HPE StoreVirtual Storage Remote Copy User Guide

HPE StoreVirtual Storage Remote Copy User Guide
HPE StoreVirtual Storage Remote
Copy User Guide
Abstract
This guide provides information about configuring and using asynchronous replication of storage volumes and snapshots across
geographic distances.
For the latest version of this guide, see the Hewlett Packard Enterprise website http://www.hpe.com/support/StoreVirtualManuals.
Part Number: AX696-10026R
Published: November 2015
Edition: 11
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Revision History
Revision 1
September 2009
First edition
Revision 2
March 2010
Third edition. Rebranded to HP StorageWorks P4000.
Revision 3
November 2010
Fourth edition. Updated with changes for the SAN/iQ software 9.0 release.
Revision 4
September 2011
Fifth edition. Updated with rebranding to HP P4000 for the SAN/iQ software 9.5 release.
Revision 5
November 2012
Sixth edition. Updated with rebranding to HP LeftHand Storage for the SAN/iQ software 10.0 release.
Revision 6
March 2013
Seventh edition. Updated with rebranding to HP StoreVirtual Storage for the LeftHand OS software 10.5 release.
Revision 7
September 2013
Eighth edition. Updated for the LeftHand OS 11.0 release.
Revision 8
January 2015
Ninth edition. Updated for the LeftHand OS 12.0 release.
Revision 9
August 2015
Tenth edition. Updated with changes to the Failover/Failback wizard and additional troubleshooting.
Revision 10
November 2015
Eleventh edition. Updated Hewlett Packard Enterprise references.
Contents
1 Understanding and planning HPE StoreVirtual Storage Remote Copy...............4
How Remote Copy works.....................................................................................................................4
Uses for Remote Copy.........................................................................................................................5
Benefits of Remote Copy......................................................................................................................5
Graphical representations of Remote Copy..........................................................................................6
Planning Remote Copy.........................................................................................................................7
Application-managed snapshots...........................................................................................................7
Remote Copy schedules.......................................................................................................................7
Testing the copy time............................................................................................................................8
Using schedules for Remote Copy.......................................................................................................9
2 Using Remote Copy..........................................................................................10
Working with remote snapshots..........................................................................................................10
Monitoring remote snapshots.............................................................................................................17
Scheduling remote snapshots............................................................................................................20
Best practices for scheduling remote snapshots................................................................................20
Creating the schedule.........................................................................................................................20
Pausing and resuming scheduled snapshots.....................................................................................22
Editing the schedule to remote snapshot a volume............................................................................23
Deleting the remote snapshot schedule.............................................................................................24
Failover and failback using Remote Copy..........................................................................................24
Using the Volume Failover/Failback Wizard.......................................................................................24
Resuming production after failover.....................................................................................................25
Rolling back primary and remote volumes.........................................................................................27
Using remote snapshots for data migration and data mining.............................................................28
Disassociating remote management groups......................................................................................29
Troubleshooting Remote Copy...........................................................................................................29
3 Sample Remote Copy configurations................................................................30
Using Remote Copy for business continuance...................................................................................30
Using Remote Copy for off-site backup and recovery........................................................................37
Using Remote Copy for data migration or cloning..............................................................................42
4 Support and other resources.............................................................................45
Accessing Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support.................................................................................45
Accessing updates..............................................................................................................................45
Websites.............................................................................................................................................45
Customer self repair...........................................................................................................................46
Remote support..................................................................................................................................46
Documentation feedback....................................................................................................................46
Glossary...............................................................................................................47
Index.....................................................................................................................53
Contents
3
1 Understanding and planning HPE StoreVirtual Storage
Remote Copy
How Remote Copy works
Remote Copy provides a powerful and flexible method for reproducing data and keeping that
replicated data available for disaster recovery, business continuance, backup and recovery, data
migration, and data mining.
Remote Copy uses the existing volume and snapshot features with replication across geographic
distances to create remote snapshots. The geographic distance can be local (in the same data
center or on the same campus), metro (in the same city), or long distance (cross-country, global).
•
Remote Copy works at the management group, cluster, volume, and snapshot levels.
◦
◦
Management groups
–
Create remote snapshots in the same management group or in a different
management group than the primary volume.
–
If using different management groups, set local bandwidth priority of the remote
management group to determine the maximum rate of data transfer to the remote
snapshot.
–
Event notification tells you when copies complete or fail. It also notifies you if a
remote volume or snapshot is made primary or if the status of the connection
between management groups containing primary and remote volumes changes.
Clusters
–
◦
◦
Create remote snapshots in the same cluster or in a cluster different from the
primary volume.
Volumes
–
Primary volumes contain the data to be copied to the remote snapshot.
–
Data is copied to the remote snapshot via the remote volume.
–
The remote volume is a pointer to the remote snapshot. The remote volume has a
size of 0 bytes.
Snapshots
–
After data is copied from the primary snapshot to the remote snapshot, the remote
snapshot behaves as a regular snapshot.
–
Snapshots can be regular snapshots or application-managed snapshots.
•
Both the primary and completed remote snapshots are the same as regular snapshots.
•
Remote Copy can be used on the same site, even in the same management group and
cluster.
•
Remote Copy is an asynchronous replication of data. Network RAID is a synchronous
replication of data. Using synchronous Network RAID on multiple storage systems within a
cluster in combination with asynchronous Remote Copy on a different cluster of storage
systems creates a robust, high-availability configuration.
For example, the accounting department in the corporate headquarters in Chicago runs the
corporate accounting application and stores the resulting data. The designated backup site is in
Detroit. Nightly at 11:00 p.m., accounting updates are copied to the Detroit backup facility using
Remote Copy. Figure 1 (page 5) shows the basic flow of a Remote Copy operation.
4
Understanding and planning HPE StoreVirtual Storage Remote Copy
Reproducing data using Remote Copy follows a three-step process:
1. At the production location, create a snapshot of the primary volume. This is called the primary
snapshot.
2. Create a remote volume at the remote location.
3. Create a remote copy of the primary snapshot to the remote snapshot.
Figure 1 Basic flow of Remote Copy operation
For more information
HPE StoreVirtual Storage User Guide
Uses for Remote Copy
•
Business continuance and disaster recovery—Remote Copy stores remote snapshots
on a machine in a geographically separate location. The remote snapshots remain available
in the event of a site or system failure at the primary site.
•
Off-site backup and recovery—Remote Copy eliminates the backup window on an
application server by creating remote snapshots on a backup server, either local or remote,
and back up from that server.
•
Split mirror, data migration, content distribution—Remote Copy makes a complete copy
of one or more volumes without interrupting access to the original volumes. You can move
the copy of the volume to the location where it is needed.
•
Volume clone—Remote Copy creates copies of the original volume for use by other
application servers.
Benefits of Remote Copy
•
Remote Copy maintains the primary volume’s availability to application servers. Snapshots
on the primary volume are taken instantaneously, and are then copied to remote snapshots
in the off-site location.
•
Remote Copy operates at the block level, moving large amounts of data much more quickly
than file system copying.
Uses for Remote Copy
5
•
Snapshots are incremental, that is, snapshots save only those changes in the volume since
the last snapshot was created. Therefore, failback may need to resynchronize only the latest
changes rather than the entire volume.
•
Remote Copy is robust. If the network link goes offline during the process, copying resumes
where it left off when the link is restored.
Graphical representations of Remote Copy
The HPE StoreVirtual Centralized Management Console displays special graphical representations
of Remote Copy.
When the primary snapshot is copying to the remote snapshot, seen in Figure 2 (page 6), the
CMC depicts the process with a moving graphic of pages from the primary to the remote snapshot.
The pages move in the direction of the data flow from primary to remote snapshot.
Figure 2 Icons depicting the primary snapshot copying to the remote snapshot
The Graphical Legend window available from the HPE StoreVirtual Storage Online Help menu,
seen in Figure 3 (page 6), depicts the icons associated with Remote Copy.
Figure 3 Icons for Remote Copy in the Graphical Legend window
6
Understanding and planning HPE StoreVirtual Storage Remote Copy
Planning Remote Copy
•
Management groups and volumes
•
Application-managed snapshots vs point-in-time snapshots
volume set — application using two or more volumes
•
Bandwidth
•
Capacity
•
Schedules
•
Retention Policy
Application-managed snapshots
You can create remote application-managed snapshots that use the Application Aware Snapshot
Manager to quiesce the application before creating the remote snapshots. Application-managed
snapshots can be single snapshots or part of a volume set; that is, the application is using two
or more volumes. Because the application is quiesced, the data in the snapshot is consistent
with the application's view of the data. That is, no data was in flight or cached waiting to be written
when the application created the snapshot.
This option requires the use of the Application Aware Snapshot Manager. For more information
about the requirements for application-managed snapshots, see the section “Prerequisites for
application-managed snapshots” in the HPE StoreVirtual Storage User Guide or online help.
Remote Copy schedules
Scheduled remote snapshots provide fault tolerance for business continuance and disaster
recovery, and a consistent, predictable update of data for remote backup and recovery.
Planning for scheduled remote snapshots is critical. The following issues impact the amount of
storage available in the system:
•
Recurrence—How often do you want the snapshots created? The recurrence frequency
must account for the amount of time it takes to complete a remote snapshot. For example,
if your recurrence schedule is set for a new snapshot every four hours, you should ensure
that the time to copy that snapshot to the remote location is less than four hours. For one
possible method of testing remote copy time, see “Testing the copy time” (page 8).
•
Capacity—Does the cluster that contains the remote volume have sufficient space to
accommodate scheduled snapshots?
If the cluster does not have sufficient space available, the remote snapshot appears in the
CMC and flashes red. On the Details tab of the remote snapshot, the status message
displayed is Read only, not enough space in cluster to start copy.
•
Retention policies—How long do you want to retain the primary snapshots? The remote
snapshots? You can set different retention policies for the primary and remote snapshots.
For example, you can choose to retain two primary snapshots and five remote snapshots.
The number of snapshots retained refers to completed snapshots. Take the following
characteristics of scheduled remote snapshots into account when planning retention policies.
◦
The LeftHand OS software never deletes the last fully synchronized remote snapshot.
Under some circumstances, such as unpredictable network speeds or varying snapshot
size, a scheduled remote snapshot may create primary snapshots so frequently that
the remote copy process cannot keep up with them. The retention policies for scheduled
remote snapshots ensure that such factors do not cause primary and remote snapshots
to become unsynchronized. Regardless of the retention policy defined for scheduled
remote snapshots, up to two additional snapshots may be retained by the system at
Planning Remote Copy
7
any given time. These two additional snapshots include the snapshot that is in the
process of being copied and the last fully synchronized snapshot. A fully synchronized
snapshot is one that has completed copying so that the remote snapshot matches its
corresponding primary snapshot.
◦
Up to two additional snapshots may be retained at any given time.
Because the LeftHand OS software never deletes the last fully synchronized snapshot,
a remote copy schedule may retain n+2 copies for a retention policy of n (the currently
copying remote snapshot plus the last fully synchronized snapshot). Using the example
above, if you have a retention policy for your remote copy schedule of two primary and
five remote snapshots, the software may retain up to four primary and seven remote
snapshots for a period of time. Table 1 (page 8) shows the maximum retained
snapshots with respect to a specific retention policy.
Table 1 Snapshot retention policy and maximum number of retained snapshots
Scheduled remote snapshot retention policy
Maximum number of snapshots retained
n of primary snapshots x of remote snapshots
n + 2 of primary snapshots x + 2 of remote
snapshots
n of hours for primary snapshots x of hours for
remote snapshots
n + 2 primary snapshots older than nx + 2 remote
snapshots older than x
n of days for primary snapshots x of days for remote n + 2 primary snapshots older than nx + 2 remote
snapshots
snapshots older than x
n of weeks for primary snapshots x of weeks for
remote snapshots
◦
n + 2 primary snapshots older than nx + 2 remote
snapshots older than x
A remote snapshot is deleted only after its corresponding primary snapshot is deleted.
Additionally, a remote snapshot is deleted only after its counterpart primary snapshot.
You cannot retain fewer remote snapshots than primary snapshots when setting your
retention policies.
Over the course of time, through deletion of primary snapshots, if you accumulate more
remote snapshots than primary snapshots, the remote snapshots become regular
snapshots when their corresponding primary snapshots are deleted. You can identify
them as remote snapshots by their names, since the naming convention is established
as part of creating the remote snapshot schedule.
Testing the copy time
Run a test of the actual process. The first remote snapshot copies the entire volume so it takes
longer to copy. The second remote snapshot copies only changes made to the volume since the
first remote snapshot was taken. Create the second remote snapshot after the planned time
interval for the schedule. The copy time for the second remote snapshot is more representative
of the actual time required for copying subsequent remote snapshots.
To test the copy time:
1. Create a remote snapshot of the primary volume.
2. Wait for the copy to finish.
3. Create another remote snapshot of the primary volume.
4. Track the time required to complete the second remote snapshot. This is the minimum
amount of time that you should allow between scheduled copies.
8
Understanding and planning HPE StoreVirtual Storage Remote Copy
5.
6.
Change the remote bandwidth setting for the other management group by using the Edit
Management Group command. This setting affects the time required to copy a remote
snapshot.
Repeat steps 1 through 4 to measure the effect of a different bandwidth setting.
Using schedules for Remote Copy
Best practices
•
Retain at least two primary snapshots to ensure that only incremental copying is required
for remote snapshots.
•
Review your remote copy schedule to ensure that the frequency of the remote copies
correlates to the amount of time required to complete a copy.
Use the checklist in Table 2 (page 9) to help plan scheduled remote snapshots.
Table 2 Scheduled Remote Copy planning checklist
Configuration category Characteristic
Before you start
Scheduled snapshot
Start time
• Start date (mm/dd/yyyy) for the schedule to begin
• Start time (mm:hh:ss) for the schedule to begin
Recurrence
• Recurrence is a yes or no choice. Do you want to take a remote snapshot one time in
the future and not have it recur, or do you want a remote snapshot to be taken on a
regular schedule?
• Frequency (minutes, hours, days, or weeks) determines the interval between recurring,
scheduled, remote snapshots.
Primary setup
Retention
Select one of the following options:
• Maximum number of snapshots (#)
• Set period of time (minutes, hours, days, or weeks)
Remote setup
Management group
The management group that contains the remote snapshot
Volume
The remote volume for the remote snapshots
Retention
Select one of the following options:
• Maximum number of snapshots. This number equals completed snapshots only.
In-progress snapshots take additional space on the cluster while copying. Also, the
system will not delete the last fully synchronized snapshot. For space calculations,
figure n+2 where n=maximum number of snapshots.
• Set period of time (minutes, hours, days or weeks)
Using schedules for Remote Copy
9
2 Using Remote Copy
For information about how Remote Copy works and how to plan capacity for Remote Copy, see
“Understanding and planning remote copy” (page 4).
Working with remote snapshots
Remote snapshots are a core component of Remote Copy. Remote Copy uses the existing
volume and snapshot capabilities to copy data across geographic distances. Remote snapshots
require a remote volume, which may be created ahead of time.
Designating or creating the remote volume
Create a remote volume by using any of the following methods:
•
Make an existing volume into a remote volume.
•
Create a new remote volume while creating a remote snapshot.
•
Create a new volume from the cluster Details tab window, and then select Remote on the
Advanced tab of the New Volume window.
For more information about these methods of creating remote volumes, see “Creating a remote
volume” (page 13).
Creating a remote snapshot
You can either create a one-time remote snapshot or set up a schedule for recurring remote
snapshots. Many of the characteristics for either case are the same.
Create a remote snapshot by using the following steps:
1. Log in to the primary management group.
2. Log in to the remote management group.
3. Create a primary snapshot of the primary volume manually to create a single remote copy
snapshot. When setting up a schedule to create a remote snapshot of a volume, the software
automatically creates a primary snapshot, which is then copied to the remote volume.
4. Either create a remote volume on a remote management group, or select an existing remote
volume.
5. Create the remote snapshot.
Best practice
The best way to prepare for remote snapshots is to create the management group and volumes
that will be remote before taking the snapshot. Although the interface allows you to create volumes
and snapshots as you go, that may be a distraction at the time a crucial snapshot is needed.
Getting there
Navigate to the New Remote Snapshot window where remote copy procedures start.
1. In the navigation window, log in to the management group that contains the primary volume
or snapshot for which you are creating the remote snapshot.
2. Log in to the remote management group.
3. In the navigation window, select the primary volume (or snapshot).
To copy an existing snapshot to a remote management group, select that snapshot at this
step.
4.
10
Click Snapshot Tasks, and then select New Remote Snapshot.
Using Remote Copy
Creating the primary snapshot
1.
In the Primary Snapshot Setup box, click New Snapshot.
If you selected a snapshot to start the process, you do not need to create a new snapshot.
2.
3.
(Optional) If you are using the Application Aware Snapshot Manager and want to quiesce
the application before creating the snapshot, select Application-Managed Snapshot.
Enter a name for the snapshot or accept the default.
TIP: Make the beginning of volume and snapshot names meaningful, for example,
“Snap1Exchg_03.”
4.
5.
(Optional) Enter a description of the snapshot.
Click OK to return to the New Remote Snapshot window.
The information for the primary snapshot is pre-filled. For example, the text for Snapshot
Name changed from “Create Primary Snapshot” to “HdqtrsLogs_SS_1”.
6.
In the Remote Snapshot Setup box, select the remote management group and volume.
If you need to create a volume, click New Remote Volume.
7.
8.
9.
In the Snapshot Name box, enter the name for the remote snapshot.
(Optional) Enter a description for the remote snapshot.
Click OK in the New Remote Snapshot window.
The remote copy of the primary snapshot to the remote volume begins.
Figure 4 Remote Copy in progress
Working with remote snapshots
11
Creating primary snapshots for volume sets
When you create an application-managed snapshot of a volume in a volume set, the software
recognizes that the volume is part of a volume set, and prompts you to create a snapshot for
each volume in the volume set. The result is a snapshot set that corresponds to the volume set.
To see any associated snapshots, select a snapshot, click the Details tab, and look at the Snapshot
Set field.
For information about the requirements for application-managed snapshots, see the HPE
StoreVirtual Storage User Guide.
NOTE: After you create snapshots for a volume set, typically you do not want to delete individual
snapshots from the snapshot set. You want to keep or delete all snapshots for the volume set.
If you need to roll back to a snapshot, you want to roll back each volume in the volume set to its
corresponding snapshot. The system gives you the option to automatically delete or roll back all
associated volumes.
To create primary snapshots for volume sets:
1. Select a volume that is part of a volume set for the snapshot.
2. Log in to the management group that contains the volume for which you want to create a
snapshot.
3. right-click the volume and then select New Remote Snapshot.
4. Click New Snapshot.
5. Select Application-Managed Snapshot.
The software fills in the Description field and disables the Assign and Unassign Servers
button automatically. You can assign servers after the snapshot is created.
6.
7.
Enter a name for the snapshot or accept the default.
Click OK.
The New Snapshot—Associated Volumes window opens with a list of all volumes in the
volume set.
8.
(Optional) Edit the Snapshot Name for each snapshot.
NOTE: Be sure to leave the Application-Managed Snapshots check box selected. This
option quiesces the application before creating the snapshots. If you deselect the option,
the system creates a point-in-time snapshot of each volume listed.
9. (Optional) Edit the Description for each snapshot.
10. Click Create Snapshots to create a snapshot of each volume.
The Primary—Remote window opens with the list of the snapshots you just created. The
first snapshot is already selected.
11. In the Remote Snapshot Setup box, select the remote management group and volume for
the selected snapshot.
NOTE:
If you need to create a volume, select New Remote Volume.
12. In the Snapshot Name field, enter the name for this remote snapshot or accept the default.
13. (Optional) Enter a description for this remote snapshot.
14. Click Update Pending Table Below to add this remote snapshot setup to the list at the
bottom of the window.
The system selects the next volume in the Select Primary Snapshot list at the top of the
window.
15. Select or enter the Volume Name, Snapshot Name, and Snapshot Description for this remote
snapshot.
12
Using Remote Copy
IMPORTANT:
group.
All remote snapshots must be set up to use the same remote management
16. Click Update Pending Table Below to add this remote snapshot setup to the list at the
bottom of the window.
17. Continue until each snapshot at the top of the window is set up.
A green check mark shows the snapshot is set up.
18. Click Create Remote Copies.
The remote copy of the primary snapshots to the remote volumes begins.
Creating a remote volume
You can create a remote volume by using the following methods:
•
Designate an existing primary volume as a remote volume.
•
Create a new remote volume manually.
•
Create a new remote volume during creation of a remote snapshot.
•
Use the Management Groups, Clusters, and Volumes wizard in the “Getting Started” launch
pad. See the HPE StoreVirtual Storage User Guide for details on working through the wizards.
Designating an existing volume as a remote volume
When you select an existing volume to become a remote volume, the following occurs:
•
A snapshot is created of the volume to preserve the data from the primary volume.
•
The volume becomes a 0-byte remote volume.
Creating a new remote volume manually
Create a remote volume as you would any other volume. Be sure to select the storage systems
at the remote site. Because management groups and clusters are logical entities, name them to
reflect their remote functionality.
In this method, the primary volume is ready. Create a remote volume at the remote site to receive
the snapshot, and then either take the snapshot and create a remote copy, or create the schedule
to take remote snapshots.
Using Remote Copy to move a volume to a different management group
Use the Remote Copy functionality to move a volume to a new management group. This method
does involve a slight interruption while data is moved and connectivity is established.
1. Create a new remote snapshot of the volume from the old management group to the target
cluster in the new management group.
2. Wait for the data to finish copying.
3. Convert the remote volume containing the new remote snapshot to a primary volume, creating
a new primary volume that contains the data of the original volume.
4. Reconfigure the server connections for the volume to the VIP of the cluster in the new
management group.
5. Connect iSCSI sessions to the new volume, and it is ready for use.
6. [Optional] Delete the original volume and snapshots from the original management group.
Creating a remote volume while creating a remote snapshot
If you are using the New Remote Snapshot window, you can create a needed cluster and volume
as you work through the window.
Working with remote snapshots
13
1.
In the Remote Snapshot Setup box, select a management group to contain the remote
snapshot.
NOTE:
2.
You must be logged in to the management group you select.
Click New Remote Volume.
The Management Groups, Clusters, and Volumes wizard opens.
The wizard uses the information you entered to complete the New Remote Snapshot window
when you exit the wizard.
3.
(Optional) Enter a description of the remote snapshot and click OK.
The system creates the remote copy.
NOTE:
There may be a delay in remote copy time.
What the system does
The system creates the remote snapshot in the cluster that contains the remote volume, and
then copies the primary snapshot onto the remote snapshot. The process of copying the data
may take some time.
The remote snapshot appears below the remote volume in the navigation window when the copy
completes.
NOTE: If you create a remote snapshot of a volume while a remote snapshot is in progress,
the second remote snapshot does not begin copying until the first remote snapshot is complete.
Creating the first copy
Creating the first copy of data is the first step when setting up a Remote Copy solution. Three
methods for creating the first copy are described below.
Copy data directly to the remote site over the WAN.
Use this method if you are implementing the Remote Copy solution before you accumulate much
data in the primary site, and your hardware is already installed in the remote site.
With this method, you create the primary management group and the remote management group
in their respective locations, and then create the initial copy of the data directly over the WAN
using Remote Copy.
Use the storage systems intended for the remote site to configure the remote management
group onsite and copy data locally, and then ship the remote storage systems to the
remote site.
Use this method if you initially have all the storage systems for the Remote Copy solution at the
primary site.
1. Configure both the primary and remote management groups.
2. Create the first copy of the data locally over the gigabit Ethernet.
3. Ship the storage systems for the remote site and install the remote management group just
as you configured it in the primary site.
4. Allow adequate time between the arrival of the storage systems and the first remote copy
operation.
NOTE: The subsequent snapshots from the primary volume to the remote volume are
incremental.
Use the PrimeSync method of Remote Copy to configure a temporary management group,
create the first copy locally, ship the temporary storage system, and then copy locally to
the remote target.
14
Using Remote Copy
Use this method if you have the primary (Site A) and remote site (Site B) configured and
operational.
1. While at the primary Site A, use available storage systems to create a new temporary
management group, cluster, and volume.
This management group, cluster, and volume are the PrimeSync that you will set up at the
primary Site A.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Make a remote snapshot of the primary Site A volume, and then copy it to the temporary
PrimeSync management group over gigabit Ethernet. See “Creating a remote snapshot”
(page 10).
Ship the storage systems to the remote Site B.
Power them on and discover them in the CMC to display the temporary PrimeSync
management group, cluster, and volume.
Copy the remote snapshot from the temporary PrimeSync management group to the existing
remote Site B management group.
Disassociate the temporary PrimeSync management group from the remote Site B
management group. For more information, see “Disassociating remote management groups”
(page 29).
Delete the temporary PrimeSync management group.
Use the initial snapshot that you used for the temporary PrimeSync management group
copy, to create the second Remote Copy or the schedule to create remote snapshots of the
volume. You are now setting up the Remote Copy that goes from primary site A directly to
remote site B which maintains that relationship going forward.
PrimeSync ensures that the proper relationship is established between the original primary
volume and the remote site. Subsequent remote snapshots from the primary site to the remote
site are incremental.
Viewing a list of remote snapshots
View a list of remote snapshots associated with management groups, clusters, volumes, or
snapshots.
1. In the navigation window, select a cluster to view its list of remote snapshots.
2. Click the Remote Snapshot.
The report in the Remote Snapshot tab lists management groups and all the snapshots. The
other columns show status information about the remote snapshots. For more information,
see “Monitoring remote snapshots” (page 17).
Setting the remote bandwidth
The remote bandwidth sets the maximum rate for data transfer between management groups.
The copy rate is equal to, or less than, the rate set. The factory setting is a Custom setting of 4.
To control the maximum rate of data transfer to a remote snapshot, set the remote bandwidth
on the management group that contains the remote snapshot which is the remote management
group. When setting the remote bandwidth, you can choose from a list of common network types,
or calculate a custom rate, based on your particular requirements.
Selecting remote bandwidth rate
You may either select a preset speed from a list of standard network types or calculate a custom
speed based on your specific requirements. Remember that the speed is the maximum rate at
which data copies.
•
Defaults setting—When setting remote bandwidth, selecting Defaults allows you to choose
from a list of common network types, listed in Table 3 (page 16).
Working with remote snapshots
15
Table 3 Guide to remote bandwidth priority settings
•
Network type
Link speed
Throughput in MB
Fractional T1 (1/6)
256.0 Kb/sec
0.03125
Fractional T1 (1/2)
768.0 Kb/sec
0.09375
T1
1.544 Mb/sec
0.193
Bonded T1 (2)
3.088 Mb/sec
0.386
Bonded T1 (4)
6.176 Mb/sec
0.772
Ethernet
10.0 Mb/sec
1.25
T3
44.736 Mb/sec
5.592
Fast-Ethernet, 100BaseT
100.0 Mb/sec
12.5
OC-3
155.0 Mb/sec
19.375
OC-12
622.0 Mb/sec
77.75
Gigabit-Ethernet, 1000BaseT
1.0 Gb/sec
128.0
Custom setting—The custom setting for remote bandwidth defaults to 32,768 KB, or about
4 MB. Use the calculation tool to identify a desired bandwidth setting. For example, if you
have a T1 line, and you want to set the remote bandwidth to 12% of that capacity, you can
use the calculation tool to find the correct value, 189 KB.
Best practice
Set the bandwidth speed the same in both directions unless you have an asymmetrical WAN
link.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
In the navigation window, select the primary management group.
Click Management Group Tasks, and then select Edit Management Group.
Select the remote management group in the Remote Copy Targets list.
Click Edit Remote Bandwidth.
Change the bandwidth setting as desired (Figure 5 (page 16)).
Figure 5 Calculating a custom value for setting remote bandwidth
Canceling a remote snapshot
When you cancel a remote snapshot that is in progress, the remote snapshot is deleted, but the
primary snapshot remains.
16
Using Remote Copy
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
In the navigation window, select the remote snapshot.
Click the Remote Snapshot tab.
Select the remote snapshot to cancel from the list, if it is not already selected.
Click Remote Snapshot Tasks, and then select Cancel Remote Snapshot.
Click OK.
Editing a remote snapshot
To change the description and change the server assignment of a remote snapshot:
1. Log in to the management group that contains the remote snapshot.
2. Select the remote snapshot in the navigation window.
3. Click Snapshots Tasks, and then select Edit Snapshot.
4. Change the desired information, and then click OK.
Deleting a remote snapshot
CAUTION: Do not delete individual snapshots that are part of a snapshot set. To see associated
snapshots, select a snapshot, click the Details tab, and then view the Snapshot Set field. For
information about snapshot sets, see the HPE StoreVirtual Storage User Guide. Hewlett Packard
Enterprise recommends that you keep or delete all snapshots for a volume set. If you need to
roll back to a snapshot, you want to roll back each volume in the volume set to its corresponding
snapshot. The system gives you the option to automatically delete or roll back all associated
volumes.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Log in to the management group that contains the remote snapshot.
Select the remote snapshot in the navigation window.
Click Snapshot Tasks, and then select Delete Snapshot from the menu.
Do one of the following:
If the snapshot is not If the snapshot is part of a snapshot set
part of a snapshot set
A confirmation message A warning message opens.
opens.
• To delete all snapshots in the snapshot set, click Delete All Associated
• Click Delete
Snapshots.
Snapshot.
• To delete only the snapshot you selected, click Delete Selected Snapshot Only.
• To cancel the deletion, click Cancel.
5.
Click OK.
Monitoring remote snapshots
Information for monitoring remote snapshots is available from multiple sources. Remote snapshot
alarms and events are listed in the Alarms window and in the Events category for the management
group. You can also receive event notification through email and SNMP traps. For information
about configuring event notification, see the HPE StoreVirtual Storage User Guide.
Monitoring details from the Remote Snapshots feature
You can view information about each remote snapshot in both the Remote Snapshots tab and
in the Remote Snapshot Details window.
Monitoring remote snapshots
17
Viewing information in the Remote Snapshots tab
The Remote Snapshots tab displays a list of remote snapshots for each selected item in the
navigation window. You can view lists of remote snapshots by management group, cluster,
volume, and snapshot levels.
1. Select the appropriate item in the navigation window.
2. Click the Remote Snapshot tab.
The following fields appear:
•
% Complete—The incremental progress of the remote copy operation
•
Elapsed Time—The incremental time of the copy operation
•
Data Copied—The incremental quantity of data copied
•
Rate—The rate at which data is being copied, or, when the remote snapshot is complete,
the average rate for the total operation
•
State—The status of the operation
Viewing the status in the Remote Snapshot Details window
The Remote Snapshot Details window displays additional details about a remote snapshot.
1. In the tab window, select the Remote Snapshots tab.
2. Select a remote snapshot from the list of snapshots on the Remote Snapshots tab.
3. Click Remote Snapshot Tasks, and then select View Remote Snapshot Details.
Figure 6 Viewing remote snapshot details
During the remote copy process, the Remote Snapshot Details window reports current statistics.
When the copy is completed, the statistics show summary data. For field descriptions, see Table 4
(page 18).
Table 4 Fields for Remote Snapshot Details window
Statistic
Fields
Source Info section
Primary Mgmt Group
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Using Remote Copy
The management group containing the primary volume and snapshot
Table 4 Fields for Remote Snapshot Details window (continued)
Statistic
Fields
Primary Snapshot
The primary snapshot
Remote Mgmt Group
The management group containing the remote volume and snapshot
Remote Snapshot
The remote snapshot
Original Mgmt Group
The original management group that contained the original volume and
snapshot. This is used with the PrimeSync feature.
Original Snapshot
The first version of the snapshot from which the first copy was created.
This is used with PrimeSync feature.
Status
Manual | Scheduled
Whether the snapshot was created manually or with a scheduled
snapshot.
Snapshot Scanned (%)
The percentage complete of the copy process. Values are 0 to 100%.
State
The current state of the copy process. Valid values are Started, Copying,
Stalled, and Complete.
Time
Start Time
Time Zone date and time copy started. The field format is MM/DD/YYYY
HH:MM:SS [AM/PM].
Elapsed Time
The number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds since the copy began
processing. The field format is Xd Xh Xm Xs X. N/A signifies completed
copies or in-progress copies not yet calculated.
Est. Time Remaining
The number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds estimated to remain
in the copy process. The field format is Xd Xh Xm Xs X. N/A signifies
completed copies or in-progress copies not yet calculated.
Completion Time
Time Zone date and time copy completed. The field format is
MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM:SS [AM/PM]. N/A signifies completed copies or
in-progress copies not yet calculated.
Data
Data Copied
Amount of data copied so far in the smallest unit size.
Data Remaining
Amount of data remaining to be copied in the smallest unit size.
Current Rate
Current rate of data being copied in Kb/second. This rate is recalculated
regularly throughout the remote copy process. N/A if not yet available or
completed.
Avg. Rate
Kb/sec. Average rate of copy progress.
To monitor the progress of the remote copy, leave the Remote Snapshot Details window open.
Monitoring remote snapshots
19
Figure 7 Viewing remote snapshot details for remote copy in progress
Scheduling remote snapshots
In addition to taking remote snapshots of a volume manually, you can set up a schedule to take
snapshots and save them remotely. Scheduled remote snapshots provide business continuance
and disaster recovery, as well as a consistent, predictable update of data for remote backup and
recovery.
Planning for scheduled remote snapshots is a crucial initial step in implementing Remote Copy.
The following items require planning in advance for successful deployment of scheduled remote
snapshots:
•
Recurrence (frequency)
•
Retention policies
•
Capacity planning
•
Timing
For detailed information about these issues, see “Planning Remote Copy” (page 7).
Best practices for scheduling remote snapshots
•
Create a new remote volume to use with the scheduled remote snapshots.
•
If you are performing daily remote copies, schedule the remote snapshots during off-peak
hours. If you are setting scheduled remote snapshots for multiple volumes, stagger the
schedules with at least an hour between start times.
•
Use NTP to set all storage systems in the management group to the same time zone.
•
Reset the management group time before creating a new schedule to remote snapshot a
volume.
Creating the schedule
To create the schedule for continuing remote snapshots:
1. In the navigation window, select the primary volume.
2. Click the Schedules tab.
20
Using Remote Copy
3.
4.
5.
Click Schedule Tasks, and then select New Schedule to Remote Snapshot a Volume.
Click Edit, and then select a Start At time.
Select a recurrence interval.
You can schedule a snapshot to occur every 30 minutes or more.
6.
Select a retention interval for the primary snapshot, either number of days or number of
snapshots.
You can retain up to 50 snapshots for a volume.
7.
To use VSS to quiesce the application before creating the snapshot, select
Application-Managed Snapshot.
This option requires the use of the Application Aware Snapshot Manager. For more
information, see “Prerequisites for application-managed snapshots” in the HPE StoreVirtual
Storage User Guide. If the Application Aware Snapshot Manager is not installed, the LeftHand
OS software allows the creation of a point-in-time snapshot.
8. Select the management group and volume that will hold the remote snapshots.
9. Log in.
10. Click New Remote Volume to use the wizard to create a volume if you need to make a new
one.
11. Set the retention interval for the remote snapshot.
You can retain up to 50 snapshots for a volume.
12. Click OK to close the scheduling window and return to the navigation and tab windows.
The timetable you just created is now listed in the Schedules tab view.
Creating the schedule for volume sets
When you create a schedule to remote snapshot a volume that has associated volumes, the
system automatically creates remote snapshots for each associated volume. For information
about volume sets, see the HPE StoreVirtual Storage User Guide.
The volume that you select when you create the schedule becomes the “owning” volume and
the schedule displays (O) next to it. Check that the Volume Set box displays all of the volumes
that you want to snapshot. It is possible that the owning volume is not aware of all associated
volumes. If it is not, select a volume that is aware of all associated volumes, and create the
schedule there.
NOTE: If you have a schedule to create remote snapshots of a volume and you add a volume
to the volume set using the application, the system cannot update the volume set information.
You must delete the schedule and create a new one to reflect the current volume set.
To create a schedule for a volume set:
1. In the navigation window, select the primary volume.
2. Click the Schedules tab.
3. Click Schedule Tasks, and then select New Schedule to Remote Snapshot a Volume.
4. Click Edit, and then select a Start At time.
5. Select a recurrence interval.
You can schedule a snapshot to occur every 30 minutes or more.
6.
Select a retention interval for the primary snapshot, either number of days or number of
snapshots.
You can retain up to 50 snapshots for a volume.
7.
To use the Application Aware Snapshot Manager to quiesce the application before creating
the snapshot, select Application-Managed Snapshot.
Creating the schedule
21
8. Select the management group and volume that will hold the remote snapshots.
9. Log in if needed.
10. Click New Remote Volume to use the wizard to create a volume if you need to make a new
one.
11. Set the retention interval for the remote snapshot.
You can retain up to 50 snapshots for a volume.
12. Click OK.
The Volume Associations Found window opens with a list of all volumes in the volume set.
13. Review the information about the volume set and the remote copies the schedule will create.
14. Click Continue.
The Primary and Remote Volume Associations window opens with the list of the primary
volumes in the volume set. The first volume is already set up and the next one in the list is
selected.
15. In the Remote Volume Setup box, use the Volume Name list to select the remote volume
to use for the selected volume.
All remote volumes must be set up to use the same remote management group. If you need
to create a remote volume, click New Remote Volume.
16. Click Update Pending Table Below to add this remote volume setup to the list at the bottom
of the window.
The system selects the next volume in the Primary Volume list at the top of the window.
17. Select the remote Volume Name for the selected volume.
18. Click Update Pending Table Below to add this remote volume setup to the list at the bottom
of the window.
19. Continue until each volume at the top of the window is set up.
A green check mark shows the volume is set up.
20. Click Create Schedule.
The timetable you just created is now listed in the Schedules tab view.
What the system does
If you created a new volume for the remote volume, the system creates a new primary snapshot
of the primary volume and a remote snapshot of the remote volume. See “Best practices for
scheduling remote snapshots” (page 20).
If you selected an existing volume to become the remote volume, the system alerts you that it
will create a snapshot to save existing data on the volume. The snapshot that is then created
retains all the volume’s data.
1. Enter a name for that snapshot in the alert.
2. Click OK to continue.
The new snapshot is created and the volume becomes a remote volume.
The system creates a new primary snapshot of the primary volume and a remote snapshot of
the remote volume. It then copies the data from the primary snapshot to the remote snapshot.
This process occurs according to the schedule.
Pausing and resuming scheduled snapshots
At times, it may be convenient to prevent a scheduled snapshot from taking place. When you
pause a snapshot schedule, the snapshot deletions for that schedule are paused as well. When
you resume the schedule, both the snapshots and the snapshot deletions resume according to
the schedule.
22
Using Remote Copy
Pause a schedule
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
In the navigation window, select the volume for which you want to pause the schedule.
Click the Schedules tab.
Select the schedule.
Click Schedule Tasks on the Details tab, and then select Pause Schedule.
In the Confirm window, click OK.
In the Next Occurrence column of the Schedules tab window, this snapshot schedule is
marked as paused.
6.
Make a note to resume this snapshot schedule at a convenient time.
Resume a schedule
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
In the navigation window, select the volume for which you want to resume the snapshot
schedule.
Click the Schedules tab.
Select the desired schedule.
Click Schedule Tasks on the Details tab, and then select Resume Schedule.
In the Confirm window, click OK.
In the Next Occurrence column of the Schedules tab, this snapshot schedule shows the
date and time the next snapshot will be created.
Editing the schedule to remote snapshot a volume
When editing the timetable for a schedule to create a remote snapshot of a volume, you can
change the following items:
•
Schedule—Description, start date and time, recurrence policy
•
Primary Setup—Retention policy
•
Remote Setup—Retention policy
If the snapshot is part of a snapshot set, you can also verify that the volumes included in the
schedule are the current volumes in the volume set. For more information, see “Scheduling
snapshots for volume sets” in the HPE StoreVirtual Storage User Guide.
To edit the remote snapshot schedule:
1. In the navigation window, select the primary volume that has the schedule you want to edit.
2. Click the Schedules tab, and then select the schedule to edit.
3. Click Schedule Tasks, and then select Edit Schedule.
4. Change the desired information.
5. (Optional) If displayed, click Verify Volume Associations to see if the volume set included
in the snapshot set is up to date.
The Verify Volume Associations window opens, and displays the volumes currently associated
with the schedule. Any volumes that have been added to or removed from the volume set
are reflected here.
6.
Click Close to return to the Edit Schedule to a Snapshot Volume window.
The updated list of volumes is populated with current information in the Volume Set field.
For more information, see “Scheduling snapshots for volume sets” in the HPE StoreVirtual
Storage User Guide.
7.
Click OK.
The information is automatically updated.
Editing the schedule to remote snapshot a volume
23
Deleting the remote snapshot schedule
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
In the navigation window, select the primary volume that has the schedule you want to delete.
Click the Schedule tab.
Select the schedule to delete.
Click Schedule Tasks, and then select Delete Schedule.
Click OK.
Failover and failback using Remote Copy
Configuring Remote Copy for failover provides for business continuance and disaster recovery.
When configuring failover, consider both the failover and failback paths.
Planning failover
To achieve failover, consider the following points:
•
The location and structure of management groups and clusters
•
Configuration of primary and remote volumes, snapshots, and scheduling snapshots
•
Configuration of application servers and backup application servers
•
Task flow for failback (resuming production after failover)
•
If a volume is part of a volume set, typically you want to fail over each volume using its
corresponding snapshot. To see associated snapshots, select a snapshot, click the Details
tab, and review the Snapshot Set field. For more information about volume sets and snapshot
sets, see the HPE StoreVirtual Storage User Guide.
Using scripting for failover
Application-based scripting provides the capability for creating, mounting, and deleting snapshots
using scripts. Remote Copy can be scripted as well. Remote snapshots and scheduled remote
snapshots can be created and managed using scripts. For information about scripting, see the
HPE StoreVirtual LeftHand OS Command Line Interface User Guide and the sample scripts
available at:
http://www.hpe.com/info/StoreVirtualDownloads
Using the Volume Failover/Failback Wizard
Changing the roles of primary and remote volumes may be necessary during failover and failback.
Move your primary volume either as part of a failover/failback scenario or as part of a planned
move. The Volume Failover/Failback Wizard takes you through the necessary steps to move a
primary volume to an existing remote volume, and to make the existing remote volume an acting
primary volume.
Later, when failing back or restoring operations in a planned move, resynchronize data between
the acting primary and the recovered, or newly configured, production site primary volume.
NOTE: When failing over a primary volume, the volume must have a remote copy relationship
for the wizard to be available.
Moving a primary volume
The system allows you to convert a primary volume into a remote volume. First, the system takes
a snapshot of the primary volume to preserve the existing data that is on the volume. Next, the
primary volume is converted to a remote volume. Then the remote volume is converted to a new
primary volume.
1. Log off all active connections first.
2. In the navigation window, select the volume to convert.
24
Using Remote Copy
3.
4.
5.
Right-click the volume, and then select Failover/Failback Volume.
Click Next.
Select To move the primary volume and click Next.
To failover over the primary volume to the remote volume, see “Using failover to a remote
volume” (page 25).
6.
Enter a name and a description for the snapshot to be taken of the current primary volume.
The snapshot is created and the volume becomes a remote volume.
7.
8.
9.
Click Next.
Add a description and select the size for the new acting primary volume that will be converted
from the remote volume.
Click Finish.
The final window of the wizard displays a summary of the actions and a reminder to reconnect
your iSCSI sessions, or to reassign any Fibre Channel servers.
10. Connect this acting primary volume to application servers to maintain business continuance
or accomplish disaster recovery.
Using failover to a remote volume
If the primary volume is not available, you can use the wizard to promote the remote volume to
an acting primary volume.
1. Log off all active connections first.
2. In the navigation window, select the volume to convert.
3. Right-click the volume, and then select Failover/Failback Volume.
4. Click Next.
5. Select To failover to the remote volume and then select the remote volume from the list.
To move the primary volume , see “Moving a primary volume” (page 24).
6.
7.
8.
Click Next.
Add a description for the new acting primary volume, and change the size if necessary.
Review the summary information and click Finish.
The final window of the wizard displays a summary of the actions and a reminder to reconnect
to all servers and reestablish snapshot schedules as needed. The new acting primary volume
displays in the cluster.
9.
If you promoted a remote application-managed snapshot, use diskpart.exe to change
the resulting volume's attributes.
For more information, see the HPE StoreVirtual Storage User Guide or online help.
Resuming production after failover
After failover occurs, three scenarios exist for resuming production:
•
Failback returns operations to the original primary site when it is restored.
•
Convert the backup site to the new primary site.
•
Set up a new primary site and resume operations at that site.
The task flow for restoring or recovering data and resuming the original Remote Copy configuration
is different for each scenario.
Use these procedures when you are resynchronizing data between the acting primary volume
and the recovered, or newly configured, production site primary volume.
Resuming production after failover
25
Synchronizing data after failover
After a failover, there are usually two snapshots or volumes that have conflicting data. Recovering
and synchronizing data depends on multiple factors, including the application involved.
Example scenario
The following example illustrates one process for synchronizing data. Remember that
synchronization is optional.
Table 5 Timeline of failover
Time
Event
What happens
1:00 p.m.
Regular hourly scheduled remote snapshot RemoteSS_1 is created in the remote
starts.
management group.
1:10 p.m.
Remote copy finishes.
Copying is complete.
1:30 p.m.
Primary volume goes offline.
OrigPrimaryVol_1 is offline.
1:33 p.m.
Scripted failover causes the remote volume ActPrimaryVol_1 becomes the primary
to become the acting primary volume.
active volume, and usable to the application
server.
2:00 p.m.
Original primary volume comes back online. OrigPrimaryVol_1 is online.
The following data must be synchronized once the primary volume is back online:
•
Original volume, which contains data from 1:00 to 1:30 p.m.
•
Acting primary volume, which contains data from 1:33 to 2:00 p.m.
Returning operations to original primary site
After the original primary site is operational again, restore operations to that site. The steps to
restore operations depend upon the state of the original primary volume.
•
If the primary volume is working:
Synchronize the data between the acting primary volume and the restored primary volume
before returning the acting primary volume to its remote volume state.
•
If the primary volume is not available:
Create a new primary volume, synchronize the data with the acting primary volume, and
then return the acting primary volume to a remote volume.
Synchronizing the data between the acting primary volume and the original primary volume
Create snapshots that contain the data that you need to synchronize
Table 6 Creating snapshots of data to synchronize
Action
Volumes and snapshots
on primary management
group
Volumes and snapshots
on remote management
group
What this step
accomplishes
1. Stop applications that are
accessing the volumes.
2. Make a snapshot of the
original volume.
3. Make the acting primary
volume into the remote
26
Using Remote Copy
Creates a snapshot of the
original primary volume that
includes the data from 1:00
- 1:30 p.m.
OrigPrimaryVol_
1OrigPrimarySS_1
Remotevol_
1ActPrimarySS_1
Returns the remote
management group to its
Table 6 Creating snapshots of data to synchronize (continued)
Action
Volumes and snapshots
on primary management
group
Volumes and snapshots
on remote management
group
volume. This automatically
creates a snapshot of the
acting primary volume.
What this step
accomplishes
original configuration. In
addition, you capture the
1:33 to 2:00 p.m. data.
Synchronize the data
Synchronize the snapshots OrigPrimarySS_1 and ActPrimarySS_1 that were created in
steps 2 and 3 of “Creating snapshots of data to synchronize” (page 26).
In the simplest case, to synchronize the snapshots, create a remote copy of the remote snapshot
back to the original primary volume.
Creating a new primary volume at the original production site
If the original primary volume is not available, designate a new primary volume, synchronize the
data from the acting primary volume, and then configure the timetable for the remote snapshot
schedule on the new primary volume.
1. Stop the application that is accessing the acting primary volume.
2. Create a remote snapshot of the acting primary volume.
3. As your target, create a remote volume, which will later be converted to the primary volume.
4. Convert the remote volume to a primary volume.
5. Convert the acting primary volume to the remote volume.
This creates a snapshot of that volume.
6.
7.
Configure a new timetable for the scheduled remote snapshots on the new primary volume.
Reconfigure scripts for failover on the application servers.
Setting up a new production site
Setting up a new production site involves creating a new primary volume and synchronizing the
acting primary volume before returning it to its original state as a remote volume. The steps are
the same as those for creating a new primary volume at the original production site.
Making the backup site into the new production site
Convert the backup site into the new production site and designate a different backup site. The
steps are similar to those for initially configuring Remote Copy.
1. Create a remote snapshot or a timetable for a scheduled remote snapshot on the acting
primary volume.
2. Create a new remote volume on the new backup site as part of creating that remote snapshot
or timetable for a scheduled remote snapshot.
3. Reconfigure scripts for failover on the application servers.
Rolling back primary and remote volumes
Rolling back a volume from a snapshot is one method for reverting to an earlier copy of the data
on a volume. Roll back procedures require that you delete any snapshots that were created after
the snapshot that will be rolled back to.
Using SmartClone to clone a volume from a snapshot
Consider using the SmartClone feature to clone a volume from a snapshot that contains the
earlier copy of the data you want to use. Creating a SmartClone volume preserves all snapshots
Rolling back primary and remote volumes
27
while providing an exact copy of the desired data. The SmartClone volume consumes no extra
space on the SAN.
Rolling back a primary volume
Rolling back a primary volume to a snapshot replaces the original volume with a volume that
contains the snapshot’s data. The new volume has the same name as the original.
If a volume is part of a volume set, typically you want to roll back each volume using its
corresponding snapshot. The system allows you to automatically roll back all associated volumes.
To see any associated snapshots, select a snapshot, click the Details tab, and then look at the
Snapshot Set field. For more information about volume sets and snapshot sets, see the HPE
StoreVirtual Storage User Guide or online help.
Prerequisite
Stop applications from accessing the volume.
CAUTION:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Any remote snapshot that has not completed copying is canceled.
Log in to the management group that contains the primary volume that you want to roll back.
Select the snapshot to roll back to.
Review the Details tab for the selected snapshot to that ensure you have selected the correct
snapshot.
Click Snapshot Tasks on the Details tab, and then select Roll Back Volume.
NOTE: During the rollback, any connections to the volume are detected and a warning is
displayed that reminds you to stop the applications from accessing the volumes, and to
either log off iSCSI sessions, or unassign the volumes from the Fibre Channel server before
proceeding.
5.
6.
Stop the applications from accessing the volumes, and either log off any connected iSCSI
sessions or unassign volumes from the Fibre Channel server.
Click OK.
The primary snapshot version of the primary volume is restored as a volume with the same
name.
7.
8.
Reconfigure application servers to access the new volume.
Reestablish the iSCSI sessions or reassign the volumes to the Fibre Channel server.
Rolling back a remote volume
A remote volume cannot be rolled back until you convert the remote volume into a primary volume
and then perform the steps in “Rolling back a primary volume” (page 28).
If a volume is part of a volume set, typically you want to roll back each volume using its
corresponding snapshot. The system gives you the option to automatically roll back all associated
volumes. To see any associated snapshots, select a snapshot, click the Details tab, and look at
the Snapshot Set field. For more information about volume sets and snapshot sets, see the HPE
StoreVirtual Storage User Guide or online help.
Using remote snapshots for data migration and data mining
Use remote snapshots to create split mirrors for data mining and data migration. A split mirror is
a one-time remote snapshot created from the volume containing the data you want to use or
move. Split mirrors are usually created for one-time use and then discarded.
Creating a split mirror
To create a split mirror:
28
Using Remote Copy
1.
2.
3.
Create a remote snapshot.
Create a server for client access.
Configure clients to access the remote snapshot.
TIP: Consider using the SmartClone feature to create a split mirror. The SmartClone volume
is an exact copy of the volume or snapshot but does not consume extra space on the SAN.
Disassociating remote management groups
Management groups become associated when linked by either remote snapshots or scheduled
remote snapshots. Disassociating management groups destroys all the shared knowledge
between those groups.
Best practice for disassociating management groups
NOTE: Do this only if a group no longer exists, or if instructed by Hewlett Packard Enterprise
Support.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Log in to both management groups that you want to disassociate.
In the navigation window, select the remote management group.
Click Management Group Tasks, and then select Edit Management Group.
Select the management group or groups you want to disassociate, that is, the management
groups that are remote relative to this management group.
Click Disassociate.
A confirmation message opens, describing the results of disassociating the management
groups.
6.
7.
Click OK.
Click OK to return to the navigation window.
CAUTION: Disassociating the management group cancels any in-progress remote snapshots
and deletes all timetables between the primary and remote management groups.
Troubleshooting Remote Copy
Table 7 Troubleshooting Remote Copy issues
Issue
Description
While cross–version Remote Copy is occurring from 10.0
or later to 8.5 management groups, if copying halts
because the cluster is full, the CMC displays the "See
Alarms Window" error message, although the 8.5
management group does not have the Alarms window.
The Alarms and Events feature in Version 9.x or later is
not compatible with pre-9.x versions of software. Review
the Alarms window for Version 9.x or later management
groups. If you are operating in a mixed SAN environment
with management groups earlier than Version 9.x, also
review the Alerts window.
Disassociating remote management groups
29
3 Sample Remote Copy configurations
Because of its flexibility, Remote Copy is useful in a variety of configurations. The sample
configurations described in this chapter show only a few ways to use Remote Copy for business
continuance, backup and recovery, data migration, and data mining.
Using Remote Copy for business continuance
Business continuance is composed of disaster recovery and high availability of data. If using
Remote Copy for business continuance, data is stored off-site and is readily available in the event
of a site or system failure.
Achieving high availability
Creating remote snapshots in remote locations with Remote Copy ensures that applications such
as SQL Server, Oracle, and Exchange have access to backup copies of data volumes if production
application servers or data volumes fail.
Using off-site remote snapshots of your production volumes, you can configure a backup
application server to access those remote snapshots or volumes. Off-site remote snapshots,
particularly when supplemented with synchronous Network RAID within a cluster, ensure high
availability of critical data volumes.
Configuration for high availability
To use remote snapshots for high availability, configure a backup application server to access
remote volumes in the event of a primary system failure. Figure 8 (page 31) illustrates this simple
high availability configuration.
•
Configure primary and backup application servers.
During normal operation, the production application server reads and writes to the primary
volume.
•
30
Set up a schedule for copying remote snapshots to the backup location. If your application
server uses multiple volumes that must be in sync, use a script or VSS to quiesce the
application before creating remote snapshots.
Sample Remote Copy configurations
Figure 8 High availability example configuration
How this configuration works for high availability
If the production application server or volumes become unavailable, application processing fails
over to the backup application server. The remote volume and remote snapshots become acting
primary, and the backup application server becomes the acting production application server,
accessing data from the acting primary volume.
Figure 9 High availability configuration during failover
Data availability if the primary volume or production application server fails
If either the primary volume or production application server in your production site fails, only
that data written to the volume since the last remote snapshot was created is unavailable until
the volume or production application server is restored.
Using Remote Copy for business continuance
31
Failover to the backup application server
To maintain availability of the applications and the remaining data, the following process occurs:
1. A script or other application monitoring the production application server discovers that the
primary volume is not available. A script executes to fail over to the backup application
server.
2. The backup application server executes a script to convert the remote volume into a primary
volume so that the volume can be accessed by the backup application server. For information
about scripting, see the HPE StoreVirtual LeftHand OS Command Line Interface User Guide
and the sample scripts available at http://www.hpe.com/info/StoreVirtualDownloads.
3. Because the backup application server was configured to access the remote (now primary)
volume, operation of the backup application server begins.
The application continues to operate after the failover to the backup application server.
Failback to the production configuration
When the production server and volumes become available again, you have the following two
failback options:
•
Resume operations using the original production server, and then return the backup volumes
to their original remote status, as illustrated in Figure 10 (page 32). This requires migration
of data that was written to the backup volumes since the failure back onto the production
volumes.
•
Continue operating on the backup application server. When the production server and
volumes become available, configure the production server to be the backup server (role
reversal).
Merging data for failback
In the failover scenarios described above, there are probably two snapshots with different data.
As part of failback, users must make a decision whether to merge the data from the two snapshots
and the most effective method for doing so. For more information see “Synchronizing the data
between the acting primary volume and the original primary volume” (page 26).
Figure 10 High availability configuration during failback
32
Sample Remote Copy configurations
Best practices
Remote snapshots with volume replication
Use remote snapshots in conjunction with local, synchronous volume replication, known as
Network RAID. Using remote snapshots alone, any data written to the primary volume since the
most recent remote snapshot was created will be unavailable if the primary volume is unavailable.
However, you can lessen the impact of primary volume failure by using Network RAID. Network
RAID allows you to create up to four copies of a volume on the same cluster of storage systems
as the primary volume. The only limitation is that the cluster must contain at least as many storage
systems as replicas of the volume. Replicating the volume within the cluster ensures that if a
storage system in the cluster goes down, replicas of the volume elsewhere in the cluster will still
be available. For more information about Network RAID and data protection levels, see
“Provisioning storage” in the HPE StoreVirtual Storage User Guide.
Example configuration
Figure 8 (page 31) uses three storage systems per cluster. However, this scenario can use any
number of storage systems. For information about creating clusters and volumes, see the HPE
StoreVirtual Storage User Guide.
•
In the production location, create a management group and a cluster of three storage systems.
•
Create volumes on the cluster and set the data protection level to Network RAID-10.
•
Configure the production application server to access the primary volume via iSCSI.
•
In the backup location, create a second management group and a cluster of three storage
systems.
•
Create a schedule for making remote snapshots of the primary volume. See “Scheduling
remote snapshots” (page 20).
NOTE:
Data protection levels are set independently for primary and remote volumes.
How it works
If one of the storage systems in the primary location fails, the primary volume will still be available.
If all of the storage systems fail, or if the application server fails, then failover to the backup
application server occurs, and the remote snapshot(s) becomes available.
Using Remote Copy for business continuance
33
Figure 11 High availability during failover-Example configuration
Achieving affordable disaster recovery
Even if you do not have clustered application servers or network bandwidth required for configuring
hot backup sites, you can still use Remote Copy to protect your data during an emergency.
Using remote snapshots, you can maintain copies of your volumes in remote sites. Set up a
schedule for creating remote snapshots, and if your primary storage site becomes unavailable,
you can easily access the most recent remote copy of your data volumes. You can also use
remote snapshots to transfer data to a backup location where tape backups are then created.
This eliminates the backup window on your primary volumes, and ensures that you have copies
of your data in the remote site on storage systems as well as on tape.
Configuration for affordable disaster recovery
To configure affordable disaster recovery, create remote snapshots of your volumes in an off-site
location. In addition, you can create tape backups from the remote snapshots in the off-site
location:
•
Designate one or more off-site locations to be the destination for remote snapshots.
•
Set up a schedule for creating remote snapshots in the designated off-site locations. If your
application server uses multiple volumes that must be in sync, use a script to quiesce the
application before creating remote snapshots.
•
Create routine tape backups of the remote snapshots in the off-site locations.
Figure 12 (page 35) shows an example configuration for disaster recovery.
34
Sample Remote Copy configurations
Figure 12 Affordable disaster recovery example configuration
How this works for affordable disaster recovery
If the storage systems in your primary location fail or volumes become unavailable, the off-site
location contains the most recent remote snapshots.
•
Use the remote snapshots to resume operations as shown in Figure 13 (page 36). If you
created tape backups, you can recover data from tape backups, as shown in Figure 14
(page 36).
•
Only data written to the primary volumes since the last remote snapshot was created will be
unavailable.
•
Application servers that were accessing the offline volumes will not be available until you
reconfigure them to access recovered data.
To resume operations using the most recent set of remote snapshots:
1. In the backup location, make the remote volume into a primary volume.
Using Remote Copy for business continuance
35
2.
Configure application servers to access the primary volume, or if network connections are
not fast enough to facilitate reading and writing to the off-site location, copy this volume to
a location where application servers can access it more efficiently.
Figure 13 Restoring from a remote volume
In Figure 13 (page 36) note the volume labeled Primary Snapshot in the Production Site. It
originated as a read only backup, but is brought into use as an acting primary.
Figure 14 Restoring from tape backup
36
Sample Remote Copy configurations
Best practices
Select an optimum recurrence schedule.
Select a recurrence schedule for remote snapshots that minimizes the potential for data loss.
Any data written to the primary volume since the most recent remote snapshot was created will
be unavailable if the primary volume is unavailable. Consider how much data you are willing to
lose in the event of an emergency and set the recurrence for creating remote snapshots
accordingly.
If you do not want a large number of remote snapshots to accumulate on your remote volume,
you can use several timetables for scheduled remote snapshots, each with different retention
policies. For example, suppose you want to create remote snapshots every four hours to ensure
that no more than four hours worth of data is lost in an emergency. In addition, you want to retain
one week's worth of remote snapshots. Retaining four-hour snapshots for one week can result
in the accumulation of over 40 remote snapshots. Another approach would be to create two
remote snapshot schedules for the volume:
•
One schedule to create remote snapshots every four hours, but only retain the most recent
six remote snapshots. This ensures that you do not lose more than four hours worth of data
in an emergency.
•
A second schedule to create remote snapshots every 24 hours and retain 7 remote snapshots.
Use remote snapshots in conjunction with local, synchronous volume replication
To prevent data loss, reinforce Remote Copy with Network RAID within the cluster of storage
systems at the primary geographic site. With Network RAID configured, a single storage system
can be offline, and your primary volume remains intact.
At the backup location, you can also use synchronous replication to protect your remote volume
against storage system failure.
Example configuration
•
In the production location, create a cluster of three storage systems, all with managers.
•
Create volumes on the cluster, and set the data protection level to Network RAID-10.
•
Create a schedule for making remote snapshots of the primary volume. Set the recurrence
to every four hours, and retention of remote snapshots to two days.
NOTE: You can use the same data protection levels on the remote volume as well. However,
this data protection level is configured independently of the data protection level that is configured
on the primary volume.
If one of the storage systems in the primary location fails, the primary volume will still be available.
If all of the storage systems fail, or if the application server fails, then you can recover data from
the remote snapshots or tape backups in the off-site location.
Using Remote Copy for off-site backup and recovery
For backup and recovery systems, Remote Copy can eliminate the backup window on an
application server. Using iSCSI command line interface commands and scripts, configure the
iSCSI initiator to mount remote snapshots on a local or remote backup server, and then back up
the remote snapshot from the backup server. The remote snapshot is available if the primary
volume fails.
Using Remote Copy for off-site backup and recovery
37
Achieving off-site backup
Rather than creating tape backups and then transporting them to a secure off-site location, you
can use Remote Copy to create remote snapshots in an off-site location. Then, optionally, you
can create tape backups at the off-site location.
Configuration for off-site backup and recovery
To use remote snapshots for off-site tape backup, create remote snapshots for access by your
tape backup application:
•
Create remote volumes in your backup location.
•
Configure your backup application to access the remote snapshots.
•
Configure schedules to create remote snapshots in the designated off-site locations. If your
application server uses multiple volumes that must be in sync, use a script to quiesce the
application before creating remote snapshots.
•
[Optional] Create routine tape backups of the remote snapshots.
Configuration diagram
Figure 15 Off-site backup and recovery example configuration
How this configuration works for off-site backup
Depending on how long you retain the copies of the remote snapshots, you can retrieve data
directly from recent remote snapshots rather than using tape backups. Otherwise, retrieve data
as you normally would from the tape backup.
Best practices
Retain the most recent primary snapshots in the primary cluster
38
Sample Remote Copy configurations
By keeping snapshots on your primary volume, you can quickly roll back a volume to a previous
snapshot without accessing off-site backups.
•
When you create a schedule for Remote Copy, specify the number of primary and remote
snapshots that you want to retain. You can retain primary snapshots to facilitate easy rollback
of the primary volume.
NOTE: Retention of snapshots affects the amount of space that is used in the cluster of
storage systems. Balance the number of snapshots to retain with the amount of space you
are willing to use. You can still access remote snapshots or tape backups if you want to roll
back to a snapshot that you did not retain.
•
Retain remote snapshots in the backup location to facilitate fast recovery of backed-up data.
If you retain a number of remote snapshots after a tape backup is created, you can access
the data without going to the backup tape.
Example configuration
•
Retain three primary snapshots. This enables you to roll the primary volume back, yet it
requires a relatively small amount of space on the primary cluster.
•
Retain up to a week's worth of remote snapshots on the backup cluster.
•
For snapshots older than one week, go to the backup tape.
Achieving nondestructive rollback
As discussed in “Rolling back primary and remote volumes” (page 27), rolling a snapshot back
to a volume requires you to delete any snapshots that were created since the snapshot that you
roll back to. For example, suppose you created snapshots of a volume on Monday, Tuesday,
and Wednesday. On Thursday, if you roll the volume back to Monday's snapshot, then the
snapshots from Tuesday and Wednesday must be deleted first.
You can use Remote Copy to roll a volume back to an old snapshot without losing the interim
snapshots. Because Remote Copy creates two sets of snapshots—primary and remote
snapshots—you can roll a volume back to a snapshot and still retain the other set of snapshots.
Configuration for nondestructive rollback
To use remote snapshots for nondestructive rollback:
•
Create a remote snapshot schedule.
•
In the schedule, specify the same retention policy for the primary and remote snapshots.
This ensures that you have copies of the same number of snapshots in your primary and
remote locations. Any snapshots destroyed during rollback of one volume remain intact on
the other volume. See an illustration of a nondestructive rollback configuration in Figure 16
(page 40).
Using Remote Copy for off-site backup and recovery
39
Figure 16 nondestructive rollback example
How this configuration works for nondestructive rollback
You can choose to roll back either the primary snapshot or the remote snapshot. Rolling back
one of the snapshots requires that you delete more recent snapshots of that volume. The other
volume retains the full set of snapshots. You can continue to make snapshots even though one
side was rolled back and the other side was not.
When deciding whether to roll back the primary or remote volume, consider the following:
•
40
When you roll back the primary snapshot to a primary volume, any applications accessing
the primary volume will no longer have access to the most current data (because the primary
volume has been rolled back to a previous state). If the primary volume must be synchronized
with other volumes accessed by the same application, consider rolling back the remote
volume instead. Figure 17 (page 41) shows rollback of the primary snapshot while leaving
the remote snapshots intact.
Sample Remote Copy configurations
Figure 17 Nondestructive rollback from the primary snapshot
•
To roll back the remote snapshot, you must first make the remote volume into a primary
volume. This stops scheduled creation of remote snapshots, which may jeopardize your
high availability, disaster recovery, or routine backup strategies. Figure 18 (page 42) shows
rollback of the remote snapshot.
Using Remote Copy for off-site backup and recovery
41
Figure 18 Nondestructive rollback from the remote snapshot
Best practices
Roll back the primary snapshot and keep the remote snapshots as a backup.
To ensure that Remote Copy continues to operate, roll back the primary volume as follows:
1. Preserve the current state of the primary volume that you want to roll back by creating a
one-time (manual) remote snapshot of it.
2. Roll back the volume.
Before roll back, scheduled remote snapshots fail. After the primary volume is rolled back,
scheduled creation of remote copies will resume correctly.
Completed remote snapshots remain intact.
Using Remote Copy for data migration or cloning
Remote Copy allows migration of data from one application server to another without interrupting
the production application server. This capability supports a number of uses such as data mining
or content distribution.
Achieving data migration
You can use Remote Copy to make a complete copy (clone) of one or more volumes without
interrupting access to the original volumes. This type of data migration allows you to copy an
entire data set for use by a new application or workgroup.
To copy data from one location to another, simply create a one-time remote snapshot of the
volume. To make the remote snapshot a read/write volume, make it into a primary volume.
42
Sample Remote Copy configurations
Configuration for data migration
To make a copy of a volume in a remote location, configure a cluster of storage systems in the
remote location with enough space to accommodate the volume. See Figure 19 (page 43) for
an example configuration.
Figure 19 Data migration example configuration
How this configuration works for data migration
Suppose you want to create a complete copy of a volume for an application to use in a different
location.
1. Configure a cluster of storage systems in the new location to contain the copied volume.
2. Create a one-time remote snapshot of the volume onto the cluster in the new location.
If your application server uses multiple volumes that must be in sync, use a script to quiesce
the application before creating remote snapshots.
[Optional] You can create regular one-time snapshots and use remote copy to move the
snapshots to the remote cluster at your convenience.
3.
4.
On the cluster in the new location, make the remote volume into a primary volume.
Configure the application server in the new location to access the new primary volume.
Figure 20 (page 44) shows the migration of data after converting a remote volume into a
primary volume.
Using Remote Copy for data migration or cloning
43
Figure 20 Configuration after data migration
44
Sample Remote Copy configurations
4 Support and other resources
Accessing Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support
•
For live assistance, go to the Contact Hewlett Packard Enterprise Worldwide website:
www.hpe.com/assistance
•
To access documentation and support services, go to the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support
Center website:
www.hpe.com/support/hpesc
Information to collect
•
Technical support registration number (if applicable)
•
Product name, model or version, and serial number
•
Operating system name and version
•
Firmware version
•
Error messages
•
Product-specific reports and logs
•
Add-on products or components
•
Third-party products or components
Accessing updates
•
Some software products provide a mechanism for accessing software updates through the
product interface. Review your product documentation to identify the recommended software
update method.
•
To download product updates, go to either of the following:
◦
Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center Get connected with updates page:
www.hpe.com/support/e-updates
◦
Software Depot website:
www.hpe.com/support/softwaredepot
•
To view and update your entitlements, and to link your contracts, Care Packs, and warranties
with your profile, go to the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center More Information
on Access to Support Materials page:
www.hpe.com/support/AccessToSupportMaterials
IMPORTANT: Access to some updates might require product entitlement when accessed
through the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center. You must have an HP Passport
set up with relevant entitlements.
Websites
Website
Link
Hewlett Packard Enterprise Information Library
www.hpe.com/info/enterprise/docs
Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center
www.hpe.com/support/hpesc
Accessing Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support
45
Website
Link
Contact Hewlett Packard Enterprise Worldwide
www.hpe.com/assistance
Subscription Service/Support Alerts
www.hpe.com/support/e-updates
Software Depot
www.hpe.com/support/softwaredepot
Customer Self Repair
www.hpe.com/support/selfrepair
Insight Remote Support
www.hpe.com/info/insightremotesupport/docs
Serviceguard Solutions for HP-UX
www.hpe.com/info/hpux-serviceguard-docs
Single Point of Connectivity Knowledge (SPOCK)
Storage compatibility matrix
www.hpe.com/storage/spock
Storage white papers and analyst reports
www.hpe.com/storage/whitepapers
nl
Customer self repair
Hewlett Packard Enterprise customer self repair (CSR) programs allow you to repair your product.
If a CSR part needs to be replaced, it will be shipped directly to you so that you can install it at
your convenience. Some parts do not qualify for CSR. Your Hewlett Packard Enterprise authorized
service provider will determine whether a repair can be accomplished by CSR.
For more information about CSR, contact your local service provider or go to the CSR website:
www.hpe.com/support/selfrepair
Remote support
Remote support is available with supported devices as part of your warranty, Care Pack Service,
or contractual support agreement. It provides intelligent event diagnosis, and automatic, secure
submission of hardware event notifications to Hewlett Packard Enterprise, which will initiate a
fast and accurate resolution based on your product’s service level. Hewlett Packard Enterprise
strongly recommends that you register your device for remote support.
For more information and device support details, go to the following website:
www.hpe.com/info/insightremotesupport/docs
Documentation feedback
Hewlett Packard Enterprise is committed to providing documentation that meets your needs. To
help us improve the documentation, send any errors, suggestions, or comments to Documentation
Feedback (docsfeedback@hpe.com). When submitting your feedback, include the document
title, part number, edition, and publication date located on the front cover of the document. For
online help content, include the product name, product version, help edition, and publication date
located on the legal notices page.
46
Support and other resources
Glossary
The following glossary provides definitions of terms used in the LeftHand OS software
and the HPE StoreVirtual Storage.
acting primary
volume
The remote volume, when it assumes the role of the primary volume in a failover scenario.
active-passive
A type of network bonding where, in the event of a NIC failure, the logical interface uses another
NIC in the bond until the preferred NIC resumes operation.
Adaptive Load
Balancing
A type of network bonding where the logical interface performs load balancing of data
transmission.
application-managed snapshot
Snapshot of a volume that is taken while the application that is serving that volume is quiesced.
Because the application is quiesced, the data in the snapshot is consistent with the application's
view of the data. That is, no data was in flight or cached waiting to be written.
authentication
group
For release 7.0 and earlier, identifies the client or entity accessing the volume. Not used in
release 8.0 and later.
Auto Discover
A feature in the CMC that automatically searches for storage systems on the subnet the CMC
is connected to. Any storage systems it discovers appear in the navigation window on the left
side of the CMC.
Bond0
Interface created for network interface failover and only appears after configuring for failover.
bonding
Combining physical network interfaces into a single logical interface.
boot device
Compact flash cards from which the storage system boots up. Also known as disk-on-modules
or DOMs.
CHAP
Challenge-Handshake Authentication Protocol.
CLI
Command-line interface. An interface comprised of various commands which are used to control
operating system responses.
clone point
The snapshot that has two or more volumes related to it. A clone point is created when a
SmartClone volume is created from a snapshot or from snapshot temporary space.
cluster
A cluster is a grouping of storage systems that create the storage pool from which you create
volumes.
CMC
Centralized Management Console. See HPE StoreVirtual Centralized Management Console.
communication
mode
The unicast communication among storage systems and application servers.
community
string
The community string acts as an authentication password. It identifies hosts that are allowed
read-only access to the SNMP data.
Configuration
Summary
The Configuration Summary displays an overview of the volumes, snapshots, storage systems,
and iSCSI sessions in the HPE StoreVirtual Storage. It provides an overview of the storage
network broken out by management groups.
consolidating
snapshot
Consolidating means the snapshot and/or volume is currently optimizing the movement of data
among snapshots due to a snapshot delete operation. Consolidating optimizes the amount of
space required to maintain the desired number of snapshots.
When a snapshot is in a consolidating state, there may temporarily be more snapshots listed
under a volume than expected. After the consolidating operation completes, the number of
snapshots retained will be as expected. This operation does not require more volume or snapshot
space.
data center
Also known as a “Site.” A data center is a physical location in your environment where application
servers, SAN storage and network equipment reside. In the LeftHand OS Multi-Site software,
a data center is typically referred to as a site.
disaster recovery
site
Similar to a secondary site, the disaster recovery site is used to operate the SAN in the event
of a disaster.
47
disk status
Whether the disk is:
•
Active - on and participating in RAID
•
Uninitialized or Inactive - On but not participating in RAID
•
Off or Missing - Not on
•
DMA Off - disk unavailable due to faulty hardware or improperly seated in the chassis
DSM
Device Specific Module.
DSM for MPIO
The StoreVirtual DSM for Microsoft Windows MPIO vendor-specific DSM that interfaces with
the Microsoft MPIO framework.
failback
After failover, the process by which you restore the primary volume and turn the acting primary
back into a remote volume.
failover
The process by which the user transfers operation of the application server over to the remote
volume. This can be a manual operation, a scripted operation, or VMware enabled.
Failover Manager
A specialized manager running as a VMware appliance that allows you to place a quorum
tie-breaker system into a 3rd location in the network to provide for automated failover/failback
of the Multi-Site SAN clusters. The Failover Manager is designed to run on VMware ESX Server,
VMware Server, and VMware Player. It is installed on hardware separate from the SAN hardware.
failover recovery
After failover, the process by which the user chooses to fail back to the primary volume or to
make the acting primary into a permanent primary volume.
frame size
The frame size specifies the size of data packets that are transferred over the network.
full provisioning
Full provisioning reserves the same amount of space on the SAN as is presented to application
servers.
ghost storage
system
When using Repair Storage System, a “ghost” storage system acts as a placeholder in the
cluster, keeping the cluster intact, while you repair or replace the storage system.
Graphical
Legend
Describes all the icons used in the CMC:
•
Items tab - displays the icons used to represent virtual items displayed in the CMC
•
Hardware tab - displays the icons that represent the physical storage units.
hardware reports
Hardware reports display point-in-time statistics about the performance and health of the storage
system, its drives, and configuration.
hostname
The hostname on a storage system is the user-definable name that displays below the storage
system icon in the network window. It is also visible when the users browse the network.
HPE StoreVirtual
Centralized
Management
Console
management interface for the LeftHand OS software.
ID LED
LED lights on the physical storage system so that you can find that system in a rack.
iSCSI
Internet small computer system interface. Like an ordinary SCSI interface, iSCSI is
standards-based and efficiently transmits block-level data between a host computer (such as
a server that hosts Exchange or SQL Server) and a target device (such as the HPE All-in-One
Storage System). By carrying SCSI commands over IP networks, iSCSI is used to facilitate
data transfers over intranets and to manage storage over long distances.
iSCSI load
balancing
Improves iSCSI performance and scalability by distributing iSCSI sessions for different volumes
evenly across storage systems in a cluster.
LeftHand OS
interface
When you initially set up a storage system using the Configuration Interface, the first interface
that you configure becomes the interface used for the LeftHand OS software communication.
license key
A WWN-encoded sequence that is obtained from the license key fulfillment website.
Link Aggregation
Dynamic Mode
A type of network bonding in which the logical interface uses both NICs simultaneously for data
transfer.
log files
Log files for the storage system are stored both locally on the storage system and are also
written to a remote log server.
48
Glossary
logical site
This site is on an isolated network and power connection than the other sites. However, it can
be in the same physical location as one of the real sites. Also, a site for a Failover Manager.
management
group
A collection of one or more storage systems which serves as the container within which you
cluster storage systems and create volumes for storage.
managers
Manager software runs on storage systems within a management group. You start managers
on designated storage systems to govern the activity of all of the storage systems in the group.
MIB
Management Information Base. A database of managed objects accessed by network
management protocols. An SNMP MIB is a set of parameters that an SNMP management
station can query or set in the SNMP agent of a network device (for example, a router).
Multi-Site cluster
A cluster of storage that spans multiple sites (up to three). A Multi-Site cluster must meet at
least one of the following conditions:
•
Contain storage systems that reside in two or more sites
•
Contain storage systems that span subnets
•
Contain multiple VIPs. The cluster can have a single site, and the multiple VIPs make it a
multi-site cluster.
network RAID
Synchronous replication, mirroring or parity protection on a volume-by-volume basis. Protecting
data for a volume across all storage systems in the cluster. Network RAID-10, 10+1 or 10+2 is
required to protect data in HPE StoreVirtual Storage.
network window
Graphically depicts the status of each storage system. Storage systems on the network are
either available or part of a management group.
NTP
Network Time Protocol
original primary
volume
The primary volume that fails and then is returned to service.
overprovisioned
cluster
An overprovisioned cluster occurs when the total provisioned space of all volumes and snapshots
is greater than the physical space available on the cluster. This can occur when there are
snapshot schedules and/or thinly provisioned volumes related to the cluster.
parity
In RAID 5, redundant information is stored as parity distributed across the disks. Parity allows
the storage system to use more disk capacity for data storage.
peer site
Absence of a primary site designation makes all the sites peer sites.
point-in-time
snapshot
Snapshots that are taken at a specific point in time, but an application writing to that volume
may not be quiesced. Thus, data may be in flight or cached and the actual data on the volume
may not be consistent with the application's view of the data.
preferred
interface
A preferred interface is the interface within an active backup bond that is used for data transfer
during normal operation.
primary site
A site designation assigned by the administrator in the HPE StoreVirtual Centralized Management
Console. A primary site is more important than a secondary site. In this setup, you would run
a majority of managers in the primary site. In a two-site setup, this allows the primary site to
stay online even if the network link between the primary and secondary sites fails. Typically,
the primary site has majority/all of the application servers. In configurations that do not designate
a primary site, the sites are referred to as “peer” sites.
primary
snapshot
A snapshot of the primary volume which is created in the process of creating a remote snapshot.
The primary snapshot is located on the same cluster as the primary volume.
primary volume
The volume which is being accessed (read/write) by the application server. The primary volume
is the volume that is backed up with Remote Copy.
quorum
A majority of managers required to be running and communicating with each other in order for
the LeftHand OS software to function.
RAID device
RAID (originally redundant array of inexpensive disks, now redundant array of independent
disks) refers to a data storage scheme using multiple hard drives to share or replicate data
among the drives.
49
RAID levels
Type of RAID configuration:
•
RAID 0 - data striped across disk set
•
RAID 1 - data mirrored from one disk onto a second disk
•
RAID 10 - striped sets of RAID 1 disks
•
RAID 5 - data blocks are distributed across all disks in a RAID set. Redundant information
is stored as parity distributed across the disks.
RAID quorum
Number of intact disks required to maintain data integrity in a RAID set.
RAID rebuild rate
The rate at which the RAID configuration rebuilds if a disk is replaced.
RAID status
Condition of RAID on the storage system:
•
Normal - RAID is synchronized and running. No action is required.
•
Rebuild - A new disk has been inserted in a drive bay and RAID is currently rebuilding.
No action is required.
•
Degraded - RAID is not functioning properly. Either a disk needs to be replaced or a
replacement disk has been inserted in a drive.
•
Off - Data cannot be stored on the storage system. The storage system is offline and
flashes red in the network window.
register
Register individual storage systems to use add-on applications. Registration requires sending
in the storage system serial numbers to purchase the license keys, which are then applied to
the storage system.
remote copy pair
The primary volume and its related remote volume.
remote snapshot
An identical copy of a primary snapshot. The remote snapshot is located on the same cluster
as the remote volume.
remote volume
The volume that resides in the Remote Copy location where the remote snapshots are created.
The remote volume contains no data. It acts as a pointer to tell the system where to make the
copy of the primary snapshot. The remote volume can be stored in these ways:
•
In the same cluster in the same management group
•
In a different cluster in a different management group
•
In a different cluster in the same management group
Repair storage
system
Creates a placeholder in the cluster, in the form of a “ghost” storage system, that keeps the
cluster intact while you remove the storage system to replace a disk or replace the storage
system itself, and return it to the cluster.
replication level
In Release 8.5 this changes to data protection level. Prior to release 8.5, replication level is the
term that designated how many copies of data to keep in the cluster.
replication
priority
Removed in Release 8.5. Prior to Release 8.5, replication priority allowed you to designate
whether data availability or redundancy is more important in your configuration. Release 8.5
forward defaults to availability. This default can be changed using the HPE StoreVirtual LeftHand
OS Command Line Interface.
restripe
Striped data is stored across all disks in the cluster. You might change the configuration of a
volume, for example, change data protection level, add a storage system, or remove a storage
system. Because of your change, the pages in the volume must be reorganized across the new
configuration. The system can keep track of several configuration changes at once. This means
you can change configurations, even while a volume is in the midst of a different reconfiguration.
In particular, if a reconfiguration was done by accident, you don't have to wait until it finishes
to change back to the original configuration. See “Stripe”.
resync
When a storage system goes down, and writes continue to a second storage system, and the
original store comes back up, the original storage system needs to recoup the exact data
captured by the second storage system.
rolling back
Replaces the original volume with a read/write copy of a selected snapshot. Starting with release
8.0, the new volume retains the same name.
50
Glossary
secondary site
A site that is less important than the primary site. In this setup a minority of managers runs in
the secondary site. In a two-site setup, this allows the secondary site to go offline if the network
link between the Primary and secondary sites fails. Typically, the secondary site has a minority,
or none, of the application servers. If the primary site fails, customers can manually recover
quorum in the secondary site.
server
An application server that you set up in a management group and then assign volumes to it to
provide access to those volumes.
shared snapshot
Shared snapshots occur when a clone point is created from a newer snapshot that has older
snapshots below it in the tree. All the volumes created from the clone point will display these
older snapshots that they share, as well as the clone point.
site
A user-designated location in which storage systems are installed. Multi-Site SAN configurations
have multiple sites with storage systems in each site, and each site has its own subnet. A site
can be a logical configuration, such as a subnet within the same data center, department, or
application.
SmartClone
volume
SmartClone volumes are space-efficient copies of existing volumes or snapshots. They appear
as multiple volumes that share a common snapshot, called a clone point. They share this
snapshot data on the SAN.
snapshot set
Application-managed snapshots created for a volume set.
snapshot
A fixed version of a volume for use with backup and other applications.
SNMP traps
Use traps to have an SNMP tool send alerts when a monitoring threshold is reached.
solution pack
HPE StoreVirtual Application Integration Solution Pack
split mirror
A full copy of data that has been split off from the original and is no longer being updated.
standard cluster
Also known as a “cluster.” A standard cluster is one that does not use any of the Multi-Site
features within the LeftHand OS software. Standard clusters:
•
Cannot contain storage systems that are designated to reside in a site.
•
Cannot contain storage systems that span subnets.
•
Can only have a single VIP.
storage server
Storage server software maintains the customer's data. It reads to and writes from disks in
response to customer reads and writes of LeftHand OS volumes.
stripe
Striped data is stored across all disks in the array, which increases performance but does not
provide fault tolerance.
synchronize
The process of copying the most recent snapshot from the primary volume to a new remote
snapshot. On failback, synchronization is the process of copying the most recent remote snapshot
back to the primary volume. The CMC displays the progress of this synchronization. Also, you
can manually synchronize if necessary to include data that is on the remote volume but not the
primary.
target secret
Target secret is used in both 1-way and 2-way CHAP when the target (volume) challenges the
iSCSI initiator.
temporary space
Temporary space is created when a snapshot is mounted for use by applications and operating
systems that need to write to the snapshot when they access it. Temporary space can be
converted to a volume using the SmartClone process.
thin provisioning
Thin provisioning reserves less space on the SAN than is presented to application servers.
trap
A type of SNMP message used to signal that an event has occurred. (SNIA)
Trap Community
String
The Trap Community String is used for client-side authentication when using SNMP.
unicast
Communication between a single sender and a single receiver over a network.
VIP
virtual IP address
virtual IP address
A highly available address that ensures that if a storage system in a cluster becomes unavailable,
servers can still access the volume through the other storage systems in the cluster.
51
virtual machine
A virtual storage appliance that provides one or more simultaneous storage environments in
which LeftHand OS may execute as though they were running on the bare iron.
virtual manager
A manager that is added to a management group but is not started on a storage system until
it is needed to regain quorum.
volume
A logical entity that is made up of storage on one or more storage systems. It can be used as
raw data storage or it can be formatted with a file system and used by a host or file server.
volume lists
For release 7.0 and earlier, provide the link between designated volumes and the authentication
groups that can access those volumes. Not used in release 8.0 and later.
volume set
Two or more volumes used by an application. For example, you may set up Exchange to use
two volumes to support a StorageGroup: one for mailbox data and one for logs. Those two
volumes make a volume set.
volume size
The size of the virtual device communicated to the operating system and the applications.
VSS Provider
HPE StoreVirtual VSS Provider is the hardware provider that supports the Volume Shadow
Copy Service on the HPE StoreVirtual Storage.
VSS
Volume Shadow Copy Service
writable space
See temporary space.
52
Glossary
Index
A
accessing
updates, 45
adding
a remote snapshot schedule, 20
a remote volume, 13
remote snapshots, 10
affordable disaster recovery
best practices, 37
configuration, 34
application-managed snapshots
creating, 11, 21
creating primary snapshot for volume sets, 12, 21
deleting remote, 17
failing over from, 24
promoting remote to primary, 25
rolling back from, 28
B
backup and recovery
using Remote Copy, 37
benefits of Remote Copy, 5
best practices
for affordable disaster recovery, 37
for high availability, 33
for nondestructive rollback, 42
for off-site backup and recovery, 39
scheduled remote snapshot, 10, 20
scheduled remote snapshots schedule, 9
C
canceling remote snapshots, 16
changing
backup site into new production site, 27
primary volume into remote volume, 24
configuration
for affordable disaster recovery, 34
for data migration, 43
for high availability, 30
for nondestructive rollback, 39
for off-site backup and recovery, 38
configuring
failover, 24
Remote Copy, 7
contacting Hewlett Packard Enterprise, 45
copying
using Remote Copy, 10
creating
first remote copy, 14
first remote copy using PrimeSync, 15
remote snapshots, 14, 22
split mirrors, 28
customer self repair, 46
D
data
availability during failover, 31
merging for failback, 32
synchronizing after failover, 26
transfer rate (bandwidth setting), 15
data migration
and volume cloning, 42
configuration diagram, 43
configuration for, 43
using Remote Copy for, 42
with remote snapshots, 28
data mining
split mirror, 28
with remote snapshots, 28
deleting
remote snapshot schedule, 24
remote snapshots, 17
snapshot schedules, 23
disassociating management groups, 29
for PrimeSync, 15
disaster recovery
affordable, using Remote Copy, 34
documentation
providing feedback on, 46
E
editing
remote snapshot schedules, 23
remote snapshots, 17
F
failback
merging data for, 32
to production configuration, 32
Failover
with volume sets, 24
failover
configuring, 24
data availability during, 31
planning, 24
resuming production after, 25
scripting for, 24
setting up new site, 27
synchronizing data after, 26
timeline for, 26
to backup application server, 32
with Remote Copy, 33
G
glossary, 47
graphical representations of Remote Copy, 6
H
high availability
and failover, 33
and Remote Copy, 33
best practices, 33
configuration diagram, 30
53
configuration for, 30
configuration of Remote Copy, 33
I
icons for Remote Copy, 6
M
management groups
disassociating, 29
disassociating PrimeSync, 15
temporary, for PrimeSync, 15
merging data for failback, 32
monitoring
progress of remote copy, 19
remote copy details, 18
remote snapshots, 17
N
nondestructive rollback
best practices, 42
configuration diagram, 39
configuration for, 39
O
off-site backup and recovery
best practices, 39
configuration diagram, 38
configuration for, 38
using Remote Copy for, 37
P
pausing scheduled snapshots, 22
planning
failover, 24
remote copy schedules, 9
remote snapshot schedules, 7
prerequisites
for rolling back primary volumes, 28
primary snapshots, 11
primary volumes
prerequisites for rolling back, 28
rolling back, 28
PrimeSync, 14
temporary management group and, 15
using for first copy, 15
production
resuming after failover, 25
R
recurring snapshots, 20
remote bandwidth
setting, 15
Remote Copy
business continuance, 37
creating, 6
creating the first copy, 14
disassociating management groups, 29
disassociating PrimeSync management groups, 15
high availability, 33
54
Index
high availability and failover, 33
high availability configuration, 33
icons for, 6
monitoring details window, 18
monitoring progress of, 19
overview, 4
planning checklist for remote copy schedules, 9
PrimeSync, 15
routine backup and recovery, 37
remote snapshots
canceling, 16
creating, 10, 14, 22
creating schedule, 20
data migration, 28
data mining, 28
deleting, 17
deleting application-managed, 17
deleting scheduled, 24
editing, 17
editing schedules, 23
monitoring, 17
monitoring details window, 18
new, 10
planning for scheduled, 7
primary, 11
retention policy, 8
remote support, 46
remote volumes
adding, 13
creating manually, 13
creating on the fly, 13
using an existing, 13
resuming scheduled snapshots, 22
retention policy for remote snapshots, 8
rolling back a volume
from application-managed snapshots, 28
Remote Copy and primary volumes, 28
Remote Copy and remote volumes, 28
S
scheduled snapshots, 20
pausing or resuming, 22
schedules, planning Remote Copy, 9
scheduling
remote snapshots, 20
scripting for failover, 24
setting remote bandwidth, 15
snapshots
creating application-managed, 11, 21
creating application-managed for volume sets, 12, 21
deleting schedules, 23
pausing or resuming, 22
scheduling, 20
split mirrors, creating, 28
support
Hewlett Packard Enterprise, 45
synchronizing data
after failover, 26
after failover, between acting primary volumes and
original primary volumes, 26
T
timeline of failover, 26
U
updates
accessing, 45
uses for Remote Copy, 5
using Remote Copy
for business continuance, 30
for data migration, 42
for off-site backup and recovery, 37
V
viewing a list of remote snapshots, 15
volume sets
creating application-managed snapshots for, 12, 21
failing over from, 24
volume type
changing primary into remote, 24
volumes
cloning and data migration, 42
synchronizing data after failover, 26
W
websites, 45
customer self repair, 46
55
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