for wholesalers
insight
for wholesalers
An industry-specific guide
for your MYOB software
Contents
Introduction
3
Case Study – Bunyips Gourmet Deliveries
19
Choosing your MYOB software
4
Setting up inventory
20
Understanding the essentials
5
Creating a new item
20
Setting up item buying details
21
Setting up item selling details
21
Creating product groups and categories
22
Creating your accounts list
5
Reviewing your accounts list
5
Checking your preferences
6
Setting up opening balances
6
Getting ready to go
6
Analysing stock levels
23
7
Setting automatic re-order levels
23
Analysing your profitability
Managing your inventory
Dealing with special inventory situations
23
24
Analysing profitability by accounts
7
Analysing profitability by jobs or cost centres
7
Tracking stock in more than one location
24
Analysing profitability by category or location
8
Creating assemblies and auto-builds
25
Communicating with customers
9
Inventory adjustments and transfers
26
Creating sales
9
Adjusting for missing or damaged stock
26
Including additional information on your sales
9
Adjusting the unit costs of inventory items
26
Creating credit notes when inventory
returns to zero
27
Changing the layout of your printed sale
10
Providing different payment options for your
customers
10
Sending goods to branches and statements
to head office
11
Entering sales orders
11
Processing sales orders and finalising sales
11
Recording backorders
12
Planning delivery runs
13
Managing supplier relationships
Incorporating freight into the cost of goods
28
Calculating your freight percentage
28
Recording the receipt of goods when
incorporating freight
28
Recording the invoices for freight when
you have incorporated freight into your
cost of goods sold
29
14
Case Study – Echidna Gifts
30
Recording a supplier invoice
14
Pricing
31
Placing supplier orders
15
Paying suppliers electronically
15
Analysing how much you owe
16
Recording other types of expenses
17
Dealing with credit cards
17
Organising petty cash (if you have a petty
cash tin)
18
Organising petty cash (if you have a wallet
full of receipts)
18
Calculating average and last cost
Setting up multiple selling prices
31
Updating prices
32
Analysing profit on each stock line
32
Sales teams and commissions
33
Setting up salespeople
33
Tracking salesperson performance
33
Generating commission reports
33
Understanding GST
35
Recording GST
35
Deciding what GST codes you need
35
Deciding what codes to use when
36
Budgeting for tax
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
31
38
insight
for wholesalers
for
2
Introduction
An efficient and robust accounting system is more important
for wholesalers than for almost any other type of business.
Invoicing, stock control and timely reporting are central to
business success, as margins are often small and changes
in customer demand occur frequently. Even the smallest
wholesaler usually encounters relatively complex situations,
such as salesperson commissions, inventory in multiple
locations or a mixture of taxable and non-taxable goods.
Fortunately, MYOB software offers a range of practical
and versatile products for most small to medium-sized
wholesalers, streamlining stock control, financial reporting
and tax management so that complex tasks become as simple
as possible. In this guide, you’ll find lots of ideas and tips
on the best way to set up MYOB software, all written with
wholesaling specifically in mind. If you are a manufacturer as
well as a wholesaler, you’ll find additional information in MYOB
Software for Manufacturers. If you import or export goods
overseas, then refer also to MYOB Software for Exporters and
Importers.
Throughout this guide, you’ll also come across case studies
where you can read about real-life examples of Australian
wholesalers. Browse through these case studies to get the
big picture of how MYOB software can work for you, and to
discover new tips and ideas.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
3
Choosing your MYOB software
For small wholesalers with simple inventory requirements and no
employees, MYOB Accounting is probably your best bet (MYOB
BusinessBasics and MYOB FirstEdge are not recommended as
they don’t have stock tracking features). However, if you have
employees, MYOB Accounting Plus is the way to go as it includes
full payroll management.
If you need to have more than one person working in your
accounting system at a time (perhaps one person invoicing and
another doing the books), then MYOB Premier (for Windows)
or MYOB AccountEdge (for Macs) provide the most suitable
solution, as both these products provide multi-user capability
(both these products include payroll management as standard).
In addition, MYOB Premier and MYOB AccountEdge both
include advanced inventory features such as multiple selling
prices.
Whichever product you choose, if you want to upgrade to
another product that’s further up the family tree, you can do
so at any time. You don’t need to buy the new software from
scratch; you simply pay an upgrade price.
To find out more about these MYOB products, visit
www.myob.com.au .
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
4
Understanding the essentials
The following five steps are a brief guide to getting started, highlighting important information specific to wholesalers.
Creating your accounts list
When you create the company file for your business, the Easy Setup Assistant asks you to
Build Your Accounts List, giving you the option of starting with a standard list. The best
choice is to select Other as your Industry Classification, and Wholesale Business as your
type of business. This template provides a sample list of accounts and makes a good
starting point. Don’t worry if this accounts list is not perfect - you can add, change or
delete as many accounts as you like.
Reviewing your accounts list
Before entering your opening balances, you need to adapt your accounts list so that it
suits the unique needs of your business.
Your accounts list is a list of categories to which you allocate all transactions. There are
eight major account categories.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
Account Category
What it means
Assets
Things you own, or that people owe you. Includes bank accounts,
outstanding customer accounts and new equipment.
Asset account numbers start with 1.
Liabilities
What you owe to other people. Includes loans, taxes payable, and
outstanding supplier accounts.
Liability account numbers start with 2.
Equity
This is the profit or loss your business has made since its inception.
Examples of equity accounts include retained profits, partners’
drawings, or capital contributions.
Equity account numbers start with 3.
Income
Money in! Everything you invoice to your customers.
Income account numbers start with 4.
Cost of sales
Cost of sales are the goods you buy for resale plus any direct
costs, such as freight or commissions.
Cost of sales account numbers start with 5.
Expenses
Overheads. The day-to-day running costs of your business.
Includes wages, electricity, repairs, telephone, and so on.
Expense account numbers start with 6.
Other Income
Extraordinary income that is not part of normal operations. Could
include compensation income, capital gains or interest income.
Other Income account numbers start with 8.
Other Expenses
Extraordinary expenses that are not part of normal operations.
Could include lawsuit expenses, capital losses, or fire damage
costs.
Other Expenses account numbers start with 9.
insight
for wholesalers
for
5
Understanding the essentials
Checking your preferences
You can customise all MYOB software so that it works for your business the way you
want it to. You can do everything from changing the appearance of your windows,
to automatically requesting a backup prompt each time you quit the program. It all
happens via the Preferences window.
To review your preferences, go to the Setup menu, choose Preferences and then
explore the System, Windows, Reports & Forms, Banking, Sales, Purchases and
Security tabs. Remember—your choice of preferences does not commit you to this for
ever and ever, for you can change your preferences at any time.
Setting up opening balances
To enter opening account balances, go to the Setup menu, choose Balances, and then
choose Account Opening Balances.
To enter opening balances for outstanding customer accounts, go to the Setup menu,
choose Balances, and then choose Customer Opening Balances.
To enter opening balances for outstanding supplier accounts, go to the Setup
menu, choose Balances, and then choose Supplier Opening Balances.
To get up and running, you only need to enter opening balances for a few accounts.
Your opening account figures won’t balance, but this out of balance amount simply goes
to the Historical Balancing account. You or your accountant can fix this later.
Getting ready to go
Before you start entering transactions, work out how you intend to back up your
company file. If your file is going to contain very few transactions, you may be able to fit
your backup onto floppy disk. Otherwise, you’ll need to have a CD burner or a zip drive.
You might have been lucky so far, but nobody can guarantee continued immunity to
power surges, theft, fire or hard disk failure. If you don’t organise a system now, you’ll
probably forget about it until it’s too late—and then you’ll be sorry.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
6
Analysing your profitability
One of the fantastic things about MYOB software is that every transaction can be coded in several different ways. For
example, in the Spend Money transaction below, the Card shows the name of the supplier; the Allocation Account shows
the type of expense, the Job column shows the cost centre and the Category shows the location.
You can use accounts, jobs and
categories to analyse business
profitability
When you first set up your system, it’s
worth taking some time to figure out
how you might take advantage of the
job and category features. By analysing
how much money you’re making (or
losing!) on everything you do, you can
fine-tune your business to maximise
your chances of success.
Analysing profitability by accounts
The first (and possibly the easiest) way to analyse where you make your money is to set
up your Accounts List so that it reflects the many activities of your business. For example,
if you sell three kinds of products your income accounts might include Income Product
A, Income Product B, and Income Product C. Alternatively, if you deal with different
types of customers, your income accounts might include Income Customer Type A,
Income Customer Type B and Income Customer Type C. (Note that it is always good
to try and divide your income into several different accounts, rather than lumping it all
together as one.)
Analysing profitability by jobs or cost centres
The second way to analyse where you make your money is to divide your business into
different cost centres and create a job for each one. You can then generate a Profit &
Loss report for each cost centre, as well as a Profit & Loss report for your business as a
whole.
Here are some real-life examples of how wholesalers use job numbers to help them
manage their business:
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
•
An established wholesaler started up a side-line of a mail order catalogue. In order
to monitor the success of the mail order, he set up the mail order part of his business
as a Job. By coding all mail order income and expenses with this job number, he can
see how much the mail order makes (or loses) every month, independently of the
rest of his business.
•
An exporter was trying to establish new outlets in Singapore, Hong Kong and
Malaysia. By creating a job number for each country, he is now able to track the
income and expenses from each source.
insight
for wholesalers
for
7
Analysing your profitability
•
A wholesaler was eligible for an AusTrade export grant that refunded 50% of all
marketing expenses that related to exports. By creating a job number for AusTrade,
and coding all eligible marketing expenses, he could print a job report that detailed
all expenses at the drop of a hat, ready for his annual grant submission to AusTrade.
Jobs can be used creatively to
analyse all types of information
Analysing profitability by category or location
If you operate from more than one location, you can use categories to analyse the
profitability of each branch. For example, you might have one warehouse in Sydney and
another in Melbourne. If you code every transaction with a category that indicates which
branch it came from, you can assess the profitability of each branch independently of
the other.
To use categories, you need to turn on category tracking. Go to the Setup menu, choose
Preferences, and then click the System tab. Mark the Turn on Category Tracking
checkbox. If you want to be forced to enter a category for every transaction, select the
Categories are Required option, rather than the Categories are Not Required option.
By the way, if you’re unsure of whether to use jobs or categories to analyse profitability,
bear in mind that you can split a single transaction across several jobs, but you can’t
select more than one category for a single transaction.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
8
Communicating with customers
The most elementary part of communicating with your customers has to be your sales invoices. Not only do your invoices
need to be clear and easy to understand, but they need to look good too, creating a positive impression every time.
Fortunately, MYOB software makes creating and printing invoices as simple as pie.
Creating sales
To create your first customer invoice, go to the Sales command centre and click Enter
Sales. Next, click Layout to choose the most appropriate invoice format. There are three
main invoice layouts: Service, Item and Professional.
The best invoice format for wholesalers is usually an Item invoice, a typical one of which
is shown below.
Don’t worry if this
invoice layout includes
unnecessary columns,
such as the Backorder
column or the Job
column, as you can
customise your printed
invoice so that these
don’t print.
A standard item sale
Including additional information on your sales
Wholesalers often confront complex situations that are unique to their business and for
this reason, require special formats or information on their sales. You’ll find that MYOB
software has a standard invoice format that is surprisingly flexible; all you need is a little
forethought and creativity. The following examples give you an idea of how versatile this
format can be.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
•
You may need to print your customer’s item code, as well your own item code, on
every sale. MYOB Accounting, MYOB Accounting Plus, MYOB Premier and MYOB
AccountEdge offer the facility for additional item descriptions in the Item Details tab.
Simply enter the customer’s item code here and then customise your invoice layout
so that this prints on every sale.
•
You may need to print additional item information, such as colour, size or model
type. Again, all recent versions of MYOB software offer the ability to create Custom
Fields and Custom Lists for each item and you can customise your invoice layout so
that this information prints on every sale.
•
You may use salespeople to make your sales. Simply complete the Salesperson field
at the time you create the sale to print their name on the customer invoice. (Even
better, later you will be able to generate commission reports from your Sales reports
menu.)
insight
for wholesalers
for
9
Communicating with customers
•
You may offer different prices to different customers, depending on their location
or how much they buy from you. MYOB Premier and MYOB AccountEdge offer
the facility for up to six different levels of pricing for a single item, with five quantity
breaks for each level.
•
You might want to show customer discounts on your invoice, displaying the retail
price, followed by the discount, followed by their wholesale price. To do this, simply
enter the Volume Discount for each customer in the Selling Details tab of their
card.
Changing the layout of your printed sale
With all MYOB software, you can customise your invoices or receipts so that they look
exactly as you want them to look. You can change the fonts, add your own logo, draw
boxes, add comments and much more. All you have to do is go to the Sales command
centre, click Print Invoices and then click Customise (refer to MYOB help for more
details on customisation commands).
Below is one possible way in which an invoice could be customised.
You can customise your
invoice to look exactly as
you want it to look
Providing different payment options for
your customers
By subscribing to a special
service called MYOB
M-Powered® invoices,
you can now offer your
customers the choice of
paying invoices by BPAY®,
Postbillpay (at all Australia
Post outlets) or by credit
card over the phone.
The main advantage of this service is that by providing more ways for your customers
to pay you, you’ll be paid quicker, not to mention the fact that receiving electronic
payments is less time-consuming than receiving cheques. Also, by offering these facilities
you will make your business look that much ‘bigger’ and more professional.
For more information about MYOB M-Powered invoices, and to read the Product
Disclosure Statement, see www.myob.com.au/m-powered/ .
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
10
Communicating with customers
Sending goods to branches and statements to head office
Many wholesalers encounter the situation where they make a sale to Head Office, but
need to deliver goods to many individual branches. At the end of each month, Head
Office expects to receive a consolidated statement showing all sales made, along with
branch details for every sale.
MYOB software makes it easy to deal with this situation:
1. First, create a Customer card for Head Office, e.g. Harvey Norman Head Office.
2. Next, create a separate Customer card for each branch, e.g. Harvey Norman
Gosford.
3. Go to the Sales command centre and click Enter Sales to create your first invoice. As
the Customer, select your Head Office card.
4. In the Ship To field, click the Search icon and select another card.
5. You’ll see a list of all customer cards; select the branch customer card that you need
and click Use Card.
6. Complete the invoice as you would normally, but in the Journal Memo field type the
branch name to which you are delivering.
That’s all there is to it. Head Office is invoiced for every delivery made, but delivery
dockets, packing slips and shipping labels all show the appropriate branch address.
Furthermore, by writing the branch name in the Journal Memo field on every sale, the
branch details print on your monthly customer statements to Head Office.
Entering sales orders
When customers place orders with you, the best approach is to enter these orders
straightaway, so that you can see at a glance the value of all outstanding customer
orders as well as the total quantity on order for any individual item.
Recording sales orders is easy. Simply go to the Sales command centre and click Enter
Sales as if you were about to record a normal customer sale, and in the top left corner
select Order from the drop-down list.
You’ll find that orders affect neither your financial figures nor your receivables reports.
When you’re ready to invoice the goods, you can convert orders to sales simply by
opening up the initial order (you’ll find it under the Order tab in the Sales Register
or the To Do List), changing any amounts or quantities if necessary, and clicking the
Invoice button.
Processing sales orders and finalising sales
Many wholesalers find it works best to finalise sales (by changing the status from Order
to Invoice) on the morning after the sales leave the warehouse. Here’s one way of
working that you might find practical:
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
11
Communicating with customers
1. When a customer places an order, go to the Enter Sales window and enter the order
details, selecting Order as the status.
2. If you need to see what items are currently outstanding on order, go to the Analysis
menu in the Command Centre, click Inventory, and look in the On Order column.
3. When the goods are ready to go out to the customer (which could be several days
or weeks after the initial placing of the order), the order is called up, quantities and
amounts reviewed, and the date changed to the current date. This order (which
has been customised to print as a Tax Invoice) is then printed, along with a delivery
docket, and sent to the warehouse for packing.
4. The warehouse refers to the order when packing the goods. If any goods are out of
stock or can’t be sent that day for some reason, the packer marks changes on the
Tax Invoice and the delivery docket. The delivery dockets go out with the goods, the
invoices return to the office.
5. The next morning in the office, you review the invoices. Invoices without any
changes are ready to send to the customers as they stand. Invoices with changes are
called up in the system, quantities or items changed as required, and then re-printed.
6. Finally, go to the To Do List, click the Orders tab, and mark off all the orders that
have just been finalised. Click Record as Actual to finalise these orders, changing
them into sales.
Look up all
outstanding customer
orders in your To Do
List
Recording backorders
If you can’t fulfil every item on a customer’s order, you may choose to send some goods
now and place the remainder on backorder. To do this, go to the Enter Sales window
as normal. Enter the quantities you intend to send now in the Ship column and the
quantities you plan to place on backorder in the Backorder column. Once you click
Record, a new sales order for the backordered items will automatically be created.
You can set up your preferences so that original invoice numbers are retained on
backorders, making the fulfilment of orders easier to track. By adding an additional digit
to the invoice number when it comes up on the backorder (e.g. changing the Invoice
# from 9130 to 9130-1), you provide every sale with a unique number, yet group all
the invoices relating to a single sale together. To select this preference, go to the Setup
menu, choose Preferences, click the Sales tab and then mark the Retain Original
Invoice Number on Backorders preference.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
12
Communicating with customers
If you want to inform the customer in writing that items have been placed on backorder
and will be delivered as soon as possible, you can generate a letter automatically
by going to their card, clicking the Letter button and selecting the template called
BACKORDR.DOT. Click Use Template and Microsoft® Word will create a standard
backorder letter for you.
Planning delivery runs
Many wholesalers want to print invoices in a certain order based on the location of
their customers. Obviously, the easiest way to do this is to enter invoices in the order in
which they’re going to be delivered, for example, entering South Australia invoices first,
Victorian invoices next, and so on. However, this doesn’t work so well if you want to be
able to enter orders as and when they are received, and not necessarily in the order in
which they will be delivered.
A neat solution is to use the Card ID in each customer’s card, giving every customer a
sequential number indicating where they are in the delivery run. When raising a sale to
the customer, simply zoom in on their card, note the Card ID and insert this number in
front of the invoice number. This way, your invoices will print in the desired sequence.
Incidentally, if a customer has special delivery instructions (e.g. deliver goods to the back
driveway behind the shed), enter these instructions in the Notes section of their card
and customise your delivery dockets to include the Notes field.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
13
Managing supplier relationships
Most wholesalers end up with substantial amounts owing to suppliers. To keep track of how much is outstanding, the best
approach is to record all supplier invoices in the Purchases command centre when you receive them. Later, when you pay
these invoices, go to the Supplier Payments window. By working in this way, you have a few advantages:
•
At the click of a button, you can see exactly how much you owe to suppliers.
•
It’s easy to see whether accounts are overdue (and by how much) before things get out of hand.
•
If you report for the GST on an accrual basis (as opposed to a cash basis), then you can claim the GST on bills you’ve
received, but haven’t yet paid.
•
You’ll be prompted when early payment discounts fall due.
•
You can plan your cashflow better.
Incidentally, a simpler way of working is to record expenses as they are paid, using the Spend Money window in the Banking
command centre. You can read about this way of working in the document MYOB Software for Service Businesses.
Recording a supplier invoice
Wholesalers tend to use one of two layouts when recording purchases: either an Item
layout or a Service layout. Item layouts work best when placing an order for goods
you buy and then sell; service layouts work best for things such as electricity bills, office
stationery or accounting fees.
Here’s how to record a purchase:
From the Purchases command centre, click Enter Purchases.
Click the Layout button and select either Item or Service as your layout.
Fill in the supplier name and if required, enter the purchase order number.
Check the Date and enter the supplier’s invoice number in the Supplier Inv# field.
For item invoices, enter the Quantity, Item Number and check the Price. Enter each
line one at a time, making sure the final total tallies.
6. For service invoices, choose your allocation account in the Acct# field. Don’t worry
about detailed descriptions, as they’re usually not necessary. A general description
such as ‘Advertising in this June’s Gazette’ does just fine.
7. Don’t forget to complete the Job column if you’re tracking cost centres.
8. Make sure the GST total matches with your supplier invoice, and then click Record.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Recording supplier
invoices
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
14
Managing supplier relationships
Placing supplier orders
It’s easy to enter purchase orders, and to print, fax or email them direct to your suppliers.
This way you can see at a glance what items are on order and when they are due to
arrive.
To create a supplier order, go to the Purchases command centre, click Enter Purchases
and select the supplier. In the top left corner, make sure that the purchase status is Order
(not Bill). Complete the order as normal and click Print, or click Send To and select Fax
or E-mail.
You’ll find that orders affect neither your financial figures nor your payable reports.
When you receive the goods, you can convert orders to purchases simply by opening
up the initial order (you’ll find it under the Order tab in the Purchases Register or the
To Do List), changing any amounts or quantities if necessary, and clicking the Purchase
button.
Paying suppliers electronically
MYOB M-Powered® payments enable you to make electronic payments to your
suppliers directly from your MYOB software. Once you subscribe to this service, you can
use your MYOB software to record payments in your company file and then transmit
these payments electronically using a secure link. The M-Powered Services Centre,
accessible from any command centre, monitors the progress of all payments and, at your
request, emails or faxes remittance advices direct to your suppliers.
If you pay more than five suppliers per week, M-Powered payments are well worth the
fees. If you were to put a value on your own time (or on your bookkeeper’s time) and
calculate how long it takes you to pay a supplier (including writing a cheque, printing a
remittance advice, writing their address on an envelope, entering the payment into your
MYOB company file, and so on) as well as the costs (the envelope, the stamp, the petrol
to the post office, etc.), then chances are that paying a supplier is much more expensive
than you think.
M-Powered payments offer other benefits too, although these are somewhat less
tangible. You can schedule payments to be made at future dates, ensuring that suppliers
are paid on time, even when you’re away from the business. Payments are more secure,
as you pay directly from your account into your supplier’s account (whereas cheques are
more prone to fraud or getting lost in the mail). Finally, the M-Powered Services Centre
keeps track of all online payments, including when payments are sent, when they’re
processed, if they fail due to insufficient finds, and so on.
To subscribe to M-Powered payments, all you have to do is click the M-Powered Services
Centre icon that appears on the bottom-right of every command centre. (Note that MPowered payments are only available for MYOB Accounting v14, MYOB Accounting Plus
v14 and MYOB Premier v8 or later.
For more about M-Powered payments, including how to subscribe, the current pricing
structure and to read the Product Disclosure Statement, visit
www.myob.com.au/m-powered/ .
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
15
Managing supplier relationships
Analysing how much you owe
To see how much you owe to your suppliers, go to the Analysis menu in the Command
Centre and click Payables. You’ll see a summarised Analyse Payables report, aged as at
the current date.
Click the zoom arrows to go straight to a detailed breakdown of any supplier’s totals, or
click Print to print the report.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
16
Recording other types of expenses
MYOB realises that most businesses don’t just pay for expenses by cheque and electronic transfer, but by cash and credit cards
as well. Luckily, it’s easy to record these kinds of transactions.
Dealing with credit cards
The easiest way to deal with credit cards is to think of them as if they were a bank
account. Create a new liability account in the Accounts List and make it a Credit Card
account.
For expenses where you don’t receive a supplier account (such as fuel, interest,
memberships or internet access), do the following:
1. Go to the Banking command centre and click Spend Money.
2. Select your credit card account as your bank account in the top left.
3. Record each transaction on the credit card in the same way as you would record
cheques, the only difference being that you ignore the Cheque No field completely.
(You end up with one transaction per line on your credit card.)
Entering credit card
transactions (note the
account in the topleft corner)
For payments on your credit card where you have already recorded the supplier account,
do the following:
1. Go to the Purchases command centre and click Pay Bills.
2. Select your credit card account as your bank account in the top left.
3. Record the payment in the same way as you would any other supplier payment,
ignoring the cheque number.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
17
Recording other types of expenses
Organising petty cash (if you have a petty cash tin)
The method described here works best if you have an office with a petty cash tin, and
more than one person takes money out of the tin. However, if you don’t have a petty
cash tin but end up paying lots of little cash expenses directly from your own pocket, see
the method listed in Organising petty cash (if you have a wallet full of receipts) below.
1. Start off with a float, say $200. Write a cash cheque for this float, and allocate this
cheque to an asset account called ‘Petty Cash’. If you don’t have an account by this
name already, create one now, selecting Bank as the Account Type.
2. Whenever staff take money out of the tin, get them to give you a receipt in
exchange. Store these receipts in the tin.
3. Now, add up the receipts and work out which expense categories they belong to.
Then go to the Spend Money window but this time change the bank account at the
top to read Petty Cash. Complete the payment, allocating it across several Allocation
Accounts and several Amounts. Click Record when you’re done.
Recording petty cash
transactions when you use
a petty cash tin
4. When funds in the tin
get low, write out a cash
cheque to top the tin
back up to its original
float value. For example,
if you have a $200 float
but there’s only $4.50
left in the tin, write out a
cash cheque for $195.50.
Allocate this cheque to
Petty Cash.
Organising petty cash (if you have a wallet full of receipts)
If you don’t have a petty cash tin, but end up paying lots of cash expenses directly from
your own pocket, you’ll find the following method works best.
1. Pile these receipts into their various categories and then, with a calculator, add up
the value of each pile of receipts. You might end up with $40 worth of receipts for
stationery, $50 for postage, $15 for travel and so on.
2. Next, go to the Spend Money window and as your bank account, select Petty Cash
in the top left corner.
3. As the Amount, enter the total value of all these receipts added together.
4. Split the transaction across the appropriate expense accounts, writing individual
memos on each line, if desired.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
18
Case Study – Bunyips Gourmet Deliveries
Business Name:
Bunyips Gourmet Deliveries
Overview:
Bunyips delivers gourmet cookies and deli goods to
cafes and restaurants in the Brisbane area.
Bunyips was a small business with many teething problems, largely due to the high
volume of transactions, all with relatively small profit margins. By switching to MYOB
AccountEdge, they were able to streamline customer order processing and concentrate
on making their business more profitable.
Most of Bunyips’ customers order once a week, some order twice a week. As customers
phone their orders through, the sales staff enter these as Orders. On the morning of
delivery, they print a Sales Detail report and delivery dockets so that the warehouse can
prepare deliveries. The delivery dockets include any special delivery instructions (this
information is found in the Notes field of each customer card).
Every customer has a Card ID number indicating where they are in the delivery run, and
this Card ID number is written in front of the invoice number so that invoices print in
the correct order. Each driver receives their own Sales Detail report based on area (there
are four distinct delivery areas and each one is set up as a custom field in the customer
cards). This report provides the driver with an overview of their run, and makes sure
nothing gets missed.
At the end of each day, the sales staff finalise all completed orders, changing them
to sales. Strict credit limits are set for each customer, so that if a customer fails to pay
promptly for current outstanding sales, no more orders are accepted.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
19
Setting up inventory
If you’re setting up MYOB software for the first time, probably the single most important thing you need to know is this: you
don’t need to retype everything! Chances are you already have an inventory listing in another program, such as a database,
spreadsheet or even as a word processing document. It’s almost always possible to get this information into a format where
you can automatically import it into your Items List.
If you’re not familiar with file formats and shifting information around between programs, you may find it most efficient to
get the help of an MYOB Certified Consultant. MYOB Certified Consultants are independent trainers specialising in all aspects
of MYOB software. See www.myob.com.au/support/ccmembers/ for more details.
Creating a new item
To create a new item, go to the Inventory command centre, click Items List, click New
and then follow the simple steps below.
1. Enter an Item Number followed by a Name. (The item number doesn’t have to be a
number; you may find it makes more sense to use letters instead.)
2. Tick the relevant boxes to indicate whether you buy, sell or inventory this item.
(Usually, wholesalers tick all three boxes.)
3. Complete the income, cost of sales and asset accounts fields.
4. Go to the Buying Details tab (see below for more details).
5. Go to the Selling Details tab (see below for more details).
6. Click OK to record this new item and return to your Items List.
Creating a new item
(don’t forget to
complete the buying
and selling detail tabs
also)
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
20
Setting up inventory
Setting up item buying details
When you create a new item, click the Buying Details tab to set up information about
suppliers and restocking quantities.
Here’s what you need to know:
•
The only essential field to complete is the Tax Code When Bought field.
•
Don’t worry that you can’t enter a figure in the Last Purchase Price field when you
first create a new item. As soon as you record your first purchase for this item, this
price will be updated.
•
The Buying Unit of Measure is a descriptive term, such as Each, Pair, Case, and so
on.
•
The Number of Items per Buying Unit is the number of items that will add to your
on-hand inventory for each unit sold. Always express your buying unit as a multiple
of the smallest unit that the item can be sold in.
•
The minimum stock level acceptable is your Minimum Level for Restocking Alert.
•
Your Primary Supplier for Reorders should be the main supplier for that item. It
doesn’t matter if you sometimes buy from someone else; you can always edit the
purchase order that comes up automatically.
•
If it’s useful for your reference or for purchase orders, enter your supplier’s code for
this item in the Supplier Item Number field.
•
As the Default Reorder Quantity, enter the smallest multiple you would ever
order for that item. (For example, if you buy water filters in batches of 50, and your
minimum stock level is 25, when your stock level falls to 23, a purchase order will
be generated for 50 filters, not for two filters.) Once restocking details are in place,
MYOB software automatically generates purchase orders for stock items that fall
below minimum stock levels.
Setting up item selling details
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
•
To record selling prices and unit details, double-click the item from your Items List
and click the Selling Details tab.
•
Select the appropriate code in the Tax Code When Sold field.
•
The Base Selling Price should be the base price that you sell this item for, including
GST if the Tax Inclusive checkbox is marked.
•
The Selling Unit of Measure should be a descriptive term, such as Each, Pair, Case,
and so on.
•
The Number of Items per Selling Unit is the number of items that will be
subtracted from inventory for each unit sold. For example, if you sell shoes in
pairs, the Number of Items per Selling Unit would be 1, and the Selling Unit of
Measure would be ‘Pair’.
insight
for wholesalers
for
21
Setting up inventory
Creating product groups and categories
MYOB Premier and MYOB AccountEdge both offer the ability to further group each item
using custom lists, found under the Item Details tab. You can categorise items in any
way you like — anything from colour to size, from model to grade.
In order to take advantage of custom lists, follow these two steps:
1Go to the Lists menu, choose Custom List & Field Names, and then click the Item
tab. Specify what labels you require for your custom lists, e.g. colour, size or type.
2Return to the Items List and enter the specific custom information for each item, under
the Item Details tab. The screenshot below shows how this might appear.
Adding custom
information to
inventory items opens
up whole new worlds
of possibilities
To print custom
information on your
invoices, take a couple
more steps. Go to the
Sales command centre,
click Print Invoices,
select Item as your
Form Layout and click Customise. Go to the Data Fields icon (first on the left on your
forms toolbar) and select the custom fields that you want to print (Item Custom List 1,
Item Custom List 2, and so on). Click OK to insert these fields on to your invoice, and
then drag and drop them into position.
By the way, if a particular report doesn’t show the custom list information you require,
click the Report Fields tab (formerly the Design button) on the report customisation.
You’ll almost certainly find this custom information listed as an optional report column.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
22
Managing your inventory
If you are like most wholesalers, then the value of your inventory represents your largest single asset. Successful control of
inventory costs and quantities defines the difference between business success and failure.
Analysing stock levels
To see what stock you have on hand, simply go to the Analysis menu in the Command
Centre and select Inventory. You’ll see a report similar to the one shown below. The On
Hand column shows the quantity you currently have in stock, the Committed column
shows the quantity outstanding on current customer sales orders, the On Order column
shows the quantity you currently have on order with suppliers and the Available column
shows what you would have left should all orders (both customers and suppliers) be
fulfilled.
See how much stock
you have on hand,
what’s on order and
what’s available
Setting automatic re-order levels
If you have set up all the restocking information in the Buying Details tab of each item,
all stock needing to be re-ordered appears on the To Do List under Stock Alert. To view
or change details on these purchase orders, click the arrow to the left of the order.
While the inventory reports in MYOB software are flexible and detailed, the link to
Microsoft® Excel opens many more doors in terms of what you can develop in the
way of custom reports. If you have special reporting needs, investigate using Excel and
Visual Basic together with MYOB software to produce the information that you require.
A further improvement in this area is the release of MYOB BusinessAnalyst, MYOB
ReportWriter, MYOB ODBC Direct, as well as the MYOB Developers Kit, all of which
provide the potential to create and view custom reports and exchange information with
other software applications. Several of MYOB’s Certified Consultants have skills in these
areas. Go to www.myob.com.au/support/ccmembers/ for more information.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
23
Dealing with special inventory situations
Tracking stock in more than one location
If you have stock in a number of locations and want to track what stock you have where,
you can set up some very clever systems using MYOB software that gives you full stock
reporting in each location. You might want to adapt the finer detail to your particular
circumstances, but here’s one possible framework to get you started:
1. Go to the Lists menu, choose Custom List & Field Names, and then click Items. As
the Name of Custom List #1, type ‘Location’.
2. Go to the Setup menu, choose Preferences, and then click the System tab. Mark
the Turn on Category Tracking checkbox.
3. Go to the Lists menu and choose Categories. Create a new category for each
location where you want to track stock.
4. Go to the Items List and adapt all Item Numbers so that the last two letters indicate
the location (you can see how this might work in the screenshot below). Leave the
Item Name the same, regardless of the location.
5. Still in your Items List, go to the Item Details tab and select the appropriate location
for each item in the custom lists.
6. Go to the Inventory command centre, click Count Inventory and enter stock counts
for all items in each location.
Adapting Item Numbers so that
they reflect the location
With this setup complete, you can
now proceed to run stock for a
number of locations. Here are a
couple of examples of how it works:
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
•
When invoicing, pick the correct
stock code according to the
location (for example, if you’re selling goods from the Brisbane location, you select
the item with the Brisbane code as part of its Item Number).
•
If you transfer stock from one location to another, go to the Inventory command
centre, click Transfer Inventory and record a negative quantity for the Item Number
that relates to the departure location, and a positive quantity for the Item Number
that belongs to the receiving location.
•
By always completing the Category field at the bottom of each transaction to
indicate what location this transaction took place in, you can generate Profit & Loss
reports and Balance Sheets for each location.
•
To print stock reports that are itemised according to location, simply click Customise
when generating the Item List Summary report and select the relevant location. You
can see how this might look in the following report.
insight
for wholesalers
for
24
Dealing with special inventory situations
You can print reports
that group stock by
location
Creating assemblies and auto-builds
The Auto-Build feature is fantastic if you want to create an item that is made up of other
items. For example, you may sell a dining table suite that always consists of a single table
plus six chairs, or you might ‘manufacture’ a drum kit that consists of a snare drum, a
hi-hat, a bass drum and a stand.
Imagine you were going to create a first-aid kit that consisted of two bandages, a packet
of band-aids and some scissors. Here’s what you would do:
1. Start by setting up a new item for each individual component, so that you have an
item for bandages, an item for band-aids, and so on. Make sure you mark the
I Inventory This Item checkbox for each component.
2. Create a new item called ‘First-aid Kit’, making sure you mark the I Inventory This
Item checkbox.
3. Click the Auto-Build tab.
4. Click Edit List and type the Item Number and Quantity for all the items that make
up the kit of this finished item. Click OK and you’re done.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
25
Inventory adjustments and transfers
However perfect your bookkeeping and administration, from time to time you’ll have to adjust quantities on hand or
inventory unit costs. The following procedures explain just what to do.
Adjusting for missing or damaged stock
Go to the Inventory command centre and click Count Inventory. Locate the item for
which the quantity is wrong and type the correct quantity in the Counted column. The
Difference column will reflect the quantity you want to adjust.
Click Adjust Inventory and you’ll be asked for a Default Adjustment Account. In most
situations, the best way to allow for small stock variations is to create a cost of sales
account called ‘Stock Adjustments’, but if you’re not sure about this, ask your accountant
for their opinion.
Click Continue to get to the Inventory Adjustment window. All you have to do next is
check the Date and write a Memo, always recording a clear, concise description if you
can. Enter job or category information, if required, and click Record.
Adjusting the unit costs of inventory items
This scenario is the trickiest of all, and only arises if you know that the average cost of an
item is wrong, but that the quantity is correct. Here’s what to do:
1
Go to the Inventory command centre and click Adjust Inventory.
2
Enter the Date along with a concise explanation in the Memo.
3
Work out the total adjustment you need to make. For example, if you want to raise
the unit cost from $6 to $10 and you have 20 items in stock, you need to make a
positive adjustment for $80 ($4 difference x 20). Enter $80 in the Amount column,
and 0 in the Quantity column.
4
Enter job or category information, if required, and click Record.
Adjusting the unit
cost without affecting
the quantity
For all adjustments,
you need to select
something in the
Account column. ‘Cost
of goods sold’, ‘writedown of obsolescent
stock’ or ‘stock
adjustment account’ are all likely candidates. Just be careful never to use your inventory
account here, as this will throw your inventory out of balance.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
26
Inventory adjustments and transfers
Creating credit notes when inventory returns to zero
Sometimes, when you try to put a credit note through for inventory items, you will get
a message saying that ‘The purchase of this item would value your inventory at less than
$0.00’.
This message appears because if you want to put a credit note through that will reduce
stock levels of that particular item down to zero, the credit note must equal the value
that you already have on hand for that stock item. However, prices are always changing,
so it is highly probable that the unit cost that comes up in your credit note doesn’t equal
your existing average unit cost.
Here’s one way to fix the problem (a more detailed proceedure is available in MYOB
Support Note 903 which is available at http://support.myob.com.au):
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
1
Go to the Inventory command centre, click Set Item Prices and then click Avg Cost.
Note the Average Cost for the item you are crediting, down to the last decimal point
(if the price is $22.50234, then note this down exactly).
2
Return to your credit note, and use this Average Cost as the Price.
3
Note the Total Amount of this credit note and calculate the difference between this
and the total on the credit note you have received. Then click Record.
4
You will need to put through an adjustment for the difference. To do this, create a
new purchase, click Layout and select Miscellaneous.
5
Use a cost of sales account as the Allocation Account, and write the credit note
number in the Memo field. Remember to put a minus figure in the Amount column
if you are doing a further credit adjustment.
insight
for wholesalers
for
27
Incorporating freight into the cost of goods
Many wholesalers incur significant shipping costs and want to incorporate these costs into the cost of goods sold. For
example, if an item costs $10 per unit plus $2.50 freight per unit, then you probably want your unit cost to show as $12.50
per unit. The following procedures explain how to incorporate freight into the cost of goods.
In order to use these procedures, you first need to create a new item in your Items List. Call the item LC with the description
‘Landing Charges’ and mark the I Buy This Item checkbox. As the Expense Account, select a cost of sales account called
Freight Clearing (you will probably have to create a new account by this name).
If you are importing goods from overseas and this freight scenario is further complicated by foreign currency implications, you
can read further in MYOB Software for Importers and Exporters.
Calculating your freight percentage
When you order goods, create a new purchase, making sure you choose Order as the
status in the top left hand corner. Enter all buy prices not including freight and if you
wish, fax or email this direct to your supplier.
When the goods arrive, work out the proportion of freight as a percentage of the total cost
of the purchase.
1
Establish the total freight costs, not including GST.
2
Confirm the total value of the purchase, not including freight or GST.
3
Calculate the percentage of freight as a proportion of the total purchase. For
example, if the purchase comes to $25,000 and freight comes to $2,500, then the
percentage is 10%. This figure is called your freight percentage.
Recording the receipt of goods when incorporating freight
1
Go to the Orders tab in your To Do List and zoom in on the outstanding order.
On every line of the order, enter your freight percentage as a negative amount in the
Discount column as shown in the screenshot below. Entering a negative discount in
this manner increases the item cost by the appropriate percentage and show its true
cost.
2
By now, you should have the true cost of each item including freight, but the Total
Amount of the purchase order will be too high, because it includes the freight that
you don’t owe to that supplier. To fix this, add a credit line for “minus one” of item
LC (that is, Landing Charges). As the Price for this item, enter the total value of your
shipping costs.
3
Check that the Total Amount of this
purchase is now equivalent to the
amount owed to your supplier. If the
amount is out by a few cents, adjust
the price of your LC item. Click the Bill
button to change this transaction from
an order to an account payable.
Incorporating freight into unit cost of
goods
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
28
Incorporating freight into the cost of goods
Recording the invoices for freight when you have incorporated freight into
your cost of goods sold
Go to Purchases and record the invoice for freight as you would any other invoice,
except instead of allocating this invoice to your regular freight expense account, allocate
it to your Freight Clearing account.
On your Profit & Loss, your Freight Clearing account should behave like a holding
account. You credit this account when you receive goods into stock (because the
Landing Charges item links to Freight Clearing), and debit this account when you record
the purchases from shipping agents. At the end of financial year, your freight clearing
account will probably have very little in it. This is alright; you don’t want to show freight
from overseas separately on your Profit & Loss. The aim has been to include these costs
as part of your cost of goods sold figure.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
29
Case Study – Echidna Gifts
Business Name:
Echidna Gifts
Overview:
Echidna distributes giftware throughout Australia,
specialising in hand-crafted and Australian-made
goods.
Echidna has had their ups and downs in their long period of trading and, like many small
businesses, has learnt their lessons the hard way. However, their real turning point was
when GST was introduced and they purchased MYOB Accounting. Finally, they were
able to analyse their business properly and see where changes could be made.
Echidna’s real focus has been to use MYOB Accounting as a sales tool. They group
customers according to sales agents and analyse customer trading patterns, alerting
agents when customers have not placed a re-order in the time expected. Echidna also
analyse the purchasing patterns of each customer, and if a customer isn’t buying one
of the stronger products in their range, they usually try to persuade them to do so by
offering one-off specials and introductory offers.
MYOB Accounting’s item reports (analysing gross profit and units sold for every item
sold) enabled Echidna to make some tough decisions. Some of the items the owner
was most fond of (including her sister’s hand-made patchwork quilts) simply didn’t
sell in sufficient quantities to justify their inclusion in the range. They’ve now simplified
what goods they sell and rationalised the prices on items where the profit was next to
nothing.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
30
Pricing
Keeping an eye on costs is essential and you want to make updating prices as easy and as efficient a process as possible. Here’s
how:
Calculating average and last cost
If you go to the Set Item Prices function in the Inventory command centre, you’ll notice
that you can choose to view items either by Average Cost or by Last Cost.
Average Cost is calculated by dividing the current inventory value by the number
of units in inventory. It’s as simple as that! In accordance with Australian accounting
standards, MYOB software uses Average Cost to calculate the total value of your
inventory.
Last Cost is the equivalent of your supplier’s list price, and does not include supplier
discounts, freight or early payment discounts.
Remember! Be careful when relying on Average Cost or Last Cost information when
setting prices. Average Cost includes supplier discounts, but Last Cost does not. Neither
cost includes freight or early payment discounts. The average cost is exclusive of GST.
Setting up multiple selling prices
Only MYOB Premier and MYOB AccountEdge allow for multiple selling prices per item.
Click the Selling Details tab of any item and you’ll notice that you can have up to six
pricing levels for each item. By default, these levels are labelled A through F, but you
can label your pricing levels in whatever way makes the most sense for your business.
For example, you might have Retail, Wholesale, Trade 1, Trade 2, Staff and Special as
your price levels. That way, you can keep separate selling prices for different types of
customers.
It’s a good idea to change the price level labels so that they are more meaningful for your
business. Go to the Lists menu, choose Custom Lists & Field Names, and then click the
Price Level tab.
Setting up price levels
and quantity breaks in
MYOB Premier
If you offer discounts
for certain quantities,
you can set up quantity
breaks using the
Quantity Over field.
For example, if you want to create pricing levels for sales of this item in quantities of 25
or more, enter 25 in this field. If you intend to offer further discounts for sales of this item
in quantities of 50 or more, enter 50 in the next field.
The last stage of setting up multiple selling prices is to specify what price level each
customer belongs to. Go to the Card File command centre, click Cards and edit your
customers one by one. Click the Terms button and select the appropriate Price Level.
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
31
Pricing
Updating prices
If your selling prices are based on a certain markup percentage or dollar margin use the
Set Item Prices function in the Inventory command centre. If you only wish to change
a few prices, mark each item you wish to update by clicking against them, and then click
the Shortcuts button. To set new prices for the entire list, just click Shortcuts.
Work through this dialogue box from the bottom up, starting with the Basis for
Calculation. Choose whether you wish to refer to Average Cost or to Last Cost, and
whether you want to calculate profit based on Margin, Markup or Gross Profit. State
whether you want to round prices Up or Down, or to the nearest specified unit.
The differences between Percent Margin, Percent Markup and Gross Profit can be
confusing. Use Percent Margin if you think of profit as a percentage of the final selling
price. Use Percent Markup if you think of profit as a percentage of the buying price. Use
Gross Profit if you think of profit as a fixed dollar amount per item.
An alternative way to update your Item selling prices is to export your Item List to
Microsoft Excel, make your changes, and then import the updated list.
Analysing profit on each stock line
To see how much profit you’re making on each individual stock line, do the following:
1
Go to the Analysis menu in the Command Centre and choose Sales.
2
Click Filters and select All Items.
3
Select your desired date range, and click OK.
4
Click the Profit button to analyse the profit contributed from each stock line, or click
Margin to see this as a percentage. Click the Avg Cost button to see total sales of
each line, along with the number of units sold.
5
Click the graph
buttons (Sales
and Profit) to see
this information in
pictorial format,
similar to the
screenshot below.
You can analyse sales
in many different ways
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
32
Sales teams and commissions
Many wholesalers need to calculate sales commissions on a weekly or monthly basis. MYOB software can help to streamline
and even automate this process.
Setting up salespeople
The first thing to do is to create a new card for every salesperson. Go to the Card File
command centre, click Cards List and create a new card for every salesperson, selecting
Employee as the Card Type. If these sales people are not employees, select Labour Hire
as the employment basis in the Payroll Details tab of each card.
If some of your sales are made directly by head office, telephone or mail order, you can
create cards to track these sale categories too. Just create new cards called ‘Head Office’,
‘Head Office Phone Sales’, ‘Head Office Mail Order Sales’, and so on.
If you pay a single salesperson different commission rates depending on the type of
customer they sell to, or where the customer is located, then it makes sense to create a
separate card for each rate that salesperson receives. For example, you might have three
cards for Alan Jones: Alan Jones 5%, Alan Jones 7.5% and Alan Jones 10%. Furthermore,
note these different rates in the Custom List #1 of their card (under the Card Details
tab). Including this information helps you to extract commission reports later on.
Now all you have to do is remember to complete the Salesperson field every time you
create a sale. Even better, create a default salesperson in the Selling Details tab of every
customer card so that this information pops up automatically every time you go to create
a sale.
Tracking salesperson performance
The easiest way to find out who sold how much is to choose Sales from the Analysis
menu in the Command Centre. Click Filters, select the All Salespeople option and then
select the year and the period that you want to analyse.
Clicking Sales displays a bar graph comparing the total sales in dollars for each selected
month. Clicking Ledger displays the total sales in dollar terms for each salesperson over
the selected period, as well as each salesperson’s sales expressed as a percentage of the
total sales.
Further sales team reports can be found by going to the Reports menu, choosing
Index to Reports, and clicking the Sales tab. You’ll find another seven salesperson
reports listed here, many of which can be sorted by salesperson, custom lists or
identifiers.
Generating commission reports
Commissions and how they are calculated vary enormously from business to business.
However, chances are you can get a salesperson report that provides information in a
format close to the one you’re looking for. Here are some tips:
•
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
In the Index to Report’s Sales tab, find the report that is closest to the one you’re
looking for. Don’t hesitate to click the Design button and experiment with the
different types of information you can display.
insight
for wholesalers
for
33
Sales teams and commissions
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
•
As suggested earlier, set up commission rates in the Custom Lists of each
salesperson’s card (under the Card Details tab). Remember to display this custom
field when generating reports.
•
When the report looks close, click the Send To button and send the report to Excel.
From here, you should be able to make minor adjustments to create the report
you’re looking for.
•
If you want to automate the process of customising this report in Excel, you should
be able to create additional worksheets that link to the worksheet that MYOB
software creates automatically every time.
•
Alternatively, if you find yourself doing significant hours of calculations by hand, or
in additional spreadsheets, consider contacting an MYOB Certified Consultant and
asking them to design you a custom report for you. You can get a listing of Certified
Consultants from www.myob.com.au/support/ccmembers/ .
insight
for wholesalers
for
34
Understanding GST
MYOB software makes accounting for GST about as easy as something so complex could be. So long as you record all your
transactions and allocate the right tax code to each one, there’s not a great deal that can go wrong. The main thing to
remember is to allocate the right tax code when recording transactions. This done, everything else should fall into place.
Recording GST
Whenever you record a transaction, you can choose whether to enter the amount as taxinclusive or tax-exclusive by marking or clearing the Tax Inclusive checkbox in the top
right of every window.
Usually, you’ll find it easiest to mark the Tax Inclusive checkbox and enter all amounts
including tax. You’ll find that the GST calculates automatically and you don’t have to go
looking up every receipt to double-check the tax total.
Deciding what GST codes you need
Most wholesalers find that they only need six tax codes: CAP; FRE; GST; ITS; N-T and
QUE.
To review your codes, go to the Lists menu and choose Tax Codes. Comparing your list
with the list shown below, delete any codes you don’t need (they’ll only serve to cause
confusion) and add any codes that are missing.
For all tax codes, the Linked Account for Tax Collected should be GST Collected from
Sales and the Linked Account for Tax Paid should be GST Paid on Purchases. Once
you’re finished, your tax code list should look similar to the one below:
Your tax code list
should look something
like this
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
35
Understanding GST
What do the different codes mean? Here’s an explanation:
CAP (GST on capital acquisitions)
If you buy new tools, equipment or vehicles that cost more than $1,000 before GST
(assuming you’re part of the Simplified Tax System) or if you buy any new tools,
equipment or vehicles at all (if you’re not part of the Simplified Tax System), you need
to report these purchases separately on your Business Activity Statement. To do this, you
need a separate tax code called CAP. If you’re not sure whether or not you’re part of the
Simplified Tax System, ask your accountant.
FRE (GST-free goods and services)
Even if you don’t sell any GST-free goods or services, you’re bound to end up purchasing
GST-free supplies such as bank charges, donations or government charges. If you
employ any subcontractors who have an ABN but aren’t registered for GST, use FRE as
the tax code for their payments.
GST (Goods and Services Tax)
GST is the tax code that you’ll use for most sales and purchases.
ITS (input taxed sale)
Use this code for interest and dividend income and rental income from residential
property investments.
N-T (not reportable)
N-T stands for not reportable and is the code you use for everything that falls outside the
GST net, such as wages; superannuation; loan repayments; bank transfers and personal
spending.
QUE (query)
Use the query code whenever you’re not sure what code to use. That way, when you get
to the end of the quarter, you can print a report for all transactions coded QUE and ask
your accountant or MYOB Certified Consultant to give you a hand choosing the correct
codings.
Deciding what codes to use when
One of the tricky things when first recording income and expenses is to figure out what
tax code to use when. Here are tips to help you out, written especially with wholesalers
in mind:
Income
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
•
All taxable items should have GST as the tax code.
•
All non-taxable items (food, medical supplies, educational materials, etc) should have
FRE as the tax code.
•
All exports should have EXP as the code.
•
All interest income should have ITS as the tax code.
insight
for wholesalers
for
36
Understanding GST
•
If you receive money from a personal source and it isn’t really income (for example,
a family loan, a gift, a tax refund or a transfer between bank accounts), select N-T as
the tax code.
Expenses
•
All purchases of taxable items should have GST as the tax code.
•
All purchases of non-taxable items (including imported goods from overseas) should
have FRE as the tax code.
•
Most expenses should have GST as the tax code, including things such as
advertising, electricity, postage and telephone.
•
If you’re registered for the Simplified Tax System, if you buy new tools or equipment
that cost over $1,000, select CAP as the tax code (CAP stands for ‘GST on capital
acquisitions’).
•
If you’re not registered for the Simplified Tax System, you may need to select CAP as
the tax code for all new tools or equipment, regardless of cost.
•
Donations should have FRE as the tax code, as should almost all bank charges and
interest expense. However, watch out, as merchant fees should have GST as the tax
code.
•
Hire purchase and lease payments depend on what you’re paying off, when you
bought it and how your accountant intends to treat it. Ask your accountant.
•
Insurance is tricky, because almost every insurance policy is a mixture of taxable and
tax-free (stamp duty doesn’t have GST on it). Enter QUE as the tax code for insurance
expense, then double-check the exact amount of GST on every insurance payment
when you record it.
•
Milk, tea, coffee and some first aid supplies should have FRE as the tax code.
•
Residential rents should have ITS as the tax code, commercial rent should have GST
as the tax code.
•
Domestic travel should have GST as the tax code, overseas travel should have FRE as
the tax code.
•
Government charges are almost all GST-free, and include licence renewals, motor
vehicle registration, council rates, water rates, land tax and stamp duty
Private expenses
•
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
100% private-use expenses should have N-T as the tax code, as should wages and
superannuation.
insight
for wholesalers
for
37
Budgeting for tax
One of the harder aspects of running your own small business is keeping track of how much tax you owe, and making sure
that you have sufficient funds available when tax bills fall due. Fortunately, you can use the financial reports in MYOB software
to help you budget for tax, avoiding any nasty surprises.
The best way to avoid getting in a pickle with GST and employee tax is to open a savings account that links to your business
bank account, so that you can transfer money between accounts easily.
Created in partnership with Macquarie Bank, MYOB M-Powered® MoneyController can
help you better manage your cashflow, by assisting to provide for your business’s tax
obligations and investing any surplus cash you may have. With this service you can:
•
Analyse your current tax and payroll obligations.
•
Securely transfer funds from your everyday business account to a high-interest
MoneyController Provision Account straight from your MYOB software.
•
Make ATO payments from your Provision Account with Macquarie Bank.
•
Analyse your business's investment capacity.
•
Transfer surplus cash into a high-interest MoneyController Investment Account with
Macquarie Bank.
To find out more about M-Powered MoneyController, or to download the Product
Disclosure Statement, visit www.myob.com.au/m-powered/ .
© MYOB Technology Pty Ltd
insight
for wholesalers
for
38
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement