Saugus High School Program of Studies

Saugus High School Program of Studies
Saugus High School
“Make a Choice for Excellence”
Program of Studies
2015-2016
Table of Contents
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 3
Core Values, Beliefs, and Learning Expectations .........................Error! Bookmark not defined.
Learning Expectations .................................................................................................................... 6
Graduation Requirements: .............................................................................................................. 7
Advanced Placement ...................................................................................................................... 7
Honor Courses ............................................................................................................................... 8
College Prep Courses ..................................................................................................................... 8
Course Changes ............................................................................................................................. 8
Sequential Subjects ........................................................................................................................ 8
English .................................................................................................................................... 8
Social Studies .......................................................................................................................... 9
Science .................................................................................................................................... 9
Mathematics ............................................................................................................................ 9
World Language...................................................................................................................... 9
New Beginnings ...................................................................................................................... 9
Technology Education ............................................................................................................ 9
Fine Arts.................................................................................................................................. 9
Wellness .................................................................................................................................. 9
Human Sexuality Curricula .................................................................................................... 9
Four Year Credit/Course Projection Sheet .................................................................................. 11
Admission to Post-Secondary Schools ......................................................................................... 10
Profile of SHS Graduates .............................................................................................................. 11
Guidance Program ........................................................................................................................ 11
Testing........................................................................................................................................... 13
Rank & GPA ................................................................................................................................. 14
Financial Aid & Scholarships ....................................................................................................... 14
College Planning Guidelines for Students: ................................................................................... 15
Guidelines for Parents: .................................................................................................................. 17
Virtual High School ...................................................................................................................... 17
NovaNET Credit Recovery ........................................................................................................... 20
Special Programs .......................................................................................................................... 18
The Saugus High School Academy For The Advanced Program of Studies Overview ............... 20
Advanced Program Flowchart .................................................................................................. 22
Advanced Placement Contract ...................................................................................................... 24
Course Descriptions
English ...................................................................................................................................... 24
History....................................................................................................................................... 31
Science ...................................................................................................................................... 39
Mathematics .............................................................................................................................. 45
World Language........................................................................................................................ 53
Computer Technology .............................................................................................................. 59
Child Care ................................................................................................................................. 66
Technology Education .............................................................................................................. 64
Fine Arts.................................................................................................................................... 65
Wellness ................................................................................................................................... 71
2
Introduction
This booklet is your guide to planning your program for the next year and beyond with the help
of your parents and our staff. You should plan a sound educational program through your senior
year based on your personal goals, needs and interests. Saugus High School offers a wide
variety of electives from which you may choose; on the other hand, we also have a number of
requirements for graduation which must be kept in mind at all stages of planning.
Saugus High School
Saugus High School Principal,
Mr. Michael Hashem
781-231-5027
ext. 1101
Saugus High School Assistant Principal,
Ms. Lucy DiNatale
ext. 1104
Saugus High School Assistant Principal/Athletic Director
Mr. Michael Nelson
ext. 1115
Saugus High School Assistant Principal and Humanities Director
Mr. Brendon Sullivan
ext. 1112
Director of Guidance,
Ms. Leanne Mottola
ext. 1110
Saugus High School Guidance
ext. 1110
Saugus Middle School Guidance
781-231-5060
Director of Pupil Personnel,
Ms. Lisa Howard
781-231-5007
3
4
5
Graduation Requirements:
1.
2.
Credits Required - 120 credits total to graduate
Students must be registered for a minimum of 35 credits per year
Subjects to be passed:
English
20 credits
(4 years)
Mathematics
20 credits
(4 years)
Social Studies
15 credits
(3 years)
Science
15 credits
(3 years)
Wellness
10 credits
(4 years)
Fine Arts
5 credits
(1 year)
World Language
10 credits
(2 years of same language)
A minimum of 20 credits must be passed during the student's senior year.
3.
In addition to the requirements listed above, twelve (12) hours of community service per
year for a 4-year minimum of 48 hours.
4.
MCAS Requirement
All students must pass the MCAS test in Math, English Language Arts and Science.
Math and ELA require a minimum score of 240. Science requires a passing score of
220. Any student earning a 220 to 238 on the Math or ELA test will be placed on an
Education Proficiency Plan (EPP). This will require the student to take addition
courses and/or tests in the content area in which they do not meet the passing score.
Students failing to meet the minimum score of 220 will be placed on an Individual
Student Success plan to help them meet the passing score. This plan will require
students to attend MCAS remediation course offered throughout the year.
Advanced Placement (AP) Courses: Saugus High School offers a variety of Advanced
Placement (AP) courses. These courses give students the opportunity to take college-level
courses while still in high school. Advanced Placement courses are rigorous and designed for
students who wish to be challenged intellectually. Subjects are studied in greater depth and
detail, with students expected to develop and support their arguments and perspectives.
Development of writing skills, problem-solving techniques, and study habits essential for college
academics provides an advantage to students successfully completing AP courses.
Advanced Placement courses currently planned for 2013-2014 at Saugus High School include:
AP Biology
AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC
AP Chemistry
AP Computer Science A
AP English Language & Composition
AP English Literature & Composition
AP Environmental Science
AP Physics B Course 1
AP Physics B Course 2
AP Physics C
AP Psychology
AP Spanish Language
AP Statistics
AP US Government & Politics
AP US History
AP World History
6
Students taking AP courses at Saugus High School are required to take the corresponding AP
exam administered at school in May. The fee for each exam is currently $89.00, with fee
reduction or waiver available for qualified students. Failure to complete the exam will lead to
removal of the AP designation for the course on the student's transcript.
Several additional AP courses may be available through Virtual High School.
Most colleges and universities in the United States (as well as in thirty other countries) award
college credit and/or advanced placement through qualifying AP exam scores. This allows
students the possibility of moving into upper-level courses, pursuing a double major, or gaining
time to study abroad while in college.
Honors (H) Courses: Saugus High School currently offers our students a wide variety of honors
level courses. Honors level courses are designed to provide students with a rigorous curriculum
that is introduced at an accelerated pace. These courses are designed to challenge students
academically and help them to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.
College Prep (CP) Courses: Saugus High School offers wide variety of college prep courses
spanning a range of content areas. Students will follow curriculum designed to follow the
Common Core State Standards as well as state level content standards. The students will be
instructed using various instructional strategies designed to prepare students for college success.
Course Changes
Students may make course changes during summer vacation. Changes made after the start of school may
be allowed after parents/guardians contact the teacher and it is decided that the student is misplaced in the
course. Students should discuss all matters of this nature with parents, counselors and teachers before
making a decision.
Sequential Subjects
In order to continue in sequential subjects, students must have received a passing grade in the
preceding courses or pass a pre-requisite to qualify for placement.
English
All students must successfully pass 4 years of English (Non-Elective) in order to
graduate. It is strongly recommended that students who fail English take advantage of
summer school opportunities and maintain their position in their class.
2. English failed at the end of the freshman or sophomore year will necessitate either
passing the course at an approved summer school with a grade of “70” or better, or
repeating the course. English failed at the end of the junior year may be made up at an
appropriate summer school with a grade of “70” or may be taken concurrently with
Senior English if it fits into the student’s schedule. Students should meet with their
Guidance Counselor as soon as possible to see if this is an option for his or her senior
year.
1.
Social Studies
1.
To meet the three year requirement for graduation, all students will pass US History I, US
History II, and World History II.
Science
1. To meet the three year requirement for graduation, all students will pass Biology,
Chemistry, and one additional year of lab science.
Mathematics
Students are required to complete 4 years in mathematics courses, including the
completion of Geometry and Algebra 2.
2. It is strongly recommended that students who fail any math course take advantage of
summer school opportunities and maintain their position in their class.
3. Students on Educational Proficiency Plans (EPP) are required to complete the Integrated
Math for Proficiency course.
4. Seniors are encouraged to take Personal Finance as a senior elective in mathematics.
1.
World Language
1.
2.
3.
All students are required to pass a minimum of two years of one world language.
A third year of the same world language is strongly recommended.
Students aspiring to a highly selective college are recommended to elect a fourth year.
Fine Arts
The courses offered in the Fine Arts Department are meant to enhance, broaden and enrich the
student’s background in visual and performing arts. Most classes will attempt to foster lifelong
appreciation, understanding and interest. Students are required to explore the world of fine arts
by taking a minimum of 5 credits in the fine arts area.
Wellness
All students must pass 10 credits of Wellness in four years. For the next four years students will
be required to pass a combination of Physical Education, Health Education, and Wellness.
Students not physically capable of handling this program must submit a written statement from a
medical doctor in order to be excused. Medical excuses must be renewed yearly and presented
with the approved Final Course Selection. Included in Wellness, students are required to fulfill
their community services hours for that year concurrently.
Human Sexuality Curricula
Parental/Guardian Notification Regarding Human Sexual Education and Human Sexuality
Curricula. The Saugus Public School system has implemented a K-12 Comprehensive Health
Education component with HIV/AIDS and human sexuality education programs occurring at the
9-12 grade level. Our School Committee has approved our curriculum to ensure the present and
future health of our students. If you wish to review the curriculum or remove your son/daughter
from its instruction in part or whole, please contact the building principal to schedule an
appointment.
8
4-Year Credit/Course Projection Sheet
Graduation Requirements Contract
Name: ____________________ Current Credits: _____ YOG: _____ Date: ____
English (4 years/20 credits)
Credits Needed to Graduate: 120 credits
English 1 ________
English 2 ________
English 3 ________
English 4 ________
Courses/Credits Needed to Graduate:
5
5
5
5
Social Studies (3 years/15 credits)
U.S. History I _______ 5
U.S. History II _______ 5
World History II ______ 5
Math (4 years/20 credits)
Algebra ________
Geometry ________
Algebra 2 ________
Math
________
Math
________
5
5
5
5
5
Science (3 years/15 credits)
Biology ________
Chemistry ________
Physics ________
5
5
5
Wellness (4 years/10 credits)
Wellness 1
Wellness 2
Wellness 3
Wellness 4
_______
_______
_______
_______
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
Community Service (48 HOURS)
FRESHMEN
SOPHOMORE
JUNIORS
SENIORS
12 HOURS _______
12 HOURS _______
12 HOURS _______
12 HOURS _______
MCAS
Math
_______
ELA
_______
Science _______
_______
_______
_______
EPP:
ELA
(circle)
Math
*Student Signature: ______________________
Fine Arts (1/2 year/2.5 credits)
_________________ 2.5
_________________ 2.5
Counselor Signature:_____________________
World Language (2 years/10 credits)
_________________ 5
_______________ 5
*To Student: Your signature indicates that you are fully
aware of the courses needed for your graduation and that
you are completely responsible for fulfilling your
requirements.
Date: __________
9
Admission to Post-Secondary Schools
During the school year, admissions officers from many schools and colleges visit our school. These
visits are posted on Naviance & students can sign up online. Interested juniors and seniors are given
the opportunity to meet with these college representatives and discuss their colleges with them. The
most important part of a student’s college application is their high school transcript. The transcript
includes each course a student has taken and the final grade they earned. Colleges see first and second
term grades during a student’s senior year.
Students should check specific entrance requirements on college’s websites. Guidance Counselors will
assist students with the college planning process. College-bound students should plan their schedules
with sufficient credits in each subject area to meet the requirements of colleges they are interested in.
College-bound students must remember that they are competing with students from all over the world
when it comes to applying to colleges and universities. Students are encouraged to build a strong
academic transcript to better their chances for acceptance into certain institutions. Colleges also take
into account standardized test scores, co-curricular activities, letters of recommendation, essays,
enrichment programs and summer school attendance.
General requirements for most four year liberal arts colleges/universities are:
4 years of English
4 years of College-Prep Math
3-4 years of one World Language
3 years of Social Studies
3 years of Science, preferably Biology, Chemistry and Physics including 2 years in a lab.
Specialized electives recommended
College requirements for most highly selective colleges/universities or scientific programs
(engineering) are:
4 years of English
4 or more years of College-Prep Math
4 or more years of Science, usually Biology, Chemistry and Physics including 2 years of a lab.
4 or more years of one World Language
3 years of Social Studies
Specialized electives recommended (Computer Aided Design)
Requirements usually expected of nursing applicants are:
4 years of English
4 years of College-Prep Math
4 years of Science, preferably Biology, Chemistry and Physics including 2 years in a lab.
3 years of Social Studies
3 or more years of one World Language (recommended)
Specialized electives recommended (Anatomy & Physiology)
Minimum requirements for technical institutions are:
4 years of English
3-4 years of College-Prep Math
10
3-4 years of Science, preferably a course in Chemistry and Physics
2-3 years of Social Studies
Specialized electives recommended
Massachusetts State College Admission Standards
The State Colleges and the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education require the following collegepreparatory academic units as a minimum:
4 years English
4 years Mathematics (Algebra I, II & Geometry)
3 years Science (2 years of lab science)
3 years Social Studies
3-4 years World Language
2 years College Preparatory Electives
Profile of SHS Graduates
Four Year Colleges and
Universities
Two Year Colleges and
Community Colleges
Other Education
Military
Work
Undecided
CLASS of CLASS of CLASS of CLASS of CLASS of
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
65.3%
65.6%
59.2%
69.5%
67.3%
23.8%
24.8%
29.6%
23.5%
20.4%
2.1%
4.8%
2.1%
1.4%
5.1%
1.9%
1.9%
.6%
3.3%
2.7%
1.9%
3.3%
2.2%
2.8%
.5%
1.1%
2.3%
4.1%
4.1%
1.8%
Guidance Program
The Saugus High School Guidance Department works cooperatively with students, parents and faculty
on academic planning, course selection, personal/developmental issues, transition concerns, and the
career/college search process. Counselors assist students in working toward their academic potential
and encourage social and co-curricular experiences that provide opportunities for personal growth and
independence. Students are encouraged to be self-advocates and seek out assistance whenever
necessary. Parents are encouraged to contact their child’s Guidance Counselor for assistance in a
student’s transition to school, educational planning or if they have any questions or concerns relating to
school. Guidance Counselors are available to meet by appointment and can be contacted via e-mail and
telephone. Contact information is available on the Saugus High School Guidance website.
Students will be participating in assigned guidance seminars throughout the school year. These
seminars will focus on different topics based on grade level.
Grade 9: Study skills, goal setting, co-curricular activities, time management, learning styles,
Naviance introduction.
Grade 10: Career and college planning, resume building, PSAT review, testing information, and
Naviance review.
11
Grade 11: PSAT review, Naviance, college and career searches, college admissions planning, testing
information, resume building, stress management
Grade 12: Naviance, college and career searches, college essays, resume building, application process;
interviewing skills, post high school planning, scholarships, stress management
Counselors also work individually with students throughout their high school career on a variety of
topics including: academic planning, transition, learning styles, decision making, coping strategies,
goal setting, school and community involvement, personality profiles, career exploration, testing, and
college planning. Various group meetings for parents are scheduled each year as well. In the spring,
counselors meet individually with students to help them choose elective courses based on
postsecondary interests.
The SHS Guidance Department also hosts a college fair in the cafeteria every June. Sophomore,
juniors and parents are welcomed to attend. Announcements will be posted prior to the event. Students
and parents may be surveyed after various activities to provide feedback which will be used to
plan future programs.
The Saugus High School Guidance Department incorporates technology into its program with its use
of Family Connection from Naviance, a web-based service which is designed especially for students
and parents. Family Connection is a comprehensive website that you can use to help in making
decisions about courses, colleges, and careers. Family Connection is linked with Counselor’s Office, a
service that is used in the Guidance Office to track and analyze data about college and career plans, so
it provides current information that’s specific to our school.
Family Connection allows students and families to:
•
•
•
•
•
Receive important e-mails – Family Connection lets us share important information with you
and your child about up-coming meetings and events, local scholarship opportunities, and other
Web resources for college and career information. In addition, the site includes a link that your
child can use to send us an e-mail message.
Get involved in the planning and advising process – Build a resume, complete on-line
inventories regarding career searches, personality types, and learning styles. You can also
manage timelines and deadlines for making decisions about colleges and careers.
Research colleges – Compare GPA, standardized test scores, and other statistics to actual
historical data from our school for students who have applied and been admitted in the past.
Seniors can check their own rank & GPA as well.
College visits – Find out which colleges are visiting our school & sign up to meet with college
representatives. Students must pick up a Guidance pass & obtain their teachers’ signed
permission in order to miss class for these meetings. Students are responsible for making up
any missed work.
Scholarships – Local scholarships from area businesses & organizations are posted weekly and
there is also a link for the National Scholarship Search from Sallie Mae.
To visit our school’s Family Connection site, go to: http://connection.naviance.com/saugus. Parent
registration codes can be obtained by contacting their student’s Guidance Counselor.
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Testing
College Entrance Examination Board Tests (CEEB) include the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and
the American College Testing Assessment (ACT) and are done on a voluntary basis. Students who
plan to attend college should take advantage of all test opportunities in order to check their educational
progress. It is the responsibility of the students and parents to watch for testing announcements and to
follow directions for registration. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the four free score
reports at each registration. All test scores must be sent to colleges directly from the College Board
or ACT program. The Saugus High School CEEB code: 221-885. New security measures have been
implemented by the Collegeboard so students need to follow directions carefully when they register
online. Students on free or reduced lunch should ask their Guidance Counselor about fee waivers.
Sophomores, and Juniors: The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Tests and National Merit Scholarship
Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) is a two-hour practice version of the College Board SAT. The
examination gives juniors the chance to qualify for National Merit Scholarship Corporation scholarship
programs. Students should take the exam to receive feedback on their strengths/weaknesses on skills
necessary for college, to see how their performance on an admissions test might compare with that of
other students applying to college and to help them prepare for SAT Program tests. The tests are
scheduled for mid-October and is only administered once per school year; there is no make-up exam if
the PSAT is missed. SHS offers a Wednesday administration for all juniors and sophomores in order to
access AP Potential. This option is subject to funding. Otherwise students will be offered the standard
Saturday administration of the exam.
Juniors and Seniors: The SAT Reasoning Test is required by most colleges, including the
Massachusetts State Universities. The test has three sections: Critical Reading, Math, and Writing,
with a combined maximum score of 2400. Students are encouraged to take the SAT in the spring of
their junior year and again during the fall of their senior year. Students who plan to apply to college
Early Action/Decision should take the SAT’s twice in the spring of the junior year. Practice tests are
available on the College Board website and an SAT Prep Program is offered by SHS periodically. The
setup of the SAT is due to change in Spring 2016. Students can find more information about the
new SAT at www.Collegeboard.org.
The SAT Subject Tests focus on specific subject areas and are required by more selective colleges. It is
strongly recommended that students check college admissions requirements and discuss testing options
with their Guidance Counselor. Students may take up to three subject tests on one SAT testing day
and the maximum score for each test is 800. Subject Tests may not be taken on the same day as an
SAT reasoning test; a student must choose one or the other. Students can register for the SAT
Reasoning Test and the SAT Subject Tests via the College Board website www.collegeboard.org.
The ACT is also a widely accepted college entrance exam which assesses high school students’ general
educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. The choice tests cover four
skill areas; English, mathematics, reading, and science. The writing test is optional and it measures
skills in planning and writing a short essay. Students can register at, and send their score reports from,
www.ACTstudent.org.
Career Exploration Program
Saugus High School offers grade 11 and 12 students the opportunity to participate in the ASVAB
Career Exploration Program. The ASVAB is a comprehensive career exploration and planning
program that includes a multiple aptitude test battery, an interest inventory, and various career
13
planning tools. It is designed to help all students, not just those with an interest in the military, explore
their strengths and weaknesses and begin to think about different career options. For more information
go to: http://www.asvabprogram.com. The ASVAB will be offered annually to juniors and students
and parents are strongly encouraged to watch for announcements.
Military
Military recruiters visit SHS frequently during the school year via cafeteria visits and small group
meetings if requested by the student.
Rank & GPA
Class rank is cumulative over four years and is weighted on the basis of achievement level. Class rank
is based on GPA.
GRADE
AP
H
CP
GRADE
AP
H
CP
97-100
93-96
90-92
87-89
83-86
80-82
5.3
5.0
4.7
4.3
4.0
3.7
4.8
4.5
4.2
3.8
3.5
3.2
4.3
4.0
3.7
3.3
3.0
2.7
77-79
73-76
70-72
67-69
65-66
Below 65
3.3
3.0
2.7
2.3
2.0
0
2.8
2.5
2.2
1.8
1.5
0
2.3
2.0
1.7
1.3
1.0
0
Financial Aid & Scholarships
College tuition is on the rise and families need to take advantage of all resources available to finance
higher education. Applying for federal financial aid includes completing and submitting the Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Colleges use information from the FAFSA to determine
a student’s “financial aid package,” which may include: grants or scholarships which do not need to be
repaid; low-interest loans to be repaid after the student leaves college and work-study which is parttime work on a college campus. As a service to parents, the SHS Guidance Department sponsor two
Financial Aid Presentations with resource persons from the local community. These presentations
assist families in college financial planning and the preparation of the FAFSA and the College
Scholarship Service (CSS Profile for private colleges).
Families need to obtain a Federal Student Aid Pin at www.pin.ed.gov before filing the FAFSA online
at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The FAFSA can be filed on or after January 1st; families should always file the
FAFSA! Beware of scams; it should never cost money to file the FAFSA. Parents can file the CSS
Profile in the fall of their student’s senior year and should watch for specific financial aid deadlines!
Students should contact college Financial Aid Offices if they have questions about the financial aid
process. Please note that Guidance Counselors can only provide general information regarding
financial aid. Parents and students can go to www.MEFA.org for financial aid assistance.
The Guidance Office receives notices of local scholarships during the school year. Criteria for awards
may vary but are usually based on academic achievement, test scores, entrance examinations, essays,
school and community service, and leadership qualities. Scholarship announcements are publicized on
Naviance. It is especially important for families to inquire about scholarship opportunities offered by
employers, church and community groups…etc.
14
College Planning Guidelines for Students:
Grade 9:
● Take challenging classes! If you struggle in a subject, attend after school help sessions with
your teacher or seek out peer tutoring. You are responsible for your grades and attendance!
● Get involved in sports, clubs and your community to help you explore your career interests.
● Talk to your Guidance Counselor about classes, career interests, standardized tests and plans
for after high school.
● Keep a list of your awards, honors, work experience, and co-curricular activities.
● Use Naviance to take the Learning Styles Inventory, start building a resume, and search
different careers.
● Always check your e-mail for important announcements and be sure all of your social media
accounts are appropriate!
●
Work hard all year! Colleges see final grades for ALL years of high school!
Grade 10:
● Meet with your Guidance Counselor to check on your graduation requirements and to discuss
colleges and their admissions requirements.
● Seek out leadership roles whenever possible.
● Use Naviance to take the career interest profiler and personality inventory and explore different
post-graduation options.
● Prepare to take the PSAT and/or SAT Subject Tests. Talk with your Guidance Counselor for
more information. PSAT and SAT signups are online!
● Always check your e-mail for important announcements and be sure all of your social media
accounts are appropriate!
● Work hard all year! Colleges see final grades for ALL years of high school! Your GPA is
based on all four years of high school!
Grade 11:
● Meet with your Guidance Counselor to check on your graduation requirements and to use
Naviance to work on your college search.
● In September, register for the PSAT/NMSQT online.
● Go to college fairs, such as the National College Fair in the spring (www.nacacnet.org) and talk
to college representatives. Contact colleges to request information about admissions
requirements, including required tests and financial aid!
● Register for the SAT, Subject Tests and/or ACT in the spring. Watch for deadlines!
● Decide whether you’re going to apply early action/early decision or regular decision. Deadlines
will approach quickly during your senior year. Early Decision is binding! You can only apply
to one school this way. Early Action is not binding and you are able to apply to multiple
schools using this method.
● Look on Naviance & check in with your Guidance Counselor to find out about college visits,
special events, open houses, and scholarships opportunities!
● Ask teachers who know you well if they can write your letter of recommendation & provide
them with the appropriate forms.
● Visit colleges! This is the best way to figure out which type of college is for you. Check
websites and ask about tours and take the time to talk to students on campus. Bring the College
Visit Checklist with you!
15
●
Always check your e-mail for important announcements and be sure all of your social media
accounts are appropriate!
Grade 12:
● Meet with your Guidance Counselor to check on your graduation requirements and to discuss
your plans for after graduation. Check with colleges you are interested in to see what tests they
require and keep a calendar of application deadlines.
● Talk with your parents about their expectations and yours, financial considerations, etc.
● Contact your Guidance Counselor frequently to touch base in regards to post-graduation
planning. Communication is very important! Let your Guidance Counselor know if you plan
to apply to schools early decision or early action. Early action/decision deadlines can start as
early as the end of October!
● Use resources in the Guidance Office & Naviance to check/sign up for college visits. If you
plan to play sports in college, be sure to register with the NCAA Clearinghouse.
● Register for the SAT/Subject Tests/ACT. Make sure to send your scores to colleges directly
from the College Board. You can send your score reports by going to: www.collegeboard.org.
Make sure to take advantage of your four free score reports when registering!
● Attend open houses and arrange college visits & interviews in the fall of your senior year.
Write thank you notes and e-mails after college interviews & meetings with admissions
representatives.
● Ask teachers if they can write you a letter of recommendation in person. Provide them with a
request form, activities resume & ample time to compose them! (At least 2 weeks). Then send
them an invitation via Naviance. Also, ask your Guidance Counselor to write you a letter of
recommendation and provide him/her with a completed Guidance Questionnaire. Write thank
you notes to teachers who wrote you letters of recommendation!
● All colleges require an official transcript of your high school grades which must be submitted
to colleges by your Guidance Counselor. In most cases, your counselor will do this
electronically through Naviance.
○ Set up a Common Application account at www.COMMONAPP.org.
○ Log into Naviance and link it to your Common App account. Add colleges to your list
and request transcripts electronically via Naviance.
● Read directions carefully! College applications can have different essay questions and testing
& program requirements. Mistakes can reflect very poorly on your candidacy for admission.
st
nd
● Work hard all year! Colleges see 1 & 2 term grades. Fight senioritis…colleges can rescind
your acceptance if your final grades drop drastically!
● Attend financial aid nights with your parents & watch for financial aid deadlines. The FAFSA
can be filed after January 1st. Check Naviance & the SHS Guidance website for important
financial aid websites and local scholarships. Contact college financial aid offices or
www.mefa.org if you have questions or concerns about your financial aid package.
● Continue to visit colleges to help make your final decision. Review college acceptances and
submit your deposit by May 1st.
● Inform your Guidance Counselor of admissions decisions. Update your decisions in Naviance.
● Always check your e-mail for important announcements and be sure all of your social media
accounts are appropriate!
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Guidelines for Parents:
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Parents should keep an eye on grades via X2, study habits, and also talk to your child about
their goals after high school. Help your child clarify goals and priorities.
Be sure your student has and checks an appropriate e-mail account frequently for important
announcements. Also, please be sure all of their social media accounts are appropriate!
Openly discuss future plans, including financial concerns and any restrictions with your child.
This should be done early in the school selection process so that everyone is on the same page.
Encourage your child to develop independence! They are responsible for balancing homework,
sports, work, and other activities. Students should be seeking out help if they are having trouble
in school. Self-advocacy is key!
Contact your child’s Guidance Counselor with any questions regarding graduation
requirements or post graduation planning.
Check the SHS Guidance website & Naviance for important information regarding
scholarships, financial aid opportunities, standardized tests, and career exploration.
Check your e-mail, phone messages, Naviance and SHS website and speak with your child
periodically about college bulletins and information distributed in school.
Attend college fairs. Prepare questions for college representatives ahead of time & let your
child do the talking!
Visit colleges at every opportunity! The experience of walking on to a college campus will help
students as they plan for their future and figure out what type of college they are best suited for.
Attend financial aid nights and plan ahead for college and other financial expenses.
Be aware of deadlines!
Keep records of all contacts with schools – phone calls, names or representatives, meetings, etc.
Assist your child with payment of sending testing scores from www.collegeboard.com and
college application fees on-line or by sending in a check with application packets.
Attend financial aid night & watch for financial aid deadlines. The FAFSA can be filed after
January 1st. Check Naviance & the SHS Guidance website for important financial aid websites
and local scholarships. Contact college financial aid offices or www.mefa.org if you have
questions or concerns about the financial aid package.
Remain positive and encourage your child to work hard in achieving success!
Virtual High School
Saugus High School offers online courses through the Virtual High School program. VHS is a nonprofit organization that collaborates with schools to offer online high school courses to students from
across the country and around the world. By joining VHS, Saugus High School has been able to
expand its College Prep, Honors, and Advanced Placement course offerings.
Priority is given to seniors as space is limited for the VHS program. VHS courses appear on the
student’s high school transcript and the grades are figured into rank & GPA. Students who are
interested in enrolling in a VHS class can see their Guidance Counselor to begin the application
process. Classes are offered at no cost to the student and are taken as part of their daily schedule.
Students enrolled in a VHS course are required to log in five times per week, complete all readings and
assignments, submit written assignments, and participate in class discussions with classmates and the
course teacher online. In addition to gaining knowledge about course material, students will also learn
valuable skills that will help them in college, such as multimedia presentation skills, effective online
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research tactics, and time management. The successful VHS student is self-motivated, tech savvy, has
effective written communication skills, and the ability to learn independently.
NovaNET Credit Recovery Program
Selected students will utilize the NovaNET online learning application to recover credits toward
graduation. NovaNET is a self-paced, comprehensive, standards-based online courseware. Instruction
and assessment will take place online. Credit for the course will be awarded upon successful
completion of the NovaNET course module. NovaNET requires a minimum of 80% mastery to award
credit. However, space is limited to students, who must complete the application process, and are
deemed most likely to experience success.
First priority for admission to this program will be for students who are eligible to graduate in 2016.
The cost is $275 per course or 2 for $500, this must be paid online through unipay, a direct link is
available on the SHS website. The remaining seats available will be given to students who failed a
large number of required classes along with approval from the principal. As students complete their
Credit Recovery coursework, additional seats will be filled on a rolling admission basis.
Students will be considered for the Credit Recovery Program based on the recommendation of their
Administrator or Guidance Counselor. Students wishing to apply to the Saugus High School Credit
Recovery Program must complete the Application Form and Credit Recovery Contract. The Contract
must be signed by the student and a parent/guardian. In addition, students must meet with their
Guidance Counselor to review their transcripts, Assistant Principal for discipline reports and
attendance in order to be accepted. Failure to meet the terms and conditions of the Credit Recovery
Contract may result in removal from the program.
Special Programs
Student Center
Course # 1020
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all grades for students on IEP plans.
Students interested in receiving additional academic help may report to the Student Center during a directed study period
where staff and/or student instructional aides will provide assistance. Students enrolled full time will be eligible for up to 5
credits as determined by the team.
SEI Academic Support
Course # 1035
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all grades for students enrolled in the ELL program.
At the High School level a certified ESL teacher instructs ELL students in a course whose curricula reflect students’
fluency levels, grades 9-12. This is an Academic Support Course offering explicit instruction in all of the language domains
(listening, speaking, reading, writing, grammar) and placing a strong emphasis on development of academic language
proficiency. Students are able to earn core academic credit.
Life Skills
Course # 648
5 Periods
5 Credits
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Prerequisites: Students are assigned to this course based on their Individualized Education Plans.
This course is design for students with individual education plans who need additional instruction for post high school
endeavors. Basic skills in reading, math and writing will be stressed using a variety of information and hands-on related
work that will provide for independent living.
Office Aides
Prerequisite: Open to grade 12 students. Limit 2 per period per office.
Students, who are interested in a working in one of the schools offices, may apply to work as an Office Aide. Application
and request should come through the Principal’s office. This course is eligible for school community service credit.
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The Saugus High School Academy for the Advanced Program of Studies Overview
The Academy for the Advanced Program of Studies was founded to challenge gifted and highly
motivated students through a rigorous series of courses culminating in college-level Advanced
Placement classes and a specialized endorsement upon graduation. The Academy is designed with two
academic concentrations or pathways in mind:
1. Humanities pathway emphasizing world language, cultures, history, and literature.
2. Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) pathway.
Prior to entering Saugus High School, students will apply to participate in the Academy for the
Advanced Program of Studies. Freshmen are accepted into the program based on past MCAS results,
teacher recommendations, an application essay, and middle school transcripts. Each year, the review
committee accepts students who meet or exceed performance benchmarks in each of the established
criteria outlined above. Once accepted, students must maintain a final grade of 78 in all courses in
order to remain in the Advanced Program. Students who fail to meet this expectation may still follow
the Academy Program of Studies, but will not receive the Academy designation upon graduation.
All courses in the academy meet rigorous honors or Advanced Placement expectations. Successful
completion of the Advanced Program of Studies at Saugus High School will provide students with
collegiate level coursework and the necessary skills for success at elite colleges and universities. The
overall goal of the Academy for the Advanced Program of Studies is to challenge students in becoming
engaged critical problem-solvers, self-motivated learners with a relentless work-ethic, and mature
young adults with the desire to take on collegiate level coursework necessary to succeed at elite
colleges and universities.
Please see the charts below outlining the Humanities and STEM pathways for the Advanced Academy.
During the freshman and sophomore years, the coursework is similar. Once students get to be juniors
and seniors, the paths begin to diverge as students approach either an Advanced Endorsement for
STEM or the Humanities.
*Students from the Classes of 2016 and 2017 can choose either program.
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The Saugus High School Academy for the
Advanced Program of Studies
Classes of 2018 and 2019
Freshman Year
US History Honors
Freshman Honors English
Biology Honors
Geometry Honors
Spanish 2 Honors or World Language 1
Wellness 1/ Elective
Elective
Sophomore Year
AP US History or Honors US History 2
Sophomore Honors English
Chemistry Honors
Algebra 2 Honors
Spanish 3 Honors or World Language 2
Wellness/Elective
Elective
Requirements for the Humanities Pathway
Besides following the outline prescribed for freshman and sophomore year, a student enrolled in the
Humanities Pathway will have to meet the following requirements.
• A total of 5 Advanced Placement (AP) courses.
• At least 4 of those AP courses must be in the content areas related to Humanities.
• At least 1 of those AP courses must be in the content area of ELA.
• At least 1 of those AP courses must be in the content area of Social Studies.
• Four years of World Language courses at the high school.
• Latin is strongly recommended in addition to Spanish 2 Honors
• Meet all of the other graduation requirements for Saugus High School
Requirements for the STEM Pathway
Besides following the outline prescribed for freshman and sophomore year, a student enrolled in the
STEM Pathway will have to meet the following requirements.
• A total of 5 Advanced Placement (AP) courses.
• At least 4 of those AP courses must be in the content areas related to STEM.
• At least 1 of those AP courses must be in the content area of Mathematics.
• At least 1 of those AP courses must be in the content area of Science.
• At least three years of World Language courses at the high school.
• One year of a Computer Technology and/or Technology Education courses at the high school.
• Meet all of the other graduation requirements for Saugus High School
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The Saugus High School Academy for the
Advanced Program of Studies
Classes 2016 and 2017
Humanities Track
Freshmen
Six (6) AP courses required
Sophomore (1 AP required**)
Junior (2 AP required)
Senior (3 required**)
US History Honors
AP US History
AP World History
AP Elective
Geometry Honors
Algebra 2H
Pre-Calculus H
AP Calculus AB /AP Stats/Stats CP
Biology Honors
Chemistry H
Honors or AP Science
AP Elective
English Honors
English H 023
AP English Language
AP English Literature
Latin 1
Latin 2
Latin 3H
Latin 4H
Wellness 1/Fine Arts
Wellness 2/ Fine Arts
Wellness 3 / Elective
Wellness 4 / Elective
Spanish 2H
Spanish 3H
Spanish 4H
Elective/Elective
STEM Track
Freshmen
Physical Science
Sophomore
Six (6) AP courses required
Junior (3 AP required**)
Senior (3 AP required**)
US History Honors
AP US History or US 2H
AP World History or World H
AP Math/Science Elective
Geometry Honors
Pre-Calculus H
AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC
Biology Honors
Elective/Fine Arts
AP Physics C
English Honors
English 023
AP Physics B
Eng. 33H or AP English
Language
Algebra 2H
AP Computer Science
Advanced CAD* required
Wellness 1/Fine Arts
Chemistry H
Wellness 2 /Honors
Programming
Wellness 3 / Elective
Wellness 4 / Elective
Spanish 2H or WL 1
Spanish 3H or WL 2
Spanish 4H or WL 3
Elective/Elective
STEM Track
Freshmen
Life Science
Sophomore (1 AP required**)
English 43H, or AP Eng Lit or AP End Lang
Six (6) AP courses required
Junior (2 AP required**)
Senior (3 AP required**)
US History Honors
AP US History or US 2H
AP World History or World H
AP Elective
Geometry Honors
Pre-Calculus H
AP Calculus AB
AP Statistics
Biology Honors
Chemistry H
AP Elective
English Honors
English 023
Physiology Honors
Eng. 33H or AP English
Language
Algebra 2H
AP Environmental
AP Chemistry
AP Biology
Wellness 1/Fine Arts
Wellness 2/ Fine Arts
Wellness 3/AP Lab
Wellness 4/AP Lab
Spanish 2H or WL 1
Spanish 3H or WL 2
Spanish 4H or WL 3
Elective/Elective
Students must choose which STEM path to take in
the spring of 9th grade
English 43H, or AP Eng Lit or AP Eng Lang
*Chart subject to change
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Advanced Placement Contract
Dear Parents/Guardians and Student:
In order to enroll in an Advanced Placement (AP) course both the student and parent/guardian must read,
consent to, and sign this agreement. Signing this agreement indicates a commitment on the part of the student to
follow the requirements and demands of this course. It should be understood that AP courses require critical
thinking and reading as well as problem solving skills. The rigor of the course models that of a college
freshman level curriculum. Students are expected to be dedicated in their studies and students should expect to
complete assignments and assessments that are geared to high order thinking. AP courses follow a national
curriculum designed to prepare students to successfully take and achieve a passing score on the AP exam in
May. All students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the respective AP exam in May.
Expectations
Advanced Placement courses are designed to prepare students for the academic rigor of college. Students are
expected to attend class prepared and to participate in all of the classroom activities. Given the academic rigor,
the student need to have solid work habits and strong organizational skills, as well as, being self motivated in
their studies. We believe at Saugus High School that every student has the potential to take and find success an
AP course and we encourage all students to enroll in at least one AP course during their high school career.
Homework and Assignments
Due to the advanced nature of AP courses, there is an expectation of daily homework and long range
assignments designed to help the students develop critical thinking and reading skills and supplement in-class
instruction. Students are often assigned readings or long term projects that require them to plan their time
carefully so that they are not overwhelmed by deadlines. There are often occasions when students are required
to work on long term and short term assignments at the same time. Self-discipline and the ability to manage
time effectively will be necessary for success in these courses.
The AP Examination
All students enrolled in the AP course are required to take The Advanced Placement exam, which is
administered in May, at their own expense. The exam fee is approximately $90 and is to be paid online the via
the Unipay website. Students must submit this signed contract, with payment, to the appropriate Curriculum
Director. Students, who miss the exam due to an emergency illness, must have a doctor's note regarding the
illness and submit it the following day in order to take the make-up exam. Otherwise, students will take the final
exam for the course and receive college prep level credit in lieu of AP credit.
My child and I have read the material above and we understand the level of work required and the policies
which this course entails. We understand that both the payment & this signed contract are to be submitted
to the appropriate Curriculum Director. Deadline TBA.
Course Name: _______________________________________________________
Student Name: _______________________________________________________
Student Signature: ____________________________________________________
Parent Signature: _____________________________________________________
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English
English 10
Course # 010
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 9 students only. Students are recommended for and assigned to this course.
This course is designed for students who need intensive individualized help in the skill areas of reading, vocabulary,
writing, spelling, grammar and dictionary skills. This course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
English 12 CP
Course # 012
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to Grade 9 students.
This course focuses on improving oral and written composition skills. Reading material will include assigned
modern and classic novels, as well as short story, drama, and poetry selections from the anthology, Prentice Hall
Literature, Penguin Edition for Massachusetts: Grade 9. Grammar is taught both functionally and formally. The
functional or usage portion is regarded as an intrinsic part of the writing program. Study skills are taught through
classroom instruction and through the use of the library’s resources. Vocabulary is presented in conjunction with the
reading program. All vocabulary work will help prepare students for the MCAS and SAT examinations. Analytical
writing and the five paragraph essay are emphasized in preparation for the MCAS examination.
English 13H
Course # 013
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 9 students with teacher recommendation.
In this course emphasis is placed on written composition in a variety of types: critiques, essays, narratives,
expositions and exercises practicing techniques involved in writing research papers. Study skills, critical thinking
skills, and library/research skills are fundamental to this course.
Reading materials cover both modern and classic selections in a wide range of genres, including selections from the
anthology, Prentice Hall Literature, Penguin Edition for Massachusetts: Grade 9. Critical thinking and inferring
skills are stressed among the reading comprehension skills. Standard literary terminology is included as a basis for
interpreting literature: e.g., theme, tone, symbolism, figurative language, etc. Reading beyond classroom
assignments is encouraged.
Vocabulary is an important component of this course and is taught in context with the reading assignments.
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Grammar is taught both formally and functionally. The functional or usage portion is regarded as an intrinsic part of
the writing program. The standard five paragraph essay is an essential component in preparing the students for the
MCAS Long Composition.
English 20
Course # 020
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to Grade 10 students only. Students are recommended for and assigned to this course.
The course is designed for students who need intensive individualized help in the skill areas of reading, vocabulary,
writing, spelling, grammar and dictionary skills. This course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
English 22 CP
Course # 022
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 10 students upon successful completion of Freshmen English
This course addresses all four genres; fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama. Readings include works by a variety of
writers with selections drawn from authors such as Shakespeare, Fitzgerald, Golding, Lee, Wharton, Houston, and
Bradbury. Selections are also assigned from the anthology, Prentice Hall Literature, Penguin Edition for
Massachusetts, Grade 10. Provision is made for a wide choice of outside readings to supplement the compulsory
offerings. The careful study of functional grammar, structure, usage, punctuation, and vocabulary is offered in order
to provide for successful experiences in written and oral composition. Expository writing is emphasized; analytical
writing and the five paragraph essay are reviewed in preparation for the MCAS Examination.
English 23H
Course # 023
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 10 students with teacher recommendation.
This course has been designed for the student who has demonstrated a strong aptitude and interest in English
language arts. All four genres; fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama are addressed through assigned novels and
selections from the anthology, Prentice Hall Literature, Penguin Edition for Massachusetts: Grade 10. Succinct,
targeted writing and the five paragraph essay are practiced in preparation for the MCAS Examination. A premium is
placed on intensive class discussion. In addition, creative writing, narrative writing, and poetic expression are
emphasized. Provision is made for a wide choice of outside readings to supplement the compulsory offerings.
English 30
Course # 030
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 11 students only. Students are recommended for and assigned to this course.
The course is designed for students who need intensive individualized help in the skill areas of reading, vocabulary,
writing, spelling, grammar and dictionary skills with additional emphasis on verbal and written expression. This
course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
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English 32 CP
Course # 032
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 11 students upon successful completion of Sophomore English
This course offers a survey of readings from American literature as well as an intensive study of Hamlet and the
Shakespearean tradition exercises in vocabulary building are continued through the reading assignments. Grammar
is taught both functionally and formally, especially in preparation for the SAT Test.
A research paper makes use of the basic skills taught in English 22 and goes on to include the research form,
integration of quotations, argumentation, effective development, critical study, proper citation and overall
organization.
English 33H
Course # 033
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 11 students with teacher recommendation.
English 33H is designed for those students who have achieved satisfactory progress in English 23 and those who
have demonstrated outstanding ability in English 22. The main stress will be a study of American literature from
1620 to the present, as well as an intensive study of Hamlet and the Shakespearean tradition. Special attention will
be paid to the shifting base of literary thought and literary style as they reflect a shift in basic American thought.
Composition work will stress critical essays. Special consideration will be given to arrangement and development
of ideas and transition between paragraphs. In grammar, the basic rules will be discussed individually with students
who demonstrate weakness in a given area. Additional concepts such as parallelism and faulty reference will be
taught to the class as a whole. Vocabulary study in English 33 will stress word building through use of common
prefixes, roots and suffixes. Special attention is given to the preparation of students for the SAT Test.
AP English Language and Composition
Course # 035
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 12 students with teacher recommendation. Serves as a Senior English requirement.
The AP Language and Composition course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a
variety of periods, disciplines and rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of
purposes. This course will emphasize the expository, analytical and argumentative writing that forms the basis of
academic and professional communication as well as the personal and reflective writing that fosters the development
of writing aptitude in any context. Its purpose is to enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to
write prose of sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers. As well as
engaging in a variety of writing tasks, students will also read a wide variety of prose styles from many disciplines
and historical periods to gain understanding of the connections between interpretive skill in reading and writing.
This course assumes that students already understand and use Standard English grammar, which will serve as the
foundation from which stylistic development will be nurtured.
English 40
Course # 040
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Grade 12 students only. Students are recommended for and assigned to this course.
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The course is designed for students who need intensive individualized help in the skill areas of reading, vocabulary,
writing, spelling, grammar and dictionary skills with emphasis on consumer related reading and writing skills. This
course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
English 41 CP 1
Course # 041
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to Grade 12 students.
This course will be literature based to include intensive, individualized help with reading, writing and a research
assignment. In addition, there will be practice in spelling, punctuation and grammar usage. This course will also
include selected readings in world literature as well as an in depth study of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and the
Shakespearean tradition.
Work dealing with student compositions is designed to facilitate the college application process and resume
building. The completion of a Senior Portfolio reflective of each student’s coursework is a course requirement. This
course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
English 42 CP 2
Course # 042
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 12 students upon successful completion of Junior English
This course includes selected readings in world literature as well as an intensive study of Macbeth. Work is
continued in short stories and poetry. There is guided reading in a variety of modern novels. Reading and writing
experiences are planned to give students an opportunity to improve their powers of logical reasoning and their skill
in critical analysis of what they read. Sources, themes, essays and argumentative composition are stressed. SAT
materials are reviewed in the early part of the senior year. There is a focus on the college application process and
resume building. The completion of a Senior Portfolio reflective of each student’s coursework is a course
requirement.
English 43H
Course # 043
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 12 students with teacher recommendation.
The study of literature will stress literary forms and the devices by which an author achieves preeminence in his
craft. The majority of the reading selections will be from world literature, with an emphasis on English authors.
Composition will deal with the work as a whole: the meshing of vocabulary and development of ideas to achieve a
particular end. Topics chosen for composition will give the students the greatest possible latitude for creative selfexpression and critical evaluation. A number of critical essays and research projects will be issued in conjunction
with the study of literature. Grammar will be reviewed as needed. The study of two Shakespearean plays, including
Macbeth and continued study of the Shakespearean tradition will also be included. The college application process
and resume building will be addressed in the early part of the year. The completion of a Senior Portfolio reflective of
each student’s coursework is a course requirement.
AP English Literature and Composition
Course # 045
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 11 students with teacher recommendation. Serves as a Junior English requirement.
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The Advanced Placement course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative
literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students should deepen their understanding of the ways
writers use language to provide meaning and pleasure for their readers. Students will consider a work's structure,
style and themes as well as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Emphasis will be given to
the development of skill in treating abstract concepts and to the honing of the students’ composition skills. Resume
building and the college application process will be addressed in the early part of the year. Students enrolled in the
course will take the AP English Literature and Composition Exam in May. The completion of a Senior Portfolio
reflective of each student’s coursework is a course requirement.
Studies in Mystery and Horror
Course # 052
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all students.
This half-year course allows students to study the genre of mystery and horror through analysis of specific literary
works, student created materials, and relevant films. Students will be able to explore the key elements of mystery
through detective stories, deductive reasoning, and suspense. Students will be able to explore the key elements of
horror through gothic fiction, science fiction, and psychological disorders.
The History and Elements of Film
Course # 054
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all students.
This half-year course will allow students to study the mechanics behind analyzing film, by considering how films
are put together. The course will also study the evolution of film from the silent era up to the present day. Several
classic and modern films will be viewed and discussed as examples. This course will be designed to allow students
to view and discuss films critically with a historical perspective.
The Writer’s Workshop
Course # 064
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all interested students.
The Writer’s Workshop is an intensive writing course designed for serious, self-motivated students. The course
provides students with models and exercises in fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. The class stresses the writing
process, and constructive peer review. The overarching goal of the course is to help students develop an “authentic
voice” in their writing.
While students will be required to complete a variety of writing exercises and activities, there will also be ample
time for students to devote to their own writing projects. Students will compile a writing portfolio that will
demonstrate their growth as a writer. This is not a remedial writing course, and students will be expected to exhibit a
high-level of interest and motivation in the subject.
That’s So High School
Course # 066
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
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In this half-year course, students will focus on the contemporary high school experience. We will ask questions
such as: How do you balance the goals you have for yourself with your responsibility to others (family, friends,
town)? Why do discrimination and bullying occur? How can people overcome obstacles to achieve goals and
discover who they are? The class will read recent novels and nonfiction texts, and will watch films including
documentaries about high school and society. Projects will include: a map of your future, creative writing, comic
strips, an interview, and a mock trial.
Harry Potter in Context
Course # 067
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
In this half-year course, students will read novels from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series and will explore themes
related to these novels, including bullying, diversity, tolerance/intolerance, friendship, and heroism. Students will
also examine the novels in context by researching their position as banned books, their place in popular culture, and
their connections to other texts and cultural influences.
The Modern Bard
Course # 053
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students 9-12
The half-year elective course is designed for students to experience the comedies of William Shakespeare. Students
will be challenged to take the Bard’s classic plays and move them into today’s modern era. Project based
exploration involving: reading, writing, creating, watching, and performing will allow students to develop new,
modern views of Shakespeare’s comedies. We will study former modernizations that have been created in plays and
films to contrast them with our own modern ideas. “Truth will out” as we specifically examine two of the Bard’s
plays and by the end of the course students will certainly have discovered that “all the world’s a stage.”
The Dawn of New Genre: The Birth of Dystopia and the History of Science Fiction
Course # 055
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students 9-12
The Dystopian genre has become widely popular over the last few years because of the young adult hits such as
“The Hunger Games” and “Divergent,” but this genre has been growing from its science fiction origin for centuries.
When and how did science fiction make the jump to a technological and prophetic future? This course will be a
semester long journey into the past to discover the origin and reasons for the birth of the dystopia genre and how the
surge of technology has helped the genre grow. Together, we will look at the concepts of good vs. evil, hope vs.
despair, creation vs. destruction, the idea of God vs. technology and the prophetic nature of dystopian authors.
*This course will be built around student-led discussions and writing based activities.
Journalism
Course # 091
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all students who enjoy writing and talking to people.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to research, interview and write about newsworthy topics
of their choice. Students will prepare news and sports articles in addition to features and editorials. Writing for this
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class will be featured in “The Sachem Times,” an online news-source on the Saugus High School website.
Additionally, students will be active participants in bi-weekly press conferences for “Sachem Times Live,” a
program that airs on Saugus Community Television (SCTV). This course can be taken for honors credit based on a
discussion with the teacher.
Advanced Journalism
Course # 092
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all students who have successfully completed Journalism and enjoy writing and talking to
people.
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to research, interview and write about newsworthy topics
of their choice. Students will prepare news and sports articles in addition to features and editorials. Writing for this
class will be featured in “The Sachem Times”, an online news-source on the Saugus High School website.
Additionally, students will be active participants in bi-weekly press conferences for “Sachem Times Live,” a
program that airs on Saugus Community Television (SCTV). This course can be taken for honors credit based on a
discussion with the teacher.
Mythology
Course # 490
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
This class is an introduction to classical mythology. Students will explore ancient Greek and Roman stories about
the lives of gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the universe. The course will illustrate the influence of these
myths on the art, literature and culture of the modern world. This course presents an inter-disciplinary approach
which considers literary and artistic themes from such diverse perspectives as theology, sociology, anthropology and
history.
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Social Studies
United States History I (1763-1877)
Course # 110
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Grade 9 students are recommended and assigned to this course. This course is designed for students
requiring intensive specialized instruction in a small group setting.
In U.S. History I students examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States during the Revolution
and Constitutional eras. Students study the basic framework of American democracy and the basic concepts of
American government, as well as America’s westward expansion, the establishment of political parties, economic
and social change, sectional conflict, and the Civil War, and Reconstruction. The reading of primary source
documents is a key feature of the two-year set of U.S. History standards. This course expands the Grade 5
curriculum. Curriculum at that grade level gives students their first concentrated study of the formative years of
U.S. History. This course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
United States History I (1763-1877) CP
Course # 112
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to grade 9 students.
In U.S. History I students examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States during the Revolution
and Constitutional eras. Students study the basic framework of American democracy and the basic concepts of
American government, as well as America’s westward expansion, the establishment of political parties, economic
and social change, sectional conflict, and the Civil War, and Reconstruction. The reading of primary source
documents is a key feature of the two year set of U.S. History standards. This course expands the Grade 5
curriculum. Curriculum at that grade level gives students their first concentrated study of the formative years of
U.S. History.
United States History I (1763-1877) Honors
Course # 113
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 9 students with teacher recommendation.
In U.S. History I Honors students examine, in depth, the historical and intellectual origins of the United States
during the Revolution and Constitutional eras. Students study the basic framework of American democracy and the
basic concepts of American government, as well as America’s westward expansion, the establishment of political
parties, economic and social change, sectional conflict, and the Civil War, and Reconstruction. The reading of
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primary source documents is a key feature of the two-year set of U.S. History standards. This course expands the
Grade 5 curriculum. Curriculum at that grade level gives students their first concentrated study of the formative
years of U.S. History.
United States History II (1877 - Present)
Course # 120
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Grade 10 students are recommended and assigned to this course. This course is designed for students
requiring intensive specialized instruction in a small group setting.
In U.S. History II students analyze the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and America’s growing
role in international relations. Students study the goals and accomplishments of the Progressive movement and the
New Deal. Students also learn about the various factors that led to America’s entry into World War I and World
War II as well as the consequences of World War II for American life. Finally students study the causes and course
of the Cold War, important economic and political changes during the Cold War, such as the Civil Rights
movement, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America. The reading of primary source
documents is a key feature of the two-year set of U.S. History standards. This course does not meet NCAA
eligibility criteria.
United States History II (1877-Present) CP
Course # 122
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Grade 10 students.
In U.S. History II students analyze the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and America’s growing
role in international relations. Students study the goals and accomplishments of the Progressive movement and the
New Deal. Students also learn about the various factors that led to America’s entry into World War I and World
War II as well as the consequences of World War II for American life. Finally students study the causes and course
of the Cold War, important economic and political changes during the Cold War, such as the Civil Rights
movement, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America. The reading of primary source
documents is a key feature of the two-year set of U.S. History standards.
United States History II (1877-Present) Honors
Course # 123
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 10 students with teacher recommendation.
In U.S. History II students analyze, in depth, the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and
America’s growing role in international relations. Students study the goals and accomplishments of the Progressive
movement and the New Deal. Students also learn about the various factors that led to America’s entry into World
War I and World War II as well as the consequences of World War II for American life. Finally students study the
causes and course of the Cold War, important economic and political changes during the Cold War, such as the Civil
Rights movement, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America. The reading of primary
source documents is a key feature of the two-year set of U.S. History standards.
World History II (1500-Present)
Course # 130
5 Periods
5 Credits
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Prerequisite: Grade 11 students are recommended and assigned to this course. This course is designed for students
requiring intensive specialized instruction in a small group setting.
In World History II students study the rise of the nation state in Europe and the economic and political roots of the
modern world, including the Industrial Revolution, 19th century political reform in Western Europe, and European
imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They also examine the causes and consequences of the great
military and economic events of the past century, including World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the
Cold War, the Russian and Chinese revolutions, the rise of nationalism, and the continuing persistence of political,
ethnic, and religious conflict in many parts of the world. This course is a continuation of Ancient/Classical
Civilizations in Grade 7and World History I in Grade 8. This course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
World History II (1500-Present) CP
Course # 132
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to Grade 11 students.
In World History II students study the rise of the nation state in Europe and the economic and political roots of the
modern world, including the Industrial Revolution, 19th century political reform in Western Europe, and European
imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They also examine the causes and consequences of the great
military and economic events of the past century, including World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the
Cold War, the Russian and Chinese revolutions, the rise of nationalism, and the continuing persistence of political,
ethnic, and religious conflict in many parts of the world. This course is a continuation of Ancient/Classical
Civilizations in Grade 7 and World History I in Grade 8.
World History II (1500-Present) Honors
Course # 133
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 11 students with teacher recommendation.
In World History II students study, in depth, the rise of the nation state in Europe and the economic and political
roots of the modern world, including the Industrial Revolution, 19th century political reform in Western Europe, and
European imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They also examine the causes and consequences of the
great military and economic events of the past century, including World War I, the Great Depression, World War II,
the Cold War, the Russian and Chinese revolutions, the rise of nationalism, and the continuing persistence of
political, ethnic, and religious conflict in many parts of the world. This course is a continuation of
Ancient/Classical Civilizations in Grade 7 and World History I in Grade 8.
AP United States History
Course # 134
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 10 students with teacher recommendation. Serves as a Sophomore Social Studies
requirement. Also open to seniors as an elective with teacher recommendation.
The AP course in U.S. History is designed to provide students with analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary
to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The textbooks will be supplemented by readings
in the form of documents, essays, and books on special themes. Students will be expected to take notes from printed
materials and lectures or discussions, write essay examinations and write analytical and research papers with clarity
and precision. Summer reading is required.
This course is open to highly motivated students who are willing to meet the level of effort and performance
necessary to be prepared for the AP examination, which will be given in the spring.
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AP World History
Course # 135
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 11 students with teacher recommendation. Serves as a Junior Social Studies
requirement. Also open to seniors as an elective with teacher recommendation.
The AP course in World History is designed to provide students with analytic skills and factual knowledge
necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in World History. The textbooks will be supplemented
by readings in the form of documents, essays, and books on special themes. Students will be expected to take notes
from printed materials and lectures or discussions, write essay examinations and write analytical and research papers
with clarity and precision. Summer reading is required.
This course is open to highly motivated students who are willing to meet the level of effort and performance
necessary to be prepared for the AP examination, which will be given in the spring.
Foundations of American Government
Course # 140
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
This course is will examine the origins of American Government at the local, state, and national government.
Students will explore the functions and practices of government using the seminal documents of American History
such as the Constitution, the Declaration of Independents, multiple Supreme Court decisions, and others. Students
will also examine important aspects of state and local government as they relate to our modern world. As a
requirement of this course, students will attend public meetings, view examples of the political process at all three
levels of government, and examine the influences of new technologies in the political arena.
Geography 2.0: Understanding the World in a Digital Age
Course # 141
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
In order to build global diversity and understanding, it is important for students to be familiar with the world around
them. This course is aimed at examining the geography of the world and of our nation. Students will utilize the
latest technologies to explore and research different regions of the planet from a social, economic, political, and
physical perspective. This course will also examine the role that social media has played in figuratively shrinking
the planet and increasing educational, political, social, and economic change.
Sociology
Course # 142
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to students in Grades 11 and 12.
This course presents a framework of understanding today’s society. This course begins with an analysis of man in
the environment of his culture and his society. Particular emphasis is given to the culture concepts. Further study is
given on the effect of culture in shaping the personality. This concept is the key to understanding not only other
people but also ourselves. This course gives attention to particular institutions and social problems—dating, family,
marriage, divorce, and juvenile delinquency.
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Contemporary Citizen
Course # 143
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to students in Grade 11 or 12.
This course is open to all students who desire to become informed citizens capable of obtaining and acting upon
civic understanding and information. This course is strongly recommended to those students seeking careers in law,
law enforcement, political science, public administration, and journalism.
History of the U.S. through Film
Course # 146
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to students in grade 11 and 12.
Students will examine the history of the United States by viewing a variety of motion pictures and documentaries.
Beginning with the French and Indian War (Last of the Mohican) and continuing through some of the United States
most intriguing moments, students will be exposed to history through a medium in which they are comfortable.
Students will also be exposed to a variety of different styles of filmmaking and will be asked to judge the historical
accuracy of the films and to look for biases in the films.
Teaching History through Graphic Novels
Course # 153
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to students in Grade 11 or 12.
The course objective is to teach various periods of twentieth century history using graphic novels, pieces of
literature that illuminate historical periods using a different medium. The use of graphic novels will allow students
to witness history from a literary and personal perspective often lacking in traditional history courses. Periods
studied will be the Iranian Revolution of 1979 and the development of Islamic fundamentalism, the genocides of the
Holocaust, the Balkan crisis, the Arab/Israel conflict, and the Cold War. Supplemental materials, such as lecture,
films, and primary sources will be used to provide historical context for the historical period being studied. Novels
may include the following: MAUS, Persepolis, The Watchmen, Palestine, and Safe Area: Gorazde.
Contemporary Law
Course # 154
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to students in Grade 11 or 12.
This course provides the student with a sampling of the law such as contracts, torts, domestic relations, criminal law,
and constitutional law. Whenever possible, the case law method of teaching is used, as it would be in a law school.
In addition, students may have an opportunity to take part in the Massachusetts Bar Assoc. statewide mock trial
competition.
Philosophy
Course # 158
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
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Prerequisite: Open to students in grades 11 and 12
This course will engage students in thinking about some of the fundamental questions that confront humanity: How
do we know right from wrong? Do we have the right to tell each other what to do? Do we have free will, or is the
future already determined? What is thought? How do we know the things we know? Why are we here? This will be
a discussion-oriented class in which students will develop their own answers to these questions, and learn how some
of history’s greatest thinkers answered them. Students in this class will be expected to contribute to class
discussions, read assigned text, keep a journal, and write reflection papers on assigned topics.
The Psychology of Sports
Course # 159
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all students.
This course explores the relationship of competitive and recreational sports to social and cultural aspects of society.
Sport is analyzed as an important social institution that influences and is influenced by the larger society. Topics will
include issues concerning ethics, race, gender, deviance, and social problems, and youth socialization with regard to
sports.
Introduction to Psychology Honors
Course # 160
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to students in grades 10-12 with teacher recommendation.
This course is an introduction to the human mind and behavior. Students learn the language and methodology of
psychology. They will discuss the history and development of modern psychological thought and theories; human
physiology, particularly of the brain; conditioning and the learning process; stages of development, including the
ideas of Freud and other key figures; what happens during sleep and other states of consciousness; familial and
social relationships, including the long-term effects of child abuse; abnormal and aberrant behavior including
alcoholism and drug addiction and personalities; psychology and the law; and a variety of related topics.
Child Psychology
Course # 161
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to students in grades 10-12.
After a brief prologue on the history and methods of modern psychology, students study early childhood
development through the works of the masters in the field, from Jean Piaget to Jerome Kagan of Harvard. The
course will emphasize practical applications of child psychology by studying the different stages of child
development. Students will read about and discuss best practices in childcare, and how and why they work.
Students will define and examine child abuse, its consequences, and how to prevent it. Course materials will draw
from books, scholarly journals and newspapers; movies and television shows; and whenever possible, practical
experiences.
Abnormal Psychology
Course # 162
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to students in grade 11 and 12.
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After a brief prologue on the history and methods of modern psychology, students will examine what happens when
our brains malfunction from emotional and/or physical causes. Students will cover topics ranging from depression
to schizophrenia, and a wide variety of treatments ranging from psychotherapy to pharmaceuticals. Students will
investigate important issues like the controversy over genetic vs. environment causes of psychiatric disorders. They
will debate and discuss drug and alcohol misuse, the short-and long-term effects of child abuse, mental illness
among the homeless, and other important issues of our times. Course materials will be drawn from books,
scholarly journals and newspapers; movies and television shows; and whenever possible, personal experiences.
AP Government and Politics
Course # 163
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 11and 12 students with teacher recommendation.
This year-long course gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It
includes the study of general concepts in political science as well as an examination and evaluation of American
political history. Topics covered include the constitutional basis of the U.S. government; political culture and
socialization; political parties, interest groups, and the media; national institutions and informal sources of political
power; the development of public policy; and civil rights and liberties.
AP Psychology
Course # 165
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to Grade 11and 12 students with teacher recommendation. Students are encouraged to have
taken Introduction to Psychology Honors.
The AP course in Psychology introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental
processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to psychological facts, principles, phenomena
associated with each of the major sub fields within psychology. Students will also learn about the methods
psychologists use in their science and practice. This course is open to highly motivated students who are willing to
meet the level of effort and performance necessary to be prepared for the AP examination, which will be given in the
spring.
The American Conspiracy Honors
Course # 166
5 Periods
5.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to students in grades 11-12 with teacher recommendation.
Students in this honors course will learn the skill of investigative historical study and apply those skills to
conspiracy theories in American history. As part of this course, students will be exposed to how historiography has
influenced and, in many cases, given credibility to these theories. Students will use a combination of primary and
secondary sources to analyze the events of several American conspiracies including the Masonic foundation of
American democracy, the assassination of Presidents Lincoln and Kennedy, and the attacks of September 11th.
The Holocaust
Course # 167
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to students in Grades 10-12.
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In this elective course, students will focus on the causes of the Holocaust. Students will examine the history of antiSemitism and the European hatred toward the Jews leading up to the Holocaust, the rise of the Nationalist Socialist
Party (Nazi) and Adolf Hitler in Germany. Through teacher and guest lectures, memoirs, documentaries, featured
films, projects, and field trips, the horrors of the ghettos and concentration camps will be shared. The answer to the
Jewish question in Europe with the implementation of the “final solution” and death camps will also be examined.
Furthermore, students will investigate the aftermath of the Holocaust. Topics such as the Nuremburg Trials, antiSemitism in Europe and the United States following World War II, and the creation of the Neo-Nazi Party in today’s
world will be explored.
Language, Cultural Diversity, and Psychology
Course # 168
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all students.
This course explores the nature of human language to help students grapple with important issues that we face in the
21 century: how to understand and appreciate human psychology and cultural diversity. The acquisition and use of
language are among the most complex tasks carried out by the human mind, and language itself is connected to
every aspect of social interaction. This course will employ lectures, discussion, film, problem-solving activities,
readings, writing assignments, experiments and demonstrations to help students investigate language to discover
important truths about who we are and how our diverse cultures are connected to each other. Topics covered include
how languages are acquired and how they are organized in the brain; “nature” vs. “nurture” views of the human
mind; the “hidden nature” of the rules of language; language and cultural difference; prejudice, racism and politics;
the history of languages; language and how people think; and language and biology.
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From JFK to Barack Obama: Our World from Elvis to Lady Gaga
Course # 169
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in Grades 10-12.
The course would describe, discuss, and analyze many of the most important events and ideas that shaped the United
States and the world over the last fifty years. The cultural shift that the United States has experienced has been
tremendous and this course would examine how those changes have impacted our nation and the world. A particular
emphasis would be placed on understanding popular culture and trends as a means to study our past, our present, and
potentially our future.
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Science
Success in Biology
Course # 200
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of grade 9 Biology, but a failure to pass the MCAS Biology Exam.
This single-semester course is a review of Biology topics included on the MCAS Biology test for those students
whose original performance on the examination was below the required score for passing. Included in the course
will be a review of scientific methods, the characteristics of life, cellular organization, the flow of energy and
nutrients in ecosystems, photosynthesis and cellular respiration, genetics, evolution, diversity of life and systems of
the body. Practice with actual MCAS questions and instruction in the best approach to standardized test-taking will
be employed to improve performance on the MCAS Biology retest.
Biology
Course # 210
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Students are recommended and assigned for this course.
This is a first year science course that introduces concepts fundamental to an understanding of science, and
introduces biology as a particular branch of science. The course develops an understanding of the biology strands
following the Massachusetts curriculum frameworks. This course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
Biology CP
Course # 212
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to grade 9 students.
The life sciences investigate the diversity, complexity, and interconnectedness of life on earth. This course stresses
the basic unity of life from the simplest cell to man. The learning strands include: The Chemistry of Life, Structure
and Function of Cells, Genetics, Human Anatomy and Physiology, Evolution and Biodiversity and Ecology.
Students participate in laboratories in all of the above topics.
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Biology H
Course # 213
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to grade 9 students with teacher recommendation.
The course and laboratory component are designed to provide a survey of biological principles for students who are
interested in the subject and have demonstrated high motivation. Students will explore various topics that include:
The Chemistry of Life, Structure and Function of Cells, Genetics, Human Anatomy and Physiology, evolution and
Biodiversity and Ecology. The ability to work independently and deal with abstract concepts is expected.
Chemistry
Course # 220
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Students are recommended and assigned for this course.
This is the second year science course. Students will explore the relationship of Chemistry to many of today's
medical and ecological issues. They will apply basic chemical knowledge of the structure of matter and energy
relationships to the problems of living in a modern, technical society. The learning strands include: Properties of
matter, Atomic structure, Periodicity, Chemical Bonding, Chemical reactions and stoichiometry, Gases and Kinetic
Molecular theory, Solutions, Acids and Bases, Equilibrium and Kinetics, Thermo chemistry, and OxidationReduction and Electrochemistry. This course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
Chemistry CP
Course # 222
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of grade 9 Biology.
In this fast paced course, students will explore the relationship of Chemistry to many of today's medical and
ecological issues. They will apply basic chemical knowledge of the structure of matter and energy relationships to
the problems of living in a modern, technical society. The learning strands include: Properties of matter, Atomic
structure, Periodicity, Chemical Bonding, Chemical reactions and stoichiometry, Gases and Kinetic Molecular
theory, Solutions, Acids and Bases, Equilibrium and Kinetics, Thermo chemistry, and Oxidation-Reduction and
Electrochemistry.
Chemistry H
Course # 223
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to grade 10 students with teacher recommendation.
This is an advanced course, which is organized around a central theme: the properties of matter are a consequence of
its chemical structure. A balanced approach is presented in combining chemical theories and concepts with
quantitative problems. Students will find this material challenging and will be encouraged to think independently
throughout the course. Topics of study include scientific laboratory writing skills, factor-label method to problem
solving, formula and equation writing, stoichiometry and the mole, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity of
periodic table, gas laws, thermodynamics, equilibrium and acid/base chemistry, redox reactions, and chemical rates.
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Conceptual Physics CP
Course # 231
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.
This is a full year course offered to students in their junior and senior year. Students will explore the relationship of
Physics to many of today’s current topics. They will apply basic principles of the physical world to study learning
strands that include force and motion, conservation of energy and momentum, heat and heat transfer.
Physics CP
Course # 232
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.
This course and laboratory component provides students with a working knowledge of the physical world. Students
will use the most modern technology available to develop concepts and improve problem-solving skills. This course
can serve as an important component of college preparatory study. The learning strands are motion and forces,
conservation of energy and momentum, heat and heat transfer, waves, electromagnetism and electromagnetic
radiation.
AP Physics B Course 1
Course # 234
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology and Chemistry with
teacher recommendation.
Advanced placement Algebra based physics course with a focus on kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion, torque;
rotation motion and angular momentum; gravitation and circular motion; work, energy and power; linear
momentum; oscillation, mechanical waves and sound; introduction to electric circuits. The course follows the
College Board syllabus for AP physics B Course 1
AP Physics B Course 2
Course # 238
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 12 with successful completion of AP Physics Course 1 with teacher
recommendation.
Advanced placement Algebra based physics course with a focus on fluid statics and dynamics with kinetic theory,
PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electric circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism;
physical and geometric options; topics in modern physics. The course follows the College Board syllabus for AP
physics B Course 2
AP Physics C
Course # 239
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 12 with successful completion of AP Physics Course 1 and AP Calculus
AB with teacher recommendation.
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Advanced placement Calculus based Physics. The course follows the College Board syllabus for AP Physics C and
is equivalent to a full year of university calculus based physics. The course covers mechanics and electricity and
magnetism in full detail, has a strong laboratory component, and emphasizes student problem solving strategies.
Anatomy and Physiology H
Course # 243
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology and Chemistry with
teacher recommendation.
The course combines lectures, hands-on activities, projects and laboratory exercises in order to provide a thorough
understanding of human anatomy and physiology. The important relationships between structure and function at the
level of cells, tissues, organs and organ systems are emphasized.
AP Biology
Course # 245
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology and Chemistry with
teacher recommendation.
This course and laboratory component provide for study at the most advanced conceptual level. In addition to the
regular class work, students will design and execute an original research investigation independent of class time.
The topics of the course are molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, organisms and populations, structure and
function of plants and animals and ecology. Students who work successfully in this course are required to take the
Advanced Placement Examination in Biology.
AP Biology Lab
Course # 246
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Must be taken in conjunction with AP Biology 245.
This laboratory component accompanies AP Biology and provides for laboratory and experimental study at the most
advanced conceptual level.
AP Environmental Science
Course # 275
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology with teacher
recommendation.
The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and
methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze
environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems,
and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it
embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or
themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science.
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AP Chemistry
Course # 255
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology and Chemistry with
teacher recommendation.
Advanced Placement Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually
taken during the first college year. Therefore, it is based on a predetermined, fast paced, syllabus.
Topics include concepts in physical chemistry, organic chemistry, structure of matter, chemical bonding,
equilibrium, acid-base theory, and an extensive laboratory program.
Students taking this class are expected to work at a fast pace and exhibit good laboratory and organizational skills as
well as effective study habits. Students who work successfully in this course are required to take the Advanced
Placement examination in Chemistry.
AP Chemistry Lab
Course # 256
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Must be taken in conjunction with AP Chemistry 255.
This laboratory component accompanies AP Chemistry and provides for laboratory and experimental study at the
most advanced conceptual level.
Environmental Science
Course # 270
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.
This course is a half-year introductory elective course offered to students in their junior and senior year. The course
will survey basic aspects of environmental studies including the concepts such as; pollution, population growth,
availability of resources, and competition. Specific attention will be paid to interaction between various organisms
and their unique environment. Students will participate in laboratories in many of the included concepts.
Astronomy
Course # 271
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.
This half-year introductory elective course will explore space phenomena such as massive black holes, explosive
supernovas, alien life killer asteroids and many basic objects that make-up our universe. Students will become fluent
in star and constellation identification.
Marine Biology
Course # 272
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.
This half-year introductory elective course will dive into concepts of marine biology such as the, origins of the
oceans and how they work, marine ecology topics such as marine food webs, the inhabitants of the ocean from
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plankton to killer whales, the biology of how these organisms survive in the ocean, and the significance of the
oceans to our global ecosystem.
Forensics
Course # 274
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.
This course is designed to challenge students with topics such as fingerprinting, DNA analysis, blood typing and
spattering, trajectories (for ballistics as well as blood spattering) comparative anatomy, and chemical analysis of
drugs, poisons, and trace evidence, and the dynamics of Physics. Students will learn about the careers involved with
Forensic Science and will play mock roles as experts in the field to solve crimes. The students will all be given the
tools to interpret data and techniques involved for both chemical and biological analysis of evidence.
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Mathematics
Algebra 1
Course # 310
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Students are recommended and assigned to this course.
The primary goal of this course is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations
for Student Learning. This Algebra One class reflects NCTM standards, Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks,
and real world applications of algebra algorithms. This course is designed for students that require intensive
individualized help in mastering basic mathematical facts and operations, with an emphasis on mathematical
applications. This Algebra 1 course develops a strong foundation in patterns, relationships, and number sense.
Topics include solving linear equations, inequalities, graphing, systems of equations, and exponential functions.
Reinforcement and a real-world context strengthen the skills of less abstract learners and make math more
meaningful. Quadratic equations, factoring, and rational expressions, are explored as time allows. Technology will
be used as a tool to encourage investigation and modeling. There will be MCAS preparation skills and drills
presented to prepare each student for success in tenth grade MCAS testing. This course does not meet NCAA
eligibility criteria.
Algebra 1 CP
Course # 312
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to grade 9 students.
The primary goal of this course is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations
for Student Learning. This Algebra One CP2 class reflects NCTM standards, Massachusetts Curriculum
Frameworks, and real world applications of algebra algorithms. Critical thinking skills and the use of technology are
also a primary focus. The concepts in this level course are introduced at a moderate pace to allow students of
various ability levels to find success. This course will investigate real numbers, percentage problems, linear
equations and inequalities, linear functions, systems of linear equations, absolute value equations and inequalities,
laws of exponents, polynomials, rational expressions, quadratic functions, radical functions, and measures of central
tendency. These modern courses in first year algebra emphasize function and relations as the foundations for
algebraic structure. Applications will be provided through a wide variety of open-ended, non routine problems.
Calculators and computers will be utilized to develop conceptual understanding. There will be MCAS preparation
skills and drills presented to prepare each student for success in tenth grade MCAS testing.
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Geometry
Course # 320
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Students are recommended and assigned to this course. Students must have a passing grade in
Algebra 1 and teacher recommendation.
The primary goal of this course is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations
for Student Learning. This Geometry class reflects NCTM standards, Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, and
real world applications of geometric algorithms. This course is designed for students that require intensive
individualized help in mastering basic mathematical facts and operations, with an emphasis on mathematical
applications. This course will investigate foundations of Geometry, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles,
congruence, polygons, quadrilaterals, similarity, perimeter, circumference, area, volume, surface area, circles,
transformational geometry, geometric reasoning, and right triangles. Technology will be used as a tool to encourage
investigation and modeling. There will be MCAS preparation skills and drills presented to prepare each student for
success in tenth grade MCAS testing. This course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
Geometry CP
Course # 322
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1 CP.
The primary goal of this course is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations
for Student Learning. This Geometry CP2 class reflects NCTM standards, Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks,
and real world applications of geometric algorithms. Critical thinking skills and the use of technology are also a
primary focus. The concepts in this level course are introduced at a moderate pace to allow students of various
ability levels to find success. This course will investigate foundations of Geometry, parallel and perpendicular lines,
triangles, congruence, polygons, quadrilaterals, similarity, perimeter, circumference, area, volume, surface area,
circles, transformational geometry, geometric reasoning, right triangles, and trigonometry. These modern courses in
geometry emphasize concepts involving both geometry and measurement as the foundations for geometric structure.
Applications will be provided through a wide variety of open-ended, non routine problems. Calculators and
computers will be utilized to develop conceptual understanding. There will be MCAS and SAT preparation skills
and drills presented to prepare each student for success in tenth grade MCAS testing and SAT tests. A scientific
calculator is required for all students.
Geometry Honors
Course # 323
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to grade 9 or10 students with successful completion of Algebra 1 and teacher recommendation.
The primary goal of this course is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations
for Student Learning. This Geometry Honors class reflects NCTM standards, Massachusetts Curriculum
Frameworks, and real world applications of geometric algorithms. Critical thinking skills and the use of technology
are also a primary focus. The concepts in this level course are introduced at an accelerated pace and the students are
expected to understand more advance geometric concepts. This course will investigate foundations of Geometry,
parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, congruence, polygons, quadrilaterals, similarity, perimeter,
circumference, area, volume, surface area, circles, transformational geometry, geometric reasoning, right triangles,
and trigonometry. These modern courses in geometry emphasize concepts involving both geometry and
measurement as the foundations for geometric structure. Applications will be provided through a wide variety of
open-ended, non routine problems. Calculators and computers will be utilized to develop conceptual understanding.
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There will be MCAS and SAT preparation skills and drills presented to prepare each student for success in tenth
grade MCAS testing and SAT tests. A scientific calculator is required for all students.
Algebra 2
Course # 330
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Students are recommended and assigned to this course. Students must have a passing grade in
Geometry and teacher recommendation.
The primary goal of this course is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations
for Student Learning. This Algebra Two class reflects NCTM standards, Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks,
and real world applications of algebra algorithms. This course is designed for students that require intensive
individualized help in mastering basic mathematical facts and operations, with an emphasis on mathematical
applications. The concepts in this class will begins with an in depth review of basic algebraic concepts. This course
also extends all of the concepts and properties of numbers to include the irrational and complex numbers. Concept
of function is applied to the quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. These concepts will be covered as
time allows. Calculators and computers will be utilized to develop conceptual understanding. There will be MCAS
preparation skills and drills presented to prepare each student for success in tenth grade MCAS testing and SAT
tests. This course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
Foundations of Algebra 2 CP
Course # 331
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: A grade of 65-69 in Geometry CP or teacher recommendation.
The primary goal of this course is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and
Expectations for Student Learning. This Algebra Two CP1 class reflects NCTM standards, Massachusetts
Curriculum Frameworks, real world applications of algebra algorithms. Critical thinking skills and the use of
technology are also goals. This course assumes satisfactory completion of Algebra One. The concepts in this level
course are introduced at a slower pace to allow students of various ability levels to find success. The study of
Algebra Two begins with a thorough review of elementary algebra, and includes an extension of all basic properties
of the rational numbers. Stress is placed on solution of open sentences in one variable of all types (i.e., absolute
value, compound sentences, quadratics by factoring, and inequalities). The linear open sentence in one variable is
analyzed. Operational skill in using rational algebraic expressions is strengthened through problem solving and
applications. Applications are provided through solutions of a wide variety of open-ended, non-routine, real world
problems. The concept of function is developed so that the students will have an understanding of the general
properties and behavior of classes of functions. This course also extends all of the concepts and properties of
numbers to include the irrational and complex numbers. Concept of function is applied to the quadratic,
exponential, and logarithmic functions. Skill in solving open sentences and word problems as well as facility in
operating radical and exponential expressions is emphasized. Permutations, combinations, the binomial theorem,
arithmetic and geometric sequences, matrices, and conic sections are presented as time permits. Calculators and
computers will be utilized to develop conceptual understanding. The use of computer utilities in graphing
techniques will be used for solving equations and inequalities. SAT preparation skills and drills will be developed
and reinforced according to the SAT testing calendar. A graphing calculator is strongly recommended for this
course. The suggestion calculator is a TI-84 and TI-Nspire graphing calculator. This course does not meet NCAA
eligibility criteria.
Algebra 2 CP
Course # 332
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1.
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The primary goal of this course is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations
for Student Learning. This Algebra Two CP2 class reflects NCTM standards, Massachusetts Curriculum
Frameworks, real world applications of algebra algorithms. Critical thinking skills and the use of technology are also
goals. This course assumes satisfactory completion of Algebra One. The concepts in this level course are
introduced at a moderate pace to allow students of various ability levels to find success. The study of Algebra Two
begins with a thorough review of elementary algebra, and includes an extension of all basic properties of the rational
numbers. Stress is placed on solution of open sentences in one variable of all types (i.e., absolute value, compound
sentences, quadratics by factoring, and inequalities). The linear open sentence in one variable is analyzed.
Operational skill in using rational algebraic expressions is strengthened through problem solving and applications.
Applications are provided through solutions of a wide variety of open-ended, non-routine, real world problems. The
concept of function is developed so that the students will have an understanding of the general properties and
behavior of classes of functions. This course also extends all of the concepts and properties of numbers to include
the irrational and complex numbers. Concept of function is applied to the quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic
functions. Skill in solving open sentences and word problems as well as facility in operating radical and exponential
expressions is emphasized. Permutations, combinations, the binomial theorem, arithmetic and geometric sequences,
matrices, and conic sections are presented as time permits. Calculators and computers will be utilized to develop
conceptual understanding. The use of computer utilities in graphing techniques will be used for solving equations
and inequalities. SAT preparation skills and drills will be developed and reinforced according to the SAT testing
calendar. A graphing calculator is strongly recommended for this course. The suggestion calculator is a TI-84 and
TI-Nspire graphing calculator.
Algebra 2 Honors
Course # 333
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1with teacher recommendation.
The primary goal of this course is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations
for Student Learning. This Algebra Two Honors class reflects NCTM standards, Massachusetts Curriculum
Frameworks, real world applications of algebra algorithms. Critical thinking skills and the use of technology are also
goals. This course assumes satisfactory completion of Algebra One. The concepts in this level course are
introduced at an accelerated pace and the students are expected to understand more advance algebraic concepts. The
study of Algebra Two begins with a thorough review of elementary algebra, and includes an extension of all basic
properties of the rational numbers. Stress is placed on solution of open sentences in one variable of all types (i.e.,
absolute value, compound sentences, quadratics by factoring, and inequalities). The linear open sentence in one
variable is analyzed. Operational skill in using rational algebraic expressions is strengthened through problem
solving and applications. Applications are provided through solutions of a wide variety of open-ended, non-routine,
real world problems. The concept of function is developed so that the students will have an understanding of the
general properties and behavior of classes of functions. This course also extends all of the concepts and properties
of numbers to include the irrational and complex numbers. Concept of function is applied to the quadratic,
exponential, and logarithmic functions. Skill in solving open sentences and word problems as well as facility in
operating radical and exponential expressions is emphasized. Permutations, combinations, the binomial theorem,
arithmetic and geometric sequences, matrices, and conic sections are presented as time permits. Calculators and
computers will be utilized to develop conceptual understanding. The use of computer utilities in graphing
techniques will be used for solving equations and inequalities. SAT preparation skills and drills will be developed
and reinforced according to the SAT testing calendar. A graphing calculator is required for this course. The
suggestion calculator is a TI-84 and TI-Nspire graphing calculator.
Integrated Math for Proficiency
Course # 340
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Students are recommended and assigned to this course. Students must have a passing grade in
Algebra 2 and teacher recommendation or Specialist approval to accommodate a student’s EPP.
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The primary goal of this class is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations for
Student Learning. This course reviews and integrates the study of algebra and geometry. The concepts in this level
course are introduced at a slower pace to allow students of various ability levels to find success. Successful
completion of this course fulfills the fourth year of mathematics requirement of students’ Educational Proficiency
Plans. Additional topics include sampling, reasoning, models, linear systems, matrices, quadratic functions,
polynomial functions, coordinate geometry, quadrilaterals, probability, logic, similar and congruent triangles and
figures in space. Real life situations are used to reinforce and extend mathematical skills and strengthen overall
competence in college preparatory mathematics. SAT preparation skills and drills will be developed and reinforced
according to the SAT calendar. This course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
Integrated Math for Proficiency CP
Course # 341
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: A passing grade in Algebra 2 CP or Director approval to accommodate a student’s EPP.
The primary goal of this class is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations for
Student Learning. This course reviews and integrates the study of algebra and geometry. The concepts in this level
course are introduced at a slower pace to allow students of various ability levels to find success. Successful
completion of this course fulfills the fourth year of mathematics requirement of students’ Educational Proficiency
Plans. Additional topics include sampling, reasoning, models, linear systems, matrices, quadratic functions,
polynomial functions, coordinate geometry, quadrilaterals, probability, logic, similar and congruent triangles and
figures in space. Real life situations are used to reinforce and extend mathematical skills and strengthen overall
competence in college preparatory mathematics. SAT preparation skills and drills will be developed and reinforced
according to the SAT calendar. This course does not meet NCAA eligibility criteria.
Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry CP
Course # 342
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2.
The primary goal of this class is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations for
Student Learning. This course explores previous algebraic topics more in-depth as well as introduces new topics in
advanced algebra and trigonometry. The concepts in this level course are introduced at a moderate pace to allow
students of various ability levels to find success. Additional topics include modeling problem situations, exploration
of functions, conic sections, sequences and series, advanced functions, polar coordinates, trigonometry, and periodic
functions. Real life situations are used to reinforce and extend mathematical skills and strengthen overall
competence in college preparatory mathematics. SAT preparation skills and drills will be developed and reinforced
according to the SAT calendar.
Pre-Calculus Honors
Course # 343
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2 with teacher recommendation.
The primary goal of this class is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s Mission and Expectations for
Student Learning. The concepts in this level course are introduced at an accelerated pace and the students are
expected to understand more advance mathematical concepts. This course provides a rich preparation for college
courses in a calculus, abstract algebra, as well as some probability. This course can also serve as a terminal course
for students who do not plan to continue their study of mathematics. Topics included: Number patterns, equations,
inequalities, functions, graphs, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, properties of circular and
trigonometric functions. Selected topics from analytic geometry and a brief introduction to calculus will be included
49
as time allows. Calculators and computers will be utilized to develop conceptual understanding. SAT preparation
skills and drills will be developed and reinforced according to the SAT testing calendar. A graphing calculator is
required for this course. The suggestion calculator is a TI-84 and TI-Nspire graphing calculator.
AP Calculus AB
Course # 345
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Pre-calculus with teacher recommendation.
This course follows the topics outlined for Calculus AB as described by the College Board Advanced Placement
Program. It includes topics of functions, asymptotic and unbounded behavior, continuity, and limits. Concepts
involving derivatives will also be introduced. These concepts include basic derivatives concepts, derivatives at a
point, derivatives as a function, second derivatives, and application of derivatives, curve sketching, and computation
of derivatives. The third major concept is integrals. Topics of integrals include interpretations and properties of
definite integrals, applications of integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques of anti-differentiation,
application of anti-differentiation and numerical approximations of definite integrals. A graphing calculator is
required for this course. The suggestion calculator is a TI-84, TI-89, or TI-Nspire graphing calculator. Students
will be expected to use the graphing calculator to perform the four requirements as defined in the AP Program.
These requirements are plotting graphs of a function in the appropriate viewing window, finding the zeros of
functions, numeric calculation of derivatives, and numerical calculations of definite integrals.
AP Calculus BC
Course # 347
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Calculus AB with teacher recommendation.
This course will explore the key concepts, methods, and applications of single-variable calculus including all topics
covered in AP Calculus AB (functions, graphs, and limits, derivatives, integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of
Calculus) as well as additional topics in differential and integral calculus, such as parametric, polar and vector
functions, and series. The students will become familiar with concepts, results, and problems expressed in multiple
ways including graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Use technology to help solve problems,
experiment, interpret results, and support your conclusions. A graphing calculator is required for this course. The
suggestion calculator is a TI-84, TI-89, or TI-Nspire graphing calculator. Students will be expected to use the
graphing calculator to perform the four requirements as defined in the AP Program. These requirements are plotting
graphs of a function in the appropriate viewing window, finding the zeros of functions, numeric calculation of
derivatives, and numerical calculations of definite integrals.
Personal Finance
Course # 352
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: This course is encouraged for all seniors.
Personal Finance is designed to educate students about sound money management skills and the financial planning
process. This course is geared towards helping students begin to develop positive behaviors that are necessary to
attaining financial maturity and achieving a secure future. Now, more than ever, making sound financial decisions is
extremely important. Topics covered include: creating a personal financial plan, creating a personal budget,
proposing personal savings and investing plan, managing and handling debt, using financial services, insurance and
how career choices affect one’s financial plan. All students are expected to participate in classroom discussions,
partake in group activities and do all assigned projects.
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Entrepreneurship
Course # 354
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students
Entrepreneurship is a course designed to introduce students to the process of establishing a small business. This
course helps student's gain an understanding of the marketing, economic, finance and management necessary to start
and operate a business. The primary focus of the course is to help students understand the process of analyzing a
business opportunity, determining feasibility of an idea utilizing research, developing a plan to organize and
promote the business and its products/services, and finally, to understand the capital required, the return on
investment desired, and the potential for profit. Guest speakers, field trips, case studies, projects and other hands on
activities will be utilized in this course.
Fundamentals of Accounting
Course # 355
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students in grades 9-12 with completion of Algebra 1.
Students will learn and apply industry-standard computer programs to perform recordkeeping and accounting
procedures. The accounting concepts acquired will prepare students with the financial tools needed to keep records
in a business or to take accounting. Because comprehensive computer skills are vital to business and industry in our
rapidly changing technological, global society, students will focus on technology used to analyze and manage
information using a variety of software applications. They will demonstrate competency by utilizing multiple skills,
processing data effectively, and producing quality information.
AP Statistics
Course # 365
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2 with teacher recommendation.
This course follows the topics outlined for Statistics as described by the College Board Advanced Placement
Program. Major themes encompass exploring data, patterns and departures from patterns, anticipating patterns,
producing models using probability and simulation, planning a study, deciding what and how to measure, statistical
inferences, and confirming models. A graphing calculator is required for this course. The suggestion calculator is a
TI-84 and TI-Nspire graphing calculator.
Statistics and Discrete Structures CP
Course # 366
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2.
The primary goal of this course is to teach mathematics in accordance with our school’s mission and expectations
for student learning. The course explores in depth the collection and organization of data, descriptions and analysis
of patterns and investigation of inferential statistics. The students will apply the concepts of statistics to social and
academic issues directly related to high school students. They will be directly involved in the collection of real life
data, the development of presentations, and statistical analysis of their results. The students will present their
findings to their peers for the purpose of improving the culture at Saugus High School. Topics include hypothesis
testing with large and small samples, correlation, regression analysis, and chi-squared analysis. Discrete topics such
as recursion, fractals, graph theory, cryptography, fair division, and election theory will reinforce a complete
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foundation in finite mathematics. A graphing calculator is required for this course. The suggestion calculator is a
TI-84 and TI-Nspire graphing calculator.
Success in Math
Course # 370
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Students will be selected by past performance on previous MCAS exams
Students will be provided an opportunity for review and practice in areas of the curriculum which are emphasized on
the MCAS exam. These in include number sense and operations, patterns, relations, and functions, geometry,
measurement, data analysis, statistics, and probability. There will also be a focus on test-taking fundamentals.
These include the format of the MCAS test, multiple choice questions basic strategies, short answer questions basic
strategies, open response questions basic strategies, calculator use, and the scoring of the exam.
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World Language
Spanish 1 CP
Course # 412
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
This course is designed to develop student proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Spanish, and to
increase students’ knowledge and appreciation of the diverse cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Emphasizing
communication, the course employs a variety of activities to promote learning and application of the target
language. Students in this course are expected to perform at an average pace and skill level.
Spanish 2 CP
Course # 422
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1with teacher recommendation for incoming grade 9 students.
This course provides a brief review of the communicative functions acquired in Spanish 1. New speech patterns,
vocabulary, and controlled conversational situations are introduced in order to help students work toward Spanish
fluency. Students in this course are expected to perform at an average pace and skill level.
Spanish 2H
Course # 423
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1 with teacher recommendation.
This course continues to build on the communicative skills developed in level 1. New vocabulary, idioms, tenses,
and speech patterns are introduced, including “independent” usage and complex sentences which increase
throughout the year. The class pace is accelerated and a higher-level of student skill development is expected.
Spanish 3
Course # 432
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 2.
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This course provides a systematic review, and further development of, all communicative functions. Students are
engaged in more advanced composition, research, and aural and oral training. Literature introduced includes short
stories by Latin American and Spanish authors.
Spanish 3H
Course # 433
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 2 with teacher recommendation.
This course provides a thorough review of content from level 2H and continues development of the four language
skills. Extensive new vocabulary and speech patterns are introduced, and emphasis is placed on reading for content,
and on independent communication of ideas through original statements involving new materials, and through
written compositions. The class pace is accelerated and a higher-level of student skill development is expected.
Spanish 4
Course # 442
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 3.
This course promotes further development of the four language skills, and employs the target language in the
exploration of areas including biography, culture, politics, and economics. Themes covered by course literature
include love, death, patriotism, adventure, conflicts, and legends.
Spanish 4H
Course # 443
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 3 with teacher recommendation.
This course is a combination of oral, aural, reading, and written work, and makes use of testing materials aimed at
promoting fluency in the target language.
Spanish 5H
Course # 429
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 4 or Spanish 4H.
In this course, students will increase Spanish language proficiency through the study of various authentic resources
such as television commercials, newspaper articles, music, and films. This course will also review advanced
grammatical structures in a practical context. Students will be exposed to further in-depth study of Hispanic history
and culture. This course is intended for students who have successfully completed four years of language study.
AP Spanish Language
Course # 445
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 4 with teacher recommendation.
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This course, emphasizing the use of language for active communication, has the same objectives as Spanish 5H, and
provides students with additional readings and more in depth comprehension work in preparation for the required
AP exam. This course emphasizes student creativity and self-expression while providing for more in-depth
development of skills in five specific areas of the target language: conversation, composition, grammar, history and
literature. Students are expected to attain the following objectives:
A. to understand spoken Spanish in various contexts in both written and oral discourse;
B. to develop a Spanish vocabulary sufficiently ample for reading newspapers and magazine articles, literary
texts, and other non-technical writings without dependence on a dictionary;
C. to be able to express oneself in Spanish coherently, resourcefully, and with reasonable fluency and accuracy,
in both speech and writing.
Course content may reflect intellectual interests shared by the students and teacher in such areas as the arts, current
events, literature, and sports. Course materials may include audio and video recordings, films, newspapers, and
magazines. Extensive training in the organization and writing of compositions is included.
Italian 1
Course # 451
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all students.
This course helps students develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing in Italian. Grammar for
understanding the language is an essential part of the course, along with an exposure to elements of Italian culture.
Italian 2
Course # 462
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Italian 1.
This course continues to develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Italian, and builds on level 1 by
introducing new tenses and vocabulary. Multimedia offerings are used to present a broad cultural background of the
Italian nation and language.
Italian 2H
Course # 463
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Italian 1with teacher recommendation.
This course continues to develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Italian. New vocabulary, idioms,
tenses, and speech patterns are introduced. The class pace is accelerated and a higher-level of student skill
development is expected.
Italian 3
Course # 472
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Italian 2.
This course provides a systematic review of all grammatical constructions previously taught, and develops skills of
advanced composition, research and conversation. Course literature includes short stories in Italian.
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Italian 3H
Course # 473
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Italian 2 with teacher recommendation.
This course provides a thorough review of content developed in Italian 2H, and continues development of the four
language skills. Extensive new vocabulary and speech patterns are introduced, and emphasis is placed on reading
for content, and on independent communication of ideas through original statements involving new materials, and
through written compositions. The class pace is accelerated and a higher-level of student skill development is
expected.
Italian 4H
Course # 474
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Italian 3 with teacher recommendation.
This course emphasizes the use of language for active communication, focusing on improving speaking skills in a
variety of contexts; and on further development of reading skills using newspaper and magazine articles and other
selected texts; and on writing with greater coherence, fluency and accuracy.
Latin 1H
Course # 480
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all students with teacher recommendation.
Latin I is an introduction to the Latin language and Roman civilization. Instruction at the first year level will
emphasize grammar, vocabulary and translation. Students will also study the Greek and Roman mythology and
acquaint themselves with the major heroes, monsters and epics in this genre.
Latin 2H
Course # 481
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 1 with teacher recommendation.
Latin II: Students will continue their study of the Latin language and grammar while continuing to increase their
vocabulary and their ability to translate. Students will also study the major events and figures of the The Punic
Wars and the era of the Roman Republic.
Latin 3H
Course # 482
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 2 with teacher recommendation.
Students will continue their study of the fundamentals of the Latin language and grammar while continuing to
increase their vocabulary and strengthen their ability to translate. The students will gain the skills to translate,
comprehend and enjoy authentic Latin texts including Ovid's Metamorphoses. Students will learn the elements of
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Roman poetry including common literary devices, meter, word order and sound patterns. The students will also
study the major events and figures during the Augustan Age and how it relates to Roman Literature.
Latin 4H
Course # 483
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin 3 with teacher recommendation.
This course aims to enable students to read, understand and enjoy the poetry of two of the most famous love poets
from Antiquity: Catullus and Horace. The students will study the poetry of these men and examine the use of literary
devices, allusions, meter, and grammatical and syntactical concepts as they appear in the poetry of the authors. In
addition, the students will examine the life and times of these poets as well as events that influenced these men and
their poetry.
Mandarin Chinese 1H
Course # 485
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to all students.
This course is a combination of an introduction to Chinese language and culture. Emphasis is placed on
the communication skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Over the course of the year, a variety of basic
topics will be covered: how to use Chinese Pin Yin, how to recognize and write basic Chinese characters, basic
Chinese radicals, greetings, introductions, numbers, time, the date, weather, pronouns, basic sentence structure,
questions, verbs, and adjectives. Students will also learn about Chinese history and culture.
Mandarin Chinese 2H
Course # 486
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mandarin 1.
Mandarin 2 continues to develop the communication skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. More
emphasis will be put on the production of speech and on listening. Students will also continue to study Chinese
history and culture in greater depth. Lastly, students will deal with and be expected to use more complex grammar
structures in writing and in speech.
Mandarin Chinese 3H
Course # 487
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mandarin 2.
Mandarin 3 gives students the opportunity to continue to develop a lasting understanding of language
and culture. As such, it integrates culture and meaningful conversation. In addition, it introduces students to more
complex grammar and vocabulary, such as idioms. Students will expand their knowledge of written characters.
They will use learned characters to write short passages using increasingly complex grammatical structures. They
will also read texts in the target language to gain new information about Chinese history and culture (add).
Mandarin Chinese 4H
Course # 488
5 Periods
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5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mandarin 3.
Mandarin 4 gives students the opportunity to further solidify and grow an understanding of language (characters,
vocabulary, grammar, idioms) and culture. More emphasis is placed on exposure to and interpretation of authentic
materials such as signs, newspaper excerpts, and radio clips. They will use learned characters and vocabulary to
write short compositions and give oral presentations using increasingly complex grammatical structures. They will
also continue to read texts in the target language to broaden their understanding of Chinese history and culture.
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Computer Technology
Intro to Media Design
Course # 533
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
This course offers an introduction to students with an interest in digital imaging, photography, web design, and print
design.
The course covers the background, fundamental concepts and essential skills required for beginning multimedia
designers to create compelling meaningful content using the Adobe Suite software. Assignments are geared towards
students’ personal interests incorporating the use of big ideas. Students learn the tools, techniques and terminology
to prepare them for further study in web illustration, animation, video or digital photo manipulation or editing.
Students interested in becoming involved with the school yearbook, magazine, and websites, must take this course
as a prerequisite.
Advanced Media Design
Course # 534
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Intro to Media Design with teacher recommendation. This course can be
taken multiple times.
In this class the students will work to retain the skills developed in the first course and work to achieve mastery of
the more advanced skills. Through practice and projects the student should be able to independently produce media
using all of their acquired designing skills. The students should be able to master a required task.
Productions in this class includes planning and organizing, developing leadership skills, writing, art/graphic design,
advertising and photography involving school life, organization, clubs, academics, classes and sports.
Students will be responsible for creating the Saugus High School magazine, school related graphics, and maintaining
school websites.
Publication and Design
Course # 532
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisite: Open to grade 12 only. Successful completion of Intro to Media Design or teacher recommendation.
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This course offers a practical introduction to the conception, design and production of promotional print. Using
industry standard software taught in course # 533, students will learn more advanced techniques such as manipulate
type into artwork, designing logos, creating illustrations using computer imaging techniques and scanned images in
their projects. Students will be responsible to produce the layout for the Tontoquonian, Saugus High School's
yearbook, and to product marketable items such as: calendars with feature photos and graphics, business letterheads
and cards, newsletters, handbooks, brochures and invitations. This class is also responsible for creating the senior
video.
Video Editing
Course # 544
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
Students will learn the basics of using a digital still and video camera. They will also learn to use a scanner in
combination with video and pictures they have imported to create a variety of video projects. The video software
that is taught in the class is Apples iMovie used to create video projects. Students will be responsible for filming cocurricular events after school hours as part of their portfolio and class participation.
Introduction to Digital Photography
Course # 547
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Teacher Recommendation, Open to students in grades 10-12.
This is a fun and exciting introduction into a new world of digital photography. Students are introduced to digital
camera controls, image creation and workflow. In-class instructions and assignments cover non-automatic shooting
modes, image storage capabilities, file types, menus, exposure, light, shutter effects, and creativity.
Demonstrations and lectures are complemented by field trips around the school grounds. Students take their field
images back to the digital lab, and learn to utilize Adobe Lightroom software for optimal image development and
organization. Extensive hands-on class and fieldwork provides students with the knowledge and practice to become
comfortable with digital SLR cameras and image processing.
Honors Computer Programming
Course # 565
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
This course will begin the formal introduction of the Java programming language. Topics to be covered will include
input/output, data types, reading from text files, printing to screen and files, conditional statements, looping, and
built-in functions. This is an Honors level course. Additional programs will be assigned and completed to receive
Honors credits.
Honors Computer Programming 2
Course # 567
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Honors Computer Programming
This course continues the formal introduction of the Java programming language. The topics to be covered include:
user created data types and functions, one and two dimensional arrays, nested looping structures, sorting, searching,
array lists, object-oriented programming and classes.
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Help Desk
Course # 568
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation required.
This course is designed to develop a technical knowledge and customer relations skills necessary to be a successful
PC service technician. Students will be instructed in software installation, troubleshooting, hardware repair and
installation, and in computer maintenance. On a daily basis, students will provide help desk technical assistance,
follow-up diagnostics, repair and maintenance of school computers. Course can be taken multiple times.
Computer-Aided-Design with AutoCAD
Course # 571
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
Concentrating on Architecture, instruction will be given in mastering various commands and drawing techniques.
Topics are covered in an easy-to-understand sequence, and progress in such a way that allows the student to become
comfortable with the commands as knowledge builds. Lab will be located in the shop where students will utilize
knowledge gained with the construction of buildings.
Advanced Computer-Aided-Design with AutoCAD
Course # 572
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Computer Aided-Design with AutoCAD
Concentrating on Mechanical Design, instruction continues the work started in AutoCAD. Students will become
proficient in blueprint-reading and drawing.
Honors Computer-Aided-Design with CREO 2.0
Course # 573
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Advanced Computer-Aided-Design with AutoCAD with teacher
recommendation
Concentrating on the 3rd Dimension, students will be introduced to solid-modeling using the most up-to-date
software available to designers and engineers.
Advanced Video Editing
Course # 575
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Video Editing or with a teacher recommendation.
This course will provide students the opportunity to utilize knowledge obtained in Digital Imaging I to create and
maintain a video resume and e-portfolio utilizing Apple’s iMovie as well as other advanced movie editing software
and digital media. Students will be responsible for teaming up with teachers in other departments to develop some
type of cross curriculum projects where teachers will be able to utilize the students’ expertise with the software as
well as develop assignments that will utilize the technology used in this course. Students may be responsible for
filming co-curricular events after school hours as part of their portfolio and class participation. Only self-motivating
students should enroll.
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AP Computer Science A
Course # 577
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Honors Computer Programming and Honors Computer Programming 2
with teacher recommendation.
The AP Computer Science A course is an advanced course in computer science. Because the design and
implementation of computer programs to solve problems involve skills that are fundamental to the study of
computer science, a large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs that correctly
solve a given problem. These programs should be understandable, adaptable, and, when appropriate, reusable. At the
same time, the design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important
aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of
fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and
formal methods. In addition, the responsible use of these systems is an integral part of the course.
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Child Care
Child Lab
Course # 641
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students with teacher recommendation. Students need to have their own method of
transportation to travel to the Ballard School.
This is a full year course that offers the high school student a hands-on experience with pre-schoolers. New
Beginnings is a preschool at the Ballard School. High school students are taught how to prepare lessons and plan
circle time activities. Students have the opportunity to teach lessons to the 4 and 5 year olds enrolled in the
program.
Advanced Child Lab
Course # 642
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Child Lab with teacher recommendation.
This is a full year course that offers the high school student a hands-on experience with pre-schoolers. New
Beginnings is a preschool at the Ballard School. High school students are taught how to prepare lessons and plan
circle time activities. Students have the opportunity to teach lessons to the 4 and 5 year olds enrolled in the
program. Course can be taken multiple times. Students need to have their own method of transportation to travel
to the Ballard School.
Peer Leaders Program
Course # 660
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all interested students in grades 10-12.
This is a half year course that offers high school students the chance to work hands-on in a substantially separate
setting with peers who have intellectual disabilities. Students will be expected to work in the classroom, serve as a
peer mentor and friend. Students will learn the importance of confidentiality and respect for all students. Course can
be taken multiple times.
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Technology Education
Introduction to Woodworking
Course # 711
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
This course includes basic information on carpentry, woodworking, furniture making and design as well as wood
finishing. It is intended to help the student develop an understanding and appreciation of the tools, machines, and
processes involved in woodworking. With a strong focus on the development and understanding of sound safety
practices, the course will help the student design and construct wood products and become a more knowledgeable
consumer as well.
Woodworking Technology
Course # 712
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Introduction to Woodworking.
This course further stresses the development of proper shop attitudes. Student selected projects are designed to
expand and strengthen the varied experiences the pupil was exposed to in Introduction to Woodworking . The
strength and appearance of projects will be stressed. The latest techniques of finishing and finishing materials will
be included.
Advanced Woodworking Technology
Course # 713
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Woodworking Technology.
This course is offered to expand the knowledge acquired from Introduction to Woodworking and Woodworking
Technology. The selection of projects will be intended to incorporate the accepted joint construction with more
emphasis the student’s independent rate of progress. The setting up and operation of machines and portable power
tools will continue on a more advanced level. An approach to production type projects and possible exceptions to
the general rule of operation and procedures will be introduced.
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Fine Arts
Credit is given to student members who meet their obligations pertaining to rehearsals and
performance commitments. Students are encouraged to participate in Concert Band,
Instrumental Ensembles, Concert Choir and Quartets. Practice schedules arranged.
Chorus
Course # 800
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students 9-12 who are interested in singing. This class may be taken multiple times.
This ensemble is general chorus of mixed voices (male & female) that performs music from a wide variety of
musical styles. Performances may include, but are not limited to, school assemblies, civic/community programs, and
annual concerts. Some rehearsals outside of the regular school day may be required. Membership in this course is
required to participate in after school select vocal groups or to audition for the district/all-state level chorus.
Honors Chorus
This is an honors level option for chorus and meets at the same time as the regular chorus. In addition to the regular
requirements for chorus, students enrolled in the honors options will be required to complete an additional project
each quarter. Projects may include, but are not limited to, the creation of program notes for concerts, quartets and/or
small singing groups, and other option approved by the instructor. Membership in this course is required to
participate in after school select vocal groups or to audition for the district/all-state level chorus. Students
may choose this honors option at the beginning of the school year with teacher approval.
Band
Course # 801
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Proven basic instrumental skills either through participation in band in earlier grades or through
private study. This class can be taken multiple times.
The H.S. Band is a performance-based course of study. Performance opportunities include the marching band, the
concert band, various seasonal “pep” bands, small ensembles, solo work and participation in a spring musical.
Commitment to this class will not be limited to classroom time. Rehearsals and performances are frequently
scheduled after school and attendance is mandatory. Students are responsible for the care and maintenance of all
school-owned instruments and uniforms.
Transfer students who meet basic skills standards are invited to join auditions at the discretion of the instructor.
Students who lack basic playing skills but have an interest in band participation may make arrangements with the
instructor for lessons.
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Performance opportunities in music festivals, exchange concerts and public forums locally and out of the
community may require fund-raising to help defray the cost. Students are expected to participate.
Credit is given to student members who meet their obligations pertaining to rehearsals and performance
commitments. Students are encouraged to participate in Stage Band, Instrumental Ensembles and Orchestra.
Practice schedule arranged.
Learn How to Read Music!
Course # 802
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students (not participating in band).
Have you always wanted to learn how to read music? Music is a lifelong pursuit and this class will give you the
skills to be able to understand the basic fundamentals of reading musical notation. The skills taught in this class will
be applied to playing various classroom instruments and composing simple songs.
Basic Art
Course # 807
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
This is an introductory class in materials and techniques. Fundamentals in drawing and paintings are stressed in
combination with a wide variety of media and combinations of media. Open to all students regardless of experience
or skills but who have a desire to express themselves in an artistic manner. Students are required to complete daily,
in-class projects that have been assigned by the teacher. It is strongly suggested that only self-motivated students
with the ability to work independently should enroll.
Painting
Course # 808
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Basic Art and Drawing with teacher recommendation.
This is a half-year introductory course that will explore a variety of painting techniques and mediums. Students will
work with tempera, water-color, acrylic and possibly even oil paints. The class will look at and discuss the works
and styles of other painters. Students will create original paintings of their own, as well as working on some largescale murals throughout the school building. Students who enjoy painting, being creative, and are self-motivated
should enroll in this course.
Intermediate Art
Course # 809
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Basic Art or teacher recommendation.
Continuation of Basic Art with same consideration of fundamentals. Students are introduced to problems in color,
design, perspective still life drawing, sketching and painting. A course designed for those students who may feel
they wish to investigate more of their artistic skills. At the end of each term, students will be required to research an
artist and make a presentation to the class.
Drawing
Course # 810
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5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Basic Art or teacher recommendation.
This course will allow the student to develop skills step by step with exercises in contour drawing, gesture drawing,
and the study of line, value, form, balance and composition. Subject matter will include, but is not limited to the
natural world and the environment both immediate and vast. Students will be encouraged to allow a personal style
to emerge as confidence and ability increase. Students will be urged to experiment with the concept of "abstraction"
and "fantasy." Students need to keep a sketchbook, as well as complete ten “final” drawings per term. Work
outside of class will be required.
Printmaking
Course # 811
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Basic Art.
Printmaking is an art form that explores a variety of techniques where students will run designs through a handcranked printing press to create mass quantities of prints. Students will experiment with a number of unique printing
types, including collagraph, monotype, etching, engraving and drypoint, low-relief linoleum and woodcut printing,
and gloss medium transfers, all printed on a variety of papers and surfaces.
Advanced Art
Course # 812
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Intermediate Art with teacher recommendation.
A must course for those students who are definitely considering an art career. Art history is included to develop
aesthetic awareness. Variety is stressed in style, approach and use of materials. Students upon completion of study
must present a portfolio of finest work.
Independent Art Portfolio
Course # 814
5 Periods
5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Advanced Art with teacher recommendation and Supervisor/Director
approval.
Students will choose four projects per term:
• Imaginative Self-Portrait, (any media and numbers), ink
• New logo for a company or organization, ink
• Four page travel brochure (layout, ink illustrations, paste-up)
• Book jacket design, any media
• Design a tissue box or shoe box, any media
• Detailed drawing of a skull, any view, along with an illustration, which includes a skull, pencil one free choice
(with instructor's approval) allowed as substitution for one project. A sketchbook of your ideas, miscellaneous
sketches, unfinished work, doodles, etc. is to be passed in at end of each term.
Video Editing
Course # 544
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
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Students will learn the basics of using a digital still and video camera. They will also learn to use a scanner in
combination with video and pictures they have imported to create a variety of video projects. The video software
that is taught in the class is Apples iMovie used to create video projects. Students will be responsible for filming cocurricular events after school hours as part of their portfolio and class participation.
Video Production
Course # 815
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Video Editing.
In this class the students will be introduced to the basic skills of video production. Throughout the semester these
skills should be developed and refined and to some degree mastered by the students. Then the students with be
introduced to the more elaborate skills involved in video production and during the reminder of the course should
work to be comfortable applying these skills at a basic level. At the conclusion of this course the students should
have mastered the basic skills and be able to use with prompting the more advanced skills.
Advanced Video Production
Course # 817
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Video Production. This course can be taken multiple times.
In this class the students will work to retain that skills developed in the first course and work to achieve mastery of
the more advanced skills. Through practice and projects the student should be able to independently produce video
using all of their acquired video production skills. The students should be able to master a required task.
Beginning Pottery
Course # 818
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Basic Art.
This course is intended to give students an introduction to pottery materials and techniques. Included will be
projects that cover the basics of clay such as; slab building, coil construction, pinch pots and throwing on the pottery
wheel. Students will develop skills while exploring form and function, and the history of pottery.
Advanced Pottery
Course # 819
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Beginning Pottery with teacher recommendation. This class can be taken
multiple times.
Building upon the skills developed in “Beginning Pottery,” students will creatively apply their skills toward their
artistic goals in Pottery II. In this pottery course, students will learn advanced, hand building, and glazing
techniques as well as gaining better proficiency with the pottery wheel. Students will be required to complete an
assignment using the potter’s wheel, and other assignments contained in this syllabi. Prerequisite: Beginning
Pottery
Wheelthrowing
Course # 820
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5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Beginning Pottery and have a teacher recommendation.
Wheelthrowing class will focus specifically on the area of pottery using the potter’s wheel. Students will spend the
term learning and perfecting the skill used to make functional pottery. We will also cover underglazing, glazing,
surface texture and design.
Introduction to Theatre
Course # 821
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students
This course is designed to introduce students to the many facets of Theatre Arts including theatre history,
improvisation, script writing, and acting. Actor training activities include warm-up exercises for the body and voice
as well as the study of characterization, motivation, concentration and relaxation. Acting experiences will include
pantomimes, improvisations, dramatic readings, and memorized scenes. Students will be required to attend and
create performances outside of the school setting.
Advanced Acting Studio Honors
Course # 825
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Introduction to Theatre #821 with a teacher recommendation. This course
can be taken multiple times.
This course is a continuation of Introduction to Theatre. Intensive training in voice, characterization, motivation,
concentration and relaxation for the actor is the focus of this course. The curriculum includes extensive working
monologues, scene work, script writing, and directing. Students will be required to attend and create various
performances outside of the school setting each term.
Technical Theater
Course # 826
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students
This half year course is designed to give students hands on technical theater experience. Instructional activities
include: stage management, set design and construction, lighting and sound design and execution, properties and
costume research, design and building and make-up design and application. Box office, program and marketing will
be explored as well. Students will be required to design and run the technical aspects of class room projects and
drama productions outside of the school setting.
Women in Film
Course # 827
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students
This half year course will allow students to view 15-18 major motion pictures that are by, for and about women.
Some outstanding classics as well as modern movies that are especially appropriate for family, teen and adult
audiences will be studied and critically analyzed for the telling of the story from a feminine perspective. Students
should come to understand the genre as another means of learning.
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Theatre Games and Improvisation
Course # 829
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students. This course can be taken multiple times.
The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the fundamentals of theatrical improvisation through
the use of theatre games and exercises. Students will be trained in the fundamental skills of the theater arts,
including acting techniques, body control, voice, diction, pantomime, creating of character, projection of ideas and
emotions, and acting of improvisational scenes.
The History of Rock Music
Course # 837
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
This class will study the evolution of rock music through the decades up to the present. Topics will examine how
rock music was affected by history and vice versa. Discover who your favorite bands/artists were inspired by!
Listening, class discussion and projects will be the core requirements of this class.
Learn How to Play an Instrument!
Course # 838
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Learn How to Read Music!
This class will teach students who have taken Learn How to Read Music! how to apply the concepts they learned in
that class to an instrument. Students will learn proper technique and apply that to instrumental music. Performance
and crossover opportunities with the SHS Band and Pep Band will also be available.
Music Composition and Arranging
Course # 839
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Band member or successful completion of Learn How to Read Music!
This course is designed for students who want to take their knowledge of music to the next level. This class will
cover compositional techniques in the traditional and electronic areas. Students will use computer programs like
Finale and Garage Band to write their own songs. The class will be rigorous and heavily project-based.
Communications Workshop
Course # 065
5 Periods
2.5 Credits
Prerequisites: Open to all students.
This half-year course is designed to help students develop and strengthen the skills of speaking, listening, and
writing. Students will acquire skills necessary for successful job interviews, public presentations and appropriate
electronic communication. Students will improve these skills by preparing and delivering a variety of speeches and
presentations for different audiences and purposes, participating in small group and panel discussions, and
evaluating professional speeches and those of their peers.
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Wellness
The Wellness Department offers modules in which the students learn fundamental health concepts and skills that
foster healthy habits and behaviors. Through a combined and coordinated teaching of health education, physical
education, and family and consumer science, starting in grade 9 and continuing through grade 12, these modules will
enable the individual to make healthier lifestyle choices.
Wellness 1
Course # 911
2.5 Credits
5 Periods
Prerequisites: Required for all freshman.
As a requirement of this course, students must complete a minimum of 12 hours of community service in order to be
eligible to pass this course.
Wellness 2
Course # 912
2.5 Credits
5 Periods
Prerequisites: Required for second year students.
As a requirement of this course, students must complete a minimum of 12 hours of community service in order to be
eligible to pass this course.
Wellness 3
Course # 913
2.5 Credits
5 Periods
Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses 911 and 912.
As a requirement of this course, students must complete a minimum of 12 hours of community service in order to be
eligible to pass this course.
Students will be instructed in the fundamental skills and the rules of a number of varied team activities including
football, soccer, softball, volleyball, floor hockey and basketball. Students will also be exposed to non-competitive
individual leisure sports. These activities include walking for health, weight training, aerobic exercise, and other
selected activities. A classroom module on drug education and sexuality will be included along with CPR recertification class. Students may also be exposed to a Scared Straight Program or other pro-active prevention
programs.
Wellness 4
Course # 914
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2.5 Credits
5 Periods
Prerequisites: Successful completion of course 913.
As a requirement of this course, students must complete a minimum of 12 hours of community service in order to be
eligible to pass this course.
Students will be instructed in the fundamental skills and the rules of a number of varied team activities including
football, soccer, softball, volleyball, floor hockey and basketball Students will also exposed be to non-competitive
individual leisure sports. These activities include walking for health, weight training, aerobic exercise, and other
selected activities. A classroom module on drug education and sexuality will be included along with CPR recertification class. Students may also be exposed to a Scared Straight Program or other pro-active prevention
programs.
Intro to Athletic Training
Course # 915
2.5 Credits
5 Periods
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with teacher recommendation. This course does not meet
wellness graduation requirements.
Entry-level course designed to introduce the potential coach or athletic trainer to the field of athletic training. Basic
care and prevention of athletic injuries will be dealt with in order to equip the coach or trainer with the knowledge to
make intelligent decisions regarding common athletic injuries. It will also include some taping techniques. External
class hours are mandatory for successful completion of this course. Students will assist the athletic trainer
during practices, games and office hours.
Intro to Sports Management
Course # 917
2.5 Credits
5 Periods
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with teacher recommendation. This course does not meet
wellness graduation requirements.
Entry-level course designed to introduce this highly sought after field of study. Students will learn the different
aspects of Sports Management, such as Athletic Administration, Sports Broadcasting, Sports Law, Sports
Marketing, Public Relations, and Event/ Facility Management. External hours are required for successful completion
of this course. Students will assist the Athletic Director during home game-day events with ticket sales, concessions,
announcements, etc.
Intro to Health Care
Course # 920
2.5 Credits
5 Periods
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with teacher recommendation. This course does not meet
wellness graduation requirements.
This course is an introductory course for students who wish to pursue a career in a medical/health related
occupation. Education requirements and job responsibilities for various health careers will be explored, along with
basic concepts common to all health careers. These concepts include: medical terminology, basic anatomy and
physiology, infection control, professionalism, legal and business aspects of health care and health care work
environments.
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Stress Management
Course # 921
2.5 Credits
5 Periods
Prerequisites: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 with teacher recommendation. This course does not meet
wellness graduation requirements.
This course will provide an in-depth exploration of stress, its origins, physiological and psychological effects, and
methods of stress management. Most of the course will be devoted to the practice of stress management/relaxation
methods, including: deep breathing, meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, aromatherapy, yoga, and Tai Chi.
Students will be asked to bring a yoga/exercise mat.
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