47094-001: Jamshoro Power Generation Project

47094-001: Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Environmental Impact Assessment
June 2013
PAK: Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
CONTENTS
1.
2.
3.
Executive Summary ....................................................................................... 1-1
1.1
Project Setting ...................................................................................... 1-1
1.2
Project Rationale .................................................................................. 1-3
1.3
The Proposed Project ........................................................................... 1-4
1.4
Corrective Actions for Existing Facilities at JTPS .................................. 1-6
1.5
Environmental Impact of New Plant ...................................................... 1-7
1.5.1
Air Quality Impacts .............................................................. 1-7
1.5.2
GHG Emissions ................................................................. 1-11
1.5.3
Other Aspects ................................................................... 1-12
1.6
Environmental Management Plan ....................................................... 1-13
1.7
Conclusions ........................................................................................ 1-13
Introduction .................................................................................................... 2-1
2.1
Introduction to the EIA .......................................................................... 2-1
2.1.1
Objectives ........................................................................... 2-1
2.1.2
Scope of the EIA ................................................................. 2-2
2.1.3
Background of the EIA Study............................................... 2-2
2.2
Institutional Arrangements .................................................................... 2-3
2.3
Project Setting ...................................................................................... 2-3
2.4
Project Rationale .................................................................................. 2-7
2.5
Organization of the Report .................................................................. 2-11
Legal and Institutional Framework ............................................................... 3-1
3.1
Historical and Constitutional Context .................................................... 3-1
3.2
Environmental Law ............................................................................... 3-2
3.3
Requirements for Environmental Impact Assessment ........................... 3-2
3.4
Pollution Control Regulations and Standards ........................................ 3-6
3.5
Other Relevant Laws ............................................................................ 3-6
3.5.1
The Forest Act, 1927 ........................................................... 3-6
3.5.2
Factories Act, 1934 ............................................................. 3-7
3.6
Environmental Guidelines ..................................................................... 3-7
3.6.1
ADB‘s Safeguard Policy Statement 2009............................. 3-7
3.6.2
World Bank/IFC Environmental, Health and
Safety Guidelines for Thermal Power Plants, 2008 .............. 3-8
3.7
Institutional Framework ......................................................................... 3-9
3.7.1
Sindh Government Institutions............................................. 3-9
3.7.2
International and National NGOs ......................................... 3-9
3.8
International Treaties .......................................................................... 3-10
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3.9
4.
Comparison of NEQS with IFC Guidelines .......................................... 3-12
The Proposed Project .................................................................................... 4-1
4.1
Existing Jamshoro Power Plant ............................................................ 4-1
4.1.1
Generating Units ................................................................. 4-1
4.1.2
Fuel and Performance ......................................................... 4-1
4.1.3
Handling, Transportation and Storage of Fuel ..................... 4-1
4.1.4
Water Supply System .......................................................... 4-2
4.1.5
Wastewater Generation and Disposal ................................. 4-2
4.1.6
Cooling Water System ......................................................... 4-2
4.1.7
Solid Waste Storage and Disposal ...................................... 4-2
4.1.8
Waste Fuel Oil Handling and Management ......................... 4-2
4.1.9
Stacks and Emissions ......................................................... 4-3
4.2
General Description of the Proposed Plant ........................................... 4-4
4.3
Power Generation Technology.............................................................. 4-6
4.3.1
Supercritical Steam Generators ........................................... 4-6
4.3.2
Plant Design Parameters..................................................... 4-8
4.3.3
Coal Feeding and Pulverizer System ................................. 4-10
4.3.4
Furnace ............................................................................. 4-11
4.3.5
Superheater and Reheater ................................................ 4-11
4.3.6
Economizer ....................................................................... 4-11
4.3.7
Steam Generator Setting and Insulation ............................ 4-12
4.3.8
Air Heaters ........................................................................ 4-12
4.3.9
Air and flue Gas Fans ........................................................ 4-12
4.3.10
Soot Blowers ..................................................................... 4-13
4.3.11
Fuel Burning Equipment .................................................... 4-13
4.3.12
Ducts and Wind Boxes ...................................................... 4-14
4.4
Steam Turbine and Auxillaries ............................................................ 4-14
4.5
Condenser and Condensate System .................................................. 4-14
4.6
Generator and Electrical System ........................................................ 4-15
4.6.1
Excitation System .............................................................. 4-16
4.6.2
Generator Step-Up Transformer ........................................ 4-16
4.6.3
Auxiliary Transformers....................................................... 4-17
4.6.4
Generator Circuit Breaker .................................................. 4-17
4.6.5
Medium Voltage Switchgear .............................................. 4-17
4.6.6
Low Voltage Load Centers ................................................ 4-18
4.6.7
Electrical Motors ................................................................ 4-18
4.6.8
DC Power System ............................................................. 4-18
4.6.9
Cable Systems .................................................................. 4-18
4.7
Circulation Water and Cooling System................................................ 4-19
4.7.1
System Description ........................................................... 4-19
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4.7.2
4.7.3
4.7.4
4.7.5
4.7.6
5.
System Design Basis......................................................... 4-19
Cooling Tower ................................................................... 4-20
Circulating Water Pumps ................................................... 4-21
Closed Cooling Water System ........................................... 4-21
Chemical Treatment System ............................................. 4-21
4.8
Freshwater System ............................................................................. 4-22
4.9
Design Coal Specification and Blending ............................................. 4-25
4.10
Coal Consumption .............................................................................. 4-26
4.11
Coal Handling System ........................................................................ 4-26
4.11.1
Coal Delivery and Storage ................................................. 4-27
4.11.2
Coal Reclaim System ........................................................ 4-28
4.11.3
Dust Suppression and Temperature Monitoring................. 4-28
4.11.4
Coal Silo Design ................................................................ 4-29
4.12
Ash Handling and Disposal system ..................................................... 4-29
4.12.1
Production and Handling ................................................... 4-29
4.12.2
Ash Disposal ..................................................................... 4-30
4.13
Flue Gas Treatment System ............................................................... 4-31
4.13.1
Electrostatic Precipitators .................................................. 4-31
4.13.2
Flue Gas Desulfurization System ...................................... 4-32
4.13.3
Control of Oxides of Nitrogen ............................................ 4-37
4.14
Gaseous Emissions and Waste .......................................................... 4-39
4.15
Hazardous Waste Storage Facility ...................................................... 4-40
4.16
Port Handling and Transportation of Coal ........................................... 4-40
Description of the Environment .................................................................... 5-1
5.1
Area of Influence .................................................................................. 5-1
5.2
Physical Environment ........................................................................... 5-1
5.2.1
Geology ............................................................................... 5-1
5.2.2
Topography and Land Use .................................................. 5-1
5.2.3
Soil ...................................................................................... 5-3
5.2.4
Climate ................................................................................ 5-3
5.2.5
Water Resources................................................................. 5-7
5.2.6
Air Quality.......................................................................... 5-12
5.2.7
Noise ................................................................................. 5-17
5.3
Ecology............................................................................................... 5-19
5.3.1
Methodology ...................................................................... 5-19
5.3.2
Vegetation ......................................................................... 5-22
5.3.3
Mammals........................................................................... 5-26
5.3.4
Reptiles and Amphibians ................................................... 5-29
5.3.5
Birds .................................................................................. 5-30
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5.3.6
5.3.7
5.3.8
6.
Fish ................................................................................... 5-33
Critical Habitats ................................................................. 5-36
Limitations of the Study ..................................................... 5-37
5.4
Socioeconomic Environment .............................................................. 5-38
5.4.1
Delineation of Study Area .................................................. 5-38
5.4.2
Overview ........................................................................... 5-40
5.4.3
Data Collection and Organization ...................................... 5-40
5.4.4
Settlement Layout ............................................................. 5-41
5.4.5
Demography...................................................................... 5-43
5.4.6
Ethnicity and Religion ........................................................ 5-46
5.4.7
Gender Roles .................................................................... 5-46
5.4.8
Crime Incidence, Law Enforcement and
Conflict Resolution ............................................................ 5-47
5.4.9
Physical Infrastructure ....................................................... 5-47
5.4.10
Social Infrastructure .......................................................... 5-51
5.4.11
Economy and Income Levels............................................. 5-54
5.4.12
Agriculture ......................................................................... 5-56
5.4.13
Conclusions ....................................................................... 5-57
5.5
Transport Route .................................................................................. 5-58
5.5.1
Karachi to Jamshoro ......................................................... 5-58
5.5.2
Thar to Jamshoro .............................................................. 5-58
Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions ............................ 6-1
6.1
Identification of Significant Environmental Aspects ............................... 6-1
6.2
Discharge of Untreated Wastewater from the Plant .............................. 6-5
6.2.1
Cooling Tower Blow Down and Clarifier/Coagulator
Blow Down ........................................................................ 6-14
6.2.2
Effluents from Boilers, Demin Plant, and Laboratory.......... 6-16
6.3
Municipal Wastewater ......................................................................... 6-17
6.4
Air Emission from Stacks .................................................................... 6-18
6.5
Solid and Hazardous Waste ............................................................... 6-18
6.5.1
Solid Hazardous Waste from the Power Plant Operation... 6-18
6.5.2
Solid Waste Management of Colony and Office
Waste from the Power Plant ............................................. 6-25
6.6
Oil Decanting ...................................................................................... 6-25
6.7
Occupational Health and Safety and Housekeeping ........................... 6-28
6.8
Extraction of Water from the River ...................................................... 6-28
6.9
Quality and Temperature of the Effluent Discharged into the River ..... 6-29
6.10
Impacts on Ecology ............................................................................ 6-31
6.11
Socioeconomic Impacts ...................................................................... 6-32
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7.
8.
9.
Information Disclosure, Consultation, and Participation ............................ 7-1
7.1
Framework for Consultations ................................................................ 7-1
7.1.1
ADB Safeguard Policy Statement ........................................ 7-1
7.1.2
Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997 ....................... 7-1
7.2
Consultation Methodology .................................................................... 7-2
7.2.1
Stakeholder Consulted ........................................................ 7-2
7.2.2
Consultations Mechanism ................................................... 7-6
7.2.3
Consultation Team .............................................................. 7-6
7.2.4
Future Consultations ........................................................... 7-6
7.3
Summary of Consultations .................................................................... 7-7
7.3.1
Scoping Consultation........................................................... 7-7
7.3.2
Feedback Consultation ........................................................ 7-7
Analysis of Alternatives ................................................................................. 8-1
8.1
No Project Option ................................................................................. 8-1
8.2
Alternatives to the Proposed Project ..................................................... 8-1
8.3
Alternative Sites for the Power Plant ..................................................... 8-4
8.4
Selection of Imported Coal for the Project ............................................. 8-6
8.5
Port Handling and Transportation of Coal ............................................. 8-7
8.5.1
Selection of Port .................................................................. 8-7
8.5.2
Transportation of Coal to Project Site .................................. 8-7
8.6
Management of Oil Contaminated Soils .............................................. 8-10
8.7
Boiler Combustion Technology ........................................................... 8-10
8.7.1
Pulverized Coal-Fired ........................................................ 8-11
8.7.2
Fluidized Bed Combustion ................................................. 8-13
8.7.3
The Proposed Technology for Boiler Combustion .............. 8-14
8.8
Environmental Control Technology ..................................................... 8-14
8.8.1
Particulate Matter Treatment Options ................................ 8-14
8.8.2
SO2 Treatment Options..................................................... 8-17
8.8.3
Post Combustion SOx Control ........................................... 8-18
8.8.4
NOx Treatment Options..................................................... 8-18
8.9
Ash Disposal Options ......................................................................... 8-19
8.9.1
Ash Recycling Options ...................................................... 8-19
8.9.2
Preferred Ash Disposal Approach for the Project............... 8-22
8.10
Location Alternatives of the Ash Pond Facility .................................... 8-24
8.11
Hazardous Waste Storage Facility ...................................................... 8-25
Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures for the
Proposed Project ........................................................................................... 9-1
9.1
Identification of Significant Environmental Aspects ............................... 9-1
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10.
9.2
Construction Impact .............................................................................. 9-1
9.3
Disposal of Waste from Construction Works ......................................... 9-5
9.4
Air Quality Impacts During Operation .................................................... 9-6
9.4.1
Modeling Approach ............................................................. 9-6
9.4.2
Background Concentration of Pollutant ............................... 9-6
9.4.3
Emissions Sources and Modeling Parameters..................... 9-7
9.4.4
Fugitive Emissions .............................................................. 9-9
9.4.5
Model Description.............................................................. 9-10
9.4.6
Air Quality Modeling Results.............................................. 9-14
9.4.7
Compliance with Guidelines and Standards ...................... 9-16
9.5
GHG Emissions .................................................................................. 9-20
9.6
Traffic Impact ...................................................................................... 9-22
9.7
Ash Disposal and Handling ................................................................. 9-23
9.8
Disposal of FGD Gypsum ................................................................... 9-23
9.9
Noise .................................................................................................. 9-23
9.10
Port Impacts ....................................................................................... 9-24
9.11
Waste Management............................................................................ 9-24
9.12
Water Resource Impacts .................................................................... 9-25
9.12.1
Extraction of Water from the River ..................................... 9-25
9.12.2
Quality and Temperature of the Effluent Discharged
into the River ..................................................................... 9-26
9.13
Ecological Impacts .............................................................................. 9-28
9.14
Socioeconomic Impacts ...................................................................... 9-28
9.15
Occupational Health and Safety.......................................................... 9-30
9.16
Cumulative Impacts ............................................................................ 9-30
9.16.1
Port Facility ....................................................................... 9-31
9.16.2
Road and Railway Transport ............................................. 9-31
Environmental Management Plan ............................................................... 10-1
10.1
Institutional Framework for Implementation of EMP ............................ 10-1
10.2
Institutional Strengthening and Capacity Building ............................... 10-3
10.3
Mitigation Plan .................................................................................... 10-4
10.4
Monitoring Mechanism ...................................................................... 10-14
10.5
Resettlement Specialist .................................................................... 10-19
10.6
Reporting and Feedback Mechanism................................................ 10-19
10.7
Budget Estimates.............................................................................. 10-20
10.8
Performance Indicators ..................................................................... 10-22
10.9
Emergency Response Plan .............................................................. 10-22
10.10 Training Program .............................................................................. 10-22
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10.11 Waste Management Plan.................................................................. 10-24
10.12 Contaminated Soil Bio-remediation Plan........................................... 10-24
10.13 Construction Management Plan ........................................................ 10-26
10.14 Coal Dust Management Plan ............................................................ 10-32
10.15 Ash Management ............................................................................. 10-33
10.16 Asbestos Management Plan ............................................................. 10-34
10.16.1
Requirement for Asbestos Management.......................... 10-35
10.16.2
Responsibilities/Authorities of Various Agencies ............. 10-35
10.16.3
Minimizing Asbestos Liabilities ........................................ 10-36
10.16.4
Monitoring During the Construction Period ...................... 10-36
10.16.5
Asbestos Abatement Procedures .................................... 10-36
10.16.6
Materials and Equipment ................................................. 10-38
10.17 Social Augmentation Plan ................................................................. 10-40
10.18 Spill Management ............................................................................. 10-45
10.18.1
Avoiding spills ................................................................. 10-45
10.18.2
Spill Management............................................................ 10-45
10.18.3
Spill Kits .......................................................................... 10-45
10.18.4
Responding to Spills ........................................................ 10-46
10.19 Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Program ........................................... 10-46
10.20 Transportation Management Plan ..................................................... 10-47
11.
12.
Grievance Redress Mechanism................................................................... 11-1
11.1
Framework for Grievance Redress Mechanism .................................. 11-1
11.1.1
ADB Safeguard Policy Statement ...................................... 11-1
11.1.2
Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997 ..................... 11-1
11.2
Existing Practice for Grievance Redress ............................................. 11-2
11.3
Proposed Mechanism for Grievance Redress ..................................... 11-2
11.3.1
Function and Structure of PCU .......................................... 11-2
11.3.2
Function and Structure of GRC ......................................... 11-2
11.3.3
Grievance Focal Points ..................................................... 11-3
11.3.4
Procedure of Filing and Resolving Grievances .................. 11-3
11.3.5
Operating Principles for PCU............................................. 11-4
11.3.6
Stages of Grievances ........................................................ 11-4
11.4
Stakeholder Awareness ...................................................................... 11-5
Conclusions.................................................................................................. 12-1
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TABLES
Table 1-1:
Table 1-2:
Table 1-3:
Table 1-4:
Table 1-5:
Table 1-6:
Coal Quality of Design Coal .................................................................. 1-5
Blended Fuel Properties ....................................................................... 1-5
Coal Consumption for 1,200 MW .......................................................... 1-6
Compliance of Plant Emission with NEQS and IFC Guidelines ............. 1-8
Predicted Ground Level Concentration of Criteria Pollutants .............. 1-10
Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates ................................................... 1-12
Table 2-1:
Projected Supply and Demand in NTDC and KESC Systems ............... 2-8
Table 3-1:
Table 3-2:
Table 3-3:
ADB Project Categories ........................................................................ 3-8
International Environmental Treaties Endorsed by Pakistan ............... 3-10
Comparison of NEQS and IFC Guideline Limits for Emission of
Key Pollutants from Coal-Fired Power Plant ....................................... 3-13
Comparison of NEQS and IFC Guideline Limits for
Ambient Air Quality ............................................................................. 3-13
Comparison of NEQS and IFC Guideline Limits for
Key Liquid Effluents (mg/l, unless otherwise defined) ......................... 3-14
Table 3-4:
Table 3-5:
Table 4-1:
Table 4-2:
Table 4-3:
Table 4-4:
Table 4-5:
Table 4-6:
Table 4-7:
Table 4-8:
Measured Stack Emissions at JTPS ..................................................... 4-3
Analysis of Stack Flue Gas ................................................................... 4-3
Circulating Water Chemistry ............................................................... 4-20
Quality of Design Coal ........................................................................ 4-25
Blended Fuel Properties ..................................................................... 4-26
Coal Consumption .............................................................................. 4-26
Ash and Gypsum Production .............................................................. 4-30
Emission of Gaseous Pollutants ......................................................... 4-40
Table 5-1:
Table 5-2:
Table 5-3:
Table 5-4:
Table 5–5:
Table 5–6:
Table 5-7:
Table 5-8:
Table 5-9:
Temperatures of the Study Area ........................................................... 5-4
Rainfall in the Study Area ..................................................................... 5-5
Mean Wind in the Study Area ............................................................... 5-5
Indus River Monthly Flow at Kotri Barrage ............................................ 5-9
Drinking Water, Groundwater and Surface Water Quality Results ...... 5-10
Analysis of pesticides in drinking water ............................................... 5-11
Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Results – 24 Hours June 2012 ........... 5-14
Summary of PM data monitored in Pakistan ....................................... 5-15
Estimation of Background PM10 and PM2.5 Levels in Vicinity
of JTPS, µg/m3 ................................................................................... 5-17
Coverage of Socioeconomic Survey ................................................... 5-41
Population and Settlement Size in the Socioeconomic Study Area ..... 5-44
Educational Institutions in Socioeconomic Study Area ........................ 5-53
Table 5-10:
Table 5-11:
Table 5-12:
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Table 6-1:
Table 6–2:
Table 6–3:
Table 6–4:
Table 6-5:
Table 6-6:
Table 6-7:
Table 6-8:
Table 6-9:
Table 7-1:
Table 7-2:
Table 7-3:
Table 8-1:
Table 8-2:
Table 8-3:
Table 8-4:
Table 8-5:
Table 8-6:
Table 8-7:
Table 8-8:
Table 8-9:
Table 8-10:
Table 9-1:
Table 9-2:
Table 9-3:
Table 9-4:
Table 9-5:
Table 9-6:
Table 9-7:
Table 9-8:
Table 9-9:
Table 9-10:
Table 9-11:
Potential Environmental and Socioeconomic Impacts
of the Existing Plant .............................................................................. 6-2
Locations of Sampling Points for Water ................................................ 6-9
Groundwater Quality Results .............................................................. 6-10
Effluent Water Quality Results ............................................................ 6-12
Plant Water Balance ........................................................................... 6-17
Soil Analysis Results .......................................................................... 6-20
Inventory of Hazardous Waste ............................................................ 6-22
Analysis of the Boiler Soot .................................................................. 6-22
Plume Model Input Parameter ............................................................ 6-30
Stakeholders Consulted ........................................................................ 7-3
Summary of Concerns Expressed in Scoping Consultation
and How They Have Been Addressed in the EIA .................................. 7-8
Summary of Feedback Consultation and Comments .......................... 7-11
Life Cycle Average Cost of Power Generation from the Project
Alternatives ........................................................................................... 8-2
Selection of Site for the Power Plant ..................................................... 8-5
Comparisons of Coal Properties ........................................................... 8-6
Quality of Coal for Marker Coal Price .................................................... 8-6
Type of PF Firing System ................................................................... 8-11
Classification of Pulverized Coal Plants .............................................. 8-12
Technical and Economic Status for Coal Combustion Technologies ... 8-14
Particulate matter control technologies ............................................... 8-15
Post combustion SOx control for coal combustion sources. ................ 8-18
NOx Control Options for Coal-Fired Boilers ........................................ 8-20
Potential Environmental and Socioeconomic Impacts of the
Proposed Activities ............................................................................... 9-2
Emission Sources in the Modeled Scenarios ........................................ 9-7
Traffic Data used for Air Quality Modeling ............................................. 9-8
Modeling Parameters and Major Point Sources of
Emissions in the Model Area ................................................................ 9-8
Summary of 2009, 2010 and 2011 Meteorological
Data Input to AERMOD ...................................................................... 9-11
Details of Sensitive Receptors ............................................................ 9-13
Air Quality Modeling-Results ............................................................... 9-15
Post 1200 MW Concentration at Sensitive Receptors ......................... 9-16
Compliance with Ambient Guidelines and Standards .......................... 9-17
Compliance of Plant Emission with NEQS and IFC Guidelines ........... 9-20
Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates ................................................... 9-20
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Table 9-12:
Table 9-13:
Table 9-14:
Daily Road and Fuel Truck Traffic....................................................... 9-22
Mitigation Measures Related to Corrective Action ............................... 9-25
Plume Model Input Parameter ............................................................ 9-27
Table 10-1:
Table 10-2:
Table 10-3:
Table 10-4:
Table 10-5:
Table 10-6:
Table 10-7:
Table 10-8:
Environmental Mitigation and Management Plan ................................ 10-5
Environmental Monitoring Plan during Construction and Operation .. 10-15
Summary of Costs for Environmental Management and Monitoring .. 10-21
Performance Indicators ..................................................................... 10-22
Training Program .............................................................................. 10-23
EMP for Waste Management ............................................................ 10-25
Construction Management Plan ........................................................ 10-26
SAP Implementation Cost Estimates ................................................ 10-43
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FIGURES
Figure 1-1:
Jamshoro Thermal Power Station and Surroundings ............................ 1-2
Figure 2-1:
Figure 2-2:
Figure 2-3:
Figure 2-4:
Jamshoro Thermal Power Station and Surroundings ............................ 2-4
Photographs of JTPS Surrounding Area ............................................... 2-6
Pakistan Power Market Players ............................................................ 2-7
Pakistan Energy Mix (2011-12) ........................................................... 2-10
Figure 3-1:
EIA Review and Approval Procedure .................................................... 3-4
Figure 4-1:
Figure 4-2:
Simplified Schematic Diagram of the Proposed Power Plant ................ 4-5
Proposed Water Supply System ......................................................... 4-24
Figure 5-1:
Figure 5–2:
Figure 5–3:
Figure 5–4:
Figure 5-5:
Figure 5-6:
Figure 5-7:
Figure 5-8:
Figure 5-9:
Figure 5-10:
Figure 5-11:
Figure 5-12:
Figure 5-13:
Figure 5-14:
Figure 5-15:
Figure 5-16:
Figure 5-17:
Figure 5-18:
Figure 5-19:
Figure 5-20:
Study Area Jamshoro TPS ................................................................... 5-2
Wind Rose for 2011 .............................................................................. 5-6
Surface Water Resources in the Study Area ......................................... 5-8
Air Quality Measurement Conditions ................................................... 5-13
Ambient Noise levels .......................................................................... 5-18
Sampling Locations for Surveys for Ecological Surveys ...................... 5-20
Photographs of Habitats in the Study Area ......................................... 5-23
Habitats Distribution in the Study Area................................................ 5-24
The Indus River system with Major Head works ................................. 5-28
Asian Migratory Birds Flyways ............................................................ 5-32
Some Common Fish Species Observed in the June 2012 Survey ...... 5-34
Fishing Activities in the Study Area (upstream of Kotri Barrage) ......... 5-35
Socioeconomic Study Area ................................................................. 5-39
Location of Surveyed Settlements in Study Area ................................ 5-42
Satellite Views of Settlements in the Socioeconomic Study Area ........ 5-43
Age and Sex Composition of Surveyed Rural Population.................... 5-45
Decision Mechanism in Surveyed Rural Households .......................... 5-47
Views of Roads in Socioeconomic Study Area.................................... 5-48
Road Network in Study Area ............................................................... 5-49
Distribution of Housing Structures in Socioeconomic
Study Area by Housing Type .............................................................. 5-50
Water Supply System in Villages of Socioeconomic Study Area ......... 5-51
Common Health Problems Reported in the
Surveyed Rural Households ............................................................... 5-52
Male-Female Literacy in Surveyed Households .................................. 5-54
Educational Attainment in Surveyed Households in
Ages 10 years and above ................................................................... 5-55
Types of Occupations in Surveyed Rural Households ........................ 5-55
Figure 5-21:
Figure 5-22:
Figure 5-23:
Figure 5-24:
Figure 5-25:
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Figures
xii
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 5-26:
Figure 5-27:
Figure 5-28:
Poverty in Pakistan, FY2006 ............................................................... 5-56
Views of Agricultural Field in Socioeconomic Study Area.................... 5-57
Road Network ..................................................................................... 5-59
Figure 6-1:
Figure 6–2:
Figure 6–3:
Figure 6–4:
Figure 6–5:
Figure 6-6:
Figure 6-7:
Figure 6–8:
Figure 6-9:
Plant Water and Wastewater Circuit ..................................................... 6-6
Areas Affected by Plant and Housing Colony Effluent Water ................ 6-7
Environmental Sampling Locations ....................................................... 6-8
Photographic Evidence of Land Affected by Effluent Water ................ 6-15
Photographic Evidence of Potential Land Contamination .................... 6-21
Hazardous Waste Storage Facility Jamshoro ..................................... 6-24
Unlined Pit Used for Oil-Water Separation .......................................... 6-26
Soil Contamination Sites ..................................................................... 6-27
Results of the Thermal Plume Modeling ............................................. 6-31
Figure 7-1:
Figure 7-2:
Figure 7-3:
Consultation Locations near Project Site .............................................. 7-5
Photographs of the Scoping Consultations ......................................... 7-10
Photographs of the Feedback Consultations....................................... 7-13
Figure 8-1:
Figure 8-2:
Figure 8-3:
Figure 8-4:
Comparison of Cost of Power Generation from the
Project Alternatives ............................................................................... 8-3
Route for Transportation of Coal to Jamshoro TPS............................... 8-8
Location of Cement Plants Accessible to JTPS .................................. 8-23
Alternative Locations for JTPS Ash Disposal Site ............................... 8-25
Figure 9-1:
Figure 9-2:
Location of Sensitive Receptors.......................................................... 9-12
Results of the Thermal Plume Modeling ............................................. 9-27
Figure 10-1:
Project Organization ........................................................................... 10-3
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
Figures
xiii
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
APPENDICES
APPENDIX 1:
NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY STANDARDS
APPENDIX 2:
IFC ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDELINES
APPENDIX 3:
PARTICULATE MATTER CONCENTRATION IN AMBIENT AIR IN
PAKISTAN
APPENDIX 4:
ECOLOGICAL BASELINE–SURVEY METHODOLOGY AND DATA
APPENDIX 5:
TRAFFIC DATA
APPENDIX 6:
SOIL CONTAMINATION STUDY
APPENDIX 7:
MATERIAL FOR CONSULTATION
APPENDIX 8:
DETAILED LOG OF CONSULTATIONS CONDUCTED
APPENDIX 9:
LETTER OF SUPPORT FROM CEMENT INDUSTRY
APPENDIX 10:
ISOPLETHS FOR CRITERIA POLLUTANTS
APPENDIX 11:
LAND ACQUISITION AND RESETTLEMENT PLAN
APPENDIX 12:
COMMUNICATION WITH SINDH ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
AGENCY ON PM2.5 STANDARDS
APPENDIX 13:
TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIALISTS
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Appendices
xiv
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Currency Equivalents
(As of July 2013)
Currency Unit – Pakistani Rupee (PKR)
100 PKR = $1
ABBREVIATIONS
ADB
AFBC
BFBC
BID
BMCR
CDM
CEM
CER
CFB
CFBC
CITES
CMEC
CO
CO2
CPPA
DA
DCO
DCS
EA
EHS
EHS
EIA
EMMP
EMP
ESP
FBC
FGD
FL
GDP
GFP
GHCL
GoP
GRC
HBP
HHV
HHV
HP
HSFO
HWL
HWSF
IA
ID
IEE
IFC
IUCN
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
Asian Development Bank
Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion
Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion
Background Information Document
Boiler Maximum Continuous Rating
Clean Development Mechanism
Continuous Emission Monitoring
Certified Emission Reduction
Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler
Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion
Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species
China Machinery Engineering Corporation
Carbon Monoxide
Carbon Dioxide
Central Power Purchasing Agency
Degraded Airshed
District Coordinating Officer
Distributed Control System
Executing Agency
Environment Health and Safety
Environmental, Health and Safety
Environmental Impact Assessment
Environmental Management and Monitoring Plan
Environmental Management Plan
Electrostatic Precipitator
Fluidized Bed Combustion
Flue Gas Desulfurization
Flood Level
Gross Domestic Product
Grievance Focal Points
Genco Holding Company Limited
Government of Pakistan
Grievance Redress Committee
Hagler Bailly Pakistan (Pvt.) Limited
Higher Heating Value
Higher Heating Value
High-Pressure
High Sulfur Fuel Oil
High Water Level
Hazardous Waste Storage Facility
Implementing Agency
Induced Draft
Initial Environmental Examinations
International Finance Corporation
International Union for Conservation of Nature
Abbreviations
xv
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
JPCL
JTPS
KP
LNG
LP
LUHMS
LWL
MCR
MFF
NDA
NEPRA
NEQS
NGO
NOx
NSDW
NTDC
PA
PC
PCB
PCU
PEPA
PF
PFBC
PKR
PM
PM10
PM2.5
PPE
PQ
PSO
PVC
RBOD
RE
ROHR
SCR
SDPI
SEPA
SMART
SO2
SPM
SPS
SSGCL
WHO
WWF
XLPE
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
Jamshoro Power Company Limited
Jamshoro Thermal Power Station
Karachi Port
Liquefied Natural Gas
Low Pressure
Liaquat University and Health and Medical Sciences
Low Water Level
Maximum Continuous Rating
Multi-tranche Financing Facility
Non-Degraded Airshed
National Electric Power Regulatory Authority
National Environmental Quality Standards
Non-Governmental Organization
Oxides of Nitrogen
National Standards for Drinking Water
National Transmission and Despatch Company
Primary Air
Pulverized Coal
Polychlorinated Biphenyl
Public Complaints Unit
Pakistan Environmental Protection Act (1997)
Pulverized Fuel
Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion
Pakistani Rupees
Particulate matter
Particulate matter of less than 10 micron in size
Particulate matter of less than 2.5 micron in size
Personal Protective Equipment
Port Qasim
Pakistan State Oil
Polyvinyl Chloride
Right Bank Outfall Drain
Renewable energy
Run-of-the-River Hydropower
Selective Catalytic Reduction
Sustainable Development Policy Institute
Sindh Environmental Protection Agency
Self-Monitoring and Reporting
Sulfur Dioxide
Suspended Particulate Matter
[ADB‘s] Safeguard Policy Statement (2009)
Sui Southern Gas Limited
World Health Organization
World Wide Fund for Nature
Cross-Linked Polyethylene
Abbreviations
xvi
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
UNITS
MWth
mg/Nm3
MW
mmcft
t/d
cumec
cusec
mg/l
kg
t/h
m3/h
m/s
mg/kg
mg/Nm3
km
m
ºC
MPa
µg/m3
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
Megawatt thermal input (MWth)
mg per normal meter cube
Megawatt
million cubic feet
tons per day
cubic meters per second
cubic feet per second
milligrams per liter
kilogram
tons per hour
cubic meters per hour
meters per second
milligram per kilogram
milligram per normal cubic meter
kilometer
meter
Degree Celsius
Megapascal
Microgram per cubic meter
Units
xvii
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
1. Executive Summary
1.
The Government of Pakistan (GoP) is planning to set up a super-critical coalfired power plant at Jamshoro (the ‗Jamshoro Power Generation Project‘ or the ‗Project‘)
to be financed by the Asian Development Bank (ADB). The power plant will be setup
within the premises of the existing Jamshoro Thermal Power Station (JTPS). The
proposed Project will have a net generation capacity of 600 megawatt (MW) (the ‗First
Stage‘) with a provision of expansion to 1,200 MW in the near future (the ‗Second
Stage‘). The gross generation capacity of the Project will be 660 MW in the First Stage
and 1,320 MW after expansion.1 The plant will be owned and operated by the Jamshoro
Power Company Limited (JPCL), the implementing agency (IA) of the Project. GENCO
Holding Company Limited (GHCL), the parent company of JPCL will be the executing
agency (EA).
2.
This Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of the proposed Project is
prepared to meet the regulatory requirements of Pakistan and Sindh province as well as
the ADB‘s Safeguard Policy Statement (SPS) 2009. As SPS 2009 requires adherence
to International Finance Corporation (IFC)‘s Environment, Health and Safety (EHS)
Guidelines for pollution prevention and control technologies and practices, this EIA also
refers to these guidelines particularly for emission and effluent limits and ambient
conditions. The EIA covers the assessment of both the First and Second stages of the
Project, separately.
1.1
Project Setting
3.
JTPS is located north of Jamshoro town in the Jamshoro district of Sindh
province, Pakistan (Figure ‎1-1). The power plant is about 10 kilometer (km) northwest
of Hyderabad and about 150 km northeast of Karachi. It is located on N-55, also known
as Indus Highway. N-55 is one of the two main highways of the country which connect
Karachi, the main port and industrial hub of the country, with the rest of the country. The
north and northwest of the power plant is barren flat land. Some smaller sedimentary
hills are located in the west and southwest, which rise to an elevation of 100 meters (m)
above mean sea level. To the south, at a distance of about 5 km, is the urban area of
Jamshoro. Scattered villages and farmlands are located to the east and northeast of the
JTPS, in the flood plains along the banks of Indus River. The river also supports fish
which is a source of income for local fishermen. In places, small pools of stagnant water
are formed within the agricultural fields, some of which are caused by the effluent from
the operations of the existing facilities at JTPS. The Indus River flows in the north-tosouth direction at a distance of about 4 km to the east of the JTPS. The elevation of the
land in surroundings of the JTPS ranges between 20 and 45 m and slopes towards the
Indus River. Jamshoro area has a desert climate, characterized by a hot and dry
summer, mild winter and low rainfall. The vegetation of this region is typical of arid
regions, adapted to extreme seasonal temperatures and moisture fluctuation, and is thin
in cover
1
The total generation capacity of the power plant is the gross capacity. However, a part of the
electricity generated is used within the power plant. The balance electricity which is available
for supply to the transmission network is the net capacity. After the Second Stage the
proposed Project will have 660 X 2 = 1,320 MW gross capacity. Of this 120 MW will be used
internally and 1,320 – 120 = 1,200 MW will be the net capacity.
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
Executive Summary
1-1
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure ‎1-1: Jamshoro Thermal Power Station and Surroundings
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R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
Executive Summary
1-2
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
4.
The population clusters in the surroundings of the JTPS can be broadly classified
as rural, urban and institutional housing colonies. The rural area population is found in
small scattered villages having agriculture as the main source of livelihood. The urban
areas comprise of a contiguous population belt of the Jamshoro town and housing
colonies. The housing colonies are purpose-built residential areas associated with
institutions such as the JTPS, the University of Sindh and the Liaquat University of
Health and Medical Sciences (LUHMS). The housing colonies and the urban areas
together constitute the more developed and better-off segments of the area in the
surroundings of the JTPS.
1.2
Project Rationale
5.
Pakistan is going through an acute power shortage. According to the National
Electric Power Regulatory Authority‘s (NEPRA) ‗State of the Industry Report 2012‘ the
gap between supply and demand in 2011-2012 was well above 5,000 MW mark and
remained between 4,000 MW and 5,000 MW for most part of the year. The country has
therefore an urgent requirement to generate additional power to feed into the national
power grid. The gap between supply and demand is likely to persist over next few
years. The gap represents about one-third of the total demand in National Transmission
and Despatch Company (NTDC) system resulting in as much as 12 hours of load
shedding in urban areas and at times more than 18 hours of load shedding in rural
areas.2
6.
Chronic power shortages in Pakistan are the most serious constraints to the
country‘s economic growth and job creation. The energy crisis continues to drag down
the country‘s economic performance and spark social instability. Increasing and
unpredictable load shedding is estimated to constrain annual gross domestic product
(GDP) growth by at least 2%. Hardest hit are the small- and medium-sized enterprises
that employ the most number of people but cannot afford back-up electricity generators
and fuel.
7.
In addition to the economic impact, the shortage has environmental and social
impacts as well. Other than complaints of general discomfort, students have complained
of effects of the load shedding on their studies. It has also resulted in deterioration of
health care services. The environmental impact of the power shortage has not been
studied but potential impacts include increased use of firewood, kerosene, biomass, and
firewood and their effects on deforestation and air quality. Due to the power shortages,
use of back-up power generators has increased significantly, both in commercial and
residential sectors.3 As there is no regulatory control over the emission from these
generators, their widespread use in the urban areas has resulted in emissions of
nitrogen oxides, particulate matter and sulfur dioxide (from diesel generators) from
generator exhaust and hence contributing to the urban air pollution. These generators
are also a major source of noise.
8.
In addition to increasing the generation capacity, it is essential to lower the
generation cost. One possible option is the hydropower. It despite being the ideal
solution has long implementation period and is not useful to address immediate issues.
2
3
Load shedding, also known as rolling black out, is method of electric power management
where the supply falls short of the demand. In this, the power supply to different sections of
the network is stopped on a pre-defined schedule for a pre-defined period of time.
It is estimated that currently the total power generation by small to medium sized generator is
in 10,600 Gigawatt-hour (GWh).
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
Executive Summary
1-3
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Other solutions are either too costly or have other technical or economic issues. In this
background, coal offers a promising option in the medium as well as long-term to provide
affordable power and diversify the energy mix. The GoP aims to increase the share of
coal-based generation from nearly none now (0.07%) to about 22% in 10 years. This
will be achieved through converting existing High Sulfur Fuel Oil (HSFO) generation
units, replacing old inefficient units, and constructing new plants. Electricity generated
from coal, with long-term fuel supply contracts, will also add stability to the power price.
1.3
The Proposed Project
9.
Two 600 MW net power unit will be installed at the JTPS site. The basic design
parameters for these are:







10.
Capacity: 2 x 600 MW net
2 x 660 MW gross (nominal)
Power technology: Pulverized coal firing in super-critical boilers
Steam conditions: Main steam 24.1 Megapascal (MPa) at 593 ºC
Single reheat steam 4.5 MPa at 593 ºC
Fuel:
Blended coal—subbituminous coal 80% (minimum), lignite
(balance)
Plant efficiency LHV:
Gross 43.4% for subbituminous coal
42.8% for subbituminous-lignite blend in 80:20 ratio.
Cooling system:
Natural draft cooling tower
Emission controls: ESP efficiency > 99.9%
FGD efficiency > 95%
SCR efficiency > 80%
The major systems of the proposed Project are the following:
A. Coal handling and processing system
B. Super-critical boiler
C. Steam turbine and condenser
D. Electrical power generator and power export system
E. Flue gas treatment system
F. Cooling water system
G. Ash handling system
H. Utilities and waste management system
11.
The new coal-fired power plant will be erected within the existing JTPS site, in an
empty plot south of the existing units. It will consist of two 600 MW net capacity, supercritical, coal-fired units. The arrangement of the 600 MW units, in order from west to
east, will be the electrical transformers, turbine hall, boilers, ESPs, FGDs and stack.
The coal receiving and storage yard will be to the south of the new generating units.
The new cooling towers will be located east of the power blocks and to the north of the
coal yard. Raw water will be taken from the lndus River in a newly constructed intake
structure and pump house. Wastewater will be collected in a basin treated and reused
to the greatest extent for coal dust suppression, ash handling and other purpose. For
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
Executive Summary
1-4
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
ash disposal additional land will be acquired adjacent to existing JTPS site. A residential
colony will be constructed within the existing JTPS site.
12.
The main fuel for the power plant will be imported subbituminous coal. Lignite,
either from Thar coalfields or imported, in the ratio of 10-20% will be blended with the
subbituminous coal. The design specification of the fuel is shown in Table 1-1.
Table ‎1-1: Coal Quality of Design Coal
Parameter
Sub-bituminous
(e.g., INDO5(P))
Range
Lignite
(e.g., Thar)
Selected Value
Range
Selected Value
C
50-65
50.0
28.0-37.4
28.0
H
1-3
1.0
1.6-301
1.6
O
30–50
30.0
6.6-10.5
6.6
S
<1
1.0
0.2-2.7
2.7
N
<2
2.0
0.2-0.4
0.4
Moisture
<26
26.0
44.9-50.4
50.4
Ash
<9
9.0
4.0-15.1
15.1
> 4,780
4,780
2,231-3,250
2,231
High Heating Value
(HHV), kcal/kg
13.
For the purpose of design, three different blending percentage of lignite has been
considered, namely 10%, 15%, and 20%. The fuel properties under these blending
scenarios, identified as Coal E, Coal F, and Coal G, respectively, are shown in
Table 1-2.
Table ‎1-2: Blended Fuel Properties
Coal E
Sub-bituminous 90%
Lignite 10%
Coal F
Sub-bituminous 85%
Lignite 15%
Coal G
Sub-bituminous 80%
Lignite 20%
C
40.65%
39.96%
39.26%
H
0.90%
0.93%
0.96%
O
23.52%
22.67%
21.80%
S
1.00%
1.07%
1.15%
N
1.56%
1.51%
1.45%
24.19%
25.38%
26.58%
8.17%
8.48%
8.80%
4,525
4,398
4,270
Moisture
Ash
High Heating Value
(HHV), kcal/kg
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Executive Summary
1-5
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
14.
The total coal consumption will depend on the ratio of blending of subbituminous
and Thar coals. The coal consumption for the 1,200 MW plant for three possible
scenarios is shown in Table 1-3. In the First stage of 600 MW, the consumption will be
half of that of the values shown in Table 1-3.
Table ‎1-3: Coal Consumption for 1,200 MW
Coal
Sub-bituminous
Lignite
Total
Daily Consumption (tons)
Coal E 90:10
12,698
1,411
14,109
Coal F 85:15
12,355
2,180
14,535
Coal G 80:20
12,054
3,013
15,067
Annual Consumption at 85% Plant Factor (million tons)
Coal E 90:10
3.94
0.44
4.38
Coal F 85:15
3.83
0.68
4.51
Coal G 80:20
3.74
0.93
4.67
15.
Imported coal for the Project will be transported to JTPS by rail. Extension of
railway system to Thar will be essential to meet future demands of the new plant at
Jamshoro.
1.4
Corrective Actions for Existing Facilities at JTPS
16.
ADB requires that when the proposed project involves an existing facility, the
existing facility shall be audited to identify past or present concerns related to impacts on
the environment. If the audit identifies non-conformance, plans for appropriate remedial
measure are to be developed to address outstanding issues. The remedial measures
proposed for improvement of environmental performance of the existing facilities are the
following:



Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD): An FGD will be installed on the two existing
stacks to ensure that the emission from these meet the national standards
and guidelines for sulfur dioxide (SO2). This will also ensure that there is
enough room in the ambient air to accommodate new plant.
Spilled oil collection and drainage system: JPCL is in the process of acquiring
spilled oil collection and drainage system. It will be ensured that this system
for the decanting station is commissioned not later than June 2014. Until the
spilled oil collection and drainage system is installed, drip pans will be
provided at the decanting station to prevent further spills on soil. The
contaminated soil from the decanting area will be collected and stored in a
secured place for future disposal.
Rehabilitation of effluent pipeline: The plant wastewater system will be
revamped to ensure that the cooling tower effluent is segregated from other
plant wastewater. A pipeline for transport of effluent from the plant to the river
will be installed, as in the original design of the plant, which was operated for
about first five years after the plant was commissioned, and then abandoned.
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Executive Summary
1-6
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project






1.5
As the effluent meets the national Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS)
and is suitable for agricultural use, the option of regulated discharge for
agricultural use will be considered
Rehabilitation of evaporation pond: The evaporation pond has filled with silt and
reed and is no longer usable. The evaporation pond will be reconstructed. It
will be a ‗zero-discharge‘ system which means that it will be sized to ensure that
it can receive all potentially hazardous wastewater from the existing plant
without the need to discharge to the surrounding areas or the Indus River. The
pond will be lined to prevent seepage from the pond and potential
contamination of the surrounding land and groundwater. All low volume waste
non-complaint with the NEQS will be isolated and discharged to the evaporation
pond.
Municipal wastewater from the housing colony: The municipal wastewater from
the JTPS housing colony is presently pumped out of the colony without any
treatment. The water is then used for irrigation purposes. A small wastewater
treatment plant will be installed in the housing colony.
Development of a hazardous waste storage facility: A hazardous waste storage
facility will be developed at the plant near the switchyard to safe disposal of
potentially hazardous waste. Hazardous waste includes soot from boiler and
asbestos waste from old equipment.
Development of a landfill site for colony waste: A properly designed landfill to
cater for the plant needs will be developed. Presently, waste dumps can be
seen in different location of the plant and the colony. Solid waste is presently
being disposed in dug pits which are later covered by soil.
Bio-remediation facility for oily waste: A bioremediation facility for oily waste will
be developed that will treat all contaminated soil present on the plant site in
about five years.
Occupational health and safety management system: A complete occupational
health and safety management system will be developed at the plant. Use of
Personal protective equipment (PPE), safety criteria for heated surface, working
at heights and entering confined spaces entry are standard procedures that will
be adopted as a part of the management system.
Environmental Impact of New Plant
1.5.1
Air Quality Impacts
17.
There are two modes of air pollution from the thermal power plant, point
emissions from the stacks and fugitive emissions from the coal and ash handling and
storage. Important air pollutants from the stack are respirable particulate matter (PM10
and PM2.5),4 oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Significant health risks
are associated with these emissions if the concentration of these pollutants in the
ambient air exceeds the ambient air quality standards. Following emission controls will
be installed to reduce the emission from the plant:
4
Respirable particulate matter or PM10 are particulate matter (or dust) with particles less than
10 micrometer (a millionth of meter or micron) in diameter. Of particular concern is PM 2.5,
that is, particulate matter with particles less than 2.5 micron in diameter.
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
Executive Summary
1-7
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project




An Electrostatic precipitator (ESP) with an efficiency of 99.9% to limit the total
PM emissions to 30 mg/Nm3.
An FGD using lime slurry and with an efficiency of 95% to limit SO2 emissions to
within the World Bank Group guidelines.
A Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) with an efficiency of 80% and low NOx
burners with overfire air ports will be designed and procured to minimize the
NOx generation to meet the World Bank Group guideline.
A stack height of 210 m is proposed for wider dispersion of gaseous pollutants
and thereby dilution. A higher stack will also effectively disperse the thermal
pollution from the stack.
18.
The emission of gaseous pollutants from the 1,200 MW power plant was
modeled for blended Coal G (subbituminous 80%, Thar 20%) with an LHV efficiency of
42.8%; the ESP, FGD, and SCR installed and plant factor 85%. The compliance of the
emission to the emission standards and guidelines is shown in Table 1-4.
Table ‎1-4: Compliance of Plant Emission with NEQS and IFC Guidelines
Parameter
Emission from Each Stack
Particulate matter
30 mg/Nm
3
Standards
500 mg/Nm
IFC Guidelines
3
3
Sulfur oxides
254 mg/Nm
(20% blending of Thar with
maximum 2.7% S)
3
200 mg/Nm
(20% blending of Thar with
maximum 1.4% S)
17.3 TPD
(Both Units)
Oxides of nitrogen
75.2 mg/Nm
For NDA: 200-850
3
mg/Nm
3
For DA: 200 mg/Nm
100-500 Tons
per day
3
19.0 ng/J of heat input
3
For NDA: 50 mg/Nm
3
For DA: 30 mg/Nm
3
For NDA: 510 mg/Nm
3
For DA: 200 mg/Nm
260 ng/J of
heat input
DA: Degraded Airshed; NDA: Non-Degraded Airshed
19.
Air quality impacts due to the proposed power plant were estimated for five
scenarios. The scenarios and the rationale for selecting them is as follows:
(i)
Without JTPS scenariothe conditions that would exist if there was no
JTPS (neither the existing units nor the proposed power plant)
(ii)
Baseline scenariothe existing conditions where all the units with
existing efficiency operate on HSFO, and there are no controls on
emission. This is the worst-case present day condition. It is important to
establish the baseline condition and determine whether the present
airshed shall be considered degraded or non-degraded.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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(iii)
Baseline scenario with OffsetAll the units with existing efficiency
operate on HSFO, and FGDs are installed on stacks. Installation of FGD
will reduce the emission of SO2 to a fraction (5% or less) of its present
value. It will also, therefore, reduce the concentration of SO2 in ambient
air. To a lesser degree it will also reduce the particulate matter in the
ambient air. This will be the virtual baseline for the proposed project as
discussed later.
(iv)
Post 600 MW Scenario—This is the predicted ambient quality once First
Stage 1 of the project is commissioned. It includes incremental impact
due to the project but also takes into account the offset on the existing
units.
(v)
Post 1,200 MW Scenario—This is the predicted ambient quality after both
units of the Project are operational. It includes incremental impact due to
the project but also takes into account the offset on the existing units.
20.
USEPA regulatory model AERMOD was used to simulate criteria pollutants from
major sources in the project area and predict air quality for SO 2, NO2 and PM10.
Potential SO2 emissions from existing 4 units after the project will decrease. The
concentration of SO2 in the ambient air will also be less than the current levels after the
new project. The compliance status of the 1,200 MW power plant against the applicable
standards and guidelines is summarized in Table 1-5.
21.
The 1,200 MW plant meets all the limits under the NEQS and IFC Guidelines
except for:




PM10 with respect to IFC Guidelines, where the estimated Annual Average
concentration of 79.2 µg/m³ exceeds the limit of 70 µg/m³.
PM2.5 with respect to IFC Guidelines, where the estimated Annual Average
concentration of 47.6 µg/m³ exceeds the limit of 35 µg/m³.
PM2.5 with respect to NEQS, where the estimated Annual Average
concentration of 47.6 µg/m³ exceeds the limit of 15 µg/m³.
PM2.5 with respect to NEQS, where the estimated concentration of 67.1 µg/m³
exceeds the 24–hour (98th percentile) limit of 35 µg/m³.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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Table ‎1-5: Predicted Ground Level Concentration of Criteria Pollutants
Pollutant and
Averaging Time
Criteria
Ambient Air Quality Under Various Scenarios Concentration
(µg/m³)
NEQS
(µg/m³)
IFC
Guideline
s (µg/m³)
–
125
No JTPS
Current
Baseline
Current
Baseline
with Offset
600 MW
Post 1200
MW
SO΍
Maximum 24–hr
th
24–hr (98 %le)
Annual
10.3
223.0
22.3
34.8
47.2
120
9.2
184.5
21.0
32.6
44.1
80
3
55.5
5.7
8.5
11.2
9
56.1
56.1
59.2
62.3
7.2
37.6
37.6
47.4
57.2
NO΍
–
Maximum 24–hr
th
200
24–hr (98 %le)
80
Annual
40
40
1.2
12.0
12.0
17.2
22.3
–
150
108.4
126.1
126.1
129.2
132.2
100.8
117.2
117.2
118.9
120.5
70
69.1
73.2
73.2
76.2
79.2
75
60.8
68.8
68.8
70.2
71.5
57.7
66.3
65.5
66.3
67.1
43.1
44.9
44.9
46.3
47.6
10,000
8,846
8,846
9,352
9,858
Maximum 8–hr
–
4,083
4,083
4,347
4,611
8–hr (98th %le)
5,000
1,541
1,541
1,610
1,678
PMΌ΋
Maximum 24–hr
th
24–hr (98 %le)
150
Annual
120
PM2.5
Maximum 24–hr
th
24–hr (98 %le)
35
Annual
15
35
CO
1–hr
22.
The estimated annual average concentration of PM10 at 79.2 µg/m³ exceeds the
IFC Guideline for PM10 by 9.2 µg/m³, and the current baseline level by 6.0 µg/m³. The
background concentration of PM10 is estimated at 69 (No JTPS case in Table 1-5), while
the baseline is estimated at 73.2 µg/m³ (Current Baseline in Table 1-5). An increase of
13% over the background concentration of PM10 can be considered as acceptable under
the ADB Guidelines5, as the background concentration associated with natural sources
in the area is already close to the limit in the IFC Guideline. Similarly, the background
concentration of PM2.5 associated mainly with natural sources at 58 µg/m³ for 24–hour
(98th percentile) and 43 µg/m³ for Annual Average basis which are already above the
limits set in NEQS and IFC Guidelines. The increase in PM2.5 concentrations due to
5
According to ADB Safeguards Policy Statement 2009 Appendix 1 para 34, ‗The borrower/client will avoid,
or where avoidance is impossible, will minimize or control the intensity or load of pollutant emission and
discharge.‘ The Project includes best available technology for removal of particulate matter in the form of
ESP units with efficiency of 99.9%.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Project will be of the order of 3 µg/m³. Under these conditions, an increase of about 6%
over the current baseline concentration of PM2.5 can also be considered as acceptable
under the ADB Guidelines.
23.
NEQS has three different limits for PM2.5—Annual, 24-hour and 1-hour. A review
of the NEQS for PM2.5 and the regional practice indicates that the NEQS 1-hour limit is
inconsistent with the annual limit. The limit for 1-hour (15 µg/m3) is the same as the
annual limit. This is contrary to the practice world-wide where the limits for longer time
frame are always lower than that of a shorter time frame to allow for variations over
time.6 Similarly, the NEQS 1-hr limit of 15 µg/m3 for PM2.5 is inconsistent with the 24 hour
limit of 35 µg/m3. The ambient air quality standards of other countries in the region are
reflective of the high PM2.5 levels in the ambient air. The annual limits for PM2.5 in India
and Sri Lanka are 40 µg/m3 and 25 µg/m3 respectively. Similarly, the 24-hr limits for
PM2.5 in these countries are 60 and 50 µg/m3 respectively. Given the high natural
background particulate levels in Pakistan where environmental conditions are somewhat
similar to those in India and the current level of controls on industrial and vehicular
emissions, it is unlikely that compliance with the NEQS annual limit of 15 µg/m3 for the
PM2.5 can be achieved in any part of Sindh in the near future.
24.
The project proponent has approached the Sindh Environmental Protection
Agency of the Government of Sindh for review of the PM2.5 standards. The Agency has
indicated its willingness to review the standards. Given the sensitivity with respect to air
quality and the need for additional information to assess the air quality and to assist the
Government of Sindh in rationalization of standards, monitoring of PM10 and PM2.5 in air
quality is proposed for at least two years before commissioning of the Project.
1.5.2
GHG Emissions
25.
Estimated greenhouse gas emissions from the power plant are provided in
Table 1-6. These estimates have been developed using two different methodologies:
The IPCC Tier 1 methodology that assumes a 96,100 kg of CO2 emission per terajoule
of heat input from subbituminous and 101,000 kg of CO2 emission per terajoule of heat
input from lignite and calculation using the carbon content of design coals. The GHG
emission based on the IPCC Tier 1 method for Coal G is being used as the benchmark.
26.
The ADB Guidelines for GHG emission require the project proponents to
consider available options for offset of the GHG emissions. In the case of this Project,
options for offset that can be considered include tree plantations, carbon capture, and
recycling of fly ash. Experience of application of carbon capture technologies is lacking
in Pakistan, and application of available technologies for carbon capture in the present
environment are likely to adversely affect the project economics in view of cost of
application. ADB is considering provision of $ 1 million from its Carbon Capture and
Storage (CCS) to conduct a study on determining potential for CCS in Pakistan. Subject
to determination of financial viability, ADB will consider a CCS demonstration project to
offset carbon in Pakistan.
6
Higher pollutant concentrations are permitted for shorter intervals only and prolonged stress to
receptors over a longer period of time is avoided by prescribing a lower limit for an extended
period of time. The average for a longer period cannot also mathematically be higher than the
maximum figures for the shorter intervals.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table ‎1-6: Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates
Sub-bituminous
(Million Tons per Year)
Lignite
(Million Tons per
Year)
Total
(Million Tons per
Year)
IPCC Tier 1
Coal E
7.577
0.413
7.990
Coal F
7.372
0.638
8.010
Coal G
7.192
0.882
8.074
Coal E
6.069
0.429
6.498
Coal F
5.905
0.663
6.568
Coal G
5.761
0.916
6.677
From Carbon Content
Note: All figures for both units and assume 85% plant factor.
Fly ash can be used as a cement replacement and consultations with cement
27.
manufacturers located in the vicinity of JPCL indicate that the industry is keenly
interested in pursuing this option. Recycling of fly ash results in reduction of GHG
emissions associated with production of a corresponding quantity of cement. Potential
for offset of GHG emissions assuming recycling of 75% of fly ash produced by the
Project is estimated at 0.23 million tons of GHG annually.7 Offset potential of tree
plantations will be limited in view of limited availability of land and water in the JTPS
area. However, the project will consider this option. The proposed 1,200 MW power
plant will replace power production from small to medium sized backup generators used
by electricity consumers during load shedding. The capacity of these backup generators
installed by the residential, commercial, and industrial consumers is estimated at 2,500
MW. The 1,200 MW power available from the new coal fired power plant is estimated to
result in 31% reduction in load shedding. Assuming the IPCC emission factors for the
fuels, reduced operation of backup generators will result in an offset of an estimated
1.06 million tons of GHG annually.
1.5.3
Other Aspects
28.
Other environmental issues related to the proposed plant are:


7
Construction activities have different types of construction impacts. Some of
these relate to activities at the construction site where as others relate to the
setting up and operation of the construction crew camp. Typical issues include
dust, vegetation loss, noise, vibration, waste management, and camp effluent.
To avoid adverse impact of the construction activities on the environment, a
construction management plan (CMP) will be developed.
The annual ash produced from the Project will be in excess of 400,000 tons.
Options for disposal of fly ash and prospects for sale to the cement industry are
under consideration. Taking into account the potential for recycling of fly ash in
Corresponding to fly ash production of 349,600 t/year.
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Executive Summary
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project



1.6
the cement and construction industry, the land requirement for the ash disposal
for ten years is about 100 acres. The depth of the ash pond will be around
3.5 m to avoid ash dust formation from the wind.
The Project activities will result in both positive and negative impact on the
existing socioeconomic environment of the Socioeconomic Study Area as well
as the broader region. The positive impacts include:
Additional employment opportunities, resulting in increased prosperity and
wellbeing due to higher and stable incomes of employed people,
Potential negative socioeconomic impact includes land acquisition resulting in
physical or economic displacement of people. A land acquisition and
resettlement framework has been developed. This will be followed by a land
acquisition and resettlement plan.
Environmental Management Plan
29.
A comprehensive environmental management and monitoring plan has been
developed. It includes the following:


Identification of institutional responsibilities

Reporting and feedback mechanism

Environmental Mitigation Plan

Contaminated Soil Bioremediation Plan

Construction Management plan

Ash management plan

Social augmentation plan

Institutional strengthening and capacity building of TPS Jamshoro

Performance indicators

EMP for Waste Management

Environmental Monitoring Plan

Coal dust management plan

Asbestos Management Plan

Grievance redress mechanism
Air quality monitoring program
30.
The estimated cost of environmental monitoring and management, in US $3.85
million.
1.7
Conclusions
31.
The proposed power plant, 600 MW in the First Stage and 1,200 MW after the
completion of the Second Stage will be installed within the premises of the JTPS.
However, it will be an independent power plant, with its own fuel source, storage, utilities
and operations.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
32.
As the existing plant is not fully compliant with the national environmental
regulations and is also below the international best environmental practices as signified
by ADB‘s SPS 2009 and IFC‘s HSE Guidelines, a corrective action plan has been
developed. The plan is an essential part of the project as the improvement it will bring to
the environmental practices of JPCL and to the physical environment in the vicinity of the
JTPS, will enable the installation of the 1,200 MW power plant. The key areas in which
the project is likely to bring a positive environmental changes are:



Installation of FGD on the existing stacks and thereby reducing the emission of
sulfur dioxide;
Rehabilitation of effluent pipeline and therefore preventing of spread of plant
waste in the vicinity of the plant;

Development of a waste storage facility for hazardous waste;

Installation of a treatment plant for colony wastewater;


Development of a landfill site for colony waste;
Rehabilitation of existing evaporation pond and this prevention of release of
untreated wastewater to the river; and
Clean-up and remediation (or containment) of oily waste.
33.
The Project will fill critical gaps and provide significant support to the local
economy as well as that of the country. The cost of a unit of electricity generated by
using imported coal as fuel is less than 50% of that for fuel oil. In addition to reducing
power outages which are affecting growth of the economy, the Project will also lower the
average cost of power generation in the country by shifting the fuel mix in power
generation from fuel oil to imported coal. A diversified fuel mix with a lower dependence
on oil products for power generation will also improve the energy security of the country.
34.
The Project will contribute to improved health of the local community by
improving air quality through installation of FGDs on the existing boilers to lower SO 2
concentrations in ambient air associated with utilization of HSFO.
35.
The project will contribute to improvement in environmental management
practices and capacities in the JPCL through institution of a range of environmental
management systems and provision of training to the staff of the plant.
36.
The new 1,200 MW power project will comply with all the Pakistan regulatory
requirements and that of the ADB safeguard policies, with the exception of ambient air
quality standards of PM10 and PM2.5. It has been shown in this document that the
background concentration levels of PM10 and PM2.5 (without JTPS) reflecting the
emissions from natural sources either already exceed or are close to the limits specified
by the IFC Guidelines. This is a phenomenon that is prevalent all across Pakistan where
due dry conditions the dust levels are very high. The annual average background
concentration of PM10 is about the same as the limit specified under the IFC Guidelines,
while that of PM2.5 exceeds both the limits in both the NEQS and IFC Guidelines. The
Project includes installation of electrostatic precipitators with 99.9% efficiency on the
boilers for the 1,200 MW capacity. The ESP will limit the PM10 and PM2.5 emission to
level that is recommended for degraded airshed. The incremental contribution of the
1,200 MW plant in the ambient air will be about 13% in PM10 concentration and 6% in
PM2.5. The Project will utilize technology to achieve the maximum control possible, will
have small incremental impact, and the background concentrations are mainly due to
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Executive Summary
1-14
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
natural sources which cannot be reduced. The Project is therefore considered
acceptable under ADB guidelines which require avoidance, or where avoidance is
impossible, minimization or control of the intensity or load of pollutant emission and
discharge. The proposed 1,200 MW power plant will replace power production from
small to medium sized backup generators used by electricity consumers during load
shedding. The proposed project will result in a country-wide reduction of PM2.5 emission
by 5,600 tons. The power consumption in Hyderabad area is about 5.5% of the countrywide demand. Thus, the reduction of PM2.5 emission in the Hyderabad Area will be
about 300 tons annually due to the 1,200 MW power plant. A detailed ambient air
monitoring program including that of the PM2.5 will be instituted. The program will be
initiated before the commissioning of the Project with the objective of developing a good
understanding of the PM2.5 issue in Jamshoro area and possibly designing future
mitigation programs.
37.
It has been recognized that national standards for ambient air quality will require
revision. This issue has been discussed with the Sindh Environmental Protection
Agency and they have expressed willingness to review the standards.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
2. Introduction
38.
The Government of Pakistan (GoP) is planning to set up a super-critical coalfired power plant at Jamshoro (the ‘Jamshoro Power Generation Project’ or the ‘Project’)
to be financed by the Asian Development Bank (ADB). The power plant will be setup
within the premises of the existing Jamshoro Thermal Power Station (JTPS), owned and
operated by the Jamshoro Power Company Limited (JPCL). The proposed Project will
have a net generation capacity of 600 megawatt (MW) (the ‘First Stage’) with a provision
of expansion to 1,200 MW in the near future (the ‘Second Stage’). The gross generation
capacity of the Project will be 660 MW in the First Stage and 1,320 MW after
expansion.1
39.
Hagler Bailly Pakistan (HBP) has been retained by Asian Development Bank
(ADB) to undertake an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of the proposed Project
as required under the Pakistan’s environmental law as well as the ADB’s Safeguard
Policy Statement (SPS) 2009. The EIA covers the assessment of both the First and
Second stages of the Project, separately.
2.1
Introduction to the EIA
2.1.1
Objectives
40.
Both the Pakistan’s environmental law and ADB’s SPS 2009 require that
environmental assessment of the projects involving existing facilities shall a) cover the
potential environmental impact of proposed new activity and b) address any
environmental issues of the existing facilities. To realize this, an environmental audit of
the existing facilities is undertaken as part of the EIA. The objectives of the EIA,
therefore, are as follows:
Review the operations of existing JTPS and identify all environmental aspects
including natural resource consumption, gaseous emission, liquid effluent, and
solid waste;
Based on available information determine whether the current operations are in
compliance with the national regulatory requirements and that of the SPS 2009;
Using evidence documentary, observational or circumstantial identify and
quantify to the extent possible any issues related to non-compliance with the
law or the SPS 2009 in the past that may have resulted in environmental liability
for the plant or have the potential to become a liability in future;
Undertake consultation with the stakeholders to scope out the study and again
to provide them the feedback on the outcome of the study;
1
The total generation capacity of the power plant is the gross capacity. However, a part of the
electricity generated is used within the power plant. The balance electricity which is available
for supply to the transmission network is the net capacity. After the Second Stage the
proposed Project will have 660 X 2 = 1,320 MW gross capacity. Of this 120 MW will be used
internally and 1,320 – 120 = 1,200 MW will be the net capacity.
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2-1
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Prepare a physical, ecological and social baseline of the area of influence (the
‘Study Area’) of the existing and proposed activities in order to evaluate the
environmental impacts of the existing plant; assess the environmental impacts
of the proposed activities, and serve as reference for future;
Propose a corrective action plan for the existing plant, where needed, to ensure
that the operations are in compliance with the legal requirements and ADB’s
SPS 2009;
Assess the potential environmental impact of the proposed activities and, where
necessary, suggest mitigation measures to reduce any potential adverse impact
to acceptable levels;
Prepare an environmental management plan to ensure that the proposed
mitigation measures and corrective action measures are implemented; and
Prepare an EIA report complying with the legal requirements and the ADB’s
SPS 2009 for submission to the ADB and the Sindh Environmental Protection
Agency (SEPA).
41.
This report is prepared to meet the above objectives.
2.1.2
Scope of the EIA
42.
The scope of the EIA includes the operation of the existing JTPS and the
construction and operation of the proposed Project. It also includes the transportation of
equipment from ports of Karachi to the JTPS and the transportation of coal.
43.
The scope does not include the construction and operation of the transmission
line. The power from the proposed Project will be evacuated through the proposed MFF
Power Transmission Enhancement Investment Program - Proposed Tranche 3: Third
Circuit 500 kV Transmission Line Jamshoro to Rahimyar Khan and Moro Grid Stations.
The environmental assessment for the transmission line was completed in 20112 and
has been disclosed on the ADB website. Conversion of boilers is not in the scope of this
project.3
2.1.3
Background of the EIA Study
44.
JPCL was originally planning to a) convert two of the existing boilers in the JTPS
from High Sulfur Fuel Oil (HSFO)-firing to coal-firing and b) install one new 600 MW
coal-fired power generation unit. Both the components were envisaged to use imported
coal. An EIA for this project was initiated in May 2012 for which an environmental audit
of the JTPS was conducted, scoping consultation was undertaken, and environmental
and social baseline data was collected.
2
3
Environmental Assessment and Review Framework: PAK: MFF Power Transmission
Enhancement Investment Program – Proposed Tranche 3, Asian Development Bank,
November 2011 (www.adb.org/sites/default/files/projdocs/2011/37192-043-pak-earf.pdf),
accessed June 2013. and Initial Environmental Examination: PAK: MFF Power Transmission
Enhancement Investment Program – Proposed Tranche 3, Asian Development Bank,
November 2011 (www.adb.org/sites/default/files/projdocs/2011/37192-043-pak-iee-02.pdf),
accessed June 2013.
This study assumes that the boilers will continue to run on HSFO. If the GoP undertakes
conversion of the boilers, the responsibility of the EIA will be that of the proponents.
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2-2
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
45.
In 2012 GoP initiated a new policy that required that all conversion of boilers in
the existing public sector power plant shall be based on indigenous coal. Consequently,
the scope of this project has been redefined to include installation two 600 MW units.
Conversion of boilers is not in the scope of this project.4 Further, the boilers will now be
designed on a blend of imported coal and indigenous coal instead of only imported coal.
46.
This EIA is a continuation of the previous study however wherever necessary
new baseline data collection, stakeholder consultation, and assessment has been done,
especially with regards to the new technology and scope of operation.
2.2
Institutional Arrangements
47.
The key institutions involved in implementation of the proposed Project and their
roles are the following:
Economic Affairs Division, Government of Pakistan
Borrower of finances
GENCO Holding Company Limited (GHCL)
Executing Agency (EA) of the Project (Supervise trainings, workshops and
seminars for GHCL and JPCL personnel; monitor, coordinate and provide
support to implementing agencies in construction work of the proposed Project;
monitor implementation of the environmental management plan (EMP) and the
corrective action plan and ensure that implementing agencies comply with all
the legal requirements and the ADB safeguard requirements)
Jamshoro Power Company limited (JPCL)
Implementing Agency (IA) of the Project (Supervise construction of Project;
procurement of the contracts; supervise implementation of the EMP and the
corrective action plan);
ADB
Main project financier
48.
In addition to the above, additional institutional arrangements will be made for
implementation of the project. These are described in Chapter 10 of the EIA.
2.3
Project Setting
49.
JTPS is located north of Jamshoro town in the Jamshoro district of Sindh
province, Pakistan (Figure 2-1). The power plant is about 10 km northwest of
Hyderabad and about 150 kilometer (km) northeast of Karachi. It is located on N-55,
also known as Indus Highway. N-55 is one of the two main highways of the country
which connect Karachi, the main port and industrial hub of the country, with the rest of
the country. The north and northwest of the power plant is barren flat land. Some
smaller sedimentary hills are located in the west and southwest, which rise to an
elevation of 100 meters (m) above mean sea level.
4
Any boiler conversion will be considered separately. This study assumes that the boilers will
continue to run on HSFO.
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2-3
Environmental Impact Assessment
Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 2-1: Jamshoro Thermal Power Station and Surroundings
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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2-4
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
50.
To the south of the Plant, at a distance of about 5 km, is the urban area of
Jamshoro. Scattered villages and farmlands are located to the east and northeast of the
JTPS, in the flood plains along the banks of Indus River. The river also supports fish
which is a source of income for local fishermen. In places, small pools of stagnant water
are formed within the agricultural fields, some of which are caused by the effluent from
the operations of the existing facilities at JTPS. The Indus River flows in the north-tosouth direction at a distance of about 4 km to the east of the existing facility. The
elevation of the land in surroundings of the plant ranges between 20 and 45 m. It slopes
towards the Indus River.
51.
Jamshoro area has a desert hot climate, characterized by a hot and dry summer
and mild winter rainfall. The vegetation of this region is typical of arid regions, adapted
to extreme seasonal temperatures and moisture fluctuation, and is thin and degraded.
52.
The population clusters in the surroundings of the JTPS can be broadly classified
as rural, urban and institutional housing colonies. The rural area population is found in
small scattered villages. Agriculture is the main source of livelihood for the rural areas.
The urban areas comprise of a contiguous population belt that forms the Jamshoro town.
The urban areas have better access to facilities, such as, roads, schools and hospitals.
The housing colonies are purpose-built residential areas associated with JTPS and
educational institutions such as the the University of Sindh and the Liaquat University
and Health and Medical Sciences (LUHMS). The housing colonies and the urban areas
together constitute the more developed and better-off segments of the area in the
surroundings of the plant. Photographs of the project surrounding area are included in
Figure 2-2.
This area intentionally left blank
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Introduction
2-5
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 2-2: Photographs of JTPS Surrounding Area
Barren lands towards the north and northwest
Hills towards the west and southwest
Typical vegetation cover observed in the surroundings
An agricultural field
Pools of stagnant water created by plant effluent
Indus River, flowing at the east of the plant
Urban area of Jamshoro
Village near power plant
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Introduction
2-6
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
2.4
Project Rationale
53.
Pakistan is going through an acute power shortage. Figure 2-3 provides a brief
description of the power market players. According to the National Electric Power
Regulatory Authority’s (NEPRA) ‘State of the Industry Report 2012’ the gap between
supply and demand in 2011-2012 was well above 5,000 MW mark and remained
between 4,000 MW and 5,000 MW for most part of the year. The country has therefore
an urgent requirement to generate additional power to feed into the national grid. Table
2-1 shows the projections of power supply and demand in the NTDC‘s and KESC's
systems indicating that the gap between supply and demand is likely to persist over next
few years. The gap represents about one-third of the total demand in National
Transmission and Despatch Company (NTDC) system resulting in as much as 12 hours
of load shedding in urban areas and at times more than 18 hours of load shedding in
rural areas. Any slippage in the addition of new generation capacity or fuel availability
will further widen the gap between supply and demand.
54.
Chronic power shortages in Pakistan are the most serious constraints to the
country’s economic growth and job creation. The energy crisis continues to drag down
the country’s economic performance and spark social instability. Increasing and
unpredictable load shedding is estimated to constrain annual gross domestic product
(GDP) growth by at least 2%. Hardest hit are the small- and medium-sized enterprises
that employ the most number of people but cannot afford back-up electricity generators
and fuel.
Figure 2-3: Pakistan Power Market Players
The power sector in Pakistan primarily consists of two systems: newly corporatized generation,
transmission and distribution companies that have been formed out of the former vertically
integrated power utility, the Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), and the Karachi
Electric Supply Corporation (KESC).
In 1998, WAPDA’s Power Wing was restructured into 13 independently functioning corporate
entities with an aim to gradually move the power market towards competition, inject private capital
in mainstream development, and improve the sector’s operational efficiency. Under the
restructuring process, the functions of generation, transmission and distribution were separated
through the creation of 13 distinct entities – 4 thermal generation companies (GENCOs), one
central National Transmission and Dispatch Company (NTDC), and 8 distribution companies
(DISCOs) – through an extensive corporatization process in which the assets and liabilities of
these companies were identified and separated, and independent boards of directors appointed
to manage the affairs of each new company. The four GENCOs are now under the control of
GENCO Holding Company (GHC), a government–owned entity. Later two new DISCOs have
been formed by bifurcating two existing DISCOs, thus raising the total number of DISCOs to 10.
Since corporatization, these companies have been functioning under the aegis and financial
control of the Ministry of Water and Power (MoWP). The ultimate plan was to privatize the
generation and distribution companies so as to achieve high operating efficiencies through
prudent private management in the power sector. This is yet to be achieved.
In addition to the generation capacity installed by WAPDA and the KESC, there are a number of
power plants in the private sector that are known collectively as independent power producers
(IPPs). KESC is a vertically integrated utility serving only the city of Karachi and has already
been privatized.
The MoWP and National Electric Power Regulatory Authority (NEPRA) are the two institutions
responsible for governance of the power sector.
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Table 2-1: Projected Supply and Demand in NTDC and KESC Systems
Financial Year
ending 30th
June
Planned Generation
Capability as per
NTDC (MW)
NTDC Projected
Demand Growth
Rate
NTDC Projected
Demand during
peak hours (MW)
Surplus/
(Deficit)
(MW)
NTDC
2012
(actual)
13,733
-
20,058
6,325
2013
21,299
7.4%
24,126
2,827
2014
21,668
7.4%
25,918
4,250
2015
30,510
7.7%
28,029
2,481
2016
20,352
5.5%
24,018
3,666
2017
24,075
5.5%
25,352
1,277
2012
(actual)
2.371
5%
2,564
193
2013
2,371
5%
2,692
321
2014
2,419
5%
2,827
408
2015
2,437
5%
2,968
531
2016
2,737
5%
3,116
379
KESC
Source: NEPRA’s State of Industry Report, 2012
55.
In addition to the economic impact, the shortage has environmental and social
impacts as well. Other than complaints of general discomfort, students have complained
of effects of the load shedding on their studies. It has also resulted in deterioration of
health care services.
56.
The environmental impact of the shortage has not been studied but potential
impacts include increased use of firewood, kerosene, biomass, and firewood and their
effects on deforestation and air quality. As there are no regulatory control over the
emission from these small generators, widespread use of generators in the cities results
in emissions of nitrogen oxides, particulate matter and sulfur dioxide (from diesel
generators) from generator exhaust and hence contributing to the urban air pollution.
These generators are also a major source of noise.
57.
The power shortage cannot be attributed to any single cause. Failures in a
number of areas have led to the present conditions. Some of the factors which
significantly contributed in increasing the shortages to such staggering levels are as
follows:
Addition in power generation capacity was not planned or achieved to match the
demand, consequently rapid growth in demand outstripped the corresponding
additions in generation capacity over the past few years.
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Introduction
2-8
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Shortage of natural gas has resulted in increased power generation on HSFO.
As shown in Figure 2-4, for the last ten years about one-third of the power
generation has been on HSFO. Average generation cost of power on HSFO at
JTPS is presently about Pakistani Rupees (PKR) 21.00 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).
A continuing high level of generation on HSFO combined with rising oil prices in
the international market have contributed significantly to increase in electricity
tariff which has increased from PKR 5.50/kWh in 2008 to PKR 11.81/kWh in
2012. As the Government of Pakistan (GoP) subsidizes the electricity by about
PKR 3.17/kWh, the increasing dependence on HSFO has resulted in widening
the budget deficit. It is also making it difficult for the GoP to eliminate power
subsidy due to political considerations. This, in turn, has affected the availability
of cash to public sector power generation companies, and distribution
companies.
Shortage of funds has resulted in poor maintenance. Owing to this, the
GENCOs have lost nearly 35% of their total installed capacity due to plant
degradation and are operating at lower availability of around 75% with frequent
break downs of generation units when compared to Independent Power
Producers’ (IPPs) which are liable to maintain availability of 88% and 85% in
their respective contracts under the power policies of 2002 and 1994. By
compounding the two factors, the net availability of GENCOs merely stands
around 49%, nearly half that of IPPs; and
Excessive and prolonged shut-downs of the IPPs plants resulting from
contractual disputes and withholding of payments by the Central Power
Purchasing Agency (CPPA) constraining their ability to procure fuel or operate
the plants.
58.
In addition to increasing the generation capacity, it is essential to lower the
generation cost. One possible option is the hydropower. The government is pursuing
both large and small hydropower projects to utilize domestic resources. However,
hydropower despite being the ideal solution has long implementation period and is not
useful to address immediate issues. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and imported pipeline
gas are the other alternatives. Import on natural gas through pipelines, if it happens, is
going to take a long time to materialize. The LNG is relatively a short-term alternative
but given the current market price of LNG it is unlikely to help in lowering the cost of
power produced. Further discussion on alternatives for power generation is included in
Section 8.2.
59.
In this background, coal offers a promising option in the medium as well as longterm to provide affordable power and diversify the energy mix. The GoP aims to
increase the share of coal-based generation from nearly none now (0.07%) to about
22% in 10 years (Figure 2-4). This will require converting existing HSFO generation
units, replacing old inefficient units, and constructing new plants. Electricity generated
from coal, with long-term fuel supply contracts, will also add stability to the power price.
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Figure 2-4: Pakistan Energy Mix (2011-12)
Power Mix, 2002
Natural
Gas
34.7%
Hydel
26.1%
Coal
0.6%
Nuclear
3.2%
High
Speed
Diesel
0.5%
Fuel Oil
35.0%
Source: Pakistan Energy Yearbook, 2002
Power Mix, 2012
Natural
Gas
30.3%
Hydel
30.6%
Coal
0.2%
Nuclear
5.6%
High
Speed
Diesel
0.9%
Source: Pakistan Energy Yearbook, 2012
Hydel
37.8%
Fuel Oil
32.4%
Power Mix, 2022
Natural
Gas
19.0%
Fuel Oil
15.8%
Coal
21.7%
High
Speed
Nuclear
Diesel
5.6%
0.0%
Source: Based on NTDC Electricity Demand Forecast and Generation Expansion Plan
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2.5
Organization of the Report
60.
The EIA contains 12 chapters as follows: After the Executive Summary
(Chapter 1) and Introduction (this chapter), the Legal and Institutional Framework
(Chapter 3) discusses the environmental laws of the country and the ADB SPS 2009. A
description of the existing JTPS and the proposed Jamshoro Power Generation Project
is provided in The Proposed Project (Chapter 4). The physical, ecological and
socioeconomic baseline is presented in Description of the Environment (Chapter 5).
61.
The environmental legacy of the existing JTPS are identified and discussed in
Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Action (Chapter 6) along with the
proposed corrective action.
62.
Following two chapters are Information Disclosure, Consultation, and
Participation (Chapter 7) and Analysis of Alternatives (Chapter 8). These cover two
key aspects of the EIA process.
63.
The core of the EIA is the Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures
(Chapter 9) which identifies the potential environmental and social impacts of the
proposed Project, predicts their magnitude, evaluates the significance of impacts, and
proposes mitigation measures, where required. This chapter is followed by the
Environmental Management Plan (Chapter 10) which identifies various implementing
mechanisms, institutional arrangements, monitoring mechanisms, and other plans to
ensure effective implementation of the proposed mitigation measures. The Grievance
Redress Mechanism (Chapter 11) proposes the mechanism to affectively address any
grievances of the community and other stakeholders against the project.
64.
Finally, Conclusions (Chapter 12) concludes the report.
information and detailed data is provided in the appendices.
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Introduction
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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3. Legal and Institutional Framework
3.1
Historical and Constitutional Context
65.
The development of statutory and other instruments for environmental
management has steadily gained priority in Pakistan since the late 1970s. The Pakistan
Environmental Protection Ordinance, 1983 was the first piece of legislation designed
specifically for the protection of the environment. The promulgation of this ordinance
was followed, in 1984, by the establishment of the Pakistan Environmental Protection
Agency, the primary government institution at that time dealing with environmental
issues. Significant work on developing environmental policy was carried out in the late
1980s, which culminated in the drafting of the Pakistan National Conservation Strategy.
Provincial environmental protection agencies were also established at about the same
time. The National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS) were established in 1993.
In 1997, the Pakistan Environmental Protection Act (PEPA) 1997 was enacted to replace
the 1930 Ordinance. PEPA conferred broad-based enforcement powers to the
environmental protection agencies. This was followed by the publication of the Pakistan
Environmental Protection Agency Review of IEE and EIA Regulations (IEE-EIA
Regulations) 2000 which provided the necessary details on the preparation, submission,
and review of initial environmental examinations (IEE) and environmental impact
assessments (EIA). In addition to the PEPA 1997, Pakistan’s statute books contain a
number of other laws that have clauses concerning the regulation and protection of the
environment.
66.
Prior to the 18th Amendment to the Constitution of Pakistan in 2010, the
legislative powers were distributed between the federal and provincial governments
through two ‘lists’ attached to the Constitution as Schedules. The Federal list covered
the subjects over which the federal government had exclusive legislative power, while
the ‘Concurrent List’ contained subjects regarding which both the federal and provincial
governments could enact laws. The subject of ‘environmental pollution and ecology’
was included in the Concurrent List and hence allowed both the national and provincial
governments to enact laws on the subject. However, as a result of the 18th Amendment
this subject is now in the exclusive domain of the provincial government. The main
consequences of this change are as follows:
The Ministry of Environment at the federal level has been abolished. Its
functions related to the national environmental management haves been
transferred to the provinces. The international obligations in the context of
environment will be managed by a new ministry, the Ministry of Climate
Change of the federal government.
The PEPA 1997 is technically no longer applicable to the provinces. The
provinces are required to enact their own legislation for environmental
protection. It is understood that to ensure legal continuity PEPA 1997
continues to be the legal instrument in Sindh for environmental protection till
enactment of new law.
67.
It is anticipated that the provincial acts will be based on the PEPA 1997 and will
provide the same level of protection. The discussion on regulatory requirements is,
therefore, based on the provisions of PEPA 1997.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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3.2
Environmental Law
68.
The PEPA 1997 is the basic legislative tool empowering the government to frame
regulations for the protection of the environment. The act is applicable to a broad range
of issues and extends to air, water, industrial liquid effluent, marine, and noise pollution,
as well as to the handling of hazardous wastes. The articles of PEPA 1997 that have a
direct bearing on the proposed Project are listed below. The details are discussed in the
following sections.
Article 11 that deals with the national environmental quality standards and its
application
Article 12 that establishes the requirement for environmental impact
assessment
Article 14 that deals with hazardous substances
Article 15 that relates to vehicular pollution
69.
To implement the provisions of PEPA 1997, several rules and regulations have
been promulgated.1 The relevant rules and regulations are
National Environmental Quality Standards (Self-Monitoring and Reporting by
Industries) Rules, 2001
Environmental Samples Rules, 2001
The Pollution Charge for Industry (Calculation and Collection) Rules, 2001
Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency (Review of IEE/EIA) Regulations,
2000
70.
Guidelines are issued by the Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency for
preparation of environmental assessment. The relevant guidelines are discussed in
Section 2.3.
71.
The articles of PEPA 1997 that have a direct bearing on the proposed Project
and their implications are as follows:
3.3
Requirements for Environmental Impact Assessment
72.
The articles of PEPA 1997 that have a direct bearing on the environmental
assessment of the proposed Project are:
Article 12(1): ‘No proponent of a project shall commence construction or
operation unless he has filed with the Federal Agency2 an Initial
Environmental Examination or, where the project is likely to cause adverse
1
2
Rules and regulations are similar instruments but differ in their hierarchy. The power to make
rules and regulations is given in the enabling law, PEPA 1997 in this case. The rules are
made by the government (federal or provincial, as the case may be) and require publication in
the official gazette. Regulations are made by the government agency which is empowered by
the law, environmental protection agencies in this case, and are not always published in the
official gazette. Rules deal with relatively important matters such as delegation of powers and
authorities, whereas regulations usually deal with procedural matters.
The term ‘Federal Agency’ refers to the government agency which has the power or to which
the powers have been delegated to implement the provisions of this act. In case of this
project, the concerned agency is the Sindh EPA.
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Legal and Institutional Framework
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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environmental effects an environmental impact assessment, and has
obtained from the Federal Agency approval in respect thereof.’
Article 12(3): ‘Every review of an environmental impact assessment shall be
carried out with public participation…’
73.
The IEE-EIA Regulations 2000 provide the necessary details on the preparation,
submission, and review of the IEE and the EIA. Categorization of projects for IEE and
EIA is one of the main components of the IEE-EIA Regulations 2000. Projects have
been classified on the basis of expected degree of adverse environmental impact.
Project types listed in Schedule II of the regulations are designated as potentially
seriously damaging to the environment and require EIA, and those listed in Schedule I
as having potentially less adverse effects and require an IEE. Thermal power
generation of capacity less than 200 MW is included in Schedule I (List of Projects
requiring an IEE) whereas thermal power generation of capacity more than 200 MW is
included in Schedule II (List of Projects requiring an EIA). ‘Project’ is defined in PEPA
1997 as ‘any activity, plan, scheme, proposal or undertaking involving any change in the
environment and includes (f) alteration, expansion, repair, decommissioning or
abandonment of existing buildings or other works, roads or other transport systems,
factories or other installations.’ As the project involves expansion of an existing thermal
power plant of capacity larger than 200 MW, it falls within the category of Schedule II
and an EIA has been prepared for it.
74.
Regulation 8 of the IEE-EIA Regulations 2000 require that ‘(1) Ten paper copies
and two electronic copies of an lEE or EIA shall be filed with the Federal Agency;
(2) Every lEE and EIA shall be accompanied by (a) an application, in the form set out in
Schedule IV; and (b) copy of receipt showing payment of the review fee.’
75.
The prescribed procedure for review of EIA by the EPA is described in
Regulations 9–14 and is depicted in Figure 3-1. The key features are:
On acceptance of the EIA for review, EPA will place a public notice in
national English and Urdu newspapers and in local language newspaper
informing the public about the project and where it’s EIA can be accessed. It
will also set a date for public hearing which shall be at least 30 days after the
publication of the notice.
If it considers necessary, the EPA can form a Committee of Experts to assist
the EPA in the review of the EIA. The EPA may also decide to inspect the
project site.
Article 12(4) of PEPA 1997 binds the EPA to ‘communicate its approval or
otherwise within a period of four months from the date the initial
environmental examination or environmental impact assessment is filed
complete in all respects in accordance with the prescribed procedure, failing
which the initial environmental examination or, as the case may be, the
environmental impact assessment shall be deemed to have been approved,
to the extent to which it does not contravene the provisions of this Act and the
rules and regulations made thereunder.’ Regulation 11 of the IEE-EIA
Regulations 2000, states that the EPA ‘shall make every effort to carry out its
review of the EIA within ninety days, of issue of confirmation of
completeness’.
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Legal and Institutional Framework
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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Figure 3-1: EIA Review and Approval Procedure
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Legal and Institutional Framework
3-4
Environmental Impact Assessment
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76.
Regulation 6 of the IEE-EIA Regulations 2000 pertains to the guidelines. It
states that: ‘(1) The Federal Agency may issue guidelines for preparation of an lEE or
EIA including guidelines of general applicability and sectoral guidelines indicating
specific assessment requirements for planning, construction and operation of projects
relating to a particular sector. (2) Where guidelines have been issued under subregulation (1), an lEE or EIA shall be prepared, to the extent practicable, in accordance
therewith and the proponent shall justify in the lEE or, as the case may be, EIA and
departure therefrom.’ The relevant guidelines are the follows:
77.
Policy and Procedures for the filling, review, and approval of environmental
assessments, which sets out the key policy and procedural requirement. It contains a
brief policy statement on the purpose of environmental assessment and the goal of
sustainable development and also states that environmental assessment be integrated
with feasibility studies.
78.
Guidelines for the preparation and review of environmental reports which cover
the following:
Scoping, alternatives, site selection, and format of environmental reports;
Identification, analysis and prediction, baseline data, and significance of
impacts;
Mitigation and impact management and preparing an environmental
management plan;
Reporting;
Review and decision making;
Monitoring and auditing;
Project management.
79.
Guidelines for Public Consultation which covers the following:
Consultation, involvement and participation;
Identifying stakeholders;
Techniques for public consultation (principles, levels of involvement, tools,
building trust);
Effective public consultation (planning, stages of EIA where consultation is
appropriate);
Consensus building and dispute resolution;
Facilitating involvement (including the poor, women, building community, and
NGO capacity)
80.
Guidelines for sensitive areas which identifies the sensitive areas.
81.
Sectoral Guidelines for Environmental Reports-Thermal Power Stations deal with
major thermal power plants which will be defined as those producing electrical energy
from fossil fuels (coal, gas, oil). The guideline is prepared to assist project proponents to
identify the key environmental parameters those are required to be addressed to
develop mitigation measures and alternatives that need to be considered in the actual
EIA.
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3.4
82.
Pollution Control Regulations and Standards
Two articles of the PEPA 1997 that are relevant to pollution control are:
Article 11(1): ‘Subject to the provisions of this Act and the rules and
regulations made thereunder no person shall discharge or emit or allow the
discharge or emission of any effluent or waste or air pollutant or noise in an
amount, concentration or level which is in excess of the National
Environmental Quality Standards…’
Article 14: ‘No person shall generate, collect, consign, transport, treat,
dispose of, store, handle or import any hazardous substance except—(a)
under a license issued by the Federal Agency and in such manner as may be
prescribed; or (b) in accordance with the provisions of any other law for the
time being in force, or of any international treaty, convention, protocol, code,
standard, agreement or other instrument to which Pakistan is a party.”
83.
As per Article 14(1), the requirements of Article 14 are applicable ‘in such
manner as may be prescribed’. PEPA 1997 defines that ‘prescribed’ to mean as
prescribed under the rules made under the Act. Hazardous Substances Rules were
drafted by Pakistan EPA in 2003 but were never notified. Therefore this article of the
PEPA 1997 is not enforceable and will not affect the proposed project. However, best
industry practice and internationally acceptable guidelines for hazardous substances
would be used for the proposed project.
84.
The complete set of NEQS is included as Appendix 1. It covers the following:
Ambient air quality (9 parameters)
Drinking water (32 parameters)
Ambient noise
Industrial effluents (32 parameters)
Industrial gaseous emissions (18 parameters).
85.
All industrial standards (ambient air quality, gaseous emission, ambient noise,
and industrial effluent) are applicable to the proposed Plant.
86.
Under the National Environmental Quality Standards, Self-Monitoring and
Reporting (SMART) by Industry Rules 2001, industrial units are responsible for
monitoring their gaseous and liquid discharges and reporting them to the relevant
environmental protection agency. As fuel and coal fired thermal power plant falls under
the Schedule I Category (Category A) of industrial categorization and reporting
procedure for SMART, environmental monitoring reports required to be submitted in
monthly basis to the relevant authorities. The project proponents will report their
emission and effluent to the Sindh EPA in accordance with the rules.
3.5
3.5.1
Other Relevant Laws
The Forest Act, 1927
87.
The act empowers the provincial forest departments to declare any forest area
reserved or protected. The act also empowers the provincial forest departments to
prohibit the clearing of forests for cultivation, grazing, hunting, removing forest produce,
quarrying, felling, and lopping. Vegetation clearing will be required in the site
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preparation for the power plant but since the area is not declared as a reserve forest this
law will have no implication on the project.
3.5.2
Factories Act, 1934
88.
Particular sections of the act applicable to this project are:
Section 13(1): Every factory shall be kept clean and free from effluvia arising
from any drain, privy or other nuisance.
Section 14(1): Effective arrangements shall be made in every factory for the
disposal of wastes and effluents due to the manufacturing process carried on
therein.
Section 16(1): In every factory in which, by reason of the manufacturing
process carried on, there is given off any dust or fume or other impurity of
such a nature and to such an extent as is likely to be injurious or offensive to
the workers employed therein, effective measures shall be taken to prevent
its accumulation in any work-room and its inhalation by workers and if any
exhaust appliance is necessary for this purpose, it shall be applied as near as
possible to the point of origin of the dust, fume or other impurity, and such
point shall be enclosed so far as possible.
Section 16(2): In any factory no stationary internal combustion engine shall
be operated unless the exhaust is conducted into open air and exhaust pipes
are insulated to prevent scalding and radiation heat, and no internal
combustion engine shall be operated in any room unless effective measures
have been taken to prevent such accumulation of fumes therefrom as are
likely to be injurious to the workers employed in the work-room.
Section 20(1): In every factory effective arrangements shall be made to
provide and maintain at suitable points conveniently situated for all workers
employed therein a sufficient supply of whole-some drinking water.
Section 26(1) d(i): In every factory the following shall be securely fenced by
the safeguards of substantial construction which shall be kept in position
while the parts of machinery required to be fenced are in motion or in use,
namely – (a) every part of an electric generator, a motor or rotary convertor.
3.6
3.6.1
Environmental Guidelines
ADB’s Safeguard Policy Statement 2009
89.
As per Asian Development Bank’s SPS 2009, depending on the significance of
project impacts and risks, the assessment may comprise a full-scale environmental
impact assessment (EIA) for category A projects, an initial environmental examination or
equivalent process for category B projects, or a desk review. ADB uses a classification
system to reflect the significance of a project’s potential environmental impacts. A
project’s category is determined by the category of its most environmentally sensitive
component, including direct, indirect, cumulative, and induced impacts in the project’s
area of influence. Projects are assigned to one of the four categories shown in
Table 3-1.
90.
When the project involves existing activities or facilities, relevant external experts
will perform environmental audits to determine the existence of any areas where the
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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project may cause or is causing environmental risks or impacts. If the project does not
foresee any new major expansion, the audit constitutes the environmental assessment
for the project. The policy principles under the SPS 2009 for environmental assessment
are:
Apply pollution prevention and control technologies and practices consistent
with international good practice, as reflected in internationally recognized
standards such as the World Bank Group’s Environmental, Health and Safety
(EHS) Guidelines.
Adopt cleaner production processes, and good practices of energy efficiency.
Avoid or, when avoidance is not feasible, minimize or control the intensity or
load of pollutants emissions and discharges, including direct and indirect
greenhouse gases emissions, waste generation, and release of hazardous
material from their production, transportation, handling and storage.
Table 3-1: ADB Project Categories
Category
Project Description and Requirements
Category A A proposed project is classified as category A if it is likely to have significant
adverse environmental impacts that are irreversible, diverse, or unprecedented.
These impacts may affect an area larger than the sites or facilities subject to
physical works. An environmental impact assessment is required.
Category B A proposed project is classified as category B if its potential adverse environmental
impacts are less adverse than those of category A projects. These impacts are sitespecific, few if any of them are irreversible, and in most cases mitigation measures
can be designed more readily than for category A projects. An initial environmental
examination is required.
Category C A proposed project is classified as category C if it is likely to have minimal or no
adverse environmental impacts. No environmental assessment is required although
environmental implications need to be reviewed.
Category FI A proposed project is classified as category FI if it involves investment of ADB funds
to or through a FI
Avoid the use of hazardous materials subject to international bans or phaseouts.
Use, purchase and manage pesticides based on integrated pest
management approaches and reduce reliance on synthetic chemical
pesticides
3.6.2
World Bank/IFC Environmental, Health and Safety Guidelines for Thermal
Power Plants, 2008
91.
The Environmental, Health, and Safety (EHS) Guidelines are technical reference
documents with general and industry-specific examples of Good International Industry
Practice. The EHS Guidelines contain the performance levels and measures that are
generally considered to be achievable in new facilities by existing technology at
reasonable costs. Application of the EHS Guidelines to existing facilities may involve the
establishment of site-specific targets, based on environmental assessments and/or
environmental audits as appropriate, with an appropriate timetable for achieving them.
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92.
This document includes information relevant to combustion processes fueled by
gaseous, liquid, and solid fossil fuels and biomass and designed to deliver electrical or
mechanical power, steam, heat, or any combination of these. The emission guidelines
for boilers are included in Appendix 2.
3.7
Institutional Framework
93.
The success of environmental assessment as a means of ensuring that
development projects are environmentally sound and sustainable depends in large
measure on the capability of regulatory institutions for environmental management. The
institutional framework for decision-making and policy formulation in environmental and
conservation issues is briefly described below.
3.7.1
Sindh Government Institutions
94.
Environment and Alternate Energy Department is functioning as a department of
the Government of Sindh (GoS) since 2002. Sindh EPA operates under this
department. It is a monitoring and regulating agency with the following main functions:
Enforcement of PEPA 1997
Enforcement of NEQS
Implementation of Self-Monitoring and Reporting Tool (SMART)
Review of EIAs and IEEs
Providing advice to the government on issues related to environment
Coordination of pollution prevention and abatement measures between
government and non-governmental organizations
Assistance to provincial and local governments in implementation of schemes
for proper disposal of wastes to ensure compliance with NEQS
Undertake measures to enhance awareness on environment among general
public
Conduct research and studies on different environmental issues
Attend to public complaints on environmental issues.
Carry out any other task related to environment assigned by the government.
95.
Sindh EPA will be responsible for the review and approval of the EIA of
Jamshoro power plant.
3.7.2
International and National NGOs
96.
International environmental and conservation organizations, such as the
International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the World Wide Fund for
Nature (WWF), have been active in Pakistan for some time. Both these organizations
have worked closely with the government and have played an advisory role with regard
to the formulation of environmental and conservation policies. Since the Rio Summit, a
number of national environmental NGOs have also been formed, and have been
engaged in advocacy and, in some cases, research. The most prominent national
environmental NGOs, such as the Sustainable Development Policy Institute (SDPI) are
members of the Pakistan National Committee of the IUCN.
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97.
Environmental NGOs have been particularly active in advocacy, promoting
sustainable development approaches. Much of the government’s environmental and
conservation policy has been formulated in consultation with leading NGOs, who have
also been involved in drafting new legislation on conservation.
3.8
International Treaties
98.
Important international environmental treaties that have been signed by Pakistan
and may have relevance to the Project are listed in Table 3-2. They concern: climate
change and depletion of the ozone layer; biological diversity and trade in wild flora and
fauna; desertification; waste and pollution; and cultural heritage.
Table 3-2: International Environmental Treaties Endorsed by Pakistan
Topic
Convention
Climate
change and
the ozone
layer
Waste and
pollution
Date of
Treaty
Entry into
force in
Pakistan
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate
Change - the primary objective is the stabilisation of
greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a
level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic
interference with the climate system.
1992
1994
Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate Change - enabled by the above
Convention on Climate Change. It has more powerful
and legally binding measures. It sets binding targets for
37 industrialized countries and the European community
for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
1997
2005
Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone
Layer - acts as a framework for the international efforts
to protect the ozone layer with a primary objective to
protect human health and the environment against
adverse effects resulting from human activities that
modify or are likely to modify the ozone layer.
1985
1993
The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete
Ozone Layer and associated amendments - enabled by
the Vienna Convention, it is designed to protect the
ozone layer by phasing out the production and
consumption of a number of substances believed to be
responsible for ozone depletion.
1987
1993
Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary
Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal regulates the transboundary movement of hazardous
waste and other waste with a stated purpose to protect
human health and the environment against the adverse
effects from generation and management of hazardous
waste and other waste. The Convention provides for
three sets of measures with binding obligations. These
are: Strict control of transboundary movement of
hazardous waste; Environmentally sound management
of
hazardous
waste;
and
Enforcement
and
implementation of the provisions of the convention at
1989
1994
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Topic
Convention
Date of
Treaty
Entry into
force in
Pakistan
International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness,
Response and Co-operation
1990
1995
Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants
–seeks to protect human health and the environment
from Persistent Organic Pollutants, which are chemicals
that remain intact in the environment for long periods,
become
widely distributed
geographically and
accumulate in the fatty tissue of humans and wildlife.
2001
2008
Desertification
International Convention to Combat Desertification –
with an objective to combat desertification and mitigate
the effects of drought. It is supported by international
cooperation and partnership arrangements, with the aim
of achieving sustainable use of land and water
resources and sustainable development in affected
areas.
1994
1997
Biodiversity
and the
protection of
plants and
animals
Convention on Biological Diversity – covering
ecosystems, species, and genetic resources and also
the field of biotechnology. The objectives are:
conserve of biological diversity;
sustainable use of its components; and
fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising
from genetic resources.
1992
1994
Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on
Biological Diversity - addresses potential risks posed by
living modified organisms resulting from modern
biotechnology.
2000
2009
Bonn Convention on the Conservation of Migratory
Species of Wild Animals - aims to conserve terrestrial,
marine and avian migratory species throughout their
range. It is concerned with the conservation of wildlife
and habitats on a global scale.
1979
1987
Memorandum
of
Understanding
concerning
Conservation Measures for the Siberian Crane - parties
undertake to provide strict protection to Siberian Cranes,
and identify and conserve wetland habitats essential for
their survival.
1998
1999
Convention on International Trade in Endangered
Species of Wild Fauna and Flora - to ensure that
international trade in specimens of wild animals and
plants does not threaten their survival.
1973
1976
International Plant Protection Convention (1997 Revised
Text) - to prevent the international spread of pests and
plant diseases. It requires maintenance of lists of plant
pests, tracking of pest outbreaks, and coordination of
technical assistance between member nations.
1951/52
1954
international and national levels.
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Topic
Convention
Cultural
heritage
3.9
Date of
Treaty
Entry into
force in
Pakistan
Agreement for the Establishment of the Near East Plant
Protection Organization - to establish the Near East
Plant Protection Organisation (NEPPO), which promotes
international co-operation with a view to implementing
International Plant Protection Convention.
1993
2009
Plant Protection Agreement for the Asia and Pacific
Region and amendments – establishes the Asia and
Pacific Plant Protection Commission to review and
promote the region’s progress in the implementation of
the Agreement. Trade in plants and plant products are
regulated by certification, prohibition, inspection,
disinfection, quarantine, destruction, etc., as necessary.
1955
(amendm
ent 1967)
1958
(amendm
ent 1969)
Convention on Wetlands of International Importance
especially as Waterfowl Habitat and associated
protocols and amendments - to promote conservation
and sustainable use of wetlands. The Ramsar List of
Wetlands of International Importance now includes
almost 1,800 sites (known as Ramsar Sites). There are
currently 19 Ramsar sites in Pakistan.
1971
(amended
1987)
1976
(amended
1994)
Convention concerning the Protection of the World
Cultural and Natural Heritage - requires parties to adapt
a general policy on the protection of the natural and
cultural heritage, to set up services for such protection,
to develop scientific and technical studies, to take
appropriate legal, technical, scientific and administrative
measures and to foster training and education for such
protection.
1972
1976
Comparison of NEQS with IFC Guidelines
99.
The proposed project is legally required to comply with the NEQS for gaseous
emission, ambient air quality, and liquid effluent. In addition, the ADB financing requires
that IFC environmental guidelines should also be followed. In Table 3-3 to Table 3-5, a
comparison of NEQS and IFC Guidelines for key parameters of emission, ambient air
quality, and effluent is provided for reference. The details are found in Appendix 1 and
Appendix 2.
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Table 3-3: Comparison of NEQS and IFC Guideline Limits for Emission of
Key Pollutants from Coal-Fired Power Plant
Parameter
Standards
For NDA: 50 mg/Nm
3
For DA: 30 mg/Nm
100-500 Tons per day [1]
For NDA: 200-850 mg/Nm
3
For DA: 200 mg/Nm
Particulate matter
Sulfur oxides
500 mg/Nm
Carbon monoxide
Oxides of nitrogen
IFC Guidelines
3
800 mg/Nm
3
3
3
–
3
260 ng/J of heat input
For NDA: 510 mg/Nm
3
For DA: 200 mg/Nm
Notes:
1. For additional parameters and explanation, see complete NEQS in Appendix 1 and IFC Guidelines
in Appendix 2.
2.
3.
A “–“ in the third column indicates that IFC has not provided any guidelines for the parameter
NDA = Non-degraded airshed; DA = Degraded airshed
Table 3-4: Comparison of NEQS and IFC Guideline Limits for Ambient Air Quality
Pollutants
Sulfur Dioxide
(SO2)
Time-weighted
Average
NEQS
IFC Guidelines
3
Annual Average
80 μg/m
24 hours
120 μg/m
3
10 min
Oxide of Nitrogen as (NO)
Oxide of Nitrogen as (NO2)
Ozone (O3)
125 μg/m
3
500 μg/m
3
Annual Average
40 μg/m
3
24 hours
40 μg/m
3
Annual Average
40 μg/m
3
40 μg/m
24 hours
80 μg/m
3
200 μg/m
3
1 hour
130 μg/m
160 μg/m
3
3
3
8 hour
Suspended Particulate
Matter (SPM)
Annual Average
360 μg/m
3
24 hours
500 μg/m
3
Respirable particulate
Matter. PM 10
Annual Average
120 μg/m
3
70 μg/m
24 hours
150 μg/m
3
150 μg/m
Respirable Particulate
Matter. PM 2.5
Annual Average
15 μg/m
3
35 μg/m
3
24 hours
35 μg/m
3
75 μg/m
3
1 hour
15 μg/m
3
8 hours
5 mg/m
1 hour
10 mg/m
Carbon
Monoxide (CO)
3
3
3
3
Notes:
1. For additional parameters and explanation, see complete NEQS in Appendix 1 and IFC Guidelines
in Appendix 2.
2.
3.
A “–“ in the third column indicates that IFC has not provided any guidelines for the parameter or
they are to be established by the environmental assessment
The NEQS for PM 2.5 are not consistent with those for PM 10 . The issue is under consideration of
Sindh EPA.
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Table 3-5: Comparison of NEQS and IFC Guideline Limits for Key Liquid Effluents
(mg/l, unless otherwise defined)
Parameter
NEQS
IFC
Guidelines
=<3°C
–
6 to 9
6 to 9
80
–
Chemical oxygen demand (COD)
150
–
Total suspended solids (TSS)
200
50
3,500
–
10
10
1,000
–
Cadmium (Cd)
0.1
0.1
Chromium (Cr)-Total
1.0
0.5
Copper (Cu)
1.0
0.5
Lead (Pb)
0.5
0.5
Mercury (Hg)
0.01
0.005
Selenium (Se)
0.5
–
Nickel (Ni)
1.0
–
Silver (Ag)
1.0
–
Total toxic metals
2.0
–
Zinc (Zn)
5.0
1.0
Arsenic (As)
1.0
0.5
Barium (Ba)
1.5
–
Iron (Fe)
8.0
1.0
Manganese (Mn)
1.5
–
Boron (B)
6.0
–
Chlorine (Cl), Residuual
1.0
0.2
Temperature increase
pH value
Five-day bio-chemical oxygen demand (BOD)5
at 20°C
Total dissolved solids (TDS)
Grease and oil
Chlorides (as Cl')
Notes:
1.
For additional parameters and explanation, see complete NEQS in Appendix 1 and IFC Guidelines
in Appendix 2.
2.
A “–“ in the third column indicates that IFC has not provided any guidelines for the parameter or
they are to be established by the environmental assessment
3.
NEQS are those for the discharge to inland waters
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4. The Proposed Project
100. The proposed power plant will be installed within the premises of the JTPS.
However, it will be an independent power plant, with its own fuel source, storage, utilities
and operations.
4.1
Existing Jamshoro Power Plant
4.1.1
Generating Units
101. JTPS is an existing power plant with total installed capacity of 850 MW. Four
conventional steam power generating units, installed in two phases, are in operation at
the plant. Phase I involved the installation of one unit (Unit 1) with a capacity of
250 MW. Fuji Electric Company (Japan) supplied, erected and commissioned this unit in
1990. Phase II involved the installation of three units (Units 2, 3 and 4) with a capacity
of 200 MW each. These units were designed, supplied and commissioned by China
Machinery Engineering Corporation (CMEC).
4.1.2
Fuel and Performance
102. The boilers are mainly dual fuel-fired (heavy fuel oil and gas), except for Unit 1,
which is designed for high sulfur fuel oil (HSFO). Current efficiencies for Units 1, 2, 3
and 4 are 34.0%, 28.3%, 28.5% and 28.6%, respectively. Presently, all four units are
predominantly fired on HSFO because natural gas is no longer readily available. In
2010-11, the plant produced 2,803.87 GWh of electricity, of which only 19% was
produced using natural gas.1 Data for the current year are not available; however, the
proportion of gas used as fuel is likely to be significantly lower.
4.1.3
Handling, Transportation and Storage of Fuel
103. JTPS has fuel delivery arrangements for HSFO for both railway tank wagons and
road tankers. However, the power station presently receives HSFO only through road
tankers from Karachi through Pakistan State Oil (PSO), as delivery by rail was
discontinued in 2003. Oil is unloaded by transfer pumps from the trucks into storage
tanks. The plant is also connected to the gas transmission network of Sui Southern Gas
Company Limited (SSGCL). However, as mentioned above, natural gas is presently not
being supplied to the power plant in view of the prevailing shortage of gas in the country.
104. The unloading capacity for furnace oil is 5,000 tons per day (t/d). Road tankers
used for the transportation of HSFO have capacity of 40,000 liters (about 38.4 tons)
each, based on which the design unloading capacity is about 130 tankers per day. The
actual supply depends on the level of power production at the plant and given the
derating in capacity is, on average, less than 60 tankers per day.
105. There are four HSFO storage tanks at the premises, each with a capacity
250,000 liters; three service tanks each with a capacity of 250,000 liters; and one service
tank with a capacity of 100,000 liters.
1
Hydrocarbon Development Institute of Pakistan, Pakistan Energy Yearbook 2011.
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4.1.4
Water Supply System
106. The source of water for JTPS is the Indus River. An allocation of 1.13 cubic
meter per second (m3/s) or 40 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) has been assigned by the
Irrigation Department of the Government of Sindh (GoS) to the power plant. There are
16 intake water pumps, four for each unit, installed at the river to meet the requirements
of the plant and the associated housing colony. Current major uses of water are for the
cooling water system, and the operation of the coagulator/clarifier, where coagulated silt
is removed and returned back to the river as coagulator blowdown (0.2 m3/s). Other
uses include those for the boilers, offices, other plant and housing colony needs.
4.1.5
Wastewater Generation and Disposal
107. The major discharge of wastewater generated from the facility is the cooling
tower blowdown, which goes into the Indus through an open channel. The settled silt is
removed from the coagulator (coagulator blowdown) as slurry which is also pumped into
the open channel that carries wastewater from the plant to the river. Wastewater
generated during regeneration of demineralized water is discharged to an unlined
evaporation pond. Low volume wastes include boiler blowdown, laboratory drains,
wastewater from hydrogen and chlorine plants, and plant drains. Boiler blowdown and
wastes from the water treatment system are pH-neutralized, plant drains are treated for
oil and grease, and wastewater from air pre-heater washing and boiler chemical cleaning
are neutralized before being discharged to the evaporation pond. Sanitary wastes from
the plant are drained into septic tanks and the contents of the septic tanks are also
transferred to the evaporation pond. There is heavy overgrowth of vegetation in the
evaporation pond, with the result that the wastewater drained into the pond flows into
open channels that ultimately join other wastewater discharges from the plant outside
the eastern boundary of the plant. Untreated wastewater from the housing colony is
drained outside the boundary wall of the colony at several points, and is partly used for
agriculture by the local community.
4.1.6
Cooling Water System
108. The cooling towers are forced-draft counter-flow type, designed for a difference
in temperature (∆T) of 10 ºC. Except for the cooling tower of Unit No.1, which has six
cells, all the cooling towers for Units 2, 3, and 4 have 12 cells each. The cooling towers
are presently operating at a lower efficiency and the temperature reduction achieved
across the cooling towers is only about 5 ºC, rather than the design reduction of 10 ºC.
Of the six cells installed in the cooling tower for Unit 1, only three are operating.
4.1.7
Solid Waste Storage and Disposal
109. Hazardous waste dumped in the plant disposal areas includes asbestos sheets
and soot removed during cleaning of the boilers operating on fuel oil. There is currently
no facility for the proper storage of hazardous waste at the plant. Other non-hazardous
solid wastes produced at the plant include metallic refuse, fiberglass insulation, and
other materials removed during plant maintenance. This waste is stockpiled inside the
plant. Municipal waste generated in the housing colony and the plant offices is dumped
inside the housing colony.
4.1.8
Waste Fuel Oil Handling and Management
110. Oil spilled doing oil transfer operations is drained into an unlined sump located
just north of the oil storage tank area, from where the oil is pumped back to the oil
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storage tanks and the separated wastes are pumped and drained outside the plant
boundary.
4.1.9
Stacks and Emissions
111. There are two exhaust gas stacks at the power plant. Two units are connected
to each stack. Stack parameters are shown in Table 4-1. Stack emissions from the
plant were monitored for this study for two units that were operating at the time the
investigation was conducted, the results of which are presented in Table 4-2. The stack
emission measurements show SO2 concentration to be exceeding limits defined by the
National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS) 2000. No NO2 was detected from any
of the stacks, which means that all NOx is being released as NO. Similarly H2S
emissions were not detected.
Table 4-1: Measured Stack Emissions at JTPS
Stack
Unit
Stack 1
Units connected
Stack 2
1 and 2
3 and 4
Capacity
MW
450
400
Stack height
m
150
150
Inner diameter
m
4.5
4.5
Flue gas temperature
K
410
413
Exit velocity
m/s
20
20
Table 4-2: Analysis of Stack Flue Gas
Unit 1
Unit 2
Load
125 MW
100 MW
Date
26 Jun
6 Jul
Unit
Flue gas temperature
284.6
281.1
°C
Ambient temperature
40.5
40
°C
Oxygen (O2)
1.21%
3.45%
Carbon dioxide (CO2)
14.89%
13.20%
Carbon monoxide (CO)
147.1
30.1
800
Nitrogen dioxide (NO2)
175.6
120.1
[1]
For NDA: 510 [4]
For DA: 200
Sulfur dioxide (SO2)
2,523
4,806
0
0
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S)
NEQS
IFC Gideliens
mg/Nm
3
mg/Nm
3
[2]
For NDA: 200-850 mg/Nm
For DA: 200
3
10
mg/Nm
3
Notes:
[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]
Emission standards for NOX is 130 Ng/J of heat input.
Emission standard for SO2 is 100-500 TPD, depending on airshed degradation.
Data for dust emissions is not available.
NDA = Non-degraded airshed; DA = Degraded airshed
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4.2
General Description of the Proposed Plant
112. The Government of Pakistan (GoP) is proposing to develop a 600 MW power
plant in the first stage with the possibility of expansion to 1,200 MW in the next stageeither immediately or in the near future. A block diagram of the power plant is shown in
Figure 4-1. The major systems of the proposed plant include:
A. Coal handling and processing system
B. Super-critical boiler
C. Steam turbine and condenser
D. Electrical power generator and power export system
E. Flue gas treatment system
F. Cooling water system
G. Ash handling system
H. Utilities and waste management system.
113. Coal for the power plant will be received at the coal yard, part of the coal storage,
processing and supply system (A). Within this system the coal will be processed for
feeding into the boiler. The heat from the combustion of coal in the super-critical boiler
(B) will be used to generate steam at high pressure. The steam will then be fed into the
steam turbine (C), where it will rotate the turbine to generate mechanical energy. The
steam, after passing through the turbine, will be condensed back to water and to be reinjected into the boiler. The rotating steam turbine will operate the power generator (D),
which will generate electricity. The voltage of the electricity will then be increased or
‘stepped-up’ and exported through the high tension transmission system.
114. Flue gas from the boiler is normally laden with pollutants, oxides of nitrogen,
particulate matter and sulfur dioxide. The gas will be passed through a series of
treatment units (E) before being discharged to the atmosphere. In the treatment system,
pollutants from the gas will be removed. Cooling water is required for condensation of
the steam at the low-pressure end of the steam turbine. The water will be obtained from
the cooling water system (F). The freshwater source for the proposed project will be the
Indus River. Bottom ash from the boiler and fly ash from the flue gas treatment system
will be collected and disposed of through the ash handling system (G). Finally, several
supporting systems (H) are also required for plant operations. These include the
freshwater treatment system for feeding the boiler and the effluent treatment and
disposal systems for the wastewater generated by the plant.
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Figure 4-1: Simplified Schematic Diagram of the Proposed Power Plant
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115. Two 600 MW net power unit will be installed at the Jamshoro power station site,
basic design parameters for which are listed below:
Capacity:
Power technology:
Steam conditions:
Fuel:
Plant efficiency LHV:
Cooling system:
Emission controls:
2 x 600 MW net
2 x 660 MW gross (nominal)
Pulverized coal firing in super-critical boilers
Main steam 24.1 Megapascal (MPa) at 593 ºC
Single reheat steam 4.5 MPa at 593 ºC
Blended coal—subbituminous coal 80% (minimum),
lignite (balance)
Gross 43.4% for subbituminous coal
42.8% for subbituminous-lignite blend in 80:20 ratio.
Natural draft cooling tower
ESP efficiency > 99.9%
FGD efficiency > 95%
SCR efficiency > 80%
116. The new coal-fired power plant will be erected south of the existing Unit No. 4. It
will consist of two 600 MW, super-critical, coal fired units, one unit will be installed in the
first stage whereas the second unit will be installed in the second stage. The
arrangement of the units will be similar to that of the existing units, namely the electrical
transformers, turbine hall, boilers, ESPs, FGDs, and stack being placed from west to
east, respectively. The coal receiving and storage yard will be to the south of the new
generating units. The ash pond will be a slurry pipeline.
117. A residential colony will be constructed south of the plant’s southern border
fence. The new cooling towers for the units will be located east of their power block and
to the north of the coal yard. Raw water will be taken from the lndus river in a newly
constructed intake structure and pump house. Most of the wastewater will be collected
in a basin, treated and reused to the greatest extent possible for coal dust suppression,
ash handling and other purposes. Only a small amount from the cooling tower
blowdown will be discharged back to the river.
4.3
4.3.1
Power Generation Technology
Super-critical Steam Generators
118. In order to achieve ever higher net plant efficiency in fossil fuel-fired power
plants’ thermal cycle, the main steam pressure and temperature employed have been
steadily raised over the years. In the early 1920s, pulverized coal firing in boilers was
first applied for power generation, with main steam pressure of 1.9 MPa (275 psig) and
temperature of 293 oC. By the end of the 1950s, steam parameters had been
continuously increased, with corresponding plant efficiency improvements. Babcock and
Wilcox developed the once-through ‘Universal Pressure’ boiler to be used for subcritical
and super-critical steam parameters. The first few super-critical power plants that did
not require boilers with steam drums were put in operation in the 1950s, with steam
conditions exceeding 30 MPa (4,350 psig) and 600 oC. The materials and metallurgy
used in these plants, however, was not properly developed at the time, and these
pioneering units had to be eventually derated and operated at lower temperatures.
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119. From the 1960s through to the 80s, many super-critical power stations were built
in the US, western Europe, Japan and Russia, most with steam parameters of 24.1 MPa
(3,500 psig) and 537 oC (1,000 oF) with single reheat to 537 oC. Difficulties were
encountered during the startup and control with multiple-valve operations in the first
generation super-critical boilers, and consequently US utilities switched many units to
subcritical with steam drum boilers.
120. The necessity of reducing flue gas emissions as well as increasing efficiency
has, in the last two decades, led to the installation of new coal-fired plants with supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam generators. Introduction of in-line steam/water
separators during startup has eliminated complicated valve manipulations necessary
earlier. The development of materials suitable for high temperature operations has
allowed the use of the higher steam parameters.
121. High-strength ferrite steels are now used for boilers, steam turbines, and high
energy piping for steam temperatures of up to 565 oC. Research into materials suitable
for even higher temperatures have resulted in austenitic steel and nickel-based super
alloys, the use of which in the superheater and reheater of the boiler and high pressure
turbine allows operation at steam temperatures above 600 oC.
122. Steam parameters for current large state-of-the-art fossil power plants can be
divided into the following three categories:
Subcritical: Pressures 15-17 MPa, temperatures 537 oC to 565 oC
Super-critical:
Pressures 24-26 MPa, temperatures 560 oC to 600 oC
Ultra-supercritical: Pressures up to 31 MPa, temperatures 600 oC and higher.
123. With ultra-supercritical technology, increasing the throttle steam pressure from
16.5 MPa (2,400 psig) to 31 MPa (4,500 psig) will improve the heat rate by 2.5%, while
increasing the temperature from 537 oC (1,000 oF) to 592 oC (1,098 oF) will improve it by
about 3%.
124. In the past few years super-critical units have become the standard for large
fossil power plants in Asia, with over 100 units of 600 MW or larger capacity in operation
since 2002 in China alone. All critical components of these units, such as boilers and
turbines, are based on technology transferred from western countries. In a matter of few
years, China has become a major coal power equipment supplier and EPC contractor to
the Asian power market due to its power plant experience, fabrication capability, and
competitive prices.
125. Currently in China, most 600-660 MW units are super-critical with 24-25 MPa
pressures and ~565 oC/565 oC temperatures. For larger units of 1,000 MW, ultrasupercritical units are often selected with higher steam parameters (26-27 MPa, and
600 oC/600 oC). The main limiting factor for higher pressures and temperatures is the
availability and lead time in procuring the more exotic alloy fabrication materials.
126. India has embarked in large coal-fired power plant construction program using
imported coal and, in some cases, blend of local coals. Many of the new units are of the
ultra-supercritical type, ranging from 660 MW to 800 MW.
127. Over the years, two types of furnace water wall designs have evolved: the spiral
furnace tube configuration and the vertical rifle tube configuration. The spiral furnace
tube configuration allows more even heat flux to the tubes and facilitates the use of
variable pressure and cycling operation, and has become the choice of European boiler
manufacturers and their licensees. The vertical tube configuration with rifle tubes was
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developed to simplify furnace fabrication, construction and maintenance, and allows full
variable pressure and cycling operation with reduced pressure loss. Both furnace tube
configurations are widely used, with equally good results.
128. The once-through super-critical boiler consists of water/steam circuit in which all
water particles get heated, evaporated and superheated in one pass. In contrast to
conventional subcritical boilers, once-through boilers do not have a steam drum and
require advanced automation and control systems because of their relatively small
water/steam volume as well as very pure boiler feedwater requirement (since they lack a
drum in which impurities could deposit for blowdown from the boiler).
129. There are three main types of once-through boilers; Benson, Sulzer and Ramzin
designs. The simplest and most common design is the Benson type, in which the point
of complete evaporation varies with the load of the boiler. The temperature of the
superheated steam is controlled by the fuel firing rate. The Sulzer monotube boiler uses
a special pressure vessel, called the Sulzer bottle, for separating a low load and during
startup. The steam downstream of the separator is always dry. The Sulzer boiler uses
orifices to control the flow in the parallel water wall tubes. The Ramzin boiler has a
spirally-wound furnace water wall design, which is now also used on Sulzer and Benson
boiler designs. Ramzin boilers were mostly manufactured and used in countries of the
former Soviet Union and in Eastern Europe.
130. In a pulverized coal boiler, the steam generator receives coal from the coal yard,
then pulverizes it in coal mills to a fine powder about 1 mm in size which is conveyed by
the primary air to the burners for combustion in the furnace to produce steam that drives
the turbine and generator. The system consists of coal silos, pulverizers, burners,
furnace, back pass, heating surfaces within the furnace and back pass, air heaters, soot
blowers, forced draft fans, primary air fans, and induced draft fans.
131. In an atmospheric fluidized bed boiler, the coal is crushed to a 2-6 mm size and
fed into a bed filled with sorbent or inert materials (limestone or dolomite), where it is
burned in suspension in the bed. In a circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB), some of the
solids are entrained by the combustion gases to the upper furnace where a cyclone
separates the solids and returns them to the furnace combustion zone. The presence of
a bed with hot, solid materials in suspension in the furnace leads to quick ignition and
burnout of the coal fed into the furnace. CFB boilers operate at lower combustion
temperatures of about 750 oC (1,382 oF), while pulverized coal furnaces require gas
temperatures of 1,050 oC (1,922 oF). The lower furnace temperatures in CFB result in
lower NOx formation during combustion. CFB technology allows combustion of lowgrade fuels, is less sensitive to variations in coal quality, and can remove up to about
90% of sulfur oxides in the furnace without needing an expensive FGD (flue gas
desulphurization) system.
132. Almost all fluidized bed boilers used are in the subcritical region, with the first
super-critical fluidized bed unit built at Lagisza, Poland, with steam parameters of 28.3
MPa, main steam 563 oC and reheat to 582 oC. The Sichuan Baima Demon 600 MW
CFB power station in China went into commercial operation in 2013, with the boiler
designed and manufactured by Dongfang Boiler Group Co.
4.3.2
Plant Design Parameters
133. For the new Jamshoro 2 x 600 MW coal fired project, it is recommended to use a
super-critical thermal cycle with main steam pressure at 24.1 MPa and reheat
temperature of 593 oC. This will enable efficient use of the imported subbituminous
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coals, lower greenhouse gas emissions, as well as reduction in SO2, NOx and ash
production.
134. Since there are only a few large super-critical CFB boilers in operation, there is
insufficient data to substantiate their operating and maintenance performance.
Therefore, it is not recommended to select CFB over more proven pulverized
combustion technology for the proposed 2 x 600 MW Jamshoro project.
135. The boiler system with single reheat can attain an efficiency of not less than
89.4% HHV while firing blended coal of 80% subbituminous and 20% Thar lignite. Each
boiler will be sized to deliver 600 MW net electricity. The steam generator will be
designed based on the following:
Main steam pressure (at turbine inlet):
24.1 MPa
Main steam temperature: 593 C
Reheat steam pressure: 4.5 MPa
Hot reheat temperature: 593 C
Main steam flow @ boiler maximum
continuous rating (BMCR):2,100 t/h
Main steam flow @ guaranteed load:
Feedwater temperature: 300 C
1,800 t/h
136. The steam generator has been conservatively designed in view of the fact that it
will burn Thar lignite in the coal blending. Thar lignite has low to moderate ash fusion
temperatures and low propensity for slagging and foul. The most critical design
parameters are those of the furnace. The following design parameters must be met:
Plan area heat release rate:
40,000,000 kcal/h-m² of furnace plan area,
which is the furnace width times depth.
Burner zone heat release rate:2 1,400,000 kcal/h-m²
Volumetric heat release rate:3
130,000 kcal/h-m².
Effective projected radiant
surface heat absorption rate:4
350,000 kcal/h-m².
137. The maximum furnace exit gas temperature will not exceed 1,100 oC. The
maximum flue gas velocity through the convective sections will not exceed 22 m/s. The
flue gas exit temperature from the air heater at all load conditions will not be lower than
10 oC above the sulfuric acid dew point temperature, or 130 oC.
138. The furnace enclosure, framing and ductwork design pressure will conform with
US-NFPA 8502 or equivalent requirements for protection against explosion and
implosion. Superheater, reheater and economizer tube sections will have in-line
2
3
4
The area used in the burner zone heat release rate is the flat projected area of the perimeter walls
between an elevation 1.5 m below the centerline of the lowest burner row in service to 1.5 m above the
centerline of the highest row of burners in service.
The volume used includes the entire furnace and hopper up to the first convective section.
The area used is the total projected area of the water wall, plus the area of a plane that is perpendicular
to the gas flow where the furnace gases reach the first convection surface, plus the projected plan area
of the surfaces of both sides of the platens and pendants, and plus the projected area of the furnace
bottom.
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arrangements. Convective tube elements will be arranged for easy cleaning with steam
soot blowers. Tube banks will be arranged of not more than 2 m depth and not less than
1 m spacing between banks to allow access for inspection and repairs. The height of
the tube banks will be such as to allow effective cleaning by soot blowers.
4.3.3
Coal Feeding and Pulverizer System
139. The boiler will be serviced by six coal silos. Their size will be established such
that with five silo-pulverizer sets in operation, the steam generator will produce the
design-guaranteed steam, while the sixth set is serviced or is on standby. The silos will
be cylindrical vessels with a conical out hopper. The hopper will have a minimum 70o
slope from the horizontal. The capacity of five silos would provide for 12-hour operation
at full load.
140. The silos will be made of steel plate lined with stainless steel. The silos will be
supported on steel structures with adequate bracing and reinforcing members. Load
scales will be provided under vertical columns for assessment of inventory in each silo.
The silos will be fed with coal on the top by a traveling tripper conveyor. Each silo will be
provided with devices to transmit signals to advise when filling is needed and when to
stop. Alarms will be provided to indicate malfunctions in these systems. Provisions will
be made for injecting the silos with CO2 gas when needed. Besides the main discharge
opening leading to a gravimetric feeder and the pipe to the pulverizer unit, each silo will
have an emergency door that will allow for dumping the coal on the floor in case of a fire
in the silo, so that the dumped coal may be extinguished by portable fire extinguishers.
141. Coal feeders will be of gravimetric type, with two coal monitors for each feeder
with microprocessors to control delivery of the required tonnage of coal to each
pulverizer. The gravimetric coal feeders will have an accuracy of 0.25% or better and
will be explosion-proof. All parts in contact with the coal will be fabricated with stainless
steel. The electric motor driving the coal feeders will have variable frequency drive
controls.
142. The pulverizer with vertical shaft roller design will consist of the shaft and three
steel rollers, and electric motor drive, a gearbox velocity reducer, gear box lubricating
system, hydraulic system for creating pressure on the roller assembly, hydraulic pump
and accumulators. Each pulverizer will receive coal in pebble form, about 2 cm x 2 cm,
and will grind it to a powder, about 80% of which will pass through the 200 mesh. Air
from the primary air fans heated by the tri-sector regenerative air heater will provide for
coal drying and conveying to the burners. The air/coal dust mixture will be maintained at
60 oC to 80 oC.
143. The pulverizers will have a pyrite (pyrite, rock, metal, etc.) rejection system.
Rejected pyrites will be collected and conveyed to the ash handling system. Each
pulverizer will have a classifier which will collect oversized coal particles and return them
to the pulverizer grinding area for further size reduction. Steam or CO2 will be used for
injecting into the pulverizer in the event of overheating that could lead to an explosion.
Instruments and controls will be provided to monitor and protect the equipment and
personnel from danger.
144. The burners will be of the staged combustion, low NOx type. Additional airs for
combustion will be the secondary air stream and the over-fire air. Shutoff gates will be
provided on each mill when taken out for service or repair. Wall-fired units employ selfcontained individual burners. Tangential-fired boilers have burners arranged in a
package of vertically placed individual nozzles for firing. The flame is produced in the
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form of a fire ball in the center of the furnace. With tilt burner assemblies, the furnace
fire ball can be adjusted upwards or downwards.
4.3.4
Furnace
145. The furnace is the chamber where combustion occurs, with the hot gases
transmitting heat by radiation and convection to the water walls and pendant surfaces
located in the furnace. The burners are located either in the front or front and rear walls,
or in the corners of the furnace in a tangential-firing system. Hot flue gases travel
upwards in the furnace, then to the back pass with convective heat exchange surfaces.
146. Finer ash particles (fly ash) is entrained by the flue gas flow. Heavier particles
(bottom ash) fall into the bottom hopper below the furnace where they are collected and
removed. The front, rear and sides of the furnace will have membrane walls with fully
welded tubes. The roof will also have membrane walls. Openings will be provided in the
water walls for observation of furnace conditions and for soot blower penetration. The
bottom hopper will be entirely water cooled, with two sides inclined at least 60o from the
horizontal and so arranged that no obstruction exists that can impede the discharge of
bottom ash.
147. Pendant and platen heat exchange surfaces are placed inside the furnace and
the cross-over section from the furnace to the back pass. The back pass contains
horizontal tube sections of economizer and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system
housing for NOx reduction. The main air heaters will be vertical shaft, regenerative trisector type with flue gases flowing through one section, and the primary and the
secondary air in the other two sections. To meet environmental requirements, the
primary means of reducing NOx emissions will be low-NOx burners, over-fire air injection
and, if required, gas recirculation.
4.3.5
Superheater and Reheater
148. The superheaters and reheaters will be arranged such as to uniformly distribute
the steam temperature at all loads. Consideration will be given to the thermal expansion
of headers, spacers and supports, and to accessibility for cleaning. Pendant tube
sections, platens and wing walls will be arranged parallel to the direction of gas flow to
minimize slag buildup.
149. There will be sufficient surface provided in the platen and pendant sections to
maintain the furnace exit temperature bellow 1,100 oC at maximum boiler continuous
rating and all other loads.
4.3.6
Economizer
150. The economizer will be of continuous loop type arranged for upward flow of water
and downward flow of flue gases. The tubes will be bare type, arranged in parallel with
minimum clear spacing of one tube diameter. The economizer will be arranged with
tube banks of not more than 2 m depth, with steam soot blowers between banks.
151. A pyramidal watertight hopper will be constructed facing the entire active area of
the economizer. Hopper sides will be inclined at least 60o to the horizontal, with a
connection on the bottom to collect the coarse economizer fly ash.
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4.3.7
Steam Generator Setting and Insulation
152. The steam generator will be balanced draft for outdoor installation with a roof
cover and enclosed at the burner level. The design fuel is a blend of subbituminous coal
with 20% lignite from the Thar region. The steam generator will be started-up, operated
and shut down by remote control from the central control room using a distributed control
system (DCS).
153. The furnace and back pass enclosure will include refractory insulation, welded
steel plate fastened to the furnace tubes, and outer lagging of ribbed-type clad aluminum
alloy with thickness not less than 1 mm. Furnace and rear pass enclosure walls will be
suitable for water washing.
154. Hinged access doors, arranged to permit convenient and safe access for
maintenance will be provided at platform levels. The furnace, back pass, fans, air
heaters, flue ducts, hoppers and piping will be firmly insulated and provided, as needed,
with lagging so that the outside surface temperature will not exceed the ambient air
temperature by more than 20 oC. All thermal insulation will be made from non-corrosive
and non-asbestos materials.
4.3.8
Air Heaters
155. Two 50% capacity each vertical shaft regenerative-type air heaters will be
provided to heat the primary and secondary air, taking heat from the exiting flue gases.
The air heater rotor will be driven by an electric motor, through a totally enclosed speed
reduction drive unit. The rotor shell will be constructed of steel plate, not less than
12.5 mm thick, and braced to prevent deformation.
156. The air heater will have an automatically adjustable sealing system designed to
keep the maximum air heater leakage below 5% of the air flow entering the heater at all
loads. The heater shaft will be made of corrosion-resistant steel, and the heating
elements will be readily removable. Platforms at air heater level will be provided for
basket laydown. The hot and intermediate sections will be made of carbon steel plate
not less than 0.6 mm thick, and the cold end of low alloy corrosion-resistant steel plate
not less than 1 mm thick.
157. The air heater radial bearings will be self-aligning anti-friction type and the thrust
bearing will be pivotal segmental and anti-friction type with flat cylindrical rollers.
Bearing housings are oil-tight and readily accessible. An oil lubricating system, including
oil reservoir pump with motor, oil coolers, instrumentation and controls, will be provided
for each air heater. The air heaters will be provided with stationary soot blower, water
deluge system for fire protection and a fire detection and alarm system.
158. A steam heater will be provided to prevent acid corrosion of the air heater cold
end baskets and housing. As an alternative, cold end gas temperatures can be
maintained by use of a hot air bypass into the cold end side, complete with isolation and
control dampers.
4.3.9
Air and flue Gas Fans
159. The steam generator will be provided with two primary air (PA) fans, two
secondary air forced draft (FD) fans, and two induced draft (ID) fans. The primary air
fans will take outside air, pass it through the tri-sector air heater, and discharge it into the
coal pulverizers to dry the coal and to convey the air and pulverized coal mixture to the
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burners. The secondary air FD fans will take outside air, pass it through the tri-sector air
heater, and then convey it to the wind boxes to support the combustion process.
160. The ID fans will draw flue gases from the combustion process, cool them in the
tri-sector air heaters, and pass them first to the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) to remove
suspended particles and then to the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) equipment for
removal of sulfur dioxide, before discharging to the atmosphere through the stack. The
PA fans will be centrifugal type, while the FD and ID fans will be axial flow type. The PA
and FD fans will be located indoors with sound attenuating screens at their inlets, and
the ID fans will be located outdoors. All fans will be designed for continuous operation
over their entire operating range without excessive vibration, surging or other
undesirable characteristics.
161. The PA, FD and ID fans will be designed so that both pairs of fans operate in
parallel to produce the flow and pressures required for the boiler operating with
maximum 30% excess air. The design margins are 1.2 times the flow and 1.44 times
the pressure head of the guaranteed condition. Fans will be connected with their electric
motor drives via flexible couplings, which will all be provided with guards. Each fan will
be provided with a lubricating oil system, oil coolers, and vibration monitor.
4.3.10 Soot Blowers
162. The steam generator will be provided with soot blowers to maintain the
cleanliness of the heat transfer surfaces. These will include rotary wall blowers in the
furnace water walls and retractable soot blowers where flue gas temperature is above
540 oC, and partially retractable blowers at gas temperatures of 540 oC and below.
Where gas temperatures are 300 oC or lower, fixed soot blowers will be used. The
blowing medium of the blowers will be steam at pressure and temperature not less than
1.7 MPa and 230 oC, respectively.
163. Rotation speeds of the retractable blowers will be adjustable in the field to
provide some latitude if experience shows that the original choices require corrections.
A completely automatic programmable control system with monitor and keyboard panel
will be provided for the remote control of blower operations.
4.3.11 Fuel Burning Equipment
164. A steam generator typically uses the following equipment in its fuel burning
system:
Main burners
Warm-up burners
Remote control igniters
Flame detectors
Burner throat ceramic tiles.
165. The main burners will be of staged combustion, low NOx type. The main burners
will be sized and located so that the steam generator can be stably operated in the load
range from the boiler maximum continuous rating (BMCR) to partial loads of 35% when
burning the specified blended coal without the use of oil burners. The burners should
have a stable turndown minimum ratio of 3 to 1. The main burners will have a peek door
with tinted glass to permit flame observation. Registers will be equipped with register
drives and position indicators arranged for remote operation and from burner platform.
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166. Warm-up burners will be designed for light fuel oil with mechanical or steam
atomized construction. The warm-up burners will be retractable along with all piping,
including emergency shut-off valves. Warm-up burner operation will be subject to all
protection requirements of the burner control system.
167. The remotely controlled igniters will be electrically initiated, retractable type
designed to burn light fuel oil and to be disconnected for rapid replacement. The igniters
will be Class 1, as defined by NFPA 85E. Flame detectors with associated controls will
be provided to shut off fuel automatically and actuate alarms on loss of flame, as
required by NFPA 85D and 85E. Flame detector controls will interface with the DCS
burner management system.
4.3.12 Ducts and Wind Boxes
168. Flue ducts and wind boxes will be designed to withstand internal transient
pressures in accordance with NFPA 8502. Ducts will be constructed of steel plates not
less than 6 mm thick and reinforced with steel angles and straps. Expansion joints in the
ducts will be installed to permit free movement of ducts and expansion. Dampers of the
balanced multiple leaf type will be provided in flanged duct sections with rigid shaft
mounted on ball or roller bearings.
4.4
Steam Turbine and Auxillaries
169. The main steam turbine will be a single reheat condensing, tandem-compound,
3,000 rpm, four-flow machine designed for operation with inlet main steam conditions of
24.1 MPa, 593 oC and reheat steam at 593 oC. It will have eight stages of steam
extraction for feedwater heating: four low pressure, a deaerating, and three high
pressure feedwater heaters. The steam turbine wil be nominally rated at 660 MW gross
output at 10.2 kPa back pressure (corresponding to saturated temperature about
46.4 oC) with major design parameters as following:
Main steam pressure:
24.1 MPa
Main steam temperature: 593 oC
Hot reheat steam pressure:
4.5 MPa
Hot reheat steam temperature: 593 oC
Main steam flow @ guaranteed load:
1,800 t/h
Condenser pressure:
10.2 kPa
Maximum turbine heat rate:
7,800 kJ/kWh
170. A turbine bypass steam path, with spray water and pressure reducing valves, will
be provided to dump steam into the condenser in case of an emergency turbine trip.
Additional major steam turbine auxiliary systems will include a lubrication oil system,
gland seal system, rotor turning gear, control and protective valve system, and
supervisory and control instrumentation.
4.5
Condenser and Condensate System
171. The surface condenser will receive exhaust steam from the low pressure turbines
and condense it into liquid for reuse in the cycle. Water-cooled surface condenser is the
dominant technology used in modern large central power stations. The surface
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condenser will be maintained at a back pressure of 10.2 kPa and will serve the following
functions:
Provide low back pressure at the turbine exhaust to maximize the unit’s thermal
efficiency.
Conserve the high purity water (condensate) for reuse in the boiler-turbine cycle
to minimize water treatment costs for makeup water.
Receive and condense the exhaust steam from the boiler feed pump turbine
drives.
Serve as a collection point for all condensate drains, steam vents and dumps.
Deaerate the condensate to reduce corrosion potential in the cycle system
components.
Serve as a heat sink for the turbine by-pass steam during startup, shutdown
and emergency unit trip.
172. The condenser air evacuation system will consist of two mechanical vacuum
pumps which will hold the vacuum in the condenser during operation. A mechanical
hogging pump will be provided to evacuate air from the condenser shells during unit
startup. A taprogge rubber ball condenser tube cleaning system will be used to maintain
and clean the condenser tubes. The balls will generate contact pressure on their way
through the condenser tube, by which fouling will be removed from the inner tube. The
process will work automatically, and the tubes will be continuously cleaned of mud,
algae and scaling.
173. The condensate pumps will take suction from the condenser hotwell and pass
the condensate through low pressure feedwater heaters, the condensate ion-exchange
polishing unit, and into the deaerating heater. The purpose of the condensate polisher is
to remove any impurities and chemical contamination that may have leaked into the
condensate stream from the circulating water system. It will consist of three parallel ionexchanger trains, two in operation and while the third is on standby or regenerating the
resin using hydrochloric acid and caustic soda. The wastewaters from regeneration
process will be piped to the waste collection basin for further treatment and
neutralization and then used in ash sluicing to the disposal pond.
174. Four-stage low pressure (LP) feedwater heaters will take extraction steam from
the low pressure turbine cylinders and heat the condensate passed through them. The
flow required to maintain the deaerator storage tank level will be controlled by
modulating control valves upstream of the LP feed water heaters. The deaerating
feedwater heater is where the extraction steam gets in contact with the sprayed-in
condensate. The deaerator will be provided with a condensate storage tank in which the
heated and deaerated condensate is to be stored. The deaerator will be vented to the
atmosphere to reject the noncondensibles separated from the condensate. The
deaerated water at any load will have a residual oxygen content not to exceed 5 mg/l.
4.6
Generator and Electrical System
175. The electric generator will be a totally enclosed, three-phase, 3,000 rpm,
synchronous machine with hydrogen-cooled rotor. The cooling medium for the
conductor-cooled stator windings will be either hydrogen or water.
The main
characteristics of the electric generator will be:
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Rated output:
660 MW, 776 MVA
Power factor:
0.85
Rated voltage:
22 kV or 24 kV, 3 phase, 50 Hz
Terminal bushings:
Neutral connect
Terminal bushings basic
impulse insulate level (BIL):
110 kV
Hydrogen pressure in the generator:
400 kPa (58 psig) or higher
Short circuit ratio: 0.55
Winding insulation:Class F
Efficiency: 99% or higher.
176. The generator will be suitable for operation in parallel with other electric
generating equipment. The housing will be fabricated to withstand the pressure
generated by an explosion of a mixture of hydrogen and air within the housing. All
leads, including power, control and instrumentation will be brought out of the casing
through gastight seals.
177. The generator bearings will be lubricated by the turbine-generator lube oil
system. The hydrogen system consists will consist of four hydrogen coolers, a seal oil
unit, and instrumentation and controls. Generator rotor mounted fans will provide
hydrogen circulation through the closed system. Means will be provided to permit
purging of the hydrogen within the generator using carbon dioxide, and vice versa. The
hydrogen coolers will be cooled with water from the closed cooling water system. A
hydrogen seal oil system will be provided to maintain hydrogen pressure and purity
within the generator casing. The stator water cooling system will be completely
independent of any other system and use high purity demineralized water in a closed
circulation loop. Heat will be removed by heat exchangers cooled by the plant closed
circuit cooling water system.
4.6.1
Excitation System
178. An excitation system for the electric generator will be provided of a static
excitation type, with automatic voltage regulator and power system stabilizer. Excitation
transformers will provide power to the generator excitation system (rotor magnetic field).
They will be connected to the generator via isolated bus ducts.
4.6.2
Generator Step-Up Transformer
179. The step-up transformer will transmit electric power from the electrical generator
to the high voltage transmission system. The transformer will be located outdoors, and
will be designed to operate in an environment characterized by an ambient air
temperature range of between 10 oC and 45 oC. The step-up transformer will be
connected to the electric generator by an oil insulated/cooled phase bus ducts and a
generator circuit breaker. The transformer rating and design features will be as follows:
Rating:
430/573/720 MVA
Cooling: ONAN/ONAF/OFAF @ 55 oC rise
Input voltage:
22-26 kV (LV)
Output voltage:
500 kV with on-load tap changer (HV)
Phase:
50 Hz, 3 phase
Winding: HV wye, LV delta
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180. The high voltage neutral will be solidly grounded to the plant grounding system.
The transformer core will be made of high grade, non-aging silicon steel of low
hysteresis loss and high permeability. The coils will be wound with copper and the coil
isolation designed for continuous operation at 65 oC rise without deleterious effect. The
transformer will be provided with two complete independent groups of cooling
equipment. Each group will comprise of an air cooled radiator heat exchanger and
cooling pump.
4.6.3
Auxiliary Transformers
181. A unit auxiliary transformer and a startup transformer will be installed. The unit
auxiliary transformer will provide power for all plant auxiliaries. It will take power from
the electrical generator via the isolated bus duct tap-in ducts. The unit auxiliary
transformer will be located outdoors, and its rating will be:
Rating:
40/53/67 MVA
Cooling: ONAN/ONAF/ONAF @ 50 oC rise
Input voltage:
22-26 kV
Output voltage:
6.6 kV
Frequency:50 Hz, 3 phase
Winding: HV delta, LV wye, with resistor ground.
182. For start-up, electric power for auxiliaries is taken from the electrical grid via the
station start-up transformer. Four auxiliary (50% capacity, two sets for each unit) plus
one start-up (100% capacity, one set for two units) will be installed. The start-up
transformer has the same MVA rating as the unit auxiliary transformer, so that it could
serve as a back-up in case the unit auxiliary transformer had an emergency outage or is
taken off line for maintenance or repairs. The start-up transformer is located outdoors
with radiators cooling fans. The main characteristics will be
Rating:
60/80/100 MVA
Cooling: ONAN/ONAF/ONAN @ 55 oC rise
Input voltage:
500 kV (HV)
Output voltage:
6.6 kV (LV)
Frequency:50Hz, 3 phase
Winding: HV wye, LV delta, with HV neutral grounded to plant grounding
system.
4.6.4
Generator Circuit Breaker
183. A generator circuit breaker will be installed between the generator and the stepup transformer. It will be used to synchronize the generator with the 500 kV electrical
grid. The generator circuit breaker will be sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) insulated, selfextinguishing, interrupting single-throw design with a pneumatic high-speed operating
mechanism.
4.6.5
Medium Voltage Switchgear
184. The medium voltage 6.6 kV auxiliary system will distribute power to the low
voltage load centers and to the 6.3 kV motors from either the unit auxiliary transformer or
the unit startup transformer. The 6.6 kV switchgear will be rated to withstand and
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interrupt the maximum short-circuit current within margins established by ANSI C
37.010. The full load current rating of the 6.6kV bus will be 5,000 A.
185. The system will use a fast bus transfer system in the event of a unit trip or loss of
the unit auxiliary transformer. The transfer will be blocked in the event of a 6.6 kV bus
fault, loss of voltage at the startup transformer, or a protective relay trip of the 6.6kV
main breaker.
186. Protective relaying and metering will be provided to prevent equipment damage.
The protective relaying is such that the breaker closest to the fault will trip first. The 6.6
kV buses will be metal-clad switchgear and utilize vacuum circuit breakers, which will be
of the draw-out, electrically operated and stored energy type. The 6.6 kV switchgear will
be located indoors. Open/close time of the breakers will be 0.2 sec.
4.6.6
Low Voltage Load Centers
187. This will consist of 6.6 kV/400 V unit substation dry-type transformers and 400 V
switchgear and motor control centers. The transformers will be located indoors with twowinding, three phase, 50 Hz, insulation Class F, cooling AA/FA and LV grounding via
resistor.
188. The low voltage auxiliary system load centers will be double-ended, with two bus
sections connected by a normally open breaker. Each bus section will be fed by cable
from the 6.6 kV auxiliary system through a disconnect link and secondary main breaker.
During normal operation, each bus section will be fed from its associated load center
transformer. Upon loss of a transformer or its feed, the load will be manually transferred
to the alternative source. Main bus tie and motor feeder circuit breakers will be operable
from the main control room.
4.6.7
Electrical Motors
189. All medium and low voltage motors will be designed to start fully loaded by the
driven equipment and to accelerate their connected loads to rated speed with a
minimum of 80% of rated terminal voltage. Motors of 200 kW and larger size will be fed
from the 6.6 kV switchgear, while motors smaller than 199 kW will be fed by the low
voltage motor control centers. All motors will be built with class F insulation. Motors that
smaller than 0.75 kW will be single phase, 230 V AC. Direct current motors will be
powered by the 230 V DC system.
4.6.8
DC Power System
190. The direct current (DC) system will consist of batteries, battery chargers, DC
switchboard and distribution panel boards. The batteries will be sized to supply
emergency power for four hours in the event of loss of AC power, and have sufficient
current to feed all critical plant loads at the nominal voltage level.
191. The DC system will provide power to circuit breaker control circuits, DC motors
and all DC plant loads. The batteries will be lead-acid, low maintenance sealed cell type.
A total of 3 DC power systems will be installed, one for each unit and the third one for
the switchyard.
4.6.9
Cable Systems
192. Cable systems connect the power sources to the electrical equipment and
devices. The voltage ratings of cables and wiring will be:
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Medium voltage power cables:
10 kV
Low voltage power cables:600 V
Lighting and small power cables: 600 V
Control and instrument cables:
600 V
193. Medium and low voltage power cables will consist of soft-drawn copper
conductor and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulation and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)
jacket. The jacketing material will be rodent-proof with good flexibility and long-term
resistance to sunlight, moisture and oils, and will not propagate combustion flames.
Outdoor above-ground cables will be installed in conduits and cable trays. Underground
cables will be installed in underground duct banks or in trenches. Cables of different
types will be grouped and routed separately for safety. Medium voltage cables will be
routed separately from other cables.
4.7
4.7.1
Circulation Water and Cooling System
System Description
194. The circulating water system—the main heat rejection system—consists of
structures and mechanical equipment which serve the main condensers and cooling
water systems to reject plant heat to the atmosphere. The makeup water to the system
will be taken from the Indus river and treated by clarifiers with the addition of chemicals
to reduce hardness. The main components of the circulating water system are cooling
towers, circulating water pumps, condenser and its associated valves, and
instrumentation and controls.
4.7.2
System Design Basis
195. The closed circulating water system flow through the condenser will be about
60,000 m³/h per unit, based on a design wet bulb temperature of 28.6 oC, cooling tower
range of 10 oC (difference between the temperatures of the hot water entering the
cooling tower and the cold water collecting in the tower basin), and a cooling tower
approach of 7 oC (difference between the temperature of the cold water leaving the
cooling tower and the ambient air wet bulb temperature of the water entering it).
Makeup water required by the system will be about 35,400 m3/day per unit, with 33,600
m3/day for evaporation and 1,800 m³/day for blowdown. The circulating makeup water
will keep the water chemistry at an acceptable level to prevent salt deposition. The
water characteristics are shown in Table 4-3.
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Table 4-3: Circulating Water Chemistry
Parameter
Makeup Water
o
Temperature, C
Circulating Water
35
45.6
7-8.5
7-8.5
Conductivity, µmhos/cm
350-500
1,500-2,200
Suspended solids, mg/l
15-30
40-90
80-150
250-500
300-500
1,000-1,500
pH
Total hardness, mg/l as CaCO3
Total dissolved solids, mg/l
196. In order to maintain chemical levels as indicated above, water from the cooling
tower basin will be continuously removed through blowdown and dumped into the
wastewater collection basin for reuse in various plant services, such as ash handling and
coal dust suppression.
4.7.3
Cooling Tower
197. The cooling towers cool the heated circulating water by evaporation process that
occurs when water droplets are brought into direct contact with the upwards-flowing
ambient air, i.e., the wet-type cooling tower process. In general, there are two types of
wet-type cooling towers operated by the power industry: mechanical draft and natural
draft.
198. Mechanical draft towers use motor and fans to create an upward air flow. This
type of system has lower construction costs but is complicated to maintain and
consumes significant electrical power to operate. On the other hand, natural draft
cooling towers achieve the desired air flow using the hyperbolic shape of the concrete
tower that creates a ‘chimney’ effect. The size of the tower generally is larger and it
therefore requires higher construction cost, yet no electricity is needed for its operation.
Either mechanical draft or natural draft cooling towers can be used for the new
Jamshoro 2 x 600 MW coal fired project; however, the advantage of the natural draft
cooling tower over the mechanical draft design is the fact that it does not consume
electric power to drive the fans, nor require constant repair, maintenance and
replacement of the fans.
For this reason, the natural draft cooling tower is
recommended for the proposed Jamshoro project. Most large power units where no
once-through cooling system is available use natural draft cooling towers for cooling
circulating water.
199. The natural draft cooling tower is constructed as a hyperbolic concrete shell and
filled with certain materials in the interior. Atmospheric air is sucked in by the natural
draft created by the concrete structure shape, ambient air flows upwards against the
splashing water droplets and exits at the top of the tower. The cooling tower for one
600 MW coal-fired unit will have a base diameter of about 110 m and a height of about
140 m.
200. The tower structure is generally constructed of a combination of reinforced
concrete and FRP, the tower fill PVC or treated wood. The hyperbolic natural draft tower
is extremely dependable and predictable in its thermal performance. Air flow through
this tower is produced by the density differential that exists between the heated (less
dense) air inside the tower and the relatively cool (more dense) ambient air outside.
Although hyperbolic towers are more expensive to build than mechanical towers, they
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are used extensively in the field of electric power generation where long amortization
periods allow sufficient time to recover the capital cost of the tower.
4.7.4
Circulating Water Pumps
201. Water cooled by the cooling tower will be collected in the cooling tower concrete
basin, which will have an extension that serves as the pumps’ intake structure. For the
natural draft hyperbolic tower, a common intake structure for all pumps will be provided.
There will be four 25% capacity vertical wet pit-type circulating water pumps. Their
discharge head will be 30 m of water column, necessary to overcome the pressure drop
through the condenser, piping system and to raise the water to the elevation required for
water distribution.
202. The pump pit will be designed to be deep enough so that the water level in the pit
satisfies the pump’s required NPSH (net positive suction head). In order to reduce the
required NPSH, the pumps will be operated at a relatively low speed not to exceed 500
rpm, and will be designed with a first stage that requires a low suction head. Stop logs
will be provided to facilitate isolation of a pump pit for dewatering, cleaning and/or repair.
A pair of removable cleaning screens will be provided to filter out any debris flying into
the tower. Each circulating water pump will be equipped with an automaticallycontrolled, motor-operated butterfly discharge valve that will be fully closed when the
pump is stopped and fully opened during pump operation.
4.7.5
Closed Cooling Water System
203. The closed cooling water system will remove heat from various plant equipment
and reject it to the service water system and then to the cooling tower. The system will
operate as a closed system of clean water with makeup from the water storage basin. It
will provide cooling water at 40 oC under all operating conditions.
204.
The system will supply cooling water to the following:
Main turbine lube oil coolers
Generator hydrogen coolers
Generator air-side seal oil cooler
Generator hydrogen-side seal oil cooler
Boiler feedwater pump turbine lube oil cooler
Air compressor, inter- and after-coolers
Sample coolers
Condensate pump motor cooler
Boiler auxiliaries coolers
Hyolrogen/oxygen generator.
4.7.6
Chemical Treatment System
205. Chemical treatment of the circulating water system will consist of periodic
chlorination through diffusers placed in the circulating water pump infrastructure. pH
control will consist of sulfuric acid injection into the cooling tower basin. Chlorination is
to be achieved by injection of sodium hypochlorite produced on site. The sodium
hypochlorite generator will consist of a salt storage tank, salt dissolver tank, two fullcapacity saltwater transfer pumps, a circulation tank, two full-capacity circulation pumps,
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and a sodium hypochlorite storage tank. Two full-capacity sodium hypochlorite injection
pumps, one operating when needed and the other on standby, will be provided to control
algae and bacterial grow in the circulating water system.
206. A control and monitoring system will be installed to provide control of chemical
dosage, so as to assure safe operation of the system and its components.
4.8
Freshwater System
207. The freshwater system will take water from the Indus River. The required
quantity is about 40,000 t/day for one 600 MW unit, so the total freshwater requirement
is about 80,000 t/day for the 2 x 600 MW project. The historical water levels of the Indus
near the Kotri Barrage are as follows:
Flood level (FL): 23.2 m
High water level (HWL): 20.8 m
Low water Level (LWL): 18.9 m
Low-Low water level (LLWL):
14.8 m
208. The river flow velocity ranges from 0.2 m/s to about 0.4 m/s. River bottom
soundings show shifting in the riverbed. The suspended sediment concentrations range
from 680 to 3,500 ppm. lowest water levels usually occur during the winter season.
209. In locating the intake structure for the units, consideration will be given to the
existence of the water intakes for Units 1, 2, 3 and 4 and the scouring of the river bed.
The concrete intake structure is to be built on pile supports. Water will be pumped to the
power plant, where it will be first stored in a raw water retention basin or storage tanks
and then pretreated for distribution to various plant water uses. The total storage
capacity of the retention basin will be about 80,000 tons, capable of supplying water to
both units for one day. At the river shore, a concrete intake structure is to be built with
three pump bays. Water flowing to the intake will pass through the fixed rake bars that
will stop any large floating debris. A trash rake that travels on rails removes debris from
the trash bars and dumps them into a trash hopper for disposal.
210. A set of stop logs will allow any of the intake bays to be isolated, as required.
The water will be first cleaned by the traveling screen, which will have a fine screen
mesh with 6 mm x 6 mm openings. The water pumps will be of vertical construction,
each designed for 1/3 capacity, all in operation as needed to keep the raw water
retention basin level constant. Two 100% capacity screen wash pumps will be used to
periodically wash the traveling screens. Provisions will be made to allow fish to return to
the river before reaching the traveling screens or being sucked into the raw water
pumps. A pipe will forward the water to the plant’s raw water retention basin. From the
raw water retention basin, three 50% capacity pumps will feed the pretreatment plant
clarifiers. Two pumps will be in normal operation, the third on standby. The raw water
river pumps will be of vertical construction, multi-stage, water lubricated and with electric
motor drivers. The intake structure will have a service deck for lay down of equipment
for repair, and where the electrical switchgear and motor control center will be located.
211. Control of microbiological organisms in the raw water system will be done by use
of chlorine as a biocide. The chlorine will be injected into the intake structure between
the traveling screens and the raw water pumps. A covered shed on the intake structure
deck will store the chlorine and the injection control system. The pipe between the pump
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discharge and the raw water retention basin at the plant will be either reinforced
concrete or coated steel pipe.
212. The pretreatment plant will consist of two reactor-clarifiers, followed by a sand
filter. The pretreatment system is designed to produce an effluent containing less than
1 mg/l of suspended solids, based on treating Indus river water of the following quality:
Temperature:
20 to 35 oC
pH: 7.5 to 8.5
Turbidity: 600 to 3,500 mg/l
Conductivity:
350 to 500 µmho/cm
Suspended solids: 80 to 950 mg/l
Total hardness, as CaCO3:
80 to 150 mg/l
213. The reactor-clarifiers will be used to remove suspended materials. Each unit will
consist of two large (30 m diameter and 4.5 m height) cylindrical concrete vessels, in
which a central mixing and chemical addition zone will be located. The process takes
several stages, the first being coagulation. Coagulating agents, such as aluminum
sulfate, ferric sulfate, polymers or others, will be mixed with the incoming raw water in
the rapid mixing chamber. Additional floccules will be added to create large flocs, which
will be dispersed in the water that flows to the outer circumference of the clarifier where
a calmer environment will promote settling of these flocs at the bottom of the clarifier.
214. The clarification process will produce two streams: the cleaned water that flows
out of the unit at the top in a trough, and a sludge at the bottom that contains the solids
separated from the raw water. The sludge will be periodically withdrawn from the bottom
of the clarifier vessel and disposed of with the ashes. The clean water taken from the
top of the clarifier will be further passed through sand filters.
215. The pretreated product water will be stored in a 16,000 m3 concrete basin from
where it will be pumped by 3 x 50% capacity forwarding pumps to various users, the
largest of which would be the cooling towers. The pretreated product water storage tank
will also serve as the source of fire water, and therefore will have a fixed reserve level
always available for fire extinguishing purposes.
216. The different users of the pretreated water and the daily flow rates for each unit
are presented in the water balance diagram shown in Figure 4-2.
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Figure 4-2: Proposed Water Supply System
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217. Steam cycle makeup will be provided from the demineralized plant. It will consist
of activated carbon filter deep bed cation ion exchangers, degasifier anion exchangers
and deep mixed bed polisher. There will be three parallel trains for each unit, each
designed for 50% dematerialized load, with two trains in operation while the third
regenerates resins or remains on standby.
218. Each train will consist of an activated carbon filter which will remove chlorine and
other oxides. From the activated carbon filters, water will enter the deep bed cation
exchanger. The resins in the cation exchanger will attach to calcium, magnesium and
sodium compounds in the water. The water will then flow to the degasifier, where
carbon dioxide is released, after which it will enter the deep bed anion exchanger, which
will remove sulfates, nitrides, chlorides, bicarbonates and silicates from the stream. The
treated water will then be passed through a mixed bed polisher, which will have both a
deep cation and a deep anion bed, producing ultra-pure water for cycle makeup. The
treated water will be discharged into a demineralized water storage tank and from is
pumped to either the condensate storage tank or directly into the condenser hot well
where it will mix with the condensate. The demineralized water treatment plant will be
housed in a separate building, together with all its pumps, valves, analyzers,
instrumentation and programmable logic control (PLC) systems.
4.9
Design Coal Specification and Blending
219. The main fuel for the power plant will be imported subbituminous coal. Lignite in
the ratio of 10-20% will be blended with the subbituminous coal. The design
specification of the fuel is shown in Table 4-4.
Table 4-4: Quality of Design Coal
Parameter
Subbituminous
(e.g., INDO5(P))
Lignite
(e.g., Thar)
Range
Selected
Value
C
50-65
50.0
28.0-37.4
28.0
H
1-3
1.0
1.6-301
1.6
O
30-50
30.0
6.6-10.5
6.6
S
<1
1.0
0.2-2.7
2.7
N
<2
2.0
0.2-0.4
0.4
Moisture
<26
26.0
44.9-50.4
50.4
Ash
High Heating Value
(HHV), kcal/kg
<9
9.0
4.0-15.1
15.1
4,780
2,231-3,250
2,231
> 4,780
Selected
Value
Range
220. For the purpose of design, three different blending percentage of Lignite has
been considered, namely 10%, 15%, and 20%. The fuel properties under these
blending scenarios are shown in Table 4-5.
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Table 4-5: Blended Fuel Properties
Coal “E”
Subbituminous 90%
Lignite 10%
Coal “F”
Subbituminous 85%
Lignite 15%
Coal “G”
Subbituminous 80%
Lignite 20%
C
40.65%
39.96%
39.26%
H
0.90%
0.93%
0.96%
O
23.52%
22.67%
21.80%
S
1.00%
1.07%
1.15%
N
1.56%
1.51%
1.45%
24.19%
25.38%
26.58%
8.17%
8.48%
8.80%
4,525
4,398
4,270
Moisture
Ash
High Heating Value
(HHV), kcal/kg
4.10 Coal Consumption
221. The total coal consumption will depend on the ratio of blending of subbituminous
and Thar coals. The coal consumption for the 1,200 MW plant for three possible
scenarios is shown in Table 4-6. In the first stage of 600 MW, the consumption will be
half of that of the values shown in Table 4-6.
Table 4-6: Coal Consumption
Coal
Subbituminous
Lignite
Total
Daily Consumption (tons)
Coal E 90:10
12,698
1,411
14,109
Coal F 85:15
12,355
2,180
14,535
Coal G 80:20
12,054
3,013
15,067
Annual Consumption at 85% Plant Factor (million tons)
Coal E 90:10
3.94
0.44
4.38
Coal F 85:15
3.83
0.68
4.51
Coal G 80:20
3.74
0.93
4.67
4.11 Coal Handling System
222. The function of the coal handling system is to receive, store and deliver coal to
the boiler silos. The coal handling system will be designed to serve primarily the new 2 x
600 MW net (2 x 660 MW nominal) super-critical units, but will be able in the future, with
some modifications and equipment additions, to provide the coal needed for the
conversion of any of the existing boilers at JTPS. Two types of coal will be used:
imported subbituminous coal and lignite coal. These fuels will be blended before
delivery to the boiler coal silos.
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4.11.1 Coal Delivery and Storage
223. At full load, one 600 MW unit will consume coal at about 6,800 ton/day of 20%
lignite and 80% subbituminous blended coal. At an 85% capacity factor, the annual coal
consumption for one unit will be about 2.1 million ton/year, with 1.7 million ton of
subbituminous and 0.4 million ton of lignite. Coal will be delivered to the site primarily by
railroad car; however provisions will be made to receive, unload, and store coal
transported by trucks as well.
224. Subbituminous coal will be imported and unloaded initially at Karachi Port. In
order to be able to unload a ship in about three days (after which demurrage charges
rise sharply), the port must have adequate facilities and space for unloading and storage
of the entire shipment contents.
225. There are two types of coal cars used for railroad delivery: bottom unloading and
fixed bottom cars. Bottom unloading cars have a mechanism that opens the hinged
bottom to dump, by gravity, the contents into a hopper located below the car. These
hinged bottom cars and their operating mechanisms usually require constant
maintenance and repairs, with malfunctions leading to unwanted coal spills. Such cars
may not be currently available in Pakistan; they are used in countries employing large
internal coal shipments by rail.
226. The other method, which is recommended for this project, is the use of a rotary
car dumper. This involves a car positioning system that puts individual railcars on the
rotary dumper, which then locks the railcar in position, rotates and dumps the coal
contained in the car into a hopper from where conveyers take the coal for storage.
Railcars are usually provided with hinged couplings, so that the unloading can proceed
without decoupling the cars from one another.
227. The railroad trains will have two or three locomotives and 50 cars of about 50 ton
capacity each. Daily, three to four trainloads of 2,500 tons each will be delivered to the
site for unloading coal to the storage yard in the first stage. The number will increase to
six to seven trainloads in the second stage of 1,200 MW. If required, the unloading
system can have the option of delivering the coal directly to the boiler after appropriate
crushing, tramp iron removal, weighing, and analysis.
228. For the 1,200MW, a total of 540,000 tons of coal is to be stored at the plant at
any given time to provide for the plant to operate for 40 days, in case the coal supply
and delivery system is interrupted. The storage will be in two storage areas: an ‘active’
pile and a ‘dead’ (long term) storage pile. The active pile will be about 40,000 tons,
based on three-day full-load coal consumption. The active pile will have a cover to
protect it from rainwater for ready use. Dead storage will have a total holding capacity of
about 500,000 tons, stacked in three piles each 10 m high and occupying an area of
about 14 acres. The active coal pile will be continuously used, while the dead storage
piles will allow separation by coal source and type. Reclaim from these piles will be
dictated by the blending ratio required.
229. At the rail receiving area, the rail car positioning system will bring the cars in
succession above the receiving hoppers; on top of these hoppers there will be a spaced
bar cover to prevent excessively large lumps of coal into the hoppers. A travelling
hammer mill breaker will be available to crush lumps in size for easier handling.
230. Two vibrating feeders under the receiving coal hoppers will deliver the coal into a
5,000 t/h, 2,000 mm conveyor belt that will transport the coal to a coal crushing house.
A weigh scale and magnetic separator will be installed on this conveyor belt. In the
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crushing house, a splitter gate will deliver the coal to one of two coal crushers, which will
break it down to a size of about 40 mm.
231. From the breakers, the conveyor will put the coal on to the stacker/reclaimer
conveyer belt for stakeout in the coal piles. An ‘as-received’ sampling system will take
samples from the crushed coal and makes these samples available for laboratory
analyses. The reclaim system will use 2 m wide conveyor belts, designed for reclaim at
5,000 t/h. The conveyers and adjacent metal walkways will be enclosed for ease of
service/repair and to prevent dust emission during windy weather. The conveyer
galleries will have illumination, dust collection at transfer points, and firefighting
equipment.
232. The coal storage yard will be on level ground properly graded for drainage and
compacted by bulldozer. To prevent rainwater seeping under the pile and into
groundwater, the ground area of the coal yard will be covered with a layer of compacted
impervious clad or cement, with rainwater drainage to the periphery where a water
collection ditch will collect the water into a basin where it can settle out coal particles; the
wastewater will be reused for dust suppression or ash sluicing.
233. Railroad spurs will be provided at the car unloading area for locomotive
maneuver, and to hold a train while another is still unloading. The entire unloading
operation of a 50 car train will take not more than three hours.
234. The coal yard will have two sets of bucket wheel stacker/reclaimers, each
designed for stacking capacity of 5,000 t/h and reclaiming at 3,000 t/h. The
stacker/reclaimer will be electric power-operated via flexible electric power cables. Each
will have an operator cabin with communications to the plant operator.
235. There will be equipment for compacting the coal piles, including moving coal by
dozers to the active coal piles. A coal handling equipment repair shop will be available
for maintenance of mobile equipment and fixed installed devices, such as conveyer belts
and crushers.
4.11.2 Coal Reclaim System
236. Coal for daily use will be taken from the active coal pile, where it will have been
previously blended. The reclaimers will take the coal and transfer it on conveyer belts
into a set of two crushers to reduce the size to about 30-40 mm. The conveyers will then
bring the coal to the boiler silo filling gallery. The filling gallery will be enclosed to
prevent rain and fugitive dust from entering and leaving, respectively.
237. The conveyer running over the coal silos will have a travelling tripper that may be
positioned to discharge the conveyer belt flow to a specific silo. Level gauges in the coal
silos will indicate when the respective silo is full, and signal to have the tripper moved to
another silo. Six silos for the boiler will be provided, each with a 550 ton capacity. The
silos will allow operation at full load for about 12 hours before refilling is needed.
4.11.3 Dust Suppression and Temperature Monitoring
238. To prevent contamination of the atmosphere with coal dust, a water spray system
will be located at strategic locations at the coal yard for use by yard personnel, as
needed. Fixed conveyer belts above ground, except those associated with the
stacker/reclaimers, will be in enclosed galleries. The bucket wheel stacker/reclaimer will
be provided with water tanks, spray hoses and nozzles to be used when fly dust
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becomes a problem. Coal piles will be inspected daily for visible signs of hot spots.
Temperature monitoring probes will be strategically located at the coal piles.
4.11.4 Coal Silo Design
239. The boiler coal silos will be cylindrical with a conical hopper. The hopper funnel
will be angled at 60o to the horizontal to ease flow. The silo will be made of stainless
steel-clad steel, with a corrosion allowance of 2 mm or more. Discharge from the silos
will be through a gate valve with gravimetric feeder and coal pipe to the respective
pulverizer.
240. Coal fire in the silos should be recognized at once and dealt with. The pulverizer
will be provided with an inert gas system (nitrogen, carbon dioxide or steam) which will
be injected upon activation of the temperature-based alarm system. The coal silos’
discharge piping should have an additional emergency system that allows for rapid
dumping of the silo contents onto the ground to be dealt with by fire extinguishers.
4.12 Ash Handling and Disposal system
241. Coal combustion residuals (CCRs), commonly referred to as coal ash, are the
materials that remain after burning coal for electricity. CCRs to be produced at the
Project include the following:
Fly ash;
Bottom ash; and
Flue gas desulfurized gypsum (FGD gypsum)
4.12.1 Production and Handling
242. Table 4-7 provides the estimates for the ash and gypsum to be generated for
both stages of the project. For the 600 MW, the quantity will be half of amount shown in
the table. Assuming worst case of design coal, a blend of 80% subbituminous coal and
20% lignite (Blending Coal G in Table 4-7), and 85% plant factor, total ash production is
estimated at 411,300 t/y (205,650 t/y for 600 MW) with fly ash at 349,600 t/y (174,800 t/y
for 600 MW) and the rest being bottom ash. Production of FGD gypsum is estimated at
138,100 t/y (69,050 t/y for 600 MW).
243. During combustion in the furnace, bottom ash will fall down to the boiler bottom
hopper form where it will be conveyed into a bottom ash silo. The remainder of the ash
generated during combustion will be carried over in the flue gases as fly ash. The
electrostatic precipitator (ESP) installed between the boiler and the stack will remove
almost all the fly ash and collect it in hoppers.
244. In the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) facility limestone slurry will be sprayed
into the flue gas stream where sulfur dioxide will react with the limestone to form a
mixture of calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate (gypsum). This mixture will be collected at
the bottom where air will be injected to convert the calcium sulfite into calcium sulfate.
The gypsum thus produced will be collected in a bin for disposal.
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Table 4-7: Ash and Gypsum Production
Daily Production (kg)
Bottom
Ash
Fly Ash
Gypsum
Annual Product at 85% Plant
Factor(t)
Bottom
Fly Ash
Gypsum
Ash
Subbituminous
Coal
151,056
855,888
299,184
46,865
265,539
92,822
Coal E
172,896
979,824
359,856
53,641
303,990
111,645
Coal F
184,944
1,047,984
387,168
57,379
325,137
120,119
Coal G
198,864
1,126,992
445,056
61,698
349,649
138,079
4.12.2 Ash Disposal
245. All the waste streams including fly ash and bottom ash if not exported for
commercial use will be sluiced or conveyed to a mixing vessel where water will be added
and the product will be pumped to the ash pond through a corrosion/erosion resistant
slurry pipeline. Ash to water ratio of 1:3-4 will be used. Gypsum will initially be stored in
silos. Gypsum that cannot be recycled will also be transferred to the ash pond for
storage. Physical characteristics and utilization options for ash and gypsum to be
produced at the Project are discussed further in Chapter 8.
246. Ash produced will contain low concentrations of toxic metals such as arsenic,
selenium, lead, and mercury. For disposal in the ash pond it is therefore important to
create an impermeable layer under the disposal site that will remain impermeable under
the weight of the wastes stored on top of this foundation layer. The impermeable layer
will be a thick layer of compressed clay or a plastic membrane. The ash pond will
consist of 25 m x 25 m segments for easier land reclamation. Once a segment is filled, it
will be be covered with a layer of top soil and seeded with vegetation to prevent dust
generation due to wind. A new segment adjacent to the first one will then be created,
and so on until the entire ash pond area is covered with vegetation.
247. About 100 acres of waste land adjacent to JTPS site is being acquired by JPCL
for ash disposal. With average of about 3.5 m below ground level, the site will have the
capacity for disposal of about 5 years of ash and gypsum waste for the 1,200 MW
project, assuming no utilization of ash for commercial purposes. In case the ash pile
could be compacted and stabilized to a height of 7 meters, which appears likely but
requires a closer study, the same site would allow ash disposal for 10 years. In case,
the second stage is not commissioned immediately, the 100 acre site will be sufficient for
10 years, if the depth is 3.5 m and 20 years, if the depth is increased to 7 m.
248. As discussed in Chapter 8, ash utilization potential exists in Pakistan and
therefore the quantity of ash to be disposed in the ash pond will be reduced. It is
estimated that the ash disposal site at Jamshoro would be sufficient to accommodate
ash disposal for 15 to 20 years, depending on the extent of commercial utilization of ash
and gypsum produced at the Project. In addition, the height of the fill in the ash pond
can be increased if required to increase the disposal volume.
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4.13 Flue Gas Treatment System
4.13.1 Electrostatic Precipitators
249. The steam generator will be equipped with a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP)
to be located between the air heater outlet and the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) unit
inlet. The purpose of the ESP will be to minimize loading of particulates (fly ash and
unburned carbon) at the entrance to the FGD, primarily in order to meet product quality
requirements of saleable gypsum as well as to meet the stack emission limits for
particulates.
250. The ESP may be rigid electrode or rigid frame design. Total flue gas flow will be
about 2 million Nm3/hr and particulate loading, without treatment, will be about
6,000 ppm. The ESPs will be designed to have an efficiency of not less than 99.9% and
will limit the outlet flue gas particulate loading to below 30 ppm at all loads when burning
design coal (Note: Particulate emission will be further reduced in the absorber and mist
eliminators of the FGD system prior to leaving the stack).
251. The ESP will have multiple, independently powered electrical sections. The
electrical sections will be arranged in at least two 50% independent load groups, such
that a loss of power supply to one load group will not affect the performance capability of
the electrical section served by the other load group.
252. The complete ESP, including casing and breaching, will be designed to be
capable of withstanding an excursion flue gas temperature of 320 oC for 30 minutes, and
a transient interval positive or negative pressure of not less than 89 cm of water column,
with stresses not exceeding the yield point and without any permanent deformation. The
ESP design velocity (maximum free velocity) will be not greater than 1.2 m/s. Breaching
design velocity will not exceed 20 m/s. Flue gas conditioning by injection of substances
is not an acceptable means of meeting the specified outlet dust loading.
253. The ESP will be a self-supporting structure designed for outdoor installation. It
will be able to withstand all external forces simultaneously with all internal forces created
due to pressure, dust loading, operating temperatures and the dynamic loading imposed
by vibrators and rappers. Airtight expansion joints will be provided to accommodate the
thermal expansion of the breaching and casing. The roof will be designed to support
maintenance personnel and tools in addition to all other external loads. The roof will be
pitched for drainage and provided with suitable gutter and roof drain piping terminating at
grade level. The casing wall will have a minimum thickness of 6 mm. The ESPs will be
designed with 10% extra plate collection area. All metal parts of the collector subject to
abrasion and wear will have a 3 mm corrosion allowance, except for discharge and
collecting electrodes.
254. Adequate access and platforms will be provided for maintenance, inspections,
repair and testing. A minimum of two stairs will be provided for the ESP. Stairs will start
at grade and extend to all platforms, walkways and roof. Walkways and stairs will be at
least 92 cm wide. Hinged doors of at least 60 cm diameter, with gas tight seals will be
provided, where necessary, to permit proper inspection, cleaning, maintenance and
repairs. Doors having access to the interior will be equipped with mechanical interlocks
to prevent opening while equipment is energized. Doors having access to high voltage
equipment, such as rectifiers, high voltage bushings, etc., will be provided with a system
of mechanical interlocks that will allow opening only when that section is de-energized.
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255. The ESP transformer will be in accordance with ANSI C57.12.00 and will have
adequate surge protection. The transformer fluid will have an ignition point of not less
than 300 oC. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) use will be prohibited. Rectifiers will be of
the silicon type. A roof area weather enclosure will be provided to protect maintenance
personnel and equipment from inclement weather. It will allow maintenance of
transformer-rectifiers, rapper drives and other equipment on the roof while the remainder
of the ESP is in operation.
256. Fly ash hoppers will be of pyramidal shape, with a valley angle not less than 60o
to the horizontal. Hoppers will have a minimum wall thickness of 6 mm. The hoppers
will be of carbon steel with a Type 304 stainless steel cladding. Each hopper will be
equipped with high- and low-level switches for level indication and alarm.
257. A rapping system will be provided for cleaning electrodes and collecting plates. It
will be capable of 50g acceleration normal to the most remote section of the plates.
Rapping frequency and intensity will be adjustable to provide for variation in steam
generator operating conditions. The rapping system will operate automatically, and will
be such that flue gas puffs and fluctuations in the electrical load are minimized. Rapper
controls will be readily adjustable for intensity and frequency, and will be independently
adjustable for each electrical field. All electrical parts will be outside of the gas stream.
258. Collecting plates will be at least 1.2 mm in thickness. Collecting electrode design
will be such that the electrodes remain straight and free from warping after extended
periods of operation. The entire precipitator will be insulated and lagged. Insulation will
be asbestos free.
4.13.2 Flue Gas Desulfurization System
General
259. The flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system will be designed to treat the flue gas
from a steam generator using primarily coal and heavy fuel oil as fuel for warm-up start
up. It will be designed with efficiency not less than 95% to achieve performance
requirements under all operating conditions between 40% and 100% of the maximum
continuous rated capacity of the steam generator. The flue gas flow rate will be about 2
million Nm3/hr. SO2 emission, without treatment, will be about 1,500 ppm.
260. The FGD system will be based on the widely used limestone scrubbing
technology and will produce a gypsum byproduct that is usable for wallboard production
or as an additive in the manufacture of cement. This process is being offered as a
process and equipment package by a number of companies.
System Description
261.
The FGD system will consist of the following main subsystems:
Gas cooling and quenching
Absorption and slurry oxidation
Slurry filtration and gypsum handling
Limestone slurry preparation.
262. The flue gas will be received from the ESP relatively dust free (<30 ppm) and at
the higher temperature of 130 oC, or 10 oC above the sulfur dioxide dew-point. It will be
cooled to about 90 oC by the gas cooling heat exchanger. Sulfur dioxide absorption will
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be accomplished by direct water quench. The water quench consumes a fair amount of
water that is lost in the stack.
263. The first step of the cooling will be accomplished by indirect heat exchange
between the incoming hot flue gas and the cold desulfurized flue gas leaving the
absorber. The principal purpose of this step is the reheating of the cold, desulfurized
flue gas leaving the absorber to about 90 oC, or a temperature at least 10 oC above the
dew point of the gas at which it leaves the absorber. This, in turn, will achieve two
objectives:
The stack will not be a ‘wet’ stack with a highly visible plume of condensing
water vapor as well as water droplets in the vicinity of the stack, and
The functioning of the CEM (Continuous Emission Monitoring) system for the
continuous control of the environmentally harmful emissions (SOx, NOx, CO,
particulate matter) will be enhanced due to the absence of interfering water
droplets.
264. A second cooling step will be accomplished by direct quenching with an excess
of fresh pretreated water. This will saturate the flue gas with water vapor and cool it to
approximately 60 oC. The quenching will be accomplished in a vessel with sufficient
vapor space and entrainment separation devices to assure good separation of liquid
from vapor, in order to minimize carryover of entrained droplets of water into the
absorber. Carryover of liquid droplets must be avoided to minimize the introduction of
chlorides into the absorber and from there into the gypsum byproduct.
265. After the cooling steps, the flue gas will enter the absorber. Generally, the
absorption vessel is combined with the gypsum oxidation vessel, which is in the lower
part of the absorber. The reactions taking place in the absorber/oxidizer may be
summarized in a simplified manner as follows: The flue gas is contacted countercurrently with a series of sprays of limestone slurry and gypsum. The SO2 and calcium
carbonate solution at the surface of the limestone particles form calcium sulfite, which
precipitates as a solid and falls to the bottom section of the absorber. Air is sparged into
the slurry at the bottom of the absorber and oxidizes the sulfite to calcium sulfate.
266. The process conditions will be controlled by maintiannig the pH in the slurry to
achieve a selected outlet SO2 concentration in the stack. The pH will be controlled, in
turn, by the addition of fresh limestone slurry to the bottom of the absorber. Excess
slurry will be withdrawn on absorber vessel level control from the absorber and pumped
to the filtration section.
267. The desulfurized flue gas will exit the absorber after passing through a multistage
de-mister to reduce any entrained droplets to less than 50 mg/Nm 3. It will then be
reheated by indirect heat exchange against the incoming flue gas.
268. A single absorption and solution oxidation train will be provided and will typically
include:
Absorber, including multiple layers of slurry spray headers
Two- or more stage mist eliminator (integral or external to absorber) to reduce
liquid carryover to less than 50 mg/Nm3
Nominal 50% ID booster fans (if needed in addition to the boiler ID fans)
Oxidizer vessel (may be combined with absorber) with multiple agitators
50% oxidation air compressors ( two operating, one spare)
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34% slurry circulation pumps (three operating, one spare)
100% absorber bleed pumps (slurry feed to filters)
Instrumentation and controls.
269. The function of slurry filtration and gypsum handling subsystem is to separate the
gypsum from the circulating slurry and to generate a transportable product with a
maximum free water content of 10% or less. The expected gypsum production rate will
be about 18,544 kg/hr. Because of potentially high maintenance and plant availability
requirement, the filter train will be supplied with a full spare unit.
270. The slurry from the absorber bleed pump will be received by the gypsum filter,
which typically is a belt-type vacuum filter with multiple zones to allow for multi-stage
washing of the filter cake. The filter will be able to produce a product with a maximum
free water content of 10% by weight, under all load conditions, while meeting product
specifications.
271. The filtrate from various stages will be collected in a two-chamber filtrate sump.
Part of the most concentrated filtrate will be pumped to waste treatment at a rate that
maintains the chloride concentration of the entire system within allowable limits. The
rest of the filtrate will be returned to the absorber and part of it used to prepare fresh
limestone slurry.
272. The slurry filtration and gypsum handling system will comprise of 100% belt-type
vacuum filters, each including:
Main filter structure, filter belt, multiple filter zones
Filtrate receiver and barometric seal leg for each zone
Piping to vacuum system
Liquid ring-type vacuum pumps (one operating, one spare)
Gypsum discharge chute to gypsum conveyor
Multi-compartment filtrate sump, with agitators for each compartment
100% wastewater sump pumps
200% filtrate sump pumps
Gypsum belt conveyor, to receive dewatered gypsum cake from filter and
convey to storage or disposal transportation
Instrumentation and controls
Electrical equipment associated with the above.
273. The limestone slurry preparation subsystem will prepare a limestone slurry
appropriate for use in the absorber from as-delivered limestone and water and gypsum
filtrate or wash water. Limestone will be received by truck or railcar, stored in a storage
shed of sufficient size to hold a 15-day supply at full capacity. From there, the limestone
will be conveyed to the limestone feed silo and, via a feeder and feed conveyor, to one
of two milling systems where the slurry will be prepared and then stored in the limestone
slurry feed tank.
274. The milling systems will consist of a coarse limestone crusher, followed by wet
milling in a rod or ball mill. The product stream from the rod or ball mill will be collected
in a mixing tank, and from there pumped through wet cyclones. The overflow of the
cyclones will be transferred to the limestone slurry feed tank, and the underflow recycled
to the ball mill.
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275.
This subsystem will be comprised of the following:
One covered limestone storage area (capable of holding a 15-day supply)
One retrieval and conveying system to fill the limestone feed silos
One limestone feed silo with a capacity of 15 hours of limestone consumption
when the unit operates at full load
Two limestone milling systems, each including a feeder/conveyor, a coarse
crusher, a wet rod or ball mill, a mixing tank and a hydraulic classification
system, with the product slurry discharging to the slurry feed tank
One limestone slurry feed tank sized to hold 10 hours of slurry. The tank will be
equipped with one or more agitators to keep the slurry in suspension.
Two 100% limestone slurry feed pumps to feed the slurry to the absorber.
276. The materials of construction employed in the various parts of the FGD system
must consider the corrosion potential of the various sections. The corrosion potential
may differ slightly between different processes and may have an effect on the specific
choice of materials. Appropriate materials for the different sections will be selected to
ensure a minimum of five years of equipment life, with minimal corrosion-derived
maintenance.
277. In general, Hastelloy C-276 alloy, as base material, cladding or liner, FRP, or
flake glass-lined carbon steel have been successfully used for the construction of
vessels, ducting and other equipment in such service,.
278. The following equipment and interconnecting ducting and piping will be
constructed of a corrosion-resistant material:
Gas/gas heat exchanger
Quench vessel
Absorber and oxidation vessel
Absorber to mist eliminator and gas/gas exchanger
Pumps.
279. Lower grade alloys can be used in the filtration section. Carbon steel can be
used in the limestone slurry preparation section.
280. All sizing criteria stated below are minimum requirements and refer to the boiler
being operated at its maximum continuous rating (BMCR) with the design coal and 20%
excess air and considering the leakage rate of the boiler air heater.
a. Gas/gas heat exchanger: will be sized to raise the temperature of the treated
flue gas to 10 oC above its dew point or 90 oC, whichever is higher.
b. Quench vessel: will be designed to cool flue gas to about 60 oC by contacting
with the total makeup stream of water to the cooling tower, with minimal
entrainment of liquid.
c. Flue gas superficial velocity: will not exceed 5 m/s.
d. Number of spray levels: three operating plus one spare.
e. Slurry hold up in bottom section (when used as oxidation vessel): 5 minutes
in slurry circulation rate or 7 hours in solid retention time, whichever is larger.
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f.
Minimum vertical distance between top spray bank and first demister: 2 m.
g. Demisters will be designed to a maximum liquid carryover of 50 mg/Nm3, and
will be provided with washing sprays to remove deposits.
h. Filtrate sump will be sized for 4 hours storage.
i.
Ball or rod mill slurry tank will be sized for 15 minutes storage, plus sufficient
freeboard to accommodate surges from the mill.
j.
Limestone slurry feed tank: will be sized for 10 hours storage.
k. Slurry pumps will be sized with a margin of 20% on head and 10% on flow.
l.
All slurry piping will avoid dead ends and will have hose connections to allow
line flushing when the line is taken out of service.
m. Slurry piping 2 inches and less will be flanged rubber-lined carbon steel.
Piping over 2 inches will be flanged FRP pipe.
n. Instrument connections in slurry service will be protected from plugging by
either membrane construction or by continuous process water flushing into
the process.
o. Valves: valves for slurry service will be plug valves, slide gate valves,
diaphragm valves, ceramic globe valves or pinch valves, as appropriate for
the application.
p. Isolation valves in slurry service will be packing-less knife gate.
q. Valves will be provided with an easily visible position indicator.
r.
Flue gas ductwork: the flue gas ductwork includes the ductwork from the
gas/gas exchanger (untreated flue gas) outlet to the stack.
281. All flue gas ducting will be fabricated from steel plates not less than 6 mm thick
and will be of welded construction, and will be suitably protected against corrosion.
282. All ducts will be rigidly supported, adequately stiffened and bracketed to prevent
vibration, and will be free from internal sharp edges or projections. Internal bracing will
not be acceptable. Vanes and deflectors will be provided inside ducts and will be of
special profile to ensure complete change of direction of flow with minimum turbulence.
283. Expansion joints, manufactured from corrosion-resistant material, will be
provided at all locations, where required, to permit the free movement of the duct without
distortion and without inducing excessive stresses where ducts connect to other
equipment. Expansion joints will be nonmetallic flexible belt types of gas-tight
construction, designed for the appropriate temperature and pressure conditions.
284. The duct material will be nickel alloy plate C-276 (N10276), or carbon steel A588
with a protective liner. The protective liner may be a minimum thickness of 1.6 mm
N10276 bonded or clad to the A588, or other corrosion protection, such as flake gasfilled resin lining or similar. Contractor will provide proof of prior operating experience
with the proposed lining material and with the specified method of application.
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System Performance Requirements
285. The FGD system will be designed and guaranteed to achieve the following
performance, when the steam generator is operated anywhere between 40% and 100%
of its MCR using design coal with 20% excess air:
Remove at least 95% of the sulfur oxides in the flue gas.
The desulfurized flue gas will be reheated to the higher of 100 oC above its dew
point or 900 oC, whichever is higher.
Achieve a limestone utilization rate of less than 1.1 moles of calcium in the
limestone per mole of sulfur removed.
Produce gypsum with the following characteristics:
o Gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) dry basis >95%
o Limestone (CaCO3) dry basis <4%
o Chlorides as Cl– <100 ppm
o Vanadium as V <25 ppm
o pH between 7 and 9
o Free water (% total weight) <10%
o Whiteness >80%.
System Operation and Controls
286. The FGD system will be furnished and equipped for fully automated operation,
controlled by the overall plant distributed control system (DCS). Critical operational
parameters will be indicated via the DCS system in the central control room. Remotely
controlled operations will include switching of pumps (shutting down the operating unit
and the starting of the spare), washing of mist eliminators, and other periodical
intermittent operations.
287. Should an unscheduled outage of the regenerative air heater occur, the FGD
system will experience a rapid increase in flue gas temperature, which may be partially
offset by increased evaporation in the quench tower. This situation may prevail for
15 minutes, after which time the unit will be tripped if the air heater cannot be restarted.
The FGD system will be designed to withstand such an event without damage or
increased maintenance.
288. The FGD system will be designed to withstand, without damage, an internal
pressure equal to the shutoff pressure of the ID fans. This condition may occur due to
partial or complete blockage of the mist eliminators after the absorber stage and could
also last for several minutes until the unit is tripped.
4.13.3 Control of Oxides of Nitrogen
General
289. During combustion in boiler, nitrogen in the coal and in the air combine with the
oxygen in the air to form oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Pakistani and international
regulations have established limits of NOx emissions from power generating plants. The
nitrogen that originates from the air produces thermal NOx, while the nitrogen
compounds from the coal produce fuel NOx. The factors that affect the amount of
thermal NOx produced are combustion temperature and duration of the combustion
process. Reducing these factors will decrease the quantity of thermal NOx formed. The
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NOx conversion for coal combustion is affected by the availability of oxygen to react with
the fuel nitrogen compounds in their gaseous state. The compounds that evolve from
coal particles such as ammonia are unstable and reduce to harmless nitrogen gas under
fuel-rich conditions, or to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) under air-rich conditions. In order to
reduce formation of both thermal and fuel NO2 for pulverized coal firing, the following
measures have to be considered:
Coals with the lowest fuel nitrogen contents and the lowest fuel oxygen/nitrogen
ratios generally will produce the lowest amount of NOx
The fuel NOx can be minimized by controlling the quantity of air permitted to
mix with the fuel in early stages of the combustions
The thermal NOx contribution to the total NOx can be reduced by operating at
low excess air percentages, as well as minimizing the gas temperature
throughout the furnace by using low-turbulent diffusion flames and large water
cooled furnace.
NOx Control Methods
290. There are several ways to reduce NOx emissions from a power plant and are
categorized into two major groups, (i) reduction of the amount of NOx within the furnace,
and (ii) reduction of NOx after the flue gases have left the furnace by chemical treatment
methods.
291. Combustion process method: The reduction of the NOx generated inside the
furnace is the most economic and the preferred choice. If these means prove
insufficient to meet the regulatory requirement, then the post combustion method is
used. Among the combustion methods used to reduce the amount of NOx generated
include:
Flue gas recirculation: It is used primarily with low nitrogen fuels and reduces
NOx formation by decreasing the gas temperature in the furnace.
Fuel re-burning: It consists of injectingfuel above the main combustion zone. It
affects furnace temperature profile and provides moderate NOx reduction.
Low NOx burners (LNB): It produces staged combustion, impacts flame length
and turn-down stability. It is effective but has an increased capital cost. LNB
can reduce NOx formation by almost 50%. There are many LNB designs which
are utilized in large pulverized coal fired power plants.
Over fire air (OFA): It consists of fuel rich combustion in the main burners and
addition of fresh air atop the burners to compel additional combustion process
in the furnace. It can reduce NOx formation by about 30% with good operation
records.
Combination of LNB with OFA: This is the application thatoptimizes the two
methods and has a potential to achieve up to 70% NOx reduction.
292. Post-combustion methods: Among the methods used for post-combustion NOx
reduction, the most practical methods for pulverized coal fired large boilers are the
following:
Selective catalytic reduction (SCR): It consists of installing in the boiler
convective zone a set of catalytic baskets and injection of ammonia in the gas
stream of the catalyst. The ammonia reacts with the NOx in the presence of the
catalyst to form nitrogen and water vapor. This method can achievea very high
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NOx reduction efficiency of up to 85%, but it requires high capital cost outlay
and high operating costs. The catalyst can be plugged by the fly ash particles in
the flue gas stream and generally requires replacement every 5 or7 years. The
SCR is being used where very stringent NOx limits are imposed.
Selective Non-catalytic Reduction (SNCR): It is a method that consists of
injecting urea in the flue gas stream. It reacts with the NOx to form water and
nitrogen. The NOx reduction is moderate and is limited to a narrow flue gas
temperature range. It requires small capital cost and modest operating costs.
The NOxreduction ranges between 15-40% and varies with the load.
Low NOx Issues
293. The use of low NOx burners and several other methods that address the NOx
formation during the combustion process have revealed some side effects. These
include the presence of pyrites, sulfur and chlorine. These manifest during combustion
where fireside corrosion on water walls has been observed. Ignition loss is another
problem, and so is the increased carbon content which makes fly ash unusable as
acement additive.
294. To resolve the above, the boiler manufacturer has to provide injection of air at the
water walls. This willprevent potential future damage. Most boiler manufacturers have
combined low NOx burners, over fire air and gas recirculation thatreduce NOx formation.
It is recommended that the potential boiler manufacturer will make computational fluid
dynamics (CFD) modeling to assess impact on boiler performance to assure that NOx
level meetslocal and international environmental standards.
295. Flue duct interfacing and space are allocated as shown in the plant layout for
incorporating CCS system at a later time. ADB is presently in the process to apply for
funding to make studies of CCS application options including survey of potential regional
CO2 users, use of CO2 for reactivating oil wells and assessment of subsurface geology
for CO2 storage.
Recommended Approach for the Project
296. While current NOx emission requirement in Pakistan is relatively low, the project
is subject to international standards imposed by global agencies including the World
Bank. The proposed modern power technology for the project is expected to meet NOx
emission level as it is anticipated to be below 200 mg/Nm3 limit. SCR system of 80%
efficiency will be installed at the site; the project will then have to rely on combustion
technology plus SCR system to meet the international NOx emission requirement.
4.14 Gaseous Emissions and Waste
297. Pollutants in the gaseous emissions from the power plant will consist of carbon
dioxide, sulfur dioxide, particulates, and oxides of nitrogen. Plant emissions, with and
without treatment, are shown in Table 4-8.
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Table 4-8: Emission of Gaseous Pollutants
Without treatment (ppm)
SO2*
NOx
PM
With treatment (ppm)
SO2*
NOx
PM
Subbituminous Coal
2,874
(2,364)
200
10,995
144
(118)
40
11
Coal E
3,456
(2,843)
200
11,999
173
(142)
40
12
Coal F
3,719
(3,059)
200
12,530
186
(153)
40
13
Coal G
4,275
(3,517)
200
13,847
214
(176)
40
14
Assumed
efficiencies:
FGD
95%,
ESP
99.9%,
NOx
reduction
* The values in paranthese are for typical sulfur composition of 1.5% in Thar Coal
80%
4.15 Hazardous Waste Storage Facility
298. A Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) will be constructed at site to store
hazardous wastes, including asbestos and soot removed from the boilers. Further
details on the design of the HWSF are included in Chapter 8.
4.16 Port Handling and Transportation of Coal
299. Imported coal will be brought by ships and then by train to JTPS. The major ports
in the country include Karachi Port and Port Qasim. These ports, located close to
Karachi city, serve as major hubs for the import and export of commodities to and from
the county. Both ports have facilities to handle fuel oil and coal. Port Qasim is the
preferred choice for the project, as road transportation out of this port avoids the
congested routes out of Karachi. Further discussion on port and transportation options is
included in Chapter 8.
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5. Description of the Environment
5.1
Area of Influence
300. The potential impacts of the Project on its surrounding physical and biological
environments include air and water quality impacts, noise generation, land
transformation and changes to soil. These are expected to reduce with the increased
distance from the Project facilities, affecting more the areas located closer, up to five
kilometers, to the Project facilities. For this, a study area of five kilometers around the
site was delineated, to assess the baseline conditions in the areas likely to be affected
by the Project due to its proximity to the Project site (Figure 5-1). This is referred to as
the Study Area in this report.
301. For other impacts, such as, changes due to project water intake and water
outfall, some primary data was also collected from the Indus River. Assessment of
traffic was based on data available from secondary sources.
5.2
Physical Environment
5.2.1
Geology
302. Pakistan geologically overlaps both with the Indian and the Eurasian tectonic
plates. Sindh province lies on the north-western corner of the Indian plate. The Study
Area lies on the southeastern fringe of the Kirthar range, a hill range that runs in the
north to south direction for about 400 km along the Sindh-Balochistan provincial
boundary.1 Primary lithology in the Study Area is of sedimentary origin, consisting of
limestone with occasional shale and sandstone of Laki Formation. Laki Formation is
very rich in fossils of Eocene age (56-34 million years ago). Study area mostly consists
of flood plain deposits. Two major active fault lines located near the Study Area are
Surjam Fault, about 30 km to the west and the Jhimpir Fault, about 25 km to the
southwest. Maximum recorded earthquakes on the Surjam and Jhimpir Faults were 6.1
and 5.6 on the Richter scale, respectively.2
5.2.2
Topography and Land Use
303. The elevation of the Study Area generally ranges between 15 and 45 m above
mean sea level. It slopes towards the Indus River which runs along the eastern
boundary of the Study Area. There are small sedimentary hills in the western and
southwestern side of the Study Area that rise to an elevation of about 100 meters. The
western side of the Study Area is gravel plain with very little natural vegetation cover
(Section 5.3.2). The eastern half of the Study Area is part of the Indus River flood plain.
1
2
Geology and tectonics of Pakistan, Kazmi. A. H and Jan. M. Q, 1997
Sindh Provincial Monsoon/Floods contingency Plan 2011 (Draft Version), provincial disaster
management authority, Government of Sindh
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Figure 5-1: Study Area
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304. There are two main land uses in the Study Area other than the JTPS. These are
the agricultural land in the east and the urban and semi urban areas in the south. The
Indus River floodplain has good alluvium soil and has been converted to productive
farmlands. About 25% of the Study Area falls in this category of land use. The urban
and semi-urban areas of Jamshoro are located south of the Study Area. These include
the main town of Jamshoro and purpose-built campuses and the associated residential
areas of several educational institutions including the University of Sindh and the
medical university, LUHMS. Other minor land uses include the road network, the canal
network, the under-construction Right Bank Outfall Drain (RBOD) and about eight small
rural settlements spread around the Study Area.
5.2.3
Soil
305. The Study Area has a very shallow soil cover. The soil map of Sindh3
categorizes the area of the JTPS and its surrounding as ‘rough mountainous land’
whereas the area close to Indus River is categorized as loamy and seasonal flodded soil
of river plains. The dominant soil group in both areas is Calicisols4, which are loamy
soils with accumulation of secondary calcium carbonates.
306. Chemical analysis of soil from areas within JTPS and in the Study Area outside
JTPS was carried out to assess the contamination of the soil. The sampling and the
results are discussed in Chapter 6. The soil within the boundary of JTPS shows
contamination due to oil spills from oil decanting operations and storage, and due to
open disposal of solid waste from the plant. The soil outside the boundary of JTPS is
largely unaffected by existing plant operations.
5.2.4
Climate
307. Climate is the average course or condition of the weather at a place usually over
a period of years as exhibited by temperature, wind velocity, and precipitation. The
climate of the Study Area is broadly hot and dry summer mild winter and rainfall in
monsoon.
308. The weather station closest to the Study Area is located at Hyderabad (25 38’ N,
68 42’ E), approximately 20 km southeast of the plant site. The climatic description of
the Study Area presented in this section is based on the 30-year climatic data of
Hyderabad. The hottest month is June in which the maximum average monthly
temperature exceeds 40 oC. The winters are mild with temperature dropping to 20 oC in
January. The Study Area receives approximately 178 mm of rain annually. Almost 65 %
of the rain is concentrated in the monsoon months of July and August. Monthly
temperature, rainfall and wind data are provided in Table 5-1 to Table 5-3. The annual
and seasonal wind-roses are shown in Figure 5–2.
309. According to Koppen climate classification the climate in the Study Area is arid
desert hot climate which is broadly hot and dry summer with mild winter rainfall. Broadly
speaking, there are four seasons in Pakistan. These seasons are defined on the basis
of temperature and the changes associated with the southwest monsoon. The
southwest monsoon is a wind system that prevails from April to October in the Indian
Ocean, and is characterized by a reversal in wind direction and heavy rainfall over most
of the Indian Subcontinent. Within Pakistan, considerable variation is found in
3
4
Soil Map of Sind 1:1,000,000. Soil Survey of Pakistan, Lahore. 1978.
Calicisols is a soil with substantial accumulation of lime.
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temperature and monsoonal changes. Thus, the specific characteristics and duration of
seasons depend on geographic location. The general characteristics of the season in
the Study Area on the basis of climatic data of Hyderabad is presented below:
Table 5-1: Temperatures of the Study Area
o
C
Month
Mean of Monthly
Highest Recorded*
Maximum
Minimum
Jan
29.8
20.1
35
20/1/1902
-1
31/1/1929
Feb
33.7
22.1
39
27/2/1943
2
1/2/1929
Mar
39.1
27.2
47
28/3/1949
5
2/3/1898
Apr
43.5
33.2
48
26/4/1986
12
3/4/1903
May
46.1
37.4
49
25/5/1932
17
2/5/1916
Jun
45.0
35.6
50
9/6/1941
20
26/6/1902
Jul
41.5
32.1
46
23/7/1951
21.4
26/7/1989
Aug
40.5
31.7
44
20/8/1958
22
2/8/1884
Sep
40.8
33.2
45
22/9/1974
18
29/9/1923
Oct
41.0
32.6
45
11/1/1941
11
31/10/1949
Nov
37.0
26.6
41
4/11/1977
6
29/11/1938
Dec
31.4
21.0
35
11/12/1963
3
23/12/1945
Annual
39.1
29.4
50
9/6/1941
-1
31/1/1929
*
Value
Date
Lowest Recorded*
Value
Date
Highest and lowest recorded temperatures are based on data collected at the Hyderabad station
since it was established in 1877
Source: Pakistan Meteorological Department
Winter (December to early March): The winters have mild weather with
minimum temperatures ranging between 11 to 19 ºC with January being the
coldest month. Winter is mostly dry with accumulative rainfall of about 10 mm
similarly relative humidity is around 50%. The Wind direction is mostly towards
North in entire winter with an average speed of 1.4 meters per second (m/s) and
shift to south west direction in the month of March and remains there for the rest
of the year.
Summer (April to June): The summers are hot with average temperature
reaching 35 ºC with June being the hottest month where temperate may cross
40 ºC. Summer is also dry with rainfall of less than 14 mm in the month of June
relative humidity ranges between 50% in April to 64% in June. The wind
direction is towards southwest with average wind speed of 3 m/s.
Monsoon (July to August): Monsoon is the characteristic feature of the
subcontinent with hot average temperature reaching 36 ºC and heavy rainfall.
From the historic climatic data (1961-1990) almost 65% of the rainfall occurs in
this season with slightly higher rainfall in august than July. The relative humidity
reaches monthly average of more than 65%. The wind direction is still towards
south west with average wind speed of 3.6 m/sec.
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Post-Monsoon summer (September to November): In Post Monsoon
temperatures starts dropping and reaches 24 ºC by November, although in
month of September the recorded rainfall is of 16 mm but rest of season is
mostly dry with humidity of around 50%. Wind direction is towards southwest
which changes its course towards north in the end of season.
Table 5-2: Rainfall in the Study Area
Month
Mean
Monthly
(mm)
Wettest Month*
Value (mm)
Year
Mean Number of
Rainy Days
Jan
1.2
49.0
1888
0.2
Feb
3.9
55.1
1906
0.4
Mar
5.1
92.2
1911
0.4
Apr
5.8
46.7
1963
0.3
May
3.5
56.4
1889
0.3
Jun
13.9
149.8
1964
0.6
Jul
56.7
401.6
1908
0.6
Aug
60.8
276.6
1944
2.4
Sep
21.4
286.0
1962
0.9
Oct
1.5
26.2
1956
0.1
Nov
2.1
48.3
1890
0.1
Dec
2.0
28.8
1979
0.2
177.7
546.7
1913
8.5
Annual
*
**
Based on data collected at the Hyderabad station since it was established in 1877
‘Rainy day’ is defined as a day on which at least 0.1 mm of rain is recorded
Source: Pakistan Meteorological Department
Table 5-3: Mean Wind in the Study Area
Month
Wind Speed (m/s)
Wind Direction
Jan
1.2
N
Feb
1.3
N
Mar
1.3
SW
Apr
2.2
SW
May
3.5
SW
Jun
3.9
SW
Jul
3.7
SW
Aug
3.6
SW
Sep
2.8
SW
Oct
1.4
SW
Nov
1.3
N
Dec
1.2
N
Year
2.3
SW
* Based on data collected at the Hyderabad station between 1975 and 1979
Source: Pakistan Meteorological Department
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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5.2.5
Water Resources
310. Major water bodies in the Study Area include the Indus River, Kalri Baghar canal
and the under construction RBOD. Groundwater is not major source of drinking water in
the Study Area due to high amount of salinity in the groundwater. The water resources
are briefly described below.
Surface Water
311. The Indus River flows at a distance of about 3.7 km to the east of the plant site
(Figure 5–3). The river has an average width of about 500 m during normal flow which
increases to several kilometers during high floods. The width of the river at Kotri
Barrage is one kilometer. Kotri Barrage, built in 1955, is used to divert water to irrigation
canals and to provide protection against flood. The barrage has 44 bays and has the
maximum design capacity to discharge 24,777 cumec (cubic meters per second). The
average annual flow of Indus River at Kotri barrage is 1,787 cumec. The 18-year
monthly averaged flow data for the Indus River recorded from 1986-87 season to 200304 season at Kotri barrage is presented in Table 5-4. Average monthly flow is highest in
August when it exceeds 7,500 cumecs. In December, the leanest month, the average
flow is 213 cumecs. The Irrigation Department that manages the canal system allows
the existing power plant to abstract 1.3 cumec of water from the Indus River. Four
canals originate from Kotri Barrage, Kalri Baghar Canal on the right bank and Akram
Wah, Phuleli Canal, and Pinyari Canal on the Left Bank. Of these, Kalri Baghar Canal
partly falls in the Study Area. It has a designed flow of 255 cumecs and had an average
flow of 87 cumecs between 1986-87 season and 2003-04 seasons.
312. Part of the under-construction RBOD is also located in the Study Area. The
channel is designed to carry saline water from water logged farmlands on the right back
of Indus River to the sea. The channel is partly excavated and various excavated
sections are not connected. Rainwater and seeped water from surrounding land has
accumulated in the excavated channels.
Groundwater
313. There are no significant groundwater resources in the Study Area. No village in
the Study Area reported having functional groundwater wells. The presence of rocky
outcrop and shallow alluvium soil in the western part of the river rules out the possibility
of any groundwater aquifer.
Water Quality
314. Groundwater sampling was conducted in the Study Area to assess groundwater
quality and possible contamination from the power plant. Effluent water streams and the
quantities of effluents released form the plant are detailed in Chapter 6. Effluent from
plant is released outside the boundary at several locations which has affected areas
outside the plant. The main reason of open drainage of plant effluents outside the plant
boundary is the overflow from the unlined evaporation ponds which are apparently not in
use at present, and the blockage of the effluent drainage pipeline originally installed to
drain the plant effluents into Indus River.
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Figure 5–3: Surface Water Resources in the Study Area
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Table 5-4: Indus River Monthly Flow at Kotri Barrage
Month
Flow (cumec)*
Upstream
Jan
369
161
Feb
305
91
Mar
465
105
Apr
648
427
May
1,005
565
Jun
1,535
741
Jul
4,056
3,227
Aug
7,517
6,826
Sep
3,905
3,276
Oct
1,035
586
Nov
387
110
Dec
213
68
1,787
1,349
Annual
*
Downstream
The difference in upstream and downstream flow is the volume diverted to canals
Source: Sindh Irrigation and Drainage Authority
315. One drinking water sample was collected from JTPS housing colony;
groundwater sampling was conducted in the possible groundwater flow direction.
316. The drinking water and groundwater samples analysis results are provided in
Table 5–5. Analysis of pesticides in drinking water is presented in Table 5–6.
317.
Following are key observations from the analysis of the samples:
The pH is within limits of the National Standards for Drinking Water (NSDW) for
all the samples.
All the parameters in the drinking water conform to the NDWS and WHO
standards for drinking water quality. Both the Surface Water Samples JSW2
(Kalri Baghar Canal) and JSW1 (River Indus) also conform to the NDWS and
WHO standards for metals5. The difference in concentrations of metals in the
two samples is below the LOR. Pesticides were not detected in the Drinking
Water Sample JDW1 drawn from the plant housing colony water supply.
5
The river and canal water will not meet the NDWS overall due to presence of fecal coliform in the water.
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Table 5–5: Drinking Water, Groundwater and Surface Water Quality Results
LOR
NSDW6
Parameters
Unit
WHO
Water
Storage
Tank
Kalri Baghar
Canal
Indus River
Upstream of
Plant Intake
Ag
µg/l
1
–
–
<1
Al
µg/l
1
<200
200
148
91
7
As
µg/l
1
≤ 50
10
<1
3
3
B
µg/l
10
300
300
146
150
97
Ba
µg/l
1
700
700
64
100
60
Cd
µg/l
1
10
3
<1
<1
<1
Cl
mg/l
<250
250
277
–
–
Cr
µg/l
1
≤ 50
50
<1
<1
<1
Cu
µg/l
1
2,000
2,000
<1
1
2
F
mg/l
0.1
≤ 1.5
1.5
0.5
–
–
Hg
µg/l
0.5
≤ 1
1
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
Mn
µg/l
1
≤ 500
500
10
1
17
Ni
µg/l
1
≤ 20
20
<0.1
<1
<1
Pb
µg/l
1
≤ 50
1
<0.1
<1
<1
Sb
µg/l
1
<20
20
<1
<1
<1
Se
µg/l
1
≤ 10
10
<10
<10
<10
<5
15
<4
<4.0
–
Zn
µg/l
5
5,000
3,000
<5
CN
mg/l
0.05
≤ .05
0.07
<0.05
BOD
mg/l
4
–
–
COD
mg/l
5
–
–
–
<5
<5.0
NH3
mg/l
0.5
–
407
–
<0.5
<0.5
Nitrate
mg/l
0.1
–
–
–
CaCo3
mg/l
1
<500
–
<1
SO4
mg/l
1
–
–
0.5
TDS
mg/l
1
<1,000
<1,000
418
444
462.0
TSS
mg/l
4
–
1508
–
17
12.5
Phosphates
mg/l
0.1
Odor
Acceptable
pH
0.1
Residual
chlorine
mg/l
0.1
Taste
CU
Temp.
o
Turbidity
7
8
6.5–8.5
–
–
<0.1
<0.1
7.2
7.3
Acceptable Acceptable
6.5–8.5
5–1.5 at
source
Acceptable
Color
6
–
0.22
7.2
<0.1
Acceptable Acceptable
1
6
C
NTU
0.0
< 5 NTU
< 5 NTU
4
S,R.O. 1062 (I)/2010, National Environmental Quality Standards for drinking water
S,R.O. 549 (I)/2000, National Environmental Quality Standards for Municipal and Liquid Industrial
effluents
Ibid
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Table 5–6: Analysis of pesticides in drinking water
Analysis Description
Units
Lab I.D
231983
Sample I.D
JDW 1
LOR
Date of Extraction
7/7/12
Date of Analysis
11/7/12
Organochlorine Pesticides
Alpha–BHC
ug/l
5
<5
Beta & gamma–BHC
ug/l
10
<10
Delta–BHC
ug/l
5
<5
Heptachlor
ug/l
5
<5
Aldrin
ug/l
5
<5
Heptachlor epoxide
ug/l
5
<5
Endosulfan 1
ug/l
5
<5
4,4-DDE
ug/l
5
<5
Dieldrin
ug/l
5
<5
Endrin
ug/l
5
<5
Endosulfan 2
ug/l
5
<5
4,4’-DDD
ug/l
5
<5
Endosulfan Sulfate
ug/l
5
<5
4,4’-DDT
ug/l
5
<5
Endrin Ketone
ug/l
5
<5
Methoxychlor
ug/l
5
<5
Dichlorvos
ug/l
5
<5
Dimethoate
ug/l
5
<5
Diazinon
ug/l
5
<5
Chlorpyrifos methyl
ug/l
5
<5
Malathion
ug/l
5
<5
Fenthion
ug/l
5
<5
Chloropyrifos
ug/l
5
<5
Pirimiphos ethyl
ug/l
5
<5
Chlorfenvinphos–E
ug/l
5
<5
Chlorfenvinphos–Z
ug/l
5
<5
Prothiofos
ug/l
5
<5
Ethion
ug/l
5
<5
Parathion
ug/l
5
<5
Parathion methyl
ug/l
5
<5
Organophosphorus Pesticides
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5.2.6
Air Quality
318. Other than the JTPS, there are no major stationary sources of gaseous emission
in the Study Area. The Jamshoro urban area to the south of JTPS is the only other
significant source of emission. The main non-stationary source is the N-55 (Indus
Highway) that passes close to the Plant. Beyond the Study Area, the main sources of
emission are:
Kotri Industrial Area, with about 400 small to medium size industrial units, is
about 12 km south of JTPS
Lakhra Coal Power Plant is 25 km north of JTPS
Urban areas of Hyderabad and Kotri to the south and southeast of the plant site
at a distance of 10 to 15 km
The highway network (M-9, N-5, and N-55) is the major non-stationary source of
emission.
319. Emissions from these sources consist of oxides of nitrogen (NOx), sulfur dioxide
(SO2), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matters.
Measurement of Pollutants in Ambient Air
320. To assess the ambient air quality for the Study Area, measurements were
undertaken at three locations around the plant site from June 26 to June 28, 2012
(Figure 5–4.). These locations were selected on their proximity to the plant site, wind
direction of the plume as well as the location of sensitive receptors nearby, such as
human settlements (power house and NTDC colony).
321. The wind direction was variable but mostly towards the east during the
measurement. 24-hour concentrations of SO2, NOx, CO, Ozone (O3), particulate matter
of less than ten microns (PM10), particulate matter of less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) and
SPM were monitored in the Study Area. The results are shown in Table 5-7. With a
variable wind direction in the pre-monsoon season (average wind direction is indicated in
Figure 5-4), it is difficult to establish the relationship of the measured pollutant levels
with the emission from the plant. However, the concentrations at Sampling Point JAQ2
are likely to show higher impact of emission from road traffic (primarily NOx, SO2, and
CO) on highway N-55 downwind of the highway as compared to JAQ3 which was
upwind of the highway. Given the observed wind direction and the location of the
Sampling Points, the measured concentrations of pollutants are in all likelihood
indicative of the background pollution levels and would have limited impact from the
plant.
322. The applicable national environmental quality standards (NEQS) for ambient air
quality are discussed in Section 3-10. In addition to these, ADB’s SPS 2009 requires
compliance of ADB funded projects with the World Bank Group’s Environment, Health
and Safety Guidelines (the IFC Guidelines discussed in Section 3.7.2). Accordingly, the
ambient air quality observed data is compared with NEQS as well as the IFC Guidelines.
323. Comparison of the observed measurements with the 24-hour limits of the NEQS
(second column in Table 5-7) and the IFC guidelines (third column in Table 5-7) indicate
that all parameters were within the 24-hour limits of the ambient air quality except PM2.5
which exceeds the NEQS limit at Goth Chakar Khan Rajar and Khosa Goth.
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Figure 5–4: Air Quality Measurement Location and Conditions
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Table 5-7: Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Results – 24 Hours June 2012
Pollutant
NEQS
IFC
Guidelines
JAQ1
JAQ2
JAQ3
Staff Colony
Goth Chakar
Rajar Khan
Khosa Goth
3
Annual 80
24-hr 120
24-hr 125
26.9
42.5
32.8
3
Annual 40
24-hr 40
Annual 40
1-hr 200
8.8
35.3
33.1
SO2 (µg/m )
NO2 (µg/m )
3
NO (µg/m )
CO (mg/m
9
3)
3
Ozone (µg/m )
Annual 40
24-hr 80
–
20.1
27.0
10.7
8-hr 5
1-hr 10
–
3.6
4.9
2.3
8-hr 160
16.3
16.8
15.3
1-hr 130
3
Annual 120
24-hr 150
Annual 70
24-hr 150
84
114
114
3
Annual 15
24-hr 35
1-hr 15
Annual 35
24-hr 75
35
47
60
PM10 (µg/m )
PM2.5 (µg/m )
3
TSP (µg/m )
3
Lead (µg/m )
Annual 360
24-hr 500
–
207.8
138.5
277.0
Annual 1
24-hr 1.5
–
0.0374
0.0361
0.0345
Note: A “–“ in the third column indicates that IFC has not provided any guidelines for the parameter.
324. The concentrations of pollutant in ambient air are dependent on season. For
example, ADB (2006)10 has shown that the pollutant levels (SO2, NOx, PM10, and ozone)
in six cities of Pakistan is generally highest during summer and lowest in monsoon.
Similar pattern is expected in Jamshoro Area also. The measured pollutant levels in
Jamshoro, given in Table 5–7, were recorded in June 2012 just before onset of
monsoon season. The measured levels are likely to be on the higher side compared to
the annual average for the same location. With this assumption, it is deduced that the
measured pollutant levels of all parameters (shown in Table 5-7) are within the annual
limits with two exceptions. PM2.5 exceeds the annual limit for both NEQS and IFC
Guidelines and PM10 exceeds the IFC Guidelines.
325. Pollution related to NOx, SO2, and CO is mainly associated with anthropogenic
activities such as industry and transport. Background concentrations of these pollutants
can therefore be estimated through air quality modeling taking the emission from known
sources into account. Results of this modeling exercise are reported in Section 9.3.
The measured levels of PM10 and PM2.5 in the background were close or above the
applicable air quality standards and guidelines. These pollutants in a desert and windy
9
10
S,R.O. 1062 (I)/2010, National Environmental Quality Standards for Ambient Air
Asian Development Bank. 2006. Country Synthesis Report on Urban Air Quality Management:
Pakistan. http://cleanairinitiative.org/portal/sites/default/files/documents/pakistan_0.pdf (Date Accessed:
August 20, 2013).
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environment are more likely to be of natural origin, and therefore it is not possible to
develop estimates for background concentrations through modeling. A literature search
was therefore carried out to establish the background concentration of these pollutants.
Background Levels of PM10 and PM2.5 in Pakistan
326. To investigate the seasonal variation of the PM10 and PM2.5, data on total
suspended particulate matter (SPM), PM10 and PM2.5 from all available sources have
been collated (Appendix 3). Thirty different reports were used to develop this database
of 219 data points covering both rural and urban areas in about 25 districts of the
country. In all, more than 5,000 days of data collection is reported. Unfortunately, more
than 97% of the data is from urban areas or collected near highways. Although, the data
can be used to infer the variations but is not sufficient to give the background PM10
levels in rural areas to high degree of accuracy. The summary of the data is shown in
Table 5-8.
Table 5-8: Summary of PM data monitored in Pakistan
3
Number of Data Days
PM2.5
PM10
Weighted Average (µg/m )
TSP
PM2.5
PM10
TSP
Annual
Urban
4774
126
56
89.5
295.3
1855.1
30
62
20
38.8
156.6
200.0
Spring
19
43
4
136.0
305.0
885.3
Summer
24
14
5
93.0
215.9
717.2
Monsoon
28
12
0
37.1
168.4
Post-Monsoon
22
11
0
48.0
212.4
177
17
1
182.2
166.1
0
4
0
Summer
22
23
5
40.2
203.9
172.3
Monsoon
2
16
2
41.6
147.7
52.0
Post-Monsoon
0
0
0
Winter
2
3
0
31.9
67.5
Rural
Seasonal
Urban
Winter
514.0
Rural
Spring
88.2
Notes: Some of the data sets included in annual data is excluded from seasonal data because season or
date for data collection was not reported in sources.
327. It has been argued that dust levels in Pakistan are naturally high due to dry
conditions.11 A source apportionment study carried out in Lahore12 indicated that 6811
12
See for example, JICA Report. http://www.environment.gov.pk/pub-pdf/3city-inv.pdf (Date Accessed:
August 20, 2013)
Zhang. Y., et al. 2008. Daily Variations in Sources of Carbonaceous Aerosol in Lahore, Pakistan during
a High Pollution Spring Episode.. Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 130-146.
http://www.aaqr.org/VOL8_No2_June2008/2_AAQR-07-09-OA-0042_130-146.pdf (Date Accessed:
August 20, 2013)
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89% of PM10 in ambient air is from re-suspended soil and dust. The re-suspended solid
includes natural dust and dust from traffic movement. Similar results have been
reported from neighboring India where environmental conditions are similar.13 In the
Jamshoro area both these sources are likely to contribute. However, contribution from
the natural sources is likely to be more significant as the observation points were either
upwind or not close to the highway.
328. The calculation for the expected annual background PM10 and PM2.5 levels in
Jamshoro area is shown in Table 5-9. The calculation was based on data for rural
areas, which would be somewhat conservative in view of the peri-urban nature of the
setting. These estimates for background concentration of PM10 and PM2.5 were used for
modeling and prediction of air quality discussed in Section 9.4.
Estimate for Background PM10 and Comparison with Standards and Guidelines
329. The estimated annual background level of 69 µg/m3 for PM10 is below the NEQS
limit of 120 µg/m3, and closer to the IFC Guideline of 70 µg/m3. It can therefore be
concluded that the Project cannot realistically meet the PM10 limit for IFC.
Estimate for Background PM2.5 and Comparison with Standards and Guidelines
330. The estimated annual background level of 43 µg/m3 for PM2.5 is considerably
above the NEQS limit of 15 µg/m3, and above that of the IFC Guideline of 35 µg/m3. It is
therefore concluded that the Project cannot realistically meet the PM2.5 limit prescribed
by both NEQS and IFC Guidelines.
331.
A review of the NEQS for PM2.5 and the regional practice indicates that:
The NEQS 1-hr limit for PM2.5 is inconsistent with the annual limit. As shown in
Table 5-7, the limit for 1-hr (15 µg/m3) is the same as the annual limit. This is
contrary to the practice world-wide where the limits for longer time frame are
always lower than that of a shorter time frame to allow for variations over time.14
Similarly, the NEQS 1-hr limit of 15 µg/m3 for PM2.5 is inconsistent with the 24
hour limit of 35 µg/m3.
The ambient air quality standards of other countries in the region are reflective
of the high PM2.5 levels in the ambient air. The annual limits for PM2.5 in India
and Sri Lanka are 40 µg/m3 and 25 µg/m3 respectively. Similarly, the 24-hr
limits for PM2.5 in these countries are 60 and 50 µg/m3 respectively. Given the
high natural background particulate levels in Pakistan where environmental
conditions are somewhat similar to those in India and the current level of
controls on industrial and vehicular emissions, it is unlikely that compliance with
the NEQS annual limit of 15 µg/m3 for the PM2.5 can be achieved in any part of
Sindh in the near future.
13
14
T. Pachauri, et al. in Aerosol and Air Quality Research, 13: 977–991, 2013 have reported that PM2.5
3
levels in Agra is 308 and 91 µg/m for traffic and rural sampling sites respectively. After subtracting the
organic and elemental carbon (contributed by biomass burning and vehicular emission), the background
3
level in rural area is still 38 µg/m .
Higher pollutant concentrations are permitted for shorter intervals only and prolonged stress to
receptors over a longer period of time is avoided by prescribing a lower limit for an extended period of
time. The average for a longer period cannot also mathematically be higher than the maximum figures
for the shorter intervals.
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332. The project proponent has, therefore, formally approached the Environmental
Protection Agency of the Government of Sindh to review the PM2.5 limits in the NEQS
and to rationalize them, and the subject is presently under discussion. The Environment
Department has indicated willingness to undertake a review of the PM2.5 limits in view of
the evidence and discussion presented in this EIA. It may be noted that following the
18th Amendment in the constitution of the country, environment is a provincial subject
and setting of the environmental standards falls in the jurisdiction of the provincial
government. The Government of Sindh is therefore now empowered to review the
environmental standards set previously at the national level in view of the environmental
conditions, policies, and priorities in the province.
Table 5-9: Estimation of Background PM10 and PM2.5 Levels
in Vicinity of JTPS, µg/m3
Reported Levels
in Rural Areas
(See Table 5-8)
Estimated
Values for
Jamshoro Area
Explanation for
Estimated Values
for Jamshoro Area
Duration of
Season
(months)
37.6
Note 1
2
PM2.5
Spring
Summer
40.2
47.3
Note 2
3.5
Monsoon
41.6
49.0
Note 3
2
47.3
Note 4
1
37.6
Note 3
3.5
Post-Monsoon
Winter
31.9
Weighted Average
43.1
12
PM10
Spring
88.2
45.0
Note 3
2
Summer
203.9
104.0
Note 2
3.5
Monsoon
147.7
75.3
Note 3
2
104.0
Note 4
1
34.4
Note 3
3.5
Post-Monsoon
Winter
67.5
Weighted Average
69.1
12
Explanations Notes:
1. Assumed to be the same as Winter estimated value
2. As the measurements were done in summer (Table 5-7), this value is assumed to be equal to the
average of the measured value at three locations
3. Calculated on the assumption that the ratio of Summer Value and Monsoon Value in Jamshoro is
the same as in the reported values. It is thus calculated as follows: Monsoon Value = Measured
Summer Value (47.3) / Reported Summer Rural Value (40.2) X Reported Monsoon Value (41.6).
from reported levels by multiplying it by the same ratio of observed and reported levels in summer
4. Assumed to be the same as Summer measured value
5.2.7
Noise
333. Noise data were collected from the nearest receptor, the housing colony of JTPS.
The results are shown in Figure 5-5. The data was collected in low wind conditions to
ensure representative values. All values are within the NEQS daytime value of
55 dB(A).
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Figure 5-5: Ambient Noise levels
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5.3
Ecology
334. The Study Area for the ecological study consists of the Thermal Power Station
Jamshoro and a 5 km buffer zone around it (Figure 5-6) to account for an area in which
the ecological resources may be impacted by the project related activities including
sound, vibrations, air quality, and water quality.
335.
The specific tasks covered under this ecological baseline study include:
Review and compilation of issues relating to biodiversity and ecology raised by
stakeholders during the consultation process (see Section 1.4).
A review of the available literature on the biodiversity of the Study Area.
Field surveys including:
o
Qualitative and quantitative assessment of flora, mammals, reptiles and
birds
o
Identification of key species, their population and their conservation status in
the area.
o
Reports of wildlife sightings and fish captured in the Study Area by the
resident communities.
Data analysis to determine baseline biodiversity and to evaluate whether any
potential critical habitat and ecosystem services were present in the Study Area.
336. A field survey was conducted from June 21, 2012 to June 23, 2012. The
sampling locations for vegetation, mammals, reptiles and birds are shown in Figure 5-6.
5.3.1
Methodology
337. The survey was carried out in June to coincide with the summer season when
the vegetation has sprouted fully, and the flowering and fruiting conditions of the flora
can be observed. In addition, maximum activity of the herpeto-fauna and mammals as
well as summer migratory birds can be observed during the summer months. Even
though the survey could not observe the winter migratory birds, there is sufficient
secondary information available in literature regarding the migratory bird species that
visit the Study Area and its vicinity15. Secondary information was used in compilation of
this report.
338. The Study Area map was marked with a grid of 4 x 4 km and sampling points
were marked in the center of each grid square. These sampling points were then
adjusted to ensure that all habitats were adequately represented. These points were
sampled for ecological resources: vegetation, mammals, reptiles and birds. In the field,
some additional sampling points were identified and sampled in micro-habitats such as
wetlands and vegetation clusters. These include Sampling Points 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14
(Figure 5-6).
15
Pakistan Wetlands Migratory Birds Census Report, 2012.
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Figure 5-6: Sampling Locations for Surveys for Ecological Surveys
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339. The sampling methods used for the field surveys along with the literature
references used, are described in detail in Appendix 4. The following sampling
activities for vegetation, mammals, reptiles, birds and fish, were carried out.
Vegetation was sampled via a rapid assessment stratified approach, using three
quadrats at each sampling site of 10 × 10 m to measure presence, cover and
abundance.
Mammals were sampled using diurnal 300 × 20 m sign survey plots recording
footprints, dropping, burrows and dens. The presence and relative abundance
of rodents was confirmed by live trapping.
Reptiles were sampled by active searching and visual encounter surveys within
300 x 20 m search plots. Reptile survey data was analyzed for species diversity
and abundance.
Birds were sampled from 300 × 50 m plots using binoculars.
A literature review was conducted for the fish fauna found in the, channels,
canals and river located in the vicinity of the power plant. Secondary sources
including previous EIAs reports were also consulted for this purpose. In
addition, anecdotal information regarding the fish species found in the river was
collected by a fish expert from fishermen and locals
340. Google EarthTM images were used to initially delineate spatial distribution of
habitat types within the Study Area. Habitats were classified by geo-morphological and
other abiotic characteristics with consideration for variations within habitat types.
Geomorphology is an acceptable habitat classification approach in arid landscapes
(Swanson et al., 1988)16 (McAuliffe, 1994)17. Observational survey data was also
supplemented with interviews of local people and available literature reviews. The
results from this data analysis are summarized below.
341. The conservation status of the species identified were determined using criteria
set by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (IUCN Red List, 2012)18 and the
Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) appendices19. The
status of mammals in the Pakistan’s Mammals National Red List 200620 was also noted.
342. The presence of critical habitat was determined in accordance with IFC
Performance Standards definitions21.
16
17
18
19
20
21
Swanson, F.J., Kratz, T.K., Caine, N., Woodmansee, R.G. (1988) Landform effects on ecosystem
patterns and processes: geomorphic features of the earth’s surface regulate the distribution of
organisms and processes. Bioscience, Vol. 38, No 2 pp 92-98
McAuliffe, J.R. (1994) Landscape evolution, soil formation, and ecological patterns and processes in
Sonoran Desert bajadas. Ecological Monographs 64, pp 111–148.
IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.1. ‘www.iucnredlist.org’. Downloaded
on 26 June 2012.
UNEP-WCMC. 26 June 2012. UNEP-WCMC Species Database: CITES-Listed Species.
Status and Red List of Pakistan Mammals. 2006. Biodiversity Programme IUCN Pakistan. This list is
not officially recognized by the Government of Pakistan and is referenced in this report to provide an
indication of species that may be assigned a conservation status subject to further research, and
evaluation by the Government of Pakistan.
Policy on Social and Environmental Sustainability, January 2012. Performance Standard 6: Biodiversity
Conservation and Sustainable Management of Living Natural Resources, International Finance
Corporation. The World Bank Group.
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5.3.2
Vegetation
343. There are four phytogeographical regions in Pakistan. The Study Area falls into
the Saharo-Sindian region. This region is considered poor in vegetative diversity;
despite its large size, only 9.1% of the known 5,738 floral species of Pakistan are found
in this region (Rafiq and Nasir 1995)22. The vegetation of this region is typical of arid
regions and consists of xerophytic species that are adapted to extreme seasonal
temperatures, moisture fluctuation, and a wide variety of soil conditions.
344. The Study Area is flat land with the average altitude ranging between 20 to 45 m
above mean sea level. Elevation of the Indus River is 15 m on the banks with agricultural
fields located mainly in the flood plain. The river is located approximately 3.7 km east of
the Thermal Power Station. Smaller sedimentary hills are located in the west and southwest. These hills reach a maximum altitude of around 100 meters. Small wetlands,
some caused by the waste water from the Project, can be observed on the eastern side
of the Project. A small vegetation cluster is located approximately 1 km south of the
Project. The western side of the Study Area is dominated by gravel plains. Drainage
channels cut through the gravel plains to drain the rain water. (Figure 5–3).
345. During the June 2012 survey, sampling was conducted at 14 points, of which four
(4) were in agricultural fields, five (5) in gravel plains, three (3) in wetland, one (1) in
vegetation cluster and one (1) in hills. A total of 25 plant species were observed in the
Study Area. During the field survey, most of the observed plant species were common
and found in more than one habitat. These include Acacia senegal, Prosopis cineraria,
Aerva javanica, Leptadenia pyrotechnica, Salvadora oleoides, Ziziphus nummularia and
Calotropis procera. The vegetation of the Indus River bank mostly composed of prenial
sherbs of Tamarix dioica and Alhagi camelorum. Other vegetation species observed in
the Study Area include Seddera latifolia, Ziziphus nummularia, Commiphora wightii, and
Fagonia indica. Blepharis scindicus Periploca aphylla, Ziziphus nummullaria.
346. Based on the geomorphology, soil characteristic and vegetation communities
observed, the Study Area can be classified into four main habitats, gravel plains, hills,
agricultural fields and wetlands. Photographs of different habitats in the Study Area are
provided in Figure 5-7.
Gravel Plains
347. Gravel plains constitute 53% (including 4% of the settlements area) of the total
habitat of the Study Area (Figure 5-8). This habitat is characterized by low-lying
undulating plains. The vegetation in this habitat is relatively sparse. The vegetation
degradation in this habitat was observed due to grazing and browsing by domestic
livestock, and also due multiple access track made by local vehicles for borrowing
purposes. The dominant plant species of this habitat include Prosopis juliflora,
Zygophylum sp., Capparis decidua, Salvadora oleoides and Fagonia indica.
348. Few vegetation clusters in some local depressions were also observed in this
habitat and were labeled as a micro-habitat. In this micro-habitat, the vegetation cover
was higher than in other areas of gravel plains. The dominant species in this include
Tamarix dioica, Ziziphus nummularia, Acacia nilotica and Prosopis juliflora.
22
Rafiq, Rubina A., and Nasir, Yasin J. 1995. Wild Flowers of Pakistan, Oxford University Press.
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Figure 5-7: Photographs of Habitats in the Study Area
A
C
E
G
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B
D
F
A.
Agricultural Fields along the River Bank
B.
Gravel Plains West of Power Plant
C.
Hills North of Power Plant
D.
Wetland Fed by Waste Water from the Plant
E.
Wetland at Indus River
F.
Wetland Created by Under Construction
RBOD
G. Vegetation Cluster in Gravel Plains
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Figure 5-8: Habitats Distribution in the Study Area
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Agricultural Fields
349. Agricultural fields constitute 31% of habitats of the Study Area (Figure 5-8) and
mostly lie in the flood plains along the Indus River. The natural vegetation of this habitat
is mostly replaced by cultivated varieties of crops. However, some natural vegetation in
the form of hedges and bushes is present along the edges of the fields. The dominant
plant species observed in this habitat are Alhagi camelorum, Tamarix dioica, Saccharum
sp., Sida fruticosa, Salvadora oleoides, and Zygophylum sp.
350. Flood plains constitute 2% of the total habitat of the Study Area (Figure 5-8) and
are present along the river at the edge of agricultural fields. Some of these areas are
brought in to cultivation during the low flood season while the others are not cultivated at
any time of the year. However, since they constitute only a small percentage of the
Study Area, they were labeled as a microhabitat and included in the Agricultural Fields
for purpose of this study. This habitat comes under water during high flood and the
vegetation in this habitat is relatively thick with thin floral diversity. The dominant
species in this include Tamarix dioica, Acacia nilotica and Prosopis juliflora. Local
people; use Acacia nilotica and Prosopis juliflora as fuel wood source in the project study
area. The browsing pressure by local domestic livestock was also visible in this habitat.
Hills
351. The hills cover less than 4% of the Study Area (Figure 5-8). Vegetation cover in
this habitat is thin and degraded due to over grazing/browsing and fuel wood extraction.
The common and dominant plant species in this habitat type are Acacia senegal, Rhazia
stricta, Seddera latifolia and Commiphora wightii.
Wetland
352. This habitat covers 6% (including Indus River) of the Study Area and is mostly
found within the agricultural fields and along the Indus River. Some wetlands were
observed near the evaporation pond formed by the disposal of waste water from the
plant and seasonal flood. The vegetation in this wetland is very thick and mostly
composed of Typha sp.and Phragmites sp. The vegetation on the Right Bank Outfall
Drain (RBOD) of these habitats is degraded due to over browsing by domestic livestock.
Some part of RBOD is without any type of vegetation. The vegetation of wetlands that
occur near or along the Indus River are relatively thin in floral diversity and vegetation
cover as compared to the wetlands fed by waste water from the plant. The main reason
of this may cause due to fisher men that using bank vegetation as fuel wood and in
some cases for commercial purpose too. The grazing pressure in over this entire habitat
was prominent. The overall vegetation cover in this habitat is high as compared to other
habitats in the Study Area The dominant plant species of this habitat include Typha sp.,
Phragmites sp., Prosopis juliflora , Tamarix dioica and Alhagi camelorum.
353. Appendix 4 (Table 4-1) provides a list of plant species observed in the Study
Area during the June 2012 survey.
354. Appendix 4 (Table 4-2) provides a summary of sampling points by habitat type.
It presents the vegetation cover, relative cover, frequency, relative frequency, density
and relative density and importance value Index (IVI) of plant species.
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Conservation and Protection Status
355. No threatened or endemic plant species were observed in the Study Area during
the survey nor reported from the literature survey.
356. Determination: No threatened or endemic plant species are present in the
Study Area. None of the plant species observed were endemic, their distribution is not
limited to any specific site or habitat type, and their distribution is widespread.
5.3.3
Mammals
357. A total of 21 mammal species have been reported from the Study Area and its
vicinity23. These include members from Family Canidae, Ericinaceidae, Felidae,
Herpestidae, Hystricidae, Leporidae. Among the river mammals, a dolphin species from
Family Platanistidae24 and an otter from Family Mustellidae25 have been reported from
the Indus River mostly upstream of Kotri barrage. Small mammals reported from the
Study Area include species from Family Muridae, Sciuridae, Soricidae26. A complete list
of the mammals and small mammals reported from the Study Area is provided in
Appendix 4 (Table 4-3).
Overview of Abundance and Diversity
358. During the June 2012 survey, sampling was conducted at 14 points, of which four
(4) were in agricultural fields, five (5) in gravel plains, three (3) in wetland, one (1) in
vegetation cluster and one (1) in hills.
359. A total of 25 signs belonging to four (4) species were seen in the Study Area.
These included signs of the Asiatic Jackal Canis aureus, Indian Crested Porcupine
Hystrix indica, Desert Hare or Indian Hare Lepus nigricollis and signs of a fox species
Vulpes sp. that could not be identified on the basis of signs alone. The maximum
number of mammal signs were seen in the agricultural fields followed by wetlands. The
maximum number of signs observed belonged to the Vulpes sp. No mammal signs were
observed in the vegetation clusters or hills. The maximum abundance was observed at
Sampling Point 4 while the maximum diversity was observed at Sampling Point 7. Both
these sampling points were located in agricultural fields. No large mammals were
sighted in the Study Area.
360. A total of 4 (four) small mammals were trapped in the Study Area. These include
Balochistan Gerbil Gerbillus nanus, House Rat Rattus rattus, Indian Gerbil Tatera indica
and Soft-furred Metad Millardia meltada.
361. Appendix 4 (Table 4-4) provides a summary of Sampling Points by habitat type.
It presents the sign data for mammals (excluding rodents), abundance and diversity by
habitat type for the June 2012 survey. Appendix 4 (Table 4-5) shows the abundance of
mammal signs observed in the different habitats of the Study Area.
23
24
25
26
Ghalib, SA.,Hasnain, SA. and Khan, AR. 2004. Current status of the mammals of Sindh.J.nat.hist.Wildl.
3(1):16.
Gachal, G. S. and Slater, F. M. 2004.Barrages, Biodiversity and the Indus River Dolphin.Pakistan J.Biol.
Sci., 7(5):797-801.
Khan, W. A., Akhtar, M., Ahmad, M. S., Abid M., Ali H. and Yaqub A. Historical and Current Distribution
of Smooth-coated otter(Lutrogaleperspicillatasindica) in Sindh, Pakistan. Pakistan J. Wildl., vol. 1(1): 515, 2010
Roberts, T. J. 1997. The Mammals of Pakistan.Revised Edition, Oxford University Press, 5-Bangalore
Town, Sharae Faisal, Karachi.525 pp.
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Conservation and Protection Status
362. Signs of the Asiatic Jackal Canis aureus and a fox Vulpes sp. were observed in
the Study Area. Even though it is not possible to identify the fox species from the signs
alone, keeping in view the geographical location, it is most likely to be the Bengal Fox
Vulpes bengalensis. Signs of the Indian Crested Porcupine Hystrix indica were also
observed in the Study Area. Among the river mammals, the mammals of conservation
importance reported from the Study Area include the Smooth Coated Otter Lutrogale
perspicillata and the Indus Blind Dolphin Platanista minor.
363. The Asiatic Jackal Canis aureus is included in Appendix III of the CITES Species
List27 and listed as Near Threatened in Pakistan’s Mammals National Red List 200628.
The signs of this species were observed at Sampling Points 1, 4, 8, 9 and 13 in the
Study Area.
364. The Bengal Fox Vulpes bengalensis is placed in Appendix III of the CITES list
and listed as Near Threatened in the Pakistan’s Mammals National Red List 2006.
Signs of a fox species were observed in the Study Area at Sampling Points 1, 4, 2, 3, 9
and 13 during the June 2012 survey.
365. The Indian Crested Porcupine Hystrix indica is listed as Near Threatened in
Pakistan’s Mammals National Red List 2006. Signs of this species were seen in the
Study Area at Sampling Points 5 and 7.
366. The Smooth-coated Otter Lutrogale perspicillata has been reported from the
vicinity of the Study Area29 but the population recorded is low in number.30 It was not
seen in the Study Area during the survey of June 2012. It is listed as Vulnerable in the
IUCN Red List 2012.
367. The Indus Blind Dolphin Platanista minor is listed as Endangered in both the
IUCN Red List 2012 as well as Pakistan’s Mammals National Red List 2006. A high
abundance of this river dolphin has been reported from the area between Guddu and
Sukkur Barrage31 (Figure 5-9). About 130 years ago, the Indus dolphin was found
throughout approximately 3,400 km of the Indus river and its tributaries from the estuary
to the base of the foothills of the mountains 32.
27
28
29
30
31
32
UNEP-WCMC. 26 June 2012. UNEP-WCMC Species Database: CITES-Listed Species
Status and Red List of Pakistan Mammals. 2006. Biodiversity Programme IUCN Pakistan
Gachal, G. S., Memon, Z., Qadir, A. H., Yusuf, S. M. and Siddiqui, M. 2007. Ecological Impact on the
status of Otter (Lutrogaleperspicillata). Sindh Univ. Res. J., 39(2): 19-26.
Rais, M., Khan, MZ.,Ghalib, SA., Abbas, D., Khan, WA., Islam, S. and Husnain, A. 2009. Recent
records of Smooth-coated (Lutrogaleperspicillata) Otter form Sindh, Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of
Zoology. 41(5):
413-414
Khan M. Z. 2006, Current status and biodiversity of Indus Dolphin reserve and Indus Delta wetlands
(ramsar sites). Proceedings 9th International River symposium, Brisbane, Australia, 2006, pp 1-17
Anderson, J. 1878, Anatomical and Zoological Researches: comprising an account of the zoological
results of the two expeditions to Western Yunnan in 1868 and 1875 and a Monograph of the two
cetacean genera Platanista and Orcella. Bernard Quaritch, Piccadilly, London.
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Figure 5-9: The Indus River system with Major Head works
Map Source: WWF-Pakistan and Sindh Wildlife Department, 2010, Ecological Impact of Floods: Indus
Dolphin survey Sukkur to Kotri Barrages
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368. In 2001 a comprehensive survey of the entire range was conducted. The total
population size was estimated as 1,100 in approximately 1,000 km of river33. Nearly the
entire population (99% of the animals) occurred in only 690 linear kilometer, which
implies roughly an 80% reduction in the area of occupancy since the 1870’s34 .The
factors for decline include water pollution, poaching, fragmentation of habitat due to
barrages, and dolphin strandings in the irrigation canals35. The survey was repeated in
2006 and an increase in the population was observed. Abundance was estimated as
121 between Chashma and Taunsa barrages, 52 between Taunsa barrage and Ghazi
Ghat and 1,293 between Guddu and Sukkur barrages. Including an estimate for
unsurveyed areas, the Indus dolphin subspecies was determined to number 1,600-1,750
animals in 200636. A small population of 4 – 6 specimens was recorded near Kotri
barrage.37 This dolphin was not seen during the survey of June 2012 in the Study Area.
369. Determination: Two mammals of the Study Area that are included in the IUCN
Red List are the Smooth-coated Otter Lutrogale perspicillata and the Indus Blind Dolphin
Platanista minor. The latter is also endemic to the sub-continent. However, the dolphin
population is small in number and specimens of these species are not restricted to this
stretch of the Indus River and have been reported from other parts of the river as well.
Therefore, their distribution is not restricted to a particular site and their distribution is
widespread.
5.3.4
Reptiles and Amphibians
370. Appendix 4 (Table 4-6) provides a list of reptile species reported from the Study
Area. Two species of turtles, nine species of snakes, six species of lizards and two
species of amphibians have been reported from the Study Area. The turtle species
include the Indian Flap shell Turtle Lissemys punctata and Spotted Pond Turtle
Geoclemys hamiltonii. The snake species reported include the Indian Cobra Naja naja,
Spotted Wolf Snake Lycodons triatus, Common Sand Boa Eryx johnii, Saw scaled Viper
Echis carinatus, Russel’s Viper Daboia russelii. Common lizards of the Study Area
include the Indian Monitor Lizard Varanus bengalensis, Indian Spiny tailed Lizard Saara
hardwickii, Indian Garden Lizard Calotes versicolor.
Overview of Abundance and Diversity
371. During the June 2012 survey, sampling was conducted at 14 points, of which four
(4) were in agricultural fields, five (5) in gravel plains, three (3) in wetlands, one (1) in
vegetation cluster and one (1) in hills.
372. A total of 16 reptile individuals belonging to four (4) species were sighted in the
Study Area during the June 2012 survey. The species observed include the Indian
Fringe-toed Sand Lizard Acanthodactylus cantoris, Cholistan Desert Lacerta, Eremias
33
34
35
36
37
Braulik, G. T. 2006. Comprehensive status assessment of the Indus River dolphin (Platanistagangetica
minor). Biological Conservation 129(4): 579-590.
Gill Braulik, 2004, Indus river dolphins in Pakistan, Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society
Roberts, T. J. 1997. The Mammals of Pakistan, Oxford University Press, 448 pp.
Khan U., Bhagat H. B., Braulik G. T., Khan A. H (2010) Review of the conservation and establishment
of protected areas for the Indus River dolphin Platanista gangetica minor. In: Final workshop Report
Establishing protected area for Asian freshwater cetaceans Edited by Daneille Kreb, Randall R. Reeves
Peter O. Thomas, Gillian T Braulik and Brian D. Smith, Yasi Indonesia
WWF-Pakistan. 2006. Abundance of Indus river Dolphin in 2006, 35 pp:
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cholistanica, Brilliant Ground Agama Trapelus agilis and the Indian Spiny-tailed Ground
Lizard Saara hardwickii.
373. The maximum reptile abundance was observed in the gravel plains followed by
the agricultural fields. No reptiles were observed in the wetlands, vegetation cluster or
hills. The Indian Spiny-tailed Ground Lizard Saara hardwickii was the most abundantly
observed reptile in the Study Area.
374. Appendix 4 (Table 4-7) provides a summary of sampling points by type of
habitat, number of sightings, and the number of species sighted. Appendix 4
(Table 4-8) shows the abundance of reptiles in the Study Area for all habitat types.
Conservation and Protection Status
375. The two reptiles of conservation importance observed in the Study Area include
the Cholistan Desert Lacerta Eremias cholistanica that is endemic to Pakistan and the
Indian Spiny-tailed Ground Lizard Saara hardwickii that is included in CITES
Appendix II.38
376. The Indian Spiny-Tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii is a characteristic diurnal ground
lizard that lives in vast tracts of hard soil with moderate to sparse xerophytic vegetation
throughout the deserts of Cholistan, Thar, Thal, and Nara, as well as portions of
southern Balochistan including Lasbela (Minton 1966).39 This species is included in
CITES Appendix II40 because of its attractiveness in global wild pet trade. It was seen in
the study Area during the June 2012 survey at Sampling Points 3, 4, 6, 8 and 9.
377. The Cholistan Desert Lacerta Eremias cholistanica has been named after the
Cholistan Desert of Pakistan. It is included in Appendix II of the CITES Species List. It
was seen in the Study Area at Sampling Point 3.
378. Determination: No threatened reptiles were determined to be resident on the
Study Area. None of the observed species were included in the IUCN Red List 2012.
One species is included in the CITES Species List while one species is endemic to
Pakistan. However, their distribution is not limited to any specific site or habitat type,
and their distribution is widespread.
5.3.5
Birds
379. Appendix 4 (Table 4-9) provides a list of bird species reported from the Study
Area. River Indus and its associated tributaries provide an important habitat for both
resident and migratory birds. Vegetation on both sides of the river and agricultural areas
offer ample habitat and food for many bird species. Common resident bird species
reported from the area include Indian Pond Heron Ardeola grayii, Common Moorhen
Gallinula chloropus, Little Egret Egretta garzetta, Black-shouldered Kite Elanus
caeruleus, Black Kite Milvus migrans, Red-wattled Lapwing Hoplopterus indicus,
Eurasian collard dove Streptopelia decaocto, White-throated Kingfisher Halcyon
smyrnensis, Pied Kingfisher Ceryle rudis, Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis, Hoopoe
Upupa epops, Striated Babbler Turdoides earlei, Black Drongo or King Crow Dicrurus
38
39
40
UNEP-WCMC. 26 June 2012. UNEP-WCMC Species Database: CITES-Listed Species
Minton, S.A. 1966. A Contribution to the herpetology of W. Pakistan. Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., 134(2):
28-184.
UNEP-WCMC. 26 June 2012. UNEP-WCMC Species Database: CITES-Listed Species.
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macrocercus, House Crow Corvus splendens, Common Myna Acridotheres tristis, Bank
Myna Acridotheres ginginianus etc.41
Overview of Abundance and Diversity
380. During the June 2012 survey, sampling was conducted at 14 points, of which four
(4) were in agricultural fields, five (5) in gravel plains, three (3) in wetlands, one (1) in
vegetation cluster and one (1) in hills.
381. Appendix 4 (Table 4-10) provides a summary of sampling points by habitat type,
number of sightings, and number of species sighted during the June 2012 surveys.
Appendix 4 (Table 4-11) lists the number of birds sighted of each species by habitat
type for the June 2012 survey. A total of 451 bird individuals belonging to 25 species
were observed during the June 2012 survey. The maximum bird abundance was
observed in the wetlands followed by the agricultural fields. No birds were observed in
the hills. The maximum bird diversity was observed in agricultural fields. The most
abundant bird species seen in the Study Area included the Rock Pigeon Columba livia
and the Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo followed by the Little Egret Egretta
garzetta and House Crow Corvus splendens. The maximum bird abundance was seen
at Sampling Point 14 in wetland. The maximum bird diversity was seen at Sampling
Point 1 in agricultural fields.
Importance of Study Area for Migratory Birds
382. Pakistan gets a large number of guest birds from Europe, Central Asian States
and India every year. These birds that originally reside in the northern states spend
winters in various wetlands and deserts of Pakistan from the high Himalayas to coastal
mangroves and mud flats in the Indus delta. After the winter season, they go back to
their native habitats.
383. This famous route from Siberia to various destinations in Pakistan over
Karakorum, Hindu Kush, and Suleiman Ranges along Indus River down to the delta is
known as International Migratory Bird Route Number 4. It is also called as the Green
Route or more commonly Indus Flyway, one of the important migratory routes in the
Central Asian - Indian Flyway42. (Figure 5-10). The birds start on this route in
November. February is the peak time and by March they start flying back home. These
periods may vary depending upon weather conditions in Siberia and/or Pakistan. As per
an estimate based on regular counts at different Pakistani wetlands, between 700,000
and 1,200,000 birds arrive in Pakistan through Indus Flyway every year.43 Some of these
birds stay in the lakes but majority migrate to coastal areas.
41
42
43
Grimmett R, Roberts TJ, Inskipp T (2008) Birds of Pakistan, Yale University Press
Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species. 1 February 2006. Central Asian Flyway Action
Plan for the Conservation of Migratory Waterbirds and their Habitats. New Delhi, 10-12 June 2005:
UNEP/CMS Secretariat.
Pakistan Wetlands Programme. 2012. Migratory Birds Census Report.
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Figure 5-10: Asian Migratory Birds Flyways
384. A number of migratory birds have been reported from the Stuyd Area and its
vicinity. The winter visitors include the Grey Heron Ardea cinerea, Common Teal Anas
crecca, Northern Shoveler Anas clypeata, Common Coot Fulica atra, Common Pochard
Aythya ferina, Eurasian Wigeon Anas penelope, Gadwall Anas strepera, Garganey Anas
querquedula, Mallard Anas platyrhynchos, Eurasian Sparrow Hawk Accipiter nisus,
Osprey Pandion haliaetus, Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrines, Common Sandpiper
Actitis hypoleucos, Black-headed Gull Larus ridibundus, Common Greenshank Tringa
nebularia, Caspian Gull Larus cachinnans, and White Wagtail Motacilla alba
personata.44
385. The summer migrants include the Small Pratincole Glareola lactea, Indian
Skimmer Rynchops albicollis and Chestnut-shouldered Pretonia Petronia xanthocollis.
They were not observed in the Study Area during the June 2012 survey.
386. The passage migrants include the Yellow wagtail Motacillaflava, Blyth’s Reed
Warbler Acrocephalus dumetorum, Rosy Starling Sturnus roseus and Grus grus. These
species are irregular year round visitors to the Study Area. They were not observed in
the Study Area during the June 2012 survey.
387. The Study Area is not declared as a protected wetland Ramsaar site.45 It is also
not part of a game sanctuary or game reserve. Since the Study Area is located very
close to the coast, most of the migratory birds do not use it as a breeding and nesting
44
45
Pakistan Wetlands Programme. 2012. Migratory Birds Census Report.
The Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, called the Ramsar Convention, is an
intergovernmental treaty that provides the framework for national action and international cooperation
for the conservation and wise use of wetlands and their resources.
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area but merely as a resting ground on their way to coastal areas where there is greater
food and habitat available.
Conservation and Protection Status
388. The only bird of conservation importance found in the Study Area was the River
Tern Sterna aurantia. This is a common resident species in the area around the River
Indus and its tributaries.46 It is listed as Near Threatened in the IUCN Red List 2012.47 It
was seen in the Study Area at Sampling Points 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 12 and 14.
389. Even though the Study Area is visited by both summer and winter bird migrants,
most of the birds use it only as a temporary resting ground and the Study Area is not a
breeding ground for most of these migratory birds.
390. Determination: No threatened bird species were determined to be resident in
the Study Area. One bird species is listed as Near Threatened in the IUCN Red List.
However, its distribution is not limited to any specific site or habitat type and its
distribution is widespread. Moreover, the area is not critical for the survival of migratory
birds.
5.3.6
Fish
391. A complete list of the fish reported from the Study Area and adjoining areas is
given in Appendix 4. (Table 4-12). Photographs of some of the fish species and fishing
activities in the Study Area are shown in Figure 5-11 and Figure 5-12, respectively. At
least 49 fish species have been recorded from the reaches of the River Indus near the
Study Area and its environs.48 These include members from the Family Clupeidae,
Cyprinidae, Bagridae, Schilbeidae, Chandidae etc. Common fish species found in the
Study Area include Mrigal Cirrhinus mrigala (Morakha), Kurialabeo Labeo gonius
(Seereha), Spotfin Swamp Barb Puntius sophore (Popra), Pabdah Catfish Ompok pabda
(Dimmon), Freshwater Shark Wallago attu and the Zig-zag Eel Mastacembelus armatus
(Goj).
392. Most of the species are common but the species Chitala chitala, Macrognathus
pancalus and Tenualos ailisha are rare in the area. Species Chitala chitala and
Macrognathus pancalus are generally rare throughout the country while the species
Tenualos ailisha is rare in the Study Area due to overfishing in the breeding season,
scarcity of water and destruction of breeding grounds. The commercially important
species are facing very high fishing pressure as the number of fishermen is high as
compared to the available fish resource in the area. This was confirmed in interviews
with local fishermen during the June 2012 survey who claimed that the use of illegal
mesh size by some fishermen, shortage of water in the barrage areas due to diversions
into canals for agriculture, and an increase in the number of fishermen in the area is
responsible for this decline. The legal mesh size allowed for fishing is 3.8 cm
(1.5 inches). In order to collect more and more fish, the there is a tendency among
fishermen to use nets of smaller mesh sizes to maximize the catch. Regulation of mesh
size has been widely used for controlling the minimum commercial size in protected fish
populations. Generally Mrigal Cirrhinus mrigala, Rohu Labeo rohita, and Calbasu Labeo
46
47
48
Grimmett, R., Roberts, T., and Inskipp, T. 2008. Birds of Pakistan, Yale University Press
IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.1. ‘www.iucnredlist.org’. Downloaded
on 26 June 2012.
Hussain, Z., (1973) Fish and fisheries of the lower Indus basin (1966-67), Agric. Pakistan, (24): 170-188
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calbasu of less than one kilogram 1 kg in weight, and Catla Gibelion catla of less than
4 kg in weight is prohibited for fishing in lakes and reservoirs.
Figure 5-11: Some Common Fish Species Observed in the June 2012 Survey
Reba Carp Cirrhinus reba
Kuria Labeo Labeo gonius
Mozambique Tilapia Tilapia mosambiqa
Rohu Labeo rohita
Freshwater Shark Wallago attu
Rita Catfish Rita rita
Hilsa Shad Tenualosa ilisha
Humped Featherback Chitala chitala
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Figure 5-12: Fishing Activities in the Study Area
(upstream of Kotri Barrage)
393. Interviews with the fishermen community and the fish whole sale sellers during
the June 2012 surveys revealed that about 150-200 large boats and 350-400 small
boats are operating in the area (about 10 km upstream and 10 km downstream of Kotri
barrage) and some 2,000-4,000 people are engaged in the fishing business. An average
catch for a small boat is 8-10 kg of fish per day during the summer season with 2-4
people working on a boat. Major catch is during the flood season (July – August) and
minimum during the winter season (December – February). Large boats that involve
4-10 fishermen catch 10-20 kg of fish per day mainly during the summer season
(May – August).
394. Fish survival, growth and productivity are dependent on both biological and
environmental factors. The latter can be distinguished as edaphic (which includes water
quality) and morphometric (which includes lake and stream morphology).49 The
presence of toxic metals from industrial sources can have a detrimental impact on the
aquatic fauna including amphibians, fish, algae and aquatic invertebrates.
Importance of Study Area for Aquatic Fauna and Fish
395. Kotri Barrage is the last water reservoir on the River Indus before it flows into the
Arabian Sea. Below Kotri, the water level fluctuates tremendously and the influence of
brackish water has increased to variable extents and therefore aquatic diversity is
comparatively lower. However, several fresh-water faunal species have been reported
from the river upstream of Kotri including fish species, amphibians and turtles. The fish
abundance is high but being overexploited due to high fishing pressure.
Conservation and Protection Status
396. Among the fish species reported from the Study Area, the species Chitala chitala,
Ompok pabda, Ailia coila, Wallago attu, and Bagarius bagarius as well as the exotic fish
Oreochromis mossambicus are listed as Near Threatened in the IUCN Red List 2012.
49
Howells G.D., David J. A. Brown, Sadler K., “Effects of acidity, calcium, and aluminium on fish survival
and productivity”, Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, Vol. 34, 1983, pp. 559-570.
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The exotic fish, Cyprinus carpio, is listed as Vulnerable. Other than the Chitala chitala,
all the other fish species with conservation importance are common in the Study Area.
397. Determination: There are two fish species reported from the Study Area that
are included in the IUCN Red List 2012. However, most of them are commonly seen in
the Study Area. Moreover, their distribution is not limited to any specific site or river
habitat type and their distribution is widespread.
5.3.7
Critical Habitats
398. International Finance Corporation (IFC) Performance Standards50 recognizes
critical habitat as areas designated by various organization as having special
significance for high biodiversity value. These include:
Areas protected by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
(Categories I-VI);51
wetlands of international importance (according to the Ramsar convention);52
important bird areas (defined by Birdlife International);53 and
biosphere reserves (under the UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Programme;54
399.
No area in any of the above categories fall in the Study Area.
400. The Sindh Wildlife Protection Ordinance 1972, empowers the government to
declare areas of ecological significance as protected. The law provides three different
types of such areas, the national park, the wildlife sanctuary and the game reserve. No
such area located within the Study Area.
401. In addition, IFC’s Performance Standard 6 defines Critical Habitats with respect
to certain biodiversity related characteristics. These definitions and a discussion with
respect to the Study Area are given below:
Habitat of significant importance to Critically Endangered and/or Endangered
species
The only species of the Study Area listed as Endangered in the IUCN Red List
2012 is the Indus Blind Dolphin Platanista minor. However, the dolphin
population reported from the Study Area and its vicinity is small. Moreover, this
species is not restricted to this stretch of the Indus River and has been reported
in greater abundance from other parts of the river as well55. Therefore, the
distribution of the Indus Blind Dolphin Platanista minor is not restricted to a
particular site and their distribution is widespread. The stretch of the river
included in the Study Area is thus not critical for the survival of this endangered
50
51
52
53
54
55
Policy on Social and Environmental Sustainability, January 2012. Performance Standard 6: Biodiversity
Conservation and Sustainable Management of Living Natural Resources, International Finance
Corporation. The World Bank Group.
IUCN. 1994. Guidelines for Protected Areas Management Categories. IUCN, Cambridge, UK.
Ramsar Convention, or Convention on the Wetlands of International Importance, Administered by the
Ramsar Secretariat, Geneva, Switzerland
Birdlife International, UK
Administered by International Co-ordinating Council of the Man and the Biosphere (MAB), UNESCO.
WWF-Pakistan and Sindh Wildlife Department, 2010, Ecological Impact of floods: Indus Dolphin
survey Sukkur to Kotri Barrages
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species. However, preserving the habitat of this species from any project
related impacts would be of concern.
Habitat of significant importance to endemic and/or restricted-range species
The habitats found on Study Area are homogenous and widespread. They hold
no significance for the survival of endemic or restricted range species; or
Habitat supporting globally significant concentrations of migratory species
and/or congregatory species
Even though the Study Area is visited by both summer and winter migrants, it is
used as a temporary resting ground and is not a breeding or nesting area.
There is nothing to indicate that the Study Area is critical for the survival of
these migratory birds. Moreover, no mammal species depends on the area for
its migration. No significant concentration of congregatory species is present in
the Study Area.
Highly threatened and/or unique ecosystems
There are no threatened or unique ecosystems in the Study Area. Areas with
unique assemblages of species or which are associated with key evolutionary
processes or provide key ecosystem services. This situation is not present in
the Study Area. While all species are functioning components of ecosystems,
there are no unique assemblages of species or association of key evolutionary
processes in the Study Area; or
Areas having biodiversity of significant social, economic or cultural importance
to local communities
Members of the local community are dependent on the river for fishing that
provides a source of livelihood for them. Other than fishing, although, the area
is of importance to residents in terms of ecosystem services (such as water and
vegetation for grazing), it has no unique biodiversity value of social or cultural
importance to the community.
402.
Determination: There is no critical habitat present on the Study Area.
5.3.8
Limitations of the Study
403.
The limitations for the ecological baseline are as follows:
Difficulty in observing large carnivores due to their elusive and predominantly
nocturnal nature.
Inability to carry out nocturnal surveys for security reasons; and
Predominance of hard substrates making large mammals tracks more difficult to
identify
404. However, since the Study Area is located in a disturbed habitat, a large
population of carnivore mammals and nocturnal species is not likely to occur at this site
and these limitations are not.
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5.4
Socioeconomic Environment
405. Baseline investigations were undertaken to document the existing socioeconomic
conditions of the population that can be affected by the Project activities. The results of
the socioeconomic baseline investigations are documented in this section of the report.
5.4.1
Delineation of Study Area
406. The population likely to be affected by the Project activities was identified based
on an understanding of the potential impacts of the Project.
The potential
socioeconomic impacts of the Project fall into two categories: the direct socioeconomic
impacts, such as, employment generation and skill and technology transfers, and the
indirect socioeconomic impacts resulting due to the physical environmental impacts of
the Project, such as, land transformation resulting in physical and economic
displacement. Project induced changes to the physical environment are expected to
reduce with the increased distance from the Project facilities, affecting more the
settlements located closer, up to 5 km, to the Project facilities. For this, a study area of
five km around the site was delineated, to assess the baseline conditions in the areas
likely to be affected by the Project due to its proximity to the Project site. This is referred
to as the Socioeconomic Study Area in this report. The Socioeconomic Study Area is
shown in Figure 5-13.
407. Direct socioeconomic impacts of the Project will not only affect the immediate
socioeconomic environment of the Project but also diffuse to other parts of Jamshoro
district and possibly Sindh province. The baseline conditions in these areas will be
studied through the district and, where available, taluka level published data.
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Figure 5-13: Socioeconomic Study Area
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5.4.2
Overview
408. The Socioeconomic Study Area falls within the Kotri taluka56 of Jamshoro district,
Sindh Province. Kotri taluka is relatively developed in comparison to the other four
talukas of Jamshoro district and is home to headquarter of the district, Jamshoro town.
409. The population clusters falling within the Socioeconomic Study Area can be
broadly classified as:
Rural – these are small villages located alongside the Indus Highway and in the
outskirts of Jamshoro town. The rural segments of the Socioeconomic Study
Area are more vulnerable to changes in the socioeconomic environment
brought about by the Project, owing to lower income levels and access to
facilities in comparison to the other segments. Further detail on the conditions
in the rural areas are provided in the sections to follow;
Urban – this comprises of a dense contiguous population belt that forms the
main Jamshoro town. The sub localities of Jamshoro town that fall under this
classification are Jamshoro Phatak, Abdullah Chawaro and Saeedabad. The
urban areas of the Socioeconomic Study Area have better access to facilities
and higher incomes relative to the rural parts of the Socioeconomic Study Area;
Colonies – most of these are planned residential colonies established by
various institutions operating in the Socioeconomic Study Area. The colonies
have an independent administrative setup, which is run by the parent institution
and is not overseen by the municipal authority. Being smaller population units
to administrate, the colonies are usually well-equipped in terms of main urban
services and facilities, such as, water supply and sanitation. The colonies and
the urban areas together constitute the more developed and better-off
segments of the Socioeconomic Study Area;
410. The rural, urban and colony areas of the Socioeconomic Study Area are
identified in Figure 5-13.
5.4.3
Data Collection and Organization
411. Primary data at the settlement and household levels was collected through a
survey conducted in June 2012. The rural areas form the more vulnerable population
segments of the Socioeconomic Study Area. To determine the prevailing poverty levels
in the rural segments, a household survey was implemented, which focused on obtaining
information on household income levels, types of occupations and, age and gender
profile.
In addition to the household survey, a settlement questionnaire was
implemented in the rural, urban and colony areas to ascertain presence and accessibility
levels to various social and physical infrastructure. The survey coverage is summarized
in Table 5-10 whereas the location of the surveyed settlements is shown in Figure 5-14.
56
Taluka is an administrative subdivision of a district. The term taluka is specific to Sindh and is referred
to as tehsil elsewhere in Pakistan.
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Table 5-10: Coverage of Socioeconomic Survey
Rural
Urban
Colony
Coverage of the Settlement Survey
Total Number of Settlements
Settlements Surveyed
Total Population
Population of the Surveyed Settlements
10
3
7
6 (60%)
1 (33%)
5 (71%)
31,048
74,850
45,325
23,648 (76%)
4,000 (5%)
33,825 (75%)
3,891
9,600
5,730
29 (0.7%)
3 (0.4%)
8 (0.2%)
298 (1.0%)
33 (0.4%)
62 (0.2%)
Coverage of the Household Survey
Total Number of Households
Households Surveyed
Population of the Surveyed Households a
412. Published data at the provincial, district and, where available, taluka levels was
used to understand socioeconomic baseline conditions at for the broader region.
413. The discussion in this section has been presented separately for the rural, urban
and colony areas of the Socioeconomic Study Area, to capture the differing
socioeconomic settings.
5.4.4
Settlement Layout
414. Views of a typical rural, colony and urban area in the Socioeconomic Study Area
are shown in Figure 5-15. As evident from the satellite view, the rural locality of the
Socioeconomic Study Area has an unplanned layout, which is characteristic to the rural
areas of Pakistan. The layout of the urban areas is still reminiscent of their rural origin,
as it does not present the grid arrangement, which is typical to urban areas in Pakistan.
However, the urban areas are much densely populated than the rural areas. In
comparison to urban areas, colonies have a more planned layout. The population
density of colonies varies, depending on the staffing needs of the parent institutions.
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Figure 5-14: Location of Surveyed Settlements in the Study Area
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Figure 5-15: Satellite Views of Settlements in the Socioeconomic Study Area
Satellite Views
Images
Rural Locality
Urban Locality
Colony
5.4.5
Demography
415. Table 5-11 draws a comparison between the population and settlements sizes of
the rural, urban and colony areas. Population residing in urban areas constitutes the
largest share in the total population of the Socioeconomic Study Area; forming 49%
share. Population in colonies constitutes 30% of the Socioeconomic Study Area
population and the remaining 21% is rural. The rural settlements are much smaller in
size in terms of population. On the average 3,105 persons reside per rural settlement,
which is nearly eight times smaller than the size of a typical urban locality in the
Socioeconomic Study Area and half the size of a typical colony. The largest rural
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locality, Saeen Dino Mallah, has a population of 12,000 persons, whereas the largest
urban locality, Jamshoro Phatak has a population of 43,350 persons.
Table 5-11: Population and Settlement Size in the Socioeconomic Study Area
No. of
Settlements
Population
Distribution
Settlement Size
Average Maximum
Minimum
Rural
10
31,048
21%
3,105
12,000
60
Urban
3
74,850
49%
24,950
43,350
4,000
Colony
7
45,325
30%
6,475
21,675
300
20
151,223
100%
7,561
43,350
60
Socioeconomic Study
Area
Household Size
416. A household functions as a single unit in terms of earning and allocating its
resources. The average size of the rural household in the Socioeconomic Study Area
was 10.3, which is higher than that of Jamshoro district, 5.9, and rural Sindh, 7.0. 57
Possible reasons for this could include the extended family concept that prevails in the
area, in which family members other than parents and children are considered part of
the household and higher fertility rates.
417. The average household size in the urban and colony areas was 8.7, which is
lower than rural household size in the Socioeconomic Study Area and higher than that of
urban Sindh, 6.5.58 Possible reason for the higher size in comparison to the average for
urban Sindh could be higher fertility.
Age and Sex Composition
418. The population pyramid for the surveyed rural population is given in Figure 5-16.
The broader base of the age-pyramid specifies a younger population. The median age of
the surveyed population was 20 years. The age structure shows a relatively large
number of children of ages 11 years and younger, accounting for 28.5% of the
population. Population above 60 years was found to be only 1.3%, which suggests a
lower life expectancy in the rural households of the Socioeconomic Study Area.
57
58
Pakistan Floods 2010 – Jamshoro District Profile. December 2010. United Nations Office for the
Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). http://floods2010.pakresponse.info/DistrictProfiles.aspx
(Date Accessed: June 26, 2012).
PSLM, 2008
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Figure 5-16: Age and Sex Composition of Surveyed Rural Population
Above 60
Female
Male
51 to 60
41 to 50
31 to 40
21 to 30
11 to 20
Below 11
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
10%
20%
Percentage in Age Group
30%
40%
419. The age and sex composition of the urban and colony populations is similar to
that observed in the rural areas. The median age is 20 years and a relatively large
number of the population are children of ages 11 years and younger, accounting for 30%
of the population. Population above 60 years was found to be only 3%, which suggests a
higher life expectancy in comparison to the rural households of the Socioeconomic
Study Area.
420. The sex ratio of the surveyed rural population was 155, which could be due to
presence of immigrants in search of better educational and job opportunities due to the
proximity of the rural areas to Jamshoro town. This observation is backed by the
pronounced gender imbalance in the age bracket 21 to 40 years. Primary data collected
from the field also shows a higher tendency towards in-migration than out-migration in
the Socioeconomic Study Area. The migrants are mainly from interior Sindh districts of
Khairpur, Dadu and Tando Mohammad Khan.
421. The sex ratio of the surveyed urban and colony populations was 139, which is
lesser than that in the urban and colony areas. Migration is also reported in the urban
and colony areas, mainly inward migration, in search of jobs. However, the job-seekers
tend to migrate with their families, which is why the gender imbalance is less
pronounced in the urban and colony areas.
Dependency Ratio
422. The dependency ratio is an age based population ratio between those typically in
the working age groups that form the labor force and those in age groups that typically
depend on the labor force. Dependents include children below 15 years of age and the
geriatric above 60 years, and the labor force is the population between ages 15 and 60.
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It is expressed as the ratio of dependents to every 100 members of labor force. This
may not accurately specify dependency in the population, as it does not incorporate
handicapped people or cases of child labor. The dependency ratio in the rural segments
of the Socioeconomic Study Area was estimated at 61. This indicates the presence of
adequate labor-force to provide for the economically dependent. The dependency ratio
in the urban and colony segments of the Socioeconomic Study Area was estimated at
63. This indicates the presence of adequate labor-force to provide for the economically
dependent
5.4.6
Ethnicity and Religion
423. Up to 95% of Jamshoro’s population is Muslim. The remaining five percent
comprise of Hindus, Christians, scheduled castes and others. Similar to the overalls
district, the population in the Socioeconomic Study Area is predominantly Muslim, with
less than one percentage being Hindus. Muslims of the Socioeconomic Study Area
belong to Sunni sect of Islam, with only a minority belonging to the Shia sect.
424. The influence of spiritual leaders is widespread in the Socioeconomic Study
Area. People are into saint veneration and often undertake pilgrimage to the graves of
their saints.
425. Ethnic differences do not exist in the Socioeconomic Study Area. Only a few
castes prefer to keep to themselves and socialize more in their own caste. Otherwise
inter-caste marriages and other social exchanges amongst the castes are common.
Nearly, 23 Muslim and two Hindu castes were reported in the Socioeconomic Study
Area. The largest caste is the Solangi caste, which form 43% of the Socioeconomic
Study Area’s population.
426. The main languages spoken in Jamshoro District are Sindhi, Balochi, Pashto,
Punjabi and Saraiki. Within the Socioeconomic Study Area, majority of the population
speaks Sindhi and Balochi. Other languages spoken include Punjabi, Hindko, Saraiki,
Marvari and Jabli.
427. With respect to ethnicity and religion, no variations were observed in the rural,
urban and colony areas of the Socioeconomic Study Area.
5.4.7
Gender Roles
428. The society in rural Sindh is patriarchal. A household usually contains two
gender-based positions of authority: the first is the position of the head of the household,
the oldest, able-bodied male member of a household. The second, which is subordinate
to that of the household head, is the position of the senior woman, ideally the wife of the
eldest resident male. The male members govern household decision making process
and are responsible to represent the household in the neighborhood and larger society.
429. Figure 5-17 shows the distribution of surveyed rural households by decisionmaking mechanisms. The information suggests a higher trend in taking unilateral
decisions. According to the survey data, only 13% of the household heads that took
consultative decisions, in which they consulted with their father and brother. Women
and other family members are not consulted in matters pertaining to household budget
and family conflicts. Only 15% of surveyed households reported consultation with
daughters in their marriage decisions.
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Figure 5-17: Decision Mechanism in Surveyed Rural Households
100%
90%
Unilateral
Consultative
Percentage Households
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Household
budget
management
Family conflicts
Matrimonial
decisions
Inheritance and
Asset
management
430. The urban and colony societies are relatively flexible in comparison to the rural
society and tend to involve women in decision-making process, but still maintain male
dominance in decision-making. This is due to higher education levels amongst women
in these areas (see Chapter 10a, Education ahead). Women with time have also
started working to support the household (see Chapter 11, Economy and Income
Levels, ahead).
5.4.8
Crime Incidence, Law Enforcement and Conflict Resolution
431. There are 18 police stations in Jamshoro district, four of which are in Kotri taluka.
Two police stations and two police check posts are located in the urban and colony
areas of the Socioeconomic Study Area. The law and order situation in the
Socioeconomic Study Area is generally peaceful. Respondents reported minor thefts
and robberies in the urban and colony areas.
432. The occurrence of disputes and conflicts is minimal in the Socioeconomic Study
Area. In the rural areas, the leader or wadera and the spiritual leaders hold influence in
resolving conflicts and maintaining peace. Most of the rural areas did not report any
conflicts but stated that if a conflict were to arise, the wadera would be approached to
resolve it.
5.4.9
Physical Infrastructure
433. Kotri taluka being the hub of all economic, political, religious and district
government activities of Jamshoro district, has relatively well developed infrastructure in
comparison to the other four talukas of Jamshoro district. The communication network
of the taluka is well developed. Kotri taluka has four railway stations namely Kotri,
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Jamshoro, Bulari and Petaro. The taluka has three post offices and two main telephone
exchanges.59 Internet access is available in colonies only.
Accessibility and Communication
434. Access to Kotri taluka is possible by road. The closest airport is located in
Hyderabad city, which is situated at a distance of 20 km from Jamshoro town.
Passenger vans go across different parts of Kotri taluka, travelling through the three
main roads running through the taluka, i.e., the M-9 Motorway, National Highway-5 and
National Highway-55. The National Highway-5 connects Kotri taluka to Hyderabad city
whereas National Highway-55, also known as the Indus Highway, connects the taluka to
rest of the district and Punjab province. The road network running through the
Socioeconomic Study Area is shown in Figure 5-18 and Figure 5-19.
435. All areas of the Socioeconomic Study Area can easily be accessed through the
National Highway-55. The common means of transport include public buses, rental
cars, jeeps and pickups. Unsealed roads and dirt tracks also run through the
Socioeconomic Study Area, interconnecting the rural localities (Figure 5-18).
436. Cellular phones are the main mode of communication for the people of the Study
Area as up to 90% of the settlements have mobile network coverage. There are four
post offices in the Socioeconomic Study Area, two of which are located in the rural
areas.
Figure 5-18: Views of Roads in Socioeconomic Study Area
View of Blacktop Road
59
View of Dirt Track
District Government Jamshoro, http://www.jamshoro.com.pk/Glance.htm (Date Accessed:
June 26, 2012)
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Figure 5-19: Road Network in the Study Area
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Housing
437. Housing conditions in the Socioeconomic Study Area are generally good. All the
housing structures in the colonies are masonry. The housing structures in the rural
areas are also mostly masonry or semi-masonry (Figure 5-20), which is different from
the typical village setting observed elsewhere in Sindh province.
Figure 5-20: Distribution of Housing Structures in Socioeconomic
Study Area by Housing Type
Masonry
Colony
Semi-masonry
Adobe
Urban
Rural
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
Water Supply and Sanitation
438. The main source of drinking water in the Jamshoro district is tap water, which is
used by 30% of the households. Almost 22% households have access through hand
pump and 12% through motor pumps. Remaining 21% and 15% use dug wells and
other sources, respectively. The Kotri Barrage is one of the oldest barrages in the Kotri
taluka. This barrage through a 20 km long feeder canal provides water for irrigation
purposes.
439. The main source of drinking water in the Socioeconomic Study Area is river
water, which is pumped from the river and supplied to the settlements through pipelines.
households in the urban and colony areas is supplied to each household. In the rural
areas, the pipeline feeds into a central storage tank from where the households draw
water in large water coolers, for drinking purposes. In some villages, the water is
cleaned using filter systems installed by various NGOs (Figure 5-21). Some villages
receive their water supply from the JTPS facility and the Sandoz pharmaceutical plant
located in the Socioeconomic Study Area. No wells were reported in the areas.
440. There is no effluent disposal and treatment system reported in the surveyed
settlements. According to the findings of the field survey, pit latrine system was
available in all rural areas.
Power Supply and Fuel Consumption
441. All settlements in the Socioeconomic Study Area are connected to the national
grid. Firewood is used in the rural areas for cooking and water heating purposes. Rural
areas near the Jamshoro town have access to natural gas network. All colony and
urban areas have access to the natural gas supply system.
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Figure 5-21: Water Supply System in Villages of Socioeconomic Study Area
Central water storage tank in village
Filter in village
5.4.10 Social Infrastructure
442. Social infrastructure comprises of the health and educational service provisions
in the Socioeconomic Study Area.
Health
443. Health services in Jamshoro district are mainly provided through basic health
units (BHUs), rural health centers (RHCs) and hospitals that are equipped for primary
health care services and to some extent comprehensive emergency obstetric care
services. 60 There are four hospitals in the district, one located in each taluka, five
RHCs, 16 BHUs and six government dispensaries.61
444. The Socioeconomic Study Area has one of the major hospitals, Liaquat
University of Health and Medical Sciences Hospital (LUHMS), of the province. There is
no health facility in the rural areas of the Socioeconomic Study Area, only one
dispensary was reported in village Haji Khan Shoro. The residents of rural areas have to
travel to urban and colony areas for health facilities, mostly the LUHMS hospital. Private
clinics are operating in urban areas (Jamshoro Phatak and Saeedabad) and colonies
(the Barrage and Sindh University Colony) providing primary health facilities, while in
case of emergencies people move to LUHMS Hospital.
445. Common health problems identified in the rural households are shown in
Figure 5-22. Diarrhea and skin diseases are the most common health problem among
all age groups and gender. Breathing problems were reported in the adults and adult
children (ages six and above). In the urban and colony households, mainly cases of
hepatitis and diabetes were reported. Presence of diarrhea in the rural segments of the
Socioeconomic Study Area suggests unhygienic conditions and unclean drinking water.
60
61
Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) refers to the care of women and newborns during pregnancy,
delivery and the time after delivery
District Government Jamshoro, http://www.jamshoro.com.pk/Glance.htm (Date Accessed: June 26,
2012)
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Figure 5-22: Common Health Problems Reported in the
Surveyed Rural Households
Adult Female (15 and above)
Other
Hepatitis
Heart problems
Skin diseases
Other
Hepatitis
Heart problems
Skin diseases
Breathing
problems
Diarrhea
50%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Tuberculosis
Other
Hepatitis
Heart problems
Skin diseases
Breathing
problems
Diarrhea
Household Members,%
50%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Tuberculosis
Breathing
problems
Children (5 and below)
Adult Children (6 to 14)
Household Members,%
Diarrhea
Tuberculosis
Household Members,%
50%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Other
Hepatitis
Heart problems
Skin diseases
Breathing
problems
Diarrhea
Tuberculosis
Household Members,%
Adult Male (15 and above)
50%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Education
446. The provincial education department runs primary, middle; secondary schools in
district Jamshoro, however, there are very few middle, secondary and higher secondary
school facilities for both boys and girls. According to the district education profile of
Jamshoro, in 2011, there were 820 primary schools, 30 middle schools, 34 secondary
schools, and five high schools in the district.62 Kotri taluka has 210 primary schools, four
middle schools, eight high schools, two colleges, one each for boys and girls, three
training institutions and a cadet colleges located in Petaro. Kotri taluka is ranked higher
in education than rest of the talukas due to the presence of three major universities of
62
District Education Profile 2010-11, Reform and Support Unit, Education and Literacy Department
Government of Sindh, Karachi
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the province, namely, Sindh University, Liaquat University of Medical and Health
Sciences, and Mehran University of Engineering and Technology, all located in the
district headquarter, Jamshoro town and within the Socioeconomic Study Area.
Schools, both private and government, are located in all the colonies and some of the
settlements. Settlements only have primary schools.
447. The number of educational institutions in the colonies, urban and rural areas is
given Table 5-11. Only two institutions providing intermediate level (grade 11 and 12) of
education were reported one each in Barrage Colony and the colony of JTPS. Of the
total primary schools, 15 are mix schools, three boys and three girls’ schools. Only one
madrassah (religious school) for boys was reported in Wapda Colony.
448. Results of the settlement survey show that the number of boys enrolled at
primary and middle level is higher as compared to girls in the overall Socioeconomic
Study Area. Compared to both the urban (42%) and rural (38%) areas of the
Socioeconomic Study Area, enrollment of girls is higher in the colony (53%), which
shows that the people in colonies encourage girls to attend school,
Table 5-12: Educational Institutions in Socioeconomic Study Area
Urban and Colony
Rural
Total
Primary
15
6
21
Middle
5
–
5
Intermediate
2
–
2
Graduate and above
3
–
–
449. In 2011, the literacy rate in Jamshoro district was lower (44%) when compared to
overall Sindh (59%). Of the total population, 57% of the male and 28% of the female
population was reported literate. Only 48% of population of the Jamshoro district has
ever attended school which is low when compared to the percentage of Sindh province,
i.e., 60%.63
450. The overall literacy rate in the surveyed rural households was 29.9%, which is
much lower in comparison to the literacy observed in the urban and colony areas at
60%. The rural (Figure 5-23) display a significant gender disparity, with female literacy
being three times lower than male literacy, in population aged 10 years and above. In
contrast the urban and colony area male-female literacy rates are higher and similar
amongst the genders.
63
PSLM, 2011
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Figure 5-23: Male-Female Literacy in Surveyed Households
Rural
100%
80%
Urban and Colony
90%
Unschooled
Surveyed Population, %
Surveyed Population, %
90%
100%
Literate
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
Unschooled
80%
Literate
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Male
Female
0%
Male
Female
451. The gender wise level of education attained by the surveyed population of ages
10 years and above is illustrated in Figure 5-24. In females, highest educational
attainment in the rural areas was primary level (nearly six years of schooling), whereas
in males, educational attainment up to intermediate level (nearly 13 years of schooling)
was reported. In comparison, educational attainment was observed to be much higher
in the urban and colony areas.
5.4.11 Economy and Income Levels
452. Sindh plays a pivotal role in the national economic and development agenda. It
has the highest concentration of urban population at 49%,64 as compared to an overall
country average of 37%, making it the most urbanized and economically developed of
the provinces of Pakistan.65 The urban and colony economies of the Socioeconomic
Study Area are representative of the developed Sindh, and are largely services-based;
only few people being employed in the industrial and agriculture sectors. Employment at
JTPS and its associated facilities, local hospitals, local universities, and local district
government form the main sources of occupations for the urban and colony populations.
453. The rural economy is largely based on laboring services and agriculture.
Laborers work on daily wages taking up any labor work available. Types of labor work
include off-farm labor, construction labor and labor at hotels and bus stops. The
distribution of the surveyed rural population by occupation types and the average
monthly income by occupations are provided in Figure 5-25.
64
65
Government of Sindh Official website, http://www.sindh.gov.pk/aboutsindh.htm, (Date Accessed:
September 19, 2011)
Pakistan Economic Survey, FY2011, Finance Division, Government of Pakistan
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Description of the Environment
5-54
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Rural
25%
Male
Female
20%
15%
10%
5%
Madrassah
Intermediate
Urban and Colony
30%
25%
Male
20%
Female
15%
10%
5%
Madrassah
Post
Graduate
Graduate
Intermediate
Matriculation
Middle
0%
Primary
Surveyed Population, %
Matriculation
Middle
0%
Primary
Surveyed Population, %
Figure 5-24: Educational Attainment in Surveyed Households in
Ages 10 years and above
Figure 5-25: Types of Occupations in Surveyed Rural Households
Drivers
9%
Farmers
24%
Shopkeeper
s
3%
Government
Services
9%
Laborers
52%
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Private
Services
2%
Description of the Environment
5-55
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
454. Poverty incidence in Sindh and other provinces of Pakistan is shown in
Figure 5-26. After Balochistan, Sindh has the highest rural poverty incidence at 31%.
Figure 5-26: Poverty in Pakistan, FY2006
70%
Urban
Rural
Percentage of Population below
Poverty Line
60%
57%
50%
40%
32%
31%
30%
28%
27%
24%
21%
20%
12%
13%
12%
10%
0%
Punjab
Sindh
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Balochistan
Pakistan
455. The poverty line of Pakistan is based on a consumption of 2,350 calories per
adult equivalent per day. The latest estimate of the inflation-adjusted poverty line for
2006 as reported in the FY2008 Economic Survey of Pakistan was PKR 944 per adult
equivalent per month.66 Inflating this number for inflation estimates from FY2007 to
FY2012, the poverty line of Pakistan in FY2012 has been calculated as PKR 1,942.
Based on this estimate for poverty line, 41% of the surveyed rural households fall below
the poverty line. Poverty levels are lower in the urban and colony areas of the
Socioeconomic Study Area.
5.4.12 Agriculture
456. Approximately 68% of the land in the Study Area is cultivated. Agriculture is
practiced in the flood plains along the River Indus in a belt extending to two to three km
from the riverbank (Figure IV-24). Irrigation is mainly by water pumped from the river.
Land holdings range from seven to 10 acres for smaller farms to 20 to 30 acres for
medium sized farms. Typically, each village has a landlord that owns most of the land
around the village, which could be as much as 80 to 100 acres. These landlords tend to
be influential and employ labor to work on the farms. Sharecropping is also prevalent,
where the tenants provide all the labor and cash inputs, and are typically entitled to five
to 10% of the produce. Crops account for 75% to 85% of the cultivated area. Principle
crops in the Study Area are cotton and fodder in the summer and wheat in the winter.
Vegetables and fruits are also grown through the year, mainly tomatoes and chilies, and
melons. The yields for cotton and wheat are comparatively similar to the country
average of 725 kg/hectare for cotton and 2750 kg/ hectare for wheat.67 Agricultural land
is prone to flooding, and loss of crops was extensive in the floods of 2010. Views of
agricultural land in the Socioeconomic Study Area are shown in Figure 5-27.
66
67
Pakistan Economic Survey, FY2007-08, Finance Division, Government of Pakistan
Pakistan Economic Survey, 2011
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Description of the Environment
5-56
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 5-27: Views of Agricultural Field in Socioeconomic Study Area
Views of Agriculture Field
Views of Water Logged Land
457. In some communities, the agricultural land is water logged. Goth Haji Imam Bux
Shahano complained that the effluent discharge channel of the JTPS is the cause for
water logging.
5.4.13 Conclusions
458. The rural segments of the Socioeconomic Study Area are more vulnerable to
changes in the socioeconomic environment brought about by the Project, owing to
higher poverty levels (41%). Most of these are located adjacent to the Project site, and
therefore are likely to receive most of the Project impacts. The living conditions in the
rural segments are below par. The rural economy has a simplistic structure, with nearly
76% employed as laborers or farmers. Farming is the main means of sustenance of the
rural people of the Socioeconomic Study Area and Project impacts on local agriculture
will have significant repercussions on the lives of the rural people. In some villages, the
agricultural land has become water logged, which the people believe is due to leakages
from the effluent discharge channel of the power plant.
459. The colonies and the urban areas together constitute the more developed and
better-off segments of the Socioeconomic Study Area. People residing in these areas
have better access to facilities and higher incomes relative to the rural parts of the
Socioeconomic Study Area. Owing to higher education and skill levels prevailing in
these areas, they could offer prospective employment for the Project.
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Description of the Environment
5-57
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
5.5
5.5.1
Transport Route
Karachi to Jamshoro
460. Equipment for the power plant will enter Pakistan either through Karachi Port
(KPT) or Port Bin Qasim. Imported coal will be transported from Port Qasim to JTPS by
train wagons. JTPS is connected to the national rail network through a connection to the
Kotri-Dadu track.
461. For the transportation of equipment and material from the ports to JTPS two road
options are the M-9 (Super Highway) and the National Highway N-5. The total distance
using M-9 from KPT to JTPS is about 170 km and about 200 km using N5 through Makli.
While distance from Port Bin Qasim using M-9 is about 150 km and about 190 km via
N-5. The routes are shown in Figure 5-28. The detailed traffic data is included in
Appendix 5.
5.5.2
Thar to Jamshoro
462. The indigenous coal, if sourced from Thar, will be transported to Jamshoro by rail
for which network will have to be extended to Thar. Studies for route selection are being
conducted by Pakistan Railways.
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Description of the Environment
5-58
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 5-28: Road Network
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Description of the Environment
5-59
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
6. Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6.1
Identification of Significant Environmental Aspects
463. Environmental assessment of the projects which involve existing facilities require
the EIA to cover the potential environmental impact of proposed activity and to address
any environmental issues of the existing facilities. To realize this, ADB requires that an
environmental audit of the existing facilities be undertaken to identify past or present
concerns related to impacts on the environment, involuntary resettlement, and
indigenous peoples and to demonstrate that the past actions were in accordance with
ADB’s safeguard principles.
If the audit identifies non-conformance, plans for
appropriate remedial measure are to be developed to address outstanding issues. The
results of environmental audit undertaken to address the existing issues are included in
this section.
464. In Table 6-1, the potential environmental issues of the existing facilities are
discussed. Each of the potential impacts are discussed in the following sections.
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Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-1
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table 6-1: Potential Environmental and Socioeconomic Impacts of the Existing Plant
Plant Activity
Oil decanting
at plant site
Issue
Spillage of oil in the decanting area
Impacts and
Risk (H=High, M=Medium, L=Low)
Contamination of soil in the
decanting area (H)
Contamination of the
groundwater (L)
Contamination of the surface
water from surface run-off from
the plant site (M)
Cleaning and
maintenance of
boiler and
other
equipment
Waste is dumped in open areas within
the plant boundary. The waste is not
classified and may contain hazardous
material such as asbestos, which is
part of some of the old equipment
Solid waste dumping in the open
area is contaminating the soil
and leachate from the sumps
which may affect the
groundwater (L)
Deterioration of air quality (L)
Contamination to the surface
water from surface run-off from
the plant site (M)
Wastewater
Release of water form boilers and
discharge from demin plant and water contaminated
the plant
with oil outside the plant boundary
through open unlined drains as the
exiting evaporation pond that was
designed to handle these effluents is
dysfunctional.
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Soil and groundwater
contamination (M)
Discussion
Spillage of fuel oil from decanting operations is extensive and
widespread, and hydrocarbons in the soil have accumulated
ever since the plant went into operation. Overflow from the
oil sumps and materials removed during cleaning of oil
storage tanks have also accumulated on the ground. Fuel oil
contains heavy hydrocarbons which diffuse relatively slowly
in subsoil in comparison to lighter petroleum products such
as diesel. The risk of the oil seeping through the soil and
contaminating the groundwater is therefore low, the
contamination of soil notwithstanding. Owing to high salinity
of natural groundwater in the Study Area in general, the local
community in the plant vicinity does not use groundwater.
Impact on the local community due to any deterioration in
groundwater quality is therefore not anticipated.
Soot and other material from cleaning and maintenance of
boilers and asbestos cement sheets removed from cooling
towers during maintenance are presently being dumped at a
number of locations within the plant boundary. Asbestos
sheets are also found in the abandoned buildings. There is
risk of leaching of heavy metals from the waste into soils and
getting transported into depressions and water bodies
outside the plant boundary.
Cooling system effluent meets NEQS. However oil
contaminated water is released outside the north western
boundary of the plant adjacent to the road tanker decanting
area which is resulting in soil contamination.
Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-2
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Plant Activity
Issue
Impacts and
Risk (H=High, M=Medium, L=Low)
Discussion
Release of clarifier/coagulator blow
down and cooling water blow down
through open unlined channels results
in formation of unregulated ponds in
the surrounding areas
Land outside the boundary
where effluent is drained is
impacted (M)
In the original design the clarifier/coagulator blow down and
cooling water blow down were drained through a pipeline into
the Indus River. This pipeline is damaged and not in use,
and a dug channel is used for draining the effluent. While
some of the effluent tis used for agriculture, water spreads
outside the plant boundary into depressions. The
groundwater is not used for drinking in the area, but
inundation of land is extensive.
Emission of
combustion
products
Discharge of pollutants from the
existing stacks deteriorates air quality
Impact on health of the
populations residing in the
vicinity of the plant from
exposure to pollutants released
by the plant (H)
The plant uses HSFO that contain typically 3% to 3.5% sulfur
which gets converted to sulfur dioxide during the combustion
process. Unless the emission control equipment is installed,
the plant will continue to pollute the surrounding air quality.
Discharge of
wastewater
from housing
colony
Effluent from colony is released
without treatment and does not meet
NEQS
Land outside the boundary
where effluent is drained is
impacted. Farmers that use
water for agriculture are
exposed to pathogens in the
wastewater (M)
Waste from a municipal or residential area needs treatment
before it can be used for agriculture or released from the
boundary of the residential area.
Disposal of
solid waste
from housing
colony
Colony’s solid waste is dumped in
open areas inside the colony boundary
Leaching and run off from the
waste can contaminate surface
and ground water resources.
The waste is an eye sour and
causes odor (M)
The waste needs proper disposal.
Emission of
noise
Noise level in the plant area exceeds
the occupational safety based limits
Exposure of plant staff to noise
that exceeds NEQS limits (M)
The occupational safety issue can be addressed by proper
occupational safety measures.
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Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-3
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Plant Activity
Issue
General plant
Occupational safety
operations and
maintenance
Discussion
Injuries to plant staff from
accidents and lost work hours
(M)
Safety management is standard industry practice and legal
responsibility of plant management. Systems, procedures
and practices for housekeeping are not documented and
formally implemented at the plant.
General house keeping
Poor housekeeping can
adversely impact the efficiency
of environment, health, and
safety management at plant (L)
Procedures and practices for housekeeping are not
streamlined or standardized at the plant.
Unaddressed grievances of Project
stakeholders due to absence of
grievance redress mechanism
Ill will of local people towards the While the grievances are addressed on occasional basis, a
formal system for addressing the grievances to ensure that
Project (M)
closures on the issues are achieved expeditiously is
required.
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Impacts and
Risk (H=High, M=Medium, L=Low)
Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-4
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
6.2
Discharge of Untreated Wastewater from the Plant
465. Plant effluent includes cooling tower discharge, boilers’ blowdown, laboratory
waste, plant washing wastewater, water from oil-water separator at the oil decanting
area. The impacts of existing practices related to treatment and disposal of plant
effluents other than those related to oil decanting and storage and corrective measures
proposed are discussed in this section. Impacts related to oil decanting and storage are
addressed separately in Section 6.6.
466. Groundwater sampling was conducted in the Study Area to assess groundwater
quality and possible contamination from the power plant. Effluent water streams and the
quantities of effluents released form the plant are detailed Figure 6-1. Effluent from
plant is released outside the boundary at several locations which has affected areas
outside the plant (Figure 6-2). The locations of the samples (Figure 6-3) were selected
to ensure coverage of the Study Area. Three effluent wastewater samples were
collected from overflow from evaporation ponds, and one from the main open channel
draining the effluent from the plant cooling system into River Indus. Groundwater
sampling was conducted in the possible ground water flow direction. Rationale for
location of sampling points is summarized in Table 6–2.
467. Sampling was carried out in the month of June 2012. Laboratory chemical
analysis were undertaken by ALS Malaysia (ISO 17025:2005 accredited), who
undertook internal quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) including analysis of
reference samples, laboratory duplicates and method blanks. The samples from the
field survey were analyzed for different parameters. These included physiochemical
parameters, such as pH, dissolved oxygen, bicarbonates, chlorides, and sulfates, and
heavy metals (iron, aluminum, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, manganese, mercury, nickel,
lead selenium, and zinc). Arsenic content in the drinking water was also monitored for
the field samples. The groundwater samples analysis results are provided in Table 6–3.
468. Effluent from plant is released outside the boundary at several locations. The
main reason of open drainage of plant effluents outside the plant boundary is the
overflow from the unlined evaporation ponds which are apparently not in use at present,
and the blockage of the effluent drainage pipeline originally installed to drain the plant
effluents into Indus River.
469. Analysis of effluent water is presented in Table 6–4.
observations from the analysis of the samples:
Following are key
The pH is within limits of the National Standards for Drinking Water (NSDW) for
all the samples.
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-5
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 6-1: Plant Water and Wastewater Circuit
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Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-6
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 6–2: Areas Affected by Plant and Housing Colony Effluent Water
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-7
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 6–3: Environmental Sampling Locations
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Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-8
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table 6–2: Locations of Sampling Points for Water
No.
Type of
Sample
1
Groundwate
r
JGW1
Effluent channel
25°28'39.5"N Sample taken close to the
outside the north east 68°16'34.6"E effluent channel to check
corner of plant
contamination of
boundary
groundwater due to
seepage from plant
effluents
2
Groundwate
r
JGW2
150 m north of
25°28'51.8"N Sample taken at a distance
effluent channel
68°16'37.9"E from effluent drain to check
outside the north east
if contamination of
corner of plant
groundwater due to
boundary
seepage from plant
effluents has spread locally
3
Plant
Effluent
Water
JEW1
Channel draining
boiler and other plant
effluents into the
evaporation pond
located outside the
north east corner of
plant boundary
4
Plant
Effluent
Water
JEW2
Effluent from the plant 25°28'14.6"N Sample taken to check if
cooling water system 68°16'22.7"E there could be a threat to
located outside plant
groundwater resources
boundary wall east of
from seepage from the
the cooling water
release of the effluent into
treatment area
depressions outside the
plant boundary.
5
Plant
Effluent
Water
JEW3
Combined effluent
from the boiler and
other plant sources
and plant cooling
water system located
outside the north east
corner of plant
boundary about 800
m downstream of
JEW2
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
Sample
ID
Location
Coordinates
Comments
25°28'39.0"N Sample taken to check if
68°16'24.0"E the effluent meets the
NEQS
25°28'33.9"N Sample taken to check if
68°16'43.8"E the effluent meets the
NEQS and if there could
68°18'11.0"E be a threat to groundwater
68°18'33.6"E resources from overflow
from the evaporation
ponds.
Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-9
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table 6–3: Groundwater Quality Results
Unit
Ag
µg/l
1
–
–
<1
<1
Al
µg/l
1
<200
200
–
–
As
µg/l
1
≤ 50
10
<1
<1
B
µg/l
10
300
300
632
1,320
Ba
µg/l
1
700
700
48
26
Cd
µg/l
1
10
3
<1
<1
Cl
mg/l
<250
250
396
4,110
Cr
µg/l
1
≤ 50
50
<1
2
Cu
µg/l
1
2,000
2,000
2
<1
F
mg/l
0.1
≤ 1.5
1.5
1.8
4
Fe
µg/l
10
–
–
30
11
Hg
µg/l
0.5
≤ 1
1
<0.5
<0.5
Mn
µg/l
1
≤ 500
500
0.242
0.024
Ni
µg/l
1
≤ 20
20
3
5
Pb
µg/l
1
≤ 50
1
<1
<1
Sb
µg/l
1
<20
20
–
–
Se
µg/l
1
≤ 10
10
<10
13
Zn
µg/l
5
5,000
3,000
<5
6
CN
mg/l
0.05
≤ .05
0.07
–
–
BOD
mg/l
4
–
–
–
–
COD
mg/l
5
–
–
–
–
NH3
mg/l
0.5
–
402
–
–
Nitrate
mg/l
0.1
–
–
–
–
CaCo3
mg/l
1
<500
–
–
–
SO4
mg/l
1
–
–
669
2,840
TDS
mg/l
1
<1,000
<1,000
2,160
9,450
TSS
mg/l
4
–
1503
–
–
1
2
3
LOR
NSDW1
Parameters
WHO
Sample JGW1
(Close to
Evaporation Pond
Overflow Channel,
at 1m Depth)
Sample JGW2 (150
m from
Evaporation Pond
Overflow Channel,
at 1.9 m Depth)
S,R.O. 1062 (I)/2010, National Environmental Quality Standards for drinking water
S,R.O. 549 (I)/2000, National Environmental Quality Standards for Municipal and Liquid Industrial
effluents
Ibid
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Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-10
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Parameters
Unit
LOR
Phosphates
mg/l
0.1
Odour
WHO
–
–
Acceptable Acceptable
pH
0.1
Residual
chlorine
mg/l
0.1
Taste
Color
CU
Temp.
o
Turbidity
NSDW1
6.5–8.5
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
–
–
–
7.1
5–1.5 at
source
–
–
Acceptable Acceptable
–
–
–
–
37
37
–
–
1
0.0
–
Sample JGW2 (150
m from
Evaporation Pond
Overflow Channel,
at 1.9 m Depth)
7.0
C
NTU
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
6.5–8.5
Sample JGW1
(Close to
Evaporation Pond
Overflow Channel,
at 1m Depth)
< 5 NTU
< 5 NTU
Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-11
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table 6–4: Effluent Water Quality Results
Parameter
Unit
LOR
Ag
ug/l
1
Al
ug/l
1
As
ug/l
1
B
ug/l
10
Ba
ug/l
Cd
NEQS
4
Sample
Sample ID
JEW1
JEW2
JEW3
Location
Evaporation Pond
Water Disposal
channel
Evaporation Pond
Overflow
<1
<1
<1
2
1
<1
6,000
271
156
305
1
1,500
117
71
78
ug/l
1
100
<1
<1
<1
Cl
mg/l
5
1,000
220
156
370
Cr
ug/l
1
1,000
1
<1
<1
Cu
ug/l
1
1,000
18
1
<1
F
mg/l
0.1
20
8
7
15
Fe
ug/l
10
2,000
99
30
16
Hg
ug/l
0.5
10
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
Mn
ug/l
1
1,500
19
14
<1
Ni
ug/l
1
1,000
3
<1
3
Pb
ug/l
1
500
<1
<1
<1
Sb
ug/l
1
Se
ug/l
1
500
<10
<10
<10
4
S,R.O. 549 (I)/2000, National Environmental Quality Standards for Municipal and Liquid Industrial effluents
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6-12
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Parameter
Unit
Zn
LOR
ug/l
5
mg/l
SO4
NEQS
4
Sample
Sample ID
JEW1
JEW2
JEW3
Location
Evaporation Pond
Water Disposal
channel
Evaporation Pond
Overflow
5,000
12
<5
<5
0.05
20
0.14
0.11
0.05
mg/l
1
600
317
108
268
TDS
mg/l
1
3,500
797
568
1,350
TSS
mg/l
1
150
1
1
1
Nitrate
mg/l
1
Phosphate
mg/l
1
BOD
mg/l
5
80
55.78
15.98
7.13
COD
mg/l
4
150
157.92
48.88
18.80
NH3
mg/l
<5
40
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
6 to 10
7.10
7.20
7.30
40
37.00
37.00
37.00
Detergents
MBAS
as
pH
Temp
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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o
C
Issues Related to Existing Plant and Corrective Actions
6-13
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Effluent water quality represented by Effluent Water Samples JEW2, main
effluent channel carrying water to the river, and JEW3, evaporation pond
overflow, is well within the limits set by the NEQS for all categories. The only
exception is COD in the evaporation pond overflow as indicated by Effluent
Water Sample JEW1 taken at the evaporation pond which was observed to be
slightly above the NEQS. The COD in this sample was observed at 158 mg/l in
comparison to the NEQS limit of 150 mg/l. This effluent stream will not be
drained into the river following the rehabilitation of the evaporation pond as
proposed in Section 6.2.2. The BOD and COD of the main plant effluent
stream that carries the plant effluent to the river, Effluent Water Sample JEW2
(water disposal channel, BOD 16 mg/l, COD 49 mg/l) and JEW3 (evaporation
pond overflow, BOD 7 mg/l, COD19 mg/l), are, however, well within the NEQS
limits.
Effluent water also meets the NDWS limits for heavy metals5, again except in
the case of the evaporation pond overflow (Effluent Water Sample JEW3)
where boron was detected at 305 µg/l as compared to NDWS limit of 300 µg/l.
Boron contamination in the main effluent channel carrying the water to the river
(Effluent Water Sample JEW2) was observed at 156 µg/l.
470. In conclusion, the effluent water meets the NEQS and NDWS, except for COD
and boron which were observed to be marginally above the applicable standards.
6.2.1
Cooling Tower Blow Down and Clarifier/Coagulator Blow Down
471. The river water is used in the cooling tower and discharged back into the river
after use. In the original plant design, the cooling tower effluent was transported to the
river by means of a steel pipe. This piping system was damaged during the first five
years of plant operation, and subsequently a channel with stone pitching on the slopes
was constructed to drain the cooling tower effluent into the river. The stone pitching is
badly damaged resulting in the spread of effluent to the surrounding areas and formation
of localized unregulated ponds and wetlands which have affected areas outside the plant
(Figure 6–2). This water is also used for irrigation in some areas. The main reason of
open drainage of plant effluents outside the plant boundary is the blockage of the
effluent drainage pipeline originally installed to drain the river water treatment plant
(clarifier/coagulator blow down) and cooling tower effluent into Indus River. Photographs
of areas affected by the open drainage of plant effluents are included in Figure 6–4.
Communities have complained about land degradation from the seepage. The land
degradation can be seen on satellite image (Google Earth). It is extensive near the plant
and extends all the way to the river.
472. Faunal species such as amphibians, fish and turtles reside in these ponds and
wetlands. Irregular flow of this water as well its quality could impact these species.
However, no species of conservation concern have been reported from these wetlands.
The migratory and resident birds prefer to visit the river, rather than these wetlands,
where greater abundance of food and shelter is available. As long as the quality and
flow of this water is regulated by the Project, this impact is not expected to have any
significant impact on ecology.
5
The effluent water does not meet the NDWS overall due to presence of other contaminants such as
BOD and COD.
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Figure 6–4: Photographic Evidence of Land Affected by Effluent Water
Ponds created by plant effluent discharged
Vegetation growth in unlined evaporation pond
Open discharge of oily waste water
Oil drained from decanting area
473.
The following corrective measures will be undertaken:
The plant wastewater system will be revamped to ensure that the cooling tower
effluent is segregated from other plant wastewater. The cooling tower effluent is
NEQS compliant and the segregation will ensure that it remains so. However, if
it can ensured that mixing of one or more other waste streams will not result
making the effluent non-compliant with the NEQS, such mixing may be
undertaken.
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A pipeline for transport of effluent from the plant to the river will be installed, as
in the original design of the plant, which was operated for about first five years
after the plant was commissioned, and then abandoned.
As the effluent meets the NEQS and is suitable for agricultural use, the option of
regulated discharge for agricultural use will be considered. Any release of water
for agricultural or environmental purposes will be controlled by the plant by
providing outlets for the purpose in consultation with the farmers and local
wildlife authorities.
Uncontrolled release of water will be avoided.
6.2.2
Effluents from Boilers, Demin Plant, and Laboratory
474. The current system was designed to discharge the wastewater from boilers,
laboratory and other minor streams including oil contaminated water to an evaporation
pond located on the east of the plant in the utilities area. However, the whole system
has completely deteriorated. Due to lack of maintenance and growth of weeds and
grass in the evaporation pond, the pond is no more functional and is unsuitable for any
evaporation. The effluent is instead discharged to an open ditch located near the
evaporation pond. The effluent seeps and overflows from the ditch to the surrounding
land.
475. Groundwater Samples JGW1 and JGW2 represent ground water extracted at a
depth of about 2m in the proximity of the drain carrying effluent discharged from the
plant into the evaporation pond area. The two sub–surface samples have similar quality.
Both of them are high in salt contents (boron, chloride, sulfate and TDS). However, the
heavy metal contents are within the limits indicating that the high salt content is due to
natural conditions and is unlikely to be caused by the effluent from the evaporation pond.
The community does not use groundwater for drinking in this area as the groundwater is
saline as indicated by TDS of 9,450 mg/l for Groundwater Sample JGW2 (Table 6-2)
located close to a settlement.
476. The evaporation ponds may attract mammals which could drink this
contaminated water and become exposed to health risks. Ingestion by small mammals
and birds may also lead to bioaccumulation of toxins within the food chain. Bird species
that may be present in close proximity to the site are susceptible to this impact.
However, these birds are highly susceptible to disturbance and are likely to avoid areas
affected by the power plant activities. Migratory birds passing the site will also be
susceptible to contaminated water during the migration period.
477.
The following measures will be undertaken:
The plant wastewater system will be revamped to ensure that potentially
hazardous and non-NEQS compliant effluent is segregated as in the original
design. As indicated in Table 6-5, this will include waste water from the boilers
and demin plant, oily water waste, discharge of the septic tank for the treatment
of the office waste water.
The evaporation pond will be reconstructed. It will be a ‘zero-discharge’ system
which means that it will be sized to ensure that it can receive all hazardous
wastewater from the plant without the need to discharge to the surrounding
areas or the Indus River.
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The pond will be lined to avoid seepage from the pond and potential
contamination of the surrounding land.
Table 6-5: Plant Water Balance
Existing Status Original Design
3
3
(m /sec )
(m /sec)
Total Supply
0.581
0.986
Cooling Water System
0.257
0.522
Silt Removal
0.200
0.340
Boilers
0.024
0.024
Other Plant Uses
0.012
0.012
Offices
0.006
0.006
Housing Colony
0.082
0.082
0.581
0.986
Coagulator Blow Down
0.200
0.340
Cooling Tower Blow Down
0.077
0.078
Other Plant Wastewater
0.010
0.010
Total Returned to the River (B)
0.287
0.428
Boiler Blow Down and Demin Plant Waste
0.011
0.011
Office Septic Tanks
0.004
0.004
Water from Oil-Water Separators
0.001
0.001
Total to Evaporation Pond (C)
0.016
0.016
Wastewater Drained Outside from Housing Colony (D)
0.058
0.058
Total Wastewater (EB+C+D)
0.361
0.502
Cooling Tower Evaporation
0.180
0.444
Other Losses and Uses
0.041
0.041
Total (F)
0.221
0.485
0.581
0.986
Distribution
Total Distribution (A)
Waste Generated
Losses, Evaporation and Uses
Total Waste and Losses (E+F)
(Except Water from Oil-Water Separators)
6.3
Municipal Wastewater
478. The municipal wastewater from the JTPS staff housing colony is presently
pumped out of the colony. No analysis of the effluent is available; however, given the
nature of the effluent it is likely to be non-compliant with the NEQS. The main issues are
likely to be with fecal coliform, biological oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen
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demand (COD). The effluent is used for agricultural purposes by the community located
adjacent to the colony boundary. As the farm workers come in contact with the effluent,
they are potentially exposed to harmful substances which are likely to affect their health.
479.
To address this issue following measure will be undertaken:
A small wastewater treatment plant will be installed in the housing colony. It will
have a capacity to treat about 207 m3/h of domestic waste water. The effluent
after treatment will be provided to community, as now, as they depend on the
flow for their sustenance.
6.4
Air Emission from Stacks
480. The existing power plant has four units, three are dual fired i.e., can operate on
both furnace oil and gas and one operates only on the fuel oil. As discussed in
Chapter 2, there is shortage of natural gas in the country and the power plant is
primarily running on HSFO. The flue gas from the existing plant operations may contain
harmful pollutants that may impact the flora and fauna of the area. The migratory and
resident birds that pass through the area and the reptilian species of the deserts located
on the western side of the power plant are likely to be affected. The sulphur dioxide
emission from the existing stacks is in excess of 2,500 mg/Nm3 which is not only far in
excess of IFC emission guidelines (200 mg/Nm3) but also results in serious ambient air
quality issues.
481.
To address this issue following measure will be taken:
Two FGDs will be installed, one on each stack of the existing power plant.
6.5
6.5.1
Solid and Hazardous Waste
Solid Hazardous Waste from the Power Plant Operation
482. Plant generates various types of waste.
hazardous. Potential hazardous waste include:
Some of these are potentially
Asbestos in the scrap piles located in the plant. Additional asbestos may be
discarded during rehabilitation work.
Soot removed from the boilers, which is at present dumped in open area near
the fuel oil tanks.
483. As part of the baseline, soil samples were collected from Study Area for analysis.
The soil samples were collected from a) within the plant to identify any possible seepage
and contamination from the operations of the existing plant and b) two locations to the
north and south of the Plant to describe the baseline conditions of the Study Area. The
sampling locations are shown in Figure 6–3.
484. The samples were analyzed for metals and petroleum hydrocarbon. There are
no regulatory criteria for soils. To provide the context to discuss the soil analysis results
for metals and understand if there are any environmental or health risk, the target limit
for metals in the soil is set as three times the average abundance of metals in the earth’s
crust. A parameter is considered ‘elevated’ if its concentration in the soil sample is more
than three times its average crustal abundance. Soil analysis results (Table 6-6) shows
that the concentration of all parameters, except lead, in the background samples (JSQ5
and JSQ6) are within the target limit. The results of the four samples collected from the
plant area show evidence of soil contamination. The concentration of barium, chromium,
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copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel and zinc in the soil samples collected from the
plant are higher compared to the background soil samples by about 2 to 10 times.
However, except lead, all parameters are within the target limit.
485. The main concern is regarding lead. The average concentration of lead in the
background Soil Sample JSQ5 taken at a depth of 2 m is 67 milligram per kilogram
(mg/kg), more than two times the average crustal abundance of 30 mg/kg. Soil Sample
JSQ6 taken in the town of Jamshoro at a depth of 0.5 m shows a lead concentration of
87 mg/kg, possibly indicating the impact of lead deposits associated with transport fuels.
In the samples collected from the plant the concentration of lead is as much as 6 times
higher. This is, on average, 10 times higher than the average crustal abundance.
486. Soil contamination has taken place at the plant site due to dumping of waste.
The sites that are contaminated due to fuel oil spills and open stockpiling of solid waste
by the operation and maintenance of the existing plant are shown in Figure 6–5. Lead
contamination could originate from both solid waste and fuel oil spills.
487. Presently there is no system for identification and containment of hazardous
waste. Asbestos rope is presently used for insulation of piping in the boiler area.
Corrugated cement asbestos sheets are also being used on the sides of the water
cooling structures to prevent drift losses. Estimated quantities of asbestos that are
installed in the plant equipment and buildings and stockpiled mainly at the solid waste
dumping area and at scattered locations at the plant site are summarized in Table 6-7.
About 4.7 tonnes of asbestos sheets are piled up mainly in the dumping area, while
67 tonnes are installed in the cooling towers. Residues from cleaning of boilers including
soot removed from the boilers are dumped in the solid waste disposal area located north
of the oil storage and decanting. The quantity of the boiler soot dumped at the plant site
is estimated at 22 tonnes. Table 6-8 provides the analysis of the boiler soot.
Concentration of nickel was observed to be 1,221 mg/kg compared to about 6 mg/kg in
the background Soil Samples JSQ5 and JSQ6 outside the plant site, and 270 mg/kg
corresponding to the three times the crustal abundance. This indicates a need for
containment of the boiler soot in the ash pond or a lined hazardous waste storage
facility.
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Table 6-6: Soil Analysis Results
Parameters
Units
LOR
Three times
Crustal
abundance
Depth of Sample
o
Moisture @ 103 C
Samples
Sample ID
JSQ1
JSQ2
JSQ3
JSQ4
JSQ5
JSQ6
Location
Oil decanting
Area
Oil-water
separation pond
Evaporation
pond
Soot
disposal
site
Goth Firi Khan
Khoso
Jamshoro
City
2m
2m
1m
2m
2m
0.5m
11.8
12.2
27.9
3.3
6.7
1.4
%
0.1
Arsenic
mg/kg
1
6.3
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
Barium
mg/kg
5
1,020
34
33
84
26
10
14
Boron
mg/kg
5
26.1
<5
<5
<5
<5
<5
<5
Cadmium
mg/kg
0.05
0.5
<0.05
<0.05
<0.05
<0.05
<0.05
<0.05
Chromium
mg/kg
0.05
420
29.0
26.2
32.7
35.3
18.6
13.1
Copper
mg/kg
0.5
204
19.8
15.8
40.6
15.4
3.5
4.8
Iron
mg/kg
0.5
189,000
44,300
35,200
30,600
19,500
4,150
4,480
Lead
mg/kg
1
30
351
231
412
136
48
87
Manganese
mg/kg
1
3,300
6
4
16
3
<1
<1
Nickel
mg/kg
0.5
270
19.7
15.4
43.3
46.7
5.2
7.6
Selenium
mg/kg
5*
0.225
<5
<5
<5
<5
<5
<5
Silver
mg/kg
1*
0.225
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
<1
Zinc
mg/kg
0.5
237
46.1
35.1
66.7
34.2
8.2
9.4
Mercury
mg/kg
0.5*
0.267
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH)
TPH (C6-C9 fraction)
mg/kg
5
<5
<5
<5
<5
<5
<5
C10-C14 fraction
mg/kg
50
<50
699.0
<50
<50
<50
<50
C15-C28 fraction
mg/kg
100
<100
12,500
<100
<100
<100
<100
C29-C36 fraction
mg/kg
100
<100
8,500
<100
<100
<100
<100
*
The samples were tested to standard levels of detection only. The results indicate that there are no major alarms and secondly the remaining metals analysis was sufficient
to establish trend.
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Figure 6–5: Photographic Evidence of Potential Land Contamination
Asbestos waste
Boiler soot
Boiler soot
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Table 6-7: Inventory of Hazardous Waste
Sr.
Location
Number of
Sheets
Unit Weight
kg
Total Weight
kg
Asbestos Sheets
1
Solid Waste Dump
112
42
4,704
2
Unit-1s Cooling Tower, Longitudinal
672
42
28,224
3
Unit-1 Cooling Tower, Latitudinal
224
42
9,408
4
Construction Camp (Abandoned) Hall 1
175
42
7,350
5
Construction Camp (Abandoned) Hall 2
175
42
7,350
6
Construction Camp (Abandoned) Hall 3
175
42
7,350
7
Construction Camp (Abandoned) Hall 4
175
42
7,350
Total
71,736
Table 6-8: Analysis of the Boiler Soot
Elements
Concentrations
(µg/g)
LOD
As
ND
0.50
Cd
ND
0.09
Cr
43
0.21
Cu
43
0.35
Fe
96112
0.34
Mn
404
0.10
Ni
1221
0.50
Pb
5
0.27
Se
ND
0.50
* LOD - Limits of Determination; ND – Not Detected
488. A hazardous waste facility will be developed at the plant near the switchyard to
safe disposal of potentially hazardous waste. The measures that will be taken are as
follows:
All potentially hazardous waste in the plant will be identified
Hazardous waste will be segregated from other type of waste
A temporary storage area for asbestos will be developed which will fenced.
Access to the area will be control.
An awareness campaign will be undertaken for the workers regarding the
hazardous wastes.
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Safe handling procedures will be developed for each type of waste. The
procedures will be written and will be in English as well as vernacular
languages.
All storage areas for the hazardous waste will be clearly marked with a proper
hazard sign.
Appropriate personal protection equipment (PPE) will be provided to the staff
who will be handling the hazardous waste.
489. Design of a facility to store about 500 m3 of hazardous waste is illustrated in
Figure 6-6. The facility will have a capacity of approximately 500 m3 of waste. The
facility will cover an area of 400 m2 and essentially consist of:
One cell, 20 m
10 m with working depth of 3.0 m
Leachate collection sump
Storm water management, and
Monitoring wells
Fencing and access
490. The leachate or storm water, if any, will be collected and pumped to the
evaporation ponds located at the plant site. A geological barrier will be established,
consisting of a 0.5 m thick layer of either compacted clay (96% modified and with a
hydraulic conductivity of 1 10–9 m/s or less), or bentonite-enriched sand. The leachate
sealing system will consist of a flexible geomembrane liner (1-mm-thick, multilayer
HDPE) laid above the compacted clay. Minimum bottom slopes of the liner will be 2%
towards drainage lines. The leachate collection system will consist of a drainage layer
and leachate collection pipe work, sumps and pumps. A fenced boundary will be
required to restrict access to the facility. All areas identified as hazardous or containing
plant and equipment within the site will be enclosed. An operations and maintenance
plan will be prepared and include the operations and maintenance procedures for the
facility.
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Figure 6-6: Hazardous Waste Storage Facility Jamshoro
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6.5.2
Solid Waste Management of Colony and Office Waste from the Power Plant
491. The JTPS staff housing colony generates an estimated 750 tons of solid waste
annually. As there is no proper disposal system, the waste is scattered around the
colony. There is currently no solid waste management system in place at the power
plant either to manage waste generated in the plant offices. The waste dumps can be
seen in different location of the plant and the colony (Chapter 5). The solid waste is
presently being disposed of in the dug pits which are later covered by soil. There is no
municipal solid waste disposal facility available in the vicinity of the plant where the
waste can be sent for disposal. Aspects resulting from no solid waste management are:
Contamination of surface and sub-surface soil by leaching from the dumps
Contamination of surface water in case of runoff
Transportation of contamination from leaching to the ground water aquifer
Possible attraction of scavengers to the solid waste dumps
Attraction of pests to the waste dumps resulting in spread of disease vectors
General nuisance and odor
492. A properly designed landfill to cater for the plant needs will be developed. Other
mitigation measures will include:
Collection of waste on daily basis from the colony houses and office premises of
the plant
Placement of bins in the key area with proper labeling for the type of waste to
be thrown in the bin and segregation of waste
Awareness campaigns on municipal waste management including segregation,
reuse and recycling
6.6
Oil Decanting
493. The fuel oil used for the power plant since 1991 was transported through the rail
network until 2003 and using road tanker since then. The inefficient fuel decanting
system resulted in leakages which contaminated the surface and sub-surface soil.
Although, there is no evidence of presence of shallow groundwater aquifer in the area
and the risk of contamination of any deep aquifer is insignificant due to presence of
rocky outcrop, contamination of soil does constitute a risk to the environment. Surface
run-off from the contaminated soil can carry the oil to other areas and affect the
surrounding land.
494. Presently the spillage from the oil decanting operations is routed to an unlined pit
(Figure 6-7) where oil and water are separated and the oil is returned to the storage
tanks. The separated and oil contaminated water is pumped out into an open drain that
ultimately flows into the drainage from the plant at the evaporation ponds. It is
understood that JTPS has recently procured a spilled oil collection and drainage system
for the decanting station. However, a proper API separator is still required to replace the
unlined pit.
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Figure 6-7: Unlined Pit Used for Oil-Water Separation
495. Total petroleum hydrocarbon was not found in the background samples and
three out of four samples from the plant site. Boring was conducted to study the depth
of oil contamination, and the color of the samples was observed. The depth of
contamination in the area contaminated by fuel oil spills is illustrated in Figure 6–8. The
soil samples collected from oil water separation pond area indicates presence of higher
hydrocarbon (C10-C38) in the soil at a depth of 1-2 m. Depth of contamination at other
locations mainly along the track of the tank lorries and railway wagons carrying oil, and
the oil decanting area generally varies from 0.3 m to 1.0 m. The contamination levels
vary in different areas. Further, some of the contaminated soil near the oil decanting
area is covered with fresh soil. The geo-technical analysis of the sub-surface lithology
available with the JPCL indicates that nearly limestone is present at shallow depth.
Therefore it is likely that the contaminated soil is contained, sitting on hard rock.
496. Detailed assessment was carried out (Appendix 6) in order to determine the
precise extent of the soil contamination in the plant site (quantity of contaminated soil
and the concentration of oil in the soil). The assessment also evaluated the risk of
groundwater contamination and hazards to the community and the environment from the
contaminated soil. Where, rationale for leaving the soil in the ground because it is
contained can be found, a decision can be taken on whether to remove the
contaminated soil for remediation or to leave it in place. Based on the assessment it
was determined that the total quantity of contaminated soil is approximately 38,900 cubic
meter (m3) with contamination in excess of 23,000 mg/kg. In addition about 30,000 m3
of soil has low contamination (on average 2,000 mg/kg). This comprises the surface
contamination near the decanting area and on roads and subsurface contamination. No
groundwater was found during the assessment and in most cases hard rock was
encountered below the surface. The bulk of the sub-surface contaminated soil is located
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near the northern boundary on land adjacent to the land that is planned to be purchased
for ash pond. If this land is purchased, the sub-surface soil is likely to be contained and
not pose any threat to environment. On the other hand, if this land is not purchased, the
soil must be removed and remediation be undertaken. If it is decided that removal is
required a soil remediation plan will be developed to dispose of the oil contaminated soil.
The surface contaminated soil will be collected and disposed of in the hazardous waste
facility to be developed at the plant.
Figure 6–8: Soil Contamination Sites
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497.
The following corrective measures are planned:
JPCL will ensure that the spilled oil collection and drainage system for the
decanting station is commissioned not later than June 2014.
Until the spilled oil collection and drainage system is installed, drip pans will be
provided at the decanting station to prevent further spills on soil.
The concerned staff will be provided training in prevention of spills.
The surface contaminated soil from the decanting area will be collected and
stored in a secured place for future disposal.
The subsurface contaminated soil will be cleaned preferably through
bio-remediation, in case the adjacent land is not purchased.
During ash pond development, the contaminated soil area will be inspected and
if necessary, containment wall be constructed to prevent any lateral spread.
6.7
Occupational Health and Safety and Housekeeping
498. In general, occupational health and safety procedures are not being followed at
the Plant. This results in unnecessary exposure of the workers to various types of
occupational hazards including noise. Use of PPEs, safety criteria for heated surface,
working at heights and entering confined spaces6 entry are standards procedures
worldwide.
499. A complete occupational health and safety management system will be
developed at the plant. At the minimum, the components of the system will include:
It will be ensured that PPE are available
Development of safety standards for heated surface, working at heights at
confined spaces, scaffolding, ladders, cranes, and workshop
Training in use of PPE.
Identification of areas in the plant noise level regularly exceeds 85 dB(A),
demarcation of the are through signs and markings on the floor, and the
mandatory requirement to wear ear protection in these areas.
Development of general housekeeping procedures. This may include for
example, storage yard, signage, demarcation, provision of spill control
equipment, provision of waste bin, segregation of waste.
6.8
Extraction of Water from the River
500. Water is extracted from the Indus River and used for cooling in the JTPS. The
existing power plant requires about 1.0 m3/s of water from the River Indus when
6
“Confined space" means a space that:
Is large enough and so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work; and
Has limited or restricted means for entry or exit (for example, tanks, vessels, silos, storage bins,
hoppers, vaults, and pits are spaces that may have limited means of entry); and
Is not designed for continuous employee occupancy.
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operating at full capacity7. Of this, an estimated quantity of 0.5 m3/s or about 60% of the
inflow is returned to the river8. The net extraction of water by the power plant is
therefore estimated at 0.5 m3/s at full capacity. River flow upstream of Kotri barrage9
varies from a monthly average level of 7,517 m3/s in August, to a monthly average level
of 213 m3/s in December. Water extracted by the power plant is therefore 0.2% of the
minimum monthly average flow of the river. Minimum daily flows in the drought periods
can drop to as low as 14% of the minimum monthly average flows. In these conditions,
the water extracted by the plant as a percent of the river flow will increase to about 1.7%.
This level of change of flow will not cause any significant change in the geomorphology
and the hydraulic parameters of relevance to the river ecology such as the depth of
water, the width of the river, and the area wetted by it.
6.9
Quality and Temperature of the Effluent Discharged into the River
501. Higher pollutant concentrations can occur in the area immediately downstream of
the point of discharge of water by the Project. Samples of river water were taken before
and after the extraction as well as return of water to the river by the Project. Figure 6-3
shows the points where samples were taken during the July 2012 Survey. The
upstream sample was taken at a point about 200m from the plant water intake system.
The downstream sample was taken from the Kalri Baghar Canal on the right bank of the
Kotri barrage approximately 3.5 km downstream of the point where the water from the
power plant is discharged. Both the samples show that the quality of river water is
appropriate for supporting the ecology in the river. As discussed earlier, level of key
pollutants observed in the plant effluents returned to the river were <5 mg/l and <4 mg/l
(below minimum detection limit) for BOD and COD respectively, while the toxic metals,
nitrates, and phosphates were well below the NEQS limits. The concentrations of toxic
metals in the plant effluents were also observed to be below the National Standards for
Drinking Water.
502. The temperature of the water discharged by the plant was observed to be about
only 0.5oC above that of the river water in the June 2102 survey, which is estimated to
increase to 1.1oC when the plant operates at full capacity. Following rehabilitation of the
cooling towers, the net heat release into the Indus River will decrease due to increase in
evaporative heat transfer in the cooling towers. The increase in temperature of the
effluents returned to the river is therefore estimated to drop to 0.7°C after rehabilitation.
The temperature of effluent water discharged into the river is not expected to cause any
detectable impact on the river fauna. As discussed earlier, the plant effluent also meets
the NEQS10 limits for temperature. Modeling of thermal plume assuming a worse case
temperature difference of 2oC between the river water temperature and that of the
effluent water and low flow conditions during a drought period in winter was conducted to
assess the extent of penetration of the plume relative to the available habitat in the river.
7
8
9
10
Water taken from the river was reported at 0.35 cumec when only one power generating unit was
operating during the June 2012 survey.
From sampling conducted in June 2012 when only one of the power generation units was operating,
TDS in the river water were about 430 mg/l, while TDS were 570 mg/l in the effluent water consisting of
cooling tower blow down and water returned from the water treatment plant. A TDS of only 570 in the
effluent water indicates an excessive level of blow down, which could be attributed to a low plant
utilization factor. An estimate of 50% is return is conservative based on the current practice of a high
level of blow down, and will result in TDS of the order of 1,000 mg/l in the effluent water.
Data provided by Sindh Irrigation and Drainage Authority (SIDA) for the period 1986-2004.
The NEQS specify a drop of temperature to within 3°C at a distance of 100 m of the ambient from the
point of discharge.
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United States Environmental Protection Agency’s model Visual Plume11 was used. The
model is designed for simulation of surface water jets and plumes, mixing zone
analyses, and other water quality applications. Table 6-9 provides the parameters that
were used for modeling the cooling water discharge from JTPS into the Indus River.
503. Figure 6-9 illustrates the results of the thermal plume modeling. A temperature
of 0.5oC above that of the river water temperature is reached within a distance of 31 m
downstream from the point of discharge, at a point which is 12 m from the river bank.
Table 6-9: Plume Model Input Parameter
Parameter
Input Value
Discharge Channel Width
2 meters
Discharge Channel Depth
0.3 meters
Angle of Discharge
a
Region of Interest
Port Depth
11
b
90 degrees
1000 meters
0 meters
3
Effluent Flow
0.428 m /s
Effluent Salinity
997 kg/m
Effluent Temperature
24°C
Water Current Speed (m/s)
0.3 m/s
Current Direction
Parallel to shore, towards north
Ambient water density
997 kg/m
3
3
Dilution Models for Effluent Discharges, Visual Plumes Ver. 1.0, Ecosystems Research Division, NERL,
ORD, United States Environmental Protection Agency. Release date August 2001. Downloaded from
http://www.epa.gov/ceampubl/swater/vplume/
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Figure 6-9: Results of the Thermal Plume Modeling
Thermal Plume Path
20
Water Current Direction
(parallel to riverbank)
West-East into the River (m)
18
16
18.3
14
18.4
12
18.5
10
8
18.8
6
Plume Path
19.0
Temperature
4
Plume Boundary
19.6
2
20.0
0
10
20
Discharge
0
30
40
50
60
70
North-South Downstream (m)
80
90
100
504. In the above analysis it is assumed that during the cooling tower operation in
winter the cooling tower blow down is extracted from the outlet of the cooling tower
instead of the present practice of drawing it from the inlet sump of the cooling
tower/condenser outlet. The present practice is not permissible as it adds to the heat
load transferred to the river and adds to the thermal stress on the river ecology when
water at a temperature higher by about 10° C compared to that at the inlet of the cooling
tower is returned to the river. The following are the key mitigation measure that will be
incorporated:
Cooling towers will be revamped to reduce the thermal load on the river and to
minimize the quantity of water extracted from the river for plant use.
Cooling tower blow down will be extracted from the outlet of the cooling tower
instead of the present practice of drawing it from the inlet sump of the cooling
tower/condenser outlet.
6.10 Impacts on Ecology
505. There are several fish species observed in the Study Area and the local
fishermen depend on these fish for their livelihood. In addition, some population of Indus
Blind Dolphin Platanista minor, is also found between in Indus River between Sukkur
and Kotri. However, the prime habitat of this mammal is between Guddu and Sukkur,
which is also a protected area. If the effluent water discharged to the river is
contaminated with toxins and heavy metals, it can impact the macro-invertebrates, algal
species as well as have a negative impact on fish abundance and diversity. Eventually,
the fish tissues can become contaminated and render the fish inedible. Presence of
toxins in the river water can also potentially affect the population of the Indus Blind
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Dolphin. Implementation of mitigation measures listed for the existing plant as detailed in
this chapter will contribute significantly to lowering the impacts of the plant on the
ecological environment. Potential impacts due to the existing plant on ecology following
rehabilitation are summarized below.
506. As discussed in Section 6.8 above, net extraction of water by the existing power
plant is estimated at 0.5 m3/s at full capacity, which under worst case drought conditions
will not exceed 1.7% of the flow of the river. The impact of this level of change in flow on
the geomorphological and hydraulic parameters and consequentially the aquatic fauna
due will therefore be very minor.
507. As discussed in Section 6.9 above, the level of key pollutants in the effluent
returned to the river from the plant will remain well below the NEQS limits, and
concentrations of toxic metals in the plant effluents are below the National Standards for
Drinking Water. The river ecology is not at risk on account of higher point concentrations
of pollutants discharged by the existing power plant into the river. Interviews with local
fishermen also reveal that there is no significant difference in the fish catch upstream or
downstream of where this water is discharged. The magnitude of the impact of the
quality and temperature of the plant effluents discharged into the River Indus on the
aquatic ecology is therefore minor and the significance low.
508. As discussed in Section 6.9 above, the temperature of the effluent discharged
into the river will be 2.0 oC above that of the river in the worst case in winter when the
river flow is at minimum. A temperature of 0.5oC above that of the river water
temperature will be reached within a distance of 31m downstream from the point of
discharge, at a point which is 12m from the river bank. Comparing with the width of the
river of the order of 500 m in the dry season, the magnitude of the impact of the quality
and temperature of the plant effluents discharged into the River Indus on the aquatic
ecology will remain minor and the significance will be low. Slightly warmer water at the
plant effluent outlet in the river in winter will not stress the aquatic species as they will
not be exposed to a temperature outside their tolerance range.
509. Birds and mammals are not expected to be attracted to the ash pond or the
evaporation pond due to existing levels of disturbance and restricted ground access.
Transport of additional coal and supplies for construction of the Project will increase
traffic volumes and can result in land disturbance and habitat fragmentation of animals.
However, since existing road networks will be used to accommodate the additional traffic
volumes, this impact is not likely to be significant considering that the area is already
heavily disturbed.
6.11 Socioeconomic Impacts
510. The impacts of existing plant relate mainly to generation of effluent and
emissions from the plant, which can cause health issues for the local people. The
resulting health expenditures can constrain the household budget and reduce availability
of income for other expenditures. The poor households can be affected more severely
due to this. To ensure that such impacts are avoided, the Project is designed to meet
the required standards for air and water quality as discussed in Chapter 9.
511. The effluent is channeled to the Indus River via an unlined channel, which over
the time has leaked in multiple places, creating stagnant water and wetlands in the
surroundings and affecting use of the adjacent land for agricultural purposes. In
particular, residents of Goth Haji Imam Bux Shahano, a village located adjacent to the
effluent discharge channel, complained that their agricultural land is no longer cultivable
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due to unregulated drainage of effluent water from the plant (see Chapter 7 on
stakeholder consultation). The mitigation measures to avoid this impact have been
discussed earlier in this chapter. The mitigation consists of installation of pipeline to
transport the effluent from the plant to the River Indus to prevent impact on the land
adjacent to the pipeline. Controlled supply of water for irrigation purposes from this
pipeline in consultation with the local farmers is recommended.
512. The grievances of the people pertaining to the generation of effluent and
emissions from the existing plant facility have remained unaddressed, which suggests
a lack of organizational capacity to manage community relations. During the
consultations conducted for the purposes of the EIA, the local communities voiced the
concern that their grievances against the Project remain unaddressed despite their
efforts to bring them to the notice of the plant authorities. It is proposed that
organizational capacity be upgraded to manage community issues and relations (details
Chapter 7). In addition, a grievance redress mechanism is proposed for the Project,
which will help generate good will for the Project amongst the local population.
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7. Information Disclosure, Consultation, and Participation
513. As part of the Environmental Impact Assessment process, consultations are
undertaken with communities and institutions that may have interest in the proposed
project or may be affected by it. This section documents the consultation process for the
EIA of the proposed Project.
7.1
Framework for Consultations
514. The EIA of the proposed Project is undertaken in compliance with relevant
national legislation and in accordance with the environmental and social safeguards laid
out under ADB’s safeguard policy (SPS 2009).1
7.1.1
ADB Safeguard Policy Statement
515. Public consultation is mandated under Asian Development Bank’s Safeguard
Policy Statement (SPS 2009).2
SPS 2009 on Pubic Consultations
The borrower/client will carry out meaningful consultation with affected people and other
concerned stakeholders, including civil society, and facilitate their informed participation.
Meaningful consultation is a process that (i) begins early in the project preparation stage and is
carried out on an ongoing basis throughout the project cycle; (ii) provides timely disclosure of
relevant and adequate information that is understandable and readily accessible to affected
people; (iii) is undertaken in an atmosphere free of intimidation or coercion; (iv) is gender
inclusive and responsive, and tailored to the needs of disadvantaged and vulnerable groups;
and (v) enables the incorporation of all relevant views of affected people and other stakeholders
into decision making, such as project design, mitigation measures, the sharing of development
benefits and opportunities, and implementation issues. Consultation will be carried out in a
manner commensurate with the impacts on affected communities. The consultation process
and its results are to be documented and reflected in the environmental assessment report.
7.1.2
Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997
516. Public consultation is mandated under Pakistan’s environmental law. The
Federal Agency, under Regulation 6 of the IEE-EIA Regulations 2000, has issued a set
of guidelines of general applicability and sectoral guidelines indicating specific
assessment requirements. This includes Guidelines for Public Consultation, 1997 (the
‘Guidelines’), that are summarized below:
Objectives of Public Involvement: ‘To inform stakeholders about the proposed
project, to provide an opportunity for those otherwise unrepresented to present
their views and values, providing better transparency and accountability in
decision making, creating a sense of ownership with the stakeholders’;
Stakeholders: ‘People who may be directly or indirectly affected by a proposal
will clearly be the focus of public involvement. Those who are directly affected
may be project beneficiaries, those likely to be adversely affected, or other
stakeholders. The identification of those indirectly affected is more difficult, and
1
2
Safeguard Policy Statement, Asian Development Bank, June 2009
Safeguard Policy Statement, Asian Development Bank, June 2009
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to some extent it will be a subjective judgment. For this reason it is good
practice to have a very wide definition of who should be involved and to include
any person or group who thinks that they have an interest. Sometimes it may
be necessary to consult with a representative from a particular interest group.
In such cases the choice of representative should be left to the group itself.
Consultation should include not only those likely to be affected, positively or
negatively, by the outcome of a proposal, but should also include those who can
affect the outcome of a proposal’;
Mechanism: ‘Provide sufficient relevant information in a form that is easily
understood by non-experts (without being simplistic or insulting), allow sufficient
time for stakeholders to read, discuss, consider the information and its
implications and to present their views, responses should be provided to issues
and problems raised or comments made by stakeholders, selection of venues
and timings of events should encourage maximum attendance’;
Timing and Frequency: Planning for the public consultation program needs to
begin at a very early stage; ideally it should commence at the screening stage
of the proposal and continue throughout the EIA process;
Consultation Tools: Some specific consultation tools that can be used for
conducting consultations include; focus group meetings, needs assessment,
semi-structured interviews; village meetings and workshops;
Important Considerations: ‘The development of a public involvement program
would typically involve consideration of the following issues; objectives of the
proposal and the study; identification of stakeholders; identification of
appropriate techniques to consult with the stakeholders; identification of
approaches to ensure feedback to involved stakeholders; and mechanisms to
ensure stakeholders’ consideration are taken into account’.
7.2
517.
Consultation Methodology
Consultations with the Project stakeholders were conducted in two phases:
The scoping consultation was undertaken in the last week of June 2012. The
main document for distribution to stakeholders during the consultations was the
Background Information Document (BID) that informed the stakeholders about
the EIA process and provided a background about the Project. The BID was
made available in English, Urdu and Sindhi to suit the language preferences of
different stakeholders. The BID for the Project is included in Appendix 7.
The feedback consultation undertaken in June 2013. For this separate
meetings were held in the communities, whereas two meetings were held in
JTPS in which the institutional stakeholders were invited. Additional meetings
were held in Karachi for some stakeholders. The material that was used for the
consultation is included in Appendix 7.
7.2.1
Stakeholder Consulted
518. Stakeholders are groups or individuals that can affect or take affect from a
project’s outcome.
SPS 2009 specifically identifies affected people, concerned
nongovernment organizations (NGOs) and government as prospective stakeholders to a
project. Affected communities include population that is likely to be affected by the
Project activities. Potential impacts of the Project on the local environment include
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disturbances and changes to the physical and biological environment, such as, land
transformation, noise disturbances, and air and water quality issues.
These
disturbances can result in indirect socioeconomic impacts, such as, physical or
economic displacement. These impacts are expected to reduce with the increased
distance from the Project facilities. Based on this the communities affected by the
Project activities (the ‘Potentially Affected Communities’) were identified as those located
within five km of the Project site. In addition to the Potentially Affected Communities,
local government and local NGO officials were also consulted.
519. Table 7-1 lists the Project stakeholders consulted. Consultation were conducted
in representative number of communities while ensuring that people from various
segments of the society participate in the consultation, to ensure proper coverage of
possible stakeholder concerns. Figure 7-1 shows location of stakeholders consulted
from near Project site.
Table 7-1: Stakeholders Consulted
Group
Stakeholders
Scoping
Feedback
Consultation
C
C
C
C
C
C
Goth Chakkar Khan Rajar
C
C
Goth Haji Mehaar Khan Maachi
C
C
Goth Yar Muhammad Kachelo
C
C
Goth Haji Khan Shoro
C
Plant Housing Colony
C
C
Saeedabad
C
C
Goth Ghulam Hussain Khoso
C
C
Liaqat University of Health and C
Medical Sciences(LUHMS) Colony
C
Ramzan Rajar
C
Juma Khan Shoro/WAPDA Colony
C
Saaen Dino Mallah
C
Community:
Barrage Colony
Villages
within
five Goth Haji Imam Bux Shahano
kilometers of the Power
Sindh University Employee Colony
Station’s boundary
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Group
Stakeholders
Government and related
District Coordination Office (DCO), C
Jamshoro
I
Executive District
Health, Jamshoro
(EDO), C
C
National Transmission and Despatch C
Company (NTDC)
C
Sindh
Environmental
Agency, Hyderabad
I
Scoping
Office
Protection C
Feedback
Consultation
Provincial Health and Development C
Centre
Others (Power plant,
Academia, and NGOs)
Sindh Wildlife Department, Jamshoro
C
C
Thermal Power Plant, Jamshoro
C
C
Agriculture Engineering and Water
Management Department
C
Sindh Forest Department
C
International
Union
Conservation of Nature
for
Pakistan
Wetlands
(PWP), WWF
Programme C
Mehran University, Jamshoro
I
C
C
I
and C
and
I
Development C
I
Liaqat University of Health
Medical Sciences (LUHMS)
Nirma Cancer Hospital
Thardeep
Rural
Programme (TRDP)
the C
Sindh University, Department
Environmental Sciences
Fishermen
of C
I
C
Sindh Rural Support Programme
C
National Highway Authority
C
Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum
C
Power Cement Company
C
Dewan Hattar Cement
C
C – Consulted; I – Invited but did not participate
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Figure 7-1: Consultation Locations near JTPS
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7.2.2
Consultations Mechanism
Scoping Consultation
520. The Potentially Affected Communities were visited and consultations were
conducted with the community members within their settlements to encourage and
facilitate their participation. Representatives, notables and other interested groups from
the Potentially Affected Communities were invited. A total of 11 settlements were
consulted out of 19 settlements located within five kilometers of the Study Area.
Separate consultations were conducted with community women of six settlements.
Coverage was given to the fishermen and farming community in the consultations.
521. Letters to inform experts/institutional stakeholders about the objective of the
consultation process and to arrange meetings with the stakeholders were dispatched in
advance. BID was enclosed with the letters for the information of the stakeholders.
522. The key agenda items for the meetings with the
experts/institutional stakeholders and, fishermen communities included:
communities,
An overview of the Project description to the community representatives;
Description of the EIA process that will be undertaken for the Project and
presentation of a structure of the EIA report to facilitate understanding of the
report;
A list of the possible environmental and social impacts of the Project.
Feedback Consultation
523. The feedback consultation primarily targeted the same community that was
consulted earlier in the scoping consultation. The community consultation was
undertaken in the same manner described above.
524. For institutional consultation JTPS organized two meetings, one for the
government departments and agencies and the second for the remaining institutions.
Invitations for the meetings were sent a week before the meeting and these were
followed up with phone call to ensure maximum participation. A presentation was made
to the participants on multimedia projector. This was followed by a question-answer
session.
525.
Individual meetings with stakeholders based in Karachi were undertaken.
7.2.3
Consultation Team
526. An EIA specialist led the team, which comprised of male and female social
assistants that were familiar with the area and the local languages.
7.2.4
Future Consultations
527. Further consultations to be undertaken as part of the Project EIA process include
the Project public hearing. The Sindh EPA will require that one or more public hearings
are held to assess public opinion on the environmental impacts of the Project. Within 10
days of receipt of the EIA report for the Project and subject to acceptance of the EIA for
review, the Sindh EPA will notify the Project proponents that one or more public hearings
must be held. The Sindh EPA will advertise the public hearings in a newspaper. The
legal requirement is advertisement in at least one English or Urdu national newspaper,
but in practice, advertisements are usually placed in two national newspapers and also
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in local newspapers. The public hearings will be held at least 30 days after the public
notice. Copies of the EIA report and a non-technical summary have to be made
accessible to the public during the notification period.
Consultation beyond the EIA Process
528. The Project management will continue community engagement activities
throughout the life of the plant. Visits will be undertaken in all the communities twice or
more time in a year, depending on the number of concerns raised under each
consultation. Ongoing community engagement activities relevant to the EIA include:
Ongoing reporting on progress on the implementation of environmental and
social management measures identified during the EIA process and recording
of comments on the effectiveness of these measures;
Updating communities about new project developments and recording
comments on these; and,
Ongoing operation of the grievance mechanism (EIA Chapter 11).
7.3
7.3.1
Summary of Consultations
Scoping Consultation
529. Table 7-2 summarizes the key concerns emerging from consultations and
explains how each concern was addressed in the EIA. The detailed log of consultations
is provided in Appendix 8.
530.
The photographs of the consultations are given in Figure 7-2.
7.3.2
Feedback Consultation
531. Table 7-3 summarizes the key concerns emerging from consultations and
explains how each concern was addressed in the EIA. The detailed log of consultations
is provided in Appendix 8.
532.
The photographs of the consultations are given in Figure 7-3.
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Table 7-2: Summary of Concerns Expressed in Scoping Consultation and How They Have Been Addressed in the EIA
Issues raised by Stakeholders
Addressed in the EIA
Resettlement and Related
The inhabitants of the surrounding communities lost their agricultural land and
were given inadequate compensation when the existing power plant was
constructed. The new project should provide adequate compensation to the local
people in case of any land acquisition
In case of land acquisition, adequate compensation will be provided to the
affected people, as is required under the national law and ADB standards.
A Land Acquisition and Resettlement Framework (LARF) have been
prepared, and data is being collected on the land ownership and prices.
Physical Environment and Related
The air pollution due to coal burning will have a negative impact on the health of Mitigation measures (ESP and FGD) have been proposed to ensure that
national and ADB standards for air quality are met (EIA Chapter 9)
the inhabitants and can cause skin allergies and respiratory diseases
The particulate matter emission from coal fired boilers should be quantified and Included in EIA Chapter 4.
discussed in the EIA report
Mitigation measures should be taken to prevent all types of pollution (air, noise, Mitigation measures have been proposed to ensure that national and ADB
standards for air and water quality are met (EIA Chapter 6).
water) from the plant
The existing power plant emissions are deteriorating the air and water quality. It Mitigation measures (ESP and FGD) have been proposed to ensure that
has damaged 2,000 acre of land around a village Goth Chakar Khan Rajar, national and ADB standards for air quality are met (EIA Chapter 5)
affected NTDC grid station equipment and is posing health issues for the local
population
The present air quality and the wind flow patterns of the area should be studied Air modeling was completed, details given in EIA Chapter 9.
for air modeling. The stack heights should be engineered accordingly.
The operation of the power plant will result in an increase in the temperature of The impact of heat released by power plants on the ambient air
the surrounding area.
temperature is insignificant.
The study plan should address the ecological impacts
The Project will not result in any significant ecological impacts
(EIA Chapter 5)
The wastewater from the plant should be treated before discharge as it can Mitigation measures have been proposed to ensure that national and ADB
standards
for
water
quality are
met
(EIA
Chapter
5).
damage the fertility of surrounding agricultural land.
See B-Physical Environment
Extensive plantation should be done within and outside the power plant to lessen Mitigation measures have been proposed to ensure that national and ADB
standards for air and water quality are met (EIA Chapter 5).
the effects of air pollution.
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Issues raised by Stakeholders
Addressed in the EIA
Groundwater Issues
The water quality should not deteriorate.
Mitigation measures have been proposed to ensure that national and ADB
standards for water quality are met (EIA Chapter 5).
Social and Other issues
Mitigation measures proposed for the project will not be followed by the power Implementation of the EMP is a legal and contractual obligation of the
project proponent (EIA Chapter 3)
plant authorities.
Villagers should be given employment opportunities in the project
Recruitment from nearby communities will be given preference provided
they meet the requirements for the job (EIA Chapter 6)
The project management of the power plant should ensure that the health and Mitigation measures have been proposed to ensure that national and ADB
standards for air and water quality are met (EIA Chapter 6).
livelihoods of the locals are not be affected by the project.
See B-Physical Environment and Related in table
Populations in surroundings of coal power projects face several problems. Conversion is not part of this project. For the new project, mitigation
Therefore, we do not support conversion of Jamshoro power plant to coal.
measures have been proposed to ensure that national and ADB standards
for
air
and
water
quality
are
met
(EIA
Chapter
6).
See B – Physical Environment and Related in table
The villagers do not have enough economic resources to spend on addressing Mitigation measures have been proposed to ensure that national and ADB
standards for air and water quality are met (EIA Chapter 6).
health problems, which they fear, will be created due to the project.
See B – Physical Environment and Related in table
Wildlife/ Biodiversity Issues
Pollutant contamination from power station may affect fish and aquatic fauna of Other than COD, that was slightly above the NEQS, the concentration of
Indus River.
the toxic metals in the effluent from the Project were all found to be within
the NEQS limits for liquid effluents as well as those for the drinking water.
(EIA Chapter 6).
Pollutant contamination of Indus River ends up in the delta region and may affect Other than COD, that was slightly above the NEQS, the concentration of
the sensitive mangrove ecosystem of the region.
the toxic metals in the effluent from the Project were all found to be within
the NEQS limits for liquid effluents as well as those for the drinking water.
(EIA Chapter 6).
The project management should compensate the community and set up a fund While recognizing that the plant is not significantly affecting wildlife, the
for conservation of regional biodiversity under the Cooperate Social suggestion has been noted and will be considered by the JTPS
management.
Responsibility Programme.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 7-2: Photographs of the Scoping Consultations
Consultation at Sindh University
Consultation at EDO Office
Consultation with Men at Plant Housing Colony
Consultation at Mehran University
Consultation with Sindh EPA
Consultation with Thar Deep Rural Development
Programme
Consultation with Men at Goth Yar Muhammad Kachelo
Consultation with Men at Goth Haji Imam Bux Shahano
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
Information Disclosure, Consultation, and Participation
R3V07GRT: 09/20/13
7-10
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table 7-3: Summary of Feedback Consultation and Comments
Stakeholder
Issues raised
Communities
Power supply: Desire was expressed by some villages that free
electricity or at cheaper rate should be provided to them
Comments
Power distribution is not in legal mandate of JTPS.
Development issues: In most of the villages, the stakeholders Although these issues are not in the scope of JTPS,
expressed the problems due to lack of development. The amenities the company is proposing to invest for social
that were demanded included link roads, school, teachers in school, augmentation of the area.
clean drinking water, health facilities, sewerage system,
rehabilitation of disabled people,
And improvements of housing.
Issues with existing plant: Complaints regarding the existing plant A corrective action plan has been developed
were mostly related to the wastewater discharge and a demand to (Chapter 6)
rehabilitate the existing system. Some villagers also complained
about smell, health issues related to air quality, and heat.
Employment: Provision of jobs was another common demand. In JTPS will develop means of ensuring provision of
particular, a desire was expressed that special quotas be kept for maximum jobs to the local community (Chapter 9)
‘local’ community, for widows and off-springs of former employees.
New Plant: Villagers expressed support for the new plant provided A grievance redress mechanism has been proposed
their grievances are addressed. Some concerns the air quality (Chapter 11). Mitigation measures for the new plant
has been proposed (Chapter 9 and 10)
impacts are addressed.
Management
The plant is managed under the requirements of the
Some members suggested an independent government body for corporate laws of Pakistan. However, representation
of the community is proposed in the grievance
the plant including representation from community.
redress mechanism.
Institutional at Jamshoro
Environmental Issues: The issues that were discussed included Generally, the participants expressed satisfaction
ash management, air quality effluent disposal, and tree plantation.
with the proposed measures.
Social Issues: Social Issues were similar to those discussed in the See above
community meetings.
Monitoring: The need for detailed environmental monitoring was Monitoring plan is included in the EMP.
discussed
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Information Disclosure, Consultation, and Participation
7-11
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Stakeholder
Issues raised
Cement Industries
The aspects that were discussed included:
Comments
The national standard for Portland Cement (PS232-2008R)
has been revised to allow use of fly ash in the manufacture
of Portland Cement. It allows for 5% mixing of fly as in
ordinary Portland cement and as much as 30% in lower
grade composite cement.
At least one plant in Pakistan (located in northern Pakistan)
is mixing purchased fly ash on experimental basis. As the
use of ash improves the fineness of the cement and hence
increases the strength, there is interest among cement
manufacturers.
Within a distance of 200km of JTPS, there are several
cement plants with which also have expansion plans. The
total daily demand of fly ash can reach 1,000-15,000 tons.
Costing of ash would be critical in developing a demand
among cement manufacturers.
An Memorandum of Understanding with the JPCL is
possible which can then lead to a firm agreement once the
ash quality, availability and price is determined.
National Highway Authority
Expressed full cooperation in facilitating transport of power plant
equipment to the JTPS from the port. Some toll plaza may not be
wide enough for the large equipment. However, the plazas can be
rebuilt.
WWF
A detailed discussion took place on the EIA. No serious concern
was expressed
Pakistan Fisherfolk Form
PFF expressed serious concern on ADB funded projects. They
expressed the view that as they are opposed to a) ADB funding in
Pakistan and b) do not have faith in EIA process, they are not ready
to engage in discussion on the EIA
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Information Disclosure, Consultation, and Participation
7-12
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 7-3: Photographs of the Feedback Consultations
Men Consultation at Barrage Colony
Consultation at Chakkar Khan Rajjar
Consultation at Machar Khan Machi
Consultation at Ramzan Rajar
Men Consultation at Saeedabad
Consultation at Saeen Dino Mallah
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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7-13
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Women Consultation at Imam Bux Shahno
Women Consultation at Ramzan Rajar
Consultation with Government Institutions
Consultation with NGOs and Academia
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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7-14
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
8. Analysis of Alternatives
8.1
No Project Option
533. The no project alternative will have the following economic and environmental
consequences:
As described in Section 2.4, Pakistan is going through an acute power
shortage. The gap between supply and demand has crossed 5,000 MW.
The proposed Project represents nearly 20% of the current gap. Thus in the
absence of this project, the gap in power supply and demand will continue to
grow.
The project can also be considered as a pioneer as this will be first large-size
coal-based power project. As such it is likely to address many issues related
to coal-based power generation in the country. This is likely to reduce the
risk for future investment and will attract more investors to invest in coalbased technology in future. In the absence of this project, this process is
likely to be delayed.
Environmentally, this project will contribute towards improving the air quality
in and around Jamshoro. The installation of FGD at the existing power plant
will clean the air and improve the living conditions of the population in the
vicinity of the plant. Similarly, a component of the project is the rehabilitation
of the cooling water and wastewater discharge systems of the existing units.
The depilated state of the existing system is having adverse impact on the
land of the surrounding areas.
534. Therefore, unless an economically and environmentally more viable options can
be found, which appears unlikely (see Section 8.2), the ‘no project’ option will have a
negative impact on the economy as well as on the environment around the existing
JTPS.
8.2
Alternatives to the Proposed Project
535. The project alternatives of the proposed Project include power generation from
LNG/imported natural gas based combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs), and fuel oil
based diesel engines or steam plants. In addition, green field thermal projects and other
options such as nuclear, run-of-the-river hydropower, or wind and solar based renewable
energy power plants at other suitable locations could also be considered as the project
alternatives. An analysis of the life cycle average cost of generation from the competing
technologies was carried out to assess the least cost generation alternative of the
project.
536. Table 8-1 illustrates the calculation of life cycle average cost for the competing
alternatives for power generation in Pakistan. The analysis was carried out at the
delivered prices of US$ 696 per ton for fuel oil1 and US$120/ton for imported coal. The
price of LNG/imported natural gas was also worked out with reference to the Brent crude
oil price. The cost data of alternatives for thermal power generation were taken from
recent industry experience in Pakistan.
1
Corresponding to Brent Crude oil price of US$102/bbl
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Analysis of Alternatives
8-1
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table 8-1: Life Cycle Average Cost of Power Generation from the Project Alternatives
Cost Parameters
Existing–
Jamshoro
(Fuel Oil)
New
Imported
Coal Fired
Steam at
Jamshoro
CCGT-LNG/
Imported
Gas
Diesel
Engine- Fuel
Oil
New SteamFuel Oil
Hydel RoR
Wind
–
30
30
25
30
30
20
WACC/IRR
–
17%
15%
15%
15%
16%
16%
Plant Factor
–
85%
85%
85%
85%
55%
30%
29.9%
39.5%
48%
44%
38%
0%
0%
17.70
4.54
17.03
17.70
17.70
–
–
Project Life
Cost Units
Years
Plant Efficiency
Fuel Price
$/MMBtu
Power Plant Capital Cost
$/kW
–
1,908
944
1,283
860
1,851
2,424
Annualized Capital Cost
$/kW
–
327
144
199
131
300
409
Capital Cost
Cents/kWh
–
4.40
1.93
2.67
1.76
6.22
15.37
O&M Cost
Cents/kWh
0.78
0.88
0.56
1.43
0.78
0.12
1.69
Fuel Cost
Cents/kWh
20.19
3.92
12.07
13.72
15.89
–
–
Average Cost of Generation
Cents/kWh
20.97
9.19
14.56
17.82
18.43
6.34
17.06
Source: Hagler Bailly Pakistan Estimates
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Analysis of Alternatives
8-2
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
537. Figure 8-1 shows the comparison of cost of generation from various project
alternatives. The column ‘New Imported Coal Fired Steam’ indicates the economics of
the proposed 1,200 MW capacity under the Project.
538. The total cost of power generation in terms of US cents/kWh for various blends of
imported coal and Thar lignite considered for the Project will not be significantly different
as delivered energy price of Thar lignite is estimated to be close to that of imported subbituminous coal.
539. The cost of generation from run-of-the-river hydropower (RORH) projects works
out to be lower than the proposed Project. However, the cost of RORH must be dealt
with caution as it is based on average cost and hydrology data of a basket of RORH
projects in Pakistan. The actual capital cost and plant factors of any specific RORH
project could vary significantly from project to project. In addition, the RORH potential
lies in the northern region of the country and these projects may require additional
investment in transmission interconnections to supply the generated power to the
Southern and mid-country markets. The power generated by RORH plants also varies
seasonally, and is reduced to about 25% of the peak capacity in winters. Given the mix
of available power generation capacity in Pakistan, the shortfalls in power supply in
winter attributable to RORH plants have to be met by operation of thermal power
generation units such as the one proposed under the Project. Given these constraints
and considerations, the Project is the least cost option amongst available alternatives.
Figure 8-1: Comparison of Cost of Power Generation from the Project Alternatives
25
Fuel Cost
O&M Cost
Capital Cost
20
0.0
1.7
US Cents/kWh
15
13.7
20.2
10
15.9
12.1
15.37
3.9
0.0
0.1
5
0.9
1.4
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
6.22
0.8
Wind
Hydel RoR
1.76
New Steam-Fuel Oil
1.93
2.67
Diesel Engine-Fuel
Oil
Existing - Jamshoro
(Fuel Oil)
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
New Imported Coal
Fired Steam at
Jamshoro
0.8
0.00
-
0.6
CCGT-LNG/Imported
Gas
4.40
Analysis of Alternatives
8-3
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
8.3
Alternative Sites for the Power Plant
540. The main selection criteria for the site for coal-based power plant are the
following:
a. Proximity to source of coal, in this case the ports and the Thar field—the
potential source of indigenous lignite;
b. Availability of cooling water;
c. Proximity to transmission network for evacuation of power;
d. Proximity to road network for transportation of equipment;
e. Connection with the rail network for the transportation of coal;
f.
Availability of sufficient land;
g. Sufficient distance from population centers; and
h. Safe distance from ecologically sensitive areas.
541. Reviewing the map of southern Sindh in light of the above criteria, it is evident
that there are not many choices and also the advantages proposed site can be
appreciated. An evaluation of the potential sites based on these criteria is presented in
Table 8-2.
542. Jamshoro stands out to be a natural choice. It is well connected with the rail and
road network; a year-round source of water is available, the transmission line network is
available or planned; it is located at a suitable distance from Thar and ports; there is
sufficient land available; it is at a reasonable distance from population center; and it is
not close to any ecologically sensitive area. The only disadvantage is the relatively
degraded airshed due to the existing power plant. However, by installation of FGD on
the existing units, this disadvantage is converted to advantage, as the project will result
in improvement of the ambient air quality.
This area intentionally left blank
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Analysis of Alternatives
8-4
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table 8-2: Selection of Site for the Power Plant
Criteria
Areas that meet the criteria
Proximity to source of
coal, in this case the
ports and the Thar field—
the potential source of
indigenous lignite
Given that the port of import for the coal (Karachi or Bin Qasim) and the possible source of indigenous coal (Thar coal field) are
both in southern Sindh, the transportation cost will be minimized by locating the plant in southern Sindh.
Further, given that imported coal will be the main source so to optimize transportation cost, the site shall be closer to the port
than to the Thar coal field.
rd
Suitable area: Area in southern Sindh, below 26° N and about 1/3 of the way between Karachi and Islamkot.
Availability of cooling
water
Potential sources of cooling water are the sea, Indus River, irrigation canal, or the groundwater. The groundwater options are
limited primarily to the east of Indus. The flow in Indus downstream of Kotri Barrage is not guaranteed. Irrigation canals are a
potential source, however, during annual closure period of the canals for maintenance, alternate water sources would be
required for continued operation of the power plant.
Suitable areas: Coastal zone, areas close to Indus River upstream of Kotri Barrage, or irrigated area east of Indus River where
groundwater may be available in sufficient quantity.
Proximity to transmission
network for evacuation of
power
The present circuit of 500kVA transmission line, the backbone of the transmission system, in the southern Sindh consists of grid
stations at Hubco (west of Karachi) and Jamshoro and a 500kVA line connecting these that generally follows M-9 (Super
Highway). The secondary 220kVA network is found in areas around Hyderabad and along the M-9.
Suitable area: Areas north of the latitude of 25° N preferable close to Hyderabad.
Proximity to road network The main highways which can be used for the transport of the equipment are the National Highways N-5 and N-55, and the M-9.
for transportation of
Suitable area: Areas within a short distance (say 10 km) of the N-5, N-55, or M-9.
equipment
Connection with the rail
network for the
transportation of coal
The present main railway line follows Highway N-5. It crosses Indus River near Kotri and then heads north after Hyderabad.
The line to Dadu starts from Kotri and after passing through Jamshoro heads north along the right bank of Indus River.
Suitable area: Areas within a short distance (say 5 km) of the railway lines.
Availability of sufficient
land
There is sufficient land available throughout the region and this criterion does not limit the choice. However, east of Indus in the
irrigated area, land is both expensive and conversion to industrial purpose is not preferable.
Suitable area: Mostly areas west of Indus River.
Sufficient distance from
population centers; and
The population density in the irrigated area, east of Indus River, is high compared to the non-irrigated areas to west.
Suitable area: Preferably areas to the west of Indus River.
Away from ecologically
sensitive areas.
The ecologically sensitive areas in the region are the Rann of Kutch, Indus Delta, and the mangrove forest along the southern
coast of the Sindh and the Kirthar Park Complex, north of M-9.
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Analysis of Alternatives
8-5
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
8.4
Selection of Imported Coal for the Project
543. Pakistan is currently embarking on diversifying its fuel mix for power generation.
One of the proposed strategies is to import coal for newly designed boilers. GENCO
placed a preference on Indonesian coals due to the relatively cheaper cost, shorter
transportation distance and large options of low sulfur varieties. This section will discuss
the coal supply from Indonesia, covering the available sources and supplies, and the
cost for the Jamshoro coal fired boiler. Other similar coal is available in South Africa and
Australia. Table 8-3 presented the properties of sub-bituminous coal from Australia,
Indonesia, and South Africa. Properties of Thar coal are also provided for reference.
Table 8-3: Comparisons of Coal Properties
Coal Properties
Sub-bituminous Coal
Australia*
Lignite Coal
Indonesia
South Africa
21-28
24-38
8.5
45-50
4-9
1.5-7.5
15-62
14-15
Volatile Matter (wt. %)
24-29
28-37
22-25
21-29
Sulfur Content (wt. %)
0.3-0.9
0.07-0.90
0.6-0.9
0.2-2.7
4,500-5,000
4,100-5,200
5,900-6,200
2,500-3,700
Total Moisture (wt. %)
Coal Ash Content (wt. %)
Coal
Gross
(kcal/kg)
Calorific
Value
Thar
* Premier Coal: http://www.premiercoal.com.au/Operations/Coal_Specifications
544. Indonesian coal has been selected for its large quantity of coal reserves spread
out over the majority of its country. An estimate made in 2010 shows that Indonesia has
over 100 billion tons of coal inferred reserves, with over 20 billion tons proven reserves.
545. Indonesian coal is, by large, sub-bituminous, with low ash, low sulfur, high
volatilities and average Gross Calorific Value. Coal pricing is a factor of quality. The
price index governing Indonesian Coal is known as Harga Acuan Batubara (HAB). The
price is derived based on a marker coal price with the quality presented in Table 8-4.
Table 8-4: Quality of Coal for Marker Coal Price
Gross Calorific Value (GCV arb)
Total Moisture (% arb)
6,322 kcal/kg
8%
Total Sulfur (% arb)
0.8%
Ash (% arb)
15%
546. Most large coal mines have an established logistics network between the mines
and the sea port. One of the deciding factors for Indonesian coal import is the distance
from the source to the ports in Pakistan, which will reduce the transport cost significantly.
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Analysis of Alternatives
8-6
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
8.5
Port Handling and Transportation of Coal
8.5.1
Selection of Port
547. Coal imports in Pakistan in 2010 were 4.3 million tons, mainly for use in cement
plants. Coal can be received at Karachi at either the Karachi Port (KP) operated by the
Karachi Port Trust, or the Port Qasim (PQ), operated by the Port Qasim Authority. Both
the ports have facilities to handle coal, and are connected to the road and rail network
for transportation of goods to the northern markets in the country Figure 8-2.
548. Karachi Port was commissioned in 1973 as the capacity at KPT was not
sufficient to handle the growing cargo volumes, and the options for expansion were
limited as the port is encircled by densely populated areas. KP has 30 dry cargo berths
and 3 liquid cargo berths for petroleum and non-petroleum products, and is presently
handling about 12 million tons/year of dry cargo, in addition to 14 million tons of
petroleum products. KPT has two container terminals. PQ is located at a distance of
about 35 km east of Karachi, and presently handles about 26 million tons of cargo
annually, and is accessible through a 45 km long channel suitable for 11 meter draught
vessel. PQ is connected to the national rail network by a 14 km track. The iron ore and
coal Berth at PQ is a specialized berth originally designed for handling of raw material
imports of Pakistan Steel Mills. The design capacity of the berth stands as 3.03 million
tons per annum.
549. Handling of coal for the project is anticipated at the PQ in view of the existing
cargo as well as traffic volumes on the railway network connecting the KP to the national
rail network. The Port Qasim Authority through Paksitan Bulk International Terminal Ltd.
has planned expansion of capacity to handle up to 8 million tons of coal and other bulk
products with an investment of US $ 185 million2.
8.5.2
Transportation of Coal to Project Site
550. Imported coal can be transported from Port Qasim to Project site by rail, or by
road. Thar lignite can be transported by road, or by rail following extension of the rail
network to Thar. Fuel oil was originally transported to the JTPS from Karachi by means
of rail, and facilities for decanting of oil located from rail wagons at the plant site were
operational until 2003. This practice was discontinued due to limitations in the capacity
of Pakistan railways to provide a reliable and dependable service.
551. Transportation requirement for imported coal is estimated at 2.1 to 2.3 million
tons per year, and will increase to 4.2 to 4.5 million tons per year after future expansion
of the generation capacity to 1,200 MW. The Pakistan Railways can use the existing
track from Port Qasim to the JTPS for transportation of coal. Initial discussions with
Pakistan railways indicate that the condition of track is dependable, and the bridges on
the route are also in satisfactory condition and being rehabilitated under a proposed
program to further improve their life and reliability. Pakistan Railways also indicates that
it has sufficient rolling stock available to cater for the needs of the project. Facilities for
unloading coal at Jamshoro and for loading the coal at Port Qasim will have to be
modernized.
2
www.pibt.com.pk downloaded on September 23 2103.
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Analysis of Alternatives
8-7
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 8-2: Route for Transportation of Coal to Jamshoro TPS
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Analysis of Alternatives
8-8
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
552. Transportation traffic is estimated at 10-11 trains a day, each train carrying 1,200
tons of coal over a distance of about 150 km from Port Qasim to JTPS. A total of eight
to nine locomotives of 3,000 HP each operating on diesel fuel will be required, seven
operating and one or two standby. Pakistan Railway is not in a position to finance the
purchase of the locomotives required, estimated to cost $ 12.6 million for nine
locomotives priced at US$ 1.4 million each. Under the current tariff regime, the cost of
transportation of coal is estimated at Rs 800/ton of coal. In case the financing cannot be
arranged by the Pakistan railways, the option of the Project financing the purchase of
locomotives in return for a negotiated reduction in tariff can be discussed with Pakistan
Railways. Given the current financing costs, a reduction in transportation tariff of about
10% is estimated under this arrangement. Annual greenhouse gas emissions are
estimated at 5,700-6,070 tons assuming emission factor of 0.0089 kg carbon/ton
coal/km for transportation by rail.
553. Cost of transportation of imported coal by road using commercially available
trucking services is estimated at Rs 1,200/ton of coal. In addition to the transportation
cost in comparison to that for rail, transportation by road will result in additional traffic on
the roads and highways, and greenhouse gas emissions estimated at 57,500-61,300
tons assuming emission factor of 0.09 kg carbon/ton coal/km.
554. As both the Karachi and Bin Qasim ports are connected to the national rail
system, transportation by rail would be the preferred option in view of lower
transportation costs, lower traffic volumes on the roads which are already carrying heavy
traffic volumes, lower impacts related to air quality and noise, and lower greenhouse gas
emission. Track capacity of the Pakistan Railways network also exists as the trunk
north-south track from Karachi up to Kotri Junction located about 20 km south of the
Project site is a dual carriageway. Transportation of imported coal by rail from Port
Qasim to JTPS is therefore recommended as it is the only viable option for the Project.
555. The reliability of the rail system in Pakistan has reduced to a point where
transportation by rail is no longer considered a reliable option. Pakistan Railways
system is facing chronic delays on all major routes on account of shortage of engines
and rolling stock, and inadequate maintenance of the tracks. The Government of
Pakistan has recently approved procurement of locomotives to improve the performance
and reliability of the services offered by Pakistan Railway.
Recognizing the
overwhelming advantage of rail transportation over road transportation, GENCO will
work with the Pakistan Railway to ensure availability of transportation capacity for this
option. This may include the Project purchasing the engines and rolling stock and then
operating the trains either itself or through the Pakistan Railways.
556. Thar lignite can be transported by road or by rail. While the impact of
transportation by trucks on the traffic is not expected to be significant3, there are safety
risks associated with storage, handling, and transportation of lignite associated with the
tendency of lignite towards spontaneous combustion. Transportation by rail in specially
designed rail wagons and storage and handling systems as being done elsewhere in the
world is therefore recommended. Further studies will be required to establish the
viability of transportation of Thar lignite by road.
3
Truck traffic is estimated at 5 trucks per hour in one direction on an average basis.
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Analysis of Alternatives
8-9
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
8.6
Management of Oil Contaminated Soils
557. Figure 6-8 shows the area where soil is contaminated by oil spills from past
operations at the JTPS. Based on the industry practices, the following options can be
considered for treatment and disposal of this contaminated soil:
Burning in brick kilns
Mixing with coal and burning in the coal fired boilers on site
Disposal in the lined facility being constructed for storage of ash
Bioremediation
558. Burning in brick kilns will not be feasible for soils with a low level of oil
contamination as it will technically not be suitable for use in the brick kilns owing to its
low heating value. Available literature suggests that combustion in boilers as a method
for treatment of oil contaminated soils is not preferred by the industry.4 Use of a lined
facility for permanent storage will require land, and the cost of storage in a lined facility is
also high.
559. Bioremediation techniques are well developed and considered to be cost
effective and environmentally acceptable.5 Tests have to be conducted to develop site
specific techniques. This technique has successfully been tested in Pakistan by BHP
Billiton on soils contaminated by oil up to a level of 20%. This technique has therefore
been recommended for the JTPS and cost estimates have been included in the EMMP
for the Project (Chapter 10).
8.7
Boiler Combustion Technology
560. Coal based thermal power plants with advanced coal technologies aim to
increase the amount of electrical energy extracted from each unit of coal fired boiler.
The coal boiler solutions considered are:
Various advanced pulverized coal (PC) combustion technologies (subcritical,
supercritical, ultra supercritical)
Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) technologies (atmospheric, circulating and
pressurized). 
561. It is important that the proposed solution for coal fired steam generators is a
technologically proven and commercially available. Although a lot of new technological
advances in this field has been achieved, it is imperative that only commercially proven
systems are considered to reduce risks during implementation and subsequent
operation and maintenance.
4
5
http://www.pecj.or.jp/japanese/report/e-report/00M313e.pdf
Report Reference 2000M3.1.3, R&D on Oil Contaminated Soil Treatment System Oil
Contaminated Soil Treatment Group. Yasuhi Hotta, Masanobu Tomita, Eiichiro Kozuka,
Hiroaki Ohtsuka, Nobuya, Miyachi, Takeshi Nomura, Hiroshi Kimura, Yukio Takagi
http://www.pecj.or.jp/japanese/report/e-report/00M313e.pdf
Report Reference 2000M3.1.3, R&D on Oil Contaminated Soil Treatment System Oil
Contaminated Soil Treatment Group. Yasuhi Hotta, Masanobu Tomita, Eiichiro Kozuka,
Hiroaki Ohtsuka, Nobuya, Miyachi, Takeshi Nomura, Hiroshi Kimura, Yukio Takagi
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Analysis of Alternatives
8-10
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
8.7.1
Pulverized Coal-Fired
562. Pulverized Coal (PC) fired stations have been in use more than 60 years and, in
terms of overall numbers and generating capacity, they dominate the global market.
Pulverized fuel (PF) based plant is in widespread use throughout the world, in both the
developed and developing nations.
PF firing technology has emerged as an
environmentally acceptable technology for burning a wide range of solid fuels to
generate steam and electric power. Plants with PF boilers are available up to a current
maximum capacity of 1,300MW.
563. Over the years, many advances have been made with pulverized fuel
technology, including environmentally focused measures to minimize emissions of SOx,
NOx and particulates, as well as application of advanced steam cycles that allow for
greater plant efficiency. Globally, PF plant is characterized by overall thermal
efficiencies of up to roughly 36% (Lower Heating Value [LHV] basis), whereas plant with
higher steam temperatures and pressures can attain up to some 45%. As further
developments take place in the metallurgy of critical components of boiler and turbine
that are exposed to high pressure and high temperature steam, it is expected that
efficiencies of 50% to 55% will ultimately be achieved.
564. It has to be noted however, that the increase in efficiency of the generating plant
is due to the combination of the boiler and steam turbine working at higher pressures
and temperatures. As far as the steam generation is concerned, the efficiency of the
boiler per say does not vary much as steam pressures and temperatures are increased.
Firing System
565. Controlling parameters in the PF combustion process are time, temperature and
turbulence. In a PF boiler, furnace temperature shall be about 1,300 to 1,500°C and fuel
residence time is about 2 to 5 seconds. The most popular system for firing pulverized
coal is the use of tangential firing and opposing firing shown in Table 8-5.
Table 8-5: Type of PF Firing System
Type of Firing
Description
Tangential firing
Wall/Opposing firing
Four burners corner to corner to Typically the combustion is staged,
create a fire ball at the center of the with the first stage combustion taking
furnace.
place from the burners to the centre of
the furnace. The partially combusted
material mixes in the flow upwards;
there overfire air ports encourage
complete combustion by supply air for
the second stage of combustion.
Schematic diagram
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Advantages of PF Combustion
566.
The following are the advantages of the PF combustion technology:
Fuel Flexibility - PF boiler has the ability to burn varying quality of coals and
all ranks of coal from anthracitic to lignite, and it permits combination of firing
(i.e., can use coal, oil and gas). Because of these advantages, there is
widespread use of pulverized coal furnaces.
High Combustion Efficiency - Since the coal is being burnt in pulverized form,
the rate of burning the amount of excess air required are optimized resulting
in better combustion efficiency than the other types of boilers.
Sustainability to load variations - Boiler is known to have high thermal inertia
than any equipment in a power station. In such case, the rate of reaction with
respect to load variation is the most essential. A PF boiler has the flexibility
to sustain load variations in very short periods than any other type of boiler.
This will increase the operational flexibility for the plant operator.
Maintenance problems - Pulverized fuel boilers are less outage prone when
compared with other types of boilers such as Fluidized bed combustion.
Erosion of economizer and pressure parts are less, and hence the outages
are less. However, there is a need to be vigilant and maintain the grinding
elements of the pulverizers.
Provenness and Reliability - Pulverized fuel fired boilers are reliable and
proven worldwide since 1918, when Milwaukee Electric Railway and Light
company, later Wisconsin Electric, conducted tests in the use of pulverized
coal in 1918. Plants with PF boilers are available up to a maximum capacity
of 1,300MW. PF technology with tangential firing
Classification of PF Coal Power Plants
567. Pulverized coal power plants are broken down into three categories; subcritical
pulverized coal plants, supercritical pulverized coal plants, and ultra-supercritical
pulverized coal plants. The classifications are mainly based on the live steam
parameters and reheat steam temperature. Some of the well-known classifications are
presented in Table 8-6.
Table 8-6: Classification of Pulverized Coal Plants
Category
Unit
Year
Subcritical
Supercritical
Ultra
supercritical
<1990
1990
2000-
Live steam pressure
Bar
165
>221
>300
Live steam temperature
°C
540
540-560
>600
Reheat steam temperature
°C
540
560
>600
Single Reheat
Yes
Yes
No
Double Reheat
No
No
Yes
~38
~41
~46+
Power Plant Generating Efficiency
%
Source: Henderson, 2003; Smeers et al., 2001.
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8.7.2
Fluidized Bed Combustion
568. Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) power plants use the same steam cycle as
conventional PF plant. They raise steam via a different combustion technology. The
possibility of applying fluidized bed combustion technology for the generation of
electricity from coal first attracted worldwide interest in the 1960´s. This was especially
because it promised to be a cost effective alternative to PF plants, while at the same
time allowing sulfur capture without use of add-on scrubbers. Moreover, the technology
is suitable for high ash, variable quality, high moisture and high sulfur fuels.
569. FBC is a method of burning coal in bed of heated particles suspended in a gas
flow. An evenly distributed air or gas is passed upward through a finely divided bed of
solid particles such as sand supported on a fine mesh; the particles are undisturbed at
low velocity. As air velocity is gradually increased, a stage is reached when the
individual particles are suspended in the air stream and the bed is called “fluidized”.
Classification of FBC
570. FBC falls into three main categories which is atmospheric fluidized bed
combustion (AFBC), pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC), and advanced
pressurized fluidized bed combustion (APFBC).
571. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) technology is commercially
available in subcritical pressure with a size limit of about 350 MW. FBC is commercially
available as bubbling fluidized bed combustion (BFBC) or circulating fluidized bed
combustion (CFBC) version. CFBC technology has emerged as an environmentally
acceptable technology for burning a wide range of solid fuels to generate steam and
electric power.
572. In PFBC type, a compressor supplies the forced draft (FD) air and the combustor
is a pressure vessel. In PFB plant, the boiler combustion occurs under pressure. The
pressure is typically 6 to 16 times higher than atmosphere pressure. The heat release
rate in the bed is proportional to the bed pressure and hence a deep bed is used to
extract large amounts of heat. This improves the combustion efficiency and sulfur
dioxide absorption in the bed.
573. APFBC, a technology that will not be commercially available for at least 10 years,
will utilize high temperature gas turbines and have cycle efficiency of above 50% by fuel
gasification. The bed also operates at a higher temperature which improves efficiency at
expense of higher NOx emission.
Advantages of FBC
574.
The following are few of the advantages of FBC:
Fuel Flexibility - The relatively low furnace temperatures are below the ash
softening temperature for nearly all fuels. As a result, the furnace design is
independent of ash characteristics which allow a given furnace to handle a
wide range of fuels.
Low SO2 Emissions - Limestone is effective sulfur sorbent in the temperature
range of (815 – 925°C). SO2 removal efficiency of 95% and higher has been
demonstrated along with good sorbent utilization.
Low NOx Emissions - Low furnace temperature plus staging of air feed to the
furnace produce very low NOX emissions.
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Combustion Efficiency - The long solids residence time in the furnace
resulting from the collection/ recirculation of solids via the cyclone, plus the
vigorous solids/gas contact in the furnace caused by the fluidization airflow,
result in better combustion efficiency, even with difficult-to-burn fuels.
8.7.3
The Proposed Technology for Boiler Combustion
575. Table 8-7 presents a comparison of various types of pulverized coal combustion
and fluidized bed combustion technologies. The selected coal combustion technology
for the proposed Plant is the PF fired supercritical boiler. The main reason for selecting
PF boiler was low complexity of the firing system. The supercritical boiler was selected
for its high efficiency.
Table 8-7: Technical and Economic Status for Coal Combustion Technologies
Criteria
Pulverised Coal-Fired Combustion
Subcritical
Supercritical
Fluidized Bed Combustion
CFBC
PFBC
Status
Commercial
Commercial
Commercial
Demonstrated
Complexity
Low
Medium
Medium
Medium
Usage
Base/medium load
Base/medium load
Base/medium load
Base/medium load
Fuel range
All coals, Co-firing
with selected
biomass
All coals, Co-firing
with selected
biomass
All coals,
All coals
residuals, biomass
Operational
flexibility
Medium –
performance
limited at low load
Medium –
performance
limited at low load
Medium –
potentially similar
to PF but not yet
proven.
Medium –
potentially similar
to PF but not yet
proven.
Unit size
< 1000 MW
400 – 1,000 MW
≤460 MW
≤360 MW
Environment
al
performance
Requires ESP for
Particulate Matter
Control, FGD for
SOx Emission
Control. NOx
reduction mainly
achievable via
burner design and
configuration
Requires ESP for
Particulate Matter
Control, FGD for
SOx Emission
Control. NOx
reduction mainly
achievable via
burner design and
configuration
Requires ESP for
Particulate Matter
Control.
SOx Emission
controlled by in
furnace limestone
injection. NOx
reduction mainly
achievable via low
temperature
combustion
Requires ESP for
Particulate Matter
Control.
SOx Emission
controlled by in
furnace limestone
injection. NOx
reduction mainly
achievable via low
temperature
combustion
Availability
Proven to be
excellent
Proven to be good
Proven to be good
Limited experience
8.8
8.8.1
Environmental Control Technology
Particulate Matter Treatment Options
576. Particulate matter treatment technologies are electrostatic precipitators (ESP),
fabric filters, cyclones and wet scrubbers. Table 8-8 presents a comparison among the
technologies in terms of efficiencies, advantages and disadvantages.
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Table 8-8: Particulate matter control technologies
Control
Technology
Control
Efficiency
Advantages
Disadvantages
Electrostatic ESP is applicable to a
precipitator variety of coal
(ESP)
combustion sources and
the negatively charged
dry precipitator is most
commonly used.
The high-voltage fields to
apply large electrical
charges to particles
moving through the field.
The charged particles
move toward an
oppositely charged
collection surface, where
they accumulate. The
accumulated particles
are than removed by
rapper and collected at
ESP hopper.
>99 %
High collection
efficiency of 99% or
greater at relatively
low energy
consumption.
Low pressure drop.
Continuous operation
with minimum
maintenance.
Relatively low
operation costs.
Operation capability at
high temperature (up
to 700 °C) and high
pressure (up to 10
atm)
Capability to handle
relatively large gas
flow rates. (up to
50,000 m3/min)
High capital cost
High sensitivity to
fluctuations in gas
stream (flow rates,
temperature,
particulate and gas
composition, and
particulate loadings)
Difficulties with the
collection of
particles with
extremely high or
low resistivity.
- High space
requirement for
installation
- Highly trained
maintenance
personnel required.
Fabric filters ESP is widely applied to
or bag
combustion sources
houses
since 1970s. It consist of
a number of filtering
elements (bags) along
the bag cleaning system
contained in a main shell
structure incorporating
dust hopper. The
particle-laden gas stream
pass through the tightly
woven fabric and the
particulates are collected
on one side of fabric.
Filtered gas passes
through the bags and is
exhausted from the unit.
When cleaning is
necessary, dampers are
used to isolate a
compartment of bags
from the inlet gas flow.
Then, some of the
filtered gas passes in the
reverse direction in order
to remove some of the
dust cake. The gas used
for reverse air cleaning is
re-filtered and released.
99.9%
Very high collection
efficiency (99.9%).
Relative insensitivity to
gas stream
fluctuations and large
changes in inlet dust
loadings (for
continuously cleaned
filters).
Recirculation of filter
outlet air.
Dry recovery of
collected material for
subsequent
processing and
disposal.
No corrosion
problems.
Simple maintenance,
flammable dust
collection in the
absence of high
voltage
Various configurations
and dimensions of
filter collectors
Relatively
simple
operation
Requirement of
costly refractory
mineral or metallic
fabric at
temperatures in
excess of 290 °C.
Need for fabric
treatment to remove
collected dust and
reduce seepage of
certain dusts.
Relatively high
maintenance
requirements
Shortened fabric life
at elevated
temperatures and in
the presence of acid
or alkaline
particulate.
Respiratory
protection
requirement
for
fabric replacement.
Medium pressuredrop.
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Control
Technology
Description
Control
Efficiency
Advantages
Disadvantages
Wet
scrubber
Wet scrubbers including
venture and flooded disc
scrubbers, tray or tower
units, turbulent contact
absorbers or high
pressure impingement
scrubbers are applicable
particulate matter and
SOx control on coal-fired
combustion sources.
The system requires
substantial amounts of
water and chemicals for
neutralizing. Water is
injected into the flue gas
stream at the venture
throat to form droplets.
Fly ash particles impact
with the droplets forming
a wet by-product which
then generally requires
disposal.
95-99%
Relatively small space
requirement.
Ability to collect gases,
as well as “sticky”
particulates.
Ability to handle hightemperature, highhumidity gas streams
Low capital cost (if
wastewater treatment
system is not required)
High
collection
efficiency
of
fine
particulates (95-99%).
Potential
water
disposal/effluent
treatment problem.
Corrosion problems
(more severe than
with dry systems).
Potentially
objectionable steam
plume opacity or
droplet entrainment
Potentially high
pressure drop.
Potential problem of
solid buildup at the
wet-dry interface
Relatively
high
maintenance costs
Cyclone or
multicyclone
A cyclone is a cylindrical
vessel which can be
installed singly, in series
or groups as in a multicyclone collector. The
flue gas enters the
vessel tangentially and
sets up a rotary motion
whirling in a circular or
conical path. The
particles are hits against
the walls by centrifugal
force of the flue gas
motion where they are
impinge and eventually
settle into hoppers.
Cyclones is referred as
mechanical collectors
and are often used as a
pre-collector upstream of
an ESP, fabric filter or
wet scrubber so that
these devices can
specified for lower
particle loadings to
reduce capital and
operating costs.
90-95%
Low capital cost.
Relative simplicity and
few maintenance
problems.
Relatively low
operating pressure
drop.
Temperature and
pressure limitations
imposed only by the
materials of
construction used
Dry collection and
disposal.
Relatively small space
requirements
Relatively low
overall particulate
collection
efficiencies
especially for
particulate sizes
below 10 micron
(PM10).
Inability to handle
sticky materials.
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577. For the proposed supercritical PF boiler, ESP is the preferred alternative to
control particulate matter emission in the flue gas. The exhaust hot flue gas from the
boiler will carry the fine particle pass flows through the heat recovery area and then the
fine particle will be captured by the ESP and transported to dry fly ash silos. The clean
flue gas shall induce by induced draft fan and exhaust through chimney. The ESP has
been selected to control PM emission since ESP can be applied to wide range of system
sizes and should have no effect on combustion system performance. Besides that, ESP
will enable the Proposed Project to meet the Pakistan emission standard. The outlet
particulate concentration at the ESP is estimated to be less than 50 mg/Nm3.
8.8.2
SO2 Treatment Options
578. Several techniques are used to reduce SO2 emissions from coal combustion.
Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are in current operation on several lignite-fired
utility boilers. Post combustion FGD techniques can remove SO2 formed during
combustion by using an alkaline reagent to absorb SO2 in the flue gas. Flue gases can
be treated using wet, dry, or semi-dry desulfurization processes of either the throwaway
type (in which all waste streams are discarded) or the recovery/regenerable type (in
which the SO2 absorbent is regenerated and reused).
a. Wet FGD is the most commonly applied techniques for SOx emission reduction.
Wet systems generally use alkali slurries as the SO2 absorbent medium and can be
designed to remove greater than 90% of the incoming SO2. The effectiveness of
these devices depends not only on control device design but also on operating
variables. Lime or limestone scrubbers, sodium scrubbers, and dual alkali
scrubbers are among the commercially proven wet FGD systems. These are
favored because their availability and relatively low cost. Although wet scrubbers
can also be utilized in particulate removal, they are most effective when coupled
with ESP or filters. Wet scrubbers consist of a spray tower or absorber where flue
gas is sprayed with calcium-based water slurry.
b. Dry FGD/ Spray Drying: Dry scrubbers are an alternative application for SO2
removal. Dry FGD require the use of efficient particulate control device such as
ESP or fabric filter. Instead of saturating the flue gas, dry FGD uses little or no
moisture and thus eliminates the need for dewatering. Lime is mixed in slurry with
about 20% solids; the slurry is atomized and injected into the boiler flue gas. The
SO2 reacts with the alkali solution or slurry to form liquid-phase salts. The slurry is
dried by the latent heat of the flue gas to about 1% free moisture. The dried alkali
continues to react with SO2 in the flue gas to form sulfite and sulfate salts. The
spray dryer solids are entrained in the flue gas and carried out of the dryer to a
particulate control device such as an ESP or baghouse. The absorber construction
material is usually carbon steel making lower capital cost. However, the necessary
use of lime in the process will increase the operational costs. Besides than, dry
FGD’s efficiency is slightly lower than wet FGD (70-90% wt.). Dry FGD have been
proven with low-sulfur coal in the United States and elsewhere, but their
applicability for use with high-sulfur coals has not been widely demonstrated.
c. Furnace Injection: A dry sorbent is injected into the upper part of the furnace to
react with the SO2 in the flue gas. The finely grinded sorbent is distributed quickly
and evenly over the entire cross section in the upper part of the furnace. In PF
system, the combustion temperature at furnace is range between 750-1,2500C.
Commercially available limestone or hydrated lime is used as sorbent. Removal
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efficiency can be obtained up to 50%. Limestone may also be injected into the
furnace, typically in an FBC, to react with SO2 and form calcium sulfate.
d. Duct Injection: In duct injection, the sorbent is evenly distributed in the flue gas duct
after the pre-heater where the temperature is about 1500C. At the same time, the
flue gas is humidified with water if necessary. Reaction with the SO2 in the flue gas
occurs in the ductwork and the by product is captured in a downstream filter.
Removal efficiency is greater than with furnace injection systems. An 80% SO2
removal efficiency has been reported in actual commercial installations.
8.8.3
Post Combustion SOx Control
579. Table 8-9 presents the post combustion SOx control for coal combustion
sources. The typical control efficiencies percentage is more referred to pulverized
technology with higher combustion temperature.
Table 8-9: Post combustion SOx control for coal combustion sources.
Control
Technology
Description
Control
Efficiency
Remarks
Lime/limestone
80 – ≥95%
Applicable to high sulfur fuels,
wet sludge products.
Sodium carbonate
80 – 98%
430 MMBTU/hr typical
application range, high reagent
costs.
Magnesium oxide/hydroxide
80 – ≥95%
Can be regenerated.
Dual alkali
90 – 96%
Used lime to regenerate
sodium-based scrubbing
liquor.
Spray drying
Calcium hydroxide slurry,
vaporizes in spray vessel
70 – 90%
Applicable to low and medium
sulfur fuels, produces product.
Furnace
injection
Dry calcium carbonate/
hydrate injection in upper
furnace cavity
25 – 50%
Commercialize in Europe,
several U.S demonstration
projects are completed.
Duct injection
Dry sorbent injection into
duct, sometimes combined
with water spray
25 – ≥50%
Several research, development
and demonstration projects
underway, not yet
commercially available.
Wet scrubber
580. Based on the proposed design coal, SO2 emission without FGD installed will be
above the World Bank’s Environmental, Health and Safety Guidelines of 2008 for
Thermal Power Plant, with capacity >50<600MW boilers: 400mg/Nm3 for degraded
airshed. The Wet Type FGD, with limestone is selected as SOx emission treatment
option, due to the high rate of removal, plus the system will yield a marketable byproduct Gypsum.
8.8.4
NOx Treatment Options
581. NOx control technologies are mainly two categories: primary control technologies
and secondary control technologies. Primary control technologies reduce the amount of
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NOx produced in the primary combustion zone. In contrast, secondary control
technologies reduce the NOx present in the flue gas away from the primary combustion
zone. Some of the secondary control technologies actually use a second stage of
combustion, such as reburning. Table 8-10 summarizes available NOx control
technologies.
582. The standard practice of modern PF Boilers is to have both Low NOx burners
with Overfire air ports. This is by far the easiest solution, which also has one of the
highest NOx reduction rates. However, in order to achieve the emission standards for
NOx, an SCR will be installed.
8.9
Ash Disposal Options
583. As described in Chapter 4, the residuals of coal combustion in power plants that
are captured by pollution control technology include fly ash, bottom ash, and flue gas
desulfurization gypsum. Given the industry practice, alternatives that can be considered
for disposal of ash and gypsum that will be generated by the Project are recycling, or
storage in an ash pond. Given the fact that a lined ash facility involves investment, land,
and continuing management to contain the material stored, recycling is the preferred
alternative from both environmental and economic viewpoint.
8.9.1
Ash Recycling Options
584. Fly ash is a product of burning finely ground coal in a boiler to produce electricity.
It is removed from the plant exhaust gases primarily by electrostatic precipitators or
baghouses and secondarily by scrubber systems. Physically, fly ash is a very fine,
powdery material, composed mostly of silica. Fly ash is a pozzolan, a siliceous material
which in the presence of water will react with calcium hydroxide at ordinary temperatures
to produce cementitious compounds. Because of its spherical shape and pozzolanic
properties, fly ash is useful in cement and concrete applications. The spherical shape
and particle size distribution of fly ash also make it good mineral filler in hot mix asphalt
applications and improve the fluidity of flowable fill and grout when it is used for those
applications. Fly ash applications include its use as a:
Raw material in concrete products and grout
Feed stock in the production of cement
Fill material for structural applications and embankments
Ingredient in waste stabilization and/or solidification
Ingredient in soil modification and/or stabilization
Component of flowable fill
Component in road bases, sub-bases, and pavement
Mineral filler in asphalt
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Table 8-10: NOx Control Options for Coal-Fired Boilers
Control
Technique
Description of Applicable
technique
boiler
designs
NOx
reduction
potential
Commercial
availability
R&D status
Comments
Combustion Modifications
Load
reduction
Reduction of
coal and air.
Stokers
Minimal
Available
Applicable to
stokers that can
reduce load without
increasing excess
air; may cause
reduction in boiler
efficiency; NOx
reduction varies
with percent load
reduction.
Operational
modifications
(BOOS, LEA,
BF, or
combination)
Rearrangemen
t of air or fuel
in the main
combustion
zone.
Pulverized
coal boilers
(some
designs);
Stokers
(LEA only)
10-20
Available
Must have sufficient
operational flexibility
to achieve NOx
reduction potential
without sacrificing
boiler performance.
Overfire Air
Injection of air
above main
combustion
zone
Pulverized
coal boilers
and stokers
20-30
Available
Must have sufficient
furnace height
above top row of
burners.
Low NOx
Burners
(LNB)
New burner
designs
controlling
airfuel mixing
Pulverized
coal boilers
35-55
Available
Available in new
boiler designs.
LNB with
OFA
Combination of Pulverized
new burner
coal boilers
designs and
injection of air
above main
combustion
zone
40-60
Available
Available in new
boiler designs.
Reburn
Injection of
reburn fuel and
completion air
above main
combustion
zone
50-60
Commercially
available but
not widely
demonstrated
Reburn fuel can be
natural gas, fuel oil,
or pulverized coal.
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furnaces
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Control
Technique
Description of Applicable
technique
boiler
designs
NOx
reduction
potential
Commercial
availability
R&D status
Comments
Post-Combustion Modifications
SNCR
Injection of
NH3 or urea in
the convective
pass
Pulverized
30-60
coal boilers,
cyclone
furnaces,
stokers, and
fluidized
bed boilers
Commercially
available but
not widely
demonstrated
Applicable to new
boilers or as a
retrofit technology;
must have sufficient
residence time at
correct temperature
(1,750E±90 EF);
elaborate reagent
injection system;
possible load
restrictions on
boiler; and possible
air preheater fouling
by ammonium
bisulfate
Selective
Catalytic
reduction
(SCR)
Injection of
NH3 in
combination
with catalyst
material
Pulverized
coal boilers,
cyclone
furnaces
75-85
Commercially
offered, but not
yet
demonstrated
Applicable to new
boilers or as a
retrofit technology
provided there is
sufficient space;
hot-side SCR best
on low-sulfur fuel
and low fly ash
applications; coldside SCR can be
used on highsulfur/high-ash
applications if
equipped with an
upstream FGD
system.
LNB with
SNCR
Combination of Pulverized
new burner
coal boilers
designs and
injection of
NH3 or urea
50-80
Commercially
Same as LNB and
offered, but not SNCR alone.
widely
demonstrated
as a combined
technology
LNB with
OFA and
SCR
Combination of Pulverized
new burner
coal boilers
design,
injection of air
above
combustion
zone, and
injection of
NH3 or urea
85-95
Commercially
Same as LNB, OFA,
offered, but not and SCR alone.
widely
demonstrated
as a combined
technology
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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585. A review of the utilization of fly ash produced in the coal powered plants in India 6
shows that on an average the utilization of fly ash produced by the coal fired power
plants is over 50%, with a number of plants achieving 100% utilization. Pakistan
Standards and Quality Control Authority (PSQCA), on the initiative of cement
manufacturers have modified the Portland cement standards in 20087 to allow for up to
5% blending of fly ash in the manufacturing of cement. There are a number of potential
users of ash produced by the project in the vicinity of JTPS. These include cement
plants are located at a distance of 100-150 km from the plant mainly on the main
highway M-9 linking Hyderabad to Karachi (Figure 8-3), which is also the route through
which coal will be transported to JTPS. One of the manufacturers, the Power Cement
Limited (Formerly Al-Abbas Cement Limited) located about 60km from the JTPS has
indicated that their plant can utilize about 100,000 tons/year of ash as finished product
extender, and about 150,000 t/year as kiln feed (letter from the manufacturer included in
Appendix 9). Production of cement concrete blocks where bottom ash can be used as
an aggregate is also common and widespread in the Karachi-Hyderabad area.
586. FGD Gypsum is a product of a process typically used for reducing SO2 emissions
from the exhaust gas system of a coal-fired boiler. The physical nature of these
materials varies from a wet sludge to a dry powdered material depending on the
process. The wet sludge from a lime-based reagent wet scrubbing process is
predominantly calcium sulfite. The wet product from limestone based reagent wet
scrubbing processes is predominantly calcium sulfate. The largest single market for FGD
material is in wallboard manufacturing. Other FGD Gypsum applications include its use
as a:
Fill material for structural applications and embankments
Feed stock in the production of cement
Raw material in concrete products and grout
8.9.2
Preferred Ash Disposal Approach for the Project
587. Recycling of ash will be the preferred option for ash disposal. JTPS can
generate revenue by a proper planning of ash disposal. As the cement industry has
already shown interest in utilization of ash produced at the Project, JTPS management
will consult and enter into agreements with cement factories and other construction
industries for utilization of the ash. Meanwhile, lined ash disposal areas will be
developed in stages to store surplus ash that cannot be recycled, with the initial stage
sized to accommodate five years of the total facility ash output as described in
Chapter 4.
6
7
Report on Fly Ash Generation at Coal/Lignite Based Thermal Power Stations and its Utilization in the
Country for the Year 2010-11, Central Electricity Authority, New Delhi, December 2011
PS 232-2008 (R), Pakistan Standard: Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) (33, 43 & 53 Grades), Pakistan
Standards and Quality Control Authority
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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Figure 8-3: Location of Cement Plants Accessible to JTPS
Location of Cement Plants
Accessible to JTPS
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8.10 Location Alternatives of the Ash Pond Facility
588. As described in Chapter 3 ‘Description of the Project’, ash will be transferred to
the ash pond through a slurry pipeline. Land requirement for the ash pond is estimated
at 40.5 hectares or 100 acres. Alternative locations considered for the ash disposal
pond are indicated in Figure 8-4. The following factors were considered in selection of
the location for the ash pond.
a. The site should be close the power plant for economic as well as management
reasons. Piping of the ash slurry to a distance of more than 2 km is not
recommended.
b. The economic value of the land should be low in terms of both the current and
potential uses.
c. The location should not be subject to flooding.
589. Location F is situated in between JTPS and the NTDC housing colonies. This
location has good access to the Indus Highway, and is suitable for residential purposes
in future either for expansion of the existing housing colonies or for construction of a
residential area. This location is therefore not considered appropriate for the ash pond.
590. Location G is a low lying area. This site has been partially inundated by
uncontrolled release of cooling water effluent from the plant. Construction cost at this
location would be comparatively lower as the soil appears to mostly silt. This land would
be suitable for agriculture if the cooling water effluent is transported to the Indus River
through a pipeline to avoid uncontrolled inundation, and making water for irrigation
available from the pipeline. Access to Indus Highway from this location is also good
which will mean comparatively higher land prices as the land could be used for industrial
and commercial purposes in future.
This location is therefore not considered
appropriate.
591. Location C is close to the plant and is about 0.5 km from the Indus Highway. The
land is currently not being utilized and is not prone to flooding due to its elevation.
Housing projects are currently being planned along the Indus Highway immediately east
of this area, and in the long term the residential areas located on the Indus Highway will
spread to this location.
592. Location B situated northwest of the plant is at a distance of less than a kilometer
from the plant avoiding the low lying area adjacent to the plant which is prone to
flooding, and where agriculture lands exist. This location is about 2 km from the Indus
Highway, and the land is barren as water is not available for agriculture. This location is
being investigated to find ownership and price range and is now the preferred site for the
construction of ash pond.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 8-4: Alternative Locations for JTPS Ash Disposal Site
8.11 Hazardous Waste Storage Facility
593. Plant generates various types of waste. Some of these are potentially
hazardous. As described in Section 5.1.3, potential hazardous waste includes:
Asbestos in the scrap piles located in the plant. Additional asbestos may be
discarded during rehabilitation work
Soot removed from the boilers, which at present is dumped in the open area.
594. Options for management of hazardous waste include storage at certified facility
outside the plant, or construction of a facility for storage of hazardous waste at the plant.
Currently certified facilities for storage of hazardous waste are not available in the
country. Construction of a hazardous waste storage facility (HWSF) at the plant site is
therefore proposed.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
9. Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures for the
Proposed Project
9.1
Identification of Significant Environmental Aspects
595. Chapter 6 includes a discussion on the Impacts of existing plant on the
environment, and measures to mitigate the impacts.
This section covers the
assessment of potential environmental impact of the proposed activities. Each potential
impact is then categorized based on Table ‎9-1, to identify the potentially significant
issues according to anticipated risk to environment due to the Project activity. Risk is
defined qualitatively in terms of consequence and probability. Consequence is defined
in terms of magnitude, duration, and spatial scale. Thus, the three categories are
defined as follows:



596.
9.2
H—Definite impact, major deterioration and/or long-term impact and/or large
footprint
M—Possible impact, moderate deterioration and/or medium-term impact and/or
intermediate footprint
L—Unlikely (or low likelihood) impact, minor deterioration and/or short-term
impact and/or small footprint
The significant issues are then further discussed in the following sections.
Construction Impact
597. Some of the environmental and social impacts of construction activities relate to
activities at the construction site whereas others relate to the setting up and operation of
the construction crew camp. Typical issues include:


Site clearance leading to dust emission

Erosion and sedimentation due to large scale earthwork

Noise and vibration from machinery and construction work

Off-site impacts such as those related to borrow pits

Removal of vegetation leading to loss of vegetation cover

Air quality impact from operation of construction machinery and earthwork

Generation of waste and its disposal

Disposal of effluent from construction camp
Cultural impact related to presence of non-local workers
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table ‎9-1: Potential Environmental and Socioeconomic Impacts of the Proposed Activities
Project Activity
1
Description
Impacts
Risk
Discussion
Transportation of
equipment
The equipment for the power
plant will be imported via
Karachi Port or Port Qasim. It
will then be moved to JTPS
via one of the main highways,
M-9 or N-5. The load will
comprise dozens of 40-feet
(12.2 m) flat-bed trucks. In
addition some large
equipment will be carried on
over-sized articulated trucks.
During the main phase of equipment
transportation, the additional traffic generated on
the road can potentially result in the following
types of impact: road congestion and
inconvenience to existing road users, additional
noise and emissions and impact on the nearby
community, and community safety issues.
For the over-sized consignments, it may be
necessary to remove obstructions, such as toll
plaza, and low level power and telephone lines,
to allow the equipment to pass through. Further,
the heavy load may also damage the road
surface particularly the shoulders.
L
All the roads that will be used for the
transportation of plant equipment are
national highways, dual carriage and
have at least 4 lanes. The current
volume of traffic on any of the
highways ranges from 8,000 to 21,000
vehicles per day (see Table 9-3). In
comparison the volume of traffic
generated by the movement of plant
equipment is likely to be less than 500
trucks, spread over several weeks.
The incremental traffic and
consequently the impact will therefore
be insignificant.
Environmental management measures
have been included in the EMP.
Construction impact
Construction activities include
construction and operation of
staff camp, storage of
equipment, civil works,
installation of equipment, and
disposal of waste.
Potential environmental impacts of construction
activities include:
Camp waste disposal; disposal of camp
wastewater; spills and leakages of oil and
contamination of soil and potentially surface
water; and noise and vibration
L
As the plant is not located in any
congested areas and most of the
activities will be within the existing
JTPS, the risk is low. A construction
management is included in the EMP.
Industrial construction activities pose an
occupational health and safety risk to the
workers. Improper management of this aspect
can lead to fatalities and health issues.
M
Requirements for occupational health
and safety management plan are
included in Chapter 10 to address this
concern
Construction Phase
1
H = High; M = Moderate; L = Low. See Section 9.1 for discussion on the categories.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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Project Activity
Description
Socioeconomic impact Contribution of the project to
the local livelihoods in the
of the Project
construction phase.
Grievances of
Unaddressed grievances of
stakeholders due to
Project stakeholders due to
absence of grievance redress
construction activities
mechanism
Impacts
Risk
Additional employment opportunities, resulting in
increased prosperity and wellbeing due to
additional employment for local people.
Ill will of local people and other stakeholders
towards the Project
1
Discussion
M
The project will employ about 3,000
(Benefit) persons during the construction phase.
M
Grievances are addressed on
occasional basis in the existing plant
operation. A formal system for
addressing the grievances to ensure
that achieve closure on the issues are
achieved expeditiously is of priority as
construction related activities are likely
to generate concerns and issues
among the stakeholders. A Grievance
Redress Mechanism to be followed in
Project implementation is included in
Chapter 11.
Operations Phase
Emission from Power
Plant
Emission of SO2, NOx, PM10,
and other pollutants
GHG Emissions
Socioeconomic impact Contribution of the project to
the local livelihoods and
of the Project
economy of the country.
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Health issues due to Project related pollution,
resulting in increased health expenses and
affecting deprived segments of the local
populace.
H
Mitigation measures such as
installation of FGDs on boilers in the
existing plant have been incorporated
in the EIA and design.
As described in Section 9.7, ash from
Global warming
L
the Project will recycled in the cement
industry to partially offset the GHG
emission.
Increased power generation due to the Project,
H
The project will fill critical gaps and
reducing energy shortfall and reviving associated (Benefit) provide significant support to the local
economy as well as that of the country.
economy.
As indicated in Chapter 2, in addition
to reducing power outages which are
affecting growth of the economy, the
project will lower the average cost of
power generation in the country by
shifting the fuel mix in power
generation from fuel oil to coal.
Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures for the Proposed Project
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Project Activity
Description
Impacts
Risk
1
Discussion
Grievances are addressed on
occasional basis in the existing plant
operation. A formal system for
addressing the grievances to ensure
that achieve closure on the issues are
achieved expeditiously is of priority as
construction related activities are likely
to generate concerns and issues
among the stakeholders. A Grievance
Redress Mechanism to be followed in
Project implementation is included in
Chapter 11.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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598. Many of the construction impacts are temporary and end with the completion of
the construction activity. However, poor management can result in long-term residual
impacts. To avoid adverse impact of the construction activities on the environment,
following measures are proposed:



9.3
To the extent possible, the camp of the construction contractor(s) will be located
within the premises of JTPS.
The construction contractor will develop a specific construction management
plan (CMP) based on the CMP included in the EMP. The CMP will be
submitted to the JTPS and CSC for approval.
The CMP will clearly identify all areas that will be utilized during construction for
various purposes. For example, on a plot plan of the construction site the
following will be shown:
o
Areas used for camp
o
Storage areas for raw material and equipment
o
Waste yard
o
Location of any potentially hazardous material such as oil
o
Parking area
o
Loading and unloading of material
o
Septic tanks
Disposal of Waste from Construction Works
599. The plant construction and installation of equipment will generate considerable
amount of waste. It will include metals (mainly iron and copper), concrete, wood, cotton,
plastic, packing materials, electronic, and insulation material. Different types of hazards
are associated with some of the waste material. For example:


Sharp edges in metals

Soil contamination from leaking oil from equipment

Potentially toxic content

Tripping hazards if material is left in the pathways

Slipping hazard from oil on floors

Dust and soot
Respiratory disorders
600. A comprehensive Waste Management Plan will be instituted at JTPS and re-use
opportunities for waste generated during construction will be investigated. Hazardous
waste identified, if any, will be stored in the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Facility
as described in Chapter 4.
601. As a standard practice all metal (mainly iron and copper) parts generated as
waste will be recycled. Similarly, wood will also be recycled. Part of the recycling may
be done internally, within JTPS or other companies owned by GENCO Holding
Company.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
9.4
9.4.1
Air Quality Impacts During Operation
Modeling Approach
602. Emissions from the power plant are estimated for four scenarios. The scenarios
and the rationale for selecting them is as follows:
(i)
Without JTPS scenariothe conditions that would exist if there was no
JTPS (neither the existing units nor the proposed power plant)
(ii)
Baseline scenariothe existing conditions where all the units with
existing efficiency operate on HSFO, and there are no controls on
emission. This is the worst-case present day condition. It is important to
establish the baseline condition and determine whether the present
airshed shall be considered degraded or non-degraded (this is discussed
further in later in this section).
(iii)
Baseline scenario with OffsetAll the units with existing efficiency
operate on HSFO, and FGDs are installed on stacks. Installation of FGD
will reduce the emission of SO2 to a fraction (5% or less) of its present
value will also, therefore, reduce the concentration of SO2 in ambient air.
To a lesser degree it will also reduce the particulate matter in the ambient
air. This will be the virtual baseline for the proposed project as discussed
later.
(iv)
Post 600 MW Scenario—This is the predicted ambient quality once First
Stage 1 of the project commissioned. It includes incremental impact due
to the project but also takes into account the offset on the existing units.
(v)
Post 1,200 MW Scenario—This is the predicted ambient quality once the
project is installed. It includes incremental impact due to the project but
also takes into account the offset on the existing units.
603. A sixth possible scenario is a variation of third scenario where the offset is
provided on only one stack of the existing plant. This is also discussed separately.
604.
The 1,200 MW is modeled with the following assumption:


Blended coal (Sub-bituminous 80%, Thar 20%)

ESP (99.9%), FGD (95%), and SCR (80%) installed

9.4.2
Efficiency on LHV 43.4%
Plant factor 85%
Background Concentration of Pollutant
605. The existing JTPS has dual-fuel fired boilers, however currently the plant
operates mainly on HSFO. As shown in Table 4-2, the SO2 emission from the existing
stacks exceeds the IFC emission guidelines. This is also likely to result in exceeding the
ambient air quality standards. This is, however, not reflected in the baseline data shown
Table 5-7 as the data was collected over three days only and under conditions in which
the plant was not operating at full load.
606. For this reason, the SO2 and NOX background levels were modeled on the basis
of known point sources in the area and the road traffic. As the sources of PM10 and
PM2.5 are both natural and anthropogenic, the background level calculated in Table 5-9
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9-6
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
which is assumed to be primarily from natural sources was used as background and
were added to the modeled results for PM10 and PM2.5.
9.4.3
Emissions Sources and Modeling Parameters
607. The emission sources that are included in each scenario are described in
Table 9-2.
608. The existing traffic data used to model highways is shown in Table 9-3. The
existing major point sources include the power plants in various locations. These are
characterized in Table 9-4.
Modeling parameters including stack height, gas
temperature, flow rate, and pollutant emission rates are also summarized in Table 9-4.
Table ‎9-2: Emission Sources in the Modeled Scenarios
Source
Type
Existing traffic on road Line source
(N-55, M-9, and N-5)
Lakhra power plant
Point Source
Kotri power plant
Point Source
JTPS HSFO Units
unmitigated
Point Sources
JTPS HSFO Units
mitigated
Point Sources
1200 MW
Point sources
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Scenario 1: Scenario 2: Scenario 3: Scenario 4:
Without
Current
Current
Proposed
JTPS
Baseline
Baseline
Project
Mitigated
(1,200 MW
Mitigation
on Existing)
















Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures for the Proposed Project
9-7
Environmental Impact Assessment
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Table ‎9-3: Traffic Data used for Air Quality Modeling
Car
Wagon/Pi
ckup
Mini Bus
Bus
2 Axle
Truck
3 Axle
Truck
>3 Axle
Truck
Tractor
Motor
Cycles
Total
Karachi – Hyderabad (M-9)
9,327
1,197
732
1,476
2,309
2,272
3,243
12
486
21,115
Hyderabad – Hala (N-5)
4,370
1,621
344
402
1,275
1,176
229
42
822
10,510
Karachi-Dadu (N-55)
3171
1703
-
819
1183
-
8,062
1,186
Source: National Highway Authority (NHA), 2010;.
Table ‎9-4: Modeling Parameters and Major Point Sources of Emissions in the Model Area
JTPS Existing Status [1]
JTPS (after FGD Installation)
Lakhra TPS
(Coal fired)
Stack Number
Stack 1
Stack 2
Stack 1
Stack 2
Capacity, MW
450
400
450
400
1 and 2
3 and 4
1 and 2
3 and 4
Stack Height, m
150
150
150
150
100
Inner Dia, m
4.5
4.5
4.5
4.5
Flue Gas Temperature, K
410
413
335
20
20
1,187.67
PM10, g/s
Kotri TPS
(Combined Cycle)
New 1,200 MW
Power Plant at JTPS
Stack 1
Stack 2
660
660
1
2
15
210
210
4.5
4.5
8
8
337
433
413
333
333
20
20
23
20
38.3
38.3
1,035.82
59.38[2]
51.79[2]
43.33
1.80
100.2
100.2
54.45
47.49
54.45[3]
47.49[3]
19
4.1
11.8
11.8
PM2.5 g/s
24.50
21.37
24.50[3]
21.37[3]
-
-
5.31
5.31
NO2, g/s
237.8
233.0
237.8[4]
233.0[4]
150
104
29.7
29.7
Units Connected
Exit Velocity, m/s
SO2, g/s
150
174
Notes: [1] Existing JTPS was modelled assuming 90% of existing capacity available and 85% plant factor. Emission factors are based on production data for 2011, wherever
available. All other emissions are design emissions. [2] The total SO2 emission (both stack) equals 9.61 Tons per day (TPD) compared to NEQS limit of 500 TPD. [3]
3
3
Total PM emission (PM10 + PM2.5) from Stack 1 and 2 is 305 and 267 mg/Nm , respectively compared to NEQS limit of 500 Mg/Nm . [4] NO2 emissions from Stacks 1
and 2 are 126 ng/J and 123.4 ng/J compared to the NEQS limit of 130 ng/J of heat input.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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9.4.4
Fugitive Emissions
609. The fugitive dust emissions will be generated from coal storage yards, coal
conveyor belt area, ash dumping areas, transportation of fuel, and solid waste. The dust
emissions, if any, from the above areas will be fugitive in nature and maximum when the
wind velocities are high. The dust emissions are likely to be confined to the place of
generation only. Generally large dust particles (greater than about 30 μm), that make up
the greatest proportion of dust emitted from construction activities and stockpiles will
largely deposit within 100 m of sources. Dust particles in the size range 10 – 30 μm are
typically likely to travel 200 m to 500 m. Smaller particles than these are not produced in
significant amounts from construction activities. The potential for significant dust
nuisance is therefore greatest within 500 m of the source and will be limited to within the
plant. The quantification of these fugitive emissions from the area sources is difficult as
it depends on a number of factors such as dust particle size, specific gravity of dust
particles, wind velocity, moisture content of the material and ambient temperatures etc.
Also, there is a high level of variability in these factors. Hence, these are not amenable
for mathematical dispersion modelling.
610. By proper utilization of the following measures, dust generation and dispersions
will be reduced.


Dust extraction/suppression system will be provided at transfer points of
conveyor system;

Conveyor belt will be enclosed to prevent dust generation;

Asphalting of the roads within the plant area; and

Provision of water sprinkling system at material handling and storage yard;
Developing of greenbelt around the plant to arrest the fugitive emissions.
611. Two methods of dust control will be implemented: dust extraction and dust
suppression. A Coal Dust Management Plan is included in Chapter 10, EMP.
612. Coal dust suppression will comprise wetting air-borne dust particles with a fine
spray of water, causing the dust particles to agglomerate and move by gravity to the coal
stream flow. Once properly wetted, the dust particles will remain wet for some period
and will not tend to become airborne again. The dust suppression system at the
stockyard will include a facility to introduce a surfactant or "wetting agent" to the water
supply to minimize the amount of water required. The contaminated water resulting from
dust suppression will be collected and directed to the coal stockyard waste water
management system.
613. Coal dust extraction system will extract dust from screening feeders and belt
feeders by suctioning the dust-laden air and trapping coal particles in fine water sprays,
thereafter discharging the clean air into the atmosphere. The dust collection equipment
will include cyclones, wet scrubbers, fans, collecting hoppers, filters, hoods, ducts,
dampers, and drain pipes. In this system, the dust-laden air will enter the collector
where it will come in contact with water; the slurry will be collected in the hopper and
disposed of in the settling pond. Settled dust will be put back into the stockyard where it
will be mixed with crushed coal for use. In addition, roof extraction fans will be provided
in essential areas like crusher house and boiler bunker floors. Air conditioning for
control room and pressurized ventilation with unitary air filter unit for Electrical and
Control Buildings of coal handling plant will be provided.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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614. The volatility of the coal of this project is expected to be high, and can easily
cause spontaneous combustion; therefore, the coal in the coal yard will be stored in
different piles and compacted. The earlier it comes, the earlier it will be used, with
regular rearrangement of the coal piles. The bucket wheel machine will be used and will
be equipped with water tank to spray water over the fly dust points to reduce the fly dust.
The coal pile will have an automatic temperature monitoring system; when an increase
in temperature is detected, an alarm will be immediately triggered, alerting presence of
hot spots. Based on the temperature and the risks, the coal will be either immediately
sent to the boiler for utilization, or the portion of coal will be isolated and allowed to burn
off. Coal fires cannot be extinguished by water. Rubber belt of the belt conveyer will
use flame retardant material.
615. Following emission controls will be installed to reduce the emission from the
plant:




9.4.5
High efficiency (>99.9%) electrostatic precipitators (ESP) will be installed to limit
the total PM emissions to 30 mg/Nm3.
Flue Gas Desulphurisation (FGD) units (efficiency > 95%) using lime slurry will
be installed to limit SO2 emissions on the existing as well as the proposed plant.
Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit (efficiency > 80%), low NOx burners with
Overfire air ports will be designed and procured to limit the NOx generation to
75.2 mg/Nm3.
A stack height of 210 m is proposed for wider dispersion of emission and
thereby dilution. A higher stack will also effectively disperse the thermal
pollution from the stack, which represents about 8 to 10% of the total input of
the furnace.
Model Description
616. USEPA regulatory model AERMOD was used to simulate criteria pollutants from
major sources in the project area and predict air quality for SO2, NO2 and PM10 and
PM2.5.
Model Area
617. A 50 km by 50 km area with the JTPS in the center was selected as the model
area. Given that the area is nearly flat and hills west of the plant are uninhabited, the
modeling was done assuming flat terrain.
Meteorological Data
618. A pre-processed hourly meteorological data for the Hyderabad Station for 2009,
2010, and 2011 were purchased and used in the model. A monthly summary of the
meteorological data is given in Table ‎9-5.
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Table ‎9-5: Summary of 2009, 2010 and 2011 Meteorological
Data Input to AERMOD
Month
o
Wind
Max. Speed
(m/s)
Temperature ( C) Relative Humidity (%)
Predominant
Direction
Min
Max
Min
Max
Jan
11.0
N
10.0
28.8
15
95
Feb
11.3
N
12.2
34.2
13
91
Mar
15.1
SW
15.9
40.0
7
97
Apr
15.8
SW
20.9
43.6
5
88
May
17.8
SW
25.6
45.0
10
90
Jun
17.2
SW
23.8
45.9
10
93
Jul
18.2
SW
26.3
42.7
25
96
Aug
15.1
SW
24.6
38.4
38
98
Sept
14.4
SW
23.8
36.8
31
99
Oct
12.7
N
19.6
39.6
11
97
Nov
12.0
N
16.0
36.3
17
95
Dec
11.3
N
9.7
29.8
14
89
Sensitive Receptors
619. The model area was divided into a 1,000 m grid and receptors were allocated on
the corner of each grid for plotting of air quality data within all the model area. A finer
grid of 250m interval was defined within 5 km of the JTPS to accurately estimate the air
quality data near the probable high concentration areas. Further, sensitive receptors
such as schools and hospitals were incorporated in the model area to assess the impact
of air quality on those areas. The list of sensitive receptors, their locations and details
are given in Table ‎9-6. These are also shown in Figure 9-1.
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Figure ‎9-1: Location of Sensitive Receptors
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Table ‎9-6: Details of Sensitive Receptors
Name of Sensitive Receptors
Location
Latitude
Longitude
Maa Jee Hospital
25.374507
68.363028
Hospital
25.367445
68.389935
Allah Bachayo Memon Hospital
25.426842
68.340969
Quaid Public School
25.368129
68.374772
Hyderabad Public School
25.374247
68.374772
Girls College
25.368129
68.374772
Noor Muhammad High School
25.386448
68.354317
City School
25.380856
68.357906
Govt. Boys Degree College Qasimabad
25.390098
68.366062
Old Campus Sindh University
25.384631
68.365014
The Aga Khan Maternal and Child Care Centre
25.412229
68.354273
Qasimabad Government Hospital
25.409516
68.339295
Jijal Maa Hospital
25.39934
68.340411
Red Crescent Hospital
25.392968
68.334859
Government School for Boys
25.392061
68.333099
25.3869
68.338813
City Care Hospital
25.369011
68.354316
St Elizabeth Hospital
25.372636
68.356451
Isra University Hospital
25.436066
68.382168
Plant Colony (Iqra Public School)
25.465558
68.262302
Sindh University
25.419255
68.271317
Mehran University of Engineering & Technology
25.406085
68.259634
LUMHS university
25.430443
68.271340
Taluka Hospital
25.366694
68.307366
T. B. Sanotorium Hospital
25.361439
68.270974
Government Girls High School
25.357232
68.273442
Kulsoom Ghulam Hussain Memorial School
25.360111
68.276585
T&T Hospital
25.367653
68.284729
Government Degree Boys College
25.360072
68.287958
Govt. Girls High School
25.365656
68.311347
Govt. Boys High School
25.365908
68.31404
Govt. Muslim Primary School
25.36664
68.298086
Hyderabad
Ghani Hospital
Jamshoro
Kotri
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9.4.6
Air Quality Modeling Results
620. In this section, the maximum concentration levels in ambient air are presented for
SO2, NO2, PM10, PM2.5 and CO for the four scenarios specified earlier. For SO 2, NO2,
PM10, PM2.5 the maximum concentration levels were modeled for 24-hour averaging
period and annual averaging period to correspond with the NEQS requirements. For CO
the maximum concentration levels were modeled for 1-hour and 8-hour averaging
periods to correspond to the NEQS requirements. The 24-hour and annual isopleth for
the 1,200 MW scenario for SO2, NO2, and PM10, are included in Appendix 10. Similarly
for CO the diagrams show the highest 8-hour and 1-hour concentration corresponding to
the standards. The NEQS permit the 24-hour and 8-hour standard value (for CO) to be
exceeded 2% of the time in a year, but not on two consecutive days. Therefore, to
assess whether a particular pollutant meets the NEQS standards, the number of
exceedances per year were assessed. Table 9-7 summarize the air quality modeling
results for the five scenarios. The maximum value gives the extreme high, highest
concentration reached for a particular averaging period based on 3 years meteorological
data. The 98th percentile value shows the highest concentration 98% of the time in a
year, which is found by eliminating 2% of the highest values as per the standards.
621. In case an FGD is installed on one stack only in the existing plant, SO2
concentration will be 142-145 µg/m³ and the 24–hr (98th percentile) limit for SO2 for
NEQS of 120µg/m³ will not be met. Similarly, the Maximum 24 hour concentration with
FGD installed on one stack only is estimated at 147-150 µg/m³, and the limit of
125 µg/m³ under IFC Guidelines will also not be met. Installation of FGD on one stack
only in the existing plant is therefore not an option.
622. At full load, the contribution of the new plant in the SO2 concentration will be
about 50% of the total concentration. About 25% will come from the existing plant (with
FGD installed) and the remaining from other sources. The contribution of SO 2 from the
new plant will be about 18% of the IFC Guidelines limit.
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Table ‎9-7: Air Quality Modeling-Results
Pollutant
Criteria
SO΍
Averaging
Time
Maximum 24–hr
th
24–hr (98 %le)
Annual
NO΍
Maximum 24–hr
th
NEQS
(µg/m³)
–
IFC
Guidelines
(µg/m³)
No JTPS
Concentration
(µg/m³)
Days
Exceeding
Per year
Concentration
(µg/m³)
10.3
–
223.0
120
9.2
–
184.5
80
3
–
9
–
125
200
Current Baseline with
Offset
Current Baseline
Days
Exceeding
Per year
Concentration
(µg/m³)
Days
Exceeding
Per year
Post 600 MW
Concentration
(µg/m³)
Post 1200 MW
Days
Exceeding
Per year
Concentration
(µg/m³)
Days
Exceeding
Per year
22.3
–
34.8
–
47.2
–
50
21.0
–
32.6
0
44.1
0
55.5
–
5.7
0
8.5
–
11.2
–
–
56.1
–
56.1
–
59.2
–
62.3
–
7.2
–
37.6
–
37.6
–
47.4
0
57.2
0
24–hr (98 %le)
80
Annual
40
40
1.2
–
12.0
–
12.0
0
17.2
–
22.3
–
–
150
108.4
–
126.1
–
126.1
–
129.2
–
132.2
–
100.8
–
117.2
–
117.2
–
118.9
0
120.5
0
70
69.1
–
73.2
–
73.2
0
76.2
–
79.2
–
75
60.8
–
68.8
–
68.8
–
70.2
–
71.5
–
57.7
–
66.3
–
65.5
0
66.3
0
67.1
0
43.1
–
44.9
–
44.9
–
46.3
–
47.6
–
10,000
–
–
8,846
–
8,846
–
9,352
–
9,858
–
Maximum 8–hr
–
–
–
4,083
–
4,083
–
4,347
–
4,611
–
8–hr (98th %le)
5,000
–
–
1,541
0
1,541
0
1,610
0
1,678
0
PMΌ΋ Maximum 24–hr
th
24–hr (98 %le)
150
Annual
120
PM2.5 Maximum 24–hr
th
CO
Ambient Air Quality Under Various Scenarios
24–hr (98 %le)
35
Annual
15
1–hr
35
Notes:
1. According to NEQS 24-hr Average standard values may be exceeded 2% of the year but not on two consecutive days
2. A ‗–‗ indicates that either the information is not available of not applicable.
3. As the two stacks are identical and close to each other, the 600 MW results are estimated from the 1,200 MW modeling results assuming linier increment .
4 The PM10 and PM2.5 baseline (No JTPS) is set equal to the values calculated from baseline (Chapter 5).
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Sensitive Receptors
623. LUMHS in Jamshoro and Iqra Public School in WAPDA colony were identified as
the two closest sensitive receptor locations to JTPS and chosen for further analysis.
The baseline and post project modeling results for the two receptors are given in
Table ‎9-8 below.
Table ‎9-8: Post 1200 MW Concentration at Sensitive Receptors
Sr
1
Pollutant
SO΍
2
NO΍
Averaging
Time
PMΌ΋
LUMHS
Average Exceedances
(µg/m³)
(days)
Maximum 24hr
41
24-hr (98th
Percentile)
37
Annual
4
Average Exceedances
(µg/m³)
(days)
32
0
–
19.1
–
6.2
–
3.7
–
Maximum 24hr
37.0
0
25.1
0
24-hr (98th
Percentile)
25.3
–
14.2
–
4.3
–
3
–
Maximum 24hr
95.8
0
31.8
0
24-hr (98th
Percentile)
78.2
–
3.7
–
Annual
71.2
0.9
–
Annual
3
Iqra Public School
–
Maximum Ground Level Concentration
624. For the post 1,200 MW Project scenario, the maximum ground level
concentration will occur near the coordinates 25.4240N, 68.2792 E (located east of
LUMHS near the Indus River). It is recommended that a fixed station monitoring station
be established at this point.
9.4.7
Compliance with Guidelines and Standards
Ambient Air Quality
625. The compliance status of the 600 MW and 1,200 MW power plant against the
applicable standards and guidelines is summarized in Table 9-9. The 1,200 MW plant
meets all the limits under the NEQS and IFC Guidelines except:


PM10 with respect to IFC Guidelines, where the estimated Annual Average
concentration of 79.2 µg/m³ exceeds the limit of 70 µg/m³.
PM2.5 with respect to IFC Guidelines, where the estimated Annual Average
concentration of 47.6 µg/m³ exceeds the limit of 35 µg/m³.
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Table ‎9-9: Compliance with Ambient Guidelines and Standards
NEQS
(µg/m³)
SO΍
Maximum 24–hr
th
24–hr (98 %le)
Annual
NO΍
Maximum 24–hr
125
34.8
47.2
120
-
32.6
44.1
8.5
11.2
59.2
62.3
47.4
57.2
–
200
80
Annual
40
40
17.2
22.3
–
150
129.2
132.2
118.9
120.5
70
76.2
79.2
75
70.2
71.5
66.3
67.1
46.3
47.6
10,000
9,352
9,858
Maximum 8–hr
–
4,347
4,611
8–hr (98th %le)
5,000
1,610
1,678
Maximum 24–hr
24–hr (98 %le)
150
Annual
120
Maximum 24–hr
th
CO
Concentrations
for 1200 MW
(µg/m³)
24–hr (98 %le)
th
PM2.5
Concentrations
for 600 MW
(µg/m³)
–
80
th
PMΌ΋
IFC
Guidelines
(µg/m³)
24–hr (98 %le)
35
Annual
15
1–hr


35
PM2.5 with respect to NEQS, where the estimated Annual Average
concentration of 47.6 µg/m³ exceeds the limit of 15 µg/m³.
PM2.5 with respect to NEQS, where the estimated concentration of 67.1 µg/m³
exceeds the 24–hour (98th percentile) limit of 35 µg/m³.
626. The predicted concentrations for 600 MW are lower however, the same limits are
exceeded.
627. The estimated Annual Average concentration of PM10 for 1,200 MW at
79.2 µg/m³ exceeds the IFC Guideline for PM10 by 9 µg/m³, and the baseline level by
6 µg/m³. The background concentration of PM10 is estimated at 69 (No JTPS case in
Table 9-7), while the baseline is estimated at 73 µg/m³ (Current Baseline in Table 9-7).
An increase of 13% over the background concentration of PM10 can be considered as
acceptable under the ADB Guidelines2, as the background concentration associated with
natural sources in the area is already close to the limit in the IFC Guideline. Similarly,
the background concentration of PM2.5 associated mainly with natural sources at 58
µg/m³ for 24–hour (98th percentile) and 43 µg/m³ for Annual Average basis which are
already above the limits set in NEQS and IFC Guidelines. The increase in PM2.5
2
According to ADB Safeguards Policy Statement 2009 Appendix 1 para 34, ‗The borrower/client will
avoid, or where avoidance is impossible, will minimize or control the intensity or load of pollutant
emission and discharge.‘ The Project includes best available technology for removal of particulate matter
in the form of ESP units with efficiency of 99.5%.
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concentrations due to Project will be of the order of 3 µg/m³. Under these conditions, an
increase of about 6% over the current baseline concentration of PM2.5 can also be
considered as acceptable under the ADB Guidelines.
628. As pointed in Section 5.2.6, the ambient air quality NEQS for PM2.5 requires
rationalization. The project proponent has approached the Sindh Environmental
Protection Agency in Government of Sindh for review of the PM2.5 standards. The
Department has indicated its willingness to review the standards (Appendix 12). Given
the sensitivity with respect to air quality and the need for additional information to assess
the air quality and to assist the Government of Sindh in rationalization of standards,
monitoring of PM10 and PM2.5 in air quality is proposed for at least two years before
commissioning of the Project and included in the Environmental Management Plan
(Chapter 10).
Degraded vs Non-degraded Airshed
629. In general, IFC emission guidelines are different for degraded and non-degraded
airsheds. The degraded airshed is defined by IFC as: Airshed should be considered as
being degraded if nationally legislated air quality standards are exceeded or, in their
absence, if WHO Air Quality Guidelines are exceeded significantly.3
630. As Pakistan has established national ambient air quality standards which,
although not identical to those of the WHO, are comparable and even more stringent in
certain cases, the decision of degraded or non-degraded airshed shall be based solely
on the national criteria. For this purpose, a baseline monitoring was undertaken which is
discussed in Section 5.6. As this was a limited monitoring, it is not considered sufficient
to establish the year-round average concentration to categorize the airshed. However,
based on the results shown in Table 9-7, it is argued that the airshed after the
application of offset to the existing power plant shall be considered as non-degraded as
all ambient air quality standards (with the possible exception of PM2.5 which is currently
under review) will be met.
631. IFC recommends that facilities in degraded airsheds should minimize incremental
impacts by meeting IFC guidelines. Further, it suggest that ―facilities or projects located
within poor quality airsheds should ensure that any increase in pollution levels is as
small as feasible, and amounts to a fraction of the applicable short-term and annual
average air quality guidelines or standards …‖
632. The airshed of the JTPS will be classified as degraded under the present
conditions as it does not meet national ambient air quality standards with respect to SO2.
The introduction of FGD on the existing stacks will result in reducing the emission of SO2
by 95%. This will result in cleaning the air to the extent that the concentration of SO 2 will
be well within the ambient air quality standards. This would result in re-classifying the
airshed as non-degraded.
PM2.5 Offset
633. IFC also recommends that for facilities in degraded airsheds where even after
minimizing the emissions, compliance with IFC guidelines cannot be achieved, the
―project should explore and implement site-specific offsets that result in no net increase
in the total emissions of those pollutants (e.g., particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, or
3
This definition is provided in several places in the IFC‘s EHS Guidelines. For example, Tables 6(A),
6(B), 6(C) of the Thermal Power Plant Guidelines.
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nitrogen dioxide) that are responsible for the degradation of the airshed‖. The proposed
1,200 MW power plant will replace power production from small to medium sized backup
generators used by electricity consumers during forced outages or load shedding. The
PM2.5 emission factor for backup power generators is about 0.5 g per MJ of power
output4, while that for the proposed power plant is 0.004 g per MJ of power output. A
unit of electric power generated from the power plant will thus result in less than 1%
PM2.5 emission compared to that produced by backup generators. The total annual
power generation in the country in 2011-12 was 95,365 GWh.5 The estimated shortfall
in power supply in the country is about 25% of the demand on an annual average basis6.
Thus about 31,800 GWh of power demand is unmet by the generating companies, of
which about one-third is replaced by back-up generators primarily running on diesel and
gasoline. These generators thus generate about 10,600 GWh of electricity annually.
Based on this the current total annual emission of PM2.5 from backup power generators
in the country during forced outages is estimated to be 19,000 tons. Assuming a 90%
plant factor, the 600 MW power plant will produce about 4,730 GWh annually,
corresponding to 15% of the unmet demand of 31,800 GWh. Assuming a proportionate
reduction in power generation from back-up generators, the 600 MW plant will result in a
country-wide reduction of PM2.5 emission by 2,800 tons. The corresponding reduction
for 1,200 MW power plant will be 5,600 tons. The power consumption in Hyderabad
area is about 5.5% of the country-wide demand. Thus, the reduction of PM2.5 emission
in the Hyderabad Area will be about 300 tons annually due to the 1,200 MW power plant.
A detailed ambient air monitoring program including that of the PM2.5 will be instituted.
The program will be initiated before the commissioning of the Project with the objective
of developing a good understanding of the PM2.5 issue in Jamshoro area and possibly
designing future mitigation programs. The objectives and approach of the program are
described in Section 10.19.
Stack Emission
634. The compliance status of the 1,200 MW project is shown in Table 9–10. It
shows that:



4
5
6
The PM10 emission will meet the NEQS as well as the IFC Guidelines for DA.
SO2 emission will comply with IFC Guidelines for NDA and will be marginally
above the DA limits. As it is argues that the airshed shall be re-categorized as
non-degraded subsequent to installation of FGD on the existing power plant, the
SO2 emission shall be considered as compliant to the IFC Guidelines.
Nitrogen oxides emission will comply with the IFC Guidelines for DA and the
NEQS.
USEPA Emission factor for large gasoline engines, small gasoline engines and diesel engines is 0.12,
0.37, 2.64 g/MJ. A mix of 40%, 10%, and 50% is assumed for these types of engines respectively.
Emission factors are derived from USEPA Emissions Factors & AP 42, Compilation of Air Pollutant
Emission Factors (http://www.epa.gov/ttn/chief/ap42/index.html#toc), Chapters 3.3 and 3.4 and USEPA:
Exhaust
Emission
Factors
for
Nonroad
Engine
Modeling,
July
2010
(http://www.epa.gov/otaq/models/nonrdmdl/nonrdmdl2010/420r10019.pdf). In Ap-42, USEPA assumes
that all PM emission is less than 1 micron. In the second document, 92% of the emission is assumed to
be less than 92%.
Government of Pakistan, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Resources, Pakistan Energy Yearbook,
2012. March 2013.
Shortage at peak demand level is about a third of the demand (Section 2.5)
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Table ‎9-10: Compliance of Plant Emission with NEQS and IFC Guidelines
Parameter
Emission from Each Stack
Particulate matter
30 mg/Nm
3
500 mg/Nm
IFC Guidelines
3
3
For NDA: 50 mg/Nm
3
For DA: 30 mg/Nm
3
Sulfur oxides
254 mg/Nm
(20% blending of Thar with
maximum 2.7% S)
3
200 mg/Nm
(20% blending of Thar with
maximum 1.4% S)
17.3 TPD
(Both Units)
Oxides of nitrogen
75.2 mg/Nm
For NDA: 200-850
3
mg/Nm
3
For DA: 200 mg/Nm
100-500 Tons
per day
3
19.0 ng/J of heat input
9.5
Standards
3
For NDA: 510 mg/Nm
3
For DA: 200 mg/Nm
260 ng/J of
heat input
GHG Emissions
635. The estimated greenhouse gas emission from the power plant is provided in
Table 9-11. Estimate has been developed using two different methodologies: The
IPCC Tier 1 methodology that assumes a 96,100 kg of CO 2 emission per terajoule of
heat input from sub-bituminous and 101,000 kg of CO2 emission per terajoule of heat
input from lignite. Calculation is also made using the carbon content of design coals.
The GHG emission based on the IPCC Tier 1 method for Coal G is being used as the
benchmark.
Table ‎9-11: Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates
Sub-bituminous
(Million Tons per year)
Lignite (Million Tons
per year)
Total (Million Tons
per year)
IPCC Tier 1
Coal E
7.577
0.413
7.990
Coal F
7.372
0.638
8.010
Coal G
7.192
0.882
8.074
Coal E
6.069
0.429
6.498
Coal F
5.905
0.663
6.568
Coal G
5.761
0.916
6.677
From Carbon Content
Note: All figures for both units and assume 85% plant factor. For 600 MW the quantities will be half of the
numbers in the table.
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636. The ADB Guidelines for GHG emission require the project proponents to
consider available options for offset of the GHG emissions. In the case of this Project,
options for offset that can be considered include tree plantations, carbon capture, and
recycling of fly ash. Experience of application of carbon capture technologies is lacking
in Pakistan, and application of available technologies for carbon capture in the present
environment are likely to adversely affect the project economics in view of cost of
application. ADB is considering provision of $ 1 million from its Carbon Capture and
Storage (CCS) to conduct a study on determining potential for CCS in Pakistan. Subject
to determination of financial viability, ADB will consider a CCS demonstration project to
offset carbon in Pakistan.
637. Recycling of fly ash which is presently being practiced in India and elsewhere in
the world was investigated further as an offset option. As discussed in Chapter 8 fly ash
can be used as a cement replacement and consultations with cement manufacturers
located in the vicinity of JPCL indicate that the industry is keenly interested in pursuing
this option. A letter confirming the interest of a cement plant located about 60 km from
the Project in utilization of fly ash from the Project is included in Appendix 9. Recycling
of fly ash results in reduction of GHG emissions associated with production of a
corresponding quantity of cement. USEPA estimates the emissions reduction factor in
terms of tons of carbon equivalent per ton of fly ash recycled (TCE/Ton of ash) at 0.87.7
On this basis, potential for offset of GHG emissions assuming recycling of 75% of fly ash
produced by the Project is estimated at 0.23 million tons of GHG annually.8
638. Offset potential of tree plantations will be limited in view of limited availability of
land and water in the JTPS area. However, the project will consider this option. A
comprehensive study to assess the potential of tree plantation to offset the GHG
emission will be undertaken. The study will also consider working with the UN-REDD
Programme.9
639. As shown in Section 9.4.7, the proposed 1,200 MW power plant will replace
power production from small to medium sized backup generators used by electricity
consumers during load shedding. The capacity of these backup generators installed by
the residential, commercial, and industrial consumers is estimated at 2,500 MW 10.
These generators operate mainly on diesel and gasoline, and generate about 9,745
GWh of electricity annually11. Average efficiency of these generators is estimated at
19.0%12. With 1,200 MW power available from the new coal fired power plant, 7,596
GWh will be available for consumption after accounting for 15% T&D losses, which will
result in 31% reduction in load shedding. The plant will displace 3,038 GWh of energy
7
8
9
10
11
12
United States Environmental Protection Agency. Solid Waste Management and Greenhouse Gases.
http://epa.gov/climatechange/wycd/waste/downloads/fly-ash-chapter10-28-10.pdf.
Accessed October
2013.
Corresponding to fly ash production of 349,600 t/year.
The UN-REDD Programme (http://www.un-redd.org/Home/tabid/565/Default.aspx) is the United Nations
collaborative initiative on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD) in
developing countries.
Survey conducted by Hagler Bailly Pakistan in 2009 by interviewing sellers and service providers of
backup generators.
Of the 2,500 MW installed capacity of backup generators, 50% operates on diesel mainly in commercial
and residential segments, 35% on gasoline mainly in residential segment, and 15% on natural gas
mainly in industry.
Corresponding efficiencies taking into account operation at part loads, inadequate maintenance, and
deterioration in performance over the life of the equipment are estimated at 20% for diesel, 15% for
gasoline, and 25% for natural gas fired generators.
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from backup generators, while the remaining 4,557 GWh will be used by the consumers
that previously could not access power either from the grid or from the backup
generators. Allowing for new coal fired plant operating at 42.8% efficiency, 15%
technical losses in the transmission and distribution system and assuming the IPCC
emission factors for the fuels, reduced operation of backup generators will result in an
offset of an estimated 1.06 million tons of GHG annually.
9.6
Traffic Impact
640. Aspects resulting from transportation of construction equipment and plant
machinery to the JTPS are:




Incremental increase in the existing traffic on the road will affect the daily
commuters
Traffic interference, may cause nuisance and safety hazards
Emission and noise level will affect the air quality and cause nuisance to
communities living alongside the route selected for transportation
Degradation of the existing roads
641. Traffic baseline has been provided in Chapter 5. Currently HSFO is transported
through Karachi using M-9 and N55 and N5. In Table ‎9-12, the comparison of existing
traffic and the projected traffic with the demand of the plant is presented.
Table ‎9-12: Daily Road and Fuel Truck Traffic
Current Traffic (2012)
Light vehicles
11,300
Heavy vehicles
9,300
Total
20,600
Projected Traffic (2015)
Light vehicles
13,700
Heavy vehicles
12,400
Total
26,100
Plant Fuel Trucks
Oil tankers – current
55
642. Currently the JTPS traffic associated with transportation of HSFO constitutes
about 0.6% of the heavy traffic on the M-9. Both imported coal and Thar lignite for the
1,200 MW power plant will be transported by railway. GHCL will work with the Pakistan
Railways, GoS, and coal mining companies in Thar to develop the rail link to Thar as
soon as possible.
643. During construction additional road traffic carrying equipment will be generated.
These shall not be more than 10-drucks daily during peak construction period.
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644. A comprehensive transportation management plan will be prepared for
transportation of material during construction and operation of the Project.
9.7
Ash Disposal and Handling
645. The annual ash produced from the Project will be in excess of 400,000 tons.
Options for disposal of fly ash and prospects for sale to the cement industry are
discussed in Chapter 8. Taking into account the potential for recycling of fly ash in the
cement and construction industry, the land requirement for the ash disposal for ten years
is about 100 acres (Section 4.10). The depth of the ash pond will be around 3.5 m to
avoid ash dust formation from the wind. The following practices will be followed for the
construction and operation of the ash pond.


The area will be demarcated

Quantity and quality of ash will be monitored regularly




9.8
The area will be properly lined
Of-site disposal i.e., selling to cement and construction industry will be
considered
The dry and wet ash will be handled separately
Bottom-liner will be laid and monitoring wells will be installed to assess any
contamination to the groundwater
Fugitive emissions will be controlled by sprinkling
Disposal of FGD Gypsum
646. Options for disposal of FGD gypsum and prospects for sale to the cement
industry are discussed in Chapter 8. Surplus gypsum accumulated while the market in
cement industry is developed will be stored in the ash pond in an area separately
demarcated for this purpose.
9.9
Noise
647. Noise is defined as a loud, undesired sound that interferes with normal human
activities. If it affects the well-being of the surrounding community (environmental
noise), it is considered a nuisance. Exposure to very high noise levels (exceeding
85 dBA), particularly for prolonged period can cause hearing loss. Construction and
operation of a coal fired power plant will encounter certain unavoidable noise.
648. The noise during the construction phase greatly depends on the stage of
construction work and equipment used at the site. The construction activities can be
divided into the following phases:


site clearing and preparation,

foundations and concrete placement,

delivery of equipment and materials to the site,

excavation and pile driving,

erection of metal structures,
installation of mechanical and electrical equipment, and
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
649.
steam blowing and commissioning.
The source of noise during operation and maintenance phase includes:


coal delivery, unloading and handling,

steam blowing and purging,

operation of equipment within the turbine generator building and outside,

electric power transmission to the switchyard, and
shutting down of components and switching to other equipment,
650. There are no communities in the vicinity of the power plant and the existing plant
noise is well within the limits. A preliminary assessment of noise levels from the power
plant under unmitigated conditions (Chapter 5) indicate that the noise level at the
nearest community (1,800 m from the noise source) will be about 60 dBA which with
mitigation and due to the presence of a high hill between the proposed site and the
residential area will be reduced by another 5-10 dBA. This noise is therefore not a major
concern.
651. However, noise will be measured and monitored around the periphery of the site
to assure that permissible limits have not been exceeded. Alarms system will be
employed to alert the main control room when any of the detectors indicate excessive
noise levels. The detectors will be installed at critical receptor areas, such as hospital,
school and residential areas. These detectors will be checked and calibrated periodically
by plant personnel.
9.10 Port Impacts
652. Port Qasim currently has a capacity to handle 4 million tons of coal annually.
The project will require about 3.74 million tons of imported coal annually. During the
past 5 years, the port has handled less than one million tons of coal annually. Given the
low current handling and the fact that a plan to expand the capacity to 8 million tons
annually is also underway, it is envisaged that the port has capacity to handle the coal
requirement for the 1,200 MW coal fired capacity at JTPS.
9.11 Waste Management
653. The main environmental and social concerns relate to waste disposal. Other
issues mainly relate to occupational health and safety. In Table ‎9-13, the mitigation
measures related to different activities are described.
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Table ‎9-13: Mitigation Measures Related to Corrective Action
Activity
Onsite handling and
storage of new equipment




Construction activities–
General





Construction–Working in
confined Spaces




Mitigation Measure(s)
The new equipment will be stored in properly demarcated and
identified areas
Separate storage of each item will be adopted and each area
should be marked either on floor or cordoned off by tapes
Lifting equipment (cranes) used for the equipment will follow the
prescribed safety specification.
Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for chemicals, if any, will
accompany the consignment. A copy of the MSDS will be
available near the storage area at all times.
Appropriate PPE will be provided to the workers and it will be
ensured that the PPE are used
The staff will be provided with training in use of PPE.
Proper scaffolding platforms will be provided for all work areas
located more than 1 m above floor level.
First Aid facilities and fire protection devices should be placed in
areas where activates will be performed
Ear protection devise will be used if the noise level is above 85
dB(A)
13
All confined spaces will be identified
The temperature of the confined space will be in the human
tolerance range
Artificial and intrinsically safe lighting will be provided in the
confined spaces
If there is a risk of gases or fumes in the confined space the
provisions for ventilation will be made
9.12 Water Resource Impacts
9.12.1 Extraction of Water from the River
654. Water is extracted from the Indus River and used for cooling in the JTPS. As
described in Chapter 4, the existing power plant requires 1.13 m3/s water from the River
Indus when operating at full capacity. This requirement will increase to 2.06 m 3/s with
commissioning of the Project. Of this, an estimated quantity of 0.47 m 3/s will be returned
to the river. The net extraction of water by the existing and the proposed power plant is
therefore estimated at 1.59 m3/s at full capacity. As detailed in Chapter 6, river flow
upstream of Kotri barrage14 varies from a monthly average level of 7,517 m3/s in August,
to a monthly average level of 213 m3/s in December. Water extracted by the power plant
13
Confined space" means a space that:
(1) Is large enough and so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work; and
(2) Has limited or restricted means for entry or exit (for example, tanks, vessels, silos, storage bins, hoppers,
vaults, and pits are spaces that may have limited means of entry); and
(3) Is not designed for continuous employee occupancy.
14
Data provided by Sindh Irrigation and Drainage Authority (SIDA) for the period 1986-2004.
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will therefore be 0.75% (0.2% for the existing plant) of the minimum monthly average
flow of the river. Minimum daily flows in the drought periods can drop to as low as 14%
of the minimum monthly average flows. In these conditions, the water extracted by the
plant as a percent of the river flow will increase to about 5.3% (1.7% for the existing
plant). This level of change of flow will not cause any significant change in the
geomorphology and the hydraulic parameters of relevance to the river ecology such as
the depth of water, the width of the river, and the area wetted by it.
9.12.2 Quality and Temperature of the Effluent Discharged into the River
655.
As discussed in Chapter 6, level of key pollutants observed in the plant effluents
presently being returned to the river were <5 mg/l and <4 mg/l (below minimum detection
limit) for BOD and COD respectively, while the toxic metals, nitrates, and phosphates
were well below the NEQS limits. The concentrations of toxic metals in the plant
effluents were also observed to be below the National Standards for Drinking Water. As
described in Chapter 4, the proposed 1,200 MW power plant will only discharge cooling
tower effluent/blowdown into the river, and all other waste water generated will either be
recycled or channeled to the evaporation ponds. Effluent flow with the proposed 1,200
MW power plant will increase only slightly from 0.428 m3/s to 0.470 m3/s. The additional
effluent from the Project with TDS in the range of 1,000 to 1,500 mg/l will meet the
NEQS (Chapter 4, Table 4-4, concentrations for circulating water).
656. As discussed in Chapter 6, the existing plant effluent meets the NEQS15 limits for
temperature in the river. Modeling of thermal plume assuming a worst case temperature
difference of 2oC between the river water temperature and that of the effluent water and
low flow conditions during a drought period in winter was conducted to assess the extent
of penetration of the plume relative to the available habitat in the river. Results of thermal
plume modeling for the existing plant following proposed rehabilitation indicate that a
temperature of 0.5oC above that of the river water temperature is reached within a
distance of 31 m downstream from the point of discharge, at a point which is 12 m from
the river bank. Considering the width of the river of the order of 500 m in the dry season,
the plume modeling confirmed that the fish fauna of the river will not be subjected to
stress on account of the temperature of the effluent discharged into the river. Interviews
with local fishermen also confirm that there is no significant difference in the fish catch
upstream or downstream of where this water is discharged.
657. Table 9-15 lists thermal plume modeling inputs with the Project. Effluent flow with
the proposed 1,200 MW power plant will increase only slightly, from 0.428 m 3/s to 0.470
m3/s. The temperature of effluent will increase from 20.0°C to 20.5°C. This will increase
the assumed worst case temperature difference between the river water temperature
and that of the effluent water for the existing plant at low flow conditions during a drought
period in winter from of 2oC to 2.5oC. All other operating parameters listed in Table 6-9
will remain unchanged. Results of thermal plume modeling for the proposed Project
plant inclusive of rehabilitation of the existing plant are illustrated in Figure 6-9. The
results show that a temperature of 0.5oC above that of the river water temperature will be
reached within a distance of 40m (31m for the existing plant) downstream from the point
of discharge, at a point which is 14m (12m for existing plant) from the river bank. The
plant effluent will therefore comply with the NEQS standard for temperature of water in
the river.
15
The NEQS specify a drop of temperature to within 3°C at a distance of 100 m of the ambient from the
point of discharge.
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Table ‎9-14: Plume Model Input Parameter
Parameter
Input Value
Discharge Channel Width
2 meters
Discharge Channel Depth
0.3 meters
Angle of Discharge
a
90 degrees
Region of Interest
Port Depth
1000 meters
b
0 meters
3
Effluent Flow
0.470 m /s
Effluent Salinity
997 kg/m
Effluent Temperature
20.5°C
Water Current Speed (m/s)
0.3 m/s
Current Direction
Parallel to shore, towards north
Ambient water density
997 kg/m
3
3
Figure ‎9-2: Results of the Thermal Plume Modeling
Thermal Plume Path
Plume Path
20
Water Current Direction
(parallel to riverbank)
18
West-East into the River (m)
Temperatur
e
16
18.4
14
12
18.6
10
8
18.81
6
19.1
4
19.4
2
20.0
0
Discharge
0 20.510
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20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
North-South Downstream (m)
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9.13 Ecological Impacts
658. Following the implementation of mitigation measures listed for the existing plant
as detailed in Chapter 6, there will be no impacts associated with the quantity or quality
of the water discharged to the river and ponds created by return of cooling water effluent
to the river, and seepage of effluent from the evaporation ponds. Other potential
impacts due to the Project are discussed below.
659. As described in Chapter 4, 80,000 t/day (0.93 m3/s) of fresh water will be
required for the 1,200 MW power plant. The Project will therefore increase the water
intake from the river from 1.13 m3/s to 2.06 m3/s. As discussed in Section 9.12 above,
there will be minor impact on the hydraulic parameters and consequentially the aquatic
fauna due to change in the quantity of water extracted.
660. As discussed in Section 9.12 above, the temperature of the effluent discharged
into the river will be 2.5 oC above that of the river in the worst case in winter when the
river flow is at minimum. A temperature of 0.5oC above that of the river water
temperature will be reached within a distance of 40m downstream from the point of
discharge, at a point which is 14m from the river bank. Comparing with the width of the
river of the order of 500 m in the dry season, the magnitude of the impact of the quality
and temperature of the plant effluents discharged into the River Indus on the aquatic
ecology will remain minor and the significance will be low. Slightly warmer water at the
plant effluent outlet in the river in winter will not stress the aquatic species as they will
not be exposed to a temperature outside their tolerance range.
661. As discussed in Section 9.12.3 above, the level of key pollutants in the effluent
returned to the river from the plant will remain well below the NEQS limits. The
conclusion reached in Chapter 6 for the existing plant following rehabilitation that the
river ecology is not at risk on account of higher point concentrations of pollutants
discharged by the existing power plant into the river will therefore remain unchanged.
662. Birds and mammals are not expected to be attracted to the ash pond or the
evaporation pond due to existing levels of disturbance and restricted ground access.
Transport of additional coal and supplies for construction of the Project will increase
traffic volumes and can result in land disturbance and habitat fragmentation of animals.
However, since existing road networks will be used to accommodate the additional traffic
volumes, this impact is not likely to be significant considering that the area is already
heavily disturbed.
663. Following the implementation of mitigation measures listed for the existing plant
as detailed in Chapter 6, there will be no additional impacts on the quantity or quality of
the water discharged to the river and ponds created by return of cooling water effluent to
the river, and seepage of effluent from the evaporation ponds. Other potential impacts
are discussed below.
9.14 Socioeconomic Impacts
664. The Project activities will result in both positive and negative impact on the
existing socioeconomic environment of the Socioeconomic Study Area as well as the
broader region. The positive impacts include:

Increased power generation reducing energy shortfall and reviving associated
economy,
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
665.
666.
Additional employment opportunities, resulting in increased prosperity and
wellbeing due to higher and stable incomes of employed people,
The potential adverse impacts include:

Land acquisition resulting in physical or economic displacement of people
Each of these is discussed below.
Reduction in Power Outages
667. Pakistan is suffering from an acute energy crisis as describe in Chapter 2. The
unreliable power supply is affecting the productive end-uses of power due to which the
direct and multiplier benefits of productive activities are foregone and the economy
incurs a loss.
668. Due to the Project, 1,200 MW will be added to the system. The power generated
by the Project would be supplied to various sectors that are currently impacted by the
power shortages and bridge part of the energy shortfall facing the country. This, in turn,
will have a positive impact on the country‘s economy through increase in gross domestic
product (GDP). The impact will last through the life of the Project and thus, be of a long
duration.
Employment Impact
669. The Project will create additional job opportunities. It is expected that more than
200 staff positions will be created under the Project. Most of these positions will be
skilled, having expertise in handling the new equipment and processes. During
construction period about 3,000 people will be hired.
670. The education levels of the rural population are low at 38% and the rural
economy less diversified, mostly specializing in labor work and agriculture. Given this, it
is less likely that they will benefit from the Project employment opportunities. However,
due to the presence of the Sindh, Mehran and LUHMS universities, the local urban and
colony populations have a pool of skilled labor, which are likely to have the skills
required for the Project. The Project will:


Preferentially recruit local candidates provided they have the required skills and
qualifications for the announced positions;
Coordinate efforts to recruit unskilled labor, if any are required under the
Project, from the adjacent rural areas;
671. The long-term stable incomes of people employed by the Project during
operational phase of the Project are likely to lead to improved nutritional status, better
housing, access to education and improvement in overall well-being of their families.
Physical or Economic Resettlement
672. Additional land will be required for the ash pond proposed under the Project (see
Chapter 3, Project Description). The potential sites for the ash pond have been
identified and shown in Figure 6.2 in Chapter 6. None of the identified sites is used for
residential purposes. However, some land with marginal agriculture falls within the
proposed sites.
673. The land will be acquired through the principles and standards laid out under
Pakistan Land Acquisition Act 1894 and the ADB standards spelled out under SPS
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2009. Both require that the affected people be compensated adequately for their loss
due to resettlement. The framework under which land will be acquired under the Project
is given in Appendix 11 of the report.
9.15 Occupational Health and Safety
674. Other than environmental impact, the proposed Project can also increase the risk
of exposing the workers and employees of the power plant and its contractors to
occupational and safety hazards. Although risk is characterized in a similar way to
impacts (consequence and probability), generally the probability of such risks occurring
is much lower than the impacts discussed in the previous sections. This will be achieved
through instituting an occupation health and safety management system. Although
JPCL has a safety policy and a management system, it needs to be up-graded to bring it
at par with the international standards. The requirements are described in Chapter 11.
675. Public risk associated with on-site activities will be restricted by the security
controls in place and the awareness training provided to visitors to the sites.
9.16 Cumulative Impacts
676. The following are the special aspects of the location of JTPS that are of
relevance to the cumulative impacts of the project:




JTPS is connected to the national transmission system at a key point where the
power supplied by it can feed both the southern as well northern markets in the
country.
The plant has access to river water for operation of cooling towers and general
plant use.
The plant is connected to both the national rail and highway networks.
With proximity to Jamshoro town and city of Hyderabad, the plant has access to
a pool of skilled and unskilled labor.
677. While the area in which JTPS is located is attractive for installation of additional
power capacity, there are no firm plans available at present for installation of additional
power plants in the area. GENCO has been considering conversion of the existing 850
MW fuel oil fired capacity to coal firing. If implemented, the existing rail and road
transportation networks connecting the plant to the supply points at ports and mines can
come under further stress. These are discussed in the following sections. Given the
potential for industrial development and installation of power generation capacity in the
area, JPCL will remain in touch with the relevant local and national authorities to ensure
that the development plans take the baselines, impacts, and mitigations presented in the
Project EIA into account.
678. Capacity expansion at JTPS can trigger further industrial and housing
development in the vicinity of the plant. As the transportation of coal to the plant will be
by rail, the road transportation network in the vicinity of the plant is not likely to be
impacted by the plant operations in future. Air quality in the new residential areas that
may develop in close proximity of the plant could be a potential concern. JPCL will
coordinate the planning and zoning of the area in the vicinity of the plant with the local
authorities and explore the option of buffer zones around the plant where residential
developments are restricted.
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9.16.1 Port Facility
679. As discussed earlier the port capacity and existing usage has sufficient capacity
to handle JTPS coal supply. Against the existing capacity of 8 million tons for both Port
Qasim and Karachi Port, the potential future coal handling requirements are:


Pakistan Steel Mills:
3 million tons
New plant at Jamshoro:
3.7 million tons

Coal Conversion KESC Bin Qasim:
3 million tons
Coal conversion at FFBQ, Port Qasim:
0.5 million tons

680. It is evident that without the planned expansion plan Port Qasim will not be able
to handle the coal traffic demand in future. A new bulk coal terminal is under
construction at Port Qasim with a capacity of 8 million tonnes (www.pibt.com.pk). There
are plans to enhance the capacity of this terminal to 12 millions tons in future.
9.16.2 Road and Railway Transport
681. Imported coal for the Project will be transported to JTPS by rail. In the long term,
upgrading of the railway facilities for inland transportation of coal will contribute
substantially to lowering the pressure on road networks. As shown earlier, the 1,200
MW project will generate lignite transportation requirement from Thar. It may be
possible to use road trucks in the early years but railway transportation needs to be
developed in the long term. Extension of railway system to Thar will be essential to
meet future demands of the new plant at Jamshoro.
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10.
Environmental Management Plan
682. The main objective of the Environmental Management Plan (EMP) is to identify
mechanisms to implement the environmental mitigation measures discussed in
Chapter 9. It is the fundamental tool that ensures that all mitigation measures are
consolidated, their implementation responsibilities identified and the resources required
to implement the measures are provided. Further, the EMP includes monitoring
measures as a feedback mechanism on implementation and effectiveness of the
mitigation measures.
683. Environmental Management Plan (EMP) is prepared for all the identified
environmental impacts during design, construction, and O&M stages due to
implementation of various Project activities. The methodology followed for preparing the
EMP consists of the following steps:
Deriving mitigation/protection measures for identified impacts,
Recommend mitigation, compensation and enhancement measures for each
identified impacts and risks,
Developing a mechanism for monitoring the proposed mitigation measures,
Estimating budget requirements for implementation mitigation and monitoring
measures, and
Identifying responsibilities of various agencies involved in the Project for
implementation and monitoring of mitigation measures.
10.1 Institutional Framework for Implementation of EMP
684. Figure 10-1 presents the structure of the project organization. Institutions
responsible for executing and monitoring the environmental aspects of this Project are:
Project Management Unit (PMU) at the GHCL Headquarters, and,
Project Implementation Unit (PIU) at JPCL.
685. Project Management Unit (PMU) and, Project Implementation Unit (PIU) will
ensure that the mitigation and management measures proposed in the EIA are properly
implemented. The top management of JPCL and GHCL will ultimately head the PIU and
PMU. For this purpose, JPCL and GHCL will develop internal institutional capacity for
environmental management (Section 10.4)
686. Project Implementation Consultant (PIC) will be primarily responsible for the
implementation of the EMP and the corrective action plan for the existing plant, and will
report to the PMU. The PIC will be engaged in early 2014 at the start of the Project and
will remain engaged through the construction and commissioning of the Project ending in
2018. The PIU will supervise, while PMU will monitor the implementation of the EMP.
Two EPC contractors will come on board in 2016, one responsible for project
construction and the other for bioremediation. The PIC will ensure that all activities of
both the EPC contractors carried out under the Project comply with the ADB guidelines
and standards and will provide necessary guidance and supervision to PIU for this
purpose. As the EPC contractors will be working simultaneously for timely and speedy
implementation of the project, it is important that PIC ensure that the environmental
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activities are being implemented in the field. The PIC will also be responsible to update
or make necessary changes to the EMP if required based on the revised designs and
locations.
687. Each EPC contractor engaged for this project will be responsible for
implementation of the EMP to the extent that it applies to the contractor’s area of work.
Each contractor will be recommended to have an environmental management system
compliant with ISO 14001:2004 Environmental Management System (EMS) certification.
The major contractors will be required to have one Environmental Specialist and one
Occupational Health and Safety Specialist, who will be working in close coordination with
the environmental staff of PIC and JPCL. The terms of reference of the environmental
specialists required to monitor, implement and supervise of the EMP are included as
Appendix 13.
688. A Recycling Marketing Expert will work under the PIC in order to market the ash,
liaise between GENCO and cement manufacturers and facilitate the signing of ash
purchase agreement between GENCO and cement manufacturers.
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Environmental Management Plan
10-2
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Figure 10-1: Project Organization
Ministry of Water and Power
(MOWP)
Asian Development
Bank (ADB)
Reporting
GENCO Holding Company Limited (GHCL)
Reporting
Reporting
Project Management Unit (PMU)
Supervision
rd
Reporting
3 Party Auditor
Project Implementation
Consultants (PIC)
Audit
Reporting
Report and
Assist
Supervise
and Monitor
JPCL
PIU
Reporting
Monitor
EPC
Contractors
10.2 Institutional Strengthening and Capacity Building
689. Currently, the plant laboratory at JTPS is responsible for monitoring of
environmental conditions at the plant. A full-fledged Health, Safety and Environment
(HSE) Department will be established under JPCL as part of this project. Initially, the
HSE Department will be tasked to oversee all environmental, health and safety related
issues arising during the implementation of the corrective action plan. Eventually, this
department will be responsible for environmental management of the entire plant during
operation and maintenance.
690. The department will be headed by an EHS Manager. The person will have
qualification in environmental sciences, management or engineering. The person will
have at least 5 years of experience in environmental management in industrial units.
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Environmental Management Plan
10-3
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
10.3 Mitigation Plan
691. The mitigation plan prepared in accordance with the above framework is given in
Table 10-1. The key components of the plan are discussed in the following sections.
The environmental and social mitigation plan includes the following:
The measures that are required to be implemented during the design,
construction and implementation phases of the Project are identified
For each mitigation measure the person responsible to implement and monitor
the implementation is identified
The timing to implement and the location to implement
692. Principal mitigation measures for improvement of environmental performance of
the existing facilities (see Chapter 6) are the following:
Installation of FGD on the existing stacks
Rehabilitation of effluent pipeline
Development of a hazardous waste storage facility
Development of a landfill site for colony waste
Treatment plant for colony wastewater
Rehabilitation of evaporation pond
Bio-remediation facility for oily waste
693. In addition to the above, specific management plans have been developed for
areas of concern. The plans that have been developed include:
Coal Dust Management Plan
Construction Management Plan
Ash Management Plan
Asbestos Management Plan
Social Augmentation Plan
Soil Bioremediation Plan
694. EMP will be included in all the bid documents of the Project and will become a
part of the civil works contract. The strict implementation of the EMP and project
management’s strict enforcement of the adequate construction practices and standards
will greatly reduce the negative impacts of the Project.
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Environmental Management Plan
10-4
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table 10-1: Environmental Mitigation and Management Plan
Aspect or Concern
Potential Environmental
Impact
Environmental Mitigation and Management Measures
When
Institutional Responsibilities
Implementation
Supervision
GENCO
GENCO
A. Design Phase
Project disclosure
Ensure statutory
compliance with PEPA
1997.
Submit EIA to Sindh EPA and obtain approval.
Land Acquisition
Effects on livelihood
The land acquisition and resettlement plan (LARP) will be As and when JPCL
implemented. In case of any change in the area of the required
land, the LARP will be updated before any acquisition of
land.
PIC
Stack Emissions
SO2, NOx and PM
emissions from the stack
Ensure that the following equipment are included in the During
project design in order to ensure compliance with the detailed
World Bank Group EHS Guidelines on Thermal Power designing
Plants, 2008, national standards and international best
practices:
ESP (High efficiency 99.9%) to limit the total PM
3
emissions to 30 mg/Nm
FGD (High efficiency 95%) using lime slurry to limit
SO2 emissions
SCR 9 High efficiency 80%) and dry low NOx burners
to minimize the NOx generation
A stack height of 210 m
The equipment type and details may be changed as long
as the objectives are met. Any such change will require
approval of ADB.
GENCO
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Before start
of
construction
Design
Consultant
Environmental Management Plan
10-5
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Aspect or Concern
Potential Environmental
Impact
Environmental Mitigation and Management Measures
When
Institutional Responsibilities
Implementation
Supervision
Ash pond
Dust and leachate are the
potential sources of
contamination
Minimum Area: A minimum of 100 acres of land will be During
purchased for the ash pond disposal.
detailed
Additional Land: The ash recycling agreement with the designing
cement plant will be put in place within two years of loan
becoming effective. At the end of the two year period, the
land requirement for the power plant for 20-year operation
will be reassessed as follows:
Land Requirement = (Estimated volume of ash –
volume of ash for which recycling agreement is in
place) / designed depth of ash pond
In case the land requirement is more than 100 acres, fresh
land acquisition process will be initiated such that the land
is available by the time of the commissioning of the project.
Prior to initiating the process, the EMP will be updated to
reflect the change. The revised EMP will be approved by
ADB and will also be shared with the SEPA..
Design: A High Concentration Slurry Disposal (HCSD) is
proposed for ash disposal, in which the slurry is highly
viscous and non–Newtonian fluid requiring less water
compared to conventional low concentration slurry
disposal. The ash pond will be provided with trenches to
collect the storm water during rainy days. Greenbelt will be
provided enveloping the ash pond to arrest the fugitive dust
emissions. Ash pond will also be provided with clay or
HDPE liner. The design will allow phased expansion of the
ash pond to store ash for 20 years of plant operation.
Design
Consultant
GENCO
Plant Wastewater
Discharge of untreated
waste water will pollute
the surface water and
expose river ecology to
thermal stress
Ensure that the following measures are included in the During
project design in order to ensure compliance with the detailed
World Bank Group EHS Guidelines, 2008 (see designing
Table 10-4), national standards and international best
practices:
Cooling tower blow down will be extracted from the
JPCL
PIC
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Environmental Management Plan
10-6
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Aspect or Concern
Potential Environmental
Impact
Environmental Mitigation and Management Measures
When
Institutional Responsibilities
Implementation
Supervision
outlet of the cooling tower instead of the present
practice of drawing it from the inlet sump of the
cooling tower/condenser outlet
Replacement of the pipeline originally designed to
carry the effluent from the plant to the river and
restoration of the system for collection of effluent
water and its routing to the effluent pipeline
Provision is made for continuous monitoring of the
temperature of the river water and the temperature
of the waste water returned to the river through the
effluent discharge pipeline, and the ∆T between
the two, complete with alarms on ∆T.
The evaporation pond is reconstructed to allow
discharge of untreated waste from demin plant and
other non-compliant waste
Colony effluent
Effluent is discharged to Ensure the facility is designed after proper survey of During
the
surrounding
area effluent quality and quantity
detailed
where the population is
designing
exposed
JPCL
PIC
Colony solid waste
Colony solid waste is not Ensure the facility is designed after proper survey of colony During
properly disposed creating waste characteristics and quantity
detailed
a health hazard
designing
JPCL
PIC
Hazardous waste
Hazardous waste from the Ensure that accurate estimated are developed and During
existing plant is not
characterization undertaken of the hazardous waste in detailed
properly disposed
order to design the hazardous waste facility
designing
JPCL
PIC
GHG Offset
GHG Emission from the
Project
A comprehensive study to assess the potential of tree
plantation to offset the GHG emission will be undertaken.
The study will also consider working with the UN-REDD
Programme
Prior
to Consultant
Commission
of the First
Stage of the
Project
PIC
B. Construction and Implementation Phase
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Environmental Management Plan
10-7
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Aspect or Concern
Potential Environmental
Impact
Environmental Mitigation and Management Measures
When
Institutional Responsibilities
Implementation
Supervision
Disposal of replaced Generates wastes such as Ensure that the waste is disposed as per the waste
spare parts
Iron, cooper, electronics
management plan.
and oil
During
construction
Contractor
JPCL,
PEPCO
Construction
management
Ensure that a detailed Construction Management Plan
(CMP) based on the skeleton plan included in Table 10-7
is developed
Before
construction
Contractor
PIC, JPCL,
External
Monitor
Ensure that the CMP is implemented
During
Construction
Contractor
PIC
Baseline particulate
levels in ambient air
in the Project Area
Construction activities
although temporary can
potentially have adverse
impact on the
environment.
Measurement of changes
in particulate levels in
ambient air due to future
stack emissions from
Project
Regular monitoring of PM10 and PM2.5 is recommended and For a period JPCL
presented in the environmental monitoring plan of at least
(Section 10.19).
two years
prior to
commissioning and three
years during
operations
PIC
Compliance with the World Bank Group EHS Guidelines,
During
2008 (see Table 10-4), national standards and
operation
international best practices ;
Complete segregation of wastewater streams to ensure
that all streams other than the cooling tower blow down
and the silt from the water treatment plant are routed to the
evaporation pond;
Recycling of wastewater in coal–fired plants for use as
FGD makeup. This practice conserves water and reduces
the number of wastewater streams requiring treatment and;
Sindh EPA
C. Operation and Maintenance Phase
Water and Effluent Waste
Waste water from
plant
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Pollution of receiving
water bodies.
JPCL
Environmental Management Plan
10-8
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Aspect or Concern
Potential Environmental
Impact
Environmental Mitigation and Management Measures
When
Institutional Responsibilities
Implementation
Supervision
Use of infiltration and runoff control measures such as
compacted soils, protective liners, and sedimentation
controls for runoff from coal piles;
Treatment of low–volume wastewater streams that are
typically collected in the boiler and turbine room sumps in
conventional oil–water separators before discharge;
Treatment of acidic low–volume wastewater streams, such
as those associated with the regeneration of makeup
demineralizer and deep–bed condensate polishing
systems, by chemical neutralization in–situ before
discharge;
Pretreatment of cooling tower makeup water, installation of
automated bleed/feed controllers, and use of inert
construction materials to reduce chemical treatment
requirements for cooling towers;
Elimination of metals such as chromium and zinc from
chemical additives used to control scaling and corrosion in
cooling towers.
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Environmental Management Plan
10-9
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Aspect or Concern
Storm Water
Potential Environmental
Impact
Typically
storm
water
runoff contains suspended
sediments,
metals,
petroleum hydrocarbons,
coliform, etc.
Environmental Mitigation and Management Measures
When
Institutional Responsibilities
Implementation
Rainfall runoff from the coal pile will contain mainly During
suspended solids. This runoff will be routed to the settling operation
basin for retention and settling of suspended solids, and
the clear water from there may be used for dust
suppression system.
Storm water will be separated from process and sanitary
wastewater streams in order to reduce the volume of
wastewater to be treated prior to discharge
Surface runoff from process areas or potential sources of
contamination will be prevented
Oil water separators and grease traps will be installed and
maintained as appropriate at refuelling facilities,
workshops, parking areas, fuel storage and containment
areas.
Adequate storm drains will be constructed along the
boundary of the plant area and within the plant area to
drain off the storm water during monsoon period.
Limestone and gypsum storage areas will be covered so
that there will be no contaminated runoff
JPCL
Treated waste water Land degradation due to Regulation of the use of effluent water for agriculture and During
from Housing
open drainage of water
provision of outlets to farmers under agreements for water operation
Colony
use with permission from the Irrigation Department;
JPCL
Supervision
EPA
Fugitive Emissions
Coal Storage Areas
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Dust emissions
Dust extraction/suppression system will be provided at
transfer points of conveyor system and ventilation system
to supply fresh air;
Roof extraction fans will be provided in essential areas like
crusher house and boiler bunker floors.
Conveyor belt will be enclosed to prevent dust generation;
Provision of water sprinkling system at material handling
During
operation
JPCL
Environmental Management Plan
10-10
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Aspect or Concern
Potential Environmental
Impact
Environmental Mitigation and Management Measures
When
Institutional Responsibilities
Implementation
Supervision
and storage yard;
Asphalting of the roads within the plant area; and
Developing of Greenbelt around the plant to arrest the
fugitive emissions.
Fire hazards from auto
generated combustion
Emissions from fuel
Self–generated combustion of coal stock prevented by
limiting the coal stock height to design limit of 15 meters,
and compaction of coal stock to avoid the air passage.
During
operation
JPCL
Provision and periodic inspections of mechanical seals in
pumps;
Preventive maintenance of valves, flanges, joints, roof
vents of storage tanks; and
Submerged filling of liquid fuel storage tanks.
During
operation
JPCL
The following strategies will be adopted to ensure During
maximum fly ash utilization in brick and cement block operation
manufacturing:
JPCL will make ash available for at least 10 years without
any payment or any other consideration, for the purpose of
manufacturing ash–based products.
Fly ash will be supplied to the users free of charge at the
user silos initially for few years.
Basic technology, as well as initial expert advice for using
fly ash in making bricks and cement blocks, will be
provided to local brick and cement block makers free of
charge.
JPCL will use fly ash building materials in the construction
of its various facilities to instill confidence in local people
regarding fly ash building materials.
JPCL
Ash Disposal
Fly ash
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Dust
Environmental Management Plan
10-11
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Aspect or Concern
Potential Environmental
Impact
Environmental Mitigation and Management Measures
When
Institutional Responsibilities
Implementation
Supervision
Disposal of FDG Sludge
Sludge from FGD
Water pollution
The sludge from the FGD will be treated to separate the
gypsum which can be potentially sold in the market and
water. The water will be treated by first separating the
solid material and then through the plant treatment system.
The gypsum, if it could not be marketed, will be disposed in
the ash pond.
Air and Noise pollution
Air Pollution
Changes in ambient air
quality due to stack
emissions
Regular monitoring of ambient air quality is recommended During
and presented in the environmental monitoring plan.
operation
Installation of continuous emission monitoring (CEM)
equipment on the new stack for coal-fired boilers
JPCL
Noise pollution
Noise from the equipment
The occupational noise exposure to the workers in the form During
of 8–hourly time weighted average will be maintained well operation
within the 60 dB (A)). Acoustic enclosures will be provided
wherever required to control the noise level below 60 dB
(A). Anywhere not possible technically to meet the required
noise levels, personal protection equipment will be
provided to the workers.
JPCL
Higher exposure to
electric and magnetic
fields
Identification of potential exposure levels in the workplace, During
including surveys of exposure levels in new projects and operation
the use of personal monitors during working activities;
Training of workers in the identification of occupational
EMF levels and hazards;
Establishment and identification of safety zones to
differentiate between work areas with expected elevated
EMF levels compared to those acceptable for public
exposure, limiting access to properly trained workers;
Implementation of action plans to address potential or
JPCL
Health and Safety
Boilers
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Environmental Management Plan
10-12
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Aspect or Concern
Potential Environmental
Impact
Environmental Mitigation and Management Measures
When
Institutional Responsibilities
Implementation
Supervision
confirmed exposure levels that exceed reference
occupational exposure levels developed by international
organizations such as the International Commission on
Non–Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), the Institute
of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).28 Personal
exposure monitoring equipment will be set to warn of
exposure levels that are below occupational exposure
reference levels (e.g., 50 percent). Action plans to address
occupational exposure may include limiting exposure time
through work rotation, increasing the distance between the
source and the worker, when feasible, or the use of
shielding materials.
Heat Exposure
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Regular inspection and maintenance of pressure vessels During
and piping;
operation
Provision of adequate ventilation in work areas to reduce
heat and humidity;
Reducing the time required for work in elevated
temperature environments and ensuring access to drinking
water;
Shielding surfaces where workers come in close contact
with hot equipment, including generating equipment, pipes
etc;
Use of warning signs near high temperature surfaces and
personal protective equipment (PPE) as appropriate,
including insulated gloves and shoes.
JPCL
Environmental Management Plan
10-13
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
10.4 Monitoring Mechanism
695. Monitoring of environmental components and mitigation measures during
implementation and operation stages is a key component of the EMP to safeguard the
protection of environment. The objectives of the monitoring are to (i) monitor changes in
the environment during various stages of the project life cycle with respect to baseline
conditions; and (ii) manage environmental issues arising from construction works
through closely monitoring the environmental compliances. A monitoring mechanism is
developed for each identified impact and it includes:
Location of the monitoring (near the Project activity, sensitive receptors or within
the Project influence area)
Means of monitoring, i.e. parameters of monitoring and methods of monitoring
(visual inspection, consultations, interviews, surveys, field measurements, or
sampling and analysis)
Frequency of monitoring (daily, weekly, monthly, seasonally, annually or during
implementation of a particular activity)
696. The monitoring program will also include regular monitoring of construction and
commissioning activities for their compliance with the environmental requirements as per
relevant standards, specifications and EMP. The purpose of such monitoring is to
assess the performance of the undertaken mitigation measures and to immediately
formulate additional mitigation measures and/or modify the existing ones aimed at
meeting the environmental compliance as appropriate during construction.
697. During construction, environmental monitoring will ensure the protection of air
and noise pollution, community relations, and safety provisions. Given the sensitivity
with respect to air quality and the need for additional information to assess the air quality
and to assist the Government of Sindh in rationalization of standards, monitoring of PM10
and PM2.5 in air quality is proposed starting at least two years before commissioning of
the Project. Post monitoring evaluation will be carried to evaluate the impacts of the
Project during first 3 years of operation of the Project. During operation, emissions, air,
noise, and waste water quality monitoring and greenbelt development around the plant
will be important parameter of the monitoring program.
698.
Environmental monitoring program is presented in Table 10-2.
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Environmental Management Plan
10-14
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Table 10-2: Environmental Monitoring Plan during Construction and Operation
Parameter
Location
Means of Monitoring
Frequency
Responsible Agency
Implementing
Supervising
During Construction
Handling and storage of
parts and equipment at
plant
Work Sites
Visual inspection
Daily
Contractor
PIC, JPCL
Top Soil
Construction areas
Top soil of 0.5 m depth will be
excavated and stored properly
Beginning of earth
filling works
Contractor
PIC, JPCL
Erosion
Construction areas and
material storage sites
Visual inspection of erosion
Monthly
prevention measures and occurrence
of erosion
Contractor
PIC, JPCL
Hydrocarbon and chemical
storage
Construction camps
Visual Inspection of storage facilities
Monthly
Contractor
PIC
Local Roads
Approach Roads
Visual inspection to ensure local
roads are not damaged
Monthly
Contractor
PIC
Traffic Safety
Haul Roads
Visual inspection to see whether
proper traffic signs are placed and
flagmen for traffic management are
engaged
Monthly
Contractor
PIC
Air Quality (dust, smoke)
Construction sites
Visual inspection to ensure good
Daily
standard equipment is in use and
dust suppression measures (spraying
of waters) are in place.
Contractor
PIC
Material storage sites
Visual inspection to ensure dust
suppression work plan is being
implemented
Contractor
PIC
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Monthly
Environmental Management Plan
10-15
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Parameter
Location
Means of Monitoring
Frequency
Responsible Agency
Air Quality (PM, NO2, SO2, Suggested locations are:
Air quality monitoring station (two)
CO) See Section 10.19 for a) locations where the
and mobile monitoring station (one)
details.
impact of power plants,
road traffic, and other
sources are minimal; b)
locations near the N-5; c)
locations near maximum
GLC; d) sensitive
receptors (e.g, LUMHS);
e) locations on the East
(say near Kotri Barrage) to
capture the effects of
Hyderabad city.
Suggested frequency
is: Continuously at two
locations and once
every fortnight at other
locations for one day
Data to be collected for
at least two years
before operations and
to continue for at least
three years after the
commissioning of the
project.
External contractor PIC
or
arrangements
with educational or
government
agencies
Noise
Visual inspection to ensure good
standard equipment are in use
Weekly
Contractor
Hourly, day and night time noise
levels (dB) monitoring using noise
meters
Quarterly
Contractor through PIC
a nationally
External
recognized
Monitor
laboratory
Construction sites
PIC
Waste management
Construction camps and
construction sites
Visual inspection that solid waste is
disposed at designated site
Monthly
Contractor
PIC, JPCL,
External
Monitor
Drinking water and
sanitation
In construction sites and
construction camps
Ensure the construction workers are
provided with safe water and
sanitation facilities in the site
Monthly
Contractor
PIC, JPCL
Cultural and archeological
sites
At all work sties
Visual observation for chance finding
Daily
Contractor
PIC, External
Monitor
Reinstatement of work
sites
All Work Sites
Visual Inspection
After completion of all
works
Contractor
PIC, JPCL,
External
Monitor
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10-16
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Parameter
Safety of workers
Location
At work sites
Means of Monitoring
Frequency
Responsible Agency
Usage of Personal Protective
equipment
Monthly
Contractor
PIC, External
Monitor
SMART parameters (flow,
temperature, pH, TSS, and oil &
grease) and TDS for a 24 hour
composite sample
Heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Ni, Fe, Hg,
Cu, Co, Cr, As, CD) for a 24 hour
composite sample – in order to meet
the regulatory requirement and IFC
guidelines
Monthly
JPCL
EPA
At point of discharge for
effluent and 100 m
downstream in the river for
river
Continuous monitoring of ∆T
between the river water temperature
and that of the waste water returned
to the river through the pipeline
draining the effluent to the river. The
maximum temperature difference
should be 3ºC as per the legal
requirement.
Continuous
JPCL
EPA
Prior to pre–treatment in
ESP and FGD and at the
exit of the stack
For the new stack for coal-fired
boilers, continuous monitoring using
on–line equipment during operation
phase (SO2, NOx, CO, PM10 and
PM2.5) and exit gas temperature and
velocity.
For Units 1 and 2, monthly
monitoring as per the SMART rules
through third-party contractor
Continuous monitoring
JPCL
EPA
During Operation and Maintenance
Wastewater Drained into
the River
Stack emissions
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At the point where effluent
leaves the plant boundary
Quarterly
Environmental Management Plan
10-17
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
Parameter
Location
Ambient air quality
Near the sensitive sites
and settlements
particularly the GLS sites
Groundwater
Means of Monitoring
External
Monitor
At the Baseline Monitoring Sampling and laboratory analysis for Bi–annually
Sites and from
heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Ni, Fe, Hg, Cu,
piezometers around the
Co)
ash pond
JPCL through
nationally
recognized
laboratory
External
Monitor
Noise
At the work areas, control
rooms and nearest
residential areas
Hourly, day and night time noise
levels (dB) monitoring using noise
meters
Quarterly
JPCL through
nationally
recognized
laboratory
External
Monitor
Treated waste water from
housing colony
Outlet of water treatment
plant
24 hour composite sample
Quarterly
JPCL through
recognized
laboratory
External
Monitor
Heavy metals (Mainly As, Be, Cd,
Cr, Pb, Hg, and Ni)
Every lot of coal (and
JPCL through
ash produced) received recognized
from abroad and
laboratory
quarterly on Thar coal
External
Monitor
Monitoring of flue gases flow and
carbon content
Once in 6 months
External
Monitor
GHG emission
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Stacks
Quarterly
Responsible Agency
JPCL through
nationally
recognized
laboratory
Coal and fly ash
specifications
24 hours air quality monitoring of
PM10, PM2.5, , SO2, NO2 and CO
Frequency
JPCL through
recognized
laboratory
Environmental Management Plan
10-18
Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
10.5 Resettlement Specialist
699. A Resettlement Specialist will be hired for the duration land acquisition and
resettlement period. The details are included in Appendix 11.
10.6 Reporting and Feedback Mechanism
700. The Contractor will prepare a ‘Construction Environmental Action Plan’ (CEAP)
demonstrating the manner in which they will comply with the requirements of mitigation
measures proposed in the EMP of the EIA Report. The CEAP will form the part of the
contract documents and will be used as monitoring tool for compliance. Violation of the
compliance requirements will be treated as non–compliance leading to the corrections or
otherwise imposing penalty on the contractors
701. Contractor, through the environmental specialist on the team, will prepare
monthly status reports on the EMP implementation. Such reports must carry information
on the main types of activities carried out within the reporting period, status of any
clearances/permits/licenses which are required for carrying out such activities,
mitigation measures applied, and any environmental issues emerged in relations with
suppliers, local authorities, affected communities, etc. Contractor’s monthly status
reports shall be submitted to the PIC, JPCL.
702. PIC will prepare monthly reports on the status of EMP implementation and
environmental performance of the contractor. These reports will be based on the
contractor’s reports and their supervision. PIC will assess how accurate is the factual
information provided in the contractor’s reports, fill any gaps identified in them, and
evaluate adequacy of mitigation measures applied by contractor. PIC will highlight any
cases of incompliance with EMPs, inform on any acute issues brought up by contractor
or revealed by supervisor himself, and propose corrective actions.
703. The JPCL will report annually to the ADB on the status of environmental
compliance of construction works. Such reporting will contain information on all
violations identified and the actions taken for fixing of such cases. JPCL will inform the
ADB on any major environmental issues at any time, independently from the schedule of
regular reporting.
704. After project completion, JPCL will be in charge of the operation and
maintenance of the Project. HSE Department of JPCL will be responsible for
compliance with the monitoring plan during O&M.
705. Feedback and adjustment will be carried out in two tiers. Upon request for EMP
modification by the Contractor and JPCL will review the proposals in detail and consider
their acceptance or rejection. Only those modifications will be considered, which do not
contradict to the Conditions of the Environmental Permit. JPCL will consider comments
and suggestions from PIC and ADB. Appropriate responses and revisions in the EMP
will be implemented, if necessary. The contractor and JPCL will then implement the
modifications.
706. JPCL will be responsible for enforcing compliance of contractor with the terms of
the contract, including adherence to the EMP. For minor infringements, an incident
which causes temporary but reversible damage, the contractor will be given 48 hours to
remedy the problem and to restore the environment. If restoration is done satisfactorily
during this period, no further actions will be taken. If it is not done during this period,
PEPCO will arrange for another contractor to do the restoration, and deduct the cost
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from the offending contractor’s next payment. For major infringements, causing a long–
term or irreversible damage, there will be a financial penalty up to 1% of the contract
value in addition to the cost for restoration activities.
10.7 Budget Estimates
707. Cost estimates are prepared for all the mitigation and monitoring measures
proposed in the EMP. The details of the cost estimates and the budget during
construction stage and first three years of operation stage for the mitigation and
monitoring measures are given in Table 10-3. The cost estimates for control measures
and some of the mitigation measures that were already part of Engineers estimate are
not included in the EMP.
708. The cost estimates also includes the budget for environmental monitoring,
consultants for EMP implementation, institutional strengthening and capacity building of
power plant staff and environmental enhancement/compensation measures.
709. The total budget for EMP implementation is estimated to be about
US$ 3.85 million.
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Table 10-3: Summary of Costs for Environmental Management and Monitoring
Item
Unit
Unit Cost
US$
Qty
Total Cost
US$
A
Environmental Monitoring 6 years (Design, Construction, and Operation Periods)
1
Air quality monitoring Fixed Station
LS
80,000
2
Air quality monitoring Mobile Station
LS
50,000
3
Air quality monitoring recurring cost
LS
428,000
4
Monitoring of SMART parameters in effluent
water @ monthly over 6 years)
Site
50
72
3,600
5
Heavy metals monitoring in effluent water (@
Quarterly over 6 years)
Site
70
24
1,680
6
Groundwater quality monitoring (5 [email protected] 3
yearly over 6years)
Site
500
30
15,000
7
Noise monitoring (5 [email protected] 3 yearly over 6
years)
Site
25
30
3,000
Sub Total (A)
B
581,280
Social Augmentation Plan
Social Augmentation Plan
LS
Sub Total (B)
C
1
1
328,000
328,000
Mitigation Plans
Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF)
LS
47,000
Soil Bioremediation
LS
1,310,000
Effluent Pipeline
LS
1,137,000
Evaporation Ponds
LS
211,000
Colony Wastewater Treatment
LS
155,000
Colony Landfill
LS
10,000
Sub Total (C)
D
FGD on Existing Stacks
E
Training Cost
Grand Total (A+B)
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
R3V10GRT: 10/29/13
2,870,000
Included in
project
budget
75,000
3,854,280
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of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
10.8 Performance Indicators
710. The environmental parameters that may be qualitatively and quantitatively
measured and compared are selected as ‘performance indicators’ and recommended
for monitoring during project implementation and O&M stages. These monitoring
indicators will be continuously monitored to ensure compliance with the national or other
applicable standards and comparison with the baseline conditions established during
design stage. The list of indicators and their applicable standards to ensure compliance
are given below. The monitoring data will be reviewed on a regular basis (as and when
collected and annually) to determine trends and issues. The performance indicators are
given In Table 10-4.
Table 10-4: Performance Indicators
Aspect
Indicator
Stack emissions (SO2, NOX, PM10)
Existing Stacks
SO2
9.6 TPD
NO2
NEQS
PM10 NEQS
New Stacks
3
SO2
254 mg/Nm
3
NO2
75.2 mg/Nm
3
PM10 30 mg/Nm
Ambient Air quality (PM10, PM2.5, SO2,
and NO2)
Requirement of World Bank EHS Guidelines, that is, the
NEQS for Ambient Air,
Table 1-6 of Appendix 1
Noise levels
Requirement of World Bank EHS Guidelines, that is, the
NEQS for Ambient Noise,
Table 1-7 of Appendix 1
Wastewater Quality
Requirement of World Bank EHS Guidelines, that is, the
NEQS for Wastewater Quality,
Table 1-1 of Appendix 1
Groundwater Quality
Baseline values to be established. Monitoring wells will
be installed for the ash pond. Groundwater samples will
be collected from the monitoring wells and any
community within one kilometer of the ash pond.
Greenhouse Gas
Emission per unit of energy produced
10.9 Emergency Response Plan
711. Firefighting system is in place in JTPS with a standard operating procedure,
which will be strengthened considering the potential fire from the sparks in coal storage
and handling.
10.10 Training Program
712.
The planned training program is shown in Table 10-5.
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Table 10-5: Training Program
Sr
Type of Training
1
Occupational Health and Safety
External
Sources
EHS Manager
Plant managers
and supervisors
2
Occupational Health and Safety
EHS
Manager
Workers
Staff
3
Health, Safety and
Environmental Auditing
External
Sources
4
Waste Disposal and Handling
5
Social & environmental laws &
regulations, norms, procedures
and guidelines of government
and ADB
Training
By
Personnel to be
Trained
Training Description
Period
Duration
Training will be provided to aware staff to conform
to safety codes.
Plant manager will be instructed the mandatory
use of PPE by the senior administration during all
plant visits. That will attract other junior and
maintenance staffs to abide by the rules.
Precautions to be taken for working in confined
areas.
Health, safety and hygiene
Proper usage of personnel protective gear
Precautions to be taken for working in confined
areas.
Before starting of
project activities
Full day
(8 hour
session)
Before starting of
project activities
During Project
Activities
Full day
(8 hour
session)
Staff responsible
for
inspection/audits
Procedures to carry out Health, Safety and
Environmental Audits
Reporting requirements
Before starting of
project activities
Full day
(8 hour
session)
External
Sources
Relevant Workers
Relevant Staff
Segregation, identification of hazardous waste, use Before starting of
of PPEs, waste handling
project activities
Full day
(8 hour
session)
External
sources
EHS staff
Plant managers
and supervisors
Environmental standards and their compliance
ADB and Govt. regulations
Before starting
the project
activities
Full day
(8 hour
session)
6
Implementation of
External
environmental management and Sources
monitoring plant
EHS staff
Responsible
supervisory staff
Management
Concepts of environmental management and
monitoring plan
Once in 3 months Full day
during the entire
(8 hour
construction
session)
period
7
Asbestos Management
EHS staff
Responsible
supervisory staff
Management
As per Asbestos Management Plan
Before starting of
project activities
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External
Sources
Two full day
(8 hour
session)
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10.11 Waste Management Plan
713.
In Table 10-6, the waste inventory and disposal plan is presented.
10.12 Contaminated Soil Bio-remediation Plan
714. The contaminated soil will be managed in accordance with the IFC General EHS
Guidelines (Section 1.8 Contaminated Land).
715. The volume of contaminated soil is estimated at 38,900 m3. The contamination
level is estimated at 23,000 mg/kg. In addition, about 30,000 m3 of low contamination
(about 2,000 mg/kg) was also identified.
716. Bioremediation allows natural processes to clean up harmful chemicals such as
oil. Microbes that live in soil like to eat certain harmful chemicals, such as those found in
oil. When microbes completely digest these chemicals, they change them into water and
harmless gases such as carbon dioxide. In order for the microbes to work, the optimum
temperature, nutrients, oxygen, and moisture is required. If conditions are not right,
nutrients, enhancers (microbes) and air must be added. Bio-remediation will take place
on concrete pads. Leachate collection channels will be constructed around the pads. A
concrete sump will be constructed for collection of leachate. A sprinkler system will be
installed to sprinkle water on the soil. The facility will also include a washing pad for
washing tyres of trucks and equipment to prevent spread of contaminated soil outside of
the facility.
717. Contaminated soil will be brought in truck and spread on the concrete native soil
in about the same quantity is spread on top of the contaminated soil. Using a tractor, the
contaminated soil and the native soil are mixed and will be left on the pad. Periodically
(typically once in a fortnight), water will be sprinkled and the mixture will be turned over
using a tractor. As and when required nutrients and enhancers may be added to speed
up remediation. One batch is estimated to take 2-3 months to complete. Water from the
sump may require occasional removal.
718. Total cost for bioremediation is estimated to US$ 1.31 million considering the fact
that 1 m2 of land (includes land for pad, surrounding path, and other facilities) can treat
0.26 m3 of contaminated soil annually.
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Table 10-6: EMP for Waste Management
Sr
Material Waste
1
Iron
Material returned to Store as
unserviceable
Scrap Store
Recycling
Equipment and parts may be contaminated with
Separate contaminated parts and ensure disposal
oil or other liquids. This may pose hazards during contractor cleans and removes contaminations
recycling and/or melting.
before recycling equipment.
2
Copper
Recycling
Scrap Store
Copper wires and tubes may be covered with
insulation and may pose hazard if melted.
Separate insulated copper from rest and ensure
disposal contractor removes it before recycling.
3
Other Materials
Material returned to Store as
unserviceable
Scrape Store
Recycling
Landfill
Some waste materials may contain hazardous
materials (such as mercury and lead) which may
pose health risks if not handled or disposed of
properly.
All hazardous substances such as lead and
mercury will be identified and separated.
Ensure waste contractor disposes hazardous
materials in accordance with accepted methods.
4
Wood, Cotton,
Plastic, Waste
and Packing
Materials
Recycling
Landfill
Burning of wood, paper, plastic and other
materials may cause air pollution
Littering due to improper disposal
Ensure waste contractor disposes all non–
recyclable plastic wastes and other non–
recyclable materials at land disposal.
5
Electronics
Material returned to Store as
unserviceable
Some electronic equipment may contain toxic
materials and pose a health risk if opened or
dismantled.
Ensure contractor disposes equipment properly
and equipment is opened only under guidance of
qualified professional.
6
Insulation
Material Re–used
Landfill
Burning may cause air pollution.
Littering due to improper disposal
Ensure contractor disposes insulation properly at
landfill site.
7
Oil
Recycling Contractors
May cause contamination of soil or waterways
Ensure properly certified recycling contractors are
used.
8
Concrete
Landfill or reuse as for filling
None
Ensure safe storage till disposal
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Final Disposal Method
Associated Risks
Recommended Procedure
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Environmental Impact Assessment
of Jamshoro Power Generation Project
10.13 Construction Management Plan
719. The construction contractor will develop a specific construction management plan
(CMP) based on the CMP included in the Table 10-7. The CMP will be submitted to the
JPCL and ADB for approval.
720. The CMP will clearly identify all areas that will be utilized during construction for
various purposes. For example, on a plot plan of the construction site the following will
be shown:
Areas used for camp
Storage areas for raw material and equipment
Waste yard
Location of any potentially hazardous material such as oil
Parking area
Loading and unloading of material
Septic tanks
Table 10-7: Construction Management Plan
Aspect
Vegetation
clearance
Objective
Minimize vegetation
clearance and felling of
trees
Mitigation and Management Measure
Removal of trees will be restricted to the
development footprint.
Construction activities shall minimize the loss
or disturbance of vegetation
Use clear areas to avoid felling of trees
A procedure shall be prepared to manage
vegetation removal, clearance and reuse
Inform the plant management before clearing
trees
Cleared areas will be revegetated
Poaching
Avoid illegal poaching
Contractual
poaching
obligation
to
avoid
illegal
Provide adequate knowledge to the workers
relevant
government
regulations
and
punishments for illegal poaching
Discharge from
construction
sites
Minimize surface and
ground water
contamination
Reduce contaminant
and sediment load
discharged into water
bodies affecting humans
and aquatic life
Install temporary drainage works (channels
and bunds) in areas required for sediment
and erosion control and around storage areas
for construction materials
Prevent all solid and liquid wastes entering
waterways by collecting waste where
possible and transport to approved waste
disposal site or recycling depot
Ensure that tires of construction vehicles are
cleaned in the washing bay (constructed at
the entrance of the construction site) to
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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Aspect
Objective
Mitigation and Management Measure
remove the mud from the wheels. This will be
done in every exit of each construction
vehicle to ensure the local roads are kept
clean.
Soil Erosion
and siltation
Avoid sediment and
contaminant loading of
surface water bodies and
agricultural lands.
Minimize the length of time an area is left
disturbed or exposed.
Reduce length of slope of runoff
Construct temporary cutoff drains across
excavated area
Setup check dams along catch drains in order
to slow flow and capture sediment
Water the material stockpiles, access roads
and bare soils on an as required basis to
minimize dust.
Increase the watering frequency during
periods of high risk (e.g. high winds)
All the work sites (except permanently
occupied by the plant and supporting
facilities) will be restored to its initial
conditions (relief, topsoil, vegetation cover).
Excavation,
earth works,
and
construction
yards
Proper drainage of rainwater
and wastewater to avoid
water and soil
contamination.
Ponding of
water
Prevent mosquito breeding
Prepare a program for prevent/avoid standing
waters, which PIC will verify in advance and
confirm during implementation
Establish local drainage line with appropriate
silt collector and silt screen for rainwater or
wastewater connecting to the existing
established drainage lines already there
Do not allow ponding of water especially
near the waste storage areas and
construction camps
Discard all the storage containers that are
capable of storing of water, after use or store
them in inverted position
Reinstate relief and landscape.
Storage of
Prevent spillage of
hazardous and hazardous and toxic
toxic chemicals chemicals
Implement waste management plans
Construct appropriate spill containment
facilities for all fuel storage areas
Remediate the contaminated land using the
most appropriate available method to
achieve required commercial/industrial
guideline validation results
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Aspect
Land clearing
Objective
Preserve fertile top soils
enriched with nutrients
required for plant growth or
agricultural development.
Mitigation and Management Measure
Strip the top soil to a depth of 15 cm and
store in stock piles of height not exceeding
2m and with a slope of 1:2
Spread the topsoil to maintain the physio–
chemical and biological activity of the soil.
The stored top soil will be utilized for
covering all disturbed area and along the
proposed plantation sites
Topsoil stockpiles will be monitored and
should any adverse conditions be identified
corrective actions will include:
o Anaerobic conditions – turning the
stockpile or creating ventilation holes
through the stockpile;
o Erosion – temporary protective silt
fencing will be erected;
Avoid change in local
topography and disturb the
natural rainwater/ flood
water drainage
Construction
Control vehicle exhaust
vehicular traffic emissions and combustion
of fuels.
Ensure the topography of the final surface of
all raised lands are conducive to enhance
natural draining of rainwater/flood water;
Reinstate the natural landscape of the
ancillary construction sites after completion
of works
Use vehicles with appropriate exhaust
systems and emission control devices.
Establish and enforce vehicle speed limits to
minimize dust generation
Cover haul vehicles carrying dusty materials
(cement, borrow and quarry) moving outside
the construction site
Level loads of haul trucks travelling to and
from the site to avoid spillage
Use of defined haulage routes and reduce
vehicle speed where required.
Transport materials to site in off peak hours.
Regular maintenance of all vehicles
All vehicle exit points from the construction
site shall have a wash-down area where
mud and earth can be removed from a
vehicle before it enters the public road
system.
Minimize nuisance due to
noise
Hagler Bailly Pakistan
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Maintain all vehicles in good working order
Make sure all drivers comply with the traffic
codes concerning maximum speed limit,
driving hours, etc.
Environmental Management Plan
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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Aspect
Objective
Avoid impact on existing
traffic conditions
Mitigation and Management Measure
Prepare and submit a traffic management
plan
Restrict the transport of oversize loads.
Operate transport vehicles, if possible, in
non–peak periods to minimize traffic
disruptions.
Prevent accidents and
spillage of fuels and
chemicals
Restrict the transport of oversize loads.
Operate transport vehicles, if possible, in
non–peak periods to minimize traffic
disruptions.
Design and implement safety measures and
an emergency response plan to contain
damages from accidental spills.
Designate special
materials transport.
Construction
machinery
Prevent impact on air quality
from emissions
routes
for
hazardous
Use machinery with appropriate exhaust
systems and emission control devices.
Regular maintenance of all construction
machinery
Provide filtering systems, duct collectors or
humidification or other techniques (as
applicable) to the concrete batching and
mixing plant to control the particle emissions
in all stages
Reduce impact of noise and
vibration on the surrounding
Appropriately site all noise generating
activities to avoid noise pollution to local
residents.
Ensure all equipment is in good repair and
operated in correct manner.
Install high efficiency mufflers to construction
equipment.
Operators of noisy equipment or any other
workers in the vicinity of excessively noisy
equipment are to be provided with ear
protection equipment
The project shall include reasonable actions
to ensure that construction works do not
result in vibration that could damage property
adjacent to the works.
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Environmental Impact Assessment
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Aspect
Construction
activities
Objective
Minimize dust generation
Mitigation and Management Measure
Water the material stockpiles, access roads
and bare soils on an as required basis to
minimize dust.
Increase the watering frequency during
periods of high risk (e.g. high winds).
Stored materials such as gravel and sand will
be covered and confined
Locate stockpiles away from sensitive
receptors
Reduce impact of noise
and vibration on the
surrounding
Avoid driving hazard
where construction
interferes with pre–
existing roads.
Minimizing impact on water
quality
Notify adjacent landholders or residents prior
to noise events during night hours
Install temporary noise control barriers where
appropriate
Avoid working during 21:00 to 06:00 within
500m from residences.
Stockpiles of potential water pollutants (i.e.
bitumen, oils, construction materials, fuel,
etc.) shall be locate so as to minimize the
potential of contaminants to enter local
watercourses or storm-water drainage.
Storm-water runoff from all fuel and oil
storage areas, workshop, and vehicle parking
areas is to be directed into an oil and water
separator before being discharged to any
watercourse.
An Emergency Spills Contingency Plan shall
be prepared.
Siting and
location of
construction
camps
Minimize impact from
construction footprint
Construction
Minimize pressure on local
Camp Facilities services
Arrange accommodation in local towns for
small workforce
Locate the construction camps at areas which
are acceptable from environmental, cultural
or social point of view.
Adequate housing for all workers
Safe and reliable water supply.
Hygienic sanitary facilities and sewerage
system.
Treatment facilities for sewerage of toilet and
domestic wastes
Storm water drainage facilities.
In–house community entertainment facilities.
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Aspect
Disposal of
waste
Objective
Minimize impacts on the
environment
Mitigation and Management Measure
Ensure proper collection and disposal of solid
wastes in the approved disposal sites
Store inorganic wastes in a safe place within
the household and clear organic wastes on
daily basis to waste collector.
Establish waste collection, transportation and
disposal systems
Ensure that materials with the potential to
cause land and water contamination or odor
problems are not disposed of on the site.
Ensure that all on-site wastes are suitably
contained and prevented from escaping into
neighboring fields, properties, and
waterways, and the waste contained does not
contaminate soil, surface or groundwater or
create unpleasant odors for neighbors and
workers.
Fuel supplies
for cooking
purposes
Discourage illegal fuel wood
consumption
Site
Restoration
Restoration of the
construction camps to
original condition
Restore the site to its condition prior to
commencement of the works
Construction
activities near
religious and
cultural sites
Avoid disturbance to cultural
and religious sites
Stop work immediately and notify the site
manager if, during construction, an
archaeological or burial site is discovered.
Provide fuel to the construction camps for
domestic purpose
Conduct awareness campaigns to educate
workers on preserving the protecting the
biodiversity and wildlife of the project area,
and relevant government regulations and
punishments on wildlife protection.
It is an offence to recommence work in the
vicinity of the site until approval to continue is
given by the plant management.
Maintain appropriate behavior with all
construction workers especially women and
elderly people
Resolve cultural issues in consultation with
local leaders and supervision consultants
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Aspect
Best practices
Objective
Minimize health and safety
risks
Mitigation and Management Measure
Implement suitable safety standards for all
workers and site visitors which will not be less
than those laid down on the international
standards (e.g. International Labor Office
guideline on ‘Safety and Health in
Construction; World Bank Group’s
‘Environmental Health and Safety
Guidelines’) and contractor’s own national
standards or statutory regulations,
Provide the workers with a safe and healthy
work environment, taking into account
inherent risks in its particular construction
activity and specific classes of hazards in the
work areas,
Provide personal protection equipment (PPE)
for workers, such as safety boots, helmets,
masks, gloves, protective clothing, goggles,
full–face eye shields, and ear protection.
Maintain the PPE properly by cleaning dirty
ones and replacing them with the damaged
ones.
Water and
sanitation
facilities at the
construction
sites
Improve workers’ personal
hygiene
Provide portable toilets at the construction
sites and drinking water facilities.
Portable toilets will be cleaned once a day.
All the sewerage will be pumped from the
collection tank once a day into the common
septic tank for further treatment.
10.14 Coal Dust Management Plan
721. Coal dusts from coal stockpile and coal conveyor belt area are the major source
of fugitive emissions. Dust suppression using a sprinkler system will be primarily
employed to control the coal dust from these areas. Recycled water from the waste
water treatment plants and cooling water blow down will be the primary source of water
to the sprinkler system.
Two methods of dust control will be implemented: dust
extraction and dust suppression.
722. Coal dust suppression will comprise wetting air–borne dust particles with a fine
spray of water, causing the dust particles to agglomerate and move by gravity to the coal
stream flow. Once properly wetted, the dust particles will remain wet for some period
and will not tend to become airborne again. The dust suppression system in the
stockpile yard will consist of swivelling and wide–angle full–cone spray nozzles. These
nozzles will be provided on both sides of the pile and at ground level, spaced every
50 m.
723. In the coal dust extraction system, dust will be extracted from screening feeders
and belt feeders by suctioning the dust–laden air and trapping coal particles in fine water
sprays, thereafter discharging the clean air into the atmosphere. The dust collection
equipment will include cyclones, wet scrubbers, fans, collecting hoppers, filters, hoods,
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ducts, dampers, and drain pipes. In this system, the dust–laden air will enter the
collector where it comes in contact with water; the slurry will be collected in the hopper
and disposed of in the settling pond. Settle dust will be put back into the stockyard
where it will be mixed with crushed coal for use. In addition, roof extraction fans will be
provided in essential areas like crusher house and boiler bunker floors. Air conditioning
for control room and pressurized ventilation with unitary air filter unit for Electrical and
Control buildings of coal handling plant will be provided.
724. Rainfall runoff from the coal pile and runoff from the application of dust
suppression sprays will contain mainly suspended solids. This runoff will be routed to
the settling basin for retention and settling of suspended solids, and the clear water from
there may be used for the dust suppression system.
725. The volatility of the coal of this project is high, easy to cause spontaneous
combustion; therefore, the coal to the coal yard must be stored in different piles and
compacted, the earlier it comes, the earlier it is to be used, with regular rearrangement
of the coal piles. The bucket wheel machine itself will be equipped with water tank to
spray water over the fly dust points so as to reduce the fly dust. The coal pile will have
an automatic temperature monitoring system; when an increase in temperature is
detected, an alarm will be immediately triggered, alerting of the presence of hot spots.
Based on the temperature and the risks, the coal will be either immediately sent to the
boiler for utilization, or the portion of coal will be isolated and allowed to burn off. Coal
fires cannot be extinguished by water. Rubber belt of the belt conveyer shall use flame
retardant material.
10.15 Ash Management
726. The ash pond will be 3.5 m deep, and have a raised bund of 1 m. For ease of
operation, the ash pond plot will be divided into smaller plots of 20m X 20m. This
enables the ponds to be filled properly, and in case of future reclamation, the process
will be easier. The ash pond will be lined with a layer of HDPE membrane or clay liner in
order to avoid water seepages to the ground.
727.
The options of ash utilization including the ash–based products include:
Brick/Block/Tiles Manufacturing
Cement Manufacturing
Roads and Embankment Construction
Structural Fill for Reclaiming Low Lying Areas
Mine–Filling
Agriculture, Forestry and Waste–land Development
Part Replacement of Cement in Mortar, Concrete and Ready Mix Concrete
Hydraulic Structure (Roller Compacted Concrete)
Ash Dyke Raising
Building Components – Mortar, Concrete,
Concrete Hollow Blocks, Aerated Concrete Blocks etc.
Fill material for structural applications and embankments
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Ingredient in waste stabilization and/or solidification
Ingredient in soil modification and/or stabilization
Component of flowable fill
Component in road bases, sub–bases, and pavement
Mineral filler in asphalt
Other Medium and High Value Added Products (Ceramic Tiles, Wood, Paints)
Pavement Blocks, Light Weight Aggregate, Extraction of Alumina,
Cenospheres, etc.
728. The following strategies will be adopted to ensure full fly ash utilization in brick
and cement block manufacturing: During the first three years a study will be undertaken
to ascertain the market for utilization of fly as in cement and other industry.
Subsequently, the JPCL will enter into formal contract with the cement unit(s) to sell the
fly ash. The contract will be commissioned before the commissioning of the power plant.
In case this agreement could not be reached, purchase of additional land for landfill may
be mandated.
729. Practically there should not be any leachate from ash pond due to provision of
impermeable layer at the bottom of ash pond. However, a groundwater monitoring
program is recommended to detect any possible groundwater contamination from ash
pond. 3 piezometers, one on upstream, 2 on downstream of the ash pond will be
installed for collection of water levels and water samples.
10.16 Asbestos Management Plan
730. Asbestos is recognized internationally as a hazardous material because it can
present a risk to human health. In many jurisdictions asbestos is classified as
hazardous and is a controlled chemical waste or a hazardous waste because if it is
mishandled it can release airborne fibers that are known to cause asbestosis and have
also associated with other lung diseases and cancer. All forms of the asbestos mineral
will release asbestos fibers if broken up and all types of asbestos containing material
(ACM) will release asbestos fibers to some degree if damaged or abraded.
731. Asbestos has been widely used in numerous types of materials, usually because
of its good qualities as a thermal insulation material. Asbestos has also been used
extensively in numerous types of cement materials, pipe insulation plaster and in
refractory brick work. Asbestos is often used because of its good qualities as a thermal
insulation material but it is also useful as a binder to form complicated cement shapes
and durable pipes. The amounts of asbestos used vary from product to product but
certain types of asbestos cement can contain more than 50% asbestos. When bound in
the cement matrix the asbestos is generally considered safe. However over time the
cement surface can become corroded or abraded leading to the release of asbestos
fibers. The surface of the ACM, such as pipe and corrugated sheets can gradually
become more friable and release asbestos fibers. Exposure to chemicals and moisture
also affects the rate of deterioration of ACM as they gradually wear out or become more
fragile. The removal and replacement of ACM also give rise to some release of fiber as
it is almost impossible to remove more fragile old material without breaking them.
Therefore in addition to giving rise to a controlled waste the removal of the ACM can
also easily lead to the release of asbestos fibers if the removal is not conducted under
controlled conditions.
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732. This plan has been prepared because the ACM is present in the power plants
which may be broken or cracked during the rehabilitation work. The procedures to be
adopted are outlined in this framework by reference to known asbestos in ACM. This
framework will be applied whenever any ACM is identified. Prior to any removal work
asbestos investigation will be carried out to check if there is any likelihood of ACM being
present.
10.16.1
Requirement for Asbestos Management
733. Best practice asbestos management usually entails several stages. Survey and
investigation are the first steps in which all structural elements, fixtures and fittings are
checked for fibrous materials that are potentially asbestos. Samples are taken under
controlled conditions and an accredited laboratory analyses the samples using polarized
light microscopy. The type, location and condition of asbestos is assessed to
undertaken a hazard assessment. If asbestos needs to be removed an asbestos
abatement plan is usually prepared to cover removal with detailed work specifications for
specialist contractors. In all cases the asbestos will be labeled and safety procedures
instigated to prevent disturbance, until such time as it can be removed safely.
734.
There are as yet no statutory controls on hazardous waste in Pakistan. The
Hazardous Substances Rules were drafted in 2003 but were never brought into force.
Asbestos waste is listed in the draft Hazardous Substances Rules 2003. If enacted the
HSR would require an entity licensed under the Pakistan Environmental Protection Act
1997 to have a waste management plan for any listed hazardous substance.
735. Therefore as there are as yet no local standards for asbestos control in Pakistan,
any known asbestos waste requiring removal will be disposed of following best
international practice.
10.16.2
Responsibilities/Authorities of Various Agencies
736. Potential environmental liabilities with respect to asbestos associated with
subprojects will be minimized by implementing the requirements of the AMF and by
prescribing the selection of alternative non-asbestos materials. All measures shall be in
line with ADB’s SPS 2009, the GOP’s regulations and guidelines, the Environmental
Assessment Review Framework and the Guidance on Environmentally Responsible
Procurement1.The subprojects shall only involve asbestos activities that follow the AMF.
737.
JPCL will:
Prepare an asbestos investigation report (AIR) before undertaking any work on
a equipment or work area.
Ensure that adequate sampling and analysis has been carried out to ensure all
environmental liabilities with respect to asbestos have been identified, review
the asbestos assessments AIR and submit the AIR to ADB.
Ensure that the contracts have specified the asbestos management procedure
(AMP) to be used in the construction of the subproject to control environmental
liabilities to acceptable levels.
Ensure that the asbestos abatement procedures, including all proposed
mitigation measures and monitoring are properly implemented.
Monitor the implementation of AMPs and present its monitoring report.
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10.16.3
Minimizing Asbestos Liabilities
738. Potential environmental liabilities with respect to asbestos associated with
subprojects will be minimized by taking the following measures:
Implementing the requirements of the AMF and by prescribing the selection of
alternative non-asbestos materials.
Where ACM must be disturbed in a equipment the ACM shall only be removed
under controlled conditions for disposal in line with the provisions of the AMF or
any rules subsequently promulgated by the Sindh EPA.
All Contractors shall agree through their agreement to carry out the asbestos
abatement procedures in line with the procedures included in the AMF.
Conducting sampling of potential asbestos containing materials (ACM) and
compiling an asbestos investigation report (AIR) with adequate implementation.
10.16.4
Monitoring During the Construction Period
739. Monitoring during construction will be the responsibility of the PIC. The PIC may
acquire the services of an Asbestos Specialist. The monitoring will relate to compliance
with construction contracts. The Asbestos Specialist will inspect the ongoing works
regularly and systematically; checking that the above-mentioned the asbestos
abatement mitigation measures specified in the AMP have been implemented effectively
during the design and construction stages of the project and ensure the implementation
and effectiveness of mitigation measures. Reporting will be to the JPCL on a regular
basis and to ADB semi-annually.
740. The PIC will also be responsible for coordinating and supervising monitoring of
asbestos abatement, quality control, and writing the periodic progress reports on
implementation of the AMF.
10.16.5
Asbestos Abatement Procedures
Removal of ACM
741. The principle will be that asbestos cement pipes shall be carefully excavated,
lifted on to plastic sheets for wrapping, wrapped in polythene and sealed with duct tape
and then lifted and lowered on to the transport lorry for transport to the designated
storage area or landfill.
742.
The procedure shall follow the measures indicated below:
Preparation
The Contractor shall make available the materials required for the work.
The Contractor shall be prepared and agree to remove and transport, on lorries
covered with tarpaulins, all the ACM, from the site to the designated facility or
secure temporary store to await disposal.
The Contractor shall provide approved protective clothing to all workers.
Protective clothing shall consist of an approved disposable full body coverall,
with head cover. Hard hats and boots shall also be made available to all
workers by the Contractor.
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Workers handling the ACM shall wear approved half face dust masks protective
coverall and goggles. The Contractor shall ensure all workers wear the
protective clothing provided.
Abatement Method
The ACM shall be removed in sections carefully using manual labor and hand
tools to expose the old ACM so that it can be lifted carefully to avoid cracking as
far as possible. Any accidentally fractured loose pieces of asbestos picked up
and stored in plastic bags or barrels and sealed.
The drums / barrels to contain the fractured pieces of ACM shall be made of
plastic or metal. If made of some other material the drums / barrels shall be
lined with two layers of 0.15mm polythene sheeting. When the drums are full
the plastic lining shall be folded over the pipe segments and secured in place
with duct tape and the lid placed on the drum and secured in place with duct
tape.
Before commencing with the removal of the ACM the surface of the asbestos
shall be wet. Any dry areas of exposed existing ACM shall be sprayed with
water (preferably containing a wetting agent) to reduce fiber release. The
wetting agent shall be of a correct mix and concentration in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions as specified under materials (Section 9.6.6).
The wetting solution (amended water) shall be sprayed using equipment
capable of providing a ‘mist’ application to reduce the release of fibers. The
existing asbestos material shall be sufficiently saturated to wet it thoroughly.
The existing asbestos material shall be sprayed repeatedly during the removal
processes to maintain a wet condition and to minimize asbestos fiber
dispersion.
The fixed asbestos cement pipes shall be carefully separated and prized off any
supporting brackets and separated from any attached asbestos cement pipes or
cement screed base and taken up in manageable sections taking care not to
drop, crack, break or damage the asbestos cement pipes. Powered mechanical
equipment (such as backhoe) shall not be used to remove the asbestos pipes
because this will increase the risk of cracking and fiber release.
The asbestos cement pipes shall then immediately be wrapped in two layers of
polythene or smaller pieces can be double bagged and goose neck tied with
duct tape and the polythene shall be wet wiped clean.
The bottom 10cm of soil below the old ACP shall be assumed to be
contaminated with asbestos fragments or fibers and shall be loosened and
shoveled or picked up and stored in plastic bags or barrels and sealed as ACM.
The bottom 5cm of soil below the old ACM pipe, loose debris and rubble will be
removed to create a level floor to the trench and to designate the completion of
the removal work
The exposed surfaces of the partially wrapped pipes and the surface of the
trench to be sprayed with adhesives (PVA) to be used as “lock down” on
surfaces during the final cleanup of the area. This is to bind any traces of
asbestos fiber which may remain on exposed surfaces.
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All wrapped asbestos cement packs shall be transferred to the lorries for
immediate transportation to the temporary buffer store to await disposal. All
wrapped asbestos cement packs shall remain at the temporary buffer store and
not be removed
The workers shall immediately wet wipe down the overalls and mask and wash
hands and face and any accidentally exposed areas of skin to decontaminate.
The dust masks and overalls, gloves, wet wipes and any other litter shall then
immediately be double bagged and goose neck tied for disposal as asbestos
waste.
The PIC will then carry out a visual inspection to certify that all visible asbestos
cement pipe and fragments have been removed to a satisfactory standard. If
the visual inspection indicates a satisfactory standard all the asbestos cement
packs shall be counted and picked up and transferred to the lorries for
transportation to the temporary buffer store to await disposal.
The PIC will then carry out a reassurance visual inspection to certify that all
remaining polythene packs and equipment and visible asbestos has been
removed to a satisfactory standard and proper decontamination of tools and
equipment has taken place.
The PIC will then check and record the number of packs of waste transferred to
the lorries are the same as those that arrive at the temporary buffer or landfill
using a trip ticket system.
The PIC will monitor and periodically audit the buffer store and landfill security
to ensure no pilfering or theft of the stockpiled waste.
10.16.6
Materials and Equipment
Containment Materials
At least two layers of transparent plastic (0.15mm thickness low density
polythene (B.S.4932:1973) shall be used for wrapping the ACM in sizes which
minimize the need for jointing. Polythene transparent bags and containers used
for packing of asbestos waste should be able to resist puncturing by the sharp
edges of the asbestos cement.
The wrappings shall be carefully joined and sealed with wide duct tape, spray
adhesive capable of sealing adjacent sheets of polythene and facilitating
attachment of polythene to the asbestos cement. The adhesive agents should
be capable of adhering and maintaining the wrapping in place under both wet
and dry conditions.
Pipe sections and fragments of 2m or less shall be completely wrapped in
polythene or collected in polythene bags. Pipe sections and fragments of
greater than 2m shall have the end up to 1m and any cracked or broken areas
completely wrapped in polythene. Intact pipe sections greater than 2m shall
have the ends end up to 1m and any cracked or broken areas completely
wrapped in polythene.
The access to the asbestos waste shall be guarded at all times by security
personnel.
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Wetting Agent and Lock Down
It is strongly recommended to apply amended water containing a wetting agent
on the asbestos materials prior to removal so as to minimize the release of
asbestos fibers during the removal process. Electrical equipment is not likely to
be present in the excavated trenches but if electrical cables are present these
should be de-energized and isolated prior to the application of wetting agents.
The recommended wetting agent for the amended water to enhance
penetration should be 50% polyoxyethylene ester and 50% polyoxyethylene
ether or equivalent. The wetting agent shall be diluted in accordance with the
manufacturers’ instructions. As a fall back option household washing up
detergent mixed at 10% to amend wetting water can be substituted Water
based polyvinyl acetate adhesives (PVA) to be used as “lock down” for spraying
on to surfaces during the final clean up of the area shall be able to bind traces
of asbestos fibre which may remain on exposed surfaces. The adhesive shall
be dyed to indicate where it has been sprayed and facilitate a check as to
whether they have been applied or not and to facilitate cross-checking at a later
stage.
Lifting Gear & Ladders
All lifting appliances, i.e. wire slings, ropes and chain blocks, must comply with
the local construction sites safety regulations. Valid test certificates must be
kept on site for checking at all times.
Ladders shall be used in line with general safety procedures. Joints and ends of
ladders, scaffolds and parts of lifting gear where appropriate shall be sealed
with tape to prevent the incursion of asbestos fibers and finished to create a
smooth surface to facilitate cleaning.
Respirators (dust mask)
The respirators to be provided by the Contractor shall be of an approved type
contained appropriate for protection against the level of asbestos fibers
reasonably expected in the particular stage and environment of work. In this
case half face dust mask shall be required.
The Contractor shall provide disposable paper respirators to all workers with a
protection factor of 4 (e.g. recommended 3M8812 or equivalent).
The respirators shall be removed when wet and be treated as contaminated
waste. A new half face dust mask shall be provided to each worker prior to each
shift, and the Contractor shall hold sufficient spare masks on site at all times for
replacement purposes.
Protective Clothing
The Contractor shall provide approved protective clothing to all workers.
Protective clothing shall consist of an approved disposable full body coverall,
with head cover. Hard hats and boots shall also be made available by the
Contractor. Coveralls will be of a disposable type:
o
made from material which does not readily retain asbestos dust and
o
prevents, so far as is reasonably practicable, dust penetration;
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o
is close fitting at the neck, wrists and ankles; and
o
without external pockets or unnecessary pleating or accessories.
Preferred disposable coveralls, mask and sprayer
friable asbestos
Workers handling drummed high risk
Laboratories in Pakistan with Capability to Identify Asbestos
1.
Pakistan Council of Scientific & Industrial Research
PCSIR Labs Complex
Off University Road, Karachi
Tel#: +92-21-8141841
Fax#: +92-21-8141847
2.
National Physical and Standards Laboratory (NPSL), Islamabad
Plot No.16, Sector H-9, Islamabad
Tel#: +92-51-9257459, 9257462-7
Fax#: +92-51-9258162
3.
Pakistan Council of Scientific & Industrial Research
PCSIR Labs Complex
Ferozepur Road, Lahore
Tel#: +92-42-9230688-95, 9230704
Fax#: +92-42-9230705
10.17 Social Augmentation Plan
Scope of Accruing Social Benefits
743. There have been impacts in the natural as well as social environment due to the
operation of the power plant within the project influence area. The people living within
the vicinity of JTPS are mostly poor. Taking this point into consideration some social
benefits in terms of environmental enhancement are proposed in the EMP. The
proposed social augmentation/enhancement measures are explained below:
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Providing water supply facility
744. The people living in Jamshoro town and the villages within the project influence
area suffer from severe shortage of water for safe drinking and washing purposes. In
Jamshoro town, piped water supply by the town management is often insufficient for the
residents. As a consequence, most of the people have to spend considerable amounts
of money to install their own pumps and/or to buy drinking water from the water carriers.
The poorer residents and villagers in the project influence area have to collect untreated
water from the Indus River. Most of the water collection activity is done by the women
and children on–top of their day–to–day domestic responsibilities.
745. As a result, the women and children suffer from over–work and a variety of water
borne diseases. The EMP under this project proposes to provide potable water by
constructing small–scale drinking water supply systems or installing hand–pumps at
certain convenient points in the urban and rural communities. Provision of drinking water
to communities would contribute to the general health of the women and children and
save the families from extra fatigue and water buying costs.
Educational Facilities
746. Apart from the Government universities located in the south of Jamshoro town,
there are government high schools for both boys and girls in the town and a number of
primary schools in the villages within the Project influence area. Besides, there are some
private primary schools where only financially solvent families can afford their children
for better quality education. Poor families have to send their children to the government
schools where the classrooms are overcrowded because the numbers and sizes of the
rooms are insufficient.
747. As a result, educational standards are generally low and overall performances of
the children are often poor. The EMP proposes financial assistance to the Education
department for constructing additional few classrooms to the nearest schools and
providing them with necessary furniture and equipment. The same schools can also be
used in the afternoons for adult education, community training, and other collective
activities.
Agricultural Training
748. Agriculture is not a major economic activity in the Jamshoro, as most lands are
barren and there are no irrigation canals in the vicinity. However, some people grow
small–scale irrigated crops on river side where the subsurface water table is high. Most
of the people are serving either as a sharecropper or working as land labor. The people
reported that they had mainly inherited rather than acquired knowledge on farming, and
any attempt to pursue that would be appreciated by them. Therefore, it is proposed that
farmers will be provided relevant training on modern agriculture.
749. A need assessment will be carried out by the Project Management Consultant
before imparting such training by an NGO(s) with the support of provincial agricultural
department. The nature of training would largely depend on the ecological setting,
availability of water, technology, interest and ability to produce different crops, etc. The
training will be imparted by a professional organization or an experienced NGO in
agricultural promotion, and previously worked with the farmers in Sindh province.
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Skills Training and Capacity Building Activities
750. Having poor land water resources and nominal agricultural activity, the people in
the JTPS area depend mostly on employment in both public and private sectors,
industrial and construction labor work, and small scale business activities for earning
their living. Women prepare some traditional embroidery items to sell in the local
markets to supplement their family incomes. The Project will contribute in economic
activities by supporting skills training and capacity building activities for these poor
communities, especially for the women and youth. By doing this, the project would be
enabling the poor families to enhance their earnings and living standards. Training
programs will focus in skill development in construction and power industries.
Health Care Facilities
751. People living in the area are devoid of good quality health care system. In case of
suburban and rural communities in the villages around Jamshoro, communities during
consultation indicated that the government health facilities are insufficient and inefficient,
mainly because of lack of qualified doctors and quality medicines. The people requested
for creating an opportunity for their health care under the proposed project. It is
proposed to establish basic clinic and paramedic to check condition of the health of the
people three times a week, so that their needs for primary health care is taken care of. In
addition, the project will attempt to provide financial and technical assistance on health
issues of Jamshoro town and rural communities in the project influence area to impart
training through an experienced NGO and, especially to traditional birth attendants and
in preventive measures against water–borne diseases, mother–and–child care, and the
like.
Tentative budget for social benefits
752. The proposed Social Augmentation Plan (SAP) will cover social enhancement
measures to the project affected communities. It includes all costs including construction
of facilities, fixtures and furniture and all other administrative and operation costs such
as hiring of implementing NGO(s), and monitoring of the implementation arrangements
by the consultants. The total estimated budget for the SAP is US$ 0.328 million, as
presented in Table 10-8.
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Table 10-8: SAP Implementation Cost Estimates
Activity
Social Augmentation and Monitoring
Costs
Unit
Quantity
Cost in US Dollars
Rate
Amount
Social Augmentation Costs – Civil Works
Construction of Drinking Water Supply Scheme
No.
4
3,238
12,952
Construction of additional Rooms in Schools
No.
6
3,860
23,160
Fixture/Furniture for Classrooms
No.
6
2,150
12,900
Clinic of Primary Health Care (with Fixture &
Furniture)
No.
3
3,800
11,400
–
–
–
60,412
NGO Implementation
Years
3
30,000
90,000
Education Material for adult Education
Years
3
800
2,400
Operational Costs of 3 Primary Health Clinics
Years
3
4,800
14,400
NGO Training Services (3 Trainers)
Years
3
2,100
6,300
Primary Health Training Equipment & Material
Sites
2
2,100
4,200
Skills Training for Women and Youth
Sites
2
2,100
4,200
Farmers' training in modern agriculture
Sites
2
800
1,600
Gender Development & HIV/AIDS training (Basic)
Sites
2
800
1,600
–
–
–
124,700
Sub–total (a):
Operational Costs of Project Provided Facilities
Sub–total (b):
Social Monitoring During and After Project's Construction
International Social Development Specialist
MM
3
2,100
6,300
Domestic Social Development Specialist
MM
12
6,000
72,000
Field Vehicle for Social Development Unit (SDU)
No.
1
16,800
16,800
Years
3
3,800
11,400
Furniture & Computers for Database/Monitoring
Site
1
3,000
3,000
Social Monitoring Reports (5 bi–annual, 1 final)
Reports
6
600
3,600
Sub–total (c):
–
–
–
113,100
Total Itemized Costs (a+b+c):
–
–
–
298,212
Admin. Costs & Contingency (10% of Total
Itemized Cost):
–
–
–
29,821
Total Estimated Cost:
–
–
–
328,033
Operational Cost of Field Vehicle
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Implementation and Operation
753. Proposed facilities under the social augmentation program require proper
operation and maintenance. The following section discusses the operational procedure
and maintenance of the facilities.
Setting up the Facilities
754. All facilities proposed under social augmentation program will be created and
implemented by the JPCL in association with local NGOs or local government in close
collaboration of the beneficiary. Involvement of beneficiary community from the
beginning of the augmentation work is critical as without their active involvement the
design and implementation will not be as per the requirement of the targeted people.
Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) method may be used while designing the facilities to
identify the possible locations and scope of operation and maintenance as well as
management.
Selection of NGOs
755. Selection of NGOs will be done based on their capacity, experience, and interest.
Organizations that have experience of carrying out similar assignment will be given
priority as operation and management of such types of jobs require capacity and
tenacity. There are some good NGOs operating in both Badin and Hyderabad areas as
reported by the stakeholders. A short list of those NGOs can be made first and then
proposal may be sought from them for the work. Consultant will prepare a TOR
containing the descriptions of all works that will be carried out by the selected NGO(s).
The TOR will be included as part of Initial Poverty and Social Assessment Report.
Operation of the Adult Learning School
756. Experienced NGO or NGOs will be recruited for the first three years to operate
the adult learning school and then hand over the operation to the Local Government
Organization such as Union Council or other suitable public or private organization.
Selected NGO will identify a teacher from the nearby area or to engage someone, such
as the wife of a JPCL staff, who would be interested in the job.
Imparting Training
757. The targeted people will be trained in modern agricultural practices, health care,
sanitation, gender and development, and HIV/AIDS. They will be given training on the
modern techniques and methods of agricultural production including marketing to make
them aware of the market prices of different agro produce. On the other hand, since the
rural people often suffer from various health hazards because of lack of basic health
care knowledge, it would be beneficial for them to receive training on those issues. The
training will be a part of preventive rather than curative measures. All the trainings
including good agricultural practices, health care, gender and development, and
HIV/AIDS related issues will be conducted by the selected NGO(s). The training will be
provided by both male and female trainers, as some of the issues are more suited for
female trainers compared to the male trainers.
758. Before conducting the training, the NGO will perform a needs–assessment to
prepare the training modules. Based on the module, a manual will be prepared in local
languages covering the scope, needs of the training, and the training techniques.
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10.18 Spill Management
759. Liquid waste spills that are not appropriately managed have the potential to harm
the environment. By taking certain actions JPCL can ensure that the likelihood of spills
occurring is reduced and that the effect of spills is minimized.
10.18.1
Avoiding spills
760. By actively working to prevent spills, JPCL can save money and time by not
letting resources go to waste. In addition, the environment is protected from
contaminants that can potentially cause harm.
761. All liquids will be stored in sealed containers that are free of leakage. All
containers will be on sealed ground and in an undercover area. Keep sharp parts and
items away from containers containing liquid to avoid damage and leaks.
762. Bunding: To prevent spills from having an effect on the plant site operations or
the environment, bunding will be placed around contaminant storage areas. A bund can
be a low wall, tray, speed bump, iron angle, sloping floor, drain or similar and is used to
capture spilt liquid for safe and proper disposal.
10.18.2
Spill Management
763. To enable spills to be avoided and to help the cleanup process of any spills, both
management and staff members should be aware of spill procedures. By formalizing
these procedures in writing, staff members can refer to them when required thus
avoiding undertaking incorrect spill procedures. As part of the overall EMP for the site,
spill procedures will be practiced by holding drills. A detailed Spill Management Plan will
be prepared that will contain the following:
Identification of potential sources of spill and the characterization of spill
material and associated hazards.
Risk assessment (likely magnitude and consequences)
Steps to be undertaken taken when a spill occurs (stop, contain, report, clean
up and record).
A map showing the locations of spill kits or other cleaning equipment.
10.18.3
Spill Kits
764. Spill kits are purpose designed units that contain several items useful for
cleaning up spills that could occur. Typical items are:
Safety gloves and appropriate protective clothing (depending on the type of
chemicals held onsite)
Absorbent pads, granules and/or pillows
Booms for larger spills
Mops, brooms and dustpans.
765. Spill kits are used to contain and clean up spills in an efficient manner. JPCL will
have enough spill kits or big enough spill kits to deal with any potential spills. Spill kits
will be kept in designated areas that are easily accessible to all staff.
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766. Staff members will be trained in using the spill kit correctly. The supplier may do
this at the time of purchase or the management may organize it itself.
767. After cleaning up a spill, the materials used to clean up will be disposed of
correctly. Depending on the spill material, the used material may be disposed in the
hazardous waste facility or the landfill site.
10.18.4
Responding to Spills
768. Stop the source: If it is safe to do so, the source of the spill will be stopped
immediately. This may be a simple action like upturning a fallen container.
769. Contain and control the flow: To stop the spill from expanding, absorbent
materials and liquid barriers will be placed around the spill. Work from the outside to
soak up the spill. It is vital that spilt liquid is not allowed to reach storm water drains,
sewer drains, natural waterways or soil. For large scale spills that involve hazardous
materials, authorities may have to be alerted.
770. Clean up: Using information from Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) about the
properties of the liquid spilled and the spill equipment available, spills will be cleaned up
promptly.
771. Record the incident: By keeping a simple log of all spills, precautionary measures
can be put in place to avoid similar accidents from occurring in the future.
10.19 Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Program
772. An ambient air quality monitoring program will be initiated in the Jamshoro Area
and an air quality assessment undertaken to help improve the baseline and design and
implement offset measurement. The information will be used to document the
magnitude of PM2.5 offset discussed in Section 9.4.7. The outline of the program is as
follows:
Objective: To determine the PM2.5 and PM10 levels in Jamshoro area,
understand its seasonal variation, and undertake source apportionment of PM2.5
and PM10 in the area.
Spatial Coverage: Jamshoro Town including the residential area, commercial
areas, educational institutions, rural area, colonies, and JTPS. The area is
roughly bounded by the Indus River on the East, the M-9 on the South, and the
hills on the West and extends to Petaro area on the North.
Parameters to be Covered: Focused on aerosol (SPM, PM10 and PM2.5) but will
also include other key pollutants (NO2, NO, SO2 and CO) for complete
characterization. In addition to the concentration of aerosol, analysis of aerosol
will also be carried out to determine the distribution of elemental carbon and
organic carbon to characterize the source (See studies referred in Footnote 12
and 13 of Chapter 5 for details)
Monitoring Locations: Suggested monitoring locations are a) locations where
the impact of power plants, road traffic, and other sources are minimal; b)
locations near the N-5; c) locations near maximum GLC; d) sensitive receptors
(e.g, LUMHS); e) locations on the East (say near Kotri Barrage) to capture the
effects of Hyderabad city.
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Additional information to be collected: For source characterization and
apportionment, data on load shedding, household fuel, back-up power source,
traffic and any other major source in the area of study area be collected.
Timeline: Data will be collected such that prior to commissioning of the
proposed Project at least two years of data is collected and analyzed. The
study will then continue for at least three years after the commissioning of the
project.
Executing arrangement: The PIC will be responsible to design the program,
define the implementing arrangement (through Jamshoro academic institutions,
appropriate public sector organizations, or private organizations) monitor and
supervise the execution of the plan.
10.20 Transportation Management Plan
773. A detailed transportation management plan will be prepared through the PIC.
The outline of the plan is as follows:
Objective: To protect the community and environment from potential hazards of
bulk transportation and to protect the workers of JPCL and its contractors from
occupational hazards of associated with bulk transportation of material.
Scope: The plan will cover both rail and road transportation of all material
including, but not limited to, coal, equipment, ash, limestone, construction
material and gypsum.
Referring Documents: The Plan will be prepared in light of the project feasibility
study, this EIA of the Project, and the Coal Logistics Report commissioned by
ADB.1
Timeline: The Plan for the construction phase of the Project will be completed
before the start of construction activity and arrival of the equipment on port. The
Plan for the operations phase will be completed at least one year before
commissioning of the First Stage of the Project.
Executing arrangement: The PIC will be responsible to commission the study
and implement its recommendations.
1
The report will primarily cover coal handling system at port and Jamshoro and the rail
transportation.
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11. Grievance Redress Mechanism
774. Timely and effective redress of stakeholder grievances contribute to bringing
sustainability in the operations of a project. In particular, it will help advocate the
process of forming and strengthening relationships between project management and
the stakeholder community groups and bridge any gaps to create a common
understanding, providing the project management the ‘social license’ to operate in the
area. The grievance redress mechanism proposed for the Project will help achieve the
objectives of sustainability and cooperation by dealing with the environmental and social
issues of the Project.
775. The proposed grievance redress mechanism will be designed to cater for the
issues of the people that can be affected by the Project. The population that can be
affected by the Project is identified in Chapter 5, and comprises of the people residing
within five kilometer of the plant site. The potential impacts of the Project are described
in Chapter 9.
11.1 Framework for Grievance Redress Mechanism
776. The grievance redress mechanism proposed for the Project will meet the
compliance requirements laid out under the relevant national legislation and will be in
accordance with the environmental and social safeguards laid out under SPS 2009.
11.1.1 ADB Safeguard Policy Statement
777. Developing a grievance redress mechanism is mandated under SPS 2009.1 The
requirements for the grievance redress mechanism under the SPS 2009 are laid out
below.
SPS 2009 on Grievance Redress Mechanism
ADB requires that the borrower/client establish and maintain a grievance redress mechanism to
receive and facilitate resolution of affected peoples’ concerns and grievances about the
borrower's/client's social and environmental performance at project level. The grievance
redress mechanism should be scaled to the risks and impacts of the project. It should address
affected people's concerns and complaints promptly, using an understandable and transparent
process that is gender responsive, culturally appropriate, and readily accessible to all segments
of the affected people.
11.1.2 Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997
778. The Federal Agency, under Regulation 6 of the IEE-EIA Regulations 2000 (see
Chapter 3 for more details), has issued a set of guidelines of general applicability and
sectoral guidelines indicating specific assessment requirements. Under the regulations
and guidelines, no specific requirements are laid out for developing a grievance redress
mechanism for projects. However, under its Guidelines for Public Consultation, 1997,
the proponents are required to consult stakeholders during the implementation phase of
the project. In this regards, it is stated that the representatives of local community
partake in the monitoring process to promote a stable relationship between the project
management and the community.
1
Safeguard Policy Statement, Asian Development Bank, June 2009
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11.2 Existing Practice for Grievance Redress
779. Currently, the grievances of stakeholders against the activities undertaken at
JTPS are redressed on an ad hoc basis, where any concern that reaches the
management’s notice is given attention. A complaints clerk maintains record of
complaints in a daily complaints register and coordinates complaint resolution with the
plant management. The complaints clerk is also required to keep the complainant
informed of the progress. The current mechanism is not sufficient for the purpose of
grievance redress. Under the consultations, the local communities voiced their concern
that their issues were not addressed (Chapter 7).
11.3 Proposed Mechanism for Grievance Redress
780. Under the Project the following will be established or appointed to ensure timely
and effective handling of grievances:
A Public Complaints Unit (PCU), which will be responsible to receive, log, and
resolve complaints; and,
A Grievance Redress Committee (GRC), responsible to oversee the functioning
of the PCU as well as the final non-judicial authority on resolving grievances
that cannot be resolved by PCU;
Grievance Focal Points (GFPs), which will be educated people from each
community that can be approached by the community members for their
grievances against the Project. The GFPs will be provided training by the
Project in facilitating grievance redress.
781.
Details of the proposed mechanism are given below.
11.3.1 Function and Structure of PCU
782. PCU will be set up as part of the environment, health and safety department2 of
the Project. A senior official with experience in community and public liaison will lead the
unit. Two assistants, one male and one female will be responsible for coordinating
correspondence and preparing documentation work and will assist the senior official.
The senior official will be responsible to review all documentation.
783. The PCU will be responsible to receive, log, and resolve grievances. Given that
the female community members have restricted mobility outside of their villages and
homes, the female PCU staff will be required to undertake visits to the local
communities. The frequency of visits will depend on the nature and magnitude of activity
in an area and the frequency of grievances.
11.3.2 Function and Structure of GRC
784. The GRC will function as an independent body that will regulate PCU and the
grievance redress process. It will comprise of:
Head of environment, health and safety department, JTPS;
Senior engineer that is responsible to oversee the contractors, JTPS;
2
An Environment, Health and Safety Department is not yet in place and is proposed to be set up under
the Project (see Chapter 10).
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Two literate representatives from the communities residing near the plant site;
A representative of the local government. In case the local government
elections take place, this could be the Naib-Nazim or Nazim (the district
governor). If not, this would be the District Coordinating Officer (DCO) or an
appointed representative;
Senior member from the local civil society, which could be a professor from one
of the universities of Jamshoro;
A female member from the local civil society with experience in community
relations.
785. The GRC will meet once every three months to review the performance of the
PCU; the frequency can be changed depending on the nature and frequency of
grievances received. The performance will be gauged in terms of the effectiveness and
the timeliness with which grievances were managed. In case there are any unresolved
or pending issues, the GRC will deliberate on mechanisms to resolve those and come
up with solutions acceptable to everyone.
11.3.3 Grievance Focal Points
786. The GFPs will be literate people from each community that will facilitate their
community members in reporting grievances from the Project. The GFPs will be
provided training by the Project in facilitating grievance redress. Each community will
have a male and female GFP appointed for this purpose.
11.3.4 Procedure of Filing and Resolving Grievances
787.
Grievances will be logged and resolved in the following steps:
Step 1: Receive and Acknowledge Complaint
788. Once the PCU receives a complaint, which could be the complainant giving it in
person, via letter or email, through phone call, or through a GFP, an acknowledgement
of receipt of the complaint has to be sent within two working days to the complainant.
The complainant will be issued a unique complaint tracking number for their and PCU’s
record.
Step 2: Investigation
789. PCU will work to understand the cause of the grievance for which the PCU may
need to contact the complainant again and obtain details. The PCU will be required to
complete preliminary investigations within five working days of receiving the complaint
and send a response to the complainant documenting the results of their investigations
and what the PCU plans to do ahead.
Step 3: Resolution through PCU
790. Once the PCU have investigated a grievance, it will share with the complainant
the proposed course of action to resolve the complaint, should PCU believe any to be
necessary. If the complainant considers the grievance to be satisfactorily resolved, the
PCU will log the complaint as resolved in their records.
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791. In case the grievance remains unresolved it will be reassessed and GRC will
have further dialogue with the complainant to discuss if there are any further steps,
which may be taken to reach a mutually agreed resolution to the problem.
792. For minor or less complex grievances, Steps 1, 2 and 3 or Steps 2 and 3 can be
merged.
Step 4: Resolution through GRC
793. In case the PCU is unable to resolve the issue, the matter will be referred to
GRC. All complaints that could not be resolved within four weeks will by default be
referred to GRC. However, the complainant or the PCU can convene the GRC at any
point in time, depending on the nature and urgency of the issue.
11.3.5 Operating Principles for PCU
794. The PCU will operate on the principles of transparency, approachability and
accountability. To achieve these, the PCU will be required to:
Be equipped to handle grievances in the local languages;
Be equipped to work through all possible modes of communication, such as,
emails, by-post and face-to-face meetings at plant site or requiring visits;
Employ female staff, preferably from the nearby communities, to oversee
complaints and issues of the female community members.
Maintain a log of all grievances, with record of the date and time of the
complaint logged and stakeholder information, such as, name, designation and
contact details;
Provide opportunity to the stakeholder to revert with their comments on the
proposed plan of action;
Keep the stakeholder informed of the progress in grievance resolution;
Obtain stakeholder consent on the mechanism proposed to redress the
grievance and document consent; and,
Maintain confidentiality of the stakeholder, if requested so.
11.3.6 Stages of Grievances
795.
Once a grievance is logged with the PCU, it could acquire the following stages:
Stage 1: it is resolved by the PCU or if not PCU, by the GRC;
Stage 2: If the GRC cannot resolve the issue, it will inform ADB accordingly,
and the ADB project team will organize a special mission to address the
problem and identify a solution; and
Stage 3: If the stakeholders are still not satisfied with the reply in Stage 4, they
can go through local judicial proceedings.
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11.4 Stakeholder Awareness
796. The stakeholders will be informed of the establishment of the PCU through a
short and intensive awareness campaign. Under the awareness campaign, the
proponent will share:
Objective, function and the responsibilities of the PCU;
Means of accessing the PCU and the mechanics of registering a grievance at
the PCU;
Operating principles of the PCU; and,
Contact details.
797.
Additional awareness campaigns may be organized, if necessary.
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12. Conclusions
798. The proposed power plant, 600 MW in the First Stage and 1,200 MW after the
completion of the Second Stage will be installed within the premises of the JTPS.
However, it will be an independent power plant, with its own fuel source, storage, utilities
and operations.
799. As the existing plant is not fully compliant with the national environmental
regulations and is also below the international best environmental practices as signified
by ADB’s SPS 2009 and IFC’s HSE Guidelines, a corrective action plan has been
developed. The plan is an essential part of the project as the improvement it will bring to
the environmental practices of JPCL and to the physical environment in the vicinity of the
JTPS, will enable the installation of the 1,200 MW power plant. The key areas in which
the project is likely to bring a positive environmental changes are:
Installation of FGD on the existing stacks and thereby reducing the emission of
sulfur dioxide;
Rehabilitation of effluent pipeline and therefore preventing of spread of plant
waste in the vicinity of the plant;
Development of a waste storage facility for hazardous waste;
Development of a landfill site for colony waste;
Installation of a treatment plant for colony wastewater;
Rehabilitation of existing evaporation pond and this prevention of release of
untreated wastewater to the river; and
Clean-up and remediation (or containment) of oily waste.
800. The Project will fill critical gaps and provide significant support to the local
economy as well as that of the country. The cost of a unit of electricity generated by
using imported coal as fuel is less than 50% of that for fuel oil. In addition to reducing
power outages which are affecting growth of the economy, the Project will also lower the
average cost of power generation in the country by shifting the fuel mix in power
generation from fuel oil to imported coal. A diversified fuel mix with a lower dependence
on oil products for power generation will also improve the energy security of the country.
801. The Project will contribute to improved health of the local community by
improving air quality through installation of FGDs on the existing boilers to lower SO 2
concentrations in ambient air associated with utilization of HSFO.
802. The project will contribute to improvement in environmental management
practices and capacities in the JPCL through institution of a range of environmental
management systems and provision of training to the staff of the plant.
803. The new 1,200 MW power project will comply with all the Pakistan regulatory
requirements and that of the ADB safeguard policies, with the exception of ambient air
quality standards of PM10 and PM2.5. It has been shown in this document that the
background concentration levels of PM10 and PM2.5 (without JTPS) reflecting the
emissions from natural sources either already exceed or are close to the limits specified
by the IFC Guidelines. This is a phenomenon that is prevalent all across Pakistan where
due dry conditions the dust levels are very high. The annual average background
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concentration of PM10 is about the same as the limit specified under the IFC Guidelines,
while that of PM2.5 exceeds both the limits in both the NEQS and IFC Guidelines. The
Project includes installation of electrostatic precipitators with 99.9% efficiency on the
boilers for the 1,200 MW capacity. The ESP will limit the PM10 and PM2.5 emission to
level that is recommended for degraded airshed. The incremental contribution of the
1,200 MW plant in the ambient air will be about 13% in PM10 concentration and 6% in
PM2.5. The Project will utilize technology to achieve the maximum control possible, will
have small incremental impact, and the background concentrations are mainly due to
natural sources which cannot be reduced. The Project is therefore considered
acceptable under ADB guidelines which require avoidance, or where avoidance is
impossible, minimization or control of the intensity or load of pollutant emission and
discharge. The proposed 1,200 MW power plant will replace power production from
small to medium sized backup generators used by electricity consumers during load
shedding. The proposed project will result in a country-wide reduction of PM2.5 emission
by 5,600 tons. The power consumption in Hyderabad area is about 5.5% of the countrywide demand. Thus, the reduction of PM2.5 emission in the Hyderabad Area will be
about 300 tons annually due to the 1,200 MW power plant. A detailed ambient air
monitoring program including that of the PM2.5 will be instituted. The program will be
initiated before the commissioning of the Project with the objective of developing a good
understanding of the PM2.5 issue in Jamshoro area and possibly designing future
mitigation programs.
804. It has been recognized that national standards for ambient air quality will require
revision. This issue has been discussed with the Sindh Environmental Protection
Agency and they have expressed willingness to review the standards.
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