2017-18 Course Catalogue
Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin
School
Course Description Catalogue
2017-2018
Mission
Like Mary, who gave Christ to the world, Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin
School educates leaders who transform the world, as Jesus did, by living
the truth in love.
Core Values
As a community of faith and learning
rooted in the enduring values of Notre Dame Academy
and Cathedral Latin School, NDCL seeks





Justice
Respect
Integrity
Community
Excellence
Vision
Notre Dame Schools will engage students from preschool through
high school in an exceptional Catholic education.
We will focus on loving, respecting, and educating all to discover
and develop their God-given talents.
We will challenge our students to respond faithfully to Jesus’ call
to transform the world by consciously doing good
and bringing hope to the hearts of all.
PURPOSE OF THIS COURSE DESCRIPTION CATALOGUE
Academic planning is an important part of high school. This catalogue is designed to assist
students and parents with the course selection process. It contains essential information
necessary for you to choose your courses for next year. Students are encouraged to look beyond
the coming year and try to create a meaningful and flexible plan for the remaining years of
high school.
It is important to do the following as you use this catalogue:
1. Review all requirements for graduation.
2. Analyze your successes and challenges in high school studies to this point.
3. Reflect on your goals both for high school and beyond.
4. Consider the following:
 Am I choosing courses most appropriate for my abilities and interests?
 Am I fulfilling graduation requirements and challenging myself academically?
 Am I establishing options for post-high school education and careers?
 Will my choices enable me to make a difference in the world?
5. Study the course offerings sequences.
6. Seek assistance from parents, counselors, and teachers.
2
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
In order to graduate from high school, Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin and the State of Ohio require completion
of the following courses of study:
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
Credits in Theology
Credits in English
Credits in Mathematics
Credits in Social Studies
Credits in Science
Credits in the same World Language
1.0
1.0
.5
.5
.5
2.5
Credit in Fine Arts
Credit in Technology
Credit in Speech
Credit in Health
Credit in Physical Education
Elective Credits
Twenty-six credits are required for graduation from NDCL, including four credits in Theology. Students who
take College Credit Plus English may earn up to 6 credits of English, but must take English every year.
Selective colleges may prefer additional credits in science, social studies, and a world language. Students
who plan to attend a particular college are urged to obtain the competitive entrance requirements and discuss
these with their counselor. This should be done in the sophomore and junior year so that those students may
plan their program accordingly.
State of Ohio Graduation Requirements
In accord with the requirements established by the State of Ohio, each Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin student
must earn satisfactory scores on state-approved examinations in order to qualify for a diploma. Specifically,
students must earn remediation-free scores in English, reading, and mathematics on the ACT or earn passing
scores on the Iowa Assessments according to a formula established by the state. Students will have multiple
opportunities to meet these testing requirements. State law prohibits the school from awarding any student a
diploma until the requirements are met.
Ohio Department of Education "Diploma with Honors"
A student must complete 7 of the following 8 criteria to be eligible for the Diploma with Honors from the
State of Ohio:
Subject
English
4 units
4 units, including algebra I, geometry,
algebra II, and another higher level
course
Mathematics
World Languages
4 units including physics and chemistry
4 units
3 units, including at least 2 units in each
language studied
Fine Arts
GPA
ACT / SAT
1 unit
3.5 on a 4.0 scale
27 ACT / 1210 SAT
Science
Social Studies
3
U.S. President’s Award for Educational Excellence:
Seniors qualify for this award by meeting the following criteria:
1. 3.5 cumulative GPA
2. 27 on ACT / 1210 SAT
Deficiencies in Credit
All semester class failures must be remediated prior to the subsequent school year. Options for credit recovery
include: enrollment in a public school summer school course, a course offered from an accredited online
school, through a Credit Flex plan, or through a private tutor who is appropriately licensed in the specific
subject area for grades 9-12. Approval for recovery credit must be secured from the student’s counselor prior
to enrollment. Course failures may not be made up by retaking the course at NDCL.
Any student who has received a semester “F” grade and who fails to make up that course or an equivalent
course may not be able to return to NDCL.
For any semester failure, a senior must make up the course or take a course of equivalent credit before a
diploma will be issued. Students must have completed all requirements for graduation in order to participate
in commencement exercises. The final decision rests with the administration.
Summer School
Summer school is an option for earning recovery credit after failure, not typically for earning original credit.
However, some students choosing the College Credit Plus program or a Credit Flex plan may take courses in
the summer for original credit. Earning original credit during the summer does not exempt a student from
taking the required course load during the school year.
Schedule Changes and Withdrawal from Courses
The Master Schedule is planned according to student course selections; thus, schedule changes and
withdrawals are only made for educational reasons. Classes will not be over-filled or under-scheduled as the
result of a schedule change request.
If a student drops a course during the first 6 days of the semester (3 Blue or 3 Gold day classes), with the
approval of the counselor, class teacher, and the assistant principal, the course will not appear on the
transcript. Generally, a student may not drop a class after this time except for serious reasons. If a student
drops a course after the first 3 days of the course, the student will receive an "F" grade for the course and the
credit attempted will be calculated in the student's grade point average. The final decision will be made by
the administration.
AP Classes
Students taking AP classes have the opportunity to earn college credit based on their performance on the AP
exam. Placement in AP classes is based on the eligibility criteria that are determined in the respective
department for each class. All students enrolled in an AP class take the respective AP test from the College
Board and the regularly scheduled 2nd semester NDCL exam.
Enhanced Learning Block (ELB)
Students may choose to take an enhanced learning block in place of an elective course. The decision to take
an ELB should be considered carefully between the student, parent, and school counselor. Students will have
the opportunity to tap into academic coaches, wellness programs, campus ministry opportunities, group
counseling experiences, and independent work time during the enhanced learning block.
4
COURSE OFFERINGS 2017-2018
BUSINESS (p. 13)
MATHEMATICS (p. 20)
Algebra I
Honors Algebra I (W)
Geometry
Honors Geometry (W)
Algebra II Concepts
Algebra II
Honors Algebra II-Trigonometry (W)
Honors Pre-Calculus (W)
*Trigonometry
*Pre-Calculus
*Statistics
*Functions
*Calculus I A
*Calculus I B
*College Calculus I (W)
*College Calculus II (W)
AP Statistics (W)
*Engineering Principles
Accounting I
*Introduction to Business
*Business in the 21st Century
ENGLISH (p. 14)
English 9
Honors English 9 (W)
English 10
Honors English 10 (W)
English 11
English 12
*College English Composition I (W)
*College English Composition II (W)
*Speech
*Creative Writing
*Rebels with a Cause (W)
*Film Study (next offered 2018-2019)
PERFORMING ARTS (p. 25)
Choir
Advanced Choir
Stage Band
*Ukulele
*Advanced Music Theory
*Theatre
*Theatre Workshop
FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE (p. 17)
*Creative Foods I
*Creative Foods II
*Family & Child Development
*Independent Living
SCIENCE (p. 27)
Physical Science: STEM Explorations
Biology
Honors Biology (W)
Environmental Science
Chemistry
Honors Chemistry (W)
Physics
AP Physics (W)
Human Anatomy and Physiology
*College Biology I and Lab (W)
*College Biology II and Lab (W)
*Astronomy
HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION (p. 18)
*Health
*Physical Education I
*Physical Education II
*Advanced Physical Education I
*Advanced Physical Education II
*Strength and Conditioning
*Plyometrics and Conditioning
W – Indicates a weighted course
* - Indicates a semester course
*Forensic Science A
*Forensic Science B
*Biodiversity
*STEM: Biomedical Studies
5
COURSE OFFERINGS 2017-2018 (continued)
SOCIAL STUDIES (p. 31)
Modern World History
Honors Modern World History (W)
U.S. History
AP U.S. History (W)
Government
AP Government (W)
*Sociology
*Middle East Issues
*Economics
*Human Geography
*Introduction to Psychology (W)
*East Asian Studies (next offered 2018-2019)
*World Issues (next offered 2018-2019)
VISUAL ARTS (p. 37)
*Introduction to Drawing and Painting
*Introduction to Design
*Introduction to Ceramics
*Introduction to Photography
*Drawing and Painting I
*Drawing and Painting II
*Design I
*Design II
*Creative Computer Art
*Ceramics I
*Ceramics II
*Ceramics III
*Wheel Throwing
Traditional & Digital Photography I
Traditional & Digital Photography II
AP Studio Art (W)
TECHNOLOGY (p. 34)
*Digital Design
*Multimedia Technology
*Creative Computer Art
*3D Computer Animation
*NDCL Publications
*Computer Programming with C ++
*Advanced Computer Programming with C ++
WORLD LANGUAGES (p. 40)
French I
French II
French III
French IV
Spanish I
Spanish II
Spanish III
*College Spanish II (W)
THEOLOGY (p. 36)
Theology 9
Theology 10
Theology 11
Theology 12
COLLEGE CREDIT PLUS COURSES
*Introduction to Psychology (W)
*Rebels with a Cause (W)
*College English Composition I (W)
*College English Composition II (W)
*College Biology I and Lab (W)
*College Biology II and Lab (W)
W – Indicates a weighted course
* - Indicates a semester course
*College Calculus I (W)
*College Calculus II (W)
*College Spanish II (W)
6
PLANNING PAGES
The following pages are intended to serve as worksheets to help plan courses for the entire four
years of high school. All students are required to take a minimum equivalent of 7 courses per
semester.
Students may choose to take one enhanced learning block (ELB) per semester if academically
appropriate. Choosing electives or continuing with a World Language will fill the other blocks. All
students are required to have one credit in fine arts and one credit in technology. Keep the following
graduation requirements in mind when planning.
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
Credits in Theology
Credits in English
Credits in Mathematics
Credits in Social Studies
Credits in Science
Credits in the same World Language
Grade 9
Semester 1
1.0
1.0
.5
.5
.5
2.5
Credit in Fine Arts
Credit in Technology
Credit in Speech
Credit in Health
Credit in Physical Education
Elective Credits
Grade 10
Semester 1
Semester 2
Semester 2
Theology
Theology
Theology
Theology
English
English
English
English
Math
Math
Math
Math
Science
Science
Science
Science
Social Studies
Social Studies
*Social Studies
*Social Studies
World Language
World Language
World Language
World Language
PE
Health
*PE
Speech
*In certain circumstances, PE and/or
Social Studies may be taken junior year.
Grade 11
Semester 1
Grade 12
Semester 1
Semester 2
Semester 2
Theology
Theology
Theology
Theology
English
English
English
English
Math
Math
Math
Math
Science
Science
Social Studies
Social Studies
*Students may elect to take Government
their junior year.
7
Four-year High School Course Planner
Each block represents one semester class. The blocks in color are NDCL graduation requirements and the white blocks are additional semester openings.
THEOLOGY
THEOLOGY
THEOLOGY
THEOLOGY
THEOLOGY
THEOLOGY
THEOLOGY
THEOLOGY
ENGLISH
MATH
SOC. STUDIES
______________
______________
ENGLISH
MATH
______________
______________
ENGLISH
MATH
______________
______________
ENGLISH
MATH
______________
______________
ENGLISH
MATH
______________
______________
ENGLISH
MATH
______________
______________
ENGLISH
MATH
TECH
______________
______________
______________
ENGLISH
MATH
TECH
______________
______________
______________
SCIENCE
LANGUAGE
______________ ________________ ______________
SOC. STUDIES
SCIENCE
LANGUAGE
______________ ________________ ______________
SOC. STUDIES
SCIENCE
LANGUAGE
______________ ________________ ______________
SOC. STUDIES
SCIENCE
LANGUAGE
______________ ________________ ______________
SOC. STUDIES
SCIENCE
PE
______________ ________________ ______________
SOC. STUDIES
SCIENCE
______________ ________________
ELECTIVE
______________
______________
ELECTIVE
______________
______________
ELECTIVE
______________
______________
ELECTIVE
______________
______________
ELECTIVE
______________
______________
______________
______________
______________
______________
______________
______________
PE
_____________
FINE ARTS
SPEECH
HEALTH
______________
FINE ARTS
_____________
8
College Credit Plus (CCP)
Qualified Ohio students in grades 7-12 may receive both high school credit and college credit for college
classes under the College Credit Plus program. Students must meet the admissions criteria established
by the post-secondary institution of choice. According to the Ohio Department of Education, “The
purpose of this program is to promote rigorous academic pursuits and to provide a wide variety of options
to college-ready students.”
Application Process for CCP Option
1. At course selection time, the student contacts his/her counselor to review requirements and to
discuss how CCP aligns with his/her academic and career goals. Students must carry the
equivalent of 7 courses per semester.
2. Student and family are urged to attend the CCP information session to hear from counselors,
administrators, and participating post-secondary colleges to learn about the risks and advantages
of the program.
3. The student and his/her parent complete the College Credit Plus Intent to Participate Form and
Certification of Counseling Form.
4. The applicant’s parent must establish a SAFE Account through the Ohio Department of
Education in order to apply for funding.
5. The student and family contact the colleges of choice for information, documents, and criteria for
acceptance into their CCP program.
6. The student applies to the college and takes the college placement test such as the ACT or SAT.
7. Once the applicant receives the college acceptance letter, he/she may apply for funding through
their parent’s SAFE account. The college acceptance letter is required to apply for funding.
8. The notification of funding award will be received through the College Credit Plus funding
application in the SAFE Account in May.
9. Once notified of the award for funding, the student registers for the college classes and then
meets with his/her counselor to create a schedule that will provide for the student to take the
needed high school courses and college courses. Priority will be given to the scheduling of the
high school courses.
10. Once a college schedule has been determined the final college schedule must be submitted to the
high school counselor.
Attendance and Finances
 Students must provide their own transportation to and from college classes.
 Students must cover their own parking expenses.
 There is no tuition reduction at NDCL for students in CCP classes.
 Students must sign out/in from NDCL daily if taking a class on a college campus during school hours.
 Students who fail a course or drop the course too late will have to pay for the course.
Grades
 Grades for CCP are included in the student’s high school GPA and are weighted the same as Honors
and AP courses in the same subject area.
 CCP credits appear as college courses on the high school transcript and are included in the total
credits earned at NDCL.
 3-5 college semester hours equals 1 high school Carnegie unit of credit.
 2 college semester hours equals 0.66 high school Carnegie unit of credit.
 1 college semester hour equals 0.33 high school Carnegie unit of credit.
 A student is limited to 30 college credit hours per school year.
9
Benefits
 Under the Transfer to Degree Guarantee, many entry-level courses earned through an Ohio public
college are guaranteed to transfer to any other Ohio public college.
 Students may complete high school graduation requirements and college requirements
simultaneously.
 College credits are earned at no cost to the student or family.
 Students assume more responsibility for their own learning (may also be a risk).
 Classes can be taken in a subject not offered in the high school’s curriculum.
 Will result in the student gaining a permanent college transcript that he/she may submit to any college
when applying for admission (may also be a risk).
 Students experience college-level teaching methods.
Risks
 There is an increased responsibility on the part of the student that is compounded by a more rigorous,
challenging environment.
 May reduce opportunities for participating in high school activities if college classes are after school
or on weekends.
 May take a student out of the high school course sequencing (e.g. math, world languages, etc.) and
present a challenge if the student chooses to re-enter the high school program.
 Could result in a student’s not graduating if the student fails or drops the course.
 May result in different calendar dates between college and high school for vacations and course
endings.
 Private and out-of-state colleges may not accept the college credits earned through CCP.
 Could affect athletic eligibility.
 While a student may meet the academic requirements to participate in CCP, students and parents
should also consider the student’s social and emotional maturity.
NOTRE DAME COLLEGE – College Credit Plus Courses
Nine courses are offered on our campus through Notre Dame College of Ohio that qualify for college and
high school credit. The courses are described in the respective department pages.
The courses are: College Composition I (1 H.S. English credit; 3 college credits) – see p. 15
College Composition II (1 H.S. English credit; 3 college credits) – see p. 15
Topics in Humanities:
Rebels with a Cause (1 H.S. English credit; 3 college credits) - see p. 16
Introduction to Psychology (1 H.S. Social Studies credit; 3 college credits) - see p. 32
College Biology I with Lab (1 H.S. Science credit; 4 college credits) – see p. 29
College Biology II with Lab (1 H.S. Science credit; 4 college credits) – see p. 30
College Calculus I (1 H.S. Math credit; 4 college credits) – see p. 22
College Calculus II (1 H.S. Math credit; 4 college credits) – see p. 22
College Spanish II (1 H.S. World Language credit; 4 college credits) – see p. 41
The Psychology class is taught at NDCL by a professor from Notre Dame College. The other courses are
taught by a NDCL faculty member using a college-level syllabus, instructional strategies, and assessment
procedures.
The procedures for CCP enrollment described on page 9 apply to enrolling in these classes. Students will
work closely with their counselors to enroll in these classes. Participation may be limited by class space
and instructor availability. April 1, 2017 is the application deadline to take CCP classes through NDC.
10
CREDIT FLEX POLICY
Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin accepts applications for flexible credit from its students in accord
with Ohio Senate Bill 311 and the 2009 State Board of Education’s Credit Flex policy. The state
requires each school to shape a process whereby students have the option to “earn units of high
school credit based on demonstration of subject area competency, instead of or in combination
with completing hours of classroom instruction.”1
The intent of Ohio’s Credit Flex policy is to increase student engagement in their learning,
accelerate learning and create habits of mind essential for success in careers, post-secondary
education and life-long learning. In addition, Credit Flex is designed to broaden the scope of
curricular offerings available to students in order to increase the depth of study available for a
subject as well as tailor learning time and conditions needed to customize student learning.2
As a college-preparatory school, NDCL accepts Credit Flex applications from its students. The
student initiates the application and develops the learning plan. At least three months before
beginning the plan, the student presents the learning plan and specific performance outcomes for
a whole or half-credit to NDCL’s Credit Flex panel, which includes the principal, assistant
principal for academics, director of counseling and subject department chairperson.
Approval will be granted in accord with Ohio’s Credit Flex policy using the following
criteria:
1. The plan must reflect and advance NDCL’s mission, vision, and core values so that, in
the judgment of the administration, it enhances and does not compromise the overall
integrity of the student’s NDCL experience.
2. The plan must have equitable value with courses offered at NDCL.
3. The plan must focus on supporting and accelerating student learning in preparation for
college.
4. The plan must be driven by the needs of the student and aligned with the Ohio’s New
Learning Standards.
5. The plan must work with NDCL’s alternate-day block schedule.
Essential elements of a Credit Flexibility Plan:
1. Category/Subject area of learning (e.g. English, social studies, visual arts, science, etc.).
2. Desired outcomes, including a statement of how the learning reflects and advances
NDCL’s mission, vision, and core values.
3. Specific learning plan.
4. Means used to demonstrate and to measure achievement of the desired outcomes. For
example, a rubric evaluating the desired outcomes.
5. Specific performance levels to be used to determine the letter grade for the flexible
learning option upon its completion.
6. Persons/organizations responsible for providing the learning and assigning the quality
percent of mastery at the end of the experience (e.g. internship sponsor, distance learning
instructor, facility supervisor).
7. Specific dates for completion of the plan as well as for presentation of the learning
outcomes to the Credit Flex Panel.
8. After reviewing the student’s achievement and considering any evaluations submitted by
learning providers, if any, included in the plan, the Credit Flex Panel will recommend a
letter grade for the student’s work to the Principal, who is ultimately responsible for the
determination of the final grade and the awarding of credit.
11
Other considerations:
1. Each Credit Flex plan will be considered on its own merit with respect to the individual
needs of the student and his/her college-preparatory plans.
2. Failure to complete an approved plan or earning a failing grade for a completed plan will
be recorded on the student’s permanent record and included in the student’s GPA.
3. All expenses involved in Credit Flex are the responsibility of the student; there is no
tuition reduction for students receiving credit through this program.
4. Specific decisions regarding Credit Flex will not reflect the prejudice of precedent.
5. Courses taken through Credit Flex have implications for interscholastic collegiate athletic
eligibility as determined by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).
1
All quotations and source language taken from : New Emphasis on Learning, A Report to the State Board of
Education prepared by the Ohio Credit Flex Design Team, June 2009.
2
Ibid., pp. 3-5
12
BUSINESS
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Prerequisites
Introduction to Business
610
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
None
Accounting I
2611
11, 12
Year
1.0
“C” in Geometry or Algebra
Business in the 21st
Century
612
11, 12
Semester
.5
Introduction to Business
suggested
Introduction to Business
In this course, students learn the fundamentals of business design and practice in a global marketplace. Modern day
business strategies are discussed allowing students to understand today’s interactive global economy. Students will
examine business ethics and social responsibility to gain an understanding of the key roles played by owners,
managers, and workers. Students will research entrepreneurs and companies in the world of business. This
exploratory course is highly recommended for future business majors.
Accounting I
In Accounting I, students learn the basic principles and concepts of accounting processes. Students will follow the
accounting cycle for a small business involving analyzing, recording and posting transactions to the accounting
books of small businesses. Students will create analysis of their results and will create adjustments, closing entries
and the financial statements for small businesses. In the second semester, special journals and ledgers will be
introduced to expand the accounting process to larger entities. Computer-based spreadsheets and accounting
software will be used to complete problems and small business simulations. This course is highly recommended for
those who plan to major in business in college and those who are uncertain about their career choice.
Business in the 21st Century
This course is an in-depth study of the business areas of entrepreneurship and marketing. Students in this class
participate in the statewide Believe in Ohio STEM Business Plan Competition. In addition, soft skills such as verbal
and written presentations, resume writing and job interviewing techniques are included to help prepare students to
become successful business professionals. This class is a must for future business leaders.
13
ENGLISH
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
English 9
2110
9
Year
1
Honors English 9
2111
9
Year
1 (W)
English 10
2120
10
Year
1
Prerequisites
Placement
2121
10
Year
1 (W)
Completion of Honors
English 9 with a
minimum C average or
Dept. Placement
150
10
Semester
.5
Required Grade 10
English 11
2130
11
Year
1
College Composition I
(must also take Comp II)
191
11, 12
Semester
1 (W)
College Composition II
192
11, 12
Semester
1 (W)
English 12
2140
12
Year
1
College English
Literature
2131
12
Year
1 (W)
Honors English 10
Speech
(beginning in school year
2018-2019)
English Elective Course
Creative Writing
Film Study
(next offered in 2018-2019)
Topics in Humanities:
Rebels with a Cause
AP English Lit, Honors
English 10 and
college-ready test scores
Successful completion of
College Comp I
Successful Completion
College Composition
I & II
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Prerequisites
151
11, 12
Semester
.5
C- or above in English
152
11, 12
Semester
.5
190
11, 12
Semester
1 (W)
C- or above in English
College-ready test scores
NOTE: English electives may not substitute for the required English courses.
NOTE ON THE HONORS ENGLISH SEQUENCE:
The department sets the criteria for enrollment in the English honors course sequence. Qualification is based on
standardized test data, demonstrated language arts skill level, and grades in previous honors/AP English courses.
Other factors given consideration are student motivation, academic work ethic, and previous English teacher’s
recommendation(s).
14
English 9
In this course, a variety of student-centered activities and assessments focus on the critical research, reading and
writing skills necessary for success in high school English courses. Students will read a wide range of materials,
both classical and modern, exploring various genres and styles. Writing and research skills will emphasize student
use of the process approach and technology to create increasingly sophisticated expository writing.
Honors English 9
Honors English 9 is a open to freshmen who meet the prerequisites for placement set by the English Department.
This course will study the same critical research, reading and writing skills as English 9, but on a deeper and more
challenging level. This is a weighted course and requires a motivated and responsible student who has demonstrated
strong ability in verbal and reading skills.
English 10
Sophomore students in this course will study a representative selection of American authors to explore the American
experience in literature. Critical reading, writing and research skills will be further developed and refined, with
increasing emphasis on evaluation of sources. Students will work increasingly independently to analyze and
interpret literature.
Honors English 10
Honors English 10 is open to sophomores who meet the prerequisites for placement set by the English Department.
The course will study the same critical research, reading and writing skills as English 10, but on a deeper and more
challenging level. Analysis and interpretation skills will be emphasized, and research projects will introduce
students to literary analysis and database sources. This is a weighted course and requires a motivated and
responsible student who has demonstrated strong ability in verbal and reading skills.
English 11
Junior students in this course will study the major literary movements and historical influences on the development
of literature in the British Isles, from Anglo-Saxon poetry to 21st Century literature. Increasingly, analysis and
writing assignments will emphasize college-readiness skills as students refine their research, reading and writing.
English 12
Seniors in this course will synthesize the critical research, reading and writing skills developed over their academic
careers, with an emphasis on skills needed for success in college and beyond: the ability to listen, think, read, speak
and write with clarity and insight. Reading a broad selection of literature drawn from many cultures, students will
explore the human experience, which transcends time, distance and culture.
College Composition I & II (a dual high school/college-credit course open to juniors and seniors)
College Composition I and II is a two-course sequence that will span the academic year and will be open to juniors
and seniors who meet the prerequisite for placement set by Notre Dame College and NDCL. Through writing as
inquiry, students in this course will foster critical thinking as they learn to evaluate arguments, and to locate and
organize evidence to support their own written arguments. Students will learn to understand contexts by studying the
rhetorical situation out of which a text arises. Students in this course will often engage with other learners and share
different points of view throughout the year as we seek to gain a deeper understanding of ourselves and of the world
around us. This course will focus on writing, reading and the thinking process, with a strong research component. As
a college-level class, this course is weighted and requires a motivated and responsible student who has demonstrated
strong ability in verbal and reading skills. Upon successful completion of the sequence, students will receive six (6)
total college credits.
Creative Writing
In this course, students use the written word as a means of self-expression; therefore, students should have mastered
basic sentence and paragraph construction. Students study works by noted writers and practice techniques used in
writing essays, critical reviews, narratives, short stories, poetry, and plays. The course focuses on the writing skills
of precision, sentence structure, and originality of language. Students use methods of self-evaluation to improve
their skills and techniques. Independent projects enable the students to apply what is learned and to explore areas of
personal interest.
Speech
This is a required course for all sophomores, designed to enable the students to communicate in front of a group with
ease and poise. The heart of the course is the organization and delivery of speeches of all types in order to achieve
facility in speaking in public clearly, concisely, coherently and effectively.
15
Topics in Humanities: Rebels with a Cause (a dual high school/college-credit course open to juniors and seniors)
This course explores connections among great philosophers, thinkers and artists. Studies of how writers/artists of
many types are influenced by those that came before them will be included. Projects will explore those connections
and trace how the ideas and themes in earlier works manifested themselves into the poetry, fiction, music, media and
visual art that followed. Focus will be specifically on thinkers who identified social injustice and how their work
attempted to change or address those (or similar) injustices.
Film Study (next offered in 2018-2019)
Film Study explores the role and influence of the media from its beginning with film and television shows. Oscarworthy films that reflect the time period in which they were made will tie in with the role of advertising, music, art
and television that are now part of the popular culture. The cultural, economic and political influences of media will
be analyzed. What is the intent? Is the intent biased or a distorted realization? What are the effects of the media’s
message? How did censorship evolve? Does censorship need to exist? How can we find “truth” from the information
that we are given? From a faith-perspective, how are characters, plots and messages in the art-form that is film
media to be viewed? By studying the evolution of the media, students will develop new habits needed to think
carefully and wisely about the abundant messages received and created.
16
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Prerequisites
Creative Foods I
870
9, 10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
None
Creative Foods II
871
9, 10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
Creative Foods I
Family and Child
Development
872
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
None
873
11, 12
Semester
.5
None
Independent Living
Creative Foods I
High school aged students make many personal food choices. They are surrounded by messages from the media to
try food supplements or the latest fad diet that may hold unrealistic promises. Future healthful living may depend on
the habits and food choices made during the teenage years.
The Creative Foods classes offer opportunities to learn more about good nutrition and to develop skills using basic
recipes, kitchen utensils and appliances. Students will gain confidence in reading recipes, understanding how
ingredients work together and how to prepare a variety of foods. This is a laboratory and lecture course offering
practical group experiences in following recipes and safe food handling/preparation techniques. Lab work includes:
appetizers, vegetables, eggs, seasonal foods (chocolate candy making), breads, and cookies.
Creative Foods II
Students who are interested in food preparation, healthful eating and the latest trends in foods can take this advanced
foods course. This course is a continuation of Creative Foods I. During the second semester, the lab work
emphasizes main dish recipes including salads, soups, casseroles, and sandwiches - all with side dishes. We will
also prepare advanced chocolates and pastries. Successful completion of Creative foods I is required.
Family and Child Development
There are very few people who go through life without the opportunity to interact with children. Students are
encouraged to enroll in this course if they are interested in learning more about families, young children or to help
prepare for child-related career choices. This course offers a broad awareness of the major issues related to
parenting and children. Topics include the history of parenting, guidance and discipline, character development, and
family management techniques. Pregnancy/birth and a brief overview of milestones of early childhood development
to age four will also be discussed. Students will have an infant simulator experience as well as observing children
and assisting teachers at the Notre Dame Preschool.
Independent Living
We are all consumers. We make decisions about what foods to buy, clothing selection and care, and how we
manage our resources. Independent Living covers a variety of topics for high school juniors and seniors as they
strive for independence and adulthood. This class helps prepare students for the many choices they will make after
high school. The main topics of this class include: social and business manners, banking and credit, basic food
preparation, caring for clothes, consumer awareness and insurances.
17
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Prerequisites
810
820
821
9
9
10
Semester
Semester
Semester
.5
.25
.25
None
None
None
830
11, 12
1st Semester
.25
None
831
11, 12
2nd Semester
.25
None
Strength and
Conditioning
840
9, 10
Semester
.25
None
(may only be taken once)
Plyometrics and
Conditioning
850
11, 12
Semester
.25
None
Health
Physical Education I
Physical Education II
Advanced Physical
Education I
Advanced Physical
Education II
Health
The definition of health has taken on a much broader perspective in the 21st century. Currently, wellness describes
the interrelationships among physical, mental and social well-being. With this expanded concept of health in mind,
students are exposed to topics and problems that call for choosing good health through a well thought out decisionmaking process. Topics for study include wellness, stress management, nutrition, substance use and abuse, lifestyle
diseases, and infectious and noninfectious disease. During the course, students are given the opportunity to discuss
their problems and questions and/or misconceptions, which then challenge them to examine their own health
behaviors that will affect them now as they mature into adults.
Physical Education I
The goal of the year is for students to demonstrate a basic level of competency in many movement forms and a
proficiency in a few of them. Students can expect to study units in volleyball, soccer, softball, and basketball.
Physical fitness activities will be emphasized as students test their pre and post fitness levels. As a result, students
should be able to participate successfully in rhythm activities, outdoor pursuits and team and individual games.
Physical Education II
Physical Education II may be the last formal physical education our students will experience. Current research
suggests that students should increase the number of activities for which they have acquired a level of competency.
These activities should represent a variety of movement forms. Competency involves the ability to use basic skills,
strategies and rules of an activity to a degree of success that makes the activity enjoyable. Activities include
archery, tennis, golf, floor hockey, table tennis, shuffleboard, badminton, and bowling.
Strength and Conditioning
Strength and Conditioning is a semester course offered to all 9th and 10th graders, although it is geared toward the
interscholastic athlete. Weight training, speed and agility exercises will be implemented during the semester, along
with fitness testing, so the students’ progress can be measured. This course will offer intense workouts for students
who are interested in reaching their full athletic potential. Students will learn the proper techniques of many lifts
along with correct running techniques. This course may only be taken for one semester. The student’s other required
PE course must be either PEI or PEII, depending on when the conditioning course is taken.
Plyometrics and Conditioning
Plyometrics and Conditioning is a semester course offered to students seriously interested in strength training and
plyometrics. This course can be used as an elective class and would be excellent for female and male athletes. The
course will offer an intense workout for students who are extremely dedicated to becoming stronger and faster to
improve their athletic performance. PAC will offer programs for off-season and in-season conditioning by strength
training daily in class. Each student will be pre-tested, have a mid-term test, and post-term test at the conclusion of
the program.
18
Advanced Physical Education I
(Basketball - 9 weeks; Flag Football/Team Handball - 9 weeks)
This course is designed for juniors and seniors who want to further develop their skill development and knowledge
in Physical Education. This course focuses on advanced skill development, offensive and defensive strategies,
coaching philosophies and basic officiating. This course may be taken only once.
Advanced Physical Education II
(Floor Hockey - 4 weeks; Volleyball - 6 weeks; Indoor Soccer - 4 weeks; Softball - 4 weeks)
This course is designed for juniors and seniors who want to further develop their skill development and knowledge
in Physical Education. This course focuses on advanced skill development, offensive and defensive strategies,
coaching philosophies and basic officiating. This course may be taken only once.
19
MATHEMATICS
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Prerequisites
Algebra I
2210
9
Year
1
Placement
Honors Algebra I
2211
9
Year
1 (W)
Placement
Geometry
2220
9, 10
Year
1
Placement
Honors Geometry
2221
9, 10
Year
1 (W)
Placement
Algebra II Concepts
2230
11
Year
1
Placement
Algebra II
2231
10, 11
Year
1
Placement
Honors Algebra II
with Trigonometry
2232
10, 11
Year
1 (W)
Placement
Honors Pre-Calculus
2222
10, 11, 12
Year
1 (W)
Placement
*Trigonometry
252
11, 12
Semester
.5
Placement
*Pre-Calculus
250
11, 12
Semester
.5
Placement
*Statistics
253
11, 12
Semester
.5
Algebra II or Algebra II Concepts
*Functions
251
12
Semester
.5
Algebra II or Algebra II Concepts
*Calculus I A
243
12
Semester
.5
Placement
*Calculus I B
5243
12
Semester
.5
Placement
AP Statistics
2241
11, 12
Year
1 (W)
*College Calculus I
290
12
Semester
1 (W)
*College Calculus II
291
12
Semester
1 (W)
B in Algebra II or successful
completion of H Algebra II-Trig.
Honors Pre-Calculus and
College-ready test scores
Successful completion of College
Calculus I
Engineering
*Engineering
Principles
270
11, 12
Semester
.5
Algebra II or concurrently taking
Algebra II
* - indicates a semester course
Math Department Notes: All students are required to have a TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS) calculator for the
mathematics courses indicated. Students in Algebra 1 and Geometry courses will learn how to use the
TI-Nspire calculator via a class set. Students in those courses are encouraged to purchase the calculator,
but are not required to do so.
Math department placement is based eligibility. Any student who wishes to take a course that he/she
does not meet the eligibility requirements for must follow the school’s over-ride policy.
20
Algebra I
Algebra I is the study of real numbers and their properties using many methods of problem solving. The
requirements of this course demand that the student manifests average or above average computational and problemsolving skills. Topics include solving equations, inequalities, systems, and word problems, performing operations
with polynomials, graphing in the coordinate plane, and probability and statistics.
Recommended calculator (but not required): TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Honors Algebra I
Honors Algebra I is open to freshmen who meet the approval of the Mathematics Department. This course offers all
the topics offered in Algebra I, but on a deeper and more challenging level. Students taking this course must have
done well on the placement test.
Recommended calculator (but not required): TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Geometry
Geometry deals with the measurement, properties, and relationships of points, lines, angles, surfaces, and solids. It
develops in students the ability to reason logically and to formulate mathematical proofs.
Recommended calculator (but not required): TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Honors Geometry
Honors Geometry is open to students who meet the approval of the Mathematics Department. This course covers all
the topics offered in Geometry, but on a deeper and more challenging level. Students electing this course must have
an interest in mathematics, and be willing to think and work hard to meet the challenge offered in this honors course.
Recommended calculator (but not required): TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Algebra II Concepts
This course is for students who do not meet the requirement for Algebra II. It is a second course in algebra that
integrates the concepts, principles and operations of algebra and geometry. Students in this course will continue their
math program by taking Functions and Statistics during their senior year. In Algebra II Concepts, students study
linear and quadratic functions, polynomial and rational expressions, systems of equations and inequalities, radicals,
complex numbers and problem solving.
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
This is NOT an NCAA-approved course for athletic eligibility in DI and/or DII schools.
Algebra II
Algebra II is a second course in Algebra. In this course, students will study linear, quadratic, exponential,
polynomial, rational and radical expressions and equations. Students will also be introduced to trigonometry,
probability, sequences and series. Those who do well in this class will continue their math program by taking
Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus the following year.
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Honors Algebra II with Trigonometry—Students taking this course are expected to take Honors PreCalculus at the same time or the following year.
Honors Algebra II with Trigonometry is open to students who meet the criteria of the department. This course
covers all of the topics offered in Algebra II as well as Trigonometry, but on a deeper and more challenging level.
Students electing this course must have an interest in mathematics and be willing to think and work hard to meet the
challenges offered at this honors level.
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Honors Pre-Calculus
In this full year course, students will analyze functions, describe end behavior, classify discontinuous functions and
deal with many other topics. This course will include a detailed study of derivatives and limits. This course is
designed to be taken with Honors Algebra II-Trigonometry. This class will prepare students to take AP Calculus the
following year. Each student must have the following calculator: TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Trigonometry
In this semester course, students will analyze trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic
trigonometry, and additional topics. The prerequisite for this class is Algebra II.
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Pre-Calculus
21
In this semester course, students will analyze functions, describe end behavior, classify discontinuous functions and
deal with other topics. This course will prepare students for Calculus. Students who sign for this class must also
take Trigonometry. This course is NOT for students who have previously taken H Algebra II with Trigonometry.
Each student must have the following graphing calculator: TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Functions
In this semester course, students will extend the study of mathematics. Topics will include trigonometry, systems of
equations, matrices, sequences, and series. The course is designed for students who do not meet the requirements for
Trigonometry or Pre-Calculus.
Each student must have the following graphing calculator: TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Statistics
In this semester course students will learn to organize and understand data, investigate measures of central tendency,
analyze trends, and study elementary probability. Statistics deals with risk, reward, randomness and uncertainty.
The prerequisite for this class is the successful completion of Algebra II or Algebra II Concepts.
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
Calculus I A
This two-course sequence provides the fourth year of mathematics option for the student who took Pre-Calculus in
their junior year. The first semester course introduces the concepts and basic ideas of calculus, such as limits and
continuity, the derivative and its applications. Students will work with polynomial, rational, and radical functions.
This course is NOT for students who have previously taken Honors Pre-Calculus.
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-NspireCX (non-CAS).
Calculus I B
This is the second course in a two-course sequence of Calculus I. Students will continue to work with polynomial,
rational, and radical functions as well as explore logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions. Integration
techniques as well as additional applications of the antiderivative will be the major focus of this course.
Prerequisite: Calculus 1A or Honors Pre-Calculus
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-NspireCX (non-CAS).
AP Statistics
This course is an introduction to statistics, including analysis of single and bivariate data, probability distributions
and sample variability. This course is intended for students who want a math elective in addition to Pre-Calculus or
Calculus and those who are interested in a course of study in college that requires statistics. Students in this course
will read case studies and write responses for them.
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
All students will be required to take the AP exam in Statistics, as well as the second semester exam during the
regularly scheduled exam period.
College Calculus I (A dual high school/college-credit course open to seniors)
In this semester course, the first of a two-course sequence, students will review functions and graphs, limits and
continuous functions, and the derivative. Students will explore differentiation of algebraic and transcendental
functions, as well as applications of the derivative. Further study will include anti-derivatives, definite integrals and
their applications.
Prerequisite: Honors Pre-Calculus
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-NspireCX (non-CAS).
College Calculus II (A dual high school/college-credit course open to seniors)
College Calculus II is a continuation of College Calculus I. This semester course involves continued study of the
definite integral, computation of anti-derivatives, and various techniques of integration. Volume and revolution of
solids is explored as well as logistic equations. Other topics include the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus,
convergence and divergence of sequences, and differential equations.
Prerequisite: College Calculus I
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-NspireCX (non-CAS).
22
ENGINEERING
Engineering Principles
This application driven course will introduce students to general engineering. Students will have an introduction to
the many fields of engineering, gain technical reading, writing, and drawing skills, engage in the engineering design
process, and learn basic robotics. This course will contain many projects that include 3D design and printing, logic
programming, and simple machines. Students will apply mathematical and science skills and use creative thinking
and problem solving strategies to solve real world engineering-based problems. This course is designed as a math
elective and may not count toward the four credits of math required for graduation.
Each student must have the following calculator: TI-Nspire CX (non-CAS).
23
Typical Math Sequences
Grade 9
Grade 10
Geometry
Grade 11
Algebra II
Grade 12
Trig
Trig
Pre-Calc
Stats
Trig
Pre-Calc
&
Stats
Algebra I
*Algebra II Concepts
Trig
Pre-Calc
&
Stats
Geometry
&
Functions
Stats
Calculus I A & B
AP Statistics
Calculus I A & B
Trig
Pre-Calc
Algebra II
AP Statistics
____________________________________________________________________________________________
H Alg II-Trig
&
H Pre-Calculus
H Geometry
AP Statistics
College Calculus I & II
Calculus I B
H Algebra I
H Pre-Calculus
H Geometry
H Alg II-Trig
AP Statistics
H Geometry
&
H Alg II-Trig
H Pre-Calculus
College Calculus I & II
Calculus I B
AP Statistics
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Trig
Geometry
Pre-Calc
Algebra II
Calculus I A & B
AP Statistics
Trig
Pre-Calc
Calculus I A & B
&
AP Statistics
Stats
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
H Geometry
H Alg II-Trig
H Pre-Calculus
College Calculus I & II
Calculus I B
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
NOTE: brackets indicate taking two math courses in the same year; arrows indicate choices within that year
*See important note in the course description regarding NCAA eligibility.
24
PERFORMING ARTS
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Prerequisites
Ukulele Class
762
9,10,11,12
Semester
.5
None
Stage Band
2764
764
9, 10, 11, 12
Year
Semester
1
.5
Placement
2766
766
9, 10, 11, 12
Year
Semester
1
.5
None
2770
770
9, 10, 11, 12
Year
Semester
1
.5
Placement
Advanced Music
Theory
761
9, 10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
Placement
Theatre
767
10, 11, 12
Fall Semester
.5
None
Theatre Workshop
768
10, 11, 12
Spring
Semester
.5
Theatre
9, 10, 11, 12
Extracurricular
(may be taken more than once)
Choir
(may be taken more than once)
Advanced Choir
(may be taken more than once)
Marching Band
.5
through
Credit Flex
None
NOTES: All courses offered by the Performing Arts Department will satisfy the Fine Arts requirement.
Designated concerts constitute the final exam for vocal and instrumental performance classes.
Marching Band (credit awarded through a Credit Flex plan)
Marching band is a musical ensemble that performs at all varsity football games and a variety of parades, concerts,
and other events throughout the year. Marching band is available to all woodwind, brass, and percussion players, or
anyone who is willing to learn and practice an instrument. Marching band also supports the visual element of color
guard. The color guard is selected by audition each May. We also welcome baton twirlers interested in becoming
majorettes.
Marching band rehearses after school, and may be taken as either an extra-curricular activity for no credit or for .5
credit/year. Credit must be applied for during course registration through the Credit Flex policy (see p. 11)
Students interested in marching band may sign up during orientation, or at any other time by contacting the music
director. Marching band students are also able to participate in sports and other extra-curricular activities.
Stage Band
Stage Band is open to experienced saxophone, flute, clarinet, trumpet, trombone, keyboard, guitar, bass, and drum
set players. Wind instrument players should know how to read written music. Guitar, bass and keyboard players
must be able to read either written notes and rhythms or chord changes (not tab). Through the performance of a
variety of jazz and popular music, students develop an understanding of a wide variety of styles, ensemble
communication and basic improvisational skills. Members participate in all major assemblies and performances
undertaken by the Performing Arts Department and are also showcased through several special events.
Ukulele Class
Ukulele is designed to teach fundamental concepts of music while simultaneously developing skills on the ukulele.
Students will read written music, count in time, learn intonation and develop elementary composition skills. The
ukulele is a fun instrument suitable for both inexperienced and experienced student musicians. Skills learned on the
ukulele segue well into guitar or bass. Students are expected to provide their own ukulele and tuner. These items
may be purchased at most music stores.
25
Choir
Choir is a vocal ensemble available to all students interested in singing and performing. No audition is required.
Students are introduced to the elements of choral music, voice production, basic sight singing, and the qualities of
good performance. Choir members will participate in various school functions, assemblies and at the semester
concert of the Performing Arts Department.
Advanced Choir
Advanced choir is a vocal ensemble available to experienced singers who are interested in developing a deeper
understanding of vocal technique and high-level choral music. Students will be expected to sing compelling
harmonies and have at least a basic understanding of written music and sight singing. The advanced choir will have
limited space available for students based on the balance of the ensemble. All interested students must either be
placed by audition or admitted upon the recommendation of the choir director.
Advanced Music Theory
Advanced Music Theory is a course designed for experienced instrumental or vocal musicians who are seeking to
understand the music we sing, play, and listen to in a deeper way. We will closely examine scale structures, major
and minor key signatures and other types of tonality, chord construction and harmonic analysis. We will also
develop the musical ear through aural training exercises and exams. Advanced music theory builds on the concepts
introduced in musical ensembles like choir and band. Students are admitted through teacher approval or placement
test.
Theatre
Theatre class is designed to enhance theatrical concepts for better understanding and a stronger experience onstage
and offstage. Students develop and practice skills in the use of body and voice: the actor’s primary tools. Students
learn theatrical terms, different types of stages, stage areas, and staging concepts. Activities involve planning
movement, improving vocal projection, working with a script, developing the creative process, and exploring
production responsibilities. Participation includes individual and group theatrical activities, performance
assessments of scenes and monologues, and a written evaluation of participation in, or attendance of, the current
NDCL production. Students will be tested on theatrical knowledge. The final exam is the performance of a
prepared, memorized monologue.
Theatre Workshop
Theatre Workshop revolves around two key realms of theatre: acting and directing. Some technical theatre may be
applied. Students participate in preparation and performances. Memorization skills are addressed and demonstrated
at various times. Students will peruse and choose scripts for assignments. Some highlights of the course are
auditions, stage movement and blocking, the rehearsal process, and characterization through body and voice.
Participation in selecting, casting, rehearsing, and performing a one-act play is the essence of this applied skills
course. The final exam is the public performance of a one-act play. This course is ideal preparation for WINGS
directors.
26
SCIENCE
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Prerequisites
Physical Science:
STEM Explorations
2312
9
Year
1
Required
Biology
2320
10
Year
1
Placement
Honors Biology
2321
10
Year
1 (W)
Placement
Environmental Science
2232
11, 12
Year
1
Two years of high school science
Chemistry
2330
11, 12
Year
1
Honors Chemistry
2331
11
Year
1 (W)
Honors Chemistry
Complement
361
11
Semester
.5 (W)
Human Anatomy and
Physiology
2342
12
Year
1





2340
12
Year
1
Physics Complement
370
12
Semester
.5
AP Physics C,
Mechanics
2341




12
Year
A in Biology or B- in Honors Biology
Department placement
Algebra II or Honors Algebra II with
Trig. taken previously or concurrently
Chemistry or Honors Chemistry

Physics
C in Algebra I; C in Biology.
B- in Environmental Science.
Algebra II Concepts or Algebra II
taken previously or concurrently.
1 (W)

B- in Chemistry or B- in
Honors Chemistry and
B- in Algebra II,
C+ in Honors Alg. II-Trig., or Trig/
Pre-Calculus.
Concurrent enrollment in H Pre-Calc,
Calculus I, or Trig/Pre-Calc.
Concurrent enrollment in
College Calculus I & II
Department placement.
AP Physics C,
Mechanics Comp.
371
Biodiversity
351
11, 12
Semester
.5
None
Forensic Science A
352
11, 12
Semester
.5
Two years of high school science
Forensic Science B
353
11, 12
Semester
.5
Astronomy
350
11, 12
Semester
.5
Two years of high school science
STEM – Biomedical
Studies
355
11,12
.5
Two years of high school science
.5 (W)
Semester
27
Two years of high school science
College Biology I
and Lab
College Biology II
and Lab
390
12
Semester
1 (W)
391
12
Semester
1 (W)
Chemistry or Honors Chemistry and
College-ready test scores
Successful completion of
College Biology I & Lab
Physical Science: STEM Explorations
Students will explore content in Physics, Chemistry, and Astronomy through guided problem based learning and
student-led projects. Emphasis through-out the course will be on developing critical thinking skills, integrating
multiple branches of knowledge, and designing ways to understand and solve problems using the Physical Sciences.
Students will develop ideas through inquiry, research, in-class labs, and will begin using technical writing to present
their understanding.
Biology
Biology is the study of living things. Using the scientific method, students investigate life processes in the cell as
well as in organisms of the six-kingdom system.
Honors Biology
This course is an in-depth Biology course, paced for the high ability student. Strong emphasis is placed on scientific
reasoning and creative thinking, which are developed through laboratory problem solving. Eligibility for taking this
course is determined by the student’s PSAT 8/9 science test scores and a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 and
above.
Environmental Science
Environmental Science is a course that explores earth systems and resources. Connections and interactions—both
natural and human-made—between earth’s spheres (the hydrosphere, atmosphere, biosphere and lithosphere) are
explored Students will also learn about the availability of earth’s resources, extraction of the resources,
contamination problems, remediation techniques and the storage/disposal of the resources or by-products. The topics
of conservation, protection and sustainability of earth’s resources are also included.
Chemistry
Course content follows a standard development centered on matter, its composition, structure, and the changes it can
undergo. The course enables the chemistry student to interpret and express scientific and mathematical relationships.
Memorization and application skills are used frequently throughout this fast-paced course. Laboratory work
develops lecture topics and incorporates many basic skills and lab techniques.
Honors Chemistry and Honors Chemistry Complement
This course is for students with both high ability and interest in science. The course is designed to prepare students
for an entry-level college chemistry course, which involves a more in-depth study of chemical principles than
regular chemistry. A semester long project will be completed that will require students to apply their scientific
method skills. Eligibility for taking this course is determined by 10th grade Biology grade, Pre-ACT scores, and
cumulative GPA of 3.5 and above.
Human Anatomy and Physiology
For seniors interested in biological sciences or health-related careers, this course provides additional work in
selected areas, with emphasis on human anatomy and physiology. Other topics include biochemistry and genetics as
well as analysis of contemporary problems in these areas. Dissection of a fetal pig will be done to help understand
the human body systems. These include: digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, excretory and nervous systems.
Physics and Physics Complement
Physics is for seniors with both a strong interest in and aptitude for science and/or mathematics. It is essential for
the student contemplating college level work in the physical sciences, engineering, etc. Through lectures, problem
solving, discussions, and laboratory work students investigate the traditional spectrum of topics: mechanics, waves,
light, etc. A strong trigonometry/algebra-based mathematical development is used throughout the course. Each
student must have a hand-held graphing calculator (TI-83 PLUS is preferred; TI-83 is permitted).
28
AP Physics C: Mechanics and AP Physics C: Mechanics Complement
AP Physics C: Mechanics is a calculus-based, college level course that provides in-depth study of Newtonian
mechanics. Students will learn about each of the following six mechanics content areas: kinematics; Newton’s laws
of motion; work, energy, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation;
oscillations and gravitation. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding and application through guided
inquiry, problem solving and laboratory work.
Each student must have a hand-held graphing calculator. TI-83 PLUS or greater such as TI-Nspire non-CAS.
All students will be required to take the AP exam in Physics as well as the second semester exam during the
regularly scheduled exam period.
Biodiversity
If you like studying life science and want to explore more of the uniqueness and diversity of bacteria, plants and
animals, this course is for you. The class will be taught in an interactive way using an online textbook. Activities
will include computer work, outdoor labs, collaborative project-based exercises, comparative dissection of animals
and more. Engaging assignments will take you on an interactive exploration of biological concepts that capture your
imagination, give you opportunities to express your creativity, and let you contribute your findings to the class, the
NDCL community and community at large. As a result of this class, you can acquire an appreciation for the
immense treasure of biodiversity and be inspired to make informed decisions about how to take care of the living
planet now and in the future.
Forensic Science
In this interdisciplinary science course, students learn some of the history of forensic science and basic biological,
chemical, and physical techniques used in analyzing evidence and identifying unknowns. Computer, math and
internet research skills are used. Students practice making observations, organizing data, solving problems, making
comparative analyses, and communicating their results in oral and written form. The courses themselves are
differentiated by the areas considered. Courses may be taken in any order; one section is not a prerequisite for the
other.
Forensic Science A - Topics in section A will be chosen from the following:
~Crime scene analysis
~Anthropology and Entomology
~Fingerprints and lip prints
~2-D Facial recognition and reconstruction
~Blood spatter
Forensic Science B – Topics in section B will be chosen from the following:
~Crime scene analysis
~DNA analysis, fingerprinting and profiling
~Toxicology and chromatography
~Hair, fibers and textiles
~Glass and glass fracture analysis
~Casts and impressions
~Bite marks
~3-D facial recognition and reconstruction with clay and plastic skulls
Astronomy
How can we study something so big that it includes everything, even us? The cosmos or the universe, as it is more
commonly called, is the subject of astronomy. Students will learn about the origin of modern astronomy and
explore the components of our solar system as a starting point to study stellar and galactic astronomy. Topics
include: the night sky, historical astronomy, solar systems, star formation, the life and death of stars, black holes,
introduction to cosmology and the early universe
STEM – Biomedical Studies
Diseases! Fighting Infection! Cures! Students will explore how diseases are detected and treated, as well as screen
and evaluate problems when the body is failing. Emphasis will be on discovering ways the most pressing health
challenges of the 21st century are handled. Using real world cases as the starting point, students will have the
opportunity to design their own investigations. Topics such as public health, infectious diseases, clinical medicine,
human physiology, biomedical engineering and innovations will be explored. Outside speakers and collaborators
will enhance student learning.
College Biology I and Lab (a dual high school/college-credit course open to seniors)
College Biology I Is an introductory course for biology majors designed to develop a foundation for future higherlevel courses within the biological sciences. Topics covered include basic concepts of chemistry, biomolecules,
DNA & RNA, cellular structure, cell division & cycle, inheritance, genes, chromosomes, genomes, biotechnology,
and bioenergetics. General Biology Laboratory I is incorporated into this course.
29
College Biology II and Lab (a dual high school/college-credit course open to seniors)
College Biology II is taken after College Biology I. Topics covered include evolution, a survey of the taxonomic &
phylogenetic organization of life with attention given to each of the biological Domains and an introduction into
ecology and ecosystems. General Biology Laboratory II is incorporated into this course.
30
SOCIAL STUDIES
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Modern World History
2410
9
Year
1
Honors
Modern World History
2411
9
Year
1 (W)
U.S. History
2420
10, 11
Year
1
AP U.S. History
2421
10, 11
Year
1 (W)
Government
5430
11, 12
Year
1
5431
11, 12
Year
1 (W)
Dept. Placement
443
11, 12
Semester
.5
None
Middle East Issues
440
11, 12
Semester
.5
None
Human Geography
442
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
None
Economics
445
11, 12
Semester
.5
Introduction to
Psychology
490
12
Semester
1 (W)
None
This course is taken for dual
high school/college credit.
See CCP requirements
East Asian Studies
441
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
None
444
11, 12
Semester
.5
None
AP U.S. Government
and Politics
Sociology
(next offered in 2018-2019)
World Issues
(next offered in 2018-2019)
Prerequisites
None
Dept. Placement
None
Dept. Placement
None
Modern World History
Required of all students, this course gives an overview of modern world history. The course will focus on Western
history from the Age of Enlightenment to the present. The students are also introduced to the non-Western cultures.
This study of events, contributions and values which have shaped our heritage and the heritage of other nations,
gives the students a chance to broaden their outlook of the world and grow in appreciation of their own values and
culture. The course lays the foundation for students to analyze history and to critically think about past and current
world events.
Honors Modern World History
Honors Modern World History is open to freshmen who meet the prerequisites for placement set by the Social
Studies Department. This course will study the same eras of history and emphasize the same historical analysis and
critical thinking as Modern World History, but on a deeper and more challenging level. This is a weighted course
and requires a motivated and responsible student who has demonstrated strong ability in verbal and reading skills.
U.S. History
Required of all students, the U.S. History course is essential for the development of their democratic values and
ideals. After a brief overview of U.S. History from colonial times to the Civil War period, the course focuses on
U.S. History from Reconstruction to the present emphasizing both domestic issues and foreign policy. From the
imperialist movements at the turn of the twentieth century to international power politics of the twenty-first century,
the course directs student learning in a thoughtful and analytical way. Thus, the course lays foundational skills for
future social studies classes in which students are able to analyze history, politics, economics, society and law with
reason, scope and vision.
31
AP U.S. History
Open to sophomores and juniors who meet the approval of the Social Studies Department, this course follows the
basic outline of the U.S. History course. In addition, students will explore specific topics in greater depth. They
will be encouraged to analyze and evaluate historical documents and the impact of American issues, movements,
and people on our society today. Various historical interpretations of past events will also be examined and
discussed. The course will help students develop and/or improve their research and analytical skills, expand their
essay-writing abilities and become more articulate in expressing their views and ideas. This course also prepares
students to take the Advanced Placement Exam in United States History in May. All students will be required to take
the AP exam in US History, as well as the second semester exam during the regularly scheduled exam period.
Government
Government is a required course in which the students study, analyze, and interpret the structure and function of
American government and learn the workings of the democratic process. Students are encouraged to pursue the
study of political issues more critically and more independently than before. They will study the American political
process; the constitution; the executive, judicial and legislative branches; criminal and civil rights; state and local
government. In doing so, the students have the opportunity to realize the value of the American way of life and the
value of active participation in civic affairs. The state-required Financial Literacy component will be included in this
course.
AP U.S. Government and Politics
This course gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It is based on
the College Board's curriculum for AP Government and Politics. This course requires considerable knowledge of
the various institutions, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students will analyze a variety of theoretical
perspectives. Extensive reading, writing, and a scholarly approach are expected in this course. The state-required
Financial Literacy component will be included in this course.
All students will be required to take the AP exam in US Government, as well as the second semester exam during the
regularly scheduled exam period.
Sociology
Sociology is an elective course with inquiry into the issues and problems of modern social life; students analyze
patterns of cultural tradition and change in society. The course will focus on sociological theories and will examine
various topics: group behavior, population, crime, social stratification, race and ethnicity, collective behavior, and
social movements. Beyond an understanding of the social structure, the students are encouraged to develop those
skills of inquiry which lead to realistic decision-making and effective problem solving in today's world.
Introduction to Psychology (a dual high school/college-credit course open to seniors)
This course will provide a study of psychology as a discipline concerned with behavior and mental processes
including how they are affected by a person’s physical state, mental state and external environment. Students will
appreciate psychology as a science by exploring how it can impact multiple parts of life including: yourself, your
body, your mind, your environment, your mental health and your life. Students will gain an overview of how
psychologists apply the four primary goals of psychology (description, understanding, prediction and control of
behavior and mental processes) to the world.
Human Geography
This course builds on students’ understanding of geography and spatial thinking. Contemporary issues are explored
through the lens of geography. In addition to understanding where physical and cultural features are located and
why those features are located as they are, students examine the implications of how humans adapt to and modify
the environment and shape the landscape.
Economics
Economics is a social science that studies how people make a living and how the larger society attempts to minimize
economic problems and maximize benefits. The course will focus on the American economy as well as worldwide
economic systems. Current issues, problems, trends and modern day concerns will also be studied. The course will
allow the students to master the terminology of economics so as to give them a greater literacy in society. Specific
topics are as follows: the role and impact of labor, governmental purpose and involvement in economic systems,
monetary and banking policies and concepts, business organizations and their function, international trade
relationships and the global economy.
32
Middle East Issues
The Middle East is a region that has extreme significance on global affairs and U.S. foreign policy today. This
course will provide a look at the important issues that have crucial consequences in the 21st century. Students will
be introduced to the conflict between Israel and Arabs, the emergence of Islamic fundamentalism, the turmoil in Iraq
and Afghanistan, the oil-soaked sagas of Iraq and Saudi Arabia, and the rivalry of nuclear-armed giants of India and
Pakistan. This course will provide the history behind today’s headlines from the Middle East, increasing students’
understanding and broadening their outlook.
East Asian Studies (next offered in 2018-2019)
This course offers students an introduction into East Asian culture and society. The continent of Asia’s influence on
world affairs continues to grow. From the rise of the economic titans of Japan and South Korea to the intrigue of
China and the uncertainty of crowded Indonesia and Vietnam, there are endless fascinating stories to be explored.
Americans trade with Asia more than they do with Europe; yet our understanding of the East is minimal. Students
will explore both the history and contemporary issues that have a global impact on our society today.
World Issues (next offered in 2018-2019)
The content of the course focuses on current world issues of major political, economic, and social significance.
Though the focus is on the issues and their background, day-to-day world events are also considered. By taking this
discussion-oriented course, students will be better prepared to understand the issues of today and tomorrow. A
willingness to think critically and the ability to write analytical essays are expected.
33
TECHNOLOGY
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Digital Design
633
9, 10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
Multimedia Technology
642
9, 10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
Creative Computer Art
643
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
Year
.5
Semester
1.0
2631
NDCL Publications
Prerequisites
10, 11, 12
631
3D Computer
Animation
644
10, 11, 12
Fall
Semester
.5
Computer Programming
with C++
635
10, 11, 12
Spring
Semester
.5
"B-“ in Geometry
Advanced Programming
with C++
(next offered Fall 2018)
636
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
"B-“ in Computer Programming
Digital Design
In Digital Design, students design and layout text and graphics for the creation of many types of publications such as
brand identity, movie posters, book covers and postcards. They will learn to design high-quality publications using
the Adobe InDesign CS5 software. This application software allows users maximum precision and control in the
creation of print-ready documents and communications. In addition, students will learn and apply basic tools for
photo manipulation and editing in Adobe Photoshop CS5. Combined, these two powerful Adobe products enable
users to design, produce and present real-world practical applications using cutting-edge software. Students
enrolling in Digital Design should be prepared to think creatively, uniquely and independently.
Multimedia Technology
Students learn techniques to enhance their ability to present information in a variety of formats and to a variety of
people. They will learn how to plan, create, and deliver successful presentations.
Some of the software includes:
Prezi—a cloud-based presentation software with a clean zoom-able interactive canvas.
Canva— used to create infographics, which are virtual interactive posters that display a chosen subject in a visual
presentation form.
Microsoft PowerPoint—advanced skills are developed to create a successful, clean and creative presentation.
Stupeflix—a web-based program that produces videos from photos, video clips, and music.
Various Video Editing Software—used to create videos incorporating photos or footage from mobile devices.
Students will learn good design principles highlighting the importance of how to use them in presentations. Students
will also design and create a website used to showcase their projects resulting in an online portfolio.
NDCL Publications
In this course, students will be responsible for the layout and copy of the major student publications at NDCL: The
Mane Page news magazine and Chrysalis yearbook. Students will work on the staff of both publications in a
leadership capacity. The class will study and apply basic and advanced design principles to layout (using the Adobe
Suite) as well as learn and apply basic journalistic principles, focusing mostly on feature writing. Additionally,
students will engage in many publication processes including: writing and editing copy, making layout and design
decisions, preparing and placing artwork, capturing and selecting photos as well as coordinating and organizing
copy and photos generated from the student publications club at NDCL. This course is recommended for highly
motivated students and would be a valuable experience for those whose career interests include communications,
journalism, design (web or traditional) or publishing. Skills emphasized in this course include technology and
composition.
34
Computer Programming with C++ (This course will be offered every other year. It will be offered in Spring
2018 and then again in Spring 2020)
C++ is the most widely used programming language to develop applications for various platforms. The concepts
learned in this course can translate easily to other programming languages. We explore basic programming
structures, inputting from keyboard and files, outputting to the screen and files, basic logical constructs like If-ThanElse, While Loops, library functions, user defined functions, and the different variable types and when to use them.
Advanced Programming with C++ (This course will be offered every other year only. It will be offered in Fall
2018 and then again in Fall 2020)
We continue exploring the C++ language while building on the basic programming learned in the first
class. Additional concepts explored include: Do While Loops, For Loops, Arrays, and Structs (records). Projects
are larger and explore functional decomposition and proper development. The course includes some practical
application creation during the course and for the final.
3D Computer Animation
This course is designed to introduce students to basic methods and practices in animation including creating scenes
and animating objects. We will explore concepts of modeling, designing and applying textures for objects and
adding motion to create animations. While creating scenes, we will learn about adding objects, camera motion,
lighting, scene effects and much more.
Concepts learned in this course can be used in many fields from architecture to science, and engineering to movie
making. Students who plan on majoring in any type of engineering are strongly encouraged to take this course.
Animations will be mixed with Live Video, filmed in front of the green screen to create movie effects through
Adobe Premier.
Creative Computer Art - This class can be taken for either a Fine Arts or Technology credit.
This course will explore the basics of graphic design through the use of Adobe Illustrator. With the Elements of Art
as a foundation, students will create original graphic design projects and study the graphic design profession.
35
THEOLOGY
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Prerequisites
Theology 9
2009
9
Year
1
None
Theology 10
2010
10
Year
1
None
Theology 11
2011
11
Year
1
None
Theology 12
5013
12
Year
1
None
All grade levels have a service requirement each year. The Theology teacher explains the details.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Theology 9
The Freshman Theology curriculum begins by showing students how they can come to know God through both
Natural and Divine Revelation. Students are then provided with general knowledge about the Bible, including how it
developed; its major sections, different ways to interpret it, and its value to all people. Special focus is given to the
Gospels, where students are introduced to the mystery of the Trinity and the person of Jesus Christ, God’s ultimate
Revelation to humanity. Through this, students gain a better appreciation for Sacred Scriptures, as well as grow in
their knowledge and love for Jesus Christ.
Theology 10
The Sophomore Theology curriculum has a simple yet challenging goal: to bring students to a deeper knowledge
and love of Jesus Christ. It includes a study of the Pascal Mystery, morality and the sacramental nature of the
Church. This yearlong course provides an opportunity for students to encounter our risen Savior and grow as
disciples of Christ.
Theology 11
The Junior Theology curriculum promotes a deeper relationship with God, a sense of belonging to the Church and
personal commitment to social justice. The purpose of the first semester course is to help students understand that in
and through the Church they encounter the living Jesus Christ. They will be introduced to the fact that the Church
was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by him through the Holy Spirit. In the second semester
course, Catholic Social Teaching, students will learn how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and needy,
is present today in the Church’s social teaching and mission.
Theology 12
The Senior Theology curriculum is about living Christian values fully; reflecting on personal relationship with God
and ultimately how we are created in His image. We examine the proofs for God’s existence. We look at how being
a child of God provides meaning and purpose and also calls us to a way of living that incorporates discipleship,
morality and handling the challenges of suffering. We will conclude this course with extensive discussions in
ecumenical and interreligious issues.
36
VISUAL ARTS
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Prerequisites
Introductory Level Courses
*Introduction to
Drawing and Painting
710
9, 10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
None
*Introduction to Design
711
9, 10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
None
*Introduction to Ceramics
713
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
None
*Introduction to Photography
712
9, 10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
Digital camera required
(no cell phone camera)
Intermediate Level Courses
Drawing and Painting I
720
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
Intro to Drawing and Painting
Design I
721
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
Intro to Design
Ceramics I
723
11, 12
Semester
.5
Intro to Ceramics
Creative Computer Art
725
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
None
1
Intro to Photo
Manual 35mm SLR and
digital camera
(no cell phone camera)
Traditional/Digital Photography
Level I
2722
10, 11, 12
Year
Advanced Level Courses
Drawing and Painting II
730
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
Drawing and Painting I
Design II
731
10, 11, 12
Semester
.5
Design I
11, 12
Semester
.5
Ceramics I
Ceramics II
733
Ceramics III
743
12
Semester
.5
Wheel Throwing
734
12
Semester
.5
Traditional/Digital Photography
Level II
AP Studio Art
2732
11, 12
Year
1
2735
11, 12
(Level I and
Level II)
Year
1 (W)
2736
37
Ceramics II
Ceramics I
Traditional/Digital Photography
Level I
Manual 35mm SLR camera and
a digital camera
(no cell phone camera)
1) Any Introductory level art course
and an Intermediate level art
course.
2) Application to Art Department
and Portfolio
*Introductory Courses
These courses are offered non-sequentially without prerequisites to introduce the elements of art: line, shape,
value, form, color space, and texture, and the principles of design: balance unity, emphasis, rhythm and
movement The student interested in pursuing a Fine Arts Major should begin with the Introductory courses in
their freshman and sophomore years.
Introduction to Drawing and Painting
This course is open to any student who would like to learn or improve on their drawing and painting skills.
Emphasis will be placed on visual awareness using basic materials of drawing and painting. Media used include:
pencil, charcoal, ink and acrylic. Techniques learned include: contour and gesture drawing, value study, and color
mixing. This is a foundation course for learning and applying the elements of art.
Introduction to Design
This course focuses on using the elements of art to create successful compositions in a variety of media and
techniques. Students will develop creative and critical thinking skills as they design their projects in 2-and 3dimensions. Media used in this course include: pencil, pen and ink, printmaking, collage and plaster carving.
Drawing and Painting I
This course explores a broad range of materials including but not limited to: watercolor, acrylics, charcoal, pencil,
pastels and colored pencil. While reviewing the elements of art and implementing the principles of design, emphasis
will be placed on the importance of composition and visual communication.
Drawing and Painting II
This course builds on the skills and knowledge acquired in previous Drawing and Painting courses. Emphasis will
be placed on further development of observational work. Instruction will be geared to individual concerns. Personal
expression and creativity will be encouraged in a variety of media.
Design I
This course reviews the elements of art and implements the principles of design. Emphasis will be placed on using
composition as a means of visual communication. Students will expand creative and critical thinking skills as they
design their projects in 2- and 3-dimensions.
Design II
This course utilizes the skills and knowledge acquired in Introduction to Design and Design I. The student will draw
on his/her creativity, ability, and intellect to work through the design process. Instruction will be geared to
individual concerns. Personal expression and creativity will be encouraged.
Introduction to Ceramics
This course is open to all students who want to learn about ceramics. Students will learn how to create projects out
of clay using hand building techniques, as well as learn how to glaze, or apply color, to their projects. Students will
learn how to use the art elements, such as color and texture in combination with design principles to develop their
skill in constructing 3-dimensional Art.
Ceramics I
Ceramics I continues the exploration of pottery making through continued development of hand building techniques
and design principles. Ceramics I deepens the knowledge of glaze types, techniques and applications. Students are
introduced to wheel throwing methods.
Ceramics II
Continued development of pottery making skills and independent thinking is stressed in the Ceramics II class.
Emphasis will be placed on using hand building methods and glazing as a means of visual communication. Wheel
throwing methods will be revisited and cultivated.
Ceramics III
The focus of Ceramics III will be on hand building and wheel throwing while emphasizing a full understanding of
the pottery making process. Strong idea generation, high quality construction, glaze and color concepts and
aesthetic value will be developed through instruction geared specifically to individual artistic concerns.
38
Wheel Throwing
This course is designed to refine, develop and cultivate a student’s wheel throwing skills that were initiated in
Ceramics I. Emphasis will be placed on development of craftsmanship, form, design and glazing techniques.
Introduction to Photography (Digital camera required)
This course is an introduction to artistic photography. Students will learn the art of composition. The basics of
digital photography, including color photography, will include an introduction to Adobe Photoshop and how to
handle digital image files. Critique of your own work and that of others is introduced. Traditional chemical black
and white photography is learned at the end of the semester to transition students into the next level of photography
courses.
Traditional and Digital Photography Level I (Manual 35mm SLR camera and digital camera required)
This course furthers the student’s skill in composing interesting photographs and working in Photoshop. Students
will be introduced to the Manual 35mm film SLR camera (required). Students will learn to use the SLR to compose
photographs, process film and make black and white prints in the darkroom. Students will begin to explore the role
of photographic imagery in reflecting and defining our culture. Self-analysis and group critique are integral parts of
the evaluation of student work.
Traditional and Digital Photography Level II (Manual 35mm SLR camera and digital camera required)
This course aims to bring the student’s eye for photography into focus, using techniques learned in Introduction to
Traditional/Digital Photography and Traditional/Digital Photography I. Students will concentrate on developing a
voice as a black and white and color photographer. The ability to discern the best use of traditional photography and
digital photography will lead the student to develop a body of work that demonstrates a knowledge of both the
technical and artistic aspects of the medium.
Creative Computer Art - This class can be taken for either a Fine Arts or Technology credit.
This course will explore the basics of graphic design through the use of Adobe Illustrator. With the Elements of Art
as a foundation, students will create original graphic design projects and study the graphic design profession.
Advanced Placement Studio Art
This course is designed for the highly motivated art student who wishes to present a portfolio for Advanced
Placement credit consideration and for college portfolio submission. This course enables students to perform at the
college level while still in high school. Because the AP Studio Portfolio is a performance-based exam rather than a
written exam, students must be prepared to invest considerable time, effort, thought and creative energy into
developing a portfolio. The student will develop a portfolio in one of the following categories: 2D Design, Drawing
or 3D Design. The portfolio must meet the specific requirements necessary for evaluation by the College Board AP
examiners in the formal, technical and expressive aspects of their work. The completion of this course will provide
students with the opportunity to receive college credit or to place out of certain college courses. For further
information, visit: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/sub_studioart.html.
Application form and artwork due one week before course selection sheet is due.
All seniors will be required to take one of the College Board AP Studio Art exams: 2-D Design OR 3-D Design OR
Drawing, as well as the second semester exam during the regularly scheduled exam period.
39
WORLD LANGUAGES
Course
Code
Grade(s)
Term
Credits
Prerequisites
French I
2510
9, 10, 11, 12
Year
1
None
French II
2520
9, 10, 11, 12
Year
1
French III
2530
10, 11, 12
Year
1
French IV
2540
11, 12
Year
1
Spanish I
2511
9, 10, 11, 12
Year
1
Spanish II
2521
9, 10, 11, 12
Year
1
Spanish III
2531
10, 11, 12
Year
1
College
Spanish II
590
11,12
Semester
1 (W)
Successful completion of French I,
(sem. 1 and sem. 2)
See NOTE below.
Completion of French II with a Cor above (sem. 1 and sem. 2).
Completion of French III with a C+
or above (sem. 1 and sem. 2).
None
Successful completion of Spanish I,
(sem. 1 and sem. 2)
See NOTE below.
Completion of Spanish II with a Cor above (sem. 1 and sem. 2).
Spanish III and
NDC Placement test required
NOTE: Students who do not have the required grade (C- or above) in either semester in the first year of
a language may be required to complete remedial work (10 hours) with a certified tutor in the target
language during the summer. The work must be completed before the beginning of the new school year.
French I
Students in French I develop the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing with an emphasis
on oral communication in French. Foundations of grammar and vocabulary are laid along with the initiation of
foreign language study skills. Proper pronunciation and intonation are learned through imitation of the teacher,
exposure to voices of native speakers, and immersion in the target language during class. Students are introduced to
cultural products and practices of France and Francophone countries.
French II
Students in French II continue to master listening and speaking in the target language and further develop their
reading comprehension and writing skills. Students are exposed to complex grammatical structures and their
vocabulary base is broadened so they can more effectively communicate their ideas both orally and in writing. This
course continues the study of France and Francophone culture in greater depth.
French III
French III concentrates on enriching vocabulary, finalizing the basics of grammar, and refining the listening,
speaking, reading and writing skills the students have acquired. To achieve these objectives, students are required to
do interpretive reading, oral reports, short dramatizations and written reports. The reading of French literature
introduces students to the literary heritage of France and Francophone countries. This course will be conducted
primarily in the target language.
French IV
This course aims at deepening the cultural knowledge of France and Francophone countries through their history,
geography, art and literature. Grammatical skills are reviewed and new, more advanced grammar is introduced.
Speaking and writing skills are furthered through oral presentations. French and Francophone literature is explored
with various selections from short stories, poetry and novels. The course will be conducted primarily in the target
language.
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Spanish I
Students in Spanish I develop the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing with an emphasis
on oral communication in Spanish. Foundations of grammar and vocabulary are laid along with the initiation of
foreign language study skills. Proper pronunciation and intonation are learned through imitation of the teacher,
exposure to voices of native speakers and immersion in the target language during class. Students are introduced to
cultural products and practices of Spain and Latin America.
Spanish II
Students in Spanish II continue to master listening and speaking in the target language and further develop their
reading comprehension and writing skills. Students are exposed to complex grammatical structures and their
vocabulary base is broadened so that they can more effectively communicate their ideas both orally and in writing.
This course continues the study of Spanish and Latin American culture in greater depth.
Spanish III
Spanish III concentrates on enriching vocabulary, finalizing the basics of grammar, and refining the listening,
speaking, reading and writing skills the students have acquired. To achieve these objectives, students are required to
do interpretive reading, oral reports, short dramatizations and written reports. The reading of Spanish literature
introduces students to the literary heritage of Spain and Latin America. This course will be conducted primarily in
the target language.
College Spanish II (a dual high school/college-credit course open to juniors and seniors)
A continuation of the study of the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures through interactive and communicative
reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities to develop language and cultural proficiency. This class is
intended for students looking to advance their understanding and practice of the Spanish language to the college
level. Students interested in this course must take the Notre Dame College placement test.
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Enhanced Learning Block
Students may choose to take an enhanced learning block in place of an elective course. The decision to
take an ELB should be considered carefully between the student, parent, and school counselor. Students
will have the opportunity to tap into academic coaches, wellness programs, campus ministry
opportunities, group counseling experiences, and independent work time during the enhanced learning
block.
Course Number Grade Level
Semester
960
5960
Freshman
Freshman
Semester 1
Semester 2
961
5961
Sophomore
Sophomore
Semester 1
Semester 2
962
5962
Junior
Junior
Semester 1
Semester 2
963
5963
Senior
Senior
Semester 1
Semester 2
Intervention – by placement only
5920
Intervention
Students with an IEP are scheduled with the Intervention Specialist during one block of the
school day. This block is individually structured to aid the student in meeting goals as described
in his/her IEP and is facilitated by a licensed Intervention Specialist.
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