Windows® 10 In Depth
Windows 10 IN DEPTH
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Windows 10
®
Brian Knittel
Paul McFedries
800 East 96th Street
Indianapolis, Indiana 46240
WINDOWS® 10 IN DEPTH
Copyright © 2016 by Pearson Education, Inc.
All rights reserved. No part of this book shall be reproduced, stored in a retrieval
Editor-in-Chief
system, or transmitted by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,
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recording, or otherwise, without written permission from the publisher. No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of the information contained
Executive Editor
herein. Although every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this
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book, the publisher and author assume no responsibility for errors or omissions.
Nor is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the use of the informa-
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tion contained herein.
Faithe Wempen
ISBN-13: 978-0-7897-5474-5
Managing Editor
ISBN-10: 0-7897-5474-6
Sandra Schroeder
Library of Congress Control Number: 2015944547
Printed in the United States of America
Senior Project Editor
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First Printing: September 2015
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All terms mentioned in this book that are known to be trademarks or service
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marks have been appropriately capitalized. Que Publishing cannot attest to the
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as affecting the validity of any trademark or service mark.
Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
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CONTENTS AT A GLANCE
Introduction
1
I Starting Out with Windows 10
1 Meet Windows 10 9
2 Installing or Upgrading to Windows 10 31
3 Your First Hour with Windows 10 59
II Using Windows 10
4
5
6
7
8
9
Using the Windows 10 Interface 105
Windows Apps and the Windows Store 133
Managing Files and Searching 153
Devices and Printers 179
Accessories and Accessibility 201
Configuring Windows 10 215
III Multimedia and Imaging
10
11
12
13
Windows Media Player 239
Windows and Imaging Devices 255
Scanning and Faxing 271
More Windows 10 Media Tools 285
IV Windows 10 and the Internet
14
15
16
17
Getting Connected 295
Web Browsing with Windows 10 309
Windows 10 Internet Communications 339
Troubleshooting an Internet Connection 351
V Networking
18
19
20
21
22
Creating a Windows Network 367
Connecting Your Network to the Internet 413
Networking with Other Operating Systems 429
Using a Windows Network 453
Troubleshooting Your Network 485
VI Maintaining Windows 10
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Windows Management Tools 503
Tweaking and Customizing Windows 545
Managing Hard Disks and Storage Spaces 563
Troubleshooting and Repairing Problems 593
Managing Your Software 629
Managing Your Hardware 645
Editing the Windows Registry 669
Command-Line and Automation Tools 689
VII Security
31
32
33
34
Protecting
Protecting
Protecting
Protecting
Windows from Viruses and Spyware 713
Your Data from Loss and Theft 739
Your Network from Hackers and Snoops 771
Yourself from Fraud and Spam 805
VIII Windows On the Move
35
36
37
38
39
Windows on Mobile Devices 823
Wireless Networking 841
Networking on the Road 855
Meetings, Conferencing, and Collaboration 879
Remote Desktop and Remote Access 893
IX Appendixes
A Virtualization 915
B Command-Line Utilities 925
Index
965
C ont ent s
CONTENTS
Introduction
1
I Starting Out with Windows 10
1 Meet Windows 10 9
An Overview of Windows 10 9
Should I Get Windows 10? 13
Windows 10 Editions 15
Upgrading Windows 18
What’s New in Windows 10? 19
The New Start Menu 19
Touch-a Touch-a Touch-a Touch Me! 20
Modern Apps 20
Hey, Cortana 20
Online User Accounts 21
Virtual Desktops 21
Expanded Settings App 21
File Explorer Ribbon 22
The Windows Store 22
Management Tools 23
Installation and Setup 24
Storage Spaces 24
Improved Web Browsing with Microsoft
Edge and Internet Explorer 11 24
Wi-Fi Sense 25
Faster Startup 25
Secure Boot 26
Integrated Cellular Data
Connections 26
What Changed Between Windows 10
and Windows 8 and 8.1 27
Beyond Windows 10 27
v
Memory Requirements 32
Storage Requirements 33
Graphics Requirements 34
Hardware Requirements for Various
Windows 10 Features 34
Preparing Your System: A Checklist 36
Check Your System Requirements 36
Back Up Your Files 36
Clean Up Your Hard Disk 36
Check and Defragment Your Hard
Disk 36
Create a System Image Backup and a
System Repair Disc 37
Installing Windows 10
38
Upgrading to Windows 10 42
Dual- (and Multi-) Booting Windows 10
Dual-Booting Windows 10 43
Multibooting with Three or More
Operating Systems 44
Using Windows Boot Manager 45
43
Customizing the Boot Configuration
Data 46
Using Windows Boot Manager to Modify
the BCD 47
Using Startup and Recovery to Modify
the BCD 47
Using the System Configuration Utility to
Modify the BCD 48
Using BCDEDIT to Customize the Startup
Options 51
Installing Windows 10 Components 56
3 Your First Hour with
Windows 10 59
In the Modern Age 28
2 Installing or Upgrading to
Windows 10 31
Windows 10 System Requirements 31
Processor Requirements 32
The First Things to Do After Starting
Windows 10 59
A Quick Tour of the Important Windows 10
Features 60
The Lock and Sign In Screens 60
vi
Win d o ws 1 0 I n De p th
The Start Menu 62
Modern Apps 64
The Touch Tour 65
Important Keyboard Shortcuts 66
Tablet Mode 66
Windows Explorer Is Now Called File
Explorer 68
Cortana 70
Search Before You Look 71
Getting to the Management Tools 71
Compatibility and Virtualization 100
User Account Control 101
The New Taskbar 103
Jumplists 104
II Using Windows 10
4 Using the Windows 10
Interface 105
Setting Up User Accounts 73
Microsoft Versus Local Accounts 73
Create New Accounts 74
Change Account Settings 77
Before You Forget Your Password 78
Just One User? 79
Taking a Tour of the Windows 10
Interface 105
Navigating Windows 10 with a
Keyboard 107
Navigating Windows 10 with a Touch
Interface 109
Downloading Critical Updates
Working with Running Apps 111
Snapping an App 111
Switching Between Running Apps 113
Pinning an App to the Taskbar 113
Using Desktop Apps as the Default 114
79
Personalizing Windows 10 80
Personalize Screen Settings 80
Tune Up the Taskbar, Action Center, and
Start Menu 82
Store to OneDrive or This PC 83
Privacy Settings 84
Important Adjustments and Tweaks 85
Transferring Information from Your Old
Computer 88
Third-Party User Transfer Programs 89
Copying Your Old Data Manually 89
How the Heck Do I Shut This Thing
Off? 93
More Than You Wanted to Know 94
After You Forget Your Password 95
Using a Password Reset Disk 96
Accessing the Real Administrator
Account 96
If You’re Moving to Windows 10 from
XP 97
Control Panel Wordiness 97
Where’s My Stuff? The User Profile
Structure 98
Working with Notifications
115
Searching Windows 10 116
Searching via the Taskbar 117
Searching with Cortana 118
Customizing the Start Menu 120
Resizing a Tile 121
Moving a Tile 121
Turning Off a Live Tile 122
Pinning an App to the Start Menu 122
Pinning a Website to the Start
Menu 123
Displaying the Administrative Tools on
the Start Menu 123
Adding Shutdown and Restart
Shortcuts 124
Creating an App Group 125
Customizing the Start Menu’s System
Icons 126
Customizing the Start Menu
Background 127
C ont ent s
Customizing the Lock Screen 128
Customizing the Lock Screen
Background 128
Controlling the Apps Displayed on the
Lock Screen 129
Disabling the Lock Screen 130
Working with Virtual Desktops 131
Adding a Virtual Desktop 131
Working with Virtual Desktops 131
Customizing Virtual Desktops 132
5 Windows Apps and the
Windows Store 133
The Windows Apps 133
Alarms & Clock 135
Calculator 135
Calendar 136
Camera 137
Cortana 137
Food & Drink 137
Groove Music 138
Health & Fitness 139
Mail 139
Maps 139
Microsoft Edge 140
Microsoft Wi-Fi 141
Money 141
Movies & TV 141
News 142
OneDrive 143
OneNote 143
People 144
Phone Companion 144
Photos 145
Reader 145
Reading List 146
Scan 146
Settings 147
Sports 147
Store 148
Voice Recorder 149
Weather 149
Xbox 149
Installing Apps from the Windows
Store 149
Uninstalling Apps
150
Sharing App Data 150
6 Managing Files and
Searching 153
Understanding File Types 153
File Types and File Extensions 153
File Types and the Registry 154
Navigating Folder Windows
Folder Navigation 157
Instant Search 158
The Ribbon
156
159
The Navigation Pane
160
Basic File and Folder Chores: The
Techniques Used by the Pros 160
Selecting Files with Check Boxes 160
Resolving File Transfer Conflicts 162
Expert Drag-and-Drop Techniques 162
Taking Advantage of the Send To
Command 163
The Recycle Bin: Deleting and
Recovering Files and Folders 164
File Maintenance Using the Open and
Save As Dialog Boxes 166
Metadata and the File Explorer Property
System 167
Searching Your PC 169
As-You-Type Searches with Instant
Search 172
Using Advanced Query Syntax to Search
Properties 173
Saving Searches 175
Grouping and Filtering with Metadata 175
Grouping Files 175
Filtering Files 176
vii
viii
Win d o ws 1 0 I n De p th
7 Devices and Printers 179
Windows Printing Primer
179
Installing and Configuring a Printer 181
Adding a New Printer 182
Installing a Local Printer 182
If the Printer Isn’t Found 183
What to Do If Your Printer Isn’t
Listed 186
Changing a Printer’s Properties 187
Printing Preferences 188
Printer Properties 190
Print Server Properties 192
Removing a Printer
192
Printing from Your Applications 193
PDF and XPS Print Output 195
Faxing 196
Printing Offline 196
Working with the Printer Queue 196
Deleting a File from the Queue 197
Canceling All Pending Print Jobs on a
Given Printer 197
Pausing, Resuming, and Restarting the
Printing Process 198
Advanced Printer Management
8 Accessories and
Accessibility 201
A Boatload of Useful Tools 201
Gadgets Are Gone 202
Apps as Accessories 202
Desktop Accessories 203
Character Map 203
Math Input Panel 205
Notepad 205
Paint 206
Snipping Tool 207
Steps Recorder 208
Sticky Notes 209
Sound Recorder 209
198
Windows Journal 209
WordPad 210
XPS Viewer 211
Accessibility Tools 211
Ease of Access (in PC Settings) 212
Ease of Access Center (in Control
Panel) 212
Magnifier 213
Narrator 214
9 Configuring Windows 10 215
Configuring Windows 10 with Control
Panel 215
Touring the Control Panel Window 215
Reviewing the Control Panel Icons 217
Understanding Control Panel Files 221
Gaining Easier Access to Control
Panel 223
Configuring Windows 10 with the Settings
App 225
Changing Your User Account
Picture 226
Changing a Password 227
Creating a Picture Password 230
Creating a Fingerprint Sign-In 231
Customizing Notifications 232
Synchronizing Your Settings Between
Devices 233
Creating a Shortcut to a Specific Settings
Tab 234
III Multimedia and Imaging
10 Windows Media Player
239
Getting to Know Media Player 239
Navigating the Library 240
Customizing the Navigation Pane 242
Syncing Media Devices 243
Playing Media Files
245
Setting Media Player’s Playback
Options 246
C ont ent s
Copying Music from an Audio CD 248
Selecting a Location and Filename
Structure 248
Choosing the Recording File
Format 249
Specifying the Quality of the
Recording 250
Copying Tracks from an Audio CD 251
Copying Tracks to a Recordable CD or
Device 251
Creating a Playlist 251
Recording to a CD 252
Streaming Your Media Library 252
11 Windows and Imaging
Devices 255
Connecting Imaging Devices 255
Testing an Installed Scanner 256
Configuring Device Events 257
Accessing Media on a Memory Card 258
Importing Photos from a Digital
Camera 259
Viewing Digital Camera Images 259
Importing Digital Camera Photos 261
Burning Photos to an Optical Disc 265
Selecting an Optical Disc Format 265
Burning a Mastered Disc 265
Closing a UDF Session 266
Burning a Live File System Disc 267
Sending Photos to a Printer 268
Sending Faxes from Windows Fax and
Scan 277
Selecting Recipients 278
Selecting a Dialing Rule 278
Selecting a Cover Page 278
Entering Subject and Comment
Text 279
Adding Other Documents to the
Fax 279
Adding Scanned Pages 279
Previewing the Fax 279
Sending the Fax 280
Monitoring Outgoing Faxes 280
Receiving Faxes 280
Printing Received Faxes
Automatically 280
Scanning Documents with Windows Fax
and Scan 281
Editing Scan Profile Defaults 281
Creating a New Scan Profile 283
Scanning Images 283
Emailing and Faxing Scans 284
13 More Windows 10 Media
Tools 285
Controlling the Volume 285
Controlling the Overall System
Volume 285
Controlling an Application’s
Volume 286
Balancing Your Headphones 287
Equalizing the Volume 288
Setting the Default Output Device 289
12 Scanning and Faxing 271
Introducing Windows Fax and Scan 271
Installing Fax and Scanner
Hardware 272
Installing a Fax Modem 272
Installing a Scanner 272
Configuring the Fax Service 273
Creating a Customized Cover Page 274
Changing Fax Settings 276
Assigning Sounds to Events 289
Recording Sounds with Voice Recorder 291
Setting Up the Microphone 291
Making a Voice Recording 292
Controlling Your Computer with Speech
Recognition 293
ix
x
Win d o ws 1 0 I n De p th
IV Windows 10 and the Internet
14 Getting Connected
Going Worldwide
The Favorites Folder: Sites to
Remember 320
Adding a Shortcut to the Favorites
Folder 320
Opening an Internet Shortcut from the
Favorites Folder 321
Maintaining Favorites 322
Sharing Favorites with Other
Browsers 322
295
295
Understanding Connection
Technologies 296
DSL 296
Cable Modem 297
Satellite Service 297
Wireless and Cellular Service 298
Analog Modem 299
Choosing a Technology 299
Choosing Equipment 301
Working with RSS Feeds 323
Subscribing to a Feed 324
Reading Feeds 325
Setting the Feed Update Schedule 325
Installing a Network Adapter for Broadband
Service 301
Installing Filters for DSL Service 302
Configuring a High-Speed Connection 302
Configuring a PPPoE Broadband
Connection 304
Configuring an Always On
Connection 305
Setting Up a Fixed IP Address 306
Dial-Up Internet 307
Creating a New Dial-Up Connection
307
Making and Ending a Dial-Up
Connection 308
15 Web Browsing with
Windows 10 309
Internet Explorer or Microsoft Edge? 309
Tips and Techniques for Better Web
Surfing 310
Taking Advantage of the Address
Bar 312
Creating a Shortcut to a URL 314
Working with Tabs 314
Using the Handy History List 317
Searching the Web
319
Customizing Internet Explorer 326
Controlling the Web Page Cache 326
Setting Internet Explorer Options 328
Changing the Home Page 328
Configuring the Page History 329
Setting More General Options 329
Understanding Internet Explorer’s
Advanced Options 330
16 Windows 10 Internet
Communications 339
Working with Email
339
Setting Up Mail Accounts 340
Specifying Basic Account Settings 340
Specifying Advanced Internet Account
Settings 341
Specifying Advanced Exchange Account
Settings 343
Maintaining Accounts 344
Handling Incoming Messages 344
Controlling Sync Settings for an
Account 345
Processing Messages 346
Setting Swipe Options 347
Sending Messages 347
Initiating a New Message 347
Creating a Signature 349
Maintaining Mail
349
C ont ent s
17 Troubleshooting an Internet
Connection 351
It’s Great When It Works, But...
351
Troubleshooting Step by Step 352
Identifying Software Configuration
Problems 355
Troubleshooting a Cable or DSL Modem
Connection 355
Troubleshooting a LAN Connection 356
Identifying Network Hardware
Problems 359
Troubleshooting Internet Problems with
Windows TCP/IP Utilities 360
ipconfig 360
ping
362
tracert 363
Third-Party Utilities 365
WhatIsMyIP 365
Speed Check 365
Reverse tracert 365
V Networking
18 Creating a Windows
Network 367
Creating or Joining a Network 367
Planning Your Network 368
Are You Being Served? 369
When to Hire a Professional 371
Choosing a Network and Cabling
System 371
10/100BASE-T Ethernet 373
801.11ac, 802.11n, and 802.11g Wireless
(Wi-Fi) Networking 374
Powerline Networking 377
1000Mbps Ethernet (Gigabit
Ethernet) 378
Adding Additional Networking
Functions 379
Printing and Faxing 379
Providing Internet Connectivity 380
Providing Remote Access 380
Connecting to a Remote Network 380
Installing Network Adapters 381
Checking Existing Adapters 382
Installing Multiple Network
Adapters 382
Installing Network Wiring 383
Cabling for Ethernet Networks 383
General Cabling Tips 384
Wiring with Patch Cables 386
Installing In-Wall Wiring 387
Connecting Just Two Computers 387
Connecting Multiple Switches 388
Installing a Wireless Network 390
Wireless Network Setup Choices 390
Setting Up a New Wireless
Network 393
Sharing Wi-Fi Network Settings with
Friends 397
Getting Maximum Wireless Speed 398
Configuring a Peer-to-Peer Network 400
Configuring the TCP/IP Protocol 401
Enabling and Disabling Sharing 403
Setting Your Computer
Identification 404
Configuring Windows Firewall 405
File and Printer Sharing Without a
Router: Avoiding the Unidentified
Network Problem 405
Setting Up a Homegroup 406
Alternatives to Using a Homegroup 408
Wrapping Up 409
Joining a Windows Domain Network 410
Bridging Two Network Types 411
xi
xii
Win d o ws 1 0 I n De p th
19 Connecting Your Network to
the Internet 413
Sharing an Internet Connection 413
Selecting a Way to Make the
Connection 414
Managing IP Addresses 415
NAT and Internet Connection
Sharing 416
Special Notes for Wireless
Networking 418
Special Notes for Cable Service 419
Configuring Your LAN 419
Scheme A—Router with a Broadband
Modem 419
Scheme B—Cable Modem, Multiple
Computers 421
Scheme C—Combination Router/
Modem 422
Routed Service with Multiple
Addresses 422
Universal Plug and Play 423
Configuring the Rest of the Network 423
Making Services Available
424
20 Networking with Other
Operating Systems 429
Making Windows Play Well with
Others 429
Internetworking with Windows 8.1, 8, 7,
Vista, and XP 431
Setting TCP/IP as the Default Network
Protocol 432
Password Protection and Simple File
Sharing 433
Using Windows Vista and XP with a
Homegroup 435
Internetworking with Unix and Linux 437
Samba 437
Samba Client Tools 437
Samba Server Tools 438
Internetworking with Macintosh 440
Compatibility Issues 440
Working with Windows Resources from
Mac OS X 442
Installing Optional Network
Components 447
Using the Hosts File 450
21 Using a Windows Network 453
Windows Was Made to Network 453
Using Shared Folders in Windows 10 454
Browsing Through a Homegroup 454
Browsing a Network’s Computers 456
Viewing a Computer or Shared Folder
Directly Using Its UNC Path 458
Searching the Network 458
Searching for Files or Folders 458
Searching for Computers 459
Searching for Printers 459
Searching Active Directory 460
Security and File Sharing 462
File Permissions and Networking 462
Network Permissions 463
Using Printers on the Network 464
Using a Shared Printer 464
Using Printers over the Internet with
IPP 466
Using Unix and LPR Printers 466
Using Other Network-Connected
Printers 467
Network Power User Topics 468
Backing Up Your Computer over the
Network 468
Sharing and Using an Entire Drive 468
Understanding the Universal Naming
Convention 469
Mapping Drive Letters 470
Mapping a Drive to a Subfolder 472
C ont ent s
Sharing Resources 472
Sharing with a Homegroup 473
Sharing the Public Profile Folder 476
Sharing Your Own Folders in Place 477
Sharing Folders Independently 478
VI Maintaining Windows 10
23 Windows Management
Tools 503
Managing Windows
Sharing Printers 479
Setting Printer Permissions 480
Changing the Location of the Spool
Directory 481
Printer Pooling 481
Managing Your Network 482
Monitoring Use of Your Shared
Folders 482
Managing Network Resources Using the
Command Line 483
22 Troubleshooting Your
Network 485
When Good Networks Go Bad 485
Getting Started
486
Using Troubleshooters and Diagnostic
Tools 487
The Network and Sharing Center 487
Network 489
Network Troubleshooters 492
Windows Firewall 493
Event Viewer 493
Device Manager 495
Testing Network Cables
496
Checking Network Configuration 496
ipconfig 496
System 498
Network Connections 499
Testing Network Connectivity with
PING 499
Diagnosing File and Printer Sharing
Problems 501
503
Policing Windows 10 with Group
Policies 504
Understanding Group Policies 504
Local Group Policy Editor and Windows
Versions 504
Launching the Local Group Policy
Editor 505
Working with Group Policies 506
Group Policy Examples 512
Configuring the Microsoft Management
Console 517
Reviewing the Windows 10 Snapins 517
Launching the MMC 519
Adding a Snap-in 520
Saving a Console 522
Creating a Custom Taskpad View 522
Controlling Snap-ins with Group
Policies 526
Controlling Services 527
Controlling Services with the Services
Snap-in 527
Controlling Services at the Command
Prompt 530
Controlling Services with a Script 530
Making Windows Shut Down Services
Faster 534
Resetting a Broken Service 534
Monitoring Performance 536
Monitoring Performance with Task
Manager 536
Using the Resource Monitor 540
Using the Performance Monitor 542
xiii
xiv
Win d o ws 1 0 I n De p th
24 Tweaking and Customizing
Windows 545
Customizing File Explorer 545
Customizing the Ribbon 545
Changing the View 546
Viewing More Properties 548
Turning On File Extensions 549
Exploring the View Options 551
Customizing the Taskbar for Easier Program
and Document Launching 555
Improving Productivity by Setting
Taskbar Options 555
Pinning a Favorite Program to the
Taskbar 557
Using the Windows Key to Start Taskbar
Programs 557
Taking Control of the Notification
Area 558
Displaying the Built-in Taskbar
Toolbars 561
Setting Some Taskbar Toolbar
Options 562
Creating New Taskbar Toolbars 562
25 Managing Hard Disks and
Storage Spaces 563
Dealing with Hard Disk Errors 563
Hard Drive Health States 565
Repairing a Drive Manually 567
Checking Free Disk Space 567
Deleting Unnecessary Files
569
Defragmenting Your Hard Disk 571
Running the Optimize Drives Tool 572
Changing the Optimization
Schedule 573
Changing Which Disks Get
Defragmented 574
Working with Storage Spaces 575
Managing Your Disks 577
Assigning a Different Letter to a Disk
Drive 578
Dividing Your Hard Drive into Two
Volumes 579
Creating a Spanned Volume 581
Creating Mirrored Volumes 585
Creating a RAID 5 Volume 586
Working with Disk Files 589
Mounting an ISO File 589
Mounting a Virtual Hard Disk 591
Creating a Virtual Hard Disk 592
26 Troubleshooting and Repairing
Problems 593
Troubleshooting Strategies: Determining
the Source of a Problem 594
Did You Get an Error Message? 594
Does an Error or Warning Appear in the
Event Viewer Logs? 594
Does an Error Appear in System
Information? 595
Did You Recently Edit the Registry? 596
Did You Recently Change Any Windows
Settings? 596
Did Windows 10 “Spontaneously”
Reboot? 596
Did You Recently Change Any
Application Settings? 599
Did You Recently Install a New
Program? 599
Did You Recently Install a New
Device? 600
Did You Recently Apply an Update from
Windows Update? 600
General Troubleshooting Tips
600
More Troubleshooting Tools 601
Running the Windows 10
Troubleshooters 601
Running the Memory Diagnostics
Tool 602
Checking for Solutions to Problems 603
C ont ent s
Troubleshooting Startup 605
Some Things to Try Before Anything
Else 605
Disabling Startup Programs 606
Disabling Startup Services 606
A Startup Troubleshooting
Procedure 608
Troubleshooting Device Problems 609
Troubleshooting with Device
Manager 609
Troubleshooting Device Driver
Problems 611
Rolling Back a Device Driver 613
Recovering from a Problem 613
Accessing the Recovery
Environment 614
Navigating the Recovery
Environment 617
Booting Up in Safe Mode 621
Automatically Repairing Your PC 624
Recovering Using System Restore 624
Resetting Your PC 625
Restoring a System Image 626
27 Managing Your Software 629
Configuring and Managing Windows
Update 629
Configuring Automatic Updates 629
Setting the Automatic Maintenance
Schedule 632
Checking for Updates 633
Working with Third-Party Software 634
Running Through a Preinstallation
Checklist 635
Installing Software 637
Opening the Programs and Features
Window 638
Changing a Software Installation 639
Repairing a Software Installation 639
Uninstalling Software 639
Understanding Compatibility Mode 640
28 Managing Your Hardware 645
Windows 10 and Hardware 645
Viewing Your Devices
646
Installing Devices 647
Installing Plug and Play Devices 647
Completing a Device Install 648
Installing a Bluetooth Device 649
Running Windows 10 with Multiple
Monitors 651
Extending the Screen to a Second
Monitor 651
Duplicating the Screen on a Second
Monitor 653
Using Only the Second Monitor 653
Configuring the Taskbar for Multiple
Monitors 654
Moving Up to Three Monitors 654
Managing Your Hardware with Device
Manager 656
Controlling the Device Display 657
Viewing Device Properties 658
Showing Nonpresent Devices in Device
Manager 658
Working with Device Drivers 659
Tips for Downloading Device
Drivers 659
Checking Windows Update for
Drivers 660
Updating a Device Driver 661
Configuring Windows to Ignore
Unsigned Device Drivers 662
Write a Complete List of Device Drivers
to a Text File 665
Uninstalling a Device
667
Working with Device Security Policies 667
xv
xvi
Win d o ws 1 0 I n De p th
29 Editing the Windows
Registry 669
What Is the Registry? 669
How the Registry Is Organized 670
New Registry Features 672
Registry Virtualization 672
Registry Redirection and Reflection 674
Backing Up and Restoring the Registry 675
Backing Up the Registry 675
Restoring the Registry 678
Using Regedit 679
Viewing the Registry 680
Searching in the Registry 681
Editing Keys and Values 681
Editing Registry Entries for Another
User 683
Editing Registry Entries for Another
Windows Installation 684
Editing Registry Security 685
Other Registry Tools 687
Registry Toolkit 687
Registrar Registry Manager
Tweak-10 687
Setting Environment Variables 697
Setting the PATH Environment
Variable 699
The MS-DOS Environment 700
Editing Advanced Settings for a DOS
Application 700
Issues with ANSI.SYS and
DOSKEY
701
Printing from MS-DOS Applications 701
Batch Files 702
Batch File Tips
687
30 Command-Line and Automation
Tools 689
689
The Windows 10 Command Prompt
Environment 690
Changing Directories 691
Saving Output 691
The Search Path 692
Command-Line Access from the Power
User Menu 693
Running Commands with Elevated
Privileges 693
Copying and Pasting in the Command
Prompt Window 694
703
Windows Script Host 704
Some Sample Scripts 705
Windows PowerShell
Task Scheduler
Registry Privileges and Policies 687
Command-Line Tools
Transparency 696
Learning About Command-Line
Programs 696
Running GUI Programs from the
Command Line 696
706
708
VII Security
31 Protecting Windows from
Viruses and Spyware 713
Avoiding Viruses and Spyware: The
Basics 713
First, a Few Simple Precautions 714
Locking Your Computer 716
Requiring Ctrl+Alt+Delete at
Startup 717
Checking Your Computer’s Security
Settings 718
Making Sure Windows Firewall Is
Turned On 718
Making Sure Windows Defender Is
Turned On 719
Making Sure User Account Control Is
Turned On 722
C ont ent s
Making Sure the Administrator Account
Is Disabled 722
Understanding User Account Control
(UAC) 723
Elevating Privileges 724
Configuring User Account Control 726
Setting User Account Control
Policies 727
Preventing Elevation for All Standard
Users 728
Enhancing Your Browsing Security 730
Blocking Pop-Up Windows 730
Adding and Removing Zone Sites 732
Changing a Zone’s Security Level 733
Protected Mode: Reducing Internet
Explorer’s Privileges 734
Total Security: Internet Explorer Without
Add-Ons 735
Understanding Internet Explorer’s
Advanced Security Options 736
32 Protecting Your Data from Loss
and Theft 739
Preparing for Trouble 739
Backing Up File Versions with File
History 740
Restoring a Previous Version of a
File 744
Setting System Restore Points 746
Creating a Recovery Drive 748
Creating a System Image Backup 750
Protecting a File 752
Making a File Read-Only 752
Hiding a File 753
Setting Security Permissions on Files and
Folders 754
Assigning a User to a Security
Group 756
Assigning a User to Multiple Security
Groups 757
Assigning Standard Permissions 758
Assigning Special Permissions 759
Fixing Permission Problems by Taking
Ownership of Your Files 761
Encrypting Files and Folders 764
Encrypting a Folder 764
Backing Up Your Encryption Key 765
Encrypting a Disk with BitLocker 766
Enabling BitLocker on a System with a
TPM 767
Enabling BitLocker on a System Without
a TPM 767
33 Protecting Your Network from
Hackers and Snoops 771
It’s a Cold, Cruel World 771
Who Would Be Interested in My
Computer? 772
Types of Attack 773
Your Lines of Defense 775
Preparation: Network Security Basics 776
Active Defenses 778
Firewalls and NAT (Connection-Sharing)
Devices 778
Windows Firewall 779
Packet Filtering 780
Using NAT or Internet Connection
Sharing 782
Using Add-on Firewall Products for
Windows 783
Securing Your Router 783
Configuring Passwords and File
Sharing 784
Setting Up Restrictive Access
Controls 785
Testing, Logging, and Monitoring 786
Testing Your Defenses 787
Monitoring Suspicious Activity 788
Disaster Planning: Preparing for Recovery
After an Attack 789
Making a Baseline Backup Before You
Go Online 789
xvii
xviii
Win d o ws 1 0 I n De p th
Making Frequent Backups When You’re
Online 790
Writing and Testing Server Restore
Procedures 790
Writing and Maintaining
Documentation 790
Preparing an Incident Plan 791
Specific Configuration Steps for
Windows 10 791
Windows 10’s Security Features 792
If You Don’t Have a LAN 793
If You Do Have a LAN 794
Keep Up to Date 794
Tightening Local Security Policy 794
Configuring Windows Firewall 797
Enable and Disable Windows
Firewall 798
Allow an App or Feature Through
Windows Firewall 799
Change Notification Settings, Turn
Windows Firewall On or Off 800
Restore Defaults 801
Advanced Settings 801
More About Security
803
34 Protecting Yourself from Fraud
and Spam 805
Phishing for Information 805
Common Types of Fraud 806
Live Phish: A Real-World Example 808
More Help from the Browser 813
How to Protect Yourself on a Public
Computer 814
Two-Way Authentication 814
Two-Factor Authentication 815
Identity-Management Software 815
Fighting Spam 816
Protecting Your Email Address 817
Using Spam Filtering 818
Avoiding Spammers’ Tricks 818
Taking Action Against Email Abuse 819
Whois Database 820
VIII Windows On the Move
35 Windows on Mobile
Devices 823
Windows 10 on Tablets and Mobile
Devices 823
Managing Mobile Computers 825
Airplane Mode 825
Getting the Most Out of Your
Battery 827
Using Windows Mobility Center 831
Using Tablet Input Methods 833
Touch Keyboard 834
The On Screen Keyboard 835
Touch Input and Gestures 835
Pen and Stylus Input 835
Configuring Touch and Pen Input 836
Configuring Pen Flicks
836
Using Handwriting Recognition 838
Handwriting Gestures 839
Training the Handwriting
Recognizer 839
36 Wireless Networking
841
Wireless Networking in Windows 10 841
Types of Wi-Fi Networks 842
Take Care When You Share 842
Connecting with Wi-Fi Sense 843
Joining a Wireless Network 845
In the Corporate Environment 847
At Your Home or Small Office 848
In Someone Else’s Home or Office 848
At a Public Hot Spot 849
Ad Hoc Networks and Meetings 850
Managing Wireless Network
Connections 851
Changing Wireless Settings 852
Setting Up Preferred Wireless
Networks 852
C ont ent s
Adding a Network Manually 853
Deleting Wireless Profiles 854
37 Networking on the Road 855
Windows Unplugged: Mobile and Remote
Networking 855
VPN and Dial-Up Networking 856
Virtual Private Networking 857
Setting Up a VPN Connection 858
Editing a VPN Connection’s
Properties 859
Establishing a VPN Connection 860
Using Remote Network Resources 862
Using Email and Network
Connections 863
Monitoring and Ending a VPN
Connection 863
Setting Up Advanced Routing for Remote
Networks 863
Incoming VPN Access 865
Setting Up VPN Access 866
Enabling Incoming VPN Connections
with NAT 867
Disabling Incoming Connections 868
Offline Files 868
Identifying Files and Folders for Offline
Use 870
Using Files While Offline 871
Using Sync Center 873
Managing and Encrypting Offline
Files 875
Making Your Shared Folders Available
for Offline Use by Others 876
Multiple LAN Connections
877
38 Meetings, Conferencing, and
Collaboration 879
Windows 10 Plays Well with Others 879
Making Presentations with a Mobile
Computer 880
Adjusting Presentation Settings 880
xix
Controlling an External Display 882
Connecting to Wireless Displays 883
Remote Assistance 884
Enabling Remote Assistance 885
Requesting Remote Assistance 885
Responding to an Assistance
Request 888
Working with Remote Assistance 889
Using Third-Party Tools 891
Online Meeting Tools
891
39 Remote Desktop and Remote
Access 893
Using Your Computer Remotely 893
Setting Up Access to Your Own
Computer 895
Enabling Remote Desktop Access to
Your Computer 896
Establishing 24/7 Access 897
Setting Up Dynamic DNS 898
Configuring Port Forwarding 900
Connecting to Other Computers with
Remote Desktop 902
Using the Modern-Style Remote Desktop
App 903
Using the Standard Remote Desktop
Client 906
Third-Party Remote Control Tools 912
IX Appendixes
A Virtualization
915
B Command-Line Utilities
Index 965
925
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
Brian Knittel is a software developer, consultant, and writer. He has authored or coauthored
many of Que’s best-selling Windows books, including Que’s leading Windows books, Windows
8.1 In Depth, Windows 8 In Depth, Windows 7 In Depth, and Special Edition Using Microsoft
Windows for Windows 2000 and XP. Brian is also the author of Windows 7 and Vista Guide to
Scripting, Automation, and Command Line Tools and Windows XP Under the Hood. In addition,
Brian coauthored Upgrading and Repairing Microsoft Windows with Scott Mueller.
Paul McFedries is the author of more than 85 computer books that have sold more than
4 million copies worldwide. His recent titles include the Sams Publishing books Microsoft
Windows 7 Unleashed and Microsoft Windows Vista Unleashed and the Que Publishing books
PCs for Grownups, Formulas and Functions for Excel 2016, and My Office 2016. Paul also is the
proprietor of Word Spy (www.wordspy.com), a website devoted to tracking new words and
phrases as they enter the English language.
Dedication
To my parents, who supported every odd interest and hobby that led to this topsyturvy career. —Brian
To Karen, who gives new meaning to the phrase “better half.” —Paul
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
It’s an honor to work with a highly respected publisher like Que. We are grateful to our editorin-chief, Greg Wiegand, and executive editor, Rick Kughen, who played matchmaker and
shepherd and brought together a great team to write and produce this book. We thank Faithe
Wempen for her insight and attention to detail in development and editing, Chuck Hutchinson,
for copy editing, and Tonya Simpson, for keeping everyone on track and making the production
process seem effortless. Don’t let those job descriptions fool you—at Que at least, titles such
as “development editor” and “copy editor” don’t begin to describe the breadth of the contributions that each team member makes to each book.
We’d also like to acknowledge the support of our technical editor, Karen Weinstein, who meticulously checked every detail and tried every procedure. Then, there is an entire army of people
who labor largely unseen and unthanked—the people who do the real work—the editorial,
indexing, layout, art, proofing, and other production staff at Que. And finally, thanks to everyone from the marketing and sales folks at Que to the booksellers who ensured that this book
made it from the printing press to your hands.
We also thank Maureen Maloney at Waterside Productions for great work in taking care of the
legal mumbo jumbo part of the book business.
We Want to Hear from You!
As the reader of this book, you are our most important critic and commentator. We value your
opinion and want to know what we’re doing right, what we could do better, what areas you’d
like to see us publish in, and any other words of wisdom you’re willing to pass our way.
We welcome your comments. You can email or write to let us know what you did or didn’t like
about this book—as well as what we can do to make our books better.
Please note that we cannot help you with technical problems related to the topic of this book.
When you write, please be sure to include this book’s title and author as well as your name
and email address. We will carefully review your comments and share them with the author
and editors who worked on the book.
Email:
[email protected]
Mail:
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ATTN: Reader Feedback
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Reader Services
Visit our website and register this book at quepublishing.com/register for convenient access to
any updates, downloads, or errata that might be available for this book.
INTRODUCTION
Welcome
We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
—T. S. Eliot
Thank you for purchasing or considering the purchase of Windows 10 In
Depth. Windows 10 is, in short, a bold, thoughtful, and well-executed step
forward in Microsoft’s quest to create a single operating system that looks
and acts the same across all devices, from desktop PCs to tablets, notebooks to telephones, and eventually even vending machines and gaming
consoles. Rather than taking Apple’s approach of having one OS for computers (OS X) and a second OS for phones and tablets (iOS), Microsoft has
committed itself to the “One Ring to Rule Them All” principle, and has
engineered Windows 10 to efficiently manage both types of devices.
If this sounds familiar, it’s because Microsoft attempted to do this in 2013
with Windows 8, which was, not to put too fine a point on it, universally
reviled. If there was one positive thing that you could say about it, it was
that in comparison it made Windows Vista look like a spectacular success.
There were two main problems: first, a lack of flexibility, especially on
desktop computers. While a full-screen, one-application-at-a-time interface
2
I n tro d u ctio n
is sensible on a phone or tablet, on a desktop computer it was a productivity drain of black hole
proportions. The second and worse problem was that Microsoft could have made it work well but
refused. The company’s attitude at the time was essentially, “This is what you’re going to get, and
it doesn’t matter if you don’t like it. You’re stuck with it, so get used to it.”
It turns out that this wasn’t a spectacularly effective business strategy.
So, now, after firing the CEO and the Windows Division president, eating nearly $2 billion in losses
from its Surface Tablet product line, and skipping an entire version number just to show that it’s
really moved on, a much humbler, much more responsive Microsoft has released a new operating
system. It kept what was good about Windows 8 and either tossed out or fixed the rest. The folks at
Microsoft listened...really listened; in fact, they let the public vote on how Windows 10 would work.
And the result is very, very good.
Microsoft backtracked on two key points:
• On traditional desktop and laptop computers, “Modern*” apps no longer have to run full-screen,
one at a time. They can now run in normal windows, which you can move around and open and
close.
• The Start menu is back. It’s modernized, but it’s recognizable as the Windows Start menu that
we’ve had since 1995.
And still, Windows 10 has enough of the new to be interesting. There’s an online personal digital
assistant named Cortana. There are Modern apps and the Windows Store from which to find and
install them. And, according to Microsoft, this is the last version of Windows you’ll ever have to
install. The plan is to incrementally improve and polish it bit by bit over the years, through frequent
automatic updates.
If you’re upgrading from Windows 8.1, you’ll find that this version of Windows is easier to use.
There are fewer “secrets.” You know what we mean: those invisible places you had to click or
bizarre gestures you had to make with your finger to perform even basic tasks.
And, despite all the new features, if you skipped Windows 8 and are moving up, or are considering
moving up, from Windows 7 or XP, you’ll find that almost everything you know about Windows still
applies to Windows 10—you just have to learn some new routes to reach old places. In this book,
we show you not only how to use all the new features, but also how to quickly and easily navigate
to the parts of Windows that you’re already familiar with.
This book covers the main desktop, notebook, and tablet versions of Windows 10: Windows 10
Home, Windows 10 Pro (which includes advanced features such as virtualization, encryption,
Remote Desktop hosting, and group policy), and Windows 10 Enterprise (which includes additional
features for enterprise IT support and security). Windows 10 Education version is Windows 10
Enterprise licensed for educational institutions. We cover how to use Enterprise and Education,
although we don’t cover the server-side management tools that are supplied with Windows Server
operating systems.
* These are programs based on software technology that makes them as capable of running on phones and
tablets that have only a touchscreen and no mouse or keyboard as they are on desktop computers. Microsoft
doesn’t know quite what to call them. They’ve tried a bunch of names, including Metro apps, Windows 8
Style-apps, and Windows Store apps. In this book we call them Modern apps. We talk about this in Chapter 1.
Why T his B ook?
3
Although some of what we cover here also applies to the small-device version called Windows
Mobile, we don’t explicitly cover that version in this book.
Why This Book?
Windows has been evolving, mostly incrementally, since 1985. Each new version has new features.
Some you can figure out on your own, but some require explanation. Some features, such as networking, are easy enough to use but are very complex underneath, and setting them up can involve
making complex technical decisions. In some cases, years might go by between the times that
you use some management tool, and your human random access memory might need refreshing.
Computer books come to the rescue for all of these needs, giving step-by-step instructions, helpful
advice, and detailed reference material for the future.
Although usually the path from one version of Windows to the next is smooth and straight, every
so often there is a big bump in the road. The first was with Windows 95, where the Start button appeared and the right mouse button suddenly became very important. The next bump was
Windows XP, which marked the move from MS-DOS to the Windows NT operating system kernel,
to a security system for files, and to a whole new way of managing Windows. It happened again
with Windows 8. The Start button disappeared, and you had to use arcane “gestures” and tools to
get anywhere.
Windows 10 fixes most of those problems, but there are still a bunch of shortcuts and tricks that
you’ll want to know about. We found these out for ourselves as we worked with Windows 10 daily,
for months, as we wrote this book. We didn’t have anyone’s guidance then, but you do now. In this
book, we’ll show you how to manage the Windows 10 interface without a struggle.
In addition to getting you through the steeper parts of the Windows 10 learning curve, we’ll give
you the benefit of our combined 50-plus years of experience working with, writing about, and even
writing software for Microsoft Windows. We know what parts of using and managing Windows are
confusing. We know the easy ways to do things. We’ve seen just about every bug and glitch, have
been through just about every ugly scenario one can come up with, and have made just about every
mistake one can make. Therefore, we can spare you from having to repeat some of them.
You might also appreciate that in this book, we can be honest with you. We don’t work for
Microsoft, so we can tell you what we really feel about the product: the good, the bad, and the
downright ugly. If we say something’s great, it’s because we think it is; and if we hate something,
we’ll tell you, and we’ll try to show you how to avoid it.
Our book addresses both home and business computer users. As we wrote, we imagined that you,
our reader, are a friend or coworker who is familiar enough with your computer to know what it’s
capable of, but might not know the details of how to make it all happen. So we show you, in a helpful, friendly, professional tone. We make an effort not just to tell you what to do, but why you’re
doing it. If you understand how Windows and its component parts work, you can get through rough
patches: diagnosing problems, fixing things that the built-in wizards can’t fix, and otherwise solving
problems creatively.
And if you’re looking for power-user tips and some nitty-gritty details, we make sure you get those,
too. We try to make clear what information is essential for you to understand and what is optional
for just those of you who are especially interested.
4
I n tro d u ctio n
However, no one book can do it all. As the title says, this book is about the versions of Windows
10 that run on desktop computers, notebooks, and mobile devices (tablets) that have an Intelcompatible processor. Our coverage of the new Modern interface, Start menu, apps, management
tools, and setup panels for the most part apply to tablets that run Windows 10 Mobile; however, a
few parts of this book won’t apply to those devices, and if you have one, you might want to get a
book that specifically addresses that operating system.
We also don’t have room to cover how to set up or manage the various Microsoft Server operating
systems, such as Windows Server 2016, or how to deploy or manage Windows 10 using enterprise
tools that are provided only with those operating systems. For these topics, you’ll need to consult a
Windows Server book.
Because of space limitations, only one chapter is devoted to coverage of the numerous Windows 10
command-line utilities, its batch file language, Windows Script Host, and Windows PowerShell. For
that (in spades!), you might want to check out Brian’s book Windows 7 and Vista Guide to Scripting,
Automation, and Command Line Tools, which is equally applicable to Windows 10.
Even when you’ve become a Windows 10 pro, we think you’ll find this book to be a valuable source
of reference information in the future. Both the table of contents and the very complete index provide an easy means for locating information when you need it quickly.
How Our Book Is Organized
Although this book advances logically from beginning to end, it’s written so that you can jump in at
any location, quickly get the information you need, and get out. You don’t have to read it from start
to finish. (Remember, the index at the back of the book is your best friend.)
If you’re new to Windows 10, however, we do recommend that you read Chapter 3, “Your First Hour
with Windows 10,” and Chapter 4, “Using the Windows 10 Interface,” in their entirety. Windows
10 has new ways of doing things that aren’t always entirely intuitive or obvious. Reading these two
chapters might save you hours of frustration.
This book is broken down into six major parts. Here’s the scoop on each one:
Part I, “Starting Out with Windows 10,” introduces the new Windows 10 user interface, and shows
you how to install Windows 10 on a new computer or upgrade an older version of Windows to
Windows 10. In addition, we take you on a one-hour guided tour that shows you the best of the new
Windows 10 features, and we walk you through making essential settings and adjustments that will
help you get the most out of your computer. Consider this the Windows 10 version of “freshman
orientation.”
In Part II, “Using Windows 10,” we cover the new Modern user interface and apps, managing documents and files, starting and stopping applications, searching for files and media, printing, and
using the included desktop accessories and accessibility tools. In other words, this section covers all
the routine, day-to-day stuff. However, it’s very important material: Windows 10 does many things
differently, and using it can be frustrating and confusing, especially if you don’t know the basic
tricks and techniques.
Part III, “Multimedia and Imaging,” covers the Windows 10 bells and whistles, including Windows
Media Player, imaging devices, using a document scanner, faxing, and all the other media tools that
ship with Windows.
How Our B ook Is Organized
5
In Part IV, “Windows 10 and the Internet,” we help you set up an Internet connection and then
move on to cover the Windows 10 Internet tools. The final chapter in this part shows you how to
diagnose Internet connection problems.
Any home or office with two or more computers needs a local area network (LAN) to easily transfer and back up files, share printers, and use a shared high-speed Internet connection. In Part V,
“Networking,” we walk you through setting up a network in your home or office, and show you how
to take advantage of it in day-to-day use. We also show you how easy it is to share a DSL or cable
Internet connection with all your computers at once, show you how to network with other operating
systems, and, finally, help you fix it when it all stops working.
Part VI, “Maintaining Windows 10,” covers system configuration, maintenance, and troubleshooting. We tell you how to work with the huge assortment of Windows 10 management tools, show
you various useful tweaks and customizations, take you through some hard disk management techniques, give you advice on troubleshooting and repairing problems, show you how to manage software and hardware, and give you the details on editing the Windows Registry. And for real power
users, we show how to use and tweak the command-line interface.
When Windows was introduced more than two decades ago, computer viruses, online fraud, and
hacking were only starting to emerge as threats. Today (thanks in great part to gaping security
holes in previous versions of Windows), computer threats are a worldwide problem, online and
offline. In Part VII, “Security,” we provide a 360-degree view of the ways in which Windows protects you and your data. Here, you’ll find out both what Windows 10 will do to help you and what
you must do for yourself. We cover protection against viruses and spyware, data loss and theft,
hackers and snoops, and fraud and spam—in that order.
Part VIII, “Windows On the Move,” shows you how to get the most out of Windows 10 when either
you or your computer, or both, are on the go. We show you how to use a touch or pen interface on
a Windows tablet or some other mobile PC, how to use wireless networking safely, how to get the
most out of your laptop or tablet PC when traveling, and how to connect to remote networks. We
also show you how to remotely connect to and use your Windows 10 computer from anywhere in
the world.
Appendix A, “Virtualization,” explains how to use Microsoft’s Hyper-V virtualization technology
to run other operating systems side by side with Windows 10, or to run Windows 10 within some
other operating system. This can be an excellent alternative to setting up a dual-boot system.
And, finally, Appendix B, “Command-Line Utilities,” takes you through a tour of various Windows
command-line utilities.
6
I n tro d u ctio n
Conventions Used in This Book
Special conventions are used throughout this book to help you get the most from the book and from
Windows 10.
Text Conventions
Various typefaces in this book identify terms and other special objects. These special typefaces
include the following:
Type
Meaning
Italic
New terms or phrases when initially defined
Monospace
Information that appears in code or onscreen in command-line tools
All Windows book publishers struggle with how to represent command sequences when menus
and dialog boxes are involved. In this book, we separate commands using a comma. Yeah, we
know it’s confusing, but this is traditionally how Que’s books do it, and traditions die hard. So,
for example, the instruction “Choose Edit, Cut” means that you should open the Edit menu and
choose Cut. Another, more complex example is “Select Control Panel, System and Security, Change
Battery Settings.”
Key combinations are represented with a plus sign. For example, if the text calls for you to press
Ctrl+Alt+Delete, you would press the Ctrl, Alt, and Delete keys at the same time. The letterless
“Windows Logo” key is very useful in Windows 10. In key combinations it appears as, for example,
“Windows Logo+X.”
Special Elements
Throughout this book, you’ll find Notes, Tips, Cautions, Sidebars, Cross-References, and
Troubleshooting Notes. Hopefully, they’ll give you just the tidbit you need to get through a tough
problem, or the one trick that will make you the office hero. You’ll also find little nuggets of wisdom,
humor, and lingo that you can use to amaze your friends and family, or that might come in handy as
cocktail-party conversation starters.
tip
We specially designed these tips to showcase the best of the best. Just because you get your work done
doesn’t mean you’re doing it in the fastest, easiest way possible. We show you how to maximize your
Windows experience. Don’t miss these tips!
note
Notes point out items that you should be aware of, but you can skip them if you’re in a hurry. Generally,
we’ve added notes as a way to give you some extra information on a topic without weighing you down.
C onvent ions U sed in This B ook
7
caution
Pay attention to cautions! They could save you precious hours in lost work.
Something Isn’t Working
Throughout the book we describe some common trouble symptoms and tell you how to diagnose and fix problems with Windows, hardware, and software.
We Had More to Say
We use sidebars to dig a little deeper into the more esoteric features, settings, or peculiarities
of Windows. Some sidebars are used to explain something in more detail when doing so in the
main body text would’ve been intrusive or distracting. Sometimes, we just needed to get something off our chests and rant a bit. Don’t skip the sidebars, because you’ll find nuggets of pure
gold in them (if we do say so ourselves).
We designed these elements to call attention to common pitfalls that you’re likely to encounter.
Finally, cross-references are designed to point you to other locations in this book (or other books in
the Que family) that provide supplemental or supporting information. Cross-references appear as follows:
➥ To learn more about the Start menu and Modern apps, see “Taking a Tour of the
Windows 10 Interface,” p. 105.
Let’s get started!
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4
USING THE WINDOWS 10
INTERFACE
Taking a Tour of the Windows
10 Interface
“Ah, that’s better.” That was our first thought when we saw the
Windows 10 interface, which does away with the much-maligned
Windows 8/8.1 interface and its jarring and inefficient switching between
the Start screen and the desktop. Instead, we’re back to an interface
that’s more reminiscent of Windows 7, with a desktop front and center
supplemented by a Start menu that implements some of the nicer features
of the Windows 8/8.1 Start screen. The Windows 10 interface might look
familiar, but there’s lots that’s new, so the goal of this chapter is to help
you get comfortable with this new look. That is, you learn exactly how
the Windows 10 interface works, what shortcuts you can use to make it
easier, and what customizations you can apply to make it your own.
Let’s begin with a tour of the Windows 10 interface. Figure 4.1 shows the
Windows 10 desktop and Start menu.
PART
Usin g th e Win d o ws 1 0 I nt erface
106
II
Frequent apps
User account
Start menu
Figure 4.1
The Windows
10 interface: the
desktop and Start
menu, together
again at long
last.
Desktop
Tiles
Live tile
Start button
Search box
System icons
Pinned apps
Task View
Taskbar
Notification area
The Windows 10 screen offers the following main features:
• Start button—It’s back! As with Windows 7 and most earlier versions of Windows, the Start button appears in the lower-left corner of the screen, and you click it to display the Start menu.
• Start menu—The new Start menu is divided into two sections. On the left is a navigation section that gives you access to your user account; your most frequently used apps; system features
such as File Explorer, Settings, and Power; and the rest of your apps (via the All Apps command). On the right is a scaled-down version of the Windows 8/8.1 Start screen that offers quick
viewing and access to the tiles (see the next item) of a few apps.
• Tiles—The rectangles you see on the right side of the Start menu each represent an item on your
PC—most tiles represent apps, but you can also add tiles for folders and websites—and you click
a tile to launch that item. Tiles can appear in one of four sizes (see “Resizing a Tile,” later in this
chapter).
• Live tiles—Many of the Start menu tiles are “live” in the sense that they display often-updated
information instead of the app icon. For example, the Weather tile shows the current weather for
your default location; the Mail tile displays recent email messages; and the Calendar tile shows
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your upcoming events. Note that these tiles don’t display any live content until you have used
them at least once.
• All Apps—Clicking this icon displays a complete list of the apps and desktop programs installed
on your PC. Click Back to return to the main Start menu.
• User account—Clicking this icon gives you access to several account-related tasks (see Figure
4.2): accessing the Accounts section of the Settings app, locking your PC, and signing out of your
account.
Figure 4.2
Click your user account tile for quick access to some account features
and commands.
• Desktop—Relegated to a mere “app” in Windows 8/8.1, the desktop is back in Windows 10 and
resumes its (rightful, in our opinion) place in the main interface as the default location for programs and documents.
• Taskbar—This strip along the bottom of the screen displays icons for each running app. You can
also pin an app’s icon so that a shortcut to it remains in the taskbar even when the app isn’t running.
• Search box—You use this box to search your PC. We’ve found that this feature is the easiest way
to launch apps, settings, and documents in Windows 10.
• Task View—Click this taskbar icon to display thumbnails of your running apps and to create virtual desktops (see “Working with Virtual Desktops,” later in this chapter).
• Pinned apps—The Windows 10 taskbar comes with several pinned apps, which means those
icons remain on the taskbar even when the apps are closed. To learn how to work with pinned
apps, see “Pinning an App to the Taskbar,” later in this chapter.
• Notification area—This part of the taskbar displays various system icons for features such as
networking, sound, and power, as well as the notification issued by Windows.
Navigating Windows 10 with a Keyboard
Windows 10 offers a huge number of Windows Logo key–based shortcuts that not only enable you
to navigate the Windows 10 interface quickly but also let you easily invoke many Windows 10 features and programs. Table 4.1 provides the complete list.
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Table 4.1 Keyboard Shortcuts for Navigating Windows 10
Press This
To Do This
Windows Logo
Toggle the Start menu
Windows Logo+A
Open the Notifications pane
Windows Logo+B
Activate the notification area’s Show Hidden Icons arrow
(press Enter to display the hidden icons)
Windows Logo+C
Open Cortana for voice commands
Windows Logo+D
Minimize all open windows to display the desktop
Windows Logo+E
Run File Explorer
Windows Logo+F
Display the Start menu and activate the Search box
Windows Logo+H
Display the Share pane
Windows Logo+I
Run the Settings app
Windows Logo+K
Display the Devices pane
Windows Logo+L
Lock your computer
Windows Logo+M
Minimize all windows
Windows Logo+O
Turn the tablet orientation lock on and off
Windows Logo+P
Display the Project pane to configure a second display
Windows Logo+Q
Open Cortana for voice commands
Windows Logo+R
Open the Run dialog box
Windows Logo+S
Open Cortana for keyboard commands
Windows Logo+T
Activate the taskbar icons (use the arrow keys to navigate
the icons)
Windows Logo+U
Open the Ease of Access Center
Windows Logo+W
Activate the Search box
Windows Logo+X
Display a menu of Windows tools and utilities
Windows Logo+Z
Display an app’s commands (although this works in only
some Modern apps)
Windows Logo+=
Open Magnifier and zoom in
Windows Logo+-
Zoom out (if already zoomed in using Magnifier)
Windows Logo+,
Temporarily display the desktop
Windows Logo+Enter
Open Narrator
Windows Logo+Left
Snap the current app to the left side of the screen
Windows Logo+Right
Snap the current app to the right side of the screen
Windows Logo+Up
Restore a minimized app; maximize a restored app
Windows Logo+Down
Restore a maximized app; minimize a restored app
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Press This
To Do This
Windows Logo+PgUp
Move the current app to the left monitor
Windows Logo+PgDn
Move the current app to the right monitor
Windows Logo+PrtSc
Capture the current screen and save it to the Pictures folder
Windows Logo+Ctrl+D
Create a virtual desktop
Windows Logo+Ctrl+Right
Switch to the next virtual desktop
Windows Logo+Ctrl+Left
Switch to the previous virtual desktop
Windows Logo+Ctrl+F4
Close the current virtual desktop
Windows Logo+Tab
Open Task View, which displays thumbnails for each running app as well as the available virtual desktops
Navigating Windows 10 with a Touch Interface
We used to always say that Windows was built with the mouse in mind. After all, the easiest way
to use screen elements such as the Start menu, the taskbar, toolbars, ribbons, and dialog boxes
was via mouse manipulation. However, for tablet PCs that come with no input devices other than a
touchscreen, it’s now safe to say that Windows 10 was built with touch in mind. That is, instead of
using a mouse or keyboard to manipulate Windows 10, you use your fingers to touch the screen in
specific ways called gestures. (Some tablet PCs also come with a small penlike device called a stylus, and you can use the stylus instead of your finger for some actions.)
What are these gestures? Here’s a list:
• Tap—Use your finger (or the stylus) to touch the screen and then immediately release it. This is
the touch equivalent of a mouse click.
• Double-tap—Tap and release the screen twice, one tap right after the other. This is the touch
equivalent of a mouse double-click.
• Tap and hold—Tap the screen and leave your finger (or the stylus) resting on the screen until
the shortcut menu appears. This is the touch equivalent of a mouse right-click.
• Swipe—Quickly and briefly run your finger along the screen. This usually causes the screen to
scroll in the direction of the swipe, so it’s roughly equivalent to scrolling with the mouse wheel.
You also use the swipe to display some of the Windows 10 interface elements: Swipe up from
the bottom edge of the screen to display the taskbar, swipe right from the left edge to open Task
View, and so on.
• Slide—Place your finger on the screen, move your finger, and then release. This is the touch
equivalent of a mouse click and drag, so you usually use this technique to move an object from
one place to another. However, this is also ideal for scrolling, so you can scroll an app vertically
by sliding your finger up and down on the screen, or horizontally by sliding your finger right
and left on the screen, making this technique the touch equivalent of clicking and dragging the
scroll box.
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• Pinch—Place two fingers apart on the screen and bring them
closer together. This gesture zooms out on whatever is displayed on the screen, such as a photo.
• Spread—Place two fingers close together on the screen and
move them farther apart. This gesture zooms in on whatever
is displayed on the screen, such as a photo.
• Turn—Place two fingers on the screen and turn them clockwise or counterclockwise. This gesture rotates whatever is
displayed on the screen, such as a photo.
note
If you don’t see the Touch
Keyboard icon in the taskbar,
tap and hold the taskbar to
display the shortcut menu,
and then tap Show Touch
Keyboard Button.
You can also use touch to enter text by using the onscreen touch keyboard, shown in Figure 4.3. To
display the keyboard in an app, tap inside whatever box you’ll be using to type the text; you can
also tap the Touch Keyboard icon that appears in the taskbar’s notification area.
Figure 4.3
To type on a touch PC, use
the onscreen keyboard.
Tap here to enter numbers and symbols
Tap here for more keyboard layouts
As pointed out in Figure 4.3, you can tap the key in the bottom-right corner to see a selection of keyboard layouts, including the one shown in Figure 4.3, a split keyboard, and a writing pad for inputting handwritten text using a stylus (or, in a pinch, a finger). A full keyboard is also available. It’s
activated by default, but if you don’t see it, you must follow these steps to enable it:
1. Tap Start.
2. Tap Settings to open the Settings pane.
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3. Tap Devices.
4. Tap Typing.
5. Tap the Add the Standard Keyboard Layout as a Touch Keyboard Option switch to On.
6. Tap Close (X).
➥ To learn more about using the touch keyboard, see “Touch Keyboard,” p. 834.
Working with Running Apps
One of the ironies of Windows 8/8.1 “features” that we didn’t like was that, at least as far as the
interface went, there no longer seemed to be any windows. After all, when you launched an app, it
didn’t appear inside a box. Apps technically did appear in a window; it’s just that by default those
windows took up the entire screen. Fortunately, that window weirdness is behind us now, and
in Windows 10 all apps appear within bona fide, readily recognizable windows. You’ll see this for
yourself over the next three sections as we take you through various techniques for manipulating
running apps.
Snapping an App
One way you can take advantage of the “windowness” of apps (both Modern and Desktop) is to
show more than one app onscreen at the same time. So, for example, you could display your Money
app stock watch list while simultaneously surfing the Web, or watch what your Facebook friends
are up to while also shopping in the Windows Store.
You do this by snapping the current app to the left or right side
of the screen. This means that the app automatically resizes itself
to half the screen width and parks itself on the left or right side of
the screen, and then the next app takes up the rest of the screen.
Figure 4.4 shows the Money app snapped to the left side of the
screen, while Internet Explorer covers the rest.
note
In Windows 8, you couldn’t
snap an app unless your
screen resolution was set to
at least 1366×768, but that
restriction was removed in
Windows 8.1 and isn’t part of
Windows 10.
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Figure 4.4
You can display
two apps at the
same time by
snapping an app
to the left or
right side of the
screen.
To snap an app, use the mouse or your finger to drag the app’s
title bar to the left or right side of the screen and then release.
That’s a pretty good trick, but Windows 10 goes one better by
enabling you to snap four apps at once. You do so by snapping
apps to the corners of the screen instead of to the sides. For
example, if you drag an app window to the upper-left corner of
the screen, Windows 10 snaps the app into that corner and automatically resizes it so that it takes up half the screen width and
half the screen height.
tip
Another way to snap the current app is to hold down the
Windows Logo key and tap
either the left- or right-arrow
key repeatedly. Windows
10 cycles the app through
snap left, snap right, and
unsnapped.
Note, too, that you can mix these snap techniques. For example,
you could snap two apps to the left side of the screen—one in the
upper-left corner and one in the lower-left corner—and then snap a third app to the right edge to fill
the remainder of the screen.
tip
You’re not restricted to snapped apps taking up exactly one half or one quarter of the screen. After you
snap an app, you can adjust the size of the window as needed. When you then snap an app to an adjacent
area, Windows 10 is smart enough to resize that app’s window to fit the space available. For example, suppose you snap an app to the right side, then adjust the width so that it takes up two-thirds of the screen. If
you then snap an app to the left side, Windows 10 will resize that app’s window to take up just the remaining one-third of the screen.
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Switching Between Running Apps
If you have multiple apps going, Windows 10 does away with the convoluted Windows 8/8.1 techniques for switching between them. Now you can switch to any running app either by clicking a visible portion of its window or by clicking its taskbar button. If an app isn’t visible or you’re not sure
which taskbar icon to click, here are two other techniques you can use:
• Click the taskbar’s Task View button to display thumbnails of your running apps, as shown in
Figure 4.5; then click the app you want to use. From the keyboard, press Windows Logo+Tab to
activate Task View, use the arrow keys to select the app, and then press Enter.
• Hold down Alt and press Tab until the app you want is selected; then release Alt to switch to
that app.
Figure 4.5
Use Windows
10’s new Task
View to view and
switch between
your running
apps.
Pinning an App to the Taskbar
For our money, by far the easiest way to launch an app in Windows 10 is to pin your favorite programs to the taskbar, which puts the app just a click away.
You can pin a program to the taskbar either from the Start menu or from the desktop. First, here’s
the Start menu method:
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1. Click Start and then locate the app you want to pin.
2. Right-click the app.
3. Click Pin to Taskbar. Windows 10 adds an icon for the program to the taskbar.
Here’s how to pin a running desktop program to the taskbar:
tip
You can also pin an app to
the taskbar by dragging the
app from the Start menu and
dropping it on an empty section of the taskbar.
1. Launch the program you want to pin.
2. Right-click the running program’s taskbar icon.
3. Click Pin This Program to Taskbar. Windows 10 adds an icon
for the program to the taskbar.
Using Desktop Apps as the Defaults
tip
Windows 10 displays the taskbar icons left to right in the
order in which you pinned
them. To change the order,
click and drag a taskbar icon
to the left or right and then
drop it in the new position.
It’s an unfortunate fact of Windows 10 life that many of the socalled Modern apps are actually extremely simple programs that
offer only minimal feature sets. We don’t recommend using them,
but Windows 10 often tries to force the issue by using many apps
as the default programs for certain file types. For example, if you double-click a JPEG file in File
Explorer, Windows 10 opens it in the Photos app. Similarly, double-click an MP3 file and Windows
10 plays the song using the Music app.
Fortunately, with a bit of work you can configure Windows 10 to open these and other file types
using desktop programs. Here are the steps to follow:
1. In the taskbar’s Search box, type set default.
2. In the search results, click Default Programs. The Default Programs window appears.
3. Click Set Your Default Programs. The Set Default Programs window appears.
4. Click a desktop program that you want to use for opening one or more file types. For example, to
change how Windows opens MP3 files, click Windows Media Player.
5. Click Choose Defaults for This Program. The Set Program Associations window appears.
6. Select the check box beside each file type that you want to associate with this program. For
example, in Figure 4.6 you can see that we’re working with Windows Media Player and that
we’ve selected the .mp3 check box.
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Figure 4.6
Use the Set
Program
Associations
window to
associate file
types with
a desktop
program.
7. Click Save. Windows 10 associates the program with the file types you selected.
8. Repeat steps 4–7 to set the defaults for your other desktop programs.
9. Click OK.
Working with Notifications
If you’re a Windows old-timer, you’re certainly all too familiar with the notification area in the taskbar, which displays balloons whenever Windows or an application has information for you. Those
notifications are still available, but that older style of notification appears only for desktop programs.
Windows 10 and all apps use a different system in which the notifications appear as larger fly-out
messages above the notification area. For example, you might add an appointment to the Calendar
app and ask the app to remind you about it, and that reminder appears as a notification. Similarly, if
you use the Alarms app to set an alarm, the alarm message and options appear as a notification.
These notifications appear briefly in the lower-right corner of the screen. For example, Figure 4.7
shows the notification that appears when you insert a USB flash drive. In this case, Windows 10 is
wondering what you want to do with the drive.
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Figure 4.7
Notifications appear in the lower-right corner of the
screen.
To handle the notification, click it. Windows 10 then takes you
to the app that generated the notification. If the notification was
generated by Windows 10 itself, it displays more information. In
the flash drive example, Windows 10 displays a list of options
similar to the one shown in Figure 4.8.
tip
Notifications appear for only
a few seconds. To keep a
notification onscreen indefinitely, move your mouse
pointer over the notification.
Figure 4.8
Click a notification, and Windows 10 either displays
more information, as shown here, or switches to
the app that generated the
notification.
Searching Windows 10
If you use your PC regularly, there’s an excellent chance that its hard drive is crammed with thousands, perhaps even tens of thousands, of files that take up hundreds, perhaps even thousands, of
gigabytes. That’s a lot of data, but it leads to a huge and growing problem: finding things. We all
want to have the proverbial information at our fingertips, but these days our fingertips tend to fumble around more often than not, trying to locate not only documents and other data we’ve created
ourselves, but also apps, Windows settings, and that wealth of information that exists “out there”
on the Web, in databases, and so on.
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Searching via the Taskbar
Windows 10 attempts to solve this problem by combining all search operations into a single interface element called the Search box. Using this deceptively simple taskbar-based text box, Windows
10 lets you search for apps by name, for Windows 10 settings and features, for documents, for app
data, for web content, and more.
As you type, Search displays the results that match your search text. As shown in Figure 4.9, Search
displays the most likely result at the top (which you can select by pressing Enter), and then the rest
of the top results divided into categories such as Settings, Store, Documents, and Web.
Figure 4.9
The Search box displays as-you-type results.
To see more results, click My Stuff. Windows 10 opens the full results window, which is similar to
the window shown in Figure 4.10. For even more detailed results, use the Show list to select the
subset you want to see: Documents, Folders, Apps, Settings, Photos, Videos, or Music. Whether
you’re using the Search pane or the Results screen, when you see the item you want, click it.
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Figure 4.10
When you
click My Stuff,
Windows 10
displays the full
search results,
which you can
then filter by type.
Searching with Cortana
Software engineers, having grown up watching Star Trek characters interact with computers using
voice commands, have been trying to get the rest of us to use voice to control our PCs for many
years. The problem is that most people feel awkward “speaking” to a PC and although voice would
in some cases be a more efficient way to interact with the machine, the inaccuracies, glitches, and
slow performance of voice-recognition systems almost always make such systems less efficient in
the long run.
Still, the engineers keep trying, and Microsoft is no different with its Cortana voice-activated personal assistant, debuted originally on the Windows Phone and now available on all Windows 10
computers and tablets. Cortana first appears when you click inside the taskbar’s Search box and you
see a message like the one shown in Figure 4.11. Either select Not Interested (our choice) to not be
pestered by this message in the future or, if you want to see what Cortana can do, select Next.
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Figure 4.11
Select Next to give Cortana a test drive.
If you chose Next, Cortana runs through a quick setup procedure
that includes asking you what Cortana should call you and giving
Cortana permission to use your location.
tip
Unfortunately, how you
access Cortana’s settings from
within Cortana itself is not
even a little bit obvious. You
must select the Notebook
icon (see Figure 4.12), then
select Settings.
With Cortana set up, the Search box prompt now says “Ask me
anything” and you see a microphone icon on the right side of the
text box (see Figure 4.12). Select that icon to interact with Cortana
using voice commands. Note, too, that the Search pane is now
festooned with icons down the left side: Home (the main Search
pane), Notebook (a quick look at your calendar, traffic, weather,
news, and more), Reminders (upcoming reminders), Places (add
your favorite map locations), Music (have Cortana recognize the
song that’s playing), Help (see what Cortana can do), and Settings (configure Cortana and search
options).
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Home
Notebook
Figure 4.12
With Cortana active, the left side of
the Search pane displays a more extensive menu of icons.
Reminders
Feedback
Microphone icon
To toggle Cortana on or off, follow these steps:
1. Click inside the taskbar’s Search box.
2. Select Notebook (refer to Figure 4.12).
3. Select Settings to display the Settings pane.
4. Select the Cortana switch to On or Off, as preferred.
Customizing the Start Menu
The Start menu, with its live tiles and easy access (just press the Windows Logo key), is meant to
be a kind of automatically and frequently updated bulletin board that tells you what’s going on in
your life: your latest messages, your upcoming appointments, the music you’re listening to, the
weather, the latest news and financial data, and so on. The key phrase here is “your life,” meaning
that it’s unlikely the default configuration of the Start menu will be a reflection of who you are, what
you do, and how you use Windows 10. Fortunately, the default Start menu layout isn’t set in stone,
so you’re free to customize it by resizing and moving tiles, adding new tiles, and much more. The
next few sections provide the details.
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Resizing a Tile
The Start menu tiles come in up to four sizes (we say “up to” because not all app tiles support all
four sizes). Medium is the most common (see, for example, the default Music and Video tiles), and
the other sizes are based on the Medium dimensions: Small is one quarter the size of Medium; Wide
is the equivalent of two Medium tiles side-by-side; and Large is the equivalent of four Medium tiles
arranged in a square.
The Wide and Large sizes are useful for tiles that are live because the tile has more room to display
information. However, if you’ve turned off the live tile for an app (see “Turning Off a Live Tile,” later
in this chapter), these bigger tile sizes now seem like a waste of menu real estate, so you might prefer
to use the smaller size. Similarly, if you turn on the live tile for an app that’s using the Medium tile
size, you might see only limited information in the tile (or none at all if the tile is using the Small size).
For example, when the Mail app tile is set to Medium, it shows only the number of new messages you
have, compared to showing you a preview of the new messages when the tile is set to Wide.
Whatever the scenario, you can resize a tile by right-clicking it, clicking Resize, and then clicking the
size you want (see Figure 4.13).
Figure 4.13
Right-click a tile, click Resize, and then click
a tile size.
Moving a Tile
One of the problems many new users have with the Windows 10 Start menu is the slight delay that
occurs when they try to find the app they want to launch. This is particularly true when you have
many live tiles on the go, because you no longer see the app name in each tile, just the app icon. If
this is the case with just the default Start menu tiles displayed, it’s only going to get worse after you
start adding more tiles (see “Pinning an App to the Start Menu,” later in this chapter).
One way to reduce this problem is to rearrange the Start menu in such a way that it helps you locate
the apps you use most often. For example, you could place your favorite apps on the left side of the
screen, or you could arrange similar apps together (for example, all the media-related apps).
Here are the techniques to use to move an app tile:
• Regular PC—Use your mouse to click and drag the tile and then drop it on the new location.
• Tablet PC—Use your finger (or a stylus) to tap and drag the tile and then drop it on the new
location.
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Turning Off a Live Tile
As we mentioned earlier, the Start menu offers a kind of aerial view of what’s happening in your life,
and it does this by displaying live content—called tile notifications—on many of the tiles. That seems
like a good idea in theory, but much of that live content is not static. For example, if you have multiple email messages waiting for you, the Mail tile continuously flips through previews of each unread
message. Similarly, the News and Money tiles constantly flip through several screens of content.
tip
You can clear tile notifications automatically when you sign out or when you restart or shut down Windows
10. In the taskbar’s Search box (or the Run dialog box; press Windows Logo+R), type gpedit.msc and then
press Enter to open the Local Group Policy Editor (which is not available in Windows 10 Home Edition).
Open the User Configuration, Administrative Templates, Start Menu and Taskbar branch, double-click the
Clear History of Tile Notifications on Exit policy, select Enabled, and then click OK.
This tile animation ensures that you see lots of information, but it can be distracting and hard on
the eyes. If you find that the Start menu is making you less productive instead of more, you can tone
down the Start menu by turning off one or more of the less useful live tiles. You do that by rightclicking a tile and then clicking Turn Live Tile Off.
Pinning an App to the Start Menu
One of the significant conveniences of the Start menu is that the apps you see can all be opened with
just a couple of clicks or taps. Contrast this with the relatively laborious process required to launch
just about any other app on your PC: Display the Start menu, click All Apps, scroll through the list to
find the app you want to run, and then click it. Alternatively, you can use the taskbar’s Search box to
start typing the name of the app and then click it when it appears in the Search results.
Either way, this seems like a great deal of effort to launch an app, and it’s that much worse for an
app you use often. You can avoid all that extra work and make
a frequently used program easier to launch by pinning that program to the Start menu.
If you have a folder that you
Follow these steps to pin a program to the Start menu:
open frequently, you can pin
that folder to the Start menu.
1. Use the Start menu or File Explorer to locate the app you want
Open File Explorer, and then
to pin.
open the location that contains the folder you want to
2. Right-click the app.
pin. Right-click the folder and
3. Click Pin to Start. Windows 10 adds a tile for the program to
then click Pin to Start.
the Start menu.
tip
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Pinning a Website to the Start Menu
If you have a website that you visit often, you can use the Internet Explorer app to pin the website
to the Start menu. This means that you can surf to that site simply by clicking its Start menu tile.
Follow these steps to pin a website to your Start menu using Internet Explorer:
1. On the Start menu, select All Apps, Windows Accessories, Internet Explorer.
2. Navigate to the website you want to pin.
3. Click Settings, which is the gear icon that appears to the right of the Address bar.
4. Click Add Site to Apps. Click Add when the Add Site to Apps box opens. This adds an icon for
the site to the Start menu’s Apps list (the left side of the menu).
5. Open the Start menu.
6. Right-click the website icon.
7. Click Pin to Start. Windows 10 adds a tile for the website to the
Start menu.
Follow these steps to pin a website to your Start menu using
Microsoft Edge:
note
To remove a tile from the
Start menu, right-click it and
then click Unpin from Start.
Windows 10 removes the tile
from the Start menu.
1. On the Start menu, select Microsoft Edge.
2. Navigate to the website you want to pin.
3. Click More Actions, which is the ellipsis icon near the upper-right corner of the window.
4. Click Pin to Start. Windows 10 adds a tile for the website to the Start menu.
Displaying the Administrative Tools on the Start Menu
Windows 10 comes with a set of advanced programs and features called the administrative tools.
We cover many of these tools in this book, including Performance Monitor, Resource Monitor,
and Services (all covered in Chapter 23, “Windows Management Tools”) as well as Disk Cleanup,
Defragment and Optimize Drives, and Computer Management (all covered in Chapter 25, “Managing
Hard Disks and Storage Spaces”).
➥ For a rundown of all the administrative tools, see “Reviewing the Control Panel Icons,”
p. 217.
Some of these tools are relatively easy to launch. For example, you can press Windows Logo+X
or right-click the Start button to display a menu that includes Event Viewer, Disk Management,
Computer Management, and a few other administrative tools (see Figure 4.14). However, the rest
of these tools are difficult to access in Windows 10. For example, to run Defragment and Optimize
Drives, you display the taskbar, type defrag in the Search box, and then click Defragment and
Optimize Your Drives in the search results. Other administrative tools aren’t even accessible via an
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apps or settings search, so instead you need to know the tool’s filename. For example, to run the
System Configuration utility, in the taskbar’s Search box, type msconfig and then press Enter.
Figure 4.14
Press Windows Logo+X to display this handy menu of power
user tools, which includes a few of the administrative tools.
This extra effort isn’t that big of a deal if you use the administrative tools only once in a while. If
you use them frequently, however, all those extra steps are real productivity killers. Instead, configure the Start menu with a tile for Control Panel’s Administrative Tools icon by following these steps:
1. Press Windows Logo+X (or right-click the Start button) to display the menu of advanced tools,
and then select Control Panel.
2. Use the View By list to select either Large Icons or Small Icons.
3. Right-click Administrative Tools.
4. Select Pin to Start. Windows 10 adds an Administrative Tools tile to the Start menu.
Adding Shutdown and Restart Shortcuts
Although the Start menu does offer a few productivity improvements—at-a-glance info with live
tiles, one-click app launching, as-you-type searching—a few tasks are maddeningly (and, in our
view, unnecessarily) inefficient. We’re thinking in particular of shutting down and restarting the PC.
To perform these tasks using a mouse, you must click the Start button to open the Start menu, click
Power, and then click either Shut Down or Restart. It’s just inefficient, particularly if you regularly
shut off or reboot your machine.
If you want an easier way of shutting down and restarting your PC, we show you how you can do
just that. The basic idea is to create shortcut files that perform the shutdown and restart tasks, and
then pin those shortcuts to the Start menu or taskbar, or leave them on the desktop.
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So let’s begin with the steps required to create the shortcuts:
1. Right-click the desktop and then select New, Shortcut. The Create Shortcut dialog box appears.
2. Type shutdown /s /t 0. This command shuts down your PC. Note that the last character in
the command is the number zero.
3. Click Next. Windows 10 prompts you to name the shortcut.
4. Type the name you want to use. The name you type is the name that will appear on the Start
menu.
5. Click Finish.
6. For the restart shortcut, repeat steps 2–5, except in step 3, type shutdown /r /t 0 (again, the
last character is a zero).
To help differentiate between these two shortcut files, follow these steps to apply a different icon to
each file:
1. Right-click a shortcut and then click Properties. The shortcut’s Properties dialog box appears.
2. Click Change Icon. Windows 10 warns you that the shutdown command contains no icons.
3. Click OK. The Change Icon dialog box appears.
4. Click the icon you want to use, and then click OK to close the Change Icon dialog box.
tip
Although the Shell32.dll file contains plenty of shortcut icons, you can also try two other files:
•
•
%SystemRoot%\system32\pifmgr.dll
%SystemRoot\explorer.exe
Press Enter after you type each location to see the icons.
5. Click OK to close the Properties dialog box.
6. Repeat steps 1–5 to apply a new icon to the other shortcut file.
Finally, you can now pin the shortcuts to either the Start menu or taskbar by right-clicking each
shortcut and then clicking Pin to Start or Pin to Taskbar.
Creating an App Group
At first, the right side of the default Start menu appears like nothing so much as a random collection
of tiles scattered willy-nilly. However, look closer and you see that there are actually two collections
of tiles: the one on the left is labeled Life at a Glance, while the one on the right is labeled Play and
Explore. These are called app groups and you can create your own to help organize the Start menu
to suit the way you work and play.
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Follow these steps to create an app group:
1. Pin to the Start menu an app, website, or Control Panel icon, as described earlier in this chapter.
Alternatively, drag an existing tile to an empty section of the Start menu.
2. Add the other tiles you want to include in the group and drag each one to the same area of the
Start menu as the first tile.
3. Move the mouse pointer just above the new group until you see an icon with two horizontal
bars, and then click that icon. Windows 10 displays a text box above the group, as shown in
Figure 4.15.
Figure 4.15
Move the mouse pointer above the group and click the
icon to see the app group’s Name text box.
4. Type the name you want to use for the group, as shown in Figure 4.15.
5. Press Enter. Windows 10 applies the name and your new group is ready to use.
You can rename the group at any time (including the default Start menu app groups) by repeating
steps 3 and 4.
Customizing the Start Menu’s System Icons
As mentioned earlier, the left side of the Start menu includes a collection of system icons just
above the Power button. In a default install, there are two system icons: File Explorer and Settings.
However, Windows offers 10 icons in all, including icons that take you to the specific user account
folders (such as Documents, Downloads, and Pictures) as well system folders such as HomeGroup
and Network. Follow these steps to add one or more of these icons to your Start menu:
1. Open the Start menu and select Settings to display the Settings app. (You can also press
Windows Logo+I.)
2. Click Personalization. The Settings app displays the Personalization window.
3. Click the Start tab.
4. If you don’t want see the list of oft-used apps, click the Store and Display Recently Opened
Programs in Start switch to Off.
5. Click Customize List. Settings displays a list of system icons that you can add to the Start menu.
6. For each icon you want to add to the Start menu, click its switch to On.
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Customizing the Start Menu Background
If you’re getting tired of the same old, same old on your Start menu, you can tweak the background
and color scheme, as described here:
1. Open the Start menu and select Settings to display the Settings app. (You can also press
Windows Logo+I.)
2. Click Personalization. The Settings app displays the Personalization window.
3. Click the Colors tab to display the controls shown in Figure 4.16.
Figure 4.16
Use the Colors tab to customize
the Start menu background and
colors.
4. If you want Windows 10 to assign a color to the Start menu
background automatically based on the desktop background,
click the Automatically Pick a Color from My Background switch
to On. If you click this switch to Off, Settings displays a collection of color swatches and you click a swatch to assign that
color to the Start menu background.
5. Use the Show Color on Taskbar, Start, and Action Center switch
to toggle the color from step 4 on and off.
note
The color you select applies
to both the Start menu and
the taskbar.
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6. By default, the backgrounds of the Start menu, taskbar, and Action Center pane have a slight
transparency effect. If you want to disable that effect, click the Make Start, Taskbar, and Action
Center Transparent switch to Off.
Customizing the Lock Screen
The Lock screen is the screen that appears before you sign in to Windows 10 (or, if your PC has multiple user accounts, it’s the screen that appears before you select which account to sign in to). You
have three ways to invoke the Lock screen:
• Turn on or restart your PC.
• Sign out of your user account (by clicking your user account tile and then clicking Sign Out).
• Lock your PC (by clicking your user account tile and then clicking Lock, or by pressing Windows
Logo+L).
In other words, the Lock screen comes up relatively often when you use Windows 10, so you might
as well get the most out of it by customizing it to suit how you work. The next three sections take
you through these customizations.
➥ To learn more about locking your computer, see “Locking Your Computer,” p. 716.
Customizing the Lock Screen Background
If you use the Lock screen frequently, you might prefer to view a background image that’s different
from the default image. To choose a different Lock screen background, follow these steps:
1. Open the Start menu and select Settings to display the Settings app. (You can also press
Windows Logo+I.)
2. Click Personalization. Windows 10 displays the Personalization window.
3. Click the Lock Screen tab. The Settings app displays the Lock Screen settings, as shown in
Figure 4.17.
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Figure 4.17
Use the Lock Screen settings to
customize the background image
displayed on the Lock screen.
4. In the Background list, select Picture.
5. Either select one of the supplied images or select Browse and
then use the Open dialog box to choose an image from your
Pictures folder.
Controlling the Apps Displayed on
the Lock Screen
note
Another way to apply one
of your own images as the
Lock screen background is
to launch the Photos app,
display the image you want
to use, select See More (the
three dots), and then select
Set as Lock Screen.
As you’ll learn in Chapter 31, “Protecting Windows from Viruses
and Spyware,” locking your computer is a useful safety feature
because it prevents unauthorized users from accessing your files
and your network. When you lock your PC, Windows 10 displays the Lock screen, which includes
the current date, an icon that shows the current network status, and an icon that shows the current
power state of your computer (that is, either plugged in or on battery). By default, Windows 10 also
includes Lock screen icons for apps that have had recent notifications. For example, the Mail app
shows the number of unread messages, and the Calendar app shows upcoming appointments. The
Lock screen also shows any new notifications that appear for these apps.
If you lock your computer frequently, you can make the Lock screen even more useful by adding
icons for other apps that support notifications. Here are the steps to follow:
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1. Open the Start menu and select Settings to display the Settings app. (You can also press
Windows Logo+I.)
2. Click Personalization. Windows 10 displays the Personalization window.
3. Click the Lock Screen tab. The Settings app displays the Lock Screen window.
4. Under Choose an App to Show Detailed Status, click the icon (or click + if no app is currently
selected).
5. Click the app for which you want to display detailed status updates (such as the name, location,
and time of an upcoming event in the Calendar app).
6. Under Choose Apps to Show Quick Status, click +. Settings opens the Choose an App window.
7. Click the app you want to add to the Lock screen. Windows 10 puts the new settings into effect,
and the apps appear in the Lock screen the next time you use it.
Disabling the Lock Screen
The Lock screen is one of those innovations that seem like a good idea when you first start using
it but then quickly loses its luster the more you come across it. In the case of the Lock screen, the
problem is that it forces you to take the extra step of dismissing it before you can sign in:
• Regular PC—Press any key or click the screen.
• Tablet PC—Swipe up.
If you’ve had to perform this extra task one too many times, and
if you don’t find the Lock screen all that useful anyway, you can
disable it. This means you don’t see the Lock screen when you
start or lock your PC. Instead, Windows 10 takes you directly to
the sign-in screen.
Follow these steps to disable the Lock screen:
1. In the taskbar’s Search box (or the Run dialog box; press
Windows Logo+R), type gpedit.msc and then press Enter.
The Local Group Policy Editor appears.
2. Open the Computer Configuration, Administrative Templates,
Control Panel, Personalization branch. The Personalization
policies appear.
caution
In Chapter 31, we show you
how to require that users
press Ctrl+Alt+Delete before
they log on, which is a helpful
security precaution. However,
if you configure your PC
to require Ctrl+Alt+Delete,
Windows 10 ignores the Do
Not Display the Lock Screen
policy setting.
3. Double-click the Do Not Display the Lock Screen policy. The policy details appear.
4. Click Enabled.
5. Click OK. Windows 10 puts the new policy into effect.
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Working with Virtual Desktops
Now that the desktop is once again a first-class Windows citizen, we can all go back to cluttering
our screens with umpteen app windows scattered around the desktop. Well, we could go back to
that, or we could take advantage of a useful new Windows 10 feature: virtual desktops. A virtual
desktop is just like the regular Windows 10 desktop—that is, you can add icons to it, open apps on
it, and so on—except that it resides offscreen until you summon it with your mouse or the keyboard.
When you do that, Windows 10 moves the current desktop, as well as its icons and running apps,
offscreen and replaces them with the second desktop, meaning you now see its icons and apps. So
rather than having all your running apps on one desktop, you could create separate desktops for,
say, productivity apps, media apps, Internet apps, and so on, then cycle through them as needed.
Adding a Virtual Desktop
To add a new virtual desktop, you have two choices:
• In the taskbar, select the Task View button (or press Windows Logo+Tab) and then select New
Desktop. Windows 10 adds the new virtual desktop to the Task View, as shown in Figure 4.18.
Select the desktop thumbnail to switch to it.
Figure 4.18
In Task View, select New
Desktop to add a virtual
desktop.
• Press Windows Logo+Ctrl+D. Windows 10 creates and switches to the new virtual desktop.
Working with Virtual Desktops
Once you have two or more desktops on the go, here’s a rundown of the techniques you can use:
• Switching desktops—Invoke Task View and then select the icon of the desktop you want. From
the keyboard, either press Windows Logo+Ctrl+Right arrow to switch to the next desktop, or
press Windows Logo+Ctrl+Left arrow to switch to the previous desktop.
• Moving an app to a different desktop—Switch to the desktop that has the app you want to
move, and then invoke Task View. Drag the app’s thumbnail and drop it on the desktop to which
you want it moved.
• Closing a virtual desktop—Invoke Task View, move the mouse pointer over the desktop you
want to remove, and then click Close (X). You can also close the current virtual desktop by pressing Windows Logo+Ctrl+F4.
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Customizing Virtual Desktops
Windows 10 offers a couple of customization settings for virtual desktops. To see them, open the
Settings app, select System, and then select the Multitasking tab. The Virtual Desktops sections
offers two lists:
• On the Taskbar, Show Windows That Are Open On—By default, Windows 10 shows a taskbar
icon for all running apps, regardless of which virtual desktop is current. If you’d rather the taskbar show icons only for the current virtual desktop’s apps, use this list to select Only the Desktop
I’m Using.
• Pressing Alt+Tab Shows Windows That Are Open On—By default, Windows 10 cycles through
every running app when you hold down Alt and press Tab, regardless of which virtual desktop
is current. If you’d rather that pressing Alt+Tab cycle through only the current virtual desktop’s
apps, use this list to select Only the Desktop I’m Using.
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INDEX
.. operator, searches, 174
Modern apps as, 202
Address bar, 157, 312-314
< operator, searches, 174
Notepad, 205
address gateway, networking, 863-865
<= operator, searches, 174
Paint, 206-207
> operator, searches, 174
Remote Desktop
Connection, 203
address spoofing, 774
>= operator, searches, 174
searching for, 203
Address toolbar, 561
Snipping Tool, 207-208
Administrative tools
* wildcard, searches, 174
? wildcard, searches, 174
Sound Recorder, 209
alternative launches, 223
Steps Recorder, 208-209
Component Services, 217
3G, 298
Sticky Notes, 209
Computer Management, 217
4G/4G LTE, 298
Windows Fax and Scan, 203
32-bit version, 17
Windows Journal, 209-210
Defragment and Optimize
Drives, 217
WordPad, 210-211
Disk Cleanup, 217
XPS Viewer, 211
displaying, 123-124
64-bit version, 17-18
Event Viewer, 217
A
account lockout policy, 795
access control,
restricting, 785
fingerprint sign-in, 231-232
new accounts, 74-76
ODBC Data Sources
ODBC, 218
accessibility tools
password
password recovery, 96-97
Accounts (Settings app), 226
iSCSI Initiator, 218
Local Security Policy, 218
Ease of Access, 211-212
changes, 227-229
Performance Monitor, 218
Ease of Access Center,
211-213
picture password,
230-231
Print Management, 218
Resource Monitor, 218
Magnifier, 211, 213-214
Sync Your Settings, 233-234
Services, 218
Narrator, 211, 214
user account picture, 226-227
System Configuration, 218
On Screen Keyboard, 212
user account settings, 77-78
System Information, 218
Speech Recognition, 211
Action Center, 82-83
Task Scheduler, 218
Welcome screen, 212
ActiveX Control snap-in, 517
Windows Firewall with
Advanced Security, 218
accessories
Calculator, 203
Character Map, 203-204
MIP (Math Input Panel), 205
AD (Active Directory), 454
searches, 460-461
ad hoc networks, 850-851
Windows Memory
Diagnostic, 218
Windows PowerShell ISE, 218
966
Ad o b e Co n n e ct
Adobe Connect, 891
Microsoft Edge, 140
ARP, 957
Airplane mode, 825-827
Microsoft Wi-Fi, 141
ATTRIB, 933-936
Alarms & Clock app, 135
Modern, 20, 64-65
Money, 141
as-you-type searches, 172-173
attacks on networks
All Apps, 107
Movies & TV, 141-142
AMD CrossFireX video
cards, 655
Music, 138
address spoofing, 774
News, 142-143
backdoors, 774
analog modems, 299
OneDrive, 143
DoS (denial of service), 775
AND operator, 175
OneNote, 143
eavesdropping, 774
People, 144
exploits, 774
ANSI.SYS, 701
Phone Companion, 144
identity theft, 775
antivirus programs, 778
Photos, 145
impersonation, 774
AOL (America Online), 805
pinned, 107
open doors, 774
API (Application
Programming Interface), 640
Apple Newton, 823
apps, 133-135
Alarms & Clock, 135
All Apps, 107
Calculator, 135
Calendar, 136-137
Camera, 137
Cortana, 137
data sharing, 150-151
desktop, as defaults, 114-115
file extensions, 154
Food & Drink, 137-138
Health & Fitness, 139
Lock Screen, 129-130
Mail, 139, 339
account maintenance,
344
account settings,
340-341
advanced, 341-342
Exchange account,
343-344
SMTP authentication,
342
Maps, 139-140
menus, 134
to taskbar, 113-114
pinning
password cracking, 773-774
phishing, 775
to Start menu, 122
Trojan horses, 774-775
to taskbar, 557
viruses, 774-775
printing from, 193
troubleshooting, 193
audio. See also sounds
devices, default, 289
Reader, 145
editing, 292
Reading List, 146
hardware requirements, 34
Scan, 146
MPEG 4 files, 292
Settings, 21-22, 147
recording
snapping, 111-112
Sports, 147
Start menu, groups, 125-126
Store, 148
installing, 149-150
microphone setup, 291
Voice Recorder, 292
volume
application, 286-287
equalizing, 288
uninstalling, 150
headphone balance,
287-288
Voice Recorder, 149
system, 285
switching between, 113
volume control, 286-287
audit policy settings, 796
Weather, 149
authentication
Xbox, 149
AQS (Advanced Query
Search), 173-175
archives, 569
ARM microprocessor,
tablets, 824
ARM processor, WMP
and, 240
two-factor, 815
two-way, 814-815
Authorization Manager
snap-in, 517
auto-hide, taskbar, 556
AutoPlay, 218
camera
B
backdoors, 774
background
Lock screen, custom, 128-129
Start menu, custom, 127-128
Backup and Restore, 218
backups
967
biometric sign in, 62
breadcrumb bar, 157
BIOS
bridging networks, 411-412
startup troubleshooting
and, 605
UEFI, 26
Birthday calendar, 136
BitLocker, 766
hardware requirements, 34
broadband service
connection sharing, 415
LAN configuration, 419-421
network adapter, installation,
301-302
PPPoE connection, 304-305
encryption keys, 765
no TPM, 767
burning CDs, 251-252
File History, 740
TPM system, 767
burning DVDs, hardware
requirements, 34
installation prep, 36
network computers, 468
BitLocker Drive
Encryption, 218
Registry
Bluetooth
buttons, taskbar
grouping, 556
hard disk, 676
device installation, 649-650
location, 556
Registry Editor and, 677
printers, 183
small, 556
System Restore and,
676-677
BMP files, 206-207
third-party software, 676
Boolean operators
system image, 37-38, 750-752
Balanced power profile, 828
batch files, 702-703
ap.bat, 703
AND, 175
NOT, 175
OR, 175
Boot Manager, 45-46
e.bat, 703
booting
n.bat, 704
s.bat, 704
Battery Saver, 827-828, 855
BCD (Boot Configuration
Data), 46-47
System Configuration Utility,
48-51
BCD (Boot Configuration
Data), 46-47
dual-booting, 43-44
multibooting, 44-45
10/100BASE-T Ethernet,
373-374
Ethernet networks, 383-384
multiple switches, 388-389
patch cables, 386
testing, 496
two computers, 387
Wi-Fi, 374-376
automatic disk check,
928-930
Calculator app, 135, 203
troubleshooting and,
596-598
camera
Secure Boot, 26
BeAnywhere, 913
cabling (networks), 371-373
in-wall wiring, 387
rebooting
BCDEDIT, 944
troubleshooting, 355-356
Windows Boot
Manager, 47
BCDEDIT tool, 51-55
Windows Boot Manager, 47
LAN configuration, 421-422
1000Mbps Ethernet, 378
backup copy, 55
renaming entries, 56
configuration, 305-306
System Configuration
Utility, 48-56
RE (Recovery Environment)
and, 616
ordering entries, 56
cable modem, 297
connection sharing, 415, 419
boot logging, RE and, 620
bye.bat, 703
h.bat, 703
C
Windows Boot Manager, 45-46
Calendar app, 136-137
hardware requirements, 34
Scanners and Camera
window, 255
968
Ca me ra a p p
Camera app, 137
Carbon Copy, 913
Cautions, 7
command line
Command Prompt window,
690-691
Control Pan icons launch, 222
CD, 933
directories, changing, 691
cd command, 691
disk management, 925
CD/DVD drive, hardware
requirements, 34
CDs, copying to, 251-252
CHKDSK, 926-928
CHKNTFS, 926-930
CONVERT, 926
TAKEDOWN, 933
TREE, 933
WHERE, 933
XCOPY, 933, 940-944
folders
NET USE, 956-957
groups
NET LOCALGROUP,
956
DEFRAG, 931-932
GUI programs, 696-697
cellular data connections, 26,
298-299
DISKCOMP, 926
lusrmgr.msc, 696
DISKCOPY, 926
Central Desktop, 891
DISKPART, 926
network resource
management, 483-484
Certificates snap-in, 517
EXPAND, 926
notepad, 696
Character Map, 203-204
FORMAT, 926
output, saving, 691-692
FSUTIL, 926
Power User menu and, 693
LABEL, 926
privileges, 693-694
MOUNTVOL, 926
search path, 692-693
VOL, 926
secpol.msc, 696
CHCP, 944
check boxes, file selection,
160-161
CHKDSK, 36-37, 926-928
documentation, 696
services control, 530
CHKNTFS, 926-930
executable program
extensions, 692
system management tools
Cisco WebEx MeetMe
Center, 891
clean install, 39-40
ClearType Tuner, 81-82
BCDEDIT, 944
explorer, 696
CHCP, 944
file management
DATE, 944
ATTRIB, 933-936
EVENTCREATE, 944
CD, 933
REG, 944-947
clock, Alarms & Clock
app, 135
COMP, 933
REGSVR32, 944
COMPACT, 933
cloud, 13
COPY, 933
SHUTDOWN, 945,
947-949
collaboration
DEL, 933
online meeting tools, 891-892
DIR, 933
SYSTEMINFO, 945,
949-951
presentations, mobile devices,
880-883
FC, 933
TIME, 945
FIND, 933, 936-937
TYPEPERF, 945, 951-953
Remote Assistance, 884
FINDSTR, 933
WHOAMI, 945, 953-954
enabling, 885
MKDIR, 933
WMIC, 945
menu controls, 890
MOVE, 933
taskschd, 696
requesting, 885-888
REN, 933, 937-938
timedate.cpl, 696
responding to requests,
888-889
REPLACE, 933, 938-939
tools, 689-690
RMDIR, 933
troubleshooting tools, 957
Color Management, 219
SFC, 933
ARP, 957
SORT, 933, 939-940
IPCONFIG, 957
C ort ana
969
Indexing Options, 219
NETSTAT, 957
DSL (Digital Subscriber Line),
296-297, 305-306
PING, 957, 960-961
hardware, 301
Keyboard, 219
ROUTE, 957
high-speed connections,
configuration, 302-307
Language, 219
IP addresses, fixed, 306-307
Network and Sharing
Center, 219
NBTSTAT, 957
TRACERT, 957, 961-963
TTL value, default, 963
users
NET USER, 954-956
wf, 696
Command Prompt, 85
dir, 706
environment variables,
697-699
PATH, 699-700
window, 690-691
network troubleshooting, 499
ping, 499-500
Personalization, 220
Phone and Modem, 220
wireless service, 298-299
Power Options, 220
consoles, MMC, saving, 522
Control Panel
alternative launch methods,
223-224
pasting in, 694-696
command-line icon
launch, 222
COMPACT, 933
files, 221-222
icons
CompactFlash cards, 258
Administrative Tools,
217-218
Component Services, 217
AutoPlay, 218
snap-in, 517
Computer Management, 217
snap-in, 517
Connected Devices, 646
connectivity
always on connections,
305-306
analog modem, 299
broadband service, PPPoE
connection, 304-305
cable modem, 297, 305-306
cellular data connections, 26,
298-299
comparing technologies,
299-300
dial-up service, 307
creating, 307-308
making/ending
connections, 308
Pen and Touch, 220
satellite service, 297-298
Category view, 216
COMP, 933
Mouse, 219
PING, 960-961
copying in, 694-696
transparency, 696
Internet Options, 219
Backup and Restore, 218
BitLocker Drive
Encryption, 218
Color Management, 219
Credential Manager, 219
Date and Time, 219
Default Programs, 219
Device Manager, 219
Devices and
Printers, 219
Display, 219
Ease of Access
Center, 219
File Explorer
Options, 219
Programs and
Features, 220
Recovery, 220
Region, 220
RemoteApp and Desktop
Connections, 220
removed from
Windows 7, 220
Security and
Maintenance, 220
Sound, 220
Speech Recognition, 220
Sync Center, 221
System, 221
Tablet PC Settings, 221
Taskbar and
Navigation, 221
Troubleshooting, 221
User Accounts, 221
Windows Defender, 221
Windows Firewall, 221
Windows Mobility
Center, 221
Work Folders, 221
launching, 215
Settings app and, 23
Windows XP upgrade, 97
File History, 219
CONVERT, 926
Flash Player, 219
COPY, 933
Fonts, 219
Cortana, 20, 70, 137
searches and, 118-120
HomeGroup, 219
970
CP Us, ta b le ts
CPUs, tablets, 823
custom, 132
crackers, 713-714
moving apps, 131
Credential Manager, 219
switching desktops, 131
Desktop apps, 11
D
data theft prevention,
backups, file history and,
740-744
printing from, 193
Desktop toolbar, 561
Details pane, 168
device drivers
DATE, 944
Device Manager, updating,
661-662
Date and Time, 219
downloading, 659-660
alternative launches, 223
debugging, RE and, 620
Windows Update,
660-661
printers, 186-187
installation
Bluetooth, 649-650
Plug and Play, 647-648
media, syncing, 243-245
Playback Devices, 289
Plug and Play, 255
uninstalling, 667
Scanners and Cameras
window, 255
security policies, 667-668
viewing, 646-647
Devices (Settings app), 226
Devices and Drives, 259
Devices and Printers, 179-181,
219, 464-466, 647
Default Programs, 114-115,
219
rollbacks, 613
DEFRAG, 926, 931-932
troubleshooting, 611-613
Printing Preferences tabs,
188-190
Defragment and Optimize
Drives, 217
unused, 662-665
removing printers, 192
defragmenting hard disk,
36-37, 571-572
text file list, 665-667
Windows Update, checking,
660-661
Device Manager, 219, 656
DEFRAG, 931-932
alternative launches, 223
optimization schedule,
573-574
device display, 657
dial-up service, 307
creating, 307-308
making/ending connections,
308
digital camera photos
importing, 261-264
Optimize Drives, 572-573
network troubleshooting,
495-496
selecting disks, 574-575
nonpresent devices, 658-659
viewing, 259-261
DEL, 933
deleting
files, Recycle Bin, 164-165
folders, Recycle Bin, 164-165
printers, 192
desktop, 10, 107
apps
as defaults, 114-115
pinning to taskbar, 114
Remote Desktop, 425
searching, 169-172
virtual, 21, 131
adding, 131
closing, 131
printing, 268
Plug-and-Play devices,
uninstalling, 667
DIR, 933
properties, viewing, 658
dir comment, 706
snap-in, 517
directories, changing, 691
troubleshooting and, 609-611
unused devices, 662-665
updating devices, 661-662
devices
disaster planning
backups
baseline, 789
online, 790
audio, default, 289
documentation, 790-791
Connected Devices, 646
incident plan, 791
imaging
restore procedures, 790
digital cameras, 259-264
events, 257-258
installing, 255-256
scanners, 256-257
disk check, 928-930
Disk Cleanup, 36, 217, 570
Disk Director, 580
encrypt ion
disk drives
mapping, 470-472
to subfolder, 472
recovery drive, 616
disk encryption, BitLocker
and, 766
TPM and, 767-770
disk files
ISO, mounting, 589-590
virtual hard disk
creating, 592
mounting, 591
disk images, 589
disk management command
line tools, 926
CHKDSK, 926-928
CHKNTFS, 926-930
CONVERT, 926
DEFRAG, 926, 931-932
DISKCOMP, 926
DISKCOPY, 926
moving documents, 569
WMA files, 250
DISKCOMP, 926
drive letters, 578-579
DISKPART, 926
drive volumes, 579-581
disks
sharing, 468
size, 160
system repair disk, RE
and, 617
Display, 219
display, presentations,
882-883
DMZ, host configuration,
426-427
DNS (Domain Name Service),
425
documents
scanning, hardware
requirements, 34
MOUNTVOL, 926
VOL, 926
Disk Management snap-in,
517, 577-578
drivers. See device drivers
DSL (Digital Subscriber Line),
296-297
configuration, 305-306
filters, 302
modem troubleshooting,
355-356
network adapter, 301-302
dual-booting, 43-44
RE (Recovery Environment)
and, 616
documentation, disaster
planning and, 790-791
EXPAND, 926
LABEL, 926
inter-window, 163
lassoing, 162
DISKPART, 926
FSUTIL, 926
between Explorer
windows, 163
DISKCOPY, 926
files, 153-154
FORMAT, 926
971
DOM (Document Object
Model), Internet Explorer
and, 737
domains, joining, 410-411
DoS (denial of service)
attack, 775
E
Ease of Access, 211-212, 226
Ease of Access Center,
211-213, 219
eavesdropping attack, 774
Edge app, 24-23, 86-87, 140,
309-310
network security and, 792
searches, 87
email. See also Mail app
phishing scams, 808-813
drive volumes, 579-581
DOSKEY, 701
driver letter assignment,
578-579
double-tap gesture, 109
abuse reporting, 819-821
downloads, device drivers,
659-660
address, protecting,
817-818
mirrored volumes, 585
RAID 5 volume, 586-588
spanned volumes, 581-584
disk space
checking, 567-569
deleting files, 569-570
Disk Cleanup, 570
Windows Update, 660-661
drag-and-drop
canceling, 163
spam, 816-817
filtering, 818
viruses and, 715-716
encryption
drag-and-open, 163
disks, BitLocker and, 766-770
drag-and-scroll, 163
folders, 764-765
keys, backups, 765
972
e n cry p tio n
network security, 778
configuration, 273-274
Offline Files, 875-876
cover page, 274-276, 278
wireless networks, 391-392
dial tone detection, 280
environment variables,
697-699
PATH, 699-700
error checking hard disk,
564, 926-928
error messages, 594
Event Viewer, 594
System Information, 595
ERUNT Registry tool, 676
Ethernet
cabling, 369
excluding files, 742-743
monitoring, 280
System Restore, 746-748
networks, 379
version cleanup, 743
previewing, 279
version restore, 744-746
receiving faxes, 280
ATTRIB, 933-936
scanned documents, 284
CD, 933
sending, 280
COMP, 933
settings, 276
COMPACT, 933
subject, 279
COPY, 933
Event Log, entries,
sources, 494
Details view, 548
Event Viewer, 217
file extensions, 549-550
File Explorer Options, 219
alternative launches, 223
Homegroup and, 454-456
network troubleshooting,
493-495
Network window, 456-457
events
devices, imaging devices,
257-258
sounds, assigning, 289-290
EXPAND, 926
exploits, 774
Quick Access Toolbar, 546
ribbon, 22
customizing, 545-546
searches
AD (Active Directory),
460-461
fax modem, installation,
272-273
Fax printer, 180
faxing, 196
attachments, 279
comments, 279
DEL, 933
DIR, 933
FC, 933
FIND, 933, 936-937
FINDSTR, 933
MKDIR, 933
MOVE, 933
REN, 933, 937-938
REPLACE, 933, 938-939
RMDIR, 933
SFC, 933
SORT, 933, 939-940
TAKEDOWN, 933
computers, 459
TREE, 933
printers, 459
WHERE, 933
shared files/folders,
458-459
XCOPY, 933, 940-944
UNC (Universal Naming
Convention), 458
F
file management tools
recipients, 278
File Explorer, 68-69
EVENTCREATE, 944
selecting, 741
hardware requirements, 34
FC, 933
troubleshooting and, 594
network share as,
741-742
dialing rules, 278
LAN configuration, 423-424
snap-in, 517
drive
files
attributes, 933-936
batch files, 702-703
view, 546-548
ap.bat, 703
View options, 551-555
bye.bat, 703
file extensions, 85-86, 153-154
e.bat, 703
File History, 219, 740
h.bat, 703
activating, 744
changed files search time, 743
deleting versions, 743
n.bat, 704
s.bat, 704
BMP, 206-207
Control Panel, 221-222
folders
copying
conflicts, 162
Hyper-V
Administrators, 756
forcing, 164
ISS_IUSRS, 756
replacing, 938-939
List Folder
Contents, 755
deleting
973
sharing
blocking, 421
network security and,
784-785, 787
Offline Files, 876-877
program archives, 569
Modify, 755
searching for, 458-459
Recycle Bin, 164-165
Network Configuration
Operators, 756
Simple File Sharing,
433-435
Performance Log
Users, 756
troubleshooting, 501-502
canceling, 163
Performance Monitor
Users, 756
drag-and-open, 163
Windows/Macintosh,
442-443, 445-446
Power Users, 756
drag-and-scroll, 163
size, 160
Read, 755
between Explorer
windows, 163
sorting, 939–940
Read and Execute, 755
text strings, 936–937
read-only, 752
TIFF, 207
Remote Desktop
Users, 756
transferring, 88
uninstalling, 569
documents, 153-154
drag-and-drop
inter-window, 163
lassoing, 162
GIF, 207
hiding, 753-754
Remote Management
Users, 756
JPEG (JPG), 207
Replicator, 756
media, playing, 245-246
setting, 754-756
metadata, 167-169
special, 755, 759-761
filtering, 176
grouping, 176
standard, assigning,
758-759
conflicts, 162
System Managed
Accounts Group, 756
forcing, 164
troubleshooting, 761-763
moving
network sharing, 405-406
permissions
Access Control
Assistance
Operators, 755
Administrators
group, 755
Backup Operators, 755
Cryptographic
Operators, 755
Distributed COM
Users, 755
Event Log Readers, 755
users, adding to groups,
756-758
Users group, 755
Write, 755
PNG, 207
printing
deleting, 197
pausing/resuming, 198
recovering, 166
Registry, 154
renaming, 937–938
replacing, 938–939
Full Control, 755
selecting, check boxes,
160-161
Guests, 755
shadow copies, 740
UNC, 458
conflicts, 162
drag-and-drop, 162-163
LapLink PCmover
Express, 89
manual copy, 89-92
Send To, 163-164
Zinstall, 89
filters
DSL, 302
files, metadata and, 176
packet filtering, 780-782
FIND, 933, 936-937
FINDSTR, 933
firewalls, 778-779. See also
Windows Firewall
add-on products, 783
network security and, 792
spyware and, 714-715
viruses and, 714-715
Flash Player, 219
Folder snap-in, 517
folders
attributes, 933-936
deleting, Recycle Bin, 164-165
974
f o ld e rs
encryption, 764-765
navigating, 157
Navigation pane, 160
FTP Server, 425
network security and, 785
Full Control access, 755
NET USE command, 956-957
training recognizer, 839-840
hard disk
defragmenting, 36-37, 571-572
DEFRAG, 931-932
path, 157
G
permissions, setting, 754-756
optimization schedule,
573-574
recovering, 166
Gadgets, 202
Optimize Drives, 572-573
renaming, 937-938
gestures, 835
selecting disks, 574-575
searching, 158
sharing, 454
Homegroup, 454-456
Disk Cleanup, 36
GIF files, 207
Snipping Tool, 208
Disk Management snap-in,
577-578
GoToMeeting, 891
drive volumes, 579-581
network computers,
456-457
GoToMyPC, 913
driver letter assignment,
578-579
network security
and, 787
group policies, 504
independently, 478
in place, 477
searching for, 458-459
troubleshooting, 501-502
Fonts, 219
alternative launches, 223
fonts
graphics, requirements, 34
configuring, 508
examples, 512-513
filtering, 509-511
panes, 506-508
errors, 563-565, 926-928
size, 81
Windows Security window,
customization, 514-516
Unicode value, 204
Windows versions, 504-505
Group Policy Editor, device
security policies, 667-668
Group Policy Object Editor
snap-in, 517
phishing and, 805-806
advance fee, 807
classic attack, 806
email example, 808-813
lottery scams, 807
Nigerian letter scam,
807
stranded friend, 807
Trojan horses, 807-808
public computers, 814
types, 806
FSUTIL, 926
drive volumes, 579-581
Shut Down Event Tracker,
516-517
Internet Explorer, 330
fraud
spanned volumes,
581-584
driver letter assignment,
578-579
snap-ins, 526-527
FORMAT, 926
RAID 5 volume, 586-588
Registry and, 505
Character Map, 203-204
Food & Drink app, 137-138
mirrored volumes, 585
files, ISO, mounting, 589-590
free space, 567-569
deleting files, 569-570
Disk Cleanup, 570
installation prep, 36
mirrored volumes, 585
power management, 830
power surges and, 564
RAID 5 volume, 586-588
groups
apps, Start menu, 125-126
files, metadata and, 176
NET LOCALGROUP
command, 956
Registry backup, 676
repair, manual, 567
spanned volumes, 581-584
states, 565-566
virtual
H
hamburger icon, 134
Handwriting Input, 838-839
gestures, 839
creating, 592
mounting, 591
hardware, 645-646
Device Manager, 656
device display, 657
inst allat ion
nonpresent devices,
658-659
properties, viewing, 658
devices
HDMI slot, 34
headphones
balancing volume, 287-288
hardware requirements, 34
installation, 647-650
viewing, 646-647
hibernation, 94
Internet connection, 301
hiding files, 753-754
troubleshooting, 359-360
requirements
High Performance power
profile, 829
burning DVDs, 34
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE,
670-671
HKEY_USERS, 671
memory, 32-33
modems, 34
network adapters, 34
networking and, 34
I'm InTouch, 913
images. See also photos
BMP files, 206-207
GIF files, 207
JPEG (JPG) files, 207
HKLM, 672
PNG files, 207
HomeGroup, 219
TIFF files, 207
HDMI slot, 34
Internet and, 34
ICS (Internet Connection
Sharing), 417
identity theft, 775
CD/DVD drive, 34
headphones, 34
I
HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG,
671
HKEY_CURRENT_USER, 671
faxing and, 34
running VMs, 918-920
identity management software, 815-816
camera, 34
document scanning
and, 34
physical computer
conversion, 920-921
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT, 671
audio listening and, 34
BitLocker and, 34
IS (Integration Services),
919-920
Health & Fitness app, 139
fax modem, 272
monitors, multiple, 651-656
975
folders, browsing, 454-456
setup, 406-408
imaging devices
sharing, 473-476
digital cameras, importing
photos, 259-264
Windows Vista, 435-437
events, 257-258
Windows XP, 435-437
installing, 255-256
scanners, testing, 256-257
processor, 32
hosts file, networking and,
450-451
impersonation attack, 774
ripping/burning CDs, 34
hotspots, 299
importing photos
scanners, 34
HP printer, 180
all from camera, 264
HTML, Snipping Tool
and, 208
selected, 264
photo editing and, 34
sound card, 34
speakers, 34
tablets, 34
touch and, 34
TPM (Trusted Platform
Module) and, 34
TV watching, 34
USB slot, 34
video editing, 34
videoconferencing, 34
scanner, 272-273
HTTP (Hypertext Transfer
Protocol), 425
settings, 261-264
Indexing Options, 219
InPrivate Browsing, 814
network security, 785
HTTPS (Secure Web
Server), 425
install media, RE (Recovery
Environment) and, 617
installation, 24, 38-42
Hyper-V, 916
configuration, 916-917
connecting to VM, 918-920
installation, 916-917
apps, Store, 149-150
clean version of Windows 10,
39-40
976
in sta lla tio n
NAS (network-attached
storage), 429
fonts, 330
Bluetooth, 649-650
NAT, 416-418
Home page, 328-329
imaging, 255-258
Password Protected,
431, 433-435
HTTP settings, 335
router/modem
combination, 415
Integrated Windows
Authentication, 737
services, 421-424
International, 335-336
wireless networking,
418-419
languages, 329
components, 56-57
devices
Plug and Play, 647-648
network adapters, 301-302
preparation, 36-38
printers, 181-182
local, 182-187
software
third-party, 637-639
uninstalling, 639
troubleshooting and, 599-600
as upgrade, 39-40, 42-43
Integrated Windows
Authentication, 737
interface
All Apps, 107
desktop, 107
navigating. See Navigation
pane
Notification area, 107
pinned apps, 107
connection troubleshooting,
352-353
cable modem
connection, 355-356
DSL modem connection,
355-356
hardware problems,
359-360
LAN connection, 359-360
Speed Check, 365
connection sharing, 413
broadband modem, 415
cable modem, 415, 419
HomeGroup
networking, 431-432
IP addresses, 415
LAN connection, 414-419
multiple OSs, 429
security, 337
SmartScreen Filter, 737,
811-812
SSL and, 737
tabs
navigating, 316
new pages, 314-316
Web searches, 319
Security section, 736-738
Internet. See also
connectivity
Protected mode, 734-735, 792
URLs, 310
Start menu, 105-106
live tiles, 106-107
Pop-up Blocker, 730-731
WhatIsMyIP, 365
hardware requirements, 34
user account, 107
options, 328
tracert, 365
Start button, 106
tiles, 106
multimedia, 337
TLS and, 738
search box, 107
taskbar, 107
InPrivate Browsing, 814
TCP/IP utilities and,
360-364
Enhanced Protected
mode, 737
Task View, 107
History list, 317-318, 329
XMLHTTP support, 737
zones
adding/removing,
732-733
Internet Explorer, 309-310
security level, 733-734
Accelerated Graphics, 330
Internet Explorer 11, 24-23,
86-87
accessibility, 331
add-ons, 735
Address bar, 310, 312-314
browsing, 332-335
cache, 326-327
colors, 329
Favorites, 320
adding shortcuts, 320
maintenance, 322
opening shortcuts, 321
sharing between
browsers, 322
searches, 87
Internet Options, 219
alternative launches, 223
IoT (Internet of Things), 825
IP addresses
fixed, 306-307
Internet connection
sharing, 415
IP Security Monitor
snap-in, 517
LPR prot ocol
L
IP Security Policy
Management snap-in, 517
iPad, debut, 823
LABEL, 926
IPCONFIG, 957
Language, 219
ipconfig, 360-362
LANs (local area networks),
295
network troubleshooting,
496-498
IPP (Internet Printing
Protocol), 466
iSCSI Initiator, 218
ISO files, 589-590
ISP (Internet service
provider), 295
Item Check Boxes box, 160
J
configuration
cable modem, 421-422
routed service, 422-423
router with broadband
modem, 419-421
router/modem
combination, 422
UPnP, 423
wired Ethernet, 423-424
connection troubleshooting,
359-360
977
Live File System optical
discs, 265
burning discs, 267-268
closing UDF session, 266-267
live tiles, 106-107
turning off, 122
LLDP mapping, 431
local accounts, 73-74
Local Group Policy
Editor, 504
configuring policies, 508
filtering policies, 509-511
group policies, 504
icons
removing, 512-513
specified, 513
network security and, 793
launching, 505
operating systems, multiple,
429-431
notifications and, 560-561
Jobs, Steve, 824
join.me, 891
remote networking and, 877
Journal, 209-210
sharing, 414
Shut Down Event Tracker,
516-517
JPEG (JPG) files, 207
Snipping Tool, 208
jumplists, Windows XP
upgrade, 104
K
Keyboard, 219
broadband modem, 415
cable modem, 415, 419
IP addresses, 415
NAT, 416-418
router/modem
combination, 415
wireless networking,
418-419
shortcuts, 66, 107
media files, 246
Remote Desktop
Connection, 904-906,
911
Touch Keyboard, 110, 834
Windows Security window,
customization, 514-516
Windows versions, 504-505
Local Security Policy, 218
network security and, 794-797
Local Users and Groups
snap-in, 517
LapLink Everywhere, 913
Location Services, Wi-Fi
Sense and, 844
LapLink PCmover Express, 89
Lock screen, 60, 128
keyboard
OSK (On Screen Keyboard),
835
panes, 506-508
lassoing multiple files, 162
Libraries, 85
Link to Web Address
snap-in, 517
Links toolbar, 561
List Folder Contents
access, 755
apps displayed, 129-130
background, custom, 128-129
disabling, 130
locking computer, 716-717
locking toolbar, 561
LogMeIn, 912
Loudness Equalization, 288
LPR protocol, 466-467
978
Ma cin to sh
M
Macintosh
application associations, 440
networking
account login, 443-444
compatibility, 440-441
shared files on
Windows, 445-446
shared printers on
Windows, 447
Windows printers,
444-445
Windows, shared files, 442-443
Magnifier, 211, 213-214
Mail app, 139, 339
account maintenance, 344
account settings, 340-341
Maps app, 139-140
Mikogo, 891
mastered optical discs, 265
MIP (Math Input Panel), 205
MathML (Mathematical
Markup Language), 205
Miracast devices, 883
media
mirrored volumes, 585
MKDIR, 933
burning CDs, 251-252
devices, syncing, 243-245
disk space, 250
memory cards, accessing, 258
MP3 files, 250
playing files, 245-246
streaming, 252-254
MMC (Microsoft
Management Console)
consoles, saving, 522
launching, 519
snap-ins, 517
adding, 520
WAV files, 250
group policies and,
526-527
WMA files, 249
taskpad view, 522-525
Lossless, 250
Variable Bit Rate, 249
WMA Pro, 249
mobile devices
Airplane mode, 825-827
Apple Newton, 823
Exchange account, 343-344
Media Player. See WMP
(Windows Media Player)
inbox cleanup, 349
memory cards, accessing, 258
messages
IoT (Internet of Things), 825
attachments, 346
Memory Diagnostics tool,
602-603
deleting, 347
memory requirements, 32-33
Jobs, Steve, 824
Memory Sticks cards, 258
Palm Pilot, 823
advanced, 341-342
flagging, 346
forwarding, 347
moving, 346
Menu icon, 134
replying, 346
metadata, 167-169
sending new, 347-348
files
signature, 349
filtering, 176
Sync settings, 345-346
grouping, 175-176
SMTP authentication, 342
swipe and, 347
Trash cleanup, 349
malware, 719-722
Management Console,
printers and, 198-199
microphone
Speech Recognition and,
293-294
voice recordings, 291-292
Microsoft accounts, 73-74
Microsoft Print to PDF, 180
management tools, 23-24,
71-73
Microsoft Wi-Fi, 141
mapped disk drives, 470-472
Microsoft XPS Document
Writer, 180
to subfolders, 472
battery life, 827
Battery Saver, 827-828
power profiles, 828-831
iPad, debut, 823
power management
Battery, 831
hard disk, 830
multimedia settings, 831
Processor Power
Management, 831
Sleep mode, 830-831
wireless adapters, 830
presentations
display, 882-883
settings, 880-881
tablets
ARM microprocessor,
824
debut, 823
gestures, 835
net work securit y
Network and Sharing
Center, 219
pens, 835-836
Mouse, 219
on screen keyboard, 835
MOVE, 933
Star Trek, 823
Movies & TV, 141-142
stylus, 835-836
touch input, 835
touch keyboard, 834
Windows Mobility Center,
831-832
MP3 files, 250
MPEG 4 files, 292
MS-DOS
ANSI.SYS, 701
Battery Status, 832
DOSKEY, 701
Brightness slider, 832
printing from, 701-702
External Display, 833
settings, editing, 700-701
Presentation
Settings, 833
Screen Orientation, 832
Sync Center, 833
Volume slider, 832
multibooting, 44-45
MultiMedia cards, 258
Music app, 138
My Stuff, searches and, 117
N
mobile networking, 855-856
analog, 299
cable modem, 297
hardware requirements, 34
Modern apps, 11, 20, 64-65.
See also apps
accessories and, 202
printing from, 193
alternative launches, 223
Network window, 489-491
File and Printer
Sharing, 491
File Sharing
Connections, 491
HomeGroup
Connections, 491
Media Streaming, 491
Network Discovery, 491
Password Protected
Sharing, 491
Public Folder
Sharing, 491
troubleshooting and, 487-491
Windows Phone, 824
modems. See also
connectivity
979
Narrator, 211, 214
NAS (network-attached
storage), 429
NAT (Network Address
Translation), 416-418
View Your Active
Networks, 488
wireless networks, 843
network appliances, 429
network security
access control restriction, 785
account lockout policy, 795
devices, 778-779
active defense, 778
network security and, 782-783
antivirus programs, 778
Navigation pane, 160
attacks
address spoofing, 774
Modify access, 755
NBTSTAT, 957
backdoors, 774
Money app, 141
NET LOCALGROUP, 956
monitors, 81
NET USE, 956-957
DoS (denial of service),
775
multiple, 651
duplicating screen, 653
NET USER, 954-956
eavesdropping, 774
exploits, 774
NETSTAT, 957
identity theft, 775
Network & Internet (Settings
app), 226
impersonation, 774
network adapters, 368
taskbar and, 654
DSL, 302
password cracking,
773-774
three, 654-656
hardware requirements, 34
phishing, 775
installation, 301-302, 381-382
Trojan horses, 774-775
extending screen,
651-652
second monitor only,
653-654
Remote Desktop, 906
MOUNTVOL, 926
multiple adapters,
382-383
open doors, 774
viruses, 774-775
audit policy settings, 796
980
n e two rk se cu rity
blocking services, 781
testing and, 787
disaster planning
UAC and, 785, 792
backups
Windows Defender, 792
baseline, 789
Windows Firewall, 792
online, 790
Windows Update and, 794
documentation, 790-791
incident plan, 791
restore procedures,
writing, 790
Edge, 792
Network window, 456-457
networking, 367-368, 453-454.
See also LANs (local area
networks); shared folders/
files; sharing
shared printers on
Windows, 447
Windows printers,
444-445
management, 482-484
mapped drives, 470-472
to subfolder, 472
mobile, 855-856
offline files, 856
optional features, 447-450
encryption and, 778
ad hoc networks, 850-851
OS differences, 431-432
file sharing and, 784-785
address gateway, 863-865
peer-to-peer
firewalls, 778-779
bridging, 411-412
add-on products, 783
Windows Firewall,
779-780
cabling, 371-373
10/100BASE-T Ethernet,
373-374
FTP and, 785
1000Mbps Ethernet, 378
HTTP and, 785
Ethernet networks,
383-384
Internet Explorer, Protected
mode, 792
LANs and, 793
in-wall wiring, 387
Local Security Policy, 794-797
multiple switches,
388-389
monitoring activity, 788-789
patch cables, 386
NAT, 782-783
Powerline, 377-378
NAT devices, 778-779
two computers, 387
packet filtering, 780-782
Wi-Fi, 374-376
partitions and, 785
computer backups, 468
passwords, 784-785
disk drive sharing, 468
policy settings, 795
domains, joining, 410-411
patches and, 794
Ethernet cable, 369
preparations, 776-778
faxing, 379
printers, searching for, 459
hardware requirements, 34
router, security, 783
HomeGroups, 431-432,
435-437
searches
AD (Active Directory),
460-461
hosts file, 450-451
computers, 459
Macintosh
Internet connectivity, 380
computer
identification, 404
file sharing, 405-406
HomeGroup
alternatives, 408-409
HomeGroup setup,
406-408
printer sharing, 405-406
sharing enabling/
disabling, 403-404
TCP/IP protocol
configuration, 401-403
Windows Firewall, 405
permissions, 463-464
planning, 368-371
printers, 183, 467-468
IPP, 466
LRP/LPD, 466-467
permissions, 480-481
pooling, 481-482
sharing, 479-482
spool directory
location, 481
Unix, 466-467
using shared, 464-466
printing, 379
account login, 443-444
professional assistance, 371
security options settings, 797
compatibility, 440-441
remote, 855-856
shared folders and, 787
shared files on
Windows, 445-446
printers, 459
SMTP and, 785
SNMP and, 785
LANs, multiple, 877
offline files, 868-877
VPN, 857-868
passwords
remote access, 380
resource sharing, 472-473
connection
management, 852-854
981
OneDrive, 83-84, 143, 855
OneNote, 143
folders, independently,
478
domain, 843
folders in place, 477
private, 842-843
online user accounts, 21
homegroups, 473-476
public, 842
open doors, 774
Public folder, 476-477
setup, 390-397
operators
resources, 454
command line and,
483-484
joining, 844-846, 847-850
speed, 398-400
Wireless-N router, 369
News app, 142-143
searches, files/folders, 458-459
Server, 369-371
sharing, monitoring use,
482-483
Simple File Sharing, 433-435
TCP/IP protocol, as
default, 432
troubleshooting
cable testing, 496
configuration checks,
496-499
connection checks, 499
Device Manager,
495-496
Event Viewer, 493-495
file sharing, 501-502
ipconfig, 496-498
Network and Sharing
Center, 487-491
ping, 496, 499-500
printer sharing, 501-502
problem categories,
486-487
questions to ask, 486
tools, 492-493
Windows Firewall, 493
UNC (Universal Naming
Convention), 469
Unix, Samba, 437-439
VPN (Virtual Private
Networking), 380-381, 856
wireless
connecting, 846
NOT operator, 175
online meeting tools, 891-892
Boolean, searches, 175
searches, 174
optical discs, 589
Life File System, 265
burning discs, 267-268
Notepad, 205
UDF session, 266-267
notes, 6
Notification area, 107, 558-561
Local Group Policy Editor
and, 560-561
notifications, 115-116
custom, 232-233
Windows Firewall, 800-801
Windows Update, 631-632
photos, mastered discs,
265-266
OR operator, 175
OSs (operating systems)
networks, multiple OSs,
429-432
virtualization and
Hyper-V and, 916-917
Notifications & Actions settings, 559-560
VM connection, 918-920
NTFS (New Technology File
System), 740
Windows 10 as guest,
921-922
VM creation, 917-918
NVIDIA SLI video cards, 655
O
ODBC Data Sources ODBC,
218
offline files, 856, 868-869
encryption, 875-876
P
packet filtering, 780-782
packet tracing, 961-963
Paint, 206-207
Palm Pilot, 823
managing, 875-876
parallel port, printers, 183
marking, 870-871
missing, 873
partitions, network security
and, 785
shared folders, 876-877
passwords
synchronizing, 873-875
offline printing, 196
On Screen Keyboard, 212
Administrator and, 96-97
changing, 227-229
cracking, 773-774
982
p a sswo rd s
fingerprint sign-in, 231-232
network security and, 784-785
policy settings, 795
Password Protected Sharing,
431, 433-435
Password Reset Wizard, 96
picture password, 230-231
recovery, 95-96
Sign in screen, 61
user account, 78-79
patch cables, 386
patches, network security
and, 794
PATH variable, 699-700
permissions. See also
security
Administrators group, 755
file sharing, 462-463
files
users, adding to groups,
756-758
Users group, 755
Write, 755
folders, setting, 754-756
Access Control
Assistance
Operators, 755
networking, 463-464
Administrators
group, 755
Users group, 755
Backup Operators, 755
printers, 480-481
read-only files, 752
Personalization, 126, 220, 226
Cryptographic
Operators, 755
alternative launches, 223
Distributed COM
Users, 755
Lock Screen tab, 128, 130
Colors tab, 127-128
phishing attacks, 775
Event Log Readers, 755
advance fee, 807
Full Control, 755
Peek, 556
classic, 806
Guests, 755
email example, 808-813
peer-to-peer network
fraud and, 805-806
computer identification, 404
Hyper-V
Administrators, 756
file sharing, 405-406
ISS_IUSRS, 756
HomeGroup
alternatives, 408-409
List Folder
Contents, 755
setup, 406-408
Modify, 755
PDF documents, printing, 195
printer sharing, 405-406
sharing, enabling/disabling,
403-404
TCP/IP protocol, 401-403
Windows Firewall, 405
Pen and Touch, 220
Pen Flicks
actions, 837
enabling, 837
performing, 837
pens for tablets, 835-836
People app, 144
Performance Monitor, 218,
542-544
data collector sets, 544
reports, 544
snap-in, 517
Network Configuration
Operators, 756
Performance Log
Users, 756
Performance Monitor
Users, 756
Power Users, 756
Read, 755
Read and Execute, 755
Remote Desktop
Users, 756
Remote Management
Users, 756
Replicator, 756
setting, 754-756
special, 755
standard, assigning,
758-759
System Managed
Accounts Group, 756
lottery scams, 807
Nigerian letter scam, 807
stranded friend, 807
Trojan horses, 807-808
Phone and Modem, 220
Phone Companion, 144
photos
digital cameras, viewing,
259-261
editing, hardware
requirements, 34
importing
all from camera, 264
selected, 264
settings, 261-264
optical discs, mastered discs,
265-266
printing, 268
Photos app, 145
pinch gesture, 110
PING, 957, 960-961
processor, hardware requirement s
ping, 362-363
network troubleshooting, 496,
499-500
pinning
apps, 107
to Start menu, 122
to taskbar, 113-114, 557
websites, to Start menu, 123
Playback Devices, 289
playlists, copying to device
and, 251-252
Plug-and-Play devices, 255
Power Saver power
profile, 829
Powerline, 377-378
pausing/resuming
printing, 198
PowerShell. See WPS
(Windows PowerShell)
deleting files, 197
removing, 192
serial port, 183
PPPoE connection, 304-305
presentations
display
external, 882-883
wireless, 883
uninstalling, 667
settings, 880-881
Snipping Tool, 208
queue, 196-197
canceling jobs, 197-198
Miracast devices, 883
PNG files, 207
properties, 187, 190-191
Power User menu,
command-line access, 693
installation, 647-648
UPnP, LAN configuration, 423
983
shared, 464-466
IPP, 466
USB, 183
wireless, 183
printing
from applications, 193
troubleshooting, 193
Print Server Properties, 192
Devices and Printers, 179-181
printers
Fax printer, 180
adding, 182
HP printer, 180
pooling printers, 481-482
all-in-one, faxing, 272
Macintosh/Windows, 444-445
POP3 (Post Office
Protocol), 425
Bluetooth, 183
Microsoft Print to PDF, 180
configuration, 181-182
pop-up browser windows,
730-731
connection types, 183
Microsoft XPS Document
Writer, 180
drivers, 186-187
from Modern apps, 193
power management
installation, 181-182
from MS-DOS, 701-702
battery life, 827
Battery Saver, 827-828
power profiles, 828-831
Balanced, 828
High Performance, 829
Power Saver, 829
settings
Battery, 831
hard disk, 830
multimedia settings, 831
Processor Power
Management, 831
local, 182-187
networks, 379
local, installation, 182-187
offline, 196
Management Console and,
198-199
PDF documents, 195
manual detection, 183-186
preferences, 187-190
network, 183, 467-468
Print Management, 218
photos, 268
LRP/LPD, 466-467
snap-in, 517
searching for, 459
Print Manager, 179
Unix, 466-467
network sharing, 405-406
networking
offline printing, 196
troubleshooting, garbled
text, 193
permissions, 480-481
Unix, 439
Sleep mode, 830-831
pooling, 481-482
XPS documents, 195
wireless adapters, 830
sharing, 479-482
Privacy (Settings app), 226
spool directory
location, 481
Problem Reporting, 603-604
Power Options, 220
alternative launches, 223
parallel port, 183
processor, hardware
requirements, 32
984
P ro ce sso r P o we r Ma n a g e ment set t ing
keys
Processor Power
Management setting, 831
Startup Repair, 624
Startup Settings, 619
adding, 682-683
Programs and Features, 220
system image restore, 626-627
Copy Key Name, 683
alternative launches, 224
System Restore, 619, 624-625
deleting, 682-683
third-party software and,
638-639
public computers, 814
Public folder, sharing,
476-477
Publisher's Certificates,
Internet Explorer and, 736
Read access, 755
Read and Execute access, 755
REG_EXPAND_SZ, 680
REG_MULTI_SZ, 680
Reading List app, 146
REG_QWORD, 680
rebooting
troubleshooting and, 596-598
Radmin, 913
RAID 5 volume, 586-588
RAS (Remote Access
Services), 856
VPN access
incoming connections,
867-868
setup, 866-867
VPN setup, 865-867
RE (Recovery Environment),
614-617
Disable Automatic Restart
After Failure, 621
Disable Driver Signature
Enforcement, 620
REG_SZ, 680
Registry restore, 679
searching Registry, 681
values
recording
Sound Recorder, 209
R
REG_DWORD, 680
Reader app, 145
recordable CDs, 252
Quick Access section
(Navigation pane), 160
REG_BINARY, 680
read-only files, 752
automatic disk check, 928-930
Q
renaming, 683
WMA files, Voice
Recorder, 292
adding, 681-682
changing, 682
deleting, 682
viewing, 680
Windows versions, 684-685
Recovery, 220
Region, 220
recovery drives
creating, 748-750
Registrar Registry
Manager, 687
RE (Recovery Environment)
and, 616
Registry, 154, 669-670
Recycle Bin, 164-165
backup
hard disk, 676
options, 165-166
Registry Editor and, 677
recovering from, 166
System Restore and,
676-677
REG, 944-947
REG_BINARY, 680
REG_DWORD, 680
REG_EXPAND_SZ, 680
REG_MULTI_SZ, 680
third-party software, 676
corruption signs, 678
edits, troubleshooting and, 596
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT,
155-156, 671
REG_QWORD, 680
Disable Early Launch
Anti-Malware Driver, 620
HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG,
671
REG_SZ, 680
HKEY_CURRENT_USER, 671
Reset This PC, 625-626
Regedit, 154, 670
data types, 680
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE,
670-671
editing keys, 681-683
HKEY_USERS, 671
Safe Mode, 621-622
Boot Options menu, 623
Command Prompt, 622
networking and, 622
for other users, 683-684
editing security, 685-686
HKLM, 672
organization, 670-672
rollback device driver
policies, 687
redirection, 674-675
reflection, 674-675
restoring, 678
number of users, 911
Resource Manager, 540-542
signing out, 911
Resource Monitor, 218
setup, 895-896
performance monitoring and
always on, 897-898
CPU tab, 541
Regedit, 679
DDNS, 898-899
Disk tab, 542
Restore Point, 678
enabling access, 896-897
Memory tab, 541
port forwarding, 900-902
Network tab, 542
searching, 681
Tweak-10, 687
virtualization, 672-674
Registry Editor. See Regedit
Registry Toolkit, 687
REGSVR32, 944
remote access. See remote
networking
Remote Assistance, 884
Terminal Services Client,
902-903
third-party alternatives,
912-913
Overview tab, 541
resource sharing, 472-473
folders, independently, 478
versus third-party tools,
894-895
folders in place, 477
versions, 894
Public folder, 476-477
remote networking, 855-856,
862-863
Actual Size, 890
BeAnywhere, 913
Chat, 890
carbon copy, 913
enabling, 885
GoToMyPC, 913
Fit to Screen, 890
I'm InTouch, 913
Help, 890
LANs, multiple, 877
menu controls, 890
LapLink Everywhere, 913
Request Control, 890
LogMeIn, 912
requesting, 885-888
offline files, 868-869
responding to requests
985
homegroups, 473-476
resources, 454
restart, Start menu, 124-125
Restore Point, Registry
backup, 678
restore points. See also
System Restore
third-party software
installation, 635
Resultant Set of policy
snap-in, 517
encryption, 875-876
ribbon, 22, 159
Easy Connect, 888-889
managing, 875-876
email invitations, 889
marking, 870-871
files, 889
missing, 873
Copy Protect Music, 250
Settings, 890
shared folders, 876-877
filenames, 248
third-party tools, 891
synchronizing, 873-875
location, 248
toolbar, 888
using, 871-873
MP3s, 250
Remote Desktop, 425, 856,
893-894
connections, 902-903
Modern-style app, 903-906
monitors, 906
Remote Desktop Connection,
902-903, 906-907
connection options,
907-910
keyboard shortcuts,
904-906, 911
ripping CDs
Radmin, 913
recording quality, 250-251
TeamViewer, 912-913
WAV files, 250
VNC, 913
WMA (Variable Bit Rate), 249
RemoteApp and Desktop
Connections, 203, 220
WMA files, 249
REN, 933, 937–938
WMA Pro files, 249
REPLACE, 933, 938–939
resizing. See sizing, tiles,
Start menu
resolution, 80-81
WMA Lossless, 250
ripping/burning CDs,
hardware requirements, 34
RMDIR, 933
rollback device driver, 613
986
ROUTE
scripts
ROUTE, 957
routers, security, 783
RSS feeds, 323
reading, 325
subscribing to, 324
update schedule, 325-326
S
Safe Mode, RE and, 620
Samba, 437
services control, 530-534
WSH, 704
JScript, 704
sample scripts, 705
VBScript, 704
WMI, 706
search box, 107, 117, 170
as-you-type searches, 172-173
searches, 116-120
accessories, 203
client tools, 437-438
as-you-type, 172-173
server tools, 438-439
Cortana, 70, 118-120
printing from
Windows, 439
default provider, 87
printing to
Windows, 439
Edge, 87
satellite service, 297-298
Scan app, 146
scanners
hardware requirements, 34
desktop searching, 169-172
File Explorer, computers, 459
Access Control
Assistance
Operators, 755
Administrators
group, 755
Backup Operators, 755
Cryptographic
Operators, 755
Distributed COM
Users, 755
Event Log Readers, 755
Full Control, 755
Guests, 755
Internet Explorer, 87
ISS_IUSRS, 756
My Stuff, 117
List Folder
Contents, 755
networks
testing, 256-257
computers, 459
emailing, 284
file permissions, 754-756
Hyper-V
Administrators, 756
AD (Active Directory),
460-461
scanning, 281
devices, Group Policy Editor,
667-668
folders, 158
installation, 272-273
Scanners and Cameras
window, 255
Ctrl+Alt+Delete at startup,
717-718
files/folders, 458-459
printers, 459
operators, 174
Boolean, 175
Modify, 755
Network Configuration
Operators, 756
Performance Log
Users, 756
Performance Monitor
Users, 756
faxing scans, 284
properties, 173-175
Power Users, 756
images, 283-284
Registry, 681
Read, 755
scan profiles, 281-283
saving, 175
Read and Execute, 755
settings, 282-283
taskbar, 117
read-only, 752
slow speed, 284
Web pages, 319
Remote Desktop
Users, 756
screen, personalizing
wildcards, 174
ClearType Tuner, 81-82
Secure Boot, 26
Remote Management
Users, 756
font size, 81
SecureDigital cards, 258
Replicator, 756
monitors, 81
security. See also network
security; spyware; viruses
setting, 754-756
resolution, 80-81
Screen Resolution, multiple
monitors and, 656
Administrator Account,
722-723
special, 755, 759-761
standard, assigning,
758-759
sharing
987
System Managed
Accounts Group, 756
copying from backup, 536
tabs, shortcuts, 234-235
deleting, 535
Time & Language, 226
troubleshooting, 761-763
names, 535
Update & Security, 226
users, adding to groups,
756-758
resetting, 534-535
setup, 24
scripts and, 530-534
Users group, 755
SFC, 933
Services snap-in, 527-530
Write, 755
shutting down, 534
shadow copies of files, 740
Share, 150-151
file sharing, 462-464
snap-in, 517
folder permissions, 754-756
StartService method, 533
Shared Folders snap-in, 517
Internet Explorer
StopService method, 533
shared folders/files
add-ons, 735
Pop-up Blocker, 730-731
Protected mode, 734-735
zones, 732-734
system hive backup, 535-536
Services snap-in, 527-530
Set Program Associations, 114
files, Windows/Macintosh,
442-443, 445-446
homegroup, browsing, 454-456
network computers, 456-457
locking computer, 716-717
Set Up Your Mic wizard, 291
searching for, 458-459
option settings, 797
Settings app, 21-22, 147
UNC (Universal Naming
Convention), 458
routers, 783
Accounts, 226
settings, Windows Firewall,
718-719
fingerprint sign-in,
231-232
UAC, 722
new accounts, 74-76
app data, 150-151
web browsing, 730
password changes,
227-229
blocking, file sharing, 421
picture password,
230-231
Internet connection, 413
pop-up windows,
730-731
Windows Defender, 719-722
wireless networks, 390-391
Security and
Maintenance, 220
hard drive health and, 565-566
Security Configuration and
Analysis snap-in, 517
Sync Your Settings,
233-234
user account picture,
226-227
user account settings,
77-78
Control Panel and, 23
Security Templates
snap-in, 517
Devices, 226
See more icon, 134
Network & Internet, 226
Send To command, 163-164
Personalization, 226
serial port, printers, 183
Personalization window, 126
Server Certificate, Internet
Explorer and, 736
Service Hardening, 766
Services, 218
broken, 534-535
command line and, 530
Ease of Access, 226
Privacy, 226
RE (Recovery
Environment), 614
syncing between devices,
233-234
System, 225
notifications, 233
sharing, 454. See also
networking
disk drives, 468
broadband modem, 415
cable modem, 415, 419
HomeGroup
networking, 431-432
IP addresses, 415
LAN connection, 414-419
NAT, 416-418
Password Protected,
431, 433-435
router/modem
combination, 415
services, 421-424
wireless networking,
418-419
networks, enabling/disabling,
403-404
printers, 464-466
resource
folders, independently,
478
988
sh a rin g
folders in place, 477
Sleep mode, 830-831
Shared Folders, 517
homegroups, 473-476
slide gesture, 109
Task Scheduler, 517
Public folder, 476-477
resources, 472-473
sharing folders/files
monitoring, 482-483
network security and,
784-785, 787
networking troubleshooting
and, 501-502
SmartScreen Filter, 811-812
Internet Explorer and, 737
SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer
Protocol), 425
authentication, 342
network security and, 785
snap-ins
Offline Files feature, 876-877
ActiveX Control, 517
permissions, 462-463
adding, 520
security, 462-464
Authorization Manager, 517
ShieldsUP, 787
Certificates, 517
Component Services, 517
shortcuts. See also keyboard
shortcuts; Speech
Recognition
management tools, 71
Settings app tabs, 234-235
Start menu
restart, 124-125
shutdown, 124-125
URLs, 314
SHUTDOWN, 945, 947–949
shutdown
Computer Management, 517
Device Manager, 517
Disk Management, 517,
577-578
drive volumes, 579-581
driver letter assignment,
578-579
mirrored volumes, 585
RAID 5 volume, 586-588
spanned volumes,
581-584
options, 93-94
Event Viewer, 517
RE (Recovery
Environment), 615
Folder, 517
TPM Management, 517
Windows Firewall with
Advanced Security, 517
WMI Control, 517
snapping app windows,
111-112
Snipping Tool, 207-208
SNMP, network security
and, 785
software, third-party
compatibility, 635
compatibility mode, 640-643
data files and, 636
documentation, 635-636
installation, 637-638
installation changes, 639
installation repair, 639
Programs and Features,
638-639
restore point, 635
uninstalling, 639
virus check, 636
SORT, 933, 939-940
Sound, 220
alternative launches, 224
Group Policy Object
Editor, 517
sound card, hardware
requirements, 34
IP Security Monitor, 517
Sound Recorder, 209
IP Security Policy
Management, 517
sounds, assigning, 289-290
signatures, Internet Explorer
and, 736
Link to Web Address, 517
spam, 816-817
sign-out options, 93-94
Performance Monitor, 517
shortcut, Start menu, 124-125
sidebars, 7
Sign in screen, 60-62
Simple File Sharing, 433-435
Local Users and Groups, 517
Print Management, 517
Resultant Set of policy, 517
Size on Disk values, 160
Size values, 160
Security Configuration and
Analysis, 517
sizing, tiles, Start menu, 121
Security Templates, 517
Sleep, 94
Services, 517, 527-530
abuse reporting, 819-821
email address protection,
817-818
filtering, 818
spammers' techniques,
818-819
spanned volumes, 581-582
dynamic disks
adding, 584
SY ST E MINFO
combining, 583-584
hard drive conversion to
dynamic disk, 582
speakers, hardware
requirements, 34
Speech Recognition, 211, 220,
293-294
websites, pinning, 123
StartService method, 533
startup, 25-26
security, 717-718
troubleshooting, 605
disabling programs, 606
989
System Configuration, 218
BCD, 48-51
BCDEDIT tool, 51-55
backup copy, 55
ordering entries, 56
renaming entries, 56
system icons, custom, 126
SpeedCheck, 365
disabling services,
606-607
spool directory, printers, 481
procedure, 608-609
system image, backups,
37-38, 750-752
Sports app, 147
Steps Recorder, 208-209
System Information, 218
spread gesture, 110
Sticky Notes, 209
spyware. See also security
StopService method, 533
crackers, 713
storage
prevention, 714-716
memory cards, accessing, 258
Windows Defender and,
719-722
OneDrive, 83-84
requirements, 33-34
troubleshooting and, 595
system management tools
BCDEDIT, 944
CHCP, 944
DATE, 944
EVENTCREATE, 944
REG, 944-947
SSH (Secure Shell), 425
Storage Sense, 567-568
SSL (Secure Sockets Layer),
Internet Explorer and, 737
Storage Spaces, 24
SHUTDOWN, 945, 947-949
storage spaces, 575
SYSTEMINFO, 945, 949-951
REGSVR32, 944
Start button, 10, 106
characteristics, 575-576
TIME, 945
Start menu, 10, 19, 62-63,
105-106
storage pool creation, 576-577
TYPEPERF, 945, 951-953
administrative tools,
displaying, 123-124
apps
Store app, 22-23, 148
installing apps, 149-150
streaming media, 252-254
groups, 125-126
stylus for tablets, 835-836
pinning to, 122
swipe gesture, 109
pinning to taskbar,
113-114
background, custom, 127-128
customizing, 83
shortcuts
restart, 124-125
shutdown, 124-125
system icons, custom, 126
taskbar settings, 555
tiles
live tiles, turning off, 122
Mail app, 347
switching between apps, 113
WHOAMI, 945, 953-954
WMIC, 945
system repair disk, RE
(Recovery Environment)
and, 617
system requirements, 31-32
graphics, 34
memory, 32-33
Symantec PCAnywhere, 425
processor, 32
Sync Center, 221
storage, 33-34
Sync Your Settings option,
233-234
syncing
Mail app, 345-346
System Restore
File History, 746-748
Registry backup, 676-677
system volume, 285
media devices, 243-245
System, 221, 225
moving, 121
alternative launches, 224
sizing, 121
notifications, 233
System window, network
troubleshooting, 498
SYSTEMINFO, 945, 949-951
990
Ta b le t mo d e
T
Tablet mode, 66-68
Tablet PC Settings, 221
tablets. See also touchscreen
opening, 709
snap-in, 517
Task View, 107
switching between apps, 113
virtual desktops, 131-132
ARM microprocessor, 824
Task View button, 561
debut, 823
taskbar, 107
gestures, 835
auto-hide, 556
handwriting
buttons
gestures, 839
grouping, 556
training, 839-840
small, 556
TCP/IP (Transmission
Connection Protocol/
Internet Protocol)
as default, 432
troubleshooting and, 360-364
TeamViewer, 891, 912-913
Telnet Server, 425
Temporary Internet Files,
Internet Explorer and, 736
Terminal Services Client,
902-903
hardware requirements, 34
Task View, 561
tethered data service, 299
OSK (On Screen
Keyboard), 835
Touch Keyboard, 561
text, Character Map, 203-204
icons, adding, 82-83
text strings in files, 936-937
Pen Flicks, 836-838
location, 556
third-party software
pens, 835-836
locking, 556, 561
compatibility, 635
Star Trek, 823
Peek, 556
compatibility mode, 640-643
stylus, 835-836
pinning apps to, 113-114, 557
data files and, 636
touch input, 835
Search box, 170
documentation, 635-636
buttons, 836
calibration, 836
as-you-type searches,
172-173
left/right-handedness,
836
searches and, 117
pen gestures, 836
toolbars
screen rotation, 836
Touch Keyboard, 834
TAKEDOWN, 933
tap and hold gesture, 109
Start Menu, 555
Task Manager, 536-540
changing, 639
repairing, 639
Programs and Features,
638-639
Address, 561
Registry backup, 676
creating, 562
restore point, 635
Desktop, 561
uninstalling, 639
Links, 561
virus check, 636
options, 562
tap gesture, 109
installation, 637-638
Show Text
command, 562
TIFF files, 207
tiles, 106
live tiles, 106-107
Disk, 537, 539-540
Show Title
command, 562
Ethernet, 540
toggling on/off, 562
Start menu
CPU, 537-538
live tiles, turning off, 122
Network, 537
Windows key and, 557-558
live tiles, turning
off, 122
Performance tab, 537
Windows XP upgrade, 103-104
moving, 121
Memory, 537, 539
Task Scheduler, 218, 708-709
computer name change, 712
creating tasks, 710-711
View command, 562
Taskbar and Navigation, 221
alternative launches, 224
taskpad view, snap-ins,
522-525
sizing, 121
TIME, 945
Time & Language (Settings
app), 226
t roubleshoot ing
tips, 6
WordPad, 210-211
XPS Viewer, 211
TLS (Transport Layer
Security), Internet Explorer
and, 738
administrative tools,
displaying, 123-124
toolbars, taskbar
Gadgets, 202
Address, 561
touch input, 835
creating, 562
buttons, 836
Desktop, 561
calibration, 836
Links, 561
left/right-handedness, 836
options, 562
Pen Flicks, 836-838
toggling on/off, 562
pen gestures, 836
tools, 201-202
accessibility
screen rotation, 836
Touch Keyboard, 110, 834
Ease of Access, 211-212
Touch Keyboard button, 561
Ease of Access Center,
211-213
touchscreen, 13, 20, 65-66
Magnifier, 211, 213-214
gestures, 835-836
991
TPM Management
snap-in, 517
tracert, 363-365
TRACERT, 957, 961-963
transferring files, 88
conflicts, 162
drag-and-drop, 162-163
LapLink PCmover Express, 89
manual copy, 89-92
Send To, 163-164
Zinstall, 89
TREE, 933
Trojan horses, 774-775
Troubleshooting, 221
troubleshooting
double-tap, 109
application settings, 599
pinch, 110
BIOS, 605
slide, 109
device drivers, 611-613
spread, 110
Device Manager and, 609-611
Speech Recognition, 211
swipe, 109
error messages, 594
Welcome screen, 212
Narrator, 211, 214
On Screen
Keyboard, 212
tap, 109
Event Viewer, 594
tap and hold, 109
System Information, 595
Calculator, 203
Character Map, 203-204
turn, 110
accessories
MIP (Math Input
Panel), 205
Modern apps as, 202
Notepad, 205
Paint, 206-207
file permissions, 761-763
hardware requirements, 34
general tips, 600-601
input, 835
installations
Touch Keyboard, 834
OSK (On Screen
Keyboard), 835
devices, 600
programs, 599
Internet connection, 352-353
Remote Desktop
Connection, 203
Pen Flicks, 836-838
cable modem, 355-356
pen/stylus, 835-836
DSL modem, 355-356
searching for, 203
touch input
Snipping Tool, 207-208
buttons, 836
hardware problems,
359-360
Sound Recorder, 209
calibration, 836
LANs, 356-359
Steps Recorder, 208-209
left/right-handedness,
836
SpeedCheck, 365
Windows Fax and
Scan, 203
pen gestures, 836
TCP/IP utilities and,
360-364
screen rotation, 836
tracert, 365
Windows Journal,
209-210
TPM (Trusted Platform
Module), hardware
requirements, 34
Sticky Notes, 209
WhatIsMyIP, 365
Memory Diagnostics tool,
602-603
992
tro u b le sh o o tin g
network
cable testing, 496
configuration checks,
496-499
connection checks, 499
Device Manager,
495-496
Event Viewer, 493-495
file sharing, 501-502
ipconfig, 496-498
Network and Sharing
Center, 487-491
ping, 496, 499-500
WDI (Windows Diagnostic
Infrastructure), 601
Windows settings, 596
Troubleshooting window,
601-602
TTL value, 963
printers, 466-467
printing to/from Windows, 439
Samba, 437
client tools, 437-438
turn gesture, 110
Update & Security (Settings
app), 226
TV, hardware
requirements, 34
updates, Windows Update,
79-80
Tweak-10, 687
upgrade, 39-40, 42-43
TxF (Transactional NTFS), 740
reasons to, 13-15
TYPEPERF, 945, 951-953
to Windows 10, 18-19
printer sharing, 501-502
from Windows XP
problem categories,
486-487
questions to ask, 486
Unix networking
U
compatibility, 100-101
Control Panel, 97
UAC (User Account Control)
jumplists, 104
tools, 492-493
command line and, 693-694
taskbar, 103-104
Windows Firewall, 493
network security and, 785, 792
user account, 97-101
permissions and, 724-726
user profile, 98-100
from applications, 193
policies, setting, 727-728
virtualization, 100-101
garbled text, 193
privileges, 724-726
printing
Problem Reporting, 603-604
reboot, spontaneous, 596-598
elevation prevention,
728-729
Registry, edits, 596
security and, 722
sources of problem, 594-600
settings, 726-727
startup, 605
tasks, 717-723
disabling programs, 606
disabling services,
606-607
procedure, 608-609
tools
ARP, 957
IPCONFIG, 957
NBTSTAT, 957
UDF (Universal Disk Format),
Live File System discs, 265
closing session, 266-267
UEFI (Unified Extensible
Firmware Interface), 26
UNC (Universal Naming
Convention), 458, 469
UPnP (Universal Plug and
Play), 423
URLs (Uniform Resource
Locators), 310
phishing emails, 808-813
shortcuts, 314
USB (Universal Serial Bus),
printers, 183
USB slot, hardware
requirements, 34
user account, 21, 107
account lockout policy, 795
Undo command, 166
creating, 74-76
Unicode values, 204
local accounts, 73-74
PING, 957, 960-961
ROUTE, 957
uninstalling
NETSTAT, 957
TRACERT, 957, 961-963
apps, 150
TTL Value, default, 963
files, 569
Updates, 600
Plug-and-Play devices, 667
third-party software, 639
Microsoft accounts, 73-74
multiple users, 79
NET USER command, 954-956
password, 78-79
picture, 226-227
WFS (Windows Fax and Scan)
993
settings, 77-78
installation prep, 36-37
remote resources, 862-863
Windows XP upgrade, 97-101
prevention, 714-716
routing, advanced, 863-865
User Accounts, 221
public computers, 814
Vyew, 891
VM (virtual machine), 915
V
VBScripts, disk space check,
568-569
VHD files, booting, 922-923
video
converting physical computer,
920-921
creating virtual machines,
917-918
running, 918-920
Windows XP mode, 921
editing, hardware
requirements, 34
RE and, 620
videoconferencing, hardware
requirements, 34
virtual desktop, 21, 131
adding, 131
W
connecting to, 918-920
VMware, converting physical
computer, 920-921
VNC, 913
WAV files, 250
WDI (Windows Diagnostic
Infrastructure), 601
Weather app, 149
Web
RSS feeds, 323
reading, 325
subscribing to, 324
Voice Recorder app, 149
VOL, 926
volume
update schedule,
325-326
searching, 319
closing, 131
applications, 286-287
custom, 132
equalizing, 288
default, 86-87
moving apps, 131
headphone balance, 287-288
Internet Explorer, 309-310
switching desktops, 131
system, 285
lock icon, 813-814
virtual hard disk
creating, 592
mounting, 591
virtualization
Volume Mixer, 286-287
VPN (Virtual Private
Networking), 380-381, 856
connections
VHD files, 922-923
certificates, 862
VM, 915
editing properties,
859-860
connecting to, 918-920
converting physical
computer, 920-921
creating virtual
machines, 917-918
ending, 863
error number 720 or
629, 862
establishing, 860-862
running, 918-920
setup, 858-859
Windows XP mode, 921
status, 863
Windows 10 as guest, 921-922
viruses, 774-775. See also
security
email connections, 863
incoming access
disabling, 868
antivirus programs, 778
NAT and, 867-868
authentication, 814-815
setup, 866-867
crackers, 713
manufacturers, 857
web browsers
web browsing, security, 730
pop-up windows, 730-731
Welcome screen, 212
WFS (Windows Fax and
Scan), 271-273
fax service configuration,
273-274
cover page, 274-276
settings, 276
faxes
attachments, 279
comments, 279
cover page, 278
dialing rules, 278
faxing scans, 284
monitoring, 280
previewing, 279
receiving, 280
recipients, 278
994
WF S ( Win d o ws F a x a n d Scan)
sending, 280
Windows 10 IoT, 15
subject, 279
Windows 10 Mobile, 15,
855-856
scanning, 281
emailing, 284
faxing scans, 284
images, 283-284
Windows 10 Mobile
Enterprise, 15
Windows 10 Pro, 16
scan profiles, 281-283
settings, 282-283
slow speed, 284
WhatIsMyIP, 365
WHERE, 933
WHOAMI, 945, 953-954
whois database, 820-821
Windows Boot Manager,
45-46
BCD (Boot Configuration
Data), 47
Windows Defender, 221,
719-722
network security and, 792
Wi-Fi. See wireless networks
Windows Explorer. See File
Explorer
Wi-Fi Sense, 25, 843-844, 856
Windows Fax and Scan, 203
wildcards, searches, 174
Windows Firewall, 221, 405,
779-780, 797-798
WiMax, 298
Windows
Advanced Settings, 801-803
Windows Mobility Center,
831-832, 855
alternative launches, 224
Battery Status, 832
Brightness slider, 832
External Display, 833
Presentation Settings, 833,
880-881
Project settings, 882-883
projectors, 883
Screen Orientation, 832
Sync Center, 833
Volume slider, 832
Windows Phone, 824
Windows PowerShell
ISE, 218
Windows Service
Hardening, 766
Windows Store, 12, 22-23
Macintosh, shared files,
442-443
Allowed Apps and Features,
799-800
Windows Terminal Services.
See Remote Desktop
upgrading, 18-19
enabling/disabling, 798-799
Windows Update, 27-28
Windows 8, changes in
Windows 10, 27
Windows 8.1, changes to
Windows 10, 27
Windows 10
network security and, 792
automatic updates, 629-632
network troubleshooting, 493
checking for updates, 633
notification settings,
800-801
device drivers, checking for,
660-661
Restore Defaults, 801
downloading updates, 79-80
services, 421-424
32-bit, 17
settings, 718-719
maintenance, automatic,
632-633
64-bit, 17-18
turning on/off, 800-801
network security and, 794
changes from
Windows 8/8.1, 27
editions, 15-18
as guest in Windows 10
system, 921-922
overview, 9-19
upgrade, reasons to, 13-18
Windows Firewall with
Advanced Security, 218
snap-in, 517
Windows Journal, 209-210
Windows Logo key, taskbar
programs and, 557-558
notifications, 631-632
troubleshooting and, 600
Windows Vista, HomeGroups
and, 435-437
Windows XP
HomeGroups and, 435-437
Windows 10 Education, 17
Windows Media Center, 17
Password Protected Sharing,
433-435
Windows 10 Enterprise, 16-17
Windows Memory
Diagnostic, 218
Simple File Sharing, 433-435
Windows 10 Home, 15-16
TCP/IP protocol, 432
Zinst all
upgrading from
compatibility, 100-101
WMA (Windows Media
Audio) files, 249
Control Panel, 97
disk space, 250
jumplists, 104
Lossless, 250
taskbar, 103-104
MP3s, 250
user account, 97-101
recording
user profile, 98-100
virtualization, 100-101
virtualization, 921
wireless networks, 298-299
ad hoc, 850-851
adapter power
management, 830
microphone setup, 291
Voice Recorder, 292
streaming media, 252-254
Variable Bit Rate, 249
WAV files, 250
WMA Pro, 249
995
navigating, 240-242
Navigation pane, 240
custom, 242
Player tab, 246-248
playing media files, 245-246
screen saver, 247
updates, 246
user account switch, 248
WAV files, 250
window position, 246
WMA files, 249
Lossless, 250
Variable Bit Rate, 249
WMA Pro, 249
channel number, 392
WMI (Windows Management
Instrumentation), 706
connecting, 846
WMI Control snap-in, 517
connection management
WMIC, 945
WPS (Windows PowerShell),
85, 706-708
WMP (Windows Media
Player), 239
Write access, 755
adding manually,
853-854
deleting profiles, 854
settings, changing, 852
connection sharing, 418-419
domain, 843
encryption, 391-392
joining, 844-846
corporate environment,
847
home office/small office,
848-849
hot spots, 849-850
offline files, 856
printers, 183
private, 842-843
public, 842
security type, 390-391
setup, 390-397
speed, 398-400
SSID (Service Set
Identifier), 390
VPN, 856
Wi-Fi Sense, 843-844
Wireless-N router, 369
ARM processor, 240
autohide controls, 248
categories
Album, 241
Artist, 241
Genre, 241
Rating, 241
Year, 241
Copy Protect Music, 250
copying from CD
file format, 249-250
filenames, 248
location, 248
recording quality,
250-251
copying to device or CD
playlists, 251-252
recordable CDs, 252
devices, syncing, 243-245
Internet connection, 247
launching, 240
Library tab, 240
local media files, 247
MP3s, 250
WordPad, 210-211
WSH (Windows Script
Host), 704
JScript, 704
sample scripts
disk free space, 705
drive mappings, 705
VBScript, 704
WMI (Windows Management
Instrumentation), 706
X
Xbox app, 149
XCOPY, 933, 940-944
XPS documents, printing, 195
XPS Viewer, 211
Y
Yugma, 891
Z
Zinstall, 89
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