Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000

Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Front cover
Implementing the IBM
Storwize V5000
Easily manage and deploy systems
with embedded GUI
Experience rapid and flexible
provisioning
Protect data with remote
mirroring
Jon Tate
Saiprasad Prabhakar Parkar
Lee Sirett
Chris Tapsell
Paulo Tomiyoshi Takeda
ibm.com/redbooks
International Technical Support Organization
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
October 2013
SG24-8162-00
Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on
page ix.
First Edition (October 2013)
This edition applies to Version 7 Release 1 of IBM Storwize V5000 machine code.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2013. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule
Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .x
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Now you can become a published author, too! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Stay connected to IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1 IBM Storwize V5000 overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2 IBM Storwize V5000 terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.3 IBM Storwize V5000 models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.4 IBM Storwize V5000 hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.4.1 Control enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.4.2 Expansion enclosure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.4.3 Host connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.4.4 Disk drive types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.5 IBM Storwize V5000 terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.5.1 Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.5.2 Node canister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.5.3 I/O groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1.5.4 Clustered system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1.5.5 RAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.5.6 Managed disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
1.5.7 Quorum disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
1.5.8 Storage pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
1.5.9 Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1.5.10 iSCSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.5.11 SAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.6 IBM Storwize V5000 features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.6.1 Mirrored volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.6.2 Thin provisioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1.6.3 Easy Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1.6.4 Storage Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1.6.5 FlashCopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1.6.6 Remote Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1.6.7 External virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
1.7 Problem management and support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
1.7.1 IBM Assist On-site and remote service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
1.7.2 Event notifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
1.7.3 SNMP traps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
1.7.4 Syslog messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
1.7.5 Call Home email . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
1.8 More information resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
1.8.1 Useful IBM Storwize V5000 websites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
1.8.2 IBM Storwize learning videos on YouTube . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Chapter 2. Initial configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013. All rights reserved.
iii
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
Hardware installation planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SAN configuration planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FC Direct-attach planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SAS Direct-attach planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LAN configuration planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.1 Management IP address considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.2 Service IP address considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6 Host configuration planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.7 Miscellaneous configuration planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.8 System management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.8.1 GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.8.2 CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.9 First-time setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.10 Initial configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.10.1 Adding Enclosures after initial configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.10.2 Configuring Call Home, email alert, and inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.10.3 Service Assistant tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28
31
33
33
35
35
36
37
38
39
39
40
41
49
59
69
71
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
3.1 Getting started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
3.1.1 Supported browsers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
3.1.2 Access the management GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
3.1.3 Overview panel layout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
3.2 Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
3.2.1 Function icons navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
3.2.2 Extended help navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
3.2.3 Breadcrumb navigation aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
3.2.4 Suggested Tasks feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
3.2.5 Presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
3.2.6 Access actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
3.2.7 Task progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
3.2.8 Navigating panels with tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
3.3 Status Indicators menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
3.3.1 Horizontal bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
3.3.2 Allocated status bar menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
3.3.3 Running tasks bar menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
3.3.4 Health status bar menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
3.4 Function icon menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
3.4.1 Home menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
3.4.2 Monitoring menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
3.4.3 Pools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
3.4.4 Volumes menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
3.4.5 Hosts menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
3.4.6 Copy Services menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
3.4.7 Access menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
3.4.8 Settings menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
3.5 Management GUI help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
3.5.1 IBM Storwize V5000 Information Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
3.5.2 Watching an e-Learning video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
3.5.3 Learning more . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
3.5.4 Embedded panel help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
3.5.5 Hidden question mark help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
3.5.6 Hover help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
iv
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.5.7 IBM endorsed YouTube videos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Chapter 4. Host configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1 Host attachment overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 Preparing the host operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.1 Windows 2008 R2: Preparing for FC attachment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.2 Creating SAS hosts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
153
154
155
155
157
Chapter 5. I/O Group basic volume configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1 Provisioning storage from IBM Storwize V5000 and making it available to the host. .
5.1.1 Creating a generic volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.2 Creating a thin-provisioned volume. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.3 Creating a mirrored volume. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.4 Creating a thin-mirror volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2 Mapping a volume to the host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.1 Mapping newly created volumes to the host by using the wizard . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.2 Manually mapping a volume to the host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3 Discovering the volumes from the host and specifying multipath settings . . . . . . . . .
5.3.1 Windows 2008 Fibre Channel volume attachment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.2 Windows 2008 iSCSI volume attachment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.3 Windows 2008 Direct SAS volume attachment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.4 VMware ESX Fibre Channel volume attachment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.5 VMware ESX iSCSI volume attachment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.6 VMware ESX Direct SAS volume attachment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
161
162
164
167
169
174
177
177
181
185
186
191
203
207
215
227
Chapter 6. Storage migration wizard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1 Interoperability and compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2 Storage migration wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2.1 External virtualization capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2.2 Overview of the storage migration wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2.3 Storage migration wizard tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.3 Storage migration wizard example scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.3.1 Storage migration wizard example scenario description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.3.2 Using the storage migration wizard for example scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
237
238
238
238
238
239
253
253
255
Chapter 7. Storage pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1 Working with internal drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.1 Internal Storage window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.2 Actions on internal drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2 Configuring internal storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.1 RAID configuration presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.2 Customizing initial storage configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.3 Creating an MDisk and pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.4 Using the recommended configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.5 Selecting a different configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3 Working with MDisks on internal and external storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.1 Adding Externally Virtualized MDisks to storage pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.2 Importing externally virtualized MDisks to storage pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.3 MDisk by Pools panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.4 RAID action for MDisks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.5 Selecting the drive tier for externally virtualized MDisks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.6 More actions on MDisks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4 Working with storage pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4.1 Create Pool option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
295
296
297
299
307
307
309
310
312
314
320
322
326
332
334
338
339
343
345
Contents
v
7.4.2 Actions on storage pools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
vi
Chapter 8. Advanced host and volume administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1 Advanced host administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1.1 Modifying Mappings menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1.2 Unmapping volumes from a host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1.3 Renaming a host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1.4 Deleting a host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1.5 Host properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2 Adding and deleting host ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.1 Adding a host port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.2 Adding a Fibre Channel port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.3 Adding a SAS host port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.4 Adding an iSCSI host port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.5 Deleting a host port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3 Host mappings overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.1 Unmap Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.2 Properties (Host) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.3 Properties (Volume) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4 Advanced volume administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.1 Advanced volume functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.2 Mapping a volume to a host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.3 Unmapping volumes from all hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.4 Viewing a host that is mapped to a volume. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.5 Renaming a volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.6 Shrinking a volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.7 Expanding a volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.8 Migrating a volume to another storage pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.9 Exporting to an image mode volume. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.10 Deleting a volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5 Volume properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.1 Overview tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.2 Host Maps tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.3 Member MDisk tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.4 Adding a mirrored volume copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.5 Editing thin-provisioned volume properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6 Advanced volume copy functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.1 Thin-provisioned menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.2 Splitting into a new volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.3 Validate Volume Copies option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.4 Delete Volume Copy option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6.5 Migrating volumes by using the volume copy features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7 Volumes by Storage Pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.8 Volumes by Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
349
350
352
356
359
361
362
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
374
374
375
376
379
380
380
381
382
382
383
385
387
388
388
391
392
394
395
398
399
400
402
404
404
406
408
Chapter 9. Easy Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.1 Easy Tier overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2 Easy Tier for IBM Storwize V5000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.1 Disk tiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.2 Tiered storage pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3 Easy Tier process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3.1 I/O Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3.2 Data Placement Advisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
411
412
413
413
414
415
415
415
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
9.3.3 Data Migration Planner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3.4 Data Migrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3.5 Easy Tier operating modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3.6 Easy Tier rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4 Easy Tier configuration by using the GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4.1 Creating multitiered pools: Enable Easy Tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4.2 Downloading Easy Tier I/O measurements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.5 Easy Tier configuration by using the command-line interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.5.1 Enabling Easy Tier evaluation mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.5.2 Enabling or disabling Easy Tier on single volumes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.6 IBM Storage Tier Advisor Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.6.1 Creating graphical reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.6.2 STAT reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.7 Tivoli Storage Productivity Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.7.1 Tivoli Storage Productivity Center benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.7.2 Adding IBM Storwize V5000 in Tivoli Storage Productivity Center . . . . . . . . . . .
9.8 Administering and reporting an IBM Storwize V5000 system through Tivoli Storage
Productivity Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.8.1 Basic configuration and administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.8.2 Generating reports by using Java GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.8.3 Generating reports by using Tivoli Storage Productivity Center web console . .
415
416
416
417
419
419
427
429
429
432
434
434
435
436
437
437
Chapter 10. Copy services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1 FlashCopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.1 Business requirements for FlashCopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.2 FlashCopy functional overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.3 Planning for FlashCopy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.4 Managing FlashCopy by using the GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.5 Managing FlashCopy mappings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.6 Managing a FlashCopy consistency group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2 Remote Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.1 Remote Copy concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.2 Global Mirror with Change Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.3 Remote Copy planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3 Troubleshooting Remote Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3.1 1920 error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3.2 1720 error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.4 Managing Remote Copy by using the GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.4.1 Managing cluster partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.4.2 Managing stand-alone Remote Copy relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.4.3 Managing a Remote Copy consistency group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
449
450
450
451
459
461
467
490
500
500
507
512
515
515
517
517
518
522
534
Chapter 11. External storage virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.1 Planning for external storage virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.1.1 License for external storage virtualization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.1.2 SAN configuration planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.1.3 External storage configuration planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.1.4 Guidelines for virtualizing external storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2 Working with external storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.1 Adding external storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.2 Managing external storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.3 Removing external storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
547
548
548
550
551
552
552
553
553
557
439
439
441
444
Chapter 12. RAS, monitoring, and troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 559
Contents
vii
viii
12.1 Reliability, availability, and serviceability on the IBM Storwize V5000 . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2 IBM Storwize V5000 components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.1 Enclosure midplane assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.2 Node canisters: Ports and LED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.3 Node canister replaceable hardware components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.4 Expansion canister: Ports and LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.5 Disk subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.6 Power supply unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.3 Configuration backup procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.3.1 Generating a configuration backup by using the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.3.2 Downloading a configuration backup by using the GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.4 Upgrading software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.4.1 Upgrading software automatically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.4.2 GUI upgrade process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.4.3 Upgrading software manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.5 Event log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.5.1 Managing the event log. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.5.2 Alert handling and recommended actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.6 Collecting support information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.6.1 Support information via GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.6.2 Support information via Service Assistant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.6.3 Support Information onto USB stick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.7 Powering on and shutting down IBM Storwize V5000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.7.1 Shutting down the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.7.2 Powering on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
560
561
561
562
566
570
571
574
576
576
577
580
581
581
584
589
590
593
601
601
602
603
605
605
608
Appendix A. Command-line interface setup and SAN Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Command-line interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SAN Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling SAN Boot for Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling SAN Boot for VMware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows SAN Boot migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
609
610
610
620
623
623
624
624
Related publications and information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Storwize V5000 publications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Storwize V5000 support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
627
627
627
627
627
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.
IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consult
your local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area. Any
reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM product,
program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that does not
infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the user's responsibility to
evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document. The
furnishing of this document does not grant you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in
writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where such
provisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION
PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of
express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made
to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make
improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any time
without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM websites are provided for convenience only and do not in any
manner serve as an endorsement of those websites. The materials at those websites are not part of the
materials for this IBM product and use of those websites is at your own risk.
IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate without incurring
any obligation to you.
Any performance data contained herein was determined in a controlled environment. Therefore, the results
obtained in other operating environments may vary significantly. Some measurements may have been made
on development-level systems and there is no guarantee that these measurements will be the same on
generally available systems. Furthermore, some measurements may have been estimated through
extrapolation. Actual results may vary. Users of this document should verify the applicable data for their
specific environment.
Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their published
announcements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm the
accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on the
capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.
This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate them
as completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products.
All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual business
enterprise is entirely coincidental.
COPYRIGHT LICENSE:
This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrate programming
techniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs in
any form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing application
programs conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which the sample
programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM, therefore,
cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013. All rights reserved.
ix
Trademarks
IBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business Machines
Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. These and other IBM trademarked terms are
marked on their first occurrence in this information with the appropriate symbol (® or ™), indicating US
registered or common law trademarks owned by IBM at the time this information was published. Such
trademarks may also be registered or common law trademarks in other countries. A current list of IBM
trademarks is available on the Web at http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml
The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both:
AIX®
DS8000®
Easy Tier®
FlashCopy®
IBM®
Netfinity®
Power Systems™
Redbooks®
Redbooks (logo)
Storwize®
System i®
System Storage®
®
Tivoli®
VIA®
XIV®
xSeries®
The following terms are trademarks of other companies:
Intel, Intel logo, Intel Inside logo, and Intel Centrino logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel
Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.
Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both.
Microsoft, Windows, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both.
Java, and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its
affiliates.
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.
Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.
x
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Preface
Organizations of all sizes are faced with the challenge of managing massive volumes of
increasingly valuable data. But storing this data can be costly, and extracting value from the
data is becoming more difficult. IT organizations have limited resources but must stay
responsive to dynamic environments and act quickly to consolidate, simplify, and optimize
their IT infrastructures. The IBM® Storwize® V5000 system provides a smarter solution that
is affordable, easy to use, and self-optimizing, which enables organizations to overcome
these storage challenges.
Storwize V5000 delivers efficient, entry-level configurations that are specifically designed to
meet the needs of small and midsize businesses. Designed to provide organizations with the
ability to consolidate and share data at an affordable price, Storwize V5000 offers advanced
software capabilities that are usually found in more expensive systems.
This IBM Redbooks® publication is intended for pre-sales and post-sales technical support
professionals and storage administrators.
The concepts in this book also relate to the IBM Storwize V3700.
This book was written at a software level of Version 7 Release 1.
Authors
This book was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the IBM
Manchester Lab, UK.
Jon Tate is a Project Manager for IBM System Storage® SAN
Solutions at the International Technical Support Organization,
San Jose Center. Before joining the ITSO in 1999, he worked in
the IBM Technical Support Center, providing Level 2/3 support
for IBM storage products. Jon has over 27 years of experience
in storage software and management, services, and support,
and is an IBM Certified Consulting IT Specialist and an IBM
SAN Certified Specialist. He is also the UK Chairman of the
Storage Networking Industry Association.
Saiprasad Prabhakar Parkar is a senior IT Specialist for IBM
at the ISTL Pune, India. He has worked for IBM for five years
and provides Level 3 support for UNIX, IBM Power Systems,
and storage products. Sai has a total of 10 years of experience
in UNIX, and Power System and Storage. He also is an IBM
Certified Solution Specialist.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013. All rights reserved.
xi
Lee Sirett is a Storage Technical Advisor for the European
Storage Competency Centre (ESCC) in Mainz, Germany.
Before he joined the ESCC, he worked in IBM Technical
Support Services for 10 years and providing support for various
IBM Products, including Power Systems™. Lee has 24 years
experience in the IT Industry. He is IBM Storage Certified and
an IBM Certified XIV® Administrator and Certified XIV
Specialist.
Chris Tapsell is a Presales Storage Technical Specialist for
IBM Systems & Technology Group. Before his current role, in
his 25+ years at IBM, he worked as a CE covering products
such as, typewriters up to AS400 (System i®), as a Support
Specialist for all of the IBM Intel server products (PC Server,
Netfinity®, xSeries®, and System x), PCs and notebooks, and
as a Presales Technical Specialist for System x.
Chris holds a number of IBM Certifications covering System x
and Storage products.
Paulo Tomiyoshi Takeda is a SAN and Storage Disk
Specialist at IBM Brazil. He has over eight years of experience
in the IT arena. He holds a Bachelors degree in Information
Systems from Universidade da Fundacao Educacional de
Barretos and is IBM Certified for IBM DS8000® and IBM
Storwize V7000. His areas of expertise include planning,
configuring, and troubleshooting DS8000, SAN Volume
Controller, and IBM Storwize V7000. He was involved in
storage-related projects such as, capacity growth planning,
SAN consolidation, storage microcode upgrades, and copy
services in the Open Systems environment.
Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Martyn Spink
Djihed Afifi
Karl Martin
Imran Imtiaz
Doug Neil
David Turnbull
Stephen Bailey
IBM Manchester Lab
򐂰 John Fairhurst
򐂰 Paul Marris
򐂰 Paul Merrison
IBM Hursley
򐂰 Mary Connell
IBM STG
xii
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Thanks to the following authors of the previous edition of this book:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Uwe Dubberke
Justin Heather
Andrew Hickey
Imran Imtiaz
Nancy Kinney
Dieter Utesch
Now you can become a published author, too!
Here’s an opportunity to spotlight your skills, grow your career, and become a published
author—all at the same time! Join an ITSO residency project and help write a book in your
area of expertise, while honing your experience by using leading-edge technologies. Your
efforts helps to increase product acceptance and customer satisfaction, as you expand your
network of technical contacts and relationships. Residencies run from two to six weeks in
length, and you can participate either in person or as a remote resident working from your
home base.
Find out more about the residency program, browse the residency index, and apply online at
this website:
http://www.ibm.com/redbooks/residencies.html
Comments welcome
Your comments are important to us!
We want our books to be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments about this book or
other IBM Redbooks publications in one of the following ways:
򐂰 Use the online Contact us review Redbooks form that is found at this website:
http://www.ibm.com/redbooks
򐂰 Send your comments in an email to:
redbooks@us.ibm.com
򐂰 Mail your comments to:
IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization
Dept. HYTD Mail Station P099
2455 South Road
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601-5400
Preface
xiii
Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
򐂰 Find us on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/IBMRedbooks
򐂰 Follow us on Twitter:
http://twitter.com/ibmredbooks
򐂰 Look for us on LinkedIn:
http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=2130806
򐂰 Explore new Redbooks publications, residencies, and workshops with the IBM Redbooks
weekly newsletter:
https://www.redbooks.ibm.com/Redbooks.nsf/subscribe?OpenForm
򐂰 Stay current on recent Redbooks publications with RSS Feeds:
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/rss.html
xiv
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
1
Chapter 1.
Overview of the IBM Storwize
V5000 system
This chapter provides an overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 architecture and includes a
brief explanation of storage virtualization.
This chapter includes the following topics:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
IBM Storwize V5000 overview
IBM Storwize V5000 terminology
IBM Storwize V5000 models
IBM Storwize V5000 hardware
IBM Storwize V5000 terms
IBM Storwize V5000 features
Problem management and support
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013. All rights reserved.
1
1.1 IBM Storwize V5000 overview
The IBM Storwize V5000 solution provides a modular storage system that includes the
capability to virtualize its own internal storage and external SAN-attached storage. The IBM
Storwize V5000 system is a virtualizing Redundant Array of Independent Disk (RAID) entry
and midrange storage system.
IBM Storwize V5000 features the following benefits:
򐂰 Brings enterprise technology to entry and midrange storage
򐂰 Speciality administrators are not required
򐂰 Easy client setup and service
򐂰 Ability to grow the system incrementally as storage capacity and performance needs
change
򐂰 Simple integration into the server environment
The IBM Storwize V5000 addresses the block storage requirements of small and midsize
organizations and consists of one 2U control enclosure and, optionally, up to six 2U
expansion enclosures, which are connected via serial-attached Small Computer Systems
Interface (SCSI SAS) cables that make up one system that is called an I/O Group.
Two I/O Groups can be connected to form a cluster.
The control and expansion enclosures are available in the following form factors and can be
intermixed within an I/O group:
򐂰 12 x 3.5-inch drives in a 2U unit
򐂰 24 x 2.5-inch drives in a 2U unit
Within each enclosure, there are two canisters. Control enclosures contain two node
canisters, and expansion enclosures contain two expansion canisters.
The IBM Storwize V5000 supports up to 168 x 3.5-inch or 336 x 2.5-inch or a combination of
both drive form factors for the internal storage in a two I/O group cluster.
SAS, NL-SAS and solid-state drives (SSDs) types are supported.
The IBM Storwize V5000 is designed to accommodate the most common storage network
technologies to enable easy implementation and management. It can be attached to hosts via
a SAN fabric, an iSCSI infrastructure, or via SAS. Hosts can be SAN or Direct attached.
Important: IBM Storwize V5000 can be direct-attached to a host. For more information
about restrictions, see the IBM System Storage Interoperation Center (SSIC), which is
available at this website:
http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/support/storage/ssic/interoperability.wss
Information also is available at this website:
http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=ssg1S1004233
2
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
The IBM Storwize V5000 is a virtualized storage solution that groups its internal drives into
RAID arrays (called Managed Disks or MDisks). MDisks can also be created by importing
LUNs from external FC SAN-attached storage. These MDisks are then grouped into storage
pools. Volumes are created from these storage pools and provisioned out to hosts. Storage
pools are normally created with MDisks of the same type and capacity of drive. Volumes can
be moved non-disruptively between storage pools with differing performance characteristics.
For example, a volume can be moved between a storage pool that is made up of NL-SAS
drives to a storage pool made up of SAS drives.
The IBM Storwize V5000 system also provides several configuration options that are aimed at
simplifying the implementation process. It also provides configuration presets and automated
wizards called Directed Maintenance Procedures (DMP) to help resolve any events that might
occur.
Included with an IBM Storwize V5000 system is a simple and easy to use graphical user
interface (GUI) that is designed to allow storage to be deployed quickly and efficiently. The
GUI runs on any supported browser. The management GUI contains a series of
preestablished configuration options that are called presets that use commonly used settings
to quickly configure objects on the system. Presets are available for creating volumes and
IBM FlashCopy® mappings and for setting up a RAID configuration.
You can also use the command-line interface (CLI) to set up or control the system.
1.2 IBM Storwize V5000 terminology
The IBM Storwize V5000 system introduced some terminology, which is consistent with the
entire IBM Storwize family and SAN Volume Controller. The terms are defined in Table 1-1.
Table 1-1 IBM Storwize V5000 terminology
IBM Storwize V5000 term
Definition
Battery
Each control enclosure node canister in a IBM Storwize V5000
contains a battery.
Canister
Canisters are hardware units that are subcomponents of a IBM
Storwize V5000 enclosures. Each enclosure contains two
canisters.
Chain
A set of enclosures that is attached to provide redundant
access to the drives that are inside the enclosures. Each control
enclosure has two chains.
Clone
A copy of a volume on a server at a particular point. The
contents of the copy can be customized while the contents of
the original volume are preserved.
Control enclosure
A hardware unit that includes the chassis, node canisters,
drives, and power sources.
Data migration
By using IBM Storwize V5000, you can migrate data from
existing external storage to its internal volumes.
Drive
IBM Storwize V5000 supports a range of hard disk drives
(HDDs) and SSDs.
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
3
4
IBM Storwize V5000 term
Definition
Enclosure
An enclosure is the basic housing unit for the IBM Storwize
V5000. It is the rack-mounted hardware that contains all the
main components of the system: canisters, drives, and power
supplies.
Event
An occurrence that is significant to a task or system. Events can
include completion or failure of an operation, a user action, or
the change in the state of a process.
Expansion canister
A hardware unit that includes the SAS interface hardware that
enables the node hardware to use the drives of the expansion
enclosure.
Expansion enclosure
A hardware unit that includes expansion canisters, drives, and
power supply units.
External storage
MDisks that are SCSI logical units (LUs) presented by storage
systems that are attached to and managed by the clustered
system.
Fibre Channel port
Fibre Channel ports are connections for the hosts to get access
to the IBM Storwize V5000.
Host mapping
The process of controlling which hosts can access specific
volumes within a IBM Storwize V5000.
Internal storage
Array MDisks and drives that are held in enclosures and nodes
that are part of the IBM Storwize V5000.
iSCSI (Internet Small Computer
System Interface)
Internet Protocol (IP)-based storage networking standard for
linking data storage facilities.
Managed disk (MDisk)
A component of a storage pool that is managed by a clustered
system. An MDisk is part of a RAID array of internal storage or
a SCSI LU for external storage. An MDisk is not visible to a host
system on the storage area network.
Node canister
A hardware unit that includes the node hardware, fabric, and
service interfaces, SAS, expansion ports, and battery.
PHY
A single SAS lane. There are four PHYs in each SAS cable.
Power Supply Unit
Each enclosure has two power supply units (PSU).
Quorum disk
A disk that contains a reserved area that is used exclusively for
cluster management. The quorum disk is accessed when it is
necessary to determine which half of the cluster continues to
read and write data.
Serial-Attached SCSI (SAS) ports
SAS ports are connections for the host to get direct attached
access to the IBM Storwize V5000 and expansion enclosure.
Snapshot
An image backup type that consists of a point-in-time view of a
volume.
Storage pool
A collection of storage capacity that provides the capacity
requirements for a volume.
Strand
The SAS connectivity of a set of drives within multiple
enclosures. The enclosures can be control enclosures or
expansion enclosures.
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
IBM Storwize V5000 term
Definition
Thin provisioning or thin
provisioned
The ability to define a storage unit (full system, storage pool, or
volume) with a logical capacity size that is larger than the
physical capacity that is assigned to that storage unit.
Volume
A discrete unit of storage on disk, tape, or other data recording
medium that supports some form of identifier and parameter
list, such as, a volume label or input/output control.
Worldwide port names
Each Fibre Channel port is identified by their physical port
number and worldwide port name (WWPN).
1.3 IBM Storwize V5000 models
The IBM Storwize V5000 platform consists of a number of different models.
More information: For more information about the features, benefits, and specifications of
IBM Storwize V5000 models, see this website:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/storage/disk/storwize_v5000/index.html
The information in this book is accurate at the time of writing. However, as the IBM
Storwize V5000 matures, expect to see new features and enhanced specifications.
The IBM Storwize V5000 models are described in Table 1-2. All models have two node
canisters. C models are control enclosures and E models are expansion enclosures.
Table 1-2 IBM Storwize V5000 models
Model
Cache
Drive slots
2077-12C
16 GB
12 x 3.5-inch
2077-24C
16 GB
24 x 2.5-inch
2077-12E
N/A
12 x 3.5-inch
2077-24E
N/A
24 x 2.5-inch
2078-12C
16 GB
12 x 3.5-inch
2078-24C
16 GB
24 x 2.5-inch
2078-12E
N/A
12 x 3.5-inch
2078-24E
N/A
24 x 2.5-inch
One-Year Warranty
Three-Year Warranty
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
5
Figure 1-1 shows the front view of the 2077/2078-12C and 12E enclosures.
Figure 1-1 IBM Storwize V5000 front view for 2077/2078-12C and 12E enclosures
The drives are positioned in four columns of three horizontal-mounted drive assemblies. The
drive slots are numbered 1 - 12, starting at upper left and going left to right, top to bottom.
Figure 1-2 shows the front view of the 2077/2078-24C and 24E enclosures.
Figure 1-2 IBM Storwize V5000 front view for 2077/2078-24C and 24E enclosure
The drives are positioned in one row of 24 vertically mounted drive assemblies. The drive
slots are numbered 1 - 24, starting from the left. There is a vertical center drive bay molding
between slots 12 and 13.
6
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
1.4 IBM Storwize V5000 hardware
The IBM Storwize V5000 solution is a modular storage system that is built on a common
enclosure (control enclosure and expansion enclosure).
Figure 1-3 shows an overview of the hardware components of the IBM Storwize V5000
solution.
Figure 1-3 IBM Storwize V5000 hardware components
Figure 1-4 shows the controller rear view of IBM Storwize V5000 models 12C and 24C.
Figure 1-4 IBM Storwize V5000 controller rear view of models 12C and 24C
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
7
In Figure 1-4 on page 7, you can see that there are two power supply slots at the bottom of
the enclosure. The power supplies are identical and exchangeable. There are two canister
slots at the top of the chassis.
In Figure 1-5, you can see the rear view of an IBM Storwize V5000 expansion enclosure.
Figure 1-5 IBM Storwize V5000 expansion enclosure rear view - models 12E and 24E
You can see that the only difference between the node enclosure and the expansion
enclosure are the canisters. The canisters of the expansion have only the two SAS ports.
For more information about the expansion enclosure, see 1.4.2, “Expansion enclosure” on
page 9.
1.4.1 Control enclosure
Each IBM Storwize V5000 system has one control enclosure that contains two node
canisters, disk drives, and two power supplies.
Figure 1-6 shows a single node canister.
Figure 1-6 IBM Storwize V5000 node canister
Each node canister contains the following hardware:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Battery
Memory: 8 GB memory
8 Gb Fibre Channel Host interface card
Four 6 Gbps SAS ports
Two 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet ports
Two USB 2.0 ports (one port is used during installation)
System flash
The battery is used in case of power loss. The IBM Storwize V5000 system uses this battery
to power the canister while the cache data is written to the internal system flash. This memory
dump is called a fire hose memory dump. After the system is up again, this data is loaded
back to the cache for destage to the disks.
8
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 1-6 on page 8 also shows the following that are provided by the IBM Storwize V5000
node canister:
򐂰 Two 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet ports, which are used for management. Port 1 (left port)
must be configured. The second port is optional and is used for management. Both ports
can be used for iSCSI traffic. For more information, see Chapter 4, “Host configuration” on
page 153.
򐂰 Two USB ports. One port is used during the initial configuration or when there is a
problem. They are numbered 1 on the left and 2 on the right. For more information about
usage, see Chapter 2, “Initial configuration” on page 27.
򐂰 Four serial attached SCSI (SAS) ports. They are numbered 1 on the left to 4 on the right.
The IBM Storwize V5000 uses ports 1 and 2 for host connectivity and ports 3 and 4 to
connect to the optional expansion enclosures. The IBM Storwize V5000 incorporates two
SAS chains and three expansion enclosures can be connected to each chain.
򐂰 Four Fibre Channel ports, which operate at 2 Gbps, 4 Gbps, or 8 Gbps. The ports are
numbered from left to right starting with 1.
Service port: Do not use the port marked with a wrench. This port is a service port only.
The two nodes act as a single processing unit and form an I/O group that is attached to the
SAN fabric, an iSCSI infrastructure or directly attached to hosts via FC or SAS. The pair of
nodes is responsible for serving I/O to a volume. The two nodes provide a highly available
fault-tolerant controller so that if one node fails, the surviving node automatically takes over.
Nodes are deployed in pairs that are called I/O groups.
One node is designated as the configuration node, but each node in the control enclosure
holds a copy of the control enclosure state information.
The IBM Storwize V5000 supports two I/O groups in a clustered system.
The terms node canister and node are used interchangeably throughout this book.
1.4.2 Expansion enclosure
The optional IBM Storwize V5000 expansion enclosure contains two expansion canisters,
disk drives, and two power supplies.
Figure 1-7 shows an overview of the expansion enclosure.
Figure 1-7 Expansion enclosure of the IBM Storwize V5000
The expansion enclosure power supplies are the same as the control enclosure. There is a
single power lead connector on each power supply unit.
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
9
Figure 1-8 shows the expansion canister ports.
Figure 1-8 Expansion canister ports
As shown in Figure 1-8, each expansion canister provides two SAS interfaces that are used
to connect to the control enclosure and any optional expansion enclosures. The ports are
numbered 1 on the left and 2 on the right. SAS port 1 is the IN port and SAS port 2 is the OUT
port.
Use of the SAS connector 1 is mandatory because the expansion enclosure must be
attached to a control enclosure or another expansion enclosure. SAS connector 2 is optional
because it is used to attach to more expansion enclosures.
Each port includes two LEDs to show the status. The first LED indicates the link status and
the second LED indicates the fault status.
For more information about LED and ports, see this website:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/v5000_ic/index.jsp
1.4.3 Host connectivity
With 1 Gb iSCSI, 8 Gb FC, and 6 Gb SAS host interfaces supported as standard, the IBM
Storwize V5000 is designed to accommodate the most common storage networks. This broad
networking support enables deployment of IBM Storwize V5000 in existing storage network
infrastructures.
The 1 Gb iSCSI and 6 Gb SAS interfaces are built into the node canister hardware and the 8
Gb FC interface is supplied by a host interface card (HIC). As of this writing, the 8 Gb FC HIC
is the only HIC that is available and is supplied as standard.
1.4.4 Disk drive types
IBM Storwize V5000 enclosures support SSD, SAS, and Nearline SAS drive types. Each
drive has two ports (two PHYs) and I/O can be issued down both paths simultaneously.
10
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Table 1-3 shows the IBM Storwize V5000 Disk Drive types that are available at the time of
writing.
Table 1-3 IBM Storwize V5000 Disk Drive types
Drive type
Speed
Size
2.5-inch form factor
Solid-state disk
N/A
200 and 400 GB
2.5-inch form factor
SAS
10,000 rpm
600 GB, 900 GB, and
1.2 TB
2.5-inch form factor
SAS
15,000 rpm
146 and 300 GB
2.5-inch form factor
Nearline SAS
7,200 rpm
1 TB
3.5-inch form factor
SAS
10,000 rpm
900 GB and 1.2 TBa
3.5-inch form factor
SAS
15,000 rpm
300 GBb
3.5-inch form factor
Nearline SAS
7,200 rpm
2 TB, 3 TB, and 4 TB
a. 2.5-inch drive in a 3.5-inch drive carrier
b. 2.5-inch drive in a 3.5-inch drive carrier
1.5 IBM Storwize V5000 terms
In this section, we introduce the terms that are used for the IBM Storwize V5000 throughout
this book.
1.5.1 Hosts
A host system is a server that is connected to IBM Storwize V5000 through a Fibre Channel
connection, an iSCSI connection, or through a SAS connection.
Hosts are defined on IBM Storwize V5000 by identifying their WWPNs for Fibre Channel and
SAS hosts. iSCSI hosts are identified by using their iSCSI names. The iSCSI names can be
iSCSI qualified names (IQNs) or extended unique identifiers (EUIs). For more information,
see Chapter 4, “Host configuration” on page 153.
Hosts can be Fibre Channel attached via an existing Fibre Channel network infrastructure or
direct attached, iSCSI attached via an existing IP network, or directly attached via SAS. A
significant benefit of having direct attachment is that you can attach the host directly to the
IBM Storwize V5000 without the need for an FC or IP network.
1.5.2 Node canister
A node canister provides host interfaces, management interfaces, and SAS interfaces to the
control enclosure. A node canister has the cache memory, the internal storage to store
software and logs, and the processing power to run the IBM Storwize V5000 virtualizing and
management software. A clustered system consists of a one or two node pairs or I/O groups.
One of the nodes within the system is known as the configuration node that manages
configuration activity for the clustered system. If this node fails, the system nominates the
other node to become the configuration node.
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
11
1.5.3 I/O groups
Within IBM Storwize V5000, there are one or two pairs of node canisters, which are known as
I/O groups. The IBM Storwize V5000 supports four node canisters in the clustered system,
which provides two I/O groups.
When a host server performs I/O to one of its volumes, all the I/Os for a specific volume are
directed to the I/O group. Also, under normal conditions, the I/Os for that specific volume are
always processed by the same node within the I/O group.
Both nodes of the I/O group act as preferred nodes for their own specific subset of the total
number of volumes that the I/O group presents to the host servers (a maximum of 2048
volumes per hosts). However, both nodes also act as a failover node for its partner node
within the I/O group. Therefore, a node takes over the I/O workload from its partner node (if
required) without affecting the server’s application.
In a IBM Storwize V5000 environment (which uses active-active architecture), the I/O
handling for a volume can be managed by both nodes of the I/O group. Therefore, servers
that are connected through Fibre Channel connectors must use multipath device drivers to
handle this capability.
The IBM Storwize V5000 I/O groups are connected to the SAN so that all application servers
that access volumes from the I/O group have access to them. Up to 1024 host server objects
can be defined to one I/O group or 2048 in a two I/O group system.
Important: The active/active architecture provides availability to process I/Os for both
controller nodes and allows the application to continue running smoothly, even if the server
has only one access route or path to the storage controller. This type of architecture
eliminates the path/LUN thrashing that is typical of an active/passive architecture.
1.5.4 Clustered system
A clustered system consists of one or two pairs of node canisters or I/O groups. All
configuration, monitoring, and service tasks are performed at the system level. The
configuration settings are replicated across all node canisters in the clustered system. To
facilitate these tasks, one or two management IP addresses are set for the clustered system.
By using this configuration, you can manage the clustered system as a single entity.
There is a process to back up the system configuration data on to disk so that the clustered
system can be restored in the event of a disaster. This method does not back up application
data; only IBM Storwize V5000 system configuration information is backed up.
System configuration backup: After the system configuration is backed up, save the
backup data on your hard disk (or at the least outside of the SAN). If you are unable to
access the IBM Storwize V5000, you do not have access to the backup data if it is on the
SAN. Perform this configuration backup after each configuration change to be safe.
The system can be configured by using the IBM Storwize V5000 management software
(GUI), CLI, or the USB key.
12
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
1.5.5 RAID
The IBM Storwize V5000 contains a number of internal drives, but these drives cannot be
directly added to storage pools. The drives must be included in a RAID array to provide
protection against the failure of individual drives.
These drives are referred to as members of the array. Each array has a RAID level. RAID
levels provide different degrees of redundancy and performance and have different
restrictions regarding the number of members in the array.
IBM Storwize V5000 supports hot spare drives. When an array member drive fails, the system
automatically replaces the failed member with a hot spare drive and rebuilds the array to
restore its redundancy. Candidate and spare drives can be manually exchanged with array
members.
Each array has a set of goals that describe the required location and performance of each
array. A sequence of drive failures and hot spare takeovers can leave an array unbalanced,
that is, with members that do not match these goals. The system automatically rebalances
such arrays when the appropriate drives are available.
The following RAID levels are available:
򐂰 RAID 0 (striping, no redundancy)
RAID 0 arrays stripe data across the drives. The system supports RAID 0 arrays with one
member, which is similar to traditional JBOD attach. RAID 0 arrays have no redundancy,
so they do not support hot spare takeover or immediate exchange. A RAID 0 array can be
formed by one to eight drives.
򐂰 RAID 1 (mirroring between two drives, which is implemented as RAID 10 with two drives)
RAID 1 arrays stripe data over mirrored pairs of drives. A RAID 1 array mirrored pair is
rebuilt independently. A RAID 1 array can be formed by two drives only.
򐂰 RAID 5 (striping, can survive one drive fault, with parity)
RAID 5 arrays stripe data over the member drives with one parity strip on every stripe.
RAID 5 arrays have single redundancy. The parity algorithm means that an array can
tolerate no more than one member drive failure. A RAID 5 array can be formed by 3 - 16
drives.
򐂰 RAID 6 (striping, can survive two drive faults, with parity)
RAID 6 arrays stripe data over the member drives with two parity stripes (which is known
as the P-parity and the Q-parity) on every stripe. The two parity strips are calculated by
using different algorithms, which give the array double redundancy. A RAID 6 array can be
formed by 5 - 16 drives.
򐂰 RAID 10 (RAID 0 on top of RAID 1)
RAID 10 arrays have single redundancy. Although they can tolerate one failure from every
mirrored pair, they cannot tolerate two-disk failures. One member out of every pair can be
rebuilding or missing at the same time. A RAID 10 array can be formed by 2 - 16 drives.
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
13
1.5.6 Managed disks
An MDisk refers to the unit of storage that IBM Storwize V5000 virtualizes. This unit can be a
logical volume on an external storage array that is presented to the IBM Storwize V5000 or a
RAID array that consists of internal drives. The IBM Storwize V5000 then can allocate these
MDisks into storage pools.
An MDisk is invisible to a host system on the storage area network because it is internal to the
IBM Storwize V5000 system.
An MDisk features the following modes:
򐂰 Array
Array mode MDisks are constructed from internal drives by using the RAID functionality.
Array MDisks are always associated with storage pools.
򐂰 Unmanaged
LUNs presented by external storage systems to IBM Storwize V5000 are discovered as
unmanaged MDisks. The MDisk is not a member of any storage pools, which means it is
not being used by the IBM Storwize V5000 storage system.
򐂰 Managed
Managed MDisks are LUNs presented by external storage systems to an IBM Storwize
V5000 that are assigned to a storage pool and provide extents so that volumes can use it.
Any data that might be on these LUNs when they are added is lost.
򐂰 Image
Image MDisks are LUNs that are presented by external storage systems to an IBM
Storwize V5000 and assigned directly to a volume with a one-to-one mapping of extents
between the MDisk and the volume. For more information, see Chapter 6, “Storage
migration wizard” on page 237.
1.5.7 Quorum disks
A quorum disk is an MDisk that contains a reserved area for use exclusively by the system. In
the IBM Storwize V5000, internal drives can be considered as quorum candidates. The
clustered system uses quorum disks to break a tie when exactly half the nodes in the system
remain after a SAN failure.
The clustered system automatically forms the quorum disk by taking a small amount of space
from an MDisk. It allocates space from up to three different MDisks for redundancy, although
only one quorum disk is active.
To avoid the possibility of losing all of the quorum disks because of a failure of a single
storage system if the environment has multiple storage systems, you should allocate the
quorum disk on different storage systems. It is possible to manage the quorum disks by using
the CLI.
1.5.8 Storage pools
A storage pool is a collection of MDisks (up to 128) that are grouped to provide capacity for
volumes. All MDisks in the pool are split into extents of the same size. Volumes are then
allocated out of the storage pool and are mapped to a host system.
14
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
MDisks can be added to a storage pool at any time to increase the capacity of the pool.
MDisks can belong in only one storage pool. For more information, see Chapter 7, “Storage
pools” on page 295.
Each MDisk in the storage pool is divided into a number of extents. The size of the extent is
selected by the administrator when the storage pool is created and cannot be changed later.
The size of the extent ranges from 16 MB - 8 GB.
Default extent size: The GUI of IBM Storwize V5000 has a default extent size value of 1
GB when you define a new storage pool. This is a change in the IBM Storwize code v7.1.
The GUI cannot change the extent size. Therefore, if you want to create storage pools with
a different extent size, this must be done via the CLI by using the mkmdiskgrp and mkarray
commands.
The extent size directly affects the maximum volume size and storage capacity of the
clustered system.
A system can manage 2^22 (4,194,304) extents. For example, with a 16 MB extent size, the
system can manage up to 16 MB x 4,194,304 = 64 TB of storage.
The effect of extent size on the maximum volume and cluster size is shown in Table 1-4.
Table 1-4 Maximum volume and cluster capacity by extent size
Extent size
Maximum volume capacity for
normal volumes (GB)
Maximum storage capacity of
cluster
16
2048 (2 TB)
64 TB
32
4096 (4 TB)
128 TB
64
8192 (8 TB)
256 TB
128
16384 (16 TB)
512 TB
256
32768 (32 TB)
1 PB
512
65536 (64 TB)
2 PB
1024
131072 (128 TB)
4 PB
2048
262144 (256 TB)
8 PB
4096
262144 (256 TB)
16 PB
8192
262144 (256 TB)
32 PB
Use the same extent size for all storage pools in a clustered system, which is a prerequisite if
you want to migrate a volume between two storage pools. If the storage pool extent sizes are
not the same, you must use volume mirroring to copy volumes between storage pools, as
described in Chapter 7, “Storage pools” on page 295.
A storage pool can have a threshold warning set that automatically issues a warning alert
when the used capacity of the storage pool exceeds the set limit.
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
15
Single-tiered storage pool
MDisks that are used in a single-tiered storage pool should have the following characteristics
to prevent performance and other problems:
򐂰 They should have the same hardware characteristics, for example, the same RAID type,
RAID array size, disk type, and disk revolutions per minute (RPMs).
򐂰 The disk subsystems providing the MDisks must have similar characteristics, for example,
maximum input/output operations per second (IOPS), response time, cache, and
throughput.
򐂰 Use MDisks of the same size, and ensure that the MDisks provide the same number of
extents. If this configuration is not feasible, you must check the distribution of the volumes’
extents in that storage pool.
Multitiered storage pool
A multitiered storage pool has a mix of MDisks with more than one type of disk tier attribute,
for example, a storage pool that contains a mix of generic_hdd AND generic_ssd MDisks.
A multitiered storage pool contains MDisks with different characteristics unlike the
single-tiered storage pool. However, each tier should have MDisks of the same size and
MDisks that provide the same number of extents.
A multitiered storage pool is used to enable automatic migration of extents between disk tiers
by using the IBM Storwize V5000 Easy Tier® function, as described in Chapter 9, “Easy Tier”
on page 411.
1.5.9 Volumes
A volume is a logical disk that is presented to a host system by the clustered system. In our
virtualized environment, the host system has a volume that is mapped to it by IBM Storwize
V5000. IBM Storwize V5000 translates this volume into a number of extents, which are
allocated across MDisks. The advantage with storage virtualization is that the host is
decoupled from the underlying storage, so the virtualization appliance can move around the
extents without impacting the host system.
The host system cannot directly access the underlying MDisks in the same manner as it can
access RAID arrays in a traditional storage environment.
The following types of volumes are available:
򐂰 Striped
A striped volume is allocated one extent in turn from each MDisk in the storage pool. This
process continues until the space that is required for the volume is satisfied.
It also is possible to supply a list of MDisks to use.
16
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 1-9 shows how a striped volume is allocated, assuming 10 extents are required.
Figure 1-9 Striped volume
򐂰 Sequential
A sequential volume is a volume in which the extents are allocated one after the other from
one MDisk to the next MDisk, as shown in Figure 1-10.
Figure 1-10 Sequential volume
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
17
򐂰 Image mode
Image mode volumes are special volumes that have a direct relationship with one MDisk.
They are used to migrate existing data into and out of the clustered system to or from
external FC SAN-attached storage.
When the image mode volume is created, a direct mapping is made between extents that
are on the MDisk and the extents that are on the volume. The logical block address (LBA)
x on the MDisk is the same as the LBA x on the volume, which ensures that the data on
the MDisk is preserved as it is brought into the clustered system, as shown in Figure 1-11.
Figure 1-11 Image mode volume
Some virtualization functions are not available for image mode volumes, so it is often useful to
migrate the volume into a new storage pool. After it is migrated, the MDisk becomes a
managed MDisk.
If you want to migrate data from an existing storage subsystem, use the Storage Migration
wizard, which guides you through the process.
For more information, see Chapter 6, “Storage migration wizard” on page 237.
If you add an MDisk that contains data to a storage pool, any data on the MDisk is lost. If you
are presenting externally virtualized LUNs that contain data to a IBM Storwize V5000, import
them as image mode volumes to ensure data integrity or use the migration wizard.
18
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
1.5.10 iSCSI
iSCSI is an alternative method of attaching hosts to the IBM Storwize V5000. The iSCSI
function is a software function that is provided by the IBM Storwize V5000 code, not
hardware.
In the simplest terms, iSCSI allows the transport of SCSI commands and data over an
Internet Protocol network that is based on IP routers and Ethernet switches. iSCSI is a
block-level protocol that encapsulates SCSI commands into TCP/IP packets and uses an
existing IP network instead of requiring FC HBAs and a SAN fabric infrastructure.
Concepts of names and addresses are carefully separated in iSCSI.
An iSCSI name is a location-independent, permanent identifier for an iSCSI node. An iSCSI
node has one iSCSI name, which stays constant for the life of the node. The terms initiator
name and target name also refer to an iSCSI name.
An iSCSI address specifies the iSCSI name of an iSCSI node and a location of that node. The
address consists of a host name or IP address, a TCP port number (for the target), and the
iSCSI name of the node. An iSCSI node can have any number of addresses, which can
change at any time, particularly if they are assigned by way of Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP). An IBM Storwize V5000 node represents an iSCSI node and provides
statically allocated IP addresses.
Each iSCSI node, that is, an initiator or target, has a unique IQN, which can have a size of up
to 255 bytes. The IQN is formed according to the rules that were adopted for Internet nodes.
The IQNs can be abbreviated by using a descriptive name, which is known as an alias. An
alias can be assigned to an initiator or a target.
For more information about configuring iSCSI, see Chapter 4, “Host configuration” on
page 153.
1.5.11 SAS
The SAS standard is an alternative method of attaching hosts to the IBM Storwize V5000.
The IBM Storwize V5000 supports direct SAS host attachment providing easy-to-use,
affordable storage needs. Each SAS port device has a worldwide unique 64-bit SAS address.
1.6 IBM Storwize V5000 features
In this section, we describe the features of the IBM Storwize V5000.
1.6.1 Mirrored volumes
IBM Storwize V5000 provides a function that is called storage volume mirroring, which
enables a volume to have two physical copies. Each volume copy can belong to a different
storage pool, be generic or a thin-provisioned, and be on different physical storage systems,
which provides a high-availability solution.
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
19
When a host system issues a write to a mirrored volume, IBM Storwize V5000 writes the data
to both copies. When a host system issues a read to a mirrored volume, IBM Storwize V5000
requests it from the primary copy. If one of the mirrored volume copies is temporarily
unavailable, the IBM Storwize V5000 automatically uses the alternative copy without any
outage for the host system. When the mirrored volume copy is repaired, IBM Storwize V5000
resynchronizes the data.
A mirrored volume can be converted into a non-mirrored volume by deleting one copy or by
splitting away one copy to create a non-mirrored volume.
The mirrored volume copy can be any type: image, striped, sequential, and thin-provisioned
or not. The two copies can be different volume types.
The use of mirrored volumes also can assist with migrating volumes between storage pools
that have different extent sizes. Mirrored volumes also can provide a mechanism to migrate
fully allocated volumes to thin-provisioned volumes without any host outages.
The Volume Mirroring feature is included as part of the base software and no license is
required.
1.6.2 Thin provisioning
Volumes can be configured to be thin-provisioned or fully allocated. Concerning application
reads and writes, a thin-provisioned volume behaves as though they were fully allocated.
When a volume is created, the user specifies two capacities: the real capacity of the volume
and its virtual capacity.
The real capacity determines the quantity of MDisk extents that are allocated for the volume.
The virtual capacity is the capacity of the volume that is reported to IBM Storwize V5000 and
to the host servers.
The real capacity is used to store the user data and the metadata for the thin-provisioned
volume. The real capacity can be specified as an absolute value or a percentage of the virtual
capacity.
The thin provisioning feature can be used on its own to create over-allocated volumes, or it
can be used with FlashCopy. Thin-provisioned volumes can be used with the mirrored volume
feature as well.
A thin-provisioned volume can be configured to autoexpand, which causes the IBM Storwize
V5000 to automatically expand the real capacity of a thin-provisioned volume as its real
capacity is used. This parameter prevents the volume from going offline. Autoexpand
attempts to maintain a fixed amount of unused real capacity on the volume. This amount is
known as the contingency capacity. The default setting is 2%.
The contingency capacity initially is set to the real capacity that is assigned when the volume
is created. If the user modifies the real capacity, the contingency capacity is reset to be the
difference between the used capacity and real capacity.
A volume that is created with a zero contingency capacity goes offline when it must expand. A
volume with a non-zero contingency capacity stays online until it is used up.
Autoexpand does not cause the real capacity to grow much beyond the virtual capacity. The
real capacity can be manually expanded to more than the maximum that is required by the
current virtual capacity and the contingency capacity is recalculated.
20
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
To support the autoexpansion of thin-provisioned volumes, the storage pools from which they
are allocated have a configurable warning capacity. When the used free capacity of the group
exceeds the warning capacity, a warning is logged. For example, if a warning of 80% is
specified, the warning is logged when 20% of the free capacity remains.
A thin-provisioned volume can be converted to a fully allocated volume by using volume
mirroring (and vice versa).
The Thin Provisioning feature is included as part of the base software and no license is
required.
1.6.3 Easy Tier
IBM Easy Tier provides a mechanism to seamlessly migrate hot spots to the most appropriate
tier within the IBM Storwize V5000 solution. This migration can be to different tiers of internal
drive within IBM Storwize V5000 or to external storage systems that are virtualized by IBM
Storwize V5000.
The Easy Tier function can be turned on or off at the storage pool and volume level.
It is possible to demonstrate the potential benefit of Easy Tier in your environment before
installing SSDs by using the IBM Storage Advisor Tool.
For more information about Easy Tier, see Chapter 9, “Easy Tier” on page 411.
The IBM Easy Tier feature is licensed per enclosure.
1.6.4 Storage Migration
By using the IBM Storwize V5000 Storage Migration feature, you can easily move data from
other Fibre Channel attached external storage to the internal capacity of the IBM Storwize
V5000. Migrating data from other storage to the IBM Storwize V5000 storage system provides
benefit from more functionality, such as, the easy-to-use GUI, internal virtualization, thin
provisioning, and Copy Services.
The Storage Migration feature is included as part of the base software and no license is
required.
1.6.5 FlashCopy
FlashCopy copies a source volume on to a target volume. The original contents of the target
volume is lost. After the copy operation starts, the target volume has the contents of the
source volume as it existed at a single point in time. Although the copy operation takes time,
the resulting data at the target appears as though the copy was made instantaneously.
FlashCopy is sometimes described as an instance of a time-zero (T0) copy or a point-in-time
(PiT) copy technology.
FlashCopy can be performed on multiple source and target volumes. FlashCopy permits the
management operations to be coordinated so that a common single point-in-time is chosen
for copying target volumes from their respective source volumes.
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
21
IBM Storwize V5000 also permits multiple target volumes to be FlashCopied from the same
source volume. This capability can be used to create images from separate points in time for
the source volume, and to create multiple images from a source volume at a common point in
time. Source and target volumes can be thin-provisioned volumes.
Reverse FlashCopy enables target volumes to become restore points for the source volume
without breaking the FlashCopy relationship and without waiting for the original copy
operation to complete. IBM Storwize V5000 supports multiple targets and thus multiple
rollback points.
The FlashCopy feature is licensed per enclosure.
For more information about FlashCopy copy services, see Chapter 10, “Copy services” on
page 449.
1.6.6 Remote Copy
The Remote Copy can be maintained in one of two modes: synchronous or asynchronous.
With the IBM Storwize V5000, Metro Mirror and Global Mirror are the IBM branded terms for
the functions that are synchronous Remote Copy and asynchronous Remote Copy.
By using the Metro Mirror and Global Mirror Copy Services features, you can set up a
relationship between two volumes so that updates that are made by an application to one
volume are mirrored on the other volume. The volumes can be in the same system or on two
different systems.
For both Metro Mirror and Global Mirror copy types, one volume is designated as the primary
and the other volume is designated as the secondary. Host applications write data to the
primary volume and updates to the primary volume are copied to the secondary volume.
Normally, host applications do not perform I/O operations to the secondary volume.
The Metro Mirror feature provides a synchronous copy process. When a host writes to the
primary volume, it does not receive confirmation of I/O completion until the write operation
completes for the copy on the primary and secondary volumes. This ensures that the
secondary volume is always up-to-date with the primary volume if a failover operation must be
performed.
The Global Mirror feature provides an asynchronous copy process. When a host writes to the
primary volume, confirmation of I/O completion is received before the write operation
completes for the copy on the secondary volume. If a failover operation is performed, the
application must recover and apply any updates that were not committed to the secondary
volume. If I/O operations on the primary volume are paused for a brief time, the secondary
volume can become an exact match of the primary volume.
Global Mirror can operate with or without cycling. When it is operating without cycling, write
operations are applied to the secondary volume as soon as possible after they are applied to
the primary volume. The secondary volume is less than one second behind the primary
volume, which minimizes the amount of data that must be recovered in the event of a failover.
However, this requires that a high-bandwidth link is provisioned between the two sites.
22
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
When Global Mirror operates with cycling mode, changes are tracked and where needed
copied to intermediate change volumes. Changes are transmitted to the secondary site
periodically. The secondary volumes are much further behind the primary volume, and more
data must be recovered in the event of a failover. Because the data transfer can be smoothed
over a longer time period, however, lower bandwidth is required to provide an effective
solution.
For more information about the IBM Storwize V5000 Copy Services, see Chapter 10, “Copy
services” on page 449).
The IBM Remote Copy feature is licensed per enclosure.
Copy Services configuration limits
For the most up-to-date list of these limits, see the following website:
http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=ssg1S1003702&myns=s028&mynp=familyin
d5402112&mync=E
1.6.7 External virtualization
By using this feature, you can consolidate FC SAN-attached disk controllers from various
vendors into pools of storage. In this way, the storage administrator can manage and
provision storage to applications from a single user interface and use a common set of
advanced functions across all the storage systems under the control of the IBM Storwize
V5000.
The External Virtualization feature is licensed per disk enclosure.
1.7 Problem management and support
In this section, we introduce problem management and support topics.
1.7.1 IBM Assist On-site and remote service
The IBM Assist On-site tool is a remote desktop-sharing solution that is offered through the
IBM website. With it, the IBM service representative can remotely view your system to
troubleshoot a problem.
You can maintain a chat session with the IBM service representative so that you can monitor
this activity and understand how to fix the problem yourself or allow the representative to fix it
for you.
To use the IBM Assist On-site tool, the management PC that is used to manage the IBM
Storwize V5000 must have access the Internet. For more information about this tool, see this
website:
http://www.ibm.com/support/assistonsite/
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
23
When you access the website, you sign in and enter a code that the IBM service
representative provides to you. This code is unique to each IBM Assist On-site session. A
plug-in is downloaded on to your PC to connect you and your IBM service representative to
the remote service session. The IBM Assist On-site contains several layers of security to
protect your applications and your computers.
You also can use security features to restrict access by the IBM service representative.
Your IBM service representative can provide you with more information about the use of the
tool, if required.
1.7.2 Event notifications
IBM Storwize V5000 can use Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) traps, syslog
messages, and a Call Home email to notify you and the IBM Support Center when significant
events are detected. Any combination of these notification methods can be used
simultaneously.
Each event that IBM Storwize V5000 detects is sent to a different recipient. You can configure
IBM Storwize V5000 to send each type of notification to specific recipients or only the alerts
that are important to the system.
1.7.3 SNMP traps
SNMP is a standard protocol for managing networks and exchanging messages. IBM
Storwize V5000 can send SNMP messages that notify personnel about an event. You can use
an SNMP manager to view the SNMP messages that IBM Storwize V5000 sends. You can
use the management GUI or the IBM Storwize V5000 CLI to configure and modify your
SNMP settings.
You can use the Management Information Base (MIB) file for SNMP to configure a network
management program to receive SNMP messages that are sent by the IBM Storwize V5000.
This file can be used with SNMP messages from all versions of IBM Storwize V5000
software.
1.7.4 Syslog messages
The syslog protocol is a standard protocol for forwarding log messages from a sender to a
receiver on an IP network. The IP network can be IPv4 or IPv6. IBM Storwize V5000 can
send syslog messages that notify personnel about an event. IBM Storwize V5000 can
transmit syslog messages in expanded or concise format. You can use a syslog manager to
view the syslog messages that IBM Storwize V5000 sends. IBM Storwize V5000 uses the
User Datagram Protocol (UDP) to transmit the syslog message. You can use the
management GUI or the CLI to configure and modify your syslog settings.
1.7.5 Call Home email
The Call Home feature transmits operational and error-related data to you and IBM through a
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) server connection in the form of an event notification
email. When configured, this function alerts IBM service personnel about hardware failures
and potentially serious configuration or environmental issues. You can use the call home
function if you have a maintenance contract with IBM or if the IBM Storwize V5000 is within
the warranty period.
24
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
To send email, you must configure at least one SMTP server. You can specify as many as five
other SMTP servers for backup purposes. The SMTP server must accept the relaying of email
from the IBM Storwize V5000 clustered system IP address. You can then use the
management GUI or the CLI to configure the email settings, including contact information and
email recipients. Set the reply address to a valid email address. Send a test email to check
that all connections and infrastructure are set up correctly. You can disable the Call Home
function at any time by using the management GUI or the CLI.
1.8 More information resources
This section describes resources that are available for more information.
1.8.1 Useful IBM Storwize V5000 websites
For more information about Storwize V5000, see the following websites:
򐂰 The IBM Storwize V5000 home page:
http://www.ibm.com/storage/support/storwize/v5000
򐂰 IBM Storwize V5000 Online Information Center:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/v5000_ic/index.jsp
Chapter 1. Overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 system
25
1.8.2 IBM Storwize learning videos on YouTube
Videos are available on YouTube that describe the IBM Storwize GUI and are available at the
URLs that are shown in Table 1-5.
Table 1-5 Videos available on YouTube
Video description
URL
IBM Storwize V7000 Storage Virtualization
Terminology Overview
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2rzt3m2gP0
IBM Storwize V7000 Interface tour
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPbNRs9HacQ
IBM Storwize V7000 Volume management
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXeKqH8Sd9o
IBM Storwize V7000 Migration
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXxnUN6dk74
IBM Storwize V7000 Introduction to FlashCopy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXWgGWjBzG4
VMware data protection with Storwize V7000
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vecOap-qwbA
IBM SAN Volume Controller and Storwize V7000
Performance Panel Sped-up! (HD)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7noC71tLkWs
IBM Storwize V3700 Hardware Installation
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VuEfmfXihrs
IBM Storwize V3700 - Effortless Management
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfGbKWcCsR4
Introducing IBM Storwize V3700
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AePPKiXE4xM
IBM Storwize V3700 Initial Setup
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oj9uhTYe6gg
Storwize V7000 Installation
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCCFxM5ZMV4
These videos are applicable to IBM Storwize V5000 because the GUI interface on the IBM
Storwize V3700 and IBM Storwize V7000 is similar. The IBM Storwize V3700 hardware also
is similar and the videos provide a good overview of the functions and features.
26
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
2
Chapter 2.
Initial configuration
This chapter provides a description of the initial configuration steps for the IBM Storwize
V5000.
This chapter includes the following topics:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Planning for IBM Storwize V5000 installation
First time setup
Initial configuration steps
Call Home, email event alert, and inventory settings
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013. All rights reserved.
27
2.1 Hardware installation planning
Proper planning before the actual physical installation of the hardware is required. The
following checklist of requirements can be used to plan your installation:
 Install the hardware as described in IBM Storwize V5000 Quick Installation Guide Version
6.4.1, GC27-4219
 For more information about planning the IBM Storwize V5000 environment, see this
website:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/V5000_ic/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.
storwize.V5000.641.doc%2Fsvc_webplanning_21pb8b.html
 An appropriate 19-inch rack with 2 - 14 U of space should be available, depending on the
number of enclosures to install. Each enclosure measures 2 U and a single control
enclosure with up to six expansion enclosures constitutes an IBM Storwize V5000 system.
 There should be redundant power outlets in the rack for each of the two power cords that
are included per enclosure. In all, 2 - 14 outlets are required, depending on the number of
enclosures to install. The power cords conform to the IEC320 C13/C14 standards.
 A minimum of four Fibre Channel ports that are attached to the fabric are required.
However, it is a best practice to use eight 2-Gbps, 4-Gbps, or 8-Gbps Fibre Channel ports.
Fibre Channel ports: Fibre Channel (FC) ports are required only if you are using FC
hosts. You can use the Storwize V5000 with Ethernet-only cabling for iSCSI hosts or
use serial-attached SCSI (SAS) cabling for direct attach hosts.
 You should have eight 2-Gbps, 4-Gbps, or 8-Gbps compatible Fibre Channel cable drops.
 Up to four hosts can be directly connected by using SAS ports 1 and 2 on each node
canister, with SFF-8644 mini SAS HD cabling.
 You should have a minimum of two Ethernet ports on the LAN, with four preferred for more
configuration access redundancy or iSCSI host access.
 You should have a minimum of two Ethernet cable drops, with four preferred for more
configuration access redundancy or iSCSI host access. Ethernet port one on each node
canister must be connected to the LAN, with port two as optional.
Ports: Port 1 on each node canister must be connected to the same physical LAN or be
configured in the same VLAN and be on the same subnet or set of subnets.
 Verify that the default IP addresses that are configured on Ethernet port 1 on each of the
node canisters (192.168.70.121 on node one and 192.168.70.122 on node 2) do not
conflict with existing IP addresses on the LAN. The default mask that is used with these IP
addresses is 255.255.255.0 and the default gateway address that is used is 192.168.70.1.
 You should have a minimum of three IPv4 or IPv6 IP addresses for system configuration.
One is for the clustered system and is what the administrator uses for management, and
one for each node canister for service access as needed.
IP addresses: A fourth IP address should be used for backup configuration access.
This other IP address allows a second system IP address to be configured on port 2 of
either node canister, which the storage administrator can also use for management of
the IBM Storwize V5000 system.
28
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
 A minimum of one and up to four IPv4 or IPv6 addresses are needed if iSCSI attached
hosts access volumes from the IBM Storwize V5000.
 A single 1-meter, 3-meter, or 6-meter SAS cable per expansion enclosure is required. The
length of the cables depends on the physical rack location of the expansion relative to the
control enclosure or other expansion enclosures. Locate the control enclosure so that up
to six enclosures can be located, as shown in Figure 2-1 on page 30. The IBM Storwize
V5000 supports two external SAS chains by using SAS ports 3 and 4 on the control
enclosure node canisters.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
29
Figure 2-1 Connecting the SAS expansion cables example
The following connections must be made:
– Connect SAS port 4 of the left node canister in the control enclosure to SAS port 1 of
the left expansion canisters in the first expansion enclosure.
– Connect SAS port 4 of the right node canister in the control enclosure to SAS port 1 of
the right expansion canisters in the first expansion enclosure.
30
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
– Connect SAS port 3 of the left node canister in the control enclosure to SAS port 1 of
the left expansion canister in the second enclosure (above the control enclosure, as
shown in Figure 2-1 on page 30).
– Connect SAS port 3 of the right node canister in the control enclosure to SAS port 1 of
the right expansion canister in the second enclosure (above the control enclosure, as
shown in Figure 2-1 on page 30).
Continue to add expansion controllers alternately on the two different SAS chains that
originate at ports 3 and 4 on the control enclosure node canisters. No expansion enclosure
should be connected to both SAS chains.
Disk drives: The disk drives that are included with the control enclosure (model 2077-12C
or 2077-24C) are part of the single SAS chain. The expansion enclosures should be
connected to the SAS chain as shown in Figure 2-1 on page 30 so that they can use the
full bandwidth of the system.
2.2 SAN configuration planning
The recommended SAN configuration is composed of a minimum of two fabrics that
encompass all host ports and any ports on external storage systems that are to be virtualized
by IBM Storwize V5000. The IBM Storwize V5000 ports are evenly split between the two
fabrics to provide redundancy if one of the fabrics goes offline (planned or unplanned).
Virtualized Storage: External storage systems that are to be virtualized are used for
migration purposes only.
Zoning must be implemented after the IBM Storwize V5000, hosts, and optional external
storage systems are connected to the SAN fabrics.
To enable the node canisters to communicate with each other in band, create a zone with only
the IBM Storwize V5000 WWPNs (two from each node canister) on each of the two fabrics. If
an external storage system is to be virtualized, create a zone in each fabric with the IBM
Storwize V5000 WWPNs (two from each node canister) with up to a maximum of eight
WWPNs from the external storage system. Assuming every host has a Fibre Channel
connection to each fabric, create a zone with the host WWPN and one WWPN from each
node canister in the IBM Storwize V5000 system in each fabric. The critical point is that there
should only ever be one initiator (host HBA) in any zone. For load balancing between the
node ports on the IBM Storwize V5000, alternate the host Fibre Channel ports between the
ports of the Storwize V5000.
There should be a maximum of eight paths through the SAN from each host to the IBM
Storwize V5000. Hosts where this number is exceeded are not supported. The restriction is
there to limit the number of paths that the multi-pathing driver must resolve. A host with only
two HBAs should not exceed this limit with proper zoning in a dual fabric SAN.
Maximum ports or WWPNs: IBM Storwize V5000 supports a maximum of 16 ports or
WWPNs from a virtualized external storage system.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
31
Figure 2-2 shows how to cable devices to the SAN. Refer to this example as the zoning is
described.
Figure 2-2 SAN cabling and zoning diagram
Create a host/IBM Storwize V5000 zone for each server that volumes are mapped to and
from the clustered system, as shown in the following examples in Figure 2-2:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Zone Host 1 port 1 (HBA 1) with both node canister ports 1
Zone Host 1 port 2 (HBA 2) with both node canister ports 2
Zone Host 2 port 1 (HBA 1) with both node canister ports 3
Zone Host 2 port 2 (HBA 2) with both node canister ports 4
Similar zones should be created for all other hosts with volumes on the Storwize V5000.
Verify interoperability with which the IBM Storwize V5000 connects to SAN switches or
directors by following the requirements that are provided at this website:
http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=ssg1S1004111
Switches or directors are at the firmware levels that are supported by the IBM Storwize
V5000.
Important: IBM Storwize V5000 port login maximum that is listed in the restriction
document must not be exceeded. The document is available at this website:
http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=ssg1S1004233
Connectivity issues: If you have any connectivity issues between IBM Storwize V5000
ports and Brocade SAN Switches or Directors at 8 Gbps, see this website for the correct
setting of the fillword port config parameter in the Brocade operating system:
http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=591&uid=ssg1S1003699
32
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
2.3 FC Direct-attach planning
IBM Storwize V5000 can be used with a direct-attach Fibre Channel host configuration. The
recommended configuration for direct attachment is to have at least one Fibre Channel cable
from the host that is connected to each node of the IBM Storwize V5000 to provide
redundancy if one of the nodes goes offline, as shown in Figure 2-3.
Figure 2-3 FC Direct-attach host configuration
Verify direct attach interoperability with the IBM Storwize V5000 and the supported server
operating systems by following the requirements that are provided at this website:
http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/support/storage/ssic/interoperability.wss
2.4 SAS Direct-attach planning
There are two SAS ports per node canister that are available for direct host attach on an IBM
Storwize V5000. These are ports 1 and 2. Do not use ports 3 and 4 because they are
reserved for expansion enclosure connectivity only. Refer to Figure 2-4 on page 34 to
correctly identify ports 1 and 2. Also, note the keyway in the top of the SAS connector.
Inserting cables: It is possible to insert the cables upside down despite the keyway.
Ensure that the blue tag on the SAS connector is underneath when you are inserting the
cables.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
33
Figure 2-4 SAS port identification
Although it is possible to attach four hosts (one to each of the two available SAS ports on the
two node canisters), the recommended configuration for direct attachment is to have at least
one SAS cable from the host that is connected to each node of the IBM Storwize V5000. This
configuration provides redundancy if one of the nodes goes offline, as shown in Figure 2-5.
Figure 2-5 SAS host direct-attach
34
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
2.5 LAN configuration planning
There are two Ethernet ports per node canister that are available for connection to the LAN
on an IBM Storwize V5000 system.
Ethernet port 1 is for accessing the management GUI, the service assistant GUI for the node
canister, and iSCSI host attachment. Port 2 can be used for the management GUI and iSCSI
host attachment.
Each node canister in a control enclosure connects over an Ethernet cable from Ethernet port
1 of the canister to an enabled port on your Ethernet switch or router. Optionally, you can
attach an Ethernet cable from Ethernet port 2 on the canister to your Ethernet network.
Configuring IP addresses: There is no issue with configuring multiple IPv4 or IPv6
addresses on an Ethernet port or the use of the same Ethernet port for management and
iSCSI access. However, you cannot use the same IP address for management and iSCSI
host use.
Table 2-1 shows possible IP configuration of the Ethernet ports on the IBM Storwize V5000
system.
Table 2-1 Storwize V5000 IP address configuration options per node canister
Storwize V5000 Management Node Canister 1
Storwize V5000 Partner Node Canister 2
IPv4/6 management address
IPv4/6 service address
ETH PORT 1
IPv4/6 service address
ETH PORT 1
IPv4/6 iSCSI address
IPv4/6 iSCSI address
IPv4/6 management address
ETH PORT 2
IPv4/6iSCSI address
ETH PORT 2
IPv4/6 iSCSI address
IP management addresses: The IP management address that is shown on Node
Canister 1 in Table 2-1 is an address on the configuration node. If a failover occurs, this
address transfers to Node Canister 2 and this node canister becomes the new
configuration node. The management addresses are managed by the configuration node
canister only (1 or 2; in this case, by Node Canister 1).
2.5.1 Management IP address considerations
Because Ethernet port 1 from each node canister must be connected to the LAN, a single
management IP address for the clustered system is configured as part of the initial setup of
the IBM Storwize V5000 system.
The management IP address is associated with one of the node canisters in the clustered
system and that node then becomes the configuration node. Should this node go offline
(planned or unplanned), the management IP address fails over to the other node’s Ethernet
port 1.
For more clustered system management redundancy, you should connect Ethernet port 2 on
each of the node canisters to the LAN, which allows for a backup management IP address to
be configured for access, if necessary.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
35
Figure 2-6 shows a logical view of the Ethernet ports that are available for configuration of the
one or two management IP addresses. These IP addresses are for the clustered system and
therefore are associated with only one node, which is then considered the configuration node.
Figure 2-6 Ethernet ports available for configuration
2.5.2 Service IP address considerations
Ethernet port 1 on each node canister is used for system management and for service
access, when required. In normal operation, the service IP addresses are not needed.
However, if there is a node canister problem, it might be necessary for service personnel to
log on to the node to perform service actions.
Figure 2-7 on page 37 shows a logical view of the Ethernet ports that are available for
configuration of the service IP addresses. Only port one on each node can be configured with
a service IP address.
36
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 2-7 Service IP addresses available for configuration
2.6 Host configuration planning
Hosts should have two Fibre Channel connections for redundancy, but the IBM Storwize
V5000 also supports hosts with a single HBA port connection. However, if that HBA, its link to
the SAN fabric or the fabric fails, the host loses access to its volumes. Even with a single
connection to the SAN, the host has multiple paths to the IBM Storwize V5000 volumes
because that single connection must be zoned with at least one Fibre Channel port per node.
Therefore, a multipath driver is required. This is also true for direct-attach SAS hosts. They
can be connected by using a single host port that allows up to four hosts to be configured, but
for redundancy two SAS connections per host are recommended. If two connections per host
are used, a multipath driver also is required on the host. If iSCSI host is to be employed, they
also require an MPIO driver. Both node canisters should be configured and connected to the
network so any iSCSI hosts see at least two paths to volumes and an MPIO driver are
required to resolve these.
SAN Boot is supported by IBM Storwize V5000. For more information, see the IBM Storwize
V5000 Information Center at this website:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/v5000_ic/index.jsp
Verify that the hosts that access volumes from the IBM Storwize V5000 meet the
requirements that are found at this website:
http://www-947.ibm.com/support/entry/portal/overview/hardware/system_storage/disk_
systems/entry-level_disk_systems/ibm_storwize_v3700
Multiple operating systems are supported by IBM Storwize V5000. For more information
about HBA/Driver/multipath combinations, see this website:
http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/support/storage/ssic/interoperability.wss
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
37
As per the IBM System Storage Interoperation Center (SSIC), keep the following items under
consideration:
򐂰 Host operating systems are at the levels that are supported by the IBM Storwize V5000.
򐂰 HBA BIOS, device drivers, firmware, and multipathing drivers are at the levels that are
supported by IBM Storwize V5000.
򐂰 If boot from SAN is required, ensure that it is supported for the operating systems that are
deployed.
򐂰 If host clustering is required, ensure that it is supported for the operating systems that are
deployed.
򐂰 All direct connect hosts should have the HBA set to point-to-point.
For more information, see Chapter 4, “Host configuration” on page 153.
2.7 Miscellaneous configuration planning
During the initial setup of the IBM Storwize V5000 system, the installation wizard asks for
various information that you should have available during the installation process. Several of
these fields are mandatory to complete the initial configuration.
The information in the following checklist is helpful to have before the initial setup is
performed. The date and time can be manually entered, but to keep the clock synchronized,
use a network time protocol (NTP) service:
 Document the LAN NTP server IP address that is used for synchronization of devices.
 For alerts to be sent to storage administrators and to set up Call Home to IBM for service
and support, you need the following information:
 Name of primary storage administrator for IBM to contact, if necessary.
 Email address of the storage administrator for IBM to contact, if necessary.
 Phone number of the storage administrator for IBM to contact, if necessary.
 Physical location of the IBM Storwize V5000 system for IBM service (for example,
Building 22, first floor).
 SMTP or email server address to direct alerts to and from the IBM Storwize V5000.
 For the Call Home service to work, the IBM Storwize V5000 system must have access
to an SMTP server on the LAN that can forward emails to the default IBM service
address: callhome1@de.ibm.com for Americas-based systems and
callhome0@de.ibm.com for the rest of the World.
 Email address of local administrators that must be notified of alerts.
 IP address of SNMP server to direct alerts to, if required (for example, operations or
Help desk).
After the IBM Storwize V5000 initial configuration, you might want to add more users who can
manage the system. You can create as many users as you need, but the following roles
generally are configured for users:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
38
Security Admin
Administrator
CopyOperator
Service
Monitor
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
The user in the Security Admin role can perform any function on the IBM Storwize V5000.
The user in the Administrator role can perform any function on the IBM Storwize V5000
system, except create users.
User creation: The create users function is allowed by the Security Admin role only and
should be limited to as few users as possible.
The user in the Copyoperator role can view anything in the system, but the user can configure
and manage only the copy functions of the FlashCopy capabilities.
The user in the Monitor role can view object and system configuration information but cannot
configure, manage, or modify any system resource.
The only other role that is available is the service role, which is used if you create a user ID for
the IBM service representative. This user role allows IBM service personnel to view anything
on the system (as with the monitor role) and perform service-related commands, such as,
adding a node back to the system after it is serviced or including disks that were excluded.
2.8 System management
The graphical user interface (GUI) is used to configure, manage, and troubleshoot the IBM
Storwize V5000 system. It is used primarily to configure RAID arrays and logical drives,
assign logical drives to hosts, replace and rebuild failed disk drives, and expand the logical
drives.
It allows for troubleshooting and management tasks, such as, checking the status of the
storage server components, updating the firmware, and managing the storage server.
The GUI also offers advanced functions, such as, FlashCopy, Volume Mirroring, Remote
Mirroring, and EasyTier. A command-line interface (CLI) for the IBM Storwize V5000 system
also is available.
This section describes system management by using the GUI and CLI.
2.8.1 GUI
A web browser is used for GUI access. You must use a supported web browser to access the
management GUI. For more information about supported web browsers, see Checking your
web browser settings for the management GUI, which is available at this website:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/V5000_ic/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.sto
rwize.V5000.641.doc%2Fsvc_configuringbrowser_1obg15.html
Complete the following steps to open the Management GUI from any web browser:
1. Browse to one of the following locations:
a. http(s)://host name of your cluster/
b. http(s)://cluster IP address of your cluster/ Example: https://192.168.70.120
2. Use the following default login information:
– User ID: superuser
– Password: passw0rd
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
39
For more information about how to use this interface, see this website:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/V5000_ic/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.sto
rwize.V5000.641.doc%2Ftbrd_usbgui_1936tw.html
More information also is available in Chapter 3, “Graphical user interface overview” on
page 75.
After the initial configuration that is described in 2.10, “Initial configuration” on page 49 is
completed, the IBM Storwize V5000 Welcome window opens, as shown in Figure 2-8.
Figure 2-8 Setup wizard: Welcome window
2.8.2 CLI
The CLI is a flexible tool for system management that uses the SSH protocol. A public/private
SSH key pair is optional for SSH access. For more information about setting up SSH Access
for Windows, Linux, or UNIX systems, see Appendix A, “Command-line interface setup and
SAN Boot” on page 609. The storage system can be managed by using the CLI, as shown in
Example 2-1.
Example 2-1 System management by using the CLI
IBM_Storwize:mcr-atl-cluster-01:superuser>lsenclosureslot
enclosure_id slot_id port_1_status port_2_status drive_present
1
1
online
online
yes
1
2
online
online
yes
1
3
online
online
yes
1
4
online
online
yes
1
5
online
online
yes
1
6
online
online
yes
1
7
online
online
yes
1
8
online
online
yes
1
9
online
online
yes
40
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
drive_id
20
22
21
23
17
12
10
18
9
1
10
online
online
1
11
online
online
1
12
online
online
1
13
online
online
1
14
online
online
1
15
online
online
1
16
online
online
1
17
online
online
1
18
online
online
1
19
online
online
1
20
online
online
1
21
online
online
1
22
online
online
1
23
online
online
1
24
online
online
IBM_Storwize:mcr-atl-cluster-01:superuser>
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
11
8
14
15
13
16
19
1
3
6
0
4
7
2
5
The initial IBM Storwize V5000 system setup should be done by using the process and tools
that are described in 2.9, “First-time setup” on page 41.
2.9 First-time setup
This section describes how to perform a first-time IBM Storwize V5000 system setup.
IBM Storwize V5000 uses an initial setup process that is contained within a USB key. The
USB key is delivered with each storage system and contains the initialization application file
that is called InitTool.exe. The tool is configured with your IBM Storwize V5000 system
management IP address, the subnet mask, and the network gateway address by first
plugging the USB stick into a Windows or Linux system.
The IBM Storwize V5000 starts the initial setup when you plug in the USB key with the newly
created file in to the storage system.
USB key: If you cannot find the official USB key that is supplied with the IBM Storwize
V5000, you can use any USB key that you have and download and copy the initTool.exe
application from IBM Storwize V5000 Support at this website:
http://www.ibm.com/storage/support/Storwize/V5000
The USB stick contains a readme file that provides details about how to use the tool with
various operating systems. The following operating systems are supported:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Microsoft Windows (R) 7 (64-bit)
Microsoft Windows XP (32-bit only)
Apple Mac OS(R) X 10.7
Red Hat Enterprise Server 5
Ubuntu (R) desktop 11.04
We use Windows in the following examples.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
41
Complete the following steps to perform the initial setup by using the USB key:
1. Plug the USB key into a Windows system and start the initialization tool. If the system is
configured to autorun USB keys, the initialization tool starts automatically; otherwise, open
My Computer and double-click the InitTool.bat file. The opening window of the tool is
shown in Figure 2-9. After the tool is started, select Next and then select Create a new
system.
Figure 2-9 System Initialization: Welcome window
Mac OS or Linux: For Mac OS or Linux, complete the following steps:
a. Open a terminal window.
b. Locate the root directory of the USB flash drive:
•
For Mac systems, the root directory is often in the /Volumes/ directory.
•
For Linux systems, the root directory is often in the /media/ directory.
•
If an automatic mount system is used, the root directory can be located by
entering the mount command.
c. Change the directory to the root directory of the flash drive.
d. Enter: sh InitTool.sh
42
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
The options for creating a system are shown in Figure 2-10.
Figure 2-10 System Initialization: Create a system
There are other options available through the Tasks section. However, these options
generally are only required after initial configuration. The options are shown in Figure 2-11
on page 44 and are accessed by selecting No to the initial question to configure a new
system. A second question asks if you want to view instructions on how to expand a
system with a new control enclosure appears. Selecting No to this question gives the
option to reset the superuser password or set the service IP of a node canister. Selecting
Yes (as shown in Figure 2-10) progresses through the initial configuration of the IBM
Storwize V5000.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
43
Figure 2-11 Inittool task options
2. Set the Management IP address, as shown in Figure 2-12.
Figure 2-12 System Initialization: Management IP
44
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3. Click Apply and Next to display the IBM Storwize V5000 power up instructions, as shown
in Figure 2-13.
Figure 2-13 Initialization application: V5000 Power up
Any expansion enclosures that are part of the system should be powered up and allowed
to come ready before the control enclosure. Follow the instructions to power up the IBM
Storwize V5000 and wait for the status LED to flash. Then, insert the USB stick in one of
the USB ports on the left side node canister. This node becomes the control node and the
other node is the partner node. The fault LED begins to flash. When it stops, return the
USB stick to the Windows PC.
Clustered system creation: While the clustered system is created, the amber fault
LED on the node canister flashes. When this LED stops flashing, remove the USB key
from IBM Storwize V5000 and insert it in your system to check the results.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
45
The wizard then attempts to verify connectivity to the IBM Storwize V5000, as shown in
Figure 2-14.
Figure 2-14 Verify system connectivity
If successful, a summary page is displayed that shows the settings that are applied to the
IBM Storwize V5000, as shown in Figure 2-15.
Figure 2-15 Initialization Summary
46
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
If the connectivity to the IBM Storwize V5000 cannot be verified, the warning that is shown
in Figure 2-16 is displayed.
Figure 2-16 Initialization Failure
Follow the on-screen instructions to resolve any issues. The wizard assumes the system
that you are using can connect to the IBM Storwize V5000 through the network. If it cannot
connect, you must follow step 1 from a machine that does have network access to the IBM
Storwize V5000. After the initialization process completes successfully, click Finish.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
47
The initial setup is now complete. If you have a network connection to the Storwize system,
the wizard redirects you to the system Management GUI, as shown in Figure 2-17.
Figure 2-17 System Initialization complete
We describe system initial configuration by using the GUI in 2.10, “Initial configuration” on
page 49.
48
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
2.10 Initial configuration
This section describes how to complete the initial configuration, including the following tasks:
򐂰 Setting name, date, and time
򐂰 Initial storage configuration by using the setup wizard
If you just completed the initial setup, that wizard automatically redirects to the IBM Storwize
V5000 GUI. Otherwise, complete the following steps to complete the initial configuration
process:
1. Start the configuration wizard by using a web browser on a workstation and point it to the
system management IP address that was defined in Figure 2-12 on page 44. Enter the
default superuser password <passw0rd> (where 0 = zero), as shown in Figure 2-18.
Figure 2-18 Setup wizard: Login
2. After you are logged in, a welcome window opens, as shown in Figure 2-19 on page 50.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
49
Figure 2-19 Welcome window
Click Next to start the configuration wizard.
3. Set up the system name, as shown in Figure 2-20.
Figure 2-20 Setup wizard: Insert system name
50
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
There are two options for configuring the date and time, as shown in Figure 2-21.
Figure 2-21 Setup wizard: Date and time
Select the required method and enter the date and time manually or specify a network
address for an NTP server. After this is done, the Apply and Next option becomes active.
Click this option to continue.
4. The configuration wizard continues with the hardware configuration. Verify the hardware,
as shown in Figure 2-22 on page 52.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
51
Figure 2-22 Setup wizard: Verify the detected hardware
Click Apply and Next.
5. The next window in the configuration process is setting up Call Home, as shown in
Figure 2-23.
Figure 2-23 Call Home setup
52
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
It is possible to configure your system to send email reports to IBM if an issue that requires
hardware replacement is detected. This function is called Call Home. When this email is
received, IBM automatically opens a problem report and contacts you to verify whether
replacements parts are required.
Call Home: When Call Home is configured, the IBM Storwize V5000 automatically
creates a Support Contact with one of the following email addresses, depending on
country or region of installation:
򐂰 US, Canada, Latin America, and Caribbean Islands: callhome1@de.ibm.com
򐂰 All other countries or regions: callhome0@de.ibm.com
IBM Storwize V5000 can use Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) traps, syslog
messages, and Call Home email to notify you and the IBM Support Center when
significant events are detected. Any combination of these notification methods can be
used simultaneously.
To set up Call Home, you need the location details of the IBM Storwize V5000, Storage
Administrators details, and at least one valid SMTP server IP address. If you do not want
to configure Call Home now, it can be done later by using the GUI option by clicking
Settings  Event Notification (for more information, see 2.10.2, “Configuring Call
Home, email alert, and inventory” on page 69). If your system is under warranty or you
have a hardware maintenance agreement to enable pro-active support of the IBM
Storwize V5000, it is recommended that Call Home is configured. Selecting Yes and
clicking Next moves to the window that is used to enter the location details, as shown in
Figure 2-24.
Figure 2-24 Location details
These details appear on the Call Home data to enable IBM Support to correctly identify
where the IBM Storwize V5000 is located.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
53
Important: Unless the IBM Storwize V5000 is in the US, the state or province field should
be completed by using XX. Follow the help for correct entries for locations inside the US.
You can enter the contact details of the main storage administrator in the nest window, as
shown in Figure 2-25. You can choose to enter the details for a 24-hour operations desk.
These details also are sent with any Call Home. This information allows IBM Support to
contact the correct people to quickly progress any issues.
Figure 2-25 Contact details
The next window is for email server details. To enter more than one email server, click the
green + icon, as shown in Figure 2-26 on page 55.
54
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 2-26 Email server details
The IBM Storwize V5000 also can configure local email alerts. These can be sent to a
storage administrator or an email alias for a team of administrators or operators. To add
more than one recipient, click the green + icon, as shown in Figure 2-27.
Figure 2-27 Event notification
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
55
Clicking Apply and Next displays the summary window for the call home options, as
shown in Figure 2-28.
Figure 2-28 Call Home summary
Click Apply and Next.
6. The initial configuration wizard moves on to the Configure Storage option next. This option
takes all the disks in the IBM Storwize V5000 and automatically configures them into
optimal RAID arrays for use as MDisks. If you do not want to automatically configure disks
now, select No and you exit the wizard to the IBM Storwize V5000 GUI, as shown in
Figure 2-29 on page 57.
56
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 2-29 Configure Storage option
Selecting Yes and clicking Next moves to the summary window that shows the RAID
configuration that the IBM Storwize V5000 implement, as shown in Figure 2-30.
Figure 2-30 Storage Configuration Summary
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
57
The storage pool is created when you click, Finish as shown in Figure 2-31.
Figure 2-31 Storage array creation
Closing the task box completes the Initial configuration wizard and automatically directs you
to the Create Hosts task option on the GUI, as shown in Figure 2-32.
Figure 2-32 Create hosts
If you choose to create hosts at this stage, see Chapter 4, “Host configuration” on page 153
for details.
Selecting Cancel exits to the IBM Storwize V5000 GUI. There is also a hot link to the
e-Learning tours that are available through the GUI.
58
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
2.10.1 Adding Enclosures after initial configuration
When the initial install of the IBM Storwize V5000 is complete, all expansion enclosures and
control enclosures that were purchased at that time should be installed as part of the initial
configuration. This process enables the system to make the best use of the enclosures and
drives that are available.
Adding a control enclosure
If you are expanding the IBM Storwize V5000 after the initial installation by adding a second
I/O Group (a second control enclosure) or adding expansion enclosures, follow the physical
installation procedures as described in IBM Storwize V5000 Quick Installation Guide Version
6.4.1, GC27-4219. For more information about zoning the node canisters, see 2.2, “SAN
configuration planning” on page 31.
After the hardware is installed, cabled, and powered on, a second control enclosure is added.
Complete the following steps to use the management GUI to configure the new enclosure:
1. In the Monitoring tab, select Actions  Add Enclosures  Control and Expansions, as
shown in Figure 2-33.
Figure 2-33 Option to add a control enclosure
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
59
2. If the control enclosure is properly configured, the new control enclosure is identified in the
next window, as shown in Figure 2-34.
Figure 2-34 New control enclosure identification
Click the Identify option to turn on the identify LEDs of the new canister, if required.
Otherwise, click Next.
3. You might receive a message that indicates the software level of the new control enclosure
needs upgrading, as shown in Figure 2-35. This is normal if the new enclosure is at a
lower level of code than your existing IBM Storwize V5000. Click OK.
Figure 2-35 New control enclosure software upgrade warning
It can take several minutes for the software upgrade to complete.
60
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Important: It is recommended that you have your system at the latest level of code
before any enclosure expansions are done.
After the code upgrade completes or if the new enclosure is already at the same level, the
IBM Storwize V5000 adds the new enclosure to the configuration, as shown in
Figure 2-36.
Figure 2-36 Add enclosure complete
Because the new control enclosure forms an I/O Group of its own, it appears as a single
enclosure in the rack. The original I/O Group is not shown even though they are part of the
same clustered system. The wording in the window is also misleading. By clicking the
enclosure that is shown, you see the candidate nodes that are to be added to the system.
The empty spaces do not actually do anything. If no new hardware is shown, check your
cabling and zoning and use the Refresh option. Be aware the Refresh option also is
disabled in subsequent windows if you use it. Therefore, if you still cannot see the new
hardware after a refresh, you might have to stop the process by clicking Cancel, correcting
any physical connectivity issues or hardware issues, and then beginning the process of
adding an enclosure again.
4. To add the enclosure, select the new enclosure and click Finish. The task to add the
enclosure completes, as shown in Figure 2-37 on page 62.
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
61
Figure 2-37 Add control enclosure task completion
5. Click Close to finish the wizard. You are prompted to configure the new storage, as shown
in Figure 2-38.
Figure 2-38 New storage configuration prompt
At this point, you can choose Configure Storage or No to quit the wizard and return to the
IBM Storwize V5000 GUI.
62
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
If you choose to configure storage, a wizard starts, as shown in Figure 2-39.
Figure 2-39 Configure new enclosure storage
6. Select Yes to have the IBM Storwize V5000 automatically configure the new drives as
candidates. Select No to exit the wizard.
The wizard prompts you to configure the new internal storage, as shown in Figure 2-40.
Figure 2-40 Configure new Internal Storage
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
63
7. The new enclosure is now be part of the cluster, as shown in Figure 2-41.
Figure 2-41 New enclosure that is shown as part of existing cluster
Adding a new expansion enclosure
Complete the following steps to add a new expansion controller:
1. In the Monitoring tab, select Actions  Add Enclosures, as shown in Figure 2-42. If you
have a four-node cluster (two control enclosures), the only option that is available is to add
an expansion enclosure. If you have a two-node cluster (a single control enclosure), you
have the options that are shown in Figure 2-33 on page 59. In this case, select Expansion
only.
Figure 2-42 Adding an expansion enclosure
64
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
2. You are prompted to check and confirm cabling and power to the new expansion
enclosure. Click Next to continue, as shown in Figure 2-43.
Figure 2-43 Expansion enclosure cable check
3. A task runs and completes to discover the new hardware, as shown in Figure 2-44. Click
Close to continue.
Figure 2-44 New enclosure discovery task
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
65
4. A window opens that shows the details of the new hardware to be added, as shown in
Figure 2-45. There is an option to identify the new enclosure by flashing the identify light
and another option to view the SAS chain that relates to the enclosure.
Figure 2-45 New hardware to be added
66
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
5. To add the enclosure, highlight it and click Finish, as shown in Figure 2-46.
Figure 2-46 Selecting new hardware to be added
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
67
6. The task to add the new enclosure runs and completes, as shown in Figure 2-47. Click
Close.
Figure 2-47 Add new enclosure task completion
7. The new expansion enclosure now is shown as part of the cluster that is attached to its
control enclosure, as shown in Figure 2-48.
Figure 2-48 New expansion enclosure as part of the cluster
For more information about how to provision the new storage in the expansion enclosure, see
Chapter 7, “Storage pools” on page 295.
68
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
2.10.2 Configuring Call Home, email alert, and inventory
If your system is under warranty or you have a hardware maintenance agreement, it is
recommended to configure your system to send email reports to IBM if an issue that requires
hardware investigation is detected. This feature is known as Call Home and is typically
configured during the Initial Configuration of the system, as described in item 5 on page 52.
To configure the Call Home and email alert event notification in IBM Storwize V5000 after the
Initial Configuration, complete the following steps:
1. Click Settings  Event Notifications, as shown in Figure 2-49.
Figure 2-49 Enabling Call Home
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
69
2. Click Email  Enable Email Event Notification, as shown in Figure 2-50.
Figure 2-50 Selecting Event Notification
The wizard to configure Call Home starts, as shown Figure 2-51.
Figure 2-51 Call Home wizard
You are prompted to enter the details of the system, contact, event notification, and email
server.
70
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
2.10.3 Service Assistant tool
The IBM Storwize V5000 is initially configured with three IP addresses: one service IP
address for each node canister and a management IP address, which is set when the cluster
is started.
The following methods are available to configure the Storwize V5000 system:
򐂰 The Inittool Program, as described in 2.9, “First-time setup” on page 41.
򐂰 The Service Assistant tool, which is described next.
Additionally, the Management IP and Service IP addresses can be changed within the GUI as
shown in 3.4.8, “Settings menu” on page 137.
The Service Assistant (SA) tool is a web-based GUI that is used to service individual node
canisters, primarily when a node has a fault and is in a service state. A node cannot be active
as part of a clustered system while it is in a service state. The SA is available even when the
management GUI is not accessible. The following information and tasks are included:
򐂰 Status information about the connections and the node canister.
򐂰 Basic configuration information, such as, configuring IP addresses.
򐂰 Service tasks, such as, restarting the common information model object manager
(CIMOM) and updating the worldwide node name (WWNN).
򐂰 Details about node error codes and hints about what to do to fix the node error.
Important: The Service Assistant tool can be accessed only by using the superuser
account.
The Service Assistance GUI is available by using a service assistant IP address on each
node. The SA GUI is accessed through the cluster IP addresses by appending service to the
cluster management URL. If the system is down, the only other method of communicating
with the node canisters is through the SA IP address directly. Each node can have a single
SA IP address on Ethernet port 1.It is recommended that these IP addresses are configured
on all Storwize V5000 node canisters.
The default IP address of canister 1 is 192.168.70.121 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
The default IP address of canister 2 is 192.168.70.122, with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
To open the SA GUI, enter one of the following URLs into any web browser:
򐂰 http(s)://cluster IP address of your cluster/service
򐂰 http(s)://service IP address of a node/service
Example:
򐂰 Management address: http://1.2.3.4/service
򐂰 SA access address: http://1.2.3.5/service
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
71
When you are accessing SA by using the <cluster address>/service, the configuration node
canister SA GUI login window opens, as shown in Figure 2-52.
Figure 2-52 Service Assistant Login
The SA interfaces can view status and run service actions on other nodes and the node
where user is connected.
72
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
After you are logged in, you see the Service Assistant Home window, as shown in
Figure 2-53.
Figure 2-53 Service Assistant Home Window
The current canister node is displayed in the upper left corner of the GUI. In Figure 2-53, this
is I/O Group 1 node 2. To change the canister, select the relevant node in the Change Node
section of the window. You see the details in the upper left change to reflect the new canister.
The SA GUI provides access to service procedures and displays the status of the node
canisters. These procedures should be carried out only if you directed to do so by IBM
Support.
For more information about how to use the SA tool, see this website:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/V5000_ic/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.sto
rwize.V5000.641.doc%2Ftbrd_sagui_1938wd.html
Chapter 2. Initial configuration
73
74
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3
Chapter 3.
Graphical user interface
overview
This chapter provides an overview of the IBM Storwize V5000 graphical user interface (GUI)
and shows how to navigate the configuration panels.
This chapter includes the following topics:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Getting started
Navigation
Status Indicators menus
Function icon menus
Management GUI help
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013. All rights reserved.
75
3.1 Getting started
This section provides information about accessing the IBM Storwize V5000 management
GUI. It covers topics such as, supported browsers, log in modes, and the layout of the
Overview panel.
3.1.1 Supported browsers
The IBM Storwize V5000 management software is a browser-based GUI. It is designed to
simplify storage management by providing a single point of control for monitoring,
configuration, and management.
For more information about supported browsers, see the IBM Storwize V5000 Information
Center at this website:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/v5000_ic/index.jsp
3.1.2 Access the management GUI
To access the management GUI, open a supported web browser and enter the management
IP address or Hostname of the IBM Storwize V5000. The login panel is displayed, as shown
in Figure 3-1.
Figure 3-1 IBM Storwize V5000 login panel
Default user name and password: Use the following information to log in to the IBM
Storwize V5000 storage management:
򐂰 User Name: superuser
򐂰 Password: passw0rd (a zero replaces the letter O)
76
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
A successful login shows the Overview panel by default, as shown in Figure 3-2. Alternatively,
the last opened window from the previous session is displayed.
Figure 3-2 IBM Storwize V5000 overview panel
Figure 3-1 on page 76 shows the IBM Storwize V5000 login panel and the option to enable
low graphics mode. This feature can be useful for remote access over narrow bandwidth links.
The Function Icons no longer enlarge and list the available functions. However, you can
navigate by clicking a Function Icon and by using the breadcrumb navigation aid.
For more information about the Function Icons, see 3.1.3, “Overview panel layout” on
page 79.
For more information about the breadcrumb navigation aid, see 3.2.3, “Breadcrumb
navigation aid” on page 84.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
77
Figure 3-3 shows the management GUI in low graphics mode.
Figure 3-3 Management GUI low graphics mode
78
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.1.3 Overview panel layout
As shown in Figure 3-4, the Overview panel has three main sections: Function Icons,
Extended Help, and Status Indicators.
Figure 3-4 Three main sections of the IBM Storwize V5000 overview panel
The Function Icons section shows a column of images. Each image represents a group of
interface functions. The icons enlarge with mouse hover and the following menus are shown:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Home
Monitoring
Pools
Volumes
Hosts
Copy Services
Access
Settings
The Extended Help section has a flow diagram that shows the available system resources.
The flow diagram consists of system resource images and green arrows. The images
represent the physical and logical elements of the system. The green arrows show the order
to perform storage allocation tasks and highlight the various logical layers between the
physical internal disks and the logical volumes.
Clicking the objects in this area shows more information. This information provides Extended
Help references, such as, the online version of the Information Center and e-Learning
modules. This information also provides direct links to the various configuration panels that
relate to the highlighted image.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
79
The Status Indicators section shows the following horizontal status bars:
򐂰 Allocated: Status that is related to the storage capacity of the system.
򐂰 Running Tasks: Status of tasks that are running and the recently completed tasks.
򐂰 Health Status: Status relating to system health, which is indicated by using the following
color codes:
– GreenHealthy
– YellowDegraded
– RedUnhealthy
Hovering the mouse pointer and clicking the horizontal bars provides more information and
menus, which is described in 3.3, “Status Indicators menus” on page 93.
3.2 Navigation
Navigating the management tool is simple and, like most systems, there are many ways to
navigate. The two main methods are to use the Function Icons section or the Extended Help
section of the Overview panel. For more information about these sections, see 3.1.3,
“Overview panel layout” on page 79.
This section describes the two main navigation methods and introduces the well-known
breadcrumb navigation aid and the Suggested Tasks aid. Information regarding the
navigation of panels with tables also is provided.
80
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.2.1 Function icons navigation
Hovering the mouse pointer over one of the eight function icons on the left side of the panel
enlarges the icon and provides a menu with which to access various functions. Move the
pointer to the required function and click the function. Figure 3-5 shows the results of
hovering the mouse pointer over a function icon.
Figure 3-5 Hovering over a function icon
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
81
Figure 3-6 shows all of the menus with options under the Function Icons section.
Figure 3-6 Options that are listed under Function Icons section
3.2.2 Extended help navigation
Selecting an image in the flow diagram of the Extended Help section in the Overview panel
shows information beneath the flow diagram. This information contains links to e-Learning
modules and configuration panels that are related to the selected image. This feature is
convenient when the system is implemented because it is possible to work from left to right,
following the flow, and select each object in order. Figure 3-7 on page 83 shows the selection
of Internal Drives in the flow diagram. The information that is below the flow diagram relates to
the internal storage.
82
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-7 Navigating GUI with the extended help section
To access the e-Learning modules, click Need Help. To configure the internal storage, click
Pools. Figure 3-8 shows the selection of Pools in the Extended Help section, which opens the
Internal Storage panel.
Figure 3-8 Using the extended help section
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
83
Figure 3-9 shows the Internal Storage panel, which is shown because Pools was selected in
the information area of the Extended Help section.
Figure 3-9 The internal storage configuration panel
3.2.3 Breadcrumb navigation aid
The IBM Storwize V5000 panels use the breadcrumb navigation aid to show the trail that was
browsed. This breadcrumb navigation aid is in the top area of the panel and includes a
System menu on the last breadcrumb. Figure 3-10 on page 85 shows the breadcrumb
navigation aid for the System panel.
84
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-10 Breadcrumb navigation aid
3.2.4 Suggested Tasks feature
The Suggested Tasks feature is a navigation and configuration aid that is in the top area of
the Overview panel. The list of suggested tasks changes, depending on the configuration of
the system. This aid can be useful to follow during the system installation process.
Figure 3-11 shows the Suggested Tasks navigation and configuration aid.
Figure 3-11 Suggested Tasks navigation and configuration aid
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
85
3.2.5 Presets
The management GUI contains a series of preestablished configuration options that are
called presets that use commonly used settings to quickly configure objects on the system.
Presets are available for creating volumes and IBM FlashCopy mappings and for setting up a
RAID configuration. Figure 3-12 shows the available internal storage presets.
Figure 3-12 Internal storage preset selection
86
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.2.6 Access actions
The IBM Storwize V5000 functional panels provide access to various actions that can be
performed, such as, modify attributes and rename, add, or delete objects. The available
actions menus can be accessed by using one of two main methods: highlight the resource
and use the Actions drop-down menu (as shown in Figure 3-13), or right-click the resources,
as shown in Figure 3-14.
Figure 3-13 Actions menu
Figure 3-14 Right-clicking the Actions menu
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
87
3.2.7 Task progress
An action starts a running task and shows a task progress panel, as shown in Figure 3-15.
Click Details to show the underlying command-line interface (CLI) commands. The
commands are highlighted in blue and can be pasted into a configured IBM Storwize V5000
SSH terminal session, if required. This is useful when you are developing CLI scripts.
Figure 3-15 Task progress panel
3.2.8 Navigating panels with tables
Many of the configuration and status panels show information in a table format. This section
describes the following useful methods to navigate panels with rows and columns:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Sorting columns
Reordering columns
Adding or removing columns
Multiple selections
Filtering objects
Sorting columns
Columns can be sorted by clicking the column heading. Figure 3-16 on page 89 shows the
result of clicking the heading of the Capacity column. The table is now sorted and lists
volumes with the least amount of capacity at the top of the table.
88
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-16 Sorting columns by clicking the column heading
Reordering columns
Columns can be reordered by dragging the column to the required location. Figure 3-17
shows the location of the column with the heading Host Mappings positioned in the last
column. Dragging this heading reorders the columns in the table.
Figure 3-17 Reordering columns
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
89
Figure 3-18 shows the column heading Host Mappings as it is dragged to the required
location.
Figure 3-18 Dragging a column heading to the required location
Figure 3-19 shows the result of dragging the column heading Host Mappings to the new
location.
Figure 3-19 Reordering column headings
90
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Adding or removing columns
To add or remove a column, right-click the heading bar and select the required column
headings by selecting the box that is next to the heading name. Figure 3-20 shows the
addition of the column heading Real Capacity.
Figure 3-20 Adding column heading Real Capacity
Important: Some users might run into a problem in which a context menu from the Firefox
browser is shown by right-clicking to change the column heading. This issue can be fixed
by clicking in Firefox: Tools Options Content  Advanced (for Java setting) 
Select: Display or replace context menus.
The web browser requirements and recommended configuration settings to access the
IBM Storwize V5000 management GUI can be found in the IBM Storwize V5000
Information Center at this website:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/V5000_ic/index.jsp
Multiple selections
By using the management tool, you also can select multiple items in a list by using a
combination of the Shift or Ctrl keys.
Using the Shift key
To select multiple items in a sequential order, click the first item that is listed, press and hold
the Shift key, and then click the last item in the list. All of the items between the first and last
items are selected, as shown in Figure 3-21.
Figure 3-21 Selection of three sequential items
Using the Ctrl key
To select multiple items that are not in sequential order, click the first item, press and hold the
Ctrl key, and then click the other items that you need. Figure 3-22 on page 92 shows the
selection of two non-sequential items.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
91
Figure 3-22 Selecting two non-sequential items
Figure 3-23 shows the result of the use of the Ctrl key to select multiple non-sequential items.
Figure 3-23 Result of selecting two non-sequential items
Filtering objects
To focus on a subset of the listed items that are shown in a panel with columns, use the filter
field that is found at the upper right side of the table. This tool shows items that match the
value that is entered. Figure 3-24 shows the text Vol1 was entered into the filter field. Now,
only volumes with the text Vol1 in any column are listed and the filter word also is highlighted.
Figure 3-24 Filtering objects to display a subset of the volumes
Filter by column
Click the magnifying glass that is next to the filter field to activate the filter by column feature.
Figure 3-25 shows the Filter by Column drop-down menu. This allows the filter field value to
be matched to the values of a specific column.
Figure 3-25 Filter by column
92
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-26 shows the column filter is set to Host Mappings, the filter value set to Yes, and the
resulting Volumes with Hosts mapped.
Figure 3-26 Choosing filter value
3.3 Status Indicators menus
This section provides more information about the horizontal bars that are shown at the bottom
of the management GUI panels. The bars are status indicators, and include associated bar
menus. This section describes the Allocated, Running Tasks, and Health Status bar menus.
3.3.1 Horizontal bars
As described in 3.1.3, “Overview panel layout” on page 79, the status indicators include the
allocated, running tasks, and health status horizontal bars and are shown at the bottom of the
panel. The status indicators are color-coded and draw attention to alerts, events, and errors.
Hovering over and clicking the bars shows more menus.
3.3.2 Allocated status bar menu
The allocated status bar shows the capacity status. Hovering over the image of two arrows on
the right side of the Allocated status bar shows a description of the allocated menu
comparison that is in use. Figure 3-27 on page 94 shows the comparison of the used capacity
to the real capacity.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
93
Figure 3-27 Allocated bar that compares used capacity to real capacity
To change the allocated bar comparison, click the image of the two arrows on the right side of
the Allocated status bar. Figure 3-28 on page 95 shows the new comparison of virtual
capacity to real capacity.
94
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-28 Changing the allocated menu comparison, virtual capacity to real capacity
3.3.3 Running tasks bar menu
To show the Running Tasks bar menu, click the circular image to the left of the running tasks
status bar. This menu lists running and recently completed tasks and groups similar tasks.
Figure 3-29 shows the Running Tasks menu.
Figure 3-29 Running Tasks menu
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
95
For an indication of task progress, browse to the Running Tasks bar menu and click the task.
Figure 3-30 shows the selection of a task from the Running Tasks menu.
Figure 3-30 Selecting a task from the Running Task menu
Figure 3-31 shows the Recently Completed tasks panel.
Figure 3-31 Recently Completed tasks panel
96
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.3.4 Health status bar menu
The health status bar provides an indication of the overall health of the system. The following
color of the status bar indicates the state of IBM Storwize V5000:
򐂰 Green: Healthy
򐂰 Yellow: Degraded
򐂰 Red: Unhealthy
If a status alert occurs, the health status bar can turn from green to yellow or to red. To show
the health status menu, click the attention icon on the left side of the health status bar, as
shown in Figure 3-32.
Figure 3-32 Health status menu
The health status bar menu shows the system as Unhealthy and provides a description of
Internal Storage for the type of event that occurred. To investigate the event, open the health
status bar menu and click the description of the event, as shown in Figure 3-33.
Figure 3-33 Status and description of an alert via the health status menu
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
97
Click the description of the event in the health status menu to show the Events panel
(Monitoring Events), as shown in Figure 3-34. This panel lists all events and provides
directed maintenance procedures (DMPs) to help resolve errors. For more information, see
“Events panel” on page 105.
Figure 3-34 Events panel via health status menu
98
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.4 Function icon menus
The IBM Storwize V5000 management GUI provides function icons that are an efficient and
quick mechanism that is used for navigation. As described in section 3.1.3, “Overview panel
layout” on page 79, each graphic on the left side of the panel is a function icon that presents a
group of interface functions. Hovering over one of the eight function icons shows a menu that
lists the functions. Figure 3-35 shows all of the Function Icon menus.
Figure 3-35 All Function Icon menus
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
99
3.4.1 Home menu
As shown in Figure 3-36, the Home menu provides access to the Overview panel.
Figure 3-36 Home menu
To see the Overview panel, select Overview in the Home menu to open the panel. For more
information, see 3.1.3, “Overview panel layout” on page 79.
3.4.2 Monitoring menu
As shown in Figure 3-37, the Monitoring menu provides access to the System, System
Details, Events, and Performance panels.
Figure 3-37 Monitoring menu
System panel
Select System in the Monitoring menu to open the panel. The System panel (as shown in
Figure 3-38 on page 101), shows capacity usage, enclosures, and all drives in the system.
100
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-38 The System panel
Selecting the name and version of the system shows more information about storage
allocation. The information is presented under two tabs: Info and Manage. Figure 3-39 shows
the System panel Info tab.
Figure 3-39 System panel Info tab
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
101
Select the Manage tab to show the name of the system and shutdown and upgrade actions,
as shown in Figure 3-40.
Figure 3-40 System panel Manage tab
Selecting a rack-mounted enclosure shows more information. Hovering over a drive shows
the drive status, size, and speed details. Identify starts the blue identification LED on the front
of the enclosure. Click Enclosure 1 to show the System Details panel. For more information,
see “System Details panel” on page 103. Figure 3-41 on page 103 shows the System panel
enclosure view.
102
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-41 System panel enclosure view
System Details panel
Select System Details in the Monitoring menu to open the panel. As shown in Figure 3-42,
the System Details panel provides the status and details of the components that make up the
system.
Figure 3-42 System Details panel
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
103
Actions and environmental statistics
Actions, such as, adding expansion enclosures, viewing the SAS chain connections, and
performing a software upgrade and a system shutdown, can be run from the System Details
panel. Information that relates to environmental statistics, such as, power consumption and
temperature, is also accessible from this panel. Figure 3-43 shows the available actions for
and the environmental statistics of the enclosure.
Figure 3-43 System details actions and environmental statistics
Node canister information
Node canister information, such as, FC and SAS WWPNs and iSCSI IQNs, is useful for host
attachment purposes. This information is shown by clicking the control enclosure node
canister in the System Details panel. Figure 3-44 shows node canister information.
Figure 3-44 Node canister information via system details panel
104
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Events panel
Select Events in the Monitoring menu to open the Events panel. The machine is optimal
when all errors are addressed and no items are found in this panel, as shown in Figure 3-45.
Figure 3-45 Events panel with all errors addressed
Filtering events view
To view Unfixed Messages and Alerts or to Show All, select the appropriate option from the
menu that is next to the filter field, as shown in Figure 3-46. For more information, see
“Filtering objects” on page 92.
Figure 3-46 Unfixed messages and alerts in the events panel
Event properties
To show actions and properties that are related to an event or to repair an event that is not the
Next Recommended Action, right-click the event to show other options. Figure 3-47 on
page 106 shows the selection of the Properties option.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
105
Figure 3-47 Selecting event properties
Figure 3-48 shows the properties and sense data for an event.
Figure 3-48 Event properties and sense data
106
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Show events entries within
To show events that occurred within a certain time of a particular event, select the required
event entry, then select Show entries within... from the Actions menu and set the period
value. Figure 3-49 shows the selection of the Show entries within... option with a period value
of 5 minutes. This shows all events within 5 minutes of the selected event.
Figure 3-49 Showing events within a set time
Saving events to a file
It is possible to save the events that are listed in the events panel to a file. To do this, click the
diskette icon and select the format that you require to save the file. A comma-delimited file is
created that can be saved in text format or as a .csv file for input to a spreadsheet program,
such as, Microsoft Excel.
Figure 3-50 on page 108 shows saving the events as formatted values.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
107
Figure 3-50 Saving events as formatted values
Performance panel
Select Performance in the Monitoring menu to open the Performance panel. This panel
shows graphs that represent the last 5 minutes of performance statistics. The performance
graphs include statistics about CPU Utilization, Volumes, Interfaces, and MDisks. Figure 3-51
shows the Performance panel.
Figure 3-51 Performance panel
108
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Custom-tailoring performance graphs
The Performance panel can be customized to show the workload of a single node, which is
useful to help determine whether the system is working in a balanced manner. Figure 3-52
shows the custom-tailoring of the performance graphs by selecting node 1 from the System
Statistics menu. The measurement type can also be changed between throughput (MBps) or
IOPS by selecting the relevant value.
Figure 3-52 Graphs representing performance statistics of a single node
Performance peak value
Peak values over the last 5-minute period can be seen by hovering over the current value, as
shown in Figure 3-53 on page 110 for the SAS Interfaces.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
109
Figure 3-53 Peak SAS Interface usage value over the last 5 minutes
3.4.3 Pools menu
The Pools menu provides access to the Volumes by Pools, Internal Storage, MDisks by Pools,
and System Migration functions, as shown in Figure 3-54.
Figure 3-54 Pools menu
110
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Volumes by Pool panel
Select Volumes by Pool in the Pools menu to open the panel. By using the Volumes by Pool
panel, you can display volumes by using the Pool Filter function. This view makes it easy to
manage volumes and determine the amount of real capacity that is available for more
allocations. Figure 3-55 shows the Volumes by Pool panel.
Figure 3-55 Volumes by Pools panel
Volume Allocation
The upper right corner of the Volumes by Pool panel shows the Volume Allocation, which, in
this example, shows the physical capacity (3.81 TB), the virtual capacity (5.10 TB), and the
used capacity (204.00 GB in the green portion). The red bar shows the threshold at which a
warning is generated when the used capacity in the pool first exceeds the threshold that is set
for the physical capacity of the pool. By default, this threshold is set to 80% but can be altered
in the pool properties. Figure 3-56 shows the volume allocation information that is displayed
in the Volumes by Pool panel.
Figure 3-56 Volume Allocation
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
111
Renaming pools
To rename a pool, select the pool from the pool filter and click the name of the pool.
Figure 3-57 shows that pool V5000_Pool_1 was selected to be renamed.
Figure 3-57 Renaming a pool
Changing pool icons
To change the icon that is associated with a pool, select the pool in the pool filter, click the
large pool icon that is above New Volume and Actions, then use the Choose Icon buttons to
select the wanted image. This change helps to manage and differentiate between the classes
of drive or the tier of the storage pool. Figure 3-58 shows the pool change icon panel.
Figure 3-58 Changing a pool icon
112
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Volume functions
The Volumes by Pool panel also provides access to the volume functions via the Actions
menu, the New Volume option, and by right-clicking a listed volume. For more information
about navigating the Volume panel, see 3.4.4, “Volumes menu” on page 121. Figure 3-59
shows the volume functions that are available via the Volumes by Pool panel.
Figure 3-59 Volume functions are available via the Volume by Pools panel
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
113
Internal Storage panel
Select Internal Storage in the Pools menu to open the Internal Storage panel, as shown in
Figure 3-60. The internal storage consists of the drives that are contained in the IBM Storwize
V5000 control enclosure and any SAS-attached IBM Storwize V5000 expansion enclosures.
By using the Internal Storage panel, you can configure the internal storage into RAID
protected storage (MDisks). You can also filter the displayed drive list by drive class.
Figure 3-60 Drive actions menu of the internal storage panel
Drive actions
Drive level functions, such as, identifying a drive and marking a drive as offline, unused,
candidate, or spare, can be accessed here. Right-click a listed drive to show the Actions
menu. Alternatively, the drives can be selected and then the Action menu is used. For more
information, see “Multiple selections” on page 91. Figure 3-60 shows the Drive Actions menu.
Drive properties
Drive properties and dependent volumes can be displayed from the Internal Storage panel.
Select Properties from the Drive Actions menu. The drive Properties panel shows the drive
attributes and the drive slot SAS port status. Figure 3-61 on page 115 shows the drive
properties with the Show Details option selected.
114
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-61 Drive properties
Configure internal storage wizard
Click Configure Storage to show the Configure Internal Storage wizard, as shown in
Figure 3-62.
Figure 3-62 Internal Storage panel
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
115
By using this wizard, you can configure the RAID properties and pool allocation of the internal
storage. Figure 3-63 shows Step 1 of the Configure Internal Storage wizard.
Figure 3-63 Configure Internal Storage wizard: Step 1
Figure 3-64 shows Step 2 of the Configure Internal Storage wizard.
Figure 3-64 Configuring Internal Storage wizard: Step 2
116
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
MDisks by Pool panel
Select MDisks by Pool in the Pools menu to open the MDisks by Pool panel. By using this
panel, you can perform such tasks such as, display MDisks in each pool, create pools, delete
pools, and detect externally virtualized storage. Figure 3-65 shows the MDisks by Pool panel.
Figure 3-65 MDisks by Pool panel
Pool actions
To delete a pool or change the pool name or icon, right-click the listed pool. Alternatively, the
Actions menu can be used. Figure 3-66 shows the pool actions.
Figure 3-66 Pool actions
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
117
RAID actions
By using the MDisks by Pool panel, you can perform MDisk RAID tasks, such as, Set Spare
Goal, Swap Drive, and Delete. To access these functions, right-click the MDisk, as shown in
Figure 3-67.
Figure 3-67 RAID actions menu
118
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
System Migration panel
Select System Migration in the Pools menu to open the System Migration panel, as shown in
Figure 3-68. This panel is used to migrate data from externally virtualized storage systems to
the internal storage of the IBM Storwize V5000. The panel displays image mode volume
information. To begin a migration, click Start New Migration and the Start Migration wizard is
shown.
Figure 3-68 System Migration panel
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
119
Storage Migration wizard
The Storage Migration wizard is used for data migration from other Fibre Channel-attached
storage systems to the IBM Storwize V5000. Figure 3-69 shows Step 1 of the Storage
Migration wizard.
Figure 3-69 Storage Migration wizard
For more information, see Chapter 6, “Storage migration wizard” on page 237.
120
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.4.4 Volumes menu
As shown in Figure 3-70, the Volumes menu provides access to the Volumes, Volumes by
Pool, and Volumes by host functions.
Figure 3-70 Selecting the Volumes menu
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
121
Volumes panel
Select Volumes in the Volumes menu to open the panel, as shown in Figure 3-71. The
Volumes panel shows all of the volumes in the system. The information that is displayed is
dependent on the columns that are selected.
Figure 3-71 Volumes panel
Volume actions
Volume actions such as, Map to Host, Unmap All Hosts, Rename, Shrink, Expand, Migrate to
Another Pool, Delete, and Add Mirrored Copy can be performed from this panel.
Create new volumes
Click New Volume to open the New Volume panel, as shown in Figure 3-72 on page 123. 
By using this panel, you can select a preset when a volume is created. The presets are
designed to accommodate most user cases. The presets are generic, thin-provisioned,
mirror, or thin mirror. After a preset is determined, select the storage pool from which the
volumes are allocated. An area to name and size the volumes is shown.
For more information, see Chapter 5, “I/O Group basic volume configuration” on page 161
and Chapter 8, “Advanced host and volume administration” on page 349.
122
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-72 New Volume panel
Creating multiple volumes
A useful feature is available for quickly creating multiple volumes of the same type and size.
Specify the number of volumes that are required in the Quantity field, then complete the
volume capacity and name. A number range can also be specified.
The New Volumes panel displays a summary that shows the real and virtual capacity that is
used if the proposed volumes are created. Click Create or Create and Map to Host to
continue.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
123
Figure 3-73 shows the quantity of 3 in the Quantity field.
Figure 3-73 Creating multiple volumes quickly
Volume advanced settings
Click Advanced to show more volume configuration options. Use this feature when the preset
does not meet your requirements. After the advanced settings are configured, click OK to
return to the New Volumes panel. Figure 3-74 shows the Advanced Settings panel.
Figure 3-74 Advanced Settings panel
Volumes by Pool panel
For more information, see “Volumes by Pool panel” on page 111.
124
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Volumes by Host panel
Select Volumes by Host in the Volumes menu to open the panel. By using the Volume by
Hosts panel, you can focus on volumes that are allocated to a particular host by using the
host selection filter.
3.4.5 Hosts menu
As shown in Figure 3-75, the Hosts menu provides access to the Hosts, Ports by Host, Host
Mappings, and Volumes by Host functions.
Figure 3-75 Selecting the Hosts menu
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
125
Hosts panel
Select Hosts in the Hosts menu to open the panel, as shown in Figure 3-76. The Hosts panel
shows all of the hosts that are defined in the system.
Figure 3-76 Hosts panel
Host Actions
Host Actions, such as, Modify Mappings, Unmap All Volumes, Duplicate Mappings, Rename,
Delete, and Properties can be performed from the Hosts panel. Figure 3-76 shows the
actions that are available from the Hosts panel.
For more information about the Hosts Actions menu, see 8.1, “Advanced host administration”
on page 350.
Creating a host
Click New Host and the Create Host panel opens. Choose the host type from Fibre Channel
(FC), iSCSI, or SAS host and the applicable host configuration panel is shown. After the host
type is determined, the host name and port definitions can be configured. Figure 3-77 on
page 127 shows the Choose the Host Type panel of the Create Host window.
For more information about how to create hosts, see Chapter 4, “Host configuration” on
page 153.
126
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-77 Choose the Host Type panel
Ports by Host panel
Select Ports by Host in the Hosts menu to open the panel, as shown in Figure 3-78. The
panel shows the address, status, and type of ports that are assigned to the host definition.
Actions such as, map, unmap, and port deletion can be performed from this panel.
Figure 3-78 Ports by Host panel
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
127
Host Mappings panel
Select Host Mappings in the Hosts menu to open the panel, as shown in Figure 3-79. This
panel shows the volumes that each host can access with the corresponding SCSI ID. The
Unmap Volume action can be performed from this panel.
Figure 3-79 Host Mappings panel
Volumes by Host panel
For more information, see “Volumes by Host panel” on page 125.
3.4.6 Copy Services menu
The Copy Services menu provides access to the FlashCopy, Consistency Groups, FlashCopy
Mappings, Remote Copy, and Partnership functions. Figure 3-80 on page 129 shows the
Copy Services menu.
128
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-80 Copy Services menu
FlashCopy panel
Select FlashCopy in the Copy Services menu to open the panel, as shown in Figure 3-81.
The FlashCopy panel displays all of the volumes that are in the system.
Figure 3-81 FlashCopy panel
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
129
FlashCopy actions
FlashCopy actions such as, New Snapshot, New Clone, New Backup, Advanced FlashCopy,
and Delete can be performed from this panel. Figure 3-81 on page 129 shows the actions that
are available from the FlashCopy panel.
Consistency Groups panel
Select Consistency Groups in the Copy Services menu to open the panel. A consistency
group is a container for FlashCopy mappings. Grouping allows FlashCopy mapping actions
such as, prepare, start, and stop to occur at the same time for the group instead of
coordinating actions individually. This feature can help ensure that the group’s target volumes
are consistent to the same point and remove several FlashCopy mapping administration
tasks.
The Consistency Group panel shows the defined groups with the associated FlashCopy
mappings. Group Actions such as, FlashCopy Map Start, Stop, and Delete can be performed
from this panel. New FlashCopy Mapping also can be selected from this panel. For more
information, see “FlashCopy mappings panel”. Figure 3-82 shows the Consistency Group
panel.
Figure 3-82 Consistency Groups panel
FlashCopy mappings panel
Select FlashCopy Mappings in the Copy Services menu to open the panel. FlashCopy
mappings define the relationship between source volumes and target volumes. The
FlashCopy Mappings panel shows information that relates to each mapping, such as, status,
progress, source and target volumes, and flash time. Select New FlashCopy Mapping to
configure a new mapping or use the Actions menu to administer the mapping. Figure 3-83 on
page 131 shows the FlashCopy Mappings panel.
130
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-83 FlashCopy Mappings panel
For more information about how to create and administer FlashCopy mappings, see
Chapter 8, “Advanced host and volume administration” on page 349.
Remote Copy panel
Clicking Remote Copy opens the window that is shown in Figure 3-84. This window shows
the existing Remote Copy relationships in which you can set up and modify consistency
groups. From this window, you can also start and stop relationships, add relationships to a
consistency group, and switch the direction of the mirror.
Figure 3-84 Remote Copy window
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
131
Partnerships panel
Clicking Partnerships opens the window that is shown in Figure 3-85. In this window, you
can set up a new partnership or delete an existing partnership with another IBM Storwize or
SAN Volume Controller system for the purposes of remote mirroring.
Figure 3-85 Partnerships window
From this window, you can also set the background copy rate. This rate specifies the
bandwidth, in megabytes per second (MBps), that is used by the background copy process
between the clusters.
132
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.4.7 Access menu
The Access menu provides access to the Users and Audit Log functions, as shown in
Figure 3-86.
Figure 3-86 Access menu
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
133
Users panel
Select Users in the Access menu to open the panel. The Users panel shows the defined user
groups and users for the system. The users that are listed can be filtered by user group. Click
New User Group to open the Create a New Group panel. Figure 3-87 shows the Users panel
and the Users Actions menu.
Figure 3-87 Users panel
Creating a user group
By using the New User Group panel, you can configure user groups. Enter the group name,
select the role, then click Create, as shown in Figure 3-88.
Figure 3-88 New User Group panel
134
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Creating a user
Click New User to define a user to the system. Figure 3-89 shows the Users panel and the
New User option.
Figure 3-89 Users panel and the New User option
By using the New User panel, you can configure the user name, password, and
authentication mode. It is essential to enter the user name, password, group, and
authentication mode. The public Secure Shell (SSH) key is optional. After the user is defined,
click Create.
The authentication mode can be set to local or remote. Select local if the IBM Storwize V5000
performs the authentication locally. Select remote if a remote service such as, an LDAP
server authenticates the connection. If remote is selected, the remote authentication server
must be configured in the IBM Storwize V5000 by clicking Settings menu  Directory
Services panel.
The SSH configuration can be used to establish a more secure connection to the
command-line interface. For more information, see Appendix A, “Command-line interface
setup and SAN Boot” on page 609.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
135
Figure 3-90 shows the New User panel.
Figure 3-90 New User panel
Audit Log panel
Select Audit Log in the Access menu to open the panel. The audit log tracks action
commands that are issued through a CLI session or through the management GUI. The Audit
Log panel displays information about the command, such as, the user, time stamp, and any
associated command parameters. The log can be filtered by date or by the Show entries
within... feature to reduce the number of items that are listed. It is not possible to delete or
alter the Audit log. Figure 3-91 shows the Audit Log panel.
Figure 3-91 Audit Log panel
136
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.4.8 Settings menu
The Setting menu provides access to the Event Notifications, Directory Services, Network,
Support, and General functions. Figure 3-92 shows the Settings menu.
Figure 3-92 Settings menu
Event Notifications panel
Select Event Notifications in the Settings menu to open the panel. The IBM Storwize V5000
can use Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) traps, syslog messages, emails, and
IBM Call Home to notify users when events are detected. Each event notification method can
be configured to report all events or alerts. Alerts are the significant events and might require
user intervention. The event notification levels are critical, warning, and information.
The Event Notifications panel provides access to the Email, SNMP, and Syslog configuration
panels. IBM Call Home is an email notification for IBM Support. It is automatically configured
as an email recipient and is enabled when the Email event notification option is enabled by
following the Call Home wizard.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
137
Enabling Email Event Notification option
Click Enable Email Event Notification to open the Call Home wizard. Figure 3-93 shows the
Event Notifications Email configuration panel.
Figure 3-93 Event Notifications panel: Email
Call Home wizard
The Call Home wizard, as shown in Figure 3-94, guides the user through account contact,
machine location entry, and email configuration tasks.
Figure 3-94 Call home wizard
138
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
SNMP event notification
As shown in Figure 3-95, the Event Notifications panel provides access to the SNMP
configuration panel. Click SNMP to open the panel, then enter the server details. Multiple
to add more servers.
servers can be configured by clicking
+
Figure 3-95 SNMP configuration panel
Syslog event notification
The Event Notifications panel provides access to the Syslog configuration panel. Click
Syslog to open the panel, then enter the server details. Multiple servers can be configured by
to add more servers. Figure 3-96 shows the Syslog configuration panel.
clicking
+
Figure 3-96 Syslog configuration panel
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
139
Directory Services panel
Select Directory Services in the Settings menu to open the panel. The Directory Services
panel provides access to the Remote Authentication wizard. Remote authentication must be
configured to create remote users on the IBM Storwize V5000. A remote user is authenticated
on a remote service, such as, IBM Tivoli® Integrated Portal or a Lightweight Directory Access
Protocol (LDAP) provider.
Enabling Remote Authentication
Click Configure Remote Authentication to open the wizard, as shown in Figure 3-97.
Figure 3-97 Directory Services panel
Network panel
Select Network in the General menu to open the panel. As shown in Figure 3-98, the
Network panel provides access to the Management IP Addresses, Service IP Addresses,
iSCSI, and Fibre Channel configuration panels.
Figure 3-98 Network panel
140
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Management IP addresses
The Management IP address is the IP address of the system and is configured during initial
setup. The address can be an IPv4 address, IPv6 address, or both. The Management IP
address is logically assigned to Ethernet port 1 of each node canister, which allows for node
canister failover.
Another Management IP address can be logically assigned to Ethernet port 2 of each node
canister for more fault tolerance. If the Management IP address is changed, use the new IP
address to log in to the Management GUI again. Click Management IP Addresses and then
click the port that you want to configure (the corresponding port on the partner node canister
is also highlighted). Figure 3-99 shows Management IP Addresses configuration panel.
Figure 3-99 Management IP Addresses configuration panel
Service IP Addresses
Service IP addresses are used to access the Service Assistant. The address can be an IPv4
address, IPv6 address, or both. The Service IP addresses are configured on Ethernet port 1
of each node canister. Click Service IP Addresses and the select the Control Enclosure
and Node Canister to configure. Figure 3-100 on page 142 shows the Service IP addresses
configuration panel.
For more information, see 2.10.3, “Service Assistant tool” on page 71.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
141
Figure 3-100 Service IP Addresses configuration panel
iSCSI connectivity
The IBM Storwize V5000 supports iSCSI connections for hosts. Click iSCSI and select the
node canister to configure the iSCSI IP addresses. Figure 3-101 shows the iSCSI
Configuration panel.
Figure 3-101 iSCSI Configuration panel
142
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Fibre Channel connectivity
The Fibre Channel panel displays Fibre Channel connections that are established between
the IBM Storwize V5000 node canisters, other storage systems, and hosts. Click Fibre
Channel and select the required view from the View connectivity for: drop-down menu.
Figure 3-102 shows the Fibre Channel panel with the All nodes, storage systems, and hosts
option selected.
Figure 3-102 Fibre Channel panel
Support panel
Select Support in the Settings menu to open the Support panel. As shown in Figure 3-103,
this panel provides access to the IBM support package, which is used by IBM to assist with
problem determination. Click Download Support Package to access the wizard.
Figure 3-103 Support panel
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
143
Download Support Package wizard
The Download Support Package wizard provides a selection of various package types. IBM
support provides direction on package type selection as required. To download the package,
select the type and click Download. The output file can be saved to the user’s workstation.
Figure 3-104 shows the Download Support Package wizard.
Figure 3-104 Download Support Package wizard
Show full log listing
The Support panel also provides access to the files that are on the node canisters, as shown
in Figure 3-105. Click Show full log listing... to access the node canister files. To save a file
to the user’s workstation, select a file, right-click the file, and select Download. To change to
the file listing to show the files on a partner node canister, select the node canister from the
menu that is next to the panel filter.
Figure 3-105 Full log listing
144
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
General panel
Select General in the Settings menu to open the General panel. This panel provides access
to the Date and Time, Licensing, Upgrade Software, and GUI Preferences configuration
panels.
Date and Time
Click Data and Time to configure the date and time manually or via a Network Time Protocol
(NTP) server. Figure 3-106 shows the Date and Time function of the General panel.
Figure 3-106 General panel
Licensing
The Licensing view shows the current system licensing. The IBM Storwize V5000 uses the
same honor-based licensing as the Storwize V7000, which is based on per enclosure
licensing.
The following optional licenses are available:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
FlashCopy
Remote Copy
Easy Tier
External Virtualization
Figure 3-107 on page 146 shows the Update License panel within the General panel. In this
example, two enclosures are licensed for FlashCopy, Remote Copy, and Easy Tier, while
External Virtualization is licensed for 10 external disk trays.
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
145
Figure 3-107 Update License panel
Upgrade Software panel
IBM recommends that you use the latest version of software. The Upgrade Software panel
shows the current software level. If the system is connected to the Internet, it connects to the
IBM upgrade server to check whether the current level is the latest. If an update is available, a
direct link to the code is provided to the make code download process easier.
To upgrade the code, the IBM Storwize V5000 Code and the IBM Storwize V5000 Upgrade
Test Utility must be downloaded. After the files are downloaded, it is best to check the MD5
checksum to ensure that the files are sound. Read the release notes, verify compatibility, and
follow all IBM recommendations and prerequisites.
To upgrade the software of the IBM Storwize V5000, click Launch Upgrade Wizard. After the
upgrade starts, an Abort option is shown that can be used to stop the upgrade process.
Figure 3-108 on page 147 shows the Upgrade Software panel.
For more information, see 12.4, “Upgrading software” on page 580.
146
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Figure 3-108 Upgrade machine code panel
GUI Preferences panel
By using the GUI Preferences panel (as shown in Figure 3-109), you can refresh GUI objects,
restore default browser preferences, set table selection policy, and configure the Information
Center web address.
Figure 3-109 GUI Preferences panel
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
147
3.5 Management GUI help
This section provides information about the following methods that are available to get help
while you use the IBM Storwize V5000 management GUI:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
IBM Storwize V5000 Information Center
e-Learning modules
Embedded panel help
Question mark help
Hover help
IBM endorsed YouTube videos
3.5.1 IBM Storwize V5000 Information Center
The best source of information for the IBM Storwize V5000 is the Information Center. Click
Visit the Information Center for direct access to the online version from the Overview panel,
as shown in Figure 3-110.
Figure 3-110 Overview panel
3.5.2 Watching an e-Learning video
The IBM Storwize V5000 provides embedded e-Learning videos to watch. The videos provide
directions to complete various tasks. Click Watch e-Learning to start the video, as shown in
Figure 3-111.
Figure 3-111 Watch e-Learning module
148
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.5.3 Learning more
The IBM Storwize V5000 provides embedded Need Help links to explain important concepts
and panels. Click Need Help to open the information panel, as shown in Figure 3-112.
Figure 3-112 Learn more link
Figure 3-113 shows the information panel.
Figure 3-113 Information panel
3.5.4 Embedded panel help
The IBM Storwize V5000 provides embedded help that is available on each panel. Click Help
to open the information panel, as shown in Figure 3-114.
Figure 3-114 Embedded panel help
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
149
Figure 3-115 shows the information panel that is opened from the embedded panel help. The
information panel includes links to various other panels, including the Information Center.
Figure 3-115 Information panel
3.5.5 Hidden question mark help
The IBM Storwize V5000 provides a hidden question mark help feature for some settings or
items that are found in various configuration panels. This help feature is accessed by hovering
next to an item where the question mark is shown and the help bubble is displayed, as shown
in Figure 3-116.
Figure 3-116 Hidden question mark help
3.5.6 Hover help
The IBM Storwize V5000 provides hidden help tags that are shown when you hover over
various functions and items, as shown in Figure 3-117.
Figure 3-117 Hover help
150
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
3.5.7 IBM endorsed YouTube videos
IBM endorses various YouTube videos for the IBM storage portfolio. Client feedback suggests
that these videos are a good tool to show management GUI navigation and tasks. Check for
new videos from IBM Storage to find useful information at the IBM System Storage Channel
at this website:
https://www.youtube.com/user/ibmstoragevideos
Chapter 3. Graphical user interface overview
151
152
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
4
Chapter 4.
Host configuration
This chapter provides an overview on how to set up Open System hosts and the different
methods that are available in the context of IBM Storwize V5000. It also describes how to use
the IBM Storwize V5000 GUI to create hosts connections to access Storage Disk Subsystem
volumes. For more information about Volume administration, see Chapter 5, “I/O Group basic
volume configuration” on page 161.
This chapter includes the following topics:
򐂰 Host attachment overview
򐂰 Preparing the host operating system
򐂰 Configuring hosts on IBM Storwize V5000
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013. All rights reserved.
153
4.1 Host attachment overview
A host system is an open-systems computer that is connected to a switch through a Fibre
Channel (FC) or Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI). Because IBM Storwize
V5000 is geared towards small to medium scale data center storage solutions, a
direct-attached Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) interface is also supported.
IBM Storwize V5000 supports the following host attachment protocols:
򐂰 8 Gb Fibre Channel (FC) Protocol
򐂰 6 Gb SAS Protocol
򐂰 1 Gb iSCSI
In this chapter, we assume that your hosts are ready and attached to your FC and IP network,
or directly attached if SAS Host Bus Adapters (HBAs) are used and that you completed the
steps that are described in 2.9, “First-time setup”.
Follow basic switch and zoning recommendations and ensure that each host has at least two
network adapters, that each adapter is on a separate network (or, at minimum, in a separate
zone), and connections to all canisters exist. This setup assures four paths for failover and
failback purposes. For SAS connections, ensure that each host has at least two SAS HBA
connections to each IBM Storwize V5000 canister for resiliency purposes.
Before new volumes are mapped on the host of your choice, some preparation goes a long
way towards ease of use and reliability. There are several steps that are required on a host
system to prepare for mapping new IBM Storwize V5000 volumes. Use the System Storage
Interoperation Center (SSIC) to check which code levels are supported to attach your host to
your storage. SSIC is an IBM web tool that checks the interoperation of host, storage,
switches, and multipathing drivers. For more information about IBM Storwize V5000
compatibility, see this website:
http://ibm.com/systems/support/storage/ssic/interoperability.wss
This chapter focuses on Windows and VMware. If you must attach any other hosts, for
example, IBM AIX®, Linux, or even an Apple system, you can find the required information in
the IBM Storwize V5000 Information Center at this website:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/v5000_ic/index.jsp
154
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
4.2 Preparing the host operating system
In this section, we describe how to prepare Microsoft Windows and VMware host side
attachment that is required to use an IBM Storwize V5000 with FC, iSCSI, or SAS
connectivity.
4.2.1 Windows 2008 R2: Preparing for FC attachment
Complete the following steps to prepare a Windows 2008 (R2) host to connect to an IBM
Storwize V5000 by using FC:
1. Make sure that the latest operating system Service Pack, updates, and hotfixes are
applied to your Microsoft server.
2. Use the latest firmware and driver levels on your host system.
3. Install the HBAs on the Windows server by using the latest BIOS.
4. Connect the FC Host Adapter ports to the switches by using FC cables.
5. Configure the switches (SAN Zoning).
6. Configure the HBA parameters, if necessary.
7. Set the Windows timeout value.
8. Install the multipath Driver Device Module software.
Downloading and installing the supported drivers and firmware
Install a supported HBA driver for your configuration. Use the Windows Device Manager or
vendor tools, such as, SANsurfer for QLogic product, HBAnyware for Emulex, or Brocade
HBA Software Installer to install the driver. Also, check and update the BIOS (firmware) level
of the HBA by using the tools that were provided by manufacturer. Always check the readme
file to see whether there are Windows registry parameters that should be set for the HBA
driver.
Configuring Brocade HBAs for Windows
This section applies to Windows hosts that have Brocade HBAs installed. After the device
driver and firmware are installed, you must configure the HBAs. To perform this task, use the
Brocade host connectivity manager (HCM) software or reboot into the HBA BIOS, load the
adapter defaults, and set the following values:
򐂰 Host Adapter BIOS: Disabled (unless the host is configured for SAN Boot)
򐂰 Queue depth: 4
Configuring QLogic HBAs for Windows
This section applies to Windows hosts that have QLogic HBAs installed.
After the device driver and firmware are installed, you must configure the HBAs. To complete
this task, use the QLogic SANsurfer software or reboot into the HBA BIOS, load the adapter
defaults, and set the following values:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Host Adapter BIOS: Disabled (unless the host is configured for SAN Boot)
Adapter Hard Loop ID: Disabled
Connection Options: 1 (point-to-point only)
Logical Unit Numbers (LUNs) Per Target: 0
Port Down Retry Count: 15
Chapter 4. Host configuration
155
Configuring Emulex HBAs for Windows
This section applies to Windows hosts that have Emulex HBAs installed.
After the device driver and firmware are installed, you must configure the HBAs. To complete
this task, use the Emulex HBAnyware software or reboot into the HBA BIOS, load the
defaults, and set topology to 1 (10F_Port Fabric).
Setting the Windows timeout value
For Windows hosts, the disk I/O timeout value should be set to 60 seconds as an overall rule,
but you must also check the recommended guidelines for your application. To verify this
setting, complete the following steps:
1. Click Start  Run.
2. In the window, enter regedit and press Enter.
3. In the registry editor, search for the
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\services\Disk\TimeOutValue key.
4. Confirm that the value for the key is 60 (decimal value), and, if necessary, change the
value to 60, as shown in Figure 4-1.
Figure 4-1 Windows timeout value
Installing Microsoft MPIO multipathing software
Microsoft Multipath Input/Output (MPIO) solutions are designed to work with device-specific
modules (DSMs) that are written by vendors. The MPIO driver package does not form a
complete solution on its own. By using this joint solution, the storage vendors can design
device-specific solutions that are tightly integrated with the Microsoft Windows operating
system. MPIO in Microsoft Windows 2008 is a DSM that is designed to work with Storage
Arrays that support the Asymmetric Logical Unit Access (ALUA) control model (active-active
Storage Controllers).
The intent of MPIO is to provide better integration of a multipath storage solution with the
operating system. It also allows the use of multipath in the SAN infrastructure during the boot
process for SAN Boot hosts.
To install MPIO on a computer that is running Microsoft Windows Server 2008, complete the
following steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
156
Open Server Manager by clicking Start  Administrative Tools  Server Manager.
In the Features area, click Add Features.
Select MPIO from the list of available features. Click Next.
Review and confirm the installation selections and click Install.
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
Before your ESXi host can discover the IBM Storwize V5000 storage, the iSCSI initiator must
be configured and authentication might need to be done (depending on customer scenario),
as shown Figure 4-2.
Figure 4-2 iSCSI IP Configuration
You can verify the network configuration by using the vmkping utility. If you must authenticate
the target, you might need to configure the dynamic or static discovery address and target
name of the Storwize V5000 in vSphere.
For more information about creating volumes and mapping them to a host, see Chapter 5,
“I/O Group basic volume configuration” on page 161.
4.2.2 Creating SAS hosts
These steps provide guidance on how to setup hosts with SAS HBAs. Complete the following
steps by using the IBM Storwize V5000 GUI to create an SAS host:
1. Click SAS Host. The Create Host window opens, as shown in Figure 4-3
Figure 4-3 Create SAS host
Chapter 4. Host configuration
157
2. Enter the host name and, from the drop-down menu, select the SAS worldwide port name
(WWPN) or names that are associated with the host, as shown in Figure 4-4.
Figure 4-4 Available SAS WWPN or WWPNs
3. Click Advanced to expand the Advanced Settings options.
4. As shown Figure 4-5, select HP/UX or TPGS if you are creating one of these types of
hosts. In our example, an HP/UX host is created with permissions to access volumes from
I/O Group 1.
Important host setting: If this setting is set incorrectly, the host appears in volume
mapping options that physically cannot be created. For more information, see
Chapter 5, “I/O Group basic volume configuration” on page 161.
Figure 4-5 Creating HP/UX SAS host
5. Click Create Host to create the SAS Host object on IBM Storwize V5000.
6. Click Close when the task completes.
158
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
The IBM Storwize V5000 shows the host port WWPNs that are available if you prepared the
hosts. If they do not appear in the list, scan for new disks in your operating system and click
Rescan in the configuration wizard. If they still do not appear, check your physical
connectivity and pay particular attention to the SAS cable orientation and repeat the
scanning. For more information about hosts, see the Information Center at this website:
http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/storwize/v5000_ic/index.jsp
The IBM Storwize V5000 is now configured and ready for SAS Host use. For advanced host
and volume administration, see Chapter 8, “Advanced host and volume administration” on
page 349.
Chapter 4. Host configuration
159
160
Implementing the IBM Storwize V5000
5
Chapter 5.
I/O Group basic volume
configuration
This chapter describes how to use the IBM Storwize V5000 to create a volume and map a
volume to a host. A volume is a logical disk on the IBM Storwize V5000 that is provisioned out
of a storage pool and is recognized by a host with an identifier UID field and a parameter list.
The first part of the chapter describes how to create volumes of different types and map them
to the defined host.
The second part of this chapter describes how to discover those volumes. After you finish this
chapter, your basic configuration is complete and you can store data on the IBM Storwize
V5000.
For more information about advanced host and volume administration, such as, adding and
deleting host ports and creating thin provisioned volumes, see Chapter 8, “Advanced host
and volume administration” on page 349.
This chapter includes the following topics:
򐂰 Provisioning storage from IBM Storwize V5000 and making it available to the host
򐂰 Mapping a volume to the host
򐂰 Discovering the volumes from the host and specifying multipath settings
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2013. All rights reserved.
161
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising