solas about to light up tasca brava fashion

solas about to light up tasca brava fashion

SOLAS ABOUT

TO LIGHT UP

Three-story project close to opening

TASCA BRAVA

Real Spanish cuisine on

Glenwood South

FASHION

Something cool and shady in downtown

Raleigh

Downtown Eats

A comprehensive list of fine and casual dining in and around downtown

By Elizabeth Shugg

i t’s Friday night in downtown

Raleigh. Steaks clink and soft lights sizzle, glasses cast sophisticated shadows across spirited diners. From exquisite five-star fare to convenient gourmet take-out, downtown Raleigh’s diverse dining options make it easy for the experienced foodie—or casual diner—to discover culinary bliss.

Not sure where to start? Riviera’s oldworld Mediterranean cuisine fuses

Spanish, French and Italian flavors.

The Mint serves up contemporary southern cuisine amid preserved glass etchings and vault hardware from the building’s former bank days, and The Duck & Dumpling’s modern ambience and light pan-Asian menu elevates Chinese food to new heights.

If underlying—or newly forming— southern roots call you home, a pulled pork shoulder or half-rack of Carolinastyle ribs from The Pit may be just what your appetite ordered. While there, try a BBLT—cured barbecue bacon, lettuce, tomato and aioli on toast.

Downtown Raleigh boasts a refreshing adult beverage scene, but be warned: Blue Martini’s cocktail infusions might carry you away to a

“Hawaiian Sunset”—or leave you in a

“Purple Haze.” After enjoying a martini or two, spend a cozy night at home with your HDTV and an order of India

Mahal’s Tandoori Mix via Raleigh

Take-Out.

You really can’t go wrong in a city where experienced, internationallytrained chefs view evolving dining trends as a positive. Menus reflect emergent food pairings, seasonal harvests and discriminating tastes to produce culinary pleasures that never go out of style.

Take note: you may suddenly experience a relentless craving for gourmet fare after reading our Downtown Eats guide. Don’t say we didn’t warn you!

Restaurant list compiled by Melissa Santos

Restaurants are in alphabetical order, classified by cuisine. Hours have been included but may have changed since going to print. Be sure to confirm before visiting a restaurant.

Visit our website, www.raleigh2.com, for an updated listing, available soon with photos and descriptions of all restaurants.

Restaurant owners/managers:

Please contact us by email at [email protected]

to add or update your listing.

AMERICAN

Arthur’s Top of the Tower

(Clarion Hotel)

320 Hillsborough St

919.832.0501

www.raleighclarion.com

Lunch M-F: 11am-2pm

Dinner Su-Sa: 5:30-10pm

(See website for lounge and weekend breakfast hours)

Berkeley Café

217 Martin St

919.821.0777

www.berkeleycafe.net

Lunch M-F: 11am- 3pm

T: 10 pm-2 am, W-Sa: 8pm-2am

Big Ed´s City Market Restaurant

100 Person St

919.836.9909

M-F: 5:30am-noon, Sa: 6:30am-noon

Bogart's American Grill

510 Glenwood Ave

Continued on page 3

The Raleigh Downtowner

Vol. 4, Issue 6

ON THE COVER:

Customers enjoy an evening meal outside at the Duck & Dumpling in Moore Square.

LEFT

:

The private dining cellar at Riviera Resto, a

Mediterranean restaurant and lounge located on historic Wilmington Street.

Riviera offers some of the best dining in downtown

Raleigh.

READERS: Is your company super environmentally-friendly or does it create products/services that help other companies to be more green? Do you have an interesting downtown pet? Email us about it and we might feature you in one of our upcoming issues. Tell us more at [email protected]

The Downtowner is a local monthly print magazine dedicated to coverage of downtown Raleigh.

The Chronicle is a weekly online publication covering Raleigh and the surrounding community.

617 West Jones Street

Raleigh, NC 27603

919.821.9000

Fax: 919.821.4998

www.raleighdowntowner.com

www.raleigh2.com

Online issue, ad rates/media kit, rack locations, and archived issues are available on www.raleighdowntowner.com

General inquiries may be sent to [email protected]

For advertising, call, or send email to [email protected]

PUBLISHER / EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

................. Crash Gregg

FOUNDERS

................................................... Sig Hutchinson, Randall Gregg

SALES / ACCOUNT MANAGERS

................ Chris Moutos, Lisa Stone

FOOD EDITOR

.............................................. Fred Benton

MARKETING & RESEARCH MANAGER

..... Melissa Santos

FASHION WRITER

....................................... Kelly Hubbard

WRITERS

...................................................... Beth Shugg, Dave Rose, Matt Fern,

....................................................................... Kim Weiss, Sarah Styron, Melissa Santos

PHOTOGRAPHERS

....................................... Jeff Basladynski, C.Gregg

PROOFREADING / EDITING

........................ Ginny Gillikin

LAYOUT / PHOTO EDITING

......................... Tina Savoy

UPCOMING ISSUES

Volume 4, Issue 7 - Going Green!

Volume 4, Issue 8 - Downtown Pets

PAGE 2 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6

© Copyright 2008, Downtown Raleigh Publishing, LLC

The name, logo, and any logo iterations of the Raleigh Downtowner and the Downtowner D graphic and the Raleigh Chronicle are a TM of Downtown Raleigh Publishing LLC. No part of this publication may be reproduced without express written permission.

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

Continued from page 2

919.832.1122

www.bogartsamericangrill.com

Lunch M-F: 11:30am-2:30pm; Dinner

M-W: 5-10pm, Th: 5-10pm, F: 5-11pm,

Sa: 5-11pm, Su: 5-9 pm (See website for bar hours)

The Borough

317 Morgan St, Ste 117

919.832.8433

www.theboroughraleigh.com

Su-Sa: 4pm-2am

Boylan Bridge Brewpub

201 S Boylan Ave

919.839.1888

www.boylanbridge.com

Opening August 2008

The Brass Grill

208 Wilmington St, Suite 210

919.833.9595

M-F: 7am-3pm, Sa: 9am-4pm

The Burger Hut

829 W. Morgan St

919.832.5303

M-F: 6am-3pm, Sa: 9am-3pm

Cameron Bar & Grill

2018 Clark Ave

919.755.2231

www.cameronbargrill.com

M-W: 11am-11pm, Sa: 11am-midnight,

Su: 11am-10pm

Char-Grill

618 Hillsborough St

919.821.7636

www.chargrillusa.com

M-W: 10am-midnight, Th: 10am-1am,

F-Sa: 10am-2am, Su: 10:30am-11pm

Charles' Place

222 Hargett St

919.890.3565

Fast Break

314 Salisbury St

919.833.7070

M-F: 6:30am-4pm

Fayetteville Street Tavern

112 Fayetteville St

919.833.1722

www.fayettevillestreettavern.com

M-F: 11:30am-2 am, Sa: 4pm-2am,

Su: 7pm-2am

Finch’s Restaurant

401 Peace Street

919.834.7396

www.finchrestaurant.com

M-F: 6am-3pm, Sa: 6am-1pm,

Su: 7am-2pm

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium

328 Morgan St

919.821.7468

www.beerknurd.com

M-Th: 2pm-2am, F-Sa: 11am-2am, Su: noon-midnight

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

Frazier’s

2418 Hillsborough Street

919.828.6699

M-Th: 5pm-10pm, F-Sa: 5pm-10:30pm

Hard Times Café

410 Glenwood Ave, Ste 300

919.835.1600

www.hardtimes.com

Su: noon-9pm, M-Th: 11am-10pm, F-

Sa: 11am-11pm

Hayes Barton Café & Desserter y

2000 Fairview Rd

919.856.8551

Lunch T-Sa: 11:30am-2pm; Dinner W-

Th:6-9pm, F-Sa: 6-9:30pm

Hi-5 Sports Bar

510 Glenwood Ave

919.834.4335

www.hi5raleigh.com

M: 5pm-midnight, T-Su: 5pm-2am,

Lilly's Pizza

1813 Glenwood Ave

919.833.0226

www.lillyspizza.com

Su-W: 11am-10pm,

Th-Sa: 11am-midnight

The Mecca Restaurant

13 Martin St

919.832.5714

M-F: 7:30am-7pm, Sa: 7:30am-1pm

Mellow Mushroom

601 Peace St

919.832.3499

www.mellowmushroom.com

M-W: 11am-10pm, Th-Sa: 11am-11pm,

Su: noon-10pm

Mojoe's Burger Joint

620 Glenwood Ave

919.832.6799

M-Sa: 11:30am-2am,

Su: 11:30am-midnight

Moonlight Pizza Company

615 Morgan St

919.755.9133

Tu-Th: 11:30am-11pm,

Sa: 5-11pm, Su: 5-9:30pm

NOFO at the Pig

2014 Fairview Rd

919.821.1240

www.nofo.com

Lunch M-F: 11am-3pm

Brunch Sa-Su: 10am-3pm

Dinner M-Th: 5:30-9pm,

Fr-Sa: 5:30-10pm

Noodles & Company

403 Daniels St www.noodles.com

Opening late 2008-early 2009

Pharaoh's

170 Davie St

919.899.6329

pharaohsamericangrill.com

M-F: 8am-3pm

Player's Retreat

105 Oberlin Rd

919.755.9589

www.playersretreat.net

M-F: noon-midnight

The Point

1626 Glenwood Ave

919.755.1007

www.thepointatglenwood.com

Lunch M-F: 11am-3pm; Dinner M-Su:

11am-3pm; Brunch Su: 11am-3pm

(See website for bar hours)

This Five Points restaurant specializes in wood-fired dishes, including everything from steaks to pizza. This eatery also boasts over 40 wines and a full bar, so whether you’re looking for a post-work drink, hearty dinner or late-night snack, The Point can satisfy your needs. Be sure to check out the Bloody Mary and Mimosa specials served every Sunday for brunch.

Poole's Diner

426 McDowell St

919.832.4477

www.poolesdowntowndiner.com

W-Sa: 5pm-2am, Sa: 10:30am-3pm

Porter’s City Tavern

2412 Hillsborough Street

919.821.2133

M-Th: 11am-10pm, F: 11am-11:00pm,

Sa: 5pm-11pm, Su: 11am-2:30pm,

5pm-9pm

The Raleigh Times Bar

14 Hargett St

919.833.0999

www.raleightimesbar.com

M-Sa: 11:30am-2:30am, Su: 5pm-

2:30am

Serving classic bar fare—but with fresh ingredients and different techniques—for lunch, dinner or as a midnight snack, any time is a good time for the Raleigh Times; the continual crowd huddled inside and out attest as much. While this century-old building (former home of the Raleigh

Times newspaper) has been carefully

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE MAGAZINE

and beautifully restored by Empire

Properties, it’s the food that really draws people in. Customer favorites include the shrimp burger with cilantro tartar, guacamole and tortilla chips, and of course, the chicken-fried pickles.

The Roast Grill-Hot Weiners

7 West St

919.832.8292

www.roastgrill.com

M-Sa: 11am- 4pm

Roly Poly

201 Hargett St

919.834.1135

www.rolypoly.com

M-F: 8am-8pm, Sa: 11am-8pm, Su: 1-

8pm

Rum Runners

208 Martin St

919.755.6436

www.rumrunnersusa.com

W-Sa: 6pm-2am, Su: 7pm-2am

Side Street Restaurant

225 N Bloodworth St

919.828.4927

www.sidestreetrestaurant.com

Lunch M-F: 11am-3pm; Dinner

M,T,Th,F: 5-9pm; Sa: 11am-8pm

Snoopy's Hot Dogs and More

600 Hillsborough St

919.839.2176

Su-W: 10am-midnight,

Th-Sa: 10am-3am

Square Rabbit

19 Martin St

919.829.9223

www.squarerabbit.com

M-F: 10am-6pm

Stool Pigeons Coop & Grill

410 Glenwood Ave

919.831.0400

www.stoolpigeons.org

M-Su: 11am-2am

Tookie's Grill

18 Seaboard Ave, Ste 130

919.829.7221

www.tookiesgrill.com

M-Sa: 7am-8pm, Su: 10am-4pm

The Village Draft House

428 Daniels St

919.833.1373

www.village.mydrafthouse.com

Su-M: 11-12am; T-Sa: 11-2am

Woody's at City Market

205 Wolfe St

919.833.3000

www.woodyscitymarket.com

Su-Sa: 11:30am-2am

(No one under 21 admitted after 9pm)

Continued on page 4

VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 3

Continued from page 3

ASIAN

Champa Thai Café

16 Martin St

919.758.8988

www.champathaicafe.com

M-F: 11am-6pm

The Duck & Dumpling

222 Blount St

919.838.0085

www.theduckanddumpling.com

Lunch M-F: 11:30am-2:30pm; Dinner

Tu-Th: 5pm-10pm, F-Sa: 5pm-11pm

Chef David Mao’s first restaurant,

The Mandarin House in Cameron

Village, gained a devout following 25 years ago, so it’s no surprise that The

Duck and Dumpling has acquired the same popularity. The mahogany wood paneling, soft red lighting and classic jazz background music provide an inviting atmosphere and the lamb chops with curried coconut milk,

“lion's head” meatball stuffed with scallops, and braised New York strip with garlic sauce give customers a reason to stay and keep coming back.

Five Star

511 Hargett St

919.833.3311

www.heatseekershrimp.com

M-Su: 5:30pm-2am

Peace China

802 Semart Dr, Ste 106

919.833.8668

M-Su: 11am-10pm

Sono

319-101 Fayetteville St

PAGE 4 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6

919.521.5328

www.sonoraleigh.com

Lunch M-F: 11am-2pm

Dinner Su-Th: 5-10pm, F-Sa: 5-11pm

Thaiphoon Bistro

301 Glenwood Ave, Ste 190

Lunch: M-Su 11:30am-2:30pm

Dinner: M-Th 5pm-10pm

F-Sa 5pm-11pm, Su 12pm-9pm

Opening soon

Sushi Blues Café

301 Glenwood Ave

919.664.8061

www.sushibluescafe.com

Lunch M-F: 11:30 am-2:30 pm

Dinner Su-Th: 5:30pm-midnight,

F-Sa: 5:30pm-2am

Waraji

19 W Hargett St www.warajirestaurant.com

Opening Soon

Wild Ginger

180 E Davie St

919.277.1999

www.wildgingersushi.com

Lunch M-F: 11:00am-2:30pm

Dinner M-Th: 5:00pm-9:30pm,

F: 5:00pm-10:30pm, Sa: noon-10:30pm soup to po boys and muffuletta sandwiches, the Big Easy satisfies any

Cajun craving. And the large mahogany tables, exposed brick walls, wrought iron staircases and balconies, and streetlights and photos from the French Quarter help create that New Orleans vibe.

Zydeco Downtown

208 Wolfe St

919.834.7987

Lunch M-F: 11am-3pm; Dinner W-Sa:

4pm-2am; Brunch Su: 11am-3pm

CUBAN & ARGENTINIAN

The New Oakwood Café

300 Edenton St

919.828.5994

M-F: 11:30am-2:30pm, F-Sa: 6-10pm

DELI/CAFE/

COFFEE HOUSE

The Bean Counter

421 Salisbury St, 2nd floor

919.834.9900

www.sheraton.com/raleigh

M-F: 6:30am-2:30pm

CAFETERIA

K&W Cafeteria

511 Woodburn Road

Cameron Village

919.832.7505

www.kwcafeterias.com/raleigh.html

M-Th: 11am-2:30pm, 4pm-8pm

F: 11am-2:30pm, 4pm-8:30pm

Sa-Su: 11am-8:30pm

Lighthouse Restaurant

411 Fayetteville St

919.546.6488

M-F: 6:30-10am, 11am-2pm

CAJUN & CREOLE

The Big Easy

222 Fayetteville St

919.832.6082

www.thebigeasync.com

M-Su: 11am-2am

The Big Easy brings New Orleans favorites to downtown Raleigh.

Serving popular Louisiana dishes from gumbo, jambalaya and she-crab

Café Carolina and Baker y

150 Fayetteville St

919.834.9117

www.cafecarolina.com

M-F: 7am-4pm

Café Carolina and Baker y

401 Daniels St

919.821.7117

www.cafecarolina.com

M-Sa: 7am-9pm; Su: 8am-7pm

Café Helios

413 Glenwood Ave

919.838.5177

www.cafehelios.com

M-Tu: 6:30am-10pm, W-F: 6:30ammidnight, Sa: 7:30am-midnight,

Su: 8:30am-10:30pm

Calvert Café

5 Edenton St

919.807.7843

M-F: 8am-3pm, Sa: 10am-3pm,

Su: noon-4pm

Capital City Grocer y

10 W Franklin St

919.833.7096

www.capitalcitygrocery.com

M-Sa: 7am-8pm, Su: 9am-7pm

Center Plaza Sundries Shop

411 Fayetteville St

919.832.9720

M-F: 6:30am-5pm

Crema on Fayetteville

121 Fayetteville

919.832.5959

M-Th: 7am-7pm, F: 7am-10pm,

Sa: 10am-10pm, Su: 11am-5pm

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE

The Cupcake Shoppe Baker y

104 Glenwood Ave

919.821.4223

www.thecupcakeshopperaleigh.com

M-Th: 10am-8pm, F-Sa: 10am-11pm

Metro Cafe

309 Blake St

919.926.8796

www.metrocafe.org

M-Th: 8am-10pm, F: 8am-1am, Sa:

11am-2am, Su: noon-9pm

The Morning Times Cafe

10 Hargett St

919.836.1204

www.morningtimes-raleigh.com

M-F: 6:30am-5pm, Sa-Su: 7:30am-5 pm

Port City Java

234 Fayetteville St

919.232.5282

www.portcityjava.com

M-Th: 7 am-6 pm, F: 7 am-10 pm,

Sa: 8 am-10 pm, Su: 8 am-3 pm

Sam & Wally’s Eater y

434 Fayetteville St, Ste 50

919.829.7215

www.samandwallys.com

M-F: 7:30 am-4 pm,

Sa: 10:30am-2:30 pm

Seaboard Café

707 Semart Dr

919.821.7553

www.seaboardcafe.com

M-Sa: 11am-2:30pm

Sosta Café

130 Davie St

919.833.1006

www.sostacafe.com

M-F: 6:30am-5pm

Sunflower´s

8 Peace St

919.833.4676

Lunch M-Sa:11am-3pm

Dinner T-F: 5-8:30pm

The Third Place

1811 Glenwood Ave

919.834.6566

www.thirdplacecoffee.com

M-F: 6-12am; Sa-Su: 7am-12am

Turkish Delights

125 Glenwood Ave

919.755.4306

www.turkishdelightsusa.com

Continued on page 5

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

Continued from page 4

M-Th, Su: 10am-11pm

F-Sa: 10am-midnight

The Village Deli

500 Daniels St

919.828.1428

www.villagedeli.net

M-F: 7am-9pm; Sa: 8am-9pm

Su: 11am-4pm

ECLECTIC/

NEW AMERICAN

18 Seaboard

18 Seaboard Ave, Ste 100

919.861.4318

www.18seaboard.com

Lunch M-F: 11:30am-2pm

Dinner Su-Th: 5-10pm, F-Sa: 5-11pm

Acro Café

(NC Museum of Natural Sciences)

11 Jones St

919.733.7450

www.naturalsciences.org

M-Sa: 8am-4pm, Su: noon-4pm

Enoteca Vin

410 Glenwood Ave

919.834.3070

www.enotecavin.com

T-Th: 5:30pm-10:30pm, F-Sa: 5:30-

11pm, Su: 5:30-10pm

Brunch Su: 11am-2:30pm

Fosters

521 Daniels St

919.821.5969

T-Sa: 11am-10pm

Globe

510 Glenwood Ave

919.836.1811

Lunch: M-F 11:30am-2pm; Dinner: M-

Sa 5-10pm; Late: Th-Sa: 10pm-2am www.sheraton.com/raleigh

M-F: 6:30am-2pm, 5 pm-9pm

Sa-Su: 7am-2pm, 5pm-9pm

Irregardless

901 W Morgan St

919.833.8898

www.irregardless.com

Lunch: T-F 11:30am-2:30pm;

Dinner: T-Th 5:30-9:30pm, F-Sa 5:30-

10pm; Brunch: Su 10am-2pm

Martin Street Pizza

14 W Martin St

919.301.8791

M-Th: 11am-10pm, F-Sa: 11am-11pm

The Rockford

320 1/2 Glenwood Ave

919.821.9020

Lunch M-Sa: 11:30am-2:30pm

Dinner Tu-Th: 6-10pm, F-Sa: 6-

10:30pm, Su: 5-10pm

(See website for bar hours)

Zely & Ritz

301 Glenwood Ave

919.828.0018

www.zelyandritz.com

M-Th: 6-10pm, F-Sa: 6-11pm

(See website for bar hours)

Executive Chef and co-owner Heath

Holloman and Chef Gray Modlin have created a tempting menu offering

New American dishes with a global flair. Try one of the Globe’s wine selections from France, Australia or

South America with their blue cheese, bacon and arugula panini or lamb chops with feta gnocchi, grilled eggplant, spinach, tomato and cucumber

Napoleon.

Grove Café

421 Salisbury St

919.256.1407

To all those saddened by the closing of Underground, rejoice! Chef Daniel

Taylor is back from London and offering the same concept—a rotating menu of seasonal, innovative food at a good price—at Martin Street Pizza.

For lunch, Daniel offers the basic meat, vegetable and cheese pies, but we recommend you try the more exciting (and flavorful) asparagus and prosciutto pizza topped with a fried egg.

EUROPEAN-CENTRAL/

EASTERN EUROPE

J. Betski's

10 W Franklin St, Ste 120

919.833.7999

www.jbetskis.com

M-Th; 5:30-10pm

F-Sa: 5:30-10:30pm

Late: 11pm-1am

EUROPEAN-IRISH

Hibernian Pub & Restaurant

311 Glenwood Ave

919.833.2258

www.hibernianpub.com

Continued on page 6

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 5

Continued from page 5

M-Su: 11am-2am

(Dinner served until 1:30am nightly)

Napper Tandy's Irish Pub

126 West St

919.833.5535

www.nappertandysirishpub.com/ raleigh/raleigh

Su-Sa: 11am-2am

Tir na nOg Irish Pub

218 Blount St

919.833.7795

www.tirnanogirishpub.com

M-Sa: 11am-2am, Su: 10:30am-2 am

FINE DINING

Capital City Club

(Members Only)

411 Fayetteville St, Ste 2100

919.832.5526

www.capitalraleigh.com

M: 7am-5pm, T-F: 7am-9am,

11:30am-2pm, Sa: 6-10pm

Cardinal Club

(Members Only)

150 Fayetteville St, Ste 2800

919.834.8829

www.cardinal-club.com

M-F: 7-9am, 11:30am-2pm,

T-Sa: 6-10pm

The Mint

1 Exchange Plaza

919.821.0011

www.themintrestaurant.com

Lunch M-F: 11am-3:30pm; Dinner T-

Th: 5:30-10:30pm, F-Sa: 5:30-11pm

An upscale restaurant located in a restored bank at 1 Exchange Plaza on

Fayetteville Street, The Mint offers downtown Raleigh contemporary

Southern cuisine in an upscale setting. Chef Jeremy Clayman adds flair to Southern staples like macaroni and cheese, using ziti pasta and adding cheddar cheese, broccoli, and bacon before topping it with minced black truffles. And that’s just at lunch.

Mo´s Diner

306 Hargett St

919.856.9938

www.mosdiner.net

T-Sa: 5:30-9pm

In a blue house with yellow shutters that dates back to 1880 is Mo’s Diner, a restaurant serving up simple yet delicious food in a comfortable atmosphere for over 11 years. Especially good are the grilled marinated flank steak with béarnaise and pan-fried catfish with remoulade and sautéed spinach.

Second Empire Restaurant and

Tavern

330 Hillsborough St

919.829.3663

www.second-empire.com

Dinner M-Sa: 5:30-10pm

Tavern: M-Sa: 4:30-10pm; Tavern Late

Night Menu: Fri-Sat 10-11pm world-class wines with grilled Maine sea scallops served with a chorizo sausage or the roasted Angus beef filet and braised short rib duet topped with Newcastle brown-ale reduction.

You can’t go wrong with any of their dinner offerings.

Solas

419 Glenwood Ave

919.755.0755

www.solasraleigh.com

Opening August 2008

FRENCH

Bloomsbur y Bistro

509 W Whitaker Mill Rd, Ste 101

919.834.9011

www.bloomsburybistro.com

M-Sa: 5:30pm-10pm

Second Empire has won the AAA

Four Diamond Award, the DiRoNa

Award and the Wine Spectator Award of Excellence, so there’s no doubt your dining experience here will be top shelf. Pair one of Second Empire’s

ITALIAN

518 West Italian Café

518 Jones St

919.829.2518

www.518west.com

Lunch: M-Sa 11:30 am-2:30pm

Dinner: M 5-9:30pm, T-Th 5-10pm,

F-Sa 5-10:30pm, Su 5-9pm;

Brunch: Su 10:30am-2pm

Continued on page 7

PAGE 6 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6 DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

Continued from page 6

Angelo´s

200 Martin St

919.832.2994

M-T: 11am-7pm, W-Th: 11am-7:30pm,

F: 11am-8pm, Sa: 11am-5:30pm

Caffé Luna

136 Hargett St

919.832.6090

www.caffeluna.com

Lunch M-F: 11:30am-2:30pm

Dinner W-Sa: 5-10pm

Piccola Italia Pizza & Restaurant

423 Woodburn Ave

919.833.6888

www.piccolaitalianc.com

Lunch M-F: 11am-2:30pm,

Sa: 12-3:30pm;

Dinner M-F: 5-9:30pm,

Sa: 3:30-9:30pm

Posta Tuscan Grille

(Marriott City Center)

500 Fayetteville St

919.227.3370

Breakfast M-F: 6:30-11am,

Sa-Su: 7-11am

Lunch M-Su: 11am-2pm

Dinner M-Su: 5-10pm

(Opening July 30)

Vic´s Italian Café & Pizzeria

331 Blake St

919.829.7090

M-Th: 11am-10pm, F-Sa: 11am-11pm

MEDITERRANEAN

America's Pita & Grill

121 Fayetteville

919.899.6339

www.americaspita.com

M-F: 7:30am-4pm

EVOO

2519 Fairview Rd

919.782.3866

www.782evoo.com

Lunch M-F: 11:30am-2pm

Dinner M-Sa: 5:30pm until...

Niro's Gyros

126 Salisbury St

919.833.3966

M-F: 10:30am-5pm

Riviera Mediterranean

Resto & Lounge

135 Wilmington St

919.834.7480

www.rivieraresto.com

Lunch M-F: 11:30am-2pm

Dinner M-W: 5:30-10pm,

Th-Sa: 5:30-11pm

(See website for lounge hours)

Riviera, a Mediterranean restaurant and lounge located on historic

Wilmington Street, offers some of the best lunch in downtown Raleigh. Try the croque-dinde, a smoked turkey sandwich with gruyere, tomato aioli and apple-wood smoked bacon served warm or the pan-roasted mahi mahi over romaine lettuce with caponata

(eggplant relish) and crumbled feta cheese. Just aspopular as lunch, dinner options vary weekly. Be sure to come for Date Night Tuesday, where a three-course dinner and bottle of wine are only $50.

Siti by Neomonde

137 S Wilmington St

919.459.2347

(Opening Fall 2008)

MEXICAN

Armadillo Grill

439 Glenwood Ave

919.546.0555

www.armadillogrill.com

M-Th: 11am-11pm, F-Sa: 11am-2am,

Su: 11am-10pm

Dos TaQuitos Centro

106 Wilmington St

919.835.3593

www.dostaquitoscentro.com

Lunch M-F: 11:30am-2:30pm

Dinner Th-Sa: 6-10:30pm

Jibarra

327 W Davie St, Ste 102 www.jibarra.net

(Opening Fall 2008)

SEAFOOD

42nd Street Oyster Bar

508 Jones St

919.831.2811

www.42ndstoysterbar.com

Lunch M-Fri: 11:30am-3pm; Dinner

M-F: 3-10pm, Sa: 5-11pm, Su: 5-10pm

(See website for lounge hours)

North Carolina, and not just because it’s been in the same location for over

75 years. Their oyster Rockefeller with spinach, bacon and Parmesan cheese and house specials, like twin lobster tails and snow crab legs will keep you coming back for more. And with its extensive bar and live music, you may never want to leave.

Fins Restaurant

110 Davie St

919.834.6963

Lunch M-F: 11:30am-2:30pm; Dinner

M-Th: 5:30-10pm, F-Sa: 5:30-11pm

SOUTHERN/BARBEQUE

Big Ed´s City Market Restaurant

220 Wolfe St

919.836.9909

M-F: 7am-2pm, Sa: 7am-noon

Cooper´s BBQ & Catering

109 Davie St

919.832.7614

M-Sa: 10am-6pm

Joe´s Place Featuring

Joe´s Mom´s Food

301 Martin St

919.832.5260

Lunch M-F: 11am-3pm

Dinner M-F: 5-9pm

Red Hot and Blue

1900 Hillsborough St

919.851.2282

www.redhotandblue.com

M-Su: 11am-10pm

(Late Night coming soon)

State Farmer's Market Restaurant

1240 Farmer's Market Dr

919.755.1550

www.ncsfmr.com

M-Sa: 6am-3pm, Su: 8am-3pm

The Pit

328 Davie St

919.890.4500

www.thepit-raleigh.com

M-Th: 11:30am-10 pm,

F: 11:30am-11pm, Sa: 5-11pm

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

42nd Street is a Raleigh tradition and one of the most famous eateries in

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE

Located in a renovated warehouse,

The Pit features whole-hog, pitcooked BBQ alongside other

Southern favorites like Brunswick stew, crispy fried tilapia and sweet potato home-fries. Pitmaster Ed

Mitchell recently took the prize for

Continued on page 8

VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 7

Continued from page 7

best BBQ in a Carolina Cook-Off between North and South Carolina on the Today Show’s “Battle of the

BBQs,” and the experts can’t be wrong….

SPANISH

Tasca Brava

607 Glenwood Ave

919.828.0840

www.tascabrava.com

Lunch T, Th, F: 11:30am-2pm

Dinner M-Sa: 5:30-10pm

Sullivan’s Steakhouse

414 Glenwood Ave

919.833.2888

www.sullivansteakhouse.com

Dinner M-Su: 5:30-11pm, Su: 5-10pm

(Bar opens at 4:30pm)

Tobacco Road Sports Café

222 Glenwood Ave www.tobaccoroadsportscafe.com

(Opening Fall 2008)

At Tasca Brava, the only recommendation Chef Juan Samper will give when ordering is to “try anything it’s all cooked to perfection” — and we can’t argue. A new addition in

Glenwood South, this restaurant serves some of the best Sangria we’ve ever had alongside a traditional

Spanish fare such as paella. We also suggest you try Samper’s foie gras

Vasca, a pan-seared goose liver flamed with sherry and served on buttery crustades with cooked peaches and apples as an hors d’oeuvre.

TAPAS

101 Lounge & Cafe

444 Davie St

919.833.8008

www.101Lounge.com

M-F: 7am-midnight

Sa: 9am-midnight, Su: 11am-3pm

Blue Martini

116 N West St, Ste 100

919.899.6464

www.bluemartiniraleigh.com

Su-Sa: 4pm-2am

STEAK & SEAFOOD

Prime Only Steak &

Seafood/Sashimi Bar

505 Jones St

919.835.2649

www.primeonlydowntown.com

M-W: 5-10pm, Th-Sa: 5-11pm

Blue Martini is way more than a martini bar. Featuring an array of appetizers and tapas from fried calamari to flatbread topped with chicken, roasted tomatoes, onions, goat cheese, spinach, and balsamic drizzle, along with live music and daily drink specials, it’s no wonder Blue Martini is a

Raleigh favorite.

The George

414 Glenwood Ave

919.828.9082

www.thegeorgeonglenwood.com

M-Sa: 5pm-2am

(Smoking permitted after 10pm)

Humble Pie

317 Harrington St

919.829.9222

www.humblepiebakery.com

T-W: 5pm-midnight, Th-Sa: 5pm-2am,

Su: 11am-2pm

Red Room

510 Glenwood Ave

919.835.1322

www.redroomraleigh.com

M-W: 5pm-midnight, Th-Sa: 5pm-2am,

Su: 5pm-midnight

Visit our website at the Raleigh

Chronicle <www.raleigh2.com> for an electronic version of our restaurant list.

PAGE 8 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6 DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 9

Finding Your Way Downtown

Part 5 of 5, Glenwood South District

O

ver the past few years, the Glenwood South district has transformed from a series of nondescript warehouse and storefronts into an entertainment hub and ideal place to live, play and work.

Even before Glenwood South became known for its booming nightlife, it was celebrated for its thriving art scene. Since 1923, Clark Art has been exhibiting antique and contemporary watercolors and oil paintings from famous as well as unknown artists, while just up the street, Glenwood

South Antiques has been specializing in American paintings and antiques since 1969. Located in a bright, teal-colored house is another must-see in this district, Lee Hansley Gallery. This gallery, founded and managed by

Lee Hansley, former curator at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary

Art in Winston-Salem, features the fine art of local, Southeastern and national artists in a series of revolving exhibitions. At the end of Glenwood

Avenue and housed in the Carter Building is Local Color Gallery, which has grown from a handful of women selling their art into a 14-member women’s artist cooperative featuring new exhibits on each First Friday.

Everyone knows that a night out requires a lot of primping, and the

Glenwood South district has an abundance of hair and makeup experts who can help you achieve the look you desire, including the professionals at

Salon 21. Celebrating 10 years in Triangle, owner Toni Hernandez and her award-winning team are sure to help you find a style that is manageable yet still cutting-edge. There’s no lack of skilled stylists around, with close to ten salons spread throughout the district.

Whether it’s showing off your new look or unwinding after a long day’s work, Glenwood South is the perfect district to do either. Wine bars

Enoteca Vin and Zely & Ritz have been offering a wide variety of wines as well as locally-grown, seasonal dinners & small plates for years. New to the

Glenwood South restaurant scene are Tasca Brava, a restaurant serving authentic Spanish-style cuisine in the former Bistro 607 location, and Solas, a dining, lounge and rooftop concept opening soon beside Café Helios. One of the many after-dinner bar options in this district is Brooklyn Heights, whose come-as-you-are atmosphere and skilled bartenders are guaranteed to make you forget your workday woes. If you prefer live music, check out

Blue Martini, purveyor of pages of signature martinis in Powerhouse

Square, or Hibernian Pub, home to an assortment of beers in a contemporary Irish pub setting. For local jazz, head over to 42nd Street Oyster Bar, which has been at the corner of West and Jones Street since 1931, or

Amra’s, a 1930s-style bar serving drinks and cigars in a sophisticated yet comfortable atmosphere. If you love the sleek, contemporary look of

Amra’s but prefer a more sports-orientated theme, you’re in luck. The latest project by the brothers Amra, Tobacco Road Sports Café (on the main floor of the nearly completed 222 Glenwood), will be opening this fall. But if it’s the latest in dance and world beat music you crave, stop by Mosaic Wine

Lounge, a Moroccan-themed nightclub spinning the newest dance tracks from Miami, London and Paris.

The Glenwood South district is always humming with activity, as flocks of people drift in as the sun sets. With the plush West at North condominium nearing completion and the other new residential options in this district, there will soon be even more room for all the gallery-hoppers, party-goers and nine-to-fivers migrating downtown.

Clarion State

Capital Hotel

Glenwood South

District

PAGE 10 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6 DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

The [R]evolution of Media

The Early Years of Newspaper

By Raleigh City Museum Staff

t he first newspaper in Raleigh, the Minerva, began in

1799 when William Boylan and Abraham Hodge moved their Fayetteville paper to the Capital City.

Because it took as long as two months for world news to travel to Raleigh, the “late news and foreign intelligence” that graced the cover was usually extremely out of date.

In Raleigh, both Boylan and the Minerva were strong voices for the Federalist Party, as most papers in this period were politically affiliated with a party.

Six months after the founding of the Minerva, a

Republican paper was started by Joseph Gales called the

Raleigh Register

. Boylan and Gales were fierce competitors and bitter enemies throughout their careers, but regardless, both made significant contributions to the development of the young city of Raleigh. However, the animosity between them eventually came to a head when Boylan punched Gales during an argument on

Fayetteville Street. Gales sued Boylan over the conflict, won 100 pounds and donated the winnings to the

Raleigh Academy.

The next major paper to make its mark in Raleigh was the Star. It was published by Thomas Henderson, Jr., and Dr. Calvin Jones beginning November 1808 and was devoted to agricultural interests. Unlike the Minerva and the Register, the Star was originally neutral in politics

(which later changed when Thomas Lemay became editor)and was a forerunner of the family newspaper.

During the Civil War Era, Raleigh saw the emergence of many papers that only lasted a few years. Two important papers that emerged from that period were The Sentinel and

The Standard

. The Sentinel was founded in 1865 by Josiah Turner who made it a leading conservative paper in the state. As editor, Turner led the paper to take extremely controversial positions. He was bitter rivals with William W. Holden, the editor of the Raleigh

Standard

, which was founded about twenty years prior to the Sentinel. Holden also published his strong political views in his paper. The Standard was not only popular in

Raleigh, it was respected nationally.

The old Raleigh Times building downtown in 1921

In the late 1800s, the two major newspapers were established, one of which is still printed today. The News and Observer was a merger of the Raleigh Observer (established in

1876) and the Raleigh News (established in 1872). The two papers were merged in 1880 by Samuel A’Court Ashe, who remained publisher of the paper until it was bought at public auction in 1894 by Josephus Daniels. The News and Observer’s rival paper was the afternoon daily, the Raleigh Times. It was originally founded as early as 1879 under the name Evening Visitor and became the Raleigh Times in 1901. John A. Park bought the

Time

s in 1911 and served as its editor for 44 years. Then in 1955, the N&O bought the

Raleigh Times

, which ran until

1989 when the paper closed due to a drop in circulation of afternoon papers nationwide.

An 1811 front page of The Star, one of Raleigh's oldest newspapers

On September 5, 2008, the Raleigh City Museum will open its newest exhibit, The [R]evolution

of Media: A History of Newspaper, Radio and Television in Raleigh

. The exhibit will feature the histories of these three media and the roles they have played in local society. In the next three issues of the Downtowner, we will be taking a look at each of the medium as a preview to information that will be found in the exhibit.

The museum is located at 220 Fayetteville Street in downtown Raleigh and is open from 10am-

4pm Tuesday through Friday and 1-4pm on Saturdays. If you have any questions, please call 919-

832-3775 or check out our website at www.raleighcitymuseum.org.

Josephus Daniels (center) and Frank Daniels (third from left) starting the new News and Observer press in 1938

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 11

nightlife

Solas Lights Up Soon

By Melissa Santos

g

lenwood

South has seen streetfront buildings razed and renovated over the past years, but no transformation is comparable to that of 419 Glenwood. What was once a brake shop on a small quarter-acre lot is now Hibernia Entertainment

LLC’s three-story dining, lounge and rooftop terrace Solas. True to its

Gaelic name meaning “light,” Solas is sure to be a beacon for all those in search of something hip and innovative.

Co-owner Niall Hanley says the multilevel building wasn’t a concept per se but rather a “good use of space and good way to introduce a very

European design [to downtown

Raleigh] that’s seen in a lot of bigger cities in the US and around the world.”

While the group turned to Ted Van

Dyk, principal of New City Design

Group (the same firm which did the stylish interiors of The Duck &

Dumpling, Fins and Porter’s City

Tavern) to design the building’s exterior and structure, Niall is handling the interior himself. And from the looks of the work-to-date, he clearly doesn’t need any help.

For the first-floor restaurant Niall chose deep, beautiful woods but to offset their dark color—and to give the feel of the name Solas—he used LED lights to “create a beautiful and cool lighting effect that’s also eco-friendly.”

In keeping with their greenness, they’ve already begun growing fresh tomatoes and herbs behind the complex and along the wooden fence running along the edge of the property.

The bar’s all-glass countertop and

First floor booths and entranceway

PAGE 12 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6

Above: View from the third floor terrace

floor-to-ceiling wine racks further set the mood for the ultimate white-linen, fine-dining experience. As for the kind of food Solas will be serving, Niall was coy about the menu details: “Customers are just going to have to come in and find out about our food.” But with Chef

Cliff Vogelsberg, formerly of

Sullivan’s, working in the expansive kitchen, and General Manager John

Hackett, also from Sullivan’s, making sure things run efficiently, customers won’t be disappointed. According to

Niall, Solas will be enforcing a dress code for the entire building, hoping to attract a more professional and upscale clientele. Another idea they’re toying with to bring in a more exclusive caliber of customers is charging a per-booth/table fee for the second and third floors. Any drink or food purchases would be applied toward this charge.

The second-floor ultra-lounge also features tabletop dining, but in a much different ambience. Here Niall selected a red and black color scheme with white overhead lighting, but just like on the first floor, he interspersed lights throughout the entire room.

This floor also features two private dining rooms, iridescent ceramic tile in the bathrooms (each floor with its own unique design), a small glass dance floor—because it is an ultra-lounge after all, and not a nightclub—and a balcony with great views of the city.

But arguably the most-anticipated floor is the third—the rooftop terrace. Niall modeled this level after the rooftop bars of Miami Beach and Las Vegas and outfitted it with deep-seated furniture, attractive and functional umbrellas and exotic plants in lighted pots to give customers a luxurious yet relaxing atmosphere. The serving tables come with removable wood tops designed to hold ice and drinks. As we walk out onto the terrace, Niall mentions the third floor was specifically

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE

Downtowns bar woodwork and lighting

designed to support yet another floor, if traffic should warrant more room.

With the central lobby giving customers access to the restaurant, lounge or rooftop via stairs or elevator, white-linen dining on the first-floor patio and food being served until 2am,

Solas is embarking on a revolutionary way to entertain in downtown Raleigh.

And with the buzz Hibernia’s threefloor project has been generating, it promises to be a trifecta for entertaining, whether it be for business or pleasure.

Solas

919.755.0755

419 Glenwood Ave

Raleigh 27605

Open Seven Days 4pm-2am

www.solasraleig

h.com

RD

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 13

Photos below taken during a tour by the Downtowner staff of the new RBC Building. To view more images and building information, visit www.raleigh2.com

The new RBC sign atop the spire

Completed residential unit

View from the 23rd floor pool patio

North view from the rooftop of the RBC Building

AROUNDTOWN

AROUND

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AROUNDTOWNAROUND

Kirsten, chef/owner Juan, Iain, and Isabel from Tasca Brava

At the Raleigh Sports Council Quarterly meeting: Steve Bryant (Carolina

Mudcat’s owner), Don Mincher (Southern Baseball League president) and Rick French (French West Vaughn, Sports Council president)

Cary serving up a late night dog to Kelly from Napper Tandy’s

Effie, Kenji and Meena out at Mosquito

Carmen and Tommy at Brooklyn Heights

Leo and Jim celebrating Laszlo’s (center) birthday at Mosquito

PAGE 14 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6 DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

Photos from the Contemporary Art Musuem get-together for the CAM Advisory Board and friends at the home of Frank Thompson and Charman Driver

Marvin Malecha, Dean, NCSU College of Design

Trish Healy was the recipient of a surprise birthday cake at the get-together, seen here with her husband John Healy of Hyde Street Holdings (far right), Whitney Wilkerson

(Contemporary Art Foundation

Board), and Raven Manocchio

(CAM Advisory Board). Trish is well-known in Raleigh for her untiring efforts for the arts community.

Architect’s rendering for the new Contemporary

Art Museum design on West Martin Street.

For more info on how you can help, visit

CAM.ncsu.edu/support-giving.html

Kaola Phoenix, artist; A.T. Stephens of NCSU and

Director, Contemporary Art Museum; event host, Frank Thompson, AV Metro

AROUNDTOWNAROUNDTOWN

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Photos from the recent Downtown Live in Moore Square, presented by Deep South Entertainment

Mayor and guest glad to see all the visitors downtown

Downtown Live vendor Andre and son

Patrick from Coffee and Crepes (find his booth and try the Mocha Frappe!)

Bob the Blade, Salt and Foster from 96Rock

Enjoying the perfect Saturday weather at Downtown Live

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

A record-setting crowd for the all-day event Some of the Harris Wholesale girls

Former Carolina Hurricane Jesse Boulerice and fiancee Jackie, with Andy from

Deep South and friends

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 15

fashion

Shady Business

By Kelly Hubbard

S unglasses are probably the most unappreciated accessory.

Oftentimes necklaces, earrings or watches get all of the attention while the shades sit atop your head almost as an afterthought.

In the sunny, summery months when we spend more time in the great outdoors it would be a good idea to consider making your sunglasses a top priority when accessorizing.

Not only can the right pair of shades make you look cool, calm and collected, but select sunglass technologies protect your eyes and make your life more convenient. “It drives me crazy when I see people walking down the street squinting from the sunlight when sunglasses are an easy option,” says Tasha Holden, optical consultant for the Eye Care Center located on

Fayetteville Street in downtown

Raleigh.

Holden has been in the optical business for 15 years but she first found her passion for fitting people for glasses when she had the opportunity to go to several vision expos in Asheville,

NC. These expos bring vendors from all over the world together to display the latest in sunglass fashion, technology and design.

So what types of trends are popping up this year? Like many clothing styles, fashion is cyclical and many trends tend to come back in style. The trend for shades this year is to go retro.

The aviator design first appeared in 1939 for issue to US aviators. They became a fashion statment in the 1980s and are now back in style again.

“Aviators and Wayfarer sunglasses are continuing to gain popularity,” Holden says. “Classics are back and even designers like Nicole Miller and

BCBG are creating their own version of the original Ray-Ban Aviator sunglasses.”

Aviator glasses are a style that was developed by Ray-Ban in the 1930s and are characterized by large, teardropshaped lenses and metal wired frames.

They gained instant popularity in the 80s when stars like

Madonna began wearing them.

To bring new life to a traditional style, pick up some Aviators with gold metal frames. According to Holden, white was the color to have for sunglasses last season but now gold is very trendy. Dolce & Gabbana make a

Continued on page 17

PAGE 16 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6 DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

Continued from page 16

pair of gold-rimmed glasses similar to the Aviator style.

Many consumers are looking for the label when it comes to shades.

“People come in to Eye Care Center with labels and logos in mind; it’s what they recognize as fashionable,”

Holden says. “They like the giant ‘D’ and ‘G’ on many Dolce & Gabbana pairs and the large, interlocking ‘Cs’ on Chanel glasses.”

Staying in step with the classics this summer, the “old Hollywood” glasses trend is still running strong. These thick, chunky frames are known as

Distinguished by the interlocking “Cs,”

Chanel remains one of the most recognizable fashion brands

shields and are often glasses with a dark tint and large, plastic frames to give ladies a “Jackie O” look. Most of the time people tend to select the more traditional black or tortoise shell colored frames when rocking this glamorous style instead of going over the top with bold colors. Shields can also be a nice blend between past and present since some of the latest styles convey a sleeker, modern chic.

Guys who are looking for a new pair of shades often look to combine fashion with function. Oakley’s and Raylenses – your eyes will never let you go back.

Sunglasses can be an investment but they can also make every day life more convenient. Many existing glasses-wearers like to add a prescription to their favorite style of sunglasses. This may not work with every style, but

The large lens “Jackie-O’s” were made popular by Jacqueline Onassis

Kennedy in the 1960s. They have enjoyed a resurgence by Hollywood celebrities hiding from the paparazzi’s cameras.

Bans are popular choices, but Maui

Jim sunglasses are becoming more well-known in the Raleigh area. Maui

Jim’s sunglasses are known for their quality and polarized lenses, a technology that prevents and protects the eyes from glares and results in a clearer, more natural view when wearing your sunglasses. If you’re a golfer or water sport enthusiast, you really should compare the difference between polarized and non-polarized there are so many that you should be able to find a few that work for you. “If you already wear glasses, there’s nothing in the world like having prescription sunglasses,” says Holden. “I have five or six pairs now, and I even made a pair of prescription Aviators for myself.”

Seek out some shades this summer and strut your stuff. Whether they’re for fashion, function or performance, don’t let those shades get lost in your purse or crushed in your pocket.

Once you find the perfect pair, you won’t want them out of your sight.

RD

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 17

PAGE 18 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6 DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

The Deep South Local Music Review

e ach month, we look at three local bands within a wide range of music types, from rock to reggae, country to classic. You won’t find any negative or bad reviews here, just bands worth hearing in your favorite local music hangout. Enjoy the reviews, check out the bands when they’re in town, and be sure to mention you read about them in the Raleigh Downtowner Deep South

Local Music Review.

Artist: Mr. Coffee and the Creamers Genre: Motown/Soul/R&B www.mrcoffeeandthecreamers.com

Whether or not you were around when The Jackson Five’s “ABC” hit the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1970, or when Stevie Wonder scored two Grammys for “Superstition” in 1973, you’ll find yourself transported to another musical era when you hear Mr. Coffee and the Creamers perform these same classic songs.

The combined energy of the keys, sax, trombone, drums, bass, and guitar are brought home by a diverse group of musicians with musical influences and backgrounds as varied as punk, funk, hip-hip and jazz.

Even if you don’t think this ensemble sounds precisely like the real thing, you won’t hurt their feelings if you tell them so; in fact, they would prefer it if you did. Mr. Coffee and the Creamers pride themselves on their ability to mix their personal styles with those of artists past while still remaining loyal and respectful to the history of the original music.

We witnessed this fusion of old and new ourselves when they played at Downtown Live on June 28. But with Mr. Coffee and the Creamers covering everyone from Aretha Franklin, The Temptations, Marvin Gaye, Jean Knight, and Otis Redding, it’s impossible to pick a favorite song.

Artist: Mobley Album:

2/3 EP

Genre: Pop/Rock www.mobleytheband.com

The complimentary talents of singer/songwriter Anthony Watkins II and classically-trained bassist Tim Shelburne came together as one just last summer. And while it may take years for some musicians to generate a sound that works for both the group and its listeners, Mobley is already past that point of adjustment.

They describe their sound as “all over the map,” and we agree. Whether it stems from Watkins’ growing up the son of an itinerant military man or the duo’s innate creativity, Mobley’s music is the kind that makes you stop and listen—and this is our feeling after hearing just five tracks on their debut, 2/3 EP.

When the guys sang of “sitting captivated by the music all around” in the opening track “A Beautiful Mistake,” we too found ourselves captivated by their sound, notably the haunting yet alluring vocal transitions on “A Chorus (for the Silences).” And we’re not the only ones. On Mobley’s thesixtyone.com profile, one fan called “Didn't Get It” one of “the most infectious things I have heard on this site.”

Artist: The Remix Project Album:

MIXTAPE

Genre: Hip-Hop/Drum&Bass /Experimental www.theremixproject.com

Everyone loves a good remix, but it’s rare that audiences get the opportunity to see these re-done tracks performed live. Luckily for us,

Triangle-based The Remix Project—DJ Merlin, turntables; Matt Brandau, bass; Kevin Timmons, keys; Brevan Hampden, percussion, and

Stephen Levitin, drums—is giving local music-goers that chance.

And when we say this group performs “live,” we mean it. We’re not just talking about a couple of guys standing behind a DJ booth playing tracks off their iPods. We’re talking about a guy—Levitin, better known to some as producer “The Apple Juice Kid”—who has opened shows for

Outkast, The Roots and Busta Rhymes, and a group that has opened up for acts like the Jungle Brothers and Black Sheep.

Taking sounds from musical luminaries like 50 Cent, Justin Timberlake, Dirty Vegas, A Tribe Called Quest, Coldplay and the White Stripes, these masterminds do far more than simply cover today’s popular tracks. Check out their songs “Get By” and “Electric Relaxation” to experience their unconventional sound for yourself.

The Deep South Local Music Review is written by Dave Rose with contributions by Elizabeth Barrett. Dave is the co-founder and co-owner of Deep South Entertainment. Formed in 1995, Deep South Entertainment is a record label, artist management company, and concert event production company with offices in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Nashville, Tennessee. Deep South is best known locally as producers of the Bud Light Downtown Live summer concert series, featuring national recording artists. Their latest addition to downtown Raleigh is Deep South–The Bar. Elizabeth is a UNC student working part time for Deep South and the Downtown Live concert series.

What Gen Y & Z are listening to…

By Elizabeth Barrett (Deep South Entertainment)

Wonder what music high school and college students are listening to and downloading onto their iPods?

Each month we’ll give you a quick look as to what you’re likely to hear blaring out of dorm room windows on college campuses and out of car windows throughout the Triangle.

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

Robert

Randolph & The

Family Band

Colorblind

(Rock/Soul/

Funk)

www.robertrandolph.net

Radiohead

In Rainbows

(Rock/Alternative/ Britpop)

www.radiohead.com

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE

Jason Isbell

Sirens of the

Ditch

(Rock)

www.jasonisbell.com

VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 19

By Mat Fern

w hile there are no kangaroos in

Austria, there is world-class, racy, complex and exciting wine. Although most of the wine produced in Austria is white, there are great red wines made from both indigenous and nonindigenous grapes. Over the past several years, Austrian wine has been finding its way more and more into the glasses of the

American wine consumer. This success is large attributed to Austria ’s most famous grape, Grüner Veltliner [GROO-ner FELTlih-ner].

As a varietal, Grüner can vary in style from a light quaffable white with notes of lime zest and white pepper to a full-bodied, complex beast worthy of years of aging. During our last trip to Austria with Klaus Wittauer

(KW Selections) to taste the new vintages this past January, we sat in a 900-year-old cellar with winemaker Karl Steininger drinking Grüner from 1976, and it still had many years of life left to it. I know what you’re thinking, “Oh wow. What a tough life this guy lives.” And to that I say, “Hey, it’s a tough job trying to find great wines from around the world for you to enjoy at a reasonable price.” And also, “You’re welcome.”

I think that any time of year is a great time to drink a nice crisp white wine, but there’s just something about our climate in central

North Carolina that makes these wines taste especially wonderful in the summer.

Two great Grüners are perfect candidates for these hot months: Tegernseerhof T26 and Steininger’s “Steven Holl.” The first,

Martin Mittlebach’s entry-level Grüner

Veltliner, is wonderfully crisp and vibrant with a refreshing finish. Steininger’s

Yes, I said Austria, not Australia

“Steven Holl” is a great example of a more extracted, fuller-bodied style of Grüner that has hints of baked apples and white currants with a vibrant acidity and lengthy finish. This wine and its label were inspired by world famous architect Steven Holl, who especially enjoys the Grüners from the vineyard surrounding The Wine and Spa

Resort Loisium Hotel which he designed and from which this bottling is sourced.

Although better know for their whites,

Austria also crafts many exciting reds as well. A few of the more popular red varietals are St. Laurent, a distant relative to

Pinot Noir; Blaufränkisch, also known as

Lemberger; and Zweigelt, a grape crossbred from the two aforementioned varietals. Zweigelt, pronounced [TSVYE-gelt], was created by Franz Zweigelt in 1922 and has varietal characteristics similar to that of

Syrah from the Rhone Valley in France. My favorite Zweigelt of late would be from

Anton Bauer because of its expansive flavors of dark-berried fruits and subtle spice.

My personal favorite wine that was tasted on the trip is the Tegernseerhof Rosé of

Zweigelt. That’s right, a pink wine! Rosé has had an American resurgence over the past few years, becoming increasingly more accepted throughout the wine drinking public. The unfortunate side effect to the success of White Zinfandel throughout the

80s and 90s had driven people to think all pink wines are sweet and one of your grandmother’s favorites. But as people are learning, this couldn’t be further from the truth. Most rosés are in fact fermented dry and get their color from a limited time of skin contact right after pressing. This particular rosé is a great companion to grilled summer vegetables, heirloom tomato salads or just a few friends and a front porch.

The convenient screwcap makes it perfect for camping trips or a walk over to a neighbor’s house.

Austria has a wonderful amalgamation of traditional and modern approaches to most things, from food to architecture to wine.

Many of the wines that are meant to be enjoyed young and when needed, should be re-sealed with either the Stelvin enclosure, a fancy style of screwcap, or the “vino-lok” which is a glass “cork” with a rubber ring around the inside. Both seals are developed to keep wine from spoiling or becoming “corked,” where the wine picks up an unpleasant moldy aroma from the cork.

Austrian wines make for some of the best food pairing wines around. When I’m at a loss for the perfect food pairing,

I often find myself grabbing an Austrian wine. My suggestion to you would be to either try some on your own from

Seaboard Wine or have the crew at J. Betski’s restaurant in Seaboard Station pick out a few of their favorites.

Matt Fern is a wine schlep who works at

Seaboard Wine

Warehouse and believes that you should drink what you like. He doesn’t think you should make wine complicated; besides it’s just fermented grape juice made by farmers. Prost!

RD raleigh’s weekly online newspaper

★ www.

raleigh2 .com ★

PAGE 20 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6 DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

Rosie’s Plate

A holistic, alternative approach to cooking

whenever possible,” said Everitt.

“Our goal is to prepare fresh, healthy and natural foods.”

By Sarah Styron

R osie’s Plate founder and owner, Rose Waring, was overwhelmed in 2004 when she learned that her children had multiple food allergies. She soon realized that information and support for people with dietary restrictions were very limited.

Through research and trial and error,

Waring learned a whole new way to shop, cook and plan.

Indeed, Rosie’s Plate may turn out to be a good food option for anyone seeking more healthy eating options, even if they’re not on a restricted diet. The food service sources meats and poultry that are naturally raised with no antibiotics or growth hormones.

Now Waring is using her experience to help others with food restrictions due to allergies, intolerances or other medical conditions. She opened

Rosie’s Plate, a gluten-free, shellfishfree and peanut-free commercial kitchen in downtown Raleigh late

May.

“For produce, we use local organic sources,” said Everitt. “When local organic produce is not available, we look to our conventional local farmers before ordering from outside the area.”

Rosie’s Plate may turn out to be a good food option for anyone seeking more healthy eating options, even if they’re not on a restricted diet.

Rosie’s Plate customers can order from an appetizing selection of entrées, side dishes, salads, soups, snacks, lunch-to-go, breads and desserts. The menu changes weekly, and orders can be placed on online at www.rosiesplate.com or by phone.

Customers then pick up their meals at Rosie’s Plate located at 701 North

Person Street in downtown Raleigh.

According to a recent News & Obser-

ver

report citing the Food Allergy &

Anaphylaxis Network, an estimated

12 million Americans have food allergies, or one of every 25 people. And the most alarming news is that food allergies seem to be on the rise.

Rosie’s Plate’s holistic philosophy extends beyond the kitchen to the entire building, which was renovated with energy-efficient and sustainable materials to promote an allergy-free environment. Recycled materials and cotton insulation were used throughout, and a living roof garden filters rain water and collects in a cistern for use in exterior irrigation.

Once Rosie’s Plate is established,

Waring hopes to expand by offering classes, support groups and even coaching for people with food restrictions. The goal is to offer a holistic approach to food challenges so that clients’ needs can be met – whether that’s helping them keep up with the demands of cooking, teaching different cooking techniques, or offering support groups where they can share ideas.

According to Executive Chef Anne

Everitt, Rosie’s Plate provides prepared foods that eliminate common allergens such as gluten, shellfish and peanuts. “Because many people find themselves with multiple allergies or intolerances, we also avoid dairy, egg, corn, tree nuts and soy

For more information about Rosie’s

Plate or to place an order, go online to www.rosiesplate.com or call 919-

833-0505. Delivery service is planned to start in the fall.

RD

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 21

downtown dining

By Fred Benton

Food Editor

t asca Brava, which first opened in 2001 on Falls of the Neuse Road in Sutton

Square, is often described as a

“tapas bar,” but it really isn’t.

Spanish cuisine is so much more than small plates; it’s generous, robust and hearty flavors with more depth than chili-pepper hot.

Spanish is the quintessential Mediterranean cuisine more analogous to Near Eastern and French food than Mexican. Tasca Brava owner Juan Samper deserves this authentic Spanish tag over simply

“tapas.”

When asked his opinion on any specific dishes we should order, he confidently suggested, “It doesn’t matter. Everything on the menu is wonderful When you love food as much as we do, it will come across in your cooking. It’s our passion and an important part of our life.” We found Juan’s confidence to be well-founded to say the very least. After our amazing dinner, we were just as passionate about his food as he was.

With his restaurant’s move from North Raleigh to

Glenwood South (607 Glenwood Avenue), it’s a new day—and it’s all about redolent Spanish food. My

Tasca Brava

food friends and I began our exploration of the

Tasca Brava bill of fare with a tomato-and-chicken-based Garlic Soup

($8)

that literally popped with flavor. It’s served with a poached egg and is spicy with just enough heat to make it really interesting; in truth I could have made a meal of this soup and Tasca

Brava’s signature

Sangria

, which I think is one of the best renditions in the area. It was loaded with citrus fruits but there were some cut up bits of fruit I couldn’t readily identify when I was drinking it. After giving it some thought, I’m placing my bet on a fine

When you enter Tasca Brava, you feel as though you’ve been transported to a local bistro in the heart of Spain.

chop of red cinnamon doughnut-ring apple slices. I add these to my hot apple cider in the fall and always thought of it was a “secret ingredient.” I think the rings and juice are the only sweetener that’s added to the red wine in addition to great fruit flavor. Ingenious!

Tasca Brava occupies the same space as did Bistro

607. I was sorry when the Bistro 607 location was purchased because I would greatly miss the

Continued on page 23

B E T T E R L I V I N G

BEST OF THE BEST!!

Fred Benton knows the Triangle! Benton, long-time lifestyle journalist covering the Triangle for over 20 years, has definite ideas about businesses that he feels are particularly consumer-friendly and offer superlative products and service. This list is based entirely on the recommendations of Fred and betterlivingnc productions, and is a companion information guide that

Benton presents on WCKB radio, heard throughout southeastern NC.

Angus Barn - Glenwood Avenue, close to

RDU International Airport, 787-3505. The

BEST steaks!

42nd Street Oyster Bar - 508 West Jones

Street, Raleigh, 831-2811. 42ndstoysterbar.com

BEST Seafood Salad!

larrysbeans.com - 828-1234. Your web site for

BEST coffees.

The Point at Glenwood - 1626 Glenwood

Avenue at Five Points, Raleigh, 755-1007.

BEST Reuben Sandwich!

Lilly’s Pizza - Five Points, Raleigh, 833-0226.

lillyspizza.com BEST pizza! BEST house side

salad! BEST beer selection!

Abbey Road Grill - Located corner W.

Chatham and Old Apex roads, 2 miles from downtown Cary. 481-4434; abbeyroadgrill.com

BEST burger, BEST onion rings!

Dakota Grill - 9549 Chapel Hill Road (Hwy.

54), intersection with Cary Parkway, 463-9526.

BEST exotic burger (double bison burger), and

BEST chili for pepperheads

Apex Chiropractic - Apex, 362-9066. I could

hardly walk. Acupuncture saved my life!

William and Garland Motel - Hwy.58, Salter

Path, 252-247-3733. BEST budget-friendly family

accommodations on the Crystal Coast!

Trish the Dish Catering - Raleigh, 852-0369.

Fabulous fun food for the budget-minded!

Waraji Japanese Restaurant - Duraleigh

Road, corner of Duraleigh and Pleasant Valley roads, 783-1883. “If you knew sushi like I know

sushi.” BEST sushi! warajirestaurant.com

Cafe Tiramisu - North Ridge Shpg Ctr, near

Ace Hardware, Falls of Neuse Road, 981-0305.

BEST stuffed pork chop! BEST fried cheese souffle!

Simpson’s Beef & Seafood - at Creedmoor and Millbrook roads, 783-8818.

BEST prime rib! BEST coconut shrimp!

Jibarra - 7420 Six Forks Road, corner SawMill and Six Forks,844-6330. Hit the Tequila Lounge

here for the BEST house Margarita!

NoFo - 2014 Fairview Road, at Five Points,

Raleigh, 821-1240. BEST retail for feeding the

eye and palate. nofo.com

The Duck & Dumpling - 222 S. Blount

Street, 838-0085. theduckanddumpling.com

The BEST Peking Duck!

London Fish & Chips - Wellington Park Shp.

Ctr., corner of Tryon and Cary Pkwy, 859-8999.

BEST authentic Fish & Chips (Haddock)!

Nina’s Ristorante - 801 Leadmine Road,

Harvest Plaza, 845-1122. BEST NY-style Italian!

The Black Mountain Inn - 828-669-6528.

Best in Black Mountain! Pet-friendly!

The Lamplight Inn - Henderson, 252-438-

6311. www.lamplightbandb.com - Relaxing!

If you would like to propose your enterprise as a better living business to be included on this list please email Fred at [email protected] or call 782-5276.

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

PAGE 22 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6

Continued from page 22

chef/owner’s fabulous foie gras presentations. But I happily report that the Foie Gras Vasca ($15), prized goose liver pan-seared and flamed with sherry and served on buttery crustades with cooked peaches and apples, was every bit—in fact better— than any foie gras I ever had at Bistro 607. The foie gras is listed in the tapas (or hors d'oeuvres) section.

The reigning queen on the menu here at Tasca

Brava, in my opinion, is the entree—what I would consider the national dish of Spanish cultural cuisine—Paella Valenciana ($21 per person—minimum

The paella at Tasca Brava was as good as the chef/owner, Juan, promised.

2 people)

. In short, paella, made in much the same way as any pilaf (a braised rice and meat dish), is saffron-flavored rice plus, the plus being always tomatoes and some type of seafood accented with a variety of meats such as chorizo sausage and chicken. The name “paella” comes from the type of pan it’s usually cooked in, a two-handled, usually castiron cooking vessel. The dish is then brought to the table, and with a flourish, the top is dramatically raised and tendrils of aroma-laden steam tease the appetite senses. The most technically difficult aspect of making paella is timing. Paella traditionally is a one-pot dish from start to finish; game meats and chicken take longer to cook than shellfish or most any fish. The chef must ensure that the chicken is done before the seafood is added to the mix on a time-table that doesn’t allow any of it to overcook. This choreographed procedure must be perfect or the all-important backbone of the dish, the rice, will be gummy.

I know great paella by one test—is the rice flavored enough and delicious enough to eat sans meat? I am pleased to report that here at Tasca Brava, it was and is! However, I was just as appreciative of the bonus additions of chorizo, scallops, chicken, shrimp, large jumbo shrimp and mussels.

My tablemates had the Filet of Grouper ($22) sauteed in black butter and topped with capers, and the Pato Manchego ($16.95) (semi-boneless duck leg) served with grilled polenta. Both were cooked to perfection and disappeared from our plates quickly. Our dessert was a wonderful close to our meal, a myriad of fresh sorbets, one of which was avocado. Surprisingly delicious!

Tasca Brava is a superb new addition to the downtown dining scene!

Tasca Brava

607 Glenwood Avenue

919.828.0840

www.tascabrava.com

Lunch: T, Th, F 11:30am-2pm

Dinner: M-Sa 5:30-10pm

RD

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 23

artist profile

By Kim Weiss

i n downtown

Raleigh, “hip” is short for

Hipolito.

It’s hard to take in the city’s nightlife without encountering one of artist

Clark Hipolito’s stylish interiors.

Combining the sleekness of modern lines, the allure of Asian-inspired details and faux finishes, and the elegance of rich woods, deep colors and fine fabrics, Clark has left his mark on some of the most popular spots in the downtown district area: bars Brooklyn

Heights, Mosaic, The George, and Ess

Lounge, and fashion boutique Catch

22 in Glenwood South, and restaurant

EVOO in Five Points.

Clark Hipolito, 38, is the founder and principal of The Art Company

(www.art-company.com), an awardwinning, interdisciplinary firm located on Glenwood Avenue. Since Clark moved to Raleigh from New York City in 1994, he has built a reputation for bringing both elegance and cuttingedge design to restaurants, stores, bars, lounges and many private residences in and around downtown

Raleigh.

Over the past two years, he has also turned his artistic energies onto an offshoot of The Art Company that has further catapulted he and fellow artist

Tony Ramsi into the national limelight:

ArtCo Surf (www.artcosurf.com).

Clark Hipolito

wood) and Asian art. And they’re fetching prices in the thousands.

Through this brand, Clark and Tony – both surfing enthusiasts -- have become well-known for their “Against

The Grain” collection of hand-painted, wood-grain surfboards, which are hand-shaped by Brian Wynn of Wynn

Surfboards in New Jersey. The inspiration for the wood-grain boards is both the Polynesian surfing legacy (when all surfboards used to be made of

“There’s a fine line we’re dancing between invoking classical elements and keeping the design hip,” Clark said. “The point is to focus on the artwork in conjunction with the application of timeless wood grains.”

The wood-grain boards have been fea-

Continued on page 25

One of ArtCo Surf’s newest products, a stretch beach cruiser

PAGE 24 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6 DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

Continued from page 24

tured in regional, national and international magazines and online journals.

This spring, Clark and Tony expanded their work to include a line of signature skateboards, stretch beach cruisers and a new line of limited-edition surfboards. Dubbed “The Muse” collection, Clark turns to his “muses”–or as he likes to call them, “my gorgeous friends who keep me inspired”–for the images that are then printed on rice paper and laminated onto the boards.

Clark’s wood-grain surfoards have been drawn national and international attention

“I’ve always been fascinated with figurative art,” he said, “and I’ve always wanted to take it beyond paints on canvas. Since surfboards became a medium, I decided to experiment with it on them.”

Yet he’s perhaps most excited about

ArtCo Surf’s new apparel line for men and women that draws details from the wood-grain boards as well as elements of nature and other objects like old-fashion bicycles and movie cameras.

Clark recently took ArtCo Surf’s show on the road when he helped sponsor and participated in “Rocksta,” a charitable fundraising event in San Diego presented by Line Up Magazine to benefit SURFAID International and

"The Land of Plenty" (LOP) skateboard foundation. (For more information on the event and to see Clark in the thick of things there, check out http://tinyurl.com/surfaid)

In August, Clark will introduce ArtCo

Surf’s premiere collection of apparel during the MAGIC Marketplace in Las

Vegas, the largest, most comprehensive apparel and accessory trade event in the United States.

Kim Weiss is an award-winning journalist and principal of blueplate pr in downtown Raleigh <www.blueplatepr.com>.

She served as managing editor of the former Spectator magazine and North

Carolina Architect for 18 years.

RD

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 25

REAL ESTATE

TRENDY RETAIL SPACE FOR RENT

At Palladium Plaza! Great location, close to

Moore's Square and City Market! Glass store front, stained concrete floors, 11ft. ceilings!

Plumbed for small hair salon - hookups for 3 hair bowls. W/D hookup, 1/2 bath, break room in back. Spiral staircase. $1250/mo.

Call Ashton @ TGA 919.828.0077

baths. The May Budd House. c.1921. 405 N.

East St. $437,921. Peter at Prudential. 919-971-

4118. Pics & plans at www.PeterRumsey.com

MORE UNIQUE HOMES

Fresh ideas. Proven success. Peter at

Prudential. 919-971-4118. Pictures, plans and historic district maps at www.PeterRumsey.com

gant. 323 E. Lane St. 3 or 4 bedroom, 2 baths.

$585,000. Peter at Prudential. 919-971-4118.

Pics & plans at www.PeterRumsey.com

PARAMOUNT CONDO

Gorgeous condo w/ spectacular view of

Downtown Raleigh from HUGE balcony!

2BR/2BA, large foyer w/ coat closet. Bamboo floors, exposed concrete column & lots of natural light in LR. Large master suite w/custom closet, Japanese soaking tub & Keuco vanity.

European look and feel... $429,000 Call [email protected]

919.828.0077

MORDECAI

A condo cure – A double lot with a classic 2 story home c.1930. Large elegant formal spaces plus extraordinary open kitchen, breakfast room, screen porch. 3 or 4 bedrooms, 3 baths. 1210 Mordecai Ave. Peter at

Prudential. 919-971-4118. Pictures, plan and maps at www.PeterRumsey.com

UNIVERSITY PARK

Claustrophobes will celebrate the openness of this restored bungalow c.1940 located in a historic district near Cameron Village &

NCSU. 3 bedrooms. 2 baths. 2708 Vanderbilt

Ave. $365,000. Peter at Prudential. 919-971-

4118. Pictures, plan and maps at www.PeterRumsey.com

BOYLAN HEIGHTS BUNGALOW

Lease or buy. Contemporary loft like spaces

& amenities. Stunningly rebuilt. 1014 W.

Cabarrus St. 3/2. 1784 sf. Call Peter at

Prudential 919-971-4118. Pics & plans at www.ReterRumsey.com

OFFICE SPACE

DAWSON ON MORGAN

Gorgeous 2BR/2BA unit at the luxurious

Dawson on Morgan. Hdwds, stainless appls!

Juliet balcony w/ great view! Walkable downtown location! Secured entry & parking!

Unbelievable closet space & storage unit under parking deck! Call now to schedule an appointment! $379,000 T 828-0077

HISTORIC OAKWOOD

Craftsman style bungalow with central hall, living & dining rooms, eat-in kitchen,

Georgetown patio plus 3 or 4 bedrooms, 2.5

HISTORIC OAKWOOD

A city skyline view, two porches, a deck and parking. The Robert Lee Horton House ca.

1897 is strikingly modern and classically ele-

DOWNTOWN OFFICE SUITES

Exquisite office space perfect for a small business, located w/in walking distance of the

Capital, Glenwood South & the NCSU area. 3and 4-room suites available w/ reception area, rear ramp access & private restrooms in a beautiful brick bldg w/ lush landscaping right in the heart of Downtown Raleigh! Call Lucas

Kinnin, Coleman & Associates (919) 961-7195.

PAGE 26 ~ VOL 4, ISSUE 6 DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

RALEIGH

DOWNTOWNER

DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S PREMIER MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL 4, ISSUE 6 ~ PAGE 27

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