USE OF WIRELESS BROADBAND FOR RURAL AND

USE OF WIRELESS BROADBAND FOR RURAL AND
USE OF WIRELESS
BROADBAND FOR
RURAL AND REMOTE
AREAS –India case study
1
BroadbandBroadband- Status, Policy & Regulation in India
And
Use of Wireless Broadband for Rural & Remote areas
S. N. Gupta
Telecom Regulatory Authority of India
Suresh. B.R
CDOT
2
1
Contents
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction- Broadband Policy & Targets
Status of ICT in India
International Trends
Broadband Policy 2004 - Technology Neutrality
Regulation for Broadband
–
–
–
–
–
Roadblocks for Broadband
Govt’s Role in promoting Broadband
Enabling Regulation for Broadband
Liberalized Licensing and Regulation
Enabling Broadband
• Tariff for Broadband
• Roadmap - Current Plans
• Conclusions
Introduction
Broadband- Broad Definition
• Generally, Broadband describes high speed, high capacity data
communication making use of DSL, Cable Modem, Ethernet, Fixed
Wireless Access, Optical Fiber, W-LAN, V-SAT etc.
• There is no specific international definition for the Broadband
though there is a common understanding that it should be better
than ISDN.
• As per Broadband Policy 2004, Broadband in India is defined as:
– ‘Always-On’ data connection that is able to support various
interactive services including Internet access having the capacity of a
minimum download speed of 256 Kbps to an individual subscriber
form the Point of Presence of the service provider.
(The interactive services will exclude any services for which a separate
license is specifically required)
2
Broad ICT Statistics-India
(June 2005)
1) Population- 1.08 billion
2) Fixed Teledensity – 4.4 (47.7 million nos.)
3) Mobile Teledensity- 5.3 (57.4 million nos.)
4) Overall Teledensity- 9.7 (105 million nos.)
5) Internet Connections- 5.8 million (17.5 million users @ 3 users per connection)
6) No. of PCs- 15 million
7) No. of TVs- 100 million
8) No. of Cable TV Connections- 55 million
9) International Connectivity- 360 Gbps/16.7Tbps (Designed)
10) National connectivity- 10 Gbps (6.7 Lakh Kms)
11) Broadband Connection (>=256 Kbps) – 0.4 million
12) International Gateways by ISPs- 25 ( Including 5 on Submarine cables)
OVERALL ICT PENETRATION IN INDIA
STILL LAGS BEHIND
Key internet and broadband indicators
End of year 2003
India
Jun’05
Parameters
Korea
Malaysia
China
India
Internet connections per
100 persons
26
12
2.5
0.4
0.57
Broadband connections
per 100 persons
25
0.4
1.4
0.02
0.04
Ratio of High speed to
Internet Connections
0.96
0.33
0.56
0.05
0.1
0.9
0.5
0.4
Ratio of Internet connection 0.3
to PCs
0.8
Charges per 256 kbps
($ per month)
0.60
20
7.5
40
12
GDP (US$ Per capita)
month (US$)
10,000
4,000
965
465
480
6
3
Targets for
Internet & Broadband Penetration
(Broadband Policy 2004)
Year
Internet Subscribers
(in million)
Broadband
Subscribers
(in million)
2004
(existing Dec’04)
5.5
0.05
2005
6.0
3.0
2007
18.0
9.0
2010
40.0
20.0
International Scenario - Penetration
Korea (Rep.)
China, HK
25
14.6
Canada
Taiwan
Iceland
11.5
9.4
8.7
Denmark
Belgium
Sweden
Source: ITU
World Telecom
Indicators
Database.
Austria
Netherlands
United States
Switzerland
Japan
Singapore
Finland
8.6
8.4
Broadband
subscribers per 100
inhabitants, by
technology
7.7
6.6
6.5
DSL
6.5
Cable
6.3
6.1
Other
5.5
5.3
8
4
Broadband -Regional distribution
Asia-Pacific leads
9
Broadband – Technology wise
deployment
10
5
Broadband Policy India2004
Contents
BROADBAND CONNECTIVITY
ESTIMATED GROWTH
TECHNOLOGY OPTIONS FOR BROADBAND SERVICES
•Various Access Technologies
Optical Fibre Technologies
Digital Subscriber Lines (DSL) on copper loop
Cable TV Network
Satellite Media
Terrestrial Wireless
Future Technologies
•Quality of Service (QoS)
•Simplification of SACFA / WPC Clearance
OTHER ISSUES
•Bandwidth Availability
•National Internet Exchange of India (NIXI)
•Role of Other Agencies
•Fiscal Issues
11
Roadblocks for Broadband
1. Price
-
Price for broadband access @ Rs. 500 ($12) per month – still unaffordable to masses
2. Access to the customer
-
Lack of access to the incumbent’s copper loop for DSL by competitors
-
Low quality of cable TV infrastructure and lack of industry organization
-
High costs for DTH and VSAT access
-
Bottlenecks preventing wireless solutions from spreading
-
Cumbersome processes for Right Of Way (ROW)
3. Cost of connectivity
-
Lack of effective competition in the “within city”/ last mile access networks
-
High costs of international bandwidth
-
Ineffective implementation of National Internet Exchange of India (NIXI)
4. Fiscal policies
-
High taxes and duties, and lack of fiscal incentives for faster growth
5. Content and applications
-
Lack of locally relevant content and absence of “change agent” to drive growth
12
6
Govt’s Role in Promoting
Broadband
• Creating the right policy environment by removing entry
barriers.
• Creating National Backbone infrastructure.
• Establishing Internet Exchange in the country.
• Permitting Unlimited Competition for Broadband.
• Encouraging International players to setup Gateways in the
country.
• Funding community investment in Broadband in uneconomic
remote rural areas.
• Leveraging Govts. own demand and setting example by being
on-line leader.
• Extending special tax concessions for equipments & access
devices used for Broadband.
Enabling Regulation for Broadband
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Promoting facility-based competition by lowering market entry
barriers.
Permitting infrastructure sharing among different service providers for
optimum utilization and cost reduction.
Allowing captive infrastructure of utility companies to be used for
public Broadband service.
Reducing the bottleneck in last-mile access by facilitating deployment
of alternative technologies like Cable TV network, Wireless, Power
Line etc.
Reducing the cost of bandwidth for domestic and international Internet
connectivity.
De-Licensing of Radio Spectrum used for Broadband services.
Permitting broadcast infrastructure like DTH to be used for
Broadband access.
7
Liberalized Licensing and Regulation
for Broadband Services
Same as Internet Service Providers’ (ISP) License.
The most liberal licensing regime.
Unlimited competition (180 ISPs operational, 388 Licenses signed).
No entry fee.
No license (revenue share) fee. Annual Fee of Re. 1 only
No contribution to Universal Service Fund (USF).
Permitted to have own international gateway through sub-marine optical fiber
cable or satellite.
FDI limit (100% for non-gateway service provider, 74% for International gateway
service provider).
Permitted to make use of BSO’s Dialup Network, Cable TV’s
Copper, Fiber, Radio for last-mile connectivity.
Network, own
2.4 Ghz (ISM) band de-licensed for indoor as well as outdoor usage for broadband
access (5.1 to 5.3 and 5.7 to 5.8 GHz delicensed for indoor & in-campus usage).
High speed WLL permitted for BSOs.
A liberal V-SAT licensing policy (upto 2Mbps).
Permission to use DTH setup for Receive-Only Internet.
Broadband Policy- Technology Neutrality
•Service Providers can choose any technology
•Over existing infrastructure
DSL/ ADSL over Copper loop
Cable Modem over Cable TV network
Power Line Broadband Access
•Over new Cable Infrastructure
Fiber To The Curb (FTTC)
Fiber To The Home (FTTH)
Hybrid Fiber Coaxial (HFC)
Metro Ethernet over Fiber
•Over Wireless Infrastructure
Fixed Wireless Broadband Access (FWBA) (WiMax 802.16x)
Wireless LAN (Wi-Fi) (802.11a/ b/ g)
Satellite (V-SAT, DTH)
High speed WLL (GPRS, EDGE, CDMA, CorDect)
3G Cellular Mobile System (WCDMA, EVDO, IMT2000)
B3G Technologies (802.16e, WiBRO, Mobi-Fi)
8
VSAT
INTERNET
KIOSK/ HOME
FTTC
>2 Mbps
512 Kbps2 Mbps
Metro
Ethernet
256 Kbps4 Mbps
DSL
Cordect
WLL
CDMA
SWITCHED
TELEPHONE/DATA
SERVICE (FR/ATM)
144 Kbps –
2 Mbps
3G
Cellular
Mobile
ROUTED
(TCP/IP)
Cable TV
Network
(Shared)
PLMN
384 Kbps- GSM/ GPRS/ EDGE 128 Kbps2 Mbps
1.5 Mbps
WAP ENABLED/ GPRS/ EDGE
HANDSET
CM
Broadband
64-384 Kbps through Cable TV
E-COMM
SERVER
INTERNET
(CONNECTIONLESS)
PSTN
(Connection oriented)
70 Kbps
HOME SHOPPING
SERVER (E-COMM)
VIDEO
SERVER
Ethernet
M-COMM
SERVER
Hotspots Network
(WISP)
Wireless
Broadband Broadband Access
through DTH (Wi-Fi, Wi-Max)
BUSINESS
VOICE, DATA
& VIDEO ON
SAME
PLATFORM
Broadband Access in India- Technology-Neutrality
(making use of existing infrastructure & wireless)
Enabling Faster Growth of
Broadband
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Evolution of Alternate Last Mile Technologies
Mobile Technology Developments
Broadband using DTH for Receive-only Access
V-SAT for Broadband Access
Facilitating Radio Spectrum for Broadband Access
Fiscal measures to reduce the cost of access devices,
infrastructure and service
7. Reduction in the cost of connectivity
8. Quality of Service for Broadband
9. National Internet Exchange of India (NIXI)
9
1. Evolution of Alternate Last
Mile Technologies
• Use of Coaxial Cable for Telecom Services (Cable
TV Network for Broadband and telephony local
loop).
• Use of DSL technology on traditional Copper Loops
(DIY, Franchising, Shared unbundling, Bit stream
access).
• Wireless Access Service for Fixed and Mobile
communication.
• VSAT-based Access in remote areas.
• DTH based one-way Broadband Access.
• Emergence of Metro Ethernet Networks
Technology Alternatives for
Wireline Broadband
1. Evolution of Wireline Technologies
i) Use of Digital Subscriber Loop (DSL) technology on
traditional Copper Loops (DIY, Franchising,
Shared unbundling, Bit stream access)
– Asymmetric DSL (ADSL) – 1 Mbps upstream/ 8 Mbps
downstream, 3 Km
– ADSL (G.Lite) – Splitter free, 512 Kbps upstream/ 1.5
Mbps downstream, 5.4 km
– Symmetrical DSL – 1.5 Mbps, 3 Km
– Single pair High-speed DSL (SHDSL) – 2.3 Mbps
symmetric, 3 Km
– ADSL 2, ADSL 2 plus – 8/16 Mbps, 1.5 Km
– Very high Data Rate DSL (VDSL) – 52 Mbps, 1.5 Km
10
ii) Cable TV Networks can play a significant role in
providing broadband
– Broadband over cable TV accounts for 74% of total connections in US, and
55% in Canada
– 55 million cable homes in India, but infrastructure can not support bidirectional communication and requires upgrade
– Regulatory environment, via an ISP license, allows this with some MSO’s and
operators already doing so
– For advances to occur, better organization of the industry needed to be
executed
– Cable operators will need to adopt innovative business models to compete in
converged environment
• Possible to provide upgraded entertainment services such as interactive digital TV,
pay-per-view, video on demand and time-shifted TV
• Benefits operators with significantly higher ARPU and better customer retention
• To start with Cable TV network which is uni-directional can be used for
downloading, the uplink to be conventional narrow band like dialup/ ISDN/ RADIO
– Operators need training to create awareness about utility of their networks
and understanding of the investments required, returns possible, and technical
aspects
21
iii) Fibre Optic Cable Technologies
–Fiber To The Curb (FTTC) – by existing operators
–Fiber To The Home (FTTH) – Fibre in last mile to deliver converged
services
–Hybrid Fiber Coaxial (HFC) – by Cable TV operators
–Metro Ethernet (Fibre based) – extending the range of LAN
–GPON (Gigabit - Passive Optical Network) – triple play over TDM
–(No limitation of distance or throughput speeds)
iv) Broadband over Powerline (BPL) Technologies
–Use of existing domestic power connections for sending data
–Throughput in the range of 1 MHz (4 – 6 Mbps)
–Ideal for rural areas where telecom / cable TV infrastructure may not be
there
v) Metro Ethernet Networks
–Use of Ethernet beyond LAN
–Use of high-speed access using hybrid fiber/ copper based Ethernet
technology
22
11
2. Mobile Technology Developments
• GPRS, EDGE, CDMA-1X, CorDect, 802.11
(WLAN, Wi-Fi), PTT, Bluetooth-Already Available.
• UWB, 3G, B3G, 802.11n, 802.16 (WiMAX), OFDM,
802.20(WWAN, Mobi-Fi, MBWA)- Emerging out.
• Personnel Area Network (PAN) associated with
body/ clothing-Becoming a possibility.
• Software Defined Radios (SDR) – Multi-Functional,
Multiservice, Multiprotocol, Multiband, Multimode
(Universal) Radios.
Broadband Wireless Access (BWA) Technologies
Technology
Max Throughput
Frequency Bands
Typical Range
Application
WiFi (802.11x)
54 Mbps/ 11 Mbps
2.4 G, 5.1 G
100-400 mtrs
WLAN
WiMax (802.16x)
70 Mbps
700 MHz, 2.3 G, 2.5 G,
3.5 G, 5 G
Up to 50 Kms
WWAN
Mobi-Fi (802.20)`
40 Mbps
2.4, 3.5, 5.5 G
8-10 Kms
Mobile Broadband
CorDect
70 Kbps
1900 MHz
10-15 Kms
WWAN
WCDMA/ 3G
2.0 Mbps
1900-2100 MHz
Unlimited (Cellular)
Mobile Broadband
EV-DO,HSPDA
2.4 Mbps (shared)
450,,900,1800 MHz
Unlimited (Cellular)
Mobile Broadband
EDGE
230 Kbps
900,1800 MHz
Unlimited (Cellular)
Mobile Internet
GPRS
58 Kbps
900,1800 MHz
Unlimited (Cellular)
Mobile Internet
CDMA (2000-1X)
144 Kbps (shared)
450,,900,1800 MHz
Unlimited (Cellular)
Mobile Internet
FSO
100 Mbps to few Gbps
Light Wave
Few Kms
CAN
Microwave radio
(MMDS/ LMDS)
Few Mbps
3.5 G – 31 G
50 Kms +
MAN
VSAT
20 Mbps
4 G – 11 G
Unlimited
GAN (Remote Area)
Wireless USB 2.0
480 Mbps
2.4 G
10 mtrs
PAN
Bluetooth(802.15.1
3 Mbps
2.4 G
1-10 mtrs
PAN
Infrared
16 Mbps
Light Wave
1-5 meter
PAN
ZigBee/ UWB
200Kbps/400-500Gbps
2.5G-5.8G
1-100 mtrs
PAN
RFID
Few Kbps
2.4 G,900Mhz
Few Inches
Contact-less
Detection
24
12
Technology Comparison – BWA (3G and beyond)
UMTS
(3G)
HSDPA
EVDO
(3G)
802.16
a/d
802.16e
802.20
Bandwidth
5 MHz
5 MHz
1.25 MHz
1.25-20
MHz
1.25-20
1.25-5 MHz
Typical
Spectrum
1.9-2.1
GHz
1.9-2.1
GHz
450-1900
MHz
2.3-5.8
GHz
2.3-5.8 GHz
Various
Downlink
Peak Rate
0.4 bps/Hz
2.9 bps/Hz 2.5 bps/Hz
3.2 bps/Hz
3.2 bps/Hz
2.4-3.6
bps/Hz
Uplink Peak
Rate
0.4 bps/Hz
0.4 bps/Hz 1.4 bps/Hz
2.4 bps/Hz
2.4 bps/Hz
1.2 bps/Hz
Ave DL
Thr put
0.1 bps/Hz
0.7 bps/Hz 0.9 bps/Hz
0.53
bps/Hz
0.75 bps/Hz
0.78 bps/Hz
Ave UL
Thr put
0.1 bps/Hz
0.1 bps/Hz 0.32 bps/Hz
NA
NA
0.35 bps/Hz
Flat IP
Support
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Mobility
Full
Full
Full
Fixed
Limited
Full
25
3. Satellite based DTH Services offer
alternate for the Broadband via Receive Only
Internet Service (ROIS)
– Deployment of DTH for TV has begun, but internet
access through this was not permitted
– While internet data is downloaded from the
satellite, the uplink connection to the ISP is through
another channel
• Since DTH (or receive-only VSAT) dish is only
receiving, should not require SACFA clearance or
NOCC fee for uplink monitoring
– New technology permits DTH to be used for bidirectional internet access, though costs are high
because of required hardware
•• Broadband
Broadband Policy
Policy 2004
2004
a.DTH
a.DTH provider
provider with
with ISP
ISP
license
license allowed
allowed to
to offer
offer
Receive
Receive Only
Only internet
internet
services
services
b.ISP
b.ISP licenses
licenses permitted
permitted to
to
allow
allow customers
customers for
for
downloading
downloading data
data through
through
DTH
DTH
c.DTH
c.DTH providers
providers permitted
permitted
to
to provide
provide both
both way
way
Internet
Internet service
service after
after
obtaining
obtaining VSAT
VSAT and
and ISP
ISP
license
license
13
Broadband using DTH for Receiveonly Internet
CUSTOMER
PREMISES
EQUIPMENT
BROADCAST
CHANNEL
RECEIVE
ONLY SIGNAL
Inbound
CUSTOMERS
RECIVING
SET
512 kbps
DTH PROVIDERS
TRANSMITTER
OUTBOUND
COMBINED
SIGNAL
DTH Service
Provider
Hub
OUTWARD
DIALUP
EQUIPMENT
Outbound Channel
(Radio, ISDN,
Dial up etc.)
-
64 – 128 kbps
Internet
Service
Provider
International
Internet
Cloud
Speed of outbound channel is -generally between 10 to 20% of inbound channel
VSAT has the potential for significant impact on
Broadband Penetration if artificial cost drivers
are removed
– Advantages
of
VSAT
for
remote
geographies, high reliability, multi-casting
and disaster recovery applications are wellknown
– VSAT operators face increased costs due to
special regulations & restrictions because of
its CUG category
– Policy makers have some concerns that can
be addressed in changing current rules
– To bridge last mile, VSAT license could be
permitted to be used as access media for
Broadband
•• Broadband
Broadband Policy
Policy 2004
2004
a.Open
a.Open Sky
Sky policy
policy for
for VSAT
VSAT to
to
be
be pursued
pursued by
by DOT
DOT
b.Minimum
b.Minimum dish
dish size
size of
of 11 m
m for
for
KU-band
KU-band permitted
permitted
c.
c. Throughput
Throughput restricted
restricted upto
upto 22
Mbps
Mbps
d.VSAT
d.VSAT service
service providers
providers
permitted
permitted to
to provide
provide Internet
Internet
services
services by
by obtaining
obtaining ISP
ISP
license
license
14
4. Fixed Wireless Access- Great potential to be a
dominant access technology
Unlicensed
Unlicensed
bands
bands
– 802.11x (Wi-Fi) technologies are widely used
international standards. Wi-Max has substantial
future potential
• 5.1 and 5.7 GHz bands (802.11a, Wi-Max) equally
important as 2.4 GHz (802.11b/g, Wi-Max)
Alternative
Alternative
spectrum
spectrum
– IMT 2000 bands have been keenly contested world
over for 3G
• Need to encourage alternative technologies in less
congested bands
– Spectrum allocation for fixed use should be unlinked
from mobile
• Certain fixed technologies, e.g., CorDECT, considered
WLL and spectrum allocation counted against allocation
for mobile services
•• Broadband
Broadband Policy
Policy 2004
2004
a.
a. 2.40
2.40 –– 2.48
2.48 GHz
GHz spectrum
spectrum
De-licensed
De-licensed for
for outdoor
outdoor
usage
usage with
with power
power
restrictions
restrictions (4W).
(4W).
b.
b. 5.15–5.35
5.15–5.35 &
& 5.7–5.8
5.7–5.8 GHz
GHz
spectrum
spectrum De-licensed
De-licensed for
for
indoor
indoor usage
usage for
for low
low
power
power (200
(200 mW)
mW) systems.
systems.
c.
c. 5.25
5.25 –– 5.35
5.35 GHz
GHz will
will be
be
De-licensed
De-licensed for
for outdoor
outdoor
usage
usage in
in consultation
consultation with
with
DOS.
DOS.
d.
d. 1880
1880 –– 1900
1900 MHz
MHz
spectrum
spectrum delinked
delinked from
from
access
access providers
providers
allocation
allocation and
and available
available to
to
ISPs.
ISPs.
e.
e. Alternate
Alternate spectrum
spectrum for
for
broadband
broadband services
services to
to be
be
identified
identified
5. Facilitating Radio Spectrum for
Broadband Access
• ISM Spectrum (2.4 to 2.48 GHz, Wi-Fi) de-licensed for incampus WLAN using any technology.
• De-licensing of this for outdoor usage has also been
notified with 4W EIRP.
• De-licensing of 5.1 to 5.3 and 5.7 to 5.8 GHz spectrum for
indoor & in-campus usage has been notified.
• Earmarking of 20 MHz (1880 to 1900 MHz) for wireless
TDD access systems by ISPs (delinking from WLL).
• Time-bound frequency allocation, site clearance &
frequency licenses through automation of Spectrum
Management System and by setting predetermined
standards for WPC.(E-application for SACFA clearance)
15
6. Fiscal measures to reduce the cost of access
devices, infrastructure and broadband service
Recommendations
Recommendations
a.
a. Allow
Allow 100%
100% depreciation
depreciation of
of PC’s
PC’s and
and
broadband
broadband CPE’s
CPE’s in
in first
first year
year
b.
b. Give
Give tax
tax benefit
benefit for
for donated
donated PC’s
PC’s
c.
c. Remove
Remove anti-dumping
anti-dumping duty
duty on
on import
import of
of
recycled
recycled PC’s
PC’s
d.
d. Reduce
Reduce and
and rationalize
rationalize import
import duties
duties
e.
e. Put
Put local
local manufacturing
manufacturing on
on equal
equal
footing
footing with
with imported
imported finished
finished goods
goods
f.f. Exempt
Exempt web
web hosting
hosting from
from income
income tax
tax
g.
g. Exempt
Exempt ISP’s
ISP’s from
from service
service tax
tax
h.
h. Personal
Personal broadband
broadband allowance
allowance
Broadband
Broadband Policy
Policy 2004
2004
a.
a. High
High priority
priority to
to indigenous
indigenous manufacture
manufacture
of
of Broadband
Broadband related
related equipments
equipments
b.
b. Package
Package to
to bring
bring down
down the
the cost
cost of
of
broadband
broadband services
services at
at affordable
affordable level
level to
to
be
be worked
worked out
out in
in consultation
consultation with
with
Ministry
Ministry of
of Finance
Finance and
and other
other related
related
departments.
departments.
31
7. Reduction in the cost of connectivity
• Cost of connectivity (international & domestic) forms a
significant part of Opex for Broadband services.
• Tariff for international bandwidth was forborne and left to
the market forces. It was considered to be on the higher
side in comparison to international benchmarks.
• Govt. has reduced the license fees for Infrastructure
Provider category II from 15% to 6% of AGR and bank
guarantee from Rs. 100 crore to Rs. 5 crore.
• Revised tariff orders reducing the ceiling price for
international bandwidth (IPLC) by 35% for E1 and by
70% for DS3 and STM1 capacity to be effective from
1.5.2005 have already been issued (sub-judice at present).
• The revised tariff orders reducing the ceiling tariff for
domestic leased circuits (DLC) by an extent of 3% for E1
market price and 70% for DS3/ STM1 market price,
effective from 1.5.2005 have been issued by TRAI.
32
16
8. Quality of Service for Broadband
•As per TRAI Act, 1997, TRAI has to prescribe QoS
parameters.
•Government recognises that QoS parameters are
extremely important and have an impact on investment
and roll-out decisions of operators.
•TRAI is requested to prescribe QoS parameters for
provisioning of broadband service using various access
technologies at an early date.
•Work has already started in this direction.
•Govt. has already directed the service providers, not to
market a service as Broadband unless it has a download
33
speed of > 256 Kbps.
Broadband Services
• High speed Internet access – Still the killer
application for Broadband in India
• Video-On Demand, Interactive TV, IPTV, PPV,
Time Shifted TV, Videoconferencing (Multimedia
over Broadband)
• Triple Play (data, voice, video) – One stop solution
• IP-VPN (low cost connectivity)
• VOIP (permitted only for telecom companies)
• Interactive Gaming (future killer application)
• 4 e’s (e-Governance, e-Learning, e-Health, eCommerce)
34
17
Broadband Tariff
1. Regulation:
•
Tariff for Internet/ Broadband forborne by TRAI
due to unlimited competition
•
Determined by market forces (180 players)
2. Type of Tariffs
(i) Flat Rate Unlimited (fixed Rs./ month for
unlimited usage)
(ii) Flat Rate Usage based
Time based (per hour)
Data download based (per Mbps)
35
Customer Options
SP-1
SP-2
SP-3
Speed
256 Kbps
Security
Deposit
Triband- Rs. 1300 with Landline Rs. 1000
Rs. 5300 partly refundable
None, since
connection through
cable
Installation
Charges
Rs. 500
Rs. 1000-3000
Rs. 2500
Equipment cost Rental Rs. 95/month
Included in
installation charge
None
Basic Package
•Rental of Rs. 590 for 500 MB
for a month.
•Lapses if unused.
•Additional usage Rs. 1.20 per
Mb. Free from 12 am – 8 am
•Rental of Rs. 375 for
500 MB for a month.
•Lapses if unused.
•Additional usage at
Rs. 1.25 per MB.
•Rental of Rs. 400 for
400 MB for a month.
•Lapses if unused.
•Need
to
renew
package.
Additional IP
address
Rs. 2000
Rs. 2000
NA
Dialup
domestic and
international
roaming
NA
Yes
NA
256/ 512 Kbps
256 Kbps
36
18
Roadmap - Current Plans for Broadband
•Govt. has issued Broadband Policy 2004 based on TRAI’s recommendations on
‘Accelerating Growth of Internet & Broadband Penetration in the country.
• ISPs are teaming up with Cable TV operators to provide Broadband to the homes
using HFC technologies and also making use of radio links for high speed last mile
access.
• New entrants in Basic Service are using advanced technologies like ‘Fiber to the
Curb’, High Speed WLL, DSL etc. to enable Broadband access in the last mile. Some
of the service providers have started offering PC alongwith the Broadband connection
under rental / installment schemes.
• Incumbent operators BSNL & MTNL which have a subscriber base of around 40
million over copper loop are appointing franchisees to offer broadband services by
offering existing copper network and co-location facilities to the third parties on
mutually agreed revenue share basis. Aim to provide 1.5 million connections by the
end of 2005 and a total of 7 million Broadband connections in further years. They
have also launched broadband services @ Rs. 500 per month throughout the country.
• Public places like Airports, Railway stations, modern business centres, star hotels,
cyber cafes, Malls have started having deployment of Hot Spots (Wi-Fi) in unlicensed
2.4 Ghz band (already 300 hotspots in the country). More expected now after outdoor
de-licensing of 2.4 GHz band.
Conclusions
1.
Government has issued Broadband policy 2004 to
accelerate the growth of Broadband services in the
country on regulator’s recommendations including setting
up ambitious targets.
2.
Alternate access technologies specially wireless access to
play significant role for Broadband penetration in India,
breaking the natural monopoly of copper local loop.
3.
Cable TV network offers great potential for contributing
towards Broadband access.
19
Conclusions (Contd…)
4.
5.
6.
Wireless based technologies specially WLL, Wi-Fi, WiMax, V-SAT, DTH etc. are enabling cost effective and
faster broadband deployment & will pick up after enabling
notifications are in place.
Markets to offer innovative applications and leverage costeffective technologies to make Broadband attractive and
affordable.
In India one of the main hindrance to Broadband
deployment has been the cost to consumer which was of the
order of US$ 20 per month against the telephony ARPU of
US$ 10 per month and Internet ARPU of US$ 5 per
month. Now with offerings @ below Rs. 500 per month, it
should pick up, but real growth is expected at the tariff of
Rs. 250 / month.
**********
Rural Access Scenario
Rural telecom access in India is characterized by
• Low population density – poor commercial
viability for service provider
• Difficult topological & climatic conditions –high
costs of connectivity, spectrum & infrastructure
• Scarcity or absence of reliable electric power
This makes it difficult to provide telecom services
of acceptable quality by traditional means & at
affordable prices. Also it restricts the fast &
economic roll out of services in rural areas
Centre for Development of Telematics
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20
Rural Access Solutions
India needs to provide widespread internet
access, that can boost.
Economic growth &.
Other services/applications.
Wireless solution is must to avoid.
Overwhelming cost of infrastructure.
Resources and time required to deploy countrywide
fixed-line broadband internet.
Rural access solutions from CDOT addresses
these issues through their product design &
engineering of rural communications systems.
Centre for Development of Telematics
41
Objective
The objective is to improve
– rural tele-density,
– broadband access
– facilitating mobility services
for rural subscribers with low cost of
infrastructure & operations.
Centre for Development of Telematics
42
21
Features of Rural Wireless Solution
Provides integrated voice, multimedia &
broadband services
Based on cost effective standard wireless
access technologies
Provision for mobility
Provides all IP solutions
Re-utilization of existing infrastructure
where available
Frequency re-use for better usage of radio
resource
Co-channel interference control
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Applications Envisaged
• E-governance,
• Entertainment,
• Tele-medicine,
• Video conferencing
• Disaster management
• Internet Kiosks
• Village enterprise development
• Tele-marketing
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22
The following table depicts the goal of telecom services in the country.
Year
No.
of
phones
Teledensity
No
of
mobile
phones
Rural
connectivity
Internet
connectivity
Broadband
connections
2005
100 Mn
10 %
55 Mn
87 %
5.45 Mn
3 Mn
2007
250 Mn
22 %
180-200
Mn
100 %
18 Mn
9 Mn
40 Mn
20 Mn
2010
Centre for Development of Telematics
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Evolution of Rural Telecom Solutions
India has about 600,000 villages 87% of these villages are provided
with village public phones (VPT’s)
The rural tele-density is still about 2% which is very low
compared to more than 27% in urban areas
The rural telephones capacity is about 15 million largely catered
by CDOT switches designed for rugged rural conditions
In the last 3 years the rural switches were up-graded to provide
ISDN connectivity with 128kbps data rates
As a next step the same switches are provided with add-on units to
cater to wireless access using GSM/CDMA technology
Further an upgrade path is envisaged which addresses broad band
wireless connectivity, extension of range, provision of direct
interface to IP based soft switch
Centre for Development of Telematics
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23
Rural Wireless Solution
• The GSM/CDMA access on existing rural switches is
supported based on SDR which can be configured for
GSM or CDMA base stations.
• WiMAX/MILTON is the new broadband wireless
technology capable of delivering broadband internet
and extending services like internet telephony
throughout India without major disruption to other
services while deploying the infrastructure.
• The last-mile broadband wireless could be achieved
through the deployment of wireless LANs (like Wi-Fi),
and the LAN traffic could be back hauled to the
WiMAX network. This helps in quick provisioning of
high-speed connectivity to customers within the base
station range.
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Existing rural switch in network
248 subscribers
V5.2 on
256P RAX
(AN-RAX)
V5.2 on
256P RAX
248 subscribers
E1 links
(V5.2
Interfaces)
Local /
Tandem
Exchange
V5
CAPABILITY
(AN-RAX)
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24
Existing Rural Switch Features
• It is an Access Network Product
More than 30,000 switches are in field.
• It combines the advantage of the proven
technology and new network configuration for the
rural areas with:
–
–
–
–
–
Extreme temperatures
Non air-conditioning operation
Operation in High humidity and salinity
Dust prone
Low power
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Network Architecture For Rural Access and Broadband System
PSTN
PSTN
POTS
FIXED
LINE
ISDN BRI
V5.2
CORE NETWORK
MSC
A INTERFACE
BROADBAND IP
BACKHAUL
E1/STM1
VILLAGE1
COMMUNITY
INTERNET
RURAL ACCESS
&
BROADBAND
SYSTEM
VILLAGE2
COMMUNITY
INTERNET
SOFTSWITCH
IPIP
BROADBAND
CONTENT
PROVIDER
GSM/CDMA
BTS
BROADBAND
WIRELESS TERMINAL
COLOCATED
UNIT
BROADBAND
WIRELESS PMP
SYSTEM (HUB)
VILLAGE3
COMMUNITY
INTERNET
VILLAGE4
COMMUNITY
INTERNET
BROADBAND
DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
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25
Conclusions
• 70% Indian population is in rural area with low Teledensity
• Village community/enterprise development which
contributes to country’s GDP growth can be achieved
through broad band services
• Faster roll-out and cost effective BW services can be
provided using combination of WiMAX and/or Wi-Fi
access for both “last mile” and “back haul” connectivity
for GSM/CDMA application
• IP migration can be achieved with minimal up-gradations
of the current infra-structure
• Broad band solution addresses all the applications required
for rural information and communication needs
Centre for Development of Telematics
51
Thank You
S.N. GUPTA
Advisor, TRAI, India
E-mail: [email protected]
Suresh. B.R
CDOT, India
[email protected]
26
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