ICD-10 Is Your Practice Ready?

ICD-10 Is Your Practice Ready?
ICD-10
Is Your Practice Ready?
Helping you with the transition
Contents
Introduction
A changing landscape
Budgets and payments
3
The position of CMS
3
Top five risks of ICD-10 conversion
3
How much cash should you have available during the first few months
following the implementation of the ICD-10 coding system?
4
Have you set a goal to clear out all ICD-9 billings before starting to bill ICD-10
effective October 1, 2015?
4
Is your practice ready?
4
Checklist
The time to start is yesterday
5
Have you developed an ICD-10 implementation plan?
5
Organize an implementation effort
6
Make sure you understand testing is essential - you must be aggressive!
6
Establish a communication plan
6
Have you created an ICD-10 budget?
7
Have you contacted your top three payers?
7
Payer questions
Checklist
Have you conducted an ICD-10 impact analysis?
Impact analysis
Training
Vendors
8
8
Worksheet
9
Who should be trained?
10
Have you conducted ICD-10 training sessions with your staff?
10
Three training approaches to consider
10
Do your physicians understand the impact of ICD-10?
11
Potential impacted areas
12
Have your physicians participated in training?
12
Have you developed a plan to train your coding staff?
13
Do you plan to start coding after training, but before October 1, 2015 to
minimize impact and maintain office efficiency?
13
Will you conduct any pre-October 1 coding audits?
14
Are you using a Superbill?
14
Are your vendors ICD-10 ready?
Checklist
15
Additional vendor questions to consider
Checklist
16
Know your vendors’ plans
17
AAPC diagram
ICD-10 will change everything. Will you be ready?
18
AAPC Top 50 codes
ICD-9 to ICD-10 crosswalk (multispecialty)
19
Resources
Third-party sources of guidance are shown in [square brackets].
2 Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015
25
Introduction
The long delayed and controversial implementation of ICD-10-CM scheduled
for October 1, 2015 is just around the corner.
The information in this document is compiled from various sources to provide your practice
with a comprehensive checklist. Coding backlogs and increased denials resulting from the
ICD-10 transition will impact reimbursement, and the need for your organization to develop a
contingency plan which focuses on cash flow decreases are more important than ever.
A changing landscape
The position of CMS
As of July 2015, CMS and other major payers
have announced that on October 1, 2015 they
will only accept ICD-10 coding.
The guidelines stress the importance of
compliant coding, including use of specific
codes, even if general ones exist. This has
contributed to the broader concern that lack
of specificity, or even unintentional mistakes,
could result in claim rejections, denials, and
interruptions in cash flow.
Top five risks of ICD-10 conversion
[athenahealth]
1 Lack of preparation by your billing, practice
management and EMR vendor
2 Lack of preparation by your payers
3 Insufficient training for your staff
4 Reduced physician and staff productivity
5 Financial risk associated with high transition
costs.
CMS has addressed these concerns in a
guidance document which states:
✓✓ For one year, CMS contractors will not
deny claims solely on the basis of lack of
specificity, as long as the code is generally
correct (from the right family).
✓✓ For 2015, CMS will not impose a penalty
under any of its quality reporting programs
on the basis of lack of specificity, as long as
the code is generally correct (from the right
family).
✓✓ When contractors cannot process a claim
due to internal administrative problems,
an advance partial payment may be
applied for.
Financial risk will be associated with
high transition costs. The two biggest
intangible costs will come after
implementation from lost productivity
and denied or delayed claims due to
coding mistakes.
Avery Hurt for Physicians Practice
Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015 3
How much cash should you have available during the first few months
following the implementation of the ICD-10 coding system?
Industry experts suggest practices should have three to six months of operating cash set aside, or
available in the form of a line of credit.
Have you set a goal to clear out all ICD-9 billings before starting to bill ICD-10
effective October 1, 2015?
Compare your days to pay prior to October 1, and then post October 1 to verify if you are
experiencing any delays receiving payments.
Is your practice ready?
To get a sense of where your practice currently stands, see how many of the following questions
you can answer.
Encounter documentation
££ What is your EHR vendor’s readiness plan?
££ Can you name all the vendors with which you exchange diagnosis information?
££ Will your providers’ documentation workflows be specific enough for ICD-10?
££ Do you have a training plan for MAs, physicians, and billing staff?
Quality measurement
££ Do you know when you’ll need to generate the necessary reporting updates?
££ How will your utilization review or population management reports change?
Revenue cycle impact
££ How many certified medical billers do you have? Do they need to re-certify?
££ Do you know which ICD-9 codes are commonly used on your claims?
££ How are they changing in ICD-10?
££ What rules might payers implement, and what are some errors you might see?
http://cdn.roadto10.org/wp-uploads/2015/06/ICD10_Quick_Start_Guide.pdf
CMS ICD-10 FAQs: http://www.ahima.org/topics/icd10/faqs
CMS ICD-10: Are you ready? http://dc.cn.ubm-us.com/i/530145-pulse-icd-10-ebook-2016/2
4 Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015
The time to start is yesterday
Determine where change needs to happen and what it will cost
• Aligning your vendors is key to success
• Do not be conservative when allocating a budget
• Physicians must be trained as well - ICD-10-CM is very different
• Examine your payer policies; some are already translated!
• Use 5010 experience to transition into ICD-10
• Take advantage of resources that are available at no charge
• Create a list of the top 75 diagnoses codes for your practice and make sure your staff is most
familiar with these.
Have you developed an ICD-10 implementation plan?
Divide plan into sections:
• Planning - organize implementation effort and establish a communication plan
• Vendors - contact system vendors
• Budgeting - estimate budget
• Training - develop training plan, analyze business processes and policy change development
• Testing - deployment of code
• Payers - communicate and assess their readiness
• Go-live / Monitoring - implementation compliance
CMS ICD-10: Get Ready Now!
http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/ICD10/Downloads/CMSICD10FullInfographic.pdf
Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015 5
Organize an implementation effort
Look at all areas that will impact your practice and identify each area that will be affected.
✓✓ List of codes
✓✓ Practice management system
✓✓ Electronic medical record (if applicable)
✓✓ Superbills
✓✓ Clinical areas and pharmacy
Schedule regular meetings to share information with physicians and discuss progress and barriers
to implementation.
AMA ICD-10 Implementation Project Plan Template:
https://download.ama-assn.org/resources/doc/washington/icd-10-project-plan-template.xls
Make sure you understand testing is essential - you must be aggressive!
30%
30% of heathcare payers
plan to test with most of their
healthcare providers
60%
60% plan to test with a sample
of their providers
10%
10% plan to test
clearinghouses only
IDC-10 Readiness Survey Results (1174 participants).
Posted February 2015 by Workgroup Electronics Data Interchange (WEDI)
Establish a communication plan
Write and distribute a plan covering how and when things will happen, such as:
✓✓ Training
✓✓ Testing
✓✓ Systems testing
✓✓ Go-live date
✓✓ Chart audits
✓✓ Monitoring
✓✓ Dual coding
✓✓ Shut down of ICD-9-CM
6 Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015
Budgets and payments
Have you created an ICD-10 budget?
Budget considerations should include:
Cost breakdown example:
New hardware cost
New software cost and licensing
Training
Parallel coding
Physician query
Productivity loss
Temporary workers
Jeopardy to cash flow
Printing and document change
Transcription
Lending/charge cards
Overtime
Education
Process analysis
Superbill changes
IT costs
Increased doc.
Cash flow disrupt.
$ 2,500
$ 7,000
$ 3,000
$ 7,500
$44,000
$20,000
TOTAL
$84,000
ICD-10 Cost Calculator:
http://www.aafp.org/practice-management/payment/coding.html
Have you contacted your top three payers?
Lack of preparation by your payers is going to happen. It’s happened with other big industry
transitions such as NPI and ANSI-5010, and it’s bound to happen with ICD-10.
New Payer contracts (perhaps some even before the ICD-10 deadline) will need to be renegotiated using ICD-10, and practices need to fully understand ICD-10 to determine if contracts
are favorable.
Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015 7
Payer question checklist
££ Are your top payers ready for ICD-10?
££ Other than CMS, can you do any testing? What date can you begin testing?
££ What specifically are they testing?
££ Will testing provide you with what you need to know about compliance?
££ How disruptive is testing?
££ What type of rejections/denials might you expect?
££ Do your payers see any increase in days to receiving payment?
££ Will it cost you money in software, staffing or claim delays?
££ Have you confirmed how your systems/payers will handle billing pre October 1 ICD-9 claims
and post October 1 ICD-10 claims at the same time?
Medicare Testing includes two types: Acknowledgement Testing and End-to-end Testing. Some of
these opportunities are limited in your MAC jurisdiction.
Query your vendors and ask if they participated, and if so, what were the results?
CMS Payer Assessment
http://cdn.roadto10.org/wp-uploads/2013/12/Payer-Assessment.doc
To access the CMS MCD, visit:
http://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/indexes/national-and-local-indexes.aspx
Have you conducted an ICD-10 impact analysis?
• Develop a reasonable timeline that can be accomplished in your practice.
• Map out a project plan using a MS Excel spreadsheet with benchmarks and status of
completion. Develop a plan for Systems, Processes, Departments, and Training.
• Managers and/or coders should get physician approval for the project plan and its impact on
the practice. Make sure you show and tell them the level of work it will take.
8 Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015
Impact analysis worksheet
Use this worksheet to track the various systems and processes that use ICD-9 today.
The assumption is that all current systems that use ICD-9 will need to be upgraded to ICD-10.
Review your current systems, and consider converting manual processes to electronic processes.
Work process
People
Systems
Claims submission
Billing system
Posting payments
Clinical documentation,
eg, patient reports, EMR
Patient registration system
Checking patient’s eligibility
Verifying referral/
prior authorization
Writing referrals
Writing orders
Encounter forms
Coding tool, eg, superbills,
programs, books, resource
materials
Quality reporting
Public health reporting
Disease registry/
disease management
Health insurance contracting
Laboratory systems
Other
Other
http://www.cms.org/uploads/Impact-Analysis-Worksheet.pdf
Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015 9
Training
Who should be trained?
Physicians, coders, billing staff, administration, nurses, MAs, pharmacists.
• Determine the required number of hours per role, dependent on tasks and coding interface.
Coders must pass proficiency test.
• Establish a training schedule or ‘train the trainer’ and choose a trusted coding employee to
communicate necessary information to clinicians.
• Your coding point person should flag any claims that have not been paid as the filing deadline
draws near, in case the payer never received it or rejects it with no time to resubmit.
Insufficient training for your staff presents a HIGH risk. Learning all new information will be a
significant challenge for providers and their staff, and if not handled efficiently and effectively,
ICD-10 could become very costly for your practice.
ICD-10 is far more complex than ICD-9, breaking diagnosis codes down to a much finer level of
granularity. Ensure you are staffed for the change.
Have you conducted ICD-10 training sessions with your staff?
££ Who will be responsible for training staff?
££ Have you determined who will code for ICD-10 and any extra training required?
££ Have you identified a physician champion expert for the practice who will assist with initial and
future training needs?
This expert should be trained on all aspects of ICD-10 including the general equivalence
mappings (GEMs), what GEMs are, and understanding why GEMs are not a substitute for
appropriate coding, but should be used only as a mapping tool between ICD-9 and ICD-10.
££ Have you reviewed your workflow? (Note: temporary coders may impact your workflow)
10 Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015
Three training approaches to consider
[Angie Comfort for Physicians Practice]
1
Awareness training
Office managers, schedulers, and non-clinical personnel are examples of roles that may
need only basic ICD-10 training. Engage these employees with small doses of what they
need to know throughout the next few months.
2
Intense training
Quality Managers, Compliance Officers,
Physicians, PAs, NPs, Registered Nurses,
Medical Assistants, Imaging or Lab
Managers fall into the intense training
category.
Reassure physicians the conversion
is not a bureaucratic change that
will only fall in the hands of the
administrator...
Schedule regular meetings to share
information with physicians and
discuss progress and barriers of
implementation. Do not joke about
this or tell them it will be delayed.
These employees need training for ICD-10
awareness, but would additionally need
to have targeted training based on the
practices’ top 20 billed diagnosis codes.
Main points to be communicated are the
Roberta Buell, OnPoint Oncology
differences between ICD-9 and ICD-10,
code structure, and conventions review.
Some of the areas will need to be reviewed
again at different intervals to retain the information and changes between the two
code sets.
3
Extensive training
This training includes any practice employee whose role includes assigning ICD-9 codes for
ordering tests, reimbursement, or quality initiatives.
One valuable exercise would be to have the expert trainer review the current clinician
documentation and identify gaps that need to be remedied for ICD-10 readiness.
Do your physicians understand
the impact of ICD-10?
The transition to ICD-10 will be disruptive, and may well impact cash flow in your practice.
• Make sure lines of credit are in place. Perform a blitz and get rid of as much A/R as you can by
September 30.
Diagnostic codes are used everywhere - used by every person, every process, every system.
Superbills, Payments/EOBs/ERAs, Referrals, Contracts, EMRs/Order Entry, Payer Policies.
Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015 11
Potential impacted areas
Clinical Area
Patient coverage
Disability requests
Superbills
ABNs
Managers
Policies and procedures
Vendor/payer contracts
Budgets
Training plan
Physicians
Documentation
Code specialty
Problem lists
Lab
Documentation
Reporting
Billing
Policies and procedures
Training
Coding
Code set
Clinical knowledge
Concurrent use
Front Desk
Referrals/history codes
Systems
Nurses
Forms
Documentation
Prior Authorization
Have your physicians participated in training?
Will the physician be assigning codes in ICD-10?
✓✓ Demonstrate the differences in coding using internal or external resources.
✓✓ If the physician is selecting the ICD-10 code, either on a superbill or within an EHR, a detailed
course/training covering guidelines and conversions may be in order.
✓✓ If the physician is coding, then train specifically on their patient population disease site.
✓✓ Train physician on the use of key terms per disease site when dictating or completing
assessment.
✓✓ When training, make sure you have a post test (use coding examples from your charts).
✓✓ Consider training on specific medical terminology for updated coding.
If the physician has coding staff that assign the
diagnosis codes based on the documentation,
the focus of training should be on the nuances of
documentation for ICD-10.
Road To 10: Physician Champion Tips
http://www.roadto10.org/physician-champion-tips/
12 Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015
Perhaps the best way to help
physicians improve their coding
accuracy is to spend 10 minutes at
physician meetings having them read
a blinded note and coding it together
with a certified coder.
Shelly Schwartz
Have you developed a plan to train your coding staff?
AHIMA estimates that approximately 16 hours of hands-on coding training in ICD-10 will be
needed for an individual to learn the new code set.
Coders must understand how to:
✓✓ Use all resources available to ensure continued accuracy of coded data
✓✓ Identify the differences between ICD-9 and ICD-10 coding guidelines
✓✓ Ensure accurate and compliant ICD-10 coding on claims.
The CMS website provides a list of the mappings of ICD-9 to ICD-10 codes called the General
Equivalence Mappings (GEMs). View it here:
http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/ICD10/2015-ICD-10-CM-and-GEMs.html
This tool is helpful as a first step for practices to compare the commonly used ICD-9 codes to the
related ICD-10 codes. However, the user must keep in mind GEMs are not a crosswalk.
The full list of ICD-10 codes, including coding guidelines and conventions, must be reviewed to
determine the appropriate code assignment.
Do you plan to start coding after training, but before October 1, 2015 to
minimize impact and maintain office efficiency?
££ When you start practicing coding after training consider:
Week 1 - Coding one patient per MD per day
Week 2 - Coding two patients per MD per day
££ Where will you be able to store the ICD-10
codes before October 1?
The list of ICD-10 codes can be overwhelming;
therefore, you should ensure your staff is
familiar with your top 50-75 codes. Do not
attempt to only use a crosswalk — you may
need to code with greater specificity.
Initial training exercise: Have
coders and billing staff use existing
documentation to code patient
encounters prior to the ICD-10
transition. Be sure to monitor every
claim prior to submission for code
compliance.
Greg Vap for Physicians Practice
Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015 13
Will you conduct any pre-October 1 coding audits?
• Who will audit the coding by physician, by coder, etc., and check for accuracy?
• Will you be coding your problem list effective October 1 with ICD-10?
Start with only the codes that are needed for billing, and then work your way to coding all
problems. For coding problems, review the Continuity of Care document that you may receive
from other providers.
Coding tools:
EncoderPro https://optumcoding.com/Product/20510
Supercoder http://www.supercoder.com
CodeItRightOnline http://www.codeitrightonline.com
Are you using a Superbill?
If yes, what method will you be using with ICD-10? (ie, ICD-10 manual, phone app)
✓✓ Create Superbills per disease site and for symptom management.
✓✓ Do NOT convert superbills/charge documents too early as things can change.
✓✓ Assign ICD-10 CM codes directly, not by applying ICD-9 CM to ICD-10 CM map, or use a tool
that has REMS and GEMS.
http://www.physicianspractice.com/icd-10/superbill-and-forms-revision-icd-10
Billing services assessment
Evaluate your billing department:
http://cdn.roadto10.org/wp-uploads/2013/12/Billing-Service-Assessment.doc
Diagnosis code impact inventory template:
http://cdn.roadto10.org/wp-uploads/2013/12/Process-and-System-Inventory-Template.doc
14 Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015
The ICD-10 set contains about 68,000 codes with three to seven characters, compared to only
13,000 codes in the ICD-9 set, each three to five characters long. Of course, no single provider
will be using all 68,000 new codes but it’s important to recognize that all providers face an
increase in the number of relevant codes for use within their practices.
While the increased specificity allows for more information to be conveyed in a code — such
as reporting what side of the body or limb is being evaluated — many in the healthcare
industry have voiced concern that there is no simple translation between ICD-9 and ICD-10
diagnosis code sets. There are some one-to-one correspondences, but often a single ICD-9
code can map to a number of ICD-10 codes, or several ICD-9 codes match with one ICD-10
code — increasing the likelihood of potential miscoding.
Are your vendors ICD-10 ready?
To assess whether your vendor is prepared, ask these questions:
££ What date will you be ready for ICD-10?
££ When will you be able to show me how ICD-10 will function in my system?
££ Will you be able to fully support ICD-10?
££ Is your software going to run on the same platform and database currently used?
££ Will I need to re-customize my templates and content for ICD-10 compliance?
££ When can I begin testing?
££ Will you support both ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes?
££ Will I be able to search for ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes?
££ Will you help me test ICD-10 compliance with my payers?
££ Are there any upgrade costs or fees associated?
££ What tools, training and support will you provide?
££ Will you be able to run test claims prior to October 1, 2015?
££ How will existing interfaces with other vendors be upgraded?
££ Do you know when most payers will begin accepting ICD-10 codes for pre-authorizations for
dates of services that will take place after October 1, 2015?
Technology vendor assessment:
http://cdn.roadto10.org/wp-uploads/2013/12/Technology-Vendor-Assessment.doc
Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015 15
Additional vendor questions to consider
££ Have you spoken with your clearinghouse and asked if they are ready to handle your ICD-10
feed? Have they tested, and if so, with whom?
££ What issues do they foresee? Is there anything that you can do to assist on the practice side?
££ Did you or your clearinghouse participate in any of the CMS testing periods (last period was
June 1-5)?
££ If your EMR and PM systems support both ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes, where will they be
located?
This is important because dual compatibility is required since not all insurance claims will be
forced to submit ICD-10 coding. An example of this is Workers’ Compensation.
££ Is your coding translated to incentive programs? (eg, PQRS, EHR)
££ Will your practice require new hardware due to updates? (computers, servers, etc.)
££ Do you have a lab interface?
££ Are ICD-10 codes imported or exported and are both systems ready?
Determine when they allow for test submissions of ICD-10 claims, which will assist in the
identification of problems with both provider and payer systems that may delay reimbursement.
http://cdn.roadto10.org/wp-uploads/2013/12/Clearinghouse-Assessment.doc
Prepare for costly software upgrades and lost or delayed revenue due to delayed preparation
for ICD-10 by some payers — which, as we’ve already established, is highly likely.
It is important to recognize that the complexity of the ICD-10 transition will make it virtually
impossible for you to go it alone. To make the transition successful, it is essential that your
billing, practice management, and EHR vendor help you plan and execute the changes that
need to be made to your practice processes and systems.
October is not a good time to schedule vacations!
16 Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015
Know your vendors’ plans
[athenahealth]
Your billing, practice management, and EHR vendors should be working hard right now, with you
and your payers, to adapt your processes and systems for the changeover to ICD-10. Your vendor
should have the software, knowledge and services to make the transition as smooth as possible.
Software
• Continuously updated as the industry moves toward the ICD-10 cutover
• Flexibility to support a variety of vendor requirements and timelines
Knowledge
• Leverage learning from ANSI 5010 conversion for the smoothest possible ICD-10 conversion
• Conduct extensive and ongoing payer readiness surveys
• Reaffirm the relationships with payers that enable proactive creation of updated coding rules
Service
• Conduct individual payer and vendor testing, when available
• Establish cross-functional teams monitoring and responding in real-time to changes in the
performance of clients, vendors, and payers
• Streamline triage workflow to provide quick prioritization and problem resolution
Your billing, practice management and EHR vendor should provide:
• Support for diagnosis code selection
• Dual billing workflows to support coding staff
• Testing with payers and vendors on ICD-10, as available
• Movement of payers and vendors to ICD-10
• Management of highly specified implementations (eg, payers, labs, interfaces, reports)
• Updates to all relevant rules (eg, billing, coding, utilization)
• Ongoing communications on the progress of the conversion
• Tips and reporting tools to minimize productivity loss during transition (eg, guidance on
metrics to track, workflows to review, timelines, etc.)
• Training and consideration of a period of reduced productivity as your practice adapts to the
new codes.
Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015 17
Nurse
Policies and Procedures:
All payer reimbursement
policies may be revised.
Billing
ICD-10 Will Change Everything
Will You Be Ready?
Physicians
Documentation:
The need for specificity dramatically increases
by requiring laterality, stages of healing, weeks in
pregnancy, episodes of care, and much more.
Code Training:
Codes increase from 17,000 to 140,000.
Physicians must be trained.
Forms:
Every order must be revised or recreated.
Documentation:
Must use increased specificity
Prior Authorizations:
Policies may change, requiring training and updates.
Lab
Documentation:
Must use increased specificity
Reporting:
Health plans will have new requirements
for the ordering and reporting of services.
Clinical Area
Patient Coverage:
Health plan policies, payment
limitations, and new ABN forms
are likely.
Superbills:
Revisions required and paper superbills maybe
impossible.
Systems:
Updates to systems are likely required
and may impact patient encounters
HIPAA:
Privacy policies must be revised and
patients will need to sign the new forms.
Front Desk
ABNs:
Health plans will revise all policies linked to LCDs
or NCDs, etc., ABN forms must be reformatted
and patients will require education.
Training:
Billing department must be trained on new
policies and procedures and the ICD-10-CM
code set.
Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015
Managers
New Policies and Procedures:
Any policy or procedure associated with a
diagnosis code, disease management,
tracking, or PQRI must be revised.
Vendor and Payer Contracts:
All contracts must be evaluated and updated.
Budgets:
Changes to software, training, new contracts, new Paperwork
will have to be paid for.
Training Plan:
Everyone in the practice will need training on the changes.
Coding
Code Set:
Codes will increase from 17,000 to
140,000. As a result, code books and
styles will completely change.
Clinical Knowledge:
More detailed knowledge of anatomy and medical
terminology will be required with increased specificity and
more codes.
Concurrent Use:
Coders may need to use ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM
concurrently for a period of time until all claims are resolved.
AAPC can help every aspect of your practice’s transition to ICD-10. Whether you just want the basics or need complete implementation
training, AAPC has a solution to fit your needs.
18 Fast Forward
Top 50 Codes
ICD-9-CM Code
ICD-10-CM Code(s)
2015
Multispecialty
ICD-9-CM Code
ICD-10-CM Code(s)
789.00
Abdominal pain, unspecified site
311
Depressive disorder, not elsewhere classified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
R10.9 Unspecified abdominal pain
*There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
R10.0 Acute abdomen
R10.10 Upper abdominal pain, unspecified
R10.11 Right upper quadrant pain
R10.12 Left upper quadrant pain
R10.13 Epigastric pain
R10.2 Pelvic and perineal pain
R10.30 Lower abdominal pain, unspecified
R10.31 Right lower quadrant pain
R10.32 Left lower quadrant pain
R10.33 Periumbilical pain
R10.84 Generalized abdominal pain
ICD-10-CM
Codes
F32.9 Major depressive disorder, single episode, unspecified
*There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
F32.0 Major depressive disorder, single episode, mild
F32.1 Major depressive disorder, single episode, moderate
F32.2 Major depressive disorder, single episode, severe without
psychotic features
F32.3 Major depressive disorder, single episode, severe with
psychotic features
F32.4 Major depressive disorder, single episode, in partial remission
F32.5 Major depressive disorder, single episode, in full remission
F32.8 Other depressive episodes
466.0
Acute bronchitis
461.9
Acute sinusitis, unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
ICD-10-CM
Codes
J01.90 Acute sinusitis, unspecified
**Use additional code (B95-B97) to identify infectious agent
* There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
J01.00 Acute maxillary sinusitis, unspecified
J01.10 Acute frontal sinusitis, unspecified
J01.20 Acute ethmoidal sinusitis, unspecified
J01.30 Acute sphenoidal sinusitis, unspecified
J01.40 Acute pansinusitis, unspecified
J01.80 Other acute sinusitis
J20.9 Acute bronchitis, unspecified
* There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
J20.0 Acute bronchitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae
J20.1 Acute bronchitis due to Hemophilus influenzae
J20.2 Acute bronchitis due to streptococcus
J20.3 Acute bronchitis due to coxsackievirus
J20.4 Acute bronchitis due to parainfluenza virus
J20.5 Acute bronchitis due to respiratory syncytial virus
J20.6 Acute bronchitis due to rhinovirus
J20.7 Acute bronchitis due to echovirus
J20.8 Acute bronchitis due to other specified organisms
784.0
Headache
R51 Headache
724.5
Backache, unspecified
250.00
Diabetes mellitus
without mention of
complications type II or
unspecified type, not
stated as uncontrolled
E11.9 Type 2 diabetes mellitus without
complications
ICD-10-CM
Codes
599.0
Urinary tract infection, site not specified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
N39.0 Urinary tract infection, site not specified
** Use additional code (B95-B97)to identify infectious agent
** There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
N30.00 Acute cystitis without hematuria
N30.01 Acute cystitis with hematuria
N30.10 Interstitial cystitis (chronic) without hematuria
N30.11 Interstitial cystitis (chronic) with hematuria
N30.20 Other chronic cystitis without hematuria
N30.21 Other chronic cystitis with hematuria
N30.30 Trigonitis without hematuria
N30.31 Trigonitis with hematuria
N30.40 Irradiation cystitis without hematuria
N30.41 Irradiation cystitis with hematuria
N30.80 Other cystitis without hematuria
N30.81 Other cystitis with hematuria
M54.9 Dorsalgia, unspecified
*There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
M54.89 Other dorsalgia
M54.6 Pain in thoracic spine
M54.5 Low back pain
M53.3 Sacrococcygeal disorders, not elsewhere classified
V72.31
Routine gynecological exam
ICD-10-CM
Codes
Z01.411 Encounter for gynecological examination (general)
(routine) with abnormal findings
* Use additional code to identify abnormal findings
Z01.419 Encounter for gynecological examination (general)
(routine) without abnormal findings
Instructional note under codes should be as follows:
**Use additional code: for screening for human papillomavirus, if applicable (Z11.51) for screening vaginal pap smear, if
applicable (Z12.72) to identify acquired absence of uterus, if
applicable (Z90.71-)
616.10
Vaginitis and vulvovaginitis, unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
N76.0 Acute vaginitis
**Use additional code (B95-B97), to identify infectious agent
There are other codes from this subcategory to describe vaginitis:
N76.1 Subacute and chronic vaginitis
N76.2 Acute vulvitis
N76.3 Subacute and chronic vulvitis
N76.89 Other specified inflammation of vagina and vulva
719.41
Pain in joint, shoulder region
ICD-10-CM
Codes
M25.511 Pain in right shoulder
M25.512 Pain in left shoulder
M25.519 Pain in unspecified shoulder
Copyright © 2015 AAPC all rights reserved — 2480 S. 3850 W. Suite B. Salt Lake City, Utah, 84120 — 800-626-2633 — www.aapc.com/icd-10/
Page 1
Fast Forward
Top 50 Codes
ICD-9-CM Code
ICD-10-CM Code(s)
2015
Multispecialty
ICD-9-CM Code
ICD-10-CM Code(s)
V10.83
Personal history of other malignant neoplasm of skin
782.3
Edema
ICD-10-CM
Codes
Z85.828 Personal history of other malignant neoplasm of skin
*There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
Z85.820 Personal history of malignant melanoma of skin
Z85.821 Personal history of Merkel cell carcinoma
ICD-10-CM
Codes
R60.0 Localized edema
R60.1 Generalized edema
R60.9 Edema, unspecified
786.2
Cough
V70.0
Routine general medical examination at a health care facility
ICD-10-CM
Codes
Z00.00 Encounter for general adult medical examination without abnormal findings
Z00.01 Encounter for general adult medical examination with
abnormal findings
** Use additional code to identify abnormal findings
729.5
Pain in limb
ICD-10-CM
Codes
M79.609 Pain in unspecified limb
** There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
M79.601 Pain in right arm
M79.602 Pain in left arm
M79.603 Pain in arm, unspecified
M79.604 Pain in right leg
M79.605 Pain in left leg
M79.606 Pain in leg, unspecified
M79.631 Pain in right upper arm
M79.622 Pain in left upper arm
M79.629 Pain in unspecified upper arm
M79.631 Pain in right forearm
M79.632 Pain in left forearm
M79.639 Pain in unspecified forearm
M79.651 Pain in right thigh
M79.652 Pain in left thigh
M79.659 Pain in unspecified thigh
M79.661 Pain in right lower leg
M79.662 Pain in left lower leg
M79.669 Pain in unspecified lower leg
724.1
Pain in thoracic spine
M54.6 Pain in thoracic spine
723.0
Spinal stenosis of
cervical region
M48.02 Spinal stenosis, cervical region
724.3
Sciatica
ICD-10-CM
Codes
M54.30 Sciatica, unspecified site
M54.31 Sciatica, right side
M54.32 Sciatica, left side
M54.40 Lumbago with sciatica, unspecified site
M54.41 Lumbago with sciatica, right side
M54.42 Lumbago with sciatica, left side
706.2
Sebaceous cyst
707.9
Chronic ulcer of unspecified site
ICD-10-CM
Codes
L98.499 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of skin of other sites with
unspecified severity
*There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
L98.411 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of buttock limited to breakdown of skin
L98.412 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of buttock with fat layer
exposed
L98.413 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of buttock with necrosis of
muscle
L98.414 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of buttock with necrosis of
bone
L98.419 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of buttock with unspecified
severity
L98.421 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of back limited to breakdown of skin
L98.422 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of back with fat layer exposed
L98.423 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of back with necrosis of muscle
L98.424 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of back with necrosis of bone
L98.429 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of back with unspecified
severity
L98.491 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of skin of other sites limited
to breakdown of skin
L98.492 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of skin of other sites with
fat layer exposed
L98.493 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of skin of other sites with
necrosis of muscle
L98.494 Non-pressure chronic ulcer of skin of other sites with
necrosis of bone
L72.3 Sebaceous cyst
272.4
Hyperlipidemia, other and unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
E78.4 Other hyperlipidemia
E78.5 Hyperlipidemia, unspecified
**There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
E78.0 Pure hypercholesterolemia
E78.1 Pure hyperglyceridemia
E78.2 Mixed hyperlipidemia
E78.3 Hyperchylomicronemia
E78.6 Lipoprotein deficiency
R05 Cough
786.59
Chest pain, other
722.52
Degeneration of lumbar or lumbosacral intervertebral disc
ICD-10-CM
Codes
R07.89 Other chest pain NOS
R07.82 Intercostal pain
ICD-10-CM
Codes
M51.36 Other intervertebral disc degeneration, lumbar region
M51.37 Other intervertebral disc degeneration, lumbosacral region
Copyright © 2015 AAPC all rights reserved — 2480 S. 3850 W. Suite B. Salt Lake City, Utah, 84120 — 800-626-2633 — www.aapc.com/icd-10/
Page 2
Fast Forward
Top 50 Codes
ICD-9-CM Code
ICD-10-CM Code(s)
592.0
Calculus of kidney
ICD-10-CM
Codes
N20.0 Calculus of kidney
N20.9 Urinary calculus; unspecified
N20.2 Calculus of kidney and ureter
585.9
Chronic kidney disease, unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
N18.9 Chronic kidney disease, unspecified
** Code first any associated:
Diabetic chronic kidney disease (E08.22, E09.22, E10.22,
E11.22, E13.22)
Hypertensive chronic kidney disease (I12-, I13-)
Use additional code to identify kidney transplant status, if
applicable (Z94.0)
** There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
N18.1 Chronic kidney disease, stage 1
N18.2 Chronic kidney disease, stage 2 (mild)
N18.3 Chronic kidney disease, stage 3 (moderate)
N18.4 Chronic kidney disease, stage 4 (severe)
N18.5 Chronic kidney disease, stage 5
N18.6 End stage renal disease
** Use additional code to identify dialysis status (Z99.2)
443.9
Peripheral vascular disease, unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
I73.9 Peripheral vascular disease, unspecified
** There are more specific code choice selections available.
These include:
I73.00 Raynaud’s syndrome without gangrene
I73.01 Raynaud’s syndrome with gangrene
I73.1 Thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger’s disease)
I73.81 Erythromelalgia
I73.89 Other specified peripheral vascular diseases
780.97
Altered mental status
ICD-10-CM
Codes
R41.82 Altered mental status, unspecified
** There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
R41.0 Disorientation, unspecified
R41.81 Age-related cognitive decline
R41.840 Attention and concentration deficit
R41.89 Other symptoms and signs involving cognitive functions
and awareness
327.23
Obstructive sleep apnea (adult)(pediatric)
ICD-10-CM
Codes
G47.33 Obstructive sleep apnea (adult)(pediatric)
** Code also any associated underlying condition
385.30
Cholesteatoma, unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
H71.90 Unspecified cholesteatoma, unspecified ear
H71.91 Unspecified cholesteatoma, right ear
H71.92 Unspecified cholesteatoma, left ear
H71.93 Unspecified cholesteatoma, bilateral
** There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
H71.00 Cholesteatoma of attic, unspecified ear
H71.01 Cholesteatoma of attic, right ear
2015
Multispecialty
ICD-9-CM Code
ICD-10-CM Code(s)
ICD-10-CM
Codes
(cont.)
H71.02 Cholesteatoma of attic, left ear
H71.03 Cholesteatoma of attic, bilateral
H71.10 Cholesteatoma of tympanum, unspecified ear
H71.11 Cholesteatoma of tympanum, right ear
H71.12 Cholesteatoma of tympanum, left ear
H71.13 Cholesteatoma of tympanum, bilateral
H71.20 Cholesteatoma of mastoid, unspecified ear
H71.21 Cholesteatoma of mastoid, right ear
H71.22 Cholesteatoma of mastoid, left ear
H71.23 Cholesteatoma of mastoid, bilateral
H60.40 Cholesteatoma of external ear, unspecified ear
H60.41 Cholesteatoma of right external ear
H60.42 Cholesteatoma of left external ear
H60.43 Cholesteatoma of external ear, bilateral
715.00
Osteoarthrosis, generalized, site unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
M15.0 Primary generalized (osteo)arthritis
M15.4 Erosive (osteo)arthritis
M15.8 Other polyosteoarthritis
M15.9 Polyosteoarthritis, unspecified
729.1
Myalgia and myositis, unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
M79.1 Myalgia
M79.7 Fibromyalgia
M60.9 Myositis, unspecified
**There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
M60.811 Other myositis, right shoulder
M60.822 Other myositis, left shoulder
M60.819 Other myositis, unspecified shoulder
M60.821 Other myositis, right upper arm
M60.822 Other myositis, left upper arm
M60.829 Other myositis, unspecified upper arm
M60.831 Other myositis, right forearm
M60.832 Other myositis, left forearm
M60.839 Other myositis, unspecified forearm
M60.841 Other myositis, right hand
M60.842 Other myositis, left hand
M60.849 Other myositis, unspecified hand
M60.851 Other myositis, right thigh
M60.852 Other myositis, left thigh
M60.859 Other myositis, unspecified thigh
M60.861 Other myositis, right lower leg
M60.862 Other myositis, left lower leg
M60.869 Other myositis, unspecified lower leg
M60.871 Other myositis, right ankle and foot
M60.872 Other myositis, left ankle and foot
M60.879 Other myositis, unspecified ankle and foot
Copyright © 2015 AAPC all rights reserved — 2480 S. 3850 W. Suite B. Salt Lake City, Utah, 84120 — 800-626-2633 — www.aapc.com/icd-10/
Page 3
Fast Forward
Top 50 Codes
ICD-9-CM Code
ICD-10-CM Code(s)
2015
Multispecialty
ICD-9-CM Code
ICD-10-CM Code(s)
R06.02 Shortness of breath
726.5
Enthesopathy of hip region
786.05
Shortness of breath
ICD-10-CM
Codes
M70.60 Trochanteric bursitis, unspecified hip
M70.61 Trochanteric bursitis, right hip
M70.62 Trochanteric bursitis, left hip
M70.70 Other bursitis, unspecified hip
M70.71 Other bursitis, right hip
M70.72 Other bursitis, left hip
** Use additional external cause code to identify activity causing disorder (Y93-)
M76.10 Psoas tendinitis, unspecified hip
M76.11 Psoas tendinitis, right hip
M76.12 Psoas tendinitis, left hip
M76.20 Iliac crest spur, unspecified hip
M76.21 Iliac crest spur, right hip
M76.22 Iliac crest spur, left hip
493.90
Asthma, unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
J45.909 Unspecified asthma, uncomplicated
**Use additional code to identify:
exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (Z77.22)
exposure to tobacco smoke in the perinatal period (P96.81)
history of tobacco use (Z87.891)
occupational exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (Z57.31)
tobacco dependence (F17-)
tobacco use (Z72.0)
** There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
J45.20 Mild intermittent asthma, uncomplicated
J45.21 Mild intermittent asthma with (acute) exacerbation
J45.22 Mild intermittent asthma with status asthmaticus
J45.30 Mild persistent asthma, uncomplicated
J45.31 Mild persistent asthma with (acute) exacerbation
J45.32 Mild persistent asthma with status asthmaticus
J45.40 Moderate persistent asthma, uncomplicated
J45.41 Moderate persistent asthma with (acute) exacerbation
J45.42 Moderate persistent asthma with status asthmaticus
J45.50 Severe persistent asthma, uncomplicated
J45.51 Severe persistent asthma with (acute) exacerbation
J45.52 Severe persistent asthma with status asthmaticus
J45.901 Unspecified asthma with (acute) exacerbation
J45.902 Unspecified asthma with status asthmaticus
J45.990 Exercise induced bronchospasm
J45.991 Cough variant asthma
J45.998 Other asthma
V72.31
Routine gynecological exam
ICD-10-CM
Codes
Z01.411 Encounter for gynecological examination (general)
(routine) with abnormal findings
* Use additional code to identify abnormal findings
Z01.419 Encounter for gynecological examination (general)
(routine) without abnormal findings
Instructional note under codes should be as follows:
**Use additional code:
for screening for human papillomavirus, if applicable (Z11.51)
for screening vaginal pap smear, if applicable (Z12.72)
to identify acquired absence of uterus, if applicable (Z90.71-)
786.50
Chest pain, unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
R07.9 Chest pain, unspecified
**There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
R07.89 Other chest pain
R07.2 Precordial pain
R07.1 Chest pain on breathing
R07.81 Pleurodynia
401.1
Essential hypertension,
benign
600.01
Hypertrophy (benign) of prostate with urinary obstruction and
other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) lower urinary tract
symptoms (LUTS)
ICD-10-CM
Codes
I10 Essential (primary) hypertension
Two codes are required in ICD-10-CM:
N40.1 Enlarged prostate with lower urinary tract symptoms
(LUTS); AND
N13.8 Other obstructive and reflux uropathy
** Note under N40.1 states – Use additional code for associated
symptoms, when specified:
tIncomplete bladder emptying (R39.14)
tNocturia (R35.1)
tStraining on urination (R39.16)
tUrinary frequency (R35.0)
tUrinary hesitancy (R39.11)
tUrinary incontinence (N39.4-)
tUrinary obstruction (N13.8)
tUrinary retention (R33.8)
tUrinary urgency (R39.15)
tWeak urinary stream (R39.12)
** Note under N13.8 states – Code first, if applicable, any causal
condition, such as:
tEnlarged prostate (N40.1)
474.00
Chronic tonsillitis
ICD-10-CM
Codes
J35.01 Chronic tonsillitis
* Use additional code to identify:
Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (Z77.22)
Exposure to tobacco smoke in the perinatal period (P96.81)
History of tobacco use (Z87.891)
Occupational exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (Z57.31)
Tobacco dependence (F17-)
Tobacco use (Z72.0)
474.10
Hypertrophy of tonsils with adenoids
ICD-10-CM
Codes
J35.3 Hypertrophy of tonsils with hypertrophy of adenoids
* Use additional code to identify:
Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (Z77.22)
Exposure to tobacco smoke in the perinatal period (P96.81)
History of tobacco use (Z87.891)
Occupational exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (Z57.31)
Tobacco dependence (F17-)
Tobacco use (Z72.0)
Copyright © 2015 AAPC all rights reserved — 2480 S. 3850 W. Suite B. Salt Lake City, Utah, 84120 — 800-626-2633 — www.aapc.com/icd-10/
Page 4
Fast Forward
Top 50 Codes
ICD-9-CM Code
ICD-10-CM Code(s)
2015
Multispecialty
ICD-9-CM Code
ICD-10-CM Code(s)
787.20
Dysphagia, unspecified
285.9
Anemia, unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
R13.10 Dysphagia, unspecified
** There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
R13.11 Dysphagia, oral phase
R13.12 Dysphagia, oropharyngeal phase
R13.13 Dysphagia, pharyngeal phase
R13.14 Dysphagia, pharyngoesophageal phase
R13.19 Other dysphagia
ICD-10-CM
Codes
780.79
Other malaise and fatigue
ICD-10-CM
Codes
R53.1 Weakness
R53.81 Other malaise
R53.83 Other fatigue
G93.3 Postviral fatigue syndrome
R53.0 Neoplastic (malignant) related fatigue
* Code first associated neoplasm
D64.9 Anemia, unspecified
** There are more specific code choice selections available for
use. These include:
D64.0 Hereditary sideroblastic anemia
D64.1 Secondary sideroblastic anemia due to disease
** Code first underlying disease
D64.2 Secondary sideroblastic anemia due to drugs and toxins
** Code first (T36-T65) to identify drug or toxin
** Code first poisoning due to drug or toxin, if applicable (T36–
T65 with fifth or sixth character 1–4 or 6)
* Use additional code for adverse effect, if applicable, to identify
drug (T36–T50 with fifth or sixth character 5)
D64.3 Other sideroblastic anemia
D64.81 Anemia due to antineoplastic chemotherapy
D64.89 Other specified anemias
780.97
Altered mental status
ICD-10-CM
Codes
R41.82 Altered mental status, unspecified
** There are more specific code choice selections available in
ICD-10-CM. These include:
R41.0 Disorientation, unspecified
R41.81 Age-related cognitive decline
R41.840 Attention and concentration deficit
R41.89 Other symptoms and signs involving cognitive functions
and awareness
276.51
Dehydration
786.52
Painful respiration
ICD-10-CM
Codes
R07.1 Chest pain on breathing
R07.81 Pleurodynia
R07.89 Other chest pain
782.3
Edema
ICD-10-CM
Codes
R60.0 Localized edema
R60.1 Generalized edema
R60.9 Edema, unspecified
300.00
Anxiety state, unspecified
ICD-10-CM
Codes
F41.1 Generalized anxiety disorder
F41.8 Other specified anxiety disorders
F41.9 Anxiety disorder, unspecified
530.81
Esophageal reflux
ICD-10-CM
Codes
K21.9 Gastro-esophageal reflux disease without esophagitis
K21.0 Gastro-esophageal reflux disease with esophagitis
E86.0 Dehydration
Copyright © 2015 AAPC all rights reserved — 2480 S. 3850 W. Suite B. Salt Lake City, Utah, 84120 — 800-626-2633 — www.aapc.com/icd-10/
Page 5
Copyright © 2015 AAPC all rights reserved — 2480 S. 3850 W. Suite B. Salt Lake City, Utah, 84120 — 800-626-2633 — www.aapc.com/icd-10/
Resources
American Medical Association Quick Start Guide
http://www.ama-assn.org/resources/doc/washington/icd-10-readiness-testing.pdf
CMS ICD-10 Quick Start Guide
http://cdn.roadto10.org/wp-uploads/2015/06/ICD10_Quick_Start_Guide.pdf
CMS ICD-10 FAQs
http://www.ahima.org/topics/icd10/faqs
CMS ICD-10 ‘Are You Ready?’
http://dc.cn.ubm-us.com/i/530145-pulse-icd-10-ebook-2016/2
CMS Payer Assesment Template
http://cdn.roadto10.org/wp-uploads/2013/12/Payer-Assessment.doc
Diagnosis Code Impact Inventory Template
http://cdn.roadto10.org/wp-uploads/2013/12/Process-and-System-Inventory-Template.doc
ICD-10-CM Online
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd10cm.htm
GEMs Mapping Files
ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/Publications/ICD10CM/2011/
CMS ICD-10 Information
https://www.cms.gov/ICD10/
CMS Road to 10: The Small Physician Practice’s Route to ICD-10
http://www.roadto10.org/
Coding Tools EncoderPro
https://optumcoding.com/Product/20510
Supercoder
http://www.supercoder.com
CodeItRightOnline
http://www.codeitrightonline.com
Hospitals - 3M Coders
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Health-Information-Systems/HIS/Products-and-Services/Products-ListA-Z/Coding-and-Reimbursement-System/
Short link: http://tinyurl.com/pdh9z69
Impact Analysis Worksheet
http://www.cms.org/uploads/Impact-Analysis-Worksheet.pdf
Superbill and Forms Revision for ICD-10
http://www.physicianspractice.com/icd-10/superbill-and-forms-revision-icd-10
Billing Services Assessment
http://cdn.roadto10.org/wp-uploads/2013/12/Billing-Service-Assessment.doc
Besse Medical ICD-10 Guide – July 2015 25
besse.com
Where knowledge,
reach and partnership
shape healthcare delivery.
[email protected]
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