HP E3491B Pentium Processor Probe Installation and

HP E3491B Pentium Processor Probe Installation and
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Installation and Service
Guide
Publication number E3491-97002
July 1997
For Safety information, Warranties, and Regulatory information, see the
pages behind the index.
© Copyright Hewlett-Packard Company 1994-1997
All Rights Reserved
HP E3491B
Pentium Processor Probe
HP E3491B Pentium Processor Probe—At a Glance
The HP E3491B Pentium processor
probe provides a low-cost way to debug
embedded software for Intel Pentium
microprocessors. It can also be used
with the HP E2457A Preprocessor
Interface for microprocessor code
disassembly.
The target connection
The HP E3491B Pentium processor
probe connects to your target
microprocessor via a special connector
on the target system, or through the HP
E2457A Preprocessor Interface.
The HP 16505A connection
The HP E3491B Pentium processor
probe connects to the HP 16505A
Prototype Analyzer via an Ethernet LAN
for remote operation, or directly for
point-to-point operation. The logic
analyzer connects to the
HP 16505A through a SCSI connector.
The configuration switches
Use the switches to configure
communication to the HP 16505A. There
is a guide to these switches on the
bottom of the HP E3491B Pentium Probe.
ii
The status LEDs
LEDs show the status of the power
supply, the target system, and the
connection to the HP 16505A.
Compatibility with other products
The HP E3491B Pentium processor
probe and
HP 16505A Prototype Analyzer can also
be used with the HP E2457A
Preprocessor Interface.
iii
iv
Contents
1 Overview
1
Equipment Used with the Processor Probe 2
Equipment Supplied 3
Minimum Equipment Required 4
System Configurations
5
HP Prototype Analyzer 5
HP Logic Analyzer 6
No Logic Analyzer 7
Power-On/Power-Off Sequence 8
To power on the system 8
To power off the system 8
To connect the processor probe to a power source
9
Connection Sequence 10
2 Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
Setting Up a LAN Connection to a PC or Workstation
11
13
To obtain an IP address 14
To configure LAN parameters using the built-in terminal interface
To configure LAN parameters using BOOTP 18
To set the 10BASE-T configuration switches 20
To verify LAN communications 21
15
Setting Up a Serial Connection 22
To set the serial configuration switches
To connect a serial cable 23
To verify serial communications 25
Setting up Debugger Software
23
26
v
Contents
3 Connecting the Processor Probe to an HP 16505A Prototype
Analyzer
27
Connecting the Probe to the Prototype Analyzer 29
Connecting for a point-to-point configuration 30
Connecting to a LAN 31
To set the 10BASE-T configuration switches 32
Setting Up LAN Communication
33
To set the LAN address of the processor probe using the Run Control tool 33
To verify LAN communications 34
4 Connecting to the Target System
35
To test the HP E3491B Pentium processor probe 36
To connect to a target system via the Intel defined debug port 37
To connect to a target system via the HP E2457A Pentium Preprocessor 39
5 Configuring the Processor Probe
41
To configure using the Run Control tool 43
To configure using the built-in commands 44
To configure using a debugger 44
To configure restriction to real-time runs 45
To configure the Trigger Out BNC 46
To configure the Trigger In BNC 46
To configure branch trace messaging 47
To configure breaks on processor read/write to debug registers
To configure INIT behavior 48
To configure RESET behavior 49
6 Designing a Target System
47
51
Designing a target system for use with the HP E2457A Preprocessor Interface 52
Designing a target system for use with the Intel-defined debug port 53
Planning INIT and RESET operation 53
vi
Contents
APIC interrupts 53
7 Specifications and Characteristics
55
Processor Compatibility 56
Electrical Specifications 56
Environmental Specifications 59
Pinout for 30-pin Debug Port 60
8 Updating Firmware
61
To update firmware using the HP prototype analyzer 63
To update firmware using prgflash.xxx 64
To run prgflash.xxx on Unix workstations 65
To run prgflash.exe on Windows 95 or Windows NT 65
To display current firmware version information 66
If the firmware doesn’t appear to be updated 67
If there is a power failure during a firmware update 67
9 Solving Problems
69
Troubleshooting Guide 71
Status Lights 72
Built-in Commands 74
Problems with the LAN Interface 76
If you cannot verify LAN communication 76
If you have LAN connection problems 77
If the "POL" LED is lit 78
If it takes a long time to connect to the network 78
Problems with the Serial Interface 79
If you cannot verify RS-232 communication 79
If you have RS-232 connection problems with the MS Windows Terminal program 79
vii
Contents
Problems with the Processor Probe Itself 81
To run the power up self test 81
To execute the built-in performance verification test 83
If a performance verification test fails 86
Returning the Parts to Hewlett-Packard for Service 89
To return a part to Hewlett-Packard 89
To obtain replacement parts 90
To clean the processor probe 90
viii
1
Overview
1
Chapter 1: Overview
Equipment Used with the Processor Probe
Equipment Used with the Processor Probe
2
Chapter 1: Overview
Equipment Used with the Processor Probe
Equipment Supplied
•
•
•
•
A processor probe.
A 12V power supply for the processor probe.
A power cord.
A target interface module (TIM) circuit board (HP part number
E3491-66504).
• A processor probe loopback test board (HP part number
E3496-66502).
• Firmware for the processor probe and/or updated software for the
Run Control tool on a 3.5-inch disk, if required.
• A 50-pin ribbon cable (connects the processor probe to the target
interface module).
• A 20-conductor and a 30-conductor ribbon cable (connects the
target interface module to your target system).
• This User’s Guide.
3
Chapter 1: Overview
Equipment Used with the Processor Probe
Minimum Equipment Required
For run control of a Pentium target system, you need all of the
following items in addition to the items listed on the previous page:
• A target system with the appropriate connector. The target system
must meet the criteria on page 51.
• A LAN cable.
• A serial cable (for troubleshooting).
• An HP 16505A prototype analyzer or a PC or a workstation.
4
Chapter 1: Overview
System Configurations
System Configurations
HP Prototype Analyzer
You can use an HP 16505A prototype analyzer connected to an HP 16500B
or HP 16500C logic analysis system to analyze bus activity (via a
preprocessor) and to control processor execution (via the processor probe).
This is the easiest way to configure the processor probe. When the prototype
analyzer’s Run Control tool is not connected to the processor probe, you may
connect a debugger to the processor probe.
5
Chapter 1: Overview
System Configurations
HP Logic Analyzer
You can connect an HP logic analyzer to your target system via a
preprocessor to analyze bus activity. To control processor execution via the
processor probe, you will need to use a debugger. If your debugger doesn’t
provide a way to configure the processor probe, you will need to use the
built-in configuration commands via a telnet connection.
6
Chapter 1: Overview
System Configurations
No Logic Analyzer
With no logic analyzer or preprocessor connected, you will not be able to
analyze bus activity, but you can still use a debugger to control processor
execution (including setting breakpoints and reading/writing registers and
memory). If your debugger doesn’t provide a way to configure the processor
probe, you will need to use the built-in configuration commands via a telnet
connection.
7
Chapter 1: Overview
Power-On/Power-Off Sequence
Power-On/Power-Off Sequence
To power on the system
With all components connected, power on your system as follows:
1 Logic analyzer, if you are using one.
2 Processor probe (see page 9).
3 Your target system.
To power off the system
Power off your system as follows:
1 Your target system.
2 Processor probe.
3 Logic analyzer, if you have one.
8
Chapter 1: Overview
Power-On/Power-Off Sequence
To connect the processor probe to a power source
The processor probe does not have an On/Off switch. To power on the
processor probe:
1 Connect the power cord to the power supply and to a socket outlet.
2 Connect the 12V power cord to the back of the processor probe.
The power light on the target side of the processor probe will be illuminated.
The processor probe is shipped from the factory with a power supply and
cord appropriate for your country. If the cord you received is not appropriate
for your electrical power outlet type, contact your Hewlett-Packard sales and
service office.
Warning
Caution
Use only the supplied HP power supply and cord.
Failure to use the proper power supply could result in electric shock.
Use only the supplied HP power supply and cord.
Failure to use the proper power supply could result in equipment damage.
9
Chapter 1: Overview
Connection Sequence
Connection Sequence
Disconnect power from the target system, processor probe, and logic
analyzer before you make or break connections.
1 Connect the processor probe to the host computer (page 11) or to the
prototype analyzer (page 27).
2 Connect the processor probe to your target system (page 35).
3 Configure the processor probe (page 35).
10
2
Connecting the Processor
Probe to a PC or Workstation
11
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC
or Workstation
You can connect your PC or workstation to the processor probe via a
serial or LAN connection.
Serial connection
A serial connection allows you to complete all of the performance
verification tests. Performance over a serial connection, especially if
you are downloading code, may be unacceptably slow.
LAN connection
A LAN connection will allow you to make your measurements quickly
and easily. A few of the performance verification tests cannot be run
over a LAN.
Recommended connection
Use a LAN connection for routine use, and a serial connection for LAN
configuration and for troubleshooting.
12
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
Setting Up a LAN Connection to a PC or
Workstation
The processor probe has two LAN connectors:
• A BNC connector that can be directly connected to a
IEEE 802.3 Type 10BASE2 cable (ThinLAN). When using this
connector, the processor probe provides the functional equivalent
of a Medium Attachment Unit (MAU) for ThinLAN.
• An IEEE 802.3 Type 10BASE-T (StarLAN) connector.
Use either the 10BASE2 or the 10BASE-T connector. Do not use both.
The processor probe will not work with both connected at the same
time.
You must assign an IP address (Internet address) to the processor
probe before it can operate on the LAN. You can also set other
network parameters such as a gateway address. The IP address and
other network parameters are stored in nonvolatile memory within the
processor probe.
The processor probe automatically sets a subnet mask based on the
subnet mask used by other devices on the network.
You can configure LAN parameters in any of the following ways:
• Using the built-in terminal interface over a serial connection. This is
the most reliable method.
• Using BOOTP. BOOTP is part of the HP-UX, SunOS, and Solaris
operating systems.
13
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To obtain an IP address
To obtain an IP address
1 Obtain the following information from your local network
administrator or system administrator:
• An IP address for the processor probe.
You can also use a "LAN name" for the processor probe, but you must
configure it using the integer dot notation (such as 127.0.0.1).
• The gateway address.
The gateway address is an IP address and is entered in integer dot notation.
The default gateway address is 0.0.0.0, which allows all connections on the
local network or subnet. If connections are to be made to workstations on
other networks or subnets, this address must be set to the address of the
gateway machine.
2 Find out whether port numbers 6470 and 6471 are already in use on
your network.
The host computer interfaces communicate with the processor probe
through two TCP service ports. The default base port number is 6470. The
second port has the next higher number (default 6471).
The default numbers (6470, 6471) can be changed if they conflict with some
other product on your network.
To change the port numbers, see page 15. If you have already set the IP
address, you can use a telnet connection instead of a serial connection to
connect to the processor probe.
3 Write down the link-level address of the processor probe.
You will need this address if you use BOOTP to set the IP address.
The link-level address (LLA) is printed on a label above the LAN connectors
on the processor probe. This address is configured in each processor probe
shipped from the factory and cannot be changed.
IP Address of Processor probe
LAN Name of Processor Probe
Gateway Address
Link-Level Address of Processor Probe
14
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To configure LAN parameters using the built-in terminal interface
To configure LAN parameters using the built-in
terminal interface
1 Set configuration switches S1 through S4 to CLOSED, and set the
other switches as appropriate for your serial interface.
Switch settings are printed on the bottom of the processor probe. If you will
use a baud rate of 9600 baud, set the switches like this:
2 Connect an ASCII terminal (or terminal emulator) to the processor
probe’s RS-232 port with a 9-pin RS-232 cable.
Complete instructions for setting up a serial connection begin on page 22.
3 Plug in the processor probe’s power cord. Press the terminal’s
<RETURN> key a couple times. You should see a prompt such as
"p>", "?>", or "c>".
At this point, you are communicating with the processor probe’s built-in
terminal interface.
4 Display the current LAN configuration values by entering the lan
command:
R>lan
lan is disabled
lan -i 0.0.0.0
lan -g 0.0.0.0
lan -p 6470
Ethernet Address : 08000903212f
The "lan -i" line shows the current IP address (IP address) of the processor
probe.
The Ethernet address, also known as the link level address, is preassigned at
the factory, and is printed on a label above the LAN connectors.
5 Enter the following command:
lan -i <internet> [-g <gateway>] [-p <port>]
The lan command parameters are:
-i <internet>
The IP address which you obtained from your network administrator.
15
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To configure LAN parameters using the built-in terminal interface
-g <gateway>
-p <port>
The gateway address. Setting the gateway address allows access outside
your local network or subnet.
This changes the base TCP service port number.
The default numbers (6470, 6471) can be changed if they conflict with some
other product on your network. TCP service port numbers must be greater
than 1024. If you change the base port, the new value must also be entered in
the /etc/services file on the host computer. For example, you could modify
the line:
hp64700
6470/tcp
The IP address and any other LAN parameters you change are stored in
nonvolatile memory and will take effect the next time the processor probe is
powered off and back on again.
6 Disconnect the power cord from the processor probe, and connect
the processor probe to your network.
This connection can be made by using either the 10BASE-T connector or the
10BASE2 (BNC) connector on the processor probe. Do not use both
connectors at the same time.
7 Set the configuration switches to indicate the type of connection that
is to be made.
Switch S1 must be set to OPEN, indicating that a LAN connection is being
made.
Switch S5 should be CLOSED if you are connecting to the BNC connector:
Switch S5 should be OPEN if you are connecting to the 10BASE-T connector:
Set all other switches to CLOSED.
8 Connect the power cord to the processor probe.
16
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To configure LAN parameters using the built-in terminal interface
9 Verify your processor probe is now active and on the network. See
"To verify LAN communications" on page 21.
Once you have set a valid IP address, you can use the telnet utility to connect
to the processor probe, and use the lan command to change LAN parameters.
Example
To assign an IP address of 192.6.94.2 to the processor probe, enter the
following command:
R>lan -i 192.6.94.2
Now, cycle power on the processor probe so that the new address will take
effect.
See Also
"Solving Problems," page 69, if you have problems verifying LAN
communication.
17
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To configure LAN parameters using BOOTP
To configure LAN parameters using BOOTP
Use this method only on a workstation which is running bootpd, the BOOTP
daemon.
1 Make sure that BOOTP is enabled on your host computer.
If the following commands yield the results shown below, the BOOTP
protocol is enabled:
$ grep bootp /etc/services
bootps
67/udp
bootpc
68/udp
$ grep bootp /etc/inetd.conf
bootps dgram udp wait
root
/etc/bootpd
bootpd
If the commands did not yield the results shown, you must either add BOOTP
support to your workstation or use a different method to configure the
processor probe LAN parameters.
2 Add an entry to the host BOOTP database file, /etc/bootptab. For
example:
# Global template for options common to all HP 64700
# emulators and Processor Probes.
# Use a different gateway addresses if necessary.
hp64700.global:\
:gw=0.0.0.0:\
:vm=auto:\
:hn:\
:bs=auto:\
:ht=ether
# Specific emulator entry specifying hardware address
# (link-level address) and ip address.
hpprobe.div.hp.com:\
:tc=hp64700.global:\
:ha=080009090B0E:\
:ip=192.6.29.31
In this example, the "ha=080009090B0E" identifies the link-level address of
the processor probe. The "ip=192.6.29.31" specifies the IP address that is
assigned to the processor probe. The node name is "hpprobe.div.hp.com".
3 Connect the processor probe to your network.
This connection can be made by using either LAN connector on the
processor probe.
18
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To configure LAN parameters using BOOTP
4 Set the configuration switches to indicate the type of connection that
is to be made.
Switch S1 must be set to OPEN, indicating that a LAN connection is being
made.
Switch S6 must be set to OPEN to enable BOOTP mode.
Switch S5 should be set to CLOSED if you are connecting to the BNC
connector
Switch S5 should be set to OPEN if you are connecting to the 10BASE-T
connector.
Set all other switches to CLOSED.
5 Connect the power cord to the processor probe.
Verify that the power light stays on after 10 seconds.
The IP address will be stored in EEPROM.
6 Set switch S6 back to CLOSED.
Do this so that the processor probe does not request its IP address each time
power is cycled. The IP address is stored in EEPROM, so BOOTP does not
need to be run again. Leaving this switch on will result in slower
performance, increased LAN traffic, and even failure to power up (if the
BOOTP server becomes inactive).
7 Verify your processor probe is now active and on the network. See
"To verify LAN communications" on page 21.
See Also
For additional information about using bootpd, refer to the bootpd (1M) man
page.
19
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To set the 10BASE-T configuration switches
To set the 10BASE-T configuration switches
Set switches S7 and S8 to CLOSED unless one of the following conditions is
true:
• If the LAN cable exceeds the standard length, set switch S7 to OPEN.
The processor probe has a switch-selectable, twisted-pair receiver threshold.
With switch S7 set to OPEN, the twisted-pair receiver threshold is lowered by
4.5 dB. This should allow you to use cable lengths of up to about 200 meters.
If you use a long cable, you should consult with your LAN cabling installer to
ensure that:
• The device at the other end of the cable has long cable capability, and
• The cable is high-grade, low-crosstalk cable with crosstalk attenuation
of greater than 27.5 dB.
When switch S7 is set to CLOSED, the LAN port operates at standard
10BASE-T levels. A maximum of 100 meters of UTP cable can be used.
• If your network doesn’t support Link Beat integrity checking or if the
processor probe is connected to a non 10BASE-T network (such as
StarLAN) set this switch to LINK BEAT OFF (0 or OPEN).
In normal mode (switch S8 set to CLOSED), a link integrity pulse is
transmitted every 15 milliseconds in the absence of transmitted data. It
expects to receive a similar pulse from the remote MAU. This is the standard
link integrity test for 10BASE-T networks. If your network doesn’t support
the Link Beat integrity checking or if the Software Probe is used on a non
10BASE-T network (such as StarLAN) set this switch to LINK BEAT OFF
(OPEN).
Note
Setting switch S8 to OPEN when Link Beat integrity checking is required by
your network will cause the remote MAU to disable communications.
20
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To verify LAN communications
To verify LAN communications
1 Verify your processor probe is now active and on the network by
issuing a telnet to the IP address.
This connection will give you access to the processor probe’s built-in terminal
interface.
2 To view the LAN parameters, enter the lan command at the terminal
interface prompt.
3 To exit from this telnet session, type <CTRL>D at the prompt.
The best way to change the processor probe’s IP address, once it has already
been set, is to telnet to the processor probe and use the terminal interface
lan command to make the change. Remember, after making your changes,
you must cycle power or enter a terminal interface init -p command before
the changes take effect. Doing this will break the connection and end the
telnet session.
If You Have Problems
If you encounter problems, refer to the "Problems" chapter (page 69).
Example
$ telnet 192.35.12.6
R>lan
lan is enabled
lan -i 192.35.12.6
lan -g 0.0.0.0
lan -p 6470
Ethernet Address : 08000F090B30
21
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To verify LAN communications
Setting Up a Serial Connection
To set up a serial connection, you will need to:
• Set the serial configuration switches
• Connect a serial cable between the host computer and the
processor probe
• Verify communications
Serial connections on a workstation
If you are using a UNIX workstation as the host computer, you need to
use a serial device file. If a serial device file does not already exist on
your host, you need to create one. Once it exists, you need to ensure
that it has the appropriate permissions so that you can access it. See
the system documentation for your workstation for help with setting
up a serial device.
Serial connections on a PC
Serial connections are supported on PCs. You must use hardware
handshaking if you will use the serial connection for anything other
than setting LAN parameters.
If you are using a PC as the host computer, you do not need to set up
any special files.
22
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To set the serial configuration switches
To set the serial configuration switches
1 Set switch S1 to CLOSED (RS-232).
2 Set switches S2-S4 to CLOSED.
3 Set switch S5 to CLOSED (HW HANDSHAKE ON) if your serial
interface uses the DSR:CTS/RTS lines for flow control. Set S5 to
OPEN (HW HANDSHAKE OFF) if your serial interface uses software
flow control (XON/XOFF).
If your serial interface supports hardware handshaking, you should use it (set
switch S5 to CLOSED). Hardware handshaking will make the serial
connection much more reliable.
4 Set switches S6-S8 for the baud rate you will use. These switch
settings are listed on the bottom of the processor probe.
The higher baud rates may not work reliably with all hosts and user
interfaces. Make sure the baud rate you choose is supported by your host
and user interface.
Example
To use a baud rate of 9600 baud, set the switches as follows:
To connect a serial cable
CAUTION
Use a grounded, shielded cable. If the cable is not shielded, or if the cable is
not grounded at the serial controller, the processor probe may be damaged
by electrostatic discharge.
Connect an RS-232C modem cable from the host computer to the processor
probe. The recommended cable is HP part number C2932A. This is a 9-pin
cable with one-to-one pin connections.
23
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To connect a serial cable
If you want to build your own RS-232 cable, follow the pinout shown in the
following figure:
Serial Cable Pinout
Pin
Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
24
Signal
Signal Description
DCD
TD
RD
DTR
GND
DSR
RTS
CTS
RING
Data Carrier Detect (not used)
Transmit Data (data coming from HP processor probe)
Receive Data (data going to HP processor probe)
Data Terminal Ready (not used)
Signal Ground
Data Set Ready (Output from HP processor probe)
Request to Send (Input to HP processor probe)
Clear to Send (connected to pin 6)
Ring Indicator (not used)
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To verify serial communications
To verify serial communications
1 Start a terminal emulator program on the host computer.
If you are using a PC, the Terminal application in Microsoft Windows will
work fine.
If you are using a UNIX workstation, you can use a terminal emulator such as
cu or kermit.
2 Plug the power cord into the processor probe.
When the processor probe powers up, it sends a message (similar to the one
that follows) to the serial port and then displays a prompt:
Copyright (c) Hewlett-Packard Co. 1987
All Rights Reserved. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation without prior
written permission is prohibited, except as allowed under copyright laws.
HPE3499A Series Emulation System
Version:
A.07.06 06May97
Location: Generics
HPE3491A Pentium(tm) Processor Probe Emulator
Version:
A.02.15 16Jul97
R>
The version numbers may be different for your processor probe.
3 Press the Return or Enter key a few times.
You should see a prompt such as "p>", "C>", or "?>".
For information about the commands you can use, enter ? or help at the
prompt.
See Also
"Problems with the Serial Interface," page 79.
25
Chapter 2: Connecting the Processor Probe to a PC or Workstation
To verify serial communications
Setting up Debugger Software
Before you can use a debugger with the processor probe, you may
need to configure some communication parameters, including the
LAN address which you assigned to the processor probe.
If you have an HP 16505A prototype analyzer, use the Run Control
tool to configure the processor probe. End the Run Control tool
session before you start the debugger.
Do not use the Run Control tool at the same time as a debugger.
See Also
Refer to the documentation for your debugger for more information on
connection the debugger to the processor probe.
26
3
Connecting the Processor
Probe to an HP 16505A
Prototype Analyzer
27
Chapter 3: Connecting the Processor Probe to an HP 16505A Prototype Analyzer
Connecting to an HP 16505A Prototype
Analyzer
To use the processor probe you need to:
• Install the HP E3491A/B software (Run Control Tool) in the
HP 16505A Prototype Analyzer, if needed
• Connect the processor probe to a power source
• Connect the processor probe to the HP 16505A via a LAN or direct
connection
For a list of the parts supplied with the processor probe, see page 3.
28
Chapter 3: Connecting the Processor Probe to an HP 16505A Prototype Analyzer
Connecting the Probe to the Prototype Analyzer
The processor probe can be connected directly to the prototype
analyzer for a point-to-point connection, or it can be connected via a
LAN. The LAN connection allows remote operation; it also allows a
probe to be shared by more than one prototype analyzer.
The following sections describe the connections for point-to-point and
LAN configurations.
29
Chapter 3: Connecting the Processor Probe to an HP 16505A Prototype Analyzer
Connecting for a point-to-point configuration
Connecting for a point-to-point configuration
The point-to-point connection is technically a LAN connection, with only two
nodes.
• Use a point-to-point 10Base-T LAN cable (such as HP part number
5061-7342) to connect the processor probe directly to the prototype
analyzer.
• The configuration switches must be set for a LAN configuration. Switch 1
must be set to OPEN, indicating that a LAN connection is being made.
Since this is a 10BASE-T connection, switch 5 must also be set to OPEN.
• Use the procedure in "Setting Up LAN Communication" to set the Ethernet
address, IP address, and gateway address.
Point-to-point Connection
30
Chapter 3: Connecting the Processor Probe to an HP 16505A Prototype Analyzer
Connecting to a LAN
Connecting to a LAN
The processor probe has two LAN connectors:
• A BNC connector that can be directly connected to an IEEE 802.3
Type 10BASE2 cable (ThinLAN). When using this connector, the
processor probe provides the functional equivalent of a Medium
Attachment Unit (MAU) for ThinLAN.
• An IEEE 802.3 Type 10BASE-T (StarLAN) connector.
Caution
Use either the 10BASE2 or the 10BASE-T connector. Do not use both. The
processor probe will not work with both connected at the same time.
The configuration switches must be set for a LAN configuration. Switch 1
must be set to OPEN, indicating that a LAN connection is being made. For
10BASE-T connections, switch 5 must also be set to OPEN. Refer to "To set
the 10BASE-T configuration switches" for additional information on
configuring 10BASE-T switches.
Use the procedure in "Setting Up LAN Communication" to set the
Ethernet address, IP address, and gateway address.
LAN Connection
31
Chapter 3: Connecting the Processor Probe to an HP 16505A Prototype Analyzer
To set the 10BASE-T configuration switches
To set the 10BASE-T configuration switches
Set switches S7 and S8 to CLOSED unless one of the following conditions is
true:
• If the LAN cable exceeds the standard length, set switch S7 to OPEN.
The processor probe has a switch-selectable, twisted-pair receiver threshold.
With switch S7 set to OPEN, the twisted-pair receiver threshold is lowered by
4.5 dB. This should allow you to use cable lengths of up to about 200 meters.
If you use a long cable, you should consult with your LAN cabling installer to
ensure that:
• The device at the other end of the cable has long cable capability, and
• The cable is high-grade, low-crosstalk cable with crosstalk attenuation
of greater than 27.5 dB.
When switch S7 is set to CLOSED, the LAN port operates at standard
10BASE-T levels. A maximum of 100 meters of UTP cable can be used.
• If your network doesn’t support Link Beat integrity checking or if the
processor probe is connected to a non 10BASE-T network (such as
StarLAN) set this switch to LINK BEAT OFF (0 or OPEN).
In normal mode (switch S8 set to CLOSED), a link integrity pulse is
transmitted every 15 milliseconds in the absence of transmitted data. It
expects to receive a similar pulse from the remote MAU. This is the standard
link integrity test for 10BASE-T networks. If your network doesn’t support
the Link Beat integrity checking or if the processor probe is used on a non
10BASE-T network (such as StarLAN) set this switch to LINK BEAT OFF
(OPEN).
Note
Setting switch S8 to OPEN when Link Beat integrity checking is required by
your network will cause the remote MAU to disable communications.
Switch Positions for LAN (left) and 10BASE-T LAN (right) Configurations, S6 Open for Initialization
32
Chapter 3: Connecting the Processor Probe to an HP 16505A Prototype Analyzer
To set the LAN address of the processor probe using the Run Control tool
Setting Up LAN Communication
To use the processor probe on a LAN, you must assign an IP address
(Internet address) an Ethernet address, and a gateway address. The
IP address and other network parameters are stored in nonvolatile
memory within the processor probe. These addresses must be
initialized for either point-to-point or LAN connections.
The processor probe automatically sets the subnet mask based on the
subnet mask used by other devices on the network.
To set the LAN address of the processor probe using
the Run Control tool
1 Set the configuration switch S6 on the processor probe to OPEN.
Cycle power to reconfigure the probe. Switch 6 causes the probe to
continuously broadcast a search message over the network.
2 Drag the "uP Run Control" tool from the toolbox onto the HP 16505A
prototype analyzer workspace.
3 Move the mouse cursor over the icon, press the right mouse button,
and select "Init Probe LAN Addresses...".
4 Enter the Ethernet address, IP address, and the gateway address in
the appropriate fields, then select Set Addresses.
Use the processor probe Ethernet address. This address is on a sticker
labeled "LLA" (for "link-level address") on the processor probe.
For point-to-point connections, use an IP address that is one greater
than or one less than the HP 16505A IP address (for example, the
prototype analyzer default address is 192.0.2.231, so use 192.0.2.230
or 192.0.2.232).
33
Chapter 3: Connecting the Processor Probe to an HP 16505A Prototype Analyzer
To verify LAN communications
For LAN connections, obtain an IP address from your local network
administrator or system administrator.
The gateway address is an IP address and is entered in integer dot
notation. For point-to-point connections, just leave this field blank. If
connections are to be made to workstations on other networks or
subnets, this address must be set to the address of the gateway
machine. Obtain that address from your local network administrator or
system administrator.
5 Set the configuration switch S6 back to CLOSED, then power down
the probe. When the probe is powered down and then powered up, it
will be configured for the new LAN parameters.
See also
"Setting Up the Processor Probe on Your LAN" in the on-line help for the uP
Run Control tool.
To verify LAN communications
Start a user session to verify your processor probe is now active and on the
network.
1 Drag the uP Control Tool from the toolbox to the workspace.
2 Move the mouse cursor over the uP Control Tool in the workspace, press and
hold the right mouse button, move the cursor over Start Session..., and
release the mouse button.
See also
"Starting Sessions" in the on-line help for the uP Run Control tool.
If You Have Problems
If you encounter problems, refer to the "Problems" chapter (page 69).
If you are having difficulty establishing LAN connections and need to perform
the LAN performance verification tests, you will need a serial connection to a
PC or a workstation.
34
4
Connecting to the Target
System
35
Chapter 4: Connecting to the Target System
To test the HP E3491B Pentium processor probe
Connecting to a Target System
The E3491B Pentium processor probe can be connected to a target
system by the methods listed below.
• Directly through the Intel defined 20- or 30-pin debug connector.
• Through the HP E2457A Pentium Preprocessor Interface.
• Through a custom designed interface.
This chapter describes the procedures to connect to the Intel defined
debug connectors and the E2457A Pentium preprocessor. To design a
custom interface refer to "Designing a target system for use with the
Intel-defined debug interface" on page 53.
To test the HP E3491B Pentium processor probe
If this is the first time that you have used the E3491B Pentium processor
probe, you should run the built-in performance verification test before you
connect to a target system. Refer to the "Problems" chapter (page 69) for
information on performance verification.
36
Chapter 4: Connecting to the Target System
To connect to a target system via the Intel defined debug port
To connect to a target system via the Intel defined
debug port
If the target system has been designed with the Intel defined 20- or 30-pin
debug port, the HP E3491B Pentium probe should be connected to the
target system using one of the 20- or 30-conductor cable assemblies
provided.
1 Remove power from the target system and the processor probe.
2 Plug one end of the 50-pin cable into the processor probe.
3 Plug the other end of the 50-pin cable into the target interface module.
4 Plug the 30-pin connector end of the 20- or 30-conductor cable into
the target interface module.
37
Chapter 4: Connecting to the Target System
To connect to a target system via the Intel defined debug port
5 If you are using the 20-conductor assembly, plug the 20-pin connector
end of the cable assembly into the 20-pin debug port in the target
system.
6 If you are using the 30-conductor assembly, plug the 30-pin connector
end of the cable assembly into the 30-pin debug port in the target
system.
Note that pins 21 - 30 are not used by the HP E3491B; the probe does not
support the dual processor capability of the 30-pin debug port.
7 Turn on the power to the probe, then turn on the power to the target
system.
38
Chapter 4: Connecting to the Target System
To connect to a target system via the HP E2457A Pentium Preprocessor
To connect to a target system via the HP E2457A
Pentium Preprocessor
If the target system does not have either the 20- or 30-pin Intel-defined
debug port, the HP E3491 Pentium processor probe can be connected to the
target system through the HP E2457A Pentium Preprocessor Interface. The
64762-61602 cable assembly is used to connect the DBRESET signal from the
HP E3491B Pentium processor probe because DBRESET is not a Pentium
processor pin. In target systems where it is not known if there are target
system resources driving the TCK, TDI, TDO, TMS, TRST,PRDY or R/S#
signals, the target system signals can be isolated from the processor by
removing the associated pins from one of the pin protectors on the bottom
side of the E2457A Pentium Preprocessor.
To connect to the target system:
1 Remove power from the target system, logic analyzer and the probe.
2 Plug one end of the 50-pin cable into the processor probe.
3 Plug the other end of the 50-pin cable into the target interface module.
4 Plug the 30-pin connector end of the 20-conductor cable assembly
5
6
7
8
into the target interface module.
Plug the 20-pin connector end of the 20-conductor cable assembly
into the 20-pin debug connector of the HP E2457A Pentium
Preprocessor.
Connect the 2-conductor cable assembly to J3 or J6 of the E2457A
Pentium Preprocessor. J3 provides a high system reset to the target
system. J6 provides a low true system reset to the target system.
Connect the free leads from the 2-conductor cable assembly to the
target system reset circuitry.
Power up the processor probe probe, then the logic analyzer, then
the target system.
39
Chapter 4: Connecting to the Target System
To connect to a target system via the HP E2457A Pentium Preprocessor
40
5
Configuring the Processor
Probe
41
Chapter 5: Configuring the Processor Probe
Configuring the Processor Probe
The HP processor probe has a number of user configurable
parameters. These parameters may be customized for specific target
systems and saved in configuration files for future use.
The easiest way to configure the processor probe is through the Run Control
tool in the HP 16505A prototype analyzer.
If you use the Run Control tool, please refer to the online help in the
Configuration window for information on each of the configuration options.
Other ways to configure the processor probe are:
• the processor probe’s built-in terminal interface
• your debugger
42
Chapter 5: Configuring the Processor Probe
To configure using the Run Control tool
To configure using the Run Control tool
If you are using the processor probe with an HP 16505A prototype analyzer,
you can use the Run Control tool to configure the processor probe.
1 Start a Run Control tool session.
Drag the "uP Run Control" tool from the toolbox onto the HP 16505A
prototype analyzer workspace. Next, move the mouse cursor over the icon,
press the right mouse button, and select "Start Session...".
2 Open a Configuration window.
Select "Configuration..." from the
tool menu or from the Window
menu in any uP Run Control tool
window.
3 Set the configuration options, as needed.
The configuration selections will take effect when you close the configuration
window or when you move the mouse pointer outside the window.
4 Save the configuration settings.
If you like, you can save the configuration settings as part of a workspace.To
save the configuration settings, save the workspace by selecting File➝Save
Workspace As... from the prototype analyzer’s main menu.
See Also
Help ➝Help on this window in the Configuration window for information
on each of the configuration options.
Help in the Run Control tool menu for help on starting a uP Run Control
session.
43
Chapter 5: Configuring the Processor Probe
To configure using the built-in commands
To configure using the built-in commands
If you are unable to configure the processor probe with the Run Control tool
or a debugger interface, you can configure the processor probe using the
built-in "terminal interface" commands.
1 Connect a terminal or terminal emulator to the processor probe’s
serial port, or use a telnet session over the LAN.
2 Enter cf to see the current configuration settings.
3 Use the cf command to change the configuration settings.
See Also
Enter help cf for help on the configuration commands.
For information on connecting a serial terminal or terminal emulator, see
page 22.
For information on other built-in commands, see page 74.
Example
To see a description of the "restrict to real-time runs" option, type:
help cf rrt
To enable the "restrict to real-time runs" mode, type:
cf rrt=yes
To configure using a debugger
Because the HP processor probe can be used with several third-party
debuggers, specific details for sending the configuration commands to the
probe cannot be given here. However, all debuggers should provide a way of
directly entering terminal mode commands to the probe. Ideally, you would
create a file that contains the configuration entries you need modified that
can be sent to the probe at the beginning of each debugger session. See your
debugger manual for more details.
44
Chapter 5: Configuring the Processor Probe
To configure restriction to real-time runs
To configure restriction to real-time runs
Real-time runs configuration
Value
no
yes
Processor probe configured for
Allows commands which break to the monitor.
Examples include commands which display
memory or registers. These commands break to
the monitor to access the target processor, then
resume the user program. (Default)
No commands are allowed which break to the
monitor, except "break," "reset," "run," or "step."
The processor must be explicitly stopped before
these commands can be performed.
Built-in command
cf rrt=no
cf rrt=yes
If your debugger allows displaying or modifying memory or registers while
the processor is running, you must set rrt=no in order to use this feature.
45
Chapter 5: Configuring the Processor Probe
To configure the Trigger Out BNC
To configure the Trigger Out BNC
Trigger out configuration
Value
fixhigh
The Trigger Out BNC will
Always be high
cf trigout=fixhigh
fixlow
Always be low
cf trigout=fixlow
monhigh
Go high when the processor is running in
background (Default)
Go low when the processor is running in
background
cf trigout=monhigh
monlow
Built-in command
cf trigout=monlow
To configure the Trigger In BNC
Trigger in configuration
Value
off
rising
falling
Meaning
Inputs to the Break In BNC will be ignored.
The processor probe will cause a break on a
rising edge. (Default)
The processor probe will cause a break on a
falling edge.
Built-in command
cf breakin=off
cf breakin=rising
cf breakin=falling
There is a delay between receiving the edge and stopping the processor.
46
Chapter 5: Configuring the Processor Probe
To configure branch trace messaging
To configure branch trace messaging
Branch trace messaging
Value
Disabled
One
Cycle
Two
Cycles
Meaning
No Branch Trace Message special
cycles are generated. (Default)
The Branch Trace Message cycle is
the address for the instruction
causing the taken branch.
The Branch Trace Message cycles
are the address for the instruction
causing the taken branch and the
target address.
Built-in command
cf bratrcmsg=nocycle
cf bratrcmsg=onecycle
cf bratrcmsg=twocycle
To configure breaks on processor read/write to debug
registers
Debug registers
Value
no
yes
Processor probe configured for
Any program reads or writes to the debug
registers do not cause a break. The read or write
completes successfully. (Default)
Any program reads or writes to the debug
registers will cause a break. The actual read or
write will not be performed.
Built-in command
cf brkwrdbg=no
cf brkwrdbg=yes
47
Chapter 5: Configuring the Processor Probe
To configure INIT behavior
To configure INIT behavior
This configuration option specifies how the processor probe behaves when
the Pentium processor’s INIT input signal is asserted (without the processor’s
RESET input signal being asserted).
INIT
Value
Restore Debug
Registers, Break
Do Not Restore
Debug Registers, Run
Restore Debug
Registers, Run
48
Meaning
An INIT without RESET will
break into monitor. Debug
registers will be restored.
(Default)
An INIT without RESET will
not break into monitor.
Debug registers will not be
restored.
An INIT without RESET will
break into monitor. Debug
registers will be restored,
and the user program will
begin running.
Built-in command
cf initworeset=break
cf initworeset=continue
cf initworeset=start
Chapter 5: Configuring the Processor Probe
To configure RESET behavior
To configure RESET behavior
This configuration option specifies how the processor probe behaves when
the Pentium processor’s RESET input signal is asserted.
RESET
Value
Restore Debug
Registers, Break
Do Not Restore Debug
Registers, Run
Restore Debug
Registers, Run
Meaning
A RESET will break into monitor.
Debug registers will be restored.
(Default)
A RESET will not break into
monitor. Debug registers will
not be restored.
A RESET will break into monitor.
Debug registers will be restored,
and the user program will begin
running.
Built-in command
cf reset=break
cf reset=continue
cf reset=restart
These actions occur only when the RESET signal transitions from high to
low.
When a reset command is sent to the processor probe, the processor probe
asserts RESET continuously until another command causes RESET to be
deasserted.
49
Chapter 5: Configuring the Processor Probe
To configure RESET behavior
50
6
Designing a Target System
51
Chapter 6: Designing a Target System
Designing a target system for use with the HP E2457A Preprocessor Interface
Designing a Target System
This chapter will help you design a target system that will work with
the HP E3491B Pentium processor probe.
Designing a target system for use with the HP E2457A
Preprocessor Interface
The following should be considered when designing a target system for use
with the HP E3491B via the HP E2457A Pentium Preprocessor:
• The TCK, TDI, TMS, TDO, TRST#, R/S# and PRDY target system signals
should not require more than 3 ma. at 2.4V or more than 4 ma. at 0.5V.
Excessive trace lengths on these signals should be avoided.
• Target system circuitry should not actively drive TCK, TDI, TMS, TRST or
R/S#.
If necessary, all of the signals above can be disconnected from the
target system by removing the following pins from one of the pin
protectors on the bottom of the E2457A Pentium Preprocessor.
TCK (pin M34), TMS (pin P34), TDI (pin N35), TDO (pin N33),
TRST# (pin Q33), R/S# (pin AC35), PRDY (pin AC05)
• To enable the E3491B Pentium processor probe to reset the target system,
an input to the target system reset circuitry must be provided. This can be
connected to the target system by the 2-conductor cable assembly
(HP part number 64762-61602). A high true reset is available
from J3 of the HP E2457A. J3 can source 3 ma at 2.4 v and sink 4 ma at
0.5V. A low true reset is available from J6 of the HP E2457A. J3 can
source 3 ma at 2.4V and can sink 64 ma at 0.55V.
52
Chapter 6: Designing a Target System
Designing a target system for use with the Intel-defined debug port
Designing a target system for use with the
Intel-defined debug port
For information about designing an Intel defined debug port refer to
"Pentium Family User’s Manual" Volume 1 chapter 31. (Intel order
#241428-003).
In addition, the following should be considered when designing a target
system for use with the Intel defined debug port.
• The Vcc from the target system should sourced from the Pentium Vcc not
+5 volts.
• The second processor in the 30-pin debug port definition is not currently
supported by the HP E3491B.
• Only one device, the Pentium processor, is allowed in the boundary scan
path when the HP E3491B is connected.
For a pinout of the debug port, refer to the Specifications and
Characteristics (page 60).
Planning INIT and RESET operation
Note that the processor probe’s "action upon reset" behavior happens only
after RESET is deasserted.
If INIT and RESET are asserted at the same time, or at almost the same time,
the processor will only be reset. Remember to wait until the reset is
complete before asserting INIT.
See pages 48 and 49 for information on configuring what actions the
processor probe should take after a RESET or an INIT.
APIC interrupts
The processor probe does not break operation when an interrupt is issued
from the APIC. APIC interrupts should be disabled when you are using the
processor probe.
53
54
7
Specifications and
Characteristics
55
Chapter 7: Specifications and Characteristics
Processor Compatibility
Processor Compatibility
The HP E3491B Pentium processor probe supports the Pentium
microprocessors at iCOMP INDEX 735/90 and 815/100.
Electrical Specifications
BNC, labeled TRIGGER OUT
Output Drive Logic high level with 50-ohm load >= 2.0 V. Logic low
level with 50-ohm load <= 0.4 V. Output function is selectable—see the
Configuration chapter (page 41).
BNC, labeled BREAK IN
Input Edge-triggered TTL level input, 20 pf, with 2K ohms to ground in
parallel. Maximum input: 5 V above VCC; 5 V below ground. Input
function is selectable—see the Configuration chapter (page 41).
Communications
Serial Port 9-pin female type “D” subminiature connector. RS-232 DCE
to 115.2 kbaud.
10BASE-T LAN Port RJ-45 connector. IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T
(StarLAN).
10BASE 2 LAN Port 50-ohm BNC connector. IEEE 802.3 10BASE2
(ThinLAN). When using this connector, the HP E3491B processor probe
provides the functional equivalent of a Medium Attachment Unit (MAU)
for ThinLAN.
Power Supply
Input 100-240 V, 9.75 A, 50/60 Hz, IEC 320 connector.
Output 12 V, 3.3 A
Accessory Power Out 12 V, 3.0A, center negative
56
Chapter 7: Specifications and Characteristics
Electrical Specifications
Maximum Ratings
Characteristics for HP E3491B Pentium processor
probe
Notes
Symbol
Min
Max
Unit
Input voltage range (Vcct only)
1, 2
Vin
-0.3
5.5
V
Input voltage range (All others)
Vin
-0.5
5.5
V
Input Current (Vcct only)
Iil
15
µA
Input High Voltage (except Vcct)
3
Vih
Input Low Voltage (except Vcct)
3
Vil
0.8
V
Input High Current
3
Iih
-15
µA
Input Low Current
3
Iil
100
µA
Output High Voltage
4
Voh
Vcct + 0.5
V
2.0
2.4
V
Output Low Voltage
4
Vol
Output High Current
4
Ioh
3
mA
Output Low Current
4
Iol
-4
mA
0.5
V
Notes
1 Vcct = target system microprocessor voltage
2 When connected to a Pentium 735/90 or 815/100 this voltage should not exceed the Vcc of the microprocessor
3 INIT, PRDY, RESET, TDO
4 TCK, TDI, TMS, TRST#, R/S#, DBRESET
57
Chapter 7: Specifications and Characteristics
Electrical Specifications
Characteristics for HP E2457A Pentium
Preprocessor, J3 and J6
Notes
Symbol
Min
Max
Unit
Output High Voltage (J3 only)
5
Voh
2.4
Vcct + 0.5
V
Output Low Voltage (J3 only)
5
Vol
Output High Current (at Voh, J3 only)
5
Ioh
3
0.5
V
mA
Output Low Current (at Vol, J3 only)
5
Iol
-4
Output High Voltage (J6 only)
6
Voh
2.4
Output Low Voltage (J6 only)
6
Vol
Output High Current (at Voh, J6 only)
6
Ioh
3
mA
Output Low Current (at Vol, J6 only)
6
Iol
-64
mA
Notes
5 J3 = DBRESET from the HP E3491B
6 J6 = inverted DBRESET from the HP E2457A
58
mA
5.0
V
0.55
V
Chapter 7: Specifications and Characteristics
Environmental Specifications
Environmental Specifications
Temperature
Operating, 0 to +40 °C (+32 to +104 °F); nonoperating, -40 to +60 °C (-40 to
+140 °F).
Altitude
Operating/nonoperating 4600 m (15 000 ft).
Relative Humidity
15% to 95%.
59
Pinout for 30-pin Debug Port
Pin
Number
Pin Name
HP E3491 Usage
1
INIT
INIT signal from the target system
2
DBRESET
Reset output from the HP E3491B
3
RESET
RESET signal from the target system
4
GND
5
not connected
6
VCC
Vcc from the Pentium microprocessor
7
R/S# 1
R/S# signal from the target system
8
GND
9
not connected
10
GND
11
PRDY 1
PRDY signal from the target system
12
TDI
JTAG signal
13
TDO
JTAG signal
14
TMS
JTAG signal
15
GND
16
TCK
JTAG signal
17
GND
18
TRST#
JTAG signal
19
DBINST#
Grounded when the target debug port is connected
to the HP E3491B
20
BSEN#
Grounded when the target debug port is connected
to the HP E3491B
21
PRDY 2
Not supported by the HP E3491B
22
GND
23
R/S# 2
24 - 28
not connected
29
GND
30
not connected
60
Not supported by the HP E3491B
8
Updating Firmware
61
Chapter 8: Updating Firmware
Updating Firmware
Hewlett-Packard formally supports only configurations that include
the latest revisions of all software and firmware. Software updates can
be ordered to get the latest firmware revisions.
You can update the firmware in the HP processor probe by using the
prototype analyzer Run Control tool or by running the prgflash.xxx
utility program.
Four different versions of the prgflash program are available. The
program prgflash.hp7 runs on HP-UX Series 700 machines,
prgflash.sun runs on Sun SPARC machines running SunOS 4.1,
prgflash.sol runs on Sun SPARC machines running Solaris and
prgflash.exe runs on Windows® machines. The prgflash.xxx utility
will only update the firmware over lan.
The floppy disk is in MS-DOS format and can be read directly on
MS-DOS machines, HP-UX Series 700 and Solaris machines equipped
with a 3.5 inch floppy drive.
See the "readme" file on the floppy disk for any special instructions
regarding the firmware.
62
Chapter 8: Updating Firmware
To update firmware using the HP prototype analyzer
To update firmware using the HP prototype analyzer
The easiest way to update the firmware in your HP processor probe is to use
the Run Control tool.
1 End any run control sessions which may be running.
2 Install the firmware onto the prototype analyzer hard disk, if
necessary.
3 Move the mouse cursor over the Run Control tool in the workspace,
press and hold the right mouse button, move the mouse cursor over
Update Probe Firmware..., and release the right mouse button.
4 In the Update Probe Firmware dialog, enter the LAN name or address
of the processor probe, then click Update Firmware.
5 When the firmware has been updated, cycle power on the processor
probe.
See Also
The Run Control tool online help for instructions on how to copy the
firmware files to the prototype analyzer hard disk.
63
Chapter 8: Updating Firmware
To update firmware using prgflash.xxx
To update firmware using prgflash.xxx
1 Make a directory on your computer, change to that directory and
copy the files from the floppy to that directory.
On HP-UX Series 700 machines, if your machine is equipped with a floppy
drive, copy the file install.hp7 to this directory with the doscp command and
execute it as follows:
mkdir myprobe
cd myprobe
doscp <floppy device>:install.hp7 .
./install.hp7 <floppy device>
Where <floppy device> is the name of the floppy raw device file, typically
"/dev/rdsk/0s1".
On SUN Solaris machines, insert the floppy in the drive, run volcheck to
"mount" the volume and copy the files to the current directory.
volcheck
mkdir myprobe
cd myprobe
cp /floppy/floppy0/* .
eject
On SUN SunOS 4.1 machines, there are no standard utilities for reading
MS-DOS format floppies. To find out if there are any non-standard means of
reading PC format floppies on your machine, check with your system
administrator.
For MS-DOS machines, you can run prgflash.exe copy the files from the
floppy drive to a directory on your hard drive.
md c:\myprobe
a:
copy *.* c:\myprobe
For all UNIX machines that do not have floppy drives, you can copy the files
from a LAN based PC using a LAN based file transfer utility like ftp or rcp,
see your network administrator or LAN software documentation. Use binary
mode when transferring the files from MS-DOS machines.
2 Run the prgflash.xxx command.
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Chapter 8: Updating Firmware
To run prgflash.xxx on Unix workstations
To run prgflash.xxx on Unix workstations
Use the command:
prgflash.xxx [-v] [probe IP addr] [product to update]
where xxx is hp7, sun or sol as described above.
The -v option means "verbose". It causes progress status messages to be
displayed during operation.
The probe IP addr option is the ip address of the HP processor probe in
either dotted decimal form or alias form (from /etc/hosts).
The product to update option names the products whose firmware is to be
updated. Check the "readme" file on the disk for more details.
If you enter the prgflash.xxx command without all options, it becomes
interactive. You must always supply the "probe IP addr" option. If you don’t
include the "product to update" option, it displays the products which have
firmware update files on the system and asks you to choose one. It will first
look in the current directory for product files, if it does not find any there, it
will check the directory $HP64000/inst/update if the $HP64000 environment
variable is set or /usr/hp64000/inst/update if $HP64000 is not set. You can
abort the interactive prgflash.xxx command by pressing <CTRL>c.
Example
To use update the firmware in "myprobe" from a series 700 HP-UX machine,
you could enter the following command:
prgflash.hp7 -v myprobe E3491
To run prgflash.exe on Windows 95 or Windows NT
In an MS-DOS window, use the command:
prgflash [-v] [probe IP addr] [product to update]
The -v and [product to update] options are the same as described above.
The [probe IP addr] option is the ip address of the HP processor probe in
dotted decimal form or alias form (if a hosts file has been set up on the PC).
You can enter prgflash without any options and you will be prompted for the
IP address and "product to update" option. It will first look in the current
directory for product files, if it does not find any there, it will check the
directory $HP64700\update if the $HP64700 environment variable is set or
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Chapter 8: Updating Firmware
To display current firmware version information
\hp64700\update if $HP64700 is not set. You can abort the interactive
prgflash.exe command by pressing <CTRL>c.
This version of prgflash will only run under Windows 95 or Windows NT. If
you only have access to MS-DOS or Windows 3.1, contact HP.
Example
To use update the firmware, you could enter the following command:
prgflash -v 192.5.21.2 E3491
Prgflash.xxx will print "Flash programming SUCCEEDED" and return 0 if it is
successful; otherwise, it will print "Flash programming FAILED" and return a
nonzero (error).
You can verify the update by displaying the firmware version information.
To display current firmware version information
• Use telnet or a terminal emulator to access the built-in "terminal
interface" and use the ver command to view the version information
for firmware currently in the HP processor probe.
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Chapter 8: Updating Firmware
If the firmware doesn’t appear to be updated
If the firmware doesn’t appear to be updated
Though Flash EPROM is very reliable, it can fail. If the HP processor probe
determines the Flash EPROM is not working, it will try to use the boot code
in its Flash EPROMs. The only useful operation the boot code allows is
running prgflash.
Make sure the current version information is correct by comparing it
with the version numbers of the update software.
Try updating the firmware again.
If none of these steps solves the problem, contact your local HP
Representative.
If there is a power failure during a firmware update
If there is a power glitch during a firmware update, some bits may be lost
during the download process, possibly resulting in an HP processor probe
that will not boot up.
Set switch S4 to OPEN, then cycle power. This tells the HP processor
probe to ignore everything in the Flash EPROM except the boot code.
Repeat the firmware update process.
Set switch S4 to CLOSED, then cycle power. This restores the
HP processor probe to its normal mode.
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Chapter 8: Updating Firmware
If there is a power failure during a firmware update
68
9
Solving Problems
69
Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Solving Problems
If you have problems with the processor probe, your first task is to
determine the source of the problem. Problems may originate in any
of the following places:
• The connection between the processor probe and your workstation,
PC, or HP 16505A prototype analyzer
• The processor probe itself
• The connection between the processor probe and the target system
• The target system
You can use several means to determine the source of the problem:
•
•
•
•
70
The troubleshooting guide on the next page
The status lights on the processor probe
The processor probe "performance verification" tests
The processor probe’s built-in "terminal interface" commands
Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Troubleshooting Guide
Troubleshooting Guide
Common problems and what to do about them
Symptom
What to do
See also
Host computer reports LAN
connection problems
Follow the checklist in the "If you have LAN problems" section.
page 76
Commands from the Run Control
tool or debugger have no effect
1 Verify LAN communication.
page 21
2 Use a telnet connection (or serial connection) to try a few
built-in commands. If this works, your debugger may not be
configured properly. If this does not work, continue with the
next procedure....
page 74
1 Check that the processor probe has been properly
configured for your target system.
page 41
2 Run the processor probe performance verification tests.
page 83
3 If the performance verification tests pass, then there is an
electrical problem with the connection to the target processor
OR the target system may not have been designed according
to "Designing a Target System."
page 51
Processor probe built-in commands
do not work
"Slow or missing clock" message
after a logic analyzer run
Check that the target system is running user code or is in reset.
(This message can appear if the processor is in background
mode.)
Some commands fail
Check the "restrict to real-time runs" configuration
page 45
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Status Lights
Status Lights
The processor probe communicates various modes and error
conditions via the status lights. The meanings of the status lights are
shown on the previous page.
The following table gives more information about the meaning of the
power and target status lights.
❍ = LED is off
● = LED is on
✳ = Not applicable (LED is off or on)
Power/Target Status Lights
Pwr/Target
LEDs
Meaning
❍❍
❍❍
Processor probe is not connected to power supply
❍●
❍❍
No target system power, or processor probe is not connected to the
target system
❍●
❍●
Target system is in a reset state
●●
●❍
Only boot firmware is good (other firmware has been corrupted)
●●
❍❍
The target processor is executing in Debug Mode
❍●
●❍
The target processor is executing user code
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Status Lights
Processor probe status lights
The following illustration shows the status lights on both sides of the
processor probe and what they mean:
Lit when the power supply is properly
connected to the processor probe
Lit when the target processor is
running in debug mode
Lit when the target processor is running
in normal (user program) mode
Lit when the target system is in a
reset state
Lit when LAN data is being transmitted
Lit when 10BASE-T connection
has a good link; not used for
10BASE2
Lit when the polarity on the receive
twisted pair is reversed for a
10BASE-T connection
Lit when LAN data is being received
Figure 7. Status Lights
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Built-in Commands
Built-in Commands
The processor probe has some built-in "terminal interface" commands which
you can use for troubleshooting.
You can access the terminal interface via:
•
•
•
•
A serial connection (see page 22)
A telnet (LAN) connection
The Command Line window in the Run Control tool
A "debugger command" window in your debugger
Here are a few useful commands:
Useful built-in commands
b
Break—go into the background monitor state
cf
Configuration—read or write configuration options
help
Help—display online help for built-in commands
init
lan
Initialize—init -c reinitializes everything in the processor probe except for the
LAN software; init -p is the equivalent of cycling power (it will break LAN
connections)
configure LAN address
m
Memory—read or write memory
reg
Register—read or write a register
r
Run—start running user code
rep
Repeat—repeat a command or group of commands
rst
Reset—reset the target processor (the processor probe will wait for you to
press the target’s RESET button)
Step—do a low-level single step
s
ver
74
Version—display the product number and firmware version of the processor
probe
Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Built-in Commands
The prompt indicates the status of the processor probe:
Processor probe prompts
U
Running user program
M
Running in background monitor
r
Target is reset
R
Emulation reset
p
No target power
?
Unknown state
Examples
To set register GPR0, then view GPR0 to verify that it was set, enter:
reg gpr0=ffff
reg gpr0
To break execution then step a single instruction, enter:
b
s
To determine what firmware version is installed in the processor probe, enter:
ver
See Also
Use the help command for more information on these and other commands.
Note that some of commands listed in the help screens may not be available.
If you are writing your own debugger, contact HP for more information.
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the LAN Interface
Problems with the LAN Interface
If you cannot verify LAN communication
If you cannot verify connection using the procedure in "To verify LAN
communication", or if the commands are not accepted by the processor probe:
Make sure that you have connected the processor probe to the proper
power source and that the power light is lit.
Make sure that you wait for the power-on self test to complete before
connecting.
Make sure that the LAN cable is connected. Watch the LAN LED’s to see
whether the processor probe is seeing LAN activity. Refer to your LAN
documentation for testing connectivity.
Make sure that only one of the LAN ports is connected.
Make sure the processor probe communication configuration switches
are set correctly. Unplug the processor probe power cord, then plug it
in again to make sure the switch settings are read correctly by the
processor probe.
Check that the Run Control Tool or debugger was configured with the
correct LAN address. If the processor probe is on a different subnet
than the host computer, check that the gateway address is correct.
Make sure that the processor probe’s IP address is set up correctly. Use
the RS-232 port to verify this that the IP address is set up correctly.
When you are connected to the RS-232 port, run performance
verification on the processor probe’s LAN interface with the "pv"
command.
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the LAN Interface
It’s also possible for there to be a problem with the processor probe
firmware while the LAN interface is still up and running. In this case,
you must reboot the processor probe by disconnecting power to the
processor probe and reconnecting it again.
Use a serial connection to run the LAN performance verification tests
(see page 83).
If you have LAN connection problems
If the processor probe does not accept commands from the prototype
analyzer:
1. Check that switch S1 is "0" (attached to LAN, not RS-232).
2. Check that switch S5 is in the correct position for your LAN interface
(either 10BASE2 or 10BASE-T).
(Remember: if you change any switch settings, the changes do not take effect
until you cycle power.)
If the processor probe still does not respond, you need to verify the IP
address and gateway mask of the processor probe. To do this, connect
the processor probe to a terminal or terminal emulator (see page 22),
change the switch settings so it is connected to RS-232, and enter the
"lan" command. The output looks something like this:
lan -i 15.5.24.116
lan -g 15.5.23.1
lan -p 6470
Ethernet Address : 08000909BAC1
"lan -i" shows the internet address is 15.5.24.116 in this case. If the Internet
address (IP) is not what you expect, you can change it with the ’lan -i <new
IP>’ command.
"lan -g" shows the gateway address. Make sure it is the address of your
gateway if you are connecting from another subnet, or 0.0.0.0 if you are
connecting from the local subnet.
"lan -p" shows the port is 6470. If the port is not 6470, you must change it
with the "lan -p 6470" command (unless you have deliberately set the port
number to a different value because of a conflict).
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the LAN Interface
If the "POL" LED is lit
The "POL" LED indicates that the polarity is reversed on the receive pair if
you are using a 10BASE-T connection. The processor probe should still work
properly in this situation, but other LAN devices may not work.
If it takes a long time to connect to the network
Check the subnet masks on the other LAN devices connected to your
network. All of the devices should be configured to use the same subnet
mask.
Subnet mask error messages do not indicate a major problem. You can
continue using the processor probe.
The processor probe automatically sets its subnet mask based on the first
subnet mask it detects on the network. If it then detects other subnet masks,
it will generate error messages.
If there are many subnet masks in use on the local subnet, the processor
probe may take a very long time to connect to the network after it is turned
on.
To "clean up" the network, connect a terminal to the processor probe. You
can then see error messages which will help you identify which devices on
the network are using the wrong subnet masks.
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the Serial Interface
Problems with the Serial Interface
If you cannot verify RS-232 communication
If the processor probe prompt does not appear in the terminal emulator
window:
Make sure that you have connected the processor probe to the proper
power source and that the power light is lit.
Make sure that you have properly configured the data communications
switches on the processor probe and the data communications
parameters on the host computer. You should also verify that you are
using the correct cable.
The most common type of data communications configuration problem
involves the configuration of the processor probe as a DTE device instead of
as a DCE device. If you are using the wrong type of cable, no prompt will be
displayed.
A cable with one-to-one connections will work with a PC or an HP Series 700
workstation.
If you have RS-232 connection problems with the MS
Windows Terminal program
Remember that Windows 3.1 only allows two active RS-232 connections
at a time. To be warned when you violate this restriction, choose
Always Warn in the Device Contention group box under 386 Enhanced
in the Control Panel.
Use the "Terminal" program (usually found in the Accessories windows
program group) and set up the "Communications..." settings as follows:
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the Serial Interface
Baud Rate: 9600 (or whatever you have chosen for the
emulator)
Data Bits: 8
Parity: None
Flow Control: hardware
Stop Bits: 1
When you are connected, hit the Enter key. You should get a prompt back.
If nothing echos back, check the switch settings on the processor probe.
If the switches are in the correct position and you still do not get a
prompt when you hit return, try turning OFF the power to the processor
probe and turning it ON again.
If you still don’t get a prompt, make sure the RS-232 cable is connected
to the correct port on your PC, and that the cable is appropriate for
connecting the PC to a DCE device.
With certain RS-232 cards, connecting to an RS-232 port where the processor
probe is turned OFF (or is not connected) will hang the PC. The only way to
get control back is to reboot the PC. Therefore, we recommend that you
always turn ON the processor probe before attempting to connect via RS-232.
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the Processor Probe Itself
Problems with the Processor Probe Itself
To run the power up self test
1 Unplug the processor probe, then plug it in.
2 Watch the status lights. They should show the following pattern:
❍ = LED is off
● = LED is on
✳ = Not applicable (LED is off or on)
Normal sequence during power up self test
Pwr/Target
LEDs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
❍●
❍❍
❍●
❍❍
❍●
●❍
●●
❍❍
❍●
●❍
●●
❍❍
❍●
●❍
●●
❍❍
❍●
●❍
Meaning
Initial power up, system reset
XILINX array initialized successfully
XILINX array tested successfully
BOOT ROM space tested successfully
GENERIC ROM space tested successfully
DRIVER ROM space tested successfully
RESERVED ROM space tested successfully
RAM tested successfully
LAN internal feedback tested successfully
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the Processor Probe Itself
Pwr/Target
LEDs
10
11
❍●
❍❍
●●
●❍
Meaning
Boundary scan master (BSM) test begun
BSM test completed, start system, load drivers, initialize LAN
If the power up self test fails, the RESET LED will flash the number of the
test, then stay lit.
If any of the LEDs fail to change, or all of them remain on, there is a system
failure.
Following power up, the LEDs will enter one of the following states:
❍●
❍❍
No target system power, or the processor probe is not connected to the
target system, or
●●
❍❍
Target system is executing in Debug Mode
❍●
❍●
Target system is in a reset state
❍●
●❍
Target system is running user code
●●
●●
Target system is in an unknown state
●●
●❍
Only the boot ROM was used; other firmware in the Flash EPROM has
been corrupted
Starting a user interface will change the pattern to the one requested
by the interface.
If the power up self tests fail, try the following:
Check and reset the LAN address. LAN powerup failures will occur if the
processor probe does not have a valid Link Level Address and IP
Address.
Disconnect all external connections, including the LAN, serial (RS-232),
and BNC Break and Trigger cables, then cycle power.
To ensure that the firmware is working as it should, reprogram the
firmware, then cycle power.
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the Processor Probe Itself
To execute the built-in performance verification test
In addition to the powerup tests, there are several additional performance
verification (PV) tests available.
Some of these tests can be performed through the prototype analyzer. The
LAN tests can only be executed through the RS-232 port.
To fully test the processor probe, you will need to run the PV test with
several hardware configurations:
• For the BREAK IN, TRIGGER OUT BNC FEEDBACK TEST, connect a
coaxial cable between BREAK IN and TRIGGER OUT.
• For the TARGET PROBE FEEDBACK TEST, connect the processor probe
loopback test board (HP part number E3496-66502).
To perform PV tests through the HP 16505A prototype
analyzer
1 End any Run Control tool sessions.
2 Disconnect the 50-pin cable from the processor probe, and plug the
3
4
5
6
processor probe loopback test board (HP part number E3496-66502)
into the processor probe.
From the Run Control tool menu, open the Performance Verification
window.
Enter the LAN address of the processor probe.
Select the number of iterations to perform.
Click Start PV.
The results will appear on screen.
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the Processor Probe Itself
To perform complete PV tests
The LAN tests can only be executed through the RS-232 port. The
remainder of this section assumes that the tests are being run from a terminal
emulator connected to the RS-232 port.
1 Disconnect the 50-pin cable from the processor probe, and plug the
processor probe loopback test board (HP part number E3496-66502)
directly into the processor probe. Do not plug anything into the
other end of the processor probe loopback test board.
On a good system, when the feedback connector is plugged into the target
connector, the RESET LED will light and the BKG and USER LEDs will be
out.
2 Connect a coaxial cable between BREAK IN and TRIGGER OUT.
3 Set all of the switches to CLOSED.
This is standard RS-232 at 9600 baud which can be connected directly to a 9
pin RS-232 interface that conforms to the IBM PC-AT 9 pin standard.
4 Use a terminal emulator to connect to the processor probe.
5 Enter the pv 1 command.
Note that all of the tests cannot be executed at once. Tests 4, 5, and 6 require
the loopback test board, which cannot be connected at the same time as the
50-pin cable.
See Also
Options available for the "pv" command are explained in the help screen
displayed by typing "help pv" or "? pv" at the prompt.
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the Processor Probe Itself
Examples:
Here are some examples of ways to use the pv command.
To execute both tests one time:
pv 1
To execute test 2 with maximum debug output repeatedly until a ^C is
entered:
pv -t2 -v9 0
To execute tests 3, 4, and 5 only for 2 cycles:
pv -t3-5 2
The results on a good system, with the BNC’s connected, and with the
loopback test board connected, are as follows:
c>pv 1
Testing: HPE3499A Series Emulation System
Test # 1: Powerup PV Results
passed!
Test # 2: LAN 10Base2 Feedback Test
passed!
Test # 3: LAN 10BaseT Feedback Test
passed!
Test # 4: Break In and Trigger Out BNC Feedback Test
passed!
Test # 5: Target Probe Feedback Test
passed!
Test # 6: Boundary Scan Master Test
passed!
PASSED Number of tests: 1
Number of failures: 0
Copyright (c) Hewlett-Packard Co. 1987
Copyright (c) International Business Machines Corp. 1995
All Rights Reserved. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation without prior
written permission is prohibited, except as allowed under copyright laws.
HPE3499A Series Emulation System
Version:
A.06.00 14Feb96
Location: Generics
HPE3491A Pentium(tm) Processor Probe Emulator
Version:
A.02.15 16Jul97
?>
You may get an error like "!ERROR 172! Bad status code (0xff) from the hard
reset sequence" just before the prompt. This is because the selftest loopback
connector is installed instead of being connected to a real target system. You
will also get either a "c>" or "?>" prompt for the same reason, this is normal
and expected. Any errors after the "PASSED Number of tests: 1 Number of
failures: 0" line can be ignored.
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the Processor Probe Itself
If a performance verification test fails
There are some things you can do if a failure is found on one of these tests.
Details of the failure can be obtained through using a verbose level of 2 or
more.
If the particular failure you see is not listed below, contact HP for assistance.
TEST 2: LAN 10BASE2 Feedback Test failed
For LAN 10BASE2 test, the following is an example of a failure which is not
caused by a broken processor probe.
R>pv -t2 -v2 1
Testing: HPE3499A Series Emulation System
Test # 2: LAN 10Base2 Feedback Test
failed!
FAILED - no lan connection (LAN probably not terminated)
FAILED Number of tests: 1
Number of failures: 1
Check to see that the port under test has a good cable connected to it and
that the cable is properly terminated with a 50 ohm terminator on each end
of the overall cable.
R>pv -t2 -v2 1
Testing: HPE3499A Series Emulation System
Test # 2: LAN 10Base2 Feedback Test
failed!
FAILED due to excessive collisions
FAILED Number of tests: 1
Number of failures: 1
The most common cause of this problem is poor termination of the cable or
failure to remove the port under test from the LAN before performing the
test. Check to see that the terminators are good (50 Ohms) and that you are
isolated from any traffic on a system LAN.
R>pv -t2 -v2 1
Testing: HPE3499A Series Emulation System
Test # 2: LAN 10Base2 Feedback Test
failed!
FAILED - invalid Ethernet address in EEPROM
FAILED Number of tests: 1
Number of failures: 1
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
Problems with the Processor Probe Itself
First check to see that a correct LLA and IP address have been set in the
virtual EEPROM through the "lan" command. If the "lan" command shows bad
information for the LLA and IP, then try to set them to correct values. If you
are unable to set them to correct values, their is a failure in the FLASH ROM
which requires service from HP.
Test 3: 10BaseT Feedback Test failed
R>pv -t3 -v2 1
Testing: HPE3499A Series Emulation System
Test # 3: LAN 10BaseT Feedback Test
failed!
FAILED Number of tests: 1
Number of failures: 1
In addition to the internal checks performed in Test 2, this test also checks
for shorts on the cable connected to the network. If this test fails, disconnect
the cable and run the test again. If it then passes, the cable is faulty. If it still
fails, it requires service from HP.
If the processor probe passes this "pv" test, additional testing can be
performed through exercising the connection to the network. To run this
test, set configuration switch 1 and switch 5 to OPEN, all other configuration
switches CLOSED (this enables LAN using 10BaseT). Cycle power and wait
for 15 to 30 seconds. Then "ping" the processor probe from your host
computer or PC. See the LAN documentation for your host computer for the
location and action of the "ping" utility. If the processor probe fails to
respond to the "ping" request, verify that the lan parameters (IP address and
gateway address) are set correctly and that your host computer recognizes
the IP address of the processor probe. If all else is good, then failure to
respond to ping indicates a faulty processor probe.
Test 4: Break In and Trigger Out BNC Feedback Test
R>pv -t4 -v2 1
Testing: HPE3499A Series Emulation System
Test # 4: Break In and Trigger Out BNC Feedback Test
failed!
Break In not receiving Break Out HIGH
FAILED Number of tests: 1
Number of failures: 1
Before returning to HP, check to ensure that you have connected a good
Coaxial cable between the two BNCs. If the cable is good, the processor
probe is bad.
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
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TEST 5: Target Probe Feedback Test
A verbose output on this test can be extensive. For example, the following is
the output of this test if you forget to plug in the processor probe loopback
test board.
p>pv -t5 -v2 1
Testing: HPE3499A Series Emulation System
Test # 5: Target Probe Feedback Test
failed!
Bad 20 Pin Status Read when unconnected = 0x7fb7
Expected Value = 0xffb7
Bad 20 Pin Status Read when connected= 7fb7
Expected Value = 0x7fb7
Output 19 Low not received on Input 11
Output 11 Low not received on Input 19
Output 13 Low not received on Input 1
Output 12 High not received on Input 6
Output 12 and Input 6 not pulled high on release
Output 8 Low not received on Input 10
Output 7 Low not received on Input 20
Output 4 Low not received on Input 14
Output 2 Low not received on Input 18
FAILED Number of tests: 1
Number of failures: 1
If the you get a verbose output like this, check to make sure that the
loopback test board was connected properly.
TEST 6: Boundary Scan Master Test
TEST 7: I2C Test
TEST 8: Data Lines Test
If these tests are not executed, check that you have connected the processor
probe loopback test board.
If these tests fail, return the processor probe to HP for replacement.
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Chapter 9: Solving Problems
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Returning the Parts to Hewlett-Packard for
Service
To return a part to Hewlett-Packard
1 Follow the procedures in this chapter to make sure that the problem
is caused by a failure in the processor probe or power supply, not by
configuration or communication problems.
2 Call your nearest HP sales office. Ask them for the address of the
nearest HP service center.
A list of HP sales offices is included at the back of this binder.
3 Package the part and send it to the HP service center.
Keep any parts which you know are working. For example, if only the power
supply is broken, keep the target interface module, processor probe and
cables.
4 When the part has been replaced, it will be sent back to you.
The unit returned to you will have the same serial number as the unit you
sent to HP.
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To obtain replacement parts
The repair strategy for this emulation solution is board replacement. The
following table lists some parts that may be replaced if they are damaged or
lost. Contact your nearest Hewlett-Packard Sales Office for further
information on servicing the board.
Exchange assemblies are available when a repairable assembly is returned to
Hewlett-Packard. These assemblies have been set up on the "Exchange
Assembly" program. This allows you to exchange a faulty assembly with one
that has been repaired, calibrated, and performance verified by the factory.
The cost is significantly less than that of a new assembly.
Part numbers
Exchange Assemblies
Part Number
Description
E3491-69402
Programmed processor probe
Replacement Assemblies
Part number
0950-3043
E3491-61601
E3491-61602
E3496-61601
E3496-66502
E3491-66504
Description
Power Supply
20-conductor target cable
30-conductor target cable
50-pin data cable
Processor probe loopback test board
Target interface module (TIM)
To clean the processor probe
If the processor probe requires cleaning:
1 Remove power from the instrument.
2 Clean with a mild detergent and water.
3 Make sure that the instrument is completely dry before reconnecting
it to a power source.
90
Index
A
address, IP
See IP address
altitude specifications, 59
APIC interrupts, 53
10BASE-T, 13, 56
10BASE2, 13, 56
serial, 56
current specifications, 57
lan command, 15–17
LAN connection problems, 77, 86–87
LAN interface, 13, 33
LAN parameters, configuring
BOOTP, 18–19
methods, 13
D
prototype analyzer, 33
B
data communications
terminal interface, 15–17
BKG light, 73
specifications, 56
lights
BNC
DBRESET signal, 39
break in, 46
DCE or DTE selection and RS-232 cable, 79 See status lights
link beat, 20, 32
LAN, 13, 31
debug port, designing, 53, 60
trigger out, 46
debug registers, break on program reads or link level address, 15, 18
LINK light, 73
BNC, LAN, 56
program writes to, 47
logic analyzer
BOOTP, 18–19
debugger
configuration overview, 6
branch trace messaging,
configuration, 44
enabling/disabling, 47
setting up, 26
break on program reads or writes to debug writing, 75
M
registers, 47
mask, subnet, 78
breakpoints, restoration on INIT without E
MAU, 13, 31, 56
RESET, 48
monitor, 45
equipment supplied, 3
breakpoints, restoration on RESET, 49–50 ethernet address, 15
monitor, INIT without RESET and breaks
built-in commands
into, 48
configuration, 44
monitor, RESET and breaks into, 49–50
F
LAN configuration, 15–17
files
list of commands, 74–75
P
workstation setup, 26
parts supplied, 3
firmware version, 66
C
PC
firmware, updating, 62
cable
connecting to, 11–26
flash EPROM, 62
LAN, 20, 32
performance verification test, 83
power, 9
ping command, 77
G
replacing, 90
pinout, debug port, 60
gateway address, 16, 77
serial, 23–24
point-to-point connection, 30
cf commands, 44
POL light, 73, 78
H
cleaning, 90
port number, 16
host computer
clocks
power cord, 9
connecting to, 11–26
specifications, 56–58
power failure during firmware update,
HP 16505A prototype analyzer, 27–34
configuration, 41–50
67–68
configuration, system, 5–7
power on/off sequence, 8–9
I
connecting to the target system, 35–40
power supply, connecting, 9
IEEE 802.3, 13, 33
connection
power up self test, 81
INIT signal, 53
host workstation, 11–26
INIT without RESET, specifying action on, prgflash, 62
problems, LAN, 77
problems, 69–90
48
problems, RS-232, 79
program reads or writes to debug registers,
internet address
prototype analyzer, 27–34
break on, 47
See IP address
sequence, 10
prompts, 75
interrupts, APIC, 53
connector
prototype analyzer
IP address, 13–15, 33, 76–77
configuration overview, 5
connection, 27–34
L
91
Index
R
real-time runs, configuring, 45
registers (debug), break on program reads
or writes to, 47
requirements
minimum equipment, 4
RESET
light, 73
RESET signal, 49, 53
RESET, specifying action on, 49–50
RS-232
See serial connection
Run Control tool
configuration, 43
debugger conflict, 26
run control unit
See processor probe
S
self test, 81
serial connection
DCE or DTE selection, 79
number of connections, 79
problems, 79
setting up, 22
verifying, 25–26
service ports, TCP, 16
service, how to obtain, 89
setup
See configuration
signals, specifications, 52, 57, 60
slow clock, 71
software probe
See processor probe
specifications
altitude, 59
clock, 56–58
data communications, 56
temperature, 59
trigger in/out, 56
StarLAN, 13, 20, 31–32
status lights, 72–73, 81
subnet mask, 13, 33, 77–78
switches
bootp, 19
LAN configuration, 15–17, 20, 30, 32
serial configuration, 23
system configurations, 5–7
92
T
target system
connecting to, 36
TCK signal, 52
telnet, 21, 76
temperature specifications, 59
terminal (MS Windows program), 79
terminal interface, 21
See also built-in commands
LAN parameters, setting, 15–17
ThinLAN, 13, 31, 56
trigger
in/out specifications, 56
troubleshooting, 71
TX light, 73
U
update, firmware, 62
USER light, 73
V
version, firmware, 66
voltage specifications, 57
W
workstation
connecting to, 11–26
workstation files, 26
© Copyright HewlettPackard Company1994- 1997
All Rights Reserved.
Reproduction, adaptation, or
translation without prior
written permission is
prohibited, except as allowed
under the copyright laws.
Restricted Rights Legend.
Use, duplication or disclosure
by the U.S. Government is
subject to restrictions as set
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(ii) of the Rights in Technical
Data and Computer Software
clause at DFARS
252.227-7013 for DOD
agencies, and subparagraphs
(c) (1) and (c) (2) of the
Commercial Computer
Software Restricted Rights
clause at FAR 52.227-19 for
other agencies.
Hewlett-packard Company
3000 Hanover Street
Palo Alto, California 94304
U.S.A.
Document Warranty
The information contained in
this document is subject to
change without notice.
Hewlett-Packard makes
no warranty of any kind
with regard to this
material, including, but
not limited to, the implied
warranties of
merchantability or fitness
for a particular purpose.
Hewlett-Packard shall not be
liable for errors contained
herein or for damages in
connection with the
furnishing, performance, or
use of this material.
Safety
This apparatus has been
designed and tested in
accordance with IEC
Publication 1010, Safety
Requirements for Measuring
Apparatus, and has been
supplied in a safe condition.
This is a Safety Class I
instrument (provided with
terminal for protective
earthing). Before applying
power, verify that the correct
safety precautions are taken
(see the following warnings).
In addition, note the external
markings on the instrument
that are described under
"Safety Symbols."
Warning
• Before turning on the
instrument, you must connect
the protective earth terminal
of the instrument to the
protective conductor of the
(mains) power cord. The
mains plug shall only be
inserted in a socket outlet
provided with a protective
earth contact. You must not
negate the protective action
by using an extension cord
(power cable) without a
protective conductor
(grounding). Grounding one
conductor of a two-conductor
outlet is not sufficient
protection.
• Only fuses with the
required rated current,
voltage, and specified type
(normal blow, time delay,
etc.) should be used. Do not
use repaired fuses or
short-circuited fuseholders.
To do so could cause a shock
or fire hazard.
Hewlett-Packard
P.O. Box 2197
1900 Garden of the Gods Road
Colorado Springs, CO 80901-2197, U.S.A
• Service instructions are for
trained service personnel. To
avoid dangerous electric
shock, do not perform any
service unless qualified to do
so. Do not attempt internal
service or adjustment unless
another person, capable of
rendering first aid and
resuscitation, is present.
• If you energize this
instrument by an auto
transformer (for voltage
reduction), make sure the
common terminal is
connected to the earth
terminal of the power source.
Safety Symbols
Instruction manual symbol:
the product is marked with
this symbol when it is
necessary for you to refer to
the instruction manual in
order to protect against
damage to the product.
Hazardous voltage symbol.
• Whenever it is likely that
the ground protection is
impaired, you must make the
instrument inoperative and
secure it against any
unintended operation.
• Do not operate the
instrument in the presence of
flammable gasses or fumes.
Operation of any electrical
instrument in such an
environment constitutes a
definite safety hazard.
• Do not install substitute
parts or perform any
unauthorized modification to
the instrument.
• Capacitors inside the
instrument may retain a
charge even if the instrument
is disconnected from its
source of supply.
• Use caution when exposing
or handling the CRT.
Handling or replacing the
CRT shall be done only by
qualified maintenance
personnel.
Earth terminal symbol: Used
to indicate a circuit common
connected to grounded
chassis.
WARNING
The Warning sign denotes a
hazard. It calls attention to a
procedure, practice, or the
like, which, if not correctly
performed or adhered to,
could result in personal
injury. Do not proceed
beyond a Warning sign until
the indicated conditions are
fully understood and met.
CA UTIO N
The Caution sign denotes a
hazard. It calls attention to
an operating procedure,
practice, or the like, which, if
not correctly performed or
adhered to, could result in
damage to or destruction of
part or all of the product. Do
not proceed beyond a
Caution symbol until the
indicated conditions are fully
understood or met.
Product Warranty
This Hewlett-Packard
product has a warranty
against defects in material
and workmanship for a period
of one year from date of
shipment. During the
warranty period,
Hewlett-Packard Company
will, at its option, either
repair or replace products
that prove to be defective.
For warranty service or
repair, this product must be
returned to a service facility
designated by
Hewlett-Packard.
For products returned to
Hewlett-Packard for warranty
service, the Buyer shall
prepay shipping charges to
Hewlett-Packard and
Hewlett-Packard shall pay
shipping charges to return
the product to the Buyer.
However, the Buyer shall pay
all shipping charges, duties,
and taxes for products
returned to Hewlett-Packard
from another country.
Hewlett-Packard warrants
that its software and firmware
designated by
Hewlett-Packard for use with
an instrument will execute its
programming instructions
when properly installed on
that instrument.
Hewlett-Packard does not
warrant that the operation of
the instrument software, or
firmware will be
uninterrupted or error free.
Limitation of Warranty
The foregoing warranty shall
not apply to defects resulting
from improper or inadequate
maintenance by the Buyer,
Buyer-supplied software or
interfacing, unauthorized
modification or misuse,
operation outside of the
environmental specifications
for the product, or improper
site preparation or
maintenance.
No other warranty is
expressed or implied.
Hewlett-Packard
specifically disclaims the
implied warranties of
merchantability or fitness
for a particular purpose.
Exclusive Remedies
The remedies provided herein
are the buyer’s sole and
exclusive remedies.
Hewlett-Packard shall not be
liable for any direct, indirect,
special, incidental, or
consequential damages,
whether based on contract,
tort, or any other legal theory.
Assistance
Product maintenance
agreements and other
customer assistance
agreements are available for
Hewlett-Packard products.
For any assistance, contact
your nearest Hewlett-Packard
Sales Office.
Certification
Hewlett-Packard Company
certifies that this product met
its published specifications at
the time of shipment from the
factory. Hewlett-Packard
further certifies that its
calibration measurements are
traceable to the United States
National Institute of
Standards and Technology, to
the extent allowed by the
Institute’s calibration facility,
and to the calibration
facilities of other
International Standards
Organization members.
About this edition
This is the HP E3452A
PowerPC 603/603e
Processor Probe User’s
Guide.
UNIX is a registered
trademark in the United
States and other countries,
licensed exclusively through
X/Open Company Limited.
Publication number
E3491-97002, July 1997
Printed in USA.
Windows, MS Windows,
Windows NT, and MS-DOS
are U.S. registered
trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation.
Print history is as follows:
E3491-97000, May 1995
E3491-97001, Aug 1995
New editions are complete
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product updates do not
require manual changes; and,
conversely, manual
corrections may be done
without accompanying
product changes. Therefore,
do not expect a one-to-one
correspondence between
product updates and manual
updates.
Pentium is a U.S. registered
trademark of Intel
Corporation.
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