Literature in Mathematics - MsM-sotw
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Addtron
Author:
Calvin Irons
Publisher: Rigby Education Inc.
Math Concepts / Topics:
Addition, doubles, even/odd
Summary:
Addtron is a rhyming book in which the concept of adding
doubles is explored through the antics of a robotic space creature.
Connecting Activities
•
Find rhyming pairs, chart these.
•
Doubles
•
Odd/even
•
Number words
•
Go back and find all the sets on each page that are being added.
Extending Activities
•
Create “Subtractron book”.
•
Create new book of Addtron that is not focused on doubles.
•
Integrate with Earth, Moon, Sun unit.
•
Change number words to numerals.
•
Doubles plus one.
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
1
12-09
12-15
55-07
Integrate concrete, pictorial, and symbolic
representations of sums/differences 0-10
Recall addition/subtraction facts to 10
Explore number patterns to 100 by 1's, 2's, 5's
and 10's
Materials: Paper for student book pages.
Preparation:
Addtron is a fun book to use during Earth, Moon, and Sun
units. Children will have been introduced to and are
comfortable with addition.
Suggested Homework:
Find doubles at your house. Draw and label
them.
Development:
1.
2.
3.
Before
Predict, after looking at the book, why it is called
Addtron. Who is Addtron? What does he do? List ideas
or have children write own predictions.
During
Let's find out what Addtron likes to do?
After
What did you learn about Addtron? Check predictions.
Addtron forgot to give us the answers to the double
problems. In teams, you will create your own Addtron
books, but this time we need answers.
Follow-up: Teams create Addtron books, making their own addtron creature
and sets for the doubles pages. They may include text and number
sentences or just number sentences. (Manipulatives may be
provided.)
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Addtron
Contents of this packet:
1.
Grade 1 lesson
2.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday
Author:
Judith Viorst
Publisher: Aladdin Books
Math Concepts / Topics:
Money, fractions, decimals, percents
Summary: Alexander’s grandparents gave him one dollar when they came
to visit, and now he has nothing to show for it. Follow his losses with
interest and recognition!
Connecting Activities
•
Practice counting money skills.
•
Determine combinations of coins that make $1.00.
•
Keep a running tally of Alex’s money situation.
•
Write money amounts as fractions and percents.
•
Discuss and practice shopping within a budget.
Extending Activities
•
Discuss ways kids can earn money.
•
Create the story of Alexander’s next dollar.
•
Encourage students to share money-earning experiences with the
class.
•
Alexander wants to buy a walkie-talkie. Have students research
how much a walkie-talkie costs. If Alexander’s grandparents came
to visit every other week, and if they gave him a dollar each time,
how long would it take Alexander to buy a walkie-talkie?
•
How could Alexander earn enough money? Suggestions: renting
his toys, hunting for coins in soda machine, returning bottles.
Students decide on an item they would like to own. Devise a plan
to earn the money. Implement and record progress.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Alexander, Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson plan for Level 5 on fractions, decimals, & percents.
2.
Decimal/Fraction/Percent Chart
3.
Money Fraction sheets (6)
4.
Math Literature Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
Read Any Good Math Lately.........................................................pp. 74-76
2.
Math Through Children’s Literature.................................................p. 51
3.
It’s the Story That Counts..................................................................p. 101
4.
Books You Can Count On........................................................................p. 35
5.
Literature-Based Math Activities...............................................pp. 72-73
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Alexander Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
5
12-07
12-11
13-27
Materials:
Discover concretely the fraction of a number or
monetary amount
Express fractions as percents, and decimals to
thousandths
Find the percent of a number or monetary
amount
Alexander Who Used to Be Rich Last Sunday by Judith Viorst
Decimal/Fraction/Percent Chart (1 per student)
Play money kit (1 per group)
Penny fraction sheet (1 per student)
Money fraction overheads
Preparation:
Make copies of chart and money fraction sheets
Make overhead of money fractions
Assemble play money kits
Suggested Homework: Use any combination of 3 coins. Write the amount in
decimal, fraction and percent form. Try 5 of these.
Development:
1.
2.
3.
Follow-up:
Read the book to students in its entirety.
Read it again, stopping each time Alexander spends
some of his dollar and asking students to figure out
how much he has left. Write the remaining amount as
a decimal. Find and model what fraction of a dollar
this is. Show the connection to a percent by coloring
the number of pennies remaining from 100, writing it
as a percent.
Continue the process, writing the decimal, fraction,
and percent for the remaining amount Alex has after
spending each time.
25 = 1 . Show
100 4
4.
Simplify fractions of a dollar, ex.
5.
relationship on overheads.
Extend to writing any fraction as a decimal and
percent.
Decimal
Fraction
Percent
Literature in Mathematics
Title: Anno’s Math Games III
Author: Mitsumasa Anno
Publisher: Philomel Books
Math Concepts / Topics: Location/ Direction
Summary: The book contains a variety of activities covering Stretching
Shapes, Triangles and Paper Folding, Mazes, and Left and Right. The
activities cross grade levels from K through middle school.
Connecting Activities
The children will:
discuss, act out, and draw pictures relating to the questions,
images, and ideas presented in the book.
Extending Activities
Draw maps and give directions using “left” and “right” to move
through them.
The map activity can be done individually or by teams. Many math
problem solving activity books provide maps that would be suitable.
Divise oportunities for the children to use “left” and “right” directions
throughout the school day.
Allow students to create their own set of programming cards to move
the robot through the “robot house” and performs other tasks (see
attached sheet).
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Anno’s Math Games III
Contents of this packet:
Anno’s Math Games III
Robot activities
miscellaneous left/right activities sheets
ROBOTS activity
Setup: Use tape or other material to set up a Robot House (see diagram below)
Purpose: To provide practice giving and following accurate instructions.
Student will develop a program for the ROBOT (another student) by arranging a set
of instruction cards.
Method: The robot will face the doorway of the Robot House with the
program(deck of instructions) and proceed to follow the instructions in the order
given.
Robots may not pass through exterior walls of the Robot House.
The simplest program may be to develop a program that will send the robot into the
room and out the other door.
A more challenging program will have the robot enter the house, sit in a chair
placed in the house, and then rise and exit the room. An additional activity would
be to place an object on the chair. The object can only be placed on the chair
while the robot is facing the front of the chair, etc.
ROBOT Room:
A deck of program cards should contain the following types of cards .
10 Forward cards - move one square forward
3 Turn Right cards - turn right 90 degrees
3 Turn Left cards - turn left 90 degrees
1 Sit Down card - sit down in the square directly behind you
1 Stand Up card - the inverse of Sit Down
1 Pick Up card - pick up the object directly in front of you but do not move
1 Put Down card - put an object in the square directly in front of you
Use your imagination and the students’ to define tasks for the robot to carry out
in the house.
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level: 2nd - 3rd
Enabling Skill(s): An understanding of the concept of left and right.
Materials: Anno's Math Games III, manipulatives (chips, etc.), program
cards from the Robot Activity (attached).
Preparation: practice with the children the concept of left and right hand.
Provide manipulative experiences with the concept of left and right.
Suggested Homework: Make or create copies of exercises similar to those
on pgs. 90-95. For children to work on with others or
alone.
Have children create a map of the school or part of
the school. Have them create sets of directions using
left and right directions to get from their class to
other areas of the school.
Development: Read pages 75 to 89 to the students. Discuss and act out
where appropriate to illustrate an idea that is difficult to
grasp in the abstract. Example: Even though something is
on the right when you look at it, if a person opposite you
looks at it, it will be on that person's left.
The relation of north south east and west to right and left
can follow from the proper understanding that left and right
are relative to the way one is facing.
Follow-up: Use North, East ,South, and West ordinal directions to determine
whether they too are relative to the person standing
opposite the person giving directions.
Use Robot activity (materials attached,) to provide further
activities to extend the ability of the student to get outside
him/her self and provide directions to a "robot" in an
attempt to accomplish a task.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Anno’s Mysterious Multiplying Jar
Author:
Masaichiro and Mitsumasa Anno
Publisher: Philomel Books
Math Concepts / Topics:
Multiplication, factorial
Summary: Inside Mr. Anno’s jar is not a genie but a deceptively simple bit
of water, which leads somewhat magically to the deeper waters of the sea,
and thence to a series of amazing numerical happenings.
Connecting Activities
•
Survey text - identify math in book; Read story - estimate# of jars.
•
Construct Math Booklets of fact problems to provide a simpler
problem to solve. 1 group makes 2 booklets with 3 pages each.
Each page has 4 problems.
•
Pose another problem to further develop factorial concept. 1
backpack with 2 lunch bags. Each lunch bag has 3 baggies. Each
baggie has 4 grapes. Each grape has 5 seeds.
•
Adjust jar estimates.
•
Introduce term factorial and ! symbol.
•
Revisit story and complete worksheet of calculations. Determine #
of jars.
Extending Activities
•
•
•
•
•
Create own picture books using Anno’s Mysterious Multiplying Jar
as an example.
Create multiplying chests of objects within objects.
Students can research “astronomical” facts and numbers, create
problems, and challenge others to solve them.
•How much farther is it to the Sun than the Moon?
•Rank the 9 planets in our solar system by distance away form Sun.
Talk about how symbols are used in math to make recording easier
and simpler. Challenge students to make up their own symbols:
ex. 10* = 10 + 9 + 8 + 7....+ 1
[email protected] = 10 x 10 + 9 x 9 + 8 x 8 ....+ 1 x 1
10™ = 10 x 9 + 9 x 8 + 8 x 7 ....+ 1 x 0
Estimate how long it would take to take the lids off 3,628,800 jars.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Anno’s Mysterious Multiplying Jar
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson for Level 5
2.
Math Booklet Planning Sheet
3.
Basic Math Facts Sheet
4.
Anno’s Mysterious Multiplying Jar Worksheet
5.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
Math and Literature (K-3) Book 1..........................................p. 59
2.
Read Any Good Math Lately.................................pp. 10 - 11, 84,
.......................................................................91 - 92, 131, 135 - 139
3.
Math Through Children’s Literature.....................................p. 52
4.
It’s the Story That Count’s............................pp. XI, 60 - 65, 92
5.
Books You Can Count On............................................................p. 46
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Anno's Mysterious Multiplying Jar
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
5
12-03
13-03
13-13
15-03
55-03
Demonstrate factors
Show relationships among standard numerals,
expanded notation, and word names through
millions
Multiply whole numbers
Estimate/verify reasonableness of answers
Complete/describe/explore a number pattern or
sequence
Materials: Anno's Mysterious Multiplying Jar by Masaichiro and Mitsumasa
Anno
calculator (1 per child)
construction paper, plain paper (for booklets)
Math Facts sheet (1 per child)
Planning worksheet (1 per pair of children)
Anno's Mysterious Multiplying Jar worksheet (1 per child)
Preparation:
Set up materials for booklet making for student access. (You
may determine and precut sizes of the covers and pages, or
students may determine this themselves.)
Make copies of the math facts sheet, planning sheet, and
worksheet
Suggested Homework: Have students write about what they learned from the
book or what they liked about it.
Development:
1.
2.
3.
Warm-up: Show students pictures in book. Students
look for signs of math. Look for similarities/differences.
Students share ideas.
Read story and stop after reading the page "Within each
box there were 10 jars." Ask students to estimate how
many jars they think there are altogether.
Discuss strategy of solving a simpler problem. Introduce
booklet construction project.
a. work in groups: 1 group = 2 students
b. each group produces 2 booklets
c. each booklet contains 3 pages
and verify calculations.
6. Begin developing factorial concept:
1 group x 2 booklets x 3 pages x 4 problems = 24
7. Use following problem to develop further: One backpack
contains 2 lunch bags. Each lunch bag contains 3
baggies. Each baggie has 4 grapes inside it. Each grape
contains 5 seeds. Estimate how many seeds. Set up
number sentence and solve.
8. Go back to previous estimates about jars in story and
adjust if desired.
9. Introduce the term factorial and the ! symbol.
10. Revisit the story and complete worksheet.
Follow-up:
1.
2.
Students create a picture book using The Mysterious
Multiplying Jar as a model.
Create a multiplying chest: Begin with 1 large object and
progress by putting objects within objects.
Math Booklet Planning
You and your partner will work together as one group to create
booklets of math problems.
1.
Your group will construct 2 booklets.
•
How many booklet covers will you need?
Number sentence:
2.
Each booklet will contain 3 pages.
•
How many pages will be needed for your
2 booklets?
Number sentence:
3.
pages
On each page of each booklet you will put 4 math problems.
•
How many math problems will you need
for your 2 booklets?
Number sentence:
4.
covers
problems
List below the supplies you will need.
covers
pages
problems
5.
Get the materials listed above and construct your booklets.
Anno’s Mysterious Multiplying Jar
Complete the chart
Number
Amount
Item
1!
island
2!
countries
3!
mountains
4!
walled kingdoms
5!
villages
6!
houses
7!
rooms
8!
cupboards
9!
boxes
10 !
jars
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Anno’s Magic Seeds
Author:
Mitsumasa Anno
Publisher: Philomel Books
Math Concepts / Topics:
Problem Solving, mental math
Summary: The magic begins when a wizard gives Jack two mysterious
seeds. Jack eats one and buries the other. His fortunes grows by ones and
twos, then faster and faster.
Connecting Activities
•
Extend the patterns seen in the book.
•
Talk about the economics of planting crops.
•
Search for number relationships that help in extending the pattern.
Extending Activities
•
Think about how Jack may have changed (improved or lessened) his
production and created a different type of pattern.
•
How would things have been different if Jack had saved a different
number of seeds after the storm - explore the patterns created.
•
Pretend Jack had children through the years. Each would need to
eat a seed. How would the pattern be affected?
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Anno’s Magic Seeds
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson for Level 5
2.
Anno’s Magic Seeds Inventory
3.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
5
Enabling Skill(s):
15-07
47-03
Materials:
Compute mentally the product of one and
three digit numbers by rounding the larger
factor to the nearest 100
Select and apply appropriate strategies to
solve life problems (time, money,
measurement, & temperature)
Anno's Magic Seeds by Mitsumasa Anno
beans, unifix cubes or other counters
Inventory Chart - on a chart or overhead
Inventory Chart - one per student
overhead or chart of the various problems students will solve
(7th, 8th, 9th years)
Preparation:
•
•
•
Fill a baggie approximately half way for each pair of
students.
Prepare a chart or overhead of the Inventory Chart
(attached).
An overhead or chart of the story problems for these
years: seventh, eighth, and ninth years. (see
procedure #3)
Suggested Homework:
Development:
If Jack always harvested twice as many seeds as he
planted and ate only one seed each year (before his
family came along) how many seeds would be bury
in the fourth year? Draw a "T" table to show your
answers.
1.
Read the book through one time. Go back and reread
until the sixth year that Jack plants the seed and it
yields two seeds. Ask the class what Jack might do to
produce more seeds. Continue reading the selection
until Jack decides to plant both seeds. Ask, "How many
seeds will Jack have at the end of the next year. (4
seeds) Begin recording on the "T" table. As students
begin to notice a pattern allow them to share ideas.
(doubles)
2.
Continue reading the selection having the students
predict each time how many new seeds Jack will get
from the seeds he planted. Stop at the point when
Alice also eats a seed. How many seeds will they plant?
Follow-up:
3.
Distribute beans to each pair of students. Have students
work in pairs to determine how many seeds Jack and
Alice buried and record on the student data sheets.
4.
Continue reading the story and having students solve
the various story problems.
Literature in Mathematics
Title: A Cloak for a Dreamer
Author: Aileen Friedman
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Math Concepts/Topics: Geometry
Summary: The archduke orders new cloaks for an important
journey.The tailor asks his three sons for help. The father is pleased
with the beauty of each cloak. Two cloaks have been sewn by
aspiring tailors, and one cloak has been sewn by the dreamer.
Connecting Activities
Sort, classify,and label shapes in a hands-on discussion.
Create a basic(abab) pattern of geometric shapes. Have the
students describe and extend the pattern.
Have children investigate which shapes can be used to create
patterns found in quilts.
Extending Activities
Look for examples of geometric shapes in the classroom, at home,
on clothing, on buildings, etc.
Model a math investigation about the most frequent geometric
shape found on clothing,by having your class serve as a sample
one day. Collect data, and display results in a graph.
Then have students work cooperatively in teams to investigate
which shape might be seen most frequently on clothing. Will the
sample group(other third grade classes, classes from other grade
levels) that your students select have similar results? Let the
teams predict and investigate(plan, collect data). Teams display
the results of their math investigation in a graph, and discuss
their findings.
Children create their own tesselation design using paper shapes,
pattern blocks, or an original shape they create themselves.
For additional activities see the end of the selection,
A Cloak for the Dreamer.
Literature in Mathematics
Title: A Cloak for a Dreamer
Contents of this packet:
A Cloak for a Dreamer
Blackline master for Cloak for the Dreamer Shapes
Resource Sheets
Tesselation Master
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level: 3
Enabling Skill(s): Recognize and name basic shapes.
Sequence a pattern using 2 or more shapes.
Materials: A Cloak for the Dreamer
Shapes for students(pattern blocks, or pre-cut paper)
Preparation:
Suggested Homework: Have students create a new pattern at home
using shapes(pre-cut paper) to cover a sheet of paper.
Development:
Read the selection, but stop after the tailor has given the task to his
sons, so that the children can investigate cloak-making themselves
with shapes (pattern blocks,pre-cut). This will promote problem
solving and concept attainment for shapes, repeated patterns, and
finally tesselations. Have them predict what shapes will form a cloak.
Allow time for hands-on investigation.
What shapes produced a repeated pattern to form a “cloak.”
Return to the selection to compare their findings with those
of the tailor’s sons.
Introduce tesselations by having students look at the
repeated patterns found in the cloaks . Have students tell
you what they see. Do they see repeated patterns where
shapes touch sides, but don’t overlap nor have gaps? When
this observation is made, label this type of repeated
pattern as, a tesselation.
Make a T chart: Will tesselate
Won’t tesselate
Hold a shape. Have students decide where it belongs. List
names of shapes on the chart under the appropriate
heading.
Demonstrate the nibble technique for creating tesselations.
Demonstrate how to slide the newly cut nibble across the
congruent and parallel side. Tape it.
Demonstrate rotations and turns with the new shape. Have
students practice rotating and tracing the shape until it
covers a paper.
Consult the resources pages, math/science facilitator,or
curriculum specialist for further information on
tesselations.
A Cloak for a Dreamer by Aileen Friedman
Math and Literature(K-3) Book 2 by Stephanie Sheffield. pp. 17-25
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Counting on Frank
Author:
Rod Clement
Publisher: Gareth Stevens Publishing
Math Concepts / Topics:
Estimation, Problem Solving
Summary: A young man and his dog estimate their world.
Connecting Activities
•
Have students estimate as the boy in the story does.
•
Work on problem solving skills and strategies.
•
Practice various measurement - linear, liquid, volume
Extending Activities
•
Have students find estimation problems in the classroom and
home
•
Create a similar book
•
Suggested questions in back of book
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Counting on Frank
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for Level 3
2.
Lesson Plan for Level 6em
3.
SOARganizer
4.
Homework questions for Level 3 lesson
5.
Problems for Level 3 lesson
6.
Problems for Level 6em lesson
7.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
6em
12-12
43-08
Estimate answers to decimal problems
Choose a reasonable answer to a problem
Materials:
Counting on Frank by Rod Clement
Transparencies of problems to be presented
Multiple transparencies of the SOARganizer
Can (size of dog food can)
Dried peas (1 bag per team)
Various size small boxes (1 per team)
Copy of SOARganizer for each student
SOAR poster
Rulers
Preparation:
Prepare can by cutting and pasting Doggo label on it
Suggested Homework:
Development:
Talk with the students about estimation. Ask them to give
some examples of what it means to estimate. Are there
things you estimate each day? Emphasize that estimates are
important when checking answers to make sure they are
reasonable. Explain, too, that sometimes being exact is not
necessary. Sometimes an estimate is enough.
Tell the students that you have a book about a kid who likes
to estimate. Read Counting on Frank to the class. Use
reading strategies as you do this - have the students
hypothesize about what it is about. As you read the book, you
may want to talk with the kids about whether they think the
estimates are good ones.
The boy in the story proves that sometimes estimation is a
valuable skill.
We are going to take a closer look at some of the estimations
in this book and see whether we agree that they really are
reasonable estimations.
The teacher can choose which problems to address first,
but the 'peas' problem should be saved for the end.
If the class is comfortable with SOAR, the teacher may
choose to let the teams progress with solving the problem
independently. It is recommended, however, that these
problems be addressed as a class with teams working
independently on the Attack stage. The teacher should
record the students' responses on the SOARganizer.
For example: "I calculate that twenty-four Franks could fit
into my bedroom."
Study the problem. Begin by having the students state the
problem in their own words. Underline important
information. Identify areas of confusion.
Organize. Have the students hypothesize about whether
they think the estimate is a good one or not. Why or why
not? Have them clarify the problem by establishing what
they know and coming to consensus on things they don't
know (size of Frank, size of bedroom). Have them plan how
they might conduct an experiment to solve the problem.
You may want each team to conduct this discussion so they
can plan what their group will do. As they do this point out
the problem solving strategies being suggested.
Attack. Have the groups go to work on solving the problem.
Review. Have each team report their findings. Make sure
they answer the question. Think back about their
hypothesis.
This type of process should be done for each problem. The
'peas' problem is the most difficult. This will be difficult
because the problem must be defined by consensus and
because other data is needed (the number of days in a year).
After the students have begun the planning process, tell
them that you just happen to have some materials that may
help them (a bag of peas and a box). From there, let them
go to work.
Make sure students are filling in the SOARganizer as they
work. The communication of results in the Review stage is
critical one. Make sure the students tell about the process
they used and the reasons for doing what they did. Remind
them that they must answer the question.
Follow-up: Have the students share their results.
DOGGO
“I calculate that twenty-four
Franks could fit into my
bedroom.”
Problem:
Is this an accurate
estimate?
“If I had grown at a rate of six
and one-half feet every year,
I’d now be fifty-three feet
tall.”
Problem:
Is this an accurate
estimate?
“If I had accidentally knocked
fifteen peas off my plate every
night for the last eight years,
they would now be level with
the table top.”
Problem:
Is this an accurate
estimate?
“It takes forty-seven cans of
dog food to fill one shopping
bag.”
Problem:
Is this an accurate
estimate?
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Counting On Frank
Instructional Level: 3
Enabling Skill(s):
Materials:
15-07
Estimate and justify reasonableness of answers
in life situations
SOARganizer (1 per student)
SOARganizer transparency
SOAR poster
“Now Here’s A Chance to Use Your Brain!” packet
Problem Solving Strategy cards
Empty one gallon milk jug
Preparation:
Prepare handouts in advance. It is best to distribute them
one at a time so collating will not be necessary.
Suggested Homework: See Homework questions sheet in packet
Development:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Warm up: Think-Pair-Share question, “What is problem solving?”
Accept all answers! The purpose of this activity is to assess the
student’s understanding of problem solving, not to develop an accurate
definition of problem solving.
Introduce literature selection. Explain that the boy in the story is a
true problem solver. Ask them to pay close attention to the way he
attacks problems as they occur in the story.
After completing the selection, discuss with the class what they
noticed about the boy. Was he a problem solver? What strategies did
he use to solve problems? What were some of the problems he
solved? Do you think SOAR could have helped the boy solve some of
the problems?
Tell the students, “Now here’s a chance to use your brain!” Remind
them to refer to the strategy cards to help them solve the problems
you are about to give them.
Hand out a copy of the first problem, “How many cans of Doggo Dog
food does Frank eat every week?” Read through the problem
together. Ask the students to highlight or underline important
information. Discuss what might be important and what is not. Allow
them to work independently, in cooperative pairs or teams. After
several minutes, ask students to share the ways they approached the
problem. Deemphasize the answer. Focus on how they got the
answer. Model the use of the SOARganizer on the overhead.
Demonstrate the “Make a Table” strategy for this problem.
6.
7.
Day#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
cans of
dog food
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
total
3
6
9
12
15
18
21
Distribute the next problem, “How old is Frank’s owner?” Again, read
through the problem and have them highlight the important
information. Suggest that as they attack the problem they consider
using one of the strategies. Allow them time to work. After several
minutes discuss the strategies used. You may want to model the use of
the SOARganizer again and work through this problem using the
“make a table” strategy again.
year#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
height
6
12
18
24
30
36
42
48
Distribute problem 3, “How many Frank pictures can you fit on a
whole piece of paper?” Repeat steps from above. Make a model, act it
out is a nice strategy for this problem. You can make available an 8
1/2 x 11 sheet of paper and suggest scissors can be used!
(Steps 1-7 are likely to take at least one class period. The following
steps can be extended to the following period as further extension of
the concept of using SOAR and Strategy cards to solve problems in
math.)
8.
Distribute problem 4, “How would you calculate how long it would take
to fill a ten gallon tub of water?” Ask the students to brainstorm some
ideas before they proceed with the problem. Usually someone will
suggest using a one gallon container and time how long it will take to
fill up. This idea uses the Make it simpler strategy as well as the Act it
out strategy. If you have a sink and an empty one gallon milk jug handy
you can actually try it. Do the procedure at least 3 times, record your
data, and average the time. Discuss why you wouldn’t want to rely on
the data from just one trial and why it is important to keep all
variables the same each time you fill the jug and time it.
9.
Distribute problem 5, “That would be a real mess wouldn’t it” Ask
students to read through the problem and use their problem solving
skills to solve it. After several minutes, draw a simple table on
the board with 2 columns. Label one “Yes” and the other “No” . Ask
the students to raise their hands if they think the answer to the
problem is “Yes” Count the hands and place tally marks on the board.
(Sometimes no one will vote at first!) Next ask for a show of hands for
those who thought “no” was the correct response. By this time many
students have re-read the question and realized it is a simple yes or no
response. Some insist on telling you the answer is 93. Point out that
it is important to pay close attention to the wording in questions so we
don’t get off track. Ask the students to write a question for the peas
that could be answered using numbers. Have the students share their
ideas.
Follow-up: Homework questions could also be used as independent work
during class.
Name__________________________
“Counting on Frank” Homework
questions
If Frank eats 21 cans of Doggo Dog food every week, about how
much would he eat in a year? Remember: 52 weeks in a year. 365
days in a year) Show your work.
How tall would you be if you grew six feet every year? Is that
taller or shorter than your school building? show your work.
According to Frank’s owner, it took almost 12 hours to fill the
entire bathroom with water. At one gallon per minute, how many
gallons of water does the bathroom hold? Show your work.
Name__________________________
SOARganizer
S tate the problem
What do you know?
Estimate the answer
O rganize
Plan what to do
A ttack
Step 1
Step 2
Review
Check your work
The answer is:
Step 3
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Twelve Days of Christmas
Author:
Jan Brett (Illustrator)
Publisher: Trumpet Club
Math Concepts / Topics:
Multiplication, Patterns, Problem Solving
Summary:
In this song gifts are presented on each of the twelve days of
Christmas. There are many math patterns in the song and in the illustrations.
Connecting Activities
•
Play a recording of the “The Twelve Days of Christmas” before reading
the book.
•
Teach the students to use the “Memory Recall” button on the
calculator.
•
Have the students develop tables to organize the problem.
•
Have students determine the least number of bills needed to pay for
each gift.
•
Graph the cost of each gift or number of each kind of gifts received.
•
Have students research the cost of each gift.
Extending Activities
•
Students can use ads from newspapers or catalogs to generate their
own “Twelve Days of Christmas” list. They can figure the cost of the
gifts and their work could be turned into their own pattern book.
•
Create an original story that uses another number pattern.
•
Discuss how to write out a check to pay the total cost of the gifts.
•
Have students extend tables to 20 days and develop formulas for
determining the number of gifts received on any day.
(ex. 25th day = n (n+1) = 325
2
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Twelve Days of Christmas
Contents of this packet:
1.
Grade 4 or 5 Lesson Plan
2.
Students Worksheets
3.
Answer Key
4.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
Books You Can Count On.....................................................p. 43
Mathematics Lesson Plan
The Twelve Days of Christmas
Instructional Level: 4-5
Enabling Skill(s):
13-09
47-03
55-03
Materials:
Preparation:
The Twelve Days of Christmas, by Jan Brett
Class copies of student worksheets
Teacher might want to make overheads of several or all
pages of the book so students can see details of
illustrations and identify patterns easily.
Suggested Homework:
Development:
Multiply a multi-digit number by a two-digit
number.
Select and apply appropriate strategies to solve
life problems.
Describe a number pattern.
Students list 12 presents they would like to
give someone. After finding the cost of each
present, students can figure the cost of all
presents.
1. Read the story and have students identify the patterns in
both the story and in illustrations.
Possible Patterns: (Use the first three patterns to get the
children to practice their observing skills so that they are
able to see the mathematical pattern.)
* Each page of the story has side panels where they are
wishing "Merry Christmas" in different languages. The
main illustration reflects the culture of that language.
Ex. "Feliz Navidad" on the 11th day of Christmas is
Spanish and the picture is of Spanish dancers.
* The garland at the top of each page has ornaments
representing the gift that is given each day. The
ornaments are also found on the Christmas tree on the
last page.
* At the bottom corners of each page there are animals and
they are drawn in their proper environment.
* The number of gifts = the number of days plus the
previous days gifts.
2. Have the students try to solve the following three
problems:
Note: The teacher may decide to give the class the attached students
worksheets that have the charts already organized to solve the previous
problems, or the teacher can have the students try to organize their own
charts. Another option would be to give the students the three problems
and allow them to use any strategy to come up with their solutions.
Follow-Up:
Discuss what students are "GIVING" for Christmas and
Hanukkah, emphasizing thinking of others instead of
themselves.
Problem 1: How many gifts did the lady receive each day?
Day
Daily Gifts
Received
Total Daily
Gifts
Cumulative
Gifts
1
1
1
1
2
1+2
3
4
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
What patterns do you see?
Answer key:
Problem 1: How many gifts did the lady receive each day?
Day
Daily Gifts
Received
Total Daily
Gifts
Cumulative
Gifts
1
1
1
1
2
1+2
3
4
3
1+2+3
6
10
4
1+2+3+4
10
20
5
1+2+3+4+5
15
35
6
21
56
7
1+2+3+4+5+6
1+2+3+4+5+6
+7
28
84
8
1+2+3+4+5+6
+7+8
36
120
9
1+2+3+4+5+6
+7+8+9
45
165
10
1+2+3+4+5+6
+ 7 + 8 + 9 + 10
55
220
11
1+2+3+4+5+6
+ 7 + 8 + 9 + 10 + 11
66
286
12
1+2+3+4+5+6+
7 + 8 + 9 + 10 + 11 +12
78
364
n (n + 1)
2
Formula:
4 (4 + 1)
2
Ex. 4th day =
20
2
=
=
10 gifts
Problem 2: How many gifts did the lady receive over the 12 days?
Gift
#
X
days
Total
Gift
#
X
1. partridge
X
7. swans
X
2. turtle
X
8. maids a-milking
X
3. French hens
X
9. ladies dancing
X
4. calling birds
X
10. lords
X
5. golden rings
X
11. pipers
X
6. geese
X
12. drummers
X
days
Total Gifts
What patterns do you see?
Problem 3: HowGift
much would allQuantity
the gifts cost?
1. partridge
2. turtle
3. French hens
4. calling birds
5. golden rings
6. geese
7. swans
8. maids a-milking
9. ladies dancing
10. lords
11. pipers
12. drummers
TOTALS
Cost Each
Total Cost
Total
Answer Key:
Problem 2: How many gifts did the lady receive over the 12 days?
Gift
#
X
days
Total
1. partridge
1
X
12
12
2. turtle
2
X
11
3. French hens
3
X
4. calling birds
4
5. golden rings
6. geese
Gift
#
X
days
Total
7. swans
7
X
6
42
22
8. maids a-milking
8
X
5
40
10
30
9. ladies dancing
9
X
4
36
X
9
36
10. lords
10
X
3
30
5
X
8
40
11. pipers
11
X
2
22
6
X
7
42
12. drummers
12
X
1
12
Total Gifts
364
What patterns do you see?
Problem 3: How
much would allQuantity
the gifts cost? (Prices
are based on findings
of 4th graders
Gift
Cost Each
Total Cost
from Milton Academy in Milton, Mass. (1993).
1. partridge
12
$45
$540
2. turtle
22
$28
$616
3. French hens
30
$8
$240
4. calling birds
36
$500
$18,000
5. golden rings
40
$250
$10,000
6. geese
42
$25
$1,050
7. swans
42
$20
$840
8. maids a-milking
40
$50
$2,000
9. ladies dancing
36
$275
$9,900
10. lords
30
$100
$3,000
11. pipers
22
$900
$19,800
12. drummers
12
$35
$420
TOTALS
364
$67,456
Literature in Mathematics
Title: The Doorbell Rang
Author: Pat Hutchins
Publisher: Greenwillow Books
Math Concepts / Topics: Division
Summary:
Two children are sharing a dozen cookies. Then, the doorbell rings.
Each time more people arrive to share the cookies.
Connecting Activities
Division - lesson included
Area - cookie sheet activity
Graphing - favorite cookie activity
Fractions - sharing cookies equally
Extending Activities
Cookie bags - see attached
Recipes - see attached
Writing activities - see attached
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Doorbell Rang
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for division
2.
Dozen Cards
3.
Writing Activities
4.
Favorite Cookie Graph
5.
An introduction to Area
6.
Division Door Pattern
7.
Sharing Cookies Chart
8.
Sharing Cookies Division Practice
9.
Extending Activites (recipes & cookie bags)
10.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
Math and Literature (K-3).......................................................p. 59
2.
Storytime Mathtime...................................................................pp. 36 - 42
3.
Read Any Good Math Lately.....................................................p. 87
4.
Read Any Good Math Lately.....................................................p. 102
5.
Read Any Good Math Lately.....................................................pp. 105 - 108
6.
Math Through Children’s Literature...................................pp. 47 - 48
7.
It’s the Story that Counts.........................................................pp. 45 - 46
8.
It’s the Story that Counts.........................................................pp. 91
9.
It’s the Story that Counts.........................................................pp. 97
10. It’s the Story that Counts.........................................................pp. 99
11. Books You Can Count On...........................................................p. 26
12. Literature-Based Math Activities...........................................pp. 40 - 41
Mathematics Lesson Plan
The Doorbell Rang
Instructional Level: 2 or 3
Enabling Skills:
Gr. 2
Gr. 3
Materials:
12-11 Distribute items equally to
demonstrate division.
12-07 Integrate concrete, pictorial, and
symbolic representations of
multiplication/division facts to 9
The Doorbell Rang
cereal - Cookie Crisp or chosen manipulative
cookie template if wanted
paper folded to show 4 blocks
dozen cards
Preparation:
Have cookies already bagged at one dozen for each
child.
Suggested Homework:
Development:
Share the dozen cookies equally with the
people at your house. Draw a picture and
show how many cookies each person will get.
Write a number sentence to go with your
picture.
Set motivations: bring cookies, make paper cookies,
share, etc. Predict from the title, cover and
illustrations. Read to relate sharing to the division
concept.
Read the first 3 pages. Have the children draw a plate
for each child mentioned. Draw the number of
cookies on each plate. How many cookies did Ma
make? Write a number sentence to prove. Continue
in this manner until the end of the book (one problem
in each of the 4 boxes). Discuss how the cookies were
shared.
Turn the paper over and use it to record when you
reread the book.
This time, emphasize how many cookies Ma had to
start with--12. If using cookie cereal, pass out a dozen
pieces to each child. Now start with 12 cookies and
draw a plate for Sam and Victoria. Show how many
cookies each child will get when you divide 12 into 2
groups.
Complete the book recording each division problem.
Teacher should model the recording sentence on the
board if this is your introduction to division.
Continue the division using different amounts of
cookies and children.
Follow-up: Can include the following questions for discussion or a
follow up activity where they divide different numbers of
cookies among varying sizes of groups.
Ma said she had plenty of cookies. Did she?
How did they know that there were 6 each?
The students arrive is groups of 2 and a group of 6. Why
not a group of 3 or 5? What did the author have in mind?
Why does Ma suggest they eat the cookies before opening
the door?
How many students would there have to be outside the
door fir each child to get exactly half a cookie?
About how many cookies are there on Grandma's tray?
Have the students write and illustrate cookie problems.
Pupils may develop charts of servings, given trays of
cookies.
Organize students in groups. Assign a dozen card to each
group. The groups find ways to "fair share" that number of
cookies among 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12 children.
The Doorbell Rang
Writing activities
If you rewrote this story, what would happen if the number of cookies
changed? Have pairs of students work together to write their own version.
It might be helpful to some students to first explore why the author chose
12 cookies and groups of 2,3,4,6, and 12 children before they write their
own stories. Talk about other numbers of cookies and groups that would
result in no remainders. Have students write a division sentence at the
appropriate place in their stories. Students may decide to include
remainders. Allow time for students to share their stories.
Included in this packet is a template for writing their own story. This
makes an attractive bulletin board.
Another writing option is to answer the question at the end of the book.
Who was at the door? How many more cookies did Grandma bring? Now
how many cookies does each person get? Write the next chapter.
Cookie Sheets
An introduction to area
The Doorbell Rang
How large a cookie sheet would Grandma have used to bake her
cookies? Have students work in small groups to estimate or count the
number of cookies on Grandma’s tray. Have them cut out a life size paper
cookie. A template page of cookies is included. Provide groups with
newsprint, construction, or chart paper to represent a cookie sheet and
challenge them to find out how much area would be required to bake the
cookies in one batch.
Could you cover more tray area with round or with square cookies?
Explain your answer.
Other possible manipulatives aside from cut cookies and squares may
be the cereal Cookie-Crisp, color tiles and/or different sized tile squares
from a carpet store.
Sharing Cookies
Find each child’s share.
Write the matching number sentence.
1.
12 COOKIES
2 children
3 children
4 children
6 children
each
each
each
each
÷
=
÷
=
÷
=
÷
=
Favorite Cookie Graph
The cookies in the book are chocolate chip. Do you think chocolate
chip is the most popular cookie among members of your class? Have
students work in groups to design a survey to find out. Ask them to predict
the outcome. Groups may differ in what choices they offer on their survey,
how they phrase their survey question, and how they collect and record
their data.
One interesting possibility to introduce students to creating circle
graphs may be to use a paper plate and labeled clothespins. This may be
done as a class. Then, individual groups may prepare, conduct and present
their own survey, graph, (not necessarily a circle graph) and report.
Other graphs may be created: bar, line, or pictograph. Students could
survey other classes, their families, etc.
The Doorbell Rang
Extension Activities
Recipes
Children may bring in a favorite cookie recipe. Write their recipes on
chart paper and post around the room.
•
double a recipe
•
compare the recipe temperatures
•
which recipe use the least salt?
•
find equivalent measurements
•
identify standard vs. metric measures
•
how much milk would we need all together if we made all the recipes?
(eggs, flour, etc.)
•
act out measurements using water
•
use newspaper ads to determine costs
•
bind all recipes together for a class book
Cookie Bags
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Using a real bag of cookies:
play 20 questions
estimate the weight of the cookies
weigh the cookies
find the price, determine the change back if you pay a certain amount
estimate the probability of a broken cookie
graph (# of chips in cookies)
write ads
compare bags (size, measure, type of packaging)
create original story problems
Dozen Cards
3 dozen
4 dozen
5 dozen
6 dozen
7 dozen
8 dozen
Pattern
Ex.
Directions: Use the door pattern to write a division word problem. Follow
the cookie model in the story. Cut out the frame and 3 sides
of the door. Glue onto white paper. Illustrate the problem
inside.
Sharing Cookies
Ex.
Cookies
Children
Cookies
Each
Number
Sentence
18
3
6
18 ÷ 3 = 6
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Grain of Rice
Author:
Helena Clare Pittman
Publisher: Bantam Skylark
Math Concepts / Topics:
Problem Solving, Standard Numerals, Place
Value, Word Names, Estimation,
Doubling, Exponents, Number Patterns
Summary: Once a year, the Emperor of China opens the court to visitors.
One year, Pong Lo, the son of a farmer, tells the Emperor that he would like
to marry the princess . The Emperor refuses, the princess falls ill because
she has fallen in love with the young farmer. Pong Lo cures her with a
potion, and as a reward receives a grain of rice. This grain is to be doubled
every day for one hundred days.
Connecting Activities
•
Bring in a jar filled with rice. Give each student a grain of rice
through the day as a reward. Show the cover of the book and ask
students to predict what they think the story will be about.
•
Bring out the jar of rice, and have the students estimate how
many grains of rice there are in the jar. Ask them to justify their
estimate. List the variety of possible methods to solve this
problem.
•
Ask the children the following question: “What if Pong Lo had
received two grains of rice the first day?” Show how this can be
written in exponential form . The first day, Pong Lo received 2
grains of rice, the second day, 2 to the second power, etc.
Review base and exponent.
•
In the book, Pong Lo receives 549,754,213, 888 grains of rice.
Have the children write the word name for this standard
numeral, as well as the expanded notation. Ask the children to
write three examples of similar numerals in standard form, word
name, and in expanded form.
•
Present students with the idea of the rice doubling every day.
For example, day one, one grain of rice, day two, two grains, day
three, four grains, etc. Have students predict how many grains of
rice, Pong Lo will have on the fifth day, and the tenth day.
Connecting Activities (continued)
•
Create real applications of “What if?” situations that address
doubling. For example, what if you received a penny for your
allowance. The first day you receive one penny, the second day,
two cents, and so on. How much money would you receive at the
end of thirty days?
•
Determine the size of the container it would take to hold the rice
Pong Lo received on Day 10, Day 20, and Day 30. What if Pong
Lo had received a Hershey Kiss instead? What size container
would be required for Day 10, Day 20 and Day 30?
Extending Activities
•
Write a persuasive paragraph to convince your parents that you
should receive an allowance of a penny the first day, two cents
the second, four cents the third day, etc. for a month.
•
Brainstorm other ways Pong Lo could have convinced the
Emperor to allow him to marry the Princess.
•
Write a paragraph explaining why or why not you would have
chosen to be a friend of Pong Lo.
•
Answer the following question: “Do you feel Pong Lo was a wise
person?” Support your answer with details from the story.
•
After reading this book, compare and contrast the life of an
Emperor and a peasant in China. Include a graphic organizer and
a paragraph.
•
Explain what you think the duties of an “Imperial
Mathematician” would be. (Refer to page 41 in the selection.)
•
Draw a map of China. Label and tell the location of the capital
using latitude and longitude.
•
Magic Card activity from I Hate Mathematics by Marilyn Burns.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
A Grain of Rice
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for grade 5 on exponential numbers.
2.
Teacher Key and Student Worksheet
3.
Connection and Extension activities
4.
Math Literature Resource Bibliography
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
Math Level 5
13-03
13-07
17-03
47-03
55-03
55-07
55-09
Show relationships among standard numerals,
expanded notation, and word names through
millions.
Expand a three digit number using multiples of
ten and exponential notation
Vocabulary : estimate, expanded notation,
exponent, reasonableness,repeated
pattern,standard numeral,place value
Select and apply appropriate strategies to solve
life problems
Complete/describe a number pattern or
sequence including exponents
Explore/describe number pattern or sequence
including exponents
Solve for a missing number/variable in a
number including exponents for numbers
Materials:
A Grain of Rice by Helena Clare Pittman
Jar filled with rice
Worksheet- "A Grain of Rice"
Preparation:
Fill a jar with rice. Prepare worksheets.
Suggested Homework: Look in the newspaper or magazine from home.
Find three examples of numbers in the millions.
Write the standard numeral, expanded notation, and
word names. Expand one of these examples using
multiples of ten and exponential notation.
Development:
1.
Bring in a jar filled with rice. Give each student a grain of rice
through the day as a reward. Show the cover of the book and ask
students to predict what they think the story will be about.
2.
Teacher reads the novel through page 39. Discuss the totals for
each day so far, and look for a pattern. Have the students calculate
the total of grains for Day 11. Check the total given for Day 12 to
see if it follows the pattern.
3.
Have students work cooperatively to complete Days 13 through
Days 17 on the attached worksheet.
4.
Students will independently complete Days 18 through 40 on their
worksheet.
5.
As teacher continues to read the novel, page 40 to the end, the
students will check their worksheets for the Days 18, 20,25,30,
and 40. The answers for these days are given in the selection.
6.
Students will write the totals for Days 35-40 in expanded notation
and word names.
7.
Students will write the totals for Days 8-10 using multiples of ten
and exponential notation.
Follow-up: Bring out the jar of rice, and have the students estimate how
many grains of rice there are in the jar. Ask them to justify
their estimate. List the variety of possible methods to solve this
problem.
TEACHER KEY
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
Day
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
A Grain of Rice by Helena Clare Pittman
1 grain of rice
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
256
512
2,048
131,072
524,288
16,777,216
EMPEROR’S MATHEMATICIAN, “Your Majesty...by next
month that young man will own all the rice in China!”
Day 27
Day 28
Day 29
Day 30
536,870,912 grains of rice
Days 31 - 39
Day 40
549,754,213,888 grains of rice
Five hundred forty-nine billion,seven hundred fiftyfour million, two hundred thirteen thousand,
eight hundred eighty-eight grains of rice!!!!!!
Pong Lo married the Princess Chang Wu...NO MORE RICE!!!
“A Grain of Rice”
NAME:
Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10 Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15 Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20 Day 21 Day 22 Day 23 Day 24 Day 25 Day 26 Day 27 Day 28 Day 29 Day 30 Day 31 Day 32 Day 33 Day 34 Day 35 Day 36 Day 37 Day 38 Day 39 -
1 grain of rice
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
256
512
Day 40 -
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Grandfather Tang’s Story
Author:
Ann Tompert
Publisher: Crown Publishers, Inc.
Math Concepts / Topics:
Geometry
Summary: Grandfather Tang and Little Soo enjoy making shapes with their
tangram pieces. Grandfather tells a story of two foxes, who use their powers
to become other animals. As he tells the story he uses the pieces to make
the animal shapes.
Connecting Activities
•
Introduce tangrams. An explanation can be found on the last page of
the book.
•
Compare and classify tangram pieces according to size and shape.
•
Arrange pieces of puzzle into a square.
•
Manipulate pieces to make other objects using all pieces without
overlapping.
•
Create animal tangrams. (Tangram animal shapes included in
packet.)
Extending Activities
•
Have students use tangrams to tell stories you have created
•
Create a class book with tangram characters.
•
Make the 7 tangram pieces by folding and cutting apart an 8”x8”
square. Directions are in Math Through Children’s Literature, pp.
73-74.
•
Send a tangram puzzle home with each child. students are to
explain tangram to parents, and create a tangram together.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Grandfather Tang’s Story
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for Level 2 or 3
2.
Character Sheet
3.
Tangram Pattern
4.
Character Patterns from the Story
5.
Numbered Tangram Pattern
6.
Tangram Shape Sheet
7.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Math and Literature (K-3).....................................................................p. 62
Storytime Mathtime....................................................................pp. 82 - 96
Read Any Good Math Lately.....................................................p. 154 -156
Math Through Children’s Literature......................................pp. 72 -75
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Grandfather Tang's Story
Instructional Level:
2 or 3
Enabling Skill(s): 32-11
32-13
Materials:
Describe characteristics of two and three
dimensional shapes and effects of combining
them.
Demonstrate congruency, symmetry,
reflection, two dimensional rotation (slides and
turns)
Grandfather Tang's Story, by Ann Tompert
a baggie for each child
tangram puzzle pattern (available as die cut)
tangram shape sheet activity
tangram animal shape patterns
Preparation:
Use the tangram pattern (with or without numbers) to
prepare student puzzle pieces.
Suggestion: run off on index paper. Cut apart and place
the 7 puzzle pieces in a baggie. Prepare one puzzle in a
baggie for each student.
Suggested Homework: Send puzzle pieces home with each child. students
are to explain tangrams to their parents, and create a
tangram together.
Development:
Teacher says: "I am going to read you a Chinese story about
fox fairies. According to Chinese folklore, fox fairies live for
eight hundred to one thousand years. They could change
themselves into any animal. The storyteller uses tangrams
to illustrate the animals that the fox fairies changed into.
Show the class the seven pieces of the tangram puzzle.
Explain "A tangram begins, with a square. It is divided into
seven standard pieces. You can arrange the seven pieces to
create a picture of anything you want."
Challenge the students to use the tangram pieces to form a
square.
Next, have students rearrange all seven pieces to make one
of the fox fairies from the story. Model how to make a fox.
(See animal pattern sheet in packet.)
Distribute prepared baggies to the students. Let the
children explore by making the fox.
Read Grandfather Tang's Story. There are two fox fairies in
this story. Their names are Chou and Wu Ling. Stop reading
right before Chou or Wu Ling changes into a different
animal. Have students use the clues given to predict what
animal the next change will be. Allow the students time to
form each new animal with their tangrams. Discuss shape
names that form the new animals. For example: The head
of the rabbit is a square OR the tail of the lion is a
parallelogram.
Continue reading the story. Stop at appropriate places in
the story to predict and form images with the tangram
pieces.
Upon completion of the story, use the character sheet to list
the animals changes and the reason for each change.
Give each child a large sheet of white construction paper.
Have the students explore the pieces by rearranging them
on the construction paper. Make "tangranimals",
resembling either real or imaginary animals.
After this exploration, have students select one of the
animals they have created. Students should trace each
tangram piece of their chosen animal onto the construction
paper. Color the animal and create background details.
Have students write an original story about their
"tangranimal".
Follow-up: Share original stories.
Tangram shape sheet activity.
TANGRAM
NUMBERED TANGRAMS
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Greedy Triangle
Author:
Marilyn Burns
Publisher: Scholastic Inc.
Math Concepts / Topics:
Geometry
Summary: A triangle is dissatisfied with its shape so it asks a shape shifter
to add more lines and angles until the triangle doesn’t know which side is
up.
Connecting Activities
•
Have students draw one triangle on a piece of paper. Ask: How
many sides? Tell them to draw two triangles. How many sides?
Continue with three, four, etc. Have students create a “T” table
on a sheet of paper to record their answers. If students do not
see a pattern, point out the numbers and ask if anybody sees a
pattern.
Extending Activities
•
•
•
Have students practice creating various polygons using the
geoboard. One way is to play a game similar to “battleship”. One
person (the “describer”) creates a polygon without the other
person (the “guesser”) looking. The “guesser” turns his/her back
with a geoboard in his/her lap. As the “describer” explains how
to create the intended shape, the “guesser” must try to create the
same shape on his/her board. Both students must use
mathematical terms. (Another version is to have the “guesser”
ask questions (yes or no questions) to gain enough information to
create the shape.) The players then compare their boards to see
if they were successful in creating the same shape.
Math journals: Write your definition of a polygon. Select one
polygon and describe it using mathematical terms. Answer this
question: What would happen if the shapeshifter continued to
make sides and angles on the shape? What might the triangle
become? (Teacher may want to provide a pipe cleaner for
students to test predictions.)
Have the students create riddles about each shape. Ex: My shape
is a closed shape. It has 4 sides. Can you draw (or create on a
geoboard) my shape (This type of riddle allows students to see
relationships between a variety of shapes (quadrilateral, rectangle,
parallelogram, square, rhombus, etc.)
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Greedy Triangle
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson for Level 3
2.
Polygons data chart
3.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Additional resources for this literature selection:
1.
2.
Burns, Marilyn, “Close Encounters with Shapes”, Instructor Magazine,
January/February 1995, .............................................................. pp. 24-25
Math and Literature (K-3), Book Two.....................................pp. 26-31
Mathematics Lesson Plan
The Greedy Tangle
Instructional Level:
3
Enabling Skills:
Material:
25-19 Estimate and find perimeter of polygons
32-11 Describe characteristics of 2 and 3 dimensional
shapes and effects of combining them.
32-13 Demonstrate congruency, symmetry, reflection,
two dimensional rotations (slides and turns).
The Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns
geoboards
geobands (rubber bands)
pattern blocks
Preparation:
Suggested Homework:
Development:
1.
Provide each student with a geoboard and one geoband. Tell the
students to use the band to create a shape on the geoboard.
(Suggestion: Set you expectations for the "do's and don'ts" of using
rubber bands. Calling them "geobands" sends the message that the
bands are math tools and not to be used in another manner.)
2.
After students have created the shape, use "concept attainment"
to develop the concept of a polygon (a closed figure with more than 2
sides). Some possible ideas students may share are: not open spaces,
straight sides, angles or turns.
Concept Attainment (Guess my rule): On the board draw a "T" chart.
On one side write "yes" and on the other write "no". Select one or two
examples from the students' work that fits the definition of a polygon
and examples that do not fit the definition on the chalk ledge under
the correct heading. Continue to add examples until students think
they know the rule you have in mind. They are to raise their hand
when they think they know your "rule". When students think they
know your "rule" allow them to select another example from the class
that fits one of the categories and place it accordingly. They should not
tell the answer aloud. When the majority of the class seems to know
the "rule" allow students to share their ideas. Have students write a
definition of a polygon from the examples on the chalk ledge.
3.
Tell the class that today they will listen to a story that describes
many different polygons. As they listen to the story they should draw a
picture of the shape and write as many describing words about the
shape as they can. A piece of paper folded into fourths should work
well for this activity. (Students should stop after "hexagon" since the
other shapes are not described or shown very clearly.)
4.
Create a class chart of the 5 polygons mentioned in the story.
You may want to add octagon since children may be familiar with the
term. (*See the attached matrix to organize the information. An
overhead transparency of the matrix or a class chart would work well
in the classroom. You may want each child to have a copy to complete
as you discuss the polygons.) It is at this time you may want to
introduce the formal language used to describe shapes. (sides, angles,
closed/opened figures)
Follow-up:
1.
Have students practice created various polygons using the
geoboard. One way is to play a game similar to "Battleship". One
person (the "describer") creates a polygon without the other person
(the "guesser") looking. The "guesser" turns his/her back with a
geoboard in his/her lap. As the "describer" explains how to create the
intended shape the "guesser" must try to create that same shape on
his/her board. One rule is that both students must use mathematical
terms.
Another version is to have the "guesser" ask questions (yes and no
questions) to gain enough information to create the shape.
The players then compare their boards to see if they were successful
in creating the same shape.
2.
Math journals: Write you definition of a polygon. Select one
polygon and describe it using mathematical terms. Answer this
question: What would happen if the shapeshifter continued to make
sides and angles on the shape? What might the triangle become? (You
may want to provide a pipecleaner for students to test their
predictions.)
3.
Have the students create riddles about each shape. Ex: My shape
is a closed shape. It has 4 sides. Can you draw my shape (or create the
shape on the geoboard).
Polygons Data Chart
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Grouchy Ladybug
Author:
Eric Carle
Publisher: Scholastic Book Services
Math Concepts / Topics:
time to the 1/4 hour and 1/2 hour,
measurement, counting, sequence,
comparison, fractions
Summary: The grouchy ladybug is looking for someone to fight, no matter
how big. From sunrise to sunset the ladybug badgers and bullies until she
finds herself back where she started. Finally, tired and wet, she accepts the
friendship of another ladybug.
Connecting Activities
• Length - size of animals
• Discuss seasonal activities
• Relate circle, square, triangle and rectangle to objects in the
environment
• Find patterns
Extending Activities
•
Make different “animals” clocks
•
Design a ladybug clock
•
Write digital times
•
Follow Eric Carl’s flipbook style to make a book about another
animal’s adventure for a day
•
Research ladybugs / life science integration
•
Dramatize the story
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Grouchy Ladybug
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for grade 1 on time.
2.
Connection and Extension activities lists
3.
Child’s Recipe Book
4.
Connecting Clock Paper
5.
Inside page of Clock Book
6.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Additional Resources:
1.
Math Through Children’s Literature ...............................................p. 78
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level: 1
Enabling Skill(s):
18-03
25-17
25-13
42
45
47-07
Materials:
Preparation:
Vocabulary
Tell time to hour and half hour
Discuss seasonal activities
Collect, organize, and display data; and
interpret information in oral and written form
Demonstrate basic concepts of probability such
as predicting and finding outcomes
Relate math experiences in daily life using
clocks, lunch money, bus numbers, etc.
Construction paper, paper with clock on it.
Recipe book and connecting clock paper.
Make clock books and recipe books. This book can be
used at the end of your time unit. Excellent review and
assessment.
Suggested Homework:
Have students play time games related to telling time.
Take clocks home to retell story.
Development:
Before:
Build background on ladybugs and aphids. Show book
survey, identify, predict and do chosen vocabulary in
context. Make clocks for each child. The beginning of the
story reviews time to the hour. The end reviews time to the
half-hour.
During:
Read story for enjoyment. Then re-read and encourage
active listening. As you read, children follow along using
their own clocks to show each time. They may work in
pairs. Question and discuss at appropriate times during
reading.
After:
Demonstrate joint hand movement on a real clock.
Follow-up:
Make a clock activity book.
Practice elapsed time with cook books (in pairs).
Create his/her own story about any animal and its activities
throughout the day.
Start - 12:00
Stop - 1 hour later
Start - 2:00
Stop - 1 hour later
Start - 3:00
Stop - half past 3
Start - 4:00
Stop - 1 hour later
Start - 8:30
Stop - 1 hour later
11
12
1
11
2
10
4
8
7
6
5
1
2
10
3
9
12
3
9
4
8
7
6
5
Food
Start
Stop
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
How Big Is A Foot?
Author:
Rolf Myller
Publisher: Dell Publishing
Math Concepts / Topics: Measurement
Summary: The King wants to give the queen a bed for her birthday. No one
knows how big a bed is. The King has an apprentice that tries to make a bed
for the Queen.
Connecting Activities
•
Non-standard measuring (paper clips, toothpicks, Unifix Blocks)
•
Use teacher made measuring tape (non-standard) by using stickers
lined up on a strip of paper.
•
Measure with inches.
Extending Activities
•
Estimate, measure, compare student heights with their own
foot, then find the class “standard.”
•
Compare your own foot to an actual “foot.”
•
Paste 3 of their own foot outlines to make a “yard” stick. Use
the yard stick to measure with.
•
Write a letter to the apprentice telling he/she how to get the
bed the right size for the Queen.
•
Talk about what careers use measuring each day.
(carpenter, plumber, mechanic, landscaper, seamstress, etc.)
•
Measure distances in the room using their feet.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
How Big Is A Foot?
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for Level 1
2.
Student Record Sheets for Level 1 lesson:
“Measuring With Footprints”
“Taking the Big Step!”
“Measurement Recording Sheet”
3.
Lesson Plan for Level 2
4.
Student Record Sheets for Level 2 lesson:
Letter to the King
Measurement Worksheet
5.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Additional Resources:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Math and Literature ................................................................................p. 49
Read Any Good Math Lately? ..........................................................pp. 8-9
..........................................................................................................pp. 170-171
Math Through Children’s Literature ..................................pp. 99-101
Literature-Based Math Activities ............................................pp. 64-65
Mathematics Lesson Plan
How Big Is A Foot?
Instructional Level:
1
Enabling Skills(s): 25-03 Use standard and nonstandard units for length, ,
liquid capacity
18-03 Vocabulary:
bar graph, estimate, equal
Materials:
How Big Is A Foot?, by Rolf Myller
Newspaper
12 inch foot to measure with
“Measuring with Footprints” (1 per students)
“Taking the Big Step!” (1 per students)
“Measuring Recording Sheet” (1 per students)
Preparation:
Have taught previously some non-standard and standard
(inches) measurement
Paper for graph (see attached)
Ask principal (or a parent) to come in for part of the
lesson
Copies of 12 inch foot selected from students
Duplicate “Measuring with Footprints”, “Taking the Big
Step!”, “Measuring Recording Sheet” pages.
Suggested Homework: Use your foot to measure your bed and a family
member’s bed (see attached sheet)
Development:
Day 1:
1. Read book through the page where the king measures
the queen for her bed with his feet.
2.
Tell the students “The King used his feet to measure
for a bed for the queen. Now we’ll prepare a pattern
we can use to measure a bed for yourself”. Group
students in pairs.
3.
Each pair gets several layers of newspaper. As one
child puts their foot on the paper, the partner traces
the foot. The child cuts out their own foot pattern,
cutting through all layers of newspaper. Each child
needs at least 10 outlines of their feet.
4.
Now partners will measure like the king did with
their foot, using both the width and the length,
recording data.
5.
Go over homework sheet.
(Teacher needs to keep one foot for each child with
their name for the next days lesson.)
Day 2:
1. Reread part of the book from the previous day.
2.
Read each new part of the book to the page where
the apprentice is put in jail.
3.
Each child measures their foot in inches, using the
newspaper pattern from the previous day.
4.
Each child colors the corresponding square on the
the class graph to indicate the length of their foot.
5.
Children serial order their paper “feet” on the floor
from the shortest to the longest and discuss.
6.
Have the children vote on a way to choose the class
“standard” to measure with. Discuss why.
7.
Invite in the principal for the next activity. Trace his/
her foot, cut out several copies, then tell the children
that this pattern will represent the “King’s” foot.
8.
Divide the children into 2 teams (one team will use
the class standard foot and the other will use the
King’s foot to measure.)
9.
Teams complete “Measuring with Footprints.”
10. Share results on a class chart.
11. Have students will complete their own “Taking the
Big Step!” page.
Day 3:
1. Review what you have previously read in the book and
read to the end. Discuss.
2.
Discuss how 12 inches equals 1 foot.
3.
Each student will make a 12 in. foot.
4.
In pairs, students need to find 2 things in the room
that are more than a foot, but no more than 6 feet.
5.
Follow-up:
Assign “Measurement Recording Sheet” for
homework.
Use inch-long paper clips to keep track of the
number of days left in the school year (link those
remaining together).
The linked chain can be used as warm-up for
measuring objects with non-standard units.
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
Materials:
2
25-03
Estimate/measure lengths to nearest meter,
centimeter, foot, inch
How Big is a Foot? by Rolf Myller
3' x 6' sheets of packaging paper (1 per group)
Scissors
Letter to king
Measuring worksheet
Preparation:
Cut paper to size. These need not be exact as students will
cut them. However, this is the size prescribed by the king if
his feet are 1' in length.
Print letter (1 per student)
Suggested Homework: Have students measure their bed in their foot size
and in standard feet.
Development:
Read How Big is a Foot? to the point where the job of
making the bed has been given to the apprentice.
Tell the students that they are going to pretend to be the
apprentice. Set up groups of 3 to 4 students.
Present this as a problem using the steps of SOAR.
State the problem. Ask the students to give the problem. It
should be something like "we need to make a bed for the
queen."
Ask them if they know any data that is needed to solve the
problem. The answer is that the bed must be 3' wide and
6' long.
Organize. Ask the students what they will need to solve this
problem. Hopefully, they will respond with:
materials for the bed (give them the paper)
scissors
Have the groups plan how they will solve the problem.
Attack the problem. Have the groups make their beds.
Review. Tell the students that ______ will pretend to be
the queen. This can be a teacher, principal, etc. Bring in
the queen and have the students test their beds.
Continue reading the book to see what happened in the
story. Stop reading when the apprentice is in jail thinking.
Now, each of the students will pretend to be the apprentice.
Using the letter template, have the students write a letter
to the king explaining what went wrong and offering a
solution for correcting the problem.
Have the students share their letters.
Now, complete reading the book. Talk with the students
about the importance of standard units of measure. Talk
about a measuring device that is 1' long and that it is called
a "ruler". If this name came from the book, why is it called a
ruler?
Ask the students how big they think the apprentice's
measuring device is? Have them look at the picture.
Follow-up:
Have the students measure other things around the room
with their feet and with standard feet. A template is
provided is desired.
How Big is a Foot?
Pick 5 things in the room and measure each with your foot and with a standard foot.
Item
Example
My Foot
Estimate
Measurement
Standard Foot
Estimate
Measurement
Mathematics Lesson Plan How Much is a Million
Instructional Level:
4
Enabling Skill(s):
13-03 Show relationships among standard numerals
Materials:
Literature Selection: "How much is a Million" (Use the selection
at the conclusion of the lesson to reinforce the concepts taught
rather than to introduce the lesson!)
Base ten blocks: You will need at least 10 "one thousand" cubes
12 meter sticks
Preparation:
Included in this packet is pattern for one thousand cubes. You
may need to prepare several of these for the lesson if you don't
have at least 10.
Development:
1. As a warm-up have the class think-pair-share definitions for: cube,
square, base ten, and digit.
2. As an introduction to the lesson ask the question, "How much is a
million?" Accept all responses. You don't need to comment on the
responses as right or wrong, good or not good.
3. Tell the students that the question you asked was actually somewhat
vague! You could have been talking about a million dollars or a million cats
or a million grains of sand. Actually it would have been a much better
question had you specified exactly what you were talking about! Tell them
that rather than answering the question they should have asked you the
question, "A million what?"
4. Ask the students (again) "How much is a million?" More than likely some
wise student will respond with, "A million what?" At this point your
response should be, "Well, I'm glad you asked!" Show the students a one
(centimeter) cube. Say, "I want you to tell me how big a million of these
cubes would be. What would a million of these look like? How much space
would they take up? Would they fit in this room? In this school?" Hand out
one to each student. Tell them to use this object as a tool (which is
something you work with) to help them determine the size of a million.
Remind them that if they use the cube as a toy (which is something you play
with!) you will have to take it back.
5. After the students have offered several guesses, remind them that a
million is a big number and that it is difficult even for adults to imagine how
much space a million of anything might take up. Suggest that it might be
easier if we start small and work our way up.
6. Ask the students to predict what size ten might be. Usually this is quite
simple for them. Have them "show" the size by holding up their hands.
Next say, "Well let's find out." Count out ten ones into a student's hand.
Show them an actual ten rod. Ask them to identify the shape. Remind them
that the company who makes the blocks calls this a "rod" or a "long."
7. Create a chart on the board that shows place value and list shapes of the
base ten blocks. (see below)
T
O
ROD CUBE
8. Ask the students what comes next in place value. When they say
"hundred", ask them to show what size a hundred is with their hands. Start
to count out a hundred ones and then ask the students if there is an easier
way. They should suggest to count by tens. Ask how many tens they will
need to get to one hundred (10). Count them out.
9. Show them a "hundred flat". Ask them what shape this makes. Remind
them that the company who makes these blocks calls this a "hundred flat".
Record the shape on the chart.
10. Ask what comes next in place value. Ask what you can count by to easily
get to one thousand. Ask how many hundreds it will take to reach one
thousand. Count them out. Ask what shape this makes (cube). Record on
the chart.
11. At this point you can ask the students if they have noticed any patterns.
Some of them will notice that it takes ten of each manipulative at any place
value to make the shape of the next place value. (ie. ten ones is ten; ten tens
is one hundred; ten hundreds is one thousand). Ask if they can imagine the
size and shape of a million now that they know the size and shape of one
thousand. (Most still can't!)
12. Ask the students to identify the next place in place value. At this point
they should realize that it will take ten "one thousand cubes" to make the
next shape. Many students will guess that the next place in place value is a
million. Instead of saying no, accept this as a possibility and suggest the
class count by thousands to the next place. Count out ten one thousand
blocks with the class so they realize that ten one thousands is in fact "ten
thousand."
13. Ask the students what shape the ten thousand is. Once they recognize
that it is a rod, record this on the chart. Ask them to study the chart to see
another pattern besides the repeating ten pattern. Hopefully they will
recognize the repeating cube, rod, flat pattern.
H
T
O
Th
Th
Th H
T
O
F
C - Cube
R - Rod
R
C
F
R
C
F - Flat
14. Now ask them to use the information they have learned so far to make
several predictions about the next place in place value. Ask the students to
work with a partner to answer these questions: "What is the name of the
next place in place value? (one hundred thousand), What shape will it be? (
A flat of course...it's a pattern!), How many ten thousand rods will it take to
make one? (ten of course...it's a pattern!)"
15. Once the students recognize the patterns of repeating tens and cube,
rod, flat, see if they see yet another pattern. They should be able to identify
the repeating ones, tens, and hundreds place. Students should have
identified the next place value as "one hundred thousand." This will be
difficult to physically demonstrate unless you have created 100 "one
thousand cubes". You can use meter sticks to build a model. Each ten
thousand rod is exactly one meter. (Cardboard ten thousand rods could also
be constructed.)
16 Now ask students to work with their partner and use the patterns and
models they have seen to describe what the next place in place value will
look like. We have finally reached a million! They should be able to tell you
it is a "cube", it takes ten "one hundred thousand flats" to make one, and it is
called "one million."
17. You can create a model of a one million cube with 12 meter sticks. One
million centimeter cubes creates one cubic meter. Ask the students if the
million cube is anything like the shape they imagined when the lesson first
started.
Follow-up:
Ask students to complete the activity page (attached). To further
demonstrate the incredible quantity of one million, read the literature
selection "How Much is a Million?".
Students can also create a 2 dimensional (2-D) model of a million using
millimeter grid paper (attached). A million square millimeters will form a
square meter!
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
How Much is a Million?
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson plan for base ten
2.
"A Million Is A Lot" Student pages
3.
Millimeter Grid Sheet
4.
Centimeter Cube Pages - Blackline of 1,000 Cube
5.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
Read Any Good Math Lately? .................................................pp. 1, 2, 130
2.
Math Through Children's Literature ..................................p. 53
3.
It's The Story That Counts .....................................................pp. 39, 39, 6572, 91, 122-124
4.
Literature-Based Math Activities .........................................pp. 24-25
Name______________________________________________
A Million is a Lot!!!
A million is a lot! I’ll show you what I mean! Try and answer the
following questions. They’re kind of tough but you can work
them out. Use your problem solving strategies and don’t give up
too quickly!
1. Suppose your teacher said you could be excused from all
regular class work to do a special assignment. Sounds good so
far doesn’t it? This is the assignment! Take one million cubic
centimeters and stack them up into a perfect cube! No problem!
It will take you one second to place each cube. Your teacher
says “No breaks...except for lunch!” That means you will be
stacking cubes for 6 hours each school day! the question is
“How long will it take you to stack all one million? Remember,
one per second for 6 hours each day!
Well, get started! There is some space below to show your
work. A few hints.: There are 60 seconds in each minute and 60
minutes in each hour! Also, if you use manipulatives it might
help you ! Good luck!
Name______________________________________________
2. What if your teacher decided it would be fun to take one
million centimeter cubes and lay them end to end! Some wacky
teacher your probably thinking, but just suppose it really
happened! How far would they stretch from beginning to end? If
you said “one million centimeters “you would be absolutely
right but I want the answer in kilometers.
Before you get started you might want to get more familiar with
metric measurement! Find out how many centimeters are in a
meter and how many meters are in a kilometer. I will tell you
that a kilometer is .62 miles or about 6/10 of a mile. Of course
that doesn’t help you solve the problem but it will help you
calculate the distance that a million centimeters stretch in
miles!
Again, good luck! You may want to consult your problem solving
strategies before you get started! This kind of problem won’t
be easy unless you get yourself organized!
Name______________________________________________
Answer Key
#1 Every minute you can stack 60 cubes! So in one hour that
would be 60 x 60 or 3,600 cubes. After six hours you would have
a stack of 21,600. That’s just 2 ten thousand rods, a one
thousand cube and 6 hundred flats! Still a long way to go! After
10 school days you could stack 216,000 cubes. After 40 days
you would be up to 824,000. You’re getting closer! 46 days will
get you close but you won’t be able to finish until your 47th day!
Wow, that’s over 9 weeks of school! Four million would take you
the whole school year!
#2 A million centimeters! That’s far! One hundred centimeters
is one meter. Kilo means one thousand so a kilometer is a
thousand meters.
1,000 x 100 is 100,000! That makes sense doesn’t it? So each
kilometer is one hundred thousand centimeters. Since 10
hundred thousand flats is equal to one million, 10 kilometers
must be the same as a million centimeters. If a kilometer is .62
miles then 10 kilometers is 6.2 miles. That really is far!
Imagine running along for even one mile and the whole time
you’re running all you see are these little centimeter cubes
lined up one after the other as far as you could see! Math rules!
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
How Tall Are You?
Author:
JoAnne Nelson
Publisher: Modern Curriculum Press
Math Concepts / Topics:
Subtraction, measurement
Summary: As a child grows, his height is monitored and recorded
Connecting Activities
•
Measure and graph students in the class.
•
Record the heights in the book and graph them.
•
Use the graph to predict how tall the boy will be when he is six.
•
Compare things other than height.
•
Compare quantities of coins to work on comparative subtraction.
Extending Activities
•
Have students measure their feet with unifix cubes and write
number sentences to compare sizes.
•
Use the graphs mentioned above to write subtraction (or addition)
sentences .
•
Have students measure their family members with paper rulers (in
inches). Bring the data to school for height comparisons.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
How Tall Are You?
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson plan for Level 1 on comparitive subtraction
2.
My Pockets sheet
3.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
1
Enabling Skill(s): 12-09 Integrate concrete, pictorial, and symbolic
representations of sums/differences 0-10
12-11 Integrate concrete, pictorial, and symbolic
representations of sums/differences for two-digit numbers
without regrouping
Materials:
Unifix cubes
Pennies
My Pockets Mat
How Tall Are You by JoAnne Nelson
Preparation:
Make a copy of the My Pockets Mat for each student.
Development:
Begin by discussing comparing things.
We use "more than" and "less than to compare numbers.
Ask the children to identify some more than and less than
things in the room.
There are other words we use to compare things.
When we compare sizes, we use "larger" and "smaller".
Are there other words like larger and smaller that we use.
Ex: longer, shorter, richer, poorer, heavier, lighter,
When things are the same, we call them equal. Talk
about some equal things they can see.
But when things are not equal, it is often helpful to
talk about how much they are different. Compare the
students ages which are a little different and my age which
is a lot different.
But sometimes it helps to know exactly how
different things are. I have a book that I'd like to share
with you to show what I mean.
Read How Tall Are You. As you read, talk about how
much growth occurred. Talk about how you could find
how much more or taller.
Let's try to figure out how many more boys or girls
their are in the class. How could we solve this problem?
Let's look at another problem. I have some pennies
in each of my pockets. How many do you think I have in
each. Give them some clues until they have the correct
numbers for each pocket. Now let's see if we can figure
out how many more coins I had in one pocket than the
other. Talk about how we can represent this as a number
sentence. Maybe you can discover it yourself. Do several
more of these games together. Talk about why subtraction
can help with this (use pairing up in order to see what is
left.)
Have the students play the game together and create
their own pockets. After using the coins, have them draw
the coins, then write the number sentence at the bottom.
Follow-up: Have the students measure their feet with
unifix cubes (or inches if they have worked at measuring in
inches.) Have them write word and number sentences
about their feet. Ex: John's feet are 8 cubes. My feet are 6
cubes. John's feet are 2 cubes longer. 8 - 6 = 2
Tape a measuring tape to the chalkboard. Have children
use sticky paper with their name on it and have them stick
their paper up where they think is their approximate
height. Children to use measuring tapes to measure
heights. Make a chart on graph paper to show their
heights.
My Pockets
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
1 Hunter
Author:
Pat Hutchins
Publisher: Mulberry Books
Math Concepts / Topics:
Counting, Number words, Estimation, Problem
Solving
Summary: A Hunter goes into the jungle and passes by 2 elephants, 3 giraffes,
4 ostriches....10 parrots.
Connecting Activities
•
Practice counting-pictures of groups of animals, estimate are there
more or less than ten?
•
Practice problem solving skill - Draw a picture
•
Talk about patterns.
•
Practice recognizing numerals 1-10.
Extending Activities
•
Create class 1 Hunter book change characters, number of organisms
•
Read books that have the same pattern i.e. One Gorilla, Ten Black
Dots
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
1 Hunter
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for grade 1 on problem solving using Make a Picture
2.
Numbers for number puzzles
3.
Math Literature Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
Math and Literature (K-3)....................................................... p. 8
2.
Books You Can Count On.....................................................p. 18
Mathematics Lesson Plan
1 Hunter by Pat Hutchins
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
1
12-03
15-03
15-07
17-03
47-03
Use words zero through thirty-one
Use ordinal numbers through thirty-first
Use numbers in sequence and random through
99
Estimate the number of objects in a set as being
greater than or less than ten
Select and apply appropriate strategies
Materials:
1 Hunter by Pat Hutchins
Number puzzles
names of animals on sentence strips
Preparation:
Cut apart numbers place in plastic bags.
Write names of animals on sentence strips: Hunter,
elephants, giraffes, ostriches, antelopes, tigers, crocodiles,
monkeys, snakes, parrots.
Development:
Share book 1 Hunter by Pat Hutchins with class. Looking at
cover discuss what they think we will read about in the book.
What is a hunter? Do you know any hunters? How do you
think animals feel about hunters? Read book.
Pose the challenge question, How many animals (organisms)
are in the book 1 Hunter? Can we estimate? Do you think
there are more than 10 or less than ten? Why? Discuss
estimates. Have students fill out more or less than sheet
(individually or in groups). Ask students to explain thinking.
How can we find out exactly how many animals are in the
book? Accept answers. If someone suggests counting in
book, ask if there is a way to see all the pages at one time?
Could we make pages like the pages in the book to help us
count?
Use number puzzles to group students into 9 or 10 groups.
(decide if the hunter is an animal or not, group consensus).
Give each group a baggie with number puzzle inside. Group
puts together puzzle and glues the numeral on paper
Groups will draw a picture to go with the numeral.
Put all pictures on board and group count animals. Compare
with estimates.
Follow-up:
1.
2.
Have students sort animals explaining their reasons for
groupings.
Make a class book based on 1 Hunter,possibly changing
the animals, or the title(i.e. 1 Student).
12
34
56
78
9
10
1234
5678
9 10
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Author:
Publisher:
Math Concepts /
Inch by Inch
Leo Lioni
Astor-Honor, Inc.
Topics:
Measurement, estimation, comparison,
classification
Summary: A tale of a friendly inchworm who is in danger of being eaten by
several birds. He cleverly inches his way to safety my measuring.
Connecting Activities
•
copy illustrations from book; give to teams to measure using nonstandard measure, then measure using inches
•
make 12 inch ruler of “inchworm”
•
use ruler to practice finding objects in room or desk that are so
many inches long (see recording sheet)
•
have students create their own animal pictures, trade, and measure
•
discuss how many inches are in a foot; how many “inchworms” are
in one foot?
Extending Activities
•
Go to a store and locate items that have units of measure printed on
them (i.e. picture frames, bedspreads, etc.)
•
Use inch measurements to discuss foot and yard, etc.
•
Scavenger Hunt - have students find objects out on the playground
that are different, predetermined measurements
•
Write an inchworm story - change the setting of the story from that
of the book
•
Find out more about inchworms
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Inch by Inch
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan
2.
Student Record Sheet
3.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Additional Resources:
1.
Read Any Good Math Lately................................................................p. 170
2.
Literature-Based Math Activities...............................................pp. 66-67
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Inch by Inch
Instructional Level:
1
Enabling Skills(s):
25-03
25-13
42-03
47-07
Use standard and nonstandard units for length,
weight, liquid capacity
Discuss seasonal activities
Construct/interpret a picture/bar graph
Relate math experiences in daily life using clocks,
lunch money, bus number, etc.
Materials:
Inch by Inch by Leo Lioni
Recording sheet
Card stock
Rulers (standard)
Yardsticks
Drawing paper
Preparation:
Have students’ “Recording Sheets” copied in advance
Run off copies of “inchworm” rulers on card stock
Suggested Homework:
Take home inchworm rulers to measure
specific things.
Development:
(could be integrated with Organisms unit)
Spend a day or two with non-standard measurement using
pasta, paper clips, straws, etc. to measure objects in the
classroom.
Discuss what an inchworm is. Has anyone ever seen one?
Share the book Inch be Inch.
Refer to “Connecting Activities” and “Extending
Activities.”
Follow-up:
Use inch-long paper clips to keep track of the number of
days left in the school year (link those remaining
together).
The linked chain can be used as warm-up for measuring
objects with non-standard units.
Name:
Measurement Recording Sheet
In each box below, draw or write the name of an
object that is the size shown in that box.
about 1 inch
about 2 inches
high
about 3 inches
long
about 4 inches
around
about 6 inches
tall
about 9 inches
high
about 1 foot
about 2 feet
about 3 feet
Literature in Mathematics
Title: The King’s Commissioners
Author: Aileen Friedman
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Math Concepts / Topics: Place value, division with remainders, counting
patterns, addition with and without regrouping.
Summary:
A king has so many commissioners he loses track of them. He enlists
the help of his Royal Advisors and the Princess to help him count them. He
finds that there’s more than one way to count to 47.
Connecting Activities
• Use base ten blocks to build various numbers
• Play “Race to a Flat” (“Race to 100”)
Directions: Children begin with an empty place value board. Player 1
rolls die, adds ones to the board equal to the number rolled. Player 1
regroups when necessary. Player 2 then takes a turn adding one to the
place value board. Play continues until a player reaches one hundred.
Try playing “Race From 100”. Played in the same manner except the
players begin with one hundred on the board and take away the number
they have rolled on the die. Play continues until a player reaches zero.
Extending Activities
Write a note to the King explaining one of the ways the two Royal
Advisors and the Princess calculated the total number of
commissioners.
Brainstorm what all 47 commissioners’ jobs could be. If you could be
one of the commissioners, which one would you be and why?
How many ways can you write the numbers 36, 49, etc.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The King’s Commissioners
Contents of this packet:
1.
Grade 2 lesson plan for understanding numerical relationships in
grouping, place value and operations.
2.
Grade 3 lesson plan for multiplication and division facts to 9.
3.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
Math and Literature (K-3).......................................................p. 39 - 46
Mathematics Lesson Plan
The King's Commissioners
Instructional Level: 2
Enabling Skills: 13 Understanding numerical relationships in
grouping, place value, and operations
55-09 Counting patterns
Materials:
Base Ten Blocks or unifix cubes
place value boards or mats
dice
book - The King's Commissioners
Preparation: Organize Base Ten Blocks for each team. The following
amount should be sufficient: 1 flat, 11 rods, 15 cubes
Suggested Homework:
Development:
Have the students play "Race to 100" with a
family member. One suggestion is to make a
set of base ten blocks for each student using
the plastic canvas.
1. Ask the students, "Why would a king need a math?
Develop the concept of a commissioner as someone
who helps a king with important matters. What might
be some of the tasks the king would want
commissioners to help complete?
2. Read the story, stopping at the appropriate point to
predict how the king could solve his problem. What
strategies can we use to solve the problem? (Make a
table, draw a picture, etc.)
3. Continue reading the story discussing how each
person solved the problem. Which way was correct?
(All of them; there are many ways to solve the same
problem.)
4. Distribute unifix cubes or base ten blocks and have
the students count 47 cubes/blocks. Is there an
easier way to count 47 than one cube at a time.
Instruct the students that the problem today is to find
many different ways to count the commissioners.
Which way is quickest or easiest? Have students make
an illustration of the different combinations they
create on a large piece of newsprint folded into
fourths.
illustration of the different combinations they create
on a large piece of newsprint folded into fourths.
5. Allow time for teams to share the different solutions
they discovered.
Follow-up:
Focus the class on solving the problem using tens and
ones. Introduce the game, "Race to a Flat (or 100)".
Have students practicing trading tens and ones by
playing the game.
Mathematics Lesson Plan
The King's Commissioners
Instructional Level: 3
Enabling Skills: 12-09 Recall multiplication / division facts to 9.
Materials:
Base Ten Blocks or unifix cubes or other type counters
place value boards or mats
dice
book - The King's Commissioners
Hundred chart
Preparation: Organize Base Ten Blocks for each team. The following
amount should be sufficient: 1 flat, 11 rods, 15 cubes
Suggested Homework:
Development:
Have the students play "Race to 100" with a
family member. One suggestion is to make a
set of base ten blocks for each student using
the plastic canvas.
1. Develop the concept of a commissioner as someone
who helps a king with important matters. Brainstorm
tasks the king might need commissioners to help
complete? Why might a king need math?
2. Read the story stopping at the appropriate point to
predict how the king could solve his problem. What
strategies could we use to solve his problem? (make a
table or chart, draw a picture, etc.)
3. Continue reading the story discussing how each
person solved the problem. Have students use
counters to act-out the different solutions. They can
also record the solutions on paper. Which way was
correct? (All of them; there are many ways to solve
the same problem.)
4. Ask the students if there are any other ways to
count the commissioners. Have them create a chart
listing the following headings for each column; # of
commissioners, # in each group, # of groups, leftovers.
(Students may try grouping counters by 3, 4, 6, etc.)
5. Discuss the concept of dividing the counters into
groups to make counting easier.
6. Allow time for teams to share the different solutions
they discovered.
6. Allow time for teams to share the different solutions
they discovered.
Follow-up:
1. Focus the class on solving the problem using tens
and ones. Introduce the game, "Race to a Flat (or
100)". Have students practicing trading tens and ones
by playing the game.
2. Have students use a Hundred's Chart to find
patterns as they count by 2s, 3s, 4s, 5s, etc. Students
may use colored chips to cover the numbers or
colored code a chart using crayons.
3. Ask the students, "Why would a king need a math?
Tell the students they are to listen and look to find
many different ways math was used throughout this
book. Students can record their ideas on an individual
T-chart of "math we saw" (in the illustrations) and
"math we heard" (in the text). A class T-chart can be
created later.
Literature in Mathematics
Title: The M&M’s Counting Book
Author: Barbara Barbieri McGrath
Publisher: Charlesbridge Publishing
Math Concepts / Topics: Addition, Subtraction, Estimating, graphing
Summary:
This book uses real M&M’s to develop math concepts and skills.
Connecting Activities
• Sort M&M’s by colors.
• Make a real graph on desk.
• Color bar graph sheet
Extending Activities
• Choose any other activities from packet.
• Use bar graph to write story problems,
e.g., There are 8 red M&Ms and 7 M&Ms. How many altogether?
•Use cut-out M&Ms (construction paper) to make shapes or designs.
• Use place value sheet.
• Use M&Ms to make a pattern or face on a frosted cookie.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The M&M’s Counting Book
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson plan for M&M book using counting
2.
Governor’s Academy M&M packet:
3.
Parent Letter
4.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
pp. 1-13
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
AIMS “Bears”
Mathematics Lesson Plan
The M & M's Counting Book
Instructional Level:
1
Enabling Skill(s):
12-15 Recall addition/subtraction facts to 10
15-13 Count backward from 10 to demonstrate
subtraction
15-17 Share items equally with classmates to
demonstrate division
Materials:
M&M book
1 pint size bag for each student
1 gallon size bag for extras
"Guess Box"
Chart paper
Student pages of choice, pp. 1-13
Laser disc, Window On Science, Vol. 1, "Primary M&M's
Sorting"
Preparation:
Have chart paper, "Guess Box", and any desired class
charts prepared in advance
Suggested Homework: Students are to take home p. 13 from the packet
and list at least 4 describing words or adjectives
about M&M's.
Development:
Use a "Guess Box" to motivate students. Students
are to ask 20 questions about the possible mystery
object(s) inside. Use a yes/no answer format. Mark
their questions and your responses on chart paper.
Read M&M's Counting Book.
Discuss ways we could do math using the book and
our M&M's.
Distribute bags to students and have them estimate
the number of M&M's in their bags.
Open and check estimation of M&M's.
Have students count out the matching number of
M&M's to the story, based on the colors. Use the
extra bag to fill in M&M's that children may not have
in their own bags.
Re-read the book and have students use M&M's to
act out the story. Remind them not to eat until the
end of the lesson if you are doing more activities.
Follow-up:
See pp. 1-13 in the enclosed packet for a wealth of
wonderful ideas!
Literature in Mathematics
.Title:The Magic School Bus Lost in the Solar System
Author:Joanna Cole
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Math Concepts / Topics:Graphing, diameter, scale, and decimals
Summary:Mrs. Frizzle takes her class on a trip to the planetarium. Since the
planetarium is closed for repairs, the class heads back to their school. On
the way back the bus becomes a spaceship and travels to outerspace. The
class takes a trip through the Solar System
Connecting Activities
!1. Answer a list of questions.
2. Make a model of the Solar System to scale.
3. Compare the relationship between the length of the year and the
distance from the sun.
4. Study data to discover other relationships.
Extending Activities
1. Figure out if there is a relationship between the length of a day and
the distance from the sun
2. Use ratio to determine whether or not there is a relationship
between the length of a day and the length of a year.
Mathematics Lesson Plan The Magic School Bus: Lost in the Solar System
Instructional Level: 4
Enabling Skill(s): 15-07 Estimate and Justify reasonableness of answers in
life situations
42-07 Develop / solve problems using information derived
form tables / charts
42-11 Write a descriptive paragraph that interprets data
32-09 Identify / label diameter of a circle
Materials:
Literature Selection: "The Magic School Bus: Lost in the Solar
System"
Planet Chart
Planet Chart overhead
meter stick(s)
base ten blocks - ones & tens only
measuring tape - metric (optional)
bulletin board paper for each planet - Remember: Jupiter will be
143 centimeters in diameter...that's big!
Calculators
Preparation:
Have bulletin board paper, scissors, and markers available to
make scale planets.
Suggested Homework:
Development:
1. Introduce literature selection. Ask the students to focus on information
in the selection that has a math connection. Ask the students to list
possible connections to math a book on the solar system might have.
2. Read the selection.
3. Discuss math connections. Compare connections found to predictions
made before the selection was read.
4. Hand out the planet chart shown near the end of the literature selection
to each student (attached). Allow them several minutes to look over the
chart. There is a lot of information on it and can be overwhelming to many
students. Ask them if the chart gives them any new ideas about math
connections.
5. Introduce Activity 1. (See Attached) Although this is a teacher directed
activity, encourage students to think and respond. Use student responses to
direct the activity. For each question, you may have them think-pair-share.
Ask students to point to the place on the planet chart where they found the
information.
6. Activity 2 (see attached) Model each step of the activity for the students
using Jupiter as an example. Students will need to refer to their planet
chart to find the information. You may want to ask students to round off and
find the scale size for several other planets if you think more practice is
necessary.
7. Activity 3 (see attached). Model for the class how to use the information
from activity 2 to create your scale planet. The scale diameter of Jupiter is
143 centimeters. Show the students how they can use base ten blocks,
metric rulers, or even meter sticks to mark the diameter on the bulletin
board paper. Ask class what strategies they would use to create a circle
based on the diameter. Demonstrate how to find the center point of the
circle by dividing the diameter by 2. Show them how to measure from the
center at a number of different points around a circle to create points to
connect.
8. Have students count off 1 to 8. Assign a team leader for each number and
have them select a planet to make. Allow teams 10-15 minutes to draw, cut,
and label their scale planet. Some teams will finish sooner than others.
(Pluto is 2cm diameter and Saturn is 121cm!) Teams that finish faster can
begin to write their steps (See activity 3).
9. You may want to have each team present their models and display them
on the board. With the physical models displayed students can visually see
the relationship between the numbers on the planet chart under the
heading "How Big Across".
10. Activity 4 (see attached). Discuss with your class the meaning of the
heading "How Long One Year". Ask the students which planet (according to
the planet chart) orbits the sun in the shortest amount of time. Some will
say Jupiter because the number 12 is smallest. Ask why that information is
inaccurate. Read Activity #4. Have the students work with calculators to
translate years to days.
11. Activity #5 (see attached). Read Activity #5. Allow cooperative groups
or teams time to discuss. Give students several minutes to work
independently to write their conclusions.
12. Activity #6 (see attached). Based on all the information covered so far
give the students time to work independently or with a group to complete
the chart. You could also make an overhead of the chart and work through it
as a class or simply ask the class to create their own headings for a planet
chart that they believe are more appropriate than those selected by Ms.
Frizzle's class.
Follow-up: Activity #6 is a good culminating activity for this lesson. Based
on student responses the class could create a large bulletin board sized
chart for the classroom.
Name___________________________________________
The Magic School Bus - Lost in the Solar System
Ms. Frizzle’s class made an awesome planet chart and we are going to use
those facts to help us understand the solar system a little better.
Activity #1 Lets get comfortable with the planet chart. Answer the following
questions:
a.
What is the diameter of Mars? (remember, diameter is the
distance across something!)__________________
b.
How long does it take earth to revolve around the sun? (Don’t
forget, revolution is the path objects in the solar system take
from a starting point back to that same place!)
________________
c.
How long does it take Pluto to revolve around the
sun?____________
d.
Hey, what’s the deal there? Why do you think it takes Pluto so
much longer than Earth to travel around the sun?
e.
Which planet rotates the fastest?___________________
f.
Which planet is closest to the sun? ____________
g.
How close to the sun is it?__________________
Name___________________________________________
Activity #2 Well, that was fun! Now I think we’re ready to move on. We’re
going to build a scale model of the solar system using the data we have on
the planet chart. It would take way too long for everybody to do all 9 planets
so let’s each do one.
a.
My planet is__________________________.
b.
The actual diameter of my planet is_____________________.
c.
Rounded to the nearest thousand, the diameter
is_______________.
d.
So everybody uses the same scale, we will say that every
thousand km is the same as 1 cm. (1cm = 1,000k).
My scale planet is__________ centimeters across (diameter).
Activity #3 Okay, now use the information from activity #2 and your base
ten blocks to create a 2 dimensional scale model of your planet. Label it
with planet name, actual diameter, and scale diameter. Explain below the
steps you took to make your model.
Name___________________________________________
Activity #4 The planet chart is a little confusing to me. One of the headings
is called “How Long One Year”. What does that mean? Talk with a Friend
and tell me what you think! There’s something else weird too! Sometimes
the class writes “days” and sometimes they write “years”. I don’t like that. It
gets me mixed up. Please use a calculator (or your just figure them out) to
fill in the chart below.
Planet
Number of Days for a Complete Revolution
Mercury
88
Venus
225
Earth
365
Mars
687
Jupiter
Saturn
Uranus
Neptune
Pluto
Activity #5 Notice anything interesting about the relationship between the
“How long One Year” data and the “How Far From The Sun” data? Talk
with a classmate and report your findings below.
Name___________________________________________
Activity #6 Use your planet chart from Ms. Frizzles class and all of the
information you have used so far to complete the attached “Planet Chart”.
Good luck!
Literature in Mathematics
Title: Math Curse
Author: Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith
Publisher: Viking
Math Concepts / Topics: problem solving using real life experiences
Summary: When the teacher tells her class that they can think of almost
everything as a math problem, one student acquires a math anxiety which
becomes a real curse. **(Discuss the term curse and the fact that there is
really no such thing as a curse; this is just make-believe.)
Connecting Activities
• Take the class schedule and create similar time problems. (p. 4)
• Get concrete measurement manipulatives and use them to solve
problems in the book. (p. 7)
• Use a calendar to solve the calendar questions in the story. (p. 9)
• Draw models for “class” multiplication problems. (p.10)
• Compare fractions using manipulatives. (p. 12)
• Get a map of the U. S. to estimate the length of the Mississippi
River using manipulatives and the map scale. (p. 13)
• Compare sports data. (p.14)
• Use fingers to practice counting in the same manner as the beings
on planet Tetra and planet Binary. (p. 17)
• Determine the truth of money statements using real or manipulative
money. (p. 20)
• Calculate the number of minutes of “math madness” in a year using
clocks, calendars and calculators. (p. 23)
• Discuss why some questions in the book cannot be solved.
• Discover the counting pattern Mrs. Fibonacci uses. (p16)
Extending Activities
• Design class or individual “math curse” book.
• Make a class birthday graphs (bar, line, picto). Write a paragaph to
analyze data.
• Extend concept of different base systems. Have students use the
appropriate number of fingers as “manipulatives.”
• Read the book A Day with No Math published by HBJ. This is about a
boy whose day has no numbers in it and the problems that this
causes.
Continued on next page
Extending Activities Cont’d.
•
•
Have students keep track the times and events in their day. Use
this information to compose and share problems involving elapsed
time.
Create counting patterns similar to the one presented by Mrs.
Fibonacci. Have friends see if they can discover the pattern.
Compile these into a books to be shared with other classes.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Math Curse
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for grade 4 on scheduling time
2.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level: 4
Enabling Skill(s): 25-11 Tell time to one minute intervals
25-13 Represent activities as a.m. or p.m.
25-17 State time equivalencies
25-19 Discuss elapsed time
Materials:
Math Curse by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith
Preparation: Prior to lesson teacher will have read Math Curse to the class.
Review time and time equivalencies.
Suggested Homework:Students will take planned schedule home and record
actual amount of time to one minute intervals spent on various
listed activities. They will write a brief paragraph that
compares their planned schedule to the actual amount of time
spent on various activities.
Development:
Warm-Up - Review the events in the book Math Curse that deal with
time. Discuss whether the girl felt that time was a problem for
her. Ask students if they feel that time is a sometimes a
problem for them? Have them brainstorm in cooperative
groups reasons to support their opinions. Share responses.
Procedure 1. Ask students to list the activities that they plan to do this
evening from the time that they get home from school until
they go to bed. (Teacher models this with her evening
activities)
2. Have students estimate time needed to the nearest 10
minute interval for each activity. (Teacher models this with
her activities)
3.Students will list activities in the order that they want them
to happen. (Teacher will continue to model using her
activities.)
4. Using their planned time allotments students will develop a
schedule for their evening activities listing exact beginning
and ending times including the p.m. designation. (Teacher
models.)
5. Share schedules.
Follow-up:
1. Design a schedule for a weekend day using the same basic
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Moira’s Birthday Party
Author:
Robert Munsch
Publisher: Annick Press Ltd.
Math Concepts / Topics:
Estimation, problem solving, money, division,
multiplication
Summary: Moira has a birthday party and invites all students in grades K-6
without her parents consent. Her parents are expecting 6 of her friends,
but 200 show up. Moira orders 200 pizzas and birthday cakes.
Connecting Activities
•
Estimate the cost of feeding the class pizza and birthday cake before
reading the book.
•
Have students create a birthday graph from class data (or grade level
data- children choose a class and conduct a math investigation).
Have them choose the graph to organize their data.
•
Graph the classes favorite type of pizza,cake, or ice cream.
Extending Activities
•
Figure out the least number of cuts needed to serve a layer cake to
the class.
•
Evaluate Moira’s way of cleaning the house.
•
Discuss other ways of distributing the 200 gifts and the extra food.
•
Compare Moira’s birthday party to one a student has had.
•
Plan a menu for a birthday party, including the amounts of each food.
•
Discuss ways Moira might pay the bill for the pizza and cakes.
•
Figure out the total number of students in Moira’s school and the
total amount in your school and compare.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Moira’s Birthday Party
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson plan for grade 4
2.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Additional Resources:
1.
Read Any Good Math Lately...............................................................p. 118.
2.
Math Through Children’s Literature.................................pp. 127-129.
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skills:
4
12-03
13-09
13-11
Materials:
Moira’s Birthday by Robert Munsch
paper
200 counters per cooperative group
optional: birthday decorations or a gift wrapped
box to create a party mood
Suggested Homework:
Development:
*
*
*
*
Given:
Given the number of students in the
class, devise ways to cut cakes(sheet and or layer),
to serve everyone.
Warm up- Discuss memorable birthdays.
Read the selection.
Moira ordered 2 pizzas, and 2 cakes for her guests. This
means each child was expected to eat 1 whole pizza and
1 whole cake. Evaluate her thinking. Do the students
think she needed to order that much food? How would
they decide what Moira should order?
Students calculate the cost of food for each of the groups
in the table.
1 pizza feeds 4 and costs $8
1 cake feeds 9 and costs $9
Person
or group
You
Your family
Your class
Your grade
Your school
Moira’s guest
Follow-up:
Integrate concrete pictorial, and symbolic
representations of division
Multiply a mutlti-digit number by a l digit number
Divide a three or four digit dividend by a 1 digit
divisor
Number
of people
Number
of pizzas
Total
pizza cost
Number
of cakes
Total
cake cost
Moira’s guests spread out in two bedrooms, the basement,
the living room, the kitchen, the bathroom, and on the roof.
Have cooperative groups draw a picture of these rooms.
Give each group 200 counters and divide evenly in each room.
How many would be in each room? Students draw a picture
of their plan and write a number sentence.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Only One
Author:
Marc Harshman
Publisher: Cobblehill Books
Math Concepts / Topics:
Patterns, number relationships
Summary: A unique counting book centered around a country fair. The
author shows how single things combine to create something totally
different. (ex: “The sky is made of millions of stars; one hive of 50,000
bees”
Connecting Activities
•
Have students look for patterns in our base ten system or in
our liquid measurement tools. Use one of these themes to
create a big book about the relationships students found. (ex.:
There may be only one quart, but there are 4 cups.) Students
can create characters to illustrate the patterns they observe.
Extending Activities
•
Have students create a big book for the multiplication ideas
they explore during Day II of this lesson. You may want to call
the book, “More Than One”. Students can create a sentence
to include on each page. (ex: “There may be four wheels on
a wagon, But two wagons have eight.”)
•
Follow these lessons with the book What Comes In Twos,
Threes and Fours, by
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Only One
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson plan for grade 2
2.
Organizer - Concrete, Pictorial, Abstract
3.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Additional resources for this literature selection:
1.
Math And Literature (K-3) Book 2...........................................pp. 79-83
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Only One
Instructional Level:
2
Enabling Skills:
12-09 Demonstrate concretely multiplication as
repeated addition
47-03 Select and apply appropriate strategies to life
problems (time, money, measurement, and
temperature)
47-07 Relate math experience in daily life using
clocks, lunch money, bus money, calendar,
games, etc.
55-07 Explore counting patterns for odd and even
numbers to 99
Materials:
Only One
large paper for students to create a big book (Day I)
copies of the attached organizer (Day II)
Preparation:
Prepare a baggie with 25-30 counters for each student
or pair of students. (needed for Day II)
Copy the organizer for the follow-up activity for Day II.
Suggested Homework:
Have students look at home for various ways
to group objects. (ex: four members, only one
family; three remote controls, only one
television; four doors, only one house; six
drawers, only one dresser)
Development:
Day I
1. Read the book to the class. Discuss the patterns found in
the book. (some answers may include: only one sentence on a
page; every page has the words, "only one"; the numbers get
smaller as the book progresses;)
2. If students haven't noticed, point out that some pages have
words/groups that must contain a specific number of objects,
(ex. one dime must have 10 pennies) but other groups/words
may contain more or less of the objects (ex. a herd does not
need to be 11 animals).
3. Brainstorm a list of words that have a specific number of
objects and a list of words where the number is not specific.
Some possible words for the "specific number" list might be:
pennies in a nickel, eggs in a dozen, planets in our solar
system, legs on a healthy dog, wheels on a bike, legs on a
rectangular table, letters in our alphabet. Some possible words
on the varying number list might be: pages in a book, people in
a family, students in a class)
4. Have each student select an idea from the lists and write a
sentence that follows the pattern in the book. Next have them
illustrate the idea and then put the pages together to create a
class big book.
Day II **This portion of the lesson may take more than one day
depending on your students.
1. Reread the book Only One or read the book the class
created during Day I.
2. Tell the students that the literature selection you just read
discussed how many in a group if you only had one group (ex:
10 pennies in one dime). Today we will discuss how to
determine how many objects in a group if we have more than
one of each group.
In the book the author said there were four wheels on a wagon.
Ask students, "If we had two wagons, how many wheels would
we have?" Allow time for students to use counters or pictures
to create a model of the problem. Discuss the various
strategies students chose. (Act it out, Make a picture, repeated
addition, etc.)
Then ask, "What if we had 3 wagons? How would our model
change?" Draw a "T" chart on the board and begin to record
the answers on the table. Continue with four and five wagons.
wagons
1
2
3
wheels
4
8
12
If the students have not recognized the pattern ask them to
look for patterns on the chart. Student should begin to see
that the number of wheels increases as we add more wagons to
our picture.
3. Have the students repeat the process for five babies in a
nest and three musicians in a trio. (**You may want students
to create the "t" table for trios in their math journals.)
4. Select one of the equations the students have solved (ex. 5
babies in a nest and 3 nests). Ask the students how we might
record a number sentence that matches the picture. Possible
answers should include 5 + 5 + 5 =15. Tell them you are going
to show them another way to write the equation: 3 x 5 = 15 or
3 groups/nests of 5 babies. Introduce this as multiplication.
5. Allow time for the students to practice creating number
sentences to match other equations you have solved during the
lesson.
Follow-up:
1. Provide the students with the attached organizer. Share the
following stories with the students and have them first create
the model with counters, then have the students draw picture
of the model, and finally write a number sentence to match the
picture.
A. There are four petals on a flower and you have three flowers.
How many petals altogether?
B. You see three bicycles ride by you. There are two wheels on
each bicycle. How many wheels did you count?
C. You can fit five oranges in a box. You have three boxes. How
many oranges do you have altogether?
A. There are four petals
on a flower and you have
three flowers. How many
petals altogether?
B. You see three bicycles
ride by you. There are two
wheels on each bicycle.
How many wheels did you
count?
C. You can fit five
oranges in a box. You
have three boxes. How
many oranges do you have
altogether?
1. Draw a picture of the model you create.
1. Draw a picture of the model you create.
2. Write a number sentence that
matches your picture.
2. Write a number sentence that
matches your picture.
3. Write the story problem that
matches your number sentence.
3. Write the story problem that
matches your number sentence.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Quilt Story
Author:
Tony Johnston
Publisher:
Scholastic
Math Concepts / Topics:
Patterns, Geometry, Fractions
Summary: Project-based lessons introducing geometry and fractions, and
reinforcing patterns.
Connecting Activities
•
Review two-dimensional shapes and relate to objects in the
environment
•
Have children bring in quilts from home. Look for patterns and
evidence of symmetry.
•
Four-triangle investigation lesson in Geometry by Marilyn Burns.
Extending Activities
•
Science: Discuss quilt-making as an early form of recycling.
•
Art: Prepare a color wheel to aid in the choice of two colors,
choosing complementary colors.
•
Language Arts: Read more stories about quilts.
Josephina Story Quilt by Eleanor Coerr
The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Quilt Story
Contents of this packet:
1.
Grade 2 Lesson
2.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Mathematics Lesson Plan
The Quilt Story
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
Materials:
2
12-13
Explore fractional concepts concretely.
Spatial geometry problem solving
The Quilt Story by Tony Johnston
a sampler or quilt
36"x36" background paper (black is good for most color
combinations)
Preparation:
Each child will need:
a 4"x4" square piece of ditto paper
two squares 2"x2" of light-colored paper
two squares 2"X2" of dark-colored paper
Suggested Homework: Instruct students to find quilts at home. Make a list
of the different shapes used to make the quilt
squares.
Duplicate on paper if possible.
Development:
1.
Introducing quilts: Read The Quilt Story and share a
quilt to initiate a discussion about quilts. Make a
simple chart of the children's contributions. Entitle
the chart: What We Know About Patchwork Quilts
2.
Create a four-patch quilt: Ask children how a square
of paper can be folded to make four smaller squares.
Follow their instructions exactly. Model correct
procedure. Give each child a 4"x4" square and ask
them to fold their own four-patch block. Using two
light and two dark squares, lay them on your paper to
make a checkerboard.
3.
Have each child place their quilt block on a 36"x36"
piece of background paper. Blocks can be set in
straight rows or diagonal rows.
4.
Look at one of the four-patch blocks. Say that half the
squares are light and half the squares are dark. Show
that as the fraction one-half. Demonstrate how this is
also two out of four or two-fourths.
Follow-up:
Day Two
Each child will need:
one 7"x7" square of ditto paper
two 3 1/2"x 3 1/2" squares of one color paper
two 3 1/2"x 3 1/2" squares of a second color paper
1.
Further exploration of four-patch patterns: Draw a
square on the board. Ask children to show how it
could be divided in half. Discuss the resulting shapes
and explain that today we will be working with
triangles. Pass out the two squares of one color and
the two squares of a second color to each child. Have
them fold each square in half to form two triangles.
When all four are folded and cut, each child should
have four triangles of one color and four triangles of
another color. Next, ask them to fold their 7"x7"
paper into four equal squares.
2.
Ask children to arrange and rearrange their triangles,
creating as many different blocks as they can. Have
them glue down their favorite arrangement.
3.
Compare the arrangements. How are they the same?
How are they different? Talk abut the shapes that
appear in their designs.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Reflections
Author:
Ann Jonas
Publisher: Greenwillow Books
Math Concepts / Topics:
Geometry
Summary: A child’s perfect day is expressed through a series of beautiful
illustrations that hold a double wonder. In each full-color picture there is
another picture reflected. Read the book, turn it upside down, and continue
the story.
Connecting Activities
•
Reviewing fractions such as halves and fourths.
•
Making connections with objects in nature that have symmetry
(butterfly, fruit, etc.).
•
Study reflection and symmetry in architecture.
•
Locate fabric patterns or quilts that are symmetrical.
•
Teach your students about tessellations.
Extending Activities
•
Have students locate pictures in magazines that have one line
of symmetry. Have them carefully cut out the symmetrical subject
then fold the picture along this line. Have them cut the picture in
half, following the fold line and glue one half to a piece of drawing
paper. They are then to draw a matching “half” to complete the
missing side of the picture.
•
Use mirrors to show that not all things must be cut in half to
show symmetry. An object that has a reflection is not symmetrical
with the object in the mirror.
•
Have the students create their own short story and illustrate it
in such a way that the pictures are symmetrical.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Reflections
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for Level 3
2.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Additional Resources:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Math and Literature ................................................................................p. 49
Read Any Good Math Lately? ..........................................................pp. 8-9
..........................................................................................................pp. 170-171
Math Through Children’s Literature ...................................pp. 99-101
Literature-Based Math Activities ............................................pp. 64-65
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Reflections
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skills(s):
3
32-13 Demonstrate congruency, symmetry,
reflection, two dimensional rotation (slides
and turns)
Materials:
Reflections by Ann Jonas
Rulers
Scissors
Attribute or Pattern Blocks
Drawing paper
Crayons
Small mirrors
Magazines
Preparation:
Select pictures from magazines that have at least one line
of symmetry. Have these torn out ready for class.
Have enough blocks available for the class.
Suggested Homework: Make a list of places in the their surroundings that
they see reflections or mirror images.
Development:
Seat your students so that they can easily see the pictures
in the book.
Share the story slowly and carefully, making sure that the
students can see the images as you read, but not making
reference to the words are the top of each page.
When you get to the last page, emphasize the words “It’s a
little scary in the woods, so I turn around...” as you slowly
turn the book over and continue with the words “... and
find my way back.”
Ask the students what they noticed as you turned the
book.
Finish the story, then review each illustration from both
points of view.
Ask the students what they are seeing in each illustration
and what the illustrator did to create each image.
Point out specific illustrations that use symmetry, such as
the bed, sunset and sunrise or the buildings in the rain.
Ask the students if there would be a way to fold the page
in half so that both halves of the illustration match.
Have pictures from magazines or another source available
that can be folded in half, so that both halves “match.”
Demonstrate this technique, then have a few students try.
Invent the term symmetry. Have the students create their
own definition, based on what they have seen on the pages
and what they were able to do with the magazine pictures.
Have the student return to the seats and provide them
with attribute or pattern blocks. Allow them to explore
these materials, looking for shapes that have symmetry.
Have students trace or draw the shapes they find on their
paper, indicating the line(s) of symmetry with a dotted or
broken line.
Look for objects around the classroom that are
symmetrical. Have the students point out those that they
find and list and/or draw them. How many lines of
symmetry does each object have?
If time allows, try some of the extension activities
provided.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
A Remainder of One
Author:
Elinor J. Pinczes
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Co. Boston, 1995
Math Concepts / Topics: Division, with remainders, factors and multiples
Summary:
Joe wants to march in the parade but every time the lines are uneven
he has to stand aside. He studies the problem of rearranging the 25 bugs
from two lines to three lines and four lines, until inspiration results in five
lines of five. Joe fits in at last!
Connecting Activities
Develop the concept of division and remainders. Use chips to build an
array under the “division” sign. Label the number of rows to the left of
the sign and the number in each row (columns) above the sign.
Discuss ways to interpret a remainder. Give students examples of
remainders in different situations and discuss how we should handle
that remainder. Ex. 1. Students need to work with a partner. There
are 25 students in the class. What should we do with the extra
student? 2. We are going on a field trip and parents are driving. Four
students can fit in one car and we have 29 students in our class. How
many cars do we need?
Extending Activities
Have each team choose a number to create their own book about
remainders. Some suggested numbers: 15, 26, 21, 28.
Have students research how various battle formations were utilized in the
Civil War.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
A Remainder of One
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for grade 5 on “prime” and “composite” numbers
2.
Organizer to show the progression from concrete to pictorial to
abstract for multiplication arrays/ equations
3.
Student copy of a Hundred Chart
4.
Organizer for division box
5.
Grade 3 Extension activities
6.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Mathematics Lesson Plan
A Remainder of One
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
Materials:
3/5
12-03
13-23
Demonstrate primes, multiples, and factors.
Integrate concrete, pictorial and symbolic
representations for division of a two digit
number with remainders. (grade 3)
colored bingo chips (one container for each team)
organizer - attached (one for each student)
hundreds chart (one for each student)
overhead of a hundreds chart
Preparation:
make copies of the attached math organizer, hundreds
chart
make an overhead transparency of the hundreds chart
Suggested Homework: Continue looking for prime and composite numbers
on the hundreds chart. Find at least 5 more prime
numbers.
Development:
1. Read the story to where the bugs divide into groups
of six (page 25).
2. Distribute chips to students to show the first
squadron the bugs tried (12 x 2). Discuss the concept
of an array. Label the columns and the rows as "factors"
and the total as a "multiple". Model the attached
organizer.
3. Continue with the 4 x 6 and 3 x 8 arrays, recording
on the data sheet.
4. Tell the students to find a solution that would allow
Joe to be part of the squadron. Record their solution
on their organizer.
5. Finish reading the story to verify their prediction.
6. Try to organize other squadrons to find solutions
where no member would be left out.
7. Model solutions for the numbers four and twelve.
(The number four can be set up in three different
arrays: 2 x 2 and 1 x 4; 4 x 1. Discuss how the arrays 1
x 4 and 4 x 1 are the same array, only rotated.).
8. Assign a number to each team. Be sure to include
prime numbers. Attached is a number page for your
use. Have students use the chips to find arrays for the
numbers. They should record all solutions on the
organizer.
9. After students have explored their assigned number,
allow each team to share their number and all arrays
they have found. Discuss why some teams have only one
solution. Identify those numbers as "prime numbers".
Numbers are either "prime" or "not prime". (You may
have students recall that a volcano composed of
different types of materials is a composite volcano.)
Numbers that have more than one array are called
"composite numbers".
Follow-up:
10. Focus the students' attention on the chart you
posted and the hundreds chart you distributed.
Challenge them to discover other "prime numbers" and
"composite numbers" and record on the hundreds chart
by color coding the primes and composites. (Students
should develop their own key.)
11. Have the class share the prime and composite
numbers they have found. Discuss any conflicts by
having the class use the chips to make arrays.
A Remainder of One
Grade 3 - Extension Ideas
•
Use plastic creatures for manipulatives. You may relate to life science
and integrate populations.
•
Cootie model to build motivation.
•
Create a “geo-ant”.
shapes.
•
Use calculators to interpret remainders in ant problems.
•
Write a note to the squadron leader to suggest a good total number for
lines.
•
Outline long division steps using the text number problem.
•
Odd and even numbers.
Ex.
labeling geometric
Concrete
Pictorial
Symbolic
Write the
numbers of
rows here.
Place chips here
A Remainder of One
Number Page
8
26
33
9
27
34
15
28
36
16
30
37
20
31
39
Note: Any numbers may be used as long as some prime numbers are included.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Sea Squares
Author:
Joy N. Hulme
Publisher: Hyperion Books for Children
Math Concepts / Topics: multiplication facts / basic exponents
Summary: Illustrations of sea creatures used to count animals and their
parts from 1 to 10; 1 one-ton whale to 10 squirmy squids.
Connecting Activities
•
•
•
•
Division
Fact Families
Patterns, extend and create
Repeated addition
Extending Activities
1. If you have geoboards, the students can practice making squared
numbers on them. Have the students start out with a square of one.
Then make a square of two, then a square of three, and so on up to
a square of ten. Ask students if their squares make a pattern.
2. Write the numbers 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81, and 100 on
index cards, one number per card. Make enough cards so each
student has one. Make another packet of index cards. On these
cards write the numbers one through ten. You or a student leader
then pulls out a number from the packet and holds it up for the class
to see. If the number five, for example, is pulled from the packet
and held up, the students with 25 stand to represent the the square
of 5 is 25.
3. Pattern write a class big book (ex. Bay Blocks, Desert Squares, etc.)
4. Color the square products on a multiplication table so that
students can recognize the diagonal patterns formed.
5. Complete the attached Pattern Table Sheet.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Sea Squares
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for grade 4 on patterns and exponential numbers.
2.
“More Sea Squares” student page
3.
SOARganizer
4.
Sample extension text
5.
Sea Squares Pattern Chart
6.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
Math and Literature K-3).....................................................................p. 67
2.
Literature-Based Math...........................................................................pp. 22-25
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level: 4
Enablings Skills:
55-07 Explore/describe a number pattern or
sequence including exponents
55-09 Solve for a missing number/variable in a
number including exponent for numbers
Materials:
Sea Squares, by Joy N. Hulme
SOARganizer (1 per student)
SOARganizer transparency
Graph paper (1/2 in. or 1 in.)
Scissors
Student pages; "More Sea Squares"
Drawing paper (8 1/2 in. x 11 in. or larger)
Crayons / colored pencils
Glue sticks
Preparation:
Print student pages of "More Sea Squares"
Suggested Homework: Have each student find 2 more perfect squares.
Development:
1. Read aloud book, Sea Squares. Allow the students
to study the beautiful illustrations and how they
match the text.
2. After completing the book, reexamine each of the
ocean organisms or groups of organisms to discover
how their body parts relate to the numbers used.
3. Have the students attempt number sentences that
would represent what is discussed in the text
ex. three-striped clown fish
3+3+3=9 or 3x3=9
4. Share their responses using the board or overhead
for each of the organisms.
5. Using the graph paper, have the students use the
squares to construct a model to represent each number
sentence. They should outline the square created then
use the scissors to cut it out.
ex.
3x3=9
6. Model for the students the exponential form for each
of the equations or “squares” created.
ex. 3x3=9 or 3 =9
7. Have the students write the appropriate exponential
form inside the graph paper “square” that represents it.
8. Using notebook paper, the students should choose
one of the “squares” to create a new story line for, other
than 1x1=1.
9. Students should then use the drawing paper to
transfer their sentence to then create an illustration
that brings their sentence to life.
10. The students should staple their graph “squares”
along the top of their drawing, making sure their
name is also on their paper.
11. The students may wish to explore what 11 squared
or 12 squared would look like.
12. The students may wish to continue this activity
by creating complete books, either on their own or
working in teams. They could assemble their creations
including a cover to be shared within the class or with
with other classrooms. Pages could be laminated.
Follow-up:
You may want to explore the understanding of the
exponent concept by having the students try to create
the following models using graph paper.
1. 2x2x2 =
2. 4x4x4x4x4 =
3. 6x6x6x6 =
4. 7x7x7 =
5. 9x9x9x9x9x9 =
6. 3x3x3x3x3x3x3 =
Discuss whether or not these are “squares”or not. If not, why not?
Only true "squares" or figures created by two factors can be modeled
using graph paper. Others would require a three-dimensional
configuration.
Sea Squares Pattern Table
Complete the following charts based on the story numbering to 10.
Seal Eyes
1
Sea Star Arms
2
1
Squid Tentacles
6
1
Octopus Legs
10
1
Find the missing numbers!
Clownfish
2
Stripes
Seal
Flippers
6
3
12
15
5
9
24
Sea Lily
20
3
36
6
1
3
Frond
50
24
2
Brain Teaser!
12 eyes = ______________ whales
22 tails = ____________ whales
35 fronds = _____________sea lilies
16 wings = _____________gulls
24 flippers = _____________seals
20 shells = _____________clams
8
Sea Squares
(Exponents)
Grade Level: 4/5
Objectives:
55-07
55-09
Explore/describe a number pattern or
sequence including exponents
Solve for a missing number/variable in a
number including exponent for numbers
Materials: Sea Squares, by Joy N. Hulme
Graph paper (1/2 in. or 1 in.)
Scissors
Drawing paper (8 1/2 in. x 11 in.)
Crayons
Glue sticks
Lesson:
1. Read aloud book, Sea Squares. Allow the students
to study the beautiful illustrations and how they
match the text.
2. After completing the book, reexamine each of the
ocean organisms or groups of organisms to discover
how their body parts relate to the numbers used.
3. Have the students attempt number sentences that
would represent what is discussed in the text
ex. three-striped clown fish
3+3+3=9 or 3x3=9
4. Share their responses using the board or overhead
for each of the organisms.
5. Using the graph paper, have the students use the
squares to construct a model to represent each number
sentence. They should outline the square created then
use the scissors to cut it out.
ex.
3x3x3=9
6. Model for the students the exponential form for each
of the equations or “squares” created.
ex. 3x3=9 or 3 =9
7. Have the students write the appropriate exponential
form inside the graph paper “square” that represents it.
8. Using notebook paper, the students should choose
one of the “squares” to create a new story line for, other
than 1x1=1.
9. Students should then use the drawing paper to
transfer their sentence to then create an illustration
that brings their sentence to life.
10. The students should staple their graph “squares”
along the top of their drawing, making sure their
name is also on their paper.
11. The students may wish to continue this activity
by creating complete books, either on their own or
working in teams. They could assemble their creations
including a cover to be shared within the class or with
with other classrooms.
12. The students may wish to explore what 11 squared
or 12 squared would look like.
Extension/Evaluation:
You may want to explore the understanding of the
exponent concept by having the students create
graph paper models for extended examples, such as:
1. 2x2x2=
3. 6x6x6x6=6
2
2. 4x4x4x4x4=4
4. 7x7x7=7
5. 9x9=9
6. 3x3x3x3x3x3x3=3
Discuss whether or not these new arrays are “squares”
or not. If not, why not?
These “squares” can be cut apart and reassembled in
different configurations to demonstrate that area is
conserved in the new figures.
SOARganizer
S tate the problem
What do you know?
Estimate the answer
O rganize
Plan what to do
A ttack
Step 1
Step 2
Review
Check your work
The answer is:
Step 3
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Shapes Game
Author:
Paul Rogers
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.
Math Concepts / Topics:
Geometry
Summary:
This book introduces children to a variety of shapes using
riddles and colorful pictures.
Connecting Activities
•
Practice drawing and labeling of shapes.
•
Write definitions for shapes (has four sides, all the same length).
•
sort plastic geometric shapes.
Extending Activities
Grade 1
•
Look through magazines for one of several geometric shapes and
make a collage of what is found.
•
Write a class “copycat” shape riddle book.
•
Find examples of cubist paintings & share with the clas. Identify
various geometric shapes.
•
Have children use their bodies to make geometric shapes and take
“aerial” photographs.
•
Glue toothpicks on paper to make geometric shape pictures.
•
Make shapes using geoboards.
Grade 2
•
Use the book as a review of shapes.
•
Move into 3-dimensional shapes.
•
Use toothpicks and small marshmallows to make 3-d shapes.
•
Use real manipulatives, boxes, cones, styrofoam sphers, etc. to
design something.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
The Shapes Game
Contents of this packet:
1.
Grade 1 lesson
2.
Shapes Collection Sheet
3.
Student Samples
4.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
Math Through Children’s Literature...................................p. 65
2.
Math & Literature (K-3) Book 1............................................p. 68
Mathematics Lesson Plan
The Shapes Game
Instructional Level: 1
Enabling Skill(s): 32-07
Materials:
Relate circle, square, triangle, and rectangle to
objects in the environment.
Circles, triangles, squares, and rectangles (various sizes) copied
on different colored paper - see black line master or, cut
shapes from craft die cutter.
The Shapes Game by Paul Rogers.
Shapes Collection Sheet (1 per pair of students)
Attribute Blocks (optional)
Preparation:
Duplicate Shapes Collection Sheet as needed. You will
need at least one shape black line worksheet per two
students. Cut out shapes.
Suggested Homework:
Development:
Have students take home one of the shapes
recording sheets to explore and record shapes
found at home or in nature.
Provide students with trays of various shapes. Allow time to
explore shapes(paper, pattern blocks, attribute blocks, or
manipulative shape of your choice). Have students decide
how to sort their shapes. Have students describe their
shapes in their own language. Record.
Read The Shapes Game to the class. This story is written
in an "I Spy" riddle format. It is suggested that you select
the pages most appropriate for this lesson. These pages
would relate to circle, square, triangle, rectangle. Then you
can return to this selection at a later date to share other
pages.
Read the riddle on each page before showing students the
picture. Have students close their eyes while you read and
visualize the shape you are describing. Then show them
the picture to verify their answer. As you show each page to
the children, have them describe all the different examples
of the shape in the illustration. For each shape they spy,
encourage them to tell its color, size, (properties) and
position on the page.
As you read, post the names and pictures of the shapes
described in the story above the descriptions recorded
earlier: (circle, triangle, squares, stars, ovals, crescents,
rectangles spirals, and diamonds.) Have students play the
"I Spy" game using shapes in the classroom. Ex. "I spy a
large, wooden rectangle" - door.
To assess students knowledge of identifying shapes,
describe the properties of shapes and have students hold up
the correct shape using the paper cutouts. Ex. "Hold up
the shape that has three sides and three corners" - triangle.
Follow-up:
DAY 1
Choose the Shape Collection/Recording worksheets. Have
students work with a partner to go on a "Shape Hunt" in the
classroom. Students can write or draw the shapes that they
found. This activity can also be extended to the entire
school and/or outside.
"Shapes Hunt" discoveries can than be shared with the class.
DAY 2
Give students pattern block shapes to create a shape
picture. with a given number of shapes. In this way students
will be successful in reproducing their design. Have the
children draw ( or trace) their design and describe it using
shape words.
See student example attached for a model.
Have individual students share their written descriptions
verbally. Have the rest of the class reproduce the picture
using their own blocks. Accept all possibilities. Responses
will vary.
Shapes Collection Sheet
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Six-Dinner Sid
Author:
Inga Moore
Publisher: Aladdin
Math Concepts / Topics:
Multiplication/Division
Summary: Sid is a cat who has convinced six people on his street that each
is his owner. He visits each house every day for dinner and gets six different
dinners every day.
Connecting Activities
•
Use manipulatives to act out student-created Sid (or other cat)
stories.
Extending Activities
•
Problem: How many dinners did Sid eat in one week, two weeks, or
one month, one year? Have students illustrate and explain how
they determined their answer. How many more is that than the
average cat? How much does it cost to keep Sid fed for a week,
month, or year?
•
Time: Write out a schedule that Sid might follow in order to make
it to all six dinners in one night.
•
Graphing: Have students graph the number of pets owned by
students in their classroom.
•
Perimeter/Area: Help Sid’s owners design a cage for him so they
can keep him at home for dinner.
•
Facts: Have students develop mult/div. fact families from different
stories written; ie. Two-Dinner Tom, Three-Dinner Theo etc...
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Six-Dinner Sid
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson plan for grade 3: problem solving activity using “act it out” as a
strategy
2.
Nine-Dinner Nate Sheet
3.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
Math and Literature (K-3) Book 2.......................................pp. 101-108
2.
It’s the Story That Counts...........................................................pp. 44-45
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
3
Enabling Skill(s): 12-07 Integrate concrete, pictorial, and symbolic
representations of multiplication/division facts to 9
12-09 Recall multiplication/division facts to 9.
Materials:
Six-Dinner Sid by Inga Moore
Counters (beans, chips , etc.)
Six small (6") paper plates for each pair of students
Preparation:
Gather materials as listed. This lesson may be used at the
beginning or after the introduction of multiplication.
Suggested Homework: Nine-Dinner Nate problem (see attached).
Development:
1. Discuss cats with student: habits, likes, peculiarities,
etc..
2. Read Six-Dinner Sid. Student listen and look for
math in the book. Write responses on class chart.
Reread book and add to chart.
Six-Dinner Sid
by Inga Moore
Math we saw:
Math we heard:
3.
Present problem: How many dinners did Sid eat in
one week?
Use SOAR to help students think through the
problem.
Discuss strategies for solving the problem act it out
should be a choice.
Students can use counters and plates to solve problem
concretely. Then students illustrate the solution to
the problem and explain in a paragraph how they got
that solution.
4.
Student pairs share their solutions with the entire
class.
Follow-up:
Use Six-Dinner Sid as a pattern to develop stories and
problems for Sid's friends:
Two-Dinner Tom
Seven-Dinner Sampson
Three-Dinner Theo
Eight-Dinner Elsie
Four-Dinner Francesca
Nine-Dinner Nate
Five-Dinner Fred
Design a cage for Sid.
Prompt: Sid's real owner wants Sid to stay home. His bed
should be in a cage. Determine how large the floor of
his cage should be to hold Sid, his bed and his two
dishes (food and water). Draw and label the
measurements of the floor. Find the perimeter and
area. Write a note Sid's family convincing them that
your cage is the one they should choose.
Name
Date
Nine-Dinner Nate
Problem: Nine-Dinner Nat had nine families. Each one lived in a different
house. Every night, Nine-Dinner Nate enjoyed nine different dinners. How
many meals did Nine-Dinner Nate eat . . .
(Remember to show your work!)
in one week?
dinners
in two weeks?
dinners
in three weeks?
dinners
in four weeks?
dinners
Write about how you got your answers.
Literature in Mathematics
Title: Ten Black Dots
Author: Donald Crews
Publisher: Scholastic
Math Concepts / Topics: Geometry, Problem Solving, Addition
Summary: Black dots are used to make pictures from 1-10.
Connecting Activities
Use chips or dot counters for children to manipulate and create their
own number dot pictures.
Have the children estimate and then problem solve to find the total
number of black dots used in the book. Encourage children to use their
own problem solving strategy. Have children explain which one they
used.
Extending Activities
Make copy cat book using another color and shape(ten blue rectangles).
How many dots would the teacher need to prepare for the whole class?
Circle patterns: The teacher selects 2 colors for the class. Circles are
cut so that each child will have one. Each child folds their circle and
cuts them in half. Then the half circles are combined with others to
create different patterns.
Number sentences: Use two colors of dots or chips to create addition
number sentences.
Read additional selections about shapes as a topic.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Ten Black Dots
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for grade 1 on problem solving.
2.
Grade 1 extension activities
3.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
2.
Math and Literature K-3...........................................................p. 19
Read any Good Math Lately?...................................................p. 51
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level: one
Enabling Skill(s):
12-07
12-09
17-03
32-07
18-03
Materials:
Demonstrate concretely addition and
subtraction facts 0-10
Integrate concrete, pictorial, and symbolic
representations of sums/differences 0-10
Estimate the number of objects in a set as
being greater than or less than ten
Relate circle, square, triangle and rectangle to
objects in the environment
Vocabulary: circle, shape
Ten Black Dots by Donald Crews
Preparation:
Development:
Ten page books for each student
1.
Circle Hunt-pairs find things in and outside of the
classroom that have circles. (shirt buttons, clock,
sprinklers, etc..) Students will draw and label objects and
write the number of circles. Share with partners or class.
2.
Read Ten Black Dots
3.
Tell students they are going to make a copy cat book.
How many dots will you need? Let students choose a
strategy to solve this problem. Guide as needed.
4.
Share strategies.
5.
Students can make own copy cat books. Write a
sentence on each page, if appropriate. this may take more
than one day. Or do a class book using cooperative groups.
Follow-up:
Make "circle pictures" using paper circles. Students can use
as many circles as they want. Write about the pictures.
Literature in Mathematics
Title: Ten Silly Sheep
Author: Calvin Irons
Publisher: Rigby
Math Concepts / Topics: Subtraction
Summary: The story is set on a farm where there are 10 sheep. On
consecutive pages a different quantity of sheep run away until there are none
left.
Connecting Activities
Use manipulatives to act out student created sheep stories
Extending Activities
Children create own book, Ten _________
different adjective and noun in teams.
___________, using a
What will the farmer do when he wakes up? children create class story
of what they think happens next. (This can be done in teams.)
Create an addition book, instead of subtraction. (This can extend the
farmer waking up and going to find his sheep.)
Learn more about sheep, wool, or sheep farming. count be used in
conjunction with a theme day.
Match number words to number words in the story.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Ten Silly Sheep
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for grade 1 on problem solving using strategies act
it out and draw a picture.
2.
Grade 1 extension activities
3.
Sheep book page
4.
Sheep page
5.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
1
Enabling Skill(s): 12-09 Integrate concrete, pictorial, and symbolic
representations of sums/differences 0-10
12-07 Demonstrate concretely addition and subtraction
facts 0-10.
Materials:
Ten Silly Sheep
manipulatives(counters, beans, cotton balls)
paper,crayons, pencil for each child
wool
Preparation:
Students should have prior knowledge of subtraction.
Teacher needs to make copies to use for follow-up.
Suggested Homework:The children take turns taking home the class
created book to share with their families.
Development:
This lesson uses the Before, During, and After strategy.
Before: Have a piece of wool to pass around. What is
this? Where did it come from? Discuss sheep and show
cover of the book. Discuss the setting.
During: Listen to what happens in the story.
What is the farmer doing in the story?
After: What happened to the sheep? What did you
discover by reading this selection? Are we adding or
subtracting in this story?
Look at how the pages were created. What subtraction
number sentences can we make using this story?
Pass out manipulatives(counters, beans, cotton balls). Each
child should receive 10. Students will use manipulatives
to concretely show subtraction relating to the story. The
children will be using the Act it Out strategy.
For example, if the first page is used, children would use
10 manipulatives, take 2 away. A student would write10
on the board. How many ran away? The number 2 is
written on the board. The teacher can then ask what sign
needs to go in between the 10 and the 2(-). This number
sentence shows subtraction.
Children then draw a picture of what has taken place
using X's on /'s to mark off those sheep who have jumped
over the gate. Children than write a number sentence to
correspond with their picture.
Follow-up:
Model on a chart or overhead how to create pages for our
own Ten Silly Sheep book.
Each pair of children will create their own page for the
class book.
Share pages after assembly in book form.
Name
silly
ran away
are left
Draw a picture.
Write a number sentence.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
What Comes in 2’s, 3’s, & 4’s
Author:
Suzanne Aker
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Math Concepts / Topics:
Introduction to multiplication as repeated
addition, multiplication, skip counting
Summary: Real life objects that typically come in 2’s (eyes), 3’s (silverware),
4’s (legs on a table)
Connecting Activities
•
Use manipulatives to develop grade level skills, for example:
•
First grade: Create a train from unifix cubes using the counting
pattern of two.
•
Second grade:
Build two sets of 2.
•
Third grade:
Show me 5 groups of 3.
•
Use 100’s chart to color in number patterns.
Extending Activities
•
Create a copy cat book- choose other patterns.
•
Have teams create posters of other numbers or multiples.
•
Cut out pictures from magazines showing things in groups of
2,3,4.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
What Comes in 2’s, 3’s, and 4’s
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for level 4
2.
Hundreds Chart
3.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Activities available in the following resources:
1.
2.
Read any Good Math Lately?........................................ p. 97
Math and Literature K-3.............................................. p. 70
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
4
12-03
17-03
Integrate concrete, pictorial, and symbolic
representations of multiplications facts to 12.
Read, write, and discuss mathematics using
appropriate language: multiple
Materials: What Comes in 2’s, 3’s, and 4’s by Suzanne Aker
chart paper
chips/beans (enough for each student to eventually build an array
with 96 chips in it)
overhead or large hundreds chart for the teacher
hundreds chart 1 per student
book making materials (paper, markers)
Preparation:
Read over entire plan before beginning lesson.
Gather materials.
Suggested Homework: Look around the house for things that come in 2’s,
3’s or 4’s(5’s, 6’s, 7’s, 8’s,9’s etc.)
Development:
1.
Begin by brainstorming objects in our everyday lives
that come in groups of twos, threes, and fours. Record
responses on a chart listed on the overhead(see format
below).
What Comes In...
2’s
3’s
4’s
2.
Let the children know that we will share the literature
selection, and compare our list to the author’s.
Share the selection.
Have the children return to their seats and distribute
hundreds charts and chips.
For most students, remembering 6’s,7’s,8’s are a
problem. The remainder of the lesson will be focusing
on these multiples.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Begin with the basic fact of 6x1. Have the children
build an array of 6 chips in a row. Build this same array
on the overhead. Label the array like this:
6
1
7.
Then the students will mark this multiple of six with
their crayon on the hundreds chart.
Continue systematically with the next multiple of 6:
6x2. Have the children add another row of six chips to
their initial row.
Label the next row with a 2(hence building on the
concept that the product of 6x2 is the next multiple in
the series).
6
1
2
8.
Have the students mark 12 with a crayon.
Move on to the next multiple of 6. Build the row of
another set of 6. Add onto the existing array. Mark off
the number 18 on the chart.
Continue systematically until an entire array of the
multiples of six have been built(See below). Then have
the students read off the multiples of 6, as you record
on chart paper.
6
1
2
3
Build. Add on. Mark off 24 on chart.
4
5
6
7
8
9
9.
Have students pair/share their definition of a multiple.
Ask for each team to report their definitions and have
class determine a common definition for multiple.
10. When the multiples of 6 are completed, move onto the
multiples of 7, and then 8, following the same
aforementioned series of steps. Depending upon your
students and time frame, this may be accomplished in
one class period or several.
Follow-up:
(at a later time) The children will create with a partner or a
team a page for the class adaptation of “What Comes in 6’s,
7’s and 8’s.” The teacher and students may decide which
medium to use (crayon, marker, cut out pictures, paint,
stamps, etc.).
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
What’s in the Cupboard?
Author:
Rosemary & Calvin Irons
Publisher: Rigby
Math Concepts / Topics:
Addition
Summary: A big book modeled after the nursery rhyme, Old Mother
Hubbard. Each time the cupboard is opened,it is filled with sets of fun
things that lend themselves to addition.
Connecting Activities
•
Bring in real items from your cupboards to make sets and number
sentences(cans, pasta boxes, cereal boxes,etc.).
•
Open a cupboard in the classroom and find sets to create number
sentences.
•
In teams children make number sentences and copy pages from
the book.
•
Discuss probability of keeping all of the things in the book in your
cupboard. Why would you or would you not find these things in
the cupboard?
•
Opposites, comparative words in the book.
Extending Activities
•
Write a class book entitled, “What’s in the closet?” or “What’s in
the toy box?”
•
Compare this Old Mother Hubbard to the one in the nursery
rhyme. What is a like/ different about their cupboards?
•
Choose another rhyme to turn into a math activity. Let the
children choose the rhyme and how to create a math story, book
or rhyme with it.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
What’s in the Cupboard?
Contents of this packet:
1.
Grade 1 Lesson
2.
Cupboard design
3.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
1
12-07
12-09
Materials:
Demonstrate concretely addition and
subtraction facts 0-10
Integrate concrete, pictorial, and symbolic
representations of sums/differences 0-10
Big Book: What's in the Cupboard? by Rosemary & Calvin Irons
Brown construction paper pre-folded for cupboards
Crayons, markers
magazines(optional)
Preparation:
Prior exposure to addition would be recommended.
Prepare brown paper with folds.
Suggested Homework: Write and draw the sets for a number sentence in a
cupboard in your house.
Development:
Before: Ask students what are some things that could be
found in a cupboard in your house? List.
Read Old Mother Hubbard to familiarize them with the
rhyme.
During: Listen for things found in the cupboard. Show the
book.
After: What was found in the cupboard? Any items like
ours? What do you notice about the items found in the
cupboard (adding two things together)?
Can we make a number sentence for some of these sets?
Choose a page or two to model how to turn them into
number sentences( two big bones and three little bones,
2+3=5). Record these on the board.
What could you put on your cupboard(refer to list
generated)?
Add to list
Follow-up:
The children will create their own "cupboards," and draw
sets and write number sentences to go with the sets. Fold
paper so that the doors fold in and open.
(Optional):Magazine pictures could be used for sets.
and display on the board.
Share
Cupboard Design
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
“Band-Aids” from Where the Sidewalk Ends
Author:
Shel Silverstein
Publisher: Harper Collins Publishers
Math Concepts / Topics:
Addition, problem solving
Summary: A child has a series of band-aids all over his/her body.
Connecting Activities
Use real band-aids on a student to find how many band-aids are used in
the poem.
Use real band-aids on large front/back copies of bodies. Teams solve
problem. (Paper cut out or children drawn band-aids could also be used.)
Make band-aid glyphs.
Extending Activities
Children create own poem using other things on their bodies (chicken
pox, mosquito bites, freckles, etc.)
Design own band-aids.
Children bring in band-aids from home. Use them to sort, graph.
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
Where the Sidewalk Ends
Contents of this packet:
1.
Lesson Plan for level 1 for “Band-aid” addressing number sense and
addition
2.
Lesson Plan for level 3 for “Smart” addressing money
3.
Band-aid Glyph master
4.
Two Band-aid Glyph ideas
5.
Front and back of girl for use with “Band-aid”
6.
Literature in Mathematics Resource Bibliography
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
1
12-03
12-07
15-07
Materials:
Use words zero through thirty-one
Demonstrate concretely addition and
subtraction facts 0-10
Use numbers in sequence and random through
99
"Band-aid" from Where the Sidewalk Ends
"Band-aid" on chart or overhead
band-aids (real or paper copies)
copies of front and back of body (front and back of paper)
Preparation:
Put poem on chart or make overhead copy.
Make copies for students of bodies, band-aid.
Suggested Homework: Bring in a band-aid to use for sorting, graphing, etc.
Development:
Find a student in the room with a band-aid or wear one
yourself. Discuss band-aids and their uses.
Read Shel Silverstein's "Band-aid" from Where the Sidewalk
Ends. How would we find out how many band-aids the child
has on their body? List ideas.
In teams, children choose a problem solving strategy and
solve. Discuss ways the problem was solved. Discuss
discrepancies in answers and how we can check.
“Band-aid Glyph”
•
•
Color sides of band-aid
boy -
red
girl -
purple
Are you wearing a band-aid now?
yes no
•
-
Favorite sport
soccer
basketball
gymnastics
baseball
swimming
other
•
Color of eyes - color the center pad
•
Color of hair - draw lines on band-aid
blond
brown
black
red
•
Favorite lunch
tacos
1
pizza
2
nuggets
4
spaghetti 5
packed
3
“Band-aid Glyph”
•
Color sides of band-aid
boy -
green
girl -
blue
•
Age -
number of dots on band-aid
•
Number of brothers and sisters - number of stripes on bandaid
•
Favorite subject
math
2+2=4
science
•
•
language arts
social studies
Favorite type of book
animal
sports
people
science
Are you wearing a band-aid now?
yes
no
ABC
Literature in Mathematics
Title:
“Smart” from Where the Sidewalk Ends
Author:
Shel Silverstein
Publisher: Harper Collins Publishers
Math Concepts / Topics:
Number sense, addition, subtraction
Summary: The poem tells the story of a boy who started with one dollar
and made several exchanges for coins.
Connecting Activities
Use the poem as the basis for practicing money equivalencies (lesson
included.
Decimals using money.
Fractional parts of a dollar.
Extending Activities
For each set of coins, find equivalent coin combinations.
If the boy had five coins, what is the most money he could have? the
least?
Compare coins.
List coin combinations for one dollar.
Find sums to $10.00 and change to $1.00.
Identify coins. (by touch in a bag, coin rubbing, etc.)
Mathematics Lesson Plan
Instructional Level:
Enabling Skill(s):
3
12-03
13-13
25-09
Materials:
Integrate concrete, pictorial, and symbolic
representations for sums and differences
Count change to $1.00
Write value of a set of coins from $.02 to $1.00
"Smart" from Where the Sidewalk Ends
transparency of "Smart"
money: coins and bills
Preparation:
Make a transparency of "Smart"
Suggested Homework: Redesign quarter, nickel, dime, and penny basing
size on value. Scale:
1 cm = 1 ¢.
Development:
Students read the poem and answer the question, "Did the
boy get a good deal?" They may draw and/or write their
explanation.
Read the poem to the class. Have the students role-play the
boy and characters. Record how much money was traded
and received.
Discuss the wrong assumptions the boy made: more coins =
more money and Dad was proud.
Determine how the poem would be different if the coins
were bills. List the various denominations from #100 to $1.
Have students rewrite the poem, replacing the coin
amounts with bills. Again, students role-play and record the
sequence of trades by drawing pictures and writing
subtraction sentences.
Discuss if the boy in the poem would rather have his height
in dimes laid side by side or his height in stacked pennies.
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