Mackie 1604-VLZ3 User manual

Mackie 1604-VLZ3 User manual
1604-VLZ3
16-Channel Mic/Line Mixer
OWNER’S MANUAL
1604-VLZ3
Important Safety Instructions
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Read these instructions.
Keep these instructions.
Heed all warnings.
Follow all instructions.
Do not use this apparatus near water.
Clean only with a dry cloth.
Do not block any ventilation openings. Install in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions.
8. Do not install near any heat sources such as radiators, heat registers,
stoves, or other apparatus (including amplifiers) that produce heat.
9. Do not defeat the safety purpose of the polarized or grounding-type
plug. A polarized plug has two blades with one wider than the other.
A grounding-type plug has two blades and a third grounding prong.
The wide blade or the third prong are provided for your safety. If the
provided plug does not fit into your outlet, consult an electrician for
replacement of the obsolete outlet.
10. Do not overload wall outlets and extension cords as this can result in a
risk of fire or electric shock.
11. Protect the power cord from being walked on or pinched particularly at
plugs, convenience receptacles, and the point where they exit from the
apparatus.
12. Only use attachments/accessories specified by the manufacturer.
PORTABLE CART
13. Use only with a cart, stand, tripod, bracket, or
WARNING
table specified by the manufacturer, or sold with
the apparatus. When a cart is used, use caution
when moving the cart/apparatus combination to
avoid injury from tip-over.
14. Unplug this apparatus during lightning storms or
when unused for long periods of time.
15. Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. Servicing is required
when the apparatus has been damaged in any way, such as powersupply cord or plug is damaged, liquid has been spilled or objects have
fallen into the apparatus, the apparatus has been exposed to rain or
moisture, does not operate normally, or has been dropped.
16. This apparatus shall not be exposed to dripping or splashing, and no
object filled with liquids, such as vases or beer glasses, shall be placed
on the apparatus.
17. This apparatus has been designed with Class-I construction and must
be connected to a mains socket outlet with a protective earthing connection (the third grounding prong).
18. This apparatus has been equipped with a rocker-style AC mains power
switch. This switch is located on the rear panel and should remain
readily accessible to the user.
19. The MAINS plug or an appliance coupler is used as the disconnect
device, so the disconnect device shall remain readily operable.
CAUTION
AVIS
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK. DO NOT OPEN
RISQUE DE CHOC ELECTRIQUE. NE PAS OUVRIR
CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK DO NOT REMOVE COVER (OR BACK)
NO USER-SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED PERSONNEL
ATTENTION: POUR EVITER LES RISQUES DE CHOC ELECTRIQUE, NE PAS ENLEVER LE COUVERCLE.
AUCUN ENTRETIEN DE PIECES INTERIEURES PAR L'USAGER.
CONFIER L'ENTRETIEN AU PERSONNEL QUALIFIE.
AVIS: POUR EVITER LES RISQUES D'INCENDIE OU D'ELECTROCUTION, N'EXPOSEZ PAS CET ARTICLE
A LA PLUIE OU A L'HUMIDITE
The lightning flash with arrowhead symbol within an equilateral triangle is
intended to alert the user to the presence of uninsulated "dangerous
voltage" within the product's enclosure, that may be of sufficient magnitude
to constitute a risk of electric shock to persons.
Le symbole éclair avec point de flèche à l'intérieur d'un triangle équilatéral
est utilisé pour alerter l'utilisateur de la présence à l'intérieur du coffret de
"voltage dangereux" non isolé d'ampleur suffisante pour constituer un risque
d'éléctrocution.
The exclamation point within an equilateral triangle is intended to alert the
user of the presence of important operating and maintenance (servicing)
instructions in the literature accompanying the appliance.
Le point d'exclamation à l'intérieur d'un triangle équilatéral est employé
pour alerter les utilisateurs de la présence d'instructions importantes pour le
fonctionnement et l'entretien (service) dans le livret d'instruction
accompagnant l'appareil.
20. NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with
the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC
Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if
not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause
harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no
guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If
this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television
reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and
on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or
more of the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and the
receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from
that to which the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for
help.
CAUTION: Changes or modifications to this device not expressly
approved by LOUD Technologies Inc. could void the user's authority to
operate the equipment under FCC rules.
21. This apparatus does not exceed the Class A/Class B (whichever is
applicable) limits for radio noise emissions from digital apparatus as
set out in the radio interference regulations of the Canadian Department
of Communications.
ATTENTION — Le présent appareil numérique n’émet pas de bruits
radioélectriques dépassant las limites applicables aux appareils
numériques de class A/de class B (selon le cas) prescrites dans le
réglement sur le brouillage radioélectrique édicté par les ministere des
communications du Canada.
22. Exposure to extremely high noise levels may cause permanent hearing
loss. Individuals vary considerably in susceptibility to noise-induced
hearing loss, but nearly everyone will lose some hearing if exposed to
sufficiently intense noise for a period of time. The U.S. Government’s
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has specified
the permissible noise level exposures shown in the following chart.
According to OSHA, any exposure in excess of these permissible limits
could result in some hearing loss. To ensure against potentially dangerous exposure to high sound pressure levels, it is recommended that all
persons exposed to equipment capable of producing high sound pressure levels use hearing protectors while the equipment is in operation.
Ear plugs or protectors in the ear canals or over the ears must be worn
when operating the equipment in order to prevent permanent hearing
loss if exposure is in excess of the limits set forth here:
Duration,
per day in
hours
8
6
4
3
2
1.5
1
Sound Level
dBA, Slow
Response
90
92
95
97
100
102
105
0.5
110
0.25 or less 115
Typical Example
Duo in small club
Subway Train
Very loud classical music
Dave screaming at Steve about
deadlines
Loudest parts at a rock concert
WARNING — To reduce the risk of fire or electric shock, do not
expose this apparatus to rain or moisture.
Correct disposal of this product. This symbol indicates that this product should not be disposed of with your household waste, according to the WEEE Directive (2002/96/EC) and your national law. This product
should be handed over to an authorized collection site for recycling waste electrical and electronic equipment (EEE). Improper handling of this type of waste could have a possible negative impact on the environment and
human health due to potentially hazardous substances that are generally associated with EEE. At the same time, your cooperation in the correct disposal of this product will contribute to the effective usage of natural
resources. For more information about where you can drop off your waste equipment for recycling, please contact your local city office, waste authority, or your household waste disposal service.
2
1604-VLZ3
We realize that you must be keen to try
out your new 1604-VLZ3. All we ask is
that you read this page NOW, and the rest
can wait until you’re good and ready. But
do read it — you’ll be glad you did.
WARNING: Before you plug the AC power
cord into the mixer, make sure the VOLTAGE
SELECTOR switch is set to the same voltage
as your local AC mains supply (see page 13).
Level-Setting Procedure
Message to seasoned pros: do NOT set levels using the
old “Turn the trim up until the clip light comes on, then
back off a hair” trick. When a Mackie mixer clip light
comes on, you really are about to clip.
This procedure really works — it assures low noise
and high headroom. Please read on.
It’s not even necessary to hear what you’re doing to
set optimal levels. But if you’d like to: Plug headphones
into the PHONES output jack, then set the CTL ROOM/
PHONES knob about one-quarter of the way up.
The following steps must be performed one channel at
a time:
Other Nuggets of Wisdom
For optimum sonic performance, the channel faders and the MAIN MIX fader should be set near the “U”
(unity gain) markings.
Always turn the MAIN MIX fader and CTL ROOM/
PHONES knob down before making connections to and
from your 1604-VLZ3.
If you shut down your equipment, turn off your amplifiers first. When powering up, turn on your amplifiers
last.
Save the shipping box! You may need it someday.
Instant Mixing
Here’s how to get going right away, assuming you have
a microphone and a keyboard:
1. Plug your mic into Channel 1’s MIC input.
2. Turn on the 1604-VLZ3.
3. Perform the Level-Setting Procedure.
4. Connect cords from the MAIN OUT jacks to
your amplifier.
5. Hook up speakers to the amp and turn it on.
6. Set channel 1’s fader to the “U” mark.
7. Engage (push in) Channel 1’s L-R switch.
1. Turn the GAIN, AUX send and fader controls
fully down.
8. Set the MAIN MIX fader one-quarter of the way
up.
2. Be sure the 1–2, 3–4 and L–R channel assignment switches are all disengaged.
9. Sing like a canary!
3. Set the EQ knobs at the center detents.
11. Turn channel 3’s PAN knob fully left and channel 4’s PAN knob fully right.
4. Connect the signal source to the MIC or LINE
channel input.
10. Plug your keyboard into channels 3 and 4.
12. Set those faders to the “U” mark.
5. Engage (push in) the channel’s SOLO switch.
13. Perform the Level-Setting Procedure.
6. Push in the MODE switch in the output section
(LEVEL SET (PFL) mode) — the LEVEL SET
LED will light.
14. Engage the L-R switch on these channels.
7. Play something into the selected input, at realworld levels.
8. Adjust the GAIN control so that the display on
the meter stays around “0.” (Only the left meter
is active in the Level-Setting Procedure.)
Owner’s Manual
Read This Page!
15. Play like a madman and sing like a canary!
Please write your serial number here for future
reference (i.e., insurance claims, tech support,
return authorization, make dad proud, etc.)
9. If you’d like to apply some EQ, do so now and
return to the previous step.
10. Disengage that channel’s SOLO switch.
Purchased at:
11. Repeat for each of channels 1–16.
Part No. SW0548 Rev. E 01/09
©2006-2009 LOUD Technologies Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Loosely based on a dream sequence in which the entire marketing department dance "The Twist" on a live TV pop music show back in 1966.
Date of purchase:
Owner’s Manual
3
1604-VLZ3
Introduction
Thank you for choosing a Mackie professional compact mixer. The 1604-VLZ3 is equipped with our precision-engineered XDR2TM Extended Dynamic Range
premium studio-grade mic preamp.
This icon marks information that is critically
important or unique to the 1604-VLZ3. For your
own good, read them and remember them. They
will be on the final test.
Now that you have your 1604-VLZ3, find out how to get
the most from it. That’s where this manual comes in.
This icon will lead you to in-depth explanations of features and practical tips. While not
mandatory, they usually have some valuable
nuggets of information.
How To Use This Manual
Since many of you folks will want to hook up your
1604-VLZ3 immediately, the first pages you will encounter after the table of contents are the ever-popular
hookup diagrams. These show typical mixer setups for
Recording and Stereo PA. After this section is a detailed
tour of the entire mixer.
Every feature of the 1604-VLZ3 is described “geographically;” in other words, in order of where it is
physically placed on the mixer’s top or rear panel. These
descriptions are divided into the first three sections,
just as your mixer is organized into three distinct zones:
Appendix A is a section on troubleshooting and repair
information.
Appendix B is a section on connectors: XLR connectors, TRS balanced connectors, TS unbalanced connectors, and Insert connectors.
Appendix C shows the technical specifications, and
a block diagram showing the internal signal path and
general goings-on within the mixer.
Patchbay: The patchbay along the top and back,
where you connect things.
Channel Strip: The sixteen channel strips on the
left where you adjust each channel.
Output Section: The output section on the right.
Throughout these chapters you’ll find illustrations,
with each feature numbered. If you’re curious about a
feature, simply locate it on the appropriate illustration,
notice the number attached to it, and find that number
in the nearby paragraphs.
Need help with your new mixer?
• Visit www.mackie.com and click Support to find:
FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions), manuals, and addendums.
• Email us at: [email protected]
• Telephone 1-800-898-3211 to speak with one of our splendid
technical support chaps, (Monday through Friday, normal
business hours, PST).
4
1604-VLZ3
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS ........................ 2
INTRODUCTION ...................................................... 4
HOOKUP DIAGRAMS............................................... 6
CONVERTING TO RACKMOUNT MODE ...................... 8
PATCHBAY DESCRIPTION ......................................... 9
E-Z INTERFACE ......................................... 9
1. MIC INPUTS ............................................. 9
PHANTOM POWER .................................... 9
2. LINE INPUTS .......................................... 10
3. GAIN .................................................... 10
4. INSERT .................................................. 10
5. DIRECT OUT ........................................... 10
SPLIT MONITORING ............................... 10
6. AUX SEND OUTPUTS ............................. 11
EFFECTS: SERIAL OR PARALLEL? .............. 11
7. STEREO RETURNS................................... 12
8. SUB OUTS ............................................. 12
DOUBLE BUSING .................................... 12
9. C-R OUTS (CONTROL ROOM OUTPUTS) ... 12
10. PHONES OUTPUT (ON FRONT PANEL)...... 12
11. TAPE OUTPUT ........................................ 12
12. TAPE INPUT ........................................... 13
13. MAIN INSERT ......................................... 13
14. MAIN OUTS .......................................... 13
15. MONO OUTPUT...................................... 13
16. MONO LEVEL ......................................... 13
17. VOLTAGE SELECTOR ................................ 13
18. POWER CONNECTION ............................. 13
19. FUSE...................................................... 14
20. POWER SWITCH..................................... 14
21. POWER LED ........................................... 14
22. PHANTOM SWITCH ................................ 14
23. 48V LED ................................................ 14
24. BNC LAMP SOCKET ................................. 14
CHANNEL STRIP DESCRIPTION ............................... 15
“U” LIKE UNITY GAIN ............................ 15
25. CHANNEL FADER..................................... 15
A CLEAN FADE ........................................ 15
26. ASSIGN (1–2, 3–4, L–R) ........................ 15
27. SOLO ..................................................... 16
28. –20 (SOLO) LED ..................................... 16
29. OL (MUTE) LED ....................................... 16
30. MUTE .................................................... 16
31. PAN....................................................... 17
STEREO SOURCES ................................... 17
CONSTANT LOUDNESS ! ! ! ...................... 17
32. 3-BAND MID-SWEEP EQ ......................... 17
33. LOW CUT .............................................. 18
34. AUX 1, 2, 3, & 4 .................................... 18
35. PRE ....................................................... 18
36. 5/6 SHIFT ............................................. 18
OUTPUT SECTION DESCRIPTION............................. 19
37. MAIN MIX FADER................................... 19
38. SUBGROUP FADERS ............................... 19
39. ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX............................ 19
40. TAPE IN (LEVEL) ..................................... 20
41. TAPE TO MAIN MIX ................................ 20
42. SOURCE ................................................ 20
43. CTL ROOM/PHONES .............................. 20
44. MODE (NORMAL (AFL)/LEVEL SET (PFL)). 21
45. LEVEL SET LED ........................................ 21
46. SOLO (LEVEL) ......................................... 21
47. RUDE SOLO LIGHT .................................. 21
48. METERS ................................................. 22
METERS VS. REALITY .............................. 22
AUX TALK .............................................. 23
49. AUX SENDS (MASTER) ............................ 23
50. AUX SENDS SOLO .................................. 23
51. STEREO RETURNS (LEVEL)....................... 23
52. TO AUX 1 AND TO AUX 2 ....................... 24
53. MAIN MIX TO SUBS (STEREO RET 3) ....... 24
54. 1–2/3–4 (STEREO RETURN 3) ................ 24
55. C-R/PHNS ONLY (STEREO RETURN 4) ..... 25
56. RETURNS SOLO AND LED ........................ 25
APPENDIX A: SERVICE INFORMATION .................... 26
APPENDIX B: CONNECTIONS.................................. 27
APPENDIX C: TECHNICAL INFORMATION ................ 30
SPECIFICATIONS ............................................. 30
TRACK SHEET.................................................. 32
BLOCK DIAGRAM ............................................ 34
1604-VLZ3 LIMITED WARRANTY........................... 35
Owner’s Manual
Owner’s Manual
Contents
5
1
Bass
2
Guitar
1
Mic 1-2
2
1604-VLZ3
HOOKUP DIAGRAMS
3
Processors
Keyboard
Drum Machine
CHANNEL INSERTS
CHANNEL INPUTS
4
Stereo Compressor
5 4 3
8 7 6
BAL/UNBAL
BAL/UNBAL
Recording System
6
1604-VLZ3
4
3
2
5
6
STEREO RETURNS
3
2
1
R L
BAL/UNBAL
OUT
Headphones
PHONES
HR824s or
other Powered
Studio Monitors
SUB OUTS
C/R OUT TAPE TAPE
BAL/UNBAL OUT
IN
Stereo Tape Deck
4
MAIN
INSERT
1
DIRECT OUT
AUX SENDS
BAL/UNBAL
Stereo Compressor
and Stereo EQ
STEREO MONO
MAIN OUT
2 1
Multi-track
Digital Recorder
Reverb
Delay
Mono in
Stereo out
Owner’s Manual
Stereo
Compressors
1
2
3
3
2
1
Mics 1-4
11
10
9
8
Drum Machine
CHANNEL INPUTS
7
6
Processor
CHANNEL INSERTS
5
4
4
Guitar
BAL/UNBAL
8 7 6
Mono EQ
Mono EQ
3
4
BAL/UNBAL
L
6
5
AUX SENDS
2
1
DIRECT OUT
BAL/UNBAL
Reverb
Delay
4
BAL/UNBAL
OUT
Headphones
PHONES
SUB OUTS
Multi-track
Digital Recorders
for Optional Live Recording
STEREO RETURNS
3
2
1
R L R
C/R OUT TAPE TAPE
BAL/UNBAL OUT
IN
CD/DVD Player
Stereo Compressor
and Stereo EQ
5 4 3
15
16
MAIN
INSERT
STEREO MONO
MAIN OUT
Left and Right
Active PA Speakers
2 1
14
Keyboard or other line-level input
13
12
Active Stage Monitors
Live Stereo PA System
Owner’s Manual
7
1604-VLZ3
Converting To Rackmount Mode
Not only is the new 1604-VLZ3 a compact, professional-quality tabletop mixer, it’s rack- mountable. The
unique rotating input pod makes this possible.
7. Carefully install the pod-mounting screws in
their new locations [d].
8. Install the rack ears that came with the mixer,
using the supplied packet of screws. These
screws are a bit longer than the ones you have
to take out. The rack ears can be installed in
either of two depths as shown at the bottom
of this page: [e] mixer’s surface flush with the
rack rails, like ordinary rackmount equipment,
or [f] mixer’s surface sunken into the rack, to
protect the knobs from being bumped.
With a trusty phillips screwdriver, nerves of steel, grit,
determination, your charming good looks, and a few
moments of your valuable time, it can be converted from
desktop mode (from the factory) to rackmount mode:
1. Turn off the power and remove ALL the cords
from the mixer — power cord, audio, lamps,
everything.
2. Place the mixer, face down, on a clean soft
surface, like a blanket or very large dog.
NOTE: If you remove the rack ears at a later date,
use the original (shorter) screws to secure the
sides.
3. Remove the four screws securing the cable
cover [a] and set the plate aside.
4. Replace two of the screws; the ones at the pod
end of the mixer [b].
5. Remove two pod-mounting screws on each side
of the mixer [c].
6. Gently pull the pod away from the slots, rotate
it, and place it, tabs first, into the rackmount
tabs [d], located on the underside of the main
chassis. Be careful not to constrict or pinch any
of the ribbon or power cables.
An optional accessory called the ROTOPOD-VLZ is
available and can be used in desktop or rackmount
installations. It will put the patchbay jacks on the same
plane as all the knobs, buttons and faders. This is a lifesaver in applications that demand frequent repatching,
and costs a heck of a lot less than an external patchbay,
not to mention all the interface and patch cords. Please
visit your dealer for more exciting details. Be sure to
order the “VLZ3” version so you don’t end up with the
one for the classic CR-1604!
remove
screws
replace
screws
remove
plate
rackmount
tab slots
remove
screws
flush mount
8
1604-VLZ3
use the longer screws
that come in a little bag
rotate
pod
replace
screws
sunken
position
use the longer screws
that come in a little bag
Owner’s Manual
Patchbay Description
1
At the risk of stating the obvious, this is where you
plug everything in: microphones, line-level instruments
and effects, headphones, and the ultimate destination
for your sound: a tape recorder, PA system, etc. A few of
the features described in this section are on top of the
mixer, but most are out back on this “pod.”
See Appendix B (page 27) for further details and
some rather lovely drawings of the connectors you can
use with the 1604-VLZ3.
E-Z INTERFACE
Concerned about levels, balancing, impedances, polarity, or other interface goblins?
Don’t be. On your 1604-VLZ3, you can patch
anything almost anywhere, with nary a care.
Here’s why:
•
Every input and output is balanced (except
insert, phones and RCA jacks).
•
Every input and output will also accept unbalanced lines (except XLR jacks when phantom
power is on).
•
Every input is designed to accept virtually any
output impedance.
•
The main left and right mix outputs can deliver
28 dBu into as low as a 600 ohm load.
•
All the other outputs can deliver 22 dBu into as
low as a 600 ohm load.
•
All the outputs are in phase with the inputs.
All we ask is that you perform the Level-Setting Procedure every time you patch in a new sound source. So
stop worrying and start mixing!
1. MIC INPUTS
We use phantom-powered, balanced microphone
inputs just like the big studio mega-consoles, for exactly
the same reason: This kind of circuit is excellent at
rejecting hum and noise. You can plug in almost any
kind of mic that has a standard XLR-type male mic connector.
Professional ribbon, dynamic, and condenser mics
will all sound excellent through these inputs. The
1604-VLZ3’s mic inputs will handle any kind of mic level
you can toss at them, without overloading. Be sure to
perform the Level-Setting Procedure on page 3.
Not every instrument is made to connect directly to a
mixer. Guitars commonly need a Direct Injection (DI)
box to connect to the mixer's MIC inputs. These boxes
convert unbalanced line-level signals from your guitar,
into balanced mic-level outputs, and provide signal and
impedance matching. They also let you send your gifted
guitar renditions over long cables or audio snakes, with
minimum interference or high-frequency signal loss. Ask
your dealer or guitar maker about their recommendations for a good DI box.
PHANTOM POWER
Most modern professional condenser mics
are equipped for Phantom Power, which lets
the mixer send low-current DC voltage to
the mic’s electronics through the same wires that carry
audio. (Semi-pro condenser mics often have batteries to
accomplish the same thing.) “Phantom” owes its name
to an ability to be “unseen” by dynamic mics (Shure
SM57/SM58, for instance), which don’t need external
power and aren’t affected by it anyway.
The 1604-VLZ3’s phantom power is globally controlled
by the PHANTOM [22] switch on the rear panel. (This
means the phantom power for all channels is turned on
and off together.)
Never plug single-ended (unbalanced) microphones, or ribbon mics into the MIC input
jacks if phantom power is on.
Do not plug instrument outputs into the MIC
input jacks with phantom power on unless you
know for certain it is safe to do so.
Owner’s Manual
9
1604-VLZ3
6
4
2
2. LINE INPUTS
4. INSERT
These 1/4" jacks share circuitry (but not phantom
power) with the mic preamps, and can be driven by
balanced or unbalanced sources at almost any level. You
can use these inputs for virtually any signal you’ll come
across, from instrument levels as low as –50 dBu, to
operating levels of –10 dBV to +4 dBu, since there is –15
to +45 dB of gain (60 dB range) available for line inputs
via the GAIN [3] knob. Always make sure to perform the
Level-Setting Procedure on page 3.
These unbalanced 1/4" jacks are for connecting serial
effects processors such as compressors, equalizers,
de-essers, or filters. The insert point is after the GAIN
[3] control, but before the channel’s EQ [32], LOW
CUT [33], FADER [25] and MUTE [30] controls. Insert
cables must be wired thusly:
To connect balanced lines to these inputs, use a 1⁄4"
Tip-Ring-Sleeve (TRS) plug, the type found on stereo
headphones:
To connect unbalanced lines to these inputs, use a
1⁄4" mono (TS) phone plug or instrument cable:
3. GAIN
3
Yes it’s true, these controls are not in the
patchbay section at all. They’re found along the
top row of knobs in the channel strip section.
But their purpose is so closely linked with the
MIC [1] and LINE [2] input jacks that we
couldn’t bear to separate them. Here’s why:
Every time you plug something into a MIC or
LINE input jack, you should perform the LevelSetting Procedure, and that procedure is basically “how to use the GAIN knob.”
GAIN adjusts the input sensitivity of the MIC
and LINE inputs. This allows signals from the
outside world to be adjusted to optimal internal
operating levels.
Through the XLR jack (MIC), there will
be 0 dB of gain with the knob fully down,
ramping to 60 dB of gain fully up.
Through the 1/4" input (LINE), there is 15 dB of attenuation fully down and 45 dB of gain fully up, with a
“U” (unity gain) mark at 10:00.
This 15 dB of attenuation can be very handy when you
are inserting a signal that is very hot, or you want to add
a lot of EQ gain, or both. Without this “virtual pad,” this
scenario might lead to channel clipping.
10
5
1604-VLZ3
tip
SEND to processor
ring
sleeve
(TRS plug)
This plug connects to one of the
mixer’s Channel Insert jacks.
“tip”
“ring”
RETURN from processor
Tip = send (output to effects device)
Ring = return (input from effects device)
Sleeve = common ground
Even though channels 1–8 already have DIRECT OUT
[5] jacks , INSERT jacks can also be used as channel
direct outputs; post-GAIN, pre-LOW CUT, and pre-EQ.
See the connector section on page 29 (figure F) showing
three ways to use insert cables.
5. DIRECT OUT
Found only on channels 1–8, these balanced 1/4"
jacks deliver the signal from the very end of the channel
path; post-GAIN [3], post-EQ [32], post-LOW CUT [33],
post-FADER [25], and post-MUTE [30]. They are the
key player in “split monitoring,” making the 1604-VLZ3
perfect for an 8-track studio.
SPLIT MONITORING
With split monitoring, you use the first eight
channels for your sound sources: vocal mics,
drum mics, keyboard/synth outputs, guitar
effects outputs, that sort of thing. From
there, the channels manipulate the sound, but are
not assigned to the output section. Instead, they’re
patched from the channel’s DIRECT OUT [5] jacks to
the corresponding multitrack input (DIRECT OUT 1 to
multitrack input 1, 2 to 2, 3 to 3, etc.). The signals will
now be recorded or pass directly through the multitrack,
depending on each track’s record-ready status.
multitrack
machine
sound sources
1–8
direct
outputs
9–16
group
outputs
The point is that you never listen directly to the
source channels (1–8). You listen to the monitor channels (9–16) and they’re listening to the multitrack that
is listening to the source channels. (Make sure to assign
the monitor channels 9-16 to the L/R mix, and not the
source channels 1-8.) The main advantage is that you
won’t be forced to constantly repatch your multitrack
— just set it up and forget it. You’ll also know for certain that the signals are indeed getting to the multitrack, since you’re constantly listening to it.
Owner’s Manual
to some of the tracks, and the DIRECT OUT jacks to
feed single-channel signals (like bass guitar) to the
other tracks.
Another method of interfacing a multitrack is called
inline monitoring, and requires a dedicated mixing
console, like the Mackie 8•Bus. Each of its channels is
actually two channels: one carrying the mic/line sound
source and the other carrying the multitrack output.
6. AUX SEND OUTPUTS
The outputs of the multitrack are then patched to the
next eight LINE [2] inputs on the 1604-VLZ3 (multitrack out 1 to LINE input 9, 2 to 10, 3 to 11, etc.). Aha!
That’s why it says “TRACK 1” next to channel 9’s fader,
“TRACK 2” next to channel 10, and so forth. These channels (9–16) will be assigned to the mixer’s output section, delivering the signals to their ultimate destination,
which may be your mixdown 2-track, your control room
system, or your headphones.
But let’s not forget that the 1604-VLZ3 is a 4-bus
mixer. These buses lead to the SUB OUTS [8], and are
designed to accomplish the task of getting channels to
the multitrack without using the direct outputs.
For example, a channel is assigned to SUB OUT 1.
SUB OUT 1’s output is patched to multitrack input 1.
From there, the multitrack output goes to the mixer’s
channel 9 LINE input, as we just discussed. (Hot tip:
To feed an 8-track deck with 4 sub outputs, simply use
Y-cords: SUB OUT 1 feeds tracks 1 and 5, 2 feeds 2 and
6, 3 feeds 3 and 7, and 4 feeds 4 and 8. Tracks in record
mode will accept the signal, and tracks in safe mode will
ignore the signal.)
The advantages: You can assign any channel to any
track, without repatching. You can assign multiple channels to one track and control the overall level of that
subgroup. You can’t bounce tracks without this feature.
These 1/4" jacks usually patch to the inputs of your
parallel effects devices or to the inputs of your stage
monitor amps. For details see "Aux Talk" on page 23.
EFFECTS: SERIAL OR PARALLEL?
You’ve heard us carelessly toss around the terms “serial” and “parallel.” Here’s what we mean by them:
“Serial” means that the entire signal leaves the mixer
(INSERT [4] send), is routed through the effects
device, and returns to the mixer (INSERT return). Examples: compressor, limiter, graphic equalizer. Line-level sources can also be patched through a serial effects
device before or after the mixer.
Insert
Send
Insert
Return
Signal Processor
(e.g., Compressor)
Dry Signal
Processed
Signal
“Parallel” means that a portion of the signal in the
mixer is tapped off to the device (AUX SEND [6]), processed, and returned to the mixer (STEREO RETURN
[7]) to be mixed with the original “dry” signal. This way,
multiple channels can all make use of the same effects
device. Examples: reverb, digital delay.
Aux
Send
Aux
Return
Signal Processor
(e.g., Reverb)
Output
Section
Wet Signal
Mix
Stage
Channel Path
Dry Signal(s)
Processed
Signal
Dry Signal(s)
Perhaps the best method is to do both: Use the SUB
OUTS to feed multichannel submixes (like a drum kit)
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11
1604-VLZ3
18
19
14 15 13 12 11 9
8
7
16
7. STEREO RETURNS
9. C-R OUTS (CONTROL ROOM OUTPUTS)
This is where you connect the outputs of your parallel
effects devices (or extra audio sources). They’ll accept
just about any pro or semipro effects device on the market. To learn how signals are routed from these inputs,
see STEREO RETURN LEVEL [51] on page 23.
These 1/4" jacks are usually patched to the inputs of
your control room amplifier or a headphone distribution amplifier. To learn how signals are routed to these
outputs, see CTL ROOM/PHONES [43] on page 20.
Mono: If you have an effects device with a mono
output (one cord), plug that into the left input of a
STEREO RETURN and leave the right input unplugged.
That way, the signal will be sent to both sides, magically
appearing in the center as a mono signal.
8. SUB OUTS
These four 1/4" jacks are usually patched to the inputs of a multitrack deck, or to secondary amplifiers in a
complex installation. To learn how signals are routed to
these outputs, see SUBGROUP FADERS [38], page 19.
10. PHONES OUTPUT (on front panel)
The 1604-VLZ3’s stereo 1/4"
phones jack will drive any standard headphone to very loud levels. Walkperson-type phones can
also be used with an appropriate
adapter. To learn how signals are
routed to these outputs, see CTL
ROOM/PHONES [43] on page 20.
If you’re wiring your own cable for
the PHONES output:
10
Tip = left channel
Double Busing
Ring = right channel
How on earth do you get four jacks to feed eight
tracks? To feed an 8-track deck with only four SUB
OUTS, simply use four Y-cords:
Sleeve = common ground
•
SUB OUT 1 feeds tracks 1 and 5
•
SUB OUT 2 feeds tracks 2 and 6
•
SUB OUT 3 feeds tracks 3 and 7
•
SUB OUT 4 feeds tracks 4 and 8
Tracks in record mode will accept the signal, and
tracks in safe mode will ignore the signal. It’s that easy.
This method is exactly the same as the
double-busing feature found in other mixers.
Built-in double-busing is nothing more than Ycords living inside the mixer instead of hanging out the back. If we had room for the extra jacks, we
would have thrown them in, but we don’t, so we didn’t.
Sonically, there is no difference.
Y-cord advice: Do not use the stereo “headphone-toleft/right” splitter adapters. Use the type that send the
same signal to two places; the tip of the source plug
feeds the tips of both destination plugs.
12
1604-VLZ3
WARNING: When we say the headphone
amp is loud, we’re not kidding. It can cause
permanent ear damage. Even intermediate
levels may be painfully loud with some earphones. BE
CAREFUL! Always turn the CTL ROOM/PHONES [43]
knob all the way down before connecting headphones.
Keep it down until you’ve put the phones on. Then turn
it up slowly. Why? “Engineers who fry their ears find
themselves with short careers.”
11. TAPE OUTPUT
These unbalanced RCA jacks tap the main mix outputs to make simultaneous recording and PA work more
convenient. Connect these to your 2-track recorder’s
inputs. To learn how signals are routed to these outputs,
see MAIN MIX [37] fader details on page 19.
Mono: If you want to feed a mono signal to your tape
deck or other device, simply use the 1/4" MONO [15]
output jack.
These unbalanced RCA jacks are designed to work
with semipro as well as pro recorders. Connect your
2-track tape recorder’s outputs here, using standard hi-fi
RCA cables. To learn how signals are routed from these
inputs, see TAPE IN (LEVEL) [40] on page 20.
Use these jacks for convenient playback of your mixes.
You’ll be able to review a mix, and then rewind and try
another pass without repatching or disturbing the mixer
levels. You can also use these jacks with a portable tape
or CD player to feed music to a PA system between sets.
WARNING: Pushing TAPE TO MAIN MIX [41]
in the output section can create a feedback
path between TAPE INPUT and TAPE OUTPUT. Make sure your tape deck is not in record, recordpause or input monitor mode when you engage this
switch, or make sure the TAPE IN level knob is fully
counterclockwise (off).
a cord in this 1/4" jack, hand the other end to Mr. Mono,
and you’re done. He’s got his mono mix and you’ve still
got your stereo mix. The MONO output is nothing more
than a mix of the left and right main mix.
16. MONO LEVEL
So, Mr. Mono comes running back, screaming about
the mono mix being so loud that his camcorder is melting. Just reach for this knob and turn it down a bit. Just
the thing for sending mono signals to mic inputs like
camcorders, telephone interface boxes, even answering
machines. With the pot all the way up (fully clockwise),
you’ll have 6 dB of extra gain, with unity gain halfway
between the one and two o’clock positions.
17. VOLTAGE SELECTOR
Located on the bottom panel, is a voltage selector
switch.
17
13. MAIN INSERT
These 1/4" jacks are for connecting serial effects such
as compressors, equalizers, de-essers, or filters. The
insert point is after the mix amps, but before the MAIN
MIX [37] fader. Insert cables must be wired thusly:
Tip = send (output to effects device)
Ring = return (input from effects device)
Sleeve = common ground (connect shield to all
three sleeves)
14. MAIN OUTS
These 1/4" jacks are usually patched to the inputs
of your 2-track mixdown deck (unless you’ve chosen
to use the TAPE OUTPUT [11] RCA jacks), or to the
house amplifier during live sound sessions. To learn how
signals are routed to these outputs see MAIN MIX [37]
fader details on page 19. To use these outputs to drive
balanced inputs, connect 1/4" TRS (Tip-Ring-Sleeve)
phone plugs like this:
Tip = + (hot)
Ring = – (cold)
Sleeve = ground
To use these outputs to drive unbalanced inputs, connect 1/4" TS (Tip-Sleeve) phone plugs like this:
Tip = signal
Owner’s Manual
12. TAPE INPUT
WARNING: Before you plug the AC
power cord into the 1604-VLZ3, you
must make sure that this slide switch
is set to the same voltage as your local AC mains
supply. Only slide the voltage switch with the
power cord unplugged.
Use a flat headed screwdriver to slide the switch if
needed. The switch allows you to use the mixer in different countries and voltages, meet interesting people
from other cultures, and entertain them.
18. POWER CONNECTION
Just in case you lose the cord provided with the 1604VLZ3, its power jack accepts a standard 3-prong IEC
cord like those found on most professional recorders,
musical instruments, and computers.
WARNING: Before you plug the AC power cord
into the 1604-VLZ3, you must make sure that
the VOLTAGE SELECTOR [17] slide switch is
set to the same voltage as your local AC mains supply.
WARNING: Disconnecting the plug’s ground
pin can be dangerous. Please don’t do it.
Sleeve = ground
15. MONO OUTPUT
It happens to everybody sooner or later: The forces
that govern your world will demand a monaural output
from your painstakingly-created stereo panorama. The
last thing you want to do is start twirling all your carefully-placed PAN settings to one side. What to do? Stick
Owner’s Manual
13
1604-VLZ3
20
22
19
19. FUSE
24
The 1604-VLZ3 is fused for your (and its own)
protection. If you suspect a blown fuse, disconnect the
power cord, pop out the fuse drawer with a small flat
screwdriver, and replace the fuse with a 1A SLO BLO,
5x20mm, available at electronics stores or your dealer
(or a 500 mA SLO BLO 5x20 mm if your 1604-VLZ3 is set
to 220V-240V).
If two fuses blow in a row, something is very wrong.
Please call our toll-free number 1-800-898-3211 from
within the U.S. (or call the distributor in your country)
and find out what to do.
20. POWER SWITCH
Press the top of this rocker switch inwards to turn
on the mixer. The POWER LED [21] on the top surface
of the mixer will glow with happiness, or at least it will
if you have the mixer plugged in to a suitable live AC
mains supply.
Press the bottom of this switch to put the mixer into
standby mode. It will not function, but the circuits are
still live. To remove AC power, either turn off the AC
mains supply, or unplug the power cord from the mixer
and the AC mains supply.
As a general guide, you should turn on your mixer
first, before the power amplifier or powered speakers,
and turn it off last. This will reduce the possibilities of
any turn-on, or turn-off thumps in your speakers.
21. POWER LED
You’ve probably already figured this out, but if the
POWER [20] switch is on, this LED (light-emitting
diode), located in the output section, will light. If the
switch is off, well, you get the idea. If the POWER switch
is on and the LED does not glow, one of three things
has happened: Somebody tripped over the power cord
and yanked it from the outlet, your electricity has been
turned off due to nonpayment, or the fuse has blown.
23
21
22. PHANTOM SWITCH
This switch controls the phantom power supply for
all the MIC [1] inputs, as discussed on page 9. When
turned on (or off), the phantom power circuitry takes a
few moments for voltage to ramp up (or down). This is
perfectly normal. Make sure that you pull down the master fader, and headphone/control room volume before
engaging the phantom switch.
23. 48V LED
Located right next to the POWER LED, this is just to
let you know which way you have the PHANTOM [22]
switch set. If your dynamic mics work and your condensers don’t, chances are this LED is off, so turn it on.
You’ll notice that when you turn the phantom power
off, the LED stays on for a while. This is a natural phenomenon — the LED is actually a voltmeter telling you
that the phantom power takes time to ramp itself down
to zero volts. So, if you’ve turned phantom power off to
connect something to the mic inputs, wait until the LED
stops glowing and then make your connections safely.
24. BNC LAMP SOCKET
Located in the top right corner of the output section, this 12V socket will drive any standard BNC-type
lamp (a Littlite® #12G or #12G-HI (high-intensity), for
instance).
14
1604-VLZ3
The sixteen channel strips look alike
and function identically. So if you learn
one, you have learned them all. The only
difference is that the eight on the left have
DIRECT OUT [5] jacks and the eight on
the right don’t. We’ll start at the bottom
and work our way up.
“U” LIKE UNITY GAIN
Mackie mixers have a “U” symbol on
almost every level control. This “U” stands
for “unity gain,” meaning no change in
signal level. Once you have performed the
Level-Setting Procedure , you can set every
control at “U” and your signals will travel
through the mixer at optimal levels. What’s
more, all the labels on our controls are
measured in decibels (dB), so you’ll know
what you’re doing level-wise if you choose
to change a control’s settings.
25. CHANNEL FADER
The fader is almost the last control in a
channel’s signal path. It’s placed after the
EQ [32] and MUTE [30] controls (post-EQ
/post-MUTE) and before the PAN [31]control (pre-PAN). The “U” mark, about threequarters of the way up, indicates unity
gain, meaning no increase or decrease of
signal level. All the way up provides an
additional 10 dB, should you need to boost
a section of a song. If you find that the
overall level is too quiet or too loud with a
fader near unity, you’ll want to confirm the
setting by performing the Level-Setting
Procedure on page 3.
26
25
26. ASSIGN (1–2, 3–4, L–R)
Alongside each channel fader are four buttons,
labeled SOLO, 1–2, 3–4 and L–R. The latter three are
collectively referred to as channel assignment switches.
1, 3 and L are the left sides of these stereo pairs, and
2, 4 and R are the right sides. Used in conjunction with
the channel’s PAN [31] knob, these switches determine
the destination of a channel’s signal: With PAN set at
the center detent, the left and right sides receive equal
signal levels. To feed only one side or the other, just turn
the PAN knob accordingly.
Owner’s Manual
Channel Strip Description
If you’re doing a mixdown to a 2-track, simply engage
the L–R switch on each channel that you want to hear,
and they’ll be sent to the main mix. If you want to create
a subgroup of certain channels, engage either the 1–2
or 3–4 switches instead of the L–R, and they’ll be sent
to the appropriate subgroup faders. From there, the
subgroups can be sent back to the main mix, allowing
you to use the subgroup faders as a master control for
those channels.
If you’re printing new tracks or bouncing existing
ones, you’ll also use the 1–2 and 3–4 switches, but not
the L–R switch. Here, you don’t want the subgroups
sent back into the main mix, but sent out, via the SUB
OUTS [8] jacks, to your multitrack inputs. However, if
you’re printing tracks via the DIRECT OUT [5] jacks, all
the channel assignment switches should be disengaged
(up).
The 1604-VLZ3 is what we call a “true 4-bus mixer.”
Each channel can be assigned or unassigned to any of
the subgroups without affecting the other subgroups or
settings within the channel, and each subgroup has its
own master fader and dedicated output. In fact, since
there are 4 subgroups and the main L/R mix, it’s actually
a true 6-bus mixer. We could have named it the 1606VLZ3. Darn!
A Clean Fade
Faders are not rocket science — they
operate by dragging a metal pin (the
wiper) across a carbon-based strip (the
track). It is possible for airborne crud to
land on the track. Should that happen, you
may hear scratchy noises or signal dropouts as the wiper stumbles over the crud.
Do all you can to keep airborne crud out of your
profession. Use air-conditioned rooms whenever possible, avoid smoking near the mixer, keep food and drink
away from the mixer, and for pity’s sake, never put the
mixer in your kitchen! We also recommend “exercising”
the faders — give them a few full-travel excursions
once a week or so, and that will help scare the crud
away. Do not use spray cleaners, rather use compressed
air, or a vacuum with brush attachment.
Owner’s Manual
15
1604-VLZ3
27. SOLO
29. OL (MUTE) LED
This lovable switch allows you to check signals in your
phones or control room without having to assign them to
the L-R, 1-2 or 3-4 mixes. You can solo as many channels
as you like. SOLO does not interrupt any of the other
channels, buses or outputs — that’s called nondestructive solo.
Another LED that does two completely different
things! First, the “OL” part: “OL” means overload, or
clip. You don’t want that to happen. Ever. Clipping can
happen to any mixer — it’s the point where the signal’s
voltage tries to exceed the supply voltages that power
the circuitry. The 1604-VLZ3’s OL LED will come on just
before clipping, so if you see it, take immediate action:
Perform the Level-Setting Procedure on page 3. If that
doesn’t help, check for excessive use of EQ boost or
fader gain. Like the –20 LED, it will tend to flicker in
time with that channel’s signal.
Using the MODE [44]
switch, the 1604-VLZ3’s solo
system comes in two flavors:
NORMAL (AFL) (sometimes
called SIP, or solo-in-place)
and LEVEL SET (PFL) (sometimes called PFL, or prefader-listen). The MODE switch is described in tender
loving detail on page 21.
LEVEL SET (PFL) taps the channel signal
before the fader. If you have a channel’s
fader set way below “U” (unity gain), SOLO
won’t know that and will send a unity gain signal to the
control room, headphones, and meter display. That may
result in a startling level boost at these outputs, depending on the position of the SOLO [46] level knob.
In a nutshell, soloed channels are sent to the SOURCE
[42] mix, that ultimately feeds your control room, headphones and meter display. Whenever SOLO is engaged,
all source selections (MAIN MIX, 1–2, 3–4, and TAPE)
are defeated, to allow the soloed channel to do just that
— SOLO!
28. –20 (SOLO) LED
32
31
30
29
28
27
16
An LED that does two completely different things! Saves space, recycles the planet,
but requires some explanation. First, the
“–20” part: Often referred to as “signal activity,” this LED will flicker in time with the
signal present in that channel. It’s handy
for confirming that a channel is indeed
active, and may also lend a clue as to what
the signal is. For instance, a kick drum will
cause the LED to pulse in time with the
drum, and a synth pad will cause it glow a
bit more steadily.
Now for the “SOLO” part. When a channel’s SOLO switch is engaged, this LED will
glow steadily, without flickering. It will also
be brighter than it would be as a –20 indicator. In conjunction with the RUDE SOLO
LIGHT [47], you can find a rogue SOLO
switch quickly.
1604-VLZ3
Now for the “MUTE” part. Assuming your levels are set
correctly, the OL LED will never come on as a result of
clipping. That’s pretty boring. So, to liven things up, this
LED will glow steadily when that channel’s MUTE [30]
switch is engaged.
Here is a quick reference to these LEDs:
Name
Color
Flickering
Glowing
–20 (SOLO)
green
signal present
channel soloed
OL (MUTE)
red
channel clipping
channel muted
30. MUTE
Engaging this switch provides the same results as
turning the channel's fader all the way down: Any channel assignment to L-R, 1-2 or 3-4 will be interrupted.
All the post AUX sends will be silenced, as will the
direct out signals on channels 1 through 8, and the OL
(MUTE) LED will glow. The PRE AUX sends, channel
INSERT send, and SOLO (in LEVEL SET (PFL) mode)
will continue to function during MUTE.
Depending on the audio content in a channel, engaging its MUTE switch may cause a slight popping sound.
This is not a problem within the mixer, and it can be
avoided: Simply engage the LOW CUT [33] switch on
each channel (unless its low frequency content is vitally
important, such as a kick drum or bass guitar). LOW
CUT eliminates subsonic debris, which causes the pop,
and its effect is usually transparent.
This adjusts the amount of channel signal sent to the
left versus the right outputs. PAN determines the fate
of the L-R assignment, subgroups 1–2 and 3–4, and the
SOLO (in AFL mode). With the PAN knob hard left, the
signal will feed the left main mix, subgroup 1, subgroup
3 and left NORMAL (AFL) solo mode (assuming their
assignment switches are engaged). With the knob hard
right, signal feeds the right main mix, subgroup 2, subgroup 4 and right NORMAL (AFL) solo mode. With PAN
set somewhere in-between left and right, the signal will
be divided between the left and right buses.
Stereo Sources
Your life will be easier if you follow this standard convention: When patching stereo sound sources to a mixer,
always plug the left signal into an “odd” channel (1, 3, 5,
etc.) and the right signal into the adjacent “even” channel (2, 4, 6, etc.). Then pan the odd channel hard left
and the even channel hard right.
CONSTANT LOUDNESS ! ! !
The 1604-VLZ3’s PAN controls employ a design
called “Constant Loudness.” It has nothing
to do with living next to a freeway. As you
turn the PAN knob from left to right (thereby
causing the sound to move from the left to the center to
the right), the sound will appear to remain at the same
volume (or loudness).
If you have a channel panned hard left (or right) and
reading 0 dB, it must dip down about 4 dB on the left
(or right) when panned center. To do otherwise, like
those Brand X mixers, would make the sound appear
much louder when panned center.
The LOW EQ provides up to
15 dB boost or cut below 80 Hz.
0
The circuit is flat (no boost or
cut) at the center detent position. This frequency represents
the punch in bass drums, bass
guitar, fat synth patches, and some really serious male
singers who eat broken glass for breakfast.
+15
+10
+5
–5
–10
–15
20Hz
100Hz
1kHz
10kHz 20kHz
Used in conjunction with the LOW CUT [33] switch,
you can boost the LOW EQ without injecting a ton of
subsonic debris into the mix. We recommend using the
LOW CUT feature on all channels, except low frequency
signals, like kick drums and bass guitars.
Owner’s Manual
31. PAN
The MID EQ , or “midrange,” has a fixed bandwidth of
1 octave. The MID knob sets the amount of boost or cut,
up to 15 dB, and is effectively bypassed at the center
detent. The frequency knob sets the center frequency,
sweepable from 100 Hz to 8 kHz.
+15
+15
+10
+10
+5
+5
0
0
–5
–5
–10
–10
–15
–15
20Hz
100Hz
1kHz
10kHz 20kHz
20Hz
100Hz
1kHz
10kHz 20kHz
Most of the root and lower harmonics that define a
sound are located in the 100 Hz–8 kHz frequency range,
and you can create drastic changes with these two
knobs. Many engineers use MID EQ to cut midrange
frequencies, not boost them. One popular trick is to set
the MID fully up, turn the frequency knob until you find
a point where it sounds just terrible, then back the MID
down into the cut range, causing those terrible frequencies to disappear. Sounds silly, but it works. Sometimes.
The HI EQ provides you up
to 15 dB boost or cut above 12
kHz, and it is also flat at the
0
detent. Use it to add sizzle to
cymbals, an overall sense of
transparency, or an edge to
keyboards, vocals, guitar and
bacon frying. Turn it down a little to reduce sibilance or
to mask tape hiss.
+15
32. 3-BAND MID-SWEEP EQ
The 1604-VLZ3 has a 3-band, mid-sweep equalization:
LOW shelving at 80 Hz, MID sweep peaking from 100
Hz to 8 kHz, and HI shelving at 12 kHz. It’s probably
all the EQ you’ll ever need! (Shelving means that the
circuitry boosts or cuts all frequencies past the specified
frequency. For example, the 1604-VLZ3’s LOW EQ boosts
bass frequencies below 80 Hz and continuing down to
the lowest note you never heard. Peaking means that
certain frequencies form a “hill” around the center
frequency.)
+10
+5
–5
–10
–15
20Hz
100Hz
1kHz
10kHz 20kHz
With too much EQ, you can screw things up royally.
We’ve designed a lot of boost and cut into each equalizer
circuit because we love you, and know that everyone
will occasionally need that. But if you max the EQ on
every channel, you’ll get mix mush. Equalize subtly
and use the left sides of the knobs (cut), as well as the
right (boost). If you find yourself repeatedly using full
boost or cut, consider altering the sound source, such as
placing a mic differently, trying a different kind of mic,
changing the strings, or gargling.
Owner’s Manual
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1604-VLZ3
33. LOW CUT
This switch, often referred to as a high pass filter (all
depends on how you look at it), cuts bass frequencies
below 75 Hz at a rate of 18 dB per octave. This ain’t no
thrown-in dime-store filter — an 18 dB per octave curve
requires an elaborate circuit. Nothing but the best.
We recommend that you use this on every sound
source except kick drum, bass guitar, or bassy synth
patches. These aside, there isn’t much down there that
you want to hear, and filtering it out makes the low stuff
you do want much more crisp and tasty. Not only that,
but low cut can help reduce the possibility of feedback
in live situations, and it helps to conserve amplifier
power.
With LOW CUT, you can safely boost LOW EQ. Many
times, bass shelving EQ can really benefit voices.
Trouble is, adding LOW EQ also boosts the
subsonic debris: Stage rumble, mic handling clunks, wind noise and breath pops.
LOW CUT removes all that debris so you
can boost the LOW EQ without frying your
woofer.
34
35
We recommend going into a stereo reverb in
mono and returning in stereo. We have found
that on most “stereo” reverbs, the second
input just ties up an extra aux send and adds
nothing to the sound. There are exceptions, so feel free
to try it both ways. Should you choose to use two aux
sends, use the “odd” AUX (1, 3 or 5) to feed its left input
and the “even” AUX (2, 4 or 6) to feed the right input.
Remember, if you’re also dealing with a stereo source
signal, you’ll want to follow the sides — use the odd
AUX on the channel carrying the left side and the even
AUX on the channel carrying the right.
35. PRE
This switch determines the tap point of AUX 1 and 2.
Generally, “post” sends are used to feed effects devices,
and “pre” sends are used to feed your stage monitors.
See the “Pre vs. Post” diagram below. AUX 3 through 6
are always in post mode.
MUTE
INPUT
TRIM
INSERT
'PRE' SIGNAL
Here’s a frequency curve of LOW EQ
combined with LOW CUT:
PAN
ASSIGN
EQ
FADER
AUX 1
'POST' SIGNAL
PRE SWITCH
AUX 2
In post mode (switch up), AUX 1 and 2 will follow the
EQ [32], LOW CUT [33], FADER [25], and MUTE [30]
settings. If you fade the channel, you fade the send. This
is a must for effects sends, since you want the levels of
your “wet” signals to follow the level of the “dry.”
+15
+10
+5
36
LOW
CUT
0
–5
–10
–15
20Hz
100Hz
1kHz
10kHz 20kHz
34. AUX 1, 2, 3, & 4
33
These four knobs tap a portion of each
channel’s signal, mix them together and
send them to the AUX SEND [6] outputs.
They are off when turned fully down,
deliver unity gain at the center detent,
and can provide up to 15 dB of gain turned
fully up. Chances are you’ll never need this
extra gain, but it’s nice to know it’s there if
you do.
The AUX SEND outputs are then patched
to parallel effects processor inputs or
stage monitor amp inputs. AUX SENDS 1
and 2 levels are controlled not only by the
channel’s AUX knobs, but also by the AUX
SEND [49] master knobs.
AUX SENDS can also be used to generate
separate mixes for recording or “mix-minuses” for broadcast. By using AUX 1 or 2
in the PRE [35] mode, these mix levels can
be obtained independently of a channel’s
FADER [25] settings.
18
1604-VLZ3
In PRE mode (switch down), AUX 1 and 2 follow the
GAIN and LOW CUT settings only. EQ, PAN, FADER, and
MUTE settings have no effect on the PRE sends. This is
the preferred method for setting up stage monitor feeds
— they’ll be controlled independently of the fader and
mute moves.
36. 5/6 SHIFT
Don’t let the fact that there’s only four AUX knobs per
channel fool you — the 1604-VLZ3 has six AUX SENDs
[6]. With this 5/6 SHIFT switch up, the knobs labeled
AUX 3 and AUX 4 deliver their signals to AUX SEND 3
and 4 outputs. With this switch down, the signals appear
at the AUX SEND 5 and 6 outputs.
We recommend that AUX SEND 3 and 4 be patched
into your “utility” effects, like a short reverb and slap
delay; effects you use all the time. Use AUX SEND 5 and
6 for “exotic” effects, like harmonizers and multi-tap
delays; they are not likely to be used as often.
You’ve just learned about the input channels and how
the signals get in and out. The signals come in via MIC
[1] and LINE [2] input jacks, are manipulated by the
channels, and then sent to the output (master) section.
Things get a little more complicated, so put on your
thinking caps, take a deep cleansing breath, take this
manual, get on a bycycle, ride down to the canal, ponder
your life and all its unique experiences, then read this
section.
37. MAIN MIX FADER
This fader controls the levels of signals sent to the
MAIN OUT [14] jacks and TAPE OUTPUT [11] RCA
jacks. All channels and STEREO RETURNs that are assigned to the main mix, not muted and not turned fully
down will appear at the MAIN OUTs. Before the main
mix gets to this fader, the signals pass through the MAIN
INSERT [13].
The main mix signals are off with the fader fully down,
the “U” marking is unity gain, and fully up provides 10
dB additional gain. This additional gain will typically
never be needed, but once again, it’s nice to know it’s
there. The fader itself is a stereo version of the channel and subgroup faders — same supersmooth custom
taper, same dead silence when turned fully down. This is
the fader to pull down at the end of the song when you
want “The Great Fade-Out.”
Owner’s Manual
Output Section Description
38. SUBGROUP FADERS
As you might expect, these faders control the levels of
signals sent to the SUB OUTS [8]. All channels that are
assigned to subgroups with the ASSIGN [26] switches,
not muted and not turned fully down will appear at the
SUB OUTS. Unlike the MAIN OUT [14], the subgroup
signals do not pass through an insert jack on their way
to the subgroup faders. That’s no problem — should you
want to send these signals through a serial effects processor, simply patch from the SUB OUTS to the effect’s
input, and from the effect’s output to whatever the final
destination is, usually a multitrack recorder.
The subgroup signal is off when its fader is fully down,
the “U” marking is unity gain, and fully up provides 10
dB additional gain. Remember that if you’re treating
two subgroups as a stereo pair, subgroup 1 and 2 for
example, make sure that both subgroup faders “ride”
together, to maintain the left/right balance.
39
39. ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX
One popular use of the subgroups is to use them as
master faders for a group of channels on their way to
the main mix. Let’s say you’ve got a drum kit hogging up
seven channels and you’re going to want to fade them
out at a different rate than the other channels. You don’t
want to try that with seven hands or seven fingers, so
just un-assign these channels from L–R, reassign them
to subgroup 1–2, engage the ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX,
LEFT on subgroup 1 and the ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX,
RIGHT on subgroup 2. Now you can ride the entire
stereo drum mix with two faders — 1 and 2.
38
37
If you engage just one ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX switch
per subgroup (LEFT or RIGHT), the signal sent to the
main mix will be the same level as the SUB OUTS [8].
Owner’s Manual
19
1604-VLZ3
If you want the subgroup to appear in the center of the
main mix, engage both the ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX, LEFT
and RIGHT switches. The signal will be sent to both
sides, and will be attenuated just enough to preserve
constant loudness, just like the channel PAN [31] knobs
when set in the center.
40. TAPE IN (LEVEL)
This knob controls the level of the stereo signal coming from the TAPE INPUT [12] RCA jacks. Its range is
off when fully down, unity at the center detent, with 20
dB additional gain turned fully up, which may come in
handy if you’ve patched in a device with wimpy output
levels. After the level is determined, the stereo tape
signal can be sent to either of two places — the main
mix or the SOURCE [42] matrix .
41. TAPE TO MAIN MIX
Engaging this switch is just like engaging the L-R
switch on a channel — the signal, stereo in this case, is
sent to the main mix. It does not interrupt other signals,
just adds itself to them. This switch can be very handy
in a live sound situation when you want to play soothing
elevator music to an anxious crowd.
WARNING: Engaging TAPE TO MAIN MIX can
create a feedback path between TAPE INPUT
[12] and TAPE OUTPUT [11]. Make sure your
tape deck is not in record, record-pause or input monitor mode when you engage this switch, or that the TAPE
IN [40] level knob is turned fully down.
42. SOURCE
Typically, the engineer sends the main mix to an
audience or to a mixdown deck (if recording). But what
if the engineer needs to hear something other than the
main mix? With the 1604-VLZ3, the engineer has several
choices of what to listen to. This is one of those tricky
parts — have a double espresso first.
Using these switches, you can choose to listen to any
combination of MAIN MIX, SUBS 1-2, SUBS 3-4 and
TAPE. Selections made here deliver stereo signals to
the control room, headphones, and meter display. These
signals are tapped off as follows — post-MAIN MIX
FADER, post SUBGROUP FADERS [38], and post-TAPE
IN [40] knob. With no switches engaged, there will be
no signal at these outputs and no meter indication, with
two exceptions: SOLO and STEREO RETURN 4.
Regardless of the SOURCE matrix selection, engaging a SOLO switch will replace that selection with the
SOLO signal, also sent to the control room, headphones,
and meter display. This is what makes the Level-Setting
Procedure so easy.
43
Now you know how to select the signals you want to
send to the engineer’s control room and/or phones. Once
selected, these signals all pass through the same level
control, aptly named:
40
41
42
46
43. CTL ROOM/PHONES
45
44
47
20
1604-VLZ3
As you might expect, this knob controls the levels
of both the stereo control room, and the headphones.
Make sure that you move it to minimum before selecting
or adding a new source.
Whatever your selection, you can also use the control
room outputs for other applications. The sound quality
is just as impeccable as the main outputs. It can be used
as an additional main mix output and this one will have
its own level control. However, should you do this, be
aware that if you engage a SOLO [27] switch, that will
interrupt the mix:
44. MODE (NORMAL (AFL)/LEVEL SET (PFL))
The 1604-VLZ3’s solo system comes in two flavors:
NORMAL (AFL) (sometimes called SIP, or solo-inplace) and LEVEL SET (PFL) (sometimes called PFL,
or pre-fader-listen).
In NORMAL (AFL), the soloed channel’s signal is sent
directly to the control room, headphones and meter display just as it would sound to the channel’s assignment
switches: post-EQ [32], post-FADER [25] and post-PAN
[31]. The only difference is that SOLO works regardless
of the channel’s assignment positions, and that makes it
really handy — you can check out a channel before you
assign it.
NORMAL (AFL) is the preferred mode during mixdown: If the channel has some midrange boost at
4.236kHz, is panned a smidgen to the left, and its fader
is at –5.385dB, that’s exactly what you’ll hear if you
SOLO during NORMAL (AFL) mode. It’s just as if you
took the time to mute all the other channels.
LEVEL SET (PFL) solo is the key player in the all-important Level-Setting Procedure . It’ll send the channel’s actual internal levels to the meters so you’ll know
just what’s going on, level-wise. This procedure should
be performed every time a new sound source is patched
into a channel’s MIC [1] or LINE [2] input jacks.
LEVEL SET (PFL) is also the preferred mode for SR
(sound reinforcement, or live sound), to preview channels before they are let into the mix. It won’t give you
stereo placement, but will give you signal even if the
fader is turned down.
45. LEVEL SET LED
To quote step 6 of the Level-Setting Procedure , “Push
in the MODE [44] switch in the output section (LEVEL
SET (PFL) mode) — the LEVEL SET LED will light.”
When the MODE switch is engaged, it’s in LEVEL
SET (PFL) mode, the mode you must be in to set levels.
Now, when you engage any solo switch, this LED will
be a “green light” to set levels. If you tried to set levels
during NORMAL (AFL) mode, the meter display would
be at the mercy of the channel fader, and that would be
a big problem.
Owner’s Manual
Engaging a SOLO switch will cause this dramatic turn
of events: Any existing SOURCE matrix selections will
be replaced by the SOLO signals, appearing in the control room, headphones and meter display. The audible
solo levels are controlled by the SOLO [46] level knob.
The SOLO levels appearing on the meter display are
not controlled by anything — you wouldn’t want that.
You want to see the actual channel level on the display,
regardless of how loud you’re listening.
46. SOLO (LEVEL)
This knob controls the level of the signals coming
from the SOLO system. After the SOLO level is determined, the SOLO signals will proceed to take over the
control room, headphones, and meter display .
Once again, LEVEL SET (PFL) SOLO taps the
channel signal before the fader. If you have
a channel’s fader set way below “U” (unity
gain), LEVEL SET (PFL) SOLO won’t know that and
will send a unity gain signal to the control room, headphones, and meter display. This may result in a startling
level boost at these outputs, depending on the position
of the SOLO level knob.
47. RUDE SOLO LIGHT
This flashing LED (light emitting diode) serves two
purposes — to remind you that you’re in SOLO, and to
let you know that you’re mixing on a Mackie. No other
company is so concerned about your level of SOLO
awareness. We even force the soloed channel’s –20 LED
to play along, so you can find that rogue switch fast.
If you work on a mixer that has a SOLO function with
no indicator lights, and you happen to forget you’re in
SOLO, you can easily be tricked into thinking that something is wrong with your mixer. Hence the RUDE SOLO
LIGHT. It’s especially handy at about 3:00 in the morning, when no sound is coming out of your monitors, even
though your multitrack is playing back like mad.
Remember, LEVEL SET (PFL) taps the
channel signal before the fader. If you have
a channel’s fader set way below “U” (unity
gain), SOLO won’t know that and will send a unity gain
signal to the control room, headphones, and meter display. That may result in a startling level boost at these
outputs, depending on the position of the SOLO [46]
level knob.
Owner’s Manual
21
1604-VLZ3
48. METERS
Meters vs. Reality
The 1604-VLZ3’s peak metering system is made up of
two columns of twelve LEDs. Deceptively simple, considering the multitude of signals that can be monitored
by it. If nothing is selected in the SOURCE [42] matrix,
and no channels are in SOLO [27], the meter display
will just sit there. To put them to work, you must make a
selection in the SOURCE matrix (or engage a channel's
SOLO switch).
You may already be an expert at the world of “+4” (+4
dBu=1.23 V) and “–10” (–10 dBV=0.32 V) operating
levels. Basically, what makes a mixer one or the other
is the relative 0 dB VU (or 0 VU) chosen for the meter
display. A “+4” mixer, with a +4 dBu signal pouring out
the back will actually read 0 VU on its meter display.
A “–10” mixer, with a –10 dBV signal trickling out, will
read, you guessed it, 0 VU on its meter display. So when
is 0 VU actually 0 dBu? Right now!
Why? You want the meter display to reflect what the
engineer is listening to, and as we’ve covered, the engineer is listening either to the control room output or the
headphones. The only difference is that while the listening levels are controlled by the CTL ROOM/PHONES
[43] knob, the meter display reads the SOURCE mix
before that control, giving you the real facts at all times,
even if you’re not listening at all.
When the solo MODE [44] switch is set to LEVEL SET
(PFL) (down) , all soloed signals will be sent to the left
meter only. That, combined with the LEVEL SET LED
[45], are along the path of enlightenment known as
the Level-Setting Procedure (page 3). During NORMAL
(AFL) mode, the meters will behave normally.
43
48
42
45
44
22
1604-VLZ3
At the risk of creating another standard, Mackie’s
compact mixers address the need of both crowds by
calling things as they are: 0 dBu (0.775 V) at the output
shows as 0 VU on the meter display. What could be
easier? By the way, the most wonderful thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from.
Thanks to the 1604-VLZ3’s wide dynamic range, you
can get a good mix with peaks flashing anywhere between –20 and +10 dB on the meter display. Most amplifiers clip at about +10 dB, and some recorders aren’t so
forgiving either. For best real-world results, try to keep
your peaks between “0” and “+7.”
Please remember: Audio meter displays are just tools
to help assure you that your levels are “in the ballpark.”
You don’t have to stare at them (unless you want to).
If you find that staring at the meters sends you into a
hypnotic trance, please do not be alarmed. Just cut my
lawn and polish my car every Tuesday.
49
52
51
This is usually the knob you turn up when the lead
singer glares at you, points at his stage monitor, and
sticks his thumb in the air. (It would follow suit that if
the singer stuck his thumb down, you’d turn the knob
down, but that never happens.)
50. AUX SENDS SOLO
50
51
53
54
55
56
AUX TALK
SENDS are outputs, RETURNS are inputs. Each
channel's AUX [34] knobs tap the signal off the channel
and send it to the AUX SEND [6] outputs. AUX 1 and 2
are sent to the AUX SENDS 1 and 2 [49] master knobs
before the AUX SEND outputs; AUX 3 through 6 are sent
directly.
These outputs can be fed to the inputs of a reverb or
other device. From there, the outputs of the external
device are fed back to the mixer’s STEREO RETURN [7]
inputs. Then these signals are sent through the STEREO
RETURN [51] level controls, and finally delivered to the
main mix.
So, the original “dry” signals come from the channels
to the main mix, and the affected “wet” signals come
from the STEREO RETURNS to the main mix, and once
mixed together, the dry and wet signals combine to create a glorious sound. Armed with this knowledge, let’s
visit the Auxiliary World:
49. AUX SENDS (MASTER)
These knobs provide overall level control of AUX
SENDS 1 and 2, just before they’re delivered to their
AUX SEND [6] outputs. This is perfect for controlling
the level of stage monitors, since you’ll be using AUX 1
and 2 for this, with their PRE [35] switches engaged.
AUX SENDS 3 through 6 have no such control — they’ll
just send their mixes directly to their respective AUX
SEND outputs at unity gain.
Owner’s Manual
These knobs go from off (turned fully down), to unity
gain at the center detent, with 10 dB of extra gain
(turned fully up). As with some other level controls, you
may never need the additional gain, but if you ever do,
you’ll be glad you bought a Mackie.
Once again, in live sound situations AUX SEND 1 and
2 are likely to feed your stage monitors. You’ll want to
check the mix you’re sending them, and that’s what
these two buttons are for. (AUX 3 through AUX 6 have
no such switch.) Beside each switch is a green LED
that, just like the channel’s –20 LED [28], helps you
find the rogue SOLO switch.
The only thing different about AUX SENDS SOLO is
that it’s not really PFL (pre-fader listen), and it’s not
really SIP (solo-in-place), it’s actually AFL (after-fader
listen). During NORMAL (AFL) [44] mode , you’ll
get AUX SEND 1’s solo signal, post-AUX SENDS [49]
master level, in the left side of the control room outputs,
phones output and meter display, and AUX SEND 2 on
the right side. (If you ever use AUX 1 and 2 to create a
stereo monitor mix, you’ll understand why.) In LEVEL
SET (PFL) mode, you’ll get the signal dead-center, but
still post-AUX SENDS master level.
51. STEREO RETURNS (LEVEL)
These four controls set the overall level of effects
received from the STEREO RETURN [7] input jacks.
These controls are designed to handle a wide range of
signal levels — each knob goes from off, to unity gain at
the detent, to 20 dB gain fully clockwise, to compensate
for low-level effects. Signals passing through these level
controls will proceed directly to the MAIN MIX FADER
[37], with exceptions that we’ll discuss in a moment.
Typically, these knobs can just live at the center
detent, and the effects device’s output control should
be set at whatever they call unity gain (check their
manual). If that turns out to be too loud or too quiet,
adjust the effects device’s outputs, not the mixer. That
way, the mixer’s knobs are easy to relocate at the center
detent.
Owner’s Manual
23
1604-VLZ3
53. MAIN MIX TO SUBS (STEREO RETURN 3)
With this switch up, STEREO RETURN 3 behaves like
all the others — it delivers a stereo signal, regulated
by its level knob, to the main mix. When you engage
this switch, the signals are removed from the main mix
buses and sent to the 1-2/3-4 switch, which diverts the
signal once more. We’re not finished. Please read on.
54. 1–2/3–4 (STEREO RETURN 3)
49
52
51
53
50
51
55
54
56
52. TO AUX 1 and TO AUX 2
If you want to add reverb or delay to the stage monitor
mixes, these are the knobs for you. Operating independently of their respectively numbered STEREO RETURNS [51] level controls, these knobs are exactly the
same as the channel strip AUX 1 [34] and AUX 2 knobs.
These two knobs feed stereo return signals to their
respective AUX SEND [6] outputs:
TO AUX SEND 1 feeds STEREO RETURN 1 to AUX
SEND 1 master, and:
TO AUX SEND 2 feeds STEREO RETURN 2 to AUX
SEND 2 master.
They are off when turned fully down, deliver unity
gain at the center detent, and can provide up to 15 dB of
gain turned fully up. STEREO RETURN 3 and 4 have no
such knobs.
24
1604-VLZ3
If the MAIN MIX TO SUBS [53] switch is disengaged,
this switch does absolutely nothing. Let’s now assume
it’s engaged. STEREO RETURN 3’s stereo signal will not
be sent to the main mix, but to subgroup faders 1 and 2
(this switch up) or subgroup faders 3 and 4 (this switch
down).
Let’s say you’ve made a stereo drum submix on subgroup faders 1 and 2, so you can ride those two faders
instead of the seven channels that the drums came
from. Subgroup fader 1 has its ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX
[39], LEFT button engaged and subgroup fader 2 has its
ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX, RIGHT button engaged, blending the drum submix back into the main mix. The drum
channels are also sending signals to your reverb via the
AUX SENDS [6], and the reverb outputs are patched
into STEREO RETURN 3 [7]. So far so good.
Even though you could send STEREO RETURN 3 directly to the main mix (MAIN MIX TO SUBS [53] switch
up), you don’t want to. Instead, engage the MAIN MIX
TO SUBS switch and make sure the 1–2/3–4 switch is
up. Now the reverb return will be blended into the drum
submix, and as you ride those two faders, the reverb
level will follow.
Why do we want that? Because if you had just sent the
reverb directly to the main mix (MAIN MIX TO SUBS
switch up) and you did a drum fade-out using subgroup
faders 1 and 2, the “dry” signals would fade out, but the
“wet” signals would keep on singing. All you would hear
is the drum reverb (the “wet”), and none of the original
drum signals (the “dry”). That’s because the reverb is
being fed by the channel’s AUX sends, and they have no
idea that you’ve pulled down the subgroup faders. That’s
why we threw in these switches, phew!
Owner’s Manual
55. C-R/PHNS ONLY (STEREO RETURN 4)
Once again, the default for all the STEREO RETURNS
is to feed them directly into the main mix. You’ve just
learned about the optional exceptions involving STEREO RETURN 3.
STEREO RETURN 4 also has an optional exception:
By engaging this switch, you will remove STEREO
RETURN 4’s stereo signal from the main mix and send it
directly to the CTL ROOM/PHONES SOURCE [42] matrix. It matters not if any of the SOURCE matrix switches are assigned, but it will be interrupted, as usual, if a
SOLO [27] switch is engaged.
Let’s pretend you’re doing a live mix to a 2-track deck,
a house PA, or both, and you want to play along to a
click track. You could run the click track directly into
the main mix, but you don’t want the mixdown deck
and/or audience to hear it. By gum, this is the switch
for you. Similarly, it can be used for voice-over tracks,
narration, anything you want heard by the engineer and
players but not by the audience and mixdown deck.
56. RETURNS SOLO and LED
This switch operates just like the channel SOLO [27]
switches — engaging it sends signals to the control
room, headphones, and meter display, and interrupts
whatever happened to be there before you soloed. It
follows the MODE [44] switch setting as well. The only
difference is that when you engage this RETURNS SOLO
switch, it sends all four STEREO RETURNS signals to
the SOLO circuit.
Assume you want to solo the snare drum. Hit that
channel’s SOLO switch, and you get the “dry” (no
effects) snare only. That helps, but you want to hear
it with the reverb you have patched into a STEREO
RETURN. Leaving that channel’s SOLO switch engaged,
also engage the RETURNS SOLO switch, and now you’ll
get the dry snare and its reverb.
Since it is a global feature, you’ll also get the signals
from all the other STEREO RETURNS, so there may be
some sounds that you didn’t want to hear. If they offend
your sensibilities, simply turn down the levels of the
STEREO RETURNS you don’t want to hear, or MUTE
the channels feeding the unwanted signal to the effects
device you do want to hear.
Congratulations! You’ve just read about all the features of your 1604-VLZ3. You’re probably ready for a cold
one. Go ahead. The rest of the manual can wait.
Owner’s Manual
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1604-VLZ3
Appendix A: Service Information
Warranty Service
Repair
If you think your Mackie product has a problem,
please check out the following troubleshooting tips and
do your best to confirm the problem. Visit the Support
section of our website (www.mackie.com/support)
where you will find lots of useful information such as
FAQs, and documentation. You may find the answer to
the problem without having to send your Mackie product away.
For warranty service, refer to the warranty information on page 35.
Troubleshooting
If you do not have access to our website, you can
call our Tech Support department at 1-800-898-3211,
Monday-Friday, normal business hours, Pacific Time, to
explain the problem. Tech Support will tell you where
the nearest factory-authorized service center is located
in your area.
Bad Channel
•
Are the channels assigned to the correct mix
(1-2, 3-4, L-R )?
•
Is the fader up?
•
Try unplugging any insert devices from the
INSERT jacks.
•
Try the same source signal in another channel,
set up exactly like the suspect channel.
Bad Output
•
Is the level control (if any) turned up?
•
If you’re listening to the C-R OUTS or PHONES
outputs, has a SOURCE selection been made?
•
If it’s one of the MAIN OUTS, try unplugging its
companion. For example, if it’s the 1/4" LEFT
MAIN OUT, unplug the RCA output. If the problem goes away, it’s not the mixer.
•
If it’s a stereo pair, try switching them around.
For example, if a left output is presumed dead,
switch the left and right cords, at the mixer
end. If the problem stays on the left, it’s not the
mixer.
•
Unplug everthing from the MAIN INSERTS.
Noise
•
Turn the channel faders and STEREO RETURN
knobs down, one by one. If the sound disappears, it’s either that channel or whatever is
plugged into it, so unplug whatever that is. If
the noise disappears, it’s from your whatever.
Power
•
26
Unplug the power cord and check the fuse.
1604-VLZ3
Non-warranty service for Mackie products is available at a factory-authorized service center. To locate
your nearest service center, visit www.mackie.com, click
“Support” and select “Locate a Service Center.” Service
for Mackie products living outside the United States can
be obtained through local dealers or distributors.
“XLR” Connectors
Mackie mixers use 3-pin female “XLR” connectors on
all microphone inputs, with pin 1 wired to the grounded
(earthed) shield, pin 2 wired to the “high” (”hot” or
positive polarity) side of the audio signal and pin 3
wired to the “low” (“cold” or negative polarity) side of
the signal. See Figure A. This is all totally aboveboard
and in full accord with the hallowed standards dictated
by the AES (Audio Engineering Society).
You can cook up your own adapter for a stereo
microphone adapter. “Y” two cables out of a
female 1⁄4" TRS jack to two male XLR plugs,
one for the Right signal and one for the Left.
•
Balanced mono circuits. When wired as a balanced connector, a 1⁄4" TRS jack or plug is connected tip to signal high (hot), ring to signal
low (cold), and sleeve to ground (earth).
•
Unbalanced Send/Return circuits. When wired
as send/return “Y” connector, a 1⁄4" TRS jack
or plug is connected tip to signal send (output
from mixer), ring to signal return (input back
into mixer), and sleeve to ground (earth).
Use a male “XLR”-type connector, usually found on the
nether end of what is called a “mic cable,” to connect to
a female XLR jack.
2
SHIELD
Owner’s Manual
Appendix B: Connections
HOT
SHIELD
1⁄4"
1
3
COLD
“TS” stands for Tip-Sleeve, the two connections available on a “mono” 1⁄4" phone jack or plug. See Figure C.
1
COLD 3
HOT
1
3
TS Phone Plugs and Jacks
2
SLEEVE
COLD
2
SLEEVE
TIP
SHIELD
TIP
TIP
HOT
Figure A: XLR Connectors
SLEEVE
Figure C: TS Plug
1⁄4"
TRS Phone Plugs and Jacks
“TRS” stands for Tip-Ring-Sleeve, the three
connections available on a “stereo” 1⁄4" or “balanced”
phone jack or plug. See Figure B.
RING SLEEVE
SLEEVE RING TIP
TIP
TS jacks and plugs are used in many different
applications, always unbalanced. The tip is connected to
the audio signal and the sleeve to ground (earth). Some
examples:
•
Unbalanced microphones
•
Electric guitars and electronic instruments
•
Unbalanced line-level connections
RING
TIP
SLEEVE
Figure B: 1⁄4" TRS Plugs
TRS jacks and plugs are used in several different applications:
•
Stereo Headphones, and rarely, stereo microphones and stereo line connections.
When wired for stereo, a 1⁄4" TRS jack or plug
is connected tip to left, ring to right and sleeve
to ground (earth). Mackie mixers do not
directly accept 1-plug-type stereo microphones.
They must be separated into a left cord and a
right cord, which are plugged into the two mic
preamps.
Switched 1⁄4" Phone Jacks
Switches can be incorporated into 1⁄4" phone jacks,
which are activated by inserting the plug. These switches may open an insert loop in a circuit, change the input
routing of the signal or serve other functions. Mackie
uses switches in the channel insert and bus insert jacks,
input jacks and AUX returns. We also use these switches
to ground the line-level inputs when nothing is plugged
into them.
In most cases, the plug must be inserted fully to
activate the switch. Mackie takes advantage of this in
some circuits, specifying circumstances where you are
to insert the plug only partially. See Special Mackie
Connections, on the next page.
Owner’s Manual
27
1604-VLZ3
RCA Plugs and Jacks
Special Mackie Connections
RCA-type plugs (also known as phono plugs) and
jacks are often used in home stereo and video equipment and in many other applications (Figure D). They
are unbalanced and electrically identical to a 1⁄4" TS
phone plug or jack. See Figure C. Connect the signal to
the center post and the ground (earth) or shield to the
surrounding “basket.”
The balanced-to-unbalanced connection has been
anticipated in the wiring of Mackie jacks. A 1⁄4" TS plug
inserted into a 1⁄4" TRS balanced input, for example,
will automatically unbalance the input and make all the
right connections. Conversely, a 1⁄4" TRS plug inserted
into a 1⁄4" unbalanced input will automatically tie the
ring (low or cold) to ground (earth).
SLEEVE TIP SLEEVE TIP
Figure D: RCA Plug
Unbalancing a Line
In most studio, stage and sound reinforcement situations, there is a combination of balanced and unbalanced inputs and outputs on the various pieces of
equipment. This usually will not be a problem in making
connections.
•
•
•
28
When connecting a balanced output to an
unbalanced input, be sure the signal high (hot)
connections are wired to each other, and that
the balanced signal low (cold) goes to the
ground (earth) connection at the unbalanced
input. In most cases, the balanced ground
(earth) will also be connected to the ground
(earth) at the unbalanced input. If there are
ground-loop problems, this connection may be
left disconnected at the balanced end.
When connecting an unbalanced output to a
balanced input, be sure that the signal high
(hot) connections are wired to each other. The
unbalanced ground (earth) connection should
be wired to the low (cold) and the ground
(earth) connections of the balanced input. If
there are ground-loop problems, try connecting
the unbalanced ground (earth) connection only
to the input low (cold) connection, and leaving
the input ground (earth) connection disconnected.
In some cases, you will have to make up special
adapters to interconnect your equipment. For
example, you may need a balanced XLR female
connected to an unbalanced 1⁄4" TS phone
plug.
1604-VLZ3
TRS Send/Receive Insert Jacks
Mackie’s single-jack inserts are the three-conductor,
TRS-type 1⁄4" phone. They are unbalanced, but have
both the mixer output (send) and the mixer input
(return) signals in one connector. See Figure E.
tip
SEND to processor
ring
sleeve
(TRS plug)
This plug connects to one of the
mixer’s Channel Insert jacks.
“tip”
“ring”
RETURN from processor
Figure E
The sleeve is the common ground (earth) for both
signals. The send from the mixer to the external unit is
carried on the tip, and the return from the unit to the
mixer is on the ring.
Using the Send Only on an Insert Jack
If you insert a TS (mono) 1⁄4" plug only partially (to
the first click) into a Mackie insert jack, the plug will
not activate the jack switch and will not open the insert
loop in the circuit (thereby allowing the channel signal
to continue on its merry way through the mixer).
This allows you to tap out the channel or bus signal
without interrupting normal operation.
If you push the 1⁄4" TS plug in to the second click, you
will open the jack switch and create a direct out, which
does interrupt the signal in that channel. See Figure F
on the next page.
NOTE: Do not overload or short-circuit the signal you
are tapping from the mixer. That will affect the internal
signal.
Channel Insert jack
Direct out with no signal interruption to master.
Insert only to first “click.”
A mono signal connected to the RIGHT jack will show
up in the right bus only. You probably will only want to
use this sophisticated effect for special occasions.
MONO PLUG
Channel Insert jack
Direct out with signal interruption to master.
Insert all the way in to the second “click.”
STEREO
PLUG
Channel Insert jack
For use as an effects loop.
(TIP = SEND to effect, RING = RETURN from effect.)
Figure F
Mults and “Y”s
A mult or “Y” connector allows you to route one output
to two or more inputs by simply providing parallel wiring connections. You can make “Y”s and mults for the
outputs of both unbalanced and balanced circuits.
Owner’s Manual
MONO PLUG
A stereo signal, having two plugs, should be patched
into the LEFT (MONO) and the RIGHT input or return
jacks. A jack switch in the RIGHT jack will disable the
mono function, and the signals will show up in stereo.
Remember: Only mult or “Y” one output into
several inputs. If you need to combine several
outputs into one input, you must use a mixer,
not a mult or a “Y.”
Mackie Stereo Inputs and Returns: Mono,
Stereo, Whatever
Stereo line inputs and stereo returns are a fine
example of the Mackie philosophy (which we just made
up) of Maximum Flexibility with Minimum Headache.
The inputs and returns will automatically be mono or
stereo, depending upon how you use the jacks. Here’s
how it works:
A mono signal should be patched into the input or
return jack labeled Left (MONO). The signal will be
routed to both the left and right sides of the return
circuit, and will show up in the center of the stereo pair
of buses it’s assigned to, or it can be panned with the
PAN control.
RING (IN)
RING (RETURN)
TIP (OUT)
FROM
PROCESSOR
OUTPUT
RING
(RETURN)
TIP
(SEND)
TO MIXER
CHANNEL INSERT
TO
PROCESSOR
INPUT
TIP (SEND)
Y-cord insert cable
Y-cord splitter cable
Owner’s Manual
29
1604-VLZ3
Appendix C: Technical Information
Specifications
Main Mix Noise
Impedances
(20 Hz–20 kHz bandwidth, 1/4" Main out, channel gains @
unity gain, channel EQs flat, all channels assigned to Main Mix,
odd channels panned left, even channels panned right.)
Mic in:
2.5 kilohms
Channel Insert return:
2.5 kilohms
All other inputs:
10 kilohms or greater
Tape out:
1.1 kilohms
All other outputs:
120 ohms
Main Mix fader unity, channel faders down:
–88.5 dBu
(92 dB Signal to Noise Ratio, ref +4 dBu)
Main Mix fader unity, channel faders @ unity:
–82.5 dBu
EQ
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
High Shelving
(1 kHz 35 dB gain, 20 Hz–20 kHz bandwidth)
Mic in to insert send:
<0.0007%
Mic in to Main Out:
<0.005%
Attenuation (Crosstalk)
(1 kHz relative to 0 dBu, 20 Hz–20 kHz bandwidth,
Line in, 1⁄4" Main Out, Gain @ unity.)
Mid Peaking
±15 dB @ 12 kHz
±15 dB sweep 100 Hz–8 kHz
Low Shelving
Low Cut Filter
±15 dB @ 80 Hz
18 dB/octave, –3 dB @ 75 Hz
Power Consumption
50 watts
Channel Mute switch engaged:
–84 dBu
Fuse Ratings
Channel Gain knob down:
–84 dBu
100–120 VAC
1A Slo Blo, 5 x 20 mm
220–240 VAC
0.5A Slo Blo, 5 x 20 mm
Frequency Response
(Mic input to any output.)
Dimensions (H x W x D) in Normal Pod Position
20 Hz to 60 kHz:
+0 dB/–1 dB
20 Hz to 100 kHz:
+0 dB/–3 dB
Equivalent Input Noise (EIN)
17.5" x 17.3" x 5.1" (445 mm x 440 mm x 129 mm)
Weight
20.0 lb (9.1 kg)
(Mic in to Insert Send out, max gain.)
150 ohm termination:
–129.5 dBu
Common Mode Rejection Ratio (CMRR)
(Mic in to Insert Send out, max gain.)
1 kHz:
better than –70 dB
Maximum Levels
Mic in:
+22 dBu
All other inputs:
+22 dBu
Main Mix TRS out:
+28 dBu
All other outputs:
+22 dBu
LOUD Technologies Inc. is always striving to improve our products by incorporating new and improved materials, components,
and manufacturing methods. Therefore, we reserve the right to
change these specifications at any time without notice.
“Mackie,” and the “Running Man” are registered trademarks of
LOUD Technologies Inc. All other brand names mentioned are
trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders, and are hereby acknowledged.
The technical writer responsible for this manual tends to fade
in and out of various different realities, depending on how
many cups of tea he has had. Please check our website for any
updates to this manual: www.mackie.com.
©2007-2009 LOUD Technologies Inc. All Rights Reserved.
30
1604-VLZ3
Owner’s Manual
Dimensions
19.0 in/ 483 mm
(with Rack Ears fitted)
10 Rack Spaces
17.3 in/ 440 mm
8 Rack Spaces
5.7 in
146 mm
(with Rack Ears fitted
in upper position)
17.5 in
445mm
Pod in normal position
WEIGHT
20.0 lb/
9.1 kg
8.7 in
222 mm
9.4 in
238 mm
(with Rack Ears fitted
in upper position)
13.0 in
330mm
Pod in back position
11 Rack Spaces
5.1 in
129 mm
6.3 in
160 mm
(with Rack Ears fitted
in upper position)
5.7 in
144 mm
(shown with
optional RotoPod)
17.9 in
446mm
Pod in front (with optional RotoPod)
Owner’s Manual
31
1604-VLZ3
Track Sheet
Session:
Date:
Notes:
GAIN
1
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
GAIN
0
60
+15dB -45dB
AUX
2
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
U
1
U
+15
OO
PRE
5
5
U
U
6
4
5/6
SHIFT
5/6
SHIFT
HI
U
-15
EQ
+15
-15
-15
MID
+15
-15
+15
-15
2k
8k
MID
+15
-15
8k
-15
-15
+15
8k
8k
-15
-15
+15
8k
+15
-15
2k
+15
8k
-15
+15
-15
+15
+15
200
2k
100
LOW
U
-15
+15
LOW
U
80Hz
2
8k
80Hz
+15
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
18
PAN
PAN
PAN
PAN
PAN
PAN
PAN
PAN
PAN
PAN
P
L
R
L
R
L
2
MUTE
R
L
3
MUTE
R
L
4
MUTE
R
L
5
MUTE
R
L
6
MUTE
R
L
7
MUTE
R
L
8
MUTE
R
L
9
MUTE
LO
R
10
MUTE
MUTE
M
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
-20
-20
-20
-20
-20
-20
-20
-20
-20
-20
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
3–4
3–4
3–4
3–4
3–4
3–4
3–4
3–4
3–4
3–4
L-R
L-R
L-R
OO
OO
OO
L-R
L-R
OO
OO
L-R
L-R
OO
OO
L-R
OO
L-R
L-R
OO
OO
TRACK
1
1604-VLZ3
MID
800
8k
-15
E
+15
-15
2k
80Hz
HI
12k
U
+15
100
4
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
1
32
U
MID
200
LOW
U
80Hz
EQ
800
200
LOW
U
HI
12k
U
-15
6
+15
OO
5/6
SHIFT
U
MID
+15
100
8k
4
+15
-15
+15
U
-15
2k
80Hz
EQ
800
200
LOW
U
-15
-15
MID
+15
100
HI
12k
3
U
6
OO
5
+15
OO
5/6
SHIFT
U
800
2k
80Hz
EQ
+15
U
+15
100
HI
12k
3
U
5/6
SHIFT
U
MID
200
LOW
U
-15
+15
EQ
+15
U
-15
2k
80Hz
HI
12k
800
200
LOW
U
-15
-15
MID
+15
100
5/6
SHIFT
U
800
2k
80Hz
EQ
+15
U
+15
100
HI
12k
5
+15
4
+15
OO
U
3
OO
6
4
+15
OO
5/6
SHIFT
U
MID
200
LOW
U
-15
+15
EQ
+15
U
-15
2k
80Hz
HI
12k
800
200
LOW
U
5/6
SHIFT
U
MID
+15
100
8k
-15
+15
-15
2k
80Hz
EQ
800
200
LOW
U
HI
12k
U
+15
100
5/6
SHIFT
U
800
200
-15
EQ
12k
U
800
100
HI
U
12k
U
5/6
SHIFT
+15
OO
5
U
6
4
PRE
U
+15
OO
+15
OO
PRE
3
U
6
4
+15
OO
5
+15
OO
U
+15
OO
2
2
PRE
3
U
6
4
+15
OO
5
+15
OO
+15
OO
U
3
U
6
4
+15
OO
5
+15
OO
U
2
PRE
U
3
U
6
4
+15
OO
5
+15
OO
+15
OO
PRE
U
3
U
6
4
+15
OO
5
+15
OO
+15
OO
PRE
U
3
+15
OO
+15
OO
PRE
U
3
+15
OO
+15
OO
PRE
U
3
+15
OO
PRE
U
EQ
+15
OO
1
+15
OO
U
2
A
U
1
+15
OO
G
0
60
+15dB -45dB
U
U
2
10
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
AUX
1
+15
OO
GAIN
0
60
+15dB -45dB
U
U
2
9
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
AUX
1
+15
OO
GAIN
0
60
+15dB -45dB
U
U
2
8
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
AUX
1
+15
OO
GAIN
0
60
+15dB -45dB
U
U
2
7
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
AUX
1
+15
OO
GAIN
0
60
+15dB -45dB
U
U
2
6
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
AUX
1
+15
OO
GAIN
0
60
+15dB -45dB
U
U
2
5
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
AUX
1
+15
OO
GAIN
0
60
+15dB -45dB
U
U
U
2
4
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
AUX
1
+15
OO
GAIN
0
60
+15dB -45dB
AUX
1
+15
OO
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
0
60
+15dB -45dB
AUX
3
GAIN
TRACK
2
Owner’s Manual
GAIN
11
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
GAIN
12
BV
-10d
C GAIN
U MI
GAIN
13
BV
-10d
GAIN
U MIC
14
GAIN
BV
-10d
GAIN
U MIC
GAIN
15
BV
-10d
GAIN
U MIC
GAIN
16
BV
-10d
GAIN
U MIC
12V
0.5A
0
60
+15dB -45dB
AUX
0
60
+15dB -45dB
AUX
U
0
60
+15dB -45dB
AUX
U
1
PRE
U
U
5
+15
+15
OO
U
6
6
5/6
SHIFT
Q
6
4
+15
OO
5/6
SHIFT
HI
U
EQ
5/6
SHIFT
HI
U
12k
6
EQ
HI
U
12k
6
EQ
HI
EQ
U
6
4
+20
OO
C-R / PHNS
ONLY
5/6
SHIFT
HI
U
12k
ASSIGN OPTIONS
+20
OO
+15
OO
5/6
SHIFT
U
12k
U
4
+15
OO
5/6
SHIFT
+15
OO
3
U
4
+15
OO
+20
OO
+15
OO
U
4
+15
OO
+10
5
3
+15
OO
U
OO
U
5
3
+15
OO
U
4
+15
OO
+15
OO
U
U
PRE
U
5
+15
OO
U
2
+15
OO
PRE
3
U
+20
OO
U
2
U
5
3
U
+10
OO
U
+15
OO
PRE
U
5
3
+15
OO
2
PRE
U
U
+15
OO
LAMP
U
1
+15
OO
2
PRE
U
U
+15
OO
AUX
1
+15
OO
2
+15
OO
U
U
2
AUX
0
60
+15dB -45dB
1
+15
OO
U
+15
OO
U
0
60
+15dB -45dB
1
+15
OO
U
OO
AUX
1
+15
OO
0
60
+15dB -45dB
EQ
HI
U
12k
LEFT RIGHT
U
12k
0 dB=0 dBu
20
-15
-15
+15
+15
MID
U
-15
+15
MID
U
-15
+15
MID
U
-15
+15
MID
U
-15
+15
MID
U
OO
MAX
MID CTL ROOM / PHONES
U
OO
10
+20
TAPE IN
7
4
-15
+15
-15
800
+15
-15
800
00
2k
+15
-15
800
200
2k
+15
-15
200
2k
+15
-15
800
800
200
2k
TAPE
+15
2
TAPE TO
MAIN MIX
0
800
200
2k
200
2k
2
SUBS 1–2
4
100
100
8k
LOW
U
100
8k
LOW
U
80Hz
100
8k
LOW
U
80Hz
100
8k
LOW
U
80Hz
8k
100
LOW
U
80Hz
8k
OO
LOW
U
80Hz
80Hz
SUBS 3–4
MAX
SOLO
LEVEL
SET
7
10
20
-15
+15
-15
+15
-15
+15
-15
+15
-15
+15
-15
OW CUT
75 Hz
8dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
LOW CUT
75 Hz
18dB/OCT
AN
PAN
PAN
PAN
PAN
PAN
L
R
L
11
R
L
12
MUTE
R
L
13
MUTE
MUTE
L
R
L
15
MUTE
CTL ROOM
SOURCE
30
RUDE
SOLO
LIGHT
R
16
MUTE
MUTE
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
R
14
MAIN MIX
+15
-20
-20
-20
-20
-20
-20
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
SOLO
dB
dB
10
10
5
5
U
U
5
5
10
10
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
20
20
3–4
3–4
3–4
3–4
3–4
3–4
30
30
L- R
40
50
60
40
50
60
OO
OO
L-R
OO
L-R
OO
TRACK
3
L-R
OO
TRACK
4
L-R
OO
TRACK
5
L-R
OO
TRACK
6
OO
TRACK
7
TRACK
8
Owner’s Manual
33
34
LINE IN
MIC IN
1604-VLZ3
GAIN
R
L
R
L
R
L
R
MACKIE 1604-VLZ3
SIGNAL FLOW
9th Feb 2007
STEREO RETURN 4
STEREO RETURN 3
STEREO RETURN 2
STEREO RETURN 1
L
INPUT CHANNEL
(1 OF 16)
DIRECT OUT
(CH'S 1–8 ONLY)
PHANTOM POWER
(GLOBAL SWITCH
75Hz
HPF
LOW CUT
INSERT
PRE
MID
EQ
HI
FREQ
TO AUX 2
LEVEL
LEVEL
LEVEL TO L/R
PFL
SIP L
SOLO
ASSIGN TO
C-R/PHNS
ONLY
1–2/3–4
PFL
SIP R
4
SIP R
2
1
R
L
3
SOLO
ASSIGN
SIP L
PAN
MAIN/SUBS
FADER
TO SOLO LED
LEVEL TO L/R
SHIFT 5/6
AUX 2
AUX 1
TO AUX 1
AUX 4
AUX 3
GAIN
MUTE
OL (FLICKER)
MUTE (GLOW)
80 100–8K 12K
LO
–20 (FLICKER)
SOLO (GLOW)
R
TAPE IN
L
ASSIGN
TO MIX
FADER
SOLO
R
L
R
L
LEVEL
LEVEL SET
(PFL) LED
SIP/PFL
SOLO LEVEL
AUX MIX
ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX
SUB 2 MIX
3–4
1–2
TAPE
MAIN
FADER
ASSIGN TO MAIN MIX
SUB 1 MIX
SOLO MIX
SOLO
RELAY
(FROM SUB 4 OUT)
(FROM SUB 3 OUT)
TAPE LEVEL
MAIN MIX
INSERT
AUX SEND 3
(#4–6 IDENTICAL)
AUX 3 OUT
AUX 1 OUT
AUX SEND 1
(#2 IDENTICAL)
SUBMIX 2
(SUBMIX 4 IDENTICAL)
SUB 2 OUT
C-R/
PHONES
LEVEL
METERS
(0VU = 0dBu)
20
10
7
4
2
0
2
4
7
10
20
30
CONTROL ROOM OUT
R
L
PHONES OUT
MAIN MIX RIGHT OUT
TAPE OUT RIGHT
TAPE OUT LEFT
MAIN MIX LEFT OUT
MAIN MIX MONO OUT
1604-VLZ3
RUDE SOLO LED
C-R/PHONES MIX
SUBMIX 1
(SUBMIX 3 IDENTICAL)
SUB 1 OUT
C-R/
PHONES
SOURCE
FADER R
MONO LEVEL
Block Diagram
CR/PHN R
CR/PHN L
LOGIC
PFL
SIP R
SIP L
AUX 6
AUX 5
AUX 4
AUX 3
AUX 2
AUX 1
SUB 4
SUB 3
SUB 2
SUB 1
MAIN R
MAIN L
Please keep your sales receipt in a safe place.
This Limited Product Warranty (“Product Warranty”) is provided by LOUD Technologies Inc. (“LOUD”)
and is applicable to products purchased in the United States or Canada through a LOUD-authorized
reseller or dealer. The Product Warranty will not extend to anyone other than the original purchaser of
the product (hereinafter, “Customer,” “you” or “your”).
For products purchased outside the U.S. or Canada, please visit www.mackie.com/warranty to find
contact information for your local distributor, and information on any warranty coverage provided by the
distributor in your local market.
Owner’s Manual
Mackie Limited Warranty
LOUD warrants to Customer that the product will be free from defects in materials and workmanship
under normal use during the Warranty Period. If the product fails to conform to the warranty then LOUD
or its authorized service representative will at its option, either repair or replace any such nonconforming
product, provided that Customer gives notice of the noncompliance within the Warranty Period to the
Company at: www.mackie.com/support or by calling LOUD technical support at 1.800.898.3211 (tollfree in the U.S. and Canada) during normal business hours Pacific Time, excluding weekends or LOUD
holidays. Please retain the original dated sales receipt as evidence of the date of purchase. You will need it
to obtain any warranty service.
For full terms and conditions, as well as the specific duration of the Warranty for this product, please visit
www.mackie.com/warranty.
The Product Warranty, together with your invoice or receipt, and the terms and conditions located
at www.mackie.com/warranty constitutes the entire agreement, and supersedes any and all prior
agreements between LOUD and Customer related to the subject matter hereof. No amendment,
modification or waiver of any of the provisions of this Product Warranty will be valid unless set forth in a
written instrument signed by the party to be bound thereby.
Owner’s Manual
35
16220 Wood-Red Road NE • Woodinville, WA 98072 • USA
United States and Canada: 800.898.3211
Europe, Asia, Central and South America: 425.487.4333
Middle East and Africa: 31.20.654.4000
Fax: 425.487.4337 • www.mackie.com
E-mail: [email protected]
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