advisory neighborhood commission 3-c

advisory neighborhood commission 3-c
r
December 21, 1987
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners'
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Ftoger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
I.
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
December 21, 1987
(Regular Meeting)
The following resolution was adopted by majority voice vote:
WHEREAS Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C has evaluated the
scope of work required by its Treasurer and has determined that
the most efficient way to fulfill its monthly and quarterly
reporting obligations to the Commission and the D.C. Auditor,
and to reconcile the monthly bank statement is to obtain the
services of a qualified accountant;
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED That the Treasurer of ANC 3-C is
authorized to engage on a month-to-month basis the services of
a certified accountant at a fee not to exceed $150 per month.
II.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C hereby authorizes a one-time $200
holiday bonus/payment for its Executive Director.
III.
The attached resolution, concerning the Iona House medically supe
day care center Certificate of Need application, was adopted by unanimous
voice vote.
IV.
The attached resolution, concerning a Wisconsin/Upton traffic sig
was adopted by unanimous voice vote.
V.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: ANC 3-C supports the position of the McLean Gardens
Condominium regarding the request of the Holladay Corporation
for parking meters on Idaho Avenue. That is, ANC 3-C supports
the installation of metered angled parking on the retail store
side of Idaho Avenue between Wisconsin Avenue and Newark Street.
Further, ANC 3-C authorizes Phil Mendelson to represent the
Commission on this issue.
cont'd...
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
2
December 21, 1987
VI.
The attached resolution, regarding Connecticut Avenue (Cleveland
zoning, was adopted by unanimous voice vote.
VII.
The Commission committed a proposed resolution, concerning zonin
for low density local neighborhood commercial centers, to the Planning &
Zoning Committee, to be reported out at the Commission's regular January
meeting.
VIII.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That it
authorizes the Chairman, her designee, or Phil Mendelson to
represent the Commission in upcoming hearings on Zoning Case
87-2 along the following general lines (the advice and recommendations of ANC 3-C to be more fully presented in written and
oral testimony):
1. That it strongly supports the proposed amendment #1 in the
public notice. Accordingly, amendment #2 is not desirable.
2. That it strongly supports the proposed amendment #3.
3. That it strongly opposes amendment
IX.
it4.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
WHEREAS ANC 3-C is interested in developing and distributing
a newsletter to residents in the ANC;
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: That the Commission authorize an
amount of up to $3,200 for expenditure under the supervision
of the Communications Committee for the purpose of printing
and distributing an ANC 3-C newsletter. This is in addition
to the authorization adopted November 23, 1987.
X.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C: That it send a letter to the Department of Public Works in support of the relighting of the urns
and the repainting of the Klingle Valley Bridge, and the placement of Historic District markers at four entrances to the
Cleveland Park Historic District.
XI.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: To adopt the minutes (which include the Summary of
Actions) as follows:
1. For August 24, 1987;
2. For September 28, 1987 with the following changes:
cont'd...
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
- 3 -
December 21, 1987
a) Insert Resolution No. IV in the Summary of Actions
b) Correct Resolution No. X to correspond to the Treasurer's report;
c) Move the first paragraph on page 3 to page 2 of the
Minutes — as the new paragraph 4 on page 2.
3. For October 26, 1987;
4. For November 23, 1987.
Further, the Secretary is authorized to correct obvious typographical
errors in these minutes and to conform the official copies with these
corrections.
ATTEST:
^Phil Mendelson, Secretary
Attachments: Iona House day care center resolution
Wisconsin/Upton traffic signal resolution
Connecticut Avenue rezoning resolution
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
01 -Cheryl Opacinch
02Sam Friedman
03John A. Jenkins
04Roger Bums
05Peggy Robin
06Phil Mendelson
07Patricia Wamsley
08David Grinnell
09Peter Espenschied
RESOLUTION
IONA HOUSE MEDICALLY SUPERVISED DAY CARE CENTER
(Certificate of Need Application 87-3-4)
Adopted: December 21, 1987
WHEREAS: The Iona House Day Health Center has been in operation at
3720 Upton Street N.W., Washington, D.C. since August 1986 in space
rented from the Washington Home as an adult day care center approved
"as a social model"; and
WHEREAS: Although this program is funded in part through the D.C.
Office on Aging, provision also is made for individual reimbursement
in accordance with ability to pay, and, where available, from third
party payments; and
WHEREAS: The requirements of the D.C. Office of Health Care Financing
require Certificate of Need (CON) certification from the State Health
Planning and Development Agency (SHPDA) for approval as a Medicaid
Provider for reimbursement from that agency (see Letter of Intent dated
October 27, 1987 from Program Director); and
WHEREAS: Under current SHPDA requirements Iona House must reapply for
its Certificate of Need as a Medical Provider and reestablish community
support from the ANC; therefore
BE IT RESOLVED: That Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C reaffirms
its earlier position in support of Iona House's application for a
therapeutic day care center for older adults as a needed facility in
this area of Northwest Washington.
Adopted by unanimous voice vote of the Commission, December 21, 1987
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
' RESOLUTION
Re. DPW Docket No. 87-265-TS
(Wisconsin/Upton Traffic Signal)
Adopted: December 21, 1987
WHEREAS: The Department of Public Works (DPW) has asked for comments
on a proposed traffic signal at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street (Dec. 4,
1987 D.C. Register, Docket No. 87-265-TS); and
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-F has asked that the comment period be extended until February 1, 1988; and
WHEREAS: This issue is of great importance to the constituents of
ANC 3-C; therefore
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That we raise
the following issues and concerns in connection with a signal at Upton and
Wisconsin:
CONCERN: DPW officials have stated repeatedly that the Department would
make no changes in traffic measures in this area until after the 4000 Wisconsin Avenue building was in full operation and until both the Department and
the community (including the ANCs) could see what traffic conditions will
exist and how they would be affected by measures such as a signal.
We endorse that policy and the Department should hold to it.
CONCERN: We support and offer as our own the sentiment of ANC 3-F (per
their letter of December 9, 1987) that substantial community input is needed
before the record closes on this rulemaking, and therefore the public comment period should be extended until February 1, 1988.
This is consistent
with the Department's objectives of fully understanding and serving the community.
Moreover, ANC 3-C specifically requests copies of any correspondence
from developers or tenants (or their agents) which requests traffic signals
or other changes in traffic controls in the vicinity of 4000 Wisconsin Avenue.
CONCERN: We have grave doubts about the efficacy of this signal.
We
are deeply concerned about the probable and direct impact of the proposed
signalization; particularly the impact on residential Upton Street east of
Wisconsin Avenue, and generally the effect on other east-west streets in
the area.
The proposed signalization would appear to threaten the local
residential character of Upton, 37th, and 38th Streets, and that is unacceptable to ANC 3-C and a dangerous precedent for other east-west streets
in the area.
DPW has not provided information in this regard.
Nor has it
provided a description of the particular type of traffic signal to be in-
Resolution
Re. 87-265-TS
December 21, 1987
Page Two
stalled. We are thus asked to comment without a full understanding of the
implications and alternatives, if any, to the rulemaking. Accordingly, we
hereby request a feasibility study by DPW dealing with these issues.
CONCERN: DPW should not proceed with any change in traffic operations
until measures which simultaneously mitigate the impact on the adjoining
neighborhood are formally proposed and adopted. Residents of Upton, Van
Ness, Tilden, Idaho, 37th, and 38th streets are currently discussing proposals. This process will be negatively aggravated if DPW proceeds now
solely with this rulemaking and the traffic signal.
CONCERN: Separate from simultaneous mitigation measures, ANC 3-C is
concerned about dealing in a fragmentary manner with traffic "improvements"
connected with the worsening conditions in the Wisconsin/Van Ness area.
Before closing the record on this docket, DPW is hereby asked to inform
ANCs 3-C, 3-E, and 3-F of the entire realm of changes under consideration
and their liklihood of adoption: street widenings, removal of curb parking,
reversible lanes, additional signals, stop signs, barriers, thru-truck and
bus prohibitions, changes in existing signals, changes in existing curb
cuts, left turn signals/lanes, etc. The scope of this request is Van Ness
Street on the north, 37th Street on the east, Porter Street on the south,
and Nebraska Avenue on the west. We also request an estimate of their cost.
CONCERN: The imposition of traffic signals to facilitate commuter
traffic related to office buildings must be coupled with specific and
effective measures to encourage public transit use as an alternative.
For example, if the developers or tenants of 4000 Wisconsin are requesting
this signal, they should be required to offer Metro incentives as a trade-
off.
Adopted by unanimous voice vote of the Commission, December 21, 1987
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
01-
0203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
RogerBurns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
PatriciaWamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
_
RESOLUTION
Re. Connecticut Avenue (Cleveland Park) Rezoning
Adopted: December 21, 1987
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C (ANC 3-C), the Cleveland
Park Historical Society (CPHS), the Tenley and Cleveland Park Emergency
Committee (TACPEC), and the Wisconsin Avenue Corridor Committee (WACC)
have jointly sponsored a petition before the Zoning Commission to rezone
the portion of Connecticut Avenue that falls within the Cleveland Park
Historic District, for the purpose of ensuring consistency with the
Comprehensive Plan and to preserve its historic and local-neighborhoodservice character; and
WHEREAS: All the co-petitioners have been consulted and have agreed
upon the principal facts and reasons to be presented in the case; and
WHEREAS: There is limited time for each petitioner to put forward its
views, and a desire to avoid duplication of testimony and use the time
available to put forward those witnesses who can speak with the most
authority about each of the different concerns (e.g., traffic, Comprehensive Plan compliance, integration of historic preservation and urban
planning goals) that petitioners wish to raise in this complex and
important case;
THEREFORE BE IT NOW RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C:
That it adopt as its own the "Pre-Hearing Submission" filed on November
30, 1987 with the Zoning Commission by Tersh Boasberg on behalf of all
four petitioners named above, and that it authorize the witnesses named
therein to represent its views and concerns in the hearings set for
January 21, 25, and 28, 1988; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: that ANC 3-C request the Zoning Commission to
include in the case a parcel of land along Connecticut Avenue, west side,
between Macomb Street and Newark Street, N.W. (Lot 686, Square 2082) now
occupied by the Cleveland Park Library, which was omitted by clerical
error from the listing of lots and squares in the Notice of Hearing; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That the Chairman of this ANC, Peggy Robin, Lisa
Koteen, or a designee to be appointed by the Chairman may also represent
the ANC's views in this case.
ATTEST:
Phil Mendelson, Secretary
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
MINUTES
Regular Meeting
December 21, 1987
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
I.
The meeting was called to order by the Chair at 8:19 p.m.
Cheryl
Opacinch
Sam
Friedman
The following
Commissioners were present: John Jenkins,, Peggy
John A. Jenkins
Robin,Burns
Sam Friedman, Roger Burns, Phil Mendelson and Pat Wamsley.
Roger
Peggy
Robin being present,
A quorun
the posting of notice of the meeting was
Phil Mendelson
veri f i Wamsley
ed.
Patricia
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
II.
Announcement was made about a Park and Shop rally scheduled
for January 16 at 2:00 p.m. sponsored by the Cleveland Park
Historical Society in opposition to the large scale development
proposed for the site. Also, requests for nominations to a Hall
of Fame are invited by the D.C. Commission on Women.
III.
Minutes were deferred to later
IV.
Tresurer’s Report
in the meeting.
The Executive Director was asked to leave the room.
Thereupon, the Treasurer proposed a resolution to provide a
holiday-time bonus to the Commission's Executive Director, which
was written by the Secretary. After brief discussion ascertaining
that this is not inappropriate for a consultant relationship, the
resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote.
Sam Friedman introduced a resolution to engage the services
of an accountant to computerized the ANC’s accounts, balance the
check book and prepare monthly and quarterly reports required by
the D.C. Auditor and the Commission. After discussion the
resolution was adopted by majority voice vote.(Summary of
Actions, Item II)
A $25.00 contribution
considered and declined.
V.
to the D.C Preservation League was
Committee Reports
A.
Health and Human Services
Ruth Haugen requested a resolution (moved by Phil
Mendelson) reaffirming the Commission’s support for an
application for a Certificate of Need by Iona House to continue
to operate an adult day center at the Washington Home. After
discussion the Commission adopted the resolution with minor
amendments by unanimous voice vote. (Summary of Actions, Item 111)
B.
Iransportation
Charles Warr reported on traffic issues on Upton Street.
The Department of Public Worl-s has proposed signalizing the
intersection at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street to assist the
development at 4000 Wisconsin Avenue. The proposed rulemaking
does not detail the nature of the signal to be installed or speak
to potential impact and steps to alieviate its impact on the
adjacent neighborhood. Phil Mendel son introduced a resolution
asking: for more information, for a delay in taking any action
until neighborhood protective measures are taken, and until ANC
3-F and the community have participated more fully. After some
discussion and comments from residents of Porter agd Quebec
Streets attending the meeting, the Commission adopted the
resolution by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item IV)
Charles Warr reported on the proposed metered parking on
Idaho Avenue at McLean Gardens. The McLean Gardens Condominium
Association has endorsed angle parking at meters as a way to
provide parking and to prevent the street from being made
two-way. Phil Mendel son introduced a resolution supporting angled
meter parking which was adopted'by the Commission by unanimous
voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item V)
C. Planning and Zoning
The Chair reported on the Connecticut Avenue case which
is scheduled for hearing begining January 14 with sign up to
testify by January 4. The Chair introduced a resolution to have
the Cleveland Park Library site included in the case. The
resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of
Actions, Item VI.)
The Chair reported on the proposed plan for development
of Tregaron. The property has not yet been purchased by the
developer. The Friends of Tregaron have been reformed and the
Chair will continue to track activity.on this issue.
Phil Mendel son brought up a resolution on the rationale
for ANC 3-C7 s support of C-2-A for the Woodley Park neighborhood
center area and C—1 for the Murhpy7s/Giant local neighborhood
center area. The resolution introduced in November- had been
considered favorably by the F'lannign
Zoning Committee; After
discussion, Phil Mendelson moved to commit, and the Commission,
by unanimous voice vote, referred the matter back to the Planning
& Zoning Committee for further examination. (Summary of Actions,
Item VII)
Phil Mendelson introduced a resolution on vesting,
authorising the ANC15 position to be represented at the public
hearing January 7, 1987 on case? number 87-2. The resolution was
adopted by unanimous voice vote. Phil Mendelson will represent
the Commission.(Summary of Actions, Item VIII)
Phil Mendelson gave an update report on the TACPEC
activity.
Charles Warr reported on St Thomas school and the need to
follow up with a letter and phone cal I.
Charles Warr reported on the Sheraton Hotel Zoning
violations. A foilow up phone call to the Commission’s request
that the Hotel be cited for violations is needed.
The Chair reported on an application before the BZA by
residents on Highland Place. She will follow the issue on an SMD
basis.
The Chair reported on a letter received from the Swedish
Ambassador indicating their intent to go forward with their
proposed chancery office development.
■
D. Communications
Roger Burns introduced a resolution authorising up to
$3200 (not including the $600.00 previously authorized -for
editorial services) -for the development and distribution of the
ANC newsletter. Discussion involved whether this cost was
excessive but also the need to put out a long-needed newsletter.
The resolution was passed by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of
Actions, Item IX)
E. Historic Preservation and Landmarks
The Chair introduced a resolution on the KJ. ingle
Bridge: to support the relighting of the urns and repaintingthe
iron work. It was adopted by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of
Actions, Item X)
VI.
The Minutes For August 24, September 28, October 26 and
November 23 were approved (with corrections to September 28) by
unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item XI.)
VII.
Administrative and Other Business
Roger Burns reported on the work in progress to evaluate
copier equipment and a personal computer and printer for the
office. Susan Straus had assisted with a great deal of research.
Additional information will be provided at the next meeting.
The Chair announced that Richard Ridley is in GW
University Hospital. The Commissioners will make personal
contributions to send flowers on behalf of the ANC.
VIII. SMD Reports
Sam Friedman reported on the proposed use of the David Lee
property at Connecticut and Woodley as a conference center by
Stanford University.
IX. There being no other business the meeting was adjourned at
10:30 p.m.
Approved: _J///__
Qf'rr e i a
t#
r
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
AGENDA
Regular Meeting
December 21, 1987
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
I.
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
II.
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
III.
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
Call to Order
Verification of Notice and Announcements
Minutes
Minutes of August, September, October and November
Regular meetings
IV.
Community Forum
V.
Treasurer's Report
D.C. Preservation League Grant request
Alice Deal Report
Accountant Services - Resolution
VI.
Committee Reports
A. Human Services and Aging
Iona House Day Health Center - Resolution
B. Planning and Zoning
Report on Conn Ave Case- Resoultion
Tregaron
Cl or C2, A Rationale, -Resolution
Vesting Case 87-2 Resolution
Vesting Public Hearing Jan 7
Update on TACPEC
St Thomas School Site
Outreach on Upton Street Issues
Sheaton Zoning Violations
C. Transportation
Traffic light at Upton and Wisconsin Proposed RulemakingResolution
Metered Parking at Idaho Ave/McLean Gardens
D. Communications
Report on Newsletter-Resolution
E. Historic Preservations and Landmarks
Klingle Bridge- Resolution
F. Other Business and Administrative Matters
Office equipment
Computer/printer
Copy Machine
VII. v.SMD Reports
VIII.
A
ANNOUNCEMENTS
1. . D.C. Commission, for Women is having its First Annual Hall of Fame
and requests nominations fro ANC's.
A form is in each
Commissioner"s packet. Nominations must be received by Dec 31.
For more information call 486 4034
2.
Nominations for membership on the D.C. Commission on the Arts
and Humanities are being accepted and are due bu Dec 31.
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
RES0ULTI0N
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
IONA HOUSE MEDICALLY SUPERVISED.DAY.
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson Certificate of Need Application
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
CARE CENTER
87-3-4
WHEREAS:
the Iona House Day Health Center has been in operation at
3720 Upton Street N.W., Washington, D.C. since August 1986 in space
rented from the Washington Home as an adult day care center approved
"as a social model"; and
WHEREAS:
this
D.C. Office oh
imbursement in
party payments
\
program is funded in part through the
Aging, provision also is
made for individual reaccordance with abiltiy to pay, and,where available,from third
and;
WHEREAS:
the requirements of the D.C. Office of Health Care Financing
require Certificate of Need (CON) certification from the State Health
Planning and Development Agency (SHPDA) for approval as a Medicaid
provider for re-imbursement from that agency, (see Letter of Intent dated
October 27, 1987 from Program Director)and;
WHEREAS:
under current SHPDA requirements Iona House must reapply for
its Certificate of Need as a Meducal Provider and reestablish community
support from the ANC; therefore
BE.IT RESOLVED:
that Adivsory Neighborhood Commission 3-C reaffirms
its earlier position in support of Iona House's application for a
therapeutic day care center for older adults as a needed facility in
this area of Northwest Washington.
ATTEST:
Phil Mendelson, Secretary
COMMUNICATIONS REPORT
including: Resolution for budget allocation,
and recommendation to hire Barbara Kraft
as our newletter editor
HIRE AN EDITOR: Many Commissioners have missed having a newsletter,
and the alleged Communications chair doesn't appear on the verge of
ekeing one out by himself. I concur with the sentiment expressed at
the housekeeping meeting that we hire a newsletter editor to do this
job for us.
I recommend that we hire Barbara Kraft as our newsletter editor.
Ms. Kraft is a writer, an editor, and an historian, and has worked
professionally as a newsletter editor at various times for 3
different organizations. She has been a resident of Cleveland Park for
over 25 years and has long shown an interest in community affairs.
Barbara was instrumental in starting up the Annual Book Sale for the
Cleveland Park Library, and she currently serves as treasurer for the
Society of Architectural Historians.
PROCEDURE FOR HIRING: I recommend that as a matter of procedure we should
hire a newsletter editor on a trial basis, initially contracting for
one newsletter at a time for approximately 2 newsletters. Then we
should make a decision about a longer term arrangement.
DISTRIBUTION ? I still have NO means of creating or re-creating a
"teenagers network" for distribution. If no one does this, the
alternative (discussed months ago) is for us to print much fewer
newsletters - only as many as individual Commissioners can distribute
to their neighborhoods. Whatever the distribution system may be, we
must be certain of HOW MANY copies we need before we can order the
newsletter to be printed. That's a necesity.
BUDGET RECOMMENDATION:
Printing 8,000 copies
by Tyler Press
$700
Editor's fee
{ Norma earned $10/hr for being editor &
for office work; perhaps being editor
alone is worth $12 ? in any event, these
ballpark figures are acceptable to Ms. Kraft
Also, a talk with Lynn Kamarck yields an
estimate that doing the entire newsletter may
take 40 or 50 or more hours }
Distribution
{ Our past records show that the old
"teenagers network" had cost us about
$400 per issue }
for 1st trial:
variable, up to $600 max
$400
TOTAL: $1700
REPORTS { No resolutions proposed }
SUPERMARKET TAX INCENTIVES BILL update:
The bill initially seemed stalled in John Wilson's Committee on Finance
Revenue. Some effective lobbying, guided by advice from astute political
|^>servers in Wilson's own Ward, has gotten the bill going again. The bill,
with some prospective amendments, might be of help to the Shirazi brothers
with regard to the SAFEWAY building (specifically via property tax
abatements).
HOUSING:
Berkshire Apts: Negotiations between the landlord and the tenants
are coming to a head as the landlord's ultimatum (on how to proceed
with a rent increase) approaches a deadline of this Monday at 5PM.
The rent increase issue may wind up back at an RACD hearing (which
DCRA is NOT looking forward to).
Roger
which
Roger
chair
Burns has been chosen to serve on the TOPAC Legal Task Force,
will consider rent control reforms in 1988. Amongst others,
serves with David Conn, the Berkshire Tenants legal committee
and newly elected President of the Berkshire Tenants Association.
Asbestos Licensing & Control Act of 1987: This bill, introduced last
spring by Dave Clarke, was revived by the TOPAC group and saw a hearing
on Nov. 12 in John Ray's committee on Consumer & Regulatory Affairs.
The excellent testimony of David Conn clearly impressed Clarke, Ray,
and Nathanson, and the bill is expected to be greatly strengthened
as a result of the hearing. The bill will require stringent standards
for asbestos abatement in DC, and will require a long period of notice
^ to tenants of residential buildings if such work is to be done.
RESOLUTION to encourage volunteers
to join & serve on an
EDUCATION COMMITTEE for ANC-3C
The purpose o£ the following resolution is justify the placing of an
item in our next press release to the NW Current & the Uptown Citizen
stating that we would like citizen volunteers to serve on an active
ANC-3C Education Committee. The resolution may be unnecesary for putting
such an item in the release, but I do want to recommend that we take
advantage of the free advertising available to us via our monthly report
to the local papers, in order to find people who will perform a function
that we all feel is valuable but cannot take the time to do ourselves.
Perhaps we could also put the word out to other concerned groups PTAs or whatever - that this option is available to interested citizens.
WHEREAS issues relating to education are a major and important
responsibility in the life of our community, and
Advisory Neighborhood Commissions have a role to play
in helping to form District Government policies on
these issues,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by ANC-3C that we actively encourage
interested citizens to participate in the Education
Committee of this Commission.
t
Communications Committee Resolution For Newsletter Expense
Whereas ANC 3-C is interested in developing and distributing
a Newsletter to residents in the ANC
Therefore be it resolved that the Commission authorize an
amount of up to $
for expenditure under the supervision
of the Communications Committee for the purpose of printing and
distributing an ANC 3-C newsletter.
REPORT ON PURCHASING A
PC COMPUTER & PRINTER FOR ANC-3C
Roger Burns
12-21-87
SUMMARY CONCLUSION:
Amongst those of us who are most involved in this topic ( i.e.
Cheryl, Peter, Peggy, & myself ), there is a consensus that the
kind of PC we should purchase is an IBM AT clone. Also, the particular AT clone offered by Community Computers of 1617 K St. NW
is probably an excellent buy. It goes for $1500 - $2000, depending
on the options.
There are a variety of other costs relating to software and
support that the Commission may want to pay for; however, there are
also very inexpensive alternatives to these options.
Regarding printers, there is no clear consensus now. Although
there are 100-odd printers on the market that one could choose from,
I present here a list of some preferable alternatives which I have
gleaned from a consumer-review article which recently appeared in a
well-regarded computer magazine. The major trade-offs are between
print quality, speed, and price. The available price range is from
$550 - $1800 (store price, not list).
II. WHY BUY AN "AT CLONE" ?
There are 3 kinds of IBM PCs (or compatibles) in existence now.
There's the lower-level "88" based PCs - the original IBM PC and
its upgraded version, the XT; the middle-level "286" based PC which is the AT; and the upper-level, new PS/2 class of PCs just
coming on to the market now.
The new PS/2 class of PCs in general have much more power than
we really need, so they would not be a good buy for us. (Some of
them have a more appropriate level of power, but they cost much more
than they should given their abilities - this is often true of newly
released models, as you know.)
The lower-level "88" based PCs are probably good enough for our
needs, except that this kind of technology is soon to be outmoded.
Please note that the ANC will often be using software that Individual
Commissioners will donate to our computer, and that in the near future
this donated software will be based on middle-level "286" technology.
As we will want to make a long term investment that will be able to take
advantage of what the new basic standard for software will be, we want
a PC that is based on middle-level "286" technology (if it's not too
expensive), that is, we want an AT. It is widely recognized by experts
that the AT will be the standard amongst PCs for the next 5 years, if
not longer, and in spite of the newly-developed PS/2 class which is coming
out now.
•
Why buy a clone of the AT ? Well, manufacturers who have copied the
original IBM AT have gotten so good that IBM has left the market - they
don't make ATs anymore ! It's just as well, since the clones are so good
and cost so much less.
Ill
EXTRA COSTS: SOFTWARE & SUPPORT
The Commission will need software for its PC, otherwise it won't run!
An option at one extreme is that all of the needed word-processing, and
other, software will be donated by individual Commissioners and can be
supplemented with good how-to manuals that are easily purchased at local
bookstores. (This is an option I recommend.) On the other hand, we can
obtain our own software with other options (Cheryl prefers on-line
support). Software packages can run from $200 - $450.
REPORT ON PURCHASING
PC & PRINTER
page 2 of 3
111A. PC OPTIONS
The Community Computers AT clone comes with a monitor (monochrome),
keyboard, & a 20 meg hard disk for a total of $1495. A small speed
■pgrade is $100 (from 6/10 Mhz to 12/6 Mhz), a 40 meg hard disk would
MDe $350 more, a modem (300/1200 baud) is $99. I recommend we get no
speed upgrade, consider a larger hard disk at a later time, and think
about a modem (enables telephone communication).
IV. PRINTERS - IN GENERAL
There is much debate on what we should purchase regarding a printer.
The general options are:
daisy-wheel printer - highest quality print, and inexpensive
(most $350 - $500, some $600-$900)
but slow (most 16-31 cps; one has
56 cps)
dot-matrix printer - varying quality of print depending
on model, and many people are
satisfied in general with the quality
of print while many others are not;
middle range in price ($550-$900);
standard speed for many business uses
(about 66 cps in near-letter-quality
mode)
laser printer - print quality better than dot-matrix,
although not up to daisy-wheel standard;
price range $1200 - $1800 and up;
speed: around 300 cps ; other features too
Some of the strong sentiments expressed by interested Commissioners are:
When we have long reports we will need fast printing - we can afford top
quality now, so we should by a fast laser printer.
OR: Our office never needs fast printing, there's no sense in spending
for qualities we don't need, so given the importance of price & print
quality we should strongly consider a daisy-wheel printer.
There is a consensus on ensuring that we get a low- or no-maintenance
machine, & that it should be easy to feed single sheets (such as letterhead) into our printer.
V. SORTING OUT THE CHOICES
I recommend that we take advantage of the study recently made by the
renowned PC Magazine on the specific brands of printers available.
(I've attached a copy of selected pages of that study following this
report.) In particular, we should look at the featured Editor's Choices
in each category.
The Commission will, however need to debate the acceptable price range,
print quality, and desired speed. PLEASE form opinions on as many of these
qualities as you can. Also note: some favorite choices may be unavailable
or hard to get. A Primage 90-GT daisy-wheel may have great print quality,
a moderate price at $900, and an adequate speed at 56 cps, but a short
search on my part has not yet found a Washington dealer who sells daisywheel printers. So we should debate more about qualities we're looking
for, unless we settle on a popular item we know is available, like an
Epson dot-matrix, or a Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Series II.
t
VI . GUIDE TO PRINTERS
A table of contents for the accompanying reprint:
TOPIC
PAGES
INTRO / GEN'L DISCUSSION
DAISY WHEELS
DOT-MATRIX
> *BEST PICKS
GEN'L
SPECIFIC
LASERS
> *BEST
GEN'L
SPECIFIC
1-6
7-13
14
15-18
19-23
24
25-27
28-30
The editor's picks are:
MODEL
LIST
RETAIL*
Dot-matrix
Epson LQ-850
Epson LQ-1050
C Itoh C-715A
$799
$1,099
$1,295
$550
$759
($900)
Laser
Okidata Laserline 6
^ HP LaserJet Series 2
$1,995
$2,595
$1200
$1800
SPEED*
67 cps
68 cps
64 cps
270 cps
360 cps
Daisy wheels - field too narrow to make picks
NOTES: prices from Printers Plus; price in parenthesis was
estimated at 30% discount off of list;
speed for lasers converted to cps for comparison,
assuming 1 page per minute = 45 characters per second
ADVISORY
NEIGHBORHOOD
COMMISSION 3-C
Cathedral Heights
Cleveland Park
McLean G ardens
Woodley Park
Massachusetts Ave Heights
Government of the District of Columbia
Please do not remove this notice until after date posted
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Meeting of
Advisory
Neighborhood
Commission
ANC-3C
DATE & TIME:
LOCATION:
DECEMBER 21, 1987
8:00 p.m.
SECOND DISTRICT POLICE STATION
COMMUNITY ROOM
IDAHO AVE AND NEWARK STREETS N.W.
FOR AGENDA ITEMS INFORMATION CALL 232 2232
ANC-3C meets regularly on the fourth Monday of each month. Meetings include a TOWN MEETING segment during which concerns may be raised by local residents. The public is invited to attend and
ENCOURAGED TO PARTICIPATE.
0102030405-
Opacinch
ANC 3-C Cheryl
Office
06Friedman
2737 DevonshireSam
Place, N.W.
07Washington, D.C.
20008
John
A. Jenkins
08Roger
Burns
232-2232
009Peggy Robin
November 24, 1987
Mr. Joseph Bottner
Zoning Administrator
Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs
614 H Street NW
Washington, DC 20001
Dear Mr. Bottner:
Pursuant to our August 25, 1987 request to you, we understand
that a zoning inspection was made at the Sheraton Washington
Hotel during the period October 12, 13 and 14, 1987. We
appreciate your attention to this matter, which is of great
importance to our constituents. Advisory Neighborhood Commission
3-C has recently received information and photographs (enclosed)
suggesting that violations of the Zoning Regulations had occurred
at the Sheraton on the above cited days in October. A comparison
of this information with the District's December 30, 1986 zoning
violation notice caused the Commission to conclude that repeat
violations had, in fact, occurred. Accordingly, at its regular
meeting of November 23, 1987, ANC 3-C unanimously passed the
attached resolution requesting that appropriate enforcement
action be taken in this matter under the provisions of the Civil
Infractions Act.
I also call your attention to our request of August 25, 1987 for
copies of any reply correspondence from the Sheraton Washington
Hotel or its agents pursuant to the December 30, 1986 zoning
violation notice cited in our resolution. If no reply
correspondence was received, we would appreciate confirmation of
that fact.
FOR THE COMMISSION
Peggy Robin
Chairperson
cc: Honorable Jim Nathanson
Enclosures
SHERATON LOADING DOCK RESOLUTION
WHEREAS the Sheraton Washington Hotel (Hotel) has repeatedly
violated District of Columbia Zoning Regulations regarding the
use of its loading dock and parking spaces, and
WHEREAS the Hotel was formally advised by the District of
Columbia by letter dated December 30, 1986 "...that in October,
1986, you used the subject areas in violation of the D.C. Zoning
Regulations...", and
WHEREAS the Hotel was further advised by the District of Columbia
on December 30, 1986 "...that any future use of the subject
premises in violation of the D.C. Zoning Regulations will result
in the matter being referred for appropriate enforcement action
without further notice...", and
WHEREAS Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C (ANC 3-C) concurs
with the findings and conclusions of the District of Columbia in
the above cited letter of December 30, 1986, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C had requested by letter dated August 25, 1987
that zoning inspections for similar violations be made on October
12, 13 and 14, 1987, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C has received reports and evidence which indicate
that subsequent violations of the type cited by the District of
Columbia on December 30, 1986 have occurred, and
WHEREAS regulations and a schedule of fines for implementing the
Civil Infractions Act of 1985 were published in the DC Register
as a Final Rule on September 4, 1987 and became effective at that
time, and
WHEREAS any similar proven violations occurring after the above
cited December 30, 1986 notice would be regarded by ANC 3-C as
"flagrant ...or willful conduct" within the meaning of DCMR
1200.1, and as a new offense on each day that such a violation
continued, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C regards the above cited December 30, 1986 letter
as official notice of a first offense within the meaning of DCMR
1200.1, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED by Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C that a
Notice of Infraction (NOI) be issued to and served upon the
Sheraton Washington Hotel for a Class 2 infraction, and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the scope of this NOI should
encompass possible offenses on all of the dates referred to by
ANC 3-C (including but not limited to October 12, 13 and 14,
1987) and all other evidence attached herewith as well as any
evidence produced by on-site zoning investigations.
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
MINUTES
Regular Meeting
December 21, 1987
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
I.
The meeting was called to or
The -following Commissioners were present: John Jenkins, Peggy
Robin, Sam Friedman, Roger Burns, FTiil Mendelson and Pat Wamsley.
A quorum being present, the posting of notice of the meeting was
veri f i ed.
II.
Announcement was made about a Park and Shop rally scheduled
for January 16 at 2:00 p.m. sponsored by the Cleveland Park
Historical Society in opposition to the large scale development
proposed for the site. Also, requests for nominations to a Hall
of Fame are invited by the D.C. Commission on Women.
III.
Minutes were deferred to later in the meeting.
IV.
Treasurer’s Report
}
The Executive Director was asked to leave the room,. .
Thereupon, the Treasurer proposed a resolution to provide fe.
holiday—time bonus to the? Commission’s Executive Director, which
was written by the Secretary. After brief discussion ascertaining
that this is not inappropriate for a consultant relationship, the
resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote.
Sam Friedman introduced a resolution to engage the services
of an accountant to computerise the AMC"s accounts, balance the
checkbook and prepare monthly and quarter!y reports required by
the D.C. Auditor and the Commission. After discussion the
resolution was adopted by majority voice vote.(Summary of
Actions, Item II)
A $25.00 contribution to the D.C Preservation League was
considered and declined.
V.
Committee Reports
A. Health and Human Services
Ruth Haugen requested a resolution (moved by Phil
Mendelson) reaffirming the Commission’s support for an
application for a Certificate of Need by Iona House to continue
to operate an adult day center at the Washington Home. After
discussion the Commission adopted the resolution with minor
amendments by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item III)
B. Transportation
Charles Warr reported on traffic issues on Upton Street.
The Department of Public Works has proposed signalizing the
intersection at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street to assist the
development at 4UOO Wisconsin Avenue. The orooosed rulemakinn
does not detail the nature of the signal to be installed or speak
to potential impact and steps to aleviate its impact on the
adjacent neighborhood. Phil Mendel son introduced a resolution
asking: for more information, for a delay in taking any action
until neighborhood protective measures are taken, and until ANC
3-F and the community have participated more fully. After some
discussion and comments from residents of Porter and Quebec
Streets attending the meeting, the Commission adopted the
resolution by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item IV)
Charles Warr reported on the proposed metered parking on
Idaho Avenue at McLean Bardens. The McLean Gardens Condominium
Association has endorsed angle parking at meters as a way to
provide parking and to prevent the street from being made
two-way. Phil Mendelson introduced a resolution supporting singled
meter parking which was adopted by the Commission by unanimous
voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item V)
C. Planning and Zoning
The Chair reported on the Connecticut Avenue case which
is scheduled for hearing beginirtg January 14 with sign up to
testify by January 4. The Chair introduced a resolution to have
the Cleveland Park Library site included in the case, The
resolution was adopted by unanimous voice? vote. (Summary of
Actions, Item VI.)
The Chair reported on the proposed plan for development
of Tregaron. The property has not yet been purchased by the
developer. The Friends of Tregaron have been reformed and the
Chair will continue to track activity on this issue.
Phil Mendelson brought up a resolution on the rationale
for ANC 3-C’s support of C-2-A for the Woodley Park neighborhood
center area and C—1 for the Murhpy’s/Giant local neighborhood
center area. The resolution introduced in November had been
considered favorably by the Planning
Zoning Committee?. After
discussion, Phil Mendelson moved to commit, and the Commission,
by unanimous voice vote, referred the matter back to the Planning
& Zoning Committee for further examination. (Summary of Actions,
Item VII)
Phil Mendelson introduced a resolution on vesting,
authorising the ANC’s position to be represented at the public
hearing January 7, 1987 on case number 87-2. The resolution was
adopted by unanimous voice vote. Phil Mendelson will represent
the Commission.(Summary of Actions, Item VIII)
Phil Mendelson gave an update report on the TACPEC
activity.
Charles Warr reported on St Thomas school and the need to
follow up with a letter and phone call.
Charles Warr reported on the Sheraton Plotel Zoning
violations. Susan Straus will follow up with a phone call to the
Zoning Office to the Commission’s request that the Hotel be cited
for violations is needed.
The Chair reported on an application before the BZA by
residents on Highland Place. She will follow the issue on an SMD
basis.
The Chair reported on a letter received from the Swedish
Ambassador indicating their intent to go -forward with their
proposed chancery of-fice development.
D. Communications
Roger Burns introduced a resolution authorizing up to
$3200 (not including the $600.00 previously authorized fared i tori al services) for the development and distribution of thee
ANC newsletter. Discussion involved whether this cost was
excessive but also the need to put out a long-needed newsletter.
The resolution was passed by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of
Actions, Item IX)
E. Historic Preservation and Landmarks
The Chair introduced a resolution on the Klingle
Bridge: to support the relighting of the urns and repainting of
the the iron work. It was adopted by unanimous voice
vote.(Summary of Actions, Item X)
VI.
The Minutes For August 24, September 28, October 26 and
November 23 were approved (with corrections to September 28) by
unanimous voice vote. (Summary of Actions, Item XI.)
VII.
Administrative and Other Business
Roger Burns reported on the work in' progress to evaluate
copier equipment and a personal computer and printer for the
office. Susan Straus had assisted with a great deal of research.
Additional information will be provided at the next meeting.
The Chair announced that Richard Ridley is in GW
University Hospital. The Commissioners will make personal
contributions to send flowers on behalf of the ANC.
VIII. SMD Reports
Sam Friedman reported on the proposed use of the David Lee-:
property at Connecticut and Woodley as a conference center by
Stanford University.
IX. There being no other business the meeting was adjourned at
10:30 p.m.
Respectfully Submitted:
Approved:
^ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
01 -Cheryl Opacinch
02Sam Friedman
03John A. Jenkins
04Roger Burns
05Peggy Robin
06Phil Mendelson
07Patricia Wamsley
08David Grinnell
09Peter Espenschied
I.
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
January 29, 1988
Regular Meeting
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED: That Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C hereby
approves the quarterly report for the period October 1, 1987
through December 31, 1987 and further approves it's submittal
to the District of Columbia Auditor.
II.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C authorize $1,000 to pay ABH [The
Harrison Institute for Public Law] expenses for work, including
the previously allocated $600 for vesting and Large Tract Review,
and to include overlay zones and other matters related to overlay
zoning.
III.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C reimburse Commissioner Cheryl Opacinch
the amount of $170.13 for xeroxing charges involved in Zoning
Case 86-26.
IV.
The following were elected officers of the Commission pursuant to t
Bylaws:
Chairman:
Vice-Chairman
Secretary:
Treasurer:
V.
Patricia Wamsley (by acclamation)
Cheryl Opacinch (by acclamation)
Phil Mendelson (by acclamation)
Sam Friedman (by acclamation)
By vote of applause, the Commission expressed its appreciation to
missioner Peggy Robin for her service as Chairman during the last two
years.
cont1d...
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
VI.
2
January 29, 1988
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C appoint the following Committees and Committee
Chairs, with additional committee officers to be selected by the
Committees:
Bylaws & Rules:
Communications:
Crime & Safety:
Housing:
Human Services & Aging:
Planning & Zoning:
Preservation & Landmarks:
Transportation:
VII.
VIII.
Phil Mendelson, chair
Roger Burns, chair
Cheryl Opacinch, chair
Roger Burns, chair
Ruth Haugen, chair
with Roger Burns included as a member
Sam Friedman and John Jenkins, co-chairs
Peggy Robin, chair
Charles Warr, chair
with Peter Espenschied, David Grinnell,
John Jenkins, and Peggy Robin included
as members
The Minutes for the Regular Meeting of December 21, 1987 were app
without correction.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C fully supports the Notice of Proposed
Rulemaking in Docket 87-235-TS, with respect to additional truck and
bus restrictions in Woodley Park, and a 4-way stop sign at the intersection of Klingle and 32nd, and authorizes that a letter of support
be sent by the ANC to the city.
IX.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C send the attached letter to Joe Bottner
X.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C opposes the waiving of the Large Tract Review
on the Addis Israel Congregation development project, and that ANC 3-C
sponsor a meeting with the developer regarding the project.
XI.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote (wi
abstention):
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That this
Commission supports establishment of the proposed Naval Observatory
Precinct District (as stated in the Notice of Public Hearing for
Case No. 87-34), with the following additional points:
(1) The precinct should be drawn to include the unzoned land south
of the Observatory.
cont'd...
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
3
January 29, 1988
(2) The provision for BZA consideration of the Comprehensive Plan
should clearly include the federal elements.
(3) Provisions for PUDs should be severely limited in the precinct.
Density bonuses should be disallowed. Assemblage for large buildings, even though restricted in height, would detract from the
scientific mission objective of the precinct.
(4) We would support more restrictive height calculations such as
measuring from the midpoint of the frontage on the lowest elevation
of the construction site.
Further, ANC 3-C recommends that "downzoning" of the C-2-A districts
within the precinct be considered by the Zoning Commission so as to
limit densities permitted with or without the overlay in the existing
C-2-A zone.
XII.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
WHEREAS: ANC 3-C has received notice of BZA Application No. 14745, proposed addition to a non-conforming structure at 3320 Highland Place, NW
(lot 806, square 2075) requesting variances from the rear and side yard
requirements of the R-l-B zone, and a variance from the provisions regarding additions to non-conforming structures; and
WHEREAS: ANC 3-C was informed by the architect for the project that the
immediate neighbors have been shown the plans and have no objection to
them; and
WHEREAS: The ANC 3-C office has received neither letters nor phone calls
from any constituents in oppostiion; and
WHEREAS: The Architectural Review Committee of the Cleveland Park Historical Society at its regular monthly meeting of January 4, 1988, reviewed
the plans and found them acceptable from a design standpoint; therefore
BE IT NOW RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C: That it enter a comment of "no objection"
into the record of Case No. 14745.
XIII.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C: That it authorizes a letter to the D.C.
Zoning Commission regarding Gannett's proposed 4100 Wisconsin Avenue
building: ANC 3-C believes the building is inconsistent with the
Comprehensive Plan and the intent of the C-2-B rezoning in 1987,
and that the Zoning Commission should consider additional zoning
action at this Square.
XIV.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C: That a letter be sent to the D.C. Zoning Commission regarding Case 87-27 objecting to ANC 3-C being lumped under a
"Wisconsin Avenue Task Force" rather than regarded as a separate petitioner
cont'd..
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
- 4
January 29, 1988
XV. The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: We submit that D.C. Code Section 5-1206(d)(2) must be understood inlight of the issues properly before the "special" BZA, that is,
zoning issues. D.C. Law 2-144 has not been preempted and it remains
applicable to foreign missions in the District of Columbia. For the
Corporation Counsel to conclude otherwise would be a severe set back
to Home Rule and an abdication to those who have no regard for the
District's preservation laws. The District government successfully
lobbied Congress to limit the scope of the Foreign Missions Act and
those efforts can only be undermined by the position advocated by the
Turkish Chancery (see December 3, 1987 letter from Wilkes & Artis to
Ms. Diane Herndon). Accordingly, giving due regard to the legislative
history of the Foreign Missions Act and the Court of Appeals application of that Act to zoning matters affecting chanceries, the Corporation Counsel's Office should advise the Department of Consumer and
Regulatory Affairs that D.C. Law 2-144 must be complied with in regard
to demolition applications by a chancery.
XVI. After reconsideration and amendment, the following resolution was adopted
by unanimous voice vote:
WHEREAS: The Zoning Commission on February 8th is scheduled to hear
a request from the Urban Group to have their PUD scheduled for full
zoning hearings; and
WHEREAS: The Zoning Commission has not yet concluded their deliberations in the Connecticut Avenue case 86-26, which outcome will have
direct bearing on this PUD; therefore
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C send a representative to the Zoning
Commission to request that the Commission not consider the Urban
Group's proposed PUD until such time as zoning changes petitioned
for this site have taken effect.
Phil Mendelson, Secretary
attachments: Letter to Joseph F. Bottner, Jr.
Mr. Joseph F. Bottner,
Jr.
Acting Zoning Administrator
Room 333
614 H Street N.W.
Washington, DC 20004
Re: Rozansky Co. development proposal
Porter Street and Rock Creek
Fark
Dear Mr. Bottner,
Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C has been
Creek Glen Neighborhood Association o-f
in-formed by the Rock
the recent developments with regard
to the proposed plan by the Rozansky Company to develop
this site
(Lot 5,
Square 2224).
We are told that
access to the site
there seem to be some
in question. Presently,
legal
access
questions regarding the
is through a private
C--
unimproved driveway which lies within a right o-f way easment which appears
C-
o-f record in deeds to properties abutting the existing drive. The easment
o-f record
i.e.
is
in -favor o-f all
the owners o-f
the property
in Colman Park,
it
is a jointly held easment.
It
is the opinion o-f the Advisory Neighborhood Commission
the legal
rights o-f
the owners o-f the properties abutting the private
driveway should not be
Moreover, we are
remaining portion o-f
that
in-fringed.
in-formed that by paving part o-f the
the drive, which now serves several
Could be rendered unusable.
drive,
the
other residences,
Rozansky <5ould be adversely a-f-fecting the
rights o-f adjoining property owners to have access to their property.
The Commission was also in-formed by the Neighborhood Association
‘they expressed their readiness to meet with the
that
developer, without any
pre-conditions, but with no success.
The Commission urgeSthat the District Goverment examine
carefully and only
if
the development plans meet
the matter
the paved parking access
requirment of the District of Columbia zoning regulations, as well
as all
other zoning regulations, should they be approved.
We
will
thank you for
keep us
looking into the matter for us and trust
informed.
FOR THE COMMISSION
Chairman, ANC 3-C
00
..
fL ck- C^AQU^
Ir^rU^/ chscc^'
that you
Mr. Joseph F. Bottner, Jr.
Acting Zoning Administrator
Room 333
614 H Street N.W.
Washington, DC 20004
Re: Rozansky Co. development proposal
Porter Street and Rock Creek Park
Dear Mr. Bottner,
Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-Chas been in-formed by the Rock
Creek Glen Neighborhood Association o-f the recent developments with regard
to the proposed plan by the Rozansky Company to develop this site (Lot 5,
■-x
■
Square 2224).
\
\
We are told that there seem to be some legal questions regarding the
access to the site in question. Presently, access is through a private
unimproved driveway which lies within a right o-f way easment which appears
♦
e,
o-f record in deeds to properties abutting the existing drive. The easment
of record is in favor of all the owners of the property in Colman Park,
i.e. it is a jointly held easment.
It is the opinion of the Advisory Neighborhood Commission that
A
-$(s
the legal rights of the owners of ;the properties abutting the private
driveway should not be infringed.
Moreover, we are informed that by paving part of the drive, the
remaining portion of the drive, which now serves several other residences,
Could be rendered unusable. Rozansky 6ould be adversely affecting the
rights of adjoining property owners to have access to their property.
The Commission was also informed by the Neighborhood Association that
•they expressed their readiness to meej with the developer, without any
pre-conditions, but with no success'.
The Commission urgeStfoat the District Goverment examine the matter
carefully and only if the development plans meet the paved parking access
requirment of the District of Columbia zoning regulations, as well as all
other zoning regulations, should they be approved.
Ule thank you for looking into the matter for us and trust that you
will keep us informed.
FOR THE COMMISSION
P Ct~
c
—Peggy Robin
*
Chairman, ANC 3-C
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ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
I.
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
January 29, 1988
Regular Meeting
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED: That Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C hereby
approves the quarterly report for the period October 1, 1987
through December 31, 1987 and further approves it's submittal
to the District of Columbia Auditor.
II.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C authorize $1,000 to pay ABH [The
Harrison Institute for Public Law] expenses for work including
the previously allocated $600 for vesting and Large Tract Review,
and to include overlay zones and other matters related to overlay
zoning.
III.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C reimburse Commissioner Cheryl Opacinch
the amount of $170.13 for xeroxing charges involved in Zoning
Case 86-26.
IV.
The following were elected officers of the Commission pursuant to th
Bylaws:
Chairman:
Vice-Chairman
Secretary:
Treasurer:
V.
Patricia Wamsley (by acclamation)
Cheryl Opacinch (by acclamation)
Phil Mendelson (by acclamation)
Sam Friedman (by acclamation)
By vote of applause, the Commission expressed its appreciation to Co
missioner Peggy Robin for her service as Chairman during the last two
years.
cont'd...
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
VI.
2
January 29, 1988
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C appoint the following Committees and Committee
Chairs, with additional committee officers to be selected by the
Committees:
Bylaws & Rules:
Communications:
Crime & Safety:
Housing:
Human Services & Aging:
Planning & Zoning:
Preservation & Landmarks:
Transportation:
VII.
VIII.
Phil Mendelson, chair
Roger Burns, chair
Cheryl Opacinch, chair
Roger Burns, chair
Ruth Haugen, chair
with Roger Burns included as a member
Sam Friedman and John Jenkins, co-chairs
Peggy Robin, chair
Charles Warr, chair
with Peter Espenschied, David Grinnell,
John Jenkins, and Peggy Robin included
as members
The Minutes for the Regular Meeting of December 21, 1987 were appr
without correction.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C fully supports the Notice of Proposed
Rulemaking in Docket 87-235-TS, with respect to additional truck and
bus restrictions in Woodley Park, and a 4-way stop sign at the intersection of Klingle and 32nd, and authorizes that a letter of support
be sent by the ANC to the city.
IX.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C send the attached letter to Joe Bottner
X.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C opposes the waiving of the Large Tract Review
on the Addis Israel Congregation development project, and that ANC 3-C
sponsor a meeting with the developer regarding the project.
XI.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote (wit
abstention):
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That this
Commission supports establishment of the proposed Naval Observatory
Precinct District (as stated in the Notice of Public Hearing for
Case No. 87-34), with the following additional points:
(1) The precinct should be drawn to include the unzoned land south
of the Observatory.
cont'd...
4
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
- 3 -
January 29, 1988
(2) The provision for BZA consideration of the Comprehensive Plan
should clearly include the federal elements.
(3) Provisions for PUDs should be severely limited in the precinct.
Density bonuses should be disallowed. Assemblage for large buildings, even though restricted in height, would detract from the
scientific mission objective of the precinct.
(4) We would support more restrictive height calculations such as
measuring from the midpoint of the frontage on the lowest elevation
of the construction site.
Further, ANC 3-C recommends that "downzoning" of the C-2-A districts
within the precinct be considered by the Zoning Commission so as to
limit densities permitted with or without the overlay in the existing
C-2-A zone.
XII.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
WHEREAS: ANC 3-C has received notice of BZA Application No. 14745, proposed addition to a non-conforming structure at 3320 Highland Place, NW
(lot 806, square 2075) requesting variances from the rear and side yard
requirements of the R-l-B zone, and a variance from the provisions regarding additions to non-conforming structures; and
WHEREAS: ANC 3-C was informed by the architect for the project that the
immediate neighbors have been shown the plans and have no objection to
them; and
WHEREAS: The ANC 3-C office has received neither letters nor phone calls
from any constituents in oppostiion; and
WHEREAS: The Architectural Review Committee of the Cleveland Park Historical Society at its regular monthly meeting of January 4, 1988, reviewed
the plans and found them acceptable from a design standpoint; therefore
BE IT NOW RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C: That it enter a comment of "no objection"
into the record of Case No. 14745.
XIII.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C: That it authorizes a letter to the D.C.
Zoning Commission regarding Gannett's proposed 4100 Wisconsin Avenue
building: ANC 3-C believes the building is inconsistent with the
Comprehensive Plan and the intent of the C-2-B rezoning in 1987,
and that the Zoning Commission should consider additional zoning
action' at this Square.
XIV.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C: That a letter be sent to the D.C. Zoning Commission regarding Case 87-27 objecting to ANC 3-C being lumped under a
"Wisconsin Avenue Task Force" rather than regarded as a separate petitioner
cont'd..
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
4
January 29, 1988
XV. The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: We submit that D.C. Code Section 5-1206(d)(2) must be understood inlight of the issues properly before the "special" BZA, that is,
zoning issues. D.C. Law 2-144 has not been preempted and it remains
applicable to foreign missions in the District of Columbia. For the
Corporation Counsel to conclude otherwise would be a severe set back
to Home Rule and an abdication to those who have no regard for the
District's preservation laws. The District government successfully
lobbied Congress to limit the scope of the Foreign Missions Act and
those efforts can only be undermined by the position advocated by the
Turkish Chancery (see December 3, 1987 letter from Wilkes & Artis to
Ms. Diane Herndon). Accordingly, giving due regard to the legislative
history of the Foreign Missions Act and the Court of Appeals application of that Act to zoning matters affecting chanceries, the Corporation Counsel's Office should advise the Department of Consumer and
Regulatory Affairs that D.C. Law 2-144 must be complied with in regard
to demolition applications by a chancery.
XVI. After reconsideration and amendment, the following resolution was adopted
by unanimous voice vote:
WHEREAS: The Zoning Commission on February 8th is scheduled to hear
a request from the Urban Group to have their PUD scheduled for full
zoning hearings; and
WHEREAS: The Zoning Commission has not yet concluded their deliberations in the Connecticut Avenue case 86-26, which outcome will have
direct bearing on this PUD; therefore
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C send a representative to the Zoning
Commission to request that the Commission not consider the Urban
Group's proposed PUD until such time as zoning changes petitioned
for this site have taken effect.
ATTEST:
Phil Mendelson, Secretary
attachments: Letter to Joseph F. Bottner, Jr.
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ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
Minutes
August 24, 1987
Regular Meeting
The meeting was called to order by Pat Wamsley acting as
Chair at 8:11 p.m. The -following Commissioners were present:
David Grinnell, Roger Burns, Cheryl Opacinch, Peter Espenschied,
John Jenkins and Pat Wamsley.( Commissioners Sam Friedman and
Phil Mendelson arrived at 8:35 p.m. ) A quorum being present the
posting of Notice of the Meeting was verified. The first order of
business was consideration of the minutes of the regular
Commission meeting July 27, 1987.
II.
The minutes of the July 27,1987 meeting were approved
submitted by unanimous voice vote.
III.
as
Community Forum
The Chair, recognising residents of the community from 4000
Massachusetts Avenue in the audience, took up the issue of 4000
Massachusetts Avenue under Community Forum. Mrs. Eunice
Lipkowitz, Ms. Iris Lipkowitz and Ms. Tony Ritzenberg commented
on tenant opposition to the pending application before the BZA
for a variance allowing commercial use of residential space at
4o0o Massachusetts Avenue. Iris Lipkowitz informed the Commission
of a petition she is circulating among the tenants expressing
opposition to the application. She requested the Commission take
action to halt the granting of a variance to Mr. Kaplan the
building owner. By unanimous voice vote the Commission adopted a
resolution (after several amendments) to be submitted to the BZA
stating ANC 3-C's opposition to the application.(Summary of
Actions Item II)
III.
Committee Reports
A. Human Services and Aging
Ruth Haugen reported on the activity associated with
the Psychiatric Institute's proposed plan to consolidate
administrative offices, inpatient treatment beds and outpatient
facilities in the commercial building in the 4200 block of
Wisconsin Avenue. Ruth reported that the process is just
beginning and she will be requesting the Project. Review Analysis
and following developments for the Commission. The issue she has
already raised is one of the parking and traffic impact of the
project on an already congested area.
Ruth also reported on the establishment of the
Cleveland Park Renal Dialysis Center which has been approved at
3520 Connecicut Avenue..
—Ruth also reported on the continuing need -for space by
the Iona House.
B. Pllanning and Zoning
Cheryl Opacinch reported on the issue before the
Zoning Commission and the Planning Office regarding 2637
Connecticut Aveneue and the apparent failure of the Planning
Office to give\±he ANC the required 30 day notice for comment.
The Commission,\by unanimous voice vote, authorised the
transmission of 'comments to the Office of Planning restating ANC
3-C’s position supporting down zoning for that site, asking for a
extension of the time period for review and comment on the issue
and informing the Office that the ANC will hold a special meeting
no later than September 16th to take up the issue. (Summary of
Actions Item III) ''
Phil Mendelson reported on the introduction in the D.C.
Council by Counci 1 member Nathanson of a Bill turning the Glover
Archbold Park over to 'Federal control.
The Commission, by
unanimous voice vote adopted a resolution is support of the
Bi11.(Summary of Actions^Item IV)
Phil Mendelson reported that the comments of the ANC in
opposition to the planned ^develpment at 4100 Wisconsin Avenue
which were forwarded to the, Office of Planning recieved high
praise from Counci 1 member hay.
The Chair mentioned tne ANC has not been receiving zoning
notices on the WICAL project.Veter Espenschied and David
Grinnell will look into the communications problem.
The
developer has filed another PUD\appl ication (and may have filed a
(tatter of right application as well) for a somewhat smaller
project. However, the proposal is\still opposed by both the
Secret Service and the Observatory. The Navy has undertaken an
engineering study showing serious potential negative impact on
the Observatory’s activities by the\development. The NCPC is
examining rezoning the area in accordance with the comprehensive
plan. The ANC may want to comment on this activity at the
appropriate time.
\
\
IV.
Treasurer’s Report
\
\
\
Sam Friedman submitted the quarterly Report for the period
4/1/B7 through 6/30/87. The report was adopted as submitted by
unanimous voice vote.
\
V.
Committee Reports (Continued)
\
A. Transportation
\
Charles Warr reported on the Associatio\ of the U S
Army s plan to hold its meeting at the Sheraton Vjashington Hotel
in October. The Commission directed Charles to drlaft a letter to
the Zoning Commission, requesting an inspector be\assigned to
monitor the event, and to prepare a letter for the ANC requesting
that the Public Space Committee keep the ANC informed of activity
relating to the AUSA meeting.
John Jenkins reported an understanding reached on the
recontruction of Cleveland Avenue: The City has agreed that the
geometry of the Avenue will remain as it is. There will be no cut'
backs in the intersections with one exception at 29th Street and
Calvert Street where the modification will facilitate bus
turning. Any portion.of the road which does not need
reconstruction (as indicated by core samples) will not be
reconstructed.
Charles Warr reported on routine stop signs in the^ANC area
that are in various stages of rulemaking.
/
The Commission indicated its interest in havingCharles set
up a committee meeting on the implications of the Transportation
study of the Connecticut Avenue Corridor.
y'
Charles reported that the ZOO has expressed its
appreciation of the ANC’s interest in issues r'elated to the ZOO
crosswalk.
B. Preservation and Landmarks
Roger Burns reported on events elated to the new Cafe at
3500 Connecticut Avenue and its violation of the Cleveland Park
Historic District proceedures.
Roger has informed the owners of
the process required and they are pow following it. The
Commission will consider the need/to sponsor a meeting to bring
D.C. Govrnment Officials together with merchants in the Cleveland
Park Historic District to educate them to the permit application
process and potential actions by the City's Civil Infractions
Division.
/
Sam Friedman reported for the record he has had numerous
conversations with Mr. Deoi/des about the St. Sophia adopt—a—park.
Phil Mendel son introduced a resolution which was discussed
at the July 27th meeting/regarding the preservation of the stone
wall along Wisconsin Avenue in McLean Gardens. The resolution to
make available up to $500.00 for the project was adopted by
unanimous voice vote. /(Summary of Actions Item VII)
VI.
Other Business/and Administrative matters
The Chair directed that the Cannon Company be instructed to
continue the ANC /account for copier supplies.
John Jenkins suggested the Commission should obtain legal
advice on vesting in relation to Large Tract Review in light of
its increasing relevance to matters before the ANC and
particularly as vesting has been described as "a grey area " by
City officials.
The Commission adopted by unanimous voice vote a
resolution to secure legal services for up to $500.00 from the
Anne Blaine Harrison Institute in this regard. (Summary of
Actions Item VIII)
VII. There being no other business the meeting was adjorned at
10:15 p.m.
Respectfully Submitted:
Approved By:
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
k e q u I a r M c-; e? t :L n g
S c? p L e rn b 0 r 2 8, L 9 B 7
I.
The minutes of the speci al
September 16, .1.987 were approved
by voice vote,
II.
vote:
The following
resolution
Commission meeting held
unanimously, without: correction
was adopted
by unanimous
VOJce
WHEREAS AIMC 3-C shares the city--wi.de concern over the many
instances of corruption and mismanagement in the Executive branch
of the D.C. government, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C believes that the " District of Columbia
Ant 1-Corruption and Fraud Act of 1987" introduced by
Counci1 member Schwarts as Bill 7—248, offers a significant
possibility of reducing the level of corruption and
mi •".management, t: her of ore
. BE IT F<EQQLVIII) ANC 3™c urge tin* Counc: 1 1
thi ff Bill for hearing at an early daft?.
J 1.1 *
‘fh£
£1, tf»<Jb«d
V©jc# V(i9%e,
Phi)
h eatiurer ' ts
Report
fiend#! 600 not
was
voting r,n
and
adopted
its
by
Chairman
to
major >ty
the question ol
hit?
IV.
tih# ptt#Ched report to the Off ire Of PlanoinQ on r h«?
proposed (level op men t at. 2/17.1-’4 1 Connect irut Avenue wae adopt ed
submitted hy unanimous voice vot e,
V.
The attached resolution in support
Urban Design Project at 3000 Conecti cut.
unanimous voice vote.
o< legal resear'c li tor
Avenue was adopted by
m
the
VI. the attached resolution authorizing the expenditure of up to
4600.00 for additional legal research into Vesting issues by the
Anne Blaine Harrison Institute to be undertaken under the-:
supervision of the Planning and Zoning Committee was adrud ed bv
un a n i mous va i. c e vot e.
V.1 1 . The
vot e:
following
re?olut] on
was adopted
unaui mousl y
dv
voice
EL .1. I RE80L'■■!-)): I hat ANC
—C send a let for to the 8wc?di sit
A m b a s s a r.l o r e x p r e s s i n g A Ml. 3 - C ■' s q r a v e c o n c e r n r e cj a 1 - d 1 n q 1.11 o
proposed office building pro -| ec:1. at "al 1A Mas'; a c; h u s e t1: 0 s Avenue?,
N „ w.
VI I. 3. .. . I h e? f o 1 lowing
\- ot o
BE
slop
L
I I KI-.SUI. VE. D::
gnc's of
'.'•6 Mi
rosnl ut 3 on
was adc..j:i l.od
i li a 1
I'iNf..
’■ -1.' ha :. MU
end Ur dway !■ I r L-'O !. e ,,
by
imurii ittoi.is voice
ob 1 o<. t 1 on
l-l„W.
to
I ho
-i-wa'
rx
The
following
reso I. u I: i on
was ark j|)1 od
b/ unanimous
voice
)le:
BE IT RESOLVED BY NEIGHBORHOOD ADVISORY COMMISSION 3-C: Yhat
the Department, of Lib lie Works not. proceed withthe proposed
rulemaking (published in the August 2.1,, .1 (?87 D„C. Register)
prohibiting left turns from Mac onb street t o hi a so a chu setters
Avenue until this ANC has been provided with necessary
1 n f or rna t i on and g i ven an op p or t un .i. t y t o c omment nie an i. n g t u 1 1 v,
A r TEST ::
Secretary
r
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ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners
f
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS ITEM III
Treasurer's Report September 28, 1987
BE IT RESOLVED that the treasurer is authorized to pay
the following office expenses in excess of the $250.00
per month allowed by the BYLAWS & RULES for the month
of September 1987:
$23.52
107.36
30.53
37.00
75.00
50.00
20.36
$343.77
Northwest Office Supply
Duplicate Impressions
C&P Telephone
Canon
Adam Vogt
DC Postmaster
Northwest Office Supply
TOTAL
Office Supplies
Office Stationary
Toner
Distribution Mtg. Notices
Stamps
Office Supplies
BE IT RESOLVED that the treasurer is authorized to pay
the invoice to The Michie Company for
the 1987 Replacement Volume 9 of the DC Code in
the amount of $52.64 including postage and handling.
Further BE IT RESOLVED that the treasurer be authorized to
stop payment on check number 483 issued to IBM for a typewriter service
contract from 10/1/86 - 9/30/87 for the amount of $375.00, and write
a new check for the same services, time period and amount.
Also, BE IT RESOLVED that $436.00 be authorized for a new service contract on
typewriter with IBM for the time period of 10/1/87 thru 9/30/89.
Also BE
expenses
Also, BE
expenses
IT RESOLVED that Phil Mendelson be reimbursed $86.98 for miscellaneous
related to land use issues on Wisconsin Avenue.
IT RESOLVED that Phil Mendelson be reimbursed &86.98 for miscellaneous
related to land use issues on Wisconsin Avenue.
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS ITEM V
RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF BILL 7-124
"THE SUPERMARKET TAX INCENTIVE ACT OF 19S7"
BE IT RESOLVED:
That Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C adopt
the following as its official comment and advice to the Committee
on Finance and Revenue (John Wilson, Chairman) and other members
of the Council and the Mayor regarding Bill 7-124, "The Supermarket Tax Incentive Act of 1987."
Bill 7-124 would provide for the identification of areas underserved by supermarkets and allow for negotiations to be conducted
involving property owners, lessees, and City officials resulting
in a package of financial incentives (including low cost loans
and property tax abatements) to aid in the siting and operation
of a grocery store of at least 6000 square feet in such underserved ai'ess.
ANC 3-C believes this bill will give the District government a
useful and needed tool for working on a problem facing a growing
number of our City’s neighborhoods.
Over the past several years,
as urban land prices have steadily risen, developers and other
property owners have found greater financial return in use of
commercial space by upscale restaurants, boutiques, bars, night
clubs, etc., than in grocery stores and other neighborhood-based
businesses operating on much narrower per-sguare-foot profit
margins.
Without some program of incentives from government, ANC
3-C believes this trend can only continue, to the detriment of
the quality of life for the residents most dependent on those
small businesses — the elderly, the handicapped, families with
young children, and those with limited incomes and means of
transportation.
However, such a program, as this bill would initiate, is very
much in keeping with the dictates of the City’s Comprehensive
Plan, adopted in 1984, and with its various Ward Plans (not yet
law), which call for the government to create specific policies,
including financial incentives, in support of the objective of
strenghtening the local-service character of the commercial
strips within the District’s stable residential neighborhoods
[cite Comp. Plan. page].
Though the Bill addresses a city-wide need, ANC 3-C sees a
particularly urgent need for its adoption now that our commission
area is slated to lose the Safeway store located at 3407 Connecticut Avenue, NW.
The store is the only non-specialty grocery
store serving the residents of the Connecticut Avenue corridor
from California Street to Tilden Street.
Among these residents
are some 6000 elderly citizens, few of whom have cars and for
whom the loss of a walking-distance source of food mean considerable hardship.
With the departure of the Safeway now definite and irreversible,
swift adoption of the bill may be the only practical action the
Council can take to help the citizens of the area in their bid to
find a replacement grocery store.
If the bill becomes law (or if
Its enactment can be reasonably anticipated) it may then become
possible for the citizens, through the "Save Our Supermaket"
organization formed for this purpose, to work productively with
the City’s Office of Business and Economic Development, to put
together a package of loans and tax incentives sufficient to
induce another grocery store operator to purchase the otherwise
unaffordable real estate.
Alternatively, the citizens of the
area might use the prospect of financial incentives as a means to
raise capital from within the community, establishing a neighborhood grocery co-operative on the Safeway site.
A preliminary
analysis of the demographic and economic data indicates that the
site would Qualify under the terms of the bill, and that without
the relief provided, the chances of attracting another grocery
store to the site would be poor. Other D.C. communities may face this
situation in months and years to come.
Given these considerations, ANC 3-C strongly urges that the bill
be approved by the Committee on Finance and Revenue, forwarded to
the Council for its adoption, after which it should be signed by
the Mayor and steps for its implementation worked out as soon as
is practicable.
ANC 3-C’s advice is underscored by the approximately 6000
citizens of the District, who as of this date have signed the
"Save Our Supermarket" petition (copy enclosed).
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS ITEM VI
RESOLUTION
Legal Research for Urban Design Project
3000 Connecticut Avenue
WHEREAS the DC Public Space Committee (the Committee) has
requested that the community provide a study on the impact of the
Urban Design Project proposed for 3000 Connecticut Avenue on
street vending, and will not proceed to take up the necessary
permit request until such a study has been submitted, and
WHEREAS the Woodley Park Community Association has agreed to
perform this study and has assembled volunteers to provide the
Committee with an appropriate presentation, and
WHEREAS Advisory Neighborhood 3-C has previously expressed its
support for this Urban Design Project, and
WHEREAS considerable legal analysis of the DC Municipal
Regulations concerning vending is required to reach a proper
understanding of vending impact, for which contributions totaling
$600 have already been raised by the community, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED THAT ANC 3-C authorizes up to $600 for legal
research on DC vending regulations by the Ann Blaine Harrison
^^stitute for Public Law, and further authorizes John Jenkins to
wesent the ANC's position to the DC Public Space Committee.
John Jenkins
I
jr
COUNCIL OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20004
June 12, 1987
On Tuesday, June 2, 1987, I introduced legislation, entitled the
"District of Columbia Anti-Corruption and Fraud Act of 1987" (Bill 7-248) '
which I want to share with you. This legislation would deal with the
internal investigation of corruption and fraud in the District Government
by adding subpeona power to the arsenal of the D.C. Auditor, by providing
additional protections to District employees who report wrongdoing, and by
providing an easily accessible Hot Line into the Auditor's office.
The District Government today has an Inspector General, a Police
Department Integrity Unit, an Ethics Ombudsman, Department of
Administrative Services' procurement monitors, Office of Personnel ethics
counselors and an Office of Campaign Finance; all of these are Executive
branch agencies and therefore, lack true independence. What we need is an
office which is free to root out corruption — an office which in both
appearance and fact is an independent agency. The office of the D.C.
Auditor is such an agency. The D.C. Auditor is appointed by the Chairman
of the Council with Council approval for a fixed term of seven years; the
terms of the Chairman and the Councilmembers are for four years. The long
fixed term of the Auditor and his appointment by the Council, rather than
the Mayor, gives the Auditor the needed independence. All that the D.C.
Auditor now needs is the legal tools and the support to do his
legislatively mandated job.
In contrast to legislation, the "Municipal Integrity Act of 1987"
(Bill 7-244), on the same subject which was introduced on May 26, my
proposed legislation would not create an expensive and a redundant new
agency at a cost of several million dollars in addition to the millions
already being spent in this area. The legislation which I have introduced
reinforces an existing agency of proven independence. By adding a few
employees to an already functioning office my solution would cost only
about $150,000. The other legislation creates a new agency largely to
keep tabs on the Executive branch, yet provides that the Mayor choose the
new agency's director from a list of nominees provided by a committee to
which the Mayor also appoints the majority of the members. Further, that
other legislation provides that agency heads approve an "integrity
officer" for their own agency. That hardly seems the recipe for
independence to me. My legislation makes use of an agency of proven
independence, free from Executive branch control.
Finally, my legislation would offer real protection to those District
Government employees who report wrongdoing by stiffening the penalties
against retributive harassment and by providing for the functioning of a
special outside prosecutor to protect employees rights. The other
legislation retains the protection of those employees reporting wrongdoing
in the hands of the District's Corporation Counsel, who is appointed by
the Mayor.
The legislation, the "District of Columbia Anti-Corruption and Fraud
Act of 1987" (Bill 7-248), which I introduced has been referred by
Chairman Clarke to the Committee of the Whole, which he chairs. My
legislation is co-sponsored by CounciImembers Winter, Crawford, Jarvis and
Kane. I have contacted the Chairman, urging him to hold hearings on Bill
7-248. At this time, no hearing date has been set. However, a hearing
date has been set for the other legislation, the "Municipal Integrity Act
of 1987" (Bill 7-244), by the Committee on the Judiciary. That hearing is
scheduled for Thursday, July 9, 1987, at 2 p.m. in the Council Chambers on
the 5th Floor of the District Building.
All of us are concerned about both proven and alleged charges of
corruption which have undermined our government for the past several
years. I believe that something must be done and that the best thing to
do is what is provided in the "District of Columbia Anti-Corruption and
Fraud Act of 1987" (Bill 7-248). This legislation attacks the crisis of
confidence by providing the most independent oversight of this government
at the lowest cost to our taxpayers. Please share this information with
your membership and, if you agree with me, I suggest that you express your
support by contacting your Ward and At-Large CounciImembers to urge their
approval of Bill 7-248, the "District of Columbia Anti-Corruption and
Fraud Act of 1987". Further, those wanting to do so can express their
preference for the approach of Bill 7-248 by appearing as witnesses at the
July 9 Committee on the Judiciary Hearing. To be placed on that witness
list, call the Committee at 724-8031. I am available to speak to your
Association; call my office at 724-8045 to schedule such an appearance.
Sincerely
Carol Schwartz
CS:rc
Enclosures (2)
INTRODUCTION OF THE "DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ANTI-CORRUPTION
AND FRAUD ACT OF 1987"
COUNCILMEMBER CAROL SCHWARTZ
JUNE 2, 1987
This morning I am introducing legislation to expand the powers of the
Auditor of the District of Columbia and to provide protections to District
Government employees who report wrongdoing within our government to the
authorities.
Specifically, this legislation would give the Auditor of the District of
Columbia subpoena power and the necessary personnel to exercise that needed ‘
prerogative. Further, this legislation would provide employment and other
non-retribution protections to those District Government employees who choose
to report wrongdoing; a special prosecutor could be provided to protect those
employee rights. Finally, this legislation would provide for a Hot Line in
the Auditor's Office enabling those with knowledge of such wrongdoing in our
government to have quick access to an easily publicized telephone number.
This legislation would, therefore, effectively deputize all 42,000
District Government Employees as investigators, by guaranteeing to those
employees protections against retribution and/or harassment by their
employer. Those who tried £o revenge themselves on employees who stepped
forward to report wrongdoing would be subject not only to employment sanctions
but to civil actions as well.
Last week legislation was introduced to provide a new "independent" Officeof Investigations "responsible for the investigation and elimination of fraud,
corruption, and other illegal or unethical conduct within the District of'
Columbia Government." By definition, the principal target of this office
would be executive branch agencies. Independence of this function is clearly
necessary. Yet, since the "Municipal Integrity Act of 1987", Bill 7-242,
provides that the Mayor would appoint the majority of the.members of the
Selection Committee and then would appoint the Director of this agency from
the recommendations of that Selection Committee, I do not see how this new
office can honestly be called independent.
The new powers provided to the Auditor in the legislation now before you,
added to the statutory authority already established for that office, will
allow the Auditor's Office to accomplish all of the goals set for this new
agency as provided in Bill 7-242, as well as its existing functions, and do so
at a negligibly increased cost. The office of the Auditor of the District of
Columbia is an existing office which serves the Council. The Auditor is
appointed by the Council Chairman free of undue influence from the Mayor and
thus, is far more independent than the Director of a new agency who will be
appointed by the Mayor.
The Auditor's Office has a proven record of both independence and
accomplishment. A recent and partial history of that office includes valuable
audit reports of the University of the District of Columbia., of the Lottery
and Charitable Games Control Board and of costs relating to the provision of
emergency shelter. Why create a new agency of doubtful independence and of
doubtful performance at a great cost to our taxpayers, when a far more certain
and better end can be reached at a low cost, by expanding the powers of an
existing office? That latter course makes far more sense to me and I urge my
colleagues to support this legislation.
Council of the District of Columbia
Memorandum
Notice is given that the attached proposed legislation has been
introduced in the Legislative Meeting on June 2, 1987.
Copies are available in Room 28, Legislative Services Division.
TITLE:
District of Columbia Anti-Corruption and Fraud Act
of 1987, Bill 7-248
INTRODUCED BY:
CO-SPONSORED
Council member Schwartz
BY:
Council members Winter, Crawford and Jarvis
and
Kane.
The Chairman is referring this proposed legislation to the Committee
of the Whole with comments from the Committee on the Judiciary.
cc:
General Counsel
Legislative Counsel
Legi siati ve Servi ces Di vi si on
t
Counc i1 member Caro l Schvfscct^
A BILL
IN THE COUNCIL OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Councilmember Carol Schwartz introduced the following Bill,
which was referred to the Committee on
To provide for the establishment of a comprehensive law to
expand the powers of present laws to ferret out and eliminate
corruption and fraud in government by amending the District of
Columbia Government Comprehensive Merit Personnel Act of 1979
approved March 3, 1979 (D.C. Law 2-139; D.C. Code §1-601.1 et
seq. and other things.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,
that this act may be cited as the "District of Columbia
Anti-corruption and Fraud Act of 1987". '
Sec. 2. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE - It is incumbent upon
citizens in a democracy to be able to fully exercise their
right to criticize their government and to be assured of the
integrity and fairness of that government.
In order to see
that fraud, corruption and malfeasance by government officials
are quickly and judiciously ended, the government of the
District of Columbia must have independent investigators in
which the public has confidence and to whom employees and
members of the public can confidently and safely report their
knowledge of wrongful acts.
• Page (2)
Sec. 3. FINDINGS - The Council of the.District of Columbia
finds that:
(a)
. In the last several years high ranking of
our government have been found guilty of crimes of fraud,
corruption and the abuse and misuse of their powers.
(b) . Such incidents have the potential to undermine the
government by raising a question as to the integrity of all
government officials.
(c)
. Most governmental officials are hardworkin
public servant's whose reputations are tarnished by the
corruption of those few rotten apples in the barrel.
(d)
. As a co-equal part of this government the
the District of Columbia is compelled to act to restore
confidence in this government by facilitating the process by
which those involved in illegal acts can be removed from office.
Sec. 4. DEFINITIONS - The following words shall have
meaning when used in this Act:
(a)
"Auditor" means the District of Columbia Auditor.
(b)
"Council" means the Council of the District of
Co 1umb i a.
(c)
“Chairman" means the Chairman of the Council of the
District of Columbia.
{d)
“Court" means the Superior Court of the District of
Co 1umb i a.
(e)
"Mayor" means the Mayor of the District of Columbia.
Sec. 5. The District of'Columbia Government Comp rehensive
Merit Personnel Act of 1979 approved March 3, 1979 (D.C. Law
2-139; D.C. Code §1-601.1 et seq. is amended as follows:
(a) Section 1 503(a) (D.C. Code, sec. 1-616.3(a))
is amended by adding after the phrase "or any of its
committees" the phrase "or providing information to any
auditing or investigating agency of the District Government or
the Federal Government which the employee reasonably believed
was evidence of wrongful act".
(b) Section 1503(b) (D.C. Code, sec. 1-616.3(b))
is amended by adding after the phrase “testimony to the
Council" the phrase "or providing information to any auditing
- Page (3)
or investigating agency of the District Government or the
Federal Government which the employee reasonably believed to be
evidence of wrongful acts".
c)
. Section 150
amended by adding after the phrase, "to be commenced", the
phrase "by a special prosecutor appointed by the Courts to
prosecute violations of this section";
d)
Section 1503(f) (D.C. Code §1-616.3(f) is
amended to read as follows: "(f) Any employee aggrieved under
the provisions of this section may initiate a civil action
against the District of Columbia and the Agency head or his or
her designee in the Superior Court. Following a trial on the
merits, the Court may award actual civil damages, punitive
damages not exceeding $5,000 against any or all of the named
defendants,’ reasonable attorneys' fees and costs.
Sec. 6.
(a) The Auditor may conduct investigations and
hearings with respect to any audit of accounts and operations
of the government of the District of Columbia pursuant to
section 455 of the District of Columbia Self-Government an
Governmental Reorganization Act, approved December 24, 1973 (87
Stat. 774; D.C. Code, sec. 1-201 et seq.). All investigations
and hearings shall be conducted in accordance with the
provisions of the District of Columbia Administrative Procedure
Act, approved October 21 , 1 968 (82.Stat. 1 203 ; D.C. Code, sec.
1-1501 et seq. ) . For purposes of investigations and hearings,
the Auditor, or any person authorized by the Auditor, may
require the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the
production of books, papers, and other evidence. For purposes
of investigations and hearings, the auditor, or any person
authorized by the Auditor, shall have the power to administer
oaths and issue subpoenas ad testificandum and subpoenas duces
tecum. In case of contumacy by or refusal to obey a subpoena
issued to any person, the Auditor may refer the matter to the
Superior Court of the District of Columbia which may, by order,
require the person to appear and give or produce testimony,
books, papers, or other evidence bearing upon the matter under
investigation. Any failure to obey the order may be punished
ra^c
v **
i
by the court as a contempt thereof as is the case of failure to
obey a subpoena issued or to testify in a case pending before
the court.
(b) The Auditor shall establish a "Hot-Line" which
shall consist of a well publicized telephone number which any
district employee or member of the public can call, during the
hours between 6:00 A.M. and midnight, to report any suspicion
or belief that any member of the government or employee or
contractor is engaged in any unlawful conduct.
Sec. 7.
This act shall take effect after a 30-day period
of Congressional review following approval by the Mayor (or in
the event of its veto by the Mayor, action by the Council to
.override the veto) as provided in section 602(c)(1) of the
District of Columbia .SeVf-Government and Reorganization Act,
approved December 24, 1973 (87 Stat. 813; D.C. Code, sec.
1 -233(c)(1)).
★★★•*★
★★★★★
Council of the District of Columbia
NEWS RELEASE
District Building
14th and E Streets, N.W.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Washington, D.C.
20004
CONTACT:
Robert Richards or
Ron Cocome
202/724-8045
SCHWARTZ OFFERS ANTI-CORRUPTION LEGISLATION
D.C. Councilmember Carol Schwartz (R At-Large) today introduced the
"District of Columbia Anti-Corruption and Fraud Act of 1987".
In an
introductory statement Mrs. Schwartz defined this legislation as, "expanding
the powers of the Auditor of the District of Columbia [to include subpeona
power] and to provide protections to District Government employees who report
wrongdoing within our government to the authorities".
Mrs. Schwartz added,
that her legislation provides for the establishment of "a Hotline in the
Auditor's Office enabling those with knowledge of such wrongdoing in our
government to have quick access to an easily publicized telephone number".
In response to growing allegations of corruption in District Government,
last week legislation was introduced, the "Municipal Integrity Act of 1987",
to establish a new "independent" Office of Investigations "responsible for the
investigation and elimination of fraucU.-.corruption , and other illegal or
unethical conduct within the District of Columbia Government."
Councilmember
Schwartz questioned the "independence" of this new office as proposed, "since
[the "Municipal Intergrity Act of 1987"] provides that the Mayor would appoint
the majority of the members of the Selection Committee and then would appoint
the Director of this agency from the recommendations of that Selection
Committee", Mrs. Schwartz added, "I do not see how this new office can
honestly be called independent".
Mrs. Schwartz further noted the cost advantages of beefing up an existing
(MORE)
s,
2-
-
agency to full strength rather than creating a new agency.
In regard to both
the independence issue and the cost, CounciImember Schwartz said, "The office
of the Auditor of the District of Columbia is an existing office which serves
the Council.
The Auditor is appointed by the Council Chairman free of undue
influence from the Mayor and thus, is far more independent than the Director
of a new agency who will be appointed by the Mayor.
The Auditor's Office has
a proven record of both independence and accomplishment.
Why create a new
agency of doubtful independence and of doubtful performance at a great cost to
our taxpayers, when a far more certain and better end can be reached at a low
cost, by expanding the powers of an existing office"?
So far -three other Councilmembers have endorsed her legislation.
are:
They
Councilmembers Nadine P. Winter (D Ward 6), H.R. Crawford (D Ward 7) and
Charlene Drew Jarvis (D Ward 4).
######
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September 29, 1987
Susan,
For.the'next (& future) set of minutes, I would like to suggest that
we follow the procedure you recommended for the August minutes: call me
and leave a message when the draft is ready, and suggest a deadline for
me to get the draft back to you.
I found the draft of the Sept. 16 minutes
with my meeting packet — which contained the final copy of the minutes,
too.
1 would like to make arrangements to meet with you in the office
from time to time, but I don't know your hours.
What can we do?
Would you give me a copy of Peter's resolution (as he submitted it)
on the Carol Schwartz bill.
What follows are the resolutions I wrote and proposed at the meeting:
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C send a letter to the Swedish Ambassador
expressing ANC 3-C's grave concern regarding the proposed office building
project at 3415 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
[I guess you wrote this one,
but this is how I have it wricten down.]
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C has no objection to 4-way stop signs at
36th and Ordway Streets, N.W.
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That the
Department of Public Works not proceed with the proposed rulemaking
(published in the August 21, 1987 D.C. Register) prohibiting left turns
from Macomb to Massachusetts Avenue until this ANC has been provided
with necessary information and given an opportunity to comment meaningfully.
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re.
vesting case 87-2 before the Zoning Commission:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That it
authorizes the Chairman, her designee, or Phil Mendelson to
represent the Commission in upcoming hearings on
Zoning Case
87-2 along the following general lines
(the advice and recommendations of ANC 3-C shall be along these
lines, to be more fully presented in written and oral testimony)
1. That it strongly supports the proposed amendment #1 in the
public notice.
Accordingly, amendment #2 is not desirable.
2.
That
3.
That it strongly opposes amendment #4.
re.
it strongly supports the proposed
amendment #3.
Idaho Avenue metered parking by McLean Gardens:
RESOLVED: ANC 3-C supports the position of the McLean Gardens
Condominium regarding the request of the Holladay Corporation
for parking meters on Idaho Avenue.
That is, ANC 3-C supports
metered angled parking be installed on the retail store side
of Idaho Avenue between Wisconsin Avenue and Newark Street.
Further, ANC 3-C authorizes Phil Mendelson to represent the
Commission on this issue.
(p-tn pr "2_
NOV 2 3 1967
Resolution re. ANC rationale for supporting C-2-A instead of C-1'
at the Woodley Park low density local neighborhood commercial
center.
RESOLVED: ANC 3-C believes that C-1 zoning is generally the
most appropriate zone classification for low density local
neighborhood commercial areas under the Comprehensive Plan.
^.However, each local neighborhood commercial center is unique.
For instance the Woodley Park commercial node on Connecticut
Avenue is characterized by tall townhouse-type buildings that
preexist the Comprehensive Plan.
(In fact, ANC 3-C believes
these buildings are significant enough to qualify for historic -ik*. ^
district status.)
A C-1 designation would makeimsff&t o"f_tHXs
neighborhood center nonconforming and may not be necessary
to preserve the present character of the area. Thus it
would be reasonable, here, for a rezoning from C-2-B to C-2-A
-- especially if coupled with historic district and local
neighborhood center overlay restrictions. ANC 3-C's formally
adopted position is that this area should be downzoned "to at
least C-2-A."
In general, the factors mitigating the application of C-1 to low
density local neighborhood commercial areas include:
•The predominant height, bulk, and set back?'* of structures
predating the Comprehensive Plan;
•The (stabiTlxy^of the area, including the condition of current
vacaneTesCexcluding vacancies caused by an owner’s decision to
terminate occupancies);
•Whether the Comprehensive Plan designates the center as "new or
upgraded" or as a development opportunity area;
•Transportation factors such as very high levels of service (LOS
in the A or B range)
7
-
November 10, 1987
Draft re. ANC rationale for supporting C-2-A instead of C-l at the
Woodley Park low density local neighborhood commercial center.
ANC 3-C believes that C-l zoning is generally the- most appropriate
zone classification for low density local neighborhood commercial areas
under the Comprehensive Planf However, each local neighborhood commercial area is unique.
For instance, the Woodley Park commercial node on
Connecticut Avenue is characterized by tall townhouse-type buildings
that pre-exist the Comprehensive Plan.
(In fact ANC 3-C believes these
buildings are significant enough to qualify for historic district status.)
A C-l designation would make most of this neighborhood center non-conforming
and may not be necessary to preserve the present character of the area.
Thus it would be reasonable, here, for a rezoning from C-2-B to C-2-A —
especially if coupled with historic district and local neighborhood center
overlay restrictions. ANC 3-C's formally adopted position is that this
area should be downzoned "to at least C-2-A."
Other factors mitigating the applicatin of C-l to low density local
neighborhood commercial areas include) whether the Comprehensive Plan
designates the center as "new or upgraded" or as a development opportunity
area, and whether the area is^-no-t^a qtable residential community.
r.
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Drafted by Phil Mendelson in light or discussion at Nov. 9 P&Z meeting.
This should be discussed at November/ Commission meeting.
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ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
RESOLUTION
01 -Cheryl Opacinch
02Sam Friedman
03John A. Jenkins
04Roger Burns
IONA HOUSE MEDICALLY SUPERVISED DAY
05Peggy Robin
06Phil MendelsonCertificate of Need Application
07Patricia Wamsley
08Davtd Grinnell
09Peter Espenschied
CARE CENTER
87-3-4
WHEREAS: the Iona House Day Health Center has been in operation at
3720 Upton Street N.W., Washington, D.C. since August 1986 in space
rented from the Washington Home as an adult day care center approved
"as a social model"; and
WHEREAS: this
D.C. Office oh
imbursement in
party payments
program is funded in part through the
Aging, provision also is
made for individual reaccordance with abiltiy to pay, and .where available.from third
and;
WHEREAS:
the requirements of the D.C. Office of Health Care Financing
require Certificate of Need (CON) certification from the State Health
Planning and Development Agency (SHPDA) for approval as a Medicaid
Provider for re-imbursement from that agency, (see Letter of Intent dated
October 27, 1987 from Program Director)and;
WHEREAS: under current SHPDA requirements Iona House must reapply for
its Certificate of Need as a Meducal Provider and reestablish community
support from the ANC; therefore
BE IT RESOLVED:
that Adivsory Neighborhood Commission 3-C reaffirms
its earlier position in support of Iona House's application for a
therapeutic day care center for older adults as a needed facility in
this area of Northwest Washington.
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
j/yfrUf
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
Mr. Ed Curry, Executive Director
D.C. Zoning Commission
The District Building
Washington, D.C.
20004
r e.
McLEAN GARDENS
^
Th > v
S
WOODLEY PARK
f
-
December 15, 1987
RE: Case No. 87-2
Dear Mr. Curry:
I am writing pursuant to the Public Hearing Notice scheduling a
January 7, 1988 hearing in the so-called "vesting" case (No. 87-2).
Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C wishes to testify at the hearing.
We received the notice subsequent to our last (November) meeting, and
will consider the amendments proposed in the hearing notice at our
next (December) meeting.
Although I have been authorized to represent ANC 3-C in this case,
I am unable to offer our comments on this new notice until after we
meet. However, our past comments have been consistent with proposals
#1 and #3 in the notice.
If the Zoning Commission desires further information from ANC 3-C
prior to the hearing, please contact me either through our office or
at 966-1485.
Sincerely,
Phil Mendelson
Secretary
PM/ms
.4 \ ^ w
fru.
District of Columbia Zoning Commission
NOTICE OP PUBLIC HEARING
TIRE Mt PLACE:
Thursday, January 7, 1988 @ 1:30 P.M.,
District Building, Room 9, 1350
Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington,
D.C. 20004.
FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSIDERING THE FOLLOWING:
Case No. 87-2 (Zoning Commission, sponsor)
THIS CASE IS OF INTEREST TO ALL ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD
COMMISSIONS
The Zoning Commission for the District
action to consider proposed amendments
Columbia Municipal Regulations (DCMR),
section 3202, which regulates building
of Columbia initiated
to the District of
Title 11, Zoning,
permits.
The proposed amendments which the Commission will consider
are set forth or generally summarized below:
1.
2.
Amend 11 DCMR 3202.5 to provide that the right to
construct a building or other structure would not vest
until a permit to construct the building or structure
has been validly issued, and the permit holder has
completed a substantial degree of construction under
the permit, and in good faith reliance thereon.
Revise 11 DCMR 3202.5(a)
(a)
3.
62. 1066•p
5>
to read as follows:
The application shall be accompanied by any fee
which is required, and by the plans and other
information required by section 3202.2, which
shall be sufficiently complete to permit
processing without substantial change or
deviation, and by any other plans and information
which are required to permit complete review of
the entire application under applicable District
of Columbia regulations.
C
Adopt a provision which would require a
a construction permit to give notice of the filing of
the application to the Advisory Neighborhood Commission
in which the proposed structure would be located, if
Z.C. Notice of Public Hearing
Case No. 87-2
Page 2
the area, height, bulk, or other characteristics of the
proposed structure are significant.
/Vo ./
4.
Adopt a provision to establish a procedure and fee by
which the District would grant a reservation of a
vested right to construct a building or other structure
before the filing of an application for the permit to
construct the building or structure.
5.
The Commission will also consider the adoption of
amendments which persons who participate in the hearing
recommend as alternatives to the above amendments.
6.
The Commission also invites the submission of views on
other issues which any interested person believes to be
reasonably related to the proposed amendments.
i)o!
Proposed amendments to the text of the Zoning Regulations of
the District of Columbia, are authorized pursuant to the
Zoning Act (Act of June 20, 1938, 52 Stat. 797, as amended,
Section 5-413 et seq., D.C. Code, 1981 Ed.).
The public hearing on this case will be conducted in accordance with the provisions of 11 DCMR 3021. Pursuant to that
section, the Commission will impose time limitations on
testimony presented to it at this public hearing.
All individuals, organizations, or associations who wish to
testify in this case should file their intention to testify
in writing with the Executive Director of the Zoning
Secretariat by December 15, 1987, together with any written
material which the person or entity wishes the Commission to
consider. Written statements, in lieu of a personal
appearance or oral presentation, may be submitted for inclusion in the record.
Information should be forwarded to the Executive Director,
Office of the Zoning Secretariat, Room 11, District Building, 1350 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.
20004.
Please include the number of the particular case and
your daytime telephone number.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, YOU
MAY CONTACT THE ZONING SECRETARIAT AT 727-6311.
GEORGE M. WHITE, JOHN G. PARSONS, LINDSLEY WILLIAMS,
MAYBELLE T. BENNETT AND PATRICIA N. MATHEWS
ZONING
COMMISSION OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, BY EDWARD L. CURRY,
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, ZONING SECRETARIAT.
87-2notice/BJW25
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ZONING COMMISSION
Case No. 87-2
Proposed Amendments to 11 DCMR 3202
Comments of the
Cleveland Park Historical Society and the Tenl.ey and Cleveland
Park Emergency Committee
The Cleveland Park Historical Society (CPHS) and the
Tenley and Cleveland Park Emergency Committee (TACPEC)
herewith submit their written comments on the pending Case
87-2 concerning newly proposed amendments to 11 DCMR 3202 and
other proposed additions to the regulations.
The proposed changes would modify the presently applicable
rules governing the right of a property owner to construct
or develop under existing zoning, regardless whether that
zoning is or may be altered by map or text amendment.
1/
These rules, in various permutations, have been the subject
of repeated consideration by the Commission for over a year.
In July 1987, the Commission received comments and
testimony on the then-proposed amendments to the relevant
regulations.
At that time, CPHS and TACPEC submitted written
comments urging that the Commission adopt what is generally
recognized to be the majority rule in this country concerning
the vesting of rights in existing zoning.
See Testimony
submitted July 10, 1987.
That rule is stated in 4 Rathkopf,
The Law of Zoning and Planning, 50-62, §50.04 (1987):
The majority rule, as hereinbefore noted,
is that no vested rights are acquired
except where a landowner, prior to the
effective date of prohibitory legislation
and in reliance upon a validly issued permit
has made, in good faith, a substantial change
of position in relation to the land, or has
made substantial expenditures or has incurred
substantial obligations.
1 / CPHS and TACPEC stress, as we have in our earlier
comments, that it is the general rule, in the District and
elsewhere, that "a property owner has no vested right in the
continuance of the zoning status of his land . . .." Wi ncamp
Partnership v. Anne Arundel County, Md., 458 F. Supp. 1009,
1 027 (~D^ Md. 1978 ).
See also Town of Vienna Council v.
Kohler, 244 S.E.2d 542, 548 (Va. 1978).
from city agencies and from the affected Advisory Neighborhood Commission, and to review proposals for compliance
with the Comprehensive Plan. Under the present rules,
where the developer submits an acceptable application for
a building permit, the submission would "vest" the current
zoning and thus would severely limit the scope of administrative
review. Even if there were serious questions regarding the
appropriateness of the project under the Comprehensive Plan
or under proposed zoning changes, arguably the "vested"
project would have to be approved if a hearing on a zoning
change had not actually been scheduled at the time the permit
application was submitted. The present rules do not establish
the climate of certainty sought by the citizens and, apparently,
by the development community. Rather, they foster a competition for filing times which impedes the decisionmaking
that the Zoning Commission, and other agencies, must conduct.
Under the first proposed amendment set out in the
hearing notice, the developer would have to inform the City,
and the general community, of a projected development at
a time when modification of the development may be possible,
if it is deemed upon review not to be in compliance with the
Comprehensive Plan or some other aspect of the regulations.
The absence of such notifcation has resulted in the construction
of at least one highly controversial project that was later
implicitly found to be inappropriate (4000 Wisconsin Avenue).
Surely, it is as much in a developer's interest to avoid a
protracted dispute with the community as it is in the
community's interest to have a legally established opportunity
to participate in decisions which shape its future.
For these reasons and those stated in our July 10
comments, CPHS and TACPEC urge that the Commission adopt
the first proposed amendment.
For the same reasons, CPHS and TACPEC recommend that the
Commission reject the second proposed amendment. This is
no more than a fine-tuning of the present rules.
It would
expand upon the requirements for the application, but would
still allow that application to freeze the zoning of the
land, regardless of the desirability of the proposed rezoning.
It would continue the present procedure which abandons
decisionmaking regarding future zoning to private landowners
rather than preserving it to public agencies.
The third proposed provision listed in the hearing notice
would require notice to the Advisory Neighborhood Commission
(continued from preceding page)
substantial expense has been incurred in good faith before
the change in zoning. See Board of Supervisors of Fairfax
County v. Medical Structures, Inc., 213 Va. 355, 192 S.E.2d
799, 801 (1972).
3
In this region, the majority rule has been specifically
applied by the Maryland courts. For example, in County
Council, Montgomery County v. District Land Corporation,
274 Md. 691, 337 A.2d 712, 721 (1975), the court said: 2_/
We have held that the obtention of a building
permit creates no vested right in an existing
zoning classification unless substantial construction has been undertaken in reliance
thereon . . . and that possession of a building
permit, taken together with the payment of a
high price in reliance on existing zoning, and
with substantial expenditures for architectural
fees creates no vested right in the absence of
actual construction.
The first proposed amendment listed in the Commission's
recent Notice of Public Hearing in effect states the "Maryland
rule." CPHS and TACPEC fully endorse the adoption of this
rule.
As we noted in our earlier comments, such action would
not only bring the District of Columbia into accordance
with the majority position in this country, but would yield
such regulatory benefits as giving the Zoning Administrator
and other administrative bodies a full and unencumbered
opportunity to review proposed developments for consistency
with planned zoning and with the Comprehensive Plan. The
present rules allow a developer to "lock in" current zoning
with no more than an application, even where a change of
zoning may be necessary to comply with the Comprehensive
Plan or to reflect changed conditions in the area. The
rules thus take control over general questions of future
land use out of the hands of the agencies empowered to
decide such questions. Adoption of the majority rule would
give that control back to the community, while preserving
the landowner's rights where he has relied in good faith
on current zoning.
Further, adopting the "Maryland" or majority rule
regarding vesting would allow full implementation of existing
rules on Large Tract Review, 10 DCMR §1500. Those rules
were adopted to "minimize adverse environmental, traffic
and neighborhood impact," to allow coordinated comments
2 / See also Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission v. TKU
Associates, 281 McL V, 376 A. 2d 505, 5T6 ( 1 977 ); Wi ncarnp
Partnership v. Anne Arundel County, Md., supra, 458 F. Supp.
at 1027; Prince George's County v. Equitable Trust Co.,
408 A.2d 737, 741 (Md. App. 1979).
Virginia similarly limits a vested right to zoning to
cases where a permit has been issued under earlier zoning,
the site plan has been filed and diligently pursued, and
(continued on next page)
2
of an application for a construction permit for a significant
structure.
CPHS and TACPEC heartily endorse this proposal.
Such a provision would further carry out the purpose of
D.C. Code §1-261, requiring notice to the ANCs of significant
governmental actions.
Direct notice from the developer
to the community should allow consideration of the project
at a stage when citizens' comments may have real import,
rather than deferring that consideration to a point at
which the development proposal is essentially fixed.
The fourth proposed provision, on the other hand,
should be rejected.
It would allow a developer to purchase
a vested right in zoning without consideration of that
zoning by this Commission or, apparently, by any other
responsible body.
In sharp contrast to the operation of
the majority rule described above, under this provision
the developer would merely have to buy his zoning.
He would
not be required to apply for the permit, or expend any
significant sums on the project, or take any actions other
than the payment of a fee.
We submit that this amounts to
an abdication of the legislative function of this Commission.
In a recently reported case, the City of New York was
found to have made "an illegal deal" with a Manhattan
developer by selling him the right to build a structure on
a scale in excess of that allowed by the zoning.
See
Washington Post, December 8, 1987, p. A13 (copy attached).
Permitting a developer to "buy" existing zoning for a fee,
as proposed here, is very similar to the action found
unlawful by the New York court.
If existing zoning is
deemed appropriate by this Commission, then a development
can go forward under it.
If the zoning is not appropriate,
no one should be able to buy it.
For these reasons, CPHS and TACPEC strongly oppose
adoption of the fourth proposed provision.
Finally, CPHS and TACPEC request the opportunity to have
a representative of these organizations appear at the
January 7, 1988, hearing at which these provisions are to
be considered.
Respectfully submitted,
,
/
/A-'if-
/
/~ ‘‘■'-■jyf-i
CLEVELAND PARK HIST0RTC AL SOCIETY
by Tersh Boasberg, President
4
// ■*.'*/*
TENLEY and CLEVER
PARK EMERGENCY
COMMITTEE
by Joel Odum, President
December 15,
1987
4
•. •* TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8,1987
THE WASHINGTON POST
City Loses Manhattan Zoning Case
Sale to Zuckerman of Right to Increase Building Size Ruled Illegal
neighborhood and cast imposing
public opinion here against the onshadows across Central Park.
slaught of skyscrapers that block
Kent L. Barwick, president of the •the sky and add to traffic and conNEW YORK, Dec. 7—In a case
Municipal Art Society,.which filed
gestion.
that has become a symbol of ramthe suit, said the ruling "provides a .'•••' When Zuckerman beat 15 other
pant overdevelopment in Manhatmeasure of protection against the
developers during a 1985 auction,
tan, a state judge ruled today that - .sale of city property to the highest . $57 million of his bid was for a bonus enabling him to erect a building
city officials had struck an illegal
bidder, regardless of the consequences. The real message here is
20 percent larger than zoning laws
deal with developer Mortimer B.
normally would allow. The proceeds
that the city should be balancing
Zuckerman by selling him the right
to increase the size of a proposed • interests, rather than acting as an . were to be used by the Metropolbuilding at Columbus Circle for $57 .'overzealous developer.”r - itan Transportation Authority,
: ^Zuckermanjl vpubhsheVj^of ;3J.S.'.‘&/which owns the site, for subway
million.
i
New York City cannot make “a /ijNews.& World Report^'jjfidj'hft At- *-/.coh£truction and for maintaining
* .
‘cash sale’ of a zoning bonus," Man-, •f/lahtic, defen<M .the 'city's auction- ^T.the^l subway fare. :•
hattan Supreme Court Justice Ed- ■ ing of the 'site, saying, “A lot of/-•>•'Zuckerman’s firm, Boston Propward H. Lehner ruled. He said this / buildings have-been built with zori- .^rertiesj agreed to contribute another
amounted to “an illegal payment ;•> ing bonuses qulte'( similar to ;What-ftv$40 .million to upgrade the nearby
V^ubway* station at 59th Street and
.. v. Government may not place rv was done here.” ' V 1■
••
*
itself in the position of reaping a . '■ But 'Zuckerman acknowledged v.viBrdadway//
•'
that
the
project
had
“become
one
of//'..
While
the
city
frequently
negocash premium because one of its
the examples of what people per-. -;tiates zoning bonuses with develagencies bestows a cash benefit
• ,'ceive to be overdevelopment.” Un- v;'opers after the fact, Lehner adoptupon a developer.”
1/
' ,-rder the revised plan, he said, “we’ll Ved the Municipal Art Society's arAs a practical matter, :Zucker- jeduce the building substantially / gument that the city had perverted
man’s plans for 68- and 58-story
.. and try to make sure the build- '/the zoning process by including the
towers at Columbus Circle ‘were ’ ing works more in tune with the
20 percent bonus from the start and
lolled last week when Salomon /'community's interests." '
...requiring developers to raise their
Bros., the investment banking firm
' New York Mayor Edward I. Koch . bids accordingly.
that was his major tenant and finan- v’said the project’3 opponents had ( The expected reduction in Zuckcial partner, pulled out of the ven- //won “a temporary^ victory" and that
erman’s purchase price has created
ture, citing staff layoffs.
. . ■f the city would appeal. He said the
an immediate headache for. Koch,
Zuckerman said today he is prowho had included about half the procity would suffer “substantial harm”
ceeding with a scaled-down version
ceeds in next year’s budget. It could
if deprived of the $455 million purof the project, which would require
also lead to legal challenges by
chase price.''
V-..
a reduction in the record $455 milsome of the losing bidders.
“If the project is riot built, thfere
1
lion price he had negotiated for the
Zuckerman said the project, which
will be fewer policemen, fewer sancity-owned site.
itation workers, fewer teachers and v originally included about 2 million
The project, which would replace
substantially fewer dollars for tran- ^square feet for Salomon Bros.’ tradthe vacant New York Coliseum, has
sit,” Koch said. “Thousands of mu- / ing floors, would be changed to inbeen the target of a high-powered
nicipal jobs would be at risk.”
: -• crease the proportion of luxury houspublicity campaign, with celebrities
Zuckerman’s project and Tele-'' -ing. The brokerage’s withdrawal is
vision City, a 13-block West Side/.part of retrenchment and layoffs by
such as Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis
development planned by Donald J. - major Wall Street firms after the
and Bill Moyers charging that it
Trump, appear to have galvanized / Oct. stock market collapse.
would mar the Upper West Side
By Howard Kurtz
Washington Post Sufi Writer
- J.
J
ATTACHMENT
l
MEMO:
December 18, 1987
TO:
FROM:
SUBJECT:
All Commissioners
Susan K. Straus
Copier Comparative Information
I have invited prices on the following features from CANNON, TOSHIBA, XEROX and PANASONIC
AUTOMATIC FEED
AUTOMATIC TWO SIDED COPY
SORTING CAPABILITY
TOSHIBA has a machine in the ANC office now with these features for your inspection. Panasonic will be next
on a trial basis if you do not make a desision at the Dec. 21 meeting. Included in your packets is information
on each of the machines that will give us the automatic features. Here is a brief summary of costs with
highlights on the features. I visited the Xerox facilty to use their machine and I will visit Cannon also.
TOSHIBA
$6700 plus service for one year = $6925.00
Copy Quality is good
Several features come with the package at no cost(Color, reduction/enlargement and edit)
Fully automatic copying two sided from one sided. Not automatic copyong two sided from two sided
Will not copy mulitple two sided legal size automatically
During use some paper jamming did occur
Supply costs include Toner and Developer. A year's supply of Developer comes with this-purchaser loner lasts
approximately three months giving us a supply cost of approximately $60.00 per year.
CANNON
*$5953 plus service for one year =
$7083.00
*Price good only until 12/31/87 then goes to $6418.0
(plus service -1130.00
Automatic two sided from both one sided and two sided originals
_
55
Several features come with the package at no cost(reduction/enlargement , edit and highlight)
No information on jamming or copy quality as machine has not been used in test mode yet.
Supply costs are required only for toner (does not use developer) Estimated supply cost are $80.00 per year.
No information yet on copy quality
XEROX
*$8750 plus free service for 16 months (a discount of $1423) *This price and service arrangement good
only until 12/31/87
Copy Quality excellent
Very easy use for.all features
Supply costs based on our volume would be nothing for Developer for approximately one year and nothing
for Toner for more than two years. Cost for supplies would run approximately $70.00 when needed.
PANASONIC
$ 7348 plus service/ supplies for approximately 15 moths = $7877.00
PANASONIC (Continued)
Automatic two sided from one sided original
No information on jamming or copy quality as trial not yet held
Supplies of Toner and Developer must be purchsed from Gold Office Products to benefit from the warranty of
24,00 copies or 36 months whichever cpmes first
If you want to take advantage of either the Xerox or the Cannon offer you will need to act at the December
meeting.
NBV 2 3 1987
Resolution re. D.C. Prison
WHEREAS: ANC 3-C is aware of the controversy in locating a new
D.C. Prison, currently proposed for Ward 6, and recognizes that
this is a citywide issue addressing a citywide need; and
WHEREAS: ANC 3-C is appalled at the D.C. Executive Branch's
which has been to impose its plans on the community
rather than to approach the community first to develop a proposal
with widespread support; and
WHEREAS: The first "theme" and major objective of the
Comprehensive Plan is to protect and stabilize the city's
neighborhoods. ANC 3-C -- from its own experience -- is a
strong supporter of the sanctity of neighborhoods and the need
to protect them from nonresidential intrusions such as office
buildings, prisons, etc.; and
WHEREAS: Congress has a role in seeking and funding a new D.C.
Prison, and now appears to be urging the District to look at
alternative sites; therefore,
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That ANC
3-C supports the efforts of ANC 6B and the Capitol Hill Prison
Task Force in resisting the imposition of the proposed new
D.C. Prison in the Capitol Hill community. ANC 3-C supports
the review of alternative locations, in spite of alleged
topographical limitations. ANC 3-C believes that the city's
efforts to place the prison should overcome topography rather
than overwhelm the community. A new D.C. Prison should not be
placed in or near any D.C. neighborhood.
REPORT ON PURCHASING A
PC COMPUTER & PRINTER FOR ANC-3C
Roger Burns
12-21-87
I. SUMMARY CONCLUSION:
Amongst those of us who are most involved in this topic ( i.e.
Cheryl, Peter, Peggy, & myself ), there is a consensus that the
kind of PC we should purchase is an IBM AT clone. Also, the particular AT clone offered by Community Computers of 1617 K St. NW
is probably an excellent buy. It goes for $1500 - $2000, depending
on the options.
There are a variety of other costs relating to software and
support that the Commission may want to pay for; however, there are
also very inexpensive alternatives to these options.
Regarding printers, there is no clear consensus now. Although
there are 100-odd printers on the market that one could choose from,
I present here a list of some preferable alternatives which I have
gleaned from a consumer-review article which recently appeared in a
well-regarded computer magazine. The major trade-offs are between
print quality, speed, and price. The available price range is from
$550 - $1800 (store price, not list).
II. WHY BUY AN "AT CLONE" ?
There are 3 kinds of IBM PCs (or compatibles) in existence now.
There's the lower-level "88" based PCs - the original IBM PC and
its upgraded version, the XT; the middle-level "286" based PC which is the AT; and the upper-level, new PS/2 class of PCs just
coming on to the market now.
The new PS/2 class of PCs in general have much more power than
we really need, so they would not be a good buy for us. (Some of
them have a more appropriate level of power, but they cost much more
than they should given their abilities - this is often true of newly
released models, as you know.)
The lower-level "88" based PCs are probably good enough for our
needs, except that this kind of technology is soon to be outmoded.
Please note that the ANC will often be using software that individual
Commissioners will donate to our computer, and that in the near future
this donated software will be based on middle-level "286" technology.
As we will want to make a long term investment that will be able to take
advantage of what the new basic standard for software will be, we want
a PC that is based on middle-level "286" technology (if it's not too
expensive), that is, we want an AT. It is widely recognized by experts
that the AT will be the standard amongst PCs for the next 5 years, if
not longer, and in spite of the newly-developed PS/2 class which is coming
out now.
Why buy a clone of the AT ? Well, manufacturers who have copied the
original IBM AT have gotten so good that IBM has left the market - they
don't make ATs anymore ! It's just as well, since the clones are so good
and cost so much less.
III. EXTRA COSTS: SOFTWARE & SUPPORT
The Commission will need software for Its PC, otherwise it won't run!
An option at one extreme is that all of the needed word-processing, and
other, software will be donated by individual Commissioners and can be
supplemented with good how-to manuals that are easily purchased at local
bookstores. (This is an option I recommend.) On the other hand, we can
obtain our own software with other options (Cheryl prefers on-line
support). Software packages can run from $200 - $450.
REPORT ON PURCHASING
PC & PRINTER
page 2 of 3
IIIA. PC OPTIONS
The Community computers AT clone comes with a monitor (monochrome),
a keyboard, & a 20 meg hard disk for a total of $1495. A small speed
upgrade is $100 (from 6/10 Mhz to 12/6 Mhz), a 40 meg hard disk would
be $350 more, a modem (300/1200 baud) is $99. I recommend we get no
speed upgrade, consider a larger hard disk at a later time, and think
about a modem (enables telephone communication).
IV. PRINTERS - IN GENERAL
There is much debate on what we should purchase regarding a printer.
The general options are:
daisy-wheel printer - highest quality print, and inexpensive
(most $350 - $500, some $600-$900)
but slow (most 16-31 cps; one has
56 cps)
dot-matrix printer - varying quality of print depending
on model, and many people are
satisfied in general with the quality
of print while many others are not;
middle range in price ($550-$900);
standard speed for many business uses
(about 66 cps in near-letter-quality
mode )
laser printer - print quality better than dot-matrix,
although not up to daisy-wheel standard;
price range $1200 - $1800 and up;
speed: around 300 cps ; other features too
Some of the strong sentiments expressed by interested Commissioners are:
When we have long reports we will need fast printing - we can afford top
quality now, so we should by a fast laser printer.
OR: Our office never needs fast printing, there's no sense in spending
for qualities we don't need, so given the importance of price & print
quality we should strongly consider a daisy-wheel printer.
There is a consensus on ensuring that we get a low- or no-maintenance
machine, & that it should be easy to feed single sheets (such as letterhead) into our printer.
V. SORTING OUT THE CHOICES
I recommend that we take advantage of the study recently made by the
renowned PC Magazine on the specific brands of printers available.
(I've attached a copy of selected pages of that study following this
report.) In particular, we should look at the featured Editor's Choices
in each category.
The Commission will, however need to debate the acceptable price range
print quality, and desired speed. PLEASE form opinions on as many of thes
qualities as you can. Also note: some favorite choices may be unavailable
or hard to get. A Primage 90-GT daisy-wheel may have great print quality,
a moderate price at $900, and an adequate speed at 56 cps, but a short
search on my part has not yet found a Washington dealer who sells daisywheel printers. So we should debate more about qualities we're looking
for, unless we settle on a popular item we know is available, like an
Epson dot-matrix, or a Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Series II.
)2 /s//fc>
re.
vesting case 87-2 before the Zoning Commission:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That it
authorizes the Chairman, her designee, or Phil Mendelson to
represent the Commission in upcoming hearings on
Zoning Case
87-2 along the following general lines
(the advice and recommendations of ANC 3-C shall be along these
lines, to be more fully presented in written and oral testimony):
1. That it strongly supports the proposed amendment #1 in the
public notice.
Accordingly, amendment #2 is not desirable.
2.
That it strongly supports the proposed amendment #3.
3.
That it strongly opposes amendment #4.
re.
Idaho Avenue metered parking by McLean Gardens:
•ew*'
RESOLVED :/iANC 3-C supports the position of the McLean Gardens
Condominium regarding the request of the Holladay Corporation
for parking meters on Idaho Avenue.
That is, ANC 3-C supports
metered angled parking be installed on the retail store side
of Idaho Avenue between Wisconsin Avenue and Newark Street.
Further, ANC 3-C authorizes Phil Mendelson to represent the
Commission on this issue.
'"'A'/TA- ,
: A
NOV 2 3 1907
Resolution re. ANC rationale for supporting C-2-A instead of C-1
at the Woodley Park low density local neighborhood commercial
center.
RESOLVED: ANC 3-C believes that C-1 zoning is generally the
most appropriate zone classification for low density local
neighborhood commercial areas under the Comprehensive Plan.
However, each local neighborhood commercial center is unique.
For instance, the Woodley Park commercial node on Connecticut
Avenue is characterized by tall townhouse-type buildings that
preexist the Comprehensive Plan.
(In fact, ANC 3-C believes
these buildings are significant enough to qualify for historic
district status.) A C-1 designation would make most of this
neighborhood center nonconforming and may not be necessary
to preserve the present character of the area. Thus it
would be reasonable, here, for a rezoning from C-2-B to C-2-A
-- especially if coupled with historic district and local
neighborhood center overlay restrictions. ANC 3-C's formally
adopted position is that this area should be downzoned "to at
least C-2-A."
In general, the factors mitigating the application of C-1 to low
density local neighborhood commercial areas include:
•The predominant height, bulk, and set backs of structures
predating the Comprehensive Plan;
•The stability of the area, including the condition of current
vacancies (excluding vacancies caused by an owner's decision to
terminate occupancies);
•Whether the Comprehensive Plan designates the center as "new or
upgraded" or as a development opportunity area;
•Transportation factors such as very high levels of service (LOS
in the A or B range)
Lf
MEMO:
December 18, 1987
TO:
FROM:
SUBJECT:
All Commissioners
Susan K. Straus
Copier Comparative Information
I have invited prices on the following features from CANNON, TOSHIBA, XEROX and PANASONIC
AUTOMATIC FEED
AUTOMATIC TWO SIDED COPY
SORTING CAPABILITY
TOSHIBA has a machine in the ANC office now with these features for your inspection. Panasonic will be next
on a trial basis if you do not make a desision at the Dec. 21 meeting. Included in your packets is information
on each of the machines that will give us the automatic features. Here is a brief summary of costs with
highlights on the features. I visited the Xerox facilty to use their machine and I will visit Cannon also.
TOSHIBA
$6700 plus service for one year = $6925.00
Copy Quality is good
Several features come with the package at no cost(Color, reduction/enlargement and edit)
Fully automatic copying two sided from one sided. Not automatic copyong two sided from two sided
Will not copy mulitple two sided legal size automatically
During use some paper jamming did occur
Supply costs include Toner and Developer. A year's supply of Developer,comes with thisrpurchasev loner lasts
approximately three months giving us a supply cost of approximately $60.00 per year.
CANNON
*$5953 plus service for one year =
$7083.00
*Price good only until 12/31/87 then goes to $6418.
(plus service -1130.0
Automatic two sided from both one sided and two sided originals
———
Several features come with the package at no cost(reduction/enlargement , edit and highlight)
7548.0
No information on jamming or copy quality as machine has not been used in test mode yet.
Supply costs are required only for toner (does not use developer) Estimated supply cost are $80.00 per year.
No information yet on copy quality
XEROX
*$8750 plus free service for 16 months (a discount of $1423) *This price and service,arrangement good
onlyUntil
12/31/87
x
Copy Quality excellent
Very easy use for all features
Supply costs based on our volume would be nothing for Developer for approximately one year and nothing
for Toner for more than two years. Cost for supplies would run approximately $70.00 when needed.
PANASONIC
$ 7348 plus service/ supplies for approximately 15 moths = $7877.00
PANASONIC (Continued)
Automatic two sided from one sided original
No information on jamming or copy quality as trial not yet held
Supplies of Toner and Developer must be purchsed from Gold Office Products to benefit from the warranty of
24,00 copies or 36 months whichever cpmes first
If you want to take advantage of either the Xerox or the Cannon offer you will need to act at the December
meeting.
PLP
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R&PORI
ON PURCHASING
PC & PRINTER
page 2 of 3
111A. PC OPTIONS
The Community Computers AT clone comes with a monitor (monochrome),
a keyboard, & a 20 meg hard disk for a total of $1495. A small speed
upgrade is $100 (from 6/10 Mhz to 12/6 Mhz), a 40 meg hard disk would
be $350 more, a modem (300/1200 baud) is $99. I recommend we get no
speed upgrade, consider a larger hard disk at a later time, and think
about a modem (enables telephone communication).
IV. PRINTERS - IN GENERAL
There is much debate on what we should purchase regarding a printer.
The general options are:
daisy-wheel printer - highest quality print, and inexpensive
(most $350 - $500, some $600-$900)
but slow (most 16-31 cps; one has
56 cps)
dot-matrix printer - varying quality of print depending
on model, and many people are
satisfied in general with the quality
of print while many others are not;
middle range in price ($550-$900);
standard speed for many business uses
(about 66 cps in near-letter-quality
mode )
laser printer - print quality better than dot-matrix,
although not up to daisy-wheel standard;
price range $1200 - $1800 and up;
speed: around 300 cps ; other features too
Some of the strong sentiments expressed by interested Commissioners are:
When we have long reports we will need fast printing - we can afford top
quality now, so we should by a fast laser printer.
OR: Our office never needs fast printing, there's no sense in spending
for qualities we don't need, so given the importance of price & print
quality we should strongly consider a daisy-wheel printer.
There is a consensus on ensuring that we get a low- or no-maintenance
machine, & that it should be easy to feed single sheets (such as letterhead) into our printer.
V. SORTING OUT THE CHOICES
I recommend that we take advantage of the study recently made by the
renowned PC Magazine on the specific brands of printers available.
(I've attached a copy of selected pages of that study following this
report.) In particular, we should look at the featured Editor's Choices
in each category.
The Commission will, however need to debate the acceptable price range
print quality, and desired speed. PLEASE form opinions on as many of thes
qualities as you can. Also note: some favorite choices may be unavailable
or hard to get. A Primage 90-GT daisy-wheel may have great print quality,
a moderate price at $900, and an adequate speed at 56 cps, but a short
search on my part has not yet found a Washington dealer who sells daisywheel printers. So we should debate more about qualities we're looking
for, unless we settle on a popular item we know is available, like an
Epson dot-matrix, or a Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Series II.
VI. GUIDE TO PRINTERS
A table of contents for the accompanying reprint:
TOPIC
PAGES
INTRO / GEN'L DISCUSSION
DAISY WHEELS
DOT-MATRIX
> *BEST PICKS
GEN'L
SPECIFIC
LASERS
> *BEST
GEN'L
SPECIFIC
1-6
7-13
14
15-18
19-23
24
25-27
28-30
The editor's picks are:
MODEL
LIST
RETAIL*
Dot-matrix
Epson LQ-850
Epson LQ-1050
C Itoh C-715A
$799
$1,099
$1,295
$550
$759
($900)
Laser
Okidata Laserline 6
HP LaserJet Series 2
$1,995
$2,595
$1200
$1800
SPEED*
67 cps
68 cps
64 cps
270 cps
360 cps
Daisy wheels - field too narrow to make picks
NOTES: prices from Printers Plus; price in parenthesis was
estimated at 30% discount off of list;
speed for lasers converted to cps for comparison,
assuming 1 page per minute = 45 characters per second
'JHEREAi;
Advisory Neighborhood Lorn mission 3 - C l.ANC Z ~ 0 \ • the C1 c « c 12 r d
Park Historical Society ICPHS). the Teniey and Cleveland Park Emergency
Committee 1TACPEC). and the Wisconsin Avenue Corridor Committee (UACCI
have jointly sponsored a Petition before the Zoning Commission to re z one
the portion of Connecticut Avenue that falls within the Cleveland Park
Historic District, for the purpose of ensuring consistency with the
Comprehensive Plan and to preserve its historic and local-neighborhoodservice character: and
WHEREAS:
All the co-petitioners have been consulted and have agreed uoon
the principal facts and reasons to be presented in the case: and
WHEREAS:
There is limited time for each petitioner to out forward its
views, and a desire to avoid duplication of testimony and use the time
available to cut forward those witnesses who can speak with the most
authority about each of the different concerns (e.g.. traffic.
Comprehensive Pl3n compliance, integration of historic preservation and
urban Planning goals) th3t Petitioners wish to raise in this complex and
important case;
THEREFORE BE IT NOW RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C:
That it adept as its own the
Pre-He3ring Submission
(attached) filed on
November 3C. 1937 with the Zoning Commission by Tershi Boasberg on behalf
of all four petitioners named above, and that it authorize the witnesses
named therein to resoresent its views 3nd concerns in the hearings set for
January 21. 25. and 23. 1922: and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED:
That the Chairman of this ANC. Feggy Robin, Lisa
Kotee.n* or a designee to be appointed by the Chairman may also represent
the ANC’s views in this C3se.
11
We may want to have eyewitness testimony to the Tact that the Council
dcsisnatior; to
changed Cleveland Park from
Multi-Neighborhood Center
Local Neighoorhood
on the Comprehensive Plan.
As I recall, Lisa
ror the amendmen
Ul CdCluCU
. U til III A, $ C. A. U » I
•eaue;
to the Council, and
BOASBERG
&
NORTON
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
1233
20TH STREET
N W
WASHINGTON.
0 C
12021
TERSH
901
828 9600
BOAS0ERG
THOMAS A
COUGHLIN
ELIZABETH
LANGER
JULIA
SUITE
20036
H
MILLER
EDWARO W
MATTHEW
ELEANOR
NORTON
S.
HOLMES
OF COUNSEL
WATSON
November 30, 1987
Mr. Lindsley Williams, Chairman
D.C. Zoning Commission
District Building
1350 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW - Room 11
Washington, DC
20004
Re:
HAND DELIVERY
Z.C. Case No. 86-26
Connecticut Avenue (Cleveland Park)
PRE-HEARING SUBMISSION
Dear Chairman Williams and Members of the Commission:
The Cleveland Park Historical Society (CPHS) will
take the lead in presenting Co-Petitioners' case.
None of the
other Co-Petitioners will be requesting separate time of its
own.
CPHS views this hearing as important not only for all
Cleveland Park residents; but also because it will be the first
time the Commission has considered an overlay zone to better
protect a commercial historic district designated under D.C.
Law 2-144 and listed on the National Register of Historic
Places. As such, this hearing has precedent-setting implications in the District of Columbia and in the U.S., as a whole,
which looks to the nation's capital for leadership in the
historic preservation field.
I.
POSITION OF PETITIONERS (C.P. Overlay)
Petitioners' are completely supportive of the proposal of
OP as expressed in the Z.C. Notice of Public Hearing (Case No.
86-26) with these additions:
A.
The maximum height "alternative" noted in § 1401.1
should be an integral part of the "twice-the-height" limitation. Thus, the two sentences should be combined:
NORTON
BOASBERG
&
NORTON
Mr. Lindsley Williams
November 30, 1987
Page 2
§ 1401.1 Any new building or expansion of
an existing building shall be restricted to
a maximum height not to exceed two times
the height of the lowest existing building
on an abutting lot fronting on the same
street as the lot being built upon and not
separated from the latter by a street or
alley; provided, however. that the maximum
permitted height of buildings in the CP
Overlay District shall be three stories and
40 feet.
(added words underlined)
B.
In connection with PUDs, we would add this language:
"No PUD shall be permitted unless it is compatible with the
purposes, design, and character of the CP Overlay District."
C.
We would like the name of the new zoning district to
be the "Cleveland Park Historic Overlay District."
II.
LIST OP WITNESSES, SUMMARY OF TESTIMONY, ESTIMATED TIME
Witness
Subject Matter Summary
Estimated
Time
Tersh Boasberg
(lead counsel)
Overview
10 min.
Richard Longstreth
and Kathleen S. Wood,
architectural
historians
Connecticut Avenue and
Cleveland Park:
an
historical perspective
15 min.
Richard Ridley,
architect
Graphics of existing
and proposed zoning
10 min.
Expert A —
planner, city
official
Rezoning to protect
neighborhood commercial
area in other cities
15 min.
Experts B, C, D —
planner, city
official, attorney
Rezoning to protect
historic districts in
other cities
15 min.
Expert E —
federal official
Rezoning to protect
National Register
historic districts
15 min.
SO'ASBERG
8c
NORTON
Mr. Lindsley Williams
November 30, 1987
Page 3
Expert F — PhD
Traffic analysis —
traffic congestion
15 min.
Residents G and H
D.C. Code 5-414 analysis
parking, pollution,
general welfare, neighborhood stability
10 min.
Expert I
Connecticut Avenue
businesses — upgrading;
similar experiences in
other cities
10 min.
Experts/Res idents
Protecting neighborhood
businesses, METRO utilization, protecting local
jobs
10 min.
Tersh Boasberg
Summary
5 min.
TOTAL
2 hours
Please note that other individuals and residents, as
well as, local and national organizations also have contacted
us about presenting their views.
Because of expected time constraints, we have informed them that we probably would not be
able to include them as a part of our direct case presentation.
However, a number have indicated to me that they will appear on
their own behalf. We will make every effort possible to caution them about repetitious testimony.
III. INFORMATION, REPORTS, OTHER MATERIALS AND INFORMATION TO
BE INTRODUCED AT HEARING.
A.
Case No. 85-9 before the D.C. Historic Preservation
Review Board (Park & Shop landmark designation^.
Pertinent portions of this record relating to the
architectural significance and historicity of the Park & Shop
complex.
B.
Case No. 85-10 before the D.C. Historic Preservation
Review Board (historic district designation^.
Pertinent portions of the record relating to the
architectural significance, historicity, urban planning, and
BOASBERG
&
NORTON
Mr. Lindsley Williams
November 30, 1987
Page 4
neighborhood preservation in relationship to Connecticut
Avenue, including *The Development of Connecticut Avenue in
Cleveland Park* by Cherrie Anderson and Ned W. Dearborn.
C.
Pertinent portions of Cleveland Park's nomination to
the National Register of Historic Places.
D.
Other maps, plans, and articles relating to the history and current status of Connecticut Avenue and surroundings;
relevant portions of the Comprehensive Plan, Draft Ward 3 Plan,
Connecticut Avenue Corridor Study, and similar public documents .
E.
Charts and graphics prepared by Richard Ridley
depicting existing and proposed zoning and historic characteristics of Connecticut Avenue in Cleveland Park.
F.
Traffic analysis of area and critique of Connecticut
Avenue Corridor Study.
G.
Analysis of historic preservation concerns, National
Register protections, zoning controls, and overlay zones in
other cities, including relevant portions of other municipal
ordinances, pertinent state and federal laws and regulations,
scholarly articles, affidavits, charts, maps, and plans.
H.
Relevant analysis and published materials dealing
with urban commercial areas, city planning, retention of jobs
and businesses, retention of housing, neighborhood economic
development, retial uses, METRO concerns, and historic districts.
Respectfully submitted,
CLEVELAND PARK HISTORICAL SOCIETY
TB/vrr
cc:
Peggy Robin, Chairman, ANC-3C
Carol Currie, P?esident, WACC
Joel Odum, President, TECPEC
D e c e m b e r 21. 1 '5 2 7
Re:
Cleveland Park Historical
Society Reauests Re. Kiingle
Valley Bridge
Mr. Charles Mason
Assistant to the Director
Department of Public Works
Reeves MuniciDal Center
200C lAth Street, NU
Washington, DC 20009
Dear Mr. Mason:
I am writing to express the enthusiastic support of Advisory
Neighborhood Commission 3-C for two proposals put forward by the Cleveland
Park Historical Society. The first concerns the restoration of the
decorative elements of the Klir.gle Valley Bridge, at the southern entrance
to the Cleveland Park Historic District, and also within the boundaries of
this ANC. We would be very pleased to have the large stone urns refurbished and their electrical connections restored, so that they may again
function as bridge lights, as they were intended by their designer Paul
Cret, and we would further support the repainting of the Art Deco railing,
which is now very chi peed and rust-covered. We believe that renovation of
these decorative elements will allow both residents and tourists alike to
recognize and enjoy this bridge as one of the loveliest ar.d and most
historic of Washington’s public uorks.
Second, this Commission supports the placement of four Historic
District markers, to be posted at the nothern and southern entrances to
the Cleveland Park Historic District along Connecticut and Wisconsin
Avenues, NW. The markers will be similar in design to those already in
place at five major er.tryways to the Takoma Park Historic District. We
understand that the cost of making the template for the markers has been
donated by the Cleveland Park Historical Society. Ue believe that the
placement of these signs will enhance public awareness of an important
phase of our City’s development and will encourage shooowners and
residents to take pride in their neighborhood and its history.
ANC 3-C thanks you for this opportunity to express our views.
FOR THE COMMISSION:
Peggy Robin
Chairman
cc:
Cleveland Park Historical Society
3P3T w
. 01
iilcct.ii^
i«.« _ 1 / ■« <
3E IT RESOLVED 3Y ANC 3-C:
That it send the attached letter to the
DeDartiaer.t of Public Works in suooort of the relijhting of the urns and
the repainting of the Klingle Valley Bridge, and the olacetnent of
Historic District markers at four entrances to the Cleveland Fark Historic
District.
MCLEAN GARDENS
CONDOMINIUM
-
COM MJH
X
*>
•*
c%
December 14, 1987
Mr. Terry Eakin
Vice President
The Holladay Corporation
2121 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.
Suite 400
Washington, DC 20007
Re:
Parking Meters on Idaho Avenue
Dear Terry:
Your proposal for metered parking on Idaho and Wisconsin Avenues
was considered by the Community Affairs Committee and the Board
of Directors took action on the proposal at our meeting of
December 9, 1987. The Board of Directors recommends that metered
angled parking be installed on the retail store side of Idaho
Avenue.
Since the street is a one way street it was felt that
cars could easily pull in and out of angled parking.
Also- the
parking would be directly in front of the stores to be served and
people would be less inclined to cross in the middle of the block
to their parked car. In addition, the Board felt that parking on
one side of the street would allow sufficient room for delivery
trucks and commercial traffic to use Idaho Avenue.
The Board was concerned that parking on both sides of the street
would create congestion and make it difficult for the movement of
commercial traffic thus encouraging the commercial traffic to use
neighborhood streets.
The Board requests that the meters run from 9:00 a.m. to 6:30
p.m. so that there is no lose of possible residential parking for
the neighborhood.
3811 PORTER STREET, N.W., WASHINGTON, D.C. 20016 (202) 966-9780
Page Two
December 14, 1987
Mr. Terry Eakin
The Board's primary concern is the impact of development and the
increasing density of the population on the quality of life for
the residents of McLean Gardens.
The Board is concerned that
added congestion on Wisconsin and Idaho Avenues will encourage
motorists to cut through the residential streets of the Gardens.
If you have any questions about our position,
calling me or Katherine Coram.
—
■
—
-ours,
Julie B. Koczela
Board Member
JBK:mam
cc: McLean Gardens Board of Directors
Community Affairs Committee
do not hesitate
I.v
RECEIVED NOV 3 | 387 ^
-y '
The
Holladay
Corporation
2121 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.
Suite 400
Washington, D.C. 20007
202-337-6470
November 24, 1987
Ms. Katherine Coram
President
McLean Gardens Condominium Association
3811 Porter Street, N.W.
Washington D.C.
20016
RE:
Parking Meters on Idaho Avenue
4
'
Dear Katherine:
As we've discussed, enclosed please find a drawing entitled
"Metered Parking Plan" showing the proposal of The Village at McLean
Gardens to add parking meters both on Idaho Avenue between Wisconsin
Avenue and Newark Street, as well as on Wiscconsin Avenue,just north
of Idaho Avenue.
Because the retail stores fronting on Idaho Avenue will soon be
completed, I would like very much for the McLean Gardens Condominium
Owners Association to support this proposal at the earliest possible
date.
It is my strong view that these parking meters will discourage
Maryland commuters from parking in your neighborhood, thus providing
spaces for retail visitors. This in turn will keep the retail
visitors out of the residential areas of McLean Gardens. These
meters of course, would not be operating after business hours, and
hence these spaces will be available at that time for local
residents.
I understand that the Association will be meeting in early
December, and I would greatly appreciate a review of this proposal at
that time.
If this plan can receive Association approval, we will
ask the Advisory Neighborhood Commission for support as well, and
submit the proposal to the District.
Please do not hesitate to
contact me should you have any questions.
cc:
Ms. Peggy Robin, Chairman
Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C
Ms. Julie B. Koczela,
McLean Gardens Board Member
Ms. Andrea Sallea, Esq.
Wilkes,Artis,Hedricks &Lane
C%r£^
WHEREAS: The Department of Public Works (DPW) has asked for comments on a
proposed traffic signal at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street
(Dec. 4, 1987 D.C. Register, Docket No. 87-265-TS); and
'*/**/#?
DRAFT
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-F has asked that the comment
period be extended until February 1, 1988; and
WHEREAS: This issue is of great importance to the constituents of ANC 3-C;
therefore
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That we raise the
following concerns in connection with a signal at Upton and Wisconsin:
CONCERN: DPW officials have stated repeatedly that the Department
would take no action until after the 4000 Wisconsin Avenue building was
operating and both the Department and the community (including the ANCs)
could see what traffic conditions exist and how they would be affected by
measures such as a signal. We endorse that policy and the Department
should hold to it.
CONCERN: We support and offer as our own the sentiment of ANC
3-F (per their letter of December 9, 1987) that substantial community
input is needed before the record closes on this rulemaking, and therefore
the public comment period should be extended until February 1, 1988. This
is consistent with the Department's objections of fully understanding and
serving the community.
CONCERN: We have grave doubts about the efficacy of this signal.
We are deeply concerned about the probable and direct impact of the proposed
signalization: particularly the impact on residential Upton Street east of
Wisconsin Avenue, and generally the effect on other east-west streets in
the area. DPW has not provided information in this regard — we are asked
to comment without a full understanding of the implications and alternatives,
if any, to the rulemaking. Accordingly, we hereby request a feasibility
study by DPW dealing with these issues.
CONCERN: DPW should not proceed with any change in traffic operations until measures which simultaneously mitigate the impact on the
neighborhood are proposed. Residents of Upton, Van Ness, and 38th streets
are currently discussing proposals. This process will be negatively
aggravated if DPW proceeds now solely with the traffic signal.
CONCERN: Separate from simultaneous migation measures, ANC 3-C is
concerned about dealing in a peace-meal manner with traffic "improvements"
connected with the worsening conditions in the Wisconsin/Van Ness area.
Before closing the record on this docket, DPW must inform ANCs 3-C, 3-E,
and 3-F of the entire realm of changes under consideration and liklihood
of adoption: street widenings, removal of curb parking, reversible lanes,
additional signals, stop signs, barriers, thru-truck prohibitions, changes
in existing signals, left turn signals/lanes, etc. We also request an
estimate of their cost.
CONCERN: The imposition of a traffic signal to facilitate commuter
traffic related to office building construction must be coupled with specific
and effective measures to encourage public transit use as an alternative.
For example, if the developers of 4000 Wisconsin are requesting this signal,
they should be required to offer Metro incentives as a trade-off.
r
AMO?
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION
North Cleveland Park and Forest Hills
Mailing address: P.O. Box 39083 Friendship Station, Washington, D .C. 20018
Location: 4000 Albamarla Street, N.W., Suit* LL16
|
phono 362-6120
December 9,1987
Mr. George Schoene
Chief, Bureau of Traffic Services
2000 lUth Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20009
Re: Docket No. 87-265-TS
Dear Mr. Schoene:
The proposed traffic signal at the intersection of Wisconsin Avenue and
Upton Street, N.W. is a major concern of ANC 3F which represents the
neighborhood on the east side of Wisconsin Avenue from Upton Street to
Nebraska Avenue. Beacuase of the substantial effect this traffic
signal is likely to have on our neighborhood's traffic and parking,
we feel that it is important to get substantial input from the
nearby community before commenting in any detail regarding the proposal.
ANC 3F unanimously passed a resolution at its .November 30th meeting,
requesting that the public comment period on the proposed stop signal
be extended until February 1,1988.
Extending the comment period will allow the ANC time to contact residents
of affected streets, to hold an informal meeting on the topic, and to
officially present the ANC's position at the next public meeting which
will be held.in January.
Your assistance in this matter would be greatly appreciated. Please contact
the ANC office as soon as possible with your response.
Sincerely,
Kendall C. Valentine, Jr.
Chairman
cc: ANC 3C
District of Columbia Register
OEC 4
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULEMAKING
DOCKET NO. 87—265-TS
The Director of the Department of Public Works, pursuant
to the authority of Sections IV(A) and V of Reorganization
Plan No. 4 of 1983, 30 DCR 6428 (December 16, 1983), effective March 2, 1984, and Mayor's Order 84-55, 31 DCR 1323
(March 16, 1984), hereby gives notice of the intent to amend
the Vehicles and Traffic Regulations (18 DCMR). Final rulemaking action shall be taken in not less than thirty (30) days
from the date of publication of this notice in the
D.C. REGISTER.
The following rulemaking action is proposed:
Title 18 DCMR, Section 4010, TRAFFIC SIGNALS, Subsection
4010.3, (a) Northwest Section, is amended by adding the
following:
"Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street, N.W."
All persons interested in commenting on this proposed
rulemaking action may file comments, in writing, with the
Department of Public Works, 2000 14th Street, N.W.,7th Floor,.
Washington, D.C.
20009, (Attention: Docket No. 87-265-TS).
Comments must be received no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice in the D.C. REGISTER.
Copies of this proposal may be obtained, at cost, by writing to
the above address.
7916
REPORT ON PURCHASING A
PC COMPUTER & PRINTER FOR ANC-3C
Roger Burns
12-21-87
I. SUMMARY CONCLUSION:
Amongst those of us who are most involved i.n this topic ( i.e.
Cheryl, Peter, Peggy, & myself ), there is a consensus that the
kind of PC we should purchase is an IBM AT clone. Also, the particular AT clone offered by Community Computers of 1617 K St. NW
is probably an excellent buy. It goes for $1500 - $2000, depending
on the options.
There are a variety of other costs relating to software and
support that the Commission may want to pay for; however, there are
also very inexpensive alternatives to these options.
Regarding printers, there is no clear consensus now. Although
there are 100-odd printers on the market that one could choose from,
I present here a list of some preferable alternatives which I have
gleaned from a consumer-review article which recently appeared in a
well-regarded computer magazine. The major trade-offs are between
print quality, speed, and price. The available price range is from
$550 - $1800 (store price, not list).
II. WHY BUY AN "AT CLONE" ?
There are 3 kinds of IBM PCs (or compatibles) in existence now.
There's the lower-level "88" based PCs - the original IBM PC and
its upgraded version, the XT; the middle-level "286" based PC which is the AT; and the upper-level, new PS/2 class of PCs just
coming on to the market now.
The new PS/2 class of PCs in general have much more power than
we really need, so they would not be a good buy for us. (Some of
them have a more appropriate level of power, but they cost much more
than they should given their abilities - this is often true of newly
released models, as you know.)
The lower-level "88" based PCs are probably good enough for our
needs, except that this kind of technology is soon to be outmoded.
Please note that the ANC will often be using software that individual
Commissioners will donate to our computer, and that in the near future
this donated software will be based on middle-level "286" technology.
As we will want to make a long term investment that will be able to take
advantage of what the new basic standard for software will be, we want
a PC that is based on middle-level "286" technology (if it's not too
expensive), that is, we want an AT. It is widely recognized by experts
that the AT will be the standard amongst PCs for the next 5 years, if
not longer, and in spite of tAe newly-developed PS/2 class which is coming
out now.
Why buy a clone of the AT ? Well, manufacturers who have copied the
original IBM AT have gotten so good that IBM has left the market - they
don't make ATs anymore ! It's just as well, since the clones are so good
and cost so much less.
III. EXTRA COSTS: SOFTWARE & SUPPORT
The Commission will need software for its PC, otherwise it won't run!
An option at one extreme is that all of the needed word-processing, and
other, software will be donated by individual Commissioners and can be
supplemented with good how-to manuals that are easily purchased at local
bookstores. (This is an option I recommend.) On the other hand, we can
obtain our own software with other options (Cheryl prefers on-line
support). Software packages can run from $200 - $450.
REPORT ON PURCHASING
PC & PRINTER
page 2 of 3
111A. PC OPTIONS
The Community computers AT clone comes with a monitor (monochrome),
a keyboard, & a 20 meg hard disk for a total of $1495. A small speed
upgrade Is $100 (from 6/10 Mhz to 12/6 Mhz), a 40 meg hard disk would
be $350 more, a modem (300/1200 baud) is $99. I recommend we get no
speed upgrade, consider a larger hard disk at a later time, and think
about a modem (enables telephone communication).
IV. PRINTERS - IN GENERAL
There is much debate on what we should purchase regarding a printer.
The general options are:
daisy-wheel printer - highest quality print, and inexpensive
(most $350 - $500, some $600-$900)
but slow (most 16-31 cps; one has
56 cps)
dot-matrix printer - varying quality of print depending
on model, and many people are
satisfied in general with the quality
of print while many others are not;
middle range in price ($550-$900);
standard speed for many business uses
(about 66 cps in near-letter-quality
mode)
laser printer - print quality better than dot-matrix,
although not up to daisy-wheel standard;
price range $1200 - $1800 and up;
speed: around 300 cps ; other features too
Some of the strong sentiments expressed by interested Commissioners are:
When we have long reports we will need fast printing - we can afford top
quality now, so we should by a fast laser printer.
OR: Our office never needs fast printing, there's no sense in spending
for qualities we don't need, so given the importance of price & print
quality we should strongly consider a daisy-wheel printer.
There is a consensus on ensuring that we get a low- or no-maintenance
machine, & that it should be easy to feed single sheets (such as letterhead) into our printer.
V. SORTING OUT THE CHOICES
I recommend that we take advantage of the study recently made by the
renowned PC Magazine on the specific brands of printers available.
(I've attached a copy of selected pages of that study following this
report.) In particular, we should look at the featured Editor's Choices
in each category.
The Commission will, however need to debate the acceptable price range
print quality, and desired speed. PLEASE form opinions on as many of thes
qualities as you can. Also note: some favorite choices may be unavailable
or hard to get. A Primage 90-GT daisy-wheel may have great print quality,
a moderate price at $900, and an adequate speed at 56 cps, but a short
search on my part has not yet found a Washington dealer who sells daisywheel printers. So we should debate more about qualities we're looking
for, unless we settle on a popular item we know is available, like an
Epson dot-matrix, or a Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Series II.
VI .
GUIDE TO PRINTERS
A table of contents
for the accompanying reprint:
TOPIC
PAGES
INTRO / GEN 1L DISCUSSION
DAISY WHEELS
DOT-MATRIX
> *BEST PICKS
GEN'L
SPECIFIC
LASERS
> *BEST
GEN'L
SPECIFIC
1-6
7-13
14
15-18
19-23
24
25-27
28-30
The editor's picks are:
MODEL
LIST
RETAIL*
Dot-matrix
Epson LQ-850
Epson LQ-1050
C Itoh C-715A
$799
$1,099
$1,295
$550
$759
($900)
Laser
Okidata Laserline 6
HP LaserJet Series 2
$1,995
$2,595
$1200
$1800
SPEED*
67 cps
68 cps
64 cps
270 cps
360 cps
Daisy wheels - field too narrow to make picks
NOTES:
prices from Printers Plus; price in parenthesis was
estimated at 30% discount off of list;
speed for lasers converted to cps for comparison,
assuming 1 page per minute = 45 characters per second
T
Laser and 24-pin dot
matrix printers share the
limelight as 106 machines
meet 12 reviewers in
PC Magazine's fourth
annual printer survey.
The conclusion: you’ll do
more with and pay
less for this year’s crop.
PC
his is the fourth edition of PC Magazine's annual printer issue. Over
the past 4 years PC Labs has spent
more than 10,000 man-hours testing
120, 70, 97, and now 106 printers—393 in all that have been reviewed. A
few others that failed the PC Labs gauntlet
of speed, compatibility, and durability
tests haven’t been heard from since.
Since that first annual printer issue in
November 1984, 3 months after the birth
of the IBM PC AT, the market has seen
substantial changes:
■ Bang-for-the-buck has obviously improved. Dot matrix printers today run an
average 31 percent faster than they did in
1984, based on PC Labs speed benchmark
tests, and cost about 26 percent less. Even
with the yen kicking sand in the dollar’s
face, prices on some dot matrix printers
have fallen 10 to 25 percent in die past
year. The era of the $500 24-pin dot matrix
printer is fast approaching.
■ Today’s $2,500 business printer of
choice is a laser printer that cranks out the
whispery equivalent of 200 to 300 characters per second. Yesterday it was a clackety 55-cps NEC 7730/8850, NEC Spinwriter, or a Diablo 630 that didn’t have a
clue to the meaning of graphics.
MAGAZINE ■ NOVEMBER 10. 1987
92
2
k
■ PRINTERS
■ Automatic sheet feeding used to cost interlocks prevent you) but not quite pow- fied by Kyocera’s $8,395, 15.6-ppm FSI ,000 extra on daisy wheel printers and erful enough to bring down geosynchro- 3010). They’re destined for small work
was unheard of on dot matrix printers.
nous satellites, shines on an electrically groups linked by a smart printer-sharing
Now it's built in on laser printers and costs charged photoconductor drum (the thing box or on a network (but never, never put
only a few hundred dollars on many dot inside the laser printer that looks like a mir- in a network just to share printers).
matrix and lower-end daisy wheel printers. -rer wrapped around a cylinder). The light ■ A handful of brain-dead units, so called
Of course, the more things change, the alters the charge. Powdered black toner because the controller card is the PC, not
more they stay the same. The industry has with an opposite electrical charge adheres the printer. They’re fine for dedicated sinyet to devise anything as simple and idiot- to the drum and is transferred to paper, per- gle systems because graphics output is draproof as the office Selectric for envelopes manently bonded by heat.
matically faster, but printer sharing is nearand that small run of file-folder labels.
ly impossible. Examples are the Cordata
When you come right down to it. which
LP300 series, the Tall Tree JLaser cards,
would do more for your productivity in
and the evolving Advanced Vision Re1988: OS/2 running on a 20-MHz Compaq
search PageMaster system.
Deskpro 386 or a printer that conveniently
■ The 600-dpi-and-up plain-paper typehandles Federal Express air bills?
setters that cost somewhere between laser
Tractor-feed paper continues to snag
printers and film typesetters, such as the
printer cables and evade pin-feed mechaVarityper VT-600. Check Charles Petnisms. And cryptic control panels assume
zold’s kindly but scathing review to see
users walk around chanting their mantras:
why this category isn’t quite there yet.
"Hold select and form-feed as you power
Since Hewlett-Packard revolutionized
up; then quickly press line-feed twice and
the printer business in 1984 with the
you’ll go into compressed mode." And so
$3,495 LaserJet, prices for lasers have
on. and so on, and so on.
dropped and keep dropping to the point
Perhaps the best way to summarize the
t where you can find a highly competent
printer part of the PC industry is to realize
Variants use light-emitting diodes and ! machine like the Okidata Laserline 6 for a
that although printers have made wondrous liquid crystal shutters. While manufacturstreet price of $1.400 and the LaserJet Sestrides, they still have a long way to go be- ers will argue their relative merits—as well ries II for $1,750.
fore users reach nirvana. In other words, as the merits of white-print and black-print
Daisy wheel printers A hammer
printers are just like everything else.
page printers—to the user, the result is whacks a plastic or metal petal with 88 to
At the risk of recounting the obvious, more alike than different: ultraquiet opera- 96 spokes and transfers the character
here are your choices in printers:
tion, 5- to 8-page-per-minute output, and through a ribbon to the paper. NEC’s
Dot matrix printers Despite the end- 300-dot-per-inch resolution.
once-dominant Spinwriters used a 64less fascination with laser printers, the dot
Laser and laserlike printers fall into five spoke thimble wheel looking like, well, a
matrix is the most common printer because general categories:
large sewing thimble or a variation on the
it's relatively cheap and effective. By most ■ LaserJet wannabes, the two dozen IBM Selectric ball.
estimates, dot matrix printers account for units that claim 6 to 8 ppm, HP compatibilLook in the dictionary under dinosaur
about two-thirds of the printers being sold ity. $2,000 to S3.000 list prices, and an in- and you’re likely to see a picture of a
today. The vast majority are impact dot tense desire to share in Hewlett-Packard’s Qume Sprint 11 or Diablo 630 ECS. The
matrix printers with 9 pins. Coming on fast success. As PC Labs HP graphics com- slowest laser printer produces a whisperare the 24-pin printers with side-by-side patibility tests made abundantly clear, quiet 4 ppm; the fastest daisy wheel mancolumns of 12 pins; the two columns with some should be thought of as text-only de- ages^ shade over 2.5 ppm. For a rough
staggered vertical offsets help speed in vices.
comparison between ppm and cps, multidraft mode, quality in near-letter-quality.
■ Amazing-output devices, such as the ply or divide the speed test results by 30.
Print quality gets better with each new Apple LaserWriter Plus, that speak the
Only in the $500 to $1,000 range is
printer, and the business community has PostScript page description language and there much of a market left for daisy
become more accustomed to the generally have more built-in smarts and more typo- wheels, and the most aggressive player is
pleasing dot matrix output. But no matter graphic ability than the HP clan—at higher Brother, which says it is now shipping
what you read or hear, it’s still near-letter- prices. Some, like the NEC Silentwriter more units (although not necessarily doing
quality.
LC-890, have both emulations. These are greater dollar volume) than any of the big
Laser (page) printers To trivialize a the weapons of choice for the desktop pub- three of the first half of the decade: NEC,
bit, laser printers are essentially photo- lishing crowd.
Diablo, and Qume.
copiers with a data cable in back. The light ■ Long-life $3,000-to-$5.000 printers
Ink jet printers They’re technically
beam from an honest-to-goodness laser, offering heavier-duty cycles (such as the dot matrix printers, too, although everypowerful enough to cause eye damage if Quadram Quadlaser I and the Genicom body uses that term to speak of impact dot
you were so dumb as to look inside (safety 5010) and fast, long-life printers (exemplimatrix printers that go zzzzzzzt zzzzzzzzzzt.
A
Ixlthough printers have made
wondrous strides, they still have a
long way to go before users reach nirvana. In other words, printers are just
like everything else.
i
i
PC
MAGAZINE ■
N O V E M B E R I 0. I 9 8 7
■ PRINTERS
Their numbers are as small as these nonPrinter categories we’d all love to
impact machines are quiet. They spray tiny see—and will, eventually—are color laser
drops of ink in a matrix pattern, and color printers (prototypes may be shown in back
models are available, such as HP’s amaz- rooms at the Fall Comdex) and affordable
ing PaintJet {see Mitt Jones’s review of B-sized (11- by 17-inch) laser printers to
this 330-color marvel). Ink jet units work be used for CAD, spreadsheets, and deskwith plain paper, but most of them really lop publishing.
need more costly clay-coated paper for
best output. Clogging problems are markedly fewer than they were a few years ago.
Thermal transfer printers They’re
yet another dot matrix variety, typically
used for color charts and graphs. A waxy
ink from a ribbon or a transfer sheet is
melted onto the paper.
Categories we aren't reviewing:
Line printers They print entire lines
all at once, either with fully formed characters or with dot matrixes—unlike the serial matrix and serial fully formed printers
that do a character at a time. They’re expensive and more for mainframes and minis than for PCs.
Typewriter/printers There’s a yearning among small-business and PC-at- ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT Mehome users for an electronic typewriter chanically, a printer is pretty much imthat’s also a printer. They’re good for lim- mune to failure. If it works correctly straight
ited-duty printing only. Street prices are in out of the box, it should run without mishap
the $250-to-$500 range, plus $75 to $150 for years, requiring only changes of ribbons
to add interfaces to machines that don’t and other consumables.
have them built in. Players include BrothWhether you’ll love those intervening
er, Canon. Olivetti, Olympia, Panasonic,
years is another matter. For all their meand Royal Smith-Corona. This category chanical perfection, printers still have
may be covered in a future issue of PC quirks that can drive you up the wall. What
Magazine.
do they do wrong now? What could they
Plotters Laser printers, especially do better? Here’s a list, culled from a
those that speak HPGL (Hewlett-Packard round-robin discussion among PC MagaGraphics Language, the lingua franca of zine editors and contributors Frank
the CAD set), and color dot-matrix print- Derfler, Jr., John Dvorak, Nora Georgas,
ers can do many of the same things as plot- Cheryl Goldberg, Stephen Manes, Jim
ters, but plotters don’t stand a chance of Seymour, and Gus Venditto:
imitating a text printer. They’re reviewed ■ Abysmal front control panels I. If you
apart from PC Magazine's annual printer have one of the ubiquitous power-switchsurveys, most recently in Volume 6 Num- and-three-buttons (on-line, line-feed,
ber 11 (see “Big Draws: The New Large- form-feed) dot matrix machines, you have
Format Plotters”).
to remember arcane button sequences
Instant tutorial on plotters: Hewlettwhen you power up to set the machine into
Packard owns the market; IBM agrees (it compressed or elite mode, and the instrucrelabels HP plotters); the other players are tions are seldom printed on the panel.
Houston Instrument, Bruning, CalComp, ■ Abysmal control panels II. Hard-toIoline, and Roland; plotters are a ball to see read LCDs-and cryptic two-digit LEDs are
in action; nobody buys two-pen plotters the wrong place to save a few pennies. Just
anymore (now it’s six or eight); and if you what does the blinking number 7 on the
want to produce plots the size of your desk, front panel mean? More machines should
have at least $5,000 to $10,000 at the have 24-character LEDs you can read from
ready.
at least 5 feet away that say things like “12
M'
i- T Aechanically, a printer is pretty much immune to failure. If it works
correctly straight out of the box, it
should mn without mishap for years,
requiring only changes of ribbons and
other consumables.
PC
MAGAZINE
■
CPI NLQ, PERF SKIP ON. ”
■ Abysmal control panels III. Every
printer above entry level should have these
front-panel buttons: data-stream lockout
that makes your printer ignore control
codes sent from the PC, automatic perforation skip and/or half-inch left margin, and
buffer-flush. The first is for times when
you don’t want to look up and type in a different 15-character 1-2-3 setup string for
just this one print job; the second for printouts of unformatted text; the third when
you realized you’ve screwed up the printout and want to try again. Hitting the power switch or pulling the paper tray on a laser printer guarantees a paper jam.
■ Too-small buffers. With memory so
cheap, why not put a really useful buffer
into printers—at least 64K, preferably
128K? Tiny 2K, 4K, and 8K buffers are a
joke.
■ Inadequate paper handling. Why is a
pin-feed or tractor-feed still optional on dot
matrix printers? Do manufacturers hope
paper wills itself to feed through straight?
Power and data connections sometimes
appear designed so that the cable hardware
grabs and shreds tractor-feed paper.
■ Missing bottom-feed. The best way to
avoid paper jams on dot matrix and daisy
wheel printers is to feed paper through bottom slots. Too few printers have bottom
slots.
■ Hidden power and DIP switches. The
only place for the power switch is in front.
DIP switches aren’t accessed as frequently, but too often they’re secreted in places
where the sun doesn’t shine, such as under
the platen.
■ Poor sound insulation. Too bad dot matrix printers and the few remaining daisy
wheels don’t have stealth options that include slightly bulkier cases with massive
amounts of sound-deadening material.
■ Polyglot printer-driver standards.
Word processors now must devote one or
more disks to emulate all the oddball printers out there, often because a printer says it
can emulate an Epson LQ-1500 or IBM
Proprinter, but it’s really happier with the
custom Yamagatzi Dotwriter driver. Compare this situation with that of the simpler
world of modems: everybody emulates
Hayes.
■ Bad VM1 indexing. Know the white
bands you get on a dot matrix graphics
N O V E M B ER 1 0. 1 9 8 7
96
CU1US1 Ul
of nume
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year’s pr
jonatha
of PCM
printout ft
They’re fr
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■ Expe
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■ Topprinters c
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T
OUR REVIEWERS
Bruce Brown is a principal at Soft Industries, a Connecticut computer consultancy. He is the founder of the Connecticut Computer Society and has taught
business uses of computers at various
colleges. Brown also worked on last
year’s printer project.
Carol Olsen Day is a free-lance book
and magazine writer based in New York.
A contributor to last year’s printer issue,
she has also written numerous articles on
computer training and maintenance for
PC Magazine.
Erika Hortz is majoring in computer
science at Columbia University. She
teaches minicourses in the use of personal computers at the Barnard College Academic Computer Center.
Mitt Jonca is an assistant editor of PC
Magazine.
Barbara Krasnoff is a former associate
editor of PC Magazine. She is the author
of numerous articles on computers and
robotics and was a reviewer for last
year’s printer issue.
Jonathan Matzkin is an assistant editor
of PC Magazine.
printout from a non-IBM/Epson printer?
They’re from companies that use a nonstandard vertical-motion-index spacing
and then do a poor job of mathematically
converting to Epson/IBM movement.
■ Expensive, idiosyncratic, hard-tochange ribbons. Aren’t there enough ribbon designs to go around now? Why do
manufacturers create new ones every
month? Is it too much to ask Okidata to include a 5-cent disposable plastic glove
with its $25 ribbon for an Oki 2410?
■ Top-of-form detector. Would that
printers could use an optical or a mechanical sensor to determine the perforation at
the top of a form and advance the paper accordingly.
■ Built-in printer-sharing devices. It's no
secret that many lasers get shared among
several users (see “Sharing Your Laser’s
Power,’’ PC Magazine, Volume 6 Number 8). Compared with the $500-to-$ 1,000
cost of buying an external smart sharing
PC
Charles Petzold is a contributing editor
pf PC Magazine. He has worked on the
past three printer projects.
Alfred Poor is a principal of Soft Industries. a Connecticut computer consultancy. A frequent contributor to PC Magazine. he has participated in the last three
printer projects.
Vincent Puglia writes frequently for PC
Magazine. He has edited for several
newsletters and is a free-lance consultant. He has contributed to the three previous printer issues.
Philip F. H. Rose is a project leader at
PC Labs.
Jeffrey Rothfeder is a free-lance book
and magazine writer based in New Jersey . He is the author of Minds Over Matter (Computer Book Division, Simon &
Schuster Inc., 1983), a discussion of
trends in artificial intelligence.
M. David Stone is a contributing editor
of PC Magazine. A reviewer for the three
previous printer issues, he is a free-lance
consultant specializing in computer communications and has also written three
computer books.
device, it’s rather trivial to build one in. As
sharing devices become more common,
software needs to be tweaked to keep from
hanging the system if the sharing device is
temporarily full.
■ Mindless font emulations. Genicom's
first stab at emulating the HP Times Roman/Helvetica font cartridges on its excellent 3010 laser was the gap-toothed HP B
cartridge, followed by the slightly better F
cartridge, when it should have gone
straight to the wonderful Z cartridge. Of
course, there’s almost no interchangeability between different companies' font cartridges, so you have to take what the maker
offers.
■ The envelope crisis. Most printers have
no easy method for dealing efficiently with
envelopes. Too many laser printers crinkle
envelopes, inadvertently heat-seal the
flap, and fail to offer a special envelopefeed tray. IBM’s Proprinters are among the
very few dot matrix units with envelope
MAGAZINE
■
slots (you don’t have to unload tractor paper to use them). The plastic card guides
on daisy wheels are fiendishly designed to
grab, fold, and ink-smudge the upper-lefthand comers of envelopes. No wonder so
many laser-printed letters go out the door
in hand-addressed envelopes.
M" '
i. ▼ .Lost printers have no easy
method of dealing efficiently with envelopes. Too many laser printers crinkle envelopes, inadvertently heat-seal
the flap, and fail to offer a special envelope-feed tray.
ALL IN ORDER The 98 reviews of 106
printers are organized into three main categories: 36 lasers, 65 dot matrixes (including inkjet, thermal transfer, and Brother’s
hybrid dot/daisy Twinriter 6), and 3 daisy
wheels. Reviews are arranged in alphabetical order by company name within the
sections, Alps before Epson before Toshiba. Features tables compare print quality, speeds, prices, available fonts and print
enhancements, and compatibility with established printer standards.
Finally, a historical index summarizes
259 of the 393 printers that were tested
over the past four years and are still available. At the request of readers, the index
has been expanded to include the type of
printer, highest tested speed (based on PC
LaFs benchmark tests, not inflated manufacturer claims), price then and now,
whether the printer is still in production or
whether it’s been superseded by another
model, and when it was reviewed. Even if
a printer is out of production, it may be
available used, or you may be offered the
printer as a hand-me-down from a power
user who finally convinced the budget-review committee that he deserves that LaserJet.—Bill Howard
Bill Howard is an executive editor of PC
Magazine.
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
97
6
■ PRINTERS
TESTING THE PRINTERS
PC Labs has refined its printer benchmark tests once again for our fourth annual
roundup of new printers. _ _
C Magazine invited 12 reviewers,
most of them veterans of past printer
projects, to the PC Labs for another go at
testing the new printers—106 of
them—that hit the market in the last year.
Sounds like a huge undertaking, right? It
always is.
The printer features table is a distillation of approximately 4,000 hours of
testing, but much work was done before
the reviewers—and the printers—arrived
in the PC Labs. Anticipating PC Magazine's largest full-scale evaluation project of the year, the PC Labs project leaders revised their tried-and-true printer
benchmark tests, making them more
comprehensive than ever before. Not
only do the new tests measure the speed
ofavide-carriage printers and test the capabilities of PostScript printers more accurately, but they are also tougher on
graphics and emulation pretenders.
As our 23-page table of printer features suggests, PC Magazine doesn’t just
report the manufacturers' claimed specifications. Instead, each category included in our table corresponds to a test developed in PC Labs for the express
purpose of testing these claims and verifying their accuracy—or lack of it. The
results of our reviewers’ findings are then
presented in tabular format so that you’ll
be able to see at a glance how machines
of different types and different prices
stack up against each other.
We think you'li agree that the new
format of this year’s printer features table, designed to be concise and easy to
read, culls the most important statistics
from the reviews, objectively bringing
you the facts and figures our reviewers
considered when they rated these 106
new machines.
The revised benchmark tests, which
are available through the PC Magazine
Interactive Reader Service electronic
bulletin board, check the printers'
claimed graphics and resolution compati-
PC
With stacks of
primers waiting in
the wings, veteran
reviewers and PC
Labs project leaders pul this year’s
crop of 106
primers to the test
in PC Labs.
;
bilities, generate text and graphics samples, and measure the printers’ speeds. A
sound level measurement is also included
for dot matrix and daisy wheel printers.
This year the test developers replaced
the graphics test that used the PC Magazine logo with one that uses a pattern and
line-resolution sample, a change that
should add to your ability to see the printers' graphics and resolution capabilities
in greater detail.
We’ve also lengthened the text sample shown in the features table. So that
you can get a closer look at the output
produced by each machine, our test now
requires each printer to generate a fiveline quality sample as well as a four-line
sample of fonts and features. The astute
quotation comes from a letter written in
1789 by Benjamin Franklin, a venerable
printer himself.
Our revised speed tests—which were
performed on all printers, including both
narrow- and wide-carriage machines—were designed to simulate reallife print jobs more closely. Unlike some
manufacturers that base their printers’
speed ratings on tests that do not include
page breaks or that do not measure print
speeds with paper loaded into the ma-
MAGAZINE
■
chines, PC Labs tested the speed of dot
matrix and daisy wheel printers by having them print a two-page single-spaced
business letter containing 2,888 characters. Laser printers printed this letter ten
times. On the whole, printer speeds now
tend to be slightly higher than those of
last year and more on a par with the manufacturers’ claims.
After consulting with Adobe Systems, the developer of the PostScript
page description language, PC Labs developed its first PostScript-compatibility
test for laser printers. Aspiring desktop
publishers will want to pay close attention to these results.
— A*.usual, evaluations and descriptions of each printer follow in review articles. Here’s where we put all the specs in
context and where, we admit, we present
some of our more subjective reactions to
the printers. Each review is accompanied
by a Fact File that lists manufacturer and
pricing information and summarizes the
printer’s most important features, as well
as by a photograph of the printer being reviewed.—Donald P.Wflhnott
Donald P. Willmott is an assistant editor
of PC Magazine.
N O V E M B E R 1 0, I 9 8 7
95
J
1
W
*
ith list and street prices of many
laser printers falling below
$2,000, and with most dot matrix printers offering respectable letter quality output, why would anyone buy a daisy wheel printer? The answer
is the same as it's always been: for the print
quality.
Rumors of the death of the noisy, slow
daisy wheel printer have not been greatly
In light of these numbers, it would be
difficult for anyone to argue that the future
of formed-character daisy wheel printers
doesn't look bleak. Nor does it take a great
deal of foresight to see that the vastly improved performance of dot matrix printers
combined with the large number of fonts
being offered with laser printers will continue to push daisy wheel printers the way
of wood-block type.
exaggerated. The number of daisy wheel
printers continues to dwindle at a brisk
pace, dropping down to only five models
in this year's roundup from 12 in last
year's issue and 15 in the issue before that.
While the number of new dot matrix printers PC Magazine has reviewed has remained almost constant over the past 2
years, the number of laser printers has exactly doubled—from 18 in Volume 5
Number 19 to 36 in this year’s issue.
WHEN QUALITY MATTERS
A FAREWELL
From the fast-narrowing
field of daisy wheel
printers, PC Labs reviews
five machines that
belong to a vanishing breed.
PC
But
there are reasons why you should consider
buying a daisy wheel printer. Above all is
the high quality of the output that it produces. Often referred to as “Selectric quality” for their similarity to the output of an
IBM Selectric typewriter, the sharply defined characters produced by daisy wheel
printers are created when a formed character strikes a ribbon, depositing ink on the
page in the same way that a typewriter
MAGAZINE ■ N O V E M B E R I 0. I 9 8 7
378
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would. Although many dot matrix printers
can generate letter quality text, you can
still tell even the best dot matrix samples
apart from the crisp, clear output of a daisy
wheel printer.
Laser printers, on the other hand, offer
high-resolution output (at least 300 dots
per inch) in any number of fonts, but the
documents these printers produce look as
if they came off a copying machine—at
funJ development for a non-profit corporation and you’re soliciting donations from
CEOs of the Fortune 500, you don’t want
your letters to look as if they’re fresh off a
copier.
That leaves a niche, albeit a small one,
for such daisy wheel printer manufacturers
as Primages and Brother International
Corp. to fill. While claiming that the daisy
wheel market is price insensitive, Pri-
ers of laser printers who need machines
that can handle the chores that lasers can’t
do well or can’t do at all. As a spokesman
for Brother points out, laser printers aren’t
well suited to printing envelopes or labels,
and they can’t print multipart forms at all.
They are also limited to using 8.5-inchwide paper.
Brother is more than ready to supply
you with wide-carriage daisy wheel print-
least until you get used to them.
True, the increasing number of new laser printers indicates that PC users want
the variety of fonts and high-resolution
graphics that lasers offer, and they are willing to sacrifice Selectric quality to get
them. But for those times when nothing
less than the look and feel of a document
printed by a formed-character machine
will do, the obvious choice is a daisy
wheel. For example, if you’re in charge of
I
PC
mages has slashed its prices: the Primage
90-GT, which is basically the same printer
as one of last year’s Editor’s Choices, the
Primage 100, sells for $1,095—$800 less
than its predecessor. However, the cost of
an additional tractor-feed mechanism
($295). cut-sheet-feeder ($395), or dualbin envelope-feeder ($795) undercuts the
price advantage the Primage 90-GT has
over some laser printers.
Brother International is going after us-
ers like the HR-40 ($799) or the HR-20
7549$)Tor those purposes. Although similarly priced dot matrix printers can handle
the same tasks as these midrange entries,
chances are their NLQ modes won’t measure up to the high-quality output produced
by these daisy wheels. In addition, some
dot matrix printers slow down to about the
same speed as daisy wheels when they
print in NLQ mode, clocking in at approximately 35 characters per second.
MAGAZINE ■ NOVEMBER 10. 1987
379
lavtcrRamno
TO DAISY WHEELS
1
■ DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS
PICKING THE RIGHT DAISY If
you've decided that daisy wheel technology is what you need, you'll definitely
want a printer that emulates the de facto
standard in daisy wheel printers—the Diablo 630—but it's hard to find a new daisy,
wheel printer that doesn't. Print speed is
based largely on how much you're willing
to pay. In this year's crop of printers,
speeds range from 16 cps for the $419 Panasonic KX-P3131 to 56 cps for the S1.095
Primage 90-GT.
Most important, remember that print
quality is the only reason to buy a daisy
wheel printer. Of the printers reviewed
here, all provide true Selectric quality or
very close to it. Don't settle for anything
less. In addition, machines that offer a
range of print wheels will afford you greater variety in the pitches and typefaces you
can use.
Daisy wheel printers are an endangered
species and may soon become extinct. But
be assured that in demanding a daisy wheel
printer, you're showing your good taste.
When you care enough to print the very
best, a daisy wheel printer is still the only
choice. Reviews of five diehards follow:
read about them while they last.
—M. David Stone
spondence. reports, or any other text-only
application. And although daisy wheel
printers lack some of the text enhancement
features of dot matrix or laser printers, the
Brother HR-20 offers shadow print for
huldface printing, double-strike mode for
extra-dark printing, and underlining.
Of course, daisy wheel printers are
slow. and the Brother HR-20 is no exception. But for many users, superior print
quality is more important than high speed.
Wo clocked the Brother HR-20 at 21 characters per second (cps) in standard mode.
In double-strike mode, its speed dropped
to a crawl—about 7 cps. But the extra-dark
text produced in double-strike mode is
worth waiting for if you are printing short
documents, such as business letters or resumes.
Neither a tractor-feed nor a sheet-feeder
iv included in the Brother HR-20's base
pike of $499. which limits it to handling
sincic cut sheets in its basic form. That
w on‘t be adequate for most users, who will
need to purchase either the $169 tractor-
Brother HR-40
Brother HR-20
Conventional wisdom may have it that the
noisy, slow. and limited daisy wheel printer bears some resemblance to the dinosaur
and will suffer the same fate. But for some
users, daisy wheel printers, like the $499
Brother HR-20 from Brother International
Corp.. still offer the best combination of
print quality, typeface selection, and
price/performance ratio.
The HR-20 uses Brother s interchangeable cartridge system. The print wheels are
contained in plastic cartridges, and changing typefaces is as simple as snapping out
one cartridge, snapping in another, and
flipping a DIP switch or two if necessary.
The cartridges not only simplify font and
typeface selection but also prevent you
from getting ink all over your hands when
changing wheels. Brother has a selection
of 25 cassettes at $24.95 each.
The Courier typeface that I tested with
the Brother HR-20 is suitable for correPC
feed or the $299 cut-sheet-feeder The cutsheet-feeder works very well: it moves the
paper smoothly through the printer and up
to its stacker. I had no problem with stray
sheets or jamming.
While Brother didn't see fit to include a
paper-feed, the vendor does supply both
parallel and serial interfaces as standard
equipment with the HR-20.
The Brother HR-20's front panel has
switches for line-feed, top-of-form. and
type pitch. The panel also has switches that
control the HR-20's useful copy functions
Data can be loaded into the printer's 8K
buffer (expandable to 16K) and then reprinted ad infinitum at the touch of a micros witch.
Neither dot matrix nor laser printers can
beat the letter quality that a relatively inexpensive daisy wheel printer like the Brother HR-20 produces. So if you need to print
only text, why spend more'.’
—Jonathan Matzkin
Brotber HR-20
Brother International Corp
8 Corporate PI.
Piscataway, NJ 08854
(800)526-3537
(201)981-0300
Ltat Price: $499; tractor-feed, $169; cutsheet-feeder, $299. additional daisy wheel
cartridges. $24.95.
Dimmdonr (HWD): 5.5 x 18 x 13.5 in.
Weight: 18.5 lbs
In Short: A basic wide-caniage 21-cps personal daisy wheel printer that uses easy-to-replace print wheel cartridges.
CIRCLE
see ON READER SERVICE CARD
MAGAZINE
■
With the $799 Brother HR-40. Brother Intemational Corp. upholds its tradition of
producing low-cost, high-quality daisy
wheel printers. The Brother HR-40’s
speed and print quality are unexpected lor
the price and a match for the high-end daisy wheel printers that once ruled the letterquality market.
The printer also boasts such pluses as a
built-in cut-sheet-feeder and tractor-feed
And because the Brother HR-40 uses Diablo 630 control codes, you can use it with
most applications software without encountering problems.
—Print quality on the Brother HR-40 fall'
just short of true IBM Selectnc typewriter
quality. Characters are crisp and cleanthey're not uniformly dark, but they t*
fine for most types of correspondence.
The Brother HR-40’s print speed is also
good for a daisy wheel pnnter. On the PC
Labs tests the printer clocked in at 31 characters per second (cps). This speed P
roughly half that of the fastest daisy whe«'
printer ever tested at PC Labs (it also sell'
for well under half the price).
The Brother HR-40’s built-in multip*f
approach to paper handling is a nice touch
As shipped, the printer can take singl*
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
380
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10
■ DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS
reprint it minutes or hours later (any time trix printers, the documentation for this
before turning the printer off). With Copy daisy wheel is disappointingly sparse and
Mode/Reprint, the computer can go about
incomplete. What’s more, the section that
its own work while the Fortis DX41 prints details the use of control codes lacks sample BASIC runs and even examples of the
out copies, reading from its buffer.
To the right of Copy Mode/Reprint in -typ^wyles and enhancements.
the front panel is a control for a function
The Fortis DX41 offers a few unusual
called Load. Here you select the type of conveniences, most notably its Copy
paper: cut-sheet or fanfold.
Mode Reprint and automatic paper-loadIn some printers, automatic paper load- ing features. But don’t expect exceptional
ing is akin to one-button ignition systems print capabilities; in that respect the Fortis
on backyard gas barbecue grills: they're DX41 is only slightly better than most daifaulty, and within a week or two the func- sy wheel printers in its class.
tion is disabled. The Fortis DX4I. which —Jeffrey Rothfeder
emulates the Diablo 630, is different. Using an automatic paper-feeding system
controlled by a touch-sensitive switch, the
printer loads forms from the excellent single or dual cut-sheet-feeders or the built-in A sturdy, easy-to-operate. well-priced
tractor-feed.
(S4)9>. almost-wide-carriage daisy wheel
Another good design feature is the loca- printer from that superb market competition of the DIP switches. Frequently. DIP tor. Panasonic Industrial Co., the Panaswitches are put somewhere in the rear of sonic KX-P3131 is a trustworthy performprinters, buried behind and beneath cables er in Hi lice and home environments. The
and plastic ridges; it's as if the manufactur- printer is especially distinctive because it’s
ers searched for the most awkward spot in
which to bury the minuscule switchboards.
To its credit, the DX4I eschews this design course. Its DIP switches are underneath the top front cover, where you can
Art FACT
FILE
see and use them easily.
The print wheels for the Fortis DX41
are tiny plastic cassettes that both prevent
the encased printing elements from being
damaged and ensure that ink doesn't stain
your fingers. A joy to work with, they slide
in and out smoothly.
When it comes to printing capabilities,
though, the Fortis DX41 is only slightly
above average. In low-speed near-letterquality mode, it prints solid, strong characters. It offers bold, proportional, and compressed modes as well as underlined
Panamrie KX-P3131
characters, but it lacks italics as well as suPinaaonjc Industrial Co
perscripts and subscripts. In proportional
OnePanatoaicWay
Secauau, NJ 07094
printing, the letters appear to be bunched
(800) 222-0584
too tightly.
(201)348-7000
In terms of speed, the DX41 is typical
Ltat Price: $419
of other printers in its class. In bidirecUmaMtaB (HWD): 6.6 x 18.9 x 12.8 ia.
Weight: 19.7 lbs.
tional printing, it clocked in at 31 characla Shaft: This lightweight 13.5-incb-carters per second; Fortis claims a maximum
riage daisy wheel printer outperforms heaviof 40 cps for the machine. In tests for unier, more expensive primers; at 16 cps it’s no
directional printing, the Fortis DX41 came
speedster, hut it’s a trustworthy machine for
in at 19 cps.
home or office.
CaCtEftSON RBtPBtaBMCg OOP
Considering that excellent user manuals accompany the Fortis line of dot ma-
Panasonic KX-P3131
PC
MAGAZINE
■
extremely lightweight (only 19.7 pounds).
Its basic design is simple, not overwhelming, and its footprint is small enough to fit
in most workstation areas.
The Panasonic KX-P3131’s output is
smart, if not stylish. In the default font we
tested (Courier 10), certain letters, such as
r and e, appear a bit ragged and soft, but
overall the print looked good, without being overly inky, as is the output of many
daisy wheels.
Although the KX-P3131 costs significantly less than do other daisy wheels, this
printer's speed is nothing to keep secret.
We clocked it at 16 characters per second
(cps) in unidirectional printing, while Panasonic's testers claim 17 cps.
Typical printer enhancements such as
bold type, underlining, and proportional
printing are available. Particularly pleasing is the way the printer handles proportional type. The letters do not lean on each
other, but seem to have a well-separated
space in which to sit—a sign of a well-designed daisy wheel machine. Moreover,
the Panasonic KX-P3131 also offers such
nontypical type enhancements as outlining
and shadow print.
The types of switches and indicators on
the printer, as well as their location, are another plus. The DIP switches are conveniently located under the front top cover,
where they are easy to see and use. Moreover. the usual function switches—on/offline, form-feed, line-feed—are enhanced
by a second set of selector switches that enable you to set margins and justification,
choose type pitch, select line spacing, and
indicate how heavy or light the outpui
should be.
In addition, the Panasonic KX-P3131 s
usef-maiwal is excellent. It begins with *
concise, interesting explanation of whai
daisy wheel printing is all about. A stepby-step. comprehensible guide to setting
up the printer and loading paper follows
Finally, control codes for type enhancements and special printer functions are illustrated through sample BASIC progf8,1,5
and samples of the output produced wbj®
the programs are run. If that’s not
well-organized appendexes and an
make the information easy to find wW
you need it.
If, despite the manual’s help, yoU.
need assistance, knowledgeable tec
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
384
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DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS
(sheets with manual insertion, single sheets
I through the built-in cut-sheet-feeder, or
ntinuous forms through the built-in tracItor-feed. If you have to shift among differ[ent kinds of paper regularly, you’ll appropriate this flexibility.
The built-in sheet-feeder is strictly for
lletter-sized paper, and it holds only 50
[sheets. For heavy-duty printing, you’ll
[probably want the optional dual-bin sheet[feeder, which holds 125 sheets of 20I pound paper, up to 14 inches wide, in each
[bin and offers an optional envelope-feeder
as well.
[MODERN LOOK The Brother HR-40
•sports a suitably modem squarish look.
■The seven front-panel buttons have the
{usual settings for on- and off-line, linefeed, and top-of-form. Another button sets
{pitch (10, 12, 15, or proportional type).
The reprint button, which you use when
[you want to print multiple copies of documents, is another interesting feature. To
[use the reprint feature, you put the printer
[off-line and push the copy button to put it
[in copy mode. Then you go on-line and
"feather HR-40
tauter hMraotioMl Cap.
fafennrtcn Syteems Div.
.0 Corporate PI.
Pi*caarw»y, NJ 08854
.(201)981-0300
Lfat Price: S799
IDterteana(HWD): 7.7 x 23.1 x 13.4 in.
9WMtbt:31.9Ibs.
fe Short: Thu tmpressivo-for-«he-poce
Wide-camage daisy wheel printer offers 31 ■
ups speed, high-qurity pcnbog, i boik-in
'cut-iheet-feeder, etniNirtnBtor-feed, and a
hnty reprint tetewL
iTiii■liifTio i'dIliiMHViWi
PC
T
X he HR-40’s reprint feature helps
make up for the slow speed of a daisy
wheel printer, since it frees the computer for other jobs.
pnnt as usual. After printing the first copy,
you simply go back off-line and print as
many additional copies as you need merely
by hitting the reprint button once for each
copy.
The reprint feature helps make up for
the relatively slow speed of a daisy wheel
printer, since it frees the computer for other jobs once the printer has produced the
first copy. Unfortunately, the feature is
useful only for printing short documents,
since the Brother HR-40 comes with only
8K of memory, expandable to just 16K.
Even when using the reprint feature,
you may find it difficult to work on your
freed-up computer. Like most daisy wheel
printers, the HR-40 has a relatively high
noise level. It clatters along at a distracting
71 decibels.
Another innovative feature found in the
HR-40 is the Diablo 630 ECS compatibility mode. Most standard daisy wheel printers cannot print the IBM high-order characters because they can print only one
character per spoke, and they only have either 92 or 96 spokes. The Diablo 630 ECS
puts two characters on each spoke, with
the standard characters at the end of the
daisy wheel petals and the high-order characters half-way up. Brother International
offers a print wheel that can duplicate the
Diablo 630 ECS feat by overprinting certain characters with others. According to
the vendor, printing the high-order characters is simply a matter of putting the proper
print wheel in the printer, setting a DIP
switch for Diablo 630 ECS mode, and
printing as usual.
The clear, straightforward instruction
manual for the Brother HR-40 gives you
all the information you’ll need to get the
most from the machine. Installation and
paper handling are detailed step by step
with careful explanations, complemented
MAGAZINE ■
by illustrations. And the manual discusses
control codes thoroughly.
At $799, the Brother HR-40 is worth
investigating if you need true letter-quality
output—on a tight budget. But its real market may be for laser printer owners who
need a second printer to handle labels, envelopes, and multipart forms or wide printouts. So if you’re looking for a reasonably
priced printer to supplement your laser,
your search may come to a successful
close when you encounter the Brother HR40.—M. David Stone
Fortis DX41
The Fortis DX41, a $699 wide-carriage
daisy wheel printer from Fortis Information Systems, has a raft of bells and whistles that make it functionally enticing.
In addition to the three typical frontpanel controls—on/off-line, line-feed, and
top-of-form—the Fortis DX41 has a control called Copy Mode/Reprint. This function allows the printer to store data in a
buffer as it is being printed; you can then
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
383
WFACT
FILE
Forte DX41
Form fafcnnotiun Syowtec.
fitPORkkatectaxSt
Commerce. CA90MQ
(213)727-1227
LM Price: 5699
V
'
llteiatemSWffi* tM ’x 13!4in.
(2
■ DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS
support representatives will respond to
your calls. And Panasonic's technical-support phone number is toll free.
One drawback to the machine: in the interest of making a compact printer. Panasonic made the KX-P3131 too narrow. It
does not accept paper wider than 13.3“
inches. And although the company claims
that the printer is wide enough for most invoices and spreadsheets, you won't be able
to use the wider tractor-feed computer paper, which is 147/8 inches. If your printing
needs are frequently in the wide-carriage
range, this narrowness of vision in the design of the KX-P3131 could be the reason
why you'll decide to choose another daisy
wheel printer.
That problem aside, however, the Panasonic KX-P3131 is a contender for your
printer budget, particularly if pure price
and printing performance measurements
are your guide.—Jeffrey Rothfeder
Primage 90-GT
The Primage 90-GT daisy wheel printer is
Primages’ 51,095 answer to the falling
price of laser printers. It's essentially the
same printer as last year's Primage 100, a
PC Magazine Editor’s Choice. The Primage 100 offered high-quality output at
high speed. It also offered Epson-compatible graphics—a feature virtually unheard
of among daisy wheel printers. Alas, its
price of $ 1,895 forced it to compete with
low-end laser printers.
This year’s Primage 90-GT differs essentially only in that it has 2K memory instead of 8K and offers a parallel connector
as standard, rather than both a parallel and
a serial connector. These two changes allowed Primages to reduce the price to
$1,095, less perilously close to laser price
territory.
Print quality is a strong point of the Primage 90-GT. Previous models of Primages printers have always fallen just
short of true IBM Selectric typewriter
quality, but the 90-GT closes the gap. In
fact, the Primage 90-GT output is indistinguishable from IBM Selectric output.
Its secret is a new ribbon cartridge—the
Jogger, a variation on a Diablo Hytype II
cartridge. (You can use any Hytype IIstyle cartridge with the 90-GT, but print
PC
P
X revious models of Primages
printers have always fallen just short of
true IBM Selectric typewriter quality,
but the 90-GT output is indistinguishable from IBM Selectric output.
quality will suffer. You can also use the
Jogger cartridge on any printer that will
lake the Hytype II cartridges.)
The ribbon on most carbon ribbon cartridges moves less than a full character
w idth for each character the printer produces. But as the Jogger moves the ribbon
through the printer, it also moves it up and
down. Thanks to the vertical motion, the
Pnmage 90-GT strikes a different part of
the ribbon with each character, and the
output is far crisper and cleaner than that
produced using other cartridges. The Jogger cartridge also has a sensor that alerts
the printer to stop printing if the ribbon
breaks.
Speed is another strong point of the Primage 90-GT. On the PC Labs speed test,
the printer managed 56 characters per second (cps) for letter-width paper (compared
with just over 60 cps for the fastest daisy
wheel printer ever tested at PC Labs). On
the wide-carriage test, the Primage 90-GT
scored 53 cps.
that’s two blocks away and having one a
your front door.
Despite the noise, the graphics are impressive. The printer has both a Diablocompatible mode and an Epson-compatible mode. To switch between them, you
turn the printer off and change an easily accessible DIP switch. You then turn the
printer back on, set your program for an
Epson printer, and print the graphic. Primages claims that the graphics mode is Epson FX compatible, but on the PC Labs
test, the Epson MX graphics worked much
better.
As you’d expect, printing graphics with
the Primage 90-GT takes a long time and
chews up a great deal of ribbon. The
graphics feature is obviously only for occasional use. But if your main concern is
high-quality text and you need graphics
only rarely, you can get by using just the
Primage 90-GT.
Graphics produced with the Primage
90-GT are better than they appear in the
sample. The printer’s daisy wheel technology produces extremely dark graphics.
QUIET PRINTING Noise level is the
Achilles’ heel of most daisy wheel printers. If you’re printing all day long, you
won’t want to share an office with one. But
Primages printers have always been quieter than most, and the Primage 90-GT upholds that tradition, producing only a mild
clatter.
The only time printer noise may drive
you from the room is when printing the Epson-compatible graphics. If you have any
solid black areas in the graphic, the sound
quickly becomes unpleasant as the printer
slams the spokes against the paper. The
difference between printing text on this
printer and printing graphics is like the difference between having a jackhammer
MAGAZINE
■
NOVEMBER 10, 1987
386
tM-GT
Primages Inc.
131 Trade Zone Dr.
Ronfconkoma, NY 11779
(516)383-8200
Lfat Price: $1,095
DMM(HWD); 7.4 x 24.5 x l5J*j
ten 56-cps qwed,jpqaaia Jmel, DM
Froi
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Nobody ever thinks
of PC AT batteries
until it’s too late.
DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS
^EDITOR’S
CHOICE
Too few choice!
Without a functioning battery,
your computer is as good as dead.
The battery in vour PC AT or compatible controls your computer's
configuration files, real time clock,
and calendar. When the clock
and calendar begin to fail,
your battery's hours are
numbered.
So be prepared. Get the
best replacement battery you
can buy. Get a TADIRAN
battery from IBC — the high
quality, high energy lithium battery that is already found in 80%
of all PC AT’s and compatibles as
original equipment.
A unique 3 year warranty, 10
year shelf life, and UL approval
make a TADIRAN replacement battery the best insurance there is. So
don’t wait until your computer
battery dies. Get a TADIRAN replacement battery from IBC today.
ORDER NOW!
800/654-3790 (US)
800/225-9359 (CA)
Price only $27.50
Dealer inquiries welcome.
Corporate discounts
available.
For IBM PC AT, Compaq
286, and all other AT
compatibles and clones.
Checks, money orders,
and credit cards welcome.
Add $3 00 for shipping and
handling.
IBC
International Battery Corporation
6860 Canbv Avenue, #113,
Reseda, CA 91335
818/609-0516. (TLX 6975427+)
IBM AT and Compaq 286 are respective trademarks of
IBM Corp and Compaq Corp
('all for all Six-Pack replacement batterie.
CIRCLE 269 ON READER SERVICE CARD
PC
MAGAZINE
■
Last year we selected three Editor’s1
Choices froma field of 12 daisy
wheel printers—die $1,895 Primage 100 for its Epson-compatible
graphics, the $899 Qume LetterPro
Plus for its 41 -cps (character-persecond) letter quality speed and low
cost, and the $1,495 Fujitsu
SP320Efor its full-sized carriage
and quiet operation. This year, ead(
cf the five daisy wheel printers tested offers Selectric- or near-Selectrie-quality output, all but one
wide carriages, and their noise
is on a par with dial of dot matrix
printers. However, with only five
daisy wheel printers from which to
choose, die category has become
too limited to support an Editor's
Choice.
and so for best results you should set your
graphics program for single-density printing. The PC Labs tests, which assume that
darker is better, are designed to print
graphics in quadruple density. This practice makes sense for most printers, but for,
the 90-GT it causes the graphics to kxA 1
less detailed.
The Primage 90-GT’s boxy look is beginning to look a bit dated, but it will still
look at home with most office decors. The
user manual contains most of the inform*',
tion you’ll need, and if you run into p
- -temsr the company provides knowledge-1
able technical support. Also, a noteworth) ;
$795 triple-bin sheet-feeder is available. **
well as a $395 single-bin sheet-feeder at*
a $295 tractor-feed.
If you’re faced with the choice of a la**1
printer or the Primage 90-GT. the l*sef
will probably triumph over the dai5?
wheel. But if a daisy wheel will ans***
more of your needs, you’ll find that the
Primage 90-GT, son of last year’s Edimj/
Choice, offers more features at a lo'veI
price than you'll find elsewhere.
—M. David Stone
NOVEMBER 10, 1987
388
If
■ DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
EDITOR
CHOICE
• C. Itah C-71SA
. Epson LQ-850/LQ-1Q50
• Panasonic KX-P109U :
There’s no better example of the
long way low-end dot matrix printers have come than the $289 9-pin
Panasonic KX-P109H. An upgrade
ofthe $399 KX-P1091, which was
an Editor’s Choice in 1985, the 99cps KX-P 1091 i offers more features
and fonts, has an improved control
panel, and hfaster, cheaper, and
quieter than its award-winning predecessor. Built-in fnction- and tractor-feed mechanisms allow the
printer to accept both single-sheet
and fanfold paper; Epson and IBM
emulations add to its versatility. At
a list price But'shard to beat, the
Panasonic KX-P 1091 i is the ideal
low-end dot matrix printerfor smallbusiness, college, and home use.
Among mid-range 24-pin primers, upgrades are also in the spotlight. The $799Epson LQ-850and
the wide-oarriage $1,099LQ-1050
deliver the same high print quality
that made last year’s modeh, the
LQ-dQOandLQ-lOOQ, Eton's
Choices, but they do it faster and
with more style for the same money.
Respective measured speeds of 153
cps and 163 cps for the LQ-850 and
LQ-1050make these printers 24-pin
paceseaers.-and an auto-load paper feed mechanism is one element
of their smart design. Epson LQ1500 and IBM Propriruer emula- '
tions round out the LQ-850 and LQ1050" s offerings. Like last year’s
models, no other 24-pin printer
came close to the LQ-850 and LQ1050" s moderate price and high
performance.
Slightly slower than the Epsons,
the $1.295145-cps C. Itch C-715A
more than compensates with its
adaptability. Four credit-card-sued
identity cards come with the widecarriage 24-pin C-715A, allowing it
to emulate the IBM Proprinter XL,
Epson LQ-1000ILQ-1500, Toshiba
P351, and Diablo 630printers; ac ditional identity carets are available
for $49.95 each. With the Undof
16-character LCD control panel
you’d expea to see on a laser printer (but often don’t), a quick setup
method, and a manual that includes
a chapter on how to use the printer
with nine popular software packages, the C-715A earns high marks
for ease cf use as well as versatility.
But, really, the quality of dot matrix printers has improved so dramatically—while prices have gotten
more in line with reality—that almostanyofthe 65 printprs we’ve
evaluated is worth consideration.
clearly delineates the process. You can set
the default font and character pitch by using the DIP switches, conveniently located
in the front of the printer and under the top
cover. Rather than giving you a cryptic
chart, the manual includes separate sections with step-by-step instructions on how
to set each switch.
The DIP switch settings control the font
and the pitch that the printer uses as defaults when you first turn it on. You can
use the front-panel buttons to change each
PC
setting as well as to select cartridge or
downloaded fonts.
The printer’s front panel consists of six
buttons and a two-character LED. Besides
changing font and pitch, the buttons put
the printer on- and off-line, control formfeed and line-feeds, and select quiet mode.
The LED indicators show power on, online status, quiet mode, paper end, and
character pitch. In quiet mode the printer
takes two passes to print a line. Paper End
indicates that the Toshiba P351C is out of
MAGAZINE
■
paper, and the buffer holds unprinted data
The Toshiba P351C manual is divide
into two sections: Setup and Operation
and Technical Reference. The setup info,’
mation includes a discussion of how to use
the printer with MultiMate, MultiMate Advantage, WordPerfect, WordStar, Micro,
soft Word, and Lotus’s 1-2-3. The two sections of the manual have separate tables of
contents, but they share a single index. \
stiff divider tab placed at the beginning of
the Technical Reference section and a
heavy-stock quick-reference card would
improve the manual.
The Toshiba P351C delivers goodquality print, high-speed draft, and fas
graphics. Also, its rugged construction
makes it suitable for heavy use. Although
the Toshiba P351C can’t perform every aspect of printing as well as individual printers that excel in one aspect can perform
their speciality, it's a good compromise in
a world where no printer is—as yet—perfect.—Brace Brown
Toshiba P321SL and
P341SL
The Toshiba P321SL and P341SL are narrow- and wide-carriage versions of Toshiba America’s entry-level 24-pin dot
matrix printer, selling for $749 and $999,
respectively. What these built-to-last
printers give you for your money are 120and 125-character-per-second draft print,
flexibility in using different fonts, easy-touse front-panel controls, and some handy
features.
The print speeds of the P321SL and the
P341SL—120 cps in draft and 50 cps in
near-letter-quality mode for the P321SL,
125 cps in draft and 52 cps in NLQ for the
P341SL—put them solidly in the running
with similarly priced printers. When you
factor in the print quality they attain, the
speed is even more impressive.
Besides the standard draft, NLQ, and
condensed type, the printers have attractive built-in Courier and Prestige Elite
fonts. You can add other fonts through
plug-in font cards and by downloading
fonts from software.
The machines have two front slots for
the credit-card-sized font cards that Toshiba sells for $79 each. The printers’ stan-
N O V E M B E R I 0, 1 9 8 7
370
~D0T MATRIX:
W
Known for their
durability and dependability,
9- and 24-pin dot matrix
printers do more, cost less,
and are faster than ever.
PC
omen's magazines run on endlessly about the search for Mr.
Right. Perhaps their readers
should face reality and instead
search for Mr. Bell Curve—the guy who
falls within one or two standard deviations
of perfection. A dot matrix printer represents the same kind of trade-off: it may not
be exactly what you want, but more than
likely, it will be what you need—or get.
In a world Tilled with compromises and
budget committees, a dot matrix printer is
what, statistically, you’re most likely to
wind up with. Two out of every thru,
printers sold today are dot matrix, and th...
proportion will probably hold over the ne \:
few years. The rest of the market is spi t
between lasers (about a tenth of the mark. •
and climbing fast) and daisy wheels (also
moving fast, in the opposite direction).
An impact dot matrix printer is the jackof-all-trades, the only printer that can produce graphs and DNLQ (dam near . . . )
text, handle 11- by 147/g-inch printouts,
multipart forms, and color—all without
taking up much space on the desk. If
there’s nothing a dot matrix printer is a
master of, there’s nothing it really can't
do, or at least take a stab at.
Dot matrix printers also represent excellent value. Look at the bang-for-thebuck chart comparing the top sellers and
PC Magazine Editor’s Choices of the past
3 years against this year’s top printers, and
you’ll see the kind of progress being made
by the printer industry. Besides more
speed for fewer dollars, today’s dot matrix
printers have
■ Smaller footprints.
MAGAZINE ■
■ More fonts and type widths. beyond the
usual draft/NLQ/compressed options.
Many have proportional fonts built in. and
many of the 24-pin printers take additional
font cartridges, cards, or chips. These are
usually inexpensive, especially when
compared with laser-printer rates ($200)
for extra fonts.
■ Better paper handling, including semiautomatic paper loading and the ability to
print an envelope or a single sheet without
removing the tractor-feed paper.
■ Sheet feeders. Three years back, this
would have been a joke, since cut sheets
often imply company letterhead stationery
that calls for best-foot-forward print quality. Now, with the quality up and the world
more accepting of DNLQ printing, cut
sheets make lots of sense. Even if you just
print on nondescript paper swiped from the
photocopier (c’mon, admit it—everyone
docs), it's such a delight to be freed from
ripping apart all those perforations.
■ More ribbon choices. Look for more
manufacturers to offer film ribbons (the
Mylar multistrike ribbons, often called
carbon ribbons) that do wonders for 24-pin
printers.
■ Color. It used to be a separate model or
an expensive option. Now. with many
printers, you just slap on a red-blue-ycllow-black ribbon and you're in business.
HOW MANY PINS? The majority of dot
matrix printers are the 9-pin units that have
about 85 percent of the market, with the
rest being 24- and 18-pin designs. Expect
to see the market share of 24- and 18-pin
printers double or triple in the next 4 or 5
NOVEMBER 10, 1987
246
16
a
i COVER STORY
UX FHE JACK-OF-ALL-PRINTERS
Iths. beyond the
■ssed options,
nts built in. and
. take additional
hips. These are
pecially when
er rates ($200)
including semind the ability to
le sheet without
laper.
/ears back, this
since cut sheets
rhead stationery
vard print qualitp and the world
Q printing, cut
Even if you just
swiped from the
lit it—everyone
> be freed from
nations.
Look for more
m ribbons (the
s, often called
nders for 24-pin
jparate model or
ow, with many
i a red-blue-yel're in business.
llliftiraiirifl Javier Romero
te majority of dot
in units that have
market, with the
designs. Expect
f 24- and 18-pin
n the next 4 or 5
PC
MAGAZINE
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
247
DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
years. Dot matrix technology also includes
non-impact ink jet printers and thermal
transfer printers that hold small market
niches, but important ones nonetheless.
Twenty-four-pin printers, with two columns of 12 pins, aren’t automatically superior to 9-pin printers for all tasks. Just
most of them. The matrix, or bax.Jbat
makes up each character can be ten times
as detailed in 24-pin, proportional-spaced
NLQ mode as that of a 9-pin printer in everyday draft mode. Because of their staggered-pin offset, 24-pin printers can run
faster in draft mode and need only a single
pass to do near-letter-quality.
Even with the best 24-pin printers,
there remains some discernible difference
between true Selectric/daisy wheel/laser
printer letter quality and dot matrix printer
near-letter-quality. It’s not that bad if you
don't look closely, and most people aren't
looking closely in the “does-she-ordoesn’t-she—only-her-hairdresserknows-for-sure” sense. The business
world is growing accustomed to seeing
correspondence on dot matrix printers; as
long as the print quality doesn't pain the
eyes, the message really does count more
than the medium for most but not all crucial documents.
Besides 9- and 24-pin printers. Okidata
and Alps, among others, offer 18-pin
printers arranged in two columns of 9.
Eighteen-pin printers typically emulate 9pin Epson printers, which was an advantage a year or two ago when there weren’t
many 24-pin printers except those by Toshiba. Okidata says the dual-9 arrangement makes for faster text and graphics.
Oki’s 18-pin Microline ad campaign
claims output is 2 to 6 times faster than that
of comparable 9-pin printers; PC Labs
didn’t find that to be the case with text, at
least.
Japan Inc. (that’s where almost every
printer comes from these days) has a bunch
of 32- and 36-pin designs ready or on the
back burner, but it’s unclear how much the
quality improves beyond 24 pins. It’s
equally uncertain how soon—if ever—
these designs will come to market.
WHY NINE? If 24-pin printers are so
hot, why don’t they have 100 percent of
the dot matrix printer market?
Those ubiquitous 9-pin printers hum
IS
A
▲
A
A
750
Prlc*
$799
$549
$289
$299
$299
$499
$549
$399
$599
$449
800
fmon. IBM, Okidata. and Panasonic rethree advantages: pnce. print density,
ij apparent durability. Based on PC
tests over the past 4 years and on ev£jay expenence. we've found that S>-pin
(inters produce somewhat darker charac^over the lives of their ribbons than do
Ipin printers. Ribbons typically produce;
Pp. dark print for just a few pages (about
j to 100). then several thousand somedial fainter pages. (Daisy wheel printers
^ing nylon fabric ribbons perform the
ft# way.) Each wire, or pin. on a 9-pm
an 18-pin printer has about twice as
,ich surface area as a pin on a 24-pin
mter, about 3 millimeters across vs. .2
iillimeters.
The daintier pin ( .2 millimeters is about
i? inch) is also the reason why 24-pin
inters shouldn't hold up as well, at least
[theory In practice, all dot matrix printsare rugged; if 9-pin printers seem to last
lever and 24-pin printers last 90 percent
long—well, that's more than adequate.
n't it'.’
Bear that in mind as you read the 57 dot
atnx printer reviews that follow. Also,
here PC Labs found some printer houses to be of comparatively thin plastic, or
(here the machines seemed less solidly
avy than in years past, don’t assume that
e printers are inferior. Instead, the engisers and designers may have found ways
i make less do more and shave a few penes off manufacturing costs. When the
cn is climbing, you don't get falling pnntrprices without some compromises.
OLOR RIBBONS Many higher-end
ot imatrix printers now accept four-color
:d-l-blue-yellow-black ribbons to produce
olor images and graphs. The best color
nages can be quite good.
If it's color you want, you should confer the thermal transfer color printers and
olor ink-jet printers also reviewed here,
ntil the dominant corporate printing
resses—photocopiers—all work in color.
ie use of color output remains limited to
assing around a handful of originals or to
isplays on overhead projectors. That
Duld change with color laser printers.
Two special-purpose machines relewed in the dot matrix category are
rother's Twinriter 6. which has both daiJf wheel and dot matrix printheads in the
PC
same machine, and IBM's Quietwnter III.
which produces truly excellent output using thermal transfer technology. The latest
version runs three times as fast for only
S100 more—but when you're talking
SI.699 for a quiet, letter-quality printer,
you should be talking a 200- to 300-character-per-second laser printer.
As with the other categories, these
printers are reviewed in alphabetical order
by company name.—Bill Howard
Although the S595 narrow-carnage Alps
ALQ200 and S895 wide-carnage ALQ300
are less-expensive versions of the $1,395
Alps P2400C printer, also reviewed in this
issue, they do have most of the interesting
and useful features of that higher-priced
machine
Like the Alps P2400C. the ALQ200
and ALQ300 are available in an 18-pin
configuration, which emulates the Epson
FX-185. and a 24-pin configuration
which emulates the Epson LQ-1500 and
LQ-2500. The 24-pin unit costs $100 more
than the 18-pin machine, but you don'i
have to sacrifice 24-pin printing if you pur
chase an 18-pin machine or vice versa.
You can transform your 24-pin machine
into an 18-pin machine by purchasing an
18-pin configuration kit. The $295 kit includes an 18-pin printhead and a system
cartridge. If you have an 18-pin printer,
you can buy a 24-pin configuration kit for
$395.
To switch the two printheads, all you
need to do is replace the printhead and the
system cartridge, then move the line-feed
pitch-control lever. You'll also need to be
able to do 50 fingertip push-ups. because
e» en though the task is simple, it requires
some challenging finger maneuvers.
Other than this, setting up the printers is
easy: for example, inserting the ribbon cartridge is literally a snap. But it would be a
good idea to read the printer manual first,
even for experienced printer users. When I
first tried to use the ALQ200. it seemed as
if the printer had failed its diagnostic selftest. After reading the setup instructions. I
found that I should have checked to see if
the line-feed pitch-control lever was set for
MAGAZINE ■
NOVEMBER 10. I
249
\
Alps ALQ2Q0 and ALQ300
Alps America
3553 N. First St.
San Jose. CA 95134
(800)828-2577
(800) 257-7872 (ui Calif.)
(800) 858-2577 (in Canada)
(408)946-5000
Lift Price: ALQ20O. 18-pin. $595.24-ptn,
$695 ALQ300: 18-pin. $895: 24-pin, $995
Dimensions (HWD): ALQ20O 5 6* 18.5
x 18.5 in , ALQ300: 5.6 x 24.1 x 15 8 in.
Weight: ALQ200. 30.9 lbs.; ALQ300.37 5
lbs.
In Short: Narrow- and wide-carnage dot
matrix printers that let you swap between 18and 24-pin printheads, these impressive machines have a measured speed of 123 cps in
draft mode.
|
CIRCLE aoa ON READER SERVICE CARO
i
the type of printhead that was currently installed.
The manual is well written and has
dear and complete instructions for setting
up the printer; it also includes descriptive
chapters on printer commands and escape
codes for both the Epson FX-185 and LQ1500 emulations. If that's not good
enough, you'll find the Alps technical support staff patient and helpful.
The front panel has an array of buttons
and indicator lights that may look intimidating at first, but actually makes printing
easier and lets the user feel in control.
These buttons can be used to select letter
quality, draft, or high-density print. You
can also select line spacing of 6. 8, 3. or 4
lines per inch; character pitches of 10, 12.
or 17; and proportional spacing.
You won t find yourself turning the
printer off and on again to clear the buffer;
•>
s7
I
l DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
into position. The function works well, although I had to remove the printer cover
before loading new paper to prevent it
1
from gening caught beneath the cover.
!
The print quality produced by the Citi! zen Tribute 224 is impressive. Correspon:
dence-quality output is a bit light, but is
less jagged and uneven than that produced
| by many other printers. High-speed draft
pnnt has the zigzag quality typical of 24pin printers. Letter quality output is excellent and approximates that produced by a
typewriter. The curves of the letters are
smooth. Draft and correspondence modes
are available only in Courier, you can produce letter quality output in both Courier
i and elite.
What you get in pnnt quality from the
; Citizen Tribute 224. you pay for in speed.
! Not one of the fastest printers on the marI ket. the wide-camage Tribute 224 prints at
56 characters per second in LQ mode. 91
1
cps in draft mode, and 116 cps in highspeed draft. In narrow-carriage draft
mode, we clocked the printer at 91 cps.
And at 75 decibels in high-speed draft, the
pnnter is a little loud but the noise is not
overly shnll.
The Citizen Tnbute 224's two manuals
are very well planned and written. A user
manual tells you how to assemble the
printer, as well as how to set its DIP
switches. A reference manual describes
the control codes and command sets; it also
includes a handy control-code reference
card.
Unfortunately, the PC Labs graphics
emulation test did not include a Toshiba
emulation. However. I was able to test the
Tribute 224's graphics capability using
EMUL3, a software utility from M.A.P.
Systems (Houston. Texas) that allows Toshiba printers to emulate the printer commands and graphics modes of Epson machines. The resulting designs were sharp
and in proportion.
j In fact, the Tribute 224's only serious
| setback is its inclusion of a Toshiba emula1
hon rather than an IBM or Epson emulai hon. which also means that the printer can! not produce high-order ASCII characters
nr true superscripts and subscripts. According to a Citizen spokesman, these limitations will be remedied with the production of its font cards. They certainly should
not deter companies that are looking for a
PC
solid, well-planned business printer from
seriously considering the Citizen Tnbute
224.—Barbara KrasnofT
*
. ii i
- I r* \
The wide-camage C. Itoh C-715A. from
C. Itoh Digital Products, masters the possibilities. The $1,295 24-pin dot matrix
pnnter uses credit-card-sized plastic identity cards to give you more choices, both in
pnnting capabilities and in software programs And it won't keep you waiting.
The control panel 's 16-character LCD instantly confirms your choices.
With four identity cards that plug into
slots in its left side, the C-7I5A lets you
choose among IBM Proprinter XL. Epson
LQ-1000/LQ-1500. Toshiba P351. and
Diablo 630 emulations. Additional cards
are a\ .Htable for $49.95 each.
The C-715A'suse of identity cards protect' i! from becoming obsolete; as new
prints ' are introduced, all C. Itoh has to
do is develop new identity cards. And inserting a card in a slot is certainly a great
deal easier than installing an interface
C. Itoh C-715A
C. Itoh Digital Products Inc.
1011 Francisco Si
Torrance, CA 90502
(800)423-0300
(213)327-5939
List Price: SI.295
Dimeasioiis(HWD): 5.2 x 24.9 x 14.7 in.
Weight: 37 5 lbs.
In Short: A smooth-running 24-pin widecamage dot matrix that can change emulation
idenuty in a flash; draft speed is a fast 145
cps. and changing options through the LCD
front panel is a cinch.
CIRCLE SSI ON REAPER SERVICE CARO
MAGAZINE
■
board or even changing the DIP switches.
But there's more to the C-715A than
four emulations. Both serial and parallel
interface connections, each with a 32Kbyte buffer, are standard. Built into each
identity card are draft and Courier near-letter-quality in 10 pitch (pica), 12 pitch
(elite). 15 pitch, and 17 pitch (compressed). as well as proportional near-letter-quality fonts. You can also add fonts by
using optional font cards, currently available in Letter Gothic 12 pitch and 15 pitch.
Prestige Elite 12 pitch, and Bold Proportional Space I and 2. Each costs $39.95,
and more are on the way.
Setting up and using the printer
couldn't be much easier. In fact, unless
you're a first-time printer user, you'll
probably be able to use the quick setup
method—ten fast, simple steps that take
you from unpacking the pnnter to installing an identity card.
The state-of-the-art control panel, with
its 16-character LCD, tells you what’s going on. and you can also print a list of all
the current options selected. In addition,
four indicator lights—power, ready. LQ
(letter quality), and quiet—are aligned
above the on-line and LQ/quiet buttons to
indicate the current status. The other four
buttons are mode, set, LF (line-feed), and
TOF (top-of-form)—all you need to program the printer for most jobs.
With the LQ/quiet button you can
choose draft, letter quality, quiet letter
quality, or quiet draft. The set button,
helpful when you're using preprinted
forms, enables you to adjust the alignment
of the paper precisely.
With the pnnter off-line, the set. linefeed. and top-of-form buttons take on another role. Along with the mode button,
they"activate changes in the control-panel
menu.
The basic menu controls the nine functions that are changed most frequently, including font, characters per inch, page
length, paper width. The extended menu
lets you select options for 61 functions that
are changed less frequently, among them
ribbon color, buffer, slashed zero, and
character set.
Each function has several options, and
you can easily scroll through the menu’s
functions using the line-feed and top-ofform buttons. You can make changes to
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
267
2J0
• DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
the displayed options by using the set button. When you’ve made your adjustments
to the options, you press the mode button
to exit.
Print quality and speeds fulfill the
promise of the high-tech controls. Clocked,
at 145 characters per second, the CI7l5A’s draft font looked clear and crisp.
The LQ font rated a much slower 64-cps
speed, but its print quality rivals that of a
daisy wheel. And the standard 32K-byte
buffer allows you to move on to other tasks
quickly. The operating noise level seemed
quieter than the 78-decibel draft and 79decibel letter-quality sound readings indicated.
Besides user-defined characters, 18 international character sets are available.
The printer will print high-order (ASCII
code 128 to 255) characters but only if the
IBM Proprinter XL or the Toshiba P351
identity card is installed. Graphics produced with the C-715 A are precise. and 11
densities are available.
Other vendors should get a copy of the
C-715A's user manual and applications
manual to use as guides—they're that
good. The applications manual includes a
chapter on using the C-7I5A with nine
popular software programs: Microsoft
Word. Version 3.0: WordStar, Version
3.3; WordStar 2000 and 2000 Plus\ WordPerfect. Version 4.1; Lotus's 1-2-3 Release 2; SuperCalc4: Symphony; and
Framework II. It also includes guidelines
for using the printer with other programs.
Companies that are as concerned about
hardware and software adaptability, easy
control of features, and versatility as they
are about fast, professional-looking print
will discover that the C. Itoh C-715A
printer has it all. And with a fast change of
identity cards, the C. Itoh C-715A brings
you unlimited possibilities.
—Carol Olsen Day
C. Itoh C-815
Befitting its low-profile good looks, C.
Itoh's C-815 printer offers an attractive
combination: both high speed and good
print quality. But as you might expect, this
combination does not come cheap. With
its price of just under $2,000, the 24-pin C.
Itoh C-815 is for users who take their dot
matrix printers seriously.
PC
C. Itoh C-815
C Itoh Digital Products Inc
1011 Francisco St
Torrance. CA 90502
(800)423-0300
■ 213)327-5939
l ist Price: SI,995
DunwatasdlWD): 5 75 x 22.75 x 15.5 in.
Weight: 33 lbs
In Short: With measured speeds of 195 cps
■ viandard draft and 285 cps in high-speed
auli.theC. Itoh C-815 24-pin wide-camage
dot matrix printer offers not only impressive
speed but also good print quality: proportional spacing and graphics, though, are less than
ideal
CIRCLE in ON REAPER SERVICE CARD
High price usually goes hand in hand
with high speed, and the C-815's speed
lets it compete with laser printers. In the
PC Labs speed tests the printer clocked in
at 96 characters per second in near-letterquality mode and 195 cps in standard draft.
When printing a double-spaced, lettersized page, 195 cps translates to 8.3 seconds per page, or better than 7 pages per
minute. The NLQ speed of 96 cps translates to about 17 seconds per page, or a still
respectable 3.5 ppm.
The C-815 also has a special highspeed draft mode with a claimed speed of
570 cps. In the PC Labs speed tests,
though. most dot matrix printers clock in at
about half their claimed speed, and, true to
form, the C-815 managed "only” 285
cps. For a double-spaced letter, this rate is
equivalent to just under 6 seconds a page,
or more than 10 ppm.
Unfortunately, the high-speed draft
mode requires a clumsy setup procedure.
You can set condensed mode to give either
NLQ print or high-speed draft. But to
MAGAZINE
■
change the setting, you must work your
way through nested menus that you access
with the printer's front-panel buttons. You
can't access the high-speed draft mode by
using software commands from the computer. What's missing from this scheme is
an easy way to switch between the two
modes. You’ll probably find yourself
making do without one of them.
The C-815 scores well on print quality
Text in NLQ mode approaches true letter
quality, though a close look discloses the
dot matrix source. Although the normal
and the high-speed draft print look like dot
matnx output, they're highly readable.
Alas, the C-815 has some minor pnntquality problems, mostly when trying to
produce combinations of enhancements.
For example, when using the IBM Proprinter emulation, the C-815 will not
switch to NLQ compressed text from II
pitch. And changing to italic throws the
printer back to 10 pitch.
The C-815's proportional printing is a
also disappointing. Rather than changing
to a font designed for proportional spacing. the printer keeps the standard Courier
monospace font. Unfortunately. Courier is
designed with wide lines at the base of the
"i" and the "!." leaving little room to
close up between characters. So you’ll find
it hard to detect the proportional spacing
True proportional fonts are available from
an optional plug-in font card.
Graphics quality is also less than il
might be. The C-815 passed the IBM Proprinter graphics emulation test with ease,
but the solid black bars tend toward the
gray part of the spectrum.
On the plus side, the C-815 has some
helpful small touches. The printer cable.
fog example, goes into a recess in the back
of the machine, where it's hidden by 3
plastic cover. The cable extends out
through a hole at the left rear comer of the
printer, where it's well out of the paper
path. Also, the nested menus mentioned
earlier work well for settings you don *
want to change often. You can print a list
of default settings by pressing the top-ofform button when you turn on the printer.
The C-815 has a more modem design
and appearance than you might expect in a
high-speed dot matrix printer. Weighing if
at 33 pounds, it’s far lighter than othef
printers in its category, some of which
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
268
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CIRCL
■ DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
The speeds of the Epson FX-86E and tractor unit is much better than earlier Epthe Epson FX-286E are right on the money son pin-feed mechanisms. Loading paper
for their price category: 129 characters per is foolproof, and you no longer waste a
second in draft and 41 cps in near-letter- sheet of paper every time you start or finish
quality for the Epson FX-86E. and 138 cps a printing job.
in draft and 43 cps in NLQ for the Epson- - “ff you have the desk space to accommodate it, the wider Epson FX-286E affords
FX-286E.
Print quality itself has also improved greater flexibility for reports and spreadfor the FX series. Of course, these 9-pin sheets, as well as the ability to print mailprinters can't produce results like those of ing labels four to a sheet.
24-pin printers, and you can make out the
The Epson FX-86E and FX-286E come
dots in NLQ print—but only if you try.
w ith a draft typeface and an NLQ typeface
By setting manual DIP switches on the with Roman and sans serif fonts. To
back of the printer, you can select either switch between draft and NLQ modes and
IBM or Epson modes, in which case you between normal and condensed type, all
will be hard pressed to find software that you do is push the proper buttons on the
will not work with these printers. Epson control panel, called the SelecType menu.
FX-series printers are one of the few stan- Software control codes override Selecdards in the dot matrix world, and nearly Type settings.
all software supports them.
You can also use software to control
Both models come standard with fric- other pnnting characteristics, including
tion feed and an external tractor unit. The bold, underline, italic, double-strike, superscripts ana subscripts, automatic centering and justification, double-high and
double-wide characters, horizontal and
tabs, variable form length and line
S&BFACT
FILE vertical
height, and proportional spacing.
One characteristic of the printers that
Epson America could improve in future
versions is noise level. Both printers
scored 73 to 78 decibels. Although the
sound isn't particularly grating, it leaves
room for improvement.
Both models come standard with a parallel printer interface and an 8K data buffer. Optional interfaces include several
types of serial interface as well as larger
data buffers, to a maximum of 128K.
Printers in this price category are priEpaoo FX-ME sod FX-286E
Epson America Inc.
marily designed and marketed to single us2780 Lomita Blvd.
ers who have light- to medium-duty print
Torrance, CA 90505
runs and who print everything from drafts
(800)421-5426
to correspondence-quality letters, and
(213)539-9140
from charts and graphs to mailing labels. If
Urt Price: Epson FX-86E, $499; Epson FX286E, 1699.
you fit that profile, you’ll want to see what
Unearioos (HWD): Epson FX-86E, 5.5 x
the Epson FX-86E and the Epson FX16.5 x IS in.; Epson FX-286E, 5.5 x 21.5
286E can do.
x 15 in.
Essentially, these printers are great if
Wright: Epson FX-86E, 16.9 lbs.; Epson
FX-286E. 22.2 lbs.
you need more performance, durability,
hi Short: The narrow- and wide-carnage
and features than you get with the lowestversions of this 9-pin dor matrix model prim
priced printers, but can get by with 9-pin
draft at I29cp6 and 138 cps, respectively.
print quality. Continuing the Epson tradi'They continue the tradition of Epson's legendary series, adding an extra internal font
tion of excellence, they’re sturdy, reliable
.andfiont-pand menu selection.
printers with creditable performance and
ON HEWER aeHwcEOflD
unmatched software compatibility.
—Bruce Brown
PC
MAGAZINE ■
Epson LQ-850 and
LQ-1050
Marrow- and wide-carriage versions of the
same Epson America 24-pin dot matrix
printer, the $799 Epson LQ-850 and
$1,099 Epson LQ-1050 are the latest incarnations of two of last year’s Editor's
Choices, the LQ-800 and LQ-1000.
The rage in dot matrix printers is currently the print quality many manufacturers obtain by using 24-pin printheads. Epson America attracted a lot of attention
with the 24-pin LQ-1500 in 1984, and its
24-pin printers have been front-runners
since. Last year the low-priced machines
in the series, the LQ-800 and the LQ1000, were elected Editor’s Choices because of their type quality and features for
their price level. The LQ-850 and the LQ1050 are even better.
N O V E M B E R I 0. I 9 8 7
Epaon LQ-850 and LQ-1050
Epson America Inc.
2780 Lomita Blvd.
Torrance, CA 90505
*(8007421-5426
(213) 539-9140
List Price: LQ-850, $799; LQ-1050,
$1,099.
Dimensions (HWD): LQ-850 5.5 x 17.5 x
16 in; LQ-1050,5.5 x 24.25 x 16.5 in.
Wright: LQ-850.19.8 lbs; LQ-1050,26.4
lbs.
In Short: This 24-pin dot matrix printer, in
both narrow- and wide-camage versions, is a
terrific deal, with fast (153 cps) draft and excellent letter quality, fril compatibility with
the Epson LQ-1500 ad the IBM ftoprinter,
snd the latest advances in convenience mad
control features.
emCLE MS ON HEADER SERVICE OHO
Wtk
mm*
DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
Both the 80-column LQ-850 and the
132-column LQ-1050 pnnt draft mode on
letter-sized paper at 153 characters per second. The LQ-850 prints letter quality type
at 67 cps; the LQ-1050. at 68 cps. The
wide-carriage LQ-1050 can print at 163
cps on wide paper. These speeds are noth~
ing to sneeze at, especially for printers in
this price category.
E
pson equips most of its printers
with a front-panel control feature
called SelecType. The buttons on the
top of the LQ-850 and the LQ-1050 let
you choose the font, the pitch, and
condensed mode.
Of course, speed should be the second
half of the story with any printer whose
model number starts with LQ. Both the
LQ-850 and the LQ-1050 deliver the print
quality we’ve come to expect from the Epson LQ series. Draft quality is clean and
neat, and letter quality is exceptionally
good. Although not as impressive as that
of the superb LQ-2500. Epson's highestpriced 24-pin printer, the best print of the
LQ-850 and the LQ-1050 will certainly
serve most office needs.
Both models offer all the formatting
and print enhancement features you’d expect: boldface, underline, double-strike,
double-high, and double-wide characters;
italic, compressed print, superscripts and
subscripts; automatic centering, automatic
justification, proportional spacing, horizontal and verticail tabs, and variable form
length and line height.
Standard features include draft and both
roman and sans serif letter quality fonts.
Two easily accessed font cartridge ports on
the right of the printer hold optional
$59.95 cartridges.
Epson equips most of its printers with a
front-panel control feature called SelecType. You can use this feature to select
various print settings, which vary from
model to model. The buttons on the top of
the LQ-850 and the LQ-1050 let you
choose font, pitch, and condensed mode.
The font-selection control also has lights
that indicate use of two optional fonts,
which work only if cartridges are inserted.
The machines include other “intelligent"
menu characteristics as well. Forexample.
you cannot set the pitch to PS (proportional
spacing) and turn on condensed mode at
the same time. Condensed mode overrides
proportional spacing.
Both models bang away with their 24
pins, scoring 72 decibels on our sound level test. The noise isn’t bad, but there’s
something magic about dot matrix printers
that are quieter than 70 decibels.
One of the niftiest features of this new
printer is the auto-load paper device. To
load paper, all you have to do is to put the
top of the first sheet of continuous-form
paper in the tractor and hit the load button.
The paper comes forward right to the top
of the printhead.
Many printers have an auto-load feature. but where the LQ-850 and the LQ1050 leave most of their competitors behind is what happens after you load
continuous-form paper. If you then want to
load single-sheet paper, you can do it without much fuss. You simply hit the load
button with paper in place (and with the paper-feed lever in the continuous-form position). and the printer retracts the paper almost all the way. You can then print on
single sheets without wasting continuousform paper and your time.
When you want to resume continuousform printing, you simply hit the load button. and the printer reloads the paper so
you can proceed. Only a few other printers
do this trick to date.
The LQ-850 and the LQ-1050 emulate
both the Epson LQ-1500 and the IBM Proprinter. You can select emulation through
software or by changing one rear-mounted
DIP switch.
When it comes to dot matrix performance for the dollar, it’s hard to beat the
LQ-850 and the LQ-1050. The print is
good-looking and fast, and the convenience features are valuable perics. Why
spend more for printers that can do only
slightly better when you can have the highquality LQ-850 and LQ-1050 without the
high cost?—Bruce Brown
PC MAGAZINE
B
Kpson LQ-2500
The Epson LQ-2500 is the latest in Epson
America’s line of 24-pin wide-carriage dot
matri* printers. This new unit includes
five '.tter-quality fonts, a front-panel LCD
menu system called SelecType. and the
ability to create macro settings that retain
four different sets of printer configuration
codes. The $1.399 Epson LQ-2500 is not
the fastest dot matrix printer on the market,
but its print quality competes with everything shy of laser printers.
Unfortunately, the LQ-2500 has to
spend a lot of time banging away to make
its lovely characters. The highest tested
speed I could wring from our review unit
was 133 characters per second in draft
mode. Bear in mind, however, that the
LQ-2500's draft mode is very, very good.
Perhaps more significant is the 67 cps I obtained in letter quality mode. Quite often
printers that fly while creating only acceptable draft quality slow down to below 30
cps in highest quality. The LQ-2500 is
clearly designed to deliver lots of crisp
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
276
FACT
FILE
Epson America Inc.
2780 Lomita Blvd.
Torrance, CA 90505
(800)421-5426
(213)539-9140
Ltat Price: $1,399
IMwlHWD):5.75 x 24 x 16.5in.
WeMt: 26.4 fee.
In Hull null |iK MHiiiwinBi 1 0
2500is Spew's
awtlrty
yields 133 <
ayfoess.
owiiieiowigeiBiWiirtgrwp
lea
u DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
Ipear letter-quality dot matrix print at relaIlively rapid speeds.
Speed isn't all this machine offers. The
[LQ-2500 comes with an impressive selection of five letter-quality fonts, including
gpson copyright Roman. Sans Serif. Couj^r. Prestige Elite, and Script typefaces.
Combined with the usual selection
Enhancement and formatting features, the
LQ-2500'S many font options give you a
iieat deal of control over the design of
iour output.
The SelecType fonts and the features
menu system give you a lot of control over
the printer, but 1 found the system somewhat difficult to use. The way you get into
the SelecType menu is to take the printer
otf-line and then hit the line-feed and
form-feed buttons at the same time. This
pounds simple, but in practice I found it
hard to hit them exactly at the same time.
As a result I would often cause a line-feed
or form-feed to occur.
Once you do get into the menu system
vou can select print quality, font, pitch,
condensed type, form length, perforation
skip, left and right margins, graphics character sets, language, single or bidirectional
pnnting, half-speed, and optional sheetfeeder control.
One of the most impressive features of
the LQ-2500 is its ability to use what Epson calls macros for separate printer control configuration sets. The four factory
settings for macros include one for draft
pnnting, another for letter quality printing,
a third for wide spreadsheet printing with
condensed print that allows up to 233 columns across a page, and the fourth for
pnnting graphics. You can customize any
of the macro settings, as well as set and
save four macros. While many beginning
users might avoid using the macros because it seems a bit hard at first, the actual
time saved should make up for the time invested in learning how to use them.
The LQ-2500 makes a fair amount of
noise. It registered 79 decibels in both draft
and NLQ modes. While that level isn’t
! enough to chase you out of the room, long
nins could be objectionable without an
I acoustic enclosure.
The typically good Epson documentaI ton includes sections on setting up and usmg the printer, SelecType, command
summary, and reference listings. There is
j
PC
also a quick-reference card that includes a
command menu map and a glossary.
Besides emulating the rest of the Epson
LQ line, the LQ-2500 also can be set to
emulate the IBM Propnnter.
If your primary need is letter quality
print but you have occasional need for
graphics and high-speed draft pnnting as
well, the LQ-2500 offers exceptional pnnt
quality and very respectable speed. This
machine is justly Epson's dot matnx flagship —Bruce Brown
At S299. the Epson LX-800 dot matrix
printer is Epson America's entry-level
model, intended for first-time buyers. The
best news about the 9-pin LX-800 is the
functions and the performance you get for
pnce: draft and near-letter-quality pnnt.
character and graphics compatibility with
the IBM Propnnter. and the usual range of
print enhancements.
The LX-800 pnnts at 105 characters per
second in draft mode and 27 cps in Si j
:3M FACT
FILE
Epson LX-800
Epson America Inc.
2780 Lomita Blvd.
T jrrance. CA 90505
(JTO)421-5426
(213)539-9140
List Price: S299
Dimensions(HWD): 3 58 x 15.7 x 12.1 m
Weight: 11 2 lbs.
In Short: This narrow-carnage 9-pin dot matnx pnnter offers a combination of speed (105
cps in draft), print quality, compatibility
(IBM Propnnter), and features: it's good as a
first or backup pnnter.
CIRCLE 463 ON READER SERVICE CARD
MAGAZINE
■
mode. These speeds are not earthshaking,
but when you consider that they are tested
speeds and not manufacturer-rated
speeds—and remember what the pnnter
costs—the LX-800 is quite a deal.
The LX-800's printhead uses 9 pins to
pnnt characters and graphics. Usually. 9pin heads can't produce characters as full
and clear as those produced by 18- or 24pin heads, and the LX-800 bears out the
generalization. Yet the draft type is certainly acceptable, and the NLQ type compares well with that of pnnters that cost
twice this pnce 3 or 4 years ago.
The 80-column LX-800 has both fnction-feed and an internal tractor-feed. Both
of these paper-feeding mechanisms work
smoothly.
The pnnter is light (11 pounds) and
takes up little desk space. Its small size and
weight make it convenient to move
around, but the disadvantage of its largely
plastic construction is the impression it
gives that it won't stand up to a lot of
abuse. Clearly, the LX-800 is not intended
for heavy-duty printing.
Besides draft and NLQ. the LX-800
can produce emphasized (bold), doublestnke. condensed, italic, and double-wide
print. It can also print superscripts and subscripts. No extra fonts are available, although you can define your own characters
and symbols using software. The LX-800
successfully prints the IBM high-order
character set.
The LX-800 is fairly noisy, another
drawback of the lightweight case. It registers 79 decibels in draft mode and 78 decibels in NLQ. But since the pnnter probably won't be used much for long print jobs,
the noise level is only a minor concern.
Setting up the LX-800 is easy, especially if you've installed a printer before. The
familiar ribbon cartridge slips into place
easily, and loading the paper is straightforward as well.
Novice computer users who buy this
printer will enjoy one of Epson's most welcome contributions: complete and clear
documentation. The manual includes stepby-step installation information, tips on
using the LX-800 with different types of
applications programs, and reference information on how to use all the features.
Appendixes include a command summary. character set tables, a problem-solving
NOVEMBER 10 1987
283
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I
■ LASER PRINTERS
APRIL 28,1987
II \M)S ON
BY JONATHAN MATZKIN
Has the fun gone out of the romance with
your printer? Well, perhaps what you need
is a little Pizazz to make things exciting
again. Technically, Pizazz is a memoryresident print utility, but it is really more
like a turbo-charger for your PrtSc key
JULY, 1907
PC W#RLD
SOFTWARE HITS OF 1987
By Ross Smith
Pizazz lets you capture color and monochrome graphics, manipulate the images,
and print them to disk or to a pnnter.
The premise behind Pizazz is simple:
If you can put it on the screen, Pizazz
can capture it. And once it’s captured,
you can manipulate an image to your
heart's content.
Executive Summary
Ease of loading and
use
Excellent
Image manipulation
Excellent
Color selection
Excellent
Printer control
Excellent
Overall value
Excellent
Put Some Pizazz
In Your PrtSc Key
Tha word Is out Whether you have a
color or B&W pnnter, Pizazz puts flair
into your PrtSc key. Now with support
for over 150 printer models, can you
afford not to have Pizazz?
TO Oft OCR CALL 1-800-433-5201
For information or in MA call 617-433-5201
CIRCLE 115 ON READER SERVICE CARD
[J}?E D I T O R •
ArfC H O I C E
S
• Hewlett-Packard T.aerrjtl Series IT " • NEC SBentwritcr LC-89B
• Okkiata Laaertkae 6
Of the three laser printers umder
$2,000that we evaluated, one
stands out. The $1,995 Okideta Laserline 6 (including the single-mer
personality module) has more builtin fonts than the HP LaserJet that it
emulates. Beyond that, a diskette of
LaserControl software provides Diablo 630, NEC 3550, Qume Sprint
5, Epson MX-80, and IBM Graphics
Printer emulations; hence the printer can use a wellspring of popular
software packages. Mating the
package even more attractive is a
$400 multiuser personality module,
which allows three personal computers to be hooked up to one Laserline 6, bringing the cost of the printer down to less than $800per user.
Although the Laserline 6’s 150sheet paper tray is a bit on the
skimpy side, what you’ll see on
those 150 sheets is print quality
that’s solid and black. Considering
that you can buy the Laserline 6 on
the streetfor about $1,400, ifsa
hard deal to pass up.
The easiest call we had to make
was choosing the $2,595 HewlettPackard LaserJet Series II. Forty
percent cheaper than the HP LaserJet Plus that it replaced, the Series
11 maintains its standing as the laser
printer by which all others are measured. Building on the features that
made the earlier LaserJets a success but without sacrificing compatibility, the Series II accepts HP
downloadable fonts and supports
the whole HP command set. Its
smaller size, reduced weight, and
ability to go the extra distance when
printing large areas of black are
dividends of the new 8-ppm-rated
Canon SX print engine. With more
fonts (Courier, Courier Bold, and
PC
Line Printer, all in portnutand
landscape) than in
i, a ■
200-sheet paper tray, am improved - ■
paper jnrnag, ewajpm am tnage.
v
slots, andanJJtt&pmirion sU*, tkf
HP Series Madmtbmitobeapamt
of reference far same time to come.
‘ Althm^ilhaApptkLaserWriberPlus (reviewed last year) is still dm
PostScript primer to beat, the
_
$4,795NEC SilentwriterLC-890
has a. lot to offer for the money ;Besides bampPeedicript compadbhtf
the 6 ppm LC-890offers HP LmerJ et Plus and Diabio 630 undTtftun.
pnrimgar from the most intelligent
tathfmaefprimithm. OHhm.sMiftff'j
fy pricedprimtrX suchasdm'
^
$4,995Laser amneatinPS Jit;
and the $S,49S QMS PS^QO
.
also offer themaptiamy bmthe
NEC LC-890produced die daanem
darkest output cf this group* ^ .
Equipped with parallel; serial, and
AppleTalk ports, 3 megabytes of
memory, two 250-sheet paper trays,
and all the fonts found in the Apple
LaserWriter, this large machine
should stand up under heavy use.
An honorable mention goes to
the $3,495 Dataproducts LZR1230
for its 10.9-ppm measured speed,
three HO ports, and rugged construction. As many as three personal computers running software configuredfor different emulations can
be linked to the LZR 1230 at the
same time. Also worth considering
for multiuser environments are the
$3,495 Genicom 5010, which has a
rated duty cycle cf15,000pages per
month, and the $3,795 Quadlaser l,
which has a rated duty cycle cf
10,000pages per month.
MAGAZINE
2
5
LASERS
S
ince the introduction of the Canonengine-based Hewlett-Packard LaserJet in 1984, desktop printing has
never been the same. Easy to install
and maintain, the HP LaserJet set new
standards for speed (8 pages per minute),
print quality (300 dots per inch), and price
($3,495). For the first time, PC users had a
faster, quieter alternative to daisy wheel
printers for letter-quality printing—and
they didn’t have to take out a second mortgage to afford it.
Like PC users, printer manufacturers
knew a good thing when they saw it, and it
didn’t take long for HP’s competitors to in-;
troduce their own, lower-priced laser
printers. In 1984 we reviewed only one laser printer, the HP LaserJet; this year
we’ve evaluated 36 machines from 26 vendors. With at least two dozen lasers in this
year’s roundup claiming HP compatibility
and speeds of 6 to 8 pages per minute, it’s
easy to see that imitation is indeed the finest form of flattery.
List prices of some new laser printers
start at little more than half the 1984 list
price of the venerable HP LaserJet. The
least expensive of this year’s group is the
$lff95 Crltoh Jet-Setter, followed by the
$1,895 Oasys LaserPro Express, followed
by the $1,995 Okidata Laserline 6. At the
high end, we’ve reviewed two high-resolution, high-ticket laser printers—the
PC MAGAZINE ■ NOVEMBER 10. 1987
152
$12,980 Pri
and the $18
other first fc
ject and a ta
to come.
As the pt
fallen, perfo
HP LaserJet
to be replao
rated speed
128K of me
we’ve rev
changes in
5,000 page
have edged
ppm rating
One new 1
3010, atterr
18-ppm ratin
ing print enj
than Canon
Kyocera, an
pensive, and
here come w
RAM. Gai
raw speed
and 1,200$30,000 tyj
There a
use PostSc
guage spoi
more that
compatibiL
t
26
COVER STORY
A NEW5TANDARD
of the Canontt-Packard Lajp printing has
Easy to install
serJet set new
:s per minute),
nch), and price
PC users had a
0 daisy wheel
printing—and
a second mortmanufac turers
:y saw it, and it
mpetitors to inr-priced laser
ed only one larJet; this year
:s from 26 venn lasers in this
’ compatibility
er minute, it's
ndeed the finlaser printers
1 the 1984 list
LaserJet. The
~’s group is the
ollowed by the
press, followed
erline 6. At the
two high-resoprinters—the
$12,980 Printware 720 IQ Laser Imager
and the $18,750 Van typer VT-600—another first for PC Magazine's printer project and a tantalizing suggestion of things
to come.
As the price of many laser printers has
fallen, performance has risen. The original
HP LaserJet used toner cartridges that had
to be replaced every 3,000 pages; it had a
rated speed of 8 ppm and offered only
128K of memory. Among the new printers
we’ve reviewed, some do not need
changes in consumable components for
5,000 pages or more, (hint speed ratings
have edged upward, with 10-ppm and 12ppm ratings becoming more common.
One new laser, the $8,395 Kyocera F3010, attempts to redefine Mach 1 with its
18-ppm rating. More laser printers are using print engines made by vendors other
than Canon, such as Hitachi, Konica,
Kyocera, and Ricoh. Memory is less expensive, and some of the printers reviewed
here come with as much as 3 megabytes of
RAM. Gains have been made not only in
raw speed but in resolution, with 600-dpi
and 1,200-dpi laser printers challenging
$30,000 typesetting machines.
There are also more laser printers that
use PostScript, the page description language spoken by desktop publishers, and
more that offer both PostScript and HP
compatibility. Among those in the latter
PC
group that you'll read about are the NEC
Silentwriter LC-890, the Texas Instruments OmniLaser 2115, the Laser Connection PS Jet, and the QMS PS-800 Plus.
These machines may sell themselves as
crossover dreams, but they still have a way
to go to catch up to the preeminent PostScript laser printer, the Apple LaserWriter
Plus.
HP may have started it all with the LaserJet, but the inspiration for laser print engines came from inexpensive de^top
copier designs. Instead of using a paper
original and optics to transfer an image to a
photosensitive drum, laser printers use a
small diode laser to create an image With
one notable exception, all the printers reviewed here follow this path. Instead of using a laser, the $2,495 Data Technology
CrystalPrint Vm uses a strip of liquid crystal shutters (LCS) similar to the liquid crystals used in watch faces to either block or
transmit light. The idea behind using LCS
technology is to avoid distorting the printed image, but the resolution and quality of
the output produced by LCS machines
seem to differ very little from those of laser
printers. And although none are represented here, some manufacturers have used arrays of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to
create a printed image. Only time will
show which design is the most reliable.
Whether they use laser or LCS technol-
MAGAZINE ■
In only 3 years, laser
printers have changed the
way we think about
desktop printing; now the
ubiquitous office printer
is a faster, cheaper laser.
NOVEMBER 10, 1987
153
■ LASER PRINTERS
ogy, all of these machines are part of the
rapidly expanding page printer market.
For PC users such fast growth means a
greater choice among alternatives and
more features for less money, but also the
risk that some products will be brought to
market before they're ready. As our tell-itlike-we-saw-it reviews attest. we«tm
across our share of those during our tests.
PRINT ENGINES Different combinations of features make certain laser printers
better suited to some applications than to
others, so you'll need to know a few facts
about the machines’ print engines before
you can decide which of the 36 we review
here is right for you. For example, the
"rated duty cycle.’’ which is usually presented in terms of recommended pages per
month and is obtainable from the manufacturers, will give you a rough estimate of
how long it will be before your printer
gives up its toner. Many of the printers reviewed here, including the HP LaserJet
Series II. have rated duty cycles of 5.000
pages per month: others, like the Genicom
5010. have rated duty cycles of 15,000
pages per month.
There’s a trade-off to be made for the
claimed long life of the Genicom 5010’s
Hitachi print engine, however. Maintenance of machines built on this and other
non-Canon print engines isn’t exactly a
breeze. In our reviews we point out those
designs that, unlike the Canon engine's,
require you to contend with separate consumable components, including toner, developer, photosensitive drum, and fusing
unit. Laser printers that are based on either
the new Canon LBP-SX (the HP LaserJet
Series II) or the LBP-CX (the original LaserJet, Apple LaserWriter) print engines
use all-in-one cartridges that contain almost all the components—toner, developer, drum—that get used up or wear out. As
it turns out, when calculated on a per-page
basis using the manufacturers’ recommended replacement intervals, some of the
separate-component systems end up costing more per page than the all-in-one approach.
PAPER HANDLING We ’ ve also looked
at how these 36 newcomers handle paper.
Almost all have at least one input tray,
which may have a maximum capacity of
PC
100 to 250 sheets. Some, like the Kyocera
F-2010 and the Texas Instruments OmniLaser 2115, have second input trays—a
handy feature if you need to load two types
of paper. Other machines, like the HP LaserJet Series II and the NEC Silentwriter
LC-850. feature a manual input slot that
■lets you feed envelopes or special paper
through the printer without having to replace the paper in the trays.
More laser printers are stacking their
output facedown, which means that documents are ordered correctly the first time
around. The original HP LaserJet offered
only faceup output, thus kicking out documents in reverse order. But because facedown output means that paper has to navigate a tight turn along the printer’s paper
path, laser printers that offer it may not be
able to handle stiff, thick-stock paper. The
most flexible laser engine designs offer
both kinds of output along with a manual
feed slot.
FRONT-PANEL CONTROLS Beyond
supplying dual paper drawers and colku i
documents, laser printers are showing i
er signs of intelligent life. Like the HP 1
serJet Series II. more laser printers h.i J
conversational 16-character LCD vs
dows (and in English, too), although some
holdouts, like the Epson GQ-3500, still
provide displays with cryptic two-digit
codes that stand for operating and error
messages. Of course, those printers arc
great if you need to test your recall of tnv ial information.
The original HP LaserJet had a Spartan
front panel—Five buttons, four indicator
lights, and a two-digit display. Now more
laser printers offer greater access to configuration options than ever before. The front
panel of the Kyocera F-2010. for example.
has 14 buttons and a 10-key numeric pad:
different combinations can be used to select a font or emulation, set margins, and
eject a page. Other laser printers allow you
to select and configure the interface ports
through front-panel controls. With these
options at hand, laser printers that make
you set DIP switches buried deep inside
their casings or that force you to set default
parameters through complex strings of escape codes seem anachronistic.
All that convenience is nice, but compatibility with existing applications packMAGAZINE ■
NOVEMBER 10
154
ages decides whether a laser printer will increase your productivity or be just a 70pound paperweight. Because it’s too timeconsuming to write nonstandard printer
drivers to accommodate every odd laser on
the market, many applications vendors
have written drivers for the HP LaserJet
Plus command set. In this year’s roundup,
we’ve seen more printers that emulate the
widely used LaserJet command set, as
well as the popular Diablo 630 command
set. IBM Propnnter and Epson emulations
are also common, and a handful of laser
printers are compatible with HPGL. the
language of choice for HP plotters.
Intelligence, raw speed. PostScript,
emulations, paper handling, resolution,
longevity, and near-typeset-quality out- |
put—in varying combinations and with
varying degrees of success, that’s what the
36 laser printers we’ve evaluated have to
offer. Read on to find out what our experts
think of the largest and most diverse group
of laser printers ever reviewed in PC Magazine.—Alfred Poor
;
j
i
)
Blaser Industries’ $2,395 BlaserStar is the
kind of laser printer that has much in common with its dot matrix or daisy wheel I
counterparts, except that it prints faster. [
quieter, and with laser print quality. It’s
aimed at those who want laser technology
but don’t need a page description language. built-in user-definable fonts, or yet
another printer command language.
Setting up the Canon-engine BlaserStar
requires little more than attaching the paper trays, inserting the toner cartridge,
loading the paper, and connecting the parallei cable. One minor complication:
you’ll need to add a MODE command to
your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. But since
the manual explains the process, adding
the command shouldn’t be a problem.
The command (MODE LPTl:,,p) is
supposed to set the computer system for infinite retries on the parallel port. It’s necessary because the printer takes so long—notably when printing graphics in the HP
LaserJet Plus emulation mode—that the
computer may give up before the page finishes.
We ran into the resulting time-out error
1987
f^SER PRINTERS
only with the HP LaserJet Plus emu.. Also, in HP mode the printer can
I any HP-format soft font sold by
j-party vendors.
The one drawback to the Genicom
i0 is i[s pnce. But this printer is for
' . who need a laser printer that is more
I than versatile and who value speed
stamina over low cost. If you must
. high-quality output. 8.5-ppm-speed,
i up to 5.000 copies per month—and if
i re willing to choose one emulation
je and stick with it. at least for a
ghile—-you’ll want to have enough money
- your budget to cover a heavy-duty printlike the Genicom 5010.
, David Stone
fewlett-Packard
,a>cr.M Su'lc" I’.
How do you stay number one in a competijve market? It’s not easy, but HewlettPackard Co.’s LaserJet Series II printer
gems to put the competition to bed with its
mbeatable combination of price, features.
gti power.
Almost every segment of the microcomputer market has a trendsetter. IBM
did it with the PC. Hayes with the Smartmodem, Lotus with 1-2-3, and AshtonTate with dBASE III. In the world of desktop laser printers. Hewlett-Packard set the
tandard with the original HP LaserJet.
Other products compete with these
standards by isolating and improving on a
single feature of the original—typically,
price. But you won’t find yourself struggling to choose between the original and its
competitors this time. When HP upgraded
its successful LaserJet and unveiled the
new Series II, it not only added features
and shrank the printer's size, but it also
slashed the price of the new machine by
about 40 percent compared with that of the
LaserJet Plus it replaced. At a list price of
S2.595 (recently raised $ 100), the LaserJet
Series II can compete on price with almost
any other laser printer on the market.
The LaserJet Series II doesn't skimp on
value for those dollars, either. It supports
the entire HP LaserJet Plus command set
and accepts HP format downloadable
fonts. It includes the same half megabyte
°f memory that the LaserJet Plus offered.
It comes with a parallel and a serial interface and can be fed paper either automatically by a paper cassette by hand or a sheet
at a time. It even accepts the same ROM
font cartridges used by the earlier LaserJet
models.
HP engineers further improved the
printer by using a new laser print engine,
the Canon SX. Rated at the same 8 pages
per minute as the venerable Canon LPBCX engine (which drove the original LaserJet. the Apple LaserWriter, and the
QMS Big Kiss), the new one is only twothirds the size and weight of its larger, older sibling. The result is a lower, sleeker
housing that takes up less space and is easier to move when necessary. And the new
engine performs at a measured speed of
7.5 ppm. quite close to its rating.
The new engine keeps the same design
for the drum and the toner: both arc combined into a single, disposable cartridge.
Other printers offer separate drum and toner units, but these typically result in more
difficult maintenance and little if any perpage savings.
One disadvantage to the smaller engine, however, is that it cannot use the older machine's drum cartridges, and the new
ones cost a bit more (list price, SI 15). although you get about 25 percent more
pages per cartridge with the new design.
On the other hand, the tendency of the
original LaserJet to print unevenly when
printing large areas of black is a thing of
the past. The new Series II engine prints a
solid, dark black, even over large areas.
The difference is striking.
FONTS The HP LaserJet Series II also
comes with a few more fonts than its predecessors. Besides the familiar 10-pitch
Courier in portrait and landscape modes,
the Series II also offers the tiny 16.6-pitch
Line Printer font and a 10 pitch Courier
Bold in both portrait and landscape orientations. These six fonts are twice as many
as are offered in the HP LaserJet Plus, but
still far fewer than the number offered by
many competitors.
You can solve the font shortage in one
of two ways. The machine will accept two
ROM font cartridges at one time, so you
can have more than a dozen fonts instantly
available. A more economical solution is
the use of downloadable fonts, available
from HP as well as from third-party
sources, although this approach requires
more time and takes up some of the printer’s available memory.
You need not run out of memory, however, should you want to download lots of
fonts or print large graphics in full 300-dotper-inch resolution. HP makes it easy and
fairly affordable to expand the printer's
half megabyte of memory by adding expansion boards that boost it by an additional 4 megabytes of RAM. With a total of
4.5 megabytes, there will be plenty of
room for both fonts and graphics.
Another major improvement over the
original design is prominently displayed
on the new printer's front control panel.
No longer must users contend with the
cryptic two-character messages from the
LaserJet of the past. The Series II includes
a 16-character LCD panel that gives the familiar numeric messages along with
prompts in English that spell out their
meaning. (Not all the messages are helpful
Hewta-MMtfCbC
.A
3000 Hanover St.
Palo Alto, CA94?04>
(800)752-0900
.
,
LiMPricK $2,395
MHtMJJrtSX flirUiK
“■ lafcwanae
■ LASER PRINTERS
since more than one simply shows the
word “ERROR” or “SERVICE.” But
since the numeric codes still correspond to
the original LaserJet error codes, you can
decipher them by referring to a manual for
the older machines.)
The front panel not only conveys more
information, but it also eliminates the
dreaded DIP switch. Want to change interface or bps rate? Need to select a different
font but can't get at the commands through
your software? Want to change margin settings, paper source, or number of copies?
With the original, these tasks required either excavating the DIP switches buried
within the case or sending a complex command sequence, or both. Now you can perform all these jobs simply by pressing the
buttons on the control panel. The options
and the display are not as extensive as
some of the other lasers that have appeared
since the Series II. but the facilities should
be more than adequate for most users.
REVISED MANUALS The manuals
have also been revised for the Series II.
with both some improvements and some
ground lost. Like the latest versions of the
original LaserJet, the Series II comes with
a pair of manuals, but the organization is a
bit different. The first manual for the Series II is devoted to installation and includes excellent illustrations that make
good yet sparing use of color to show exactly how to unpack and set up the printer.
The first section takes you through running
the printer's self-test and printing a sample
status page. The second half of the manual
covers detailed instructions on configuring
the printer to run with any one of ten different popular computers, from the Apple lie
to the IBM AT. Generic instructions are
also included.
The other manual is the user manual, it
contains instructions on programming via
the front panel and the LaserJet software
control commands. It also includes tips on
using the Series II with a range of popular
MS-DOS applications programs. Like the
original LaserJet reference manual, the
new user manual includes a table that lists
all the different software control commands. Unlike the original, the manual explains fewer than a third of the available
commands, referring you instead to an optional book called LaserJet Series ll TechPC
nical Reference Manual. This is unfortunate; one of my big quarrels with some of
the LaserJet clones is that they do not adequately explain the command set and refer
you to HP documentation. Here HP does
the same thing. Users don't read manuals
any more than they have to, so including
full details about the command set
shouldn’t scare anyone off. The information should be there for those who need it.
The printer shows some other important improvements. The paper cassette has
been enlarged to hold 200 sheets of standard weight paper. You can also get your
output in facedown, collated order. Unlike
some competing designs, however, the
facedown feature was not made at the expense of a straight-through paper path for
heavier stock such as transparencies; pull
on a hatch and you get the same faceup
output as on the original LaserJet.
Something old and something new, the
Series II shows clearly that HP is able to
stay in front of the pack by offering a competitively priced product that builds on the
successful features of the past models
without losing compatibility. The La . Jet
Series II remains the standard against
which other laser printers must be juda. J.
—Alfred Poor
On paper, at least, the Kyocera F-1010 is
an exciting printer. For $3,695. you get a
list of features hard to find at twice the
price.
The F-1010, from Kyocera Unison, is
rated at 10 pages per minute; the PC Labs
speed test clocked it at a brisk 9.2 ppm.
The list of six emulated printers includes
output heavyweights such as the HP LaserJet Plus, Epson FX-80, and IBM Graphics
Printer—printers any software package
worth its salt should accommodate.
To top it all off, the F-1010 packs 36
resident fonts based on six typefaces, including Courier, Times Roman. Letter
Gothic, and Helvetica. You can also
download additional HP LaserJet or Kyocera fonts or generate your own with Kyocera’s Prescribe command language.
But the excitement fades a bit once you
get past the initial status sheet.
The F-1010 depends heavily on its emMAGAZINE ■
ulations. always operating under one of the
six it offers. The HP LaserJet Plus emulation passed the PC Labs emulation test
with flying colors, but some of the other
emulations appeared flawed.
The IBM Graphics Printer emulation
produced beautiful results during the PC
Labs emulation test but printed only one of
the three pages. The Epson FX-80 emulation consistently and mistakenly ejected a
page during the PC Labs emulation test.
If you've got time to bum and software
that lets you tinker with its printer definitions, you can probably solve these problems. But don’t expect much help from the
F-1010 documentation.
While some portions of Kyocera’s documentation are excellent, others leave you
flipping through the pages in vain, searching for additional information. The programming manual includes a chapter that
offers notes about each emulation and lists
command codes for each emulated printer. |
However, the 42-page section does a poor I
job of explaining what the codes mean or I
how they should be used. You get just i
enough information to realize that you
need to dig up a manual for the printer
you’re trying to emulate.
A chapter or two devoted to the particulars of using the F-1010 with each of the
major word processors would be a big
help. Kyocera reports that such a chapter is
in the works.
Besides the apparent emulation shortcomings, our evaluation unit suffered from
paper-handling problems. The single.
250-page feed tray kicked up slightly with
each page feed, and the feed mechanism
was noisy compared to most laser printers.
These oddities in themselves are not unforgivable. but the printer jammed frequently
when the feed tray got down to about 50
pages. A Kyocera representative said the
paper-jamming problem was unusual for
the F-1010.
The F- 1010’s C-shaped paper path
feeds pages facedown into a tray that holds
about 150 pages. You can feed envelopes
or odd-sized pages through a manual feed
slot above the feeder cartridge, but expect
a few creases in your envelopes if you do.
Getting the printer up and running is relatively easy and takes only about an hour,
thanks to Kyocera’s excellent installation
documenation.
NOVEMBER 10.1987
T_
I■
LASER PRINTERS
the manual, or both to keep track of the stallation. That process takes a while but is
various codes. The procedure is simple somehow fun, requiring you to push varienough but clumsy, requiring you to look ous levers and even use a rachet crank to
extract the foil covering from underneath
up too much information.
As you would expect from two printers the toner cartridge.
using the same engine, speed and print — The paper tray extends from the rightquality on the LaserPro Express and the hand side of the printer, and paper is colSilver Express are identical. The LaserPro lected in a well on the top. The input and
Silver Express is rated at the same 8 pages output trays are both rated for 150 sheets,
per minute as the Express, and it scored the which is a little on the light side compared with trays that can easily hold up to
same 7.4 ppm on the PC Labs speed test.
Text and graphics output is suitably dark 250 sheets. A manual paper-feed is also inand looks like it came from a good copier, cluded.
A S200 personality module is necessary
as is typical of laser printers.
On the Epson emulation in the PC Labs for using the Laserline 6 printer. This pergraphics test, the LaserPro Silver Express sonality module is a small unit that slides
into the back of the printer and defines the
also performed identically to the Express.
In both cases the Epson FX-80 graphics emulation capabilities and the interface. I
\ emulation mode worked with PC Labs tested the personality module with HP LaMX-80 graphics, not with FX-80 graphserJet Plus emulation (the only emulation
! ics. This small discrepancy is important to currently available) and a parallel port. A
; keep in mind when installing software for personality module with a serial port is
! the printer. The printer had no problem also .nailable.
with HP LaserJet Plus graphics emulation.
Tnc personality module comes with a
The Oasys LaserPro Silver Express of- handbook that describes the use of the HP
I fers a range of emulations, including HP LaserJet control sequences and contains
LaserJet Plus, and a choice of fonts. Like instructions on installing some popular
its little brother, it's a solid value. But its programs (WordStar 2000, 1-2-3. MicroS2.795 price tag puts it in competition with soft Word, and WordPerfect) for use with
a good number of heavyweights in the la- the Laserline 6. The manual is very good
ser arena. Stacked up against some of these and even includes an example of programmachines, the LaserPro Silver Express is ming graphics in BASIC.
not a printer you’ll get excited about—unAlso included with the personality
less you plan to use the Express command module is a disk of LaserControl software
language in your own software.
(a repackaged version of LaserControl 100
—M. David Stone
from Insight Development Corp.) and another excellent manual. Using a fullscreen display with a menu from which
you can configure the Okidata Laserline 6.
<
I iiserlintthis software provides emulation of the DiThe Okidata Laserline 6 is a nice deal. For ablo 630, NEC 3550, Qume Sprint 5. EpSi,995 (the cost of the basic laser printer son MX-80, and the IBM Graphics Printplus a personality module), you get Hew- er. Two versions of the program are
lett-Packard LaserJet Plus compatibility supplied: one is run from the DOS comwith more built-in fonts than the HP Lasermand level whenever you need it. and the
Jet—14-point Helvetica. 12-point Couri- other remains resident.
er, 10-point Times Roman, 8-point Times
Whichever version you run, the emulaRoman, and Line Printer. If you need tion software remains resident and transmore, the 5.8-page-per-minute Laserline 6
lates control sequences associated with
can accept HP LaserJet font cartridges or these other printers into HP LaserJet Plus
Okidata's own. The built-in fonts are satis- control sequences. This emulation helps
factory in appearance, and the print is solid out in a pinch, but you get much better reand black.
sults using the printer as a LaserJet comA setup guide provided with the Laser- patible, particularly for graphics. For exline 6 uses clear photographs—not confus- ample, the manual warns about losing the
ing diagrams—to lead you through the in- first couple of characters on each line be-
cause the emulation software attempts to
start at the left edge of the paper. This is a
nuisance. I would have preferred that the
emulation software compensate for this
problem.
I also looked at Okidata's multiuser
personality module. Costing $400 more
than the standard Laserline 6 personality
module but allowing three adjacent PCs to
be attached to one printer, this module
electronically switches among the three
printer ports and prevents the dangerous
surges that might be a problem with mechanical switches. If data is coming
through one of the ports, the module creates a not-ready status on the other two
ports. Only if data ceases to come through
a port for 15 seconds will the other two
ports again be polled for data.
The multiuser personality module
comes with three copies of the printer
handbook and three LaserControl software packages. The LaserControl disk
would be an excellent place for Okidata to
include a software print buffer.
As a printer-sharing device, the mul-
I
PC
MAGAZINE ■
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
213
Tfiddata LaaerMnet
Okidata Cotp.
532 FeUowritip Rd.
Mount Laurel. NJ 08054
(800)634-3282
Lht Price: Si ,995, including pcnonaldy
module; $400 far multiuser personality
module.
Dtaeariona 8IWD* M50M6.1 x 8Jin.
Weight: 37.8 k*.
la Start: Extra littorpdiaa Brrrlrwly
fonts, and easymMHttMfegMiaa aoAware—matattaS J^pMrtaMrptaMra
goad park agraLa gnat yirr.
CW&EttaONflEAOBiaPWCECaSP ,
Communications Committee Resolution For Newsletter Expense
Whereas ANC 3-C is interested in developing and distributing
a Newsletter to residents in the ANC
Therefore be it resolved that the Commission authorize an
amount of up to $
» for expenditure under the supervision
of the Communications Committee for the purpose of printing and
distributing an ANC 3-C newsletter.
\ w.
>, a-
g.V
'
"Hr*'
MEMO
December 11, 1987
TO:
Roger Burns
FROM:
Susan K. Straus
SUBJECT:
Newsletter
(_/
Printing and Distribution Cost Estimates
The following information may be helpful in determining the amount of money
the Commission will need to authorize for the printing and mailing of a
Newsletter:
Address Labels'for Residents in ANC 3-C
The Board of elections will provide address labels for all registered
voters in ANC 3-C (as of the fall 1987) for a fee of $50.00. The names and addresses c
be provided by zip code on Cheshire 4 up labels to accomodate the mailing house. Payme
is accepted in cash, certified check or money order only. The $50.00 payment
is required each time labels are provided. Production time is 48 hours after
the request is submitted. ANC 3-C has approximately 17,500 registered voters.
Printing / Mailing
Newsletter Services Inc. will print and mail the Newsletter. We provide
camera ready copy. They provide paper , bundle the mail for bulk mailing and
take it to the Post Office. From the time we give them the camera ready copy
to the time they take the mailing to the Post Office it should take 4 days.
This includes a blue line review by us (assuming no changes)
The cost for this service is based on 17,500 four page 8 l/2"x ll"newsletters
folded down to a size #10 envelop as a self mailer.
* Printing/folding
- GO
Mailing5
3
Paper
No Charge
Cjamera ready copy can be provided by Duplicate Impressions for an estaimated
price of $400.00. That fugure was without actually knowing the contents, number of pb
etc. Photos require * half tones which cost $10.00 each. Turnaround time for
the camera ready copy is two weeks. This anticipates prompt pick up when ready
and time for us to proof the galleys and make any needed corrections.
This does not
include time required to make any major .changes in the copy.
*Does not include prices for photos($9.50 each) or for screens($5.25 each).
Postage
ANC 3-C is entitled to mail as a non profit organization so long as it proves
to the Post Office its eligibilty for this status. To do this we need to submit
an application to the Post Office that includes an application form 3524, a letter
from the appropriate government agency attesting to our non profit status, a sample
of the piece we plan to mail and a copy of our bylaws in which there is some statememt
as to the disposition of our funds. To set up a bulk rate non profit account will
require a$50.00 application fee and a $50.00 bulk rate fee payable once a year.
In addition the ANC must pay for the mailing at the time it goes to the post office
or before. The bulk rate nonprofit cost per newletter will be 7.1 cents for us so
long as we meet zipcode quantity bulk rate rules (which we will so long as the mailing
house is properly instructed on how to bundle our mailing)..
Once we receive our non profit bulk permit number from the Post Office
we cna deposit the approximate amount we anticipate the mailing will cost into that
account so that when the mailing house delivers the mail to the Post Office it will
go through. The estimate on Postage for 17,500 pieces at 7.1 cents is $1242.50.
The permit number must be given to the typesetter so it can be printed on the self
mailer portion of the folded newsletter.
Summary of Newletter Costs:
Labels
Printing/Mailing/Sorting
Typeset
Nonprofit Bulk Permit
Postage
B. Kraft Editorial Services*
$
50.00
I'L'Jv-oo ***
400.00
100.00
1242.50
600.00
Total
*Already authorized by resolution at November regular Meeting.
Y6u*may want to introduce a resolution at tne UecemB*eTT"ZTP meeting to authorize
expenditures up to ^3Z-C6-Od
to permit staff work to move forward to
accomplish all the activity necessary to enable the ANC to put out its next
newsletter.
P.S.
cc:
Tyler Business Services who was used for the previous nesletters estimated
p<ri.nting.i.and-.type set only at $1175.00 with a reccommedation that we use
S & S mailing house for distribution. S & S estimates $470 for labels,
sacking and mailing.
All Commissioners
To: All Commissioners
From: Peggy
f
'
Your packet Is missing some Important documents:
1. Ruth called to say that she will have a report and a resolution
for the Monday meeting dealing with the Iona House Adult Day Care Program
at the Washington Home.
She regrets she was not able to have the material
ready in time for the distribution.
2. MINUTES!
Enclosed are the November minutes and summaries only. Phil
did not have the corrections to the Aug., Sept., and Oct. minutes ready
in time for Susan to redo them and include them in the distribution packet.
He promised to have them for her over the weekend. PLEASE NOTE:
it is
my intention, as my final act as Chair, to get all outstanding minutes
approved for 1987 — Phil or no Phil.
If corrections aren't ready in time
for her to have the minutes done by the Monday night meeting, I will
suggest that the Commission approve the version she has already prepared
for those months. Whatever version we get, we will need some time to read
them, so I will ask the Commission to defer approval of the minutes until
midway through the meeting, and suggest we take a 10-minute break, after
which we should reconvene and adopt the minutes for those 3 months.
I
hope this meets with your approval; it was the only way I could think of
to avoid having Susan come in to do 3 months of minutes over the weekend
and then go out on a second distribution.
She has been ready and willing
all this past month to make those corrections on the minutes. Thanks for
your indulgence.
I hope we can have a relatively brief (!) Dec. meeting, so I will ask
those reporting on events that do not require Commission action not to
give all the interim news, but just tell us the bottom line.
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
3 53
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J^ATA^IVS
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$ 53
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ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D C. 20008
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
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ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
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CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
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CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
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Treasurer's Report
Whereas AdvisoryNeighborhood Commission 3-C actively
supports historic preservation in the area served by the
.Commission a«ffa the District of Columbia;
THEREFpitE BE IT RESOLVED that Advisory Neighborhood Commission
3-C jflakes a contribution of $25 to support the program activity
of'the D.C. Preservation League.
m
$
h
Whereas Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C has evaluated the
scope of work required by its Treasurer and has determined that
the most efficient way to fulfill its monthly and quarterly
reporting obligations to the iDC Auditor, and to reconcile the
monthly bank statement is to lobtain the services of a qualifed
accountant;
*H A
Co
wy tS-i l >v\
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Treasurer of ANC 3-C is authorized
to engage the services of a bonified accountant at fee not to
i&eLudf a $150 month.
gX CA^<2-'
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ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
RESOULTION
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger IONA
Burns
HOUSE MEDICALLY SUPERVISED DAY
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Certificate of Need Application
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
CARE CENTER
87-3-4
WHEREAS:
the Iona House Day Health Center has been in operation at
3720 Upton Street N.W., Washington, D.C. since August 1986 in space
rented from the Washington Home as an adult day care center approved
"as a social model": and
WHEREAS
this
D.C. Office oh
imbursement in
party payments
program is funded in part through the
Aging, provision also is
made for individual reaccordance with abiltiy to pay, and.where available,from third
and;
WHEREAS:
the requirements of the D.C. Office of Health Care Financing
require Certificate of Need (CON) certification from the State Health
Planning and Development Agency (SHPDA) for approval as a Medicaid
Provider for re-imbursement from that agency, (see Letter of Intent dated
October 27, 1987 from Program Director)and;
WHEREAS:
under current SHPDA requirements Iona House must reapply for
its Certificate of Need as a Meducal Provider and reestablish community
support from the ANC; therefore
*
BE IT RESOLVED: that Adivsory Neighborhood Commission 3-C reaffirms
its earlier position in support of Iona House's application for a
therapeutic day care center for older adults as a needed facility in
this area of Northwest Washington.
\
WHEREAS: The Department of Public Works (DPW) has asked for comments on a
proposed traffic signal at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street
(Dec. 4, 1987 D.C. Register, Docket No. 87-265-TS); and
DRAFT
/
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-F has asked that the comment
period be extended until February 1, 1988; and
cl***)* A
(l)t*llCl
*
WHEREAS: This issue is of great importance to the constituents of ANC 3-C;
therefore
sls
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BE IT RESOLD BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That we raise the
following/concerns in connection with a signal at Upton and Wisconsin:
fY>*k-C no ci'n
CONCERN: DPW officials have stated repeatedly that the Department
would^tako-no e<H:-ion until after the 4000 Wisconsin Avenue building was /*> lJ)
opcrating-and both the Department, and the community (including the ANCs)
could see what traffic conditions^'exist and how they would be affected by
measures such as a signal. We endorse that policy and the Department
should hold to it.
/
eyOf r A. tc'Oty
Ct/i <4 o n | • J
CONCERN: We support and offer as our own the sentiment of ANC
3-F (per their letter of December 9, 1987) that substantial community
input is needed before the record closes on this rulemaking, and therefore
the public comment period should be extended until February 1, 1988.
This
is consistent with the Department's objections of fully understanding and
serving the community. Moreover, ANC 3-C specifically requests copies of any
correspondence from developers or tenants (or their agents) which requests
traffic signals or other changes in traffic controls in the vicinity of 4000
Wisconsin Avenue.
CONCERN: We have grave doubts about the efficacy of this signal.
We are deeply concerned about the probable and direct impact of the proposed
signalization: particularly the impact on residential Upton Street east of
Wisconsin Avenue, and generally the effect on other east-west streets in
the area.
The proposed signalization would appear to threaten the local
residential character of Upton, 37th, and 38th strreets, and that is
unacceptable to ANC 3-C and a dangerous precedent for other east-west
streets in the area.
DPW has not provided information in this regard^
Nor has it provided a description of the particular type of traffic signal
to be installed, we are thus asked to comment without a full understanding
of the implications and alternatives, if any, to the rulemaking.
Accordingly,
we hereby request a feasibility study by DPW dealing with these issues.
, i of wl
CONCERN: DPW should/hot proceed with any change in traffic operT»\ d t*j
ations until measures whicji simultaneously mitigate the impact on the
3?T-i
^neighborhood are^proposed<
Residents of Upton, Van Ness,^and 38th streets
are currently discussing proposals.
This process will be negatively
aggravated if DPW proceeds now solely with^t
,the traffic signal.
rv>if>v><-le>-a c.nJ.
CONCERN: Separate from simultaneous migation measures, ANC 3-C is
concerned about dealing in a ppaVo-"mothL manner with traffic "improvements"
connected with the worsening conditions in the Wisconsin/Van Ness area.
,'j.
Before closing the record on this docket, DPW^aadt inform ANCs,3-C, 3-E,~
and 3-F of the entire realm of changes under consideration and^liklihood
of adoption: street widenings, removal of curb parking, reversible lanes,
additional signals, stop signs, barriers, thru-truck“prohibitions, changes
in existing signals,cnanges in existing curb cuts, left turn signals/lanes, etc.
The scope of this request is Van Ness Street on the north, 37th Street on
the east, Porter Street on the south, and Nebraska Avenue on the west.
We also request an estimate of their cost.
CONCERN: The imposition of ^traffic signalsto facilitate commuter
traffic related to office buildings aonatpuotioa must be coupled with specific
and effective measures to^encourage public transit use as an alternative.
For example, if the developers^of 4000 Wisconsin are requesting this signal,
they should be required to offer Metro incentives as a trade-off.
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^yiSORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
^THEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
,737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON,
D.C.
20008
232-2232
ygie Member District Commissioners:
M-Cheryl Opacinch
ASam Friedman
0john A. Jenkins
jtfioger Burns
frPeggy Robin
*pnil Mendelson
jpatncia Wamsley
^Oavid Grinnell
j|Peter Espenschied
The following resolution
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
October 26, 1987
Regular Meeting
was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED: That the fourth quarter FY 87 quarterly report be approved
as submitted by the Treasurer.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote, with Commissioners Robin and Mendelson abstaining:
BE IT RESOLVED: That Peggy Robin be reimbursed $35.41 for Commissioner's
expense relating to the Glover Archbold Parkway case;
BE IT RESOLVED: That Phil Mendelson be reimbursed $101.03 for Commissioner's
expense relating to the Glover Archbold Parkway.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
WHEREAS: The owners of 2323 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. (WICAL LTD. Partnership)
have filed, or have announced an intention to file, for permission to build
a matter-of-right development on their site bordering on federal property;
and
WHEREAS: The National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC) is due to consider
a proposal calling for certain restrictions to be placed on matter-of-right
and PUD development located within 300 feet of the Naval Observatory;
therefore
BE IT RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C: That the Chairman, in consultation with the Planning & Zoning Committee, is authorized to send a letter to the D.C. Department
of Consumer & Regulatory Affairs (DCRA) requesting that any application for a
matter-of-right permit within 300 feet of the boundaries of the Naval Observatory be held until such time as the NCPC has reviewed the issue and acted
upon the proposed restrictions.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED: That the Planning and Zoning Committee of ANC 3-C is
hereby authorized to prepare, on behalf of this ANC and pursuant to ANC 3-C's
resolution of July 13, 1987, a submission to the Zoning Commission of all
'“aterials required by 11 DCMR 3013 in re. Case 86-26, for which 3-C is a co-
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
2
October 26,
1987
petitioner.
Such materials include, but are not limited to: an outline of
testimony, witness list of persons authorized to present testimony on behalf of ANC 3-C, estimation of time for presentation, information on property ownership, and lists of other materials, reports, maps, plans, or
documentation to be presented in support of the case; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C may delegate any portion of the responsibilities involved in preparation of this case to any authorized representatives of the co-petitioning organizations.
V. The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C has found it desirable to
prevent the demolition of the historic Macomb House at 3415 Massachusetts
Avenue; therefore it is
RESOLVED: That this Commission cosponsor an application for Historic Landmark
status for Macomb House, in conjunction with the Cathedral Heights/Cleveland
Park Citizens Association; and it is further
RESOLVED: That the Treasurer of the Commission is authorized to disburse
$325 toward the expenses of preparing and defending the application.
VI. The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
WHEREAS: The Department of Public Works (DPW) has published a proposed rule
in Docket No. 87-132-TS which would prohibit left turns from west-bound
Macomb Street onto southeast-bound Massachusetts Avenue; and
WHEREAS: The DPW turning movement study dated September 19, 1981 indicates
that this turn is infrequently performed during the most difficult period
(pm-peak); and
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C is not aware of an unusual
incidence of accidents at this intersection; and
WHEREAS: Motorists bound in-town from Macomb Street who are not familiar
with this intersection may be placed in difficulty by an unexpected leftturn prohibition, considering the lack of ready alternatives once the intersection is reached; therefore
BE IT RESOLVED: That the proposed left turn restriction should not be instated
and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That this recommendation be reconsidered if evidence
of an unusual incidence of accidents at the intersection of Massachusetts and
Macomb Street is made available.
xhe attached resolution concerning the temporary suspension of the Residential
Permit Parking system on the 3100 block of Macomb Street was adopted by unanimous voice vote.
cont'd.. . .
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
VIII.
- 3
October 26, 1987
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vot
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That it comment
unfavorably on Section 6 of the proposed District of Columbia Housing
Production Trust Fund Act (Council Bill 7-264). This section would
establish a too-vague District government policy for linked housing and
commercial development. The proposed policy would authorize zoning
changes based on financial payments and without specified standards.
Further, linkage by allowing off-site construction, would very likely
become a form of "spot zoning" and violative of the purpose and intent
of land-use zoning regulation.
IX.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vot
RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C authorizes up to $160 (or 20 hours) for the compilation
of a property owners list in the Woodley Park neighborhood to be notified in
Zoning Commission Case No. 86-26.
X.
The following resolution was adopted by majority voice vote
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That we support the
continuation of a full-service supermarket at 3427 Connecticut Avenue and
believe this use is very much in the interest of the communities we represent
Further, we encourage the consideration of economic incentive programs related to this business.
Phil Mendelson, Secretary
one attachment
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
01 -Cheryl Opacinch
02Sam Friedman
03John A. Jenkins
04Roger Burns
05Peggy Robin
06Phil Mendelson
07Patricia Wamsley
08David Grinnell
09Peter Espenschied
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
Regular Meeting
August 24, 19S7
Commi ssion
meeti ng
July 27,
I.
The
minutes
of held
the regular
19S7 were unanimously approved without corrections by voice vote.
II.
vote:
The -following resolution was a
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C that it
comment as -follows on BZA applications 14639 and 14666:
1. This ANC notes that the applicants in the two cases —
both involving variances in the same apartment building — are
different, and recommends that the BZA ensure that its
requirement under 11 DCMR 3316 be complied with fully,
2.
Otherwise, this ANC has
valet shop, or other service shops for residents as an adjunct in
an apartment house provided its operations are not found to be
offensive to the residents, and provided only the present
underground space, unsuitable for apartments, is used,
3. ANC 3-C opposes the granting of a special exception, in
Case 14639, to establish a.n office (.currently known a.s The
Sporicidin Company) at 4000 Massachusettee five. The use is
inappropriate, has been found to be objectionable to residents,
and is in no way adjunct or accessory to the apartment house. The
requested variance does not satisfy the public purpose of 11 DCMR
3107. Based on information and belief, the requested variance
appears to be an effort to stave off pending litigation and
enforcement by sanctioning an existing and unauthorized use. The
requested variance is not the result of difficulties or hardship
(unless self-imposed,1 and, if granted, would only impair the
intent, purpose, and integrity of the Zoning Regulations.
4. As a matter of principle, ANC 3-C opposes the granting of
any so-called "blanket exceptions" which would serve to convert
residential s p a c e t o c o rn m e r" c i a 1 u s e ,
III.
v o t e:
was adapted by
T
h e unanimous
f o 1 1 o w i n q rvoice
es o 1 u t
A
B E IT R E S G L V E D; T hi a t A d v i s o r y N e :i. g hi b o rhoo d C o m m i s s i o n 3 -- C
convey to the Office of Planning,, and other interested parties,
that the minimum required 30 day notice tor the consideration and
comment at proposals under the Large Tract Review process has not
been met by the Of Tice of Planning notice received by AIMC 3—C on
August 18, 1987 and therefore should be extended until September
29, 1937s and further, that ANC 3-C's longstanding position
regarding development on Square 2204 is that downzoning to C-2-A
is necessary. Additionally, the ANC 3-C Chairperson may delegate
to other Commssioners Qpancinch, Jenkins, Wamsley, Mendel son and
Friedman authority to represent ANC 3-C on this matter in
whatever manner maty be required. Further , ANC 3-C will hold a
Special Meeting on this issue no later that September 16, 1987.
IV.
The attached
by unanimous voice vote.
V.
vote:
resolution
The following resolution
in
support
of
Bil
was
adopted
by un
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That
inasmuch as this Commission objects strenuously to the paving of
" Glover Archbold Parkway", we therefore cannot comment favorably
on landscape plans that implicitly sanction the road.
(N.B. The
plans do not reflect the existing trees, which are a different
species from those proposed, suggesting the possibility that
these mature trees are to be removed.) ANC 3-C opposes any
further (alteration of the land that will increase the difficulty
and expense of restoring this land for park purposes. Further
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C believes it to be inappropriate
■for the Department of Public Works to proceed with this
landscaping plain (or with any other plans related to the
construction of this roadway) in light of pending legal appeals
and legislation in the Council of the District of Columbia
sponsored by two thirds of its members.
VI,
The attached
vote as submitted by the Treasurer.
VII,
vote:
Quarterly Report,
The following
resolution
was
adopt
was adopted
REE30LVED: That ANC 3-C hereby authorizes the expenditure of
up to $500.00 for the purpose of professional preparation and
representation in connection with an historic landmark
application by the McLean Gardens Condominium Association under
D.C. Law 2-144 far the stone wall fronting McLean Gardens along
W1 s c o n s i n A v e n u. e,
VIII,.
vote:
The Following resolution was adopted unanimously by voice
RESOLVEDTo authorise up to $500.00 -for advice by the Anne
Blaine Harrison Institute regarding vesting under the Zoning
Regulations, especially in relation to Large Tract Review.
ATTESTED".
Secertary
Attachements:
Resolution in support at
Bill 7-287
Quarterly Report (April - June,
1987)
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Mi nut es
Cheryl Opaclnch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia
Wamsley
I"
The meeting was called to
David Grinnell
The
following
Commissioners were
Peter Espenschied
Regular
Meeting
September
23,
1937
order
by tne Chair at S : 10 p . m .
presents Cam
r i eaman , Pat
Wamsley, Phil Mendelson,
David Grinnell,
Peter Espenscn ied,
ar.i
John Jenkins, Cheryl Dpacinch arrived at 8:20 p„m. F.cger
Bur n s
arrived at 3:30 p.m, A
quorum being present,
trie postin
5 of
i''1- cf tne meeting was verified. The first order of b usiness
consideration of minutes for the regular Commission meeting
August 24,
1937 and consideration of minutes for the Spe
ci ai
Commission meeting September la,
1987.
!ne
in a/
were
Special
minutes of ohe regular Commission
held over to the next meeting,, The
Commission
unanimously
by
meeting
voice
September
vote.(Summary
III.
meeting
mi nutss
1937
of
Actions.
approved
I)
Foru
Counci1 member Carol Scnwartz discussed her proposed bill
-i r: government compared to the bill proposed by Council
Chairman
bill and
hearing
Dave Clarke. She asked the Commission to support
her
to urge Council Chairman Clarke to schedule her bill f
promptly.
David Grinnell reported on the absence of
r el at i .ng to Pilbi=in Towers.
However , the Alban
association
IV.
V.
Item
Cornmunitv
eoiu.Ce
the
were
August
of the
is
continuing
Treasurer’s
end
A.
proposed
pursue
their
goals.
Report
Consideration of
of the meeting,
Committee
to
progress on issue
Towers tenanf s
the
Treasurer's
Report
was
deferred
to
Reports
Planni ng and Zoning
Cher y1 Opacinon presented
f x na1 comments on t he
development at 2631-41 Connecticut Ave, to be submitts
by 71 Me 3-C to the Office Of Planning under the Large Tract Fev:.
Process
After discussion of the efforts of she Planning arc" "
Zoning committee and others in the level comer. t of this reoort,
f.he conmI ss i on , by un ar. i mcus voi ce vot e „ ad ap t sd a r eso 1:j.11 cn c
submit the hep or t as o-eservted to the Office of Pi. anninc.
(sammary of
Actions.
Item 1.1 )
Phil Mendel son noted that in the future the Commission
should deal with the possible inconsistencies in its position in
support of various levels of zoning on the Wisconsin Avenue
corridor and the Connecticut Avenue corridor.
Charles Warr and John Jenkins reported on the status of
efforts related to street vending .at 3000 Conn. Ave. and the need
to intergrate the legal research with what has been done in the
Comprehensive Plan for vending policies. The Commission,, by
unanimous voice vote, adopted a resolution authorizing up to
$600.00 for legal research on this issue and quthorized John
Jenkins to represent the Commission's interests on this issue
before the Public Space Committee. (Summary of Actions, item III)
After extensive discussion on the information on vesting
already provided to ANC 3-C by the Harrison Institute, the
Commission, by majority voice vote, adopted a resolution
authorizing up to $600.00 for additional legal research tied to
specific ANC 3-C project concerns to be done by the Harrison
Institue under the direction of the Planning and Zoning
Cornmittee.Summary of Actions, Item IV)
Peter Espenschied reported on the status of neighborhood
efforts to oppose all five of the proposed options for a new
Swedish Embassy office complex on Massachusets Ave, The
Commission, By unanimous voice vote, adopted a resolution to send
a letter to the Swedish Ambassador expressing ANC 3-C's qrave
concerns about the proposed office complex. (Summary of Actions,
I tern VI)
Charles Warr reported on the Benin Case. The BZA decision not
to approve a broadcast facility in the back yard of the Benin
Embassy has been appealed by the Embassy. Charles Warr will
continue to keep the Commission informed of activity related to
this issue,
Phil Mendel son reported on the efforts to transfer
ownership of Glover Archbold Parkway to the National Park Service
and on the two letters from the Park Service to the B.C, City
Council stating the Park Service's changing positions on the
transfer. ANC 3—C will continue to support the transfer to the
Park Service.
Charles Warr reported on downzoning on Connecticut Avenue
and Wisconsin Avenue. The Connecticut Avenue downzoning case
before the zoning Commission has been postponed unti1 Qctober 1„
The Office of Planning will report on the Connecticut Avenue
Corridor Study on Septemben 3o.
On the Wisconsin Avenue issue ANC 3-C has requested
d o w nooning for t h e M u r p h y' s / G l a n t lot, N o decision In a s been in a d e
by the Zoning Commission on that request.
The Chair reported on the progress to save the Safeway
The petition garnered over 6000 names., The Mayor will hold
conference on September 29 in front of the Safeway to,show
support to beep the supermarket. Peggy Robin introduced a
resolution in support of The Supermarket Tai; Incentive Act
1987" (Bill 7-124). The resolution was seconded and after
amendment was adopted by unanimous voice vote. (Summary of
Actions,, Item V)
store,,
a news
his
of
Pat Wamsley reported that at 4000 Massachusett.es Ave, the
physician whose use of residential space for commercial purposes
was the basis of citizen concern at that address, has moved to
Maryland making this issue moot. More BZA cases for other
commercial uses in the building are now pending,
Sam Friedman reported on the Ta.ft Bridge article in the
Washington Times.
B.
Transportation
Charles Warr reported on the proposed stop sign at 36th
and Ordway Streets.
The Commission adopted a resolution by
unanimous voice vote not to object to the placement of the stopsign. (Summary of Actions,, Item VII)
After discussion of a proposed rulemaking prohibiting a
left turn from Macomb Street on to Massachu.settes Ave, - - -about
which the AMC has received no information - — — the Commission by
unanimous voice vote adopted a resolution requesting the
Department of Public Worksto hold off with the rulemaking until
the Commission has had an opportunity to review the issue,
(Summary of Actions, Item VIII)
Charles Warr reported on the question of whether or not a
stop sign would be appropriate at Upton Street. The
Transportation Committee will take the issue under advisement,
John Jenkins reported the Commission has received written
confirmation of the agreement reached in negotiations with the
City over the scope of reconstruction of Cleveland Ave: that
there will be no widening of the Avenue.
C. Crime and Safety
Cheryl Qpacinch reported on neighborhood meetings in the
Woodley Park area about, bug 1 ary prevention.
D. Historic Preservation and Landmarks
Roger Burns reported on the problems of keeping the owner
of the Uptown Cafe (Connecticut and Ordway) within the rules
governing the Cleveland Park Historic District.
VI „ Con si der a.t i on of B i 1 1 7-24S
T h e C o m mission r e s u rn e d disc u s s i a n o f C a u n c i. 1 m e m b e r S c h w a r t z s
b :L 1 1 7--248 n ftf t er discussi on of t.he :i ssues, the Cammi ssi an
adopted a resolution by majority voice vote urging the Chairman
of the City Council to set the bill tor hearing at an early
date. (Summary of Actions, Item IX)
Treasurer ■’ s report
Scam Friedman continued the Treasurer’s report. The
Commission adopted resolutions authorising! (1) payment of office
expenses that exceeded the $250.00 per month allowed by the By
Laws 8< Rules, (2) payment to
The Mitchie Company for the 1987
Replacement Volume 9 of the D„C. Code, (3) stop payment and
reissue of a lost check to IBM for the 1986-1987 typewriter
service agreement, (4) payment to IBM of $436.00 for renewal of
the typewriter service agreement for the period October 1, 1987
to September 30, 1989, (5) payment to Phil Mendelson to reimburse
$86.98 for miscellaneous expenses related to land use issues on
Wisconsin Avenue.(Summary of Actions, Item X)
VII.
VI.
The meeting was adjourned at 11:10 p.m.
Sumitted by:
Susan K.
Approved By:
Secretary
Straus
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
Regul a.r Meet i ng
September 28, 1987
I.
The
minutes held
of the special
Commission meeting
September 16, 1987 were approved unanimously, without correction
by voice vote.
II.
The attached report to th
proposed development at 2631-41 Connecticut Avenue was adopted as
submitted by unanimous voice vote.
III.
vote:
The following resolutio
WHEREAS the D. C, Public Space Committee (the Committee)
has requested that the community provide at study on the impact of
the Urban Design Project proposed for 3000 Connecticut Avenue on
street vending, and will not proceed to take up the neccessary
permit request until such a study has been submitted, and
WHEREAS
the Woodley Park Community Association has agreed
to perform this study and has assembled volunteers to provide the
Committee with an appropriate presentation, and
WHEREAS Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3—C has previously
expressed its support for this Urban Design Project, and
WHEREAS considerable legal analysis of the D.C. Municipal
Regulations concerning vending is required to reach an proper
understanding of vending impact,, for which contributions total! no
$600 have already been raised by the community, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED That ANC 3—C authorizes up to
legal research on D.C. vena ing regulations by the
Harrison Institute for Public Law, and further au.
Jenkins to present the ANC’s position to the D.C.
Committee.
$ 6 0 < J „ 0 (f o r
Ann Blaine
horizes John
Public Space
%
V
'I
V.
The attached resolution
u n a n .i. rn o u s v o i c e v o t e .
VI.
vote:
supporting
The
Bill
7-12 4 was
following
adopted by
resolution
was
adopted
by u
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C send a letter to the Swedish
Ambassador expressing ANC 3-C;,s grave concern regarding the
proposed office building project at 3415 Massachusetts Avenue
N.W„
VII.
vote:
The -following resolution
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C has no objection
signs at 36th and Ordway Streets N.W„
VIII.
vote:
the following
was adopted
to 4-way
by
stop
resolution
was
adopted
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That
the Department of Public Works not proceed with the proposed
rulemaking (published in the August 21,, 19S7 D.C. Reg i steer)
prohibiting left turns from Macomb to Massachusetts Avenue until
this ANC has been provided with neccessary information and given
an opportunity to comment meaningfully.
IX.
The following
resolution
was adopted
WHEREAS This ANC shares the city-wide concern over the many
instances of corruption and mismanagement in the Executive Branch
of the D.C. government; and
WHEREAS This ANC believes that the "Anti-Corruption and
Fraud Act of 1987" introduced by Counci I member Schwarts as Bill
7-248, offers a significant possibility of reducing the level of
corruption and mismanagement; therefore
E-iE IT RESOLVED That this
Chairman to set this Bill for
ANC urges the Council and
hearing at an early date.
its
by
A.
The tol .1 owing resolution was adopted by majority voice? vote.
Phil Mendel son not voting on the question of his rei mb ur see merit„
BE IT RESOLVED That the? Treasurer is authorised to pay the?
■following office expenses in excess of the $250. oo per month
allowed by the BYLAWS 0 RULES for the month of September 1987:
$23.52 Northwest Office Supplies - Of f i ce Supp1i es
10 7„3A Duplicate Impressions
Offices Stationery
30.53 C & P Telephone
37.00 Cannon
Toner
75.00 Adam Vogt
Posting Meeting Notice
50.00 D.C Postmaster
Stamps
20.36 Northwest Office Supplies
Office Supplies
$342.77 TOTAL
BE IT RESOLVED That the treasurer is authorized to pay
invoices to The Mi chi e Company for the 19E!7 Replacement Volume 9
of the D.C.Code in the amount of $52.64 including postage and
handling; Further
BE IT RESOLVED That the Treasurer be authorized to stop
payment on check number 483 issued to IE*M for a typewriter
service contract from 10/1/86 - 9/30/37 for the amount of
$375.00, and write a new check for the same services, time period
and amount; Also
BE IT RESOLVED That $436.00 be authorized for a new service
contract on typewriter with IBM for the time period 10/1/87 thru
9/30/39; Also
BE IT RESOLVED That Phil Mendelson be reimbursed $86,98 for
mi seel 1eneous expenses related to land use issues on Wisconsin
Avenue.
ATTEST:
Secretary
Attachments:
Incenti vc?)
Report to Office of Planning re 2631-41 Conn.Ave.
Resolution Supporting Bill 7-124 (Supermarket Tax
. ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
^GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
Mi nutes
Regul ar
October
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
WOODLEY PARK
Meet:mg
2s,
193'
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam
I.
TheFriedman
meeting was called to order by the Chair at S
John A. Jenkins
Roger
Burns Commissioners were present::
following
Cheryl Opacinch
Peggy
Robin Wamsley,
Robin, Pat
Sam Friedman,, David Grinnel .
{
Phil Mendelson
■ Arr
3: 15 p ,m„
- . . . Mendelson, John Jenkins and Roger
were Phil
Patricia
Wamsley
David
Grinnell
Peter E
Ei'penschei d arrived at 9:10 p.m. A quorum being
Peter Espenschied
posting
™
o
notice
of
the
II.
meeting
was
10
Capitol
Planning
Commission
present
=
-
2S
at
— ■
2615
- ■ ■ —
th
verified.
meeting.
WICAL
the agenda. Peggy Robin will attend and represent
position,
ihe regular meeting of the Woodley Park
Association on October
also announced.
Th
i vi ng at
Burns,)
Hnnouncement
National
p.m.
Peggy
- • — — — * — 7
Woodley
»
I
Place
was
will
made
be
of
on
ANC 3-C's
Citizen’s
r*.
W J.
at
1— J.
B::00
cr! I
p.m.
was
III. Minutes of August 24 and September 23 meetir.as were deferred
until after Susan Straus and F'hil Mendelson have a conference on
the prcceedurt; to follow in taking and reporting minutes.
IV.
she
Community
Forum
Flossie Lee7 s
did not attend
V.
iasurer's
scheduled apprearance
the meeting.
was
discussed.
However,
Report
Sam Freidman presented the fourth quarter FY 37 quarterlyreport. There being no questions, Phil Mendelson moved adoption
of the report. After a second, the report was adopted by
unanimous voice vote. (Summary of Actions,,
Item I.)
The Treasurer requested a Budget Committee meeting. The Cha:
suggested it address administrative eitpediture matters.
A date
was agreed to and the meeting was set for November 2 ah Pat
Wamsley’s home at 3:00 p.m. The Treasurer suggested Commissioner
come
with
suggestions
for
Commission
activities.
The
Chair
sugqested housekeeping issues also be discussed,,
A resolution was presented to- reimburse Commissioners
out-of-pocket expenses. The
voice vote with Peggy Robin
resolution was passed
and F'hil Mendelson
abstaining, (Summary of
A request from the
Actions,,
Item II)
Alice Deal Junior
$T'60
purchasing
High
tv
for
majoritv
h oo 1 P . T „ A
■ '_■!
:• e e n m a c e t n
o the
ANC. As a general rule the ANC does not n u p p o r t s c h o o 1 e q u i p m e n
needs. John Jenkins will take the lead on getting more
i n form at i on and r epert on t h *
n< : u r e
he request at the next
meet i ng.
ter
The
assistance
. nai r
in
reported
that
the
a
piano
Gu r
5
has
per market
organic a
i.
I
on
has raised -funds from other sources and would like to use the
■funds from ANC 3—C for communication efforts (printing; and a.
block party. If the Commissioners preferred., the funds could be
returned
Rut h Hauqen suggested a community f 1 yer e;: p 1 ai ni ng what
had occurred in the efforts to keep a supermarket on the site
could be at good use for the funds. The discussion brought out
that use of the funds for a block party would be inconsistent
with the guidelines for ANC funding.
The sense of the Commission
was to leave the money with the organisation for use in
cornmun icati ons.
The Treasurer read the Biannual Audit Report of ANC 3-C to
the Commissioners in which D.C. Auditor Otis Troupe praised ANC
3-C’s bookkeeping but reccommended the Treasurer keep running
monthly balances in the future.
VI.
Committee Reports
A.
Planning And Zoning
The Chair reported on the Save Our Supermarket situation.
The Shirazi brothers, who operate the Brookville Market in
Maryland have bid to buy the Safeway site. There are legal
proceedures to be completed with one of the owner-’s conservators
who needs evidence that the Shirazi brothers are appropriate
purchaser,, The Shirazi brothers are also looking for support -from
the community in their effort to obtain an SBA low interest loan
or a HUE' block grant to reduce their buy-in costs.
The Chair offered a resolution, seconded by Roger Burns,
whereby ANC 3-C would support the efforts of the Shirazi brothers
to obtain HUB or SBA support. Discussion followed. It was
suggested the resolution be amended to authorize the Chair to
send a letter to the brothers that they could then use in their
applications to SBA or HUD. The matter was tabled until the end
of the meeting at Phil Mendel son’s suggestion.
ANC 3-B requested ANC 3-C to support their position on
WICAL. A resolution to that effect was offered by the Chair with
seconds by Cheryl Qpacinch and Phil Mendel son. The resolution was
adopted by unanimous voice vote. Peggy Robin will write the
letter. (Summary of Actions, Item III.)
The Chair reported the Cleveland Park Post Office’s lea.se
ends on June 30, 198S. The company managing the property is
inviting potential lessees to view the property. The Post Office
plans to renew. It. appears the management company is testing the
waters on behalf of the owner, Nick Kotz. Peggy Robin is opening
lines of communication with the owner to track this. The Save Our
Supermarket organization is expected to stay interested in this
al so.
Phil Mendel son reported on Glover Archbold Parkway, 4000 and
4100 Wisconsin Ave. A hearing was held for six hours the paist
Tuesday by the Committee of the Whole of the D.C. Council.
Proponents of th'e bill to transfer control to the Park Service
spoke. The Secretary of Interior’s Office said the Park Service
does n o t w a n t t h e transfer.. P r i v a. t. e 1 y , t h e P a r k Ei e r v ice h a s
indicated it does want the land. The issue now relys on political
maneuvering. Twenty-Two ANC’s have supported the bill. John
Jertki ns suggested seeking to bring pressure an the Interior
D e p a r t m e n t. t h r o u. g h t t h e c o n q r e s s i o n a 1 a v e r s 1 q h t c a rn m 111 e e S T h e
only thing the developer is will i ng to negotiate i s the PEPCO
land. Phil Mendel son will continue to work on this project,,
On 4000 Wisconsin Avenue the legal appeals are proceeding.
The crimi na1 charqes at 4000 invo1ving Peggy Rob in and Peter
Espenscheid have a court date ot November IS. On 4100 Wisconsin
Avenue the Office of Planning extended thee Large Tract Review
process to November &. The Mayor's Office is now looking at the
issues surrounding 4:1.00 Wisconsin.
A Tregaron development proposal was reported by the Chair. It
calls for 35 single family homes sited similarly to the PUD
scheme ANC 3-C disapproved. As a matter of right it would only go
through the Historic Preservation review process.. Residents have
requested more information from the potential purchaser (Mr.
Shelly Blitz) who will get back to the group. Peggy Robin will
fo 11 ow the issue„
The Chair introduced the concerns of ANC 2--B in their
comments on the housing linkage proposal now before the City
Council in Bill 7-264. Discussion on the topic was deferred to a
later time in the meeting.
The Chair reported ANC 3-C was notified on October 20 that
all testimony on the Connecticut Avenue zoning case must be
prepared and submitted by November 19 including a list of
witnesses, maps, estimates of time required, and a lists of
affected property owners. The Chair offered a resolution
empowereing the Planning and Zoning Committee? to follow up with
preparation of materials. The resolution was amended to indicate
the ANC s position as outlined by former resolutions. The Chair
suggested coordination with other interested groups. Cheryl
Qpacinch will take the lead on this project. A planning and
Zoning Committee meeting was set for November 9 to which specific
leaders, e.g. Tersh Boasberg, and a list of identified witnesses
and the basic topics to be covered in testimony will be brought.
The question of expert testimony will be taken up at the Planning
and Zoning Committee meeting. Proir to November 9, several
Commissioners will try to have a preliminary luncheon meeting to
examine the issues. The resolution, as amended, was adopted by
unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item IV)
Charles Warr reported on issues pending before the Zoning
Commission relating t.o chancery expansion outside overlay areas.
The Chair requested from Charles information on the Zoning
Commission's emergency action on vesting. Charles reported the
Zoning Commission did set down an emergency rule requiring that
DCRA must have in hand all items required to issue a permit
before vesting occurs.
VII.
John Pressley, the new ANC 1iason from the Mayor's Office
was introduced to the Commissioners. He disscu.ssed various
initiatives by the Mayor to support the role of the ANC's.
VIII. Committee Reports (continued)
B. Historic Preservation and Landmarks
Pet er Esp en sc h i ed i n troduced a. r eso I u11 o\i t h at ANC "3-C
co—sponsor an -ipp 1 i c at i on for historic landmark status for Macomb
Ho Lice (3415 Massachusetts Ave) and that the Commission authorize
'5250.. Oh
to be used for expenses required to prepare and defend
h
a p p 1 i c a t. J. c; n .. A f t e r d i s c u s s i o n . t h e r e s I u t :L o n w a s a m e n d e d t o
incl u d e t i i e C a t h e d r a 1 H e i g h t. s C i t i 2 e n s ■’ A ssociation as a
co-sponsor with AMC 3—C and to authorise up to $325»00 to defray
$325.00 costs -associated with the project. Time is critical in
o b t a ini n g hist o r i c I a n d in a r k s t a t u s for the in a n s i o n . K a t h 1 e is n W o d
is the architectural historian who is already preparing the
initial application. The Swedish Embassy will not close on the
property until they have all necessary permits and engineering
studies are completed. However., Cape Verde (the current owner)
could demolish the Macomb House on short notice. The adoption of '
the resolution was seconded by Peggy Robin and passed by
unanimous voice vote with instructions to Peter to imforin the
Citizens’ Association that the authorization is meant to be
matching funds.(Summary of Actions. Item V)
<=:
a
a
C. Transportation
Charies Warr reported on traffic measurements for Upton
Street which were considered at the Transportation Committee
meeting. The Committee determined to defer any proposal to ANC
3-C until greater Community input has been digested and the
Committee has the opportunity to develop full rsccommendations.
Phil Mendel son mentioned several options discussed
which
included erection of barriiers.
The proposed no left turn at Macomb Street at Massachusetts
Avenue was discussed. Phil Mendel son moved the Transportation
Committee's resolution to oppose the restriction. The resolution
was adopted by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions. Item VI)
Charies Warr reported on the transportation aspects of the
Connecticut Avenue Study and its failure to include key traffic
assumptions related to the hotels and the Zoo. These failures
need to be pointed out to the Zoning Commission. The serious
omissions create an unrealisticly optimistic low traffic volume
estimate. The Chair suggested an outline of these observations be
included in the submission to the Zoning Commission on November
19. With regard to hiring a traffic expert Charles Warr suggested
he would testify and would have an expert to support him. He
suggested the titizens's associations of Cleveland Park and
Woodley Park share the expert for the report. Charles will
oversee the substantive effort. The Commissioners supported
Charles' approach.
The Chair brought up the issue of Bill 7—100 which was
previously referred to the Transportation Committee. Phil
Mendelson commented on what is going on in that regard. He will
collec t comment s f or submi ssi on.
A Residentai1 Permit Parking resolution was introduced by the
Chair regarding proposed suspension! of RPP on Macomb Street in
front of the Washington International School. Peggy Robin
reported on the limits she had identified on where the RPP will
be removed. Pat Warns ley' seconded the resolution which was passed
by unanimous voice vote. (Summary of Actions. Item VI I)
D.
Housing
R o g e r 8 u r n s r e p o r 1: e d o
a >: t i v i n i e s 3. t t h e B e r k s h J. r e
Apai'"tment.s where tenan La are prot.est.:i. riq the pass -!:.hr oug'n of costs
a hi i. q h e r r e n t s f o r w o r k i n t h e ta u I i d i n q s t o r e m o v o
r e m o d e 1 k i t c h e n <3H e a r i n g s h a v e b e e n r e o p e n e d o n t h e rent
increases. Sam Friedman raised the question of civil r i g h t s
i n f r a c 1 o n is b y t h e 1 a n d 1 a r d t
Fait Warns ley reported a League for Urban Land C onservati on
meeting on urban land use is set for November 12 at the Capitol
Hill Presbyterian Church to look at the way land is taxed.
Printed material from the workshop is available and can be
purchased for the ANC office.
11
•/1
.1
F£. Planning and Z o n i n g (Con t i n u e d )
Discussion resumed on two resolutions offered by Roger
Burns on the question of Linkage in Bill 7—264..
After extended
discussion Roger withdrew one resolution endorsing the bill in
general with reservations about the linkage section. Phil
Mendel son moved adoption of the remaining resolution
which is
limited to expressing ANC 3—C:‘s specific disapproval of the
specific section of the bill addressing linkage. The resolution
was adopted by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item
VIII)
Discussion turned to the need to complete staff work
researching property owner names in Woodley Park in time for the
submission to the Zoning Commission November 19. In the event
additional resources are needed the Commission adopted a
resolution authorising up to $16d„o0 to be spent to compile the
names for the submission.(Summary of Actions, Item IX)
Discussion resumed on the question of ANC 3—C support for
the Shirazi brothers. Phil Mendel son introduced a resolution,
expressing ANC 3—C^s support for a supermarket in the area, which
the Chair could include in letters that can be sent to the
Shirazi brothers, SBA or HUD. The resolution was passed by
majority voice vote.(Summary of Action, Item X)
IX.
X.
SMD Reports
None
There being no other business,
11:10p.m.
Sub it. ted by:
Approved by:
Susan K,
Straus
the meeting was adjourned at
Mi nutes
Requl ar Meet.i n g
October 26, 1987
I.
The meeting was called to order by the Chair at 8:10 p.m. The
•following Commissioners were present; Cheryl Opacinch, Peggy
Ftobin, Pat Wamsley, Sam Friedman, David Grinnel. ( Arriving at
8; 15 p.m. were F"' h i 1 Mendel son, John Jenkins and Roger Burns.)
Peter Espenscheid arrived at. 9; 10 p.m. A quorum being present the
posting of notice of the meeting was verified.
II.
Announcement was made of the November 5th meeting of the
National Capitol Planning Commission meeting. WI CAL. will be on
the agenda. Peggy Robin will attend and represent ANC 3-0’s
position. The regular meeting of the Woodley Park Citizen's
Association on October 28 at 2615 Woodley Place at 8:00 p.m. was
also announced.
III. Minutes of August 24 and September 28 meetings were deferred
until after Susan Straus and Phil Mendel son have a conference on
the proceedure to follow in taking and reporting minutes.
IV.
Community Forum
Flossie Lee's scheduled apprearance was discussed.
she did not attend the meeting.
V.
However,
Treasurer's Report
Sam Freidman presented the fourth quarter FY 87 quarterly
report. There being no questions, Phil Mendel son moved adoption
of the report. After a second, the report was adopted by
unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item I.)
The Treasurer requested a Budget Committee meeting. The Chairsuggested it address administrative expediture matters.
A date
was agreed to and the meeting was set for November 2 at Pat
Wamsley's home at 8:00 p.m. The Treasurer suggested Commissioners
come with suggestions for Commission activities. The Chair
suggested housekeepring issues also be discussed,
A resolution was presented to reimburse Commissioners for
out-of-pocket expenses. The resolution was passed by majority
voice vote with Peggy Robin and Phil Mendel son
abstai n i ng. (Summar y of Actions, Item II)
A request from the Alice Deal Junior High School P.T.A.
for
$960 for assistance in purchasing a piano has been made to the
ANC. As a general rule the ANC does not' support school equipment
needs. John Jenkins will take the lead on getting more
information and report on the nature of the request at the next
meet, i ng.
The Chair reported that the Save Our Supermarket organization
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
Regular Meeting
August 24, 1987
I.
The minutes of the regular Commissi
1987 were unanimously approved without corrections by voice vote.
II.
vote:
The following resolution was ado
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C that it
comment as follows on B2A aippl i cati ons 14639 and 14666:
1. This ANC notes that the applicants in the two cases —
both involving variances in the same apartment building — are
different, and recommends that the BZA ensure that its
requirement under 11 DCMR 3316 be complied with fully,
2.
Otherwise, this ANC ha-is n
valet shop,' or other service shops for residents as an adjunct in
an apartment house provided its operations are not found to be
offensive to the residents, and provided only the present
underground space, unsuitable for apartments, is used.
3, ANC 3-C opposes the granting of a special exception, in
Case 14639, to establish an office (currently known as The
Sporicidin Company) at 4000 Massachusettes Ave. The use is
inappropriate, has been found to be objectionable to residents,
and is in no way sidjunct or accessory to the apartment house. The
requested variance does not satisfy the public purpose of 11 DCMR
3107. Based on information and belief, the requested variance
appears to be an effort to stave off pending litigation and
enforcement by sanctioning an existing and unauthorized use. The
requested variance is not the result of difficulties or hardship
(unless self-imposed) and, if granted, would only impair the
intent, purpose, and integrity of the Zoning Regulations.
4. As a matter of principle, ANC 3-C opposes the granting of
any so-called "blanket exceptions" which would serve to convert
residential s p a c e t o c o m m e r c: i a 1 u s e.
III.
vote:
The following resolution
VOl Ce
was a
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
Oft
V
WOODLEY PARK
RESOLUTION o£ appreciation to Mayor Barry
for his continuing involvement in the SAFEWAY issue
{ PLEASE NOTE:
I will be taking a poll by telephone of the Commissioners
to see if there is any major problem with this resolution.
I will move this resolution ONLY IF it is clear beforehand that
it will pass. I don't want to have a PUBLIC discussion of this
resolution that would end with a negative conclusion.
WHEREAS Mayor Marion Barry has performed an invaluable
service in working to solve the problem of the closing
of the Safeway at 3427 Connecticut Ave. NW, and
WHEREAS our community continues to need help in ensuring that
our neighborhood will be served by a grocery store, and
Mayor Marion Barry continues to play an important role in
every aspect of this issue where he is needed,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that ANC-3C expresses its appreciation
and gratitude to Mayor Marion Barry for the attention and
effort he has devoted to this vital issue.
(T
Susan
%)
Agenda items for our meeting:
a
/V
Under Planning and Zoning:
1.
Update on Connecticut Avenue Corridor Study Hearings Before the
Zoning Commission
Crime and Safety:
Please call Mike Manglitz at the 2nd District (if he's not in ask
for Marty Clarke) and ask that he have Crime Report available for
us.
It could be left for us at the Desk or he could have someone
bring it to you.
(Marty is a "she").
And:
Wherever on the agenda Peggy thinks or you think it best fits:
Office Computer Equipment
(If anyone —was it John Jenkins??— has gotten information about a
copier, it could all appear under Office Equipment as a topic.)
Also, I will have a request for funds for Woodley Park's presentation
under Connecticut Avenue Corridor Study - Zoning Hearings Preparation
Please alert members. We will need to hire some consultant expertise
in at least one area —namely, to prepare schematics of the blocks in
question as they now appear and could appear if zoning isn't changed,
or if PUD's are allowed.
I would like, authorization to spend up to
$2,000 dollars for expenses related to this, but will spend only what
is absolutely necessary. Further, Woodley Park has already earmarked
a similar amount.
Thank you.
Cheryl
(232-4338)
Oc/ ~2~&
transportation -
27
resolution re. Residential Permit Parking (RPP) on Macomb St.
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C submit the following comments to the Residential
Permit Parking Office as its official advice regarding the temporary suspension
of the Residential Permit Parking system (RPP) on the 3100 block of Macomb St., NW.
The Washington International School (WIS), located at 3100 Macomb Street,
has requested the suspension to accomodate cars that can no longer be
parked on site due to construction currently underway for a new parking
lot and academic building. ANC 3-C has supported this construction, and
understands that some disruption of neighborhood parking patterns is to be
expected. Therefore ANC 3-C supports the WIS request, but with the
following understanding:
1.
During the construction period WIS will atempt to find as much
on-site parking for employees’ cars as possible.
2.
The need for non-RPP parking is expected to end sometime in the
late summer or fall of 1988. Upon notification by WIS that the
suspension is no longer needed, the RPP office will automatically
reinstitute the RPP program. No new petition by Macomb Street
residents will be required.
3.
The extent of the RPP suspension is to be from the western property
line of 3030 Macomb Street to the eastern property line on the
Macomb Street side of the Twin Oaks Estate (3225 Woodley Rd, NW),
on the south side of the block only. RPP will remain in effect
on the north side, and on the south side to the east and west of
the segment described.
ANC 3-C is in receipt of a letter (attached) from WIS agreeing that the
suspension shall be in effect as outlined above.
*
Commissioners please note: Dr. .Brandt, Headmaster of WIS, promised
me a letter on Thursday afternoon, but I doubt if he'll have gotten
it to me by our meeting on MOnday.
If we pass this res. Monday night,
I'll hold off on sending out the resolution until such time as we
have received a statisfactory written understanding from WIS on
the boundaries and temporary nature of the suspension.
SHERATON LOADING DOCK RESOLUTION
WHEREAS the Sheraton Washington Hotel (Hotel) has repeatedly
violated District of Columbia Zoning Regulations regarding the
use of its loading dock and parking spaces, and
WHEREAS the Hotel was formally advised by the District of
Columbia by letter dated December 30, 1986 "...that in October,
1986, you used the subject areas in violation of the D.C. Zoning
Regulations...", and
WHEREAS the Hotel was further advised by the District of Columbia
on December 30, 1986 "...that any future use of the subject
premises in violation of the D.C. Zoning Regulations will result
in the matter being referred for appropriate enforcement action
without further notice...", and
WHEREAS Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C (ANC 3-C) concurs
with the findings and conclusions of the District of Columbia in
the above cited letter of December 30, 1986, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C had requested by letter dated August 25, 1987
that zoning inspections for similar violations be made on October
12, 13 and 14, 1987, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C has received reports and evidence which indicate
that subsequent violations of the type cited by the District of
Columbia on December 30, 1986 have occurred, and
WHEREAS regulations and a schedule of fines for implementing the
Civil Infractions Act of 1985 were published in the DC Register
as a Final Rule on September 4, 1987 -and became effective at that
time, and
WHEREAS any similar proven violations occurring after the above
cited December 30, 1986 notice would be regarded by ANC 3-C as
"flagrant ...or willful conduct" within the meaning of DCMR
1200.1, and as a new offense on each day that such a violation
continued, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C regards the above cited December 30, 1986 letter
as official notice of a first offense within the meaning of DCMR
1200.1, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED by Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C that a
Notice of Infraction (NOI) be issued to and served upon the
Sheraton Washington Hotel for a Class 2 infraction, and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the scope of this NOI should
encompass possible offenses on all of the dates referred to by
ANC 3-C (including but not limited to October 12, 13 and 14,
1987) and all other evidence attached herewith as well as any
evidence produced by on-site zoning investigations.
SHERATON LOADING DOCK RESOLUTION
WHEREAS the Sheraton Washington Hotel (Hotel) has repeatedly
violated District of Columbia Zoning Regulations regarding the
use of its loading dock and parking spaces, and
WHEREAS the Hotel was formally advised by the District of
Columbia by letter dated December 30, 1986 "...that in October,
1986, you used the subject areas in violation of the D.C. Zoning
Regulations...", and
WHEREAS the Hotel was further advised by the District of Columbia
on December 30, 1986 "...that any future use of the subject
premises in violation of the D.C. Zoning Regulations will result
in the matter being referred for appropriate enforcement action
without further notice...", and
WHEREAS Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C (ANC 3-C) concurs
with the findings and conclusions of the District of Columbia in
the above cited letter of December 30, 1986, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C had requested by letter dated August 25, 1987
that zoning inspections for similar violations be made on October
12, 13 and 14, 1987, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C has received reports and evidence which indicate
that subsequent violations of the type cited by the District of
Columbia on December 30, 1985 have occurred, and
WHEREAS regulations and a schedule of fines for implementing the
Civil Infractions Act of 1985 were published in the DC Register
as a Final Rule on September 4, 1987 and became effective at that
time, and
WHEREAS any similar proven violations occurring after the above
cited December 30, 1986 notice would be regarded by ANC 3—C as
"flagrant ...or willful conduct" within the meaning of DCMR
1200.1, and as a new offense oil each day that such a violation
continued, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C regards the above cited December 30, 1986 letter
as official notice of a first offense within the meaning of DCMR
1200.1, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED by Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C that a
Notice of Infraction (NOI) be issued to and served upon the
Sheraton Washington Hotel for a Class 2 infraction, and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the scope of this NOI should
encompass possible offenses on all of the dates referred to by
ANC 3-C (including but not limited to October 12, 13 and 14,
1987) and all other evidence attached herewith as well as any
evidence produced by on-site zoning investigations.
WHEREAS: The Department of Public Works (DPW) has asked for comments on a
proposed traffic signal at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street
(Dec. 4, 1987 D.C. Register, Docket No. 87-265-TS); and
DRAFT
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-F has asked that the comment
period be extended until February 1, 1988; and
WHEREAS: This issue is of great importance to the constituents of ANC 3—C;
therefore
s I l iue V
O'
>2/
«
J th 1 urn
"A
BE IT RESOLD BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That we raise the
following/concerns in connection with a signal at Upton and Wisconsin:
TYUok-e. no
*//*’*■
i'n
rn
th)W‘r*ZCONCERN: DPW officials have stated repeatedly that the Department
would^tako no aetion until after the 4000 Wisconsin Avenue building was m Jj) of>f*ko„
an t jn
opcratrng-and both the Department, and the community (including the ANCs)
° '
could see what traffic conditions^'exist and how they would be affected by
' measures such as a signal. We endorse that policy and the Department
should hold to it.
CONCERN: We support and offer as our own the sentiment of ANC
3-F (per their letter of December 9, 1987) that substantial community
input is needed before the record closes on this rulemaking, and therefore
the public comment period should be extended until February 1, 1988. This
is consistent with the Department's objections of fully understanding and
serving the community. Moreover, ANC 3-C specifically requests copies of any
correspondence from developers or tenants (or their agents) which requests
traffic signals or other changes in traffic controls in the vicinity of 4000Wisconsin Avenue.
CONCERN: We have grave doubts about the efficacy of this signal.
We are deeply concerned about the probable and direct impact of the proposed
signalization: particularly the impact on residential Upton Street east of
Wisconsin Avenue, and generally the effect on other east-west streets in
the area. The proposed signalization would appear to threaten the local :
residential character of Upton, 37th, and 38th strreets, and that is
unacceptable to ANC 3-C and a dangerous precedent for other east-west
^
streets in the area. DPW has not provided information in this regard^-v'
Nor has it provided a description of the particular type of traffic signal
to be installed, we are thus asked to comment without a full understanding
of the implications and alternatives, if any, to the rulemaking. Accordingly,
we hereby request a feasibility study by DPW dealing with these issues.
-
ft a
1
CONCERN: DPW should/not proceed with any change in traffic operations until measures whidz simultaneously mitigate the impact on the
TolAc^
7
.^eigtiborhood a*reTpf*oposed^ Residents of Upton, Van Ness.^and 38th streets
^ ^~J
are currently discussing proposals. This process will be negatively
aggravated if DPW proceeds now solely with^the traffic signal.
CONCERN: Separate from simultaneous migation measures, ANC 3-C is
concerned about dealing in a pof&o^moifcL manner with traffic "improvements"
connected with the worsening conditions in the Wisconsin/Van Ness area.
Before closing the record on this docket, DPWj.a«&t inform ANCs. 3-C, 3-E,~
and 3-F of the entire realm of changes under consideration andAliklihood
of adoption: street widenings, removal of curb parking, reversible lanes,
additional signals, stop signs, barriers, thru-truckAprohibitions, changes
in existing signals,cnanges in existing curb cuts, left turn signals/lanes, etc.
aAcAVo
*The scope of this request is Van Ness Street on the north, 37th Street on
the east, Porter Street on the south, and Nebraska Avenue on the west.
We also request an estimate of their cost.
_
CONCERN: The imposition of ^traffic signals, to facilitate commuter
traffic related to office buildingsconoe-r-tiotioft must be coupled with specific
and effective measures to encourage public transit use as an alternative.
or
> « r> * r\ * V
For example, if the developers^of 4000 Wisconsin are requesting this signal,
they should be required to offer Metro incentives as a trade-off.
1
re. vesting case 87-2 before the Zoning Commission:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That it
authorizes the Chairman, her designee, or Phil Mendelson to
represent the Commission in upcoming hearings on Zoning Case
87-2 along the following general lines
(the advice and recommendations of ANC 3-C shall be along these
lines, to be more fully presented in written and oral testimony)
1. That it strongly supports the proposed amendment #1 in the
public notice. Accordingly, amendment #2 is not desirable.
2. That it strongly supports the proposed amendment #3.
3. That it strongly opposes amendment #4.
re. Idaho Avenue metered parking by McLean Gardens:
RESOLVED: ANC 3-C supports the position of the McLean Gardens
Condominium regarding the request of the Holladay Corporation
for parking meters on Idaho Avenue. That is, ANC 3-C supports
metered angled parking be installed on the retail store side
of Idaho Avenue between Wisconsin Avenue and Newark Street.
Further, ANC 3-C authorizes Phil Mendelson to represent the
Commission on this issue.
WHEREAS: The Department of Public Works (DPW) has asked for comments on a
proposed traffic signal at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street
(Dec. 4, 1987 D.C. Register, Docket No. 87—265—TS); and
DRAFT
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-F has asked that the comment
period be extended until February 1, 1988; and
WHEREAS: This issue is of great importance to the constituents of ANC 3—C;
therefore
sI i
kwc l
mJ
f 1**1
&. "<J.
BE IT RESOLJM) BY- ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That we raise the
following/'concerns in connection with a signal at Upton and Wisconsin:
JYi«ke. /»p ch**}** in
CONCERN: DPW officials have stated repeatedly that the Department
would^takc -no action until after the 4000 Wisconsin Avenue building was /*>
oporating-and both the Department, and the community (including the ANCs)
could see what traffic conditions^'exist and how they would be affected by
measures such as a signal.
We endorse that policy and the Department
should hold to it.
Jv)I
PyO'ff * )! on
a/iol on 4-, I
CONCERN: We support and offer as our own the sentiment of ANC
3-F (per their letter of December 9, 1987) that substantial community
input is needed before the record closes on this rulemaking, and therefore
the public comment period should be extended until February 1, 1988.
This
is consistent with the Department's objections of fully understanding and
serving the community. Moreover, ANC 3-C specifically requests copies of any
correspondence from developers or tenants (or their agents) which requests
traffic signals or other changes in traffic controls in the vicinity of 4000
Wisconsin Avenue.
CONCERN: We have grave doubts about the efficacy of this signal.
We are deeply concerned about the probable and direct impact of the proposed
signalization: particularly the impact on residential Upton Street east of
Wisconsin Avenue, and generally the effect on other east-west streets in
the area.
The proposed signalization would appear to threaten the local
residential character of Upton, 37th, and 38th strreets, and that is
unacceptable to ANC 3-C and a dangerous precedent for other east-west
^
streets in the area.
DPW has not provided information in this regardUp^
Nor has it provided a description of the particular type of traffic signal
to be installed. we are thus asked to comment without a full understanding
of the implications and alternatives, if any, to the rulemaking.
Accordingly,
we hereby request a feasibility study by DPW dealing with these issues.
CONCERN: DPW should/not proceed with any change in traffic operjatiQns until measures whidi simultaneously mitigate the impact on the
^eigliborhood areTpi?oposed^ Residents of Upton, Van Ness,^and 38th streets
are currently discussing proposals.
This process will be negatively
aggravated if DPW proceeds now solely with^the traffic signal
T-’Uf*, Id.
3?Tb.
A*
CONCERN: Separate fr|>m simultaneous migation measures, ANC 3-C is
concerned about dealing in a peab’o-’moarl manner with traffic "improvements"
connected with the worsening conditions in the Wisconsin/Van Ness area.
Before closing the record on this docket, DPW^»»et inform ANCs.3-C, 3-E,~~
and 3-F of the entire realm of changes under consideration and^liklihood
of adoption: street widenings, removal of curb parking, reversible lanes,
additional signals, stop signs, barriers, thru-truck“prohibitions, changes
in existing signals,cnanges in existing curb cuts, left turn signals/lanes, etc.
The scope of this request is Van Ness Street on the north, 37th Street on
the east, Porter Street on the south, and Nebraska Avenue on the west.
We also request an estimate of their cost.
CONCERN: The imposition of .s'traffic signal«.to facilitate commuter
traffic related to office buildings oonoeguotioa. must be coupled with specific
and effective measures to^encourage public transit use as an alternative.
For example, if the developers^of 4000 Wisconsin are requesting this signal,
they should be required to offer Metro incentives as a trade-off.
eiWAVo
ATON LOADING DOCK RESOLUTION
WHEREAS the Sheraton Washington Hotel (Hotel) has repeatedly
violated District of Columbia Zoning Regulations regarding the
use of its loading dock and parking spaces, and
WHEREAS the Hotel was formally advised by the District of
Columbia by letter dated December 30, 1986 "...that in October,
1986, you used the subject areas in violation of the D.C. Zoning
Regulations...", and
WHEREAS the Hotel was further advised by the District of Columbia
on December 30, 1986 "...that any future use of the subject
premises in violation of the D.C. Zoning Regulations will result
in the matter being referred for appropriate enforcement action
without further notice...", and
WHEREAS Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C (ANC 3-C) concurs
with the findings and conclusions of the District of Columbia in
the above cited letter of December 30, 1986, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C had requested by letter dated August 25, 1987
that zoning inspections for similar violations be made on October
12, 13 and 14, 1987, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C has received reports and evidence which indicate
that subsequent violations of the type cited by the District of
Columbia on December 30, 1986 have occurred, and
WHEREAS regulations and a schedule of fines for implementing the
Civil Infractions Act of 1985 were published in the DC Register
as a Final Rule on September 4, 1987 and became effective at that
time, and
WHEREAS any similar proven violations occurring after the above
cited December 30, 1986 notice would be regarded by ANC 3-C as
"flagrant ...or willful conduct" within the meaning of DCMR
1200.1, and as a new offense on each day that such a violation
continued, and
WHEREAS ANC 3-C regards the above cited December 30, 1986 letter
as official notice of a first offense within the meaning of DCMR
1200.1, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED by Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C that a
Notice of Infraction (NOI) be issued to and served upon the
Sheraton Washington Hotel for a Class 2 infraction, and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the scope of this NOI should
encompass possible offenses on all of the dates referred to by
ANC 3-C (including but not limited to October 12, 13 and 14,
1987) and all other evidence attached herewith as well as any
evidence produced by on-site zoning investigations.
December 21,
Re:
1927
Cleveland Park Historical
Society Reauests Re. Klingle
Valley Bridge
Hr. Charles Hason
Assistant to the Director
Department of Public Works
Reeves Municipal Center
2000 Uth Street. NW
Washington, DC 20009
Dear Mr. Mason:
I am writing to express the enthusiastic support of Advisory
Neighborhood Commission 3-C for two proposals out forward by the Cleveland
Park Historical Society.
The first concerns the restoration of the
decorative elements of the Klingle Valley Bridge, at the southern entrance
to the Cleveland Park Historic District, and also within the boundaries of
this ANC.
We would be very pleased to have the large stone urns refurbished and their electrical connections restored, so that they may again
function as bridge lights, as they were intended by their designer Paul
Cret, and we would further support the repainting of the Art Deco railing,
which is now very chipped and rust-covered.
We believe that renovation of
these decorative elements will allow both residents and tourists alike to
recognize and enjoy this bridge as one of the loveliest and and most
historic of Washington’s public works.
Second, this Commission supports the placement of four Historic
District markers, to be posted at the no^hern and southern entrances to
the Cleveland Park Historic District along Connecticut and Wisconsin
Avenues, NW.
The markers will be similar in design to those already in
Place at five major entryways to the Takoma Park Historic District.
We
understand that the cost of making the template for the markers has been
donated by the Cleveland Park Historical Society.
We believe that the
placement of these signs will enhance public awareness of an important
phase of our City’s development and will encourage shooowners and
residents to take pride in their neighborhood and its history.
ANC 3-C thanks you for this opportunity to express our views.
P0R THE COMMISSION:
Peggy Robin
Chairman
cc:
Cleveland Park Historical Society
Treasurer's Report
Whereas Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C actively
supports historic preservation in the area served by the
Commission and the District of Columbia;
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that Advisory Neighborhood Commission
3-C makes a contribution of $25 to support the program activity
of the D.C. Preservation League.
Whereas Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C has evaluated the
scope of work required by its Treasurer and has determined that
the most efficient way to fulfill its monthly and quarterly
reporting obligations to the DC Auditor, and to reconcile the
monthly bank statement is to obtain the services of a qualifed
accountant;
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Treasurer of ANC 3-C is authorized
to engage the services of a bonified accountant at fee not to
include a $150 month.
DhT l ?. IM7
COUNCIL OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20004
December 3, 1987
Mr. Dinsmoor White
Vice President, Real Estate
The Gannett Company Inc.
1100 Wilson Blvd.
Arlington, Va. 22209
Dear Mr. White:
I am writing regarding Gannett's proposed office building at
4100 Wisconsin Avenue N.W. in the District of Columbia.
After
careful review of The Gannett Company's "Large Tract Review
Application," I am convinced that it should not be approved.
According to the Comprehensive Plan enacted by the Council
of the District of Columbia, the area of Wisconsin Avenue where
you wish to build your new office building is designated as a
"local neighborhood center."
This particular area of the
District, which is primarily a low density residential area, has
been experiencing severe problems associated with large scale
commercial development.
A building of the size and scale which
is proposed would only compound those problems.
I have contacted the Office of Planning and urged
agency to act according to the legislative intent of
Comprehensive Plan. I plan to fo llow this matter closj*
would be happy to discuss it with you should you desi,
Ray
ilmember at-Large
JR :ps
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Glover Archibold Park
A tentative agreement has been reached whereby the existing roadway would
be torn out and replaced with a roadway so that no more than thirteen and
one-half feet of roadway of the Glover Archibold Parkway would be west of the
\
private property line, except at the mouth, and eighteen and one-half feet of
r rK \ roadway and sidewalk would be on private property.
This would widen the
narrowest portion-\from what is now 52 feet to greater than 84 feet, an
1—Increase of greater than sixty-one percent.
ocS*)
Moreover, pursuant to the tentative agreement, the developers would
negotiate with PEPCO an easement or a permit making available 5300 sauare feet
of PEPCO property, immediately to the west of the right of way, for public
park usage.
Together with the movement of the road to the east, this would
provide an entrance to the park wider greater than existed prior to the road
construction.
The tentative agreement would also have the developers landscaping the
PEPCO area and the area abutting the roadway according to the citizen's
reasonable requests.
4100 Wisconsin Avenue, N. W.
It was tentatively agreed that, excluding the area now occupied by Roy
Rogers and leaving roan for (1) an connector between Roy Rogers and the new
ouilding and (2) an expansion by Roy Rogers of no more than one floor in
height, the building would not create a F.A.R. of more than 1.235.
Additionnaly, the volume of the atrium would be decreased by twenty percent.
Expressed in other terms, these two changes would result in a thirteen percent
volumetric reduction in the new building from what was originally proposed.
Within this structure of reduced size, the following design changes would be
incorporated:
a. The building would be setback 10' from the property line on Wisconsin
Avenue.
(On the park side, the movement of the road would cause some movement
of the building line to the east.).
b.
The front of the building (on Wisconsin Avenue) would be stepped back.
c.
There would be real fenestration on the Roy Rogers side of the
building.
d.
Design details would be added to the elevation to modulate the
feeling of size.
e. The developer would work with the material palate to blend with the
neighborhood.
f. The satellite antennas would be screened as much as possible without
interfering with signal reception and the weather radar antenna would be
painted.
g.
An entrance way would be put on Wisconsin Avenue.
h.
The height of the logo would be reduced.
i.
There would be no retail presence.
4000 Wisconsin Avenue
The developers offered to permit free parking at the building for ten
years and charge only a nominal fee from the eleventh through the thirtieth
year.
The nominal fee would be $2.00 (in 1987 dollars) increased by the
consumer price index annually. The developers repeated their offers to reduce
the theater seats from 2070 to 1800.
The citizens responded that they were not authorized to settle 4000
Wisconsin Avenue and would like to sever the issue. The issue was put to the
developers who adamantly refused.
At this point,
terminated.
the negotiations were recessed but not necessarily
t
MCLEAN GARDENS
CONDOMINIUM
COM
X
!*»»//
HA/JZJI *> •*
U+
December 14, 1987
Mr. Terry Eakin
Vice President
The Holladay Corporation
2121 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.
Suite 400
Washington, DC 20007
Re:
Parking Meters on Idaho Avenue
Dear Terry:
Your proposal for metered parking on Idaho and Wisconsin Avenues
was considered by the Community Affairs Committee and the Board
of Directors took action on the proposal at our meeting of
December 9, 1987.
The Board of Directors recommends that metered
angled parking be installed on the retail store side of Idaho
Avenue.
Since the street is a one way street it was felt that
cars could easily pull in and out of angled parking.
Also the
parking would be directly in front of the stores to be served and
people would be less inclined to cross in the middle of the block
to their parked car. In addition, the Board felt that parking on
one side of the street would allow sufficient room for delivery
trucks and commercial traffic to use Idaho Avenue.
The Board was concerned that parking on both sides of the street
would create congestion and make it difficult for the movement of
commercial traffic thus encouraging the commercial traffic to use
neighborhood streets.
The Board requests that the meters run from 9:00 a.m. to 6:30
p.m. so that there is no lose of possible residential parking for
the neighborhood.
3811 PORTER STREET, N.W., WASHINGTON, D.C. 20016 (202) 966-9780
Page Two
December 14, 1987
Mr. Terry Eakin
The Board's primary concern is the impact of development and the
increasing density of the population on the quality of life for
the residents of McLean Gardens.
The Board is concerned that
added congestion on Wisconsin and Idaho Avenues will encourage
motorists to cut through the residential streets of the Gardens.
If you have any questions about our position,
calling me or Katherine Coram.
ours,
Julie B. Koczela
Board Member
JBK:mam
cc: McLean Gardens Board of Directors
Community Affairs Committee
do not hesitate
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Cept/m /
McLEAN GARDENS
tetrtsv*
WOODLEY PARK
: X
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
Mr. Ed Curry, Executive Director
D.C. Zoning Commission
The District' Building
Washington, D.C.
20004
rt
Thu *
December 15, 1987
RE: Case No. 87-2
Dear Mr. Curry:
I am writing pursuant to the Public Hearing Notice scheduling a
January 7, 1988 hearing in the so-called "vesting" case (No. 87-2).
Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C wishes to testify at the hearing.
We received the notice subsequent to our last (November) meeting, and
will consider the amendments proposed in the hearing notice at our
next (December) meeting.
Although I have been authorized to represent ANC 3-C in this case,
I am unable to offer our comments on this new notice until after we
meet. However, our past comments have been consistent with proposals
#1 and #3 in the notice.
If the.-Zoning Commission desires further information from ANC 3-C
prior to "'the hearing, please contact me either through our office or
at 966-1485.
Sincerely,
Phil Mendelson
Secretary
PM/ms
JS'l&l
I « WU
feu.
£
•><>/.Die fc.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
TIME MD PUCE
*
Thursday, January 7, 1988 § 1:30 P.M.,
District Building, Room 9, 1350
Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington,
D.C. 20004.
FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSIDERING THE FOLLOWING
Case No. 87-2 (Zoning Commission, sponsor)
THIS CASE IS OF INTEREST TO ALL ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD
COMMISSIONS
The Zoning Commission for the District
action to consider proposed amendments
Columbia Municipal Regulations (DCMR),
section 3202, which regulates building
of Columbia initiated
to the District of
Title 11, Zoning,
permits.
The proposed amendments which the Commission will consider
are set forth or generally summarized below:
1.
Amend 11 DCMR 3202.5 to provide that the right to
construct a building or other structure would not vest
until a permit to construct the building or structure
has been validly issued, and the permit holder has
completed a substantial degree of construction under
the permit, and in good faith reliance thereon.
2.
Revise 11 DCMR 3202.5(a)
(a)
3.
a2. teas.P
to read as follows:
The application shall be accompanied by any fee
which is required, and by the plans and other
information required by section 3202.2, which
shall be sufficiently complete to permit
processing without substantial change or
deviation, and by any other plans and information
which are required to permit complete review of
the entire application under applicable District
of Columbia regulations.
Adopt a provision which would require an applicant for
a construction permit to give notice of the filing of
the application to the Advisory Neighborhood Commission
in which the proposed structure would be located, if
Co r f
C
e1
ni ^
Z.C. Notice of Public Hearing
Case No. 87-2
Page 2
the area, height, bulk, or other characteristics of the
proposed structure are significant.
/jo!
4.
Adopt a provision to establish a procedure and fee by
which the District would grant a reservation of a
vested right to construct a building or other structure
before the filing of an application for the permit to
construct the building or structure.
5.
The Commission will also consider the adoption of
amendments which persons who participate in the hearing
recommend as alternatives to the above amendments.
6.
The Commission also invites the submission of views on
other issues which any interested person believes to be
reasonably related to the proposed amendments.
Vo>
Proposed amendments to the text of the Zoning Regulations of
the District of Columbia, are authorized pursuant to the
Zoning Act (Act of June 20, 1938, 52 Stat. 797, as amended,
Section 5-413 et seq., D.C. Code, 1981 Ed.).
The public hearing on this case will be conducted in accordance with the provisions of 11 DCMR 3021. Pursuant to that
section, the Commission will impose time limitations on
testimony presented to it at this public hearing.
All individuals, organizations, or associations who wish to
testify in this case should file their intention to testify
in writing with the Executive Director of the Zoning
Secretariat by December 15, 1987, together with any written
material which the person or entity wishes the Commission to
consider. Written statements, in lieu of a personal
appearance or oral presentation, may be submitted for inclusion in the record.
Information should be forwarded to the Executive Director,
Office of the Zoning,, Secretariat, Room 11, District Building, 1350 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.
20004.
Please include the number of the particular case and
your daytime telephone number. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, YOU
MAY CONTACT THE ZONING SECRETARIAT AT 727-6311.
GEORGE M. WHITE, JOHN G. PARSONS, LINDSLEY WILLIAMS,
MAYBELLE T. BENNETT AND PATRICIA N. MATHEWS
ZONING
COMMISSION OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, BY EDWARD L. CURRY,
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, ZONING SECRETARIAT.
87-2notice/BJW25
Z.C. Notice of Public Hearing
Case No. 87-2
Page 2
the iarea, height, bulk, or other characteristics of the
proposed structure are significant.
Ho'.
4
-
Co '
Adopt a provision to establish a procedure and fee by
which the District would grant a reservation of a
vested right to construct a building or other structure
before the filing of an application for the permit to
construct the building or structure.
5.
The Commission will also consider the adoption of
amendments which persons who participate in the hearing
recommend as alternatives to the above amendments.
6.
The Commission also invites the submission of views on
other issues which any interested person believes to be
reasonably related to the proposed amendments.
Proposed amendments to the text of the Zoning Regulations of
the District of Columbia, are authorized pursuant to the
Zoning Act (Act of June 20, 1938, 52 Stat. 797, as amended,
Section 5-413 et seq., D.C. Code, 1981 Ed.).
The public hearing on this case will be conducted in accordance with the provisions of 11 DCMR 3021.
Pursuant to that
section, the Commission will impose time limitations on
testimony presented to it at this public hearing.
All individuals, organizations, or associations who wish to
testify in this case should file their intention to testify
in writing with the Executive Director of the Zoning
Secretariat by December 15, 1987, together with any written
material which the person or entity wishes the Commission to
consider. Written statements, in lieu of a personal
appearance or oral presentation, may be submitted for inclusion in the record.
Information should be forwarded to the Executive Director,
Office of the Zoning Secretariat, Room 11, District Building, 1350 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.
20004.
Please include the number of the particular case and
your daytime telephone number.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, YOU
MAY CONTACT THE ZONING SECRETARIAT AT 727-6311.
GEORGE M. WHITE, JOHN G. PARSONS, LINDSLEY WILLIAMS,
MAYBELLE T. BENNETT AND PATRICIA N. MATHEWS
ZONING
COMMISSION OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, BY EDWARD L. CURRY,
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, ZONING SECRETARIAT.
87-2notice/BJW25
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ZONING COMMISSION
Case No. 87-2
Proposed Amendments to 11 DCMR 3202
Comments of the
Cleveland Park Historical Society and the Tenl.ey and Cleveland
Park Emergency Committee
The Cleveland Park Historical Society (CPHS) and the
Tenley and Cleveland Park Emergency Committee (TACPEC)
herewith submit their written comments on the pending Case
87-2 concerning newly proposed amendments to 11 DCMR 3202 and
other proposed additions to the regulations.
The proposed changes would modify the presently applicable
rules governing the right of a property owner to construct
or develop under existing zoning, regardless whether that
zoning is or may be altered by map or text amendment.
1/
These rules, in various permutations, have been the subject
of repeated consideration by the Commission for over a year.
In July 1987, the Commission received comments and
testimony on the then-proposed amendments to the relevant
regulations. At that time, CPHS and TACPEC submitted written
comments urging that the Commission adopt what is generally
recognized to be the majority rule in this country concerning
the vesting of rights in existing zoning. See Testimony
submitted July 10, 1987. That rule is stated in 4 Rathkopf,
The Law of Zoning and Planning, 50-62, §50.04 (1987):
The majority rule, as hereinbefore noted,
is that no vested rights are acquired
except where a landowner, prior to the
effective date of prohibitory legislation
and in reliance upon a validly issued permit
has made, in good faith, a substantial change
of position in relation to the land, or has
made substantial expenditures or has incurred
substantial obligations.
1 / CPHS and TACPEC stress, as we have in our earlier
comments, that it is the general rule, in the District and
elsewhere, that "a property owner has no vested right in the
continuance of the zoning status of his land . . .." Wi ncamp
Partnership v. Anne Arundel County, Md., 458 F. Supp. 1009,
1 027
Md"! 1 978 ) . See also Town of Vienna Council v.
Kohler, 244 S.E.2d 542, 548 (Va. 1978).
In this region, the majority rule has been specifically
applied by the Maryland courts. For example, in County
Council, Montgomery County v. District Land Corporation,
274 Md. 691, 337 A.2d 712, 721 (1975), the court said: 2_/
We have held that the obtention of a building
permit creates no vested right in an existing
zoning classification unless substantial construction has been undertaken in reliance
thereon . . . and that possession of a building
permit, taken together with the payment of a
high price in reliance on existing zoning, and
with substantial expenditures for architectural
fees creates no vested right in the absence of
actual construction.
The first proposed amendment listed in the Commission's
recent Notice of Public Hearing in effect states the "Maryland
rule." CPHS and TACPEC fully endorse the adoption of this
rule.
As we noted in our earlier comments, such action would
not only bring the District of Columbia into accordance
with the majority position in this country, but would yield
such regulatory benefits as giving the Zoning Administrator
and other administrative bodies a full and unencumbered
opportunity to review proposed developments for consistency
with planned zoning and with the Comprehensive Plan. The
present rules allow a developer to "lock in" current zoning
with no more than an application, even where a change of
zoning may be necessary to comply with the Comprehensive
Plan or to reflect changed conditions in the area. The
rules thus take control over general questions of future
land use out of the hands of the agencies empowered to
decide such questions. Adoption of the majority rule would
give that control back to the community, while preserving
the landowner's rights where he has relied in good faith
on current zoning.
Further, adopting the "Maryland" or majority rule
regarding vesting would allow full implementation of existing
rules on Large Tract Review, 10 DCMR §1500. Those rules
were adopted to "minimize adverse environmental, traffic
and neighborhood impact," to allow coordinated comments
2 / See also Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission v. TKU
Associates, 281 McL V, 376 A.2d 505, 51 6 (1977); W i n c a m~p
Partnership v. Anne Arundel County, Md., supra, 458 F. Supp.
at 1027; Prince George's County v. Equitable Trust Co.,
408 A.2d 737, 741 (Md. App. 1979).
Virginia similarly limits a vested right to zoning to
cases where a permit has been issued under earlier zoning,
the site plan has been filed and diligently pursued, and
(continued on next page)
2
from city agencies and from the affected Advisory Neighborhood Commission, and to review proposals for compliance
with the Comprehensive Plan.
Linder the present rules,
where the developer submits an acceptable application for
a building permit, the submission would "vest" the current
zoning and thus would severely limit the scope of administrative
review. Even if there were serious questions regarding the
appropriateness of the project under the Comprehensive Plan
or under proposed zoning changes, arguably the "vested"
project would have to be approved if a hearing on a zoning
change had not actually been scheduled at the time the permit
application was submitted. The present rules do not establish
the climate of certainty sought by the citizens and, apparently,
by the development community. Rather, they foster a competition for filing times which impedes the decisionmaking
that the Zoning Commission, and other agencies, must conduct.
Under the first proposed amendment set out in the
hearing notice, the developer would have to inform the City,
and the general community, of a projected development at
a time when modification of the development may be possible,
if it is deemed upon review not to be in compliance with the
Comprehensive Plan or some other aspect of the regulations.
The absence of such notifcation has resulted in the construction
of at least one highly controversial project that was later
implicitly found to be inappropriate (4000 Wisconsin Avenue).
Surely, it is as much in a developer's interest to avoid a
protracted dispute with the community as it is in the
community's interest to have a legally established opportunity
to participate in decisions which shape its future.
For these reasons and those stated in our July 10
comments, CPHS and TACPEC urge that the Commission adopt
the first proposed amendment.
For the same reasons, CPHS and TACPEC recommend that the
Commission reject the second proposed amendment. This is
no more than a fine-tuning of the present rules.
It would
expand upon the requirements for the application, but would
still allow that application to freeze the zoning of the
land, regardless of the desirability of the proposed rezoning.
It would continue the present procedure which abandons
decisionmaking regarding future zoning to private landowners
rather than preserving it to public agencies.
The third proposed provision listed in the hearing notice
would require notice to the Advisory Neighborhood Commission
(continued from preceding page)
substantial expense has been incurred in good faith before
the change in zoning. See Board of Supervisors of Fairfax
County v. Medical Structures, Inc., 213 Va. 355, 192 S.E.2d
799, 801 (1972).
3
of an application for a construction permit for a significant
structure.
CPHS and TACPEC heartily endorse this proposal.
Such a provision would further carry out the purpose of
D.C. Code §1-261, requiring notice to the ANCs of significant
governmental actions.
Direct notice from the developer
to the community should allow consideration of the project
at a stage when citizens' comments may have real import,
rather than deferring that consideration to a point at
which the development proposal is essentially fixed.
The fourth proposed provision, on the other hand,
should be rejected.
It would allow a developer to purchase
a vested right in zoning without consideration of that
zoning by this Commission or, apparently, by any other
responsible body.
In sharp contrast to the operation of
the majority rule described above, under this provision
the developer would merely have to buy his zoning.
He would
not be required to apply for the permit, or expend any
significant sums on the project, or take any actions other
than the payment of a fee.
We submit that this amounts to
an abdication of the legislative function of this Commission.
In a recently reported case, the City of New York was
found to have made "an illegal deal" with a Manhattan
developer by selling him the right to build a structure on
a scale in excess of that allowed by the zoning.
See
Washington Post, December 8, 1987, p. A13 (copy attached).
Permitting a developer to "buy" existing zoning for a fee,
as proposed here, is very similar to the action found
unlawful by the New York court.
If existing zoning is
deemed appropriate by this Commission, then a development
can go forward under it.
If the zoning is not appropriate,
no one should be able to buy it.
For these reasons, CPHS and TACPEC strongly oppose
adoption of the fourth proposed provision.
Finally, CPHS and TACPEC request the opportunity to have
a representative of these organizations appear at the
January 7, 1988, hearing at which these provisions are to
be considered.
Respectfully submitted,
by Tersh
Boasberg,
COMMITTEE
by Joel Odum,
December
15,
1987
4
President
President
« TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8,1987 1
THE WASHI.VGTO.N POST
■City Loses Manhattan Zoning Case
Sale to Zuckerman of Right to Increase Building Size Ruled Illegal
neighborhood rind cast imposing public opinion here against the onshadows across Central Park.
slaught of skyscrapers that block
Waihingtoa Post Su/I Writer
... Kent L. Barwick, president of the -the sky and add to traffic and conNEW YORK, Dec. 7—In a case
Municipal Art Society,. which filed gestion.
that has become a symbol of ram- the suit, said the ruling "provides a • ■ When Zuckerman beat 15 other
pant overdevelopment in Manhat- ..measure of protection against the developers during a 1985 auction,
tan, a state judge ruled today that .sale of city property to the highest .$57 million of his bid was for a bobidder, regardless of the conse- nus enabling him to erect a building
city officials had struck an illegal
quences. The real message here is 20 percent larger than zoning laws
deal with developer Mortimer B.
that the city should be balancing normally would allow. The proceeds
Zuckerman by selling him the right
to increase the size of a proposed interests, rather than acting as an .were to be used by the Metropoli
’ ' deve)oper."^V'
’
’
» I*-.-'.-*—- Transportation Authority,
: '^«f:f:-r':• --itan
building at Columbus Circle for $57 ibverzealous
owns the site, for subway
:
Zuckerman!
vpublisheV$>f
^.S.’^which
'million.
& World
World Report’?mdJ^'At-|^coh^ti
Report ‘i^dJlie'At- ‘:^co'n^tniction and for maintaining
New York City
make "aV-Jtfews
"a JTews &
w.v, cannot ...c.e
‘cash sale'’ of a zoning bonus," Man- f :* laritic, defended .the 'city’s -auction-'7 Jthe:$l subway fare. ■: ■ v
ipreme Court Justice Ed-';
of the'site, saying, “A lot ofi'j-'^-'Zuckerman’s firm, Boston Prophattan Supreme
r .1
1-J n—:
.t.:- ■ buildings have jteen built with zon- -Gerties, agreed to contribute another
ward H. Lehner
ruled.
He saidJ this
amounted to "an illegal payment ^8
Government may not place
itself in the position of reaping a • - “ut.
. ^
,_
- .
- .. .
cash premium because one of its , that the project fad "become one of
While the city frequently negoacencies bestows a cash benefit the examPIe3 of w1131 peoP*e per-_ -;tiates zonmg bonuses with devel®
■: - . ceive to be overdevelopment,” Un- t opers after the fact, Lehner adoptupon a e
pe .
M T 'r7 /rder the revised plan, he said, “we’ll 'Ved the Municipal Art Society’s ar:
As a practical matter', Zucker
fis. anrf
^«-Qtnrv
the tQbuilding
substantially
’gument
thatprocess
the city
perverted
an ontory .'reduce,
^ ^ ancj ^
j^g aure
build- ; .‘the
zoning
byhad
including
the
man’s plans for oocircle were .
^g ■ 20 percent bonus from the start and
towers at Columbus Circle
WQr|t3 more ^ tune
Tolled last week when Sal0®0" r:community'3interest3■.requiring developers to raise their
Bros.,
the,. investment banking
firm ,. ^ ■ j^ York Mayor Edward I. Koch bids accordingly. :. v
,
uungrirm
ew
that was his major tenant and frnan-;v.~ said
ooi^ the project's opponents had
,t . The expected reduction in Zuckdal partner, pulled out of the ven- won “a temporary; victory" and that erman’s purchase price has created
ture, citing staff layoffs.
. . . '"the city would appeal. He said the an immediate headache for. Koch,
Zuckerman said today he is pro- city would suffer “substantial harm" who had included about half the proceeding with a scaled-down version if deprived of the $455 million pur- ceeds in next year’s budget. It could
of the project, which would require
also lead to legal challenges by
chase price.''
V- '
a reduction in the record $455 mil“If the project is riot built, thfcre some of the losing bidders.
lion price he had negotiated for the
/ Zuckerman said the project, which
will be fewer policemen, fewer san
dty-owned site.
itation workers, fewer teachers and .-'originally included about 2 million
The project, which would replace
substantially fewer dollars for tran-; /square feet for Salomon Bros.’ tradthe vacant New York Coliseum, has
sit,” Koch said. “Thousands of mu- _-; ing floors, would be changed to inbeen the target of a high-powered
nicipal jobs would be at risk."
. -'.'crease the proportion of luxury houspublicity campaign, with celebrities
Zuckerman’s project and Tele-’ -ing. The brokerage's withdrawal is
such as Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis vision City, a 13-block West Side .‘.part of retrenchment and layoffs by
and Bill Moyers charging that it development pjanned by Donald J. ■ major Wall Street firms after the
Trump, appear to have galvanized Oct. stock market collapse.
would mar the Upper West Side .....
- ' j ■ ■ ' »'.• •
By Howard Kurtz
.•-'j
□'
ATTACHMENT
r~c?r rx/~2-)
C p-zn pr -2_
NOV 2 3 1987
Resolution re. ANC rationale for supporting C-2-A instead of C-1'
at the Woodley Park low density local neighborhood commercial
center.
X*t
9
^
RESOLVED: ANC 3-C believes that C-1 zoning is generally the
most appropriate zone classification for low density local
neighborhood commercial areas under the Comprehensive Plan.
oJ'Jowever t each local neighborhood commercial center is unique.
For instance,A the Woodley Park commercial node on Connecticut
Avenue is characterized by tall townhouse-type buildings that
preexist the Comprehensive Plan.
(In fact, ANC 3-C believes
these buildings are significant enough to qualify for historic
district status.) A C-1 designation would makeo’f thTs
neighborhood center nonconforming and may not be necessary
to preserve the present character of the area. Thus it
would be reasonable, here, for a rezoning from C-2-B to C-2-A
-- especially if coupled with historic district and local
neighborhood center overlay restrictions. ANC 3-Cs formally
adopted position is that this area should be downzoned "to at
least C-2-A."
TV*.
p-
In general, the factors mitigating the application of C-1 to low
density local neighborhood commercial areas include:
•The predominant height, bulk, and set back?'*of structures
predating the Comprehensive Plan;
•The stability of the area, including the condition of current
vacancies (excluding vacancies caused by an owner's decision to
terminate occupancies);
•Whether the Comprehensive Plan designates the center as "new or
upgraded" or as a development opportunity area;
•Transportation factors such as very high levels of service (LOS
in the A or B range)
V
CO /OO /y> > ii / Of) P r- L
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f~ y J.
fir e« <■ rtf
>a-}i?)t?
ve
t<r.
TL
C f u r If f
TftcPzc
Glover Archibold Park
A tentative agreement has been reached whereby the existing roadway would
be torn out and replaced with a roadway so that no more than thirteen and
one-half feet of roadway of the Glover Archibold Parkway would be west of the
private property line, except at the mouth, and eighteen and one-half feet of
roadway and sidewalk would be on private property.
This would widen the
narrowest portion^from what is now 52 feet to greater than 84 feet, an
“increase of greater than sixty-one percent.
Moreover, pursuant to the tentative agreement, the developers would
negotiate with PEPCO an easement or a permit making available 5300 square feet
of PEPCO property, immediately to the west of the right of way, for public
park usage.
Together with the movement of the road to the east, this would
provide an entrance to the park wider greater than existed prior to the road
construction.
The tentative agreement would also have the developers landscaping the
PEPCO area and the area abutting the roadway according to the citizen's
reasonable requests.
4100 Wisconsin Avenue, N. W.
It was tentatively agreed that, excluding the area now occupied by Roy
Rogers and leaving room for (1) an connector between Roy Rogers and the new
building and (2) an expansion by Roy Rogers of no more than one floor in
height, the building would not create a F.A.R. of more than 1.235.
Additionnaly, the volume of the atrium would be decreased by twenty percent.
Expressed in other terms, these two changes would result in a thirteen percent
volumetric reduction in the new building from what was originally proposed.
Within this structure of reduced size, the following design changes would be
incorporated:
a. The building would be setback 10' from the property line on Wisconsin
Avenue.
(On the park side, the movement of the road would cause some movement
of the building line to the east.).
=//P
2
-
b.
*
The front of the building (on Wisconsin Avenue) would be stepped back.
c.
There would be real fenestration on the Roy Rogers side of the
building.
d.
Design details would be added to the elevation to modulate the
feeling of size.
e. The developer would work with the material palate to blend with the
neighborhood.
f. The satellite antennas would be screened as much as possible without
interfering with signal reception and the weather radar antenna would be
painted.
g.
An entrance way would be put on Wisconsin Avenue.
h.
The height of the logo would be reduced.
i.
There would be no retail presence.
4000 Wisconsin Avenue
Hie developers offered to permit free parking at the building for ten
years and charge only a nominal fee from the eleventh through the thirtieth
year.
The nominal fee would be $2.00 (in 1987 dollars) increased by the
consumer price index annually. The developers repeated their offers to reduce
the theater seats from 2070 to 1800.
The citizens responded that they were not authorized to settle 4000
Wisconsin Avenue and would like to sever the issue.
The issue was put to the
developers who adamantly refused.
At this point,
terminated.
the negotiations were recessed but not necessarily
WHEREAS: The Department of Public Works (DPW) has asked for comments on a
proposed traffic signal at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street
(Dec. 4, 1987 D.C. Register, Docket No. 87-265-TS); and
F**
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-F has asked that the comment
period be extended until February 1, 1988; and
WHEREAS: This issue is of great importance to the constituents of ANC 3-C;
therefore
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY. NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That we raise the
following concerns in connection with a signal at Upton and Wisconsin:
CONCERN: DPW officials have stated repeatedly that the Department
would take no action until after the 4000 Wisconsin Avenue building was
operating and both the Department and the community (including the ANCs)
could see what traffic conditions exist and how they would be affected by
measures such as a signal. We endorse that policy and the Department
should hold to it.
CONCERN: We support and offer as our own the sentiment of ANC
3-F (per their letter of December 9, 1987) that substantial community
input is needed before the record closes on this rulemaking, and therefore
the public comment period should be extended until February 1, 1988. This
is consistent with.the Department's objections of fully understanding and
serving the community.
CONCERN: We have grave doubts about the efficacy of this signal.
We are deeply concerned about the probable and direct impact of the proposed
signalization: particularly the impact on residential Upton Street east of
Wisconsin Avenue, and generally the effect on other east-west streets in
the area.'. DPW has not provided information in this regard — we are asked
to comment without a full understanding of the implications and alternatives,
if any, to the rulemaking. Accordingly, we hereby request a feasibility
study by DPW dealing with these issues.
CONCERN: DPW should not proceed with any change in traffic operations until measures which simultaneously mitigate the impact on the
neighborhood are proposed. Residents of Upton, Van Ness, and 38th streets
are currently discussing proposals. This process will be negatively
aggravated if DPW proceeds now solely with the traffic signal.
CONCERN: Separate from simultaneous migation measures, ANC 3-C is
concerned about dealing in a peace-meal manner with traffic "improvements"
connected with the worsening conditions in the Wisconsin/Van Ness area.
Before closing the record on this docket, DPW must inform ANCs 3-C, 3-E,
and 3-F of the entire realm of changes under consideration and liklihood
of adoption: street widenings, removal of curb parking, reversible lanes,
additional signals, stop signs, barriers, thru-truck prohibitions, changes
in existing signals, left turn signals/lanes, etc. We also request an
estimate of their cost.
CONCERN: The imposition of a traffic signal to facilitate commuter
traffic related to office building construction must be coupled with specific
and effective measures to encourage public transit use as an alternative.
For example, if the developers of 4000 Wisconsin are requesting this signal,
they should be required to offer Metro incentives as a trade-off.
DRAFT
It?
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION
North Cleveland Park and Forest Hills
Mailing address: P.O. Box 39083 Friendship Station, Washington, D .C. 20016
Location: 4000 Albemarle Street, N.W., Suite LL16
|
phone 362*6120
December 9>1987
Mr. George Schoene
Chief, Bureau of Traffic Services
2000 lUth Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20009
Re: Docket No. 87-265-TS
Dear Mr. Schoene:
The proposed traffic signal at the intersection of Wisconsin Avenue and
Upton Street, N.W. is a major concern of ANC 3F which represents the
neighborhood on the east side of Wisconsin Avenue from Upton Street to
Nebraska Avenue. Beacuase of the substantial effect this traffic
signal is likely to have on our neighborhood's traffic and parking,
we feel that it is important to get substantial input from the
nearby community before commenting in any detail regarding the proposal.
ANC 3F unanimously passed a resolution at its '.November 30th meeting,
requesting that the public comment period on the proposed stop signal
be extended until February 1,1988.
Extending the comment period will allow the ANC time to contact residents
of affected streets, to hold an informal meeting on the topic, and to
officially present the ANC's position at the next public meeting which
will be held.in January.
Your assistance in this matter would be greatly appreciated. Please contact
the, ANC office as soon as possible with your response.
Sincerely,
Kendall C. Valentine, Jr.
Chairman
cc: ANC 3C
District of Columbia Register
DEC 4
OF
887.
PUBLIC
WORKS
°«0E OP PROPOSED RULEMAKING
DOCKET NO. 87-265-TS
to the authority of Section^ivU^and V^f^R Works' Pursuant
Plan No. 4 of 1983, 30 DCR fijjp 7n andwV of Reorganization
tive March 2, 1984 and Savor19831 - ««ec8 -53
(March 16, 1984), hereby aivesnoH
1
' 31 DCR 1323
06
the intent to
the Vehicles and Tragic ReauL??^ , ,°f
amend
making action shall be SakSTj?*1+ i (18 ?£MR) * Final rulefrom the date of publication of thi «eSS4.^han. thlrtY (30) days
F
D.C. REGTSTRP
J-J-cation of this notice in the
The following rulemaking action is proposed:
4010.3, (a) Northwest°Section10isTamrFdCaSh<31,AI'S' Subsecti°n
following:
' ls amended by adding the
"Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street, N.W."
rulemaking action”^6?ile comment I***119 °" *his ProPosed
Department of PublicWorks 2000with the
Washington, D.C.
20009, (Attention^n8^^ fc' N*W*» 7th Floor,. .
No
Comments must be received no ?S
;uDocket
* 87-265-TS).
th±rty (30) da s
the date of publication of thi?
y after
the
c
Copies of this proposal mav
bi
^ - REGISTER Y
the above address.
obtained, at cost, by writing to
:'rl
Cl
7916
MCLEAN GARDENS
CONDOMINIUM
COM
X
Wltl
*>
■
CK
December 14, 1987
Mr. Terry Eakin
Vice President
The Holladay Corporation
2121 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.
Suite 400
Washington, DC 20007
Re:
Parking Meters on Idaho Avenue
Dear Terry:
Your proposal for metered parking on Idaho and Wisconsin Avenues
was considered by the Community Affairs Committee and the Board
of Directors took action on the proposal at our meeting of
December 9, 1987. The Board of Directors recommends that metered
angled parking be installed on the retail store side of Idaho
Avenue.
Since the street is a one way street it was felt that
cars could easily pull in and out of angled parking.
Also the
parking would be directly in front of the stores to be served and
people would be less inclined to cross in the middle of the block
to their parked car.
In addition, the Board felt that parking on
one side of the street would allow sufficient room for delivery
trucks and commercial traffic to use Idaho Avenue.
The Board was concerned that parking on both sides of the street
would create congestion and make it difficult for the movement of
commercial traffic thus encouraging the commercial traffic to use
neighborhood streets.
The Board requests that the meters run from 9:00 a.m. to 6:30
p.m. so that there is no lose of possible residential parking for
the neighborhood.
3811 PORTER STREET, N.W., WASHINGTON, D.C. 20016 (202) 966-9780
Page Two
December 14, 1987
Mr. Terry Eakin
The Board's primary concern is the impact of development and the
increasing density of the population on the quality of life for
the residents of McLean Gardens.
The Board is concerned that
added congestion on Wisconsin and Idaho Avenues will encourage
motorists to cut through the residential streets of the Gardens.
If you have any questions about our position,
calling me or Katherine Coram.
■
’
ours,
Julie B. Koczela
Board Member
JBK:mam
cc: McLean Gardens Board of Directors
Community Affairs Committee
do not hesitate
\a-\o
RECEIVED NOV 3 I ;J87 far
'>*
The
Holladay
Corporation
/Vr~
k) > * «
':*JM •/— ^
(Tn <-
-ct--
f^vnu^^
2121 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.
Suite 400
e,«J)
jJr 0~L
3
i s«pj «# 4/,r
Washington, D.C. 20007
-L$ J ZS
202-337-6470
November 24, 1987
Ms. Katherine Coram
President
McLean Gardens Condominium Association
3811 Porter Street, N.W.
Washington D.C.
20016
RE:
Parking Meters on Idaho Avenue
Dear Katherine:
As we've discussed, enclosed please find a drawing entitled
"Metered Parking Plan" showing the proposal of The Village at McLean
Gardens to add parking meters both on Idaho Avenue between Wisconsin
Avenue and Newark Street, as well as on Wiscconsin Avenue,just north
of Idaho Avenue.
Because the retail stores fronting on Idaho Avenue will soon be
completed, I would like very much for the McLean Gardens Condominium
Owners Association to support this proposal at the earliest possible
date. It is my strong view that these parking meters will discourage
Maryland commuters from parking in your neighborhood, thus providing
spaces for retail visitors. This in turn will keep the retail
visitors out of the residential areas of McLean Gardens.
These
meters of course, would not be operating after business hours, and
hence these spaces will be available at that time for local
residents.
I understand that the Association will be meeting in early
December, and I would greatly appreciate a review of this proposal at
that time.
If this plan can receive Association approval, we will
ask the Advisory Neighborhood Commission for support as well, and
submit the proposal to the District.
Please do not hesitate to
contact me should you have any questions.
cc:
Ms. Peggy Robin, Chairman
Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C
Ms. Julie B. Koczela,
McLean Gardens Board Member
Ms. Andrea Sallea, Esq.
Wilkes,Artis,Hedricks &Lane
G«S
(kre^-
l ^,'tU c>(<fe
draft for meeting 12/21/87
3E IT RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C:
That it send the attached letter to the
Deoartment of Public Works in support of the relighting of the urns and
the repainting of the K1ingle Valley Bridge, and the placement of
Historic District markers at four entrances to the Cleveland Park Historic
District.
REPORT ON PURCHASING A
PC COMPUTER & PRINTER FOR ANC-3C
Roger Burns
12-21-87
I. SUMMARY CONCLUSION:
Amongst those of us who are most involved in this topic ( i.e.
Cheryl, Peter, Peggy, & myself ), there is a consensus that the
kind of PC we should purchase is an IBM AT clone. Also, the particular AT clone offered by Community Computers of 1617 K St. NW
is probably an excellent buy. It goes for $1500 - $2000, depending
on the options.
There are a variety of other costs relating to software and
support that the Commission may want to pay for; however, there are
also very inexpensive alternatives to these options.
Regarding printers, there is no clear consensus now. Although
there are 100-odd printers on the market that one could choose from,
I present here a list of some preferable alternatives which I have
gleaned from a consumer-review article which recently appeared in a
well-regarded computer magazine. The major trade-offs are between
print quality, speed, and price. The available price range is from
$550 - $1800 (store price, not list).
II. WHY BUY AN "AT CLONE" ?
There are 3 kinds of IBM PCs (or compatibles) in existence now.
There’s the lower-level "88" based PCs - the original IBM PC and
its upgraded version, the XT; the middle-level "286" based PC which is the AT; and the upper-level, new PS/2 class of PCs just
coming on to the market now.
The new PS/2 class of PCs in general have much more power than
we really need, so they would not be a good buy for us. (Some of
them have a more appropriate level of power, but they cost much more
than they should given their abilities - this is often true of newly
released models, as you know.)
The lower-level "88" based PCs are probably good enough for our
needs, except that this kind of technology is soon to be outmoded.
Please note that the ANC will often be using software that individual
Commissioners will donate to our computer, and that in the near future
this donated software will be based on middle-level "286" technology.
As we will want to make a long term investment that will be able to take
advantage of what the new basic standard for software will be, we want
a PC that is based on middle-level "286" technology (if it's not too
expensive), that is, we want an AT. It is widely recognized by experts
that the AT will be the standard amongst PCs for the next 5 years, if
not longer, and in spite of the newly-developed PS/2 class which is coming
out now.
Why buy a clone of the AT ? Well, manufacturers who have copied the
original IBM AT have gotten so good that IBM has left the market - they
don’t make ATs anymore ! It's just as well, since the clones are so good
and cost so much less.
III. EXTRA COSTS: SOFTWARE & SUPPORT
The Commission will need software for its PC, otherwise it won't run!
An option at one extreme is that all of the needed word-processing, and
other, software will be donated by individual Commissioners and can be
supplemented with good how-to manuals that are easily purchased at local
bookstores. (This is an option I recommend.) On the other hand, we can
obtain our own software with other options (Cheryl prefers on-line
support). Software packages can run from $200 - $450.
REPORT ON PURCHASING
PC & PRINTER
page 2 of 3 •
111 A. PC OPTIONS
The Community Computers AT clone comes with a monitor (monochrome),
a keyboard, & a 20 meg hard disk for a total of $1495. A small speed
upgrade is $100 (from 6/10 Mhz to 12/6 Mhz), a 40 meg hard disk would
be $350 more, a modem (300/1200 baud) is $99. I recommend we get no
speed upgrade, consider a larger hard disk at a later time, and think
about a modem (enables telephone communication).
IV. PRINTERS - IN GENERAL
There is much debate on what we should purchase regarding a printer.
The general options are:
daisy-wheel printer - highest quality print, and inexpensive
(most $350 - $500, some $600-$900)
but slow (most 16-31 cps; one has
56 cps)
dot-matrix printer - varying quality of print depending
on model, and many people are
satisfied in general with the quality
of print while many others are not;
middle range in price ($550-$900);
standard speed for many business uses
(about 66 cps in near-letter-quality
mode )
laser printer - print quality better than dot-matrix,
although not up to daisy-wheel standard;
price range $1200 - $1800 and up;
speed: around 300 cps ; other features too
Some of the strong sentiments expressed by interested Commissioners are:
When we have long reports we will need fast printing - we can afford top
quality now, so we should by a fast laser printer.
OR: Our office never needs fast printing, there's no sense in spending
for qualities we don't need, so given the importance of price & print
quality we should strongly consider a daisy-wheel printer.
There is a consensus on ensuring that we get a low- or no-maintenance
machine, & that it should be easy to feed single sheets (such as letterhead) into our printer.
V. SORTING OUT THE CHOICES
I recommend that we take advantage of the study recently made by the
renowned PC Magazine on the specific brands of printers available.
(I've attached a copy of selected pages of that study following this
report.) In particular, we should look at the featured Editor's Choices
in each category.
The Commission will, however need to debate the acceptable price range
print quality, and desired speed. PLEASE form opinions on as many of thes
qualities as you can. Also note: some favorite choices may be unavailable
or hard to get. A Primage 90-GT daisy-wheel may have great print quality,
a moderate price at $900, and an adequate speed at 56 cps, but a short
search on my part has not yet found a Washington dealer who sells daisywheel printers. So we should debate more about qualities we're looking
for, unless we settle on a popular item we know is available, like an
Epson dot-matrix, or a Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Series II.
VI. GUIDE TO PRINTERS
A table of contents for the accompanying reprint
TOPIC
PAGES
INTRO / GEN'L DISCUSSION
DAISY WHEELS
DOT-MATRIX
> *BEST PICKS
GEN’L
SPECIFIC
LASERS
> *BEST
GEN'L
SPECIFIC
1-6
7-13
14
15-18
19-23
24
25-27
28-30
The editor's picks are:
MODEL
LIST
RETAIL*
Dot-matrix
Epson LQ-850
Epson LQ-1050
C Itoh C-715A
$799
$1,099
$1,295
$550
$759
($900)
Laser
Okidata Laserline 6
HP LaserJet Series 2
$1,995
$2,595
$1200
$1800
SPEED*
67 cps
68 cps
64 cps
270 cps
360 cps
Daisy wheels - field too narrow to make picks
NOTES: prices from Printers Plus; price in parenthesis was
estimated at 30% discount off of list;
speed for lasers converted to cps for comparison,
assuming 1 page per minute = 45 characters per second
I
ANNUAL
T
Laser and 24-pin dot
matrix printers share the
limelight as 106 machines
meet 12 reviewers in
PC Magazine's fourth
annual printer survey.
The conclusion: you’ll do
more with and pay
less for this year’s crop.
PC
his is the fourth edition of PC Magazine's annual printer issue. Over
the past 4 years PC Labs has spent
more than 10,000 man-hours testing
120, 70, 97, and now 106 printers—393 in all that have been reviewed. A
few others that failed the PC Labs gauntlet
of speed, compatibility, and durability
tests haven’t been heard from since.
Since that first annual printer issue in
November 1984, 3 months after the birth
of the IBM PC AT, the market has seen
substantial changes:
■ Bang-for-the-buck has obviously improved. Dot matrix printers today run an
average 31 percent faster than they did in
1984, based on PC Labs speed benchmark
tests, and cost about 26 percent less. Even
with the yen kicking sand in the dollar’s
face, prices on some dot matrix printers
have fallen 10 to 25 percent in die past
year. The era of the $500 24-pin dot matrix
printer is fast approaching.
■ Today’s $2,500 business printer of
choice is a laser printer that cranks out the
whispery equivalent of 200 to 300 characters per second. Yesterday it was a clackety 55-cps NEC 7730/8850, NEC Spinwriter, or a Diablo 630 that didn’t have a
clue to the meaning of graphics.
MAGAZINE
NOVEMBER 10, 1987
92
[
/
3
■ PRINTERS
i
■ PF
■ Automatic sheet feeding used to cost interlocks prevent you) but not quite pow$1,000 extra on daisy wheel printers and erful enough to bring down geosynchronous satellites, shines on an electrically
was unheard of on dot matrix printers.
Now it’s built in on laser printers and costs charged photoconductor drum (the thing
only a few hundred dollars on many dot inside the laser printer that looks like a mirmatrix and lower-end daisy wheel printe»r -fer wrapped around a cylinder). The light
Of course, the more things change, the alters the charge. Powdered black toner
more they stay the same. The industry has with an opposite electrical charge adheres
yet to devise anything as simple and idiot- to the drum and is transferred to paper, perproof as the office Selectric for envelopes manently bonded by heat.
and that small run of file-folder labels.
When you come right down to it. which
would do more for your productivity in
1988: OS/2 running on a 20-MHz Compaq
Deskpro 386 or a printer that conveniently
handles Federal Express air bills?
Tractor-feed paper continues to snag
printer cables and evade pin-feed mechanisms. And cryptic control panels assume
users walk around chanting their mantras:
“Hold select and form-feed as you power
up; then quickly press line-feed twice and
you’ll go into compressed mode.” And so
on. and so on, and so on.
Perhaps the best way to summarize the
printer part of the PC industry is to realize
Variants use light-emitting diodes and
that although printers have made wondrous liquid crystal shutters. While manufacturstrides, they still have a long way to go be- ers will argue their relative merits—as well
fore users reach nirvana. In other words, as the merits of white-print and black-print
printers are just like everything else.
page printers—to the user, the result is
At the risk of recounting the obvious,
more alike than different: ultraquiet operahere are your choices in printers:
tion, 5- to 8-page-per-minute output, and
Dot matrix printers Despite the end- 300-dot-per-inch resolution.
less fascination with laser printers, the dot
Laser and laserlike printers fall into five
matrix is the most common printer because general categories:
it’s relatively cheap and effective. By most ■ LaserJet wannabes, the two dozen
estimates, dot matrix printers account for units that claim 6 to 8 ppm, HP compatibilabout two-thirds of the printers being sold
ity, $2,000 to $3,000 list prices, and an intoday. The vast majority are impact dot tense desire to share in Hewlett-Packard’s
matrix printers with 9 pins. Coming on fast success. As PC Labs HP graphics comare the 24-pin printers with side-by-side patibility tests made abundantly clear,
columns of 12 pins; the two columns with some should be thought of as text-only destaggered vertical offsets help speed in vices.
draft mode, quality in near-letter-quality.
■ Amazing-output devices, such as the
Print quality gets better with each new Apple LaserWriter Plus, that speak the
printer, and the business community has PostScript page description language and
become more accustomed to the generally have more built-in smarts and more typopleasing dot matrix output. But no matter graphic ability than the HP clan—at higher
what you read or hear, it’s still near-letter- prices. Some, like the NEC Silentwriter
quality.
LC-890, have both emulations. These are
Laser (page) printers To trivialize a the weapons of choice for the desktop pubbit, laser printers are essentially photo- lishing crowd.
copiers with a data cable in back. The light ■ Long-life $3.000-to-$5,000 printers
beam from an honest-to-goodness laser, offering heavier-duty cycles (such as the
powerful enough to cause eye damage if Quadram Quadlaser 1 and the Genicom
you were so dumb as to look inside (safety 5010) and fast, long-life printers (exempli-
A'"'
IJilthough printers have made
wondrous strides, they still have a
long way to go before users reach nirvana. In other words, printers are just
like everything else.
PC
MAGAZINE
■
fied by Kyocera’s $8,395, 15.6-ppm F3010). They’re destined for small work
groups linked by a smart printer-sharing
box or on a network (but never, never put
in a network just to share printers).
■ A handful of brain-dead units, so called
because the controller card is the PC, not
the printer. They’re fine for dedicated single systems because graphics output is dramatically faster, but printer sharing is nearly impossible. Examples are the Cordata
LP300 series, the Tall Tree JLaser cards,
and the evolving Advanced Vision Research PageMaster system.
■ The 600-dpi-and-up plain-paper typesetters that cost somewhere between laser
printers and film typesetters, such as the
Vari typer VT-600. Check Charles Petzold’s kindly but scathing review to see
why this category isn’t quite there yet.
Since Hewlett-Packard revolutionized
the printer business in 1984 with the
$3,495 LaserJet, prices for lasers have
dropped and keep dropping to the point
where you can find a highly competent
machine like the Okidata Laserline 6 for a
street price of $1,400 and the LaserJet Series II for $1,750.
Daisy wheel printers A hammer
whacks a plastic or metal petal with 88 to
96 spokes and transfers the character
through a ribbon to the paper. NEC’s
once-dominant Spinwriters used a 64spoke thimble wheel looking like, well, a
large sewing thimble or a variation on the
IBM Selectric ball.
Look in the dictionary under dinosaur
and you’re likely to see a picture of a
Qume Sprint 11 or Diablo 630 ECS. The
slowest laser printer produces a whisperquiet 4 ppm; the fastest daisy wheel manages, a shade over 2.5 ppm. For a rough
comparison between ppm and cps, multiply or divide the speed test results by 30.
Only in the $500 to $1,000 range is
there much of a market left for daisy
wheels, and the most aggressive player is
Brother, which says it is now shipping
more units (although not necessarily doing
greater dollar volume) than any of the big
three of the first half of the decade: NEC,
Diablo, and Qume.
Ink jet printers They’re technically
dot matrix printers, too, although everybody uses that term to speak of impact dot
matrix printers that go zzzzzzzt zzzzzzzzzzt.
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
94
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■ PRINTERS
1
Printer categories we’d all love to
Their numbers are as small as these nonimpact machines are quiet. They spray tiny see—and will, eventually—are color laser
drops of ink in a matrix pattern, and color printers (prototypes may be shown in back
models are available, such as HP’s amaz- rooms at the Fall Comdex) and affordable
ing PaintJet <see Mitt Jones's review of B-sized (11- by 17-inch) laser printers to
this 330-color marvel). Inkjet units work be used for CAD, spreadsheets, and deskwith plain paper, but most of them really Top publishing.
need more costly day-coated paper for
best output. Clogging problems are markedly fewer than they were a few years ago.
Thermal transfer printers They’re
yet another dot matrix variety, typically
used for color charts and graphs. A waxy
ink from a ribbon or a transfer sheet is
melted onto the paper.
Categories we aren’t reviewing:
Line printers They print entire lines
all at once, either with fully formed characters or with dot matrixes—unlike the serial matrix and serial fully formed printers
that do a character at a time. They’re expensive and more for mainframes and minis than for PCs.
Typewriter/printers There’s a yearning among small-business and PC-at- ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT Mehome users for an electronic typewriter chanically, a printer is pretty much imthat’s also a printer. They’re good for lim- mune to failure. If it works correctly straight
ited-duty printing only. Street prices are in out of the box, it should run without mishap
the $250-to-$500 range, plus $75 to $150 for years, requiring only changes of ribbons
to add interfaces to machines that don’t and other consumables.
have them built in. Players include BrothWhether you’ll love those intervening
er, Canon, Olivetti, Olympia, Panasonic, years is another matter. For all their meand Royal Smith-Corona. This category chanical perfection, printers still have
may be covered in a future issue of PC quirks that can drive you up the wall. What
Magazine.
do they do wrong now? What could they
Plotters Laser printers, especially do better? Here’s a list, culled from a
those that speak HPGL (Hewlett-Packard round-robin discussion among PC MagaGraphics Language, the lingua franca of zine editors and contributors Frank
the CAD set), and color dot-matrix print- Derfler, Jr., John Dvorak, Nora Georgas,
ers can do many of the same things as plot- Cheryl Goldberg, Stephen Manes, Jim
ters, but plotters don’t stand a chance of Seymour, and Gus Venditto:
imitating a text printer. They’re reviewed ■ Abysmal front control panels I. If you
apart from PC Magazine's annual printer have one of the ubiquitous power-switchsurveys, most recently in Volume 6 Num- and-three-buttons (on-line, line-feed,
ber 11 (see “Big Draws: The New Large- form-feed) dot matrix machines, you have
Format Plotters”).
to remember arcane button sequences
Instant tutorial on plotters: Hewlettwhen you power up to set the machine into
Packard owns the market; IBM agrees (it compressed or elite mode, and the instrucrelabels HP plotters); the other players are tions are seldom printed on the panel.
Houston Instrument, Bruning, CalComp, ■ Abysmal control panels II. Hard-toIoline, and Roland; plotters are a ball to see read LCDs and cryptic two-digit LEDs are
in action; nobody buys two-pen plotters the wrong place to save a few pennies. Just
anymore (now it’s six or eight); and if you what does the blinking number 7 on the
want to produce plots the size of your desk,
front panel mean? More machines should
have at least $5,000 to $10,000 at the have 24-character LEDs you can read from
ready.
at least 5 feet away that say things like “12
fy[
± ▼ Aechanically, a printer is pretty much immune to failure. If it works
correctly straight out of the box, it
should run without mishap for years,
requiring only changes of ribbons and
other consumables.
PC
MAGAZINE
■
CPI NLQ, PERFSKIPON.”
■ Abysmal control panels III. Every
printer above entry level should have these
front-panel buttons: data-stream lockout
that makes your printer ignore control
codes sent from the PC, automatic perforation skip and/or half-inch left margin, and
buffer-flush. The first is for times when
you don’t want to look up and type in a different 15-character I -2-3 setup string for
just this one print job; the second for printouts of unformatted text; the third when
you realized you’ve screwed up the printout and want to try again. Hitting the power switch or pulling the paper tray on a laser printer guarantees a paper jam.
■ Too-small buffers. With memory so
cheap, why not put a really useful buffer
into printers—at least 64K, preferably
128K? Tiny 2K, 4K, and 8K buffers are a
joke.
■ Inadequate paper handling. Why is a
pin-feed or tractor-feed still optional on dot
matrix printers? Do manufacturers hope
paper wills itself to feed through straight?
Power and data connections sometimes
appear designed so that the cable hardware
grabs and shreds tractor-feed paper.
■ Missing bottom-feed. The best way to
avoid paper jams on dot matrix and daisy
wheel printers is to feed paper through bottom slots. Too few printers have bottom
slots.
■ Hidden power and DIP switches. The
only place for the power switch is in front.
DIP switches aren’t accessed as frequently. but too often they’re secreted in places
where the sun doesn’t shine, such as under
the platen.
■ Poor sound insulation. Too bad dot matrix printers and the few remaining daisy
wheels don’t have stealth options that include slightly bulkier cases with massive
amounts of sound-deadening material.
■ Polyglot printer-driver standards.
Word processors now must devote one or
more disks to emulate all the oddball printers out there, often because a printer says it
can emulate an Epson LQ-1500 or IBM
Proprinter, but it’s really happier with the
custom Yamagatzi Dotwriter driver. Compare this situation with that of the simpler
world of modems: everybody emulates
Hayes.
■ Bad VM1 indexing. Know the white
bands you get on a dot matrix graphics
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
96
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OUR REVIEWERS
Bruce Brown is a principal at Soft In- Charles Petzold is a contributing editor
dustries, a Connecticut computer consul- _of EC.Magazine. He has worked on the
tancy. He is the founder of the Connecti- past three printer projects.
cut Computer Society and has taught Alfred Poor is a principal of Soft Indusbusiness uses of computers at various tries. a Connecticut computer consultancolleges. Brown also worked on last cy. A frequent contributor to PC Magazine. he has participated in the last three
year’s printer project.
Carol Olsen Day is a free-lance book printer projects.
Vincent Puglia writes frequently for PC
and magazine writer based in New York.
A contributor to last year’s printer issue, Magazine. He has edited for several
she has also written numerous articles on newsletters and is a free-lance consulcomputer training and maintenance for tant. He has contributed to the three previous printer issues.
PC Magazine.
Erika Hortz is majoring in computer Philip F. H. Rose is a project leader at
science at Columbia University. She PC Labs.
teaches minicourses in the use of person- Jeffrey Rothfeder is a free-lance book
al computers at the Barnard College Aca- and magazine writer based in New Jersey . He is the author of Minds Over Matdemic Computer Center.
Mitt Jones is an assistant editor of PC ter (Computer Book Division, Simon &
Schuster Inc., 1985), a discussion of
Magazine.
Barbara KrasnofT is a former associate trends in artificial intelligence.
editor af PC Magazine. She is the author M. David Stone is a contributing editor
of numerous articles on computers and of PC Magazine. A reviewer for the three
robotics and was a reviewer for last previous printer issues, he is a free-lance
consultant specializing in computer comyear’s printer issue.
Jonathan Matzkin is an assistant editor munications and has also written three
of PC Magazine.
computer books.
printout from a non-IBM/Epson printer?
They’re from companies that use a nonstandard vertical-motion-index spacing
and then do a poor job of mathematically
converting to Epson/IBM movement.
■ Expensive, idiosyncratic, hard-tochange ribbons. Aren’t there enough ribbon designs to go around now? Why do
manufacturers create new ones every
month? Is it too much to ask Okidata to include a 5-cent disposable plastic glove
with its $25 ribbon for an Oki 2410?
■ Top-of-form detector. Would that
printers could use an optical or a mechanical sensor to determine the perforation at
the top of a form and advance the paper accordingly.
■ Built-in printer-sharing devices. It’s no
secret that many lasers get shared among
several users (see “Sharing Your Laser’s
Power,” PC Magazine, Volume 6 Number 8). Compared with the $500-to-$ 1,000
cost of buying an external smart sharing
PC
device, it’s rather trivial to build one in. As
sharing devices become more common,
software needs to be tweaked to keep from
hanging the system if the sharing device is
temporarily full.
■ Mindless font emulations. Genicom's
first stab at emulating the HP Times Roman/Helvetica font cartridges on its excellent 5010 laser was the gap-toothed HP B
cartridge, followed by the slightly better F
cartridge, when it should have gone
straight to the wonderful Z cartridge. Of
course, there’s almost no interchangeability between different companies’ font cartridges, so you have to take what the maker
offers.
■ The envelope crisis. Most printers have
no easy method for dealing efficiently with
envelopes. Too many laser printers crinkle
envelopes, inadvertently heat-seal the
flap, and fail to offer a special envelopefeed tray. IBM’s Proprinters are among the
very few dot matrix units with envelope
MAGAZINE
■
slots (you don’t have to unload tractor paper to use them). The plastic card guides
on daisy wheels are fiendishly designed to
grab, fold, and ink-smudge the upper-lefthand comers of envelopes. No wonder so
many laser-printed letters go out the door
in hand-addressed envelopes.
M
A. ▼ .Lost printers have no easy
method of dealing efficiently with envelopes. Too many laser printers crinkle envelopes, inadvertently heat-seal
the flap, and fail to offer a special envelope-feed tray.
ALL IN ORDER The 98 reviews of 106
printers are organized into three main categories: 36 lasers, 65 dot matrixes (including inkjet, thermal transfer, and Brother’s
hybrid dot/daisy Twinriter 6), and 5 daisy
wheels. Reviews are arranged in alphabetical order by company name within the
sections, Alps before Epson before Toshiba. Features tables compare print quality, speeds, prices, available fonts and print
enhancements, and compatibility with established printer standards.
Finally, a historical index summarizes
259 of the 393 printers that were tested
over the past four years and are still available. At the request of readers, the index
has been expanded to include the type of
printer, highest tested speed (based on PC
LaFs benchmark tests, not inflated manufacturer claims), price then and now,
whether the printer is still in production or
whether it’s been superseded by another
model, and when it was reviewed. Even if
a printer is out of production, it may be
available used, or you may be offered the
printer as a hand-me-down from a power
user who finally convinced the budget-review committee that he deserves that LaserJet.—Bill Howard
Bill Howard is an executive editor of PC
Magazine.
N O V E M B E R I 0. I 9 8 7
97
G
■ PRINTERS
TESTING THE PRINTERS
PC Labs has refined its printer benchmark tests once again for our fourth annual
roundup of new printers.
P
C Magazine invited 12 reviewers,
most of them veterans of past printer
projects, to the PC Labs for another go at
testing the new printers—106 of
them—that hit the market in the last year.
Sounds like a huge undertaking, right? It
always is.
The printer features table is a distillation of approximately 4,000 hours of
testing, but much work was done before
the reviewers—-and the printers—arrived
in the PC Labs. Anticipating PC Magazine's largest full-scale evaluation project of the year, the PC Labs project leaders revised their tried-and-true printer
benchmark tests, making them more
comprehensive than ever before. Not
only do the new tests measure the speed
of *vide-camage printers and test the capabilities of PostScript printers more accurately, but they are also tougher on
graphics and emulation pretenders.
As our 23-page table of printer features suggests, PC Magazine doesn’t just
report the manufacturers' claimed specifications. Instead, each category included in our table corresponds to a test developed in PC Labs for the express
purpose of testing these claims and verifying their accuracy—or lack of it. The
results of our reviewers’ findings are then
presented in tabular format so that you’ll
be able to see at a glance how machines
of different types and different prices
stack up against each other.
We think you’ll agree that the new
format of this year’s printer features table, designed to be concise and easy to
read, culls the most important statistics
from the reviews, objectively bringing
you the facts and figures our reviewers
considered when they rated these 106
new machines.
The revised benchmark tests, which
are available through the PC Magazine
, Interactive Reader Service electronic
bulletin board, check the printers’
claimed graphics and resolution compati-
PC
With stacks of
printers waiting in
the wings, veteran
reviewers and PC
Labs project leaders put this year’s
crop of 106
printers to the test
in PC Labs.
bilities, generate text and graphics samples. and measure the printers’ speeds. A
sound level measurement is also included
for dot matrix and daisy wheel printers.
This year the test developers replaced
the graphics test that used the PC Magazine logo with one that uses a pattern and
line-resolution sample, a change that
should add to your ability to see the printers' graphics and resolution capabilities
in greater detail.
We’ve also lengthened the text sample shown in the features table. So that
you can get a closer look at the output
produced by each machine, our test now
requires each printer to generate a fiveline quality sample as well as a four-line
sample of fonts and features. The astute
quotation comes from a letter written in
1789 by Benjamin Franklin, a venerable
printer himself.
Our revised speed tests—which were
performed on all printers, including both
narrow- and wide-carriage machines—were designed to simulate reallife print jobs more closely. Unlike some
manufacturers that base their printers’
speed ratings on tests that do not include
page breaks or that do not measure print
speeds with paper loaded into the maMAGAZINE ■
chines, PC Labs tested the speed of dot
matrix and daisy wheel printers by having them print a two-page single-spaced
business letter containing 2,888 characters. Laser printers printed this letter ten
times. On the whole, printer speeds now
tend to be slightly higher than those of
last year and more on a par with the manufacturers’ claims.
After consulting with Adobe Systems, the developer of the PostScript
page description language, PC Labs developed its first PostScript-compatibility
test for laser printers. Aspiring desktop
publishers will want to pay close attention to these results.
. As-usual, evaluations and descriptions of each printer follow in review articles. Here’s where we put all the specs in
context and where, we admit, we present
some of our more subjective reactions to
the printers. Each review is accompanied
by a Fact File that lists manufacturer and
pricing information and summarizes die
printer’s most important features, as well
as by a photograph of the printer being reviewed.—DowdrfP.Wflhnott
Donald P. Willmott is an assistant editor
of PC Magazine.
N O V E M B E R I 0, 1 9 8 7
95
■'Z-T3
7
LpA^K
W
A
ith list and street prices of many
laser printers falling below
$2,000, and with most dot matrix printers offering respectable letter quality output, why would anyone buy a daisy wheel printer? The answer
is the same as it’s always been: for the print
quality.
Rumors of the death of the noisy, slow
daisy wheel printer have not been greatly
In light of these numbers, it would be
difficult for anyone to argue that the future
of formed-character daisy wheel printers
doesn’t look bleak. Nor does it take a great
deal of foresight to see that the vastly improved performance of dot matrix printers
combined with the large number of fonts
being offered with laser printers will continue to push daisy wheel printers the way
of wood-block type.
exaggerated. The number of daisy wheel
printers continues to dwindle at a brisk
pace, dropping down to only five models
in this year’s roundup from 12 in last
year’s issue and 15 in the issue before that.
While the number of new dot matrix printers PC Magazine has reviewed has remained almost constant over the past 2
years, the number of laser printers has exactly doubled—from 18 in Volume 5
Number 19 to 36 in this year’s issue.
WHEN QUALITY MATTERS
A FAREWELL
From the fast-narrowing
field of daisy wheel
printers, PC Labs reviews
five machines that
belong to a vanishing breed.
PC
MAGAZINE ■
But
there are reasons why you should consider
buying a daisy wheel printer. Above all is
the high quality of the output that it produces. Often referred to as ‘ ‘Selectric quality” for their similarity to the output of an
IBM Selectric typewriter, the sharply defined characters produced by daisy wheel
printers are created when a formed character strikes a ribbon, depositing ink on the
page in the same way that a typewriter
NOVEMBER 10, 1987
378
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would. Although many dot matrix printers
can generate letter quality text, you can
still tell even the best dot matrix samples
apart from the crisp, clear output of a daisy
wheel printer.
Laser printers, on the other hand, offer
high-resolution output (at least 300 dots
per inch) in any number of fonts, but the
documents these printers produce look as
if they came off a copying machine—at
fund development for a non-profit corporation and you’re soliciting donations from
CEOs of the Fortune 500, you don’t want
your letters to look as if they’re fresh off a
copier.
That leaves a niche, albeit a small one,
for such daisy wheel printer manufacturers
as Primages and Brother International
Corp. to fill. While claiming that the daisy
wheel market is price insensitive, Pri-
ers of laser printers who need machines
that can handle the chores that lasers can’t
do well or can’t do at all. As a spokesman
for Brother points out, laser printers aren’t
well suited to printing envelopes or labels,
and they can’t print multipart forms at all.
They are also limited to using 8.5-inchwide paper.
Brother is more than ready to supply
you with wide-carriage daisy wheel print-
TO DAISY WHEELS
least until you get used to them.
True, the increasing number of new laser printers indicates that PC users want
the variety of fonts and high-resolution
graphics that lasers offer, and they are willing to sacrifice Selectric quality to get
them. But for those times when nothing
less than the look and feel of a document
printed by a formed-character machine
will do, the obvious choice is a daisy
wheel. For example, if you’re in charge of
PC
mages has slashed its prices: the Primage
90-GT, which is basically the same printer
as one of last year’s Editor’s Choices, the
Primage 100, sells for $1,095—$800 less
than its predecessor. However, the cost of
an additional tractor-feed mechanism
($295). cut-sheet-feeder ($395), or dualbin envelope-feeder ($795) undercuts the
price advantage the Primage 90-GT has
over some laser printers.
Brother International is going after us-
MAGAZINE ■
ers like the HR-40 ($799) or the HR-20
7$499)Tor those purposes. Although similarly priced dot matrix printers can handle
the same tasks as these midrange entries,
chances are their NLQ modes won’t measure up to the high-quality output produced
by these daisy wheels. In addition, some
dot matrix printers slow down to about the
same speed as daisy wheels when they
print in NLQ mode, clocking in at approximately 35 characters per second.
NOVEMBER 10, 1987
379
■ DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS
PICKING THE RIGHT DAISY If
you've decided that daisy wheel technology is what you need, you'll definitely
want a printer that emulates the de facto
standard in daisy wheel printers—the Diablo 630—but it's hard to find a new daisywheel printer that doesn't. Print speed is
based largely on how much you're willing
to pay. In this year's crop of printers,
speeds range from 16 cps for the $419 Panasonic KX-P3131 to 56 cps for the $ 1.095
Primage 90-GT.
Most important, remember that print
quality is the only reason to buy a daisy
wheel printer. Of the printers reviewed
here, all provide true Selectric quality or
very close to it. Don’t settle for anything
less. In addition, machines that offer a
range of print wheels will afford you greater variety in the pitches and typefaces you
can use.
Daisy wheel printers are an endangered
species and may soon become extinct. But
be assured that in demanding a daisy wheel
printer, you're showing your good taste.
When you care enough to print the very
best, a daisy wheel printer is still the only
choice. Reviews of five diehards follow;
read about them while they last.
—M. David Stone
spondence, reports, or any other text-only
application. And although daisy wheel
printers lack some of the text enhancement
features of dot matrix or laser printers, the
Brother HR-20 offers shadow print for
bnkiface printing, double-strike mode for
extra-dark printing, and underlining.
Of course, daisy wheel printers are
slow, and the Brother HR-20 is no exception. But for many users, superior print
quality is more important than high speed.
We clocked the Brother HR-20 at 21 characters per second (cps) in standard mode.
In double-strike mode, its speed dropped
to a crawl—about 7 cps. But the extra-dark
text produced in double-strike mode is
worth waiting for if you are printing short
documents, such as business letters or resumes.
Neither a tractor-feed nor a sheet-feeder
is included in the Brother HR-20's base
pike of $499. which limits it to handling
single cut sheets in its basic form. That
won t be adequate for most users, who will
need to purchase either the $169 tractor-
Brother HR-40
Brother HR-20
Conventional wisdom may have it that the
noisy, slow. and limited daisy wheel printer bears some resemblance to the dinosaur
and will suffer the same fate. But for some
users, daisy wheel printers, like the $499
Brother HR-20 from Brother International
Corp.. still offer the best combination of
print quality, typeface selection, and
price/performance ratio.
The HR-20 uses Brother's interchangeable cartridge system. The print wheels are
contained in plastic cartridges, and changing typefaces is as simple as snapping out
one cartridge, snapping in another, and
flipping a DIP switch or two if necessary.
The cartridges not only simplify font and
typeface selection but also prevent you
from getting ink all over your hands when
changing wheels. Brother has a selection
of 25 cassettes at $24.95 each.
The Courier typeface that I tested with
the Brother HR-20 is suitable for correPC
feed or the $299 cut-sheet-feeder. The cutsheet-feeder works very well: it moves the
paper smoothly through the printer and up
to its stacker. I had no problem with stray
sheets or jamming.
While Brother didn't see fit to include a
paper-feed, the vendor does supply both
parallel and serial interfaces as standard
equipment with the HR-20.
The Brother HR-20's front panel has
switches for line-feed, top-of-form. and
type pitch. The panel also has switches that
control the HR-20's useful copy functions
Data can be loaded into the printer's 8K
buffer (expandable to I6K) and then reprinted ad infinitum at the touch of a microswitch.
Neither dot matrix nor laser printers can
beat the letter quality that a relatively inexpensive daisy wheel printer like the Brother HR-20 produces. So if you need to print
only text, why spend more?
—Jonathan Matzkin
Brotber HR-20
Brother International Corp.
8 Corporate PI.
Piscataway, NJ 08854
(800) 526-3537
(201)981-0300
List Price: $499; tractor-feed, $169; cutsheet-feeder, $299; additional daisy wheel
cartridges. $24.95.
Dtanensioiis(HWD): 5.5 x 18 x 13.5 in.
Welgjit: 18.5 lbs.
In Short: A basic wide-caniage 21 -cps personal daisy wheel printer that uses easy-to-replace print wheel cartridges.
CIRCLE «6i ON HEADER SERVICE CARD
MAGAZINE
■
With the $799 Brother HR-40. Brother International Corp. upholds its tradition of
producing low-cost, high-quality daisy
wheel printers. The Brother HR-40's
speed and print quality are unexpected tor
the price and a match for the high-end daisy wheel printers that once ruled the letterquality market.
The printer also boasts such pluses as a
built-in cut-sheet-feeder and tractor-feed
And because the Brother HR-40 uses Diablo 630 control codes, you can use it with
most applications software without encountering problems.
—Print quality on the Brother HR-40 fall-'
just short of true IBM Selectric typewrit^
quality. Characters are crisp and clean:
they're not uniformly dark, but they ^
fine for most types of correspondence.
The Brother HR-40’s print speed is also
good for a daisy wheel printer. On the
Labs tests the printer clocked in at 31 chaf'
acters per second (cps). This speed i*
roughly half that of the fastest daisy whee'
printer ever tested at PC Labs (it also sells
for well under half the price).
The Brother HR-40's built-in multip'e
approach to paper handling is a nice touchAs shipped, the printer can take single
N O V E M B E R 1 0, I 9 8 7
380
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■ DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS
trix printers, the documentation for this
reprint it minutes or hours later (any time
before turning the printer off). With Copy daisy wheel is disappointingly sparse and
Mode/Reprint, the computer can go about
incomplete. What’s more, the section that
its own work while the Fortis DX41 prints details the use of control codes lacks sample BASIC runs and even examples of the
out copies, reading from its buffer.
To the right of Copy Mode/Reprint in -type-styles and enhancements.
the front panel is a control for a function
The Fortis DX41 offers a few unusual
called Load. Here you select the type of conveniences, most notably its Copy
paper: cut-sheet or fanfold.
Mode/Reprint and automatic paper-loadIn some printers, automatic paper loading features. But don’t expect exceptional
ing is akin to one-button ignition systems print capabilities; in that respect the Fortis
on backyard gas barbecue grills: they’re DX41 is only slightly better than most daifaulty, and within a week or two the func- sy wheel printers in its class.
tion is disabled. The Fortis DX41. which —Jeffrey Rothfeder
emulates the Diablo 630, is different. Using an automatic paper-feeding system
controlled by a touch-sensitive switch, the
printer loads forms from the excellent single or dual cut-sheet-feeders or the built-in
A sturdy, easy-to-operate. well-priced
tractor-feed.
($419). almost-wide-carriage daisy wheel
Another good design feature is the loca- printer from that superb market competition of the DIP switches. Frequently. DIP tor. Panasonic Industrial Co., the Panaswitches are put somewhere in the rear of sonic KX-P3131 is a trustworthy performprinters, buried behind and beneath cables er in ottice and home environments. The
and plastic ridges; it’s as if the manufactur- printer is especially distinctive because it's
ers searched for the most awkward spot in
which to bury the minuscule switchboards.
To its credit, the DX4I eschews this de7T:I
sign course. Its DIP switches are underneath the top front cover, where you can
■SB FACT
FILE
see and use them easily.
The print wheels for the Fortis DX41
are tiny plastic cassettes that both prevent
the encased printing elements from being
damaged and ensure that ink doesn’t stain
your fingers. A joy to work with, they slide
in and out smoothly.
When it comes to printing capabilities,
though, the Fortis DX41 is only slightly
above average. In low-speed near-letterquality mode, it prints solid, strong characters. It offers bold, proportional, and compressed modes as well as underlined
Panasonic KX-P3131
characters, but it lacks italics as well as suPanasonic Industrial Co.
perscripts and subscripts. In proportional
One Panasonic Way
Secaucus, NJ 07094
printing, the letters appear to be bunched
(800) 2224)584
too tightly.
(201)348-7000
In terms of speed, the DX41 is typical
List Price: $419
of other printers in its class. In bidirecDimensions (HWD): 6.6 x 18.9 x 12.8 in.
Weight 19.7 ibs.
tional printing, it clocked in at 31 characIn Short This lightweight 13.5-inch-carters per second; Fortis claims a maximum
riage daisy wheel printer outperforms heaviof 40 cps for the machine. In tests for unier, more expensive printers; at 16cpsit’sno
directional printing, the Fortis DX41 came
- speedster, hut it’s a trustworthy machine for
in at 19 cps.
. home or office.
QBCtfCT ON HEADER SEBVCE CARD
Considering that excellent user manuals accompany the Fortis line of dot ma-
Panasonic KX-P3131
PC
MAGAZINE
■
extremely lightweight (only 19.7 pounds).
Its basic design is simple, not overwhelming. and its footprint is small enough to fit
in most workstation areas.
The Panasonic KX-P3131’s output is
smart, if not stylish. In the default font we
tested (Courier 10), certain letters, such as
r and e, appear a bit ragged and soft, but
overall the print looked good, without being overly inky, as is the output of many
daisy wheels.
Although the KX-P3131 costs significantly less than do other daisy wheels, this
printer's speed is nothing to keep secret.
We clocked it at 16 characters per second
(cps) in unidirectional printing, while Panasonic’s testers claim 17 cps.
Typical printer enhancements such as
bold type, underlining, and proportional
printing are available. Particularly pleasing is the way the printer handles proportional type. The letters do not lean on each
other, but seem to have a well-separated
space in which to sit—a sign of a well-designed daisy wheel machine. Moreover,
the Panasonic KX-P3131 also offers such
nontypical type enhancements as outlining
and shadow print.
The types of switches and indicators on
the printer, as well as their location, are another plus. The DIP switches are conveniently located under the front top cover,
where they are easy to see and use. Moreover. the usual function switches—on/offline. form-feed, line-feed—are enhanced
by a second set of selector switches that enable you to set margins and justification,
choose type pitch, select line spacing, and
indicate how heavy or light the output
should be.
In addition, the Panasonic KX-P313I s
usef-mam»l is excellent. It begins with a
concise, interesting explanation of what
daisy wheel printing is all about. A step*
by-step, comprehensible guide to setting
up the printer and loading paper follows
Finally, control codes for type enhance*
ments and special printer functions are >•*
6
lustrated through sample BASIC progr#*
and samples of the output produced whe*1
the programs are run. If that’s not en0U£1’
well-organized appendexes and an in«®
make the information easy to find whC
you need it.
.y ■
If, despite the manual’s help, yoU.fjj|
lC8r
need assistance, knowledgeable techn )l
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
384
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DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS
[sheets with manual insertion, single sheets
[through the built-in cut-sheet-feeder, or
[continuous forms through the built-in trac| tor-feed. If you have to shift among different kinds of paper regularly, you’ll appre^_
[date this flexibility.
The built-in sheet-feeder is strictly for
[letter-sized paper, and it holds only 50
[sheets. For heavy-duty printing, you’ll
[probably want the optional dual-bin sheet[•feeder, which holds 125 sheets of 20pound paper, up to 14 inches wide, in each
bin and offers an optional envelope-feeder
as well.
pMODERN LOOK The Brother HR-40
[sports a suitably modem squarish look.
[The seven front-panel buttons have the
[usual settings for on- and off-line, linefeed, and top-of-form. Another button sets
[pitch (10, 12, 15, or proportional type).
The reprint button, which you use when
[you want to print multiple copies of docugments, is another interesting feature. To
[use the reprint feature, you put the printer
[off-line and push the copy button to put it
Sin copy mode. Then you go on-line and
FACT
FILE
^Brother HR-40
^Brother International Cop.
Information Systems Div.
8 Corporate PI.
Piscataway, NJ 08854
(201) 981-0300
List Price: $799
tPhnensions(HWD): 7.7 x 23.1 x 13.4 in.
^Weight: 31.9 lbs.
jjto Short: This impressive-for-the-price
[wide-camage daisy wheel printer offers Sleeps speed, high-qualitypanting; a built-in
;<U-sheet-feeder, arfauA4stra&r-foedt and a
shandy repiiHl
PC
T
X he HR-40’s reprint feature helps
make up for the slow speed of a daisy
wheel printer, since it frees the computer for other jobs.
pri nt as usual. After printing the first copy,
you simply go back off-line and print as
many additional copies as you need merely
by hitting the reprint button once for each
copy.
The reprint feature helps make up for
the relatively slow speed of a daisy wheel
printer, since it frees the computer for other jobs once the printer has produced the
first copy. Unfortunately, the feature is
useful only for printing short documents,
since the Brother HR-40 comes with only
8K of memory, expandable to just 16K.
Even when using the reprint feature,
you may find it difficult to work on your
freed-up computer. Like most daisy wheel
printers, the HR-40 has a relatively high
noise level. It clatters along at a distracting
71 decibels.
Another innovative feature found in the
HR-40 is the Diablo 630 ECS compatibility mode. Most standard daisy wheel printers cannot print the IBM high-order characters because they can print only one
character per spoke, and they only have either 92 or 96 spokes. The Diablo 630 ECS
puts two characters on each spoke, with
the standard characters at the end of the
daisy wheel petals and the high-order characters half-way up. Brother International
offers a print wheel that can duplicate the
Diablo 630 ECS feat by overprinting certain characters with others. According to
the vendor, printing the high-order characters is simply a matter of putting the proper
print wheel in the printer, setting a DIP
switch for Diablo 630 ECS mode, and
printing as usual.
The clear, straightforward instruction
manual for the Brother HR-40 gives you
all the information you’ll need to get the
most from the machine. Installation and
paper handling are detailed step by step
with careful explanations, complemented
MAGAZINE ■
by illustrations. And the manual discusses
control codes thoroughly.
At $799, the Brother HR-40 is worth
investigating if you need true letter-quality
output—on a tight budget. But its real market may be for laser printer owners who
need a second printer to handle labels, envelopes, and multipart forms or wide printouts. So if you’re looking for a reasonably
priced printer to supplement your laser,
your search may come to a successful
close when you encounter the Brother HR40.—M. David Stone
Fortis DX41
The Fortis DX41, a $699 wide-carriage
daisy wheel printer from Fortis Information Systems, has a raft of bells and whistles that make it functionally enticing.
In addition to the three typical frontpanel controls—on/off-line, line-feed, and
top-of-form—the Fortis DX41 has a control called Copy Mode/Reprint. This function allows the printer to store data in a
buffer as it is being printed; you can then
N O V E M B E R I 0. I 9 8 7
383
ESE25E0 FACT
FILE
Forth DX41
Rxtis Information System inc.r'<
6070 Rickmharirrr St
Commerce, CA 90040;
(213)727-1227 '
Lht Price:3699
'
..
-‘T'-'V
23.1^53*in.''
'Weight:
printer has
' tog)and ""'
retag s
■ DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS
support representatives will respond to
your calls. And Panasonic’s technical-support phone number is toll free.
One drawback to the machine: in the interest of making a compact printer, Panasonic made the KX-P3131 too narrow. It
does not accept paper wider than 13.3~
inches. And although the company claims
that the printer is wide enough for most invoices and spreadsheets, you won’t be able
to use the wider tractor-feed computer paper, which is l47/8 inches. If your printing
needs are frequently in the wide-carriage
range, this narrowness of vision in the design of the KX-P3131 could be the reason
why you’ll decide to choose another daisy
wheel printer.
That problem aside, however, the Panasonic KX-P3131 is a contender for your
printer budget, particularly if pure price
and printing performance measurements
are your guide.—Jeffrey Rothfeder
Primage 90-GT
The Primage 90-GT daisy wheel printer is
Primages’ $1,095 answer to the falling
price of laser printers. It’s essentially the
same printer as last year’s Primage 100, a
PC Magazine Editor’s Choice. The Primage 100 offered high-quality output at
high speed. It also offered Epson-compatible graphics—a feature virtually unheard
of among daisy wheel printers. Alas, its
price of $ 1,895 forced it to compete with
low-end laser printers.
This year’s Primage 90-GT differs essentially only in that it has 2K memory instead of 8K and offers a parallel connector
as standard, rather than both a parallel and
a serial connector. These two changes allowed Primages to reduce the price to
$1,095, less perilously close to laser price
territory.
Print quality is a strong point of the Primage 90-GT. Previous models of Primages printers have always fallen just
short of true IBM Selectric typewriter
quality, but the 90-GT closes the gap. In
fact, the Primage 90-GT output is indistinguishable from IBM Selectric output.
Its secret is a new ribbon cartridge—the
Jogger, a variation on a Diablo Hytype II
cartndge. (You can use any Hytype IIstyle cartridge with the 90-GT, but print
PC
P
X revious models of Primages
printers have always fallen just short of
true IBM Selectric typewriter quality,
but the 90-GT output is indistinguishable from IBM Selectric output.
quality will suffer. You can also use the
Jogger cartridge on any printer that will
take the Hytype II cartridges.)
The ribbon on most carbon ribbon cartridges moves less than a full character
width for each character the printer produces. But as the Jogger moves the ribbon
through the printer, it also moves it up and
down. Thanks to the vertical motion, the
Primage 90-GT strikes a different part of
the ribbon with each character, and the
output is far crisper and cleaner than that
produced using other cartridges. The Jogger cartridge also has a sensor that alerts
the printer to stop printing if the ribbon
breaks.
Speed is another strong point of the Primage 90-GT. On the PC Labs speed test,
the printer managed 56 characters per second (cps) for letter-width paper (compared
with just over 60 cps for the fastest daisy
wheel printer ever tested at PC Labs). On
the wide-carriage test, the Primage 90-GT
scored 53 cps.
that’s two blocks away and having one at
your front door.
Despite the noise, the graphics are impressive. The printer has both a Diablocompatible mode and an Epson-compatible mode. To switch between them, you
turn the printer off and change an easily accessible DIP switch. You then turn the
printer back on, set your program for an
Epson printer, and print the graphic. Primages claims that the graphics mode is Epson FX compatible, but on the PC Labs
test, the Epson MX graphics worked much
better.
As you’d expect, printing graphics with
the Primage 90-GT takes a long time and
chews up a great deal of ribbon. The
graphics feature is obviously only for occasional use. But if your main concern is
high-quality text and you need graphics
only rarely, you can get by using just the
Primage 90-GT.
Graphics produced with the Primage
90-GT are better than they appear in the
sample. The printer’s daisy wheel technology produces extremely dark graphics.
QUIET PRINTING Noise level is the
Achilles’ heel of most daisy wheel printers. If you’re printing all day long, you
won’t want to share an office with one. But
Primages printers have always been quieter than most, and the Primage 90-GT upholds that tradition, producing only a mild
clatter.
The only time printer noise may drive
you from the room is when printing the Epson-compatible graphics. If you have any
solid black areas in the graphic, the sound
quickly becomes unpleasant as the printer
slams the spokes against the paper. The
difference between printing text on this
printer and printing graphics is like the difference between having a jackhammer
MAGAZINE ■
NOVEMBER 10, 1987
386
FACT
FILf.
FTCM
formle
RapidF
Erimage 90-GT
Primages Inc.
151 Trade Zone Dr.
Ronkookoma, NY 11779
(516)585-8200
List Price: $1,095
Dtanenekns (HWD): 7.4 x 24.5 x I5i!gp
Wright 53 lbs.
InShort This wide-carriage daisy
fen 56-cps q»ed, townone level, 1
tectric-rpietty«g^4lpirn^a^ria*:
1
codes far n 11 l iMjjrtriifflIincupfaM
daisy wheel pooler Kid knprcssive f ^
cwnaenowigAOBisBwcEOUP
stora^
canto
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snapi
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creatt
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disk.’
*^hite sup
ttapKlFile.
Novell. Ne
Nobody ever thinks
of PC AT batteries
until it’s too late.
DAISY WHEEL PRINTERS
Li M E D I T O R
CHOICE
• Too few chokes
Without a functioning battery,
your computer is as good as dead.
The battery in your PC AT or compatible controls your computer's
configuration files, real time clock,
and calendar. When the clock
and calendar begin to fail,
your battery's hours are
numbered.
So be prepared. Get the
best replacement battery you
can buy. Get a TADIRAN
battery from IBC — the high
quality, high energy lithium battery that is already found in 80%
of all PC AT’s and compatibles as
original equipment.
A unique 3 year warranty, 10
year shelf life, and UL approval
make a TADIRAN replacement battery the best insurance there is. So
don’t wait until your computer
battery dies. Get a TADIRAN replacement battery from IBC today.
ORDER NOW!
800/654-3790 (US)
800/225-9359 (CA)
Price only $27.50
• Dealer inquiries welcome.
• Corporate discounts
available.
For IBM PC AT, Compaq
286, and all other AT
compatibles and clones.
Checks, money orders,
and credit cards welcome.
Add $3 00 for shipping and
handling.
IBC
International Battery Corporation
6860 Canbv Avenue, #113,
Reseda, CA 91335
818/609-0516. (TLX 6975427+)
IBM AT, and Compaq 286 are respective trademarks of
IBM Corp and Compaq Corp
Call for all Six-Pack replacement batteries.
CIRCLE 269 ON READER SERVICE CARD
PC
Last year we selected three Editor’s2
Choices from a field of 12 daisy
..A
wheel printers—the $1,895 Primage 100 for its Epson-compatible ‘l
graphics, the $899 Qume LetterPro \
Plus for its 41-cps (character-persecond) letter quality speed and low
cost, and the $1,495 Fujitsu
SP320E for its full-sized carriage 5.
and quiet operation. This year, eactfr.
of the five daisy wheel printers te.
ed offers Selectric- or near-Selec-"
trie-quality output, all but one hm~g
wide carriages, and their noise leva,
is on a par with that of dot matrix ^
printers. However, with only five
daisy wheel printers from which to
choose, the category has become
too limited to support an Editor's
Choice.
MAGAZINE
■
and so for best results you should set your
graphics program for single-density printing. The PC Labs tests, which assume that
darker is better, are designed to print
graphics in quadruple density. This practice makes sense for most printers, but for
the 90-GT it causes the graphics to loci
less detailed.
The Primage 90-GT's boxy look is beginning to look a bit dated, but it will still
look at home with most office decors. The
user manual contains most of the information you'll need, and if you run intopr0^
--lemsr the company provides knowledgeable technical support. Also, a noteworth)
$795 triple-bin sheet-feeder is available,
well as a $395 single-bin sheet-feeder and
a $295 tractor-feed.
If you’re faced with the choice of a la^
printer or the Primage 90-GT, the laser
will probably triumph over the dais)
wheel. But if a daisy wheel will ans'v
more of your needs, you'll find that tl*
Primage 90-GT, son of last year’s Edit°r^
Choice, offers more features at a 1°*
price than you'll find elsewhere.
—M. David Stone
N O V E M B E R 1 0. I 9 8 7
388
.^Copo
If
■ DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
EDITOR
CHOICE
• C. Itoh C-715A
• Epson LQ-850/LQ-1050
• Panasonic KX-P10911 There's no better example of the
long way low-end dot matrix printers have come than the $289 9-pin
Panasonic KX-P109U. An upgrade
of the $399 KX-P1091, which was
an Editor’s Choice in 1985, the 99cps KX-P109H offers more features
and fonts, has an improved control
panel, and isfaster, cheaper, and
quieter than its award-winning predecessor. Built-in friction- and tractor-feed mechanisms allow the
printer to accept both single-sheet
andfanfold paper; Epson and IBM
emulations add to its versatility. At
a list price Butt’shard to beat, the
Panasonic KX-P109U is the ideal
low-end dot matrix printer for smallbusiness, college, and home use.
Among mid-range 24-pin printers. upgrades are also in the spotlight. The$799 Epson LQ-850 and
the wide-carriage $1,099LQ-1050
deliver thesame high print quality
that made last year's models; the
LQ-800and LQ-1000, Editor's
Choices, but they do it faster and
with more style for the same money.
Respective measured speeds of 153
cps and 163 cps for the LQ-850 and
LQrlOSOmake these printers24-pin
pacesetter# and an auto-load paper-feed mechanism is one element
of their smart design. Epson LQ1500 and IBM Proprinter emula- '
tions round out the LQ-850 and LQ1050’ s offerings. Like last year’s
models, no other 24-pin printer
came close to the LQ-850 and LQ1050‘ s moderate price and high
performance.
Slightly slower than the Epsoru,
the $1,295145-cps C. Itoh C-715A
more than compensates with its
adaptability. Four credit-card-sized
identity cards come with the widecarriage 24-pin C-715A, allowing it
to emulate the IBM ProprinterXL,
Epson LQ-1000ILQ-1500, Toshiba
P351, and Diablo 630printers; additional identity cards are available
for $49.95 each. With the kind of
16-character LCD control panel
you’d expea to see on a laser primer (but often don’t), aquicksetup
method, and a manual that includes
a chapter on how to use the printer
with nine popular software packages, the C-715A earns high marks
for ease of use as well as versatility.
But, really, the quality of dot matrix printers has improved so dramatically—while prices have gotten
more in line with reality—that almost any of the 65 printers we’ve
evaluated is worth consideration.
clearly delineates the process. You can set
the default font and character pitch by using the DIP switches, conveniently located
in the front of the printer and under the top
cover. Rather than giving you a cryptic
chart, the manual includes separate sections with step-by-step instructions on how
to set each switch.
The DIP switch settings control the font
and the pitch that the printer uses as defaults when you first turn it on. You can
use the front-panel buttons to change each
PC
setting as well as to select cartridge or
downloaded fonts.
The printer’s front panel consists of six
buttons and a two-character LED. Besides
changing font and pitch, the buttons put
the printer on- and off-line, control formfeed and line-feeds, and select quiet mode.
The LED indicators show power on, online status, quiet mode, paper end, and
character pitch. In quiet mode the printer
takes two passes to print a line. Paper End
indicates that the Toshiba P351C is out of
MAGAZINE ■
paper, and the buffer holds unprinted data
The Toshiba P351C manual is divide
into two sections: Setup and Operation
and Technical Reference. The setup infor!
mation includes a discussion of how to use
the printer with MultiMate, MultiMate Advantage, WordPerfect, WordStar, Micro,
soft Word, and Lotus’s 1-2-3. The two sections of the manual have separate tables of
contents, but they share a single index. \
stiff divider tab placed at the beginning of
the Technical Reference section and a
heavy-stock quick-reference card would
improve the manual.
The Toshiba P351C delivers goodquality print, high-speed draft, and fast
graphics. Also, its rugged construction
makes it suitable for heavy use. Although
the Toshiba P351C can’t perform every aspect of printing as well as individual printers that excel in one aspect can perform
their speciality, it’s a good compromise in
a world where no printer is—as yet—perfect.—Bruce Brown
Toshiba P321SL and
P341SL
The Toshiba P321SL and P341SL are narrow- and wide-carriage versions of Toshiba America’s entry-level 24-pin dot
matrix printer, selling for $749 and $999,
respectively. What these built-to-last.
printers give you for your money are 120and 125-character-per-second draft print,
flexibility in using different fonts, easy-touse front-panel controls, and some handy
features.
The print speeds of the P321SL and the
P341SL—120 cps in draft and 50 cps in
near-letter-quality mode for the P321SL,
125 cps in draft and 52 cps in NLQ for the
P341SL—put them solidly in the running
with similarly priced printers. When you
factor in the print quality they attain, the
speed is even more impressive.
Besides the standard draft, NLQ, and
condensed type, the printers have attractive built-in Courier and Prestige Elite
fonts. You can add other fonts through
plug-in font cards and by downloading
fonts from software.
The machines have two front slots for
the credit-card-sized font cards that Toshiba sells for $79 each. The printers ’ stan-
NOVEMBER 10,1987
370
=DOT MATRIX
W
Known for their
durability and dependability,
9- and 24-pin dot matrix
printers do more, cost less,
and are faster than ever.
PC
omen's magazines run on endlessly about the search for Mr.
Right. Perhaps their readers
should face reality and instead
search for Mr. Bell Curve—the guy who
falls within one or two standard deviations
of perfection. A dot matrix printer represents the same kind of trade-off: it may not
be exactly what you want, but more than
likely, it will be what you need—or get.
In a world filled with compromises and
budget committees, a dot matrix printer is
what, statistically, you’re most likely to
wind up with. Two out of every thro,
printers sold today are dot matrix, and th..i
proportion will probably hold over the ne\;
few years. The rest of the market is spin
between lasers (about a tenth of the markci
and climbing fast) and daisy wheels (also
moving fast, in the opposite direction).
An impact dot matrix printer is the jackof-all-trades, the only printer that can produce graphs and DNLQ (dam near . . . )
text, handle 11- by 147/g-inch printouts,
multipart forms, and color—all without
taking up much space on the desk. If
there’s nothing a dot matrix printer is a
master of, there’s nothing it really can't
do, or at least take a stab at.
Dot matrix printers also represent excellent value. Look at the bang-for-thebuck chart comparing the top sellers and
PC Magazine Editor’s Choices of the past
3 years against this year’s top printers, and
you’ll see the kind of progress being made
by the printer industry. Besides more
speed for fewer dollars, today’s dot matrix
printers have
■ Smaller footprints.
MAGAZINE
■
■ More fonts and type widths. beyond the
usual draft/NLQ/compressed options.
Many have proportional fonts built in, and
many of the 24-pin printers take additional
font cartridges, cards, or chips. These are
usually inexpensive, especially when
compared with laser-printer rates ($200)
for extra fonts.
■ Better paper handling, including semiautomatic paper loading and the ability to
print an envelope or a single sheet without
removing the tractor-feed paper.
■ Sheet feeders. Three years back, this
would have been a joke, since cut sheets
often imply company letterhead stationery
that calls for best-foot-forward print quality. Now, with the quality up and the world
more accepting of DNLQ printing, cut
sheets make lots of sense. Even if you just
print on nondescript paper swiped from the
photocopier (c’mon, admit it—everyone
does), it’s such a delight to be freed from
ripping apart all those perforations.
■ More ribbon choices. Look for more
manufacturers to offer film ribbons (the
Mylar multistrike ribbons, often called
carbon ribbons) that do wonders for 24-pin
printers.
■ Color. It used to be a separate model or
an expensive option. Now, with many
printers, you just slap on a red-blue-yeliow-black ribbon and you’re in business.
HOW MANY PINS? The majority of dot
matrix printers are the 9-pin units that have
about 85 percent of the market, with the
rest being 24- and 18-pin designs. Expect
to see the market share of 24- and 18-pin
printers double or triple in the next 4 or 5
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
246
COVER STORY
fHE JAGK-OF-ALL-PRINTERS
Iths. beyond the
:ssed options,
nts built in. and
. take additional
hips. These are
pecially when
er rates ($200)
including semind the ability to
le sheet without
taper.
/ears back, this
since cut sheets
rhead stationery
vard print qualiip and the world
Q printing, cut
Even if you just
swiped from the
tit it—everyone
j be freed from
) rations.
Look for more
m ribbons (the
s, often called
nders for 24-pin
cparate model or
ow, with many
t a red-blue-yel’re in business.
Illustration Javici Romero
te majority of dot
in units that have
market, with the
designs. Expect
f 24- and 18-pin
n the next 4 or 5
PC
MAGAZINE ■
N O V E M B E R 1 0. I 9 8 7
247
17
DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
years. Dot matrix technology also includes
non-impact ink jet printers and thermal
transfer printers that hold small market
niches, but important ones nonetheless.
Twenty-four-pin printers, with two columns of 12 pins, aren’t automatically superior to 9-pin printers for all tasks. Just
most of them. The matrix, or bo*, that
makes up each character can be ten times
as detailed in 24-pin, proportional-spaced
NLQ mode as that of a 9-pin printer in everyday draft mode. Because of their staggered-pin offset, 24-pin printers can run
faster in draft mode and need only a single
pass to do near-letter-quality.
Even with the best 24-pin printers,
there remains some discernible difference
between true Selectric/daisy wheel/laser
printer letter quality and dot matrix printer
near-letter-quality. It’s not that bad if you
don’t look closely, and most people aren’t
looking closely in the “does-she-ordoesn’t-she—only-her-hairdresserknows-for-sure” sense. The business
world is growing accustomed to seeing
correspondence on dot matrix printers; as
long as the print quality doesn’t pain the
eyes, the message really does count more
than the medium for most but not all crucial documents.
Besides 9- and 24-pin printers, Okidata
and Alps, among others, offer 18-pin
printers arranged in two columns of 9.
Eighteen-pin printers typically emulate 9pin Epson printers, which was an advantage a year or two ago when there weren’t
many 24-pin printers except those by Toshiba. Okidata says the dual-9 arrangement makes for faster text and graphics.
Oki’s 18-pin Microline ad campaign
claims output is 2 to 6 times faster than that
of comparable 9-pin printers; PC Labs
didn’t find that to be the case with text, at
least.
Japan Inc. (that’s where almost every
printer comes from these days) has a bunch
of 32- and 36-pin designs ready or on the
back burner, but it’s unclear how much the
quality improves beyond 24 pins. It’s
equally uncertain how soon—if ever—
these designs will come to market.
s: Bang for the Buck
Epson LQ-850
IBM Proprietor II
jagaintumedtKlpj
Panasonic KX-P10S11
Choices the pest 4 years andaewn*:c;^-.,f
other popular printers. AH are affordahie 9t - ■>?::
pin (except one), narrow carriage dotmatrix-rs ^“QB leriseentn
RCA VP 2100
C. Itoti ProWriter Jr.
Epson FX-08
IBM Proprietor
riorprtos^w ftriridrtiid'ralttiSen wtttffe~ -
Panasonic KX-P1001
. added caster the 24-pin head; Thesamer _
hpkte true tor seder-carriage printeiSW«kr>
laser printers.
.
".j.
\.
iaSiatSS- •
180
Epson FX-00
IBM PC Graphics Printer
r7<.
•
■<8*.
f
110
’-A! ’ M!
■ - T<v
-.100 :
90
:• *-.
•
*
tff
Ml
*
70
: #
0^, w
' ' *•
»
rr*t
■H
Inet
*
$aM •m.
livv/T?
-O^eL* *
J2KPH.300S 3»
450
soo
Epson LQ-8S0
87
158'
$7995-’
IBM I
87
129
*849;:
Panasonic KX-P10911
87
RCA VP210O
PC
'^ted
■3?:
V"
WHY NEVE? If 24-pin printers are so
hot, why don’t they have 100 percent of
the dot matrix printer market?
Those ubiquitous 9-pin printers from
,7
- - . - - - - « - - - ——
40a
$288?
51
$29Bf:'-
C.ltoh ProWriter Jc.
85
43
$299
Epson FX>88.
85
80
$4aa
IBM Pioprintar
85
Panasonic KX-P1091
85
59
EpaonFX-00
84
63
IBM PC Graphics Printer
84
46
MAGAZINE
NOVEMBER 10, I987
248
urn
cnion. IBM, Okidata. and Panasonic re^three advantages: price, print density,
j apparent durability. Based on PC
tests over the past 4 years and on evJ^jay experience, we've found that 9-pin
%ers produce somewhat darker charac, over the lives of their ribbons than do
pin printers. Ribbons typically produce
^p. dark print for just a few pages (about
p to 100). then several thousand some^at fainter pages. (Daisy wheel printers
idg nylon fabric ribbons perform the
,,ne way.) Each wire, or pin. on a 9-pin
r an 18-pin printer has about twice as
iuch surface area as a pin on a 24-pin
finter. about .3 millimeters across vs. .2
ullimeters.
The daintier pin (.2 millimeters is about
13 inch) is also the reason why 24-pin
inters shouldn't hold up as well, at least
iheorv. In practice, all dot matrix printis are rugged; if 9-pin printers seem to last
jever and 24-pin printers last 90 percent
long—well, that's more than adequate,
sn't it?
Bear that in mind as you read the 57 dot
atnx printer reviews that follow. Also,
there PC Labs found some printer houses to be of comparatively thin plastic, or
here the machines seemed less solidly
tavy than in years past, don't assume that
e printers are inferior. Instead, the engisrs and designers may have found ways
imake less do more and shave a few penles off manufacturing costs. When the
cn is climbing, you don't get falling printi prices without some compromises.
COLOR RIBBONS Many higher-end
lot matrix printers now accept four-color
xl-blue-yellow-black ribbons to produce
olor images and graphs. The best color
nages can be quite good.
If it's color you want, you should conider the thermal transfer color printers and
olor ink-jet printers also reviewed here.
Intil the dominant corporate printing
resses—photocopiers—all work in color.
ie use of color output remains limited to
assing around a handful of originals or to
isplays on overhead projectors. That
ould change with color laser printers.
Two special-purpose machines reiewed in the dot matrix category are
irother's Twinriter 6. which has both dai_ 1 wheel and dot matrix printheads in the
same machine, and IBM's Quietwriter III,
which produces truly excellent output using thermal transfer technology. The latest
version runs three times as fast for only
SI00 more—but when you're talking
SI.699 for a quiet, letter-quality printer,
you should be talking a 200- to 300-character-per-second laser printer.
As with the other categories, these
printers are reviewed in alphabetical order
by company name.—Bill Howard
,
,
ix _I
, -. • > >
M
•
i
Although the S595 narrow-carriage Alps
AJps ALQ200 and ALQ300
ALQ200 and S895 wide-carriage ALQ300
Alps America
are less-expensive versions of the SI.395
3553 N. First St.
San Jose, CA 95134
Alps P2400C printer, also reviewed in this
(800) 828-2577
issue, they do have most of the interesting
(800) 257-7872 (in Calif.)
and useful features of that higher-priced
(800) 858-2577 (in Canada)
machine.
(408)946-6000
Like the Alps P2400C. the ALQ200
List Price: ALQ200: 18-pin. $595,24-pin,
$695. ALQ300: 18-pin, $895: 24-ptn. $995.
and ALQ300 are available in an 18-pin
Dimensions (HWD): ALQ200 5.6 x 18.5
configuration, which emulates the Epson
x 18.5 in.; ALQ300: 5.6 x 24.1 x 15.8 in.
FX-185. and a 24-pin configuration,
!
Weight: ALQ200. 30.9 lbs.. ALQ300. 37.5
which emulates the Epson LQ-1500 and
lbs.
In Short: Narrow- and wide-carnage dot
LQ-2500. The 24-pin unit costs $100 more
matnx printers that let you swap between 18than the 18-pin machine, but you don't
and 24-pin printheads, these impressive mahave to sacrifice 24-pin printing if you purchines have a measured speed of 123 cps in
chase an 18-pin machine or vice versa.
draft mode.
You can transform your 24-pin machine
CIRCLE 608 ON READER SERVICE CARO
into an 18-pin machine by purchasing an
18-pin configuration kit. The $295 kit includes an 18-pin printhead and a system ' the type of printhead that was currently incartridge. If you have an 18-pin printer, stalled.
you can buy a 24-pin configuration kit for :
The manual is well written and has
S395.
dear and complete instructions for setting
To switch the two printheads, all you up the printer: it also includes descriptive
need to do is replace the printhead and the chapters on printer commands and escape
system cartridge, then move the line-feed codes for both the Epson FX-185 and LQpitch-control lever. You'll also need to be 1 1500 emulations. If that's not good
able to do 50 fingertip push-ups. because j enough, you'll find the Alps technical support staff patient and helpftil.
e';en though the task is simple, it requires
The front panel has an array of buttons
some challenging finger maneuvers.
and indicator lights that may look intimiOther than this, setting up the printers is
dating at first, but actually makes printing
easy: for example, inserting the ribbon careasier and lets the user feel in control.
tridge is literally a snap. But it would be a
These buttons can be used to select letter
good idea to read the printer manual first,
even for experienced printer users. When I
quality, draft, or high-density print. You
first tried to use the ALQ200, it seemed as
can also select line spacing of 6. 8, 3. or 4
if the printer had failed its diagnostic selflines per inch; character pitches of 10. 12.
or 17; and proportional spacing.
test. After reading the setup instructions. I
You won't find yourself turning the
found that I should have checked to see if
the line-feed pitch-control lever was set for
printer off and on again to clear the buffer;
1
\t
DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
f
i
I
! into position. The function works well, alj though I had to remove the printer cover
! before loading new paper to prevent it
! from getting caught beneath the cover,
j The print quality produced by the Citizen Tribute 224 is impressive. Correspondence-quality output is a bit light, but is
less jagged and uneven than that produced
I by many other printers. High-speed draft
j pnnt has the zigzag quality typical of 24j pm printers. Letter quality output is exceli lent and approximates that produced by a
j typewriter. The curves of the letters are
: smooth. Draft and correspondence modes
i are available only in Courier: you can pro• duce letter quality output in both Courier
and elite.
What you get in print quality from the
Citizen Tribute 224. you pay for in speed.
Not one of the fastest printers on the market. the wide-carriage Tribute 224 prints at
56 characters per second in LQ mode. 91
cps in draft mode, and 116 cps in highspeed draft. In narrow-carriage draft
i mode, we clocked the printer at 91 cps.
I And at 75 decibels in high-speed draft, the
j pnnter is a little loud but the noise is not
I overly shrill.
I The Citizen Tribute 224's two manuals
i are very well planned and written. A user
manual tells you how to assemble the
.printer, as well as how to set its DIP
! switches. A reference manual describes
■ the control codes and command sets; it also
■ includes a handy control-code reference
! card.
!
Unfortunately, the PC Labs graphics
emulation test did not include a Toshiba
: emulation. However. I was able to test the
'Tribute 224's graphics capability using
j EMUL3. a software utility from M.A.P.
1
Systems (Houston. Texas) that allows To! shiba printers to emulate the printer com1
mands and graphics modes of Epson ma| chines. The resulting designs were sharp
and in proportion.
In fact, the Tribute 224's only serious
setback is its inclusion of a Toshiba emulation rather than an IBM or Epson emulation. which also means that the printer cannot produce high-order ASCII characters
j°r true superscripts and subscripts. Ac; cording to a Citizen spokesman, these limitations will be remedied with the production of its font cards. They certainly should
| not deter companies that are looking for a
E
PC
solid, well-planned business printer from
seriously considering the Citizen Tribute
224.—Barbara KrasnofT
The wide-carriage C. Itoh C-715A, from
C. Itoh Digital Products, masters the possibilities. The $1,295 24-pin dot matrix
pnnter uses credit-card-sized plastic identity cards to give you more choices, both in
pnnung capabilities and in software programv And it won't keep you waiting.
The control panel’s 16-character LCD instantly confirms your choices.
With four identity cards that plug into
slots in its left side, the C-715A lets you
choose among IBM Proprinter XL. Epson
LQ-1000/LQ-1500. Toshiba P35I. and
Diablo 630 emulations. Additional cards
area\.u)able for$49.95each.
The C-715A's use of identity cards protects n from becoming obsolete: as new
prime; - are introduced, all C. Itoh has to
do is develop new identity cards. And inserting a card in a slot is certainly a great
deal easier than installing an interface
C. Itoh C-71SA
C. Itoh Digital Products Inc.
1011 Francisco St.
Torrance. CA 90502
(800)423-0300
(213)327-5939
List Price: $1.295
Diniensioiis(HWD): 5.2 x 24.9 x 14.7 in.
Weight: 37.5 lbs
In Short: A smooth-running 24-pin widecamage dot matrix that can change emulation
idenuty in a flash; draft speed is a fast 145
cps, and changing options through the LCD
front panel is a cinch.
CIRCLE 61 ON READER SERVICE CARD ~
MAGAZINE
■
board or even changing the DIP switches.
But there’s more to the C-715A than
four emulations. Both serial and parallel
interface connections, each with a 32Kbyte buffer, are standard. Built into each
identity card are draft and Courier near-letter-quality in 10 pitch (pica), 12 pitch
(elite). 15 pitch, and 17 pitch (compressed), as well as proportional near-letter-quality fonts. You can also add fonts by
using optional font cards, currently available in Letter Gothic 12 pitch and 15 pitch,
Prestige Elite 12 pitch, and Bold Proportional Space I and 2. Each costs $39.95,
and more are on the way.
Setting up and using the printer
couldn't be much easier. In fact, unless
you're a first-time printer user, you'll
probably be able to use the quick setup
method^—ten fast, simple steps that take
you from unpacking the printer to installing an identity card.
The state-of-the-art control panel, with
its 16-character LCD, tells you what’s going on. and you can also print a list of all
the current options selected. In addition,
four indicator lights^power. ready, LQ
(letter quality), and quiet—are aligned
above the on-line and LQ/quiet buttons to
indicate the current status. The other four
buttons are mode, set, LF (line-feed), and
TOF (top-of-form)—all you need to program the pnnter for most jobs.
With the LQ/quiet button you can
choose draft, letter quality, quiet letter
quality, or quiet draff. The set button,
helpful when you're using preprinted
forms, enables you to adjust the alignment
of the paper precisely.
With the printer off-line, the set. linefeed. and top-of-form buttons take on another role. Along with the mode button,
they*activate changes in the control-panel
menu.
The basic menu controls the nine functions that are changed most frequently, including font, characters per inch, page
length, paper width. The extended menu
lets you select options for 61 functions that
are changed less frequently, among them
ribbon color, buffer, slashed zero, and
character set.
Each function has several options, and
you can easily scroll through the menu’s
functions using the line-feed and top-ofform buttons. You can make changes to
NOVEMBER 10. I 987
267
-2JD
■ DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
the displayed options by using the set button. When you’ve made your adjustments
to the options, you press the mode button
to exit.
Print quality and speeds fulfill the
promise of the high-tech controls. Clocked_
at 145 characters per second, the CI715A’s draft font looked clear and crisp.
The LQ font rated a much slower 64-cps
speed, but its print quality rivals that of a
daisy wheel. And the standard 32K-byte
buffer allows you to move on to other tasks
quickly. The operating noise level seemed
quieter than the 78-decibel draft and 79decibel letter-quality sound readings indicated.
Besides user-defined characters. 18 international character sets are available.
The printer will print high-order (ASCII
code 128 to 255) characters but only if the
IBM Proprinter XL or the Toshiba P35I
identity card is installed. Graphics produced with the C-715A are precise, and 11
densities are available.
Other vendors should get a copy of the
C-715A’s user manual and applications
manual to use as guides—they’re that
good. The applications manual includes a
chapter on using the C-7I5A with nine
popular software programs: Microsoft
Word. Version 3.0: WordStar, Version
3.3: WordStar 2000 and 2000 Plus: WordPerfect, Version 4.1; Lotus’s 1-2-3 Release 2; SuperCalc4: Symphony, and
Framework II. It also includes guidelines
for using the printer with other programs.
Companies that are as concerned about
hardware and software adaptability, easy
control of features, and versatility as they
are about fast, professional-looking print
will discover that the C. Itoh C-7I5A
printer has it all. And with a fast change of
identity cards, the C. Itoh C-715A brings
you unlimited possibilities.
—Carol Olsen Day
C. Itoh C-815
Befitting its low-profile good looks. C.
Itoh’s C-815 printer offers an attractive
combination: both high speed and good
print quality. But as you might expect, this
combination does not come cheap. With
its price of just under $2,000, the 24-pin C.
Itoh C-815 is for users who take their dot
matrix printers seriously.
PC
LH
« FACT
FILE
C. Itoh C-815
C Itoh Digital Products Inc.
1011 Francisco St.
Torrance. CA 90502
(800)423-0300
(213)327-5939
l.ist Price: $1,995
Dimenaons(HWD): 5.75 x 22.75 x 15.5 in.
H eight: 33 lbs
I n Short: With measured speeds of 195 cps
r Mandard draft and 285 cps in high-speed
oralt. the C. Itoh C-815 24-pin wide-carriage
dot matrix printer offers not only impressive
speed but also good print quality: proportional spacing and graphics, though, are less than
ideal
CIRCLE S7t ON READER SERVICE CARD
High price usually goes hand in hand
with high speed, and the C-815's speed
lets it compete with laser printers. In the
PC Labs speed tests the printer clocked in
at 96 characters per second in near-letterquality mode and 195 cps in standard draft.
When printing a double-spaced, lettersized page, 195 cps translates to 8.3 seconds per page, or better than 7 pages per
minute. The NLQ speed of 96 cps translates to about 17 seconds per page, ora still
respectable 3.5 ppm.
The C-815 also has a special highspeed draft mode with a claimed speed of
570 cps. In the PC Labs speed tests,
though, most dot matrix printers clock in at
about half their claimed speed, and, true to
form, the C-815 managed “only" 285
cps. For a double-spaced letter, this rate is
equivalent to just under 6 seconds a page,
or more than 10 ppm.
Unfortunately, the high-speed draft
mode requires a clumsy setup procedure.
You can set condensed mode to give either
NLQ print or high-speed draft. But to
MAGAZINE
■
change the setting, you must work your
way through nested menus that you access
with the printer’s front-panel buttons. You
can't access the high-speed draft mode by
using software commands from the computer. What's missing from this scheme is
an easy way to switch between the two
modes. You'll probably find yourself
making do without one of them.
The C-815 scores well on print quality
Text in NLQ mode approaches true letter
quality, though a close look discloses the
dot matrix source. Although the normal
and the high-speed draft print look like dot
matrix output, they're highly readable.
Alas, the C-815 has some minor printquality problems, mostly when trying to
produce combinations of enhancements
For example, when using the IBM Proprinter emulation, the C-815 will not
switch to NLQ compressed text from 12
pitch. And changing to italic throws the
printer back to 10 pitch.
The C-815's proportional printing is a
also disappointing. Rather than changing
to a font designed for proportional spacing. the printer keeps the standard Courier
monospace font. Unfortunately. Courier is
designed with wide lines at the base of the
“i" and the “I.” leaving little room to
close up between characters. So you’ll find
it hard to detect the proportional spacing.
True proportional fonts are available from
an optional plug-in font card.
Graphics quality is also less than it
might be. The C-815 passed the IBM Propnnter graphics emulation test with ease,
but the solid black bars tend toward the,
gray part of the spectrum.
On the plus side, the C-815 has some
helpful small touches. The printer cable.
fOLexample. goes into a recess in the back
of the machine, where it’s hidden by 3
plastic cover. The cable extends out
through a hole at the left rear comer of the
printer, where it's well out of the paper
path. Also, the nested menus mentioned
earlier work well for settings you don’t
want to change often. You can print a list
of default settings by pressing the top-ofform button when you turn on the printer.
The C-815 has a more modem design
and appearance than you might expect in a
high-speed dot matrix printer. Weighing to
at 33 pounds, it's far lighter than other
printers in its category, some of which
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
268
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CIRCl
■ DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
The speeds of the Epson FX-86E and tractor unit is much better than earlier Epthe Epson FX-286E are right on the money son pin-feed mechanisms. Loading paper
for their price category: 129 characters per is foolproof, and you no longer waste a
second in draft and 41 cps in near-letter- sheet of paper every time you start or finish
quality for the Epson FX-86E, and 138 cps a printing job.
in draft and 43 cps in NLQ for the Epsom - “ff you have the desk space to accommoFX-286E.
date it, the wider Epson FX-286E affords
Print quality itself has also improved greater flexibility for reports and spreadfor the FX series. Of course, these 9-pin sheets, as well as the ability to print mailprinters can’t produce results like those of ing labels four to a sheet.
24-pin printers, and you can make out the
The Epson FX-86E and FX-286E come
dots in NLQ print—but only if you try.
with a draft typeface and an NLQ typeface
By setting manual DIP switches on the w ith Roman and sans serif fonts. To
back of the printer, you can select either switch between draft and NLQ modes and
IBM or Epson modes, in which case you between normal and condensed type, all
will be hard pressed to find software that you do is push the proper buttons on the
will not work with these printers. Epson control panel, called the SelecType menu.
FX-series printers are one of the few stan- Software control codes override Selecdards in the dot matrix world, and nearly Type settings.
all software supports them.
You can also use software to control
Both models come standard with fric- other printing characteristics, including
tion feed and an external tractor unit. The bold, underline, italic, double-strike, superscripts ana subscripts, automatic centering and justification, double-high and
double-wide characters, horizontal and
tabs, variable form length and line
FACT
FILE vertical
height, and proportional spacing.
One characteristic of the printers that
Epson America could improve in future
versions is noise level. Both printers
scored 73 to 78 decibels. Although the
sound isn’t particularly grating, it leaves
room for improvement.
Both models come standard with a parallel printer interface and an 8K data buffer. Optional interfaces include several
types of serial interface as well as larger
data buffers, to a maximum of 128K.
Printers in this price category are priEpson FX-86E and FX-286E
Epson America Inc.
marily designed and marketed to single us2780 Lomita Blvd.
ers who have light- to medium-duty print
Torrance, CA 90505
runs and who print everything from drafts
(800)421-5426
to correspondence-quality letters, and
(213)539-9140
Ust Price; Epson FX-86E, $499; Epson FXfrom charts and graphs to mailing labels. If
286E, $699.
you fit that profile, you’ll want to see what
Dimensions(HWD): Epson FX-86E, 5.5 x
the Epson FX-86E and the Epson FX16.5 x 15 in.; Epson FX-286E, 5.5 x 21.5
286E can do.
x 15 in.
Essentially, these printers are great if
Weight: Epson FX-86E, 16.9 lbs.; Epson
;
FX-286E, 22.2 lbs.
you need more performance, durability,
in Short: The narrow- and wide-carnage
and features than you get with the lowestversions of this 9-pin dot matrix model print
priced
printers, but can get by with 9-pin
draft at 129 cps and 138 cps, respectively.
print quality. Continuing the Epson tradi? They continue the tradition of Epson’s legtion of excellence, they’re sturdy, reliable
endary series, adding an extra internal font
<: «ad front-panel menu selection.
printers with creditable performance and
‘rORCLEaW ON REAOBt SERVICE CARD
unmatched software compatibility.
—Bruce Brown
PC
MAGAZINE ■
Epson LQ-850 and
LQ-1050
Narrow- and wide-carriage versions of the
same Epson America 24-pin dot matrix
printer, the $799 Epson LQ-850 and
$1,099 Epson LQ-1050 are the latest incarnations of two of last year’s Editor’s
Choices, the LQ-800and LQ-1000.
The rage in dot matrix printers is currently the print quality many manufacturers obtain by using 24-pin printheads. Epson America attracted a lot of attention
with the 24-pin LQ-1500 in 1984, and its
24-pin printers have been front-runners
since. Last year the low-priced machines
in the series, the LQ-800 and the LQ1000, were elected Editor’s Choices because of their type quality and features for
their price level. The LQ-850 and the LQ1050 are even better.
Epson LQ-850 and LQ-1050
Epson America Inc.
2780 Lomita Blvd.
Torrance, CA 90505
’-"(8007421-5426
(213)539-9140
Ust Price: LQ-850, $799; LQ-1050,
$1,099.
Dimensions (HWD): LQ-850 5.5 x 17.5 x
16 in; LQ-1050.5.5 x 24.25 x 16.5 in.
Weight: LQ-850. 19.8 lbs; LQ-1050.26.4
lbs.
In Short: This 24-pin dot matrix printer, in
both narrow- and wide-caniage versions, is a
terrific deal, with last (153 cps) draft and excellent letter quality, full compatibility with
the Epson LQ-1500 and the IBM Pwprinter,
and the latest advances in convenience and
control features.
NOVEMBER 10,1987
CIRCLE aaa ON READER SERVICE CARD
■ DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
Both the 80-column LQ-850 and the
132-column LQ-1050 print draft mode on
letter-sized paper at 153 characters per second. The LQ-850 prints letter quality type
at 67 cps; the LQ-1050. at 68 cps. The
wide-carriage LQ-1050 can print at 163
cps on wide paper. These speeds are nothing to sneeze at. especially for printers in
this price category.
E' '
J-^pson equips most of its printers
with a front-panel control feature
called SelecType. The buttons on the
top of the LQ-850 and the LQ-1050 let
you choose the font, the pitch, and
condensed mode.
Of course, speed should be the second
half of the story with any printer whose
model number starts with LQ. Both the
LQ-850 and the LQ-1050 deliver the print
quality we've come to expect from the Epson LQ series. Draft quality is clean and
neat, and letter quality is exceptionally
good. Although not as impressive as that
of the superb LQ-2500. Epson’s highestpriced 24-pin printer, the best print of the
LQ-850 and the LQ-1050 will certainly
serve most office needs.
Both models offer all the formatting
and print enhancement features you’d expect: boldface, underline, double-strike,
double-high, and double-wide characters;
italic, compressed print, superscripts and
subscripts; automatic centering, automatic
justification, proportional spacing, horizontal and vertical tabs, and variable form
length and line height.
Standard features include draft and both
roman and sans serif letter quality fonts.
Two easily accessed font cartridge ports on
the right of the printer hold optional
$59.95 cartridges.
Epson equips most of its printers with a
front-panel control feature called SelecType. You can use this feature to select
various print settings, which vary from
PC
model to model. The buttons on the top of
the LQ-850 and the LQ-1050 let you
choose font, pitch, and condensed mode.
The font-selection control also has lights
that indicate use of two optional fonts,
which work only if cartridges are inserted.
The machines include other "intelligent”
menu characteristics as well. For example,
you cannot set the pitch to PS (proportional
spacing) and turn on condensed mode at
the same time. Condensed mode overrides
proportional spacing.
Both models bang away with their 24
pins, scoring 72 decibels on our sound level test. The noise isn’t bad, but there’s
something magic about dot matrix printers
that are quieter than 70 decibels.
One of the niftiest features of this new
printer is the auto-load paper device. To
load paper, all you have to do is to put the
top of the first sheet of continuous-form
paper in the tractor and hit the load button.
The paper comes forward right to the top
of the printhead.
Many printers have an auto-load feature. but where the LQ-850 and the LQ1050 leave most of their competitors behind is what happens after you load
continuous-form paper. If you then want to
load single-sheet paper, you can do it without much fuss. You simply hit the load
button with paper in place (and with the paper-feed lever in the continuous-form position). and the printer retracts the paper almost all the way. You can then print on
single sheets without wasting continuousform paper and your time.
When you want to resume continuousform printing, you simply hit the load button. and the printer reloads the paper so
you can proceed. Only a few other printers
do this trick to date.
The LQ-850 and the LQ-1050 emulate
both the Epson LQ-1500 and the IBM Proprinter. You can select emulation through
software or by changing one rear-mounted
DIP switch.
When it comes to dot matrix performance for the dollar, it's hard to beat the
LQ-850 and the LQ-1050. The print is
good-looking and fast, and the convenience features are valuable perks. Why
spend more for printers that can do only
slightly better when you can have the highquality LQ-850 and LQ-1050 without the
high cost?—Bruce Brown
MAGAZINE ■
Epson LQ-2500
The Epson LQ-2500 is the latest in Epson
America's line of 24-pin wide-carriage dot
matriv printers. This new unit includes
five1 ~iter-quality fonts, a front-panel LCD
menu system called SelecType, and the
ability to create macro settings that retain
four different sets of printer configuration
codes. The $1,399 Epson LQ-2500 is not
the fastest dot matrix printer on the market,
but its print quality competes with everything shy of laser printers.
Unfortunately, the LQ-2500 has to
spend a lot of time banging away to make
its lovely characters. The highest tested
speed I could wring from our review unit
was 133 characters per second in draft
mode. Bear in mind, however, that the
LQ-2500’s draft mode is very, very good.
Perhaps more significant is the 67 cps I obtained in letter quality mode. Quite often
printers that fly while creating only acceptable draft quality slow down to below 30
cps in highest quality. The LQ-2500 is
clearly designed to deliver lots of crisp
FACT
FILE
m\
NOVEMBER 10. 19 87
276
13k
-£paarLQ-2S00
Epson America Inc.
2780 Lomita Btvd.
Tonance, CA 90505
(800)421-5426
(213)539-9140
Ust Price: $1,399
Phnenriows (HWDh 5.75 x 24 x 16.5 in.
Weight: 26.4 lbs.
C'w- >
In Short: The 21 pihwide.caoingc bQ)
2500 is Epson’* higheasftt&y. meat hilly
featured dot manistrinteiAftbonghU
yields 133 cpsindnftamie»the emphasis is’
on NLQ printing with iirehiiih-mieacrquaK,
:
ity fonts. '
—fyo;CIRCLE ttl ON READER SBtMOEQflP'
—
-
-
-•
■■ ■T.-jsj
- -*■ -
^
DOT MATRIX PRINTERS
near letter-quality dot matrix print at relatively rapid speeds.
Speed isn't all this machine offers. The
LQ-2500 comes with an impressive selection of five letter-quality fonts, including
£pson copyright Roman. Sans Serif. Couner. Prestige Elite, and Script typefaces.
Combined with the usual selection offline"'"
enhancement and formatting features, the
LQ-2500'S many font options give you a
.treat deal of control over the design of
vour output.
The SelecType fonts and the features
menu system give you a lot of control over
the printer, but 1 found the system somewhat difficult to use. The way you get into
ihe SelecType menu is to take the printer
off-line and then hit the line-feed and
torm-feed buttons at the same time. This
pounds simple, but in practice I found it
hard to hit them exactly at the same time.
As a result I would often cause a line-feed
or form-feed to occur.
Once you do get into the menu system
vou can select print quality, font, pitch,
condensed type, form length, perforation
skip, left and right margins, graphics character sets. language, single or bidirectional
printing, half-speed, and optional sheetfeeder control.
One of the most impressive features of
the LQ-2500 is its ability to use what Epson calls macros for separate printer control configuration sets. The four factory
settings for macros include one for draft
pnnting, another for letter quality printing,
a third for wide spreadsheet printing with
condensed print that allows up to 233 columns across a page, and the fourth for
printing graphics. You can customize any
of the macro settings, as well as set and
save four macros. While many beginning
users might avoid using the macros because it seems a bit hard at first, the actual
time saved should make up for the time invested in learning how to use them.
The LQ-2500 makes a fair amount of
, noise. It registered 79 decibels in both draft
| and NLQ modes. While that level isn't
enough to chase you out of the room, long
tuns could be objectionable without an
acoustic enclosure.
The typically good Epson documentation includes sections on setting up and ustttg the printer. SelecType, command
summary, and reference listings. There is
PC
also a quick-reference card that includes a
command menu map and a glossary.
Besides emulating the rest of the Epson
LQ line, the LQ-2500 also can be set to
emulate the IBM Proprinter.
If your primary need is letter quality
print but you have occasional need for
graphics and high-speed draft printing as
well, the LQ-2500 offers exceptional print
quality and very respectable speed. This
machine is justly Epson's dot matrix flagship —Bruce Brown
At S299. the Epson LX-800 dot matrix
printer is Epson America's entry-level
model, intended for first-time buyers. The
best news about the 9-pin LX-800 is the
functions and the performance you get for
price: draft and near-letter-quality print,
character and graphics compatibility with
the IBM Proprinter, and the usual range of
print enhancements.
The LX-800 prints at 105 characters per
second in draft mode and 27 cps in M.1,)
Epson LX-800
Epson America Inc.
2780 Lomita Blvd.
T jrrance. CA 90505
(JT)) 421-5426
(213)539-9140
List Price: $299
Dimensions (HWD): 3.58 x 15.7 x 12.1 tn.
Weight: 11.2 lbs.
In Short: This narrow-carriage 9-pin dot matrix primer offers a combination of speed (105
cps in draft), print quality, compatibility
(IBM Propnnter). and features: it's good as a
first or backup printer.
CIRCLE 463 ON REAPER SEHVICE CARD
MAGAZINE
■
mode. These speeds are not earthshaking,
but when you consider that they are tested
speeds and not manufacturer-rated
speeds—and remember what the printer
costs—the LX-800 is quite a deal.
The LX-800's printhead uses 9 pins to
print characters and graphics. Usually. 9pin heads can't produce characters as full
and clear as those produced by 18- or 24pin heads, and the LX-800 bears out the
generalization. Yet the draft type is certainly acceptable, and the NLQ type compares well with that of printers that cost
twice this price 3 or 4 years ago.
The 80-column LX-800 has both friction-feed and an internal tractor-feed. Both
of these paper-feeding mechanisms work
smoothly.
The printer is light (II pounds) and
takes up little desk space. Its small size and
weight make it convenient to move
around, but the disadvantage of its largely
plastic construction is the impression it
gives that it won't stand up to a lot of
abuse. Clearly, the LX-800 is not intended
for heavy-duty printing.
Besides draft and NLQ. the LX-800
can produce emphasized (bold), doublestrike. condensed, italic, and double-wide
print. It can also print superscripts and subscripts. No extra fonts are available, although you can define your own characters
and symbols using software. The LX-800
successfully prints the IBM high-order
character set.
The LX-800 is fairly noisy, another
drawback of the lightweight case. It registers 79 decibels in draft mode and 78 decibels in NLQ. But since the printer probably won't be used much for long print jobs,
the noise level is only a minor concern.
Setting up the LX-800 is easy, especially if you've installed a printer before. The
familiar ribbon cartridge slips into place
easily, and loading the paper is straightforward as well.
Novice computer users who buy this
printer will enjoy one of Epson's most welcome contributions: complete and clear
documentation. The manual includes stepby-step installation information, tips on
using the LX-800 with different types of
applications programs, and reference information on how to use all the features.
Appendixes include a command summary. character set tables, a problem-solving
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
■ LASER PRINTERS
APRIL 28,1987
II \M)S ON
BY JONATHAN MATZKIN
Has the fun gone out of the romance with
your printer? Well, perhaps what you need
is a little Pizazz to make things exciting
again. Technically, Pizazz is a memoryresident print utility, but it is really more
like a turbo-charger for your PrtSc key—
JULY, 1987
PC W©RLD
SOFTWARE HITS OF 1987
By Ross Smith
Pizazz lets you capture color and monochrome graphics, manipulate the images,
and print them to disk or to a printer.
The premise behind Pizazz is simple:
If you can put it on the screen, Pizazz
can capture it. And once it’s captured,
you can manipulate an image to your
heart's content.
Executive Summary
Ease of loading and
use
Excellent
Image manipulation
Excellent
Color selection
Excellent
Printer control
Excellent
Overall value
Excellent
Put Some Pizazz
In Your PrtSc Key
The word Is out. Whether you have a
color or B&W printer, Pizazz puts flair
into your PrtSc key. Now with support
for over 150 printer models, can you
afford not to have Pizazz?
TO ORDER CALL 1-800-433-5201
For information or in MA call 617-433-5201
CIRCLE 115 ON READER SERVICE CARD
D I T O R ’
HC H O I C E
S
• Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Series IF
• NEC Sflentwriter LC-890
• Okidata Laserline 6
Of the three laser printers under
$2,000 that we evaluated. one
stands out. The $1,995 Okidata Laserline 6 (including the single-user
personality module) has more builtin fonts than the HP LaserJet that it
emulates. Beyond that, a diskette of
LaseiControl software provides Diablo 630, NEC 3550, Qunte Sprint
5, Epson MX-SO, and IBM Graphics
Printer emulations; hence the printer can use a wellspring of popular
software packages. Making the
package even more attractive is a
$400 multiuser personality module,
which allows three personal computers to be hooked up to one Laser line 6, bringing the cost of the printer down to less than $800per user.
Although the Laserline 6’s 150sheet paper tray is a bit on the
skimpy side, what you ll see on
those 150 sheets is print quality
that’s solid and black. Considering
that you can buy the Laserline 6 on
the streetfor about $1,400, it’s a
hard deal to pass up.
The easiest call we had to make
was choosing the $2,595 HewlettPackard LaserJet Series 11. Forty
percent cheaper than the HP LaserJet Plus that it replaced, the Series
11 maintains its standing as the laser
printer by which all others are measured. Building on the features that
made the earlier LaserJets a success but without sacrificing compatibility, the Series 11 accepts HP
downloadable fonts and supports
the whole HP command set. Its
smaller size, reduced weight, and
ability to go the extra distance when
printing large areas of black are
dividends of the new 8-ppm-rated
Canon SXprint engine. With more
fonts (Courier, Courier Bold, and
PC
Line Printer, allinportraitand
landscape) than ^predecessors, a
200-sheet paper tray, an improved . \J.
16-characterfrontpanel, frcedoyac
paper stacking^ two font cartridge:'.
slots, and an VQaptpaibh "sldi, daft
HPSeriesllis.desdnedtobeapoint
of reference for some time to come.
" AlthoughtheAppleLaserWriier.
Plus (reviewed last year) is still the?
PostScript printer to beat, the
$4,795 NEC SilentwrixerLC-890has alot tooffer for the money rlfe-.
sides bangiPostScript compalfbtl&t
the 6-ppmLC-890offers HP LaserJet Plus andDiablo630emulations,
wkjqfrttilovejtm vrorkkHt^ioftwpser
packages from the most intelligent
to thomostprimitive.
lypricedprinteri; suckasihe^
$4,995Laser ComebftemPS^^
also offer these aptianSy butttm , ,.;'
NEC LC-890produced the deere&i
darkest output of this group.,^.:;., r
Equipped with paratieif-scrial;'and '
AppleTalk ports, 3 megabytes af
memory, two 250-sheet paper trays,
and all the fonts found in die Apple
LaserWriter, this large machine
should stand up under heavy use.
An honorable mention goes to
the $3,495 Dataproducts LZR1230
for its 10.9-ppm measured speed,
three HO ports, and rugged construction . As many as three personal computers running software configuredfor different emulations can
be linked to the LZR 1230 at the
same time. Also worth considering
for multiuser environments are the
$3,495 Genicom 5010, which has a
rated duty cycle of15,000pages per
month, and the $3,795 Quadlaserl,
which has a rated duty cycle of
10,000pages per month.
MAGAZINE
S
ince the introduction of the Caronengine-based Hewlett-Packard LaserJet in 1984, desktop printing has
never been the same. Easy to install
and maintain, the HP LaserJet set new
standards for speed (8 pages per minute),
print quality (300 dots per inch), and price
($3,495). For the first time, PC users had a
faster, quieter alternative to daisy wheel
printers for letter-quality printing—and
they didn’t have to take out a second mortgage to afford it.
Like PC users, printer manufacturers
knew a good thing when they saw it, and it
didn’t take long for HP’s competitors to in-;
troduce their own, lower-priced laser
printers. In 1984 we reviewed only one laser printer, the HP LaserJet; this year
we’ve evaluated 36 machines from 26 vendors. With at least two dozen lasers in this
year’s roundup claiming HP compatibility
and speeds of 6 to 8 pages per minute, it’s
easy to see that imitation is indeed the finest form of flattery.
List prices of some new laser printers
start at little more than half the 1984 list
price of the venerable HP LaserJet. The
least expensive of this year’s group is the
$17^95 Crltoh Jet-Setter, followed by the
$1,895 Oasys LaserPro Express, followed
by the $ 1,995 Okidata Laserline 6. At the
high end, we’ve reviewed two high-resolution, high-ticket laser printers—the
PC MAGAZINE ■ NOVEMBER 10, 1987
$12,980 Prii
and the $18
other first fo
ject and a ta;
to come.
As the pr
fallen, perfoi
HP LaserJet
to be replaa
rated speed
128K of mei
we’ve rev
changes in
5,000 pages
have edged
ppm rating
One new 1;
3010, attem
18-ppm ratin
ing print enj.
than Canon
Kyocera, am
pensive, and
here come w
RAM. Gaii
raw speed I
and 1,200$30,000 tyj
There ar
use PostSci
guage spok
more that
compatibili
26
= COVER STORY
A NEW5TANDARD
manufacturens
:y saw it, and it
mpetitors to inr-priced laser
ed only one larJet; this year
;s from 26 venn lasers in this
’ compatibility
er minute, it’s
indeed the finlaser printers
t the 1984 list
LaserJet. The
’s group is the
ollowed by the
press, followed
erline 6. At the
two high-resoprinters—the
$12,980 Printware 720 IQ Laser Imager
and the $18,750 Varityper VT-600—another first for PC Magazine's printer project and a tantalizing suggestion of things
to come.
As the price of many laser printers has
fallen, performance has risen. The original
HP LaserJet used toner cartridges that had
to be replaced every 3,000 pages; it had a
rated speed of 8 ppm and offered only
I28K of memory. Among the new printers
we’ve reviewed, some do not need
changes in consumable components for
5,000 pages or more. Print speed ratings
have edged upward, with 10-ppm and 12ppm ratings becoming more common.
One new laser, the $8,395 Kyocera F3010, attempts to redefine Mach 1 with its
18-ppm rating. More laser printers are using print engines made by vendors other
than Canon, such as Hitachi, Konica,
Kyocera, and Ricoh. Memory is less expensive, and some of the printers reviewed
here come with as much as 3 megabytes of
RAM. Gains have been made not only in
raw speed but in resolution, with 600-dpi
and 1,200-dpi laser printers challenging
$30,000 typesetting machines.
There are also more laser printers that
use PostScript, the page description language spoken by desktop publishers, and
more that offer both PostScript and HP
compatibility. Among those in the latter
group that you’ll read about are the NEC
Silentwriter LC-890, the Texas Instruments OmniLaser 2115, the Laser Connection PS Jet, and the QMS PS-800 Plus.
These machines may sell themselves as
crossover dreams, but they still have a way
to go to catch up to the preeminent PostScript laser printer, the Apple LaserWriter
Plus.
HP may have started it all with the LaserJet, but the inspiration for laser print engines came from inexpensive desktop
copier designs. Instead of using a paper
original and optics to transfer an image to a
photosensitive drum, laser printers use a
small diode laser to create an image With
one notable exception, all the printers reviewed here follow this path. Instead of using a laser, the $2,495 Data Technology
CrystalPrint VIE uses a strip of liquid crystal shutters (LCS) similar to the liquid crystals used in watch faces to either block or
transmit light. The idea behind using LCS
technology is to avoid distorting the printed image, but the resolution and quality of
the output produced by LCS machines
seem to differ very little from those of laser
printers. And although none are represented here, some manufacturers have used arrays of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to
create a printed image. Only time will
show which design is the most reliable.
Whether they use laser or LCS technol-
BZ2
ra
In only 3 years, laser
printers have changed the
way we think about
desktop printing; now the
ubiquitous office printer
is a faster, cheaper laser.
lUustniiton Javier Romero
of the Canontt-Packard Lajp printing has
Easy to install
serJet set new
;s per minute),
nch), and price
PC users had a
o daisy wheel
printing—and
a second mort-
na
PC
MAGAZINE ■
N O V E M B E R I 0, 1 9 8 7
153
■ LASER PRINTERS
ogy, all of these machines are part of the
rapidly expanding page printer market.
For PC users such fast growth means a
greater choice among alternatives and
more features for less money, but also the
risk that some products will be brought to
market before they’re ready. As our tell-itlike-we-saw-it reviews attest, we ettmeacross our share of those during our tests.
PRINT ENGINES Different combinations of features make certain laser printers
better suited to some applications than to
others, so you'll need to know a few facts
about the machines' print engines before
you can decide which of the 36 we review
here is right for you. For example, the
“rated duty cycle." which is usually presented in terms of recommended pages per
month and is obtainable from the manufacturers. will give you a rough estimate of
how long it will be before your printer
gives up its toner. Many of the printers reviewed here, including the HP LaserJet
Series II, have rated duty cycles of 5.000
pages per month: others, like the Genicom
5010. have rated duty cycles of 15,000
pages per month.
There’s a trade-off to be made for the
claimed long life of the Genicom 5010's
Hitachi print engine, however. Maintenance of machines built on this and other
non-Canon print engines isn’t exactly a
breeze. In our reviews we point out those
designs that, unlike the Canon engine’s,
require you to contend with separate consumable components, including toner, developer. photosensitive drum, and fusing
unit. Laser printers that are based on either
the new Canon LBP-SX (the HP LaserJet
Series II) or the LBP-CX (the original LaserJet. Apple LaserWriter) print engines
use all-in-one cartridges that contain almost all the components—toner, developer. drum—that get used up or wear out. As
it turns out, when calculated on a per-page
basis using the manufacturers’ recommended replacement intervals, some of the
separate-component systems end up costing more per page than the all-in-one approach.
PAPER HANDLING We ’ ve also looked
at how these 36 newcomers handle paper.
Almost all have at least one input tray,
which may have a maximum capacity of
PC
100 to 250 sheets. Some, like the Kyocera
F-2010 and the Texas Instruments OmniLaser 2115, have second input trays—a
handy feature if you need to load two types
of paper. Other machines, like the HP LaserJet Series II and the NEC Silentwriter
LC-850, feature a manual input slot that
lets you feed envelopes or special paper
through the printer without having to replace the paper in the trays.
More laser printers are stacking their
output facedown, which means that documents are ordered correctly the first time
around. The original HP LaserJet offered
only faceup output, thus kicking out documents in reverse order. But because facedown output means that paper has to navigate a tight turn along the printer's paper
path, laser printers that offer it may not be
able to handle stiff, thick-stock paper. The
most flexible laser engine designs offer
both kinds of output along with a manual
feed slot.
FRONT-PANEL CONTROLS Beyond
supplying dual paper drawers and collat- i
documents, laser printers are showing o; er signs of intelligent life. Like the HP LaserJet Series II. more laser pnnters ha „■
conversational 16-character LCD windows (and in English, too), although some
holdouts, like the Epson GQ-3500, still
provide displays with cryptic two-digit
codes that stand for operating and error
messages. Of course, those pnnters are
great if you need to test your recall of trivial information.
The original HP LaserJet had a Spartan
front panel—five buttons, four indicator
lights, and a two-digit display. Now more
laser printers offer greater access to configuration options than ever before. The front
panel of the Kyocera F-2010, for example,
has 14 buttons and a 10-key numeric pad:
different combinations can be used to select a font or emulation, set margins, and
eject a page. Other laser printers allow you
to select and configure the interface ports
through front-panel controls. With these
options at hand, laser printers that make
you set DIP switches buried deep inside
their casings or that force you to set default
parameters through complex strings of escape codes seem anachronistic.
All that convenience is nice, but compatibility with existing applications packMAGAZINE
■
ages decides whether a laser printer will increase your productivity or be just a 70pound paperweight. Because it’s too timeconsuming to write nonstandard printer
drivers to accommodate every odd laser on
the market, many applications vendors
have written drivers for the HP LaserJet
Plus command set. In this year’s roundup,
we’ve seen more printers that emulate the
widely used LaserJet command set. as
well as the popular Diablo 630 command
set. IBM Proprinter and Epson emulations
are also common, and a handful of laser
printers are compatible with HPGL. the
language of choice for HP plotters.
Intelligence, raw speed. PostScript,
emulations, paper handling, resolution,
longevity, and near-typeset-quality output—in varying combinations and with
varying degrees of success, that’s what the
36 laser printers we’ve evaluated have to
offer. Read on to find out what our experts
think of the largest and most diverse group
of laser printers ever reviewed in PC Mag- i
azine.—Alfred Poor
Blaser Industries’ $2,395 BlaserStar is the
kind of laser printer that has much in common with its dot matrix or daisy wheel
counterparts, except that it prints faster,
quieter, and with laser print quality. It’s
aimed at those who want laser technology
but don’t need a page description language. built-in user-definable fonts, or yet
another printer command language.
Setting up the Canon-engine BlaserStar
requires little more than attaching the paper trays, inserting the toner cartridge,
loading the paper, and connecting the parallel cable. One minor complication:
you’ll need to add a MODE command to
your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. But since
the manual explains the process, adding
the command shouldn’t be a problem.
The command (MODE LPTl:,,p) is
supposed to set the computer system for infinite retries on the parallel port. It’s necessary because the printer takes so long—notably when printing graphics in the HP
LaserJet Plus emulation mode—that the
computer may give up before the page finishes.
We ran into the resulting time-out error
NOVEMBER 10 1987
154
t
|
.
.
2a
T^jER PRINTERS
, 0(1iy with the HP LaserJet Plus emuAJso, in HP mode the printer can
joad any HP-format soft font sold by
j-paity vendors.
Vgain
’ V°u perfbtfcj
print operation
"the one drawback to the Genicom
d to the next
DlO is ‘ts P^ce. But this printer is for
iter on a finite. who need a laser printer that is more
sis. Print Master
I than versatile and who value speed
a to all printers
‘'stamina over low cost. If you must
ly to keep your
. high-quality output, 8.5-pprn-speed,
ing at full capaci,J
I up to 5.000 copies per month—and if
sharing several ^
ten, such as a
i're willing to choose one emulation
)t matrix and a
fL0de and stick with it, at least for a
/ou wish to select
l*hile—you’ll want to have enough money
sr, you do your
,your budget to cover a heavy-duty printroutine and also
rlike the Genicom 5010.
: select code (whw,
David Stone
* yourself) beftx*
icters of your date,
ten routed to the
er. It’s that easy.
[Hewlett-Packard
n.iistTjk’i
Sx-i icN I’
How do you stay number one in a competitive market? It’s not easy, but HewlettPackard Co.’s LaserJet Series II printer
seems to put the competition to bed with its
lei ports), $795
unbeatable combination of price, features,
ports), $795
and power.
pons), $895
il pons), $995
Almost every segment of the microlel/2 serial), $795
computer market has a trendsetter. IBM
lel/2 serial), $895
did it with the PC, Hayes with the Smart'2 parallel), $795
Jmodem, Lotus with 1-2-3, and Ashton'2 parallel), $895
PTate with dBASE HI. In the world of desk7 parallel), $995
i laser printers, Hewlett-Packard set the
4 parallel), $895
4 parallel), $995
| standard with the original HP LaserJet.
els have standard
Other products compete with these
I standards by isolating and improving on a
K buffer, $249
single feature of the original—typically,
stances up to
price.
But you won’t find yourself strugavailable on
I gling to choose between the original and its
competitors this time. When HP upgraded
its successful LaserJet and unveiled the
new Series II, it not only added features
; BayTech at P.O.
and
shrank the printer’s size, but it also
way 603, Bay
slashed
the price of the new machine by
ississippi 39520,
0333-1618. about 40 percent compared with that of the
-8231 or
LaserJet Plus it replaced. At a list price of
S2.595 (recently raised $100), the LaserJet
12702 Series II can compete on price with almost
any other laser printer on the market.
The LaserJet Series II doesn’t skimp on
value for those dollars, either. It supports
the entire HP LaserJet Plus command set
and accepts HP format downloadable
fonts. It includes the same half megabyte
of memory that the LaserJet Plus offered.
•TAILS?
PC
It comes with a parallel and a serial interface and can be fed paper either automatically by a paper cassette by hand or a sheet
at a time. It even accepts the same ROM
font cartridges used by the earlier LaserJet
models.
HP engineers further improved the
printer by using a new laser print engine,
the Canon SX. Rated at the same 8 pages
per minute as the venerable Canon LPBCX engine (which drove the original LaserJet. the Apple LaserWriter, and the
QMS Big Kiss), the new one is only twothirds the size and weight of its larger, older sibling. The result is a lower, sleeker
housing that takes up less space and is easier to move when necessary. And the new
engine performs at a measured speed of
7.5 ppm. quite close to its rating.
The new engine keeps the same design
for the drum and the toner: both are combined into a single, disposable cartridge.
Other printers offer separate drum and toner units, but these typically result in more
difficult maintenance and little if any perpage savings.
One disadvantage to the smaller engine, however, is that it cannot use the older machine’s drum cartridges, and ihe new
ones cost a bit more (list price, SI 15). although you get about 25 pierce nt more
pages pier cartridge with the new design.
On the other hand, the tendency of the
original LaserJet to print unevenly when
printing large areas of black is a thing of
the past. The new Series II engine prints a
solid, dark black, even over large areas.
The difference is striking.
from HP as well as from third-party
sources, although this approach requires
more time and takes up some of the printer’s available memory.
You need not run out of memory, however, should you want to download lots of
fonts or print large graphics in full 300-dotper-inch resolution. HP makes it easy and
fairly affordable to expand the printer’s
half megabyte of memory by adding expansion boards that boost it by an additional 4 megabytes of RAM. With a total of
4.5 megabytes, there will be plenty of
room for both fonts and graphics.
Another major improvement over the
original design is prominently displayed
on the new printer's front control panel.
No longer must users contend with the
cryptic two-character messages from the
LaserJet of the past. The Series II includes
a 16-character LCD panel that gives the familiar numeric messages along with
prompts in English that spell out their
meaning. (Not all the messages are helpful
FONTS The HP LaserJet Series II also
comes with a few more fonts than its predecessors. Besides the familiar 10-pitch
Courier in portrait and landscape modes,
the Series II also offers the tiny 16.6-pitch
Line Printer font and a 10 pitch Courier
Bold in both portrait and landscape orientations. These six fonts are twice as many
as are offered in the HP LaserJet Plus, but
still far fewer than the number offered by
many competitors.
You can solve the font shortage in one
of two ways. The machine will accept two
ROM font cartridges at one time, so you
can have more than a dozen fonts instantly
available. A more economical solution is
the use of downloadable fonts, available
MAGAZINE
NOVEMBER 10, 1987
185
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3000 Hanover St.
PaloAlto, CA94304-. :
(800) 752-0900
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LASER PRINTERS
since more than one simply shows the
word “ERROR” or “SERVICE.” But
since the numeric codes still correspond to
the original LaserJet error codes, you can
decipher them by referring to a manual for
the older machines.)
The front panel not only conveys more
information, but it also eliminates the
dreaded DIP switch. Want to change interface or bps rate? Need to select a different
font but can't get at the commands through
your software? Want to change margin settings, paper source, or number of copies'.’
With the original, these tasks required either excavating the DIP switches buried
within the case or sending a complex command sequence, or both. Now you can perform all these jobs simply by pressing the
buttons on the control panel. The options
and the display are not as extensive as
some of the other lasers that have appeared
since the Series II, but the facilities should
be more than adequate for most users.
REVISED MANUALS The manuals
have also been revised for the Series II.
with both some improvements and some
ground lost. Like the latest versions of the
original LaserJet, the Series II comes with
a pair of manuals, but the organization is a
bit different. The first manual for the Series II is devoted to installation and includes excellent illustrations that make
good yet sparing use of color to show exactly how to unpack and set up the printer.
The first section takes you through running
the printer's self-test and printing a sample
status page. The second half of the manual
covers detailed instructions on configuring
the printer to run with any one of ten different popular computers, from the Apple lie
to the IBM AT. Generic instructions are
also included.
The other manual is the user manual, it
contains instructions on programming via
the front panel and the LaserJet software
control commands. It also includes tips on
using the Series II with a range of popular
MS-DOS applications programs. Like the
original LaserJet reference manual, the
new user manual includes a table that lists
all the different software control commands. Unlike the original, the manual explains fewer than a third of the available
commands, referring you instead to an optional book called LaserJet Series II TechPC
nical Reference Manual. This is unfortunate; one of my big quarrels with some of
the LaserJet clones is that they do not adequately explain the command set and refer
you to HP documentation. Here HP does
the same thing. Users don't read manuals
any more than they have to, so including
full details about the command set
shouldn’t scare anyone off. The information should be there for those who need it.
The printer shows some other important improvements. The paper cassette has
been enlarged to hold 200 sheets of standard weight paper. You can also get your
output in facedown, collated order. Unlike
some competing designs, however, the
facedown feature was not made at the expense of a straight-through paper path for
heavier stock such as transparencies; pull
on a hatch and you get the same faceup
output as on the original LaserJet.
Something old and something new, the
Series II shows clearly that HP is able to
stay in front of the pack by offering a competitively priced product that builds on the
successful features of the past models
without losing compatibility. The La-^i Jet
Series II remains the standard against
which other laser printers must be judged.
—Alfred Poor
On paper, at least, the Kyocera F-1010 is
an exciting printer. For $3,695, you get a
list of features hard to find at twice the
price.
The F-1010, from Kyocera Unison, is
rated at 10 pages per minute; the PC Labs
speed test clocked it at a brisk 9.2 ppm.
TTie list of six emulated printers includes
output heavyweights such as the HP LaserJet Plus, Epson FX-80, and IBM Graphics
Printer—printers any software package
worth its salt should accommodate.
To top it all off, the F-1010 packs 36
resident fonts based on six typefaces, including Courier, Times Roman. Letter
Gothic, and Helvetica. You can also
download additional HP LaserJet or Kyocera fonts or generate your own with Kyocera’s Prescribe command language.
But the excitement fades a bit once you
get past the initial status sheet.
The F-1010 depends heavily on its emMAGAZINE
ulations. always operating under one of the
six it offers. The HP LaserJet Plus emulation passed the PC Labs emulation test
with flying colors, but some of the other
emulations appeared flawed.
The IBM Graphics Printer emulation
produced beautiful results during the PC
Labs emulation test but printed only one of
the three pages. The Epson FX-80 emulation consistently and mistakenly ejected a
page during the PC Labs emulation test.
If you've got time to bum and software
that lets you tinker with its printer definitions. you can probably solve these problems. But don’t expect much help from the
F-1010 documentation.
While some portions of Kyocera’s documentation are excellent, others leave you
flipping through the pages in vain, searching for additional information. The programming manual includes a chapter that
offers notes about each emulation and lists
command codes for each emulated printer.
However, the 42-page section does a poor
job of explaining what the codes mean or
how they should be used. You get just
enough information to realize that you
need to dig up a manual for the printer
you're trying to emulate.
A chapter or two devoted to the particulars of using the F-1010 with each of the
major word processors would be a big
help. Kyocera reports that such a chapter is
in the works.
Besides the apparent emulation shortcomings, our evaluation unit suffered from
paper-handling problems. The single,
250-page feed tray kicked up slightly with
each page feed, and the feed mechanism
was noisy compared to most laser printers.
These oddities in themselves are not unforgivable, but the printer jammed frequently
when the feed tray got down to about 50
pages. A Kyocera representative said the
paper-jamming problem was unusual for
the F-1010.
The F-1010's C-shaped paper path
feeds pages facedown into a tray that holds
about 150 pages. You can feed envelopes
or odd-sized pages through a manual feed
slot above the feeder cartridge, but expect
a few creases in your envelopes if you do.
Getting the printer up and running is relatively easy and takes only about an hour,
thanks to Kyocera’s excellent installation
documenation.
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
186
rz
!■ LASER PRINTERS
the manual, or both to keep track of the
various codes. The procedure is simple
enough but clumsy, requiring you to look
, up too much information.
As you would expect from two printers
i using the same engine, speed and print
i quality on the LaserPro Express and the
:
Silver Express are identical. The LaserPro
■ Silver Express is rated at the same 8 pages
: per minute as the Express, and it scored the
: same 7.4 ppm on the PC Labs speed test
i Text and graphics output is suitably dark
i and looks like it came from a good copier,
i as is typical of laser printers.
I
On the Epson emulation in the PC Labs
graphics test, the LaserPro Silver Express
also performed identically to the Express.
In both cases the Epson FX-80 graphics
emulation mode worked with PC Labs
MX-80 graphics, not with FX-80 graphI ics. This small discrepancy is important to
! keep in mind when installing software for
• the printer. The printer had no problem
i with HP LaserJet Plus graphics emulation,
i
The Oasys LaserPro Silver Express offers a range of emulations, including HP
LaserJet Plus, and a choice of fonts. Like
its little brother, it’s a solid value. But its
$2,795 price tag puts it in competition with
a good number of heavyweights in the laser arena. Stacked up against some of these
j machines, the LaserPro Silver Express is
! not a printer you’ll get excited about—unless you plan to use the Express command
i language in your own software.
! —M. David Stone
;
OkkktUi I nserjinc 6
The Okidata Laserline 6 is a nice deal. For
! $1,995 (the cost of the basic laser printer
j plus a personality module), you get Hew! lett-Packard LaserJet Plus compatibility
with more built-in fonts than the HP LaserJet— 14-point Helvetica, 12-point Courier. 10-point Times Roman, 8-point Times
i Roman, and Line Printer. If you need
more, the 5.8-page-per-minute Laserline 6
can accept HP LaserJet font cartridges or
Okidata's own. The built-in fonts are satisfactory in appearance, and the print is solid
and black.
A setup guide provided with the Laserline 6 uses clear photographs—not confusing diagrams—to lead you through the inPC
stallation. That process takes a while but is
somehow fun, requiring you to push various levers and even use a rachet crank to
extract the foil covering from underneath
the toner cartridge.
— The paper tray extends from the righthand side of the printer, and paper is collected in a well on the top. The input and
output trays are both rated for 150 sheets,
which is a little on the light side compared with trays that can easily hold up to
250 sheets. A manual paper-feed is also included.
A S200 personality module is necessary
for using the Laserline 6 printer. This personality module is a small unit that slides
into the back of the printer and defines the
emulation capabilities and the interface. I
tested the personality module with HP LaserJet Plus emulation (the only emulation
currently available) and a parallel port. A
personality module with a serial port is
also available.
The personality module comes with a
handbook that describes the use of the HP
LaserJet control sequences and contains
instructions on installing some popular
programs (WordStar 2000, 1-2-3, Microsoft Word, and WordPerfect) for use with
the Laserline 6. The manual is very good
and even includes an example of programming graphics in BASIC.
Also included with the personality
module is a disk of LaserCorurol software
(a repackaged version of LaserControl 100
from Insight Development Corp.) and another excellent manual. Using a fullscreen display with a menu from which
you can configure the Okidata Laserline 6,
this software provides emulation of the Diablo 630, NEC 3550, Qume Sprint 5, Epson MX-80, and the IBM Graphics Printer. Two versions of the program are
supplied: one is run from the DOS command level whenever you need it. and the
other remains resident.
Whichever version you run, the emulation software remains resident and translates control sequences associated with
these other printers into HP LaserJet Plus
control sequences. This emulation helps
out in a pinch, but you get much better results using the printer as a LaserJet compatible, particularly for graphics. For example. the manual warns about losing the
first couple of characters on each line beMAGAZINE
■
cause the emulation software attempts to
start at the left edge of the paper. This is a
nuisance. I would have preferred that the
emulation software compensate for this
problem.
I also looked at Okidata’s multiuser
personality module. Costing $400 more
than the standard Laserline 6 personality
module but allowing three adjacent PCs to
be attached to one printer, this module
electronically switches among the three
printer ports and prevents the dangerous
surges that might be a problem with mechanical switches. If data is coming
through one of the ports, the module creates a not-ready status on the other two
ports. Only if data ceases to come through
a port for 15 seconds will the other two
ports again be polled for data.
The multiuser personality module
comes with three copies of the printer
handbook and three LaserControl software packages. The LaserControl disk
would be an excellent place for Okidata to
include a software print buffer.
As a printer-sharing device, the mul-
NOVEMBER 10. 1987
213
Okktata Lasertine 6
Okidata Corp
532 Fellowship Rd.
Mount Laurel, NJ 08054
(800)654-3282
List Price: $1,995, including personality
module; $400 for multiuser personality
module.
DimtnAm(HWD): 16.5* t6.1x 8.2 in.
Weight: 37.8lbs.=.
,. ,
In Short: Extra Unteifjwjhffi tilrrcVeasiy .,
written user mahu^ hioivbus beak-in fonts, and essy-to-uaethiEfigtntibn software—mnhi iliisl n HSIIIHIII ISIIWII.II
good park age ala gre« price-jci-.
CIRCLE rt# ON READER SgWlCE CARD
, ,
",
. :
^ I
£ i
w
t
yj i
.n> of 1 o / -•» 1 / o 7
WHEREAS :
Advisory Mc i ■*o r h oo u C o rnm i i s i on 3 ~ C l ANC 3 - C J ■ t ti c C1 c v a 1 a r. d
Park Historical Society ICPHS!. the Teniey and Cleveland Park Emergency
Committee ITACPECl. and the Wisconsin Avenue Corridor Committee (UACC)
have jointly soonsored a petition before the Zoning Commission to redone
the portion of Connecticut Avenue that falls within the Cleveland Park
Historic District, for the Duroose of ensuring consistency with the
Comprehensive Plan and to preserve its historic 3nd local-neighborhoodservice character: and
WHEREAS:
All the co-petitioners have been consulted and have agreed upon
the principal facts and reasons to be presented in the case: and
WHEREAS:
There is limited time for each petitioner to put forward its
views, and a desire to avoid duplication of testimony and use the time
available to out forward those witnesses who can soeak with the most
3bout each of the different concerns
Tai 1 1 C .
Comprehensive Plan compliance, integration of historic preservation and
urban Planning goais- * 1. V13 , pei : 10ners wish to raise in thi
complex and
important case;
THEREFORE BE IT NOW RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C:
That it adopt as its own the Pre-Hc3ring Submission
(attached) filed or
November 30. 1927 with the Zoning Commission by Tersh Boasberg on behalf
of all four Petitioners named above, and that it authorize the witnesses
j ar.uar
and 22.
1922; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED:
That the Chairman of this ANC. Feggy Robin. Lisa
Koteen* or a designee to be appointed by the Chairman may 3lso represent
the ANC s views in this case.
1
We may want v 0 i i 2 V <5 cycWiuicao w $ 5 w- 1 TTt 0 H V
that the Council
uc3 1 3H5110n to
changed Cleveland Park from "Multi-Neighborhood Center
"Loc31 Neighborhood" on the Comprehensive Plan.
As I recall. Lisa
and
presented tnis Commission* s reouest tor thie amendment to
in.
BOASBERG
8C
NORTON
tnORNCYS AT (.AW
1233
20TH STREET.
WASHINGTON.
<2021
TERSH
SUITE
901
20030
828 9000
BOASBERG
THOMAS
A
COUGHLIN
ELIZABETH
JULIA
N W
O.C
H.
LANGER
MILLER
EDWARD W.
MATTHEW
ELEANOR
NORTON
S.
HOLMES
OP
COUNSEL
WATSON
November 30, 1987
Mr. Lindsley Williams, Chairman
D.C. Zoning Commission
District Building
1350 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW - Room 11
Washington, DC
20004
Re:
HAND DELIVERY
Z.C. Case No. 86-26
Connecticut Avenue (Cleveland Park)
PRE-HEARING SUBMISSION
Dear Chairman Williams and Members of the Commission:
The Cleveland Park Historical Society (CPHS) will
take the lead in presenting Co-Petitioners' case. None of the
other Co-Petitioners will be requesting separate time of its
own.
CPHS views this hearing as important not only for all
Cleveland Park residents; but also because it will be the first
time the Commission has considered an overlay zone to better
protect a commercial historic district designated under D.C.
Law 2-144 and listed on the National Register of Historic
Places. As such, this hearing has precedent-setting implications in the District of Columbia and in the U.S., as a whole,
which looks to the nation's capital for leadership in the
historic preservation field.
I.
POSITION OF PETITIONERS (C.P. Overlay)
Petitioners' are completely supportive of the proposal of
OP as expressed in the Z.C. Notice of Public Hearing (Case No.
86-26) with these additions:
A.
The maximum height "alternative" noted in § 1401.1
should be an integral part of the "twice-the-height" limitation. Thus, the two sentences should be combined:
NORTON
BOASBERG
&
NORTON
Mr. Lindsley Williams
November 30, 1987
Page 2
§ 1401.1 Any new building or expansion of
an existing building shall be restricted to
a maximum height not to exceed two times
the height of the lowest existing building
on an abutting lot fronting on the same
street as the lot being built upon and not
separated from the latter by a street or
alley; provided, however, that the maximum
permitted height of buildings in the CP
Overlay District shall be three stories and
40 feet.
(added words underlined)
B.
In connection with PUDs, we would add this language:
"No PUD shall be permitted unless it is compatible with the
purposes, design, and character of the CP Overlay District."
C.
We would like the name of the new zoning district to
be the "Cleveland Park Historic Overlay District."
II.
LIST OP WITNESSES, SUMMARY OF TESTIMONY, ESTIMATED TIME
Witness
Subject Matter Summary
Estimated
Time
Tersh Boasberg
(lead counsel)
Overview
10 min.
Richard Longstreth
and Kathleen S. Wood
architectural
historians
Connecticut Avenue and
Cleveland Park:
an
historical perspective
15 min.
Richard Ridley
architect
Graphics of existing
and proposed zoning
10 min.
Expert A —
planner, city
official
Rezoning to protect
neighborhood commercial
area in other cities
15 min.
Experts B, C, D —
planner, city
official, attorney
Rezoning to protect
historic districts in
other cities
15 min.
Expert E
federal official
Rezoning to protect
National Register
historic districts
15 min.
SOASBERG
&
NORTON
Mr. Lindsley Williams
November 30, 1987
Page 3
Expert F — PhD
Traffic analysis —
traffic congestion
15 min.
Residents G and H
D.C. Code 5-414 analysis
parking, pollution,
general welfare, neighborhood stability
10 min.
Expert I
Connecticut Avenue
businesses — upgrading;
similar experiences in
other cities
10 min.
Experts/Residents
Protecting neighborhood
businesses, METRO utilization, protecting local
jobs
10 min.
Tersh Boasberg
Summary
5 min.
TOTAL
2 hours
Please note that other individuals and residents, as
well as, local and national organizations also have contacted
us about presenting their views.
Because of expected time constraints, we have informed them that we probably would not be
able to include them as a part of our direct case presentation.
However, a number have indicated to me that they will appear on
their own behalf. We will make every effort possible to caution them about repetitious testimony.
III. INFORMATION, REPORTS, OTHER MATERIALS AND INFORMATION TO
BE INTRODUCED AT HEARING.
A.
Case No. 85-9 before the D.C. Historic Preservation
Review Board fPark & Shoo landmark designation^.
Pertinent portions of this record relating to the
architectural significance and historicity of the Park & Shop
complex.
B.
Case No. 85-10 before the D.C. Historic Preservation
Review Board (historic district designation) .
Pertinent portions of the record relating to the
architectural significance, historicity, urban planning, and
BOASBERG
&
NORTON
Mr. Lindsley Williams
November 30, 1987
Page 4
neighborhood preservation in relationship to Connecticut
Avenue, including "The Development of Connecticut Avenue in
Cleveland Park" by Cherrie Anderson and Ned W. Dearborn.
C.
Pertinent portions of Cleveland Park's nomination to
the National Register of Historic Places.
D.
Other maps, plans, and articles relating to the history and current status of Connecticut Avenue and surroundings;
relevant portions of the Comprehensive Plan, Draft Ward 3 Plan,
Connecticut Avenue Corridor Study, and similar public documents .
E.
Charts and graphics prepared by Richard Ridley
depicting existing and proposed zoning and historic characteristics of Connecticut Avenue in Cleveland Park.
F.
Traffic analysis of area and critique of Connecticut
Avenue Corridor Study.
G.
Analysis of historic preservation concerns, National
Register protections, zoning controls, and overlay zones in
other cities, including relevant portions of other municipal
ordinances, pertinent state and federal laws and regulations,
scholarly articles, affidavits, charts, maps, and plans.
H.
Relevant analysis and published materials dealing
with urban commercial areas, city planning, retention of jobs
and businesses, retention of housing, neighborhood economic
development, retial uses, METRO concerns, and historic districts .
Respectfully submitted,
CLEVELAND PARK HISTORICAL SOCIETY
TB/vrr
cc:
Peggy Robin, Chairman, ANC-3C
Carol Currie, President, WACC
Joel Odum, President, TECPEC
December 21.
Re:
Cleveland Park Historical
Society Reauests Re. Klingle
Valley Bridge
Hr. Charles hason
Assistant to the Director
Deoartment Gf Public Works
Reeves MuniciDal Center
2000 14th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20009
Dear Hr. Hason:
I am writing to express the enthusiastic suDDort of Advisory
Neighborhood Commission 3-C for two proposals put forward by the Cleveland
Park Historical Society.
The first concerns the restoration of the
decorative elements of the Klingle Valley Bridge, at the southern entrance
to the Cleveland Park Historic District, and also within the boundaries of
this ANC.
We would be very pleased to have the large stone urns refurbished and their electrical connections restored, so that they may again
function as bridge lights, as they were intended by their designer Paul
Cret, and we would further support the repainting of the Art Deco railing,
which is now very chiooed and rust-covered.
We believe that renovation of
these decorative elements will allow both residents and tourists alike to
recognise and enjoy this bridge as one of the loveliest and and roost
historic of Washington’s public works.
Second, this Commission supports the Placement of four Historic
District markers, to be posted at the nofhern and southern entrances to
the Cleveland Park Historic District along Connecticut and Wisconsin
Avenues, NW.
The markers will be similar in design to those already in
Place at five major entry ways to the Takoma Park Historic District.
We
understand that the cost of making the template for the markers has been
donated by the Cleveland Park Historical Society.
We believe that the
placement of these signs will enhance public awareness of an important
phase of our City’s development and will encourage shooowners and
residents to take pride in their neighborhood and its history.
ANC 3-C thanks you for this opportunity to express our views.
FOR THE COMMISSION:
Peggy Robin
Chairman
cc:
Cleveland Park Historical Society
craft for meeting 12/21/27
3E IT RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C:
That it send the attached letter to the
Deoartmer.t of Public Works in suooort of the relighting of the urns 3nd
the reoainting of the Klingle Valley Bridge, and the olacement of
Historic District markers at four entrances to the Cleveland F3rk Historic
District.
To: All Commissioners
From: Peggy fl s?
Your packet is missing some important documents:
1. Ruth called to say that she will have a report and a resolution
for the Monday meeting dealing with the Iona House Adult Day Care Program
at the Washington Home.
She regrets she was not able to have the material
ready in time for the distribution.
2. MINUTES!
Enclosed are the November minutes and summaries only. Phil
did not have the corrections to the Aug., Sept., and Oct. minutes ready
in time for Susan.to redo them and include them in the distribution packet.
He promised to have them for her over the weekend. PLEASE NOTE:
it is
my intention, as my final act as Chair, to get all outstanding minutes
approved for 1987 — Phil or no Phil.
If corrections aren’t ready in time
for her to have the minutes done by the Monday night meeting, I will
suggest that the Commission approve the version she has already prepared
for those months. Whatever version we get, we will need some time to read
them, so I will ask the Commission to defer approval of the minutes until
midway through the meeting, and suggest we take a 10-minute break, after
which we should reconvene and adopt the minutes for those 3 months.
I
hope this meets with your approval; it was the only way I could think of
to avoid having Susan come in to do 3 months of minutes over the weekend
and then go out on a second distribution. She has been ready and willing
all this past month to make those corrections on the minutes. Thanks for
your indulgence.
I hope we can have a relatively brief (!) Dec. meeting, so I will ask
those reporting on events that do not require Commission action not to
give all the interim news, but just tell us the bottom line.
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
MIMUTES
Regular Meeting
December 21, 19S7
Single Member District Commissioners:
01 -Cheryl Opacinch
02Sam Friedman
03John A. Jenkins
04Roger Burns
05Peggy Robin
06Phil Mendelson
07Patricia Wamsley
08David
Grinnell
:
09Peter Espenschied
I.
The meet in (.3 was called to o
The following Commissioners were present: John Jenkins,, Peggy
Robin, Sam Friedman, Roger Burns, Phil Mendelson and Pat Wamsley.
A quorum being present, the posting of notice of the meeting was
veri f i ed »
II.
Announcement was made about a Park and Shop rally scheduled
■for January 16 at 2:00 p.m. sponsored by the Cleveland Park
Historical Society in opposition to the large scale development
proposed tor the site. Also, requests for nominations to a Hall
of Fame are invited by the D.C. Commission on Women.
III.
Minutes were deferred to later in the meeting.
IV.
Treasurer’s Report
The Executive Director was asked to leave the room.
Thereupon, the Treasurer proposed a resolution to provide a
holiday-time bonus to thee Commission’s Executive Director, which
was written by the Secretary. After brief discussion ascertaining
that this is not inappropriate for a consultant relationship, the
resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote,
Sam Friedman introduced a resolution to engage the services
of an accountant to computerize the ANC’s accounts, balance the
checkbook and prepare monthly and quarterly reports required by
the D.C. Auditor and the Commission. After discussion the
resolution was adopted by majority voice vote.(Summary of
Actions, Item II)
A $25.00 contribution to the D.C Preservation League was
considered and declined.
V.
Committee Reports
A. Health and Human Services
Ruth Haugen requested a resolution (moved by Phil
Mendelson) reaffirming the Commission’s support for an
application for a Certificate of Need by Iona House to continue
to operate an adult day center at. the Washington Home. After
discussion the Commission adopted the resolution with minor
amendments by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item III)
B. Transportation
Charles Warr reported on traffic issues on Upton Street,
The Department of Public Works has proposed signalizing the
intersection at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street to assist the
development at 4000 Wisconsin Avenue. The proposed rulemaking
does not detail the nature of the signal to be installed or speak
to potential impact and steps to aleviate its impact on the
adjacent neighborhood, Phil Mendel son introduced a resolution
asking: -for more information, for a delay in talking any action
until neighborhood protective measures are-? taken, and until ANC
3-F and the community have participated more fully. After some
discussion and comments from residents of Porter and Quebec
Streets attending the meeting, the Commission adopted the
resolution by unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item IV)
Charles Warr reported on the proposed metered parking on
Idaho Avenue at McLean Gardens. The McLean Gardens Condominium
Association has endorsed angle parking at meters as a way to
provide parking and to prevent the street from being made
two-way. Phil Mendel son introduced a resolution supporting angled
meter parking which was adopted by the Commission by unanimous
voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item V)
C. Planning and Zoning
The Chair reported on the Connecticut Avenue case which
is scheduled for hearing begining January 14 with sign up to
testify by January 4. The Chair introduced a resolution to have
the Cleveland Park Library site included in the case. The
resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote. (Summary of
Actions, Item VI.)
The Chair reported on the proposed plan for development
of Tregaron. The property has not yet been purchased by the
developer. The Friends of Tregaron have been reformed and the
Chair will continue to track activity on this issue.
Phil Mendel son brought up a resolution on the rationale
for ANC 3—C's support of C—2—A for the Woodley Park neighborhood
center area and C—1 for the Murhpy1’ s/Giant local neighborhood
center area. The resolution introduced in November had been
considered favorably by the Planning S< Zoning Committee?. After
discussion, Phil Mendel son moved to commit, and the Commission,
by unanimous voice vote, referred the matter back to the Planning
S-: Zoning Committee for further examination. (Summary of Actions,
Item VII)
Phil Mendelson introduced a resolution on vesting,
authorising the ANC’s position to be represented at the public
hearing January 7, 1987 on case number 87-2. The resolution was
adopted by unanimous voice vote. Phil Mendelson will represent
the Commission.(Summary of Actions, Item VIII)
Phil Mendelson gave an update report on the TACF'EC
acti vi ty.
Charles Warr reported on St Thomas school and the? need to
follow up with a letter and phone call.
Charles Warr reported on the Sheraton Hotel Zoning
violations. Susan Straus will follow up with a phone call to the
Zoning Office to the Commission's request that the Hotel be cited
for violations is needed.
The Chair reported on an application before the BZA by
residents on Highland Place. She will follow the issue on an SMD
basis.
The Chair reported on a letter received from the Swedish
PARENTS UNITED
for the
D.C. PUBLIC SCHOOLS
1400 Eye Street N.W.
Suite 450
Washington, D.C. 20005
202*289-4988
Name of Organization:
Name of President:
Home Address:
Heme Phone:
zip
Work Phone:
YES! Our Civic Organization wants to
join PARENTS UNITED to help improve
the quality of the D.C. Public Schools.
Our contribution is enclosed.
( )$500 ( ) $250 ( ) $100 ( ) $50
We have already joined PARENTS UNITED
and would like to make an additional
contribution this year to further ' '
your work, A contribution of $
is enclosed.
No! We cannot join PARENTS UNITED
at this time but would appreciate
being on your mailing list!
Ambassador indicating their intent to go -forward with their
proposed chancery office development.
D. Communications
Roger Burns introduced a resolution authorizing up to
$3200 (not including the $600.00 previously authorized for
editorial services) for the development and distribution of the
ANC newsletter. Discussion involved whether this cost was
excessive but also the need to put out a long-needed newsletter.
The resolution was; passed by unanimous voice vote?. (Summary of
Actions, Item IX)
E. Historic Preservation and Landmarks
The Chair introduced a resolution on the K1ingle
Bridge: to support the relighting of the urns and repainting of
the the iron work. It was adopted by unanimous voice
vote.(Summary of Actions, Item X)
VI.
The Minutes For August 24, September 28, October 26 and
November 23 were approved (with corrections to September 28) by
unanimous voice vote.(Summary of Actions, Item XI.)
VII.
Administrative and Other Business
Roger Burns reported on the work in' progress to evaluate
copier equipment and a personal computer and printer for the
office. Susan Straus had assisted with a great deal of research.
Additional information will be provided at the next meeting.
The Chair announced that Richard Ridley is.in GW
University Hospital. The Commissioners will make personal
contributions to send flowers on behalf of the ANC.
VIII. SMD Reports
Sam Friedman reported on the? proposed use of the David Lee
property at Connecticut, and Woodley as a conference center by
Stanford University.
IX. There being no other business the meeeting was adjourned at
10:30 p.m.
Respectfully Submitted:
Approved:
ADVISORY
NEIGHBORHOOD
COMMISSION 3-C
Cathedral 1 leights
Cleveland Park
McLean Ci a felons
Woodley Pork
Massachusetts Avc Heights
Government of the District of Columbia
Please do not remove this notice until alter dale posted
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Meeting of
Advisory
Neighborhood
Commission
ANC-3C
THIS IS A NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF THE JANUARY 25th Meeting
DATE & TIME:
LOCATION:
AGENDA:
FRIDAY
JANUARY 29, 1988
9:00 a.m.
Second District Police Station Community Room
Idaho Ave at Macomb Street N.W.
Election of Officers and Committee Chairs
Upton Street Traffic Issues
ANC-3C meets regularly on the fourth Monday of each month. Meetings include a TOWN MEETING segment during which concerns may be raised by local residents. The public is invited to attend and
ENCOURAGED TO PARTICIPATE.
01 -Cheryl Opacinch
02030405-
ANC3-C Office
06Sam
Friedman
2737 Devonshire
Place, N.W.
07A. Jenkins
Washington,John
D.C. 20008
08Roger
Burns
232-2232
009Peggy Robin
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL IIEIGII IS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGH IS
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
AGENDA
Regular Meeting
January 29, 1988
Single Member District Commissioners:
Ot-Cheryl Opaclnch
02Sam Friedman
03Jolin A. Jenkins
04rtoger Burns
05Peggy Robin
06Pliil Mendelson
07Palricla Wamsley
00-Dnvld Grlnnell
09-Peler Espensctried
III.
Call to Order
I•
Special Business
II.
Election of Officers
Election of Committee Chair
C
Upton Street Issues - Brian Smith
IV.
M
V.
VI.
Tre
Committee Reports
A. Transportation
Update on Sheraton Washington Hotel Zoning Violations
Residential Visitor Parking Permit Amendment Act 1988
B. Planning and Zoning
Report on Case 86-26
Adas Israel Request to Waive Large Tract Review
WICAL
Miscellaneous Zoning Issues: Fast Food EstablishmentsWingmasters/Shanghi Express/ Peking Cafe
lloak Case - Highland Lane - Resolution
TACPEC & Wisconsin Avenue Update
Request for additonal support ($1000.00) for work
on Woodley Park Overlay presentation for the Zoning
Commission - Cheryl Opacinch
Tregaron Sale, Development Plan
VII. SMD Reports
IX.
Other Business
X.
Adjourn
Announcements: Zoning Commission Meeting on WICAL issues is scheduled for February 25
at the District Building, Room 9. If a second session is required it will
be held February 29th at 1:00 p.m. in the same room.
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
01 -Cheryl Opacinch
02Sam Friedman
03John A. Jenkins
04Roger Burns
05Peggy Robin
06Phil Mendelson
07Patricia Wamsley
08David Grinnell
09Peter Espenschied
November 23, 1987
Treasurer's Report
A. BE IT AUTHORIZED that Phil Mendelson be reimbursed the amount
of $101.03 for Committee expenses, and that Cheryl Opacinch
be reimbursed the amount of $142.38 for Administrative expenses
incurred on the Connecticut Avenue re-zoning project.
B. BE IT RESOLVED THAT the budget for fiscal 1988 as proposed
by the treasurer be adopted.
C. BE IT RESOLVED that Wolf & Cohen, Inc. be paid $52.00
for the balance due on the content and liability
insurance for the ANC Office for 1987.
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
November 23, 1987
Treasurer's Repor t
3. Supplemental Budget for 1988
WHEREAS Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C at the close of
fiscal 1987 has a surplus of $29,500,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the following supplemental budget
be adopted:
Reserve
$7,500
Newsletter
2,000
Salary Reserve
5.000
Equipment
6.000
Connecticut Avenue Rezoning
3,000
Wisconsin Avenue Rezoning
3,000
Excess
3,000
TOTAL
$29,500
WOODLEY PARK
ADVISORY
NEIGHBORHOOD
COMMISSION 3-C
Cathedral Heights
Cleveland Park
McLean Ci arilcns
Wo.KIlev Park
Massachusetts Avc. Heights
Government of the District of'Columbia
Please do not remove this notice until alter date posted
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Meeting of
Advisory
Neighborhood
Commission
ANC-3C
THIS IS A NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF THE JANUARY 25th Meeting
DATE & TIME:
LOCATION:
AGENDA:
FRIDAY
JANUARY 29, 1988
9:00 a.m.
Second District Police Station Community Room
Idaho Ave at Macomb Street N.W.
Election of Officers and Committee Chairs
Upton Street Traffic Issues
ANC-3C meets regularly on the fourth Monday of each month. Meetings include a TOWN MEETING segment during which concerns may be raised by local residents. The public is invited to attend and
ENCOURAGED TO PARTICIPATE.
01 -Cheryl Opacinch
02030405-
ANC 3-C Office
062737 Devonshire
Sam
Place, N.W.
Friedman
07A. Jenkins
Washington,John
D.C. 20008
08Roger
Burns
232-2232
009Peggy Robin
A
MEMO
December 11, 1987
If*
TO:
Roger Burns
FROM:
Susan K. Straus
SUBJECT:
Newsletter
U
Printing and Distribution Cost Estimates
The following information may be helpful in determining the amount of money
the Commission will need to authorize for the printing and mailing of a
Newsletter:
Address Labels for Residents in ANC 3-C
The Board of elections will provide address labels for all registered
voters in ANC 3-C (as of the fall 1987) for a fee of $50.00. The names and addresses ca
be provided by zip code on Cheshire 4 up labels to accomodate the mailing house. Paymen
is accepted in cash, certified check or money order only. The $50.00 payment
is required each time labels are provided. Production time is 48 hours after
the request is submitted. ANC 3-C has approximately 17,500 registered voters.
Printing / Mailing
Newsletter Services Inc. will print and mail the Newsletter. We provide
camera ready copy. They provide paper , bundle the mail for bulk mailing and
take it to the Post Office. From the time we give them the camera ready copy
to the time they take the mailing to the Post Office it should take 4 days.
This includes a blue line review by us (assuming no changes)
The cost for this service is based on 17,500 four page 8 l/2"x 11 newsletters
folded down to a size #10 envelop as a self mailer.
* Printing/f olding
T ‘3*6
Mailing
m-00
Paper
No Charge
Qamera ready copy can be provided by Duplicate Impressions for an estaimated
price of’$400.00. That fugure was without actually knowing the contents, number of pho
etc. Photos require 1 half tones which cost $10.00 each. Turnaround time for
the camera ready copy is two weeks. This anticipates prompt pick up when ready
and time for us to proof the galleys and make any needed corrections.
This does not
include time required to make any major changes in the copy.
*Does not include prices for photos($9.50 each) or for screens($5.25 each).
Postage
ANC 3-C is entitled to mail as a non profit organization so long as it proves
to the Post Office its eligibilty for this status. To do this we need to submit
an application to the Post Office that includes an application form 3524, a letter
from the appropriate government agency attesting to our non profit status, a sample
of the piece we plan to mail and a copy of our bylaws in which there is some statememt
as to the disposition of our funds. To set up a bulk rate non profit account will
require a$50.00 application fee and a $50.00 bulk rate fee payable once a year.
In addition the ANC must pay for the mailing at the time it goes to the post office
or before. The bulk rate nonprofit cost per newletter will be 7.1 cents for us so
long as we meet zipcode quantity bulk rate rules (which we will so long as the mailing
house is properly instructed on how to bundle our mailing)..
Once we receive our non profit bulk permit number from the Post Office
we cna deposit the approximate amount we anticipate the mailing will cost into that
account so that when the mailing house delivers the mail to the Post Office it will
go through. The estimate on Postage for 17,500 pieces at 7.1 cents is $1242.50.
The permit number must be given to the typesetter so it can be printed on the self
mailer portion of the folded newsletter.
Summary of Newletter Costs:
Labels
Printing/Mailing/Sorting
Typeset
Nonprofit Bulk Permit
Postage
B. Kraft Editorial Services*
$
50.00
jZ-^v-oo ***
400.00
100.00
1242.50
600.00
Total
*Already authorized by resolution at November regular Meeting.
Y6u~may want to introduce a resolution at" the Decem5eTr'Z'F meeting to authorize
expenditures up to ^3ZC6-O0
to permit staff work to move forward to
accomplish all the activity necessary to enable the ANC to put out its next
newsletter.
P.S.
cc:
Tyler Business Services who was used for the previous nesletters estimated
P^intinsu Ancl-Xype set only at $1175.00 with a reccommedation that we use
S & S mailing house for distribution. S & S estimates $470 for labels,
sacking and mailing.
All Commissioners
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacmch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
ANC 3-C FY 1988 BUDGET
(adopted November 23, 1987)
FY 87
Actual
FY 87
Budget
Cash on Hand
FY 88
Budget
$29,500
FY 1988 Allocation
30,000
Projected Interest
1,000
TOTAL
$60,500
$60,500
1. Net Salaries & Wages
$
0-
-
2. Total Federal Wage Taxes
and D.C. Income Taxes
-
3. Unemployment Insurance Tax
-
0-
-
-
0
-
-
-
$
0
0
-
-
0
-
0
-
425
235.35
300
1,440
1.440.00
1,440
500
368.13
400
1,450
608.50
1,450
0
8. Utilities
-
-
-
6. Telephone Service
7. Postage and Delivery
0
-
0
4. Local Transportation
5. Office Rent
$
-
-
0
-
-
0
-
-
1,700
452.79
3,700
22,000
6.617.00
26,000
11. Office Supplies & Expense
900
457.35
600
12. Office Equipment
300
689.60
6,300
13. Grants
910
2.450.00
1,810
1,825
2,039.45
11,000
9. Printing & Duplicating
10. Purchase of Services
14. Other
7,500
15. Reserve
TOTAL
ATTEST:,.
$31,450
UP?
■
<&**'*'*"- -
Phil Mendelson, Secretary
$15,358.17
$60,500
$60,500
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
01 -Cheryl Opacinch
02Sam Friedman
03John A. Jenkins
04-Roger Burns
05Peggy Robin
06Phil Mendelson
07Patricia Wamsley
08David Grinnell
09Peter Espenschied
December 1, 1987
The Hon. Flossie Lee, Chairman
Advisory Neighborhood Commission 6B
921 Pennsylvania Avenue, S.E.
Washington, D.C. 20003
At our most recent Commission meeting, the Commissioners of ANC 3-C
unanimously adopted the attached resolution regarding the D.C. prison.
We have sent copies to Senator Harkin and to Councilmember Winter. Please
let us know if we can be helpful in other ways.
FOR THE COMMISSION:
Peggy Robin
Chairman
Phil Mendelson
Secretary
PR/PM/ms
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
December 1, 1987
The Hon. Nadine Winter
Councilmember, Ward 6
Council of the District of Columbia
The District Building
Washington, D.C.
20004
Dear Mrs. Winter:
Enclosed is a copy of our recently adopted resolution concerning the
D.C. prison — a matter we know is important to you and your Ward. ANC 3-C
recognizes the city-wide importance of this issue and stands ready to
join our fellow citizens of Ward 6 in opposing any unwarranted intrusion
upon residential neighborhoods.
Sincerely,
Peggy Robin,
Chairman
Phil Mendelson
Secretary
PR/PM/ms
enc.
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners.
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
December
The Hon. Tom Harkin, Senator
United States Senate
Washington, D.C.
20510
Dear Senator Harkin:
We transmit the enclosed resolution because we know the issue of
the D.C. prison has been of concern to you. While we treasure the
need for Home Rule, we also recognize that all citizens of the United
States often turn to Congress for help — and in this case your role
has been appreciated.
Sincerely,
Peggy Robin
Chairman
Phil Mendelson
Secretary
PR/PM/ms
enc.
1,
1987
^ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
December 7, 1987
Mr. Charlie Mason
Special Assistant to the Director
Department of Public Works
2000 14th Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20009
Dear Mr. Mason:
I am writing to you in your capacity as ANC Liaison for the Department
Of Public Works.
One of the Community groups in Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C,
the Woodley Park Community Association (WPCA), has brought to our attention
their requests to the Department of Public Works in connection with their
community beautification project. The enclosed Status Report was furnished
to us detailing the requests made by WPCA to the Department of Public
Works.
We wanted to alert you, as our liaison with the Department, that there
are requests for services pending that have not yet been provided to a
community group in our ANC. We would appreciate any information you can
provide about the schedule for planting the requested trees. In addition,
your assistance in' resolving the question of repairing the sidewalk on
24th Street and on Woodley Place also would be greatly appreciated.
I look forward to hearing from you regarding these matters at your
earliest convenience.
Sincerely,
Peggy Robin
Chairman , ANC 3-C
Woodley Park Community Association
2929 Cathedral Avenue, Northwest
Washington, D.C. 20008
STATUS REPORT
WOODLEY PARK COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BEAUTIFICATION ACTIVITIES
Completed Activities
o
May, 1987—WPCA members and area merchants cleaned up alley behind Connecticut
Avenue and Woodley Place.
o
September, 1987—Five trash cans were added In Woodley Park, at WPCA's request.
Ongoing Activities
o
June, 1987 to present—WPCA requested DPW to plant new trees in empty tree
boxes on Connecticut Avenue and Calvert Street near the metro. WPCA has
been promised that Zelcova trees would be planted along Calvert Street
by the end of November, and red oak trees would be planted on Connecticut
Avenue next Spring.
No trees have been planted yet.
Contact—Brad Sweet, DPW
767-8532
o
June, 1987—Requested sidewalk repairs on 24th Street and on Woodley
Place near the Calvert Collection.
September, 1987—Conducted a site visit of areas needing repairs with
Klent Karry from DPW.
He said that DPW will not repair the sidewalk
near the Calvert Collection because it is illegally used as a driveway.
The sidewalk on 24th Street cannot be repaired until Murphy's repairs
its patio which has run off problems.
Contacts—Bill Barnes, DPW
767-8515
Klent Karry
767-8525
Charles Warr, I’rcsidem
Howard Friedman, Vice I’resideni
Caml Chamberlain. Sericiary
Charles l.npnm, Treasmei
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
December 7, 1987
Dear Adam:
Here are the Notices for the next meeting
of Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C
which will be held on December 21.
Please put up the notices before
December 14.
We will be sending you a check for the
months of October, November and December
shortly.
Thanks again for your help.
Happy Holidays.
Susan K. Straus
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
^^ATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
December 7, 1987
By Hand
Single Member District Commissioners
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
Mr. Lindsley Williams, Chairman
The Zoning Commission
The District Building, room 11
Washington, D.C. 20004
Re:
Case No. 86-26 Petitioner's Status
Dear Mr. Williams:
On behalf of ANC 3-C I would like to raise a preliminary matter at the
pre-hearing conference set for this Thursday, December 10. Mr. Cecil Tucker
of your staff has informed me by telephone that ANC 3-C is not listed as one
of the petitioners in the case. Since my ANC was one of the initiators of
the petition for rezoning Cleveland Park (signed also by the heads of the
three other sponsoring organizations, the Cleveland Park Historical Society,
WACC, and TACPEC) and we equally sponsored the petition for rezoning in
Woodley Park (along with the Woodley Park Community Association), I think
it important that the record be corrected and that our status as petitioner
be recognized.
Both acts of co-sponsorship were authorized by resolution passed by
unanimous voice vote at a properly noticed public meeting, at which a quorum
was present. Sponsorship of the Cleveland Park rezoning petition was authorized at a special meeting held on July 13, 1987; sponsorship of the Woodley
Park petition was authorized at our regular monthly meeting of July 27, 1987.
These facts were also contained in my letter to you dated November 25, 1987,
which addressed our request for time for testimony in the hearing schedule.
Correction of our status will, I believe, have bearing on the legal weight
to be given to the presentations made on behalf of the petitioners in the case.
As regards the Cleveland Park segment, it is the intent of all the signatories
of the petition (the ANC, CPHS, WACC and TACPEC) to put on one unified presentation. Therefore all witnesses are not only CPHS witnesses but also represent
the official position of ANC 3-C, and, we believe, are thus entitled to "great
weight" consideration of their testimony. Mr. Tersh Boasberg, President of
CPHS, is taking the lead in coordinating the case, with the approval of this
ANC. Should there be any question about his authority to represent the Commission, I will introduce a resolution at our next official ANC meeting (set
for December 21, 1987, at the 2nd District Police Station at 8 p.m.) to
Mr. Lindsley Williams, Chairman
December 7, 1987
2
-
-
appoint him specifically as our spokesperson and to designate as witnesses all
those listed by him on the "Pre-Hearing Submission" that he filed on behalf of
all the petitioners on November 30, 1987.
If I could have just a minute at the December 10th hearing to have the
ANC's status clarified, I would be most appreciative.
Sincerely
Peggy Robin
Chairman
cc:
CPHS
WPCA
WACC
TACPEC
Cecil Tucker
yudidx
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
December 9, 1987
Ms. Lorraine Mangine
Wolf & Cohen
5225 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C.
20008
Re: Insurance for Advisory Neighborhood Commission Office
Dear Ms. Mangine:
I am writing in reference to the insurance policy for
Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C for the time period
December I, 1987 thru November 30, 1988.
My purpose is to revise
the commercial package policy and renewal premium quoted in your
letter dated November 20, 1987.
Please provide ANC 3-C with the following insurance:
Property Coverage
Business Personal Property
$
20,000
General Liability
Occurrence
Aggregate
$
$
100,000
200,000
Please note I am deleting the "Extra Expense" from the package, and
reducing the general liability to the mininum level.
Thank you.
Yours Truly
Samuel W. Friedman
Treasurer
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia WamsISy
David Gnnneii
Peter Espenschied
_
,
„
December 9, 1987
Mr. Gerald Gleason
Treasurer
Cleveland Park Historical Society
c/o 3901 Langley Court, D556
Washington, D.C.
20016
Re: Wisconsin Avenue Rezoning Grant
Dear Mr. Gleason:
I am writing to deliver to the Cleveland Park Historical Society
a grant for one thousand dollars ($1,000) authorized by ANC 3-C in
support of our joint petitiop for rezoning along Wisconsin Avenue.
Also enclosed is a copy of the transmittal letter dated August 14, 1987
when this grant was originally mailed.
A stop payment order will be
issured on that check, and if by some chance it turns up, please notify
me for instructions about its return to ANC 3-C.
The authorization is from a resolution at the ANC's regular
meeting on June 22, 1987.
Enclosed is our check in the amount of $1,000, number 627
drawn on our Perpetual American account.
For our records we ask
that you countersign this letter below to note your acceptance of
the funds and return a copy for our files.
A return envelope is
provided.
Yours Truly,
Samuel W. Friedman
Treasurer
Enclosure
RECEIPT & ACCEPTANCE
Date
i
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
01 -Cheryl Opadnch
02Sam Friedman
03John A. Jenkins
04Roger Bums
05- Peggy Robin
06Phil Mendelson
07Palrida Wamsley
08-
Oavtd Grinned
09-
Peter Espenschied
August 14, 1987
Mr. Tersh Boasberg
President, Cleveland Park
Historical Society
3136 Newark Street, NW
Washington, DC 20008
Re:
Wisconsin Avenue Rezoning Grant
Dear Mr. Boasberg:
I am writing to deliver to the Cleveland Park Historical Society a grant
for one thousand dollars ($1000.00) authorized by ANC 3-C in support of our
joint petition for rezoning along Wisconsin Avenue.
The authorization is from a resolution at the ANC's regular meeting on
June 22, 1987. Please accept my apologies for the delay.
Sincerely,
//**<
Samuel W. Friedman
Treasurer
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
ATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
:
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
01-
0203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Bums
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
December 11,
Ms. Joyce Isis
Perpetual Savings Bank
3439 Wisconsin Ave N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20016
Dear Ms. Isis:
Please order 300 checks for the Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C
I am enclosing the order form that was in our current check book along
with a copy of the checks we currently use.
You will note there are two signature lines on our checks.
All otn:
r.heek.-, require two signatures. Our current format is a three ring binder.
_ , ;:.Jt need a new binder. We woulu like the order to fit the binder we
..ntly use.
We would also like the least expensive check of this kind
If you have any question, please call me aL 232 2232.
If there
is no one in the office , please lea^e a message on our recording and I
will call you back promptly.
Sincerely •,
7]
J
Susan K. Straus
Executive Director
Enclosures
1987
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
Mr. Ed Curry, Executive Director
D.C. Zoning Commission
The District Building
Washington, D.C. 20004
December 15, 1987
RE:
Case No. 87-2
Dear Mr. Curry:
I am writing pursuant to the Public Hearing Notice scheduling a
January 7, 1988 hearing in the so-called "vesting" case (No. 87-2).
Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C wishes to testify at the hearing.
We received the notice subsequent to our last (November) meeting, and
will consider the amendments proposed in the hearing notice at our
next (December) meeting.
Although I have been authorized to represent ANC 3-C in this case,
I am unable to offer our comments on this new notice until after we
meet. However, our past comments have been consistent with proposals
#1 and #3 in the notice.
If the Zoning Commission desires further information from ANC 3-C
prior to the hearing, please contact me either through our office or
at 966-1485.
Sincerely,
Phil Mendelson
Secretary
PM/ms
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
^CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
01 -Cheryl Opacinch
02Sam Friedman
03John A. Jenkins
04Roger Burns
05Peggy Robin
06Phil Mendelson
07Patricia Wamsley
08David Grinnell
09Peter Espenschied
December 21, 1987
Re:
Cleveland Park Historical
Society Requests Re. Klingle
Valley Bridge
Mr. Charles Mason
Assistant to the Director
Department of Public Works
Reeves Municipal Center
2000 14th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20009
Dear Mr. Mason:
I am writing to express the enthusiastic support of Advisory
Neighborhood Commission 3-C for two proposals put forward by the Cleveland
Park Historical Society. The first concerns the restoration of the
decorative elements of the Klingle Valley Bridge, located at the southern
entrance to the Cleveland Park Historic District, and also within the
boundaries of this ANC. We would be very pleased to have the large stone
urns refurbished and their electrical connections restored, so that they
may again function as bridge lights, as they were intended by their
designer Paul Cret, and we would further support the repainting of the Art
Deco railing, which is now very chipped and rust-covered. We believe that
renovation of these decorative elements will allow both residents and
tourists alike to recognize and enjoy this bridge as one of the loveliest
and most historic of Washington’s public works.
Second, this Commission supports the placement of four Historic
District markers, to be posted at the northern and southern entrances to
the Cleveland Park Historic District along Connecticut and Wisconsin
Avenues, NW. The markers will be similar in design to those already in
place at five major entryways to the Takoma Park Historic District. We
understand that the cost of making the template for the markers has been
donated by the Cleveland Park Historical Society. We believe that the
Hr. Charles Mason
Department of Public Works
December 21, 1987
page two
placement of these signs will enhance public awareness of an important
phase of our City's development and will encourage shopowners and
residents to take pride in their neighborhood and its history.
ANC 3-C thanks you for this opportunity to express our views.
FOR THE COMMISSION:
Peggy Robin
Chairman
cc:
Cleveland Park Historical Society
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
I.
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
December 21, 1987
(Regular Meeting)
The following resolution was adopted by majority voice vote:
WHEREAS Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C has evaluated the
scope of work required by its Treasurer and has determined that
the most efficient way to fulfill its monthly and quarterly
reporting obligations to the Commission and the D.C. Auditor,
and to reconcile the monthly bank statement is to obtain the
services of a qualified accountant;
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED That the Treasurer of ANC 3-C is
authorized to engage on a month-to-month basis the services of
a certified accountant at a fee not to exceed $150 per month.
II.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED: That ANC 3-C hereby authorizes a one-time $200
holiday bonus/payment for its Executive Director.
III.
The attached resolution, concerning the Iona House medically
day care center Certificate of Need application, was adopted by unanimous
voice vote.
IV.
The attached resolution, concerning a Wisconsin/Upton traffic
was adopted by unanimous voice vote.
V.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: ANC 3-C supports the position of the McLean Gardens
Condominium regarding the request of the Holladay Corporation
for parking meters on Idaho Avenue.
That is, ANC 3-C supports
the installation of metered angled parking on the retail store
side of Idaho Avenue between Wisconsin Avenue and Newark Street.
Further, ANC 3-C authorizes Phil Mendelson to represent the
Commission on this issue.
cont1d.. .
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
2
December 21, 1987
VI.
The attached resolution, regarding Connecticut Avenue (Clevelan
zoning, was adopted by unanimous voice vote.
VII.
The Commission committed a proposed resolution, concerning zoni
for low density local neighborhood commercial centers, to the Planning &
Zoning Committee, to be reported out at the Commission's regular January
meeting.
VIII.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That it
authorizes the Chairman, her designee, or Phil Mendelson to
represent the Commission in upcoming hearings on Zoning Case
87-2 along the following general lines (the advice and recommendations of ANC 3-C to be more fully presented in written and
oral testimony):
1. That it strongly supports the proposed amendment //I in the
public notice. Accordingly, amendment #2 is not desirable.
2. That it strongly supports the proposed amendment #3.
3. That it strongly opposes amendment #4.
IX.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
WHEREAS ANC 3-C is interested in developing and distributing
a newsletter to residents in the ANC;
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: That the Commission authorize an
amount of up to $3,200 for expenditure under the supervision
of the Communications Committee for the purpose of printing
and distributing an ANC 3-C newsletter. This is in addition
to the authorization adopted November 23, 1987.
X.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
BE IT RESOLVED BY ANC 3-C: That it send a letter to the Department of Public Works in support of the relighting of the urns
and the repainting of the Klingle Valley Bridge, and the placement of Historic District markers at four entrances to the
Cleveland Park Historic District.
XI.
The following resolution was adopted by unanimous voice vote:
RESOLVED: To adopt the minutes (which include the Summary of
Actions) as follows:
1. For August 24, 1987;
2. For September 28, 1987 with the following changes:
cont'd...
SUMMARY OF ACTIONS
a) Insert Resolution No.
- 3
December 21,
1987
IV in the Summary of Actions
b) Correct Resolution No. X to correspond to the Treasurer's report;
c) Move the first paragraph on page 3 to page 2 of the
Minutes — as the new paragraph 4 on page 2.
3. For October 26, 1987;
4. For November 23, 1987.
Further, the Secretary is authorized to correct obvious typographical
errors in these minutes and to conform the official copies with these
corrections.
ATTEST:
^ Phil Mendelson, Secretary
Attachments: Iona House day care center resolution
Wisconsin/Upton traffic signal resolution
Connecticut Avenue rezoning resolution
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
RESOLUTION
IONA HOUSE MEDICALLY SUPERVISED DAY CARE CENTER
(Certificate of Need Application 87-3-4)
Adopted: December 21, 1987
WHEREAS: The Iona House Day Health Center has been in operation at
3720 Upton Street N.W., Washington, D.C. since August 1986 in space
rented from the Washington Home as an adult day care center approved
"as a social model"; and
WHEREAS: Although this program is funded in part through the D.C.
Office on Aging, provision also is made for individual reimbursement
in accordance with ability to pay, and, where available, from third
party payments; and
WHEREAS: The requirements of the D.C. Office of Health Care Financing
require Certificate of Need (CON) certification from the State Health
Planning and Development Agency (SHPDA) for approval as a Medicaid
Provider for reimbursement from that agency (see Letter of Intent dated
October 27, 1987 from Program Director); and
WHEREAS: Under current SHPDA requirements Iona House must reapply for
its Certificate of Need as a Medical Provider and reestablish community
support from the ANC; therefore
BE IT RESOLVED: That Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C reaffirms
its earlier position in support of Iona House's application for a
therapeutic day care center for older adults as a needed facility in
this area of Northwest Washington.
Adopted by unanimous voice vote of the Commission, December 21, 1987
Phil Mendelson, Secretary
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
RESOLUTION
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
Re. DPW Docket No. 87-265-TS
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
(Wisconsin/Upton Traffic Signal)
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
Adopted: December 21, 1987
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
WHEREAS: The Department of Public Works (DPW) has asked for comments
on a proposed traffic signal at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton Street (Dec. 4,
1987 D.C. Register, Docket No. 87-265-TS); and
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-F has asked that the comment period be extended until February 1, 1988; and
WHEREAS: This issue is of great importance to the constituents of
ANC 3-C; therefore
BE IT RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C: That we raise
the following issues and concerns in connection with a signal at Upton and
Wisconsin:
CONCERN: DPW officials have stated repeatedly that -the~Department would
make no changes in traffic measures in this area until after the 4000 Wisconsin Avenue building was in full operation and until both the Department and
the community (including the ANCs) could see what traffic conditions will
exist and how they would be affected by measures such as a signal.
We endorse that policy and the Department should hold to it.
CONCERN: We support and offer as our own the sentiment of ANC 3-F (per
their letter of December 9, 1987) that substantial community input is needed
before the record closes on this rulemaking, and therefore the public comment period should be extended until February 1, 1988.
This is consistent
with the Department's objectives of fully understanding and serving the community.
Moreover, ANC 3-C specifically requests copies of any correspondence
from developers or tenants (or their agents) which requests traffic signals
or other changes in traffic controls in the vicinity of 4000 Wisconsin Avenue.
CONCERN: We have grave doubts about the efficacy of this signal.
We
are deeply concerned about the probable and direct impact of the proposed
signalization; particularly the impact on residential Upton Street east of
Wisconsin Avenue, and generally the effect on other east-west streets in
the area.
The proposed signalization would appear to threaten the local
residential character of Upton, 37th, and 38th Streets, and that is unacceptable to ANC 3-C and a dangerous precedent for other east-west streets
in the area.
DPW has not provided information in this regard.
Nor has it
provided a description of the particular type of traffic signal to be in-
Resolution
Re. 87-265-TS
December 21, 1987
Page Two
stalled. We are thus asked to comment without a full understanding of the
implications and alternatives, if any, to the rulemaking. Accordingly, we
hereby request a feasibility study by DPW dealing with these issues.
CONCERN: DPW should not proceed with any change in traffic operations
until measures which simultaneously mitigate the impact on the adjoining
neighborhood are formally proposed and adopted. Residents of Upton, Van
Ness, Tilden, Idaho, 37th, and 38th streets are currently discussing proposals. This process will be negatively aggravated if DPW proceeds now
solely with this rulemaking and the traffic signal.
CONCERN: Separate from simultaneous mitigation measures, ANC 3-C is
concerned about dealing in a fragmentary manner with traffic "improvements"
connected with the worsening conditions in the Wisconsin/Van Ness area.
Before closing the record on this docket, DPW is hereby asked to inform
ANCs 3-C, 3-E, and 3-F of the entire realm of changes under consideration
and their liklihood of adoption: street widenings, removal of curb parking,
reversible lanes, additional signals, stop signs, barriers, thru-truck and
bus prohibitions, changes in existing signals, changes in existing curb
cuts, left turn signals/lanes, etc. The scope of this request is Van Ness
Street on the north, 37th Street on the east, Porter Street on the south,
and Nebraska Avenue on the west. We also request an estimate of their cost.
CONCERN: The imposition of traffic signals to facilitate commuter
traffic related to office buildings must be coupled with specific and
effective measures to encourage public transit use as an alternative.
For example, if the developers or tenants of 4000 Wisconsin are requesting
this signal, they should be required to offer Metro incentives as a tradeoff.
Adopted by unanimous voice vote of the Commission, December 21, 1987
ATTEST
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
01-
0203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
RogerBurns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
PatriciaWamsiey
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
RESOLUTION
Re. Connecticut Avenue (Cleveland Park) Rezoning
Adopted: December 21, 1987
WHEREAS: Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C (ANC 3-C), the Cleveland
Park Historical Society (CPHS), the Tenley and Cleveland Park Emergency
Committee (TACPEC), and the Wisconsin Avenue Corridor Committee (WACC)
have jointly sponsored a petition before the Zoning Commission to rezone
the portion of Connecticut Avenue that falls within the Cleveland Park
Historic District, for the purpose of ensuring consistency with the
Comprehensive Plan and to preserve its historic and local-neighborhoodservice character; and
WHEREAS: All the co-petitioners have been consulted and have agreed
upon the principal facts and reasons to be presented in the case; and
WHEREAS: There is limited time for each petitioner to put forward its
views, and a desire to avoid duplication of testimony and use the time
available to put forward those witnesses who can speak with the most
.authority about each of the different concerns (e.g., traffic, Comprehensive Plan compliance, integration of historic preservation and urban
planning goals) that petitioners wish to raise in this complex and
important case;
THEREFORE BE IT NOW RESOLVED BY ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C:
That it adopt as its own the "Pre-Hearing Submission" filed on November
30, 1987 with the Zoning Commission by Tersh Boasberg on behalf of all
four petitioners named above, and that it authorize the witnesses named
therein to represent its views and concerns in the hearings set for
January 21, 25, and 28, 1988; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: that ANC 3-C request the Zoning Commission to
include in the case a parcel of land along Connecticut Avenue, west side,
between Macomb Street and Newark Street, N.W. (Lot 686, Square 2082) now
occupied by the Cleveland Park Library, which was omitted by clerical
error from the listing of lots and squares in the Notice of Hearing; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That the Chairman of this ANC, Peggy Robin, Lisa
Koteen, or a designee to be appointed by the Chairman may also represent
the ANC's views in this case.
Phil Mendelson, Secretary
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
Ms. Carlessia A. Hussein, C.H., Se. P.H.
Director
State Health Planning and Development Agency
1330 H Street N.W. 7th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20005
Attention: Barbara Cobb
Staff Analyst
Re: Iona House Day Health Center
Certificate of Need
Registration // 87-3-12
Dear Ms. Huessein:
Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C at its regular meeting on
December 21, 1987 with a quorum being present unanimously adopted the
attached resolution re-affirming its action of January 27, 1987 concerning
Iona House's Certificate of Need application for a "medically supervised
day care" program for older adults.
Ruth Haugen, Chairman
Human Services & Aging Committee
cc: E. Fox Iona House
D.C. Office on Aging
ANC 3-E
ANC 3-F
Hon. James Nathanson
DVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
RESOLUTION
Cheryl Opadnch
Sam Friedman
John
A. Jenkins
IONA
HOUSE MEDICALLY SUPERVISED DAY CARE CENTER
Roger Bums
Peggy Robin
(Certificate of Need Application 87-3-4)
Phil Mendetson
Patrida Wamsley
David Grin noil
Adopted: December 21, 1987
Peter Espenschied
WHEREAS: The Iona House Day Health Center has been in operation at
3720 Upton Street N.W., Washington, D.C. since August 1986 in space
rented from the Washington Home as an adult day care center approved
"as a social model'.1; and
WHEREAS: Although this program is funded in part through the D.C.
Office on Aging, provision also is made for individual reimbursement
in accordance with ability to pay, and, where available, from third
party payments; and
WHEREAS: The requirements of the D.C. Office of Health Care Financing
require Certificate of Need (CON) certification from the State Health
Planning and Development Agency (SHPDA) for approval as a Medicaid
Provider for reimbursement from that agency (see Letter of Intent dated
October 27, 1987 from Program Director); and
WHEREAS:
Under current SHPDA requirements Iona House must reapply for
its Certificate of Need as a Medical Provider and reestablish community
support from the ANC; therefore
BE IT RESOLVED:
That Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3-C reaffirms
its earlier position in support of Iona House's application for a
therapeutic day care center for older adults as a needed facility in
this area of Northwest Washington.
Adopted by unanimous voice vote of the Commission, December 21,
1987
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 3-C
GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
/
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS
CLEVELAND PARK
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. HEIGHTS
McLEAN GARDENS
WOODLEY PARK
2737 DEVONSHIRE PLACE, N.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008
232-2232
Single Member District Commissioners:
010203040506070809-
Cheryl Opacinch
Sam Friedman
John A. Jenkins
Roger Burns
Peggy Robin
Phil Mendelson
Patricia Wamsley
David Grinnell
Peter Espenschied
Mr. George W. Schoene, Bureau Chief
Bureau of Traffic Services
Department of Public Works
2000 14th Street, N.W. (7th Floor)
Washington, D.C. 20009
December 31, 1987
RE: Docket No. 87-265-TS
Dear Mr. Schoene:
Attached is a copy of the resolution, adopted unanimously by this
Commission, on the proposed traffic signal at Wisconsin Avenue and Upton
Street, N.W. The resolution is lengthy, but the essence is threefold:
1) Extend the comment period until February 1, 1988;
2) Provide more information to the ANCs; and
3) Traffic mitigation measures to protect the neighborhood
must be in place before any signal is implemented, and
therefore the Department should not proceed to final
rule on this signal.
The resolution has been drawn in a format that facilitates your
recognition of, and response to, the issues and concerns raised by ANC 3-C,
as required by D.C. Code 1-261.
We realize that this resolution seeks a great deal of assistance from
your office, but the proposed signal is viewed by the community as a major
change and threat. To aid in your efforts, as well as ours and those of
our sister ANC, we would like a small meeting with you the first week of
January. I believe ANC 3-F Commissioner Eben Fodor has already contacted
your office about this.
ANC 3-C is hopeful that with cooperation and good planning among all
the parties, a potentially acrimonious controversy can be avoided.
FOR THE COMMISSION:
Phil Mendelson
Commission Secretary
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