Contractors Code of Practice and Standards and

Contractors Code of Practice and Standards and
SUSTAINABLE
ENERGY
AUTHORITY OF
IRELAND
Better Energy Programmes
Contractors Code of Practice and
Standards and Specifications Guidelines
Version 7.2 2016
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BE COP Rev 7.2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
GLOSSARY OF TERMS ......................................................................................................................... 3
DISCLAIMER .......................................................................................................................................... 3
1
INTRODUCTION TO THE PROGRAMME...................................................................................... 4
2
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................................................... 8
2.1 GENERAL CONTRACTOR REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................... 8
2.2 GENERAL PRODUCT STANDARDS ................................................................................................. 8
2.3 GENERAL INSTALLATION STANDARDS ........................................................................................... 9
3
CODE OF CONDUCT ................................................................................................................... 11
4
HEALTH & SAFETY REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................... 14
4.1 SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS ............................................................................................................. 14
5
VENTILATION ............................................................................................................................... 16
6
PLANNING AND PROTECTED STRUCTURES .......................................................................... 21
7
SPECIFIC MEASURES – COMPETENCY AND STANDARDS ................................................... 22
7.1 CAVITY W ALL INSULATION.......................................................................................................... 23
7.2 EXTERNAL W ALL INSULATION ..................................................................................................... 25
7.3 INTERNAL W ALL INSULATION (INCLUDING FLAT ROOF CEILINGS) ................................................... 30
7.4 CEILING LEVEL ATTIC INSULATION .............................................................................................. 34
7.5 RAFTER LEVEL ATTIC INSULATION (WARM ROOF) ......................................................................... 40
7.6 FLOOR INSULATION.................................................................................................................... 43
7.7 FULLY INTEGRATED HEATING CONTROLS.................................................................................... 48
7.8 HIGH EFFICIENCY BOILERS ........................................................................................................ 53
7.9 HEAT PUMPS ............................................................................................................................ 57
7.10
BIOMASS BOILERS (WITH/WITHOUT THERMAL STORAGE) .................................................. 62
7.11
SOLAR WATER HEATING .................................................................................................. 66
7.12
DRAUGHT PROOFING...................................................................................................... 69
7.13
W INDOW REPLACEMENT ................................................................................................ 71
7.14
EXTERNAL DOOR REPLACEMENT .................................................................................... 74
7.15
W INDOW GLAZING ENVELOPE REPLACEMENT .................................................................. 77
7.16
W INDOW GLAZING LOW E-FILM ........................................................................................ 80
7.17
ENTRY LEVEL HEATING CONTROLS ................................................................................. 82
7.18
ENTRY LEVEL HEATING CONTROLS WITH REMOTE ACCESS ............................................... 84
7.19
FULLY INTEGRATED HEATING CONTROLS WITH REMOTE ACCESS ...................................... 86
7.20
SOLID MULTI-FUEL STOVES (INCL BIOMASS) ................................................................... 91
7.21
GAS FIRED ROOM HEATER ............................................................................................. 96
7.22
MECHANICALLY-ASSISTED POWERED CLEANSE AND FLUSH (POWERFLUSHING) OF HEATING
SYSTEM ......................................................................................................................... 98
7.23
MECHANICALLY-ASSISTED POWERED CLEANSE AND FLUSH (POWERFLUSHING) OF HEATING
SYSTEM AND INSTALLATION OF MAGNETIC FILTRATION SYSTEM TO EXISTING HEATING SYSTEM ...... 101
7.24
CHIMNEY DRAUGHT LIMITER ......................................................................................... 103
7.25
BOILER SERVICE.......................................................................................................... 104
7.26
CFL AND LED DOMESTIC LIGHTING............................................................................... 105
7.27
HOME ENERGY REPORTS ............................................................................................ 106
7.28
ELECTRICITY ENERGY MONITORS ................................................................................ 107
7.29
HIGH HEAT RETENTION ELECTRIC STORAGE HEATERS ..................................................... 108
APPENDIX 1: REFERENCE DOCUMENTS ..................................................................................... 109
APPENDIX 2: SUMMARY TABLE OF COMPETENCIES AND STANDARDS ................................. 115
APPENDIX 3: ESB NETWORKS GUIDANCE DOCUMENTS ........................................................... 133
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Glossary of Terms
Contractor – Member of the Registered List of Contractors maintained by The Sustainable Energy
Authority of Ireland , who are approved to install measures supported by this programme. The
installation of these measures by unregistered Contractors will not be supported by the Programme.
Customer – An applicant for support from the Programme who has had one or more of the
measures outlined herein installed by a Registered Contractor.
Agrément – the National Standards Authority of Ireland, which issues Certificates for certain
products and installers. Formerly known as the Irish Agrément Board.
The Programme – The Better Energy Homes Programme administered herein and created to
increase the energy efficiency of Ireland’s residential building stock.
Disclaimer
This document is a reference for Registered Contractors who wish to carry out works supported by
SEAI’s Better Energy Homes, Better Energy Warmer Homes and Better Energy Partners programme
(the “Programme”). It sets out the general competence, standards and specifications that
Contractors should possess, and adhere to, in carrying out works supported by the Programme.
SEAI and its Agents do not provide any warranty or guarantee concerning the completeness,
effectiveness, reliability, accuracy or otherwise of such standards or any work carried out on foot of
such standards. The provision of goods and/or services by Contractors to Customers of this
Programme is entirely a matter between the Contractor and the Customer. SEAI and its Agents
accept no liability or responsibility, whether for breach of contract, negligence, health and safety
violations or otherwise, in respect of any dispute, claim or cause of action arising out of, or in
relation to, any product, equipment, work, system or installation supplied or carried out by the
installer under the programme. The Contractor is entirely responsible for all such matters.
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1
Introduction to the Programme
The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) is Ireland’s national energy authority with a
mission to promote and assist the development of sustainable energy and was established by the
Government pursuant to the Sustainable Energy Act 2002. The Better Energy Homes programme is
one of a range of measures and support mechanisms administered by SEAI to improve the quality of
the built environment in Ireland.
The Programme provides financial support to existing Customers (Customers) for a defined range of
remedial technologies and materials, which will improve the overall efficiency of their home. The
Customer will be able to select Contractors to carry out the measures supported and defined by the
Programme from a list of Registered Contractors published and maintained by SEAI. Following
completion of the works, the Customer will be able to claim certain levels of grant relating to these
measures. In order to successfully claim the grant, the works must be carried out in accordance with
the guidance set out in this document.
Better Energy Homes programme
The Better Energy Homes programme provides grants to homeowners who invest in energy
efficiency improvements in one or more of the following areas: Roof Insulation, Wall Insulation,
Installation of a High Efficiency (>90%) Gas or Oil fired Boiler, Heating Control Upgrades and Solar
panels
The remedial measures funded include:
 Attic Insulation
 Cavity Wall Insulation
 Internal Wall Insulation
 External Wall Insulation
 Solar Water Heating
 Heating Control Solutions – A minimum standard ‘solution’ is required to be completed
before support can be applied for. This includes:
 Installation of a Seven Day Timer and Temperature Control to an Existing Boiler
 Installation of Zonal Control over at least two zones in the home (these minimum
two zones are defined as being the space heating and domestic hot water zones)
 Installation of a Timer and Temperature Control on the Hot Water Cylinder
 Installation of a Boiler Interlock (which prevents the boiler from firing where the set
temperature in the home has been reached.)
 In addition to the above four items either:
- The installation/modification to include an additional Heating Zone (which
will allow the space heating to be split into two separate zones) or
- The installation of Thermostatic Radiator Valves on at least three radiators
but no less than half of all radiators
 High Efficiency Heating System which consists of Heating Control Solutions (as above
minimum standard solution) plus installation of a high efficiency boiler (in excess of 90%
seasonal efficiency).
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Better Energy Warmer Homes programme
The Better Energy Warmer Homes programme (BEWH), administered by the Sustainable Energy
Authority of Ireland (SEAI), funds energy efficiency improvements in the homes of the elderly and
vulnerable, making the homes more comfortable, healthier and more cost effective to run
The remedial measures funded under Better Energy Warmer Homes programme include:
 Attic Insulation
 Cavity Wall Insulation
 External Wall Insulation
 Internal Dry Lining Wall Insulation
 Cavity Wall Insulation
 High Efficiency Gas or Oil fired Boiler with Fully integrated Heating Controls Upgrade
 Fully integrated Heating Controls Upgrade
 Solid Fuel Room Heater (without back boilers)
 Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of system
 Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of system and Installation
of magnetic filtration system to existing heating
 Oil Boiler Service
 LPG Boiler service
 Natural Gas Boiler service
 Draught Proofing
 Insulation of pipe-work and water storage tanks
 CFLs
 Energy Advice
Better Energy Partners
The Government has committed to achieve energy efficiency savings of 20% by 2020 as set out in
specific targets for energy savings in the National Energy Efficiency Action Plan. Energy Suppliers
will play a key role in meeting this goal. There is a requirement for all major energy companies to
deliver energy savings in proportion to their market share. This is in keeping with the EU
requirements as set out in the Energy Services Directive, which has been transposed into Irish law
via Regulation 16 and 17 of S.I. No. 542 of 2009, and the more recent Energy Efficiency Directive,
which is currently under review.
This programme has two broad strands – the setting of energy saving targets to be achieved by
energy suppliers (both network connected and non-network connected) and the creation of an
energy efficiency fund, which will be made available to the energy suppliers and energy services
providers. The role for SEAI in all of this will be to promote and facilitate continued development
and evolution on the programme while ensuring governance, standards and quality assurance
underpins all works carried out under the programme. In addition SEAI continue to develop systems
and processes to support the promotion, management and reporting of programme progress
towards a successful programme outcome and achievement of targets.
Measures recognised under Better Energy Partners programme include:
 Attic Insulation
 External Wall Insulation
 Internal Dry Lining Wall Insulation
 Cavity Wall Insulation
 Floor Insulation
 Full Window Replacement
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Window glazing envelope replacement
Window glazing low e film
External Door Replacement
High Efficiency Gas or Oil fired Boiler with Fully integrated Heating Controls Upgrade
High Efficiency Gas or Oil fired Boiler with Fully integrated Heating Controls Upgrade with
remote access
Heat Pump with Fully integrated Heating Controls Upgrade
Heat Pump with Fully integrated Heating Controls Upgrade with remote access
Biomass boiler (with/without thermal storage) with Fully integrated Heating Controls
Upgrade
Biomass boiler (with/without thermal storage) with Fully integrated Heating Controls
Upgrade with remote access
Fully integrated Heating Controls Upgrade
Fully integrated Heating Controls Upgrade with remote access
High Efficiency Gas or Oil fired Boiler with Entry Level Heating Controls Upgrade
High Efficiency Gas or Oil fired Boiler with remote access Entry Level Heating Controls
Upgrade
Entry Level Heating Controls Upgrade only
Entry Level Heating Controls Upgrade only with remote access
Solid Fuel Room Heater (without back boilers)
Gas Fired Room Heaters
Solar Water Heating Installation
Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of system
Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of system and Installation
of magnetic filtration system to existing heating
Chimney draught limiter
Oil Boiler Service
LPG Boiler service
Natural Gas Boiler service
CFL and
LED
Home Energy Reporting
Electricity Energy Monitors
High heat retention electric storage heater
A Contractor wishing to participate in the Programme, by being entered onto the list of Registered
Contractors, must have the minimum levels of competency outlined in this document and must also
commit to supplying materials and equipment and performing the works to at least the standards
set out herein.
Each section of the Contractors Code of Practice and Standards and Specifications Guidelines has its
own label, which dictates which measure is covered under each individual programme
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BEH
Better Energy Homes Programme
WHS
Better Energy Warmer Homes Programme
BEP
Better Energy Partners
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Measure
7.1
7.2
Cavity Wall Insulation
External Wall Insulation
7.3
Internal Wall Insulation (Including flat roof ceilings)
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
7.11
7.12
7.13
7.14
7.15
7.16
7.17
7.18
Ceiling Level Attic Insulation
Rafter level attic insulation (warm roof)
Floor Insulation
Fully Integrated Heating Controls
High Efficiency Boilers
Heat Pumps
Biomass Boilers (with/without thermal storage)
Solar Water Heating System
Draught proofing
Window Replacement
External Door Replacement
Window glazing envelope Replacement
Window glazing low e film
Entry level Heating controls
Entry level Heating controls with remote access
7.19
Fully Integrated Heating controls with remote access
7.20
7.21
Solid Multi-Fuel Stoves (incl Biomass)
Gas fired room Heater
Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of
Heating system
WHS
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BEP
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Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of
Heating system and Installation of magnetic filtration system to existing
heating system
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7.24
7.25
7.26
7.27
Chimney draught limiter
Boiler Service
CFL and LED domestic lighting
Home energy reporting
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7.28
7.29
Electricity Energy Monitor
High heat retention electric storage heater
7.22
7.23
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2.1
General Requirements
General Contractor Requirements
To successfully register to complete works under the Better Energy Homes Programme, the
Contractor must meet the general requirements as shown below. The Contractor must also satisfy
the specific competency requirements set out under the Competency, Product and Installation
standards for each of the measures defined.
Demonstrated failure to satisfactorily comply with the terms and intent of this document may result
in the immediate removal of a Contractor from the Registered Contractor list and any of the
Contractors nominated personnel where they exist.
Each Contractor must:
 Fully comply with the requirements of the Contractor Registration process/form set out
separately
 hold a valid Tax Clearance Certificate
 have Public, Products and Employers Liability insurance cover which meets or exceeds the
requirements specified by SEAI
 be able to carry out the works in line with the guidelines set out by SEAI or its Agents
 submit to performance audits of their works and review of same with Customers by SEAI or
their Agents
 has in place with their customers a contract which meets or exceeds the terms set out in
SEAI’s model contract for the Programme.
The Contractor must provide a competent workforce to carry out the works. This includes all
relevant training and certification as appropriate to each element of works being carried out. All
nominated personnel must have relevant professional training or product specific manufacturer
training if required to carry out the works as appropriate. Relevant training records and certificates
must be maintained by the Contractor and may be subject to inspection by SEAI and/or its agents.
The specific competency standards relating to each of the measures supported by the Programme
are detailed further in this document.
Contractors who wish to be registered on the Better Energy Homes programme must have regular
access to e-mail facilities and must have IT software that is compatible with Microsoft Office
software in order to ensure the effective and efficient administration of the Programme.
2.2
General Product Standards
In general, all products used must be fit for purpose, improve the energy efficiency of the building
and have no detrimental impact on the structure, viability, quality or safety of the property.
All insulation products must meet relevant product standards. Adherence to applicable standards
must be followed in relation to materials that are used, and their installation.
All aspects of this guidance document will be subject to audit, QA inspection and verification.
The specific product standards relating to each of the measures supported by the Programme are
detailed further in this document.
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Equivalence of Prescribed Standards and Specifications
Where this document prescribes Standards or Specifications of products / systems or Certification
requirements for contractors, it may be possible for a manufacturer / supplier or contractor to
participate in the programme where they can clearly demonstrate full equivalence to those
requirements. Where this equivalence route is being pursued it is vitally important that the supplier
or contractor make contact with the Better Energy Homes Programme Technical Team to enter a
process which can establish to SEAI’s satisfaction that such equivalence can be demonstrated. This
must be done BEFORE any works are undertaken with the subject system or by the subject
contractor. Failure to first secure confirmation from SEAI of said equivalence will likely result in a
homeowner’s grant approval being revoked and possible sanction of the contractor.
Manufacturers / suppliers and contractors should be aware that nothing in the above will allow SEAI
to subvent legislations, regulations, procedures or institutional arrangements which would have
SEAI act beyond its formal remit.
2.3
General Installation Standards
Prior to the installation of any measure:
 the property must be assessed to ensure that it is suitable for the measure proposed
 the installation of said measure will not have any detrimental effect upon the integrity and
condition of the building
 the installation of the recommended measure is likely to achieve the desired effect in terms
of energy efficiency.
In particular, the design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the
ventilation, air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living
environment in the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living
environment in the home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the
duty of the Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to
recommend to the Customer on any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental
change to the living environment as a result of the works. (See section 5)
In general, all works should be carried out in accordance with the best practice and technical
guidance documents outlined herein and available from the following:
 S.R. 54:2014 Code of Practice Code of practice for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings
 Building Regulations Technical Guidance Documents (Part L 2007, Part B 2006, Part D 2000,
Part F 2008, Part J 2014 in particular).
 The System Supplier/ Product Manufacturer Guidelines
 NSAI Agrément certificates
 NSAI Agrément recognised certificates within the EOTA network. Irish, British or European
Standards Guides
 The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland
 The UK Energy Saving Trust
 The UK Building Research Establishment (www.bre.co.uk)
A list of the primary Best Practice Guides and where they may be obtained are referenced in
Appendix 1. In each case, the Irish Standard or NSAI Agrément Certification should be considered
the primary certification and preferred guidance.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
Where Building Regulations are referred to within this document, and where not otherwise
specified, it is the most recent amendment to and version of those Regulations which must be
adhered to by the Contractor at all times.
In all instances where the manufacturer, supplier or system supplier supplies Good Practice Guides,
Installation Guidance Notes or a Technical Guidance Document, the works must be installed in
accordance with those guidance documents.
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Code of Conduct
SEAI expects all Contractors to behave professionally at all times and to maintain the high standards
expected of the Programme. Performance checking, carried out by SEAI or their Agents, will not
only establish the quality of physical works carried out under the Programme but also the level of
professionalism with which they were completed.
As a minimum level of performance SEAI expects, under the following areas, that:
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Professionalism and Behaviour
Contractors must carry a form of photographic identification (Drivers Licence, Passport or
professional registration cards). This must concur with the contact name provided by the
Contractor when initially arranging the works or site visit. Full contact details (business
address and telephone number as a minimum) for the Contractor must be provided to the
Customer prior to installation.
Contractors must maintain a professional appearance and attitude to the Customer at all
times. When communicating with Customers, Contractors should be polite, patient and
informative.
Agreed appointment dates and times must be adhered to (as far as reasonably possible) and
the Customer must be informed as soon as possible in the event that an appointment will be
missed. Ongoing missed appointments will be queried by SEAI or its agents.
Contractors may be required to deal with vulnerable homes, or homes prone to being taken
advantage of. Contractors in such instances must ensure that their staff are trained to deal
with vulnerable homes and be able to explain the terms of an offer clearly, the full
implications of the works proposed and give appropriate information.
The Contractor is responsible for recommending to the Customer the most appropriate and
optimum solution for their property in accordance with the Better Energy Homes
Programme Standards and Specifications. As a competent professional registered with the
Better Energy Homes Programme, it is a duty of the Contractor to provide the necessary
information to a Customer for them to make an informed decision regarding their property
and the practical measures best suited to same. This should extend to contractors
recommending to Customers where measures they are requested to implement would be
inappropriate or unsuitable.
The Contractor should inform the Customer of the Cost of various solutions and the
respective benefit of those solutions to the Customer, e.g. the costs of dry-lining walls with
different thicknesses of materials, the respective benefits and cost comparisons of each.
In particular, the Contractor must ensure that, in the case of insulation, an optimal wholesurface solution is provided where physically and economically feasible e.g. when dealing
with walls that this comprises Internal insulation of all exposed walls; External Insulation of
all exposed walls; and in the case of attic insulation that this comprises insulation of the
whole surface of the ceiling / roof-space as appropriate. This economic feasibility refers only
to the viability of the installation itself. Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the
ability of the Customer to fund their portion of the capital cost for a conventional
installation. An example would be where, in exceptional circumstances a home may require
significant additional modifications, over what would normally be expected, that would
make the initial investment in the whole home insulation solution inappropriate compared
to the benefit the Customer will get out of the investment. Where only part-home coverage
is achieved, this must be detailed in the Declaration of Works and the Contractor should
inform the Customer that this may impact on their ability to draw down support from the
Programme.
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The Contractor must inform the Customer of the relative costs and performance standards
of their selected products and any limitations which might be relevant.
As appropriate to the specific measure being installed, the Contractor must be able to
supply the customer with the relevant warranties and commitment of after sales service.
In the case of heating controls the Contractor must ensure that the Customer has a full
working knowledge of what impact the measures may have on their home and how to
operate these measures in the most effective and efficient way possible. It is expected that
the Contractor will demonstrate the various working conditions, controls and limitations of
these systems and measures to the Customer and to provide any relevant user instructions
in English.
Administration and Responsibility
The Contractor must, in all instances, provide a detailed quotation specifying all costs of
works including making good. This quotation must be laid out in a clear, concise and specific
manner using language that can be readily understood by the customer and include all
proposed works and associated cost and applicable VAT rates. The Contractor must also
agree a procedure with the Customer on any alterations or omissions within the original
quotation and the method by which the Contractor will be paid.
The Contractor shall not complete an on-line Better Energy Homes Programme application
for a Customer, nor let the Customer use their e-mail address in an application to the Better
Energy Homes programme.
Where specific ancillary works are required but will not be done by the contractor these
should be clearly specified to the Customer and inform them as to how the completion of
these works should be provided, e.g. where the installation of internal insulation requires the
temporary removal and re-fitting of a fitted kitchen or where electrical switches and sockets
need to be removed and repositioned and this is being provided by another party.
The Contractor is to obtain any necessary approvals from the Customer, management
company, local authority or appropriate third party where applicable for the works before
installation. The Contractor must inform the Customer, to the best of their ability, of their
responsibility to obtain any approvals, permits and permissions required, where applicable
to the works.
The Contractor shall indemnify and keep indemnified SEAI and their Agents from and
against all costs, claims, demands, liabilities, expenses, damages or losses in accordance
with the specified insurance terms for registration as a contractor (including without
limitation any direct or indirect consequential losses, loss of profit and loss of reputation,
and all interest, penalties and legal and other professional costs and expenses) arising out of
or in connection with the Contractor’s failure to obtain such consents or their failure in
ensuring these consents were in place as appropriate to the works.
Any installation works shall only be carried out by a suitably qualified and competent
employee. This includes all works supported by the Programme including, but not limited to,
electricity, gas, plumbing, working at heights and the operation and storage of machinery
and plant.
On completion of works a detailed invoice, including a copy of the original quotation, and
subsequent receipt for payment must be provided to the Customer along with any other
forms deemed necessary by SEAI.
To ensure that they are kept informed of procedural communications, programme notices
and information requests, Registered Contractors are obliged to maintain an active e-mail
address. Failure to do so by a Contractor will result in penalty points and possible deregistration in accordance with the Better Energy Homes programme document Quality
Assurance and Disciplinary Procedures (available on www.seai.ie).
BE COP Rev 7.2
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Service Delivery
All Contractors must make sure that their staff take every reasonable precaution to protect
the property on which they are working, and leave the property clean and tidy. All excess
materials, packaging, dust and debris must be removed from the Customer’s premises, and
any adjacent premises affected by the works, by the Contractor.
Where works are completed over a number of days, the property must be left in an
appropriate condition, minimising the impact to the Customer and surrounding properties
and having regard to all Health and Safety and security Requirements.
Contractors must make good, to the satisfaction of the Customer, any accidental damage
sustained by a property where this is a direct result of their work or installation.
All works are to be completed and finished to the Customer’s satisfaction and requirements.
In the event of a Customer not being satisfied with the works completed, Contractors must
make every reasonable effort to resolve the complaint to the Customer’s and SEAI’s
satisfaction.
SEAI or its Agent will conduct random quality and performance checks with regard to works
supported by this Programme. In the event of SEAI or its Agent not being satisfied with the
service provided to the Customer, Contractors must make every reasonable effort to resolve
the issue in line with the SEAI defined process.
The requirements relating to the installation of the specific measures detailed further in this
document must be adhered to by the Contractor.
SEAI may de-register Contractors where SEAI has evidence of repeated failures on the part
of Contractors or their nominated personnel to deliver quality work or give customer
satisfaction. SEAI have put in place a Quality Assurance System, the key elements and
processes of which are outlined in the document Quality Assurance System and Disciplinary
Procedure available on www.seai.ie. A primary element of the Quality Assurance System is
the penalty point procedure which will be applicable to findings of administrative and / or
technical non-compliance with the Better Energy Homes Programme’s Terms and
Conditions and contractor’s Code of Practice. SEAI may publish and make public
information concerning any deregistration from the Registered Contractors List and the
reasons for same.
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Health & Safety Requirements
It is the sole responsibility of the Contractor to ensure that they comply with all relevant Health and
Safety Legislation, Regulation and appropriate Guidelines and that their staff are appropriately
trained to operate to these standards.
In addition to the above it is required that any Contractor performing works which are supported by
the Programme:
 has a current, written Health and Safety Statement available for inspection if required.
 follows safe working practices for both employees, customers and the public at all times in
accordance with current Health and Safety Legislation and relevant Health & Safety
Authority guidelines.
 uses the appropriate equipment safely and in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions
and stores materials and equipment properly.
 Particular attention shall be given to a contractor’s Health and Safety procedures when
working in vulnerable households and where children, the elderly or the general public may
be directly affected by the progress of works.
4.1
Special Precautions
Special precautions must be taken in relation to the following issues:
 Radon
Where work is to be carried out that will compromise a radon barrier, the Contractor must
bring it to the attention of the Customer and highlight appropriate preventative measures
taken to address the issue. The Building Regulations Technical Guidance Document C and the
Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government publication Radon in
Existing Buildings - Corrective Options should be consulted. For further information refer to
http://www.epa.ie/radiation/publications/rad/RPII_Radon_Homes_Brochure_2008.pdf
14

Asbestos
Where appropriate, the Contractor must bring to the attention of the customer that it may
be necessary to undertake an asbestos management survey of the property to determine
the presence of Asbestos Containing Materials (ACMs) in the building where proposed
works may disturb the ACMs. All ACMs identified must be removed by a competent
contractor prior to the commencement of proposed works in accordance with the Safety,
Health and Welfare at Work (Construction) Regulations 2013 (S.I. No. 291 of 2013). For
further information on this refer to
http://www.hsa.ie/eng/Your_Industry/Chemicals/Asbestos/

Carbon Monoxide
Carbon Monoxide alarms can be used as a backup to provide a warning to householders in
the event of a dangerous build-up of CO (Carbon Monoxide). Check that the Carbon
Monoxide alarm complies with the EN 50291 standard. Carbon Monoxide alarms are no
substitute for regular inspection and maintenance of appliances, vents, flues and chimneys.
For further information on this refer to www.carbonmonoxide.ie.

Wildlife
The Contractor shall be aware of the potential for rodent infestation within the building
fabric and shall take all necessary precautions to protect himself and his employees against
the risk of disease (e.g. Weils disease) when carrying out the works. If there is evidence of
BE COP Rev 7.2
rodent, or any other pest infestation the Contractor shall advise the Customer accordingly.
For further information related to rodent control refer to:
http://www.hse.ie/eng/services/publications/services/Environmentalhealth/Rodent_Control
_for_Householders.pdf
If there is evidence of species of wildlife, e.g. bats or bat roosts, present in the attic space to
be insulated, the contractor should consult with the National Parks & Wildlife Service
(NPWS) for advice on how to proceed. For further information on this refer to
http://www.npws.ie/licences/disturbance/disturbanceofbatsorottersortheirbreeding/ and
www.npws.ie
15
BE COP Rev 7.2
5
Ventilation
Proper ventilation of a home is necessary in order to ensure:
 Adequacy of fresh air for a healthy and comfortable environment for the occupants
 Adequacy of the air supply for safe operation of particular types of fuel burning appliances
 Minimisation of condensation risk
 Avoidance of radon accumulation
Ventilation Types
Uncontrolled (and unintended) air infiltration – through the porosity of the building structure or
through looseness in detailing or workmanship of openings such as doors and windows - which ‘provides’
ventilation on an arbitrary basis but is not an appropriate basis on which to rely for ensuring occupant
safety, health or comfort.
Purposeful ventilation provision – which may be to varying degrees controlled e.g. MVHR, humidistat
actuated extract fans, closable wall vents, trickle vents or uncontrolled e.g. permanent wall vents, in
accordance with TGD F to the Building Regulations. Key is avoidance of disturbance to any such proper
existing provisions, and making all reasonable effort by way of works execution.
Ventilation should be considered at the same time as when improvements to the thermal envelope
and/or windows are being made as improvements will reduce heat loss and lead to higher internal
temperatures within a building. With a higher internal temperature, the internal air can hold a
significant amount of additional water vapour. Air leakage paths should be minimised to help reduce
interstitial condensation.
Each house should be upgraded such that the ventilation complies with Part F of the building
regulations 2009.
In undertaking the works, and on the basis of the findings of an initial assessment of the home, the
contractor must:
1. Ensure that the works to be undertaken will not compromise the existing necessary
ventilation provisions in the home to the detriment of the air quality and / or living
environment therein.
2. Inform the homeowner where it is noted that the existing necessary ventilation provisions
have already been adversely affected by actions of the homeowner or other parties.
3. Inform the homeowner of any aspects of ventilation considered to be inadequate or
potentially unsafe (particularly with rooms containing a fuel burning appliances). Guidance
on background ventilation is provided in TGD F 2002 (6,500mm2 ventilation opening per
habitable room) and permanent ventilation (minimum. 6,500mm2) for heat producing
appliances in TGD J 1997 for pre 2006 housing.
4. Inform the homeowner that levels of the radioactive gas, radon, can be increased where
existing ventilation is not adequate or where work is to be undertaken that may increase the
air tightness of the home. Guidance on whether the home is in a High Radon Area and how
to test a home for radon is available on the is available on the Environmental Protection
Agency’s website: www.epa.ie or Free Phone 1800 300 600.
5. Make appropriate recommendations to the homeowner in respect of 2 and 3 above. It is
then the responsibility of the homeowner to rectify these issues, with or without the
involvement of the contractor, before work pertaining to the Better Energy Homes
programme can commence. (Additional wall ventilators or other ventilation provisions may
be supplied by contractor as part of the refurbishment works. Where this is agreed as part of
the refurbishment contract works may proceed.)
16
BE COP Rev 7.2
These points are aimed at ensuring that the contractor takes all reasonable action to ensure that
proper ventilation provisions are installed in the home and that the homeowner is made aware of
the proper operation and maintenance of such provisions.
External Wall Insulation
In addition to points 1 to 4 above contractors should be alert to the fact that the installation of wall
insulation will increase the air tightness of the building thereby reducing unintended ventilation in
the form of uncontrolled air leakage or draughts in the home. This effect is likely to be most
pronounced in the case of external wall insulation systems. However, the primary focus should
remain on following points 1 to 4 above which relate to installed ventilation provisions.
Therefore in accordance with the training given by the Agrément ETICS Certificate Holder, and
where necessary in consultation with them, the contractor should consider the likely effect of the
installation on the home’s ventilation and to recommend appropriate options / solutions for the
homeowner.
Assessment of Ventilation Provision
Provision should be made for existing wall ventilators to be maintained and/or suitable new
ventilation provided as needed. If you note that there are no wall vents or sub-floor ventilation or
other obvious ventilation provisions, then you should document that the homeowner has been
informed of same.
Reference NSAI S.R. 54:2014: Code of practice for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings, Section
10.2.1.1 for choice of appropriate ventilation systems.
Ventilation System Design Considerations:
 Background ventilation – allow for the provision of sleeved wall ventilator or trickle window /
door ventilators. (Ref: NSAI S.R. 54:2014 clause 10.2.2.1.1 Table 30).
 Intermittent extract ventilation – all wet rooms should be fitted with mechanical extract
ventilation (Ref: NSAI S.R. 54:2014 clause 10.2.2.1.1 Table 31)
Please note: Recirculating cooker-hoods are not recognised under BEH spec.
 Intermittent fan control – use of timers, manual switches, occupancy & humidity sensors
where applicable.
 Fans and ductwork – ducting should be insulated to prevent condensation to a minimum of
25mm of mineral wool.
 Purge ventilation is the removal of pollutants and water vapour through opening such as
doors / windows and mechanical extract ventilation in wet rooms.
For all of the above reference NSAI S.R. 54:2014: Sections 10.2.2.1.1 – 10.2.2.1.3.
17
BE COP Rev 7.2
Table 30 from S.R. 54:2014 - Guidance for the provision of ventilation for retrofit works with air
permeability levels greater than 5 m3/hr/m2
Background ventilators should be located to avoid draughts and at a height of approximately 2.1m
to 2.2m above floor level. All background ventilators should be tested to EN 13141-1 and installed to
manufacturer’s instructions.
18
BE COP Rev 7.2
Table 31 from S.R. 54:2014 - Minimum levels of background and extract ventilation as specified by
Table 30
Utility room: A room used for laundry purposes, which contains a sink, washing machine, tumble
drier or similar equipment and which is not entered solely from outside the building.
Ventilation of air tight dwelling (achieve an air permeability below 5m3/hr/m2)
Reference NSAI S.R. 54:2014: Clause 10.2.1.2 for checklist to achieve air permeability below
5m3/hr/m2. The ventilation requirements are detailed in Table 32 for air tight dwellings
Table 32 from S.R. 54:2014 - Minimum levels of background and intermittent extract ventilation
when the air permeability is expected to be below 5 m3/hr/m2
19
BE COP Rev 7.2
Permanent Ventilation is any means of permanent or controllable vents, which open directly to the
external air. Vents for heat producing appliances such as gas appliances are considered permanent
as they are in a fixed position and not closable. Ref: NSAI S.R. 54:2014 table 35: Guidance for the
provision of adequate supply of air for combustion products.
Introducing mechanical extraction may cause spillage of combustion products where either an openflued (non-room sealed) heat producing appliance exists. Spillage occurs when the extraction rate of
the fan causes a depressurisation in the room containing the heat producing appliance, which in turn
may reverse the flow of air containing the combustion gases through the appliance’s flue. The
ventilation system should be designed to ensure the likelihood of spillage occurring is reduced to an
absolute minimum. This may be achieved by:
 Ensuring that sufficient fresh air is continuously and permanently available in the room
where the heat producing appliance is located.
 The relevant installation Standards for the fuel/product type should be followed.
All new permanent ventilators should be tested to EN 13141-1 and installed to manufacturer’s
instructions.
20
BE COP Rev 7.2
6
Planning and Protected Structures
In some cases, the building in which the Contractor is proposing to install measures may be subject
to specific planning controls, as in the case of Protected Structures. This is where the property is on
the Local Authority Record of Protected Structures (RPS), or is proposed to be added to this or is in
an Architectural Conservation Area (ACA).
The Customer must consult with the Local Authority prior to commencement of the works if the
property may be on the RPS list or is in an ACA, or the installation of any measures supported by this
programme may require approval from the Local Authority and or may require specialist knowledge
on the part of the contractor because of a potential effect on the character of the building and the
architectural heritage value of the element to be changed.
Similarly, there are certain works that may change the external character of a conventional
property, not on the RPS, to such an extent that approval may need to be sought from the Local
Authority e.g. the installation of external insulation and alteration of the front profile of a property in
certain cases. Any alterations that affect glazing and doors could similarly require permission from
the relevant Local Authorities.
Where a property may be on the RPS or is in an ACA, or the installation of any measures supported
by the Better Energy Homes Programme may require approval from the Local Authority the
Contractor shall satisfy himself that all necessary approvals from the relevant planning authority
have been obtained by the customer prior to commencing the works. For further information
related to planning and Architectural Conservation refer to:
http://www.environ.ie/en/Publications/DevelopmentandHousing/Planning/FileDownLoad,1595,en.p
df
21
BE COP Rev 7.2
7
Specific Measures – Competency and Standards
The following details the competency and standards expected by SEAI for each of the specific
measures to be supported under this Programme. A summary list of guides and standards referred
to are detailed in Appendix 1.
Where this document prescribes Standards or Specifications of products / systems or Certification
requirements for contractors, it may be possible for a manufacturer / supplier or contractor to
participate in the programme where they can clearly demonstrate full equivalence to those
requirements. Where this equivalence route is being pursued it is vitally important that the supplier
or contractor make contact with the Better Energy Homes Programme Technical Team to enter a
process which can establish to SEAI’s satisfaction that such equivalence can be demonstrated. This
must be done BEFORE any works are undertaken with the subject system or by the subject
contractor. Failure to first secure confirmation from SEAI of said equivalence will likely result in a
homeowner’s grant approval being revoked, and possible sanction of the contractor.
Manufacturers / suppliers and contractors should be aware that nothing above will allow SEAI to
subvent legislations, regulations, procedures or institutional arrangements which would have SEAI
act beyond its formal remit.
22
BE COP Rev 7.2
BEH
7.1
WHS
BEP
Cavity Wall Insulation
Contractor Competency
Contractors of cavity wall insulation must be approved by the NSAI Agrément and must agree to
carry out the installation to the standards required by this approval and certification.
Product Standards & Specification
Materials to be used in the insulation of a cavity wall must be certified by the NSAI Agrément.
The objective of this Programme is to put in place materials that will achieve a level of performance
in the home, equivalent to the standard required in the most recent update of Part L of the Building
Regulations. Thus, the objective for Cavity Wall Insulation is to, in as much as is physically and
economically feasible, achieve a U-value of 0.27 W/m2K for external walls.
This economic feasibility refers only to the economic performance of the installation itself. For
example, where in exceptional circumstances a home may require significant additional
modifications when compared to a normal case, making the initial investment in the insulation
solution inappropriate compared to the benefit the Customer will get out of the investment.
Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the ability of the Customer to fund their portion of
the capital cost for a conventional installation.
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The insulation must be suitable for use in masonry cavity walls so
that it does not compromise the property’s ability to resist internal fire spread within the
structure.
 Building Regulations (Part C): When installed as per the system supplier and manufacturer
guidelines, the product will not affect the property’s ability to resist weather and ground
moisture.
 Building Regulations (Part D): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the system
should meet the Building Regulations requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part F): The insulation should also be suitable for use on a property and
meet the ventilation requirements.
 Building Regulations (Part J): Correct installation should also satisfy the Building Regulations
such that the installation does not increase the risk of the property catching fire through the use
of a heat producing appliance.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The insulation system shall conserve energy in keeping with the
Building Regulations.
The installation of foam or bead insulation systems into the voids of Hollow Block Walls will not be
supported by the programme. SEAI are specifically excluding this practice from support through this
programme.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer on any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works. (See section 5)
23
BE COP Rev 7.2
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. All cavity wall insulation must be installed in accordance with the specifications laid out
by the system supplier and in accordance with the relevant system’s NSAI Agrément
certificate and clause 7.3.4 of S.R. 54:2014
b. The insulation material must be suitable as per clause 7.3.4.2.5 and 7.3.4.2.6 of S.R.
54:2014
c. The suitability of insulation depends mainly on the local exposure to driving rain and the
condition of the existing construction. Cavity wall insulation is certified for use in masonry
walls up to 12m in height subject to the conditions in the product certificate. The
exposure of the walls to wind-driven rain should be assessed and related to any restriction
on the particular type of cavity fill being considered. The map in S.R. 54:2014 (‘Code of
practice for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings’) Annex D illustrates the levels of
wind driven rain. Any area higher than 5m2/sec/year should not have the cavities filled
where the external face is open jointed. In these cases internal insulation, or full fill cavity
with external insulation which provides protection, should be used.
NOTE System certificates provide maps which identify exposure zones and specify
conditions where full fill cavity insulation can be used.
d. A survey of the walls must be carried out prior to the installation by a trained surveyor on
behalf of the approved Contractor. A complete survey, including a boroscope survey,
report is required and must be provided to the Customer. This is to ascertain the
suitability of the property for the recommended insulation system. Existing buildings
should be assessed in accordance with BS 8208: Part 1: 1985. Additional guidance on
installation considerations is detailed in clause 7.3.4.3 of S.R. 54:2014
e. Any defects recorded in the survey, which may affect the performance of the insulation
system when installed, should be notified to, and rectified by, the Customer with or
without the involvement of the Contractor before installation work commences.
f. Installation must be carried out by the system supplier or manufacturer or a Contractor
approved by the system supplier/manufacturer. Approved Contractors are required to
carry out a full survey of the property, comply with the system installation procedure
specified by the system supplier/manufacturer and at least one member of an installation
team must carry an identity card issued by the system supplier/manufacturer.
g. Cavity filling with expanded polystyrene should not be carried out where PVC-sheathed
electrical cables are passing through the cavity but are not protected within electrical
conduits.
h. If the cavity is uncapped, it must be closed at the top of the wall and at the top of any
opening in order to comply with the Building Regulations Technical Guidance Document
(Part B, 2007). There are a number of different methods for capping of existing walls,
which should be discussed with the Customer prior to completion.
i. Particular attention should be paid to ensuring that gas, oil and solid fuel appliances are
correctly ventilated as per section 5 of the Better Energy Homes specification, the system
supplier’s specifications and the Building Regulations (Part J).
j. Ventilation openings must be checked to ensure there are no obstructions due to the
insulant. All flues must also be checked for obstructions using an appropriate test (e.g.
smoke test). See section 5
k. An NSAI Agrément Certificate or supplier guarantee must be issued to the customer
where applicable. Certification is valid once the conditions outlined in the certificate are
met.
l. The Contractor should indicate to the Customer the methods he intends to use to ensure
the successful insulation of the full extent of the cavity wall.
24
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.2
External Wall Insulation
BEH
WHS
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Contractors installing external wall insulation are required to be Approved Installers by the
manufacturers of the particular product being installed. Contractors wishing to register on the
Better Energy Homes Programme for external wall insulation must be approved by the NSAI
Agrément and must agree to carry out the installation to the standards required by this approval and
certification. This must be demonstrated to the Customer prior to completion of the works. Only
contractors who have been NSAI audited and are fully registered with ETICS as a certified external
wall insulation installer will be listed with the Better Energy Homes programme for this measure.
Product Standards & Specification
The external wall insulation system must be certified by the NSAI Agrément or equivalent Only
contractors who have been NSAI audited and are fully registered with ETICS as a certified external
wall insulation installer will be accepted on the Better Energy Homes Programme registered
contractor list for external wall insulation. Only contractors installing NSAI Agrément certified
external wall systems will appear on the Better Energy Homes Programme Registered List of
Contractors for external wall insulation.
The objective of this Programme is to put in place materials that will achieve a level of performance
in the Home, equivalent to the standard required in Part L of the Building Regulations. Thus, the
objective for External Wall Insulation is to, in as much as is physically and economically feasible,
achieve a U-value of 0.27 W/m2K or better for external walls.
This economic feasibility refers only to the economic performance of the installation itself. For
example, where in exceptional circumstances a home may require significant additional
modifications when compared to a normal case, making the initial investment in the insulation
solution inappropriate compared to the benefit the Customer will get out of the investment.
Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the ability of the Customer to fund their portion of
the capital cost for a conventional installation.
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part A): The insulation system must be incorporated into the property’s
structure so that it complies with the loading and ground movement requirements.
 Building Regulations (Part B): The system must be suitable for incorporation onto structures so
that it does not compromise the property’s ability to resist internal fire spread within the
structure and external fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part C): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
system should not affect the property’s ability to resist weather and ground moisture.
 Building Regulations (Part D): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
system should meet the Building Regulations requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part F): The insulation should also be suitable for use on a property and
meet the ventilation requirements.
 Building Regulations (Part J): Correct installation of the system should also satisfy the Building
Regulations such that the installation does not increase the risk of the property catching fire
through the use of a heat producing appliance.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The insulation system shall conserve energy in keeping with the
Building Regulations.
25
BE COP Rev 7.2
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer on any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works. (See section 5)
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. All external wall insulation installation and associated works should be carried out in
accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and the National Standards Authority
of Ireland Standard Recommendation S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice for the energy
efficient retrofit of dwellings.
a. Where the system supplier/manufacturer operates an Approved Contractor programme,
the Contractor must carry appropriate identification stating they are an Approved
Contractor. The Contractor shall be NSAI ETICs registered before carrying out work.
b. The Contractor must at all times comply with the requirements of the system suppliers
specifications.
c. The insulation panels should be stored on a firm, clean, dry and level base, which is off the
ground and protected from prolonged exposure to sunlight either by storing opened
packs under cover in dry conditions or by re-covering with opaque polythene sheeting.
d. When handling the insulation boards, care must be taken to avoid damage and contact
with solvents or bitumen products. The boards must not be exposed to open flame or
other ignition sources.
e. Any metal lathes, renders, paints, texture synthetic finish coatings and sealants should be
stored in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions in a dry environment at the
required temperatures.
f. A pre-installation survey of the property should be carried out to determine suitability for
treatment and any repairs or modifications necessary to the building structure before
application of the insulation system.
g. External wall insulation may be restricted where the dwelling faces onto public footpaths.
Relevant Local Authorities should be consulted where the installation affects the width of
the public footpath. Owners of neighbouring properties should be consulted where the
installation of external wall insulation encroaches on their property.
h. The survey should also include tests conducted on the walls of the property to determine
the pull-out resistance of the proposed mechanical fixings for the appropriate substrate.
An assessment and recommendation is made on the type and number of fixings required
i. A specification is prepared for each elevation of the building indicating:
- Where required, additional corner mesh and reinforcement;
- Detailing around windows, doors and at eaves;
- Exact position of the damp-proof course (dpc);
- Exact position of expansion joints;
- Any required alterations to plumbing including rainwater downpipes and
gulley traps.
- Areas where flexible sealants must be used;
- Where required, the position of fire barriers.
j. Modifications of down pipes, soil and vent pipes, pipe extensions, meter locations and
other services should be as detailed in design specification. All pipe work should be
relocated as required to accommodate the insulation.
k. Fixings to the external fabric will need reinforcement to resist movement that may affect
joints on soil, rainwater, gas and water pipes. Satellite dishes are subject to wind load that
may cause indenting into the insulation with the potential for failure of the waterproof
26
BE COP Rev 7.2
render. A treated timber ground to the depth specified by the system certificate should
be installed.
l. Any causes of dampness such as leaking gutters or down pipes should be repaired. Where
there is evidence of rising damp, remediation measures should be carried out.
m. The condition of the exterior of the wall should be assessed. Surfaces should be sound,
clean and free from any loose material. Render finishes should be in good condition.
Pebble dash (wet and dry dash) does not provide an even surface for the adhesive to bond
to and should be adequately prepared or removed. All necessary repairs to the property’s
structure must be completed and dry before the installation of the insulation.
n. The flatness of surfaces must be checked. This may be achieved using a straight edge
spanning the storey height. Local areas may be assessed using a straight edge spanning 1
metre. Any excessive irregularities must be made good before installation.
o. If the existing wall surface is covered with a render, the bond between the background
and render should be adequate. Otherwise it must be removed and reinstated with a
sufficient bond.
p. Where appropriate, external plumbing, including rainwater downpipes and gulley traps,
must be removed and alterations made to underground drainage before installation of
the system, to accommodate repositioning on the finished face of the system.
q. Application of the external insulation system is carried out in accordance with the current
installation instructions of the system supplier/manufacturer.
r. Cavity walls should be capped before installing external wall insulation as detailed within
NSAI Agrément or equivalent certificate.
s. Starter track and base beads, typically at DPC level, should be accurately aligned to
provide a horizontal base profile and should be secured to the external wall. The first row
of insulation boards is positioned on the base profile.
t. The insulation boards must be firmly pressed to the wall and mechanically fixed in place
with a fixing arrangement as per the relevant approval documentation. Care must be
taken to ensure that the boards are butted tightly together and surface alignment should
be checked as work proceeds. Any gaps at joints should be sealed, e.g. using basecoat
material. Gaps of larger than 3 mm should be filled with slivers of insulation or spray
foam. Surface irregularities must be removed by planing with a rasp over the whole
surface.
u. The key thermal bridge junctions for external wall insulation may be addressed as
follows:
 where ground floor thermal bridges are being eliminated this may require
placement of suitable external insulation to footpath level. Further thermal
improvements may be achieved by bringing insulation below ground level and
may require removal of footpaths;
 sills may require specific detailing to avoid thermal bridging;
 External insulation should abut the roof insulation to form a continuous layer;
otherwise a thermal bridge may occur. To eliminate the cold bridge at the wall
roof junction removal of the soffit may be required.
v. The insulation should be returned into reveals, sills and jambs in accordance with the
approval documentation. To fit around doors and windows, insulation boards may be cut
with a sharp knife or a fine-toothed saw only. All junctions between external wall
insulation and existing window frames should be adequately sealed to prevent the ingress
of moisture. The insulation should overlap at the corners, and fit without gaps. Where
clearance is limited, strips of approved insulation should be installed to suit available
margins. If required, purpose-made window sills may be installed at this point. They
should prevent water ingress as per NSAI Agrément or equivalent certificate. For
additional guidance, see Acceptable Construction Details on the Department of
Environment, Community and Local Government website.
27
BE COP Rev 7.2
w. Prior to application of base and finish coats, all necessary protective measures such as
x.
y.
z.
aa.
bb.
cc.
dd.
ee.
ff.
gg.
hh.
taping off of existing window frames and covering of glass should be in place.
In sunny weather, work should commence on the shady side of the building and be
continued following the sun to prevent the rendering drying out too rapidly.
When the basecoat has been applied to the insulation boards, the reinforcing mesh is
embedded into the basecoat before it dries. The mesh should be fully embedded in the
basecoat and be free of any creases. Additional mesh may be required at corners and
openings.
Installation continues until the whole wall is completely covered including, where
appropriate, the building soffits.
Application of the undercoat and finishes should be carried out within the permitted
temperature range and should be protected from rapid drying. Drying should take 24
hours in favourable conditions.
All rendering shall be carried out in accordance with IS EN 13914-1:2005 and BS 800010:1995.
Movement joints should be provided in accordance with the system supplier’s technical
specifications.
Where there is a risk of insulant exposure, e.g. window reveals, eaves, etc., the system
must be protected by an adequate overhang or by an adequately sealed, purpose-made
flashing.
Where windows and doors are being replaced they may be relocated towards the external
face of the existing structure to reduce thermal bridging but at all times should be
supported by the structure. Details should be in accordance with approved certification.
On completion of the insulation, all external fittings shall be fixed as per applicable per
NSAI Agrément cert or equivalent.
A system supplier guarantee must be issued to the customer.
Timber frame homes cannot be insulated externally.
External Wall Insulation and Electrical Installations
For Health and Safety reasons external wall insulation must not be installed over
electricity wires / cables or other electrical fixtures.
Where installers encounter the following situations they must ensure that ESB Networks are
contacted well in advance of any proposed works in order to arrange for the necessary alterations:
(a) ESB Networks service cable clipped directly to the surface of a wall or roof soffit
DO NOT REMOVE OR TOUCH THE CABLES. ESB Networks service crew will unclip the service
safely allowing the contractor to install the external insulation and various renderings as required.
The contractor should supply and fit uPVC electrical trunking suitable for external use. In most
cases 50mm X 50mm will be the size required. Adequate fixings must be applied to cater for this
trunking and its contents i.e. the service cable. Where expanded polystyrene is used it must not
come in direct contact with the PVC insulated cables at any point in the service cables route, due to
a chemical reaction that occurs between PVC and expanded polystyrene. Note uPVC used for the
trunking is unaffected by direct contact.
(b) ESB Networks overhead service ‘aerial wires’ anchored to wall (e.g. gable end wall)
DO NOT REMOVE OR TOUCH THE AERIAL WIRES / CABLES. ESB service crew will fit a modified
bracket and replace the aerial wires with covered wires where required. This standard bracket must
be mounted on the original wall to cater for the mechanical stress levels.
28
BE COP Rev 7.2
Please also refer to Appendix 3 for the following ESB Networks documents which give
additional and more comprehensive guidance:
ESB – External Wall Insulation Guidance Bulletin and Drawings in Appendix 3 of this document
To contact ESB Networks Call 1850 372 757
ESB Networks External Meter Cabinet
DO NOT REMOVE OR TOUCH THE CABLES. The meter cabinet cannot be moved without
disturbing the cables already connected. In most situations the cabinet should remain in its original
location and will be modified by the contractor in order to seal the recess created by the fitting of
the insulation and to allow for the fitting of a new door. ESB Networks will not normally be involved.
An acceptable solution is to fit an extension to the existing cabinet by removing the door and cutting
away the back from a new cabinet. The new cabinet is then placed in the recess with the sidewalls of
the new and old cabinets overlapping. Accurate fitting is essential to “seal off” the wall insulation
from the inner cabinet. Please note that these meter cabinets are manufactured to a specific
standard to give protection in the event of fire. Do not use alternative materials to modify the meter
cabinet.
Please also refer to Appendix 3 for the following ESB Networks documents, which give additional
and more comprehensive guidance:
ESB – External Wall Insulation Guidance Bulletin and Drawings in Appendix 3 of this document
To contact ESB Networks Call 1850 372 757
External Wall Insulation and Natural Gas Supply
Bord Gáis Networks have issued a technical bulletin, which outlines the options open to contractors
applying external wall insulation to domestic homes, which have Natural Gas installations as well as
guidance on ventilation and fluing.
The technical bulletin can be viewed here:
http://www.seai.ie/Grants/Better_energy_homes/contractor/Newsletter/Bord_Gais_–
_External_Wall_Insulation_Guidelines.pdf
Where contractors have specific queries in relation to gas installations then they should contact
Bord Gáis Networks directly on 1850 200694
29
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.3
Internal Wall Insulation (Including flat roof ceilings)
BEH
WHS
BEP
Contractor Competency
Contractors of internal wall insulation must be competent to install same and must agree to
complete the work to the standard set out in Internal wall insulation in existing housing – a guide for
specifiers and contractors (CE17/GPG138) published by the Energy Saving Trust. Where the
manufacturer operates an Approved Installer list, the Contractor must demonstrate their inclusion
on the list or certification by the manufacturer. Where a product is covered by an NSAI Agrément
Certificate it must be installed in accordance with this certificate and by such qualified people as
specified. Prior to internal dry-lining works commencing the Customer must be made aware of the
effect on room sizes, services and decoration.
Material Standards
Materials to be used in the internal insulation of a wall must be certified by the NSAI Agrément or
equivalent.
The objective of this Programme is to put in place materials that will achieve a level of performance
in the Home, equivalent to the standard required in Part L of the Building Regulations. Thus, the
objective for Internal Wall Insulation is to, in as much as is physically and economically feasible,
achieve a U-value of 0.27 W/m2K for external walls.
This economic feasibility refers only to the economic performance of the installation itself. For
example, where in exceptional circumstances a home may require significant additional
modifications when compared to a normal case, making the initial investment in the insulation
solution inappropriate compared to the benefit the Customer will get out of the investment.
Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the ability of the Customer to fund their portion of
the capital cost for a conventional installation.
Where a U-value of 0.27 W/m2K is not achievable the internal insulation systems should have a
maximum u-value that is less than 0.7 W/m2K in order to prevent surface condensation being an
issue. In particular, the installation of internal wall insulation must not compromise the ventilation
(see section 5), air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living
environment in the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living
environment in the home resulting from internal wall insulation installed under the programme. It is
the duty of the Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to
recommend to the Customer any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change
to the living environment as a result of the works.
Building Regulations

Building Regulations (Part B): The insulation must be suitable for use in structures so that it
does not compromise the property’s ability to resist internal fire spread within the
structure and external fire spread.

Building Regulations (Part C): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
insulation should not affect the property’s ability to resist weather and ground moisture.

Building Regulations (Part D): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
insulation should meet the Building Regulations requirements for materials and
workmanship.

Building Regulations (Part F): The insulation should also be suitable for use on a property
and meet the ventilation requirements.
30
BE COP Rev 7.2


Building Regulations (Part J): Correct installation of the system should also satisfy the
Building Regulations such that the installation does not increase the risk of the property
catching fire through the use of a heat producing appliance.
Building Regulations (Part L): The insulation system shall conserve energy in keeping with
the Building Regulations.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer on any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works. (See section 5)
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. All internal wall insulation installation and associated works should be carried out in
accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and the National Standards Authority of
Ireland Standard Recommendation S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice for the energy efficient
retrofit of dwellings.
b. Measures used to achieve the internal insulation of walls can include composite insulated
dry-lining boards or any other approved system where insulation achieves a full coverage of
insulation across the wall.
c. Internal wall insulation solutions typically include:
 Applying composite insulated dry-lining boards directly to the wall using mechanical
fixings or plaster dabs.
 Applying battens to the wall, insulating between the battens with composite
insulated dry-lining boards
d. The wall/ceiling must be surveyed to assess its flatness and suitability for the system.
e. The internal wall insulation fixing method depends on the existing internal wall construction:
 Where the masonry wall is plastered directly, any of the internal wall insulation
solutions described may be used. Any wallpaper, skirting, picture rails, gloss paint
and projecting window boards should be removed. The wall surface should be
clean and dust free. Where the existing wall is painted the manufacturers do not
recommend the use of plaster dabs
 For existing plasterboard on dabs, it is not possible to assess whether the dabs
are able to support the additional weight of the composite insulated dry-lining
boards, therefore the plasterboard and dabs should be removed to provide a
smooth substrate. Where the block wall finish is unplastered and therefore
potentially porous resulting in poor airtightness, a parging coat of plaster should
be applied, to improve the airtightness of the final works.
 For existing plasterboard on battens, the condition of battens should be
investigated and where they are found to be in a serviceable condition the
battens may be retained and the new internal wall insulation fixed directly to
them through the existing plasterboard. Where the battens are not in a
serviceable condition, the plasterboard and battens should be removed entirely.
Where insulation exists, it should be removed and replaced with insulation to an
appropriate U-value.
f. Where existing plaster is being removed, the exposed surface of the wall should be
pointed/cement washed to seal any holes/cracks;
g. Where existing plaster is to remain, all cracks should be filled, and any loose sections should
be removed and made good. Where plaster is to be removed, the exposed surface of wall
should be pointed/cement washed to seal any holes/cracks. Where the existing wall surface
31
BE COP Rev 7.2
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
p.
q.
r.
s.
t.
32
is level and smooth, the thermal laminate board may also be fixed directly to the wall
surface
The interior wall surface should be structurally sound and free from dampness. Any repairs
should be carried out ahead of the installation, and walls should be allowed to dry out prior
to the works commencing. Any existing structural or dampness problems should be resolved
before applying any insulation.
Provision should be made for the fixing of heavy items such as kitchen cupboards, or items
that will have a level of force applied, such as banisters and grab rails.
The width of the staircase or corridor should not be reduced to less than the minimum
requirements of the Building Regulations by the application of internal wall insulation. It
may be necessary to install a reduced depth of insulation in these areas and increase the
level elsewhere to compensate for this reduced performance.
Composite insulated dry-lining boards should be installed in accordance with good dry-lining
practice and the manufacturer’s instructions.
A vapour control barrier must be included in the insulation system. This can be achieved by
using, for example, a polythene sheet applied to the warm side of the insulation. Where the
vapour control barrier is an integral part of the insulated dry-lining board, careful attention
must be given to the sealing of joints.
Where any services such as pipes or cables are present in the wall, or mounted on the wall,
these should be extended or replaced. They should extend through the full depth of the
proposed insulation layer and finish with sufficient excess for fixing or working. Where
radiators cannot be re-positioned to an internal wall or be floor mounted, a ply or OSB
timber plate should be fixed to the wall surface and secured through the thermal laminate
into the existing masonry or timber battens.
The location of potential service penetrations in the insulation should be determined by
offering up the composite insulated dry-lining board. Slots should not be formed in insulated
dry-lining board to accommodate service penetrations. A hole should be drilled through the
insulated dry-lining board, slightly larger than the diameter of the service pipe or cable and
the service should be slotted through the hole.
Where insulated dry-lining boards are being mechanically fixed to the wall using battens, the
metal fixings through the battens should penetrate at least 35mm into the masonry. Fixings
through boards must penetrate at least 25mm into the batten.
The procedure for fitting internal wall insulation to the internal face of the wall,
mechanically or using plaster dabs, should be followed from clause 7.3.3 in SR 54:2014.
Window and door reveals can be sources of condensation and mould if not insulated
correctly, but where the amount of visible window frame is too small the full thickness of the
insulated dry-lining cannot be applied. Where this is the case an insulated window lining
board (e.g. expanded PVC) can be used. The lining should not restrict ventilators or opening
mechanisms. It may be necessary to remove the existing plaster to accommodate an
adequate thickness of insulation within the limited space available.
Where there is no other option but to run electrical cables within the insulation component
of the insulation board, the cables must be enclosed in an appropriate conduit, e.g. rigid
PVC, as per the National Rules of the Electro-Technical Council of Ireland (ET101: 2008).
Avoid contact between PVC-insulated wiring and polystyrene insulation, e.g. run wires
through flexible cable protection tubes.
All gaps in an internal wall insulation solution should be sealed as any air passing through
joints or junctions with floors and ceilings will flow behind the insulation and may diminish
the thermal efficiency of the insulation and lead to interstitial condensation. The insulation
system should be sealed around all doors, windows and other openings. Any penetrations of
the insulated dry-lining board must also be sealed e.g. light switches, sockets etc. Where the
manufacturer supplies or advises the use of a plasterboard primer this must be applied.
BE COP Rev 7.2
u. Where a radiator cannot be re-positioned to an internal wall or be floor mounted, a ply or
OSB timber plate should be secured to the wall surface through the thermal laminate into
the existing masonry;
v. A system supplier or contractor guarantee must be issued to the customer where applicable.
33
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.4
Ceiling Level Attic Insulation
BEH
WHS
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Contractors of ceiling level attic insulation must be competent to complete the installation and must
agree to complete the work as set out in the guidance document entitled Energy-efficient
Refurbishment of existing houses (CE83/GPG155) published by the Energy Savings Trust and
installed in accordance with Best Practice Guides/ Technical Guides supplied by the material
manufacturer. It is recommended that contractors of ceiling level attic insulation should complete a
FETAC level 5 or equivalent in attic insulation installation. Where a product is covered by an NSAI
Agrément Certificate it must be installed in accordance with this certificate and by such qualified
people as specified.
Product Standards & Specification
Materials to be used in the insulation of an attic at ceiling level must be manufactured to a relevant
Irish, British or European Standard. Where novel insulating materials (e.g. Sheepswool, Hemp,
Cellulosic Fibre) are being used, proof of quality control in product manufacture must be
demonstrated in the Declaration of Works.
The target U-value for the programme for attics insulated at ceiling level is, in as much as is
physically and economically feasible, 0.16 W/m2K.
This economic feasibility refers only to the economic performance of the installation itself. For
example, where in exceptional circumstances a home may require significant additional
modifications when compared to a normal case, making the initial investment in the insulation
solution inappropriate compared to the benefit the Customer will get out of the investment.
Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the ability of the Customer to fund their portion of
the capital cost for a conventional installation.
Other NSAI Agrément-certified products may also be used. It is the responsibility of the Contractor
to ensure that the optimum solution for each Customer is achieved, within the cost constraints and
preference of each Customer.
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The insulation must be suitable for use so that it does not
compromise the property’s ability to resist internal fire spread within the internal linings and
internal fire spread within the structure and external fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part C): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
insulation should not affect the property’s ability to resist weather and ground moisture.
 Building Regulations (Part D): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
insulation should meet the Building Regulations requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part F): The insulation should also be suitable for use on a property and
meet the ventilation requirements.
 Building Regulations (Part J): Correct installation of the system should also satisfy the Building
Regulations such that the installation does not increase the risk of the property catching fire
through the use of a heat producing appliance.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The insulation system shall conserve energy in keeping with the
Building Regulations.
34
BE COP Rev 7.2
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer on any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works. (See section 5)
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. Attic Insulation should be carried out using materials that are approved by an Irish, British
or European Standard for attic insulation and installed in accordance with the relevant
Irish, British or European Standards, where available.
b. If there is evidence of bats or bat roosts present in the attic space to be insulated, the
Contractor
should
consult
with
the
Bat
Conservation
Ireland
at
www.Batconservationireland.org for advice on how to proceed. All bat and bat roosts are
protected under EU and Irish legislation. For further information on this refer to
www.npws.ie .
c. Where practicable, all areas of the ceiling are to be insulated to the same depth.
d. Mineral wool and other compactable insulation materials should not be compressed as
this decreases its effectiveness considerably.
e. Contractor must maintain a gap at eaves at least equal to a continuous strip 10mm wide
to ensure adequate ventilation via appropriate ventilation openings (see section 5).
Where appropriate ventilation openings are not already present in the home a soffit vent
and eaves ventilation tray or similar appropriate measure will need to be installed. In the
case where a breathable sarking membrane is used, and provides appropriate levels of
ventilation, the ventilation openings may be covered.
f. Unless a breathable sarking membrane is present, the insulation should be retained at
least 50mm from the membrane.
g. Long term exposure to interstitial condensation within a roof space can lead to structural
roof timbers rotting. It is essential that a cold roof space is adequately ventilated and the
transfer of moisture from below can be limited by:
- Installing an airtight membrane at ceiling level to reduce moisture
transfer is recommended where reasonably possible.
- Prevent moisture from entering the roof space by ensuring that loft
hatches are properly draught proofed and sealed.
- Fitting wet rooms with a suitable ventilation system to extract moisture at
source. This is in addition to window/wall vents were applicable.
- Provide roof ventilation through side eaves or through ventilation tiles
located in the slope of the roof.
h. Insulation at ceiling level should be installed in such a way to avoid gaps. This can be done
by;
- The insulation laid between the ceilings joists should be no more than
25mm either above or below the ceiling joists.
- The next layer of insulation should be placed across the joists and tucked
into the eaves ensuring access to eaves ventilation
i. High performance insulation should be placed between or above the timber joists where
a storage platform or access walkway is proposed. To maintain a high level of insulation
under any flooring or storage space, where flooring is required or is being retained by the
Customer there are two choices:
- Floor joists are installed on the existing joists at right angles to allow the required
thickness of insulation to be laid, with the floor installed above this.
35
BE COP Rev 7.2
-
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
p.
q.
r.
Use a solid, closed-cell insulation with a much lower thermal conductivity and
install a floor covering on top of this. This results in a lower height of the final floor
surface.
It is essential that any heavy-duty cables (e.g. for cookers and showers) are not covered
by the insulation material and should instead be left on top of the new insulation,
provided there is sufficient slack to do so. Where this is not possible, a gap of at least
75mm should be left either side of the (heavy duty) cables for their entire length within
the attic area.
The insulation material shall be retained at a minimum of 75mm from all electrical
apparatus penetrating the ceiling, for example recessed lighting fittings. Where
necessary a permanent physical restraint shall be used.
Recessed down-lights should be protected in such a way that the insulation does not
cover them and that they are adequately ventilated. It is recommended that a purposemade recessed lighting housing is used. The Contractor must advise the Customer of the
need to keep the recessed lights clear of insulation.
The Contractor is requested to give special consideration to the elderly and disabled who
may not be able to remove stored items in the attic space themselves and the Contractor
should, where considered appropriate, provide the customer with a quotation for the
removal and replacement of the stored items to facilitate installation of the insulation
material.
The Contractor should identify any form of water penetration in the attic and attic
insulation should not be installed if the roof or pipe-work is leaking.
All pipe-work and water storage vessels should be insulated see section 7.4.3 Insulation of
pipe-work and water storage tanks for further details.
The contractor is to insulate the roof access hatch. The insulation is to be fitted to the
same thermal value as the main attic and securely fixed to the attic hatch. Where attic
access ladders are fixed to the hatch it is recommended to use insulating hoods or a
lightweight insulating box where possible.
The Contractor is to draught proof attic hatches. See section 7.10 Draught proofing for
further details.
In every roof space where cold water tanks or other fitted appliances occur, the
Contractor must construct a permanent boarded walkway from the roof access point to
the tank ball valve position and / or the appliance location. The boarded access walkway
shall be constructed of minimum dimensions of 50x50mm soft wood battens laid across
rafters, notched over pipes and cable crossings, said battens to be securely screw fixed in
place to rafters. 19mm thickness by 450mm wide flooring grade chipboard to be fixed to
battens base with screws. This walkway should be supported above the first layer of
insulation to prevent any compaction of insulation below the walkway.
7.4.1 Attic Hatch





36
Draught strip shall be fitted to all sides of the attic hatch.
Non-hinged attic hatch covers shall be fitted with a securing catch at each side (i.e.
minimum of two catches), to achieve the required compression.
All hinged attic hatch covers shall have at least one securing latch fitted to the attic hatch
framework on the opposite side to the hinges, to achieve the compression required.
Attic access covers not located within a surrounding framework and simply covering a
ceiling aperture from above shall be fitted with a rebate seal and a minimum of two catches
shall be fitted. Where the aperture is covered from below the perimeter of the access, this
will be fitted with a rebate seal and a semi-permanent means of holding the cover against
the seal shall be provided.
Some attic hatches (e.g. with an attached attic access ladder) may be difficult to draught
proof. Particular care should be taken where spring-loaded “push-push” catches are present.
BE COP Rev 7.2
Where draught proofing can be applied without problem this should be carried out as
detailed below:
7.4.2 Non-Wooden Attic Hatches

Where these are found, they must be fitted with suitable securing catches, unless the
method adopted would cause damage to the attic hatch or frame.
7.4.3 Insulation of pipe-work and water storage tanks
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Contractors insulating pipework and water storage tanks must be competent to complete the
installation and must agree to complete the work as set out in the guidance document entitled BS
5970 Code of practice for thermal insulation of pipework and equipment in the temperature range of
-100°C to +870°C and BS 5422 Method for specifying thermal insulating materials for pipes, tanks,
vessels, ductwork and equipment operating within the temperature range -40°C to +700°C.
Insulation of pipework and water storage tanks shall be installed in accordance with Best Practice
Guides/ Technical Guides supplied by the material manufacturer. Where a product is covered by an
NSAI Agrément Certificate it must be installed in accordance with this certificate and by such
qualified people as specified.
Where attic insulation is being installed, all water pipework and water storage tanks should be
insulated in unheated areas of the roof space. If pipe-work and/or water storage tanks are not
sufficiently robust to withstand the installation of insulation, the pipework and/or water storage
tanks should be replaced. For insulation of hot water cylinders, see section 7.7.7.
Product Standards & Specification
Materials to be used for Insulation of pipework and water storage tanks must be manufactured to a
relevant Irish, British or European Standard.
Insulation of pipework and water storage tanks shall be installed as per manufactures instruction.
Other NSAI Agrément-certified products may also be used. It is the responsibility of the Contractor
to ensure that the optimum solution for each Customer is achieved, within the cost constraints and
preference of each Customer.
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The Insulation of pipework and water storage tanks must be
suitable for use so that it does not compromise the property’s ability to resist internal fire spread
within the internal linings and internal fire spread within the structure and external fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part C): When installed Insulation of pipework and water storage tanks as
per the system supplier’s guidelines, the insulation should not affect the property’s ability to
resist weather and ground moisture.
 Building Regulations (Part D): When installed insulation of pipework and water storage tanks as
per the system supplier’s guidelines, the insulation shall meet the Building Regulations
requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part J): Correct installation of the Insulation of pipework and water
storage tanks shall also satisfy the Building Regulations such that the installation does not
increase the risk of the property catching fire through the use of a heat producing appliance.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The insulation of pipework and water storage tanks shall conserve
energy in keeping with the Building Regulations.
 Building Regulations (Part G): The insulation of pipework and water storage tanks shall protect
water services in keeping with the Building Regulations.
37
BE COP Rev 7.2
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer on any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works. (See section 5)
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. The cold water storage tank, service pipe and fittings and any associated cold water pipes
should be adequately protected against damage by frost.
b. Insulation of pipework and water storage tanks should be carried out using materials that
are approved by an Irish, British or European Standard for insulation of pipework and water
storage tanks and installed in accordance with the relevant Irish, British or European
Standards, where available.
c. Insulation of pipework and water storage tanks should be carried out in accordance with BS
5970 Code of practice for thermal insulation of pipework and equipment in the temperature
range of -100°C to +870°C and BS 5422 Method for specifying thermal insulating materials
for pipes, tanks, vessels, ductwork and equipment operating within the temperature range 40°C to +700°C
d. Manufacturer’s instructions should be followed. The following are intended to be helpful
guidelines.
e. Insulation of pipework outside of heated envelope of the building to protect against freezing
for domestic cold water services shall be as per ‘Appendix Table 1’ for TGD Part G of the
Building regulations:
38
BE COP Rev 7.2
f.
Further advice is available in the 'TIMSA guidance for achieving compliance with Part L of
the Building Regulations', Table 7.1.1, and, ‘Good Building Guide 40 - Protecting Pipes from
Freezing’.
g. Insulation of cold water storage tanks outside of heated envelope of the building to protect
against freezing shall be as per BS 5970 Code of practice for thermal insulation of pipework
and equipment in the temperature range of -100°C to +870°C.
h. Insulation of cold water storage tanks should be securely fixed to sides and top of water
storage tanks. The lid of the cold water storage tank shall be ridged. No gaps should be left
between the insulation surrounding the cold water storage tank. The cold water storage
tank access cover should be removable to allow minimum disturbance to insulation.
i. Insulation should not be laid below water storage tanks in the roof space where the
underside of the storage vessel is less than 300mm above the finished level of roof
insulation. The insulation around the water storage vessel should continue down to the
finished level of attic insulation to form a skirt around the water storage vessel. If the water
storage vessel is greater than 300mm above the finished level of insulation the insulation
should be installed below the vessel and the underside of the vessel should also be insulated.
Further detail is given in the diagram below and TGD Part G of the Building Regulations.
j. All pipework bend and joints should be fully insulated.
k. Unless a breathable sarking membrane is present, the insulation should be retained at least
50mm from the membrane.
39
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.5
Rafter level attic insulation (warm roof) P
BEH
BE
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Contractors of rafter level attic insulation must be competent to complete the installation and must
agree to complete the work to the standard set out in Energy-efficient Refurbishment of existing
houses (CE83/GPG155) and in accordance with Best Practice Guides/ Technical Guides supplied by
the material manufacturer. Where the manufacturer operates an Approved Installer list, the
Contractor must demonstrate their inclusion on the list or certification by the manufacturer. Where
a product is covered by an NSAI Agrément Certificate it must be installed in accordance with this
certificate and by such qualified people as specified.
Product Standards & Specification
Materials to be used in the insulation of an attic at rafter level must be certified by the NSAI
Agrément or equivalent.
The objective of this Programme is to put in place materials that will achieve a level of performance
in the Home, equivalent to the standard required in Part L of the Building Regulations. Thus, the
target U-value for the programme for attics insulated at rafter level is, in as much as is physically and
economically feasible, 0.20 W/m2K.
This economic feasibility refers only to the economic performance of the installation itself. For
example, where in exceptional circumstances a home may require significant additional
modifications when compared to a normal case, making the initial investment in the insulation
solution inappropriate compared to the benefit the Customer will get out of the investment.
Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the ability of the Customer to fund their portion of
the capital cost for a conventional installation.
The required thickness depends on the material used. It is the responsibility of the Contractor to
ensure that the optimum solution for each Customer is achieved, within the cost constraints and
preference of each Customer.
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The insulation must be suitable for use so that it does not
compromise the property’s ability to resist internal fire spread within the internal linings and
internal fire spread within the structure and external fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part C): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
insulation should not affect the property’s ability to resist weather and ground moisture.
 Building Regulations (Part D): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
insulation should meet the Building Regulations requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part F): The insulation should also be suitable for use on a property and
meet the ventilation requirements.
 Building Regulations (Part J): Correct installation of the system should also satisfy the Building
Regulations such that the installation does not increase the risk of the property catching fire
through the use of a heat producing appliance.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The insulation system shall conserve energy in keeping with the
Building Regulations.
40
BE COP Rev 7.2
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer on any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works. (See section 5)
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. All attic insulation installation and associated works should be carried out in accordance
with the manufacturer’s specifications and the National Standards Authority of Ireland
Standard Recommendation S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice for the energy efficient
retrofit of dwellings.
b. Attic Insulation should be carried out using materials that are approved by an Irish, British
or European standard for loft insulation, where available.
c. If there is evidence of bats or bat roosts present in the attic space to be insulated, the
contractor
should
consult
with
the
Bat
Conservation
Ireland
at
www.Batconservationireland.org for advice on how to proceed. All bat and bat roosts are
protected under EU and Irish legislation. For further information on this refer to
www.npws.ie
d. Particular attention should be given to ventilation and condensation requirements of the
attic in relation to the materials used (see section 5).
e. The installed insulation must not impede cross flow ventilation.
f. Unless a breathable sarking membrane is present, the insulation should be retained at
least 50mm from the membrane.
g. When installing rigid insulation between the rafters, the sheets should be cut accurately
so as to leave no gaps around the edges. Where gaps occur these should be filled with
either insulation or insulation foam. Similarly, any service penetrations, such as a soil
stack, should be sealed adequately.
h. A constant coverage should be attained to avoid the risk of cold bridging. Cold bridging
occurs where there is not a continuous covering across the inside (attic side) of the
rafters. Where the coverage is not continuous it allows the rafter itself to conduct heat
out to the external or ‘cold’ environment, thus providing a ‘cold bridge’ through which
heat can escape.
i. Unless the product has a built in vapour control layer, a separate vapour control layer
should be fitted between the insulation and any plasterboard, i.e. on the warm side of the
insulation.
j. Insulation/vapour control layer joints should be fully sealed by appropriate tape. Where
foiled backed insulation is used, foil taping all joints between the insulation slabs in each
layer will fulfil the requirement for a vapour control layer;
k. The insulation material shall be retained at a minimum of 75mm from all electrical
apparatus penetrating the insulation, for example recessed lighting fittings. Where
necessary a permanent physical restraint shall be used;
l. Downlighters should be provided with sufficient space to dissipate heat so as to prevent
the lights themselves from overheating. Where the light fitting itself is airtight (to the
roof) but the hood of the fitting is open to the room, then the hole for the recessed fitting
should be cut into the ceiling accurately to prevent air movement from the room into the
roof space. A void should be formed around the light fitting in the lowest insulation layer.
Where the light fitting itself is not airtight (to the roof), or where it is not possible to make
the ceiling airtight where the fitting is provided, then an airtight enclosure should be
formed or a service void provided on the warm side of the vapour control layer. Forming
these spaces at regular intervals in the insulation layer reduces the overall effectiveness
41
BE COP Rev 7.2
m.
n.
o.
p.
42
of the roof insulation. Where they are fitted, a layer of high performance insulation
should be installed above the recessed lights to compensate for the voids formed in the
lowest layer to accommodate the recessed fittings. For sloped roofs where voids cannot
be provided then recessed light fittings should not be installed in the sloping roof section
unless a suitably deep service void is provided.
Whilst the Contractor is in the roof space he should identify any form of water
penetration and attic insulation should not be installed if the roof is leaking.
Where rafter level insulation is used on a partial attic conversion, the vertical walls of the
room should have insulation placed between the stud timbers (where not already
existing) and across the face of the stud walls. Where there is unused attic space outside
of the conversion, insulation should be applied at ceiling level to the standard detailed in
‘Ceiling Level Insulation’ above.
Careful detailing is required to avoid thermal loss due to thermal bridging and to
maintain roof ventilation at the roof-wall junction particularly where the dwelling is also
provided with wall insulation.
Services, such as cables/pipework, can be accommodated within a battened airspace, on
the inside of the finished insulation, with the depth determined by what services are
provided.
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.6
Floor Insulation
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Contractors installing floor insulation must be competent to complete the installation and must
agree to complete the work in accordance with the following Best Practice Guides:
 Domestic floors: construction, insulation and damp-proofing (GBG 28 Part 1) published by the
BRE
 Insulating ground floors (GBG 45), published by the BRE
 Energy-efficient Refurbishment of existing houses (CE83/GPG155) published by the Energy
Saving Trust
 Sustainable Refurbishment (CE309) published by the Energy Saving Trust
They must also be installed in accordance with Technical Guides supplied by the material
manufacturer. Where a product is covered by an NSAI Agrément Certificate it must be installed in
accordance with this certificate and by such qualified people as specified.
All electrical associated works should be carried out by a suitably qualified person in accordance
with the ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition (ET101:2008).
Where the removal of a concrete floor slab is required, the Contractor must advise the Customer to
engage the services of a suitably qualified Chartered Structural Engineer to design and oversee the
work as it must comply with the Building Regulations.
In general, it is the responsibility of the Contractor to clearly outline to the Customer the full
implications of the scope of works proposed, including:
 The potential impacts to services,
 Skirting,
 Doors and door heights,
 Room height (floor to ceiling), and
 The general environment during, and as a consequence of, the installation.
Product Standards & Specification
Materials to be used in the insulation of a suspended timber floor (e.g. glass fibre, rockwool,
sheepswool, expanded polystyrene, high-density foam, etc.) must be manufactured to a relevant
Irish, British or European Standard. Materials to be used in the insulation of a concrete ground floor
slab must be rigid insulation materials certified by the NSAI Agrément or equivalent.
Insulation to be used with a concrete floor slab must have sufficient load-bearing capacity to support
the floor and its loading.
The target U-value for the programme for the insulation of floors, in as much as is physically and
economically feasible, is:
 0.36 W/m2K, or
 0.15 W/m2K, where the refurbishment also includes the installation of underfloor heating
The installation of underfloor heating typically only applies to a floor with a concrete, groundbearing floor slab and not to suspended timber floors. Where underfloor heating is to be
incorporated into a suspended timber floor, a rigid insulation material certified by the NSAI
Agrément or equivalent must be used and the guidance of the certificate holder should be sought on
its use with underfloor heating.
43
BE COP Rev 7.2
This economic feasibility refers only to the economic performance of the installation itself. For
example, where in exceptional circumstances a home may require significant additional
modifications when compared to a normal case, making the initial investment in the insulation
solution inappropriate compared to the benefit the Customer will get out of the investment.
Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the ability of the Customer to fund their portion of
the capital cost for a conventional installation. It is the responsibility of the Contractor to ensure that
the optimum solution for each Customer is achieved, within the cost constraints and preference of
each Customer.
Where the insulation material is made from polystyrene, electrical cables should be run in conduits
to avoid direct contact between the polystyrene and the wiring. When polystyrene comes into direct
contact with PVC cabling, it has the potential to cause material degradation of the PVC insulation,
which may result in the wiring becoming unsafe. The Contractor should also (seek or sought)
guidance from the insulation manufacturer should be sought where underfloor heating services are
to be used where the insulation material is made from polystyrene.
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part A): The insulation works should not reduce the floor-to-ceiling height
of the room to below 2.4m or the clear door heights to below 2.0m.
 Building Regulations (Part B): The insulation must be suitable for use so that it does not
compromise the property’s ability to resist internal fire spread within the internal linings and
internal fire spread within the structure and external fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part C): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
insulation should not affect the property’s ability to resist weather and ground moisture.
 Building Regulations (Part D): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
insulation should meet the Building Regulations requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part F): The insulation should also be suitable for use on a property and
meet the ventilation requirements.
 Building Regulations (Part J): Correct installation of the system should also satisfy the Building
Regulations such that the installation does not increase the risk of the property catching fire
through the use of a heat producing appliance.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The insulation system shall conserve energy in keeping with the
Building Regulations.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation
(see section 5), air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living
environment in the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living
environment in the home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the
duty of the Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to
recommend to the Customer any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental
change to the living environment as a result of the works.
Installation Standards & Specifications – Suspended Timber Floor Insulation
a. Retrofit Floor insulation must be carried out in accordance with the guidelines as
described in S.R. 54 – 2014 (Code of Practice for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings)
Clause 9 – Floor Insulation
b. Suspended timber floor Insulation should be carried out using materials that are
approved by an Irish, British or European Standard for floor insulation and installed in
accordance with the relevant Irish, British or European Standards, where available.
c. The insulation materials should be stored in accordance with the manufacturers
recommendations.
44
BE COP Rev 7.2
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
Where rigid insulation panels are being used, they should be stored on a firm, clean, dry
and level base. Where they are being stored outdoors, they should be kept off the ground
and protected from prolonged exposure to sunlight either under cover in dry conditions
or by covering with opaque polythene sheeting.
Care must be taken to avoid damage and contact between rigid insulation panels and
solvents or bitumen products. The panels must not be exposed to open flame or other
ignition sources.
Where practicable, all areas of the floor are to be insulated to the same depth.
Wool and other compactable insulation materials should not be compressed as this
decreases its effectiveness considerably.
Water supply pipes should be kept above the insulation, where possible. Where it is not
possible, these pipes should be completely insulated where they are below the level of
the floor insulation. See TGD Part G of Building Regulations for further details.
The insulation material should be installed between the joists such that there are no void
spaces between the underside of the flooring and the insulation unless a space is required
for services. Loose-fill, spray-foam or quilt materials should be supported underneath by
a thin sheet of plywood or a breathable membrane and rigid insulation materials should
be supported on battens or similar. This allows the timber joists to breathe as well as
prevent air movement above the insulation.
Where an airtight membrane is used to support the insulation material, it should be
turned up at the edges and sealed against the walls around the complete perimeter of the
floor. Where a breathable membrane has not been used, one should be installed
underneath the timber joists. The membrane should be turned up at the edges and
sealed against the walls around the complete perimeter of the floor. Where fuel-burning
appliances are located within a space, please ensure there are adequate ventilation
openings (see section 5).
The space between the last joist and the wall should be filled with insulation to the full
depth of the joist so as to minimise thermal bridging at the junction between the wall and
the floor.
It is essential to ensure that the external wall vents are not blocked in any way in order to
ensure that the void beneath a suspended timber floor is adequately ventilated and that
the ventilating air has a free path across the floor void. Where fuel burning appliance are
located within a space please allow for adequate ventilation openings (see section 5).
Installation Standards & Specifications –Concrete Floor Insulation
This specification is applicable to both ground supported concrete floors and suspended precast
concrete floors. Where sufficient space is available for safe access, or a basement exists, fitting
insulation to the underside of the slabs is an option. NOTE Caution should be taken to ensure that
the area beneath a suspended ground floor is ventilated to prevent the build-up of condensation and
hazardous soil gases, such as radon.
a. Retrofit Floor insulation must be carried out in accordance with the guidelines as
described in S.R. 54 – 2014 (Code of Practice for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings)
Clause 9 – Floor Insulation
b. Materials to be used in the insulation of a concrete ground floor slab wall must be
installed in accordance with the specifications laid out by the system supplier’s
specifications and in accordance with the system’s NSAI Agrément (or equivalent)
certificate.
c. Where the excavation of an existing ground floor is required, remedial measures for the
reduction of indoor concentrations of Radon are required (see Section 4.1).
d. The ground floor slab must incorporate a damp-proof membrane (DPM). Where one is to
be installed, it should be installed in accordance with the following British Standards:
- Protection of buildings against water from the ground (CP 102:1973), and
45
BE COP Rev 7.2
e.
f.
g.
h.
46
- Design and installation of damp-proof courses in masonry construction (BS
8215:1991)
The insulation works should not reduce the floor-to-ceiling height of the room to below
2.4m or the clear door heights to below 2.0m
Storage of insulation materials:
 The insulation panels should be stored on a firm, clean, dry and level base.
Where they are being stored outdoors, they should be kept off the ground and
protected from prolonged exposure to sunlight either under cover in dry
conditions or by covering with opaque polythene sheeting. The insulation panels
should be stored in accordance with the manufacturers recommendations.
 Care must be taken to avoid damage and contact with solvents or bitumen
products. The boards must not be exposed to open flame or other ignition
sources.
Installation:
 The insulation may be placed above or below the DPM/radon barrier and should
have a high moisture resistance.
 Where the insulation is laid on top of the DPM/radon barrier it should be laid on
a well compacted hardcore that has been sand-blinded in order to provide a
level surface. The DPM/radon barrier should have overlapping joints and be well
sealed and also needs to be brought up the walls around the floor perimeter to
meet the wall DPM/radon (for more information, see www.epa.ie).
 The concrete floor slab should be fully dried out before the installation of the
insulation material.
 Insulation boards are cut to the required size and should be laid horizontally on
the concrete slab with closely-butted, staggered cross-joints to ensure there are
no gaps at joints.
 The boards should be laid such that all cut edges are at the perimeter of the floor
or at some other feature, e.g. thresholds, access ducts, etc.
 Spreader boards should be used to protect the insulation boards.
 A thinner section of insulation should be placed vertically against the abutting
wall around the perimeter of the floor area being insulated to prevent thermal
bridging.
Finishing:
 If the DPM/radon barrier is placed below the insulation, the joints between
insulation boards should be taped to prevent wet screed from entering when
being poured. If the slab/screed is power-floated, the exposed edges of
perimeter insulation should be protected during power-floating, e.g. by boards,
or the areas close to the edge of the floor should be hand trowelled.
 If there is no DPM/radon barrier above the concrete floor a vapour control layer,
e.g. polyethylene, should be placed between the insulation and the screed to
protect moisture-sensitive finishes such as timber or timber-based flooring. This
vapour control layer should be carried up along the edge of the screed. The
screed should be allowed to dry before any floor finish is laid.
 Where a timber-based overlay is to be installed on top of the insulation, the
following measures must be taken in the installation process:
 Overlays should be installed in accordance with BS DD CEN/TS 12872:2007
(Wood-based panels. Guidance on the use of load-bearing boards in floors,
walls and roofs).
 Where the DPM/radon barrier is below the insulation, a vapour control
layer must be installed between the insulation and the overlay boards. All
joints in this vapour control layer must be sealed appropriately.
BE COP Rev 7.2
 An expansion gap between overlay boards and perimeter walls or
i.
abutments must be provided at a rate of 2mm per meter run or a minimum
of 10mm, whichever is greater.
 A waterproof PVA adhesive should be applied to all joints before overlay
boards are interlocked. Wedges should be inserted between the wall and
floor to ensure the boards remain tightly locked together until the adhesive
has set.
 A suitable compressible filler must be used around the perimeter of the
floor between the overlay boards and wall.
 Overlay board protection should be considered in rooms where there is a
likelihood of regular water spillage, e.g. in bathrooms, kitchens, etc.
 Where a cement-based floor screed is to be laid on the insulation, it should be
laid in accordance with BS 8204 (Screeds, bases and in situ floorings)
Where possible, electrical conduits, gas and water pipes or other services should be
contained in ducts or channels within the concrete slab. Where this is not possible, the
non-electrical services may be accommodated within the insulation, provided they are
securely fixed to the concrete slab. Electrical cables should be enclosed in a suitable
conduit. With hot water pipes the insulation must be cut back to maintain an air space.
Radon
Where planned retrofit measures comprise of floor replacement consideration should be given to
provision of radon preventative measures as detailed in Building Regulations Technical Guidance
Document C. Post retrofit radon testing is recommended where extensive energy retrofit measures
have been completed.
NOTE: For further guidance see:
http://www.epa.ie/radiation/publications/rad/RPII_Radon_Homes_Brochure_2008.pdf and the
Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government publication Radon in Existing
Buildings - Corrective options.
47
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.7
Fully Integrated Heating Controls
BEH
WHS
BEP
General Standards & Specifications
This section outlines the general Standards & Specifications to which Contractors, products and
installation methods must conform.
Contractor Requirements & Competency
The installation of heating controls must be carried out by suitably qualified individuals in
accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum. In addition to
this, they must hold a Level 6 National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an equivalent Plumbing
qualification such as City and Guilds. Plumbers must have completed an electrical module during
their course in order to carry out the ‘minor’ electrical works involved in specific control measures. If
‘Controlled Works’, as defined by the Commission for Energy Regulation (CER) document entitled
‘Definition of the Scope of Controlled Works’ are required, a Completion Certificate must be issued.
The issuance of a Completion Certificate for ‘Controlled works’ can only be carried out by a
Registered Electrical Contractor or an Inspector of one of the two Safety Supervisory Bodies as
defined in Section 2.2 in this CER guidance.
Product Standard & Specification
All heating control products must conform to the appropriate BS, EN or IS standard for that
particular measure. As a minimum, the following Standards should be satisfied:
 EN 60730-1:2011 Automatic electrical controls for household and similar use. General
requirements
 BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and similar Use Part 2-7:
Particular Requirements for Timers and Time Switches
 BS EN 215 Thermostatic Radiator Valves. Requirements and Test Methods
Installation Standard & Specification
All Heating Controls installation should be carried out in accordance with the manufacturer’s
specifications and Industry Best Practice. All works should be installed in accordance with the
National Standards Authority of Ireland Standard Recommendation S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice
for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings, the Dept. of Environment, Heritage and Local
Government and SEAI Document Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings –
Achieving Compliance with Part L, the TACMA Guide to Heating Controls, and Energy Savings Trust
Guidelines:
 GPG 302 Controls for Domestic Central Heating and Hot Water – Guidance for Specifiers and
Installers (Energy Savings Trust and BRE)
 CE29 Domestic Heating by Oil: Boiler Systems – Guidance for Installers and Specifiers
 CE30 Domestic Heating by Gas: Boiler Systems – Guidance for Installers and Specifiers
 All works should be carried out in accordance with the ETCI National Wiring Rules for
Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008 and the latest draft of BS 5449
Specification of Forced Air Circulation Hot Water Central Heating Systems for Domestic
Purposes (or equivalent Irish Standard) where applicable.
Particular attention should be given to good house keeping and safety during installation. Every
installed measure must be fully demonstrated by the Contractor to the Customer along with a
written set of operating instructions. Before leaving the home, the Contractor must ensure that the
owner can correctly operate their upgraded heating system.
48
BE COP Rev 7.2
Two Zones (Space Heating & Domestic Hot Water)
This element of the programme involves dividing the heating system into two zones and
incorporating a 24 hour 7-day programmer for time & temperature control along with a boiler
interlock arrangement to prevent boiler operation when the heat demand drops off. These initial
two zones must be made up of the space heating zone and the domestic hot water heating zone.
Further zones to split areas of the house can be added as additional zones (as discussed below).
Product Standard & Specification
All timers, programmers, thermostats, zoning manifolds and motorised control valves must
conform to the appropriate BS or IS standard for that particular measure, for example: BS EN 607302-7 ‘Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and similar Use Part 2-7: Particular Requirements for
Timers and Time Switches’. It should also be noted that 22 mm motorised control valves are usually
suitable for boilers rated up to 20kW. For larger boilers, when fitting a motorised control valve on a
gravity hot water circuit, 28 mm valves or larger should be used.
Installation Standard & Specification
Zoning: Zones should be divided according to Industry Best Practice as outlined in Good Practice
Guide 302. This guide recommends using motorised control valves to subdivide the home into
separate heating zones. A zoning manifold can also be used to achieve separate heating zones.
Motorised control valves can be plumbed at an angle but must not be mounted so that the powerhead is below the horizontal level of the pipework. If fitted in a confined space, adequate ventilation
must be available in order to ensure that the valve will be kept within its recommended temperature
range. There must also be adequate access so that the power head can be removed if necessary.
Motorised valves should not be positioned in the line of the open safety vent pipe or the feed and
expansion pipe. Solid fuel systems should use normally-open motorised valves (i.e. they close only
when power is applied) to ensure safe operation in the event of power failure or malfunction.
A 24 hour 7-Day Programmer, facilitating time and temperature control should be installed in
accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as outlined in Good
Practice Guide 302. The room thermostat must be located in an area where it is not subject to heat
gains, direct sunlight or draughts. The thermostat should be located in a well-lit, easily accessible
position with good air circulation. The chosen position must be representative of average room/zone
temperature. Do not locate room thermostats in areas such as corners, behind furniture or curtains
or in areas where the air flow may pick up extra heat such as close to TVs, computers, wall lights, in a
room with a fixed heating appliance or direct sunlight. Locating a room thermostat in an area which
may be subject to external draughts such as beside external doors etc. should also be avoided. Best
practice recommends that thermostats are situated approx. 1.5 m from the floor. Furthermore,
room thermostats should not be installed in any room which already uses TRVs for temperature
control.
Best Practice recommends that the Hot Water Cylinder Thermostat (installed with the immersion
timer and temperature control device) is installed between 1/4 and 1/3 of the way up the vertical
height of the cylinder unless otherwise instructed by the manufacturer. Care should be taken to
ensure that there is good clean contact between the thermostat and the cylinder when attaching.
The thermostat should also be located on the front face of the cylinder so that it is easily accessible
by the Customer. It is recommended that Contractor sets the hot water temperature no higher than
60oC. It is not uncommon in many households for domestic hot water to be heated to temperatures
higher than 60oC only for residents to add cold water to it to bring the temperature down. This
would be considered wasteful of energy. A temperature of 60oC is recommended however to
protect against the risk of Legionella.
49
BE COP Rev 7.2
Boiler Interlock - A boiler interlock arrangement must be included as part of this set of controls
whereby the boiler will not fire when there is no demand for heat. All unnecessary boiler firing can
be eliminated with this control measure. In order to assess whether a boiler interlock arrangement is
already in place, the Contractor should turn all thermostats right down when the boiler is firing - if
the boiler continues to fire, then there is no interlock. (The pump may continue to run if the boiler
requires a pump to overrun, this is intentional and does not affect the boiler interlock). On a
traditional central heating system with stored hot water, a boiler interlock arrangement can be set
up by interconnecting the room and cylinder thermostats with motorised valve(s). On a combination
boiler all that is required to set up a boiler interlock arrangement is a room thermostat.
Boiler Management System – An acceptable alternative to the above control measures would be to
install a boiler management system that delivers the specified zoning, timing and temperature and
boiler interlock control provisions. Such systems must provide the same functionality as is described
above and be installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice.
In the exceptional case where the hot water cylinder is significantly isolated from the boiler and
where the installation of additional pipes to connect it separately would involve substantial civil
works, a manifold/valve arrangement to by-pass the hot water cylinder would be an acceptable
alternative solution. This arrangement would allow the Customer to use their boiler for space
heating without heating the water in the hot water cylinder. The contractor must explain to the
Customer this new heating arrangement and how to use this system for heating hot water in the
summer months e.g. turning off the radiators or using the time/temp programmer. The reasons for
implementing this alternative solution as part of the heating control upgrades must be documented
in the comments section of the Declaration of Works document.
An Additional Zone
In addition to establishing 2 zones (as described above), the Customer must also commission the
installation of an additional space heating zone OR the installation of Thermostatic Radiator Valves
(in rooms which do not contain room thermostats) per clause 7.7.4.
Product Standard & Specification
The Product Standards & Specifications outlined in Section 7.7.1 will also apply to the components
required for the establishment of an additional heating zone (room thermostat & motorised control
valve).
Installation Standard & Specification
A Third Zone can be established using an additional motorised control valve or a zoning manifold
arrangement and room thermostat. Installation should be carried out in accordance with the
manufactures instruction and Industry Best Practice. The Installation Standards & Specifications
outlined in Section 7.6.1 will also apply to the installation of an additional heating zone.
Thermostatic Radiator Valves (TRVs)
In addition to establishing 2 zones (as described above), the contractor must also install either an
additional space heating zone OR install Thermostatic Radiator Valves (TRVs) on at least three
radiators but no less than half of all radiators in rooms which do not have room thermostats.
Product Standard & Specification
All TRVs must conform to the appropriate BS or IS standard for Thermostatic Radiator Valves (if
available) such as BS EN 215 ‘Thermostatic Radiator Valves. Requirements & Test Methods’.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
Installation Standard & Specification
TRVs should be installed in accordance with the manufacturers guideline, industry best practice, the
National Standards Authority of Ireland Standard Recommendation S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice
for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings, and the latest version of BS 7478 ‘Selection and use of
thermostatic radiator valves’. This British Standard gives guidance on the selection, application and
use of thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs) manufactured in accordance with BS EN 215-1 for use in
domestic and commercial wet central heating systems up to a water temperature of 120oC. TRVs
must not be fitted in rooms, which already have temperature control through a thermostat.
When installing TRVs, the Contractor must ensure that the temperature selector scale and reference
point are easily visible to the Customer and that the TRV is not positioned in an area, which may
distort the temperature sensor. Avoid locating TRVs behind curtains, in direct sunlight, in very
draughty locations or other areas, which may distort the temperature sensor. If these conditions are
unavoidable, a remote sensor should be used. When inaccessibility of the valve to the user is
unavoidable e.g. when the radiator and valve are located behind a decorative grille, valves with
combined remote temperature sensors and adjuster should be used.
Most modern TRVs are bi-direction and can be installed in either the flow or return direction. Due
care should however be taken to ensure that valve is bi-directional – if the valve is not bi-directional,
the flow through the valve must correspond to the direction on the arrow of the valve body.
Where TRVs are being fitted to a one-pipe system, i.e. only the boiler is being replaced, units
designed for minimum flow resistance should be used.
An automatic by-pass circuit must be installed (in fully pumped systems) in homes where there are
3 or more TRVs in place. When most TRVs are open, the automatic by-pass remains closed, allowing
full circulation around the heating system. When the TRVs close, the automatic by-pass opens,
allowing an appropriate flow rate through the boiler. The use of an automatic by-pass will also
reduce the noise in the system due to excess water velocity. An automatic by-pass circuit must also
be fitted if the boiler manufacturer requires one, or if it specifies that a minimum flow rate must be
maintained while the boiler is firing. An automatic by-pass circuit must then incorporate an
automatic by-pass valve, which will control water flow in accordance with the water pressure across
it. The valve is used to maintain a minimum flow rate through the boiler and to limit circulation
pressure when some radiators or zones are turned off. This level of control cannot be achieved using
a fixed position valve. The valve should be installed between the boiler primary flow and return
noting the direction of flow.
All systems should be flushed in order to remove debris prior to commissioning and this should be
carried out with all thermostatic sensor heads removed and valves fully open. Thermostatic sensor
heads should also be removed during hydraulic balancing of the system in order to prevent changes
in room temperature affecting the balancing procedure.
Once the TRV has been correctly set to the desired temperature by the Contractor, it should not
normally require further adjustment by the Customer but they should be made aware of how to
adjust the temperature setting for future reference.
NOTE: The room where the main thermostat is fitted should NOT have a TRV fitted to the radiator
in that location. This situation would render the thermostat sensing inaccurate.
51
BE COP Rev 7.2
Time & Temperature Control of Electric Immersion Heater
Product Standard & Specification
Timers and temperature control for electric immersion heaters must conform to the appropriate BS
or IS standard for that particular measure (if available) such as BS EN 60730-2-7 ‘Automatic Electrical
Controls for Household and similar Use Part 2-7: Particular Requirements for Timers and Time
Switches’.
Installation Standard & Specification
Installation should be carried in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines and Industry Best
Practice as outlined in Good Practice Guide 302 or similar.
Additional Control Measures
It is possible that additional control measures may be specified by a Customer outside the scope of
the Programme (such as weather compensation devices), which they wish to be installed at the
same time as those measures covered by the Programme. Where this is the case, it is the
responsibility of the Contractor to explain the cumulative impact of all measures being installed and
the inter-relationship between each measure and the effects on performance that may occur as a
result.
Hot Water Cylinder Insulation
 If the hot water cylinder is not being replaced with a pre insulated hot water cylinder during
the upgrading of the boiler and/or controls upgrade under the Better Energy Homes
programme then a correctly sized insulating jacket tested and approved to BS 5615 must be
fitted.
 The insulation jacket shall not cover the immersion heater head and/or cylinder thermostat.
 The fixing bands shall be of a durable material and shall not be over tight or loose.
 Hot water storage cylinders having factory-applied thermal insulation shall not be fitted
with insulating jackets unless existing thermal insulation has been rendered ineffective
through mechanical damage or deterioration.
 Where the ESB specification details of an existing hot water storage cylinder jacket are not
completely legible and/or are not perfectly visible, a self-adhesive label shall be additionally
applied to the jacket at an accessible position stating the name of the jacket supplier and the
Irish Standard reference details.
 For an existing jacket where the British Standards compliance marking are not indicated by
any means the following action shall be undertaken:

The jacket shall be checked for compliance with this specification.

The insulating material, covering material and fastenings shall not have suffered any
permanent deterioration.

The insulating material shall be at least 80mm nominal thickness.
52
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.8
High Efficiency Boilers
BEH
WHS
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
The installation of high efficiency boilers must be carried out by suitably qualified individuals in
accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum. In addition to
this, they must hold a Level 6 National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an equivalent Plumbing
qualification such as City and Guilds. Plumbers must have completed an electrical module during
their course in order to carry out the ‘minor’ electrical works involved in specific control measures. If
‘Controlled Works’, as defined by the Commission for Energy Regulation (CER) document entitled
‘Definition of the Scope of Controlled Works’ are required, a Completion Certificate must be issued.
The issuance of a Completion Certificate for ‘Controlled works’ can only be carried out by a
Registered Electrical Contractor or an Inspector of one of the two Safety Supervisory Bodies as
defined in Section 2.2 in this CER guidance.
Oil Boilers
Contractors installing oil-fired boilers must comply with requirements and competencies stated
above. It is also recommended that the contractor should be registered with a professional
organisation, e.g. OFTEC.
Gas Boilers
In addition to the above criterion, Contractors wishing to install Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) or
Natural Gas boilers under the Programme must hold a Gas Contractors Domestic Certificate (GI D,
GI 2 or GI 3).
It is an offence for any person to carry out domestic Natural Gas or LPG works unless he/she is a
registered gas installer with RGII. To align with this requirement all registered gas installers on the
Better Energy Homes programme undertaking High Efficiency Gas Boiler and Heating Controls
upgrade works must be on the RGII list. Details on how to register with RGII is available at
www.rgii.ie .
Product Standard & Specification
Qualifying boilers must be listed on the SEAI Home-heating Appliance Register of Performance
(HARP) database, or equivalent such as the UK SEDBUK database, and have a seasonal net
efficiency greater than 90%. Please note that boiler efficiency for this Programme at 90% is greater
than is required by current Building Regulations. Technical Guidance Document Part L Dwellings
2008 states that new and replacement central heating systems must have boiler efficiency not less
than 86%.
Where a replacement boiler installation involves a change of fuel, the procedure outlined in Section
1.4 of the Dept. Of Environment & SEAI Document entitled "Heating and Domestic Hot Water
Systems for Dwellings - Achieving Compliance with Part L" must be adhered to. This procedure aims
to discourage an existing appliance being replaced by a significantly less carbon-efficient one.
The contractor must discuss both the specification and sizing of the boiler with the Customer prior
to final system selection. Size of home, levels of glazing and insulation should all be considered
among other.
53
BE COP Rev 7.2
Installation Standard & Specification
Qualifying boilers must be fitted in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines, Industry Best
Practice, the latest draft of Building Regulations Technical Guidance Document J - Home Heating
Appliances, the ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008
and the latest draft of BS 5449 Specification of Forced Air Circulation Hot Water Central Heating
Systems for Domestic Purposes (or equivalent Irish Standard) where applicable.
Condensing Boilers
Where condensing boilers are to be installed, the Department of the Environment, Heritage and
Local Government (DECLG) and SEAI document ‘Guide to the condensing boiler installation
assessment procedure for Existing Dwellings’ should be consulted prior to installation. This
document is included as an Appendix in the DECLG and SEAI document entitled "Heating and
Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings - Achieving Compliance with Part L" and contains the
detailed guidance referred to in paragraph 2.2 of Technical Guidance Document L - Dwellings 2007
to assess specific situations where the provision of condensing boilers is not practicable.
Gas Boilers
All qualifying Natural Gas and LPG boilers must be installed by a competent person and in
accordance with the following documents:
 The latest version of I.S. 813 Domestic Gas Installations. This Standard covers the Code of
Practice for the installation of Natural Gas or LPG, in domestic premises, from the point of
delivery to the gas appliance.
 The CER Criteria document ‘The Regulation of Gas Installers with respect to safety’.
7.8.1 Hot Water Cylinder Insulation






54
If the hot water cylinder is not being replaced with a pre insulated hot water cylinder during
the upgrading of the boiler and/or controls upgrade under the Better Energy Homes
programme then a correctly sized insulating jacket tested and approved to BS 5615 must be
fitted.
The insulation jacket shall not cover the immersion heater head and/or cylinder thermostat.
The fixing bands shall be of a durable material and shall not be over tight or loose.
Hot water storage cylinders having factory-applied thermal insulation shall not be fitted
with insulating jackets unless existing thermal insulation has been rendered ineffective
through mechanical damage or deterioration.
Where the specification details of an existing hot water storage cylinder jacket are not
completely legible and/or are not perfectly visible, a self-adhesive label shall be additionally
applied to the jacket at an accessible position stating the name of the jacket supplier and the
Irish Standard reference details.
For an existing jacket where the British Standards compliance marking are not indicated by
any means the following action shall be undertaken:

The jacket shall be checked for compliance with this specification.

The insulating material, covering material and fastenings shall not have suffered any
permanent deterioration.

The insulating material shall be at least 80mm nominal thickness.
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.8.2 Important guidance note for Electrical works associated with the Better Energy
Homes programme






All electrical works under the Better Energy Homes programme must be in full compliance
with current ETCI rules.
Earthing and Bonding must be in accordance with ETCI 101:2008 Chapter 54 (544
Equipotential bonding conductors) and Annex 63B (Guidelines for certification for alterations
to existing installations).
In order to comply with ETCI rules the following note from ETCI 101:2008 Annex 63B must be
taken into consideration:
As referred to in Annex 63B “Before commencing new work, the installer should assess the
existing installation to ensure that it will not impair the safety of the proposed new work,
and likewise the new work will not impair the safety of the existing installation. Should the
installer become aware of any defect in any part of the installation that would impair the
safety of the new work, the client must be informed in writing thereof. No new work should
commence until these defects have been made good.”
If the earthing/bonding is less than 6mm2 then the heating installer must either
(a) issue an ‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ to notify them that their current
wiring installation is not to current ETCI rules and work cannot commence on the installation
until the wiring has been rectified to current ETCI rules or, (b) the bonding must be rectified
to current ETCI rules by a competent suitably qualified person
Work may commence on a heating system with earthing/bonding of 6mm 2 and above
however:
Heating system with earthing/bonding of less than 10mm2 the heating installer must issue an
‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ to notify them that their current wiring
installation is not to current ETCI rules.
Where bonding arrangements are found not to be in accordance with the current ETCI
National Rules then the consumer shall be informed in writing of the situation and advised to
have the electrical installation checked and rectified by a competent person. In such
circumstances the ‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ can be issued to a home
owner when an electrical installation is not to current ETCI regulations. The ‘Electrical safety
notice to the home owner’ can be downloaded from the following link:
http://www.seai.ie/Grants/Better_energy_homes/contractor/Newsletter/Electrical_safety_n
otice_to_the_home_owner.pdf
7.8.3 Important guidance note for the installation of safety valve discharge works
associated with the Better Energy Homes programme
A safety valve is permitted to discharge externally or internally under the Better Energy Homes
programme. A guidance note to what is acceptable under the programme, I.S. 813 (natural gas
and LPG installations) and OFTEC (oil installations) is noted below:
External discharge:
A discharge pipe shall be run from the safety valve in ½” (15mm) copper. The pipework shall
terminate in a visible position outside the building and have a 100mm minimum turn down with
the outlet facing downwards, or use a boiler manufacture supplied purposed designed fitting, to
ensure that the discharge of hot water or steam shall not endanger any person or property. The
discharge pipework shall be installed with sufficient continuous fall to prevent the retention of
water and the risk of pipework becoming blocked due to freezing.
Internal discharge:
55
BE COP Rev 7.2
A discharge pipe shall be run from the safety valve in ½” (15mm) copper, to a suitable discharge
point into the waste water system within the dwelling, in pipework suitable for temperatures in
excess of 100°C. The discharge of hot water or steam shall not endanger any person or cause
damage to appliances controls, other equipment or property. The discharge into the waste water
system shall be made in an accessible location and be fitted with a waste trap and a tundish or a
(30mm) open ended riser of sufficient height to ensure that spillage cannot take place. The
discharge pipework shall be installed with sufficient continuous fall to prevent the retention of
water and the risk of the pipework becoming blocked due to freezing.
Additional Installation Guidance
The installation of boilers should also follow the guidance outlined in the following Energy Savings
Trust and Good Practice Guide Publications:
 CE29 Domestic Heating by Oil: Boiler Systems - Guidance for Contractors & Specifiers
 CE30 Domestic Heating by Gas: Boiler Systems - Guidance for Contractors & Specifiers
 Good Practice Guide 301 Controls for Domestic Heating and Hot Water – Choice of Fuel and
System Type
56
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.9
Heat Pumps
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
The installation of heat pumps must be carried out by suitably qualified and in accordance with the
following:
 The manufacturer’s guidelines,
 Microgeneration Installation Standard: MIS 3005 Requirements for Contractors Undertaking
the Supply, Design, Installation, Set to Work, Commissioning and Handover of Microgeneration
Heat Pump Systems, which is considered to be industry best practice, and
 Dept. Of Environment, Community and Local Government (DECLG) and SEAI document,
Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings - Achieving Compliance with Part L.
In addition to this, they must either hold a Level 6 National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as City and Guilds. Plumbers must have completed an
electrical module during their course in order to carry out the ‘minor’ electrical works involved in
specific control measures or the installer shall be listed on an approved manufacturer installers list.
All electrical associated works must be carried out in accordance with the ETCI National Wiring Rules
for Electrical Installations (Fourth edition (ET101:2008). If ‘Controlled Works’, as defined by the
Commission for Energy Regulation (CER) document entitled ‘Definition of the Scope of Controlled
Works’ are required, a Completion Certificate must be issued. The issuance of a Completion
Certificate for ‘Controlled works’ can only be carried out by a Registered Electrical Contractor or an
Inspector of one of the two Safety Supervisory Bodies as defined in Section 2.2 in this CER guidance.
The heating system must be divided into space heating and water heating zones with at least one
more space heating zone added so that there are at least two zones for space heating.
This should incorporate a 24-hour 7-day programmer (installation and standards specifications
outlined in Section 7.7) with/without a remote access and be interlocked with the operation of the
heat pump unit or a controls package approved by the manufacturer for the specific heat pump
installation.
The installation and standards specifications outlined in Section 7.7 will apply to the installation of
the zoning measures.
In addition to this, a suitably sized pre-insulated hot water cylinder, with an insulant thickness of at
least 50mm, should be installed where the existing cylinder does not meet this requirement.
Product Standard & Specification
Qualifying heat pumps must be listed on the SEAI Home-heating Appliance Register of Performance
(HARP) database or one of the European Heat Pump Association (EHPA) database, the European
Commission’s Ecolabel catalogue or have Eurovent Certification, and have the following minimum
Seasonal Performance Factor (SPF):
 Water-to-Water Heat Pump: 485%
 Air-to-Water Heat Pump:
350%
 Brine-to-Water Heat Pump:
390%
The design of the heat pump system should comply with IS EN 15450:2007 Heating Systems in
Buildings - Design of Heat Pump Heating Systems.
The guidance in Section 8.1 of the DECLG and SEAI document entitled ‘Heating and Domestic Hot
Water Systems for Dwellings - Achieving Compliance with Part L’ must be adhered to. This guidance
provides a minimum requirement for the performance efficiency of heat pumps to prevent the
replacement of a heating system with a significantly less carbon-efficient one.
57
BE COP Rev 7.2
The Contractor must discuss both the specification and sizing of the heat pump and the heat emitter
type(s) with the Customer prior to final system selection.
Installation Standard & Specification
a. Qualifying heat pumps must be fitted in accordance with:
 Manufacturer’s guidelines,
 Microgeneration Installation Standard: MIS 3005 Requirements for Contractors
Undertaking the Supply, Design, Installation, Set to Work, Commissioning and
Handover of Microgeneration Heat Pump Systems,
 Industry best practice,
 Building Regulations Technical Guidance Document J – Home Heating Appliances,
 The ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition
ET101:2008 and
 The latest draft of B.S. 5449: Forced circulation hot water central heating system for
domestic installation (or equivalent Irish standard) where applicable.
b. The selection of heat pump must be based on the available heat sources, the heat
distribution requirements, the existing heating system and whether cooling is required.
c. The calculation of the heating requirement to be used for the sizing of the heat pump should
be in accordance with IS EN 12831 Heating systems in buildings – method for calculation of
design heat load.
d. The heat pump selected will provide at least 100% of the designed space heating
requirements of the house. Performance data from the manufacturers of the heat pump and
the heat emitter system designer are used to support the heat pump selection. Heat pump
thermal power output for the purposes of this selection shall not include any heat supplied
by a supplementary electric heater
e. For installations where other heat sources are available to the same building, a heat pump
shall be selected such that the combined system will provide at least 100% of the calculated
design space heating requirement. Heat pump thermal power output for the purposes of
this section shall not include any heat supplied by a supplementary electric heater within the
design temperature range. The heat sources shall be fully and correctly integrated into a
single control system.
f. For installations where other heat sources are available to the same building, the Contractor
will provide the Customer with a written statement of what proportion of the building’s
space heating and domestic hot water has been designed to be provided by the heat pump.
The figures shall be based only on the energy supplied by the heat pump and shall not
include any heat supplied by a supplementary electric heater.
g. The heat pumps should be located according to the manufacturer’s instructions. For air
source heat pumps, these will include consideration of factors that may detrimentally affect
the performance of the heat pump system such as recirculation of chilled air.
h. The suitability of a proposed heat pump system installation site, including the location of
ground loops or bore holes, where present, shall be assessed by a qualified professional
experienced in heat pump systems. Contractors shall make their customers aware of all
potential permissions and approvals required. Where required the Contractor shall ensure
that these permissions and approvals have been obtained before work is commenced.
i. Heat pumps should not be located adjacent to sleeping areas or on floors that can transmit
vibration.
j. Anti-vibration pads/mats/mounts and flexible hose connections should be installed
according to the manufacturer’s instructions to reduce the effects of vibration on the
building structure.
k. The location of external fans and heat pump compressors should be chosen to avoid
nuisance to neighbours.
l. Internal fans and ducts should be fitted with sound attenuation devices.
58
BE COP Rev 7.2
m. The design of domestic hot water services should be based on an accurate assessment of the
n.
o.
p.
q.
r.
s.
t.
u.
v.
number and types of points of use and anticipated consumption within the property and be
adjusted for the intended domestic hot water storage temperature and domestic hot water
cylinder recovery rate. The reheat time shall be estimated, and then discussed and agreed
with the customer. The design should be in accordance with EN 8558 Guide to the design,
installation, testing and maintenance of services supplying water for domestic use within
buildings and their curtilages. Complementary guidance to EN 806.
For domestic hot water cylinder heat exchanger specification, installers shall follow the heat
pump manufacturers’ and/or cylinder manufacturers’/suppliers’ recommendations.
Domestic hot water systems shall incorporate a means to prevent bacterial growth
(including Legionella bacteria).
The heat emitter(s) to be installed must be selected on the basis that it will optimise the
performance of the heat pump for the distribution of heat within the house. The heat
emitter chosen must be determined by the specific room heat losses, the heating system
(e.g. radiators, etc.), the heating circuit flow temperature and the desired space heating
temperature. The Heat Emitter Guide for Domestic Heat Pumps (MCS 021) is a useful tool in
the selection of an appropriate heat emitter.
The water distribution system should be arranged for reverse return operation to maximise
efficiency and ease commissioning and future maintenance
Pipework not contributing to the space heating should be insulated to prevent heat loss.
If summer cooling is provided by the heat pump, all water distribution pipework should be
insulated to prevent condensation.
External pipework between the dwelling and the ground heat exchanger should be
insulated.
The installed heat pump system shall be commissioned according to the manufacturer’s
instructions and the design system parameters.
Heat pump unit controls should include, as appropriate the following:
 Control of room air temperature
 Control of water temperature for the distribution system
 Control of outdoor fan operation
 Defrost control of external airside heat exchanger
 Protection for high water temperature
 Protection for high refrigerant pressure
Air-to Water Heat Pumps
 Consideration should be given to the removal of condensate water produced during a
defrost cycle from the outdoor coil. The installation should make provision to deal with this
water transferring it to a suitable drain or soak away thus preventing ice build-up within the
unit or its location during extreme winter conditions.
 Refrigerant pipework connecting split units shall be of refrigerant quality copper tube or
other material, where recommended by the heat pump manufacturer. The tube shall be
insulated with a vapour barrier to prevent ice build-up, adequately supported and protected
against corrosion and accidental damage. Joints on copper tube shall be welded, brazed or
silver soldered.
 The refrigerant circuit shall be pressure tested and vacuum tested before being filled with
refrigerant.
Water-to-Water Heat Pumps
 Care should be taken to ensure that the source water does not result in any damage to the
evaporator.
59
BE COP Rev 7.2
Brine-to-Water Heat Pumps
 Ground excavations shall be undertaken with due regard to the protection of the
environment including the prevention of contaminated rainwater run-off to adjacent
watercourses.
 Shallow ground loops shall be constructed of PE 80, PE 100, PE 100RC, PE-Xa pipe, or a
suitable equivalent, with a minimum rated pressure as per manufacturers recommendations
and minimum life of 50 years.
 Pipe depth and spacing shall be such that the possibility of frost heave is minimised.
 The minimum depth of ground loop at any point should not be less than 0.6 m. The
minimum average depth of the ground loop should not be less than 1.2 m. loops should be
laid at least 1m from foundations, the site boundary and other water supply or drainage
pipes running parallel.
 If the collector crosses a water supply pipe then it should be separated by at least 0.5 m and
insulated 0.5 m each side of the crossing point.
 Multiple pipe runs should be of the same length and hydraulic resistance.
 The specific heat extraction rate for the installed heat exchanger in different ground types is
specified in IS EN 15450:2007 Heating Systems in Buildings - Design of Heat Pump Heating
Systems.
 Brine solutions shall be selected to have environmental minimum impact from anti-freeze
and inhibitor components in the case of accidental leakage.
 Brine concentration should contain sufficient anti-freeze to protect the evaporator from
icing. Too high a concentration of anti-freeze will be detrimental to heat transfer and
pumping efficiency.
Important guidance note for Electrical works associated with the Better Energy Homes
programme
 All electrical works under the Better Energy Homes programme must be in full compliance
with current ETCI rules.

Earthing and Bonding must be in accordance with ETCI 101:2008 Chapter 54 (544
Equipotential bonding conductors) and Annex 63B (Guidelines for certification for alterations
to existing installations).

In order to comply with ETCI rules the following note from ETCI 101:2008 Annex 63B must be
taken into consideration:
As referred to in Annex 63B “Before commencing new work, the installer should assess the
existing installation to ensure that it will not impair the safety of the proposed new work,
and likewise the new work will not impair the safety of the existing installation. Should the
installer become aware of any defect in any part of the installation that would impair the
safety of the new work, the client must be informed in writing thereof. No new work should
commence until these defects have been made good.”
If the earthing/bonding is less than 6mm2 then the heating installer must either
(a) issue an ‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ to notify them that their current
wiring installation is not to current ETCI rules and work cannot commence on the installation
until the wiring has been rectified to current ETCI rules or, (b) the bonding must be rectified
to current ETCI rules by a competent suitably qualified person
Work may commence on a heating system with earthing/bonding of 6mm 2 and above
however:
Heating system with earthing/bonding of less than 10mm2 the heating installer must issue an
‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ to notify them that their current wiring
installation is not to current ETCI rules.


60
BE COP Rev 7.2

Where bonding arrangements are found not to be in accordance with the current ETCI
National Rules then the consumer shall be informed in writing of the situation and advised to
have the electrical installation checked and rectified by a competent person. In such
circumstances the ‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ can be issued to a home
owner when an electrical installation is not to current ETCI regulations. The ‘Electrical safety
notice to the home owner’ can be downloaded from the following link:
http://www.seai.ie/Grants/Better_energy_homes/contractor/Newsletter/Electrical_safety_n
otice_to_the_home_owner.pdf
Additional Guidance
 Domestic Building Services Compliance Guide (Section 9)
 TR30 Guide to Good Practice – Heat Pumps (Building & Engineering Services Association)
 CIBSE Guide A – Environmental Design
 FB59 – Design of Low-Temperature Domestic Heating Systems – a Guide for System
Designers and Installers (BRE Trust)
 Good Practice Guide 339, Domestic Ground Source Heat Pumps, Design and Installation of
Closed-Loop System
61
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.10 Biomass Boilers (with/without thermal storage)
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
The installation of biomass boilers must be carried out by suitably qualified individuals in accordance
with the manufacturer’s guidelines, industry best practice, and the Dept. of Environment,
Community and Local Government (DECLG) and SEAI document entitled "Heating and Domestic
Hot Water Systems for Dwellings - Achieving Compliance with Part L".
In addition to this, they must hold a Level 6 National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an equivalent
Plumbing qualification such as City and Guilds. Plumbers must have completed an electrical module
during their course in order to carry out the ‘minor’ electrical works involved in specific control
measures. All electrical associated works must be carried out in accordance with the ETCI National
Wiring Rules for Electrical Installations (Fourth edition (ET101:2008). If ‘Controlled Works’, as
defined by the Commission for Energy Regulation (CER) document entitled ‘Definition of the Scope
of Controlled Works’ are required, a Completion Certificate must be issued. The issuance of a
Completion Certificate for ‘Controlled works’ can only be carried out by a Registered Electrical
Contractor or an Inspector of one of the two Safety Supervisory Bodies as defined in Section 2.2 in
this CER guidance.
The heating system must be divided into space heating and water heating zones with at least one
more space heating zone added so that there are at least two zones for space heating.
This should incorporate a 24-hour 7-day programmer (installation and standards specifications
outlined in Section 7.7) with/without a remote access and be interlocked with the operation of the
biomass boiler unit or a controls package approved by the manufacturer for the specific biomass
boiler installation.
The installation and standards specifications outlined in Section 7.7 will apply to the installation of
the zoning measures.
In addition to this, a suitably sized pre-insulated hot water cylinder, with an insulant thickness of at
least 80mm, should be installed where the existing cylinder does not meet this requirement.
Product Standard & Specification
Qualifying biomass boilers must be CE marked to demonstrate compliance with The Low Voltage
Directive (72/23/EEC) and The Machinery Directive (98/37/EC).
The boiler must also be listed on the SEAI Home-heating Appliance Register of Performance (HARP)
database, or appropriate equivalent, and have the following minimum gross efficiency:
 With thermal store:
77%
 Without thermal store:
82%
For boilers without automatic ignition, it is recommended that a buffer (or accumulator) tank be
connected to the boiler and the heating system. Where a buffer/accumulator tank is to be installed,
the tank must meet the following requirements:
 Vented copper hot water storage vessels should comply with the heat loss and heat
exchanger requirements of BS 1566-1:2000 ‘Plastics piping systems for soil and waste
discharge (low and high temperature) within the building structure. Chlorinated poly(vinyl
chloride) (PVC-C). Specification for pipes, fittings and the system’ or BS 3198 ‘Specification
for copper hot water storage combination units for domestic purposes’
 Vented cylinders in materials other than copper should comply with the heat loss and heat
exchanger requirements of BS 1566
 Unvented hot water storage system products should:
 comply with IS. EN. 12897 ‘Water supply. Specification for indirectly heated
unvented (closed) storage water heaters’; or
62
BE COP Rev 7.2



be certified by the Irish Agrément Board; or
be certified by another accredited body as complying with Building
Regulations
Unvented systems should not be used with gravity circulation
The guidance in Section 5.3 of the DECLG and SEAI document entitled "Heating and Domestic Hot
Water Systems for Dwellings - Achieving Compliance with Part L" must be adhered to.
The Contractor must discuss both the specification and sizing of the biomass boiler and storage
requirements with the Customer prior to final system selection.
Installation Standard & Specification
a. The Contractor must at all times comply with BS EN 14336:2004 ‘Heating systems in
buildings. Installation and commissioning of water based heating systems’ and the
requirements of the system suppliers’ specifications.
b. A pre-installation survey of the property should be carried out to assess site and location
issues likely to affect installation and fuel storage, fuel delivery considerations and specific
user requirements.
c. The survey should also determine heat demand and use trends. An assessment of the site
and heating requirements is made and recommendations on the required boiler size,
provision for back-up heating, fuel supply and any other relevant issues are made.
d. The calculation of the heating requirement to be used for the sizing of the biomass boiler
should be in compliance with IS EN 12831 ‘Heating systems in buildings. Method for
calculation of the design heat load or equivalent’.
e. The Contractor will discuss the implications of the fuel storage requirements and the
available storage space and its impact on the cost-effectiveness of the system.
f. The biomass boiler should not be installed inside the house or outdoors. It should be
installed in a suitable boiler room that conforms to local and national Building Regulations.
The outbuilding/boiler room should have the required boiler and hopper clearances to allow
the boiler installation, access for loading, cleaning and servicing as per manufacturer’s
instructions.
g. The Contractor will ensure that there is sufficient permanent ventilation to the boiler room.
Where the manufacturer has not specified the minimum area for the required ventilation
opening, a permanent air vent of at least 550mm2 per kW of boiler output will be provided as
per TGD Part J of the Building Regulations.
h. The Contractor shall ensure that the required electricity supply is available for the plant in
the boiler room.
i. The Contractor will ensure there is adequate water supply and that the boiler is plumbed
according to all relevant regulations and as per the manufacturer’s instructions. Provision
must also be made to ensure the safe and effective disposal of condensate from the boiler.
j. Where the boiler is fed directly from a bulk storage unit, the storage unit should be in
accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines. Where the fuel is not supplied directly, the
fuel storage facility to be provided should be in accordance with the fuel supplier’s guidance.
k. The existing central heating system should be thoroughly cleaned and flushed out before
installing a new boiler.
l. All components shall be installed in such a way that allows for maintenance,
repair/replacement and insulation. Where components or joints are inaccessible, they shall
be permanent. Permanent components and joints shall be maintenance free and have a
durability that corresponds to the lifetime of the components in which they are installed.
m. An exhaust flue should be twin-walled insulated stainless steel. The inner wall should be
grade 316 and the outer wall should be 306 or better. The flue should be certified as suitable
for use with wood fuels and it should be the diameter specified by the boiler manufacturer.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
n. Any pipework that is exposed as part of the work or is otherwise accessible should be
insulated as recommended in Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings Achieving Compliance with Part L. A lesser standard is only acceptable where practical
constraints dictate.
o. Biomass boilers must be commissioned to verify that the system has been installed in
accordance with IS EN 12828 ‘Heating systems in buildings. Design for water-based heating
systems’, BS EN 14336 ‘Heating systems in buildings. Installation and commissioning of
water based heating systems’ and manufacturer’s guidelines.
p. Commissioning should include:
 Testing for leakage to ensure the system is water tight;
 Pressure testing to a pressure 30% greater than the working pressure or as per
manufacturers instruction;
 The system shall be cleaned and/or flushed;
 The system shall be filled with suitable water and vented;
 A check that any equipment susceptible to frost damage has been protected;
 All components of the system shall be checked for correct operation;
 Water flow rates shall be balanced to meet the requirements of the design;
 All controls shall be adjusted in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and
the design specification.
q. All written information on the operation, maintenance and use of the system shall be
provided to the Customer, including the manufacturer’s instructions. The Contractor shall
also instruct the Customer in the safe and efficient operation, maintenance and use of the
biomass heating system.
r. The Contractor shall provide the Customer with the records of all functional, pressure and
environmental tests carried out and a balancing report.
Buffer/Accumulator Tanks




The Contractor shall ensure that the buffer/accumulator tank is sized correctly as per
manufacturer’s recommendations. It is recommended that there should be at least 15 litres
of storage for every kilowatt of output from the boiler. Where it is not possible to install a
tank of sufficient size, the Customer should be made aware of this and of the implications of
a smaller tank.
A temperature sensor shall be fitted to the top and the bottom of the buffer/accumulator
tank.
If two or more buffer/accumulator tanks are to be used, they should be connected in series
with the outlet from the bottom of the first tank connected to the inlet at the top of the next
tank and so on.
The Contractor shall ensure that the buffer/accumulator tank is insulated sufficiently. Where
the tank is not pre-insulated, it should be insulated to a minimum of 80 mm in thickness.
Important guidance note for Electrical works associated with the Better Energy Homes
programme
 All electrical works under the Better Energy Homes programme must be in full compliance
with current ETCI rules.
 Earthing and Bonding must be in accordance with ETCI 101:2008 Chapter 54 (544
Equipotential bonding conductors) and Annex 63B (Guidelines for certification for alterations
to existing installations).
 In order to comply with ETCI rules the following note from ETCI 101:2008 Annex 63B must be
taken into consideration:
As referred to in Annex 63B “Before commencing new work, the installer should assess the
existing installation to ensure that it will not impair the safety of the proposed new work,
and likewise the new work will not impair the safety of the existing installation. Should the
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BE COP Rev 7.2



installer become aware of any defect in any part of the installation that would impair the
safety of the new work, the client must be informed in writing thereof. No new work should
commence until these defects have been made good.”
If the earthing/bonding is less than 6mm2 then the heating installer must either
(a) issue an ‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ to notify them that their current
wiring installation is not to current ETCI rules and work cannot commence on the installation
until the wiring has been rectified to current ETCI rules or, (b) the bonding must be rectified
to current ETCI rules by a competent suitably qualified person
Work may commence on a heating system with earthing/bonding of 6mm2 and above
however:
Heating system with earthing/bonding of less than 10mm2 the heating installer must issue an
‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ to notify them that their current wiring
installation is not to current ETCI rules.
Where bonding arrangements are found not to be in accordance with the current ETCI
National Rules then the consumer shall be informed in writing of the situation and advised to
have the electrical installation checked and rectified by a competent person. In such
circumstances the ‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ can be issued to a home
owner when an electrical installation is not to current ETCI regulations. The ‘Electrical safety
notice to the home owner’ can be downloaded from the following link:
http://www.seai.ie/Grants/Better_energy_homes/contractor/Newsletter/Electrical_safety_n
otice_to_the_home_owner.pdf
Additional Guidance


65
Microgeneration Installation Standard: MIS 3004 Requirements for Contractors Undertaking
the Supply, Design, Installation, Set to Work, Commissioning and Handover of Solid Biofuel
Heating Systems
TR38 Guide to Good Practice – Installation of Biofuel Heating (Heating & Ventilation
Contractors’ Association)
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.11 Solar Water Heating
BEH
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
The installation of solar water heating system must be carried out by suitably qualified individuals in
accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum. To be
registered, the contractor and / or his nominated personnel who will undertake the works must hold
a Level 6 FETAC Certificate in Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems or an equivalent qualification and
must have achieved certification from an SEAI accredited solar training course.
Product Standard & Specification
Qualifying solar water heating systems must be listed on the SEAI/Greener Homes Programme
Registered Product List - Phase lll or equivalent.
The solar thermal installation must contribute a portion of renewable energy for domestic hot water
heating as detailed in the table below:
Floor Area of dwelling (as defined in
the DEAP methodology)
Solar Renewable Energy contribution Per Year
0-170m2
10 kWh/metre squared Calculated by Qs/floor area
171 – 200m2
201-250m2
250+m2
At least 1,700 solar hot water input Qs (kWh/year)*
At least 1,850 solar hot water input Qs (kWh/year)*
At least 2,000 solar hot water input Qs (kWh/year)*
*Qs (kWh/year) Annual Solar Energy of the proposed collectors. This is based on the formula for
Solar Energy available in Appendix H of the DEAP manual.
Solar Fraction is the Annual Solar Energy (Qs) as a percentage of the total heat required for
Domestic Hot Water (DHW) and can be calculated using the formula below.
Solar Fraction = Annual solar energy (Qs)
Total heat required for DHW
x
100
An Excel version of the calculator is available in the Better Energy Homes contractor section of the
SEAI website www.seai.ie
Solar Fraction is recommended under best practice not to exceed 60% except when the system is
also used for solar space heating. Where the system is only used for hot water the acceptable
method of calculating the energy yield per solar system is as per Appendix H: Solar water heating in
the DEAP Manual. Where the solar panel is installed to contribute to the space heating requirements
the acceptable method of calculating the energy contribution is as per Appendix Q: Special features
and specific data.
The contractor must discuss both the specification and the appropriate sizing (including hot water
storage) of the solar water heating system with the Customer prior to final system selection. Size of
home, levels of occupancy and payback periods etc. should be discussed. A review of the renewable
energy contribution for the proposed system should also be undertaken with a BER assessor before
the system is purchased/installed.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
Installation Standard & Specification
Qualifying solar water heating systems must be fitted in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines,
Industry Best Practice as set out in NSAI document ‘Irish guidelines (SR 50-2:2010 Code of practice
for building services - Part 2: Solar panels, Building Regulations Technical Guidance Documents and
the ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008 where
applicable.
A Standard Solar Commissioning Report (SCR), available on the SEAI website, must be completed
and a copy provided to each homeowner. The Contractor must keep a copy for his/her own records.
SEAI recommends that a solar water heating system should have ‘TMV2’ type temperature
mixing/blending valve(s) installed on the hot water system to prevent the likelihood of an occupant
being scalded due to excess water temperatures (particularly in the case of elderly, infirmed or
young users). SEAI requires that contractors discuss this matter fully with homeowners and that the
homeowner is properly advised on the option, which will best meets their household needs, as part
of the specification process ahead of installation commencement. Further guidance is available in
the Better Energy Homes Contractors section www.seai.ie
All solar water heating works under the Better Energy Homes programme must be in full compliance
with the published Technical Specification.
Water services should be operated at temperatures that prevent Legionella growth. Hot water
storage cylinders (calorifiers) should store water at 60°C or higher. Hot water should be distributed
at 50°C or higher. Consideration is needed to ensure that hot water draw offs have temperature
mixing/blending valve(s) to prevent scalded.
The recommended maximum mixed hot water temperatures for safe use for the most common
installations are listed in Table 1.
Table 1:
44°C
41°C
38°C
Maximum mixed hot water temperatures for safe use
For bath fill (46°C for assisted bathing)
For shower applications.
For bidet applications
SEAI recommends that a solar water heating system should have ‘TMV2’ type temperature
mixing/blending valve(s) installed on the hot water system to prevent the likelihood of an occupant
being scalded due to excess water temperatures (particularly in the case of elderly, infirmed or
young users).
A ‘TMV2’ type temperature mixing/blending valve is for use in domestic situations. ‘TMV2’ approval
certifies that the valves conform to the performance requirements of BS EN 1111 and BS EN 1287.
SEAI requires that contractors discuss this matter fully with homeowners and that the homeowner is
properly advised on the option, which will best meets their household needs, as part of the
specification process ahead of installation commencement.
Note: A mixer tap is not deemed to be TMV2 type valves
If ‘TMV2’ type blending/mixing valves are not installed, the homeowner must be issued with a ‘Solar
water heating safety notice to the home owner’ informing the householder of the risks associated
with not installing a ‘TMV2’ mixing/blending hot water valve(s). This document must be signed (in
duplicate) by the installer and homeowner with a copy supplied to the home owner and a copy
retained by installer. The document can be downloaded at the following link
http://www.seai.ie/Grants/Better_energy_homes/contractor/Newsletter/Solar_Water_Heating_Safe
ty_Notice.pdf
The ‘Solar water heating safety notice to the home owner’ shall be retained with any documents
supplied with the solar water heating installation i.e. operation manuals for both SEAI inspection
and future maintenance purposes.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
Failure to comply fully with the requirements set out above may lead to sanctions up to and
including deregistration.
Important guidance note for Electrical works associated with the Better Energy Homes
programme
 All electrical works under the Better Energy Homes programme must be in full compliance
with current ETCI rules.
 Earthing and Bonding must be in accordance with ETCI 101:2008 Chapter 54 (544
Equipotential bonding conductors) and Annex 63B (Guidelines for certification for alterations
to existing installations).
 In order to comply with ETCI rules the following note from ETCI 101:2008 Annex 63B must be
taken into consideration:
As referred to in Annex 63B “Before commencing new work, the installer should assess the
existing installation to ensure that it will not impair the safety of the proposed new work,
and likewise the new work will not impair the safety of the existing installation. Should the
installer become aware of any defect in any part of the installation that would impair the
safety of the new work, the client must be informed in writing thereof. No new work should
commence until these defects have been made good.”
 If the earthing/bonding is less than 6mm2 then the heating installer must either
(a) issue an ‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ to notify them that their current
wiring installation is not to current ETCI rules and work cannot commence on the installation
until the wiring has been rectified to current ETCI rules or, (b) the bonding must be rectified
to current ETCI rules by a competent suitably qualified person
 Work may commence on a heating system with earthing/bonding of 6mm2 and above
however:
Heating system with earthing/bonding of less than 10mm2 the heating installer must issue an
‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ to notify them that their current wiring
installation is not to current ETCI rules.
 Where bonding arrangements are found not to be in accordance with the current ETCI
National Rules then the consumer shall be informed in writing of the situation and advised to
have the electrical installation checked and rectified by a competent person. In such
circumstances the ‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ can be issued to a home
owner when an electrical installation is not to current ETCI regulations. The ‘Electrical safety
notice to the home owner’ can be downloaded from the following link:
http://www.seai.ie/Grants/Better_energy_homes/contractor/Newsletter/Electrical_safety_n
otice_to_the_home_owner.pdf
Additional Installation Guidance
The installation of solar water heating systems should also follow the guidance outlined in the
following Energy Savings Trust and Good Practice Guide Publications:
 Solar Heating Design and Installation Guide – CIBSE Guide
 Renewable Energy Procurement Guidelines for Solar Thermal Systems – SEAI
Warranty
Each homeowner must be supplied with a warranty (product and labour) of at least 5 years.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
7.12 Draught Proofing
WHS
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Draught proofing contractors must be competent to complete the installation and must agree to
complete the work as set out in the guidance document entitled BS 7386:1997 Specification for
draught strips for the draught control of existing doors and windows in housing. Draught proofing
shall be installed in accordance with Best Practice Guides/ Technical Guides supplied by the material
manufacturer. Where a product is covered by an NSAI Agrément Certificate it must be installed in
accordance with this certificate and by such qualified people as specified.
Product Standards & Specification
Materials to be used for draught proofing must be manufactured to a relevant Irish, British or
European Standard.
Draught proofing of windows and doors shall be installed as per manufactures instruction and shall
be installed as per draught strip class relating to nominal and maximum compression of the strips.
Other NSAI Agrément-certified products may also be used. It is the responsibility of the Contractor
to ensure that the optimum solution for each Customer is achieved, within the cost constraints and
preference of each Customer.
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The draught proofing must be suitable for use so that it does not
compromise the property’s ability to resist internal fire spread within the internal linings and
internal fire spread within the structure and external fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part C): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
insulation should not affect the property’s ability to resist weather and ground moisture.
 Building Regulations (Part D): When installed as per the system supplier’s guidelines, the
insulation should meet the Building Regulations requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part F): The draught proofing should also be suitable for use on a property
and meet the ventilation requirements.
 Building Regulations (Part J): Correct installation of the system should also satisfy the Building
Regulations such that the installation does not increase the risk of the property catching fire
through the use of a heat producing appliance.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The draught proofing shall conserve energy in keeping with the
Building Regulations.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer on any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works. (See section 5)
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. Draught proofing should be carried out using materials that are approved by an Irish, British
or European Standard for draught proofing and installed in accordance with the relevant
Irish, British or European Standards, where available.
b. Manufacturer’s instructions should be followed. The following are intended to be helpful
guidelines.
c. Where carrier based products are used, initial compression of the draught strip is listed in
the table below. The recommended gap sizes given by the manufacturers assume this
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BE COP Rev 7.2
compression on fitting and take into account the need to avoid fixing positions too close to
the edge of timber sections.
Draught strip Class
1
2
3
Nominal
(mm)
Compression Maximum Compression
(mm)
3.0
1.5
1.5
6.0
3.0
3.0
d. Draught-strips shall be fixed utilising all available fixing holes and if necessary, additional
fixing holes shall be made in line with the existing fixing holes to ensure that the draught
strip is firmly fixed at a maximum of 25mm from each end of the carrier.
e. Corners should be butt, mitered or notch cut as appropriate with a maximum gap of 1mm at
the corners to ensure a good seal at the join.
f. All fixings shall be fully driven home perpendicular to the structure being draught-proofed.
g. It is recommended that draught proofing should not be applied to windows/doors in a
dwelling with a fixed heating device or gas cooking appliance that doesn’t have the correct
permanent ventilation provisions as detailed in TGD Part J of the Building Regulations.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
7.13 Window Replacement
BEP
Contractor Competency
Contractors installing windows must be competent to complete the installation and must agree to
complete the work in accordance with British Standard document entitled Code of practice for the
survey and installation of windows and external doorsets (BS 8213-4:2007) and the manufacturer’s
guidelines as a minimum requirement.
Product Standards & Specification
All window units and glazing to be installed must meet the requirements of the Construction
Products Directive (Council Directive 89/106/EEC).
All window units to be installed must carry the CE marking and must conform to the requirements of
EN 14351-1:2006 (Windows and doors - Product standard, performance characteristics). The glazing
must conform to EN 1279-1 (Glass in building. Insulating glass units. Generalities, dimensional
tolerances and rules for the system description) and EN 1279-2 (Glass in building. Insulating glass units.
Long term test method and requirements for moisture penetration)
The objective is to put in place materials that will achieve a level of performance in the home that is
in excess of the required standard of the most recent update of Part L of the Building Regulations.
Thus, the objective for replacement windows is to, in as much as is physically and economically
feasible, achieve a U-value of 1.4 W/m2k.
The stated U-value of the units must be certified by an appropriate independent body, e.g. NSAI
Window Energy Performance (WEP) certification, British Fenestration Rating Council, and have
been calculated according to either IS EN ISO 12567 or IS EN ISO 10077 (Parts 1 and 2).
This economic feasibility refers only to the economic performance of the installation itself. For
example, where in exceptional circumstances a home may require significant additional
modifications when compared to a normal case, making the initial investment in the window
installation solution inappropriate compared to the benefit the homeowner will get out of the
investment. Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the ability of the homeowner to fund
their portion of the capital cost for a conventional installation.
Building Regulations
The installed windows must comply with TGD Part B of the Building Regulations relating to the use
of windows as an alternative means of escape or for rescue purposes.
The installed windows must comply with TGD Part K of the Building Regulations (Part K) relating to
the guarding of windows.
The installed windows must also meet the TGD part D of the Building Regulations requirements for
materials and workmanship.
The installed windows must comply with TGD Part F of the Building Regulations for the purposes of
providing a means of rapid ventilation of the habitable rooms. Correct installation will also satisfy
the Building Regulations (Part J) on the maintenance of an adequate air supply for the efficient
working of gas-burning appliances, in particular, after installation work.
The windows units shall conserve energy in keeping with TGD Part L of the Building Regulations in
as far as is practicably possible.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
The installed windows must also meet the TGD Part M of the Building Regulations requirements for
adequate provision of access to the building.
There are certain works that may change the external character of a conventional property, not on
the RPS, to such an extent that approval may need to be sought from the Local Authority. An
alteration to windows may require permission from the relevant Local Authorities.
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. All glazing should conform to the recommendations given in the relevant part of BS 6262
and in BS 8000-7. In addition, any glass or insulating glass unit manufacturer’s
instructions should be followed.
b. A survey of the walls must be carried out prior to the installation by a competent surveyor
on behalf of the approved Contractor. A complete survey will ascertain the condition of
the structural opening into which the window will be installed, the suitability of the
window and any other issues affecting the installation of the window.
c. Any structural defects recorded in the survey, which may affect the performance of the
window when installed, should be notified to, and rectified by, the Customer with or
without the involvement of the Contractor before installation work commences.
d. The existing windows must be removed with care to avoid unnecessary damage to the
building structure and its finishings and without permitting any subsidence of the
superstructure during or after the installation procedure. Reasonable care should be
taken to keep damage to the reveals to a minimum.
e. The number, location and quantity of frame fixings to be used in the installation of the
replacement windows and/or doors shall be appropriate for the material from which the
window frame has been manufactured.
f. Where lugs are used externally, they should be secured to the walls using suitable security
screws.
g. Finishing trims should be compatible with the material of the frame and external trims
should be suitable for exterior use.
h. The area of openings should not be reduced below that required for the provision of
adequate daylight as per BS 8206-2:2008.
i. The replacement windows and/or doors should be positioned to minimise the amount of
making good and without any twist, racking or distortion of the frame.
j. The frame should be positioned within the structural opening so that it:
 bridges the DPM/radon barrier. Any damage to the DPM/radon barrier should
be repaired before installation.
 is as far back in the reveal as is feasible to reduce exposure and facilitate the
required level of weather performance.
 allows sufficient space for expansion of the window set.
k. Open cavities between the inner and outer leaf of a cavity wall should be closed with an
insulating material. Care should be taken to maintain the integrity if the DPM/ radon
barrier and adequate purchase for fixings should be ensured.
l. Installation packers should be used adjacent to fixing positions to prevent outer frame
distortion during installation. Installation packers should be resistant to compression, rot
and corrosion. They should span the full depth of the outer frame.
m. Upon completion of the installation of the windows and/or doors, the structure around
the window is made good. This may involve some or all of the following:
 Debris or contaminants should be removed and any drainage paths should be
cleared.
 Internal reveals should be made good, as agreed with the Customer, ready for
the Customer to redecorate if necessary.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
 Any materials such as trims or sealant should not be applied on top of loose
n.
o.
p.
material.
 Protective tapes should be removed as soon as practicable, as ageing of tapes
can cause difficulties in removal. Refer to the manufacturer’s guidance.
 Sand and cement should not be used to fill the gap between the outer frame
and the substrate except for backfill for steel windows, nowadays usually
limited to windows in stone surrounds or interior fair-faced brick and concrete.
 Where the replacement window has a smaller front to back dimension than
the original, then there might be mastic and/or paint line visible on the
substrate which should be removed as much as practicable or covered with a
trim.
 The method of, and responsibility for, repair to any render should be as agreed
with the Customer.
After installation a final inspection should be carried out, preferably accompanied by the
Customer, to ensure that the installation is fully in accordance with the surveyor’s and
manufacturer’s instructions.
It is essential that the Customer is made aware of the method(s) of operation, locking and
unlocking and fire egress. This should be accompanied by written operating and
maintenance instructions.
The home owner/occupier shall be supplied with a written specification of the windows
detailing the U-Value of the unit/s. The home owner shall be advised that this material
should be retained if an inspection of the installation is required. The specification of the
units shall be retained by the installer for audit purposes.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
7.14 External Door Replacement
BEP
Contractor Competency
Contractors carrying out the installation of doors must be competent to complete the installation
and must agree to complete the work in accordance with British Standard document entitled Code
of practice for the survey and installation of windows and external doorsets (BS 8213-4:2007) and the
manufacturer’s guidelines as a minimum requirement.
Product Standards & Specification
All door sets to be installed must meet the requirements of the Construction Products Directive
(Council Directive 89/106/EEC).
All door sets to be installed must carry the CE marking and must conform to the requirements of EN
14351-1:2006 (Windows and doors - Product standard, performance characteristics).
All single-leaf door sets to be installed must have been tested to and passed PAS 23-1:1999 (General
performance requirements for door assemblies – Part 1: Single leaf, external door assemblies to
dwellings) and PAS 24-1:1999 (Enhanced security performance requirements for door assemblies Part 1: Single leaf, external door assemblies to dwellings).
The objective is to put in place materials that will achieve a level of performance in the home that is
in excess of the required standard of the most recent update of Part L of the Building Regulations.
Thus, the objective for replacement doors is to, in as much as is physically and economically feasible,
achieve a U-value of 1.4 W/m2k.
The stated U-value of the door sets must be certified by an appropriate independent body and have
been calculated according to either IS EN ISO 12567 or IS EN ISO 10077 (Parts 1 and 2).
This economic feasibility refers only to the economic performance of the installation itself. For
example, where in exceptional circumstances a home may require significant additional
modifications when compared to a normal case, making the initial investment in the installation of
external doors a solution inappropriate compared to the benefit the homeowner will get out of the
investment. Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the ability of the homeowner to fund
their portion of the capital cost for a conventional installation.
Building Regulations
The installed door sets must comply with TGD Part B of the Building Regulations relating to the use
of windows as an alternative means of escape or for rescue purposes.
The installed door sets must also meet the TGD Part D of the Building Regulations requirements for
materials and workmanship
The installed door sets must comply with TGD Part F of the Building Regulations for the purposes of
providing a means of rapid ventilation of the habitable rooms.
Correct installation will also satisfy the TGD Part J of the Building Regulations on the maintenance of
an adequate air supply for the efficient working of gas-burning appliances, in particular, after
installation work.
The door sets shall conserve energy in keeping with TGD Part L of the Building Regulations in as far
as is practicably possible.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
The installed door sets must also meet the TGD Part M of the Building Regulations requirements for
adequate provision of access to the building.
There are certain works that may change the external character of a conventional property, not on
the RPS, to such an extent that approval may need to be sought from the Local Authority. An
alteration to doors may require permission from the relevant Local Authorities.
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. All glazing should conform to the recommendations given in the relevant part of BS 6262
and in BS 8000-7. In addition, any glass or insulating glass unit manufacturer’s
instructions should be followed.
b. A survey of the walls must be carried out prior to the installation by a competent surveyor
on behalf of the approved Contractor. A complete survey will ascertain the condition of
the structural opening into which the door will be installed, the suitability of the door and
any other issues affecting the installation of the door.
c. Any structural defects recorded in the survey, which may affect the performance of the
door when installed, should be notified to, and rectified by, the Customer with or without
the involvement of the Contractor before installation work commences.
d. The existing door(s) must be removed with care to avoid unnecessary damage to the
building structure and its finishings and without permitting any subsidence of the
superstructure during or after the installation procedure. Reasonable care should be
taken to keep damage to the reveals to a minimum.
e. The number, location and quantity of frame fixings to be used in the installation of the
replacement door(s) shall be appropriate for the material from which the door frame has
been manufactured.
f. Where lugs are used externally, they should be secured to the walls using suitable security
screws.
g. Finishing trims should be compatible with the material of the frame and external trims
should be suitable for exterior use.
h. The area of openings should not be reduced below that required for the provision of
adequate daylight as per BS 8206-2:2008.
i. The replacement doors should be positioned to minimise the amount of making good
and without any twist, racking or distortion of the frame.
j. The frame should be positioned within the structural opening so that it:
 bridges the DPM/radon barrier. Any damage to the DPM/radon barrier should
be repaired before installation.
 is as far back in the reveal as is feasible to reduce exposure and facilitate the
required level of weather performance.
 allows sufficient space for expansion of the door set.
k. Open cavities between the inner and outer leaf of a cavity wall should be closed with an
insulating material. Care should be taken to maintain the integrity if the DPM/radon
barrier and adequate purchase for fixings should be ensured.
l. Installation packers should be used adjacent to fixing positions to prevent outer frame
distortion during installation. Installation packers should be resistant to compression, rot
and corrosion. They should span the full depth of the outer frame.
m. Upon completion of the installation of the doors, the structure around the door is made
good. This may involve some or all of the following:
 Debris or contaminants should be removed and any drainage paths should be
cleared.
 Internal reveals should be made good as agreed, ready for the Customer to
redecorate if necessary.
75
BE COP Rev 7.2
 Any materials such as trims or sealant should not be applied on top of loose
n.
o.
p.
material.
 Protective tapes should be removed as soon as practicable, as ageing of tapes
can cause difficulties in removal. Refer to the manufacturer’s guidance.
 Sand and cement should not be used to fill the gap between the outer frame
and the substrate except for backfill for steel doors, nowadays usually limited
to doors in stone surrounds or interior fair-faced brick and concrete.
 Where the replacement door has a smaller front to back dimension than the
original, then there might be mastic and/or paint line visible on the substrate
which should be removed as much as practicable or covered with a trim.
 The method of, and responsibility for, repair to any render should be as agreed
with the Customer.
After installation a final inspection should be carried out, preferably accompanied by the
Customer, to ensure that the installation is fully in accordance with the surveyor’s and
manufacturer’s instructions.
It is essential that the Customer is made aware of the method(s) of operation, locking and
unlocking and fire egress. This should be accompanied by written operating and
maintenance instructions.
The home owner/occupier shall be supplied with a written specification of the external
doors detailing the U-Value of the unit/s. The home owner shall be advised that this
material should be retained if an inspection of the installation is required. The
specification of the units shall be retained by the installer for audit purposes.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works.
76
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.15 Window Glazing Envelope Replacement
BEP
Contractor Competency
Contractors installing window glazing envelopes must be competent to complete the installation
and must agree to complete the work in accordance with British Standard document entitled Code
of practice for the survey and installation of windows and external doorsets (BS 8213-4:2007) and the
manufacturer’s guidelines as a minimum requirement.
Contractors carrying out the installation of glazing within existing frames must be competent to
complete the installation and must agree to complete the work in accordance with British Standard
document entitled Workmanship on building sites – Code of practice for glazing (BS 8000-7:1990).
In all cases the manufacturer’s instructions should be followed. Insulating glass units, setting and
location blocks (see Figure 5 of BS 8213-4:2007), distance pieces, frame to glass and bead to glass
gaskets, bead to frame airseals, corner sealing blocks, beads and bead end caps, bedding and
capping sealants should be installed in accordance with BS 8000-7.
Product Standards & Specification
All glazing to be installed must meet the requirements of the Construction Products Directive
(Council Directive 89/106/EEC).
The glazing must conform to EN 1279-1 (Glass in building. Insulating glass units. Generalities,
dimensional tolerances and rules for the system description) and EN 1279-2 (Glass in building.
Insulating glass units. Long term test method and requirements for moisture penetration). All
glazing should conform to the recommendations given in the relevant part of BS 6262 and in BS
8000-7.
The objective is to put in place materials that will achieve a level of performance in the home that is
in line with the required standard of the most recent update of Part L of the Building Regulations.
Thus, the objective for replacement window envelopes is to, in as much as is physically and
economically feasible; achieve a U-value for the glazing of envelopes of 2.1 W/m2k.
All U-values of the glazing envelopes shall be calculated according to either EN standards 410 and
673/12898.
This economic feasibility refers only to the economic performance of the installation itself. For
example, where in exceptional circumstances a home may require significant additional
modifications when compared to a normal case, making the initial investment in the glazing
replacement installation solution inappropriate compared to the benefit the homeowner will get out
of the investment. Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the ability of the homeowner to
fund their portion of the capital cost for a conventional installation.
Building Regulations
The installed windows must comply with TGD Part B of the Building Regulations relating to the use
of windows as an alternative means of escape or for rescue purposes.
The installed windows must comply with TGD Part K of the Building Regulations (Part K) relating to
the guarding of windows.
The installed glazing must also meet the TGD Part D of the Building Regulations requirements for
materials and workmanship
The installed glazing must comply with TGD Part F of the Building Regulations for the purposes of
providing a means of rapid ventilation of the habitable rooms.
77
BE COP Rev 7.2
Correct installation will also satisfy the TGD Part J of the Building Regulations on the maintenance of
an adequate air supply for the efficient working of gas-burning appliances, in particular, after
installation work.
The glazing units shall conserve energy in keeping with TGD Part L of the Building Regulations in as
far as is practicably possible.
The installed glazing must also meet TGD Part M of the Building Regulations requirements for
adequate provision of access to the building.
There are certain works that may change the external character of a conventional property, not on
the RPS, to such an extent that approval may need to be sought from the Local Authority. An
alteration to windows may require permission from the relevant Local Authorities.
Installation Standards & Specifications
q. All glazing should conform to the recommendations given in the relevant part of BS 6262
and in BS 8000-7. In addition, any glass or insulating glass unit manufacturer’s
instructions should be followed.
r. A survey of the walls must be carried out prior to the installation by a competent surveyor
on behalf of the approved Contractor. A complete survey will ascertain the condition of
the structural opening into which the glazing will be installed, the suitability of the
glazing and any other issues affecting the installation of the glazing.
s. Any structural defects recorded in the survey, which may affect the performance of the
glazing when installed, should be notified to, and rectified by, the Customer with or
without the involvement of the Contractor before installation work commences.
t. The existing glazing must be removed with care to avoid unnecessary damage to the
building structure and its finishing and without permitting any subsidence of the
superstructure during or after the installation procedure. Reasonable care should be
taken to keep damage to the reveals to a minimum.
u. Finishing trims should be compatible with the material of the frame and external trims
should be suitable for exterior use.
v. The area of openings should not be reduced below that required for the provision of
adequate daylight as per BS 8206-2:2008.
w. The replacement glazing should be positioned to minimise the amount of making good
and without any twist, racking or distortion of the frame.
x. Care should be taken to maintain the integrity if the DPM/ radon barrier and adequate
purchase for fixings should be ensured.
y. Upon completion of the installation of the replacement glazing, the area around the
window is made good. This may involve some or all of the following checks s to the
installation:
 Debris or contaminants should be removed and any drainage paths should be
cleared.
 The sealed units should be free from scratches and signs of failure
 All obscure and coated glasses shall be oriented properly
 The glazing shall be held properly by beads/gaskets, etc.
 Safety glass shall be installed where necessary
 All joints should be smooth and correctly formed
 The sealant shall be continuous around the frame
 Any materials such as trims or sealant should not be applied on top of loose
material.
 The replacement frame position and joint construction must be as per
manufactures guidelines
78
BE COP Rev 7.2
 The method of, and responsibility for, repair to any render should be as agreed
with the Customer.
After installation a final inspection should be carried out, preferably accompanied by the
Customer, to ensure that the installation is fully in accordance with the surveyor’s and
manufacturer’s instructions.
aa. It is essential that the Customer is made aware of the method(s) of operation and
maintenance of the glazing units. This should be accompanied by written operating and
maintenance instructions.
bb. The home owner/occupier shall be supplied with a written specification of the window
envelopes detailing the U-Value of the units. The home owner shall be advised that this
material should be retained if an inspection of the installation is required. The
specification of the units shall be retained by the installer for audit purposes.
z.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works.
79
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.16 Window Glazing Low E-Film
BEP
Contractor Competency
Contractors installing window glazing low e-film must be competent to complete the installation
and must agree to complete the work in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines.
Contractors carrying out the installation must be trained and registered by the manufacture. In all
cases the manufacturer’s instructions should be followed.
Product Standards & Specification
All glazing to be installed must meet the requirements of the Construction Products Directive
(Council Directive 89/106/EEC).
The objective is to put in place materials that will achieve a level of performance in the home that is
in line with the required standard of the most recent update of Part L of the Building Regulations.
Thus, the objective for window glazing low e-film is to, in as much as is physically and economically
feasible; achieve a U-value for the glazing of envelopes of 2.4 W/m2k for double glazing envelope
and 3.5 W/m²K for single glazing envelope.
All U-values for window glazing low e-film shall be calculated according to EN standards 410 ‘Glass
in building. Determination of luminous and solar characteristics of glazing’ and 673 ‘Glass in building.
Determination of thermal transmittance (U value) Calculation method before the installation of the
film’.
This economic feasibility refers only to the economic performance of the installation itself. For
example, where in exceptional circumstances a home may require significant additional
modifications when compared to a normal case, making the initial investment in the glazing
replacement installation solution inappropriate compared to the benefit the homeowner will get out
of the investment. Economic feasibility in this case does not refer to the ability of the homeowner to
fund their portion of the capital cost for a conventional installation.
Building Regulations
The installed window glazing low e-film must comply with TGD Part B of the Building Regulations
relating to the use of windows as an alternative means of escape or for rescue purposes.
The installed window glazing low e-film must comply with TGD Part K of the Building Regulations
(Part K) relating to the guarding of windows.
The installed window glazing low e-film must also meet the TGD Part D of the Building Regulations
requirements for materials and workmanship
The installed window glazing low e-film must comply with TGD Part F of the Building Regulations
for the purposes of providing a means of rapid ventilation of the habitable rooms.
Correct installation will also satisfy the TGD Part J of the Building Regulations on the maintenance of
an adequate air supply for the efficient working of gas-burning appliances, in particular, after
installation work.
The window glazing low e-film shall conserve energy in keeping with TGD Part L of the Building
Regulations in as far as is practicably possible.
The installed window glazing low e-film must also meet TGD Part M of the Building Regulations
requirements for adequate provision of access to the building.
80
BE COP Rev 7.2
There are certain works that may change the external character of a conventional property, not on
the RPS, to such an extent that approval may need to be sought from the Local Authority. An
alteration to windows may require permission from the relevant Local Authorities.
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. All window glazing low e-film should conform to the recommendations given in the
manufacturer’s instructions and should be followed.
b. A complete survey will ascertain the condition of the windows into which the window
glazing low e-film will be installed, the suitability of the glazing and any other issues
affecting the installation of the glazing.
c. Any structural defects recorded in the survey, which may affect the performance of the
window glazing low e-film when installed, should be notified to, and rectified by, the
Customer with or without the involvement of the Contractor before installation work
commences.
d. The area of openings should not be reduced below that required for the provision of
adequate daylight as per BS 8206-2:2008 ‘Lighting for buildings. Code of practice for
daylighting’.
e. Upon completion of the installation of the window glazing low e-film. This may involve
some or all of the following checks s to the installation:
 Debris or contaminants should be removed and any drainage paths should be
cleared.
 The window glazing low e-film should be free from scratches and signs of
failure
 All obscure and coated glasses shall be oriented properly
 Safety glass shall be installed where necessary
 The method of, and responsibility for, repair to any render should be as agreed
with the Customer.
f. After installation a final inspection should be carried out, preferably accompanied by the
Customer, to ensure that the installation is fully in accordance with the surveyor’s and
manufacturer’s instructions.
g. It is essential that the Customer is made aware of the method(s) of operation and
maintenance of the window glazing low e-film. This should be accompanied by written
operating and maintenance instructions.
h. The home owner/occupier shall be supplied with a written specification of the window
glazing low e-film detailing the U-Value of the units to EN standards 410 and 673.
i.
The home owner shall be advised that this material should be retained if an inspection of
the installation is required. The specification of the units shall be retained by the installer
for audit purposes.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works.
81
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.17 Entry Level Heating Controls
BEP
General Standards & Specifications
This section outlines the general Standards & Specifications that Contractors, products and
installation methods must conform to.
Contractor Requirements & Competency
The installation of heating controls must be carried out by suitably qualified individuals in
accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum. In addition to
this, they must hold a Level 6 National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an equivalent Plumbing
qualification such as City and Guilds. Plumbers must have completed an electrical module during
their course in order to carry out the ‘minor’ electrical works involved in specific control measures. If
‘Controlled Works’, as defined by the Commission for Energy Regulation (CER) document entitled
‘Definition of the Scope of Controlled Works’ are required, a Completion Certificate must be issued.
The issuance of a Completion Certificate for ‘Controlled works’ can only be carried out by a
Registered Electrical Contractor or an Inspector of one of the two Safety Supervisory Bodies as
defined in Section 2.2 in this CER guidance.
Product Standard & Specification
All heating controls products must conform to the appropriate BS, EN or IS standard for that
particular measure. As a minimum, the following Standards should be satisfied:
 EN 60730-1:2011 Automatic electrical controls for household and similar use. General
requirements
 BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and similar Use Part 2-7:
Particular Requirements for Timers and Time Switches
Installation Standard & Specification
All Heating Controls installation should be carried out in accordance with the manufacturer’s
specifications and Industry Best Practice. All works should be installed in accordance with the
National Standards Authority of Ireland Standard Recommendation S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice
for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings, the Dept. of Environment, Heritage and Local
Government and SEAI Document Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings –
Achieving Compliance with Part L, the TACMA Guide to Heating Controls, and Energy Savings Trust
Guidelines:
 GPG 302 Controls for Domestic Central Heating and Hot Water – Guidance for Specifiers and
Installers (Energy Savings Trust and BRE)
 CE29 Domestic Heating by Oil: Boiler Systems – Guidance for Installers and Specifiers
 CE30 Domestic Heating by Gas: Boiler Systems – Guidance for Installers and Specifiers
 All works should be carried out in accordance with the ETCI National Wiring Rules for
Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008 and the latest draft of BS 5449
Specification of Forced Air Circulation Hot Water Central Heating Systems for Domestic
Purposes (or equivalent Irish Standard) where applicable.
Particular attention should be given to good housekeeping and safety during installation. Every
installed measure must be fully demonstrated by the Contractor to the Customer along with a
written set of operating instructions. Before leaving the home, the Contractor must ensure that the
owner can correctly operate their upgraded heating system.
82
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.17.1 Single Zones (Space Heating)
This element of the programme involves controlling the heating system into a single zone and
incorporating a 24 hour 7-day programmer for time & temperature control along with a boiler
interlock arrangement to prevent boiler operation when the heat demand drops off. These initial
single zone must be made up of the space heating zone. Further zones to split areas of the house
can be added as additional zones (this is classed under the fully integrated heating controls
upgrade).
Product Standard & Specification
All timers, programmers and thermostats must conform to the appropriate BS or IS standard for
that particular measure, for example:
 EN 60730-1:2011 Automatic electrical controls for household and similar use. General
requirements
 BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and similar Use Part 2-7:
Particular Requirements for Timers and Time Switches
Installation Standard & Specification
A 24 hour 7-Day Programmer facilitating time and temperature control should be installed in
accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as outlined in Good
Practice Guide 302. The room thermostat must be located in an area where it is not subject to heat
gains, direct sunlight or draughts. The thermostat should be located in a well-lit, easily accessible
position with good air circulation. The chosen position must be representative of average room/zone
temperature. Do not locate room thermostats in areas such as corners, behind furniture or curtains
or in areas where the air flow may pick up extra heat such as close to TVs, computers, wall lights, in a
room with a fixed heating appliance or direct sunlight. Locating a room thermostat in an area which
may be subject to external draughts such as beside external doors etc. should also be avoided. Best
practice recommends that thermostats are situated approx. 1.5 m from the floor. Furthermore,
room thermostats should not be installed in any room which already uses TRVs for temperature
control.
Boiler Interlock - A boiler interlock arrangement must be included as part of this set of controls
whereby the boiler will not fire when there is no demand for heat. All unnecessary boiler firing can
be eliminated with this control measure. In order to assess whether a boiler interlock arrangement is
already in place, the Contractor should turn all thermostats right down when the boiler is firing - if
the boiler continues to fire, then there is no interlock. (The pump may continue to run if the boiler
requires a pump to overrun, this is intentional and does not affect the boiler interlock). On a
traditional central heating system with stored hot water, a boiler interlock arrangement can be set
up by interconnecting the room thermostats with the boiler. On a combination boiler all that is
required to set up a boiler interlock arrangement is a room thermostat.
83
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.18 Entry Level Heating Controls with Remote Access
BEP
General Standards & Specifications
This section outlines the general Standards & Specifications to which that Contractors, products and
installation methods must conform.
Contractor Requirements & Competency
The installation of heating controls with remote access must be carried out by suitably qualified
individuals in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum. In
addition to this, they must hold a Level 6 National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an equivalent
Plumbing qualification such as City and Guilds. Plumbers must have completed an electrical module
during their course in order to carry out the ‘minor’ electrical works involved in specific control
measures. If ‘Controlled Works’, as defined by the Commission for Energy Regulation (CER)
document entitled ‘Definition of the Scope of Controlled Works’ are required, a Completion
Certificate must be issued. The issuance of a Completion Certificate for ‘Controlled works’ can only
be carried out by a Registered Electrical Contractor or an Inspector of one of the two Safety
Supervisory Bodies as defined in Section 2.2 in this CER guidance.
Product Standard & Specification
All heating controls products with remote access must conform to the appropriate BS, EN or IS
standard for that particular measure. As a minimum, the following Standards should be satisfied:
 EN 60730-1:2011 Automatic electrical controls for household and similar use. General
requirements
 BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and similar Use Part 2-7:
Particular Requirements for Timers and Time Switches
Installation Standard & Specification
All Heating Controls installation should be carried out in accordance with the manufacturer’s
specifications and Industry Best Practice. All works should be installed in accordance with the
National Standards Authority of Ireland Standard Recommendation S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice
for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings, the Dept. of Environment, Heritage and Local
Government and SEAI Document Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings –
Achieving Compliance with Part L, the TACMA Guide to Heating Controls, and Energy Savings Trust
Guidelines:
 GPG 302 Controls for Domestic Central Heating and Hot Water – Guidance for Specifiers and
Installers (Energy Savings Trust and BRE)
 CE29 Domestic Heating by Oil: Boiler Systems – Guidance for Installers and Specifiers
 CE30 Domestic Heating by Gas: Boiler Systems – Guidance for Installers and Specifiers
 All works should be carried out in accordance with the ETCI National Wiring Rules for
Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008 and the latest draft of BS 5449
Specification of Forced Air Circulation Hot Water Central Heating Systems for Domestic
Purposes (or equivalent Irish Standard) where applicable.
Particular attention should be given to good housekeeping and safety during installation. Every
installed measure must be fully demonstrated by the Contractor to the Customer along with a
written set of operating instructions. Before leaving the home, the Contractor must ensure that the
owner can correctly operate their upgraded heating system.
84
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.18.1 Single Zones (Space Heating)
This element of the programme involves controlling the heating system into a single zone and
incorporating a 24 hour 7-day programmer for time & temperature control with remote access
along with a boiler interlock arrangement to prevent boiler operation when the heat demand drops
off. Further zones to split areas of the house can be added as additional zones (this is classed under
the fully integrated heating controls upgrade).
Product Standard & Specification
All timers, programmers, thermostats and remote access must conform to the appropriate BS or IS
standard for that particular measure, for example:
 EN 60730-1:2011 Automatic electrical controls for household and similar use. General
requirements
 BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and similar Use Part 2-7:
Particular Requirements for Timers and Time Switches
Installation Standard & Specification
A 24 hour 7-Day Programmer with remote access, facilitating time and temperature control
should be installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as
outlined in Good Practice Guide 302. The room thermostat must be located in an area where it is not
subject to heat gains, direct sunlight or draughts. The thermostat should be located in a well-lit,
easily accessible position with good air circulation. The chosen position must be representative of
average room/zone temperature. Do not locate room thermostats in areas such as corners, behind
furniture or curtains or in areas where the air flow may pick up extra heat such as close to TVs,
computers, wall lights, in a room with a fixed heating appliance or direct sunlight. Locating a room
thermostat in an area which may be subject to external draughts such as beside external doors etc.
should also be avoided. Best practice recommends that thermostats are situated approx. 1.5 m from
the floor. Furthermore, room thermostats should not be installed in any room which already uses
TRVs for temperature control.
Boiler Interlock - A boiler interlock arrangement must be included as part of this set of controls
whereby the boiler will not fire when there is no demand for heat. All unnecessary boiler firing can
be eliminated with this control measure. In order to assess whether a boiler interlock arrangement is
already in place, the Contractor should turn all thermostats right down when the boiler is firing - if
the boiler continues to fire, then there is no interlock. (The pump may continue to run if the boiler
requires a pump to overrun, this is intentional and does not affect the boiler interlock). On a
traditional central heating system with stored hot water, a boiler interlock arrangement can be set
up by interconnecting the room thermostats with the boiler. On a combination boiler all that is
required to set up a boiler interlock arrangement is a room thermostat.
85
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.19 Fully Integrated Heating Controls with Remote Access
BEP
General Standards & Specifications
This section outlines the general Standards & Specifications to which Contractors, products and
installation methods must conform.
Contractor Requirements & Competency
The installation of heating controls with remote access must be carried out by suitably qualified
individuals in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum. In
addition to this, they must hold a Level 6 National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an equivalent
Plumbing qualification such as City and Guilds. Plumbers must have completed an electrical module
during their course in order to carry out the ‘minor’ electrical works involved in specific control
measures. If ‘Controlled Works’, as defined by the Commission for Energy Regulation (CER)
document entitled ‘Definition of the Scope of Controlled Works’ are required, a Completion
Certificate must be issued. The issuance of a Completion Certificate for ‘Controlled works’ can only
be carried out by a Registered Electrical Contractor or an Inspector of one of the two Safety
Supervisory Bodies as defined in Section 2.2 in this CER guidance.
Product Standard & Specification
All heating controls with remote access products must conform to the appropriate BS, EN or IS
standard for that particular measure. As a minimum, the following Standards should be satisfied:
 EN 60730-1:2011 Automatic electrical controls for household and similar use. General
requirements
 BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and similar Use Part 2-7:
Particular Requirements for Timers and Time Switches
 BS EN 215 Thermostatic Radiator Valves. Requirements and Test Methods
Installation Standard & Specification
All Heating Controls installation should be carried out in accordance with the manufacturer’s
specifications and Industry Best Practice. All works should be installed in accordance with the
National Standards Authority of Ireland Standard Recommendation S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice
for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings, the Dept. of Environment, Heritage and Local
Government and SEAI Document Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings –
Achieving Compliance with Part L, the TACMA Guide to Heating Controls, and Energy Savings Trust
Guidelines:
 GPG 302 Controls for Domestic Central Heating and Hot Water – Guidance for Specifiers and
Installers (Energy Savings Trust and BRE)
 CE29 Domestic Heating by Oil: Boiler Systems – Guidance for Installers and Specifiers
 CE30 Domestic Heating by Gas: Boiler Systems – Guidance for Installers and Specifiers
 All works should be carried out in accordance with the ETCI National Wiring Rules for
Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008 and the latest draft of BS 5449
Specification of Forced Air Circulation Hot Water Central Heating Systems for Domestic
Purposes (or equivalent Irish Standard) where applicable.
Particular attention should be given to good housekeeping and safety during installation. Every
installed measure must be fully demonstrated by the Contractor to the Customer along with a
written set of operating instructions. Before leaving the home, the Contractor must ensure that the
owner can correctly operate their upgraded heating system.
86
BE COP Rev 7.2
Two Zones (Space Heating & Domestic Hot Water)
This element of the programme involves dividing the heating system into two zones and
incorporating a 24 hour7-day programmer with remote access for time & temperature control
along with a boiler interlock arrangement to prevent boiler operation when the heat demand drops
off. These initial two zones must be made up of the space heating zone and the domestic hot water
heating zone. Further zones to split areas of the house can be added as additional zones (as
discussed below).
Product Standard & Specification
All timers, programmers, thermostats, zoning manifolds and motorised control valves must
conform to the appropriate BS or IS standard for that particular measure, for example:
 EN 60730-1:2011 Automatic electrical controls for household and similar use. General
requirements
 BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and similar Use Part 2-7:
Particular Requirements for Timers and Time Switches
It should also be noted that 22 mm motorised control valves are usually suitable for boilers rated up
to 20kW. For larger boilers, when fitting a motorised control valve on a gravity hot water circuit, 28
mm valves or larger should be used.
Installation Standard & Specification
Zoning: Zones should be divided according to Industry Best Practice as outlined in Good Practice
Guide 302. This guide recommends using motorised control valves to subdivide the home into
separate heating zones. A zoning manifold can also be used to achieve separate heating zones.
Motorised control valves can be plumbed at an angle but must not be mounted so that the powerhead is below the horizontal level of the pipework. If fitted in a confined space, adequate ventilation
must be available in order to ensure that the valve will be kept within its recommended temperature
range. There must also be adequate access so that the power head can be removed if necessary.
Motorised valves should not be positioned in the line of the open safety vent pipe or the feed and
expansion pipe. Solid fuel systems should use normally-open motorised valves (i.e. they close only
when power is applied) to ensure safe operation in the event of power failure or malfunction.
A 24 hour 7-Day Programmer with remote access, facilitating time and temperature control with
remote access should be installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines and industry
best practice as outlined in Good Practice Guide 302. The room thermostat must be located in an
area where it is not subject to heat gains, direct sunlight or draughts. The thermostat should be
located in a well-lit, easily accessible position with good air circulation. The chosen position must be
representative of average room/zone temperature. Do not locate room thermostats in areas such as
corners, behind furniture or curtains or in areas where the air flow may pick up extra heat such as
close to TVs, computers, wall lights, in a room with a fixed heating appliance or direct sunlight.
Locating a room thermostat in an area which may be subject to external draughts such as beside
external doors etc. should also be avoided. Best practice recommends that thermostats are situated
approx. 1.5 m from the floor. Furthermore, room thermostats should not be installed in any room
which already uses TRVs for temperature control.
Best Practice recommends that the Hot Water Cylinder Thermostat (installed with the immersion
timer and temperature control device) is installed between 1/4 and 1/3 of the way up the vertical
height of the cylinder unless otherwise instructed by the manufacturer. Care should be taken to
ensure that there is good clean contact between the thermostat and the cylinder when attaching.
The thermostat should also be located on the front face of the cylinder so that it is easily accessible
by the Customer. It is recommended that Contractor sets the hot water temperature no higher than
60oC. It is not uncommon in many households for domestic hot water to be heated to temperatures
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higher than 60oC only for residents to add cold water to it to bring the temperature down. This
would be considered wasteful of energy. A temperature of 60oC is recommended however to
protect against the risk of Legionella.
Boiler Interlock - A boiler interlock arrangement must be included as part of this set of controls
whereby the boiler will not fire when there is no demand for heat. All unnecessary boiler firing can
be eliminated with this control measure. In order to assess whether a boiler interlock arrangement is
already in place, the Contractor should turn all thermostats right down when the boiler is firing - if
the boiler continues to fire, then there is no interlock. (The pump may continue to run if the boiler
requires a pump to overrun, this is intentional and does not affect the boiler interlock). On a
traditional central heating system with stored hot water, a boiler interlock arrangement can be set
up by interconnecting the room and cylinder thermostats with motorised valve(s). On a combination
boiler all that is required to set up a boiler interlock arrangement is a room thermostat.
Boiler Management System – An acceptable alternative to the above control measures would be to
install a boiler management system that delivers the specified zoning, timing and temperature with
remote access and boiler interlock control provisions. Such systems must provide the same
functionality as is described above and be installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines
and industry best practice.
In the exceptional case where the hot water cylinder is significantly isolated from the boiler and
where the installation of additional pipes to connect it separately would involve substantial civil
works, a manifold/valve arrangement to by-pass the hot water cylinder would be an acceptable
alternative solution. This arrangement would allow the Customer to use their boiler for space
heating without heating the water in the hot water cylinder. The contractor must explain to the
Customer this new heating arrangement and how to use this system for heating hot water in the
summer months e.g. turning off the radiators or using the time/temp programmer. The reasons for
implementing this alternative solution as part of the heating control upgrades must be documented
in the comments section of the Declaration of Works document.
An Additional Zone
In addition to establishing 2 zones (as described above), the Customer must also commission the
installation of an additional space heating zone OR the installation of Thermostatic Radiator Valves
(in rooms which do not contain room thermostats) per clause 7.16.4.
Product Standard & Specification
The Product Standards & Specifications outlined in Section 7.16.1 will also apply to the components
required for the establishment of an additional heating zone (room thermostat & motorised control
valve).
Installation Standard & Specification
A Third Zone can be established using an additional motorised control valve or a zoning manifold
arrangement and room thermostat. Installation should be carried out in accordance with the
manufactures instruction, the National Standards Authority of Ireland Standard Recommendation
S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings, and Industry Best Practice.
The Installation Standards & Specifications outlined in Section 7.16.1 will also apply to the
installation of an additional heating zone.
Thermostatic Radiator Valves (TRVs)
In addition to establishing 2 zones (as described above), the contractor must also install either an
additional space heating zone OR install Thermostatic Radiator Valves (TRVs) on at least three
radiators but no less than half of all radiators in rooms which do not have room thermostats.
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Product Standard & Specification
All TRVs must conform to the appropriate BS or IS standard for Thermostatic Radiator Valves (if
available) such as BS EN 215 ‘Thermostatic Radiator Valves. Requirements & Test Methods’.
Installation Standard & Specification
TRVs should be installed in accordance with the manufacturers guideline, the National Standards
Authority of Ireland Standard Recommendation S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice for the energy
efficient retrofit of dwellings, industry best practice and the latest version of BS 7478 ‘Selection and
use of thermostatic radiator valves’. This British Standard gives guidance on the selection,
application and use of thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs) manufactured in accordance with BS EN
215-1 for use in domestic and commercial wet central heating systems up to a water temperature of
120oC. TRVs must not be fitted in rooms which already have temperature control through a
thermostat.
When installing TRVs, the Contractor must ensure that the temperature selector scale and reference
point are easily visible to the Customer and that the TRV is not positioned in an area which may
distort the temperature sensor. Avoid locating TRVs behind curtains, in direct sunlight, in very
draughty locations or other areas which may distort the temperature sensor. If these conditions are
unavoidable, a remote sensor should be used. When inaccessibility of the valve to the user is
unavoidable e.g. when the radiator and valve are located behind a decorative grille, valves with
combined remote temperature sensors and adjuster should be used.
Most modern TRVs are bi-direction and can be installed in either the flow or return direction. Due
care should however be taken to ensure that valve is bi-directional – if the valve is not bi-directional,
the flow through the valve must correspond to the direction on the arrow of the valve body.
Where TRVs are being fitted to a one-pipe system, i.e. only the boiler is being replaced, units
designed for minimum flow resistance should be used.
An automatic by-pass circuit must be installed (in fully pumped systems) in homes where there are
3 or more TRVs in place. When most TRVs are open, the automatic by-pass remains closed, allowing
full circulation around the heating system. When the TRVs close, the automatic by-pass opens,
allowing an appropriate flow rate through the boiler. The use of an automatic by-pass will also
reduce the noise in the system due to excess water velocity. An automatic by-pass circuit must also
be fitted if the boiler manufacturer requires one, or if it specifies that a minimum flow rate must be
maintained while the boiler is firing. An automatic by-pass circuit must then incorporate an
automatic by-pass valve which will control water flow in accordance with the water pressure across
it. The valve is used to maintain a minimum flow rate through the boiler and to limit circulation
pressure when some radiators or zones are turned off. This level of control cannot be achieved using
a fixed position valve. The valve should be installed between the boiler primary flow and return
noting the direction of flow.
All systems should be flushed in order to remove debris prior to commissioning and this should be
carried out with all thermostatic sensor heads removed and valves fully open. Thermostatic sensor
heads should also be removed during hydraulic balancing of the system in order to prevent changes
in room temperature affecting the balancing procedure.
Once the TRV has been correctly set to the desired temperature by the Contractor, it should not
normally require further adjustment by the Customer but they should be made aware of how to
adjust the temperature setting for future reference.
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NOTE: The room where the main thermostat is fitted should NOT have a TRV fitted to the radiator
in that location. This situation would render the thermostat sensing inaccurate.
Time & Temperature Control of Electric Immersion Heater
Product Standard & Specification
All timers, programmers, thermostats, zoning manifolds and motorised control valves must
conform to the appropriate BS or IS standard for that particular measure, for example:
 EN 60730-1:2011 Automatic electrical controls for household and similar use. General
requirements
 BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical Controls for Household and similar Use Part 2-7:
Particular Requirements for Timers and Time Switches
Installation Standard & Specification
Installation should be carried in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines and Industry Best
Practice as outlined in Good Practice Guide 302 or similar.
Additional Control Measures
It is possible that additional control measures may be specified by a Customer outside the scope of
the Programme (such as weather compensation devices), which they wish to be installed at the
same time as those measures covered by the Programme. Where this is the case, it is the
responsibility of the Contractor to explain the cumulative impact of all measures being installed and
the inter-relationship between each measure and the effects on performance that may occur as a
result.
7.19.1 Hot Water Cylinder Insulation
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If the hot water cylinder is not being replaced with a pre insulated hot water cylinder during
the upgrading of the boiler and/or controls upgrade under the Better Energy Homes
programme then a correctly sized insulating jacket tested and approved to BS 5615 must be
fitted.
The insulation jacket shall not cover the immersion heater head and/or cylinder thermostat.
The fixing bands shall be of a durable material and shall not be over tight or loose.
Hot water storage cylinders having factory-applied thermal insulation shall not be fitted
with insulating jackets unless existing thermal insulation has been rendered ineffective
through mechanical damage or deterioration.
Where the specification details of an existing hot water storage cylinder jacket are not
completely legible and/or are not perfectly visible, a self-adhesive label shall be additionally
applied to the jacket at an accessible position stating the name of the jacket supplier and the
Irish Standard reference details.
For an existing jacket where the British Standards compliance marking are not indicated by
any means the following action shall be undertaken:
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The jacket shall be checked for compliance with this specification.
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The insulating material, covering material and fastenings shall not have suffered any
permanent deterioration.
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The insulating material shall be at least 80mm nominal thickness.
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.20 Solid Multi-Fuel Stoves (incl Biomass)
WHS
BEP
Contractor Competency
Contractors carrying out the installation of high performance stoves must be competent to
complete the installation and must agree to complete the work in accordance with the British
Standard document Installation of domestic heating and cooking appliances burning solid mineral fuels
(BS 8303: Parts 1, 2 & 3) and also in accordance with Domestic Heating: Solid fuel systems (CE 47)
published by the Energy Saving Trust.
Where the manufacturer operates an Approved Installer list, the Contractor must demonstrate their
inclusion on the list or certification by the manufacturer.
Where the installation of a multi-fuel stove will incorporate the installation of a back boiler unit or
works to connect the solid fuel boiler to another oil/gas boiler to form a linked-up system, the
installation must be carried out by suitably qualified individuals in accordance with manufacturer’s
guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum. They must hold a Level 6 National Craft
Certificate in Plumbing or an equivalent Plumbing qualification such as City and Guilds. Plumbers
must have completed an electrical module during their course in order to carry out the ‘minor’
electrical works involved in specific control measures. If ‘Controlled Works’, as defined by the
Commission for Energy Regulation (CER) document entitled ‘Definition of the Scope of Controlled
Works’ are required, a Completion Certificate must be issued. The issuance of a Completion
Certificate for ‘Controlled works’ can only be carried out by a Registered Electrical Contractor or an
Inspector of one of the two Safety Supervisory Bodies as defined in Section 2.2 in this CER guidance.
Product Standards & Specification
The multi-fuel stove to be installed must meet the requirements of the British Standard document
BS EN 13240 (Roomheaters fired by solid fuel. Requirements and test methods).
The objective is to install a multi-fuel stove that will achieve a level of performance in the home,
equivalent to the standard required in Part L of the Building Regulations. The multi-fuel stove to be
installed should be as efficient in use as is reasonably practicable. Guidance on appropriate
efficiency for various systems and fuels is contained in the Department of the Environment,
Community and Local Government and SEAI Document “Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems
for dwelling – Achieving Compliance with Part L, in particular Table 16. The contractor must discuss
both the specification and output of the stove with the Customer prior to final system selection.
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The installed multi-fuel stove must comply with Building
Regulations relating the contribution to fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part D): The installed multi-fuel stove must also meet the Building
Regulations requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part F): There should be an appropriate level of ventilation in the room(s)
where the multi-fuel stove is installed in order to comply with Building Regulations.
 Building Regulations (Part J): Correct installation must also satisfy the Building Regulations on
the maintenance of an adequate air supply for the efficient working and to prevent overheating
of the multi-fuel stove (and other heat-producing appliances, especially gas-burning appliances)
after installation work.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The installed multi-fuel stove shall be as efficient in use as is
reasonably practicable in keeping with the Building Regulations.
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The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works.
Installation Standards & Specifications
a. Handling and Storage On Site
 The appliance and components shall be handled in a manner such as to prevent
damage/breakage. Any manufacturer’s instructions on how to handle
components must be followed. Care should be taken before, during and after
installation to ensure that equipment is not damaged. This is particularly
important with fittings that are vitreous enamelled, plated or fitted with glass
 Any components removed during transit or storage shall be handled so that they
can be identified and refitted correctly to the original equipment. This is
important where several different appliances are stored together as some parts
are individually fitted to each appliance by the manufacturer and are not
interchangeable.
 All components shall be stored:
- On a firm level base in the original packaging and in accordance with the
manufacturer's instructions.
- On a sheet of polythene, pallets or timber to prevent any rising damp
affecting them where storage is on a solid floor, components shall be
stacked.
- In a safe, dry and frost-free environment
 The appliance instructions and any operating, stoking and cleaning tools shall be
kept safely in store until they can be handed directly to the user on completion
of the installation.
b. Installation preparation
 In preparing for the installation of an appliance, the following preparations need
to be made:
- site access is available,
- cooperation between trades is arranged and sufficient time is allowed
for completing each phase of the installation.
- all accessories and materials for construction are available on site;
- chases are formed true to size and correctly positioned;
- the fireplace recess, chimney, lintels and flue-connecting blocks are
installed in accordance with the design specification in their true relation
to the appliance, and hearth;
- the pipework is ready for connection to the boiler as soon as the
appliance has been fixed in place;
- any ducts or vents required to be formed in builder's work have been laid
or constructed;
- the fitter's and finishing tradesmen's work is coordinated and protection
is provided for vulnerable surface finishes, e.g. hearths, floors.
- The hearth area shall be capable of taking the weight of the stove.
c. Installation work on site
 The multi-fuel stove should be installed on a solid, level concrete hearth capable
of bearing the weight of the stove, i.e. a non-combustible base that conforms to
the Building Regulations (Part J).
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d.
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The instructions of the appliance manufacturer shall be followed in conjunction
with the design specification in accordance with BS 8303: Part 1 (Installation of
domestic heating and cooking appliances burning solid mineral fuels – Specification
for the design of installations)
 All components must be installed in a way that allows installation, maintenance
and repair / replacement. There shall be sufficient clearance, in accordance with
the manufacturer’s instructions, between the multi-fuel stove and the adjacent
materials to allow for cleaning and maintenance.
 Inaccessible components shall be permanent. Such permanent components
shall be maintenance free and have a durability corresponding to the lifetime of
the components in which they are installed.
 Components (i.e. flues) shall be placed, fixed and supported in such a way that
no harmful deformations occur and so that thermal expansion is possible.
 Where appropriate, existing chimneys should be lined or relined with rigid or
flexible flue liners having the appropriate designation and performance level
specific to the type of fuel and appliance to be used, as required by Part J of the
Building Regulations.
 If a supply of electricity is necessary to operate the control equipment or initiate
ignition in an appliance, the electrical installation and supply shall be installed in
accordance with BS 7671: 1992 (Requirements for electrical installations). All
Electrical components shall be installed in accordance with the ETCI National
Wiring Rules for Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition (ET101:2008).
 Any soot door required for cleaning the chimney shall be correctly located and
fitted. (See clause 10 of BS 8303: Part 1: 1994). Before proceeding with appliance
installation, a check shall be made to ensure that the flue is clean, clear of any
obstruction, in a sound condition and of adequate size to suit the appliance
being installed.
 Where the stove has an integrated boiler, the boiler shall be coupled to the hot
water system by means of unions. Easy access shall be provided for removal. If
flow and return pipes are taken through a fireplace recess wall they shall be
sleeved for easy removal or replacement. A drain cock shall be fitted at the
lowest point (where practical) in the system for draining down when required.
For insert appliances fitted with a boiler it is important that connection of
pipework to the boiler and leak-testing shall take place before the space around
the appliance is in-filled with insulating material.
 An inset multi-fuel stove shall be installed using in-fill material behind firebacks
or boilers and around roomheater casings (see BS 8303: Part 1: 1993, figures 1, 2,
3, 13 and 15). Further information is given in clause 14 of BS 8303: Part 3: 1994
(Installation of domestic heating and cooking appliances burning solid mineral
fuels – Recommendations for design and on site installation).
 If a gas point is required for connecting to an ignition burner or independent gas
poker it shall be installed close to the appliance.
 NOTE. Attention is drawn to the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations IS
813.
 Following installation, all building works etc. shall be made good.
Post-Installation
 Where a multi-fuel stove has been installed, a carbon monoxide (CO) alarm,
which complies with I.S. EN 50291-1:2010/A1:2012, should be provided as per
TGD Part J of the Building Regulations.
 It is recommended that not less than 48 hours after the appliance has been
installed, an inspection of the installation shall be carried out to ensure that:
BE COP Rev 7.2
All fittings (in particular dampers, boiler flue pipe, flue adaptor and
boiler pipes) are firmly fixed in the correct position and that no gaps
allowing possible air or water leakage have appeared.
- Air supply intakes and ducts shall be checked for size and position.
After installation the appliance shall not be used for burning builder's rubbish.
Before lighting a fire, any water system connected to the appliance shall be
filled. The installation shall be dried out under slow fire conditions preferably for
about 2 days using the type and size of fuel recommended in the appliance
manufacturer's instructions.
The installer shall confirm that the fire responds to the operation of the controls
and that there is no visible emission of combustion products to the room.
Appliances incorporating a boiler shall be tested to ensure that the water is
circulating throughout the system (For further information see clause 15 of BS
8303: Part 3: 1994).
Where a hearth, fireplace, flue or chimney is provided or extended, a notice
plate containing information on the type of heat producing appliance, which can
be safely served by the installed hearth, fireplace, flue or chimney shall be
permanently fixed in a suitable place in the building.
On completion of installing and commissioning the system, the installer shall
hand over the manufacturer's operating instructions to the user in order to
provide full information regarding its safe and effective operation and
maintenance.
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Important guidance note for Electrical works associated with the Better Energy Homes
programme where the installation of a multi-fuel stove will incorporate the installation of a back
boiler unit or works to connect the solid fuel boiler to another oil/gas boiler to form a linked-up
system
 All electrical works under the Better Energy Homes programme must be in full compliance
with current ETCI rules.
 Earthing and Bonding must be in accordance with ETCI 101:2008 Chapter 54 (544
Equipotential bonding conductors) and Annex 63B (Guidelines for certification for alterations
to existing installations).
 In order to comply with ETCI rules the following note from ETCI 101:2008 Annex 63B must be
taken into consideration:
As referred to in Annex 63B “Before commencing new work, the installer should assess the
existing installation to ensure that it will not impair the safety of the proposed new work,
and likewise the new work will not impair the safety of the existing installation. Should the
installer become aware of any defect in any part of the installation that would impair the
safety of the new work, the client must be informed in writing thereof. No new work should
commence until these defects have been made good.”
 If the earthing/bonding is less than 6mm2 then the heating installer must either
(a) issue an ‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ to notify them that their current
wiring installation is not to current ETCI rules and work cannot commence on the installation
until the wiring has been rectified to current ETCI rules or, (b) the bonding must be rectified
to current ETCI rules by a competent suitably qualified person
 Work may commence on a heating system with earthing/bonding of 6mm2 and above
however:
Heating system with earthing/bonding of less than 10mm2 the heating installer must issue an
‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ to notify them that their current wiring
installation is not to current ETCI rules.
 Where bonding arrangements are found not to be in accordance with the current ETCI
National Rules then the consumer shall be informed in writing of the situation and advised to
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have the electrical installation checked and rectified by a competent person. In such
circumstances the ‘Electrical safety notice to the home owner’ can be issued to a home
owner when an electrical installation is not to current ETCI regulations. The ‘Electrical safety
notice to the home owner’ can be downloaded from the following link:
http://www.seai.ie/Grants/Better_energy_homes/contractor/Newsletter/Electrical_safety_n
otice_to_the_home_owner.pdf
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7.21 Gas Fired Room Heater
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
The installation of a gas fired room heater must be carried out by suitably qualified individuals in
accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum. Contractors
wishing to install Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) or Natural Gas boilers under the Programme must
hold a Gas Contractors Domestic Certificate (GI D, GI 2 or GI 3) and be registered with RGI.
It is an offence for any person to carry out domestic Natural Gas or LPG works unless he/she is a
registered gas installer with RGII. To align with this requirement all registered gas installers on the
Better Energy Homes programme proposing to undertake High Efficiency Gas Boiler and Heating
Controls upgrade works must be on the RGII list. Details on how to register with RGII is available at
www.rgii.ie .
Product Standard & Specification
Qualifying gas-fired independent space heaters must meet the following conditions:
1. It must be replacing an open fire e.g. the fire place must not be fitted with an existing gas
fire or a low efficiency (in the region of 35%) decorative gas fire ( DGF)
2. It must have a minimum efficiency (gross calorific value) of 65% awarded by an independent
test body
3. The correct level of permanent ventilation must be installed as per TGD Part J of the
Building Regulations and/or I.S. 813.
4. It must meet the conditions specified in Section 2.5 of the Department of the Environment,
Community and Local Government and SEAI Document ‘Heating and Domestic Hot Water
Systems for dwelling – Achieving Compliance with Part L 2008’
The manufacturer’s declaration of the efficiency (gross calorific value) of the appliance (gross
calorific value) should include the following words:
“The efficiency of this appliance has been measured as specified in BS 7977-1:2009+A1:2013
‘Specification for safety and rational use of energy of domestic gas appliances.
Radiant/convectors’ and BS EN 613:2001 and the result is minimum 65% gross calorific value.
The test data from which it has been calculated has been certified by {insert name and/or
identification of Notified Body. The efficiency value may be used in the Dwelling Energy
Assessment Procedure (DEAP) for energy rating of dwellings.”
Installation Standard & Specification
A qualifying gas-fired independent space heater must be installed by a registered gas installer (RGII)
and in accordance with the latest version of TGD Part J and I.S. 813 Domestic Gas Installations. I.S.
813 covers the Code of Practice for the installation of Natural Gas or LPG appliances in domestic
premises. The gas fired appliance must also be installed in accordance with manufacturer’s
guidelines, the CER Criteria document ‘The Regulation of Gas Installers with respect to safety’ and
the latest draft of the appropriate standard, as listed in Section 2.5 of the Department of the
Environment, Community and Local Government and SEAI Document ‘Heating and Domestic Hot
Water Systems for dwelling – Achieving Compliance with Part L 2008’.
If the installation involves work to the electrical wiring:
All wiring is to be in accordance with the latest edition of the ETCI National Rules for
Electrical Installations ET101
Where applicable the contractors should be members of the Register of Electrical
Contractors (RECI) or the Electrical Contractor’s Safety and Standards Association (ECSSA)
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Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The installed appliance must comply with Building Regulations
relating the contribution to fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part D): The installed appliance must also meet the Building Regulations
requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part F): There should be an appropriate level of ventilation in the room(s)
where the appliance is installed in order to comply with Building Regulations.
 Building Regulations (Part J): Correct installation must also satisfy the Building Regulations on
the maintenance of an adequate air supply for the efficient working of the appliance (and other
heat-producing appliances, especially gas-burning appliances) after installation work.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The installed appliance shall be as efficient in use as is reasonably
practicable in keeping with the Building Regulations.
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WHS
BEP
7.22 Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of Heating
system
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Contractors undertaking a mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of a
heating system must be carried out by suitably qualified individuals in accordance with
manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum. In addition to this, they must
hold a Level 6 National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an equivalent Plumbing qualification such as
City and Guilds.
Oil Boilers
Contractors undertaking a mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of a
heating system to oil-fired system they must comply with requirements and competencies stated
above. It is also recommended that the contractor should be registered with a professional
organisation, e.g. OFTEC.
Gas Boilers
In addition to the above criterion, Contractors wishing to carry out a mechanically-assisted powered
cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of a heating system to a Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) or Natural
Gas system under the Programme must hold a Gas Contractors Domestic Certificate (GI D, GI 2 or GI
3).
It is an offence for any person to carry out domestic Natural Gas or LPG works unless he/she is a
registered gas installer with RGII. To align with this requirement all registered gas installers on the
Better Energy Homes programme undertaking High Efficiency Gas Boiler and Heating Controls
upgrade works must be on the RGII list. Details on how to register with RGII is available at
www.rgii.ie .
Product Standard & Specification
Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of system must be performed as
per section 5.3 of BS 7593. Mains pressure and gravity cleanse and flush (section 5.4 and 5.5 of BS
7593) is not deemed as an acceptable method of flushing of a heating system under the Energy
Credits programme.
As a part of this measure boiler service must be must be provided where an existing boiler is
installed. The boiler service should be to manufactures instructions or as per SEAI boiler servicing
checklist.
http://www.seai.ie/Power_of_One/Heat_Your_Home_For_Less/Servicing_Your_Boiler/
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush
(powerflushing) of a heating system must comply with Building Regulations relating the
contribution to fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part D): The mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush
(powerflushing) of a heating system must also meet the Building Regulations requirements for
materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part J): The mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush
(powerflushing) of a heating system shall also satisfy the Building Regulations such that the
installation does not increase the risk of the property catching fire through the use of a heat
producing appliance.
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Building Regulations (Part L): The mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush
(powerflushing) of a heating system shall be as efficient in use as is reasonably practicable in
keeping with the Building Regulations.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works.
Installation Standard & Specification
Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of a heating system must be
performed in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines, Industry Best Practice and the latest draft
of BS 7593 Code of practice for treatment of water in domestic hot water central heating systems
where applicable.
The powerflushing procedure should include:
o Operation of the unit for at least 10 min (circulation mode) with all radiator and system
valves open, reversing the flow regularly;
o Disposal of the dirty water by an appropriate method whilst mains water is continually
added via the powerflushing reservoir tank until the water runs clear;
o Addition of the chosen cleansing chemical to the reservoir of the powerflushing machine
and circulating to disperse throughout the system;
o Circulating the cleanser through each radiator for at least 5 min in turn by isolating the other
radiators and the hot water circuit, reversing the flow regularly;
NOTE Tapping of the radiator with a rubber hammer will help to remove any loose material.
o Cleansing of the hot water circuit for at least 5 min (circulation mode) by isolating the
radiators, reversing the flow regularly;
o Flushing of each radiator in turn for at least 5 min by isolating the other radiators and the hot
water circuit, and dumping to foul drain until the water runs clear;
o Flushing of the hot water circuit for at least 5 min by isolating the radiators, and dumping to
foul drain until the water runs clear;
o Flushing of the system with all radiator and system valves open for at least 5 min and
dumping by an appropriate method until water runs clear;
o Continual flushing and appropriate disposal until all of the cleanser and debris have been
removed. Refer to the manufacturer’s instructions.
After this procedure, re-commissioning should be carried out in accordance with BS 7593 Code of
practice for treatment of water in domestic hot water central heating systems section 5.6 where
applicable.
On completion, a suitable inhibitor should then be added to protect the system from further or
future problems. The inhibitor levels should be checked at the systems annual service and topped up
if required. It is recommended to check the manufacturer’s instructions that the chemical cleaner
and inhibitor are suitable for the equipment installed. A label stating the date of application, the
type and the amount of inhibitor used shall be fixed in a prominent position on the system.
It is recommended to check the manufacturer’s instructions that the chemical cleaner and inhibitor
are suitable for the equipment installed. A label stating the date of application, the type and the
amount of inhibitor used shall be fixed in a prominent position on the system.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
The home owner/occupier shall be supplied with a certificate detailing that a mechanically-assisted
powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) was carried out on the heating system. The home owner
shall be advised that this material should be retained if an inspection of the installation is required. A
duplicate of the certificate detailing that a mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush
(powerflushing) was carried out on the heating system shall be retained by the installer for audit
purposes.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
WHS
BEP
7.23 Mechanically-Assisted Powered Cleanse and Flush (Powerflushing) of Heating
System and Installation Of Magnetic Filtration System to Existing Heating System
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Contractors undertaking a mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) and
installing a magnetic filtration system to existing heating system must be carried out by suitably
qualified individuals in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a
minimum. In addition to this, they must hold a Level 6 National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as City and Guilds.
Oil Boilers
Contractors undertaking a mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of a
heating system and installing a magnetic filtration system to existing heating system to oil-fired
system they must comply with requirements and competencies stated above. It is also
recommended that the contractor should be registered with a professional organisation, e.g.
OFTEC.
Gas Boilers
In addition to the above criterion, Contractors wishing to perform a mechanically-assisted powered
cleanse and flush (powerflushing) and installing a magnetic filtration system to existing heating
system of a heating system to a Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) or Natural Gas system under the
Programme must hold a Gas Contractors Domestic Certificate (GI D, GI 2 or GI 3).
It is an offence for any person to carry out domestic Natural Gas or LPG works unless he/she is a
registered gas installer with RGII. To align with this requirement all registered gas installers on the
Better Energy Homes programme undertaking High Efficiency Gas Boiler and Heating Controls
upgrade works from the 27th of June 11 must be on the RGII list. Details on how to register with RGII
is available at www.rgii.ie .
Product Standard & Specification
Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of system must be performed as
per section 7.19 of the Better Energy Homes Specification.
A boiler service must be must be provided where an existing boiler is installed. The boiler service
should be to manufactures instructions or as per SEAI boiler servicing checklist
http://www.seai.ie/Power_of_One/Heat_Your_Home_For_Less/Servicing_Your_Boiler/
The installation of a magnetic filtration system to existing heating system must be as per
manufacturers guidelines, Industry Best Practice and the latest draft of SR-50-1 Code of practice for
building services – Part 1: Domestic plumbing & heating where applicable
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The installation of magnetic filtration system to an existing
heating system must comply with Building Regulations relating the contribution to fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part D): The Installation of magnetic filtration system to an existing
heating system must also meet the Building Regulations requirements for materials and
workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part J): Installation of magnetic filtration system to an existing heating
system shall also satisfy the Building Regulations such that the installation does not increase the
risk of the property catching fire through the use of a heat producing appliance.
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BE COP Rev 7.2

Building Regulations (Part L): Installation of magnetic filtration system to an existing heating
system shall be as efficient in use as is reasonably practicable in keeping with the Building
Regulations.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works.
Installation Standard & Specification
Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and flush (powerflushing) of a heating system must be
performed in section 7.19 of the Better Energy Homes Specification.
Installation of magnetic filtration system to an existing heating system must be performed in
accordance with manufacturers guidelines, Industry Best Practice and the latest draft of SR-50-1
Code of practice for building services – Part 1: Domestic plumbing & heating where applicable.
The power flushing of the heating system must be carried out before the installation of the magnetic
filtration unit.
The magnetic filtration unit should have the following properties include:
The filter should be installed on the return pipework and as close to the boiler as possible. Flexibility
of filter orientation during installation is essential to accommodate all existing pipework layouts.
The filter must be capable of maximising the volume of magnetite collected on first pass with a
recommendation that this level achieves in excess of 90% of suspended black iron oxide. This figure
should increase to virtually 100% during subsequent passes.
Recommended minimum capacity for a domestic filter is 130 g of iron oxide sludge for a standard 22
mm (3/4”) system and 28 mm (1”) over a period of at least 12 months. At capacity, the filter must
allow unrestricted flow without loss of pressure.
Domestic filter magnet strength should achieve a minimum gauss rating of 7,500 with an anticipated
lifespan exceeding that of the central heating boiler. The filter should not be susceptible to
blockage, even when full.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
7.24 Chimney Draught Limiter
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Contractors installing a Chimney Draught Limiter must be carried out by suitably qualified
individuals in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum.
Product Standard & Specification
The Chimney Draught Limiter conform to BS 1251 ‘Specification for open-fireplace components’
and BS 3376 ‘Specification for solid mineral fuel open fires with convection, with or without boilers’
A permanent mechanically fixed chimney draught limiter alters the geometry of the chimney
therefore altering the ventilation rate as per DEAP methodology.
Temporary draught limiting devices, which are removed when a fire is lit are not eligible for the
above Energy Credits. A temporary draft limiter is wholly reliant on its reinstatement on a
continuous basis when a fire is not lit and they do not alter the geometry of a chimney within DEAP
methodology therefore Energy Credits are not applicable.
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The installed Chimney Draught Limiter must comply with Building
Regulations relating the contribution to fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part D): The installed Chimney Draught Limiter must also meet the
Building Regulations requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part F): There should be an appropriate level of ventilation in the room(s)
where the Chimney Draught Limiter is installed in order to comply with Building Regulations.
 Building Regulations (Part J): The Installation of the Chimney Draught Limiter should not
increase the risk of fire in the property due to the use of a heat-producing appliance.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The installed Chimney Draught Limiter shall be as efficient in use
as is reasonably practicable in keeping with the Building Regulations.
The design and installation of the recommended works must not compromise the ventilation,
air quality, humidity (and the potential for condensation) and quality of living environment in
the home. Particular care must be given to the potential impact on the living environment in the
home resulting from any measures installed under the Programme. It is the duty of the
Contractor to prevent any detrimental changes to the living environment and to recommend to
the Customer any measures necessary to ensure that there is no detrimental change to the
living environment as a result of the works.
Installation Standard & Specification
The Installation of chimney draft limiter shall be installed to manufacturer’s recommendations.
The chimney draft limiter is installed in accordance with the design specification in their true relation
to the appliance. The instructions of the appliance manufacturer shall be followed in conjunction
with the design specification in accordance with BS 1251 ‘Specification for open-fireplace
components’ and BS 3376 ‘Specification for solid mineral fuel open fires with convection, with or
without boilers’. All components must be installed in a way that allows installation, maintenance and
repair / replacement. There shall be sufficient clearance, in accordance with the manufacturer’s
instructions, between the chimney draft limiter and the adjacent materials to allow for cleaning and
maintenance. Components shall be placed, fixed and supported in such a way that no harmful
deformations occur and so that thermal expansion is possible.
On completion of installing and commissioning the system, the installer shall hand over the
manufacturer's operating instructions to the user in order to provide full information regarding the
operation and maintenance of the appliance
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BE COP Rev 7.2
7.25 Boiler Service
WHS
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Contractors performing a boiler service to an existing heating system must be carried out by suitably
qualified individuals in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a
minimum. In addition to this, they must hold a Level 6 National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as City and Guilds.
Oil Boilers
Contractors performing a boiler service must comply with requirements and competencies stated
above. It is also recommended that the contractor should be registered with a professional
organisation, e.g. OFTEC.
Gas Boilers
In addition to the above criterion, Contractors wishing to perform a boiler service to a Liquefied
Petroleum Gas (LPG) or Natural Gas boiler under the Programme must hold a Gas Contractors
Domestic Certificate (GI D, GI 2 or GI 3).
It is an offence for any person to carry out domestic Natural Gas or LPG works unless he/she is a
registered gas installer with RGII. To align with this requirement all registered gas installers on the
Better Energy Homes programme undertaking High Efficiency Gas Boiler and Heating Controls
upgrade works must be on the RGII list. Details on how to register with RGII is available at
www.rgii.ie .
Standard & Specification
A boiler service should be to manufactures instructions or as per SEAI boiler servicing checklist
The gas boiler checklist can be downloaded for the following link:
http://www.seai.ie/Power_of_One/Heat_Your_Home_For_Less/Servicing_Your_Boiler/gas_checkli
st.pdf
The oil boiler checklist can be downloaded for the following link:
http://www.seai.ie/Power_of_One/Heat_Your_Home_For_Less/Servicing_Your_Boiler/oil_checklis
t.pdf
The home owner/occupier shall be supplied with a certificate detailing that a boiler service was
performed on the boiler an entered into the boiler log book. Further guidance on log books is
available at the following link:
http://www.seai.ie/Grants/Better_energy_homes/contractor/Newsletter/Contractor_Good_Practice
_Note_-_Boiler_Log_Books.pdf
The home owner shall be advised that this material should be retained if an inspection of the
installation is required. A duplicate of the certificate detailing that a boiler service was carried out on
the boiler shall be retained by the installer for audit purposes.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
7.26 CFL and LED domestic lighting
WHS
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
Contractors installing CFL and LED lighting must be competent to complete the installation.
Standard & Specification
For CFL luminaires:
CFLs installed must be in accordance with EC 244/2009: Ecodesign requirements for non-directional
household lamps and EU 1194/2012 Ecodesign requirements for directional lamps, light emitting
diode lamps and related equipment
EC244/2009 sets minimum lamp efficacy requirements in Annex II, Table 1, and functionality
requirements for CFL’s (Table 4).
EU1194/2012 sets minimum energy efficiency requirements in Annex III Section 1.1, and
functionality requirements in Table 2, 3 and 4.
Only CFL can be installed under the Better Energy Warmer Homes programme
For LED luminaires and lamps:
LED luminaires and lamps installed must be in accordance with EC 244/2009: Ecodesign
requirements for non-directional household lamps and EU 1194/2012 Ecodesign requirements for
directional lamps, light emitting diode lamps and related equipment
EC244/2009 sets minimum lamp efficacy requirements in Annex II, Table 1, and functionality
requirements for non-CFL’s (Table 5).
EU1194/2012 sets minimum energy efficiency requirements in Annex III Section 1.1, and
functionality requirements in Table 2, 3 and 4.
CFL and LED lights are classed as secondary measures and must be installed along with a primary
package of measures. Secondary measures can only account towards a maximum of 10% of credits
towards targets.
If the retrofit involves work to the mains wiring:
All wiring is to be in accordance with the latest edition of the ETCI National Rules for
Electrical Installations ET101
Contractors should be members of the Register of Electrical Contractors (RECI) or
the Electrical Contractor’s Safety and Standards Association (ECSSA)
105
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.27 Home Energy Reports
BEP
Standard & Specification
Natural Gas and Electricity Home Energy Reports for Behavioural Energy Efficiency
 Reports must include personalised comparison, comparing a consumer’s energy use (based
on natural gas or electrical consumption as dictated on the dwellings bi-monthly energy bill)
against a group of no more than 200 similar households (e.g. by location, size, etc.)
 A minimum of six energy reports (three paper reports and three e-reports) shall be issued
per year to the occupants of the dwelling. The energy reports should follow the issuing of an
energy bill and reference the energy (Natural Gas/Electricity of the whole dwelling) usage
during that period.
 Reports shall include advice for saving energy, potentially including but not limited to:
- Savings behaviours that become habituated (e.g., turning off the lights),
- Savings behaviours that are individually prompted (e.g., adjusting thermostat settings),
and
- Purchasing decisions (e.g., selection and installation of more energy efficient
appliances)
- Advice should be seasonally appropriate
 Advice for saving energy is personalised to the recipient (e.g. provided data available to
distinguish homeowners from renters, homeowners may receive more recommendations
focused on installed measures, whereas renters may receive more behavioural prompts)
 Contact information for final customers’ organisations, energy agencies or similar bodies,
including website addresses, from which information may be obtained on available energy
efficiency improvement measures e.g. SEAI’s ‘Power of One’ campaign, comparative enduser profiles and objective technical specifications for energy-using equipment.
106
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.28 Electricity Energy Monitors
BEP
Standard & Specification
Energy monitor complete with in-house display connected to electricity meter (e.g. linked via clamp
on transmitter)
In-house display to displaying real time energy and cost consumption
 Individual single point energy monitors i.e. three pin plug energy displays are not eligible as
they do not display the overall energy consumption of the dwelling
 MPRN must be submitted with application for Energy Credits for energy monitors
 The Installation of energy monitors shall be installed to manufacturer’s recommendations.
107
BE COP Rev 7.2
7.29 High Heat Retention Electric Storage Heaters
BEP
Contractor Requirements & Competency
The installation of a high heat retention electric storage heater should be carried out by an electrical
contractor in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines and industry best practice as a minimum
and must be registered with the Register of Electrical Contractors of Ireland (RECI) or Electrical
Contractors Safety & Standards Association (ECSSA).
To align with this requirement all registered electrical contractors on the Better Energy Homes
programme proposing to undertake Electric Storage Heater upgrade works must be registered with
RECI or ECSSA. Details on how to register are available at www.reci.ie and www.ecssa.ie
Product Standard & Specification
To qualify, the high heat retention electric storage heater must meet the following conditions:
5. It must be replacing an existing electric storage heater.
6. It must be a whole dwelling solution.
7. It must have a minimum heat retention not less than 45% as measured in accordance with
BS EN 60531 (Household Electric Thermal Storage Room Heaters - Methods For Measuring
Performance)
8. The heat retention testing must have been carried out by an organisation accredited to test
in accordance with BS EN 60531 or the testing must be endorsed by a body accredited to
test in accordance with BS EN 60531
9. It must include both input and output controls
10. It also must include both a timer and a room thermostat, which can be controlled by the
user.
Installation Standard & Specification
A qualifying high heat retention electric storage heater must be sized appropriately for the room in
which it is being installed. Suitable design methods for ensuring the heater is sized correctly is DOM
8, Guide to the Design of Electric Space Heating Systems, TEHVA or the manufacturer’s sizing
methodology.
The high heat retention electric storage heater should be installed by an electrical contractor
registered with RECI and in accordance with the latest edition of the ETCI National Rules for
Electrical Installations ET101. The high heat retention electric storage heater must also be installed
in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines, the National Standards Authority of Ireland Standard
Recommendation S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice for the energy efficient retrofit of dwellings and
the latest draft of the appropriate standard, as listed in Section 2.5 of the Department of the
Environment, Community and Local Government and SEAI Document ‘Heating and Domestic Hot
Water Systems for dwelling – Achieving Compliance with Part L 2008’.
Building Regulations
 Building Regulations (Part B): The installed appliance must comply with Building Regulations
relating the contribution to fire spread.
 Building Regulations (Part D): The installed appliance must also meet the Building Regulations
requirements for materials and workmanship.
 Building Regulations (Part F): There should be an appropriate level of ventilation in the room(s)
where the appliance is installed in order to comply with Building Regulations.
 Building Regulations (Part L): The installed appliance shall be as efficient in use as is reasonably
practicable in keeping with the Building Regulations.
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BE COP Rev 7.2
APPENDIX 1: REFERENCE DOCUMENTS
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BE COP Rev 7.2
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NSAI Agrément Certificate (NSAI)
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CE 29 Domestic Heating by Oil: Boiler Systems (Energy Saving Trust)
CE 30 Domestic Heating by Gas: Boiler Systems (Energy Saving Trust)
GBG 301: Controls for Domestic Heating & Hot Water (Energy Saving Trust)
BS 8215:1991: Design and installation of damp-proof courses in masonry construction (BSI)
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GBG 302: Controls for Domestic Central Heating & Hot Water – Guidance for Specifiers and Installers (Energy Saving Trust)
BR 262 Thermal insulation avoiding risks
Boiler

CE 83/GPG155: Energy-efficient Refurbishment of existing houses (Energy Saving Trust)
CE 184 Practical refurbishment of solid-walled houses
Heating
Controls

CE 17/GPG/138: Internal wall insulation in existing housing – a guide for specifiers and contractors (Energy Saving Trust)
CE309: Sustainable Refurbishment (Energy Saving Trust)
Floor
Insulation
External
Wall
Internal
Wall
CeilingLevel
Rafterlevel
Cavity Wall
Reference (Publisher)
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BS 7671: Requirements for Electrical Installations (BSI)
BS 5449: Specification for forced circulation hot water central heating systems for domestic premises (BSI)
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BS 7478: Selection & Use of Thermostatic Radiator Valves (BSI)
Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings - Achieving Compliance with Part L (DEHLG & SEAI)
Guide to the Condensing Boiler Installation Assessment Procedure for Existing Dwellings (DEHLG & SEAI)
I.S. 813 Domestic Gas Installations (NSAI)
CER/09/083: The Regulation of gas installers with respect to safety (CER)
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Heating Controls Guide (TACMA)
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GBG 28 Part 1 Domestic floors: construction, insulation and damp-proofing (BRE)
GBG 45 Insulating ground floors (BRE)
CP 102:1973 Protection of buildings against water from the ground
BS DD CEN/TS 12872:2007 Wood-based panels. Guidance on the use of load-bearing boards in floors, walls and roofs

S.R. 54:2014 Code of Practice

All measures must also be installed as per the Manufacturer’s Installation guidelines
110
BE COP Rev 7.2
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Solar heating design and installation guide
Renewable energy procurement guidelines for solar thermal systems- SEAI
BS7386:1987 Specification for draught strips for the draught control of existing doors and windows in housing
BS 5970 Code of practice for thermal insulation of pipework and equipment in the temperature range of -100°C to +870°C
BS 5422 Method for specifying thermal insulating materials for pipes, tanks, vessels, duckwork and equipment operating within a
temperature range -40°C to +700°C
Window
Glazing
Envelope
Replacement
Ex door
replacement
Window
Replacement
Insulation of
pipework and
CWST
Draught
Proofing
Solar water
heating
Reference (Publisher)
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BS 8213-4:2007 Code of practice for the survey and installation of windows and external doorsets
EN 14351-1:2006 Windows and doors - Product standard, performance characteristics
EN 1279-1 Glass in building. Insulating glass units. Generalities, dimensional tolerances and rules for the system description
EN 1279-2 Glass in building. Insulating glass units. Long term test method and requirements for moisture penetration
IS EN ISO 12567 Thermal performance of windows and doors -- Determination of thermal transmittance by hot box method -- Part 1:
Complete windows and doors
IS EN ISO 10077 (Parts 1 and 2) Thermal performance of windows, doors and shutters
BS 6262 Glazing for buildings. Code of practice for safety related to human impact
BS 8000-7 Workmanship on building sites. Code of practice for glazing
BS 8206-2:2008 Lighting for buildings. Code of practice for daylighting
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PAS 23-1:1999 General performance requirements for door assemblies – Part 1: Single leaf, external door assemblies to dwellings
PAS 24-1:1999 Enhanced security performance requirements for door assemblies - Part 1: Single leaf, external door assemblies to dwellings
BS EN 410:2011 Glass in building. Determination of luminous and solar characteristics of glazing

BS EN 673:2011 Glass in building. Determination of thermal transmittance (U value). Calculation method

BS EN 12898:2001 Glass in building. Determination of the emissivity

All measures must also be installed as per the Manufacturer’s Installation guidelines
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BE COP Rev 7.2
GBG 302: Controls for Domestic Central Heating & Hot Water – Guidance for Specifiers and Installers (Energy Saving Trust)
BS 7671: Requirements for Electrical Installations (BSI)
BS 7478: Selection & Use of Thermostatic Radiator Valves (BSI)
Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings - Achieving Compliance with Part L (DEHLG & SEAI)
Heating Controls Guide (TACMA)
BS 8303: Parts 1, 2 & 3 Installation of domestic heating and cooking appliances burning solid mineral fuels
CE 47 Domestic Heating: Solid fuel systems
Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings - Achieving Compliance with Part L (DEHLG & SEAI)
ET101:2008 ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition
BS 7671: 1992 Requirements for electrical installations
I.S. 813 Domestic Gas Installations (NSAI)
BS 7593:2006 Code of practice for treatment of water in domestic hot water central heating systems
SR-50-1 Code of practice for building services – Part 1: Domestic plumbing & heating where applicable
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Boiler Service
Chimney
Draught
Limiter
Magnetic
filtration
Powerflushing
of heating
systems
Multi Fuel
Stoves
LED
CE 30 Domestic Heating by Gas: Boiler Systems (Energy Saving Trust)
CFL
CE 29 Domestic Heating by Oil: Boiler Systems (Energy Saving Trust)
Heating
Controls with
Remote
Access
Reference (Publisher)
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BS 1251 Specification for open-fireplace components
BS 3376 Specification for solid mineral fuel open fires with convection, with or without boilers


SEAI gas boiler checklist
SEAI oil boiler checklist
EN 13032-1&2 Light and lighting – Measurement and presentation of photometric data of lamps and Luminaires
IES LM-79-08 Electrical and photometric measurements of Solid-State lighting products
All measures must also be installed as per the Manufacturer’s Installation guidelines
112
BE COP Rev 7.2
Micro generation Installation Standard: MIS 3005 Requirements for Contractors Undertaking the Supply, Design, Installation, Set to
Work, Commissioning and Handover of Micro generation Heat Pump Systems
Dept. Of Environment, Community and Local Government (DECLG) and SEAI document, Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems
for Dwellings - Achieving Compliance with Part L
IS EN 15450:2007 Heating Systems in Buildings - Design of Heat Pump Heating Systems
ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008
B.S. 5449: Forced circulation hot water central heating system for domestic installation
IS EN 12831 Heating systems in buildings – method for calculation of design heat load
EN 8558 Guide to the design, installation, testing and maintenance of services supplying water for domestic use within buildings and
their curtilages. Complementary guidance to EN 806.
The Heat Emitter Guide for Domestic Heat Pumps (MCS 021)
Domestic Building Services Compliance Guide (Section 9)
TR30 Guide to Good Practice – Heat Pumps (Building & Engineering Services Association)
CIBSE Guide A – Environmental Design
Good Practice Guide 339, Domestic Ground Source Heat Pumps, Design and Installation of Closed-Loop System
FB59 – Design of Low-Temperature Domestic Heating Systems – a Guide for System Designers and Installers (BRE Trust)
BS 1566-1:2000 ‘Plastics piping systems for soil and waste discharge (low and high temperature) within the building structure.
Chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC-C). Specification for pipes, fittings and the system’
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IS EN 12828 ‘Heating systems in buildings. Design for water-based heating systems’
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Micro generation Installation Standard: MIS 3004 Requirements for Contractors Undertaking the Supply, Design, Installation, Set to
Work, Commissioning and Handover of Solid Biofuel Heating Systems

TR38 Guide to Good Practice – Installation of Biofuel Heating (Heating & Ventilation Contractors’ Association)

BS 3198 ‘Specification for copper hot water storage combination units for domestic purposes’
IS. EN. 12897 ‘Water supply. Specification for indirectly heated unvented (closed) storage water heaters’
BS EN 14336:2004 ‘Heating systems in buildings. Installation and commissioning of water based heating systems’ and the
requirements of the system suppliers’
BS 8206-2:2008 ‘Lighting for buildings. Code of practice for daylighting’
EN 410 ‘Glass in building. Determination of luminous and solar characteristics of glazing’
EN 673 ‘Glass in building. Determination of thermal transmittance (U value). Calculation method before the installation of the film’.
Window
glazing low e
film
Biomass
Boilers
(with/without
thermal
storage)
Heat Pumps
Reference (Publisher)



All measures must also be installed as per the Manufacturer’s Installation guidelines
113
BE COP Rev 7.2
TGD Part J of the Building Regulations
I.S. 813. Domestic Gas Installation
Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government and SEAI Document ‘Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems
for dwelling – Achieving Compliance with Part L 2008’
BS 7977-1:2009+A1:2013 ‘Specification for safety and rational use of energy of domestic gas appliances. Radiant/convectors’
ETCI National Rules for Electrical Installations ET101
BS EN 60531 (Household Electric Thermal Storage Room Heaters - Methods For Measuring Performance)
DOM 8, Guide to the Design of Electric Space Heating Systems, TEHVA or the manufacturer’s sizing methodology





high heat
retention
electric
storage heater
Gas fired room
heaters
Reference (Publisher)



All measures must also be installed as per the Manufacturer’s Installation guidelines
114
BE COP Rev 7.2
Appendix 2: Summary Table of Competencies and Standards
Measure
Cavity wall
insulation
External Wall
Insulation
Installer Competence
NSAI Agrément approved
www.nsai.ie
Trained by manufacturer in the installation 
of the system.
NSAI Agrément certified installer on ETICS.
To facilitate full ETICS certification a
contractor can complete a maximum of
one job if they have validly applied to NSAI
Agrément to become a registered installer
of this particular system.
Internal Wall
Insulation
Ceiling-Level Attic
Insulation
Product Standards & Specification
 The insulation system must be
approved by the NSAI Agrément
www.nsai.ie
 Must help achieve a U-value of 0.27
W/m2K for external walls ((Building
Regulations – Part L 2008) in as much
as is physically and economically
possible.
www.environ.ie


Must be competent to install insulation in 
accordance with ‘Internal wall insulation in
existing housing – a guide for specifiers and
contractors’ (CE17/GPG/138) published by
the
Energy
Savings
Trust. 
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
Must be competent to install insulation in 
accordance
with
‘Energy-efficient
115
Installation Standards & Specification
 The insulation system must be installed
as per the conditions specified in the
NSAI Agrément certificate.
www.nsai.ie

The insulation system must be
approved by the NSAI Agrément or
equivalent.
www.nsai.ie
the system must be NSAI Agrément
approved.
Must help achieve a U-value of 0.27
W/m2K for external walls (Building
Regulations – Part L). in as much as is
physically and economically possible.
www.environ.ie
The insulation system must be
approved by the NSAI Agrément or
equivalent.
www.nsai.ie
Must help achieve a U-value of 0.27
W/m2K for external walls (Building
Regulations – Part L). in as much as is
physically and economically possible.
www.environ.ie

Must help achieve a U-value of 0.16
W/m2K where possible (Building

The insulation system must be installed
as per the manufacturer’s technical
guidance and specifications and also the
NSAI Agrément certificate.
www.nsai.ie


S.R. 54:2014 Code of Practice
S.R. 54:2014 Code of Practice
The insulation system must be installed
as per ‘Internal wall insulation in
existing housing – a guide for specifiers
and contractors’ (CE17/GPG/138)
published by the Energy Savings Trust.
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk

S.R. 54:2014 Code of Practice
The insulation must be installed as per
‘Energy-efficient Refurbishment of
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Installer Competence
Product Standards & Specification
Refurbishment
of
existing
houses’
Regulations – Part L).
(CE83/GPG155) published by the Energy  Must not compromise the property’s
Savings Trust.
ability to resist internal fire spread
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
within the internal linings and internal
fire spread within the structure
(Building Regulations – Part B).
 Must meet Building Regulations
definition of ‘proper materials’ and
conform to workmanship standards
(Building Regulations – Part D).
 The insulation should also be suitable
for use on a property and meet the
ventilation requirements in the
Building Regulations (Part F).
 Installation of the system should not
increase the risk of fire in the property
due to the use of a heat-producing
appliance (Building Regulations – Part
J).
www.environ.ie
116
Installation Standards & Specification
existing houses’ (CE83/GPG155)
published by the Energy Savings Trust.
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk

S.R. 54:2014 Code of Practice
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Rafter-Level Attic
Insulation
Floor Insulation
Installer Competence
Product Standards & Specification
Must be competent to install insulation in  Must help achieve a U-value of 0.20
accordance
with
‘Energy-efficient
W/m2K where possible (Building
Refurbishment
of
existing
houses’
Regulations – Part L).
(CE83/GPG155) published by the Energy  Must not compromise the property’s
Savings
Trust.
ability to resist internal fire spread
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
within the internal linings and internal
fire spread within the structure
(Building Regulations – Part B).
 Must meet Building Regulations
definition of ‘proper materials’ and
conform to workmanship standards
(Building Regulations – Part D).
 The insulation should also be suitable
for use on a property and meet the
ventilation requirements in the
Building Regulations (Part F).
 Installation of the system should not
increase the risk of fire in the property
due to the use of a heat-producing
appliance (Building Regulations – Part
J).
www.environ.ie
Must be competent to install insulation in
 The insulation system must be
accordance with
approved by the NSAI Agrément or
 Domestic floors: construction, insulation
equivalent.
and damp-proofing (GBG 28 Part 1)
www.nsai.ie
published by the BRE
 Must help achieve a U-value of 0.36
 Insulating ground floors (GBG 45),
W/m2K or 0.15 W/m2K (underfloor
published by the BRE
heating) for floors (Building
Regulations – Part L). in as much as is
 Energy-efficient
Refurbishment
of
physically and economically possible.
existing
houses
(CE83/GPG155)
www.environ.ie
published by the Energy Saving Trust
 Sustainable Refurbishment (CE309)
published by the Energy Saving Trust
117
Installation Standards & Specification
 The insulation must be installed as per
‘Energy-efficient Refurbishment of
existing houses’ (CE83/GPG155)
published by the Energy Savings Trust.
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk

S.R. 54:2014 Code of Practice
The insulation must be installed as per
 Domestic floors: construction, insulation
and damp-proofing (GBG 28 Part 1)
published by the BRE
 Insulating ground floors (GBG 45),
published by the BRE
 Energy-efficient
Refurbishment
of
existing
houses
(CE83/GPG155)
published by the Energy Saving Trust
 Sustainable Refurbishment (CE309)
published by the Energy Saving Trust

S.R. 54:2014 Code of Practice
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
New Boiler (Boiler
must be installed
complete with
heating controls
as outlined below)
Installer Competence
Product Standards & Specification
 The installation of high efficiency boilers

must be carried out by suitably qualified

individuals in accordance with
manufacturer’s guidelines and industry
best practice as a minimum. In addition
to this, they must hold a Level 6 National
Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as
City and Guilds. Plumbers must have
completed an electrical module during
their course in order to carry out the
‘minor’ electrical works involved in
specific control measures. If ‘Controlled
Works’, as defined by the Commission for
Energy Regulation (CER) document
entitled ‘Definition of the Scope of
Controlled Works’ are required, a
Completion Certificate must be issued.
The issuance of a Completion Certificate
for ‘Controlled works’ can only be carried
out by a Registered Electrical Contractor
or an Inspector of one of the two Safety
Supervisory Bodies as defined in Section
2.2 in this CER guidance.
 For gas boiler installation contractors
must hold a Gas Contractors Domestic
Certificate( GID, GI2 or GI3)
118
Installation Standards & Specification
www.seai.ie/harp


Carbon equivalent efficiency of new
boiler must be better than existing
boiler

Seasonal net efficiency > 90%




Manufacturers Guidelines
CE 29 Domestic Heating by Oil: Boiler
Systems
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
CE 30 Domestic Heating by Gas: Boiler
Systems
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government & SEAI Document
Heating and Domestic Hot Water
Systems for Dwellings - Achieving
Compliance with Part L
www.environ.ie
Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government Building Regulations
Technical Guidance Document J - Home
Heating Appliances
www.environ.ie
Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government & SEAI Guide to the
condensing boiler installation
assessment procedure for Existing
Dwellings
www.environ.ie
Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government Building Regulations
Technical Guidance Document Part L
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure

Installer Competence
Product Standards & Specification
For Natural Gas and LPG works the
contractor must be RGII registered
www.rgii.ie
2 Separate Zones
with 24 hour 7-day
Programmer (incl
remote access
controls) –
incorporating a
room thermostat,
DHW cylinder
 The installation of heating controls must
be carried out by suitably qualified
individuals in accordance with
manufacturer’s guidelines and industry
best practice as a minimum. In addition
to this, they must hold a Level 6 National
Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as
119

BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical
Controls for Household and similar
Use Part 2-7: Particular Requirements
for Timers and Time Switches
www.bsi-global.com
Installation Standards & Specification
Dwellings 2008 – Conservation of Fuel &
Energy and “Heating and Domestic Hot
Water Systems for dwellings –
Achieving compliance with Part L 2010”
(to be published).
www.environ.ie & www.nsai.ie
 ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical
Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008
www.ecti.ie
 BS 5449 Specification for forced
circulation hot water central heating
systems for domestic premises
www.bsi-global.com
 Good Practice Guide 301 Controls for
Domestic Heating & Hot Water – Choice
of Fuel & System Type
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
 I.S. 813 Domestic Gas Installations
www.standards.ie
 CER Criteria Document - The Regulation
of gas installers with respect to safety
www.cer.ie
 CER Decision Paper – Definition of the
Scope of Controlled Works
www.cer.ie




Manufacturers Guidelines
Good Practice Guide 302 Controls for
Domestic Central Heating & Hot Water
– Guidance for Specifiers and Installers
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
TACMA Controls Guide
www.heatingcontrols.co.uk
ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
thermostat,
motorised control
valve and boiler
interlock.
Additional
Heating Zone
Installer Competence
City and Guilds. Plumbers must have
completed an electrical module during
their course in order to carry out the
‘minor’ electrical works involved in
specific control measures. If ‘Controlled
Works’, as defined by the Commission for
Energy Regulation (CER) document
entitled ‘Definition of the Scope of
Controlled Works’ are required, a
Completion Certificate must be issued.
The issuance of a Completion Certificate
for ‘Controlled works’ can only be carried
out by a Registered Electrical Contractor
or an Inspector of one of the two Safety
Supervisory Bodies as defined in Section
2.2 in this CER guidance.

As above
120
Product Standards & Specification
Installation Standards & Specification
Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008
www.ecti.ie
 BS 5449 Specification for forced
circulation hot water central heating
systems for domestic premises
www.bsi-global.com
 Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government Building Regulations
Technical Guidance Document Part L
Dwellings 2008 – Conservation of Fuel &
Energy and “Heating and Domestic Hot
Water Systems for dwellings –
Achieving compliance with Part L 2010”
(to be published).
www.environ.ie and
www.nsai.ie
 CE29 Domestic Heating by Oil: Boiler
Systems – Guidance for Installers and
Specifiers
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
 CE30 Domestic Heating by Gas: Boiler
Systems – Guidance for Installers and
Specifiers
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
 CER Decision Paper – Definition of the
Scope of Controlled Works
www.cer.ie


As above
As above
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Thermostatic
Radiator Valves
Installer Competence
 The installation of this control measure
must be carried out by suitably qualified
individuals in accordance with
manufacturer’s guidelines and industry
best practice as a minimum. In addition
to this, they must hold a Level 6 National
Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as
City and Guilds
Product Standards & Specification
 BS EN 215 Thermostatic Radiator
Valves. Requirements & Test
Methods
www.bsi-global.com
Time &
Temperature
Control of Electric
Immersion Heater
 The installation of this control measure
must be carried out by suitably qualified
individuals in accordance with
manufacturer’s guidelines and industry
best practice as a minimum. In addition
to this, they must hold a Level 6 National
Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as
City and Guilds. Plumbers must have
completed an electrical module during
their course in order to carry out the
‘minor’ electrical works involved in
specific control measures. If ‘Controlled
Works’, as defined by the Commission for
Energy Regulation (CER) document
entitled ‘Definition of the Scope of
Controlled Works’ are required, a
Completion Certificate must be issued.
The issuance of a Completion Certificate

121
BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical
Controls for Household and similar
Use Part 2-7: Particular Requirements
for Timers and Time Switches.
www.bsi-global.com
www.standards.ie
Installation Standards & Specification
 Manufacturers Guidelines
 BS 7478 Selection & Use of
Thermostatic Radiator Valves
www.bsi-global.com
 Good Practice Guide 302 Controls for
Domestic Central Heating & Hot Water
– Guidance for Specifiers and Installers
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
 TACMA Controls Guide
www.heatingcontrols.co.uk
 Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government & SEAI Document
Heating and Domestic Hot Water
Systems for Dwellings - Achieving
Compliance with Part L
www.environ.ie
 Manufacturers Guidelines
 Good Practice Guide 302 Controls for
Domestic Central Heating & Hot Water
– Guidance for Specifiers and Installers
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
 TACMA Controls Guide
www.heatingcontrols.co.uk
 ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical
Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008
www.ecti.ie
 Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government & SEAI Document
Heating and Domestic Hot Water
Systems for Dwellings - Achieving
Compliance with Part L
www.environ.ie
 CER Decision Paper – Definition of the
Scope of Controlled Works
www.cer.ie
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Additional Control
Measures
Installer Competence
for ‘Controlled works’ can only be carried
out by a Registered Electrical Contractor
or an Inspector of one of the two Safety
Supervisory Bodies as defined in Section
2.2 in this CER guidance.
Product Standards & Specification
 The installation of additional control 
measure must be carried out by suitably
qualified individuals in accordance with
manufacturer’s guidelines and industry
best practice as a minimum. In addition
to this, they must hold a Level 6 National 
Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as
City and Guilds. Plumbers must have
completed an electrical module during
their course in order to carry out the
‘minor’ electrical works involved in
specific control measures. If ‘Controlled
Works’, as defined by the Commission for
Energy Regulation (CER) document
entitled ‘Definition of the Scope of
Controlled Works’ are required, a
Completion Certificate must be issued.
The issuance of a Completion Certificate
for ‘Controlled works’ can only be carried
out by a Registered Electrical Contractor
or an Inspector of one of the two Safety
Supervisory Bodies as defined in Section
2.2 in this CER guidance.
122
BS EN 60730-2-7 Automatic Electrical
Controls for Household and similar
Use Part 2-7: Particular Requirements
for Timers and Time Switches.
www.bsi-global.com
Other Relevant IS, BS or EN
Standards (if available)
www.bsi-global.com
Installation Standards & Specification
Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government Building Regulations
Technical Guidance Document Part L
Dwellings 2008 – Conservation of Fuel &
Energy and “Heating and Domestic Hot
Water Systems for dwellings –
Achieving compliance with Part L 2010”
(to be published).
www.environ.ie & www.nsai.ie





Manufacturers Guidelines
Good Practice Guide 302 Controls for
Domestic Central Heating & Hot Water
– Guidance for Specifiers and installers
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk
TACMA Controls Guide
www.heatingcontrols.co.uk
ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical
Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008
www.ecti.ie
Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government Building Regulations
Technical Guidance Document Part L
Dwellings 2008 – Conservation of Fuel &
Energy and “Heating and Domestic Hot
Water Systems for dwellings –
Achieving compliance with Part L 2010”
(to be published).
www.environ.ie & www.nsai.ie
Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government & SEAI Document
Heating and Domestic Hot Water
Systems for Dwellings - Achieving
Compliance with Part L
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Installer Competence
Heat Pump
 Level 6 National Craft Certificate in
Plumbing or an equivalent Plumbing
qualification such as City and Guilds.
Plumbers must have completed an
electrical module during their course in
order to carry out the ‘minor’ electrical
works involved in specific control
measures or
 the installer shall be listed on an
approved manufacturer installers list.
Product Standards & Specification
Installation Standards & Specification
www.environ.ie
 CER Decision Paper – Definition of the
Scope of Controlled Works
www.cer.ie
Qualifying heat pumps must be listed on
the SEAI Home-heating Appliance
Register of Performance (HARP) database
or one of the European Heat Pump
Association (EHPA) database, the
European
Commission’s
Ecolabel
catalogue or have Eurovent Certification.
IS EN 15450:2007 Heating Systems in
Buildings - Design of Heat Pump Heating
Systems.
The guidance in Section 8.1 of the DECLG
and SEAI document entitled ‘Heating and
Domestic Hot Water Systems for Dwellings
- Achieving Compliance with Part L’











123
Manufacturer’s guidelines,
Microgeneration Installation Standard:
MIS 3005 Requirements for Contractors
Undertaking the Supply, Design,
Installation, Set to Work,
Commissioning and Handover of
Microgeneration Heat Pump Systems,
Industry best practice,
Building Regulations Technical
Guidance Document J – Home Heating
Appliances,
The ETCI National Wiring Rules for
Electrical Installations, Fourth Edition
ET101:2008 and
The latest draft of B.S. 5449: Forced
circulation hot water central heating
system for domestic installation (or
equivalent Irish standard) where
applicable.
The Heat Emitter Guide for Domestic
Heat Pumps (MCS 021)
IS EN 15450:2007 Heating Systems in
Buildings - Design of Heat Pump
Heating Systems
Domestic Building Services Compliance
Guide (Section 9)
TR30 Guide to Good Practice – Heat
Pumps (Building & Engineering Services
Association)
CIBSE Guide A – Environmental Design
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Biomass boilers
(with/without
thermal storage)
Installer Competence
 Level 6 National Craft Certificate in
Plumbing or an equivalent Plumbing
qualification such as City and Guilds.
Plumbers must have completed an
electrical module during their course in
order to carry out the ‘minor’ electrical
works involved in specific control
measures.
124
Product Standards & Specification
Installation Standards & Specification
 FB59 – Design of Low-Temperature
Domestic Heating Systems – a Guide
for System Designers and Installers
(BRE Trust)
 Good Practice Guide 339, Domestic
Ground Source Heat Pumps, Design and
Installation of Closed-Loop System
Vented copper hot water storage vessels
should comply with the heat loss and heat
exchanger requirements of BS 15661:2000 ‘Plastics piping systems for soil and
waste discharge (low and high
temperature)
within
the
building
structure. Chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride)
(PVC-C). Specification for pipes, fittings
and the system’ or BS 3198 ‘Specification
for copper hot water storage combination
units for domestic purposes’
 Vented cylinders in materials
other than copper should comply
with the heat loss and heat
exchanger requirements of BS
1566
 Unvented hot water storage
system products should:
 comply with IS.
EN. 12897 ‘Water
supply.
Specification for
indirectly heated
unvented (closed)
storage
water
heaters’; or
 be certified by the






BS 1566-1:2000 ‘Plastics piping systems
for soil and waste discharge (low and
high temperature) within the building
structure.
Chlorinated
poly(vinyl
chloride) (PVC-C). Specification for
pipes, fittings and the system’
BS 3198 ‘Specification for copper hot
water storage combination units for
domestic purposes’
IS. EN. 12897 ‘Water supply.
Specification for indirectly heated
unvented (closed) storage water
heaters’
BS EN 14336:2004 ‘Heating systems in
buildings.
Installation
and
commissioning of water based heating
systems’ and the requirements of the
system suppliers’
IS EN 12828 ‘Heating systems in
buildings. Design for water-based
heating systems’
Micro generation Installation Standard:
MIS 3004 Requirements for Contractors
Undertaking the Supply, Design,
Installation,
Set
to
Work,
Commissioning and Handover of Solid
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Solar heating
system
Installer Competence
 National Craft Certificate in a relevant
trade (Electrical, Plumbing or Fitting) or a
Level 6 qualification in a related area such
as Building Services, G.I.D. etc and
FETAC accredited Domestic Solar
Heating Installation course
Product Standards & Specification
Irish
Agrément
Board; or
 be certified by
another
accredited body
as complying with
Building
Regulations
 Unvented systems should not be
used with gravity circulation
Section 5.3 of the DECLG and SEAI
document entitled "Heating and Domestic
Hot Water Systems for Dwellings Achieving Compliance with Part L" must
be adhered to.
The product must be registered on the
Greener Homes Programme product list
(Requirements for this list are the
provision of a product registration
questionnaire and an EN 12975
Performance Test Report and an EN 12975
Durability Test )
Each homeowner must be supplied with a
warranty (product and labour) of at least 5
years
Installation Standards & Specification
Biofuel Heating Systems
 TR38 Guide to Good Practice –
Installation of Biofuel Heating (Heating
& Ventilation Contractors’ Association)






125
NSAI document ‘Draft Irish guidelines
(SR 50-2:2010 Code of practice for
building services - Part 2: Solar panels,
ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical
Installations, Fourth Edition ET101:2008
www.ecti.ie
Dept. of Environment, Heritage and
Local Government Building Regulations
Technical Guidance Document Part L
Dwellings 2008 – Conservation of Fuel &
Energy and “Heating and Domestic Hot
Water Systems for dwellings –
Achieving compliance with Part L 2010”
(to be published)
Solar Heating Design and Installation
Guide – CIBSE Guide
Renewable Energy Procurement
Guidelines for Solar Thermal Systems –
SEAI
A Standard Solar Commissioning Report
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Draught Proofing
Insulation of
pipework and water
storage tanks
Installer Competence
Product Standards & Specification
Installation Standards & Specification
(SCR) as available on the Better Energy
Homes website must be completed and
a copy provided to each homeowner.
Must be competent to install draught
proofing in accordance with BS 7386:1997
Specification for draught strips for the
draught control of existing doors and
windows in housing.

The draught proofing system must be
manufactured to relevant IS, BS or EN
standard
Installed as per manufacturers
instructions
The insulation must be installed as per
 Manufacturers Guidelines
Must be competent to install Insulation of
pipework and water storage tanks in
accordance TGD part G of the Building
Regulations

BS 5970 Code of practice for thermal
insulation of pipework and equipment
in the temperature range of -100°C to
+870°C and
BS 5422 Method for specifying
thermal insulating materials for pipes,
tanks, vessels, ductwork and
equipment operating within the
temperature range -40°C to +700°C.
EN 14351-1:2006 (Windows and doors
- Product standard, performance
characteristics).
Glazing must conform to EN 1279-1
(Glass in building. Insulating glass
units.
Generalities,
dimensional
tolerances and rules for the system
description)
EN 1279-2 (Glass in building.
Insulating glass units. Long term test
The insulation must be installed as per
 Manufacturers Guidelines


Window
Replacement
Must be competent to install windows in 
accordance with Code of practice for the
survey and installation of windows and
external doorsets (BS 8213-4:2007) and the 
manufacturer’s guidelines as a minimum
requirement.

126
The window must be installed as per
 Manufacturers Guidelines
 Code of practice for the survey and
installation of windows and external
doorsets (BS 8213-4:2007)
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
External Door
Replacement
Installer Competence
Must be competent to install doors in
accordance with Code of practice for the
survey and installation of windows and
external doorsets (BS 8213-4:2007) and the
manufacturer’s guidelines as a minimum
requirement.
127
Product Standards & Specification
method and requirements for moisture
penetration)
 NSAI Window Energy Performance
(WEP)
certification,
British
Fenestration Rating Council
 Calculated according to either IS EN
ISO 12567 Thermal performance of
windows and doors -- Determination of
thermal transmittance by hot box
method -- Part 1: Complete windows
and doors or
 IS EN ISO 10077 (Parts 1 and 2)
Thermal performance of windows,
doors and shutters
 BS 6262 Glazing for buildings. Code of
practice for safety related to human
impact
 BS 8000-7 Workmanship on building
sites. Code of practice for glazing
 BS 8206-2:2008 Lighting for buildings.
Code of practice for daylighting
 EN 14351-1:2006 (Windows and doors
- Product standard, performance
characteristics).
 PAS 23-1:1999 (General performance
requirements for door assemblies –
Part 1: Single leaf, external door
assemblies to dwellings)
 PAS 24-1:1999 (Enhanced security
performance requirements for door
assemblies - Part 1: Single leaf,
external door assemblies to dwellings).
 Calculated according to either IS EN
ISO 12567 Thermal performance of
windows and doors -- Determination of
Installation Standards & Specification
The external door must be installed as per
 Manufacturers Guidelines
 Code of practice for the survey and
installation of windows and external
doorsets (BS 8213-4:2007)
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Window Glazing
Envelope
Replacement
Installer Competence
Product Standards & Specification
Installation Standards & Specification
thermal transmittance by hot box
method -- Part 1: Complete windows
and doors or
 IS EN ISO 10077 (Parts 1 and 2)
Thermal performance of windows,
doors and shutters
 BS 6262 Glazing for buildings. Code of
practice for safety related to human
impact
 BS 8000-7 Workmanship on building
sites. Code of practice for glazing
 BS 8206-2:2008 Lighting for buildings.
Code of practice for daylighting
Must be competent to install window 
Glazing Envelope in accordance with Code
of practice for the survey and installation of
windows and external doorsets (BS 82134:2007) and the manufacturer’s guidelines
as a minimum requirement and BS 8000-7 
Workmanship on building sites. Code of
practice for glazing




128
Window Glazing Envelope must
conform to EN 1279-1 (Glass in
building. Insulating glass units.
Generalities, dimensional tolerances
and rules for the system description)
EN 1279-2 (Glass in building.
Insulating glass units. Long term test
method and requirements for moisture
penetration)
BS 6262 Glazing for buildings. Code of
practice for safety related to human
impact
BS 8000-7 Workmanship on building
sites. Code of practice for glazing
BS EN 410:2011 Glass in building.
Determination of luminous and solar
characteristics of glazing
BS EN 673:2011 Glass in building.
Determination of thermal
transmittance (U value). Calculation
The Window Glazing Envelope must be
installed as per
 Manufacturers Guidelines
 Code of practice for the survey and
installation of windows and external
doorsets (BS 8213-4:2007)
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Installer Competence
Product Standards & Specification
method
 BS 8206-2:2008 Lighting for buildings.
Code of practice for daylighting
Multi fuel stoves
Must be competent to install Multi Fuel 
Stoves in accordance document Installation
of domestic heating and cooking appliances
burning solid mineral fuels (BS 8303: Parts 1, 
2 & 3) and also in accordance with Domestic
Heating: Solid fuel systems (CE 47)
published by the Energy Saving Trust
Gas fired room
heaters
The installation of a gas fired room heater
must be carried out by suitably qualified
individuals
in
accordance
with
manufacturer’s guidelines and industry
best practice as a minimum. Contractors
wishing to install Liquefied Petroleum Gas
(LPG) or Natural Gas boilers under the
Programme must hold a Gas Contractors
Domestic Certificate (GI D, GI 2 or GI 3) and
be registered with RGI.
Mechanicallyassisted powered
cleanse and flush
Must be competent to mechanicallyassisted powered cleanse and flush
(powerflushing) of a heating system must
129
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




BS EN 13240 (Roomheaters fired by
solid fuel. Requirements and test
methods)
TGD Part L of the Building
Regulations
Installation Standards & Specification
Multi Fuel Stoves must be installed as per
 Manufacturers Guidelines
 Installation of domestic heating and
cooking appliances burning solid mineral
fuels (BS 8303: Parts 1, 2 & 3)
 Domestic Heating: Solid fuel systems (CE
47) published by the Energy Saving
 BS 7671: 1992 (Requirements for
electrical installations

ETCI National Wiring Rules for Electrical
Installations, Fourth Edition
(ET101:2008).
 I.S. 813 Domestic Gas Installations
www.standards.ie
 TGD Part J of the Building Regulations
 I.S. 813. Domestic Gas Installation
 Department of the Environment,
Community and Local Government and
SEAI Document ‘Heating and Domestic
Hot Water Systems for dwelling –
Achieving Compliance with Part L 2008’
 BS 7977-1:2009+A1:2013 ‘Specification
for safety and rational use of energy of
domestic
gas
appliances.
Radiant/convectors’
 ETCI National Rules for Electrical
Installations ET101
TGD Part J of the Building
Regulations
I.S. 813.
Section 2.5 of the Department of the
Environment, Community and Local
Government and SEAI Document
‘Heating and Domestic Hot Water
Systems for dwelling – Achieving
Compliance with Part L 2008’
BS 7977-1:2009+A1:2013 ‘Specification
for safety and rational use of energy of
domestic
gas
appliances.
Radiant/convectors’ and
BS EN 613:2001
Mechanically-assisted powered cleanse and
BS 7593 Code of practice for
flush (powerflushing) of a heating system
treatment of water in domestic hot
must be performed as per
water central heating systems
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
(powerflushing) of
a heating system
Installer Competence
be carried out by suitably qualified
individuals in accordance with
manufacturer’s guidelines and industry
best practice as a minimum.
In addition to this, they must hold a Level 6
National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as
City and Guilds.
Product Standards & Specification
Installation Standards & Specification
 Manufacturers Guidelines
 BS 7593 Code of practice for treatment
of water in domestic hot water central
heating systems
Installation of
magnetic filtration
system to existing
heating system
Must be competent to install magnetic
filtration system to existing heating system
and must be carried out by suitably
qualified individuals in accordance with
manufacturer’s guidelines and industry
best practice as a minimum.
In addition to this, they must hold a Level 6
National Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as
City and Guilds
Must be competent to install a Chimney
Draught Limiter and must be carried out by
suitably qualified individuals in accordance
with manufacturer’s guidelines and
industry best practice as a minimum.

SR-50-1 Code of practice for building
services – Part 1: Domestic plumbing
& heating where applicable
Magnetic filtration system to existing
heating system must be installed as per
 Manufacturers Guidelines
 SR-50-1 Code of practice for building
services – Part 1: Domestic plumbing &
heating where applicable

BS 1251 ‘Specification for open- Chimney Draught Limiter must be installed
as per
fireplace components’ and
BS 3376 ‘Specification for solid  Manufacturers Guidelines
mineral fuel open fires with
convection, with or without boilers’
Must be competent to service a boiler and
must be carried out by suitably qualified
individuals in accordance with
manufacturer’s guidelines and industry
best practice as a minimum. In addition to



Chimney Draught
Limiter
Boiler Service
130

Manufacturers Guidelines
SEAI checklist
I.S. 813 Domestic Gas
Installations(where applicable)
Boiler Service must be carried out as per
 Manufacturers Guidelines
 SEAI checklist
 I.S. 813 Domestic Gas
Installations(where applicable)
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Installer Competence
this, they must hold a Level 6 National
Craft Certificate in Plumbing or an
equivalent Plumbing qualification such as
City and Guilds.
CFL
Contractors installing CFL lighting must be 
competent to complete the installation.
LED
High heat
retention electric
storage heater
Product Standards & Specification
EN 13032-1&2 “Light and lighting –
Measurement and presentation of
photometric data of lamps and
Luminaires”
Contractors installing LED lighting must be LED luminaires:
competent to complete the installation.
EN 13032-1&2 “Light and lighting –
Measurement and presentation of
photometric data of lamps and
Luminaires”
OR
IES LM-79-08 “Electrical and photometric
measurements of Solid-State lighting
products”.
LED lamps
IES LM-79-08 “Electrical and photometric
measurements of Solid-State lighting
products”.
The installation of a high heat retention
It must be replacing an existing electric
electric storage heater should be carried
storage heater.
out by an electrical contractor in
accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines It must be a whole dwelling solution.
and industry best practice as a minimum
and must be registered with the Register of It must have a minimum heat retention
Electrical Contractors of Ireland (RECI) or
not less than 45% as measured in
Electrical Contractors Safety & Standards
accordance with BS EN 60531 (Household
Association (ECSSA).
Electric Thermal Storage Room Heaters Methods For Measuring Performance)
Installation Standards & Specification
www.standards.ie
CFL Installation must be carried out as per
 Manufacturers Guidelines
LED Installation must be carried out as per
 Manufacturers Guidelines
High heat retention electric storage heater
Installation must be carried out as per




The heat retention testing must have
been carried out by an organisation
131
Manufacturer’s guidelines
DOM 8, Guide to the Design of
Electric Space Heating Systems,
TEHVA or the manufacturer’s sizing
methodology.
ETCI National Rules for Electrical
Installations ET101.
S.R. 54:2014 - Code of practice for
the energy efficient retrofit of
dwellings
BE COP Rev 7.2
Measure
Installer Competence
132
Product Standards & Specification
Installation Standards & Specification
accredited to test in accordance with BS
 Department of the Environment,
EN 60531 or the testing must be endorsed
Community and Local Government
by a body accredited to test in accordance
and SEAI Document ‘Heating and
with BS EN 60531
Domestic Hot Water Systems for
dwelling – Achieving Compliance with
It must include both input and output
Part L 2008’.
controls
It also must include both a timer and a
room thermostat, which can be controlled
by the user.
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