Health and Safety Guidelines for Coaching Cycling

Health and Safety Guidelines for Coaching Cycling
Health and Safety
Guidelines for
Coaching Cycling
Updated
17 December 2010
Contents
1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 3 Aim.............................................................................................................................................................. 3 Using the Guidelines .................................................................................................................................. 3 2. Levels of Qualification ............................................................................................................................. 4 3. Before the Coaching Starts ..................................................................................................................... 6 General Points ............................................................................................................................................ 6 Coaching Groups........................................................................................................................................ 7 Coaching Individuals .................................................................................................................................. 8 4. During and After Coaching ...................................................................................................................... 9 Safety Briefing ............................................................................................................................................ 9 Recording Accidents and Injuries ............................................................................................................... 9 5. Coaching Specific Levels and Disciplines........................................................................................... 10 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 10 Level 1 ...................................................................................................................................................... 11 Level 2 ...................................................................................................................................................... 15 Level 3 ...................................................................................................................................................... 19 BMX (Levels 2 and 3) ............................................................................................................................... 22 Mountain Bike (Level 2) ............................................................................................................................ 24 Road and Time Trial (Levels 2 and 3) ...................................................................................................... 28 Track (Levels 2 and 3) .............................................................................................................................. 31 Appendices .................................................................................................................................................. 34 Appendix 1 – Bike and Helmet Safety Check........................................................................................... 34 Appendix 2 – National Standard for Cycle Training ................................................................................. 36 Appendix 3 – Equipment for Individual Programmes ............................................................................... 38 Appendix 4 – BMX Bike Safety Check ..................................................................................................... 39 Appendix 5 – BMX Helmet Safety Check ................................................................................................. 41 Appendix 6 – Mountain Bike Check ......................................................................................................... 43 Appendix 7 – Mountain Bike Helmet Check ............................................................................................. 46 Appendix 8 – Testing, and the Use of Static Trainers in Coaching and Testing Sessions ...................... 47 Throughout this resource, the pronouns he and him etc are intended to be inclusive of both men and
women. It is important in cycling, as elsewhere, that men and women have equal status and opportunity.
The terms bike and bicycle should be read to include all types of pedal cycles that meet the minimum
requirements for safe participation in a coaching session. The terms rider and cyclist are also
interchangeable. References to parents are intended to be inclusive of guardians. The term riders with a
disability should be read as a generic term for anyone with a physical or sensory impairment, or learning
disability.
Note: Any reference to specific levels or disciplines within this document is intended only to include those
endorsed by British Cycling (eg Level 1 refers to British Cycling Level 1, etc)
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1. Introduction
Aim
The British Cycling Health and Safety Guidelines for Coaching Cycling (HSGCC) have been developed to
promote good practice and ensure all riders receive coaching that is safe, effective, enjoyable and
challenging. They aim to provide guidance to coaches regarding health and safety issues that should be
considered when conducting cycling sessions or prescribing training for individual riders. They also assist
organisations and coaches in formulating relevant health and safety policies.
Using the Guidelines
Each coach or organisation that regularly conducts cycling activities with groups or provides individual
training prescription should produce their own health and safety, and risk assessment policies taking the
HSGCC into account. They should do this in conjunction with any other specific requirements from their own
managers, governors or local authorities (eg rules on educational visits, staffing, the use of minibuses).
Policies should be in writing and all people assisting with the coaching activity must be fully aware of them
and know how to implement them if necessary.
This document should be read as complementary to the British Cycling Rulebook, which includes policies
such as Equity in Cycling, the Code of Conduct, and the Policy for the Protection of Children and Vulnerable
Adults. The rulebook also covers matters such as gear restrictions for young riders, clothing and safety
equipment for specific disciplines. As a part of the Coach Education Programme, British Cycling also
provides guidance on risk assessment.
If you have any queries regarding the HSGCC, please contact British Cycling’s Coaching and Education
department.
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2. Levels of
Qualification
When working with riders, coaches should be aware of their own level of experience and qualification. For
any British Cycling coaching licence to be valid, the coach must be a current member of British Cycling
(Gold or Silver level), hold a valid first aid certificate (the minimum requirement is a Health and Safety
Executive approved Emergency First Aid certificate) and have a valid CRB check issued by British Cycling.
The following table lists and describes the coaching qualifications recognised by British Cycling. Coaches
should ensure they are qualified to operate at the level, and in the environment, in which they are coaching.
When working in a discipline-specific environment, coaches must only take the discipline(s) for which they
have attained specific endorsements.
Coaching
Qualification
Level 1
Role
Description
 Prepare for, deliver and review
pre-prepared coaching sessions.
 (Assist more qualified coaches in
delivering aspects of their
coaching sessions normally under
direct supervision.)
Level 1 Coaches are able to conduct pre-prepared
cycling activity sessions independently, ie activities
from the Go-Ride Gears 1 and 2 Coaching
Workbook, or sessions prepared by an
appropriately qualified coach (ie Level 2 or Level
3).
 Plan, deliver and evaluate a
series of coaching sessions,
incorporating basic and
intermediate cycling techniques.
Level 2 Coaches are able to plan activities and
deliver their own planned sessions.
Level 2 with
DisciplineSpecific
Endorsement
 Plan, deliver and evaluate a
series of coaching sessions
incorporating basic, intermediate
and advanced discipline-specific
techniques and tactics.
As for a Level 2 Coach – and deliver basic,
intermediate and advanced discipline-specific
techniques in a discipline-specific environment
including activities from the Go-Ride Gears 5 and 6
Coaching Workbooks for the specific discipline.
Activity Coach
 Plan, deliver and evaluate
coaching sessions incorporating
basic and intermediate
techniques.
Activity Coaches (and Trainee Activity Coaches)
are able to plan activities and to deliver their own
planned sessions.
Activity Coach
with Level 2
DisciplineSpecific
Endorsement
 Plan, deliver and evaluate
coaching sessions incorporating
basic, intermediate and advanced
discipline-specific techniques and
tactics.
As for an Activity Coach – and deliver basic,
intermediate and advanced discipline specific
techniques in a discipline-specific environment
including activities from the Go-Ride Gears 5 and 6
Coaching Workbooks for the specific discipline.
Level 2
Note: Trainee Level 2 Coaches are only able to
conduct pre-prepared cycling activity sessions, ie
pre-prepared sessions such as activities from the
Go-Ride Gears 1-4 Coaching Workbooks, or
sessions prepared by an appropriately qualified
coach (ie Level 2 or Level 3).
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Coaching
Qualification
Club Coach
Role
Description
 Plan, implement, analyse and
revise an annual coaching
programme.
 Plan, deliver and evaluate
coaching sessions incorporating
basic and intermediate
techniques.
Club Coaches (and Trainee Club Coaches) are
able to prescribe training to individual riders, to
plan activities and deliver their own planned
sessions.
Club Coach
with Level 2
DisciplineSpecific
Endorsement
 Plan, deliver and evaluate
coaching sessions incorporating
basic, intermediate and advanced
discipline-specific techniques and
tactics.
As for a Club Coach – and deliver basic,
intermediate and advanced discipline-specific
techniques in a discipline-specific environment
including activities from the Go-Ride Gears 5 and 6
Coaching Workbooks for the specific discipline.
Level 3
 Plan, implement, analyse and
revise an annual coaching
programme for riders within a
particular discipline.
 Plan, deliver and review coaching
sessions incorporating advanced
discipline specific techniques and
tactics.
Level 3 Coaches are qualified to prescribe training
to individual riders within a discipline-specific
context. Level 3 Coaches are also competent to
coach advanced discipline-specific techniques and
tactics including activities from the Go-Ride Gear 7
Coaching Workbook for the specific discipline.
Level 4
 To be confirmed
To be confirmed.
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3. Before the Coaching
Starts
General Points
Prior to any coaching sessions taking place, there are a number of important issues that need to be
addressed. The following points are relevant to all coaches, irrespective of their level of qualification or
whether they are coaching groups or individuals:
1. Coaches should have access to an appropriately stocked first aid kit. They should know who the on-site
first-aider is (it may be themselves, or some venues may have an appointed first aid officer) and how to
contact them, if necessary. Coaches should also have an emergency strategy including knowing the
exact location of the venue, the location of the nearest telephone, emergency contact details and how to
contact the emergency services, as well as an evacuation plan. They must also be aware of the content
of the Emergency Operating Procedures and the Normal Operating Procedures of the venue.
2. Riders under the age of 18 must provide the coach with a Parental Consent Form. Any rider failing to
submit a form signed by a parent must be excluded.
3. Coaches should collect and retain appropriate details regarding each rider being coached including their
name, address and emergency contact, preferably through the use of a registration form, or a Rider
Information and Parental Consent Form for riders under the age of 18. The information should be stored
securely and appropriately to ensure it is kept confidential.
4. To facilitate safe participation coaches should know about any specific health requirements or medical
conditions of the riders. Where possible this information should be sought in advance of the coaching
session or training prescription through the completion of a registration form or a Rider Information and
Parental Consent Form. However, it may be necessary to talk directly with the rider and/or parent before
the session.
5. A risk assessment must be completed and recorded for all venues where cycling sessions are delivered.
The risk assessment must be reviewed prior to each session and any identified actions implemented
before any cycling activity is undertaken at that venue. It is good practice to record that the review and
implementation of the risk assessment took place. This can be done by completing Section 2B of the
Risk Assessment Form for Coaches. Guidance on risk assessment is provided as part of the British
Cycling Coach Education Programme.
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Coaching Groups
When working with groups, coaches should consider the following points in addition to the general points
listed previously, prior to the sessions taking place:
1. Appropriate details regarding each rider taking part in the session should be readily available during
every session (eg their name, address, emergency contact details and other relevant details such as
medical conditions or health requirements).
2. A register of attendance must be completed for every coaching session. When coaching riders under 18
years old, each rider should be signed out on the register by a parent in the presence of the coach.
3. The content of the coaching session must be planned with due consideration for the ability and age of the
riders in the group, as well as the venue, size and surface conditions.
4. Riders under the age of 18 are the coach’s responsibility from when the session commences until the
appropriate person collects them at the end of the session. Young riders are expected to remain in the
session from beginning to end unless they have made prior arrangements to be picked up early. If a rider
has to leave early or is being collected by someone other than the parent, the parent must advise the
coach of the details of the arrangement including who will be collecting the rider and when. The coach
should also agree departure times and procedures with parents before the session commences.
5. Coaches are responsible for ensuring the group is adequately supervised. The coach:rider ratios outlined
in Section 5 provide a minimum ratio to ensure a safe coaching session. However, coaches must only
work with the number of riders with which they feel confident and competent, within the
recommendations. The coach:rider ratio should be sufficient to enable meaningful help to be given to
riders experiencing difficulties. Younger children, beginners and those with disabilities or special needs,
for example, may require extra supervision.
6. While the coach:rider ratios provide a minimum ratio to ensure a safe coaching session, it is
recommended that when coaching young riders a minimum of two responsible adults (with at least one
person holding a valid coaching qualification at an appropriate level) are present at all times to ensure an
adequate level of supervision. This means that in an emergency one adult can stay with the riders while
the other can go for help or deal with the emergency, without having to consider supervision of the rest of
the group. It can also prevent any allegations regarding one-to-one contact with young children.
7. In some instances it may be necessary to arrange for additional help during a session (eg from another
coach, club official or parent). It is important that anyone enlisted to help in a session is suitably qualified
for the role and tasks they are required to undertake. It is good practice to have a clear and accurate
record of everyone involved in the session. This will ensure the coach is able to identify who was in
attendance at a particular session should an issue be raised at a later date that requires this information.
This person should be present at the safety briefing held at the start of the coaching sessions.
8. Coaches in charge of the session should not take part as a rider (eg cycling on the track with riders) as
this could compromise the safety of both the riders and themselves (especially if they were to have an
accident). The reason for this is that they would not be able to undertake a safe and effective coaching
role (eg controlling the group, observing riders and providing feedback) while maintaining their own
safety and that of the group. However, this does not prevent them from giving demonstrations, asking
another responsible person to ride with the group, riding alongside or behind the group at a safe distance
or riding with the group if they need to move them from the meeting point to the coaching area. (See
Section 5.2 for further information on moving riders from the meeting point to the coaching area.) If the
coach does observe the group by riding at a safe distance away from them, it is good practice to have a
helper that is first-aid trained located at an appropriate point on the circuit throughout the session.
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Coaching Individuals
When working with individual riders, coaches should consider the following points in addition to the general
points listed previously, prior to the sessions taking place:
1. The minimum age for prescribing training to individual riders is 14 years; however, for the majority of
riders it may be more appropriate to begin prescribing training at the age of 16 years or older. The
decision to start prescribing training to a rider should be based on the level of the rider’s physical and
mental maturity.
2. In addition to the general information that should be collected about the rider, a Rider Profile and Lifestyle
Audit should be completed.
3. Where riders complete prescribed training alone or in a group in the absence of a coach, the riders are
responsible for their own safety and choosing appropriate training environments. Parents of riders under
the age of 18 are ultimately responsible for the safety and training environments being used. This should
be made clear to the riders and their parents at the onset of coaching.
4. When coaching riders individually through a prescribed training programme it is recommended that
meetings should take place in a public area and, if the rider is under the age of 18, a parent should also
be present. It is recommended that coaches keep a record of all communication with the rider including
meetings, phone calls and emails.
5. Individual programmes should be developed with due consideration for the rider’s goals, ability, age,
lifestyle, training history and available resources (equipment, training environments and support).
6. During the execution of prescribed training it is the responsibility of the rider (or their parents if under the
age of 18) to ensure that the correct personal clothing and equipment is used.
Coaches qualified to coach individual riders should also be aware of the guidance outlined in Appendix 8
regarding testing, including the use of static trainers in coaching and testing sessions.
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4. During and After
Coaching
Safety Briefing
A safety briefing should be conducted at the beginning of every coach-led session to ensure that riders and
others involved in the coaching session have the relevant health, safety and emergency information
regarding the session. Relevant information might include:
 an explanation of specific safety issues and hazards of the venue (ie identified during the risk
assessment)
 an explanation of any specific safety or operational requirements associated with the planned session
 a reminder of the Rider Rules/Code of Conduct
 advise/reminder about the relevant safety and emergency procedures and how to obtain first aid if
required.
Recording Accidents and Injuries
It is essential to record any accidents or injuries that occurred during a session. When documenting the
occurrence of an injury or illness coaches should:
 briefly note it in the relevant box on the session plan, and
 record the full details on an accident and illness record form or in an accident record book.
Recording these details will help to identify any trends or re-occurring accidents as well as areas that could
be addressed to improve safety. This record will be vital in the unlikely event of legal action. A copy of the
accident report form should be submitted to the relevant person. Coaches should always keep a copy for
their own records.
Riders completing individual prescribed training should record accidents, injuries or illnesses that occur
during training in their training diary and inform the coach. Coaches should always keep a copy of such
information for their own records. They should deal with each accident, injury or illness appropriately, which
will normally involve a halt to training or a reduction in the training load until the rider has recovered. Where
appropriate, coaches should encourage riders to seek medical advice.
It is important to note that coaches are not responsible for diagnosing or treating any riders with an injury or
illness but they are expected to advise them where they can go for further help.
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5. Coaching Specific
Levels and
Disciplines
Introduction
This section outlines the key health and safety issues that need to be considered for the following specific
levels or disciplines being coached:

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

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




Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
BMX (Levels 2 and 3)
Cycle Speedway (Levels 2 and 3) – to be confirmed
Cyclo-Cross (Levels 2 and 3) – to be confirmed
Mountain Bike (Level 2)
Mountain Bike (Level 3) – to be confirmed
Road and Time Trial (Levels 2 and 3)
Track (Levels 2 and 3)
Level 4 – to be confirmed.
Each of the above will include relevant information regarding:

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


qualifications
environment
risk assessment regarding environment
equipment
coach:rider ratios
other safety issues.
Note: In this section, venue refers to any club, facility, location or area being considered as a potential
environment for coaching.
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Level 1
Qualifications
Coaching sessions in the Level 1 environment must only be delivered by a responsible person in possession
of a valid British Cycling Level 1, Level 2, Activity Coach, Club Coach or Level 3 coaching qualification. The
coach must also have a minimum of a valid Health and Safety Executive approved Emergency First Aid
certificate.
Level 1 coaches who are 16 or 17 years old must work as assistant coaches under the direct
supervision of another qualified coach (at Level 1 or above) who is at least 18 years old.
Environment
An appropriate Level 1 environment should meet the following criteria:
 An indoor or outdoor traffic-free venue (eg a gymnasium, leisure centre, school playing field, car park or
similar venue) with an area that:
 is flat
 has an appropriate surface for the bicycles and the activity (eg grass, tarmac, concrete, dirt)
 is an appropriate size for the activity and the number of riders.
 Appropriate for teaching the basic and selected intermediate cycling techniques (gear selection,
cornering and group riding) – ie it does not require the rider to have proficiency in climbing, descending
or any advanced cycling techniques in order to ride safely in the environment.
 Easily accessible for the riders (ie it is not appropriate for a Level 1 coach to have to lead a ride to get to
the coaching area).
The coach should also pay due care and attention to the health and safety of the riders, others involved in
the session and themselves, particularly when coaching outdoors. The weather and environmental
conditions must be conducive to learning and allow riders to participate safely in the session.
Risk assessment regarding environment
When conducting a risk assessment of the Level 1 coaching environment, coaches should consider the
following points:
 Venue – May be within a sports/cycling facility or belong to the local council or other organisation which
may have its own policy and procedures regarding risk assessment, health and safety, and rules and
regulations that should be considered prior to conducting the coaching session.
 Surface and area should be clear of debris and in good condition – check for loose materials on riding
surfaces (eg gravel on tarmac surface), protruding objects or holes (eg stumps, drainage holes); remove
litter, broken glass, cans and rubbish; surround netting and/or walls should be maintained and in good
condition.
 Size – The area should accommodate the activities and number of riders involved in the session; allow
the planned activities to take place without the risk of colliding or riding into walls or other obstacles; and
allow the planned activities to be arranged and controlled so that crowds are eliminated and riders are
encouraged to disperse.
 Public access should be limited as far as possible by considering pedestrian access points, the location
of entrances and exits, as well as parked and/or moving vehicles. Where public access is possible (eg
footpath crossing area) signs should be placed to make individuals aware of the activities taking place
and the riders should be informed of the possibility of pedestrian access during the safety briefing.
 Weather conditions can affect riding surfaces and clothing requirements.
 Riders should have an appropriate bike, helmet and clothing, and establish appropriate safety and rider
rules. Coaches in charge of the session should know if any of the riders have any special needs or
medical conditions.
 Equipment should be appropriate to the riders (eg in terms of their age, height and ability) and planned
activities. It should be in good condition and set up correctly.
 Other people and activities should be considered (eg the competence of others involved in session,
and any other activities occurring in the area at the same time).
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Equipment
Personal clothing and equipment
Appropriate personal clothing and equipment is essential for safe and enjoyable participation in cycling
sessions and to minimise the risk of illness or injury due to unsafe or inappropriate equipment being used.
These guidelines are relevant to everyone involved in the session including the coach, recognised
volunteers and riders.
A bike, helmet and clothing safety check must be performed at the beginning of every coaching session. Any
rider with personal clothing and/or equipment that is deemed unsafe or inappropriate should not be allowed
to participate in the cycling session and their parents (if appropriate) notified as to the reason to ensure it
can be fixed for future sessions. In such cases the coach should look to involve the rider in the session,
either as a helper or identify if the rider can be paired with someone of a similar height so they can share a
bike.
Bike
Any bicycle used in a Level 1 environment must:
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be in good working order
have two brakes that work
be fitted with a free wheel
be an appropriate size to allow the rider to participate safely in the session
be appropriate to the environment, surface conditions and activity.
NOTE: Bikes without brakes, and those that are fixed wheel are not considered safe or appropriate.
See Appendix 1 for details regarding the minimum requirements of a bike safety check.
Helmet
British Cycling strongly recommends that cyclists wear a cycle helmet when engaged in any cycling activity.
This is to prevent additional injuries occurring should a collision or incident happen.
In particular, participants of any activity supervised by a British Cycling coach will wear a cycle helmet. The
only exceptions will be when the wearing of a cycle helmet may not be compatible with a religious, faith or
disability issue. (An example is a potential cyclist wearing a turban). On such occasions the cyclist may be
permitted to participate but this will ultimately depend on the coach carrying out a risk assessment which will
consider the capability of the cyclist, the planned activity and the overall environmental conditions.
Any such cyclist (with a parent or guardian if under 18) should discuss the matter with the coach at the
earliest opportunity. British Cycling is keen to include members from all sections of the community and
reasonable adjustment will be made to coaching programmes to facilitate progress in the sport for all.
Riders in a Level 1 environment should wear a helmet that is:
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
either a standard or full-face helmet that conforms to a recognised Standard
undamaged
in good condition
the correct size for the rider
correctly fitted and worn by the rider.
See Appendix 1 for details regarding the minimum requirements of a helmet safety check, and how to
correctly fit and wear a cycling helmet. See Appendix 5 for checking and fitting a full-face helmet.
Clothing
All riders in a Level 1 environment must wear appropriate clothing. Clothing should be checked for safety, as
loose or poorly fitting clothing can get caught in moving parts. Clothing should meet the following criteria:
 Be appropriate for the activity, environment and weather conditions, taking into consideration any
possible changes in the weather (eg waterproof/windproof outer layer in winter)
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
Not include loose or baggy clothing as it can get caught in moving parts.
Trousers and tracksuit bottoms should be tucked in to prevent them becoming entangled in the chain.
Shoes must be worn, with shoe laces tucked in.
Ideally riders should wear cycling gloves.
When cycling in cold or wet conditions, wind chill, location and the activity will affect the amount of heat
generated by the body. Therefore the choice of clothing needs to accommodate these factors. As a general
rule, clothing should be many thin layers rather than a few thick layers, with the outer layer being wind
and/or rain proof. This allows the body temperature to be regulated more easily, by adding or removing
layers as necessary. This is called layering and is the recommended method for controlling body
temperature when cycling in environments where the conditions can be variable.
Riders wearing inadequate or inappropriate clothing should not be allowed to participate in the session.
Coaching equipment
A responsible coach will ensure that all equipment is in good working order, maintained appropriately and
that the manufacturer’s instructions are followed regarding usage, maintenance and storage. Coaches
should keep a record of damaged or missing parts and report them to the appropriate person so that they
can be mended or replaced accordingly.
Level 1 coaches are expected to use equipment that is appropriate to the activity, riders and environment.
When conducting Level 1 sessions, coaches should be able to use safely and effectively, the equipment that
would be found in a general coaching kit bag. This may include:
 cones, which are a durable multi-functional piece of equipment that is inexpensive and readily available
in clubs, schools and leisure centres. They are useful for marking courses, and signifying start and finish
points. Consider using soft cones when there is a high risk of riders colliding with them. It is not
recommended that industrial cones be used, as they could be a potential danger to riders due to their
size and weight
 markers, which are another multi-functional piece of equipment that can be used for marking activities
and boundaries. They are a minimal risk to riders and an excellent tool to use when working with
beginner or young riders
 chalk, which provides an easy way to mark out grids, boundaries or to signify start and finish areas. It
can also be used to provide directional guidance to riders throughout a course, allowing them to focus on
technique and skill rather than direction
 limbo set, which usually consists of a pair of bases, two upright poles and clips and a cross bar, that is
used for activities requiring the rider to ride underneath the cross bar (eg learning to lean the bike). Limbo
bars should only be used for riding under the cross bar, as any other use may result in damage to the
equipment and/or rider. You should note that limbo poles may be used for other purposes (such as
jumping activities) by appropriately qualified coaches. These uses are outside the remit of a Level 1
coach, and appropriate use will be described in the Coaching equipment section of the relevant
environment in these guidelines. When erecting the limbo set it is important the poles face the right way
(ie the clips that hold the cross bar in place should be on the opposite side of the upright poles to where
the rider will approach from) to ensure the cross bar can be easily knocked off the clips without collapsing
the entire set. Limbo bars used within a session are a potential hazard to riders, therefore a coach must
ensure attention is given to all riders who use the poles
 coloured bibs are useful for group management, assisting the coach to differentiate between groups
and aiding management of activities
 crates/water bottles can be used for activities requiring the rider to pick up and put down an object.
These types of activities require good balance and co-ordination, therefore should be used with riders
with an appropriate amount of experience and skill, ie intermediate level riders
 tape measure is useful for setting up activities, particularly if the distances between markers need to be
precise, such as setting up the Go-Ride Skills Test
 stop watch may be used to time competitive activities
 whistle, which is a useful aid for managing a coaching session, particularly if the area is outside, or if the
activities are spread over a large area. It ensures that all riders will hear the commands and be able to
act promptly and appropriately. It is important the coach establishes what behaviour is expected of the
riders when the whistle is sounded. For example, the behaviour may be safety or emergency related
such as ‘immediately stop what you are doing, dismount the bike and walk to where the coach is
standing’; or it may form part of the session such as a starting signal or other command signal (eg telling
the riders to stop, change direction or mount the bike).
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Coach:rider ratio
The coach:rider ratio in a Level 1 environment must not exceed 1:15. If a facility has its own guidelines
regarding coach:rider ratios that are less than the British Cycling recommendations, the facility guidelines
must be adhered to. Level 1 coaches are only qualified to coach groups of riders – the minimum number of
riders within each group must be at least three.
Other safety issues
The coach should always ensure there are appropriate emergency procedures in place including a method
of communicating with appropriate people/organisations in an emergency. The coach should also be aware
of, and adhere to, the rules and regulations stipulated by the owner of the coaching venue. Where there is
conflict between the rules stipulated by the venue and the HSGCC, the former must be adhered to.
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Level 2
Qualifications
Coaching sessions in the Level 2 environment must only be delivered by a responsible person in possession
of a valid British Cycling Level 2, Activity Coach, Club Coach or Level 3 coaching qualification (Note:
Trainee Level 2 Coach status is also acceptable). The coach must also have a minimum of a valid Health
and Safety Executive approved Emergency First Aid certificate.
Note: Level 2 coaches are also qualified to conduct coaching sessions in the Level 1 environment.
Environment
An appropriate Level 2 environment should meet the following criteria:
 An indoor or outdoor traffic-free venue (eg a gymnasium, leisure centre, school playing field, car park
or similar venue); or a closed-road circuit; or non-technical off-road terrain that does not require
navigational skills in order to access it and/or safely ride on it (such as forest tracks, forestry roads,
firetrack type bridleways, designated cycleways, way marked routes and rights of way on which cycles
are permitted and other smooth ground, that does not require route selection in order to ride on it); or any
outdoor cycling track with either an asphalt, tarmac, concrete or grass surface, and is suitable for
free wheel bikes (ie not an indoor cycling track, BMX track or similar cycling specific environment).
 When coaching riders under the age of 14, the riders must be in sight of an appropriately qualified coach
or recognised volunteer at all times.
 When coaching riders aged 14–18 years, the coach may exercise discretion regarding the length of time
a rider of this age group can be out of sight of a qualified coach or recognised volunteer. When making
this decision the safety of the riders is paramount, and if the coach has any concerns regarding the
safety of the riders, they should not be allowed out of sight of an appropriately qualified coach or
recognised volunteer.
 Appropriate surface and conditions for the bicycles and the activity.
 Appropriate size for the activity and numbers within the group.
 Appropriate for teaching the basic and intermediate cycling techniques (ie does not require the rider to
have proficiency in any advanced cycling techniques in order to safely ride in the environment).
The coach should also pay due care and attention to the health and safety of the riders, others involved in
the session and themselves, particularly when coaching outdoors. The weather and environmental
conditions must be conducive to learning and allow riders to participate safely in the session.
Risk assessment regarding environment
The general hazards identified for the Level 1 coaching environment are also appropriate to the Level 2
environments. However, the following issues should also be adhered to:
 Slopes/hills – The gradient and surface conditions should be safe and appropriate for the ability of the
riders, the bicycles and the planned activity.
 Emergencies and communication – The coach and riders should never be further than 10 minutes
walk from a road and shelter, and appropriate emergency procedures must be in place and understood
by everyone in the session. There should always be at least one method of communicating with
appropriate people/organisations in an emergency. Mobile phones should be carried wherever possible
(remember to check signal availability).
Closed-road circuit
When using a closed-road circuit, consider the:
 length of the circuit – the age and ability of the riders, and the planned activity, will determine an
appropriate length. Coaches should consider how long it will take riders to complete a lap and how they
will manage riders who are a long distance away from them (ie on a long circuit). If they cannot manage
the riders appropriately they should use a shortened circuit
 sight of riders – the section of circuit that is used, and the number of coaches/recognised volunteers
involved in the session must allow coaches to meet the requirements regarding keeping riders in sight
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 weather – circuits should only be used during appropriate weather conditions (eg if it is wet or icy the
surface may become slippery and dangerous to riders)
 surface conditions – the surface should be clear of debris and in good condition. Where obstacles
cannot be removed (eg posts, barriers, parked cars, bollards or drains) activities should be organised to
minimise the risks that these present.
In addition to the above points, coaches should also take into account the following issues:
 Venues may have their own policy and procedures governing risk assessment, and health and safety,
which should be considered prior to coaching activities taking place.
 Only riders taking part in the activity should be on the circuit/area being used; other riders should wait in
a safe area.
 Public access should be limited as far as possible to prevent people entering the circuit/area. Where
public access is still possible (eg footpath crossing the circuit), signs should be used to make individuals
aware of the coaching taking place and riders should be informed of the potential for public access during
the safety briefing at the start of the session.
 Be aware of other activities taking place at the same time, particularly those in the centre of the circuits.
The circuit/area should not be used when other activities that are occurring may have an impact on the
safety of riders in the session.
Non-technical off-road terrain
Coaches should consider the following points to ensure they can provide a safe environment:






Getting there and back – Coaches must consider where to meet their riders. If this is not directly at the
site where the session will take place, they will need to identify how to get the riders from the meeting
point to the coaching area and back again. This journey must be risk assessed (as outlined in Moving
Riders to the Coaching Area).
Riders and other users – It is not usually possible to restrict pedestrian access on off-road tracks and
trails, which poses a potential risk to the riders taking part in the session. Other users may also be
walking dogs, which may affect the riders. Equally the riders taking part in the session pose a risk to
other users and coaches must consider how to limit the impact upon them (eg how they would stop the
group, where they would group the riders when they need to stop them, and how they would manage
the following: dogs that are not on a leash, giving way to horses and pedestrians, closing gates,
respecting rights of way, respecting farm animals and other wildlife). If possible sessions should be
organised during off-peak times, when the area may be quieter.
Unpredictable conditions – Each time a rider uses the trail (ie each loop within a session or from one
session to another) it may present new risks, due to factors such as changes in weather, other people
and seasonal plant growth (ie tracks tend to get narrower during summer). Coaches need to consider
how to deal with this, particularly in relation to changes that may occur within a session.
Terrain and surface – The terrain in this environment presents potentially more extreme hazards to
riders than other Level 2 environments and should be risk assessed in relation to the riders’ ability, the
bikes and the activities being conducted. Coaches should consider the surface (eg dirt or gravel) and its
condition (eg loose, hard, pot holes, wet or dry), the gradient of hills, whether there are any obstructions
that riders need to avoid and how to manage these risks. The area should be rideable throughout its
entire length and riders should not be required to carry their bicycles (eg over dangerous, rough or steep
sections) in order to complete a circuit. Remember that in this environment it may not be possible to
cone-off hazards or completely avoid them. Coaches can either choose a limited area that is appropriate
to the riders’ ability and experience, and where they can control the risks, or if they are using a larger
area, educate the riders so the riders, themselves, are able to identify and avoid hazards when riding.
Size of the coaching area – Coaches should consider how spread out the group of riders is likely to be,
and whether they can effectively coach and meet the requirements for keeping riders in sight. They
might need additional support, such as other coaches or recognised volunteers, to supervise the front
and the back of the group or be positioned at key points on the circuit or within the area, allowing them
to focus on coaching and running the session.
Mechanical difficulties and repairs – The technical nature of riding off-road terrain results in an
increased risk of mechanical problems (in addition to a puncture), therefore there may be a need to
undertake trailside repairs. Coaches should encourage riders to carry a basic repair kit and tools, and
ensure they know how to repair a puncture. When working with a group they might consider a shared
repair kit and tools. If they do this, the contents should be suitable to the range of bikes in the session.
Remember that coaches are not expected to undertake repairs or adjustments to the riders’ bikes.
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Outdoor cycling track
In particular, coaches should consider the:
 length of the track in relation to the age and ability of the riders and the planned activity. They should
consider how long it will take the riders to complete a lap
 weather conditions as tracks should only be used during appropriate weather conditions (eg if it is wet
or icy the track surface may become slippery and dangerous to riders – this is particularly the case with
grass tracks). The affect of weather conditions on the track surface will vary from track to track. If
coaches have any concerns they should discuss this with a more experienced coach or the facility owner
 steepness of the banking in relation to the age and ability of the riders (eg it would be inappropriate for
beginner riders to ride high on a steeply banked track, whereas it would be acceptable for them to ride
around the track at the bottom of the banking). Most grass tracks do not have any banked sections.
In addition to the above points, coaches should also take into account the following issues:
 Venues may have their own policy and procedures governing risk assessment, and health and safety,
which should be considered prior to coaching activities taking place.
 The surface of the track and the safety zone (run off area) should be clear of debris and in good condition
(eg free from stones, glass or moss). It is common to sweep the track before using it.
 Only riders taking part in the activity should be on the track (or safety zone). Access to the track and
track centre should be restricted when using the track (this is particularly important when access is by
walking over the track itself). Where access over the track is necessary, signs should be placed in
appropriate locations to make pedestrians aware of the coaching taking place and riders should be
informed during the rider safety briefing at the beginning of the session.
 Cycling on an outdoor track is usually performed in an anti-clockwise direction. When using the whole
track all riders must ride in the same direction.
 The perimeter fence should be in good condition with no protruding parts, completely surrounding the
track, and all access gates should be closed when the track is in use.
 Equipment must not be placed around the inside edge of the track – ensure it is safely stored in a
location where it will not impede the riders or the session.
 Coaches should be aware of other activities taking place at the same time, particularly those in the centre
of the track. They should not use the track when other activities may have an impact on the safety of
riders in the session.
 The track must be suitable for free wheel bikes.
 New riders should be given an induction to riding the track and track-riding etiquette (contact the facility
owner to obtain information on the track etiquette or rider rules for the track).
 Coaches should promote good technique and track-riding etiquette at all times.
 Coaches should position themselves at a location that allows them to view the whole track, provides easy
access to the riders if an accident occurs, and enables them to control and monitor access to and from
the track, where riders either join or leave it, and from where they can see other facility users. Usually
this would be the track centre.
Some cycling tracks have an induction or training programme that coaches must complete before they will
be allowed to coach on that track. Coaches should contact the relevant facility to determine any
requirements it may have.
Moving riders to the coaching area
Where possible coaches should arrange to meet the riders at the coaching area, however this may not
always be possible. Therefore, it may be necessary to move riders from the meeting point to the coaching
area and this may require limited use of the public highway. In such instances coaches must have parental
consent, the riders MUST be under their direct supervision and it cannot not be part of the coaching activity.
Coaches should consider the type of road and the skill level of all the riders to determine whether it is
appropriate to be taking them on that particular road. They should also consider whether it is best for the
riders to walk with their bikes. This situation must be risk-assessed in advance.
Personal clothing and equipment
As for Level 1.
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Coaching equipment
As for Level 1.
Coach:rider ratio
When coaching groups of beginner/intermediate level riders in a Level 2 environment:


at an indoor/outdoor venue or closed road circuit, the ratio of riders to coaches must not exceed 20
riders to one Level 2 coach
on non-technical off-road terrain or an outdoor cycling track, the ratio of riders to coaches must not
exceed 15 riders to one Level 2 coach.
Level 2 coaches are only qualified to coach groups of riders. The minimum number of riders must be at least
three. Coaches must only work with the number of riders with whom they feel confident and competent to
deal with, without exceeding the above recommendations. If a venue has its own guidelines regarding the
ratio of coaches to riders that are less than the British Cycling recommendations, the facility guidelines must
be adhered to.
Other safety issues
The coach should always ensure there are appropriate emergency procedures in place including a method
of communicating with appropriate people/organisations in an emergency, and should never be further than
10 minutes walk from a road and shelter. The coach should be aware of, and adhere to, the rules and
regulations stipulated by the owner of the coaching venue. Where there is conflict between the rules
stipulated by the venue and the HSGCC, whichever is the stricter of the guidelines should be adhered to (ie
in the case of a venue having very lax guidelines).
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Level 3
Qualifications
Coaching sessions in the Level 3 environment must only be delivered by a responsible person in possession
of a valid British Cycling Level 3 coaching qualification. The coach must also have a minimum of a valid
Health and Safety Executive approved Emergency First Aid certificate.
Note: Level 3 coaches are also qualified to conduct coaching sessions in the Level 1 and Level 2
environments.
Generic environment
An appropriate Level 3 environment should meet the following criteria:
 The public highway, excluding areas where riders are prohibited under current legislation (eg
motorways). Note: Riders under the age of 12 may not take part in activities held in the Level 3 coaching
environment.
 Should be of a size/length and have surroundings (eg trees and buildings) that allow riders aged 12-15 to
be seen at all times by an appropriately qualified coach or recognised volunteer. When coaching riders
aged 16-18 years, the coach may exercise discretion regarding the length of time a rider of this age
group can be out of sight of a qualified coach or recognised volunteer. When making this decision the
safety of the riders is paramount, and if the coach has any concerns regarding the safety of the riders,
they should not be allowed out of sight of an appropriately qualified coach or recognised volunteer.
 Appropriate for the activities, the size of the group and experience of the riders being coached.
Risk assessment regarding environment
When conducting a risk assessment of a generic Level 3 environment, coaches should be aware of the
following issues:
 Current legislation governing road use – Coaches and riders operating on the public highway should
make themselves aware of, and adhere to, all legislation relating to the use of, and activities taking place
on, the public highway. This legislation may differ between England, Wales and Scotland.
 Other road users – Coaching sessions taking place on the public highway can present a hazard to other
road users (including other cyclists, motor vehicles, pedestrians, horses or horse drawn carriages). Other
road users can also present a hazard to individuals taking part in coaching sessions. Coaches and riders
should take precautions to reduce the level of risk to an acceptable level. In addition to considering the
safety of all road users when planning activities, coaches should consider other safety measures
including stopping and grouping the riders off the road (eg in a lay-by or car park), avoiding turning in the
road, minimising group and bunch sizes, using quiet roads, avoiding times when roads are busy and
avoiding roads where other events (eg road races, time trials, car boot sales) are taking place.
 Surface conditions – Road condition and maintenance varies greatly between regions, roads and roads
with different classifications. Where a risk assessment reveals hazards relating to poor surface conditions
or maintenance, the local authority should be informed so that appropriate repairs can be made.
 Road junctions, signs and signals – When riding on the public highway riders must, when required,
give way at road junctions and obey all road signs and signals.
 Obstacles and road works – Coaching sessions should avoid roads where obstacles (eg parked cars,
traffic calming measures) or road works may increase the level of risk presented to individuals involved in
the session and other road users.
 Weather conditions – The public highway should only be used during appropriate weather conditions
and when weather conditions are conducive to learning and safe participation.
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In addition to the above coaches must:
 perform a risk assessment of the activities – the hazards and level of risk presented by an activity
may change depending upon the environment, time of day and other road users
 assess the ability and experience of the riders – coaches should assess rider ability and experience
to ensure they are appropriately skilled to ride in the environment and take part in the activities of the
session. As a minimum, riders taking part in coaching sessions on the public highway should be
competent at Level 2 of the National Standard for Cycle Training (see Appendix 2)
 gain parental consent – informed parental consent should be gained for riders under 18 years of age.
Parents should be asked to provide written consent to allow their children to take part in coaching
sessions on the public highway and agree that their child is appropriately skilled to take part in coaching
sessions on the public highway.
Equipment
Bike
 Road bikes are defined in the British Cycling Rulebook. While any bike that meets the criteria specified
for the Level 1 coaching environment may be used in sessions in the Level 3 coaching environment,
coaches may wish to limit the bikes used to road bikes for sessions where high speed or group riding is
performed. In this instance the road bikes should conform to the British Cycling rules and regulations that
govern road bikes used for racing. For drills relating specifically to road or circuit racing (eg bunch riding)
the road bike should have a free wheel and two brakes. For drills relating specifically to time trials the
road bike may have a fixed wheel and, as a minimum, a front brake.
 Aero bars – Road bikes fitted with aero bars should be excluded from all activities involving group riding
with the exception of drills relating specifically to time trials (eg team time trial practice).
 Disk wheels – Road bikes fitted with a disk wheel should be excluded from all activities involving group
riding with the exception of drills relating specifically to time trials (eg team time trial practice).
Coaching equipment
 Cars and motorcycles may be used to accompany riders during coaching sessions. It is important to
recognise the additional risks associated with car and motorcycle use when conducting the risk
assessment. Where cars or motorcycles are used, the driver of the vehicle cannot be the coach and
should be an individual with adequate qualifications and experience (eg appropriate driving licence and
race convoy experience). It is the responsibility of the driver to drive in a way that is safe and considerate
of all other road users and to obey all rules and regulations that apply to the vehicle. It is also important
to ensure that the vehicle and driver are insured for the activities taking place. Where cars and
motorcycles are used, appropriately placed signage may assist in forewarning other road users of the
cyclists.
Coach:rider ratio
The coach:rider ratio in the generic Level 3 environment must not exceed 1:10. The maximum group size
acceptable is 20 riders.
Other safety issues
 The lead coach should not take part in the session as a rider.
 Coaches should be aware of, and adhere to, rules and regulations that govern use of the public highway.
Where there is conflict between these rules and the HSGCC, the former must be adhered to.
 Coaches should be aware, and make riders aware, that riding on the public highway is dangerous and
while other road users present hazards to them, they provide hazards to other road users. It is the
responsibility of coaches and riders to minimise the risk to themselves and other road users.
 Legislation exists to penalise dangerous, and careless and inconsiderate, cycling (see Road Traffic Act,
1998 and 1991). Riders should ensure they ride in a manner that is safe and responsible at all times.
 Coaches should make riders aware that while they are training in the Level 3 environment, they are
ultimately responsible for their riding, their safety and riding within the rules and regulations. Riders
should use their own judgement when taking part in the coaching session to ensure they meet their
responsibilities.
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 Coaching sessions on the public highway may not consist of training or mock races/events. Coaches
should refer to the Road Traffic Act, 1988 and the The Cycle Racing On Highways Regulations, 1960 for
further information regarding training or mock events.
 Coaches should devise and communicate emergency procedures to riders, including those incidents that
riders may experience during a session (eg punctures, mechanical problems, changes in environmental
conditions, accidents involving one or more members of the group or being dropped by the group).
 Road riding is often fatiguing and new riders or riders new to road riding will incur a loss of skill as they
fatigue. Coaches should ensure riders take enough rest to ensure safety is maintained.
 Group riding presents additional hazards to a rider that are not normally present when riding as an
individual; these are often the result of reduced visibility, the proximity of other riders and sudden
changes in speed or direction. Riders should use a common set of verbal/hand signals to communicate
when riding in groups.
 The coach should promote good technique and road riding etiquette at all times.
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BMX (Levels 2 and 3)
Qualifications
Coaching sessions conducted in the BMX environment may only be delivered by a responsible person in
possession of a current British Cycling Level 2 coaching qualification with a Level 2 or Level 3 BMX
coaching endorsement (Note: Trainee Level 3 BMX Coach is also acceptable). The coach must, as a
minimum, hold a current Health and Safety Executive approved Emergency First Aid certificate.
Many BMX facilities have their own guidelines, policies and procedures on risk assessment, health
and safety, track usage and coaching practice. Where these policies are maintained by a BMX facility
they take precedence over the following British cycling guidelines. Where no policies exist, the
following guidelines should be regarded as a minimum standard. British Cycling Coaching and
Education recognises the responsibility of BMX facilities to maintain high standards of coaching
practice that are appropriate for their own circumstances.
Note:
 Level 2 and Level 3 BMX coaches are also qualified to coach in the Level 1 and Level 2 coaching
environments.
 BMX facilities may specify minimum requirements for coaches and, as a result, coaches may be required
to undergo further training, including facility specific induction, before being allowed to coach at the
facility. The Level 2 BMX Coaching Award and Level 3 Certificate in Coaching BMX do not give coaches
the automatic right to coach at a BMX facility.
Environment
BMX coaching sessions can only take place in an environment that meets the following criteria:




Conform to the rules that govern BMX tracks used for racing as detailed in the British Cycling Rulebook.
Are maintained to a level where safe participation can take place.
No feature of the BMX track (excluding the start hill) exceeds 2.5 metres in height.
Level 2 BMX coaches may not coach on pro sections, regardless of their geometry, height or integration
with the BMX track.
 Is a purpose built BMX track (excluding trails or dirt jumps).
 Is a purpose built skate park.
Risk assessment regarding environment
When conducting a risk assessment of the Level 2 and Level 3 BMX environments, coaches should be
aware of the following issues:
 Facility – BMX tracks may have their own policy and procedures governing risk assessment, health and
safety, and rules and regulations, all of which should be considered prior to coaching activities taking
place.
 Surface – The track surface and start area should be clear of debris and in good condition.
 Track access – Only riders using the track should be allowed on the track or start area when the track is
in use. Access to the track, paddock and start hill should be restricted when the BMX track is in use.
Where access to the track is possible (eg non-fenced off areas) signs should be used to make individuals
aware that coaching is taking place. Areas of the track that represent a heightened hazard should be
emphasised to riders during the safety briefing at the beginning of the session.
 Weather conditions – BMX tracks should only be used during appropriate weather conditions.
 Other activities – BMX tracks, sections of a BMX track or indoor skate parks should not be used when
other activities are taking place which may have an impact on the safety of riders.
 Bikes – Ideally, cruisers and race BMX bikes should be used for BMX coaching sessions; however,
freestyle BMX bikes without pegs may be used and mountain bikes may be used unless otherwise stated
in the facility’s rules and regulations.
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Bike
Equipment specific to BMX and this environment include the following:
 BMX bikes – Should conform to the rules governing BMX bikes in the British Cycling Rulebook as well
as any rules or guidelines provided by the facility. All bikes must meet the minimum safety requirements
as detailed in the Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cycling and Level 2 BMX Coaching Award. Typically,
these bikes have a minimum of one fully working brake and are in a safe state of repair (see Appendix 4
or the Go-Ride BMX Gears 5 and 6 Coaching Workbook, Appendix A).
 Helmets – A British standard (CE marked) full face or skate-style (potty) helmet should be worn in all
sessions (see Appendix 5 or the Go-Ride BMX Gears 5 and 6 Coaching Workbook, Appendix B).
 Gloves – Full finger gloves should be worn in all sessions.
 Pads – Knee and shin protection must be worn when riding in shorts.
 General clothing – Pants shall be loose fitting long pants made of tear-resistant material. Shorts are
permitted if accompanied by appropriate knee and shin protection. A loose-fitting, long-sleeved jersey
should be worn.
Coaching equipment
Coaching equipment specific to BMX and this environment include the following:
 Cones and markers may be used to mark the edges of a BMX track or cordoned off areas.
 Start gate – It can be manual or automatic and may be used when practicing gate starts. Only riders
taking part in the gate start should be on the BMX track when a gate start is performed. The coach
should be familiar with the safe operation of the start gate prior to its use. The gate should be a purpose
built start gate in good working order.
 Portable ramps – Purpose built ramps may be used in Level 2 and Level 3 BMX coaching sessions, but
must not exceed 2.5 metres in height. The ramp should be positioned with a 10 metre safety area in front
of and behind the ramp with no obstacles present and should rest on flat, hard standing ground. A three
metre safety zone to either side of the ramp is required.
 Limbo poles may be used for Jumping and Advanced Balance and Coordination activities, such as
bunny hopping. When limbo poles are used for this purpose, the coach should ensure he has risk
assessed the use of this equipment for the planned activity, environment and ability of the riders and
must set up the equipment using the same guidelines as described in Coaching equipment in Level 1
(above) (so that if the bike or rider hits the cross bar it will be easily knocked off the upright poles and not
get tangled in the bike).
Coach: rider ratio
The coach:rider ratio in the Level 2 and Level 3 BMX environment should not exceed 1:16 with no more than
eight riders on the BMX track. Where more than one qualified BMX coach is present, eight riders per
qualified coach may use suitably cordoned sections of the track simultaneously (see Other activities in the
Risk assessment section, above) providing each group of eight is engaged in separate and discreet
activities. Level 2 coaches may coach groups only, comprising a minimum of three riders.
Other safety issues
The following list outlines a number of other safety issues relating directly to coaching on the BMX track:
 The lead coach should not take part in the session as a rider.
 Riding on BMX tracks and the use of BMX bikes have inherent risks. These risks are exaggerated in
beginner riders who often have to master the techniques and skills to enable them to ride sections of the
track before they use the whole track.
 Beginner riders should be given an induction to riding the BMX track, which should include, as a
minimum, instruction on starting off and braking on a BMX bike, observation prior to joining the track and
the correct direction of travel on the track. It is recommended that riders demonstrate competency in the
basic BMX techniques (see the Cark Park Test in the Go-Ride BMX Gears 5 and 6 Coaching Workbook,
Appendix F) in a generic Level 2 environment before riding on the BMX track.
 BMX riding is fatiguing and beginner riders or riders new to BMX riding will demonstrate a loss of skill
and/or concentration as they fatigue. Coaches should ensure that riders take enough rest to ensure
safety is maintained.
 Coaches should promote good technique and BMX riding etiquette at all times.
 Coaches should position themselves at a location that enables viewing of the whole BMX track and easy
access to riders if an accident occurs. Coaches should also position themselves where they are able to
control and monitor access to the BMX track from both riders who join and leave the BMX track, and
other facility users.
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Mountain Bike (Level 2)
Qualifications
Coaching sessions conducted in the Level 2 mountain bike (MTB) environment may only be delivered by a
responsible person in possession of a current British Cycling Level 2 coaching qualification with a Level 2
MTB coaching endorsement (Note: Trainee Level 2 MTB Coach status is also acceptable). The coach must,
as a minimum, hold a current Health and Safety Executive approved Emergency First Aid certificate.
Many MTB facilities, such as trail centres and Forestry Commission managed land, have their own
guidelines, policies and procedures on risk assessment, health and safety, trail usage and coaching
practice. Where these policies are maintained by a facility they take precedence over the following
British Cycling guidelines. Where no policies exist, the following guidelines should be regarded as a
minimum standard. British Cycling Coaching and Education recognises the responsibility of MTB
coaches and specific MTB facilities to maintain high standards of coaching practice that are
appropriate for their own circumstances.
Note:
 Level 2 MTB coaches are also qualified to coach in the Level 1 and Level 2 coaching environments.
 Certain MTB facilities may specify minimum requirements for coaches operating at that facility. As a
result, coaches may be required to undergo further training, including a facility-specific induction, before
being allowed to coach at the facility. The British Cycling Level 2 MTB Coaching Award does not give
coaches the automatic right to coach at a MTB facility.
Environment
Coaching sessions can only take place at appropriate coaching venues where MTB riding is permitted. If
intending to coach on private land, coaches should gain the land owner’s permission, in writing, before
commencing the sessions. Suitable Level 2 MTB coaching venues include:
 forest tracks and park land
 purpose-built trail centres
 purpose-built four-cross, BMX or pump tracks.
Note: Exposed open areas, such as hillsides and moorland are not an appropriate coaching venue
due to the changeability of the environment and risk of isolation.
Several points should be considered when planning MTB coaching sessions. To promote a safe and
effective Level 2 MTB coaching session, coaches should adhere to the following criteria:
 All coaching venues should be appropriate to the current level of physical fitness and technical
competence of the riders who will be participating in the session. This includes any obstacles and
features used within the coaching area and how the surface and/or weather conditions will influence the
technical severity of the coaching venue. This judgement should be based on the coach’s assessment of
the riders’ current level of ability.
 Boardwalk used in coaching sessions should have a safe anti-slip surface fitted and be wide enough for
riders to safely dismount, should they wish to do so. Boardwalk should only be included in coaching
sessions when the conditions are dry.
 All descents used within coaching sessions should be rollable, so that the wheels are not required to
leave the ground to safely negotiate any part of the descent. As a guide, rollable terrain means that any
drops or drop-offs should be no higher than hub height. Note that wheel diameters may vary within a
group of riders, which may require the coach to include alternatively sized obstacles when planning
sessions. When coaching more advanced riders, obstacles may need to be higher than hub height. In
these circumstances an alternative, rollable route option around the obstacle should be provided.
 All jumps used should be either a tabletop or double jumps that are rollable by riders when riding at
jogging pace (ie both wheels remain in contact with the jump). The use of purpose-built jumps, such as
those found in a trail centre skills area, is strongly recommended as these tend to be more stable than
local dirt jump areas.
 The direction of travel within coaching areas should be clearly marked so that they are obvious to riders
and maintained to a level where safe participation can take place.
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 Coaching venues should be within 30-minutes walk (approximately 10-minutes steady ride) from an
appropriate access point (should emergency services be required). These points should provide vehicle
access, suitable shelter for your group and access to telephone communications.
 The distance between the meeting point and coaching venue should be minimised to ensure that the
majority of time is spent in coaching activities, not moving from venue to venue.
 All meeting points and pre-planned alternative access points should allow vehicle access and also have
a telephone and/or mobile telephone signal.
 In the case of an emergency, coaches should carefully consider their mode of transport for
gaining help. Whether cycling or on foot, coaches should cover the distance to help in a calm
manner to reduce the risk of injuring themselves. In an emergency do not automatically assume
that cycling for assistance is the safest or quickest way to gain help.
 There is no limit on the number of pre-planned coaching venues a coach may use within his sessions;
however, the coaching time should be maximised within the overall duration of the session.
 The coach should be able to provide exact locations for all meeting points and coaching venues (such as
grid references or landmarks). It is good practice to lodge these locations with an appropriate venue/club
official or other responsible person (appointed contact), as well as approximate timings and the intended
route to and from each location. These details (in addition to the telephone number of the appointed
contact) should also be made available to the parents of any riders who are under the age of 18 years.
 A pre-planned coaching venue may include an area intended as an alternative venue should the weather
change suddenly. This venue location, including a description of the circumstances that would cause the
coach to change venues, should be logged with the appointed contact.
 Check all pre-planned meeting points/access points as close as is feasibly possible prior to the session
to ensure they are still valid, appropriate and usable.
 The route(s) between the meeting point and coaching venue(s) should be assessed prior to the session
and details of the intended route(s) recorded. The distance of the route(s) and technical severity should
be minimised, and be appropriate (both in terms of fitness and technical competence) to the riders’
current level of ability. The aim of this is to minimise risk to the riders and to maximise the available
coaching time. Coaching activities must not take place when moving riders from point to point.
Moving riders from a meeting point to a coaching venue
Suitable venues for MTB coaching are rarely adjacent to a suitable meeting point. Therefore, in some
instances it is likely that there may be some distance between the point at which the coach meet the riders
and the area chosen as the coaching venue. When riders need to be moved from a meeting point to a
coaching venue, the following guidelines should be adhered to:
 The overall moving time must not exceed the overall coaching time. Level 2 MTB coaches are not
insured to lead groups, however, they may escort riders between meeting points and appropriate
coaching venues.
 The coach should provide an overview of the session to the riders before leaving the meeting area,
including details of the amount and type of riding that is required between the meeting point and
coaching venues.
 It is advisable, if possible, to book-end your group of riders when moving them from point to point (ie
having a responsible person at the front and rear of the group). This will require the use of a helper, who
should ride at the front of the group, enabling the coach to ride at the back. If this is not possible, it is
imperative that the coach regularly checks the front and rear of the group. The coach must wait at turns
and junctions until the entire group has passed.
Risk assessment regarding environment
When conducting a risk assessment of the Level 2 MTB environment, coaches should be aware of the
following issues:
 Facility – Be aware that some venues, such as trail centres and four-cross courses may have their own
policy and procedures governing risk assessment, health and safety, and rules and regulations, all of
which should be considered prior to coaching activities taking place.
 Surface – The trail surface should be clear of debris such as litter, dog foul and glass. Disguised
obstacles, such as tree roots, should be highlighted. The surface conditions should not present a level of
difficulty that exceeds the riders’ level of ability or potentially puts them at risk of injury. Be aware that the
surface conditions can change considerably and rapidly with changes in the weather.
 Trail access –Areas of trail in the coaching area that represent an increase risk should be emphasised
to riders during the safety briefing at the beginning of the session. When coaching on a four-cross, BMX
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or pump track, access to the track and start area should be restricted when the track is in use. Where
trails share rights of access with other users, such as walkers, ensure that riders are aware that others
have a right of way through the coaching area. Signs should be used to make individuals aware that
coaching is taking place.
 Weather conditions – Select coaching venues based on the suitability of the surface to withstand the
forecast and actual weather conditions, and the riders’ ability to safely negotiate that area in those
conditions. In wet conditions, be aware that coaching riders in some areas can cause excessive erosion
and damage to the terrain and, therefore, such areas should be avoided at those times.
 Bikes – Any type of MTB that meets the requirements of the Mountain Bike Checklist can be used in a
Level 2 MTB coaching session. Be aware that the diameter of MTB wheels can vary, which will have
implications for ensuring terrain is rollable by all riders in your sessions.
Equipment
Bikes
Mountain bikes – Bikes used in the Level 2 MTB environment should conform to the rules governing
mountain bikes in the British Cycling Rulebook as well as any rules or guidelines provided by the facility. All
bikes must meet the minimum safety requirements as detailed in the Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cycling
and Level 2 Mountain Bike Coaching Award. Typically, these bikes should have two working brakes and are
in a safe state of repair (see Appendix 6 or the British Cycling Level 2 Coaching Handbook: Mountain Bike,
Appendix 2).
Helmet
British Cycling strongly recommends that cyclists wear a cycle helmet when engaged in any cycling activity.
This is to prevent additional injuries occurring should a collision or incident happen.
In particular, participants of any activity supervised by a British Cycling coach will wear a cycle helmet. The
only exceptions will be when the wearing of a cycle helmet may not be compatible with a religious, faith or
disability issue. (An example is a potential cyclist wearing a turban). On such occasions the cyclist may be
permitted to participate but this will ultimately depend on the coach carrying out a risk assessment which will
consider the capability of the cyclist, the planned activity and the overall environmental conditions.
Any such cyclist (with a parent or guardian if under 18) should discuss the matter with the coach at the
earliest opportunity. British Cycling is keen to include members from all sections of the community and
reasonable adjustment will be made to coaching programmes to facilitate progress in the sport for all.
Helmets that are appropriate for the Level 2 MTB environment should conform to a British standard (CE
marked) and be either a standard or full-face design. For sessions coaching downhill and four-cross, riders
should wear a full face helmet.
See Appendix 7 or the British Cycling Level 2 Coaching Handbook: Mountain Bike, Appendix 1 for further
details regarding the minimum requirements of a helmet safety check, and how to correctly fit and wear a
cycling helmet).
Clothing
 Gloves – Full finger gloves or track mitts should be worn in all sessions.
 Pads – Riders may choose to wear knee, shin and/or elbow protection in coaching sessions. For
sessions coaching downhill and four-cross, it is recommended that riders wear body armour.
 General clothing – Clothing that is appropriate for the standard Level 2 coaching environment is
appropriate for the Level 2 MTB environment. Downhill and four-cross riders may also choose to wear
loose jerseys and long moto-cross style trousers made of tear-resistant material.
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Coaching equipment
Coaching equipment specific to MTB and this environment include the following:
 Portable ramps – Purpose-built ramps may be used in Level 2 MTB coaching sessions. The ramp
should:
 be located on ground that is flat, with hard standing
 have a safety area of at least 10-metres in front and behind it with no obstacles present
 have a safety zone of at least three metres to either side of it.
Coach: rider ratio
The coach:rider ratio in the Level 2 MTB environment should not exceed 1:8. No more than eight riders can
be riding on the trail at any one time. Where more than one qualified MTB coach is present, eight riders per
qualified coach may use suitably cordoned sections of the trail simultaneously, providing each group of eight
is engaged in separate and discreet activities. Level 2 MTB coaches may coach groups only, comprising a
minimum of three riders.
When coaching Level 2 MTB techniques within the generic Level 2 environment, the appropriate Level 2
coach:rider ratio is applicable (See page 18 of the British Cycling Health and Safety Guidelines for Coaching
Cycling).
Other safety issues
Other safety issues relating directly to coaching on the MTB trails include the following:
 The lead coach should not take part in coaching activities during the session as a rider. However, the
coach may decide to make observations of rider performance by following the riders on a bike (ridethrough observation) if he has an assistant coach/helper present. Note: No coaching may take place
by the lead coach when riding a bike. Before undertaking ride-through observations of rider
performance, the coach must consider if his current riding level is suitable to be able to safely and
effectively follow the riders.
 Riding on MTB trails and the use of MTB bikes have inherent risks. These risks are exaggerated for
beginner riders who often have to master the techniques and skills to enable them to ride sections of the
trail. Always ensure that the terrain selected is suitable for the riders.
 MTB riding is fatiguing and beginner riders or riders new to MTB riding will demonstrate a loss of skill
and/or concentration as they fatigue. The coach should ensure that riders take appropriate rest breaks
during the session to ensure the level of fatigue does not affect rider safety.
 It is in the interest of the sport to promote good technique and MTB riding etiquette to riders at all times.
 The coach should position himself at a location that enables viewing of the whole trail and easy access to
riders if an accident occurs. The coach may also need to consider positioning himself where he is able to
control and monitor access to the trail from both riders who are joining and leaving the coaching area, as
well as other facility users.
 The coach should carry a basic first aid kit and emergency repair kit during all coaching sessions.
 The coach should recommend to riders that they bring appropriate spare clothing (i.e. waterproof jacket),
a basic repair kit and some food with them to sessions.
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Road and Time Trial (Levels 2 and 3)
Qualifications
Road and time trial sessions in the Level 2 and 3 road and time trial environments must only be delivered by
a responsible person in possession of a valid British Cycling Level 2 Road and Time Trial coaching
endorsement, or a British Cycling Level 3 Road and Time Trial coaching qualification. (Note: Trainee Level
3 Coach status is also acceptable.) The coach must also have a minimum of a valid Health and Safety
Executive approved Emergency First Aid certificate.
Note: Level 2 and Level 3 road and time trial coaches are also qualified to conduct coaching sessions in the
Level 1 and Level 2 environments.
Environment
An appropriate environment for a coach-led road and time trial coaching session must meet the following
criteria.
 NOT the public highway.
 Surface is of asphalt, paving, cobbles or similar; which is well maintained, well drained and free of litter
and obstacles.
 Maintained to a level where safe participation can take place.
 Either a closed circuit or enclosed area; most commonly this would be a purpose built closed-road circuit,
circuit on paths in a park or a closed car park.
 Should be of a size/length and have surroundings (eg trees and buildings) that allow riders under the age
of 14 to be seen at all times by an appropriately qualified coach or recognised volunteer. When coaching
riders aged 14 -18 years, the coach may exercise discretion regarding the length of time a rider of this
age group can be out of sight of a qualified coach or recognised volunteer. When making this decision
the safety of the riders is paramount, and if the coach has any concerns regarding the safety of the
riders, they should not be allowed out of sight of an appropriately qualified coach or recognised
volunteer.
 Should have a region around the area/circuit clear of obstacles and wide enough to allow riders to exit
the area/circuit safety.
 Must be appropriate for the activities, the size of the group and experience of the riders being coached.
Risk assessment regarding environment
When conducting a risk assessment of the road and time trial environment coaches should be aware of the
following issues:
 Facility – Closed circuits or enclosed areas may be within a venue or belong to the local authority or
other organisation, which will have their own policy and procedures governing risk assessment, health
and safety, and rules and regulations which should be considered prior to coaching activities taking
place.
 Surface – The surface should be clear of debris and in good condition. Where obstacles cannot be
removed (eg posts, barriers, parked cars, bollards or drains) activities should be organised to minimise
the risks that these present. Any obstacles should be clearly marked and riders’ attention should be
drawn to them during a safety briefing at the start of the session.
 Rider and public access – Only riders taking part in the activity should be on the circuit/area being
used; other riders should wait in a safe area. Public access should be limited as far as possible to
prevent people entering onto the circuit/area. Where public access is still possible (eg foot path crossing
area) signs should be used to make individuals aware of the coaching taking place and riders should be
informed of public access during a safety briefing at the start of the session.
 Fence/barrier surrounding circuit/area should be in a good condition and have no parts that protrude
into the riders’ path.
 Weather conditions – Circuits/areas should only be used during appropriate weather conditions and
when weather conditions are conductive to learning and safe participation.
 Other activities – Circuits/areas should not be used when other activities, particularly those adjacent to
the circuits/areas, may have an impact on the safety of riders in the session.
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 Traffic – The area used for the session should be free of traffic at all times.
Equipment
Bike
 Road bikes are defined in the British Cycling Rulebook. While any bike that meets the criteria specified
for the Level 1 coaching environment may be used in road and time trial sessions, coaches may wish to
limit the bikes used to road bikes for sessions where high speed or group riding is performed. In this
instance the road bikes should conform to the British Cycling rules and regulations that govern road bikes
used for racing.
 Aero bars – Road bikes fitted with aero bars should be excluded from all activities involving group riding
with the exception of drills relating specifically to time trials (eg team time trial practice).
Coaching equipment
 Cars may be used to follow riders during coaching sessions organised and run by Level 3 road and time
trial coaches. It is important to recognise the additional risks associated with the use of a car when
conducting the risk assessment. Where cars are used, the driver of the vehicle cannot be the coach and
should be aged 21 years or over, with adequate qualifications and driving experience (eg an appropriate
driving licence and race convoy experience). It is the responsibility of the driver to drive in a way that is
safe and considerate to others. When following riders the driver should maintain an appropriate distance
behind the riders that will allow them to stop safely. Drivers should, as a minimum, adhere to the
stopping distances as recommend by the Highway Code (see below):
Highway Code – Typical stopping distances
Driver Speed
20mph
30mph
40mph
Typical stopping distance in dry
conditions
12 metres
23 metres
36 metres
Typical stopping distance in wet
conditions
14 metres
27 metres
45 metres
The distance should be increased as the pace of the bunch increases or if the road conditions are poor
(eg wet). It is also important to ensure that the vehicle and driver are insured for the activities taking
place and that the vehicle is permitted on the circuit/area.
 Motorcycles may be used to accompany riders during coaching sessions organised and run by Level 3
road and time trial coaches. Where motorcycles are used, the rider of the motorcycle cannot be the
coach, and should have the appropriate driving licence, appropriate experience (eg race convoy
experience) and should be aged 21 years or over. It is the responsibility of the motorcycle rider to drive in
a way that is safe and considerate to others. When following riders the driver should maintain an
appropriate distance behind the riders that will allow them to stop safely. Drivers should, at a minimum,
follow the stopping distances as recommend by the Highway Code (see table above).The distance
should be increased as the pace of the bunch increases or if the road conditions are poor (eg wet). The
motorcycle rider should not ride within 2 metres of the side of the bunch. It is also important to ensure
that the vehicle and rider are insured for the activities taking place and that the vehicle is permitted on the
circuit/area.
 Radios may be used to improve communication between the coach and the group of riders in sessions
organised and run by Level 3 road and time trial coaches. It is recommended that radios are issued to
designated expert riders* within the group. The expert rider* can then relay the coach’s communication to
the other riders, as necessary.
*
Expert riders may be used during coaching activities. The expert rider must be a responsible and
experienced rider, who is both fit enough to be part of the group and can effectively and correctly perform
the techniques to be coached within the session. Expert riders do not have a coaching role - their role is
to provide a rolling demonstration for other riders to follow during the activity. The expert rider can also
be used by the coach to facilitate the coordination of the session. The expert rider should respond to
predetermined instructions from the coach, which have also been agreed with the other riders in the
group. It is recommended that radio intercom communication is used between the coach and the expert
rider, to aid the clarity of this communication. As expert riders do not have a coaching role, they cannot
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provide feedback to riders on their performance. However, they may provide feedback to the coach on
the performance of other riders.
Coach:rider ratio
The coach:rider ratio for Level 2 and 3 road and time trial environments must not exceed 1:20. If a venue
has its own guidelines regarding coach:rider ratios that are less than the British Cycling recommendations,
the former guidelines must be adhered to.
Level 2 coaches are only qualified to coach groups of riders – the minimum number of riders within each
group must be at least three.
Other safety issues
There are a number of safety issues related directly to coaching in the road and time trial environment,
which are as follows:
 Coaches should be aware of, and adhere to, the rules and regulations stipulated by the owner of the
venue. Where there is conflict between venue rules and regulations and the HSGCC, the former must be
adhered to.
 Coaches should position themselves in a location that enables viewing of the whole circuit or area.
Where a coach is unable to see the whole area, assistant coaches and recognised volunteers may be
used to supervise any remote parts. Coaches should also position themselves in a location to control and
monitor access from both riders that join and leave the session, and other facility users.
 Road riding is often fatiguing and new riders or riders new to road and time trial riding will incur a loss of
skill as they fatigue. Coaches should ensure that riders take enough rest to ensure safety is maintained.
 Group riding presents additional hazards that are not normally present when riding as an individual;
these are often the result of reduced visibility, the proximity of other riders and sudden changes in speed
or direction. Riders should use a common set of verbal/hand signals to communicate when riding in
groups.
 Coaches should ensure that all riders in a race convoy training session are 15 years or older. Within one
year of a rider's 15th birthday, a rider will be able to race on the open road and, therefore, may require
the technical ability to ride in a race convoy. Riders that are under 16 years old are only allowed to
compete on closed-road circuits, where race convoys are either unlikely, or not permitted. Therefore,
there is no requirement to expose riders, who are under the age of 15 years, to the additional risks of a
race convoy training session.
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Track (Levels 2 and 3)
Qualifications
Coaching sessions conducted in the track environment must only be delivered by a responsible person in
possession of a valid British Cycling Level 2 Track coaching endorsement, or a British Cycling Level 3 Track
coaching qualification. (Note: Trainee Level 3 Track Coach is also acceptable.) The coach must also have a
minimum of a valid Health and Safety Executive approved Emergency First Aid certificate.
Many track facilities have their own guidelines, policies and procedures on risk assessment, health
and safety, track usage and coaching practice. Where these policies are maintained by a track
facility they take precedence over the following British Cycling guidelines. Where no policies exist
the following guidelines should act as a minimum standard. British Cycling Coaching and Education
recognises the responsibility of track facilities to maintain high standards of coaching practice that
are appropriate for their own circumstances.
Note:
 Level 2 and Level 3 track coaches are also qualified to coach in the Level 1 and Level 2 coaching
environments.
 Many track facilities specify minimum requirements for coaches and, as a result, coaches may be
required to undergo further training, including facility specific induction, before being allowed to coach at
the facility. The Level 2 and 3 track qualifications do not give coaches the automatic right to coach at a
track facility.
Environment
Track coaching sessions can only take place in an environment that meets the following criteria:
 Either a hard or grass track as defined in the British Cycling Rulebook
 Conform to the rules that govern hard and grass tracks used for racing contained in the British Cycling
Rulebook.
 Be maintained to a level where safe participation can take place.
Risk assessment regarding environment
When conducting a risk assessment of the Level 2 and 3 track environments coaches should also be aware
of the following issues:
 Facility – Many tracks are contained within a venue, which will have its own policy and procedures
governing risk assessment, health and safety, and rules and regulations, and which should be
considered prior to coaching activities taking place.
 Surface – The track surface and the safety zone (run off area) should be clear of debris and in good
condition.
 Track access – Only riders using the track should be allowed on the track or safety zone when the track
is in use. Access to the track and track centre should be restricted when the track is in use. Control of
track access is particularly important when access to the centre of the track is made only by walking over
the track itself. Where access to the track is still possible (eg required for access to activities in the track
centre) signs should be used to make individuals aware of the coaching taking place and riders should
be informed during a safety briefing at the start of the session.
 Perimeter fence on hard tracks – Should be in a good condition, completely surround the track and all
access gates should be closed securely when the track is in use.
 Weather conditions – Tracks should only be used during appropriate weather conditions.
 Other activities – Tracks should not be used when other activities, particularly those in track centres,
may have an impact on the safety of riders using the track.
 Bikes – Ideally track bikes should be used for track coaching sessions, however other bikes with
freewheels (eg road and mountain bikes) may be used unless otherwise stated in the facility’s rules and
regulations. Riders using track bikes and bikes with freewheels must not use the track at the same time.
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Equipment
Bike
Equipment specific to track and this environment include the following:
 Track bikes, which should conform to the rules governing track bikes in the British Cycling Rulebook as
well as any rules or guidelines provided by the facility. Typically these bikes have a fixed wheel and no
brakes. Riders using track bikes and tandem track bikes should not use the track at the same time.
 Aero bars – Track bikes fitted with aero bars should be excluded from all activities involving group riding
with exception of drills relating specifically to events that allow aero bar use (eg pursuit, team pursuit).
 Front disk wheel – Track bikes fitted with front disk wheels should be excluded from all activities
involving group riding with exception of drills relating specifically to events that allow front disk wheel use
(eg team pursuit).
Coaching equipment
Coaching equipment specific to track and this environment include the following:
 Pegs and flags may be used to mark the edges of grass tracks. These should be used in accordance
with the British Cycling Rulebook.
 Cones and markers may be used as distance markers on tracks or to mark out grass tracks. Cones and
markers may also be used on grass tracks or outdoor hard tracks to form gates or slaloms for riders.
 Lapboards can be electronic or manual, and may be used to indicate the number of laps completed or
accumulated when appropriate to the activity being coached.
 Sponges may only be used for drills relating specifically to events where they are used to mark the track
(eg pursuit, team pursuit).
Level 3 coaches
In addition to the above equipment, Level 3 track coaches may also use:
 Start gates – These can be manual or automatic, and may be used when practicing gate starts. Only
riders taking part in the gate start (including team mates where team pursuit or team sprint drills are
performed) should be on the track when a gate start is performed. Following the gate start, the start gate
should be quickly and safely removed from the track until the track has been cleared. The coach should
be familiar with the safe operation of the start gate being used.
 Dernys – Otherwise known as derny motor-pacing cycles, these are defined in the British Cycling
Rulebook. A derny used during coaching sessions must have an engine size of less than 125cc. Derny
riders must hold a Motor Pace B or C licence and meet any additional criteria specified by the facility
rules and regulations. Lead coaches must not take part in the coaching session as a derny rider; it is their
responsibility to organise the session and insure that safety is maintained. A derny may only be used in
accordance with the British Cycling Rulebook, the derny rider’s Motor Pace licence and the facility rules
and regulations. The use of a derny in a coaching session increases the level of risk for all individuals
involved in the session. It is essential that coaches complete a comprehensive risk assessment of the
planned activities and assess the riders to ensure they have an appropriate level of skill to take part in
the planned activities.
Skills
Level 2 track coaches should not deliver Madison hand slings as a part of a coaching session held in the
track environment. In addition, Level 2 and Level 3 track coaches should not deliver skills that require the
use of personal and coaching equipment that is not within the guidelines presented above.
Coach:rider ratio
The coach:rider ratio in the Level 2 and 3 track environment must not exceed 1:15 when coaching beginner
riders and must not exceed 1:20 when coaching intermediate or advanced riders.
Level 2 coaches are only qualified to coach groups of riders – the minimum number of riders within each
group must be at least three.
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Other safety issues
The following list outlines a number of other safety issues relating directly to coaching on the track:
 The lead coach should not take part in the session as a rider.
 Coaches should be aware of and, adhere to, all procedures and rules of the facility where they are
coaching. These will usually relate to risk assessment, health and safety guidelines, and rules and
guidelines on track usage.
 Riding on tracks and the use of track bikes have inherent risks. These risks are exaggerated in beginner
riders who often have to learn to ride a bike with a fixed wheel and no brakes, along with riding the track
itself.
 Beginner riders should be given an induction to riding the track, which should include as a minimum
instruction on riding a track bike, riding a track and track-riding etiquette. Some tracks have their own
induction and accreditation schemes for riders wanting to use the track.
 Track riding is often fatiguing and beginner riders or riders new to track riding will occur a loss of skill as
they fatigue. Coaches should ensure that riders take enough rest to ensure safety is maintained.
 Coaches should promote good technique and track-riding etiquette at all times.
 Coaches should position themselves at a location that enables viewing of the whole track and easy
access to riders if an accident occurs; usually this would be the track centre. Coaches should also
position themselves where they are able to control and monitor access to the track from both riders who
join and leave the track, and other facility users.
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Appendices
Appendix 1 – Bike and Helmet Safety Check
Bike Safety Check
In order to ensure riders can participate safely, a bike safety check should form part of every coaching
session. Coaches must be satisfied that the riders’ bikes are safe for the activities of the session. Minor
repairs and adjustments, if they can be done quickly, can sometimes be undertaken immediately by the
riders or their parents (if appropriate). However, if this is not possible coaches should not undertake repairs
or adjustments to a rider’s bike. Instead, they should refer the rider to the nearest bike shop. Coaches must
never be afraid to stop riders from participating in a session if their bike could put them or others in danger.
The minimum checks for bike safety are as follows (discipline-specific exceptions are listed in Section 5 or
relevant appendices):
Frame and forks
 Check for damaged/bent frame and forks – if there is visible distortion the bicycle should not be used.
Headset and brakes
 Check the brakes actually work and are properly adjusted – when the brakes are fully on the lever should
have been pulled approximately half way to the handlebars.
 Check the brake levers are securely attached and the cables are not frayed.
 The brake pads should not be excessively worn and there should be at least 1mm between the pad and
the rim.
 Check adjustment of the headset by engaging the front brake and seeing if there is any rocking
movement when gently pushing on the handlebars – there should be no movement.
Wheels and tyres
 The wheels should run freely, with no excessive wobbles/buckles.
 Check for loose spokes by running a hand over the spokes.
 Tyres should be inflated to a reasonable pressure – this will help avoid the possibility of impact
punctures. More pressure means less grip, and less pressure results in more grip and increased risk of a
puncture. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations regarding tyre pressure, which will normally be
indicated on the side wall of the tyre.
 The tread should not be excessively worn and the tyres should have no splits, cracks or holes.
Hubs and axles
 Bolts and quick release mechanisms should be securely tightened.
Saddle and handlebars
 Check to see if either are loose, but do not use undue force.
 Check saddle:
 it should be straight
 height – this is very important as if it is too low or too high it could cause an injury. The rider’s knee
should be slightly bent when the ball of the foot is on the pedal, and the pedal is at its lowest point.
With novice riders you will probably find that the majority have their saddle set incorrectly. Do not try
to change everyone at once – look to adjust the worse cases first.
 Handlebars – handlebars and stem should be straight and in line. Handlebars should be have end plugs.
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Pedals, cranks and bottom bracket
 Check there is no movement in the bottom bracket or cranks by holding one crank still and trying to move
the other crank. There should not be any movement.
 Check the pedals rotate freely.
Chain and gears
 Check the chain is lubricated properly, and is not slack or rusty.
 Check the gears are properly adjusted, lubricated and cables are not frayed.
BMX trick nuts
 For safety reasons these should be removed if group riding activities are included in the session.
Helmet safety check
British Cycling strongly recommends that cyclists wear a cycle helmet when engaged in any cycling activity.
This is to prevent additional injuries occurring should a collision or incident happen.
In particular, participants of any activity supervised by a British Cycling coach will wear a cycle helmet. The
only exceptions will be when the wearing of a cycle helmet may not be compatible with a religious, faith or
disability issue. (An example is a potential cyclist wearing a turban). On such occasions the cyclist may be
permitted to participate but this will ultimately depend on the coach carrying out a risk assessment which will
consider the capability of the cyclist, the planned activity and the overall environmental conditions.
Any such cyclist (with a parent or guardian if under 18) should discuss the matter with the coach at the
earliest opportunity. British Cycling is keen to include members from all sections of the community and
reasonable adjustment will be made to coaching programmes to facilitate progress in the sport for all.
The helmet should have a CE mark and conform to an appropriate standard such as BS EN 1078:1997
(Europe) or SNELL B95 (USA). If a helmet is CE marked, the mark must be affixed to the helmet. If a helmet
conforms to a recognised Standard it should be indicated on the inside of the helmet, either directly on the
inner material or on a sticker attached to the inside of the helmet. The CE mark and relevant Standard
number are usually included on the same sticker.
It is important the coach checks the helmet is undamaged, and fitted and worn correctly as shown:
 Make sure it is the right way round – this is
particularly important with children.
 It should be placed on top of the head with the
straps fastened under the chin.
 The front strap should be as vertical as possible
and the rear strap should join the front strap just
below the ears (forming a ‘V’ just under the ears).
 The helmet should fit comfortably on the head – if
you try to move the helmet there should be very
little movement.
 If you can slide the helmet off the head either
backwards or forwards then you need to tighten the
straps – always get the rider to take the helmet off
before adjusting the straps.
Correctly worn and fitted helmet


Incorrectly worn and fitted helmet

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Appendix 2 – National Standard for Cycle
Training
Riders or coaches intending to ride regularly on roads should consider taking part in a Bikeability training
course. Bikeability is the Government approved award for cycle training.
There are three award levels for Bikeability, with a level to suit all abilities from beginner cyclist to
experienced commuter or sport cyclist.
 Level one will offer basic bike handling skills in a controlled environment away from roads.
 Level two will teach children to cycle planned routes on minor roads offering real cycling experience.
 Level three will ensure cyclists are able to manage all traffic conditions.
Courses are available for cycling coaches wishing to become Cycle Training Instructors, and to help clubs or
other groups to deliver Bikeability courses.
The National Standard for Cycle Training dictates the outcomes which must be covered by all Bikeability
courses. There is, however, no specified style in which the course is delivered so a qualified Instructor can
adapt a course to suit the trainees.
The outcomes of the three Bikeability courses are summarised below.
Level 1
On completion of the Level 1 Bikeability course, the trainees will be able to:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Get on and off the bike without help
Start off and pedal without help
Stop without help
Ride along without help for roughly one minute or more
Make the bike go where they want.
Use their gears
Stop quickly with control
Manoeuvre safely to avoid objects
Look all around, including behind, without wobbling
Signal right and left without wobbling
Carry out a simple bike, helmet and clothing check.
Level 2
On completion of the Level 2 Bikeability course, the trainees will be able to:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Start an on-road journey and finish an on-road journey
Communicate and negotiate with other road users
Show understanding of appropriate road positioning
Pass parked or slower moving vehicles
Pass side roads
Turn right into a major road and left into a minor road
Turn left into a major road and right into a minor road
Demonstrate a basic understanding of the Highway Code, in particular how to interpret road signs.
Optional outcomes:
9 Be able to take the correct carriageway lane when they need to
10 Decide where cycle lanes can help their journey and demonstrate correct use (if cycle lanes can be
incorporated within the training)
11 Explain why they have made decisions during riding and thereby demonstrate understanding of safe
riding strategy.
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Level 3
British Cycling’s Level 3 course includes all optional National Standard Outcomes, but expands on these to
cover 10 optional outcomes which focus on the varied conditions regular cyclists might encounter. From
these 10 outcomes, trainees should complete a minimum of four, enabling them to select those which are
most relevant to the type of riding they wish to do. The course is modelled on the UK Driving Test, and
would normally conclude with riding a route the trainee will use regularly, such as that to work or school.
The British Cycling Bikeability Level 3 course includes the following optional outcomes:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Filter safely through traffic
Recognise and deal with hazards
Apply route planning to local trips
Use cycle facilities
Use multi-lane roads
Use roundabouts
Use traffic light controlled junctions
Use bus lanes
Use rural roads
Use urban centres.
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Appendix 3 – Equipment for Individual
Programmes
There are two recommended pieces of equipment for coaches prescribing individual programmes for riders:
 turbo trainers and rollers
 heart rate monitor.
Coaches using heart rate monitors should be aware of the following guidelines:
 The heart rate monitor is a devise used for the estimation of exercise intensity based upon heart rate.
 While heart rate is useful for setting training zones, it has a number of limitations, which may affect the
usefulness of heart rate in setting training intensity and testing. Coaches should be aware of the
limitations of heart rate before using heart rate monitors in training.
 Heart rate can be elevated or lowered independently to exercise intensity.
 It is recommended that people under the age of 16 should not use a heart rate monitor.
 Maximal heart rate testing is stressful for older people or those with heart disease.
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Appendix 4 – BMX Bike Safety Check
To ensure riders can participate safely, a bike safety check should form part of every coaching session.
Coaches must be satisfied that the riders’ bikes are safe for the activities of the session. Minor repairs and
adjustments, if they can be done quickly, can sometimes be undertaken immediately by the riders or their
parents (if appropriate). However, if this is not possible coaches should not undertake repairs or
adjustments to a rider’s bike. Instead, they should refer the rider to the nearest bike shop. Coaches must
never be afraid to stop riders from participating in a session if their bike could put them or others in danger.
The minimum checks for bike safety are as follows:
Front tyre:
 No splits, cracks, holes or frayed sidewalls.
 Correctly inflated.
 Valve is straight and tyre is firmly attached or stuck to the rim.
 Tread is suitable for conditions and surface.
Front wheel and hub:
 No broken or missing spokes.
 No splits or excessive wear to the rim.
 Wheel is true and hub is free of play.
 Wheel turns smoothly.
 Wheels nuts secure, or quick releases tight and taped or wired in the locked position.
 Axle protrudes ≤5mm either side of wheel nuts.
 Wheel is centred and not rubbing on the fork crown.
Forks:
 Appear true and undamaged.
Headset and steering:
 Free of play.
 Turns freely
Handlebars:
 Do not appear damaged or distorted.
 Are perpendicular to the front wheel.
 Grips are fitted and bar ends are plugged or covered.
Stem:
 Firmly attached to forks and handlebars.
 No cracks.
 In-line with the top tube.
Frame:
 Appears true and undamaged.
Bottom bracket:
 Turns smoothly without lateral play.
Cranks:
 Firmly fixed.
 Appear true and undamaged.
 Sufficient ground clearance.
Pedals:
 Undamaged and complete.
 Turn freely and smoothly.
 Firmly fixed.
 All pins intact and undamaged.
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Chainring:
 No dents or bend.
 Teeth in good condition.
 Firmly attached to cranks or spider.
 All chainring bolts present.
Chain:
 Appropriately tensioned.
 No loose links.
 Free of rust and foreign bodies.
 Clean and lightly lubricated.
Saddle:
 Firmly fixed.
 Correctly positioned.
 Material will resist penetration of the seat post.
Rear tyre:
 No splits, cracks, holes or worn or frayed sidewalls.
 Tread is sufficient and suitable for conditions and surface.
 Valve is straight.
 Appropriately inflated.
Rear wheel and hub:
 No broken or missing spokes.
 No splits or excessive wear to the rim.
 Wheel is true and hub is free of play.
 Wheel turns smoothly.
 Wheels nuts secure, or quick releases tight and taped or wired in the locked position.
 Axle protrudes ≤5mm either side of wheel nuts.
 Wheel is centred and not rubbing on chain stay.
Rear sprocket:
 Firmly attached.
 Teeth in good condition.
Brakes:
 A minimum of one, rear brake.
 Brake lever(s) may be pulled no more than half-way to the handlebars.
 Brake lever(s) are securely attached.
 Cable(s) is not frayed.
 Cable end(s) is capped, soldered or covered.
 Pads are not excessively worn.
 ≥1mm between pad and rim.
British Cycling Health and Safety Guidelines for Coaching Cycling (Updated 17 December 2010)
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Appendix 5 – BMX Helmet Safety Check
British Cycling strongly recommends that cyclists wear a cycle helmet when engaged in any cycling activity.
This is to prevent additional injuries occurring should a collision or incident happen.
In particular, participants of any activity supervised by a British Cycling coach will wear a cycle helmet. The
only exceptions will be when the wearing of a cycle helmet may not be compatible with a religious, faith or
disability issue. (An example is a potential cyclist wearing a turban). On such occasions the cyclist may be
permitted to participate but this will ultimately depend on the coach carrying out a risk assessment which will
consider the capability of the cyclist, the planned activity and the overall environmental conditions.
Any such cyclist (with a parent or guardian if under 18) should discuss the matter with the coach at the
earliest opportunity. British Cycling is keen to include members from all sections of the community and
reasonable adjustment will be made to coaching programmes to facilitate progress in the sport for all.
For BMX, the helmet should be either full-face or a skate-style, potty helmet, have a CE mark and conform
to an appropriate standard such as BS EN 1078:1997 (Europe) or SNELL B95 (USA). If a helmet is CE
marked, the mark must be affixed to the helmet. If a helmet conforms to a recognised Standard it should be
indicated on the inside of the helmet, either directly on the inner material or on a sticker attached to the
inside of the helmet. The CE mark and relevant Standard number are usually included on the same sticker.
Note that there is no internal sizing adjustment for full-face and potty helmets and although the chin-straps
can be adjusted to retain the helmet, helmets that are too big should be rejected for a more appropriately
sized helmet. Similarly, helmets that are too small will be uncomfortable and may restrict vision.
Full-face helmet
It is important the coach checks the helmet is undamaged, and fitted and worn correctly as shown.
Procedure
 Place the helmet over the
head with the straps fastened
under the chin.
 The front strap should be as
vertical as possible and the
rear strap should join the front
strap just below the ears
(forming a V just under the
ears).
 The helmet should fit
comfortably on the head – if
you try to move the helmet
there should be very little
movement.
 If you can slide the helmet off
the head either backwards or
forwards then you need to
tighten the straps – always get
the rider to take the helmet off
before adjusting the straps.
 The chin guard should cover
the mouth and chin.
 The visor should not impair the
rider’s vision.
 The visor should be firmly
attached and fit the opening of
the helmet snugly.
Example of a correctly fitted full-face helmet
Examples of incorrectly fitted full-face helmet
British Cycling Health and Safety Guidelines for Coaching Cycling (Updated 17 December 2010)
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Skate-style helmet
Procedure
 Place the helmet on the head
with the straps fastened under
the chin.
 The front strap should be as
vertical as possible and the
rear strap should join the front
strap just below the ears
(forming a V just under the
ears).
 The helmet should fit
comfortably on the head – if
you try to move the helmet
there should be very little
movement.
 If you can slide the helmet off
the head either backwards or
forwards then you need to
tighten the straps – always get
the rider to take the helmet off
before adjusting the straps.
Example of a correctly fitted skate-style helmet
Examples of incorrectly fitted skate-style helmet
British Cycling Health and Safety Guidelines for Coaching Cycling (Updated 17 December 2010)
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Appendix 6 – Mountain Bike Check
A bike check should be completed before all sessions to ensure that all bikes are safe and in a suitable
condition to meet the demands of the session. The minimum requirements for MTB-specific bike check are
listed below.
Front tyre:
 No splits, cracks, holes or frayed sidewalls.
 Correctly inflated.
 Valve is straight and tyre is firmly attached to the rim.
 Tread is suitable for conditions and surface.
Front wheel/hub:
 No broken or missing spokes.
 No splits or excessive wear to the rim.
 Wheel is true and hub is free of play.
 Wheel turns smoothly.
 Wheels nuts are secure or quick release lever is tight and in the locked position.
 Wheel is centred and not rubbing on the forks.
 Disc rotor is securely attached and all rotor bolts are present.
Front forks:
 Appear true and undamaged.
 Fork seals and stanchions are clean and dirt free.
 No excessive play in suspension fork legs.
 Appropriate amount of fork compression for the rider.
Headset/steering:
 Free of play.
 Turns freely.
Handlebars:
 Do not appear damaged or distorted.
 Are perpendicular to the front wheel.
 Bar ends are securely attached, if fitted.
 Grips are fitted and handlebar ends are plugged or covered.
Stem:
 Firmly attached to forks and handlebars.
 No cracks.
Frame:
 Appears true and undamaged.
 For full suspension frames:
 No excessive play in the suspension linkages/bearings.
 Rear shock unit is appropriately inflated.
 Rear shock unit is clean and dirt free.
Bottom bracket:
 Turns smoothly without lateral play.
Cranks:
 Firmly fixed.
 Appear true and undamaged.
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Pedals:
 Undamaged and complete.
 Turn freely and smoothly.
 Firmly fixed.
 For flat pedals – All pins are intact and undamaged.
Chainring:
 No dents or bends.
 Teeth in good condition.
 Firmly attached to the cranks or spider.
 All chainring bolts are present.
Chain:
 Appropriately tensioned.
 No loose links.
 Free of rust and foreign bodies.
 Clean and lightly lubricated.
Saddle:
 Firmly fixed.
 Correctly positioned.
 Saddle body material will resist penetration by the seat post.
Rear tyre:
 No splits, cracks, holes or frayed sidewalls.
 Correctly inflated.
 Valve is straight and tyre is firmly attached to the rim.
 Tread is suitable for the conditions and surface.
Rear wheel/hub:
 No broken or missing spokes.
 No splits or excessive wear to the rim.
 Wheel is true and hub is free of play.
 Wheel turns smoothly.
 Wheels nuts are secure or quick release lever tight and in the locked position.
 Axle protrudes ≤5mm either side of the wheel nuts.
 Wheel is centred and not rubbing on the chain stay.
 Disc rotor is securely attached and all rotor bolts are present.
Rear cassette:
 Firmly attached.
 Teeth in good condition.
Front derailleur:
 Front derailleur or chain device is fitted securely.
 Front derailleur moves freely without excessive play.
 Front derailleur cages are not bent.
 Cables are not frayed.
 Cable ends are capped, soldered or covered.
 If a chain guide is used, it is in good working order and fitted as intended by the manufacturer.
Rear derailleur:
 Hanger is not bent.
 Attached securely and is free from excessive play.
 Limits are appropriately adjusted – derailleur should not touch the spokes or place the chain between the
smallest sprocket and the frame drop-out.
 Jockey wheels are not excessively worn.
 Adequately moves the chain across the cassette.
 Cables are not frayed.
 Cable ends are capped, soldered or covered.
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Gear shifters:
 Gear levers are securely attached to the handlebars.
 Gear levers operate the derailleurs without excessive force or pressure being applied.
Brakes:
 Front and rear brakes are fitted.
 Brake levers may be pulled no more than half-way to the handlebars.
 Brake levers are securely attached to the handlebars.
 For V brakes:
 Cables are not frayed.
 Cable ends are capped, soldered or covered.
 For disc brakes:
 Hoses are in good condition and secured at appropriate anchor points.
 Disc rotors are in good condition.
 Pads are not excessively worn.
 ≥1mm between the pad and rim (for rim brakes).
 Brake callipers (disc) or cantilevers (rim) are securely attached.
Other:
 Bottle cage is attached securely, if fitted.
 Pump is attached securely, if fitted.
 Mudguards are appropriate (ie down tube and seat post secured, without frame fitted stays) and secure,
if fitted.
 Saddle seat pack is firmly attached.
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Appendix 7 – Mountain Bike Helmet Check
Helmets are an essential piece of safety equipment for all MTB disciplines and for any riding situation.
British Cycling strongly recommends that all riders wear an appropriate helmet when riding in the Level 2
MTB environment. Riders supervised by a Level 2 MTB coach will wear a helmet, except when wearing a
helmet may not be compatible with a religious, faith or disability issue. On such occasions, the rider may be
permitted to participate but this will ultimately depend on the coach risk assessing the capability of the rider,
the planned activity and overall environmental conditions.
Helmets must be correctly fitted and should be as lightweight and as vented as possible to help keep riders
cool. When correctly fitted, a helmet should be snug but not uncomfortable and should not move around on
the rider’s head. The chin strap should be buckled, tight enough so that it does not feel uncomfortable but, at
the same time, prevent the helmet coming off if the rider crashes. The following types of helmet are
appropriate for mountain biking.
Standard helmet check
Procedure
 Place the helmet on the head with the straps
fastened under the chin.
 The front strap should be as vertical as
possible and the rear strap should join the
front strap just below the ears (forming a V just
under the ears).
 The helmet should fit comfortably on the head
– if you try to move the helmet there should be
very little movement.
 If you can slide the helmet off the head either
backwards or forwards then you need to
tighten the straps – always get the rider to
take the helmet off before adjusting the straps.
Example of a correctly fitted standard helmet
Full-face helmet check
Procedure
 Place the helmet on the head with the straps
fastened under the chin.
 The front strap should be as vertical as
possible and the rear strap should join the
front strap just below the ears (forming a V just
under the ears).
 The helmet should fit comfortably on the head
– if you try to move the helmet there should be
very little movement.
 If you can slide the helmet off the head either
backwards or forwards then you need to
tighten the straps – always get the rider to
take the helmet off before adjusting the straps.
 The chin guard should cover the mouth and
chin.
 The visor should not impair the rider’s vision.
 The visor should be firmly attached and fit the
opening of the helmet snugly.
Example of a correctly fitted full-face helmet
British Cycling Health and Safety Guidelines for Coaching Cycling (Updated 17 December 2010)
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Appendix 8 – Testing, and the Use of Static
Trainers in Coaching and Testing Sessions
Introduction
British Cycling coaches should not conduct any test that is beyond their own level of competence,
knowledge, experience and qualification. British Cycling coaches must recognise their limitations in
qualifications, experience, expertise and competence and must operate within these limits, restricting the
interpretation of results to those which they are qualified to give and in employing any equipment and
techniques which they are qualified to use.
British Cycling coaches must not undertake any invasive sampling processes unless they have undertaken
the appropriate training and have the relevant insurance cover to do so. This includes lactate testing
involving the collection of arterial, venous, arterialised or capillary blood.
Coaches conducting tests on a rider(s) must ask the rider if there are any medical issues that may impact on
his ability to complete the test. If the coach is in any doubt, the rider should be advised to consult his GP
before undertaking the test. In this instance, the coach should not conduct any testing until written clearance
is received from the rider’s GP. The law requires that working practices are safe and that the welfare of the
client is paramount.
Most coaches undertake fitness assessments with riders to gauge their current levels of fitness. There are
many standard tests that measure the individual components of fitness, some of which have been adapted
for specific sports. While many tests can be carried out in the field (eg time trials and timed sprints), several
tests (eg VO2max tests) require the use of specialist equipment and are best carried out in laboratories.
British Cycling strongly recommends that these types of test are conducted by British Association of Sport
and Exercise Science (BASES) accredited laboratories and personnel. The process of accreditation
demonstrates that equipment is regularly calibrated, is reliable and has been validated, and that health and
safety procedures are in place. Personnel have also met a minimum level of expertise and have
demonstrated that they can provide a suitable level of feedback to clients.
British Cycling licensed Level 1, Level 2, Activity Coach, Level 2 Disciplinespecific Coaches (eg Road and Time Trial, Track, BMX, MTB)
Coaches with any of these license endorsements are not qualified to coach individual riders. Therefore, all
coaching sessions must be to groups of riders (as specified in the coach-to-rider ratios given in the relevant
course documentation). The content of the session must be within the remit and context of the qualification
as specified in the qualification documentation. As such, coaches with any of these license endorsements
are not insured for performance coaching, training or testing sessions using a cycle ergometer, such as a
Watt Bike. However, they can deliver appropriate technique development coaching sessions, such as
developing correct pedalling technique, using a static bike.
British Cycling licensed Club Coaches
Club Coaches are insured to deliver coaching sessions on a cycle ergometer, such as a Watt Bike, as long
as these sessions are similar to those that they would usually deliver to a rider, or group of riders, in an
appropriate cycling environment, and are appropriate to perform on a static bike. The content of the
sessions must be based on (and consistent with) the information provided on the Club Coach Award course,
and within the coach’s competence, knowledge and experience. Group and individual coaching sessions
and monitored training come under this remit.
Club coaches can conduct tests related to their training prescriptions for a rider using a bike, static trainer or
cycle ergometer such as a Watt Bike, but they must be consistent with the guidelines provided in the
qualification documentation and taking into account the recommendations in the introduction above.
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British Cycling licensed Level 3 Coaches (eg Track or Road
and Time Trial)
Coaches with a Level 3 license endorsement are insured to deliver coaching sessions on a cycle ergometer,
such as a Watt Bike, as long as these sessions are similar to those that they would deliver to a rider, or
group of riders, and are appropriate to perform on a static bike. The content of the sessions must be based
on (and consistent with) the information provided on their Level 3 coaching course, and be within the remit
and context specified in the qualification documentation. Group and individual coaching sessions and
monitored training come under this remit.
Level 3 coaches can conduct tests related to their training prescriptions for a rider using a bike, static trainer
or cycle ergometer such as a Watt Bike, but they must be consistent with the guidelines provided in the
qualification documentation and taking into account the recommendations in the introduction above.
British Cycling Health and Safety Guidelines for Coaching Cycling (Updated 17 December 2010)
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