Athena 2C and 4C Controller Installation

Athena 2C and 4C Controller Installation
Athena
2C and 4C Controller
Installation, Configuration, and
Operation Guide
Athena is a registered trademark and Multi-Comm is a trademark of Athena Controls, Inc.
Platinel is a trademark of Engelhard Minerals & Chemical Corporation.
®
Lantronix and XPort are registered trademarks of Lantronix, Inc.
MODBUS is a registered trademark of AEG Schneider Automation, Inc.
 2009. Athena Controls, Inc. All rights reserved.
Precautions
Warning
Remove power from the controller before installing option cards, changing
switch settings, changing jumper settings, or doing hardware maintenance
tasks.
Failure to observe these precautions can result in exposure to a potentially
lethal shock hazard.
All wiring should be done by an experienced technician and be installed in
accordance with national and local electrical codes. To avoid serious
personal injury and damage to equipment, follow all warnings and cautions
provided in the controller installation manuals.
Caution
If a controller shows signs of having been damaged during shipping, do not
power up or install the controller. Save all packing materials and report any
damage to the carrier immediately.
When the controller is powered up, the outputs may be activated. Consider
the effects on your process before powering up the controller.
Read the grounding guidelines in this manual before grounding the
sensors, external power supply, or controller board. If the grounding
guideline scenarios in this manual do not cover your situation, consult the
factory before grounding the sensors, external power supply, or controller
board.
We recommend placing the controller in standby mode until you have
configured the controller for your application.

Instructions for using an optional display board to put the controller in standby
mode are in Chapter 10.

Instructions for using a MODBUS master to put the controller in standby
mode are in Using the MODBUS Protocol with 2C and 4C Controllers
Remove power from the controller before changing DIP switch settings.
I
II
Table of Contents
Precautions........................................................................................................... I
About this Guide .............................................................................................. 1-1
Section A – Controller Features, Hardware, and Installation....................... 1-1
1.
Introduction to 2C and 4C Controller ................................................... 1-1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
1.11
2.
Overview ........................................................................................................... 1-1
Setup and Configuration Process ..................................................................... 1-2
2C and 4C Features and Benefits..................................................................... 1-4
Modes of Operation .......................................................................................... 1-6
Security ............................................................................................................. 1-7
Control Types Supported .................................................................................. 1-8
Setpoint ........................................................................................................... 1-10
Alarm Annunciation......................................................................................... 1-11
Configuration Sequence Matters .................................................................... 1-14
What Happens When You Power Up the Controller ................................... 1-15
Menu Convention Used in This Manual ...................................................... 1-16
Order Codes and Specifications........................................................... 2-1
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
2.15
2.16
2.17
2.18
2.19
Hardware Overview .......................................................................................... 2-1
2C and 4C Model Number Breakdown (Order Codes) ..................................... 2-2
Example of Order Number ................................................................................ 2-2
Accessories....................................................................................................... 2-3
Communication Cards ...................................................................................... 2-3
Default Output Assignments ............................................................................. 2-4
Dimensions ....................................................................................................... 2-5
Control Loops.................................................................................................... 2-5
Operating Limits ................................................................................................ 2-5
Performance .................................................................................................. 2-5
Control Characteristics .................................................................................. 2-5
Input Types.................................................................................................... 2-6
Digital Inputs.................................................................................................. 2-6
Digital Outputs ............................................................................................... 2-6
Power Supplies.............................................................................................. 2-6
Display Board Interface ................................................................................. 2-7
Communications Interfaces ........................................................................... 2-7
LEDs .............................................................................................................. 2-7
Software Configurability................................................................................. 2-8
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
3.
Hardware Setup and Wiring .................................................................. 3-1
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
4.
Overview ........................................................................................................... 3-1
Jumper Settings ................................................................................................ 3-2
4C Switch Settings ............................................................................................ 3-4
Communication Option Cards........................................................................... 3-6
Power Wiring and Grounding.......................................................................... 3-12
I/O Wiring ........................................................................................................ 3-17
Mounting 2C and 4C Boards ................................................................. 4-1
4.1
4.2
4.3
Choosing a Location ......................................................................................... 4-1
2C Mounting Dimensions.................................................................................. 4-2
4C Mounting Dimensions.................................................................................. 4-3
Section B – Multi-Comm Installation and Use................................................... i
5.
Introduction to Multi-Comm .................................................................. 5-1
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
6.
Installing the Multi-Comm Software and Logging In ......................... 6-1
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
7.
Installing the Software....................................................................................... 6-1
Starting the Software ........................................................................................ 6-1
Logging In to Multi-Comm Using the Default Account ...................................... 6-2
Changing the Password for the Default Account .............................................. 6-3
Setting Up Operator Accounts .......................................................................... 6-4
Editing an Operator Account............................................................................. 6-6
Deleting an Operator Account........................................................................... 6-6
Logging Out of the Multi-Comm Application ..................................................... 6-6
Establishing Communication with Controllers ................................... 7-1
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
8.
Introduction ....................................................................................................... 7-1
Configuring Communication Parameters and Assigning Network Addresses
in Controllers.................................................................................................... 7-2
Configuring Communication Parameters for Multi-Comm System ................... 7-4
Recognizing Controllers with the Multi-Comm Software .................................. 7-5
Deleting a Zone................................................................................................. 7-9
Naming Controllers ........................................................................................... 7-9
Saving the .MCS File ........................................................................................ 7-9
Closing an .MCS File ...................................................................................... 7-10
Creating a New .MCS File .............................................................................. 7-10
Opening an Existing .MCS File ................................................................... 7-10
Configuring Alarms................................................................................ 8-1
8.1
8.2
ii
Features ............................................................................................................ 5-1
Computer Hardware and Software Requirements............................................ 5-4
Overview of Setup Tasks for Multi-Comm ........................................................ 5-5
Overview of Multi-Comm Menus....................................................................... 5-6
Introduction ....................................................................................................... 8-1
Procedure.......................................................................................................... 8-1
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900M231U00A
Table of Contents
9.
Viewing Process Values and Changing Setpoint............................... 9-1
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
10.
10.1
10.2
11.
11.1
11.2
11.3
12.
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
12.5
13.
13.1
13.2
13.3
14.
14.1
14.2
14.3
14.4
Introduction ....................................................................................................... 9-1
Viewing PV and SP in the Main Window .......................................................... 9-2
Viewing PV and SP in a Graph ......................................................................... 9-3
Changing the Setpoint Using the Setpoint Dialog Box ..................................... 9-4
Configuring and Invoking the Single-Step Ramp Function............................... 9-5
Changing Controller Mode and Using Autotune ............................... 10-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 10-1
Procedure .................................................................................................... 10-1
Viewing and Changing Controller Configuration Parameters ......... 11-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 11-1
Accessing Configuration Parameter Displays ............................................. 11-1
Using Configuration Parameter Displays .................................................... 11-2
Configuring and Running Ramp and Soak Recipes ......................... 12-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 12-1
Configuring Multi-Comm Recipes................................................................ 12-2
Running Multi-Comm Recipes..................................................................... 12-5
Configuring Controller Ramp and Soak Parameters................................... 12-9
Running Controller Ramp and Soak Cycles.............................................. 12-12
Storing and Loading Controller Configurations................................ 13-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 13-1
Storing Configuration................................................................................... 13-2
Loading Configuration ................................................................................. 13-4
Logging PV and SP Values ................................................................. 14-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 14-1
Turning On the Logging Function................................................................ 14-1
Viewing and Printing Log Files .................................................................... 14-2
Turning Off the Logging Function................................................................ 14-2
Section C – Display Board User Interface ................................................... 14-1
15.
15.1
15.2
15.3
15.4
15.5
16.
16.1
16.2
16.3
16.4
16.5
16.6
Display Board Overview ...................................................................... 15-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 15-1
Keypad......................................................................................................... 15-1
Control Mode Displays ................................................................................ 15-2
Configuration Displays................................................................................. 15-4
LEDs ............................................................................................................ 15-6
Display Board Keypad Use ................................................................. 16-1
Key Functions.............................................................................................. 16-1
Displaying and Changing the Setpoint ........................................................ 16-5
Putting Controller in Standby Mode............................................................. 16-5
Returning Zone to Normal Operation .......................................................... 16-6
Putting Controller into Manual Mode and Changing the Output Values ..... 16-6
Changing the Zone Count ........................................................................... 16-8
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
16.7
16.8
16.9
Starting, Pausing, and Terminating Recipe Execution................................ 16-8
Clearing Latched Alarms ........................................................................... 16-10
Working in Configuration Mode ................................................................. 16-11
Section D – Configuration Parameters ........................................................ 16-1
17.
17.1
17.2
18.
18.1
18.2
18.3
18.4
18.5
19.
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7
20.
20.1
20.2
20.3
21.
21.1
21.2
21.3
21.4
21.5
22.
22.1
22.2
22.3
23.
23.1
23.2
iv
Configuring the Controller – Quick Setup Instructions
for PID Control..................................................................................... 17-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 17-1
Quick Instructions ........................................................................................ 17-2
General Information About Configuration Parameters..................... 18-1
Information in This Chapter ......................................................................... 18-1
How to Use Chapters 19 through 26 ........................................................... 18-2
Information Provided About Each Parameter.............................................. 18-3
Menu and Parameter Display Sequence..................................................... 18-5
Using Factory Settings ................................................................................ 18-8
Input Parameters – Required .............................................................. 19-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 19-1
Factory Calibration Is Appropriate for the Input Type You Ordered............ 19-1
Input Jumper Settings Must Match Input Type............................................ 19-2
Input Menu Parameter List .......................................................................... 19-2
Specifying the Input Type ............................................................................ 19-4
Configuring Input Parameters for RTD and Thermocouple Input Types..... 19-7
Configuring Input Parameters for Linear Inputs ........................................ 19-10
Display Parameters – Required .......................................................... 20-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 20-1
Configuring Display Parameters for RTD and
Thermocouple Input Types
20-3
Configuring Display Parameters for Linear Input Types ............................. 20-5
Output Parameters – Required ........................................................... 21-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 21-1
Specifying the Output Type ......................................................................... 21-4
Choosing the Output Action for On/Off Control ........................................... 21-5
Configuring Output Parameters for PID Control.......................................... 21-6
Configuring Output Parameters for Alarm Annunciation ............................. 21-8
Control Parameters – Required If Outputs Are Used for Control .... 22-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 22-1
Configuring Control Parameters for On/Off Control .................................... 22-4
Configuring Control Parameters for PID Control......................................... 22-6
Alarm Parameters – Optional.............................................................. 23-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 23-1
Configuring Alarm Parameters .................................................................... 23-3
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900M231U00A
Table of Contents
24.
24.1
24.2
25.
25.1
25.2
25.3
25.4
26.
26.1
26.2
26.3
26.4
26.5
26.6
27.
27.1
27.2
27.3
Autotune Damping Parameter – Recommended............................... 24-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 24-1
Configuring the Autotune Damping Parameter ........................................... 24-1
Ramp/Soak Recipe Parameters – Optional........................................ 25-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 25-1
Specifying the Recipe Option ...................................................................... 25-4
Configuring Single-Setpoint Ramp Parameters .......................................... 25-5
Configuring Multi-Step Ramp/Soak Parameters ......................................... 25-7
Supervisor Parameters – Recommended .......................................... 26-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 26-1
Specifying What Happens When an Input Is Bad ....................................... 26-2
Defining the Loop Break Time..................................................................... 26-2
Viewing the Highest and Lowest Process Value Received
Since Last Reset......................................................................................... 26-3
Resetting All Parameters to the Defaults .................................................... 26-3
Specifying the Number of Active Zones ...................................................... 26-4
Calibration Function – Not Required for Configuration ................... 27-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 27-1
Calibration Is Not Usually Required ............................................................ 27-1
Menu Items.................................................................................................. 27-1
28.
Configuring Serial Communications Parameters for MODBUS....... 28-1
29.
Tuning the Controller for PID Control ................................................ 29-1
29.1
29.2
29.3
30.
30.1
30.2
31.
31.1
31.2
31.3
31.4
31.5
32.
32.1
32.2
32.3
Introduction.................................................................................................. 29-1
Autotuning ................................................................................................... 29-2
Manual Tuning (Zeigler-Nichols PID Method) ............................................. 29-5
Changing the Security Access Level ................................................. 30-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 30-1
Procedures .................................................................................................. 30-3
Calibrating the Controller .................................................................... 31-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 31-1
Determining the Simulated Input to be Used During Low
and High Calibration ................................................................................... 31-1
Preparing the Controller .............................................................................. 31-4
Initiating the Calibration ............................................................................... 31-5
Returning the Controller to Service ............................................................. 31-6
Error Messages and Codes................................................................. 32-1
Introduction.................................................................................................. 32-1
Problem with Input Signal............................................................................ 32-1
Problem with Controller ............................................................................... 32-2
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Section E – Appendices ................................................................................ 32-1
33.
Frequently Asked Questions .............................................................. 33-1
Introduction ................................................................................................................ 33-1
How do I change from thermocouple to RTD (or vice versa)? .................................. 33-1
Why doesn’t the PV displayed match the value on a thermometer in the process? . 33-1
Why does my compressor cycle so often? ................................................................ 33-2
Why doesn’t the controller communicate with the host computer? ........................... 33-2
Why isn’t the setpoint displayed all the time? ............................................................ 33-2
The last digit of the PV display changes very frequently. How can I slow it down? . 33-2
Why is the setpoint changing? I haven’t touched the controller! .............................. 33-3
34.
Index...................................................................................................... 34-1
Warranty.......................................................................................................... 34-5
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 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
About this Guide
This guide contains information about:

controller features, hardware, and installation – see Section A

Multi-Comm software installation and use – See Section B

2C and 4C display boards – see Section C

2C and 4C configuration parameters – see Section D

frequently asked questions – see Section E
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Section A – Controller Features, Hardware,
and Installation
This section contains information about:

controller features and setup sequence – see page 1-1

order codes and specifications – see page 2-1

hardware setup and wiring – see page 3-1

mounting 2C and 4C boards – see page 4-1
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
1. Introduction to 2C and 4C Controller
1.1
Overview
The 2C and 4C controllers are control boards that can perform PID or On/Off
temperature control for two zones (2C) or up to four zones (4C).
I/O for the 2C includes two analog inputs, three digital inputs, and ___ digital outputs.
I/O for the 4C includes four analog inputs, four digital inputs, and six digital outputs.
Smaller modular plug-in boards provide communication options.
Several optional display boards with buttons are available. When connected to the
4C board with a ribbon cable, a display board can be used to:

select a zone

view the process value and setpoint for the selected zone as shown below

change the setpoint

view and change configuration parameter values
You can also use a personal computer to do all these tasks. See 1.3.3 for more
information.
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1-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
1.2
Setup and Configuration Process
A high-level view of the setup process is provided by the table below.
Step
Task
Section or
Chapter in this
Guide
1
Mount the 2C or 4C board and the optional display board. Connect the
display board (if used) to the 2C or 4C board using the ribbon cable
provided with an optional display board.
2
If you plan to use the 2C or 4C board with different input types than those
specified when you ordered the board, set the input jumpers.1
3.2.2
3
Unless you plan to communicate with the 2C or 4C controller using only
an optional display board, set the starting MODBUS address for each 2C
and 4C board.
3.3
4
Wire inputs and outputs.
3.6
5
Install power supplies and connect power supplies to the 2C or 4C board.
3.5.1
6
Decide whether to ground the 2C or 4C board. Read the grounding
guidelines in this manual before grounding the sensors, an external power
supply, or the 2C or 4C board. If the grounding guideline scenarios in this
manual do not cover your situation, consult the factory before grounding
the 2C or 4C board, an external power supply, or the sensors.
3.5.2
7
If you plan to configure the 2C or 4C board using a personal computer,
connect the 2C or 4C board to the PC (or to the network to be used to
communicate with the PC).
3.4.4
8
If you plan to configure the 2C or 4C board using a personal computer,
set up the appropriate communication port on the PC.
3.4.5
9
Power up the 2C or 4C board.
10
If you plan to configure the 2C or 4C board using a Multi-Comm computer,
install Multi-Comm and configure all zones using the procedure in this
manual.
– or –
4
3.5
Section B
Section C
If you plan to configure the 2C or 4C using an optional display board,
follow the procedure in this manual.
– or –
—
If you plan to configure the 2C or 4C using a MODBUS host, read Using
the MODBUS Protocol with 2C and 4C Controllers.
Section D
Descriptions of all control parameters are in this manual.
1
Input jumpers are set at the factory for the input types you ordered.
1-2
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900M231U00A
Introduction to 4C Controller
A more detailed look at the configuration and tuning process for each zone is
provided below.
Step
Action
1
Power up the controller.
2
Select the zone.
3
Put the controller in standby mode.
4
If you plan to use a temperature input (thermocouple or RTD) and do not plan
to use the default units of measure Fahrenheit, select the units of measure.
5
Specify the input type for each zone only if different from the input types
specified when the controller was ordered. If the input is linear, scale the input.
Changing the input types requires recalibration of the affected zones.
6
Optional – If you plan to use an optional display board, specify the number of
decimal places to be stored and displayed, and the display refresh rate. If you
do not configure these display parameters, the controller will use the defaults
listed in Section D.
7
Choose how the outputs will be used and configure the parameters that apply
to the output function.
8
For on/off control, customize the output operation using the hysteresis (heating
only or cooling only) and deadband (heating and cooling).
For Autotuning, prepare the process and initiate the operation.
For manual tuning of PID, specify a manual offset and other tuning values.
900M231U00A
9
Optional – Configure alarms.
10
Optional – Configure single-setpoint ramp or multi-segment recipe (4C only).
11
Recommended – Specify the loop break time, and configure failsafe outputs to
be used if the controller detects a problem with the input.
12
Adjust the setpoint.
13
Put the controller in normal (automatic) mode.
14
Change the security access level to the most restrictive level that is appropriate
for your site.
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1-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
1.3
2C and 4C Features and Benefits
1.3.1
Control Versatility
The 2C and 4C boards can implement PID and on/off control, as well as execute
custom recipes. The 2C and 4C boards also support a manual mode that overrides
automatic control. In manual mode operators can use an optional display board or a
personal computer to control the outputs by entering a fixed output percentage value.
Transfer from PID to manual is “bumpless”. Information about the advantages of
each of these supported control types is in 1.6.
When PID control is selected, you can take advantage of the controllers’ Autotune
feature for easy tuning of the proportional, integral, and derivative components of the
control algorithm.
1.3.2
Alarm Annunciation
The 4C boards can be configured to use one or more outputs for annunciation of high
or low process alarms, deviation alarms, inverse band alarms, normal band alarms,
or recipe events.
You can also view process alarms and controller error codes for both 2C and 4C
boards with an optional display board, or a personal computer running Multi-Comm or
serving as a MODBUS host. Each display board has an LED dedicated to alarm
annunciation.
1.3.3
Ease of Configuration
To configure a 2C or 4C device, you have several options.
1-4

An optional display board (display, buttons or keypad, and LEDs) can be
connected to the 2C or 4C control board with a ribbon cable. This display
and keypad can be used to configure all of the setup parameters described
in this manual, and to monitor process values and setpoints for all zones.
For information about using the optional display, see Chapter 15.

A personal computer and the Multi-Comm application can be used to
configure the 2C and 4C configuration parameters using USB or RS-232
one-to-one communication, or using an RS-485 multi-drop network. MultiComm has a convenient user interface that also makes it easy to monitor
zone process values, save configurations, and load configurations to
multiple 2C and 4C boards quickly and easily. For information about using
Multi-Comm, see Section C.

A personal computer serving as a MODBUS host can be used to configure
all 2C and 4C parameters over a network. The MODBUS host can also
read process values, status messages, and other information about the 2C
and 4C devices. For information about using the MODBUS protocol with 2C
and 4C boards, see Using the MODBUS Protocol with 2C and 4C
Controllers.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Introduction to 4C Controller
1.3.4
Ramp/Soak Recipes
The 4C board can be configured to execute ramp/soak recipes on demand. A recipe
consists of up to eight segments. For each segment you can configure a unique
ramp time, soak level (setpoint), and soak time.
If your process is not responsive enough to achieve the setpoint within the ramp time
(or maintain the soak level for the entire soak time), you can use the recipe
“holdback” parameter to “stop the clock” on the ramp time (and soak time) if the
setpoint differs too much from the process value.
Execution of a recipe can be started, paused, resumed, and terminated using an
optional display board or using a communications interface.
If your process requires recipes with more than the eight segments that the 4C onboard parameters can handle (or you want to run recipes through a 2C board), you
can set up a personal computer as an operator station running Multi-Comm. You can
use Multi-Comm to create more complex recipes, store the recipes on the PC, and
execute the recipes on the 2C or 4C under the direction of the Multi-Comm PC.
Alternatively, 4C boards can be configured to execute a single gradual ramp to
setpoint at startup or on demand. Holdback can also be applied to this operation.
See Chapter 12 for more information about ramp/soak capabilities.
1.3.5
Communication Options
Plug-in communication option cards are available. Any of these communication
options can be used with any 2C or 4C board. These communication options allow
your personal computer to communicate with a 2C or 4C board.

The RS-232 option card or USB option card makes it easy to use MultiComm to communicate with a single board.

Option cards are also available to allow your PC to communicate with
multiple boards via Ethernet or an RS-485 multi-drop network. Your PC can
serve as a MODBUS host or a Multi-Comm configuration and operation
station.
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1-5
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
1.4
Modes of Operation
1.4.1
Control Modes
Unless all standard outputs are set to    or    (alarm), the 2C and 4C
devices support several modes of operation for control, as well as a special mode
used to tune the unit automatically for PID control.2
The table below summarizes the control modes and shows the display (on an
optional display board) used to select each. Instructions for using an optional display
board to display and change the mode are in Chapter 10.
Control
Mode
normal
Selection
Display


standby


manual
(fixed output
percentage)

Autotune



ramp/soak
start

ramp/soak
hold

resume
ramp/soak

 .
. 
. 
Description
When the controller is in normal mode, the outputs are based on
the controller’s calculations in accordance with the configured
control strategy, dependent on the input received.
When the controller is placed in standby mode, the controller does
not calculate any outputs until the controller is taken out of
standby. While in standby, the control outputs are in their
unactivated state.
When the controller is placed in manual mode, then, regardless of
the configured control strategy and the input received, the outputs
used are the fixed percentages specified by the operator using the
percent 1 and percent 2 values. See 16.5 for the procedure.
When Autotune is selected, the PID outputs are put under the
control of the Autotune algorithm, and dependent on the input
received. Autotune is not always available. The controller and
the process must be prepared before the controller is placed in
Autotune mode. See 29.2 for details.
If the controller’s ramp/soak parameters have been used to
enable the controller to execute a single-setpoint ramp or a multistep recipe, then this choice is available. When ramp/soak start is
selected from the list of available modes, the single-setpoint ramp
or multi-step ramp will be executed, based on the values stored in
the controllers ramp/soak parameters. The outputs will be
calculated by the controller to achieve the recipe setpoint. The
recipe setpoint will be manipulated by the controller in accordance
with the ramp and soak segments configured using the controller’s
ramp/soak parameters. See Chapter 25 for details.
If the controller is running a multi-step recipe based on the
ramp/soak parameter values (that is, if  . is alternating with the
display of the PV), then the ramp/soak hold choice is available on
the list of modes. When this choice is selected, the setpoint is
held at the level reached when the recipe was put on hold.
If a recipe is currently being held (that is, if   .  is alternating
with the display of the PV), then the resume ramp/soak recipe
choice is available on the list of modes. When this choice is
selected, the controller resumes execution of the recipe.
2
When all standard outputs are off or used for alarm annunciation, the instrument functions as a noncontrolling indicator. When the outputs are not used for control, the operating modes are not applicable
(because they are all related to the behavior of outputs), so no mode is displayed when you press the
mode enter key.
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 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Introduction to 4C Controller
1.5
Security
A 2C or 4C board can be configured to limit the values that can be changed using an
optional display board. For example, the access level can be set to allow operators
to change only the setpoint or the manual mode output percentage.
A controller can be set to any of the access levels in the table below. The sequence
of levels in the table is from most restrictive to least restrictive. New 2C and 4C
boards are shipped with the access level set to     (configuration).
Instructions for changing the access level are in Chapter 30
Displayed
Abbreviation
Access
Level
   .
keypad lockout
Description
Highest security level; no access.
While the access level is “keypad lockout”, no controller values can
be changed, not even the setpoint. To escape, press the
for approximately ten seconds, until 
press
.

setpoint only
key
    is displayed, then
Setpoint or manual outputs can be adjusted; no access to
mode or menus.
When the access level is “setpoint only”, the keypad can be used to
change the setpoint or the manual mode output percentage.
However, the operator will not be able to change the controller from
normal (automatic) mode to manual, and vice versa.

setpoint plus
mode
Setpoint or manual outputs can be adjusted; mode can be
changed; no access to menus.
When the access level is “setpoint plus mode”, the keypad can be
used to change the setpoint, manual mode output percentage, and
control mode, including executing recipes, and switching from
normal (automatic) to manual, and vice versa.

user
All the “setpoint plus mode” functions, and limited access to
menus.
When the access level is “user”, the keypad can be used to do all
the functions available in “setpoint plus mode”. At the “user” level,
the keypad can also be used to view and change the values on the
control menu (tuning parameters), adjust the Autotune damping
parameter, and view and change all the ramp/soak parameters.

configuration
All the “user” functions, and access to all menus except
calibration.
When the access level is “configuration”, the keypad can be used to
perform all controller functions and access all menus, except the
calibration menu.




900M231U00A
factory
Access to everything.
When the access level is “factory”, the keypad can be used to do all
controller functions, including re-calibrating the controller.
The controllers are calibrated at the factory. If you don’t change the
input type, usually the controllers will never need re-calibration. See
19.2 for the circumstance that dictates re-calibration. Do not leave
the controller set to this access level after you have recalibrated the controller.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
1.6
Control Types Supported
1.6.1
Overview
A 2C or 4C board supports PID and on/off control. Autotuning is available for PID
control. The type of control for each of the standard outputs is specified using the
output menu output type parameter. The outputs can be set for different types of
control. One or more outputs can be used for alarm annunciation instead of control.
The advantages and disadvantages of both types of control are described briefly
below.
1.6.2
PID Control
When Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control is used, the controller modulates
output power by adjusting the output power percentage within a proportional band.
Power is proportionally reduced as the process temperature gets closer to the
setpoint temperature. The integral action affects the output based on the duration of
the process value’s variation from the setpoint, and the derivative action affects the
output based on the rate of change of the process value.
PID control has the following advantages:

minimizes overshoot

enhances stability

compensates for process lag
The proportional band, derivative action (rate), and integral action (auto reset)
parameters are automatically adjusted by the Autotune operation described in
Chapter 28.
PID control is appropriate for processes with the following characteristics:

temperature lags exist

load changes are present

overshoots need to be minimized

very accurate control is required
PID is not appropriate for:

underpowered processes

processes that use compressors, blowers, or other mechanical devices that
cannot tolerate constant cycling
1.6.3
On/Off
On/off control has two states, fully off and fully on.
On/off control can be used where:
1-8

process is underpowered and has very little heater storage capacity

some temperature oscillation is permissible

electromechanical systems (compressors) make rapid cycling undesirable
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Introduction to 4C Controller
To prevent rapid cycling, the controllers allow you to configure a deadband and a
hysteresis value for on/off control.
1.6.3.1
Use of Hysteresis
If you are using a single output for control, then use the hysteresis parameter to
reduce frequency of cycling.
The hysteresis value represents a temperature value that the controller uses to
separate the on and off transitions of the individual outputs. (You configure the
Output 1 and Output 2 hysteresis values independently.)
For example, in the diagram below, the setpoint is 100 and the hysteresis value is 10.
In this case the output would be on from startup until the process value reaches 105
(the setpoint plus half the hysteresis value). After overshoot, the PV falls, but the
controller does not turn the output on again until the temperature falls to 95 (the
setpoint minus half the hysteresis value).
1.6.3.2
Use of Deadband
The controllers also permit you to specify a deadband value for each on/off output.
In an application where two of the controller’s outputs are used to control heating and
cooling of the zone, this has the effect of defining a band around the setpoint in which
neither the heating nor the cooling output is on. This avoids having the heating and
cooling devices working against one another.3
To allow you to optimize the control of your process, the heating deadband and the
cooling deadband can be different values. When the deadband value is applied to an
output, it has the effect of shifting the setpoint and the hysteresis for that output. In
the diagram below we refer to the setpoint the controller actually uses as the
“effective setpoint.” When a deadband is configured, the value of this effective
setpoint is different from the value of the displayed setpoint.
3
However, if your application sometimes requires use of heating and cooling simultaneously, you can
specify a negative deadband value. The range of valid deadband values is affected by input type; see
22.2.2 for details.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
1-9
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
For a heating (reverse-acting) output, a positive deadband (value greater than zero)
moves the effective setpoint used by the controller below the displayed setpoint. For
cooling (direct-acting outputs), a positive deadband moves the effective setpoint used
by the controller above the setpoint displayed.4
In the diagram below, the setpoint is 100, the hysteresis for each output is 10, and a
deadband of 10 has also been configured for each output. (These are probably not
realistic values for most processes, but we’re using these values to demonstrate the
controllers’ behavior when hysteresis and deadband are configured for both heating
and cooling outputs.)
The heating output is on until the process value reaches 95 (setpoint minus heating
deadband plus one half heating hysteresis), but the overshoot does not trigger the
cooling output until the temperature reaches 115 (setpoint plus the cooling deadband
plus half the cooling hysteresis).
The cooling output stays on until the PV reaches 105 (setpoint plus cooling
deadband minus one half cooling hysteresis). The heating output does not come on
until the PV has dropped to 85 (setpoint minus heating deadband minus one half
heating hysteresis). The heating output goes off when the PV gets to 95 (setpoint
minus heating deadband plus one half heating hysteresis).
1.7
Setpoint
1.7.1
Introduction
The value of the PV and the setpoint currently being used (“active setpoint”) are
always displayed (for the selected zone) on an optional display board when a 2C or
4C device is operating in normal mode. The setpoint used (and displayed) can
come from these sources.

The active setpoint can be set using the keys on a display board.

The active setpoint can come from an active recipe stored in the controller.

The active setpoint can be written to the controller from host computer.
If a single setpoint ramp or multi-step ramp/soak recipe stored in the controller is
active, this setpoint takes precedence over a setpoint from a remote host.
4
A negative deadband value has the opposite effect.
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900M231U00A
Introduction to 4C Controller
1.7.2
Setpoint from a Recipe
Each zone of a 4C device can be configured to execute a single ramp to setpoint, or
a multi-step ramp and soak recipe (eight steps maximum). As execution of the ramp
or recipe progresses, the setpoint is changed by the controller as specified in the
recipe. Starting, pausing, and terminating recipe execution is described in 12.5.
Instructions for configuring recipes are in Chapter 25. The setpoint range applied to
recipe soak levels is configured using the setpoint low and high limit parameters
described in 19.6.2 and 19.7.2.
Multi-Comm software can be used to configure Multi-Comm recipes that have any
number of steps. (The recipes are stored on the Multi-Comm host computer, not in
the controllers.) If a 2C or 4C controller is connected to a Multi-Comm host
computer, the operator can execute a Multi-Comm recipe under the direction of the
host, which sends the controller setpoint values in accordance with the recipe.
Instructions for configuring Multi-Comm recipes are in Section B.
1.7.3
Setpoint from a Host Computer
If a controller is connected to a Multi-Comm host computer or to a MODBUS host
(master), the setpoint in the controller may have been written to the controller by the
host computer. The setpoint range applied to setpoints that are configurable using a
host computer is configured using the setpoint low and high limit parameters
described in 19.6.2 and 19.7.2.
Host computers can write a new setpoint to either RAM or the EEPROM (or to both).
The controller uses the setpoint stored in RAM. If the setpoint is also stored on the
EEPROM, the setpoint will be retained, even when power to the controller is turned
off. The setpoint stored on the EEPROM will be written to RAM when the controller is
powered up.
However, a host computer can wear out the EEPROM by writing to it too many times.
Do not write the setpoint to the EEPROM when you are writing a temporary setpoint
to the controller, such as when you are ramping to a final setpoint under the direction
of a MODBUS master.
1.8
Alarm Annunciation
1.8.1
Alarm Types Configurable
Each alarm can be configured to be activated when a specific condition exists.

process alarm – Activated when the process variable reaches the alarm value
(alarm setpoint parameter value), independent of the PV’s relationship to the
process setpoint. A high process alarm activates at and above the alarm
setpoint. A low process alarm activates at and below the alarm setpoint. For
example, if you want an alarm to alert the operator when the PV goes up to 200,
then configure the alarm as a high process alarm, and specify the alarm setpoint
as 200.

deviation alarm – Activated when the process variable deviates from the
process setpoint by the amount specified using the alarm setpoint parameter
value. A high deviation alarm activates when the PV is above the process
setpoint by the amount specified using the alarm value. A low deviation alarm
activates when the PV is below the process setpoint by the amount specified
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
1-11
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
using the alarm value. For example, if you want an alarm to alert the operator
when the PV is 50 below the setpoint, then configure the alarm as a low deviation
alarm, and specify the alarm value (using the alarm setpoint parameter) as 50.

inverse band alarm – Activated when the process value is within a specified
band centered around the setpoint. For example, if you want the alarm to alert
the operator when the PV is 10 units (or less) above or below the process
setpoint, then configure the alarm as an inverse band alarm, and specify 10 for
the alarm setpoint parameter value.

normal band alarm – Activated when the process value is outside a specified
band centered around the setpoint. For example, if you want the alarm to alert
the operator when the PV is 10 units (or more) above or below the process
setpoint, then configure the alarm as a normal band alarm, and specify 10 for the
alarm setpoint parameter value.
The type of alarm (process high, process low, deviation high, deviation low, inverse
band, or normal band) is referred to as the alarm operation. The alarm menu
contains an alarm operation parameter for each of the two alarms.
For each alarm there is also an alarm action parameter. When an optional display
board is used for configuration, this parameter is the first in the alarm menu for each
of the two alarms, and is used to specify how the alarm will be used. The choices
are:
1.8.2

off – The alarm will not be used.

normal – The alarm will be indicated (on a Multi-Comm display, for
example) only while the alarm state occurs. The alarm indication will clear
when the alarm state has cleared.

latching – Once the alarm has been indicated the alarm will remain active
until the operator presses the
key (or a command from a host computer
resets the alarm), even if the alarm condition has cleared before the alarm
has been reset.

event – This special use of an alarm indicates that the controller has reached
a particular point in a ramp/soak recipe. Setting the alarm action to “event”
reserves the alarm for use by a ramp/soak recipe. However, the specific
recipe event(s) that will trigger the alarm are configured using the   
(ramp/soak) menu as described in Chapter 25.
Viewing Alarms on a Host Computer
The state of alarms configured with the    (alarm) menu can be viewed on a
Multi-Comm computer and read by a MODBUS host.
1.8.3
Using an Output to Trigger an External Device
Depending on the number of outputs needed for zone control, 4C devices can be
configured to use outputs connected to external devices to annunciate alarms.
When standard hardware outputs are used for alarm annunciation, the alarms are
configured using alarm parameters on the     (output) menu. These output
menu alarm parameters provide the same configuration choices for alarm operation
and action as the alarm menu parameters described in Chapter 23, with the
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 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Introduction to 4C Controller
exception of the “event” alarm action. Recipe events can be associated with a
“logical” alarm only using the alarm menu.
Alarms configured using the output menu and alarms configured using the alarm
menu are independent of one another.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
1-13
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
1.9
Configuration Sequence Matters
A 2C or 4C board is a versatile instrument that is capable of using many types of
input values and implementing several types of control strategies. To support this
versatility, a 2C or 4C board is capable of storing values for many configuration
parameters. Interrelationships exist between the parameters. Therefore, it is
important that you configure the parameters in the correct sequence.
If you plan to use a thermocouple or RTD input and if you do not plan to use degrees
Fahrenheit (the default unit of measure), the first step is always to specify the unit to
be used (Celsius or Kelvin) using the     (display) menu     parameter.5
The controller uses this unit of measure for internal operations, as well as for external
communications.
When you change the units of measure for temperature inputs, the controller
recalculates any values that have already been specified. For example, if you want
the setpoint to be 100 C, then you must change the units from the default F to C
before you write the setpoint of 100 to the controller. If you change the units after
you write the setpoint of 100 to the controller, the controller will convert the 100 F
setpoint to 37.8 C. In this case, you would have to reconfigure the setpoint to 100
C to implement the control needed by your process.
After the unit of measure has been changed, if necessary, from degrees Fahrenheit
to your choice of Celsius or Kelvin, the next step is always to specify the type of input
that each controller will receive if you plan to use a different type of input than the
type specified when you ordered the 2C or 4C board. (The 2C and 4C boards are
configured at the factory to use the input type you ordered for each zone.)
If you decide to use a different input type, you must reconfigure the input type to
specify the type of thermocouple or RTD that will provide the input to the controller,
or, in the case of a linear input, the range and units of the input (0 to 20 mA, 0 to 5 V,
1 to 5 V, etc.) The type of input specified affects how the controller processes the
input signal and calculates the output needed to achieve the setpoint.
With the exception of the unit of measure, generally the parameters should be
configured in the sequence in which they are presented in the menus in this manual.
In addition to being aware of the sequence in which parameters should be
configured, you should also remember that not all parameters apply to all
applications. For example, if you specify that the input type is a thermocouple or
RTD, then you will not see the low scale and high scale parameters in the input
menu. However, if you use a linear input, then you must specify scaling values, or
accept the defaults (-1999 to 9999).6
5
The input type parameter is configured at the factory to match the type of input specified when the
controller was ordered (see 19.5.1). If the controller was configured at the factory for a linear input type,
the units of measure parameter will not be included in the display menu until you change the input type.
When changing the input from a linear to a temperature input (or vice versa), the input jumper settings
must also be changed as described in 19.3, Re-calibration is also necessary.
6
The database values in new (“out of the box”) 2C and 4C boards are always the default values shown in
the tables in Section D, except in the case of the input type parameter, which is configured at the factory
to match the type of input ordered.
1-14
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Introduction to 4C Controller
1.10 What Happens When You Power Up the Controller
1.10.1
Outputs
When the controller is powered up, under some circumstances the outputs may be
activated. If the controller has been configured, this is good. However, if the
controller is new (not yet configured), then we recommend placing the controller in
standby mode until you have configured the controller for your application.
For instructions for putting a 2C or 4C device in standby using an optional display
board see Chapter 16.
A Multi-Comm computer or MODBUS host can also be used to put the controller in
standby.
1.10.2
Display
When a 2C or 4C device is first powered up, the following occurs if an optional
display board is connected to the 2C or 4C board:
1). All segments of both lines of the optional LED display light briefly while the
controller goes through a series of self-diagnostics.
2) The top line briefly displays the type of controller, while the lower line displays a
firmware version number. Write it down and save your note!7
3) The top line displays     , while the lower line displays the type of
communication protocol the controller supports.
4) The quantity of active zones is displayed. (The controller can be configured to use
fewer than four zones.)
5) The quantity of detected hardware inputs is displayed.
6) The quantity of detected hardware outputs is displayed.
7) Finally, the process variable (PV) and process setpoint value (SV) are displayed.
This is the normal operator display. See Chapter 15 for more information about the
controller displays.
1.10.3
Setpoint
Once the controller has been configured, its behavior at startup depends on the
choices made during configuration.
A 4C controller can be configured to ramp gradually up to the setpoint after the
controller is powered up.
If this single-setpoint ramp function has not been enabled as described in 25.3, then
the controller’s control algorithm will use the outputs to achieve the configured
setpoint using the configured control strategy as quickly as possible.
7
It is a good idea to make a note of this number. If you phone for technical support you will be asked for
this version information, as well as for the complete model number of the controller in question.
900M231U00A
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
1.11 Menu Convention Used in This Manual
The instructions in this manual use the following format to tell you to use a particular
item from a menu: <menu name> > <function>. For example, to tell you to access
the Alarms function on the Multi-Comm Controller menu, the instructions will say
“Select Controller > Alarms”.
1-16
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
2. Order Codes and Specifications
2.1
Hardware Overview
The 4C board is designed to control up to four zones. The 2C board is designed to
control up to two zones.
The 4C board features four 24 Vdc isolated digital inputs and six 24 Vdc isolated
digital sourcing outputs that share 750 mA of current.
The 2C board features three 24 Vdc non-isolated inputs and four 24 Vdc non-isolated
digital sourcing outputs for which 800 mA of current is available.
The 16-bit analog inputs can be standard process-types (4–20 mA or 0–10 Vdc), or
low level sensors such as T/C or RTD.
Smaller modular plug-in boards allow for communication with a personal computer.
An optional display board is available.
Available optional communication cards include RS 232, RS 485, USB, and Ethernet.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
2.2
2C and 4C Model Number Breakdown (Order Codes)
2.2.1
Analog Input Types
Requires two selections for 2C and four selections for 4C:
T
Thermocouple (ungrounded)
R
RTD (2 wire)
S
Decimal RTD
M
Millivolt Linear
V
Volt Linear
C
Current Linear
2.2.2
Communications
00
None
02
RS 232 (p/n 785A379U02)
04
RS 485 Modbus RTU (p/n 785A379U01)
0B
USB (p/n 785A382U01)
0E
Ethernet (p/n 785A418U01)
2.2.3
Display
0
None
C
4-inch square display (p/n 785A406 U01)
H
Horizontal (p/n 785A378U01)
V
Vertical (p/n 785A399U01)
4
¼ DIN (p/n 785A415U01) - default in code
All display boards are supplied with a 36-inch (91.4-centimeter) cable.
If you order a display board at the same time you order a 2C or 4C controller, the
controller will be configured at the factory to use this display board. If you add a
display board other than the small square board (p/n 785A415U01), you must use a
MODBUS host to configure a “display type” setting on the controller.
2.2.4
Special Options
Consult the factory for availability of special options.
2.3
Example of Order Number
The example below shows the order number for a 4C controller equipped with an RS
485 communication card and a horizontal display.
2-2
Series
Analog Inputs (4)
Communications
4C
4 zones
-T-T-R-C
Input 1 TC
Input 2 TC
Input 3 RTD
Input 4 Current
4
RS 485
 Athena Controls, Inc.
Special
Options
H
horizontal
display
000
None
900M231U00A
Order Codes and Specifications
2.4
2.5
Accessories
614A102U01
Connector Kit
218B044U01
Relay (SPST 30 amps)
218B043U01
Relay (SPDT 20/10 amps)
560E164U01
Transformer (115/230 Vac to 18 Vac @ 25 VA)
560E165U01
Transformer (115/230 Vac to 18 Vac @ 43 VA)
785A364U01
Power Supply (18Vac to 24Vdc @1.75 amps)
Communication Cards
You can specify a communication card when the controller is ordered; see 2.2.2.
You may also purchase a communication card later. Part numbers follow.
785A379U01
RS485
785A379U02
RS232
785A418U01
Ethernet
785A382U01
USB
Any communication card is recognized automatically by the controller. For
information about communication parameter defaults and available settings, see
Chapter 28
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
2-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
2.6
Default Output Assignments
The default output assignments depend on the number of active zones. Instructions
for specifying the quantity of active zones are in 16.6.
Note that the default assignments for the first four hardware outputs with one and two
active zones are identical in both the 4C (which has six digital outputs) and the 2C
(which has four digital outputs).
One Active Zone
Hardware
Output
Use
1
Zone 1 – heat
2
Zone 1 – cool
3
not used
4
not used
5
Zone 1 – alarm 1
6
Zone 1 – alarm 2
Two Active Zones
Hardware
Output
Use
1
Zone 1 – heat
2
Zone 1 – cool
3
Zone 2 – heat
4
Zone 2 – cool
5
Zone 1 – alarms 1 and 2
6
Zone 2 – alarms 1 and 2
Three Active Zones
Hardware
Output
2-4
Use
1
Zone 1 – heat
2
Zone 1 – cool
3
Zone 2 – heat
4
Zone 2 – cool
5
Zone 3 – heat
6
Zone 3 – cool
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Order Codes and Specifications
Four Active Zones
Hardware
Output
2.7
Use
1
Zone 1 – heat
2
Zone 1 – cool
3
Zone 2 – heat
4
Zone 2 – cool
5
Zone 3 – heat
6
Zone 4 – heat
Dimensions
4C: 4.5 by 7 inch (11.4 x 17.8 cm) PC board. All components are on top side. For a
mounting dimension drawing, see 4.3.
2C: 3 by 5 inch (7.6 x 12.7 cm) PC board. All components are on the top side. All
components are on top side. For a mounting dimension drawing, see 4.2.
2.8
Control Loops
4C hardware supports a maximum of four control loops (one for each analog input).
2C hardware supports a maximum of two control loops (one for each analog input).
2.9
Operating Limits
Ambient Temperature: 32°F to 158°F (0°C to 70°C)
Relative Humidity Tolerance: 90%, non-condensing
Power:18 Vac, 24 Vdc
Power Consumption: < 100 mA @ 18 Vac for control and display; < 1 A @ 18 Vac
for digital I
2.10 Performance
Accuracy:±0.20% of full scale (±0.10% typical), ±1 digit
Setpoint Resolution: 1 count/0.1 count
Repeatability: ±1 count
Temperature Stability: 5 μV/°C (maximum)
TC Cold-End Tracking: 0.05°C/°C ambient
Noise Rejection: 100 dB common mode
Process Sampling: 126 ms x number of active zones + 1
2.11 Control Characteristics
Proportional Band: 2 to span of sensor
Integral: 0 to 9600 sec
Derivative: 0 to 2400 sec
Cycle Time: 0 = 200 ms; 1 to 120 sec
Control Hysteresis: 1 to span of sensor
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
2.12 Input Types
Thermocouple: B, C, E, J, K, N, NNM, R, S, T, Platinel II; Maximum lead resistance
100 ohms for rated accuracy
RTD: Platinum 2-wire,8 100 ohms at 0°C, (DIN curve standard 0.00385)
Linear: 0–50 mV; 10–50 mV; 0–20 mA; 4–20 mA; 0–10 mV; 0–50 mV; 0–100 mV; 0–
1 V; 0–5 V; 0–10 V; 1–5 V
All sensors or other analog input devices must be floating and isolated with reference
to any ground. For more information about grounding, see 3.5.2.
2.13 Digital Inputs
4C: Four channels, 24 Vdc input, optically isolated. This is the same power supply
used by the digital outputs and shares the same 1 Amp fuse.
2C: Three channels, 24 Vdc input; this is the same non-isolated power supply used
by the rest of the controller and shares the same 1 Amp fuse.
On both the 4C and the 2C each input is sourced with the internal I/O 24 Vdc power
supply. The user’s switch is wired between the +24 Vdc convenience pin and each
individual input pin.
2.14 Digital Outputs
4C: Six channels, 24 Vdc sourcing outputs, optically isolated. Total current capacity
for all six outputs is fused at 1 Amp. The fuse is field-replaceable. All 4C digital
outputs are powered with the isolated internal I/O 24 Vdc power supply. The user’s
load is wired between each individual output pin and the common 24 Vdc return pin.
A diode clamp is provided for inductive loads.
2C: Four channels, 24 Vdc sourcing outputs, non-isolated. Total current capacity for
all four outputs is 800 mA available for the digital outputs. The 1 Amp fuse is shared
between the digital I/O and the logic sections of the controller. The fuse is fieldreplaceable.
All 2C digital outputs are powered with the non-isolated internal I/O 24 Vdc power
supply. The user’s load is wired between each individual output pin and the common
24 Vdc return pin. A diode clamp is provided for inductive loads
2.15 Power Supplies
4C: If I/O isolation is not required, an 18 Vac Class Two transformer or a Class Two
24 Vdc power supply can be connected to the two J4 power inputs.
2C: An 18 Vac Class Two transformer or a Class Two 24 Vdc power supply can be
connected to the J14 power inputs.
For both the 2C and 4C an 18 Vac secondary, when rectified and filtered, will
produce 24 Vdc unregulated.
Consult us for transformer sizing.
8
Consult us for availability of support for 3-wire RTDs.
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Order Codes and Specifications
2.16 Display Board Interface
An optional display board with buttons can be connected to the 2C or 4C board with
a ribbon cable. (Several display boards are available. See 2.4 for display board part
numbers.) The display board can be used to:

select a zone

view the process value and setpoint for the selected zone

change the setpoint

view and change configuration parameter values
A display board overview is in Chapter 15. Detailed instructions for using the keypad
on an optional display board are in Chapter 16.
2.17 Communications Interfaces
Optional Isolated RS-485, RS-232 or 10/100 baseT Ethernet or USB.
Protocol: Modbus RTU through serial port or Modbus TCP/IP with10-base T
Ethernet.
2.18 LEDs
The 4C board has seven LEDs.
D26 is the status LED, which flashes when the board is active.
The following LEDs are lit when the associated hardware output is active:

D28 (also labeled “1”)

D29 (also labeled “2”)

D30 (also labeled “3”)

D31 (also labeled “4”)

D32 (also labeled “5”)

D33 (also labeled “6”)
The 2C board has five LEDs.
D21 is the status LED, which flashes when the board is active.
The following LEDs are lit when the associated hardware output is active:
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
D10 (also labeled “1”)

D14 (also labeled “2”)

D13 (also labeled “3”)

D16 (also labeled “4”)
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
2.19 Software Configurability
Multi-Comm, a user-friendly PC-based program, provides significant configurability
function beyond that of standard or “hard-coded customized” controllers. The PC
program will interface to the controller via the PC’s standard serial, USB, or Ethernet
port and provide full duplication of configuration parameters accessible via optional
display board (i.e. alarms, PID values, set points, etc.) so that the end-user can
configure the entire system at once.
Alternatively, a MODBUS host can be used to configure the controller, as well as to
read process values, status messages, and other information about 2C and 4C
devices. For information about using the MODBUS protocol with 2C and 4C boards,
see Using the MODBUS Protocol with 2C and 4C Controllers.
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3. Hardware Setup and Wiring
3.1
Overview
Before you can use a 2C or 4C board you should set the on-board switches and
jumpers appropriately for your application.

Analog sensor jumper setting and remote excitation voltage settings are
described in 3.2.

The switches that can be used to specify the starting MODBUS address for
a 4C board are described in 3.3. (An optional display board and the Serial
menu or a MODBUS host can be used to set the starting address in either a
2C or a 4C controller.)
You may need to install the communication option card as described in 3.4.
Power wiring diagrams and grounding guidelines are in 3.4.6.
The I/O wiring diagrams are in 3.6.
Instructions for mounting the 2C and 4C boards are in the next chapter.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
3.2
Jumper Settings
3.2.1
Introduction
Jumper settings on the 2C or 4C board must match:

the type of sensor feeding each analog input

the remote excitation voltage
Input jumpers for standard inputs are set at the factory to match the input types you
specified when the controller was ordered. The model number indicates the input
types specified when the controller board was ordered. To determine the inputs
ordered for the controller board in hand, compare the model number on the board’s
serial tag with the model number breakdown in 2.2.
3.2.2
Analog Sensor Jumper Tables
Analog Input 1 — 2C and 4C
Sensor Type
JMP 1
JMP 2
JMP 3
JMP 12
0–1 Vdc
out
out
in
out
0–10 Vdc
out
in
in
out
thermocouple
pins 1 and 2
out
in
out
two-wire RTD
pins 2 and 3
out
in
out
out
out
in
in
JMP 4
JMP 5
JMP 6
JMP 20
0–1 Vdc
out
out
in
out
0–10 Vdc
out
in
in
out
thermocouple
pins 1 and 2
out
in
out
two-wire RTD
pins 2 and 3
out
in
out
out
out
in
in
0–20 mA, 4–20 mA
Analog Input 2 — 2C and 4C
Sensor Type
0–20 mA, 4–20 mA
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Analog Input 3 — 4C only
Sensor Type
JMP 7
JMP 8
JMP 9
JMP 21
0–1 Vdc
out
out
in
out
0–10 Vdc
out
in
in
out
thermocouple
pins 1 and 2
out
in
out
two-wire RTD
pins 2 and 3
out
in
out
out
out
in
in
JMP 10
JMP 11
JMP 13
JMP 22
0–1 Vdc
out
out
in
out
0–10 Vdc
out
in
in
out
thermocouple
pins 1 and 2
out
in
out
two-wire RTD
pins 2 and 3
out
in
out
out
out
in
in
0–20 mA, 4–20 mA
Analog Input 4 — 4C only
Sensor Type
0–20 mA, 4–20 mA
3.2.3
Remote Excitation Voltage Table
Voltage
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2C—JMP 7
4C—JMP 14
2C—JMP 8
4C—JMP 25
20 Vdc
in
out
10 Vdc
out
pins 2 and 3
5 Vdc
out
pins 1 and 2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
3-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
3.3
3.3.1
4C Switch Settings
Introduction
A set of DIP (dual in-line package) switches on the 4C board are used to set up the
controller to use the MODBUS starting address9 stored on the EEPROM or the
switches are used to set the starting MODBUS address for the board.
The location of the 4C DIP switches is shown on the diagram below. Note that the
ON position for each switch is AWAY from the edge of the board.
Power down the controller before changing switch settings.
3.3.2
Restoring Parameter Default Values
If all DIP switches are set to the ON position while the controller is off (no power),
then when the power is turned back on, all parameter values will be set to their
defaults and the message         will be displayed. Cycle power to clear
this message. Re-configure all configuration parameter values, including input type.
A MODBUS host or the Supervisor menu (see 26.5) can also be used to set al
parameter values to their defaults.
Restoring default values using DIP switches, the Supervisor menu, or a MODBUS
host has no effect on stored calibration values, nor on the display board type the
controller is set to use (and the standard button switches on that display board).
9
The MODBUS starting address is the address of the first zone on the card.
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3.3.3
Setting the Starting MODBUS Address
Regardless of the communication option selected, each zone needs a unique
MODBUS address. If you plan to use one-to-one communication between a personal
computer and the 4C controller, you can use the factory setting.
When a standard 2C or 4C board leaves the factory it is set to use the MODBUS
starting address stored on its EEPROM.
By default, Zone 1 has the starting address of 1 (stored in the EEPROM).
(Therefore, Zone 2 is 2; Zone 3 is 3; Zone 4 is 4.
You can use an optional display board and the     menu (or a MODBUS host)
to store a different starting address on the EEPROM. Alternatively, on a 4C you can
use DIP switches 1, 2, and 3 to assign a starting address to the board. (The starting
address on a 2C cannot be set via DIP switches.)
The address change will not take effect until the power to the controller has been
cycled. For your own convenience, we strongly recommend that you use contiguous
numbers for zone addresses on a single board.
The illustration below shows the 4C switch settings for starting addresses 1, 5, 9, 13,
17, 21, and 25.
4C Starting Address Switch Settings
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
3.4
3.4.1
Communication Option Cards
Introduction
Communication option cards are available for the 2C and 4C boards. An option card
can be installed at the factory. However, installing one in the field is easy.
Use the nylon snap-on stand-offs supplied with the option card to install it at the
locations shown in the illustration below.
Install the option card with the controller power off.
When a 2C or 4C board is powered up after a communication option card has been
installed, the card is detected automatically, and the controller automatically begins to
use the new card.
3.4.2
2C Communication Card Mounting Location
The picture below shows a 2C board without an optional communication card
installed.
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The picture below shows a 2C board with an optional communication card installed.
3.4.3
4C Communication Card Mounting Location
The picture below shows a 4C board without an optional communication card
installed.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
The picture below shows a 4C board with an optional communication card installed.
3.4.4
Communication Cards, Wiring, and Setup
ATTENTION: All wiring should be done by an experienced technician and
be installed in accordance with national and local electrical
codes.
3.4.4.1
Introduction
An optional display board, which can be used to configure the controllers, can be
connected to the 2C or 4C board with a ribbon cable. For information about using an
optional display board, see Chapters 15 and 16.
3.4.4.2
Communication Options
Communication options include isolated RS-485, RS-232 or 10/100-baseT Ethernet
or USB.
Protocol: Modbus RTU through serial port or Modbus TCP/IP with10/100-base-T
Ethernet.
3.4.4.3
RS-232 and RS-485 Connections
When connecting communication wiring to the RS 485 or RS-232 option cards, note
the terminal labels on the option board.
Note: RS232 protocol requires three-wire cabling (see diagram below). Grounding
the RS-485 option card is optional (but grounding improves noise rejection). The 4C
board itself may be grounded under some circumstances; see 3.5.2 for grounding
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guidelines.
Each communication option card is isolated. If you ground a communication ground
connect it to the PC ground, NOT the controller chassis ground.
For information about configuring your computer to communicate with a 4C controller,
see 3.4.5.
3.4.4.4
Ethernet and USB Connections
Ethernet and USB communication option cards are equipped with standard
connections. Cable the Ethernet or USB communication option card as you would
any other Ethernet or USB device.
The 2C and 4C controllers see a USB communication option card or an Ethernet
communication option card as a serial port. For information about configuring your
computer to communicate with a 2C or 4C controller via a USB communication card,
see 3.4.5.
For information about configuring your computer to communicate with a 2C or 4C
controller via an Ethernet communication card, see 3.4.6.
3.4.5
Serial Communication Settings
The 2C and 4C default communication settings are:

8 data bits

no parity

1 stop bit
The serial port used to communicate with a 2C or 4C controller must be COM1,
COM2, COM3, or COM4 when Multi-Comm is used. Other software applications
may be able to use other ports.
Use your operating system’s Device Manager to match these settings on the serial
port used to communicate with the 2C and 4C devices.
For example, to set a communication port on a Windows XP machine:
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 Athena Controls, Inc.
3-9
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
1. Open the System Properties window by selecting Start > Control Panel >
System.
2. In the System Properties window, click on the Hardware tab.
3. Open the Device Manage window by clicking on the Device Manager button on
the Hardware tab.
4. Expand the list of ports.
5. Open the port’s Properties window by double-clicking on the name of the port.
6. Click on the Port Settings tab and compare the port settings with 2C/4C defaults.
If necessary, adjust the computer’s port settings.
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7. If the operating system on your computer has not assigned the 2C/4C controller’s
communication card to COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4, access the Advanced
Settings window by clicking the Advanced button in the port’s Properties
window.
In the Advanced Settings window, pick COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4 from the
list of ports, and then click on OK to close the Advanced Settings window.
(Sometimes the operating system indicates that a port is in use when it really is
not. If you are sure that a device is not on the port, you can select a port that is
labeled “in use.”)
8. Save the new settings for the port by clicking on OK in the port’s Properties
window.
3.4.6
Ethernet Settings
The optional Ethernet communication card is set at the factory to use Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol (DHCP).
To configure your computer to use the 2C/4C Ethernet communication option card,
which uses a Lantronix® XPort® embedded Ethernet device server, use the free
DeviceInstaller configuration utility. You can download this utility from the Lantronix
website <http://www.lantronix.com>.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
3.5
Power Wiring and Grounding
If a controller shows signs of having been damaged during shipping, do not
power up or install the controller. Save all packing materials and report any
damage to the carrier immediately.
Caution
When the controller is powered up, the outputs may be activated. Consider
the effects on your process before powering up the controller.
Read the grounding guidelines in this section before grounding a 2C or 4C
board. In some installations, it should not be grounded. If the grounding
guideline scenarios in this manual do not cover your situation, consult the
factory before grounding a 2C or 4C board.
We recommend placing the controller in standby mode until you have
configured the controller for your application.

Instructions for using an optional display board to put the controller in standby
mode are in Chapter 10.

Instructions for using a MODBUS master to put the controller in standby
mode are in Using the MODBUS Protocol with 2C and 4C Controllers
Remove power from the controller before changing DIP switch settings.
3.5.1
Power Wiring
Power supplies must be supplied by the customer. For more information, see 2.15
and 3.5.2.
Do not ground the power supply until you have read 3.5.2.
The power wiring must be connected to the as shown in 3.6.
3.5.2
Grounding Guidelines
3.5.2.1
General Grounding of Controller Board and Power Supplies
Before grounding the controller board, the sensors, or a power supply, read the
following general guidelines. Next, read the subsections below that apply to your
sensor type.

A system can have only one ground point.10

If the sensor is a grounded thermocouple, then that can be the only ground.
(See 3.5.2.2.2 below for guidance when multiple grounded thermocouples
are used.)
10
Optional communication cards are fully isolated; therefore, the grounding point of an RS232 or RS485
communication card (which should be connected to the PC ground, NOT the controller chassis ground) is
NOT considered the grounding point for the system.
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900M231U00A

With ungrounded sensors, grounding the control board (using the provided
grounding lug illustrated below) to the chassis is the best choice. This
should give the best noise performance. If the control board is grounded to
the chassis, then the power supply and all sensors or other analog inputs
MUST be isolated from ground. (See below for additional issues with
powered sensors).
4C grounding lug
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
2C grounding lug

Grounded power supplies: If you use a 24 Vdc power supply to provide
power to the control board (instead of an 18 Vac transformer) and the
negative output of the 24 Vdc power supply must be grounded to the
chassis, then the control board and all sensors of any type MUST be
isolated and float. The board and sensors will be grounded via the control
board’s power supply through the bridge rectifier.
In this scenario the board’s logic ground will be one diode drop (from the
bridge rectifier) negative from the grounded power input pin.
On the model 2C the grounded power input pin is J2 Pin 11. Pin J2 12 is
the fused positive input under this method.
On the model 4C J4 pin 2 is the negative power input. J4 pin 1 is the fused
positive input under this method.
On both the 2C and the 4C boards the sensor ground is one diode drop
positive from the logic ground. This would make the sensor ground and the
power supply ground very close, but since the diodes do not have exactly
the same characteristics, the two diodes (bridge rectifier and analog diode)
do not cancel out perfectly and some difference will remain. If the sensor
did not float, large currents would flow and damage the circuits.

3-14
If the control board is grounded, then the sensor ground is one diode drop
positive with respect to the chassis. Placing the sensor conversion circuit
approximately 0.65 V above ground allows for negative-going sensors (such
as thermocouples) when reading below ambient or for other millivolt bipolar
sensors.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
3.5.2.2
Sensors
3.5.2.2.1
Sensor Grounding and Common Power Supplies for Active
Introduction
The 2C and 4C multizone controllers can be used with grounded sensors under
certain circumstances.
The controller’s analog input circuits have the following features/restrictions.

Each input channel is fully differential, with a jumper available for
connecting the negative differential input to analog signal ground.

Analog signal ground is one diode drop ABOVE board ground.

The analog process input types are unipolar. The maximum input range is
0.0 Vdc to +1.0 Vdc if the 10:1 jumpers are NOT used. If the 0–10 V
jumpers ARE used, the maximum allowable input range is 0.0 Vdc to +10.00
Vdc. See 3.2.2 for analog input jumper tables.

The maximum allowable common-mode input voltage is –0.200 mVdc to
+2.50 Vdc.

The analog input is bipolar only when selecting the thermocouple input type.
3.5.2.2.2
Grounded Thermocouples
When grounded thermocouples are required, special care must be taken.
1. First measure both the ac and dc voltage between the ground at control board
mounting location (chassis ground) and each sensor mounting location.
2. The voltages cannot be greater than 50 mV ac or dc.
3. The grounding lug on the control board cannot be used.
4. The output of the 24 Vdc power supply or the transformer 18 Vac secondary
powering the controller board cannot be grounded. All grounding will be through
the sensor attachment itself. You must ensure that this method of grounding
meets all safety requirements.
5. For each controller select one and only one of the thermocouples and make sure
the ground shunt for that channel is in place. Remove the ground shunts from all
other grounded thermocouples connected to this controller board.
3.5.2.2.3
Powered Sensors Overview
Powered sensors typically come in three formats: two-wire, three-wire and four-wire.
When deciding how to power these sensors, please refer to the guidelines below.

Sensors can be powered by the on-board excitation power supply, or
powered by a separate isolated floating power supply.

The on-board sensor supply can be configured for +5 Vdc, +10 Vdc and +20
Vdc.

The return for this supply is the analog sensor ground.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide

The load capacity for this supply is dependent on the compliance voltage for
which it is set.

When the on-board excitation power supply is used, typically, only one
0–20ma type sensor can be powered because of the current limit of the on
board supply. In contrast, multiple voltage-out sensors can be powered from
the on-board supply up to the current limit of the compliance voltage
selected.

All sensors must comply with the input voltage limitations, including the
sensor compliance voltage limitation.
3.5.2.2.4
Two-Wire Sensor
Two-wire sensors are usually a 20 milliamp type.
If powered by the on-board excitation supply, connect the plus sensor terminal to the
remote excitation position in the analog connector. Connect the negative terminal to
the plus position of the sensor channel. The negative position is not used. The
sensor current is returned via the grounding jumper for that sensor channel.
3.5.2.2.5
Three-Wire Sensor with Voltage Output
The output signal for a three-wire sensor with voltage output must be ground
referenced or the output signal common mode level must be below 2.5 Vdc and the
max signal level, plus common mode level cannot exceed 4 Vdc. All limitations listed
in 3.5.2.1 must be considered and requirement in that subsection must be met. It is
important to check with the sensor manufacture for sensor circuit design. Using a
fully isolated power supply for the sensor may be a better option than using the onboard excitation supply.
3.5.2.2.6
Three-Wire Sensor with Current Output
The output signal of a three-wire sensor with current output must be ground
referenced. Therefore, they cannot be powered by the on-board power supply. This is
rarely true with current-output three-wire sensors. All limitations listed above must be
met. In most cases, a fully isolated power supply for the sensor will be required.
3.5.2.2.7
Four-Wire Sensors
The output signal of four-wire sensors must be ground referenced if powered by the
on board supply. All limitations listed in 3.5.2.1 must be met. Bridge-type sensors and
voltage-type sensors can sometimes use the on-board excitation power supply. It is
important to meet the common mode and max signal level voltage requirement. This
may mean using a lower compliance voltage. Four-wire current sensors will always
require a fully isolated power supply.
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3.6
I/O Wiring
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
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4. Mounting 2C and 4C Boards
4.1
Choosing a Location
The 2C and 4C controller boards are designed to be easily mounted in almost any
enclosure.
See 2.9 for operating ambient temperature.
When choosing a location, do remember that switches and jumpers on the top side of
the board must be accessible during 2C and 4C setup.
You must maintain at least 0.250 inch clearance between a 2C or 4C board and a
conductive surface.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
4.2
2C Mounting Dimensions
The 2C mounting dimensions are shown below.
The mounting holes are sized for US #6 machine screws.
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Hardware and Installation – Mounting 2C and 4C Boards
4.3
4C Mounting Dimensions
The 4C mounting dimensions are shown below.
The mounting holes are sized for US #6 machine screws.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
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Section B – Multi-Comm Installation and Use
This section contains information about:

introduction to Multi-Comm – see page 5-1

installing the software and logging in – see page 6-1

establishing communication with controllers – see page 7-1

configuring local alarms – see page 8-1

viewing process values and changing setpoint – see page 9-1

changing controller mode and using Autotune – see page 10-1

viewing and changing controller configuration parameters – see
page 11-1

configuring and running ramp and soak recipes – see page 12-1

storing and loading controller configurations – see page 13-1

logging PV and SP values – see page 14-1
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
 Athena Controls, Inc.
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5. Introduction to Multi-Comm
5.1
Features
5.1.1
Transforms a PC into an Operator Station
Multi-Comm software makes it easy for operators to use a personal computer to
monitor networked controllers. Linked to the controllers by an RS-485 network, the
PC can be used to read process values, change setpoints and other parameters,
change controller mode, and monitor for alarms.11 Multi-Comm is also ideal for
quickly configuring a single controller in a lab or service department, using the
controller’s RS-232 or USB communication option.
The Multi-Comm application uses the MODBUS protocol to communicate with 2C
and 4C devices. All the configuration parameter values stored in non-volatile
memory in 2C and 4C devices can be saved to the PC for backup, and loaded to the
same or different controllers.
11
Up to 32 controllers can be included on an RS-485 network without using a network repeater device.
The Multi-Comm software can address up to 254 controllers.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
5.1.2
Graphical Interface
The Multi-Comm software uses a graphical user interface and familiar point-and-click
techniques. The main Multi-Comm display shows a virtual front panel for each zone
in the 2C and 4C devices networked to the computer. This virtual front panel shows
PV and SP.
The Multi-Comm system can be set up to show all zones on the networked 2C and
4C devices on a single display, or only selected zones. Any message that can be
displayed on a 2C or 4C optional display board will also be shown on the Multi-Comm
display. Operators can see at a glance if a controller is in standby or other special
mode, and if the controller detects a problem, such as an open sensor.
Double-clicking (left button) on any zone in the main display will call up a display of
all the parameters for that zone A right-click on a zone displays the form used to
change its setpoint. A left-click on a zone selects the zone for functions on the
Controller menu. Many additional functions are accessible using the other MultiComm menus.
A “text only” view is available for operators who prefer to see zone setpoints and
process variables in list form. A left-click on a zone in the list selects the zone for
functions on the Controller menu.
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Multi-Comm – Introduction
5.1.3
Automated Ramp and Soak Cycles
Use the Multi-Comm Ramp and Soak function to configure any number of recipes
consisting of any number of ramp and soak steps. These recipes are stored on the
Multi-Comm computer. Under the direction of Multi-Comm, any zone on a networked
controller can execute your choice of recipe.
The Multi-Comm displays also provide a quick way to configure and run recipes that
use the controller’s own recipe parameters.
5.1.4
Logging
The Multi-Comm application supports optional logging of SP and PV for all zones at
configurable intervals. Logs are saved in ASCII text files with comma-separatedvalue format. These files can be viewed, printed, and manipulated with other
applications, such as word processing and spreadsheet software.
5.1.5
Storing and Loading Configuration Parameter Sets
All the zone configuration parameter values stored in non-volatile memory in a
controller can be saved to the PC, and loaded to the same or different zones.
Backing up a unique controller configuration on a PC is always prudent. If a
controller is damaged later and must be replaced, its custom configuration can be
loaded quickly to a spare controller, minimizing down time. (If the 2C and 4C device
was configured to support multiple zones, each zone’s configuration must be saved
separately.)
In large installations where many zones use the same (or almost the same)
configuration, its easy to configure one zone using the Multi-Comm display, save the
parameter set to the PC, then load the same parameter set to many other zones on
the networked controllers.
Multi-Comm can change the values of all those parameters that can be changed
using the optional display board (that is, all the parameters described in Section D).
To change other parameters, use a MODBUS host.
The ability to store and load a zone configuration also enables you to reuse tuning
parameter values that have proved to be best for certain process conditions. If the
responsiveness of your process is altered at times, you may find it desirable to save
sets of tuning parameters to be used under different circumstances.
For example, if you autotune a zone for optimum control of the temperature of an
engraving cylinder while one size is in use, save the parameter set before installing a
larger or smaller cylinder. The different size cylinder may heat at a different rate,
requiring different tuning parameters to be used for optimum control. Save the new
tuning as a parameter set with a different name. When the day comes that you have
to reinstall the first cylinder, reload the parameter set, including the tuning parameters
that were optimized for that cylinder.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
5.1.6
Alarm Annunciation
If a zone is in alarm, the A1 or A2 indicator on the zone’s “front panel” on the main
display will appear to be lit (red). The process value on the Multi-Comm graphic
display will also change color from magenta (normal) to red (alarm).
As a bonus, the Multi-Comm supports “local alarms”. These two process alarms can
be configured in Multi-Comm for each zone on the networked 2C and 4C devices. If
a controller’s PV exceeds (high alarm) or falls below (low alarm) the configured local
alarm limit, the alarm indicators on the main graphic display will “light” and the PV will
change to red.
5.2
Computer Hardware and Software Requirements
The computer used to run the Multi-Comm software must meet the following
requirements:
5-4

Pentium class processor

CD drive (if you plan to install from a CD)

256 MB RAM memory

at least 20 MB free disk space on hard drive

a port available for communication with one or more 2C and 4C boards; this
port must be compartible with the communication option card installed on the
controller board; see 3.4.4 for more information

Windows XP Pro SP 2 operating system; consult us for compatibility with older
operating systems
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900M231U00A
Multi-Comm – Introduction
5.3
Overview of Setup Tasks for Multi-Comm
The following tasks must be performed in this sequence to use the Multi-Comm
application successfully with an RS-485 network. The same basic process applies to
using the Multi-Comm application to communicate with a single controller over an
RS-232 or USB link. In the case of RS-232 or USB links, the “network” consists of
only the controller and the PC.
Step
Task
Subsection
in this
Guide
1
Use the default starting MODBUS address stored on the EEPROM,
which is address 1, or use an optional display board or a MODBUS host
to change the address. (The 4C board also has DIP switches that can
be used for this purpose.)
3.3.2
2
Connect the controllers and personal computer to the network.
3.4.4
3
Power up the controllers.
----
4
Install the Multi-Comm software and log in.
6.1
5
Change the password on the default account “MULTI” (not required, but
strongly recommended).
6.4
6
Set up operator accounts and assign passwords.
6.5
7
Configure the Multi-Comm communication parameters and port
selection. (The Multi-Comm communication settings will override, but
not change, the operating system settings for the selected port on your
PC.)
7.2
8
Use the Multi-Comm software to recognize each controller on the
network automatically.
7.4
9
Name the controllers (optional, but recommended). By default, each
controller’s name will be its zone address.
7.6
10
Save the .MCS (Multi-Comm system) file so that the process of
recognizing the controllers does not have to be repeated if Multi-Comm
is restarted.
7.7
14
Set up alarms (optional).
8
At this point you are ready to configure new controllers, or to begin monitoring process
variables with the Multi-Comm computer.
To change setpoints, see Chapter 9.
To change controller mode, including use of Autotune, see Chapter 10.
To view and change controller configuration parameters, see Chapter 11.
To configure and run ramp/soak recipes, see Chapter 12.
To save and load controller configuration parameter sets, see Chapter 13.
To log PV and SP values, see Chapter 14.
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5.4
Overview of Multi-Comm Menus
5.4.1
Availability of Functions
The following tables provide an overview of the functions available on the MultiComm menus. Not all functions are available all the time. If a function is not
available, its name is displayed on the Multi-Comm window in gray instead of black.
If a keyboard shortcut is available for a function, the shortcut appears on the menu to
the right of the function name.
File Menu
Function
New
Purpose
---
Start a new Multi-Comm Setup (.MCS) file . This function can
also be invoked using the
Open
Described
12
button on the toolbar.
13
---
Open an existing Multi-Comm Setup (.MCS) file. This function
can also be invoked using the
button on the toolbar.
Close
Close the Multi-Comm Setup (.MCS) file open now.
7.8
Save
Save the Multi-Comm Setup (.MCS) file open now using the
same file name. This function can also be invoked using the
7.7
button on the toolbar.
Save As
Save the Multi-Comm Setup (.MCS) file open now to a file with
a different name.
6.3
Login
Log into the Multi-Comm application.
6.8
Logout
Log out of the Multi-Comm application without closing the
application.
Recent File
Once you have saved your Multi-Comm setup to an .MCS file,
this placeholder will be replaced by the name of the most
recently used .MCS file. Up to four additional file names will
appear on this menu.
--
Exit
Exit the Multi-Comm application. If you have not saved the
current setup to an .MCS file, you will be prompted to save
before the application is closed.
---
12
The contents of the .MCS file determine what controllers appear on the main display. The ability to
create, save, and open a variety of .MCS files enables you to create displays that do not include all the
controllers on the network hosted by the PC. For example, if Operator A is interested only in Controllers
1, 2, and 9, you can create an .MCS file that would cause the Multi-Comm display to show only those
controllers when Operator A uses that file. Operator B could use a different .MCS file to see a different
custom display, one containing only Controllers 3, 4, 6, and 9, for example.
13
5-6
If the Multi-Comm toolbar is not visible, use the View menu’s Toolbar item to display the toolbar.
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Multi-Comm – Introduction
Edit Menu
Function
Purpose
Described
Password
Enables operators to change their own passwords.
---
Operators
Allows “Super Users” (Multi-Comm Administrators) to set up
operator login accounts and specify what Multi-Comm
features each operator will be allowed to use.
6.5
View Menu
Function
Purpose
Described
Graphic
Display images of zone “front panels” on main Multi-Comm
display.
--
Text
Display a list of zones, their setpoints, and process variables
on the main Multi-Comm display.
--
Toolbar
Turn on and turn off display of Multi-Comm toolbar.
--
Status Bar
Turn on and turn off display of Multi-Comm status bar at the
bottom of the window. The right side of this status bar shows
what address number is being checked when the Option
menu “Start Find Controllers” function is used. During normal
operation the left side of the status bar displays the name of
the zone that the Multi-Comm software is polling.
--
Controller Menu
Before you can use a function marked with an asterisk (*) below, you must select a
controller on the main graphic display (or text view) by using the left button to click
on the controller’s image (or name in text view).
Function
Purpose
Described
Add *
Establish communication with a single controller. To use
this function you must know the controller’s network
address.
Delete *
Sever communication with a single controller. Once this
function has been used and the .MCS file saved, the MultiComm computer will not be able to communicate with the
controller until you use the Add function on this menu, or the
Start Find Controllers function on the Options menu.
7.5
Delete All
Sever communication with all controllers. Once this function
has been used and the .MCS file saved, the Multi-Comm
computer will not be able to communicate with the
controllers until you use the Add function on this menu, or
the Start Find Controllers function on the Options menu.
---
Select All
Select all zones in the controller.
--
Unselect All
Unselect all zones in the controller.
--
Configure *
Access the window used to change the name or network
address of a controller with which the Multi-Comm computer
can communicate.
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7.4.3
7.6
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Controller Menu
Before you can use a function marked with an asterisk (*) below, you must select a
controller on the main graphic display (or text view) by using the left button to click
on the controller’s image (or name in text view).
Function
Purpose
Described
Alarms*
Configure the alarms.
8
Graph*
Display a graph showing the controller’s SP and PV in realtime.
9.3
Setpoint*
Access the window used to change the controller’s setpoint.
9.4
Parameters*
Access the window used to view and change the controller’s
configuration parameters. A shortcut for accessing the
parameter display is double-clicking (left button) on the
controller on main graphic display.
11
Standby*
Place the controller in Standby mode. The PV for the
controller in Standby will alternate with the display of “StbY”.
This item will be checked on the menu when accessed after
selecting a controller in Standby mode.
10
Manual
Control*
Place the controller in Manual mode. The PV for the
controller in Manual will alternate with the display of “FOP”
(fixed output percent). This item will be checked on the
menu when accessed after selecting a controller in Manual
mode.
10
Auto tune*
Place the controller in Autotune mode. The PV for the
controller in Autotune will alternate with the display of “Atun”.
This item will be checked on the menu when accessed after
selecting a controller in Autotune mode. Before putting a
controller in Autotune mode, be sure to read Chapter 29.
Autotune will not work correctly unless you prepare the
process and the controller as described in that chapter.
10
Start Recipe*
The functionality of this item depends on how the controller
is configured (for multi-step ramp, single-step ramp, or
ramping disabled).
12.5
If a multi-step ramp and soak recipe based on parameter
values stored in the controller has been configured and
enabled use, Start Recipe to run that multi-step ramp and
soak recipe.
If the single-step ramp to setpoint function has been
enabled, use Start Recipe to ramp the current process
variable to the current setpoint over the time period specified
using the appropriate parameter.
If the single-step ramp to setpoint function has been
disabled, use Start Recipe to ramp the current process
variable to the current setpoint, which always occurs at
startup. However, if ramping is set to “disabled”, then a
confirmation message is displayed before the PV is ramped
using the default ramp time, one minute.
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Multi-Comm – Introduction
Options Menu
Before you can use a function marked with an asterisk (*) below, you must select a
controller on the main graphic display (or text view) by using the left button to click on the
controller’s image (or name in text view).
Function
Purpose
Described
Communications
Access the window used to specify PC port and
communication parameters to be used by the Multi-Comm
software. These parameters will override (but not
change) the communication settings in your operating
system for the selected port.
7.2
Logging
[Stop Logging]
Access the window used to specify the time interval at
which PV and SP for all controllers should be written to a
log file, name the file, and turn on logging. When logging
is active, this menu item becomes Stop Logging.
14
Start Find Controllers
[Stop Find
Controllers]
Start the process used by the Multi-Comm software to poll
each possible address on the network to see if there is a
controller at that address. When this process is active,
this menu item becomes Stop Find Controllers. The
alternative to using this automatic process to enable the
Multi-Comm computer to recognize controllers is to
recognize controllers one at a time using the Controller
menu Add function.
7.4.2
Get Software Version*
Display the version of the firmware on the selected
controller.
---
Ramp/Soak Menu
Function
Purpose
Described
New
Access the window used to begin the process of
configuring a new ramp and soak recipe to be executed
under the direction of Multi-Comm.
12.2.1
Edit
Access the window used to select an existing recipe (on
any accessible drive) for edit.
12.2.2
Run
Access the window used to select an existing recipe to
run on one or more controllers.
12.3.1
Hold
Access the window used to hold (pause) execution of an
active (running) recipe on one or more controllers. While
a controller is in hold, its setpoint will not be changed.
12.3.2
Resume
Access the window used to resume (continue) execution
of a “held” recipe in one or more controllers.
12.3.3
Stop
Access the window used to stop (terminate) the execution
of an active or “held” recipe in one or more controllers.
12.3.4
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Help Menu
Function
About Multi-Comm
5-10
Purpose
Described
Access Multi-Comm version information. If you phone for
technical support, be ready to supply this number.
--
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900M231U00A
6. Installing the Multi-Comm Software
and Logging In
6.1
Installing the Software
The Multi-Comm software is available on CD or as a download from our Web site.
To install the software:
1. Open Windows Explorer.
2. Create a directory for Multi-Comm. Multi-Comm will run from this directory.
3. Put the Multi-Comm CD in the drive.
4. Copy the Multi-Comm files from the CD to the directory you created in step 2.
6.2
Starting the Software
To start Multi-Comm:
1. In Windows Explorer open the directory to which you copied the Multi-Comm
files.
2. Double-click on the name of the file “Multicom.exe”. The Multi-Comm application
will open.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
6.3
Logging In to Multi-Comm Using the Default Account
When you start the Multi-Comm application, the Operator Login Window will be
displayed.
By default, newly installed Multi-Comm software will be set up to recognize one login
account. This is user “MULTI”. The password is “COMM”.
To log in:
1. Start the Multi-Comm application.
2. Select File > Login. The Operator Login window will be displayed.
3. Click on the User Id text entry box and type in MULTI. Multi-Comm user names
and passwords are case-sensitive. This means that capitalization matters. To
the software “MULTI”, “multi”, and “Multi” are all different names.
4. Tab to the Password entry box or click on it. Type in COMM.
5. Click on OK. The Multi-Comm window will open. Because the software was
newly installed, the main display will be blank. In the future, once communication
has been established with controllers, and the controller identities saved as a
Multi-Comm system file, logging in will result in the display of the controllers in
the most recently used .MCS file.
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Multi-Comm – Installing the Software and Logging In
6.4
Changing the Password for the Default Account
The default account, MULTI, has permission to do everything, including create and
delete other user accounts. Therefore, it is a good idea to immediately change the
password for the MULTI account from COMM to something unique to your
installation. Remember the new password. If you forget it before you create another
account with “Super User” permissions, you will not be able to add operator accounts
without reinstalling the software.
The MULTI account cannot be deleted, nor can its permissions be changed.
To change the password:
1. Select Edit > Password. The window used to change the password will open.
2. Type the old password COMM in the box provided.
3. Type the new password in the box provided.
4. Click on OK. The new password will be saved.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
6.5
Setting Up Operator Accounts
At most sites, operators will not need permission to use all Multi-Comm functions,
particularly the ability to create and delete other users’ accounts. Therefore, it is a
good idea for the Multi-Comm system administrator (the person who knows the
password to the MULTI account) to create login accounts for operators.
6.5.1
Permissions Available
The Multi-Comm system supports several permission classes. To see these classes,
take a look at the definition of the MULTI account.
To see the permissions available to a user account:
1. Select Edit > Operators. The Operator Setup window will open.
2. MULTI is already selected because it is the only login account. After you add
operator user IDs, those will also appear on this list. Click on Edit. After the
display of a message reminding you that only the MULTI password can be
changed, the Operator window will be displayed.
This window shows the definition of the Multi account. All the Access Privileges
boxes are checked, indicating that the user MULTI can do everything. The
permissions assigned to MULTI cannot be changed.
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Multi-Comm – Installing the Software and Logging In
The access privilege categories grant the following permissions.
Change Setpoint
Change the setpoint using the Change Setpoint
window, change the controller mode, and run
ramp/soak recipes under the direction of Multi-Comm
or under the direction of the controller.
View/Change Parameters
Use the Multi-Comm parameter window to view and
change the parameters stored in the controllers’ nonvolatile memory.
Controller Configuration
Super User
6.5.2
Add and delete controllers from the Multi-Comm
system.
Add and delete user accounts (operator login IDs).
Procedure
To add an operator login account:
1. While logged in as MULTI, select Edit > Operators. The Operator Setup window
will open.
2. Click on New. The Operator window used to define a new login account will be
displayed.
3. Enter the new User ID (0 to 10 letters and/or numbers).
4. Enter a password (optional, but recommended).
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5. Click on the check box for each set of access privileges you want the user to
have. “Super User” does not automatically include all the other privileges.
6. If you change your mind and want to clear a checked box, click on it again to
“erase” the check.
7. When you are satisfied with the user definition, click on OK . The window will be
closed and the user definition will be saved in a .DAT file in the directory where
the Multi-Comm software was installed.
6.6
Editing an Operator Account
To edit an operator login account, use Edit > Operators to access the Operator
Setup window, select the operator, and then change the password, and view and
change privileges. You must be logged in as MULTI or another user with Super User
privileges.
6.7
Deleting an Operator Account
To delete an operator login account, use Edit > Operators to access the Operator
Setup window, select the operator, and then click on Delete. You must be logged in
as MULTI or another user with Super User privileges.
6.8
Logging Out of the Multi-Comm Application
To log out but leave the Multi-Comm application open, use File > Logout.
To log out and close the Multi-Comm application, use File > Exit.
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900M231U00A
7. Establishing Communication with
Controllers
7.1
Introduction
Once you have connected the controllers and the computer to the network, installed
the Multi-Comm software, and changed the password on the MULTI login account,
you are ready to establish communication between the Multi-Comm computer and
the controllers on the network.
You must do the following tasks.
14

Use the default starting MODBUS address (which is 1), or assign a starting
MODBUS address to each controller; see 3.3.

Use the Communications option on the Multi-Comm Options menu to
specify the COM port to be used by the Multi-Com software. If you choose
not to use the automatic “find controllers” feature described in 7.4.2 to set
up your network, then you must also specify the baud rate to be used by the
Multi-Comm software.14 Configuration of communication parameters is
described in 7.3.

Make the Multi-Comm system aware of all devices on the network as
described in 7.4. This can be done using the automatic “find controllers”
operation, in which the Multi-Comm system seeks and finds the controllers
using the default baud rate. Alternatively, you can add controllers to the
network one at a time. If you use this manual method, then the software will
poll at the baud rate specified in the Multi-Comm Communications Setup
window.

Save the set up as an .MCS file as described in 7.7.
If you do use the “find controllers” function, the Multi-Comm software will automatically use 9600 baud.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
7.2 Configuring Communication Parameters and Assigning
Network Addresses in Controllers
7.2.1
Communication Parameters
The Multi-Comm software is designed to recognize 2C and 4C devices using the 2C
and 4C default communication parameter settings: 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit.
7-2

The network baud rate will be 9600 if you do use the automatic “find controllers”
function.

The network baud rate will be determined by the rate you configure for the MultiComm software if you do not use the automatic “find controller’s function”.
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Multi-Comm – Establishing Communication with Controllers
7.2.2
Network Addresses
All standard 2C and 4C boards leave the factory set to use the MODBUS starting
address stored on its EEPROM. The default starting address is 1.
A 2C controller board always uses the MODBUS starting address stored on its
EEPROM. You can use an optional display board and the     menu to assign a
different starting address to the board; see 28.1.2. DIP switches on a 4C board can
also be used to assign a different MODBUS starting address for each controller; see
3.3.3. (A MODBUS host can also be used to change the starting address stored on
the 2C or 4C EEPROM; see Using the MODBUS Protocol with 2C and 4C
Controllers.)
If you will have fewer than 254 controllers on the network and plan to use the MultiComm function of automatically detecting devices on the network, use the lowest
address numbers first. The software will begin polling with address 1 and proceed up
to 254 unless you stop the polling process. You can save time getting your network
up and running if you stop the process once you know the Multi-Comm system has
found the controller with the highest address number you have assigned.
Assign the addresses and go on to the next subsection.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
7.3 Configuring Communication Parameters for Multi-Comm
System
Your goal is to select the COM port to be used by the Multi-Comm software. For
information about using the computer’s operating system tools to configure this port,
see 3.4.4.4.

If you do not plan to use the automatic “find controllers” option, then you can also
specify a baud rate other than 9600 (the default) for the network.

If you do use the automatic “find controllers” feature, then the software will use
9600 baud, regardless of the baud rate specified using the Communications
Setup window shown below.
The other communication parameters must match the 2C/4C default controller
settings: 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit, which are also the Multi-Comm defaults.
To configure the Multi-Comm communication settings:
1. Launch the Multi-Comm application as described in 6.2 and log in as MULTI.
2. Select Options > Communication. The Communications Setup window will
open.
3. Use the Connector dropdown list to pick the port to be used to communicate with
the controllers. Select the port you set up as described in 3.4.4.4.
4. If you do not plan to use the automatic “find controllers” option, use the Baud
Rate dropdown list to set the baud rate at which you want the network to operate,
usually 9600.
5. If the Multi-Comm communication settings were changed from the defaults, use
the Data Format dropdown list to set n,8,1.
6. If necessary, change the Polling Frequency from the default value. The Polling
Frequency is the minimum number of milliseconds in the interval between the
Multi-Comm system receiving a reply from one controller and the system trying to
communicate with the next controller.
7. If necessary, change the Timeout from the default value. The Timeout is the
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Multi-Comm – Establishing Communication with Controllers
number of milliseconds the Multi-Comm system will wait to receive a reply from a
controller before giving up and moving on to the next controller.
8. When the settings are correct, click on OK to save the settings and close the
window.
7.4
Recognizing Controllers with the Multi-Comm Software
7.4.1
Introduction
After you have assigned a unique starting address to each controller and set the
Multi-Comm computer to use the desired COM port, you are ready to enable the
Multi-Comm software to recognize the controllers.
7.4.2
Automatically Using the Find Controllers Option
The Multi-Comm “find controllers” option polls each address, beginning at 1 and
continuing until it has polled address 254, unless you stop the process using the
Options menu. During the “find controllers” process, the Multi-Comm software polls
every address at 9600 baud
To use the automatic function:
1. Make sure all the controllers are powered up.
2. While you are logged in as MULTI (or another user with Controller Configuration
Privileges) select Options > Start Find Controllers. The process will begin.
3. You will be able to monitor the progress of the operation. A message in the
status bar (lower right corner of the main Multi-Comm window), will be displayed:
“Checking for a controller at IDn”. 15
4. As each controller is found, a virtual faceplate for each zone in the controller will
appear in the main Multi-Comm window. By default the name of the controller
will be the same as its address number. You can give each controller a different
name later (see 4.6).
5. When you see that the controller with the highest address number you assigned
has been recognized (appears on the main display), you can stop the process
using Options >Stop Find Controllers.
6. After the find controller function has been completed or has been stopped as
described in Step 6, the Multi-Comm software will begin normal operation at
9600 baud, polling the controllers and displaying their PV and SP values.
15
If the Multi-Comm status bar is not visible, use the View menu’s Status Bar item to display the status
bar.
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If any controllers were not recognized:
a) they were not powered up during the “find controllers” operation,
or
b) their communication settings were not set to the defaults or to 9600 baud, 8 data
bits, no parity, 1 stop bit.
or
c) the network has not been wired correctly.
Begin by checking (a), then (b). If neither is the problem, check (c). Once the
problem has been fixed, add the unrecognized controllers manually as described in
7.4.3.
After adding the missing controllers, save the Multi-Comm Setup file as described in
7.7.
A “text only” view is available for operators who prefer to see the controller setpoints
and process variables in list form. To access the text only view, select View >
Text.
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To return to the graphic view, select View > Graphic. When the instructions in this
manual refer to the “main Multi-Comm window”, that means the graphic view.
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7.4.3
Manually Using the Controller Menu
When you use the automatic detection function, all controllers found are displayed.
When you save the .MCS file, information about all the controllers will be saved.
Depending on your application, you may want some operators to be able to see only
a subset of the controllers on the network. To do this, you must use the manual
process described here to add the controllers you want Operator A to see, save the
configuration to an .MCS file, then start again, adding controllers to create a new
different .MCS file for the use of Operator B.
This manual process can also be used to establish communications between the
Multi-Comm computer and a controller that was added to the network after the
automatic process was used.
To add a controller manually:
1. Make sure the controller is powered up.
2. Make sure the Multi-Comm application is set to use the controller defaults for
communication parameters: 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit, 9600 baud.
3. While you are logged in as MULTI (or another user with Controller Configuration
Privileges) select Controller > Add. The Add Controller window will be
displayed.
4. Type in the network ID assigned to the controller. This must match the MODBUS
starting address stored in the controller.
5. Type in an optional name to be associated with this controller on Multi-Comm
displays. If no name is entered, the system will use the controller’s address as
its name.
6. Click on OK. The Multi-Comm computer will poll for a controller at that address
and the Add Controller window will close.
If a controller is found at that address, it will appear in the main Multi-Comm
window.
If no controller is found at that address or a controller has already been
recognized by the Multi-Comm software at that address, a message will be
displayed.
Repeat the process for other controllers as needed.
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7.5
Deleting a Zone
Any zone can be deleted from the Multi-Comm setup, regardless of whether the
controller containing the zone was added using the automatic process or the manual
method.
To delete a zone:
1. While you are logged in as MULTI (or another user with Controller Configuration
Privileges) select the zone to be deleted by clicking on its faceplate image (left
button) on the graphic display. The border of the zone image will be highlighted.
2. Select Controller > Delete. The zone will be deleted without any confirmation
message. However, if you have already saved the setup to a .MCS file as
described in 4.8, the controller will not be removed from the file until you save
again.
If you change your mind about deleting the zone, add it again using the manual
method. Alternatively, close the .MCS file without saving so that the file is not
changed to reflect the deletion, and then reopen the file. The zone will still be
part of the setup, because you did not save the file after you deleted the zone.
7.6
Naming Controllers
By default, the Multi-Comm displays use a zone’s address as its name. However,
you can assign a more meaningful name to each zone. This can be done during the
manual addition process described in 4.4.3. You can also assign a name (or change
the assigned name) of any zone using the Controller > Configure menu function. A
name may contain up to twenty letters, numbers, spaces, and special characters.
The Controller Configuration window can also be used to change the network ID of a
zone. If you do change the address in the controller’s memory using the Multi-Comm
system, the system will not be able to communicate with the zone again until you use
the procedure described in 4.4.3 to add the zone to the system using the device’s
new ID.
7.7
Saving the .MCS File
It is very important that you save your Multi-Comm setup in a Multi-Comm Setup
(.MCS) file. The contents of the .MCS file determine what controllers appear on the
main display.
The ability to create, save, and open a variety of .MCS files enables you to create
displays that do not include all the controllers on the network hosted by the PC. For
example, if Operator A is interested only in Controllers 1, 2, and 9, you can create an
.MCS file that would cause the Multi-Comm display to show only those controllers
when Operator A uses that file. Operator B could use a different .MCS file to see a
different custom display, one containing only Controllers 3, 4, 6, and 9, for example.
If you do not save your setup to an .MCS file, then the next time you start the MultiComm application you will have to repeat the recognition process. (If you try to close
the Multi-Comm software using File > Exit or double-clicking on the X at the top right
of the main Multi-Comm window, you will be prompted to save.)
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To save the setup to the .MCS file now open (named at the top of the main MultiComm window), use File > Save (or the
will be saved to the open file.
button on the toolbar). The configuration
To save the setup to an .MCS file with a new name, use File > Save As. The
operating system Save As window will open. Use it to specify the destination
directory and file name for the .MCS file. The portion of the file name before the
“.MCS” can have a maximum of eight characters.
7.8
Closing an .MCS File
To close an .MCS file, use File > Close. Before the file is closed you will be
prompted to save it if you have added any controllers or changed any controller
names since the file was last saved.
7.9
Creating a New .MCS File
To create a new .MCS file, use File > New (or the
button on the toolbar). The
open .MCS file will be closed and the main display cleared. You can now add
controllers for a new Multi-Comm setup.
7.10 Opening an Existing .MCS File
To open a different .MCS file, use File > Open (or
button on the toolbar). The
operating system Open window will be displayed. Use it to select the .MCS file to
open.
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8. Configuring Alarms
8.1
Introduction
The Multi-Comm system can read the alarm state of any 2C/4C device. Therefore, if
a 2C/4C device’s alarm parameters have been configured and the controller has
detected an alarm condition, the A1 or A2 indicator on the zone’s “front panel” on the
Multi-Comm main display will appear to be lit (red). The process value on the MultiComm graphic display will also change color from magenta (normal) to red (alarm).
Controller alarm parameter values can be changed using the Multi-Comm software
using the procedure described in Chapter 7.
As a bonus, the Multi-Comm supports “local alarms”. These two process alarms can
be configured in Multi-Comm for each zone on the network. If a zone’s PV exceeds
(high alarm) or falls below (low alarm) the configured local alarm limit, the alarm
indicators on the main display will “light” and the PV will change to red. Local alarms
are configured using the procedure described below.
8.2
Procedure
To configure local process alarms:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with Controller Configuration
privileges), select the zone.
2. With the zone selected, select Controller > Alarms. The Local Alarms window
will open.
3. To enable local process alarm 1 (signaled using the controller image’s A1
indicator on the main display), click on the box to the left of Process High.
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4. To enable local process alarm 2 (signaled using the A2 indicator on the MultiComm display), click on the box to the left of Process Low.
5. Type in the alarm limit for each alarm.
6. Click on OK to save the changes and close the window.
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9. Viewing Process Values and
Changing Setpoint
9.1
Introduction
For your convenience, the Multi-Comm system provides several ways to view
process variable and setpoint as described in this chapter.
Any operator whose login account is configured with the appropriate privilege can
use the Multi-Comm system to change a controller’s setpoint as described in this
chapter. (Instructions for changing the setpoint using ramp and soak recipes are in
12.3.)
A 4C device can use the single step Ramp to Setpoint function at times other than at
startup. The Multi-Comm system provides a method to start the timer on the ramp to
setpoint as described in this chapter.
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9.2
Viewing PV and SP in the Main Window
In the main window the Multi-Comm system always displays process value and
setpoint for every zone in every controller in the .MCS file. The refresh rate is
dependent on baud rate, the number of controllers on the network, and the
configured polling frequency and timeout (see 7.3).
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9.3
Viewing PV and SP in a Graph
The Multi-Comm system allows operators to display a trend graph showing any
zone’s SP and PV in real time.
To view the real-time trend graph:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with Controller Configuration
privileges), select the zone by clicking on its faceplate image in the main graphic
display. The border of the zone image will be highlighted.
2. Select Controller > Graph. The trend graph will be displayed.
Initially the graph will not show any trend tracings. However, as soon as the selected
zone is polled by the Multi-Comm system, trend tracings will begin to be drawn. As
long as the Graph Window remains open, the trend tracings will be updated.
To close the Graph Window, double-click on the X in the top right corner.
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9.4
Changing the Setpoint Using the Setpoint Dialog Box
Any operator whose login account is configured with the appropriate privilege can
use the Multi-Comm system to change a zone’s setpoint.
To change a controller’s setpoint:
1. Access the window used to change the setpoint by:

right-clicking on the zone’s faceplate image in the main display,
or

left-clicking on the zone’s faceplate image to select it, then selecting
Controller > Setpoint.
Either of these actions will open the Setpoint window.
2. Enter the new setpoint.
3. If you want the setpoint to be written to the controller’s non-volatile memory when
you click on Send, click on the box in front of “Permanent”. The box will be
checked. (Clicking on the box again clears it.) If the controller’s power is cycled
after you click on Send, the new SP will be used again when power is restored,
because the new SP will have been stored in the controller’s non-volatile
memory.
or
If you want the setpoint to be written to temporary (volatile RAM) memory when
you click on Send, do not click on the “Permanent” box. If the controller’s power
is cycled, the new SP will be lost.
4. Click on Send. The new setpoint will be sent to the controller the next time the
Multi-Comm computer communicates with the controller.16
16
As with any RS-485 host, the Multi-Comm computer communicates with one device at a time. To see
which controller the Multi-Comm application is currently communicating with, check the message at the
left of the status bar (at the bottom of the Multi-Comm main window). If the status bar is not visible, use
the View menu’s Status Bar item to display the status bar.
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9.5
Configuring and Invoking the Single-Step Ramp Function
The Multi-Comm system provides a method to configure the single-step ramp time.
The software also provides a means to invoke this single-step Ramp to Setpoint
function (in those controllers that can use the function) at times other than at startup.
To configure the timer for the single step Ramp to Setpoint function:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with View/Change Parameter
privileges), select the controller by clicking on it in the main graphic display.
2. To see the present values of all parameters stored in the controller’s non-volatile
memory, select Controller > Parameters. The parameter window for that
controller will open. By default, the Input tab will be on top.
3. Click on the Recipe tab. The existing recipe-related parameter values will be
displayed.
4. To enable Single-Step Ramp, select this Recipe Option. The Ramp Time entry
box will become enabled.
5. Enter the ramp time (in minutes) to be used to achieve the current setpoint when
either of two conditions occurs: power to the controller is cycled or the MultiComm system is used to gradually ramp to the current setpoint.
6. Click on OK. The value will be sent to the controller and the window will close.
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To invoke the single step ramp function:
1. Select the zone by clicking on its faceplate image in the main graphic display.
The border of the zone image will be highlighted.
2. Select Controller > Start Recipe.17 The function will be invoked. (If the Recipe
Option is set to “Disabled”, a confirmation message will be displayed before the
PV is ramped to the setpoint; the default one minute will be used.)
17
If the Recipe Option is set to “Multi-Step Ramp”, then the Controller menu Start Recipe function will
begin execution of the ramp and soak recipe stored in the controller’s recipe parameters as described in
Chapter 12.4.
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10. Changing Controller Mode
and Using Autotune
10.1 Introduction
The Multi-Comm system provides operators with an easy, reliable way of changing a
zone’s mode without using the optional display board. This ability to change mode
includes placing the zone in Autotune. Before putting a controller in Autotune, be
sure to read Chapter 28. Autotune will not work correctly unless you prepare the
process and the controller as described in that chapter.
10.2 Procedure
To change a controller’s mode:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another operator with View/Change Parameters
privileges), select the zone by clicking on its faceplate image in the main graphic
display. The border of the zone image will be highlighted.
2. Select Controller > Standby (or Manual or Tune). (If you attempt to put the
zone into Autotune mode, a confirmation message will be displayed. Before
using Autotune, you should read Chapter 28 and comply with the Autotune
guidelines provided in that chapter. After you acknowledge the confirmation
message, the Autotune command will be sent to the controller.)
3. The image of the zone’s virtual faceplate on the main display will match the
controller’s optional display in the new mode. For example, in Standby mode the
PV value will alternate with the message “    ” .
4. To take the zone out of the current mode, select the zone again.
5. Open the Controller menu. You will see the zone’s current special mode
checked. For example, if the zone is in Standby, then the menu will show 
Standby. Click on the checked mode to take the zone out of that mode.
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11. Viewing and Changing Controller
Configuration Parameters
11.1 Introduction
The Multi-Comm system permits any operator with View/Change Parameter
privileges to access parameter values stored in each controller’s non-volatile
memory.
11.2 Accessing Configuration Parameter Displays
To access the parameter displays:
1. Log in as MULTI (or another user with View/Change Parameter privileges).
2. Use one of the following two methods to access the displays:

select the zone by clicking on its faceplate image in the main graphic display,
then using Controller > Parameters,
or

double-click on any zone image in the main graphic display.
Either method will open the window showing the current value of the zone’s
accessible parameters.
The window will contain a set of tabbed “layers”. Click on a tab to select the
group of parameters to be viewed.
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11.3 Using Configuration Parameter Displays
Be aware that not all displayed parameters apply to the selected zone, or to the
current configuration. In some cases the value of an unused parameter is gray, and
no input is accepted. For example, on the input tab shown earlier in this chapter, the
Low Scale and High Scale parameters do not apply when a thermocouple input is
used. Therefore, the Low Scale and High Scale values are gray. They do not apply
to the current configuration and cannot be changed.
Sometimes it is possible to type a value in the Multi-Comm window, but the value will
not be accepted by the controller. The value will not be accepted if the controller
hardware does not support use of the parameter. You will be informed by a MultiComm message that the controller will not accept the input.
The displayed values are currently stored in the controller. If you change a value in a
parameter window, the change does not take effect until the next scan cycle after you
click on the Apply button.
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12. Configuring and Running
Ramp and Soak Recipes
12.1 Introduction
Use the Multi-Comm Ramp and Soak function to configure any number of recipes
consisting of any number of ramp and soak steps. These recipes are stored on the
Multi-Comm computer. Under the direction of Multi-Comm, any controller on the
network can execute your choice of recipe, regardless of the values stored in the
controller’s recipe parameters. Instructions for configuring these recipes are in 12.2.
Instructions for running these recipes are in 12.3.
The Multi-Comm displays also provide a quick way to configure and run recipes that
use the controller’s own recipe parameters. Instructions for configuring these recipes
are in 12.4. Instructions for running these recipes are in 12.5.
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12.2 Configuring Multi-Comm Recipes
12.2.1
Creating a New Recipe
To create a new recipe to be run on any zone under the direction of the MultiComm system:
1. While logged on as MULTI (or another user with View/Change Parameter
privileges), select Ramp/Soak > New. The Recipe Editor window will be
displayed.
You will use the Ramp Time, Soak Level, and Soak Time boxes to configure
each step, then use the Append Step button to add the step to the end of the
recipe in the large white box. (Steps can also be inserted, edited, and deleted as
described below.)
2. Enter a recipe name. This name will be used on the list of recipes on the list of
active recipes and the list of “held” recipes. (This will not be the name of the
recipe file unless you use the same name when you do Save As.)
3. Select a Units option.
4. Use the Termination State dropdown list to specify what you want to happen
when execution of the recipe has been completed. (If you stop execution of a
recipe before completion, the setpoint will remain at the value it has when you
stop execution.)
5. Use the Repeats box to enter the number of times you want the recipe to execute
each time it is run. If you want the recipe to run once, leave the Repeats value at
the default, zero. If you want the recipe to cycle continuously once started, check
the “Continuous” box.
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6. Enter a Holdback value of at least 1, or disable holdback.18
7. Enter the Ramp Time, Soak Level (setpoint), and Soak Time for a recipe step in
the boxes provided.19
8. Click on Append Step. The step will be added below the steps already in the
recipe box. The Ramp Time, Soak Level, and Soak Time boxes will be cleared
in preparation for entering your next step.
9. Repeat Steps 7 and 8 as many times as necessary.
10. Save the .RCP file for the first time using Save As. A window will open in which
you can specify the filename and directory. You must replace “Untitled“ in the
window with a meaningful file name ending with the .RCP extension. This will be
the name you select when you run the recipe.
11. To delete a step from the recipe as shown in the white box, click on the step to
select it. The values of the selected step will be displayed in the Ramp Time,
Soak Level, and Soak Time boxes. Click on Delete Step. The step will be
removed from the recipe.
12. To edit a step, select it. Its values will be displayed in the Ramp Time, Soak
Level, and Soak Time boxes. Make your changes, then click on Edit Step. The
new values will replace those in the selected step.
18
If you are concerned that your process might not be responsive enough to reach the soak levels in the
specified ramp times, use the holdback feature. If holdback is enabled, then the system will not allow the
setpoint to become more than n engineering units away from the process value, where n is the Holdback
value. The system will “hold back” the SP until the PV has had a chance to catch up. This has the effect
of “stopping the clock” on the SP ramp time until the PV is within n units of the SP.
The specified holdback value n will also be applied to the soak level. If the temperature falls more than n
units from the soak level, then the clock is stopped on the soak time until the PV is again within n units of
the SP specified for the soak level.
19
Because of the effect of the holdback value, these ramp and soak times should be considered
minimums if holdback is enabled.
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13. To insert a step, select the step it should precede. The values of the selected
step will be displayed in the Ramp Time, Soak Level, and Soak Time boxes.
Enter the values for the step to be inserted, then click on Insert Step. The new
step will be inserted before the step selected.
14. To save the recipe without closing the Recipe Editor window, click on Save. The
file will be saved to the file specified in Step 10, overwriting the old contents of
the file.
15. When the recipe displayed in the white box meets with your approval, click on
Save and Close. The recipe will be saved to the .RCP file and the editor will
close.
While you are learning to use the Recipe Editor, it is a good idea to use the
Ramp/Soak > Edit function described below to take a second look at your recipe
before running it.
12.2.2
Editing an Existing Recipe
The same Recipe Editor functions are used to edit an existing recipe. Use
Ramp/Soak > Edit to open the window used to select the .RCP file to be edited.
Once you have selected a file, the Recipe Editor will open. The steps in the existing
file will be displayed in the white box. The previous selections for engineering units,
holdback, etc. will be filled in. Add, delete, edit, and insert steps as needed, then use
Save to overwrite the old recipe file you selected, or Save As to create a new file.
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12.3 Running Multi-Comm Recipes
12.3.1
Starting to Run a Recipe
To run a Multi-Comm Ramp/Soak recipe:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with View/Change Parameter
privileges), select Ramp/Soak > Run. The Open Recipe window will open.
2. Select the .RCP file to be run and click on OK. The Run Recipe Controller
Selection window will open.
3. This window lists the name and network address of every zone not currently
executing a recipe under the direction of the Multi-Comm system. Select one or
more zones. (You can hold down the Shift key to select multiple zones that are
together on the list, or hold down the Control key to select multiple zones that are
scattered on the list.)
4. Click on OK. The Run Recipe Controller Selection window will close, and the
Multi-Comm system will begin running the recipe on the selected zone(s). As the
recipe runs the displayed setpoint and process value will change in response to
SP changes sent by the Multi-Comm computer to the controller.
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12.3.2
Holding (Pausing) Recipe Execution
To hold execution of a Multi-Comm recipe:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with View/Change Parameter
privileges), select Ramp/Soak > Hold. The Recipe Control window will open.
2. The window lists all the recipes being run under the direction of Multi-Comm.
A recipe may appear on the list in the left pane more than once. This means that
you started to run the recipe on different zones (or sets of zones) at different
times. Each of these occurrences of a recipe on the list is referred to as an
“instance” of the recipe.
To see on which zone(s) you are currently executing an instance of a recipe,
click on the name of the recipe. The zones running the selected instance of the
recipe that are not already on hold will be listed in the right pane.20
3. Select the instance of the recipe to be held.
4. Select the zones to be held. (You can hold down the Shift key to select multiple
zones that are together on the list, or hold down the Control key to select multiple
zones that are scattered on the list.)
5. Click on Hold. Execution of the selected instance of the Multi-Comm recipe will
be paused for the selected zones, and the window will close. On the MultiComm main display, the SP of the “held” zones will remain unchanged while the
recipe is held.
Execution of the selected instance of the recipe will be held for the selected zones
until you resume execution as described in 12.3.3, or stop (terminate) execution as
described in 12.3.4.
20
If all controllers on which you are running the selected recipe instance are already held, then no
controllers will be listed in the right pane.
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12.3.3
Resuming Recipe Execution
To resume execution of a “held” recipe:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with View/Change Parameter
privileges), select Ramp/Soak > Resume. The Recipe Control window will open.
2. The window lists all the recipes being run under the direction of Multi-Comm.
A recipe may appear on the list in the left pane more than once. This means that
you started to run the recipe on different zones (or sets of zones) at different
times. Each of these occurrences of a recipe on the list is referred to as an
“instance” of the recipe.
To see on which controllers you have held an instance of a recipe, click on the
name of the recipe. The zones on hold for the selected instance of the recipe will
be listed in the right pane.21 Execution of the selected recipe instance may have
been held on the zones in this group at different times.
3. Select the instance of the recipe to be resumed.
4. Select one or more zones to be resumed. (You can hold down the Shift key to
select multiple zones that are together on the list, or hold down the Control key to
select multiple zones that are scattered on the list.)
5. Click on Resume. Execution of the selected instance of the recipe will resume
on the selected zones at the point in the recipe where it was held for each zone.
Execution of the recipe can resume at different steps in the recipe in different
zones. (Although you started to run the recipe instance in all the zones at the
same time, you may have held execution at different times.) On an optional
display board, the PV of the selected zones will again alternate with the display
of “   ”, indicating that a Multi-Comm recipe is active using those controllers.
21
If the Multi-Comm system is not holding execution of the recipe instance for any zones, then no zones
will be listed in the right pane.
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12.3.4
Stopping Recipe Execution
To stop execution of a Multi-Comm recipe:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with View/Change Parameter
privileges), select Ramp/Soak > Stop. The Recipe Control window will open.
2. The window lists all the recipes being run under the direction of Multi-Comm
(both active and held). A recipe may appear on the list in the left pane more than
once. This means that you started to run the recipe on different zones (or sets of
zones) at different times. Each of these occurrences of a recipe on the list is
referred to as an “instance” of the recipe.
To see on which zone(s) you are currently running an instance of a recipe, click
on the name of the recipe.
3. Select the instance of the recipe to be stopped.
4. Select one or more zones. (You can hold down the Shift key to select multiple
zones that are together on the list, or hold down the Control key to select multiple
zones that are scattered on the list.)
5. Click on Stop. Running of the selected instance of the Multi-Comm recipe using
the selected zones will end. The setpoint for each selected controller will remain
where the setpoint was when the recipe was stopped, not at the value
determined by the Termination State configured for the recipe.
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Multi-Comm – Configuring and Running Ramp and Soak Recipes
12.4 Configuring Controller Ramp and Soak Parameters
To configure a recipe using the controller’s recipe parameters:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with View/Change Parameter
privileges), select the zone by clicking on its faceplate image in the main graphic
display.
2. To display the present values of all parameters stored in the controller’s nonvolatile memory for the highlighted zone, select Controller > Parameters. The
parameter window for that zone will open. By default, the Input tab will be on top.
3. Click on the Recipe tab. The existing recipe-related parameter values will be
displayed.22
22
If you have selected a 2C, these values will all be zeroes because the 2C does not contain a
ramp/soak menu. Although you cannot run controller-based recipes on a 2C board, you can configure
Multi-Comm recipes as described in 12.2.and then run these recipes (stored on the Multi-Comm host) on
a 2C. Recipes described in Chapter 12 are stored in the Multi-Comm host and do not use ramp/soak
parameter values stored in the controller database.
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4. To enable Multi-Step Ramp, select the Recipe Option. The Multi-Step Ramp
panel, Holdback Band, Termination State, and Repeats entry boxes will become
enabled. The Power Fail Resume and Continuous Repeat options will also
become enabled. The values in the Multi-Step Ramp panel represent the values
stored in the controller’s recipe parameters. (The units of measure match those
selected for the display units parameter.)
5. Use the Termination State dropdown list to specify what you want to happen to
the zone when execution of the recipe has been completed.
6. Use the Repeats box to enter the number of times you want the recipe to execute
each time it is run. If you want the recipe to run once, leave the Repeats value at
the default, zero. If you want the recipe to cycle continuously after it has been
started, click on the box to the left of “Continuous”. The box will be checked,
indicating that the option has been selected.
7. Enter a Holdback value of at least 1, or disable holdback.23
23
If you are concerned that your process might not be responsive enough to reach the soak levels in the
specified ramp times, use the holdback feature. If holdback is enabled, then the system will not allow the
setpoint to become more than n engineering units away from the process value, where n is the Holdback
value. The system will “hold back” the SP until the PV has had a chance to catch up. This has the effect
of “stopping the clock” on the SP ramp time until the PV is within n units of the SP.
The specified holdback value n will also be applied to the soak level. If the temperature falls more than n
units from the soak level, then the clock is stopped on the soak time until the PV is again within n units of
the SP specified for the soak level.
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Multi-Comm – Configuring and Running Ramp and Soak Recipes
8. To edit a step, click on it to select it, and then click on Edit Step.
9. Enter the Ramp Time, Soak Level (setpoint), and Soak Time for a recipe step in
the boxes provided.24
10. Repeat Steps 8 and 9 until the recipe meets the needs of your application.
11. If you want to save this recipe to an .RS file on a drive accessible to the MultiComm computer, use the Save As button. A window will open in which you can
specify the filename and directory. You must replace “Untitled“ in the window
with a meaningful file name ending with the .RS extension. (If you make further
changes and want to save to the same file, use the Save button.) When you
click on OK, the ramp time, soak level, and soak time values will be saved in the
file. They will not be sent to the controller.
12. When you are ready to write the recipe values to the controller, click on Apply, or
OK. The values will be written to the controller during the next scan cycle. If you
use Apply, the parameters window will stay open. If you use OK, the window
will close.
To open a previously saved controller recipe .RS file (not a Multi-Comm .RCP recipe
file), use the Open button on the Recipe parameter tab and select the file. The ramp
time, soak level, and soak time values in the file will be displayed on the Recipe tab.
The values will not be sent to the controller until you click on Apply or OK.
24
Because of the effect of the holdback value, these ramp and soak times should be considered
minimums if holdback is enabled.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
12.5 Running Controller Ramp and Soak Cycles
To run a multi-step ramp and soak recipe based on the values stored in the
controller:
1. Select the zone by clicking on its faceplate image in the main graphic display.
The border of the zone image will be highlighted.
2. Select Controller > Start Recipe. The function will be invoked. Note that if the
Recipe Option is set to “Single-Step Ramp” or “Disabled”, then the multi-step
ramp function is not available. In these cases, using Controller > Start Recipe
will invoke the single-step ramp function. (If the Recipe Option is set to
“Disabled”, the Multi-Comm software will display a confirmation message before
executing a single-step ramp based on the one minute default ramp time.)
When a zone is executing a ramp/soak step based on values stored in the
controller’s parameters, the PV will alternate with “  ” on an optional display board.
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13. Storing and Loading Controller
Configurations
13.1 Introduction
All the configuration parameter values stored in non-volatile memory in a controller
can be saved to the PC and loaded to the same or different controllers. Backing up a
unique controller configuration on a PC or removable medium is always prudent. If a
controller is damaged later and must be replaced, the custom configuration can be
loaded quickly to a spare controller, minimizing down time.
If the controller is configured to support more than one zone, you can save and load
configuration for one zone or all zones in the controller simultaneously.
In large installations where many zones use the same (or almost the same)
configuration, its easy to configure one zone using the Multi-Comm display, save the
parameter set to the PC, then load the same parameter set to many other zones in
2C and 4C devices on the network. (If you load the same configuration into more
than one controller, remember to give each controller a unique starting MODBUS
address; see 3.3.3.)
The ability to store and load a controller configuration also enables you to reuse
tuning parameter values that have proved to be best for certain process conditions. If
the responsiveness of your process is altered at times, you may find it desirable to
save sets of tuning parameters to be used under different circumstances.
For example, if you autotune the controller for optimum control of the temperature of
an engraving cylinder while one size is in use, save the parameter set before
installing a larger or smaller cylinder. The different size cylinder may heat at a
different rate, requiring different tuning parameters to be used for optimum control.
Save the new tuning as a parameter set with a different name. When the day comes
that you have to reinstall the first cylinder, reload the parameter set, including the
tuning parameters that were optimized for that cylinder.
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13.2 Storing Configuration
To save a controller’s configuration on the Multi-Comm computer:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with View/Change Parameter
privileges), select the zone by clicking on it in the main graphic display.
2. To display the present values of all parameters stored in the controller’s nonvolatile memory for the selected zone, select Controller > Parameters. The
parameter window for that zone will open. By default, the Input tab will be on top.
3. Click on the Parameter Set tab. It contains the buttons used to save and load
parameter sets.
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Multi-Comm – Storing and Loading Controller Configurations
4. To save the parameter set for the currently selected zone in a .PRF file, click on
Save As. The Save Parameter Set window will open. Use it to enter a filename
(with a .PRF file extension) and to specify a destination directory. (To save the
parameter set to a file with the same name as the controller, click on Save. The
file will be saved in the same directory where the Multi-Comm software was
installed.)
– or –
To save the parameter set for all zones in the currently selected controller to an
.EMC file, click Save All As (to specify the name of the .EMC file) or Save All (to
save to the currently open file).
5. As the save progresses, a status window will be displayed. When the status
window closes, the save operation is complete. You can click on OK to close the
parameter window.
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13.3 Loading Configuration
To load a configuration from the Multi-Comm computer to a controller:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with View/Change Parameter
privileges), select the zone by clicking on its faceplate image in the main graphic
display.
2. To display the present values of all parameters stored in the controller’s nonvolatile memory for the selected zone, select Controller > Parameters. The
parameter window for that zone will open. By default, the Input tab will be on top.
3. Click on the Parameter Set tab. It contains the buttons used to save and load
parameter sets.
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Multi-Comm – Storing and Loading Controller Configurations
4. To load a parameter set to the selected zone, click on Load.
– or –
To load a parameter set to all the zones in the selected controller, click on Load
All.
Either way, the Open Parameter Set window will open.
5. Select the name of the .PRF file to be loaded to the zone (or the .EMC file to be
loaded to the controller) and click on OK. The parameter values stored in the file
will be written to the controller.
6. As the load progresses, status windows will be displayed. When no more status
windows are displayed, the load has completed successfully. If the Multi-Comm
system could not write all the parameter values in the .PRF or .EMC file to the
controller, messages containing the parameter numbers will be displayed.
Usually a parameter value cannot be written to the controller because the
hardware does not support the feature that uses the parameter. If the
parameters apply to your application, configure the parameters individually.
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14. Logging PV and SP Values
14.1 Introduction
The Multi-Comm application supports optional logging of SP and PV values for all
controllers at configurable intervals. Logs are saved in ASCII text files with commaseparated-value format. These files can be viewed, printed, and manipulated with
other applications, such as word processing and spreadsheet software.
14.2 Turning On the Logging Function
To turn on the logging function:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with Controller Configuration
privileges), Select Options > Logging. The Logging window will be displayed.
2. Enter the name of the log file to be used. Keep the .log file extension. (Unless
you use the Browse button to specify a different location, the log file will be in the
same directory in which the Multi-Comm software was installed.)
3. Enter the frequency (in seconds) with which the SP and PV values should be
logged. Remember that log files will grow rapidly at frequent logging rates. Be
sure there is enough room on the drive containing the log files.
4. Click on Enable. If this file name has not been used before for a log, the logging
will begin and the Logging window will close.
If a log file already exists with that name in the Multi-Comm directory, a
confirmation message will be displayed.
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5. To append new data to the old file, click on Yes. To overwrite the old file,
click on No. This will result in the old data being lost.
14.3 Viewing and Printing Log Files
The log files are ASCII text file with comma-separated values. To view and print the
files, use any text editor (such as WordPad) that will retain the line breaks.
14.4 Turning Off the Logging Function
To turn off the logging function:
1. While logged in as MULTI (or another user with Controller Configuration
privileges), open the Options menu. When logging is enabled, the Options menu
will include the item Stop Logging.
2. Select Options > Stop Logging. Logging will be disabled.
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Section C – Display Board User Interface
This section contains information about:

the display and LEDs – see page 15-1

keypad use – see page 16-1
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 Athena Controls, Inc.
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15. Display Board Overview
15.1 Introduction
An optional display board with switches (pushbuttons) can be connected to the 2C or
4C board with a ribbon cable. (Several display boards are available. See 2.4 for
display board part numbers.) The display board can be used to:

select a zone

view the process value and setpoint for the selected zone

change the setpoint

view and change configuration parameter values
Instructions for using the keypad are in Chapter 16.
You can also use a personal computer to do all these tasks. See 1.3.3 for more
information.
Each display board has a bright two-line LED display that is easy to read over wide
viewing angles. During normal operations the process value of the selected zone is
always on display. The setpoint can also be displayed at all times. If you prefer, the
setpoint can be “blanked”, that is, it can be turned off after a configurable time period.
Pressing any key displays the setpoint again.
The display board is also equipped with zone indication and output indication LEDs.
For information about LEDs, see 15.5.
15.2 Keypad
The keypad consists of five keys: four for zone configuration and operation and one
for zone selection. 25
For convenience, this manual refers to the four zone configuration/operation keys
using the symbols and names shown in the list below. These are the symbols used
on the optional overlays for the display boards. (With the exception of zone
selection, these are also the symbols used on the faceplates of panel-mounted
Series C controllers.)
The hardware switch (button) used for each of these functions varies, depending on
the display board type you purchased. See 16.1 for the switches (pushbuttons) used
for the functions described below.
25
If your controller board contains software earlier than version 1.27, then the menu access key is used
to select the zone. Pressing the menu access key for about one second steps to the next zone. The
software version loaded on a controller is displayed when the board is powered up; see 1.10.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
menu access – Used to access the menu system; within the menu system
it is used to move from menu to menu.
up and
down – Used to change numeric values and to scroll through
lists of configuration choices.
mode/enter – Used to access the displays used to change the mode or
security access level, as well as to write values to the controller’s database and
step through items within a configuration menu
For more information about using these keys, see Chapter 16.
15.3 Control Mode Displays
What is displayed when the controller is in one of the control modes described in 1.6
depends on the mode and whether the controller detects any problems with the input
or with its own operation. The table below summarizes the various combinations of
numeric values and abbreviations displayed when the controller is operating.
What’s Displayed
Example
Top Line
Top Line
Lower Line
Lower Line
Circumstance
normal mode, no problems
detected
standby mode
manual mode
process value
   . 
setpoint (see Note 1 below)
   . 
process value alternating with 


setpoint (see Note 1 below)
   .
process value
   . 
output 1 fixed output percent value
alternating with 
or

output 2 fixed output percent value
alternating with

(Use the
key to toggle between
    and     . )
Autotune mode
recipe running under the
direction of the controller,
using ramp/soak parameter
values (See Note 2 below)
ramp/soak recipe on hold
15-2
process value alternating with 


setpoint value (see Note 1 below)
   .
process value alternating with  
followed by the ramp or soak segment
number
  .  
setpoint (ramps as the recipe is executed)
(see Note 1 below)
   . 
process value alternating with 


setpoint value (held at value it had when
recipe was put on hold) (see Note 1 below)
   . 
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900M231U00A
Display Board – Overview
Circumstance
What’s Displayed
Example
Top Line
Top Line
Lower Line
Lower Line
controller detects an open
sensor, or the input is out of
the supported sensor range
    displayed

setpoint value (see Note 1 below)
   . 
controller detects a reversed
sensor, or the input is out of
the supported sensor range
    displayed

setpoint value (see Note 1 below)
   . 
controller detects a problem
with its own operation
   displayed
numeric code displayed; see 32.3.2 for the
codes


Note 1: The controller can be configured to limit the length of time the setpoint is
displayed. If the setpoint display blanking parameter is set to a value other than
OFF, the setpoint will be displayed for only the configured number of seconds. At the
end of that time period, the setpoint display will become blank and remain blank until
the operator presses any key. The setpoint will again be displayed for the configured
number of seconds (see 20.2.4 or 20.3.3).
Note 2: If a MODBUS master or Multi-Comm host is running a recipe based on
values stored in the host (as opposed to a recipe based on ramp/soak parameter
values stored in the controller’s database), the display will show only the PV and SV
values. No other message will alternate with either value.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
15.4 Configuration Displays
15.4.1
Introduction
When the
(menu access) key has been used to display a menu, you can
configure the controller.
It is recommended that you put the controller in standby mode as described in 16.3
before going into configuration to change parameter values. Putting the controller in
standby will ensure that the outputs are off.
During configuration the top line of the display contains a menu name. The second
line of the display contains a parameter name, alternating with the current value. For
example, when the input menu input type parameter is accessed the display will
show


15.4.2
alternating
with


Menus Available
To access the menus containing the configuration parameters, press the
key
until a text string is displayed on the top line of the display (approximately three
seconds). The table below lists all the menus available.
Which of these menus is displayed depends on the access level set for the controller
(as described in Chapter 30). When a controller is first powered up the menus are
displayed in the sequence in which they are listed in the table. However, if you exit
configuration, then access the menus again, you will re-enter the cycle where you left
it.
For example, if the     (output) menu   .  (output 2 type) parameter is on
display when you exit configuration (or are timed out), then when you next access the
menus, the     menu   .  parameter will the first one displayed.
To see all the parameters in each of the menus, go to the referenced chapter of this
manual.
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Display Board – Overview
Displayed
Abbreviation
Access
Levels
Described
In
input
    (configuration) and
    (factory)
19

display
    (configuration) and
    (factory)
20

output
    (configuration) and
    (factory)
21

control
    (user) and
    (configuration)
and
    (factory)
22

alarm
    (configuration) and
    (factory)
23
Autotune damping
    (user) and
    (configuration) and
    (factory)
24
ramp/soak (4C only)
    (user) and
    (configuration) and
    (factory)
25

supervisor
    (configuration) and
    (factory)
26

calibration
    (factory) only
27
option
    (configuration) and
    (factory)




Menu
Name
See Note 1
Note 1: The 2C and 4C boards automatically detect installed option cards.
Controllers containing software before version 1.27 contain an     (option)
menu; however, the values entered with this menu are ignored by the controller.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
15.5 LEDs
15.5.1
Introduction
Each optional display board includes LEDs that indicate:

which zone has been selected

which of the standard outputs are on

whether a process alarm has been detected

whether a communication link is active
The LEDs used for these purposes vary, depending on the display board used.
15.5.2
4-Inch Square Display Board (p/n 785A406U01)
15.5.2.1
Zone Indication
The zone indication LEDs on the 4-inch square display board are LED1 (for Zone 1)
through LED4 (for Zone 4). The location of the zone indication LEDs on the 4-inch
square display is shown below.
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Display Board – Overview
15.5.2.2
Output State Indication
The on/off state of each standard hardware output is indicated by LED5 (hardware
output 1) through LED10 (hardware output 6). The location of the output indication
LEDs on the 4-inch square display board is shown below.
15.5.2.3
Alarm LED
If the controller has detected a process alarm for any zone (not only the currently
selected zone), LED15 lights. (It remains lit until the alarm is cleared.) The location
of this alarm LED on the 4-inch square display board is shown below.
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15.5.2.4
Communication LED
If a communication link with the controller is active, LED16 is lit. The location of this
comm LED on the 4-inch square display board is shown below.
15.5.3
Horizontal Display Board (p/n 785A378U01)
15.5.3.1
Zone Indication
The zone indication LEDs on the horizontal display board are D17 and D18. The
location of the zone indication LEDs on the horizontal display is shown below.
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Display Board – Overview
The meaning of the on/off combinations is shown below.
Zone
D17
D18
1
on
off
2
off
on
3
on
on
4
off
off
15.5.3.2
As
Displayed
Output State Indication
LEDs D3 through D6 indicate the on/off state of the associated hardware output. D3
is lit when hardware output 1 is on; D4 is lit when hardware output 2 is on, etc.
The locations of the output indication LEDs on the horizontal display board is shown
below.
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15.5.3.3
Alarm LED
If the controller has detected a process alarm for any zone (not only the currently
selected zone), LED D1 lights. (It remains lit until the alarm is cleared.) The location
of this alarm LED on the on the horizontal display board is shown below.
15.5.3.4
Communication LED
If a communication link with the controller is active, LED D2 is lit. The location of this
comm LED on the horizontal display board is shown below.
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Display Board – Overview
15.5.4
Vertical Display Board (p/n 785A399U01)
15.5.4.1
Zone Indication
The zone indication LEDs on the vertical display board are LED1 (for Zone 1) through
LED4 (for Zone 4). The location of the zone indication LEDs on the vertical display is
shown below.
15.5.4.2
Output State Indication
LED6, LED5, LED11, LED12, LED9, and LED10 indicate the on/off state of the
associated hardware output. The LED6 (closest to the top of the board) represents
hardware output 1, LED5 (below LED6) represents hardware output 2, LED11 (below
LED5) represents hardware output 3, etc.
The location of the output indication LEDs on the vertical display board is shown
below.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
15.5.4.3
Alarm LED
If the controller has detected a process alarm for any zone (not only the currently
selected zone), LED8 lights. (It remains lit until the alarm is cleared.) The location of
this alarm LED on the on the vertical display board is shown below.
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Display Board – Overview
15.5.4.4
Communication LED
If a communication link with the controller is active, LED7 is lit. The location of this
comm LED on the vertical display board is shown below.
15.5.5
¼ DIN Square Display Board (p/n 785A415U01)
15.5.5.1
Zone Indication
The zone indication LEDs on the ¼ DIN display board are LED1 through LED4. The
locations of the zone indication LEDs on the ¼ DIN square display are shown below.
15.5.5.2
Output State Indication
LED7, LED8, LED9, LED10, LED11, and LED12 indicate the on/off state of the
associated hardware output. The LED7 (closest to the top of the board) represents
hardware output 1, LED8 (below LED7) represents hardware output 2, LED9 (below
LED8) represents hardware output 3, etc.
The locations of the output indication LEDs on the ¼ DIN square display board are
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
shown below.
15.5.5.3
Alarm LED
If the controller has detected a process alarm for any zone (not only the currently
selected zone), LED5 lights. (It remains lit until the alarm is cleared.) The location of
this alarm LED on the on the ¼ DIN square display is shown below.
15.5.5.4
Communication LED
If a communication link with the controller is active, LED6 is lit. The location of this
comm LED on the ¼ DIN square display board is shown below.
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16. Display Board Keypad Use
16.1 Key Functions
The optional display board has five keys: four for zone configuration and operation
and one for zone selection. The functions of the keys are described in the table
below. The number of the switch used for each key depends on the type of display
board for which the controller was set up at the factory (or using a MODBUS host).
The switch used for each configuration/operation key (and for zone selection) is also
shown in the table.
The rest of this subsection contains instructions for changing the setpoint, viewing
and changing the controller’s mode, changing values in the controller’s database, etc.
using these keys.
For convenience, this manual refers to the
zone configuration/operation keys using the
symbols and names in the table below. These
are the symbols used on the optional overlays
for the display boards. The overlay for the ¼
DIN display board is shown at left. (With the
exception of zone selection, these are also the
symbols used as labels on other Series C
controllers, such as the 16C).
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16-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Symbol
Used
for the
Key in
This
Manua l
Name
menu
access
4-inch
Square
Horizontal
Vertical
¼ DIN
785A406
785A378
785A399
785A415
SW5
SW5
SW1
SW1
Function
Accessing the configuration
menus, and accessing the
security access code – Pressing
and holding this key for
approximately three seconds
accesses the configuration menus
for the selected zone.
When a menu name is on display,
key is used to step through available
menus.
When the controller is in manual
mode, key is used to toggle between
the display of the output 1 percent
and the output 2 percent.
When the normal operating display
(PV and SV) is on display, pressing
and holding this key for
approximately ten seconds shows
the current security access level.
The level can then be changed.
up
SW6
SW6
SW2
SW2
Increasing the value on display or
cycling up through a list of
choices – Pressing and releasing
this key increases the numerical
value on the operator display or
configuration display one unit.
Pressing and holding it increases
the value more rapidly.
When a string of characters
representing a configuration
parameter choice or a mode choice
is on display, pressing this key
displays the previous choice on the
list.
down
SW7
SW7
SW5
SW3
Decreasing the value on display
or cycling down through a list of
choices – Pressing and releasing
this key decreases the numerical
value on the operator display or
configuration display one unit.
Pressing and holding it decreases
the value more rapidly.
When a string of characters
representing a configuration
parameter choice or a mode choice
is on display, pressing this key
displays the next choice on the list.
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900M231U00A
Display Board Keypad Use
Symbol
Used
for the
Key in
This
Manua l
Name
mode/enter
4-inch
Square
Horizontal
Vertical
¼ DIN
785A406
785A378
785A399
785A415
SW8
SW8
SW3
SW4
Function
Viewing the mode or selecting the
currently displayed configuration
choice or value – While the
controller is in use (controlling a
process loop), this key is used to
view the current operational mode.
When a configuration menu has
been accessed, this key is used to
step through the parameters within a
menu, and to write the currently
displayed choice or value to the
controller’s database.
zone
selection
SW2
SW2
SW7
SW5
Selecting the zone for which
information will be displayed.26
26
If your controller board contains software earlier than version 1.27, then the menu access key is used
to select the zone. Pressing the menu access key for more than one second (but less than three
seconds) steps to the next zone. The software version loaded on a controller is displayed when the
board is powered up; see 1.10.
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Display Board Keypad Use
16.2 Displaying and Changing the Setpoint
The setpoint can be changed only when the controller is in normal (automatic) mode
or standby mode. (If the PV is alternating with     (standby), you can change
the setpoint, but the change will not take effect until you put the controller back into
normal mode.)
To view the current setpoint for the selected zone, if it is not on display
because setpoint display blanking is enabled:
Press any key briefly. The setpoint will be displayed on the lower line.
To change the setpoint:
Use the
and
keys to change the displayed value.
See 1.7 for the possible sources of the setpoint being displayed by the controller (the
“active setpoint”).
See 19.6.2 (temperature input) or 19.7.3 (linear input) for information about the
  .  and   .  parameters used to configure the range of setpoints that can
be entered using an optional display board.
16.3 Putting Controller in Standby Mode
To put a zone in standby mode:
1. Select the zone.
2. Press the
key until     is displayed on the top line (after approximately
three seconds) and the current mode on the lower line. For example, if the
key for approximately
controller is in normal (automatic) mode, pressing the
three seconds will display:


3. Press the
or
key to cycle through the modes until     is on the lower
line. The display will show:


4. Briefly press the
key again. The display will show     alternating with the
process value on the top line, and the setpoint displayed steadily on the lower line.
For example, if the PV is 105 and the SV is 110 you will see:


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alternating
with


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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
16.4 Returning Zone to Normal Operation
To return a zone to normal operation.
1. Select the zone.
2. Press the
key until     is displayed on the top line and the current mode’s
abbreviation is on the lower line. For example, if the controller is in standby the
display will show:


3. Press the
or
key to cycle through the modes until    is on the lower
line. The display will show:


4. Briefly press the
key again. The display will show the process value on the top
line and the setpoint on the lower line. For example, if the PV is 105 and the SV is
110 you will see:


16.5 Putting Controller into Manual Mode and Changing the
Output Values
To put a zone in manual mode:
1. Select the zone.
2. Press the
key until     is displayed on the top line and the current mode on
the lower line. For example, if the controller is in normal (automatic) mode, pressing
the
key for approximately three seconds will display:


3. Press the
or
key to cycle through the modes until    (fixed output
percentage) is on the lower line. The display will show:


4. Briefly press the
key again. The display will show the process variable on the top
line. On the lower line     (percent 1) will alternate with the current fixed output
percent. When you switch the zone to manual, the most recent output percentages
used in normal (auto) mode will continue to be used. This provides “bumpless”
transfer.
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Display Board Keypad Use
For example, if the PV is 105 and output 1 was most recently at 50% in normal mode,
you would see:


5. Use the
and
desired percentage.
alternating
with


keys to change the manual output 1 value displayed to the
6. To write the output 1 percentage to the controller’s database, briefly press the
key. The controller will begin to use the specified fixed output percentage. (The
transition from automatic PID to the manual percentage will be “bumpless”.) The
lower line display will change to     , alternating with the current value for output
2.
and
7. Use the
desired percentage.
keys to change the manual output 2 value displayed to the
8. To write the output 2 percentage to the controller’s database, briefly press the
key. The controller will begin to use the specified fixed output percentage.
9. The zone will remain in manual mode until you press and hold the
key to display
    and    , and then change to one of the other modes as described above
and below.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
16.6 Changing the Zone Count
To change the quantity of active zones:
1. With any zone selected, access configuration mode by pressing and holding the
key until a string of letters is displayed on the top line (approximately three
seconds). The letters displayed are an abbreviated name of a menu.
2. Press the
key repeatedly to until the     (Supervisor) is on the top line
of the display.
3. Briefly press the
key once to display the first parameter in the menu (or the
parameter most recently accessed in the last configuration session). The
abbreviated name of the parameter will be on the lower line, alternating with the
current value for the parameter stored in the controller’s database.
4. Press the
key until the top line of the display shows     (Zone Count).
The current quantity of active zones will be displayed on the lower line.
5. To change the current count, press the
and
keys.
6. When the desired count is on display, press the
key once. The displayed
choice or value will be written to the controller’s database. The next parameter in
the menu (or the first parameter if you were at the end of the menu) will be
displayed.
7. To implement the new zone count, cycle the power to the controller.
16.7 Starting, Pausing, and Terminating Recipe Execution
To start execution of the single-setpoint ramp27 or a multi-step recipe:
1. Select the zone.
2. Press the
key until     is displayed on the top line and the current mode
on the lower line. For example, if the controller is in normal (automatic) mode,
key for approximately three seconds will display:
pressing the


3. Press the
or
key to cycle through the modes. If a single-setpoint ramp
or multi-step recipe has been configured as described in Chapter 25,  .
(ramp/soak) will be one of the mode choices on the lower line. The display will
show:

  . 
27
If single-setpoint ramp is enabled, then the ramp will be executed automatically at startup; see 25.1.
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900M231U00A
Display Board Keypad Use
4. Briefly press the
key again.

If the zone is configured to execute a single-setpoint ramp, the display
will show   on the top line, alternating with the process variable.

If the zone is configured to execute a multi-step ramp, the display will
show   .  (ramp/soak ramp 1) on the top line, alternating with the
process value.
In either case, the lower line will display the setpoint, which has been
changed by the controller to match the process value. For example, if the PV
is 105, you would see:
  . 

alternating
with


As the single-setpoint ramp or multi-step segment 1 ramp time passes, the
setpoint will be ramped toward the target value.

In the case of a single-setpoint ramp, this is the normal setpoint.

In the case of a multi-step recipe, this will be soak level 1 value.
What happens when the target setpoint is reached depends on several factors.28

In the case of a single-setpoint ramp, the display will change to the normal
operating display with the PV on the top line and the SV on the lower line, unless
the termination state parameter was used to specify that the zone should be
placed in standby when the ramp up to setpoint has been completed.29

In the case of a multi-step recipe, the top line of the display will change to
  .  (ramp/soak soak 1). The recipe will continue to execute, maintaining
the setpoint at soak level 1 for the duration of soak time 1. The recipe will then
begin to execute the next segment, and the display will change to   .  ,
alternating with the process variable on the top line, and the setpoint on the lower
line.
To pause a recipe or single-setpoint ramp during its execution:
1. Select the zone.
key until     is displayed on the top line. The lower line will
2. Press the
show
  . (ramp/soak hold).
key once to go into recipe hold mode. The top line of the display
3. Press the
will show     alternating with the process value, while the lower line
28
Whether the process value actually matches the setpoint when the ramp time has elapsed depends on
how you have configured your recipe. If you have not used the holdback feature and have not configured
the ramp time realistically for your process, the PV may not match the SV when the ramp time has
elapsed. Read Section 25, then enable holdback or fix your ramp time so that the PV has time to catch
up to the SV.
29
This is also what happens if a single-setpoint ramp is executed automatically at startup.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
displays the setpoint. The setpoint will remain at this level until you take the
recipe out of hold.
To resume execution of a held recipe:
1. Select the zone.
2. Press the
key until     is displayed on the top line. The lower line will show
   (fixed output percentage).
3. Use the
or
key to display  .  (ramp/soak run/resume).
key once to resume execution of the recipe. The top line of the display
4. Press the
will again show the current ramp or soak segment number, alternating with the
process value, while the lower line displays the setpoint.
To terminate execution of the recipe:
1. Select the zone.
2. Press the
key until     is displayed on the top line. If the recipe is active,
the lower line will show   .  (ramp/soak hold).
key to select ramp/soak hold, use the
3. Instead of pressing the
display    (normal) or    (manual mode).
4. Press the
or
key to
key once to terminate execution of the recipe.

If you selected normal mode, the top line of the display will show the process
variable. The lower line will show the setpoint. This setpoint will be at whatever
value the recipe had reached while executing. This is different from what
happens if a recipe completes execution normally. In that case, the setpoint
value will be determined by the termination state configured using the ramp/soak
menu as described in 25.4.2.

If you selected manual mode, the top line of the display will show the process
variable. The lower line will show     alternating with the current fixed
output percentage.
16.8 Clearing Latched Alarms
To clear all latched alarms:
1. Select the zone.
2. Briefly press the
key once. All alarms currently latched will be unlatched if
the alarm condition has been cleared.
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Display Board Keypad Use
16.9 Working in Configuration Mode
16.9.1
Entering and Exiting Configuration Mode
We recommend that you put the zone into standby mode before entering the menu
system.
To enter configuration mode:
1. Select the zone.
2. Access the configuration menus by pressing and holding the
key until a
string of letters is displayed on the top line (approximately three seconds). The
letters displayed are an abbreviated name of a menu.
When a controller is first powered up, the menus are displayed in the sequence
shown in 15.4.2, beginning with the    (input) menu. However, once you leave
the menu system (or are timed out), the controller “remembers” where you were.
When you next press and hold the
key, the controller will display the menu that
was on display when you left the menu system. Pressing the
key will display the
parameter accessed most recently.
To exit configuration mode:
Return to the normal operating display by pressing and holding the
key until the
process variable is displayed on the top line and the setpoint on the lower line.
16.9.2
Procedure for Viewing and Changing a Configuration
Parameter Value
To view a parameter’s current value:
1. Select the zone.
2. Access configuration mode by pressing and holding the
key until a string of
letters is displayed on the top line (approximately three seconds). The letters
displayed are an abbreviated name of a menu.
3. Press the
key repeatedly to step through the available menus.
4. Once the name of the menu of interest is on the top line of the display, briefly press
the
key once to display the first parameter in the menu (or the parameter most
recently accessed in the last configuration session). The abbreviated name of the
parameter will be on the lower line, alternating with the current value for the
parameter stored in the controller’s database.
5. To step through the parameters in the displayed menu, press the
key repeatedly.
6. When the parameter of interest is on display, stop pressing the
key. The
abbreviated parameter name will alternate with the value or choice currently stored in
the controller’s database.
7. To change the current choice or numeric value, use the
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 Athena Controls, Inc.
and
keys.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
8. When the desired choice or numeric value is on display, press the
key once.
The displayed choice or value will be written to the controller’s database. The next
parameter in the menu (or the first parameter if you were at the end of the menu) will
be displayed.
At this point you can:

use the

if you like the current value of the parameter on display, you can press the
key to
leave the displayed value unchanged and go on through the parameters in the
menu), or

press the
key once to go to the next menu, then use the
the parameters in that menu, or

press the

press and hold the
and
keys to change the value of the newly displayed parameter, or
key to step through
key repeatedly to display menus later in the cycle, or
key until the normal operating display returns to view.
If you do not press any key, eventually you will be timed out of the menu system. The
controller will revert to the operational display that was in view before you entered the
menu system.
16.9.3
Configuration Example
Suppose that once the controller is in operation you want to turn off setpoint blanking and
change the alarm 2 setpoint.
1. Select the zone.
2. Press and hold the
key (approximately three seconds) until     is displayed
on the top line and the current mode on the lower line.
3. Press the
or
key until     is displayed.
key again. The display will show     alternating with the process
4. Press the
value on the top line. The setpoint will be displayed on the lower line.
5. Press and hold the
top line of the display.
key until the abbreviated name of a menu is displayed on the

If no one has used the menu system since the controller was powered up, the
   (input) menu will be displayed first.

If someone has already accessed the menu system since startup, the menu
displayed will be the last one used.
6. To turn off setpoint blanking, press the
name is on the top line.
key until the     (display) menu
key until the     (setpoint blanking) parameter is displayed on the
7. Press the
lower line. The display of     will alternate with the display of the current value.
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900M231U00A
Display Board Keypad Use
(When setpoint blanking is on, a numeric value represents the number of seconds
that the setpoint will be displayed after a key press. When the time elapses, the
setpoint display will become blank.)
8. Press the
key until    is displayed for     .
key once. The
9. To write this new setting to the controller’s database, press the
new setting will be saved and    . (decimal position) will be displayed on the
lower line. (The blanking parameter is the last in the display menu, so the controller
goes to the top of the menu and shows you the first display parameter, decimal
position.)
10. Because you do not plan to change any other display parameters at the present time,
press the
key to go to the next menu     (output).
11. Because you do not plan to change any output parameters during this configuration
key again. The name of the next menu in the cycle    
session, press the
(control) will be displayed.
12. You do not need to change any control parameters right now, so press the
again. The top line will show    (alarm).
key
13. Because the alarm 2 setpoint that you want to change is on the alarm menu, press
key to display the first parameter in the alarm menu. This is   .  (alarm
the
1 alarm action).
14. Press the
key repeatedly until you see the parameter that you want to change:
  .  (alarm 2 setpoint). The current value will alternate with the   .  label.
15. Use the
and
keys to change the alarm 2 setpoint to your new value.
16. Press the
key once to save the change. Because the   .  parameter is at
the end of the menu, the first parameter in the alarm menu will be displayed again.
17. The two changes you wanted to make have been accomplished, so you can press
and hold the
key to return to the normal operating display.
If you do not press and hold the
key, after a brief interval the controller will
automatically go back to the normal operating display (PV and SV).
If you do not press the
key after you change a parameter value, and you are
subsequently timed out of the menu system, the change will not be saved to the
controller’s database.
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 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Section D – Configuration Parameters
This section contains information about:

configuring the controller for PID control – see page 17-1

configuration parameters in general – see page 18-1

input parameters – see page 19-1

display parameters – see page 20-1

output parameters – see page 21-1

control parameters – see page 22-1

alarm parameters – see page 23-1

Autotune damping parameter – see page 24-1

ramp/soak recipe parameters – see page 25-1

supervisor parameters – see page 26-1

calibration function – see page 27-1

tuning the controller for PID control – see page 28-1

changing the security access level – see page 30-1

calibrating the controller – see page 31-1

error messages and codes – see page 32-1
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 Athena Controls, Inc.
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
17. Configuring the Controller – Quick Setup
Instructions for PID Control
17.1 Introduction
The instructions in this chapter assume that:

the controller is already mounted and wired correctly

the controller is new, still set to its factory settings, including access level

the correct sensor type was specified for each zone when the controller was
ordered 30), so that the input jumpers and input type parameter values were set
appropriately at the factory.
Before following the instructions in this chapter, read the precautions at the front of
this manual.
30
To determine the input types specified when the controller in hand was ordered, check the model
number on the serial tag. The meaning of each character in the model number is in 2.2.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
17.2 Quick Instructions
The instructions below guide you through the minimum tasks needed to configure a
single zone in the controller for PID control. Unless you change the value of a
configuration parameter, the controller will use the defaults and the input type
settings configured at the factory. The parameters modified using the instructions
below are only a few of the parameters available to customize the controller’s
operation for your application.
These instructions assume that a display board is connected to the controller.
Repeat the procedure for each zone.
If you want to learn about all the parameters available, read Chapters 19 through 26.
Chapters 19 through 26 also contain the default values for all configuration
parameters in every menu.
1. Put the zone in standby mode.
a) Apply power.
b) After self-check display stops, press and hold the
(mode/enter) key31
(approximately three seconds) until     is displayed on the top line and
the current mode on the lower line.
c) Press the
or
key until     is displayed.
key again. The display will show     alternating with the
d) Press the
process value on the top line. The setpoint will be displayed on the lower
line.
2. Specify the input type, unless the factory setting will be used.32
a) Press and hold the
(menu access) key until    is displayed on the
top line (approximately three seconds). (If the name of a menu other than
input is displayed, repeatedly press the
key until you see    .33)
key once to make     appear
b) When    is displayed, press the
on the lower line. The choice that is currently stored in the controller’s
database for this parameter will alternate with the display of     .
31
To see which switch (pushbutton) on the display board is used for each function, see 16.1.
32
The input type is set at the factory to match the input type specified when the controller was ordered. If
you change the input type from the factory setting, you may also have to change the input jumper
settings. See 3.2.2 for details.
If you do not see    when you access the menus (or do not see     first in the input menu),
someone has accessed the menu system since the controller was powered up. At power up the menus
are displayed in the sequence shown on page 18-5. However, once you enter and leave the menu
system, the controller “remembers” where you left. When you next access the menus, the menu
parameter that was displayed when you left (or were timed out) will again be displayed. Repeatedly
33
key will cycle through the menus. Repeatedly pressing the
pressing the
is on display will cycle through the parameters within the menu.
17-2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
key while a menu name
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Quick Setup Instructions
c) Use the
or
key to step through the list of choices until the desired
input type is on display.
d) Press
to write the choice to the controller’s database. The next
parameter in the menu (    ) will be displayed. Most applications use
the default bias value (zero).
3. Specify the output type for output 1.
a) While still in the menu system, press the
displayed on the top line.
b) Once at the output menu, press
  .  on the lower line.
key until     (output) is
to display the output 1 type parameter
c ) The output type currently assigned to output 1 will alternate with the display of
  .  . If the output has been changed from the default    , use the
or
key to display    .
key once. The next
d) To write    to the controller’s database, press the
parameter,   .  (output 1 action) will be displayed.
4. Specify the output 1 action,    (direct) or   (reverse), for output 1. Generally,
heating applications are reverse-acting and cooling applications are direct-acting.
a) When the   .  parameter is on display, use the
the action for your application.
or
keys to display
key once to write the action choice to the database. The next
b) Press the
parameter,   .  (output 1 cycle time) will be displayed.
5. Specify the output 1 cycle time.
and
keys to
a) When the   .  parameter is on display, use the
display the appropriate time for your application. Generally, for digital outputs,
valid cycle times range from 15 to 120 seconds.
key to write the cycle time value to the controller’s database and
b) Press the
display the next parameter   .  (output 1 low limit). Most applications use
the default value.
key to accept the output 1 low limit default and display the next
c) Press the
parameter   .  (output 1 high limit). Most applications use the default value.
6. Specify the output type for output 2.
Important: If only one output is PID, change output 2 from the default    , to one
of the other choices:   .  (on/off),    (alarm), or    .
key to display the   .  (output 2 type) parameter, alternating
a) Press the
with its current setting.
b) The default for output 2 is PID. If PID is not right for your application, use the
or
arrow key to display the desired output type.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
17-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
c) Press the
key to make this selection. What parameter you see next depends
on the output 2 type you selected.

If you use PID or on/off control for output 2, you will see   .  (output 2
action). Go on to step 7 below.

If you set output 2 to off, you will again see the   .  (output 1 type)
parameter. Go to step 9.

If you plan to use output 2 for alarm annunciation, you will see   . 
(output 2 alarm action). Read 21.5 and configure the output alarm
parameters before returning to step 9 in this chapter.
7. Specify the output 2 action for PID or on/off control.
a) When the   .  parameter is on display, use the
the action for your application.
or
keys to display
key once to write the action choice to the database. What
b) Press the
parameter you see next depends on the choice you make for the output 2 type.

If output 2 is PID, the next parameter,   .  (output 2 cycle time) will be
displayed. Go to step 8.

If output 2 is on/off, configuration of output 2 has been completed, and
  .   will again be displayed. Go to step 9.
8. Specify the output 2 cycle time for PID control.
and
keys to
a) When the   .  parameter is on display, use the
display the appropriate time for your application (see step 5a above).
key to write the value to the controller’s database and display the
b) Press the
next parameter   .  (output 2 low limit). Most applications use the default
value.
9. Make your choice of Autotune damping setting. Use this parameter to specify how
aggressively the controller will perform Autotune.
a) Press the
key repeatedly until     is displayed on the top line.
b) Display the current setting for the Autotune damping parameter by pressing the
key. The parameter abbreviation     will alternate with the current
setting,   (low),   , (normal) or   (high).
c) Use the
or
key to display the appropriate setting for your application.

Low provides fastest recovery, but with the possibility of overshoot.

High provides little or no overshoot, but with slower recovery.

Normal is a compromise between fast recovery and overshoot.
10. Autotune the zone while the setpoint is at least 1% of the sensor span above or
below the process value. This will set the tuning parameters: proportional band,
17-4
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Quick Setup Instructions
derivative action (rate) and integral action (auto reset). (More detailed instructions for
Autotuning are in 29.2.)
a) Press and hold the
key (approximately three seconds) until the top line of
the display shows     alternating with the process value and the lower line
displays the setpoint.
and
b) Use the
your application.
keys to change the setpoint to a value that will be used by
c) Press and hold the
displays     .
key until the top line displays     and the lower line
key to step through the modes until     is displayed.
d) Use the
or
e) Press the
.
key to start the autotuning operation. The display will flash
f)
Do not press any keys while the Autotune is in progress, unless you want to stop
the autotuning by putting the controller into standby or manual mode. When the
controller has completed autotuning successfully, the flashing     will
disappear. The display will revert to the normal mode operating display, with the
process value on the top line and the setpoint on the lower line.
If the Autotune was unsuccessful, the top line will briefly display   plus a twodigit error code, then go back to flashing     . Refer to Chapter 28 for the
Autotune error codes. Fix the problem and try tuning again.
Once Autotune has been completed successfully, and the PV and SV are on display,
the controller is controlling the process.
Monitor the process. If unacceptable overshoot occurs, change the Autotune
damping setting to high and repeat the Autotune. If the process response is
sluggish, change the damping setting to low and repeat the Autotune.
Repeat these instructions for the every active zone.
Once setup is complete, we recommend changing the security access level to the
most restrictive level suitable for your application. See Chapter 30 for details.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
17-5
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
17-6
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
18. General Information About
Configuration Parameters
18.1 Information in This Chapter
This chapter contains general information about the configuration parameters used
by the 2C and 4C controllers. Chapters 19 through 26 contain information about
functional groups of parameters. Each chapter describes the parameters in a single
configuration menu.
If you have used 2C and 4C controllers before, and plan to use PID control (the
default), then these chapters probably contain more information than you need. Go
back to the previous chapter. It contains instructions for doing the minimum to get a
controller up and running using PID control (and most of the other configuration
defaults).
However, if you are a new user of 2C and 4C controllers, or plan to use an option you
have not used before, then refer to this chapter, as well as Chapters 19 through 26,
for the information you need.
This chapter contains descriptions of only those parameters that can be
changed using an optional display board. Additional settings and status values
are available to a MODBUS host. For information about those parameters, see Using
the MODBUS Protocol with 2C and 4C Controllers.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
18-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
18.2 How to Use Chapters 19 through 26
You do not have to read the all of Chapters 19 through 26. You can skip any
chapters marked “optional” that do not apply to your control strategy. You can also
skip some parts of some of the required chapters. The path you take as you read will
be determined by your control strategy.
For example, in Chapter 19 everyone needs to know about the information in 19.1,
19.2, 19.3, 19.4, and 19.5, so there are no stop signs to interrupt your reading.
However, when you get to the end of 19.5 you will see:
What’s next after you have specified the input type?
If you chose an RTD or thermocouple input type, go to 19.6.
If you chose a linear input type go to 19.7.
This means that you should look at either 19.6 or 19.7, but you do not have to read
both.
If a parameter applies to both temperature and linear input types, the parameter
description will be repeated in 19.6 and 19.7.
18-2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – General Information
18.3 Information Provided About Each Parameter
18.3.1
Summary
Each menu consists of a functional group of parameters. For each parameter the
following information is provided:
18.3.2

parameter name

name as displayed – This is the parameter name as it is displayed on an
optional display board.

when displayed – This paragraph indicates whether the parameter applies
to all control strategies (“always”) or only under certain circumstances (which
are identified).

choices or range – If you must make a selection from a list, all the choices
are listed in the sequence in which they appear (on an optional display
key. If you must specify a
board) if you scroll through the list using the
numerical value, then the range of valid values is defined. For some
parameters the range is reduced if a linear input is used. See 18.3.2 for
details.

default value – The default value is shown for each configuration parameter.
The configuration parameters can be returned to their default values using
the procedure in 26.5.34

description – The purpose of the parameter and any special information you
need to know to use this parameter is provided.

effect on other parameters – For some parameters, additional information
is included. If applicable, this paragraph tells how the value selected for a
parameter affects other parameters.
Effect of Linear Input on Numerical Ranges
If the controller uses a linear input and the     (display) menu    .
(decimal position) parameter is not set to 0 (zero), the number of decimal places
specified is always imposed on the parameter’s value. This has the effect of
reducing the range of valid values for many parameters when a linear input is used.
The parameters affected are denoted by a cross-reference to this subsection.
For example, suppose the range of valid values for a parameter is –1999 to 9999.

If a linear input is used and the decimal position is 1, then the range for the
parameter is reduced to –199.9 to 999.9.

If a linear input is used and the decimal position is 2, then the range is –19.99 to
99.99.
34
The defaults in all controllers can be returned to the defaults using the Supervisor menu or a
MODBUS write function. On a 4C the DIP switches and also be used to reset parameters to the defaults
(see 3.3.2).
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
18-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide

If a linear input is used and the decimal position is 3 (the maximum for linear
inputs), then the range is –1.999 to 9.999.
In contrast, when a thermocouple or RTD input is used, the decimal position specified
using the    . parameter in the     (display) menu is a maximum. This
means that the controller applies the specified number of decimal places only if doing
so does not limit the value of the parameter. For example, suppose the range of
valid values for a parameter is –1999 to 9999.
18.3.3
Setting

If an RTD or thermocouple input is used and the decimal position is 1, then the
range for the parameter is still –1999 to 9999. If you configure a value of 1000,
no decimal places will be displayed, despite the Decimal Position setting of 1.

If an RTD or thermocouple input is used and the decimal position is 2 (the
maximum for temperature inputs), then the range for the parameter is still –1999
to 9999. If you configure a value of 1000, no decimal places will be displayed,
despite the decimal position setting of 2.
Changing Between Input Categories May Change Decimal
If you change between input categories (RTD, T/C, or linear), the decimal position
used by the controller may change. (For information about configuration of input type,
see 19.5.)
When you change the input setting to a type in a different category, the controller will
revert to the last decimal position setting used for the newly selected category (or to
the default    . value if the category has not been used since the last time the
controller was configured to use default values).
18-4
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – General Information
18.4 Menu and Parameter Display Sequence
The menus and parameters are displayed in the sequence shown below. When the
controller is powered up, the menu sequence starts with the    (input) menu.
Within the menus, the parameters are displayed in the sequence shown below.
However, not all parameters apply to every control strategy.
If a parameter does not apply to a particular control strategy, then that parameter will
not be displayed. For example, if you specify that the output 2 type is    , then
the other parameters used to configure output 2 will not be displayed.
When you have gone into the menu system and then exited the menus, the controller
“remembers” where you were. The next time someone accesses the menu system,
(mode/enter)
the controller will display the menu from which you left. When the
key is pressed, the parameter displayed will not be the first one in the menu. Instead,
the last parameter accessed during the most recent configuration session (since
power up) will be displayed. For example, if you exited the menu system (or were
timed out) when the     (display) menu’s     parameter was on display,
then the next time the menu system is accessed, the     menu    
parameter will be the first parameter displayed.
Displayed
Abbreviation
(menu name)

( input)

(display)

(output)
900M231U00A
Access
Levels
Parameters









  . 
  . 
 .  
 .  
.   




  . 
.   






















.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.




















    (configuration)
Described
In
19
and
    (factory)
    (configuration)
20
and
    (factory)




















.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.




















    (configuration)
21
and
    (factory)
 Athena Controls, Inc.
18-5
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Displayed
Abbreviation
(menu name)

(control)

(alarm)

Access
Levels
Described
In
    (user) a n d
    (configuration)
and
    (factory)
22
    (configuration)
23
Parameters


















. 
 . 
. 
 . 















.
.
.
.
.











(Autotune
damping)










.
.
.
.
.










and
    (factory)
    (user) and
    (configuration)
24
and
    (factory)

(ramp/soak’
4C only)
18-6



















.  
.  
  .
  .
  .
 . 



















    (user) and
    (configuration)
25
and
    (factory)
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – General Information
Displayed
Abbreviation
(menu name)

(supervisor)

(calibration)

(serial)
900M231U00A
Access
Levels
Parameters







 .  
 .  
.  . 
 .  
 .  
 .  

    (configuration)
Described
In
26
and
    (factory)


    (factory) only
27




    (configuration)
28








and
    (factory)
 Athena Controls, Inc.
18-7
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
18.5 Using Factory Settings
Chapters 19 through 26 include the default value for every parameter. Except in the
case of input type, this is the factory setting. (New controllers are configured at the
factory for the input types specified when the controller was ordered.)
If you want to use the default for a particular parameter, you do not have to take any
action.
For example, suppose you want to use the defaults for the setpoint low limit and the
setpoint high limit in the input menu. Also, you know that the defaults for every
parameter in the display menu are OK for your application.
In this case, when you work your way through the input menu and get to the setpoint
limits, you can press the
(mode/enter) key as each setpoint limit parameter is
displayed to accept the current value and move on to the input filter parameter.
After using the
and
keys to specify an input filter value, you press the
key to write the new value to the database. The first parameter in the input menu
(    ) will again be displayed.
key to display the abbreviated name of the next menu. It is
You press the
    (display). If you know you are satisfied with the defaults for all the display
key to cycle through the display
menu parameters, you do not have to press the
parameters.
You can immediately press the
(menu access) key again to move on to the
    (output) menu.
18-8
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
19. Input Parameters – Required
19.1 Introduction
If you plan to use a thermocouple or RTD input and a unit of measure other than
Fahrenheit (the default), the first step is changing the unit of measure to Celsius or
Kelvin.
Otherwise, the first step when configuring a controller is configuring input parameter
values using the    (input) menu if you want to use a type other than the one you
specified for the zone when you ordered the controller.
The input type for each zone is set at the factory to match the input type(s) you
ordered.
During input configuration you specify the bias (if any) to be applied to the input,
scaling the input (linear types only), specifying the setpoint range, and setting an
input filter value (if any).
This menu is available only when the security access level is set to
    (configuration) or     (factory).35
19.2 Factory Calibration Is Appropriate for the Input Type You
Ordered
You do not have to calibrate every new controller. New controllers are calibrated
at the factory for the type of input(s) you specified when ordering the controller. In
the context of ordering the controller, “type” refers to these choices:

thermocouple

RTD

decimal RTD

millivolt linear

volt linear

current linear input
35
The access level in all new 2C and 4C boards is set to     at the factory. If you cannot see the
input menu, the access level has been changed to a more restrictive level. Instructions for changing the
access level are in Section 30.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
19.3 Input Jumper Settings Must Match Input Type
Depending on the type of input, you might have to change jumper settings. In 2C
and 4C devices, the input jumpers must be set according to the type of input. For
more information about jumper settings, see 3.2.2.
The input jumpers are set at the factory to match the type of input specified
when the controller was ordered.36 If you plan to use the controller with an
input that does not match the factory settings, you must set the input jumpers
correctly before any configuration parameters are configured.
19.4 Input Menu Parameter List
The    (input) menu is shown in the table below. Descriptions of the individual
parameters are later in the subsection.
Item
Parameter Name
When Displayed

Input Type
always

Input Bias
always
   . 
Linear Input Scaling Low Limit
   . 
Linear Input Scaling High Limit
only for linear input types
(millivolt, voltage, or milliamp)
  .  
Setpoint Low Limit
always
  .  
Setpoint High Limit
always
 .   
Input Filter
always
36
To determine the type of input for which the controller in hand was calibrated (and for which the input
jumpers were set) at the factory, check the model number on the serial tag. The meaning of each
character in the model number is in 2.2.
19-2
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900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Input
The process of configuring the input parameters is diagramed below.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
19.5 Specifying the Input Type
19.5.1
Parameter Used
After changing the unit of measure for temperature inputs, the next step when
configuring a controller is always specifying the input type using the    (input)
menu if different from the input type specified when the controller board was ordered.
The input type is set at the factory to match the calibration type specified when the
controller was ordered.37 However, the input type can be changed using the    
parameter described below. If you change the input type from the factory setting, you
may also have to change the input jumper settings. See 3.2.2 for details.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Input Type

always























Default:


type J thermocouple
type E thermocouple
type C thermocouple
type B thermocouple

1 to 5 V linear

0 to 10 V linear

0 to 5 V linear

0 to 1 V linear
 . 
10 to 50 mV linear
.  
0 to 100 mV linear
. 
0 to 50 mV linear
. 
0 to 10 mV linear
.   
4 to 20 mA linear
.  
0 to 20 mA linear
 .
100 ohm compressed RTD with decimal support
(notice the decimal point in the parameter choice)

100 ohm platinum RTD (no decimal point)

Platinel II thermocouple
type T thermocouple
type S thermocouple
type R thermocouple

nickel-nickel-molybdenum thermocouple
type n thermocouple

type K thermocouple
J thermocouple when configuration parameters are set to their
defaults using a MODBUS host, the 4C DIP switches (see
3.3.2), or the Supervisor menu (see 26.5). At the factory, the
input type of a new controller is configured to match the input
type specified when you ordered the controller board. See Note
1 below.
37
To determine the inputs ordered for the controller in hand, check the model number on its serial tag.
The significance of each character in the model number is in 2.2.
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900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Input
Description:
The type of input the controller algorithm will expect. The type of
input specified affects how the controller processes the input
signal and calculates the output needed to achieve the setpoint.
For example, the controller will linearize a thermocouple input.
This operation is not needed if the input type is already linear.
Effect on Other
Parameters:
If you select an RTD or thermocouple input, then scaling limits
used by linear input types do not apply. The Linear Input
Scaling Low Limit (   . ) and Linear Input Scaling High Limit
(   . ) parameters will not be displayed in the input menu.
If you select   . (100 ohm compressed RTD with decimal
support), the Decimal Position parameter will not be displayed in
the display menu. A compressed RTD input always uses one
decimal position.
When you change the input type, parameters expressed in
engineering units will be recalculated or set to the defaults.
Also, the decimal position may change when you change the
input type; see 18.3.3.
Note 1: The input type is configured at the factory. The type configured depends on
the input types ordered. To determine the inputs ordered for the controller in hand,
check the model number on its serial tag. The significance of each character in the
model number is in 2.2.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
19.5.2
Procedure for Viewing the Currently Selected Input Type
To view the input type currently set for the controller:
1. Access the configuration menus by pressing the
(menu access) key until a
string of letters is displayed on the top line (approximately three seconds).
2. If a menu name other than    is displayed, press the
displayed on the top line.
key until    is
3. If a parameter name other than     is displayed on the lower line, press the
(mode/enter) key repeatedly to step until the     parameter is
displayed. The display of the parameter will alternate with the currently
configured choice for this parameter. For example, in an out-of-the box
controller,     will alternate with the display of  (for J thermocouple).
19.5.3
Procedure for Changing the Input Selection
To change the input type selection:
key or
key to cycle through the input type choices until the
1. Press the
input type you want is displayed on the lower line.
2. Press the
key once to write the configuration change to the controller’s
EEPROM and display the next parameter (bias) in the input menu.
What’s next after you have specified the input type?
If you chose an RTD or thermocouple input type, go to 19.6.
If you chose a linear input type go to 19.7.
19-6
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900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Input
19.6 Configuring Input Parameters for RTD and Thermocouple
Input Types
19.6.1
Applying a Bias to the Temperature Input
When using an RTD or thermocouple input, you can specify the bias (if any) to be
applied to the input. Applying bias allows you to compensate for any difference
between sensor reading and the point to be measured. The displayed process
variable and setpoint will be offset by the value entered here. (You can leave the
input bias set to the default zero when setting up the controller. If the need for bias
becomes evident later, you can adjust the configured value.)
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
900M231U00A
Input Bias

always
–1000 to 1000 F
–556 to 556 C and K
0
Description:
Applying bias allows you to compensate for any difference (plus
or minus) between sensor reading and the location to be
measured. The displayed process variable and setpoint will be
offset by the value entered here.
Effect on Other
Parameters:
No effect on other configuration parameters. However, the bias
will be applied to the displayed PV and the active setpoint.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
19.6.2
Used
Specifying the Setpoint Range When a Temperature Input is
Configure the setpoint range, that is, the range of setpoint values the operator can
enter using an optional display board. This range will also apply to recipe setpoints,
that is, to soak levels specified using the ramp/soak parameters.
The Setpoint Low Limit and the Setpoint High Limit must not be set to the same
value.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range
Default:
Description:
Setpoint Low Limit
  .  
always
sensor low limit to sensor high limit
–328 (See Note 1 below.)
This is the lowest value that can be entered by the operator as a
setpoint (before bias is applied). This limit is also applies to
ramp/soak recipe soak levels.
Setpoint High Limit
  .  
always
sensor low limit to sensor high limit
1400 (See Note 1 below.)
This is the highest value that can be entered by the operator as
a setpoint (before bias is applied). This limit is also applies to
ramp/soak recipe soak levels.
Note 1: The default value depends on the input type. The default value shown
applies when the input type is a J thermocouple.
19.6.3
Applying an Input Filter When a Temperature Input is Used
You can configure the controller to average the input over a period of 0.1 to 10
seconds before it uses the input value in the control algorithm calculations.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
19-8
Input Filter

always
0.1 to 10.0 seconds
0.5
Used to specify the time period over which the controller will
average the input before using the input in the control algorithm.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Input
If you are using an RTD or thermocouple input type, you have
finished configuration of input parameters. The remainder of this
chapter does not apply to your application.
Go to Chapter 20 – Display Parameters.
900M231U00A
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
19.7 Configuring Input Parameters for Linear Inputs
19.7.1
Applying a Bias to the Linear Input
When using a linear input, you can specify the bias (if any) to be applied to the input.
Applying bias allows you to compensate for any difference between sensor reading
and the point to be measured. The displayed process variable and setpoint will be
offset by the value entered here.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Input Bias

always
–1000 to 1000 (See Note 1 below.)
0
Description:
Applying bias allows you to compensate for any difference (plus
or minus) between sensor reading and the location to be
measured. The displayed process variable and setpoint will be
offset by the value entered here.
Effect on Other
Parameters:
No effect on other configuration parameters. However, the bias
will be applied to the displayed PV and the active setpoint.
Note 1: The range is reduced if a linear input is used and the value of the    
(display) menu    . (decimal position) parameter is not 0 (zero). See 18.3.2 for
more information about the effect of a linear input on numerical ranges.
19-10
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900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Input
19.7.2
Scaling the Linear Input
When a linear input is used, the controller will scale the input based on the range you
specify. That means that you enter the PV to be represented by the input when the
input signal is at its lowest level, and the PV to be represented by the input at its
highest level. The controller divides that range into equal segments to interpret a
particular input signal.
For example, suppose you use a 4 to 20 mA input to represent a PV that ranges from
0 to 170 F. You can configure the Linear Input Scaling Low Limit as 0 and the
Linear Input Scaling High Limit as 170 F. The controller will then be able to
calculate that a one mA change in the linear input means that the PV has changed
10 F. A 0.1 mA change in the input represents a 1 F change in the PV.
The Linear Input Scaling Low Limit and the Linear Input Scaling High Limit must not
be set to the same value.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
Linear Input Scaling Low Limit
   . 
only when a linear input type has been selected
–1999 to 9999 (See Note 1 below.)
–1999
Used to specify the PV represented by the lowest possible linear
input signal.
Limits the valid values for the control menu’s deadband and
hysteresis parameters applied to on/off outputs, as well as for
other parameters. Determines the value displayed for the
calibration menu’s     (calibration low) parameter.
Linear Input Scaling High Limit
   . 
only when a linear input type has been selected
–1999 to 9999 (See Note 1 below.)
9999
Used to specify the PV represented by the highest possible
linear input signal.
Limits the valid values for the control menu’s deadband and
hysteresis parameters applied to on/off outputs, as well as for
other parameters. Determines the value displayed for the
calibration menu’s     (calibration high parameter).
Note 1: The range is reduced if a linear input is used and the value of the    
(display) menu    . (decimal position) parameter is not 0 (zero). See 18.3.2 for
more information about the effect of a linear input on numerical ranges.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
19.7.3
Specifying the Setpoint Range When a Linear Input Is Used
The setpoint range, that is, the range of setpoint values the operator can enter using
an optional display board. This range will also apply to recipe setpoints, that is, to
soak levels specified using the ramp/soak parameters.
The Setpoint Low Limit and the Setpoint High Limit must not be set to the same
value.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range
Default:
Description:
19.7.4
Setpoint Low Limit
  .  
always
limited by the scaling defined for the input using the    .
and    . parameters in the    (input) menu
depends on input type
This is the lowest value that can be entered as a setpoint (before
bias is applied).
Setpoint High Limit
  .  
always
limited by the scaling defined for the input using the    .
and    . parameters in the    (input) menu
depends on input type
This is the highest value that can be entered as a setpoint
(before bias is applied).
Applying an Input Filter When a Linear Input is Used
You can configure the controller to average the input over a period of 0.1 to 10
seconds before it uses the input value in the control algorithm calculations.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
19-12
Input Filter

always
0.1 to 10.0 seconds
0.5
Used to specify the time period over which the controller will
average the input before using the input in the control algorithm.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
20. Display Parameters – Required
20.1 Introduction
The     (display) menu is shown in the table below. Descriptions of the
individual parameters are later in the subsection.
This menu is available only when the security access level is set to
    (configuration) or     (factory).38
Item
Parameter Name
When Displayed
   . 
Decimal Position39
always
 .   
Display Filter
always

Unit of Measure40
for RTD and thermocouple inputs only

Setpoint Display Blanking
always
The process of configuring the display parameters is shown on the following page.
The access level in all new controller boards is set to      at the factory. If you cannot see the
display menu, the access level has been changed to a more restrictive level. Instructions for changing
the access level are in Section 30.
38
39
Even though not all controllers are connected to an optional display board, you must configure the
appropriate decimal position parameter (or accept the default) because the controller uses this parameter
value to determine how many decimal places to store for the PV and SP values.
40
The controller uses this unit of measure internally and for external communication.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Which display parameters apply to your application?
If you chose an RTD or thermocouple input type, go to 20.2.
If you chose a linear input type go to 20.3.
20-2
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900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Display
20.2 Configuring Display Parameters for RTD and
Thermocouple Input Types
20.2.1
Used
Choosing the Decimal Position When a Temperature Input Is
The decimal point location applies to all controllers, even if no optional display board
is used. Even if the controller has no display, you must configure the decimal
position parameter (or accept the default) because the controller uses this parameter
value to determine how many decimal places to store for the PV and SV values.
The only exception is when the input type is   . (100 ohm compressed RTD with
decimal support). In this case, the decimal position is always 1, and the    .
parameter is not displayed.
The decimal position may change when you change the input type; see 18.3.3.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
20.2.2
Used
Decimal Position
   . 
always (unless the input type is   . )
0 and 1
0
In the case of a controller using a temperature input, this
parameter is used to choose the maximum quantity of digits to
the right of the decimal point on the display, and in the PV and
SV values used in the controller’s calculations. No decimal
position will be displayed if necessary to accommodate the fourcharacter display.
Specifying the Display Filter When a Temperature Input Is
Unlike the input filter, the value entered for the display filter has no effect on control.
The input filter slows the rate at which the displayed PV is changed. The display filter
is generally used when at least one decimal place is displayed.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Display Filter
 .   
always
0.1 to 10.0 seconds (See Note 1 below.)
0.1
Used to specify the minimum time period between changes of
the displayed PV value.
Note 1: The range of valid values for this parameter always includes tenths values,
regardless of the    . (decimal position) setting.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
20.2.3
Used
Choosing the Unit of Measure When a Temperature Input Is
The unit of measure applies to all controllers. The unit of measure specified here is
used by the controller for internal operations and external communication.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
20.2.4
Input Is
Unit of Measure

only when an RTD or thermocouple input type has been
selected



Fahrenheit
Celsius
Kelvin
Fahrenheit
Used to choose the unit of measure used by the controller as it
interprets the input and performs output calculations.
Blanking the Display of the Setpoint When a Temperature
Used
If you do not want the setpoint to be displayed all the time (while the controller is
operating normally), then use the Setpoint Display Blanking parameter to specify the
length of time the setpoint should be displayed before being hidden (“blanked”). The
setpoint display will remain blank until any key is pressed. Pressing any key will
cause the controller to display the setpoint again. The setpoint will remain on display
until the period specified here has elapsed.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Setpoint Display Blanking

always
    off
10 to 9999 seconds
Default:
Description:
off
Used to specify the number of seconds the setpoint should be
displayed before the display of the setpoint goes blank.
If you are using an RTD or thermocouple input type, you have
finished configuration of display parameters. The remainder of
this chapter does not apply to your application.
Go to Chapter 21 – Output Parameters.
20-4
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900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Display
20.3 Configuring Display Parameters for Linear Input Types
20.3.1
Choosing the Decimal Position When a Linear Input Is Used
The decimal point location applies to all 2C and 4C controllers. You must configure
the decimal position parameter (or accept the default) because the controller uses
this parameter value to determine how many decimal places to store for the PV and
SV values.
The decimal position may change when you change the input type; see 18.3.3.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
20.3.2
Decimal Position
   . 
always
0, 1, 2, 3
0
In the case of a controller using a linear input, this parameter is
used to choose the quantity of digits always displayed to the
right of the decimal point on the display, and in the PV and SV
values used in the controller’s calculations. If the controller uses
a linear input and the    . parameter is not set to 0 (zero),
the number of decimal places specified is always imposed on
the parameter’s value. This has the effect of reducing the range
of valid values for many parameters when a linear input is used.
See 18.3.2 for information about this effect of a linear input on
parameter ranges when a non-zero decimal position is used.
Specifying the Display Filter When a Linear Input Is Used
Unlike the input filter, the value entered for the display filter has no effect on control.
The input filter slows the rate at which the displayed PV is changed. The display filter
is generally used when at least one decimal place is displayed.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Display Filter
 .   
always
0.1 to 10.0 seconds (See Note 1 below.)
0.1
Used to specify the minimum time period between changes of
the displayed PV value.
Note 1: The range of valid values for this parameter always includes tenths values,
regardless of the    . (decimal position) setting.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
20.3.3
Used
Blanking the Display of the Setpoint When a Linear Input Is
If you do not want the setpoint to be displayed all the time (while the controller is
operating normally), then use the Setpoint Display Blanking parameter to specify the
length of time the setpoint should be displayed before being hidden (“blanked”). The
setpoint display will remain blank until any key is pressed. Pressing any key will
cause the controller to display the setpoint again. The setpoint will remain on display
until the period specified here has elapsed.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Setpoint Display Blanking

always
    off
10 to 9999 seconds
Default:
Description:
20-6
off
Used to specify the number of seconds the setpoint should be
displayed before the display of the setpoint goes blank.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
21. Output Parameters – Required
21.1 Introduction
The 2C controller uses two standard hardware outputs per zone. The 4C controller
uses one or two standard hardware outputs per zone. One or more logical output is
mapped to each of these hardware outputs. (See 2.6 for information about the
standard hardware outputs associated with the logical outputs configured here.)
The way that these standard hardware outputs are used is determined by the way
you configure logical output(s) associated with each hardware output.
Logical outputs are configured using the parameters in the     (output) menu
(shown in the table below).
The output menu is available only when the security access level is set to
    (configuration) or     (factory).41
Item
Parameter Name
When Displayed
  .  
Output 1 Type
always
  .  
Output 1 Action
only if Output 1 Type is On/Off or PID
  .  
Output 1 Cycle Time
only if Output 1 Type is PID
  .  
Output 1 Low Limit
  .  
Output 1 High Limit
  .  
Output 1 Alarm Action
  .  
Output 1 Alarm Operation
  .  
Output 1 Alarm Delay
  .  
Output 1 Alarm Inhibit
  .  
Output 1 Alarm Setpoint
  .  
Output 2 Type
always
  .  
Output 2 Action
only if Output 2 Type is On/Off or PID
  .  
Output 2 Cycle Time
only if Output 2 Type is PID
only if Output 1 Type is Alarm
41
The access level in all new 2C and 4C boards is set to     at the factory. If you cannot see the
output menu, the access level has been changed to a more restrictive level. Instructions for changing the
access level are in Section 30.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
21-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Item
Parameter Name
  .  
Output 2 Low Limit
  .  
Output 2 High Limit
  .  
Output 2 Alarm Action
  .  
Output 2 Alarm Operation
  .  
Output 2 Alarm Delay
  .  
Output 2 Alarm Inhibit
  .  
Output 2 Alarm Setpoint
When Displayed
only if Output 2 Type is Alarm
The process of configuring the output parameters is shown below.
21-2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters– Output
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
21-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
21.2 Specifying the Output Type
The first step in configuring use of the standard outputs is specifying the output type
(function).
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
Output 1 Type and Output 2 Type42
  .   a n d    .  
always












disabled
alarm
On/Off
PID
PID
Used to choose the function of each standard output.
The choice made here for output 1 or output 2 determines what
other parameters are displayed in the output menu for output 1
or output 2.
The output type selected also affects the parameters displayed
in the control menu.
If an output is disabled or used for alarm annunciation, then that
output’s failsafe output percentage parameter will not be
displayed in the supervisor menu.
What’s next after specifying the output type?
If you chose OFF for Output 1, specify the type for Output 2.
If you chose on/off for an output, go to 21.3.
If you chose PID control for an output, go to 21.4
If you chose alarm for an output, go to 21.5.
42
All the output 1 parameters applicable to the type selected are displayed before the Output 2 type
parameter is displayed.
21-4
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters– Output
21.3 Choosing the Output Action for On/Off Control
When the output type is set to on/off, only one other output parameter must be
configured: output action.
When an output is used for on/off control, it can be either direct or reverse acting.

When the on/off output action is configured for reverse action (heating
applications), the controller will apply 100% output if the process temperature is
below the setpoint and 0% if the PV is at the SV.

When the on/off output action is configured for direct action (cooling
applications), the controller will apply 100% output if the process temperature is
above the setpoint and 0% if the PV is at the SV.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
Output 1 Action and Output 2 Action
  .  and   .  
if output type is on/off or PID


direct
reverse
output 1: reverse
output 2: direct
Used to specify whether the output will be direct-acting or
reverse-acting.
If you are using an on/off output, you have finished configuration
of that output’s parameters. The remainder of this chapter does
not apply to on/off outputs.
If only one output has been configured, go back to 21.2 to specify
the type for the other output.
If both outputs have been configured, go to Chapter 22 – Control
Parameters.
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21-5
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
21.4 Configuring Output Parameters for PID Control
21.4.1
Choosing the Output Action for PID Control
When an output is used for PID control, it can be either direct or reverse acting.

When the PID output action is configured for reverse action (heating
applications), the proportional band is initially applied below the setpoint.

When the PID output action is configured for direct action (cooling applications),
the proportional band is initially applied above the setpoint.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
21.4.2
Output 1 Action and Output 2 Action
  .  and   .  
if output type is on/off or PID


direct
reverse
output 1: reverse
output 2: direct
Used to specify whether the output will be direct-acting or
reverse-acting.
Specifying the Cycle Time for PID Control
When an output is used for PID control, you must specify a cycle time that is
appropriate for your application. The cycle time enables you to use a digital output to
achieve PID control.
For example, suppose the cycle time is set to 10 seconds and the control algorithm
calculates that the output percentage should be 50%. A normally open relay
connected to the digital output of the controller will be closed for 5 seconds and open
for 5 seconds in each ten second cycle. If the output percentage changes to 70%,
the relay will be closed for 7 seconds and open for 3 seconds in each ten second
cycle.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
21-6
Output 1 Cycle Time 1 and Output 2 Cycle Time
  .   a n d    .  
if output type is PID
1 to 120 seconds
5 seconds
Used to specify the period of time in which the output completes
an on-off cycle.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters– Output
21.4.3
Specify the PID Output Range
If the controlled field device should never be fully off and/or fully on, you can limit the
range of the output when PID is used. The range defined here affects both:

the control algorithm’s output when the controller is in normal (automatic) mode,
and

the fixed output percentage the operator can enter when the controller is in
manual mode.
For example, suppose the lowest input the controlled device should receive is 30% of
a discrete output’s cycle time, and the maximum input the controlled device should
receive is 70% of the discrete output’s cycle time. In this case you set the   . 
= 30 and the   .  = 70.
The lowest percentage of the cycle time the digital output would be on is 30% of the
cycle time, and the highest percentage of the cycle time the output is on is 70%. If
the cycle time configured with the   .  parameter is 10 seconds, then the output
is never on for less than 3 seconds (30% of 10 seconds), even if the process variable
requires no correction. The output is never on for more than 7 seconds (70% of 10
seconds).
The limits apply to both normal (automatic) mode and manual mode. In our example,
the operator can never turn off the field device using the controller while the output
limits are set to 30 and 70, regardless of whether the controller is in auto or manual
mode.
The lower and upper output limits should not be set to the same value.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
900M231U00A
Output 1 Low Limit and Output 2 Low Limit
  .   a n d   .  
if output type is PID
0 to 100 percent
0
Used to specify the lowest percentage used for the output in
both manual and normal (automatic) modes.
No effect on other configuration parameters. However, it limits
the allowable range for the fixed output percent in manual mode.
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21-7
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
Output 1 High Limit and Output 2 High Limit
  .  a n d   .  
if output type is PID
0 to 100 percent
100
Used to specify the highest percentage used for the output in
both manual and normal (automatic) modes.
No effect on other configuration parameters. However, it limits
the allowable range for the fixed output percent in manual mode.
21.5 Configuring Output Parameters for Alarm Annunciation
21.5.1
Choosing the Alarm Action
The first step in configuring an output to be used for alarm annunciation is to choose
the alarm action. The choices are:

   (off) – The alarm output will not be used.

   (normal) – The output will go to the alarm state when the process
value triggers the alarm and go out of the alarm state when the alarm
condition has been cleared.

   (latching) – Once the output goes to the alarm state, the output will
key, even if the
remain in the alarm state until the operator presses the
alarm condition has been cleared before the operator presses the key.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
21-8
Output 1 Alarm Action and Output 2 Alarm Action
  .  and   .  
if output type is alarm



off
normal
latching
off
Used to choose the function of the alarm output.
If off is chosen, then no other output alarm parameters are
displayed.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters– Output
21.5.2
Choosing the Alarm Operation
The second step in configuring an output to be used for alarm annunciation is to
choose the alarm operation. The choices are:

process alarm – Activated when the process variable reaches the alarm value
(alarm setpoint parameter value), independent of the PV’s relationship to the
process setpoint. A high process alarm activates at and above the alarm
setpoint. A low process alarm activates at and below the alarm setpoint. For
example, if you want an alarm to alert the operator when the PV goes up to 200,
then configure the alarm as a high process alarm, and specify the alarm setpoint
as 200.

deviation alarm – Activated when the process variable deviates from the
process setpoint by the amount specified using the alarm value (alarm setpoint
parameter value). A high deviation alarm activates when the PV is above the
process setpoint by the amount specified using the alarm value. A low deviation
alarm activates when the PV is below the process setpoint by the amount
specified using the alarm value. For example, if you want an alarm to alert the
operator when the PV is 50 below the setpoint, then configure the alarm as a low
deviation alarm, and specify the alarm value (using the alarm setpoint parameter)
as 50.

inverse band alarm – Activated when the process value is within a specified
band centered around the setpoint. For example, if you want the alarm to alert
the operator when the PV is 10 units (or less) above or below the process
setpoint, then configure the alarm as an inverse band alarm, and specify 10 for
the alarm setpoint parameter value.

normal band alarm – Activated when the process value is outside a specified
band centered around the setpoint. For example, if you want the alarm to alert
the operator when the PV is 10 units (or more) above or below the process
setpoint, then configure the alarm as a normal band alarm, and specify 10 for the
alarm setpoint parameter value.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
900M231U00A
Output 1 Alarm Operation and Output 2 Alarm Operation
  .  and   .  
if output type is alarm












 .
 .
.
 . 
.
.
low process alarm
high process alarm
inverse band
normal band
low deviation alarm
high deviation alarm
output 1: process low
output 2: process high
Used to choose the alarm operation.
Determines how the value of the   .  or   .  (alarm
setpoint) parameter is used.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
21-9
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
21.5.3
Specifying the Alarm Delay – Optional
If you specify an alarm delay, then when the controller detects an alarm condition, the
alarm output will not be activated until the alarm delay time has passed. Use the
alarm delay to reduce nuisance alarms for transient conditions that are corrected
without any operator action.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
21.5.4
Output 1 Alarm Delay and Output 2 Alarm Delay
  .  and   .  
if output type is alarm
0 to 9999 seconds
0
Used to specify the number of seconds the controller should wait
before signaling an alarm condition.
Inhibiting the Alarm– Optional
You can configure an inhibit time for the alarm. If you specify an alarm inhibit time,
the controller will not activate the alarm output following power up until the alarm
inhibit time has elapsed. This is particularly useful for preventing activation of low
alarms during startup (before the process has had time to reach operating
temperature).
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
21-10
Output 1 Alarm Inhibit and Output 2 Alarm Inhibit
  .  and   .  
if output type is alarm
0 to 9999 seconds
0
Used to specify the number of seconds the controller should wait
after power up before signaling an alarm condition.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters– Output
21.5.5
Specifying the Alarm Value (Setpoint)
How the alarm setpoint value is used depends on the type of alarm.

process alarm – activated when process value reaches the value specified
with the output alarm setpoint parameter

deviation alarm – activated when process value differs from the process
setpoint by the value specified with the output alarm setpoint parameter

inverse band alarm – activated when the PV is inside a band centered
around the setpoint; the width of the band on either side of the setpoint is
specified with the output alarm setpoint parameter

normal band alarm – activated when the PV is outside a band centered
around the setpoint; the width of the band on either side of the setpoint is
specified with the output alarm setpoint parameter
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Output 1 Alarm Setpoint and Output 2 Alarm Setpoint
(See Note 2 below)
  .   and   .  
if output type is alarm
RTD and thermocouple input types: sensor low limit to sensor
high limit
linear input types: limited by the scaling defined for the input
using the    . and    . parameters in the   
(input) menu (See Note 1 below.)
process alarm: 77
deviation, inverse band, normal band: 1728
Used to specify the alarm setpoint (process alarm), the alarm
limit (deviation alarm), or the width of the alarm band on either
side of the setpoint (inverse and normal band alarms)
Note 1: The range is reduced when a linear input is used and the value of the
    (display) menu    . (decimal position) parameter is not 0 (zero). See
18.3.2 for more information about the effect of a linear input on numerical ranges.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
21-11
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
21-12
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
22. Control Parameters – Required If Outputs
Are Used for Control
22.1 Introduction
The 2C and 4C boards all support both PID and on/off control. Zones outputs can be
configured for two different types of control. For information about the types of
applications that are suitable for each type of control, see 1.6.
The parameters used to customize the control operation are in the     (control)
menu. This menu is available only when the security access level is set to
    (configuration) or     (factory).43
If both outputs are configured for use with alarms or turned off (using the output 1
type and output 2 type parameters), then the     (control) menu will not be
displayed.
43
The access level in all new 2C and 4C boards is set to     at the factory. If you cannot see the
control menu, the access level has been changed to a more restrictive level. Instructions for changing
the access level are in Section 30.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
22-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Item
Parameter Name
When Displayed
  . 
Deadband for Output 1
only if output 1 type is on/off
   . 
Hysteresis for Output 1
only if output 1 type is on/off
  . 
Deadband for Output 2
only if output 2 type is on/off
   . 
Hysteresis for Output 2
only if output 2 type is on/off

Proportional Band 1
only if output 1 type is PID

Proportional Band 2
only if output 2 type is PID, and output 1 and
output 2 are not both set to the same action
(see Note 1)

Derivative (Rate) Action
only if output 1 or output 2 type is PID (see
Note 2)

Offset (Manual Reset)
only if output 1 or output 2 type is PID (see
Notes 2 and 3)

Integral Action (Auto Reset)
only if output 1 or output 2 type is PID, and
the value of 
3)
   = 0 (see Notes 2 and
Note 1: If output 1 and output 2 are both set to PID direct action, or if both outputs
are set to PID reverse action, then the controller applies the same proportional band
to both outputs. The   . parameter is not needed, so it is not displayed when
you step through the control menu.
Note 2: If both outputs are PID, then the values specified for    ,     , and
   are applied to both outputs.
Note 3: The controller uses either a manual reset value or an integral action value,
not both.
22-2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Control
The process of configuring the control parameters is shown below.
Which control parameters apply to your application?
If you chose on/off for an output in Chapter 7, then go to 22.2.
If you chose PID control for an output in Chapter 7, go to 22.3.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
22-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
22.2 Configuring Control Parameters for On/Off Control
22.2.1
Introduction
On/off control has two states, fully off and fully on. To prevent rapid cycling, the
controllers allow you to configure a deadband and a hysteresis value as described in
1.6.3.
22.2.2
Specifying the Deadband for On/Off Control
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
  . and   . 
When Displayed:
if output type is on/off
Range:
Default:
Description:
22-4
Deadband for Output 1 and Deadband for Output 2
RTD and thermocouple input types: negative sensor span to
positive sensor span
linear input types: –1999 to 9356
1
If a deadband value is applied to an output, it has the effect of
shifting the setpoint and the hysteresis for that output. That is,
the deadband for each output moves the “off” transition away
from the setpoint, and pushes the “on” transition away by an
equal amount. For a heating (reverse-acting) output, a positive
deadband value moves the setpoint used by the controller below
the displayed setpoint. For a cooling (direct-acting) output, a
positive deadband value moves the setpoint used by the
controller above the setpoint displayed. (A negative deadband
value has the opposite effect.) For more information about the
use of deadband, see 1.6.3.2.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Control
22.2.3
Applying Hysteresis to On/Off Control
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Hysteresis for Output 1 and Hysteresis for Output 2
   . and    . 
if input type is on/off
RTD and thermocouple input types: 0 to positive sensor span
linear input types: 0 to 9356
1
The hysteresis value represents a temperature value that the
controller uses to move the “on” and “off” transitions away from
the setpoint by an amount equal to half the configured hysteresis
value. For more information about use of hysteresis, see 1.6.3.1.
If you are configuring control parameters for an on/off output, you
are finished configuring the control parameters that apply to that
output. The remainder of this chapter does not apply to on/off
outputs.
If both outputs will be used for control, but control parameters for
only one output have been configured, configure the control
parameters for the second output.
900M231U00A

If you chose on/off for the second output, configure the
deadband and hysteresis for the second output as
described here in 22.2.

If you chose PID control for the other output, go to 22.3.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
22-5
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
22.3 Configuring Control Parameters for PID Control
22.3.1
Introduction
When Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control is used, the controller modulates
output power by adjusting the output power percentage within a proportional band.
Power is proportionally reduced as the process temperature gets closer to the
setpoint temperature. The integral action affects the output based on the duration of
the process value’s variation from the setpoint, and the derivative action affects the
output based on the rate of change of the process value.
The values of the PID tuning parameters are automatically adjusted during the
Autotune procedure (see 29.2).
Unless you want to tune the controller manually as described in 29.3, do not alter the
tuning parameters Proportional Band for Output 1, Proportional Band for Output 2,
Derivative (Rate) Action, and Integral Action (Auto Reset). If you enter a non-zero
value for the manual offset, the controller will ignore it when you do Autotune. The
controller uses only one reset, either auto or manual.
22.3.2
Specifying the Proportional Band for Manual Tuning of PID
Control
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Proportional Band for Output 1 and Proportional Band for
Output 2
  . and   . 
if output 1 or output 2 type is PID; if both output 1 and output 2
are direct acting or reverse acting, then only   . is displayed
and applied to both outputs.
RTD and thermocouple input types: 1 to sensor span
linear input types: 1 to n, where n is the range between the
values of the    . and    . parameters in the   
(input) menu. (See Note 1 below.)
100
Used to specify the width of the band above (direct-acting
outputs) or below (reverse-acting outputs) the setpoint within
which the controller will modulate the output as the process
value approaches the setpoint.
Note 1: The range is reduced when a linear input is used and the value of the
    (display) menu    . (decimal position) parameter is not 0 (zero). See
18.3.2 for more information about the effect of a linear input on numerical ranges.
22-6
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Control
22.3.3
PID
Specifying the Derivative (Rate) Action for Manual Tuning of
Control
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Derivative

if output 1 or output 2 type is PID
0.0 to 0.9, 1 to 2400 seconds (See Notes 1 and 2 below.)
0.0
Used to specify the time period used by the derivative
component of the control algorithm when analyzing load
changes.
Note 1: The range is reduced when a linear input is used and the value of the
    (display) menu    . (decimal position) parameter is not 0 (zero). See
18.3.2 for more information about the effect of a linear input on numerical ranges.
Note 2: This parameter is a special case. Even if the value of the     (display)
menu    . (decimal position) parameter is 2 or 3 (which is permitted when a
linear input is used), the maximum number of decimal places applied to the PID
derivative (rate) action is 1 (the tenths position).
22.3.4
PID
Specifying the Offset (Manual Reset) for Manual Tuning of
Control
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
900M231U00A
Offset (Manual Reset)

if output 1 or output 2 type is PID
off, or –100 to 100 percent (See Note 1 below.)
off
Used to specify a fixed amount that the proportional band will be
offset up (positive) or down (negative). The result is an increase
or decrease of power applied at the setpoint to compensate for
proportional control offset error.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
22-7
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
22.3.5
Integral Action (Automatic Reset) Calculated Automatically
During Autotune for PID Control
This parameter is not used in manual tuning. If you assign a non-zero value to the
manual offset     parameter, then this parameter    will not be displayed.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Integral Action (Automatic Reset)

if output 1 or output 2 type is PID
0.0 to 0.9, 1 to 9600 seconds (See Note 1 below.)
0.0
Used by the Autotune operation to store the automatic reset
value.
Note 1: This parameter is a special case. Even if the value of the     (display)
menu    . (decimal position) parameter is 2 or 3 (which is permitted when a
linear input is used), the maximum number of decimal places applied to the integral
offset (automatic reset) action is 1 (the tenths position).
22-8
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
23. Alarm Parameters – Optional
23.1 Introduction
The 2C and 4C supports configuration of “logical alarms” that are mapped to 2C and
4C hardware outputs in the default mappings for one- or two-active zone controllers
(see 2.6). The state of these logical alarms can be viewed on the Multi-Comm
display for a 2C or 4C zone. (Each “faceplate” in Multi-Comm contains two “virtual
LEDs” that are associated with the logical alarms. These LEDs appear to light when a
specific condition exists.
Alarm configuration is done using the    (alarm) menu. This menu is available
only when the security access level is set to     (configuration) or    
(factory).44
These logical alarms can be configured to be the same types of alarms as the alarms
configured via the output menu. In addition, the logical alarms configured here can
be used to signal that recipe events have occurred. (Recipe events are defined using
parameters in the ramp/soak menu; see Chapter 25.)
Item
Parameter Name
When Displayed
  .  
Alarm 1 Action
always
  .  
Alarm 1 Operation
if alarm 1 action is not off or event
  .  
Alarm 1 Delay
if alarm 1 action is not off or event
  .  
Alarm 1 Inhibit
if alarm 1 action is not off or event
  .  
Alarm 1 Setpoint
if alarm 1 action is not off or event
  .  
Alarm 2 Action
always
  .  
Alarm 2 Operation
if alarm 2 action is not off or event
  .  
Alarm 2 Delay
if alarm 2 action is not off or event
  .  
Alarm 2 Inhibit
if alarm 2 action is not off or event
  .  
Alarm 2 Setpoint
if alarm 2 action is not off or event
44
The access level in all new 2C and 4C boards is set to     at the factory. If you cannot see the
alarm menu, the access level has been changed to a more restrictive level. Instructions for changing the
access level are in Section 30.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
23-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
The process of configuring the alarm parameters is shown below.
23-2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Alarm
23.2 Configuring Alarm Parameters
23.2.1
Choosing the Alarm Action
The first step in configuring an alarm is to choose the alarm action. The choices are:

   (off) – The alarm will not be used.

   (normal) – The alarm will be on when the process value triggers the
alarm and be turned off when the alarm condition has been cleared.

   (latching) – Once the alarm is on, it will remain in the alarm state until
key, even if the alarm condition has cleared
the operator presses the
before the operator presses the key.

    (event) – This special use of an alarm indicates that the controller
has reached a particular point in a ramp/soak recipe. Setting the alarm
action to “event” reserves the alarm for use by a ramp/soak recipe.
However, the specific recipe event(s) that will trigger the alarm are
configured using the    (ramp/soak) menu as described in 25.4.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
  .  and   .  
always
Choices:




Default:
off
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
45
Alarm 1 Action and Alarm 2 Action45




 off
 normal
 latching
  recipe event
Used to choose the function of the alarm.
If event is chosen, then no other alarm parameters are
displayed, and the ramp event and soak event parameters as
described in 25.4.are available for configuration.
All the alarm 1 parameters are displayed before the alarm 2 action parameter is displayed.
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23-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
23.2.2
Choosing the Alarm Operation
Unless the alarm will be used to signal ramp/soak recipe event, the second step in
configuring an alarm is to choose the alarm operation. The choices are:

process alarm – Activated when the process variable reaches the alarm value
(alarm setpoint parameter value), independent of the PV’s relationship to the
process setpoint. A high process alarm activates at and above the alarm
setpoint. A low process alarm activates at and below the alarm setpoint. For
example, if you want an alarm to alert the operator when the PV goes up to 200,
then configure the alarm as a high process alarm, and specify the alarm setpoint
as 200.

deviation alarm – Activated when the process variable deviates from the
process setpoint by the amount specified using the alarm value (alarm setpoint
parameter value). A high deviation alarm activates when the PV is above the
process setpoint by the amount specified using the alarm value. A low deviation
alarm activates when the PV is below the process setpoint by the amount
specified using the alarm value. For example, if you want an alarm to alert the
operator when the PV is 50 below the setpoint, then configure the alarm as a low
deviation alarm, and specify the alarm value (using the alarm setpoint parameter)
as 50.

inverse band alarm – Activated when the process value is within a specified
band centered around the setpoint. For example, if you want the alarm to alert
the operator when the PV is 10 units (or less) above or below the process
setpoint, then configure the alarm as an inverse band alarm, and specify 10 for
the alarm setpoint parameter value.

normal band alarm – Activated when the process value is outside a specified
band centered around the setpoint. For example, if you want the alarm to alert
the operator when the PV is 10 units (or more) above or below the process
setpoint, then configure the alarm as a normal band alarm, and specify 10 for the
alarm setpoint parameter value.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
  .  and   .  
When Displayed:
if alarm action is not event
Choices:
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
23-4
Alarm 1 Operation and Alarm 2 Operation












 .
 .
.
 . 
.
.
low process alarm
high process alarm
inverse band
normal band
low deviation alarm
high deviation alarm
alarm 1: process high
alarm 2: process low
Used to choose the alarm operation.
Determines how the value of the   .  or   .  (alarm
setpoint) parameter is used.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Alarm
23.2.3
Specifying the Alarm Delay – Optional
Unless the alarm will be used to signal ramp/soak recipe event, you can configure an
alarm delay. If you specify an alarm delay, then when the controller detects an alarm
condition, the alarm will not be activated until the alarm delay time has passed. Use
the alarm delay to reduce nuisance alarms for transient conditions that are corrected
without any operator action.
Parameter Name:
Alarm 1 Delay and Alarm 2 Delay
Name as Displayed:
  .  and   .  
When Displayed:
if alarm action is not event
Range:
Default:
Description:
23.2.4
0 to 9999 seconds
0
Used to specify the number of seconds the controller should wait
before signaling an alarm condition.
Inhibiting the Alarm– Optional
Unless the alarm will be used to signal a ramp/soak event, you can configure an
inhibit time for the alarm. If you specify an alarm inhibit time, the controller will not
activate the alarm following power up until the alarm inhibit time has elapsed. This is
particularly useful for preventing activation of low alarms during startup (before the
process has had time to reach operating temperature).
Parameter Name:
Alarm 1 Inhibit and Alarm 2 Alarm Inhibit
Name as Displayed:
  .  and   .  
When Displayed:
if alarm action is not event
Range:
Default:
Description:
900M231U00A
0 to 9999 seconds
0
Used to specify the number of seconds the controller should wait
after power up before signaling an alarm condition.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
23-5
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
23.2.5
Specifying the Alarm Value (Setpoint)
How the alarm setpoint value is used depends on the type of alarm.

process alarm – activated when process value reaches the value specified
with the alarm setpoint parameter

deviation alarm – activated when process value differs from the process
setpoint by the value specified with the alarm setpoint parameter

inverse band alarm – activated when the PV is inside a band centered
around the setpoint; the width of the band above and below the setpoint is
specified with the alarm setpoint parameter

normal band alarm – activated when the PV is outside a band centered
around the setpoint; the width of the band above and below the setpoint is
specified with the alarm setpoint parameter
Parameter Name:
Alarm 1 Setpoint and Alarm 2 Setpoint
Name as Displayed:
  .   and   .  
When Displayed:
if alarm action is not event
Range:
Default:
Description:
RTD and thermocouple input types: sensor low limit to sensor
high limit
linear input types: limited by the scaling defined for the input
using the    . and    . parameters in the   
(input) menu (See Note 1 below.)
process alarm: 77
deviation, inverse band, normal band: 1728
Used to specify the alarm setpoint (process alarm), the alarm
limit (deviation alarm), or the width of the alarm band (inverse
and normal band alarms)
Note 1: The range is reduced when a linear input is used and the value of the
    (display) menu    . (decimal position) parameter is not 0 (zero). See
18.3.2 for more information about the effect of a linear input on numerical ranges.
23-6
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
24. Autotune Damping Parameter –
Recommended
24.1 Introduction
The 2C and 4C controllers support Autotune for PID control. The     (Autotune
damping) menu contains a single parameter used to control how aggressively the
controller performs its Autotuning operation.
The choices are:

low – provides fastest recovery, but with the possibility of overshoot

high – provides little or no overshoot, but with slower recovery

normal – a compromise between fast recovery and overshoot
This menu is available only if at least one output is set to PID control. In addition, for
this menu to be accessible, the security access level is set to     , (user),
    (configuration) or     (factory).46
24.2 Configuring the Autotune Damping Parameter
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
Autotune Damping

The tune menu is displayed only if at least one output type is
PID. If the menu is displayed, then this parameter is displayed.



low
normal
high
normal
Used to choose how aggressively the controller performs
Autotune.
Affects the automatic tuning implemented using the parameters
in the control menu.
46
The access level in all new 2C and 4C boards is set to     at the factory. If you cannot see the
Autotune damping menu, the access level has been changed to a more restrictive level. Instructions for
changing the access level are in Section 30.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
24-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
24-2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
25. Ramp/Soak Recipe Parameters –
Optional
25.1 Introduction
The 4C controller can be configured to execute ramp/soak recipes on demand. A
recipe consists of up to eight segments.47 For each segment you can configure a
unique ramp time, soak level (setpoint), and soak time. As the controller executes a
segment, the controller gradually (over the period of the ramp time) changes the
currently used setpoint up or down until the setpoint reaches the soak level. During
the duration of the soak time, the controller maintains the setpoint at the specified
soak level. When the soak time has elapsed, the controller executes the next
segment of the recipe.
If at least one alarm was configured in the alarm menu (not the output menu) for
“events”, then you can activate and deactivate an alarm based on the recipe reaching
particular events in its execution, such as the start of a numbered soak period.
If your process is not responsive enough to achieve the setpoint within the ramp time
(or maintain the soak level for the entire soak time), you can use the recipe
“holdback” parameter to “stop the clock” on the ramp time (and soak time) if the
setpoint differs too much from the process value.
Execution of a recipe can be started, paused, resumed, and terminated using an
optional display board (or a Multi-Comm or MODBUS host).
Alternatively, a controller can be configured to execute a single gradual ramp to
setpoint at startup or on demand.
If both outputs are configured for use with alarms or turned off (using the output type
parameters), then the ramp/soak menu will not be displayed. However, if at least one
output is available for control, then the    (ramp/soak) menu will be available if
the security access level is set to     (user),     (configuration) or
    (factory).48
47
The eight-segment recipes configured here are based on configuration values stored in the controller’s
on-board database. You can also use a computer running Multi-Comm or a MODBUS host to run recipes
based on values stored in the computer. Those recipes in the computer can have more than eight
segments and can run on either a 4C or 2C (which has no on-board ramp-soak capability).
48
The access level in all new 4C boards is set to     at the factory. If you cannot see the
ramp/soak menu, the access level has been changed to a more restrictive level. Instructions for
changing the access level are in Section 30.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
25-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Item
Parameter Name
When Displayed
 .   
Recipe Option
always (assuming the menu is displayed
because an output is available for control)
 . . . 
Single-Setpoint Ramp Time
if recipe option is single-setpoint ramp
   . 
Recipe Holdback
always
   . 
Recipe Termination State
always
   . 
Recipe Recycle Number
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe
  .  
Resume from Power Failure
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe

Ramp Time 1
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe

Ramp Event 1
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe
and at least one alarm has been reserved
for use by the ramp/soak function49

Soak Level 1
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe

Soak Time 1
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe

Soak Event 1
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe
and at least one alarm has been reserved
for use by the ramp/soak function

Ramp Time 8
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe

Ramp Event 8
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe
and at least one alarm has been reserved
for use by the ramp/soak function

Soak Level 8
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe

Soak Time 8
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe

Soak Event 8
if recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe
and at least one alarm has been reserved
for use by the ramp/soak function



49
Use the alarm 1 action and/or alarm 2 action in the alarm menu to reserve alarm(s) for use by the
ramp/soak function.
25-2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Ramp/Soak Recipe
The process of configuring the ramp/soak parameters is shown below.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
25-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
25.2 Specifying the Recipe Option
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Recipe Option
 .   
if at least one output type is on/off or PID
Choices:

 . .
 .  .
Default:
disabled
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
disabled
eight-segment ramp/soak recipe
single-setpoint ramp
Used to choose the ramp/soak function (if any) to be used.
The choice made here affects what other parameters are
displayed in the ramp/soak menu.
What’s next after specifying the recipe option?
If you chose “disabled”, go to Chapter 26 to configure the
Supervisor menu parameters.
If you chose “single-setpoint ramp”, go to 25.3.
If you chose “eight-segment ramp/soak recipe, go to 25.4.
25-4
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Ramp/Soak Recipe
25.3 Configuring Single-Setpoint Ramp Parameters
25.3.1
Specifying the Ramp Time for a Single-Setpoint Ramp
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Single-Setpoint Ramp Time

if the recipe option is single-setpoint ramp
1 to 9999 minutes
1
Used to specify the time period over which the setpoint will be
ramped at start up from the starting process value to the
configured setpoint.
25.3.2
Specifying the Optional Recipe Holdback for a Single
Setpoint Ramp
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Recipe Holdback
   . 
always
thermocouple and RTD input types:
off
0.1 to 100 F
0.1 to 55.6 C or K
linear input types:
off
1 to 100 (See Note 1 below.)
Default:
10
Description:
Used to specify the maximum number of units that the controller
will allow the setpoint to differ from the process value before
“stopping the clock” on the ramp time. The controller will “hold
back” the SV until the PV differs from the SV by no more than
the holdback value.
Effect on Other
Parameters:
When a holdback has been configured, the single-setpoint ramp
time is used as a minimum ramp time.
Note 1: The range is reduced when a linear input is used and the value of the
    (display) menu    . (decimal position) parameter is not 0 (zero). See
18.3.2 for more information about the effect of a linear input on numerical ranges.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
25-5
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
25.3.3
Specifying What Happens at the Conclusion of the SingleSetpoint Ramp Time
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Termination State
   . 
always



Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
normal mode using default setpoint (setpoint
displayed on optional display board)
normal mode using last setpoint reached
put controller in standby mode
put controller in standby mode
Used to specify what happens at the conclusion of the ramp
time.
No effect on other configuration parameters. Does affect
setpoint and controller mode of operation. Applied only if the
ramp is allowed to run to completion. If the operator terminates
the ramp up to setpoint by changing the controller mode, the
setpoint used will be the setpoint in effect when the operator
changed the mode.
If you are using the single-setpoint ramp option, you are finished
configuring the recipe parameters. The remainder of this chapter
does not apply to the single-setpoint ramp option.
Go to Chapter 26 – Supervisor Parameters.
25-6
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Ramp/Soak Recipe
25.4 Configuring Multi-Step Ramp/Soak Parameters
25.4.1
Introduction
When the eight-segment ramp/soak recipe option has been selected, several
parameters can be configured that apply to the entire recipe. These include:

recipe holdback that prevents the setpoint from getting too far ahead of the
process value

termination state that determines what happens when execution of the recipe has
been completed

recipe recycle number used to specify the number of additional times the recipe
should be executed once started; this can also be use to set the recipe for
continuous execution

resume from power failure parameter that controls whether execution of a recipe
is resumed after a power failure
After these parameters that apply to the entire recipe have been configured, you
configure up to eight individual segments.50 Each consists of a ramp time, a soak
level (setpoint) and a soak time. In addition, if at least one logical alarm has been
reserved for recipe event annunciation, you can specify that an available alarm will
go on or off when a ramp time or soak time starts.
The following diagram shows the first few segments of a recipe and the configuration
used to implement the segments.
50
To configure fewer than eight segments, leave the values of all parameters associated with the unneeded segments set to OFF or zero.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
25-7
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
25-8
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Ramp/Soak Recipe
25.4.2
Recipe
Parameters That Apply to the Entire Multi-Step Ramp/Soak
25.4.2.1
Specifying the Optional Recipe Holdback
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Recipe Holdback
   . 
always
thermocouple and RTD input types:
off
0.1 to 100 F
0.1 to 55.6 C or K
linear input types:
off
1 to 100 (See Note 1 below.)
Default:
10
Description:
Used to specify the maximum number of units that the controller
will allow the setpoint to differ from the process value before
“stopping the clock” on the ramp time or soak time. The
controller will “hold back” the SV until the PV differs from the SV
by no more than the holdback value.
Effect on Other
Parameters:
When a holdback has been configured, the ramp times and soak
times are used as minimum times.
Note 1: The range is reduced when a linear input is used and the value of the
    (display) menu    . (decimal position) parameter is not 0 (zero). See
18.3.2 for more information about the effect of a linear input on numerical ranges.
25.4.2.2
Specifying What Happens at the Conclusion of the Multi-Step
Recipe Execution
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Termination State
   . 
always



Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
900M231U00A
normal mode using default setpoint (setpoint
displayed on optional display board)
normal mode using last setpoint reached in the
recipe
put controller in standby mode
put controller in standby mode
Used to specify what happens at the conclusion of the ramp
time.
No effect on other configuration parameters. Does affect
setpoint and controller mode of operation. Applied only if the
recipe runs to completion. If the operator terminates the recipe
execution by changing the controller mode, the setpoint used will
be the setpoint in effect when the operator changed the mode.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
25-9
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
25.4.2.3
Specifying the Number of Additional Times the Multi-Step
Recipe Will Repeat Once Started
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Recipe Recycle Number
   . 
if the recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe
0 to 99

continuous (after the recipe has been started by
an operator; recipe execution does not start automatically at
power up)
Default:
Description:
0
Used to specify the number of additional times the recipe will be
executed once started. If set to zero, the recipe will execute
once each time the operator starts it. If set to 1, the recipe will
execute twice. If set to 2, the recipe will execute three times,
etc.
25.4.2.4
Specifying What Will Happen to the Multi-Step Recipe After a
Power Failure
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
25-10
Resume from Power Failure
  .  
if the recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe


off
on
off
Used to indicate whether the recipe execution should resume
after a power failure. If this parameter is set to   , then when
power is restored, execution of the recipe will resume at the
point reached before the power failure. If this parameter is set to
   , execution of the recipe will not be resumed when power
is restored. If the operator runs the recipe later, execution will
start with segment 1.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Ramp/Soak Recipe
25.4.3
Configuring Individual Recipe Segments
25.4.3.1
Specifying the Ramp Time for Each Step of a Multi-Step Recipe
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
25.4.3.2
   ,    through    
if the recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe
0 to 9999 minutes
0
Used to specify the length of the ramp time for each segment.
Each segment can use a unique ramp time.
No effect on other configuration parameters. Does affect the
setpoint used by the controller.
Linking a Ramp Period to an Alarm
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
25.4.3.3
Ramp Time 1, Ramp Time 2, etc. through Ramp Time 8
Ramp Event 1, Ramp Event 2 etc. through Ramp Event 8
   ,    through    
if the recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe, and at least one
alarm is reserved for recipe events using the    (alarm)
menu











.
.
.
.




disabled
alarm 1 on if alarm 1 is reserved for recipe use
alarm 1 off if alarm 1 is reserved for recipe use
alarm 2 on if alarm 2 is reserved for recipe use
alarm 2 off if alarm 2 is reserved for recipe use
disabled
Used to link the chosen alarm action with the start of the ramp
time with the same segment number.
Specifying the Setpoint for Each Soak in a Multi-Step Recipe
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Soak Level 1, Soak Level 2 etc. through Soak Level 8
   ,    through    
if the recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe
   . to    . (setpoint low limit to setpoint high limit
from input menu) (See Note 1 below.)
Default:
Description:
Effect on Other
Parameters:
77
Used to specify the setpoint for the soak for each segment.
Each segment can use a unique soak level.
No effect on other configuration parameters. Does affect the
setpoint used by the controller.
Note 1: The range is reduced if the value of the     (display) menu    .
(decimal position) parameter is not 0 (zero). See 18.3.2 for more information about
the effect of a linear input on numerical ranges.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
25-11
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
25.4.3.4
Specifying the Length of Each Soak in a Multi-Step Recipe
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
25.4.3.5
   ,    through    
if the recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe
0 to 9999 minutes
0
Used to specify the length of the soak time for each segment.
Each segment can use a unique soak time.
Linking a Soak Period to an Alarm
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
25-12
Soak Time 1, Soak Time 2 through Soak Time 8
Soak Event 1, Soak Event 2 etc. through Soak Event 8
   ,    through      
if the recipe option is eight-segment r/s recipe, and at least one
alarm is reserved for recipe use using the    (alarm) menu











.
.
.
.




disabled
alarm 1 on if alarm 1 is reserved for recipe use
alarm 1 off if alarm 1 is reserved for recipe use
alarm 2 on if alarm 2 is reserved for recipe use
alarm 2 off if alarm 2 is reserved for recipe use
disabled
Used to link the chosen alarm action with the start of the soak
time with the same segment number.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
26. Supervisor Parameters – Recommended
26.1 Introduction
You can use the     (supervisor) menu to specify the output percentages to be
used if the controller detects a problem with the process input (failsafe values), and
the length of the time period during which the input should change in response to
output action if the input is working normally (loop break time).
You can also use this menu to see the highest and lowest process value received by
the controller since the controller was powered up.
The supervisor menu can also be used to set the values of all the configuration
parameters back to their factory defaults. The calibration of the controller will not be
affected when the defaults are set back to their factory defaults.
The supervisor menu is available only when the security access level is set to
    (configuration) or     (factory).51
Item
Parameter Name
When Displayed
  .  
Output 1 Failsafe Output
Percentage
if output 1 type is PID or on/off
  .  
Output 2 Failsafe Output
Percentage
if output 2 type is PID or on/off
 .  . 
Loop Break Time
always
  .  
Highest Reading
always
  .  
Lowest Reading
always
  .  
Load Default Parameter Values
always

Zone Count
always
51
The access level in all new 2C and 4C boards is set to     at the factory. If you cannot see the
supervisor menu, the access level has been changed to a more restrictive level. Instructions for
changing the access level are in Section 30.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
26-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
26.2 Specifying What Happens When an Input Is Bad
The failsafe output percentages are used when the controller detects a problem with
the input: open sensor, reversed sensor, or loop break time exceeded. You cannot
rely on the controller using these output percentages if the controller’s internal
circuitry fails.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Output 1 Failsafe Output Percentage and Output 2 Failsafe
Output Percentage
  .  and   .  
if output type is PID or on/off
0 to 100% (output high limits   .  and   .  are
ignored when the controller is in the failsafe state)
0
Used to specify the fixed output percentage the controller will
use if it detects a problem with the input.
26.3 Defining the Loop Break Time
The loop break time parameter is used to specify the length of the time period during
which the input should change in response to output action if the input is working
normally. The controller will use this loop break time as a criterion for going into
failsafe state and sending the outputs to the failsafe output percentages.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
26-2
Loop Break Time
 .  . 
always
   , 4 to 9600 seconds
off
Used to specify the time period during which the input should
change in response to output action if the input sensor is
working correctly.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Supervisor
26.4 Viewing the Highest and Lowest Process Value Received
Since Last Reset
The highest and lowest process values received since the last reset are read-only
or
key.
values. To reset the values, press the
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Highest Reading and Lowest Reading
  .  and   .  
always
RTD and thermocouple input types: sensor low limit to sensor
high limit
linear input types: limited by the scaling defined for the input
using the    . and    . parameters in the   
(input) menu
highest reading: –3566
lowest reading: 18030
Used to view read-only values that are the highest and lowest
process values received by the controller since the values were
reset.
26.5 Resetting All Parameters to the Defaults
Using this function returns all configuration parameter values to their defaults.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Load Default Parameter Values
  .  
always


loads all the defaults
does not load the defaults
Beware! If you press the
or
key while     is on
display, regardless of whether it is alternating with   or
   , the default values will be written to all configuration
parameters. The display will show     on the top line and
    o n the lower line. After a second, the display will
change to          . At this point, all the parameters
(mode/enter)
have been set back to the defaults. Press the
or
(menu access) key to clear the         
display and to begin to reconfigure the controller.
Default:
900M231U00A
n/a
Description:
Used to reset all configuration parameters to their default values.
Effect on Other
Parameters:
Resets all configuration parameters to their default values. (The
calibration of the controller will not be affected when the defaults
are set back to their factory defaults.)
 Athena Controls, Inc.
26-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
26.6 Specifying the Number of Active Zones
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
26-4
Zone Count

always
1 to 4
maximum
Used to specify the number of zones the controller board will
monitor and control.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
27. Calibration Function – Not Required for
Configuration
27.1 Introduction
The    (calibration) menu does not contain configuration parameters. Instead it
is used to display the values for which a simulated input should be applied to the
controller input terminals during calibration of the zero offset (    ) and the span
adjustment (    ). It is also used to initiate the calibration operation after the
controller has been prepared as described in Chapter 31.
Read Chapter 31 before trying to calibrate the controller.
The calibration menu is available only when the security access level is set to
    (factory).52
27.2 Calibration Is Not Usually Required
You do not have to calibrate every new controller. New controllers are calibrated
at the factory for the input type(s) you specified when ordering the controller. In the
context of ordering the controller, “type” refers to these choices:

thermocouple

RTD

decimal RTD

millivolt linear

volt linear

current linear
27.3 Menu Items
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Description:
Calibration Low

always
Displays the temperature input value that should be simulated
during low calibration.
or
key while this is on display
Beware! Pressing the
will clear the controller’s existing zero offset and initiate the low
calibration, even if you have not prepared the controller as
The access level in all new 2C and 4C boards is set to 
changing the access level are in Section 30.
52
900M231U00A
   at the factory. Instructions for
 Athena Controls, Inc.
27-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
described in Chapter 31. If the controller has not been prepared
correctly before you initiate calibration, the resulting calibration
will be invalid.
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Description:
Calibration High

always
Displays the temperature input value that should be simulated
during high calibration.
or
key while this is on display
Beware! Pressing the
will clear the controller’s existing span adjustment and initiate the
high calibration, even if you have not prepared the controller as
described in Chapter 31. If the controller has not been prepared
correctly before you initiate calibration, the resulting calibration
will be invalid.
27-2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
28. Configuring Serial Communications
Parameters for MODBUS
28.1.1
Introduction
The     (serial) menu’s MODBUS communication parameters presented briefly
below are described in more detail in Using the MODBUS Protocol with 2C and 4C
Controllers. We recommend that you consult that manual before setting up your
MODBUS network and configuring these communication parameters.
28.1.2
Used
Assigning a Unique Controller Address When MODBUS is
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Range:
Default:
Description:
Controller ID Number
  .  
always
1 to 247
1
Used to assign a unique address to each controller on the
MODBUS network. Instead of using this address stored on the
EEPROM, a 4C controller can use the address configured with
DIP switches; see 3.3.2.
28.1.3
Selecting the Baud Rate Applicable to MODBUS
Communications
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
900M231U00A
Baud Rate

always
1200
2400
4800
9600
19,2 Kbaud
38.4 Kbaud
57.6 Kbaud
115.2 Kbaud
9600
Used to select the baud rate.
 Athena Controls, Inc.
28-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
28.1.4
Selecting the Parity When MODBUS is Used
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
28.1.5
Parity

if the card type is serial



none
odd
even
none
Regardless of the parity selected, a 2C or 4C board always uses
1 start bit, 8 data bits, and 1 stop bit.
Selecting the Sequence for 32-bit IEEE Registers
Parameter Name:
Name as Displayed:
When Displayed:
Choices:
Default:
Description:
MODBUS IEEE Register Ordering

always


MODBUS standard ordering: low register before high
non-standard ordering: high register before low
yes
Used to choose whether the two registers that make up a single
32-bit IEEE floating point value are transmitted in standard
MODBUS sequence (low before high), or not in standard
sequence (high before low)
You have finished configuring the communication parameters.
If you are using PID control, go to Section 29 for tuning.
If you are using on/off control, go to Section 30 for restricting
access.
28-2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
29. Tuning the Controller for PID Control
29.1 Introduction
When Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control is used, the controller modulates
output power by adjusting the output power percentage within a proportional band.
Power is proportionally reduced as the process temperature gets closer to the
setpoint temperature. The integral action affects the output based on the duration of
the process value’s variation from the setpoint, and the derivative action affects the
output based on the rate of change of the process value. If both standard outputs
are used for PID control, then the same integral and derivative parameters apply to
both outputs. Proportional band is specified for each output individually, unless both
outputs use the same action (direct or reverse).
The proportional band, derivative action (rate), and integral action (auto reset)
parameters are automatically adjusted by the Autotune operation described in 29.2.
Autotune is best suited to temperature control applications. Some other applications
may respond well to Autotune. However, some non-temperature control applications
may require manual tuning, in which the proportional band, derivative action (rate),
and integral term or manual reset are entered using the control menu as described in
29.3.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
29-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
29.2 Autotuning
29.2.1
Introduction
The procedure below is used to start Autotune using an optional display board. You
can also use a Multi-Comm host or a MODBUS master to change the mode, view
and change parameter values, and to start Autotune.
The Autotune operation overwrites any existing proportional band, integral, and
derivative parameter values that were previously configured. (When PID control is
used, the manual reset value is ignored.)
If more than one zone is set to use PID control, then this procedure must be repeated
for each PID zone.
29.2.2
Procedure
To use the Autotune feature for temperature applications:
1. Select the zone.
2. Put the zone in standby mode by pressing the
(mode/enter) key until
    is displayed on the top line (after approximately three seconds) and the
current mode on the lower line. (If     is never displayed, then both outputs
for the zone are set to OFF in the output menu. You must dedicate at least one
output to control before you can calibrate.)
Press the
or
key to cycle through the modes until     is on the
key again. The display will show    
lower line. Briefly press the
alternating with the process value on the top line, and the setpoint displayed
steadily on the lower line.
3. Configure the zone. Quick instructions for setting up a zone to use PID control
and many of the configuration default values are in Chapter 17.

For the Autotune feature to be available, at least one output type parameter must
be set to PID (see 21.2).

For Autotune to work, the controller cannot be configured to ramp to the setpoint
at startup as described in 25.2. You do not have to disable the single-step ramp
feature, but if it is enabled, set the     (single step ramp time) parameter to
0 (zero).
4. Select the appropriate Autotune damping setting (see 24.2), or leave it set to the
default (normal).
5. Enter the process setpoint using the
and
keys.
6. If possible, wait for the process to become stable (no latent energy remaining).
For heating or cooling applications, wait for the process to reach ambient
temperature. Unless the setpoint is at least 1% of supported sensor span above
or below the initial process value, the Autotune will terminate with a 05 error code
(see 29.2.3).
29-2
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Tuning the Controller for PID Control
7. Start the Autotune operation. To initiate autotuning, press the
key until
    is displayed on the top line and     on the lower line. Use the
key to display     on the lower line. Press the
key again to start
or
the Autotune operation.
8. Unless you want to terminate the Autotune by putting the zone in standby or
manual mode, do not press any keys during the Autotune operation. While the
controller does the Autotune,     will alternate with the process value on the
top line. (The lower line will continue to display the setpoint you entered in Step
4.)
9. When the controller has completed autotuning the zone successfully, the flashing
    will disappear. The display will revert to the normal mode operating display,
with the process value on the top line and the setpoint on the lower line. The
controller will save the tuning parameter values in the proportional band, rate, and
auto reset parameters. (The new tuning values can be viewed in the     menu.)
If the Autotune was unsuccessful, the top line will briefly display   plus a two-digit
error code, and then go back to flashing     . Refer to 29.2.3 for the Autotune
error codes. Fix the problem and try tuning again.
10. Once Autotune has been completed successfully, and the PV and SV are on display,
the controller is controlling the process.
Monitor the process. If unacceptable overshoot occurs, change the Autotune
damping setting to high and repeat the Autotune. If the process response is
sluggish, change the damping setting to low and repeat the Autotune.
Once setup is complete, we recommend changing the security access level to the
most restrictive level suitable for your application. See Chapter 30 for details.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
29-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
29.2.3
Autotune Error Codes
If an Autotune error occurs, the top line of the display will alternately show    
and an error code for three seconds before the autotuning terminates and the
controller goes back into standby mode. The error codes are in the table below.
Error Code
02
Description
Neither output is configured for PID using the 
   or
  .  (output type) parameter in the     (output
menu).
03
The process changes in the wrong direction. The cause is
usually reversed thermocouple leads or an incorrectly configured
  .  or   .  (output action) parameter.
29-4
05
There is not enough difference between initial PV and the
setpoint. For Autotune to work, the difference must be at least
1% of supported sensor span.
08
The startup curve (change in PV) was not acceptable to the
Autotune algorithm. This could be caused by a process upset
that occurred during tuning. Try Autotuning again when the
process is stable. If the error recurs, your process is not suitable
for Autotuning. Use manual tuning as described in 29.3.
09
The Autotuning timed out because the process was
unresponsive (or extremely slow). Your process is not suitable
for Autotuning. Use manual tuning as described in 29.3, or
configure the controller for on/off control).
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Configuration Parameters – Tuning the Controller for PID Control
29.3 Manual Tuning (Zeigler-Nichols PID Method)
29.3.1
Introduction
This tuning method may be used for non-temperature control processes or if the
spread between initial process temperature and process operating temperature is
small. This manual tuning process requires that the PV be tracked over time.
The procedure below is used to do manual tuning using an optional display board.
You can use a Multi-Comm host or a MODBUS master to change the mode, and to
view and change tuning parameter values.
29.3.2
Procedure
To perform manual tuning:
1. Select the zone.
2. For heat/cool control processes, disable any cooling device used or set the
output type parameter (in the     (output) menu) for this direct-acting output
to off. (Usually, output 2 is used for cooling, so you would set   .  =
   .)
3. With the power off and the controller NOT in the Key Lockout security level,
apply power and immediately put the controller in standby mode by pressing the
(mode/enter) key until     is displayed on the top line (after
approximately three seconds) and the current mode on the lower line. Press the
or
key to cycle through the modes until     is on the lower line.
key again. The display will show     alternating with
Briefly press the
the process value on the top line, and the setpoint displayed steadily on the lower
line.
4. Enter the process setpoint using the
and
keys.
5. Make sure the   (proportional band) is set to its maximum value, and that
   (derivative / rate action),     (manual reset), and    (integral
offset / auto reset) are all set to zero. To access the menu system, press and
hold the
(menu access) key until a menu name abbreviation is displayed on
key repeatedly until the     menu is reached.
the top line. Press the
key. To change values, use
Step through the tuning parameters using the
the
and
keys, then press
to write the new value to the controller’s
database.
6. Put the controller in normal (automatic) mode by pressing the
key until    
is displayed on the top line (after approximately three seconds) and the current mode
on the lower line. Press the
or
key to cycle through the modes until   
key again. The display will show the
is on the lower line. Briefly press the
process value on the top line and the setpoint on the lower line.
7. While monitoring the recording device or plotting the displayed PV against time
manually, decrease the proportional band value by repeatedly halving the value until
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
29-5
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
a small, sustained temperature oscillation is observed. Measure the period in
seconds of one cycle of oscillation (“T” on the diagram below).
T
8. Divide the period of oscillation (T) by 8. The resulting number (quotient) is the correct
   (derivative) time in seconds.
9. Divide T by 2. The resulting number (quotient) is the correct integral time in seconds.
10. Multiply the proportional band value used in Step 6 (to obtain T) by 1.66 and enter
this as the new proportional band value.
Manual tuning of the heating output is complete. If the second output will be used for
PID cooling, set the cooling output type to PID. (It was disabled in Step 1 of the
manual tuning process.) Enter the proportional band value calculated in Step 9 for
the cooling output also. If overcooling results, increase the cooling proportional
bandwidth. If too little cooling action results, decrease the cooling proportional band.
29-6
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
30. Changing the Security Access Level
30.1 Introduction
A 2C or 4C board can be configured to limit the functions and configuration menus
that can be accessed using the keypad on an optional display board. For example,
the access level can be set to allow operators to change only the setpoint or the
manual mode output percentage.
A controller can be set to any of the access levels in the table below. The sequence
of levels in the table is from most restrictive to least restrictive. New controller boards
are shipped with the access level set to     (configuration), but resetting the
parameters to their defaults sets the access level to     .
The access level setting applies to all zones. After you have configured the controller
for your application, set the access level to the most restrictive level appropriate for
your site.
Instructions for changing the access level are in 30.2.
Displayed
Abbreviation
Access
Level
   .
keypad
lockout
Description
Highest security level; no access.
While the access level is “keypad lockout”, no controller
values can be changed, not even the setpoint. To escape,
press the
key for approximately ten seconds, until
   . is displayed, then press

setpoint only
.
Setpoint or manual outputs can be adjusted; no access
to mode or menus.
When the access level is “setpoint only”, the keypad can be
used to change the setpoint or the manual mode output
percentage. However, the operator will not be able to
change the controller from normal (automatic) mode to
manual, and vice versa.
  .   setpoint plus Setpoint or manual outputs can be adjusted; mode can
mode
be changed; no access to menus.
When the access level is “setpoint plus mode”, the keypad
can be used to change the setpoint, manual mode output
percentage, and control mode, including executing recipes,
and switching from normal (automatic) to manual, and vice
versa.

user
All the “setpoint plus mode” functions, and limited
access to menus.
When the access level is “user”, the keypad can be used to
do all the functions available in “setpoint plus mode”. At the
“user” level, the keypad can also be used to view and
change the values on the control menu (tuning parameters),
adjust the Autotune damping parameter, and view and
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Displayed
Abbreviation
Access
Level
Description
change all the ramp/soak parameters.
     configuration All the “user” functions, and access to all menus except
calibration.
When the access level is “configuration”, the keypad can be
used to perform all controller functions and access all
menus, except the calibration menu.

factory
Access to everything.
When the access level is “factory”, the keypad can be used
to do all controller functions, including re-calibrating the
controller.
The controllers are calibrated at the factory for the input
type(s) specified when the controller was ordered. Unless
you change the input type for a zone, usually a zone will
never need re-calibration. Do not leave the controller set
to this access level after you have re-calibrated the
controller.
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Changing the Security Access Level
30.2 Procedures
30.2.1
To View the Access Level
To view the access level when the PV and SV are displayed:
1. Press and hold the
(menu access) key for approximately ten seconds. (After the
first three seconds a menu name will be displayed on the top line. Ignore it and
continue to press the
key.) The display will show the access level label    
and the access level now in effect. For example, if the controller is set to “user” level,
the display will show:


2. What you do next depends on whether the present access level is OK.
If you do not want to change the access level, press the
to go back to the PV and SV display.
(mode/enter) key once
If you do want to change the access level, follow the instructions in 30.2.2.
30.2.2
To Change the Access Level
To change the access level when the current access level is on display:
1. Use the
or
key to step through the list of access level choices.
2. When the desired access level is on display, press the
key to write the new
access level to the controller’s database and return to the PV and SV display.
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31. Calibrating the Controller
31.1 Introduction
You do not have to calibrate every new controller. New controllers are calibrated
at the factory for the type of input(s) you specified when ordering the controller. In
the context of ordering the controller, “type” refers to these choices:

thermocouple

RTD

decimal RTD

millivolt linear

volt linear

current linear input
If you change the input type (including changing linear input type), you must
recalibrate. You might also have to change input jumper settings. See 3.2 for details.
WARNING
All wiring should be done by an experienced technician and be installed
in accordance with national and local electrical codes. To avoid serious
personal injury and damage to equipment, follow all warnings and
cautions provided in the controller installation manuals.
31.2 Determining the Simulated Input to be Used During Low
and High Calibration
31.2.1
Introduction
When calibrating the controller, you will remove the output wiring. You will remove
the input wiring and substitute an appropriate simulated input to the controller’s input
terminals.

When calibrating for an RTD input, you will apply an appropriate resistance value
across the input terminals using a “decade box” or precision resistors as
described in 31.2.2.

When calibrating for a thermocouple input, you will use a thermocouple simulator
to provide input during calibration as described in 31.2.3.

When calibrating for a linear input, you will use a milliamp, millivolt, or voltage
input device as described in 31.2.4.
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31.2.2
Simulating RTD Input for Calibration
When calibrating the controller for use with an RTD input, you will remove the output
wiring. You will remove the input wiring and substitute an appropriate resistance
across the controller’s input terminals.
For this purpose, good results can be achieved using a “decade box” type of
calibrator or using precision resistors. Use of an “active resistance” calibrator (that
simulates resistance with its circuitry instead of actually providing the resistance) may
not produce satisfactory results.
Before calibrating the controller, you must determine the correct resistance to apply.
Two resistance values are used, one for low calibration and one for high calibration.
For RTD inputs, each of these resistances corresponds to a calibration low and
calibration high temperature. The calibration temperatures depend on the specific
type of input. The values can be read from the     (cal low) and     (cal
high) parameters in the    (calibration) menu as described in Chapter 27.
For example, if the    (input) menu     (type) parameter is set to    and
the     (unit of measure) parameter in the     menu is set to 
(Fahrenheit), then the calibration low value displayed will be 32 and the calibration
high value displayed will be 1414.
The table below shows the resistance that represents the RTD calibration low and
calibration high temperatures. Use this table to determine what resistance to apply
across the input terminals when performing the calibration procedure described in
this chapter.
Low Calibration
Input
Resistance
Setting
in ohms
Temperature
Equivalent
in F (C) [K]
High Calibration
Resistance
Setting
in ohms
Temperature Equivalent
in F (C) [K]
RTD
100 ohms
32 F (0 C) [273 K]
365 ohms
1408 F (765 C) [1038 K]
RTD with
decimal
support
100 ohms
32 F (0 C) [273 K]
221 ohms
617.5 F (325.3 C) [598.3 K]
31.2.3
Simulating Thermocouple Input for Calibration
When calibrating the controller for use with a thermocouple input, you will remove the
output wiring. You will remove the input wiring and substitute a simulated input
provided by a thermocouple simulator.
Before calibrating the controller, you must determine the correct temperature input
values to simulate during calibration. Two values are used, one for low calibration
and one for high calibration. The temperatures to be simulated depend on the
specific type of input. The values can be read from the     (cal low) and
    (cal high) parameters in the    (calibration) menu as described in
Chapter 27.
For example, if the    (input) menu     (type) parameter is set to J
thermocouple and the     (unit of measure) parameter in the     menu is
set to  (Fahrenheit), then the calibration low value displayed will be 32 and the
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Configuration Parameters – Calibrating the Controller
calibration high value displayed will be 1258.
Set the thermocouple simulator accordingly when performing the calibration
procedure described in this chapter.
31.2.4
Simulating Linear Input for Calibration
When calibrating the controller for use with a linear input, you will remove the output
wiring. You will remove the input wiring and substitute a simulated input provided by
a milliamp input device, millivolt input device, or voltage input device, depending on
the type of input you plan to use for control.
During calibration, you will simulate two process values: one for low calibration and
one for high calibration. In the case of linear inputs, these are usually the process
values that are configured for the    . (linear input scaling low limit) and
   . (linear input scaling high limit) parameters in the    (input) menu.
These scaling values are the values displayed for the     (cal low) and    
(cal high) parameters in the    (calibration) menu as described in Chapter 27.
Configure the input scaling parameters    . and    . before calibrating the
controller. During calibration, use the lowest input value for the calibration low value
and the highest input value for the calibration high value. For example, if you plan to
use a 0 to 20 mA input for control, then apply 0 (zero) mA to the input terminals
during low calibration and 20 mA to the input terminals during high calibration.
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31.3 Preparing the Controller
To prepare the zone for calibration:
1. Select the zone.
2. Make sure the access level is set to     (factory). Instructions for viewing
and changing the access level controller are in Chapter 30.
3. Go to the    (input menu) and select the new input type as described in 19.5.
(mode/enter) key when the new input type is on display,
Be sure to press the
so that the change is written to the controller’s database.
4. In the case of linear input types, also use the    . and    . (scaling
low and scaling high) parameters (in the input menu) to specify the PV
represented by the lowest possible linear input signal and the PV represented by
the highest possible linear input signal.
5. Remove power from the controller and disconnect all output wiring.
6. Disconnect the input wiring.
7. Attach an appropriate calibrator (or precision resistor representing the calibration
low process value) to the input terminals. (Refer to 31.2 to determine the type of
device to be used to calibrate for the input type you have selected.)
8. Power up the controller and put the zone in standby mode. Allow the controller
to warm up for fifteen minutes after you have attached the calibrator (or precision
resistor for the low calibration).
After the fifteen minute warm-up, you are ready to proceed with the calibration as
described in 31.4.
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Configuration Parameters – Calibrating the Controller
31.4 Initiating the Calibration
To calibrate the controller after it has been prepared as described in 31.3
(including the fifteen minute warm-up period in standby mode):
1. Select the zone.
2. Go to the    (calibration) menu and display     (calibration low). It will
alternate with the process value for which you must apply a simulated input (see
31.2).
3. To initiate low calibration, when     is on display, press the
key.
or
To initiate low calibration using a MODBUS write function, follow the instructions
in Using MODBUS Protocol with 2C and 4C Controllers. (Special values must be
written to the correct two MODBUS registers in the same write operation.)
4. While the controller performs the calibration, the display will freeze with    
on the lower line. When the low calibration has been completed, the lower line
will display     . (If the calibration is not successful,     (error
calibration) will be displayed. You probably did not supply the correct simulated
input. Fix the problem and try again.)
5. After successfully doing the low cal operation, you are ready to continue with the
high calibration procedure.
If you are using a “decade box” calibrator, thermocouple calibrator, or linear input
source, switch to the appropriate input for the “calibrate high” operation.
If you are using precision resistors for RTD calibration, remove power from the
controller, remove the low calibration resistor, and install the high calibration
resistor across the input terminals, then power up the controller. After powering
up the controller, wait fifteen minutes before proceeding to the next step. (This
fifteen minute wait for warm-up is required only if the controller has been
powered down to permit you to change a precision resistor at the input
terminals.)
6. Display     . (If     is on display, press
(mode/enter) to display
    .)     will alternate with the PV for which you must apply a
simulated input (see 31.2).
7. To initiate high calibration when     is on display, press the
key.
or
To initiate high calibration using a MODBUS write function, follow the instructions
in Using MODBUS Protocol with 2C and 4C Controllers. (Special values must be
written to the correct two MODBUS registers in the same write operation.)
8. While the controller performs the calibration, the display will freeze with    
on the lower line. When the high calibration has been completed, the lower line
will display     . (If the calibration is not successful,     (error
calibration) will be displayed. You probably did not supply the correct simulated
input. Fix the problem and try again.)
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
If both the low calibration and the high calibration were successful, you are ready to
return the controller to service as described in 31.5.
31.5 Returning the Controller to Service
To return the zone to service:
1. Remove power from the controller.
2. Remove the precision resistor or calibrator from the inputs.
3. Replace the input and output wiring.
4. Power up the controller.
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32. Error Messages and Codes
32.1 Introduction
Usually the controller displays the process variable on the top line and the setpoint
on the lower line of the display. When the controller is in a mode other than normal
(automatic), the mode alternates with the PV. However, when the controller detects
a problem with the input signal or with its own operation, messages and codes are
displayed to alert you to a condition that requires your immediate attention.
32.2 Problem with Input Signal
32.2.1
Introduction
When the controller detects a problem with the input signal, a message is displayed
on the top line in place of the process value. For example, if the controller detects an
open sensor when the setpoint is 250, the display would look like this:


32.2.2
Input Error Messages
The table below lists the error messages and codes displayed in place of the process
value when a problem with the input is detected by the controller. These error
conditions can be read from all controllers by a MODBUS master or a Multi-Comm
host.
When the controller detects any of these sensor problems, the controller’s outputs
will go to the percentage specified using the failsafe values (if any) configured using
the     a n d     parameters in the     (supervisor) menu (see
26.2).
Display
i
Error Condition
open sensor
Operator Action
Check the sensor and wiring.
This message will clear when the problem has
been corrected.
     reversed sensor
Make sure the correct input type has been
selected for the input type parameter.
Check sensor polarity.
This message will clear when the problem has
been corrected.
     loop break; the input value
has not changed for the time
period specified using the
supervisor menu’s loop
break time parameter.
900M231U00A
Check sensor and wiring.
This message will not clear automatically when
the problem has been corrected. You must
cycle the power to the controller to clear the
message and to cause the controller to resume
normal operation.
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2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
32.3 Problem with Controller
32.3.1
Introduction
If the controller detects a problem with its own operation, it displays    on the top
line instead of the process value and displays a numerical code on the lower line
instead of the setpoint. For example, if the controller detects a checksum error, the
display will show:


32.3.2
Controller Error Codes
The table below lists the error messages and codes displayed in place of the setpoint
value when a self-diagnostic is failed by the controller. These error conditions can be
read from all controllers by a MODBUS master or a Multi-Comm host.
The effect of the error condition on the controller’s outputs depends on the error, as
described below.
Display

Error Condition
RAM error
Operator Action
Press any key to clear the message. .
This message is usually
displayed only at startup,
before any outputs are
calculated.

default parameter values
were loaded automatically,
because the controller found
corrupted values stored on
the EEPROM
Press any key to clear the message.
Re-configure all configuration parameter
values, including input type. .
This message is usually
displayed only at startup,
before any outputs are
calculated.

default parameter values
were loaded automatically
because the 4C controller
was powered up with all DIP
53
switches set on
Press any key to clear the message.
Re-configure all configuration parameter
values, including input type. .
This message is usually
displayed only at startup,
before any outputs are
calculated.

53
EEPROM write failure
Press any key to clear the message.
This message is usually
displayed only at startup,
before any outputs are
calculated.
Try the write operation again. If the
message recurs and persists, the EEPROM
may be worn out. Call for service. (See Note
1 below.)
The 2C board does not have these DIP switches.
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Frequently Asked Questions
Display
Error Condition

power fail resume feature
cannot be used
Operator Action
Press any key to clear the message.
Call for service. (See Note 1 below.)
The EEPROM is worn out; no
storage space is available for
storage of recipe execution
information. Therefore, this
message is displayed when
power is restored after a
power failure that occurred
while a recipe was being
executed under the direction
of the controller. When this
message is displayed,
execution of the recipe
cannot be resumed
automatically.


through


interrupt-related problem
While one of these messages
is on display, the controller
outputs are held at state in
use when the problem was
detected.
Cycle the power to the controller. If the
message recurs and persists, call for
service.
Note 1: A host computer can wear out the EEPROM by writing to it too many times.
Do not write the setpoint to the EEPROM when you are writing a temporary setpoint
to the controller, such as when you are ramping to a final setpoint under the direction
of a MODBUS master.
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Section E – Appendices
This section contains information about:

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frequently asked questions – see page 33-1
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33. Frequently Asked Questions
Introduction
Before you call for tech support, please look at this chapter to see if your question is
covered here. If you do call for technical assistance, be ready to supply the following
information:

complete model number of controller

symptoms of the problem

unusual events, if any, that preceded the problem

remedies you have already tried
How do I change from thermocouple to RTD (or vice versa)?
To change the type of sensor used (or to switch to a linear input), go to the input
menu and change the input type specified (see 19.5). If you change to a linear input
type, you can use input menu parameters to scale the input.
You must also change the analog sensor jumper settings (see 19.3) and calibrate for
the new input type (see Chapter 31), and for PID control you must retune (see
Chapter 29).
Why doesn’t the PV displayed match the value on a thermometer
in the process?
Unless the thermometer and the sensor providing input to the controller are very
close to one another, their readings will not match in some applications, because of
temperature variations within the process. However, if you want the controller to
maintain the setpoint value at the location of the thermometer, instead of at the
location of the sensor, use the input menu’s bias parameter for RTD or thermocouple
inputs. Applying bias allows you to compensate for any difference between sensor
temperature and the location to be measured. The process variable and setpoint will
be offset by the value entered for the bias parameter. (See 19.6.1.)
For example, suppose you want the process to be 150 F. However, the sensor
providing input to the controller is so close to the heater that it reads 50 degrees
higher than the process at the location of interest to you. Enter –50 as the bias
value. Enter the setpoint of 150. The setpoint 150 will be displayed. However, the
controller will use a setpoint of 200. The process value displayed will also be offset,
so that when the temperature at the sensor location next to the heater is 206 F, the
controller shows 156, the temperature at the location of interest in the process.
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Why does my compressor cycle so often?
If the controller’s output type parameter is set to PID, the controller attempts to
moderate the rate of change of the PV. PID control is not appropriate for devices
such as compressors that are either on or off. Change the output type to on/off.

When the on/off output action is configured for reverse action (heating
applications), the controller will apply 100% output if the process temperature is
below the setpoint and 0% if the PV is at the SV.

When the on/off output action is configured for direct action (cooling
applications), the controller will apply 100% output if the process temperature is
above the setpoint and 0% if the PV is at the SV.
The result of switching from PID to on/off will be a reduction in the cycling of the
compressor. The trade-off is greater oscillation of the process temperature. (If there
is still too much cycling, introduce hysteresis to the on/off control as described in
1.6.3.1.)
Why doesn’t the controller communicate with the host
computer?
When a controller has been communicating successfully with a MODBUS master or
Multi-Comm host computer, then stops communicating, the cause is most likely
damage to the network wiring. However, before going to search for the fault, take a
quick look at the communication settings on the controller’s serial menu. Make sure
that the controller ID has not been changed, and that the other communication
settings match those used by the host. (See Chapter 28.)
Why isn’t the setpoint displayed all the time?
The controller’s     (display) menu contains a     (setpoint blanking)
parameter that can be used to specify the number of seconds the setpoint is
displayed. Once the configured time period has elapsed the setpoint display will go
blank and remain blank until any key is pressed. Pressing any key will cause the
controller to display the setpoint again. The setpoint will remain on display until the
period specified in the setpoint blanking parameter has elapsed.
If you want the setpoint to be displayed all the time while the unit is in a control mode,
turn off the blanking function by setting the setpoint blanking parameter to OFF.
(See 20.2.2 or 20.3.2.)
The last digit of the PV display changes very frequently. How
can I slow it down?
If the display is configured to show one or more decimal places, those values might
change frequently, sometimes so quickly that the value is hard to read. Go to the
    (display) menu and increase the value of the     (display filter)
parameter. The display filter parameter is used to specify the minimum time period
between changes of the displayed PV value. The display filter value has no effect on
control. (See 20.2.2 or 20.3.2.)
In contrast, the input menu’s input filter does affect control, because the input filter is
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Appendix I – FAQs
used to specify the time period over which the controller will average the input values
before using the value in the calculation of control output values. (See 19.6.3 or
19.7.4.)
Why is the setpoint changing? I haven’t touched the controller!
As described in 1.7, the setpoint used (and displayed) when the controller is
operating in “normal” mode (automatic) is not always entered by the operator using
an optional display board’s keypad. The active setpoint can come from a recipe or
from a host computer.
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34. Index
A
A1 and A2 indicators in Multi-Comm, 8-1
access levels
described, 1-7, 30-1
menus, 15-5
access privileges in Multi-Comm, 6-4
Add Controller window (Multi-Comm), 7-8
adding controllers in Multi-Comm, 7-5, 7-8
address for controller, 3-4, 3-5, 7-3, 7-8, 7-9, 28-1
alarm action, 1-12, 21-8, 23-3
alarm annunication, 5-4
alarm delay, 21-10, 23-5
alarm menu, 18-6, 23-1
alarm operation, 1-12, 21-9, 23-4
alarm outputs, configuration of, 21-4
alarm outputs,configuration of, 21-8
alarm setpoint, 21-11, 23-6
alarm value, 21-11, 23-6
alarms
configuration, 23-1, 23-3
inhibiting, 21-10, 23-5
LEDs indicating state, 15-7, 15-10, 15-12, 15-14
methods of annunciation, 1-4, 1-11, 8-1, 15-7, 15-10, 15-12,
23-1
Multi-Comm, 8-1
types supported, 1-11
ALr menu. See alarm menu
analog inputs
configuration parameters for, 19-1
jumper settings, 3-2
supported sensor types, 2-6
analog output cycle time, 21-6
Append Step button (Multi-Comm), 12-2
Apply button (Multi-Comm), 11-2, 12-11
auto reset, 1-8, 22-6, 22-7, 22-8, 29-1, 29-5, 29-6
automatic mode. See normal mode
Autotune
damping menu, 1-7, 18-6, 24-1, 30-2
display, 15-2
in Multi-Comm, 10-1
parameters adjusted, 22-6
selection display, 1-6
B
baud rate, 3-9, 7-2, 7-4, 28-1
bias, 19-7, 19-10, 33-1
blanking, 20-4, 20-6, 33-2
bumpless transfer, 1-4, 16-6
C
cabling
communication, 3-8
input/output, 3-17
power, 3-12
calibration
permission to do, 1-7, 30-2
calibration menu, 18-7
calibration procedure, 27-1
Change Password window (Multi-Comm), 6-3
900M231U00A
changing
fixed output percentage, 16-6
mode, 16-5
setpoint, 16-5
communication
option card, 28-1
settings in Multi-Comm, 7-2, 7-4
settings in PC, 3-9
setup, 3-8
communication card grounding, 3-9
communication LED, 15-8, 15-10, 15-13, 15-14
Communications Setup window (Multi-Comm), 7-4
configuration
communication parameters, 7-2
display, 15-4
effect on output state, 15-4
example, 16-12
general information, 18-1
importance of sequence, 1-14
parameter sequence, 18-5
permission to access, 1-7, 30-1
sequence, 1-14
using Multi-Comm, 11-1
viewing and changing values, 16-11
configuration (access level), 1-7, 30-2
Connector field (Multi-Comm), 7-4
control menu, 18-6, 22-1
control types supported, 1-8
controller addresses, 3-4, 7-3, 7-8, 7-9, 28-1
Controller menu (Multi-Comm), 5-7
controller parameter sets, saving and loading with Multi-Comm,
13-2, 13-4
controller recipes. See recipes (controller)
CtrL menu. See control menu
current inputs, 19-1, 19-4, 19-10, 20-5
cycle time, 21-6
D
damping parameter, 24-1
DAT file, 6-6
data bits, 3-9, 7-2, 7-4
data format, 28-2
Data Format field (Multi-Comm), 7-4
deadband for on/off control
configuration, 22-4
example, 1-9
decimal position, 20-3, 20-5
default address, 3-5
default output assignments, 2-4
default values for parameters
accepting, 18-8
list, 18-3
message when loaded automatically, 32-2
restoring, 3-4, 26-3
Delete Step button (Multi-Comm), 12-3
deleting controllers in Multi-Comm, 7-9
deleting login accounts in Multi-Comm, 6-6
derivative action, 1-8, 22-6, 22-7, 29-1, 29-3, 29-5
detection of option boards, 3-6
deviation alarms, 1-12, 21-9, 21-11, 23-4, 23-6
Device Manager, 3-10
digital inputs
specification, 2-6
 Athena Controls, Inc.
34-1
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
digital outputs. See outputs
dimensions, 2-5, 4-1
DIP switch settings, 3-4, 7-3
direct output action, 21-5, 21-6
display at startup, 1-15
display menu, 18-5, 20-1, 20-5
down key, 15-2, 16-2
dSPL menu. See display menu
E
Edit menu (Multi-Comm), 5-7
editing login accounts in Multi-Comm, 6-6
EEPROM
storing address, 3-4, 7-3, 28-1
write error, 32-2
writing setpoints, 1-11
EMC files, 13-3
error codes, 29-4, 32-1
events for recipes
alarm action, 23-3
configuration, 25-11, 25-12
indication, 1-12
excitation voltage jumpers, 3-3
F
factory (access level), 1-7, 30-2
factory default values for parameters
accepting, 18-8
list, 18-3
restoring, 26-3
failsafe outputs, 26-2
File menu in Multi-Comm, 5-6
filtering
display, 20-3, 20-5, 33-3
input, 19-8, 19-12
finding controllers (Multi-Comm), 7-5, 7-8
fixed output percentage
and manual mode, 1-6, 15-2
changing, 16-6
permission to change, 1-7, 30-1
four-wire sensors, 3-16
fuse rating, 2-6
G
Graph window (Multi-Comm), 9-3
grounded thermocouples, 3-12, 3-15
grounding, 3-9, 3-12, 3-16
H
hardware requirements for Multi-Comm computer, 5-4
highest reading, 26-3
Hold function in Multi-Comm, 12-6
Holdback Band field (Multi-Comm), 12-3, 12-10
holdback parameter, 25-1, 25-5, 25-9
hysteresis for on/off control
configuration, 22-4, 22-5
example, 1-9
limited by input scaling, 19-11
I
IEEE register ordering, 28-2
inhibiting alarms, 21-10
InP menu. See input menu
input bias, 19-7, 19-10, 33-1
input failure, 26-2
input jumpers, 3-2, 19-2
input menu, 18-5, 19-1, 19-2
input type, 19-4
34-2
inputs
bias, 19-7, 19-10, 33-1
failure, 26-2
filtering, 19-8, 19-12
scaling, 19-11
wiring, 3-17
Insert Step button (Multi-Comm), 12-4
installing Multi-Comm software, 6-1
integral action, 1-8, 22-6, 22-8, 29-1, 29-5, 29-6
interrupt (unexpected or invalid), 32-3
inverse band alarms, 1-12, 21-9, 21-11, 23-4, 23-6
J
J4, 2-6, 3-14
jumpers
analog sensor, 3-2
input, 19-2
remote excitation, 3-3
K
keypad
functions, 16-1
using, 16-5
keypad lockout (access level), 1-7, 30-1
L
latching alarms, 1-12, 16-10, 21-8, 23-3
LEDs
alarm indication, 15-7, 15-10, 15-12, 15-14
alarms, 23-1
communication indication, 15-8, 15-10, 15-13, 15-14
output state indication, 2-7, 15-7, 15-9, 15-11, 15-14
status, 2-7
zone indication, 15-6, 15-8, 15-11, 15-13
linear inputs, 1-14, 19-1, 19-4, 19-10, 20-5
Load button (Multi-Comm), 13-5
loading default parameter values, 3-4, 26-3
logging in to Multi-Comm, 6-2
logging out of Multi-Comm, 6-6
logging PV and SP values in Multi-Comm, 14-1
Logging window (Multi-Comm), 14-1
login accounts in Multi-Comm:, 6-4
loop break detected, 32-1
loop break time, 26-2
lowest reading, 26-3
M
manual mode
changing mode with Multi-Comm, 10-1
display, 15-2
permission to change outputs, 1-7, 30-1
selection display, 1-6
manual reset, 1-8, 22-6, 22-7, 29-1, 29-5, 29-6
manual tuning procedure, 29-5
MCS files
closing, 7-10
creating, 7-10
opening, 6-2, 7-8, 7-10
removing zone from, 7-9
saving, 5-6, 7-9
menu access key, 15-2, 16-2
menu overview, 5-6
menu system in controller
accessing, 16-11
menu system in controller
display sequence, 15-4
permission to access, 1-7
menu system in controller
display sequence, 18-5
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Index and Warranty
menu system in controller
permission to access, 30-1
milliamp inputs, 19-1, 19-4, 19-10, 20-5
millivolt inputs, 19-1, 19-4, 19-10, 20-5
MODBUS address. See address for controller
Modbus protocol
Autotuning with, 29-2
calibration with, 31-4
configuring communication parameters, 28-1, 33-2
manual tuning with, 29-5
reading error codes, 32-1, 32-2
recipe execution, 15-3
MODBUS starting addresses, 3-4, 7-3, 7-8, 7-9, 28-1
mode/enter key, 15-2, 16-3
model number breakdown, 2-2
modes of operation
changing in Multi-Comm, 10-1
displays, 15-2
permission to change, 1-7, 30-1
selecting, 1-6, 16-3
mounting dimensions, 4-1
MULTI login account, 6-2, 6-3
Multi-Comm application
alarm annunication, 5-4
Autotuning with, 29-2
calibration with, 31-4
computer requirements, 5-4
executing recipes, 15-3
features, 5-1
installation, 6-1
logging in, 6-2
manual tuning with, 29-5
reading error codes, 32-1, 32-2
serial communication, 33-2
Multi-Comm recipes. See recipes (Multi-Comm)
Multi-Comm Setup files
adding controllers to, 7-6
closing, 7-10
creating, 7-10
deleting zones from, 7-9
opening, 7-10
saving, 5-6, 7-9
Multi-Step Ramp
invoking in Multi-Comm, 12-10
N
naming controllers in Multi-Comm, 7-8, 7-9
network addresses, 3-4, 7-3, 7-8, 7-9, 28-1
network wiring, 3-8
normal band alarms, 1-12, 21-9, 21-11, 23-4, 23-6
normal mode, 1-6, 1-10, 15-2, 16-6, 33-3
O
on/off control
advantages and disadvantages, 1-9, 33-2
configuration, 21-5
output type, 21-4
on/off deadband
configuration, 22-4
example, 1-9
on/off hysteresis
configuration, 22-4, 22-5
example, 1-9
limited by input scaling, 19-11
Open button, 12-11
Open Recipe window (Multi-Comm), 12-5
open sensor detected, 15-3, 32-1
operator login accounts in Multi-Comm, 6-4
Operator Login window (Multi-Comm), 6-2
Operator Setup window (Multi-Comm), 6-4, 6-5, 6-6
Operator window (Multi-Comm), 6-4, 6-5
optional cards, 3-6
optional display board, 2-7, 15-1
Options menu (Multi-Comm), 5-9
order codes, 2-2
900M231U00A
OutP menu. See output menu
output failsafe values, 26-2
output menu, 18-5, 21-1
output range for PID, 21-7
outputs
default assignments, 2-4
functions, 1-4
LEDs indicating state, 2-7, 15-7, 15-9, 15-11, 15-14
specifications, 2-6
state during standby mode, 15-4
state on power up, 1-15
use for alarms, 1-4, 21-8
wiring, 3-17
overlays, 16-1
overlays for display boards, 15-1
overshoot, 1-8, 1-10, 17-4, 17-5, 24-1, 29-3
P
parameter display sequence, 18-5
Parameter Set tab (Multi-Comm), 13-2, 13-4
Parameters function in Multi-Comm, 11-1
parameters, viewing and changing in Multi-Comm, 11-1
parity, 3-9, 7-2, 7-4, 28-2
part numbers
accessories, 2-3
communication cards, 2-2, 2-3
display boards, 2-2
passwords in Multi-Comm, 6-3, 6-5
permission levels in controller, 1-7, 30-1
permissions in Multi-Comm, 6-4
PID control
advantages and disadvantages, 1-8, 33-2
instructions for quick setup, 17-1
output action, 21-6
output type, 21-4
tuning, 24-1, 29-1
Polling Frequency field (Multi-Comm), 7-4
port settings, 3-9
power failure resume, 25-10, 32-3
power supply, 2-3, 2-6, 3-12, 3-14, 3-15, 3-16
power wiring, 3-12
powering up controller, 1-15
PRF files, 13-3, 13-5
privileges in Multi-Comm, 6-4
process alarms, 1-11, 8-1, 21-9, 21-11, 23-4, 23-6
process lag, 1-8
process value
displaying, 15-2, 33-3
highest, 26-3
lowest, 26-3
viewing in Multi-Comm, 9-2, 9-3
viewing with optional display board, 15-1
proportional band, 1-8, 22-6, 22-7, 29-1, 29-3, 29-5, 29-6
Proportional-Integral-Derivative control. See PID control
pushbutton purposes. See SW assignments
PV. See process value
R
RAM error, 32-2
RAM, writing setpoints, 1-11
ramp events, 1-12, 23-3, 25-11
Ramp Time field (Multi-Comm), 12-3, 12-11
ramp times, 25-1, 25-11
Ramp to Setpoint Function. See Single-Step Ramp function
ramp/soak execution
directed by external host, 15-3
feature described, 1-5
holding, 1-6, 15-2, 16-8
resuming, 1-6, 16-8
starting, 15-2, 16-8
termination state, 16-9
ramp/soak menu (controller), 1-7, 1-12, 18-6, 25-1, 30-2
Ramp/Soak Menu (Multi-Comm), 5-9
 Athena Controls, Inc.
34-3
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
range
PID output, 21-7
setpoint, 19-12
rate of change, 1-8, 22-6, 22-7, 29-1, 29-3, 29-5
RCP file, 12-3
Recipe Control window (Multi-Comm), 12-6
Recipe Editor window (Multi-Comm), 12-2
recipe events
configuring, 25-11, 25-12
dedicating alarm, 23-3
indication, 1-12
recipe holdback parameter, 25-5, 25-9
recipe option, 25-4
Recipe tab (Multi-Comm), 9-5, 12-9
recipes (controller)
configuring in Multi-Comm, 12-9
configuring with optional display board, 25-1
execution directed by external host, 15-3
holding, 1-6, 15-2, 16-8
parameters, 25-1
resuming, 1-6, 16-8
running in Multi-Comm, 12-12
running with optional display board, 16-8
setpoint, 1-11
starting, 15-2, 16-8
termination state, 16-9
recipes (Multi-Comm)
configuring, 12-2
described, 1-5
running, 12-5
recognizing controllers (Multi-Comm), 7-5, 7-8
recovery, 1-8, 17-4, 17-5, 24-1, 29-3
recycle number, 25-10
register ordering, 28-2
relays, 2-3
remote excitation voltage jumpers, 3-3
Repeats field (Multi-Comm), 12-2, 12-10
resume from power failure, 25-10
Resume function in Multi-Comm, 12-7
reverse output action, 21-5, 21-6
reversed sensor detected, 15-3, 32-1
RS file, 12-11
r-S menu. See ramp/soak menu
RTD inputs, 1-14, 19-1, 19-4, 19-7, 20-3, 33-1
Run Recipe Controller Selection window (Multi-Comm), 12-5
S
safety information, I, 3-12
Save Parameter Set window (Multi-Comm), 13-3
scaling inputs, 1-14, 19-11
security access levels
described, 1-7, 30-1
menus, 15-5
self-diagnostics failed, 15-3, 32-2
sensor failure, 26-2
sensor ground, 3-12
sequence of configuration parameters, 1-14
serial menu, 18-7
setpoint
alarm, 21-11, 23-6
at recipe termination, 25-6, 25-9
changing in Multi-Comm, 9-4
changing with optional display board, 15-1, 16-5
displaying with optional display board, 15-2
ramping to, 1-15, 16-8, 16-9, 25-5
sources, 1-10
specifying range, 19-8, 19-12
viewing in Multi-Comm, 9-2, 9-3
viewing with optional display board, 15-1
setpoint display blanking, 20-4, 20-6, 33-2
setpoint only (access level), 1-7, 30-1
setpoint plus mode (access level), 1-7, 30-1
Setpoint window (Multi-Comm), 9-4
Single Step Ramp function
configuring in Multi-Comm, 9-5
34-4
described, 1-5, 1-15, 16-9, 25-5
invoking in Multi-Comm, 9-5, 9-6
soak events, 1-12, 23-3, 25-12
Soak Level field (Multi-Comm), 12-3, 12-11
soak levels, 25-1, 25-11
Soak Time field (Multi-Comm), 12-3, 12-11
soak times, 25-12
software requirements for computer
Multi-Comm, 5-4
SP. See setpoint
specifications, 2-1
standard outputs, 1-13, 21-1, 21-6
standby mode
accessing, 16-5
changing mode with Multi-Comm, 10-1
operational display, 15-2
selection display, 1-6
Start Find Controllers function (Multi-Comm), 7-5
starting addresses, 3-4, 7-3, 7-8, 7-9, 28-1
status LEDs, 2-7
stop bit, 3-9, 7-2, 7-4
Stop function in Multi-Comm, 12-8
supervisor menu, 26-1
SUPr menu. See supervisor menu
SW assignments, 15-1, 16-2
switch settings, 3-4, 7-3, 7-8, 7-9, 28-1
System Properties, 3-10
T
technical support, 33-1
termination state, 25-6, 25-9
Termination State field (Multi-Comm), 12-2, 12-8, 12-10
thermocouple inputs, 1-14, 19-1, 19-4, 19-7, 20-3, 33-1
three-wire sensors, 3-16
Timeout field (Multi-Comm), 7-5
transformer, 2-3, 2-6, 3-12, 3-15
trend graphs, 9-3
troubleshooting, 32-1, 33-1
Tune function, 10-1
tunE menu. See Autotune damping menu
tuning
automatically, 29-2
manual procedure, 29-5
parameters, 1-8, 22-1, 22-6, 29-1, 29-3, 29-5, 29-6
two-wire sensors, 3-16
U
units of measure, 1-14, 20-4
unresponsive processes, 12-3, 12-10
up key, 15-2, 16-2
user (access level), 1-7, 30-1
User Id field, 6-5
user interface, 15-1
V
View menu (Multi-Comm), 5-7
voltage inputs, 19-1, 19-4, 19-10, 20-5
W
wiring
communication, 3-8
input/output, 3-17
power, 3-12
Z
zone indication LEDs, 15-6, 15-8, 15-11, 15-13
zone selection, 15-1, 16-1
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
Index and Warranty
Warranty
Two-Year Limited Warranty
THIS EQUIPMENT IS WARRANTED TO BE FREE FROM DEFECTS OF MATERIAL AND
WORKMANSHIP. IT IS SOLD SUBJECT TO OUR MUTUAL AGREEMENT THAT THE
LIABILITY OF ATHENA CONTROLS, INCORPORATED IS TO REPLACE OR REPAIR THIS
EQUIPMENT AT ITS FACTORY, PROVIDED THAT IT IS RETURNED WITH
TRANSPORTATION PREPAID WITHIN ONE (1) YEAR OF ITS PURCHASE.
THE PURCHASER AGREES THAT ATHENA CONTROLS, INCORPORATED ASSUMES NO
LIABILITY UNDER ANY
CIRCUMSTANCES FOR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES RESULTING FROM ITS USE OR
FROM IMPROPER
HANDLING OR PACKAGING OF SHIPMENTS RETURNED TO THE FACTORY.
COMPONENTS WHICH WEAR OR WHICH ARE DAMAGED BY MISUSE ARE NOT
WARRANTED. THESE INCLUDE CONTACT POINTS, FUSES, ELECTROMECHANICAL
RELAYS, AND TRIACS. UNITS WHICH HAVE BEEN MODIFIED BY A CUSTOMER IN ANY
WAY ARE NOT WARRANTED.
Other than those expressly stated herein, THERE ARE NO OTHER WARRANTIES OF ANY
KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AND SPECIFICALLY EXCLUDED BUT NOT BY WAY OF
LIMITATION, ARE THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
AND MERCHANTABILITY.
IT IS UNDERSTOOD AND AGREED THE SELLER’S LIABILITY WHETHER IN CONTRACT, IN
TORT, UNDER ANY WARRANTY, IN NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE SHALL NOT EXCEED
THE RETURN OF THE AMOUNT OF THE
PURCHASE PRICE PAID BY THE PURCHASER AND UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHALL
SELLER BE LIABLE
FOR SPECIAL, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES. THE PRICE
STATED FOR THE EQUIPMENT IS A CONSIDERATION IN LIMITING SELLER’S LIABILITY.
NO ACTION, REGARDLESS OF FORM, ARISING OUT OF THE TRANSACTIONS OF THIS
AGREEMENT MAY BE BROUGHT BY PURCHASER MORE THAN ONE YEAR AFTER THE
CAUSE OF ACTION HAS ACCRUED.
SELLER’S MAXIMUM LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED AND BUYER’S REMEDY IS LIMITED
TO EITHER (i) REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT OF THE DEFECTIVE PART OR PRODUCT, OR
AT SELLER’S OPTION (ii) RETURN OF THE PRODUCT AND REFUND OF THE PURCHASE
PRICE, AND SUCH REMEDY SHALL BE BUYER’S ENTIRE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY. THE
SPECIFICATIONS PUT FORTH IN THIS MANUAL ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT
NOTICE.
900M231U00A
 Athena Controls, Inc.
34-5
2C and 4C Controller Installation, Configuration, and Operation Guide
Unit Repairs
It is recommended that units requiring service be returned to an authorized service center. Before
a controller is returned for service, please consult the service center nearest you. In many cases,
the problem can be cleared up over the telephone. When the unit needs to be returned, the
service center will ask for a detailed explanation of problems encountered and a Purchase Order
to cover any charge. This information should also be put in the box with the unit. This should
expedite return of the unit to you.
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While efforts have
been made to render accuracy to its content, the information contained herein does not purport to
cover all details or variations in hardware, nor to provide for every possible contingency in
connection with the installation and maintenance. Features may be described herein which are
not present in all hardware. Athena Controls assumes no obligation of notice to holders of this
document with respect to changes subsequently made.
Proprietary information of Athena Controls, Inc. is furnished for customer use only. No other use
is authorized without the written permission of Athena Controls, Inc.
34-6
 Athena Controls, Inc.
900M231U00A
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