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PACKARD
— y HEWLETT E.
CERTIFICATION
Hewlett-Packard Company certifies that this product met its published specifications at the time of shipment from
the factory. Hewlett-Packard further certifies that its calibration measurements are traceable to the United States
National Bureau of Standards, to the extent allowed by the Bureau's calibration facility, and to the calibration
facilities of other international Standards Organization members.
WARRANTY
This Hewlett-Packard instrument product is warranted against defects in material and workmanship for a period of
one year from date of shipment. During the warranty period, Hewlett-Packard Company will, at its option, either
repair or repiace products which prove to be defective.
For warranty service or repair, this product must be returned to a service facility designated by HP. Buyer shall
prepay shipping charges to HP and HP shall pay shipping charges to return the product to Buyer. However, Buyer
shail pay ail shipping charges, duties, and taxes for products returned to HP from another country.
HP warrants that its software and firmware designated by HP for use with an instrument will execute its programm-
ing instructions when properly installed on that instrument. HP does not warrant that the operation of the instru-
ment, or software, or firmware will be uninterrupted or error free,
LIMITATION OF WARRANTY
The foregoing warranty shail not apply to defects resulting from improper or Inadequate maintenance by Buyer,
Buyer-supplied software or interfacing, unauthorized modification or misuse, operation outside of the environmen-
tal specifications for the product, or improper site preparation or maintenance.
NO OTHER WARRANTY IS EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED. HP SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS THE IMPLIED WARRAN-
TIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES
THE REMEDIES PROVIDED HEREIN ARE BUYER'S SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES. HP SHALL NOT BE
LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, WHETHER
BASED ON CONTRACT, TORT, OR ANY OTHER LEGAL THEORY.
ASSISTANCE
Product maintenance agreements and other customer assistance agreements are available for Hewlett-Packard pro-
ducts.
For any assistance, contact your nearest Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service Office. Addresses are provided at the
back of this manual,
дите
Ks HEWLETT
PACKARD
AUTORANGING
DC POWER SUPPLY
MODEL 6012A
OPERATING AND SERVICE MANUAL FOR
SERIALS 1946A-00101 AND ABOVE*
*For Serials above 1946 А-00101
a change page may be included.
HP Part No. 06012-90001
Printed: August 1980
SAFETY SUMMARY
The following general safety precautions must be observed during all phases of operation, service, and
repair of this instrument, Failure to comply with these precautions or with specific warnings elsewhere
in this manual violates safety standards of design, manufacture, and intended use of the instrument.
Hewlett-Packard Company assumes no liability for the customer's failure to comply with these re-
guirements. |
GROUND THE INSTRUMENT.
To minimize shock hazard, the instrument chassis and cabinet must be connected to an electrical
ground. The instrument must be connected to ac power through a three-conductor power cable, with
the third wire firmly connected to an electrical ground (safety ground) at the power outlet.
DO NOT OPERATE IN AN EXLOSIVE ATMOSPHERE.
Do not operate the instrument in the presence of flammable gases or fumes. Operation of any electrical
instrument in such an environment constitutes a definite safety hazard.
KEEP AWAY FROM LIVE CIRCUITS.
Operating personnel must not remove instrument covers. Component replacement and internal ad-
justments must be made by qualified maintenance personnel. Do not replace components with power
cable connected. Under certain conditions, dangerous voltages may exist even with the power cable
removed. To avoid injuries, always disconnect power, discharge circuits and remove floating voltages
before touching components.
DO NOT SERVICE OR ADJUST ALONE.
Do not attempt internal service or adjustment unless another person, capable of rendering first aid and
resuscitation, is present.
SAFETY SYMBOLS.
Л Caution symbol. Advises the operator to refer to the instruction manual for additional information.
D Indicates terminal intended to be connected to system ground,
DO NOT SUBSTITUTE PARTS OR MODIFY INSTRUMENT.
Because of the danger of introducing additional hazards, do not install substitute parts or perform any
unauthorized modification to the instrument. Return the instrument to a Hewlett-Packard Sales and
Service Office for service and repair to ensure that safety features are maintained.
DO NOT EXCEED INPUT RATINGS.
“This instrument is equipped with a line filter to reduce electromagnetic in-
terference and must be connected to a properly grounded receptacle to
minimize electric shock hazard. Operation at line voltages or frequencies in
excess of those stated on the data plate may cause leakage currents in ex-
cess of 3.5 mA.”
Section
Page
GENERAL INFORMATION
1-1 DESCRIPTION............... 1-1
18 SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS. . 1-1
1-10 SPECIFICATIONS ........... 1-1
1-12 INSTRUMENT AND MANUAL
IDENTIFICATION .......... 1-1
1-15 OPTIONS ................... 1-1
1-17 ACCESSORIES .............. 1-2
1-19 ORDERING ADDITIONAL
MANUALS ................ 1-2
INSTALLATION
2-1 INITIAL INSPECTION........ 2-1
2-3 Mechanical Check........... 2-1
2-5 REPACKAGING FOR
SHIPMENT ................ 2-1
2-9 РВЕРАВАТЮМ.............. 2-1
2-11 Location and Cooling ........ 2-1
2-13 Outline Diagram........e._... 2-2
2-15 Input Power Requirements... 2-2
2-17 Power Connection........... 2-2
2-20 Rack Mounting.............. 2-3
2-22 AC LINE IMPEDANCE
CHECK .................... 2-3
2-25 LINE VOLTAGE OPTION
CONVERSION ............. 2-3
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
3-1 INTRODUCTION ............ 3-1
3-4 TURN-ON CHECKOUT
PROCEDURE .............. 3-1
3-6 CONNECTING THELOAD.... 31
3.14 PROTECTIVE CIRCUITS ..... 3-3
3-16 OPERATING MODES ........ 3-3
3-19 NORMAL OPERATING
MODE........ eee 3-3
3-27 Constant Voltage Operation. .3-4
3-31 Overvoitage Protection
(OVP). rennen ann 3-4
3-35 ALTERNATE OPERATING
MODES.................... 3-5
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section
IV
3-37
3-42
3-61
3-67
3-82
3-96
Page
Remote Voltage Sensing... .. 3-5
Remote Programming ....... 3-6
Auto-Parallel Operation...... 3-9
Auto-Series Operation ...... 3-10
Auto-Tracking Operation... 3-12
I-MONITOR OUTPUT
SIGNAL .................. 3-14
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-1 DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN
AUTORANGING POWER SUP-
PLY AND A CONVENTIONAL
POWERSUPPLY ........... 4-1
4-3 SIMPLIFIED SCHEMATIC
DESCRIPTION ............. 4-1
4-5 BasicConcept............... 4-1
4-8 input AC Circuits ............ 4-1
4-17 Constant Voltage {CV)
Circuit. .................... 4-3
4-21 Constant Current (CC)
Circuit..................... 4-3
4-24 Control Voltage ............. 4-4
4-27 Pulse Width Modulator
(PWM). ............c.co.... 4-4
4-30 PWWM Fast Turn Off .......... 4-4
4-32 Primary Current (lp) Limit ....4-5
4-35 Down Programmer .......... 4-5
4-33 Overvoltage Protection
Circuit (OVP). .............. 4-5
4-42 AC Dropout Detector/Siow-
Start Circuit. ............... 4-5
4-45 Bias Voltage Detector........ 4-5
MAINTENANCE
5-1 INTRODUCTION ............ 5-1
5-3 TEST EQUIPMENT
REQUIRED ................ 5-1
5-5 PERFORMANCETEST ....... 5-2
5-7 Measurement Techniques... .52
5-12 Constant Voltage Tests ...... 5-2
5-42 Constant Current Tests ...... 5-6
Section
5-52
5-57
5-60
5-63
5-64
5-67
5-69
5-71
5-73
5-75
5-77
5-79
5-81
5-83
5-86
5-90
Page
TROUBLESHOOTING........ 5-7
Initial Troubleshooting Pro-
cedures........._.oecrcceros 5-7
Overall Trouble Isolation ....5-10
REPAIR AND REPLACE-
MENT ...urooraraarecaran, 5-13
Outside Cover Removal ..... 5-13
A2 Control Board Remaova! .. 5-14
A3 FET Boards And A4 Output
Diode Board Removal ..... 5-14
FET Board Disassembly ..... 5-14
Qutput Diode Board
Disassembly .............. 5-15
A1 Main Board Removal ....5-15
Relay K1 Removal ......... .5-16
Component Access Through
Bottom Chassis ........... 5-16
Front Panel Removal....... .5-16
Replacement Parts ......... 5-17
ADJUSTMENT AND CALI-
BRATION. ................ 5-17
Section Page
5-92 |p Limit Adjustment. ....... 5-18
5-94 Constant Voltage Offset Adjust-
ment .......... cine. 5-18
5-96 Constant Current Full Scale and
Offset Adjustment ........ 5-18
5-98 Constant-Current-Source
Adjustment............... 5-18
5-100 Ammeter Adjustment. ...... 5-18
5-102 Voltmeter Adjustment ...... 5-18
Vi REPLACEABLE PARTS
6-1 INTRODUCTION ............ 6-1
64 ORDERING INFORMATION ..6-1
vil COMPONENT LOCATION
ILLUSTRATIONS AND
CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS ............. 7-1
APPENDIX A
SYSTEM OPTION 002 .............ew—..——. A-1
APPENDIX B
100 Vac INPUT POWER
OPTION 100 ccc, B-1
SECTION |
GENERAL INFORMATION
1-1 DESCRIPTION
1-2 The Model 6012A Autoranging Power Supply provides -
laboratory-grade performance with the high efficiency of
switching regulation techniques. Autoranging allows the
supply to provide at least 1000 watts output power over a wide
range of output voitage and current combinations without the
user having to select the proper output range. The output is
adjustable through the entire operating range of 0 to 60 volts
and 0 to 50 amperes by 10-turn front-panel conirols,
1-3 The supply is of the Constant Voltage/Constant Cur-
rent (CV/CC) type, with green front-pane! LEDs to indicate
whether the unit is operating in CV or CC mode. Output
voltage and current are continuously indicated on individual
front-panel meters. A secondary scale on the voltmeter in-
dicates Arperes Available within the maximum output-power
range; a secondary scale on the ammeter indicates Volts
Available.
1-4 Overvoltage protection (OVP) protects the user's load
by quickly and automatically interrupting energy transfer if a
preset trip voltage is exceeded. A screwdriver control on the
front panel sets the OVP trip point between 2V and 63V. À red
LED on the front panel indicates that OVP has tripped.
1-5 Output connections are made to bus bars on the rear
panel. Erther the positive or negative output terminal may be
grounded, or the output may be floated up to +240Vdc
{including output voltage) from ground.
1-6 Remote programming, remote or local voltage sens-
ing, and several methods of operating multiple-supply com-
binations for increased output voltage or current capability are
possible by making connections to rear-pane! terminals. These
capabilities are more fully described in Section IH.
1-7 The 6012A is considerably smaller, lighter, and
dissipates less power than older-design supplies with similar:
output-power capability. The unit is fan cooled and is pack-
aged in a Hewiett-Packard System H-compatible modular
enclosure, which is sturdy, attractive, and provides easy ac-
cess for servicing.
1-8 SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
1-9 This product is à Safety Class 1 instrument (provided
with a protective earth terminal), The instrument and this
manual should be reviewed for safety markings and instrue-
tions before operation.
1-1
1-10 SPECIFICATIONS
1-11 Detailed specifications for the power supply are given
in Table 1-1.
1-12 INSTRUMENT AND MANUAL
IDENTIFICATION
1-13 Hewlett-Packard power supplies are identified by a
two-part serial number. The first part is the serial number
prefix, a number-letter combination that denotes the date of a
significant design change and the country of manufacture,
The first two digits of the prefix indicate the year (20 = 80, 21
= 81, atc.}, the second two digits indicate the week, and the
letter “A” designates the USA as the country of manufacture.
The second part of the serial number is a different sequential
number assigned to each power supply, starting with 00101.
1-14 if the serial number on your instrument does not
agree with those on the title page of this manual, a yellow
Manual! Changes sheet supplied with the manual defines the
difference between your instrument and the instrument
described by this manual,
1-15 OPTIONS
1-16 Options are standard factory modifications that are
requested by the customer, The following options are
available with this instrument. Option 002 is described in
Appendix A, Option 100 is described in Appendix B.
Option No. Description
‚ 002 Systems Option: allows the supply to operate
automatically in system applications. Provides
resistance, voltage, and current programming
of output voltage and current: six isolated
status lines; three isolated control lines: +5V
and +15V bias voltages. This option is
mounted on a single additional printed-circuit
board, which includes a rear-panel connector.
100 Input Power: 87 to 106 Vac, 48 to 63 Hz, single
phase. Output: 675 W, 50 V, 50 A.
220 input Power: 191 to 233 Vac, 48 to 63 Hz,
single phase. - ;
240 Input Power: 208 to 250 Vac, 48 to 63 Hz,
single phase,
310 One additional operating and service manual
shipped with the power supply for each Option
910 ordered,
1-17 ACCESSORIES
1-18 The System lí Cabinet accessories listed below may
be ordered with the power supply or separately from your local
Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service Office (see list of ad-
dresses at the rear of this manual).
HP Part No. Description
5061-0089 Front handle kit for 5-1/4 inch high cabinets.
1460-1345 Tilt stand (1) snaps into standard foot supplied
with instrument, must be used in pairs.
5061-0077 Rack flange kit for 5-1/4 inch high cabinets
{will be shipped with instrument if ordered as
Option 908).
5061-0083 Rack flange/front handle kit for 5-1/4 inch
high cabinets {will be shipped with instrument
if ordered as Option 909),
HP Part No. Description
1484-0018 Slide kit for installing 17-inch deep cabinet in
HP rack enclosure.
1494-0025 THt slide kit, same as 1484-0018 plus permits
tilting instrument up or down 90°.
1434-0023 Slide adapter kit, permits use of 1494-0018 kit
in non-HP rack enclosure of adequate depth.
5060-2809 Control Board Extender card,
1-19 ORDERING ADDITIONAL MANUALS
1-20 One manual is shipped with each power supply. Ad-
ditional manuais may be purchased directly from your local
Hewlett-Packard Sales office, Specify the model number, in-
strument serial number prefix, and the manual part number
provided on the title page. (When ordered at the same time as
the power supply, additional manuals may be purchased by
adding Option 910 to the order and specifying the number of
additional manuals desired.)
Table 1-1. Specifications, Model 6012A
All performance specifications are at rear terminals with a
resistive load.
INPUT POWER
Two internal switches and two internal jumpers permit
operation from 120, 220, or 240 Vac { — 13%, + 6%}: 48-63 Hz.
Maximum input current is 24 A rms for 120 Vac, 15 À rms for
220 Vac, and 14 A rms for 240 Vac.
EFFICIENCY (Typical):
80% on maximum output power boundary.
INPUT PROTECTION:
The ac input is protected by a rear-panel mounted 25 A cir-
cuit breaker,
PEAK INRUSH CURRENT (Maximum)
120 Vac, 31.5 A
220 Vac, 13.3 A
240 Vac, 14.3 A
DC OUTPUT:
Adjustable from 0 10 60V and 0 to 50 A, Maximum output
power is 1000 W at 50A, 1050 W at 60Y, and approximately
1200 W at mid-range. See graph:
GM a FOTO OUT four Pour
50 175 +050
55 200 FOO
50 230 150
47 280 1475
Sov \ 45 265 493
N 40 30.0 1200
35 340 {490}
14 35.0 MO
доу 2004 30 385 {+55
гоу 285 400 1140
304 25 440 400
el N 24 245.0 1080
< N 20 500 1000
—
D 3ov \
= N
&
5 № 1000W
© L
20v |
1OV
OA 204A SOA 404 SOA
QUTPUT CURRENT
LOAD EFFECT (LOAD REGULATION):
Constant Voltage - Less than 0.01% of output voltage pius
5 mY for a load change equal to the maximum available cur-
rent rating of the supply at the set voltage.
Constant Current - Less than 0.01% of output current
plus 5 mA for a load change equal to the maximum available
voltage rating of the supply at the set current. |
1-2
Tabie 1-1. Specifications, Model 6012A (continued)
SOURCE EFFECT {LINE REGULATION):
Constant Voltage - Less than 0.01% of output voltage plus
3 mV for any line voltage change within rating.
Constant Current - Less than 0.01% of output current
plus 5 mA for any line voltage change within rating.
PARD (Ripple and Noise}, 20 Hz to 20 MHz:
Constant Voltage - Less than 5 mV rms and 50 mV p-p.
Constant Current - Less than 25 mA rms.
— TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENT:
Constant Voltage - Less than 0.01% plus 2 mV change in
output per degree Celsius change in ambient after 30-minute
warmup. | |
Constant Current - Less than 0.01% plus 4 mA change
in output per degree Celsius change in ambient after
30-minute warmup.
DRIFT (Stability): |
(Change in output over an 8-hour interval under constant
line, load, and ambient temperature after 30-minute warmup).
Constant Voltage - Less than 0.03% of output plus 5 mV.
Constant Current - Less than 0.03% of output plus 5 mA.
LOAD TRANSIENT RECOVERY TIME:
Less than 2 ms is required for output voltage recovery (in
constant voltage operation) to within 100 mV of the nominal
output following a change in output current of 10% of max-
imum current rating at any output voltage {output current
=5A). -
RESOLUTION:
(Minimum output voltage or current change that can be ob-
tained using the 10-turn front-panel controls].
Constant Voltage - 20 mV
Constant Current - 20 mA
QUTPUT IMPEDANCE (Typical);
0.2 m) @ dc. Ses graph:
100 mil
mil —
OUTPUT IMPEDANCE
im
Юн: НУ kHz CHE
FREQUENCY
ОКНЕ
DC OUTPUT ISOLATION:
Either output terminal may be floated up to +240 Vdc
{including output voltage} from ground.
OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION:
Trip voltage adjustable from 2 V to 83 V. Minimum setting
above output voltage to avoid false tripping is 1.5 V + 1% of
VOUT.
REVERSE VOLTAGE PROTECTION:
(Maximum permissible current caused by reverse voltage
impressed across output terminals} B0 A continuous, 20 A
continuous with ac power off.
REMOTE SENSING:
Maintains nominal voltage at load by correcting for load-
lead voltage drop of up to 0.5V per lead.
REMOTE PROGRAMMING:
Resistance Programming - 0 to 2.5 k provides zero to max-
imum rated voltage or current output,
Accuracy: CV: 1% + 3mV CC: 2,5% +15mA
Voltage Programming - 0 to 5V provides zero to maximum
rated voltage or current output.
Accuracy: CV: 0.3% + 3mV CC: 1% +15 mA
Current Programming - 2 mA to 0 mA current sink provides
zero to maximum rated voltage or current output (with user-
provided 2.5k resistor),
Accuracy: CV; 0.3% + 0.42V + accuracy of resistor
CC; 1% + 0.8A + accuracy of resistor
PROGRAMMING RESPONSE TIME:
Maximum time for output voltage to change from 0 V to
60 Y or 60 Y to 2 V and settle within 200 mV band.
Un: Full load (3.40) 120 ms
No Load 120 ms
Down: Full Load (3.407) 400 ms
No Load 1.28
Typical response time to settle within 200 mV band, for
excursions other than full-scale.
Down: On graph, read difference in time between initial out-
put voltage and final output voitage; add settling time of 200
ms @ full load or 330 ms @ no load.
60
50 SN
Al
Your
(VOLTS) NO LOAD
30
FULL LOAD
(340)
TN
© 100 200 300 400 500 500 700
DOWN PROGRAMMING TIME (m5)
1-3
Table 1-1. Specifications, Model 6012A (continued)
Up: On graph, read time for change in output voltage.
|"
50
40
ot
20
UP PROGRAMMING TIME {mS}
9 ю 20 30
40 60
CURRENT MONITORING OUTPUT:
0 to 5 Y output from rear-pañel terminal indicates zero to
maximum rated current output; accuracy, T% + 10 mV; out-
put impedance, TOk.
METERS AND INDICATORS:
Voltmeter - Continuously reading 70 V scale with secondary
scale indicating amperes available; accuracy, + 3% of full
scale.
Ammeter - Continuously reading 60 A scale with secondary
scale indicating volts available; accuracy, + 3% of full scale.
VOLTAGE Indicator - Green LED indicates Constant
Voitage operation.
CURRENT Indicator - Green LED indicates Constant Cur-
rent operation,
OUTPUT UNREGULATED Indicator - Red LED indicates
that output is unregulated because of any of the following
conditions: overrange operation, overvoltage, over
temperature, or low-input-power shutdown.
OVP Indicator - Red LED indicates shutdown caused by
voltage at output terminals exceeding preset limit.
OVERTEMPERATURE indicator - Red LED indicates shut-
down because of FET or output diode overtemperature.
MULTIPLE UNIT OPERATION:
Auto Parallel - Any number of units may be connected in
parailel to increase total output current capability while main-
taining control from a single unit.
Auto-Series - Up to four units {eight if center-tapped to
ground) may be connected in series to increase total output
voltage to 240 Vdc (480 Vdc if center-tapped to ground) while
maintaining control from a single unit.
Auto-Tracking - Any number of units may have either one of
their output terminals connected to a common bus so that ail
outputs track, at some fraction, the output of a single,
controlled, unit.
TEMPERATURE RATINGS:
Operating: O to +50% Storage: —40 to +75%
Unit is fan cooled. Thermostats turn off unit if FET or output
diode temperatures rise above a critical level; reset
automatically.
BACKPRESSURE:
Unit will operate against static backpressure at air outlet
{rear panel) of up to 0.06 inches of water (air inlet at 0 inches
of water).
CERTIFICATION:
Unit complies with these requirements:
IEC 348 - Safety Requirements for Electronic Measuring
Apparatus.
CSA Electrical Bulletin 556B - Electronic Instruments and
Scientific Apparatus for Special Use and Applications.
VDE 0871/6.78 Level A - RFI Suppression of Radio Frequency
Equipment for Industrial, Scientific, and Medical {ISM)
and Similar Purposes.
VDE 0411 - Electronic Measuring instruments and Automatic
Controls.
DIMENSIONS:
See Figure 2-1.
WEIGHT:
Net: 15 kg {33 ib) Shipping: 16 kg (35 Ib)
1-4
SECTION H
INSTALLATION
2-1 INITIAL INSPECTION
2-2 Before shipment, this instrument was inspected and
found to be free of mechanical and electrical defects. As soon
as the instrument is unpacked, inspect for any damage that
may have occurred in transit. Save all packing materials until
the inspection is completed. If damage is found, file claim with
carrier immediately. The Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service
office should be notified as soon as possible.
2-3 Mechanical Check
2-4 This check should confirm that there are no broken
controls, connectors, or indicators, that the cabinet and panel
surfaces are not dented or scratched, and that the meters and
plastic cover on rear panel are not scratched or cracked.
2-5 Electrical Check
2-6 Section V of this manual contains complete verifica-
tion procedures for this instrument, Section Hi contains an ab-
hreviated check which can be used quickly to place the unit in-
to operation. Refer to the inside front cover of the manual for
the Certification and Warranty statements.
2-7 REPACKAGING FOR SHIPMENT
2-8 To insure safe shipment of the instrument, it is recom-
mended that the package designed for the instrument be
used. The original packaging materia! is reusable. If it is not
available, contact your local Hewlett-Packard Sales and Ser-
vice office to obtain the materials. This office will also furnish
the address of the nearest service office to which the instru-
ment can be shipped. Be sure to attach a tag to the instrument
specifying the owner, model number, full serial number, and
service required, or a brief description of the trouble.
2-3 PREPARATION
2-10 In order to be put into service, the 60124 must be
connected to an appropriate ac input power source. Álso, the
line voltage for which the unit is set and the rear-panel circuit
breaker must be checked. Additional steps may include Ппе-
voltage conversion and rack mounting. Do not apply power to
the instrument before reading paragraphs 2-15 and 2-17.
2-11 Location and Cooling
2-12 The instrument is fan cooled and must be installed
+ 240 VDC TOP
ra 4 MAX TO e _ lel
А! NY — 1
2218 г
A3 © E] by
as |S) © © -
TERMINAL STRIP USES
6-32 SCREWS, °° S
ONG38CTRS 458 + ® |® — 16.75"
-s Q) (4255mm)
169 oe
AT &
+0 ue 1
bi |]
TERMINAL STRIP DETAIL Y Uy
0.0"
(2.5mm)
Lg 48.80 nn »!
(426.7 тт)
5 |
5.04" os 5.2"
(428mm) CI E (432 Emm)
TT Le “J
. й i : § 40" o70" |
REAR (42 7mm)— > (279mm) SIDE (17.8mm]” 6*
Figure 2-1. Qutline Diagram
2-1
with sufficient space behind the instrument for air exhaust. it
should be used in an area where the ambient temperature does
not exceed + 50°C,
The instrument should not be installed in a
forced-air-cooled rack enclosure in which the
static air pressure exceeds 0.06 inches of water.
Static air pressure behind the instrument of
greater than 0.06 inches of water will prevent pro-
per air flow thorugh the instrument and allow the
instrument to overheat,
2-13 Qutline Diagram
2-14 Figure 2-1 illustrates the outline shape and dimen-
sions of the cabinet.
2-15 Input Power Requirements
2-18 The supply may be operated from a nominal 120V,
220V, or 240V single-phase ac power source, 48-63 Hz. The in-
put voltage range and input current required for each of the
nominal inputs are listed below.
Nominal Line-Voltage Maximum
Voltage Range Input Current
120V 104-127 24A
220V 191-233 15A
240V 208-250 14A
2-17 Power Connection
| CAUTION |
Connection of this instrument to an ac power
source should be done only by an electrician or
other qualified personnel. Before connecting the
instrument to the ac power source, check the
label on the rear panel to ensure that the instru-
ment is set for the ac voltage to be used. If
necessary, the user can convert the instrument
from one line voltage option to another by follow-
ing the instructions in paragraph 2-25,
2-18 input power is connected to the instrument via the
AC Filter Assembly on the rear panel, The power cord must be
a three-conductor cord rated for at least 85°C. For 120V
operation, each conductor must be AWG #12 or larger. For
220V or 240V operation, each conductor must be AWG #14 or
larger. Larger wire sizes may be required to prevent excessive
voltage drop in the ac input.
2-2
| WARNING |
Do nat use three individual wires to connect
power to the instrument. The strain relief on the
rear panel is designed for use only with a single
three-conductor cord,
2-19 To connect input power to the instrument, proceed
as follows:
a. Remove four screws, one in each corner, that secure the
AC Filter Assembly to the rear panel, and carefully pull the
assembly away from the rear panel.
b. Prepare the power cord as shown in Figure 2-2 and insert
the cord through the strain relief on the AC Filter Assembly.
c. Connect the longer lead to the GND terminal; connect
one of the two shorter leads to the AC terminal ("hot side of
the ac line) and the other to the ACC termina! (’neutral” or
“common” side of the ac line).
de. Position the cord so that the strain relief grips the outer
jacket of the cord, and tighten the strain relief.
e. Replace the AC Filter Assembly.
f. Connect the other end of the power cord to an ap-
propriate ac power source,
REAR
PANEL
emi 553
8 cm {Ss Pre У /2Ъ,
He
mv a уе 1
Je,
Figure 2-2. Power Cord Preparation
NOTE
Connections to the ac power line must be made in
accordance with applicable electrical codes,
For proper protection by the instrument circuit
breaker, the wire connected to the AC terminal on
the instrument must be connected to the AC side
of the line (hot); the wire connected to the ACC
terminal must be connected to the ACC side of
the line (neutral or common).
To protect operating personnel the wire con-
nected to the GND terminal must be connected to
earth ground. In no event shall this instrument
be operated without an adequate ground
connection.
§ CAUTION
4
+4
Before applying power to the instrument check
to see that the rear-panel circuit breaker CB1 is in
the NORMAL (up) position (breaker may trip
because of rough handling during transit). If the
breaker trips while power is on, or if the breaker is
found to be tripped at any time for unknown
reasons, refer to troubleshooting procedures in
Section Y,
2-20 Rack Mounting
2-21 This instrument can be rack mounted in a standard
18-inch rack panel or enclosure. All rack mounting accessories
for this unit are listed in the ACCESSORIES paragraph in Sec-
tion |. Complete installation instructions are included with
each rack mounting kit.
2-22 AG LINE IMPEDANCE CHECK
2-23 The 6012A is designed for proper operation with line
impedance typically found in ac power lines. However, ¡f the
S012A is connected to an ac power line having high im-
pedance combined with line voltage near the minimum
specified value {e.g., 104 Vac for nominal 120 Vac), some
components may overheat if the unit is asked to provide full
rated output power. Such a situation might occur if the 6012A
is connected to ac power an extended distance from the main
ac distribution terminals and/or if the ac power wires from the
main ac distribution terminals are of relatively small gauge.
2-24 Measurement of ac line voltage at the 6012A input
terminals typically is not a reliable indication of the actual ac
line voltage because of the peak-clipping effect of the power
supply and the averaging effect of the voltmeter. Symptoms
of excessive line impedance may include erratic or no output
from the 6012A and/or inability of the 6012A to provide full
output power, If there is reason to suspect the ac power lines
to the 6012A may have high impedance, perform the following
check:
| WARNING |
This check should be performed only by service-
tramed personnel who are aware of the hazards
involved {for example, fire and electrical shock).
Turn power supply off before making or breaking
connections to power supply. Hazardous voltages
are present within the unit even when power
switch is turned off,
2-3
a. Remove three screws that secure top cover to rear panel:
slide cover to rear and lift off.
b. Monitor unregulated + БУ (pin K) with respect to com-
mon (pin E) at test connector P2 on top edge of contro! board
(see Section VII. If +5V unregulated is less than 12
voits, 6012A is not receiving adequate ac line input. If +5V
unregulated = 12 volts, proceed to step c. |
с. Connect variable load {Table 5-1 lists recommended load)
to 6012A, turn VOLTAGE and CURRENT controls to max-
imum (fully CW), and adjust load for 50A output current.
6012A output voltage should be =22V; if it is not, proceed to
Ip calibration procedure in Section V. H Ip calibration is cor-
rect but unit does not provide =22V at 50A, 6012A is not
receiving adequate ac line input.
2-25 LINE VOLTAGE OPTION
CONVERSION
2-26 Line voltage conversion is accomplished by adjusting
three components; the two-section line select switch $2, and
jumpers W1 and W2. Figure 2-3 shows the locations of these
components at the center-rear section of the main board. To
convert the instrument from one line voltage option to
another, proceed as follows:
a. Disconnect line cord from power source, and wait 120
seconds.
b. Remove top cover from instrument by removing three
screws (one on each side and one in center) that secure cover
to rear panel; slide cover to rear and lift off.
Cc. Use a smail-biade screwdriver to set the two switch sec-
tions of $2 to match the pattern silkscreened on main board
for nominal line voltage to be used. For example, to set
switches for 120V operation (as illustrated in Figure 2-3), move
forward switch section so that its white slot is toward front of
instrument and move rearward switch section so its white siot
is toward rear of instrument,
d. One end of W1 is soldered to main board: the other end
has a female guick-connect terminal that fits onto one of two
terminals soldered to main board. For 120V operation, W1
must be connected to terminal closer to front of instrument
(as shown in Figure 2-3). For 220V or 240V operation, W1
must be connected to terminal closer to rear of instrument, Be
certain that jumper is firmly mated with terminal on main
board. Do not grip jumper insulation with pliers; either grip
jumper wire by hand or grip jumper terminal with pliers.
e. Jumper WZ2 is similar to W1. For 120V operation, W2
must be connected to terminal closer to rear of instrument {as
shown in Figure 2-3). For 220V or 240V operation, W2 must be
connected to terminal closer to front of instrument. Be certain
that jumper is firmly mated with terminal on main board. Do
not grip jumper insulation with pliers; either grip jumper wire
by hand or grip jumper terminal with pliers,
f. Replace top cover and mark the instrument clearly with a
tag or label indicating correct line voltage to be used.
REAR OF INSTRUMENT
® E=L
WZ.
220/240
100/t20
29
‚ 1007/1260
220/240
А ОФ
IVA ez
IEA Sel
IVA COR
NOLiAYO
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Figure 2-3. Line Voltage Conversion Components
2.4
SECTION HI
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
3-1 INTRODUCTION
3-2 This section describes the operating controls and in-
dicators, turn-on checkout procedures, and operating pro-
cedures and considerations for the Model 6012A.
| WARNING }
Before the instrument is turned on, all protective
earth terminals, extension cords, auto-
transformers, and devices connected to it should
be connected to a protective earth ground. Any
interruption of the protective earth grounding will
cause a potential shock hazard that could result in
personal injury.
3-3 Only fuses with the required current rating and
specified type should be used. Do not use short circuited
fuseholders or circuit breakers. To do so could cause a shock
or fire hazard.
3-4 TURN-ON CHECKOUT PROCEDURE
3-5 The following checkout procedure describes the use
of the front-panel controls and indicators (see Figure 3-1) and
ensures that the suppiy is operational. This check should be
performed when the unit is first received. If the supply fails to
perform properly, proceed to the troubleshooting procedures
in Section V.
a. Ensure that rear terminal board straps are connected as
shown in Figure 3-3, but do not connect load. Check that rear-
panel label indicates unit is set for line voltage to be used. If it
is not, refer to Section il, Line Voltage Option Conversion. !f
unit is equipped with System Option 002 ensure that option
cable is disconnected from rear-panel option connector before
proceeding.
b. Ensure that CURRENT control is rotated clockwise at
least two turns and OVP ADJUST potentiometer
(screwdriver adjust} is fully clockwise.
ec, Press pushbutton LINE switch © on (pushbutton in)
and observe that green LINE indicator turns on and that fan
operates.
d. Turn VOLTAGE control 3 through output voltage
range of unit as indicated on voltmeter . Green VOLTAGE
light (4) should be lit across entire range indicating that supply
is in constant voltage mode.
e. Check overvoltage circuit by turning OVP ADJUST con-
trol counterclockwise until output voltage drops. Output
voltage should drop to =0 volts and red OVP{9)and QUTPUT
UNREGULATED indicators should fight.
3-1
f. Reset overvoltage circuit by returning OVP control to
maximum clockwise position and turning supply off for at
least two seconds and then back on. Qutput voltage should
return to value set in step d.
g. To check constant current circuit, turn off supply and
connect short {AWG #8 or larger} across + and — output ter-
minals on rear panel. Ensure that VOLTAGE control is rotated
at least two turns clockwise. |
h. Turn supply back on and rotate CURRENT control
through output current range of unit as indicated on ammeter
. Green CURRENT light @ should be on across entire
range indicating that supply is in constant current mode,
i. Turn off supply, remove short from output, and read re-
mainder of operating instructions before connecting actual
load to supply.
2-5 ИИА ==>
STE
Figure 3-1. Front Panel Controls and Indicators
3-6 CONNECTING THE LOAD
3-7 Load connections to the power supply are made at
rear-panel + and — bus bars. Wires may be connected to any
of the three pairs of connecting screws on the bus bars.
Stranded wires should be terminated with an appropriate size
terminal. To satisfy safety requirements, the wires to the load
should be at feast heavy enough not to overheat while carrying
the power supply output current that would flow if the /oad
were shorted. Table 3-1 lists some single wire sizes and two-
wire combinations, and the current-carrying capacity they pro-
vide. Generally, heavier wire than that listed in Table 3-1 is re-
quired to obtain good regulation at the load, If the load regula-
tion is critical, use remote voltage sensing {refer to Paragraph
3-37).
Table 3-1. Copper Wire Current-Carrying Capacity
Wire Type
(note 1) 20A 30A 40A BOA
80°C Stranded 1 - #12 1 - #10 1 - #8 1 - #8
2 - #14 2 - #12 2 - #12 2 - #10
80°C Solid 1 - #10 1 - #8 1 - #6 1 - #6
2 - #14 2 - #12 2 - #10 2 - #8
105°C Stranded 1 - #14 1 - #12 1 - #10 1 - #10
2- #16 2-#14 2 - #12 2 - #12
105°C Solid 1- #12 1 - #10 1- #8 1 - #6
2 - #16 2 - #12 2 - #10 2 - #10
Notes:
1. Maximum allowable conductor temperature based on 60°C ambient temperature plus 20°C or 45°C temperature
rise due to continuous de current.
2. Capacities based on assumption that + and — leads are twisted together to reduce noise pickup.
3 Other wire combinations can also be used to provide the capacities listed in this table. Note that increasing the
number of conductors in a bundie does not increase the current-carrying capacity by the number of conductors.
(EG: Two #10 wires bundled together provide only 1.89 times the current-carrying capacity of one #10 wire.)
4, Current-carrying capacity of aluminum wire is approximately 84% of that listed for copper wire,
3-8 The bus bars and terminal strip are protected by a
high-impact plastic cover, which is secured to the unit with
two 7/8-inch #6-32 screws, Wires to the bus bars and terminal
strip pass through slots in the cover. Be certain to replace the
cover after making connections.
3-9 If multiple loads are connected to one supply, each
load should be connected to the supply’s output terminals
using separate pairs of connecting wires, This minimizes
mutual coupling effects between loads and takes full advan-
tage of the supply’s low output impedance. Each pair of con-
necting wires should be as short as possible and twisted or
shielded to reduce noise pickup.
3-10 if load considerations require the use of output
distribution terminals that are located remotely from the sup-
ply, then the power supply output terminals should be con-
nected to the remote distribution terminals by a pair of twisted
or shielded wires and each load should be separately con-
nected to the remote distribution terminals. Remote voltage
sensing is required under these circumstances (Paragraph
3-37),
3-11 Either positive or negative voltages can be obtained
from this supply by grounding one of the output terminals. 11 15
best to avoid grounding the output at any point other than the
power suply output terminals to avoid regulation problems
caused by common-mode current flowing through the load
leads to ground. Always use two wires to connect the load to
the supply regardless of where or how the system is ground-
ed. Never ground the system at more than one point. This
supply can be operated with either output terminal up to + 240
volts de (including output voltage) from ground.
3-2
3-12 The PARD specifications in Table 1-1 apply at the
power supply output terminals, However, noise spikes
induced in the load leads at or near the load may affect the
load although the spikes are inductively isolated from the
power supply. To minimize voltage spikes at the load, connect
a bypass capacitor as shown in Figure 3-2. With this setup,
peak-peak noise at the load can actually be reduced to a level
well below the value specified at the 6012A output terminais.
3-13 Before operating the power supply, read the
paragraphs in this section concerning protective circuits, nor-
mal operating mode, and any sections of alternate operating
modes relevant to your application.
POWER SUPPLY
i |
par ACC
e NE)
BYPASS CAPACITOR:
P1uF, 75Vde, AS
CLOSE AS POSSIBLE
TO LOAD,
LOAD
NOTE:
iF EITHER SIDE
OF LOAD IS TO M
BE GROUNGED, 7
TWISTED PAIR OR PARALLEL
ANS CLOSE TOGETHER
Zi
GROUND CONNECTION
SHOULD BE MADE AT
SORA, NOT AT LOAD.
Figure 3-2. Connecting a Bypass Capacitor
3-14 PROTECTIVE CIRCUITS
3-15 Protective circuits within the instrument may limit or
turn off the output in case of abnormal conditions. The cause
for the protective action can be determined by observing the
front-panel indicators and meters. An overrange condition is
indicated by the QUTPUT UNREGULATED indicator on, all
other indicators off, and the VOLTS and AMPERES meters
reading relatively high. An overvoltage condition is indicated
by both the OVP and QUTPUT UNREGULATED indicators on,
all other indicators off, and the meters reading near zero. An
overtemperature condition is indicated by both the
OVERTEMPERATURE PROTECTION and OUTPUT
UNREGULATED indicators on, ail other indicators off, and the
meters dropping toward zero from the readings that existed
when the overtemperature condition occurred, If the ac input
voitage drops below approximately 70% of nominal, the bias
voltage detector will shut down the output. In this case, the
QUTPUT UNREGULATED indicator is on, all other indicators
are off, and the meters read zero immediately.
3-16 OPERATING MODES
3-17 This power supply is designed so that its mode of
operation can be selected by making strapping connections on
its rear panel, Normal operating mode for this power supply
uses local programming of the output voltage and current via
the front-panel VOLTAGE and CURRENT controls, and local
sensing of the output voltage. Alternate operating modes
allow use of remote programming, remote voltage sensing,
and multiple power supply combinations.
3-18 The following paragraphs first describe operating
considerations with the normal operating mode, using the
strapping pattern as it is connected at the factory. Later
paragraphs cover alternate operating modes. The operating
considerations described with normal mode, such as constant
voltage/constant current crossover, overrange, constant
voltage and constant current operation, and overvoltage pro-
tection apply to the alternate modes as well as to normal
mode. More theoretical descriptions regarding the operational
features of power supplies in general are given in the DC
Power Supply Handbook, Application Note 908 (available at
no charge from your local Hewlett-Packard Sales Office).
3-19 NORMAL OPERATING MODE
3-20 The power supply was shipped with the proper
rear-panel strapping connections made for constant
voltage/ constant current operation with local sensing and
local programming. This strapping pattern is illustrated in
Figure 3-3. By means of the front-panel voltage and current
controls, the operator selects either a constant voltage or a
constant current output as described In Paragraphs 3-27 or
3-29. Whether the supply functions in the constant voltage or
constant current mode depends on the settings of the
VOLTAGE and CURRENT controls and on the value of the
load resistance.
3-3
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Figure 3-3. Normal Strapping
3-21 Figure 3-4 shows the overall output range of the sup-
ply, with three sample operating loci. Locus 1 is established
with a VOLTAGE setting of 20V and a CURRENT setting of
8A. For any values of load resistance greater than the
crossover value of 2.5 ohms, the supply operates in constant
voltage mode. For values of load resistance less than the
crossover value, the supply operates in constant current
mode. The transition occurs smoothly and automatically; no
switches need be operated or connections changed. The
front-panel VOLTAGE and CURRENT lights indicate which
mode is operating.
DOW
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CONSTANT VOLTAGE (CV)
OPERATING КОМУ
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1 i E
Eo ton 163 504A
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LUT — ———
hos VOLTAGE CONTROL SETTING
1g = CURRENT CONTROL SETTING
Rs = : CROSSOVER VALUE OF LOAD RESISTANCE
Figure 3-4. Overall Output Range with Three Sample
Operating Loci
3-22 Locus 2 is established with VOLTAGE setting of 40V
and a CURRENT setting of 30A. Its crossover load resistance
is 1.3 ohms, and lies on the rated-output-power boundary.
3-23 A rectangular operating locus will be established for
all voltage and current settings within the rated-output-power
boundary, and the load resistance determines where on that
locus the power supply operates. However, if the VOLTAGE
and CURRENT controls are set so that the boundary can be
exceeded, as in locus 3, the supply will go into overrange if the
load resistance falls within a critical band {refer to next
paragraph).
3-24 Overrange. The supply will be driven into overrange
{shaded area of Figure 3-4) if the VOLTAGE and CURRENT
controis are set above the output power rating and the load
resistance falls within a critical band. For example, assume
that the operator sets the VOLTAGE control at 50V and the
CURRENT control at 40A, as in locus 3 on Figure 3-4, For all
load resistances above 2.2 ohms (which is the critical value)
the supply would operate normally in the constant voitage
mode. If the load resistance were to fall much below 2.2 ohms,
however, the supply would be forced into overrangs. If the
load resistance continued to decrease to a 0.7 ohm value, the
supply would automatically come out of overrange and into
the constant current mode at the 40A, 25V point. {The supply
will probably go out of regulation while operating in the over-
range region, refer to Paragraph 3-26.)
3-25 Anytime the supply operates in overrange, the
VOLTAGE and CURRENT indicators turn off and the OUTPUT
UNREGULATED indicator lights, The VOLTS and AMPERES
meters indicate the voltage and current being supplied to the
output. {The product of the two readings will exceed 1000
watts.) Paragraph 3-14 identifies conditions other than over-
range which cause the OUTPUT UNREGULATED indicator to
light.
3-26 The supply can operate in the overrange region
{beyond the rated-output-power boundary} for sustained
periods without being damaged. However, the supply is not
guaranteed to meet specifications in overrange. Output rippie
increases substantially and regulation is seriously degraded.
As an operator aid, the maximum available load current for
each voltage setting is indicated on a secondary scale of the
voltmeter. Similarly, the maximum availabie load voltage for
each current setting is indicated on the ammeter.
NOTE
Under certain conditions of line and load, it is
possible for the supply to provide more than rated
output power and still maintain regulation. If this
occurs, the unit will operate normally and the
QUTPUT UNREGULATED indicator will be off.
However, the slightest change in either line or
foad may cause the unit to go out Of regulation.
Operation of the unit beyond the rated-output-
power boundary is not recommended under any
circumstance,
3-4
3-27 Constant Voltage Operation
3-28 To adjust the supply for constant voltage operation:
a. Turn on supply and, with output terminals open, adjust
the VOLTAGE control for the desired output voltage. Then
turn power off. |
b. Connect a short across thé rear-panel + and — output
terminals, restore power, and adjust the CURRENT control for
the desired maximum output current. Then turn power off and .
remove the short, If a load change causes this currrent limit to
be exceeded, the supply automatically crosses over to con-
stant current operation at this preset current limit and the out-
put voltage drops proportionately. In setting the current limit,
make an adequate allowance for high peak currents that could
cause unwanted crossover.
3-29 Constant Current Operation
3-30 To adjust the supply for constant current operation:
a. With supply turned off, connect a short across the rear-
panel + and — output terminals, turn the power on, and ad-
just the CURRENT control for the desired output current.
b. Turn power off, open the output terminals and adjust the
VOLTAGE contro! for the desired maximum output voltage, If
a load change causes this voltage límit to be exceeded, the
supply automatically crosses over to constant voltage opera-
tion at this preset voltage limit and the output current drops
proportionately. In setting the voltage limit, make an adequate
allowance for high peak voltages that could cause unwanted
crossover.
3-31 Overvoitage Protection (OVP)
3-32 Adjustment. The overvoltage trip point is adjusted
with the single-turn OVP ADJUST screwdriver control on the
front panel. The approximate trip voltage range for this unit is
from two volts to 63 volts. When the overvoltage protection
circuit trips, the supply is inhibited and delivers no output
power; the OVP and OUTPUT UNREGULATED indicators on
the front panel light. Rotating the control clockwise sets the
trip voltage higher. {It is set to maximum at the factory.)
3-33 When adjusting the OVP trip point, the possibility of
false tripping must be considered. If the trip voltage is set too
close to the suppiy's operating voltage, a transient in the out-
put would falsely trip the OVP. For this reason it is recom-
mended that the OVP trip votlage be set higher than the out-
put voltage by at least 1.5 volts + 1% of the output voitage.
To adjust the OVP trip voitage, proceed as follows:
a. With OVP ADJUST control fully clockwise, no ioad con-
nected, turn on supply.
b. Set output VOLTAGE control to desired trip voltage.
Cc. Turn OVP ADJUST contro! counterciockwise until OVP
circuit trips; red OVP indicator lights and output voltage falls
to zero.
d. Turn off supply and turn down output voltage.
e. Turn supply back on and set desired output voltage.
3-34 Resetting the OVP Circuit, If the OVP circuit trips
during normal operation, the ac LINE switch must be turned
off for at least two seconds and then back on to reset the cir-
cuit. if the OVP circuit trips continuously, check the load
and/or the trip point setting. If the supply does not operate
properly after the OVP circuit is reset, proceed to
troubleshooting in Section V,
3-35 ALTERNATE OPERATING MODES
3-36 The alternate operating modes discussed in the
following paragraphs include: remote voltage sensing, remote
programming, auto-parallei operation, auto-series operation,
and auto-tracking operation. By changing the rear-panel
strapping pattern according to the instructions which foliow,
the suppiy can be operated in any of the modes listed above.
Disconnect input ac power before changing any
rear-panel connections and make certain all wires
and straps are properly connected and terminal
strip screws are securely tightened before
reapplying power,
3-37 Remote Voitage Sensing
3-38 Because of the unavoidable voltage drop developed
in the load leads, the normal strapping pattern shown in Figure
3-3 will not provide the best possible voltage regulation at the
load. The remote sensing connections shown in Figure 3-5 im-
prove the voltage regulation at the load by monitoring the
voltage there instead of at the supply’'s output terminals. {The
advantages of remote sensing apply only during constant
voltage operation.) When using remote sensing, turn off the
power supply before changing the rear-panel straps, sense
leads, or load leads. The following paragraphs discuss some
precautions that should be observed when making a remote
sensing installation.
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ГОД
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rhs (О) г LOAD
Figure 3-5. Remote Sensing
3-39 The load leads should be of the heaviest practicable
wire gauge, at least heavy enough to limit the voltage drop in
each lead to 0.5 volts. The power supply has been designed to
minimize the effects of long load lead inductance, but best
results will be obtained by using the shortest load leads
practical.
NOTE
Because the OVP circuit monitors voltage at the
rear terminals and there is an unavoidable voltage
drop in the load leads, it may be necessary to
readjust the OVP trip point jn remote sensing
mode.
3-40 Since the sensing leads carry only a few milliamperes,
the wires used for sensing can be much lighter than the load
leads (AWG #22 is generally adequate), but they should be a
shielded, twisted pair to minimize the pickup of external noise.
Any noise picked up on the sensing leads will appear at the
supply’s output, and CV load regulation may be adversely af-
fected. The shield should be grounded at one end only and
should not be used as one of the sensing conductors. The
sensing leads should be connected as close to the load as
possible.
3-41 The sensing leads are part of the supply's program-
ming circuit, so they should be connected in such a way as to
make it unlikely that they might inadvertently become open
circuited. If the sense leads open during operation, it is possi-
ble that the load voltage will rise above its programmed value.
Therefore, itis recommended that no switch, relay, or connec-
tor contacts be included in the remote sensing path.
3-42 Remote Programming
3-43 The output voltage and/or current of the power sup-
ply can be remotely controlled by external resistance, voltage,
or current sink. Programming can be accomplished via the
standard rear-panel screw-on terminals or via the option con-
nector on units equipped with System Option 002. Standard
programming is described in this section; programming with
System Option 002 is described in Appendix A.
3-44 For resistance programming, a variable resistor can
control the output over its entire range. To restrict control of
the variable resistor to a limited portion of the output range,
fixed resistors can be connected in series and/or parallel with
the variable resistor. Alternatively, a switch can be used to
select fixed values of programming resistance to obtain a set
of discrete voltages or currents. (lt is recommended that
make-before-break switch contacts be used, to avoid pro-
ducing the output voltage spikes caused by momentarily
opening the programming terminals. The output voltage will
drop momentarily while both sets of switch contacts are
closed. If break-before-make switch contacts are used, the
output voitage will rise momentarily while both sets of switch
contacts are open. Depending on the switching speed, this
may trip the OVP.)
3-45 To maintain the temperature and stability specifica-
tions of the supply, any resistors used for programming must
be stable, low-noise resistors with a temperature coefficient of
less than 25ppm per *C and a power rating at least 10 times
what they will actually dissipate.
3-46 Both voltage and current outputs can aiso be con-
trolled by a voltage source. A voltage source of 0 to 5 volts
programs the output from zero to full scale. Voltage sources
of more than 5 volts can be scaled down to the proper range.
3-47 Current programming of both voltage and current
outputs is possible also. With current programming, the sup-
piy's own constant current sources are used to provide current
through an external resistance. A controllable current sink,
such as a DAC, in parallel with the external resistor sinks a
controllable percentage of the current arcund the resistance,
The remaining current flows through the external resistance
and develops a voltage that programs the power supply. The
DAC used for current programming must be capabie of sink-
ing 0-2 mA and must have a compliance voltage range of 0 to
+ BY,
NOTE
The 60124 constant-current source must be
calibrated to provide exactly 2 mA and the DAC
must sink exactly 2 mA when it is programmed for
zero output. Otherwise, there will be a fixed error
that will be relatively large compared to the zero
output desired. The DAC must have a very low
temperature coefficient to avoid drifting. Most
DACs have a temperature-compensating resistor
through which they sink current, but this com-
pensation is not effective when used with an ex-
ternal resistor such as that used when current
programming the power supply. Both of these
error possibilities, mis-calibration and
temperature drift, are most pronounced when
programming zero or near zero output (volts or
amperes),
For these reasons and for reasons given in the
current-programming paragraphs, it is recom-
mended that current programming of either out-
put voltage or output current be accomplished via
System Option 002.
3-48 Connecting a supply for remote programming of out-
put voltage or current disables the corresponding front-panel
controls.
3-49 The following paragraphs discuss in greater detail the
methods of remotely programming the output voltage or cur-
rent using either a resistance, voltage, or current input.
Whichever method is used, the wires connecting the program-
ming terminals of the supply to the remote programming
device must be shielded to reduce noise pickup. The outer
shield of the cable should not be used as a conductor, and
3-6
should be connected to ground at one end only, {For clarity,
Figures 3-6 through 3-13 do not show shielded cable.)
3-50 Although the following connection drawings (Figures
3-6 through 3-13) show the supply strapped for focal sensing,
remote programming and remote voitage sensing do not in-
teract and may be used simultaneously.
3-51 Resistance Programming of Output Voltage.
The rear-panel connections shown in Figure 3-6 allow the out-
put voltage to be varied by using an external resistor to pro-
gram the supply. A programming resistor variable from 0 to
2500 ohms produces a proportional output voltage from zero
to full scale. Note that fixed resistors may be connected in
series and/or parallel with the variable programming resistor
to set lower and/or upper output voltage limits. The resultant
programming resistance is the sum of the series/paraliel
resistor combination, and must be between 0 and 2500 ohms.
3-52 For example, a 1250 chm resistor connected in series
with the variable programming resistor will set the lower limit
for output voltage at one-half full scale, i.e., 30 volts. A 1250
ohm resistor connected in parallel with a 2500 ohm variable
programming resistor will set the upper limit for output voltage
at 20 volts. Connecting the parallel resistor directly from ter-
minal A7 to — S will limit the output voltage even if the remote
programming leads become open circuited.
+240 VOC
Mi S + МАХ ТО,
д2 |
1 EX
O ©; ©
5 O
> SS 9 Во =
+5 NS et”
AS | $3
>|
O
| LOAD
pe NAL, SETS
|
+ A NN
PROGRAMMING OPTIONAL,
RESISTOR SETS LOWER
es LEMET
Figure 3-6. Resistance Programming of Output Voltage
NOTE
If the programming terminals {A7 to — 8) become
open circuited during resistance programming,
the output voltage will tend to rise above rating.
The supply will not be damaged if this occurs, but
the OVP trip point should be properly adjusted to
protect the user's load.
3-53 Voltage Programming of Output Voltage. The
rear-panel connections shown in Figure 3-7 allows the output
voltage to be varied by using an external voltage source to pro-
gram the supply. A voltage source variable from 0 to +5 volts
produces a proportional output voitage from zero to full scale.
The load on the programming source is less than 5 pA.
+240 VDC
MAX TO + —
At S + >
AZ
АЗ
Ad 63
5 ©
+5 fe wom
но
AS
A?
—al a ©
Nal
AB
| LOAD
ЧЕ
VOLTAGE
SOURCE
0-5
Figure 3-7. Voltage Programming of Output Voltage
3-54 Scaled Voltage Programming of Output
Voltage. The rear-panel connections shown in Figure 3-8
aliow the output voltage to be varied by using an external
voltage source of more than 5 volts to program the supply.
The ratio of the resistance values in the voltage divider must
be selected so that the voltage at the center tap of the divider,
A7, varies from 0 to 5 volts as the programming voltage source
varies from zero to maximum.
3-55 The total resistance of the voltage divider should be
as small as practical without excessively loading the external
voltage source. This minimizes degrading the programming
speed, offset, and drift specifications. The voltage divider ap-
pears as a paraliei pair of resistors to the power supply. An
equivalent resistance of Bk will approximately double the up-
3-7
programming time. An equivalent resistance of less than 1k
will make the degradation unnoticeable in most applications.
ао УС
sio + MAX TO fy a
А? |
АЗ SS
e oe
50
+5 dd HE =) =
O. LL
6 O Ï
д? |
„© Ù
| LOAD
re (J = BY
VOLTAGE DIVIDER
+
Fm
VOLTAGE SOURCE
>
3-56
Figure 3-8. Scaled Voltage Programming of Output
Voltage
Current Programming of Output Voltage. The
rear-panel connections shown in Figure 3-9 allow the output
voltage to be varied by using an external current sink to pro-
gram the supply. in this configuration the supply's own con-
stant current source is used to develop a voltage across the
resistor. A current sink, such as a DAC, connected in parallel
with the resistor sinks part or all of the current, and thereby
determines the voltage developed across the resistor. (See
note following Paragraph 3-47.) A current sink variable from 2
mA to 0 mA produces an inversely proportional output voitage
from zero to full scale. Many DACs include a sign-change bit,
so that a zero digital input to the DAC will produce a 0 volt
output from the power supply, and a maximum digital input to
the DAC will produce a full scale output from the power sup-
ply. Note that the VOLTAGE control potentiometer can be
used in place of the external resistor by connecting A8 and A7
in place of the 2.8k resistor connected between A7 and — $.
{ CAUTION |
If the DAC is turned off or the program leads
open, the output voltage will tend to rise above
rating. The supply will not be damaged if this
occurs, but the OVP trip point should be property
adjusted to protect the user's load.
2240 VOL
Al (© + MAX TO Ay —
Az | (on
A3 SS
“ST © ©
a5 |
> ss © O a
<Q ee
26 |
SR I
лв | ©)
CURRENT SINK
O-2mA
Figure 3-9. Current Programming of Output Voltage
3-57 Resistance Programming of Output Current. The
rear-panel connections shown in Figure 3-10 allow the output
current to be varied by using an external resistor to program
the supply. The discussion in Paragraphs 3-51 and 3-52 for
constant voltage operation also applies for constant current
operation.
§ CAUTION }
If the programming terrninals (A2 to A5) become
open circuited during resistance programming,
the output current will tend to rise above rating.
The supply will not be damaged if this occurs, but
the user's load may be damaged, If there is a
possibility that the programming leads may be
opened, it is suggested that the optional resistor
be connected directly across terminals AS and A2,
as shown in Figure 3-10. The value of this resistor
should be selected to limit the output current to
the maximum that the load can handle without
damage. For example, if the foad can handle 25
amperes (one-half of full scale), a 1250 ohm
resistor should be connected from AS to AZ.
Remember that the resistance value actually pro-
gramming the supply is the parallel combination
of the programming resistor and the optional
resistor.
3-8
240 VDC
A1 S| + MAX TO dy
AZ
A3
ZN
AS
69 || ®
+5 +| (2) e
AS
AT
AB
—
LOAD
OPTIONAL, SETS
UPPER LIMIT
[=== уу — +
!
À LA E TA
hi A Y wow
PROGRAMMING OPTIONAL,
RESISTOR SETS LOWER
2.5K LIMIT
Figure 3-10. Resistance Programming of Qutput Current
3-58 Voltage Programming of Output Current, The
rear-panel connections shown in Figure 3-11 allow the output
current to be varied by using an external voltage source to pro-
gram the supply. The discussion in Paragraph 3-53 for cons-
tant voltage operation also applies for constant current opera-
tion,
NS Ee
a2 (Y
A3 Y
9 ee
AS |
se | +0 9 -
SU Ce]
AS Ory Î E
AT ID
[SP
| LOAD
:
1
VOLTAGE
SOURCE
0-5
Figure 3-11. Voltage Programming of Qutput Current
3-59 Scaled Voltage Programming of Output Cur
rent. The rear-panel connections shown in Figure 3-12 allow
the output current to be varied by using an external voltage
source of more than 5 volts to program the supply. The
discussion in Paragraphs 3-54 and 3-55 for constant voltage
operation also applies for constant current operation.
5
AG
A7
—e\® e
AB
As S de MAX TO he —
22 Y!
O
9 ®
AS | Qe
+5 Ss mf O J,
© Lo
©
&
ST
LOAD
E
E (5 -—
VOLTAGE DIVIDER
—IME
VOLTAGE SOURCE
>5v
Figure 3-12. Scaled Voltages Programming of Output
Currant
3-60 Current Programming of Qutput Current. The
rear-panel connections shown in Figure 3-13 allow the output
current to be varied by using an external current sink to pro-
gram the supply. (See note following Paragraph 3-47.) The
discussion in Paragraph 3-56 for constant voltage operation
also applies for constant current operation, except that the
CURRENT control can be used in place of the external resistor
by connecting A4 to A3 in place of the 2.5k resistor connected
between A3 and AB.
CAUTION §
If the DAC is turned off or the program leads
open, the output current will tend to rise above
rating. The supply will not be damaged if this
occurs, but the VOLTAGE control should be ad-
“justed such that the supply will switch to CV
* mode once the output current reaches the highest
level the load can absorb and/or the OVP AD-
JUST should be set to shut down the supply.
3-9
+240 VDC
Ai S + MAX TOA —
AZ
АЗ
AS @ e
AS
- 5 : —
* +8 | ©
-5
Аб
А?
AB
| LOAD |
2.5K
salem mir
DAC
CURRENT SINK
O-2mÁ
Figure 3-13. Current Programming of Output
Current
3-61 Auto-Parailel Operation
3-62 Figure 3-14 shows the rear-panel interconnections re-
quired to auto-paraliel two or more units. This mode of opera-
tion provides a greater current capability than can be obtained
from a single supply, while ensuring that each supply will
share the load proportionally to its own total power capability
under alt load conditions. For example, if a 1000W supply and
a 200W supply were auto-paralieled, the 1000W supply wouid
provide 5/6 the total current and the 200W supply would pro-
vide 1/6 the total current. The 6012A can be auto-paralleled
only with other autoranging units, or with units that have
current-monitoring output signals that are internally refer-
enced to the — output and equal to + BV at maximum rated
current output. Any number of supplies may be connected in
auto-parailel,
NOTE
Use wire of equal length and gauge to connect
each auto-paralleled supply to the load. Load
sharing will not be equal unless the leads connec-
ting each supply to the load are equal in
resistance. If it is impractical to run leads from
each supply to the load because of distance be-
tween the supplies and the load, leads of equal
length should be run from each supply to com-
mon distribution terminals, with a single pair of
leads run from the distribution terminals to the
load.
MASTER
A MAX Th
a
A3 | St A
e Sen)
añ o
me +| 7) © =
5 a ay
46 3 e: O
A
re
agi 1 E e
SLAVE #1
A = + re OUR -
1
AS St MH aux N
“o Se К 1000
ABI Per
os [Send ALE Lar
“5 "
AG Sh ® ®
ar SS
28 | {5 ha 5 LA
Figure 3-14. Auto-Parallei Operation
3-83 Setting the Voltage and Current Controls, The
auto-parallel combination of supplies behaves as if it were a
single constant voltage/ constant current supply controlled by
the voltage and current controls of the master supply. The
current controls of the siaves are disabled, The voltage con-
trols of the slaves should be set above the desired output
voltage to avoid interference with the master,
3-64 Overvoltage Protection in Auto-Parallel. Adjust
the OVP trip point at the master sdpply. The slave supply OVP
controlís) may be set to the same level or to maximum (fully
clockwise) to disable them. If the master OVP trips, the master
will program the slaves to zero output. If a slave OVP trips, it
shuts down only that slave; the other units supply more cur-
rent until the master switches to CC mods.
3-65 Auto-Parallel with Remote Sensing. To combine
auto-parallel operation with remote sensing, connect the sup-
nly as described above but remove the +S and —- 5 jumpers
from the master supply and connect the +5 and — 5 ter-
minals directly to the + and — ends of the load. Observe the
precautions outlined under Paragraph 3-37.
3-66 Auto-Parallei with Remote Programming. The
output voltage and/or current of an auto-parallel combination
can be remotely programmed. Remote programming connec-
tions are made to the master supply. Observe ail precautions
outlined in the remote programming paragraphs.
Simultaneous use of remote sensing and remote programming
is also possible during auto-paralle! operation.
NOTE
Because only the master can down-program the
output of an auto-parallel combination, dowr-
programming speed will be reduced under no-
load conditions.
3-67 Auto-Series Operation
MASTER
240 VIE
a ® de MÁX TOA ит
Ag | Syn
АЗ сы e N
Ns 5 “NN
as bly
= mari EE
e +0 © |-
=5 y
AG On ® ED
АР OS
AB [A herd ый
SLAVE Hi
мах т e
EM hy
J >
pe LOAD
Se N°
DA fe
|
|
SLAVE #2
_ > ааа мос
Ад Si 2x2 — MAR Tm
42:
= SS —
«O в TD A
AS
Sa +0 LO -
si
a7 <
Figure 3-15, Auto-Series Operation
3-68 Figures 3-15 and 3-16 show the rear-panel intercon-
nections required to operate two or mere supplies in auto-
series. This mode of operation provides a greater voltage
capability than can be obtained from a single supply. As many
as four supplies can be connected in auto-series in the con-
figuration shown in Figure 3-15, and as many as eight supplies
can be connected if the power supply combination and load
are center-tapped as in Figure 3-16 (with no more than four
supplies on each side of the center tap). Either configuration
allows all the supplies to be programmed simultaneously by
the voltage and current controls of the master supply. The
master supply must always be the one at the positive end of
the series combination. Any point of the output can be
grounded if desired, as long as no other point in the output is
more than 240 volts (including output voltage) from ground.
3-69 The output voltage of each slave supply varies in
direct proportion to that of the master. The ratio of each
slave's output voltage to the master’s is established by the
ratio of the resistors in the voltage divider connected between
the + Sense of the master and the — $ Sense of the slave,
3-70 Any power supply capable of auto-series operation
can be used in the auto-series combination. The supply with
the lowest current rating limits the maximum output current of
the combination. Any well-regulated, variable-output supply
can be used as the master,
3-71 in applications in which coordinated positive and
negative voltages are required, center tapping the supply com-
bination and load as shown in Figure 3-16 allows simultaneous
proportional control of both supply voltages.
{ CAUTION |
If more than four supplies are connected together
in an auto-series combination, be certain thaï
neither the more positive end nor the more
negative end of the auto-series combination is
more than 240 volts {including output voltage)
from ground.
3-72 Setting the Voitage and Current Controls. The
auto-series combination of supplies behaves as if it were a
single constant voltage/ constant current supply controlled by
the voltage and current controls of the master suppiy. The
voltage controls of the slaves are disabled. The current con-
trols of the slaves should be set above the desired output cur-
rent to avoid having a slave switch to CC mode,
NOTE
The current controls of the slave supplies can be
disabled by disconnecting the straps between the
A3 and A4 terminals and connecting a resistor
between A3 and A5 on each slave. The resistor
value should be chosen to program a current
greater than the desired output current. {See
Paragraph 3-67.)
3-11
MASTER
4 245 YDC
E MÁX TO ны
А!
RE
АЗ ши
e y
RE
=
+5 + ТР | m
© LA
=
AB E © LOAD
AT
AB board Seres
|
SLAVE LOAD
2240 VDGC
+ MAA TO —
—_
La”
e
E | 2 |+--
pa a
Ир
Figure 3-16. Auto-Series Operation, Positive and
Negative Outputs
3-73 Resistor Values. As shown, each slave has an exter-
nal voitage divider, Ry and Ry, that determines its program-
ming voltage. The ratio of Ry to Ry determines the ratio of a
slave's output voltage to the output voltage of its master (the
next more-positive supply). To determine the value of Ry and
Rx, first choose the ratio of the slave output voltage to the
output voltage of its master (Va1/Vg), select a value for Ry,
and then determine the value for Ry by solving this equation:
Вх = | 12 (В) (1 + YM) |-Ry.
Vs
For example, assume a two-supply combination that is to pro-
vide 90 vofts, 50 volts from the master and 40 volts from the
slave. If we select a value of 1k for Ry, the equation becomes:
Ry - 120000) € +23 | - 1000
Ry = [12,000 (2.251} ~1000
Rx = 26,000
3-74 Note that the slave output voltage may be lower
than, equal to, or higher than the master output voltage.
3-75 Two factors must be considered when selecting the
resistance value of Ry; the effect on programming specifica-
tions, particulariy speed, and the power that the resistor will
have to dissipate. In the previous example, with a total
resistance of 27k across an output of 90 volts, Ry will have to
dissipate 290 milliwatts and Ry will have to dissipate slightly
more than 11 milliwatts, Lower resistance values of Ry and
Ry will increase programming speed while increasing the
amount of power that Ry and Ry will have to dissipate.
3-76 To maintain the temperature coefficient and stability
specifications of the supplies, Ry and Ry must be stable, low-
noise resistors with temperature coefficients of less than 26
ppm per °C and power ratings of at least 10 times what they
wilt actually dissipate.
3-77 Thefront-panel VOLTAGE control of the slave can be
used in place of Ry by connecting a strap from A7 of the slave
to AB of the slave. This enables the user to vary the percent-
age of the total voltage contributed by the slave. For caicula-
tion purposes, use a resistance value of 2.7k for the VOLTAGE
control when it is set to maximum.
3-78 Overvoitage Protection in Auto-Series, Set the
OVP trip point in each supply so that it trips at a level higher
than the voltage that supply will contribute, If the master sup-
ply OVP trips, the master will program the slaves to zero out-
put. if a slave OVP trips, that slave and all slaves between it
and the negative end of the series will go to zero ouput; all
units more positive than the tripped slave {which includes the
master) will continue to supply their set output voltage.
Therefore, the total output voltage of the auto-series com-
bination will be the sum of the outputs from the master plus
any slaves between the master and the tripped slave.
3-79 For maximum protection against overvoltage, set
each unit's OVP slightly higher (1.5 volts +1% VgyT) than
the voltage it will contribute. For maximum protection against
faise tripping, set the slave OVPs to maximum and adjust OVP
at the master.
3-80 Auto-Series with Remote Sensing. To combine
auto-series operation with remote sensing, connect the sup-
plies as described above but remove the + $ jumper from the
master supply and the - $ jumper from the most negative
supply, and connect the +5 and the — $ terminals directly to
the + and — ends of the load.
3-81 The output voltage and/or current of an auto-series
combination can be remotely programmed. Remote program-
ming connections are made to the master supply. The
percentage of the total voltage contributed by a slave can also
be remotely programmed by connecting a variable resistor to
the slave in place of Ry. Observe all precautions outlined in
the remote programming paragraphs. Simultaneous use of
remote sensing and remote programming is also possible dur-
ing auto-series operation.
3-82 Auto-Tracking Operation
3-83 Figure 3-17 shows the interconnections required to
operate two or more units In auto-tracking mode. This mode
of operation allows muitiple supplies that share a common
negative (or positive} output bus to power separate loads and
have their output voltages simultaneously programmed by the
voltage and current controls of the master supply. The output
voltage of each slave supply varies in direct proportion to that
of the master. The ratio of each slave's output voltage to the
master's is established by the ratio of the resistors in the
voltage divider connected between +S of the master and —S
of the slave.
MASTER
A Si + TAR TOR —
£2105 Ра LOAD
A3 LA
м oe
aL
+ Er wn
TE 2
А? ;
48 SH LL!
SLAVE #4
Eu NT
yd LOAD
fer]
уе 8 TA EC
aS x2 ib Dt
AB Oy Pe LOAD
A SS и” |
“SF MEL E E
д5 | &
<[S 4D O -
5
ES a xa
m— J i
ar (ER oc
AS LL...
_
“с
Figure 3-17. Auto-Tracking Operation
3-84 Figure 3-18 shows the interconnections reguired to
provide both positive and negative outputs from an auto-
tracking combination. As can be seen, the only difference
from standard auto-tracking operation is that the + output
terminal of slave #2 instead of the — output terminal is con-
nected to the common bus. There is no limit to the number of
supplies that can be operated in either auto-tracking con-
figuration.
al
Е LOAD
SLAVE #4
FID VDC
ir MAR TO 4 ==
”
E LOAD
BEEN
SLAVE #2
ps 340 VIG
At & Ayo X Oh
к ® | и LOAD
АЗ o, ™
—) L и
AS OT Ayo ee
jeje _
A =
-5 PEPE
e E
AT <
[© JL
Figure 3-18. Auto-Tracking Operation, Positive and
Negative Outputs
3-85 Resistor Values. The method for determining the
values of Ry and Ry in Figure 3-17 is similar to that given in
Paragraph 3-73 for auto-series mods. First choose the ratio of
the slave output voltage to the master output voltage, select a
value for Ry, and then determine the value for Ry by solving
this equation:
3
J
3-86 For example, assume a two-supply configuation in
which the slave output is to vary from 0 to 50 volts while the
master output varies from 0 to 30 voits. If we select a value of
1k for Ry, the equation becomes:
м
Вх = Ву 2 Ve )- 1
Ry = 1000 (1233 - ||
Вх = 1000 [7.2-1]
Ry = 6200
3-87 The same factors that govern the choice of Ry in
auto-series mode apply in auto-tracking mode.
3-88 Repeat the process for each slave, with each slave
referenced to the same (master) supply {unlike auto-series
mode). Note that the slave output voltage may be lower than,
equal to, or higher than the master cutput voltage.
3-89 For auto-tracking operation with both positive and
negative outputs, as shown in Figure 3-18, the equation in
Paragraph 3-85 is used to determine the values of Ry and Ry
for the slave providing positive outputs, and the equation in
Paragraph 3-73 is used to determine the values of Ry and Ry
for the slaves providing negative outputs.
3-90 To maintain the temperature coefficient and stability
specifications of the supplies, Ry and Ry must be stable, low-
noise resistors with temperature coefficients of less than 25
ppm per °C and power ratings at least 10 times what they will
actually dissipate.
3-91 The front-panel VOLTAGE control of the slave can be
used in piace of Ry by connecting a strap from A7 of the slave
to AB of the slave. This enables the user to vary the ratio of the
slave output voltage to the master output voltage, For calcula-
tion purposes, use a resistance value of 2.7k for the VOLTAGE
control when it 1s set to maximum,
3-92 Setting the Current Controis. The current controls
of ali supplies in an auto-tracking combination are in-
dependently operative and can be used to set current limits for
each individual load. If the master supply goes into the con-
stant currant mode, the output voltages of the slaves continue
to track that of the master. if a slave goes into constant cur-
rent mode, however, no other supply is affected.
3-93 Overvoitage Protection in Auto-Tracking. Set
the OVP of each supply as appropriate for the load connected
to that supply. If the master supply OVP trips, the master will
program the slaves to zero output. if a slave OVP trips, only
that slave and its load will be affected.
3-94 Auto-Tracking with Remote Sensing. To com-
bine auto-tracking operation with remote sensing, connect the
supplies as described above but remove the +S and — 5
jumpers from each supply and connect the +S and —S ter-
minals directly to the + and — ends of its load.
3-95 Auto-Tracking with Remote Programming. The
output voltages of an auto-tracking combination can be
remotely programmed by programmming connections made
to the master supply. In addition, the ratio of each slave's out-
put to the master’s output can be remotely programmed by
connecting a variable resistor to the slave in place of Ry. The
output currents of the individual supplies can also be remotely
programmed. Observe ail precautions outlined in the remote
programming paragraphs. Simultaneous use of remote sens-
ing and remote programming is also possible during auto-
tracking operation.
3-96 I-MONITOR OUTPUT SIGNAL
3-97 An ampiified and buffered output signal from the
current-monitoring resistor is available between terminals A1
and A5 on the rear panel.- This signal can be connected to a
remote voltmeter to indicate the amount of output current.
The signal varies from 0 to 5 volts to indicate a zero to full scale
(SOA) current output. The — terminal of the voltmeter should
be connected to terminal AB. Output impedance at terminal
A1 is 10k; a load of 1 megohm will maintain 2% reading
accuracy.
«Totection Circuit,
MANUAL CHANGES
Model 6012A DC Power Supply
Manual HP P/N 06012-90001
“ake all Corrections in the manual according to errata below,
áble for your power supply serial number and enter any listed changes (s) ín the manual.
Fr do A A A O opm di dol CAR AOS OA Y e a dle A bk OA A ЧМ Ч ЧН AO NR A EE pir mile el A AE WR
i SERIAL { MAKE |
fore io rr re em | CHANGES |
| Prefix | Number | |
| ----==---- |--======-тото | -======--
I All | -— | Errata - |
| 1046A | 00101-00140 | 1 |
| 20L7A | 00141-00260 | 1,2 |
| 2116A | 00261-00300 | 1-3 |
{ 2121A | 00301-00540 | 1-5,8* |
| 2136A | 00541-00680 | 1-6,8* |
| 2147A | 00681-00770 | 1-7,8* . |
i 220LA | 60771-00810 | 1-8 |
| 22074 | 00811-00960 | 1-9,10% |
| 2213A | 00961-01110 | 1-10 |
| 22284 | 01111-01360 | 1-11 |
| 2241A | 01361-01585 | 1-12 |
| 23024 | 01586-01935 | 1-13 |
| 23294 | 01936-02260 | 1-14 |
! 2L02A | 02261-02285 | 1-14 |
| 2YOLA | 02286-02335 | 1-15 |
| 24054 | 02336-02360 | 1-16 |
1 2406A | 02361-02385 | 1-17 |
- QUIZA | 02386-02485 | 1-18 |
| 2L20A | 02486-02635 | 1-19 |
| 2426A | 02636-02642 | 1-19 |
| 2U26A | 02642-02801 | 1-20 |
| 24264 | 02892-02908 | 1-21 |
I 24264 | 02909 | 1-20 |
| 242648 | 02910 {| 1-21 |
| 24514 | 02911-up | 1-21 |
ERRATA:
In paragraph 2-24, step E should also be
performed with a full load, as described in
step c. |
On page B-2, change INPUT POWER specifica-
tions to: Two internal switches and two in-
ternal jumpers permit operation from 100Vac
(-10%, +5%), 48-63 Hz. Maximum input current
is 24 A rms.
values for 120, 220,
(Specifications for 120, 220, and 240 Vac
are given in Table 1-1). In paragraph B-53,
change HP P/N of R136 to 0698-4486, R151 to
0757-0471. On Figure 7-9, change R19 (bet-
and 20k Vac.
ween + and - output lines, just to right of
‘own Programmer) to 6 k. In the Overvoltage
the wiper of ASRL is
connected to J2-2.
Eliminate PEAK INRUSH CURRENT -
then check the following
| CHANCE 1: |
In the replaceable parts list for A2 Control
Board Assembly; add CR31, HP P/N 1901-0033;
and R8G, 1 M ohm +/-5%, HP P/N 0683-1055:
change CR19 to HP P/N 1901-0033. .CR31 is
mounted next to C31, with its cathode con-
nected to CR19 and its anode connected to
R57. RBG is mounted between the cathode end
of CR19 and the end of R60 closer to U6. On
the schematic, add CR31 and R89 to the out-
put of the CC Circuit as shown below.
The operation of the CC Circuit is essen-
tially the same as described in paragraphs
4-21 through 4-26, except that there is an
extra diode drop in the output of the CC
Circuit.
Cid
0.033
CR19
CRI res UBC
M
CHANGE 2:
In the replaceable parts list make the fol-
lowing changes: on page 6-3, R20 from HP P/N
06012-80005 to HP P/N 06012-80006; on page
6-5, R27 from HP P/N 0698-6335 (900 ohm) to
HP P/N 0698-6341 (750 ohm). On page 6-5, R8
from HP P/N 0757-0413 (392 ohm) to HP P/N
0757-0410 (301 ohm).
CHANGE 3:
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-9, un-
der Chassis Mechanical, add bumper feet HP
P/N 04023-0266, qty. 3.
Model E0D12A Page -2-
CHANGE Ц
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-8,
change Fan-tube axial 115 V to HP P/N
3160-0301. (When ordering a mew fan the
hardware listed below must be ordered). On
page 6-9, under Chassis Mechanical, add
screw HP P./N 2370-0026, gty. 4 and nut HP
P/N 0590-0653, qty. h.
CHANGE 5:
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-5,
change R133 and R134 to 110 к, 1/8 W, 1%, HP
P/N 0757-0466. On page 6-7, under FET
Assembly, add 12 and L3, ferrite bead, HP
P/N 9170-0894, aty. 2.
CHANGE 6:
In.the replaceable parts list, page 6-7, un-
der A3 FET Assembly, change Q1,2 to FET-dual
TO3 HP P/N 5080-1991.
ERRATA: |
On page 1-3, under Programming Response
Time, change the first sentence to read:
"Maximum time for output voltage to change
from 2 V to 60 \М...". In Appendix В page
B-2, under Programming Response Time, change
the first sentence to read: "Maximum time
for output voltage to change from 2 V to 50
V or 50 V to 2 V and settle within the 200
mV band...”.
CHANGE 7:
On page 6-8, under Main Board Mechanical,
change the quantity of contact- terminal, HP
P/N 1251-0600, from № to 6. Under Front
Panel Assembly-Mechanical add: Fan cable as-
sembly, HP P/N 8120-3468, qty 1. This fan
cable assembly was soldered directly onto
the circuit board, now it is attached Бу
means of two contact terminals. In the
replaceable parts list, page 6-9, under
Chassis- Mechanical, add cable bushing HP
P/N 1251-6532, qty. 1.
ERRATA:
On page 1-2, paragraph 1-18, add the follow -
ing statement under Front handle kit for 5
1/4 inch high cabinets: “(will be shipped
with instrument if ordered as Opton 907).”
On page 5-11 Figure 5-11, add the following
section to the flow chart where the first
decision box appearing below is the same as
the one appearing in the manual.
YGS WAVEFORMS
ON BOTH PET
ASSEMBLIES OK7 (6)
(NOTE 2) 7
CHECK FOR +11YDE
ACROSS ACT
YESO
CHECK FETS & YE +11VOC"
DRIVER CIRCUITS >
NO
RAISE Vext SLOWLY TO 20V
or” CHECK A3C2
= CHECK AICZ AND VR2
ERRATA:
In Section II (Installation), page 2-2,
paragraph 2-18 should read: “Input power isk
connected to the instrument vía the AC
Filter Assembly on the rear panel. The power
cord must. be a three-conductor cord rated
for at least 85 degrees C. For 120 V opera-
tion each conductor must be AWG #12
(3.31m%) or larger. For 220 V or 240 V
operation, each conductor must be AWG #14
(2.08mm*) or larger. Larger wire sizes may -
be required to prevent excessive voltage
drop in the AC input.”
CHANGE 8:
*This change also applies to the following
serial numbers:
|2121A-00327 | 2147A-00681
|2121A-00334 | 2147A-00687
Pr |
| 2136A-00600
| 2136A-00609
|21364-00612
| 2136A-00615-00617
| 2147A-00688-00692
| 2136A-00645 |
|
|
|
|
|
2147A-00695 |
21h 7A-00699 |
2147A-00700-00703|
2147A-00705 |
| 21.36А-00563 21474-00707 |
|2136-00670-00672 | 2147A-00708 |
|2136A-00676-00679| 21347A-00170-00717!
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-3, add
CRi4 HP P/N 1901-0050, qty. 1. On the
schematic Figure 7-9, add CRIL across Q2,
Base (cathode) to Emitter (anode).
CHANGE 9:
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-4,
J
0180-2264,
serial
Model 60124 Page -3-
CHANGE 10:
*This change also applies to the following
- numbers: 2207A-009l9, 2207-00950
207A-00952. Change L2 and L3 (previously
—ádded in CHANGE 5) to Inductor 0.15 ul, HP
P/N 9100-1610, aty. 2. In the replaceable
parts list, page 6-7 under FET Assembly,
change R9 to res 110 k 1% 1/8 WwW, HP P/N
0757-0466.
CHANGE 11:
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-3,
change A1Q2 to HP P/N 1854-0156, and on page
6-8, under Al Main Board Mechanical, delete
“spacer, plastic (Q2),” HP P/N 1200-0181.
CHANGE 12:
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-7 un-
der A5 Front Panel Assembly add the follow-
ing note to RY: When replacing RL, check the
casing style. If the casing is square, order
the RL HP P/N 2100-3252 listed in the
manual. If the casing is round, order HP P/N
2100-2216. Both resistors are the same value
but, because of their different casing sytle
they are not interchangeable.
CHANGE 13:
Tn the replaceable parts list, page 6-8 un-
… der Chassis Electrical Parts, change LO to
"BP P/N 06012-80099.
ERRATA
The Terminal Block reference printed on the
A2 control board is incorrectly labeled ТВ2
and should be labeled TBl. The manual
references the correct label TEl, thus
reguiring no change to the manual.
CHANGE 1k:
In the replaceable parts list page 6-4, un-
der AZ board, add CR40 and CR41, HP P/N
1901-0033, qty 2. On the schematic Figure
7-9 connect CRUO cathode end to TB2Al and
anode end to TBLAS. Connect CRU1 cathode end
to TB1A5 and anode end to TBLAS.
ERRATA:
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-7, un-
der FET Assembly, change Q1,2 (previo usly
changed in change 6) to HP P/N 1855-0473.
CHANGE 15:
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-3, un-
der Al Main Board Assembly,change VRZ to
zener, 11V, 2% HP P/N1002-3172, qty 1.
Also,make this change to the Schematic
Diagram figure 7-9.
CHANGE 16:
In the replaceable parts list for Option
$002, page A-15, change U7,8 to HP P/N.
1826-0986.
CHANGE 17:
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-8,
change Fan-tubeaxial to HP P/N 3160- 0259.
CHANGE 18:
Diodes CRLO and CRL1 added in change 14 have
been moved from the A2 Terminal Block to the
A2 PC Board. They are now located on the A2
PC Board as follows; CRLO is next to Ri and
CRUl is next to R18. Make these additions on
page 7-4, figure 7-3, Control Board (A2)
component location. Electrically CRU0 and
CRUl are connected as decribed in CHANGE 14,
In the replaceable parts list, on page
6-L, under A2 Control Board Assembly add,
C69, O.luf, 50V, HP P/N 0160-4722, TQ 1, On
page 6-6 add R180, 1K, 5%, 1/44, HP P/N
0683-1025, TQ 1, R181, 56.2K, 1%, 1/8w, HP
P/N 0757-0459, TQ 1, and R182, 10K, 1%,
1/8W, HP P/N 0757-0842, ТО 2. Маке these ad-
ditions on page 7-4, figure 7-3, Control
Board (A2) Component location as follows;
R180,R181,R182, and C60 are added between
resistors RG8 and R92, the finished change
should display the components in the follow-
ing order; R98, R180, R181, R182, C60 and
RG2. Add R180, R181, R182 and C60 to the
Schematic Diagram, Figure 7-9 as shown
below. These components are added on the AZ
Board in the Dropout Detector/Slow Start
Circuit.
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Model 60124, Page -4-
CHANGE 18 (eont.)
On page 6-5 change R81 to 20K, 1%, 1/8W, HP
P/N 0757-0h49, TQ 1 and change the TQ of R28
to 2. On page 6-6 change R119 to 21.5K, 1%,
1/8W, HP P/N 0757-0199, TQ 1.
CHANGE 19
In the Replacement Parts list, page 6-3, add
C29, .0LTuf, 250Vac, TQ 1, HP P/N 0160-4323.
On Figure 7-9 Schematic Diagram, near the
LINE SWITCH ASSEMBLY, sketch C29 between
points P2 and r2. On page 7-3, Figure 7-2
Main Board (A1) Component Location,
capacitor C29 is installed from standoff Ri
to standoff R3.
ERRATA:
In. the replaceable parts list, page 6-3,
change CR3 and CRY to HP P/N 1901 -1154,
qty. г. :
CHANGE 20
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-9, un-
der Chassis-Mechanical change front panel to
HP P/N 06012-00016. Change Bracket Meter to
HP P/N 06012- 00017, Qty.1. On page 6-7,
under Front-Panel Assembly,change meter-
volts to HP P/N 1120-1902 and change meter-
amps to HP P/N 1120-1901.
ERRATA:
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-9, un-
der Miscellaneous, change jumper, terminal
block to HP P/N 0360-2187.
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-8, un-
der FET Assembly, change contact-connector,
to HP P/N 1251-7600, qty. 2.
CHANGE 21:
In the replaceable parts list, page 6-9, un-
der Chassis-Mechanical change front panel to
HP P/N 06012-00002, TQ 1 and change bracket
meter to HP P/N 06012-00012 ,TQ 1. On page
6-7, under Front-Panel Assembly, change
meter-volts to HP P/N 1120-1392 TQ 1 and
change meter-amps to HP P/N 1120-1393, IQ 1.
1/23/85
SECTION IV
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-1 DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN
AUTORANGING POWER SUPPLY
AND A CONVENTIONAL
POWER SUPPLY
4-2 The main difference between an autoranging power
supply and conventional types of constant voltage/constant
current {CV/CC) power supplies can be seen by comparing
the output characteristics of each. A conventional CV/CC
power supply can provide maximum output power at only one
combination of output voitage and current, as shown in Figure
4-1A. The range of a power supply can be extended by design-
ing an instrument with two or more switch-selectable
voltage/current ranges within the maximum power output
capability, as shown in Figure 4-1B. The 6012A autoranging
power supply provides maximum output power over a wide
and continuous range of voltage and current combinations, as
shown ¡f Figure 4-1C, without the operator having to select
the proper output range.
43 SIMPLIFIED SCHEMATIC
DESCRIPTION
4-4 The basic operating concepts of the 60124 are shown
on the simplified schematic, Figure 4-2, and described in the
following paragraphs. Detailed descriptions are provided only
for those individual circuits and components whose operation
may not be obvious to the user. The circuit names and layout
of the simplified schematic are the same as used on the com-
plete schematic in Section VII: however, some items, such as
the Display Circuits, are left off the simplified schematic for
clarity. The heavy lines represent the input rails and output
rails. Positive logic conventions are used; signals with a bar
are low when true. (E.g., ON INHIBIT goes low to inhibit on
puises, high to enable on pulses.)
4-5 Basic Concept
4-6 The 6012A is a flyback-type switching power supply,
so-called from the fiyback technique of generating high
voltage in television receivers. in the 60124, energy is stored in
the magnetic field surrounding a transformer while current
flows in the primary, and this energy is transferred to the
secondary circuit when current flow in the primary is turned
off. Current flow in the primary is controlled by FET switches,
which are turned on and off at a 20kHz rate by a pulse width
modulator. Regulation is accomplished by controlling the on
time of the FET switches, On puises are initiated by a clock cir-
cuit. Off pulses are initiated when current flow in the primary
has stored enough energy for the output circuit, which is
determined as follows.
4-7 The output voltage and current are compared to
reference voltages set by front-panel controls to produce a
control voltage, The control voltage indicates the amount of
power reguired by the output circuit. Current flow in the
primary circuit produces a ramp voltage that represents the
amount of energy being stored for transfer to the output cir-
cuit. An off pulse is generated when the ramp voltage exceeds
the control voltage.
4-8 Input AC Circuits
4-9 Primary power is connected through the RFI Filter to
the LINE switch and contacts of relay A1kK1, When the LINE
switch closes, current flows through ATR1 and A1R3 and the
input Bridge/Doubler to charge the Input Filter. A jumper in
A. TYPICAL CV/ CC
fOGOW SUPPLY 1000W SUPPLY
60V
40V e pou AQ Y fumo 1000
20V 2 oon 20V
‘
254, 25A 50A НБА SOA
B. DUAL-RANGE CV/ CC
CG. MODEL 6042 A
AUTORANGING 1000W SUPPLY
Figure 4-1. Output Characteristics; Typical, Dual-Range, and Autoranging Supplies
rom m ROT Th Foon shines
|
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Figure 4-7. Simplified Schematic
4-2
the Input Bridge/ Doubler circuit, W1, connects the circuit as a
voltage doubler for 120V operation, so that for any nominal in-
put voltage the input filter charges to approximately 300Vdc.
Resistors A1R1 and A1R3 limit inrush current while the
capacitors in the Input Filter charge up after the instrument is
turned on. After a one-second delay provided by the AC
Dropout Detector/ Slow-Start Circuit, relay A1K1 closes and
shorts out A1R1 and A1R3.
4-10 Primary power is also connected to the Bias Power
Supplies and the Relay Driver. The Bias Power Supplies pra-
duce the +B5V, + 15V, and -— 12V used throughout the instru-
ment, and the + 11V used by the FET drivers. Also provided
from the Bias Power Supply circuits are the 120Hz-puise input
to the AC Dropout Detector/Slow-Start Circuit and the +5V
unreguiated-voltage input to the Blas Voltage Detector, These
two circults operate as described in later paragraphs to pro-
duce the relay-enable signal that controls relay ATK1.
4-11
Transformer A1T2 is controlied by a paraillei pair of FET
switches in each of the two identical FET and FET driver cir-
cuits. On and off signals for the FETs are derived from the
Pulse Width Modulator (PWM), as will be described shortly.
The on pulses are applied through drivers A3UZA, U2B, and
UA and transformer A371 to the gates of FETs A301 and 02.
- Although the on pulse is less than 2 microseconds duration,
the FETs' input capacitance holds the FETs on after the on
pulse has disappeared.
4-12 When the FETs are turned on, current flows through
the primary of Power Transformer AÎTZ. {One of the leads for
AÎTZ serves as the prirnary for Current-Monitor Transformer
AîT1.) Output Diode A4CR1 is reverse biased and blocks cur-
rent flow through A1T2 secondary. Consequently, energy is
stored in the field that builds around the AJT2 transformer
windings. The longer that voitage is applied to the primary,
the more energy is stored.
4-13 Current flow in the secondary of A1T1 develops the
lp Ramp Voltage across resistors AZR59, R63. The amplitude
of this linearly increasing voltage corresponds to the amount
of current flow through the A1T2 primary; therefore, it
represents the amount of energy being stored in the field
around A1T2. It is this lp Ramp Voltage that is compared to a
control voltage to determine when the FETs should be turned
Off.
4-14 Off pulses for the FETs are applied through driver
A3U1B and transformer A3T1 to the base of transistor A3O3.
A303 turns on and shorts the FETs’ gates to sources, thereby
turning the FETs off. When the FETs turn off, the collapsing
magnetic field reverses the polarity across the A1T2Z primary,
and current flows from A1T2 secondary through Output Diode
AACR1 to charge output capacitors ATCT, A1C12, and
A1C21. The level to which the output capacitors are charged
corresponds to the length of time that the FETs are on and
current flows in A1T2 primary.
Current flow from the input rails through Power
4-3
4-15 When the FETs turn off, the leakage inductance of
A1TZ develops a small amount of reverse current flow in the
primary circuit, Flyback Diodes ATCR3 and ATCR4 protect the
FETs by conducting this current around the FETs and back to
the Input Filter. Voltage spikes are filtered by the Snubber
networks.
4-16 it can be seen that the power available in the ouput
circuit corresponds to the duty cycle of the FET switches. The
following paragraphs describe the method by which output
voltage and current are sensed to control the FET duty cycle,
4-17 Constant Voltage (CV) Circuit
4-18 The Constant Voltage (CV) Circuit compares a
percentage of the output voltage to the CV Programming
Voltage set by the VOLTAGE control. Any difference is
amplified to establish a control voitage, as follows.
4-19 Current from the Constant Current Source flows
through VOLTAGE control ABR2 to develop the CV Program-
ming Voltage at terminal A7. The level of this programming
voltage is dependent on the setting of ABR2. Amplifier A2U3
compares a fraction of the 6012A output voltage at the
+ Sense terminal to the programming voltage at A7. The out-
put of A2U3 is applied to a second comparison amplifier,
AZUSB. This amplifier compares the output of A2U3 to a frac-
tion of the inboard + Out, which is the + output voltage
sensed at the inboard side of the output filter, Use of two
comparison amplifier loops provides increased stability for
load variations. :
4-20 In normal CV mode, the output of A2U6B varies be-
tween = — (0.5 volts and = 41.0 volts. It is at its most
negative when the load is drawing little or no power from the
instrument. Progressively more-positive voltages from A2U6B
correspond to increased power demand by the load. The out-
put from the CV Circuit is applied to diode A2CR18.
4-21 Constant Current (CC) Circuit
4-22 Operation of the Constant Current (CC) Circuit is
similar to the CV Circuit. Qutput current from the 6012A
develops a voltage across the Current-Monitor Resistor,
A1R20, This voltage is amplified and buffered by the !-Monitor
Amplifier, A202, to isolate the power supply output from cur-
rents in the CC Circuit. Comparison Amplifier A2U6C com-
pares the I-Monitor signal to the CC Programming Voltage. In
normal CC mode, the output from the CC Circuit also varies
between = —0.5 volts and = + 1.0 volts, and is applied to
diode AZCR19.
4-23 Differentiator circuit A2U1TA and U1B compensates
for highly reactive loads. CC Clamp AZUBA limits the current
output from the instrument to no more than 55 amperes.
4-24 Control Voltage
4-25 The outputs of the CV and CC Circuits are applied to
diodes that connect to a “wired-OR’’ junction. Whichever cir-
cuit is requesting less power will forward bias its output diode
and determine the voltage at the wired-OR junction. As stated
earlier, the outputs vary between — 0.5 volts and + 1.0 volts,
with the more negative levels representing lower power
demands. The wired-OR junction at the anodes of AZCR18
and A2CR19 is biased to + 1.5 volts. Therefore, whichever cir-
cult, CV or CC, produces the more negative output will cause
its output diode to be forward biased and thereby determine
the Control Voltage. This Control Voltage is compared to the
lp Ramp Voltage to determine when the FET switches are
turned off.
4-26 For example, assume the output from the CV Circuit
(AZ2U6B) is +0.2 volts and the output from the CC Circuit
(AZU6C) is +0.9 volts. AZCR18 will be forward biased and the
wired-OR junction will be heid at + 0.8 volts {includes the 0.6
voit drop across A2CR18). A2CR19 will be reverse biased, so
the CC Circuit will have no effect.
4-27 Pulse Width Modulator (PWM)
4-28 The FET switches are turned on and off at a 20 kHz
rate by signals derived from the Pulse Width Modulator
(PWM). On pulses are initiated by the 20 kHz Clock signal. Off
pulses are initiated when the Ip Ramp Voltage {which in-
dicates the amount of energy being stored for transfer to the
output circuit) exceeds the Control Voltage {which indicates
the amount of power required by the output circuit). Figure
4-3 is a timing diagram showing the relationship of various
signals that control the FET switches.
4-29 The more negative level of the 20 kHz A2U11 output
resets both flip flops AZUSE and AZUSA, and holds them reset
until the A2U11 output goes positive. Then, the next positive
edge from the output of the 320 kHz Oscillator triggers
A2U9B, triggering AZUSA and one-shot multivibrator
AZUT2A. The FET switches are turned on, current flows
through Power Transformer A1T2, and Ip Ramp Voltage starts
to rise. When Ip Ramp Voltage exceeds the Control Voltage,
the output of AQUS changes state and flip flop A2USA is reset,
triggering one-shot multivibrator A2U128 to produce an off
pulse.
4-30 PWM Fast Turn Off
4-31 Figure 4-3 shows that there is a delay between the
time when the Control Voltage is exceeded at A2UB and the
time when the FETs turn off. This delay consists of the com-
parator switching time, gate delays, transformer delay, and
FET turn-off time, and it results in a certain amount of power
being transferred to the output after the desired off time, If the
Control Voltage is at a very low level {unit supplying little or no
output power), this power may exceed the amount required
by the load. To offset this, the PWM is designed to reduce the
minimum on-time of the FETs if necessary to reduce the
power transferred to the output circuit. When the 20 kHz
Clock goes high (allowing the PWM to be triggered by the
next 320 kHz signal}, A2C31 charges rapidly and exponentiaily
HOLDS
PWM
20kHz CLOCK RESET | i
AZUL QUTPUT x }
| INITIATES
ON PULSE
A2U9B CLOCK |
INPUT, 320kHz
INITIATES
pol “OFF PULSE!
CONTROL pl - i
VOLTAGE PE |
| | |
o |
CHARGE и ip RAMP VOLTAGE | | helt
RAMP CHARGE Y 7, Ip a Na DISCHARGE (
VOLTAGE | > —
lO ||
A2U5 bs ||
COMPARATOR “ul Li
OUTPUT à |
|
|
|
E
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
_—
|
3
i
| |
!
ON PULSE | |
| |
|
OFF PULSE | [|
|
3 FET TURN-
N =— OFF DELAY
FETS 9 i |
OFF crecen mude
Figure 4-3. FET Control Signais Timing Diagram
4-4
to a low level, i this auxilary ramp level exceeds the Control
Voltage, the PWM initiates an off pulse, turning off the FETs
immediately after they turn on.
4-32 Primary Current (Ip) Limit
4-33 lp Ramp Voltage is also compared to a preset |p Limit
at comparison amplifier A2U130. ip Limit is a factory-set ad-
justment that limits the total power output of the instrument,
Ordinarily, the PWM initiates an off pulse when Ip Ramp
Voltage exceeds the Control Voltage at AZUS, and lp Ramp
never reaches Ip Limit at AZU13D. However, if the Control
Voltage is excessively high (both VOLTAGE and CURRENT
controls set to relatively high values), Ip Ramp will exceed ip
Limit, The output of A2U13D changes state, initiating an off
pulse,
4-34 As an additional protection feature, if nothing else
resets flip flop AZUSA {such as the control circuit,
overtemperature, low bias or ac dropout, or overvoitage;}, it
wilt be reset by the next negative level from A2U11, triggering
A2U12B ta generate an off pulse, Therefore, maximum duty
cycle of the FETs is always less than 50%.
4-35 The ip Limit Comparator also includes a siow-start
circuit, which limits the output power the unit can provide un-
til after the ATK1 relay contacts close completely.
4-36 Down Programmer
4-37 This circuit allows the output voltage to be lowered
rapidly when required. In order to lower the output voltage itis
necessary to discharge the output filter capacitors (typically,
through the load). In situations that require the output voltage
to drop more rapidly than can be accomplished through the
load, the Down Programmer pulls the output line to a low level
and dischaiges the capacitors. This action can be triggered by
any of three conditions: The CV Circuit programs a much
lower output voltage, an overvoltage is detected оп the out-
put, or low bias or ac dropout is detected (including ac
turnoff}.
4-38 A long-carryover bias supply associated with the
Down Programmer stores enough energy to operate the
Down Programmer after joss of primary power. This ensures
that the Down Programmer will be able to discharge the out-
put circuit completely when primary power is turned off.
4-39 Overvoltage Protection Circuit (OVP)
4-43 The Overvoltage Protection Circuit monitors the out-
put voltage across the + output line and circuit cornmon
( — output line). If the output voltage exceeds a preset limit,
set by the front-panel OVP ADJUST potentiometer, the Over-
voltage Protection Circuit inhibits the PWM, triggers the
Down Programmer, and latches itself until the instrument is
turned off.
4-5
4-41 The Overvoltage Protection Circuit operates from the
long-carryover bias supply associated with the Down Pro-
grammer. 8y ensuring that the reference voltage remains high
until after the + output reaches zero volts when the instru-
ment is turned off, this feature prevents the Overvoltage Pro-
tection Circuit from latching if the unit is turned back on again
immediately after turn-off,
4-42 AC Dropout Detector/Slow-Start
Circuit
4-43 This circuit contains two ramp circuits. The slow-
start ramp holds the output of the AC Dropout
Detector/ Slow-Start Circuit, AC DROPOUT, low for approx-
imately one second after the instrument is turned on, The AC
DROPOUT signal operates through the Bias Voltage Detector
to inhibit the power supply output. This one-second delay
allows the Input Filter capacitors to charge slowly through
A1Rt and AÎR3.
4-44 The dropout detector ramp operates to shui down
the instrument when primary power is turned off or lost. This
ramp circuit is ordinarily reset by the 120 Hz pulses in the
unregulated +5 V. If the ramp is not reset within approxi-
mately 20 milliseconds of the previous reset, the output of the
AC Dropout Detector goes low (AC DROPOUT). AC
DROPOUT inhibits the power supply output, as described in
the following paragraphs.
4-45 Bias Voltage Detector
4-46 The Bias Voltage Detector inhibits operation of the
power circuits if the bias voltage drops below a certain level.
This is the level at which sufficient voltage is availabie to
operate the control circuits reliably.
4-47 When the instrument is turned on, the outputs of the
Bias Power Supplies begin to rise from zero volts. When the
output of the + 5V regulated supply reaches approximately 1
volt, transistors in the Bias Voltage Detector turn on and per-
form the following functions: inhibit the On pulse, Off pulse,
and PWM; trigger the Down Programmer: and inhibit the
Relay Enable signal. When the +5V unregulated supply
reaches approximately 7 volts, the OFF pulse is enabled.
When the + BV unregulated supply reaches approximately 9
volts, the On pulse and PWM are enabled, the Down Pro-
grammer trigger is removed, and the Relay Enable signal is
generated. {This assumes that the AC DROPOUT signal from
the AC Dropout Detector/Slow-Start Circuit is not present.
AC DROPOUT operates through the Bias Voltage Detector to
inhibit the power circuits. Upon turn-on, the one-second delay
provided by AC DROPOUT ordinarily exceeds the time re-
quired for the bias voltage to reach the proper level.)
4-48 The Bias Voltage Detector also inhibits the power
circuits in “brownout” conditions if the ac line voltage falls
below approximately 70% of nominal,
SECTION V
MAINTENANCE
5-1 INTRODUCTION
52 Upon receipt of the power supply, the performance
test {Paragraph 5-5) can be made. This test is suitable for in-
coming inspection. if a fault is detected in the power supply
while making the performance test or during normal opera-
tion, proceed to the troubleshooting procedures. After
troubleshooting and repair {Paragraph 552), perform any
necessary adjustments and calibration {Paragraph 5-86).
Table 5-1. Test Equipment Required
Before returning the power supply to normal operation, repeat
the applicable portions of the performance test to ensure that
the fault has been properly corrected and that no other fauits
exist.
5-3 TEST EQUIPMENT REQUIRED
5-4 Table 5-1 lists the test equipment required to perform
the various procedures described in this section.
REQUIRED RECOMMENDED
TYPE CHARACTERISTICS USE MODEL
Oscilloscope Sensitivity: 1 mV Troubleshooting: measure ripple, | HP 1740A
Bandwidth: 20 MHz noise spikes, and load
transient response
Digital Multimeter Sensitivity: 1 uV Measure ac and dc voltages, HP 3455A
input impedance: 10 MO (minimum)
Accuracy: 0.02% 6% digit
troubleshooting, and calibration
Elecironic Load
Voltage Range: 60V
Current Range: 50A
Power Range: 12006
Open and short circuit switches
Variable at 30 Hz rate
Power supply load
Transistor Devices
Model DLP 130-650-2500
Variable Voltage
Autotransformer
Voitage Range: see Paragraph 2-15
4 КУА {minimum}
Vary ac input for line
regulation measurement,
troubleshooting
RMS Voltmeter True RMS Reading Measure ripple НР 3400 А
Bandwidth: 10 MHz
Sensitivity: 1 mV
DC Power Supply Voltage Range: 0 to 20V Troubleshooting, slow- HP 6024A
Current Range: 0 to 6A
start procedure
Current-Measuring
Transformer
Able to nass 50 A de without
saturating
Bandwidth: 20 Hz to 20 MHz
Qutput voltage of at least 1 mV
for 1 mA input
Constant Current PARD test
Tektronix Model P6303
Probe/AMbB03 Amplifier
(must be used with
TMBLOO-series power
module)
Current-Monitoring
Resistor
Value: 50 mV @ SOA {1 mi)
Accuracy: 1% or better
Measure output current,
calibration
Weston instrument Shunt
Model 9992, Catalog
#41218, 50 mV @50A
Isolation Transformer
4 KYA (minimum)
Troubleshooting
Terminating Resistors
Value: 50 Q0+ 5%, Non-inductive
(four required)
Noise spike measurement
Blocking Capacitors
Value: 0.01 pF, 100 Vde, (wo
required)
Noise spike measurement
5-1
5-5 PERFORMANCE TEST
56 The following test can be used as an incoming inspec-
tion check, and appropriate portions of the test can be
repeated to check the operation of the instrument after
repairs. The tests are performed using the specified nominal
input voltage for the unit, If the correct result is not obtained
for a particular check, proceed to troubleshooting
(Paragraph 5-52 ).
5-7 Measurement Techniques
5-8 All specifications should be measured at the power
supply terminals. Also, all tests are performed with the supply
strapped for local programming and sensing, as shown in
Figure 3-3. The wires used to connect the load to the supply
should be heavy enough to ensure that they will drop less than
0.5V. 1f the supply is equipped with System Interface Option
002, remove the interface Option cable from the rear-panel
connector and check the power supply first. Then proceed to
the checkout procedure in Appendix A 10 test the Option 002
components,
5-9 Select A Load. Specifications are checked with vary-
ing amounts of load resistance connected across the supply.
For most of the constant-voltage tests, the value of load
resistance must be approximately 0.4 Q to permit operation of
the supply at 20V and its maximum-output-power-rating cur-
rent of SOA. For the constant-current tests, the load resistance
must be approximately 3.4 1 to permit operation at 17.54 and
its maximum-output-power-rating voltage of 80V. The power
rating of the load must be at least equal to the maximum out-
put power of the supply: 1200 watts.
5-10 For load regulation and {oad transient response tests,
load resistance must be switched between two values. An
electronic load, such as listed in Table 5-1, eliminates the need
for connecting many resistors or rheostats in parallel to pro-
vide adequate power capability, is considerably more stable
than carbon pile devices, and permits varying the load with an
external modulating signal.
5-11 Connecting a Current-Monitoring Resistor, To
allow precise measurement of output current, a current-
monitoring resistor, such as the shunt listed in Table 5-1, is in-
serted between the output of the power supply and the load.
This resistor must be connected as a four-terminal device in
the same manner as a meter shunt would be {see Figure 5-1).
The load current is fed to the extremes of the wire leading to
the resistor, while the monitoring terminals are located as
close as possible to the resistance element itself. A current-
monitoring resistor should have low noise, a low temperature
coefficient {less than 30ppm/ °C), and should be used at no
more than 5% of its rated power so that its temperature rise
will be minimized.
5-12 Constant Voltage Tests
5-13 Connect all of the measuring devices used in the
constant-voltage performance tests directly to the power sup-
3-2
ply sensing terminals {+ S, — 5). For best accuracy, the sens-
ing terminals must be used rather than the output terminals,
since the measuring instruments must be connected to the
same pair of terminals to which the feedback amplifier within
the power supply is connected, This is particularly important
when measuring the regulation of the power supply. A
measurement made across the load includes the impedance of
the leads to the load, and such lead lengths can easily have an
impedance several orders of magnitude greater than the sup-
ply impedance (typically < 1 milliohm at do), thus invalidating
the measurement.
MONITORING
TERMINAS LOAD
TO NEGATIVE Ry TO POSITIVE
TERMINAL OF o A Lee TERMINAL OF
POWER SUPPLY x A POWER SUPPLY
LOAD TERMINALS
Figure 5-1. Current-Monitoring Resistor Connections
5-14 To avoid mutual coupling effects, connect each
monitoring device to the sensing terminals by a separate pair
of leads. Use coaxial cabie or shielded two-wire cables to
avoid pickup on the measuring leads. Connect the load across
the output terminals as ciose to the supply as possible. When
measuring the constant-voltage performance specifications,
the CURRENT control should be set at least 2% above the
output current the load will draw, since the onset of constant-
current operation could cause a drop in output voltage, in-
creased ripple and other performance changes not properly
ascribed to the constant-voltage operation of the supply.
a
COAXIAL CABLE OR SHIELDED PAIR
Figure 5-2. Basic Test Setup
5-15 Rated Voltage and Voltmeter Accuracy. To
check that the supply will furnish its rated output voltage, pro-
ceed as follows:
a. Connect test setup shown in Figure 5-2. Operate the load
in constant resistance mode (Amps/Volt) with resistance
initially set to maximum.
b. Turn both CURRENT control and OVP adjust fully
clockwise,
ce, Turn on supply and adjust VOLTAGE controf until digital
voltmeter (DVM) indicates exactly 60V (maximum rated out-
put voltage).
d. Front-panel voitmeter should indicate 60V +3%.
e. Disconnect DVM from power supply sense terminals and
connect DVM across current-monitoring resistor (Ras).
f. Reduce resistance of load until DVM reads 17.5 mV, in-
dicating that current output is exactly 17.5A {maximum rated
power output). Ensure that power supply remains in constant-
voltage mode by checking CV light.
g. Disconnect DVM from Ryps and reconnect DVM to power
supply sense terminals.
h. DVM and front-panel voltmeter should both indicate
60\.
5-16 Load Effect (Load Regulation).
Definition; The change in the static value of dc output
voltage (AEQyT) resulting from a change in load resistance
from open circuit to a value which yields maximum rated out-
put current, or from the latter value to open circuit,
5-17 To check the constant-voitage load effect, proceed
as follows:
a. Connect test setup shown in Figure 5-2.
b. Turn CURRENT control fully clockwise.
¢. Turn on supply and adjust VOLTAGE control until DVM
indicates 20V,
d. Disconnect DVM from power supply sense terminals and
connect DVM across Ras.
е. Adjust resistance of load until DVM reads 50 mV, in-
dicating that current output is exactly 50A {maximum rated
output current). Ensure that power supply remains in
constant-voltage mode by checking CV light.
f. Disconnect DVM from Ry and reconnect DVM to power
supply sense terminals.
g. Open dc circuit breakers on load to disconnect load,
h. Record voltage indicated on DVM.
i. Close de circuit breakers on load to reconnect load.
i. Wait a few seconds only to allow DVM to settle. Reading
on DVM should not differ from reading of step h by more than
7 mV.
5-18 Source Effect (Line Regulation),
Definition: The change in the static value of de output
voltage (AEg yy) resulting from a change in ac input voltage
over the specified range from low line to high line, or from
high line to low line.
5-19 To check the source effect, proceed as follows:
a. Connect test setup shown in Figure 5-2.
b. Connect variable autotransformer between input power
source and power supply ac power input,
c. Adjust autotransformer for low line voitage (Paragraph
2-15).
d. Tum CURRENT control fully clockwise,
e. turn on power supply and adjust VOLTAGE control until
DVM indicates exactly 60V.
f. Disconnect DVM from power supply sense terminals and
connect DVM across Rpg.
5-3
g. Adjust resistance of load until DVM reads 4 mV, in
dicating that current output is exactly 4 A. Ensure that power
supply remains in constant-voltage mode by checking CV
light.
h. Disconnect DVM from Rps and reconnect DVM to power
supply sense terminalis.
i. Record voltage indicated on DVM,
j. Adjust autotransformer for high line voltage.
k. Reading on DVM should not differ from reading of step |
by more than 9 mV,
5-20 PARD (Ripple and Noise).
Definitions: The residual ac voltage superimposed on
the dc output of a regulated power supply. Ripple and noise
measurements may be made at any input ac line voltage com-
bined with any dc output voltage and current within the sup-
ply's rating.
5-21 The amount of ripple and noise present on the power
supply output is measured either in terms of its rms or
{preferably} peak-to-peak value. The peak-to-peak measure-
ment is particularly important for applications where noise
spikes could be detrimental to sensitive loads such as logic cir-
cuitry. The rms measurement is not an ideal representation of
the noise, because fairly high output noise spikes of short
duration can be present in the ripple without appreciably in-
creasing the rms value.
RMS YOLTMETER
+ vf —
COAXIAL CABLE OR SHIELDED PAIR
Figure 5-3. Constant-Voltage Ripple Test Setup.
5-22 Ripple Measurement Techniques. Figure 5-3
shows the method for measuring ripple using a single-ended
true-reading RMS voitmeter or oscilloscope. The power sup-
ply output terminals should not be connected to ground at the
power supply terminal strip to prevent current from flowing
through à ground loop and adding to the measured signal.
Also, to ensure that no potential difference exists between the
supply and the RMS voltmeter, it is recommended that they
both be plugged into the same ac power bus. H the same bus
cannot be used, both ac grounds must be at earth ground
potential.
5-23 To minimize pickup, a coaxial cable or shielded two-
wire cable should be used to connect the sensing terminals of
the power supply to the input of the RMS voltmeter. To verify
that the RMS voltmeter is not measuring ripple that is induced
in the leads or picked up from ground, turn both the
VOLTAGE and CURRENT controls fully counterclockwise and
short the voltmeter + lead to the voltmeter — lead at the
power supply output terminals, If the test setup is properly
configured, the noise value obtained when the leads are
shorted should not be significant compared to the measured
ripple value.
5-24 Ripple Measurement Procedure. To check the rip-
pie output, proceed as follows:
a. Connect test setup shown in Figure 5-3.
b. Turn CURRENT contro! fully clockwise,
c. Turn on power supply and adjust VOLTAGE control and
idad so that front-panel meters indicate 40V and 30A.
d. Ripple should be less than 5 mV.
5-25 Noise Spike measurement Techniques. An in-
strument of sufficient bandwidth must be used when making a
high-frequency spike measurement, Measuring noise with an
instrument that has insufficient bandwidth may conceal high-
frequency spikes that could be detrimental to the load. The
oscilloscope listed in Table 5-1 should be operated with the
bandwidth limited to 20 MHz. À modest increase in noise
spike amplitude may be observed above 20 MHz.
5-26 À single-ended measurement (replacing RMS
voltmeter in Figure 5-3 with an oscilloscope) is usually not ade-
quate for measuring spikes: a differential oscilloscope is
. necessary, Because of its common-mode rejection, a differen-
tial ascilloscope displays only the difference between its two
vertical input terminals, thus ignoring the effects of any
common-mode signal produced by the difference in the ac
potential between the power supply case and the oscilloscope
case. Before using a differential-input oscilloscope, however,
it is imperative that the common-mode-rejection capability of
the oscilloscope be verified. Tum both the VOLTAGE and
CURRENT controls fully counterciockwise, short together the
two input leads at the power supply, and observe the trace on
the CRT. If the trace is a straight line, then the oscilloscope is
properly ignoring any common-mode noise present, If the
trace is not a straight line, then the oscilloscope is not
rejecting the ground signal and must be realigned in accord-
ance with the manufacturers instructions so that proper
common-mode rejection is attained.
5-27 Figure 5-4 shows the test setup used to measure
noise spikes. Two coaxial cables must be used. Impedance-
matching resistors must be included to eliminate standing
waves and cable ringing, and capacitors must be connected to
biock de. The lenyih of the test leads outside the coaxial cable
should be kept as short as possible. The blocking capacitor
and impedance-maiching resistor should be connected direct-
ly from the inner conductor of the cable to the power supply
sensing terminal. Notice that the shieids of the two coaxial
cables are not connected to the power supply.
5-4
POWER SUPPLY DIFFERENTIAL OSCILLOSCOPE
+ — pe AC Albi
+5
s | E NE >
- ee a rx
5041 AR +
LOAD CU ;
+ vf — | ST У
2”
CONNECTORS Y Y
|
COAXIAL CABLES И
VERT.
INPUT
a
soil
PA
|
;
Figure 5-4, Constant Voltage Noise Spike Measurement
Test Setup
5-28 Noise Spike Measurement Procedure. To check
the noise spikes, proceed as foliows:
a. Connect test setup shown in Figure 5-4.
b, Turn CURRENT control fuliy clockwise.
c. Turn on power supply and adjust VOLTAGE control and
load so that the front-panel meters indicate 20 V and 50 A.
de Because the impedance-matching resistors constitute a
2-10-1 attenuator, the noise spikes observed on the
oscilloscope should be less than 25 mV p-p {instead of 50 mV
p-pl.
5-29 The circuit of Figure 5-4 can aiso be used for the
display of low-frequency ripple. Simply remove the four ter-
minating resistors and the blocking capacitors.
5-30 Load Transient Recovery Time.
Definition: The time “X” for output voltage recovery
to within “Y” millivolts of the nominal output voltage follow.-
ing a'Z” amp step change in load current, where “Y” is
specified as 100mV and '7” is the specified load current
change of 10% of maximum current rating.
5-31 Measurement Techniques. The load must be
switched between two resistance values such that the load
current varies 10% of the maximum current rating at any out-
put voltage. For example, if the test is done at 40V output, the
maximum current available is 30A. Therefore, the current
should vary by 3A (10%). A load increase of 0.149 G, from
1.333 0 to 1.482 Q, will decrease output current from 30 À to
27 А.
5-32 The load change need not be at the maximum current
available, as in the previous example, but it should cause a
current change of 10% of the maximum current available.
Therefore, at the same 40V output, the load would have to
decrease 0.218 Q, from 1.818 {1 to 1.600 Q, to increase output
current by ЗА from 22A to 254, The maximum current
available is different at different output voltages, therefore the
10% value is different for each output voltage. The test may
be run at whichever output voltage/current combinationís)
is/are of most interest. In all cases, however, the oad must be
selected such that the output current is equal to or greater
than BA both before and after the load change.
5-33 The electronic load listed in Table 5-1 has provisions
for externally modulating the load. Use of a 30 Hz square wave
modulating signal provides a repetitive display that is easy to
observe, Follow the manufacturer's instructions for operating
the electronic load to switch the load current by 10% of the
power supplys maximum output current capability at the
selected output voltage le.g.: between 90% and 100%, be-
tween 35% and 45%, etc).
EXT
E
COAXIAL TABLE OR SHIELDED PAIR
Figure 5-5. Load Transient Recovery Time Test Setup
EouT
UNLOADING
TRANSIENT
NOMINAL №
OUTPUT um , — te TIME
VOLTAGE
| LOADING —T
TRANSIENT
la-16 7ms-el
сот
028v i NOMINAL, ——];E
wu OUTPUT неее
TYPICAL VOLTAGE —*
Wim
— ZS MAX
+ 2m5 MAX
ЮО НМ y
NOMINAL |
OUTPUT 1 — a TIME e.
VOLTAGE UNLOADING LOADING
TRANSIENT TRANSIENT
Figure 5-86. Load Transient Recovery Waveforms
5-34 Measurement Procedure. To check load transient
recovery time, proceed as follows:
a. Connect the test setup shown in Figure 5-5.
b. Set electronic load for external modulation, and adjust
load for maximum current to be used in test,
c. Adjust square wave signal source for 30 Hz modulating
signal. Signal levels should be chosen in accordance with load
manufacturer's requirements for varying load current by the
desired amount.
d. Set oscilloscope for internal sync and lock on either
positive or negative load transient spike.
e, Set vertical input of oscilloscope for ac coupling so that
small dc level changes will not cause display to shift,
5-5
5-39
f. Adjust oscilloscope to display transients as in Figure 5-6.
g. Recovery of power supply output voltage to within 100
mV of nominal output voltage shouid be within two
milliseconds,
5-35 Temperature coefficient.
Definition: The change in output voltage per degree
Celsius change in ambient temperature measured while ac line
voltage, output voltage setting, and load resistance are ali held
constant.
5-36 The temperature coefficient of a power supply is
measured by placing the unit in an oven and varying the
temperature over any span within the power supply's rating,
The power supply temperature must be allowed to stabilize for
a sufficient time at each measurement temperature.
5.37 The temperature coefficient given in the specification
table is the maximum temperature-dependent output voltage
change which will result over any one-degree interval. The
digital voltmeter used to measure the supply’s output voltage
change should be placed outside the oven and should have a
long-term stability adequate to insure that its drift will not
affect the overall measurement accuracy.
5-38
follows:
a. Connect load and digital voltmeter as illustrated in Figure
5-2.
b. Turn CURRENT control fully clockwise.
с. Turn on supply and adjust VOLTAGE control until digital
voltmeter (DVM) indicates exactly 60V (maximum rated out-
put voltage).
d. Disconnect DVM from power supply sense terminals and
connect DVM across current-monitoring resistor (Rag).
e, Reduce resistance of load until DVM reads 17.5 mV, in-
dicating that current output is exactly 17.5A {maximum rated
power output). Ensure that power supply remains in constant-
voltage mode by checking CV light.
f. Disconnect DVM from Ray and reconnect DVM to power
supply sense terminals.
g. Place power supply in temperature-controlled oven
{DVM remains outside oven). Set temperature to 30°C and
allow 30 minutes warm-up.
В. Record DVM reading.
i. Raise temperature to 40°C and allow 30 minutes
warm-up.
|. Observe DVM reading. Difference in voltage reading be-
tween steps h and ¡ should be less than 80 mVde.
To check the temperature coefficient, proceed as
Drift {Stability}.
Definition: The change in output voltage for the first
eight hours following a 30-minute warm-up period. During the
interval of measurement, input line voltage, load resistance,
and ambient temperature are all held constant.
5-40 This measurement is made by monitoring the output
of the power supply on a digital voltmeter over the stated
measurement interval. A strip chart recorder can be used to
provide a permanent record. Place a thermometer near the
supply to verify that the ambient temperature remains con-
stant during the period of measurement. The supply should be
located away from any source of stray air current. If possible,
place the supply in an oven and hold it at a constant
temperature. Take care that the measuring instrument has an
elght-hour stability at least an order of magnitude better than
the stability specification of the power suppiy being tested.
Typically, a supply will drift less over the eight-hour measur-
ment interval than during the half-hour warm-up period.
5-41 To check the output stability, proceed as follows:
a. Connect load and digital voltmeter (DVM) as illustrated
in Figure 5-2.
b. Turn CURRENT control fully clockwise.
Cc. Turn on supply and adjust VOLTAGE control until DVM
indicates exactiy 60V (maximum rated output voltage).
d. Disconnect DVM from power supply sense terminals and
connect DVM across current-monitoring resistor (Rpg).
e. Reduce resistance of load until DVM reads 17.5 mV, in-
dicating that current output is exactly 17.5A {maximum rated
power output}. Ensure that power supply remains in constant-
voltage mode by checking CV light.
f. Disconect DVM from Ry, and reconnect DVM to power
supply sense terminals,
g. Allow 30 minutes warm-up, then record DVM reading.
H. After eight hours, DVM reading should not differ from
reading of step g by more than 23 mVde.
5-42 Constant-Current Tests
543° The instruments, methods, and precautions for the
proper measurement of constant-current power supply
characteristics are for the most part identical to those already
described for the measurement of constant-voltage
characteristics. The main difference is that the power supply
performance will be checked between short circuit and full
load rather than open circuit and full load.
5-44 Current Output and Ammeter Accuracy. To
check that the supply will furnish Its rated output current, pro-
ceed as follows:
a, Connect test setup shown in Figure 5-2. Operate the load
in constant resistance mode (Amps/Volt) with resistance in-
itially set to minimum.
bh. Turn VOLTAGE control fully clockwise.
¢. Turn on supply and adjust CURRENT control untii DVM
reads 50 mV, indicating that current output is exactly SOA
(maximum rated output current).
d. Front-panel ammeter should indicate SOA + 3%.
e. Disconnect DVM from Ray and connect DVM to power
supply sense terminals.
f. Increase resistance of load until DVM reads exactly 20V
{maximum rated power output}, Ensure that power supply re-
mains in constant-current mode by checking CC light.
g. Disconnect DVM from power supply sense terminals and
reconnect DVM across Ray.
h. DVM should indicate 50 mV, front-panel ammeter
should indicate 50A +3%. |
5-45 Load Effect (Load Regulation).
Definition: The change in the static value of the de
output current (Aloy) resulting from a change in load
resistance from short circuit to a value which yields maximum
rated output voltage, or from the latter value to short circuit.
5-6
5-46 To check the constant-current load effect, proceed
as follows:
a. Connect test setup shown in Figure 5-2.
b. Turn VOLTAGE contro! fully clockwise.
ce. Turn on supply and adjust CURRENT control until DVM
reads 50 mV, indicating that current output is exactiy 50A.
d. Disconnect DVM from Ray and connect DVM to power
supply sense terminals.
e. Adiust resistance of load untd DVM indicates 20V. En-
sure that power supply remains in constant-current mode by
checking CC light. |
f. Disconnect DVM from power supply sense terminals and
reconnect DVM to Hypa.
g. Record voitage indicated on DVM.
h. Short circuit load. (Electronic load listed in Table 5-1 has
short circuit switch.)
i. Wait a few seconds only to allow DVM to settle. Reading
on DVM should not differ from reading of step g by more than
10 uv.
Source Effect (Line Regulation).
Definition: The change in the static value of dc output
current (Algyy) resulting from a change in ac input voltage
over the specified range from low line to high line, or from
high line to low line.
5-47
5-48 To check source effect, proceed as follows:
a. Connect test setup shown in Figure 5-2.
b. Connect variable autotransformer between input power
source and power supply ac power input.
¢. Adjust autotransformer for iow line voltage (Paragraph
2-15).
d. Turn VOLTAGE control fully clockwise,
e. Turn on power supply and adjust CURRENT control uritil
DVM reads 50 mV, indicating that current output is exactly
BOA {maximum rated output current).
f. Disconnect DVM from Ray and connect DVM to power
supply sense terminals.
g. Adjust resistance of load until DVM reads exactly 5V. En-
sure that power supply remains in constant-current mode by
checking CC light.
h. Disconnect DVM from power supply sense terminals and
reconnect DVM across Ry.
i. Record voltage indicated on DVM.
j. Adjust autotransformer for high line voltage.
k. Reading on DVM should not differ from reading of step i
by more than 10 4V.
5-49 PARD {Ripple and Noise).
Definition: The residual ac current superimposed on
the dc output of à requlated power supply. Ripple and noise
measurement may be made at any input ac line voltage com-
bined with any de output voltage and load currrent within the
supply s rating.
5-50 Most of the instructions pertaining to pickup
problems associated with constant-voitage ripple and noise
measurement also apply to the measurement of constant-
current ripple and noise. The current probe listed in Table 5-1
clips on one of the load leads.
5-51 To check the ripple and noise, proceed as follows:
a. Connect test setup shown in Figure 5-7,
b. Rotate VOLTAGE controi fully clockwise,
c. Turn on supply and adjust CURRENT control and load so
that the front-panel meters indicate 50 À and 20 V.
d. The observed ripple and noise should be less than 25 mA
rms.
CURRENT
PROBE /
AMPLIFIER
de -
Figure 5-7. Constant-Current Ripple and Noise
Measurement Test Setup
TROUBLESHOOTING
| WARNING |
Maintenance described herein is performed with
power supplied to the instrument, and protective
covers removed. Such maintenance should be
performed only by service-trained personnel who
are aware of the hazards involved (for example,
fire and electrical shock), Energize the power sup-
ply through an isolation transformer to lessen the
danger of electrical shock from contacting an
energized circuit while contacting the instrument
frame or other earth ground. (The isolation
transformer must have a power rating of at least 4
КУА.) The safest practice while working on
energized circuits is to disconnect power, make or
change test connections, and then reapply
power.
A red LED (DS!) on the main board lights to in-
dicate that the input bus is energized. DST is in-
cluded in the event the relay K1 contacts are stuck
or welded closed. In this case, the input bus re-
mains energized even when the LINE switch is
turned off. DS! goes out when the input bus
voltage drops below approximately 80 Vdc. Some
components are at ac line potential even with the
LINE switch off.
5-52
5-53 Before attempting to troubleshoot this instrument,
ensure that the fault is with the instrument itself and not with
an associated circuit, The performance test enables this to be
determined without having to remove the covers from the
supply.
5-54 The most important aspect of troubleshooting is the
formulation of a logical approach to locating the source of
trouble. A good understanding of the principles of operation is
particularly helpful, and it is recommended that Section IV of
this manual be reviewed before attempting to troubleshoot the
unit. Often the user will then be able to isolate a problem sim-
ply by using the operating controls and indicators. Once the
principles of operation are understood, refer to the following
paragraphs.
5-55 Section VI contains a schematic diagram and infor-
mation concerning the voltage levels and waveforms at many
of the important test points. Section Vil also includes compo-
nent location diagrams to help the user locate the unit's com-
ponents and test points. Most of the test points used for
troubleshooting the supply are located on the control board
test fingers”, which are readily accessible at the top of the
board.
| CAUTION |
To avoid damaging the 60124, be careful not to
short circuit test points together. The safest prac-
tice is to turn the 60124 off while connecting and
disconnecting test instruments.
5-56 HF a component is found to be defective, replace it
and re-conduct the performance test. When a component is
replaced, refer to the repair and adjustment portions of this
section, It may be necessary to perform one or more of the ad-
justment procedures after a component is replaced,
5-57 Initial Troubleshooting Procedures
5-58 if a problem occurs, follow the steps below in se-
quence:
a, Cheek that input power is available, and check the power
cord and rear-panel circuit breaker. If breaker trips while
power is on, or if breaker is found to be tripped at any time for
unknown reasons, refer to Figure 5-11, Slow Start Procedure.
CAUTION
To prevent excessive inrush current, do not manually
operate relay K1 on main board.
b. Check that straps on the rear-panel terminal strip are
property connected.
c. Check that all connections to the power supply are
secure and that circuits between the supply and external
devices are not interrupted.
5-59 Troubleshooting Test Setup. Before continuing
with troubleshooting, proceed as follows:
a. Turn off supply and disconnect alt loads.
GO TO FIGURE 5-44, SLOW
START.
CHECK FUSE AF SETTING
OF SWITCHES ASZA @ AISZE,
JUMPERS ATW AND AWE.
RESLACE ASF1IF BLOWN
NOTE:
LF FALURE ES ACCOMPANIED BY SMOKE ANDY
OR NOISE, 60 TO SLOW START PROCEDURE
REGARDLESS OF WHETHER (BY 15 TRIPPED
2 NUMBERS Ih BRACKETS L J REPRESENT
WAVEFORMS IN FIGURE 7-3.
WITH POWER SUPALY OFF,
ci UNPLUG AND CARÉFULLY
CHECK BIAS VOLTAGES
LISTED IN TABLE 5-2
RE-PLUG CONTROL BOARD
60 TO FIGURE 5-9, MAS
SUPPLIES
CONNECT Cv TO CATPUT
TEFOMIMALS
CLOSES A SEL
_ AFTER ;
50 T FIGURE 5-9, días
SUPPLIES.
+ TRACE POWER TO FAN.
CHECK FOR RELAY ENABLE
SIGNAL, CHECK RELAY DRIVER
YM
H£ADS AT LÉAST
CHECK CV CERCLET
CHECK FRONT FANÉEL CABLE
AND CONMECTOR, VOLTAGE
LIGHT ANO ASSOCIATED
ADSUST OUTFAS FO JW
TURN CURRENT CONTRO:
FULLY COW
ATR
VEL TAGE
DECHE, ASEU
| DFSCONNECT LOAD, ADJUST
CURRENT CONTROL TO MIT
RANGE TURN CYP ADJUST
[SINGLE - TURN] LOW.
COMPONENTS
pom CALA LO ACI
CHECK FRONT PANEL CASE
AMD CONNECTOR, CURRENT
LIGHT AND ASSOCISTED
COMPONENTE
ТОРЫ СМР АВК АНД
CW TURN LINE STORE OFF
FOR AT LEAST TWO SECONDS
AND BACH ON
CHECK {WP CIRCLE.
CHECK FRONT PANEL CABLE
AND SONBECTOR, UMREGULA-
TES LIGHT AND ASSOCIATED
NTS
TURK UNIT SFE
QUTPUE
VOLTAGE | №
AQV >
CONHECT OSCILLOSCOPE TO
ALPE-L ANO AZPZ-10
CHECK VOL TME TER AND
ASSOCIATED CIRÇUETS
EOMECE CLDCK ARO PYR:
TURN POWER SUPPLY OFF
AÑO INSPECT FET ASSEMBLES
CHECK FET ASSEMBEJES.
CHECK, OWN PROGRAMMER
CHECK Cv CIRCUIT,
CHECK OROPOLT DETECTOR,
SHOPS
ZEV IN SEC
OA LES
0 TO PERFORMANCE TEST
SLOW-START CIRCUIT
CAPACITORS CHARGE uf
LSO TO FIGURE 5:11 SECW
f
TES
REMOVE CAITAUT DIODE
ASSEMBLY.
CHECK FOR SHORTS ACROSS
CIT
PUT, RS, Cit, Са,
£
OUTPUT CONNECTORS ANO
SUPPORTS
OUTPUT
SV ODE AdCRE
“SHORTED 7
CHECK DOWN PROGR AMER
REPLACE DIODE.
Figure 5-8. Overall Troubleshooting Tree.
5-8
“FUSE
AIFi BLOWN
7
50 TO TABLE 5-2, BIAS
VOLTAGES,
REMOVE AZ CONTROL BOARD AND FUSE AtF4 CONNECT ISOLAT
TRANSFORMER, VARIABLE AUTOTRANSFORMER, AND AMMETER TO
GOA AS SHOWN IN FIGURE 5-10. FIGURE 7-1 SHOWS LOCATION OF
J5 AMD 15. DO NOT MAKE ANY CONNECTION TO AC OR ACC ON
BONA, DO NOT CONNECT LOAD, GC4ZA LINE SWITCH SHOULD BE
OFF SLOWLY INCREASE AUTOTRANSFORMER OUTPUT TO NOMINAL
AC LINE VOLTAGE WHILE MONITORING AUTOTRANSFORMER OUTPUT
CURRENT. IN THIS AND IN FOLLOWING STEPS, TURN AUTOTRANS-
FORMER BACK TO ZERO IF OUTPUT CURRENT EXCEEDS T50mA
AUTOTRANS-
FORMER OUTPUT
> ?"50mA?
YES
REINSTALL A2 CONTROL
BOARD DISCONNECT A2Q41.
SLOWLY INCREASE AUTO
TRANSFORMER OUTPUT TO
NOMINAL AC LINE.
AUTOTRANS-
NO
CHECK AZG41 AND ALL
FORMER OUTPUT
> T50mAP
RECONNECT AZQ1Y AND DIS-
CONNECT AZGB. SLOWLY
INCREASE AUTOTRANSFORME
OUTPUT TO NOMINAL AC LINE.
AUTOTRANS-
FORMER OUTPUT
„> ГОА?
YES
RECONNECT AZOB AND DIS-
CONNECT AZURD SLOWLY IN-
CREASE AUTOTRANSFORMER
na TO NOMINAL AC
LINE.
AUTOTRANS-
FORMER OUTPUT
> ТОНА?
| RECONNECT AZUAS CHECK
AZC43, AZC51, AZCH2, AZUIT,
AZUIB CHECK PC BOARDS
CAREFULLY FOR SHORTS BE-
TWEEN CIRCUITS.
CIRCUITS OPERATING ON
+45Y REG (NOTE 4}
CHECK A208 AND ALL
CIRCUITS OPERATING ON
—12Y REG INQTE El.
NOTE:
{ TABLE 7-2 LISTS THE ACTIVE
COMPONENTS OPERATING ON
EACH BIAS SUPPLY.
REMOVE BOTH FET
ASSEMBLIES.
7 BUTOTRANS- ©
FORMER OUTPUT
mn, > 750MA7
DISCONNECT AIG FROM
MAIN BOARD, CHECK AIRIS
AND AIVR2. SLOWLY IN-
CREASE AUTOTRANSFORMER
OUTPUT TO NOMINAL AC LINE.
AUTOTRANS-
FORMER OUTPUT
> 750mA 7
YES
RECONNECT AÏQ2 AND DiS-
CONNECT AUT SLOWLY IN-
CREASE AUTOTHANSFORMER
GUTPUT TO NOMINAL ACLINE.
CHECK A2015 AND ALL
CIRCUTS OPERATING ON
+5 REGINOTE 4).
AUTOTRANS-
FORMER OUTPUT
> TSOmA?
CHECK COMPONENTS CPERAT
ING ON UNREGULATED BIAS
SUPPLIES (NCTE 1), MTS AND
ASSOCIATED COMPONENTS,
AND FAN REINSTALL AiU3
DISCONNECT GOZA FROM
TEST EQUIPMENT REPLACE
CHECK FET DRIVERS
CHECK AIGE, &
ASSOCIATED COMPONENTS.
CHECK RELAY DRIVER.
Figure 5-9. Troubleshooting Bias Supplies
5-9
bh. Connect a 50-ohm 40-watt load resistor across output
terminals.
с. Connect a digital voltmeter (DVM) across output ter-
minals to monitor output voltage.
de Turn VOLTAGE and CURRENT controls to mid-range
(5 turns), and OVP ADJUST control to maximum {fully CW).
e, Remove top cover,
f. An extender card, HP Part No. 5060-2809, can be
used with the A2 Control Board to allow easy access
to components.
5-60 Overall Trouble Isolation
5-61 Once the test setup is arranged, proceed to the ov-
verail troubleshooting tree in Figure 5-8, This tree will isolate
trouble to a particular circuit. Table 5-3 provides information
that the user who understands the operation of the circuit as
described in Section IV can use with standard troubleshooting
procedures to locate the trouble.
5-62 The following notes apply to ail troubleshooting pro-
cedures.
1. Before removing or replacing components, turn power
off and disconnect ac power cable.
2. Allow two minutes for capacitors to discharge before
making resistance checks or removing components in primary
circuit.
3. Unless otherwise noted, all voltages measured with
respect to bias common {available at A2U15 case).
4. Numbers in brackets refer io waveforms shown in
Figure 7-8.
5. The troubleshooting trees and table provide general
guidelines to help isolate trouble. They will not isolate all
possible troubles. The user should use signal tracing and other
standard troubleshooting techniques to identify faulty com-
ponents. The user is responsible for connecting and adjusting
meters, oscilloscopes, ete. properly,
6. Before replacing a component, check connections to
the component and ensure that bias voltages to the compo-
nent are correct.
7. After isolating and correcting a problem, go back to
beginning of troubleshooting tree.
SOL ATION VARIABLE SCHZA POWER
TRANSFORMER ALTOTRANSFORMER WITH
(HOW min) LISO mint
POWER SUPPLY
GND
Figure 5-10. Slow Start Setup
Table b-2. Bias Voltage Check
Bias Measurement Normal Check These Components
Voltage Point Range
+5V Reg Pin M +4.75V to +5.25V Check for presence of + 5V Unreg (+ 12Y fo + 19Y, pin 10.
it absent, check A173 pins 8 and 10, ATCR7-8, A1C14,
ATR18, A1VR2. 1f present, check A2U15,
+ 15V Reg Pin 12 + 14.10V to + 15.90V | Check for presence of + 15V Unreg ( + 19V to +31V, pin
D). If absent, check ATT3 pins 7 and 11, A1U4, А1С16.
present, check A2011, A2018, A2R149, A2R 150, A2R 158,
AZR159, AZR24, A2R29, AZVRE6, A2C46.
— 12V Reg Pin P — 12.36V to — T1.04V | Check for presence of — 12V Unreg {— 19V to — 31V, pin 2):1f
absent, check A1C15, If present, check A2Q8, AZU17,
A2R 142, A2R143, AZR156, A2R157, A2C45.
All bias voltages measured at control board test fingers (P2) with respect to bias common at pin E or at A2U15 case. Table 7-2
lists semiconductor components operating on each bias supply.
REMOVE FUSE AFL CONNECT TEST SETUP IN FIGURE 5-10 WITH
AUTOTRANSEGRMEN QUÍPUT AT OY, VEyT AT 4, CEI UN í
LINE SWITCH ON, VOLTAGE AND 27
CA
TROLS BOTH FULLY
CW. YEYT POWER SUPPLY CURRENT LIMIT AE BE SETWEÉN
OSA AND 14. CHECK THAT A152, Wi, AND W2 ARE SET PROPERLY
FOR THE NOMINAL LINE VOLTAGE MONITOR BUS VOLTAGE 71
WITH 6 DvM CONNECTED BETWEEN ENDS OF REL+) AND RSi-
TOWARD FRONT DF MAN BOARD (SEE FIGURE 7-11
RAISE VEY T SLOWLY TO
A OY.
SET VEXT TO @ REVERSE
Ver CONNECTIONS. RAISE
VET SLOWLY TO 2 ov
NE
YES
CHECK FETS, SNUBBER
COM PONENTS, AND AIR,
ACR.
SET VEXT TO @ REVERSE
YeXy CONNECTIONS
RAE Veyy SLOWLY TO
= ЮУ.
SET vpyy TO 8 REMOVE
E DOTA FET ASSEMBLIES RAISE
VENT SLOWLY TO 5 WY
YES
VALS Rs YEXT?
YES
SET VExT 10 4 REMOVE
BOTH FET ASSEMBLIES
ВАЗЕ VEYT SLOWEY TO
ALC
CHECK ANH
Vous > Vex?
CLEAN ANI CONTACTE,
CHECK 26M.
REINSTALL FET ASSEMBLIES.
SET YEXT TO €.
Vous = VExT?
YES
SET ext 300 SLOWLY IN
CREASE AUTOTRANSFORMER
QUTPUT TO NOMINAL AC LINE
VOLTAGE WHILE MONITORING
AUTOTRANSFORMES OLITPUT
CURRENT. INTHIS AND IN FOL
LOWING STEPS, TURN ALTO
TRANSFORMER HACK TO
TERO IF CUEPUT CURRENT
EXCEEDS 750mA.
„AUF
TRANSFORMER
QUTPUT > 750má
CLOSES AF=P00
OF NOMINAL, LINE
?
SÊT AUTOTRANSFORMER GUT
FET TC NOMINAL LINE
VOLTAGE.
CHECK BIAS VOLTAGE LIST
£0 ™ TABLE 5-2.
НАЗ
VOLTAGES OK?
LNPLUE ARO THEN RE-PLLIG
AUTOTHANSFORMER,
АКИ
CLOSES AFTER
) SEC?
TURN LINE SWITCH OFF
RAISE VEXT SLOWLY TO
hs 10
CHECK COMPONENTS 1 IN-
PUT SECTION AMRE-55, AT,
AICRI-CRZ, AMECA, CAI 51
50 TO FIGURE 5-9, BIAS
| SUPPOIES
CHECK RELAT CRIVER
CHECK COMPONENTS LISTED
iM TABLE 5-2, THEM GO TO
FIRIRE 9-9, BIAS SUPPLIES.
CHECK DROFOLT DETECTOR,
SUCW- START CIRCUIT
cu МЫ AND DRIVER
CIACU
Wey CURRENT DRAIN < 250mA
AND Ve WAVEFORMS ON BOTH
FET ASSEMBLIES Ci 7 C6
SET VEUT TO В REMOVE
QUTEUT DHDE ASSEMBLY.
RAISE VENT SLOWLT TG
20%
SET VEXT TO @ RAISE Ver
POWER SUPPLY CURRENT
LIMIT 70 6 6A. CONNECT SHORE
ACROSS 60124 OUTPUT
RAISE vext SLOWLY TO 20.
in SENSE
WAYE FORM 3% 7
155
CHECK OUTPUT DIGDE AP,
A4LF, MTZ SECONDARY, AILS.
LA, AIR2D, RED AND BLACK
WIRES FROM MAIN BOARD
70 BUS BARS
CHECK AIT, ACCRAIT ATRÉS,
AgRSI-R6é.
MOMENTARILY SHORT *0-
GE THES PING CAND 2 ON
ACR7O tip LIMIT ACJUSTI
EYES
CHECK AZUES, PWM
REMOVE SHORT FROM
AZRÈG AND CUTPUT,
G0 TO FIGURE 5-8, OVERALL
TROUBLESHOOTMKG TREE.
VENT CURRENT THAIN <250ma
AND 15 WAVEFCRME ON BOTH
FET ASSEMBLI:ES DE? 6
CHECK FETS, SNUBBER
mm] COMPONENTS, AICAZ- 2R4,
ASCRID-CRIZ, AIRIS, AUS,
SHORTS ACROSS OUTPUT
CHECK DOWN PROGRAMMER
CHECK ONTPOT CODE ASCRA,
BSAS, ASTE, AYCE-C12, AKCZE)
NOTES
ae
M FIQURE Y
ra
AYTZ, AMA.
NUMBERS N BRACKETS | 3 REPRESENT WAVEFRORMS
-E.
FET ASSEMBLIES MAY BE OPERATED CN EXTENDER
BOARDS MES AT BUS VOLTAGE (Hey TPS ZERO
Figure 5-11. Slow Start Procedure
5-41
Table 5-3. Troubishooting
After using the overall troubleshooting tree {Figure 5-8}, bias supplies troubleshooting tree (Figure 5-9), and slow-start pro-
cedure (Figure 5-11) to isolate a fault to a particular circuit, use the following guidelines with the schematic and standard
troubleshooting techniques to locate the fault.
Relay Driver
1. DC voltage across A1C8 should be 130 to 175 volts.
2. Approximately one second after ac pawer is applied, dc voltage from pin 1 to pin 2 on ATUZ should be + 1.2 to 1.7 volts,
de voltage across ATVRI should be <3 volts, and A1Q1 VRE should be = +0.7Vdc. ATQ1 Veg should be < 1 voit,
3. With no load connected to output, shorting pin 1 to pin 2 on A1U2 should cause relay to open,
Clock and PWM
1. Check for 320kHz [1] and 20kHz [2] clock signals.
2. Check if PWM (A2U9A-5! is inhibited by inputs to A2U10.
3. Check on and off pulses [4] at A2P2-L and A2P2-10.
FET Assemblies
To isolate a fault to either the FETs or driver circuits, remove all FETs and replace one FET on each assembly with a 3300pF
capacitor connected between the gate- and source- lead pins (heatsink should not be connected for this test). Observe all
precautions given in Paragraph 5-72 while handling FETs, If Vg waveform [8] is correct with FETs removed, then FETs were
bad. (Gate to drain resistance «1M indicates bad FET.) Replace FETs in pairs on an assembly. If V «waveform remains
bad with FETs removed, then driver circuits were bad. Check A3R10, A3U1-U2, АЗТ1, A3CR3. À fault in the driver circuits
will usually damage the FETs on that assembly.
Down Programmer
1. With VOLTAGE control one turn CW and OVP ADJUST fully CW, output voltage should be = +5V and anodes of
AZCR26-29 should be = +2.4V. Otherwise, check cathodes of A2CR26-28 to determine which circuit is triggering down pro-
grammer.
2. With anodes of A2CR26-29 = +2.4V and A2U19B inverting input { —, pin 6} = + 1.8V {A2U19B non-inverting input =
+0.6V}, A2U198 output should be =0V and A2012 and A401 bases should be =(V. Otherwise, check A2U198, A2Q12, A4Q1
and associated components,
CV Circuit
1. Voltage from A7 to — $ should vary from 0 to 5 voits as VOLTAGE control is varied from minimum to maximum. Other-
wise, check VOLTAGE control and output of constant-current source A201.
2. Trace signal through A2U3 and A2U6B. Amplifier output should be high when non-inverting input {+} is More positive
than inverting input { — }.
3. With AQUS non-inverting input { +, pin 2) positive, A2U5 inverting input (—, pin 3) should be a positive-going ramp
starting from 0 volts. Otherwise, check A2R88, A2R87, A2C32, A2R84, A2R55 and A2C31. As the dc level at AZU5-2
varies between 0 and + 1.5 volts, the pulse width at A2U9-5 should vary from =1 to ZOus. The ramp magnitude at A2U5-3
also varies proportionally, |
4. AZU3 output interfaces with down programmer through A2VR7 and A2CR28. Check that A2U6-5 is not loaded down.
Table 6-3. Troubleshooting (Continued)
CC Circuit
1. Voltage from A3 to A5 should vary from 0 to 5 volts as CURRENT control is varied from minimum to maximum. Other-
wise, check CURRENT control and output of constant-current source AZ04.
2. Trace signal through A2UBC. Ampiifier output (pin 8) should be high when non-inverting input (+, pin 10) is more
positive than inverting input (-, pin 9).
3. {Same as step 3 in CV Circuit}
4. A5U2 output (pin 6} should vary from 0 to 5 volts as 6012A output current varies from 0 to BOA, Otherwise, check A2U2
and associated components, including adjustment potentiometers AZR22 and A2R23.
5. AZUSA output (pin 1) should always be high {= + 15V) during normal operation {output current <52A}. AZUBA non-
inverting input (+, pin 3) should always be +5.5V.
6. AZ2U1B output (pin 7) should be within + or -100mV at de. AZUTA output {pin 1) should be within + or —1.5V at dc.
This de level should not affect the dc level at A2UBC pin 9; otherwise check A2C3 and A2R7. if user injects a sinusoid be-
tween A3 and AB, ac gain from + S to A2U1A pin 1 (both referenced to AS) should be unity at 22Hz, 2.7 at 60Hz, and b.b at
120Hz.
OVP Circuit
1. With OVP ADJUST fully CCW, OVP light should be on, output voltage should be <2V, and test point A2P2-9 should be
low. Otherwise, check ABR4, AZJ2 and cable from front panel, AZUI9A, A208, A20Q10, AZVRS, and associated com-
ponents.
2. When QVP is tripped, A2U 139A non-inverting input { +, pin 3) should be more positive than inverting input {5 pin 2}, and Ea
AZ2UIYA output (pin 1) and A2010 base should be high. |
3. With OVP ADJUST fully CW, turn power supply off for at least two seconds and then back on, Test point A2P2-9
should be high, OVP light should be off, and output voltage is determined by setting of VOLTAGE control.
Bias Voltage Detector/Dropout Detector
1. À fuil-wave rectified 120Hz sine wave of approximately 18 volts peak should be present at A2P1-16. Otherwise check
that AZ control board is properly aligned and fully seated, and check A1CR6 and А1СЯЗ.
2. Output of dropout detector ramp circuit at A2U13B pin 1 should be = + BV {use high impedance voltmeter, = 10M).
3, Output of slow-start ramp circuit at A2U13C pin 14 should be =0V,
4. AZUTGA pin 8 shouid be = +0,7V.
5. A2U16A pin 7 should be < +0.2V.
5-63 REPAIR AND REPLACEMENT 5-65 To remove top cover, remove the three screws, one
at each side and one at center of rear panel, that secure top
cover to instrument. Lift back of cover, slide cover to the rear,
ч — and lift off. ;
Disconnect the power supply from the ac line and
wait two minutes before performing any repair or 5-66 To remove bottom cover, proceed as follows:
replacement procedures. a. Remove two pan-head screws that secure cover to
rear panel {one at each side}.
5.64 Outside Cover Removal b. Remove two flat-head screws from front edge of bot-
tom cover.
c. Remove four screws that secure two carrying straps to
sides of instrument.
d. Lift back of cover, slide cover to rear, and lift off. itis
not necessary to remove instrument feet.
5-67 AZ Control Board Removal
5-68 The control board is held in place by two screws
through the side panel. To remove the control board, proceed
as follows:
a. Remove top cover.
b. Disconnect all wires from rear-panel terminal block.
c. Unplug cable from option card Uf installed).
d. Unplug cable from front panel.
e. On side panel, remove two flat-head screws that
secure contro! board to right-side panel,
f. Grasp control board carefully and pull upward to
unplug it from main board. Do not use spacers between con-
trol board and side panel to pull control board.
g. To remove U15 from control board, first remove two
screws that secure U15 case and heatsink to printed-circuit
board, Then unsoider both U15 pins from board. —
NOTE
When replacing UT5, you must spread a thin layer
of heatsink compound between UT5 case and
heatsink. Do not use any compound containing
silicone. An organic zinc oxide cream, such as
American Oil And Supply Company Heatsink
Compound #100, 1s recommended. See Figure
5-12 for location of mounting hardware,
h. When replacing contro! board, carefuily line up con-
nector on bottom edge with socket on main board.
i. Carefully press control board down so it is properly
aligned and fully seated in main-board socket. Control board is
fully seated when printed-circuit board presses against both
ends of main-board socket. Do not push down on any com-
ponents on control board.
i. Replace two screws that secure control board to side
panel.
к. Reconnect cabie from front panel to J2 socket. Red
tracer is to front of instrument (white dot on control board},
|, Reconnect cable from option card {if instailed} to J1
socket. Red tracer is to front of instrument {white dot on con-
trol board. (Incorrect replacement will damage option board.)
m. Reconnect any wires disconnected from rear-panel
terminal block.
5-69 A3 FET Boards and A4 Output Diode
Board Removal
5-70 The two FET board assemblies and the output diode
board assembly piug into sockets on the main board and are
heid in place by the heatsink cover, which is screwed to the
fan bracket. To remove these assemblies, proceed as follows:
5-14
Wait two minutes for input capacitors to
discharge before removing heatsink cover or per-
forming any maintenance procedure,
|
rn don -мат
ethan expres = LOCKWAÁSHER
em mp FLAT WASHER
| |
LS
~HEAT SINK
rr оаанны,
E
PLASTIC TOS SPACER
Li
Eleven wt pitan un ити ии
y -PRINTED CIRCUIT
BOARD
—SCREWS
Eleven =
Figure 5-12. A2U15 Mounting Hardware
a. Remove sight screws from heatsink cover {two screws
hold heatsink cover to fan bracket, six screws fasten heatsink
cover 10 FET board and output diode board assemblies}, and
[ft cover off.
b. Pull assembly upward to unplug it from main board.
c. When replacing assemblies, be certain to replace
assembiies in proper locations. With user facing front panei,
the FET board assemblies fit in left and center sockets, with
printed-circuit board facing left. The output diode board
assembly fits in right socket, with printed-circuit board facing
right.
д. After replacing FET board and output diode board
assemblies, replace heatsink cover. Be certain all six plastic in-
serts, two in each heatsink, are properly located under screw
holes in heatsink cover, Start screws into plastic heatsink in-
serts carefully, and do not over-tighten.
CAUTION
To prevent heatsinks from shorting together, do
not operate power supply without heatsink cover
in place. Be certain that all six plastic heatsink in-
serts are properly located under heatsink cover
holes and engaged by six heatsink cover screws.
5-71 FET Board Disassembiy
5-72 To disassemble a FET board, proceed as follows:
a. Unsolder both wires from thermostat.
b. Remove four screws that secure FETs and heatsink to
printed-circuit board.
c. FETs plug into pins that are soldered to printed-circuit
board. Do not unsolder these pins. Carefully unplug each FET.
CAUTION
To avoid damage to FETs, handle with care when
out of circuit, Use a grounding strap to avoid
static discharge into gate. Avoid touching gate or
source pins, FETs should be replaced in pairs; if
one FET on a FET board has to be replaced,
replace both,
NOTE
When replacing FETs or thermostat, you must
spread a thin layer of heatsink compound be-
tween component and heatsink. See note follow-
ing Paragraph 5-68 step g for recommended com-
pound,
d. Before re-assembly of FET board, ensure that plastic
insulators for FET leads remain in heatsink. Figure 5-13 shows
TQ3 component mounting.
e. Ensure that four pins for FET leads are standing
straight up from printed-circuit board.
f. Mate printed-circuit board with heatsink, ensuring that
four FET-lead pins fit into four holes in heatsink,
g. Carefully mate FET leads with pins extending into
heatsink from printed-circuit board.
h. Replace four screws that secure FETs and heatsink to
printed-circult.
i. Re-solder wires to thermostat.
4
- SCREWS W/ LOCKWASHERS
~T03 COMPONENT
— | — nnd)
;
ho — =) fre НАНА
ей
Le ~HEATSINK \W/ PLASTIC
7 INSULATOR INSERTS
ZE
i
| M2. TO3- COMPONENT
e | LÉAD PINS
L
* i
|
Ш — —PÉINTED CIRCUIT BOARD
8 ] 7 W/STANDOFES
1 :
Figure 5-13. T03 Components {A3Q1, A3Q2, A4Q1}
Mounting
5-73 Output Diode Board Disassembly
5-74 To disassemble the output diode board, proceed as
follows:
a, Unsolder both wires from thermostat.
b. Unsolder both wires from output diode at points A and
B on printed-circuit board.
c. Remove three screws, two of which secure QT, that
secure heatsink to printed-circuit board,
а. Q1 plugs into pins that are soldered to printed-circuit
hoard. Do not unsolder these pins, Carefully unplug Q1.
NOTE
When replacing Q1, output diode, or thermostat,
you must spread a thin layer of heatsink com-
pound between component and heatsink. See
note following Paragraph 5-68 step g for recorm-
mended compound.
e. Before re-assembiy of output diode board, ensure that
plastic. insulators for Q1 leads remain in heatsink, Figure 5-13
shows TO3 component mounting.
f. Ensure that two pins for Q1 leads are standing straight
up from printed-circuit board.
g. Mate printed-circuit board with heatsink, ensuring that
two Qt-lead pins fit into two holes in heatsink.
h. Carefully mate Q1 leads with pins extending into heat-
sink from printed-circuit board,
i. Replace three screws that secure Q1 and heatsink to
printed-circuit board.
|. Re-solder output diode wires to points A and B
on printed-circuit board. Ensure good solder connections,
because these connections carry the fuil output current, up to
SOA.
5-75 А1 Main Board Removal
5-76 The main board is held in place by 16 #6-32 screws
(see Figure 7-1). These 16 screws include two that secure K1
to the main board, four that secure T2 to the main board, and
two that secure T3 to the main board. To remove the main
board, proceed as follows:
NOTE
Certaín components can be accessed through
bottom chassis without removing main board.
See Paragraph 5-79. Relay K1 can be removed to
allow access to components under KT without
removing main board. See Paragraph 5-77.
a. Remove control board, both FET board assembiies,
and output diode board assembly.
b. Remove red and black wires from output bus bars.
c. Remove and tag any wires connected to main board
from components not on main board. Note that this step is re-
quired only if main board is to be completely removed from
unit. Main board can be pulled up and turned on its side
without removing any wires,
de Remove 16 mounting screws (see Figure 7-1 for
locations).
e. Lift board up Y inch so capacitor bracket clears
spacers under four large filter capacitors, and tit board to
allow access to bottom of board.
5-77 Relay K1 Removal
5-78 Resistors R1, RZ and R3 are mounted under relay K1
on main board. To remove K1, proceed as follows:
a. Remove and tag six wires connected to K1 from main
board {Figure 7-1 shows wire colors and locations).
b. Remove two screws that secure K1 to main board
{Figure 7-1 shows screw locations}.
5-79 Component Access Through Bottom
Chassis
5-80 Figure 5-14 shows components on the main board
that can be accessed through holes in the bottom chassis.
5-81 Front Panei Removal
5-87 The front-panel controls and indicators are wired to a
printed-circuit board mounted directly behind the front panel.
To remove the front panel, proceed as follows:
a. Remove top cover and disconnect front-panel ribbon
cable from JZ on control board.
b. Remove snap-out plastic trim strip that extends across
top of unit above front panel,
с. Remove two flat-head screws in channel from which
trim strip was removed {one at each end}. Other screws may
show through holes in the front chassis; do not remove them.
а. Turn unit bottom up and repeat step ¢ for bottom of
front panel.
e. Turn unit top up and carefully pull front panel out from
unit.
f. Remove two screws at top and three screws at bottom
that secure front panel to bracket behind front panel.
g. Disconnect ground wire from left side of chassis.
/
HIT. X
f
NA
FT
ДНИ
| @D+ce
A
ey a
ona
818
\ ©) es
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FRONT
Figure 5-14. Component Access Through Bottom Chassis
h. Remove four screws that secure printed-circuit board
to bracket. Be careful not to break connections to front-panel
potentiometers or meters.
i. When replacing front panel remember to put ribbon
cable through hole in right side of fan bracket, and reconnect
ground wire.
ji. Plastic trim strip across top of front panel should be
replaced with channel in strip toward rear of instrument,
5-83 Replacement Parts
5-84 Section Vi of this manual contains a list of replace-
ment parts. If the part to be replaced does not have a standard
manufactuer's part number, it is a special part and must be ob-
tained directly from Hewlett-Packard. After replacing a com-
ponent, refer to Table 5-4 for adjustments that may be
necessary.
5-85 Some components are mounted with spacers, in-
sulators, etc. on leads. Be certain to note location of ali
mounting pieces before removing component, and repiace all
pieces in proper location.
5-86 ADJUSTMENT AND CALIBRATION
5-87 Adjustment and calibration may be required after per-
formance testing, troubleshooting, or repair and replacement.
Perform only those adjustments that affect the operation of
the faulty circuit. Table 5-4 lists symptoms indicating that ad-
justment is necessary. If two or more adjustments will be
made, they should be performed in the order in which they are
listed in Table 5-4.
5-88 Unless otherwise stated, ali adjustments are per-
formed with the power supply strapped as shown in Figure
3-3. The unit should have heen turned on for at least 30
minutes before performing any adjustments to allow it to
reach normal operating temperature,
The power supply should be turned off while
making and removing connections to the rear-
panel terminals.
5-89 All adjustment potentiometers are located along the
top edge of the control board. Figure 5-15 shows the location
of the adjustments as viewed from the left of the instrument.
REAR OF POWER SUPPLY
R20 lp LIMIT
RA Cv OFFSET
R22 CC FULL SCALE
R23 CC OFFSET | Y
Siete
R24 CONSTANT -CURRENT SOURCE [e]
ANiddNS HIMOd 40 3018 IHS
REZO AMMETER ADJUST | ©
R34 VOLTMETER ADJUST | ©
LE
Figure 5-15, Location of Adjustment Potentiometers
5-90 Meter Zero Adjustment
5-91 The meter pointers must point to zero an the meter
scales when the instrument is at normal operating temperature
in its normal operating position, and turned off. The same pro-
cedure is used for both meters. To zero a meter, proceed as
follows:
a. Turn power supply off and wait three minutes for
Table 5-4. Adiustments
Adjustment
Sympton Indicating Adjustment Necessary
A2R20 Ip Limit
A2R21 CV Offset
AZR22 CC Fuil Scale
A2R23 CC Offset
AZR24 Constant-Current Source
A2R130 Ammeter Adjust
A2R131 Voltmeter Adjust
Output unregulated even though operating within power limit {set too low}, or provides more
than 25V at SOA (set too high}
0-volt programming input does not produce 0-voit output
5-volt programming input does not produce 50-amp output
0-volt programming input does not produce §-amp output
2.5k resistive programming input does not produce 60-volt output
Front-panel ammeter does not agree with output current indicated by DVM connected across
shunt in series with output
Eront-nanel voltmeter does not agree with DVM connected to output terminals
5-17
power supply capacitors to discharge completely.
b. Insert a small-blade screwdriver in meter-adjust screw
(about one inch below meter face) and turn screw until pointer
points to zero mark on scale,
5-92 Ip Limit Adjustment
5-93 The Ip limit adjustment ensures that the power sup-
piy will provide maximum output power under worst-case
conditions. With power supply turned off, proceed as follows:
a. Connect load and shunt to power supply output ter-
minals as in Figure 5-2. Operate load in constant current
mode, and adjust load to draw more than 52A.
b. Connect digital voltmeter (DVM) across input bus.
input bus voltage can be monitored between ends of R6 { +)
and AS (-) toward front of instrument on main board (see
Figure 7-1). Note that this voltage is referenced to the ac line,
c. Connect a second DVM across shunt,
de. Connect power supply ac input to a variable
autotransformer.
e. Turn VOLTAGE and CURRENT controis both fully
clockwise, and tum Ip limit adjust (A2R20) fully
counterciockwise.
f. With autotransformer set at zero volts, turn power sup-
ply on. Increase autotransformer voltage until input bus
voltage is 300 Vdc.
g. Adjust AZR20 for 52 mV across shunt {52A output).
h. Decrease load current for 50 mV across shunt {504
output).
i. Disconnect DVM from shunt and connect DVM across
output terminals.
!. Adjust AZ2R20 for 22V output +0.1V,
k. Adjust autotransformer for 240 Vdc input bus voltage.
| Repeat steps | and k until A2R20 is adjusted for 22V
output with 240V bus voltage. (Output current should remain
at 50A during steps | and k.)
m. Turn off power supply and disconnect load, shunt,
and autotransformer. Disconnect DVM from input bus.
5-94 Constant Voltage Offset Adjustment
5-95 The constant voltage offset adjustment is made with
a 500, 40W load connected to the power supply. Proceed as
follows:
a. Connect digital voltmeter (DVM) between A7 and ~ S
terminals.
b. Turn power supply on and adjust VOLTAGE control
for 10 mV reading on DVM,
ce. Disconnect DVM from A7 and — S and connect DVM
across output terminals.
а. Adjust A2R21 for 120 mV +2mV on DVM, (Output
voltage is 12x A7 voltage).
5-96 Constant Current Full Scale and
Offset Adjustment
5-97 Proceed as follows:
a. Connect a 1 m{l shunt across output terminals.
b. Turn on power supply.
c. Connect digital voltmeter (DVM) between A3 { +} and
AB terminals.
d. Adjust CURRENT control for BV at A3.
e. Disconnect DVM from A3 and AS and connect DVM
across shunt.
f. Adjust A2R22 for 50 mV reading on DVM {50A output
current}.
g. Disconnect DVM from shunt and reconnect DVM
across A3 and Ab.
h. Adjust CURRENT control for 10 mV at A3.
i. Disconnect DVM from A3 and AB and reconnect DVM
across shunt.
j. Adjust AZR23 for 1 mV reading on DVM (100 mA out-
put current.) H output current is initially zero amperes, there
may be a few-second delay when A2R23 is turned up.
k. Repeat steps c through | as necessary until 5V Бе!
ween AJ and AS produces 50A +0.2% output current, and
10mV between A3 and AD produces 100mA + BmA output
current.
I. Turn off power supply and disconnect shunt,
5-98 Constant-Current-Source Adjustment
5-39 The constant-current-source adjustment is made
with a resistor whose value is known within 0.1% connected
directly between terminais A7 and — $ on the rear panel, The
nominal value of the resistor should be between 1 k and 2.7 k.
A value of 1 k is recommended for ease of calculating current
flow through the resistor. Proceed as foliows:
a. Remove the strap between terminals A8 and A7.
b. Connect resistor between A7 and —S.
6, Connect digital voltmeter (DVM) across resistor,
d. Turn power supply on and adjust A2R24 for 2 mA +
0.2 % through resistor. {For example, if a 1 k resistor is used,
DVM reading of 2 V indicates 2 mA through resistor.)
e. Turn power supply off, disconnect resistor between
AY and — 5, and reconnect strap between A8 and A7.
5-100 Ammeter Adjustment
5-101 The CC full scale and CC offset adjustments must
be correct before adjusting the ammeter circuit. To adjust the
ammeter circuit, proceed as follows:
a. Connect a 1 m{l shunt across output terminals.
b. Connect digital voltmeter {DVM} across shunt.
c. Turn on power supply and adjust CURRENT control
for 0.05 V +0.1mY on DVM (50 A + 100mA output).
d. Adjust AZR130 for 50 À reading on front-panel
ammeter.
e. Turn off power supply and disconnect shunt,
5-102 Voitmeter Adjustment
5-103 The CV offset and constant-current source adjust-
ments should be correct before adjusting the voltmeter circuit.
To adjust the voltmeter circuit, proceed as follows:
a. Connect digital voltmeter (DVM) across output ter-
minals.
b. Turn on power supply and adjust VOLTAGE control
for 60 V + 120 mVreading on DVM.
с. Adjust A2R131 for 80 V reading on front-panel
voltmeter.
SECTION VI
REPLACEABLE PARTS
6-1 INTRODUCTION
6-2 This section contains information for ordering replace-
ment parts, Table 6-4 lists parts in alpha-numeric order by
reference designators and provides the following information:
a. Reference Designators. Refer to Table 6-1.
b. Hewlett-Packard Part Number.
с. Total Quantity (TQ) used in that assembly.
d. Description. Refer to Table 6-2 for abbreviations,
e. Manufacturer's Federal Supply Code Number. Refer
to Table 6-3 for manufacturer's name and address,
tf. Manufacturers Part Number or Type,
6-3 Parts not identified by reference designator are listed at
the end of Table 6-4 under Mechanical and/or Miscellaneous.
The former consists of parts belonging to and grouped by in-
dividual assemblies; the latter consists of all parts not im-
mediately associated with an assembly,
Table 6-1 Reference Designators
A Assembly
В Blower (fan)
С Capacitor
CB Circuit Breaker
CR Diode
DS Signaling Device
(light)
F Fuse
FL Filter
J Jack
K Relay
L inductor
M Meter
P Plug
Q Transistor
R Resistor
S Switch
T Transformer
TB Terminal Block
TS Thermostat
U Integrated Circuit
VR Voltage Regulator
{zener diode)
WwW Wire {jumper}
Y Oscillator
6-1
6-4 ORDERING INFORMATION
6-5 To order a replacement part, address order or inquiry
to your local Hewlett-Packard sales office (see lists at rear of
this manual for addresses). Specify the foilowing information
for each part: Model, complete serial number, and any Option
or special modification (J) numbers of the instrument;
Hewlett-Packard part number; circuit reference designator;
and description. To order a part not listed in Table 6-4, give a
complete description of the part, its function, and its location.
Table 6-2. Description Abbreviations
AL Aluminum
AWG American Wire
Gauge
CAP Capacitor
CC Carbon Composition
CER Ceramic
CF Capacitor
CONN’ Connector
DIO Diode
DPDT Double Pole
Doubie Throw
F Film
FC Carbon Film/
Composition
FET Field Effect
Transistor
Р.5, Full Scale
FW BRDG Full Wave Bridge
GEN PRP General Purpose
К Integrated Circuit
MET POLY Metallized Poly-
propylene
MO Metal Oxide
NO Normally Open
POLY E Polyester
PW Power Wirewound
PWR Power
RECT Rectifier
RES Resistor
Si Silicon
SW-PB Switch, Pushbutton
SW-SL Switch, Slide
SW-THRM Switch, Thermal
TA Tantalum
TBAX Tube Axial
TRMR Trimmer
VAR Variable
XFMR Transformer
XSTR Transistor
ZNR Zener
Table 6-3. Code List of Manufacturers
Code Manufacturer Address
00853 Sangamo Electric Company Pickens, SC
01121 Allen Bradley Company Milwaukee, WI
01295 Texas Instruments Inc., Semicon Comp. Division Dallas, TX
01686 RCL Electronics Inc. Manchester, NH
02111 Specctrol Electronics Corporation City of Ind, CA
03508 G.E. Company, Company, Semiconductor Products Department Auburn, NY
04713 Motorola Semiconductor Products Phoenix, AZ
06776 Robinson Nugent Inc. New Albany, IN
07263 Fairchild Semiconductor Division Mountainview, CA
12954 Siemans Corporation Components Group Scottsdale, AZ
14604 Elmwood Sensors, inc. Cranston, Ri
14936 General instrument Corporation, Semicon Products Hicksville, NY
16299 Corning Glass Works, Component Division Raleigh, NC
19701 Mepco/ Electra Corporation Mineral Wells, TX
20932 Emcon Division ITW San Diego, CA
24546 Corning Glassworks Bradford, PA
27014 National Semiconductor Corporation Santa Clara, CA
27167 Corning Glassworks Wilmington, NC
28480 Hewlett-Packard Palo Alto, CA
2171627 R-Ohm Corporation irvine, CA
31918 ITT Schadow Minneapolis, MN
32997 Bourns, Inc. Riverside, CA
3.585 RCA Corporation, Solid State Division Somerville, NJ
4NE33 ETRI Inc. Monroe, NC
54473 Matsushita Electric Corporation of America New York, NY
56789 Sprague Electric Company North Adams, MA
71400 Bussman Division of McGraw Edison Company St. Louis, MO
72982 Erie Technological Products, Inc. Erie, PA
73138 Beckman Instruments, Inc., Helipot Division Fullerton, CA
82389 Switchcraft, Inc. Chicago, IL
84411 TRW Capacitor Division Ogallala, NE
91637 Dale Electronics, Inc. Columbus, NE
C0833 Rifa Bromma, Sweden
? Wima Mannheim, Germany
6-2
Table 6-4. Replacement Parts
Ref. HP Mer, Mr.
Desig. Part No. TQ Description Code Part No,
AT Main Board Assembly
Ct-4 0180-2889 4 cap 3400uF 200V -10 + 50% 28480
C5,6 0160-4355 2 cap .OiuF + 10% 250Vac C0633 PME271Y510
C7,17 0160-5187 2 cap 0.15uF 600V 28480
C8 0180-0426 1 cap 22uF -10 + 100% 250Vdc 31918 EN12.35N22/250
C9,10 0160-3569 2 cap .O15uF +20% 250Vac £0633 PME271Y515
C11,12 0180-3049 2 cap 26800uF -10 +50% 75Vde 00853 101262 T075AJ2A
C13 0160-4281 1 cap 2200pF + 20% 250Vac £0633 PME271Y422
Cid 0180-1916 1 cap 20004F -10 + 100% 28Vdc 56289 (TYPE 680) D44591-DFP
C15,16 0180-2628 2 C-F 220uF + 50-10% 50V 54473 ECE-ASOV2201
CR1,2,
10-12 1901-0759 5 dio- IN5406 14936 IN5406
CR3,4 1901-1087 2 dio-pwr rect 600V 3A 04713 MR856
CR5 1901-0028 1 dio-pwr rect 400V 10A 04713 SR1358-9
CR6,9 1901-0050 2 dio-switching 07263 FDHS308
CR7.8 1901-0327 2 dio-pwrrect 200V TA 03508 A14B
DST 1990-0325 1 LED-visible 28480
F1 2110-0063 1 fuse .754 250V 71400 AGC-3/4
J1-4 1251-6488 4 conn.-pc edge 28480
Ki 0490-1267 1 relay DPST 28480
LL? 06012-80096 | 1 choke-input 28480
L2 1 choke ass'y, consists of:
9170-0707 2 core-ferrite 28480
06012-80003 | 1 wire-snubber 28480
L3 1 choke ass'y, consists of:
9170-0721 1 core-magnetic 28480
06012-80095 | 1 choke-output 28480
L4 1 choke ass’y consists of:
9170-0061 1 core-ferrite 28480
06012-80004 | 1 choke 28480
LS 9140-0082 1 RF choke 15uH + 10% 28480
Qt 1854-0575 1 xstr NPN si 27014 5 T48090A
Q2 1854-0448 1 xstr NPN si 04713 551147
R1,3 0811-1892 2 res 317 +5% 10W ww 91637 RS-10
R2 0811-1898 1 res 207 +5% 10w ww 01686 110-78
rá 0686-3015 1 res 3000 5% 0.5W cc 01121 EB3015
R5,6 0811-1914 2 res Bk +5% 10W ww 91637 RS-10
R7-12 0686-0275 6 res 2.70 +5% 0.5W cc 01121 EB27G5
R13 0811-1803 1 res 1.3k £5% 3W ww 01686 T28-79
R14,15 0686-1645 2 res 160k 5% 0.5W cc 01121 EB1645
R16 0686-1005 1 res 1002 5% 0.5W cc 01121 EB1005
R17 0683-2035 1 res 20k 5% 0.25W cc 01121 CB2035
R18 0686-4715 1 res 470 5% 0.5W cc 01121 EB4715
R19 0811-1559 1 res 6k +5% 5W ww 91637 RS-5
R20 06012-80005 | 1 res-monitor 3.7m 28430
R21 0698-3428 1 res 14,70 + 1% 0,125Wf 16299 NK4H
52 3101-1914 1 sw-si 2-DPDT 82389 11E-1060
T1 5080-1937 1 xfrar-current im 28480
T2 06012-80093 | 1 xfrnr-pwr 28480
T3 06012-80080 | 1 xfmr-bias 28480
Lit 1906-0218 1 dio-fw brdg 600V 35A 04713 SDA10254-21
Uz 1990-0593 1 opto-isolator 04713 SOC-156
U3,4 1906-0006 1 dio-fw brdg 400V 1A 14936 WO4 Special
VR1 1902-3104 Î dio-zrw 5.62V + 5% 04713 SZ30016-110
VR2 1902-3180 1 dio-znr 11.8V 2% 04713 5230016-204
6-3
Table 6-4. Replacement Parts {continued)
Ref, HP | Mir. Mfr.
Desig. Part No. TQ Description Code Part No.
A2 Control Board Assembly
C1,51,52 0180-0230 3 cap TuF 20% 50V 56289 15D 105X0050A2
C2,23 0160-4557 2 cap 0.1uF 20% 50V cer 16299 CAC04X7R 104MOB0-A
C3,8,53 0160-0128 3 cap 2.2u.F 20% 50V . 56289 5CZ5U225X0050C5C-CML
C4-6,9,
14,20,21,
25,28-30,
33,36-38 0160-4722 15 | cap 0.1uF + 80-20% 50V cer 16299 CACO3Z5U104Z0O50A
C7,57 0140-0203 2 cap 30pF 5% H00V mica 28480
C10,22 0160-4741 2 cap 0.22.F 10% 50V cer 20832 5O30EMBORD224M
C11,18 0160-0163 2 cap .O33uF 10% 200V 56289 192733392
C12 0160-0159 1 cap 6800pF 10% 200V poly 56289 192P68292
C13 0160-0127 1 cap 1uF 20% 25V cer 20932 5033ES25RD105M
C15 0180-0218 1 cap 0.15uF 10% 35V 56289 150D154X9035A2-DYS
C16 0160-0162 1 cap .022u.F 10% 200V poly 84411 HEW238M
C17 0160-2036 1 cap 4300pF 5% 500V mica 28430
C19 0160-0194 1 cap .015xF 10% 200V 56289 192P 15392
C24,42 0180-0137 2 cap 100uF 20% TOV 56289 150D107X0010R2-DYS
C26 0180-1380 1 cap pF 5% 35V 56289 T50D107X5035A2-DYS
C27 0180-0405 1 cap 1.8uF 10% 20V 56289 1500186 X3020A2
C31,49 0140-0149 2 cap 470pF 5% 300V mica 28480
Caz 0140-0199 1 cap 240pF 5% 300V mica 28480
(034,35 0160-3070 2 cap 100pF 5% 300V mica 28480
C39,40 0160-0134 2 cap 220pF 5% 300V mica 28480
C41 0180-0550 1 cap 330uF + 100-10% 25V 54473 FCE-A25V330L
C43,50 0180-0291 2 cap uF 10% 35V 56289 150D105X9035A2
a C44 0140-0200 1 cap 390pF 5% 300V mica 28480
C45,46 0160-0174 2 cap 0.47uF + 80-20% 25V cer 20932 5033ES25RD47RZ
C47 0160-2215 1 cap 750pF 5% 300Y mica 20480
C48,55 0160-2639 2 cap 5000pF 20% 100V cer 72982 835-100-25U-502M
C54 0160-2496 1 cap 470pF 10% 1kv 28480
C56 0140-0210 1 cap 270pF 5% 300V mica 28480
CR1,3,7,
9,12-15,
17-19,22-30 1901-0050 20 | dio-switching 07263 РОН 6308
CR2,4-6,
8,10,
11,16,20,21 1901-0033 10 | dio-gen PRP 07263 FDH 3369
J1,2 1200-0507 2 connector, 16 pin 06776 0002811
1.1.3 9140-0210 2 coll 100uH 5% 28480
L2 9140-0131 1 coil 10mH 5% 28480
Qf 1855-0413 1 J-fet P-chan D-mode 28480
Q2,3,5-7,
9,10 1854-0823 7 xstr NPN si 01295 SKC0221
04 1853-0086 1 xstr PNP si 2N5087 27014 2N5087
Q8 1853-0041 1 xstr PNP si 07263 521297
a1 1854-0448 1 xstr NPN si 04713 551147
Q12 1854-0585 1 xstr NPN si 04713 MJE182
R1,2,4-6,
18,19 0686-1035 7 res 10k 5% 0.5W cc 01121 EB1035
R3,48,51,
74,102,105,
106,129 0683-4725 8 res 4.7k 5% 0.25W ce 01121 CB4725
R7,25 0683-3355 2 res 3.3M 5% 0.25W cc 01121 CB3355
6-4
Table 6-4. Replacement Parts (continued)
Ref. HP М. Mir.
Desig. Part No. TO Description Code Part No.
R8 0757-0413 1 res 3920 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-61R9
R9 0757-0480 1 res 432k 1% 0.125W 1 91637 CMF-55-1,T-1
R10 0757-0344 1 res 1M 1% 0.26W f 19701 MF52C-1
R11,13 0683-1005 2 res 10Q 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB1005
R12,30,
55,124 0757-0280 4 res 1k 1% 0.125W 1 24546 C4-1/8-TO-1001-F
R14,41,90 0757-0461 3 res 68.1k 1% 0,125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-6812-F
R15 0757-0398 1 res 750 1% 0.125W 2ME627 CRB14
R16 0698-6343 1 res 8k 0.1% 0.125W 1 91637 CMF-55-1, 7-9
R17 0698-4158 1 res 100k 0.1% 0.125W f 91637 CMF-55-1,T-9
R20,24,130 2100-3273 3 res-trmr 2k 10% 73138 72XR2K
R21,23,131 2100-3353 3 res-trmr 20k 10% 02111 63X203T623
R22 2100-3351 1 res-trmr 50090 10% 02111 63X501T623
R26 0698-7880 1 res 28.7k 1% 0,125W f 24546 C4-1/8-T0-2872-F
R27 0698-6335 1 res 9000 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-900R-F
R28,81,83 0757-0451 3 res 24.3k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-T0-2434-F
R29,47,132 0757-0438 3 res 5.11k 1% 0,120W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-511R-F
R31,45,60 0757-0452 3 res 27.4k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-T0-2742-F
R32 0757-0424 1 res 1.1k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-1101-F
R33,53,
62,231,112 0757-0465 5 res T00k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-1003-F
R34,46 0757-0449 2 res 20k 1% 0.125W f 91637 CCMF-55-1,T-1
R35 0757-0442 1 res 10k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-1002-F
R36,104 0683-1045 2 res 100k 5%0.25W fc 01121 CB1045
R37,133,134 0757-0467 3 res 121k 1% 0,125W f 24546 C4-1/8-T0-1213-F
R38,95 0683-1065 2 res 10M 5% 0.25W fc 01121 СВ1065
R39,64 0683-2035 2 res 20k 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB2035
R40,156 0698-4484 2 res 19.1k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-T0-1912-F
R42 0698-3455 1 res 261k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-T0-2613-F
R43,107 0683-1055 2 res 1M 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB1055
R44 0698-5092 1 res 160k 1% 0.125W 1 24546 C4-1/8-TO-1603-F
R49,50 0698-6631 2 res 2.5k 0.1% 0,125W + 24546 NE55
R52,148,154 0683-1035 3 res 10k 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB1035
R54 0698-4536 1 res 340k 1% 0.125W + 24546 NA4
R56,69,
73,75,77,
78,88,
98,103, 146 0683-2225 10| res 2.2k 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB2225
R57 0683-5105 1 res 510 5% 0.25W fo 2M627 R-25J
R58 0757-0283 1 res 2k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-T0-2001-F
R59,63 0757-0346 2 res 102 1% 0.125W f 2627 CRB25
R61,94,122 0683-4715 |. 3 res 4708 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB4715
R65 0698-4444 1 res 4.87k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-487R-F
R67,68,
72,76,138 0683-2015 5 res 2000 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB2015
R70,71 0683-5115 2 res 5100 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB5115
R79,142 0757-0446 2 res 15k 1% 0.125W + 24546 C4-1/8-T0-1502-F
R80 0757-0455 1 res 36.5k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-T0-3562-F
R82 0683-1015 1 res 1009 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB1015
R84 0698-3498 1 res 8.66k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-B66R-F
R85 0757-0199 1 res 21.5k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-2151-F
RES6, 137 0683-0335 2 res 3.30 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CBO335
6-5
Table 6-4. Replacement Parts (continued!
Bef. HP Mfr, Mfr.
Desig. Part No. TQ Description Code Part No.
R87,109 0683-5175 2 res 5.1k 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB5125
R92,100 0683-1025 2 res 1k 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB1025
R93 0698-5094 1 res 5.1M 5% 0.25W fe 01121 СВ5094
H96,116,117 0698-0085 3 res 2.67K 1% 0.125W f 2M627 C4-1-1/8-T0-267R-F
R99 0683-2265 3 res 22M 5% 0.25W f¢ 01121 СВ2265
R101,155,
160 0683-2025 4 res 2k 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB2025
R108,153 0683-3335 2 res 33k 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB3335
R110 0698-3136 1 res 17.8k 1% 0.125W { 24546 C4-1/8-TO-1782-F
R111 0757-0483 1 res 562k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-T0-5623-F
R113,123 0683-3925 2 res 3.9k 5% 0.25W 01121 CB3325
R114 0698-3151 1 res 2.87k 1% 0.126W + 91637 CMF-55-1,T-1
Н115 0757-0422 1 res 9090 1% 0,125W T 24546 C4-1/8-TO-909HR-F
R118 0757-0200 1 res 5.62k 1% 0,125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-5602R-F
R119 0698-5152 1 res 63k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-T0-6302-F
R120,144,
145 0698-0084 3 res 2.15k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-2151-F
H121 0757-0420 1 res 7500 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-750R-F
R125 0683-2715 1 res 2700 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB2715
R126,157 0757-0440 2 res 7.5k 1% 0.125W 1 24546 C4-1/8-TO-7501-+
R127 0698-3558 1 res 4.02k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-402R-F
F128 0757-0427 1 res 1.5k 1% 0,125W 1 24546 C4-1/8-T0-1501-F
R135 0757-0410 1 res 3012 1% 0.125W f 91637 CMF-55-1,T-1
R136 0698-6889 1 res 22.1k 0.5% 0.125W f 91637 CMF-55-1, 1-2
R138 0767-0273 1 res 3.01k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/3-TO-301R-F
R140 0757-0123 1 res 34.8k 1% 0.125W f — 24546 C4-1/8-TO-3482-F
R141 0683-2235 1 ras 22k 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB2235
R143 0698-4470 1 res 6.38k 1% 0.125W f 91637 CMP-55-1,T-1
R147 0698-3496 1 res 3.57k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-357R-F
R149 0698-4435 1 res 2.49k 1% 0.125W f 24546 С4-1/8-ТО-249В-Е
R150 0698-4196 1 res 1.07k 1% 0.125W f 24546 Ca4-1/8-TO-107R-F
R151 0698-6938 1 res 196k 0.5% 0.125W tf 91637 CME-55-1,1-2
R152 0757-0473 1 res 221k 1% 0.125W f 91637 CMF-55-1,T-1
R158 0757-0290 1 res 6.19k 1% 0.125W f 24546 C4-1/8-TO-619R-F
8159 0757-0436 1 res 4.32k 1% 0.12bW + 24546 C4-1/8-TO-432R-F
R161 0698-3225 1 res 1.43k 1% 0.125W 1 24546 C4-1/8-TO-143R-F
R163 0757-0472 1 res 200k 1% 0.125W f 24545 C4-1/8-TO-2003-F
TB1 0360-2009 1 Term Block, 10 Term 28480
UT,19 1826-0346 2 IC Op Amp Dual 27014 LM358N
U2 1826-0493 1 IC Op Amp Dual 04713 SC73140P
U3 1820-0477 1 IC Op Amp 27014 LM301AN
U4,6 1826-0161 2 IC 324 Op Amp, Quad 27014 LM324N
U5,14 1826-0065 2 IC Comparator 27014 LM311N
U7 1820-1272 1 IC Quad Buffer 01295 SN74LS33N
Ug 1820-1209 1 IC 2-IN NAND, Quad 01295 SN74LS38N
Ug 1820-1112 1 KC D-Type FF 27014 SN74L5S574N
U10 1820-1203 1 IC 3-In AND, Tripie 01295 SN74LS11N
U11 1820-1443 1 IC Counter, TTL, 04713 SN74LS293N
U12 1820-1437 1 IC Muitivibrator, Dual 01295 SN74LS221N
UT3 1826-0138 1 IC Comparator, Quad 04713 MLM339P
U15 1820-0430 1 IC Voitage Reg 27014 LM309K
U16 1858-0023 1 xstr array NPN si 31.585 CA3081E
117,18 1820-0493 2 IC op amp 27014 LM307N
6-6
Table 6-4. Replacement Parts (continued)
Ref. HP МИ. Mir,
Desig. Part No. TO Description Code Part No.
VAT 1902-0057 1 dio-znr 6.49V 5% 12954 DZ730821C
VR2,4 1902-0575 2 dio-znr 6.5V 2% 12954 5211594
VR3 1902-0766 1 dio-znr 18.2V 5% 04713 SZ30016-257
VR5 1802-3092 1 dio-znr 4,99V 2% 12954 DZ/30818Z
VR6 1902-0777 1 dio-znr 6.2V 5% 04713 1N825
VR7 1902-3002 1 dio-znr 2.37V 5% 04713 SZ10939-2
Y] 0960-0586 1 resonator-ceramic 23480
A3 FET Assembly, 2 Units
C1 0160-4569 1 cap 0.01.F 10% 800Vdc 56289 715P103981LD3
C2 0180-0374 1 cap 104F 10% 20V 56289 1500106X902082-DYS
C3 0180-0185 cap 2.2uF 20% 20V 56289 150D225X0020A2
CR1 1901-1087 1 dio-pwr rect 600V ЗА 04713 MR856
CR2-4 1907-0050 3 dio-switching 07263 FDH 6308
Li 9100-1618 1 coil 5.6uH 10% 28480
Q+1,2* 5080-1926 2 FET-dual TOS 28480
Q3 1854-0585 1 xstr NPN si 04713 MJE182
R1 0811-1906 1 res 1500 5% 10W pw 91637 RS-10
В2 0811-1065 1 res 1500 5% 10МУ pw 01686 NT-10-78
R3-6 0698-3609 4 res 220 5% 2W 27167 Fp-42
R7 0683-0275 1 res 2.70 5% 0.25W fe 01121 CB0275
RE 0683-1815 1 tes 18002 5% 0,25W fc 01121 СВ1815
R9 0683-2745 1 res 270k 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB2745
R10 0683-1505 1 res 150 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CCB1505
R11 0683-0335 1 res 3.30 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB33G5
R12,13 0683-8205 2 res 820 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB8205
R14-16 0698-3547 3 res 12 5% 0.5W cc 01121 EB3547
T 06012-80091 1 xfmr-pulse 28480
TS1 3103-0081 1 sw-therm 14604 2455R-87-247
UT, 1820-1050 2 IC dual 2-IN NOR, ttl 01295 SN75454BP
VR1 1902-3092 1 dio-znr 4.98V 2% 12954 027308182
Ad Qutput Diode Board
C1 0160-4569 1 cap .OuF 10% 800Vdc 56289 715P10398LD3
CRT 1901-0887 1 dio-pwr rect BOA 28480
LI 1 choke assy, consists of;
3170-0707 2 core-ferrite 28480
06012-80003 1 wire-snubber 28480
O 1854-0755 1 xstr NPN si 31.585 2№6254
R1 0812-0019 1 res ‚330 5% 3W pw 91637 CW-2B-39
R2 0683-1025 1 res 1k 5% .25W fc 01121 CB1025
R3 0811-1068 1 res 500 5% 10W pw 01686 NT10-78
TS1 3103-0082 1 . sw-therm 14604 2450-87 -246
AS Front Panel Assembly
DS1,25 1990-0521 3 LED Green 28480
DS3,4,6 1990-0517 3 LED Red 28480
Mi 1120-1392 1 Meter-Voits 28480
M2 1120-1393 1 Meter-Amperes 28480
RI 0683-2015 1 res 2000 5% 0.25W fc 01121 CB2015
R2,3 2100-3831 2 res-var 2,7k 5% 0.5W 32997 83A1D-1324-BA0380
R4 2100-3252 1 res—var 5k 10% 01121 Е2А502
X
Should be replaced in pairs.
6-7
Tabie 6-4. Replacement Parts (continued)
Ref. HP Mr. Mir.
Desig. Part No. TQ Description Code Part No.
AB AC Filter Assembly
C18,19 0160-4355 2 cap .01uF 10% 250Vac C0633 PME271Y510
C20 0160-4962 1 cap 1.0uF 20% 250Vac T MKS4-R/1.0/250/20%
CBi 3105-0126 1 circuit breaker 254 250Vac 28480
R22 0686-8245 1 res 820k 5% 0.5W cc 01121 ЕВ8245
T81 0360-1214 1 term block, 3-term 28480
| Chassis Electrical Parts
81 3160-0328 fan-tubeaxial 115V 4N833 125XR-2187
C21 0180-3049 1 cap 2600uF -10 + 50% 75Vde 00853 101262T075AJ2A
Le 06012-80098: 1 choke-line 28480
L7 06012-80094: 1 choke-RFi 28480
51 3101-0447 1 sw-DPDT 31918 IXFAC1-0003-06 (none)
N302UTVS5EE
A1 Main Board-Mechanical
2110-0269 2 fuseholder, clip type (F1) 28480
0380-1265 2 spacer, press in {Ki} 28480
1200-0181 1 spacer, plastic (Q2) 28480
0360-1750 4 contact-terminal, single (CR3,CR4} 28480
0360-1843 12} terminal-stud {R1,2,3,5,6,13) 28480
0362-0669 2 contact-terminal, single W1) 28480
1205-0397 1 heat sink (UT) 28480
1251-0600 â contact-terminal, single {(W2,J5,J6} 28480
AZ Control Board-Mechanical
0340-0166 1 insulator bushing (01) 28480
1200-0181 2 spacer, plastic (08,011) 28480
1205-0267 1 heat sink {U15) 28480
0340-0503 1 insulator (U15) 28480
A3 FET Assembly (each}-Mechanical
06012-20001 1 heat sink {Q1,Q2) 28480
0340-0166 4 insulator bushing{Q1,Q2j 28480
1251-5318 4 contact-connector, singie (01,02) 28480
0360-1843 4 terminal-stud {R1,R2) 28480
1390-0513 2 fastener-plastic {cover} 28480
Ad Output Diode Board-Mechanical
06012-20002] 1 heat sink {CR1,Q1) 28480
0340-0166 2 insulator bushing (Q1) 28480
1251-5318 2 contact-connector {Q1) 28480
0360-1843 2 terminal-stud (R3) 28480
1390-0513 2 fastener-plastic {cover} 28480
AS Front Panel Assembly-Mechanical
0340-0447 6 insulator (DS1-6) 28480
5060-2807 1 cable assembly 28480
Table 6-4. Replacement Parts {continued}
Ref. HP Mr. Mr,
Desig. Part No. TQ Description Code Part No..
Chassis-Mechanical
06012-00004 | 1 chassis and rear panel 28480
06012-00006 | 1 top cover 28480
06012-00007 | 1 bottom cover 28480
5040-7201 4 foot 28480
06012-00002 1 1 front panel 28480
5020-8803 1 frame, front 28480
5040-7202 1 trim strip, top 28480
5060-9803 2 handle assembiy 28480
5001-0439 2 trim, side, viny! 28480
5040-7234 4 handle trim, plastic 28480
06012-00012 i 1 bracket-meter 28480
06012-00003 | 1 bracket-fan 28480
06012-00009 : 1 - | bracket-capacitor 28480
1390-0514 4 fastener-plastic, snap in (bus bars) 28480
06012-00011 1 2 bus bar 28480
4040-1686 1 cover, output bus 28480
06012-00010 | 1 heat sink cover 28480
06012-00005 | 1 panel, ac filter assembly 28480
0100-0300 1 cable clamp, strain relief, line cord 28480
06024-00011 | 1 cover, option 002 access hole 28480
Miscellaneous
0360-0523 4 jumper, terminal block 28480
9211-3487 1 packing carton 28480
9220-1401 2 packing floater pad 28480
9220-3390 4 packing carton filler 28480
6-9
SECTION VII
COMPONENT LOCATION ILLUSTRATIONS
AND CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS
7-1 This section contains component location diagrams, a
schematic diagram, and other drawings and tables useful for
maintenance of the 6012A power supply. {illustrations for Op-
tion 002 are given in Appendix A.) included in this section are:
a. Top view of unit with covers removed. {Figure 7-1),
showing sub-assembly locations, chassis- mounted com-
ponents, main board mounting screws, troubleshooting test
points, and wire colors.
b. Component location diagrams {Figure 7-2 through 7-6},
showing the physical location and reference designators of
aimost al! electrical parts. (Front-panei-mounted components
are identified by lettering on the board and front panel.)
C. Test point description table (Table 7-1), listing the signals
at the 26-pin edge connector (P2) and the 16-pin option-002
jack {J1} at the top of the AZ Control Board.
d. Bias supplies table {Table 7-2}, listing the semiconductor
components operating on each bias supply.
7-1
e. Logic symbols diagram (Figure 7-7}, illustrating the logic
symbols used on the schematic.
f. Power supply waveforms (Figure 7-8), illustrating
waveforms found at key points in the power supply.
g. Schematic diagram (Figure 7-9}, including case outline
drawings for each of the semiconductor components used in
the power supply. The test points shown on the schematic are
described in Table 7-1.
WARNING
Wait two minutes after turning power off for in-
put capacitors to discharge before performing any
maintenance procedures. To avoid excessive in-
rush current, do nat operate relay manually.
C21 (UNDER
BUS BARS)
7100) q
.
| E
220/240 -
«07420
Ч в.
WHF GRA
AC FILTER
ASSEMBLY
AVES Y 134
ATEWESoY 13]
ad As
т
+
=
and
=
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я
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LA
a
=
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a
NG WO De ¿34
AS O
16")
®
Figure 7-1. Top View, Top Cover and Heatsink Cover: Removed.
TL RIERA TAR AE
Figure 7-2. Main Board (A1) Component Location,
7-3
+8 | A5 1 A4 | A3 AZ MA!
-5
AS | A7 | AG
AQIS HITOS - 128 95928 60NUEl
FOS ININCSWOD ~ YHOU ISH MIRNA
ee 8) UT
i
я Er № EE fat al anf nn
Fon EP FP JP A
AIT
EE is gi
A
nr:
ia
£3
Се еее
©
C te
SERE
= TIFT TAY
a e qi Же Нейт Don e =
= | Heald + ¡es
-—
ho
LÉ
R53
R54
Ho
GEL
U
R57
7-4
эф
Lia LEE
ef uf fr ве
| y Saskia
A i E
1
U17
018
О
Figure 7-3. Control Board {A2) Component Location
- he =
ae
e
ттт,
LE E: i
ri
+
R153
НОЕ
“Tog >
“RD
ГАЗ55 Е
=
wl
mi
+
=
=i |
ES!
«] C52
{RIS F
R157
(R158 =
TE,
;
R26 |
ER27 +
rr
|
28 1202 9 9 IN ACTA HOB 8L 9G EZ
ACCESS FET SOURCE PINS
VIA RIGHT END OF R{ OR
Re (THIS VIEW)
— ACCESS FET GATE PINS
VIA LEFT END OF RS OR
RIO (THIS VIEW).
ACCESS FET DRAIN ON
HEATSINK OR CONNECTING
SCREWS.
&
=
=
da
[ER
A COMPONENT SIRE
1 SOLDER SIDE
COMPONENT SIDE 3
i 2
SOLDER SIDE А В D
Figure 7-6. Output Diode Board {A4) Component Location
Figure 7-6. AC Filter Assembly Component Location
7-5
Table 7-1. Test Point Descriptions
Test Point Option 002
Connector P2 Connector J1
Pin No. Pin No. Description
A — CV Amplifier Output
i va CC Amplifier Output
B 3 Constant Voltage Mode (Low = CV)
2 8 —12 V Unregulated (= — 25 V)
с 10 OVP Remote Reset Input (low = reset)
3 7 CC Programming input
D 11 + 18V Unregulated {= + 25 V)
4 6 CV Programming input
E 12 Bias Power Supplies Common
5 5 + Sense
F 13 Primary Power Fault {low = low level or ac dropout}
6 4 Qutboard Sense (common)
H 14 Overtemperature Status {low = overtemperature)
7 3 Monitor Buffer Amplifier Output
J 15 Constant Current Mode (low = CC)
8 2 — Sense
K 16 +5 V Unregulated (= +16 V)
9 1 Overvoltage Status (low = OVP)
L o On Pulses
10 — Off Pulses
M om +5 V Regulated
11 — 20 kHz Clock Signal
N — (not used)
12 — + 15 \У Regulated
Р — — 12 V Regulated
13 a Ip (Primary Current) Ramp Voltage
Table 7-2. Semiconductor Components Operating On Each Bias Supply
+5 V REG
A1U2
А202
A203
A205
AZQ6
A2Q10
AZUS
A2U7
AZU8
A2U9
A2U10
А2\011
AZU12
AZU13
AZU14
AZU16
A3U1
A3U2
+15V REG — 12 \ ВЕС
A201 A2U1
A204 A2U2
A207 A2U3
A209 ( +6.5V) A2U4
A2U1 A2U5
A2U2 A2U6
A2U3
A2.U4 — 12 Y UNREG
A2U6
A2U19 (+14.5 V) A208
A2U17
+15 V UNREG +5 Y UNREG
A2011 A2U15
A2U18
7-6
Definitions
High = more positive
Low = less positive
indicator And Qualifier Symbols
> (polarity indicator, shown outside logic symbol} Any marked input or output is active low; any unmarked input
or output is active high.
> (dynamic indicator) Any marked input is edge-triggered, ie, active during transition between states; any unmarked
input is level sensitive,
0 open-collectar output
1 monostabie {one-shot) multivibrator
t=xSec indicates puise width {usually determined by external RC network)
G gate input {a number following G indicates which inputs are gated)
С control input (clock)
R reset (clear)
5 set
OLD SYMBOL NEW SYMBOL NOTES
> ==
PR Ns E LL
«нете |) © -----
„ео [)
и не) С;
—= CLK © рен ER "=
CLR
Y
— A © A ан вн
11445 NEGATIVE - GOING EDGE AT “A
„| В —— B OR POSITIVE -GOING
_ INR Ni EDGE AT "B" TRIGGERS
etl CLR Эр DEVICE
DA +6 oa —
BOTH RESET INPUTS
bb
MUST BE HIGH TO
R RESET DIVIDER
QD
Figure 7-7. Logic Symbols and Definitions
7-7
NOTES:
1, Waveforms 1,2,3, and 4 are taken with 6012A operating at nominal line voltage.
Z. Waveforms 5,6,7, and 8 are taken with test setup shown in Figure 5-10; i.e., fuse A1F1 removed, bias supplies operating at
nominal line voltage, and input bus voltage controlled by an external de power supply.
3. Except for waveforms 5,6, and 7, oscilloscope probe is grounded at A2U15 case,
à. For waveform 5, oscilloscope probe is grounded at source pin.
5. For waveforms 6 and 7, oscilloscope probe is grounded at whichever pin, drain or source, is connected to the input bus. For
FET assembly to left of instrument as viewed from front {upper FET assembly on schematic), probe is grounded at drain {which is
connected to + side of input bus). For FET assembly to right of instrument {lower FET assembly on schematic), probe is grounded
at source (which is connected to — side of input bus).
| WARNING |
Procedures described herein are performed with power supplied to the instrument and protective covers removed. Such
maintenance should be performed only by service-trained personnel who are aware of the hazards involved [for example, fire and
electrical shock). Where procedure can be performed without power applied, power should be removed. Turn power off while con-
necting or disconnecting test equipment from 6012A.
PE [83
A2U14-7 FETS
320kHz CLOCK GATE TO SOURCE
0.545 / DIVISION {Ops / DIVISION
1V / DIVISION 5V/DIVISION
INPUT BUS AT OV
Les [62
A2P2-44 FETS
20 kHz CLOCK DRAIN TO SOURCE
10 5 / DIVISION 10 us/ DIVISION
{V/ DIVISION 5V/ DIVISION
INPUT BUS AT 20V
NO LOAD
SEE NOTE 5
£37] £77
A2U9-5 FETS
PWM OUTPUT DRAIN TO SOURCE
108 / DIVISION 10 us / DIVISION
1V 7 DIVISION 5V/ DIVISION
) INPUT 8US AT 20V
yout hed а OUT SHORTED
LOAD SEE NOTE 5
[47 (87
A2P2-L Ip SENSE
ON PULSE А2Р? -13
105 / DIVISION 10us /DIVISION
ZV/ DIVISION 0.4V/ DIVISION
АРР?-1Ю INPUT BUS AT POV
OFF PULSE OUTPUT SHORTED
{Ops / DIVISION
2V/ DIVISION
УСТ = 30V
Rioap® 500
Figure 7-8. Waveforms
APPENDIX A
System Option 002
A-1 GENERAL INFORMATION
A-2 This option facilitates the operation of a 6012A power
supply in an automated system, Four major circuit blocks pro-
vide: 1) remote analog programming of the suppiy's output by
three different control methods; 2) signals indicating the
power supply modes and conditions; 3) two different digital
methods of remote control; and 4} the outputs of three bias
supplies for use with external circuitry.
A-3 A 6012A power supply equipped with this option can
be operated from a 6940B Multiprogrammer equipped with a
69520A Power Supply Programming Card. Details are provid-
ed in the 69520A Manual.
A-4 Remote Programming. Through this interface both
the output voltage and current can be remotely programmed
by either an external voltage source, a resistance, or a current
sink.
A-5 Status Indicators. Six optically isolated lines provide
open-collector digital outputs which indicate the following
states: constant voitage mode, constant current mode, output
unregulated, AC fault, overvoltage, and overtemperature.
A-6 Remote Control. Two optically isolated methods of
remote control are available. One method requires a negative-
going edge, which sets a latch on the 002 card to inhibit the
power supply. The latch and the power supply OVP are reset
by a negative-going pulse on another input line. The second
method of remote control requires a low logic level to inhibit
the power supply for the duration of the low level.
A-7 Bias Supplies. The outputs of three bias supplies are
also available at the option connector. These outputs are;
+15 Y, - 15 V, and +5 V.
A-8 Monitoring of the output voltage and current of the
power supply is also possible at the option connector,
A-9 Other modes of operation, such as multiple supply
system control, are described in detail in later paragraphs.
Modes such as Auto-Series, Auto-Parallel, and Auto-Tracking
operation, as described in Section 3 of the main text are also
available.
A-10 Specifications
A-11 Table A-1 provides specifications for the Option 002,
This table is referred to periodically throughout the Operation
section of this Appendix.
A-12 Option 002 Hardware
A-13 The option 002 hardware consists of a single printed-
circuit board installed at the right of the 6012A chassis. A
cable connects the option board to the AZ control board at
AZJ1. Connections between the option board and externai cir-
cuits are made via a 37-pin connector mounted on the option
board and available at the rear of the power suppiy. A mating
connector is also included for the user's convenience.
Table A-1. Specifications, Option 002
All 6012A specifications remain the same unless otherwise
noted. All specifications are at option board connector J2.
REMOTE PROGRAMMING:
Resistance Programming - 0 to 2.5 k 2 provides zero to max-
imum rated voltage or current output.
Accuracy @ 25°C: CV; 1.0% +30 mV CC; 2.5% + 3b mA
Voltage Programming - 0 to 5 V provides zero to maximum
rated voltage or current output.
Accuracy @ 25°C: CV; 0.3% +3 mV CC; 1.0% + 15 mA
Current Programming - 0 to 2 mA current sink provides zero
to maximum rated voltage or current Output.
Accuracy @ 25°C: CV; 0.4% +9 mV CC; 1.1% +20 mA
— Input Compliance Voltage: +1 V
are biased from the CONTROL ISOLATOR BIAS input {see
Remote Shutdown and OVP Ciear).
Relay bias voltage;
Relay resistance;
Current Programming Enable - Relays K2 (CV) and K1 (CC)
+4 V minimum
+7 Y maximum
5008 + 10%
Note: For CONTROL ISOLATOR BIAS voltages greater than
7 V, a series resistor must. be used to maintain the relay bias
voltage within specified limits.
Enabling either relay is accomplished by bringing CV or CC
enable line to CONTROL ISOLATOR BIAS common via a
suitable driver; maximum driver off-state leakage = 0.5 mA.
Table A-1. Specifications, Option 002 (cont)
QUTPUT VOLTAGE MONITOR: 0 to 5 V output indicates zero
to maximum rated output voltage.
Accuracy @ 25°C; 0.2% + 1 mV
Output impedance: 8.3 kQ
Temperature Coefficient: 0.01% /°C
STATUS INDICATORS:
STATUS ISOLATOR BIAS input {referred to STATUS
ISOLATOR COMMON);
Voitage range; +4,75 V to +16 V
Current Drain; 20 mA maximum
Status Indicator outputs:
Open-coilector outputs
Maximum output voltage (logic high); +16 V
Logic low output; +0.4 Y maximum at 8 mA
REMOTE CONTROL (TRIP, RESET INHIBIT)
CONTROL ISOLATOR BIAS input;
Voltage range; + 4.75 V to +16 V
Remote control inputs (REMOTE TRIP, REMOTE RESET,
REMOTE INHIBIT):
DOE CÉTION
CONTROL, ISOLATOR BIAS
© {+475V TO +16V)
T —
a Is
+ 3
y Y“ A +
pom | can
1.5K
1/2W
Ce RE A E
LOW=2> L6 mA
MIGHT < ЮО дА
On state (logic low}; Minimum forward current required (igh
1.6 mA
Isolator forward voltage (Vg) at 1.6 mA
Ig: 1.4 V typical, 1.75 V maximum
For CONTROL ISOLATCOR BIAS voltage greater than +5 V.
an optional resistor (RopT) may be added to reduce drive
current.
Off state {logic high) maximum leakage current; 100 yA
REMOTE TRIP and REMOTE RESET timing;
+
i
ee Th md
| i
6
=
REMOTE TRIP
|
1
REMOTE RESET TNL TN
; ]
o Ty о
+
A
+
+
г
Y
Pulse duration (Ty): 15 «s minimum
Reset time (Ty): 125 us minimum
Set-up time (Te): 25 us minimum
OVP Clear delay (to 6012A mainframe); 1 sec. + 30%
POWER-ON PRESET:
Output ratings;
Open collector output (referred to power supply common)
Maximum output voltage (logic high); +16 V
Logic low output; + 0.4 V maximum at 8 mA
POWER-ON PRESET pulse timing:
эн POWER OFF mt POWER ОМ =
“CT
|
LOW BIAS OR AC DROPOUT
+5V REG
|
|
3
POWER ~ ON PRESET
+
€
+
Wait time after LOW BIAS OR AC DROPQUT indication
(Ty): 750 ms maximum
Pulse duration after +5 V REG has stabilized (Tp): 10 ms
minimum
BIAS SUPPLIES:
DC output ratings (0 to 55°C}:
+ 5 V +1.3% at 100 mA
+15 V + 1.5% at 75 mA
—15V + 25%at 75 mA
Short circuit output current:
+ 5 \ — 170 mA +15%
+15 \М — 125 mA + 15%
— 15V — 125 mA + 20%
Load and Source Effect: Change in output voltage for a load
change equal to the maximum available current rating of the
supply plus any line voltage change within rating:
+ 5V — 2.5%
+15 V — 3.0%
— 15 V 4 1.0%
PARD (typical):
+ 5 V — 2 mV RMS
+15 V — 3 mv RMS
- 16 Y — 3 my RMS
ISOLATION:
Status Indicator lines and Remote Control lines may be
floated a maximum of 600 VDC from ground, from the power
supply output or from each other, These lines may not be con-
nected to any primary circuits,
А-2
A-14 INSTALLATION
A-15 The 002 option board can be installed in a 6012A
power supply by the user. Proceed as follows:
a. Turn off power supply and disconnect line cord.
b. Remove three screws that secure top cover ta instru-
ment, Slide cover to rear and lift off,
¢. Disconnect front-panel cable from J2 on AZ control
board, remove two screws that secure control board to
side panel, and remove control board from 6012A.
d. Remove and save two screws that secure cover over
J2-connector hole in rear panel, Discard J2-connector-
hole cover.
e. Option board is installed on far right side of instrument
(as viewed from front). Three tabs on bottom of option
board fit into three siots in bottom chassis. Secure op-
tion board to side panel with two screws provided.
f. Using two screws removed in step d, secure option con-
nector {JZ} to rear panel.
g. Reinstall control board in unit and secure to side panel,
Reconnect front-panei cable to J2 on control board.
h. Connect 16-pin ribhon connector (P1) from option
board to connector J1 on control board, Red stripe on
ribbon cable should be toward end of Ji marked with
white dot {toward front of instrument).
i. Replace top cover.
j. Read operation section of this appendix before turning
on instrument and checking the 002 Option. No
preliminary adjustments are required.
A-16 Connector Assembly Procedure
A-17 The following instructions describe assembiy of the
mating connector provided to interface the user's system with
the option connector, J2. Figure A-1 identifies the parts of the
mating connector. Proceed as follows:
wos] Foun wn easy ESO
ro WE
4
! a
+=
ac. Г
fg
a
Figure A-1. Mating Connector Assembly
A-3
NOTE
ft may be desireable to set up a test interface
before final assembly of the mating connector to
allow checkout of the svstem. A mating connec-
tor with pins accessible for temporary wiring is
available fromm Hewlett-Packard, HP part number
1257-4464.
a. If a muiti-wire cable is being used {as opposed to in-
dividual wires}, remove approximately 1-% inches of
cable insulation from the end. Be careful not to cut the
insulation on the individual wires.
b. Strip 3/16 inch of insulation from end of each wire to be
used,
с. Insert each wire into a contact pin {1) and crimp firmly.
d. insert each pin into proper hole in connector - pin house
{2} from rear. Pins will lock into housing when fully in-
serted,
NOTE
Once the pins are locked into the connector-pín
housing, they are extremely difficult to remove.
Therefore, be certain pin is in proper hole before
inserting fully.
e. Screw a slotted set-screw (3) partially into a square nut
(4) and place in position in connector shield assembly
(6).
f. Place strain relief (5) in position in connector shield
assembly {6}, just under set screw {3). Be certain that
strain relief is oriented as shown in Figure A-1.
g. Place connector pin housing {2} in shield assembiy (6)
and route cable through cable entrance.
h, Fold connector shield assembly (8) and secure with
three screws,
i. Strain relief set screw (3) can now be adjusted from top
of connector to clamp firmly on cable.
j. Clip fasteners {7} onto ends of connector pin housing
2). |
k. Connector can now be plugged onto option connector
J2 and secured with two screws (8) into the threaded
stand-offs on either side of J2.
А-18 OPERATION
A-18 The following paragraphs provide the operating in-
structions necessary to interface an 002-equipped power sup-
ply into an automated system. A brief description of the cir-
cuits is also provided. All connections are made at the 37-pin
rear panel connector, J2 (Figure A-2} and can be wired directly
into the mating connector supplied for this purpose.
O
OUTBOARD SENSE Nao -18V REG
CL CURRENT PROG 2 a | СМ CURRENT PROG
R "TOR
CURRENT MONITO 3 22 — SENSE
+15 REG +
23 + Y REG
VOLTAGE MONITOR X
24 CC RES A VOLT PROG
FOWER-ON PRESET É
25 CY RES A YOLT PROG
POWER SUPPLY COMMON > 26
B
NOT USED { 27 NOT USED
>
28
CONTROL ISOLATOR BIAS 10
29 REMOTE RESET
CC CURRENT-PROG ENABLE 1}
re ere 30 REMOTE TRIP
Cy CURRENT-PROG ENABLE 12 TT
al REMOTE INHIBIT
i3
32
NOT USED 14 ror USED
33
15
rer ee rare 34 STATUS ISCLATOR COMMON
OvER TEMPERATURE 16
35 CC MODE
O(VERVOLTAGE EF sans
36 CV MODE
OUTPUT UNREGULATED 18
ar STATUS ISOLATOR BIAS
LOW StAS DA AC DROPOUT QE —
rpm
Figure A-2. Rear-Panel Connector J2
A-20 Remote Programming
A-21 Resistance Control (Figure A-3). It is necessary to
disable the front panel voltage and current controls during
resistance programming. This is accomplished at the rear
panel terminal strip by disconnecting the jumper between Ad
and A3 (CURRENT control) and the jumper between A8 and
A7 (VOLTAGE control).
A-22 A resistance, variable from 0 to 2500 ohms, can be
used to program the output voltage or current from 0 to full
scale. To program voltage, the variable resistance should be
connected from J2-25 (CV RES & VOLT PROG) to J2-22
{ — Sense). To program current, the variable resistance should
be connected from J2-24 (CC RES & VOLT PROG) to J2-1
{outboard sense}. For setting upper and lower limits, refer to
paragraphs 3-51 and 3-57,
+
+
If the programming fines become open circuited
during resistance programming (user's system
becomes disconnected from J2), the power sup-
ply’s output will tend to rise above rating. The
supply will not be damaged if this occurs, but the
user's load may be damaged. To protect the load,
be sure that the overvoltage trip point is properly
adjusted and that the CAUTION of paragraph
3-57 is observed.
A-23 Voltage Control (Figure A-4). To program the sup-
A-4
ply with a voltage source, it is necessary to disable the front
panel control pots and disconnect the supply’s internal current
sources from the programming voltage nodes. This is ac-
complished at the rear panel terminal strip by disconnecting
the jumpers between A8, A7, and AB for CV, and the jumpers
between A4, A3, and AZ for CC.
A-24 A voltage source, variable from 0 to 5 volts, can be
used to program the output voltage or current from Ô to fuli
scale. The load on the programming voltage source is less
than 5 uA. To program voltage, the voltage source should be
connected from J2-25 (CV RES & VOLT PROG) to J2-22
{ — Sense}. To program current, the voltage source should be
connected from J2-24 (CC RES & VOLT PROG!) to J2-1 {out-
board sense}, The — output can be up to % volt positive with
respect to outboard sense, and — sense can be up to № volt
positive with respect to — output. Therefore, a potential of up
to 1 volt can exist between — sense and outboard sense. A
discussion on programming with a voltage greater than 5 volts
can be found in paragraphs 3-54 to 3-55.
A-25 if the programming lines become open circuited
{user's system become disconnected from J2) during voltage
programming, the Programming Protection circuit will reduce
the power supply output to zero.
A-26 Current Control (Figure A-5). A current sink,
variable from 0 to 2 mA, can be used to program the output
voltage or current from © to fuil scale. The following
paragraphs provide the necessary instructions for program-
ming with a current sink. ;
А-27 It is necessary to disable the front panel control pots
and disconnect the supply’s internal current sources from the
programming voltage nodes. This is accomplished at the rear
panel terminal strip by disconnecting the jumpers between AS,
A7, and AB for CV, and the jumpers between Ad, A3, and AZ
for CC.
A-28 Current programming is enabled by relays K2 {for
CV) and/or K1 (for CC), which are powered from the CON-
TROL ISOLATOR BIAS connected to 12-10. Maintaining а
low logic level (CONTROL ISOLATOR BIAS supply common)
at one or both of the CURRENT PROG. ENABLE inputs, J2-12
(CY) and 32-11 (CC), closes the appropriate relay.
| CAUTION |
Although CONTROL 1SOLATOR BÍAS can be
+4.75 Vio + 16 V, a supply voltage of more than
7 V may damage the relays. Therefore, if CON-
TROL ISOLATOR BIAS exceeds 7 V, it is
necessary to use a resistor in series with each of
the relay enable lines. Figure A-6 provides a graph
and formulas for calculating the proper series
resistance value based on the CONTROL
ISOLATOR BIAS being used. Be certain to ac-
count for the resistor tolerance and CONTROL
ISOLATOR BIAS power supply tolerance. The
formulas and graph in Figure A-6 account for
relay tolerance. Any driver gate voltage drop
should be subtracted from the CONTROL
ISOLATOR BIAS before using formulas and
graph in Figure A-6.
AZ CONTROL BOARD OZ OPTION BOARD |
a es ee re ee cc
ce CIRCUIT |
Ë
1- MONITOR
1 CONSTANT | J2
| AMPLIFIER | CURRENT | >
SOURCE | | Pro |
| | | TB! |
| | C AZ | |
| + A3 | ||
| } A4 | |
| |
| RI | |
| sen: | | có
| | | PROGRAMMING
1 PM RESISTOR
L —— À us moe vom ed 1 | 0-26k
7 CC PROG. VOLTAGE sal |
a OUTBOARD SENSE i
О.В. ;
SENSE | |
eT > — SENSE 2.
i
| CV CIRCUIT a EY PROG VOLTAGE ol Lo
| | 7 j | 0-25k
| Po 1 Cv
| | PROGRAMMING
| CONSTANT | RESISTOR
CURRENT
| PAG
| SOURCE | TRI |
| |
| AG í
| | С AT
oo |
+SENSE | |
| RZ | |
| не
| |
| ® |
a ~ SENSE |
Figure A-3. Resistance Programming of Output Voitage And/Or Current
А-5
AZ CONTROL BOARD
PAA ——] —] ————T
COL OPTION BOARD —
24
N CE CIRCUIT
|
-
CONSTANT ;
| AMPLIFIER | CURRENT
SOURCE PIO
| | | TBI
| | AZ
| + { A3
| i
Om
|
=
| |
Lo dg ÍA
q
7 CC PROG VOLTAGE
Mr
a OUTBOARD SENSE
O8 | |
V |
В TT Sn de re er 1] 2 - SENSE
CV CIRCUIT | CV PROG. VOLTAGE
TE
| CONSTANT |
CURRENT
| SOURCE P/O
| | TB!
| a | | "М Аб
| т } AT
AB
f т +SENSE =
R2
|
| |
| ° Te |
-SENSE |
| a neo 0 Ù
CIRCUIT
}
cc
PROGRAMMING
VOLTAGE SOURCE
0-5v
+ —
—]
a
: O-5V
Cv
| PROGRAMMING
| VOLTAGE SOURCE.
JE вы теста naa srw o =”
|
— — PE Hé ==
Figure A-4. Voltage Programming of Qutput Voltage And/Or Current
A-6
AZ CONTROL BOARD OOF OPTION BOARD __
im — —
| CV CIRCUIT ol
|
CONSTANT
CURRENT 3 PIO >
SOURCE TBI — cm so mi ts i orme сто -
| ! a
| (CURRENT PROG. | , CURRENT
| м | РО СКИТ к? | | | mK
| ar | [wall
Н Qu BY to =
I у г» X»
+ SENSE o; Ug. 2! en A REG
\ bona] las + LA
+ $ peo | | | ) Dl. | |
у =
13 | | | ov
| AY | ом |+! | { f Ее
- mf [TTY та | 4 не) fA ree ri
6 PROS, | | | Ms
2 » SENSE {
PUT | | ; ISOLATOR
«SENSE i i +
| | [PROGRAMMING | | fod 10 —— | +
e | POWER SUPPLY COMMON PROTECTION | | e
. 4 5 TO
5 O CIRCUIT | | | CURRENT HEV
: | æ
a TH
„| | CC PROG.VOLTAGE 0-54 | | , ur 2 LÍO eve
| £C CIRCUIT Ai ¡OUIDOARO SENSE i f + { ;
| 08. { i i !
Ë i i Ï |
ONSTANT oh
CURRENT |] Pro | | | 98% ARES - PROG
| SOURCE To! i | ENADLE
( < | E as le a mom a ar i
| 5 24 ! 45V REG-— 20| te БУ REG
| < аз | нс | , |
| 1
| 1 MONI TOR | A y
| AMPUFIER OB |
® SEE TENT AND FIGURE 4-6 TO DETERMINE VALUE OF SERIES RESISTOR {IF REQUIRED), 0.5% TO FW.
EL CURRENT SINKS GAN CONNELT TO POWER
NEGATIVE SUPPLY THAT 1S REFERENCED ТО 6002. А POWER SUPPLY COMMON.
SUPPLY —5V REG OR TO AN EXTERNAL
Figure A-5. Current Programming Output Voltage And/Or Current
=
+
ELSTOMER - SUPPLIES CONTROL ISOLATOR BIAS {VOLTS}
SERIES OROPFING-RESISTOR VALUE (OHMS)
Figure A-8. Calculating Value of Series Dropping
Resistor
А-29 To program voltage, the current sink should be corn-
nected from J2-21 (CV CURRENT PROG) to 12-20 (- 15 V
REG). To program current, the current sink should be con-
nected from J2-2 {CC CURRENT PROG) to J2-20.
A-30 The 0 to 2 mA current sink will cause the output of
op-amps U8 and U7 to vary proprotionaily from 0 to 5 volts.
With relays K2 and K1 energized, these signals are coupled to
the CV and CC circuits {in the main supply} which, in turn, will
program the supply"s output from 0 to full scale.
A-31 if the programming lines become open circuited
(user's system becomes disconnected from J2} during current
programming, the Programming Protection circuit will bring
the power supply output to zero,
A-32 Remote Monitoring
A-33 The 002 Option board includes a voltage divider to
provide a 0 to 8 V output corresponding to a 0 to full scale
voltage output. The voltage monitor output is available be-
tween pins J2-5 (Voltage Monitor) and J2-22 (- Sense). Out-
put impedance is 8.3 kl; the monitoring device input im-
pedance should be at least 1 M to limit error to 1% + basic
accuracy, 10 MQ to fímit error to 0.1% + basic accuracy,
A-34 The I-Monitor signal from the mainframe is also
brought out through the 002 option board. A 0 to 5 Y output
corresponds to a 0 to full scale current output. The current-
monitor output is available between pins J2-3 (Current
Monitor} and J2-1 (Qutboard Sense}. Qutput impedance is
10k; the monitoring device input impedance should be at
least 1 MO to limit error to 1% + basic accuracy,
10 MQ to limit error to 0.1% + basic accuracy,
A-35 In some applications it may be desireable to install a
noise-suppression capacitor on these monitor outputs to
- lessen the effects of noise induced in the monitor leads. The
capacitors should be ceramic or tantalum type, from 0.1 to
iuF. The capacitor is installed directly across the monitor
device input terminals,
A-36 Status Indicators
A-37 Six optically isolated lines provide open collector
digital outputs which indicate certain modes and conditions of
power supply operation. For proper operation of the opto-
isolators, the user must supply the bias voltage, STATUS
ISOLATOR BIAS. This voltage can be from +4.75 V to
+ 16 Y depending upon the user's interface circuits, Refer to
the specification Table A-1. Connect the bias voltage (+) be-
tween J2-3/, STATUS ISOLATOR BIAS, and J2-34
(STATUS ISOLATOR COMMON). The status indicator out-
puts are open-collector (referenced to STATUS ISCLATOR
COMMON); therefore, it is necessary to connect a pull-up
resistor from each output to STATUS ISOLATOR BIAS.
When choosing the resistor viaue, observe the current sink
capabilites of these lines as described in the Specifications
Table A-1.
A-38 Because of the relatively slow rise and fall times of
opto-isolators, Schmitt-triggered devices should be used to in-
terface these output lines to logic circuits.
A-39 The following signals are in active-low form:
a. CV MODE, J2-36, indicates that the power supply is in
constant voltage operation.
b. CC MODE, J2-3b, indicates that the power supply is in
constant current operation.
c. OUTPUT UNREGULATED, J2-18, indicates that the
power supply is in neither constant voltage nor constant
current operation and cannot be guaranteed to meet
specifications.
d. OVERVOLTAGE, J2-17, indicates power supply shut-
down because of: the voltage output exceeding the
OVP trip point set at the front panei; or, a system-
initiated shutdown as described in Section A-45.
e. OVERTEMPERATURE, J2-16, indicates power supply
shutdown due to an excessive temperature rise on the
FET or output diode heatsink,
À-40 The LOW BIAS OR AC DROPOUT signal, 12-19, №
in active-high form. This signal indicates: loss of primary
power, momentary AC dropout, or “brownout” conditions
where the AC line voitage drops below approximately 70%
nominal.
A-41 Remote Control
A-42 For proper operation of the opto-isolators, the user
must supply the bias voltage, CONTROL ISOLATOR BIAS.
This voltage can be from +4,75 to +16 V depending on the
requirements of the driving circuits. The type of driving logic
and resultant bias voltage also determine the amplitude of the
“high” and “low” logic levels, Refer to the Specification Table
A-1.
A-43 Connect the bias voltage { +) to J2-10, CONTROL
ISOLATOR BIAS, and reference the input signals to this bias
suppiy's negative terminal.
A-44 Two optically isolated methods of remote control are
available. They are described in the following paragraphs,
A-45 Remote Trip. A negative-going edge applied at in-
put J2-30 (REMOTE TRIP) will shut down the power supply,
reducing its output voltage to near zero, For minimum puise
duration and timing considerations with respect to REMOTE
RESET, see Table A-1, The following paragraph provides a
brief circuit description (see schematic diagram and Figure
A-7.)
A-46 A negative-going edge at REMOTE TRIP is coupled
through opto-isolator U5 and sets the Trip/Reset latch output
“low.” This shuts down the supply by pulling down the OV
STATUS INHIBIT line (J1-1), which inhibits the Pulse Width
Modulator. it also lights the OVP indicator on the front panel
and results in the generation of an OVERVOLTAGE status
signal from opto-isolator U1, This signal does not affect the
state of the power supply's OVP circuit.
A-47 Remote Reset. A negative-going edge applied at
input J2-29 (REMOTE RESET) will return the supply to its in-
itial state following a system-initiated shutdown (REMOTE
TRIP) or an OVP shutdown caused by a temporary over-
voltage condition. For minimum pulse duration and timing
considerations with respect to REMOTE TRIP, see Table A-1,
The following paragranhs provide a brief description of this
circuit {see schematic diagram and Figure A-7).
A-48 The negative-going pulse applied at REMOTE
RESET is coupled through opto-isclator U4 and resets the
Trip/ Reset latch output “high”. This releases the OV
STATUS INHIBIT line and the Pulse Width Moduiator.
A-43 The REMOTE RESET pulse will also reset the power
supply OVP circuit in the event that an overvoitage condition
has shut down the supply. This is accomplished through Q4
after the one-second time delay of one-shot U11A. This delay
A-8
allows the Down Programmer (paragraphs 4-36 to 4-38) to
lower the output from its overvoltage condition to zero before
the supply can be reactivated.
_ a | Pi 2
r # 1 x
! — ; | CONTROL,
CATCH oN RESET } в |
| >— Me © | = ; Ga р +110 Pas
| | ala 4.75- 6Y
i ! ¡REMOTE
| | DIO rey
| YRIP/RESET | Edy |
i LATCA, US A A i |
+ | Lf | |
Ver E STarus” ISOLATORS | | a | |
| | } : |
в 0 gl DPTO 4 RE MOT
TRiFFED > ; a оаа | | 5 dei ISOLATORE [1 [>
NP E SETE TT ;
ADJUST | | N | PTO |
| E PM po FE ISOLATOR | |
> NBI L
| ve | i
e CIRCUIT | ’ RHETT (opens) Е!
| 7 — n= ОРТО tai y REMOTE
1k
ny PL
Figure A-7. Remote Control
NOTE A-B3 This open-collector output line, J2-6, provides a
By observing the OVERVOLTAGE status in-
dicator or power supply’s output while applying a
reset pulse to REMOTE RESET, the user can
determine the cause of the shutdown, If the out-
put returns and OVERVOLTAGE goes high im-
mediately, this indicates a controller-initiated
shutdown. If the output takes about one second
to return, this indicates that the output voltage
had exceeded the OVP trio point. H the OVP cir-
cuit trips continually, check the load and/or the
trip point setting.
А-50 Alternate Method of Remote Control. The
REMOTE INHIBIT input, J2-31, provides an alternate method
of remote shutdown. By maintaining a low logic level at this
input, the supply's output will be inhibited until REMOTE IN-
HIBIT is returned to its initial high state. The following
paragraph provides a brief description of this circuit {see
schematic diagram and Figure A-7).
A-51 À low logic level at REMOTE INHIBIT is coupled
through opto-isolator U6 and causes U9F to inhibit the supply
and light the OVP indicator in the same manner as the
REMOTE TRIP input of paragraph A-49, Note that this action
does not affect the Trip/ Reset latch and, therefore, the supply
can be returned to its initial state by switching the REMOTE
INHIBIT input to a high logic level,
A-52 Power-On Preset
A-9
logic low pulse (POWER-ON PRESET) that can be used to in-
itialize or delay system operation until the +5 Y REG bias sup-
ply in the 6012A has stabilized. The pulse is generated after
primary power is turned on, and also after resumption of
power following momentary ac dropout or brownout condi-
tions in which ac line voltage drops below approximately 70%
of nominal. See Table A-1 for POWER-ON PRESET signal
specifications.
A-54 Low Bias Or AC Dropout Buffers. These circuits
distribute the ORed outputs of the AC Dropout and Bias
Voltage Detector circuits in the 8012A mainframe (paragraphs
4-42 through 4-48). The input signal arrives at J1-13 in active-
low form and is distributed active-high to opto-isolator U1 and
to the Power-On Preset circuit.
A-55 Multipie Supply System Shutdown
A-56 When using more than one 002-equipped power
supply in a system, it may be desireable to implement a system
shutdown, In this configuration, an OVP trip or remote shut-
down of a single unit will cause all of the supplies to shut
down.
A-57 Figure A-8 shows one method of system shutdown.
The advantages of this method are that one common is used
for ail status and control lines {useful for controlier-operated
systems), and the capability of system reset. As shown in
Figure A-8, one suppiys OVERVOL TAGE line is connected to
the next supplys REMOTE TRIP fine, and so on in a con-
tinuous chain,
NOTE
© +85 V REG/POWER SUPPLY COMMON from
Supply 1 can be used instead of the bias voltage
from the controller. However, because of current
fimits of the +5 V REG, no more than four units
can be connected together in this configuration.
+ To prevent ground foops, do not parallel connect
+5 Y REG from more than one supply.
CORLL EN
POWER SUPPLY
+A. Thy TO HEW
SUPPLY + PLY 2 spy Ÿ
Ja Ja +
+8y REG R30 a a
POWER SUPPLY COMMON | To 0 a
STATUE 1904 ATOR BIAS [37
VERAOLTASY IP & >
STATUS 1SOLATON COMMON [3do >
CONTROL {SOLATEN BUS TN) ruca ud | rose |
RTD footy UE LL pracra [LL prem
REMOTE RESET ao f | 9 |
~~ PERE CPIONAL, ve
NOU EET
Figure A-8. System Shutdown Using Controller Power
Supply
A-58 The note following Paragraph A-49 tells how to
determine if a shutdown was initiated through the remote trip
line or by a supply's OVP, This aliows the controller to deter-
mine which supply initiated a system shutdown.
A-593 Following a multiple supply shutdown, each unit can
be reset individually or all the REMOTE RESET lines can be
tied together for a system reset,
А-60 if it is necessary to have all the supplies come up
simultaneousiy after a system shutdown, follow this pro-
cedure;
a. First bring the REMOTE INHIBIT line low.
b. Provide a negative-going pulse to the REMOTE RESET
nes.
¢c. After at least one second, return REMOTE INHIBIT to a
high level.
А-61 Figure A-9 shows a second method of system shut-
down. This method is appropriate in systems which are not
controller-operated and in which more than four supplies must
be shutdown simuitaneousiy. Because each supply derives its
CONTROL ISOLATOR BIAS from the previous suppiys +5V
REG, there is no limit to the number of supplies that can be
shutdown. Each supply must be reset individually.
А-62 Using either method of system shutdown, LOW
BIAS OR AC DROPOUT inhibits the OVERVOLTAGE in-
dicator from going low and shutting down succeeding sup-
plies upon initial turn-on. After the supplies have stablizied,
LOW BIAS OR AC DROPOUT returns to a high state.
SUPPLY I
de
BAY 2
JE
SUPPLY 3
JE
+ REG
POWER SLPPLY
STATUS ISN ATOR
STATUS IQLATOR
CONTROL {300 ATR BIAS
Figure A-8. System Shutdown Using 6012A Bias Supply
Output
A-63 Remote/Local Programming
A-64 When using current programming of output voltage
and/or current, it is possible to leave the front-panel controls
operable. This allows the user to switch back and forth be-
tween remote and local programming while initially checking
out a current-programming system, For this function, the
6012A rear-pane! terminal strip must be strapped as shown in
Figure 3-3. The front-panel VOLTAGE and CURRENT controls
must be turned fully CW to avoid loading the 002 current-
programming circuit. With the CURRENT PROG ENABLE
lines (J2-11 and J2-12) low, relays K2 and K1 are closed and
remote programming is enabled. Opening the CURRENT
PROG ENABLE lines (high logic level) returns control to the
front-panel pots.
CAUTION
When switching to local control, output voltage
and current will go to full scale, Remember to set
the VOLTAGE and CURRENT controls to safe
levels before switching to local control, and
remember to turn the VOLTAGE and CURRENT
controls fully CW after returning to remote con-
trol. Once the system has been checked out,
remove the straps from Ag, A7 and A6 and from
Ad, A3 and A2 and program the system
remotely.
A-65 Bias Supplies
À-66 The outputs of three current-limited bias supplies are
available for user-supplied circuitry. These are +15V
(O 75 MÁ at J2-4, — 15 V @ 75 MA at J2-20, and +5 V @ 100
mA at J2-23: all with respect to J2-7, power suppiy common.
А-10
Six screwdriver-adjustable pots located at the top of the op-
tion board set the output voltages and current limiting points
of these supplies {refer to Specification Table A-1).
CAUTION
Although the bias supplies are current limited, itis
important to avoid shorting the + 15 V supplies to
common. These supplies are used internally for
the current programming circuit. Shorting them
could cause improper programming of the power
supply and possible damage to the user's load.
А-67 it may be desireable to install noise-suppression
capacitors on the bias supply outputs near the load circuits,
The capacitors should be ceramic or tantalum type, approx-
imately 0.1uF to 10xF.
A-68 MAINTENANCE
А-69 The following paragraphs provide procedures and
set-ups to aid in checking and troubleshooting the 002 option
board. This information, used in conjunction with the
schematic drawing and the Operation section of this Appen-
dix, will help in the isolation and repair of fauity circuits.
A-70 The adjustments on the option board set the voltage
output and current limiting of the three Bias Supplies.
Although these potentiometers are set at the factory, calibra-
tion procedures are provided for purposes of checking perfor-
mance and to aid in troubleshooting of these supplies.
A-71 When testing the option, use of the test connector
of paragraph A-17 will allow easier access to the 12 contacts.
A-72 Troubleshooting
А-73 Before attempting to troubleshoot the 002 option
board, ensure that the fault is with the option itself and not
with the main supply. This can be accomplished by removing
the top cover, disconnecting ribbon connector P1 from the AZ
Control Board and checking the operation of the main supply.
H the fault still exists, proceed to the troubleshooting section,
paragraph 5-52, in the main text. Otherwise, troubleshoot the
option board as described in the following paragraphs.
A-74 Removal of the Option Board. To facilitate
troubleshooting of the 002 option, the board can be removed
from the power supply and electrically connected via the rib-
bon cable. To remove the circuit board, proceed as follows:
a. Turn off power supply and disconnect line cord.
b. Disconnect option board ribbon cable from Ji on AZ
control board, and remove control board as directed in
Paragraph A-15.
c. Disconnect option 1/0 cable from J2 on rear panel,
remove two screws that secure option connector to rear
panel, remove two screws that secure option board to
side panel, and remove option board from instrument.
d. Reinstall contro! board.
e, With 6012A top cover still off, place a piece of card-
board or other lightweight insulating material on top of
6012A and lay option board, component side up, on top
of insulating material,
AA
f. Being cafeful not to damage ribbon cable by excessive
stretching or flexing, reconnect option board ribbon
cable {P1} to J1 on control board. Red stripe on ribbon
cabie should be toward end of J1 marked with white dot
{toward front of instrument).
g. Be careful that option board lies securely on insulating
material and does not touch any part of the 6012A.
ATH Isolating Faulty Circuit. If it is apparent which
function is not operating properly, proceed to the appropriate
paragraph. If the problem involves more than one function,
check the output voltages of the Bias Supplies. (Table A-1).
A-76 Troubleshooting Resistance and Voltage
Programming.
a. Confirm that problem is on option board by disconnect-
ing P1 from Control Board and attempting to program
the supply via the rear panel terminal strip.
b. Check — 15 Vand + 11,8 V supplies.
¢. Check for a problem in the Programming Protection cir-
cuit. This circuit should draw about 2 ¿A from the pro-
gramming lines,
d. Check for shorted relay contacts on K1 and KZ.
Troubleshooting Current Programming.
a. Check + 15 V supplies. |
b. Check + 5 V supply and proceed to the test setup
shown in Figure A-10 and/or A-11.
¢. Disconnect J2-11 and/or J2-12 from J2-7. See if varying
the voltage source produces 0 to 5 V at K1, pin 14
and/or K2, pin 14. If not, check op amps and associated
circuitry.
d. Return to original test set-up and see if varying the
voltage source produces Q to 6 Vat K1, pin 8 and/or K2,
pin 8. If not, check relays for proper operation.
e. If relays are okay, check for a problem in the Program-
ming Protection circuit. This circuit should draw about
24A from the programming lines.
002 OPTION —
| CV CURRENT PROG «—— 21
|
0-20v
ЮЖ
CONTROL ISOLATOR SBIAS —— 10 “
save
| 5 7
Figure A-10. Troubleshooting Current Programming of
CV Mode
002 OPTION —
CC CURRENT PROG #4 2
f
9-20 Y
ЮЖ
+
CONTROL ISOLATOR SIAS —— 0
save Jos
RELAY К Я «жене ||
|
E
MA
вен
Figure A-11. Troubleshooting Current Programming of
CC Mode
A-78 Troubleshooting Status indicators. The test set-
up shown in Figure A-12 can be used to check each of the six
status indicators. This set-up, however, will temporarily defeat
the isolation of the status lines. Before attempting to
troubleshoot a status indicator, check for +b Vat TP (+5V
INT). This voltage must be present for proper operation of the
opto-isolators.
DVM
TO OUTPUT OF
002 OPTION STATUS INDICATOR в,
BEING TESTED ox
> > в.
TO
| ISOLATOR aed 37
| BIAS
+5V 73
STATUS .
ESOLATOR «+1 34
COMMON
Ш
Figure A-12. Troubelshooting Status Indicators
A-78 Techeck CVMÓODE, proceed as follows:
a. Using test set-up, connect top end of 2 K resistor to
J2-36.
b. Set CURRENT control one turn clockwise (CW) and
VOLTAGE control also one turn CW.
с. Turnuniton. DVM should readOto .4 V.
. Turn unit off. Short circuit the supply’s output.
e, Turnuniton, DVM should read about 5 М.
a
A-80 To check CC MODE, proceed as follows:
a, Using test set-up, connect top end of 2 kf] resistor to
J2-35,
А-12
‚ 5е! CURRENT and VOLTAGE controls one turn CW,
‚ Turn unit on. DVM should read about 5 V.
. Turn unit off. Short circuit the supply's output.
. Turn unit on, DVM should read O to 4 Y.
® с. ео с
A-81 To check OVERVOLTAGE, proceed as follows:
a. Using test set-up, connect top end of 2 kQ? resistor to
J2-17.
b. With no load on supply, turn OVP ADJUST fully CW
and set VOLTAGE control for about 30 volts output.
Turn CURRENT contro! one turn CW.
с. Turn OVP ADJUST CCW one-half turn or until the sup-
ply goes into overvoitage. DVM should read 0 to 4 V
d Turn OVP ADJUST fully CW, turn supply off and wait
several seconds,
e. Turn supply on. DVM should read about 5 volts.
A-82 To check OUTPUT UNREGULATED, proceed as
follows:
a. Using test set-up, connect top end of 2 ki? resistor to
J2-18.
b. With no load on supply, turn OVP ADJUST fully CW
and set VOLTAGE control for about 30 volts output,
Turn CURRENT control one turn CW,
с. Turn OVP ADJUST CCW one-haif turn or until the sup-
ply goes inta overvoltage. DVM should read O to 4 V.
d. Turn OVP ADJUST fully CW, turn supply off and wait
several seconds.
e. Turn supply on, DVM should read about 5 volts,
A-83 — To check LOW BIAS OR AC DROPOUT, proceed as
follows:
a. Substitute an oscilloscope in place of DVM in test
set-up.
b, Connect top end of 2 kl resistor to J2-18.
с. Turn unit on, Voltage at 2 k{) resistor should be be-
tween 0 and 4 V.
de Turn unit off. Voltage at 2 kf) resistor should go to
about 5 volts before decaying back to OV.
NOTE
In this test, the LOW BIAS OR AC DROPOUT
signal decays to OV only because of loss of
power to the +5 V REG Bias Supply used in the
test set-up. If in doubt, use an external +5 V sup-
ply for this test,
A-84
follows:
a. Tum off power supply and disconnect line cord.
b. Wait at least two minutes for input capacitors to
discharge,
¢. Remove top cover and remove heatsink cover,
d. Using test set-up, connect top end of 2 k{} resistor to
J2-16.
e. Connect a SPST switeh across any one of the three
thermostats in the 6012A. One thermostat is mounted
on each of the three heatsink assemblies, The ther-
To check OVERTEMPERATURE, proceed as
mostat on the Output Diode assembly, mounted in
A143 {furthest to the right) is the most accessible,
f. Ensure that all three heatsink assemblies are standing
straight up and not touching one another or any part of
the 6012A chassis,
g. Reconnect 6012A line cord and turn unit on,
WARNING À
The FET heatsinks are connected to the 60124
primary circuit, and hazardous voltages (up to
between 300 V and 400 V dc) exist between each
of the heatsinks and between the heatsinks and
the 60124 chassis. These potentials remain for up
to two minutes after the 60124 is turned off. Do
not touch the heatsinks or any components on
the heatsink assemblies while the 60124 is turned
on or for at least wo minutes after primary power
is turned off. Do not place any of the heatsink
assemblies on extender boards.
h. With SPST switch open, DVM should read about 5
volts.
i. Close SPST switch. DVM should read Oto 4 Y.
i. Turn off power supply and disconnect line cord.
k. Wait at least two minutes for input capacitors to
discharge, and disconnect SPST switch from ther-
mostat.
|. Replace heatsink cover, top cover, and reconnect line
cord.
A-85 Troubleshooting Remote Shutdown. The foliow-
ing procedures check the Remote Shutdown features of the
option. Troubleshooting can be accomplished by using a logic
probe and referring to the schematic and the circuit descrip
tions in Section A-46, Before attempting to troubleshoot the
Remote Shutdown function of the option, check for +53 Vat
TP1 (+5 Y INT.). This voltage must be present for proper
operation of these circuits.
A-86 To check REMOTE TRIP and REMOTE RESET, pro-
ceed as follows: |
a. Connect +5 V supply, J2-23, to CONTROL ISOLATOR
BIAS, J2-10.
b. Turn unit on and short REMOTE TRIP, J2-30, to power
supply common, J2-7, momentarily. Supply should go
into overvoltage condition.
6. Short REMOTE RESET, J2-29, to common momentari-
ly. Supply should return to initial state.
To check REMOTE INHIBIT, proceed as follows:
a. Connect +5 V supply, J2-23, to CONTROL ISOLATOR
BIAS, J2-10.
b. Turn unit on and short REMOTE INHIBIT, J2-31, to
power supply common, J2-7. Supply should go into
overvoitage condition.
с. Remove short from J2-31 to common. Supply should
return to its initial state.
A-88 Bias Supply Adjustments
A-89 After troubleshooting and repair of the 002 option, it
may be necessary to calibrate the Bias Supplies. The correct
calibration procedures are provided in the following
- paragraphs. Measurements can be taken at the appropriate
A-13
pins on connector J2 and adjustments are made with the six
potentiometers located on the top of the option board.
A-90 To remove the top cover of the power supply,
remove the four screws that secure the cover to the instru-
ment. Slide the cover back and lift off.
A-91 +5 V Supply Adjustment. The output voltage and
current limiting of the +5 V Bias Supply are adjusted as
follows:
a. Turn off supply and disconnect all loads.
b. Connect a DVM between J2-23 { +b V} and J2-7 {power
supply common).
c. Turn on power supply and adjust R43 until DVM reads
+5 V +25 mv.
d. Turn off power supply and disconnect DVM.
e. Connect 100, 5 watt resistor between J2-23 and J2-7.
Connect DVM across this resistor.
f. Turn on power supply and adjust R44 until DVM reads
1.7V £80 mV, This limits the output current to 170
mA.
g. Turn off power supply and disconnect DVM and
resistor,
A-92 +15 Y Supply Adjustment. The output voltage
and current limiting of the + 15 V Bias Supply are adjusted as
follows:
a. Turn off supply and disconnect all loads.
b. Connect a DVM between J2-4 { + 15 V) and J2-7 {power
supply common).
ec. Turn on supply and adjust R45 until DVM reads + 15 V
+ 75 mV.
d. Turn off power supply and disconnect DVM.
e. Connect 507 5 watt resistor between J2-4 and J2-7.
Connect DVM across this resistor.
f. Turn on supply and adjust R46 until DVM reads £6.25
V + 0.15 V, This limits the output current to 125 mA,
g. Turn off supply and disconnect DVM and resistor.
A-93 — 15 V Supply Adjustment. The output voltage
and current limiting of the ~ 15 V Bias Supply are adjusted as
follows:
a, Turn off supply and disconnect ail loads.
b. Connect a DVM between J2-20 (- 15 Vi) and J2-7
¡power supply common).
c. Turn on supply and adjust R48 until DVM reads — 15 \
+75 mV.
d. Turn off power supply and disconnect DVM.
e. Connect 500 b watt resistor between J2-20 and J2-7,
Connect DVM across this resistor.
f. Turn on supply and adjust R47 until DVM reads
—6.25 V +0,15 V. This limits the output current to 125
mA.
g. Turn off supply and disconnect DVM and resistor.
Table A-3. Replaceable Parts
Ref. HP Mir.
Desig. Part No. | Qty. Description Code Mfr. Part No.
C1, 3, 13 0160-3070 2 | cap 100pF 5% 300 V mica 28480
C2,11 0160-4822 1 | cap 1000pF 5% 100 V cer 16299 | XX03COG102J7100A
C4, 6 0160-2639 1 | cap 5000pF 20% 100 V cer 72982 | B35-100-Z5U-502M
Cb, 7, 14, 18, 31 | 0160-4722 5 | cap. Tur —20+80% 50 Y cer 56289 1 292CZ5U1042050C
Ca, 9 0140-0210 1 | cap 270pF 5% 300 V mica 28480
C10, 24 0160-4832 2 | cap .01uF 10% 100 V cer 16299 | CACO3X7R103KT00A
C12, 16, 17 0180-0405 3 | cap 1.84F 10% 20 V 56283 | 150D185X9020A2
C15 0160-2012 1 | cap 330pF 5% 500 V mica 28480
C19 0160-0157 1 | cap 4700p 10% 200 V 56289 | 192P47292
(20, 30 0180-2825 2 | cap 22uF — 10 +50% 50 V 28480
C21 0160-3969 1 | cap .015uF 20% + 20pF C0633 | PME2/1Y515
C22, 23 0180-0533 2 | cap 500uF +75 - 10% 40 Val 28480
C25 0160-4557 2 | cap .1uF 20% 50 V cer 16299 | CACO4X7R104MO50A
C26 0180-2407 1 | cap 1000uF +75 — 10% 25 V al
C27 0160-4830 1 } cap 2200pF 10% 100 V cer 16299 | CACO2X7R222K100A
C28 0160-4833 1 | cap .022uF 10% 100 V cer 16299 | CACOAX7R223K100A
C29 0180-0100 1 | cap 4.7.F 10% 35 V 56289 | 150D475X903582-DYS
CR1, 2, 3, 16, 17 | 1901-0327 5 | dio-pwr rect. 200 V 1A 03508 | A14B
SR: on 1901-0033 7 1 dio-gen prp 07263 | FDH3369
CR5-8, 13, 18, 191 1901-0050 7 1 dio-sw 80 V 200 mA 07263 | FDHE308
J2 1251-5075 1 { connector, F 37-pin 28480
KI, 2 0490-1277 2 | relay, reed 28480
Q1-4 1854-0823 4 | XSTR NPN si 01295 | SKC0221
Q5-7 1853-0234 3 | XSTR PNP si 01295 | TIPAZA
R1-3 0683-2015 3 | res 2000 5% .25W fc 01121 CB2015
R4-6 0686-1525 3 | res 1.5k 5% .5W fc 01121 ЕВ1525
R7-9, 13, 21 0683-4715 5 | res 4701) 5% .25W fc 01121 CB4715
R10, 12 0683-3355 2 | res 3.3m 5% .25W fc 01121 CB3355
R11 0757-0441 1 | res 8.25k 1% .125W + 16299 | C4-1/8-TO-8251-F
R14, 38 0683-4315 2 | res 4300 5% .25W fc 01121 CB4315
R15, 18 0698-6631 2 | res 2.5k .1% ,125W f 24546 | NE55
R16, 17 0683-1055 2 | res 1M 5% .25W fc 01121 СВ1055
R19, 39 0813-0001 2 | res 1k 5% 3W w 01686 | T2B-78
R20, 22, 42 0683-1035 3 | res 10k 5% .25W fc 01121 CB1035
H23, 53 0757-0427 2 | res 1,5k 1% .125W f 16299 | C4-1/8-TO-1501-F
R24, 52 0683-4725 2 | res 4.7k 5% .25W fc 01121 CB4725
R25 0683-3335 1 | res 33k 5% .25W fc 01121 CB3335
R26 0698-6343 1 | res9.k.1% ‚125 W f 91637 | CMF-55-1,T-9
R27 0698-4158 1 | res 100k .1% .125W f 28480
R28, 37 0757-0449 2 1 res 20k 1% .125W f 91637 | CMF-55-1,T-1
R29, 33 0683-1535 2 | res 15k 5% .25W fc 01121 CB1535
R30 0683-2715 1 | res 2700 5% .25W fc 01121 СВ2715
R31 0683-2745 1 {res 270k 5% .25W fc 01121 CXB2745
R32 0757-0317 1 | res 1.33k 1% .125W f 16299 | C4-1/8-TO-1331-F
R34 0683-1615 1 | res 160 5% .25W fc 01121 CB1615
R35 0683-2725 1 {res 2.7k 5% .25W fc 19701 (CR-25)1-4-5P2K7
R36 0757-0400 1 | res 90.90 1% .125W f 16299 | C4-1/8-TO-90R9-F
R40 0757-0483 1 1 res 562k 1% .12bW f 28480
A-14
Table A-3. Replaceable Parts (cont,}
Ref. HP Mfr.
Desig. Part No. Qty. Description Code Mfr. Part No.
R41 0757-0465 1 | res 100k 1% .125W T 16299 | C4-1/8-TO-1003-F
R43 2100-3273 1 | res var 2k 10% 01121 E4A202
R44, 46, 47 2100-0589 3 | res var 100 10% 25W 01121 E4A 100
R45, 48 2100-3274 2 | res var 10k 10% 01121 E4A 103
RAS 0086-2225 1 | res 2.2k 5% .5W fc 01121 ЕВ2225
R50, 57 0757-0438 2 | res5.11k 1% .125W 1 16299 | C4-1/8-TO-5111-F
R51 0683-4735 1 | res 47k 5% .25W fc 01121 CB4735
R54 0686-1205 1 | res 1202 5% .5W fc 01121 EB1205
R55, 59 0683-1025 2 | res ik 5% .25W fc 01121 СВ1025
R56 0683-0335 1 | res 3.30 5% .25W fc 01121 C833G5
R58 0757-0439 1 | res 6.81k 1% .125W f 16299 | C4-1/8-TO-6811-F
RGO 0683-6235 1 | res 62k 5% .25W fc 01121 CB6235
R61, 67 0683-3305 2 | res 332 5% .25W fc 01121 CB3305
R62, 66 0683-0275 2 | гез 2.70 5% .25W fc 01121 CB27G5
R63 0698-0084 1 | res 2.15k 1% .125W § 16299 | C4-1/8-TO-215R-F
R64 0683-3326 1 | res 3.3k 5% .25W fc 01121 CB3325
ROS 0683-1525 1 | res 1.5k 5% .25W fc 01121 CB1525
U1-3 1990-0732 3 | Opto-isolator 28480
U4-6 1990-0494 3 | Opto-isolator 28480
U7,8 1826-0493 2 1 iC LM308A 27014 | 5135008
19 1858-0023 1 1 XSTR Array NPN si 86684 | САЗОВТЕ
U10 1820-1976 1 1 IC-MC14050BCP 04713 | SC45023PK
Ui 1820-1932 1 | 1IC-MC14538BCP 04713 | SC42853PK
112 1820-2019 1 | IC-MCT4584BCP 04713 | SC45116PK
U13 1820-1600 1 1 1C-MC14093BCP 04713 | SC45057PK
Ui4 1820-1961 1 1 1C-MC14023BCP 04713 | SC45010PK
U1b 1826-0144 1 IC Voltage Reg, +5 V 07263 | 7805UC
Ue, 17 1826-0049 2 1 ]C Voltage Reg., Adi., Pos. 01295 UAT723CJ
U18 1826-0016 1 1 1C Voltage Reg., Adi., Neg. 04713 | MLM2046
VR1-8,11,14 1902-0556 10 | dio-znr 20 Y 5% 04713 | SZ11213-227
VRS 1902-0575 1 | dio-znr 6.5 \ 2% 12954 | SZ11594
VR10 1902-0064 1 1 dio-znr 7.5 Y 5% 28480
VR12 1902-3180 1 | dio-znr 11.8 V 2% 04713 1 $730016-204
VR13 1902-0779 1 | dio-znr 11.8 V 5% 04713 | 5211213-161
Zi 1810-0276 1 | res array 1.5k 2% 01121 210A152
Z2 1810-0206 1 | res array 10k 2% 01121 208A103
A-15
Table A-3. Replaceable Parts (cont.)
Ref. HP - Mir.
Desig. Part No. | Qty Description Code Mr. Part No.
OPTION BOARD ASSEMBLY
06012-60005 | 1 | cable assy, 16 conductor 28480
with connectors
MECHANICAL
1205-0398 3 | heat sink al (Q5-7) 13103 6025D
1251-4150 1 | connector 37 pin M 28480
1251-6069 37 | contacts-crimp 28480
1251-6070 1 | shieid and hardware for 37 28480
pin connector
2360-0411 2 | 6-32 screw 28480
06024-00014 1 | bracket (J2) 28480
1251-5436 1 | screwiock F (J2) 28480
MISCELLANEOUS
06012-90002 1 | Option 002 Manual 28480
A-16
Figure A-13. Logic Symbols And Definitions
Definitions
High = more positive
Low
—
pr
less positive
indicator and Qualifier Symbois
Балы
В
oa
rex у ум
я
x
UN
©
o
OR function
{polarity indicator, shown outside logic symbol} Any marked input or output is active low; any
unmarked input or output is active high.
(dynamic indicator) Any market input is edge-triggered, le, active during transition between
states; N
any unmarked input is level sensitive.
{Schmitt trigger) indicates that hysteresis exists in device.
{non-logic indicator) Any marked input or output does not carry logic information.
open-coliector or open emitter output
monostabie (one-shot) muitivibrator
indicates pulse width {usually determined by external RC network)
gate input {a number following G indicates which inputs are gated}
control input (clock)
reset (clear)
set
OLO SYMBOL NEW SYMBOL NOTES
Qutput requires external components to
achieve logic state
CLR
Q pe — A >! G barre e ; 2.
в” À positive-going transition at À or
> a negative-going transition at B triggers the
IL one-shot. External timing components
© ТЕХ _ | connect to non-logic inputs.
> Y О
Qutput changes state rapidly regardless
of input rate of change.
A-17
+5V REG.
V. ADJ
+5V REG.
CUR. ADJ.
+45V REG.
V. ADJ.
+15V REG.
CUR. ADU
—15V REG.
CUR ADJ.
-45V REG.
Y. ADJ.
T ; T
UOTE FAT =
Ri | o
| R50 | : >
JERE -
= VRTS he E
4 CRIT Lo
£26
TE
£28
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TRE Le
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64
Mis
ca}.
+ R66
Figure A-14. Option 002 Board Component Location
A-18
SCHEMATIC NOTES:
i ALL RESISTORS ARE IN OHMS, 1.5%, [/4W, UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.
<. ALL CAPACITORS ARE IN MICROFARADS, UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.
3. WHITE SILKSCREENED DOTS ON P.C. BOARDS INDICATE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING:
À. PIN 1 OF AN 1. C. {EXCEPT FOR U8 SEE NOTE 4}.
B. POSITIVE END OF A POLARIZED CAPACITOR,
C. CATHODE OF A DIODE OR THE EMITTER OF A TRANSISTOR,
4. PIN LOCATIONS FOR SEMICONDUCTORS ARE SHOWN BELOW:
O°
JUL
BCE
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5 ON VOLTAGE REGULATOR DEVICES,
TOP
VIEW
Qi-4
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3-COMMON
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147
REF SUPPLY = BIAS FOR REGULATORS INTERNAL REFERENCE.
REF = OUTPUT FROM REGULATORS INTERNAL REFERENCE.
BOOST OUTPUT = CONTROL FOR EXTERNAL PASS TRANSISTOR.
Cs = CURRENT SENSE
C; = CURRENT LIMIT
/NV = INVERTING INPUT TO REGULATORS ERROR AMPLIFIER.
N/ = NON-INVERTING INPUT TO REGULATORS ERROR AMPLIFIER,
COMP» FREQUENCY COMPENSATION,
A-19
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APPENDIX B
100 Vac INPUT POWER OPTION 100
B-1 GENERAL INFORMATION
B-2 Description
B-3 Option 100 is a modification of Model 6012A that in-
volves changing the vaiues of two resistors, located in the
Overvoitage Protection and Display Circuits. it also entails
recalibrating the unit and changing the Voitmeter, Ammeter,
and the Front panel. These changes allow the unit to operate
at a lower line voltage of 90-108 Vac, while operating on the
same line frequency of 48 to 63 Hertz. The reduced input
voitage limits the output power to 675 W and the output
voltage from 0 to 50 V, whiie retaining the standard unit's out-
put current rating. Other parameters that change due to Op-
tion 100 include the Overvoltage Trip Range and The Remote
Programming specifications.
B-4 Scope of Appendix B
8-5 This appendix contains alt the information necessary
to support Model 6012A power supplies that are equipped
with Option 100. The appendix describes only the changes
pertaining to Option 100 and how they affect the other por-
tions of this manual. Unless otherwise specified in Appendix
B, all other portions of the manual apply to both the standard
unit and the Option 100 unit. -
5-6 Suggestions for Using Appendix B
В-7 The Option 100 changes are listed sequentially, stari-
ing with Section | in the main body of the manual and working
back through Section VII. It is recommended that the user
mark all the necessary changes directly into the manual using
Appendix B as a guide. This will update the manual for Option
100 and eliminate the need for constant referrals back to Ap-
pendix B.
B-8 Section | Manual Changes
B-9 in paragraph 1-2 change the output power from “at
least 1000 W” to ” at least 675 W” and the operating range to
“from 0 to 50 Y”.
8-10 In paragraph 1-4, the Overvoitage Trip Point can be
set between 2 V and 52 V.
B-11 Specifications Changes
8-12 Table B-1 provides all specifications changes for
Option 100. Specifications not listed in Table B-1 are the same
as those in the main specifications, Table 1-1.
B-13 INSTALLATION
B-14 Section H Manual Changes
3-15 in paragraph 2-16, the supply can be operated from a
nominal 100 Y source with the addition of Option 100 and with -
a derated output. Add the following:
Nominal Line Voltage Maximum
Voltage Range Input Current
100 V 90-105 24 A rms
5-16 in paragraph 2-18 the power cord used for 120 Y
operation is also used for the 100 V operation of Option 100.
B-17 In paragraph 2-24, line c: change 22 V to 14.5 V.
B-18 Line Voltage Option. it is possible to convert the
Option 100 units to other line voltages by following the direc-
tions in paragraph 2-25 for 120 V conversion, but the unit will
maintain its derated 675 W output.
i CAUTION |
No attempt should be made by the user to uprate
the Option 100 unit above its calibrated output
voltage and power limits. To do so could result in
severe damage to the unit and a fire hazard.
R= 3130
Ego ye POLOS E __ 4
ЭМ 5OY, OVERRANGE
i 16A
| | SOY, 224
A о .
So 1 i
|
CONSTANT VOLTAGE {|
OPERATING REGIONS — |
{В Ra)
LOAD С |
: |
| I |
|
| | | 13.5 У,
Locus «y 50A
Е den. 250 ha
un O 20 270
| | CONSTANT CURRENT | 17/6
Е | OPERATING RÉGIONS |} {ees
Eour (оао < Вс) Y pS
E f |
в wi !
|
| |
E | |
154 ; isa 153 SOA
SA 274 404
Eg VOLTAGE CONTROL SETTING
15 = CURRENT CONTROL SETTING
Rs E + CROSSOVER VALUE OF LOAD RESISTANCE
Figure B-1. Overall Output Range with Three Sample
Operating Loci (Replace Figure 3-4).
Table B-1. Specification Changes, Mode! 8012A Option 100
INPUT POWER:
Two internal switches and two internal jumpers permit
operation from 100, 120, 220 or 240 Vac { — 10%, +5%)48-63
Hz. Maximum input current is 24 A rms for 100 and 120 V rms,
15 A rms for 220 V rms and 14 A rms for 240 V rms.
PEAK INRUSH CURRENT (Maximum)
100 Vac, 26.1 A
120 Vac, 31.5 A
220 Vac, 13.3 A
240 Vac, 14.3 A
DC QUTPUT:
Adjustable from 0 to 50 V and 0 to 50 A. Maximum output
power is 675 W at 50 A, 800 W at 50 Y, and approximately 910
W at midrange (See Graph).
P
800
855
870
ABO
300
210
90
862
585
800
ОМ
780
ros
575
30v
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
20v
OUTPUT CURRENT
OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION:
Trip voltage is adjustable from 2 to 52 V. Minimum setting
above output voltage to avoid false tripping is 1.5 V + 1%
Vout,
REMOTE PROGRAMMING:
Resistance Programming - 0 to 20830 provides 0 to 50 V
and 0 to 25000 provides 0 to 10 A,
Accuracy: CV; 1% +3 mV CC: 25% + 15 mA
Voltage Programming - 0 to 4.17 V provides 0 to 50 V and
0 to 5 V provides 0 to 10 A.
Accuracy: CV; 0.3% +3 mV CC; 1% + 15 mA.
Current Programming - 2 mA to 0 mA current sink pro-
vides O to 50 V with 20830 resistance and 0 to 10 A with 25000
resistance,
Accuracy: CV; 0.3% + 0.42 V + accuracy of resistor
СС; 1% + 0.8 A + accuracy of resistor
PROGRAMMING RESPONSE TIME:
Maximum time for output voltage to change from 0 V to 50
V or 50 V to 2 V and settle within the 60 mV band is:
Up: Full Load (3.10) 120 mS
No Load 120 MS
Down: Full Load (3.10) 400 mS
No Load 105
Your
VOLTS |
FUEL LOAD
NO LOAD
o 100 200 300 400
DOWN PROGRAMMING TEME Um)
500 600 700
80
… 50 ar)
oh
£ |
= „
E 40
2 и
30 YA
EL
3 2
o
0 © 20 10 40 50
voyy (VOLTS)
METERS AND INDICATORS:
Continuously reading 60 V scale with secondary scale in-
dicating amperes available; accuracy +3% of full scale.
MULTIPLE UNIT OPERATION:
Auto-series-Up to four units (eight if center tapped to
ground) may be connected in series to increase total output
voltage to 200 Vdc (400 Vdc if center tapped to ground) while
maintaining control from a single-unit.
8-2
8-19 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
8-20 Section lI Manual Changes
B-21 In paragraph 3-22 (which refers to Figure 3-4 in the
manual) the reference illustration is now Figure B-1 instead of
Figure 3-4. Also the CURRENT setting should be changed
from 30 A to 22 A and the resistance from 1.30 to 1.820.
В-22 In paragraph 3-24 change the values 2.20, 2.20,
0.70, and 25 V to 3.130, 3,130, 0.559, апа 22 \/ .
B-23 in paragraph 3-25 change 1000 W to 675 W. This
should also be done for every remaining 1000 W value in the
manual.
В-24 in paragraph 3-32 change 63 volts to 52 volts.
8-25 in paragraph 3-46, 3-51, 3-53, 3-54, and 3-56 change
“full scale,” or “maximum” or “maximum rated output
voltage” to read 0 to 50 V” or "0 to 50 A.”
B-26 Remote Programming. in paragraphs 3-46, 3-51,
3-53, 3-54 and 3-56 to obtain the 0-50 V output, different pro-
gramming values are now necessary for Constant Voltage
than those required for Constant Current Output. Resistance
Programming requires a 2083 KQ programming resistance,
Voltage Programming requires a 0-4.17 V programming
voltage and Current control requires a 2083 KQ resistance with
a 2ZmA to 0 mA current sink. The Constant Current Output
programming values for Option 100 are the same as those
shown in the manual.
В-27 In paragraph 3-51 change 25000 to 20830.
B-28 In paragraph 3-52 change 12500, 30 V, 12500, 26000,
and 20 V to 10420, 25 V, 10420, 20832, and 16.67 Y.
B-29 In paragraphs 3-53 and 3-54 change "Cto +5V to
"Ото + 4.17 V.
B-30 PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
B-31 Section 1V Manual Changes
8-32 in paragraph 4-2, the reference illustration is now
Figure B-2 instead of Figure 4-1, in Figure 4-2 and paragraph
4-3, change the de input to the FET switches from approx-
imately 300 Vdc to approximately 250 Vdc.
B-33 MAINTENANCE
8-34 Section V Manual Changes
E-35 In paragraphs 5-9: 5-17,c; 5-28,0; b-44,£ апа 5-46,е;
and 5-51,c: change 20 Y tc 13.5 V.
8-36 In paragraph 5-9 change 3.40 to 3.130,
5-37 In paragraphs 5-8: 5-15,f; 5-38,e: and 5-41,e: change
17.5 А 10 16А.
B-38 in paragraphs 5-9: 5-15, c, d, п; 5-19, е; 5-38, с; 5-41,
¢; Table 5-4, line 6; and 5-103, b, e; change 60 Y to 50 Y.
5-39 In paragraph 5-9 change 1200 W to 910 W.
8-46 in paragraphs 5-15, ft 5-28, e: and 5-41, e: change
17,5 mV to 16 mV.
B-41 in paragraph 5-19, k: change 9 mV to 8 mV,
В-42 In paragraph 5-24, ce; change 40 V and 30 A to 35 V
and 26 A.
8-43 In paragraph 5-31 change the values 30 A, 3 A,
0.1430, 1.3330, 1.4820, 30 A and 27 Ato 22 A, 2.2 A, 0.2029,
1.8189, 2.0202, 22 A and 19.8 A,
В-44 in paragraph 5-32 replace the second sentence with
the following: “Therefore at the same 40 V output, the load
would have to decrease 0.720 from 4.000 to 3.280 to increase
the output current by 2.2 À from 10 À to 12.2 A.
A. TYPICAL CV/CC
SUPPLY
50 Y
|
|
40V y MAX Poy ar 40v MAX Progr |
675 W 675 W
i
|
ZOv 675 W 13 5V |
|
|
|
с 16.88 À 0 16.884 33.754 о ISA BOA
5. DUAL -RANGE CV/ CC
SUPPLY
©. MODEL 6012 A
AUTORANGING SUPPLY
Figure B-2. Output Characteristics, Typical, Dual Range and Autoranging Supplies
pa
da >
SE in paragraph 5-38, j; change 80 mV to 70 mV.
3-48 In paragraph 5-41, h; change 23 mVdc to 20 mVdc.
B-47 In Table 5-3 under CV Circuit, line 1; change 5
voits To 4.7 volts”,
2.48 in Table 5-4, second line; change 25 V to 16 V.
5-40 in paragraph 5-93, j: and 5-93, |; change 22 V to
14,5 V.
B50 In paragraph 5-83, k; and 5-83, |; change 240 V to 206
Y. |
131 REPLACEABLE PARTS
B-52 Section VI Manual Changes
3-53 For Option 100 change R136 10 24.9 КО 11%,
1/8 W, HP Part Number 07567-0311. Change R151 to 182 kQ
+1%, 1/8 W, HP Part Number 0698-4486, .Change the
Voltmeter and Ammeter to HP Part Numbers 1120-1396 and
1170-1397. Also add the fiont panel overlay, HP Part Number
06012-00613 and the 30-105 V line label,
F120-2087.
HP Part Number,
B-4
B-54 APPENDIX A na
B-55 Appendix À Manual Changes
| | ar
5-56 Under Remote Programming for Constant Voltage
Qutput, in Table A-1 and in paragraphs A-22, A-24, and A-30:
Ч
Resistance Programming requires a 0 to 20830 programming”
resistance, Voltage Programming requires a D to 4,17 V pro- _..
gramming voltage and the Current Programming reguiresa 0.
to 1.67 mA current sink, to program the output from 0-50 V. * ol
The Constant Current programming values for Opticn 100 are...
the same as those shown in the Appendix À.
8-57 in Table A-1, and paragraphs A-22, A-Z4, A-26,
A-30, and A-33 change “maximum rated voltage or current
output,” or "full scale voltage” to "50 V” or "50 A”.
5-58 SCHEMATIC
B-59 Schematic Changes
B-60 Change R136, located in the Overvoltadé Protection.
circuit, te 24.9 kQ2, 1/8 W. Change R151, located in the Over-
voltage Protection Circuit, 10 182k, 1/8W. Also, changeithe
de input to the cer switches from approximately’ 300 gto
250 Vdc. | : E - vox
AT.
mo
E
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