NEW in 2014-15 - Rock Island/Milan School District #41

NEW in 2014-15 - Rock Island/Milan School District #41
Mission Statement
Rock Island High School’s mission is to challenge all students to reach their fullest
potential in a respectful and safe environment, preparing them for success in a rapidly
changing global society.
Dear Parents, Guardians, and Students:
Please find the materials included in this course catalog helpful as you plan your course of study
at Rock Island High School. This information will provide a description of every course offered
to help your selection process. Please take time to examine these course offerings and visit with
a counselor, administrator, or staff member regarding its contents.
Thank you for your cooperation.
Yours in education,
Tim Wernentin, Principal
Rock Island High School
NEW in 2014-15
Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)
Advanced Placement (A.P.) Physics
World Studies
Project Lead The Way (PLTW) Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA)
Cover:
Artwork on the cover of this booklet is taken from the 1917 Rock Island High School Watchtower.
1
TABLE OF CONTENTS
General Information
Graduation Requirements ............................................................................................................................................. 3
Advanced Placement ..................................................................................................................................................... 4
Avid .............................................................................................................................................................................. 4
Attendance Requirements ............................................................................................................................................. 4
Audit ............................................................................................................................................................................. 4
Cancellation of Course ..…………………………………………………………………………………………...…..4
Career Cruising……………………………………………………………………………………………………...…..4
Class Rank and Grade Point Average and Quality Points ............................................................................................. 5
Dual Credit / Dual Enrollment ...................................................................................................................................... 5
Early Graduation ........................................................................................................................................................... 5
Enrichment and Extended Learning Opportunities……………………………………………………………………. 5
Grade Point Average ..................................................................................................................................................... 6
Grading System............................................................................................................................................................. 6
Honor Roll .................................................................................................................................................................... 6
Independent Study and PLATO Virtual Academy ........................................................................................................ 6
Schedule Responsibilities ............................................................................................................................................. 6
Student Schedules ......................................................................................................................................................... 7
Student Schedule Changes ............................................................................................................................................ 7
Summer School ............................................................................................................................................................. 7
Withdrawal from a Class ............................................................................................................................................... 7
Sample Four-Year Plans and Worksheet ....................................................................................................................... 8
Business Education Curriculum .................................................................................................................................................. 11
Driver Education Curriculum ..................................................................................................................................................... 13
English Language Learners………………………………………………………………………………………………………14
English / Language Arts Curriculum……………………………………………………………………………………………..17
Family and Consumer Science Curriculum………………………………………………………………………………………20
Fine Arts Curriculum .................................................................................................................................................................. 22
Dramatic Arts .............................................................................................................................................................. 22
Instrumental Music Program ....................................................................................................................................... 23
Vocal Music Program ................................................................................................................................................. 25
Visual Arts Program ................................................................................................................................................... 25
Mathematics Curriculum ............................................................................................................................................................ 27
Physical Education & Health Curriculum/NCAA Eligiility Center ............................................................................................ 32
Reserve Officer Training Corp (R.O.T.C.) Curriculum .............................................................................................................. 34
Science Curriculum .................................................................................................................................................................... 36
Social Studies Curriculum.................................................................................................... ......................................................... 39
Special Services Curriculum ....................................................................................................................................................... 42
Technical & Career Education Curriculum ................................................................................................................................. 49
World Languages and ACC ........................................................................................................................................................ 53
Career Pathway Wheel…………………………………………………………………………………………………………...56
2
GENERAL INFORMATION
COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
(Refer to departments throughout the catalog for specific requirements)
Department
Class of 2015, 2016, and
2017
Class of 2018
English
Math
Science
4.0
3.0
2.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
Social Studies
State and Local
World Studies
American History
Consumer Economics
Federal Government
2.5
.5
n/a
1.0
.5
.5
3.0
n/a
1.0
1.0
.5
.5
Music, Art, Foreign
Language, or Vocational
Education
1.0
1.0
Physical Education
3.0
3.0
Health Education
.5
.5
Driver Education
.5
.5
Computer Concepts
.5
.5
ELECTIVES
7.0
6.5
TOTAL REQUIREMENTS
24.0
24.0
Students are required to take the PSAE/ACT test prior to graduation!
3
ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES
The Advanced Placement (AP) Program, coordinated through the College Board, provides students the opportunity
to earn college credit while in high school. These courses challenge students to higher levels of achievement and
further develop skills and study habits that are beneficial in their postsecondary planning. Courses designated as AP
have had the syllabi and instructor approved by the College Board. In May, students have the opportunity to take a
national AP examination. A fee is required for each test taken. Depending on the results and college the student
chooses to attend, he/she can earn college credit. Students enrolled in AP classes are expected to take the AP exam
in May.
AVID PROGRAM
The central goal of the AVID program (Advancement Via Individual Determination) is to prepare students in
the academic middle that have high potential for acceptance into and success in postsecondary education. An AVID
student is defined as enthusiastic, ardent, and vigorous in pursuit of his/her post high school goals. AVID students
are expected to maintain at least a “C” average in all classes, model good citizenship in the classroom, and become
active members of the school and broader community. Students must go through an application/interview process
and be approved by the AVID site team in order to take this elective course each academic school year.
ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS
Students shall attend school as full-time students for at least three years to be eligible for graduation. A full-time
student is defined as one carrying six subjects. Students participating in approved vocational-occupational work
programs are considered full-time.
Successful academic performance and attendance in school are highly correlated with one another. We encourage
parents/guardians to stress attendance to their children so they may receive the most benefit from their courses. If
you have any questions about your student's attendance, please contact the attendance office.
AUDIT
Students may audit (no grade or credit given) a class with written permission from the Associate Principal. In order
to audit a class, there must be space available in the class, the subject has been taken previously, and credit was
received.
CANCELLATION OF COURSE
Any Advanced Placement Course, elective course, or general course may be cancelled due to lack of enrollment.
CAREER CRUISING
Rock Island High School utilizes the Career Cruising program for online exploration of postsecondary schooling
options and careers. Financial aid and scholarship information is also available on this site. Over the course of four
years at RIHS, students will participate in a variety of Career Cruising activities that will culminate in a portfolio of
information that they can access beyond graduation. In addition, students have access to Career Cruising Quad
Cities, which allows them to explore careers and company profiles in the local area. Various work-based learning
activities are available to students such as company tours, job shadowing and conversing with career coaches.
CLASS RANK
Class rank will be determined by cumulative grade point average using a two-tier weighted grade system.
Rock Island High School Two Tier Grade System
Weighted Courses – 5.0 Scale
A is equal to 5 points
B is equal to 4 points
C is equal to 3 points
D is equal to 2 point
F has no point value
Remaining Courses – 4.0 Scale
A is equal to 4 points
B is equal to 3 points
C is equal to 2 points
D is equal to 1 point
F has no point value
As of the 2011-2012 school year, the following courses are approved for weighted grades:
4
Math
Honors
Pre-Calculus
AP Calculus
English
Honors
English 11
AP English 12
AP Statistics
Social Studies
AP American
History
AP European History
Science
Honors Chemistry
Foreign Language
French IV
Honors Physics
AP Physics
German IV
AP Federal
Government
AP Psychology
Biology II
Spanish IV
Class rank is computed for junior and senior students and is available from the counseling department. In
calculation of grade point average, only 20 semester courses taken over eight semesters may earn weighted points
for an individual student. Students may not receive weighted credit for courses taken over the summer or
independent study courses. All other courses are 4.0 courses.
Class Rank at End of Junior Year
Any student who has earned 20 credits (4 being weighted courses) and has all A’s will be ranked number one.
Class Rank at End of First Semester Senior Year
Any student who has taken 23 credits (7 credits being weighted courses) and has all A’s will be ranked number one.
Class Rank at End of Senior Year and Valedictorian
Any student who has taken 20 semester weighted courses and has A’s in all of his/her high school course work will
be named valedictorian. In this calculation, only 20 semester weighted courses taken over eight semesters can be
used. In the event a student has taken more than 20 semester weighted courses, the 20 highest semester weighted
grades will be used in the calculation.
In the event there is not a student that has taken 20 semester weighted courses and has A’s in all of his/her high
school course work, the student with the highest cumulative GPA be will be named valedictorian.
Only those courses designated as weighted courses at Rock Island High School shall earn weighted credit for
students transferring into Rock Island High School.
Any student with a 4.0 cumulative grade point average will be recognized at the graduation ceremony.
DUAL CREDIT / DUAL ENROLLMENT
In partnership with Black Hawk Community College and Trinity School of Nursing, Rock Island High School
juniors and seniors have an opportunity to earn dual credit (high school and college credits). With the exception of
the Trinity course, these courses are offered to our students on the high school campus. A student may enroll in the
college level classes only after he/she has taken all prerequisites needed for each class. Tuition, textbooks, and other
fees are the responsibility of the student and his/her family. Students should check with their counselor at the time
of registration for the latest information regarding dual credit classes.
EARLY GRADUATION
Students who wish to graduate a semester early must do the following:
1. Requests for early graduation shall be initiated during the first semester of the junior year. Students
must have 20.5 entering their senior year in order to qualify.
2. The student shall make his/her written request, which shall include a listing of the reasons for early
graduation, to the appropriate counselor.
3. The counselor shall review the request, assess the student's credits, and determine whether early graduation
is possible. If the student is eligible for further consideration, the request shall be forwarded to the
associate principal with the counselor's recommendations.
4. The principal shall hold a conference with the student and his/her parent/guardian and then approve or deny
the request.
5. Students who are granted permission for early graduation are eligible to participate in graduation exercises.
An early graduation meeting will be held during first semester of senior year to provide early graduates
information regarding graduation and other important dates.
5
ENRICHMENT and EXTENDED LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES
Rock Island High School holds an Enrichment period from 7:45 – 8:20 four days a week. Teachers and counselors
are available to provide additional assistance to students. Grades are evaluated every three weeks, and students
failing a course will be required to attend Enrichment for the next three weeks. Students are all encouraged to attend
any time they need assistance. There are other extended learning opportunities available for students during the
Enrichment period.
GRADE POINT AVERAGE
Grade point average will be calculated on a uniform 4.0 basis. The maximum possible GPA is 4.0.
All courses listed in this catalog are 4.0 courses unless otherwise noted.
Regular Courses
Quality Points
A=
4.0
5.0
B=
3.0
4.0
C=
2.0
3.0
D=
1.0
2.0
F=
.0
.0
GRADING SYSTEM
Students will receive report cards every nine weeks. First and third quarters, parent/guardians are encouraged to
pick them up at conferences. Report cards not picked up at conferences and second and fourth quarters are sent
home with students. Parents/guardians who do not see their son or daughter’s report card should call and check with
the student’s counselor. For students failing a course, progress reports are mailed home every three weeks. At the
six week point of each grading period, progress reports are mailed home to notify all students and parents/guardians
of academic progress. Questions regarding academic performance should be directed to the classroom teacher or
counselor.
HONOR ROLL
Rock Island High School has two honor rolls:
Crimson 3.00 - 3.49
Gold 3.50 - 4.00
The honor roll will be calculated on the student’s average GPA each quarter and published in the local newspapers.
INDEPENDENT STUDY – See Counselor for Guidelines
Students may apply for permission to take an Independent Study Course based on these reasons: to meet unique
educational needs that cannot be met in a regular class offering or a scheduling conflict which will not allow a
student to take a necessary class. The principal will determine eligibility based on the following guidelines:
1. Students must be at least sophomore standing
2. Students cannot complete Independent Study courses to meet graduation requirements.
3. Students will be allowed to take only ONE Independent Study during their high school career.
4. Students must be in good standing at Rock Island High School, and must show good character through
honorable dealings with staff, good attendance, lack of tardies, and the absence of disciplinary referrals.
5. Students must demonstrate the ability to work independently. Students must also have demonstrated the
initiative and self-discipline that will allow them to be successful with limited assistance from an instructor.
Caution: Independent Study courses will not be awarded weighted credit, and they may not meet
NCAA Eligibility Clearinghouse guidelines.
PLATO VIRTUAL ACADEMY
Rock Island High School partners with PLATO Virtual Academy to provide our students with supplemental online
learning options. The course offerings are rigorous, proven curriculum delivered through certified online teachers.
Students enrolled in these classes will earn Rock Island High School credit. Tuition is the responsibility of the
student and his/her family. Students should check with their counselor at time of registration for more information.
6
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES
As an incoming student to Rock Island High School, you have the following responsibilities:
a. To seriously consider and weigh the merits and requirements of each course which you select and commit
yourself to meet all requirements of those courses.
b. To observe all safety precautions while working in laboratories and shops, i.e., wearing of safety glasses,
lab aprons, etc.
c. To purchase any manual(s) or materials depending upon course description and teacher request, and to pay
for any damaged equipment, lost books, or excessive use of materials necessary for those courses.
STUDENT SCHEDULES
The normal class load at Rock Island High School is expected to be six courses plus physical education. A student’s
program selection recommends the joint approval of parents/guardians and a counselor. All courses are .5 of a unit
of credit per semester unless the course description states differently. Because of scheduling, lack of enrollment, or
teacher availability, a course listed as an elective may not be taught every semester or every year. Once schedules
have been established, student requests for changes will normally not be honored.
STUDENT SCHEDULE CHANGES
Schedule changes will be made only if an error has been made by school personnel, enrollment numbers are not
large enough to offer the course, or it is necessary to allow the student to meet graduation requirements. Changes in
a student’s schedule may also occur to balance class size.
SUMMER SCHOOL
Rock Island High School offers a limited number of courses in summer school. Students may earn a maximum of
one credit per summer. Since each day of summer school is equivalent to four days during the academic year, so
regular attendance is mandatory. Summer school credit will be calculated into GPA.
WITHDRAWAL FROM A CLASS
Students may withdraw from an elective class the first ten days it is in session, provided they are able to retain five
subjects. Withdrawal from a class beyond the two-week period results in a failure for the semester and the
loss of credit.
Meeting the Needs of Gifted Learners at Rock Island High School
Students identified as gifted may be scheduled into honors and advanced placement (AP) courses at R.I.H.S. based
on the following criteria:
Incoming freshmen:
EXPLORE scores
Grades in middle school courses
Middle school teacher recommendations
Continuation of current course placement
For Grades 10-12:
Teacher recommendation
Grades in high school courses
Continuation of current course placement ( ie. continuation of the mathematics sequence)
7
SAMPLE FOUR-YEAR PLANS
Following are some sample four-year plans. Electives should be chosen based upon the student’s interests, abilities,
and career plans. A student may not drop full-year courses at the end of the first semester unless he/she is failing the
class, or has the teacher’s recommendation.
COLLEGE PREP – HONORS PROGRAM – Class of 2018
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
9th Grade
Honors English 9
Honors Integrated Math II
Biology
Foreign Language I
World Studies
Physical Education/ROTC
Elective (Art/Music/PLTW, C. Concepts)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
11th Grade
Honors English 11
AP Calculus
Biology II/AP Physics/Anatomy
Foreign Language III
AP Fed. Govt/Consumer Economics
Physical Education/ROTC
Elective
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
9th Grade
English 9
Integrated Math I
Biology
Foreign Language I
World Studies
Physical Education/ROTC
Elective/Computer Concepts
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
11th Grade
English 11
Integrated Math III
Physics/Anatomy & Physiology/
Foreign Language III
Federal Government/Consumer Econ.
Physical Education/ROTC
Elective (Art/Music/VOC)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
10th Grade
Honors English 10
Honors Integrated Math III
Honors Chemistry
Foreign Language II
AP American History
Health/Drivers Education
Elective (Art/Music/PLTW/VOC)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
12th Grade
A.P. English
AP Statistics
Biology II/AP Physics/Anatomy
Foreign Language IV
AP European History
Physical Education/ROTC
Elective
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
10th Grade
English 10
Integrated Math II
Chemistry/Global Biology
Foreign Language II
American History
Health/Driver Education
Elective
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
12th Grade
Contemporary Literature
Pre-Calculus
Science Elective (Biology II/Physics)
Foreign Language IV
Social Studies Elective
Physical Education/ROTC
Elective
COLLEGE PREP
8
CAREER EDUCATION
The Pathways program is an educational curriculum for the purpose of providing students with the technical and
academic skills necessary for college entrance in technical careers and/or the technical knowledge to succeed in the
workplace of the future. The Tech Prep curriculum emphasizes a balance between academics and career pathways.
CAREER EDUCATION EMPHASIS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
9th Grade
English 9
Integrated Math I
Biology
World Studies
Physical Education/ROTC
Elective/Computer Concepts
Career Ed. Elective (Tech/Consumer Science)
1.
2.
3.
4
5.
6.
7.
11th Grade
English 11
Integrated Math III
Science Elective
Federal Government/Consumer Econ
Physical Education/ROTC
Elective (Career Specific)
Elective (Career Specific)
9
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
5.
6.
10th Grade
English 10
Integrated Math II
Science (Chemistry/Global Biology)
American History
Health/Driver Education
Elective (Art/Music/VOC)
Career Ed. Elective
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
12th Grade
English 12
Physical Education ROTC
Elective (Career Specific)
Elective (Career Specific)
Elective (Career Specific)
Elective (Career Specific)
Elective (Career Specific)
PERSONAL FOUR YEAR WORKSHEET – Class of 2018
Graduation Requirements: 24 Credits to Graduate
1.0 Credit
Semester Classes:
Year-long Classes:
Language Arts – 4 Credits
Mathematics – 3 Credits
American History – 1 Credit
World Studies – 1 Credit
Science – 2 Credits
Physical Education – 3 Credits
Art, Music, Vocational Ed., or Foreign Language – 1 Credit
9TH GRADE COURSES
0.5 Credit
Health Education - .5 Credit
Driver Education - .5 Credit
Federal Government - .5 Credit
Consumer Economics - .5 Credit
Computer Concepts - .5 Credit
ELECTIVE CREDITS - 6.5 Credits
10TH GRADE COURSES
CREDIT
CREDIT
English 9/Honors English 9
1.0
English 10/Honors English 10
1.0
Math: Int. Math I/Hon. Int. Math II
1.0
1.0
Biology
1.0
World Studies
1.0
Math: Int. Math II/Hon. Int. Math III
Chemistry/Hon. Chemistry/Global
Biology
American History/AP Am. History
Physical Education/ROTC/M. Band
Spanish I/French I/German I or
Elective
Computer Concepts
1.0
Health/Driver’s Education
SpanishII/FrenchII/German II or
Elective:
Elective:
1.0
Elective:
.5
TOTAL CREDITS 10th grade
7.0
th
TOTAL CREDITS 9 grade
1.0
.5
7.0
6.0 credits earned to be a sophomore
11TH GRADE COURSES
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
12.0 credits earned to be a junior
CREDIT
12TH GRADE COURSES
CREDIT
English 11 or Honors English 11
1.0
Contemporary Literature or AP Eng. 12
1.0
Math: Int. Math III/AP Calculus
1.0
Math Elective:
1.0
Science Elective:
1.0
Science Elective
1.0
Consumer Econ.
.5
Elective
1.0
Federal Govt. or AP Fed. Govt.
Spanish III/French III/German III or
Elective:
.5
Elective
Spanish IV/French IV/German IV or
Elective:
1.0
Physical Education/ROTC/M. Band
1.0
TOTAL CREDITS 12th grade
7.0
1.0
Physical Education/ROTC/M. Band
1.0
Elective
1.0
TOTAL CREDITS 11th grade
7.0
18.0 credits and must have taken the PSAE
as a junior to become a senior, unless you
meet state exemption criteria.
24.0 credits earned to graduate
10
1.0
BUSINESS EDUCATION
Course
Business & Technology
Concepts
Keyboarding I
Computer Concepts I
Accounting I
Accounting II
Computer Concepts II
Office Technology &
Procedures
Web Page Design I
Cooperative Work
Training
On the Job Training
Credit
Year
.5/semester
9-12
.5
.5
1.0
1.0
1.0
9-12
9-12
10-12
11-12
10-12
1.0
10-12
Keyboarding OR Computer Concepts I
1.0
10-12
Variable
11-12
Variable
11-12
Computer Concepts I
Application through counselor AND coordinator
Employed by the first day of school
Grade Given by Employer
Business & Technology Concepts
BUS15
BUS16 – Second Semester
Prerequisite: None
Notes/Prerequisites
(May register for one or both semesters.)
Data entry skills suggested
Accounting I
Computer Concepts I
.5 Credit per semester
Grades: 9-12
Two Semesters – Students may register for one or both
This orientation-level course will provide an overview of all aspects of business management, marketing and also
includes ethics, concepts, functions, and skills required for meeting the challenges of operating a business in a global
economy. Textbook topics covered will include the various forms of business ownership as well as the basic
functions of finance, management, marketing, administration and production. Student activities include a stock
market simulation and other computer activities. Students will be introduced to a wide range of careers in various
business fields.
Keyboarding I
.5 Credit
BUS17
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 9-12
One Semester
Keyboarding I is a course designed to develop basic skills in touch keyboarding techniques. Students will learn to
edit and format documents such as letters, envelopes, memorandums, reports, and tables. Students will also learn to
format works cited lists and reports using MLA style. Punctuation and capitalization skills will be reviewed. This
class uses the Micro-Type, Checkpro, and Microsoft Word software programs. Students will be introduced to voice
input using the voice recognition program Dragon Naturally Speaking. Grades are based on technique, speed and
accuracy, tests, warm-ups, and daily work.
Computer Concepts I
.5 Credit
BUS29
Prerequisite: Keyboarding Skills Recommended
Grades: 9-12
One Semester
Computer Concepts I is an orientation-level course designed to develop awareness and understanding of application
software and equipment used by employees to perform tasks in business marketing and management. Students will
apply problem-solving skills to hands-on, real-life situations using a variety of software applications. Specific units
of instruction include: word processing, spreadsheet, database applications, presentations/graphics, and integration
activities. Data entry skills upon entering high school will greatly assist the student’s success in this class.
Accounting I
1.0 Credit
BUS25 – Semester l
BUS26 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
Accounting I is a skill level course valuable to all students pursuing a business career. This course includes planned
learning experiences that develop initial and basic skills used in systematically computing, classifying, recording,
verifying and maintaining numerical data involved in financial and product control records. Basic accounting
fundamentals and terminology will be stressed. Instruction provides information on keeping financial records for a
proprietorship, a partnership, and a corporation. Students will complete concepts manually using workbook
11
materials. They will also learn to do automated accounting. Practice sets with business papers will be used to
emphasize actual business records management.
Accounting II
1.0 Credit
BUS27 – Semester l
BUS28 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Accounting I
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
Accounting II builds upon the foundation established in Accounting I using Accounting software. Students will
develop a deeper knowledge of the principles of accounting, with more emphasis placed on financial statements and
their interpretation. Skills are developed in entry, retrieval, and statistical analysis of business data. Students will
become familiar with cost accounting, departmentalized accounting, payroll accounting, and managerial accounting.
This course is Articulated with Accounting at Black Hawk College.
Computer Concepts II
.5 Credit
Grades: 11-12
Two Semesters-Students can register for one or both
BUS31 – Semester l
BUS32 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Computer Concept I
Computer Concepts II is a skill-level course that includes advanced skills, concepts and terminology related to
information processing. Building on the skills developed in Concepts I, students will learn advanced features of the
Microsoft Office Suite, digital photography techniques and photo editing. Students will prepare letters, reports,
brochures and forms. They will learn to compose rough drafts, correct copy and transmit and receive messages
electronically. Students will create data directories and learn file maintenance techniques. Students will learn to
locate and retrieve information from hard copy and electronic sources to prepare a variety of business documents.
Students will apply proper grammar, punctuation, spelling and proofreading practices. Accuracy will be
emphasized. Workplace skills, as well as communication skills will be taught and integrated throughout this course.
Office Technology & Procedures
1.0 Credit
BUS63 – Semester l
BUS64 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Keyboarding OR Computer Concepts I
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
Office Technology and Procedures is a skill-level course that is designed to prepare students for entry-level
employment in a technology-based office setting. Integrated software applications will be included in this course.
Instruction will focus on office etiquette, office management, telephone and communications procedures, time
management, records management, and proper business behavior and attire. In addition, students will file materials
manually and electronically, make travel arrangements, perform financial activities, process mail, transmit messages
electronically, and maintain office supplies and equipment. Students will learn to organize and plan office activities,
compose and distribute meeting notes and reports and answer routine correspondence. Accuracy will be
emphasized. Students will apply new skills, as well as skills learned in other courses to complete a series of realistic
office assignments.
Web Page Design I
1.0 Credit
BUS85 – Semester l
BUS86 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Computer Concepts I
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
Web Page Design I is a skill-level course designed to prepare students to plan, design, create and maintain web
pages and sites. Students will learn the fundamentals of web page design using HTML, HTML editors (including
Dreamweaver), and graphic editors, as well as programming tools such as JavaScript. Students will work in a
project-based environment to create working websites. Students will use image editing programs to enhance
websites.
Cooperative Work Training (CWT)
Varied Credit
Grades: 11-12
BUS43 – Semester l
Year Course
BUS44 – Semester 2
Prerequisite:
Application through Counselor AND Coordinator AND Employed by 1st Day of School
This course prepares students to enter today’s workforce by focusing on practical career planning,
employer/employee relations, money management, and computer skills. Students will combine one half-day of on-
12
the-job training in a local business or industry and one half-day of study in school. Cooperative Work Training
includes a variety of work training stations and is not limited to one particular field. Transportation to the job site is
the responsibility of the student. Participation and support of Co-op activities are expected, including payment of
dues and signing an attendance contract.
On the Job Training (OJT)
Varied Credit
BUS03 (Periods 5-7) Semester l
BUS04 (Periods 5-7) Semester 2
BUS05 (Periods 6-7) Semester 1
BUS06 (Periods 6-7) Semester 2
BUS07 (Period 7) Semester l
BUS08 (Period 7) Semester 2
Prerequisite:
Student must be enrolled in a CWT class
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
OJT is the credit earned for working. Students will attend one half-day in school and one-half day of on-the-job
training supervised by the teacher-coordinator. Students must work a minimum 15 hours per week at a coordinator
approved site. If a student misses more than 9 days of school in a semester, he or she will receive an F for OJT.
Exceptions to attendance include: field trips, in-school suspension, and physician notes. All participants will pay
dues. If a student loses a job, he or she will have two weeks to find other employment or they will be placed in
study hall during scheduled OJT classes and risk failing.
DRIVER EDUCATION
DRIVER EDUCATION
.5 Credit
Prerequisite: Students must be a sophomore in good standing (6 credits) AND
DRED1 Sem 1
DRED2 Sem 2
DRED3
DRED4
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
Must be 16 years of age on or before January 31st
Must be 16 years of age on or before August 31st
Behind the Wheel – Semester l
Behind the Wheel – Semester 2
Driver Education is a one-semester course involving a three-phase program. Students enrolled will be participating
in classroom simulator and street instructional phases at the same time.
The classroom phase is a study of textbook material, state curriculum guides, and other resources pertinent to the
safe operation of the automobile. This phase is required of all students.
Street instruction consists of at least three hours of behind the wheel in a specially equipped driver education car.
(Final requirements of hours based on waiver). Simulation instruction requires 12 hours in a simulator.
Rock Island High School is a participant in the Illinois state-testing program. If a student earns a grade of B or
higher in the classroom phase and passes the performance test behind the wheel, the State Examiner’s road test will
be waived (subject to State Examiner’s spot check dates).
Students passing Driver Education will receive .5 credits. Students are required to pay the Illinois license fee
(currently $20.00). A fee will be charged for the Behind the Wheel instruction (currently $100.00). Course fees
are subject to change, due to State legislation.
13
ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
Courses
English I
ELL Study Skills I
English II
English III
Eng IV
ELL Study Skills II
Math I
Math II
Math III
American History
World Studies
Federal Government
Consumer Economics
Credit
Year
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
.5
.5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
12
12
Notes/Prerequisites
Placement in English I
English I or Teacher Placement
English II or Teacher Placement
English III or Teacher Placement
Teacher Placement
Math I or Teacher Placement
Math II or Teacher Placement
English I
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL 1 – Semester 1
Year Course
ELL 2 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
A two period blocked class that offers intensive English instruction for students with limited English proficiency. This beginning
ELL course is designed for students who need intensive assistance developing listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.
Students receive both English and an elective credit for this course. Students exit from this course based on ACCESS test scores
and teacher recommendation.
ELL Study Skills I
ELL1S – Semester l
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL2S – Semester 2
Year Course
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in English I
This class is designed for student with limited English proficiency enrolled in English I to help develop a wide variety of
academic study skills. Students are expected to be working on developing their academic content knowledge as well as English
language skills throughout the course. A wide variety of methods will be used ranging from direct instruction for effective study
habits to assisting students in all academic areas. This is a pass/fail course.
English II
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL 3 – Semester 1
Year Course
ELL 4 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
This course continues to build upon the skills students develop in ELL I. This intermediate course focuses on students who are
beginning to expand their English language skills. Students exit from this course based on ACCESS scores and teacher
recommendation.
English III
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL 5 – Semester 1
Year Course
ELL 6 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
Students may have mastered basic interpersonal communication skills (BICS), but their cognitive academic language proficiency
(CALP) continues to place them at a disadvantage in content area classes taught in English. This course emphasizes expanding
students English language skills so that they may transition out of ELL classes completely. Exit criteria are based on ACCESS
test scores and teacher recommendation.
14
English IV
1.0 credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL7 – Semester 1
Year Course
ELL8 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
Students may have mastered basic interpersonal communication skills (BICS), but their cognitive academic language proficiency
(CALP) continues to place them at a disadvantage in content area classes taught in English. This course emphasizes expanding
students English language skills so that they may transition out of ELL classes completely. Exit criteria are based on ACCESS
test scores and teacher recommendation.
ELL Study Skills II
1.0 credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL3S – Semester 1
Year Course
ELL4S – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
This class is designed to aid students who have limited English ability to assist in developing academic study skills. Students are
expected to be working on developing their academic content knowledge as well as English language skills throughout the
course. This is a pass/fail course.
Federal Government
.5 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL19
One Semester
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
This class allows students with limited English language skills to study the American political system while enhancing English
language skills. Areas of study will include the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government, campaigns and
elections, the naturalization test, and the Constitution. A variety of activities are used for instruction.
Consumer Economics
.5 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL20 – Semester 1
One Semester
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
This course provides students of limited English proficiency content instruction in consumer economics as well as additional
English support. Students in this course will look at the basic principles of economics and the application to student’s daily lives.
Students will explore the roles of consumers, business, and government. This class prepares students to make good economic
choices in their lives.
World Studies
1.0 Credit
ELL23 - Semester 1
ELL24 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
World Studies is a required course that focuses on major events and themes in the world from prehistory to the
present with English language support. Students will consider the influence of geographic settings, cultural
perspectives, economic systems, and various forms of government on human events from multiple regions and time
periods and link that comprehension with the English language. The course especially emphasizes the historical
background of major problems in the world today.
American History
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL18 – Semester 1
Year Course
ELL21 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
US History focuses on combining the standards and goals of American History with English language support. This course helps
students understand major policies and events in U.S. History and link that comprehension with the English language. A wide
variety of activities are used to develop these skills.
Biology I
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
SCIA - Semester 1
Year Course
SCIB - Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
This introductory course provides instruction in the basic structure and function of living organisms. Student will investigate
these concepts through a variety of classroom and laboratory activities. This course develops student’s critical thinking skills and
supports students English language development by providing a link between conversational competency and academic language.
15
Global Biology
1.0 Credit
Grades: 10-12
SCIC – Semester 1
Year Course
SCID – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
This yearlong course focuses on the relationship between humans and their environment. This class uses a variety of classroom
and lab activities for instruction. Students study ecosystems and various environmental issues. Although a different course, this
class continues to build upon the student’s academic language developed in Biology I.
Math I
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL 9 – Semester 1
Year Course
ELL 10 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
This course is the first in a sequence for students needing additional assistance in math. Topics include positive and negative
integers, multiplication and division, simple fractions and an introduction to variables. Students in these classes receive English
language support and are introduced to academic language and critical thinking skills that will benefit them in all classes.
Math II
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL 11 – Semester 1
Year Course
ELL 12 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
This is the second course in the sheltered math sequence. This course builds upon the skills of Math I and further prepares
students for more advanced math. Topics in this course include proportions, working with more complex fractions, and basic
equations. Students will continue to build their academic vocabulary and critical thinking skills in this course.
Math III
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ELL 15 – Semester 1
Year Course
ELL 16 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Placement in this class is based on recommendations of ELL teachers.
This course represents the final step in the sheltered math sequence. Topics in this course include evaluating expressions, solving
equations, and an introduction to the quadratic formula. Students receive the necessary instruction in English, academic language
and critical thinking so that they can be successful in other mathematics courses.
16
ENGLISH
Credit
Year
English 9
English 9 Lab
Honors English 9
Courses
1.0
.5
1.0
9
9
9
English 10
1.0
10
*Honors English 10
1.0
10
English 11
*Honors English 11
Contemporary Literature 12
*A.P. English 12
Journalism
Black Literature
Creative Writing
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
.5
.5
11
11
12
12
11-12
11-12
11-12
Notes/Prerequisites
Refer to course description
Refer to course description
C- or higher in Honors English 9 or teacher
recommendation.
C- or higher in Honors English 10
C- or higher in Honors English 11
Elective
Elective
Elective
English at Rock Island High School consists of a four-year program of challenge and achievement through the study
of literature and the communication arts. Students take a prescribed series of core courses in reading, literature,
writing, and speaking. Four years of English credit are required for graduation from Rock Island High School.
Students planning to graduate early need to see their counselor to make arrangements to complete all required
English courses.
NINTH GRADE
REQUIRED:
English 9 or
Honors English 9
ELECTIVE:
English Lab
English 9
TENTH GRADE
REQUIRED:
English 10 or
Honors English 10
ELEVENTH GRADE
REQUIRED:
English 11 or
Honors English 11
TWELFTH GRADE
REQUIRED:
Contemporary Literature
12 or A.P. English 12
ELECTIVES:
Journalism
Black Literature
Creative Writing
ELECTIVES:
Journalism
Black Literature
Creative Writing
1.0 Credit
ENGF3 – Semester l
ENGF4 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: None
Grade: 9
Year Course
All ninth grade students are required to pass a comprehensive, full-year English course. The course will focus on
the development of students' reading skills through the reading of classic and contemporary literature as well as
contemporary non-fiction. Students will also study grammar, usage, and writing.
English LAB 9
.5 Credit
Grade: 9
ENGF5 – Semester l
Semester Course
ENGF6 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Students earning an average score below 10 on the EXPLORE English and Reading tests will be enrolled in
English 9 Lab, in addition to their English class.
This course will provide additional skill building support for those students who need assistance in reading, writing,
and grammar skills.
17
Honors English 9
ENGF1 – Semester l
ENGF2 – Semester 2
1.0 Credit
Grade: 9
Year Course
This class is a year-long course offered to academically accelerated 9 th grade students. The course will help students
develop more mature communication skills and will acquaint them with the life-enriching benefits of the study of
literature. Students will also study grammar, usage, and writing.
*Note: In order to stay in the Honors English program, students must maintain a semester grade
of C-.
English 10
1.0 Credit
ENG11 – Semester 1
ENG12 – Semester 2
Grade: 10
Year Course
All sophomores must pass this course which focuses on the development of writing skills. Students will be expected
to utilize the writing process to compose essays in a variety of genres. Additionally, students will develop reading
skills through the study of novels, plays, short stories, and non-fiction. Students will continue to study grammar and
usage.
*Honors English 10
1.0 Credit
ENG15 – Semester l
ENG16 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: C- or higher in Honors English 9 or teacher recommendation
Grade: 10
Year Course
This class is a year-long course offered to academically accelerated 10 th grade students. Students will investigate
different types of world literature and, through analysis, come to an appreciation of different world philosophies.
Students will utilize the writing process to compose essays in a variety of genres, including the research paper.
Grammar and usage skills will be incorporated into daily lessons.
English 11
1.0 Credit
ENG61 – Semester l
ENG62 – Semester 2
Grade: 11
Year Course
All juniors must pass this year-long course that is a study of American literature and college preparatory
composition. Development of writing skills will include: arguments, short stories, literary analysis, college
application essays, and a processed research paper. Additionally, students will prepare for the reading and English
portions of the ACT test.
*Honors English 11
1.0 Credit
ENG21 – Semester l
ENG22 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: C- or higher in Honors English 10
Grade: 11
Year Course
5.0 Weighted Credit
This class is a year-long course offered to academically accelerated 11 th grade students. Students will study
American Literature in an historical context. Additionally, students will work to develop college-level reading and
writing skills in preparation for future study as well as for the PSAE test. Written work will include: arguments,
literary analysis, college applications and MLA research.
Contemporary Literature 12
1.0 Credit
ENG45 – Semester 1
ENG46 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: None
Grade: 12
Year Course
In this one-year course, students will read, write, speak, and think critically. The course will include the study of
contemporary British and world literature in a variety of genres including lyric poetry, fiction, cultural studies,
modern drama, and modern short stories and novels. Students will complete a research project. Additionally,
students will use research skills and MLA format for written and oral projects.
18
*Advanced Placement English 12
1.0 Credit
ENG37 – Semester l
ENG38 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: C- or higher in Honors English 11
Grade: 12
Year Course
5.0 Weighted Credit
In A.P. English 12, students must read, write, and speak at advanced levels. British poetry and prose, studied
chronologically, brings students to understand the development of modern English literature and language. Writing
focuses mainly on exposition, with emphasis on process, content, clarity, and form. Students will do extensive
outside reading and present oral reports each quarter. Additionally, students use research skills and the MLA format
for written and oral projects. The literature and writing content of this year-long course helps prepare students for
the A.P. Literature (or Language) exam in May.
AP English is a year-long course. Students enrolled in this class are expected to take the AP exam in May and
are expected to remain in the course for the entire year unless they earn a semester grade of C- or lower at
the semester. Teacher, parent, and administrative approval are required to drop this course.
Grade 11 and 12 Electives
In addition to required English classes, juniors and seniors have an opportunity to select from a series of English
classes that best take into consideration their interests, abilities and future plans.
Journalism
1.0 Credit
ENG81
ENG82
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
Students will study the methods, ethics, and fundamentals of journalistic writing. They will write and edit news,
features, and sport stories, along with editorials and writing for the yearbook. Students will be introduced to and
utilize desktop publishing for production. Students will do all of the writing, photography, designs, and layouts for
the two publications, the school newspaper, The Crimson Crier, and the school yearbook, The Watchtower.
Black Literature
.5 Credit
ENG59
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12
One Semester
This course, which aims to broaden students’ knowledge and appreciation of Black/African literature, surveys the
history and literature of African-American people from their African background to the present. The course
concentrates on the literature, but includes the music and the art that contributed to each period of African-American
cultural history. Students will be writing essays in response to readings.
Creative Writing
.5 Credit
ENG90
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12
One Semester
This course offers writing experience with the short story, poetry, play, informal essay, drama, and autobiography.
It will help students develop creative thinking. Class time will be used in writing, revising, reading students’ work,
and conferring with the teacher, as well as reading and analyzing examples of various literary genres.
*********************************************************************************************
AVID
1.0 Credit
Semester 1
Semester 2
Prerequisite: Application Process
Grade: 9
Year Course
This is the first course of a 2-year program that prepares students for advanced placement courses in high school and
future college level coursework. This class focuses on developing writing, inquiry, collaboration, and reading
through the content areas as well as communication, self-advocacy, leadership, and organization/time management
skills.
19
FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE CURRICULUM
Courses
Child Growth and
Development
Child Care I
Child Care II
Child Care III
Foods & Nutrition I
Foods & Nutrition II
Culinary Arts
Credit
Year
.5
9-12
.5
.5
2.0
.5
.5
.5
9-12
10-12
12
9-12
10-12
11-12
Child Growth and Development
Notes/Prerequisites
Child Growth and Development
Child Care I
Child Care I and II
Foods & Nutrition I
C or higher in Foods & Nutrition I and II
.5 Credit
HOM17
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 9-12
One Semester
This course emphasizes knowledge and understanding of the intellectual, physical, social and emotional
development of children through age one. The content includes decision-making and goal setting skills, information
to meet children’s adequate clothing needs, food and nutrition needs and motor skills development. Practicing health
and safety standards for children is stressed. The student has an opportunity to take home a real care baby that
simulates a parenting experience. Information related to careers in child, day care and education services are
incorporated throughout the course.
Child Care I
.5 Credit
HOM05
Prerequisite: Child Growth and Development
Grades; 9-12
One Semester
This course is a continuation of child development that empathizes experiences, which help students gain knowledge
and understanding of the intellectual, physical, social and emotional development of children from the ages of two
through six years old. The course content includes meeting children’s needs, of food and nutrition, clothing and
shelter, encouraging human relations in children, and evaluating family and career changes in relation to impact on
children. Information related to careers in child care is incorporated throughout the course.
Child Care II
.5 Credit
HOM07
Prerequisite: Child Growth and Development and Child Care I
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
Child Care II is a course that deals with the care and understanding of children. Students will learn about childcare
careers and gain skills needed for personal needs and professional employment in a variety of childcare programs.
Students will work with the children either within the school or through a lab experience outside of the school.
Child Care III
2 Credits
HOM53 – Semester l
HOM54 – Semester 2
Prerequisite:
Child Care II
Application through counselor and coordinator
Grade: 12
Year Course
(Two Periods)
Child Care III is designed to give students classroom and practical training hours to qualify for the CDA (Child
Development Association) Credential. Students receive experience by working with children at a child care site.
Instruction is also provided for meeting other requirements needed to be fully qualified for employment in a licensed
child care center upon graduation from high school.
20
Foods and Nutrition I
.5 Credit
HOM01
Grades: 9-12
One Semester
This course includes the basic classroom and practical experiences needed to develop a knowledge and
understanding of basic food principles and nutrition. Course content includes the following basic skills: food
preparation management using the decision-making process; meeting foundational needs by applying nutrition
concepts; meeting health and safety needs in planning, preparing, and serving food; promoting hospitality in food
practices; and analyzing individual and family nutritional needs. Information related to careers in foods and
nutrition is incorporated throughout the course.
Foods and Nutrition II
.5 Credit
Grades; 10-12
HOM03
One Semester
Prerequisite: Foods and Nutrition I
This course is the second level of the study of foods. It centers on food selection and preparation. Laboratory
sessions are devoted to preparation of foods with specific characteristics. Course content includes the following:
Careers in foods and nutrition, influence of food customs, diet and health, current food issues and special food
needs. Food safety, sanitation, purchasing, conservation and preservation are also studied.
Culinary Arts
.5 Credit
HOM31
Prerequisite: C or higher in Foods and Nutrition I and II classes
Grades: 11-12
One Semester
This course is the most advanced study of the science of cooking. The course is designed to provide students
interested in a career in food service, information and practical experience in management with an emphasis on food
service and hospitality occupations. Topics of study include: sanitization and safety, food costing, portion control,
standardized recipes, preparation of cultural foods, garnishes, decorated baked goods.
21
FINE ARTS CURRICULUM
Courses
Credit
Year
Theatre Arts I
Theatre Arts II
Theatre Arts III
Music Theory
Music Appreciation
.5
.5
.5
.5
.5
9-12
9-12
10-12
11-12
11-12
Marching Band I
.5
9-12
Concert Band (Fall)
.5
9-12
Concert Band (Spring)
Symphonic Band
.5
.5
9-12
10-12
Jazz Band
.5
9-12
Orchestra
1.0
9-12
Concert Choir
Symphonic Choir
Chamber Choir
Art Forms
Art Studio I
Art Studio II
1.0
1.0
1.0
.5
.5
.5
.5 to
1.0
.5
.5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
10-12
Art Ideas
Ceramics I
Ceramics II
Prerequisites
C or higher in Theatre Arts I recommended
C or higher in Theatre Arts II recommended
Must be involved in Music Program
Enrollment in band both semesters of previous
year or private lessons previous year
Enrollment in band both semesters of previous
year or private lessons for the previous year
Enrollment by audition or approval of instructor
Enrollment by audition only
Concurrent enrollment in band, orchestra, or choir
for 1 year.
Previous experience in playing a stringed
instrument or approval by instructor.
Audition
Audition
Art Forms
Art Studio I
11-12
Art Studio II and teacher permission
10-12
10-12
C in Ceramics I recommended
DRAMATIC ARTS PROGRAM
Theatre Arts I
.5 Credit
ART21
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 9-12
One Semester
Theater Arts I provides opportunities for students to explore theatre skills and techniques. Students will learn the
fundamentals of theatre through various texts, daily activities, and projects, including the creation and performance
of short scenes and ensemble acting.
Theatre Arts II
.5 Credit
ART23
Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I
Grades: 9-12
One Semester
Theatre Arts II provides opportunities for students to acquire new skills and understandings such as writing,
producing, and directing plays, while enhancing and developing previously acquired experience in Theater Arts I.
Topics also include the role and development of theatre in society. The course uses a variety of texts, daily
activities, projects, tests, and performances.
22
Theatre Arts III
.5 Credit
ART25
Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I & II
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
Theater Arts III provides opportunities for students to advance themselves in the following areas: improving
established techniques, expanding students’ exposure to different types of theatrical techniques and traditions, and
increasing their chances of participating in public productions. This course may also provide a discussion of career
opportunities in the theater.
MUSIC PROGRAM
The music program includes instruction in non-performance and performance classes. The non-performance classes
are Music Theory and Music Appreciation / History. Performance classes are Instrumental Music (Marching Band,
Concert Band, Jazz Band and Orchestra) and Vocal Music (several choirs from which to choose). The performance
classes also include study of theory and appreciation / history. Certain music classes may require the purchase of
a textbook.
Non-Performance Classes
Music Theory
.5 Credit
ART39
Prerequisite: Must be involved in the music program
Grades: 11-12
One Semester
Music Theory requires that a student have an understanding of basic music. They must already be capable of
reading music. This class is for students who maybe considering majoring in music in college or furthering their
musical knowledge beyond the basics.
Music Appreciation – Dual Credit
.5 Credit
ART40
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12
One Semester
This course is designed to acquaint students with the various periods of musical composition and performance. No
previous musical training is required. It would be beneficial to all students, especially those involved in other music
classes, those planning music as a career, and those attending a college / university in liberal arts.
Students enrolled in this class must take it for dual credit. In addition to a cost for a textbook, there is a $45
fee.
Performance Classes
INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC PROGRAM
The Instrumental Music Program includes instruction in small and large group performance and solo and ensemble
in the areas of winds, strings, and percussion. Large group performance includes the orchestra and bands (concert,
marching, pep and jazz). Individual and /or small group performance includes experience in solo preparation, duets,
trios, and experience in Instrumental Music.
Marching Band I
.5 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ART31
One Semester
Prerequisite:
Enrollment in band both semesters of previous year OR
(Fall)
Private lessons the previous year
Placement of students in the marching band is subject to the discretion of the director based on audition, enrollment,
and/or performance.
Marching Band (Marching, Concert band) is available to 9-12 grade students who have previous experience playing
an instrument, or are members of the color guard. The program includes the exploration, preparation, and
performance of music written for bands and wind ensembles. All students will participate in a Marching Band camp
23
held at the high school in July and Fall Break; as well as all Marching Band related activities, which take place
during first semester. The band will rehearse concert band material throughout the semester. Course requirements
include performance in all concerts and special events. All students enrolled in band will participate in pep band
performances for basketball games. Students have the option to audition for the IMEA All-District band.
Concert Band (Fall)
.5 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ART29
One Semester
Prerequisite: Enrollment in band both semesters of the previous year OR private lessons for a year. Private lesson
students must audition for the directory by the end of February.
Concert Band is available to students who have previous experience playing a wind or percussion instrument and
prefers not to perform in marching band. The program includes the exploration, preparation, and performance of
music written for bands. Course requirements include performance in all concerts and special events, sectionals, and
rehearsals, and other appearances of the band. All students enrolled in band will participate in pep band
performances and basketball games. Students enrolled in band are also eligible to enroll in the jazz band class. Band
students have the option to audition for the IMEA All-District Band.
Concert Band (Spring)
.5 Credit
ART30
Prerequisite: Enrollment by audition
Grades: 9-12
One Semester
Concert band is the mid-level band at the high school. In order to be in this band a student must audition in the
spring and be selected. The band performs 2 times in the spring semester. Those students who may never been in
band before may be accepted in this band with instructor’s approval.
Jazz Band
.5 to 1.0 Credit
Grades 9-12
ART27 – Semester l
May enroll for one year
ART28 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Band, Orchestra, or Choir (guitar, electric bass, and piano require Director’s approval)
Enrollment in band the previous year OR
Private lessons for the previous year
Jazz band, as a class and performing group, includes the exploration, preparation, and performance of the various
styles of the musical art known as jazz. Course requirements include performances at concerts, festivals, and other
special events. Students will explore transposition, notation, improvisation, and composition of jazz music. You
must be enrolled in a performing arts class in order to participate.
Symphonic Band
.5 Credit
ART32
Prerequisite: Enrollment by audition
Students not previously enrolled in a band class must have private lessons to be eligible for approval.
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
Symphonic band is the top-level band at the high school. In order to be in this band, a student must audition in the
spring and be selected for this band. The band performs three times in the spring semester. Participation in concert
festival is required.
Orchestra
1.0 Credit
ART41 – Semester 1
ART42 – Semester 2
Prerequisite:
Previous experience in playing a stringed instrument
Wind and percussion players for full orchestra are selected from Band.
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
Orchestra, as a class and performing group, is designed to increase playing abilities and knowledge of string and
orchestra literature as well as basic musical knowledge. It will include outside of class performances and
opportunities for small group ensembles. Students will explore string technique, composers, and other orchestra
works.
24
VOCAL MUSIC PROGRAM
The vocal music program provides students the opportunity for performance in a choir, as well as instruction in
sight-reading and theory. The beginning singer or non-singer is taught technique and beginning theory in Concert
Choir. Midway through the year, all students are tested on their skills and those who have achieved success may
advance throughout the year in all choirs for optional solo/ensemble work, as well as festivals and competition.
Concert Choir
1.0 Credit
ART35 – Semester l
ART36 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
Open to all students 9-12 who are interested in learning how to sing in a choir. Intended for beginning music
students since much time is spent on choral techniques and fundamentals of reading music. Students in the class
should possess a teachable attitude and be able to practice self-discipline. There will be an average of one required
concert performance each quarter.
Symphonic Choir
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
ART37 – Semester 1
Year Course
ART38 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Audition
Students who have experience in Band, Choir, or Orchestra are strong candidates.
This is an auditioned choir of male and female singers who perform a variety of choral music. Time is spent to
continue development of choral techniques and music reading skills. Two more concerts per semester plus
opportunities to participate in state contests and festivals. Symphonic Choir periodically combines with Chamber
Choir to form a larger group for performances. This course requires some rehearsals and performances beyond the
school day, including sectional rehearsals at 7 AM in August/September and February/March to prepare for statelevel festivals and contests.
Chamber Choir
1.0 Credit
ART45 – Semester l
ART46 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Student must audition for instructor.
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
This course enables students to develop performance techniques and proficiency in group and solo situations and to
develop creativity through the study of appropriate and varied choral literature. Music reading ability is very
important, as students must be able to learn a large amount of music in a short amount of time. Chamber Choir is a
highly regarded performing group, not only in our district but also throughout the Quad Cities region. As such, this
course will require many extra rehearsals at 7 AM in August/September and February/March to prepare for statelevel festivals and contests. Private lessons are highly encouraged but not required. Auditions are conducted in the
spring for the following school year. Class size is limited to 16-24 members. Students in Chamber Singers should
plan to audition for IMEA District Festival in the fall and will prepare a solo and/or ensemble for the Solo &
Ensemble Contest in the spring.
VISUAL ARTS PROGRAM
Six courses in art are offered over an eight-semester period in a sequential order. All courses are one semester in
length.
Art Forms
.5 Credit
ARTS1
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 9-12
One Semester
Art Forms is a semester art class in which the art student is introduced to the high school art complex. This class
also stresses concepts of design and art theory and provides an opportunity for the student to become acquainted
with the various facilities of the art department.
25
Art Studio I
.5 Credit
ARTS5
Prerequisite: Art Forms
Grades: 9-12
One Semester
This class includes skill practice in two-dimensional art, with each skill involved along with the appropriate
terminology. Students incorporate the skills and terms used in their practice to create a finished product.
Art Studio II
.5 Credit
ARTS7
Prerequisite: Art Studio I
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
Art Studio II is a course, which allows students to pursue their talents by the use of both contracted and directed art
projects. With a teacher’s recommendation, the serious art student may be allowed to register for more than one Art
Studio II class per semester, if his/her schedule permits.
Art Ideas
.5 Credit/1.0 credit
ART09
ART10
Prerequisite: Art Studio II and teacher permission
Grades: 11-12
One Semester/
Full Year
The Art Ideas class is a course to provide insight and preparation for professional art school or college. Students
will survey the history of art and prepare a will prepare a portfolio of their work for college or professional use.
Ceramics I
.5 Credit
ART13
Prerequisite: Art Forms
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
This course will introduce students to several hand-building methods of clay construction such as slab, coil, pinch,
and inverted drape. A variety of decorative methods will be demonstrated as well as glazing techniques. Each
student will design his/her own unique constructions. The kick wheel and electric wheel will also be demonstrated.
Students will be required to organize a ceramics notebook/sketchbook.
Ceramics II
.5 Credit
ART15
Prerequisite: C or higher in Ceramics I is recommended
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
This course is designed for the student that enjoys working with clay. Discussions and demonstrations will be given
prior to all projects. Students will expand on their hand-building, wheel throwing and glazing experiences. All
projects will be critiqued and video taped.
26
MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM
Course #
Courses
MATF3&F4
Integrated Math I
MATH5 & 6
Integrated Math II
Credit
Year
1.0
9-10
10-12
MAT39&40
MAT77&78
Honors Integrated
Math II
Geometry
Honors Geometry
MAT45&46
*AP Statistics
1.0
11-12
MAT19
MAT20
Computer Science I
Computer Science II
.5
.5
10-12
11-12
MAT63&64
Pre-Calculus
1.0
11-12
MAT 25&26
Last year this course
is offered is the
2015-16 school year
*Honors
Pre- Calculus
1.0
11-12
MAT27&28
*AP Calculus
1.0
12
MLAB1 & 2
Math Lab
ELECTIVE
9
MATH7 & 8
1.0
9
1.0
1.0
10-12
10-12
Prerequisites
See Placement Criteria Under Listing
for this course
See Placement Criteria Under Listing
for this course
See Placement Criteria Under Listing
for this course
Algebra I
Honors Algebra II
Algebra II and Geometry or Integrated
Math I and Integrated Math II
Computer Science I
Honors Algebra II/
Geometry/Integrated Math III
See Placement Criteria Under Listing
for this course
Honors Pre-Calculus/Grade of A or B
and ACT math score of 25 or greater
See Placement Criteria Under Listing
for this course
Recommended course sequences:
Class of 2015 and Class of 2016
Class of 2015-16 State Requirements for Graduation: 3 years of high school level math to include Algebra I
and Exp. Geometry/Geometry and Algebra II/Honors Algebra II/Integrated Math II.
General and/or
Career Ed
Algebra I
Math Lab (if applicable)
Exp. Geometry/Geometry/
Integrated Math II
College-Bound Students
and
Career Ed
Algebra l
Algebra II
Geometry
Pre-Calculus or math
elective
College-Bound
Students
Algebra II
Geometry
Pre-Calculus
Calculus; APStats;
Computer Science
Honors Math
Program
Honors Algebra II
Honors Geometry
Honors Pre-Calculus
AP Calculus; AP Stats;
Computer Science
Rock Island High School students will be required to successfully complete a math course prior to moving to
the next level of math.
27
Class of 2017
Class of 2017 State Requirements for Graduation: 3 years of high school level math to include Integrated
Math I; Integrated Math II; Integrated Math III.
* For those students that completed Honors Algebra I in 8 th grade, the high school sequence is
Honors Algebra II; Geometry/Honors Geometry; Honors Pre-Calculus.
General and/or
Career Ed
Integrated Math I
Math Lab (if needed)
Integrated Math II
Integrated Math III
Math Elective
College-Bound Students
and Career Ed
Integrated Math I
Integrated Math II
Integrated Math III
Pre-Calculus; AP Stats
Computer Science
Honors Math
Program
Honors Algebra II
Honors Geometry
*Honors Pre-Calculus
AP Calculus; AP Stats
Computer Science
Last year Honors PreCalculus class is offered
2015-16 school year
Class of 2018
Class of 2018 State Requirements for Graduation: 3 years of high school level math to include Integrated
Math I; Integrated Math II; Integrated Math III.
* For those students that completed Honors Integrated Math in 8 th grade, the high school sequence is
Honors Integrated Math II; Honors Integrated Math III; AP Calculus.
General and/or
Career Ed
Integrated Math I
Math Lab (if needed)
Integrated Math II
Integrated Math III
Math Elective
College-Bound Students
and Career Ed
Integrated Math I
Integrated Math II
Integrated Math III
Pre-Calculus; AP Stats
Computer Science
Honors Math
Program
Honors Integrated Math II
Honors Integrated Math III
AP Calculus
AP Stats
Computer Science
** Honors Pre-Calculus is no longer offered.
* Math classes earning weighted credit are AP Statistics, and AP Calculus.
Math I Lab
.5 Elective Credit (not a math credit)
MLAB1 – Semester 1
MLAB2 – Semester 2
Placement Criteria: Required for Students who score 13 or less on EXPLORE.
Grade: 9
One semester
The lab will reinforce basic operations of integers, fractions and decimals related to the importance and relevance to
real world applications of these skills. Students will be re-evaluated at the end of the first semester to determine
placement for second semester.
Integrated Math I
1.0 Credit
MATF3 - Semester 1
MATF4 - Semester 2
Grade: 9
Year Course
The fundamental purpose of Mathematics I is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students leaned in the
middles grades. The critical areas, organized into units, deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships, in
part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a
linear trend. Mathematics I uses properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend
understanding of geometric knowledge from prior grades. The final unit in the course ties together the algebraic and
geometric ideas studied. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with
content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that
makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.
28
Integrated Math II
1.0 Credit
MATH5 - Semester 1
MATH6 - Semester 2
Prerequisite: Integrated Math I
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
The focus of Integrated Math II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics
and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Integrated Math I as organized into 6 critical
areas, or units. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises and real and complex numbers are
introduced so that all quadratic equations can be solved. The link between probability and data is explored through
conditional probability and counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The study of
similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean
relationships. Circles, with their quadratic algebraic representations, round out the course. The Mathematical
Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students
experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of
problem situations.
Honors Integrated Math II (9-12 Graders)
1.0 Credit
MATH7 - Semester 1
MATH8 - Semester 2
Prerequisite: Honors Integrated Math I/Grade of C- or better/Teacher Recommendation
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
The focus of Honors Integrated Mathematics II is similar to Mathematics II but contains appended curriculum
content from the Integrated Mathematics III curriculum. Content that was covered in Honors Mathematics I
curriculum is not repeated and extension content is included. Extension topics include: use complex numbers in
polynomial identities and equations, interpret structure-write equivalent equations for quadratic and exponential
equations and expressions, solve systems of equations that include quadratics, analyze functions using different
representations, build functions that model relationships and new functions from existing functions (include all types
of functions studied), extend the domain of trigonometric functions using the unit circle, prove geometric theorems
algebraically, use apply equations for conic sections, understand independence and conditional probability and use
to interpret data, use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions.
Algebra II (10-12 Graders)
1.0 Credit
MAT15 – Semester 1
MAT16 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
This class will cover most of the same topics as in Honors Algebra II, but at a slower rate. The graphing calculator
is recommended for use in this class. (TI84 Plus is recommended.)
Geometry
1.0 Credit
MAT39 – Semester 1
MAT40 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Algebra I and Algebra II
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
Geometry stresses both the basic structure of plane geometry and proficiency in developing formal proofs. Plane
Geometry topics are expanded to space when appropriate. Algebraic skills are reviewed and strengthened as
algebraic methods are applies to solving geometric problems.
Honors Geometry
1.0 Credit
MAT77 – Semester 1
MAT78 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Honors Algebra II/ Grade of C- or better/Teacher Recommendation
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
Students in Honors Geometry study the topics in our traditional geometry course in greater depth and with greater
rigor. They will also study additional properties about three-dimensional figure, and will learn about additional
solids, as well as more about the common solids.
29
*AP Statistics – Weighted Course
1.0 Credit
MAT45 – Semester 1
MAT46 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry/Grade of C- or better/Teacher Recommendation
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
5.0 Weighted
Credit
This course represents a college-level mathematics course for which students are expected to take the AP exam in
May. Depending on the results and college the student chooses to attend, he/she may earn college credit. The
purpose of this course is to introduce the students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and
drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data, Planning a
Study, Anticipating Patterns, and Statistical Inference.
Computer Science I
.5 Credit
Prerequisite: Geometry
MAT19
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
Computer Science I is a one semester introductory course in computer development, computer architecture, and
computer programming in JAVA. Programming emphasis is placed on the fundamental control structures of
sequencing, branching, and looping and on the fundamental data structures of variables, arrays, and matrices.
Examples, applications, and exercises will come from many levels of mathematics.
Computer Science II
.5 Credit
Prerequisite: Computer Science I
MAT20
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
Computer Science II is a one semester intermediate course in computer programming in JAVA. Programming
emphasis is placed on algorithms, functions, records, user-defined data types, and object oriented program design.
Students are required to develop original well-written programs to solve problems from a broad range of computer
applications.
Pre-Calculus
1.0 Credit
MAT63 – Semester 1
MAT64 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra II/Integrated Math III with Grade of C- or better
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
Pre-Calculus is a course for juniors and seniors with a desire and ability to further their math education to either take
Calculus as seniors or prepare for freshman college math. The emphasis in the course is working with functions and
their applications. In addition to studying exponential, logarithmic, circular, and trigonometric functions, the student
is introduced to mathematical induction, limits, vectors, and Analytical Geometry. The graphing calculator is used
as an aid to help the student visualize practical functions. (TI 84 Plus calculators are recommended for this class – a
classroom set will be provided for use during class).
*Honors Pre-Calculus – Weighted Course
1.0 Credit
MAT25 - Semester 1
MAT26 - Semester 2
Prerequisite: Honors Algebra II and Geometry/Grade of C- or higher/Teacher Recommendation
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
5.0 Weighted
Credit
Honors Pre-Calculus is a course for juniors only who have taken the honors series of classes and intend on taking
AP Calculus. All students should complete four years of secondary mathematics designed for college-bound
students: courses in which they study algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and elementary
functions. In Honors Pre-Calculus, students will study functions including linear, polynomial, rational, exponential,
logarithmic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, and piecewise. In particular, students will become familiar with
the properties of functions, the algebra of functions (domain and range, odd and even, periodic, symmetry, zeros,
intercepts, and so on) and know the values of the trigonometric functions of the numbers, 0, pi/6.pi/4, pi/3, pi/2, and
their multiples.
30
*AP Calculus – Weighted Course
1.0 Credit
MAT27 – Semester 1
MAT28 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: A or B in all previous Honors Math Courses and a min 25 on a Math ACT
Grade: 12
Year Course
5.0 Weighted Credit
This course represents a college-level mathematics course. Everyone who signs up for this course will be expected
to take the AP exam in May. Students should have demonstrated mastery through honors pre-calculus before
attempting this course. Course content includes the study of: functions, graphs, limits, derivatives and second
derivatives in Cartesian and polar coordinates, application of derivatives, computation of derivatives, integrals,
application of integrals, computation of integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, numerical approximations,
polynomial approximations and series, series of constants, and Maclairin and Taylor series. (TI 84 Plus calculators
are recommended for this class – a classroom set will be provided for use during class).
31
PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH CURRICULUM
Courses
Health Education
Physical Education
Adv. Physical Education
Credit
Year
.5
1.0
1.0
10
9, 11, 12
10-12
Prerequisites
All students are required to take six semesters (9th grade, 11th grade, and 12th grade) of Physical Education and one
semester of Health Education during high school.
Health Education
.5 Credit
PEO1
Grade: 10
One Semester
This is a course that includes activities, which increase the abilities of students to make decisions affecting their
personal, family, and community well being. The emphasis will be on the following topics: mental and emotional
health, nutrition, exercise, substance abuse, diseases, environmental health and community health.
Physical Education courses at Rock Island High School are designed to provide students the fundamentals of a
variety of activities in order to help support the importance of physical fitness. Physical Education promotes
students’ physical, mental, and social wellness and emphasizes the importance of continued physical activity after
high school.
Physical Education
1.0 Credit
PE25 – Semester 1
PE26 – Semester 2
Grade: 9
Year Course
This is an introductory physical education class at Rock Island High School for ninth grade students.
Physical Education
1.0 Credit
PE27 – Semester 1
PE28 – Semester 2
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
Students will be provided an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of a variety of sports and activities with an
emphasis on developing lifetime skills. In addition, curriculum will cover such areas as cardiovascular fitness,
exercising safely, weight control and other areas of wellness. Each of these activities will extend over four nineweek periods and many will be on a coed basis. They will include individual and team sports, aquatics, wellness
and recreational activities.
Activities offered include but not limited to: Soccer, Speedball, Flag Football, Tennis, Golf, Softball, Aquatics,
Ultimate Frisbee, Jogging, Basketball, Weight Training, Table Tennis, Volleyball, Badminton, Pickle ball, Dance /
Rhythms, Floor Hockey, Volley-tennis, Pillo Polo, and Aerobic Exercise.
Advanced Physical Education
1.0 Credit
Grades: 10-12
PE30 – Semester 1
Year Course
PE31 – Semester 2
Advanced Physical Education Girls Basketball (PE11 & PE12) Advanced Physical Education Football (PE13 & PE14)
Advanced Physical Education Track (PE15 & PE16)
Advanced Physical Education Swimming (PE17 & PE18)
Advanced Physical Education Boys Basketball (PE23 & PE24) Advanced Physical Education 7th period (PE25 & PE26)
Student-athletes and fitness minded students have the option of taking an Advanced Physical Education/Fitness class
rather than the traditional class. This class is based on the Bigger, Faster, Stronger Fitness Program. The students in
this class will concentrate on proper weight lifting techniques and improving their cardiovascular fitness levels.
(This class may need a recommendation of a coach or teacher to determine the student’s ability to be in this class.
Ninth grade students may be added to class if room permits.)
32
NCAA ELIGIBILITY CENTER
REFERENCE GUIDE
Divisions I and II Initial-Eligibility Requirements
www.eligibilitycenter.org
What is the NCAA Eligibility Center?
The NCAA Eligibility Center certifies the academic and amateur credentials of all
college-bound student athletes who wish to compete in NCAA Division I or II athletics.
Core Courses
NCAA Divisions I and II require 16 core courses.
Beginning August 1, 2016, NCAA Division I will require 10 core courses to be completed prior to
the seventh semester (seven of the 10 must be a combination of English, math or natural or physical
science that meet the distribution requirements below). These 10 courses become "locked in" at the start of
the seventh semester and cannot be retaken for grade improvement.
Beginning August 1, 2016, it will be possible for a Division I college-bound student-athlete to still receive
athletics aid and the ability to practice with the team if he or she fails to meet the 10 course requirement,
but would not be able to compete.
Test Scores
Division I uses a sliding scale to match test scores and core grade-point averages (GPA). The sliding scale
for those requirements is shown on Page No. 2 of this sheet.
Division II requires a minimum SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.
The SAT score used for NCAA purposes includes only the critical reading and math sections. The writing
section of the SAT is not used.
The ACT score used for NCAA purposes is a sum of the following four sections: English, mathematics,
reading and science.
When you register for the SAT or ACT, use the NCAA Eligibility Center code of 9999 to ensure
all SAT and ACT scores are reported directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center from the testing
agency. Test scores that appear on transcripts will not be used.
Grade-Point Average
Be sure to look at your high school’s List of NCAA Courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center's website
(www.eligibilitycenter.org). Only courses that appear on your school's List of NCAA Courses will be used in
the calculation of the core GPA. Use the list as a guide.
Division I students enrolling full time before August 1, 2016, should use Sliding Scale A to determine
eligibility to receive athletics aid, practice and competition during the first year.
Division I GPA required to receive athletics aid and practice on or after August 1, 2016, is 2.000-2.299
(corresponding test-score requirements are listed on Sliding Scale B on Page No. 2 of this sheet).
Division I GPA required to be eligible for competition on or after August 1, 2016, is 2.300
(corresponding test-score requirements are listed on Sliding Scale B on Page No. 2 of this sheet).
The Division II core GPA requirement is a minimum of 2.000.
Remember, the NCAA GPA is calculated using NCAA core courses only.
For more information on registering with the Eligibility Center, contact your
counselor or the Athletic Director.
33
RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) CURRICULUM
Courses
Aerospace Science
100/Leadership 100
Aerospace Science
300/Leadership 300
Cultural Studies 220/
Leadership 200
Aerospace Science
200/Leadership 400
Credit
Year(s)
1.0
9-11
1.0
10-12
1.0
10-12
1.0
10-12
Prerequisites
None – Introductory Course to AFJROTC
program
Aerospace Science 100
2013-14 School Year
Aerospace Science 100
2014-2015 School Year
Aerospace Science 100
2015-2016 School Year
The Rock Island Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corp consists of a four-year based program. Students shall be
exposed to Aerospace Science, Leadership, and Wellness. This course is by no means a tool to recruit students into
any military branch of service but is designed to make better citizens and prepare our cadets for life after high
school. In addition to teaching Aerospace and Leadership, Wellness (physical fitness) is incorporated through the
participation in the Presidential Fitness Challenge. By completing three of the four-year program, students meet the
physical education requirements for high school graduation.
Aerospace Science 100/ Leadership 100 – A Journey into Aviation History/Citizenship, Character, Air
Force Tradition
ROTC 1 - Semester 1
ROTC 2 - Semester 2
1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-11
Year Course
This is the introductory course to AFJROTC Aerospace Science and Leadership Education. Students develop skills and
self-discipline through class instruction, hands-on activities, and military drill. Academic instruction covers the history of
aviation, leadership education, and healthful living. Communication skills, problem solving, human relations, and logical
thinking are a strong part of this course. Cadets are required to participate in physical education training and activities.
Physical education components include fitness training, personal fitness, and individual and team sport skills.
Aerospace Science 200/Leadership 400 –The Science of Flight/Cadet Corp Management/Principles of
Management
ROTC 3 - Semester 1
ROTC 4 - Semester 2
Prerequisite: Aerospace Science 100/Leadership 100
1.0 Credit
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
This course is a continuation in the study of Aerospace Science and Leadership Education. Academic emphasis is on the
aerospace environment, human requirements of flight, and the principles of flight and navigation. Leadership emphasis is
on importance of management, planning and decision making, managing change, stress, and innovation, and key elements
of group behavior, communication process, and good leaders. Cadets are required to participate in physical education
training and activities. Physical education components include fitness testing, personal fitness, team sports, aerobics, and
outdoor education skills.
Aerospace Science 300/Leadership 300 – The Exploration of Space/Life Skills and Career
Opportunities
ROTC 5 - Semester 1
ROTC 6 - Semester 2
Prerequisite: Aerospace Science 100/Leadership 100
1.0 Credit
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
The development of space flight is discussed. This includes a study of terminology and general principles of launch
vehicles, the vehicles in use, and an overview of our country’s ventures into space. Leadership emphasis is on
career options, personal budget and financial planning, requirements for applying to colleges or universities, and the
process for pursuing a career. Third year cadets put leadership skills learned in AFJROTC I and II into practice by
holding leadership roles in the corps of cadets. They are required to participate in physical education training and
34
activities. Physical education components include fitness testing, personal fitness, team sports, aerobics, and
outdoor education skills.
Cultural Studies 220/Leadership 200 -- Communication, Awareness, and Leadership
ROTC 7-Semester 1
ROTC 8– Semester 2
Prerequisite: Aerospace Science 100/Leadership 100
1.0 Credit
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
Academic emphasis is on a multidisciplinary course titled Global Awareness that introduces students to various regions of
the world from a geographic, historical and cultural perspective. Issues such as terrorism, economics, politics, military,
religion, environmental concerns, human rights, disease, literacy, and the migration of peoples are examined. The regional
areas included are Europe, the Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Leadership emphasis is on
importance of management, planning and decision making, managing change, stress, and innovation, and key elements of
group behavior, communication process and good leaders. Cadets are required to participate in physical education training
and activities. Physical education components include fitness testing, personal fitness, team sports, aerobics, and outdoor
education skills.
35
SCIENCE CURRICULUM
Courses
Credit
Year
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
9-10
10-12
10-12
10-12
See Course Description
See Course Description
See Course Description
1.0
11-12
See Course Description
1.0
1.0
1.0
11-12
10-12
11-12
Biology
Global Biology
Chemistry
*Honors Chemistry
Anatomy and
Physiology (A & P)
*Biology II
Physics
*AP Physics
Prerequisites
*Designates course(s) that receive weighted credit.
The Science courses offered at Rock Island High School are an essential part of the general education of all students.
They also provide unique experiences dealing with the technology and understanding necessary for success in our
changing society. Student responsibilities in science courses include:
1. Students are expected to participate fully in all aspects of laboratory work
2. Students enrolled in any science course are required to pay for any breakage or
loss of equipment incurred as well as for any excessive or unauthorized usage of
chemicals or other materials/supplies.
3. Students enrolled in any science course are required to observe all safety
precautions while working in a laboratory; i.e., when dealing with chemicals,
the wearing of goggles.
Sequence of Progress Through Science
General Education/Career Ed
Biology l
Chemistry or Global Biology
Physics or Anatomy and Physiology
College Bound/Honors Science Program
Biology I
Chemistry or Honors Chemistry or Global Biology
Anatomy and Physiology or Physics
Biology II or AP Physics
Biological Science Program
Biology I
1.0 Credit
SCIF1 – Semester l
SCIF2 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 9-10
Year Course
A study is made of the basic structure and function of living organisms. Laboratory investigations and other
activities will lead to an understanding of biological principles and the interaction between an organism and its
environment, including Earth systems. The course encourages the development of critical thinking skills needed by
the student who enrolls in Chemistry, Physics, A&P, Global Biology, or Biology II.
36
Global Biology
1.0 Credit
SCI09 – Semester l
SCI10 – Semester 2
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
Focus is placed on the interrelationship between humans, their environment and the earth. In addition to
ecosystems, students will study environmental and other earth science issues. Aimed at both, college and noncollege bound students; this class is a laboratory based class. Special activities include guest speakers, fieldtrips, oil
hungry bacteria, environmental testing, and owl pellet dissection.
Anatomy and Physiology
1.0 Credit
SCI37 – Semester l
SCI38 – Semester 2
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
Anatomy and Physiology will provide students with a study of the structure and function of the human body. The
course takes the student through the various organ systems that make up the human body. The course has a
laboratory experience where students will be expected to dissect. This course is designed primarily for students who
have an interest in medical, health, or sports-related fields. This course is a prerequisite or may be taken
concurrently with Occupational Health.
*Biology II
1.0 Credit
SCI05 – Semester 1
SCI06 – Semester 2
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
5.0 Weighted Credit
Biology II prepares students for college and challenges them to investigate Biology concepts at the honors level.
Lectures and labs provide a study of biochemistry, cell structure and function, cells and energy, genetics,
microbiology, genetic engineering, and evolution. Special units include biotechnology, microbiology, and fetal pig
dissection. Field trips and other activities will focus on the tall and short grass prairies of Illinois.
Physical Science Program
Chemistry
1.0 Credit
SCI21 – Semester l
SCI22 – Semester 2
Grades: 10
Year Course
Students will consider the properties and chemical nature of matter and the earth. Topics include measurement;
nature of matter; atomic structure and molecules; molecular bonding; nature of reactions; conditions affecting
reactions; solutions; acids, bases, and salts; oxidation-reduction; and nuclear chemistry. Students need a basic
calculator. For students who plan to take Physics, calculators with trig-functions are recommended.
*Honors Chemistry
1.0 Credit
SCI01 – Semester l
SCI02 – Semester 2
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
5.0 Weighted Credit
Students consider chemical properties and structure of atoms and molecules. In addition to general chemistry, topics
include Kinetic Theory; solutions; reaction rates, equilibrium; electro-chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic
chemistry. The course is recommended for students pursuing engineering, chemistry, physics, electronics, or other
high-technology science related field.
Physics
1.0 Credit
SCI17 – Semester l
SCI18 – Semester 2
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
This is a general introduction to physics for students actively interested in how the world operates. Whenever
possible, graphic methods are substituted for mathematical analysis to learn about basic ideas of physics. Topics
include principles of measurement; force and motion, work, energy, and the conservation laws; states of matter;
heat, waves, sound, and light; electricity and magnetism; and nuclear energy. The course may be taken concurrently
with Chemistry, Biology II, Global Biology and Anatomy and Physiology.
37
*A.P. Physics
1.0 Credit
Grades: 11-12
SCI31 – Semester l
Year Course
SCI32 – Semester 2
5.0 Weighted Credit
Prerequisite: Biology I and Chemistry
B average in science, math, and English is recommended
AP Physics 1: Algebra-Based is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in Algebra based Physics. The course covers
Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work energy, and power; mechanical waves and
sound. It will also introduce electrical circuits.
AP Physics is a year-long course. Students enrolled in this class are expected to take the AP exam in May and
are expected to remain in the course for the entire year
38
SOCIAL STUDIES CURRICULUM
Courses
Credit
Year(s)
World Studies
American History
*AP American History
Psychology I
Sociology
Consumer Economics
Federal Government
*A.P. Federal Government
*A.P. European History
*A.P. Psychology
1.0
1.0
1.0
.5
.5
.5
.5
.5
1.0
1.0
9
10
10
10-12
10-12
12
12
12
12
12
State and Local
.5
Notes
Class of 2016 will take junior year
OFFERED IN 2015-16/NOT 2014-15
Students graduating in the class of 2015,
2016, and 2017.
The social studies program is designed to provide an understanding of people through an examination of
relationships among diverse peoples and cultures and by studying their institutions (governmental, economic, and
social). Each class will focus on college and career readiness by using Common Core State Standards in a
curriculum that teaches students to gather, comprehend, evaluate, synthesize, and report on information and ideas.
Each of the social science disciplines is studied in a historical context. Important goals include teaching the rights
and responsibilities of citizenship, fostering an understanding of and an appreciation for our rich cultural heritage,
developing a respect for other humans, cultures, our environment, and preparing the student to participate in society
intelligently, responsibly, and successfully.
GRAUATION REQUIREMENTS
CLASS of 2015, 2016, 2017
State and Local
American History or AP American History
Consumer Economics
Federal Government or AP Fed. Government
Total Social Studies Requirements
World Studies
.5
1.0
.5
.5
2.5
CLASS of 2018
World Studies
1.0
American History or AP American History
1.0
Consumer Economics
.5
Federal Government or AP Fed. Government
.5
Total Social Studies Requirements
3.0
1.0 Credit
SOCF1 – Semester l
SOCF2 – Semester 2
Grade: 9
Year Course
World Studies is a required course that focuses on major events and themes in the world from prehistory to the
present. Students will consider the influence of geographic settings, cultural perspectives, economic systems, and
various forms of government on human events from multiple regions and time periods. The course especially
emphasizes the historical background of major problems in the world today.
American History
1.0 Credit
SOC09 – Semester l
SOC10 – Semester 2
Grade: 10
Grade 11/Class of 2016
Year Course
This required course will provide an overview of the events, people, values, innovations, etc. which shaped our
nation’s history. The time period up to the Civil War will be the subject of a short review; while the remainder of
the year will focus on the Reconstruction era onward. Key historical concepts like cause and effect, chronological
order, primary document use/interpretation, and standard inquiry (who, what, where, when, and why) will be put to
use. Students will learn how present institutions, conditions, etc. relate to the past.
39
*A.P. American History
1.0 Credit
SOC23 – Semester 1
SOC24 – Semester 2
Grade: 10
Grade 11/Class of 2016
Year Course
5.0 Weighted Credit
Following the College Board’s approved curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. History courses, AP U.S.
History provides students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to address critical problems and
materials in U.S. history. Students must possess strong reading and writing skill, have the ability to do independent
study, and have good attendance. The course provides coverage of major historical topics with emphasis on political
history, foreign affairs and economic/social development. Attention is also given to literature and culture in
American History. Students will use a COLLEGE LEVEL TEXTBOOK. Students enrolled in this course are
expected to take the Advanced Placement test in May. Success on the AP exam may result in the student earning
college credit.
Consumer Economics
.5 Credit
SOC15
Grade: 12
One Semester
This course includes units on: an analysis of the American economy, distribution of the national income, price
/supply /demand, American business organization, production, marketing, labor-management relations, advertising,
and consumer protection. Also included are units on: financial planning, money and banking, investing, the use of
credit, insurance, real estate, and public welfare.
Federal Government
.5 Credit
SOC13
Grade: 12
One Semester
This course is required for graduation and provides a basic study of the Presidency, Congress, the judicial process,
the criminal justice system, the United States Constitution, citizenship rights and responsibilities, federal national
politics, and the Bill of Rights.
*A.P. Federal Government
.5 Credit
SOC29
Grade: 12
One Semester
5.0 Weighted Credit
Following the College Board’s approved curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. Government and Politics
courses, this course provides students with an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States,
involving both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies.
The goal of the course is to increase understanding of the American government and political system, its processes,
framework, traditions, and values. Students will use a COLLEGE LEVEL TEXTBOOK. Students enrolled in this
course are expected to take the Advanced Placement test in May. Success on the AP exam may result in the student
earning college credit.
Psychology I
.5 Credit
SOC07
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
This elective course will provide students a general understanding of the basic tenets of psychology. It will
emphasize the relationship of psychological theories and techniques on the lives of the students and their
relationships with others. It will cover some of the most basic components of psychology including general history,
research methods, well known individuals and perspectives, and various styles of learning. It is a subject for
students with an interest in the why and how behavior affects them and others around them.
*A.P. Psychology
1.0 Credit
SOC11 – Semester l
S0C12 – Semester 2
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
5.0 Weighted Credit
This elective course is designed to give students a thorough scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of
human beings. Topics include the biological basis of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness,
motivation and emotion, learning and cognition, developmental psychology, personality, and abnormal psychology.
This course will help students prepare for college level course work. Students enrolled in this course are expected
take the Advanced Placement test in May. Success on the AP exam may result in the student earning college credit.
40
Sociology
.5 Credit
SOC19 – WILL BE OFFERED IN 2015-16, NOT 2014-15
Grades: 10-12
One Semester
Sociology is an elective course, which studies how people behave and relate in group settings. It involves the use of
the scientific method in dealing with human interaction. In addition to vocabulary development, it uses a
multicultural approach to analyze sociological concepts found in case studies. Students will encounter information
and knowledge, which can be applied to future life situations.
*A. P. European History
1.0 Credit
SOC21 – Semester 1
SOC22 – Semester 2
Grade: 12
Year Course
5.0 Weighted Credit
This is an elective Advanced Placement course that covers a study of modern European history from 1400 to the
present. Emphasis is on: Renaissance, Reformation, Louse XIV, Age of Absolutism, English Civil Wars, French
Revolution, the Century of Ism’s, the Balance of Power, World War I, Russian Revolution, Rise and Fall of Nazism,
and the Post-War World. The course could provide the college bound student with a head start. Students enrolled in
this course are expected take the Advanced Placement test in May. Success on the AP exam may result in the
student earning college credit.
41
SPECIAL SERVICES CURRICULUM
Courses
Adaptive P.E.
Personal Living Skills
SC English
Reading Mastery
English I
English II
English III
English IV
World Studies
American History
Federal Government
Consumer Economics
Health Education
Life Science / Biology
SC Math
Math I
Math II
Math III
Math IV
Vocational Readiness
Secondary Transition
Experience Program
Credit Year(s)
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
.5
.5
.5
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
.5/1.0
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9
10
11
12
9-12
11-12
12
12
10
9-10
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
1.0
11-12
.5/1.0
.5/1.0
.5/1.0
1.0
.5/1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
.5/1.0
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
Teacher Permission
Teacher Permission
Teacher Permission
Teacher Permission
Teacher Permission
(S.T.E.P.)
Transitions I
Transitions II
Transitions III
Job Skills I/II
Social Skills
Functional Math
Functional PE
Functional Reading
Functional Health
Resource
Prerequisites
42
Cross-Categorical Program
The Special Services Department at Rock Island High School provides an educational program for students who are
classified as learning disabled (LD), orthopedic impairment (OH), mild and moderate emotional disturbance (ED),
intellectually disabled, visual impairment, hearing impairment, speech/language impairment, other health
impairment (OHI), autism, and traumatic brain injury (TBI). These students have one or a combination of
emotional, social, intellectual, perceptual, or physical difficulties, which make it difficult for them to succeed in the
mainstream high school program. Student placement into the program follows a logical and consistent format
prescribed by federal, state, and district policies and procedures.
Students are referred to the program by parents, outside agencies, counselors, teachers, administrators, and other
interested persons. All referrals are channeled through the high school Building Intervention Team, and the special
education department case manager. Eligibility for special education and/or related services is determined by a
multi-disciplinary team, and if eligible, an Individual Education Plan (IEP) is written before a student is placed into
the program. Annual meetings are held to determine the next year’s placement and program services for each
student. Cross-categorical special education classes and regular education classes are chosen based on each
student’s individual needs.
Thurgood Marshall Learning Center
The District #41 secondary program is a cross-categorical alternative program located in a separate building.
Students in this program are in need of a more highly structured environment that can be provided in a crosscategorical special education or regular education setting. The program serves senior high school level students.
Students are permitted to attend alternative education programs to the maximum extent possible. Placement is made
according to District #41’s placement procedures and follows documented efforts to serve the student in a less
restrictive environment. Each student will have an IEP, which will include a management plan for the individual
student. This management plan includes: 1). the recent behavior that caused placement, and 2) behavior goals the
student need to achieve to exit the program.
Adaptive Physical Education – Orthopedical
1.0 Credit
SE321 – Semester l
SE322 – Semester 2
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
Adaptive Physical Education is available to students who are unable to participate in the regular physical education
classes due to a physical impairment. The Adaptive Physical Education program for the orthopedically impaired has
two major aspects: 1) low organized games and recreational sports, and 2) implement physical therapy and
occupational therapy programs. The level of each student’s involvement is based on their physician’s prescription to
insure that any medical concerns are not overlooked.
Adaptive Physical Education - Cross-Categorical 1.0 Credit
SE319 – Semester l
SE320 – Semester 2
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
Adaptive Physical Education at Rock Island High School gives students an opportunity to participate successfully in
a physical education program designed to accommodate each individual’s special needs. The students are not
required to wear an official physical education uniform. Students will learn the importance of staying physically
active and fit both during and after high school. The curriculum will concentrate on individual and team sports,
cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, and recreational activities.
Personal Living Skills
SE203 – Semester l Grade 9/10
SE204 – Semester 2 Grade 9/10
SE205 – Semester 1 Grade 11/12
SE206 – Semester 2 Grade 11/12
1.0 Credit – 1 Period/2.0 Credits – 2 Periods
SE203A (1 Period)
SE204A (1 Period)
SE205A (1 Period)
SE206A (1 Period)
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
The purpose of this course is to study many different areas of curriculum where more practice is needed. These
areas may include a wide variety of units to study such as nutrition and foods, shopping, laundering, independent
living, map skills, transportation and social development skills.
43
SC English
1.0 Credit
SC1 – Semester l
SC2 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Teacher Permission
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
The self-contained English classes are for students who have had difficulty mastering reading skills in previous
grades. Emphasis is on phonics, sight words, and various reading aids such as cloze reading, wonder stories, and
visual imagery. Each level is progressively more difficult with the goal to successfully read a newspaper and
complete job applications correctly.
Reading Mastery
1.0 Credit
SE171 – Semester l
SE172 - Semester 2
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
This course is designed to improve the decoding, comprehension, vocabulary, and written language skills of those
students who are below grade level reading ability. This program is based on each student’s performance. Skills
and strategies are taught through direct instruction. This course consists of various fictional and non-fictional short
stories and the introduction of novels.
English I
1.0 Credit
SE101 – Semester 1
SE102 – Semester 2
Grade: 9
Year Course
The purpose of this course is to provide a curriculum adjusted to the individual needs of the students reading below
grade level. The course is designed so as to improve and maintain the reading, listening, spelling, writing, and
vocabulary skills of special students in the ninth grade.
English II
1.0 Credit
SE103 – Semester l
SE104 – Semester 2
Grade: 10
Year Course
This course is a continuation of English I and will provide additional work based on student needs and reading
ability. Improvement on reading, listening, and basic grammar skills will be stressed.
English III
1.0 Credit
SE105 – Semester 1
SE106 – Semester 2
Grade: 11
Year Course
The purpose of this course is to provide a curriculum adjusted to the individual needs of the students reading below
grade level. The course is designed so as to improve and maintain the reading, listening, spelling, writing, and
vocabulary skills of special education students in the eleventh grade.
English IV
1.0 Credit
SE109 – Semester 1
SE110 – Semester 2
Grade: 12
Year Course
The purpose of this course is to provide a curriculum adjusted to the individual needs of the students reading below
grade level. The course is designed so as to improve and maintain the reading, listening, spelling, writing, and
vocabulary skills of special education students in the twelfth grade.
World Studies
1.0 Credit
SE23 – Semester 1
SE24 – Semester 2
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
World Studies is a required course that focuses on major events and themes in the world from prehistory to the
present. Students will consider the influence of geographic settings, cultural perspectives, economic systems, and
various forms of government on human events from multiple regions and time periods. The course especially
emphasizes the historical background of major problems in the world today.
44
American History
1.0 Credit
SE119 – Semester l
SE120 – Semester 2
Grade: 11
Year Course
The American History course provides a brief investigation of world geography, world history, and its impact
throughout the historical development of the United States from colonial days to present days America. Emphasis
on the human side of history is presented through text notes, which explain the roles Americans have played and are
playing in the building of our country. Units are developed so that the student is actively involved in the learning
process with workbooks, homework, outside projects, reading participation, and classroom discussions.
Federal Government
.5 Credit
SE 123
Grade: 12
One Semester
This course is designed to provide students with the principles and practices of our democratic system of
government and to develop student interest in reading, thinking, and making informed decisions about our system of
government. Emphasis is on having the student become a responsible citizen.
Consumer Economics
.5 Credit
SE121
Grade: 12
One Semester
This course is designed to enable students to understand economic concepts in a practical and meaningful way.
Emphasis is on consumer problems and their solutions, wise consumer choices, and positive consumer planning in
the area of budgeting, savings, insurance, and establishing good credit.
Health Education I
.5 Credit
SE127
Grade: 10
One Semester
Health is designed to provide the basics of wellness education to assist students in making informed living choices.
Life Science / Biology
1.0 Credit
SE125 – Semester l
SE126 – Semester 2
Grades: 9-10
Year Course
This course is designed to give the special needs student an understanding of both general and specific biology
concepts relevant to their lives. The students are presented the basic science concepts through classroom
presentations, lecture and discussion, cooperative learning, laboratory activities, and video.
SC Math
1.0 Credit
SC3 – Semester l
SC4 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Teacher Permission
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
Emphasis in this course is on the mastery of basic mathematical concepts including: basic addition, subtraction,
multiplication facts, time and money, graphing, and basic measurement.
Math I
1.0 Credit
SE107 – Semester 1
SE108 – Semester 2
Grade: 9-12
Year Course
Emphasis in this course is on the mastery of basic mathematical concepts including fractions, decimals, and
percentages. Competency of basic skills is emphasized to attain a higher level of performance.
Math II
1.0 Credit
SE111 – Semester l
SE112 – Semester 2
Grade: 9-12
Year Course
The ultimate objective of this course is for the special needs student to use individual math reasoning in solving
career and/or consumer problems. Lessons are introduced at the basic level of understanding with enrichment
lessons at the average and comprehensive levels of understanding.
45
Math III
1.0 Credit
SE113 – Semester 1
SE114 – Semester 2
Grades: 9 -12
Year Course
This course is designed to improve the students’ understanding of algebra readiness skills for their success in future
math classes. Topics of studies will include: Probability, Solving Equations and inequalities, Data Analysis,
Solving Systems of Equations, and Polynomials.
Math IV
1.0 Credit
SE115 – Semester l
SE116 – Semester 2
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
This course will provide students instruction in the foundational skills needed to understand concepts taught in
Integrated Math I in the general education setting. Skills will include Algebra, Geometry, Probability and Statistics
as well as some Algebra II skills.
Vocational Readiness
.5 or 1.0 Credit
Grade: 9
SE141 – Semester l
SE142 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Teacher Permission
This class is project based with functional work skills emphasized in every unit. The work class emphasizes
following directions, time on task, project development, work skills development and community involvement.
Functional reading, English and math skills are incorporated into every lesson. Students are encouraged to explore
different types of employment to assist in career choice. Each project is designed to teach a specific skill such as
measurement, use of small tools, painting, cleaning etc. The class participates in community based training 2-3 times
per month using public transportation. The work class and the personal social communication class are responsible
for preparing food and serving teachers breakfast at the Rock Star Café every Friday.
Secondary Transition Experience Program (S.T.E.P.) 1.0 Credit
SE151 - STEP
SE152 - STEP
Semester 1
Semester 2
On The Job Training (OJT)
SE153 - OJT5
Semester 1
SE154 - OJT5
Semester 2
SE155 - OJT5-6
Semester l
SE156 - OJT5-6
Semester 2
SE157 - OJT5-7
Semester l
SE158 - OJT5-7
Semester 2
SE159 - OJT6-7
Semester l
SE160 - OJT6-7
Semester 2
SE161 - OJT6
Semester 1
Prerequisite: Teacher Permission
Varied Credit
SE162 - OJT6
Semester 2
SE163 - OJT7
Semester 1
SE164 - OJT7
Semester 2
SE165 - OJT3
Semester 1
SE166 - OJT3
Semester 2
SE167 - OJT4
Semester 1
SE168 - OJT4
Semester 2
SE169 – OJT 4-6 Semester 1
SE170 – OJT 4-6 Semester 2
Grades: 10-11
Year Course
Grades: 11-12
This program prepares the special student to take his/her place in the working community. It assists the students in
bridging the gap between the school, the community, and the world of work through related classroom instruction,
in-school experience, and community work experience. Placements are geared to meet the needs and abilities of the
individual student.
Transitions I
AE199 – Semester 1
AE200 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Teacher Permission
.5 or 1.0 Credit
One Semester or Year Course
Grades: 9-12
In this course, students will learn and develop social and academics skills needed in a variety of settings: home, job,
community and school. Role-plays are utilized to teach skills learned in class. The two A.R.T. units covered are
Empathy and Anger Control. At the end of this course students should be able to demonstrate self-control and know
how to appropriately communicate frustration, anger, and other feelings in a socially acceptable manner.
46
Transitions II
.5 or 1.0 Credit
Grades: 9-12
AE203 - Semester 1
AE204 - Semester 2
In the second course, students will utilize A.R.T. material learned in Transitions I and begin to develop more
complex social skills and character traits. This is accomplished through role-plays, skills rehearsal, discussions and
assignments for ten specific skills. The course also requires students to work in small groups with peers in the
classroom and they must collaborate to complete a service project for RIHS.
Transitions III
.5 or 1.0 Credit
Grade: 9-12
AE205 – Semester 1
AE206 – Semester 2
In the final course of this series, students combine the material learned in Transitions I and II. They will master an
understanding of aggression, the ABC’s of anger and anger cycle. This class includes whole group discussions and
the creation of individualized skits for skills learned. Instead of a paper/pencil final for second semester, the class
creates a video expressing their transition through the A.R.T. program.
JOB SKILLS I/II
1.0 Credit
CD021/022 - Semester 1
CD023/024 - Semester 2
Grade: 9-12
Year Course
This class is project based with functional work skills emphasized in every unit. The Job Skills class emphasizes
following directions, time on task, project development, work skills development and community involvement.
Functional reading, English and math skills are incorporated into every lesson. Students are encouraged to explore
different types of employment to assist in career choice. Each project is designed to teach a specific skill such as
measurement, use of small tools, painting, cleaning etc. The class participates in community based training 2-3
times per month using public transportation. The Job Skills class and the Social Skills class are responsible for
preparing food and serving teachers breakfast at the Rock Star Café every Friday. Students are registered for Job
Skills I & II at the same time.
Social Skills
.5 or 1.0 Credit
Grades 9-12
CD033 – Semester 1
CD034 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Teacher Permission
Students develop communication skills that will help them be successful in the work place and in adult social
relationships. Students are encouraged to develop appropriate conversational skills while working in a small group
setting. Students learn to follow written and verbal directions as they apply to specific projects. Many times the Job
Skills class and Social Skills class are taken back to back to allow for community training.
Functional Math
1.0 Credit
CD011 – Semester 1
CD012 – Semester 2
Grades 9-12
Year Course
All skills are taught in relationship to what students will need to know in the real world. Skills are concentrated in
the areas of money skills, time and measurement. Skills are taught in real life activities and in the community.
Functional Physical Education
1.0 Credit
CD061 – Semester 1
CD062 – Semester 2
Grades 9-12
Year Course
Adaptive Physical Education is available to students who are unable to participate in the regular physical education
classes due to a physical impairment. The Adaptive Physical Education program for the orthopedically impaired has
two major aspects: 1) Organized games and recreational sports, and 2) Implementation of physical therapy and
occupational therapy programs. The level of each student’s involvement is based on their physician’s prescription to
insure that any medical concerns are not overlooked.
47
Functional Reading
1.0 Credit
CD001 – Semester 1
CD002 – Semester 2
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
This is a life skills class designed to help students learn the necessary skills to be successful in today’s world. This
class will teach student’s how to read a menu, safety signs, and the importance of being able to complete forms.
Functional Health
1.0 Credit
CD041 – Semester 1
CD042 – Semester 2
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
This is a life skills class designed to help students learn skills to be successful in today’s world and will show them
how to use these skills in their daily life. The skills include learning how to balance a menu, personal hygiene skills,
and the benefits of exercise.
Resource
.5/1.0 Credit
AE399 – Semester 1
AE400 – Semester 2
Grades: 9-12
Semester Course
The resource class is designed for development of essential skills necessary for academic success and to provide
academic support for classes the student is taking. Assistance includes, but is not limited to, instructional support to
complete grade-level assignments, test taking strategies, test taking assistance, organizational skills, development
and writing of research papers, and reading and math strategies. The resource teacher will collaborate with the
student’s teachers regarding possible accommodations and/or modifications that may be necessary or are required
for student success. This is a pass/fail course.
48
TECHNICAL & CAREER EDUCATION CURRICULUM
Courses
Credit
Year
Prerequisites
Introduction to
Engineering Design
1.0
9-12
Principles of
Engineering
1.0
10-12
Civil Engineering and
Architecture
1.0
11-12
Intro to iJAG
1.0
11-12
iJAG II
Shielded Metal Arc
Welding
Occupational Welding
Lights and Sirens
Computer Aided
Design I
Computer Aided
Design II
Graphic Design I
Graphic Design II
Trinity Health
Occupation Academy
Occupational Health
1.0
12
1.0
11-12
2.0
.5
11-12
11-12
1.0
10-12
1.0
11-12
Computer Aided Design I
1.0
1.0
10-12
11-12
Art Forms
Graphic Design I
1.0
11-12
Biology I
2.0
11-12
Biology I and Anatomy & Physiology
Introduction to Engineering Design (IED)
Must be enrolled in Integrated Math I or
higher
Must have earned C- or higher in
Integrated Math I/Algebra I. Must be
enrolled in Geometry, Algebra II or higher
level math class
Must have earned C- or higher in
Integrated Math I/Algebra I. Must be
enrolled in Integrated Math II, Geometry,
Algebra II or higher level math class
Recommendation of counselor and
interview with instructor
Successful completion of Intro to iJAG
Shielded Metal Arc Welding
1.0 Credit
VOC81 – Semester 1
VOC82 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in Integrated Math I/Algebra I or higher
Grades: 9-12
Year Course
This is a Project Lead the Way foundation course (PLTW). Using industry standard, three-dimensional modeling
software, students utilize a problem-solving model to improve existing products and/or invent new ones, and learn
how to effectively communicate their ideas and solutions to peers and members of the professional community. The
major focus of the IED course is to expose students to the design process, teamwork, research and analysis,
engineering standards, and technical documentation. Strong math skills are recommended.
Principles of Engineering (POE)
1.0 Credit
Grades: 10-12
VOC85 – Semester 1
Year Course
VOC86 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Must have earned C- or higher in Integrated Math I/Algebra I. Must be enrolled in Integrated Math
II/Geometry, Algebra II, or higher level math class.
This is a Project Lead the Way foundation course (PLTW). This course exposes students to major concepts they
will encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics,
materials and kinematics. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and
design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions. Strong math
skills are recommended.
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Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA)
1.0 Credit
Grades: 11-12
VOC67 – Semester 1
Year Course
VOC68 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Must have earned C- or higher in Integrated Math I/Algebra I. Must be enrolled in Integrated Math
II/Geometry, Algebra II, or higher level math class.
Civil Engineering and Architecture is the study of the design and construction of residential and commercial
building projects. The course includes an introduction to many of the varied factors involved in building and site
design and construction including building components and systems, structural design, storm water management,
site design, utilities and services, cost estimation energy efficiency, and careers in the design and construction
industry. Students use industry standard 3D architectural modeling software to facilitate site and building design
and technical documentation.
Introduction to iJAG
1.0 Credit
VOC83 - Semester 1
VOC84 - Semester 2
Prerequisite: Recommendation of counselor and interview with instructor
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
Introduction to iJAG, a career exploration and preparation program, provides an educational hands-on approach in
exploring personal strengths and weaknesses. Students will work to build strengths in academic areas, time
management, learn about personality and temperament, understand communication models for personal and career
use, identify values and understand the relationship between personal actions and consequences that follow.
Students will make connections to their career interests, abilities and aptitudes by determining their education and
career goals. Students will be able to demonstrate core competency attainment. All students are expected to
participate in the student led Career Association. The program format involves individual assignments, team
building activities/projects, academic remediation, service learning and guest speakers. Fieldtrips may be included.
An interview with the instructor will he held prior to admittance to the course.
iJAG II
1.0 Credit
VOC87– Semester 1
VOC88 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to iJAG
Grade: 12
Year Course
iJAG II offers an advanced career preparation program that provides an educational, hands-on approach in
employability/job attainment skills (resumes, cover letters, job applications, interviewing, etc.) and work place
survival skills. Students will continue their own self-study on career options, with emphasis on planning of life after
high school graduation. This format involves individual assignments, team activities/projects, academic
remediation, service learning and guest speakers. Field trips may be included. All students will be expected to
complete a job shadow and participate in the student led Career Association. All students will complete a
professional career portfolio.
Graphic Design I
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Art Forms
VOC19 – Semester 1
VOC20 – Semester 2
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
This course is the first year of a two-year program which teaches the principles of layout and graphic design.
Students will expand their design skills by developing their artwork, photographs, and graphics by using computer
programs in the Adobe CS3 suite. The first year will focus on learning and applying Adobe Photoshop, Adobe
Illustrator, and Adobe Indesign. Basics of digital photography will be applied to their final designs.
Graphic Design II
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Graphic Design I
VOC21 – Semester 1
VOC22 – Semester 2
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
This course expands the student’s ability learned in the first year of Graphic Design I. Students will apply advanced
techniques in Adobe CS3 suite. First semester will focus on print publications, applying their graphic design skills in
Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Indesign. Second semester will incorporate video production and
50
basic animation using Adobe Premier Pro and Adobe Flash CS3 Professional. Digital video photography will be
applied to final design as a final portfolio will be required.
Computer Aided Design I
1.0 Credit
VOC13 – Semester l
VOC14 – Semester 2
Grades: 10-12
Year Course
This course will introduce students to the basics of Computer Aided Design using 3-dimensional modeling software
that is used in today’s manufacturing industry. In the first semester, students will learn the functions of the program,
including the sketch entities and features. In second semester, students will learn how to assemble parts and display
them in a drawing.
Computer Aided Design II
1.0 Credit
VOC15 – Semester 1
VOC16 – Semester 2
Prerequisite: CAD I
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
This course will continue where the Cad I class left off. The continuation of “Solid Works” software will expand
into the more complex part drawings and assemblies. In the first semester, the emphasis is on creating multi-part
drawings that can be assembled. In semester two, students will work on projects individually and in groups to create
final drawings with parts lists and analysis information. Upon successful completion of this class, students will be
able to create a portfolio that demonstrates their knowledge and proficiency in computer aided design.
Shielded Metal Arc Welding
1.0 Credit
VOC25 – Semester l
VOC26 – Semester 2
Grades: 11-12
Year Course
6 BHC Credits
Students will learn basic Shielded Metal Arc welding skills and safety around a welding shop. There will be a
concentration on flat, horizontal, and vertical positions and butt, lap and corner joints. This is a dual credit class
with Black Hawk College. Students will be required to provide their own welding gloves, safety glasses and pay a
registration fee to Black Hawk College. ($15 per credit hour)
Occupational Welding
2.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Shielded Metal Arc Welding
VOC27 – Semester l
VOC28 – Semester 2
Grades: 11-12
Year Course (2 Periods)
8 BHC Credits
In this course, students will continue working with Shielded Metal Arc welding and learn the basics of MIG
welding, TIG welding, and Oxy-Acetylene cutting. Metal working procedures such as cutting, bending, drilling,
forming and identifying various types of metal will also be included and safety will be emphasized. A project will
be required. This is a dual credit class with Black Hawk College. Students will be required to provide their own
welding gloves, safety glasses and pay a registration fee to Black Hawk College. ($15 per credit hour)
Lights and Sirens
.5 Credit
VOC97
Grades: 11-12
One Semester
This course provides students with an overview of the duties and responsibilities of firefighters, paramedics, and law
enforcement. Students will learn and receive Heart Saver CPR certification. The course will combine classroom
studies, as well as hands-on activities, including wearing assigned fire gear and performing tasks such as climbing
ladders, deploying hose lines. connecting to fire hydrants and much more. Students will gain a working knowledge
of a career in fire service or law enforcement.
Trinity Health Occupations Academy
1.0 Credit
Grades: 11-12
Dual Credit
3 Trinity Credits
Prerequisites: Completion of application paperwork for acceptance into the course. Heart-saver CPR required prior to
the start of the course. CPR certification is provided free of charge at Trinity College of Nursing & Health Science for
accepted Health Occupations Academy students.
The Health Occupations Academy provides a beginning exploration of healthcare and the careers that make up the industry.
Topics include an overview of the history of healthcare, common healthcare safety practices, patient rights, values, ethics,
healthcare worker shortages, economics and educational opportunities. Students will participate in both classroom activities and
VOC55
51
clinical observations. Clinical observations will take place in Trinity Health System facilities as well as community healthcare
settings. This course meets during intersession.
Occupational Health
2.0 Credits
Prerequisites: Biology I and Anatomy & Physiology (can be taken concurrently)
2.0 gpa and application signed by counselor
VOC59 – Semester 1
VOC60 – Semester 2
Grades 11-12
Year Course
Dual Credit
8 BHC Credits
This is a yearlong course designed to prepare the student to become a Nursing Assistant. Students will attain the
knowledge and understanding of the skills to function as a responsible member of the health team. This course
includes theory, laboratory practice, and clinical experience. The focus of the 40 hour clinical rotation will be caring
for patients in a long term care facility. With successful completion the student will be able to take a state exam to
become a Certified Nursing Assistant. It is a dual credit course with Black Hawk College. ($15 per credit hour) If
at the semester the student does not have a C- or higher, he/she will not be able to continue enrollment in the class.
Students must obtain a “C” both semesters and complete 40 clinical hours to earn college credit. Additional costs
may be associated with this course of study. Information regarding fees and course requirements are available
through the instructor. Clinical experiences will occur during the fall/spring intersession and other days when
school is not in session.
52
WORLD LANGUAGE CURRICULUM
Courses
Credit
Year
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
9-12
9-12
9-12
10-12
10-12
10-12
11-12
11-12
11-12
12
12
12
Spanish I
French I
German I
Spanish II
French II
German II
Spanish III
French III
German III
Spanish IV
French IV
German IV
Notes/Prerequisites
C in English is strongly recommended
C in English is strongly recommended
C in English is strongly recommended
C in Spanish I is recommended
C in French I is recommended
C in German I is recommended
C in Spanish II is recommended
C in French II is recommended
C in German II is recommended
C in Spanish III is recommended
C in French III is recommended
C in German III is recommended
Whether you enter the business world or choose to continue your education beyond high school, there are many
excellent reasons for studying a world language. If you desire to speak and write in a world language while
enhancing your own cultural background, you are encouraged to enroll in the course of your choice.
World language requirements at the college and university level vary. To learn the graduation requirements for a
specific college or university, consult the respective college catalog or your counselor. Four years of a world
language is the equivalent to two years at the college level.
Daily homework, regular attendance, active participation, and the ability to memorize considerable amounts
of material are required for successful completion of these courses.
Students may begin a study of world language in grades 9 through 12. Students are permitted to take more than one
language with permission of language instructor.
French I - German I – Spanish I
1.0 Credit
F/L13
F/L23
F/L01
F/L14
F/L24
F/L02
Prerequisite: C or higher in English is strongly recommended
Grade: 9-12
Year Courses
This is the beginning course, designed to develop oral and written communication skills in the target language. The
student will develop a proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing at a first year level. The student will develop an
appreciation and awareness of the culture and the importance of languages. Students at all levels must have the
ability to memorize vocabulary, verb conjugations, and other grammar points.
French II - German II - Spanish II
1.0 Credit
F/L15
F/L25
F/L03
F/L16
F/L26
F/L04
Prerequisite: C or higher in first year French, German, or Spanish is recommended
Grades: 10-12
Year Courses
This is a second year course, designed to further develop oral and written communication skills in the target
language. The student will develop a proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing at a second year level. The
student will continue to develop an appreciation and awareness of the culture and the importance of languages.
French III - German III - Spanish III
1.0 Credit
F/L17
F/L27
F/L05
F/L18
F/L28
F/L06
Prerequisite: C or higher in second year French, German, or Spanish is recommended
Grades: 11-12
Year Courses
Emphasis is placed on reading comprehension with continued attention to conversational written skills. The course
provides a thorough review of grammar. It offers more insights into the culture of the people and their history,
literature, art and music.
53
French IV - German IV - Spanish IV
1.0 Credit
F/L19
F/L29
F/L07
F/L20
F/L30
F/L08
Prerequisite: C or higher in third year French, German, or Spanish is recommended
Grade: 12
Year Courses
5.0 Weighted
Credit
Emphasis is placed on oral communication skills, composition, and the projects using the target language. Grammar
and structure are reviewed, and the study of culture and civilization continues.
Area Career Center Courses Available to Juniors and Seniors
Auto Body I
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Auto Body II
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: Auto Body I
Grade: 12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Auto Mechanics I
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Auto Mechanics II
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: Auto Mechanics I
Grade: 12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Barbering and
Hairstyling
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Building Trades I
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Building Trades II
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: Building Trades I
Grade: 12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Cosmetology
2.0 credits
Grades: 12
Prerequisite: Provide transportation Year Course (3 Periods)
Extended Campus
Health Occupations II
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: Health Occ. I
Grades: 12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Fire Science
& Fire Fighting I
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Fire Science
& Fire Fighting II
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: Fire Science &
Fire Fighting I
Grade: 12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Law Enforcement
& Public Safety I
2.0 credits
Prerequisite: None
Grades: 11-12
Year Course (3 Periods)
54
Law Enforcement
& Public Safety II
2.0 credits
Grade: 12
Prerequisite: Law Enforcement & Year Course (3 Periods)
Public Safety I
Manufacturing Tech. I
2.0 credits
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Screening Committee Year Course (3 Periods)
Manufacturing Tech. II
2.0 credits
Grade: 12
Prerequisite: Manufacturing Tech. I Year Course (3 Periods)
Woodworking Trades I
2.0 credits
Prerequisite:
Grades: 11-12
Year Course (3 Periods)
Woodworking Trades II 2.0 credits
Grade: 12
Prerequisite: Woodworking
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