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ISS Technology Update
Volume 7, Number 9
ISS Technology Update
Volume 7, Number 9
Keeping you informed of the latest ISS technology
Quick tips for differences in energy efficiency between online “double-conversion” technology and online
“on-demand” technology ........................................................................................................................ 1
Use iLO Advanced to capture server event video...................................................................................... 2
HP Industry Standard Servers - a leader in industry standards for storage .............................................. 4
Meet the Expert—Mark Fletcher (confessions of an ISS “hitman”)............................................................. 6
Common SM CLP scripting commands for ProLiant server management, Part 2 ........................................ 7
Recently published industry standard server technology papers ............................................................ 13
Contact us ............................................................................................................................................. 13
Quick tips for differences in energy efficiency between online “doubleconversion” technology and online “on-demand” technology
This quick tip first defines online “on-demand” technology and online “double-conversion” technology. It then contrasts the
energy efficiency performance delivered by these two technologies, each of which uses a different method to ensure a reliable
power source for continuous data center operations.
Online “double-conversion” technology
Online double-conversion is currently the technology that most data centers use for their uninterruptible power supply (UPS)
systems. In this type of UPS, the inverter is always on; it continuously converts AC to DC and then DC to AC. This generates a
pristine, or very low-distortion, sinusoidal waveform; however, efficiency is significantly lower than with online on-demand.
Online “on-demand” technology…plus double conversion
Online on-demand is an energy efficient technology that allows incoming power to connect directly to the load through
protected circuits when the incoming power is within specifications. When the power is not within specifications, the doubleconversion technology takes over to regulate the incoming voltage to an acceptable level for the load. Both online on-demand
and double-conversion modes protect the critical load from voltage fluctuations and from damaging transients that can originate
at the utility. And in the event the power goes out completely, the energy from the battery is converted to provide power to the
load until the utility returns service or until a graceful equipment shutdown becomes necessary.
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Differences in energy efficiency
From an energy efficiency standpoint, the differences between the two technologies are as follows:
• State-of-the-art, double-conversion UPS models provide 92% to 93% efficiency, while older models range from 88% to 90%.
• Online “on-demand” technology, such as the HP R12000/3, provides a higher efficiency at 97%.
Conclusion
Installing a UPS with an Eco Mode (provided with HP R12000/3) is a good way to save energy in data center applications.
Use iLO Advanced to capture server event video
HP Integrated Lights-Out (iLO 2) is a remote management processor that is integrated into HP ProLiant and BladeSystem servers.
Basically, iLO enables full control of data center servers 24 hours a day from anywhere there is access to the network. Although
this capability is not new, the fact that HP iLO Advanced Pack automatically captures video footage of the server’s boot-up and
failure occurrences, and offers “on-demand” video capture capabilities, is indeed something above and beyond basic remote
management.
iLO video
iLO video is a significant advance in remote monitoring technology that allows video capture of data center events such as
server boot or fault sequences. A replay menu and control buttons built into iLO 2 firmware provide easy selection of the type of
video footage to be recorded, where to save video for later viewing, and quick playback (see Figure 1-1).
Figure 1-1. Screen capture showing iLO Advanced Replay Menu and playback buttons
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Automatic or on-demand recording
The video feature of iLO Advanced allows powerful remote troubleshooting capabilities with automatic video recording and
playback:
• Record and play back the last boot sequence
• Record and play back the last fault sequence
It is also possible to record an event on-demand:
• Bugs can be recorded
• Trainings can be recorded
Flexible storage options
The iLO Advanced videos recorded automatically are stored on the iLO hardware (built into ProLiant servers) or to a Web
server, if needed. On-demand videos can be stored anywhere the user chooses, which could be a dedicated storage area or
on a local hard drive.
An HP exclusive
iLO Advanced video technology is available exclusively from HP. A new viewer (iLO Video Player) is currently in development
and scheduled for release in December 2008; customers will be able to download it from http://www.hp.com/go/iLO.
Summary
In summary, HP iLO Advanced offers innovative technology that enables convenient remote viewing of video from data center
events. It also allows users to record scenarios on demand for troubleshooting, training, and quality assurance purposes.
Additional resources
For additional information on the topics discussed in this article, visit the following links:
Resource
URL
Overview
www.hp.com/go/iLO
Quick Specs
http://h18013.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/12362_div/12362_div.html
User Guide
http://bizsupport.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c00553302/c0
0553302.pdf
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Volume 7, Number 9
HP Industry Standard Servers - a leader in industry standards for storage
HP is involved in numerous industry standards bodies relating to server storage. Industry standards increase interoperability
between past, current, and future products.
Serial Attached SCSI (SAS)
HP (Compaq) initiated the development of SAS in 2001, inviting LSI Logic, Seagate, and Maxtor to join together to define a
replacement for parallel SCSI that supports both enterprise-class SAS drives and desktop-class SATA drives. HP has been
heavily involved in the INCITS T10 (SCSI) standards committee, and has served as the editor for the SAS-1, SAS-1.1, and SAS2 standards. HP is also a Sponsor member of the SCSI Trade Association, which has marketed SAS since its inception. T10 is
currently finishing the definition of 6 gigabit per second (Gbps) SAS and zoning, and is starting work on active/optical cable
support, power management features, and 12 Gbps. Visit http://www.t10.org/index.html for more information.
Serial ATA (SATA)
HP sits on the Serial ATA International Organization Board of Directors, defining the industry’s leading disk drive interface. HP
founded and chaired the Interoperability Committee, which defines test cases and runs plugfests to ensure that Serial ATA
products work correctly together. SATA-IO is finishing the definition of 6 Gbps. HP also participates in the INCITS T13 (ATA)
standards committee, which defines the command set for SATA disk drives. T13 has been adding security features and
improving solid-state disk (SSD) support. Visit www.serialata.org for more information.
Fibre Channel (FC)
HP is a Principal member of the Fibre Channel Industry Association, defining the roadmap for Fibre Channel and guiding the
introduction of Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE). HP participates in the INCITS T11 (Fibre Channel) standards committee,
which is starting work on 16GFC and defining FCoE. Visit http://www.fibrechannel.org for more information.
iSCSI
HP participated in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) IP Storage Working Group, co-editing the iSCSI standard and
authoring several supplementary specifications. The IP Storage Working Group is currently dormant, having completed all its
work. HP is also involved in the definition and promotion of IPv6, leading the IPv6 Forum’s CTO Executive Committee.
Universal Serial Bus (USB)
HP is on the USB Implementers Forum Board of Directors and is a USB 3.0 Promoter. USB 3.0 (SuperSpeed USB) will provide a
10x performance increase over USB 2.0 (5 gigabits/sec versus 480 megabytes/sec). USB-IF and INCITS T10 are collaborating
on a new storage protocol to improve the performance of USB-attached storage devices. Visit http://www.usb.org for more
information.
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI)
HP is heavily involved in the INCITS T10 (SCSI) committee for development of SCSI command set standards, defining the
features implemented by disk drives, disk drive enclosures, tape drives, tape libraries, and optical drives. These command set
definitions apply across all the SCSI protocols (SAS, FC, iSCSI, and USB). Recently, T10 has been adding security features to
many of its standards, such as encrypting LTO4 tape drives. Visit http://www.t10.org/index.html for more information.
SFF Committee
HP participates in the SFF Committee, which defines connectors, form factors, and physical layer test procedures used by SAS,
SATA, Ethernet, and other storage interfaces. Visit http://www.sffcommittee.org/ie/index.html for more information.
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Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
HP participates in several IEEE 802.1 and 802.3 Ethernet (the underlying transport for iSCSI and FCoE) working groups. Work
is underway defining 40 Gbps and 100 Gbps Ethernet, Data Center Ethernet (lossless features critical for FCoE), and Energy
Efficient Ethernet (power down idle links). Visit http://standards.ieee.org/getieee802/ for more information.
HP also participates in the IEEE 1619 Security in Storage working group defining data-at-rest encryption standards for disks
and tapes. The group is currently focused on standard key management protocols.
Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA)
HP is a founding member of SNIA, which defined the Storage Management Interface (SMI-S) between storage management
software and storage devices. SNIA runs the leading industry storage trade show, Storage Networking World (SNW). SNIA’s
Green Storage Initiative is exploring energy efficiency for storage systems. HP and SNIA also work with the Distributed
Management Task Force (DMTF) to ensure server and storage management consistency. Visit http://www.snia.org for more
information.
JEDEC Solid State Technology Association
HP is part of the JEDEC, working to define high-speed DRAM interfaces like DDR2 and DDR3 (used in RAID controllers) and
NAND flash chip interfaces (used in solid state disk drives). Visit http://www.jedec.org/ for more information.
Trusted Computing Group (TCG)
An HP representative recently served as president of the TCG, which defines the Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip that can
be used as the root-of-trust for security software such as Microsoft BitLocker Full Drive Encryption. HP chairs several working
groups including the Server WG. Visit https://www.trustedcomputinggroup.org/groups/tpm/ for more information.
International Committee for Information Technology Standards (INCITS)
HP chairs INCITS, the parent committee for T10, T11, T13, and numerous other standards committees. INCITS also represents
the United States in the ISO/IEC international standards committees. Visit http://www.incits.org/ for more information.
Additional resources
For additional information on the topics discussed in this article, visit:
Resource
URL
Energy Efficient Ethernet
http://grouper.ieee.org/groups/802/3/az/public/index.html
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Meet the Expert—Mark Fletcher (confessions of an ISS “hitman”)
Mark Fletcher is an HP Industry Standard Server (ISS) systems engineer who
supports hardware platform teams by solving problems that normally occur during
development and test cycles. That’s the answer Mark would give if you asked him
what he does. If you asked Kevin Depew, Mark’s manager, he would say that
“Mark is the key technical resource in solving difficult issues on both in-production
and new development platforms. Mark has the broad knowledge of hardware,
firmware, and software necessary to investigate and determine the root cause of
the toughest problems.”
Whenever a major product issue arises and the debug effort appears difficult,
engineering teams call in Mark Fletcher. Mark has led debug efforts on countless
critical issues over the last several years. He works closely with other engineers
and with HP’s development partners, such as Intel and Broadcom, to resolve the
most complex issues. According to Kevin, “Mark can always be counted on to find
the root cause of any issue because he always pushes for a complete
understanding of the problem rather than
accepting a quick or incomplete work-around. In
addition, Mark applies his knowledge and
experience in dealing with complex issues to assist
the development teams in making wise
architecture decisions for new products. Mark’s
knowledge and expertise are important resources
that allow HP to ship and support its ProLiant
server products.
Mark and his wife Elizabeth have been married for 10 years. His hobbies include
building radio-controlled (RC) model planes, cycling, photography, coffee
roasting, and dog training. Below are excerpts from an interview with Mark.
Name: Mark Fletcher
Title: ISS Systems Engineer
Years at HP: 14
University/Degree
•
Angelo State University,
BS Applied Physics, 1986
•
University of Texas at El Paso,
MS Electrical Engineering, 1990
U.S. Patent:
•
Patent # 6311217: Method and
apparatus for improved cluster
administration. Ehlinger; Early David
(Houston, TX), Fletcher; Mark F.
(Houston, TX)
Technical Paper:
Solving impossible problems in the 21st
century-debug requirements for the future
The way Kevin described your skills, you could be considered an ISS hitman. Do you confess?
Mark: If I told you, I would have to …
Why did you decide to become an engineer?
Mark: Growing up, I was always interested in puzzles and logic problems, so I have always loved the challenge of working
through complicated problems. As a teenager, I started working on cars out of necessity. That led to a profession as an auto
mechanic (ASE certified Master technician-1986), which I did full time throughout most of my college career. Engineering was
something that just seemed to be a natural fit.
What is your favorite project or research?
Mark: For the last several months, I have been driving and defining requirements to processor vendors to add specific debug
capabilities into future platforms. This could give us the capability to do low-level debugs, such as bus trace analysis, to
determine the root causes of difficult issues.
Are you an advocate for customers in the design of HP products?
Mark: Yes, I believe that every server feature we offer can be tied back to customer feedback at one time or another. It is
important that we ask ourselves what benefits the customers will receive for every single step of our development processes.
Ultimately, we should only add features that directly impact customers.
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Kevin: Mark is a constant advocate for designing products to meet our customers’ needs. Mark has worked numerous customer
issues and understands the customer dissatisfaction caused by quality issues and the associated costs to customers in terms of
downtime. Mark pushes for the highest levels of quality. He influences the design teams to go the extra mile to ensure quality.
What must HP do to remain the leader in industry-standard servers?
Mark: As product development methodologies change, HP needs to continue to reassess its development processes to sustain
the quality levels that customers have come to expect.
Common SM CLP scripting commands for ProLiant server management, Part 2
This is the second in a series of articles that discuss common SM CLP (Server Management Command Line Protocol) scripting
commands. SM CLP is one of the communication, or access, protocols that can be used with the Systems Management Architecture for
Server Hardware (SMASH).
Some customers want to use scripts to perform basic target operations on ProLiant servers (for instance, powering on or
powering off the server, or obtaining event logs). From a Windows or Linux client, administrators can use SM CLP to remotely
interrogate and control servers using the Integrated Lights-Out 2 (iLO 2) processor.
SM CLP is accessed using Secure Shell (SSH). SSH can be interactive (as in a shell) or it can execute in a "command" mode by
processing a single command at a time suitable for scripting. The following examples use SSH command mode, using a
Windows utility (plink) that provides SSH command line support. Plink and PuTTY executables, source code, and license terms
are freely distributed on the web. Other SSH command line utilities should support this functionality in a similar manner.
The following examples specify user credentials on the command line. If user credentials are not specified, iLO 2 prompts for
account credentials, interrupting the process. iLO 2 also supports SSH key-based authentication.
Turn on the user ID light
C:\putty>plink -ssh -l admin -pw password ilo2system.corp.net start system1/led1
start system1/led1
status=0
status_tag=COMMAND COMPLETED
Unit Id On.
Turn off the user ID light
C:\putty>plink -ssh -l admin -pw password ilo2system.corp.net stop system1/led1
stop system1/led1
status=0
status_tag=COMMAND COMPLETED
Unit Id off.
Retrieve event logs
The "show system1/log1 -all" command returns all of the events in sequential (not necessarily chronological) order. To
clear the event log, use the "delete system1/log1" command.
C:\Program Files\putty>plink -ssh -l admin -pw password ilo2system.corp.net show
system1/log1 –all
show system1/log1 -all
status=0
status_tag=COMMAND COMPLETED
/system1/log1
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Targets
record1
Properties
number=1
severity=Informational
date=01/29/2008
time=14:32
description=IML Cleared (iLO 2 user:Administrator)
<screen output edited for readability>
record3
Properties
number=3
severity=NonCritical
date=04/01/2008
time=14:38
description=POST Error: 1794-Drive Array - Array Accelerator Battery Charge Low
Verbs
cd version exit show set
Properties
Verbs
cd version exit show delete set
</>hpiLO->
Retrieve the system health from all sensors
The "show system1 -all" command retrieves information about all the properties of system1, including the health status.
Administrators can use grep to filter the results, showing only health-related status.
C:\Program Files\putty>plink -ssh -l admin -pw password ilo2system.corp.net show system1
-all | grep -i health
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
HealthState=Ok
An abnormality might call for the full output (without the use of grep). The example below has been edited for brevity.
C:\Program Files\putty>plink -ssh -l admin -pw password ilo2system.corp.net show system1
-all
show system1 -all
status=0
status_tag=COMMAND COMPLETED
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/system1
Targets
firmware
Properties
version=P56
date=05/21/2006
Verbs
cd version exit show set
bootconfig1
Targets
bootsource1
Properties
bootorder=1
bootsource2
Properties
bootorder=2
bootsource3
Properties
bootorder=3
Verbs
cd version exit show set
Verbs
cd version exit show set
log1
Targets
record1
Properties
number=1
severity=Informational
date=05/08/2008
time=18:23
description=IML Cleared (iLO 2 user:admin)
Verbs
cd version exit show set
Verbs
cd version exit show delete set
led1
Properties
enabledstate=disabled
Verbs
cd version exit show set start stop
oemhp_vsp1
Properties
enabledstate=disabled
Verbs
cd version exit show set start
cpu1
Properties
speed=3733MHz
cachememory1=32KB
cachememory2=4096KB
cachememory3=0KB
cpu2
Properties
speed=3733MHz
cachememory1=32KB
cachememory2=4096KB
cachememory3=0KB
Verbs
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cd version exit show set
Targets
logical_processor1
Properties
current_pstate=1
pstate0_avg=9.5
pstate1_avg=90.5
pstate2_avg=0.0
pstate3_avg=0.0
pstate4_avg=0.0
pstate5_avg=0.0
pstate6_avg=0.0
pstate7_avg=0.0
<screen output edited for readability>
logical_processor4
Properties
current_pstate=1
pstate0_avg=11.1
pstate1_avg=88.9
pstate2_avg=0.0
pstate3_avg=0.0
pstate4_avg=0.0
pstate5_avg=0.0
pstate6_avg=0.0
pstate7_avg=0.0
Verbs
cd version exit show set
Properties
Verbs
cd version exit show set
memory1
Properties
size=512MB
speed=667MHz
location=DIMM 1A
memory2
Properties
size=not installed
speed=not installed
location=DIMM 2C
<screen output edited for readability>
memory8
Properties
size=not installed
speed=not installed
location=DIMM 8D
Verbs
cd version exit show set
slot1
Properties
type=PCI Express
width=4x
<screen output edited for readability>
slot5
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Properties
type=PCI Express
width=8x
Verbs
cd version exit show set
fan1
Properties
DeviceID=Fan 1
ElementName=I/O Board
OperationalStatus=Ok
VariableSpeed=Yes
DesiredSpeed=45
HealthState=Ok
fan2
Properties
DeviceID=Fan 2
ElementName=I/O Board
OperationalStatus=Ok
VariableSpeed=Yes
DesiredSpeed=45
HealthState=Ok
<screen output edited for readability>
fan12
Properties
DeviceID=Fan 12
ElementName=CPU
OperationalStatus=Ok
VariableSpeed=Yes
DesiredSpeed=36
HealthState=Ok
Verbs
cd version exit show set
sensor1
Properties
DeviceID=VRM 1
ElementName=CPU 1
OperationalStatus=Ok
RateUnits=Volts
CurrentReading=N/A
SensorType=Voltage
HealthState=Ok
oemhp_CautionValue=0
oemhp_CriticalValue=0
sensor2
Properties
DeviceID=VRM 2
ElementName=CPU 2
OperationalStatus=Ok
RateUnits=Volts
CurrentReading=N/A
SensorType=Voltage
HealthState=Ok
oemhp_CautionValue=0
oemhp_CriticalValue=0
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Additional resources
For additional information on the topics discussed in this article, visit:
Resource
URL
HP Integrated Lights-Out
www.hp.com/go/ilo
DMTF SMASH information
www.dmtf.org/standards/mgmt/smash/
PuTTY and Plink
www.google.com/search?q=PuTTY
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Recently published industry standard server technology papers
Title
URL
“Drive technology overview, 2nd edition” technology
brief
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c010714
96/c01071496.pdf
"HP Integrated Lights-Out security, 6th edition" technology
brief
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c002127
96/c00212796.pdf
Industry-standard server technical papers can be found at www.hp.com/servers/technology.
Contact us
Send comments about this newsletter to TechCom@HP.com.
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© Copyright 2008 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to
change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty
statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an
additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.
AMD and AMD Opteron are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
Intel, Intel Xeon, and Intel Itanium are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.
TC081003NL
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