Adjustable speaker systems and methods

Adjustable speaker systems and methods
US 20070217619Al
(19) United States
(12) Patent Application Publication (10) Pub. No.: US 2007/0217619 A1
Hall et al.
(43) Pub. Date:
(54)
ADJUSTABLE SPEAKER SYSTEMS AND
METHODS
(75)
Inventors: David S. Hall, Los Altos Hill, CA
Sep. 20, 2007
Publication Classi?cation
(Us); Bruce H_ Hall, Palo Alto, CA
(Us)
(51)
Int. Cl.
H04R 29/00
(52)
US. Cl. .............................................................. .. 381/59
(57)
(2006-01)
ABSTRACT
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Systems and methods for optimizing speaker performance.
701 FIFTH AVENUE
The system includes a self-contained speaker unit that
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includes a speaker, an ampli?er coupled to the speaker, and
a processor coupled to the ampli?er. The processor receives
a ?rst sound signal from a receiver and a second sound
SEATTLE’ WA 98104 (Us)
(73) Assignee V610 dyne Acoustics Inc Morgan Hill
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signal from a microphone, processes the ?rst sound signal
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based on a plurality of parameters, outputs the processed
sound signal to the speaker, and generates a video signal
(21)
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(22)
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alloWs a user to manipulate the parameters. The processor
May 16 2007
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Related US Application Data
(62)
based on the second sound signal. AWireless remote control
Division of application NO_ 10/67 2,841, ?led on Sep_
26, 2003.
generates a test sound signal and outputs it to the receiver.
The receiver processes the test sound signal and returns it to
the processor for output through the speaker. The video
signal includes a graphical user interface having a frequency
response graph of the second sound signal and an eight-band
equalizer.
Patent Application Publication Sep. 20, 2007 Sheet 1 0f 15
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PRESENTS THE FREQUENCY
RESPONSE ON THE DISPLAY
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ADJUST SYSTEM SETTINGS AND VIE W RESPONSE
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Patent Application Publication Sep. 20, 2007 Sheet 8 0f 15
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Patent Application Publication Sep. 20, 2007 Sheet 9 0f 15
VELUDYNE DIGITAL DRIVE
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Patent Application Publication Sep. 20, 2007 Sheet 10 0f 15
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US 2007/0217619 A1
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Patent Application Publication Sep. 20, 2007 Sheet 14 0f 15
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Patent Application Publication Sep. 20, 2007 Sheet 15 0f 15
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Sep.20,2007
US 2007/0217619 A1
ADJUSTABLE SPEAKER SYSTEMS AND
METHODS
ever, AdaptiQ does not alloW the user to vieW the output of
the speakers and to adjust according to the user’s listening
desires.
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED
APPLICATIONS
[0001] This application is a divisional of US. patent
application Ser. No. 10/672,841 entitled “ADJUSTABLE
SPEAKER SYSTEMS AND METHODS,” ?led under
Attorney Docket No. VELO-l-lOOl on Sep. 26, 2003, and
is incorporated herein by reference.
FIELD OF THE INVENTION
[0002] This invention relates generally to speakers and,
more speci?cally, to systems and methods for optimal
speaker adjustment.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
[0007] The present invention comprises systems and
methods for optimizing speaker location and speaker sound
processing. An example system includes a self-contained
speaker unit that includes a speaker, an ampli?er coupled to
the speaker, and a processor coupled to the ampli?er. The
processor receives a sound signal from an external source
and a sound signal from a microphone, processes the sound
signal from the external source based on a plurality of
parameters, and generates a video signal based on the sound
signal received by the microphone. The processor outputs
the processed sound signal to the speaker via the ampli?er.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
[0003] Producing high quality sound in a home speaker
system is a challenging task, particularly because of the
endless variety of possible orientations and interactions the
speaker might have With respect to a listener. A single
speaker might sound great in one location in a room, but
sound much Worse in different speaker locations or in
different listening locations With respect to a static speaker
location. A subWoofer might sound very good With one set
of main speakers, but not sound good at all With another set,
due to differences in frequency response betWeen the speak
ers. Some music entertainment systems have employed a
number of methods in an effort to improve sound quality and
compensate for less than ideal speaker or listening locations,
and for alternate speaker settings and/or performance. One
method uses external equipment for measurement and cor
rection. Some subWoofers include equalizer ?lters With
externally generated test tones. The subWoofers rely on the
user to chart results obtained external to the subWoofer
either on a paper graph or using computer software. The user
sets dials or other controls on the subWoofer to accomplish
the equalization as indicated via the Written instruction or
instructions presented in a softWare application program.
[0004] In?nity’s Room Adaptive Bass Optimization Sys
tem (RABOS) employed in In?nity subWoofers such as the
PRELUDE MTS, uses a single-band parametric equalizer.
RABOS includes an SPL meter, a test CD, and blank graph
paper. While playing tones on the CD the user manually
graphs the response in the room then sets an equalizer, Which
contains controls for frequency, level, and Width (Q).
[0005] The REVEL PERFORMA B15 subWoofer system
features a built-in 3-band parametric equalizer. DoWnload
able softWare, entitled Revel LoW Frequency Optimizer
(LFO), alloWs a user to enter room measurements using a
sound pressure meter microphone or other input device, and
then perform an analysis of the readings. The softWare then
suggests hoW the three equalizers (represented as dials on
the back panel of the subWoofer) should be set for optimum
performance.
[0006] The only knoWn “automated” equalization system
can be found on certain full-range Bose Home Entertain
[0008] The system includes a control device, such as a
Wireless remote control, that alloWs a user to manipulate the
parameters.
[0009] The processor generates a test sound signal that is
outputted to a receiver that is coupled to the system. The
receiver receives and processes the test sound signal, returns
the processed test sound signal to the processor and sends
the processed signal to the speakers coupled to the receiver.
The received test sound signal is processed by the processor
and outputted to the speaker via the ampli?er.
[0010] In accordance With other preferred aspects of the
invention, the generated video signal includes a graphical
user interface. The graphical user interface includes a fre
quency response graph of the sound signal received by the
microphone. In addition, the graphical user interface
includes an eight band equalizer.
[0011] In accordance With still further preferred aspects of
the invention, each of the eight bands of the equalizer is
sWitchable betWeen a graphic and a parametric equalizer.
[0012] In accordance With yet other preferred aspects of
the invention, the graphical user interface includes a param
eters section for changing the parameters using the control
device. The parameters include loW pass crossover fre
quency, loW pass crossover slope, subsonic frequency, sub
sonic slope, phase, polarity, volume, contour frequency,
contour level, and servo lop gain, Which in turn affects the
amount of distortion the speaker produces.
[0013] In accordance With still another preferred aspect of
the invention, a speaker system includes a speaker, a pro
cessor coupled to the speaker, and an accelerometer system.
The accelerometer system includes an accelerometer
mechanically coupled With the speaker. The accelerometer
generates an analog motion signal based on sensed motion
of the speaker. The accelerometer system also includes an
analog to digital converter coupled to the accelerometer and
the processor. The analog to digital converter converts the
analog motion signal to a digital signal and send it to the
processor. The processor receives a sound signal from an
external source and sends the received sound signal to the
ment systems. The Bose ADAPTiQ system automatically
speaker. The processor compares the received sound signal
adapts a music system. A user dons a headset that includes
to the received digital motion signal to determine a sound
processing value. The processor adjusts a received sound
signal based on the determined sound processing value.
microphones. The headset records output from the system.
The output is analyzed and then optimally adapted. HoW
Sep.20,2007
US 2007/0217619 A1
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
[0028]
In one embodiment, the computer system 44 is
[0014] The preferred and alternative embodiments of the
coupled to a public or private data network 46. A server 48
is also coupled to the network 46. The server 48 includes
present invention are described in detail below with refer
ence to the following drawings.
When software updates are available at the server 48, a user
[0015] FIG. 1A is a block diagram ofa system formed in
accordance with the present invention;
[0016]
FIG. 1B is a perspective view of room that includes
software updates for the processor 50 of the speaker unit 32.
at the computer system 44 retrieves the software updates via
the network 46. After retrieval of the software updates, the
computer system 44 downloads the software updates into the
processor 50. The processor 50 includes an associated
a portion of the system components shown in FIG. 1A;
memory for storing an application program that performs the
[0017] FIG. 2 is a front view of a speaker interface panel
formed in accordance with the present invention;
process described below.
[0018]
that interacts with the system;
unit 32 is a switching-type ampli?er, such as that described
in co-owned US. Pat. No. 5,963,086, which is herein
[0019]
is any commercially available microphone, such as micro
FIG. 3 is a front view of a remote control device
FIGS. 4 and 5 are screen shots of graphical user
interfaces outputted by the speaker system on a display
device;
[0020] FIG. 6 is a ?ow diagram ofa process performed by
the system shown in FIG. 1A;
[0021]
FIGS. 7-11 are screen shots of the user interface at
different stages of the process shown in FIG. 6;
[0022]
FIG. 12 is a block diagram of an alternate embodi
ment of the present invention;
[0023] FIG. 13 is a frequency response graph of the
speakers within the speaker system shown in FIG. 12; and
[0024] FIG. 14 is a block diagram of another alternate
embodiment of the present invention.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE
PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
[0025] FIGS. 1A and 1B illustrate an exemplary speaker
system 30 that easily allows the user to place a speaker
[0029] An example of the ampli?er 54 used in the speaker
incorporated by reference. An example of the microphone 34
phone model 797 made by Beijing Electronics.
[0030] The system 30 allows a user to locate the speaker
unit 32 or groups of speaker units 32 in any location within
a room. The processor 50 produces and sends to the sound
system 34 a test sound signal. The sound system 36 receives
the test sound signal through, for example, an auxiliary input
jack so that it may process the test sound signal as with any
other input sound signal. When the particular speaker
embodiment is a subwoofer, the test signal is preferably a
sweep signal within a typical subwoofer frequency range of
about 15 HZ to about 200 HZ. The sound system 36 pro
cesses and outputs the processed test sound signal to the
sound system speakers and to the speaker 56 via the pro
cessor 50. Note that in a preferred embodiment the speaker
56 is a subwoofer. In such an embodiment, additional higher
frequency range speakers would also be used with the
system. The additional speakers are not illustrated in FIG.
1A or B, but would be in signal communication with the
sound system 36 if used.
optimally within a room as well as control other speaker
[0031]
related functions. In one embodiment, the system 30
includes a speaker unit 32 that is operatively coupled with a
is played on the speaker 56 and any other speakers that are
microphone 34, a sound system 36, and a display 38, (such
as a television). The speaker system 30 also includes a
wireless input device 42 for interacting with the speaker unit
32. The speaker unit 32 may also be coupled to a wired input
device 40, and to a computer system 44 and can communi
cate with a universal remote control device, such as that
produced by Crestron.
[0026] In one embodiment, the speaker unit 32 includes a
processor 50, a communication interface 52, an ampli?er 54,
a speaker 56, and a light 58, all included within an acous
tically designed speaker housing (not shown). The processor
The microphone 34 receives the test signal after it
reproducing the test signal. The signals received by the
microphone, in turn, are passed directly to the processor 50
or to the processor 50 via the systems 36 or 44. The
processor 50 produces a video signal indicating the fre
quency response of the test sound signals produced by all
speakers and received by the microphone 34 and digitiZed
within the processor 50. The video signal is presented on the
display 38. In order to optimiZe the system for a particular
room, the microphone 34 is placed in a desired listening
location. With the microphone 34 in a desired listening
location, the user moves the speaker unit 32 in order to get
a desired frequency response of the sound that is outputted
by the speaker 56. In order to determine the desired location
50 is operatively coupled to the communication interface 52,
the ampli?er 54, the speaker 56, and the light 58. The
of the speaker unit 32, the displayed frequency response is
processor 50 is also coupled to the microphone 34, the sound
system 36, the display 38, and the computer system 44. The
input devices 40 and 42 allow a user to adjust other variables
communication interface 52 includes a wire connection to
the wired input device 40 and a component for wirelessly
communicating with the user input device 42.
[0027]
In one embodiment, the wireless input device 42 is
a remote control device, such as an infrared/optical or RF
remote control, that sends control signals to the processor 50
via the communication interface 52. The processor 50 or the
communication interface 52 converts the received control
signals into digital format for processing.
optimiZed thus indicating optimum speaker location. The
associated with the ampli?er 54 and the speaker 56. A
graphical user interface presented on the display 38 that
illustrates the frequency response and other speaker vari
ables are shown and described in more detail below with
regards to FIGS. 4 and 5. The graphic equaliZer enables the
sound to be further tailored, or to optimiZe the sound quality
to a particular listening location and/or additional speakers
in the system without moving the speaker 56.
[0032] The user may desire not to move the speaker 56,
because they prefer a speci?c location in a room. If this is
Sep.20,2007
US 2007/0217619 Al
the case, the user Will optimize performance of the speaker
56 by controlling various speaker settings that Will be
described in more detail below.
[0033] As shoWn in FIG. 2, a speaker interface panel 70 is
mounted to a back surface of a housing 71 of the speaker unit
32. The panel 70 includes a poWer sWitch 72, and a data
IN-port 76 that alloWs communication betWeen the proces
sor 50, and the computer system 44, a touch panel remote
control, or another speaker unit 32. A data OUT-port 78
alloWs communication With another speaker unit 32. In one
embodiment, the data ports 76 and 78 conform to the
RS-232 communication protocol. A 12V trigger turns all the
components in the system on and off together. A video port
80 is provided for Wired connection to the display 38. An
example of the video port 80 is an S-video port. A LoW
Frequency Extension (LFE) INPUT-port 82 receives a bal
anced LFE signal from the sound system 36 or the computer
system 44. The LFE INPUT-port 82 is an XLR INPUT
JACK (balanced input) that provides a grounded Way to
provide input signal to the Woofer and is considered an
alternate to RCA plugs. Three kinds of input signal are
supportiLFE (RCA left and right jacks) 92, XLR 82, and
speaker level 98 (i.e. speaker Wires from the ampli?er of the
sound system 36). A MIC INPUT-port 84 receives a micro
phone jack. EQ OUTPUT LEFT/RIGHT ports 86 outputs
the test sound signal to the sound system 36. The THRU
ports 88 share the input signal from the sound system to
other speaker units 32. The THRU ports 88 are RCA plugs.
Output ports 90 are RCA plugs that connect to the sound
system 36 to provide a signal Without bass to be played by
the main speakers. INPUT LFE ports 92 are RCA connec
tions that receive the signal from the sound system 36 like
the LFE INPUT-port 82. A REMOTE SENSOR port 94
receives a jack associated With the Wired input device 40.
VOLUME UP/DOWN buttons 96 When depressed incre
mentally raise or loWer the speaker’s volume. SPEAKER
LEVEL INPUT RIGHT/LEFT ports 98 alloW either banana
plug/jack or exposed Wire/terminal connections.
[0034] An example of the Wireless input device 42 is
shoWn in FIG. 3. The device 42 includes a numeric keypad
120 for entering numbers With respect to a graphical user
interface (GUI) that is displayed on the display device 38.
The remote device 42 sends IR, RF, or other Wireless signals
to the communication interface 52. Stored programming
instructions Within the communication interface or the pro
cessor interpret the signals and cause the processor to
perform the function associated With the command.
[0035] A pair of +/— SET buttons 124 increase (+) or
decrease (—) a value in a speci?ed ?eld in the displayed GUI.
A LIGHT button 128 turns the speaker’s light 58 on or olf.
When activated a NIGHT button 130 limits the output of the
speaker 56 and illuminates the light 58 in an amber mode to
signify that the speaker unit 32 is in night mode. VOL
buttons 132 raise or loWer the volume of the speaker unit 32.
A MUTE button 136 mutes the sound sent to the speaker 56.
An EXIT button 140 exits a SETUP mode of the application
program executed by the processor 50. A SELECT button
142 toggles values Within a selected ?eld in the displayed
GUI. Above and beloW the SELECT button 142 are up and
doWn arroW buttons 144 and adjacent to the SELECT button
142 are left and right arroW buttons 146. The buttons 144
[0036] A TEST button 150 When depressed activates a
TEST mode of the application program. In the TEST mode,
the test sound signal is generated and output through the
speakers. A RESET button 152 restores previously stored
values. A MENU button 154 enters a SETUP mode of the
application program. PRESET buttons (1-6) 158 access ?ve
equalizer presets and one equalizer-defeat listening preset.
An EQ DEFEAT present When selected disables the equal
izer, thereby demonstrating the bene?t of the equalizer.
[0037]
FIG. 4 illustrates a screen shot of a GUI page 160
that is generated by the processor 50 and presented on the
display 38. The GUI page 160 includes a graph area 162, an
equalizer area 164 located beloW the graph area 162, a
function area 166 located above the graph area 162, and a
description area 168 located adjacent to the equalizer area
164. The graph area 162 presents a graph 163 of a frequency
response of the signals received by the microphone 34.
[0038] In one embodiment, the speaker 56 is a subWoofer
designed to operate Within a range of approximately 15 Hz
to 120 Hz. The presented graph 163 has an x-axis starting at
15 Hz and ending at approximately 200 Hz and a y-axis
ranging from approximately 60 dB to 100 dB. In this
embodiment, the presented graph 163 illustrates the frequen
cies of the signal received by the microphone Within the
range of 15 Hz to about 200 Hz, With the subWoofer
producing the loWest frequency portion (15 Hz-l25 Hz) and
additional speakers associated With the sound system pro
ducing frequencies betWeen 125 and 200 Hz.
[0039] The equalizer area 164 includes an equalizer GUI
170 that includes 8 vertical equalizer bars 172. Each bar 172
of the equalizer GUI 170 includes a graphically slideable
knob 174. Each equalizer bar 172 is associated With a
frequency on the x-axis of the graph 163 that is directly
above the equalizer bar 172. For example, the equalizer bar
172 that is beloW 20 Hz on the x-axis of the graph 163
correlates to 20 Hz.
[0040]
The functions area 166 includes selectable func
tions that alloW the user to sWitch to another GUI page, such
as that shoWn in FIG. 5 beloW, save any changes, or exit the
GUIs.
[0041] The information area 168 provides additional infor
mation about the user’s interaction With the GUI page 160.
An example of the information presented in the information
area 168 is described in more detail beloW.
[0042]
FIG. 5 illustrates a screen shot of a second GUI
page 180 that is produced by the processor 50 and presented
on the display 38. As With the ?rst GUI page, the informa
tion on the second GUI page is stored in a memory associ
ated With the processor. The GUI page 180 includes a preset
area 182, an information area 184 located beloW the preset
area 182, and a functions area 186 located above the preset
area 182. Adjacent to the preset area 182 is a setup column
188 that alloWs a user to adjust certain variables included
Within all of the presets. The preset area 182 includes 6
speaker presets. The presets are selected by activating the
corresponding numbered preset button 158. Each preset can
be individually adjusted if desired. The presets are as
folloWs as labeled on the input device 42: l. Action/Adven
ture; 2. Movies; 3. Pop/Rock; 4. Jazz/Classical; 5. Custom;
6. EO Defeat. The characteristics of each of the presets are
and 146 control a cursor or highlight/select device that is
de?ned by the settings (FIG. 5) that are optimized based on
presented on the GUI.
the type of music that is received.
Sep.20,2007
US 2007/0217619 A1
[0043] The six presets include the following editable
?elds:
[0054] Night Mode Maximum VolumeiWhen the
NIGHT button 130 is activated on the input device 42,
[0044] LoW Pass Crossover Frequency and Slopei
Adjusts the upper limit of the subWoofer’s frequency
response. Select a crossover setting, in increments of 1,
betWeen 15 HZ and 199 HZ and slope at 6, 12, 18, 24,
30, 36, 42 and 48 dB/octave.
[0045] Subsonic Filter Frequency and SlopeiSets the
subWoofer’s subsonic ?lter (loW frequency limit), in
increments of 1, betWeen 15 HZ-199 HZ and slope at 6,
12, 18, 24, and 48 dB/octave.
[0046] PhaseiSets the phase (delay) of the subWoof
er’s output signal, 0 to 180 degrees (adjustable in 15
degree increments).
the night mode is invoked. Night mode is indicated by
illumination of the amber bar (light 58) located on the
front of the speaker unit 36.
[0055] FIG. 6 illustrates an exemplary process 200 for
using the system 30 in order to activate and optimiZe room
location for the speaker 56. First, at block 206, the processor
50 presents a frequency response graph of sound received by
the microphone 34 on the display. At block 210, the pro
cessor 50 sends a test sWeep sound signal to the sound
system 36 or the computer system 44, depending on Which
one is being used as a receiver. As another alternative, the
test sWeep signal can be sent directly from the processor 50
to the speaker 56, Without ?rst passing through a computer
or sound system. Next, at block 212, the sound system 36 or
[0047] PolarityiSets the subWoofer’s polarity by tog
gling betWeen positive (+) or negative (—) by reversing
the phase 180 degrees.
the computer system 44 ?lters the test sWeep signal in
accordance With normal ?ltering procedures. Normal ?lter
ing procedures include ?ltering a received music or sound
[0048] VolumeiSets the subWoofer’s volume in incre
ments of 1, betWeen 0-99. This sets the preset’s volume
For example, if the speaker 56 is a subWoofer designed to
different from the volume of the subWoofer. So, if a
user found during setup that 7 Was a good setup volume
signal according to Which speaker is to receive the signal.
play frequencies beloW 120 HZ, frequencies above 120 HZ
for the subWoofer, then preset 1 Would increase the
are typically ?ltered out before the signal is sent to the
subWoofer. At block 214, the ?ltered test sWeep signal is sent
sub’s volume according to the value set in this area.
to the speakers coupled to the sound system 36 (or optionally
Using the VOL + or VOL — buttons 132 on the remote
speakers coupled to the computer system 44 (not shoWn))
the speak unit volume and the preset volume are
and to the speaker unit 32.
adjusted together.
[0056] The respective speakers output the received test
[0049]
Contour FrequencyiSets a frequency to boost
or cut the signal to the subWoofer in response to speci?c
types of source material.
sWeep signal as sound, see block 216. The test sWeep signal
is a constant magnitude signal that starts at 15 HZ and ends
at 200 HZ and repeats. Other test signals may be used,
sWeeping from high to loW frequencies, for example. At
[0050]
Contour LeveliSets the amount of boost or cut
at the frequency speci?ed in the contour frequency.
Contour frequency and level settings act as an addi
tional equaliZer that can be used to manipulate the
frequency contour of the subWoofer When this particu
lar preset is invoked.
[0051] Theater/Music IndicatoriSets the distortion lim
iting capabilities of the digital servo system and alloWs a
choice betWeen a “theatrical” subWoofer, a “musical” sub
Woofer, or someWhere in-betWeen. The digital servo system
is described in more detail beloW With respect to FIG. 14.
The “musical” setting represents maximum gain from the
servo, and thus the least amount of distortion possible from
the subWoofer. The theatrical setting relaxes the servo a bit
to alloW a bit more distortion to enter the playback, making
an overall louder and more impressive sub for explosions
and other theatrical content. The scale is 1 for maximum
theater (least amount of servo gain) and 8 for maximum
music (most amount of servo gain). The “setup” values
cascade to the individual values for the presets. The indi
vidual values for each preset can be separately changed if
desired.
[0052] The information area 184 includes the folloWing
controls:
[0053] Auto On/Olf Active/InactiveiWhen active is
indicated, the subWoofer is automatically shut off after
a length of time Without any source signal (i.e. signal
from external source). When inactive is indicated, the
Woofer automatically Wakes upon receiving input sig
nal.
block 218, the processor 50 receives a sound signal gener
ated by the microphone 34, digitiZes the received sound
signal, processes the digitiZed signal to determine the fre
quency response pattern, and presents a frequency response
graph on the display based on the determined frequency
response pattern. Next, at block 220, the user turns the
subWoofer volume doWn to 0 either by the volume control
buttons 132 on the remote 42 or the volume control buttons
96 on the panel 70. At block 222, the user adjusts the volume
on the speaker system or the computer system 44 until the
displayed frequency response for the frequencies associated
With the speakers of the sound system 36 or the computer
system 44 are all shoWn Within the dB range (y-axis) of the
displayed frequency response graph. Next, at block 226, the
user adjusts the volume of the subWoofer 56 in order to raise
the associated frequencies displayed on the frequency
response graph to a level that best visually matches the level
of the frequencies of the other speakers. At block 228, the
user positions the speaker 56 Within a room in order to
generate an optimal frequency response as presented on the
frequency response graph. The optimum frequency response
is preferably a ?at response across the range of frequencies
for the speaker.
[0057] At block 232, the user adjusts the speaker settings
as shoWn in the FIG. 5 and selects a test mode (test buttons
150) that alloWs the user to vieW the frequency response at
the present settings. Next, at block 234, the user adjusts the
settings of the displayed graphic equaliZer 170 to further
optimiZe the displayed frequency response. For example,
When unWanted peaks occur in the displayed frequency
response graph, the slideable button 174 is loWered, thereby
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