resources for educators - Victory Charter School

resources for educators - Victory Charter School
Liberty Charter School, Victory Charter School
and Legacy Charter School
Right-Size Your Portions
Q: What in the world does a hamburger have to do with a yo-yo?
A: When a hamburger is a healthy portion size, it’s about the same size as a yo-yo!
Today’s oversized portions often lead to overeating. Keep that from happening in your family with these simple tips for recognizing and enjoying
healthy serving sizes. Then, share the illustrated guide on the back with
your youngster for a fun reminder of what healthy portions look like.
Recognize a serving
Play the “How big is a serving?” game. Set out measuring
cups and spoons, and choose an item from your refrigerator
or pantry (say, a tub of cream cheese or a box of crackers).
Each person measures or counts out what he thinks is one
serving. Together, check the label. Whoever came closest
picks another food to play again. Over time, your
child will learn to “eyeball” the appropriate amount.
Downsize plates
Did you know that
dinner plates are actually
3”–4” larger than they
were a generation ago?
Try instantly reducing
portions by bringing
plates back down to
size. For instance, serve
dinner on salad plates.
Or use cups instead of
bowls.
Cook—and serve—smart
Cut back on how much food everyone eats before the meal
even begins. You might bake macaroni and cheese in individual ramekins, one per person. Or plate food before bringing it
to the table. Your youngster will get used to enjoying reasonably sized meals.
Portion out leftovers
Store leftovers in sectioned plates or containers. Your child
can place individual servings of entrees and side dishes in
separate sections. When she’s ready to heat up a meal, her
portions will be just right.
Single-size your snacks
Eating from a bag or box makes it hard for your youngster
to know how many servings he consumes. Instead, help him
count or measure single servings into snack-size bags. Examples: 20 mini pretzels, 1 cup popcorn.
Dining out
Restaurants often serve extra-large portions. Try these
strategies to help your family trim them to a healthy size.
Go small
At fast-food or fast-casual places, encourage your youngster to avoid “super-size” items. In a sit-down restaurant,
suggest that she order an appetizer or two side dishes for
her meal.
Share food
Rather than ordering a full-sized meal for each person,
get one meal for every two people. Then, add side salads
or extra servings of healthy vegetables.
Bring home a doggie bag
Doggie bags aren’t just for dogs! Ask the server to bring
a to-go box with your
meal. Let your child
help you scoop
half the food in
the box before you
even put a fork in
it. You’ll not only
avoid overeating,
you’ll have dinner
tonight and lunch
tomorrow—for the
price of one meal.
Nutrition Nuggets
© 2017 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
continued
TM
This institution is an equal opportunity provider.
Right-Size Your Portions
Fruits
Page 2
Grains
Here’s a fun way
to serve up healthy portion
sizes: Have your youngster
use familiar items to
visualize how big her
servings should be. Post this
chart as a handy reference
for comparisons between
some favorite foods and
everyday objects.
1 cup dry cereal: a medium pinecone
1 bagel or hamburger bun: a hockey puck
1
–
cup cooked pasta or rice:
2
2 ice-cream scoops
Protein
1 cup grapes: a baseball
1
–
cup cooked beans: a computer mouse
2
1 cup strawberries: a doorknob
3-oz. serving of meat, chicken,
or turkey: a yo-yo
1 cup diced watermelon: a lightbulb
2 tbsp. peanut butter or other nut
butter: a golf ball
Vegetables
Dairy
1 cup raw, leafy greens like lettuce
or spinach: rolled-up ankle socks
1 oz. cheese: 4 dice
1 cup baby carrots: a tennis ball
1 tsp. butter: a Scrabble tile
1 cup peas: a child’s closed fist
1 cup yogurt: a cupcake wrapper
Editor’s Note: Nutrition Nuggets™ is reviewed by a registered dietitian. Consult a physician before beginning any major change in diet or exercise.
Nutrition Nuggets
Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
■
TM
128 N. Royal Avenue, Front Royal, VA 22630
■
800-394-5052
© 2017 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
NN17xx529E
Liberty Charter School, Victory Charter School
and Legacy Charter School
Best
Recipes
2017
Edition
Need inspiration in the kitchen? Choose a recipe, and
enjoy making and eating it with the whole family!
Squash pancakes
1 medium zucchini
1 medium yellow squash
1 tsp. salt
1 egg, beaten
–12 cup whole-wheat flour
–12 tsp. baking powder
1 medium onion, chopped
–12 cup shredded carrot
Nonstick spray
Grate zucchini and yellow squash.
Sprinkle on salt, and set in a colander for 20 minutes (to remove
moisture). Rinse well. Combine with
egg, flour, baking powder, onion, and
with nonstick spray), and saute
carrot. Put large spoonfuls into a hot skillet (coated
4.
s
Serve
the pancakes until brown on both sides.
Egg dog
quickly
Nonstick spray
–41 cup chopped red onion
–41 cup chopped asparagus
2 eggs
1 tbsp. fat-free milk
1 whole-wheat hot dog bun
1 tbsp. tomato salsa
ables
Coat skillet with cooking spray, and saute diced veget
Stir
pan.
the
until tender. Whisk eggs with milk, and add to
s 1.
Serve
salsa.
until the eggs are set. Place in a bun, and drizzle on
Chili-roasted chickpeas
2 15-oz. cans chickpeas (drained, rinsed)
1 tbsp. olive oil
–12 tsp. salt
1 tsp. chili powder
In a bowl, combine the chickUse a paper towel or clean cloth to dry the chickpeas.
baking sheet, and cook at 400°
a
peas with olive oil, salt, and chili powder. Spread on
servings.
4
s
for 20–30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes. Make
Mini meat loaves
1 lb. lean ground turkey
1 egg, beaten
–41 cup quick-cooking oats, uncooked
1 tbsp. ketchup
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
–81 tsp. ground pepper
With clean hands or a spoon, combine all ingredient
s in a bowl. Divide the mixture
into 8 muffin cups, and bake at 375° for 30 minutes.
Serves 4.
Bell pepper “pizzas”
4 bell peppers (any color)
2 tbsp. olive oil
–21 cup marinara sauce
1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
1 tsp. dried basil
Slice each bell pepper into 4 quarters, removing the
tops, bottoms, and seeds. Lightly
brush the inside of each piece with olive oil. Spoon
on marinara sauce, and sprinkle
with mozzarella and basil. Bake at 350° for 15 minu
tes. Serves 4.
Quinoa taco bowl
1 lb. lean ground beef
2 tbsp. low-sodium taco seasoning
1 15-oz. can kidney beans, drained
4 cups cooked quinoa
–41 cup cheddar cheese, shredded
–41 cup low-fat sour cream
–21 cup salsa
Brown the meat in a skillet. Add taco seasoning and
beans, and cook until liquid evaporates. In 4 bowls, add quinoa and then the meat
and bean mix. Top with cheese, sour
cream, and salsa. Serves 4. Variation: Leave out the
beef and add avocado for a vegetarian version.
Nutrition Nuggets
© 2017 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
TM
continued
This institution is an equal opportunity provider.
Best Recipes, 2017 Edition
Page 2
Teriyaki shrimp kebabs
Salmon burgers
1 lb. uncooked shrimp, peeled and deveined
–21 cup low-sodium teriyaki sauce
1 crushed garlic clove
Brown rice or large lettuce leaves
Marinate shrimp for 10–15 minutes in a
mixture of teriyaki sauce and garlic. Thread
the shrimp onto skewers. Grill 2 minutes on
each side until just cooked through. Serve with rice, or put the shrimp onto lettuce
leaves and fold into wraps. Serves 4.
2 cans salmon (6 oz. each), drained
1 egg, beaten
–12 cup whole-wheat breadcrumbs
–41 cup diced celery
–41 cup diced onion
Ground pepper
Whole-grain buns
and ground pepper. Form into
Mix salmon with egg, breadcrumbs, celery, onion,
at 375° for 10 minutes per side.
4 burgers, and put on a nonstick baking sheet. Bake
tion: Make with canned tuna.
Serve on whole-grain buns. Makes 4 servings. Varia
Chicken-apple slaw
Watermelon salad
1 rotisserie chicken
1 cup broccoli slaw
1 apple, diced
1 celery stalk, thinly sliced
1 8-oz. can water chestnut slices, drained
1 head lettuce, shredded
–41 cup low-fat ranch dressing
Shred the meat from the chicken and toss with brocc
oli slaw, apple, celery, water
chestnuts, lettuce, and dressing. Serves 8.
6 cups baby spinach
2 cups seedless watermelon chunks
1 cup diced feta cheese
–12 cup low-fat balsamic vinaigrette
In a large bowl, combine spinach (or another
dressing. Serves 4.
leafy green), watermelon, and feta. Toss lightly with
Overnight oat yogurt parfait
6 oz. nonfat plain Greek yogurt
–13 cup old-fashioned oats, uncooked
1 cup frozen or fresh fruit, such as
mango or berries
Mix the yogurt and oats together in a bowl. In
a jar, layer the yogurt-oat mixture and fruit.
Cover the jar with a lid and refrigerate overnight. Serves 1.
DIY trail mix
sh
Brussels sprout–sweet potato ha
1 tbsp. olive oil
8 sliced brussels sprouts,
with the ends cut off
1 large, diced sweet potato,
unpeeled
–41 tsp. salt
–41 tsp. pepper
oes, and season with salt and
Heat olive oil in a pan, add brussels sprouts and potat
cooked through. Serve as a side
until
heat
pepper. Saute 10–15 minutes over medium
and a fried egg. Serves 2.
hash
the
with
dish. Idea: Put fresh greens into a bowl. Top
Skip the premade trail mix at the stor
e, and help your
youngster come up with her own com
binations instead.
For example, she might toss together
cereal, sunflower
seeds, and dried apricots. Or she cou
ld combine pretzels,
banana chips, dried cherries, and cash
ews. Get started by
shopping together for items like thes
e:
● whole-grain
cereals
● raisins and
other dried fruits like
apricots, cranberries, and cherries
● different
kinds of unsalted nuts
(peanuts, cashews, almonds)
● popcorn
● mini uns
alted pretzels or pretzel sticks
● rice cakes,
granola bars, cereal bars, or
pita chips (broken into pieces)
● banana chip
s
● unsalted
sunflower and pumpkin seeds
● mini mar
shmallows
Editor’s Note: Nutrition Nuggets™ is reviewed by a registered dietitian. Consult a physician before beginning any major change in diet or exercise.
Nutrition Nuggets
Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
■
TM
128 N. Royal Avenue, Front Royal, VA 22630
■
800-394-5052
© 2017 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
NN17xx530E
Liberty Charter School, Victory Charter School
and Legacy Charter School
Active Kids = Healthier Kids
When your youngster gets plenty of physical activity,
she not only will be healthier, she’ll also be more likely to
stay focused and behave well in school. Encourage your
child to get at least an hour of exercise a day with these
fun games and activities.
Zigzag hopscotch
Have your youngster use sidewalk chalk to draw a staircase-shaped hopscotch board on a sidewalk, driveway, or
blacktop. To play, she should hop on one foot from start to
finish, landing on one square at a time. If she makes it without putting her other foot down, she writes her initials in any
square. On your turn, you must hop over the square she initialed. If you get to the end, you initial any empty square.
Keep taking turns, hopping only on empty squares or ones
with your own initials, until every square is claimed or no
one can hop across. The player with the most initials wins.
Kick and block
Form a garden hose into a large circle, and place a soccer
ball in the center. Two players stand in the circle. One person
is the “kicker,” and the other is the “blocker.” The kicker
attempts to kick the ball out of the circle—kicking in the
direction of the blocker. The blocker uses his feet to try to
keep the ball in. When the ball goes out of the circle, swap
roles, and play again.
Slow-motion race
When you take a walk, try this race where the slowpoke
wins. Challenge your family to walk in s-l-o-w m-o-t-i-o-n
from one end of a block to the other. Your children will build
balance and muscle control as they try to make each step last
as long as possible. There’s only one rule to follow: Everyone
must keep moving — no stopping allowed. The last person to
reach the end wins.
Fish or fowl
You can play this game on sidewalks or grass. One player
is the caller. If the caller names a fish (bass, perch, tuna), the
other players jump backward. If she names a bird (robin,
woodpecker, seagull), players jump forward. The caller keeps
naming fish or fowl, trying to trick the jumpers. If you jump
in the wrong direction, you’re out. The last person in the
game becomes the new caller. Play until everyone has had
a turn being the caller.
Penny hunt
Ask your youngster to count out 15 pennies. Then, have
her cover her eyes while you hide them around the house. Set
a timer for two minutes, and let her race to find the pennies
before the buzzer rings. Next game, she can hide the pennies,
and you hunt. Help each other find the pennies by saying
“You’re hot” when someone gets close to a hiding place and
“You’re cold” if she’s moving away from one. Idea: Move the
game outdoors, and hide pennies in bushes, under rocks, or
in sidewalk cracks.
Nutrition Nuggets
© 2017 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
continued
TM
This institution is an equal opportunity provider.
Active Kids = Healthier Kids
Page 2
Fitness island
Turn a sidewalk or driveway into an island. With sidewalk
chalk, your child can draw a landscape full of fitness challenges.
He might create a stream, a bridge, and stepping-stones, for
instance. Then, he can pretend to wade through the stream,
walk heel-to-toe on the narrow bridge, and jump from stepping-stone to stepping-stone across a make-believe swamp.
When he finishes, it’s your turn to take the island challenge.
Rainbow walk
Walk laps up and down a shopping strip or around a mall
until you’ve spotted one item for every color of the rainbow.
For example, you may find red shoes, an orange safety cone,
a yellow sundress, green shampoo, blue jeans, indigo earrings,
and a violet rug. Or take a rainbow walk in the neighborhood,
and see who can find a red flag on a mailbox, an orange flower,
and so on.
Beanbag tag
The object of this game is to tag the other person’s feet with
a beanbag. Choose an open space with a wood or tile floor,
such as a hall or basement. Have your child stand at one end
of the room while you stand at the other. Now, take turns sliding the beanbag across the floor at the other person’s feet. Try
to dodge the beanbag by jumping over it. Score a point each
time you tag your opponent with the beanbag. The first one
to score 10 points wins. Variation: To make the game more
challenging, slide the beanbags toward each other’s feet at the
same time.
This way or that
There are lots of ways to cross a playground. Let your
youngster start this game by saying, “Come across the playground like this…” and then crossing in a funny way (spinning like a top, walking on her heels). All the other players
must cross in the same way. Then, the next leader says, “No,
no, no. Come across like this…” and leads players across the
playground a different way, perhaps walking sideways. How
many ways can everyone think of?
Five-minute ideas
Here are everyday ideas for short bursts of activity.
Inside
● Put on music, and lip-sync while doing your
best dance
moves.
● Play with a pet.
● Do a “routine” like five forward rolls, five push-u
ps, and
five backward rolls.
● Stand in a line, and have each person put his
hands on
the shoulders of the person in front of him. See how fast
you can snake your way through the house without breaking the chain.
Outside
● Practice basketball free throws.
● Play a game of catch.
● Take turns throwing a Frisbee and measuring
the distance
you tossed it.
● Pick a starting point and a finish line. Have
a race.
Editor’s Note: Nutrition Nuggets™ is reviewed by a registered dietitian. Consult a physician before beginning any major change in diet or exercise.
Nutrition Nuggets
Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
■
TM
128 N. Royal Avenue, Front Royal, VA 22630
■
800-394-5052
© 2017 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated
NN17xx531E
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