Madrigal Imaging | MP-8 | User's Manual | Madrigal Imaging MP-8 User's Manual

Madrigal Imaging MP-8 User's Manual
Owner’s Manual
MP-8
MP-9
Projectors
C A U TI O N
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT REMOVE
COVER (OR BACK). NO USER-SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER
SERVICING TO QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL.
The lightning flash with arrowhead
symbol, within an equilateral triangle, is
intended to alert the user to the
presence of uninsulated “dangerous voltage”
within the product’s enclosure that may be of
sufficient magnitude to constitute a risk of
electric shock to persons.
The exclamation point within an
equilateral triangle is intended to
alert the user to the presence of
important operating and maintenance
(servicing) instructions in the literature
accompanying the appliance.
WARNING: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR ELECTRICAL SHOCK,
DO NOT EXPOSE THE PROJECTOR TO RAIN OR MOISTURE. OBSERVE AND
FOLLOW ALL WARNINGS AND INSTRUCTIONS MARKED ON THE PROJECTOR.
Before operating the projector for the first time, read section 4.1 Warnings and Guidelines.
NOTICE
The projector generates and may radiate radio frequency energy. If not installed and used in accordance with this
manual, it may cause interference with radio communications.
The projector is tested to and complies with the limits for a Class A computing device pursuant to subpart J of
part 15 of FCC rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against interference in a commercial
environment. When the projector is operated in a residential area it may cause radio interference. In such a case
the user will be required, at his/her expense, to take measures required to correct the interference.
The projector is tested to and complies with the limits for a Class A digital apparatus pursuant to the Canadian
Department of Communications radio interference regulations. The regulations are designed to provide reasonable
protection against such interference from devices operated in a commercial environment.
Cet appareil à affichage numerique a été contrôlé. Il est conforme aux limites des reglements de la Classe A
d’appareils a affichage numérique établis par le Ministére des Communications du Canada en ce qui concerne
les interférences radio. Ces réglements ont été mis en place pour assurer une protection raisonnable contre les
interferences produits par des appareils utilisés dans un environnement commercial.
CAUTION
Only use attachments or accessories recommended by Madrigal Imaging. Use of others may result in the risk of
fire, shock or personal injury.
Typographical Conventions
Please note the following typographical conventions used throughout this manual.
❑ Warnings that relate to user safety are highlighted in BOLD print.
❑ First and second level subsection titles are located in the left margin of each page. Third level titles are located
within the body text and are in bold italic print.
❑ The pointing hand symbol
emphasizes important information within a subsection or paragraph.
❑ Key symbols (
,
, 5 , etc.), when located in the left margin, indicate initial keystrokes required for
the function being described in the adjoining text.
❑ Special notes and comments appear in italics. Important terms within a paragraph appear in italics.
CON
❑ The ACON symbol
indicates that the associated subsection applies only to projectors which include the
ACON automatic convergence feature. ACON is a registered trademark of Electrohome Limited.
POWER
SOURCE
®
© Copyright
Madrigal Imaging – 2000. All rights reserved.
User's Manual
Table of Contents
Section
Contents
Page
1
Introduction
1.1
1.2
The Projector ________________________________________ 1.1
Purchaser's Record and Servicing _________________________ 1.2
2
Installation &
Setup
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
Quick Setup _________________________________________ 2.1
Installation Considerations ______________________________ 2.2
Hardware Setup ______________________________________ 2.8
Mounting __________________________________________ 2.12
Power Connection ___________________________________ 2.15
Source Connections __________________________________ 2.15
Serial Port Connections _______________________________ 2.16
Optical Alignment ___________________________________ 2.17
Source Setup ________________________________________ 2.26
Memory Setup ______________________________________ 2.29
ACON Setup _______________________________________ 2.35
3
Operation
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
Overview ___________________________________________ 3.1
Projector Basics _______________________________________ 3.1
Source Selection _____________________________________ 3.10
Setup Memories _____________________________________ 3.14
Display Adjustments __________________________________ 3.16
Convergence Registration ______________________________ 3.27
Utility Features ______________________________________ 3.34
Multi-projector Functions______________________________ 3.51
4
Maintenance
4.1
4.2
4.3
Warnings and Guidelines _______________________________ 4.1
Cleaning ____________________________________________ 4.3
Troubleshooting ______________________________________ 4.3
5
6
Specifications
5.1
Specifications ________________________________________ 5.1
Appendices
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Glossary ____________________________________________ A.1
Menu Tree __________________________________________ B.1
ASR/ASI Logic Diagrams_______________________________ C.1
Communication Cables ________________________________ D.1
Keypad Reference _____________________________________ E.1
Throw Distance Tables _________________________________ F.1
Lenses _____________________________________________ G.1
Interfaces ___________________________________________ H.1
NOTE: Due to constant research, the information in this manual is subject to change without notice.
Part Number: P630130 (04/00) — Software Version 4.3
iii
Section 1
Introduction
1.1 The Projector
The Madrigal Imaging MP-8 and MP-9 projectors are ultra high resolution
graphics projectors compatible with virtually all input sources. Their
superior performance and high quality projected images place them well
above other projection systems in their class. Features include:
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Functional ➤
Description
color-corrected lens systems to conform to HDTV standards
automatic lock to inputs between 14 kHz and 152 kHz
liquid coupled (MP-9) or air coupled (MP-8) lens design
high video bandwidth — 120 Mhz (-3dB)
multi-use touchscreen remote
intuitive menu driven, multi-language interface with on-line help
external computer control capability
PHAST home automation system compatibility
superior geometry control, contrast, astigmatism and color performance
Contrast Modulation
ASR and ASI to reduce the need for manual display adjustments
ACON II automatic convergence feature
The projector accepts data/graphics and video input signals from a variety of
sources for projection onto flat, curved, or rear projection screens. System
inputs are processed to provide separate red, green, and blue image components for projection through the projector’s three front lenses. The three
primary color components converge on the projection screen to provide a
high quality display output.
Sophisticated processor-based logic and control circuitry provide many of
the automatic features available on the MP-8 and MP-9. This circuitry
interfaces with the keypad and remote control to provide projector control
by the user, such as:
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
turning the projector on or off
switching input sources
adjusting all display settings such as contrast, brightness, and size
correcting for display effects and input noise
displaying projector operating status screens and on-line help
controlling projector operating settings
1.1
INTRODUCTION
Should projector servicing be required, service personnel can use the keypad
to make service adjustments and alignments. In some cases the projector
may be serviced without accessing the projector’s internal circuitry. Projector
settings, usually different for different sources, are stored in memory for
each individual source. These settings are retained until changed by the user,
even if power is removed from the projector.
Construction ➤
The projector body is comprised of a sturdy metal chassis, metal top covers,
and durable plastic side covers. The front top cover can be temporarily
removed to access the keypad and align the lenses. The rear top cover and
rear panel are removable for servicing and projector upgrading.
Expandability ➤
Madrigal Imaging projectors can be expanded or upgraded to include additional features, accessories, and input options; these include a variety of
quick plug-in interface modules to suit the input devices you are using, a
signal switcher, a video decoder, a ceiling mount, and floor mount accessories. For more information or if you need assistance for upgrading your
projector, contact your dealer or Madrigal Imaging.
1.2 Purchaser’s
Record and
Servicing
Whether the projector is under warranty or the warranty has expired,
Madrigal Imaging’s extensive factory and dealer service network is always
available. Madrigal Imaging service technicians are fully trained to quickly
diagnose and correct projector malfunctions. Complete service manuals and
updates are available to service technicians for all new projector models
manufactured by Madrigal Imaging.
If you have a problem with your projector or require assistance, contact
the authorized Madrigal Imaging dealer from which the projector was
purchased. Fill out the information below for your records.
Purchaser’s Record
Dealer:
Dealer Phone Number:
Projector Serial Number:
Purchase Date:
Note: Display projector serial# by pressing
at presentation level.
Madrigal Imaging Service Location
Madrigal Audio Laboratories, Inc.
2081 South Main Street
P.O. Box 781
Middletown, CT 06457
Telephone: (860) 346-0896
Fax: (860) 346-1540
1.2
Section 2
Installation & Setup
This section explains how to install and set up the projector. If you are familiar with the projector and want
to quickly set it up for temporary use, follow the Quick Setup instructions in section 2.1. For a complete
setup, skip section 2.1 and follow the instructions and guides covered in the remaining subsections.
2.1 Quick Setup
Step 1 ➤
Follow these 7 steps for quick set up of the projector:
Position the Projector
To perform a quick setup, the projector must be positioned so that the throw
distance is the same as that used during the most recent optical alignment;
otherwise a detailed setup is required. The throw distance is the distance
between the center lens on the projector and the center of the projection
screen. See Appendix F and Appendix G for more information. Note: If an
optical lens alignment is required, refer to section 2.8, Optical Alignment.
Step 2 ➤
Connect the Power Cord
Plug the AC line cord into the line input unit on the lower front panel of
the projector. Plug the three prong end of the line cord in a grounded AC
outlet. Notes: 1) Input voltage must be between 90 VAC and 264 VAC.
2) Ensure the line cord is the proper type for the AC receptacle.
Step 3 ➤
Connect a Source
Connect a source to the projector’s RGB input. Ensure the source is on and
properly connected.
Step 4 ➤
Access the Keypad
Remove the projector’s front top cover to access the keypad. See page 3-2.
Step 5 ➤
Turn the Projector On
Press
on the keypad to turn the projector on. Hold down the power
key for about one second. Note: If the keypad has been configured for IR
remote operation, point it towards the screen or the front of the projector.
POWER
2.1
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 6 ➤
Select the Input
Press
Step 7 ➤
Installation Type ➤
1
to select the source connected to the built-in RGB input.
Adjust the Display
Press
2.2 Installation
Considerations
0
SOURCE
HELP
0
to select the Guided Source Setup tutorial.
Careful consideration should be given as to how and where the projection
system is installed. Although the projector offers high performance, the final
display quality will be compromised if the projector is not installed properly.
This subsection discusses the considerations you should make before proceeding with a final installation. These considerations include the installation type
(floor, ceiling, rear), screen size and type, room lighting, and ventilation.
Choose the installation type which suits your needs: front or rear screen,
floor mount or ceiling mount.
Front Screen, Floor Mount Installation
ADVANTAGES
• Easy to set up.
• Can be moved or changed quickly.
• Easy to access projector.
CONSIDERATIONS
• Shares floor space with audience.
• May be accidentally moved, necessitating
alignment.
Front Screen, Ceiling Mount Installation
ADVANTAGES
• Does not take up audience space.
• The projector is less noticeable.
• The projector cannot be accidentally moved.
CONSIDERATIONS
• Installation is more permanent.
• It is more difficult to physically access the
projector.
Rear Screen, Floor Mount Installation
ADVANTAGES
• Projector is completely hidden from the audience.
• Easy to access projector.
• Usually good ambient light rejection.
2.2
CONSIDERATIONS
• Requires separate room.
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Rear Screen, Ceiling Mount Installation
ADVANTAGES
• Projector is completely hidden from the audience.
• Usually good ambient light rejection.
CONSIDERATIONS
• Requires separate room.
• Installation cost is usually higher.
Rear Screen, Floor Mount With Mirror
ADVANTAGES
• Projector is completely hidden.
• Usually good ambient light rejection.
• Less space is required behind the screen
than other rear screen installations.
Screen Type ➤
CONSIDERATIONS
• Requires separate room.
• Installation cost is usually higher.
Screen type is a very important factor when designing a projection system.
Inexperienced users or installers should always consult their dealer when
deciding on screen type. The following guidelines may be helpful to
understand the differences between screen types.
Front Screen Installations
There are two basic screen types: flat and curved. The choice between a flat
screen versus a curved screen is dependent on audience viewing angle and
screen gain. There is always a trade-off between viewing angle and gain.
Viewing angles for both screen types are illustrated in Figures 2-1 and 2-2.
Flat screens offer a gain of about 1 with a viewing angle just less than 180°.
Incident light reflects equally in all directions so the audience can see the
display from various angles. Because of the lower gain, flat screens are more
effective when ambient lighting is reduced.
Flat
Screen
(gain 1)
Viewing
Angle
Audience Coverage
Figure 2-1. Audience Coverage with Flat Screen
.
2.3
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Curved
Screen
(gain >1)
Audience Coverage
Figure 2-2. Audience Coverage with Curved Screen
Curved screens have gains larger than 1 and viewing angles much less than
180°. Most curved screens have different horizontal and vertical viewing
angles. Incident light does not reflect equally in all directions. The reflected
light concentrates in a conical volume or “viewing cone”. Audiences within
the viewing cone see a brighter image than that from an equal area on a flat
screen. Audiences outside the viewing cone see a dimmer image.
To summarize, curved screens are better suited for brightly lit rooms where
the audience is situated within the viewing cone. Flat screens are best suited
when a wide viewing angle is required and ambient room lighting (near the
screen) is low.
Note: Screen Gain is defined in Appendix A, Glossary.
Rear Screen Installations
There are two basic types of rear screens: diffused and optical. A diffused
screen has a surface which spreads the light striking it. Purely diffused
screens have a gain of less than 1. The main advantage of the diffused
screen is its wide viewing angle, similar to that of a flat screen for front
screen projection.
Optical screens take light from the projector and redirect it to increase the
light intensity at the front of the screen. This reduces it in other areas. A
viewing cone, similar to that of a curved front screen installation, is created.
To summarize, optical screens are better suited for brightly lit rooms where
the audience is situated within the viewing cone. Diffused screens are best
suited when a wide viewing angle is required but there is low ambient
room lighting.
2.4
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Screen Size and ➤
Throw Distance
Screen size and throw distance are interrelated. (See Appendices F and G.)
As screen size increases, the distance between the projector and the screen
also increases. During projection room design, make sure that the room
can accommodate the required position of the projector for the screen size
you need.
Screen Size
Screen sizes vary according to model and lens type. (See Appendices F
and G.) Choose a screen size which is appropriate for your application. If
the projector will be used to display text information it is important that
the image size allows the audience to clearly resolve all text. The eye usually
sees a letter clearly if eye-to-text distance is less than 150 times the height of
the letter. Small text, located too far from the eye, may not be legible at a
distance even though it is projected sharply and clearly on the screen.
To fill a screen with an image, the aspect ratio of the screen must be equal
to the aspect ratio of the image. The aspect ratio of an image is the ratio of
its width to its height. Standard video from a VCR has a 4:3 or 1.33:1
aspect ratio. For example, to display a VCR output with a 4:3 aspect ratio
onto a 10 foot (3m) high screen, the width of the screen must be at least
13.3 feet (4m).
Note: Screen size is often specified as diagonal size. Screens specified by diagonal
size have aspect ratios of 4:3. Screens with other aspect ratios are not typically
specified by diagonal size.
Throw Distance
The throw distance (projector-to-screen distance) must be determined for
every new installation. Throw distance, the distance between the projector’s
center lens and the center of the screen, is based on screen size. As screen
size increases, the distance between the projector and the screen increases.
Make sure that the room can accommodate the required position of the
projector for the chosen screen size.
Once your screen size is known you can determine the required throw distance for your projector model and lens by using the formulas in Appendix
G and tables in Appendix F.
Notes: 1) Calculated values are for reference only. It is good practice to simulate
the setup to determine the necessary throw distance. 2) Display size is affected by
input signal characteristics. Once the projector is set, use the Size function to fine
tune display size.
Throw distance and projection angle: Keep in mind that the ability to
properly focus all areas of the image is limited if a significantly tilted
projector is too close to the screen.
2.5
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Lighting ➤
Proper lighting is another important factor when designing a projection
room. Visiting a movie theatre can give you an idea of what makes a good
projection environment. All walls, floors and furnishings are dull colored
and non-reflectively finished. Every effort should be made to create the best
environment for your system.
When designing a projection room, try to avoid white, reflective ceilings
and non-directional lighting such as fluorescent lights. The white ceiling
spreads the light which makes the room appear brighter. You want to keep
the lighting and reflections to a minimum. Spot lighting is a better way to
obtain illumination. Installing light dimmers allows you to control your
lighting environment.
Outside windows are undesirable in any projection environment. A small
crack between curtains on a sunny day can severely wash-out an image.
Make sure that curtains are opaque and fit snugly. Some curtains can provide up to 100 percent blockage of outside light. Pay close attention to the
curtain material facing inside the room. It should have a matte finish.
Even with no external light at all, reflections from room surfaces can
degrade the image. Light from the screen should be absorbed by surfaces so
that it will not be reflected back to the screen. Keep reflective surfaces to a
minimum.
To minimize the effects caused by unwanted light from door and aisle ways,
carefully choose the position of your projector and screen. Figure 2-3 shows
an installation where poor screen placement has allowed too much unwanted
light to enter the screen. In Figure 2-4, the screen and the projector are
positioned so that unwanted light is minimized.
door
unwanted light
Prime Audience
Area
door
unwanted light
nted
unwa
light
window
Figure 2-3. Poor Screen Placement
2.6
INSTALLATION & SETUP
door
Prime Audience
Area
door
window
Figure 2-4. Good Screen Placement
Other ➤
Considerations
Here are some other considerations and tips which can help you improve
the design of your projection system.
❑
Proper ventilation is important. The ambient temperature should be kept
constant and below 35° C (95° F). Keep the projector away from heating
and/or air conditioning vents. Changes in temperature can cause drifts in
the projector circuitry which may affect performance.
❑
Keep the projector away from devices which radiate electromagnetic
energy such as motors and transformers. Common sources of these
are slide projectors, speakers, power amplifiers, elevators, etc. Keep 35
mm slide projectors at least 2 feet away from the projector. Even if both
are not used at the same time, the magnetic fields created by the slide
projector can cause permanent magnetization of the projector.
❑
For rear screen applications, less space is required if a mirror is used to
fold the optical path.
❑
Choose the right screen size for your application:
• As screen size increases, magnification increases which reduces brightness. This reduces the contrast ratio which affects legibility. Sharp
defined edges become soft and fuzzy. Consider whether screen size is
more important than these other vital picture characteristics.
• Installing a large screen in a small room is similar to watching television close up; too large a screen can overpower a room. A good rule
of thumb is to be no closer than two times the height of the screen.
• Larger screens require greater attention to lighting conditions.
❑
When laying out your projection room, consider positioning the projector
and screen in a manner which will achieve maximum audience coverage
and space efficiency. For example, placing the screen along the larger wall
in a rectangular room will reduce audience coverage. Figure 2-5 shows two
examples of how audience coverage is maximized.
2.7
INSTALLATION & SETUP
SQUARE ROOMS
Corner placement of screen
yields best audience coverage.
RECTANGULAR ROOMS
Screen placement along short
wall yields best audience coverage.
Prime Audience
Area
Prime Audience
Area
Figure 2-5. Screen Locations for Maximum Audience Coverage
2.3 Hardware
Setup
Keypad ➤
Conversion
2.8
This section explains: how to convert the keypad from a built-in keypad to
a remote keypad, how to change keypad protocol and backlit settings, and
how to determine if reverse scan setup is required.
The projector includes a multi-use full-function keypad which may be
configured for use as a built-in, IR remote, or wired remote keypad. The
keypad is configured at the factory for built-in use. It is located below the
front top cover. You can use the keypad as it is or re-configure it for
remote operation. You can also “hard wire” the keypad to be a protocol A
or protocol B keypad (see section 3.7, Utility Features for information
about keypad protocols).
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Follow the steps below to convert the keypad to a remote keypad and
change its protocol setting.
Step 1
Unplug the projector then lift the
front top cover to access the built-in
keypad. To lift the cover, grasp it
above the red and blue lenses then lift
it until the keypad is exposed. The
keypad is mounted to a securing
bracket located above the lens assemblies. Loosen the two bracket wing
nuts then move the keypad away
from the bracket. See Figure 2-6.
Step 2
Locate the battery compartment at
the back side of the keypad. Squeeze
the latch to open the door. See
Figure 2-7.
Figure 2-6. Built-in Keypad Access
Figure 2-7. Battery Compartment
If converting the keypad to an IR remote, unplug the cable connector.
Locate the jumper wires next to the cable connector location. See Figure
2-8. The jumper wires control the keypad’s operating settings.
321
JP1
JP2
JP3
JP1
PROTOCOL B
JP2
321
321
JP3
321
(ALWAYS)
321
321
JP4
(ALWAYS)
321
JP4
321
PROTOCOL A
321
BUILT-IN OR
WIRED KEYPAD
321
IR REMOTE KEYPAD
Figure 2-8. Jumper Settings
2.9
INSTALLATION & SETUP
JP1
This jumper setting is important if the keypad is configured for remote
operation. There are two keypad protocols: A and B. These protocols are
available to allow two projectors in the same room to be independently controlled by separate remote keypads. The protocol setting of the keypad must
6
7 ). For
match that set in the projector’s Keypad Options menu (
more information about keypad protocols, refer to the Remote Control
Options entry in section 3.7, Utility Features.
UTIL
JP2
This jumper must always be set between pins 1 and 2 as shown; otherwise,
the projector will not respond correctly to keypad commands.
JP3
This jumper must always be set between pins 1 and 2 as shown; otherwise,
the backlit feature will be disabled and the projector will not respond
correctly to keypad commands.
JP4
The JP4 jumper setting sets the keypad type. If you are converting the keypad to an IR remote, move the JP4 jumper from between pins 2 and 3 to
between pins 1 and 2.
Step 3
For an IR remote keypad, place four AA size, 1.5V alkaline batteries in the
compartment ensuring that the +/– orientation of each battery is correct.
Position the compartment door into place.
For a wired remote keypad, an optional accessory cable (#03-001106-02P)
is required. Plug the cable into the cable connector then position the door
into place. Plug the cable jack into the remote jack input on the projector.
WARNING: DO NOT INSTALL BATTERIES IN THE KEYPAD IF A
BUILT-IN OR WIRED REMOTE CABLE IS ATTACHED TO IT. THIS MAY
CAUSE THE BATTERIES TO EXPLODE.
Keypad Operating ➤
Settings
2.10
The keypad includes its own memory to store keypad operating settings. With
a few simple keystrokes you can over-ride the “hard wire” protocol setting
(explained earlier) and enable or disable the backlit feature. Keypad battery life
is increased if the backlit feature is disabled. The new operating settings are
stored in the keypad until the batteries are replaced (IR remote keypad) or the
keypad connection cable is unplugged (wired or built-in keypad).
INSTALLATION & SETUP
If the keypad is configured for IR remote operation, make sure the batteries
are installed. If it is configured for built-in or wired remote operation, make
sure its extension cable is properly connected to the projector. Perform the
following keystroke sequences to change its operating settings:
• To toggle the keypad’s protocol setting (A or B),
1 .
press
BRITE
TINT
DETAIL
• To toggle the backlit feature (enable or disable),
3 .
press
BRITE
TINT
DETAIL
• To return all configuration settings to the jumper settings,
0 .
press
BRITE
TINT
DETAIL
Note: The projector will not respond to keypad commands if you press
2 . If pressed accidentally, press
0 to clear
all keystroke settings.
BRITE
Reverse Scan ➤
TINT
DETAIL
BRITE
TINT
DETAIL
If the projector is not installed in a front screen, floor mount configuration,
reverse scan setup may be required. Reverse scan setup must be performed by a
qualified Madrigal Imaging service technician. Refer to Table 2-2 to determine
if reverse scan setup is required. Contact your dealer for assistance.
Table 2-2. Operating Configurations
HORIZONTAL
SCAN
VERTICAL
SCAN
NORMAL
NORMAL
Front Screen,
Ceiling Mount
REVERSED
REVERSED
Rear Screen,
Floor Mount
REVERSED
NORMAL
Rear Screen,
Ceiling Mount
NORMAL
REVERSED
Rear Screen,
Floor Mount,
With Mirror
NORMAL
NORMAL
OPERATING CONFIGURATION
Front Screen,
Floor Mount
(default configuration)
2.11
INSTALLATION & SETUP
2.4 Mounting
Front Screen ➤
Installations
The projector should be mounted after the system design has been
established and reverse scan setup (if required) is complete.
Floor Mount
Mount the projector on a secured table or cart. Position the projector at the
chosen room location with the projector pointing towards the center of the
projection screen. The angle of projection, combined with the tilt angle of
the screen should direct the reflected image towards the center of the audience. It is recommended that the difference between the projection angle
and the screen tilt angle (within a common reference) be less than 15°.
Refer to Figure 2-9.
Figure 2-9. Floor Mount Installation
You can adjust projection angle and level by adjusting the height of the
projector legs. See Figure 2-10.
Figure 2-10. Leg Adjustment
Ceiling Mount
Mounting the projector to the ceiling requires the use of a projector ceiling
mount fixture. The fixture is shipped from the factory in kit form (with
assembly instructions) for assembly and installation by the dealer/installer.
For more information, contact your dealer or Madrigal.
2.12
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Position the projector so that it is pointing toward the center of the projection
screen. The angle of projection combined with the tilt angle of the screen
should direct the reflected image towards the center of the audience. It is recommended that the difference between the projection angle and the screen tilt
angle (within a common reference) be less than 15°. See to Figure 2-11.
Figure 2-11. Ceiling Mount Installation
Instructions for adjusting projection angle are provided with the fixture kit.
For more information, contact your dealer or Madrigal.
Rear Screen ➤
Installations
When installing a rear screen system, the vertical positioning of the projector is dependent on the type of rear screen being used. There are two basic
types of rear screens: optical and diffused.
Optical Rear Screen Systems
If the system includes an optical rear screen, mount the projector along the
center axis of the screen as shown in Figure 2-12.
Projection Angle = 0
90
Figure 2-12. Optical Rear Screen Installation
2.13
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Diffused Rear Screen Systems
If the system includes a diffused rear screen, floor mount or ceiling mount
the projector so that the image is directed to the center of the audience.
Projection tilt should be less than 15°. See Figure 2-13.
Figure 2-13. Diffused Rear Screen Installation
In situations where the space behind the projector is limited, a mirror may
be used to fold the optical path as illustrated in Figure 2-14. If a diffused
screen is used, the projection angle Ø should be less than 15°. If an optical
screen is used, the optical path between the mirror and the screen should be
perpendicular to the screen. Much attention must be given to the positioning of the projector and the mirror. This can be quite difficult for installers
unfamiliar with this type of installation. It is recommended that your dealer
or an experienced installer perform the installation.
Note: When using a mirror as shown in Figure 2-14, the calculated throw
distance (D) is the summation of D1 and D2.
Figure 2-14. Folded Optics
2.14
INSTALLATION & SETUP
2.5 Power
Connection
To apply power to the projector, plug
the AC line cord into the line input
socket located at the front panel of
the projector. Plug the three prong
end of the line cord in a grounded
AC outlet. Input voltage to the projector must be between 90 and 264
VAC, 50 or 60 Hz. The power source
must supply 650 watts of power to
the projector.
90 - 264 VAC
50 - 60 Hz
Figure 2-15. Power Connection
2.6 Source
Connections
The projector includes a built-in RGB input interface for connection of
external RGB sources and audio equipment. This input interface is shown
in Figure 2-16. The built-in interface is not removable.
to projector's
RS-232 in port
control ports
PHASTLink
compatible
Figure 2-16. Projector Input Slots
Optional interface modules are available to accommodate other signal
types. These include a Composite/S-Video Module, an HDTV Input
Module, and a PC Analog Input Module. Any one of these can be installed
in slot 2. A Multi-Standard Decoder may be installed to add four additional
inputs to the system (“slots” 3 to 6). To further increase the number of
inputs, a signal switcher may be connected to the RGB interface in slot 1
to add 8 more sources to the system (9 switcher inputs replace one RGB
input). Other switchers may be connected to the first switcher for more
inputs. Brief descriptions of the above mentioned optional modules are
given in Appendix H, Interfaces. For additional details, contact your dealer
or Madrigal.
2.15
INSTALLATION & SETUP
The RGB interface allows connection of an RGB source having one of the
following sync types: sync on green, composite sync, or separate H & V sync.
To connect a source, connect the red, green, and blue outputs to the RED,
GREEN, and BLUE inputs on the interface. If the source uses sync on green,
no additional cables are required. If the source provides a composite sync output, connect it to the HOR/COMP input. If the source provides separate
horizontal and vertical sync outputs, connect the horizontal sync signal to the
HOR/COMP input, and connect the vertical sync input to the VERT input.
Interconnection cables must be terminated with BNC connectors. Figure 2-17
show source connections for the built-in interface.
Figure 2-17. Built-in RGB Interface Connections
2.7 Serial Port
Connections
Serial port connections are required when the projector is to be controlled
by a computer/controller other than PHAST.
The projector’s serial ports are located on the back panel. See Figure 2-18.
Figure 2-18. Serial Port Connections
If the projector is to be controlled by a computer or controller which has an
RS-232 serial port, connect an RS-232 serial cable between the computer
and the projector serial port labeled “IN”. After the connection is made, set
the serial port baud rate as described in the Projector Setup entry in section
3.7, Utilities.
2.16
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Notes: 1) All serial connections require a 9 pin D connector at the projector end.
Refer to Appendix D for cable wiring requirements. 2) For computer/controller
control, PC software is required. 3) The RS-232 serial port labeled “OUT” is
provided for projector networking applications.
2.8 Optical
Alignment
Optical alignment is required when the throw distance changes or the projector cannot be focused using the focus controls. The projector is optically
aligned at the factory at a fixed screen size and a fixed projector-to-screen
distance. See Appendices F and G for the specific details needed for your
projector model and lens. If the throw distance has changed since the last
setup, proceed as follows:
Notes: 1) The projector must be warmed up for at least 45 minutes prior to
performing optical alignment. 2) Optical alignment is both a mechanical and
electrical adjustment. Electrical adjustments are stored in the current setup
memory. After alignment is complete, setup memories which were previously set
up (if any) must be set up again. Memory setup is explained in section 2.10. 3)
Factory alignment is performed using the internal crosshatch with a 61.8 kHz
signal applied.
It is recommended that optical alignment be performed using the projector’s
Guided Mechanical Setup tutorial. This tutorial displays step-by-step
instructions during the alignment. The instructions in this section require
use of the Guided Mechanical Setup tutorial.
To access and use the Guided
Mechanical Setup tutorial, turn on
the projector (
) then press
at operation level. The Help menu
is displayed. Next press 2 to select
Guided Mechanical Setup. The first
page of the guide will be displayed on
the projection screen. When using
the guide, press
to display the
next page, press
to display the
previous page. When complete, press
to end Help.
POWER
HELP
HELP
RECALL
EXIT
Step 1 ➤
If you have not already done so, calculate the throw distance and set the
projector position as explained in section 2.4, Mounting. Turn power off
before moving the projector.
2.17
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 2 ➤
Locate the front top
cover of the projector.
See Figure 2-19. Next,
position your hands above
the red and blue lenses
then grasp the cover.
Gently lift it until it is
released from its securing
latch. Slide the cover away
from the projector as shown
in Figure 2-20 below.
Front Top
Cover
Foam Piece
Figure 2-19. Front Top Cover
a) Lift front cover until
latch is released.
b) Slide cover forward.
Figure 2-20. Front Top Cover Removal
Also remove the black decorative foam piece at the front of the lenses
(removal is optional). Remove the large allen head driver from the tool kit
provided with the projector. The driver is used for lens alignment.
Examine the lenses and hardware as shown in Figure 2-21a (or, for the
MP-8 model, see Figure 2-21b). Each lens consists of a rear section and a
front section. The rear section sets the optical focus at the center of the
image and is secured to the lens body by a wing nut at the top rear of the
lens assembly. The front section sets the focus at the corners and is secured
to the rear section by a wing nut at the top front of the lens assembly.
Top Plate
Securing Bolts
D
C
C
B
Center
Focus Adjust
Corner
Focus Adjust
Blue
Green
Red
Figure 2-21a. MP-9 Lens Assemblies - Top View
2.18
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Top Plate
Lens/CRT
Securing Bolts
A
A
D
D
A
C
C
B
A
B
Center
Focus Adjust
Corner
Focus Adjust
Blue
Green
Red
Figure 2-21b. MP-8 Lens Assemblies - Top View
For the MP-9: The lenses are secured to the projector frame by a top plate
and individual mounting plates as shown in Figures 2-21a and 2-22a.
During optical alignment, adjust the top plate securing bolts using the ball
nose screw driver (
) supplied with the projector. Adjust the
mounting plate securing bolts using either the ball nose screwdriver or the
projector wrench (
) supplied, as necessary. The securing bolts
are labeled B-C-D.
Top/Bottom
Focus Adjust
Blue
Green
Red
Left/Right
Focus Adjust
Lens
Mounting
Plate
D
C
B
Figure 2-22a. MP-9 Lens Assemblies - Front View
For the MP-8: The lenses are secured to the projector frame by a top plate as
shown. During optical alignment, adjust the securing bolts as instructed —
refer to Figures 2-21b and 2-22b. The securing bolts are labeled A-B-C-D.
2.19
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Lens Mounting Plate
Blue
Green
Red
Top/Bottom
Focus Adjust
Left/Right
Focus Adjust
Factory/Service
Adjust Only
Figure 2-22b. MP-8 Lens Assemblies - Front View
For the MP-9, each CRT is attached to its lens by socket head allen screws
located at each lens mounting plate. For each lens, the upper left screws
(when facing the lens) adjust the focus between the left and right sides of
the picture, and the upper right screws adjust the focus between the top and
bottom of the picture. Use the supplied ball nose screw driver for these
adjustments.
For the MP-8, each CRT is attached to its lens by 3 socket head allen screws
located at each lens mounting plate. For each lens, the upper right screw
(when facing the lens) adjusts the focus between the top and bottom of the
picture, and the lower left screw adjusts the focus between the left and right
sides of the picture. See Figure 2-22b.
Step 3 ➤
Step 4 ➤
Step 5 ➤
Loosen the rear wing nut on the green lens. Rotate the lens
using the wing nut until the picture is focused in the center.
Tighten the rear wing nut.
Loosen the front wing nut on the green lens. Rotate the
front lens barrel until the picture is focused in the corners.
Tighten the front wing nut.
B
G
R
B
G
R
Steps 6 to 8 require that you look directly into the lenses for adjustment.
Before you continue, press to reduce contrast to a low level (less than
10%).
WARNING: DO NOT LOOK INTO THE LENSES IF CONTRAST IS SET
TO NORMAL VIEWING LEVEL.
Step 6 ➤
2.20
Look directly into the red lens. Press , ,
crosshatch on the face of the picture tube.
or
to center the displayed
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 7 ➤
Look directly into the green lens. Press , , or
displayed crosshatch on the face of the picture tube.
Step 8 ➤
Look directly into the blue lens. Press , , or to center the
displayed crosshatch on the face of the picture tube.
Step 9 ➤
Press
to center the
to increase contrast to a normal viewing level.
Step 10 ➤
Pivot the projector and
move it side to side as
necessary to display a
pivot
point
symmetrical crosshatch
centered left-to-right on
After
Before
the screen. The pivot
point should be at the
rear wing nut of the green lens to avoid changing the throw distance.
Step 11 ➤
Tilt the projector until
B
G
R
the center horizontal line
is level and centered with
the screen. Adjust the feet
of the projector or ceiling mount as required.
Step 12 ➤
Step 13 ➤
Step 14 ➤
Step 15 ➤
After
Before
A red image is displayed. Loosen the rear wing nut on the
red lens. Rotate the lens using the wing nut until the picture
is focused in the center. Tighten the rear wing nut.
Loosen the front wing nut on the red lens. Rotate the front
lens barrel until the picture is focused in the corners.
Tighten the front wing nut.
A blue image is displayed. Loosen the rear wing nut on
the blue lens. Rotate the lens using the wing nut until the
picture is focused in the center. Tighten the rear wing nut.
Loosen the front wing nut on the blue lens. Rotate the
front lens barrel until the picture is focused in the corners.
Tighten the front wing nut.
B
G
R
B
G
R
B
G
R
B
G
R
2.21
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 16 ➤
Press
Step 17 ➤
On the MP-9, loosen the three bolts labeled
“B”. One is located on the top plate. The
other two are below the red lens.
or
to adjust for best electrical focus at the center of the picture.
B
B
G
G
R
R
On the MP-8, loosen the four bolts
labeled “A”.
Loosen the two bolts labeled “B”.
Step 18 ➤
Step 19 ➤
A red and green crosshatch is displayed. Move
the red lens so that the left and right edges of the
red crosshatch match the green.
After
Before
On the MP-9, tighten the three bolts
labeled “B”.
B
G
B
G
R
B
G
R
B
G
R
R
On the MP-8, tighten the two
bolts labeled “B”.
B
Step 20 ➤
G
R
On the MP-9, loosen the three bolts
labeled “D”. One is located on the top plate.
The other two are below the blue lens.
B
G
R
On the MP-8, tighten the two bolts labeled “D”.
Step 21 ➤
2.22
A blue and green crosshatch is displayed. Move the
blue lens so that the left and right edges of the blue
crosshatch match the green.
Before
After
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 22 ➤
On the MP-9, tighten the three bolts
labeled “D”.
B
G
B
G
R
B
G
R
B
G
R
R
On the MP-8, tighten the two bolts labeled “D”.
Step 23 ➤
Step 24 ➤
A green image is displayed. Loosen the rear wing nut on the
green lens and slightly defocus the center of the picture.
On the MP-9, locate the two
TOP Bolt
adjustment bolts at the upper
SIDE
right corner of the green lens
Bolt
mounting plate (viewed from
the front). Adjust the two bolts
After
Before
until the top and bottom areas
of the picture are equally defocused. Use the following technique for the
adjustment: Turn the SIDE bolt 1⁄ 8 turn CCW. Turn the TOP bolt about 1⁄ 8
turn CW until it stops. If defocus at the top and bottom are equalizing,
repeat until equal. If the top and bottom are not becoming equally defocused, use the same technique but instead turn the TOP bolt CCW then
turn the SIDE bolt CW until it stops. Repeat until defocus is equal.
G
On the MP-8, adjust the
G
B
R
large allen head bolt located
at the upper right corner of
Before
the green lens mounting plate.
Turn the bolt head until the top and bottom areas of the picture are
equally defocused.
After
NOTE: On all models, it may be necessary to readjust the lens’ rear wing nut to
keep the center defocused.
Step 25 ➤
Rotate the green lens using the rear wing nut until the
picture is focused in the center. Tighten the rear wing nut.
B
G
R
If necessary, loosen the front wing nut, rotate the front lens
barrel to readjust the focus in the corners, then re-tighten the wing nut.
2.23
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 26 ➤
A red image is displayed. Loosen the rear wing nut on the
red lens and slightly defocus the center of the picture.
B
Step 27 ➤
On the MP-9, locate the two
adjustment bolts at the upper
right corner of the red lens
mounting plate (viewed from
the front).
G
R
TOP Bolt
SIDE
Bolt
R
Before
After
Adjust the two bolts until the top and bottom areas of the picture are
equally defocused. Use the same technique as that used for the green
adjustment (step 24).
On the MP-8, adjust the large
allen head bolt located at the
B
G
R
upper right corner of the red
After
Before
lens mounting plate. Turn the
bolt head until the top and bottom areas of the picture are equally defocused.
Note: On all models, it may be necessary to readjust the lens’ rear wing nut to
keep the center defocused.
Step 28 ➤
On the MP-9, locate the two
adjustment bolts at the upper
left corner of the red lens mount-SIDE
Bolt
ing plate (viewed from the front).
TOP Bolt
R
After
Before
Adjust the two bolts until the
left and right areas of the picture are equally defocused. Use the same
technique as that used for the previous adjustment (step 27).
On the MP-8, adjust the large
B
G
R
allen head bolt located at the
lower left corner of the red
After
Before
lens mounting plate. Turn the
bolt head until the left and right sides of the picture are equally defocused.
Note: On all models, it may be necessary to readjust the lens’ rear wing nut to
keep the center defocused.
Step 29 ➤
2.24
Rotate the red lens using the rear wing nut until the picture is focused in
the center. Tighten the rear wing nut. If necessary, loosen the front wing nut,
rotate the front lens barrel to readjust the focus in the corners, then re-tighten
the wing nut.
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 30 ➤
A blue image is displayed. Loosen the rear wing nut on the
blue lens and slightly defocus the center of the picture.
B
Step 31 ➤
On the MP-9, locate the two
adjustment bolts at the upper
right corner of the blue lens
mounting plate (viewed from
the front).
G
R
TOP Bolt
SIDE
Bolt
B
Before
After
Adjust the two bolts until the top and bottom areas of the picture are
equally defocused. Use the same technique as that used for the green and
red adjustments.
On the MP-8, adjust the large
allen head bolt located at the
G
B
R
upper right corner of the blue
After
Before
lens mounting plate. Turn the
bolt head until the top and bottom sides of the picture are equally defocused.
Note: On all models, it may be necessary to readjust the lens’ rear wing nut to
keep the center defocused.
Step 32 ➤
On the MP-9, locate the two
adjustment bolts at the upper
left corner of the blue lens
mounting plate (viewed from
the front).
TOP Bolt
SIDE
Bolt
B
Before
After
Adjust the two bolts until the left and right areas of the picture are equally
defocused. Use the same technique as that used for the previous adjustment
(step 31).
On the MP-8, adjust the large
B
G
R
allen head bolt located at the
lower left corner of the blue
After
Before
lens mounting plate. Turn the
bolt head until the left and right sides of the picture are equally defocused.
Note: On all models, it may be necessary to readjust the lens’ rear wing nut to
keep the center defocused.
Step 33 ➤
Rotate the blue lens using the rear wing nut until the picture is focused in
the center. Tighten the rear wing nut.
If necessary, loosen the front wing nut, rotate the front lens barrel to readjust
the focus in the corners, then re-tighten the wing nut. See Step 15.
2.25
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 34 ➤
For the MP-9, optical alignment is now complete. If you had removed the
foam insert, reinstall it now. Install the front top cover. Proceed to set up each
source by following the source setup procedure in section 2.9, Source Setup.
On the MP-8, tighten the bolts labeled “A”. Optical
alignment is now complete. If you had removed the foam
insert, reinstall it now. Install the front top cover. Proceed to
set up each source by following the source setup procedure
in section 2.9, Source Setup.
2.9 Source Setup
B
G
R
This section gives step-by-step instructions for quick setup of the projector
for a selected external source. For a complete setup, repeat these steps as
required for each source connected to the projector.
Before starting, ensure that the projector is optically and mechanically
aligned. If optical alignment is required, follow the setup instructions in
section 2.8, Optical Alignment. Select the source to be set up using the
Source command and make sure it is visible on the projection screen.
To make setup easier, it is
recommended that you use
the projector’s Guided Source
Setup tutorial. It provides source
setup instructions on screen to
guide you through the adjustments.
To access the tutorial, first press
at operation level. The Help menu
is displayed. Next press 1 to select
Guided Source Setup. The first page
of the guide will be displayed on the
projection screen. When using the
guide,press
to display the next
page, press
to display the previous page. When complete, press
HELP
HELP
RECALL
2.26
EXIT
Step 1 ➤
Press
then or to increase or decrease the brightness setting until
black areas in the image just disappear.
Step 2 ➤
Press
Step 3 ➤
Press
.
BRITE
CONT
or
then
or
to adjust the contrast of the image to a suitable level.
to adjust electrical focus for best overall sharpness.
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 4 ➤
Press or to adjust skew until the vertical line through the center of the
image is not tilted (perpendicular to the horizontal line). Press or until
the center horizontal line is perpendicular to the vertical.
Step 5 ➤
Press or to adjust keystone until the width at the top of the picture is
equal to the width at the bottom.
Before
Step 6 ➤
After
Press or to adjust side pincushion until the left and right sides of the
picture are straight and not curved.
Before
After
Step 7 ➤
Press or to adjust vertical bow until the horizontal line at the middle
of the picture is straight. Press or to adjust horizontal bow so that the
vertical line at the middle of the picture is straight.
Step 8 ➤
Press or to adjust top pincushion until the horizontal line at the top of
the picture is straight and not curved. Press or to adjust top keystone so
that the top edge is level.
Step 9 ➤
Press or to adjust bottom pincushion until the horizontal line at the
bottom of the picture is straight and not curved. Press or to adjust
bottom keystone so that the bottom edge is level.
2.27
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 10 ➤
Adjust C linearity as follows:
Press or until the horizontal line through the center of the crosshatch
is equally distant from the lines at the very top and bottom.
Before
After
Press or until the center of the crosshatch is equally distant from the
vertical lines at the left and right edges.
Step 11 ➤
Adjust S linearity as follows:
Press or until the height of each crosshatch square is equal from the top
to the bottom.
Before
After
Press or until the width of each crosshatch square is equal from the left
to the right.
The source connected to the currently selected input should now be visible.
If there is no picture, check to see if the source is active.
Step 12 ➤
Press , ,
the screen.
or
to adjust phase until the picture is centered on
Before
Step 13 ➤
Press , , or to adjust the size of the picture. Ensure that objects in
your picture have the correct shape. For example, if there is a circle in your
picture, size should be adjusted until the circle is round, not oval.
Before
2.28
After
After
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 14 ➤
The final step is convergence. If the projector includes the ACON option,
4 to exit the guide and allow ACON to converge the system.
press
1 to enter Guided Convergence.
Otherwise, press
EXIT
CONV
EXIT
CONV
Reminder: Remember that all of the adjustments above should be repeated for
other sources in the system.
2.10 Memory
Setup
This section explains how to set up projector memories to improve the performance of the projector’s ASI and ASR features. If you are not familiar
with setup memories, read section 3, Operation, prior to memory setup; in
particular, read section 3.4, Setup Memories, and the ASI with Save and Turn
ASR On/Off entries in section 3.7, Utility Features. If the projector’s setup
memories are properly set up, the projector will be easier to use and operate.
Note: Memory setup should be performed when the projector is in its final operating position. If the physical position of the projector changes, memory setup
must be repeated.
Here is a brief summary of the setup memory, ASR, and ASI discussions in
Section 3.
About Setup Memories ...
The projector has 75 setup memories for storing display settings of different
sources. Multiple setup memories are required since display settings usually
vary amongst sources. There are two types of setup memories: Input and
Recall. Both memory types store the same parameters. The only difference is
that Input memories store display settings for a particular physical input
(e.g., switcher 0, slot 1) while Recall memories can be used with any input.
At any one time, one setup memory is the current setup memory. The display settings in the current setup memory are used for the current display.
When a source is selected by entering its input number, the Input memory
for the selected input becomes the current setup memory*. If a Recall memory is selected, it becomes the current setup memory*. Display adjustments
are automatically saved in the setup memory which is current at the time of
adjustment (unless the setup memory is locked).
* Note: If the ASR feature (explained below) is turned on during setup memory
selection, the selected memory may not be the current setup memory.
3 .
To display the Recall memories stored in the projector, press
4 to display the Input memories. (Unused setup memories are
Press
not displayed).
UTIL
UTIL
2.29
INSTALLATION & SETUP
About ASI and ASR ...
ASI (Automatic Source Interpolation) is a feature which automatically
adjusts display settings based on the settings of other setup memories stored
in the projector. When a setup memory is first created, ASI automatically
generates its initial display settings. These settings will be created by copying
another setup memory or by interpolating multiple setup memories.
ASI is activated when:
• A new setup memory is created.
• An ASR is performed and its logic has activated an ASI.
• An “ASI with Save” is specified by the user (see section 3.7).
ASR (Automatic Source Recall) is a feature which, when turned on for a
given input, provides automatic Recall memory selection or ASI adjustment.
ASR processing can activate when: 1) a change in scan frequencies is detected
at the input, 2) an input is selected, 3) a Recall memory is selected, or 4) a
channel is selected. This feature is primarily intended for use when many different sources must share the same input (via a third party switcher, for
example) or when a signal source can output several different scan frequencies
(e.g., a SVGA card). When a source switch is made, the projector may automatically select a Recall memory with matching scan frequencies or create the
display settings based on the settings in other setup memories.
(Refer to Appendix C for ASI/ASR logic diagrams.)
Input Memory ➤
Setup
Follow these steps to prepare an Input memory for a source.
Note: To assure proper setup of an existing Input memory, ASR must be off
(default) for the memory.
Step 1
Connect the source to the input to be set up, then select the input using the
Source command. For example, if the source is connected to slot 1 of the
0 1 . If the Input memory did not previously exist, it
projector, press
will be created automatically.
SOURCE
Step 2
The source should be displayed on the projection screen. If much adjustment
0 2 to perform an ASI with Save. The display appearis required, press
ance may improve based on the settings stored in other setup memories. (If
the Input memory is new, ASI with Save will have already been performed
when the input was selected.)
UTIL
Step 3
Make display adjustments as required. Adjustment changes will automatically
be saved in the Input memory.
2.30
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Recall Memory ➤
Setup
Follow these steps to prepare a Recall memory.
Step 1
Select the input connected to the source. For example, if the source is
1
5 . The source should be
connected to switcher 1, slot 5, press
displayed on the projection screen.
SOURCE
Note: To assure proper setup of a Recall memory, ASR must be off (default) for
the current input.
Step 2
Select a Recall memory as the current setup memory. For example, to make
0
3 . If the Recall
Recall memory 03 the current setup memory, press
memory did not previously exist, it will be created automatically.
RECALL
Step 3
0 2 to perform an “ASI with
If much adjustment is required, press
Save”. (If the Recall memory is new, ASI with Save will have already been
performed when the memory was selected.)
UTIL
Step 4
Make display adjustments as required. Adjustment changes will automatically
be saved in the Recall memory.
ASI Improvement ➤
If the projector will be used with many sources, or new sources will be
frequently added to the system, it is recommended that five or six setup
memories be created expressly for the purpose of improving ASI accuracy.
ASI accuracy improves as more setup memories are created and stored, and
the variations amongst horizontal and vertical scan frequencies increases.
For example, if you always use the same input and you never use Recall
memories (thus only one setup memory has ever been created), ASI will not
be effective. However, if many Input and Recall memories have been used
and adjusted for a variety of sources, the projector has more “knowledge”
in its database for performing an ASI. As this “knowledge” increases, ASI
accuracy improves.
An easy way to add setup memories at various scan frequencies is to use the
projector’s internal frequency generator. The internal frequency generator
can display a test pattern using the scan frequencies you select. When display adjustments are made, the display settings are stored in the current
setup memory. Prepare a Recall memory using the generator as follows:
2.31
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 1
Select a Recall memory to be the current setup memory. For example, to
9
0 . (Recall
make Recall memory 90 the current setup memory, press
memory numbers may be any number from 01 to 99). If the selected Recall
memory did not previously exist, it will be created automatically.
RECALL
Step 2
6 to access the Internal
1
Press
Frequency Selection menu. Items one
to six contain preset scan frequencies
covering the scan range of the projector.
It is recommended that Recall memories
be created for each. To make a selection,
enter an item number or use and to
move the cursor bar to the item you want,
then press
.
UTIL
ENTER
Tip: It is recommended that Recall memories for the two extreme frequencies
be set up first (items 1 and 4). When other Recall memories are created, their
initial display settings will be based on the settings already stored in memory.
Step 3
At this point, a test pattern is displayed. Make display adjustments as
required. All display settings will be stored in the Recall memory. To create
another Recall memory, repeat the above steps. To return to the external
source, press
while only the test pattern is displayed.
EXIT
(You may notice that as new Recall memories are created, fewer display
adjustments are required. This is because ASI is using other setup memories
to create the initial settings of the new memories.)
ASR Setup ➤
This subsection provides two examples of how the ASR feature may by used
and set up.
ASR Example #1
Refer to the system illustrated in Figure 2-23. A computer is connected to
slot 1 of the projector as shown. The graphics adapter in the computer can
operate at different frequency modes to accommodate various software
applications. The ASR feature may be used until when the frequency mode
of the computer changes, the projector setup also changes to match that of
the new mode.
2.32
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Source with multiple
scan rates / operating
modes.
Input 01
MODE
TYPE
FREQ. (H)
RECALL#
1
2
3
4
Text
Graphics
Graphics
Graphics
31.5 kHz
35.6 kHz
64.0 kHz
110.0 kHz
01
02
03
04
Figure 2-23. ASR System Example #1
To prepare setup memories for the above system, follow these steps:
Step 1
Select the input using the Source command. Press
projector slot 1.
SOURCE
0
1
to select
Step 2
Press twice to display the Current Input Parameters status page. Check to
1
4 to turn ASR
see if ASR is off for the current input. If it is on, press
off for the input. (It is usually easier to prepare setup memories when ASR is
turned off.)
UTIL
Step 3
At the computer, switch to an application which uses one of the graphics
adapter operating modes. Select an unused Recall memory as the current
setup memory. For example, to make Recall memory 01 the current setup
0 1 . Make display adjustments as required. The display
memory, press
settings for the current graphics mode will be stored in the Recall memory.
Repeat this step for the remaining graphics adapter operating modes, storing
adjustments for them in Recall memories 02, 03 and 04. It is recommended
that the two extreme frequencies be set up first.
RECALL
Step 4
0 1 to make Input memory 01 the current setup memory then
Press
1
5 to display the Clear Setup dialog box. Move the cursor to
press
“Do It” then press
to clear the display and frequency settings of the
input. Now Input memory 01 will not be used during an ASR search.
SOURCE
UTIL
ENTER
Step 5
3 to lock Input memory 01 to prevent display or frequency
1
Press
changes to the Input memory.
UTIL
2.33
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 6
1
4 to turn ASR on for the input. Now, each time the computer’s
Press
graphics adapter switches operating modes, the projector will automatically
adjust its display settings to suit the new mode.
UTIL
ASR Example #2
Refer to the system illustrated in Figure 2-24 below. Six different sources
are connected to a third party (non-Madrigal Imaging) signal switcher.
Under normal circumstances, the projector is not aware of source switches
made by the switcher. However, if ASR is turned on for the input, and a
Recall memory has been set up for each source device, the projector will
detect the external source switch and automatically select the appropriate
Recall memory. Even if Recall memories have not been set up but ASR is
on, ASR will try to adjust the display settings based on the settings of other
Input or Recall memories.
Source "C"
(setup parameters
saved in Recall
memory 03)
Source "B"
(setup parameters
saved in Recall
memory 02)
Source "D"
(setup parameters
saved in Recall
memory 04)
3rd Party Switcher
Source "E"
(setup parameters
saved in Recall
memory 05)
Source "F"
(setup parameters
saved in Recall
memory 06)
Source "A"
(setup parameters saved
in Recall memory 01)
Figure 2-24. ASR System Example #2
To prepare setup memories for this system, follow these steps:
Step 1
Connect the output of the signal switcher to a projector input. Select the
0 1 to
input using the Source command. For this example, press
select projector slot 1.
SOURCE
2.34
INSTALLATION & SETUP
Step 2
Press twice to display the Current Input Parameters status page. Check
to see if ASR is off for the current input. If it is on, press
then press
1
4
to turn ASR off for the input.
EXIT
UTIL
Step 3
At the switcher, switch in one of the source devices. Select an unused Recall
memory as the current setup memory. For example, to make Recall memory
0 1 . Make display adjustments as
01 the current setup memory, press
required. The display settings for the selected device will be stored in the
Recall memory. Repeat this step for the remaining devices.
RECALL
Step 4
1
5 to display the Clear Setup dialog box. Move the cursor to
Press
“Do It” then press
to clear the display settings and frequency settings
of the input. By doing this, Input memory 01 will not be used during an
ASR search.
UTIL
ENTER
Step 5
3 to lock Input memory 01 to prevent display or frequency
1
Press
changes to the Input memory.
UTIL
Step 6
1
4 to turn ASR on for the input. The projector’s display settings
Press
will automatically adjust to match the source selected by the switcher.
UTIL
2.11 ACON Setup
CON
This section provides setup and usage guidelines for systems which include
the ACON automatic convergence feature.
There are a few simple rules and operation fundamentals which should be
understood and considered when installing a projector which includes the
ACON automatic convergence feature. ACON operates on the principle of
monitoring projected screen images via its Locator Assembly, analyzing this
data, then adjusting the vertical and horizontal positions of the red and blue
colors until optimum convergence with the green is achieved. This process
requires that the view of the display screen by the Locator Assembly be
totally unobstructed. ACON’s performance can be adversely affected if the
projector’s optical and system functions are not properly set. Ensure the projector is focused and all user adjustments have been made prior to operating
ACON.
Figure 2-29 illustrates two common projection system configurations. ACON
responds differently for each configuration. The projector configuration is
determined by ACON during the Learn Screen process. Always perform a
Learn Screen for a new or changed installation. For more information on
Learn Screen, refer to section 3.6, Convergence Registration.
2.35
INSTALLATION & SETUP
If the installation is rear screen, the Locator Assembly should be mounted in
front of the display with an optional Locator Mounting Bracket
(kit# 38-8000805-01). See Figure 2-30.
Front Screen, Floor Mount
ACON Locator
Assembly
ACON Locator
Assembly
Front Screen, Ceiling Mount
Figure 2-29. ACON Installation Examples
Side View
Viewing Cone
Ceiling
VERTICAL
LOCATION "A"
Screen
20 max.
VERTICAL
LOCATION "B"
(preferred)
20 max.
Extension
Cable
VERTICAL
LOCATION "C"
1.5 x Screen Width
(+50%/-20%)
to Locator
Assembly
ACON Locator Assembly
must be positioned
within viewing cone
Top View
Viewing Cone
HORIZONTAL
LOCATION "X"
Screen
HORIZONTAL
LOCATION "Y"
(preferred)
20 max.
20 max.
HORIZONTAL
LOCATION "Z"
Extension
Cable
to Locator
Assembly
Figure 2-30. Remote Locator Assembly Placement
2.36
Section 3
Operation
3.1 Overview
This section explains how to operate the projector once it has been installed
and is ready for use. If you have not yet set up the projector, refer to
Section 2, Installation and Setup.
Before using the projector for the first time, it is recommended that you
read through this section of the manual. Although the projector is easy to
use, there are many advanced features which allow you to enhance performance and operation. By understanding these features, and how to use them,
you will soon be able to take full advantage of the projector’s extensive
capabilities.
Organization of this section is as follows:
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.2 Projector
Basics
Keypads ➤
Overview
Projector Basics
Source Selection
Setup Memories
Display Adjustments
Convergence Registration
Utility Features
Multi-projector Functions
Notice that the projector has no knobs or moving parts to make adjustments
or change control settings. This is because all user adjustments are digitally
controlled via the projector’s keypad. Adjustment settings are retained in the
projector’s internal memory, even when the projector is unplugged.
Four types of keypads may be used with the projector: built-in, IR remote,
wired remote, and touch-screen. The projector includes a multi-use, full function, backlit keypad which is factory configured for use as a built-in keypad.
It can easily be reconfigured for use as an IR remote keypad or a wired remote
keypad. A Madrigal IRIQ programmable touch-screen remote is also included
for overall system control. Use the keypad type which is most appropriate for
your application.
3.1
OPERATION
Notes: 1) For information on how to reconfigure the keypad, refer to section
2.3, Hardware Setup. 2) To convert the keypad to a wired remote keypad, an
optional accessory cable (#03-001106-02P) is required. 3) Additional keypads
are available from your dealer and Madrigal.
Built-in Keypad
When the keypad is configured for built-in use (factory default), it is connected to the projector by a 3 foot extension cable, located below the front
top cover. This configuration is intended for initial setup of the projector
and applications where it is desirable to keep the keypad with the projector.
The keypad can be accessed as follows:
Locate the front top cover of the
projector. Position your hands
above the red and blue lenses then
grasp the cover. Lift the cover until
the keypad is exposed. Slide the
cover away from the projector. The
keypad is mounted to a securing
bracket located above the lens
assemblies as shown in Figure 3-1.
The built-in keypad can slide out
of it securing bracket but it is recommended that it remain in place
for use. When finished using the
keypad, position the front top
cover back in place.
Figure 3-1. Built-in Keypad Access
IR Remote Keypad
When the keypad is configured for IR remote operation, you can control
the projector from a distance without a wired connection to the projector.
The keypad includes a battery powered infrared (IR) transmitter.
Wired Remote Keypad
When the keypad is configured as a wired remote keypad, you can control
the projector from a distance by way of a 25 ft extension cable (accessory
cable required). Wired remote keypad operation is recommended when:
• the location of the keypad with respect to the projector or screen is
inadequate for IR remote keypad operation,
• the projector is in a lighting environment which is unsuitable for IR
remote keypad operation, or
• there are multiple projectors in the same room and you want each
projector to be controlled by its own remote keypad.
3.2
OPERATION
Figure 3-2 shows the projector functions which are accessible from the multiuse (full function) keypad. As you may notice from the figure, some keys
provide direct access to specific functions (such as
to turn the projector
on or off ), and some keys provide indirect function access via menus.
Functions which are less frequently accessed are provided through on-screen
menus.
POWER
proj
✴
util
pic
color
tint
detail
geom
cont
brite
conv
enter
exit
source
Menu
Mute
1
2
3
recall
4
5
6
help
7
8
9
#
0
menu mute stby
power
to temporarily turn off
on-screen displays
and dialogs
Standby
to turn both picture and
audio on or off
Figure 3-2. Full Function Keypad
3.3
OPERATION
Keypad Usage ➤
The keypad is used the same way you would use a remote keypad supplied
with a TV or VCR. There are only a few general key press rules to keep
in mind:
Key Press Rules
1) All key presses are in sequence; no functions require simultaneous key
presses.
2)
and
are the only keys which require an extended hold-down for
function activation (about one second). For all other keys, a momentary
press will activate the key’s function.
3) , , and are the only keys which repeat when held down. For all
other keys, the key must first be released then pressed again for repeated
activation.
4) Pressing
always exits the current function, operation, menu, or
dialog box.
STBY
POWER
EXIT
Notes: 1) To toggle the keypad’s backlit display (enable or disable), press
3 . See section 2.3 for details. 2) If keys are pressed at a time
when the projector is busy (such as during power-up), the key presses may not
take effect.
BRITE
TINT
DETAIL
When the projector is turned on, it begins operation at Operation Level.
Operation level is the normal level of operation at which a source image
is (or may be) displayed. The projector temporarily leaves operation level
when menus are displayed, control settings are changed, or online help is
accessed. The screen display changes to reflect the operation or function
being performed. One or more of the following may be displayed:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Slidebar - to make adjustments to display settings.
Menu - to select projector functions or change projector settings.
Dialog Box - to select an action such as confirm or cancel an operation.
Message Box - to display messages.
Help Page - to display help and provide assistance.
Test Pattern - to assist during setup.
(Note: The display of slidebars and messages can be suppressed if desired. For
more information, refer to section 3.7, Utility Features).
Each of the above are explained in the following entries. As you read
through the explanations, note the following:
In most cases ...
EXIT
brings you back to operation level,
brings you back to the previous page or menu,
is pressed to make a selection, and
provides context-sensitive help.
RECALL
ENTER
HELP
3.4
OPERATION
Slidebars
When an adjustment is made, a slidebar is superimposed on the projection
screen. The slidebar displays the adjustment setting on a percentage scale.
To make an adjustment, use the arrow keys indicated by the slidebar. Press
to end an adjustment or, for a slidebar accessed from a menu, press
.
If no keys are pressed within 5 seconds while a slidebar is displayed, the
slidebar disappears.
EXIT
ENTER
For example, if
is pressed, the Contrast slidebar
is superimposed on the image. The slidebar shows
that contrast is set to 50%. Press or on the
keypad to change the contrast level. When
complete, press
.
CONT
Contrast
50
0
50
100
EXIT
Menus
When a menu key is pressed
or a menu is selected, a menu
with a list of selection items
is superimposed on the projection screen. Each menu
consists of a title, selection
items, and a cursor bar.
Selection items may include
adjustment functions, control
settings or other menus.
To make a selection from the menu, either:
• press the number key corresponding to the item number, or
• press or to move the cursor bar to the desired item, then press
ENTER
.
If a menu item includes control options, for example, items 5, 7 and 8
above, the control option setting can be changed by pressing the number
key or by pressing
when the item is highlighted.
ENTER
Note: Pressing
RECALL
while in a sub-menu returns you to the previous menu.
Dialog Boxes
Dialog boxes are displayed when the projector
requires an action to be chosen by the user.
For example, after a convergence registration
is performed, a dialog box is displayed to confirm that the new convergence settings are to be saved in memory. Press
or to highlight one of the actions then press
to perform
or
the action. If
is pressed, the previous menu is then displayed. If
is
pressed, the projector returns to operation level.
ENTER
ENTER
EXIT
EXIT
3.5
OPERATION
Message Boxes
Message boxes display brief messages on the screen to indicate a status, condition, or error. Messages are overlayed on the displayed source image and in
most cases remain on the screen for about five seconds. To remove a message
box prior to the five second display period, press
.
EXIT
Help Pages
Help pages provide assistance when you need it. There are various forms of
help available, all accessible by pressing
. For information about using
help, refer to the Using Help entry in this section.
HELP
To advance one page when using help, press
. To go back one help page,
press
. To exit from a help page, press
.
HELP
EXIT
RECALL
Test Patterns
The projector has an internal generator which can display several different
types of test patterns to assist you during projector setup. Press # to display
the first test pattern — a crosshatch. Each subsequent press of # changes the
test pattern as shown below. If a test pattern is the only graphic displayed
(i.e., no overlayed text), pressing
returns the display to the external image.
EXIT
Presentation
Level
Standard
Crosshatch
Presentation
Level
Dots
Grey
Scale
White
Screen
Fine
Crosshatch
Note: Test patterns are normally generated at the scan frequencies of the current
input signal.
Using Help ➤
The projector includes an extensive online help system. The help system
provides operation guidance and assistance. There are two types of online
help: Context Sensitive Help and Guided Help.
Context Sensitive Help
Context Sensitive Help provides help on how to use a specific function.
To view help pertaining to a dedicated key function, press the key then press
. For example, to view a help page which describes how to use the
brightness function, press
.
HELP
BRITE
HELP
To view help pertaining to a menu selectable function select the function
then press
.
HELP
3.6
OPERATION
To view help describing a menu, press
HELP
while the menu is displayed.
If multiple pages are available, press
to advance to the next page.
Press
to go back to the previous page. To end help, press
.
HELP
EXIT
RECALL
Guided Help
Guided Help provides several online
tutorials which explain how to
operate the projector and assist you
during installation and setup.
To access the tutorials, press
at
operation level. The Help menu
is displayed. When using tutorials,
press
to display the next tutorial
page, press
to display the previous page, press
to end help.
HELP
HELP
RECALL
EXIT
1. Guided Source Setup
The Guided Source Setup tutorial provides step-by-step instructions for
quick setup of the projector with the currently selected external source.
Setup may be performed while proceeding through the tutorial.
Notes: 1) During the tutorial,
displays the previous page and
returns you to operation level (this includes when slidebars are displayed).
2) If the display cannot be focused, ensure that the throw distance is correct
(see section 2.2). If the screen distance is correct but the display cannot be
focused, follow the Guided Mechanical Setup tutorial.
RECALL
EXIT
2. Guided Mechanical Setup
The Guided Mechanical Setup tutorial provides step-by-step instructions
for mechanical and optical setup of the projector. This setup is necessary
during initial installation and also when the screen size changes, the
throw distance changes, or the display image does not focus using the
focus control. For more details, refer to section 2.8, Optical Alignment.
3. Source Selection Guide
The Source Selection Guide explains various source selection methods.
4. Keypad Guide
The Keypad Guide explains how to use the keypad.
6. Using Help
Using Help provides instructions on how to use the help system.
3.7
OPERATION
Power-on ➤
To turn on the projector, press
on the keypad. Hold
down for
about one second. If using an IR remote keypad, point the keypad at the
projection screen or the front of the projector. During power-on, the projector proceeds through a series of internal diagnostic tests that last approximately 9 seconds. Once complete, an input image should be displayed on
the projection screen. If no image is displayed, press
to display the
source message. The source message displays the currently selected input.
Check that the correct source is indicated on the display.
POWER
POWER
SOURCE
If there is no display when is pressed, check the LEDs (Light Emitting
Diodes) on the projector back panel. Only the green POWER LED should
be lit. If any of the red diagnostics LEDs are lit, call your dealer for assistance.
Figure 3-3. Rear Panel LEDs
Notes: 1) Allow the projector to warm up for 45 minutes before use. Critical
adjustments should be performed after the warm-up period. 2) Turning the
projector off via a remote or built-in keypad places the projector in a “wait to
operate” mode. To remove power from the projector, unplug the power cord.
Standby Mode ➤
Standby Mode allows you to blank the display and mute the audio output
while keeping the projector in a warmed-up and ready state.
To enter standby mode, hold down
for about one second while at presentation level. The display blanks and audio is muted. Both the green
POWER LED and the yellow
LED are lit. To leave standby mode,
hold down
or
for one second. The display and audio are then
restored and the
LED is turned off.
STBY
STBY
EXIT
Tip: During presentations, the standby feature is useful when you want to direct
audience attention away from the projection screen.
Note: To prolong CRT life, it is recommended that the standby feature be used
when the display is not required.
3.8
OPERATION
Audio ➤
Functions
Mute
The Mute function is used to silence audio output.
To silence the audio output, press
MUTE
. Press
MUTE
again to restore audio.
Volume
The Volume function is used to adjust the audio output level.
To adjust Volume, press
attained.
System Status ➤
Pages
VOL
then
or
until the desired audio level is
The projector’s current operating
settings may be displayed by
pressing while at operation
level. Each time is pressed, one
of three main status pages is displayed. To return to operation
level, press
.
EXIT
Page 1 displays general projector
information and operating settings
which include identity, software
version, date and time, keypad
type, scan configuration, auto
power-up setting, message display
setting, switchers (numbers) connected, installed options, and
mute setting. Operating settings
are explained in the following
entries in this section.
Page 2 displays current input
parameters. These parameters
(defined later in this section),
relate specifically to the currently
selected input.
3.9
OPERATION
Page 3 lists the display settings
currently in use. Note: If the
current setup memory is locked
or an ASI has occurred, the display
settings shown may not be
identical to those stored in the
setup memory.
Notes: To view help pages pertaining
to the status pages and their contents,
press
during status page display.
“Time” does not update on-screen.
HELP
3.3 Source
Selection
The projector includes a built-in RGB input interface to accept a single
input. With optional accessories such as a Multi-standard Decoder, and
the use of one or more external switchers, the number of inputs can be
significantly increased. Because of this large capability, three source selection
methods are available: Input Selection, Direct Channel Selection, and
Up/Down Channel Selection. Sources are selected at operation level.
Notes: 1) For systems with only one or two source connections, direct input selection may be the only method you will use. If your system includes many sources,
all methods will be of interest. 2) Internal sources are also selectable for use during setup and testing. To select an internal source, refer to section 2.10, Memory
Setup, and section 3.7, Utility Features.
Input ➤
Selection
3.10
This method is the most basic of the three source selection methods. A
source is selected by specifying the input to which the source is connected,
defined by a switcher number and slot number. For the purposes of input
selection, the projector is considered to be a type of switcher. Projector and
switcher slots are illustrated in Figures 3-4 and 3-5 on the next page. Each
slot can accept one external input signal for display.
OPERATION
Figure 3-4. Projector Slots
SWITCHER
OUTPUT
MODULE
SWITCHER
CPU
MODULE
Outboard Signal
Switcher
(rear view)
RED
RS-232
IN
SWITCHER
GREEN
1
NUMBER
BLUE
RS-232
OUT
HOR/
COMP
REMOTE
SYNC
120/240V
50/60 HZ
90W
MAX
VERT
SWITCHER
AUDIO OUT
L
R
READY
ERROR
9
8
7
6
Slot
5
4
3
2
Output Module
(to projector)
1
1
CPU
Module
NUMBER
Figure 3-5. Switcher Slots
To select an input:
Press
SOURCE
m
n
at operation level.
where: m = 0 (projector) or 1-9 (switcher 1, 2, ... 9)
n = 1-9 (slot number)
The projector switches to, and displays, the source connected to the input
selected. The projector also uses the display settings previously set in memory
for that input. If the selected input is invalid, a warning message is displayed.
An example of an invalid input might be “0 1” when a switcher is connected
to slot 1 of the projector. Another example of an invalid input would be to
select a switcher which does not physically exist.
Example 1
Slot 1 on the projector has the output from a computer workstation
0 1 .
connected to it. To display the workstation output, press
SOURCE
3.11
OPERATION
INPUT
The workstation output
is connected to
slot 1 of the projector.
SOURCE
Example 2
A single signal switcher is connected to the projector and a computer
is connected to slot 3 of the switcher. To display the computer output,
3 .
1
press
SOURCE
SOURCE
Switcher Number 1
PROJECTOR
ON/OFF
1
STANDBY
2
ELECTROHOME
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
MARQUEE SIGNAL SWITCHER
The switcher output
is connected to
slot 1 of the projector.
INPUT
The computer output
is connected to slot 3
of switcher number 1.
Note: If a switcher is connected to the projector, its inputs can be selected using
the switcher’s front panel push buttons.
Direct Channel ➤
Selection
This method of source selection takes advantage of the Channel List feature
explained in section 3.7, Utility Features. The Channel List allows you to
assign a source to a 2-digit number, from 01 to 99.
Once you have assigned channel numbers to your sources, and the projector
is at operation level, you can select a source by pressing the 2-digit channel
number associated with it.
To select a channel, press
m
n
.
where: m = the 1st digit of the channel number
n = the 2nd digit of the channel number
3.12
OPERATION
The projector switches to, and displays, the source assigned to the channel
number. If an invalid switcher or slot number is assigned to the channel, a
warning message is displayed.
Example
Channel 08 in the Channel List was programmed to select a source connected
to slot 5 on switcher 3. To select this source, simply press 0 8 .
5
4 ) is set
Note: If the Channel Select option in the Preferences menu (
to either “1 digit only “ or “1 or 2 Digits”, the preceding zero shown in the
example above does not have to be entered. For more information, refer to the
Preferences entry in Section 3.7.
UTIL
Up/Down Channel ➤
Selection
This method of source selection also takes advantage of the Channel List
feature. It lets you quickly switch between channels programmed in the
Channel List by using the up and down arrow keys on the keypad.
To make a selection:
Press
SOURCE
followed by
or
.
Each time an arrow key is pressed, a channel number (and name) is displayed
on the screen. When the channel number you want is displayed, simply wait
to allow the projector to switch to the source defined by the channel.
Notes: 1) If a channel specifies a switcher which does not exist, the channel is
considered invalid. 2) The Channel List utility allows you to flag the channels
to be used by the Up/Down Channel selection feature. For more information,
refer to the Channel List entry in section 3.7, Utility Features.
The Source ➤
Message
When
is pressed
or
at operation level, and/or a
source switch is made, a source
message is briefly overlayed on
the projection screen. The
source message displays current
source information.
SOURCE
Channel Number
RECALL
Channel
IBM PC
Input
Recall
ASI
01
Source Name
01
13
S02-R06
Input Number
Recall Memory No.
ASI Message
2 ),
5
Notes: 1) If screen messages are turned off via the Preferences menu (
the source message is not displayed. 2) During input selection or Recall memory
selection (explained later), the message box displays numeric keypad entries as
they occur. In both cases, two digits must be entered. If only one digit is entered,
the message box will remain displayed until a second digit is entered or the
selection is cancelled by pressing
. 3) When an internal source is in use, an
internal source message is displayed.
UTIL
EXIT
3.13
OPERATION
Channel Number
If a channel has been selected, the channel number is displayed; otherwise
this line is blank.
Source Name
If a channel was selected and a source name was defined for it in the
Channel List, the name is displayed here; otherwise this line is blank.
Input Number
The switcher and slot number of the active input is displayed. If the switcher number is 0, the input is on the projector (versus on a switcher). The slot
number may indicate a projector slot or a switcher slot.
If the Input memory for the input is in use and locked, a key icon (
)
is displayed. Setup memories which are locked are not affected by adjustments to display settings. For an explanation of Input memories and locked
memories, refer to section 3.4, Setup Memories.
Recall Memory Number
When a Recall memory is in use, the Recall memory number is displayed;
otherwise this line is blank.
If the Recall memory is locked, a key icon (
) is displayed. Setup
memories which are locked are not affected by display adjustment changes.
For an explanation of Recall memories and locked memories, refer to section
3.4, Setup Memories.
ASI Message
If the ASR feature is set to ON for the Input memory, and an ASI has
occurred, an ASI message is displayed; otherwise this line is blank. The
message indicates which memories were used for interpolation to produce
the current display settings. When this line is visible, adjustments to display
settings will NOT be stored in the current setup memory. For more information about the ASR feature and ASI, refer to the Source Setup entry in
section 3.7, Utility Features.
3.4 Setup
Memories
3.14
The projector has 75 setup memories which store display settings. Multiple
setup memories are needed because display settings are usually different for
different sources. For example, the display settings (brightness, contrast,
convergence, etc.) when using a VCR may be very different than the settings
for a high resolution computer output. When display adjustments are made,
the new settings are automatically saved in one of the projector’s setup
memories.
OPERATION
There are two types of setup memories:
Input and Recall. Both memory types store
the same parameters. The only difference is
that Input memories store display settings
for a particular physical input (e.g., switcher
0, slot 1) while Recall memories can be used
with any input.
At any one time, one setup memory is the
current setup memory. The display settings
in the current setup memory are used for
the current display. When a source is
selected by entering its input number, the
Input memory for the selected input
becomes the current setup memory (unless
ASR is on and is triggered). If a Recall
memory is selected, it becomes the current
setup memory. Display adjustments are
automatically saved in the setup memory
which is current at the time of adjustment
(unless the setup memory is locked –
explained later).
Input Memories ➤
Recall Memories ➤
As mentioned above, Input memories store
display settings for each physical input (i.e.,
switcher 0, slot 1). When an input becomes
the current setup memory, its display
settings are used (unless ASR is on and is
triggered). If the input is being selected for
the first time, a new Input memory is created.
Recall memories provide an alternative to using the display settings stored in
the Input memory of the selected source. For example, you may want to
temporarily disconnect a computer connected to the projector’s RGB input
and in its place, connect another computer with different signal characteristics. Since the connection is only temporary you don’t want to change the
display settings stored in the Input memory. Instead, you can select a Recall
memory which has the settings you want for the new input.
If there are many devices which will be sharing the same input, many Recall
memories can be created to store the display settings for each. On the other
hand, if there are many sources on different inputs with exactly the same
signal characteristics, it may be possible for them to share the same Recall
memory.
Recall memories are identified by a two digit number. Any number from
01 to 99 can be assigned, although only 75 memory spaces exist.
3.15
OPERATION
To select or create a Recall memory:
Press
RECALL
m
n
.
where: m = the 1st digit of the Recall memory number
n = the 2nd digit of the Recall memory number
0 1 . Recall memory
For example, to select Recall memory 01, press
01 will then be the current setup memory and its settings will be used for
the currently selected source. If this is the first time that the Recall memory
number is used, a new Recall memory is created. Any display adjustments
you make will be stored in the Recall memory.
RECALL
Memory ➤
Allocation
Locking Setup ➤
Memories
Each time a setup memory is selected the projector checks its memory bank
to see if the selected memory exists. If it does exist, it uses the memory and
its display settings. If it does not exist, a small portion of memory is allocated for the new setup. Space is available for up to 75 setup memories. When
the last space is used up, a warning message is displayed. If this happens, call
for servicing to delete memories which you no longer use to make room for
new memories.
Setup memories may be locked or unlocked. Locking a setup memory prevents adjustments to display settings from being saved in that memory. For
example, if Recall memory 08 is locked and selected, then brightness is
adjusted, the new brightness setting is only temporary. If the setup memory
is then reselected, the original brightness setting will be restored.
Note: When a locked setup memory is selected, a key icon (
in the Source Message.
) is displayed
To lock or unlock the current setup memory, select option 3 from the
3 ). Option 3 indicates the current setting.
1
Source Setup menu (
UTIL
3.5 Display
Adjustments
This section describes the projector’s display adjustment functions. To access
all display functions, a full function keypad is required. If you are using the
IRIQ, only the primary display functions are available. There are four types of
display adjustment functions: Primary, Picture, Geometry, and Convergence.
• Primary Display functions include Brightness, Contrast, Detail, Color
and Tint. These functions are accessed directly from the keypad.
• Picture functions are used to adjust display settings that affect the projected
image. These functions include Position, Size, White Balance, Focus, Sync,
Blanking, Clamping, Retrace, and Decoding. Picture functions are accessed
via the Picture menu which is selected by pressing
on the keypad.
PIC
3.16
OPERATION
• Geometry functions adjust geometric distortions of the
NORMAL
display such as its size, keystone, pincushion, bow,
ADJUSTMENT
linearity, and skew. Access Geometry functions via
SEQUENCE
the Geometry menu – press
on the keypad.
GEOM
• Convergence is used to align the red, green, and blue
color components of the image. It is described in
section 3.6, Convergence Registration.
Most adjustment functions, when selected, display a
slidebar overlayed on the source image. The slidebar
displays the current setting and indicates which arrow
keys to use for making the adjustment. Adjustment
settings are stored in the current setup memory (Input
or Recall). There are two exceptions: 1) If the current
setup memory is locked, new adjustment settings are
shown but not stored; they are discarded when another
setup memory is selected. 2) If ASR is on for the current
input and an ASI is performed, the settings are only
temporary and are not saved in the current setup memory.
For new images, where much adjustment is required,
it is recommended that adjustments be made using the
sequence illustrated above. When making picture or
geometry adjustments, follow the sequence displayed
in the adjustment menu.
UNADJUSTED
IMAGE
Primary
Adjustments
Picture
Adjustments
Geometry
Adjustments
Convergence
Registration
FULLY
ADJUSTED
IMAGE
Tip: When making many picture or geometry adjustments, press
after each
adjustment to return the cursor back to its previous menu item position.
ENTER
Primary Display ➤
Adjustments
Brightness
The Brightness function is used to adjust the black level of the image.
To adjust brightness, press
then or . If video or data is displayed
with a black background, adjust until the background just disappears
(black becomes a very dark grey).
BRITE
Note: If room lighting changes, it may be necessary to re-adjust brightness.
Contrast
The Contrast function is used to adjust the contrast between the light and
dark areas of the display image.
To adjust contrast, press
then or . If contrast is set too high, the
image loses detail and clarity. If set too low, it may be difficult to distinguish
between foreground and background information.
CONT
3.17
OPERATION
Notes: 1) For best results, adjust brightness before contrast. 2) If room lighting
changes, it may be necessary to re-adjust contrast and brightness. 3) An excessively
high contrast level can reduce the life of the CRTs.
Detail
The Detail function is used to adjust the picture sharpness of video signals
when using the optional Multi-standard Decoder. It has no effect on an
RGB input.
To adjust detail, press
then or until the sharpest display is attained.
Detail level should be roughly proportional to input signal quality. Higher
levels of detail improve good quality signals. Lower levels of detail reduce
noise in poor quality signals.
DETAIL
Color
1)
The Color function is used to adjust color saturation levels when using
the optional Multi-standard Decoder. It has no effect on an RGB input.
To adjust color, press
then or until the desired color saturation level is displayed. If Color is set to a 0% level, the result will be a
black and white picture. If Color is set too high, the color levels in the
picture will be over-powering.
COLOR
2)
The Color function also allows you to turn on or off the red, green
and/or blue color components of the picture.
Press
followed by a
number (n) to select the color
components you want turned
on. The chart shown here shows
the selection variations.
COLOR
n
COLORS
TURNED ON
n
COLORS
TURNED ON
1
2
3
4
red
green
blue
red & green
5
6
7
8
green & blue
red & blue
none
all
Tint
The Tint function is used to adjust color hue to obtain true color reproduction
of NTSC signals when using the optional Multi-standard Decoder. It has no
effect on an RGB input.
To adjust tint, press
then or until an optimum display is attained. It
is best to adjust tint while displaying an image with natural flesh tones.
TINT
Note: Tint is not adjustable for PAL or SECAM video sources.
3.18
OPERATION
Picture Functions ➤
Picture functions are accessed through the Picture
menu. To display this menu, press .
PIC
PIC
1
Position
The Position function is used to move the
picture up, down, left, or right within the picture
display area.
To adjust position, select Position from the Picture
menu. Two slidebars are displayed: a Horizontal
Position slidebar and a Vertical Position slidebar. Press , , or to
move the picture in the direction of the arrows so that the entire picture is
visible and centered.
Note: If the picture cannot be made entirely visible, an adjustment to blanking
or retrace time may be required; refer to the blanking and retrace entries in
this section.
PIC
2
Size
The Size function is used to adjust the horizontal and vertical size of the display image. (This adjustment is also available through the Geometry menu.)
To adjust size, select Size from the Picture menu. Two slidebars are diplayed:
a Horizontal Size slidebar and a Vertical Size slidebar. Press or to adjust
vertical size and or to adjust horizontal size until the objects within
your picture have the proper shape. For example, if there is a circle in your
picture, size should be adjusted so that the circle is round, not oval.
Note: The Size function should not be used to compensate for aspect ratio mismatches between source images and the projection screen. Not all sources use the
same aspect ratio therefore it may not always be possible to fill the entire screen.
(“Aspect Ratio” is defined in Appendix A).
PIC
3
White Balance
The White Balance function is used to select or adjust the color temperature
(or shade) of white used by the projector. For most applications, the white
balance setting set by the factory is satisfactory.
To select or adjust the white balance, select White
Balance from the Picture menu. From the White
Balance menu, select item 1, 2 or 3 to use a standard color temperature. Select option 4 to use the
service adjusted user setting. Select option 5 to
make a custom white balance adjustment. The
current selection is indicated by a check mark. If
option 5 is selected, a White Balance slidebar is
displayed. Press or to adjust white balance.
0% is 3200K, 50% is 6500K, and 100% is 9300K.
3.19
OPERATION
PIC
4
Focus
The Focus function is used to adjust the electrical focus of the combined
red, green, and blue color components.
To adjust focus, select Focus from the Picture menu then use and until
the center of the display appears the sharpest. If the displayed image cannot
be adequately focused, a service adjustment to the electrical focus may be
required or an optical focus adjustment is necessary. Refer to the section
2.8, Optical Alignment for optical focus instructions.
PIC
5
Sync (Fast/Slow)
The Sync function is used to minimize horizontal jittering, “flag waving”
or tearing at the top of the display image. This effect sometimes occurs
when the source is a VCR or video signal. The function changes the
synchronization mode of the projector from fast to slow, or slow to fast.
To toggle between fast and slow sync, select item 5 from the Picture menu.
Item 5 indicates the current synchronization mode.
PIC
6
Blanking (Top/Bottom/Left/Right)
The Blanking selection item is used to hide or blank out unwanted information or noise at the top, bottom, left, or right of the display image. Blanking
adjustments may be required when the source is a VCR or video signal.
To adjust blanking, select Blanking from the Picture menu.
From the Blanking menu, select item 1, 2, 3 or 4 to adjust
the amount of blanking at the top, bottom, left, or right of
the display (respectively). A blanking slidebar is displayed for
each adjustment. A 0% level on the slidebar indicates no
blanking. For top and bottom adjustments, use and to
adjust the amount of blanking. For left and right adjustments,
use and to adjust the amount of blanking. After completing each
adjustment, press
to return to the Blanking menu, or press
to
return to the picture.
ENTER
PIC
7
EXIT
Auto Clamp (On/Off)
The Auto Clamp function is used to turn automatic signal clamping on or
off. For most input signals, auto clamp should be on. However, if one or
more of the red, green, or blue color components is abnormally bright, turn
auto clamp off. An abnormally bright color component can occur if the
input signal contains more than one sync type (e.g., both sync on green, and
composite sync). If you are using a composite video source with ASR and
are connected to an RGB interface, turn the Auto Clamp off.
To toggle auto clamp on or off, select item 7 from the Picture menu. Item 7
indicates the current Auto Clamp setting.
3.20
OPERATION
PIC
8
Retrace (Short/Long)
This function is used to set the projector’s horizontal retrace time. Retrace
time affects the width and display of the picture. A short retrace time may
be required if information is missing or “cut off ” at the left or right sides of
the picture. A long retrace time may be desired if the picture is significantly
smaller than the raster.
To toggle between short and long retrace, select item 8 from the Picture
menu. Item 8 indicates the current retrace setting.
Notes: 1) Check phase, left blanking, and right blanking from the Picture
menu before changing retrace time. 2) Long retrace is not available at all
scan frequencies.
PIC
9
Decoder Options
The Decoder Options menu item allows you to control the operation of
the optional Multi-standard Decoder.
To modify decoder operation, select Decoder
Options from the Picture menu. From the Decoder
Options menu, select item 1 to set the decoding
method to use for the current source signal input to
the decoder. Select item 2 to set the routing of the
current source signal within the projector.
Video Standard
When item 1 is selected from the Decoder Options
menu, the Video Standard menu is displayed. It
contains up to eight video standard options: Autodetect, NTSC 3.58, NTSC 4.43, PAL, SECAM and,
depending on which version of the decoder is installed,
three more PAL options (see right). The current option
is indicated by a check mark. Auto-detect is the default.
When “Auto-detect” is selected, the decoder automatically determines the video standard of the input signal
and processes it accordingly. Alternatively, you can
force the decoder to use a particular decoding method
by selecting one of the other menu options. This should
only be necessary for poor quality input signals.
3.21
OPERATION
Signal Routing
When item 2 is selected from the Decoder
Options menu, the Signal Routing menu is
displayed. It contains four signal routing options:
Auto-detect, As Composite, As S-Video, and As
RGB. The current selection is indicated by a check
mark. Auto-detect is the default. When “Autodetect” is the selected option, the projector determines whether the input signal requires routing
through the decoder according to the type of
interface used. For example, if the source is an RGB input connected to
the RGB interface, the signal will bypass the decoder since video decoding
is not required. However, if the input is a composite signal connected to a
composite/S-video interface, the projector will route the signal through the
decoder for processing.
If “As Composite” is the selected option, the projector assumes the
input signal is composite video and processes it through the decoder. If
“As S-Video” is the selected option, the projector expects the input signal
in the form of separate Y and C signals. If “As RGB” is the selected option,
the projector assumes the signal at the current input is always RGB and the
decoder is bypassed. One reason for not using Auto-detect is to allow connection of a composite or S-Video signal to a standard RGB interface and
still have the projector process the input correctly through an installed
decoder; otherwise, a composite/S-video interface would be required. Figure
3-6 illustrates the connection of a composite or S-Video signal to an RGB
input (the projector’s built-in RGB input is shown as an example).
Figure 3-6. Connection of Composite Video or S-Video to RGB Input
(Multi-Standard Decoder Option Required)
3.22
OPERATION
About the Sync Routing System
The Sync Routing System allows various sync and video combinations
to be made to the Input 01 or 02 on the Video Input Module. You can
connect Video signals with Separate sync (R-G-B-H/C-V), Composite sync
(R-G-B-H/C) or Sync-On-Green (R-Gs-B).
As well, the routing system allows Composite Video signals to be connected
through the Green BNC and routed to the Marquee Decoder as long as the
Recall (or Input) memory assigned to the Composite Video source is set for
routing as Composite Video. From the PIC menu, select “Signal Routing”
(item 9), then select “As Composite” (item 2) in order to force the routing
to the Marquee Decoder.
Similarly, the system allows you to connect S-Video (Y/C) signals to the Red
(for Y) and Blue (for C) BNCs, where they are routed to the Marquee
Decoder if the Recall (or Input) memory assigned to the S-Video source is
set for routing as S-Video. From the PIC menu, select “Signal Routing”
(item 9). Then select “As S-Video” (item 3) in order to force the routing to
the Marquee Decoder.
The IC at the U41 location on the Video Input Module (VIM) determines
the priority and routing of incoming and outgoing sync. The VIM also
includes Sync-On-Green circuitry which strips sync information from signals
connected to the Green BNC. The IC then outputs the appropriate sync
from the VIM to the Deflection Processor Board (DPB), which locks the
operating frequency of the projector to the sync it receives. Set “Auto Clamp”
in one of two ways, as described below.
1) If the routing is set to either “As Composite” or “As S-Video”, setting
“Auto Clamp” to “On” routes the sync to the DPB from the Decoder.
This setting is required for S-Video to operate properly. It also allows
Composite Video to operate. Setting “Auto Clamp” to “Off ” routes the
sync to the DPB from the Sync-On-Green circuitry. This is valid for
Composite Video operation only, since the Composite Video is connected
to the Green BNC. (NOTE: If using a Composite Video source with
ASR, “Auto Clamp” must be set to "off. This is required for source change
detection which is an integral part of ASR operation. When “Auto
Clamp” is set to “Off ”, you must set the “Horiz Position” slidebar to
approximately 25. This is due to a phase delay between the sync from the
decoder and the sync from the Sync-On-Green circuitry.)
2) In all other cases – that is, when NOT routing the signal to the
decoder – setting “Auto Clamp” to “On” results in back-porch
clamping. If Sync-Tip clamping is required, set “Auto Clamp” to “Off.”
3.23
OPERATION
Geometry ➤
Functions
Geometry functions are accessed through the Geometry
menu. To display this menu, press
.
GEOM
Note: It is usually easier to adjust display geometry while
a test pattern ( ) is displayed.
GEOM
1
Size
The Size function is used to adjust the horizontal and
vertical size of the display image. (This adjustment is
also available through the Picture menu).
To adjust size, select Size from the Geometry menu. Two slidebars are displayed: a Horizontal Size slidebar and a Vertical Size slidebar. Press or
to adjust vertical size, and or to adjust horizontal size until the objects
within your picture have the proper shape. For example, if there is a circle in
your picture, size should be adjusted so that the circle is round, not oval.
Note: The Size function should not be used to compensate for aspect ratio mismatches between source images and the projection screen. Not all sources use the
same aspect ratio therefore it may not always be possible to fill the entire screen.
(“Aspect Ratio” is defined in Appendix A).
GEOM
2
Keystone
The Keystone function adjusts side keystone geometry distortion. Adjust
keystone to change the width at the top of the display in relation to the
width at the bottom. The displays below demonstrate keystone adjustment.
To adjust keystone, select Keystone from
the Geometry menu then press or to
adjust the top and bottom widths of the
display as desired.
GEOM
3
Side Pin
The Side Pincushion function adjusts pincushion of the sides of the display
image.
The two displays shown below demonstrate side pincushion adjustment.
To adjust side pincushion, select Side Pin
from the Geometry menu then press
or
until the sides of the image are
as curved or as straight as desired.
3.24
OPERATION
GEOM
4
Top
The Top function adjusts the level (Top Key)
and pincushion (Top Pin) of the top half of
the display image. The four displays shown
here demonstrate Top adjustments.
To stretch the upper left or right corner up
or down, select Top from the Geometry menu
and press or . To adjust top pincushion,
press or until the top half of the image
is as curved or as straight as desired.
GEOM
5
Bottom
The Bottom function adjusts the level
(Bottom Key) and pincushion (Bottom
Pin) of the bottom half of the display image.
The four displays shown at right demonstrate
Bottom adjustments.
To stretch the lower left or right corner up or
down, select Bottom from the Geometry menu
and press or . To adjust bottom pincushion,
press or until the bottom half of the image
is as curved or as straight as desired.
GEOM
6
Bow
The Bow function adjusts horizontal bowing
(H Bow) across an image. It also adjusts
vertical curvature (V Bow) in the middle
of the picture. The four displays at right
demonstrate H Bow and V Bow adjustments.
To adjust H bow, select Bow from the
Geometry menu then press or until
the image appears as desired. To adjust V Bow,
press or until the center of the picture is
as curved or as straight as desired.
3.25
OPERATION
GEOM
7
C Linearity
The C Linearity function corrects for gradual non-linearity between the top
and bottom or left and right sides of the display image. Examples are shown
below. In the first example the top of the image increases in vertical size
while the bottom decreases in vertical size. In the second example the right
side of the image increases in horizontal size while the left side decreases in
horizontal size.
Select C Linearity from the Geometry menu. H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H
H H H H H HHH
It is best to have a screen full of characters
HHHHHHHHH
H H H H H HHH
HHHHHHHHH
displayed. Or use one of the internal test
HHHHHHHHH
H H H H H HHH
H H H H H HHH
patterns available by pressing # . If there is
a vertical non-linearity, press or until
the characters at the top, middle, and bottom of the screen have the same
vertical size. If there is a horizontal non-linearity, press or until
the characters at the left, middle, and right of the screen have the same
horizontal size.
HHHHHHHHH
H H H H H H H H H
GEOM
8
S Linearity
The S Linearity function corrects for vertical and horizontal non-linearities
which extend from the center of the display to the top and bottom or left
and right. Examples are shown below. Notice how the top and bottom or
left and right characters are much smaller in size than the center characters.
Select S Linearity from the Geometry menu.
H HHHHHHH H
HHHHHHHHH
H HHHHHHH H
It is best to have a screen full of characters
HHHHHHHHH
H HHHHHHH H
displayed. Or use one of the internal test
HHHHHHHHH
H HHHHHHH H
H HHHHHHH H
patterns available by pressing # . If there is
a vertical non-linearity, press or until
the characters at the top, middle, and bottom of the screen have the same
vertical size. If there is a horizontal non-linearity, press or until
the characters at the left, middle, and right of the screen have the same
horizontal size.
H H H H H H H H H
HHHHHHHHH
HHHHHHHHH
H H H H H H H H H
GEOM
9
Skew
The Skew function adjusts the display image so that the sides of an image
appear to be leaning to one side and/or shifted up or down. The two displays
below demonstrate skew adjustment.
To adjust H Skew, select Skew from the
Geometry menu then use and until
the image is slanted from side to side as
desired. For V Skew, press or to slant
up or down.
3.26
OPERATION
3.6 Convergence
Registration
Convergence Registration is the process of aligning the red, green, and blue
color components on the projection screen. The projector’s convergence system provides accurate color registration in 45 discrete convergence zones configured in a 9 by 5 array on the projection screen. Since the projector must
converge colors differently for each source (due to varying scan frequencies),
convergence settings are saved for each input. Convergence settings can also
be saved in Recall memories.
There are three basic convergence methods available: Guided, Interpolated,
and Random Access. Any one of these can be selected for performing a
registration adjustment. All are easy to use and context-sensitive help is
available if needed. With the ACON feature, the convergence process is
completely automated. ACON provides fast, accurate convergence, and
is especially helpful when many inputs must be converged, or when the
projector installation position frequently changes.
To perform a convergence:
Begin by selecting the input source to be
converged. Convergence settings will be saved
in the current setup memory. Next, press
to display the Convergence menu. Select
one of the convergence options from the menu.
Guided Convergence provides a complete
guided convergence of the red and blue images
onto the green image in all 45 convergence
zones. Use this option if the image requires
minor convergence alignment and you wish
to be guided through the 45 convergence zones.
CONV
Interpolated Convergence provides a complete convergence similar to
Guided but is recommended when the image requires major convergence
alignment (and should be used the first time a source is converged).
Random Access Convergence allows you to converge a particular area of the
display. Any zone may be quickly selected and converged. This option also
allows convergence of the blue on the red image (if preferred to the normal
blue on green).
CON
ACON is a feature that provides fast, accurate automatic convergence in
all 45 convergence zones. Minimal user intervention is required. If the
projector does not include ACON, item 4 in the menu reads “ACON
(not installed).”
The Service selection is used to access the convergence service utilities.
These utilities are provided for qualified service personnel only. (Password
access is required).
3.27
OPERATION
The following options are available while performing any of the manual
convergence routines:
Convergence on Image
When a convergence method is first selected, an internally generated
crosshatch test pattern is displayed. Alternatively, you may override the
use of the test pattern and have the external image displayed. Press # to
cycle to the external image.
Convergence Reset
During convergence, the following reset options are available:
• Press
• Press
• Press
0
1
2
to reset red and blue convergence – static and dynamic.
to reset red and blue convergence – static only.
to reset red and blue convergence – dynamic only.
“Static” refers to the complete image. “Dynamic” refers to a zonal area.
Note: Allow the projector to warm up for at least forty five minutes prior to
convergence registration.
Guided ➤
Convergence
Press 1 from the Convergence menu to select Guided Convergence. An
internally generated crosshatch is displayed for the alignment. Initially, a red
and green crosshatch is displayed and a rectangular box surrounds the center
convergence zone. Use , , , and to move the red onto the green in
the zone. Press
to similarly move the blue onto the green. These first
two adjustments adjust the position of the red and blue images with respect
to the green over the entire screen (static adjustments). The adjustments to
follow (dynamic), modify color positioning within individual zones.
ENTER
Press
to move the rectangular box to the next convergence zone. Again,
use the arrow keys to adjust the red on the green. Press
to adjust the
blue on the green.
ENTER
ENTER
3.28
OPERATION
Within each zone, a central control point defines the position of each color
within the zone. You will notice that the center position within the box is
most sensitive to the adjustment. This is where the control point is located.
Continue using
to move to the next zone/color for adjustment. If you
wish to go back to a previous zone, press . Once all 45 zones have been
converged an Exit dialog box is displayed, as shown below. If you wish to
exit prior to converging all 45 zones,
will immediately display the Exit
dialog box.
ENTER
EXIT
Note:
CONV
may be used instead of
ENTER
to change zones/colors, if preferred.
When the Exit dialog box is first displayed,
the cursor bar is positioned on “Save.” Press
,
or
to save the new settings. To
re-perform the convergence, move the cursor
bar to “Continue Adjust” then press
. To discard your changes, move
the cursor bar to “No Save” then press
,
or
.
ENTER
EXIT
RECALL
ENTER
ENTER
Interpolated ➤
Convergence
EXIT
RECALL
Press 2 from the Convergence Menu to select Interpolated Convergence.
Interpolated Convergence is performed in the same way as that described for
Guided convergence. The primary difference between Guided Convergence
and Interpolated Convergence is noticed during adjustment. In Interpolated
convergence, adjustments are not limited to single zones, but will affect larger
regions of the raster. Response is greatest within the displayed box and
decreases linearity towards zones which have already been converged in the
sequence. Interpolated convergence is recommended when converging a
source for the first time. This method can be much faster than guided convergence. However, it is not recommended if only minor convergence alignment
is required.
3.29
OPERATION
Random Access ➤
Convergence
Press 3 from the Convergence menu to
select Random Access Convergence. A red
and green crosshatch is displayed with a
rectangular box at the center zone. Above
the box, “CONV” indicates that the zone
is ready for convergence. Use the arrow
keys to move the red onto the green within
the box. This affects the position of the red
with respect to the green over the entire
screen (static convergence).
To change the convergence
color, press
. Each
press of the Color key
changes the color as shown.
SEQUENCE
Press:
COLOR
1.
2.
3.
4.
COLOR
COLOR again
COLOR again
COLOR again
To move to another control
point, press
. The
caption above the box changes to “MOVE.”
Use the arrow keys to move to another
zone for convergence. Press
to
converge the zone. When all zones
requiring adjustment are converged, press
to display the Exit dialog box. Press
to save the new convergence settings.
To go back to the convergence screen,
move the cursor bar to “Continue Adjust”,
then press
. To discard your changes,
select “No Save.”
CONV
REFERENCE
COLOR
CONVERGENCE
COLOR
green
blue
red
blue
a white crosshatch for reference
repeat starting at green-red
ENTER
ENTER
CONV
EXIT
ENTER
ENTER
Note:
may be used instead of
functions, if preferred.
CONV
3.30
ENTER
to alternate between converge and move
OPERATION
ACON Automatic ➤
Convergence
CON
Press 4 from the Convergence Menu to display
the ACON Auto-Convergence Menu. The menu
displays five ACON options for selection and
shows the most recent ACON status message
(if there is one).
Note: The ACON Auto-Convergence Menu is
available only if the ACON module is installed.
Before using ACON for the first time it is important to understand how
ACON operates. ACON consists of two primary components; a Locator
Assembly, normally mounted to the front of the projector, and an ACON
Control Board, located inside the projector. The Locator Assembly includes a
photosensor which, via two stepper motors, can monitor any point on the display screen. The ACON Control Board controls the viewing position of the
photosensor. During automatic convergence, small red, green, and blue targets
are displayed for viewing by the photosensor. Data from the photosensor is
analyzed and convergence adjustments are made accordingly. The lens of the
Locator Assembly can be observed to move about as each convergence zone is
analyzed and adjusted. No user intervention is required.
WARNING: IN RARE INSTANCES, FLASHING LIGHTS CAN TRIGGER
AN EPILEPTIC SEIZURE. DURING ACON OPERATION PERSONS
WITH EPILEPSY SHOULD NOT WATCH THE SCREEN.
Automatic Convergence – Full, Touchup, and Center Only
Options 1, 2 and 3 in the ACON Auto-Convergence Menu provide selection of three automatic convergence routines; ACON (full), ACON
(touchup), and ACON (center only). If the image has never been converged
or is poorly converged, select option 1, ACON (full). If the image has been
previously converged and only minor touch-up is required, select option 2,
ACON (touchup). If the red or blue image has shifted position and is not
registered with the green, select option 3, ACON (center only).
Note: It is important to have a good lighting environment when using ACON.
Dimmed incandescent lighting is preferred over fluorescent lighting. Avoid shadows
on the screen.
3.31
OPERATION
When ACON (full) is selected, ACON
converges the red and blue to the green
at all 45 convergence zones. As each zone
is converged, surrounding zones are also
adjusted by ACON’s proprietary
interpolation software. This software
provides fast, accurate convergence
adjustment of poorly converged images.
During automatic convergence you will
notice a small red, green, or blue square
briefly displayed at each zone location.
It is at that time that ACON is analyzing
and adjusting the convergence. Full
automatic convergence takes
approximately three minutes to complete.
ACON (touchup) also converges at all 45
convergence zones. It is different than
ACON (full) in that as each zone is
converged, surrounding zones are not
affected. It is faster than full auto-convergence and provides optimal convergence
alignment when only minor adjustment is
required.
When ACON (center only) is selected,
the full red and blue image positions are
adjusted based on the misconvergence at
the center of the display.
Red and/or blue images
are poorly convergerged
over the entire screen.
Select option 1, ACON (full).
The image is slightly mis-converged.
Select option 2, ACON (touchup).
Complete red and/or blue
images have shifted from
the green image
Select option 3, ACON (center only).
When convergence is complete, an Exit dialog box is
displayed with the cursor bar positioned on “Save.”
To save the new convergence settings, press
,
or
. To discard the changes, move the cursor bar
to “No Save” then press
,
or
.
ENTER
EXIT
RECALL
ENTER
EXIT
RECALL
Error Messages
If ACON encounters a problem which it cannot resolve,
processing halts and an error message is displayed. If
you encounter an error message, refer to section 4.3,
Troubleshooting for assistance. If you are unsure how
to resolve the problem, contact your dealer. To return to the previous convergence settings, press
or
with the cursor bar positioned on “No
Save”; otherwise, move the cursor bar to “Save” then press
or
.
ENTER
EXIT
ENTER
3.32
EXIT
OPERATION
Interrupting ACON
If you want to interrupt ACON during an automatic convergence, press
. Shortly thereafter
an Exit dialog box will be displayed with the
cursor bar positioned on “No Save.” To quit
ACON and discard the convergence adjustments made up until that point,
press
or
. To quit ACON yet retain the new convergence settings,
move the cursor bar to “Save” then press
or
(to examine the convergence quality, press # to display a crosshatch). To return to ACON, move
the cursor bar to “Continue ACON” then press
or
.
EXIT
ENTER
EXIT
ENTER
EXIT
ENTER
EXIT
Learn Screen – Auto, Manual
Options 4 and 5 in the ACON Auto-Convergence menu allow you to
perform an ACON Learn Screen. A Learn Screen must be performed prior
to automatic convergence so that ACON knows the exact screen position,
relative to the Locator Assembly. Learn Screen is usually required only once
for each new installation. A Learn Screen MUST be performed when one of
the following conditions exist:
• The throw distance has changed since the last Learn Screen.
• The ACON Locator Assembly mounting position has changed
since the last time Learn Screen was performed.
• The screen type or size has changed.
• The source has changed.
Before performing a Learn Screen, make sure the projector is fully set up
and adjusted for the installation. It is important that all focus and geometry
adjustments have been made.
Two Learn Screen options are available: Manual Learn Screen and Auto
Learn Screen. Manual Learn Screen (menu option 5) is the preferred
method for performing a Learn Screen; it requires some user assistance but
assures the best possible Learn Screen. Auto Learn Screen, which requires no
user assistance, works well in installations where ACON can easily determine the screen limits. The screen limits may be difficult for ACON to
determine if the installation is a rear screen, the ambient light conditions are
poor, or the top the screen meets the ceiling. If an Auto Learn Screen was
used but ACON had difficulty determining the screen limits, the quality of
subsequent convergences will be affected – especially near the screen edges
and corners. Until you have experience using ACON for the installation, it
is recommended that Manual Learn Screen be used; the time required to
perform a Manual Learn Screen is typically less than sixty seconds.
When Manual Learn Screen is selected, a screen similar to that shown below
(left diagram) is displayed. Use , , and to move the four black bars
to the outside edges of the screen. Initially, the arrow keys control the top
and left bars, as indicated by the bottom line of the text box. To move the
right and bottom bars, press
then use the arrow keys.
ENTER
3.33
OPERATION
Move bars to
until
move
outside
bars edge of
Manual
box
fits Learn
insideScreen
screen border.
Move bars to
until
move
outside
bars edge of
Manual
box
fits Learn
insideScreen
screen border.
<ENTER> to select bars to move
<ENTER> to select bars to move
<CONV> to do Learn Screen
<CONV> to do Learn Screen
Current Bars: Top/Left
Current Bars: Top/Left
For each bar position being adjusted, watch the bar width as it moves closer
to the screen edge. If the bar starts to overlap the screen border and reduce
in width, move it back one increment so that it is displayed in its entirety. If
the bar is as far as it will go and it is displayed in its entirety, leave it at that
position. If you notice a geometry distortion during Learn Screen, such as
keystone or pincushion, use
to correct it.
GEOM
When all bars have been adjusted, press
to continue with the Learn
Screen operation. The remainder of the Learn Screen process is handled
automatically by ACON. Wait until it is complete, at which time the
ACON Auto-Convergence Menu is returned.
CONV
If an error occurs during either of the Learn Screen functions, processing
halts and an error message is displayed. Refer to section 4.3, Troubleshooting,
for assistance. Also, if during a Learn Screen you want to interrupt ACON,
press
. Shortly thereafter an Exit dialog box will be displayed. Follow the
screen instructions to exit or continue.
EXIT
3.7 Utility Features
The projector’s utility features allow you to
customize operation of the projector to suit
your application and preferences. To access
these features, press
. The Utilities menu
is displayed.
UTIL
Item 1, Source Setup, provides utilities for
setup memory manipulation and selection
of internal sources.
Item 2, Channel List, allows you to
program the Channel List.
Item 3, Recall Memories, displays a listing of the Recall memories stored in
the projector.
Item 4, Input Memories, displays a listing of the Input memories stored in
the projector.
3.34
OPERATION
Item 5, Preferences, lets you set various operational settings which affect
the behavior of the projector, according to your preferences.
Item 6, Remote Control Options, allows you to modify the projector’s
communication settings for communication with external control devices
such as remote keypads.
Item 7, Clock/Events, allows you to set the projector’s real-time clock/
calender and program up to twelve individual projector control events to
be automatically executed at specified times or intervals.
Item 9, Service, provides service utilities for use by authorized service
personnel. (Password access is required.)
Source Setup ➤
UTIL
1
1
Source Setup utilities are accessed by
pressing 1 from the Utilities menu. Six
source related utilities are available.
Copy Setup
The Copy Setup utility is used to copy
stored display settings from one setup
memory to another. When a copy is made,
the originating memory remains unchanged
and the destination memory is overwritten
with the settings of the originating memory.
To copy a setup memory, press 1 from the Source
Setup menu. A dialog box is displayed. Enter the
setup memory you want to copy from and the
setup memory you want to copy to. Input
memories are entered by pressing
followed
by a switcher and slot number. Recall memories
are entered by pressing
followed by a two
digit Recall memory number (01 to 99).
SOURCE
RECALL
UTIL
1
1
Copy Setup
From:
S 1 2
To:
R 5 6
Press <ENTER> to copy
Once complete, press
to proceed with the copy. A “Copy Complete”
message is briefly displayed to indicate a successful copy. When you are finished copying setup memories, press
to return to operation level.
ENTER
EXIT
UTIL
1
2
ASI with Save
ASI (Automatic Source Interpolation) is a feature which automatically
adjusts display settings based on the settings of other setup memories stored
in the projector. The “ASI with Save” utility performs an immediate ASI on
the current source and saves the resulting display settings in the current
setup memory. The new settings are created by either copying the settings
from another setup memory which has matching scan frequencies or by
3.35
OPERATION
interpolating between “the two closest” setup memories. This feature is very
useful when adding a new source to the system and/or when much adjustment is required. By using the “ASI with Save” feature, the projector can do
most of the required adjustments for you.
To perform an “ASI with Save”, press 2 from the
Source Setup menu. A dialog box is displayed.
Press to move the cursor bar to “Do It” then
press
. New display settings will immediately be
calculated and saved in the current setup memory.
The only exception is when the current setup
memory is locked. If locked, display settings will not be modified. If
“Cancel” is selected from the dialog box, the operation is stopped. For
more information about the ASI logic process, refer to Appendix C,
ASR/ASI Logic Diagrams.
ENTER
Notes about the ASI feature ...
ASI works better when there are many setup memories in the system.
For example, if you always use the same input and you never use Recall
memories (thus only one setup memory has ever been created), ASI will
not be effective. However, if many Input and Recall memories have been
used and adjusted for a variety of sources, the projector has more “knowledge” in its database for performing an ASI. As this “knowledge” increases,
ASI accuracy improves.
UTIL
1
3
Current Setup (Locked/Unlocked)
This utility allows you to lock or unlock the current setup memory. Locking
a setup memory prevents changes to display settings from being saved in
that memory. For example, if a locked Recall memory is selected and then
brightness is adjusted, the new brightness setting is only temporary. If the
Recall memory is reselected, the original brightness setting will be restored.
Note: When a locked setup memory is selected, a key icon (
in the Source Message.
) is displayed
To lock or unlock the current setup memory, press 3 from the Source Setup
menu. Item 3 in the menu indicates the current setting.
UTIL
1
4
ASR (On/Off)
The ASR (Automatic Source Recall) feature provides automatic Recall
memory selection or ASI (Automatic Source Interpolation) for inputs
which have ASR set to On.
To turn ASR on or off for the current input, press 4 from the Source
Setup menu. Item 4 in the menu indicates the current setting.
3.36
OPERATION
When ASR is on, the projector monitors the current input for horizontal
and vertical scan frequency changes. When a frequency change occurs, the
current Input memory and all Recall memories are scanned in search of a
memory with matching scan frequencies. If one exists, this memory
becomes the current setup memory. If a matching memory is not found, an
ASI is performed. ASI automatically adjusts display settings based on the
settings of other setup memories stored in the projector. The new settings
created by ASI are either a copy of the settings from another setup memory
which has matching scan frequencies or an interpolation between “the two
closest” setup memories.
ASR is also performed when:
•
•
•
•
You switch to an input which has ASR set to On.
You select a Recall memory and ASR is set to On for the current input.
A channel is selected which specifies an input which has ASR set to On.
The source frequencies are different than the frequencies in the setup
being selected.
When ASR selects a setup memory, a source message is
briefly displayed to indicate which memory was selected.
If the new memory settings (Input and Recall) match
that of one of the channels in the Channel List, the
matching channel is used and displayed in the source
message. Display adjustments, if made, are stored in the
new memory (unless it is locked).
Input
Recall
01
13
Selected
Memory
If, on the other hand, an ASI is performed, a source
message is briefly displayed which includes an ASI
Input
01
message to indicate the action taken. If an Input
memory with matching scan frequencies was found by
ASI
S05-S06
ASI, its settings are used and its identity is displayed. If
an interpolation was performed, the two setup memories
Memories
selected for the interpolation are displayed and the
Selected for
Interpolation
resulting settings are used. If adjustments are made to
settings created by the ASI feature, the new settings will
NOT be saved in the current setup memory; a message is displayed to indicate this. To perform an ASI and have the adjustments saved in the current
2
1
setup memory, press
to select the ASI with Save utility.
UTIL
Note: To avoid selection/use of the current Input memory settings when it is
desired that Recall memories be ASR selected when a source change occurs,
1
5 ) to reset its scan frequency settings
clear the current Input memory (
3 ) so that its settings
1
to null values, then immediately lock the memory (
cannot be modified.
UTIL
UTIL
For more information about the ASR logic process, refer to Appendix C,
ASR/ASI Logic Diagrams.
3.37
OPERATION
When to use the ASR feature...
The ASR feature is intended for use when many different sources must share
the same input (via a third party switcher, for example) or when a signal
source can output several different scan frequencies (e.g., a SVGA card).
Example
A system has six different sources as shown in Figure 3-7. Source “A” is a
video camera. Source “B” is a VCR. Sources “C” through “F” are various
computers. All sources are connected to a 3rd party (non-Madrigal Imaging)
signal switcher. The switcher is connected to projector slot 1. For each
source, a Recall memory is created to store its display settings. No two
sources have the same frequencies.
Source "C"
(setup parameters
saved in Recall
memory 03)
Source "B"
(setup parameters
saved in Recall
memory 02)
Source "D"
(setup parameters
saved in Recall
memory 04)
3rd Party Switcher
Source "E"
(setup parameters
saved in Recall
memory 05)
Source "F"
(setup parameters
saved in Recall
memory 06)
Source "A"
(setup parameters saved
in Recall memory 01)
Figure 3-7. An Installation using the ASR Feature
1
4 is pressed to turn on the ASR feature for the projector’s slot 1
input. When ASR is on and a source is selected by the switcher, the projector automatically adjusts its display settings for the new source by switching
to the Recall memory set up for that source.
UTIL
For additional information, see “About the Sync Routing System” in
Section 3.5, subsection Decoder Options.
3.38
OPERATION
UTIL
1
5
Clear Current Setup
This utility is used to clear the current setup memory to the factory default
display settings.
To clear the current setup memory, press 5 from the Source
Setup menu. A dialog box is displayed. Move the cursor to
“Do It” then press
to clear the memory. If you press
with the edit cursor on “Cancel”, the clear operation is
not performed. When the clear operation is complete, the
Source Setup menu is returned.
ENTER
ENTER
Note: Clearing a setup memory does not “delete” it from the system. If the
projector’s 75 memory spaces are used up, and you need to delete unused
memories to make room for new memories, call your dealer for assistance.
UTIL
1
6
Select Internal Frequency
This utility allows you to use the projector’s internal signal generator. The
internal signal generator is provided to assist users and technicians during
projector setup. By using the internal generator, a setup memory can be
adjusted for a particular set of horizontal and vertical scan frequencies without requiring an external source. Six preset horizontal and vertical frequencies
are provided.
If one of the preset frequency sets closely match a source you will be using,
you can set up an Input or Recall memory for the source before it is available
for connection to the projector. When the source becomes available, few
adjustments will be required. Another reason to use the internal generator is
to improve the accuracy of the ASI feature. By setting up various memories at
different scan frequencies, ASI has more information to choose from when
making interpolations between setups.
To select an internal frequency, press 6 ,
“Select Internal Frequency” from the
Source Setup menu. The resulting menu
allows you to choose the scan frequencies
of the internal generator. Select one of
the displayed items.
To make a selection, enter an item
number or use and to move the
cursor bar to the item you want then
press
. When a selection is made, a crosshatch test pattern is displayed.
All subsequent adjustments are saved in the current setup memory.To select
one of the projector’s other test patterns, press # . Each press of # produces
a different test pattern. To return to the current external source, press
while only the test pattern is displayed.
ENTER
EXIT
3.39
OPERATION
Channel List ➤
The Channel List utility allows you to display and program the projector’s
Channel List. The Channel List is a user-programmable list of sources and
projector setups. Sources added to the list can be quickly switched to and
displayed by entering their assigned two-digit channel number. Channels
may also be selected using the keypad’s up and down arrow keys. Channel
selection is described in section 3.3, Source Selection.
To display and/or program the Channel List, press 2 from the Utilities
menu. The initial display shows the first ten channels in the list. Up to
99 channels can be displayed. For each channel a name, input number
(switcher and slot number), Recall memory number, and up/down list may
be programmed.
Program a channel as follows:
When the Channel List is
first displayed, the cursor is
positioned in the channel
number column. While in
the channel number column,
press or to highlight
the channel you want.
Alternatively, you can highlight
the channel you want by
entering the channel number
on the keypad. Entering the
channel number also allows
you to select/display/edit
channels beyond the first ten.
.
Next, press to move the cursor to the Name field. While
.
in the Name column, and change the character at the
C
cursor position and move the position of the cursor. Once
B
a source name has been entered, move the cursor to the Input
A
space
field by pressing
or by using . Edit the Input, Recall,
9
and Up/Down (U/D) fields. See below for field definitions.
8
To exit the channel list, press
or
.
7
ENTER
RECALL
EXIT
Note: When the cursor is positioned on a edit field, the field may
be cleared by pressing .
.
.
NOTE: If a channel is selected and ASR is on for the same input, and the
incoming frequency does not match the selected setup memories frequency,
it may cause the following: ASR may be triggered, the setup memory may
change and the channel number may be changed to reflect the new memory.
Example: If Channel 4 shows input (1,3) and no recall number and input
(1,3) switcher 1 slot 3 is selected and recall memory 55 is currently selected
then the Source Message box will show that Channel 4 is selected unless
there is another channel with input (1,3) and recall 55.
3.40
OPERATION
The Name Field
The Name field stores the names of the sources in the list. Source names
may be up to 11 characters in length. It is recommended that source names
be entered to make it easier to keep track of the sources. Source names are
briefly displayed when channels are selected.
Notes: 1) Digits may be entered using the number keys on the keypad or selected
using the and keys. 2) If is pressed during name editing, all characters in
the field to the right of the cursor will be cleared.
The Input Field
The Input field contains the switcher and slot number of the input to be
switched to when the channel is selected. If the input is a direct projector
input, the input number is a 0 followed by the projector slot number. If
the input is from a switcher, the input number is a number from 1 to 9
(switcher number) followed by the switcher slot number.
The Recall Memory Field
The Recall Memory field contains the number of the Recall memory to be
used when the channel is selected. If the field does not contain a number
(a blank or dash is shown), no Recall memory will be used.
The Up/Down Field (U/D)
The Up/Down field specifies the channels which are accessible when using
up/down channel selection (explained in section 3.3). If the field does not
contain a check mark, the channel is ignored. To enter a check mark, press a
number key (0-9). To clear a check mark, press .
Note: Channels should contain valid inputs. For example, do not specify
switcher 1 if switcher 1 does not exist in the system.
Recall Memories ➤
(Listing)
The Recall Memories utility provides a list of the Recall memories stored in
the projector. (Recall memories are explained in section 3.4). The list
includes the scan frequencies of each Recall memory. A check mark ( ) is
displayed in the ASR column next to the memories which ASR may use. If
two or more Recall memories have identical scan frequencies, only the
memory last adjusted will have a check mark.
3.41
OPERATION
To list the Recall Memories, press
30 Recall memories exist, press
3
ENTER
Input Memories ➤
(Listing)
from the Utilities menu. If more than
to display the remaining memories.
The Input Memories utility provides a list of the Input memories stored
in the projector. (Input memories are explained in section 3.4). The list
includes the scan frequencies of each Input memory. The ASR column
indicates if the ASR feature is on or off for each memory. A check mark ( )
is displayed in the ASR column next to the memories which may be chosen
for use by ASI during an ASR. If two or more Input memories have identical scan frequencies, only the memory last adjusted will have a check mark.
(ASR is explained in section 3.7, Utility Features.)
To list the projector’s Input Memories, press
more than 30 Input memories exist, press
memories.
4
ENTER
3.42
from the Utilities menu. If
to display the remaining
OPERATION
Preferences ➤
The Preferences utility allows you to set various preferences which affect the
behavior of the projector.
To display the Preferences menu,
press 5 from the Utilities menu. Six
preference items are displayed with
their current settings. Select an item to
change its setting. (Defaults shown.)
UTIL
5
1
Auto Power-up (On/Off)
If Auto Power-up is set to On, the
projector automatically powers itself up when line power is removed then reapplied. For example, if power is temporarily interrupted due to a storm, the
projector will automatically power back up when power returns. If Auto
Power-up were set to Off, the projector would require a manual power-on.
Note: Upon automatic power-up, the most recent display adjustments may be
lost if they were not yet saved in the current setup memory.
UTIL
5
2
Screen Messages (On/Off)
The Screen Messages preference allows you to choose whether screen messages will be displayed, such as slidebars, error and warning messages, the
,
,
and
messages, and the
and
menus. For most
applications, it is recommended that Screen Messages be left on. However,
if during a operation you want to make subtle display adjustments without
drawing attention to your actions, Screen Messages should be set to Off.
SOURCE
RECALL
PROJ
PIC
MUTE
GEOM
Note: It is still possible to display a screen message, such as a slidebar, while Screen
Messages is set to Off. To do this, press
just before selecting the function.
RECALL
UTIL
5
3
Blanking Time (Auto, 0.5s to 5.0s)
When a source is selected, the projector blanks the screen for a short period
of time. You can set the blanking time to Auto, which allows the projector
to determine the best blanking time automatically, or program a particular
blanking time. Time periods from 0.5 second to 5.0 seconds are available.
Select the Blanking Time item in the menu to change its setting.
UTIL
5
4
Channel Select (1 Digit Only, 2 Digits, 1 or 2 Digits)
There are three different ways the projector can respond to channel numbers
entered during direct channel selection: 1 Digit Only, 2 Digits, and 1 or 2
Digits. Select the Channel Select item in the menu to change its setting.
“1 Digit Only” allows only one digit to be entered after which the projector
switches immediately to the selected channel. This method can select only
channels 1 to 9. “2 Digits” requires two digits to be entered. Both digits must
be entered within 5 seconds. Channel 1 is entered as 01, etc. “1 or 2 Digits”
allows either one or two digits to be entered. If a second digit is not entered
within 5 seconds of the first, the first digit is accepted as the channel number.
3.43
OPERATION
UTIL
5
5
Language (English, French, German, Spanish, Italian)
Menus and text can be displayed in English, French, German, Spanish or
Italian. To change the language, select the Language item in the menu until
the desired language is shown.
UTIL
5
6
Programmable Events (On/Off)
This item allows you to enable or disable the Programmable Events feature.
If Programmable Events is set to On, the events flagged as “ENABLED”
7
2 ) are automatically
in the Programmable Events feature box (
executed at the dates and times specified. If Programmable Events is set to
Off, programmable event execution is disabled.
UTIL
(For information about event programming, refer to the Clock/Events entry
in this subsection.)
Remote Control ➤
Options
Remote Control Options allow you to modify the projector’s communication
settings for operation with remote keypads and control devices.
To select the Remote Control Options menu,
press 6 from the Utilities menu. Two selection
items are displayed: Keypad Options and
Communication Setup.
UTIL
6
1
Keypad Options
Press 1 from the Remote Control Options
menu to display the Keypad Options menu.
Use the menu to select the keypad protocol
type the projector will respond.
IR Sensor
This setting determines how the projector
responds to IR remote keypads aimed at
the projector’s built-in IR sensor. Select
the IR Sensor menu item to change the
current setting. Four settings are available:
A or B, A, B, and Off. If set to A, the
projector will only respond if the keypad is set for protocol A operation.
If set to B, the projector will only respond if the keypad is set for protocol
B operation. If set to “A or B”, the projector will respond to both protocol
settings. If set to Off, the projector will not respond to IR keypad commands.
The reason for having two protocols available is to allow two projectors in
the same room to be independently controlled by separate remote keypads.
See Figure 3-8 on the next page.
3.44
OPERATION
Figure 3-8. Independent IR Keypad Control
Caution: The keypad you are using may become inoperative if its protocol does
not match its setting in the menu.
Remote Jack
This setting determines how the projector responds to devices connected to
the REMOTE jack on the projector’s rear panel. This jack can accept input
from a wired keypad or remote IR sensor. Four settings are available: A or B,
A, B, and Off. If set to A, the projector will only respond if the keypad
using the REMOTE jack is set for protocol A operation. If set to B, the projector will only respond if the keypad using the REMOTE jack is set for
protocol B operation. If set to “A or B”, the projector will respond to both
protocol settings for keypads using the REMOTE jack. If set to Off, the
REMOTE jack is disabled.
UTIL
6
2
Communication Setup
Press 2 from the Remote Control Options menu
to set the projector identification number and the
RS-232 serial port baud rate.
Projector
This item contains the projector’s identification number. The projector’s
identification number allows IR remote control of a single projector in a
multi-projector installation. To set the projector identification number,
select item 1 then enter a three digit number from 000 to 999. If there is
only one projector in the installation, 000 is the recommended projector
number. For more information about multi-projector control, refer to
section 3.8, Multi-projector Functions.
3.45
OPERATION
Baud Rate
This item contains the projector’s RS-232 serial port baud rate. The RS-232
serial port, located at the back of the projector, provides a means to control
the projector using a computer or another projector. The serial port baud rate
setting must match the operating baud rate of the controlling device. Baud
rate may be set to 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, or 9600. To set the baud
rate, select item 2 from the menu until the desired baud rate is displayed.
Notes: 1) If unsure of your computer’s baud rate setting, refer to the system
documentation provided with the computer. 2) For information about cable
connections between devices, refer to Appendix D.
Clock/Events ➤
Clock/Events allows you to set the projector’s real-time clock/calender and
program up to twelve individual projector control events to be automatically
executed at specified times or intervals.
To select the Clock/Events menu press 7 from
the Utilities menu. Two selection items are
available: Set Clock and Programmable Events.
The current time and date setting is displayed at
the bottom of the menu.
UTIL
7
1
Set Clock
Press 1 from the Clock/Events menu to display the Set Clock Menu. Use
menu to set the current time and date and their format.
Time
To edit the time stored in the real time
clock/calender, press 1 from the Set Clock
menu. This puts you in time editing mode. A
flashing cursor is positioned at the first digit
of the time field. Use the number keys to enter
the current time (hours and minutes), using the
format displayed in item 3. For 12 hour format,
enter “01” to “12” for the hours and use
or to toggle between a.m.
and p.m. For 24 hour format, enter “00” to “23” for the hours. Enter
“00” to “59” for the minutes. When the proper time has been entered and
is displayed, press
to accept the changes and leave time editing mode.
ENTER
Notes: 1) On entry of the last digit of minutes, you automatically leave time
editing mode. 2) Years from 1990 to 2089 are assumed and handled.
Date
To edit the date stored in the real time clock/calender, press 2 from the
Set Clock menu. This puts you in date editing mode. A flashing cursor is
positioned at the first digit of the date field. Use the number keys to enter
3.46
OPERATION
the current date per the format displayed in item 4 (month/day/year,
day/month/ year or year/month/day). When the proper date has been
entered and is displayed, press
to accept the changes and leave date
editing mode.
ENTER
Note: On entry of the last digit, you automatically leave date editing mode.
Time Format
Press 3 from the Set Clock menu to change the time display format. The
format may be 12 hours (12h) or 24 hours (24h). All references to time by
the projector will use the format displayed (this includes the time displayed
in item 1.)
Date Format
Press 4 from the Set Clock menu to change the date display format.
The format may be month/day/year (MM/DD/YY), day/month/year
(DD/MM/YY) or year/month/day (YY/MM/DD). All references to
date by the projector will use the format displayed (this includes the date
displayed in item 2).
UTIL
7
2
Programmable Events
Press 2 from the Clock/Events menu to display the Programmable Events
feature box. The Programmable Events feature box allows you to program a
list of up to twelve events to occur at specified times and intervals. For example, you can program the projector so that at the same time each day, standby
mode is turned off and Source 01 is displayed. See the example below.
Each line contains a type of event, a frequency of occurrence (interval), a
start time and an enable/disable flag.
3.47
OPERATION
To program or modify an event, first use the arrow keys to move the cursor
to the field you want to modify (for example, the Type field). Next use
and/or the number keys to modify that field. Details for field modification are
provided on the following pages. Modify each field in the row as necessary
making sure all fields for the event are valid and logical.
ENTER
When all modifications have been made, press
to display the Exit dialog box. When the
Exit box is first displayed the cursor bar is
positioned on “Save.” Press
or
to
save the new changes. To return to the Programmable Events feature
box, move the cursor bar to “Continue Change” then press
. To
discard your changes, move the cursor bar to “No Save” then press
or
.
returns you to the Clock/Events menu.
returns you to
operation level.
EXIT
ENTER
EXIT
ENTER
ENTER
EXIT
EXIT
ENTER
The Type Field
The Type field shows the event to take place. With the cursor positioned on
the Type field press
to cycle through the available events. Press to
clear the entire event line. Events are described in Table 3-1 below.
ENTER
Table 3-1. Type Field Events
EVENT
DESCRIPTION
None
No programmed event.
Standby On
Turn Standby mode on.
Standby Off
Turn Standby mode off.
Power Off
Turn Power off.
Channel selection
Select a channel from the Channel List.
* Use the number keys to enter
the channel #.
Source selection
Select an input.
* Use the number keys to enter
the switcher # and slot #.
ACON (Full)
Perform an ACON (full) auto-convergence.
ACON module is required.
ACON (Touchup)
Perform an ACON (touchup) auto-convergence.
ACON module is required.
ACON
(Center Only)
Perform an ACON (center only)
auto-convergence.
ACON module is required.
Channels Up
Switch to the next available channel from the
Channel List.
Cycles back to the first channel
after last channel is selected.
Channels Down
Switch to the prior available channel from the
Channel List.
Cycles back to the last channel
after the first channel is selected.
Warmup
Perform a warm-up sequence:
1) Turn Standby mode off (if on).
2) Set Contrast to 20%, Brightness to 50%,
HSize to 80%, VSize to 80% and master
static focus to 100%
3) Display white field for 15 min.
4) Restore original display settings.
Exit from warm-up occurs after
15 minutes or when the EXIT key
is pressed. Other keys which
stop warm-up are PROJ, *, UTIL,
CONV and RECALL. When
warm-up stops, all original
display settings are restored.
* Only valid entries are accepted.
3.48
NOTES
OPERATION
The Interval Field
The Interval field shows a date or interval at which the event is to take
place. With the cursor positioned on the Interval field press
to cycle
through the available options. See Table 3-2 below for details.
ENTER
Table 3-2. Interval Field Options
EVENT INTERVAL
ACTIVATES THE EVENT . . .
specific date
At a specific calendar date.
Daily
Every day.
Mon–Fri
Every Monday through Friday.
Sat–Sun
Every Saturday and Sunday.
Mondays
Every Monday.
Tuesdays
Every Tuesday.
Wednesdays
Every Wednesday.
Thursdays
Every Thursday.
Fridays
Every Friday.
Saturdays
Every Saturday.
Sundays
Every Sunday.
min./sec. interval
Repeatedly at a specified time interval, in
minutes and seconds, starting at the time set in
the the Start field. (applies to Channel Up/Down
events only.)
NOTES
* Use number keys for date
entry per the format defined
by the Set Clock utility.
* Only valid entries are accepted.
The Start Field
The Start field shows the start time of the event. With the cursor positioned
on the Start field use the number keys to enter the start time. Use the notation previously defined by the Set Clock utility (12 hour or 24 hour). If
using a 12 hour clock, press
to toggle between a.m. and p.m.
ENTER
Notes: Only valid entries are accepted. For example, if “4” is entered as the first
digit of the Start time it will not be accepted. The first digit must be either “0” or
“1” when using a 12 hour clock, and “0”, “1” or “2” when using a 24 hour clock.
The Enabled Field
The Enabled field allows you to enable or disable a programmable event.
When enabled, the event is performed as programmed. When disabled, the
programmed event is ignored. A check mark indicates that the event is
enabled. With the cursor positioned on the Enabled field press
to
toggle display of the check mark.
ENTER
3.49
OPERATION
General Notes about Programmable Events
1) All events are ignored if Programmable Events is set to Off in the
5 ).
Preferences menu (
2) The projector must be turned on for programmable events to take place.
3) Be careful not to schedule two events so close to each other such that the
second event is scheduled to begin before the first event is complete; otherwise the second event may be ignored. For example, do not schedule an
event to take place one minute after a full ACON auto-convergence. A full
ACON convergence takes longer than one minute to complete.
4) If the projector is not at operation level when an event is scheduled to
begin, that event will be ignored unless operation level is returned within
the minute that that event is to take place.
5) An error or “invalid” message is temporarily displayed at the bottom of
the feature box when an entry is invalid or does not make sense.
6) “Error” in an Enabled field indicates an invalid entry for that event.
7) Events scheduled at the same time are performed in the order listed in
the Programmable Events feature box. Events never occur simultaneously.
UTIL
About Channel Up/Down Events ...
Channel Up/Down events are handled differently than other events. A
Channel Up or Channel Down event is continuously repeated at the time
interval set by the Interval field. The process begins at the start time set by
the Start field. This feature is provided for applications such as surveillance or
status display systems where multiple sources are sharing one projection display. For example, a bus terminal may use this feature to display a number of
different bus schedules, each displayed for ten seconds at a time.
To use this feature, a number of video sources must be fed to the projector
or a connected switcher. Each source is assigned to a channel in the Channel
List. The U/D status of each of these channels must be enabled in the list –
see the Channel List entry in this section for details. Within the
Programmable Events feature box, the event type is set to Channel Up or
Channel Down. The interval and start time is entered and the event is
enabled by setting a check mark in the Enabled field. When the event is
enabled and the start time is reached, the projector begins cycling through
the enabled channels in the Channel List. Each channel-defined source is
displayed for the set interval period then the next lower or higher channel
enabled in the Channel List is displayed. This continues until the event is
disabled or the projector is turned off.
Note: If during Channel Up/Down cycling you press a key to make an adjustment or change a projector setting, the channel cycling process pauses until you
return to operation level. If you manually select a different channel, channel
cycling will resume from that channel.
3.50
OPERATION
3.8 Multi-projector
Functions
The Projector ➤
In a multi-projector installation it is usually desired to have a single IR keypad control all the projectors in the system. This section explains the special
control functions available for such installations.
The Projector function allows you to select which projector in a group will
respond to IR keypad commands. To use this function, each projector in the
installation must first be assigned a unique projector number. Projector
numbers are assigned through the Communication Setup menu which is
6
2 on a built-in keypad or a wired remote keyaccessed by pressing
pad. Once each projector has its own unique projector number, projectors in
the installation can be individually controlled using the same IR keypad.
UTIL
To select a projector to solely respond to commands from an IR keypad,
press
followed by the projector’s identity number. The specified projector will be the only projector which will respond to the keypad. To enable
ALL projectors to listen to the IR keypad, press
.
PROJ
PROJ
Note: One, two, or three digits may be entered for the projector number.
Response is immediate if all three digits are entered (i.e., 001). Otherwise,
leading zeros are assumed after a five second time-out.
can also be used
2
when less than the full three digits are entered. For example,
immediately selects projector 002 for control.
ENTER
PROJ
ENTER
3.51
Section 4
Maintenance
4.1 Warnings
The Madrigal Imaging MP-8 and MP-9 projection system is FCC and
and Guidelines CSA approved and is designed for safe and reliable operation. However,
safe operation cannot simply be assured by design; installers, maintainers,
and users must maintain a safe operating environment for the system. This
section covers warnings and guidelines which promote the safe usage of the
projector. Please read through and understand these warnings and guidelines.
Labels and ➤
Markings
Observe and follow all warnings and instructions marked on the projector.
The exclamation point within the equilateral triangle is intended
to alert the user to the presence of important operating and
maintenance (servicing) instructions in the literature
accompanying the projector.
The lightning flash with arrowhead symbol, within the
equilateral triangle is intended to alert the user to the presence
of uninsulated "dangerous voltage" within the projector's
enclosure that may be of sufficient magnitude to constitute
a risk of electric shock to persons.
Projector Location➤
Operate the projector in an environment which meets the operating range
specifications in Section 5. Do not operate the projector close to water – for
example, near a swimming pool.
Do not place the projector on an unstable cart, stand or table. If the projector is to be ceiling mounted, only use an Madrigal Imaging approved ceiling
mount fixture.
The projector and cart combination should be used with care.
Quick stops, excessive force, and uneven surfaces may cause
the projector and cart combination to overturn.
4.1
MAINTENANCE
Power Cord and ➤
Attachments
Only use attachments or accessories recommended by Madrigal imaging.
Use of others may result in the risk of fire, shock or personal injury.
Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord. Locate the projector where
the cord cannot be abused by persons walking on it or objects rolling over it.
Operate the projector at the voltage indicated on the line voltage indicator.
Do not overload power outlets and extension cords as this can result in fire
or shock hazards.
The projector is equipped with a three wire plug having a third (grounding)
pin. This is a safety feature. If you are unable to insert the plug into the
outlet, contact an electrician to have the outlet replaced. Do not defeat the
safety purpose of the grounding-type plug.
Ventilation Slots ➤
Slots and openings in the projector provide ventilation. To ensure reliable
operation of the projector and to prevent overheating, these openings must
never be blocked or covered. The projector should never be placed near or
over a radiator or heat register. The projector should not be placed in an
enclosure unless proper ventilation is provided.
Do not push objects of any kind into the projector through the ventilation
openings. They may touch dangerous voltages or short-out parts resulting in
a fire or shock hazard. Do not spill liquids of any kind into the projector.
Should an accidental spill occur, immediately unplug the projector and have
it serviced by a qualified service technician.
Servicing ➤
If any of the following conditions exist, unplug the projector from the
power outlet and refer service to qualified service personnel.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
The power cord has been damaged.
Liquid has been spilled into the projector.
The projector has been exposed to excessive moisture.
The projector does not operate normally.
The projector has been dropped or the case has been damaged.
Projector performance has deteriorated.
Do not attempt to service the projector yourself. All servicing must be
performed by a qualified Madrigal Imaging service technician. If replacement parts are required, it is important that only Madrigal Imaging
approved parts are used. Other parts may result in fire, electric shock or
risk of personal injury.
WARNING: THE PROJECTOR IS INTERNALLY SHIELDED TO
PROTECT THE USER FROM EXPOSURE TO SOFT X-RAY
RADIATION. IMPROPER SERVICING OR SHIELD
REMOVAL MAY RESULT IN PERSONAL INJURY.
4.2
MAINTENANCE
CON
➤
4.2 Cleaning
In rare instances, flashing lights can trigger an epileptic seizure. During
ACON usage persons with epilepsy should look away from the screen.
Clean the projector when required. Before cleaning, always unplug the
projector from the power outlet.
Lens Cleaning ➤
To avoid the risk of scratching the lenses, only clean the lenses if absolutely
required. A small amount of dust on the lenses will have very little effect on
picture quality. If the lenses must be cleaned, use a DRY soft cotton cloth.
Rub gently in a circular motion.
Case Cleaning ➤
Clean the case with a soft dampened cloth. Use a mild commercial cleaner.
Do not use liquid or aerosol cleaners.
ACON Cleaning ➤
The lens on the ACON Locator Assembly is very tolerant to dust and
should only be cleaned if ACON performance is affected. Cleaning of the
lens (if required) must be performed with great care. Use a DRY soft cotton
cloth. Rub gently in a circular motion.
CON
4.3 Troubleshooting
If the projector is not operating properly, note the symptoms of the problem
and use the following guide to assist you. If you cannot resolve the problem
yourself, contact your dealer for assistance.
Projector Response ➤
Problems
Refer to the following if the projector is not responding to keypad commands.
Symptom:
The projector will not turn on when
is pressed. All back panel
lights are off. See Figure 4-1.
POWER
Cause/Remedy:
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
1) The power cord may be disconnected. Check the power
cord connection at the wall
outlet and the projector.
The projector will not turn on when
LED on the back panel is lit.
1)
Figure 4-1. Rear Panel LEDs
POWER
is pressed. Only the amber
may not have been held down long enough to initiate projector
power-up. Hold down
for at least one second to initiate power-up.
POWER
POWER
2) If using an IR keypad, ensure it is pointed at the screen or the front of
the projector. If the keypad is configured for built-in or wired usage,
make sure it is properly connected to the projector.
4.3
MAINTENANCE
3) If using an IR keypad, the batteries may need replacement. Remove the
batteries from the battery compartment on the back side of the keypad.
Install new batteries as described in the section 2.3.
4) The keypad may be damaged. If the back panel C LED does not flash
when
is pressed, the projector is not responding to the keypad. Try
using a different keypad.
POWER
5) If using a remote keypad (IR or wired), the keypad's protocol (A or B)
might not match the projector's IR protocol setting. Refer to section
2.3, Hardware Setup for instructions on how to check and change the
keypad's protocol setting. However, if the projector's setting is "Off",
the remote keypad will not respond. You may have to configure the
keypad for built-in operation to gain control of the projector.
Symptom:
The projector will not turn on when
is pressed. One or more of the
following red LEDs are lit: ERROR, LVPS, EHT, H.FAIL, V.FAIL.
Cause/Remedy:
1) An internal failure has occurred. Projector servicing may be required.
Contact your dealer or Madrigal for assistance.
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
POWER
The projector's green POWER LED is lit and all other LEDs are off yet
no picture is displayed.
1) Contrast or brightness may be set too low. Press to activate the status
screen. If there is no display, press # then increase contrast (
) and
brightness (
) until the crosshatch is displayed. Adjust contrast and
brightness to their proper settings.
CONT
BRITE
2) The room lighting may be too bright.
3) The projector may be too far from the screen. Move the projector closer
to the screen. The maximum throw distance is 25 feet.
4) Were the lens covers accidentally left on? Remove the lens covers.
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
4.4
While in use, the projector suddenly become non-responsive to keypad
commands, even when using a built-in keypad.
1) Although rare, it is possible that an internal software error occurred
which has put the software in a non-ending loop. This might occur if
a power spike interfered with the projector's internal processor system.
To fix this problem, leave the projector plugged in and using a small
screw driver or ball point pen, press the recessed RESET button on the
back panel. This operation will reset the projector's processor without
affecting memories or display settings.
MAINTENANCE
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
The projector does not respond to the
Cause/Remedy:
or
MUTE
keys.
1) You may not be holding down the key long enough to initiate the
action. Like
,
and
must be pressed down for at least
one second.
POWER
Symptom:
STBY
STBY
MUTE
The projector does not respond to an IR Remote keypad.
1) The projector's IR keypad listening status may be turned off. Press
to turn on the listening status of all projectors, or press
followed by the projector's identity number to turn on the listening
status of the projector you want to respond.
PROJ
PROJ
2) The keypad's protocol (A or B) might not match the projector's IR protocol setting. Refer to section 2.3, Hardware Setup for instructions on
how to check and change the keypad's protocol setting. However, if the
projector's setting is "Off", the remote keypad will not respond. You
may have to configure the keypad for built-in operation to gain control
of the projector.
3) The IR keypad may be too far away from the projector or screen. Use
the IR keypad closer to the projector or screen. Also ensure the keypad is
pointed directly at the screen or the front of the projector.
4) The viewing path between the IR keypad and the projector (or screen or
switcher) may be restricted. Ensure there is a clear line-of-sight between
the keypad and the projector (or screen or switcher).
5) The sensor may be disabled per the Keypad Options menu (
UTIL
6
).
1
6) The batteries in the IR keypad may be weak. Replace the batteries in the
keypad. See section 2.3 for battery installation instructions.
7) There may be unusual lighting conditions in the room which effect IR
keypad operation. Determine if such conditions exist and correct.
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
The display is jittery or unstable.
1) The horizontal or vertical scan frequency of the input signal may be out
of range. Check the specifications in Section 5 for scan frequency ranges.
2) Synchronization signals from the source may be inadequate. Correct the
source problem.
3) The input signal type may not match the signal type required by the
input module. Install the correct input module/interface to match the
signal type of the source.
4.5
MAINTENANCE
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
The upper portion of the display is waving, tearing, or jittering.
1) This sometimes occurs when the source is a VCR or video signal.
Change the sync mode by selecting the fast/slow sync option from
5 ).
the Picture Adjust menu (
PIC
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
The upper or lower portions of the display are cut off.
1) A top or bottom blanking adjustment may be required. Select the appropriate blanking adjustment option from the Picture Adjust Menu (
)
then adjust the amount of blanking. Note: A 0% slidebar level indicates
no blanking.
PIC
2) A phase adjustment may be required. Select Position from the Picture
Adjust menu (
). Adjust position so that the entire picture is visible
and centered.
PIC
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
One side of the display is cut off.
1) A left or right blanking adjustment may be required. Select the appropriate blanking adjustment option from the Picture Adjust menu (
)
then adjust the amount of blanking. A 0% slidebar level indicates no
blanking.
PIC
2) A position adjustment may be required. Select Position from the Picture
Adjust menu (
). Adjust phase so that the entire picture is visible
and centered.
PIC
3) The retrace time of the projector may be longer than the horizontal
8 to change projector retrace
1
blanking time of the signal. Press
time to Short.
UTIL
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
Transitions between colors are fuzzy.
1) Convergence may require adjustment. Perform a convergence on the
selected source.
2) The projector may not be optically aligned for the installation. Has the
throw distance changed significantly since the last optical alignment? If
so, have the projector re-aligned. Refer to section 2.8, Optical Alignment.
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
The display is very faint.
1) Contrast or brightness settings may be set too low.
2) The projection room may be too bright. Lower the intensity of
projection room lighting. Reduce light reflections as much as possible.
3) The projection room walls and ceilings may be too reflective. Reflective
ceilings, walls, and floors should be kept to a minimum. The best
projection rooms are dark with matte finishing.
4.6
MAINTENANCE
4) The projector may be too far from the screen.
5) The location of the audience with respect to the screen may not be
adequate. Make sure the audience is within the viewing angle set by the
projector and screen position, and the screen type.
6) The phase setting may require adjustment. Select Position from the
Picture Adjust menu (
) then determine if adjustment improves
the display.
PIC
7) The source may be double terminated. Ensure the source is terminated
(75 Ω) only once.
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
The display appears to be folded.
1) The phase setting may require adjustment. Select Position from the
Picture Adjust menu (
) then determine if adjusting the phase
improves the display.
PIC
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
The display is reversed or upside down.
1) The projector scan configuration is not set correctly for the installation
type. Refer to section 2.3, Hardware Setup, to set the projector's scan
configuration.
The display is not sharp or "clean".
1) Display adjustment may be required. Adjust the brightness, contrast,
focus, and detail settings.
2) Is a BNC T connector being used? Use a distribution amplifier to boost
signal levels.
3) Is the input signal properly terminated?
4) The screen size may be too large. As screen size increases, magnification
increases which reduces brightness. This then reduces the contrast ratio
which affects legibility. Sharp defined edges become soft and fuzzy.
5) The source input signal may be of low quality.
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
Display quality seems to drift (from good to bad, bad to good, etc.).
1) The operating temperature of the projector may not be constant. Is the
projector close to heating and/or air conditioning vents? The ambient
temperature after warm-up should be kept constant below 35° C (95° F).
Make sure none of the projector ventilation slots are obstructed.
2) The source input signal may be of low quality.
3) The horizontal or vertical frequency of the input may have changed at the
source end. For the selected source, set ASR to on. The projector will then
try to use display parameter settings which are best matched for the source.
4.7
MAINTENANCE
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
Colors on the display are not accurate (when using the
Multi-standard Decoder).
1) Color and tint settings may require adjustment.
The display is not rectangular in shape.
1) The geometry settings may not be set correctly. Adjust the display
geometry settings. (Press
for the Geometry menu).
GEOM
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
The display is “noisy.”
1) The input may not be terminated. Make sure the input is terminated
(75 Ω). If it is the last connection in a loop-through chain, it should be
terminated at the projector (only).
2) The signal cables carrying the input signal may be of poor quality. Use only
good quality signal cables. Madrigal Imaging cables are recommended.
3) The distance between the input source device and the projector may
be too great. If the distance between the input source device and the
projector is greater than 25 feet, signal amplification/conditioning may
be required.
4) There may be interference from other equipment. Keep the projector
away from devices which radiate electromagnetic energy such as motors
and transformers. Common sources of these are slide projectors, speakers, power amplifiers, elevators, etc. Keep 35 mm slide projectors at least
two feet away from the projector.
5) The input signal may be of poor quality.
6) If the source is a VCR or off-air broadcast, detail may be set too high.
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
Modified display settings are not being saved in the active setup memory.
1) Is the active setup memory locked? Press
to display the Source
3 .)
1
Message. If a
is displayed, unlock the setup. (Press
SOURCE
UTIL
2) ASR is set to On for the current input memory and an ASI was
automatically performed due to mismatched scan frequencies.
Symptom:
Cause/Remedy:
The display is OK when displaying the crosshatch test pattern ( # ) or status
screen ( ) but when trying to display a source, nothing is visible.
1) You may not be selecting the source correctly. Refer to section 3.3,
Source Selection, for source selection instructions.
2) The source may not be connected properly. Verify that the input source
is active and check the cables between the source and the projector.
4.8
MAINTENANCE
ACON Errors ➤
CON
If ACON is installed and an error message occurs during automatic
convergence or Learn Screen, proceed through the following checklist.
❑
❑
❑
Is the ambient lighting appropriate for projection? A number of problems
could result during automatic convergence and/or Learn Screen if the
ambient lighting is too bright. Dimmed incandescent lighting is preferred over fluorescent lighting. If error messages such as "Sensor Lock
Failed: Low Signal" or "Learn Screen Failed: Insufficient Magnitude"
result, lower the ambient lighting, especially at the projection screen.
Is the view path of the Locator Assembly completely unobstructed?
The view path between the photosensor lens of the Locator Assembly
and the entire screen must be completely unobstructed for proper
ACON operation.
Has a Learn Screen been performed since the last projector configuration
change? Learn Screen must be performed if:
• The throw distance has changed since the last time Learn Screen
was performed.
• The ACON Locator Assembly mounting position has changed
since the last time Learn Screen was performed.
• The screen type has changed.
• The source has changed.
If the problem cannot be resolved, call your dealer for servicing.
4.9
Section 5
Specifications
5.1 Specifications
MP-8 and MP-9
Note: Due to constant research, specifications are subject to change without notice.
Optics ➤
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Resolution ➤
❑
❑
High definition hybrid lens
Optical resolution of 10 line pairs per mm
8"(MP-8) and 9"(MP-9) electromagnetic focus CRTs
Scheimpflug adjustment for top, bottom, and side-to-side focus
Liquid coupling for optimized contrast ratio (MP-9 only)
2500 x 2000 addressability
1500 x 1200 ANSI pixels for MP-9, 1350 x 1100 for MP-8
Brightness ➤
❑
Usable light output per industry standard:
160 ANSI lumens for MP-9, 200 ANSI lumens for MP-8
Display ➤
❑
Electronic geometry circuits separately correct top, bottom and sides
for flat, curved or rear screens up to 25 feet diagonal
Keystone circuitry to correct pictures for angles greater than ±15°
vertically from screen axis (dependent on throw distance)
Color temperature adjustment for precise setup
S and C vertical and horizontal linearity
Adjustable top, bottom and side blanking
9 zone electronic astigmatism correction (service adjustment)
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Input Signals ➤
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
RGB Video Input Level: 0.5 to 1.0 volts p-p, 75 Ω ±1% terminated
Automatically switches to separate sync, composite sync, or sync on green
Separate or composite syncs are automatically accepted in either polarity
1.0 volts nominal audio input level
Sync on green: max horizontal frequency is 130 kHz
Sync input level: 0.3 to 5.0 volts p-p, 75 Ω ±1% terminated
5.1
SPECIFICATIONS
Gamma Correction ➤
Frequency ➤
Response
DC Restoration ➤
Geometry Distortion ➤
Deflection Circuits ➤
❑
Gamma correction circuitry provided for improved video performance
and gray-scale tracking.
❑
❑
120 MHz bandwidth (-3 dB)
Accommodates 3 nanosecond pixels and digital clock rates over 300 MHz
❑
Keyed clamp, better than 1%
❑
❑
Horizontal: 2.0% maximum
Vertical: 1.0% maximum
❑
Smartlock™ circuitry for quick lock-in and ultra steady images
Vertical Deflection
❑
❑
❑
Frequency Range: 39.5 Hz to 185 Hz autolock
Size automatically regulated over frequency range and adjustable from
15% underscan to 15% overscan
Retrace Time: less than 300 microseconds
Horizontal Deflection
❑
❑
Frequency Range: 14 kHz to 152 kHz autolock
Size automatically regulated over frequency range and adjustable
by ±15%
Frequency
Range
(kHz)
Retrace
Setting
Typical
Deflection
Retrace (µs)
* Maximum
Hor. Blanking
of Projector
14 – 30
Long or
Short
5.3
7.5
30 – 45
Long
5.0
5.9
30 – 60
Short
2.8
3.6
60 – 100
Long
2.5
3.1
60 – 70
Short
1.4
1.85
70 – 120
Short
1.4
1.6
120 – 152
Short
1.4
1.5
*With left and right blanking control set to 0.
5.2
SPECIFICATIONS
Notes: 1. Blanking can be increased with left and right blanking controls
2. Retrace fixed as Short in ranges 45–60 kHz and 100–152 kHz
despite user setting
3. Defl. retrace time must be less than the max. blanking duration
4. Horizontal blanking duration of the source must be more than
the max. blanking duration of the projector to avoid cutting off
the left or right edge of the source image.
5. Max. Blanking duration of the projector must be compatible with
all known sources (at the specific source frequency).
6. Max. Blanking duration of the projector restricted to 1.5µs for
operation in the range 120 kHz–152kHz.
High Voltage ➤
Power ➤
Requirements
❑
34.9 KV regulated to better than ±1%
❑
90 VAC to 264 VAC universal input
Line Frequency: 50 to 60 Hz nominal
Power: 650 watts maximum
Power factor corrected
❑
❑
❑
Inputs ➤
❑
❑
❑
Optional Source ➤
Expansion
❑
❑
Control Features ➤
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
Servicing ➤
❑
❑
Built-in RGBHV interface. Optional interface modules install in
interface slot
Built-in RS-232 for computer control, with loop-thru for connection
of multiple projectors
HDTV compatible with optional interface module
The Signal Switcher allows use of nine additional input modules. Up
to nine switchers can be connected
Maximum Number of Inputs: 78
Multi-language software (user selectable)
Menu driven interface with on-screen help
Built-in set up tutorials
Auto power up after power interruption
Six built-in test patterns
Internal frequency generator
Programmable events and real time clock
Modular design for ease of servicing
Most service adjustments are made using the keypad
5.3
SPECIFICATIONS
Environment ➤
Maximum Operating Range
❑
❑
❑
Temperature: 0 to 35°C
Humidity: 0 to 90% non-condensing
Altitude: 0 to 10,000 ft. (0-3,000m.)
Storage
❑
Temperature: -30°C to 65°C
Heat Dissipation
❑
Mounting ➤
❑
Weight ➤
❑
Can be ceiling mounted on its optional ceiling mount or placed on a
castered cart for portable applications
❑
Accessories ➤
Included
❑
❑
❑
❑
Options ➤
& Accessories
2450 BTU/Hr (approximate)
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
176 lbs / 80 kg
229 lbs / 104 kg (shipping weight)
Convertible multi-use, backlit full function keypad
Line Cord and User's Manual
Tool Kit
ACON® II which automates the convergence process, performing complete convergence in less than 3 minutes
Various interfaces: RGB Input Module, RGB Loop Thru Module,
Composite/S-Video Module, HDTV Input Module and PC Analog
Input Module.
Signal Switcher
Adapter cables
Ceiling mount and rear screen equipment
RETRO III large screen projection
Castered cart
Librarian software, Encyclopedia software
Contact your dealer or Madrigal for more information about the above
products and accessories. Also refer to Appendix H, Interfaces.
Regulatory ➤
Approvals
❑
❑
❑
Warranty ➤
❑
❑
5.4
FCC Class A, DHHS and HWC requirements, EN55022 Class B
CSA/UL/EN 60 950
EU Directives 73/23/EEC, 89/336/EEC (CE marked)
One year parts and labor for tube (see inside back cover)
Three years parts and labor for everything else (see inside back cover)
SPECIFICATIONS
Physical ➤
Figure 5-1. Projector Dimensions
5.5
Appendix A
Glossary
This appendix defines many of the terms used in this manual as they apply to the Madrigal Imaging
MP-8 and MP-9 projection system.
ACON (Automatic ➤
Convergence)
ACON is an automatic convergence feature. Convergence of the red, green
and blue images is performed accurately and automatically with minimal
user intervention.
ASI (Automatic ➤
Source Interpolation)
A process whereby a display setup for a given source is approximated from
other setups already in memory. For more information about ASI, refer to
the ASR entry in section 3.7, Utility Features.
ASR (Automatic ➤
Source Recall)
A process whereby a display setup for a given source is chosen from
memory according to its signal parameters (horizontal and vertical
frequencies). For more information about ASR, refer to the ASR entry
in section 3.7, Utility Features.
Active Line Time ➤
The time, inside one horizontal scan line, during which video is generated.
Ambient Light ➤
Rejection
The ability of a screen to reflect ambient light in a direction away from
the "line of best viewing". Curved screens usually have good ambient light
rejection. Flat screens usually have less ambient light rejection.
Analog Video ➤
The video output of most computers and video tape machines. Analog
video can generate a large number of colors.
Aspect Ratio ➤
Automatic ➤
Convergence
The ratio of the width of an image to its height.
The automatic alignment of the projected red, green and blue images on the
projection screen.
A.1
GLOSSARY
Autolock ➤
Bandwidth ➤
Blanking Time ➤
The ability of the projector to automatically synchronize to the horizontal
and vertical scan frequencies of an input signal.
The frequency range of the projector's video amplifier.
The time inside one scan line during which video is not generated. The
blanking time of the input signal must be equal to or greater than the
retrace time of the projector.
Bow ➤
A horizontal curve in the center of the image, and/or a vertical curve across
an image.
Brightness ➤
Brightness in projection usually describes the amount of light emitted from
a surface such as a screen. Brightness is measured in lumens, foot-lamberts,
foot-candles, or lux.
Candela or Candle ➤
Channel ➤
Channel List ➤
Color Shift ➤
The intensity of light is measured in candelas.
A 2-digit number with user-assigned source input information. This information includes a physical input (switcher, slot), a setup memory (input
or recall), and a name or description. Assignments are made through the
Channel List.
A list of up to 99 channels (explained above) which may be created, edited,
or deleted by the user. The Channel List feature provides an alternative, and
sometimes easier, way to select sources and their setups.
The change in the tint of a white field across an image.
Color Temperature ➤
This term refers to the coloration (reddish, white, bluish, etc.) of a white
image. (It does not refer to the brightness of a white image.) The Kelvin (K)
temperature scale is used to measure color temperature.
Color Temperature ➤
Uniformity
The accuracy of color temperature at any location.
Composite Video ➤
A.2
This term refers to the output of video tape players and some computers.
Synchronization, luminance, and color signals are combined on one
output cable.
GLOSSARY
Contrast (ratio) ➤
The ratio of brightness of the brightest possible area to the darkest possible
area of an image.
Convergence ➤
The alignment of the projected red, green and blue images on the
projection screen.
Current Setup ➤
Memory
The setup memory which is currently being used to display a given
source's image.
Curved Screen ➤
Decoder ➤
Diffused ➤
Display Setting ➤
Flicker ➤
Frame Rate ➤
Foot-candle ➤
A projection screen which is curved to improve screen gain. Curved screens
usually have screen gains which are greater than 1 but viewing angles much
less than 180°.
A device that converts NTSC, PAL, PAL M, PAL N, PAL 60, SECAM
or NTSC 4.43 video to RGB video (Multi-standard Decoder).
Screen A type of rear-projection screen which spreads the light striking it.
Screen gain is less than 1 but audience viewing angles are increased.
The level of a display adjustment. Some display adjustments are:
Contrast, Brightness, Blanking, Bow, Size, Keystone, Pincushion, Focus
and Convergence.
A rapid variation in brightness created when the frame rate is too slow.
(See also Interlace.)
The frequency at which complete images are generated. For non-interlaced
signals, the frame rate is identical to the vertical frequency. For interlaced
signals, the frame rate is one half of vertical frequency.
The intensity of visible light per square foot.
1 foot-candle = 1 lumen/square foot = 10.76 lux
Foot-lambert ➤
Gain or Screen ➤
Gain
The luminance (brightness) which results from one foot-candle of
illumination falling on a perfectly diffuse surface.
The ability of a screen to direct incident light to an audience. A flat matte
white wall has a gain of approximately 1. Screens with gain less than 1
A.3
GLOSSARY
attenuate incident light; screens with gain more than 1 direct more incident
light to the audience but have a narrow viewing angle. For example: An
image reflecting off a 10 gain screen appears 10 times brighter than it would
if reflected off a matte white wall. Curved screens usually have larger gain
than flat screens.
Gamma ➤
Correction
A feature provided on Madrigal Imaging MP-8 and MP-9 models which
boosts the blue color output when required to provide improved picture
intensity and color uniformity.
Geometry ➤
The reproduction of a straight and rectangular image.
Help Page ➤
A display of help information on the projection screen.
Horizontal ➤
Frequency
Also called horizontal scan rate or line rate, this is the frequency at which
scan lines are generated. Horizontal frequencies vary amongst sources.
Hot Spot ➤
A circular area of a screen where the image appears brighter than elsewhere
on the screen. The hot spot always appears located along the line of sight
and "moves" with the line of sight. High gain screens and rear screens
designed for slide or movie projection usually have a hot spot.
Input ➤
A physical connection route for a source signal defined by two numbers;
a switcher number and a slot number. If the switcher number is 0, the input
is a projector input.
Input Memory ➤
A.4
A setup memory which is associated with a particular projector or
switcher input.
Interface ➤
A device that accepts an input signal for display by the projector.
Interlace ➤
A method used by video tape players and some computers to double the
vertical resolution without increasing the horizontal line rate. If the resulting
frame rate is too low, the image may flicker depending on the image content.
Keypad ➤
A device which allows the user to control projector settings and operation.
There are four different keypad types which may be used with the projector:
built-in, IR remote, wired remote, and presenter's. For more information
about these keypads, refer to the keypads entry in section 3.2, Projector Basics.
GLOSSARY
Keystone ➤
A distortion of the image which occurs when the top and bottom borders of
the image are not equal in length. Side borders slant in or out, producing a
keystone shaped image.
Learn Screen ➤
An ACON function which stores screen position data in memory for future
reference. Learn Screen is usually performed only once per projector installation. If the ACON Locator Assembly or screen is moved (i.e., the projector
installation changes to ceiling mount), the Learn Screen function must be
repeated.
Linearity ➤
Line of Best ➤
Viewing
Locator Assembly ➤
Loopthrough ➤
(Loopthru)
Lumen ➤
Lux ➤
The reproduction of the horizontal and vertical size of characters and/or
shapes over the entire screen.
When light from a projector is incident on a screen, the light reflects from
the screen such that the angle of reflection equals the angle of incidence.
The Line of Best Viewing is along the line of reflection.
The Locator Assembly, situated on the front of the projector, is the "eye"
of the ACON system. It includes a photosensor/lens component which
mechanically scans the projected display at each convergence point while
sensing relative positions of each projected color.
The method of feeding a series of high impedance inputs from a single
video source with a coaxial transmission line in such a manner that the line
is terminated with its characteristic impedance at the last input on the line.
The amount of visible light emitted by a light source is measured in lumens.
The amount of visible light per square meter incident on a surface.
1 lux = 1 lumen/square meter = 0.093 foot-candles
Menu ➤
A list of options which are displayed on the screen for selection by the user.
NTSC Video ➤
A video output format of some video tape and disk players. There are two
types of NTSC (National Television Standards Committee) video: NTSC
3.58 and NTSC 4.43. NTSC 3.58 is used primarily in North America and
Japan. NTSC 4.43 is less commonly used.
A.5
GLOSSARY
Operation Level ➤
Optical Screen ➤
PAL Video ➤
Pincushion ➤
Pixel (Picture ➤
Element)
Projector-to- ➤
Screen Distance
Protocol ➤
Rear Screen ➤
Recall Memory ➤
A.6
The projector is at operation level when an image is (or may be) displayed
and no control, dialog, error, or help messages are displayed. For example, if
a help page is displayed, the projector is not at operation level.
A type of rear-projection screen which re-directs light through the screen
to increase image brightness in front of the screen. Screen gain is usually
greater than 1 but audience viewing angles are reduced.
A video output format of some video tape and disk players (used primarily in
Europe, China and some South American and African countries). All PAL
(Phase Alternating Line) video is a 50 Hz standard with 768 x 576 resolution.
A distortion of the image which occurs when the borders are concave
or convex.
The smallest discernable element of a computer generated image.
Also called "Throw Distance", the distance between the front of the
projector's green lens and the screen.
The type of code format utilized by IR keypad(s). The standard code is
Protocol A. By using two different protocols, two projectors may be used side
by side while being controlled independently by their remote IR keypads.
A translucent panel for screen projection. Incident light travels through the
incident surface of a rear screen and forms an image on the other surface.
A setup memory which is not associated with any particular input.
Resolution of ➤
the CRT
The maximum number of lines that can be distinguished on the face of
a CRT.
Resolution of ➤
the Lens
The maximum number of alternate white and black horizontal lines that
can be distinguished on a screen when a photographic target is placed
between the lens and a light source, and illuminated by that light source.
GLOSSARY
Resolution of ➤
the Projector
The smaller of CRT and Lens resolutions.
Retrace Time ➤
(Horizontal)
The minimum time required for the projector to move the position of the
scanning spot from the right edge to the left edge of a CRT.
Rise Time ➤
RGB Video ➤
Scan Frequency ➤
Scan Line ➤
SECAM ➤
Setup Memory ➤
The time required by the video amplifier of the projector to increase its
output from 10% to 90% of the maximum value.
The video output of most computers. It can be analog or digital. Analog
RGB video has 3, 4, or 5 wires; one for red, one for green, one for blue,
and none, one or two for sync. For three wire RGB, the green wire usually
provides sync. (See also TTL Video).
The horizontal or vertical frequency at which images are generated.
One scan line is one horizontal line on the display.
A video output format of some video tape and disk players (used primarily
in France). SECAM (Sequential Couleur á Mémoire) signals are similar in
resolution and frequency to PAL signals. The primary difference between
the two standards is in the way color information is encoded.
A projector memory which stores user-adjustable display settings. There are
two types of setup memories: Input and Recall. Both memory types store the
same parameters. The only difference is that Input memories store display
settings for a particular physical input (i.e., switcher 0, slot 1) and Recall
memories can be used with any input.
Slidebar ➤
A slidebar is a graphical display of an adjustment setting. The setting is
displayed on a percentage scale.
Source ➤
A device, such as a computer or VCR, which may be connected to the
projector for display.
Spot Size ➤
The diameter of the smallest dot that can be generated on the face of
a CRT.
A.7
GLOSSARY
Sync ➤
This term refers to the part of the video signal that is used to stabilize the
picture. Sync can take three forms:
1) "Composite sync" when the horizontal and vertical components are
together on one cable.
2) "Sync on green" when the sync is part of the green video.
3) "Separate sync" or "H.SYNC and V.SYNC" when the horizontal and
vertical components of the sync are on two separate cables.
Sync Width ➤
TTL Video ➤
A type of RGB video with digital characteristics.
Terminated ➤
A wire connecting a single video source to a display device, such as a projector,
must be terminated by a resistance (usually 75Ω for video).
Throw Distance ➤
Also called "Projector-to-Screen Distance", the distance between the front of
the projector's green lens and the screen.
Variable Scan ➤
The ability of a projector to synchronize to inputs with frequencies within a
specified range.
Vertical Frequency ➤
Video ➤
A.8
The duration of each sync pulse generated by a computer. The sync width is
part of the blanking time.
The frequency at which images are generated. Vertical frequencies vary
amongst sources. This term is also called vertical scan rate.
The signal that is used by display devices (such as projectors) to generate
a picture. This term also refers to the output of video tape/disk players
and computers.
GLOSSARY
Video Decoder ➤
A device that converts NTSC, PAL, SECAM or NTSC 4.43 video to
RGB video (Multi-standard Decoder).
Viewing Angle ➤
Screens do not reflect equally in all directions. Most light is reflected in
a conical volume which is centered around the "line of best viewing".
Maximum brightness is seen when you are positioned within the viewing
cone. The horizontal and vertical viewing angles are the horizontal and
vertical angles of the cone.
White Balance ➤
White Balance refers to the color temperature of white used by the projector.
White Field ➤
A white field is the area of an image that is white only. For example, a full
white field is an image that is white everywhere. A 10% white field is a white
area (usually rectangular) that occupies 10% of the image; the remaining
90% is black.
A.9
Appendix B
Menu Tree
proj
✴
util
pic
color
tint
detail
geom
cont
brite
conv
enter
exit
source
1
2
3
recall
4
5
6
help
7
8
9
#
0
menu mute stby
power
B.1
MENU TREE
B.2
Appendix C
ASR/ASI Logic Diagrams
A change in scan frequency is detected.
The change is greater than 100 Hz horizontal
or greater than 1 Hz vertical.
no
Is ASR
set to On for the
currently selected
input?
Do nothing.
match
A source, Recall memory, or channel was manually
selected. The H & V scan frequencies of the source
do not match that of the selected setup memory.
yes
Is ASR
set to On for the
selected
input?
yes
Check the
Input memory of the
currently selected input for
matching H & V scan
frequencies.
Change the current
setup memory to the
matched Input memory.
match
no
Switch to the selected
source and/or setup
memory.
no match
Search for a
Recall memory with
matching H & V scan
frequencies.
no match
ASI
Logic
Begins
Change the current
setup memory to the
matched Recall memory.
match
Search for an
Input memory with
matching H & V scan
frequencies.
Adjustments made at
this point are stored
in the current
setup memory.
Use the display settings
of the matched Input
memory but do not update
the current setup memory.
ASR Logic Diagram
ASI
Functions
no match
Create new display settings by interpolating the
two closest setup memories (in freq.). Do not
update the setup memory.
Adjustments made at this
point are displayed but
NOT stored in the current
setup memory.
B.3
ASR/ASI LOGIC DIAGRAMS
UTIL 1
2
is pressed to perform
an "ASI with Save".
Display an
"ASI with Save"
confirmation box.
yes
match
Check the
Input memory of the
currently selected input for
matching H&V scan
frequencies.
match
Was "Do It"
selected from the
confirmation box?
no
no match
Do nothing.
Return to presentation
level.
Search for a
Recall memory
with matching H&V scan
frequencies.
Copy the display
settings in the "matched"
memory to the current
setup memory.
match
"ASI with Save" Logic Diagram
B.4
no match
Search for an
Input memory
with matching H&V scan
frequencies.
no
match
Select two setup
memories for interpolation
and store the resulting
display settings in the
current setup memory.
Appendix D
Communication Cables
RS-232 Serial Communications
When connecting the projector to a signal switcher, another Madrigal imaging projector, or a computer,
a standard RS-232 serial communication cable is required. Cable details are provided below.
D.1
Appendix E
Keypad Reference
proj
✴
util
pic
color
tint
detail
geom
cont
brite
conv
enter
exit
source
Menu
Mute
1
2
3
recall
4
5
6
help
7
8
9
#
0
menu mute stby
power
to temporarily turn off
on-screen displays
and dialogs
Standby
to turn both picture and
audio on or off
To toggle the keypad’s protocol setting (A or B), press
To toggle the keypad’s protocol setting (A or B), press
BRITE
TINT
DETAIL
1
BRITE
TINT
DETAIL
2
.
.
E.1
Appendix F
Throw Distance Tables
Table F-1 Throw Distance for MP-8 (inches)
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
109
141.3
137.6
123.8
110
142.6
138.8
125.0
111
143.9
140.1
129.8
126.3
112
145.2
141.3
101
131.0
127.6
113
146.5
142.6
102
132.3
128.8
114
147.8
143.8
115.0
103
133.6
130.1
115
149.1
145.1
119.5
116.3
104
134.9
131.3
116
150.4
146.3
120.7
117.5
105
136.2
132.6
117
151.6
147.6
94
122.0
118.8
106
137.5
133.8
118
152.9
148.9
95
123.3
120.0
107
138.8
135.1
119
154.2
150.1
96
124.6
121.3
108
140.1
136.3
120
155.5
151.4
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
97
125.9
122.5
108.8
98
127.2
110.0
99
128.5
114.3
111.3
100
89
115.6
112.5
90
116.9
113.8
83.7
91
118.2
87.3
85.0
92
88.6
86.2
93
69
89.8
87.5
70
91.1
88.7
71
92.4
90.0
72
93.7
91.2
73
95.0
92.5
74
96.3
93.7
75
97.6
95.0
76
98.9
96.2
77
100.1
97.5
78
101.4
98.7
79
102.7
100.0
80
104.0
101.2
81
105.3
102.5
82
106.6
103.7
83
107.9
105.0
84
109.2
106.3
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
60
78.3
76.2
85
110.4
107.5
61
79.5
62
80.8
77.4
86
111.7
78.7
87
113.0
63
82.1
79.9
88
64
83.4
81.2
65
84.7
82.4
66
86.0
67
68
Instructions:
Measure the screen width, then find it in the table. The required throw distance is shown.
Notes:
1. All dimensions are in inches. See reverse side for metric table.
2. Throw distance is measured from the projector's center
lense to the center of the screen.
istance
Throw D
3. Use the Size function to adjust
image size.
4. These throw distances are
Screen
mimimums, assuming that
Projector
you wish to use the maximum
available phosphor area. Used
correctly, they will deliver the best possible picture. They will, however, require careful attention to proper
setup, as there is little room for error at these distances. We recommend leaving yourself ± 1⁄ 2" (± 1.25 cm)
adjustment leeway in the mounting system for final fine tuning of placement.
5. Throw distance values are for an MP-8 projector with standard HD-8 lenses. For other lens types, contact your
dealer for applicable throw distance formulas.
F.1
THROW DISTANCE TABLES
Table F-1 Throw Distance for MP-8 (cm)
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
270
348.6
339.3
272
351.2
341.8
304.2
274
353.8
344.3
315.2
306.7
276
356.4
346.8
317.7
309.2
278
358.9
349.3
248
320.3
311.7
280
361.5
351.8
274.2
250
322.9
314.3
282
364.1
354.3
276.7
252
325.5
316.8
284
366.7
356.9
286.8
279.2
254
328.0
319.3
286
369.2
359.4
289.4
281.7
256
330.6
321.8
288
371.8
361.9
226
292.0
284.2
258
333.2
324.3
290
374.4
364.4
216.5
228
294.6
286.7
260
335.8
326.8
292
377.0
366.9
219.0
230
297.1
289.2
262
338.3
329.3
294
379.5
369.4
227.6
221.5
232
299.7
291.7
264
340.9
331.8
296
382.1
371.9
178
230.2
224.0
234
302.3
294.2
266
343.5
334.3
298
384.7
374.4
180
232.8
226.5
236
304.9
296.7
268
346.1
336.8
300
387.3
376.9
182
235.3
229.0
184
237.9
231.6
186
240.5
234.1
188
243.1
236.6
190
245.6
239.1
192
248.2
241.6
194
250.8
244.1
196
253.4
246.6
198
255.9
249.1
200
258.5
251.6
202
261.1
254.1
204
263.7
256.6
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
238
307.4
299.2
240
310.0
301.7
264.1
242
312.6
274.0
266.6
244
276.5
269.1
246
216
279.1
271.6
204.0
218
281.7
206.5
220
284.3
214.7
209.0
222
217.3
211.5
224
170
219.9
214.0
172
222.5
174
225.0
176
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
206
266.2
259.1
208
268.8
261.6
194.0
210
271.4
201.9
196.5
212
204.4
199.0
214
160
207.0
201.5
162
209.6
164
212.2
166
168
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
150
194.1
189.0
152
196.7
191.5
154
199.3
156
158
F.2
Instructions:
Measure the screen width, then find it in the table. The required throw distance is shown.
Notes:
1. All dimensions are in centimeters. See reverse side for imperial table.
2. Throw distance is measured from the projector's center
lense to the center of the screen.
istance
Throw D
3. Use the Size function to adjust
image size.
4. These throw distances are
Screen
mimimums, assuming that
Projector
you wish to use the maximum
available phosphor area. Used
correctly, they will deliver the best possible picture. They will, however, require careful attention to proper
setup, as there is little room for error at these distances. We recommend leaving yourself ± 1⁄ 2" (± 1.25 cm)
adjustment leeway in the mounting system for final fine tuning of placement.
5. Throw distance values are for an MP-8 projector with standard HD-8 lenses. For other lens types, contact your
dealer for applicable throw distance formulas.
THROW DISTANCE TABLES
Table F-1 Throw Distance for MP-9 (inches)
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
109
140.2
136.5
110
141.5
137.7
123.9
111
142.7
139.0
128.6
125.2
112
144.0
140.2
129.9
126.5
113
145.3
141.5
102
131.2
127.7
114
146.6
142.7
113.9
103
132.5
129.0
115
147.9
144.0
115.2
104
133.7
130.2
116
149.2
145.2
119.6
116.4
105
135.0
131.5
117
150.5
146.5
120.9
117.7
106
136.3
132.7
118
151.7
147.7
95
122.2
118.9
107
137.6
134.0
119
153.0
149.0
96
123.5
120.2
108
138.9
135.2
120
154.3
150.2
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
97
124.7
121.4
98
126.0
122.7
108.9
99
127.3
113.2
110.2
100
114.5
111.4
101
90
115.7
112.7
82.6
91
117.0
83.9
92
118.3
87.4
85.1
93
88.7
86.4
94
70
90.0
87.6
71
91.3
88.9
72
92.6
90.1
73
93.9
91.4
74
95.2
92.6
75
96.5
93.9
76
97.7
95.2
77
99.0
96.4
78
100.3
97.7
79
101.6
98.9
80
102.9
100.2
81
104.2
101.4
82
105.5
102.7
83
106.7
103.9
84
108.0
105.2
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
85
109.3
106.4
86
110.6
107.7
77.6
87
111.9
81.0
78.9
88
82.3
80.1
89
65
83.6
81.4
66
84.9
67
86.2
68
69
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
60
77.2
75.1
61
78.4
76.4
62
79.7
63
64
Instructions:
Measure the screen width, then find it in the table. The required throw distance is shown.
Notes:
1. All dimensions are in centimeters. See reverse side for imperial table.
2. Throw distance is measured from the projector's center
lense to the center of the screen.
istance
Throw D
3. Use the Size function to adjust
image size.
4. These throw distances are
Screen
mimimums, assuming that
Projector
you wish to use the maximum
available phosphor area. Used
correctly, they will deliver the best possible picture. They will, however, require careful attention to proper
setup, as there is little room for error at these distances. We recommend leaving yourself ± 1⁄ 2" (± 1.25 cm)
adjustment leeway in the mounting system for final fine tuning of placement.
5. Throw distance values are for an MP-9 projector with standard HD-10GT17 lenses. For other lens types,
contact your dealer for applicable throw distance formulas.
F.3
THROW DISTANCE TABLES
Table F-1 Throw Distance for MP-9 (cm)
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
270
347.2
338.0
300.5
272
349.8
340.5
303.0
274
352.4
343.0
313.8
305.5
276
354.9
345.6
246
316.4
308.0
278
357.5
348.1
248
318.9
310.5
280
360.1
350.6
272.9
250
321.5
313.0
282
362.7
353.1
282.9
275.4
252
324.1
315.5
284
365.2
355.6
285.5
277.9
254
326.6
318.0
286
367.8
358.1
224
288.1
280.4
256
329.2
320.5
288
370.4
360.6
226
290.6
283.0
258
331.8
323.0
290
372.9
363.1
215.3
228
293.2
285.5
260
334.4
325.5
292
375.5
365.6
223.8
217.8
230
295.8
288.0
262
336.9
328.0
294
378.1
368.1
226.3
220.4
232
298.4
290.5
264
339.5
330.5
296
380.7
370.6
178
228.9
222.9
234
300.9
293.0
266
342.1
333.0
298
383.2
373.1
180
231.5
225.4
236
303.5
295.5
268
344.6
335.5
300
385.8
375.6
182
234.1
227.9
184
236.6
230.4
186
239.2
232.9
188
241.8
235.4
190
244.3
237.9
192
246.9
240.4
194
249.5
242.9
196
252.1
245.4
198
254.6
247.9
200
257.2
250.4
202
259.8
252.9
204
262.3
255.4
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
238
306.1
298.0
260.4
240
308.6
262.9
242
311.2
272.6
265.4
244
214
275.2
267.9
216
277.8
270.4
202.8
218
280.3
210.9
205.3
220
213.5
207.8
222
168
216.0
210.3
170
218.6
212.8
172
221.2
174
176
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
1.33 throw
distance
1.78 throw
distance
150
192.9
187.8
206
264.9
257.9
152
195.5
154
198.0
190.3
208
267.5
192.8
210
270.1
156
200.6
195.3
212
158
203.2
197.8
160
205.8
200.3
162
208.3
164
166
F.4
Instructions:
Measure the screen width, then find it in the table. The required throw distance is shown.
Notes:
1. All dimensions are in centimeters. See reverse side for imperial table.
2. Throw distance is measured from the projector's center
lense to the center of the screen.
istance
Throw D
3. Use the Size function to adjust
image size.
4. These throw distances are
Screen
mimimums, assuming that
Projector
you wish to use the maximum
available phosphor area. Used
correctly, they will deliver the best possible picture. They will, however, require careful attention to proper
setup, as there is little room for error at these distances. We recommend leaving yourself ± 1⁄ 2" (± 1.25 cm)
adjustment leeway in the mounting system for final fine tuning of placement.
5. Throw distance values are for an MP-9 projector with standard HD-10GT17 lenses. For other lens types,
contact your dealer for applicable throw distance formulas.
Appendix G
Lenses
This appendix describes the relationship between lens type, screen size and throw distance as they apply to
the projector. Please contact your dealer or Madrigal Imaging for additional assistance.
PROJECTOR
LENS
SCREEN WIDTH
RANGE
THROW DISTANCE
RANGE
THROW
DISTANCE
FORMULA
THROW
DISTANCE
FORMULA
1.33
SCREEN
1.78
SCREEN
Series
Type
From
To
From
To
Factory
MP-8
HD-8
60"
120"
76.2"
155.5"
84"
1.2875 x W + 1
1.253 x W + 1
MP-9
HD-10GT17
60"
120"
77.2"
154.3"
84"
1.286 x W
1.252 x W
Notes: 1) “Factory” refers to the throw distance used at the factory for optical setup and testing.
2) All diagonal screen sizes are based on a 4:3 aspect ratio. “W” in the throw distance formula
represents horizontal screen width. All dimensions are in inches.
3) Calculated values are for reference only. It is good practice to simulate the setup to determine
the necessary throw distance.
G.1
Index
A
ACON
definition, A.1
setup, 2.35
ASI, 3.35
definition, A.1
logic diagram C.1
set up for, 2.31
ASI with Save 3.35
logic diagram C.2
Aspect Ratio
definition, A.1
of screens, 2.5
ASR, 3.35
definition, A.1
logic diagram, C.1
set up for, 2.32
turning on/off, 3.36
Audio
connections, 2.16
mute function, 3.9
volume function, 3.9
Auto Power-up 3.43
Automatic Convergence, 3.21
definition, A.1
B
Baud Rate
setting of, 3.46
Blanking Functions, 3.20
Blanking Time, 3.43
Bow, 3.25
definition, A.2
Brightness, 3.17
definition, A.2
Built-in Keypad, 3.2
C
Ceiling Mount, 2.12
Channel Cycling, 3.50
Channel List, 3.40
definition, A.2
programming channels, 3.40
the use of, 3.12
Channel Selection, 3.12
Clamping, 3.20
Clock
setting the, 3.46
Clock/Events, 3.46
Color, 3.18
Color Temperature, 3.19
definition, A.2
Communication Cables, D.1
Contrast, 3.17
definition, A.3
Convergence
ACON, 3.31
definition, A.3
guided, 3.28
interpolated, 3.29
on image, 3.28
random access, 3.30
reset, 3.28
types of, 3.27
Copy Setup, 3.35
Cover Removal, 3.2
D
Decoder
definition, A.3
described, H.1
selecting options, 3.21
signal route selection, 3.22
use of, 2.15
video standard, 3.21
Detail, 3.18
Dialog Boxes, 3.5
Diffused Screens, 2.14
Display Adjustments, 3.16
convergence, 3.27
geometry, 3.24
picture, 3.19
primary, 3.17
Display Settings
list of, 3.19, 3.10
Guidelines
for projector use, 4.1
H
Help, 3.6
context help, 3.6
guided, 3.7
I
Input Memories, 3.15
listing of, 3.42
Input parameters
display of, 3.9, 3.10
Installation, 2.1
considerations, 2.2
types, 2.2
Interfaces
built-in RGB, 2.15
optional, 2.15, H.1
Internal Frequencies, 3.39
Interpolated Convergence, 3.29
IR Sensor, 3.44
K
Error Messages
ACON, 3.32
Expandability, 1.2
Keypad
Backlit control, 2.11
battery installation, 2.10
controls, 3.3
conversion, 2.8
guide, 3.7
illustration, 3.3, E.1
jumper wires, 2.9
operating settings, 2.10, 3.44
protocol, 2.8, 2.11
types, 3.1
usage, 3.4
Keystone, 3.24
definition, A.5
F
L
Fast/Slow sync, 3.20
Focus
electrical, 3.20
optical, 2.17
Learn Screen
definition, A.5
Learn Screen (ACON), 3. 33
Leg Adjustment, 2.12
Lighting, 2.6
Linearity, 3.26
definition, A.5
Locator Assembly, A.5
Locked Setup Memories, 3.16
how to lock/unlock, 3.36
E
G
Geometry Functions, 3.24
Glossary, A-1
Guided Convergence, 3.28
Guided Setup
mechanical, 2.17
source, 2.26
INDEX.1
Index
M
Mechanical Setup
guided tutorial, 3.7
Memory
set up of, 2.29
Menu Tree, B-1
Menus, 3.5
Message Boxes, 3.6
Mirror
the use of, 2.14
Mounting
front screen, 2.12
rear screen, 2.13
Multi-projector Functions, 3.51
Multi-standard Decoder
described, H.1
Mute, 3.9
O
Operating Settings
display of, 3.9, 3.10
Optical alignment, 2.17
Optical Screens, 2.13
Optical Setup
guided, 3.7
P
Pincushion, 3.25
definition, A.6
Position, 3.19
Power
connection of, 2.15
requirements, 2.15
turning on/off, 3.18
Preferences, 3.43
Presentation Level, 3.4
Programmable Events, 3.44, 3.47
Projection Room
lighting, 2.6
reflections, 2.6
windows, 2.6
Projector
construction, 1.2
cover removal, 3.2
description, 1.1
identification number, 3.45
mounting, 2.12
position, 2.6, 2.7
selection of, 3.51
upgrading, 1.2
usage guidelines, 4.1
INDEX.2
Protocol
changing keypad, 2.8
definition, A.6
Q
Quick Setup
instructions, 2.1
R
Random Access Convergence, 3.30
Recall Memories, 3.15
definition, A.6
listing of, 3.41, 3.42
Regulatory Approvals, 5.4
Remote Control
preference options, 3.44
Remote Jack, 3.45
Retrace Time, 3.21
Reverse Scan
setup, 2.11
RGB Interface, 2.15
S
Screen
aspect ratio, 2.5
diffused, 2.14
gain, A.3
optical, 2.13, A.6
size, 2.15
types, 2.3
Screen Messages, 3.43
Serial Port
cables, D.1
connections, 2.16
Service
locations, 1.2
manuals, 1.2
when to, 4.2
Setup
ASI, 2.31
guided, 3.7
of Input memories, 2.30
of Recall memories, 2.31
quick, 2.1
using internal frequencies, 3.39
Setup Memories, 3.14
allocation of, 3.16
clearing, 3.39
locking, 3.16, 3.36
number of, 3.16
types of, 3.15
Setup Memory
definition, A.7
Size Function, 3.19, 3.24
Skew, 3.26
Slidebar
definition, A.7
described, 3.5
Source
connections, 2.15
definition, A.7
message, 3.13
selection, 3.10
selection guide, 3.7
selection of, 3.10, 3.13
setup menu, 3.35
Source Setup
guided tutorial, 3.7
Specifications, 5.1
Standby Mode, 3.8
Status Pages, 3.9, 3.10
Switcher
connection of, 2.15
described, H.1
using ASR with, 2.34
T
Test Patterns
how to display, 3.6
Throw Distance
calculating, 2.5
definition, A.8
tables, F.1
Tint, 3.18
Trouble-shooting, 4.3
Tutorials, 3.7
U
Utility Features, 3.34
V
Volume, 3.9
W
Warm Up Time, 3.8
Warnings, 4.1
Warranty, 5.4
White Balance, 3.19
90-DAY LIMITED WARRANTY
Valid in the United States and Canada only
This MADRIGAL IMAGING® product is warranted to be
free from defects in material and workmanship under normal
use for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase.
To extend the warranty of this MADRIGAL IMAGING
product, return the warranty registration card along with a
copy of the original receipt of purchase to Madrigal Audio
Laboratories, Inc., P. O. Box 781, Middletown, CT 06457.
The extended warranty for this MADRIGAL IMAGING
product is one (1) year for the tubes, and three (3) years for
everything else, from the date of purchase. During the warranty
period, any MADRIGAL IMAGING component exhibiting
defects in materials and/or workmanship will be repaired or
replaced, at our option, without charge for either parts or labor.
The warranty will not apply to any MADRIGAL IMAGING
component that has been misused, abused or altered.
Any MADRIGAL IMAGING subassembly not performing
satisfactorily may be returned to the factory for evaluation.
Return authorization must first be obtained by either calling
or writing the factory prior to shipping the subassembly. The
factory will pay for return shipping charges only in the event
that the subassembly is found to be defective as above mentioned. There are other stipulations that may apply to shipping
charges.
There is no other express warranty on this component.
Neither this warranty nor any other warranty, express or
implied, including any implied warranties of merchantability
or fitness, shall extend beyond the warranty period. No
responsibility is assumed for any incidental or consequential
damages. Some states do not allow limitations on how long an
implied warranty lasts and other states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so
that the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to you.
Service…
We take great pride in our dealers. Experience, dedication,
and integrity make these professionals ideally suited to assist
with our customers’ needs.
Madrigal’s Technical Services Department is set up to solve
technical problems efficiently. Its philosophy is based on the
knowledge that you’ve made a substantial investment in
audio/video equipment of exceptional quality. It is the intent
of the Technical Services Department to provide service to
match that investment.
If your MADRIGAL IMAGING component requires service, contact your dealer for assistance. Alternatively, you may
contact Madrigal directly, and we will work with your dealer.
It is extremely important that information about a problem
be explicit and complete, and include the serial number of
the unit. This helps us locate and repair a defect as quickly
as possible.
A copy of the original bill of sale must be included to verify
warranty status.
In the extremely unlikely case that a circuit module or unit
must be returned to Madrigal, the unit must be properly packaged (in its original packing material), and the proper return
authorization number must be marked on the outer carton for
easy identification. Improper packaging may lead to unnecessary freight damage which will not be covered by the freight
carrier. If the packaging in which we receive a unit is, in our
opinion, inadequate to protect the unit, we reserve the right
to repackage it for return shipment at the owner’s expense.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may
also have other rights which vary from state to state. This
warranty is applicable in the United States and Canada only.
Outside of the U.S. and Canada, please contact your local,
authorized Madrigal Imaging distributor for warranty and
service information.
MADRIGAL AUDIO LABORATORIES, INC.
2081 South Main Street / P.O. Box 781
Middletown, Connectucut 06457-0781 USA
(860) 346-0896 FAX (860) 346-6251
http://www.madrigal.com
Madrigal Audio Laboratories, Inc.
2081 South Main Street, P.O. Box 781
Middletown, Connecticut 06457 USA
Telephone: (860) 346-0896
Fax: (860) 346-1540
http://www.madrigal.com
is a registered trademark of Madrigal Audio Laboratories, Inc.
a Harman International company
P630130
© 4/2000 Madrigal Audio Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
Printed in U.S.A.
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