Q) / 41o
.
US005237379A
Umted States Patent [191
[11] Patent Number:
Sklut et a1.
[45]
[54] AUTOMATIC PAPER SIZE SELECl‘lON
4,908,672 3/1990 'lto ..................................... "5355/1311
Date of Patent:
5,031,116
[75] Inventors Robert L- Sklut; John W- Dnushmn,
both of Rochester; Craig Lippolis,
1731 Assign“!
7/1991
5,237,379
Aug. 17, 1993
Shukunatni et a1. ..
.... .. 3 5/311 X
5,072,259 12/1991 1km ............................. .. 355/311 x
_
_
_
Webster, all of NY.
j’l'f'frytEgzmf'"-§
Ggmley ,
ms an
mmer- es or_ . Ramirez
Xe")! col’l'ol’l?ol, Smmfofd, Conn
Attorney, Agent, or Fim1—Rona1d F. Chapuran
[21] Appl. No.: 830,152
[57]
[22] Filed:
Feb. 3, 1992
[51] Int Cl 5
[52] Us.
....................................
A method of automatically selecting a desired copy
sheet size including sensing the size of a document, and
sensing a parameter in nonvolamc memory reprcscming
[58]
“elk of‘ s""""
‘'''''
"""""
6036 21/00
355/243
'''‘
309 ’311 230
/231 75’ 203’ 208’ 243:
’
[56]
’
’
'
ABSTRACI
a set of standard copy sheet sizes and a set of non stan
dard copy sheet sizes a selected magni?cation ratio,
determining the preferred copy sheet size in response to
References Cited
the sensed document size, parameters in memory and
Us. PATENT DOCUMENTS
the magni?cation selected, and automatically selecting
the appropriate copy sheet storage receptacle including
4,190,246 2/ 1980 Sasuga ............................... .. 271/145
4406537
9/1983
M
355/311
425301494
7/1985
S 9"}; """ '
' '' '' "
4’575’227 3/1986 1;)“; a?‘ a‘ "
4:647:l88 3/1987 xomiya'e'é'gi'
'
'
'
ratio. The determmation of acceptable 1mage to copy
5/311
/243 X
sheet ratio includes the step of determining the ratio of
Image space to non-image space on the copy sheet and
1/1939 Ito ................... ..
.. 355/311 x
4,804,997
2/1989
..... .. 355/311
4,809,050 2/1989 Ito ................................. .. 355/311 X
th° “mum °f Pmmial image 1°55 °n 11" °°PY she“
8 Claims, 13 Drawing Sheets
Q) / 41o
csuzuum IMAGE SIZE
"2
f 414
IS IMAGE
LENGTH < =TRAY 1
MAX LENGTH
RANGE
'!
SECOND CHANCE
LENGTH e- TRAY 1
OPTIONS
IS IMAGE
LENGTH> :TRAY 1
MIN LENGTH
RANGE
IS IMAGE
WIDTH < = TRAY 1
MAX WIDTH
RANGE
‘
271/9
4,796,056
Mizude et a1.
thc determination of acceptable image to copy sheet
YES
SECOND CHANCE
WIDTH e- TRAY 1
IS IMAGE
WIDTH > ‘TRAY 1
MIN LENGTH
RANGE
‘I
OPTIMAL
WIDTH Q- TRAY 1
US. Patent
Aug. 17, 1993
Sheet 1 of 13
5,237,379
GE
F
US. Patent
Aug. 17, 1993
Sheet 2 of 13
5,237,379
US. Patent
Aug. 17, 1993
Sheet 4 of 13
3L"\
M
I
5,237,379
220
21s
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+
1
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MW m \\“\\\\\\\\\
g i%%%%;m€[f_\
222
' \ _23_o
FIG. 4
226
US. Patent
Aug. 17, 1993
Sheet 6 of 13
5,237,379
:05 START
402
oocumen
SlZE MEASURMENT
VIA 1-H; DOCUMENT
GLASS saunas
f 404
MEASURE DOCUMENT
Y
K 40a
CYCLE UP MACHINE
FEED DOCUMENT,
MEASURE DOCUMENT
‘ \ ‘as
US. Patent
Aug. 17, 1993
/
Sheet 7 of 13
5,237,379
410
CALCULATE IMAGE SIZE
412
f 4'4
as muse
LENGTH < ___mY 1
YES
sscouo CHANCE
LENGTH ‘- TRAY 1
RANGE
7
415
NO
IS IMAGE
LENGTH> =TRAY 1
MIN LENGTH
' RANGE
/
418
OPTIMAL
LENGTH 4- TRAY 1
OPTIONS
420
IS IMAGE
WIDTH< =TRAY 1
MAX WIDTH
RANGE
YES
[
422
f
426
SECOND CHANCE
WIDTH 4- TRAY 1
IS IMAGE
WIDTH > =TRAY 1
MIN LENGTH
RANGE
OPTIMAL
WIDTH ¢— TRAY 1
US. Patent
Aug. 17, ‘1993
5,237,379
Sheet 8 of 13
FIG. 5c
/
428
IS IMAGE
LENGTH < =TRAY 2
YES
MAX LENGTH
RANGE
430
SECOND CHANCE
LENGTH 4- SECOND CHANCE
LENGTH OPTIONS / TRAY 2
432
NO
IS IMAGE
LENGTH> =TRAY 2
MIN LENGTH
RANGE
K
434
OPTIMAL
LENGTH ‘- OPTIMAL
LENGTH OPTIONS / TRAY 2
f 438
436
IS IMAGE
WIDTH < =TRAY 2
MAX WIDTH
RANGE
7
YES
SECOND CHANCE
WIDTH 4- SECOND CHANCE
WIDTH OPTIONS I TRAY 2
440
IS IMAGE
WIDTH > =TRAY 2
MAX WIDTH
RANGE
r442
OPTIMAL
WIDTH ‘- OPTIMAL
WIDTH OPTIONS ITRAY 2
US. Patent
Aug. 17,1993
Sheet 9 of 13
5,237,379
FIG. so
444
f 445
Is IMAGE
-
sEcoNo CHANCE
“£12 FEEERTQY 3
LENGTH +- sEcoNo CHANCE
RANGE
LENGTH OPTIONS ITRAY 3
IS IMAGE
LENGTH > =TRAY 3
MIN LENGTH
RANGE
f 450
OPTIMAL
4
LENGTH ‘- OPTIMAL
LENGTH OPTIONS / TRAY 3
452
f ‘54
IS IMAGE
_
sEcoNo CHANCE
w'a'rfv?gf 3
WIDTH ‘- sEcoNo CHANCE
RANGE
7
WIDTH OPTIONS / TRAY a
456
IS IMAGE
WIDTH > =TRAY 3
MAX WIDTH
RANGE
OPTIMAL
-Q———-———
WIDTH 4- OPTIMAL
WIDTH OPTIONS / TRAY 3
US. Patent
Aug. 17, 1993
Sheet 10 of 13
F'IG. 6E
/ ‘60
DETERMINE LOCATION
’ DEPENDENT MINIMUM AND
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE
IMAGE SIZES
ANY PAPER TRAY LOAD
(OPEN / CLOSE) OPERATION
OR INITIAL CONTROL SYSTEM
ACT UATION
5,237,379
US. Patent
Aug. 17, 1993
;
'Sheet 11 of 13
/
5,237,379
462
DETERMINE OPTIMAL
TRAY OPTIONS
464
[
PTIMAL
o OPTIOIIIJEA
Y
456
REDETERMINE OPTIMAL
TRAY OPTIONS
OPTIMAL TRAY
OPTION 5
/
470
REDETERMINE OPTIMAL
TRAY omens
I
DETERMINE LOCAL
.
AT DEPENDENT
STANDARD PAPER SIZE
f 472
US. Patent
5,237,379
Sheet 12 of 13
Aug. 17, 1993
FIG.’ 66
474
noes mu 1
CONTAIN THE
LOCATION DEPENDENT
YES
K478
STD.’SIZE
OPTIMAL TRAY
OPTIONS ‘- TRAY 1
NO
I
DOES TRAY 2
CONTAIN THE
YES
furs
LOCATION DEPENDENT
STD.’SIZE
OPTIMAL TRAY
OPTIONS <- OPTIMAL
NO
TRAY OPTIONS / TRAY Z
481
DOES TRAY 3
CONTAIN THE
LOCATION DEPENDENT
STD. SIZE
7
YES
[-486
OPTIMAL TRAY
OPTIONS <- OPTIMAL
NO
TRAY OPTIONS / TRAY 3
l
OPTIMAL TRAY
OPTIONS
?
YES
494
DETERMINE
'
NO
AVAILABLE TRAYS
I
DETERMINE THE MARKET
DEPENDENT STANDARD
PAPER SIZE
DETERMINE
SELECT TRAY
I
DECLARE THE APPROPRIATE
LOAD STANDARD PAPER
SIZE XXX FAULT AND CYCLE
MACHINE DOWN
492
496
1
5,237,379
2
size, preventing machine shutdowns where the machine
requests the loading of a paper size which, though typi
cal within the region, is not typically used at this instal
AUTOMATIC PAPER SIZE SELECTION
lation.
The invention relates to the control of a reproduction
For any copy run resulting in duplex copies from
machine, and, more particularly, to a technique for
originals placed either manually or semiautomatically
automatic paper size selection.
by the operator (i.e.: situations where originals of vari
Automatic programming facilities, such as automatic
ous sizes may be used within a single copy run) it is still
paper size selection are an important operator feature
another object of the present invention to provide the
on most copier-duplicator products.
The Fuji Xerox ‘7790 possessed a rudimentary auto 10 operator with a warning message informing the opera
tor about the potential (or actual) image loss if a particu
matic paper selection APS capability, which would
lar “side 2” is larger than the corresponding “side 1”
allow the machine to select a paper size from a limited
copy paper previously selected. This is due to the fact
list of typical sizes based primarily upon the customer
that a particular “side 2” image is committed to use the
original document size. Although this function had
corresponding “side 1” copy paper (now located within
limited utility in a particular market place, its implemen
the machine's duplex tray) rather than having free reign
tation was very inconsistent in its handling of magni?
over paper size selections.
cation ratio and its net effects on resultant on-paper
image size. The implementation also provided only a
It is another object of the present invention to specify
limited list of suitable paper sizes available for automatic
a universal “press on regardless” APS function, which
selection, and was very inconsistent in error handling or 20 would allow maximum machine productivity using the
APS function regardless of currently loaded paper
size requirements beyond which was already loaded
into the paper trays. Essentially, this functional imple
sizes, so long as the customer would accept copies on
larger paper than what was absolutely required or ac
mentation resembled how an “APS” system is con
ceptable image loss and that such paper was currently
structed on most low volume copiers, being useful pri
‘ marily only for jobs which employ only “size for size” 25 available in the machine (i.e.: minimize shutdows to
request loading of speci?c paper sizes).
copy mode.
It would be desirable, therefore, to provide a true
multinational machine that is ?eld con?gurable to spe
ci?c regional copy sheet standard sizes to be able to
It is another object of the present invention to be able
to de?ne an extended target set of paper sizes and a
limited subset of standard paper sizes in order to de?ne
efficiently project images onto the appropriate size
30 a machine as a “metric” proportional machine or a non
copy sheets.
It is an object of the present invention, therefore, to
be able to specify a complete and robust list of the most
common paper sizes associated with a speci?ed market
region, allow the full (64—155%) magni?cation range
metric North American proportional machine.
Further advantages of the present invention will be
come apparent as the following description proceeds
and the features characterizing the invention will be
pointed out in the claims annexed to and forming part of
available, and to ensure that no substantial image loss
this speci?cation.
would be incurred through the use of this feature, all the
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
Brie?y, the present invention is a method of automati
while maximizing the productivity of this feature. An
other object of the present invention is to insure that
only the nearest, most appropriate standard paper size
be automatically selected, and that an effective toler
ance band be placed around the calculated image size
and measured document size.
cally selecting a desired copy sheet size, including sens
ing the size of a document, sensing a flag in memory
representing optional standard sheet sizes, and sensing
selected magni?cation ratio, determining the preferred
copy sheet size in response to the sensed document size,
Another dif?culty in the prior art is that of being able
to freely mix both metric and English letter sizes at 45 flag in memory and the magni?cation selected, examin
ing a parameter in nonvolatile memory designating a
magni?cation ratios other than size-for-size. It is still
particular set of paper sizes, (extended and standard
another object of the present invention, therefore, to
most typical paper sizes associated with a particular
target sets), and automatically selecting the appropriate
copy sheet storage receptacle, including the determina
market which would prevent atypical and unexpected
50 tion of the amount of acceptable image on copy sheet
allow simpli?ed automatic ?eld con?guration of the
combinations from occurring (e.g.: a “letter” size docu
ment in the USA market region, after undergoing a
reduction, requesting the operator to load “B5” paper,
which is not typical in this market and should be re
placed with the nearest standard paper size for USA, 55
namely 8X 10-inch).
Also, in accordance with the present inventor, once
the list of typical market region sizes was determined, it
was discovered that this list, while accurate and appro
priate for a universal APS system, could prove too
restrictive and cumbersome for typical walk-up use.
Typical walk up use is a machine loaded with three of
the most typical paper sizes used within the region. To
error. The determination of the amount of acceptable
image on copy sheet error includes the step of determin
ing the ratio of image space to non-image space on the
copy sheet and the amount of potential image loss on
the copy sheet.
For a better understanding of the present invention,
reference maybe had to the accompanying drawings
wherein the same reference numerals have been applied
to like parts and wherein:
IN THE DRAWINGS
FIG. 1 is an isometric view of an illustrative repro
duction machine incorporating the present invention;
FIG. 2 is a schematic elevational view depicting vari
vide a programmable option to specify a different subset 65 ous operating components and subsystems of the ma
chine shown in FIG. 1;
of all standard paper sizes employed within that region.
FIG. 3 is a block diagram of the operating control
In this way, greater tolerance would be given in deter
systems and memory for the machine shown in FIG. 1;
mining the most appropriate nearest standard paper
overcome this limitation, it would be desirable to pro
3
5,237,379
4
FIG. 4 is a front view of the of the user interface of
where a fuser assembly, indicated generally by the ref
the machine of FIG. 1;
FIG. 5 is a typical initial touch screen display for
erence numeral 52 permanently affixes the toner pow
der image to the copy sheet. Preferably, fuser assembly
operator-machine dialogue of the machine of FIG. 1;
52 includes a heated fuser roller 54 and a pressure roller
and
FIGS. 6A-6H illustrate a flow chart of the automatic
56 with the powder image on the copy sheet contacting
paper size selection technique in accordance with the
present invention.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE
INVENTION
Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, there is shown an electro
photographic reproduction machine 5 composed of a
fuser roller 54.
_
After fusing, the copy sheets are fed through a de
curler 58 to remove any curl. Forwarding rollers 60
then advance the sheet via duplex turn roll 62 to gate 64
which guides the sheet to either ?nishing station F via
rolls 102 or to duplex tray 66, the latter providing an
intermediate or buffer storage for those sheets that have
been printed on one side and on which an image will be
plurality of programmable components and subsystems
subsequently printed on the second, opposed side
which cooperate to carry out the copying or printing
job programmed through a touch dialogue User Inter
face (U .I.). Machine 5 is typical of the machine incorpo
thereof. The sheets are stacked in duplex tray 66 face
down on top of one another in the order in which they
are copied.
- rating the present invention and employs a photocon
To complete duplex copying, the simplex sheets in
tray 66 are fed, in seriatim, by bottom feeder 68 back to
roller 14, tensioning roller 16, idler rollers 18, and drive 20 transfer station D via conveyor 70 and rollers 72 for
transfer of the second toner powder image to the op
roller 20. Drive roller 20 is rotated by a motor coupled
ductive belt 10. Belt 10 is entrained about stripping
thereto by suitable means such as a belt drive. As roller
20 rotates, it advances belt 10 in the direction of arrow
posed sides of the copy sheets. The duplex sheet is then
fed through the same path as the simplex sheet to be
advanced to ?nishing station F.
Copy sheets are supplied from a secondary tray 74 by
25
about the path of movement thereof.
sheet feeder 76 or from the auxiliary tray 78 by sheet
Initially, the photoconductive surface of belt 10
feeder 80. Sheet feeders 76, 80 are friction retard feeders
passes through charging station A where two corona
utilizing a feed belt and take-away rolls to advance
generating devices, indicated generally by the reference
successive copy sheets to transport 70 which advances
numerals 22 and 24 charge photoconductive belt 10 to a
the sheets to rolls 72 and then to transfer station D.
relatively high, substantially uniform potential. Next,
12 through the various processing stations disposed
the charged photoconductive belt is advanced through
imaging station B. At imaging station B, a document
handling unit 26 sequentially feeds documents from a
stack of documents 27 in a document stacking and hold
A high capacity feeder 82 is the primary source of
copy sheets. Tray 84 of feeder 82, which is supported on
an elevator 86 for up and down movement, has a vac
uum feed belt 88 to feed successive uppermost sheets
ing tray into registered position on platen 28. A pair of 35 from the stack of sheets in tray 84 to a take away drive
Xenon ?ash lamps 30 mounted in the optics cavity
shown generally at 31 illuminate the document on
platen 28, the light rays re?ected from the document
being focused by lens 32 onto belt 10 to expose and
record an electrostatic latent image on photoconductive
belt 10 which corresponds to the informational areas
contained within the document currently on platen 28.
After imaging, the document is returned to the docu
ment tray via a simplex path when either a simplex copy
or the first pass of a duplex copy is being made or via a 45
roll 90 and idler rolls 92. Rolls 90, 92 guide the sheet
onto transport 93, which in cooperation with idler roll
95 and rolls 72, move the sheet to transfer station station
D.
After transfer station D, photoconductive belt 10
passes beneath corona generating device 94 which
charges any residual toner particles remaining on belt
10 to the proper polarity. Thereafter, a pre-charge erase
lamp (not shown), located inside photoconductive belt
10, discharges the photoconductive belt in preparation
duplex path when a duplex copy is being made.
The electrostatic latent image recorded on photocon
ductive belt 10 is developed at development station C
by a magnetic brush developer unit 34 having three
developer rolls 36, 38 and 40. A paddle wheel 42 picks
up developer material and delivers it to the developer
for the next charging cycle. Residual particles are re
moved from belt 10 at cleaning station G by an electri
cally biased cleaner brush 96 and two de-toning rolls 98
and 100.
The various functions of machine 5 are regulated by
rolls 36, 38. Developer roll 40 is a cleanup roll while a
magnetic roll 44 is provided to remove any carrier
programmable microprocessors. The controller pro
a controller which preferably comprises one or more
vides a comparison count of the copy sheets, the num
ber of documents being recirculated, the number of
Following development, the developed image is 55 copy sheets selected by the operator, time delays, jam
corrections, etc. As will appear, programming and op
transferred at transfer station D to a copy sheet. There,
erating control over machine 5 is accomplished through
the photoconductive belt 10 is exposed to a pre-transfer
a User Interface. Operating and control information,
light from a lamp (not shown) to reduce the attraction
job programming instructions, etc. are stored in a suit
between photoconductive belt 10 and the toner powder
able memory which includes both ROM and RAM
image. Next, a corona generating device 46 charges the
memory types. Conventional sheet path sensors or
copy sheet to the proper magnitude and polarity so that
switches may be utilized to keep track of the position of
the copy sheet is tacked to photoconductive belt 10 and
the documents and the copy sheets. In addition, the
the toner powder image attracted from the photocon
controller regulates the various positions of the gates
ductive belt to the copy sheet. After transfer, corona
generator 48 charges the copy sheet to the opposite 65 depending upon the mode of operation selected.
With reference to FIG. 3, a memory includes a hard
polarity to detach the copy sheet from belt 10.
or rigid disk drive 115A and a floppy disk drive 115B
Following transfer, a conveyor 50 advances the copy
connected to Controller 114 including random access
sheet bearing the transferred image to fusing station E
granules adhering to belt 10.
5
5,237,379
6
memory 114A and read only memory 114B. In a pre
' Programming screens or frames, as displayed on
ferred embodiment, the rigid disks are two platter, four
head disks with a formatted storage capacity of approxi
mately 20 megabytes. The ?oppy disks are 3.5 inch,
CRT display 220, are used by the operator to select the
feature set appropriate for the completion of a copying
job. Speci?cally, the programming screens consist of a
dual sided micro disks with a formatted storage capac
ity of approximately 720 kilobytes. Preferably, all of the
control code and screen display information for the
machine is loaded from the rigid disk at machine power
up. Changing the data that gets loaded into the machine
for execution can be done by exchanging the rigid disk
in the machine 5 for another rigid disk with a different
version of data or by modifying the contents of the
current rigid disk by transferring data from one or more
?oppy disks onto the rigid disk using the ?oppy disk
5 series of a three primary screens, arranged in a file
folder or tab format, as illustrated in FIG. 5. In certain
instances, selection of specific programming features
can only be done to the exclusion of other features due
to machine constraints or known undesirable outcomes
(e.g. stapling of transparency copy sheets). The cur
rently programmed feature set is ‘always displayed using
programming frames, where selected features are indi
cated as highlighted or white buttons and disabled or
drive built into the machine 5. Suitable display 213A of 15 deselected features are indicated with a gray back
UL 213 is also connected to Controller 114 as well as a
ground.
shared line system bus 302.
The shared line system bus 302 interconnects a plural
With reference to FIG. 5, there is illustrated a typical
user interface display or screen providing an operator/
ity of core printed wiring boards including an input
machine dialogue. The screen presents to the operator
in the form of tabs, a basic features mode 234, an added
handling board 308, anda finisher/binder board 310.
features mode 236, and a computer forms mode 238.
Each of the core printed wiring boards is connected to
Also at the top of the display frame are a machine ready
local input/output devices through a local bus. For
indicator 240 and a quantity programmed indicator 242.
example, the input station board 304 is connected to
digital input/output boards 312A and 312B and servo 25 The three modes typically could be in a gray appear
ance and upon selection of a particular mode such as the
board 312C via local bus 314. The marking imaging
top tray 256 by the operator, the top tray soft button
board 306 is connected to analog/digital/analog boards
station board 304, a marking imaging board 306, a paper
316A, 316B, digital input/output board 316C, and step
would transform from a gray appearance to a white
per control board 316D through local bus 318. In a
appearance. There are also illustrated basic program
similar manner, the paper handling board 308 connects 30 ming features available to the operator other than the
'digital input/output boards 320A, B and C to local bus
quantity or number of copies to be produced, such a
322, and finisher/binder board 310 connects digital
copy output feature 244, a stapling feature 246, copy
input/output boards 324A, B and C to local bus 326.
sides feature 248, a paper supply feature 250, a copy
Referring to FIG. 4, there is shown the touch moni
quality feature 252 and a reduction and enlarge feature
tor 214 for the touch dialogue U.I. 213 of the present 35
254. These features display to the operator a variety of
invention. As will appear, monitor 214 provides an
options available to program the machine. For example,
operator user interface with hard and soft touch control
the
copy output feature can offer the operator an uncol
buttons enabling communication between operator and
lated mode, a collated mode, or simply a single sheet top
machine 10. Monitor 214 comprises a suitable cathode
ray tube 216 of desired size and type having a peripheral 40 tray mode illustrated at 256.
Similarly, various other “soft” buttons are available
framework forming a decorative bezel 218 thereabout.
Bezel 218 frames a rectangular video display screen 220
for the operator to select a particular stapling feature
on which soft touch buttons in the form of icons or
246 format for the stapling of completed sets or various
pictograms and messages are diplayed as will appear
combinations of simplex or duplex copying, a one~to
with a series of hard control buttons 222 and 10 seven 45 one simplex mode 258 being illustrated in FIG. 5 as the
segment displays 224 therebelow. Displays 224 provide
option selected by the operator or the paper supply or
a display for copy “Quantity Selected”, copy “Quantity
Completed”, and an area 226 for other information.
Hard control buttons 222 comprise “0-9" buttons
providing a keypad 230 for programming copy quan
feature 250 from which copy sheets are desired to be
provided from. Similarly there are options to determine
copy quality such as lighter or darker and reduction and
enlargement from 64% to 155%, FIG. 5 illustrating a
particular copy quality selection and also a reduction
display 224; a “Start" button to initiate print; a clear
/enlargement selection 262 of l(l)%.i
memory button “CM” to reset all dialogue mode fea
In accordance with the present invention, The APS
tures to default and place a “l” in the least significant
digit of display 224; a “Stop” button to initiate an or 55 feature starts with the list of the de?ned paper sizes that
derly shutdown of machine 5; an "Interrupt” button to
are appropriate to a particular locality as shown in
initiate a job interrupt; a “Proof’ button to initiate mak
Table 1. In particular, Table 1 illustrates typical stan
ing of a proof copy; and an “i” button to initiate a re
dard sizes for localities l, 2, 3 and 4 throughout the
tity, code numbers, etc., a clear button “C” to reset
quest for information.
Operator programming of the machine via the U/I is
facilitated through display of programming screens or
frames on CRT display 220 which represent program
ming features of the machine. Signals from IR touch
sensors are fed to the machine controller where they are
world. Thus, locality #1 has “Special B4 or 8}"X 13”
paper size and the other localities have 8§">< 14'', with
similar tradeoffs for B5 and “8X 10” paper sizes indi
cated. In addition, the locality #1 machine is program
mable to favor either “PX-SE4” or “B4” for its pre
interpreted with respect to the current programming 65 ferred size due to their nearly equal dimensions and the
probability that speci?c FX accounts would favor the
screen. Subsequently operator selections are displayed
use of only one of these two possible sizes for use with
on CRT display 220 and the appropriate machine sub
the APS function.
systems are enabled, disabled or adjusted accordingly.
5,237,379
7
T
ical "Standard" a
r sizes
ITEM
Trays 1 8t 2
Standard
and Tray 3
1
2
3
4
B5
202 X 254 m
8! X 10"
8 X 10"
m
81X ll"
8; X 11
A4
A4
8! X 13"
215 X 330 m 81 X 14"
8! X 11''
A4
Si X 13"
8} X 14"
8} X 11
A4
8} X 13"
FX-SB4'
Programmable
Sizes
B4
In
B4
B4
A3
ll X 17
85 X 14"
B4
A3
A3
11x17"
A3
11 X 17"
ll X 17”
Although each localities’ initialization of a machine will
allow that machine to properly handle the full array of
paper sizes shown in the above table, it is not believed
that, for instance, a locality #3 system could generally
attempt to ?nd B4 paper for a match if B4 is seldom
used in the locality #3 market, especially for casual,
walk-up service. Thus, the table above represents the
“expanded Standard set” locality paper sizes, and the
table below, Table 2, represents the default set of “pop
ular Standard paper sizes”:
TABLE 2
dard” original sizes based upon the locality. The image
size is determined by factoring in the magni?cation
ratio. Once the image size is determined, the system
then looks for a dimensional match for a “standard”
paper size which is the closest match to the calculated
image size, not to exceed an “acceptable” image loss of
3 mm (adjustable) for either length or width.
If the image falls within a standard size target range,
10 the system then looks for the availability of that size of
copy paper. Depending upon the paper availability, the
following actions are taken by the system: if the target
size of paper matches what is de?ned for tray contents
for any of the 3 paper trays and the tray is ready to feed
15
(no tray fault conditions exist), the target size of paper is
fed.
If, on the other hand, the target size of paper matches
what is de?ned for tray contents for any of the 3 paper
trays and the tray is not ready to feed (ie: a fault exists
for that tray), the system looks to see if the target size of
paper is available in either of the other trays. If it is, and
if that tray is ready, the copy paper will be fed. If the
' target size of copy paper is loaded but the tray(s) is not
25 available, the system will shut down and display a mes
sage to correct the fault condition associated with the
desired paper tray (i.e.: load paper, clear jam, close tray,
ITEM
Standard
sizes
8
given embodiment, 21- zones are available to infer “stan
TABLE 1
1
2
3
4
B5
A4
203 X 254mm
A4
8! X 11"
85 X 14"
8Q X 11"
A4
B4
A3
215 X 330 mm
SQX I4’
A3
ll X 17'’
85 X l4"
11 X 17"
Each machine would default to the smaller set of
“standard” sizes; however, at the customer’s request, a
bit can be set in NVM that would use the full set of
paper sizes appropriate to that particular location.
Principles of Operation
In general, APS works by taking the size of the Origi
nal and modifying it by applying the selected Magni?
cation Ratio to ?nd the resultant image size. In the
following description, the term “standard size” pertains
to one of the target sizes of paper as de?ned both by
locality setting and by the bit determining whether the
expanded or the popular set of Standard paper sizes
should be employed.
The original is initially measured by any standard
technique, such as an array of platen sensors, sensors
detecting lead and tail edge, and adjustable frames.
These usually give a fairly accurate measurement of the
size of an original. In one embodiment, if the system
detects that the size of an original measured by the
frames is within 3 mm of a “standard size”, the dimen
sions of the standard size will be substituted for the
purposes of determining a target copy paper size. This
allows for a practical amount of misregistration or skew
in the placement of the original. It should be noted that
etc.) If the target size of copy paper is not one of those
de?ned in the current contents of the paper trays, the
system will shut down and display a message requesting
that the target size of copy paper be loaded.
Finally, if the image size does not match the length
and width (within 3 mm) of any of the “standard” copy
paper, the system then looks to see if the full image will
?t onto an available copy paper within the current pitch
operation of the copier. If one exists, the image will be
copied, and the smallest paper that meets the criteria of
“no lost image” will be fed. If none exists, the system
will shut down and display a message requesting that
the operator take any of a number of corrective actions.
If the image size does not match the length and width
(within 3 mm) of any of the “standard” copy paper, and
if the full image will not ?t onto an available copy paper
within the current pitch operation of the copier, the
system will shut down and ask the operator to push the
start button. Once this is done, the system will then
operate in the appropriate pitch mode to make the copy.
This pertains only to jobs with automatic document
handler positioning originals, since the jobs with manu
ally-placed originals always run in the pitch determined
by the widest copy paper loaded in any of the 3 trays. If
the machine is con?gured to support the “press on re
gardless” feature, designed to provide maximum
throughput (via minimizing shutdowns requesting the
operator to load speci?c paper sizes) while guarantee
ing no loss of image, the paper tray containing the size
nearest the required image size without image loss that
is currently ready for operation shall be used to produce -
the tolerance can be modi?ed and the 3 mm is exem 60 the copy desired.
plary only. The original size (measured or substituted)
that is obtained from this process is then multiplied by
the magni?cation ratio to ?nd the resultant image size.
With reference to FIG. 6A, after the job start, there
is a determination as to whether or not the document
size measurements is via a document glass shutter as
shown at block 402. This block basically illustrates a
When an automatic document handler is used, an
indirect measurement process is used. Factors such as 65 distinction between the measurement of the document
size on the platen in a non automatic document handler
the number of sensors covered by the original as it
mode or whether or not the automatic document han
passes on to the document glass, as well as the time over
dler mode is in operation. If yes, the document is mea
a given sensor place the original in a size bracket. In a
9
5,237,379
10
sured using the document glass shutter at 404 and the
machine is cycled up at 406.
If the document size measurement is not via the docu
optimal copy sheet size in one of the trays to meet the
ment glass shutter, a document is fed from the auto
matic document handler and the document measured
via the automatic document feed mode as shown at 408.
With reference to FIG. 68, once the size of the docu
ment is determined, via the automatic document han
dler or non automatic document handler mode, the
image size is calculated 5 shown at block 410. This
takes into account the length and width of the measured
sheet size will fit the full image, but without an undue
amount of copy sheet space not occupied by the image.
document also taking into account the selected magnifi
cation ratio.
At block 412, a determination is made as to whether
or not the image length is less than the tray 1 maximum
lengthv range. If yes, then the tray 1 copy sheets are
potential candidates for the calculated image size as
standard requirements of the reproduction operation for
the calculated image size. In general, the optimal copy
This is a default condition that can be set in accordance
with the present invention, for a locality taking into
account speci?c reproduction requirements.
If the preferred or standard requirements are not met
by any of the copy sheets in any of the trays, in accor
dance with the present invention, there is another de
fault stage of acceptable limits that is not preferred but
acceptable for the speci?c reproduction requirement at
a specific market or locality. This analysis is preformed
as illustrated at block 466 and analyzes such options as
an optimal length, but a second width or less than pre
ferred width or an optimal width and a second length or
less than preferred length. These conditions are preset
illustrated at block 414. At block 416, the next determi
and can be altered to a specific requirement or locality.
nation is whether or not the image length is greater than
At block 468, there is a determination as to whether
the tray 1 minimum length range. If yes, there is a deter 20
or not one of the trays contains copy sheets that meet
mination of optimal length at block 418 and a determi
the second default or non preferred but still acceptable
nation of the status of image width is made. In particu
copy sheet size limitations.
lar, at block 420 there is a determination as to whether
If none of the trays contain copy sheets that meet the
or not the image width is less than the tray 1 maximum
width range. If yes, then tray 1 is still a potential for 25 ‘second chance width or the second chance length re
quirements, there is a third default acceptable standard
correct image size and there is a determination at block
424 as to whether or not the image width is greater than
the tray 1 minimum length range. If yes, then there is a
determination of optimal width for tray 1 at 426. In any
case, once the determination of the likelihood of tray 1
that is determined as illustrated at 470. This is a determi
nation related to the second chance length and the sec
check trays 2 and 3 in similar manner.
With reference to FIG. 6C, at block 428, similar to
ond chance width options. In particular, at block 472,
this determination is wholly dependent on the locality
or particular market with specific standard paper sizes.
At this locality, there is a further lower level acceptabil
ity that allows for a slight trimming or non reproduction
block 412, there is a determination if the image length is
less than the tray 2 maximum length range. If yes, tray
of a portion of the 'projected image or permits an un
usual amount of blank space on the copy sheet in rela
2 is considered to be a candidate for proper size at 430,
tion to the accepted image.
for the proper size copy sheet is made, the system will
a determination of image length being greater than the
With reference to FIG. 6G, there is then generally a
determination of which is the correct tray for the ac
ceptable default condition. At block 474 there is a deter
optimal length determination is made at 434. At block
436 the determination is made whether or not the image 40 mination if tray 1 contains the location dependent stan
dard size determined at block 478. At blocks 480 and
width is less than the tray 2 maximum width range. If
484 there is a decision to be made relative to trays 2 and
yes, tray 2 remains a candidate for suitable tray at 438.
3 respectively, whether or not these trays contains suit
At block 440, the determination is made whether or not
able copy sheets as determined at blocks 482 and 486.
the image width is greater than the tray 2 maximum
width range and at 442, the determination is made that 45 Block 488 represents this determination, that there is in
fact at least one suitable tray. If not, as illustrated at 490,
the tray 2 is an optimal tray.
there is a determination of the locality dependent stan
A similar determination is made for tray 3, with refer
dard paper size that would best fit the projected image
ence to FIG. 6D wherein blocks 444 and 452 are similar
size and that block 492 illustrates that a message is deliv
to blocks 428 and 436 respectively of FIG. 6C, blocks
ered on the screen of the operator console that there is
446, 448 and 450 are similar to blocks 430, 432 and 434,
a standard paper size fault or deficiency and the ma
and blocks 454, 456 and 458 are similar to blocks 438,
chine is cycled down. If there is at least 1 tray available
440, and 442.
With reference to FIG. 6B, at block 460 there is a
that is suitable copy sheets, a determination is made at
block 494 as to which tray has suitable paper and is not
determination of a location dependent minimum and
maximum allowable image size taking into account any 55 in any other default condition as in a jam or in a low
paper condition. The correct tray is selected at block
paper tray load operation or initial control system actu
496.
ation.
This correct tray determination is made following the
vOnce the three trays have been analyzed, there is a
sequence as illustrated at FIG. 6H. In particular, at
determination of the optimal tray options as shown at
block 498 the control cycles through the analysis based
block 462 in FIG. 6F. In short, it is determined at 462
upon whether or not the acceptable size paper trays are
which trays have the correct size copy sheets. It should
ready to feed or are currently in a fault condition. With
be noted that although an example of 3 trays have been
reference to FIG. 6H, once it is determined that there is
used throughout, it is well within the scope of the pres
tray 2 minimum length range is made at 432 and the
a tray within range, again the control cycles through
ent invention to provide any number of trays holding
copy sheets using a similar analysis. At block 464, there 65 each of the trays to determine which one is acceptable.
is the determination whether or not there is at least one
At block 512, there is a determination as to whether or
tray with the correct size copy sheets for the calculated
image size. This is the determination that there is an
not the optimal tray list includes tray 3, or tray 2 at
block 518 or tray 1 at block 522 with the faults of each
11
5,237,379
12
the method of operating the machine comprising the
steps of
sensing the size of the document,
determining the image size in response to the sensed
document size,
comparing the image size to the predetermined size of
the copy sheets in the storage receptacle,
determining that the image size is outside the size
range of the predetermined size of the copy sheets
in the storage receptacle,
referring to the image to copy sheet ?t default condi
of the trays being declared at blocks 522, 520 and 514. If
there is a particular tray within range with no faults,
whether or not the tray is tray 3 is determined at block
500 and tray 3 selected at block 504. The decision at
block 502 is relative to tray 2 which is selected at block
508, and tray 1 selected at block 510. Once a tray has
been determined to be suitable, the job run is continued
at block 506.
While the invention has been described with refer
ence to the structure disclosed, it is not con?ned to the
details set forth, but is intended to cover such modi?ca
tions or changes as may come within the scope of the
claims attached.
tion,
We claim:
1. In a machine with a plurality of operating compo
nents for producing images of documents on copy
determining that the image size is outside the size
range of the predetermined size of the copy sheets
in the copy sheet storage receptacle with reference
to the image to copy sheet ?t default condition,
sheets including a sensor to determine document size, a
referring to the image to copy sheet worst case ?t
plurality of copy sheet storage receptacles for supplying
default condition,
determining that the image size is within the size
range of the predetermined size of the copy sheets
in the copy sheet storage receptacle with reference
copy sheets of predetermined sizes, and a control with
operator interface, magni?cation selector, and memory
20
for storing an image to copy sheet ?t default condition,
the method of automatically selecting a copy sheet
to the image to copy sheet worst case ?t default
storage receptacle comprising the steps of:
condition, and
initiating operation of the machine and advancing
sensing the size of the document and the selected
magni?cation ratio,
25
estimating the image size in response to the sensed
document size, and the magni?cation ratio se
copy sheets from the storage receptacle.
6. The method of claim 5 wherein the step of initiat
ing operation of the machine and advancing copy sheets
from the storage receptacle includes the step of losing a
lected,
comparing the image size to the predetermined sizes
portion of an image on said copy sheets.
30
7. In a machine with a plurality of operating compo
of the copy sheets,
determining that the image size is outside the size
nents for producing images of documents on copy
range of the predetermined sizes of the copy sheets
sheets including means to determine document size, a
copy sheet storage receptacle for supplying copy sheets
in each of the plurality of copy sheet storage recep
of a predetermined size, and a control with memory for
tacles,
relating the image size to the predetermined sizes of
storing a ?rst image to copy sheet default condition and
the copy sheets by factoring in the relationship the
a second image to copy sheets default condition, the
second default condition relating to the degree of trim
image to copy sheet ?t default condition, including
the step of tolerating the loss of a given portion of
ming of the projected image on a copy sheet, the
method of operating the machine comprising the steps
the image on a copy sheet, and
of
selecting a copy sheet storage receptacle in response
to the sensed document size, the magni?cation
determining the size of the document,
selected and the image to copy sheet ?t default
determining the image size,
comparing the image size to the predetermined size of
condition.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the image to copy
the copy sheets in the storage receptacle with ref
45
sheet ?t default condition is programmable,
erence to the ?rst image to copy sheet default con
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the step of deter
dition,
determining that the image size is outside the size
mining that the image size is outside the size range of the
predetermined sizes of the copy sheets in each of the
range of the predetermined size of the copy sheets
in the copy sheet storage receptacle with reference
plurality of copy sheet storage receptacles includes the
step of determining that the ratio of image size to copy
to the ?rst image to copy sheet default condition,
sheet size exceeds a given ratio.
referring to the second image to copy sheet default
4. The method of claim 1 wherein the step of deter
condition,
mining that the image size is outside the size range of the
determining that the image size is within the size
predetermined sizes of the copy sheets in each of the
range of the predetermined size of the copy sheets
plurality of copy sheet storage receptacles includes the
in the copy sheet storage receptacle with reference
step of determining that the ratio of image size to copy
I to the second image to copy sheet default condi
sheet size is less than a given ratio.
tion, and
initiating operation of the machine and advancing
5. In a machine with a plurality of operating compo
copy sheets from the storage receptacle.
nents for producing images of documents on copy
8. The method of claim 7 wherein the control in
sheets including means to determine document size, a
cludes an image magni?cation selector and the step of
copy sheet storage receptacle for supplying copy sheets
determining the image size includes the step of factoring
of a predetermined size, and a control with memory for
the image magni?cation selected.
storing an image to copy sheet ?t default condition and
#
an imageto copy sheet worst case ?t default condition,
65
£
t
i
t
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