EMPEROR Campaign Creator
EMPEROR
Rise of the Middle Kingdom™
Campaign Creator
User’s Guide
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 1
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Welcome to the Emperor Campaign Creator.......................................................................... 4
Getting Started ........................................................................................................................ 4
Launching the Campaign Creator ........................................................................................... 5
Campaign Creator Screen ....................................................................................................... 5
Editing the Empire Map.......................................................................................................... 6
1. Select Empire Map.......................................................................................................... 6
2. Adding, Moving and Deleting Cities and Regions.......................................................... 6
3. City Properties: Essential Elements ............................................................................... 7
4. City Properties: Additional Elements ............................................................................. 8
5. Trade Properties ........................................................................................................... 10
6. Imperial Standard Prices.............................................................................................. 10
F. Creating City Maps (or Landscapes) .................................................................................... 11
1. Paintbrush Buttons........................................................................................................ 11
2. The Map-Editing Control Panel ................................................................................... 11
3. The Terrain Types ......................................................................................................... 12
4. The Various Types of Points You Can Set .................................................................... 17
5. The Function Controls .................................................................................................. 19
6. The Menu Selections ..................................................................................................... 19
7. Hotkeys.......................................................................................................................... 20
8. When All is Said and Done ........................................................................................... 20
G. Planning the Campaign: Mission Building ........................................................................... 21
1. Campaign Settings ........................................................................................................ 21
2. Adding and Deleting Missions ...................................................................................... 22
3. Editing Mission Settings ............................................................................................... 22
4. Editing Mission Goals................................................................................................... 24
5. Adding Events ............................................................................................................... 26
a) Event List .................................................................................................................. 27
b) Event Trigger and Timing......................................................................................... 28
c) Event Types .............................................................................................................. 28
6. Factions......................................................................................................................... 34
H. Creating the Campaign ......................................................................................................... 34
I. Saving and Loading Campaigns in the Campaign Editor..................................................... 34
J. Sharing Your Campaign ....................................................................................................... 34
K. Playing Your Campaign........................................................................................................ 35
L. Building a Multiplayer Scenario........................................................................................... 35
1. Create a map of China.................................................................................................. 35
2. Cooperative or Competitive?........................................................................................ 35
3. Pick a game length and appropriate goals ................................................................... 36
4. Setting up the multiplayer mission................................................................................ 36
5. Which buildings, resources, and heroes are appropriate?........................................... 36
6. Setting up the player cities and factions ....................................................................... 37
7. Setting up non-player cities .......................................................................................... 38
8. Add some events............................................................................................................ 38
9. Test your campaign....................................................................................................... 38
M.
File Names and Other Technical Information .................................................................. 38
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 2
N.
Support/Warranty.................................................................................................................. 39
1. Customer Service, Support and Sales ........................................................................... 39
2. Technical Support ......................................................................................................... 41
3. Sierra Warranty and Legal Information ....................................................................... 42
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 3
A. Welcome to the Emperor Campaign Creator
With the Emperor Campaign Creator, you can create your own Chinese city-builder campaigns.
This guide explains everything you need to know to create campaigns that will make the
ancestors proud!
B. Getting Started
First, get a pencil and some paper. You’re going to need them.
Before you jump into designing your campaign, take some time to write down your vision. The
more you plan out in advance, the easier it will be to create your dream campaign. Here are the
types of things you should figure out before you even open the Emperor Campaign Editor:
1. Ultimately, what do you want the player to achieve? Do you want the player to lead an
economic powerhouse? Or, maybe you want the player's military to be the mightiest in all of
China. Perhaps you want to test the player's skills as a diplomat, a city planner, an industrialist,
etc., or maybe you want to test a combination of skills. Regardless, having a clear idea of the
central challenge of your campaign will help you immeasurably as you design it.
2. Now that you have a central challenge in mind, what obstacles are you going to put in the
player's way? Let's say you want the player to make tons of cash. You could make this very
easy for the player by giving him access to all the resources he could ever want and plenty of
allies, vassals and trade partners to sell goods to. Or, you could make this quite challenging by
limiting the player's resources, allowing for very few opportunities to export goods, and creating
events that will interrupt the flow of trade. The more obstacles you place in front of the player,
the more difficult your campaign will be.
3. Create a story. You have a main character - that's the player. You have a plot (the central
challenge and the obstacles preventing the player from overcoming the challenge). And, you
have a supporting cast. Now, all you need to do is link these things together to form a story. Use
the story to describe to the player why certain things are happening. For example, let's say that
you want the player to build an economically strong empire, but you've put him in a location that
has few natural resources. Why is the player building a city in harsh surroundings? Maybe he
was ostracized from his home city (which is now a rival) and is setting out to prove that he can
make it on his own. Let your imagination run wild!
This is a good time to think about how many missions your campaign will have, and what the
player will be expected to accomplish in each one.
You don't necessarily have to figure out all of these things in the order presented here. You can
certainly have an idea in mind first and fill in the other details later. Regardless of the order in
which you think about the above, it’s important that you give each item careful consideration.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 4
C. Launching the Campaign Creator
To launch the Campaign Creator, click the Campaign Creator
button on Emperor’s Main Menu (see p.11 of the electronic manual,
titled “EmperorManual.pdf”).
In the screen appearing, choose the Create a New Campaign button
and enter a file name,
which can be up to fifteen characters long. Don't worry: you'll have an
opportunity to come up with a more elaborate name for your campaign later.
You can also select a pre-existing campaign (i.e., one you’ve created
previously) from the list provided.
D. Campaign Creator Screen
The editor's Main Menu is the control center for your campaign. From here,
you can access information about all the missions in your campaign and determine the make-up
of the Chinese world.
Menu and
Tool Bar
Editing
Tools
Empire
Map
Delete
Objects
Buttons
When the Campaign Creator screen appears, you’re automatically in “edit” mode. The first thing
you should do (to set the stage for your campaign) is edit the Empire Map. To do so, follow the
information in Section E.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 5
E. Editing the Empire Map
The Empire Map is a map of China and its surrounding areas. The four buttons on the side of the
map (the “editing tools”) will help you design the Empire Map: Add/Move Objects, City
Properties, Trade Properties and World Properties.
1. Select Empire Map
The first step should be to select the desired empire map. The campaign designer has a choice of
four different ones. Each empire map differs in the area depicted, from close in on the Yellow
River valley, to showing a view all the way out to central and southern Asia. You can cycle thru
the empire map selections by pressing the Empire Properties button, and then clicking on the
left/right arrow buttons found to the right of “Select Empire Map.” You should set the Empire
map now, before placing cities and adjusting trade routes, etc. If you later decide to change your
campaign’s empire map, your cities will be misplaced and some trade routes may not make sense
(for instance, some sea routes may end up being on land).
2. Adding, Moving and Deleting Cities and Regions
Once the empire map is set, the next thing you should do is populate the landscape
with the cities, including the player's personal (or main) city. To place some cities on
the map, click the Add/Move Cities and Regions button, and then click the
Add City button appearing to the right. Then, click the spot on the map where
you'd like the city to appear. Keep clicking on the map until you place all the
cities in your world.
Now, add some appropriate region names to the World Map. Click the Add
Region button and click on the spot on the map where you'd like the region name to appear.
Like the names of cities (see “City Name”, below), you must choose region names from the
supplied list; you cannot make up your own.
Notice that all the cities and regions you’re placing on the map have the same names. This is
okay. We’ll discuss changing names later. For now, just get your cities and regions in the places
you wish them to be.
To move a city or region, click the Move button. One city or region has a marquee around it, and
the word Move is yellow. If the object with the marquee around it is the one you'd like to move,
point to the desired location and click. If you want to move a different object, first right-click the
mouse button to deselect the current object. Then, left-click the object you want to move. The
marquee appears around it. Click on its new location to move it.
If you want to delete a city or region, make sure that the marquee is around it,
indicating that it is selected. Then, click the Delete Selected Object button at the
bottom of the Control panel. The selected object disappears. If you want to clear
the map of all cities and regions, click the Delete All Objects button.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 6
3. City Properties: Essential Elements
Now that you've placed some cities on the map, it's time to give them each unique
characteristics. Select the second button, the City Properties button, and then select a
city by clicking on it. Several buttons appear on the control panel, underneath the tabs.
Use these buttons to set the characteristics of each city.
There are a few characteristics you must define for all or some of the cities. These characteristics
are:
City Properties
Button
City Map
City Climate
City Type
City Name
City Name Location
City Number
Trade Routes
Shown/Hidden
NOTE: Those areas of the control panel not identified above are discussed later in this manual.
City Name: Click this button to choose a name for the selected city. You have to pick a name
from the list provided; you cannot create your own.
City Name Location: This button is to the right of the City Name button. Click this button to
move the location of the name. Click repeatedly to cycle through the different locations.
Changing the location of the name has no effect on game play. The most ideal locations of the
city name is either to the left or at the bottom of the city. Otherwise, there may be a conflict with
other city information symbols.
City Type: A city's type determines its basic place in the player's world. To choose a city type,
click the button that appears under Leader Name. The types are Player City, Non-player City,
and Distant City. The city types and the decisions to make with regard to them are discussed in
more detail below.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 7
City Map: This button allows you to select a pre-designed map for the city. A map must be set
for each human player cities. You may set them for all cities if you wish, but it’s only necessary
for player cities. Selecting a map also determines the climate (see below) for that city, since each
pre-designed map has a climate associated with it.
City Climate: This button allows you to set the climate for a city that does not have a city-level
map assigned to it. If you’ve selected a city map (see above), then the climate is determined for
you. Each non-player (i.e., non-human) city must have its climate set. By default, Temperate is
used, and you are welcome to leave it as such. However, it’s best to define a climate based upon
the general location of the selected city. (A city’s climate determines which menagerie animals
can be received from it.)
Two other buttons also always appear, no matter which city type you specify:
City Number: Each city has its own number. Emperor automatically assigns a number to each
city as you place it on the map. You can use this button to select a city to edit. Click the City
Number button and enter in the number of the city you'd like to edit. The information for that
city will be listed on the Control panel.
Trade Routes Shown/Routes Hidden: Use this button to help you design trade routes in the
game. Editing routes can be messy if you see all of the routes between all of the cities at the
same time. To make life easier, click the Routes Shown button to change it to Routes Hidden.
All of the routes to the selected city disappear from the map. A Routes Hidden command
supercedes any Routes Shown command. To see the routes again, click Routes Hidden to switch
to Routes Shown. See the section on Trade Properties below for more information on routes.
4. City Properties: Additional Elements
Below are further decisions you can make for each city.
The city that you designate as “Player City” is the player’s home base throughout the campaign.
You can only designate one city as “Player City” in this part of the campaign creator, and every
campaign must begin there.
Leader Name: In addition to choosing the essential elements as
specified above, pick a leader name for each city. To select a leader
name, click the Leader Name button and pick a name from the list provided. You must choose a
name from the list; you cannot make up your own.
NOTE: Non-Chinese cities have a unique, albeit shorter, list of leader names to choose from,
depending on that city’s assigned “foreign nationality.”
Nationality: Just below the leader name is a button for setting the city’s nationality. Its default is
“Chinese.” If you press this city-nationality button, a small dialog opens allowing you to choose
one of seven different nationalities. The nationality selected also determines the makeup of the
military units of that city; e.g., a city designated as “Korean” sends (naturally) Korean military
units to invade should such an invasion be scripted or occur opportunistically.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 8
Active/Inactive Status: Below the City Type button is the
Active/Inactive button. Click the button to switch back and forth
between the two choices. If you set this button to “Active,” then the selected city is visible and
fully functioning from the beginning of the campaign. If you select “Inactive,” the city may be
visible, but you cannot interact with it until (perhaps) later in the campaign when it automatically
activates. Using the Visible/Invisible button allows you to decide if the selected city is as stated:
visible to the player or invisible. The player can see visible cities from the beginning of the
campaign, while invisible cities cannot be seen until a scripted event causes the invisible city to
become visible and function normally.
City Relationship: Now, decide what the relationships will be of
all cities towards the player city. Below the City Number button is
the City Relationship button. Select each non-player city in turn and set its relationship (either
Rival, Ally, or Vassal). This button is meaningless for the player city; when setting up the player
city, disregard this button.
Faction: This setting is useful for competitive multiplayer
scenarios. See section L, Building a Multiplayer Scenario.
Military Strength: Now, decide how strong the city's military
is. You can set military strength from one to six. One is the
weakest military possible and six is the strongest. Also, if you
set a non-player city to have a military strength of six, it cannot
be conquered. Keep in mind that a city's military builds up over time. Even though you may
choose to set a city's military strength level at five, five shields won't appear next to the city's
name right away. The city builds its military up to the five-shield level.
Economic Strength: Below the Military Strength button is the Economic Strength button.
Economic strength is rated on a scale from one to five, where one is the weakest and five is the
strongest. It represents how rich the city is.
Favor: Next, decide what the city's opinion (or favor) of the player city is at the start of the
campaign, or when the city becomes active. Favor is on a scale of 1-100, with one being the
lowest. The default is 50, which is a very “apathetic” attitude.
Buy/Sell: Now, decide what the city buys and sells. Each non-player
city can deal in a maximum of eight goods. The total number of
goods the city sells plus the total number of goods the city buys
cannot exceed eight, and a city can’t buy more than four goods, nor
sell more than four, and it can’t buy and sell the same item. Click the
empty boxes to choose the commodities, and then repeatedly click
the small boxes under each item to decide how much of each item the city trades. A low level is
12 loads per year, a medium level is 24 loads per year, and a high level is 36 loads per year. You
can also set the level to none (or blank), in which case it won't buy or sell the good at all until a
scripted event causes it to sell more of the item.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 9
5. Trade Properties
Click the Trade Properties button to adjust the routes that connect cities together.
These are the routes that anyone (a hero, an army, an emissary, etc.) follows when
traveling from one city to another.
To see the routes between cities, make sure that Routes Shown (see p. 6) is specified for both
cities in question.
Adjusting Trade Routes: The game automatically draws a straight route between two cities. If
you want to reshape a route, make sure you have the Trade Properties button selected, then
click on a route. The names of the two cities that the route connects appear on the control panel
on the right. Then, click the route again to add a waypoint. Click the waypoint and drag your
mouse to move it to a new location to change the shape of the route.
Player City
Trade Route
Non-Player City
Trade Route
The two dots represent
waypoints that have
been added to the
trade route between
Banzhu and the player
city, Anxi. The trade
route has been
adjusted as shown.
Removing Waypoints: To remove a waypoint, right-click it. You cannot remove the waypoints
at the beginning or end of the route.
Changing Trade Routes: By default, all routes on the map are land routes and colored in
orange. To change a land route to a sea route, select the route by
clicking on it. Then, click the button that reads Land Route. The
button switches to Sea Route, and the route itself turns blue. NOTE:
A player city connected to another city via a Sea Route needs to have
Sea entry and exit points on it’s city-level map, and also some
straight coastline where a Trading Quay may be built; see section F,
Creating City Maps.
6. Imperial Standard Prices
Click the Empire Properties button to set the Imperial Standard
Prices of all the commodities in the empire. You can change a price
by clicking it and entering in a new price on the keypad that appears.
If you would like to return all the prices to their default settings,
click the Reset Prices button.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 10
F. Creating City Maps (or Landscapes)
Now that you have the player's world (i.e., the empire map) is set, it’s time to design the areas
where the player will build cities. You'll need to design a landscape (that is, a city-level map) for
each city site you intend to allow the player to occupy during the course of the campaign.
NOTE: If you really don’t want to landscape a city-level map, you can simply assign each
player city a map from the pre-existing “library” of map files. You can also open any such preexisting map and edit/change it to your heart’s content.
To begin landscaping a map, select New from the City Maps pop-down menu. When you do, the
“New City Map” dialog automatically appears. Type in a name for the city map you intend to
create, and press the “Save” button. Next, the Select Map Type dialog appears, where you
define the map’s size (small, medium, large, huge or enormous), and its climate (arid, temperate,
humid). The climate setting affects the extent of the underground water table (see p.32 of the
electronic manual, titled “EmperorManual.pdf”).
Map Size:
Small 84x84
Medium: 112x112
Large: 140x140
Huge: 170x170
Enormous: 226x226
Climate:
Arid: 10 tiles (the number of tiles grassland extends outward from each water tile)
Temperate: 40 tiles
Humid: 60 tiles
Click the Select Map Type dialog’s OK button when you are satisfied with size and climate
selections you’ve made. In a moment an expanse of empty, flat land appears. Because no water
terrain has yet been placed on the map, every new map initially opens with totally flat, barren
and terrain.
NOTE: When editing the landscape of a city map, it’s a good idea to save
your work frequently!
1. Paintbrush Buttons
Ten different size and shaped
“paintbrushes” are located under the menu
bar, to the right side of the E and C buttons (used to switch quickly between
Empire and City level map editors). Use the large paintbrush sizes to block
out large areas of terrain, and use the smaller paintbrush sizes to add in fine
details.
2. The Map-Editing Control Panel
The panel along the right side of the screen contains three sets of buttons
and a mini- (or overview) map. The top group of buttons (under “Terrain”)
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 11
is used to select the various terrain types; the second set of six buttons (under “Set Points”) is
used to define the various “points”; the third set (under “Functions”) provides general functional
buttons (refresh map, turn map grid on/off, rotate map, and undo last action).
Now you can “landscape” the map to your heart’s content! You might find it helpful to draw a
quick thumbnail drawing of the map you intend to create, perhaps sketching out the course of a
river, a shoreline and/or or the location and shape of hills and/or forests. Looking at maps in
books or on the Internet can provide inspiration.
When you are ready, begin landscaping by selecting a paintbrush, and then simply click on a
terrain type. With a paintbrush and a terrain type selected, hovering the mouse cursor over the
map displays a green “footprint” showing the size and shape of the selected paintbrush. Paint the
terrain onto the map by clicking and dragging your mouse. If you’ve painted some water terrain
on the map, press the “Refresh” button and, in a moment, the proper amount of grassland will
automatically be drawn around the water terrain.
3. The Terrain Types
The terrain buttons on the Control panel contain everything you need to create the landscape:
EMPTY LAND: Players will do most of their building on this type of terrain. When
you begin a new city-level map, all of the terrain is already “empty”. You won't notice
any effect if you try to place additional empty land. Think of empty land as a way to
erase most types of other terrain that you put down.
WATER: Every city-level map needs at least a little bit if water terrain, as water
provides grassland, allowing wells and certain other structures to be built. A town
without wells will not be able to advance past the very lowest level of housing. How
much (or how little!) water a map has, where and how accessible it is, will play an important role
in the design of each city-level map. Only water terrain can host fishing points. You also must
have water in a city if you want the player to be able to trade by water.
When placing water, don't forget to create some sections of straight coastline. Otherwise, players
won't be able to place water buildings such as Trading and Fishing Quays. Also, make sure that
these straight sections of coast aren't in narrow channels or inlets. Make sure to give the player
ample room for his boats to maneuver.
If you want Trading Junks to be able to come to the player’s city, make sure that the water
extends to the edge of the landscape. Otherwise, you won't be able to place the River Entry and
River Exit points (see below).
TREES: The Trees terrain button places a mix of deciduous and conifer trees typical
to China. Players can harvest wood from this type of terrain (as well as from bamboo
terrain, below). Choose the Trees terrain button, then click and drag the mouse to plant
mass quantities of verdant woodland. Trees can only be placed on grassy terrain (i.e., terrain with
an underground water table). Therefore, before placing any trees, your map needs some water
terrain and grassland (remember to Refresh your map after placing Water terrain). If placed near
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 12
the edge of grassland, trees will slightly extend the nearby grassy area, thereby slightly
increasing the surrounding underground water table.
BAMBOO: The Bamboo terrain is used to place patches of bamboo forest. Like
normal trees (above), bamboo can be harvested for its wood. During play, bamboo
grows back quicker after being cut, but trees provide more wood per tile cut down.
Otherwise, trees and bamboo are identical for all game purposes.
If you would like players to be able to harvest wood from the trees and/or bamboo, be sure to
enable Wood as a city resource when defining a city’s resources on the empire level. At the
player’s option, trees and bamboo can both be “cleared” during play, thus creating more flat,
build-able land.
ORDINARY ROCK: Rock terrain is typically used to limit where structures can be
built and walkers can go, as nothing can be built on rock, nor can immigrants,
emigrants and other people walk over it. Rock terrain can also be used to decrease
ground fertility, as each rock tile at least six tiles away from all water tiles decreases the fertility
of the surrounding terrain, shown visibly by the “feathered” grassland.
COPPER ORE: This type of rock terrain functions the same as ordinary rock, except
that it can also be harvested for copper ore by miners from the Bronze Smelter or the
Mint. Don’t forget to set Bronze as a city resource if you want the player to be able to
mine copper-ore rocks.
IRON ORE: This type of rock terrain functions the same as ordinary rock, except that
it can also be harvested for iron ore by miners from the Iron Foundry. Don't forget to
set Iron as a city resource if you want the player to be able to mine iron from iron-ore
rocks.
QUARRY: Quarries are placed a little differently than most other types of terrain.
When you select Quarry, a large (6x6), square green footprint appears. This is the
minimum size that a quarry can be. Place its footprint over a flat, open area of the
landscape where you’d like to place the quarry, and click to put the quarry in place. To enlarge
the quarry, move the large footprint adjacent to the quarry you just placed and click again. Like
other rocky terrain, a quarry also feathers out the grass of any nearby grassland.
When looking at a quarry in the editor, it appears as it will look when the quarry site has been
fully dug out. When the player enters the city, however, it will appear as its usual, flat (not yet
dug out) self.
To delete a quarry site, first make sure you have Quarry selected. When the green quarry
footprint appears, center it directly over the quarry you’d like to delete. Hold down the CTRL
key and left click once. The quarry will disappear (if it doesn’t, adjust the position of the quarry
footprint slightly, and CTRL + left-click again).
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 13
Don't forget to set Stone as a city resource if you want the player to be able to cut stone from a
quarry site.
DUNES: Dunes represent areas of ground where large deposits of sand have
accumulated. Like rocks, sand terrain cannot be cleared nor built on during play, and
feathers nearby grassland, thereby making it less fertile.
SALT MARSH: Salt Marsh terrain is found in areas where ancient oceans have
receded, leaving buried deposits of salty, brine water which (when pumped to the
surface and evaporated) can be harvested for salt. If you intend for the player to be able
to build Salt Mines your city-level map will need some Salt Marsh terrain. Only roads and Salt
Mines can be built on Salt Marsh terrain. If you would like players to be able to mine salt from
the salt marsh, be sure to enable “salt” as a city resource when defining a city’s resources on the
empire level.
NOTE: Since a 3x3 Salt Mine can be built only on terrain with is all Salt Marsh, ensure that the
map has a sufficiently large area of Salt Marsh terrain (i.e., some areas of 3x3 tiles or larger
which are all Salt Marsh).
RUINS: This terrain can be used to simulate old ruins from an ancient city, now fallen
to ruin. Like rubble terrain that occurs during the game when a structure collapses,
Ruins terrain can be cleared during play at a small cost.
BEACH: You can place sandy beach terrain anywhere, but it makes most sense to
place it near water. Sandy beach terrain is very unsuitable for building; keep in mind
that players cannot build any structures on beach terrain (neither buildings or nor
roads). Like water and woodland terrain, beach terrain increases the nearby underground water
table (therefore placing beach in a barren area will, like trees, increase the grassland of that area).
EDITING ELEVATIONS: The four terrain buttons with the large red up/down button on them
allow you to change the level of the landscape. By default,
the land of a city-level map is completely flat and at
minimum height.
RAISE LAND 2. To raise a piece of land up two levels, select Raise Land 2. The terrain you
click on (or roam your paintbrush over) is raised two levels.
RAISE LAND 1. To raise a piece of land up one level, select Raise Land 1. Click or click-anddrag over the area of the landscape you’d like to elevate one level.
LOWER LAND 1. To lower raised land by one level, select Lower Land 1, then click on (or
roam your paintbrush over) some elevated land. The elevation of the selected land is reduced by
one level.
LOWER LAND 2. To reduce (by two levels) the elevation of land that is already at least two
levels high select Lower Land 2. Select the land that you would like to lower by clicking on it.
Make sure that the land you choose has been raised by at least two levels.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 14
NOTE 1, Raising (or Lowering) an Entire Map: You can also quickly raise (or lower) the
elevation of the entire map by selecting Raise (Lower) Map Elevation from the “City Maps”
pop-down menu. It’s important to realize that some monuments (such as the Underground Vault
and the Tumulus monuments) can only be built on ground that can be dug down several levels.
NOTE 2, Elevation Problems: It is easy to create elevated terrain that just doesn’t look very
good. This happens when no art exists to support the very strange terrain undulation you’ve
created. Unless you don’t mind a visual “hole” in your map, you need to smooth out (delete)
such an occurrence using the elevation modeling tools. Have patience, and use different brush
sizes and different elevation levels to edit any strange looking tiles (frequently a tiny, 1-tile brush
is best). Use the Undo button to quickly reverse any “fix” that actually ends up making matters
worse. Refresh your map often by clicking the Refresh button (there’s one on the menu bar, and
also one located near the bottom of the Control Panel).
NOTE 3, Elevations and Water Terrain: Lastly, elevations don’t work very well when placed
adjacent to water terrain. If you have your heart set on a mountain lake, you can make one. Just
make sure some other terrain type separates the water from the rocky, elevated tiles.
NOTE 4, Elevations and Grassy Edges: Elevations used on temperate- and humid-climate
maps have grassy slopes; therefore it’s more visually appealing to keep hills on these regions’
maps in grassy areas. However, arid-climate maps do not have grassy elevations, so it’s more
visually appealing to keep mountains and hills on arid maps away from the grassy areas.
ROAD: Use the Road terrain to lay down any roads that you would like to appear in
the city when the player begins his campaign. A road can be drawn over a ramped slope
(see below) and salt marsh terrain, but otherwise can only be placed on empty land.
RAMP: Ramps give the people of a player’s city access to different elevations. A ramp
links an area of land that is one level higher (or lower) than adjacent land. A ramp can
be placed over a “one-up” slope, or over a “half slope”. To build a ramp, first select the
Ramp button. Move the red tile that appears over to the edge of some terrain that is elevated one
level higher than adjacent terrain. When the tile turns green, you’ve found an appropriate
location for the ramp. Click your mouse button to set the ramp in place. If the tile remains red,
find another location. If desired, a road can then be placed over the ramp (either in the editor or
during play).
HALF SLOPE: This type of terrain is used to represent hills that rise more gradually.
You can place “half slope” terrain along the edges (the crest) of land that has been
elevated one level, provided that the edge is relatively straight. To place half slopes,
first select the Half Slope terrain button. Roam the red tile along the edge of some land that has
been elevated one level higher than adjacent terrain. When the tile turns green, you’ve located
the edge of a hill that can be changed to half-slope. When you apply Half Slope, the terrain
elevates over two tiles instead of its normal one. Ramps can be placed over half-sloped terrain
(and then roads can be run over the ramps, if desired).
PINNACLES: This terrain simulates the soaring pinnacles of rocky, sparsely vegetated
terrain found in some parts of China. Each pinnacle (there are four types that differ
only aesthetically) is a single, large, 5x5-tile formation, and visually appear best when
placed in grassy terrain (realistically, these usually appear along river courses). Like ordinary
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 15
rocks, pinnacle terrain cannot be traversed by any walkers, nor built on. To delete an already
placed pinnacle, select the Pinnacles terrain button (any one of the four pinnacles can be
selected), then hover the green pinnacle footprint over the pinnacle you wish to erase until it
turns entirely red, and then hold down the CTRL key and left click on the pinnacle to be deleted.
Refresh the map afterwards for any removed grass to “grow” back.
MAN-MADE STRUCTURES: The editor allows you to place a variety of man-made
structures on a city-level map, simulating structures pre-existing from previous human
habitation of the area. These structures include: City Wall, City Gate*, Tower*,
Residential Walls (all four types), Ferries, and Bridges.
* The City Gate and Tower structures are placed in the editor in the exact same manner as they are placed
during play of the game (i.e., the City Gate must be place atop a combination of City Walls and road tiles,
and the Tower must be placed over City Walls). See page 112 in Emperor’s Electronic Manual (titled
“EmperorManual.pdf”) for further details.
MONUMENTS: In Emperor, the position of the Grand Canal and the Great Wall
monuments are pre-determined when the player begins a mission on a map with one of
these as a victory goal. Therefore, any map with one of these monuments must have its
position pre-determined. Only one Grand Canal, or one Great Wall, monument can be pre-placed
per map. Important: The position of a monument should be determined before other map terrain
is added, as these monuments and their attendant footprints are very large, and adding other
terrain beforehand will only increase the difficulty of finding a suitable site for the monument.
The Grand Canal monument can only be placed on a map that is Large, Huge or Enormous in
size. When you select Grand Canal from the list of monuments, a very diagonally long and
narrow footprint appears, running from upper left to lower right. If on a large-sized map, the end
of the footprint that you initially “hold” must be positioned near the upper left corner of the map
(or lower left, as if you press the R key the monument will rotate). Roam the footprint around
slowly, and watch for it to turn green. If on a huge- or enormous-sized map, roam the large
monument footprint along the left edge until it turns green. Once green, left click on the map to
lock it into position. The correct position is sometimes hard to find, so be patient. Once placed,
portions of the canal that appear finished will be already completed when play begins, whereas
sections that appear dug out will have to be completed by the player during the mission.
The Great Wall monument can only be placed on a map that is Huge or Enormous size. From
the list of available monuments, select a Great Wall Layout numbered 8 or less. (Only the first
8 layouts are usable; layouts 9-16 are reserved for future use. Each “layout” features a different
configuration of the various Great Wall sections that make up a finished Great Wall monument,
some curving, some straight, some ascending hills, some descending, some elevated, some not.)
Once selected, a Great Wall Layout’s footprint will typically be very long and narrow, but with
twists and turns that aren’t visible until it has been placed. Roam its footprint slowly around the
edge of the map, and watch for it to turn green. Once green, left click on the map to lock it into
position. The correct position is sometimes hard to find, so be patient. Once placed, the entire
monument appears as it will appear after being finished during the mission. However, on the
radar map, sections shown in orange will already be completed when play begins, whereas
purple sections will have to be completed by the player during the mission.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 16
NOTE: Most Great Wall monument layouts have some (or even most) portions of that wall
elevated (i.e., placed atop elevated terrain), as rarely did the Chinese build their massive long
walls on flat, open ground. The program automatically fills in the elevations directly under the
monument. However it will be up to you, the city-level map creator, to complete the remainder of
the required terra forming. This should be done using the Raise Land 1 tool, and various sized
paintbrushes – and saving frequently. Don’t worry if you paint a bit too far and a portion of the
Great Wall disappears. If you save and reload the map the “missing” section of the wall will still
be there. It is very important, however, not to ever decrease the amount of land directly under
the monument – only increase the surrounding elevations, slowly increasing them up to the
height of the terrain under the monument. It can be a long, arduous, and sometime painful,
process, so some degree of patience will be required.
4. The Various Types of Points You Can Set
ENTRY/EXIT POINTS: Entry and Exit points are where friendly people enter and
exit your city.
Migrants and trade caravans enter and exit via the Entry and Exit points. These two points must
be placed on land near the edge of the landscape. If you forget to place Entry and Exit points, no
one will be able to come to your city. After selecting an entry or exit point you will typically
have a red footprint. Roam this footprint around until it turns green, which signifies a valid
location for the point.
Set Sea Entry and Exit points if you intend for the city to be able to trade via water. These are the
points at which trade ships enter and exit. They must be placed on water near the edge of the
landscape.
When placing (land or sea) Entry and Exit points, make sure that you can draw a path from one
to the other (e.g., from water entry to water exit, and from land entry to land exit). If impassable
terrain completely divides the two points, migrants and traders will not be able to enter your city.
A bridge or ferry can be placed to “connect” land entry and exit points across a body of water.
However, be advised that if the player were to (inadvertently?) destroy that bridge or ferry during
play his or her city will quickly suffer serious consequences.
INVASION POINTS: Invasion points mark the areas from which invading armies can
attack the city by land.
Land Invasions points are the spots from which enemy armies attack the city. These points must
be placed near the edges of the landscape. To place a Land Invasion point, first click one of the
Invasion pt # buttons, and then, when its footprint appears green, click on the spot in the
landscape where you’d like invaders to appear. You can place up to eight invasion points. If you
set more than one, you can introduce a little randomization in your ‘Invasion’ events, as each
time an invasion occurs the program randomly chooses a point from all such pre-determined
invasion points.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 17
To quickly remove all invasion points, select the Clear Points menu and choose Clear Invasion.
All currently set invasion points are removed.
FISHING POINTS: Fishing points are used designate “hot” fishing spots in the city’s
waters – the only places where fish can be caught. To set a fishing point, click one of
the eight Fishing pt # buttons. Roam the footprint that appears over a body of water. If
you’ve found a good spot, you'll see a green block. Click your mouse button to set the point in
place.
HINT: It’s visually more appealing if you don’t place fishing points too close to the coast, or the
swirling fish animation may occasionally overprint the nearby land.
To locate a fishing point that you’ve already set, open the Fishing Points selection dialog, and
double click on the name of the point you want to locate. The program centers the map on that
point. You can move the selected point by clicking on another location.
If you intend for the player to be able to harvest the fish, make sure to set fish as a city resource.
To quickly remove all fishing points, select the Clear Points menu and choose Clear Fish. All
currently set fishing points are removed.
PREY POINTS: Prey points are used mark areas on the city map where prey animals
(ones that can be used for game meat) “spawn”. To set a prey point, click one of the
four Prey spawn # buttons. Roam the footprint that appears over some clear land.
You’ll see a green footprint when it’s over a valid location. Click your mouse button to set the
point in place.
Each of the three climates has a unique prey animal, as per the following chart:
Climate
Arid
Temperate
Humid
Prey Animal
Saiga Antelope
Pheasant
Wild Pig
HINT: Don’t place a prey point in a place where it’s likely the player will want to build, as the
program prohibits the player from building over any animal “spawn” point.
If you intend to allow the player to hunt prey animals for food, make sure to set Game Meat as a
city resource.
To quickly remove all prey points, select the Clear Points menu and choose Clear Prey. All
currently set prey points are removed.
PREDATOR POINTS: Predator points are the breeding grounds for the
dangerous wild animals that live on the map. Like prey points, you can place
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 18
predator points on any empty land, and it’s usually best not to place them too close to the
probable city location, nor in places the player is likely to want to build. Also like prey, each
climatic region has its own unique animals. Unlike prey, however, each region features two
possible predators, as per the following chart:
Climate
Arid
Temperate
Humid
Predator 1
Gobi Bear
Giant Panda
Tiger
Predator 2
Bearded Vulture
Giant Salamander
Alligator
5. The Function Controls
You have several “functional” tools at your disposal to help
you landscape your city-level map. These tools are:
UNDO BUTTON: Press the Undo button to cancel your last action.
GRID: Click the Grid button to toggle the grid on (if currently off) or off (if on) on a grid that
overlays your view of the landscape. You can use the grid to determine specific placement of
different terrain features and also to make sure that you allow the player enough room to build
larger structures. You can also use the spacebar to turn the grid on and off.
ROTATE: The Rotate button in the editor (as in the game) actually has three functions,
depending on what part of the button you click on. Click on the left side of the rotate button to
rotate the map 90 degrees clockwise; click on the central portion of the button (right on the
central blue dot) to reorient the map view so north is at the top; click on the right side of the
rotate button to rotate the map 90 degrees counter-clockwise. If unsure, use the program’s tool
tips to help you determine what part of the button to click on.
REFRESH: Click the Refresh button to refresh your view. Refreshing the view redraws all the
terrain features, updates the amount of grass tiles (which is dependant on several terrain types,
such as water, trees, rocks, quarry, etc.), and clears up many tiling problems. On large landscapes
or lower-end systems, this can take some time, so be patient.
6. The Menu Selections
When editing a city landscape, several of the pop-down menus provide additional editing tools
and functions.
CITY MAPS MENU: Open the City Maps pop-down menu and then select…
• New …to switch to a new city-level map.
• Properties …to view the current size and climate of the open city-level map. The resultant
dialog also allows you to change the climate of the current city-level map. Remember to
Refresh after changing a city-level map’s climate.
• Open …to display the Open City Map dialog, which allows you to select an existing citylevel map and open it for editing.
• Save …to save the current editing work you’ve done on the currently open city-level map.
• Save as …to save the currently open city-level map under a new name.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 19
•
•
•
Raise Map Elevation …to increase by one elevation the entire currently open city-level
map.
Lower Map Elevation …to lower by one elevation the entire currently open city-level map.
Return to Empire Map …to switch back to the empire-level map.
DISPLAY MENU: Open the Display pop-down menu and then select…
• 800 x 600 …to change the screen resolution to 800 x 600.
• 1024 x 768 …to change the screen resolution to 1024 x 768 (this setting may not take
sometimes because your desktop resolution is not high enough).
CLEAR POINTS MENU: Open the Clear Points pop-down menu and then select…
• Clear Fish …to delete all currently set fishing points.
• Clear Prey …to delete all currently set prey spawn points.
• Clear Predator …to delete all currently set predator spawn points.
• Clear Invasion …to delete all currently set invasion points.
7. Hotkeys
The following hotkeys may come in handy as you do your city-level landscaping:
• CTRL+F1-F4
Set map bookmarks 1 to 4 respectively
• F1-F4
Jump to map bookmarks 1 to 4 respectively
• Page-up
Rotate map clockwise
• Page-down
Rotate map counterclockwise
• Home
Rotate map to North view
• ALT-d
Toggle ability to scroll beyond (or only to) the map edge
• ALT-z
Refreshes the terrain
8. When All is Said and Done
After you have finished designing the perfect Chinese landscape and wish to return to the
“Empire Level”, open the City Maps pop-down menu and select Return to Empire Map (or
simply press the green E button on then menu bar).
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 20
G. Planning the Campaign: Mission Building
After creating the Empire Map, placing all cities and regions you wish, etc.,
you’re ready to design the missions for the campaign. To do this, select the
Missions button under the “Campaign” tab at the top of the Campaign Creator screen. The
Campaign Settings dialog appears.
Mission
Listings
Close
Dialog
Game
Type
Settings
Campaign
Text Buttons
Starting
Date, Cash
and Era Fields
Add/Edit
Mission
Buttons
Events
Button
Resources
Allowed
Religions
Allowed
Mission
Goals
Listing
Buildings
Allowed
Mission Goals Buttons
Before we talk about each control in this dialog, think back to the first page of this document
when we asked you to come up with a storyline for your campaign. The Campaign Settings
dialog is where you shape that story. Be prepared to answer questions about your story such as:
“How many chapters (i.e., separate missions) does my story have?”
“Does the setting change each time?”
“What challenges does the hero of our story (the player) have to face?”
With the Campaign Setting dialog as your aid, you will be able to answer each of these questions
for your campaign.
1. Campaign Settings
When you first start your campaign, begin by clicking the Campaign Title button. A text entry
dialog will appear. Type in the name you have chosen for your campaign here.
Next, you’ll want to describe the beginning of your story to the player. Click on the button that
reads Campaign Intro Text. The following dialog appears.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 21
In the large text area, you should type in
a few sentences that describe the
campaign to the player. Make it enticing
so he or she will want to start your
campaign. This text will appear on the
Campaign selection screen within the
game when your campaign is
highlighted (just like it does for the
seven historical campaigns that were
originally shipped with Emperor).
[Maximum of 350 characters in this space.]
2. Adding and Deleting Missions
When you first open the Campaign Settings dialog, one first mission (UNTITLED) is already
listed. To insert a second player city mission, click the button that reads Add Mission. A mission
is inserted below the first mission. There is a limit of 10 missions in a campaign.
If you ever need to delete a mission from the list, you can click on it in the mission listings area
to highlight it. Then just press the Delete Mission button.
3. Editing Mission Settings
After you decide how many missions will be in your campaign, edit the settings for each of
them. Some settings are changed right here on the Campaign Settings dialog. For others, you
will have to bring up additional dialogs and work there. Let’s start with the settings up on this
main panel. Remember that these settings only apply to the currently selected mission in the
Mission Listings. If you highlight a different mission, these settings will refresh to show how
they are set for the newly highlighted mission.
Start Date: Choose a start date for the selected mission. Then, click the button next to the date
to choose BCE or CE. Missions that start on or after 300 BCE receive an iron-age modifier to
agriculture production. The start date also determines the composition of Chinese military forces.
Initial Funds: Click this button to set the amount of money the player has at the start of the
mission. Provided that the player is playing the campaign at Easy, Normal or Hard level, the
amount you set will match the amount that the player starts with. If the player plays at the Very
Easy difficulty level, he will be granted 50% more money than the amount you set. If he plays at
Very Hard, he will be granted 20% less than the amount you set. So, if you set Initial Funds at
4000, the player will receive 6000 if he plays at Very Easy level and 3200 if he plays at Very
Hard. If the initial funds are set at “0” for a Continuation Mission (only), the player’s at-start
Treasury will be based on the amount of cash in the Treasury when that city-level map was last
played in the current campaign.
Now it is time to move to the settings on those other dialogs. The instructions for each are listed
below.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 22
Mission Settings Dialog: Click the Edit Mission button, and a panel with several buttons
appears.
Type the mission name in the top field,
or click on the Title button to open a
dialog for the mission name. You’ll also
want to provide Intro Text (mission
briefing) and Victory Text. Select the
player city for the mission by clicking on
the arrow button and selecting a city
name from the available list. If you want
to disable sabotage, click on that toggle
to uncheck it. If you want to prevent
cities from severing alliances (this is
especially useful in cooperative
multiplayer games), click on the “Allow
Breaking Alliances” toggle to uncheck
it. You can also limit the “Military
Target” categories by clicking any of the six possibilities. When a category is highlighted,
military forces may use that category in the mission; when a category is not highlighted, they
can’t use it. For instance, if you want a chivalrous style of warfare, you might select only the
Military category, in which case troops could only attack military buildings such as walls, forts
and weaponsmiths, and they would not attack houses, farms, etc.
Buildings Allowed Dialog: Click the Buildings Allowed button and the Select Allowed
Buildings dialog will appear.
This dialog helps to determine which buildings the player can build in
each mission. To prevent the player from building a particular structure,
click the structure's name so that it is no longer highlighted.
Most of the game's buildings are listed on the Select Allowed Buildings
dialog panel, with a few notable exceptions. Most of the raw materials
producers, such as the Bronze/Iron Smelters, Steel Furnace, Stoneworks,
Logging Shed, Salt Mine and Clay Pit, are not listed here. The
Agriculture buildings, Farmhouse, Hemp Farm, Hunter's Tent, and
Fishing Quay, aren't listed here either. The availability of these buildings
is determined solely by a city's resources. If that resource is turned on, its
associated building is available automatically.
The Mint, however, is listed on the Buildings Allowed panel. If you want
the player to be able to produce copper cash, make sure that the Mint is
enabled on the Buildings Allowed panel. Then, make sure the landscape (the city-level map) has
some copper ore-bearing rock.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 23
There's one more thing to note concerning buildings allowed. The player can't build
manufacturers (Weaver, Bronzeware/Lacquerware Maker, Kiln, Paper Maker, Jade Carver’s
Studio Weaponsmith, and Money Printer) unless the raw materials they need are available to the
player. For example, unless the player can acquire clay from a neighbor or has clay as a city
resource, he cannot build a Kiln, even if it is one of the buildings allowed.
We’ll move right into editing the city resources next.
Resources Allowed Dialog: Click the Resources Allowed button and the Select Allowed
Resources dialog will appear.
Editing the city's resources is vitally important. As we’ve discussed, a
city's resources are key in determining which buildings a player can
build in his city. In fact, the City Resources are the soul determinant for
most of the types of Agriculture and raw material-producing buildings a
player can build. For example, if you want the player to be able to build
Salt Mines, you must set salt as one of the city resources, and the citylevel map must have an adequate supply of Salt Marsh terrain! When
you choose city resources, make sure that the terrain of the city-level
map can support them.
To set a city resource, click the name of the resource you want to make
available to the player to highlight it.
Allowed Religions and Heroes Dialog: Click the Religions Allowed button and the Allowed
Religions and Heroes dialog will appear.
Select the hero(es) that you want the player to be able to use in the
selected mission. If any hero of a religion is selected, you should
also be sure to select the buildings associated with that hero’s
religion in the “Buildings Allowed” dialog (see above). For
instance, even if you select a Daoist or Buddhist hero, if the Daoist
or Buddhist temples (respectively) are not also build-able, then
those heroes will not be active in the game and cannot be
summoned. It is acceptable to have some, or all, of the heroes of a
religion turned off.
4. Editing Mission Goals
Each mission can have up to six goals, and there are many different types of goals that a player
can meet. If you choose not to set any mission goals, the episode will be an open-play mission
and will not end. The player will not be able to proceed to any subsequent mission. To get
started, first click the New Goal button. The Mission Goals dialog will appear. Now select a goal
from the list:
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 24
Allied Cities: Select this goal if you want the player to form and maintain alliances with other
cities. Adjust the number of alliances required by typing a number in the field or using the two
small arrow buttons to adjust the number up or down. Then click the Okay button on the dialog
to accept that goal for the mission.
Homage Level: When you select this
goal, you require the player to pay enough
homage to keep a hero (or heroes) active
in the city for a given number of months
(these can be non-consecutive months).
Adjust the number of homage months
required by typing a number in the field or
using the arrow buttons.
Housing Level: Use the housing goal if
you want the player's city to feature a
certain number of people in a particular type of housing. When you select this goal, two fields
appear on the right side of the dialog. On the top field, click the pull down arrow and select the
type of housing level. Then, on the bottom field, type in a number or use the arrow buttons to set
how many people should be living in that housing level. The player's housing level must be at or
above the goal at the end of the mission for the player to move on.
Menagerie: Select this goal if you want the player to collect a given number of animal types in
his or her palace menagerie. Use the field on the right of the dialog to set the number. The game
currently supports 9 animal types, so you shouldn’t exceed this number or the player won’t be
able to complete the goal.
Monuments: Use the monuments goal to require the player to build a specified monument.
Select the particular monument from the pull down menu on the right side of the dialog. You can
have up to three separate monument goals in a mission. We make no guarantee if you set more
than three monument goals! If you put more than three monument goals in a mission, the
program may slap you back to reality!
Population: If you want the player to draw a certain number of people to his city, select this goal
and enter the desired number in the field on the right side of the dialog. The player must have at
least this number of people in the city at the end of the mission.
Survival Time: Select this goal to require the player’s city to survive for a given number of
years. Use the field on the right side of the panel to set the number of years. The player must
meet all other mission goals and continue playing until the survival time is reached. Since a
player cannot win a mission while in vassal status, the player’s city must not be a vassal at the
end of the survival time. Otherwise, the mission is lost.
Time Limit: Select this goal to set a time limit on the mission. The player must complete all
mission goals before or by this date in order to progress. Time limit is defined by years. To set
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 25
the time limit, type a number in the field to the right, or use the small arrow buttons to adjust the
number up or down.
Trading Partners: Select the Trading Partners goal if you want the player to trade with a
specific number of cities. Enter a number in the field on the right side of the dialog (or use the
two arrow buttons), and click the Okay button. This is the number of trading partners you would
like the player to have.
Treasury: Set a treasury goal if you want the player to have a certain amount of cash before
moving on. The player's treasury must be at or above the goal you set at the end of the mission.
To set the treasury goal, enter a number in the field on the right side of the dialog, or use the two
arrow buttons to adjust it up or down.
Vassal Cities: Choose this goal if you want the player to rule over a given number of cities. A
city is considered a vassal if the player has conquered it and it is not in rebellion. On the right
side of the dialog, enter the number of cities you'd like the player to be overlord of, then click the
Okay button to accept the goal.
Yearly Production: A yearly production goal requires the player to produce a certain amount of
a commodity in one year. The player only has to achieve the desired level of production once. If
the production of the item subsequently slips below the desired amount, the goal is still
considered met. When you select this goal from the list, two fields appear on the right side of the
dialog. Use the pull down menu of the top field to choose which commodity you want the player
to produce. Then, enter a number (or use the arrow buttons) in the bottom field to set how much
of the commodity the player needs to produce in a single year. A year is measured from the start
of February to the end of January.
Yearly Profit: Use this goal if you want the player's city to earn a certain amount of profit in one
year. The player only has to earn the desired amount once. Remember, this is the amount of
profit that you want the city to earn, not the amount that is in the treasury (profit is calculated as
yearly income minus yearly expenses). Enter a number in the field to the right, or use the arrow
buttons to adjust it, then click the Okay button to accept the goal. A year is measured from the
start of February to the end of January.
Editing & Deleting Goals: To edit a mission goal, select it in the Mission Goals box and click
the ‘Edit Goal’ button. If you want to delete any goal, select it and then click the 'Delete Goal'
button.
5. Adding Events
Events help to drive the plots of your missions. They make the non-player cities in your
campaign take action (these actions are in addition to provoked and opportunity actions). To
begin, click the Events button on the Campaign Settings panel. When you do, the Event List
panel for that selected mission will appear.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 26
a) Event List
Depending on the goals you set for the mission, a few events may be listed here. To add a new
event, click the Add Event button. A new event appears at the end of the event list, and it has the
details of a default event. There are up to six pieces of information shown in the list for each
event. However, this information is only a shorthand version of the event. To see an event’s
complete details, select that event and the appropriate fields become active in the lower part of
the panel.
The shorthand pieces of information in the
event list include:
• ID number (starting with 0): The
ID number of an event has nothing
to do with the timing of that event
in the mission. It is simply a
numbering of events.
• Type: see section c) Event Types
below
• Month: +0 is January, +1 is
February, +2 is March, etc.
• Year(s): +0 is the first year of the
mission; +1 is the second year, etc.
• Amounts: if applicable for that
event type
• Products: if applicable for that
event type
All events are set up in the same, basic way. When you choose an event type, all the fields and
buttons that you'll need to plan the event appear. Click these buttons to adjust the settings. Each
event type and the decisions that you'll need to make are discussed below. Each adjustment
automatically updates the event in the event list.
For many of the decisions that you make, you are given the option of entering in more than one
choice. You can use this ability - the ability to enter in ranges - to add some randomization to
your events. For example, you are frequently given the option of entering the same number in
two fields or two different numbers. If you enter the same number in both fields, that is the
number used in the event. If you enter two different numbers, the program picks a number within
the range you specify, inclusive.
When you are done planning an event, you can add a new event by clicking the Add Event
button again. Or you can select an existing event in the list to edit its properties or, by pressing
the Delete Event button, to remove it from the list. When you are satisfied with the event list for
that mission, click the Close button to return to the Campaign Settings panel.
Sometimes an event could have a serious mistake in it. Unfortunately, the event list does not
detect this until after you close it. Therefore, you may want to reopen the Event List to look for
any problems. Events in the list preceded by the word ‘ERROR’ indicate a problem. Reopen the
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 27
problem event and change some value(s) to correct it. Then close the Event List panel and
reopen it again to see if the ‘ERROR’ went away.
b) Event Trigger and Timing
For nearly every event that you plan, you need to determine when the event occurs. Events can
be triggered in three ways:
One time event: This is the default trigger setting. One-time events are just that - they happen
only one time. When you designate an event as a one-time event, you'll need to decide during
which month the event happens (the event occurs at the end of that month). Click the pull down
button of the ‘Month’ field to select the month. Then, you need to decide how many years after
the start of an episode you would like the event to occur. If you want the event to happen in a
specific year, type in the same number in both the ‘Years From+’ and ‘To+’ fields (or use the
up/down arrow buttons to adjust the numbers). For example, if you want an event to occur five
years after the start of an episode, set each field to 5. The event will then occur during the
designated month of the 6th year (i.e., after 5 years have elapsed). If you want the event to occur
once during a given range of years, then enter a higher number in the ‘To+’ field than you do in
the ‘From+’ field. The program will then randomly select one year within those two settings
inclusive.
Recurring event: Recurring events happen over and over throughout a mission. Like one-time
events, you pick a month in which the event will occur. The event always happens in this month.
Then, pick numbers for the ‘Years From+’ and ‘To+’ fields. This range of years works a little
differently for recurring events. Let's say you choose 5 and 10. The recurring event will happen
for the first time between five and ten years after the start of the mission, and then will recur
every five to ten years after the first occurrence. Make sure you don't set either of the 'Years'
values to zero. If you do, the event could occur almost every month, which could result in much
annoyance to the player!
Mission complete: Mission complete events happen at the end of a mission and are mostly
“invisible” to the player (the program doesn’t generate a notification of the event). You can use
these events to change the empire for the next mission in the campaign. Generally, just city status
and trade change events can be mission complete events. If you plan an important mission
complete event, make sure you let the player know of the event in the subsequent mission’s intro
text. Otherwise, the event won't be communicated to the player at all, and he will not know that
an event has occurred.
c) Event Types
Now that you're familiar with the basics, it's time to review the different event types that you can
plan. Use the pull down arrow of the ‘Type’ field to set the type. We will discuss the default type
first, and then progress through the remaining types in alphabetical order as they appear in the
pull down list. In each case, you’ll need to set the trigger and timing as described above.
Goods request: This is the default type. Goods requests are one of the more basic and frequently
used events. There are five different reasons another city might make a request of the player, and
these reasons are listed when you click the arrow button next to 'Subtype.' They are General
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 28
Request (default subtype), Construction, Famine, Festival and Financial Woes. The subtype that
you choose helps to determine the goods that the city can request from the player. For example,
if you choose the subtype 'Famine,' you can only specify a food commodity as the good
requested. The program automatically limits your choices based on the subtype that you choose.
After you determine the subtype for the request, decide which city is doing the requesting, and
click on the ‘Cities From’ field to enter this city name.
Now that you know who is doing the requesting, choose which commodity is being requested.
Click the arrow button next to the ‘Product 1’ field and select an item from the list provided. For
the Financial Woes request, you can only pick cash. For all the other subtypes, you can pick a
second and/or third product (Product 2 and Product 3 fields). When the event occurs, the
program will pick one of the three goods that you specified.
Next, decide how much of the commodity the city is asking for by entering in a specific amount
or range of amounts.
The buttons on the right of the Event List panel determine when the event occurs. Adjust these as
discussed under part b above. Then in the ‘Time allowed’ field, enter in how many months the
player has to comply with the event. Leave the ‘Reason’ field at its default setting.
The player's consequences to complying with or refusing a request differ based on subtype.
'Famine' events are the most important -- after all, lives are at stake -- and have the most effect
on favor. Construction events are the least important. Also, the event subtype determines how
much additional time is granted to fulfill the request if the player does not comply with the
request on time.
City status change: There are many ways (subtypes) that a non-player city's relationship with
the player can change. Remember to set the trigger and timing for each of these event subtypes:
Rival Becomes Ally (default), City Becomes Rival, City Becomes Vassal: These three event
subtypes are similar, and they each can change a player's world significantly. If for some reason
the city you choose cannot be the subject of the event (for example, if you plan a 'Rival Becomes
Ally' event to happen to a city that is already an ally), the event won't occur. Other than that,
keep in mind what each event means for the player. When a rival becomes an ally, it will not
attack the player, nor can the player attack it unless the alliance is broken. If a city becomes a
vassal, it may start paying tribute. If a city becomes a rival, it may pose a new military threat and
cease paying tribute (if it had been a vassal).
Add Favor: Every non-player city has a separate favor level relative to each player city. Favor
ranges from 0 (bad) to 100 (good) and changes over time and in response to a player’s actions.
The ‘Add Favor’ subtype allows you to impose a favor boost for a non-player city (‘Cities From’
field) relative to another specified city or to ‘All Cities’ (the default setting in the ‘To’ field). Be
sure to set the amount of this boost (or a range). The addition will never change the city’s favor
above 100.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 29
Subtract Favor: The ‘Subtract Favor’ subtype works similar to the Add Favor, but the amount of
change is subtracted from the city’s current favor level, and it will never drop the city’s favor
below 0.
Set Favor: The ‘Set Favor’ subtype allows you to reset a non-player city’s favor relative to
another city (or to all cities). In this case, choose a value from 0 to 100 (50 is the norm).
NOTE: During the game, a city whose favor is less than (or greater than) 50 will gain (or lose,
respectively) two favor points per year, as its favor “migrates” back toward 50. Thus, even
though a city might start out thinking very favorably of the player’s city, if the player does not
keep currying that city’s favor (for example, by sending gifts and fulfilling requests), its favor
toward the player’s city will gradually decline until reaching 50.
City Appears: While editing the Empire Map, you may have designated some cities 'Invisible.'
Use the 'City Appears' subtype to introduce them to the world. If you also set the invisible city to
inactive, use a 'City Becomes Active' subtype if you want it to participate in diplomatic relations
or trade (see below).
City Disappears: Use the 'City Disappears' status subtype to wipe a city from the face of the
empire. When a city disappears, it is removed from the Empire Map view, and the player can no
longer interact with it. You can always make a city reappear later with a 'City Appears' subtype.
City Becomes Active/City Becomes Inactive: These two subtype events relate directly to the
characteristics that you set for cities in the Empire Map. When a city becomes active, it begins to
participate in world events, depending on its city type. When a city becomes inactive, it ceases to
have contact with the outside world. You can always reactivate a city with the 'City Becomes
Active' event.
City Conquered: Use this subtype event if you want one non-player city to conquer another one.
To plan this event, select the name of the city that you want conquered in the ‘Cities From’ field
using the arrow button. Then decide which city is doing the conquering and select its name in the
‘Attacking City’ field. Keep in mind the effects of conquering on the cities in the world. If an
ally or vassal conquers a rival, the rival becomes an ally. If a rival conquers an ally or vassal, the
conquered city becomes a rival.
Economic Decline/Economic Prosperity: These subtype events change the economic strength of
the city that you specify. Use the amount to determine how strong or weak the city becomes. The
number you enter determines how many coins are subtracted from (decline) or added
(prosperity) to the city on the Empire Map. If, for example, you plan an 'Economic Prosperity'
event and enter in 3 as the ‘Amount From’ and ‘To,’ then three coins will be added next to the
city on the Empire Map (the maximum economic strength is five).
Military Buildup/Military Decline: Use these subtype events to change the strength of a city's
military. Choose a city, and then specify the amount of the increase (buildup) or decrease
(decline). The amount you enter corresponds with the number of shields on the Empire Map. For
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 30
example, if you plan a 'Military Decline' event and set the amount of the decrease to 2, then the
city will have two less shields next to it. Keep in mind that the maximum military strength is six.
Rebellion Over: Use this subtype event to force an end to a rebellion. A rebellion occurs when
the player treats a vassal particularly badly. Rebellions can end by themselves. But, you may
want to script a ‘Rebellion Over’ event if you know that the player is going to need a vassal for a
particular reason (to help conquer another city, for example). To plan this event, choose the city
that you'd like the event to happen to. If the selected city is not currently rebelling when it is time
for the event to occur, the event won't take place.
Disaster: Choose the type of disaster you want by clicking on the 'Subtype' arrow button and
choosing from the list. The three subtypes of Disaster are Earthquake (default), Drought and
Flood. You need to set the severity of an earthquake or flood in the ‘Amount From’ and ‘To’
fields. Earthquake severity ranges from 0 (weak tremor) to 9 (severe shock). Flood severity
represents how many tiles inland from a deep-water tile the river will flood.
Goods gift: If you want another city to give the player a gift, use the 'Gift' event. To set up a Gift
event, select which city is giving the gift by clicking the ‘Cities From’ field.
Then, decide what the gift is. Click the arrow button next to 'Product 1' and pick a commodity
from the list provided. You can enter in items for one or both of the other Product fields, too. If
you do, the program randomly picks one of these selected products. Then, choose the size of the
gift. If you have a certain size in mind, make sure both values next to 'Amount' are identical.
Otherwise, insert two different numbers, and the program will pick a number within the range
that you specified.
Leave the ‘Reason’ field at its default setting.
Invasion: If you want a rival to invade the player's city, use an 'Invasion' event. First, specify
the city that is doing the invading by clicking on the field next to 'Cities From’ and making a
selection. If the city you choose is not a rival at the time of the event, the invasion won't occur.
Then, decide how large the invasion force will be. The maximum size of a single invasion force
is 256 soldiers, and you can have a total of 500 invaders in a city at one time. The program
calculates the composition of the invasion force (i.e., number of infantry, cavalry, crossbowmen,
etc.) according to the time period and nationality of the attacker.
You must also give orders to the attackers. Their aggressiveness can be Armored Turtle (least
aggressive), Alert Tiger or Fierce Dragon (most aggressive). Aggressiveness not only determines
how many losses the attackers are willing to take before retreating, but also the range at which
they detect and attempt to engage the player’s troops.
Set the target category next. There are seven possibilities:
• Food supply (the attackers focus on destroying farms and mills)
• Housing (focus on destroying houses)
• Industry (focus on destroying industry buildings)
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 31
•
•
•
•
Infrastructure (focus on destroying government-type buildings)
Military (focus on destroying forts and weaponsmiths)
Rampage (attackers destroy anything in their path)
Random (program selects one of the above).
The attacking force may also include an enemy hero. You can set this in the third field of
‘Orders.’ Huang Di, Sun Tzu, Guan Di and Sun Wu Kong can be enemy military heroes.
Now, all you need to do is determine whether the event is recurring or one time, and decide its
timing. Finally, enter in the number of months of advanced warning the player receives in the
‘Time Allowed’ field.
The invaders will arrive at one of the Invasion points you set on the player’s city map. The
program selects the Invasion point randomly.
Menagerie gift: Use this event to give the player an animal for his or her palace menagerie. You
can specify the animal in the ‘Product 1’ field, or the program can randomly pick the animal if
you specify alternative animals in the other ‘Product’ fields. Then select the city that is giving
the menagerie gift in the ‘Cities From’ field. Leave the ‘Reason’ field at its default setting.
Menagerie request: This is the inverse of the Menagerie Gift event. You select the city making
the request in the ‘Cities From’ field, and you set the animal (or range of animals) the non-player
city wants in the ‘Product’ fields. Like other requests, you need to set a value in the ‘Time
Allowed’ field – this is the number of months the player has to fulfill the request on time. Leave
the ‘Reason’ field at its default setting.
Military request: Military requests are similar to general requests. Instead of requesting goods,
however, other cities request the services of your military forces. First, select an event subtype.
Your choices are 'City Under Attack' and 'City Attacks Rival.'
For the 'City Under Attack' subtype, the city requesting aid is being attacked by a rival army. Use
the 'City Attacks Rival' event when you want one of the player's allies or vassals to attack a rival.
Now, select the city that is making the request in the ‘Cities From’ field. If the city you choose is
a rival at the time of the event, the event won't occur. It makes sense if you think about it: would
you really loan your valuable troops to a city that is not an ally? In the ‘Cities To’ field, be sure
to select the player’s city – this signifies to whom the request goes.
'Troops' is entered automatically in the ‘Product’ field because this is the requested item, but
when the player fulfills a military request, he can dispatch troops and/or a military hero (except
Bodhidharma).
Then, decide if the event is a “recurring” or “one time” event, and determine the timing of the
event. Finally, set the amount of time that the player has to respond to the request for troops in
the ‘Time Allowed’ field. Leave the ‘Reason’ field at its default setting.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 32
The requesting city’s favor toward the player decreases if he fails to comply with the military
request or his troops arrive late. If under attack, the requesting city could be conquered, in which
case a conquered vassal or ally becomes the player’s rival. If an ally or vassal conquers a rival
city, the rival becomes an ally.
Rival army away: Use this event to temporarily weaken the military strength of a rival. If one of
your mission goals is for the player to conquer a particularly strong rival, use this event to give
the player a window of opportunity to defeat the foe a little more easily. However, keep in mind
that a rival with a military strength of 6 can never be conquered.
To plan this event, specify the name of the rival city in the ‘Cities From’ field. This is the army
you want to temporarily weaken. Make sure that the city you choose is a rival of the player, or
the event won't occur. Then set the trigger and timing.
Trade change: Use the Trade Change events to alter the price and availability of goods, and the
activity of non-player city trade with the player city. There are eight subtype events. Click on the
arrow button in the Subtype field to select the subtype you want.
Demand Increase/Demand Decrease: Use these subtype events to change how much of a good
another city wants to buy from the player. Use the 'Cities From' field to select which city will
change its demand level. Then, click the arrow button next to ‘Product 1’ to set which good is
affected. If you want to randomize the type of commodity, you should also select a commodity in
the ‘Product 2’ and ‘Product 3’ fields. The program will then pick one of these goods for the
demand change.
If you decrease a Low demand, the city stops buying the good. If you increase a demand level
that you set to none, the city begins buying the item from the player. Refer to the Empire Map to
see what the demand levels are for each city.
Supply Increase/Supply Decrease: Use these subtype events to change how much of a good
another city has available to sell to the player. Choose the city and the product(s) as described
above for Demand changes.
Keep in mind that if you decrease a supply level already set to Low, the city stops selling the
good to the player. Conversely, if you increase a supply level from none to Low, the city will
begin selling the good to the player. Refer to the Empire Map to see what the supply levels are
for each city.
Price Increase/Price Decrease: To change the price of a good during a mission, use these events.
Choose a commodity in the ‘Product 1’ field, or select commodities in more than one ‘Product’
field and the program will randomly pick between your choices. Enter numbers in the 'Amount'
fields to set the amount of the increase/decrease. If you enter in two different amounts, the
program will choose an amount within the range you specified.
Trade Shuts Down/Trade Opens Up: Use the Trade Shuts Down subtype to halt trade between
the city you designate and the player's city. Use the Trade Opens Up subtype to establish trade
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 33
relations. If the city you choose is already trading with the player, the event won't occur.
Remember to also set the trigger and timing.
Wage decrease / wage increase: To plan one of these events, decide by how much you want
'Normal' wages to change. Normal wages are 30 strings of cash per year per ten workers. Enter in
the amount, or a range of amounts, by adjusting the up/down arrow buttons or typing numbers in
the Amount fields. Then, decide when the event occurs.
6. Factions
Click on the Factions button to open the Faction dialog. On this dialog, you can set the initial
level of favor within and between each faction. See section L.6, Setting up the player cities and
factions, for a complete discussion of factions.
H. Creating the Campaign
Now that all your settings are in place, it's time to create the campaign. Select Create Pak from
the Campaign Menu. The program asks you if you want to overwrite the current saved settings.
Choose yes, and the program will try to build the campaign.
If the program is unable to build your campaign due to errors, it will tell you what is causing the
problem. If the program can't find any errors, it will create your campaign and notify you of its
success. Congratulations! You're done! To exit the editor, go to the Campaign Menu and
choose Exit.
I. Saving and Loading Campaigns in the Campaign Editor
You can save your campaign at any time during its creation if you need to take a break. Use the
Save feature located in the Campaign Menu to save the campaign's information without
actually creating the campaign. This can be helpful if you want to save your work, but you know
that there is something wrong with your campaign that will prevent it from being created
successfully.
Use the Save As command in the Campaign Menu to save your campaign with a different
name. You can also load a campaign from this menu (using Open) or begin designing another
campaign (with New).
J. Sharing Your Campaign
If you want to share your campaign with others, send then the .pak file for your campaign. Use a
file browser such as Windows Explorer to open the Emperor folder. This folder is located
wherever you installed China. If you used the recommended default installation location, the
folder is located in C:\Sierra\EmperorRotMK. After you enter this folder, double click the
Campaigns folder. You should see a file with the name of your new campaign and a file
extension of “.PAK” (if the file browser is currently displaying file extensions). There is also a
folder with your new campaign name. You only need to send the PAK file to the person who
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 34
wants to play your campaign. This person should place the folder in his or her Campaigns folder,
which is located inside their EmperorRotMK folder.
If you want others to be able to edit (make changes to) the campaign, send the entire folder for
your campaign (the one we saw above in the Campaigns folder). The folder for your campaign
contains all the mission and empire information for your campaign. You will also have to send
the city maps you created for your different cities. They are all stored in the game’s ‘Cities’
folder. The person receiving your files needs to place the folder and city maps in the same
location in his or her Emperor directory tree as where you retrieved them from your Emperor
directory structure.
K. Playing Your Campaign
To play your campaign, either exit the editor and start Emperor. From Emperor’s Main Menu,
choose ‘Single Player Campaign’. After you pick a leader name, the 'Choose Game' screen
appears. Click Historical Campaign,' and pick your campaign from the list. Click the button next
to 'Begin Campaign' to enter into your version of ancient China.
L. Building a Multiplayer Scenario
The Emperor Campaign Editor also lets you create multiplayer scenarios … something you can
share online with up to 7 of your friends at once! The process for developing a multiplayer
scenario is similar to creating a single-player campaign. Therefore we will keep this section short
and focus on what is different for multi-player scenarios.
1. Create a map of China
The first step is to edit the empire map so that the cities involved with your scenario will all be in
place. The empire map creation is performed just as described in Section E above. Just make
sure to include a minimum of 10 cities. You’ll need at least 8 for player cities and there should
be a few non-player trade partners representing some of the foreign powers around China. A
good total number of cities for a multiplayer scenario is 12 to 15.
If you want you can even take the empire map from a single-player campaign and turn it into the
basis for your multiplayer scenario. Just open up that campaign and choose Save As from the
Campaign menu. Your newly saved file is the one you will edit to create your multiplayer
scenario.
2. Cooperative or Competitive?
Now that your map of China is ready, you have to make the most important single decision in
creating a multiplayer campaign. Will it be a Cooperative game or a Competitive one?
Cooperative scenarios ask all players to meet the goals before the game ends. In cooperative
scenarios, each city should be limited in the resources available or should face stiff challenges
from events and enemies. Only through strong teamwork will all the players be able to pull
through so that each achieves their goal.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 35
Competitive scenarios are a race to see which player can meet the stated goals first. In
competitive scenarios, each city should probably have a higher percentage of the resources it
needs to build a thriving city than in a cooperative scenario. You don’t want a single player to
get “stuck” lacking a key resource like hemp if the other players who control that resource
boycott trading.
The type of game is chosen using the controls in the upper-right corner
of the Campaign Settings dialog. First change “Singleplayer” to
“Multiplayer”. Then use the control just below it to set either
Cooperative or Competitive play.
3. Pick a game length and appropriate goals
Now it is time to pick some goals for this multiplayer game. Goals are set up just like in a singleplayer game using the Campaign Settings dialog (see G.4). Please keep in mind that multiplayer
games typically progress a bit slower than a single-player session since the speed is dictated by
the player with the slowest machine. So if you want a game that will finish in an hour, keep the
goals simple (1000 population or less, no military activity, etc.) Medium length games (1 to 3
hours) can start to introduce military activity and modest monument goals. And only if you want
a long game should you require large populations, extensive monument building, or a series of
military conquests.
4. Setting up the multiplayer mission
While you are using the Campaign Setting dialog to create your campaign, make sure you have it
set to just one mission. Two or more missions are NOT allowed in multiplayer scenarios. For
that reason the Campaign Intro Text and Campaign Victory Text fields can be left blank. Only
the Intro and Victory text set for Mission #1 is used in a multiplayer scenario.
Select the Edit Mission button to set the intro and victory text for Mission #1. That dialog also
has controls that allow you to control whether or not sabotage is allowed, alliances can be
broken, and if all military targets can be selected. These settings are great for creating a
multiplayer game set in a more chivalrous period of Chinese history. For example, you could
turn off “Food supply,” “Housing” and “Rampage” as targets if you wanted to represent a time
when military actions would have been fought between the warlords themselves (when they
wouldn’t have tried to burn the property of the common citizens of an enemy city).
5. Which buildings, resources, and heroes are appropriate?
You will use the Campaign Setting dialog to control the buildings, heroes, and resources allowed
in the campaign, just like in a single-player game. Keep in mind that all the players use the same
set of heroes and allowable buildings. If desired, use the Select Allowed Buildings dialog to set
the “time period” for your campaign. If it is set near 1000 CE, you can allow money printers,
chariots, lacquerware and all four religions. Only bronzeware makers and chariot forts would be
turned off. Older campaigns would have fewer buildings as appropriate to the time period
chosen.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 36
We recommend that ALL resources be allowed on the Campaign Setting dialog for a multiplayer
scenario. That’s because you will limit the resources at each player city instead, as described
next.
6. Setting up the player cities and factions
Multiplayer campaigns should have 8 or more player cities. Remember to set each one to a
player city using the City Properties panel on the Empire Map. All of these cities should have a
city map chosen for them. We strongly
recommend using city maps shipped
with the original game for multiplayer
scenarios. Restricting yourself to this
set of maps means you don’t have to
transfer your custom maps to the other
players in order to play out the
multiplayer scenario.
As mentioned above, the allowable
resources are set uniquely for each
player city. With a player city
selected, choose the Empire City
Sites menu’s entry called Resources. The Select Allowed Resources dialog appears, allowing
you to chose the available resources for this city only. You will alternately need to select each
player city on the map and set these resources once for each city. Try and vary the resources to
encourage the players to trade.
For multiplayer scenarios where you want competing factions, you can assign each city in the
empire to one faction or to no faction. You do this for each city in the City Properties control
panel using the button to the right of “Faction.” There are four possible factions. All members of
a faction start the scenario as allies. Of course, a player may break an alliance at any time.
In the Campaign Settings dialog, click on the Factions button to open the Faction dialog. Here
you can set the initial favor levels between the competing factions and between the member
cities of each faction. Favor ranges from 0 (bad) to 100 (good), and the default settings are 50.
Of course, favor only applies to a non-player city’s relationship to a player city. But if you
include a non-player city in a faction (or a city designated as a player city does not get chosen at
game start and therefore reverts to a non-player city), then its initial favor relationship depends
on the setting of this dialog.
To set the favor values, cross-index a faction with a faction, and use the up/down arrow buttons
to adjust the favor (or type a number in the appropriate field). For instance, if you want all cities
in Faction 1 to start with high favor toward one another, adjust the number up to 70 or more in
the first column of the first row. If you want Faction 1 cities to start with low favor toward
Faction 2 cities, adjust the favor down to 30 or less in the second column of the first row.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 37
7. Setting up non-player cities
Don’t forget to add non-player cities to the Empire Map to serve as potential trade partners. You
will need them if you want to include Spices or Jade in your scenario. It is also good to have
non-player trade cities included to allow the players to earn money in trade (to finance the wars
that may be occurring across China!).
8. Add some events
You are almost done, but you can add some spice to your multiplayer scenario with a few events.
Add events to the scenario just like you would in single-player campaigns. The only difference is
that each event affects all players. So if you script an earthquake … everyone will get an
earthquake. To make these events interesting, we suggest spreading the range of years out. An
earthquake scripted to arrive from year 2 to year 10 will affect all players (assuming the game
lasts at least 10 years), but each one will be hit in a random year within the scripted range. This
setting is particularly effective in cooperative scenarios. The players can take turns bailing each
other out from the earthquakes since not everyone is affected at the same time.
Once you have added the events, save your campaign just like a single-player campaign.
9. Test your campaign
Emperor’s multiplayer code allows games with just 1 player. This feature was included just so
designers could test their multiplayer campaign on their own. Since you don’t need other players,
you can use the “Other Multiplayer” button on the Lobby login screen to set up a LAN or
DirectConnect game to test your campaign. That saves you the trouble of going to the lobby and
having your test game get confused with all the other multiplayer activity in the Sierra Lobby.
To test your campaign thoroughly, you should try out all possible player cities. That is time
consuming, so perhaps after you get a few of them tested and you are sure the events work
properly, you can go recruit some other players to “beta test” your campaign.
M.
File Names and Other Technical Information
When you create a campaign, a new folder with your campaign's file name will be placed in your
'Campaigns' folder. The following files are found inside this new folder:
yourcampaignfilename.set. This file contains all of the campaign's settings.
yourcampaignfilenameP.map. This file contains details about your game’s empire map.
Up in the main ‘Campaigns’ folder is another file:
yourcampaignfilename.pak. This is the file the program reads when you play your
campaign. If you want to share your campaign with others, send them this file.
Finally, in the ‘Cities’ folder you will find all of the city-level maps that you have created, each
with an extension of “.MAP”.
If you want others to be able to edit your campaign, you'll need to send them all of these files.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 38
N. Support/Warranty
1. Customer Service, Support and Sales
United States
U.S.A. Sales Phone: (800) 757-7707
Hours: Monday-Friday 8 AM to 5 PM PST
International Sales: 310-649-8000
Hours: Monday-Friday 8 AM to 5 PM PST
Fax: (310) 258-0744
Sierra Entertainment, Inc.
6060 Center Drive
6th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90045
(800-757-7707)
Fax: (310) 258-0744
http://www.sierra.com
United Kingdom
Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing UK Ltd.
Main: (0118) 920-9111
Monday-Friday, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Fax: (0118) 987-5603
Disk/CD replacements in the U.K. are £6.00,
or £7.00 outside the UK. Add "ATTN.: Returns."
2 Beacontree Plaza,
Gillette Way,
Reading, Berkshire
RG2 0BS United Kingdom
France
Téléphone : 01 30 67 90 53
Du lundi au jeudi, de 9h00 à 18h00
Le vendredi, de 9h00 à 17h00
Fax: 01 30 67 90 94
Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing France
Vente par Correspondance
32, Av de l'Europe
Bât Energy 1 (2e étage)
78 941 VELIZY-VILLACOUBLAY CEDEX
France
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 39
Germany
Mo-Fr von 10.00 bis 19.00 Uhr
Tel.: +49 (0) 6103-99 40 106*
Fax: +49 (0) 6103-99 40 155*
*innerhalb Deutschlands zum normalen Telefontarif
Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing Deutschland GmbH
DIREKTKUNDENSERVICE
Paul-Ehrlich-Str. 1
D-63225 Langen
Deutschland
Online-informationen und Webshop:
http://www.sierra.de
On-Line Sales
CompuServe United Kingdom: GO UKSIERRA
CompuServe France: GO FRSIERRA
Internet USA: http://www.sierra.com
Internet United Kingdom: http://www.sierra-online.co.uk
Internet France: http://www.sierra.fr
Internet Germany: http://www.sierra.de
Disk and/or Manual Replacement:
Product Returns*:
Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing International
Sierra Warranty Returns
4247 South Minnewawa Ave.
Fresno, CA 93725
Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing International
Sierra CD/Doco Replacement
4247 South Minnewawa Ave.
Fresno, CA 93725
NOTE: To replace your CD(s) please send only the damaged CD and a copy of your dated
receipt, if less then 90 days. After 90 days please include a $10.00 handling fee along with the
CD(s). For Documentation replacement, please include a $5.00 handling fee and a photocopy
ONLY of either your disk or CD. Payment should be made at the time of your request. Sorry, no
credit cards.
* Returns to this address valid in North America only.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 40
2. Technical Support
North America
Sierra Entertainment offers a 24-hour automated technical support line with recorded answers to
the most frequently asked technical questions. To access this service, call (310) 649-8033, and
follow the recorded instructions to find your specific topic and resolve the issue. If this fails to
solve your problem, you may still write or fax us with your questions, or contact us via our Web
site - http://support.vugames.com.
Sierra Entertainment
Technical Support
4247 South Minnewawa Avenue
Fresno, CA 93725
Main: (310) 649-8033
Monday-Friday, 8:00 A.M.- 4:45 P.M. PST
Fax: (310) 258-0755
http://support.vugames.com
United Kingdom
Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing UK Ltd. offers a 24-hour Automated Technical Support
line with recorded answers to the most frequently asked technical questions. To access this
service, call (0118) 920-9111, and follow the recorded instructions to find your specific topic and
resolve the issue. If this fails to solve your problem, you may still write or fax us with your
questions, or contact us via the Internet.
Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing UK Ltd.
2 Beacontree Plaza,
Gillette Way,
Reading, Berkshire
RG2 0BS United Kingdom
Main: (0118) 920-9111
Monday-Friday, 9:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.
Fax: (0118) 987-5603
http://www.sierra-online.co.uk
France
Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing France
Support Technique
32, Av de l'Europe
Bât Energy 1
78 941 VELIZY VILLACOUBLAY CDEX
France
Téléphone : 0 891 670 800 (0,22 euro/mn)
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 41
Serveur vocal 24H/24 et 7J/7
Techniciens du Lundi au Vendredi de 8H00 à 21H00
Samedi, Dimanche et jours fériés de 10H00 à 18H00
Fax : 01 30 67 90 65
Courrier électronique : support@sierra.fr
http://www.sierra.fr
Germany
Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing Deutschland GmbH
Technischer Support
Paul-Ehrlich-Straße 1
D-63225 Langen
Deutschland
Montag bis Freitag von 10 - 19Uhr
Tech Support Tel: +49 (0) 6103-99-40-940
Fax: +49 (0) 6103-99-40-188
Weitere Hilfen, Patches etc. finden Sie im Internet unter:
http://www.sierra.de
http://www.sierra.de/support
Spain
Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing España
NUESTRA SEÑORA DE VALVERDE Nº 23
28034 MADRID
Spain
Teléfono de Soporte Técnico: 91 735 34 37
Soporte técnico de lunes a viernes
de 09:30 a 15:00 y de 16:00 a 18:30
www.vup-interactive.es
Soporte Tecnico: soporte@vup-interactive.es
Comercial: comercial@vup-interactive.es
Italy
Contattare il vostro distributore.
3. Sierra Warranty and Legal Information
You are entitled to use this product for your own use, but may not copy, reproduce, translate,
publicly perform, display, or reduce to any electronic medium or machine- readable form,
reproductions of the software or manual to other parties in any way, nor sell, rent or lease the
product to others without prior written permission of Sierra. You may use one copy of the
product on a single computer.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 42
YOU MAY NOT NETWORK THE PRODUCT OR OTHERWISE INSTALL IT OR USE IT
ON MORE THAN ONE COMPUTER AT THE SAME TIME.
UNAUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIONS: SIERRA WARRANTS ONLY THAT THE
PROGRAM WILL PERFORM AS DESCRIBED IN THE USER DOCUMENTATION. NO
OTHER ADVERTISING, DESCRIPTION, OR REPRESENTATION, WHETHER MADE BY
A SIERRA DEALER, DISTRIBUTOR, AGENT, OR EMPLOYEE, SHALL BE BINDING
UPON SIERRA OR SHALL CHANGE THE TERMS OF THIS WARRANTY.
IMPLIED WARRANTIES LIMITED: EXCEPT AS STATED ABOVE, SIERRA MAKES NO
WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, REGARDING THIS PRODUCT. SIERRA
DISCLAIMS ANY WARRANTY THAT THE SOFTWARE IS FIT FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE, AND ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY SHALL BE
LIMITED TO THE NINETY (90) DAY DURATION OF THIS LIMITED EXPRESS
WARRANTY AND IS OTHERWISE EXPRESSLY AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMED.
SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG AN IMPLIED
WARRANTY LASTS, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
NO CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES: SIERRA SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR SPECIAL,
INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR OTHER DAMAGES, EVEN IF SIERRA IS
ADVISED OF OR AWARE OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. THIS MEANS
THAT SIERRA SHALL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE OR LIABLE FOR LOST PROFITS OR
REVENUES, OR FOR DAMAGES OR COSTS INCURRED AS A RESULT OF LOSS OF
TIME, DATA OR USE OF THE SOFTWARE, OR FROM ANY OTHER CAUSE EXCEPT
THE ACTUAL COST OF THE PRODUCT. IN NO EVENT SHALL SIERRA'S LIABILITY
EXCEED THE PURCHASE PRICE OF THIS PRODUCT. SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW
THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
Copyright ((c)2002 Sierra Entertainment)
(c)1998-2002 Sierra Entertainment, Inc.
Sierra is a trademark of Sierra Entertainment.
Emperor: Rise of the Middle Kingdom (Campaign Creator User’s Guide) – Page 43
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