Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education

Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Supporting the
achievement of
deaf young people
in further education
For college staff working with
young people with hearing impairment
Our vision is of a
world without barriers
for every deaf child.
Contents
Introduction
5
1. Overview 7
2. Deafness and its impact on learning
13
3. Moving into further education
17
4. For students already in further education
31
Appendices
Appendix 1: Types and levels of deafness Appendix 2: Personal hearing technology Appendix 3: Communication options
Appendix 4: Specialist staff working in further education
Appendix 5: Useful resources
58
58
62
65
66
68
About the National Deaf Children’s Society 69
About the National Sensory Impairment Partnership (NatSIP)
72
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
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Introduction
Introduction
The National Deaf Children’s Society uses the word ‘deaf’ to refer to all levels
of hearing loss. We include pupils who may have been identified as having a
hearing impairment in the School Census.
Further education is the most common post-school destination for deaf young
people. It is therefore important that staff working in these settings understand
deaf young people’s needs and strategies to meet them, so that the best
outcomes can be achieved. Further education marks a significant change from
school in many ways, and both the young person and staff need to be prepared
for the challenges and opportunities involved in this transition.
The wide range of hearing and communication technologies now available to
many deaf young people has transformed their ability to access college life.
However, this also means that deaf students in further education now have a
greater diversity of needs, many of which may not be immediately apparent to
college staff, and will therefore present new challenges.
The aim of this resource is to help staff in further education to:
• m
ake effective provision for deaf students so that they make good
progress and develop the independent learning and life skills they will
need in adulthood
• prepare deaf students effectively for the range of different pathways
after further education including higher education, apprenticeships and
employment
• take the reasonable steps required under the Equality Act (2010) (or the
Disability Discrimination Act (1995) in Northern Ireland) to ensure that
deaf students are not treated less favourably than other students.
This resource will achieve this by:
• explaining the implications of deafness on language and learning
• providing advice on how to help a deaf student make a successful
transition both into college and beyond
• describing the measures college staff can take to enable a deaf student
to succeed.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
The content of this resource is informed by evidence from recent research by the
University of Manchester into the experiences of deaf young people in further
education.1
NOTE
The National Deaf Children’s Society uses the word ‘parent’ to refer to all
parents and carers of children.
1. University of Manchester, Identifying Effective Practice in the Provision of Education and
Education Support Services for 16–19 Year Old Deaf Young People in Further Education in
England (National Deaf Children’s Society) 2015
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Overview
Overview
“
y college is not deaf aware enough. They think that
M
because I can speak that I understand everything.
If I used sign, my needs would be obvious.
——Deaf student
1
”
Effective provision for a deaf student should entail:
• a thorough assessment of the student’s needs and strengths
• a
plan setting out how the college will meet those needs and overcome
any barriers to the student making good progress
• effective implementation of the plan
• A review of the student’s progress and the success of the plan to
establish whether changes need to be made and what these are.
In England, this ‘assess, plan, do, review’ cycle has been incorporated into
statutory guidance set out in the Special Educational Needs and Disability Code
of Practice (2015).
It should be remembered that deafness in itself is not a learning disability and,
given the right support, deaf students can make the same progress and achieve
the same as other students of similar cognitive ability. Having high expectations
of deaf students is vital.
This resource is intended to help you follow this approach, as set out below.
Assessing what support is needed
An accurate and thorough understanding of a student’s needs and strengths
underpins good planning and progress. A good assessment will include:
1. the student’s self-evaluation of any support requirements
2. information from the school and information on levels of attainment
3. the views of parents about appropriate provision
4. the involvement of specialists such as a Teacher of the Deaf
5. the use of specialist assessments
6. the need for access to technology and communication support
7. consideration of support needed to meet any specific course
requirements.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Deafness will impact on a range of factors that contribute to a student’s ability
to learn including:
• listening skills
• attention and concentration
• language development
• literacy skills
• working memory
• auditory memory
• processing time
• incidental learning
• social skills
• self-esteem
• learning style.
It is therefore likely that assessments will focus on these areas. Further advice
on specialist assessments can be found on page 20.
Chapter three of this resource (page 13) provides more information about
the steps that should be taken to ensure there is a proper assessment of the
student’s needs to guarantee an effective transition to college. A checklist to
support this can be found on page 23.
Planning the right support
Plans should be developed with the student and should consider:
• the outcomes the student is expecting to achieve at college in
preparation for adulthood
• the shorter term targets to achieve those outcomes
• the provision and adjustments required to achieve the outcomes and
targets, meet needs and overcome any barriers to accessing teaching
and learning. This would include support strategies and intervention,
access arrangements and support from external agencies
• arrangements for monitoring and reviewing.
The challenges presented by a hearing loss mean that for many deaf students
their plan is likely to include:
• targets related to the development of language, communication, literacy,
confidence and social skills, and the support and interventions required
to achieve the targets
• the provision and maintenance of hearing technology
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Overview
• the provision of communication support
• measures to ensure teaching and learning takes place in rooms which
provide a good listening environment and have good acoustics
• access arrangements for assessments/examinations
• access to support from specialist staff such as Teachers of the Deaf
• the provision of pre- and post-lecture tutoring
• teaching strategies and approaches to ensure access to teaching and
learning
• ensuring staff and other students are ‘deaf aware’
• details of who is responsible for the overall coordination of the plan and
who is responsible for delivering key aspects of the provision.
Again, a checklist to support assessment and transition planning can be found
on page 29.
Implement or do: putting the provision in place
A student’s plan should set out who is responsible for the overall coordination
and implementation of the plan. This could be a tutor or course leader and/or
the member of staff with responsibility for the coordination of SEN support or
additional support.
They will have responsibility for the following.
• E
nsuring that relevant staff receive the necessary information, advice,
guidance and training to support the deaf student and help them to
access teaching and learning (a template information sharing sheet can
be found on page 34).
• Ensuring the student’s progress is monitored.
• Liaising with and obtaining feedback from the student on what is going
well and not so well.
• Ensuring that support and provision are in place (for example,
employment of qualified communication support staff, hearing
technology, adjustments to teaching spaces to improve the listening
conditions).
Chapter four of this resource provides advice on the reasonable adjustments
that can be made to teaching strategies to meet the needs of deaf students.
The college should also put all necessary modifications and adaptations in
place to ensure the deaf student has equal access to examinations. More
information on access arrangements can be found on page 48.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Keeping support and its impact under review
The effectiveness of support and its impact on the student’s progress should
be regularly reviewed and evaluated, taking into account the student’s views.
The college should have developed systems and processes for doing this. Key
areas that are related to the student’s deafness and may require consideration
include the following.
• Levels of progress in areas of language and communication.
• Levels of overall progress and whether any gaps with other students are
widening or narrowing.
• The accessibility of the course content. For example, checking if the
student is able to understand the language and concepts used in
lectures or establishing where and when the student may experience
most difficulty in hearing what is said.
• The effectiveness of communication support. For example, is the
communication support worker able to interpret accurately and fluently
what the lecturer is saying.
• The effectiveness of technology.
• Any changes to the student’s level of hearing.
• Their success in communicating with others, socialising and forming
friendships.
Where the student is not making expected levels of progress, the specialist
assessments, particularly in language and communication, may be helpful
in identifying the source of difficulties and revising the plan and support
strategies. A Teacher of the Deaf can again provide advice on this.
More widely, colleges should take steps to review the general effectiveness of
provision for deaf learners. On page 55, we provide a checklist for how college
leaders can do this.
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Overview
An effective college will:
• ensure that the assessment of a student’s needs is based on accurate
information about their prior attainment, reflects the type and level
of their hearing loss and its effect on their learning and identifies key
barriers to making progress
• seek students’ views on the barriers they are experiencing and the
strategies and support that will benefit them
• consider the implications of a student’s deafness when planning how
to meet their needs. This will include a recognition that good speech
intelligibility may mask underlying linguistic difficulties and problems of
accessing what is said in lectures
• ensure that the necessary support is provided, whether this is through
modification of teaching strategies, meeting language and communication
needs, the effective use of technology, staff training, improving the
listening environment and providing for social and emotional needs
• review the effectiveness of their provision for the deaf student, monitoring
the extent to which the student is achieving the expected outcomes.
The above steps should be carried out with support from a Teacher of the Deaf.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
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Deafness and its impact on learning
Deafness and its
impact on learning
2
Deaf students cover the whole range of ability. Deafness is not a learning
disability and deaf students have the potential to attain and achieve the same
as any other student, given the right support and access to the curriculum.
However, as most teaching and learning takes place through the main senses of
sight and hearing, this presents deaf students with particular challenges when
trying to access teaching and learning.
Deaf young people have a diverse range of needs, including the type of hearing
technology used and their preferred way of communicating. It is therefore
important to find out what the specific student’s needs are and their impact on
learning.
Levels and types of deafness
There is considerable variation in the levels and types of deafness.
Young people who are deaf may have a permanent mild, moderate, severe or
profound hearing loss in one or both ears or a temporary loss such as glue ear.
The Teacher of the Deaf will be able to explain the individual deaf student’s
level of hearing by showing you an audiogram. An audiogram is a chart used by
an audiologist to record the results of the hearing assessment.
Further details on the types and levels of deafness are given in Appendix 1.
Hearing technologies
Deaf young people use different types of personal hearing technology supplied
by the NHS such as hearing aids, bone conduction hearing implants or cochlear
implants. More information about the technology that deaf young people may
use can be found in Appendix 2.
The audiologist will have assessed and recorded how much the deaf young
person can hear with their hearing technology fitted. However, it is important to
understand that while the hearing technology used is set and programmed to
enable the deaf young person to access sound as near to typical hearing levels
as possible it does not replace normal hearing.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Acquired deafness
Pupils may start school without a diagnosis of deafness, or acquire a permanent
deafness while at school. At further education age this is most likely to happen
following a serious illness, such as meningitis, but it can happen at any time.
It is important for staff to look out for any possible signs of deafness. It is also
essential to monitor deaf students’ hearing levels in case of deterioration.
Deafness and additional needs
There is a relatively high prevalence of deafness in students who have learning
difficulties/other disabilities. Often the student’s deafness is overshadowed by
their other difficulties. It is important to take steps to address the impact of the
deafness so that they can access learning, communicate and socialise.
Impact of deafness on language
Childhood deafness has a major impact on learning spoken language as it is
usually acquired through hearing and vision together. Early hearing screening of
babies and improved hearing technologies mean that more deaf students now
enter further education using spoken language (with or without signed support)
and some form of hearing technology. However, their language, communication
and learning needs may not be immediately apparent, with good speech
intelligibility masking their level of linguistic ability.
The impact of deafness on a student will also be influenced by factors such as:
• the age at which they became deaf
• whether deafness was diagnosed and managed early or late
• support from parents
• the quality of professional support they receive
• their cognitive ability
• personal characteristics, such as determination
• the functioning of their hearing technology and how often it is worn.
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Deafness and its impact on learning
Impact of deafness on access to learning
The impact of deafness on language development can mean a deaf student has
difficulty in being able to:
• m
ake sense of what people say and understand what is happening
around them
• learn to think things through and problem solve
• understand and express what they are feeling and manage their
emotions.
Deaf students are likely to require additional support if they are to make the
same progress as other pupils of a similar age and cognitive ability. Adaptations
and strategies will need to be put in place that manage and minimise the
impact of their hearing loss, develop their learning skills, provide access to the
curriculum and lead to higher levels of academic achievement.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
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Moving into further education
Moving into
further education
3
he practical nature of the further education vocational curriculum can
“ Tplay
to my son’s strengths, enabling him to become independent.
”
——Parent of deaf student
Supporting prospective students
In a review of post-16 provision in England for disabled students, Ofsted
identified that the following activities help a successful transition to further
education.2
• Link courses where learners can attend the setting during the final years
of schooling for a set time each week to follow a specified programme.
• Taster opportunities where the learner can sample subjects, including
tasters during the summer break.
• O
pportunities to get to know the building and the facilities and to meet
the tutors and support staff before starting.
• Holding interviews which focus on attainment and capability.
• Discussion and agreement about any adjustments required.
• Opportunities for students to familiarise themselves with college life.
This section sets out the specific measures that further education providers can
take to help prospective deaf students, building on the links that they may have
developed with local authority specialist services and local schools.
2. Progression Post-16 for Learners with Learning Difficulties and/or Disabilities, Ofsted 2011
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Helping prospective students choose and apply for a course
Providing information
A deaf young person will be reliant on access to reliable, comprehensive,
independent advice and guidance in order to make informed choices.
In addition to the information the college provides for all students, deaf young
people will be interested in:
• the college’s experience of educating deaf students and the specialist
support available to them, including case studies to show how the
college has met the needs of deaf students
• specific detail on courses, the content and how they are delivered
• detail on how the college environment has been adjusted to make it
accessible to deaf students (for example acoustics, use of a soundfield
system)
• contact information (including email addresses) of the key staff
members who will be able to answer questions on support and facilities,
course requirements, etc.
• clear information regarding the admissions process and what needs to
be done to obtain funding for additional support such as communication
support workers, notetakers, interpreters and equipment
• signposting to key organisations that may be able to offer help and
advice to deaf students
• information on how they can arrange communication support for college
open days and induction days.
Any information the college provides, such as DVDs, online videos or podcasts,
should have subtitles.
Post-16 option meetings and open events
Many prospective deaf students will welcome the opportunity to meet college
staff at post-16 option meetings or open events that are held outside the
college. It is important to have a member of staff available who has at least a
basic understanding of the potential communication needs of a deaf student,
the support the college offers to deaf students, help deaf students can get in
applying and contact details of the key member of staff.
For any open days held within or outside the college, it is very helpful if:
• a request is made that deaf students contact the college prior to the
event to discuss communication needs
• key personnel are present to discuss any support available
• any current or former deaf students are available to discuss their
experiences with potential students, if possible.
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Moving into further education
Further discussions
Prospective deaf students may appreciate further meetings to explore the
appropriateness of courses in relation to their knowledge and skills and the
support needed to ensure the course is accessible. Any communication support
needs should be identified before the meeting, such as a quiet room, an
interpreter, written notes and information.
No assumption should be made as to the appropriateness of a course for a deaf
student until such a meeting has been conducted. For example, deaf students
have successfully completed studies in music and modern foreign languages.
The application process
The application form
It will be helpful to provide the contact details of someone who can assist with
filling out the form if needed by the deaf student. It is important to include
on the form an explanation as to why they need to provide details of their
disability. Some young people are reticent about putting down details of their
disability during the application process, so this reassurance can help.
Interview
If an interview is part of the application process, it is essential that staff
members involved have an understanding of the communication requirements
of the candidate and an interpreter or support worker is provided if required.
The interview should also be held in a room with good lighting, no or low levels
of background noise and good acoustics..
reparing for a successful start to college
P
– assessment and planning
Transition is not an event but a process. A successful transition requires the
coordination of various individuals, systems and agencies. In recent research by
Manchester University3, the following key factors of a successful transition were
identified.
1. Starting the process early (Year 9 (or S3 in Scotland) onwards).
2. Prioritising communication support needs in all meetings and
discussions.
3. Targeting efforts towards developing the skills and knowledge required
for full participation, for example, confidence, self-advocacy and ability
to consider the pros and cons of decisions and their implications.
3. University of Manchester, Identifying Effective Practice in the Provision of Education and
Education Support Services for 16–19 Year Old Deaf Young People in Further Education in
England (National Deaf Children’s Society) 2015
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
4. Providing opportunities for practical learning to give students a better
understanding of which option will work best for them.
5. Considering the full range of possible options available.
A relationship should be established between the school and the new further
education setting in order to pass on important information about effective
practices for the young person, their needs and their preferences. Later in this
section we feature a checklist that can be used for this purpose.
Ensuring an effective transition will be the responsibility of a staff member
within the school who knows the young person well and a representative from
the further education setting (for example, a transition coordinator, someone
from disability support or a personal tutor). A Teacher of the Deaf should play a
key role in this process.
Assessment of the student’s needs
Good assessment is critical to a successful start to further education.
In a review of post-16 education for disabled students in 2011, Ofsted identified
the attributes of the most effective assessments as including:
• the student’s self-evaluation of any support requirements
• detailed consideration of documentation from previous providers and
previous levels of attainment
• the perspective of parents about the type of provision they felt would be
most appropriate
• the involvement of specialists (for deaf students this would include a
Teacher of the Deaf and/or education audiologist)
• specialist assessments, where required, to identify specific adjustments
such as enabling technologies, communicators and access to facilities
• consideration of support/adjustments needed to meet any specific
course requirements such as oral presentations or residential fieldwork.
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Moving into further education
Prior to the student applying to a college, their local authority should have
arranged an assessment covering:
• the current education situation, achievement and attainment
• future vocational aims/ambitions
• t he student’s main learning difficulties as detailed in a statement of
special educational needs, Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan or
coordinated support plan including relevant audiological information
• any environmental, family or social issues that affect future plans
• current support provided at the school
• details of learning support that need to be put in place by the post-16
provider (for example, technology, communication support, additional
tuition with basic skills)
• details of any support to enable the young person to access the college
(for example, transport)
• any funding barrier likely to prevent accessing or succeeding in the
chosen post-16 provider.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Any assessment should reflect the impact of the student’s hearing loss on
learning (see page 13). This should be completed by the end of January to give
time for the college to make sure additional help and equipment is in place for
the start of the academic year.
However, not all students will have received a sufficiently detailed assessment
and many colleges feel they need to review and update the assessment to
reflect this, the course finally chosen and examination results. An accurate
profile of a deaf learner (created from an assessment) will inform effective
teaching strategies, practice and provision of support. The following table
features a checklist of assessment information that should be sought to ensure
an effective transition from school to a further education setting.
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Moving into further education
Checklist: Information for the school to provide to
assist with post-16 transition planning
Hearing and personal hearing technology
Information required
Implications for transition plan
In this section record:
In this section record:
Degree and nature of deafness:
What needs to be done to improve access
to sound, for example, using radio aids,
improving acoustics, using soundfield
systems?
Un-aided hearing level:
Aided hearing level:
Ability to discriminate speech in
different environments (class,
workshops, halls):
Sounds/words that are difficult to
hear:
What needs to be done to ensure optimum use
of hearing technologies?
What are the health and safety implications,
for example, fire drills, giving instructions in
workshops where machinery is used?
Personal hearing technology used:
Communication
Information required
Implications for transition plan
In this section record:
In this section record:
Preferred way of communicating in
different locations and situations
(class, home, friends):
What needs to be done in the college to
support access to teaching and learning, for
example:
• seating position to allow for speech reading?
• using radio aids?
Competence in preferred way of
communication:
Lipreading ability:
• using soundfield systems?
• advice/training for the teachers/lecturers?
• providing communication support workers
with Level 3 qualification for students who
use BSL?
What needs to be done in the workplace to
facilitate good communication?
What needs to be done to promote
communication and social interaction with
other students/work colleagues?
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Checklist: Information for the school to provide to
assist with post-16 transition planning
Language
Information required
Implications for transition plan
In this section record:
In this section record:
Levels of understanding of
language:
How does this compare with hearing students?
Level of expressive language:
Vocabulary level:
What are the implications for learning
(for example, more processing time)?
If a gap exists, what targets should be set to
close the gap and what support/interventions
are required to achieve them?
Grammatical constructions:
Social interaction and use of
language:
What are the implications for teaching? What
are the implications for career choices and the
workplace?
Cognition
Information required
Implications for transition plan
In this section record:
In this section record:
Non-verbal cognitive skills to:
What needs to be done to address any other
underlying difficulties the student may be
experiencing?
a) e
nsure teachers/lecturers have
high expectations:
b) c heck whether there are other
underlying learning difficulties:
What are the implications for career choices
and the workplace?
Progress in curricular areas
Information required
Implications for transition plan
In this section record:
In this section record:
Progress in different curricular and
extracurricular areas. Are there
particular strengths? Are there
particular difficulties?
Is more support required in particular areas?
What needs to be done to build on the
strengths and address the weaknesses?
What targets need to be set?
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Moving into further education
Checklist: Information for the school to provide to
assist with post-16 transition planning
Social and emotional aspects
Information required
Implications for transition plan
In this section record:
In this section record:
Level of social interaction in class/
school, friendship groups:
If low, how can they be increased?
Do other students need deaf awareness
training and information on how to
communicate?
What support can be put in place in the
workplace?
Student’s views
Information required
Implications for transition plan
In this section record:
In this section record:
What are the student’s aspirations
and concerns about moving on?
What information and help do they
think they need to ensure the move
to college is a success?
Provision of information and opportunities to
help with the transition.
Parents’ views
Information required
Implications for transition plan
In this section record:
In this section record:
What are the parents’ aspirations
and concerns about moving on?
Provision of information and opportunities to
help with the transition.
What information and help do they
think they need to support the
transition to college?
What provision do they think is
appropriate?
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Checklist: Information for the school to provide to
assist with post-16 transition planning
Other considerations
Information required
Implications for transition plan
In this section record:
Any other information, for example:
• any other difficulties or medical
conditions or medication needs:
• attendance issues:
• behaviour issues:
Existing support provided by the school:
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Moving into further education
Further advice on assessment
A Teacher of the Deaf can provide advice on the range of specialist
assessments available to support deaf young people. In addition,
the National Deaf Children’s Society, in collaboration with the Ear
Foundation and with support from the National Sensory Impairment
Partnership (NatSIP) has produced a new online resource to support
professionals in assessing and monitoring the progress of deaf young
people in communication, language, listening, literacy, numeracy,
cognitive development and social/emotional well-being.
The resource includes examples of a range of assessments commonly
used with deaf children and young people of all ages. It also includes
guidance on issues to consider when carrying out assessments as well
as examples of assessments in practice. Assessments in other areas
will be added to the resource over time.
The resource is aimed at Teachers of the Deaf and other professionals
working with deaf children and young people. However, it may also be
of interest to other professionals who would like more information on
the assessments being carried out with a deaf pupil. The resource and
an accompanying short video are available to download from
www.ndcs.org.uk/assessments.
Information on initial and diagnostic assessment is also given on the
Learning Skills Improvement Service’s website at
www.excellencegateway.org.uk/content/eg5378.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Planning for a successful start to college
In its review of post-16 education, Ofsted identified the most effective outcomes
of the assessment as being:
• a
n individual support plan which identified periods of review and
possible adjustments to support
• an indication of training required for tutors and support staff working
with the student
• a profile of the student’s strengths and needs, and guidance for staff
about effective strategies and ways of working with the student
• guidance for staff working in service areas of the college, such as the
refectory or learning centres.
Following the assessment, the plan should set out timescales and who is
responsible for ensuring that at the start of the academic year:
• intended outcomes and targets for the deaf student have been set up
• funding is available for additional support
• hearing technology is purchased and tested
• additional support staff with the required qualifications and/or
competencies are available, including interpreters
• appropriate advice and training has been given to relevant staff on
meeting the deaf student’s needs and the technology used
• arrangements are in place to enable the student and staff to access
specialist support
• any required improvements to the acoustic quality of teaching areas are
made
• arrangements are in place to ensure curriculum differentiation
• the timetable is arranged to ensure as far as possible the student is
taught in rooms with the best acoustic qualities and any additional
tuition does not clash with other curriculum requirements.
Review of needs
As a young person’s needs may alter and the demands of the course change it is
essential that the student’s progress is monitored and the assessment of need
is reviewed. This should be done at least annually or more frequently if required
and fully involve the student.
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Checklist: Ensuring an effective transition into further education
The table below summarises the actions that should be taken to ensure that a
deaf young person makes an effective transition into further education.
Has the deaf student been provided with comprehensive
and independent advice and guidance so that they can make
informed choices about the options for different courses
that they can apply to?
Is the above information accessible to deaf young people?
Has the deaf student been provided with an opportunity to
attend open days and taster sessions? Has communication
support been provided, as appropriate, for these?
Has the deaf student received support, where appropriate
and needed, for the application process and for any
interviews?
Does the deaf student have a clear understanding of the
transition process?
Does the deaf student have the skills and confidence to
participate in the transition process and self-advocate their
needs?
Does the deaf student have a named contact at the further
education setting for any queries about the setting and/or
support needs?
Has a relationship been established between the school and
the new further education setting to ensure information is
shared as appropriate?
Has there been an in-depth assessment of the student’s
needs and preferences? Has a specialist Teacher of the Deaf
been involved in this process?
Has the assessment informed the development of a
transition plan that includes information on, for example,
funding, equipment and specialist staff so that the setting
can support the deaf student effectively from day one?
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
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For students already
in further education
4
Supporting your deaf student in further education
think it’s imperative to support a deaf young person, to meet
“ Ievery
need, I don’t think it’s just about them being able to succeed
in a qualification. It’s bigger than that and I think quite often our
deaf young people need support for their social skills and their
independence and understanding the world around them. It’s that
full package of support that enables these young people to achieve
in the future. It’s not just about getting them through a qualification;
it’s about everything else that goes alongside supporting them.
——Professional, quoted in University of Manchester research
”
Deaf young people who may have coped very well at school without additional
support may have increased support needs as they enter the less structured
environment of further education. Colleges will need to be flexible to support
these emerging needs.
In its review of post-16 education for disabled students, Ofsted found “The best
provision included some or all of the following features, depending upon the
needs of learners:
• p
lanned reviews of the adjustments made and support provided to
evaluate their effectiveness and make any changes
• flexible arrangements so that learners could identify when they required
more or less support
• a focus on capability and building on what learners did well
• opportunities for in-class support on a one-to-one basis or one-to-one
support outside the classroom or for group support that focused on
specific learning needs
• a mentor/key worker to remain a constant point of contact throughout a
learner’s programme year to year
• use of technological devices such as digital recorders that enabled
learners to become independent
• arrangements to ensure that employers understood fully what
adjustments were required for learners.”
This section sets out the measures further education providers can take to help
ensure deaf students achieve.
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n my son’s college the whole college has a high level of
“ Ideaf
awareness – this is hugely helpful. They are not regarded
”
as different and we are all on the same page.
——Parent of deaf student
after ourselves – it’s not like school.
“ —We—Deaflookstudent
”
The role of tutors and course leaders
Tutors and course leaders have the responsibility to ensure that the deaf
student is fully included in all aspects of the course, can fully access lectures
and tutorials and makes satisfactory progress.
ll the staff at college should have deaf awareness. Usually in the
“ Afirst
two weeks of a new course, the lecturers are awkward and
don’t know how to deal with me. I have to approach the lecturers
and explain via an interpreter how to deal with deaf people. Once
they know how to deal with me, they usually change their attitude
towards me and become more friendly and approachable!
——Deaf student
”
An effective tutor/course leader will:
• expect the progress of deaf students to be at least the same as hearing
students of similar cognitive ability
• develop an understanding of the impact of deafness on a particular
student
• work effectively with specialist advisers such as a Teacher of the Deaf
(page 38) and specialist support staff, involving them in the planning of
lectures/tutorials (page 39)
• evaluate the outcomes of additional support to inform future planning
• ensure that strategies to aid communication are implemented
(see page 35)
• include the effective use of technology
• adapt teaching style and strategies to maximise the deaf student’s
involvement and learning (see page 35)
• monitor the progress of the student and take advice from specialist
support if issues emerge (see pages 38 and 39)
• develop and support measures to improve the social and emotional
well-being of students (see pages 49–51)
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• understand the significance of their influence on the aspirations and
motivation of deaf learners
• take full responsibility for the quality of teaching, learning and
assessment, including support staff
• support deaf learners to both work collaboratively with their peers and
develop self-directed learning
• allow the student the opportunity to feed back on what is working well
for them and what is not.
Where a deaf student will be working with a number of different staff, the tutor/
course leader or person responsible for students with special or additional
needs may want to consider drawing up an information sheet or profile about
the student that can be shared with all those who may come into contact with
the student. The student will ideally be involved in drawing up this profile. An
example is shown overleaf.
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Sharing information
The following example information sheet4 can be distributed to staff in contact
with the deaf student (with the student’s permission).
>> Example: Information sheet to share with colleagues
Student:
Year:
Personal tutor:
[Name of student] has [subject] with you:
Photo
Timetable details:
Background information
Hearing loss, hearing technology and communication
Factors affecting learning and access
Teaching strategies to support (name of student)
Exam arrangements
4. Based on the NATED Initial Assessment Report. Developed with support from
Carrie MacHattie, Sensory Support, Access to Education, Birmingham. www.ndcs.org.uk
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For students already in further education
Student
Teacher of the Deaf
Date
Please contact Teacher of the Deaf to discuss support.
Contact details for Teacher of the Deaf:
All staff within a college should have received deaf awareness training, and
those working closely with the deaf young person should have detailed
knowledge and understanding of their needs. Deaf awareness training should
also be delivered to other students. Vigilance that the young person’s needs are
being met should be the responsibility of all staff members. This needs to be
monitored by the college lead for students with additional needs or disabilities.
Teaching strategies
This section briefly summarises the difficulties that may be encountered by deaf
students and sets out strategies that teaching staff can use to minimise the
impact that these difficulties can have.
Registering what is said during lectures
Many deaf students will not be able to receive the same amount of information
as hearing students during lectures; it can be difficult to take in new
information and make notes while listening and using visual clues.
It is therefore helpful to give deaf students and their specialist support workers
copies of handouts, PowerPoint slides and lecture notes before a lecture.
Students report that they appreciate pre-lecture tutorials so that they are aware
of new terminology and concepts – this enables them to concentrate more
fully in the lecture. Post-lecture tutorials provide an opportunity to check for
understanding.
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Language and specialist terminology
Deaf students may have difficulty in understanding and learning new
terminology in many subjects, particularly when complex specialist terms are
introduced for the first time.
It is therefore helpful to provide glossaries of the key terms for the student and
support staff prior to the lecture or course. Try to use plain spoken and written
language and use open questions and other checks for comprehension. This
will also be an important consideration for any support staff who may not have
existing knowledge of specialist terms.
Student participation in discussion
For deaf students who use a notetaker, lipspeaker or interpreter there will be a
gap in time between what a lecturer says and its reception by the deaf student.
They may therefore lose the opportunity to participate in discussion.
It is therefore important to allow sufficient time for the deaf student to receive
and respond to what the lecturer or another student says. Signposting who is
speaking is very helpful.
Use of video clips or DVDs
It is important to ensure that any video clips or DVDs used or produced by
the college have subtitles. If they are not available, then a transcript needs to
be provided and/or the student should be able to see the DVD or video clip
before or after the lecture with an interpreter or notetaker, with key information
about what they should be taking note of. Alternatively, you may wish to pause
the DVD or video clip at key moments throughout to summarise the content.
Online video clips (such as from YouTube) may not always have subtitles or
the subtitles might be of a poor quality so the student should be supported to
access the content.
PowerPoint presentations
When viewing a PowerPoint presentation with low lighting, the deaf student will
have difficulty reading manual notes from the notetaker, lipreading the lecturer
or watching the interpreter.
It is helpful to provide a brief pause, with no speaking, between slides to enable
the student to view the slide. Use of anglepoise lamps will enable the student
to see the support worker and lecturer.
Demonstrating equipment
Deaf students cannot see the demonstration and watch the notetaker or
the interpreter, or the lips of the lecturer, at the same time. It is helpful if
the lecturer explains the equipment and what they will do with it before a
demonstration. The explanation should be repeated during the demonstration
and the student’s understanding then checked afterwards.
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In group work and discussions
It is helpful if a quiet area is found for group discussion. Seating should be
arranged so that the deaf student is able to see the other students. Contributors
should raise their hand so that the deaf student is able to identify and look at
the person speaking. Where the student uses a radio aid, ensure other students
in the group use the transmitter (microphone).
one or a small group is fine but big group discussions
“ Oareneatopain.
I miss who is talking... and then lose the plot.
——Deaf student
”
Assessments
Reasonable adjustments will be required to ensure deaf students are assessed
on an equal basis. The adjustments will need to take account of the particular
needs of the student but should include:
• e
nsuring the deaf student has a clear understanding of the task and
what is being assessed
• enabling the deaf student to use alternative methods to complete tasks
where this is necessary, giving them credit for any additional tasks
• clearly written examination/test questions with short sentences and
direct questions
• allowance for mistakes in syntax and grammar where a written
assignment is set to assess knowledge and understanding of a subject,
making the student aware of these errors so that they can be addressed
• ensuring a support worker is present for any group work that is being
assessed
• ensuring students who do not use speech can use a signed interpreter
for oral presentations.
Further information
The general advice above is based on two documents produced by the
University of Wolverhampton (A Guide to Good Practice of Staff Teaching
d/Deaf students in Science and Engineering and A Guide to Good Practice
of Staff Teaching d/Deaf students in Art, Design and Communication). For
more specific advice in these subjects (for example, experiments, teaching in
workshops with machinery, health and safety considerations) please consult
these documents: www2.wlv.ac.uk/teachingdeafstudents/.
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The role of the Teacher of the Deaf
Many deaf students will require support which should be provided by a
specialist Teacher of the Deaf who holds the mandatory qualification in deaf
education. If the setting does not have a Teacher of the Deaf as part of its
support team, regular visits from a visiting Teacher of the Deaf should be
arranged.
Planning for the deaf student’s start at college should have already identified
the level and type of support required from specialist staff. This should be kept
under review, taking account of the student’s progress.
The Teacher of the Deaf should:
• help tutors/course leaders to have a clear understanding of the impact
of deafness on the student
• advise tutors/course leaders on ensuring access to the curriculum,
including communication, teaching and learning strategies
• provide advice on how to improve the acoustic quality of teaching
spaces
• assist tutors/course leaders with planning to ensure inclusion for the
deaf student
• assist tutors/course leaders and the student in maximising the benefits
of technology
• advise, train and support learning support staff and communication
support workers
• help college staff monitor deaf students’ progress through carrying out
specialist tests and assessments and assisting in interpreting standard
tests
• work directly with individual deaf students to enhance their skills
and understanding, both of the course concepts and of language and
functional skills in language and literacy
• undertake regular group work with deaf students
• advise on meeting the social and emotional needs of deaf students
• advise on the adjustments that can be made to enable equal access to
examinations.
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Additional support for learning
Some deaf students may have less well-developed literacy, language skills
and other skills. Because of this they may find the content of the course more
challenging than hearing students. Additional one-to-one tuition or tuition in a
small group will often be essential to support the student’s attainment targets
and develop their language and literacy skills.
Additional tutorials should normally be delivered by a qualified Teacher of the
Deaf. Some students will value support by regular email. These sessions may
involve:
• reinforcing new vocabulary and concepts being taught
• s tructuring and reinforcing revision of course content prior to formal and
informal assessment
• providing opportunities to guide students in their planning and
approach to assignments. This may also include help with referencing
and researching
• providing specific learning support in terms of language, literacy and
numeracy
• pre-tutoring so that the deaf student has some of the general knowledge
and terminology required prior to starting new topics
• post-tutoring to ensure the student has fully understood the lecture.
The sessions should also include:
• developing the student’s independent learning skills, encouraging them
to articulate their own needs
• opportunities for students to discuss any social issues they may have so
they can be addressed as soon as possible.
Specialist communication and learning support staff
Many deaf students will need additional support to access what the tutor
and other students are saying. There are different types of specialist support
worker:
• communication support workers
• notetakers
• sign interpreters
• lipspeakers.
The needs of each student will determine the nature of the support that is
required. Sometimes more than one type of support may be necessary.
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Communication support worker
A good communication support worker will be a highly skilled professional with
a qualification in communication support. Duties typically include:
• supporting students by interpreting between spoken English and British
Sign Language (BSL), notetaking and lipspeaking
• supporting students with understanding and producing written material
in class
• adapting learning materials so that students understand them more
easily
• suggesting ways that the school or college environment can be
improved to make it easier for students to use hearing aids or lipread.5
Communication support workers can also take on a role of key worker: ensuring
hearing technology is working, promoting deaf awareness in the college and
supporting the student’s independence and social integration.
An effective communication support worker will develop a good understanding
of the student’s language level and needs. The communication support worker
will develop a good rapport with the student and allow them to take the lead
when required. If they support a sign-dependent student the communication
support worker should have a minimum qualification of BSL Level 3.
would like a notetaker and communication support
“ Iworker
and prompter all in one go.
——Deaf student
”
Notetakers
A deaf student who is concentrating on listening and lipreading or watching an
interpreter cannot take notes at the same time. A notetaker writes down what
is being said in lectures and tutorials. They record everything that is happening
in the lecture/tutorial which the deaf student reads as the notetaker writes – it
can also be read later. To ensure effective support the notetaker should have an
OCN qualification in notetaking for students with disabilities or NVQ/Stage 2 or
3 in notetaking.
Notetaking can be done either manually or electronically. Manual notetaking
may be preferable in subjects where many diagrams, formulae or flow charts
are used and during visits away from college. Sometimes the language may be
modified to suit the reading skills of the student. The notetaker should record
as far as possible student discussions, asides, jokes, etc.
An electronic notetaker types notes into a laptop connected to the student’s
laptop. Special software, such as Speedtext, Stereotype and Typewell, enables
the student to add their own notes. Electronic notetakers use a normal ‘qwerty’
keyboard and therefore cannot type at the same speed as spoken language.
5. Taken from the FAQ page of the Association of Communication Support Workers website:
www.acsw.org.uk.
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Palantypist/speech-to-text reporter
A palantypist/speech-to-text reporter will type a verbatim transcript of what is
being said which is delivered in real time. It may be possible for this support to
be provided remotely with the reporter listening in via Skype and the transcript
being provided by a webpage.
landed lucky with my notetaker – he enabled me to listen to the
“ Ilecturer
while he wrote up the notes for me to read later.
——former deaf student
”
Sign language interpreters
A sign language interpreter interprets what is said into British Sign Language
(BSL) and/or Sign Supported English (SSE), depending on the student’s
preference. They may also translate written documents into signed versions
or vice versa. They may also voice over what a deaf student is saying if their
speech is difficult to understand.
An interpreter would not normally assist the deaf student in completing their
tasks, provide explanations or advocate for the student. In this way their role
differs significantly from that of a communication support worker.
Professional interpreters are registered with the Association of Sign Language
Interpreters or Scottish Association of Sign Language Interpreters.
Lipspeaker
A lipspeaker is trained to produce perfect lip patterns using unvoiced speech.
They will sit facing the deaf student providing the optimum lip movements to
aid lipreading, reproducing the rhythm and phrasing of speech as used by the
speaker and incorporating facial expressions and natural gesture to clearly
convey the message. Depending on the needs of the deaf student, a lipspeaker
may also use additional forms of communication support such as fingerspelling.
A lipspeaker works with deaf students who have a good understanding of
English, often people who have become hard of hearing or deafened after
acquiring spoken language. To ensure effective support, lipspeakers should
have an NVQ/Stage 2 or 3 qualification in lipspeaking.
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To ensure effective specialist support for a deaf student the college
should ensure that:
• all specialist communication support staff have the appropriate
qualification and skills
• support staff are available at all appropriate times, including for meetings,
trips, work experience placements, formal interviews and social events
organised by the college
• if a professional interpreter is to be used they are booked in advance
• there is sufficient time for the lecturer and support staff to liaise and plan
the course and lectures so that preparations are made to support the
student
• notetakers have access to technology
• ongoing training is provided which is appropriate to the role support staff
are required to undertake such as key working, use and maintenance of
technology, subjects the student is studying
• the student is able to negotiate the type of support they require and feed
back on the effectiveness of the support
• the effectiveness of the support is evaluated.
More information on the specialist staff working in further education and the
qualifications they should hold can be found in Appendix 4.
Making it easier for deaf students to listen and communicate
problem is people don’t know enough and need instruction
“ Mlikey biggest
being able to speak clearly and providing the best support.
——Deaf student
”
Communicating with deaf students
To help the student understand what you are saying:
• allow the student to see your face to aid lipreading. Try not to impede
their view of your face with hair, hands or objects or by turning to write
on the whiteboard
• stay at the front of the room and minimise moving around. Ensure you
are not standing with your back to a light source (for example, the
interactive whiteboard or a window), as a shadow cast across the face
can impede recognition of lip patterns
• ask the deaf student where they would prefer to sit, as this will aid
communication depending on their type of hearing loss and the hearing
technologies they use. The student’s cochlear implant or hearing aid
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has an optimal range of one metre in which to access speech clearly. A
location just back from the front to the side enables the student to view
most clearly what is being said by students around the room. Speak
clearly and at your normal pace
• be aware that speaking too slowly or over-exaggerating your mouth
patterns will make it harder for the student to understand, distort the
speech signal and make it more difficult to lipread. Both shouting and
whispering make mouth patterns and the speech signal more difficult to
understand
• make sure that you have the student’s attention before you start talking
• check that the student understood what was said. Repeat or rephrase
what you have said if the student has not understood. Repeat
contributions and questions from other students – this will benefit
hearing students too
• work with specialist communication support staff to deliver the lecture
at an appropriate pace for signing and notetaking. Speak directly to the
student and not the communication support worker or interpreter
• ensure audio material is subtitled/captioned, offer a transcript or
provide an overview during the lesson
• check that the hearing technology is working
• if a lecture requires lights to be turned off (for example to watch a DVD)
make sure all spoken instructions or explanations are given before the
lighting is dimmed
• be aware that brightly coloured clothing or big, colourful earrings can be
distracting and/or make it more difficult for lipreading
• monitor how well the student is able to communicate with their peers
and how well they respond.
Additional technology
For those using hearing technology of any kind, large rooms, poor acoustics,
background noise and large groups make listening and accessing what is said
difficult. The college can make it considerably easier for the deaf student (and
others) by providing additional technology and by managing background noise
and acoustic conditions.
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Radio aids
Radio aids are essential for some deaf students. They reduce the problems
caused by the distance between the student and lecturer and by background
noise. A radio aid carries the tutor’s voice directly to the student’s receiver
attached to their hearing aid/bone conduction hearing implants or cochlear
implant. Radio aids consist of two parts:
• a transmitter worn by the lecturer
• a receiver worn by the student.
The voice is then carried via radio waves directly to the receiver worn by the
student.
Advice should be sought from a qualified Teacher of the Deaf or educational
audiologist about which system best suits the student’s needs, its effective use
and its maintenance.
When using radio aids, lecturers and tutors are reminded to:
• ensure the transmitter is switched on
• wear the microphone about 15cm from the mouth
• check with the student that the aid is working
• switch it off or mute the microphone when having a conversation that the
deaf student does not need to hear
• avoid standing in a noisy place, such as next to an overhead projector
or open window, as the microphone will pick up background noise and
transmit this to the deaf student
• avoid letting the microphone knock against clothing or jewellery.
Soundfield system
A soundfield system reduces the impact of distance between the speaker and
student. The tutor’s voice is transmitted via a microphone to a base station
placed within the room. This amplifies and enhances the speech and then
broadcasts it from speakers that are carefully positioned around the room.
This enables the tutor’s voice to be accessible, at normal conversational levels,
across a significant area.
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Loop systems
Loop systems reduce the background noise. A microphone picks up sound from
the speaker (or a radio/TV) and feeds it to a wire loop running round a room.
The student in the room then switches their hearing aid or cochlear implant to a
T setting so that it picks up sound from the loop.
Loop systems are not widely used in educational settings, but may be available
in some lecture rooms.
An effective college will:
• check that deaf students are able to manage their own personal hearing
technology, including ensuring the correct settings and its maintenance
• support the student to organise the repair or replacement of personal
technology if required
• provide radio aids to students who require them
• ensure that all relevant staff know how to make effective use of
technology and its limitations
• d
esignate a suitably trained member of staff to oversee the maintenance
and repair of the equipment and undertake troubleshooting tasks
• ensure there is a spare radio aid available or knowledge of how to obtain
one quickly in the event of breakdown, as without it the student will be
unable to access the course effectively.
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Acoustics and background noise
No technology can replace normal hearing and its effectiveness depends on the
acoustic quality of the college. The listening environment can make it difficult
for deaf students to make best use of their hearing technologies. Adaptations
that can be made to improve the acoustic quality of teaching spaces (reduce
reverberation/echo) include carpets, blinds or curtains at the windows, low
ceilings with acoustic tiles, plenty of soft surfaces, including wall displays and
reduced noise from heating systems.
>> Background noise can be reduced by
Managing the room
Managing the lecture
Closing doors to noisy areas or corridors
Introducing strategies that
establish and maintain a
quiet working atmosphere,
including good behaviour
management
Closing windows to outside noise,
closing curtains and blinds if necessary
Positioning full bookshelves and
cupboards against partition walls (to
minimise noise transfer from other
rooms)
Ensuring heating and air conditioning
systems operate within acceptable noise
levels through regular maintenance
Encouraging students to
develop an understanding
of how noises such as chairs
scraping, doors banging,
dropping objects and talking
while others are speaking can
interfere with what the deaf
student can hear
Turning off IT equipment such as
interactive whiteboards, computers and
overhead projectors when not in use
Waiting for students to be
quiet and settle down before
giving instructions
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The National Deaf Children’s Society has developed a range of resources
called Creating Good Listening Environments for Learning in Education
which provide advice and guidance to schools and local authorities on
how to:
• create a better learning environment to improve the attainment of all
children and young people and particularly those who are deaf
• prepare their Accessibility Plans and Disability Equality Schemes as
required by the disability and special needs legislation
• meet their ‘anticipatory’ duties under the Equality Act (2010).
These resources are available online at www.ndcs.org.uk/acoustics.
An effective college will:
• ensure that staff are aware of the need to manage background noise
• undertake an acoustic audit of its buildings and use this as a basis for
planning improvements (including investment in soundfield systems)
• ensure that deaf students are taught in areas that meet minimum
acoustic standards.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Access arrangements for examinations
Many deaf students are entitled to certain adjustments for their examinations.
These arrangements should be in place early on in the course, especially if
there is a coursework or modular element to the assessment process. The
support they get in exams and assessed coursework must reflect the support
they usually receive.
The deaf student may be allowed:
• extra time (generally 25% but can be 50% or even 100% in special
circumstances)
• supervised rest breaks
• assistance from a scribe, reader, BSL interpreter, oral language modifier
(OLM)6 or prompter
• word processing
• a transcript of any oral/aural component.
Deciding what arrangements should apply requires a full understanding of the
student’s communication and learning needs, the nature of the assessment,
the criteria for adjustments set by the awarding body and familiarity with the
adjustments available.
The application for adjustments will require the college to provide evidence. The
examinations officer should work with professionals supporting the student to
ensure the correct adjustments are in place, particularly the Teacher of the Deaf.
An effective college will:
• decide on access arrangements for an individual student at the start of a
course
• complete all application procedures early so that modifications are
available throughout the course
• ensure that all modifications are in place for each exam.
6. The task of the OLM is to respond to a request from the candidate for clarification of the
carrier language in the examination. They must not explain any technical terms and a modified
paper has to be ordered and used. The paper can be opened an hour before the start of the
exam to allow the OLM time to prepare. The OLM would usually be the student’s Teacher of the
Deaf.
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For students already in further education
For further information on access arrangements for examinations, see:
• National Deaf Children’s Society’s factsheet for parents, Access
Arrangements for your Child’s Examinations
• Joint Council for Qualifications: www.jcq.org.uk – access arrangements,
reasonable adjustments and special consideration for candidates in
England and Wales
• The Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA): www.sqa.org.uk –
introduction to access arrangements for schools and colleges.
Social support
Deafness may have a significant impact on a student’s social experience
because of difficulties with communication. Up to 40% of deaf children and
young people experience emotional or behavioural difficulties.7
It can be difficult for deaf students to talk in a group and to follow fast-moving
conversations. For those who use sign language, making friends may not always
be easy, especially if there are no other BSL users present. This may have an
impact on confidence and learning. In research by the University of Edinburgh,8
two thirds of young people in the study sample mentioned that they had been
bullied or felt isolated because they were deaf.
The college can help facilitate friendships and encourage the student to take
responsibility for managing the impact of their deafness within social situations
by providing a support worker who can:
• e
nsure other students understand the nature of the deaf student’s
difficulties and help them communicate effectively with the deaf
student, suggesting adjustments if necessary
• e
ncourage conversation and socialising and suggest to the student
strategies for initiating relationships
• provide communication support for college clubs and societies
• h
elp the deaf student to develop the confidence and skills to let others
know when communication is difficult.
• p
rovide a ‘peer mentor’ scheme whereby a deaf young person is able to
get in touch with or obtain support from other deaf students in a nearby
college or university.
7. NHS. Mental Health and Deafness: Towards equity and access.
(Department of Health, 2005)
8. University of Edinburgh, Post-school Transitions of People who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
(National Deaf Children’s Society, 2013)
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Lunchtime can be particularly difficult for a deaf student so it can be extremely
valuable to provide a quiet area for the deaf student and their social group
to meet for lunch. It is often beneficial to bring deaf students together by
encouraging them to organise regular meetings or events, which could help
reduce loneliness.
If problems of loneliness persist, involvement in the local deaf community might
help and the student could be referred to social workers for deaf people, the
local deaf club or social networks.
It may also be useful to arrange for students to meet with a deaf adult who will
understand their feelings more readily and give them strategies for coping.
Just being deaf does not qualify somebody for this sensitive role. Care should
be taken in selecting a deaf adult who has the necessary training, skills and
experience of mentoring and knowledge of professional boundaries and codes
of conduct to fulfil this role.
Deaf awareness training for hearing students
It is helpful if fellow students are made fully aware of the problems presented
by deafness and what they can do to make sure that the deaf young person
feels included and a valued member of the group. Some deaf students may feel
understandably uncertain about drawing attention to their needs in front of the
rest of the group and such training should only be carried out in consultation
with the deaf young person. Experienced support staff or a Teacher of the Deaf
could facilitate this training.
Counselling
There may be times when a deaf student needs additional support to help them
to come to terms with their deafness, academic worries, problems at home or
relationship difficulties. It is important that the deaf student is made aware of
the college’s counselling service and how to access it.
If the student’s difficulties are complex and relate specifically to their deafness,
a professional who is used to working with deaf young people should be
involved. Colleges should refer young people to other agencies if they feel that
their internal support mechanisms cannot address the student’s needs. For
example, college students could be referred to social work services for deaf
people, local mental health services or specialist deaf child and adolescent
mental health services9 for those up to the age of 18.
9. There are a small number of specialist deaf CAMHS across the UK which your local CAMHS
should be aware of. The National Deaf Children’s Society Freephone Helpline can also help
identify nearby deaf CAMHS.
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For students already in further education
An effective college will:
• provide communication support for social occasions when requested
• be sensitive to the social needs of the deaf student and recognise if a
student is lonely or isolated and act to address this
• facilitate relationships between the deaf student and other students
• provide opportunities to meet other deaf students/people
• ensure the student’s key worker and/or support worker knows how to
raise confidence and encourage socialising
• employ support workers who can recognise and manage the possibility
of a student becoming so reliant on support that it inhibits the ability to
socialise and become independent
• make deaf students aware of how to contact counselling services
provided in college
• ensure that counsellors have appropriate training prior to working with
a deaf student so that they know how to communicate with the student,
are aware of deafness and its possible implications on emotional wellbeing and know where to seek specialist advice
• ensure that an independent sign language interpreter or communication
support worker is available if requested by the student
• refer to outside agencies if the problem cannot readily be sorted or
escalates
• direct students to advocacy services.
Transition to university or work
A successful transition out of further education will require input from a
range of different agencies, and the college should facilitate this relationship
management between, for example, the young person, parents, careers
advisers and employers. College staff must also have regard to non-educational
outcomes: personal development, independence skills and emotional wellbeing.
Deaf students will need support from experienced members of staff who
understand their needs to help them decide what to do after they have
completed further education and prepare for the future. Information on the
full range of options available across education, employment and training, the
range of support available in these settings and how to access them will need to
be provided.
All teaching and learning should maintain a focus on vocational relevance,
and deaf learners should understand how current tasks relate to their future
aspirations.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
e did not know what was available in the future, we do not know
“ Wwhat
we can do. To be informed about choices so that you can
be prepared with confidence and to be assertive to say what you
want for your future, that would have been a great help.
——Deaf student
”
Deaf students are likely to need:
• plenty of information and the opportunity to discuss future options (for
example, what will the job involve? What qualifications or experience are
required?)
• first-hand experience through work experience placements
• help in identifying issues they may encounter in another education
establishment or at work and in considering possible solutions
• help in identifying the type of support they may receive at university
or in the workplace (for example, information on the Access to Work
scheme or Disabled Students’ Allowance)
• help in applying for Access to Work funding or Disabled Students’
Allowance and dealing with the possible difficulties in this process
• help to ensure that those assessing the application have a full
understanding of the implications of the hearing loss and required
support
• advice on making applications and completing application forms for
work or university
• help in identifying higher education establishments and courses most
suited to the student’s requirements and in contacting the university’s
disability service
• help in preparing for interview, including rehearsing, and knowledge on
how to ensure appropriate communication support is available
• help in discussing the new experience and environment, developing
new friendships and ways of informing new work colleagues or other
students of their deafness.
think for me the new experience is knowing at what point to
“ Idisclose
a disability. Because you don’t want to put them off before
they’ve met you. But at the same time you need them to make
provisions sometimes and to understand in the interview you
still need time to get used to their voice […] But usually I try to
play it down. And then hopefully ask for their support later!
——Deaf jobseeker
”
Where students are moving to higher education, the university disability service
team will value information on the support needs of the deaf young person.
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For students already in further education
The following table10 sets out a number of considerations for a deaf student’s
transition into higher education.
Steps to take
during transition
This means
When?*
Consider and discuss
possible future pathways.
Preliminary decisions may
determine subject choices,
for example
Support from independent
careers adviser, supplemented by
discussions with Teacher of the
Deaf
Year 9/S3
onwards
Consider university choices
Discuss choices with Teacher of
the Deaf and careers adviser
Year 12/S5
Visit universities
Visit disability support service
(DSS) at the university and ask
about available support
Year 12/S5
Complete application
Work on your personal statement
with school and Teacher of the
Deaf
Autumn term
Year 13/S6
Prepare for interview if
asked to attend one
Request any communication
support from the university
Spring term Year
13/S6
Apply for grant and
tick disability box. This
generates an application
form to apply for Disabled
Students’ Allowance (DSA)
Return form
Summer term
Year 13/S6
Following your application
you may receive an
invitation to a DSA
assessment
Ask Teacher of the Deaf if they
can supply a letter based on
the headings on the National
Graduate School in Education
(NATED) initial assessment
headings
Summer term
Year 13/S6
Gather any medical evidence as
requested
Be honest and open about your
needs
University place confirmed
Before start date, make contact
with DSS to confirm support in
lectures and equipment needs
with university
August/
September
(before starting)
* References to S3, S4, etc. apply to Scotland
10. Developed with support from Carrie MacHattie, Sensory Support, Access to Education,
Birmingham
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Work experience
For all young people, work experience forms a core part of their further
education studies. It can help them to explore opportunities in the labour
market and inform their future choices. For deaf young people, this can be
particularly important, providing them with supported experience in the
workplace and helping them to make appropriate decisions for their future.
The student may require support from their Teacher of the Deaf and the
college to assist with prior visits and information about communication and
technology needs. This is an opportunity to help the young person to prepare
their response to queries about their hearing loss and for the independent
management of any communication or technological needs.
Work experience can provide a real opportunity to experience the wider world
and to contribute towards future vocational choices – particularly if they are
encouraged to think more widely and to follow their interests.
The college should ensure that communication support is available and
provided during any work experience placement.
Information for young people
The Buzz contains and signposts to further information about work experience,
apprenticeships, university, becoming independent, communication support,
technology and moving into employment: www.buzz.org.uk/myfuture.
Information for parents
Parents can find information on education and future career options for their
child on our website by visiting www.ndcs.org.uk/leavingschool.
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For students already in further education
Reviewing effectiveness of provision for deaf learners
The checklist below provides some measures colleges could use to evaluate
their success in meeting the needs of deaf students.
Data showing deaf students make at least satisfactory progress in line
with hearing students with similar starting points.
Data showing that the college has ‘added value’, with deaf students
making greater progress than hearing students
(i.e. the gap in attainment between deaf students and all students on
entering college is narrowing).
Evidence which shows the students have achieved individual learning
goals (for example, the student has made significant improvement in
functional skills such as language, literacy and numeracy, from assessed
levels on entry to college).
Evidence that deaf students have improved the quality of their work over
time.
Evidence that deaf students gain qualifications, skills and knowledge that
will enable them to progress to their chosen career, employment and/or
further education and training.
The dropout rate of deaf students from courses compares favourably with
other students.
The destinations of deaf students compares with other students.
Deaf students report that the college environment is welcoming to them,
they are respected and they have opportunities to comment on and
influence the provision that is made for them.
The take-up of opportunities to participate and be involved in the life of
the college (for example, student union/council, social events and course
representatives) by deaf students is similar to other students.
Deaf students develop independence and personal and social skills and
have a good circle of friends. Deaf students are able to self-advocate their
needs confidently.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Checklist: Ensuring effective support within further education
The table below summarises the actions that should be taken to ensure that a
deaf student is supported effectively within further education so that they can
achieve their potential.
Does the tutor/course leader have a good understanding of
the deaf student’s needs and the impact of their deafness on
their learning? Do they have high expectations of what the deaf
student can achieve?
Has information about the deaf student been shared with staff
within the college (assuming that the student has agreed to
this)?
Does the tutor/course leader have a good understanding of
the different teaching strategies and reasonable adjustments
that should be made? This includes, for example, ensuring that
lectures are accessible and that the student receives support, as
needed, on language and specialist terminology.
Has specialist advice been sought from a Teacher of the Deaf?
Where needed, does any additional support clearly match the
needs of the deaf student? Have steps been taken to ensure any
communication support is in place consistently where needed? Is
the support provided by qualified staff?
Is the tutor/course leader clear on the steps they need to take to
ensure effective communication within lectures and classes? Is
hearing technology – such as radio aids – being used effectively?
Have steps been taken to improve listening conditions within the
learning environments?
Have appropriate arrangements been put into place from early in
the course for access arrangements for any examinations?
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For students already in further education
Has the college considered what social support is needed by the
deaf student?
Is there a comprehensive transition plan for any transition the
deaf student is making into employment or higher education?
Does the deaf student have clear and accessible information on
their options?
Is support in place to help deaf students with applications and
interviews?
Where applicable, has information been shared with higher
education placements?
Have any links been made with local employers to ensure there
are suitable work experience opportunities?
Is the college reviewing the effectiveness of its provision for deaf
learners through, for example, attainment data?
Is the college monitoring the extent to which the deaf student
can explain and manage their own support and needs? Does the
student need additional support around self-advocacy?
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Appendix 1: Types
and levels of deafness
Conductive deafness and glue ear
Conductive deafness occurs when sound cannot pass through the outer and
middle ear to reach the cochlea and auditory nerve in the inner ear. The most
common cause during childhood is a temporary build-up of fluid in the middle
ear known as ‘glue ear’.
For some children glue ear can reduce hearing considerably for a protracted
period and this has a significant impact on learning and progress.
Sensori-neural deafness
Sensori-neural deafness results from damage to the inner ear. It is generally
caused through loss or damage to the hair cells in the cochlea that means the
cochlea is not processing sound effectively or, in some cases, when the auditory
(hearing) nerve itself is not working.
Congenital and acquired deafness
Congenital deafness refers to children who are born deaf. Other children acquire
deafness due to illness, accident or a late onset genetic condition.
Levels of hearing loss
Deafness is measured in two ways:
• how loud the sound has to be so that the young person can hear it,
measured in decibels
• which frequencies (pitch) the young person can or cannot hear,
measured in hertz.
Each young person’s deafness is different depending on which frequencies are
affected and how loud a sound has to be before they can hear.
Few young people are totally deaf. Most young people can hear some sounds
at certain pitches and volumes, known as their ‘residual hearing’. There are
different degrees of deafness classified as follows.
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Appendix 1: Types and levels of deafness
Mild hearing loss
Although for many young people mild loss does not require audiological
interventions such as hearing aids, in terms of education it can mean a
significant loss.
• S
tudents can usually hear everything that is said to them in a quiet
room, but not if there is background noise or if they are far away from
the speaker.
• A student would not be able to follow a whispered conversation.
• Some students with a mild hearing loss will use hearing aids.
Moderate hearing loss
• Most students with a moderate hearing loss will use hearing aids.
• Without hearing aids a student is likely to be able to hear most of what
someone says to them within a quiet room as long as they speak clearly.
• With hearing aids they are likely to be able to follow a conversation
within a quiet room.
• They will find it extremely difficult to follow a conversation in a large
group, if there is background noise or they are far away from the
speaker.
Severe hearing loss
• A
student will be unable to access conversation at normal levels without
hearing aids or a cochlear implant but may be able to hear loud sounds
such as a dog barking or a drum.
• With hearing aids or a cochlear implant most students will be able to
follow a conversation within a quiet room provided that the speaker is
within two to three metres of them.
• A
student is likely to require additional communication support, for
example sign support or lipreading, to understand speech in the
presence of any background noise or within a group conversation.
• I n the presence of background noise the student may find it extremely
difficult to understand speech even with communication support.
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Profound hearing loss
• The majority of profoundly deaf students will use a cochlear implant or
hearing aids.
• Without a cochlear implant or hearing aids a student will not be able to
hear speech or other sounds. They may be able to feel very loud sounds
such as a lorry passing them in the street.
• Without a cochlear implant or hearing aids the student is likely to use a
sign-based language to communicate directly with another person.
• With cochlear implants or hearing aids the student may require
additional communication support for example, through sign language
or cued speech to access speech, especially within background noise or
within a group conversation.
• In the presence of background noise the student will find it more difficult
to understand speech.
This diagram is based on the British Society of Audiology definitions of hearing loss.
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Appendix 1: Types and levels of deafness
Some pupils may have a malformation of the inner ear – an absence or
malformation of the cochlear or auditory nerve. This will mean they will have
no access to sound at all. In these situations hearing aids or cochlear implants
would offer no benefit. The student will therefore use sign language as their
main means of communication.
Unilateral deafness
• There may be little or no hearing in one ear, but ordinary levels of
hearing in the other.
• The student will be unable to localise sound and follow group
conversations and will find it difficult to understand speech in the
presence of background noise.
Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder
Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder occurs when there are faults which
affect how sound is transmitted along parts of the auditory nervous system.
It affects the brain’s ability to process all sound including speech. Pupils will
experience fluctuating hearing levels and often find it difficult to access speech,
especially in the presence of background noise. Some pupils with auditory
neuropathy spectrum disorder will use hearing aids or cochlear implants;
others will not find them beneficial and therefore not use them.
Deaf culture
About 10% of deaf young people have deaf parents. These families often use
British Sign Language (BSL)11 as the first language of the home. Other families
may also choose to use BSL as a first language with their family members.
These families, and indeed many other deaf young people and adults, consider
deafness as a culture rather than a disability. Within their community they are
able to communicate and function effectively with each other. They describe
themselves as ‘Deaf’ with a capital D. British Sign Language is the language of
the Deaf community.
11. Where the deaf student lives in Northern Ireland, Irish Sign Language may be used.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Appendix 2: Personal
hearing technology
It is likely that your deaf students will rely on various hearing technologies. The
following is an overview of the types of technology you may come across, how
they work and what limitations they have. It is important to note that hearing
technologies do not replace normal hearing.
Hearing aids
A hearing aid amplifies sound and is worn in or behind the ear. It has three basic
parts: a microphone, amplifier and speaker. Modern digital hearing aids can
be programmed very closely to match the wearers’ hearing loss and provide a
radically different listening experience compared with those of the past for deaf
people.
Hearing aids are designed to maximise the hearing the wearer has (known
as their residual hearing). If the student has no measurable hearing at all at
certain frequencies, especially the higher frequencies such as ‘ss’ and ‘th’ then
a hearing aid will not improve this.
F or more information on hearing aids see the National Deaf Children’s
Society’s resource Hearing Aids: Information for families.
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Appendix 2: Personal hearing technology
Cochlear implants
This is a surgically implanted hearing device that
can provide access to spoken language for many
profoundly deaf people. A profound hearing loss
occurs when there is significant damage to either
the cochlear hair cells, which are the mechanism
by which sound waves are converted into electrical
impulses that the brain can then interpret, or to
the auditory nerve itself. A cochlear implant works
by stimulating the auditory nerve directly so
bypassing damage to the cochlear. If an implant
is fully functional then it can provide the user with
access to sounds across the full range of speech
frequencies. For many users this gives them access
to speech in good listening conditions.
More information on cochlear implants can be
found in the National Deaf Children’s Society’s
resource Cochlear Implants: A guide for
families or you can visit www.soundingboard.
earfoundation.org.uk.
Bone conduction hearing implants
A bone conduction hearing implant is designed
for people who have a functioning cochlea but
the middle or outer part of the ear prevents the
information reaching the cochlea in the usual way.
It consists of a sound processor that is held on the
head behind the ear. This might be clipped to a
fixture, known as an ‘abutment’, a small titanium
screw that has been implanted in the skull just
behind the ear (known as a bone-anchored hearing
aid) or with a magnet holding the processor in
place. This allows sound to be conducted through
the bone rather than through the ear canal
and middle ear. This allows sound waves to be
transmitted directly to the cochlea in the inner ear.
For more information see the National Deaf
Children’s Society’s resource Bone Anchored
Hearing Aids: Information for parents and
families.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Radio aids
A radio aid carries the teacher’s voice directly
to the pupil’s receiver attached to their hearing
aid, bone conduction hearing implant or cochlear
implant. It reduces some of the problems
presented by distance from the teacher and
background noise. The microphone and transmitter
are worn by the teacher and the receiver is worn
by the student and attached to their hearing
technology such as a hearing aid. Some radio aids
can be used by students without personal hearing
technology by wearing an earpiece receiver.
This may be particularly useful for students with
unilateral deafness with the earpiece worn in their
good ear.
Most pupils will have their hearing technology
programmed to allow them to hear from both
the radio aid and their surroundings so that they
can hear other students as well as the teacher.
However, it is possible to programme their
hearing technology to only hear the radio aid. The
microphone can be passed to students speaking
in group work or class discussion to aid clarity.
The radio aid transmitter can also be connected
to equipment such as televisions or computers to
assist clarity.
For further information see the National Deaf
Children’s Society’s resource How Radio Aids
Can Help.
Soundfield systems
Soundfield systems rely on a radio or wireless
microphone worn by the teacher and loudspeakers,
which are placed around the room. They project
the teacher’s voice at a consistent level around
the classroom. These systems can improve the
listening conditions for all students.
Portable systems are available that can be moved
between learning spaces as required. Some
systems can link with other classroom equipment
such as interactive whiteboards.
A student may need to use radio aids alongside the
soundfield system and both can be set up to work
side by side.
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Appendix 3: Communication options
Appendix 3:
Communication options
The information below covers the variety of communication options that deaf
students in your college may use.
Spoken language
Most (more than 90%) of deaf children are from families with no first-hand
experience of deafness and where spoken languages are used. It is important
to remember that whichever language is used in the home, some deaf students
may still experience a significant delay. In many cases, spoken language will be
supported by signing and lipreading.
British Sign Language (BSL)
Deaf young people with deaf parents who use BSL as their first language are
likely to also have BSL as their first language. BSL is a visual language that uses
hand shapes, facial expression, gestures, body language and fingerspelling. It
has a structure and grammar different from that of written and spoken English.
Many students using BSL will also use spoken English. Some students may
grow up with spoken language but choose to learn BSL as they grow up. Deaf
young people brought up by deaf parents will often start school with ageappropriate or near age-appropriate language in BSL.
Some deaf students in Northern Ireland may use Irish Sign Language instead.
Sign Supported English (SSE)
For many students their spoken English may be supported with signs taken
from BSL. When signs are used to support spoken English in this way it is
known as Sign Supported English. This is used to add clarity to what is being
said, for example, in situations where they may struggle with background noise
or if they are too distant from the speaker.
Speech reading/lipreading
Speech reading or lipreading has an important role in helping young people
access spoken language. Lip patterns of spoken words can help the deaf
student identify what is being said, supporting the interpretation of the speech
sounds that can be heard. If used on its own it has a number of limitations but
it is a natural support to understanding spoken communication that everyone
uses and is especially helpful to the deaf student.
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Appendix 4:
Specialist staff working
in further education
Language support providers (LPS)
Qualified communication support worker (CSW)
A qualified support worker in education, communication and sign language.
Should be qualified to a minimum of level 3 in BSL. There are also additional
qualifications available to communication support workers.
Qualified BSL/English interpreter
Qualified to translate between languages with specialist training in interpreting.
Should be qualified/registered with NRCPD* and hold a Level 6 qualification in
BSL.
A trainee BSL/English interpreter should be undertaking an approved
interpreter training course that leads to registered status.
Qualified notetaker (electronic and manual)
Qualified to make precise notes during lectures, tutorials, etc. Should be
qualified/registered with NRCPD and hold a relevant qualification.
Qualified speech to text reporter (STTR)
Qualified to make verbatim notes during lectures, tutorials, etc. Sometimes
known as a palantypist. Should be qualified/registered with NRCPD and hold a
CACDP Level 3 notetaker qualification.
Qualified lipspeaker
Qualified to relay the content of lectures, tutorials, etc. using clear speech
supported by fingerspelling, gesture or sign. Should be qualified/registered
with NRCPD to a Level 3 standard.
Trainee lipspeakers may instead be qualified to a Level 2 standard.
Qualified deafblind communicator/guide/interpreter
Qualified to communicate in BSL, hands on sign, block and fingerspelling and to
guide in the environment. Should be qualified/registered with NRCPD deafblind
communicator/guide to Level 3.
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www.ndcs.org.uk/livechat
Appendix 4: Specialist staff working in further education
Oral language modifier
Qualified to modify language during examinations, usually a Teacher/Tutor of
the Deaf, CSW or interpreter.
Teaching/tutoring
Qualified Teacher of the Deaf
A qualified teacher with specialist qualifications (usually to postgraduate level)
in deaf education, including audiology, with minimum requirement of BSL
Level 1. Additional qualifications may include BSL, linguistics and adult literacy/
numeracy.
Tutor of BSL
A qualified teacher in post-16 education. Additional qualifications in BSL (up to
Level 6) and linguistics of BSL.
Educational audiologist
A qualified Teacher of the Deaf with an additional qualification in audiology and
hearing assessment.
*NRCPD – The National Registers of Communication Professionals working with
Deaf and Deafblind People
** CACDP is the previous name for the awarding body now called Signature.
www.ndcs.org.uk
Freephone Helpline 0808 800 8880 (voice and text)
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Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
Appendix 5:
Useful resources
Action on Hearing Loss
www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk
Association of Deaf Education Professionals and Trainees
www.adeptuk.co.uk
Association of Lipspeakers (ALS)
www.lipspeaking.co.uk
The British Association of Teachers of the Deaf
www.batod.org.uk
Deaf Action
www.deafaction.org
Deaf Connections
www.deafconnections.co.uk
National Careers Service
www.nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk
The Ear Foundation
www.earfoundation.org.uk
The Ewing Foundation
www.ewing-foundation.org.uk
Signature
www.signature.org.uk
www.ndcs.org.uk
www.ndcs.org.uk/livechat
About the National Deaf Children’s Society
About the National Deaf
Children’s Society
The National Deaf Children’s Society is the leading charity dedicated to creating
a world without barriers for deaf children and young people across the UK. We
support deaf children, their families and the professionals who work with them,
and challenge governments and society to meet their needs.
We provide information on all aspects of childhood deafness and hearing loss
including:
• education
• audiology
• benefits
• technology
• communication
• additional needs
• parenting.
At the National Deaf Children’s Society we use the term ‘deaf’ to refer to all
levels of hearing loss in children and young people, including a partial or total
loss of hearing. This includes those who may describe themselves as having
a ‘hearing loss’, ‘hearing impairment’ or as ‘deaf’, and includes those with
temporary deafness, such as glue ear. We support all deaf children and young
people, regardless of their level of deafness, how they communicate or what
technical aids they use.
Got a question?
Our Freephone Helpline can answer your questions about any issues relating
to deaf children’s education or development. Give us a call on 0808 800 8880,
email us at helpline@ndcs.org.uk or take part in a Live Chat at www.ndcs.org.
uk/livechat. You can also order our publications through the Helpline.
Raising awareness
Deafness isn’t a learning disability. With the right support, most deaf children
and young people can achieve the same outcomes as other students. We
produce lots of resources to support professionals who work with deaf children
and young people to promote best practice and raise expectations. Our
guidance, written by expert Teachers of the Deaf, set out the interventions and
reasonable adjustments that can be made in education settings to improve deaf
children and young people’s outcomes.
www.ndcs.org.uk
Freephone Helpline 0808 800 8880 (voice and text)
69
70
Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
All of our resources are free to download or order. They include:
Assessing and Monitoring the Progress of Deaf Children and Young People
Here to Learn DVD: A resource for schools. Also online at www.ndcs.org.uk/
heretolearn.
Look, Smile, Chat Deaf Awareness Pack
Bullying and Deaf Children: A guide for primary and secondary schools
Creating Good Listening Conditions for Learning in Education
To order any of our free resources, visit www.ndcs.org.uk/publications or
contact the National Deaf Children’s Society Freephone Helpline.
About our free support
We support families from initial diagnosis to adulthood across education,
health and social care in a range of ways including:
• free information resources for families including our seasonal Families
magazine and email updates with the latest news and family stories
• a Freephone Helpline offering clear, balanced information – we offer a
free interpreting service for families who do not speak English as a first
language
• local support from our Children and Families’ Support Officers
• events where families can meet one another and get support from
professionals
• support for mainstream art, sport and leisure organisations to run their
activities in a deaf-friendly way, with free resources at www.ndcs.org.
uk/me2
• Technology Test Drive loan service that enables deaf children and young
people to try out equipment, including radio aids, at home or school.
Buzz website
Our Buzz website is a safe space where deaf children and young people can
get support. It also provides deaf young people with a range of information on
education and growing up. www.buzz.org.uk
Find us on YouTube
We have a YouTube channel full of videos starring deaf teenagers, parents of
deaf children and the professionals who work with them, available from
www.youtube.com/ndcswebteam.
www.ndcs.org.uk
www.ndcs.org.uk/livechat
About the National Deaf Children’s Society
For more information about the National Deaf Children’s Society:
Visit our website: www.ndcs.org.uk
Facebook: www.facebook.com/NDCS.UK
Twitter: twitter.com/NDCS_UK
Become a professional member
Join the National Deaf Children’s Society for free today by calling our Freephone
Helpline on 0808 800 8880 or go to www.ndcs.org.uk/professional_support.
www.ndcs.org.uk
Freephone Helpline 0808 800 8880 (voice and text)
71
72
Supporting the achievement of deaf young people in further education
About the National
Sensory Impairment
Partnership (NatSIP)
The National Sensory Impairment Partnership (NatSIP) is a partnership of
organisations working together to improve outcomes for children and young
people with sensory impairment (SI). The agreed purpose of NatSIP is:
• to improve educational outcomes for children and young people with sensory
impairment, closing the gap with their peers, through joint working with all
who have an interest in the success of these young people
• t o help children achieve more and fulfil the potential of children and young
people who have SI
• t o promote a national model for the benchmarking of clear progress and
impact criteria for children and young people who have SI
• t o support a well-trained SI workforce responsive to the Government
agenda for education
• t o inform and advise the Department for Education in England and other
national agencies on the education of children and young people with SI
• to promote collaboration between services, schools, professional bodies and
voluntary bodies working with children and young people who have SI
• to promote collaborative working between education, health and social care
professionals in the interest of children and young people who have SI.
For more information about NatSIP and to access to resources,
visit www.natsip.org.uk – a major gateway for SI professional practice.
www.ndcs.org.uk
www.ndcs.org.uk/livechat
www.ndcs.org.uk
Freephone Helpline 0808 800 8880 (voice and text)
The National Deaf Children’s Society is the leading
charity dedicated to creating a world without barriers
for deaf children and young people.
ational Deaf Children’s Society’s Freephone Helpline:
N
0808 800 8880 (voice and text)
Email: helpline@ndcs.org.uk
www.ndcs.org.uk
The National Sensory Impairment Partnership (NatSIP)
is a partnership of organisations working together to
improve outcomes for children and young people with
sensory impairment.
www.natsip.org.uk
JR0526
This resource has been developed by the National Deaf Children’s Society, with support
from the National Sensory Impairment Partnership (NatSIP). NatSIP receives funding
from the Department for Education (DfE) in England.
ublished by the National Deaf Children’s Society © December 2015
P
Next review due: April 2017
Ground Floor South, Castle House, 37–45 Paul Street, London EC2A 4LS
Tel: 020 7490 8656 (voice and text) Fax: 020 7251 5020
NDCS is a registered charity in England and Wales no. 1016532
and in Scotland no. SC040779.
This publication can be requested in large print, in Braille and on audio CD.
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