null  User manual
FAMILY MATH GAMES
ARDROSSAN ELEMENTARY
September 2016
[email protected]
phone 1-866-342-3386
1-780-440-6284
boxcarsandoneeyedjacks.com
BoxCarsEduc
BoxcarsEducation
Addition Face-Off
LEVEL:
Grades 2 and up
SKILLS:
Addition
PLAYERS:
2
EQUIPMENT:
1 deck of cards Ace – 9 (Ace = 1)
GETTING STARTED: Players divide the cards evenly between
themselves. Then each player turns two cards over
and adds them together. The player with the
highest sum wins all the cards. In the event of a tie,
players have a “face-off.” Each player deals out
three more cards face down, then turns over two
more cards and adds them together. The player
with the highest sum wins all the cards. Play
continues until decks are empty, then the player
with the most cards wins the game.
EXAMPLE:
VARIATION:
A 5
3
Player One
Player Two
2 3 2+3=5
4 A 4+1=5
4 3 4+3=7
4 5 4+5=9
Both players draw the
same sum, so a face-off
starts. Each player deals
three face down cards,
then draws again. Player
Two wins with a sum of 9.
Draw more cards and arrange them as two or
three-digit numbers for more difficult math.
Three cards: a twodigit number (15)
added to a singledigit number (3).
5 3 4
Or...
2 3
Five cards: a threedigit number (534)
added to a twodigit number (23).
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
HORSE RACE - PRIMARY ADDITION
LEVEL:
K-2
SKILLS:
adding to 12, commutative property of addition, fact families
PLAYERS:
2 (1 vs 1)
EQUIPMENT:
GOAL:
tray of dice (each player needs 18 of their own color), gameboard
to have the greatest number of dice on your side of the “racetrack” at the end of the game
GETTING STARTED:
Each player takes 18 dice of one color and picks a side of the dice tray to be their “racetrack”. Each
player picks up a pair of dice, rolls, and calculates their sum. The player with the greatest sum puts
their dice into their side of the racetrack. Both players verbalize their sums.
EXAMPLE:
+ +
= 8
+
PLAYER ONE
MATH TALK
+
=
6
PLAYER TWO
Player One says “8 is a greater sum than 6”
The player with the greatest sum places their dice in their side of the racetrack. The player with the
least sum tosses their dice into the lid.
Players each pick up another pair of dice, roll and compare their next sums. In the event of a
EQUAL SUM – both players put their two dice into their side of the racetrack.
TIE
or
Play continues until both players’ 18 dice have been rolled out. The player with the greatest number
of dice on their side of the racetrack wins.
Level 1 : Addition to 12 - Players roll two
dice and add them
Player One
Player Two
Level 2 : Addition to 18 - Players roll three
dice and add them.
Level 3: Multiplication to 36 - Players roll
two dice and multiply them
Level 4: Multiplication to 72 - Players roll
three dice, choose two to add together,
then multiply the sum by the third.
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
Add dice to the track
along a curving path
to simulate the race!
What Time Is It, Mr. Wolf?
LEVEL:
Kindergarten – Grade 2
SKILLS:
Telling time to the hour, addition
PLAYERS:
2 or more
EQUIPMENT:
2 dice, paper and pencil
GETTING STARTED: Each player needs their own clock with the
“o'clock” (minute) hand drawn in at 12.
Player one rolls the dice and adds them together,
then uses the result to fill in a time on their clock.
For example, a roll of 3 and 5 lets a player fill in
8:00 on their clock. Players alternate rolling and
filling in times on their clocks until only 1:00
remains. Once only 1:00 is left, a player may roll a
single die and try to roll a 1. The first player to
complete their clock is the winner.
VARIATION:
The minute hand can be drawn to quarter-past,
half-past, or quarter-to the hour.
PLACE VALUE FACE OFF
LEVEL:
Kindergarten - Grade 1
SKILLS:
read, compare and order numbers to 100
PLAYERS:
2
EQUIPMENT:
cards (Ace=1) - 9, gameboard; for variation use 0-9 dice, 00-90 dice
GOAL:
to be the player with the greatest number and collect the most cards by the end
of the game
GETTING STARTED:
Players divide cards evenly between themselves. Each player turns over two cards and places
them onto the gameboard. The first number turned over is the tens number and the second is the
ones. Both players say their numbers. Have them verbalize, for example, “six tens and two ones
equals sixty-two”. The player with the largest number gets all cards. In the event of a tie (ie. each
player has the same number) FACE OFF is declared. First, each player places three cards face
down. Then, each player turns over two cards, building a two digit number. The player with the
largest number gets all of the cards. Play continues until one player has collected all of the cards.
EXAMPLE:
FACE OFF IS DECLARED!
Player One 43
Player Two
“forty-three”
43
“forty-three”
three cards face down
for “TIE BREAK”
6 tens,
2 ones
62
“sixty-two”
1 ten,
9 ones
19
“nineteen”
Player One verbalizes “sixty-two is greater than nineteen” and collects all of the cards.
10
20
PLAYER ONE
TENS
00
ONES
30
40
50
60
80
90
PLAYER TWO
TENS
70
PLACE VALUE FACE OFF GAMEBOARD
ONES
100
PRIMARY SUPER MUSH
LEVEL:
K–2
SKILLS:
fact fluency, addition facts to 12, number patterns
PLAYERS:
2 (cooperative team)
EQUIPMENT:
GOAL:
1 tray, recording sheet
to fill up the tray with 36 dice matching the selected fact family
GETTING STARTED:
The teacher selects a fact family for teams to work on:
Simple Sixes
Successful Sevens
Easy Eights
Nifty Nines
Terrific Tens
Enormous Elevens
Tremendous Twelves
All dice are removed from the tray and “super mushed” – i.e. scrambled all together and rolled for
about 20 – 30 seconds. The teacher calls stop and the dice are then set for the activity. Together
both players now hunt for combinations of dice that match the set fact family and place them into the
tray.
EXAMPLE:
Round of Easy Eights:
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
PRIMARY SUPER MUSH
_________________
_________________
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
ADDITION TIC TAC TOE
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
2
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
4
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
6
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
7
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
8
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
9
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Adapted From Dice Works page 44. Use cards 0 (K) through 9. Mix the cards up. Players take turns flipping over two cards at a time.
One card is located at the top, the other is located at the left side. Players trace their fingers from the two numbers to the sum
(answer) on the board. For example 3 and 7 are flipped over. 3 is placed on the top and 7 is placed on the left. The player runs their
left finger along the "7" row and runs their right finger down the "3" column" until they meet at the "10". They place a chip at that
location. The player then switches the cards and places the 7 at the top and the 3 on the left side. The player runs their left finger
along the "3" row and runs their right finger down the "7" column until they meet at "10". They place a chip at that location. Most
turns will have players place two chips. Players continue to alternate turns until one player places a chip that completes 3-in-a-row, 4in-a-row or 5-in-row Tic Tac Toe. When this happens, the player removes the chips for that Tic Tac Toe and places them into their
"point pile". Tic Tac Toes usually occur two at a time. Stealing points - If a player has a turn where an answer already has a chip on
it, the player.removes that chip, places it into their point pile and then places a new chip on the answer. For example, if a player
flipped a 3 and 7 and the 10 answer already has a chip on it.
©Box Cars and One Eyed Jacks
Multiplication Face-Off
LEVEL:
Grade 4 and up
SKILLS:
Multiplication facts to 81
PLAYERS:
2
EQUIPMENT:
1 deck of cards Ace – 9 (Ace = 1)
GETTING STARTED: Players divide cards evenly between themselves.
Both players turn over two cards and multiply them
together. The player with the largest product
collects all four cards. In the event of a tie, each
player deals three more cards face down, then
turns two more cards face up and multiplies them
together. The player with the largest product
collects all the cards. Play continues until decks are
empty. The player who takes the most cards wins.
EXAMPLE:
Player One
2 6 2 x 6 = 12
A 9
VARIATION:
1x9=9
Player Two
3 4 3 x 4 = 12
5 6 5 x 6 = 30
Player One draws 2 and 6,
while Player Two draws 3
and 4. Both products are 12,
so the players face off. Each
deals three cards face down.
Player Two beats Player
One with a product of 30
versus Player One's product
of 9. Player Two takes all
fourteen cards!
To increase difficulty, have players draw more cards
and use them to make and multiply two and threedigit numbers.
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
36 / 72 SLAM DUNK
PLAYER
ONE
PLAYER
TWO
 Each player takes 18 dice of own color.
 Each player rolls 2 or 3 dice, multiplies.
 Player with greatest product places them into their side of the tray, least product places in lid.
 Player with the most dice in their side of the tray at the end of the game wins.
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
38526-insides09:Nov 2004 RadMath
8/19/09
9:49 AM
Page 45
MULTIPLICATION SCRAMBLE
SKILLS:
Multiplication facts to 144, probability
PLAYERS:
1 to 2
EQUIPMENT:
Two twelve-sided (1-12) dice or cards Ace - King (Ace
= 1, Jack = 11, Queen = 12, King = 0), gameboard (see
reproducibles)
GETTING STARTED:
The goal of this game is to fill in every line on the
scramble grid. Each player rolls two dice and multiplies the numbers. Players write down their product in
the appropriate space on their gameboard (e.g. 4 x 9 =
36, so 36 would go in the space for 30 - 39). If a player rolls a product and that space has already been
filled in, that player now misses their turn (i.e. no space
is filled in for that roll). Play continues until one player
successfully fills in all of the spaces on their gameboard.
EXAMPLE:
Player One
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
140
-
9
19
29
39
49
59
69
79
89
99
109
119
129
139
149
__________
__________
7 X 4 = 28
__________
4 X 8 = 32
__________
9 X 5 = 45
__________
__________
__________
9 X 8 = 72
__________
11 X 8 = 88
__________
__________
10 X 10 = 100
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
Player Two
__________
6 X 2 = 12
__________
5 X 5 = 25
__________
5 X 6 = 30
__________
__________
__________
10 X 5 = 50
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
38526-insides09:Nov 2004 RadMath
8/19/09
9:49 AM
Page 46
Player One rolls or turns over 7 X 4 = 28
Player Two rolls or turns over 5 X 6 = 30
Player One rolls or turns over 9 X 5 = 45
Player Two rolls or turns over 5 X 6 = 30 does not
fill in anything
Player One rolls or turns over 10 x 10 = 100
Player Two rolls or turns over 10 X 5 = 50
VARIATION I:
To decrease the level of difficulty, use cards from
Ace - 9 (Ace = 1) and use grid only up to 80 - 89.
_____________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
VARIATION II:
Add rounding to the skill level of the game by using
the following gameboard:
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
140
EXAMPLE:
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
8 x 11 = 88
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
Players roll two twelve-sided
(1-12) dice, multiply them
and round their product off
to the nearest ten. The
player now records this in
the appropriate space. The
first player to fill in their
gameboard wins.
8 x 11 = 88, rounds to 90
THOUGHT PROVOKERS:
Have students figure out the average number of rolls
to fill in all spaces on the scramble grid.
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
Three-Digit Scramble
LEVEL:
Grade 2 – 3
SKILLS:
Place value to 1000, betweeness
PLAYERS:
2
EQUIPMENT:
1 deck of cards Ace – 9 (Ace = 1), paper and pencil
GETTING STARTED: Each player needs their own gameboard.
Each player turns over three cards and makes a
three-digit number. Players call their number out
loud, then write the number down in the
appropriate space on their gameboard. For
example, if a player draws 1, 3 and 5, they can put
135 or 153 in the 100 – 199 space, 315 or 351 in
the 300 – 399 space, or 513 or 531 in the 500 –
599 space. The first player to fill all ten spaces is
the winner.
VARIATIONS:
To increase the difficulty, have players fill in their
gameboards in order from lowest to highest. For
longer playing time, add more blanks to be filled in.
The game can also be played as a solitaire, “3
strikes and you're out.”
Three-Digit Scramble
TICK TOCK ROLL A CLOCK
WHAT YOU'LL NEED
Each Double Dicer needs one Three-in-a-Cube Die, paper, pencil.
TO BEGIN
Each player needs to draw a clock as illustrated below.
THE GOAL
To be the first Double Dicer to circle all the numbers on their clock.
LET'S ROLL
Player One rolls the die and may now add, subtract, multiply or divide the three
numbers to target any number between 1-12.
EXAMPLE:
•
•
•
Roll is
Player One can circle on their clock, either:
2 3 6
(2 x 3)+6= 12 OR 2+3+6=11 OR (6 ÷ 2)+3=6 etc.
Players can circle only one number per roll.
Players alternate rolling the die, analyzing their combinations, trying to be the first player to
circle all the numbers on their clock.
If a player is unable to find a combination for any of the remaining numbers, play continues to
their opponent.
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
To Sum It Up
LEVEL:
Grade 3 and up
SKILLS:
Adding 3 digit numbers
PLAYERS:
2 or more
EQUIPMENT:
1 deck of cards Ace – 10 (Ace = 1, 10 = zero),
paper and pencil
GETTING STARTED: Each player draws a 3 by 3 grid as a gameboard
and the cards are shuffled. Then a card is drawn
and placed face up. All players write the number on
the card into a space on their gameboard. Eight
more cards are drawn and players fill in the rest of
their gameboards. Once all nine spaces are full,
players add the three numbers they've made
together. The player with the greatest sum scores a
point. Play to 10 points.
EXAMPLE:
VARIATION:
The nine cards drawn, in order, are 5, 7, 4, 6, 5, 10,
Ace, 3 and 9. Three players build their gameboards
as follows. Player Three wins with a sum of 2,326.
Player One
Player Two
7
3
4
7
5
0
Player Three
7
3
5
6
5
0
6
5
1
6
4
0
+ 5
=1, 9
9
1
4
9
9
5
1
7
5
+ 3
=1, 7
5
0
=2, 3
2
6
+
For less experienced students, you can draw six
cards and make two three-digit numbers, or draw
only four cards and make two two-digit numbers.
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
=
=
©Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks
+
+
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