PROGRAM OF STUDIES 2014 – 2015 Chelmsford High School

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 2014 – 2015 Chelmsford High School
PROGRAM OF STUDIES
2014 – 2015
Chelmsford High School
Principal’s Message
In early March, you will begin the process of scheduling your course of study for the 2014-2015
school year. This process will culminate in June. The Program of Studies is published annually as a
catalogue of courses offered at Chelmsford High School. It also contains detailed information and
guidance to support you in choosing a course program that interests, challenges, and inspires you.
Please take the time to read through the program of studies provided and consult with your
teachers, your counselor, and your parents to making informed decisions as you progress toward
meeting the graduation requirements of Chelmsford High School.
Chelmsford High School offers a wide variety of courses at a number of different academic levels
to stimulate your curiosity, challenge your thinking, and promote your development as a 21 st century
learner. The course offerings that follow are designed and articulated to provide you with the depth
and breadth of a comprehensive academic program while supporting your growth and progress
toward our 21st Century Learning Expectations. Choose courses that carefully balance the rigor of a
challenging academic courseload with opportunities to broaden your horizons through our many
extracurricular clubs, activities, and athletics.
In the Spring, students in grades 8, 9, 10, and 11 will be selecting courses for the 2014-15 school
year. Course offerings and staffing for the courses will be developed based upon student requests.
Since the scheduling process only occurs once per year, it is critical for you to choose your classes
and level of difficulty wisely. After this period of selecting classes, changes to student schedules
cannot be made except in rare circumstances. Since the scheduling process occurs concurrently
with the school budgeting process, please note that some of the courses in this program may
be modified or may not be offered as a result of student requests and/or budgetary
constraints. In situations like these, you will be able to enroll in classes required to meet
graduation requirements. Choosing meaningful alternative courses will be an effective way to
expedite this process.
We look forward to working together with you as you plan for your future at Chelmsford High
School and beyond. The best part about being in a large school are the opportunities you have to
explore a variety of different academic and extracurriculum offerings. I encourage you to take
advantage of this opportunity, and choose an array of courses that challenge you academically,
broaden your horizons, and stimulate your own curiosity, maturity, and growth.
Sincerely,
Charles D. Caliri
CHS Principal
“We foster PRIDE in the pursuit of excellence.”
TABLE OF CONTENTS
21st Century Learning Expectations
Overview of Course Selection Process
Graduation Requirements
Course Levels
Policy for Program Change Consideration
Policies on Anti-Discrimination
English
Fine Arts
Mathematics
Wellness: Physical Education, Family and Consumer Science, and Health
Practical Arts: Business Education and Media
Reading
Science and Technology/Engineering
Social Studies
Special Education
World Language
Tech Prep and Non-Tech Prep Articulation Agreements
Guidance Department Contact Information
Department Coordinators’ Contact Information
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16
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28
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36
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54
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21st CENTURY LEARNING EXPECTATIONS:
Academic, Social, and Civic
1. Demonstrate transliteracy by communicating across a range of platforms, tools, and media.
2. Utilize real-world tools and other resources to access, evaluate, and share information in an authentic
task.
3. Demonstrate information, flexibility, and adaptability in thinking patterns, work habits, and
working/learning conditions.
4. Work independently and collaboratively to solve problems and accomplish goals.
5. Value and demonstrate personal responsibility, ethical behavior, and global awareness in both academic
and social communities.
OVERVIEW OF COURSE SELECTION PROCESS
The processes of selecting courses and building students’ schedules are complex and time-consuming.
Please take the time to read through the course descriptions, and confer with your parents, teachers, and
guidance counselor to choose courses carefully and request a course schedule that is appropriately
challenging for you. Once student requests are compiled, course tallies are taken. Courses without
sufficient enrollment are cancelled and a master schedule is built. Individual student schedules are then
programmed and finalized. Students are notified of any scheduling issues and are given opportunities to
amend their schedules and/or selections with their counselors. Courses needed to meet graduation
requirements will be available.
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The Program of Studies is a valuable resource for planning an appropriate educational program. Read
through it the first time to get a general overview of the graduation requirements, course sequence, and
overall expectations. Think about the courses in which you have an interest, and begin to read through
these descriptions more closely to identify the ones you will elect for your next year of schooling. Talk to
your parents about your interests and aspirations, and continue to narrow your selections. If you have
questions or need more information, the most valuable sources of information will be your current teachers
and your guidance counselors. Your current teachers have strong insight into the course curriculum, course
expectations, and your current performance, while your counselor has a strong sense of graduation
requirements and skills you will need to be successful as you plan for life after high school.
For any course that represents continued study within a department, the current teacher will confer with the
student and then record the placement on the computer’s Course Request File. When making a
recommendation, the teacher will consider current and previous academic performance in the subject area
and related subject area(s), current and previous performance on standardized tests (if applicable),
performance on departmental placement tests (if necessary), and other classroom behaviors and habits that
may be indicative of future success. This student-teacher conferencing will begin in late February/early
March. Parents should speak directly to the teacher to answer questions about course or level placement. If
the issue is still unresolved after conferring with the teacher, the parent may request an override. An
override form can be obtained from the teacher, counselor or counseling office, and must be submitted to
the Department Coordinator - for current 9th, 10th, and 11th graders the deadline is March 14, 2014;
the deadline for current 8th graders is March 21, 2014.
We strongly encourage students to maintain a reasonable balance among academic course load,
extracurricular activities, and personal time to contribute to their social and emotional well-being. It is
extremely important for students and parents to make informed decisions regarding which course and level
are most appropriate for the student. Due to a variety of factors, the selection of a course should be
considered a yearlong commitment. To maintain class sizes that are equitable for all students, it is very
difficult to switch levels and/or courses once the schedule has been completed. As a result there can be no
guarantee that space will be available in another course or level during a preferred block.
Students will enter their elective course choices online using the X2 Aspen Student Portal. Information
about this process will be distributed through PLUS Blocks prior to the beginning of the course selection
process. Please review the grid provided below to help focus your choices for the next school year.
Typical
Courses or
Departments
where they may
be offered
Students Entering
Grade 9
English
Social Studies
Science
Math
World Language
Health (1 semester)
PE (1 semester)
Students Entering
Grade 10
English
Social Studies
Science
Math
World Language
PE (1 semester)
Students Entering
Grade 11
English
Social Studies
Science
Math
World Language
Students Entering
Grade 12
English
Math
Number of
Electives/other
courses you may
add
1 full year course
or 2 semester
courses from any
department
1 full year course
and 1 semester
course or 3
semester courses
from any
department
2 full year courses, or a
combination of full year
courses and/or semester
courses totaling 4
semesters of academics
from any department
5 full year courses or a
combination of full year
courses and semester
courses totaling 10
semesters of academics
from any department
**Please note, students interested in pursuing post-secondary educational opportunities should consider
enrolling in 3 years of a World Language. Students contemplating post-secondary opportunities in the
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sciences should consider completing a full year physics course in high school.
Students are encouraged to select their academic program carefully. We believe that decisions about courses
can be made within a reasonable period of time to best capitalize on the educational process.
Our intention is to complete the scheduling process by early June so that any schedule conflicts can be
resolved before the end of the school year. Opportunities for schedule changes during the summer
and fall are very limited. Do not hesitate to call for further information. Contact information is provided
on page 55.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
In compliance with the requirements set forth by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and those affiliated
with the recognition of Chelmsford Public Schools as a Federal Race to the Top school district, CHS will be
shifting graduation requirements over the next few years to align with MassCore. In accordance with the
change, MassCore provides a course of studies to better prepare students to meet the career/college
readiness standards. Given the rigorous standards CHS already employs, the shift impacts students in
mathematics and in the fine and performing arts. After review of the graduating class of 2013, we found
93% of our graduates met the new standards in math for MassCore, while 100% of our graduates met the
new standards for the arts.
In addition to meeting the CHS course requirements below, all students in the Commonwealth are required
to meet certain performance criteria on the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS). To
receive a high school diploma, students must earn scaled scores of at least 240 on the grade 10 ELA and
Mathematics tests, or earn a scaled score between 220 and 238 on these tests and fulfill the requirements of
an Educational Proficiency Plan (EPP). Students must also earn a scaled score of at least 220 on one of the
Science, Technology, Engineering MCAS (i.e., Biology, Chemistry, Introductory Physics, or TechnologyEngineering).
Department/Academic Area
English
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
World Language
Arts
(Fine/Performing/Practical)
Physical Education
Health Education
Other Courses/Electives
Total Credits for Graduation
*
**
***
****
Class of 2016
40 credits *
30 credits
30 credits
30 credits **
20 credits ***
30 credits
Classes of 2017, 2018, 2019
40 credits *
40 credits
30 credits
30 credits **
20 credits ***
30 credits ****
10 credits
5 credits
45 credits
240 credits
10 credits
5 credits
35 credits
240 credits
Writing for High School and Reading for High School are required for 9th graders who are in
English 9.
Requirements: World History 2, US History 1 & 2.
Two years of the same World Language.
10 Credits must be from Fine and/or Performing Arts
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Please note: 10 Credits are awarded for the successful completion of a full year course; 5 Credits are
awarded for the successful completion of a semester course.
For a student to make successful progress toward graduation requirements and remain on par with her/his
grade level, she/he must earn a minimum of 60 credits per school year. Seniors, in addition to meeting
all other requirements, you must earn at least 60 credits in your senior year.
COURSE LEVELS
All of our courses are designed to prepare our students for the rigors of college and other post-secondary
paths. Students will receive teacher recommendations regarding the course level in sequential subjects
within departments. Although current grades are not the only indicator to be considered in placement
decisions, your current performance in a course can serve as a reasonable indicator of future success. A
student who has been earning grades in the B range or better should consider continuing in the same course
level or advancing to the next level. A student who has been earning grades of D or an F may not be able to
continue in the current level or sequence unless recommended or approved by the teacher. A student
earning grades in the C range should consider continuing in the same course level or dropping a level. In
each of these instances regarding level placement, it is recommended that students engage in a conversation
with their teacher to determine the most appropriately challenging level for the student. A discussion with
the current teacher regarding the placement decis The following course level descriptions are provided as
a general guideline to students and parents to help determine the most appropriately challenging course level
for students to participate. More detailed descriptions can be found within the specfiic course descriptions
on the pages that follow.
All offered courses (except those considered not predictive of future academic achievement in college) are
assigned a level according to the following criteria:
LEVEL AP
Advanced Placement Courses
Advanced Placement (AP) courses are designed to move at a faster pace, cover a broader and potentially
deeper curriculum than the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks articulates, and require significant
independent work both inside and outside of the classroom. Successful students in these courses have a
strong track record of high academic achievement as evidenced by academic grades in previous courses,
standardized test scores, and motivation in the classroom. Students can typically grasp concepts from initial
presentation. As a result, little class time will be spent practicing and/or reviewing concepts, but rather will
be dedicated to extensive analysis, synthesis, and problem-solving. Students are expected to independently
seek help and to organize and to budget their time for long-term assignments. The AP program is offered in
the specific interest of three groups: secondary school students who wish to pursue college level studies
while still in high school, schools that desire to offer these students the opportunity to do so, and colleges
that wish to encourage and recognize such achievement.
AP Courses are offered in Art Portfolio, English, Calculus, Music Theory, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, US
History, World History, American Government, Statistics, Psychology, French, and Spanish. In order to
complete the AP curriculum and earn AP credits, a student must remain in the course for the full year. No
partial credit will be awarded. Students are expected to take the AP Exam.
For more detailed information follow the course description as described in the AP Course Description
booklet - apcentral.collegeboard.com/highered
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LEVEL 1
Honors 1 College Preparatory Courses
These courses are more intensive than other courses experienced by the majority of our students.
Classroom activities require a great deal of independent learning. Course content demands critical, creative,
and analytical thinking. Courses will require that students demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of
the structure of the discipline. Assignments of original design are required. These courses require: extensive
reading, intensive application, analytical & creative thinking, and study to a greater depth of understanding.
LEVEL 2
Honors 2 College Preparatory Courses
Classroom activities are designed with a moderate amount of teacher assistance. While introducing new
skills and concepts, the students are extensively involved in interpretation, analytical, and creative thinking.
Homework is both short-term and long-range and allows students to explore skills and concepts in more
depth.
LEVEL 3
College Preparatory Courses
Classroom activities are designed with a varying amount of teacher assistance. Through a variety of
instructional strategies, learned skills and concepts are rein-forced with increasing emphasis on
interpretation, analysis, and other higher level thinking. Homework assignments are both short and longterm in duration and allow students to practice and explore skills and concepts in more depth.
POLICY FOR PROGRAM CHANGE CONSIDERATION
Allocation of staff, rooms, and the number of sections offered are determined by the number of student
requests received for a specific course; therefore, students selecting full year courses are committed to
remain in the course for the entire year. Also students selecting semester courses are committed to remain in
these courses for the semester scheduled. Please choose your course carefully. Your choices, both for first
semester and second semester, represent a commitment on your part. Exceptions are permitted under
certain circumstances.
A course change, even if approved, cannot always be granted. When the proposed course has been closed
due to class size or a change would create a conflict in a student’s schedule, the intended change cannot be
granted. If a level change is granted, the student will take with them the grade they earned from the previous
class.
All students are expected to stay in their assigned classes until at least the first mid-term grade report, unless
an obvious need for change exists. Obvious need might include:
1. A computer generated scheduling error
2. Having the same teacher in the past, with an unsuccessful academic experience the previous year
3. Incorrectly leveled students
4. Career path changes
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There are two types of schedule changes that are processed during the school year.
1. Students can move from one level of a course to a different level of the same course. This is called a
level change.
2. Students can add a course and drop a different course. This is called a course change.
The deadlines for making these changes are as follows:
 Level changes may occur at any time during the school year IF initiated or approved by a
Department Coordinator.
 The add/drop period takes place during the first two full weeks of classes in September. After the
add/drop period, schedule changes need to be processed using an add/drop form with approval
from the Department Coordinator.
During the last two weeks of any marking period no courses will be added or dropped. First semester and
full-year courses dropped before the last two weeks of quarter one will be completely removed from the
official transcript. Second semester courses dropped before the last two weeks of quarter three will be
completely removed from the official transcript. All courses dropped after these periods will receive a W
(withdrawal) as a final grade, and receive no credit for the course.
The following procedure for schedule changes will be strictly adhered to:
1. Students seeking a schedule change should see their guidance counselor and receive an "add/drop"
form.
2. Students obtain the signature of the teacher and department head/coordinator of the course(s) to be
added first.
3. Students then obtain the signature of the teacher and department head for the course(s) to be
dropped, giving that teacher an opportunity to work out any problem area before the student leaves the
class.
4. Students take the "add/drop" form home to be signed by a parent/guardian.
5. Schedule changes taking place more than one week after the first mid-term of the course require
permission of the appropriate Department Coordinator. In this case, students take the "add/drop"
form to the Dean to be signed, and for the schedule changes to be implemented assuming there is
room in the class(es) to be added.
6. There will be a 24-hour minimum waiting period for all schedule changes, unless determined to be
of an emergency nature by the Dean or Principal.
7. Students must attend classes as assigned until schedule changes are processed and new assignments
are made. Students violating this policy will not be allowed to change courses.
This policy is set in place to assure students the opportunity to change for legitimate reasons and discourage
whimsical requests. Exceptions to the above policy might be changes made to balance classes; changes
made to correct programming errors; or changes made in the interest of good mental health.
Appeal of Denied Schedule Change
1. Students who wish to appeal a denied schedule change must request a meeting with their Dean, their
guidance counselor, and any faculty member or department coordinator who has denied the change.
Parents/guardians must attend this meeting.
2. A copy of the appeal form will be distributed to the student, his or her guidance counselor, and each
affected teacher.
3. If the problem is not resolved at the Dean’s level, students and their parent/guardian should request
an appeal hearing with the Principal at which all interested parties will be present.
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Senior Year Schedule Changes
If a senior student changes his or her schedule after applying to a post-secondary school or program, the
student must inform the school or program of the schedule change. At the conclusion of the school year, a
final official transcript will be sent to the school or program the student is planning on attending. If there
has been a change and the student did not inform the school or program, the student’s integrity may be
questioned. This may result in a rescission of an acceptance, especially if the change involved the dropping
of a core subject class.
POLICIES ON ANTI-DISCRIMINATION
CHAPTER 622
An important piece of legislation affecting the public schools was passed in August of 1971. This law,
Chapter 622 of the General Laws, Acts of 1971, is referred to as "An Act to Prohibit Discrimination in the
Public Schools." The law reads as follows: “No person shall be excluded from or discriminated against in admission
to a public school of any town, or in obtaining the advantages, privileges and courses of study of such public school on account
of race, color, sex, religion or national origin. This law makes it clear that all aspects of public school education must be fully
open and available to members of both sexes and of minority groups. No school may exclude a child from any course, activity,
service or resource available in that public school on account of race, color, sex, religion or natural origin of such child.”
On June 24, 1975, the State Board of Education approved regulations for Chapter 622. These regulations
address five areas of school policy: school admission to courses of study, guidance, course content, extracurricular, and athletic activities.
REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973 - SECTION 504
It is the policy of the Chelmsford Public Schools to comply with the regulations of the Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare in implementing Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 which
provides that:
“No otherwise qualified handicapped individual.....shall, solely by reason of his handicap, be excluded from the participation in,
be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”
The act defines a person with a handicap as anyone who:
1. has a mental or physical impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities
(major life activities including activities such as caring for one’s self, performing manual tasks,
walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working)
2. has a record of such an impairment; or
3. is regarded as having such an impairment.
The Chelmsford Public Schools recognizes a responsibility to avoid discrimination in policies and practices
regarding its personnel and studnets. No discrimination against any person with a handicap will knowingly
be permitted in any of the programs and practices in the school system.
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The school district has specific responsibilities under the Act, which include the responsibility to identify,
evaluate, and if the child is determined to be eligible under Section 504, to afford access to appropriate
educational services.
If the parent(s) or guardian(s) disagrees with the determiniation of the professional staff of the school
district, he/she has the right to a hearing with an impartial hearing officer.
Inquiries regarding compliance with Section 504 may be directed to: Director of Student Services, 978-2515100 Chelmsford Public Schools Administrative Offices, 230 North Road, Chelmsford, MA 01824
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ENGLISH
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General Guidelines for Course Selection
Freshman Year
Sophomore Year
Junior Year
Senior Year—Electives
English Electives
Students at Chelmsford High School are required to take a sequential four year program in English that is
designed to encourage each student to master a successive series of skills in reading, writing, speaking and
listening. In addition, the program provides each student with a background in the major literature of his or
her country, his or her language, and the world. In grades 9 and 10 teachers will review each student’s
performance and make recommendations for a more appropriate level if needed. To meet the individual
needs and interests of students, a number of one-semester courses are offered in the sophomore, junior and
senior years, which may be elected in addition to the required 10 credit semester course. Under ordinary
circumstances, an elective course may not be taken as a make-up for a course that has been failed.
General Guidelines for Course Selection:
1. Students should read course descriptions very carefully to learn:
 an overview of each course, including materials and approach
 the level of reading and writing skills necessary for success in each course
 the types of activities involved in each course
2. Students should select courses appropriate to their ability and achievement levels and future plans.
3. Students should consult with parents, English teachers, and guidance counselors before making course
choices.
4. In addition to 9th and 10th grade English, students in English 9 are required to take Writing for High
School which will strengthen their writing and prepare them to successfully complete the MCAS Long
Composition.
FRESHMAN YEAR
The freshman English program stresses skills in reading and writing through a balanced exposure to a variety of literature and
writing experiences. The emphasis for teaching literature is on the elements of structure within each genre (short story, novel,
drama, poetry and non-fiction). While many mechanical skills are a review, advanced grammatical skills are introduced to
enable the student to deal with the complexity of thinking, writing and reading.
ENGLISH 9—H
10 Credits (#00513)
Freshman Honors English is the first of a three-year sequence for students who have demonstrated
exceptional motivation, ability and achievement in reading and in writing. This demanding course includes
in-depth reading of major genres of literature with an emphasis on literary elements and universal themes.
Students will write numerous literary analyses that demonstrate sophisticated and insightful composition.
Students are expected to demonstrate their understanding of literature with meaningful contributions in
class discussions. Students in this class will be involved in a rigorous vocabulary curriculum. Students
should expect 1-2 hours of homework daily. Preparation for the MCAS test is implied but not a part of the
classroom environment. These students should be well prepared for the challenges of a post-secondary
education.
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ENGLISH 9—H2
10 Credits (#00523)
English 9—H2 is for students who have demonstrated strong motivation, ability and achievement in reading
and in writing. This challenging course includes in-depth reading of major genres of literature with an
emphasis on literary elements and universal themes. Students will learn to write effective literary analyses.
Students are expected to demonstrate their understanding of literature in class discussion. Students in this
class will be involved in a demanding vocabulary curriculum. Students should expect approximately 1 hour
of homework daily. Preparation for the MCAS test will be a part of the curriculum. These students should
be well prepared for the challenges of a post-secondary education. Some students may be accepted later
into the honors program.
ENGLISH 9
10 Credits (#00533)
English 9 is for students who are dedicated to further developing their reading, writing and analytical skills.
This course includes in-depth reading of major genres of literature with an emphasis on literary elements
and universal themes. Students will begin to develop the skills necessary to write effective literary analyses.
Students are expected to demonstrate their understanding of literature in class discussion. Students in this
class will complete progressive vocabulary assignments weekly. Students should expect homework daily.
Preparation for the MCAS test will be an important part of the curriculum. A student who successfully
completes this course should have a solid foundation in freshman English and be able to continue working
towards an education beyond the high school level.
Students taking ENGLISH 9 are required to take WRITING FOR HIGH SCHOOL (#07304) and
READING FOR HIGH SCHOOL (#08804).
WRITING FOR HIGH SCHOOL
5 Credits (#07304)
Writing for High School is a course designed to provide extra support to freshmen who could benefit from
additional instruction in writing. The core of the course consists of multiple types of essay writing
experiences that are essential, not only to a student’s ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in
all academic disciplines, but also to effect personal change. The course will focus on content, form,
mechanics, and sentence structure. A second and equally important aspect of the course is the continuing
development of the student’s ability to use the writing process, especially through writer reflection and peer
response, as a means to strengthen his/her performance as a writer. The focus on writer reflection and peer
response will help students to develop the skills they need to reach their writing goals. Preparation for the
MCAS test is another important aspect of the course. Students will write answers to long composition and
open response questions similar to those on the statewide test and receive critical feedback to improve their
test taking skills.
Students taking ENGLISH 9 are required to take WRITING FOR HIGH SCHOOL (#07304) and
READING FOR HIGH SCHOOL (#08804).
SOPHOMORE YEAR
The sophomore English program reviews skills in reading and in writing acquired in the freshman year and exposes students to
various types of literature and writing assignments. In addition to a required 10 credit semester course, a sophomore may
choose from the following one-semester 5 credit electives:
 Journalism
 Public Speaking
ENGLISH 10—H
10 Credits (#02013)
The sophomore honors program is for students who have demonstrated exceptional motivation, ability,
and achievement in literature and in writing. Extensive out-of-class reading, followed by in-class seminar
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discussion, is required. This accelerated course emphasizes the analysis of various types of literature such as
poetry, novel, drama, short story and essay. Students view, discuss and analyze literary aspects and
techniques of film on its own merits and in comparison to novels. Students are expected to demonstrate
their understanding of literature by participating in class discussion, by writing analytical and critical papers,
and by creating projects, presentations, and performances. Students are expected to do 2 hours of
homework daily and will be well prepared for the challenge of a post-secondary education.
ENGLISH 10—H2
10 Credits (#02023)
This course provides challenge and enrichment for the student who has proven to be strong in the language
arts program in Grade 9. The reading includes various literary periods and genres including essays, poems,
short stories, plays and novels. Readings and films are analyzed, discussed and used as the basis of some of
the writing assignments. Extensive out-of-class reading, followed by in-class seminar discussion, is required.
The general difficulty of this level and the course work expected of the student demand maturity and selfdiscipline. Appreciable homework is expected of the student in this course. A student in this level class can
expect regular work in vocabulary, as well as MCAS preparation. The student completing this rigorous
English program should be looking forward to furthering his/her education beyond the secondary level.
Some students may be accepted later into the honors program.
ENGLISH 10
10 Credits (#02033)
English 10 offers students a course that strengthens reading comprehension skills while developing literature
analysis skills through whole class discussion and cooperative learning. The reading includes various literary
periods and genres including essays, poems, short stories, plays and novels. The reading is analyzed,
discussed and used as the basis of some of the writing assignments. An additional objective of the writing
assignments is to develop the skills to organize, edit, write and revise a thesis-supported essay based on
literature. A student in this level class can expect regular work in vocabulary, reading, and writing, as well as
MCAS preparation. They should expect homework every night and on most weekends. Students
satisfactorily completing this course should be prepared for college level work.
JUNIOR YEAR
The junior English program reinforces the skills in reading and writing acquired in the freshman and sophomore years by
providing students with an overview of major American writers, movements and literary works. In addition to a required 10
credit semester course, a junior may elect the following one-semester 5 credit electives:
 Creative Writing
 Public Speaking
 Journalism
AP – ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION
10 Credits (#04013)
The purpose of this course is to help students become both skilled readers and confident writers.
The course is organized around five units: an introductory unit, three thematic units, and a final course unit
following the administration of the AP exam in May. While certain units have a thematic focus and contain
seminal works of American Literature, the ultimate purpose behind each unit is to develop students’
understanding of analytical strategies, Students are exposed to a variety of texts, including speeches, essays,
articles, editorials, political or commentary-based cartoons, advertisements (both written and visual),
passages from memoirs, plus selected poems and short fiction designed to mirror the rhetorical devices
found throughout the readings of the course. By allowing students to read prose written in a variety of
rhetorical contexts, they will be able to understand and employ the skills necessary to become writers who
can compose for a variety of purposes (The College Board, AP English Language and Composition Course
Description, 2010). Student writing features a series of steps, including initial drafts, self-edits, peer and
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teacher conferences, and final drafts. They will also study how authors take into account aspects such as
audience and context. Students will learn how to arrange ideas, structure their arguments, select appropriate
rhetorical devices, and master the language that will allow them to become more effective writers.
The Seminar Approach
Students act as daily discussion leaders for assigned readings, first in small teams and later individually, and
the instructor acts as facilitator. Students receive evaluations based on both their seminar presentations and
interactions with other student presenters.
The Advanced Placement Program
The Advanced Placement Program is a collaborative effort among motivated students, dedicated teachers
and committed high schools, colleges and universities that allows high school students to earn college credit
or placement while still in high school. The corresponding exam for this course is the English Language
and Composition AP Exam. Taking this exam is the expected outcome of taking this course; it is the
culminating assessment. Additionally, students may take the English Language and Composition AP Exam
without having taken AP English. Although the specific college courses that AP credit will satisfy differ
from college to college, each exam represents a year’s college-level work (up to two semesters of credit).
(Condensed and summarized from: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com)
ENGLISH 11—H
10 Credits (#03013)
This course is designed for students who have demonstrated exceptional aptitude, interest and achievement
in literature and in writing. Through intensive study of major literary works, primarily those of American
writers, students will increase their understanding and appreciation of literature.
Writing experiences emphasize the precise use of language and the effective selection and organization of
materials for expository and critical papers. Extensive out-of-class reading and writing is required. SAT
preparation is included.
ENGLISH 11—H2
10 Credits (#03023)
This course covers American literature from the colonial period to the present in a variety of genres: novels,
short stories, plays, poems, essays, and biographies. Students have the opportunity to sample major authors’
works and major themes in American literature, as well as to acquaint themselves with the historical, social,
and cultural background of the works studied. The course focuses on critical reading and discussion. The
writing component emphasizes sophisticated literary analysis. Vocabulary study will be ongoing and
students should expect an appreciable amount of homework. Students should have above average reading
and writing skills. SAT preparation is included.
ENGLISH 11
10 Credits (#03033)
This course covers the range of American literature from the colonial period to the present in a variety of
genres: novels, short stories, plays, poems, essays, and biographies. Students will have the opportunity to
sample major authors’ works and, with the help of small and large group discussion, will become better
acquainted with the major themes in American literature. Class instruction will help students to progress
from factual reading to an understanding of more complex symbols and concepts. They will continue to
develop the writing skills necessary to write literary analysis essays. Students should have good reading and
writing skills and expect nightly homework. Preparation for the SAT is integrated into the instruction.
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SENIOR YEAR
Any senior who has successfully completed the freshman, sophomore, and junior English requirements must select a 10 credit
senior English elective. These courses continue to build on the reading and writing skills of previous years and broaden students’
literary experiences in several areas. In addition to a required 10 credit senior elective, students may choose from the following
one-semester 5 credit electives:
 Journalism
 Creative Writing
 Writing for College
 Public Speaking
AP ENGLISH 12 – LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
10 Credits (#05013)
The senior year Advanced Placement Program in English is quite demanding and is, by definition,
equivalent to a freshman Honors English course in college. The course requires active reading and the
perceptive examination of literature as well as the mastery of all elements of composition (structure), style,
theme and technique. Students participating in this program engage in intensive critical reading and analysis
of works chosen for literary merit, complexity of thought, intricacy of structure and richness of style.
Several critical and/or research-based essays focusing on literature are required; in addition, there will be
exams on the units studied and in-class essays. The course is organized by genre, offering readings in
fiction, poetry and drama from around the world and from many different periods of literature (largely from
the 16th century to the present). Students will strive to comprehend artistry and context (both social and
historical) through several critical “lenses” and write to analyze and/or present arguments. (The basic threetiered progress of the examination of literature moves from experience to interpretation to evaluation.) A
seminar approach is used, but teacher-directed instruction will also take place from time to time. To prepare
students for the AP Exam in English Literature and Composition, the teacher will administer an AP Exam
previously given by the College Board in addition to several multiple choice and essay practice sessions
provided to students over the course of the year.
The Seminar Approach
Students act as daily discussion leaders for assigned readings, first in small teams and later individually, and
the instructor acts as facilitator. Students receive evaluations based on both their seminar presentations and
interactions with other student presenters.
The Advanced Placement Program
The Advanced Placement Program is a collaborative effort among motivated students, dedicated teachers
and committed high schools, colleges and universities that allows high school students to earn college credit
or placement while still in high school. The corresponding exam for this course is the English Literature
and Composition AP Exam. Taking this exam is the expected outcome of taking this course; it is the
culminating assessment. Additionally, students may take the English Literature and Composition AP Exam
without having taken AP Senior English. Although the specific college courses that AP credit will satisfy
differ from college to college, each exam represents a year’s college-level work (up to two semesters of
credit).
(Condensed and summarized from: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com)
ENGLISH 12—H2 COURSES
THEOLOGY, PHILOSOPHY AND MORAL LESSONS IN LITERATURE
10 Credits (#05223)
This course consists of the study of literature and the impact that religion and philosophy has on various
works. After studying aspects such as their structure, tone, and purpose, one major goal is to develop an
understanding and an appreciation for the moral lessons contained in the literature, especially the ways in
which those lessons apply to contemporary society. A number of genres will be read, including non-fiction,
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poetry, anecdotes, parables and maxims. Authors and titles are Dante Alighieri’s The Divine Comedy: Inferno,
Harold Kushner’s When Bad Things Happen to Good People, The Bible, The Bhagavad-Gita, Lao-tzu’s The Tao te
Ching, Confucius’ Analects, Shelley’s Frankenstein, Camus’ The Stranger and Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha plus
selections of Native American short stories, Japanese Zen parables, and Persian and Arabic writings.
CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE
10 Credits (#05323)
This course consists of the study of literature, mostly novels supplemented by some short stories and poems
written in the late 20th and early 21st century. It should be noted that the material is intended for mature
audiences. Course materials may include any of the following: Early Autumn by Robert Parker; The Kite
Runner by Khaled Hosseini; Empire Falls by Richard Russo; Speak by Laurie Halsle; Plainsong by Kent Haruf;
Montana 1948 by Larry Watson; Contemporary Short Stories, McDouglas, Littell Publishing.
THE HERO’S QUEST IN
FICTION AND NON-FICTION
10 Credits (#05423)
The concept of the hero’s quest is the central theme tying together the literature and films we will explore.
The material represents explorations of human journeys, sometimes under great duress, from the earliest
literature written in the English language to contemporary stories. The stories also represent both men and
women in a variety of cultures. We will explore these journeys with an attempt to shed some light on our
growing awareness of our own journeys. The course will also include a weekly writer’s workshop during
which writing skills and vocabulary study is stressed. SAT prep work is part of the writing workshop
segment.
WORLD LITERATURE
10 Credits (#05823)
In this course students explore the literary contributions of authors from many nations by reading and
analyzing works from diverse eras and cultures. These works represent the literary genres of fiction, poetry,
drama, autobiography, diary, speech, and essay. Through the literature, the students will explore the roles
played by race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and culture. They will also identify commonalities
amongst the nations of the world and discuss the universal themes presented in their literature.
THE GRAPHIC NOVEL
10 Credits (#05523)
This year-long course is an introduction to reading the graphic novel. It will focus first on the history of
comics as part of the evolution of sequential art into a narrative form, highlighting important figures and
characters in this evolution. A key component of the class is to extend the students' literary lexicon to
include the language of graphic novels. Additionally, students will be given a new vocabulary with which to
discuss literature by highlighting the similarities and differences between literary novels and graphic novels.
The course will incorporate 21st century skills in visual media literacy, making the students more savvy
consumers of mass media.
LITERATURE AND FILM
10 Credits (#07824)
This year-long course deals with both classic and modern literature texts through the medium of film. The
focus for this class is to compare literature and cinema, but it will also provide an introduction to film
terminology and film criticism.
In this course students discuss, read and write about the ways in which both literary works and literary
themes are presented on film. This examination of literature and film is presented through five units of
study.
• An introduction to filmic techniques
• An examination of the theme of heroism in a literary work and a related film
• An analysis of difficulties faced in adapting short fiction to film
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• An investigation of westward expansion and its role in societal and legal change in short
fiction and film
• An analysis of difficulties in adapting theatrical productions to film
• An investigation of race as a social issue in plays and films
•An examination of Alfred Hitchcock’s works and a study of parody involving Mr.Hitchcock's films.
•An investigation of the problems specific to filming Shakespeare's plays
Reading, writing and speaking activities that relate to the literature and films being studied fosters student
skill development. Students work individually, in pairs, in small groups, and in teacher conferences to
continue their development of reading and writing skills and to increase their understanding and
appreciation of literature and film.
ELECTIVES
CREATIVE WRITING – Grades 11 and 12 Only
5 Credits (#07624)
This semester course allows students to develop skills and techniques of creative expression in the genre of
poetry, short fiction and drama. While students are able to select their own themes and forms of
expression, there are also class activities to strengthen such writing skills as selecting precise words, choosing
sensory details, eliminating mechanical errors, and recognizing elements of style. Students are asked to
establish deadlines for their progress, write daily, and be willing to share their work and ideas in small group
discussions and teacher conferences. Students should enjoy writing and have a solid understanding of the
writing process.
WRITING FOR COLLEGE – Grade 12 Only
5 Credits (#07124)
To be successful in this class a student must be self-motivated and capable of working independently.
Writing for College is a workshop in which students work to develop writing skills that will both help them
with their college application process and enable them to be successful writers at the university level.
During the semester students prepare essays following the writing process from topic search to final draft.
As they bring each essay to publishable form, students develop a number of skills that enable them not only
to produce essays for their college admission packages, but also to meet the demands of writing in college
classes. Professional and student-written models help students to define good writing and set personal
goals. The process of continual response and revision encourages students to work cooperatively with their
peers and with their teacher to develop their personal writing strengths and to eradicate persistent problems,
especially in the areas of clarity and correctness. In this class, students are expected to be active participants
who contribute meaningfully to the peer response process, seek response to their work from their teacher
and their peers, and, most importantly, are willing to revise, revise, revise. During the semester students are
required to attempt a number of different types of prose writing, drawing upon a variety of resources:
observation, personal experience, interviews and research. By the end of the course students should regard
and practice writing as a continuing process of drafting, feedback, and revision. Success in this class
includes, but is not limited to, writing essays of personal experience, persuasion, description, definition, and
social and cultural issues.
JOURNALISM
5 Credits (#07024)
This course is a one-semester elective open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. The purpose of this
journalism course is two-fold. First, through learning the history of journalism and the role the media plays
in society, students will be challenged to critically analyze the news media. The course will foster an
environment where students can question bias and develop the ability to identify authentic and “good”
(reliable) sources and information. With this information, students will also build upon the skills taught in
their English courses to experience non-academic writing and writing for an audience outside of the high
school community. Additionally, students will acquire the knowledge and skills to not only be published,
but also to publish newspapers, understand the different story styles and requirements, execute layout and
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graphic design. Students will study local, metropolitan and national newspapers and magazines. They will
examine the work of accomplished journalists and establish standards for their own writing. While the
course will focus primarily on journalistic writing for newspaper and magazine, students will investigate the
impact of radio, television and Internet on the news media. These units will investigate the writing behind
these forms of communication and discuss the impact they have made of newspaper writing and media
overall.
PUBLIC SPEAKING
5 Credits (#07704)
In this elective course students learn the fundamentals of communication including interpersonal and group
communication in addition to individual public speaking. Students are able to explore their own interests
and speaking styles as they write and present speeches to the class; through rehearsal and viewing of their
classmates' and their own speeches, they also gain insights as listeners. In their formal speeches, students
explore the formats and nuances of verbal explanation, information, persuasion, and argumentation through
debate. Participation is a vital component of the course as students work in groups, perform impromptu
speeches, and critique speeches they observe. Skills developed will help students in future college and work
settings.
FINE ARTS
The Fine Arts Department believes that we are dependent on a visually literate society that has the ability to
cope with multifaceted information and experiences. Students live in a society filled with increasingly
complex images and sounds. It is crucial that a Fine Arts education encourage students to take risks,
investigate, question, redefine, and invent. Most importantly, the Arts have intrinsic value and are worth
learning for their own sake. They possess their own unique body of knowledge, skills, and ways of thinking.
There can be no substitute for learning the Arts, and any education that omits the Arts is incomplete. The
mission of the Fine Arts Department is to develop life-long participants in, and consumers of, music, visual
art, dance, and theater.
“In dance, music, theater, and the visual arts, people express ideas and emotions that they cannot express in language alone, In
order to understand the range and depth of the human imagination, one must have knowledge of the arts.” Core Concept,
Massachusetts Arts Curriculum Framework, October 1999.
ART
THE ARTIST'S EYE
5 Credits (#51804)
This is an introductory course for those students interested in learning about art as one course of their Fine
Arts Graduation Requirement electives. This art course will provide opportunities for students to develop
critical thinking and analytical skills. Some of the questions that will be explored in this course are:
 What is the definition of “art”?
 How do we know what “good” art is?
 Where does an artist get his/her ideas or inspiration for a work of art?
 How does an artist begin a work of art?
The Artist’s Eye hopes to help students arrive at their own definition of art and to develop an appreciation
for the creative process and its product. Student projects and field trips are included as part of this class/
curriculum.
(No previous art courses or experience is required.)
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APPRECIATING THE ARTS
5 Credits (#51904)
This is an introductory course for those students interested in learning about the history of art as one course
of their Fine Arts Graduation Requirement electives. This course is a chronological study of art periods
beginning with the Ancient Greeks through the 20th Century. Students will be introduced to a wide variety
of artists and their works as well as the cultural influences of their times. This course will also provide
students with art studio activities that will enable them to experience and explore the materials and styles
developed through the decades. The primary goal of this course is to develop life-long participants in, and
consumers of, the Arts.
(No previous art courses or experience is required.)
STUDIO 1 —FOUNDATION COLOR AND DRAWING
5 Credits (#51224)
The Studio 1 course is designed to allow students to explore the methods, materials and techniques of art at
an introductory level with a strong emphasis on drawing and color. Students will be introduced to the
elements and principles of designs, and will assemble a portfolio of original artwork. Studio 1 combined
with Studio 2 will serve as the foundation for further, in-depth, study of art and serve as a prerequisite for
Studio 3.
Studio 1 and 2 may not be taken during the same semester.
STUDIO 2 —FOUNDATION 2D AND 3D
5 Credits (#51524)
The Studio 2 course is designed to allow students to explore methods, materials and techniques of art at an
introductory level with a strong emphasis on two dimensional and three dimensional design. Students will
be introduced to the elements and principles of design, and will assemble a portfolio of original artwork.
Prerequisite: Studio 1
STUDIO 3
10 Credits (#51623)
The purpose of the Studio 3 program is to provide structured, sequential learning experiences that require
the student to apply the concepts and skills learned in Studio 1and 2 to specific media. Students will learn
additional skills and concepts relevant to the use of various media as well as aesthetics, critique and art
history. The media units of study are: Drawing, Painting, and Sculpture.
Prerequisite: Studio 2
HONORS ART PORTFOLIO 1
10 Credits (#53013)
This course is designed for the serious study of art. The intent of this course is to provide appropriate
learning activities that require the student to develop one's own creative learning process based on the skills
and concepts taught. Instruction is primarily given in drawing, painting, print- making and sculpture, with
special emphasis placed on observational drawing. This course also intends to do the following:
1. Give introductory information on the development of an art portfolio.
2. Develop and encourage personal artistic statements.
3. Increase proficiency in utilizing various concepts, skills and techniques.
4. Provide art education and career information.
5. Give an overview perspective to the relationship of art and history.
6. Promote critical and aesthetic evaluation.
7. Encourage experimentation and exploration of conventional and non- conventional media.
Prerequisite: Studio 3
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AP ADVANCED ART PORTFOLIO 2: DRAWING
10 Credits (#53513)
This course is designed for the serious study of art. It is strongly recommended for all students attending
art school or pursuing an art-related major or minor in college (fine arts, illustration, graphic design,
communications, interior design, architecture, computer graphics, fashion design, etc.). The first semester
of this course is dedicated to the preparation, development and presentation of each student's individual
portfolio as defined by the College Board and various art schools, colleges and universities. The second
semester is designed to encourage the student to initiate, develop and carry out an in-depth independent
project focusing on a particular area of concentration (a series of pieces developed out of a cohesive area of
study, based on a coherent plan, underlying idea that investigates an individual interest, growth and
discovery.) Nightly homework will be mandatory. Summer work is also expected
Prerequisite: Honors Art Portfolio and teacher recommendation. May require an art entrance exam.
AP ADVANCED ART PORTFOLIO 2: 2D DESIGN
10 Credits (#53413)
This course is designed for the serious study of art. It is strongly recommended for all students attending
art school or pursuing an art-related major or minor in college (fine arts, illustration, graphic design,
communications, interior design, architecture, computer graphics, fashion design, etc.). The first semester
of this course is dedicated to the preparation, development and presentation of each student's individual
portfolio as defined by the College Board and various art schools, colleges and universities. The second
semester is designed to encourage the student to initiate, develop and carry out an in-depth independent
project focusing on a particular area of concentration (a series of pieces developed out of a cohesive area of
study, based on a coherent plan, underlying idea that investigates an individual interest, growth and
discovery.) Nightly homework will be mandatory. Summer work is also expected
Prerequisite: Honors Art Portfolio and teacher recommendation. May require an art entrance exam.
INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
5 Credits (#53824)
This course will focus on incorporating the principles and elements of art into digital photographs. Students
will learn how digital cameras work, the history of photography, Photoshop editing basics and photography
career choices.
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY II
5 Credits (#53924)
This course will focus on drafting, revising, and exhibiting multiple photographic series. Students will
further their technical knowledge of digital cameras, learn how to print their images, and how to display
images in a gallery. The class will also be looking more closely at contemporary photographers.
Projects will include:
 Self Portrait
 Artist Emulations
 Photography as Illustration
Prerequisite: Intro to Digital Photography
GRAPHIC DESIGN
5 Credits (#54234)
This course will focus on typography, design layout, package design, and creating infographics. Students will
learn to use Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign, and Adobe Flash.
Units will include:
Typography - anatomy of type, branding, and creation.
Layout - Magazine cover, magazine spread, poster, book cover, and album cover.
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Package Design - Food product, household goods.
Infographics - School statistics, sports & entertainment statistics.
Students will also learn the principles of art and elements of design to improve their use of color and
composition.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Studio Art I, The Artist’s Eye, or Digital Photography
3D DESIGN AND ANIMATION
5 Credits (#54334)
This course will focus on creating 3D spaces, 2D and 3D animations. Students will learn to use 3D
animation software, Adobe Flash, and Adobe Premiere.
Units will include:
2D Animation - Timing, and walk cycles
3D Design - Creating objects
3D Design - Creating interior and exterior spaces
3D Animation - Timing, walk cycles and mouth movements
Students will also learn storyboarding and storytelling techniques.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Studio Art I, The Artist’s Eye, or Digital Photography
ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS
10 Credits (#54423)
This semester course allows students who have taken Graphic Design and 3D Design and Animation to
expand their learning by becoming involved in more complex projects. The course is divided into two
parts:
 School-related Service Projects
 An Independent Project
Prerequisite: Graphic Design and 3D Design and Animation
MUSIC
The Music Department at Chelmsford High School provides students with situations in which each
individual can develop self- expression and aesthetic sensitivity. Course selections vary from large group
performance ensembles to more individualized non-performance courses.
MUSIC THEORY 1
10 Credits - Music Theory 1 (#54623)
In Music Theory 1 the fundamentals of note reading, chord structure, chord progressions, scales, key and
key signatures are taught. Beginning ear training is introduced as well. This course is recommended for
students seeking further music study.
AP MUSIC THEORY
10 Credits - Music Theory AP (#56513)
AP Music Theory stresses writing in four-part harmony, modulation, and analysis. Advanced ear training
along with melodic and rhythmic dictation are important components of this course. Full analysis using
figured bass is studied, as well as extensive use of all non-harmonic tones. Students progress to instrumental
transposition and orchestration. Counterpoint is also introduced. Form, analysis and motif writing are also
part of the curriculum.
Prerequisite: At least one year of performance music in Band, Choir, or Orchestra or successful completion of Music Theory I
and teacher recommendation.
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BAND-WOODWIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS H (#57013), BAND-PERCUSSION H
(#57113) CONCERT CHOIR-H (#57413), ORCHESTRA-H (#58013), CHAMBER
ORCHESTRA-H (#58113)
See individual course descriptions below
10 Credits
Band (Woodwind/Brass and Percussion), Concert Choir, Orchestra, and Chamber Orchestra may
be taken as a Level 1 (Honors) course with the approval of the instructor and the Fine Arts Coordinator if
the student agrees to complete the following requirements.
Student must:
1. Meet grade level performance expectations as indicated by the ensemble director.
2. Perform for a Faculty Jury once a semester during finals.
3. Maintain an Honors Portfolio.
4. Prepare and audition for the Junior (Grade 9) or Senior (Grades 9-12) District Ensembles.
5. Perform in community settings as a soloist or ensemble member if requested.
6. Audition for and/or perform in other Music Departments.
7. Honors students are strongly encouraged to participate in other performance music activities outside of
school.
8. While not required, private lessons on your voice or instrument are HIGHLY recommended.
9. Students must earn a grade of 90 or higher in their ensemble to enter or continue in Honors Level.
BAND-WOODWIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS
10 Credits (#57023)
The Band program is open to all students who play a wind instrument. Students enrolled in this course will
participate in Marching Band and Symphonic Band. Students are also given the opportunity to audition for
Jazz Ensemble and participate in other extracurricular musical activities such as Hoop Band, Woodwind &
Brass Choir or various other chamber ensembles. Attendance at all performances is a course requirement.
Only scheduled Band students may audition for the Northeast District Festival and All State Festival with
the recommendation of the director.
BAND-PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS
10 Credits (#57123)
The Chelmsford High School Band Percussion class is for members of the Chelmsford High School Band
percussion section. These students will meet during the school day independently from the woodwinds and
brass sections of the CHS Band. This class is a performance-based course. Students enrolled in this class will
be a part of the CHS Band program (Marching & Symphonic Band) and will be held to the same afterschool rehearsal/performance schedule and expectations. This full-year course offers hands-on experience
to drumming skills and the percussive arts. Students will experience drum-set playing, stick control, rhythm
reading, hand drumming, melodic percussion and modern theatrical percussion performance. Students will
practice on acoustic percussion, African and Latin percussion instruments, concert percussion and marching
percussion instruments. This class is open to any student at Chelmsford High School including students
with proficiency on other instruments.
CONCERT CHOIR
10 Credits (#57423)
The concert choir is a performing ensemble open to all students. Any student who wishes to be in the choir
must be scheduled for this class. Attendance at all concerts is a requirement. This mixed vocal ensemble
performs literature in a variety of musical styles and from several time periods. Music is performed from
memory in a variety of foreign languages including Latin, French, Spanish, and Italian. Additional
performance opportunities for Concert Choir members also exist, e.g., auditioning for the Treble Choir and
Vocal Jazz ensemble. Only scheduled choir students may audition for the Northeastern District Festival
and All-State, with the recommendation of the Choir Director.
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ORCHESTRA
10 Credits (#58023)
The orchestra is a performing ensemble in which string instrumentalists advance their musical skills. Any
student who wishes to be in the orchestra must be scheduled for this class. Attendance at all concerts is a
requirement. This ensemble performs string and symphonic literature in a variety of musical styles from the
Baroque to the present. Only scheduled string students may audition for the Northeastern District Festival
and All-State, with the recommendation of the Orchestra Director.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
10 Credits (#58123)
This performance ensemble is for students who wish to perform advanced orchestral repertoire. It is open,
by audition, to any student who has been enrolled in the high school orchestra class for at least one year.
Attendance at all concerts is a requirement. Only scheduled string students may audition for the
Northeastern District Festival and All-State, with the recommendation of the Orchestra Director.
MUSIC APPRECIATION: BRING YOUR IPODS!
5 Credits (#58204)
This course is open to ALL students, musicians and non-musicians alike! It requires listening, sharing, and
discussion. What makes music an art form? What sets great music apart? Who was Bach anyway? How
would Beethoven survive in the music industry in today’s world? Just how large an umbrella is rock music,
and how many styles fall under it? These and other questions will be discussed, and examples of many styles
of music will be played, listened to, and compared by the students
INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC TECHNOLOGY
5 Credits (#54524)
This course will focus on incorporating the principles and elements of music with current technology
programs. Students will explore technology to create, edit, and notate music.
Prerequisites: Music Theory or one year of Band, Orchestra, or Chorus at CHS
JAZZ STUDIES
5 Credits (#59324)
This course is open to all students. It requires listening, analysis, performance and discussion. A greater
understanding of Jazz music will be achieved by examining artists, music and cultural impact through
listening to recordings, viewing live performance, musical analysis, and hands-on performance all
culminating through group discussions, projects, playing examples and guided assessments. Although not a
requirement, proficiency on a musical instrument is highly recommended.
GUITAR 1
5 Credits (#59024)
This introductory guitar course is for the beginning guitarist with little or no experience. It is also for
guitarists who need to improve their note reading skills and theory. The course will cover 14 basic chords
with application to folk and modern pop styles: guitar structure; tuning; elementary rhythms applied to
strumming; blues form, first position melody playing: trios, accidentals; rudiments of bass-playing, half and
whole steps applied to moveable barre chords.
ADVANCED GUITAR
5 Credits (#59124)
This course is a continuation of Guitar 1. Students in this course must have completed Guitar 1 with a
grade of B or better. Initially, this course will be a review of all chords and first position note reading. It
will then pick up to major scale construction and playing, key signatures, development of the right hand
position with application to scales and accompaniment, arpeggio playing; tablature, natural notes up the fret
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board; transposition; trios and ensemble playing in many styles including; blues, classical, and country.
Students who complete Advanced Guitar are encouraged to sign up for the jazz studies classes to advance
their skills.
Prerequisite: Guitar 1
THEATRE
INTRO TO ACTING
5 Credits (#59724)
This course will be designed to meet the needs of the beginning actor. Course work will include basic
elements of theatre and play production. The chief area of concentration will be in scene study. Students
will actively work on scenes from well-known plays and will be coached in all acting skill areas including:
basic improvisational skills, dialects, script analysis and character study. Course Materials: Audition by
Michael Shurtleff, Acting One by Robert Cohen, The Meisner Approach by Sanford Meisner: various plays
may include: The Foreigner, The Crucible, The Glass Menagerie, The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-inthe-Moon Marigolds, ‘Night Mother, The Heidi Chronicles, Taming of the Shrew.
Films/Video: The Actors Studio Interviews, My Left Foot, ‘Night Mother, Rain Man
Field Trips: As many plays as possible
ADVANCED ACTING
10 Credits (#59823)
Advanced Acting offers the student who has already completed the Intro to Acting Workshop the
opportunity to explore much more. Plays will be read, playwrights will be studied. Students will perform in
a minimum of eight scenes from various plays. Students will begin to explore role building from the inside
out: methods of acting will be taught and explored. These methods include the teachings of Stanislavsky,
Meisner, Lee Strasberg, Robert Cohen, Uta Hagen and others. Students will write their own scenes, helping
them further understand the playwright and character development.
Prerequisite: Intro to Acting and approval by the Advanced Acting Teacher.
MUSICAL THEATRE:
THE TRIPLE THREAT
5 Credits (#59924)
This course is an introduction to the three performing arts that are required for a successful career in the
theatre. The elusive "triple threat" encompasses vocal work, acting, and dance. The course work will be
divided into voice lessons (for singers), staging songs for auditioning, acting lessons (with an eye towards
audition techniques) and dance lessons (musical theatre dance). A guest instructor in dance will be brought
in periodically to assure proper technique.
IMPROVISATIONAL THEATER
5 Credits (#59824)
Students will learn and explore some of the core fundamentals and principals of acting through theater
games, improvisations and exercises. In addition, social issues of today will be examined through
improvisational scenes created by the class. Basic tenets of acting will be examined including: active
listening, character, status and making your scene partner look good. Improvisation as it is used today
(audience participation theater, auditioning for film, using improvisation in playwriting and improvisation
for social consciousness) will be an integral component of the class. A brief history of improvisational
theater will also be explored (commedia dell’arte).
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MATHEMATICS
In order to address the individual needs of students at Chelmsford High School, the mathematics program
offers a wide range of courses which vary in content and level of difficulty. All courses will be taught using a
variety of instruction strategies and appropriate, available technology. Various forms of assessment will also
be used in all classes. All courses will be 10 credit full year courses except where noted. In order to be sure
to select the most appropriate course, students are urged to confer with their current mathematics teacher,
math coordinator and/or guidance counselor.
Average anticipated time for homework
Level 3: 20-30 minutes daily
Level 2: 30-40 minutes daily
Honors & AP: 40-60 minutes daily
INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA
10 Credits (#11033)
This course is designed for ninth grade students who successfully completed 8th grade mathematics. All
students will be actively engaged in problem solving, reasoning, connecting, and communicating as they
continue to focus on mathematical concepts and skill development. Topics that will be investigated in the
course will include:
 Properties of Real Numbers
 Solving and Graphing Linear Equations and Functions
 Writing, Graphing, and Solving Linear Inequalities
 Systems of Linear Equations
Students will be required to keep an organized notebook and homework will be given on a daily basis. This
course will also emphasize the investigation and solution of real world problems, including open-ended and
open response questions that will assist in preparing the students for the MCAS exam.
ALGEBRA I – H, H2, Level 3
10 Credits (#12213, #12223, #12233)
This Common Core State Standards Algebra I course covers Expressions, Equations, and Functions;
Solving, Writing, and Graphing Linear Equations and Inequalities; Systems of Equations and Inequalities;
Exponential Functions; Polynomials and Factoring; Quadratic Equations; Data Analysis; & Probability.
Students will be required to keep a notebook, read and interpret the algebra text and some independent
work. Emphasis will be placed on investigating and solving real world problems that will include openended and open-response questions to assist in preparing students for the MCAS exam. Since the course
will advocate and encourage the proper use of technology, the purchase of a TI-nSpire CAS CX graphing
calculator is strongly recommended.
INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA - H
10 Credits (#11113)
This course is designed for ninth grade students who continue to demonstrate the necessary ability,
maturity, and motivation to be successful in a rapidly paced algebra program. All students will be actively
engaged in Problem Solving, Reasoning, Connecting, and Communicating as they study the following
topics: Linear Equations & Inequalities, Linear Functions, Absolute Value Functions (equations &
inequalities), Correlation and Line of Best Fit, Piecewise Functions, Step Functions, Systems of Equations
and Inequalities, Quadratic Functions, Polynomials & Polynomial Functions, Powers, Roots & Radicals,
Exponential Functions, and Inverse & Joint Variations.
Students will be required to keep a notebook, read and interpret the algebra text and some independent
work. Emphasis will be placed on investigating and solving real world problems that will include openended and open-response questions to assist in preparing students for the MCAS exam. Since the course
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will advocate and encourage the proper use of technology, the purchase of a TI-nSpire CAS CX graphing
calculator is strongly recommended.
Prerequisite: Geometry-H at the 8th grade level
TRANSITIONS FROM ALGEBRA TO GEOMETRY—Part 1
10 Credits (#12331)
This course is designed for tenth grade students who have successfully completed Introduction to Algebra
in the ninth grade. All students will be actively engaged in problem solving, making connections, and
communicating as they continue to focus on mathematical concepts, skill development, and geometric
reasoning. Topics that will be investigated in the course will include:
 Linear Function Review
 Exponents and Exponential Functions
 Quadratic Equations and Functions
 Polynomials and Factoring
 Rational Expressions and Equations
 Radicals
Students will be required to keep an organized notebook and homework will be given on a daily basis. This
course will emphasize the investigation and solution of real world problems, including open response
questions that will assist in preparing the students for the MCAS exam.
TRANSITIONS FROM ALGEBRA TO GEOMETRY—Part 2
10 Credits (#12332)
This course is designed for tenth grade students who have successfully completed Introduction to Algebra
in ninth grade. This course should be taken simultaneously with Transitions from Algebra to GeometryPart 1. All students will be actively engaged in problem solving, making connections and communicating as
they continue to focus on mathematical concepts, skill development, and geometric reasoning. Topics that
will be investigated in the course will include:
 Basics of Geometry
 Segments and Angles
 Parallel and Perpendicular Lines
 Triangle Relationships and Special Right Triangles
 Congruent Triangles
 Quadrilaterals
 Similarity
 Polygons
 Area, Surface Area and Volume
 Circles
Students will be required to keep an organized notebook and homework will be given on a daily basis. The
investigation and solution of real world problems, including open response questions that will assist in
preparing the students for the MCAS exam will be emphasized in this course.
GEOMETRY
10 Credits (#13213-23-33)
All levels (Geometry—H, Geometry—H2, and Geometry) will cover similar topics but the depth and pace
of coverage will be adjusted according to the students’ abilities, background, and needs. This course is
designed to develop geometric thinking starting with the visual and progressing to the analytical, then
developing concepts inductively and finally moving to deductive reasoning by using a variety of activities
and investigations such as constructions with straightedge and compass, patty paper, and Geometers
Sketchpad software. Students will work in a variety of settings (classroom, lab, school, home, etc.) and
configurations (alone, pairs, groups, etc.) to continue the development of mathematical thinking and
problem solving skills. They will use the language of geometry to study and form conjectures about
geometric figures and concepts in both 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional space, as well as apply their
knowledge to practical, real-life problems, which involve measurement, formulas, inductive reasoning, and
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deductive reasoning. This course can be taken simultaneously with Advanced Algebra. Since the course will
advocate and encourage the proper use of technology, the purchase of a TI-nSpire CAS CX graphing
calculator is strongly recommended.
ADVANCED ALGEBRA H
10 Credits (#13613)
This course is specifically designed for students who have successfully completed both Intermediate Algebra
H and Geometry H. All students will be actively engaged in problem solving, reasoning, connecting and
communicating mathematically as they study the following topics: Matrices; Polynomial and Rational
Functions; Complex Numbers; Radicals; Conic Sections; and Trigonometry. Students will be required to
keep an organized notebook, read and intepret the textbook, and do independent work. Emphasis will be
placed on investigating and solving real world problems that will include open-ended and open response
questions. Since this course will require the proper use of technology, the purchase of a TI-nSpire CAS CX
graphics calculator is strongly recommended.
Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra
ADVANCED ALGEBRA
10 Credits (H2 #13623 & College Prep #13633)
This course is specifically designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Algebra and
Geometry. This course can be taken simultaneously with Geometry. All students will be actively engaged in
problem solving, reasoning, connecting and communicating mathematically as they study the following
topics: Matrices and Determinants, powers, Quadratic Functions and Inequalities, Complex Numbers,
Polynomial Functions, Rational Functions, and Exponential and Logarithmic Functions. Students will be
required to keep an organized notebook, read and interpret the algebra text and do some independent work.
Emphasis will be placed on investigating and solving real-world problems that will include open-ended and
open-response questions.
Since this course will advocate and encourage the proper use of technology, the purchase of the TI-nSpire
CAS CX graphics calculator is strongly recommended.
TOPICS FROM COLLEGE ALGEBRA
10 Credits (#14333)
This course is specifically designed for the students who successfully completed Introduction to Algebra,
Transition from Algebra to Geometry. Students will be engaged in problem solving, reasoning, connecting
and communicating as they study algebra topics that include linear, quadratic, absolute value, and
exponential functions, while analyzing data related to these functions. Students will expand their working
knowledge of polynomials, powers, roots, radicals and equation solving. Students will be introduced to
trigonometry. Students will be required to keep an organized notebook. Emphasis will be placed on
algebraic topics that will prepare students for SAT’s and an introductory college mathematics course.
COLLEGE ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY
10 Credits (#16133)
This course is designed for college bound students who are not considering math or science- related majors.
This course will continue the job of building more algebraic skills which will require good work and study
habits. Explorations into logarithms, analytic geometry, and trigonometry will be included. The emphasis
will be on the application of various mathematical techniques and obtaining accurate results. This course
should help the student to be successful with required college math courses. A scientific calculator will be
necessary.
Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra and/or the recommendation of a math teacher.
PRE-CALCULUS—H
10 Credits (#15213)
Honors Pre-Calculus is designed to cover those topics essential to the study of calculus and it will complete
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the student's preparation to meet the requirements for the SAT II Math II Exam. Students taking this
course will pursue an in-depth study of functions which are used to model the data we encounter when
solving real world problems. There is special emphasis on exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric and
inverse trigonometric functions as well as sequences and techniques in data analysis. Additionally, students
will learn how to graph in the polar coordinate plane. The TI-84+ graphing calculator will be used regularly
to enhance and facilitate the understanding of solutions to problems. Students will learn how and when to
use available technology, but will also be made aware of its limitations.
Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra
PRE-CALCULUS H2
10 Credits (#15223)
This course will provide students an applications-oriented, investigative mathematics curriculum. The
curriculum will emphasize functions and how they can be used as models for real world behavior. Linear,
exponential, logarithmic, periodic, polynomial and trigonometric functions will be investigated with the use
of graphing calculators, computers, and data collection devices. How and when to use technology as well as
its limitations will be discussed. Graphing calculators (TI-nSpire CAS CX) will be used on a daily basis in
class and for homework.
Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra
INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
5 Credits (#15424)
This course is designed for students who have sucessfully completed Advanced Algebra. The course will
introduce students to statistical reasoning and methods that are relevant in the fields of medicine, business,
education, political science, psychology and entertainment. Topics will include design of experiments and
sampling techniques, data analysis and displays, probability and counting principles, discrete probability
distributions, and the normal probability distribution. Students will be required to keep an organized
notebook, read and interpret the textbook, and do independent work. Emphasis will be placed on
investigating and solving real world problems that will include open response questions for a variety of
applications.
AP STATISTICS
10 Credits (#15413)
Advanced Placement Statistics is a yearlong course for students who are interested in studying statistics in
depth. The AP Statistics course will prepare students to take the AP Statistics exam. Emphasis will be given
to real-world applications in a variety of disciplines, including medicine, business, education, political
science, psychology, sports, and entertainment. Major topics will include:
· Exploring Data – observing patterns and departures from patterns
· Sampling and Experimentation – planning and conducting a study
· Anticipating Patterns – producing models using probability theory and simulation
· Statistical Inference – estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses
Students will be required to keep an organized notebook, read and interpret the textbook, and do
independent work. Homework will require students to identify appropriate methods for solving problems,
show detailed work to support their answers, and provide thorough explanations of their results. In
communicating results to problems, particular attention will be given to the proper use of statistical
vocabulary and accurate explanations of statistical concepts and methods.
The TI-84+ (or TI Nspire CX CAS) graphing calculator is required for this course. Students will also use
statistical software to practice and strengthen their understanding of statistical concepts.
In addition to frequent assessments that include both multiple choice and open response type questions,
there will be 1-2 projects per term. Projects will provide students an opportunity to gain hands-on
experience and make connections between different parts of the course.
Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra
Note: Visit College Board Advanced Placement online to see a complete list of topics.
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ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL DECISION MAKING – Grade 12 Only
10 Credits (#18534)
Advanced Mathematical Decision Making (AMDM) is a mathematics course for high school seniors that
builds on and extends what students have learned in Algebra and Geometry courses. The course focuses
on real-world application of the mathematics learned. It covers a range of mathematics topics including:
Analyzing numerical data, Conducting, critiquing, and communicating statistics, Modeling mathematical data
and relationships, and Mathematical decision making in finance and budgeting. Students will reinforce these
skills as they study new topics in mathematics in relevant and engaging contexts. The course also helps
students develop college and career skills such as collaborating, conducting research, and making
presentations.
CALCULUS COURSES
CALCULUS 1—H2
10 Credits (#16523)
This is a problem driven course. Practical, real world problems considered from a geometrical, numerical,
and algebraic point of view guide this course. In this context students study differential calculus.
Calculators, data collection devices, computers and other current technology are used on a regular basis in
class, on projects, and in laboratory experiences helping students to think mathematically and to connect
their learning to the real world.
AP CALCULUS (AB)
10 Credits (#16313)
Advanced Placement Calculus is a year-long course for students who have a thorough knowledge of algebra,
geometry, analytic geometry, and the properties of functions. Students will receive an introduction to the
differential and integral calculus of elementary functions, including algebraic, trigonometric, exponential
functions and their inverses. Concepts will be pursued from multiple points of view, with algebraic,
geometric, and numerical approaches given to the understanding of the concepts of calculus and their
applications. The level of theory and rigor is that prescribed by the Advanced Placement Program of the
College Board, and the use of graphing technology is required. This course will prepare a student to take
the Calculus AB test. Students in this course must have successfully completed Pre-Calculus Honors or its
equivalent*.
*Exceptional performance of Pre-Calculus-- H2 with written recommendation of their Pre-Calculus teacher
and completion of a summer mathematics packet.
Note: Visit College Board Advanced Placement on-line to see a complete list of topics.
AP CALCULUS (BC)
10 Credits (#16413)
Advanced Placement Calculus (BC) is a year-long course for students that have a thorough knowledge of
algebra, geometry, and the properties of functions. Students will complete the above course description for
AP Calculus (AB). AP Calculus (BC) builds upon and extends the concepts explored in Advanced
Placement Calculus (AB). Topics covered include the calculus of vector and polar functions, L’Hopital’s
rule, and logistic differential equations. Series and polynomial approximations, including Taylor series and
test for convergence, will be a major area of study. Students completing this course will be prepared for the
BC syllabus of the AP Calculus test.
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus—Honors. Completion of a summer packet is required for all students.
Note: Visit College Board Advanced Placement on-line to see a complete list of topics.
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PROGRAMMING COURSES
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING IN “C”
10 Credits (#17723)
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the processing of information by the
computer, computer logic, memory, input/output processing, and programming in the C language. This
course emphasizes the programming problem-solving process, problem organization, algorithms, coding,
debugging and the elements of good programming style. Programming problems will include a wide variety
of numeric and non-numeric applications. No prior programming experience necessary.
AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A
10 Credits (#17513)
Computer Science A emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with an emphasis on problem
solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester course in computer
science. It also includes the study of data structures and abstraction. The course will cover Object-Oriented
Program Design, Program Implementation, Program Analysis, Standard Data Structures, Standard
Algorithms, and Computing in Context
Prerequisite: Completion of Computer Programming in “C”
WELLNESS (PE/FCS/HEALTH)
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
All Active Life /PE Courses are aligned with the Massachusetts Health Curriculum Frameworks.
Grade 9 Required
ACTIVE LIFE 1
5 Credits (#71004)
This physical education course emphasizes the importance of gaining knowledge of health-related fitness
and developing the skills and habits necessary for a lifetime of activity. This program includes skill
development and the application of rules and strategies in the following movement forms: components of
fitness, modern aerobic exercise, team sports, individual sports, and recreational games. Students will learn
the skills necessary to comfortably use a fitness room as they will be instructed in proper techniques in
fitness machine use, free weights and core training. Students will also evaluate what it takes to achieve
nutritional balance for adolescents through a variety of activities during a two week unit. This physical
education class will build your confidence in the steps necessary to live a long and healthy life.
Grades 10 & 11 Required
ACTIVE LIFE 2
5 Credits (#72004)
This Physical Education course is required for all students in their sophomore or junior year after passing
Active Life 1. The course includes a variety of activities to empower students with the knowledge and skills
necessary to achieve success with all five personal components of fitness. Students will understand the
benefits of a healthy lifestyle while creating an achievable and enjoyable fitness plan of action. Students will
learn the skills necessary to comfortably use a fitness facility as they will be instructed in proper techniques
in machine use, free weights, and core training. Students will also have the opportunity to obtain a two-year
certification in the American Heart Association’s Healthcare Heart saver First Aid Provider Course.
Prerequisite: Passing grade in Active Life 1
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ELECTIVES - Grades 11 & 12
COMPETITIVE TEAM GAMES
5 Credits (#76204)
This is an elective option for juniors and seniors who enjoy participating in team sports (basketball, capture
the flag, soccer, ultimate Frisbee, mat ball, floor hockey, etc.). In Competitive Team Games the curriculum
is designed to help students develop positive self-esteem with regard to their physical skills and knowledge
of the rules and strategies of games so that graduates will choose to remain physically active beyond
graduation. A great deal of emphasis is placed upon demonstrating good sportsmanship and character
qualities, becoming a knowledgeable spectator, practicing appropriate behaviors for co-ed physical activities,
and developing the skills necessary to participate in both competitive and/or recreational activities.
LIFELONG ACTIVITIES
5 Credits (#76304)
This is an elective option for all juniors and seniors for those students interested in participating in less
competitive activities that have tremendous values as lifelong pursuits. Typical activity choices include
traditional activities such as, golf, tennis, and pickleball as well as some non-traditional activities including
bocce, Frisbee golf, beach volleyball, croquette, etc.
NON-COMPETITIVE SPORTS
5 Credits (#76104)
This is an elective option for all juniors and seniors who wish to participate in activities that are not
competitive. Students will learn yoga and pilates postures, breathing techniques, and mediation along with
the basic skills of fitness walking, dance, and personal fitness in this non-competitive class. Whether you are
looking for a class that provides you with a chance to learn a new skill in an environment that promotes
growth and challenge, more than competition or you would just like to provide your body with a rest to the
demands of some competitive sports, this may be the class for you.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES
All Family and Consumer Sciences Courses are aligned with the Massachusetts Health Curriculum Frameworks.
Family and Consumer Sciences courses prepare students for multiple roles in the home, work and the
community as well as offer training for many diverse professions, including day-care worker, babysitter, and
with further education, a preschool, elementary, or high school teacher. By coordinating classroom theory
with hands-on experience, students develop and enhance their creative skills, and their problem-solving
skills necessary for successful living now and in the future. All Family and Consumer Science courses are
aligned with the Massachusetts Health Curriculum Frameworks.
Grades 10, 11, & 12
EXPLORING EARLY CHILDHOOD 1—H2
5 Credits (#67024)
This semester course combines classroom instruction with hands-on participation working with children in
the Lion’s Den Preschool (the in-house preschool) and with school-age children in the Extended Day
Program at Harrington School in the morning. Theory of Child Development is studied throughout the
course, including the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children from age three to
twelve. With knowledge gained in the classroom, students have the opportunity to create and develop
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developmentally appropriate activities for the young children they will be working with. Students also have
the opportunity to explore careers in this field. Students will be asked to fill out a C.O.R.I. form before they
begin working with the young children.
Grades 10, 11, & 12
EXPLORING EARLY CHILDHOOD 2— H2
5 Credits (#67424)
This semester course is a sequel to Exploring Early Childhood 1. Students will continue to work with
children in the Lion’s Den Preschool (the in-house preschool) and with school-age children in the Extended
Day Program at Harrington School in the morning. Again, theory of Child Development is studied
throughout the course, including the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children
from age three to twelve. However, pregnancy, prenatal development, and the birth process are discussed at
great length. Students will have the opportunity to simulate parenthood in this course. Students will also
have the opportunity to plan an entire day in the Lion’s Den Preschool by creating several developmentally
appropriate activities for the preschool children. Students will be asked to fill out a C.O.R.I. form before
they begin working with the young children.
Prerequisite: Exploring Early Childhood 1. Successful completion of this course and portfolio preparation will allow students
to apply for college credit at Middlesex Community College.
EXPLORING EARLY CHILDHOOD 3 (DIRECTED STUDY)—H2
10 Credits (#67623)
This year-long advanced course is a continuation of Exploring Early Childhood I and II. This course gives
the high school student a more comprehensive understanding of the day-to-day operations of a preschool,
kindergarten, elementary, or middle school classroom. Throughout the course, students work as teacher
assistants with a mentor teacher within the school system. With the help of the mentoring teacher, each
student will be expected to teach at least six lessons to the young students they are working with. Students
will also do independent research on early childhood theorists. The final assessment of the course is the
completion of a portfolio. Students will be asked to fill out a C.O.R.I. form before they begin working with
the young children. This course is designed for students pursuing a career working with children.
Prerequisite: Exploring Early Childhood 2 and Teacher Recommendation.
HEALTH EDUCATION
All Health Courses are aligned with the Massachusetts State Frameworks
Grade 9 Required
LIFE MANAGEMENT SKILLS-H2
5 Credits (#73024)
This Health Education course is required of all freshmen. This course is designed to assist students in
making positive choices related to physical, mental/emotional, and social health. Topics of this exciting
course include: health in the United States (past, present, and future concerns), mental health, mental health
disorders, dealing with stress in a positive way, common disease prevention, time management strategies,
addictive behaviors, human sexuality and healthy relationship responsibilities, and positive plans for living
healthy in the future. Consistent points of interest include self-concept, respect, responsibility, positive
communication and actions, and safety. This course will help build the life skills necessary to make wise
choices related to personal health and the health of others.
A positive parent permission slip will be required for the Human Sexuality portion of the course.
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ELECTIVES - Grades 11 & 12
REALITY CHECK—H2
5 Credits (#75024)
This Health Education course is open to juniors and seniors who have successfully completed Life
Management Skills. (Life Management Skills is a required freshmen healthy education course.) This course focuses on
the issues/challenges that young adults face today. Students will analyze their personal health choices and
risks based on their decision making practices. The curriculum is composed of three major content areas
according to the three aspects of health: mental, physical and social health. Topics include building healthy
communication skills, understanding health literacy, developing a personal plan of action, recognizing
addictive behaviors, relationship responsibilities including protecting oneself from dating violence, and basic
human sexuality. Emphasis is placed on responsible decision making skills, which accompany factual
information and student group analysis of health issues. The entire course-work leads to a class generated
community service project.
Due to the sensitive nature of some of the themes, positive parent permission is required for all students who take this course.
NUTRITION: THE POWER OF CHOICE—H2
1 Semester 5 Credits (#66524)
Do you wonder how to “Fuel the Teen Machine”? This course is open to juniors and seniors who have
successfully completed Life Management Skills. Students interested in becoming empowered with the tools
necessary to make healthy lifestyle decisions will benefit from this course. You will find the answers to:
How do you gain nutritional balance to maintain the energy for family, school, friends, and….life? How do
you detect myth from fact in choosing the components of your diet? How do you use the resources such as
MyPlate.gov to create your personal plan to perform at your optimal level? The POWER OF CHOICE is
yours!
PRACTICAL ARTS: BUSINESS EDUCATION & MEDIA
Practical Arts courses at Chelmsford High School provide students with useful, life-long skills obtained
through courses in Business and Family & Consumer Science. Students will expand 21st Century skills, be
prepared for college and further their personal growth.
BUSINESS EDUCATION
The Business Education department’s faculty seeks to provide all students with the proper 21 st century tools
to meet their future goals. These college preparatory course offerings provide a solid foundation for
financial, economic, business, entrepreneurial and information literacy. Creativity, critical thinking, problem
solving, communication, and collaboration are skills not only central to our business education
programming but are called for by Massachusetts and Federal educational and business leaders. We endeavor
to serve our students by offering a curriculum that combines the key elements of academic and 21st Century
themes, while exposing students to today’s global economic concepts. We seek to utilize today’s technology
to explore the vast world of business, develop expertise, and to provide a foundation for further collegiate
study. We also offer membership in Distributive Education Club of America (DECA.org) and Internships
with Workers Credit Union.
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INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS LAW-H2
5 Credits (#61224)
This course provides an overview of the legal, regulatory and ethical environment in which business
decisions are made and their effect on us as citizens. The course exposes students to a brief history of our
legal system and a variety of criminal and civil concepts, then focuses on contracts and employment law.
Contract law establishes the ground rules that each of us use to define our private rights and duties. In
addition, students will gain an understanding of the rights and responsibilities they have and the protections
given them by our legal system in the workplace. This course will develop the ability of each student to read
and reason critically.
MODERN BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS—H2
5 Credits (#62024)
This 21st century introductory course in business will introduce students to the major disciplines of business
while giving them hands-on, enjoyable and challenging 21st century activities that reinforce their learning.
Within this course, students focus on real life businesses through the use of online curriculum, educational
games and activities. Here they learn about and experience current business topics, which include: Business
in the US and Global Economic Environment, Careers in Business, Corporate Leadership, and
Entrepreneurship.
Students will use our new, 21st century Principles of Business 8th edition (2012) text with accompanying
online business activities and exercises. Students use online news media and specific business websites for
their projects. Students will learn about the key stakeholders of business as well as the relationship between
businesses, customers, society and the government. The course also introduces students to basic economic
principles, personal finances, and consumer rights and responsibilities. They will have the opportunity to
explore potential career opportunities. Students in this Modern Business Fundamentals course are also
eligible for DECA.
MEDIA LITERACY FOR THE 21ST CENTURY—H2
5 Credits (#62124)
Gathering, interpreting and communicating information are key skills for everyone's success. With the
advances in technology and the amount of information available to students, literacy has a whole new
definition. Through the Internet, Facebook, Twitter, cell phones, iTunes, TV, and streaming media, we are
constantly bombarded with someone's message. In this course, students develop information and media
literacy skills and begin to understand how to transform the process of media consumption into an active
and critical process. Students will learn the responsibilities that come when they use the power of
communication technologies. They will become aware of how all messages are constructed, how to
determine who created it, and for what purpose. This enables the student to make wise choices to protect
their privacy and their digital identity.
ACCOUNTING 1— H2
5 Credits (#62424)
Accounting 1—H2 is a one semester course open to all students. Students will explore the fundamental
concepts of Financial Accounting. While traditional pencil and paper methods are not abandoned, high
emphasis is placed on computerized Accounting practices. Students will complete a variety of short and
long term projects using Aplia Online Working Papers and customized Microsoft Excel templates. Accounting
Students are now eligible for DECA competition.
ACCOUNTING 2—H2
5 Credits (#62524)
Accounting 2—H2 is a one semester course open to all students who have successfully completed
Accounting 1—H2. The focus of the course will be the role of accounting on managerial decisions such as
payroll, investing, inventory management, cost volume profit analysis, and Financial Statement analysis.
Students will be presented with common managerial decisions and use their knowledge of accounting to
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make sound business recommendations. Spreadsheet applications and specialized accounting software will
be used. Accounting Students are now eligible to compete in DECA events.
Prerequisite: Accounting 1
FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY-H2
5 Credits (#61424)
In today’s unstable economic and financial climate, it is essential that students become financially literate
citizens who will understand the fundamental concepts of financial security today and in the future. They
will develop knowledge, skills, and confidence to begin assuming responsibility for their financial future.
Students will develop critical thinking skills with respect to financial planning concepts as they relate to their
own individual situations. Topics will include:
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Financing a car loan
College Financing
Credit Cards and Debit Cards
Developing a Budget
Saving and Investing
Balancing a Checkbook
Consumer Decision Making
Insurance
Job Selection
Students will take part in a variety of realistic experiences throughout the semester including the H&R Block
Virtual Business Personal Finance Simulation as well as a customized Investopedia stock market game.
Through our partnership with Worker’s Credit Union, banking professionals will engage the students in
several interactive presentations. Financial Planning students are eligible for DECA competition.
MARKETING —H2
5 Credits (#65024)
A college oriented course designed to cover key topics such as: the role of marketing in our economy;
consumer behavior; market planning; the development of the marketing mix; market segmentation; pricing
strategies; selling and advertising. Discussions, case studies, oral presentations, and writing assignments will
be a part of the required coursework. Computer simulation programs will be used to enhance student
understanding in multiple areas. Students are eligible for and are encouraged to participate in DECA and
compete with other students in specific areas of study they are interested in: concert/event promotion,
fashion buying, displaying and showcasing. Students will explore the determination of target markets, the
psychological influences that cause people to buy, and the appropriate advertising methods used to reach the
appropriate audiences. Students will be encouraged to participate in DECA competitions and events where
they will have a chance to successfully apply their knowledge in a variety of academic and hands-on settings.
SPECIAL INDUSTRIES
MARKETING—H2
5 Credits (#61734)
Special Industries Marketing is a course for students interested in the field of marketing. Students will learn
to apply basic marketing fundamentals to the diverse fields of Fashion/Retail Management, Sports &
Entertainment Marketing, and Travel & Tourism Management with emphasis on the advertising methods
used in each industry. The concept of product, price, place, and promotion will be applied to topics such as:
hotel and restaurant management, airlines and cruises, vacation packages, theme parks, professional and
intercollegiate athletics, concert/event promotion, fashion buying, displaying and showcasing. Students will
explore the determination of target markets, the psychological influences that cause people to buy, and the
best advertising methods used to reach the appropriate audiences. Computer simulation programs will be
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used to enhance student understanding in multiple areas. Students will be encouraged to participate in
DECA competitions and events where they will have a chance to successfully apply their knowledge in a
variety of academic and hands-on settings.
MANAGEMENT—H2
5 Credits (#65424)
This semester course introduces basic functions and how organizations/businesses are owned, managed,
and controlled. The managerial roles of planning, leading, organizing and controlling provide the framework
that course materials are built around. Areas of concentration include legal and ethical considerations in
management, decision-making and communication skill development, and leadership principles. Computer
simulations are utilized to enhance student understanding. Students are eligible and encouraged to
participate in DECA competitions and events where they will have a chance to successfully apply their
knowledge in a variety of academic and hands-on settings.
BANKING INTERNSHIP
5 Credits (#61104)
Application process as explained below must be followed.
Students will learn daily banking policies and practices and apply what they have learned by working at the
Chelmsford High School branch of Workers Credit Union. Students will be encouraged to participate in the
MSBA (Mass School Bank Association) Conference where they will have a chance to apply their knowledge
in product development, marketing and banking bowl trivia events. This conference is held every spring in
Boston. In addition, seniors taking this course will be eligible to participate in the MSBA Scholarship
Program with a chance to win one of three $500 scholarships.
Course Requirement
Participants in this internship must be recommended by members of the Business Department after demonstrating interest in
and ability in the field of business and must submit a Workers Credit Union application.
INNOVATION, LEADERSHIP & COMMUNICATION (DECA) - H
10 Credits (#62213)
This year long honors course curriculum is structured on the principles of marketing and entrepreneurship
while emphasizing the techniques and principles of human relations, leadership and business
communication both oral and written.
Students will work with outside groups as well as other groups within Chelmsford High School such as the
Alumni group. Students will engage in business ventures, community service, group discussions, individual
or group projects and presentations. They will use the business concepts they learned in class and apply
them in real world business situations. Through the use of technology, students will enhance their
presentation and problem-solving skills. Students will exhibit their understanding of the curriculum at the
District 5 DECA Competition and Massachusetts DECA competition. Students are required to participate
in activities that begin in June of the previous year and continue through the following year. Activities will
take place evenings and weekends.
Course Requirements:
 Students are required to join DECA, and participate in the District Conference.
 Students are required to complete the full year for 10 credits.
 Students are required to complete a Marketing/Business Plan Independent Project.
 Students are required to have successfully completed any two (2) Business Courses
 Instructor permission.
21st CENTURY GLOBAL ECONOMICS H2
10 credits (#65623)
This class is for juniors or seniors who would like to learn about how the world they live in functions. This
course will employ discussions, independent research and a project based approach to learning how the
economic, political and sociological ideals of the people of the major countries of the world work together
to survive and grow. We will study Russia, China, the European Union, and the United States so that
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students will understand the interdependent relationships of our global economies by analyzing and
interpreting information from a variety of sources, working collaboratively and communicating their ideas
through a variety of media.
MICROSOFT OFFICE CERTIFICATION I + II H2
5 Credits (#61524, #61624)
Demonstrate that you have the skills needed to get the most out of Microsoft Office by earning a Microsoft
Office certification in a specific Office program. Master the Office 2010 Word, PowerPoint or Excel in this
hands-on course where instructor demonstrations and direction guide you through the tips and techniques
of optimal use of these software packages. Students can take the Microsoft Office certification test at the
completion of the course if they wish or they can just learn the programs for use in school or future career.
MEDIA
The following courses can be applied to either Fine Arts or Practical Arts graduation requirements.
COMMUNICATION/MEDIA 1
5 Credits (#81002)
Communication/Media 1 is project based and includes direct instruction as well as experience in producing
and TV broadcasting. The topics include:
 Overview of Mass Media (Radio, TV, Internet)
 News Media
 Broadcasting of Other Events (Elections, Olympics, etc.)
 Pod Casting
 Impact and Effect of Advertising on Media
 The roles of PBS vs. Commercial TV
 Ownerships of Various Media
 Public Service Announcements
 Introduction to Multi-camera Production
 Visual Effects from the Fine Arts Angle
 Subject Lighting
 Conducting and Taping Interviews
 Journalism
MEDIA INTERNSHIP
5 Credits (#81201)
Students learn to broadcast over cable TV by taping and editing CHS football game footage. Classwork
involves writing and conducting interviews of players and coaches which they broadcast during the game.
This course will also involve broadcasting from the game sites which is done outside of class several times.
Students will meet with the instructor, in small groups onsite at the CHS football games to produce the
broadcast.
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READING
READING FOR HIGH SCHOOL
5 Credits (#08804)
Students taking ENGLISH 9 are required to take WRITING FOR HIGH SCHOOL (#07304) and
READING FOR HIGH SCHOOL (#08804).
The primary goal of this course is to act as an intervention designed to support students who may struggle
with reading in the content areas of Social Studies, Science, and English at the high school due to below
average reading skills. The course will focus instruction on effective strategies such as identifying text
structure and will aid in comprehension of content area reading. World History and Physical Science
textbooks, along with study guides and secondary sources, will be utilized throughout the semester. Study
skills designed to further understanding of the content will be part of the curriculum. In addition,
comprehension in support of English classes will focus on poetry, short stories and novels and provide
another level of support to students at risk of attaining the level of “Proficient” on the 10 th grade ELA
MCAS exam needed for graduation. Students take a pre and post assessment of their reading level as part
of the course. A small amount of outside-of-class assigned reading is required for the course.
YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 1
5 Credits (#08034)
Young Adult Literature I is a course designed to expand a student's literal, interpretive, and evaluative
comprehension skills. Award winning young adult novels are the focus of the curriculum. The course also
includes reading selections from non-fiction that supplement the novels with background information, and
provide students with the opportunity to practice reading non-fiction text. Reading strategies that improve
fluency and comprehension of fiction and non-fiction are incorporated into the class. Outside of class
assigned reading is required.
YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 2
5 Credits (#08234)
Young Adult Literature II: Similar to Young Adult Literature I, this course is designed to expand a student's
literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension skills. Award winning young adult novels are the focus of
the curriculum. Young Adult Lit. II can be used as a continuation on Young Adult Lit. I, or as the student’s
first reading class. The course curriculum is primarily novels, but does include some content area reading
and non-fiction. Strategies that can be applied to reading selections on the MCAS, SAT or ACT are taught.
Outside of class assigned reading is required.
READING SKILLS AND
STRATEGIES
5 Credits (#08404)
Reading Skills and Strategies (9-12) is a course that explicitly teaches reading strategies that improve fluency
and comprehension of fiction and non-fiction to struggling readers. Award winning novels and short
reading selections are the focus of the curriculum. The course will focus instruction on effective strategies
such as identifying text structure and reading strategies that improve fluency and comprehension of fiction
and non-fiction. Reading Skills and Strategies is intended for students who have previously taken Reading
for High School, or who struggle with comprehension. Students who have not yet met proficiency levels on
the MCAS are also recommended.
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SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY/ENGINEERING
SCIENCE
The Science Department offers instruction at three academic levels. Level 1 Honors courses are by teacher
recommendation only. The recommendation is based upon performance in both science and math. The
student should also have exhibited a sincere interest in science or mathematics. Level 1 Honors courses are
for the self-motivated and academically mature students. It is assumed that the Level 1 Honors science
student is also in Level 1 Honors math course. Level 2 (H2) courses are for college bound students. Level 2
Honors science students should also be enrolled in, at least, a level 2 math course. Any student intending to
go to a four year college, no matter what career goal, should take Level 2 or higher science courses.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE—H
10 Credits (#21013)
This rigorous, laboratory-based course is divided into two areas of study. Concepts covered in basic physics
during the first two terms of the year include: scientific methods; measuring and graphing motion; forces;
vectors; Newton’s laws of motion; impulse, momentum and energy. An engineering-design major project
will require the construction of an operational scale model of a machine to be selected by the teacher.
Concepts covered in basic chemistry to build a solid foundation for the biochemistry required in Biology H
includes properties and classification of matter; atomic structure; the periodic table; atomic and formula
masses; and chemical reactions and equations. Students in this course will be expected to design valid
scientific experiments, collect and analyze data, and formulate appropriate conclusions. Graphing skills and
algebraic equations will be used to analyze lab data and to solve word problems. Honors students are
expected to demonstrate good organizational skills, efficient time management, and independent study skills.
On an average night, students in this course should expect to spend 30-45 minutes on homework.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE—H2
10 Credits (#21023)
This activity-based course provides a foundation for future study of biology, chemistry, and physics.
Students are expected to master basic laboratory skills as they study topics in chemistry and physics. The
course begins with an introduction to scientific methods and metric units of measurement. Physics topics
taught during the first two terms include the study of: motion; distance/time graphing; the relationship
between forces and motion; momentum; and energy. Students also explore every-day applications of
Newton’s Laws of Motion. During the chemistry terms, students participate in a structured laboratory
program as they study the properties of matter, phases and phase changes, the structure of the atom,
differences between elements, compounds and mixtures, and interactions between particles in forming
chemical bonds and participating in chemical reactions. Individual and group projects are assigned
throughout the course. Students are assessed independently and as active contributors to laboratory team
activities and group presentations to the class. On an average night, students in this course should expect to
spend 20-30 minutes on homework.
AP BIOLOGY
10 Credits (#22013)
This second year Biology course will consist initially of a review and enrichment of the major concepts from
first year Biology. This will be followed by a fast-paced, intensive study of selected topics in Biology as set
forth by the College Board. Included among these are, but not limited to: plant and animal growth and
development; embryology; cellular physiology; genetics; animal structure; biological systems and
relationships. The course emphasizes the unifying themes in biology, showing the connections between the
different areas of study. AP Biology is designed for highly motivated science students who intend to pursue
a science related major in college. Students in this course should be prepared for some independent learning
due to the volume of material covered. In addition to in-class discussions, laboratory experimentation, and
independent learning, students will have an opportunity for peer-share learning. The course will also
emphasize techniques in preparation for the AP Biology exam in May.
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Students will be required to complete summer reading and a project prior to the beginning of the academic
year.
Homework Requirements: Students are expected to read chapter material prior to in-class discussions.
Nightly homework will average 1 to 2 hours.
Recommended: concurrent enrollment or credit in a chemistry course.
BIOLOGY H
10 Credits (#22413)
This course is designed to give students an in-depth understanding of the basic principles of biology, from
the cellular basis of life to complex interactions of organisms in their environments. Frequent laboratory
exercises, designed to correlate with text materials, provide students with opportunities to learn and use
techniques and equipment associated with biological research. Independent reading, library research and
writing assignments extend learning beyond the classroom.
This course is designed for well disciplined, highly motivated students. Students can expect nightly reading
assignments of 10-15 pages in a college level text book, an average of 1-2 hours per night.
BIOLOGY—H2
10 Credits (#22423)
This course is designed to provide a college preparatory level of understanding in biology. There are six
major topics that are covered during the semester: cell-structure and function; evolution; genetics; ecology;
chemistry of the cell and human body systems. Frequent laboratory investigations are given to correlate with
the materials for each unit or topic. Students should expect nightly homework assignments of 5-8 pages of
reading and a small written assignment (30-45 minutes per night)
Recommended: Level 2 math course taken concurrently
BIOLOGY I
10 Credits (#22433)
This freshman level course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the scientific processes of
biology. Emphasis is geared to the successful completion of the MCAS test in biology. Laboratory
investigations enrich the concepts for each unit. All units are based upon the required MCAS standards for
science competency. Students should expect 20-30 minutes of homework for practice and reinforcement
most nights. Freshmen enrolled in this class are expected to take Biology II in their sophomore year in
preparation for taking the Biology MCAS test in June of their sophomore year.
Prerequisite: Recommendation of Earth Science teacher.
BIOLOGY II
10 Credits (#22633)
This sophomore level course is designed to continue to give students a basic understanding of the scientific
processes of biology. Emphasis is geared to the successful completion of the MCAS test in biology.
Laboratory investigations enrich the concepts for each unit. All units are based upon the required MCAS
standards for science competency. Students should expect 20-30 minutes of homework for practice and
reinforcement most nights. Sophomores enrolled in this course who have not passed a science MCAS test
will take the Biology MCAS test in June.
Prerequisite: Completion of Biology I.
AP CHEMISTRY
10 Credits (#24013)
After a review and enrichment of major concepts from first year chemistry, this second year Chemistry
course provides an intensive study of selected topics in chemistry. Included among these are: nuclear
chemistry and organic chemistry; reaction kinetics, acid/base equilibrium; thermodynamics; and
electrochemistry. The student must be self-motivated and industrious. There are extensive homework
assignments and frequent laboratory reports to write that will require 1-2 hours of work each day. Much of
class time will be spent in the lab with time allotted for answering questions. This is a full year course.
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Students may be required to complete chemistry work over the summer prior to the beginning of the school
year.
CHEMISTRY—H
10 Credits (#24213)
Honors Chemistry is a full year course created for students who have demonstrated a sincere interest in the
sciences. It is critical that students be able to independently use algebra skills in the context of the chemistry
curriculum. Students will be responsible to assume high academic initiative for their progress in the course.
The course requires extensive reading and diligent homework preparation. The integrated laboratory section
of the course involves both intensive independent and/or collaborative work. Students are expected to be
well versed in research skills and writing skills and able to apply their algebra knowledge to unique problems.
The course is intended to give an in-depth and experiential understanding to the fundamental principles
involved in inorganic chemistry. Daily homework is estimated to be 1 to 1-1/2 hours and on occasion 2
hours.
CHEMISTRY—H2
10 Credits (#24223)
This course is designed for the student who is seeking college preparatory credit in chemistry in order to
pursue a science related major in college. The student is expected to keep up with the daily assigned readings
and do the daily homework which can vary from 30-60 minutes for each day. The course is deliberately
interwoven with related laboratory. The assigned lab reports will utilize the student’s written, verbal and
math skills from other disciplines. The in-class independent and collaborative exercises are geared to help
the student reach the basic fundamentals of inorganic chemistry by utilizing their algebra skills. The
student’s grade will be a compilation from a variety of evaluations including tests, reading quizzes, lab
reports, presentations, and other independent and collaborative exercises.
CHEMISTRY
10 Credits (#24233)
This is a course with major emphasis on conceptual chemistry as well as the reinforcement of other basic
academic skills. These skills and chemical concepts are presented while moving through problems related to
water, material and energy use. The course addresses the practicality and usefulness of such concepts and
skills. As such it is designed around numerous laboratories and collaborative learning exercises to enhance
the student’s understanding of these chemical concepts. A variety of teaching strategies are used to reach
and to encourage the student’s progress. The student is expected to do the assigned daily reading,
homework and pass in all required assignments. Daily expected homework time is between 30-45minutes.
The student’s performance will be evaluated on the basis of his/her homework, lab work, independent and
collaborative exercises, quizzes or tests, and active participation in the program.
AP PHYSICS 1
10 Credits (#25213)
Formally known as Physics H, this is an in-depth, mathematically rigorous, course in physics that is
equivalent to a first semester college course in algebra-based Physics. The course is designed to prepare
students for future study in the core science areas (biology, chemistry or physics), mathematics or other
professional fields such as pre-med, pre-dental, veterinary study or engineering. It is also designed for all
science majors and other students wishing to demonstrate their ability to meet the challenge of an advanced
placement course. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular
momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric
circuits. Projects and lab work play an important role in this course. Homework will be approximately 1-2
hours per night and will average 4 days per week. Students may be required to complete physics work over
the summer prior to the beginning of the school year.
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AP PHYSICS 2
10 Credits (#25013)
Formally known as AP Physics, this is an in-depth, mathematically rigorous, course in physics that is
equivalent to a second semester college course in algebra-based Physics. The course is designed to prepare
students for future study in the core science areas (biology, chemistry or physics), mathematics or other
professional fields such as pre-med, pre-dental, veterinary study or engineering. It is also designed for all
science majors and other students wishing to demonstrate their ability to meet the challenge of an advanced
placement course. The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics;
and atomic and nuclear physics. Projects and lab work play an important role in this course. Homework will
be 1-2 hours per night and will average approximately 4 days per week. Students may be required to
complete physics work over the summer prior to the beginning of the school year.
PHYSICS—H2
10 Credits (#25223)
This course is designed for students going on to some form of higher education as non-science majors;
however, students should have an interest in science. Topics will be explored conceptually with a secondary
emphasis on higher level mathematical interpretation. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, energy,
momentum, electricity and magnetism, general wave properties, light and sound. Projects and Lab work are
an important role in this course. Students should expect 30-60 minutes of homework per class meeting
including 5 minutes to review notes and observations from the day’s activities.
PHYSICS
10 Credits (#25233)
Each quarter, this senior level course will focus on one core area including electricity,
plumbing/HVAC/water systems, automotive and sports science. Physics is a “hands on” class that
investigates our everyday world by constructing models and performing tests upon them. Students will
develop critical thinking skills using deductive reasoning. Nor more than simple algebra calculations will be
used in this course. Students should expect between 30 and 45 minutes of homework per class meeting
including 5 minutes to review notes and observations from the day’s activities.
ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY—H
10 Credits (#23013)
This second year Biology elective is an academically rigorous course that is designed to provide a
background for those students anticipating study in medical or health fields in the future, or for students
with an interest in how the human body functions. Topics include: anatomical terminology, histology, and
an examination of the structure, function and disease of body systems. The text is written at a college
reading level and many college level lab activities are conducted. The lab activities require motivated and
independent students. All students are required to be active participants in a cat dissection for this course.
Students will learn how to use a stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, spirometer, and other equipment in the
lab. Homework Expectations: 1-2 hours per night of reading, written assignments, and studying.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
10 Credits (#22533)
This is a full year elective course (formally known as Ecology) and is designed for seniors who intend to go
to college as non-science majors. The course will be divided into two general topic areas: abiotic and biotic
environmental factors. Within these topic areas the course will focus on ecosystems, material cycling, human
and environmental influences, succession, and environmental problems. Students are expected to complete
30 minutes of daily assigned readings, homework, study, and lab work. The student’s grade will be a
compilation from a variety of evaluations including group and individual projects, presentations and other
independent and collaborative exercises.
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BIOTECHNOLOGY
5 Credits (#22114)
This second year Biology elective provides students with basic biotechnology laboratory skills in order to
introduce them to biotechnology concepts. A “hands-on” laboratory course, it focuses on widely used
biotechnological techniques and theoretical application in biotech industry standards including biological
molecule manipulation, transformation and identification. This is a one semester course.
AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
10 Credits (#26013)
The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles,
concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify
and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated
with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them in preparation
for the AP Environmental Test. Students in this course should be prepared for some independent learning
due to the volume of material covered. Summer homework will be required; see the instructor for resources
before the end of the school year. In addition to in-class discussions, laboratory experimentation, and
independent learning, students will have an opportunity for peer-share learning. Homework Requirements:
Students are expected to read chapter material prior to in-class discussions. Nightly homework will average
1 to 2 hours.
Recommended: Completion of a biology course and a chemistry course prior to enrolling in AP
Environmental Science.
TECHNOLOGY/ENGINEERING
The technology courses explore and investigate the nature of technology systems and their practical
applications in engineering industries. Students are introduced to science, math and engineering concepts as
they relate to design applications in technology. Students learn problem-solving techniques through the
engineering design process. They also will learn new skills in drawing and modeling in the project work.
Grades are based on student performance in related theory, lab work, homework, presentations and general
conduct and effort. Certain projects may require lab fees depending on student needs and availability of
materials.
FURNITURE CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY
10 Credits (#69603)
This course is designed to give students hands-on learning opportunities to gain basic skills operating tools
and machines to implement and construct furniture and or modular shed projects in the Technology shop.
21st Century manufacturing technology, material processing and measurement system theory concepts will
be integrated. Students will evaluate furniture design criteria of the past, present and future. They will learn
technical drawing techniques; solve geometric layouts, scale, proportion and perspective drawing. There will
be opportunities for students to work and contribute in collaborative groups as well as individual project
work. Understanding and adhering to Industrial Safety Standards is a primary requirement for each student.
Both the student and parents must sign a safety contract for participation in this course to help ensure a
personal commitment to safety procedures. Grades will be based on signing the safety contract and student
conduct as well as class participation, project work, technical drawings and design, written tests that include
vocabulary and measurement computation and industrial concepts in current manufacturing practice. Some
homework will be required.
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY/ENGINEERING DESIGN 1
10 Credits (#69123)
This course is intended to cover a variety of concepts and systems within four major areas of technology
engineering, which include: manufacturing, communications, transportation and energy. Project work will be
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done in the technology shop and the CAD lab. The related theory covers simple machines, power and
energy systems, fluid mechanics, and electricity and transportation systems. Skills will be developed by using
the design process, plus the proper and safe use of tools and machines. Students can expect assessments
including chapter work, tests, quizzes, research papers, hands-on projects, CADD drawings and 1-2 hours
of homework a week
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY/ENGINEERING DESIGN 2
10 Credits (#69704)
This course is a continuation of Industrial Technology Engineering Design 1 course. Students are expected
to explore more advanced methods of design and construction. One engineering research project outside of
class and a PowerPoint presentation of research is required. Design drawings and project work will continue
to progress from the introductory level. Challenges with a variety of materials and ideas requiring more
complex designs and drawings will be the ultimate goal.
ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING AND DESIGN 1
10 Credits (#69523)
This course is designed to give the student basic knowledge of Architectural Drafting and House Design. It
includes a study of lot selections, elevation plans, floor plans, construction details, specifications, etc.
Problem solving is stressed throughout the course, along with Computer Aid Design (CAD). Students can
expect assessments including chapter work, tests, quizzes, research papers, CADD drawings and 1-2 hours
of homework a week. (See Articulation Agreement between area colleges and Chelmsford High School)
ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING DRAWING AND DESIGN 2
10 Credits (#69623)
This course is designed as an advanced continuation of Architecture 1 or Technology & Engineering
Design. A combination of architectural models, engineering drawings and design concepts will be explored
in greater depth. Problem-solving, design process and presentation of ideas will be stressed. The curriculum
will cover product design and development, power point presentations, research of new technologies, house
design, computer modeling, and construction drawings with a specific focus on new trends in green
construction, alternative energy, and new materials. Students can expect assessments including chapter work,
tests, quizzes, research papers, CADD drawings and 2-3 hours of homework a week.
ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING AND DESIGN 3 & 4 - DIRECTED STUDY
10 Credits (#69923)
This course is designed as an advanced continuation of Architectural Drawing and Design 2. Students will
work in an independent setting, working to solve design related problems of an advanced nature. Residential
as well as commercial construction techniques and materials will be explored. New trends in modern
architecture and design will be a focus.
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
ROBOTICS
5 Credits (#69724)
Robotics is a one semester course that focuses on creative problem solving and machine behaviors. The
robots are built with Legos and are programmed in C. Programming is taught as needed. It is assumed that
most students will have previous programming experience. Each class will be presented with the similar
components and programming exercises, but the challenges that students will solve will vary from term to
term. The general types of exercises will include the following: a wall or a line, knocking things over,
picking up and moving objects, and identifying colors of objects. The challenges will be inspired by real
world problems that robots face—search and rescue, handicapped assistance, moving of hazardous waste,
warehouse management, etc. This course may be used for Practical Arts credit.
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SOCIAL STUDIES
The Social Studies program at Chelmsford High School is designed to assist students in becoming informed
citizens, fully aware of the need for insuring the dignity and worth of the individual, personally involved in
improving the society they have inherited, and capable of recognizing the interdependence of all peoples.
The goals of the program are developed through a variety of semester-length and full-year courses. The
content of these courses draws upon the various social science disciplines. These courses develop skills
necessary in gathering, analyzing and evaluating information. A student should attempt to construct a
balanced program from the social studies offerings over the four years at Chelmsford High School. In
addition to satisfying graduation requirements, a student will want to select courses from history, social
sciences, and interdisciplinary electives. In planning a program, consideration should be given to the
individual’s learning style, interests, strengths and weaknesses. Thirty credits of Social Studies are required
for graduation from Chelmsford High School.
Students will have to pass World History II, United States History I and United States History II to meet the requirements
for graduation from Chelmsford High School.
WORLD HISTORY II-H – Grade 9
10 Credits (#32413)
This honors course challenges students to explore world history, geography, and related studies from the
French Revolution to the present, using both inquiry and narrative approaches. This course requires more
extensive reading and has a great emphasis on analytical writing. Students will be expected to write at least
one major research paper. Skills enhanced in this course will help prepare students for further Honors
and/or Advanced Placement work in social studies. Students who are enrolled in World History II Honors
their freshman year are required to complete a summer reading assignment (posted on the district website),
prior to attending school in September of their freshman year.
WORLD HISTORY II—H2, CP - Grade 9
10 Credits (#32423, #32433)
This course surveys world geography, history, and related studies from the French Revolution to the
present. Students will focus on a thorough review of the social, economic, religious, scientific and
technological factors that have shaped world history since the 1790s. Instruction includes the use of text,
secondary and primary source materials designed to develop inquiry, interpretation, and critical thinking as
well as a variety of print and electronic instructional materials. This course requires analytical writing.
UNITED STATES HISTORY I—H - Grade 10
10 Credits (#32513)
In United States History 1—H, students briefly review European exploration and colonization of the New
World as well as the colonial period. Students examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United
States during Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. Students study the basic framework of American
democracy and the basic concepts of American government, as well as America’s westward expansion, the
establishment of political parties, economic and social change, sectional conflict, the Civil War, and
Reconstruction. This course requires more extensive reading and writing activities. Skills enhanced in this
course will help prepare students for the Advanced Placement United States History course in Grade 11. In
the current CHS curriculum, United States History 1-H is the equivalent course to United State History
Advanced Placement 1.
UNITED STATES HISTORY I H2, CP – Grade 10
10 Credits (#32523, #32533)
In United States History 1, students briefly review European exploration and colonization of the New
World as well as the colonial period. Students examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United
States during the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. Students study the basic framework of American
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democracy and the basic concepts of America government in order to develop a deeper understanding and
appreciation of civics. Additionally, students will study America’s westward expansion, the establishment of
political parties, economic and social change, sectional conflict, the Civil war, and Reconstruction. This
course requires analytical writing and is designed to instill in the student an understanding and appreciation
of his or her heritage. A variety of resources including videos, records, primary sources and simulations are
used in this course.
AP UNITED STATES HISTORY – Grade 11
10 Credits (#33013)
The Advanced Placement course in American history is a course that will provide students in their junior
year with the analytic skills and facts necessary to deal critically with problems and materials in American
history. Students will be prepared for intermediate and advanced college courses by the demands of the
advance placement course, which are equivalent to those of full-year introductory college courses. Students
will learn to assess historical materials--their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability and
their importance--and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. A major
research paper is required.
UNITED STATES HISTORY II H2, CP – Grade 11
10 Credits (#33523, #33533)
In United States History II, students analyze the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and
America’s growing role in international relations. Students study the goals and accomplishments of the
Progressive movement and the New Deal. Students also learn about the various factors that led to
America’s entry into World War I and World War II as well as the consequences of World War II for
American life. Finally, students study the causes and course of the Cold War, important economic and
political changes during the Cold War, such as the Civil Rights movement, and recent events and trends that
have shaped modern-day America. This course requires analytical writing. Students must have successfully
completed US History I.
SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES
AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
10 Credits (#38113)
This Advanced Placement course in American Government and Politics is designed to give students a
critical perspective on government and politics in the United States of America. It involves the study of
general concepts used to interpret American politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It requires
familiarity with various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that make up the American political reality.
Students will be prepared for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them
equivalent to those of full year introductory college courses. Students will be prepared to take the Advanced
Placement Exam in American Government and Politics.
AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH FILM– H2
5 Credits (#39124)
This H2 course is for seniors interested in the portrayal of events of American History on the big screen.
This course will examine Hollywood feature films and historical dramas as historical evidence. During the
course, students will view movies on a span of events from the inception of the United States to present
day. The Standards from the Massachusetts State Curriculum Frameworks and the Common Core Standards
are an integral component of this course. Students are expected to utilize research, comparative analysis,
and critical thinking skills as they determine the value of each film to the American understanding of past
events. The continued development of discussion, debate and writing skills will be a central part of the
course. Students will research historical events in the United States using primary and secondary sources to
have a better understanding of the events they see portrayed in the films. Students will utilize and write film
reviews and critical commentaries related to the films. Students will be expected to produce comparative
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essays in which they identify the specific events and consequences of those events with the stories and
myths presented in the films.
COMMON LAW AND TRIAL PROCEDURES I—Honors
10 Credits (#39323)
Common Law and Trial Procedures will provide students the opportunity to learn about the fundamentals
of the American judicial system and how it can impact their lives in ways they might not otherwise imagine.
The course will further students’ understanding of the law, court procedures, civil liberties and the American
legal system. It will also increase proficiency in basic life skills, such as listening, public speaking, rote
memorization, reading, and analytical reasoning. Students are required to think independently and develop
their advocacy skills regardless of which side of an issue is being presented. Most importantly, the course
will promote better communication and cooperation between the student, Chelmsford High School, and the
legal profession. Students who take Common Law & Trial Procedures will be required to participate in the
Massachusetts Bar Association’s Mock Trial program. This unique experience will heighten the student’s
consciousness of law-related professions and the academic studies which lead to those professions. Many
schools in the state participate in this competition-based program, including well-known educational
facilities from the private sector. Students who have participated in this program in the past have
thoroughly enjoyed it.
COMMON LAW AND TRIAL PROCEDURES II - Honors
10 Credits (#39423)
The course will provide students the opportunity to expand their knowledge about the fundamentals of the
American judicial system and how it can impact their lives in ways they might not otherwise imagine. The
course will further students’ understanding of the law, court procedures, civil liberties and the American
legal system. It will also increase proficiency in basic life skills, such as listening, public speaking, rote
memorization, reading, and analytical reasoning. Summer reading is required in this course. Students are
required to think independently and develop their advocacy skills regardless of which side of an issue is
being presented. Most importantly, the course will promote better communication and cooperation between
the student, Chelmsford High School, and the legal profession. Students who take Common Law and Trial
Procedures II will be required to participate in the Massachusetts Bar Association’s Mock Trial program.
This unique experience will heighten the student’s consciousness of law-related professions and the
academic students which lead to those professions. Many schools in the state participate in this competition
based program, including well known educational facilities from the private sector. Students who have
participated in this program in the past have thoroughly enjoyed it. Common Law and Trial Procedures II is
available to seniors who have taken CLTP I during their junior year.
THE HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE STUDIES: A STUDY IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR-H2
10 Credits (#38423)
This course, open to Juniors and Seniors, will provide students with an opportunity to study events in
Germany before, during, and after World War II that relate to the attempted extermination of the Jews.
Appropriate print materials, films, and guest speakers will be used to help the students understand the
causes of and the nature of the Holocaust. A sociological approach will allow students to see how
individuals and small groups were influenced by man's inhumanity to man. Comparisons will be made with
other events and situations. It is hoped that students will learn to recognize and move actively to eliminate
factors which create a climate which allows racism or genocide in any form to occur.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS—Honors
10 Credits (#38823)
This Honors level course is for seniors interested in the United States and its role in international affairs.
Students will attain a global perspective and understanding of international issues including the rise of
nations, colonialism, and government practices. Students will examine world events such as environmental
concerns, coups, treaties, peace accords, genocides, natural disasters, failed states, terrorism, zones of chaos,
and resource wars. Through lively dialogue and debate, students will analyze and attempt to resolve
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conflicts and determine the role of the United States in global affairs. Students appropriate for this course
should enjoy group discussions, independent research, and the complexity of international issues. Although
the course is designed for seniors, juniors in excellent academic standing may also enroll in the course.
LEGAL RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
5 Credits (#36034)
This is a practical law course which deals with the most basic principles of individual rights and the judicial
process as it affects the daily life of a student. It is designed to acquaint students with various aspects of law
such as criminal law, juvenile law, drug laws and the court system and how it works. Attention will also be
given to correctional institutions, and their effectiveness. The major part of this one-semester course will
focus on a student's individual rights and responsibilities as they affect him/her today. It will also include
relevant films, guest speakers and field trips to local courts or correctional institutions.
AP PSYCHOLOGY
10 Credits (#37013)
This college level course is designed to introduce students to the biological and theoretical foundations of
Psychology. The course will cover material ranging from the historical roots of this social science to the
anatomical structure and function of the brain and sense organs. Emphasis will be placed on investigative
research, analysis, interpretation, and writing skills. Students will explore the concepts that today’s
psychologists are continuing to investigate. Students will be expected to take on the demands of a college
level course, including additional reading assignments during the summer and throughout the school year.
Students are required to purchase a copy of Lauren Slater’s “Opening Skinner’s Box” and read the book
prior to the first class meeting in September. Test taking and writing skills will be addressed throughout the
course to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Psychology Exam in May.
PSYCHOLOGY I
5 Credits (#36824)
This course for juniors and seniors is designed to introduce students to the biological and theoretical
foundations of psychology. The course will encourage students to develop analytical skills, conduct
research, investigate the mind-body connection, analyze the concepts of consciousness, evaluate the theories
of personality, develop an understanding of psychological disorders, evaluate the role and effectiveness of
treatments, and analyze the theories of intelligence. Students will be expected to demonstrate their
understanding of psychology through various projects, discussions, and assignments.
PSYCHOLOGY II
5 Credits (#36924)
This semester course allows students who have successfully completed Psychology I to expand their
knowledge in this discipline. The course will cover such topics as, sensation and perception, motivation and
emotion, learning, human development, and personality. This course provides an in depth study of current
psychological issues. Emphasis is placed on research, analysis, interpretation, and writing skills. Students
planning to major in the social sciences in college should consider taking this course. This course is open to
students who have completed Psychology I.
SOCIOLOGY
5 Credits (#36424)
Sociology is strongly recommended for college-bound juniors and seniors. It is designed to aid students in
understanding today's dynamic and rapidly changing world. This course has been developed to show the
complexity of social life with its interconnections between social events and conditions. It includes a study
of major social institutions, socialization, social stratification and the relationship of the personality
problems of youth to these social forces. Through a series of experiments and research projects, students
explore some examples of the sorts of problems sociologists study and their methods of solving them.
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DEBATE I
5 Credits (#34024)
Semester I. This course is open to freshman through seniors. The course is designed to introduce students to
the field of competitive debate, or its academic name: argumentation. This course is for those students
want to learn how to speak effectively and develop strong analytical skills, not only in speaking but also in
writing. The skills developed in these events transfer into business, public relations, and law and
government. Students will explore the elements of debate: its basics, it structure, the rules of competitive
debate, resolution analysis, research and the selection and evaluation of evidence, construction of a case, its
delivery, its defense in cross examination, and final summary and defense. Students will be exposed basic
logic through case construction and defense and the examination of fallacies of argument.
This course will focus on preparing students for Public Forum Debate. Public Forum Debate is a form of
debate that follows current events and policy issues. It is designed to involve a team of two, is fast-paced.
Resolutions are established by the National Forensics League, with resolutions changing monthly. Students
will participate in mock debate in class, following the rules of Public Forum Debate as established by the
Massachusetts Speech and Debate League. Students who enroll in the course must compete in Public Forum in at least
two MSDL tournaments during the time of the course, following the MSDL rules and expectations. Advanced students,
only those with previous competitive debate experience may work toward Lincoln Douglas debate,
following along with the class when appropriate, and preparing their cases based on the current resolution as
established by the NFL.
COMPETITIVE SPEECH
5 Credits (#34224)
Semester II. This course is open to freshman through seniors. This course is designed to introduce students
to various competitive speech events offered through Speech and Debate. The course will introduce
students to Interpretive and Platform Events – Interpretive Events include: Humorous Interpretation,
Dramatic Interpretation, Prose and Play Reading, Poetry, Impromtu, Duo Interpretation, Children’s
Literature etc. Platform Events include: Original Oratory, Declamation, Extemporaneous Speaking, Radio
Broadcasting, etc. Additionally, the class may explore special events such as: Multiple, Lyric Poetry,
Impromptu Multiple, etc as posted for specific tournaments. Students will participate in a variety of these
events, learn the rules and expectations of each event (as established by the Massachusetts Speech and
Debate League), work on piece selection and cutting, character and voice development, posture and poise,
movement within the piece, and delivery. The skills developed in these events transfer into business, the
media, the theater, and public relations. Students who participate in the course must participate in at least
two MSDL tournaments during the time of the course, following the MSDL rules and expectations. The
students will be able to choose which events they wish to compete in from the variety of events offered at
each tournament.
AP WORLD HISTORY
10 Credits (#32313)
The purpose of the AP World History course is for students to develop greater understanding of how the
world changed over time. It considers specific events like Columbus landing in the Americas or the Mongol
take-over of Asia and looks to considers and analyzed their effects. Student understanding of change is
advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course
also emphasizes comparison of various regions of the world. Social, political, environmental, and cultural
themes provide organization to the course, along with consistent attention to contacts among societies that
form the core of World History as a field of study.
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SPECIAL EDUCATION
RESOURCE AND LEARNING CENTER
LITERATURE AND WHOLE LANGUAGE I – Grade 9
10 Credits (#92003)
LITERATURE AND WHOLE LANGUAGE 2 – Grade 10
10 Credits (#92103)
Literature and Whole Language 1 & 2 offers students with special needs a holistic, language-based
instruction that integrates reading, writing, vocabulary, listening, communication, and critical thinking
skills. Classic popular and literary works, including short stories, essays, plays, novels, and novellas are used
as the foundation for skills instruction. Opportunities are provided for individualized instruction,
cooperative learning, and the development of language-related peer interaction skills. Individual class
presentations allow each student to develop essential public speaking skills. Integrated into each of the units
are grammar lessons, structured systematic multi-sensory writing methodologies, test-taking strategies,
reading strategies, and vocabulary. Vocabulary development supports both the reading material as well as
appropriate words for essay composition with regards to character development. Technology is
incorporated into the learning environment (word processing, graphic organizers, audio books), and the
instruction is diversified to meet the individual learning style and needs of each student.
LITERATURE AND WHOLE LANGUAGE 3 – Grade 11
10 credits (#92503)
LITERATURE AND WHOLE LANGUAGE 4 – Grade 12
10 credits (#92703)
Literature and Whole Language 3 & 4, like Literature Whole Language 1 & 2, offers students with special
needs with a holistic, language based instruction that integrates reading, writing, vocabulary, listening,
communication, and critical thinking skills. American Literature is the focus, as in English 11.
Integrated into each of the four course units are grammar lessons, structured systematic multi-sensory
writing methodologies and reading and test –taking strategies. Technology is incorporated into the learning
environment (word processing, graphic organizers, audio books), and instruction is diversified to meet the
individual learning style and needs of each student.
STUDY SKILLS FOUNDATIONS
10 Credits (#91301, #91302, #91303)
The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive study skills curriculum to students. The course
applies theory and practice from many academic disciplines and is designed so that students develop study
skills to improve academic and work performance, based on their learning styles. They are provided several
application opportunities based on self-assessments in topics such as time management, memory, oral
communications, reading, writing, note taking, critical thinking, test taking and research techniques.
Through an assessment process, students will gain a clearer, more realistic picture of where they are on the
educational ladder and what they need to do in order to grow and succeed. Students enter their next level
class motivated, prepared to work, and ready to take charge of their educational journey.
STUDY SKILLS
10 Credits (#91001,91002, 91003)
Study Skills is a special education course for recommended students with specific learning needs as
determined through the Special Education Team Evaluation Process. The purpose of this course is to
provide specifically designed instruction to address the student’s areas of difficulty. The student will learn
organizational skills and study skill strategies to address areas of weakness. Transition planning, time
management, memory strategies, communication, reading, writing, math and test taking strategies will be
taught, reviewed, and reinforced through the application of learned strategies in the student’s regular
education curriculum.
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TRANSITIONS 1
5 Credits (#92204)
Transitions 1 is designed to meet the needs of special education students who require support in
generalizing strategies and information that will aid in their transition from high school to suitable postsecondary education, training and/or employment. This course will emphasize the following transitional
services: pragmatic language, social and communication skills, organization, self-advocacy skills, vocational
as well as travel training. The program is aimed primarily at juniors and seniors who are unclear about
available career, work, and/or educational options or are indefinite about post-high school plans. The
program will develop self-assessment techniques for students relative to lifestyle and career goals, and
examine college and community resources available to attain these goals.
TRANSITIONS 2
5 Credits (#92204)
Transitions 2 continues to build on the skills learned in Transitions 1, and is designed to continue to meet
the needs of special education students who require support in generalizing strategies and information that
will aid in their transition from high school to suitable post-secondary education, training and/or
employment. Transitions 2 will further emphasize the following transitional services: pragmatic language,
social and communication skills, organization, self-advocacy skills, vocational as well as travel training.
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to describe the components of a successful
lifestyle; identify their internal and external motivating drives; identify their personal preferences, interests,
strengths and weaknesses; formulate meaningful and attainable goals; develop a detailed plan of action for
success in college and life; identify obstacles that hinder post-secondary success; and describe techniques for
overcoming obstacles in college and life.
WRITING WORKSHOP
10 Credits (#92603)
Writing Workshop is a course intended to provide students with special needs focused writing instruction
centered on content, form, mechanics, and sentence structure. A specialized instructional methodology will
systematically guide students through all stages of the writing process by employing a series of questions and
strategies that build on one another. Together, these questions and strategies will enable students to
evaluate and analyze their assignments, see the organizational patterns of their thinking, transfer their
thinking into structured text, and evaluate their written work before handing in a final paper. An emphasis
on writer reflection and peer response will also help students to develop the skills they need to reach their
writing goals. Students will apply this methodology to prepare for the MCAS test, and will be required to
write answers to long composition and open response questions similar to those on the state-wide test.
Prerequisite: Literature/Whole Language 1
The High School Special Education Program, in compliance with the Comprehensive Special Education
Law, hosts a full range of services to the high school community.
These services include:
1.
2.
An Evaluation Team whose purpose is to identify any special needs that a student might have.
An Academic Resource Program designed to cater to the individual academic and emotional needs
of students.
3. A Life Skills Resource Program designed to assist student with special needs in the development and
refinement of the knowledge and skills necessary toachieve his/her full potential at home, in school,
in the community, and in a supported work environment. This program stresses the practical
application of academics and life skills.
4. A Learning Disabilities Program that applies theory and practice from many academic disciplines and
is designed so that students develop compensatory strategies and study skills to be effective learners,
to improve academic performance, and to reach their academic potential.
5. A Student Assistance Program that serves students returning to Chelmsford High School from an
outside placement and special education students in need of more intensive social/emotional
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6.
7.
8.
support. This program addresses the social, emotional and academic needs of these students to
insure success at CHS.
A Speech and Language Development Program designed to remediate needs in a student's ability to
understand and use language skills.
An In-depth Counseling Program designed to assist students and their families in meeting and
solving personal problems as they arise.
Related services to assist students' needs in the areas of occupational therapy, physical therapy,
adaptive physical education, visual therapy and mobility.
WORLD LANGUAGE
To address the challenges of living in a global society, the World Language Department offers classes that
develop and refine communication skills, promote intellectual curiosity, and broaden cultural awareness.
During each course within a target language sequence, students are expected to master specific linguistic and
cultural proficiencies which embody the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and
presentational. A variety of instructional strategies, visual and print media sources, and technology tools are
used to recreate an authentic learning environment. As students advance through a language sequence, they
are introduced to some of the history and literature associated with their selected language and they begin to
use critical thinking skills to make connections between different countries and cultures. Active
participation in class discussions and completion of assignments beyond classroom instruction are essential
aspects to being successful and achieving proficiency in another language. To prepare our graduates to
become citizens of the world, students at Chelmsford High School are required to study two sequential
years of language, are strongly recommended to study a third and fourth year, and are encouraged to study
an additional language.
FRENCH 1—H2
10 Credits (#41023)
This introductory course is designed to expose students to the language and cultures of the French-speaking
world. Students will develop basic proficiency in the three modes of communication: interpersonal,
interpretive, and presentational. In highly structured and contextualized situations, students will learn to ask
and answer simple questions as they communicate about themselves, their families, and their friends. They
will hold basic conversations about school, food preferences, fashion trends, and vacation plans, and they
will respond to written prompts about their daily lives and responsibilities. There is a strong emphasis on
vocabulary acquisition and verb conjugation at this level. French will be used as much as possible during
classroom instruction.
It is recommended that students who choose French 1-H2 on the course selection sheet also make an alternative language
selection. For incoming Grade 9 students who studied French in middle school, participation in this course is by teacher
recommendation.
FRENCH 2
10 Credits (2H - #41313; 2H2 - #41323)
This level is designed for students who have successfully completed Grade 8 French at the middle school
level or introductory French at Chelmsford High School. Students will continue to develop proficiency in
the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. In structured and
culturally contextualized situations, students will use the language practically and creatively to describe,
50
gather and clarify information, and express opinions. Students will converse and write about topics relating
to holiday gatherings, food preparation, daily routines, and academic choices. They may discuss and analyze
the fairytales of Charles Perrault. Students will continue to expand their vocabulary base and increase their
knowledge of verb conjugation. Class will be conducted primarily in French.
Participation in the Honors level is by teacher recommendation.
FRENCH 3
10 Credits (3H - #41513; 3H2 - #41523)
This intermediate level is designed for students who have successfully completed French 2. Students will
continue to develop proficiency in the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and
presentational. In more open-ended and culturally relevant situations, students will use the language
practically and creatively to complete a variety of tasks relating to childhood memories, entertainment, and
healthy lifestyles. To expand the number and type of situations in which students can function using the
language, students will continue to broaden their vocabulary base and expand their knowledge of verb tense
and conjugation. Students will read and discuss typical childhood antics in the stories of Le petit Nicolas.
They may analyze excerpts from the works of Marcel Pagnol as well as select fables by La Fontaine. Class
will be conducted in French.
Participation in the Honors level is by teacher recommendation.
FRENCH 4
10 Credits (4H - #42013; 4H2 - #42023)
This intermediate level is designed for students who have successfully completed French 3. Students will
continue to build proficiency in the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and
presentational. In open-ended and culturally contextualized situations, students will narrate and discuss,
question and debate, and reach consensus on topics which explore the question of individual identity in
relation to society. Themes to be explored include education and career choices, advertising and the media,
art and technology, and health. Students will watch select audiovisual clips, discuss news articles, and
analyze authentic literary sources spanning several centuries. Vocabulary acquisition will be guided by topics
discussed in class and grammar explanations will highlight exceptions. Class will be conducted exclusively in
French.
Depending on enrollment requests, French 4H may be offered concurrently with AP French and/or French 4H2 may be
offered concurrently with French 6H2. Alternative curriculum choices and rotating course syllabi will be offered in such
circumstances. Participation in the Honors course is by teacher recommendation.
AP FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
10 Credits (#42913)
This course is designed for students who have successfully completed French 5 Honors. This course will
continue to build proficiency in the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and
presentational. Expanding themes begun in prior courses, students will continue to explore the question of
identity and how it is conveyed across a range of domains including politics, family, and the environment.
Students will watch select film clips, analyze fiction and non-fiction texts, and interpret data. They will
evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of print and media sources and will respond verbally and
in writing to culturally-contextualized concepts, themes, and ideas introduced in class. AP French is the
equivalent of a third year college conversation and composition class. This course prepares to take the AP
French Language and Culture exam at the end of senior year. This course will be conducted exclusively in
French.
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Depending on enrollment requests, this course may be offered concurrently with French 4 Honors. Alternative curriculum
choices and rotating course syllabi will be offered in such circumstances. Participation in this course is by teacher
recommendation.
FRENCH 6— H2
10 Credits (#42623)
This course is designed for students who have successfully completed French 5-H2. Students will continue
to build proficiency in the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational.
In open-ended and culturally-relevant situations, students will continue to improve their creative and
practical use of the language. They will investigate and debate topics relating to politics, the arts, the
environment, and social relationships. Students will continue to increase their vocabulary base and expand
their knowledge of French grammar to allow them to function in a variety of new situations. This course
will be conducted exclusively in French.
Depending on enrollment requests, this course may be offered concurrently with French 4-H2. Alternative curriculum choices
and rotating course syllabi will be offered in such circumstances.
SPANISH 1—H2
10 Credits (#43023)
This introductory course is designed to expose students to the language and cultures of the Spanishspeaking world. Students will develop basic proficiency in the three modes of communication:
interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. In highly structured and contextualized situations, students
will learn to ask and answer simple questions as they communicate about themselves, their families, and
their friends. They will hold basic conversations about their homes, favorite restaurants, fashion preferences,
and vacation destinations and they will respond to written prompts about their daily lives and
responsibilities. There is a strong emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and verb conjugation at this level.
Spanish will be used as much as possible during classroom instruction.
It is recommended that students who choose Spanish 1-H2 on the course selection sheet also make an alternative language
selection. For incoming Grade 9 students who studied Spanish in middle school, participation in this course is by teacher
recommendation.
SPANISH 2
10 Credits (2H - #43313; 2H2 - #43323; 2 - #43333)
This level is designed for students who have successfully completed Grade 8 Spanish at the middle school
level or introductory Spanish at Chelmsford High School. Students will continue to develop proficiency in
the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. In structured and
culturally contextualized situations, students will use the language practically and creatively to describe,
gather and clarify information, and express opinions. Students will converse and write about topics relating
to daily routines, healthy lifestyles, and residential life. They may discuss and analyze authentic legends from
a variety of Spanish-speaking regions. Students will continue to expand their vocabulary base and increase
their knowledge of verb conjugation. Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish.
Participation in the Honors level as well as in the level 3 course is by teacher recommendation.
SPANISH 3
10 Credits (3H - #43513; 3H2 - 43523; 3 - #43533)
This intermediate level is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish 2. Students will
continue to develop proficiency in the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and
52
presentational. In more open-ended and culturally relevant situations, students will use the language
practically and creatively to complete a variety of tasks relating to childhood memories, shopping, and the
environment. To expand the number and type of situations in which the students can function using the
language, students will continue to broaden their vocabulary base and expand their knowledge of verb tense
and conjugation. Students may read and discuss excerpts from select short stories and novels. Class will be
conducted in Spanish.
Participation in the Honors level as well as in the level 3 course is by teacher recommendation.
SPANISH 4
10 Credits (4H - #44013; 4H2 - #44023)
This intermediate level is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish 3. Students will
continue to build proficiency in the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and
presentational. In open-ended and culturally contextualized situations, students will narrate and discuss,
question and debate, and reach consensus on a variety of topics which relate to social relationships,
education, the media, and technology. Students will consider a variety of authentic text sources and watch
select film and video clips. Students will continue to build their vocabulary and expand their knowledge of
verb tenses and other grammatical topics relevant to the themes discussed in class. Class will be conducted
exclusively in Spanish.
Participation in the Honors level is by teacher recommendation.
AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
10 Credits (#44913)
This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish 5 Honors. This course will
continue to build proficiency in the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and
presentational. Students will read and analyze selected literary excerpts and be exposed to authentic realia to
increase their knowledge of Spanish language, history and culture. Students will learn to evaluate and
synthesize information from a variety of media sources. Students will respond verbally and in writing to
culturally-contextualized concepts, themes, and ideas presented in class. AP Spanish is the equivalent of a
third year college conversation and composition class. This course prepares students to take the AP Spanish
Language and Culture exam at the end of senior year. This course is will be conducted exclusively in
Spanish.
Participation in this course is by teacher recommendation.
SPANISH 6—H2
10 Credits (#44723)
This course is for students who have successfully completed Spanish 5-H2. Students will continue to build
proficiency in the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. In openended and culturally-relevant situations, students will continue to improve their creative and practical use of
the language. They will investigate and debate topics relating to personal relationships, family ancestry,
career formation, and the media. Students will continue to increase their vocabulary base and expand their
knowledge of Spanish grammar to allow them to function in a variety of new situations. This course will be
conducted exclusively in Spanish.
LATIN 1—H2
10 Credits (#46023)
This course is designed to introduce students to the structures and syntax of the Latin language, with
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particular focus on the case system and verb conjugation. Students will develop basic reading and
translation skills as they analyze short, culturally-relevant passages. Students are introduced to the culture
and history of Ancient Rome as they begin to consider how Roman civilization has influenced Western
civilization.
It is recommended that students who choose Latin 1-H2 on the course selection sheet also make an alternative language
selection.
LATIN 2— H 2
10 Credits (#46223)
This course is designed for students who wish to increase their knowledge of the structures and syntax of
the Latin language, with particular focus on case usage and verb tense. Reading and translation skills will be
further developed as students continue to explore the history of Roman civilization through select passages.
LATIN 3— H2
10 Credits (#46423)
This course is designed for students who wish to expand and refine their knowledge of the structures and
syntax of the Latin language. Word order will be studied in depth. Reading and translation skills will be
strengthened as students continue to learn about Roman civilization and famous Roman figures.
Communication in class will be in both Latin and English.
LATIN 4—H2
10 Credits (#46623)
This course is designed for students who wish to expand their knowledge of the history of Latin literature.
Students will read passages, in authentic and adapted Latin verse, by Catullus, Virgil, Horace, and Ovid.
Students will study advanced grammar concepts and continue to expand their vocabulary base within the
context of their readings. Students will discuss concepts and themes from the readings and apply them to
contemporary society. Communication in class will be in both Latin and English.
TECH PREP & NON-TECH PREP ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS
Chelmsford High School presently has articulation agreements with Anna Maria College, Middlesex
Community College, Northern Essex Community College, Johnson & Wales University, New Hampshire
Community Technical College (Nashua & Manchester), and Mount Wachusett Community College. These
agreements allow students at Chelmsford High School to receive college credit from the above academic
institutions.
If you have taken any of the following courses and plan on attending Middlesex Community College,
check with your guidance counselors for possible college credit.
 Childhood Education 1 & 2
 Industrial Technology/Engineering Drawing
 Computer Graphics 1
 Financial Planning
 Marketing
 Microsoft Applications 1&2
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If you have taken any of the following courses and plan on attending Northern Essex Community
College, check with your guidance counselor for possible college credit.
 Industrial Technology/Engineering Drawing
If you have taken any of the following courses and plan on attending Johnson and Wales University,
check with your guidance counselor for possible college credit.
 Marketing
 Management
 Accounting
If you have taken any of the following courses and plan on attending Manchester Community Technical
College (Manchester, NH), check with your guidance counselor for possible college credit.
 Architectural Drawing 1 & 2
 Construction Technology 1 & 2
If you have taken any of the following courses and plan on attending Nashua Community Technical
College (Nashua, NH), check with your guidance counselor for possible college credit.
 Early Childhood Education 1 & 2
If you have taken any of the following courses and plan on attending Mount Wachusett Community
College, check with your guidance counselor for possible college credit.
 Architectural Drawing 1 & 2
 Industrial Technology/Engineering Drawing
 Construction Technology 1 & 2
If you have taken the course below and plan on attending Anna Maria College, check with your guidance
counselor for possible college credit.
 Legal Rights & Responsibilities
If you have taken any of the following courses and plan on attending the New England Institute of
Technology (Warwick, RI), check with your guidance counselor for possible college credit.
Construction Design Program:
 Construction Technology 1
 Construction Technology 2
For all of the above requirements, students must meet the college entrance requirements and be a
matriculated student with the college and receive grades of 80% (B) or better in the course(s) in
order to be assigned credit and/or Advance Placement. The awarding of college credit is not
guaranteed but is subject to annual college policies and practices.
55
GUIDANCE
Questions about course selections and/or levels for students in the Class of 2018 should be directed to the
counselors at the student’s middle school.
McCarthy Middle School
Parker Middle School
Ms. Suzanne YatesScott
Ms. Mellissa MacIsaac
978-251-5122
[email protected]
978-251-5133
[email protected]
Questions about course selections and/or levels for students in the Classes of 2016, 2017, and 2018 should
be directed to the student’s counselor at the high school. Counselor assignments are according to the
student’s last name and house assignment at Chelmsford High School (978) 251-5111:
Emerson House
Emerson House
Hawthorne House
Hawthorne House
Whittier House
Whittier House
A through K
L through Z
A through K
L through Z
A through K
L through Z
Ms. Mariclare O’Neal
Ms. Debra Boudreau
Ms. Tammy Leary
Ms. Christine Lima
Ms. Ilene Rodman
Mr. Michael Fanning
Ext. 5522
Ext. 5519
Ext. 5585
Ext. 5603
Ext. 5547
Ext. 5560
DEPARTMENT COORDINATORS
Curriculum-related questions should be directed to the corresponding Department Coordinator (978) 2515111 at the following extensions:
English
Fine & Performing Arts
Guidance
Libraries
Mathematics
Physical Education,
Family and Consumer
Science, Health
Practical Arts:
Business & Media
Reading and ESL
Science and
Technology/Engineering
Social Studies
Special Education
World Language
Linda Hirsch
Christina Whittlesey
Thomas Wright
Valerie Diggs
Matthew Beyranevand
Kathryn Simes
Ext. 4272
Ext. 4274
Ext. 4278
Ext. 5686
Ext. 4372
Ext. 4376
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Marilyn Sweeney
Ext. 5639
[email protected]
Katie Novak
John Kittredge
Ext. 4366
Ext. 5661
[email protected]
[email protected]
Stephanie Quinn
Marla de la Cruz
Sharon Charbonnier
Ext. 4362
Ext. 5584
Ext. 4373
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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