Building Conceptual Understanding and Fluency

Building Conceptual Understanding and Fluency
GRADE
1
Building Conceptual Understanding
and Fluency Through Games
F O R T H E C O M M O N C O R E STAT E STA N DA R D S I N M AT H E M AT I C S
PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NORTH CAROLINA
State Board of Education | Department of Public Instruction
K-12 MATHEMATICS
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/curriculum/mathematics/
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Building Conceptual Understanding and Fluency Through Games
Developing fluency requires a balance and connection between conceptual understanding and computational proficiency. Computational
methods that are over-practiced without understanding are forgotten or remembered incorrectly. Conceptual understanding without
fluency can inhibit the problem solving process. – NCTM, Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, pg. 35
WHY PLAY GAMES?
People of all ages love to play games. They are fun and motivating. Games provide students with
opportunities to explore fundamental number concepts, such as the counting sequence, one-to-one
correspondence, and computation strategies. Engaging mathematical games can also encourage students
to explore number combinations, place value, patterns, and other important mathematical concepts.
Further, they provide opportunities for students to deepen their mathematical understanding and reasoning.
Teachers should provide repeated opportunities for students to play games, and let the mathematical ideas
emerge as they notice new patterns, relationships, and strategies. Games are an important tool for learning.
Here are some advantages for integrating games into elementary mathematics classrooms:
•Playing games encourages strategic mathematical thinking as students find different strategies for
solving problems and it deepens their understanding of numbers.
•Games, when played repeatedly, support students’ development of computational fluency.
•Games provide opportunities for practice, often without the need for teachers to provide the problems.
Teachers can then observe or assess students, or work with individual or small groups of students.
•Games have the potential to develop familiarity with the number system and with “benchmark
numbers” – such as 10s, 100s, and 1000s and provide engaging opportunities to practice
computation, building a deeper understanding of operations.
•Games provide a school to home connection. Parents can learn about their children’s mathematical
thinking by playing games with them at home.
For students to become fluent
BUILDING FLUENCY
Developing computational fluency is an expectation of the Common Core State Standards. Games
provide opportunity for meaningful practice. The research about how students develop fact mastery
indicates that drill techniques and timed tests do not have the power that mathematical games and
other experiences have. Appropriate mathematical activities are essential building blocks to develop
mathematically proficient students who demonstrate computational fluency (Van de Walle & Lovin,
Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics Grades K-3, pg. 94). Remember, computational fluency includes
efficiency, accuracy, and flexibility with strategies (Russell, 2000).
ability to do mathematics.
The kinds of experiences teachers provide to their students clearly play a major role in determining
the extent and quality of students’ learning. Students’ understanding can be built by actively engaging
in tasks and experiences designed to deepen and connect their knowledge. Procedural fluency and
conceptual understanding can be developed through problem solving, reasoning, and argumentation
(NCTM, Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, pg. 21). Meaningful practice is necessary
to develop fluency with basic number combinations and strategies with multi-digit numbers. Practice
should be purposeful and should focus on developing thinking strategies and a knowledge of number
relationships rather than drill isolated facts (NCTM, Principles and Standards for School Mathematics,
pg. 87). Do not subject any student to computation drills unless the student has developed an efficient
strategy for the facts included in the drill (Van de Walle & Lovin, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics
Grades K-3, pg. 117). Drill can strengthen strategies with which students feel comfortable – ones they
“own” – and will help to make these strategies increasingly automatic. Therefore, drill of strategies will
allow students to use them with increased efficiency, even to the point of recalling the fact without being
conscious of using a strategy. Drill without an efficient strategy present offers no assistance (Van de
Walle & Lovin, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics Grades K-3, pg. 117).
CAUTIONS
Sometimes teachers use games solely to practice number facts. These games usually do not engage
children for long because they are based on students’ recall or memorization of facts. Some students are
quick to memorize, while others need a few moments to use a related fact to compute. When students
are placed in situations in which recall speed determines success, they may infer that being “smart”
in mathematics means getting the correct answer quickly instead of valuing the process of thinking.
Consequently, students may feel incompetent when they use number patterns or related facts to arrive at
a solution and may begin to dislike mathematics because they are not fast enough.
in arithmetic computation, they
must have efficient and accurate
methods that are supported by
an understanding of numbers and
operations. “Standard” algorithms
for arithmetic computation are one
means of achieving this fluency.
– N
CTM, Principles and Standards
for School Mathematics, pg. 35
Overemphasizing fast fact recall
at the expense of problem solving
and conceptual experiences gives
students a distorted idea of the
nature of mathematics and of their
– S
eeley, Faster Isn’t Smarter:
Messages about Math,
Teaching, and Learning in the
21st Century, pg. 95
Computational fluency refers to
having efficient and accurate
methods for computing. Students
exhibit computational fluency
when they demonstrate flexibility
in the computational methods they
choose, understand and can explain
these methods, and produce
accurate answers efficiently.
– NCTM, Principles and Standards
for School Mathematics, pg. 152
Fluency refers to having efficient,
accurate, and generalizable methods
(algorithms) for computing that are
based on well-understood properties
and number relationships.
– N
CTM, Principles and Standards
for School Mathematics, pg. 144
i
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
INTRODUCE A GAME
A good way to introduce a game to the class is for the teacher to play the game against the class. After briefly explaining the rules,
ask students to make the class’s next move. Teachers may also want to model their strategy by talking aloud for students to hear
his/her thinking. “I placed my game marker on 6 because that would give me the largest number.”
Games are fun and can create a context for developing students’ mathematical reasoning. Through playing and analyzing games,
students also develop their computational fluency by examining more efficient strategies and discussing relationships among
numbers. Teachers can create opportunities for students to explore mathematical ideas by planning questions that prompt
students to reflect about their reasoning and make predictions. Remember to always vary or modify the game to meet the needs of
your leaners. Encourage the use of the Standards for Mathematical Practice.
HOLDING STUDENTS ACCOUNTABLE
While playing games, have students record mathematical equations or representations of the mathematical tasks. This provides
data for students and teachers to revisit to examine their mathematical understanding.
After playing a game, have students reflect on the game by asking them to discuss questions orally or write about them in a
mathematics notebook or journal:
1. What skill did you review and practice?
2.What strategies did you use while playing the game?
3.I f you were to play the game a second time, what different strategies would you use to be more successful?
4.How could you tweak or modify the game to make it more challenging?
A Special Thank-You
The development of the NC Department of Public Instruction Document, Building Conceptual Understanding and Fluency Through
Games was a collaborative effort with a diverse group of dynamic teachers, coaches, administrators, and NCDPI staff. We are
very appreciative of all of the time, support, ideas, and suggestions made in an effort to provide North Carolina with quality support
materials for elementary level students and teachers. The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction appreciates any
suggestions and feedback, which will help improve upon this resource. Please send all correspondence to Kitty Rutherford
(kitty.rutherford@dpi.nc.gov) or Denise Schulz (denise.schulz@dpi.nc.gov)
GAME DESIGN TEAM
The Game Design Team led the work of creating this support document. With support of their school and district, they volunteered
their time and effort to develop Building Conceptual Understanding and Fluency Through Games.
Erin Balga, Math Coach, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
Kitty Rutherford, NCDPI Elementary Consultant
Robin Beaman, First Grade Teacher, Lenoir County
Denise Schulz, NCDPI Elementary Consultant
Emily Brown, Math Coach, Thomasville City Schools
Allison Eargle, NCDPI Graphic Designer
Leanne Barefoot Daughtry, District Office, Johnston County
Renée E. McHugh, NCDPI Graphic Designer
Ryan Dougherty, District Office, Union County
Paula Gambill, First Grade Teacher, Hickory City Schools
Tami Harsh, Fifth Grade teacher, Currituck County
Patty Jordan, Instructional Resource Teacher, Wake County
Tania Rollins, Math Coach, Ashe County
Natasha Rubin, Fifth Grade Teacher, Vance County
Dorothie Willson, Kindergarten Teacher, Jackson County
3
ii
First Grade – Standards
1. D
eveloping understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for
addition and subtraction within 20 – Students develop strategies for
adding and subtracting whole numbers based on their prior work with
small numbers. They use a variety of models, including discrete objects
and length-based models (e.g., cubes connected to form lengths), to
model add-to, take-from, put-together, take-apart, and compare situations
to develop meaning for the operations of addition and subtraction, and
to develop strategies to solve arithmetic problems with these operations.
Students understand connections between counting and addition and
subtraction (e.g., adding two is the same as counting on two). They
use properties of addition to add whole numbers and to create and
use increasingly sophisticated strategies based on these properties
(e.g., “making tens”) to solve addition and subtraction problems within
20. By comparing a variety of solution strategies, children build their
understanding of the relationship between addition and subtraction.
2. Developing understanding of whole number relationship and place
value, including grouping in tens and ones – Students develop, discuss,
and use efficient, accurate, and generalizable methods to add within 100
and subtract multiples of 10. The compare whole numbers (at least to 100) to
develop understanding of and solve problems involving their relative sizes.
They think of whole numbers between 10 and 100 in terms of tens and ones
(especially recognizing the numbers 11 to 19 as composed of a ten and
some ones). Through activities that build number sense, they understand the
order of the counting numbers and their relative magnitudes.
OPERATIONS AND ALGEBRAIC THINKING
Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
1.OA.1 Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems
involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking
apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using
objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown
number to represent the problem. (Note: See Glossary, Table 1.)
1.OA.2 Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers
whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects,
drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to
represent the problem.
Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship
between addition and subtraction.
1.OA.3 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract.
(Note: Students need not use formal terms for these properties.)
Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known.
(Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second
two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12.
(Associative property of addition.)
1.OA.4 Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For
example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when
added to 8.
Add and subtract within 20.
1.OA.5 Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to
add 2).
1.OA.6 Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and
subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten
(e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading
to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship
between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one
knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums
(e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
3. D
eveloping understanding of linear measurement and measuring lengths as
iterating length units – Students develop an understanding of the meaning and
processes of measurement, including underlying concepts such as iterating
(the mental activity of building up the length of an object with equal-sized units)
and the transitivity principle for indirect measurement. (Note: students should
apply the principle of transitivity of measurement to make direct comparisons,
but they need not use this technical term.)
4. Reasoning about attributes of, and composing and decomposing
geometric shapes – Students compose and decompose plane or solid
figures (e.g., put two triangles together to make a quadrilateral) and
build understanding of part-whole relationships as well as the properties
of the original and composite shapes. As they combine shapes, they
recognize them from different perspectives and orientations, describe
their geometric attributes, and determine how they are alike and different,
to develop the background for measurement and for initial understandings
of properties such as congruence and symmetry.
MATHEMATICAL PRACTICES
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Work with addition and subtraction equations.
1.OA.7 Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if
equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For
example, which of the following equations are true and which are
false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.
1.OA.8 Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction
equation relating to three whole numbers. For example, determine
the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the
equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = o – 3, 6 + 6 = o.
NUMBER AND OPERATIONS IN BASE TEN
Extend the counting sequence.
1.NBT.1 Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range,
read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a
written numeral.
Understand place value.
1.NBT.2 Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent
amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:
a. 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones – called a “ten.”
b. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two,
three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
c. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two,
three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).
1.NBT.3 Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and
ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols
>, =, and <.
Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
1.NBT.4 Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit
number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using
concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value,
properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition
and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain
the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers,
one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is
necessary to compose a ten.
1.NBT.5 G
iven a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the
number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used.
1.NBT.6 Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 from multiples of 10
in the range 10-90 (positive or zero differences), using concrete
models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties
of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and
subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the
reasoning used.
MEASUREMENT AND DATA
Measure lengths indirectly and by iterating length units.
1.MD.1 Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects
indirectly by using a third object.
1.MD.2 Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by
laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end;
understand that the length measurement of an object is the number
of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit
to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole
number of length units with no gaps or overlaps.
Tell and write time.
1.MD.3 Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks.
Represent and interpret data.
1.MD.4 Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories;
ask and answer questions about the total number of data points,
how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one
category than in another.
GEOMETRY
Reason with shapes and their attributes.
1.G.1 Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and
three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation,
overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.
1.G.2 Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids,
triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional
shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right
circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new
shapes from the composite shape. (Note: Students do not need to
learn formal names such as “right rectangular prism.”)
1.G.3 Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares,
describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and
use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole
as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that
decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.
Table of Contents
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Table of Contents
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Waddle, Waddle, Splat!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nutty Buddies 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nutty Buddies 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plus “1”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shorty Forty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Outer Space Chase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
King Steven. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Color Caper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cover Up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Double Up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A Bunch of Fun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bear Races. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Concentration 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Move It Addition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moooove It! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Target Twelve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Four’s A Winner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gone Fishing 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gone Fishing 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gone Fishing 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
True or False?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Balance Your Partner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Under the Rug. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What’s My Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.OA.1 and 1.OA.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.OA.3 and 1.OA.6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.OA.3 and 1.OA.6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.OA.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.OA.5 and 1.OA.6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.OA.5 and 1.OA.6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
1.OA.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
1.OA.6 and 1.NBT.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
1.OA.6 and 1.NBT.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
1.OA.6 and 1.NBT.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
1.OA.7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
1.OA.7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
1.OA.8 and 1.OA.4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
1.OA.8 and 1.OA.4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Number and Operations in Base Ten
Skidoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scoop-De-Doo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nifty Fifty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gone Fishing 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gone Fishing 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gone Fishing 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Big Cheese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.NBT.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
1.NBT.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
1.NBT.2 and 1.NBT.4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
1.NBT.2 and 1.OA.6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
1.NBT.2 and 1.OA.6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
1.NBT.2 and 1.OA.6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
1.NBT.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Measurement and Data
Tick Tock Clock 3 in a Row. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.MD.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Time Concentration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.MD.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Geometry
XXXXX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XXX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XX
1
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.1 and 1.OA.2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Waddle, Waddle, Splat!
Building Fluency:adding and subtracting within 20
Materials: gameboard, markers, word problem cards, paper or manipulatives
Number of Players: 2-3
Directions:
1.Place the word problem cards face down on the gameboard.
2.Player 1 chooses the top word problem from the deck and reads it to Player 2.
3.If Player 2 adds to solve the problem, they waddle forward 1 space. If Player 2 subtracts to solve the problem, they waddle forward 2 spaces.
4.Players take turns drawing cards and solving problems.
5.The first player to waddle to the pond is the winner.
Variation/Extension: Students solve problems in their math notebooks.
Boo Hoo!
Waddle back
1 space
Caught in
the current.
Move Forward
1 space.
Lucky Duck!
Move Forward
1 space.
WINNER
Stop to play in
the waterfall.
Lose a turn!
START
Word Problem Cards
2
WADDLE, WADDLE, SPLAT! CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
There are eight buses in the school.
If four are sent to pick up children,
how many buses are still at school?
Alli went to the store. She bought
three red apples and five yellow apples.
How many apples did Alli buy?
8-4=4
3+5=8
A zoo has 11 black bears and 8 brown
bears. How many bears are at the zoo?
Samantha had five hair bows. If she
gave two hair bows to her friend, how
many hair bows does she have left?
11+ 8 =19
Emily and John bought nine purple
flowers and five white flowers. How
many flowers did they buy?
9 + 5 =14
Julie baked 8 chocolate chip
cookies, 3 sugar cookies and
2 peanut butter cookies.
How many cookies did Julie bake?
8 + 3 +2 =13
5 -2 = 3
Carson and Ellie counted eight birds
in the tree at school. Later they saw
eight birds in a tree at home. How
many birds did they see that day?
8 + 8 =16
Sam has nine balloons, 6 are pink
and the rest are purple. How many
balloons are purple?
9-6=3
7 ducks, 2 frogs and 1 swan are
swimming in the pond. How many
animals are in the pond?
Jason ate seven cookies and Madison
ate two cookies. How many more
cookies did Jason eat than Madison?
7+2+1=10
7-2 = 5
3
WADDLE, WADDLE, SPLAT! CONTINUED, Page 3
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Ian bought 3 packs of baseball cards.
Each pack has 4 cards. How many
cards does Ian have?
Pierce got three new CDs on his
birthday. He already had nine CDs.
How many CDs does he have now?
4 + 4 + 4 =12
3 + 9 =12
I saw 2 cats and 1 dog outside.
How many legs did I see?
Seven birds were sitting on a
tree branch. A ‘BANG’ scared some
of them away. Now there are
three on the branch. How many
birds were scared away?
8 + 4 =12 or 4 + 4 + 4 =12
7- 3 = 4
Sixteen umbrellas are by the
front door. Five of the umbrellas are
red. The rest are yellow. How many
umbrellas are yellow?
16 - 5 =11
Six girls and three boys went
to school. How many more
girls than boys went?
6-3=3
At the pet store I saw 5 hamsters,
6 fish and 4 lizards for sale. How
many pets did I see for sale?
5 + 6 + 4 =19
Harry bought seven erasers and
two pencils. How many more erasers
than pencils did Harry buy?
7-2 = 5
Mom had three blue hats and nine pink
hats. How many hats did she have?
3 + 9 =12
Wilma ran five miles on Tuesday
and three miles on Thursday. How
many more miles did Wilma run on
Tuesday than Thursday?
5-3=2
4
WADDLE, WADDLE, SPLAT! CONTINUED, Page 4
Maci has fifteen pocketbooks.
Amber has eight pocketbooks.
How many more pocketbooks does
Maci have than Amber?
15 - 8 =7
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
There were three cars. Three people
were in each car. How many people
were there in all?
3+3+3=9
The kids had three footballs
and eight baseballs. How many
balls did the kids have?
Olivia ate 1 potato, 7 green beans
and 6 baby carrots. How many
vegetables did Olivia eat?
3 + 8 =11
1+7+ 6 =14
Five cookies were on the table.
Cameron ate some cookies. Then
there were three cookies. How
many cookies did Cameron eat?
Tonya invites 15 friends to her party.
Two of her friends were unable to
come to her party. How many of Tonya’s
friends will come to her party?
5-3=2
15 -2 =13
Alli has some marbles in her pocket.
Five of the marbles are pink. The other
eight are yellow. How many marbles
does Alli have in her pocket?
Thomas played 3 baseball games one
week. He played 6 baseball games the
next week. He played 0 baseball games
the third week. How many baseball
games did Thomas play?
5 + 8 =13
Robin made 7 phone calls on Saturday.
She made 3 phone calls on Sunday.
How many more phone calls did Robin
make on Saturday than on Sunday?
7- 3 = 4
3+6+0=9
Two frogs were sitting on a log.
Six more frogs hop there.
How many frogs are there now.
2+ 6 = 8
5
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.3 and 1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
6
Nutty Buddies 1
Building Fluency: adding within 20
Materials: gameboard, pair of dice, 15 game markers per player
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1.Each player places all of their game markers on any number on their gameboard. There may be more than one marker on a number.
2.Each player takes a turn rolling the dice and finding the sum.
3.The player may remove one cube from the sum that was rolled.
4.If there is not a marker to take off the gameboard, the player loses the turn.
5.The player that clears their gameboard first is the winner.
Variation/Extension: Players can roll the dice and subtract that sum from 14.
PLAYER 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
PLAYER 2
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.3 and 1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
7
Nutty Buddies 2
Building Fluency: adding within 20
Materials: gameboard, 3 die, 16 game markers per player
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1.Each player places all of their game markers on any number on their gameboard. There may be more than one marker on a number.
2.Each player takes a turn rolling the dice and finding the sum.
3.The player may remove one cube from the sum that was rolled.
4.If there is not a marker to take off the gameboard, the player loses the turn.
5.The player that clears their gameboard first is the winner.
PLAYER 1
Variation/Extension: Players can roll the dice and subtract that sum from 21.
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
PLAYER 2
3
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.5
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Plus “1”
Building Fluency: relate counting to addition and subtraction
Materials: gameboard, die, 12 markers for each player
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1.Players take turns.
2.Each turn, a player rolls the die and adds 1 to the number of dots.
3.The player covers the sum on his gameboard.
4.Only one number may be covered at a turn.
5.If the sum is already covered, the player loses a turn.
6.The first player to cover all sums is the winner.
Variation/Extension: Use a blank gameboard to create a different game. Students can add a different number,
use a different die (1-9) or digit cards.
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
PLAYER 1
PLAYER 2
8
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.5 and 1.OA.6
GRADE 1
Shorty Forty
Building Fluency: adding and subtracting within 20
Materials: pair of dice, 40 cubes per player
Number of Players: 2-4
Directions:
1.Players take turns
2.Each turn, a player rolls the dice and adds the number together.
3.Then, the player subtracts the sum from 20.
4.The player collects that number of cubes.
5.As cubes are collected, players should compose tens when able.
6.The first player to reach 4 tens is the winner
Variation/Extension: Players can change the number of tens that need to be composed.
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
9
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.5 and 1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Outer Space Chase
Building Fluency: adding and subtracting within 20
Materials: gameboard, pair of dice, game marker for each player
Number of Players: 2-3
Directions:
1.Players take turns.
2.Each turn, a player rolls the dice and adds the numbers.
3.Then, the player subtracts the sum from 12.
4.If the difference is on the next star, the player may move ahead.
5.If the difference is not on the next star, the player loses their turn.
6.The game continues until a player reaches the flying saucer.
Variation/Extension: Players can change the number of die they use and subtract from a different number.
2
4
9
5
6
2
1
8
4
10
1
7
8
6
11
7
3
0
10
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
King Seven
Building Fluency: adding within 20
Materials: gameboard, pair of dice, game marker for each player
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1.Players take turns rolling the dice and adding.
2.If the sum is larger than seven, player 1 moves one space.
3.If the sum is smaller than seven, player 2 moves one space.
4.If the sum is seven exactly, no one moves.
5.The first person to reach the crown is the winner.
PLAYER 2
PLAYER 1
Variation/Extension: Players could roll 3 die. If the sum is greater than 10, Player 1 moves.
If the sum is smaller than 10, Player 2 moves. If the sum is exactly 10, no one moves.
7
11
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Cover Up
Building Fluency: adding/subtracting within 20
Materials: gameboard for each player, cubes, die
Number of Players: 2-3
Directions:
1.Players take turns.
2.Each turn, a player rolls a die, collects that number of markers, and places the markers on their gameboard.
3.Each turn, the player tells how many markers are on their gameboard.
4.Then, the player tells how many more markers they need to cover the board completely.
5.The first player to cover the board exactly is the winner.
Variation/Extension: Players can begin with the gameboard covered and remove cubes on each roll. Then tell how many cubes
are on the board and how many more need to be removed to uncover the board completely.
12
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Double Up
Building Fluency: adding within 20
Materials: gameboard, set of dominoes, colored game markers for each player
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1. Place all the dominoes face down.
2.Players take turns drawing a domino and adding the dots.
3.If a player finds a double, the player puts a marker on the matching double on the gameboard.
4.Play continues until all doubles are found. The winner is the player with the most doubles.
Variation/Extension: Players can remove the 11 and 12 domino, then play by drawing two dominoes and adding the two dominoes
together. Each player could write the number sentence in their math notebook.
13
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
A Bunch of Fun
Building Fluency: subtracting within 20
Materials: gameboard, pair of dice, game markers
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1.Players take turns.
2.Roll the dice.
3.Subtract the smaller number from the larger number.
4.Cover the difference on a grape in your bunch.
5.The winner is the person that covers all of their grapes first.
Variation/Extension: Use one die and subtract from 10. Create your own gameboard.
PLAYER 1
PLAYER 2
4
3
2
1
0
4 5
3
2
1
4
3
2
1
0
4 5
3
2
1
14
A BUNCH OF FUN CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
PLAYER _____
PLAYER _____
15
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
16
Bear Races
Building Fluency: subtracting within 10
Materials: gameboard, one die, one marker per player
Number of Players: 2-3
Directions:
1.Players take turns.
2.Roll the die.
3.Subtract that number from 10.
4.Move the marker than many spaces.
5.The player that reaches the finish first is the winner.
Variation/Extension: Players can roll two dice, add them together, and move that many spaces. Players can roll two die, subtract
that number from 20, and move that many spaces.
Time Out,
Go Back
3 Spaces.
START
Good Work!
Go Ahead
2 Spaces.
Go Back
2 spaces.
FINISH
Great! Roll
Again!
Delay!
Lose a
Turn.
Too Fast!
Go Back
2 Spaces.
Mud Slide!
Go Back
3 Spaces.
Detour! Lose
a Turn.
A Prize!
Move Ahead
3 spaces.
Delay,
Go Back
1 Space.
Lucky!
Roll Again!
Oops!
Go Back
1 Space.
Wait Here
1 Turn.
Lose a
Turn!
Wrong Way,
Go Back
4 Spaces.
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.6
GRADE 1
Concentration 1
Building Fluency: adding within 20
Materials: set of number facts cards (predetermine which number facts students should
work with), set of digit cards (cards should match number fact cards)
Number of Players: 2-4
Directions:
1.Place the cards face down on the table.
2.Players take turns drawing two cards.
3.If the cards match, the player keeps the cards.
4.The winner is the player with the most cards when all the cards are matched.
Variation/Extension: Change the number of cards or the sets of cards for the game.
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
17
CONCENTRATION 1 CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
1+1
1+7
1+13
1+19
1+2
1+8
1+14
2+2
1+3
1+9
1+15
2+3
1+4
1+10
1+16
2+4
1+5
1+11
1+17
2+5
1+6
1+12
1+18
2+6
2+7
2+13
3+3
3+9
18
CONCENTRATION 1 CONTINUED, Page 3
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
2+8
2+14
3+4
3+10
2+9
2+15
3+5
3+11
2+10
2+16
3+6
3+12
2+11
2+17
3+7
3+13
2+12
2+18
3+8
3+14
4+4
4+5
4+8
4+11
5+5
4+6
4+9
4+12
19
CONCENTRATION 1 CONTINUED, Page 4
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
5+6
4+7
4+10
4+13
3+15
4+14
5+13
6+12
3+16
4+15
5+14
6+13
3+17
4+16
5+15
6+14
5+7
6+6
8+10
7+11
5+8
6+7
8+11
7+12
5+9
6+8
7+7
7+13
20
CONCENTRATION 1 CONTINUED, Page 5
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
5+10
6+9
7+8
8+12
5+11
6+10
7+9
8+8
5+12
6+11
7+10
8+9
9+9
9+10
9+11
10+10
2
3
6
7
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
21
CONCENTRATION 1 CONTINUED, Page 6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
4
4
6
7
5
5
6
7
8
8
8
8
9
9
9
9
10
10
10
10
10
11
11
11
11
11
12
12
22
CONCENTRATION 1 CONTINUED, Page 7
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
12
12
12
12
13
13
13
13
13
13
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
16
16
16
16
23
CONCENTRATION 1 CONTINUED, Page 8
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
16
16
16
16
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
24
CONCENTRATION 1 CONTINUED, Page 9
19
GRADE 1
19
20
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
20
25
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Move It Addition
Building Fluency: adding within 20
Materials: gameboard, 8 markers of one color for each player, pair of dice
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1. Players take turns.
2.Roll the dice and add the dots to find the sum.
3.Place a marker on that number.
4.If the number already has an opponent’s marker on it, the player may “move” that marker off the board and return the marker to the opponent.
5.The game ends when one player has used all of their markers.
Variation/Extension: There is an additional game board with larger numbers. Players can use number cards 0-9 and draw two cards.
2
9
7
6
7
10
3
8
8
4
9
5
6
11
5
10
12
7
4
9
26
MOVE IT ADDITION CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
18
14
12
4
16
4
10
11
4
7
8
3
6
10
5
10
14
8
18
4
27
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
28
Moooove It!
Building Fluency: subtracting within 20
Materials: gameboard, eight markers of one color for each player, pair of dice
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1.Player take turns.
2.Roll the dice and subtract the smaller number from the larger number.
3.Place a marker on that number.
4.If the number already has an opponent’s marker on it, the player may “move” that marker off the board and return it to the opponent.
5.The winner is the player that has used all his or her markers.
Variation/Extension: Roll the dice and subtract from 20; use an additional game board
5
1
3
0
2
5
4
4
0
3
1
2
2
2
4
0
1
3
5
3
MOOOOVE IT! CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
18
14
12
4
16
4
10
11
4
7
8
3
6
10
5
10
14
8
18
4
29
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Target Twelve
Building Fluency: adding within 20 using up to 3 addends
Materials: three die for each player, 25 cubes, recording sheet
Number of Players: 2
12
Directions:
1.Each player rolls 2 dice.
2. They should record the addition problem on their recording sheet.
3.The player may decide to keep the sum or to roll a third die and add.
4.The winner of the round is the player whose sum (from either 2 or 3 die) is closest to 12.
5.The winner collects a cube.
6.The first person to collect 12 cubes is the winner.
Variation/Extension: Play to a different sum.
ROLL 1
Number Sentence
Sum
ROLL 2
Number Sentence
Sum
2+3
5
2+3+4
9
6+5
11
Closest to 12
30
TARGET TWELVE CONTINUED, PAGE 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
PLAYER _______
ROLL 1
Number Sentence
Sum
ROLL 2
Number Sentence
Sum
Closest to 12
31
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.6
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Four’s A Winner
Building Fluency: adding within 20
Materials: gameboard, two paperclips, different colored game markers for each player
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1.Player 1 picks two numbers.
2.Put the paperclips on those numbers.
3.Add the numbers to find the sum.
4.Put a marker on the sum.
5.Player 2 moves one paperclip to a new number.
6.Add the numbers to find the sum and put a marker on that sum.
7.The winner is the first player to get four in a row.
Variation/Extension: Players can add numbers together and subtract the sum from 20. Players can create their own gameboard.
Players cannot cross paperclips.
16
1
12
13
4
6
17
8
9
10
2
13
14
5
16
10
8
11
2
13
15
6
7
18
9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
32
FOUR’S A WINNER CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
33
Operations and Algebraic Thinking • 1.OA.6 & Number and Operations in Base Ten • 1.NBT.2
GRADE 1 • NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
34
Gone Fishing 1
6
Building Fluency: adding within 12
3
4
Materials: gameboard, pair of dice, 8 markers for each player
Number of Players: 2
7
7
9
8
Directions:
1.Players take turns.
2.Roll the dice, add the numbers, and mark
the sum on the gameboard.
3.The winner is the first player to get 8 markers
on the board.
Variations: Use playing cards and remove all
the face cards. Try to cover 10 spots.
8
4
10 2 11
10
7 9
8
7
8
11
5
6
7
7
9
3
10
5
Operations and Algebraic Thinking • 1.OA.6 & Number and Operations in Base Ten • 1.NBT.2
GRADE 1 • NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
19
Gone Fishing 2
Building Fluency: adding within 20
16
18
20
14
16
13
Directions:
1.Players take turns.
2.Roll the number cube, add the numbers, and
mark the sum on the gameboard.
3.The winner is the first player to get 8 markers
on the board.
14
Number of Players: 2
15
Materials: gameboard, number cubes (included), 8 markers for each player
35
Variations: Use playing cards and remove all
the face cards. Try to cover 10 spots.
19
17 13
15
14
17
20
13
14
15
17
18
16
18
19
19
20
15
17
13
20
18
16
GONE FISHING 2 CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
7
9
8
9
8
7
36
GONE FISHING 2 CONTINUED, Page 3
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
6
7
8
10
11
9
37
GONE FISHING 3 CONTINUED, Page 3
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
7
ones
5
ones
8
ones
7
ones
5
ones
6
ones
38
Operations and Algebraic Thinking • 1.OA.6 & Number and Operations in Base Ten • 1.NBT.2
GRADE 1 • NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
39
GONE FISHING 3 CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
BUILDING CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING & FLUENCY THROUGH GAME
40
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.7
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
41
True or False?
Building Fluency: understand the meaning of the equal sign
Materials: gameboard, game cards, marker for each player
Number of Players: 2-4
Directions:
1.Players take turns.
2.Draw a card and determine if the equation is true or false.
3.If the equation is true, the player moves forward 2 spaces.
4.If the equation is false, the player moves forward 1 space.
5.The winner is the player that reaches the finish line first.
Skip a
space!
Variation/Extension: Students can rewrite false equations to make them true
or create their own cards.
START
Move
forward
1 space!
Place
Cards
Here
Skip a
space!
FINISH
Move
forward
1 space!
Go back
4 spaces!
Lose
a turn!
Move
back 2
spaces!
14 - 9 = 5
12 - 8 = 5
5+2=4+4
3+6=1+5
7 + 6 = 15 - 2
8 + 7 = 15
3+5=2+6
1+8=4+5
3+3=9
4-2=9-5
4+7=9+2
2+3=7+1
GRADE 1
•
4+2=1+6
3+4=4+3
7-2=8-5
4+5=9
TRUE OR FALSE? CONTINUED, Page 2
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
42
5-2=3
8-2=6
9-5=3
10 - 5 = 4
6+4=5+5
11 - 2 = 9
9-4=5
8-2=7
3+2=0+5
9-6=3
3-2=1
GRADE 1
•
11 - 4 = 7
12 - 5 = 9
12 - 6 = 6
8-4=3
TRUE OR FALSE? CONTINUED, Page 3
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
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TRUE OR FALSE? CONTINUED, Page 3
GRADE 1
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NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
44
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
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1.OA.7
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Balance Your Partner
Building Fluency: understand meaning of the equal sign
Materials: gameboard, pair of dice, pencil or marker
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1.Player 1 rolls the dice.
2.Player 1 writes the two numbers rolled in the first two spaces on the gameboard.
3.Player 2 “balances” the equation by writing two numbers that will have the same sum as the first side.
4.Player 1 checks to be sure the equation is balanced.
5.Players take turns rolling the dice and balancing equations.
Variation/Extension: Write equations in math notebooks
+
+
=
=
+
+
+
+
=
=
+
+
+
+
=
=
+
+
+
+
=
=
+
+
45
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.8 and 1.OA.4
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Under the Rug
Building Fluency: Determining the unknown whole number
Materials: 10 counters, rug
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1. Place 10 counters on the rug.
2.Player 1 turns away or hides their eyes.
3.Player 2 takes some of the 10 counters and hides them under the rug.
4.Player 1 must figure out how many are “under the rug.”
5.The student should record on the recording sheet.
6.Students take turns and repeat until the recording sheet is complete.
Variation/Extension: Modify to facts to 20 by using 20 counters.
+
= 10
10 -
=
+
= 10
10 -
=
+
= 10
10 -
=
+
= 10
10 -
=
+
= 10
10 -
=
+
= 10
10 -
=
+
= 10
10 -
=
+
= 10
10 -
=
46
UNDER THE RUG CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
BUILDING CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING & FLUENCY THROUGH GAMES
47
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•
1.OA.8 and 1.OA.4
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
What’s My Number?
Building Fluency: Determining the unknown whole number
Materials: digit cards 1-10
Number of Players: 3
Directions:
1. Students play in groups of 3.
2.Player 1 is the “adder” and players 2 and 3 are the “addends”.
3.The addends will sit next to each other facing the adder.
4.Each addend will draw a digit card without looking at it and hold it up to their noses.
5.The adder will add the 2 digits together and tell the 2 addends the sum.
6.The addends will then face each other and look at each other’s digit card and try to determine what their digit is.
7.The first player to guess their digit wins both digits.
8.The winner is the player with the most digit cards when all the cards have been used. That player then becomes the adder.
Variation/Extension: Students can write equations in their math notebooks.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
48
Number and Operations in Base Ten
•
1.NBT.1
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Skidoo
Building Fluency: Counting to 120
Materials: gameboard, game markers for each player
Number of Players: 2-3
Directions:
1. Players take turns placing up to 5 markers on consecutive spaces on the gameboard.
2.As a player places markers on the board, he must say the counting numbers in sequence
beginning where the last player left off.
3.Players may not skip numbers or spaces.
4.The player who places a marker on 120 is the winner.
Variation/Extension: Students can chnage the number of markers.
1
120
49
Number and Operations in Base Ten
•
1.NBT.2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Scoop-De-Doo
Building Fluency: place value understanding
Materials: gameboard for each player, game markers, beans or other manipulative, spoon
Number of Players: 2-4
Directions:
1. Players take turns scooping a spoonful of beans and placing
the beans on the mat in the ones places.
2.When possible, players should trade 10 ones for a ten.
3.When a player trades 10 ones for a ten, he should place a marker
on one of the tens and replace the beans in the pot.
4.The first player to have 9 tens is the winner.
Variation/Extension: Player could draw models in their math notebook.
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
50
Number and Operations in Base Ten
•
1.NBT.2 and 1.NBT.4
GRADE 1
Nifty Fifty
Building Fluency: composing tens
Materials: die, cubes (50 for each player)
Number of Players: 2-3
Directions:
1. Players take turns.
2.Rolls the die and add the number on the die and 4. (4 + ?)
3.Players should collect that number of cubes.
4.As cubes are collected, players should compose tens when able.
5.The first player to reach 5 tens is the winner.
Variation/Extension: Students can play to a different number of 10s.
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
51
Number and Operations in Base Ten
•
1.NBT.3
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Big Cheese
Building Fluency: comparing two digit numbers
Materials: 2 sets of numbers cards 11-99
Number of Players: 2-4
Directions:
1. Shuffle and stack cards face down on the gameboard.
2.Each player draws one card from the stack and places it face up.
3.The player with the number that is largest takes the cards.
4.If there is a tie, those players turn over another card and the player with the highest number takes the cards.
5.The game ends when all the cards are drawn.
6.The winner is the player with the most cards.
Variation/Extension: The player with the number that is smaller takes both cards. Limit the series of cards to numbers that are
appropriate for the level of the students.
PLAYER 1
PLAYER 3
PLACE
CARDS
HERE
PLAYER 2
PLAYER 4
52
BIG CHEESE CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
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26
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BIG CHEESE CONTINUED, Page 3
GRADE 1
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NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
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41
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BIG CHEESE CONTINUED, Page 4
GRADE 1
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NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
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BIG CHEESE CONTINUED, Page 5
GRADE 1
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NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
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56
Measurement and Data
•
1.MD.3
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Tick Tock Clock 3 in a Row
Building Fluency: tell time in hours and half hours
Materials: gameboard, two sets of time cards and ten markers of one color per player
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1. Players take turns.
2.Draw a time card from the deck and cover that time on the gameboard with a marker.
3.If no clock with that time is available, the player loses a turn.
4.The winner is the first player to get three markers in a row.
Variation/Extension: Players could try to get 4 in a row.
57
TICK TOCK CLOCK 3 IN A ROW CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
6:00
3:00
1:30
2:00
3:30
9:00
1:00
5:00
8:00
8:00
10:00
2:00
4:30
3:00
10:30
9:30
6:00
5:00
11:00
4:00
58
Measurement and Data
•
1.MD.3
GRADE 1
Time Concentration
Building Fluency: tell time in hours and half hours
Materials: game cards
Number of Players: 2
Directions:
1. Place all cards face down on the table.
2.Players take turns.
3.Choose two cards and tell the time.
4.If the cards match, the player keeps the cards.
5.If they do not match, the player turns the cards over.
6.The winner is the player with the most matches.
Variation/Extension: Players can play with cards face up.
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
59
TIME CONCENTRATION CONTINUED, Page 2
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
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TIME CONCENTRATION CONTINUED, Page 3
GRADE 1
•
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
8:30
9:00
9:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
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