turbo diesel - Geno`s Garage

turbo diesel - Geno`s Garage
Volume 2010-2012
TURBO DIESEL
Buyer’s
Guide
This Buyer’s Guide was last updated
6/2014
What you should know about the
2010-2012 Ram Turbo Diesel truck.
A Publication of the Turbo Diesel Register
TURBO DIESEL
Buyer’s
Guide
A WORD ABOUT THIS BUYER’S GUIDE
Recently my wife and I spent much time looking for
a “new” used car. I fired up my computer, studied
comments and users’ experiences in forum-based
websites, and downloaded archived articles from
Car and Driver and Edmunds.com. There was a lot of
miscellaneous and helpful information, free and for the
taking. I figure this sort of web search is pretty typical
for prospective vehicle purchasers today. As it turned
out, we didn’t make a purchase, but my experience
in searching for a suitable used car made me more
aware of issues of value and economy in owning a
Turbo Diesel today.
As a writer it is tempting to tell the long story of
“information being worth the price that you paid for it.”
I will refrain. Many thought-provoking articles on the
state of the publishing business versus the free-forall of the interweb (pun intended) have been written
and my opinion is not likely to change anyone’s point
of view.
Back to the subject at hand—you are a prospective or
new owner. You want more information. You want it
now. You want it at no charge.
Since the late 90s we have compiled information on
the Dodge/Cummins Turbo Diesel truck. Each year
we update the book. We call the data the Turbo
Diesel Buyers Guide, which you have successfully
downloaded.
The price of this book has been discussed many times
over. It is offered to you at no charge. Our hope is that
its value will lead you to purchase a subscription to
the Turbo Diesel Register magazine. Thanks for your
consideration.
Robert Patton
TDR Editor
2
Volume 2010-2012
VOLUME 2010-2012
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Why A Diesel? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cummins 6.7-Liter/
Fourth Generation Power Ratings . . . . . . . . .
4G Noise Evaluation (Issue 70, p40-41) . . . . . .
4G Purchase Confirmation
or Buyer’s Remorse (Issue 71, p48-53) . . . . . .
TSBs for 2010 (Issue 70, p54-59) . . . . . . . . .
What’s Up With The
6.7-Liter Engine? (Issue 62, p74-79) . . . . . . . .
6.7-Liter Engine Report (Issue 72, p32-37) . . . .
Engine Evolution Emissions (Issue 49, p50-56) . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7 HPCR Engine
Meets 2010 Emissions (Issue 56, p44-45) . . . . .
Exhaust Aftertreatment:
Principle of Operation (Issue 66, p40) . . . . . . .
Exhaust Aftertreatment:
The Components (Issue 69, p48-55) . . . . . . . .
The Cost of Regeneration (Issue 74, p42-43) . . .
TSBs for 2011 (Issue 74, p58-65) . . . . . . . . .
One Year Follow-up (Issue 75, p50-53) . . . . . .
Some Gotta Win Ram 3500 Evaluation (Issue 75, p66-68) . . . . .
“Perform Service”
at 67,500 Miles (Issue 75, p40-45) . . . . . . . .
Lube Oil Update (Issue 76 (p52-56) . . . . . . . .
Add Oil Here/PC-11
and CK-4 Update (Issue 93, p52-54) . . . . . . . .
6.7 Aftertreatment Delete (Issue 78, p40-41) . . .
Cleaning Your DPF (Issue 84, p14-18) . . . . . . .
TSBs for 2012 (Issue 78, p56-67) . . . . . . . . .
All New 2010 Ram 2500/3500 HD Chrysler, LLC . .
2011 Ram 2500/3500 HD
Towing Specifications Chrysler, LLC . . . . . . . .
2011 Ram 3500 HD
Towing Specifications Chrysler, LLC . . . . . . . .
2011 Ram Mega Cab HD
Towing Specifications Chrysler, LLC . . . . . . . .
2012 Ram 2500/3500 HD
Specifications Chrysler, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . .
2012 Ram 2500 HD
Towing Specifications Chrysler, LLC . . . . . . . .
2012 Ram 3500 HD
Towing Specifications Chrysler, LLC . . . . . . . .
2010-2012 Buyer’s Guide last updated 02/2017.
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71
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89
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130
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158
167
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
A WORD ABOUT THE
TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
How did the Turbo Diesel Register get its start? First off, I’m an automotive enthusiast. An automotive
enthusiast that was in search of a tow vehicle for my admittedly small collection of automobiles. As
you can imagine, the search for the right tow vehicle took me in the direction of the Ram Turbo
Diesel. My search was aided by the fact that my previous job was in the diesel engine profession
as a Cummins distributor product support representative. Do I have a good knowledge of the Turbo
Diesel engine? Well, maybe. I’ll let you be the judge.
Back to the “story.” As an automotive enthusiast, I am a member of a handful of car club/register type
publications. In addition, I subscribe to just about every car and truck monthly publication in hopes
that I can learn something more about my vehicles. The only vehicle I owned that didn’t have its own
club was the Turbo Diesel. The light goes on. Why not start a Turbo Diesel club? The light flickers.
I know the immediate answer: not enough time, no money, and who would write the articles?
Needless to say, the idea got put on the back burner. Another great idea, but…
Looking back, that was many long years ago. Prior to our first magazine (Fall ’93) I took time to talk to
other Turbo Diesel owners who wanted to know more about their truck and specifically the Cummins
engine. At the time I knew the Turbo Diesel Register would work. I also knew it would be a lot of hard
work with an up-front monetary investment and the commitment to publish the magazine.
Positive discussions with other club/register publishers and an unofficial “good luck” or two from the
manufacturers, and well, I was still hesitant. Back to the all-important concerns: time, money and
writing skills. Time? In the initial two-career-days it was nothing to stay up until 2:00 a.m. Money?
What the heck, we took out a second mortgage. And writing skills? You’ve heard the saying, “if it is
to be, it is up to me.” Thus, we started the TDR way back in the summer of 1993.
Robert Patton
TDR Editor
PS. We hope you’ll learn something from the following collection of tips and Ram technical data.
Please realize this booklet is just the “tip of the iceberg.” The TDR and its members provide a
wealth of information. How to join? Please fill-out and mail the order form or register on-line at
www.turbodieselregister.com.
Join Us Today!
An annual subscription to the
Turbo DIesel Register is $35.00
U.S. and $45 Canadian/International.
Please complete this subscription
form and enclose it in an envelope
along with your check or money
order payable to:
TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
1150 Samples Industrial Drive
Cumming, Georgia 30041
(770) 886-8877
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Name ______________________________________________________________
Address ____________________________________________________________
City __________________________________State ___________Zip ___________
Phone:
Home
(
) _____________________________________________
Work
(
) _____________________________________________
Truck Year __________________ Model _______________
 Payment Enclosed
 Bill my Mastercard/VISA
# __________________________________________ Exp. Date ______________
Volume 2010-2012
3
WHy A DIESEL?
by Robert Patton
As the editor of a club news magazine (the Turbo Diesel
Register for Dodge/Cummins owners), I am frequently
asked, “Why is a diesel engine more fuel efficient than
a gasoline engine of comparable displacement and
horsepower?”
Let’s see if I can provide a simple, no-nonsense answer.
At the close of this article we’ll do a quick diesel-payback
example. Armed with a better understanding of why diesel
provides a better payback on fuel consumption, you will
be equipped to wring the most mileage from your tankful
of diesel fuel.
How would you respond to, “Why is a diesel more fuel
efficient?”
You may respond with one of the common clichés, such as,
“It’s the design of the diesel, it’s built to be more efficient.”
How about, “The compression ratio is higher, there is more
power?” Or, maybe a little more helpful, “The Btu content
of diesel fuel is greater;” or perhaps, “It’s in the injection
system.”
All of the above are correct, but the answers are pretty
intuitively obvious.
When working with diesel powered generators, I
encountered similar queries and responded with the same
partial answers. I’ve seen the same “you didn’t answer my
question” body language from interested parties. It took
being embarrassed in front of a large crowd before I vowed
to get the complete answer.
Let’s see if I can tie it all together and give you an answer
you’ll be able to use with your acquaintances. We will
examine the diesel’s design, compression ratios, fuel Btu’s,
and the fuel injection system to lead us to a concise answer,
one that’s easy to recall.
The Diesel’s Design
“It’s the design of the diesel;
it’s built to be more efficient.”
The diesel engine was designed and patented in 1892
in Europe by Rudolf Diesel.1 In the early part of the last
century, Mr. Clessie Cummins, founder of Cummins Engine
Company, refined the diesel design and developed engines
to be used on-highway in the USA. Clessie’s son, Clessie
Lyle Cummins Jr., is a diesel historian. A passage from his
book Diesel’s Engine provides an historical perspective on
Rudolf Diesel’s early struggle to perfect his revolutionary
engine and bring it to market.2
After a ten-year search Rudolf Diesel was
convinced he had found the way to design an
engine with the highest thermal efficiency. He
believed the most difficult days were over and
transforming ideas into reality should prove a
simpler task: License a qualified manufacturer to
4
Volume 2010-2012
develop and build the engine under his guidance
and then await the forthcoming royalty check. One
company finally agreed to evaluate a test engine
built to his design, but gave him no financial
support. Because of this limited commitment he
continued to promote his theories through the
book based on his studies. Gift copies went to
influential professors and companies deemed
possible licensees. A few favorable academic
endorsements resulted, but no new firms showed
any interest. Meanwhile, when Diesel came to
realize that his patented combustion process was
unsuitable for a real engine he quietly substituted
another. The path of his endeavors still failed to
follow his optimistic, short range plan.
Diesel continued to seek the “highest thermal efficiency,”
or what he called a “heat engine,” until his suicide in 1913.
But the design principle is remarkably simple. From Mr.
Clessie Cummins’ book My Days With the Diesel,3 I’ll let the
senior Mr. Cummins explain.
As the term “heat engine” implies, the diesel
differs in principle from the gasoline engine, in
that [diesel] combustion is obtained by the heat
created by compression of air in the cylinder. The
diesel needs no electrical (spark) ignition system.
Furthermore, it burns low-grade oil rather than the
highly refined, more expensive fuels required by
the gasoline engine.
Adjudged practical only for heavy-duty, stationary,
or marine power applications, diesels, when I
first encountered them, weighed as much as 400
pounds per horsepower and ran at very slow
speeds. Entering the industry some eight years
after introduction of the diesel in this country,
I undertook a personal campaign, with the
crudest of experimental facilities, to reduce this
pound-per-horsepower ratio, despite all textbook
rules to the contrary. These efforts culminated
in the invention of the high-speed, light-weight
automotive diesel.
For two decades, while struggling with the engine
developments, I battled equally big odds to build
a highly specialized business. Cummins Engine
Company was incorporated in 1919, but it took the
better part of eighteen years for our bookkeeper
to need any black ink. Then success arrived with
a rush, after the initially skeptical long distance
truckers finally accepted our new engine.
Today Cummins Inc., of Columbus, Indiana, is
the world’s largest independent producer of
automotive diesel engines. It provides jobs for
ten thousand persons, with sales of more than
$250 million annually (the publish date of Clessie
Cummins’ book was 1967).
Note: 2005 sales were 9.92 billion.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Considering the level of technology in machined parts in
the late 19th century, it is no wonder that Rudolf Diesel was
unable to build his heat engine and prove its practicality.
But in time, technology would catch up with the simplicity
of Diesel’s informing concept; and so the seemingly
offhand answer that the design of the diesel is built to be
more efficient is a true statement. Let’s look further at the
components that make the diesel different.
The Diesel Engine
Remember, the diesel is a “heat engine” using heat energy
developed from the compression of air. High compression
ratios (ratios range from 14:1 to 20:1) are possible since air
only is compressed. The hot compressed air is sufficient
to ignite the diesel fuel when it is finally injected near the
top of the compression stroke. A high compression ratio
equals a greater expansion of the gases following ignition
and a higher percent of the fuel’s energy is converted into
power! The diesel compression ratio is higher, there is more
power! However, I’ve provided yet another incomplete
answer that is a true statement, but not the complete story.
Thus far we’ve covered the principle of diesel operation
and the high compression ratios needed to make the heat
for diesel engine combustion. The high compression ratio
requires the designers to test and manufacture the block,
heads, head bolts, crankshaft, connecting rods, rod bolts,
pistons, piston pins, etc., with greater structural capacity.
Diesel engines are heavy in comparison to their gasoline
brothers. Take, for example, the B-Series engine used in
the Dodge pickup. It is 970 pounds for the 359 cubic inch
Turbo Diesel engine versus 540 pounds for the 360 cubic
inch Dodge Magnum V-8 gasoline engine. With the greater
structure and a diesel’s need for air, the turbocharger
(introduced in the 1950s) was a natural fit for diesel engines.
Looking back, the first engine designed by Clessie
Cummins in the 1920s was a monster at 400 pounds
per horsepower produced. The year model 2005, 325
horsepower Cummins Turbo Diesel pickup truck engine
is 3 pounds per unit of horsepower. I’d say diesels have
made some progress in 85 years.
Diesel’s first engine at the start of an 1893 test
(photo courtesy of C. Lyle Cummins).
HIGHER COMPRESSION RATIO
“The compression ratio is higher,
there is more power.”
Technically speaking, the compression ratio of an engine
is the comparison of the total volume of the cylinder at the
bottom of the piston’s stroke divided by the volume of the
cylinder remaining at the top of the piston’s stroke. Since
we are familiar with gasoline engines, let’s quickly discuss
their compression ratios and a condition that spells
disaster in a gasoline engine, detonation, or pinging.
The Cummins engine used in today’s Dodge pickup.
The Gasoline Engine
Fuel BTU’s
“The BTU value of diesel is greater.”
Serious damage to a gasoline engine can result if you
attempt to run a high compression ratio with low octane fuel.
Detonation or pinging is the ignition of the fuel due to the
high temperature caused by a high compression ratio/high
pressure developed by a given design. Premature ignition
of the fuel, i.e., coming before the spark of the spark plug,
results in rapid uncontrolled burning. When timed properly,
the approximate maximum compression ratio for a gasoline
engine in race trim is 14:1. Most non-racing low octane
compression ratios used in automobiles and trucks are less
than 9:1.
Quite true, the BTU, or British Thermal Unit, for diesel
fuel is 130,000 per gallon, with a weight of 7.0 lbs./gallon.
The value for gasoline is 117,000 BTUs at a weight of
6.3 lbs./gallon. If we go back to our basic physics rules
for energy, you’ll note the fuel in the tank has potential
for work if it is injected into the cylinders and, when
combined with the compressed heated air, ignited. The
piston is forced downward, the crankshaft rotates, and the
wheels turn. True as all this is, the BTU value is not the
major contributing factor to the diesel’s miles-per-gallon
superiority. So, what is the key answer?
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
5
The Injection System
“It’s in the injection system.”
Rudolf Diesel designed the heat engine to use the injection
of fuel at the last moment to ignite the compressed air.
Understanding the heart of the diesel, the fuel pump, is
the key to answering the fuel efficiency question.
The Gasoline Engine
A gasoline engine is what engineers call “stochiometric.”
Stochiometric describes the quantitative relationship
between two or more substances, especially in processes
involving physical or chemical change. With a gasoline
engine there is a stochiometric equation of 14 parts of
air to one part of fuel. Remember, always 14:1. Whether
at idle or full throttle, the fuel and air are mixed outside
the cylinders in a carburetor or injection manifold, and the
mixture is introduced to the combustion chamber via the
intake valve, 14:1, always.
The Diesel Engine
Future Considerations
Fuel and air in the diesel design are not premixed outside
the cylinder. Air is taken into the cylinder through the
intake valve and compressed to make heat. Diesel fuel is
injected near the top of the piston’s stroke in an amount or
ratio corresponding to the load on the engine. At idle the
air-to-fuel ratio can be as high as 85:1 or 100:1. At full load
the diesel still boasts a miserly 25:1 or 30:1 ratio! It is in the
injection system where we find the key to the diesel’s fuel
mileage superiority.
Further exhaust emission legislation in 1998 and again
in 2002 has forced the diesel engine manufacturers
to introduce electronic fuel injection controls. Key
legislation dates were 1988, 1994, 1998, and 2002. Thus
the progression from simple mechanical (vintage 19881993) to more complex mechanical (vintage 1994-1997)
followed by simple electronics (vintage 1998-2001) and
now advanced electronics (2002 and newer) has been
the norm that the diesel industry has followed. Stay tuned
as the 2007 emissions legislation has brought another
dramatic decrease in exhaust emissions for diesel engines
in pickups and big-rigs.
The Fuel Pump is the Key
The fuel pump used on early ‘90s vintage diesel pickup
trucks typically was a rotary style fuel pump. Think of this
pump as a mini automobile-spark-distributor. A rotary
head sends fuel pulses through the high-pressure fuel
lines to the injectors. The pressure opens the injector
valve, and fuel is injected.
As exhaust emissions standards tightened in 1994, there
was a need for higher fuel injection pressures and more
timely delivery of fuel into the combustion chamber.
Pickup truck leader, Ford, used an injection system
developed by Caterpillar called HEUI (hydraulicallyactuated, electronically controlled, unit injection). The
Dodge/Cummins engine used a Bosch P7100 in-line fuel
pump. Think of it as a mini in-line six cylinder engine,
and it’s easy to understand its principle of operation. Six
plunger pumps actuated by the pump camshaft send fuel
pulses through six high pressure fuel lines to the injectors.
The pressure opens the injector valve, allowing fuel to
pass into the combustion chamber. With the Bosch P7100
fuel pump the metering of the fuel (at idle, 85:1; or at full
load, 25:1) is controlled by a fuel rack and gears that rotate
a metering helix to allow fuel into the six plunger pumps.
6
C. Lyle Cummins Jr. poses in front of a
’02 Dodge/Cummins Turbo Diesel pickup.
Volume 2010-2012
1. We capitalize “Wankel” when referring to a rotary
engine. When did we stop capitalizing the “D” in diesel?
2. I found Lyle Cummins’ Diesel’s Engine to be a complete
history of Rudolf Diesel’s engineering efforts. For
information on how to order this book, please see this
story’s source table. I’ll bet that if you request it, Mr.
Cummins will autograph your copy! A must for your
automotive library.
3. The senior Cummins’ book, My Days with the Diesel is
no longer in print (publication date, 1967). Lyle Cummins
remembers his father in his recent book, The Diesel
Odyssey of Clessie Cummins. Copies of the latter book
are available. Again, please see the source table for
complete information.
Sources:
Diesel’s Engine (760 pages, $55) and The Diesel Odyssey
of Clessie Cummins (400 pages, $37) are books written
by diesel historian Clessie Lyle Cummins Jr. Published by
Carnot Press. The books can be ordered at (503) 694-5353.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
DIESEL VERSUS GASOLINE
DO THE MATH
My own experience has been with a 2002 Dodge 1500 with
its 360 cubic inch (5.9 liter) gasoline engine and a 2003
Dodge 2500 with the 359 cubic inch (5.9 liter) Cummins
diesel engine. Overall numbers in around-town driving
equated to 13.5 mpg gasoline, 18.5 diesel.
In our example, let’s figure that I travel 20,000 miles per
year.
Gasoline usage: 20,000 = 1,481 gallons used
13.5
Diesel usage:
20,000 = 1,081 gallons used
18.5
It used to be that the price of diesel fuel was less than that
of regular gasoline. Lately in my area that has not been
the case. However, for comparison sake, let’s assume the
numbers are equal at $3 a gallon.
Gasoline expense: $3 × 1,481 = $4,443
Diesel expense: $3 × 1,081 = $3,243
Diesel net yearly fuel savings = $1200
Estimated sticker price for the optional diesel engine – $7,000
Years (assuming 20K per year) and miles to payback – 5.8
years or 116,000 miles
If you subscribe to the adage, “Figures don’t lie, but liars
figure,” you can easily make the previous example work
for a shorter or longer payback period. In this short,
down-n-dirty comparison we’re not going to consider
maintenance or resale values. And don’t lose track of
the obvious: as the diesel engine option in pickup trucks
continues to price-creep upward, the payback is longer;
however, as fuel prices rise, the payback is quicker.
To close the do-the-math example, remember that “your
mileage may vary based on driving conditions.” Don’t ya
love the clichés of automotive doubletalk?
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
7
CUMMINS 6.7-LITER
FOURTH GENERATION
POWER RATINGS
MODEL YEAR
8
[email protected]
TORQUE @
RPM
TRANSMISSION
[email protected]
6 Manual
[email protected]
68RFE Automatic
2010
6.7 Pickup
[email protected]
2010
3500 Cab/
Chassis
[email protected]
[email protected]
2010
4500/5500
Cab/Chassis
[email protected]
[email protected]
2011
6.7 Pickup
[email protected]
2011.5
6.7 Pickup
(HO)
6 Manual
Aisin Automatic
6 Manual
Aisin Automatic
[email protected]
Manual
[email protected]
68RFE Automatic
[email protected]
[email protected]
68RFE Automatic
2011
Cab/Chassis
[email protected]
[email protected]
2012
6.7 Pickup
[email protected]
2012
Cab/Chassis
[email protected]
Volume 2010-2012
Manual
Aisin Automatic
[email protected]
Manual
[email protected]
68RFE Automatic
[email protected]
Manual
Aisin Automatic
COMMENTS
All States DOC/NAC/DPF
All States
All States
All States DOC/NAC/DPF
All States DOC/NAC/DPF
All States SCR System
All States DOC/NAC/DPF
All States SCR System
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
CUMMINS 6.7-LITER
FOURTH GENERATION
POWER RATINGS
MODEL YEAR
2013
6.7 Pickup
2013
Cab/Chassis
2014
6.7 Pickup
2014
Cab/Chassis
2015
6.7 Pickup
2015
Cab/Chassis
2016
6.7 Pickup
2016
Cab/Chassis
[email protected]
TORQUE @
RPM
[email protected]
[email protected]
Manual
[email protected]
[email protected]
68RFE Automatic
[email protected] HO
[email protected]
Aisin Automatic
[email protected]
[email protected]
Manual
[email protected]
[email protected]
Aisin Automatic
[email protected]
[email protected]
Manual
[email protected]
[email protected]
68RFE Automatic
[email protected] HO
[email protected]
Aisin Automatic
[email protected]
[email protected]
Manual
[email protected]
[email protected]
Aisin Automatic
[email protected]
[email protected]
Manual
[email protected]
[email protected]
68RFE Automatic
[email protected] HO
[email protected]
Aisin Automatic
[email protected]
[email protected]
Manual
[email protected]
[email protected]
Aisin Automatic
[email protected]
[email protected]
Manual
[email protected]
[email protected]
68RFE Automatic
[email protected] HO
[email protected]
Aisin Automatic
[email protected]
[email protected]
Manual
[email protected]
[email protected]
Aisin Automatic
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
TRANSMISSION
COMMENTS
All States SCR System
All States SCR System
All States SCR System
All States SCR System
All States SCR System
All States SCR System
All States SCR System
All States SCR System
Volume 2010-2012
9
FOURTH GENERATION
NOISE EVALUATION
by Robert Patton
It has been almost three years since we did an article on
noise. In Issue 59 (February 2008) we did a comparison of
two comparabletrucks, Jim Anderson’s ’06 3500 with the
5.9-liter engine and my ’07.5 3500 with the 6.7-liter engine,
to see if the new 6.7 engine was quieter.
Before we jump into the results of the February 2008
comparison and the evaluation of the 2010 truck in June,
let’s set the stage for an understanding of the unit of
measure for sound, the decibel.
Way back in the 12-valve days of Issue 13 (Summer 1995)
I took on a sound deadening project with enthusiasm and
a lofty goal of reducing the sound level by three decibels.
The measure of a decibel’s effects are progressive: a
3dB(A) drop equals about one-half the sound power. But
it is only the threshold of what the average person can
perceive as “quieter.” It takes a 10-dB(A) reduction for a
person to declare that something is “twice as quiet.”
From the Issue 13 test I was only able to effect a 1.0
decibel change. However, by reducing the idle speed of
the 12-valve engine from 750rpm to 680rpm (it was a fivespeed truck) I was able to get to the magic 3.0 decibel
number. To grab the readership’s attention, I titled the
article “Turn Down the Noise.” Cute.
With all of the work (pull out the entire interior and door
panels and cover with rubber, foam and jute-felt) you
would think I would have learned a lesson. Nope. In the
Fall of ’99 I tried the same thing with a 24-valve truck. The
result was a 0.4 decibel reduction. The result was hardly
worth the effort.
So I have proven to myself that it is difficult to decrease
the noise level of an engine by simply installing sound
deadening materials. The materials do tend to blanket
the higher pitched sounds and give your vehicle a
more solid feel when the doors are opened and closed.
But, for diesels, sound attenuation starts in the engine
compartment.
So, what did we find in February 2008 when we compared
the 5.9-liter engine in Jim’s truck to my 6.7-liter engine?
We found that the 6.7 is quieter. The following table gives
you the results.
2006 Dodge/
5.9 HPCR
3500, 4x2, auto
2007.5 Dodge/
6.7 HPCR
3500, 4x2, auto
INTERIOR @ IDLE
52.2
48.2
(4.0 better)
FRONT @ 3’
75.7
73.5
(2.2 better)
HOOD OPEN @ 3’
78.2
75.6
(2.6 better)
DRIVER’S DOOR @ 3’
72.6
67.7
(4.9 better)
REAR @ 3’
63.0
58.5
(4.5 better)
In late June of this year Jim took delivery of a 2010
3500 truck, 4x2, automatic transmission. He stopped
by the office with his truck and we thought it would be
good to do another sound comparison. Just one catch:
my 16-year-old decibel meter was nowhere to be found.
Darn, so much for continuity in our testing because the
replacement unit from Radio Shack did not measure in
1/10 units, only 5/10 units. Additionally, we could not
duplicate the numbers from the February ’08 test on my
truck. Apples and oranges…
So, we did an oranges-to-oranges (the trucks are the
same, both are 3500 4x2, automatics) test with the
new Radio Shack meter and the chart below shows the
differences.
2007.5 Dodge/
6.7 HPCR
3500, 4x2, auto
2010 Dodge/
6.7 HPCR
3500, 4x2, auto
INTERIOR @ IDLE
53
53.5
(.5 better)
FRONT @ 3’
71
68.5
(2.5 better)
HOOD OPEN @ 3’
74
71.5
(2.5 better)
66.5
63.5
(2.5 better)
66
57.5
(8.5 better)
DRIVER’S DOOR @ 3’
REAR @ 3’
10
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
First Conclusion: Yes the 2010 truck is quieter.
Second Conclusion: It is a shame that I no longer have my
trusted 16-year-old meter, as we cannot directly compare
Jim’s 2010 truck to the old data from his 2006 truck.
Finally, as you read in the editorial, I’ve purchased a new
2010 Ram 2500 two-wheel drive truck with the ST trim level
which means it has rubber flooring. I’ve already purchased
the factory carpet to go in the truck (reasonably priced
at $425), and the interior has to be removed to install the
carpet. Although I have proved to myself that the addition
of sound deadening materials does not have a noticeable
effect…well, the interior has to be removed, so I’ll be sure
to get before and after decibel readings. I look forward to
presenting my findings. Wish me luck!
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
Jim Anderson made this photo of me intently looking at the decibel meter.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
11
4G PURCHASE CONFIRMATION
OR BUyER’S REMORSE
ISSUE 71 – TECHNICAL TOPICS
by Robert Patton
In Issue 70 I mentioned several times that I had purchased
a Fourth Generation truck. Here is the report I promised
you on the process of my evaluation of the 2010 pickup.
Purchase Confirmation or Buyer’s Remorse?
Everybody knows what “Buyer’s Remorse” is—that sinking
feeling a guy gets after a big-ticket purchase, the gnawing
regret at making the wrong decision. But how would I label
the opposite? What phrase for the feeling of elation, that all
is well, that the big outlay was money well spent?
pulling a 30’ enclosed car hauler. Further, it was paid for, in
full. Yes, “Buyer’s Remorse,” rises to four points.
Finally, although the 2010 truck was a really fantastic
bargain—$34,316, after rebates and before taxes: a price
that was a mere $2,000 more than an ’03 truck that I
previously owned —yet that similarly priced ’03 had had the
SLT and Sport package trim; and I admitted to myself that
having bought a mere base-equipped ST truck, rankled
my ego and cast a shadow on my self-esteem. “Buyer’s
Remorse” rises to five points.
No slang phrase comes as ready-to-hand as “Buyer’s
Remorse;” but obviously I need a term to balance against
it, as I evaluate how I may feel about my recent budgetbusting purchase. As it happens, I’ve heard a catch
phrase around dealer lots, “Purchase Confirmation,” which
originally stood for a communication between buyer and
seller expressing mutual satisfaction on a deal well-made.
I will borrow that phrase to serve as the opposite to the
dread “Buyer’s Remorse” as I assess how I feel about
buying my 2010 Turbo Diesel.
So which is it? Have I got a case of “Buyer’s Remorse”
or “Purchase Confirmation”? Is it Pro or Con? Let’s take it
from the top.
In December 2007 when I attended the press event where
Dodge showcased the upcoming ’09 1500 series as the
very prototype of Dodge’s future pickup truck design,
I knew that somewhere down the road I’d be buying a
Fourth Generation Turbo Diesel. After all, you can’t write
knowledgeably in an enthusiast publication without
personal experience with “the latest and greatest.” (So it
wasn’t just a matter of truck lust, I told myself.) However,
in July of 2007 I had just purchased the ’07.5 for the latestand-greatest reason of owning the newly introduced
6.7-liter engine. Like you, the prospect of a mere two or
three year span between such big financial outlays was
sobering, to put it mildly. And then, the national economy
went south…
Although by the time I would purchase my 2010 truck (last
August) the worst of the recession seemed to have passed
and pundits said wheels were beginning to turn again,
nevertheless, the most prudent people were still holding on
to their cash (as my wife reminded me more than once).
Thus, the sheer magnitude of the purchase price has added
weight to the “Con” side of the scales. Rack up one, two,
and three points in the direction of “Buyer’s Remorse.”
Further, it did not help in my deliberations that the ’07.5
truck was already completely dialed-in. From remote
control stereo, to heated and vibrating seats, to lowered
rear suspension, to power step, running board, it was/
is a great truck. Further, the ’07.5 was a Mega Cab, Long
Box truck and it flawlessly served its intended purpose of
12
Volume 2010-2012
A Crew Cab 2500 truck with only the ST trim Package.
Buyer’s Remorse?
On the heels of that last consideration—i.e., weighing the
importance of my compromise on the trim package for
my new truck—the gremlin of “Buyer’s Remorse” was
threatening to assume the guise of “Buyer’s Anxiety.”
This was getting serious. So I hunkered down to a
serious search for things to weigh in favor of “Purchase
Confirmation.”
The first place I went to was my stack of TDR magazines,
to review what others had said about the Fourth Generation
truck. As we all know, the engine, drivetrain and suspension
are carryovers from the ’07.5 trucks when the 6.7-liter engine
and 68RFE transmission were introduced. Therefore,
my search for grounds for “Purchase Confirmation” took
me back to Issue 58, February 2008, to read the articles
“Driving the 6.7-Liter and 68RFE” by Jim Anderson and “The
2009 Dodge Ram (1500 truck)” by Greg Whale. In addition
to these penetrating review articles, each issue of the
TDR magazine since February 2008 referred to unfolding
developments in the 2010: to the powertrain directly; or to
the cab alluded to in relevant reports on design innovations
in the new 1500 truck.
In my research, Issue 67 proved to be the most useful: here
were focused articles by Steve St.Laurent, Andy Mikonis,
Greg Whale, John Holmes, and myself— all reporting on the
official Dodge press introduction in October 2009. A lot of
data. With that TDR issue in hand, I could then fully appreciate
Jim Anderson’s review of the truck in Issue 70. Finally, I fired
up my computer link to the TDR website and surveyed the
extensive input from members reporting their assessments
of this new truck. With all this TDR background—both the
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
technical facts from experts and the subjective judgments of
savvy owners in the real world—I knew I wouldn’t be making
my pro-and-con judgment just on whim: I awarded a point in
favor of “Purchase Confirmation.”
“For starters, the Cummins engine uses an oxides of
nitrogen (NOx) catalyst to comply with exhaust emissions
rules, completely eliminating the need for the selective
catalytic reduction (SCR) technology used by Ford and GM.
Next I went outside the TDR community, to an article in
Fleet Owner magazine, October 2010, forwarded me by
TDR member Albert Wilson. (Thanks, Albert. As you’ll see,
this material has proved timely.) Fleet Owner did a diesel
shootout comparing Dodge, Ford, and Chevy 2500 series
trucks. I opened a story in Motor Trend, June 2010, which
did a Dodge versus Ford comparison, elbow to elbow.
Finally, besides these print evaluations I turned to my
computer monitor and studied the results of the “Diesel
Shootout,” www.pickuptrucks.com.
“From a big-picture perspective, life-to-overhaul is a
critical figure both for those diesel owners planning to
keep their trucks a while and for used-truck buyers.
With this comprehensive comparison/evaluation from
outside the ranks of Dodge HooRah writers, I was prepared
to decide whether it was to be “Buyer’s Remorse” or
maybe “Purchase Confirmation.” But at this point in the
contest, the score was:
“Buyer’s Remorse” Bears — 5
“Purchase Confirmation” Cowboys — 1
Excerpts from the Evidence, Pro and Con
I’m going to pull several quotes from the Fleet Owner and
Motor Trend write-ups and close with a summary of the
www.pickuptrucks.com “Diesel Shootout.”
Fleet Owner
From Fleet Owner’s Sean Kilcarr: “While many dieselengine enthusiasts are swayed by horsepower,
performance and fuel-economy numbers, commercial
operators typically look long and hard at another critical
though less-sexy metric in their competitive analysis:
maintenance needs.
“That’s because the costs of upkeep, including such
mundane chores as changing engine oil, can add up to a
pretty penny over the life of a diesel engine.
“And for some operators, it’s those numbers—and not
the beefier horsepower stats—that win them over to a
particular make and model.
“Take the Cummins 6.7L turbodiesel powering Chrysler
Group’s Ram pickups, for example.
“While it placed last in the ‘Best Engines Diesel Shootout’
in acceleration times compared with Ford Motor’s
homegrown Power Stroke and General Motors’ Duramax,
it nabs the top spot outright in terms of lower maintenance
lifecycle costs.
“While engine oil, fuel-filter and engine-coolant change
intervals are almost the same among the three OEMs,
diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) replenishment needs and lifeto-overhaul metrics aren’t even close.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
“The Ram Cummins diesel offers far and away the longest
interval here, boasting a 350,000-mi. life-to-overhaul
timeline, while Ford comes in at 250,000 mi., and GM at
200,000 mi.
“GM notes that the 200,000 figure is calculated under the
severest of operating condition, so more sedate diesel
owners might get more miles for that service interval.”
Also, Fleet Owner’s Tom Murphy noted this about fuel
economy: “In our trailering evaluations, each truck got
roughly the same fuel economy (11.6mpg) and each
scampered up and down a 20% grade with relative ease.”
Motor Trend
From Motor Trend’s Mark Williams: “For fuel economy,
both trucks did well on our loop, averaging within 0.2mpg
of one another, with the Super Duty (16.6mpg) edging just
ahead of the Ram HD (16.4). We’re guessing much of that
difference is likely explained by the fact that the Ram HD
had a slightly shorter final-drive ratio with 3.73:1 gears
compared with the Ford’s 3.55s.”
Motor Trend then filled each truck’s bed with weight to
bring the truck within 100 pounds of its gross vehicle weigh
rating. They found, “The results, again, were pretty close,
giving our Super Duty an average of 18.0 mpg and our
Ram HD 17.9 mpg—and at the track, the Ford pulled away
from the Ram with a full payload. Both trucks had onboard,
instantaneous, and overtime fuel economy calculators and
we found them to consistently be overly optimistic.”
And the winner of the Ram versus Ford shootout at Motor
Trend… They gave first place to the Ford truck, but not
without this lengthy proviso. Quoting from MT, “With pricing
and equipment levels maxed out on both vehicles, it’s hard
not to tip the scales in favor of the Ram HD for delivering
so much for $10,655 less than the Super Duty, although we
should point out that some of the options and features on
our F-250 King Ranch are not available for any Ram HD. So
what wins? We have to admit there is something intangibly
desirable about the rumble of the Cummins motor and hardshifting Ram HD transmission that communicates the truck
is ready and willing to work, and work hard.
But the refinement, power delivery, driving comfort (when
empty and loaded), productivity center, and powertrain
technology makes us believe Ford has taken the segment
to new heights. Is this a perfect HD pickup? No. But, with
their backs against the wall, Ford’s engineers have given the
segment a huge push forward in quality and refinement with
a high-tech powertrain that forces the other guys to work
harder if they want to keep playing in the work-truck arena.”
Volume 2010-2012
13
Diesel Shootout Comparison
And, saving the best comparison for last mention was
the Diesel Shootout that was done by the folks at www.
pickuptrucks.com. Their test was extensive and covered
the following performance criteria:
1/4-mile unloaded
1/4-mile with trailers
7% grade with trailers
16% grade with trailers
60-0mph braking unloaded
60-0mph braking loaded with 2000 pounds
Fuel economy unloaded
Fuel economy with trailers.
The www.pickuptrucks.com Shootout was one heck of
a test. I encourage you to log on and read about their
test criteria and the thoroughness of the evaluation. The
Shootout was as apples-to-apples as I think you will find,
and it was Consumer Reports-like in its presentation of
data.
However, if you want to fish for red herrings, you can
nitpick and note that the 2500 trucks had axle ratios of
3.73 for the GM and Dodge, 3.55 for the Ford. Then, again,
the transmission overdrive for GM was .61; Dodge .63; and
Ford .67. Then again, the GM had 20” tires; Dodge 17” tires;
and Ford 18” tires. Do all of these variables really matter?
The 3500 trucks all had 3.73 ratios and 17” tall tires.
Their test was done in August prior to Ford’s release of
their 400/800 rating. So the horsepower/torque numbers
as tested were: GM 397/765, Ford 390/735, Ram 350/650.
With the horsepower/torque numbers one might expect
the four performance-type criteria to be won by the GM
and/or Ford, and that was the case (although the Ram
was close in the 2500, 1/4-mile contest at 17.10 seconds
versus 16.9 for GM and Ford). How’s that for summarizing
72 pages of text?
How did the Ram fare in their test for fuel economy? Let
me see if I can summarize 16 pages of text…
¾-Ton
GM
Ford
Ram
Unloaded
19.66
18.55
17.20
w/Trailer
13.28
13.91
12.38
Combined
15.85
15.90
14.39
DEF Consumption
1750 (mL)
360 (mL)
1-Ton
GM
Ford
Ram
Unloaded
17.96
17.32
14.53
w/Trailer
11.04
12.69
11.21
Combined
13.67
14.64
12.65
DEF Consumption
2760 (mL)
2650 (mL)
And, again, if you want to fish for red herrings, you can plug
in the cost for DEF and do some awkward mathematics
to try and compute an overall cost-for-fuel and DEF. The
math is not going to make up a difference of 1.5mpg (3/4ton trucks) or a 1 to 2mpg (one-ton trucks). Ouch.
14
Volume 2010-2012
Their test categories were “weighted”: Performance 55%,
Fuel Economy 25% and Subjective 20%. It was refreshing
to note the subjective percentage was low and would not
sway the point totals. For us Dodge “HooRa” fanatics I’ll
have to increase the subjective percentage to make the
Ram a winner.
Also, did I mention that the price tag for the Ram (the
trucks seemed comparably equipped) was noted to be
$8,000 less on the 3/4-ton trucks that were tested? Their
article did not mention the price of the 3500 trucks. Money
certainly adds to the “subjective” part of my evaluation.
So, what is the bottom line? After all, I am keeping score.
Well, no apologies for my bias, I think that Dodge and
Cummins deserve the win. My reasoning goes as follow:
How about that matter of price? Two of the articles talked
about price differences of $8000 to $10,000. I know, there
is a price point and option level for every buyer, be it Ram,
Ford or GM. But, the sources noted that the trucks were
comparably equipped, top-of-the-line vehicles. I’ll keep
the cash.
Nonetheless, for me the most compelling reason for a
Ram/Cummins win is that the engine and driveline have
been in the marketplace for four years and, aside from
turbocharger and ECM flashes for emissions updates,
the engine and drivetrain have proven to be strong
and reliable. (There is also the overriding bona fides of
twenty-plus years of close cooperation and development
between the world’s paramount diesel engine maker and
Dodge.) I shudder to think what problems Ford and GM
will encounter as their engines strive to fulfill the 2010
emissions regulations. And, with Ford’s clean-sheet-ofpaper, new engine, well, let me say that their previous 6.4
and 6.0 engines were less than stellar, and I would not
want to be the guinea pig for this new engine. As Ram/
Cummins owners, let’s enjoy the three-year head start
that we have on the competition. Score another point for
the “Purchase Confirmation” Cowboys.
“Buyer’s Remorse” Bears: 5
Purchase Confirmation Cowboys: 2
PickupTrucks.com Special Report 2010 HD Three-Quarter-Ton Diesel Trucks (SRW)
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
A Blank Canvas/Inexpensive Truck
Earlier I mentioned that the transaction price on my 2010
truck was a “fantastic $34,616.” (The actual sticker price
was $40,820, which is a real bargain in comparison to the
prices of the other trucks as I noted above in “Excerpts
from the Evidence.”)
So if you think the price of a new truck is out of hand, I
would suggest that you give the blank canvas, ST-type
truck a look. When shopping for the truck, there was a
comparable SLT/Bighorn truck next to mine with a sticker
price of $47,210. So what do you get for the difference of
$6390?
I hi-lited the two window stickers and closely compared the
trucks. The SLT/Bighorn had the additional following items:
Foglamps
Remote keyless entry
Power lumbar adjust
Rear 60/40 folding seat
10-way power seat
Polished aluminum wheels
Integrated brake controller
Power heated mirrors
Rear sliding window
Full carpeting
Chrome bumpers
Chrome Grille
Chrome interior trim
Steering wheel mounted audio controls
Leather wrapped steering wheel
Universal garage door opener
Overhead console
Sunvisors with vanity mirrors
Underhood lamp
Engine block heater
Remote start system
The only things on that list that I would like to have on
my truck were the remote keyless entry, carpeting and
steering wheel mounted audio controls. With a $6390
head start, I think I can make do. Also, with a $6390 head
start, I can purchase some 20” wheels and tires that will
transform the look of the truck. What do you think?
The wheels and tires do transform the look of the truck.
You may have noted that I had my reservations about
having bought the base model truck with the ST trim
package, and at that moment I awarded a point to
“Buyer’s Remorse” because the idea was not appealing.
As they say in the NFL play-by-play broadcast, “Upon
further review…” Well, upon further review subtract a point
from “Buyer’s Remorse” and award the point to “Purchase
Confirmation” because the blank canvas, ST trim package
does not sacrifice anything from the vehicle’s tow rating
nor does it sacrifice anything in creature comforts that I
cannot correct with aftermarket parts.
Bears: 4
Cowboys: 3
Also, upon further review, you cannot beat the
aforementioned price that was only $2000 more than my
good ‘ole 2003 truck. To keep things close, let’s deduct
.5 from “Buyer’s Remorse” and award .5 to “Purchase
Confirmation.”
Bears: 3.5
Cowboys: 3.5
The Tie Breaker and Bottom Line
Since this article injects much from the idiom of sports into
my contest between “Buyer’s Remorse” and “Purchase
Confirmation” it should come as no surprise to you that
the tie breaker is come from the home-field advantage
and the Dodge HooRa provided by the Turbo Diesel
Register’s membership. There is no doubt that without
you guys and gals as support, this new truck of mine
would still be at the dealership. Having the membership to
help out, answer questions, act as ambassadors with the
TDR Travel Companion, and provide 24/7 assistance at
the TDR’s website tips the scale in favor of the “Purchase
Confirmation.”
Thank you!
And, I say with all manner of confidence, go forth and take
a look at a 2011 Ram Turbo Diesel. The TDR, Ram and
Cummins will be there to back you up.
Will 20” wheels and tires work on a 2500 series truck?
Weight ratings?
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
Volume 2010-2012
15
THREE MONTH OWNERSHIP NOTES
AT A LOSS FOR WORDS?
I mentioned earlier that my quest for purchase confirmation
took me back through many TDR magazines. After all,
our coverage of the drivetrain (6.7-liter engine and 68RFE
automatic transmission) started back in February 2008
in Issue 58. But specific Fourth Generation write-ups
were in Issue 67 and Issue 70; and I spent time rereading
those articles and time at the TDRs web site to see what
impressions others had of this vehicle that I listed as
“Outstanding” in my Issue 67 write-up just one year ago.
I know that I stated in the article that “I was at a loss for
words.” However, I just hopped out of my Chevrolet HHR
rental car and I’ve got to make a comment on the featured
vehicle.
So, would you believe Jim Anderson said it all in Issue 70?
Would you also believe that the writers in Issue 67 covered
the truck in great detail?
Would you believe that I am at a loss for words from this
point forward? Really, I am. But please don’t send nastygrams scolding me for not submitting a full review of the
2010 truck in this column. I shouldn’t need to re-invent the
wheel. If you are interested in a Fourth Generation truck
or, like me, seeking for “Purchase Confirmation,” log on to
the TDR’s web site and reread my and others’ impressions
in Issue 67 and Jim’s evaluation in Issue 70. And, perhaps
most important, read what your fellow TDR members have
to say in the Fourth Generation forum. For the most part
(and remember, it is the nature of the internet to gripe and
complain), the online comments are more than favorable.
By member accounts the truck is impressive.
By the way, I’m sticking with my first impression from
Issue 67 which is now one-year old, “Outstanding.”
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
Wait, wrong magazine. What’s a Chevy, four-door econobox-on-wheels got to do with the 2010 Ram Heavy Duty
truck?
How about readouts which are informative and easy to
retrieve? While the Chevy did not have a fancy electronic
vehicle information center (EVIC), essential digital
information was conveniently displayed just beneath the
odometer. I was impressed. I want my information where I
want it. Dodge fans may differ about locating controls on
the steering wheel, or, as I prefer, on the push-in-the-side
stalk-type design. But it cannot be debated that the Chevy
offered more ready information than our Dodge trucks (or
at least my stripped-down ST version).
For example: Where is average miles-per-hour? (Don’t
answer, “It is on my navigation system.”) Where are
the individual tire pressure readings? To this list add
information monitored by the engine’s control module
such as turbocharger boost, exhaust gas temperature (at
various sensors for emissions), fuel rail pressure, intake air
temperature. I guess I’ll have to purchase.
The next issue will present further discussion of this
matter. More discussion with Dodge and Cummins is
called for. Questions need answers. How so? Watch your
oil pressure gauge, watch your oil pressure EVIC—Are they
the same? Ditto the water temperature. Are the gauges
the virtual type? Is the EVIC number a virtual number?
Hang in there for “Part Two” of the gauge/EVIC story in
the next issue of the TDR. Who knows, I might even have
the latest EDGE Products “Insight” monitoring system to
check against the factory readings. Stay tuned…
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
We found that the Auto Meter Sport Comp II series of
gauges are a close-to-perfect match for Dodge’s 2010 dash.
At night, just like the Dodge gauges, the backlit numbers
are green and the dial indicators are red.
16
Volume 2010-2012
An EDGE Insight monitor has been installed
on the editor’s 2010 project truck.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
NOTES:
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
17
TECHNICAL SERVICE BULLETINS
FOR 2010
ISSUE 70 – TDRESOURCE
Have we not all heard comments by those unfamiliar with
the Ram Turbo Diesel (a prospective buyer of either a new
or used truck, or a visitor on the internet or at the truck
show) that “the Turbo Diesel certainly has its share of
problems?” To them, no doubt, the grass looks greener on
the other side. However, thanks to the TDR membership
group and the support from Chrysler and Cummins, we
are equipped with answers and solutions, rather than the
dismay and isolation that would exist without a support
group.
THIS YEAR’S TECHNICAL SERVICE BULLETINS
Each year as a service for the TDR membership I
purchase a subscription to Chrysler’s online service and
data system (www.techauthority.com). New for this year,
the TechAuthority site offers an index of factory technical
service bulletins (TSBs) that have been released in
the past year. I scroll through the index and print those
bulletins that are pertinent to all Turbo Diesel trucks (all
years, all models with cab and chassis included). With the
bulletins in hand, I summarize the bulletin for publication
in the magazine. Should you need a complete copy of
the bulletin, you can contact your dealer with Issue 70
in hand, or armed with your truck’s vehicle identification
number (VIN) and a credit card you can log on to www.
techauthority.com and, for $20, you can view/print all of
the TSBs that apply to your vehicle.
In an effort to consolidate the TSBs for the magazine,
we’re going to use the same index system categories as
Chrysler. Below are the index categories.
2 Front Suspension
3 Axle/Driveline
5 Brakes
6 Clutch
7 Cooling
8 Electrical
9 Engine
11 Exhaust
13 Frame and Bumpers
18
Volume 2010-2012
14
16
18
19
21
22
23
24
25
26
A note concerning the TSBs and their use: The bulletins
are intended to provide dealers with the latest repair
information. Often the TSB is specific to the VIN. VIN data
on the Chrysler service network helps the dealer in his
service efforts. A TSB is not an implied warranty.
WHAT DO THE MODEL CODES MEAN?
Throughout our summary pages you’ll see model codes
listed for the various Dodge trucks. The following is a chart
of the model code meanings.
DR = 1500 Pickup
DS = 2009 1500 Pickup
DH = 2500 Pickup
DJ = 2010 2500 Pickup
D1 = 3500 Pickup
D2 = 2010 3500 Pickup
DC = 3500 Cab and chassis
DD = 2011 3500 C/C
DM = 4500/5500 Cab and chassis
DP = 2011 4500/5500 C/C
NEW RELEASES
Again, with the new service at www.techauthority.com
we’ve gathered information on Dodge Technical Service
Bulletins that have been released only during the past
year. If you wish to review all of the TSBs for the Third
Generation truck, we have archived those as well as
this update at the TDR’s web site (Site Features: TSBs).
Likewise, TDR Issues 66 and 58 have larger listings that
allow the Third Generation owner to review the TSBs
issued from 2003 to 2009.
Fuel
Propeller Shafts and U-Joints
Vehicle Performance
Steering
Transmission
Wheels and Tires
Body
Air Conditioning
Emissions Control
Miscellaneous
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
CATEGORY 8
ELECTRICAL
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
08-004-10
3/2/10
’10 (D1)
’10 (DJ)
’09-’10 (DS)
Radio video disable update.
This information-only bulletin describes the programming process used for allowing the
front seat video option to be displayed if the vehicle is in park (automatic) or the emergency
brake is on (manual).
09-018-10
7/29/10
’10 (DJ)
’09-’10 (DS)
Left turn signal on trailer may be inoperative.
When verifying trailer turn signal function prior to towing a trailer, the customer may
experience a non functional left trailer turn signal. Check connector terminal number one.
If there is silicone in the connector use a suitable tool, such as a straight blade Exacto knife,
to scrape the silicone off the outside of the number one, left terminal.
CATEGORY 9
ENGINE
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
09-001-10
7/2/10
All diesel models
Dust-out diagnosis for Cummins diesel engines.
This information-only bulletin involves proper inspection procedures to determine engine
failure due to dust-out condition. Engines damaged due to the infiltration of dirt and/or
debris through the air intake system are not warrantable.
CATEGORY 14
FUEL
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
14-001-10
2/2/10
’03-’09 (DH, D1)
Electronic fuel control actuator (FCA) available for service/New diagnostics available for
DTC P0251.
This bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with a 5.9-liter Cummins Turbo Diesel engine.
Should the engine surge at idle or MIL illumination of code P0251 occur, follow the
diagnostics in the service bulletin. The bulletin involves replacing the FCA with a revised
Mopar part number 05183245AA.
14-002-10
2/11/10
’03-’09 (DH, D1)
’07-’09 (DC)
Heavy duty filtration – Mopar retrofit or add on parts available.
This bulletin applies to D1/DH/DR vehicles equipped with a 5.9-liter Cummins engine built
from 2003 model year and D1/DH/DC vehicles equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins engine built
from 2007 model year. Several fuel system add-on or retrofit parts are available to enhance
the filtering capability for customers exposing their vehicles to extremely dirty conditions. The
description of parts available for Cummins diesel equipped vehicles is listed below:
6.7-Liter Changes
• New fuel filter. This is the FS2 design. (5 and 10 micron filter-in-filter) fuel filter to retrofit earlier models (shell and element).
68061633AA – FS2 Element, fuel filter and shell.
68061634AA – FS2 Element, fuel filter – This filter to supersede the original 5183410AA
filter when supplies are exhausted.
6.7-Liter and 5.9-Liter Changes
• Fuel tank vent hose. 5.9 and 6.7 add-on or upgraded fuel tank vent hose kit with vent cap.
68068997AA – Fuel Tank Vent. Must be used in conjunction with the appropriate Fuel Tank
Vent Kit listed below:
68051906AA – Kit, Severe Duty Fuel Tank Ventilation – DC 52 Gallon Tank
68061341AA – Kit, Severe Duty Fuel Tank Ventilation – D1/DH 35 Gallon Tank
68061342AA – Kit, Severe Duty Fuel Tank Ventilation – D1/DH 34 Gallon Tank
5.9-Liter Changes
• 5.9 upgraded air filter. This filter is similar in design to the current 6.7-liter air filter. The part number is: 53034249AA – Element, Air Filter – 2003-2007 5.9-liter
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
19
CATEGORY 18
VEHICLE PERFORMANCE
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
18-024-09
12/3/09
Rev. A
’07-’09 (D1, DH)
Diagnostic and System improvements and improved air filter minder.
This bulletin supersedes technical service bulletin 18-024-09, dated August 6, 2009. This
bulletin applies to D1/DH vehicles equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins engine built before
May 5, 2009. This bulletin involves selectively erasing and reprogramming the engine control
module (ECM) with new software. Pickup trucks equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins diesel
have a number of software improvements available. This latest bulletin will include:
• EGR valve cleaning cycle.
• DPF “Snuffer” feature to expand DPF temperature controls during deSoot.
• DPF “Super deSoot” feature to enhance the deSoot process. • Improved air filter minder detection.
• Added turbo cleaning scan tool service procedure available through a diagnostic scan tool. This procedure is available with version 10.02 due out in December.
• Many other enhancements.
18-016-10
4/30/10
’07-’08 (DH)
’07-’08 (D1)
CCN update required with J35 recall.
This bulletin applies to ’07 and ’08 vehicles equipped with a Cummins 6.7-liter engine. This
bulletin supersedes service bulletin 18-013-08 Rev. A, dated December 4, 2008. Many
improvements have been addressed with the latest engine control module (ECM) software
addressed in Recall J35. The cab compartment node (CCN) may require updating in
conjunction with the Recall. This service bulletin discusses the procedure used to update
the CCN.
18-017-10
5/15/10
’06 (DH) 2500 pickup
5.9-liter
’06 (D1) 3500 pickup
5.9-liter
’07 ((DH) 2500 pickup
5.9-liter
’07 (D1) 3500 pickup
5.9-liter
’07 (DC) 3500 Cab/
Chassis 6.7-liter
The problem addressed with this bulletin is that the truck will not pass a Smog Check OnBoard Diagnostic (OBD) Test or Inspection and Maintenance check up.
18-020-10
6/10/10
’07-’10 (DC)
’08-’10 (DM)
This bulletin applies to 2006 and 2007 vehicles equipped with a 5.9-liter Cummins engine
(sales code ETC or ETH) with Federal emissions (sales code NAA) built after January 1, 2006,
or Cab Chassis equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins engine (sales code ETJ) built prior to
January 11, 2007. This bulletin supersedes service bulletin 18-038-09, dated December 19,
2009. This revised bulletin will cover federal emissions (EPA) certified vehicles only. Vehicles
equipped with CARB (California) emissions have been removed and are addressed in Recall
K01, dated May 2010.
The instructions in the bulletin tell the technician how to selectively erase and reprogram the
Engine Control Module (ECM) with new software.
Cab chassis trucks equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins engine have a number of software
improvements available. This latest service bulletin (which supersedes 18-038-06 and 18001-09) will include improvements to prevent erroneous Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL)
illumination:
• P000F – Fuel System Over Pressure Relief Valve Activated
• P0087 – Fuel Rail Pressure Too Low
• P0106 – Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Performance
• P0191 – Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor circuit Performance
• P1011 – Fuel Pump Delivery Pressure Too Low
• P2299 – Brake Pedal Position/Accelerator Pedal Position Incompatible
• P2262 – Turbocharger Boost Pressure Not Detected – Mechanical
The bulletin involves selectively erasing and reprogramming the ECM.
20
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
CATEGORY 19
FRONT SUSPENSION
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
19-002-10
1/23/10
’08-’09 (DM)
Steering wander.
While traveling on a straight stretch of highway, a customer may feel the need to provide
steering input to correct a vehicle wander condition. This bulletin applies to 4x2 vehicles
built before August 8, 2009. This bulletin involves inspection or replacement of suspension
components and revised caster specifications to improve road feel and correct a vehicle
wander condition. If the vehicle operator describes the symptom/condition, perform the
repair procedure.
19-004-10
5/29/10
’09 (DH)
Steering Wander
While traveling on a straight stretch of highway, a customer may feel the need to provide
steering input to correct a vehicle wander condition. This bulletin applies to 4x4 vehicles built
before February 4, 2009. This bulletin involves installing an Intermediate steering shaft kit,
part number 05165725AA.
CATEGORY 21
21-003-10
5/12/10
’07 (DC)
TRANSMISSION
MIL illumination due to transmission related DTC P0711 or P0776.
This bulletin applies to 2007 3500 Chassis Cab models equipped with a 6.7-liter diesel
engine and an AS68RC automatic transmission. This bulletin supersedes service bulletin 21019-08, dated August 2, 2008. The customer may experience a malfunction indicator lamp
(MIL) due to one or both of the following diagnostic trouble codes:
P0711 – Transmission Temperature Sensor 1 Performance
P0776 – Pressure Control Solenoid B Performance.
This bulletin involves verifying software levels in the transmission control module (TCM)
and the engine control module (ECM). Then, as necessary, selectively erasing and
reprogramming the TCM and possibly the ECM.
CATEGORY 23
23-006-10
3/10/10
’10 (D2)
’10 (DJ)
’09 (DS)
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
BODY
Hood creaking and squeaking sound.
The customer may experience a creaking and or squeaking sound from the hood area
when turning the vehicle and or going over rough terrain. Inspect the hood, and if a
squeaking or creaking sound is observed when pressing the front of the hood, perform the
repair procedure, which calls for the addition of anti-squeak tape to the underside of the
hood.
Volume 2010-2012
21
CATEGORY 25
EMISSIONS CONTROL
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
25-001-09
10/20/09
’07-’09 (DH/D1)
MIL Illumination due to P2000, P2A00 and/or P2A01.
This bulletin supersedes service bulletin 18-035-08 dated September 13, 2008. This bulletin
applies to vehicles equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins diesel engine. The customer may
experience MIL illumination. Further investigation by the technician may find one or more of
the following DTC(s) present:
• P2000 – NOX Absorber Efficiency Below Threshold – Bank 1.
• P2A00 – O2 Sensor 1/1 Circuit Performance.
• P2A01 – O2 Sensor 1/2 Circuit Performance.
This bulletin involves verifying all TSB’s related to high sooting issues have been properly
addressed, inspecting both Oxygen (O2) sensors and either cleaning the sensors or replacing
sensors, and installing an O2 Sensor Blanket/Shield on the exhaust pipe in the area of the front
O2 sensor.
25-001-10
7/9/10
’11 (DD)
’11 (DP)
Diesel exhaust fluid.
This bulletin provides information regarding the diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) vehicle delivery
fill guidelines. The vehicle is equipped with a “Low DEF” warning system that notifies the
driver when the level of DEF drops below approximately 2.5 gallons. The warning system
includes warning messages displayed by the EVIC and audible chimes. The first level
warning displays the message “Refill DEF Engine Will Not Restart In XXX Miles”. If the vehicle is driven too long with low DEF, the message “Refill DEF Engine Will Not Start” will
be displayed. At that point, the engine will no longer restart if it is shut off. A minimum of
2.5 gallons of DEF will need to be added in order to be able to restart the engine.
The following diagnostic trouble code may be displayed on a Diagnostic Scan Tool if the level
of DEF was low.
• P203F – (Diesel Exhaust Fluid) Reductant Level Too Low
When this code is set, the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) initiates a
countdown that will inhibit an engine restart if the DEF system is not serviced
within 500 miles .
• P1C70 – SCR Error Detected – Engine Disabled
When this code is set, the PCM commands the EVIC to display the “Refill DEF
Engine Will Not Start” message. The message will continuously display when the
counter reaches zero, and will be accompanied by a periodic chime. The engine
will not start after it has been turned off unless up to 2.5 gallons of DEF is added
to the tank.
DEF has a temperature dependent shelf life that shortens when exposed to elevated
temperatures. As temperatures increase, the Urea in the DEF degrades. As the concentration
degrades, the urea will become less effective at reducing NOx levels in the SCR catalyst. The
following chart provides the approximate shelf life of DEF Versus temperature.
Temperature
32°F
(0°C)
50°F (10°C)
68°F (20°C)
86°F (30°C)
95°F (35°C)
104°F 40°C)
122°F (50°C)
140°F (60°C)
22
Volume 2010-2012
Estimated Useful Life
Indefinite
75 Years
11 Years
23 Months
10 Months
4 Months
1 Month
1 Week
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
RECALLS ISSUED THIS YEAR
CALIFORNIA EMISSIONS RECALL K01
REPROGRAM ECM—OBD READINESS
Date: May 2010
Models: ’03 (DR) Dodge Ram 2500/3500 Pickup Truck
’06-’07 (DH/D1) Dodge Ram 2500/3500 Pickup
Truck
’07 (DC) Dodge Ram 3500 Cab/Chassis
This recall applies only to the above vehicles equipped with
a 5.9-liter diesel engine (sales codes ETC and ETH) and a
California emission control system (sales code NAE). And
to above vehicles equipped with a 6.7-liter diesel engine
(sales code ETJ) and a California emission control system
(sales code NAE) built through January 5, 2007.
The Engine Control Module (ECM) on the above vehicles
may fail to accurately report diagnostic system information
with some generic scan tools This may cause the vehicle
to be rejected or fail an Inspection/Maintenance Test (also
known as a Smog Check).
Repair: The Engine control Module (ECM) must be
reprogrammed (flashed).
EMISSIONS RECALL J35
REPROGRAM ECM—REGENERATION STRATEGY
Date: April 2010
Models: ’07.5-’09 (DH/D1) Dodge Ram 2500/3500
Pickup Truck
This recall applies only to the above vehicles equipped
with a 6.7-liter diesel engine (sale code ETJ). The Engine
Control Module (ECM) software program on the above
vehicles may cause illumination of the Malfunction
Indicator Lamp (MIL) when no problem exists or under
certain conditions allow heavy sooting of the turbocharger,
exhaust gas recirculation valve and diesel particulate filter.
Heavy sooting could damage emissions components and
result in increased emissions.
www.techauthority.com
A HIGHLY RECOMMENDED RESOURCE
After a five-year absence of providing the service of listing
new technical service bulletins for a given year, the folks
at TechAuthority (www.techauthority.com) have reinstated
this service feature. This is both good and not-so-good for
the TDR audience.
How so?
Good: It allows the editor to list only those TSBs issued
during a given year. This cuts down on my research and
trims the page count as we don’t have to print a compilation
of TSBs that go on for three or four years.
Not-so-good: As the owner you only get to see a limited,
one-year window of bulletins printed in the magazine.
How can we make this news to you more agreeable? First,
realize that a compilation of the yearly TSB updates is
always available to you at the TDR’s web site under the
listing of “TSBs.” Second, if you want to search the TSBs
the old-fashioned way you can go back to your printed
magazines and look specifically at our annual summaries
(starting with a progression of four) at 66, 62, 58, 54, etc.
Elsewhere in the magazine I’ve already talked about
TechAuthority as an outstanding resource for information.
The value of the information available for your truck’s VIN
at www.techauthority.com far exceeds the TechAuthority
subscription price of $20. Using your VIN (I even tried a
’97 truck’s VIN and got the information), you’ll be able to
pull up and print all the TSBs and recall notices specific to
your truck. And, as mentioned on page 53, you’ll be able
to scroll through the entire factory service manual for your
vehicle.
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
Repair: The Engine Control Module must be reprogrammed
(flashed). The bulletin describes the service procedure
that the dealership technician is to follow. Using the
dealership’s scan tools, the time allowance for the
reprogramming operation is less than one hour. As a part
of the recall and ECM update the technician has to verify
that the previous emissions recall, recall G30, October
2007, has been performed. The G30 recall contains
software that must be installed to prevent damage to the
ECM. There are no parts involved in the J35 recall notice.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
23
WHAT’S UP WITH
THE 6.7-LITER ENGINE
ISSUE 62 – CUMMINS’ COLUMN
by Robert Patton
In buying and selling the 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel, there is bad
news and good news. For reasons well-known to everyone
witnessing the steep rise in fuel prices, demand in the
market for pickup trucks, and particularly for heavy-duty
pickups, has taken a steep slide. But as a consequence
there has never been a better time to buy.
We could hand Joe NewDiesel this bibliography, but Joe
doesn’t really want a pile of printed technical information.
He just wants to know, thumbs-up or thumbs-down. At
most he wants us to summarize the facts for him.
In such a roiled market, there is a lot of uncertainty, but
also much interest in what promises to be a unique pickup.
You’ve heard it from your friends, I’m sure, because as a
TDR type you are the automotive and truck “authority” in
your neighborhood. It goes with the badge on the grille of
your Turbo Diesel.
Let’s suppose a friend, let’s call him Joe NewDiesel, puts
it to you like this: “What’s up with that new 6.7-liter engine
in the famous Dodge-Cummins Turbo Diesel? I’ve read
that it’s a great new engine, but I’ve heard it has teething
problems.” Or he asks, “How can such a powerful engine
really meet the tough emissions controls going into effect
in 2010?” Maybe Joe NewDiesel follows that up with, “How
can it achieve acceptable engine efficiency, considering
the rising cost of fuel?”
If you are the neighborhood expert, or if you are the editor
of the TDR, how do you get the story across, so your
newcomer audience will understand that it makes sense
to own one of those incredible 6.7-liter Turbo Diesels?
Just to make sure we get the facts right, we go to the TDR
index and this is what you find:
Issue 52 – Introduction of Cab and Chassis trucks with
the 6.7 by Steve St. Laurent
Issue 53 – Highlights of the 6.7 engine by Joe Donnelly
Issue 54 – Sneak peak at the 6.7 engine in Cab and
Chassis truck by Greg Whale
Issue 55 – Introduction of a regular column chronicling
the engine’s ongoing progress
Issue 56 – Exposé on how Cummins met the strict 2010
emissions standards
Issue 57 – Joe Donnally’s detailed inspection of 6.7
engine specifications
Issues 58 through 60 – Input and feedback from new
owners in the field
Issue 61 – A new regular feature, The Cummins’ Column”
with Cummins’ answers.
24
Volume 2010-2012
Besides a thumbs-up/thumbs-down answer, we believe that
Joe NewDiesel must also be apprised of the background
that led to the introduction of the 6.7 engine. So what
exactly do you say, Mister Editor or Mister TDR Expert?
It’s a challenge, but here is how it might play out between
you or me and Joe NewDiesel. We decide to begin by
spotlighting the most impressive developments in the
diesel industry in recent years. We tell Mr. NewDiesel that
with the new 6.7-liter engine, Cummins has achieved a
nearly unbelievable reduction of 90% (that’s right 90%,
you emphasize) in both particulate matter and oxides of
nitrogen from the already strict standards implemented
in 2004.
Joe NewDiesel’s reaction, “Ho hum … everyone has to
do it.”
“No, Joe,” we counter; “other diesel engine manufacturers
are still scrambling to qualify for 2010, while the Cummins
engine is so clean that it has put the 2010 standards
behind it, and in so doing leaves the competition behind.”
Joe NewDiesel affects nonchalance: “So, what’s that
mean to me?”
Apparently Mr. NewDiesel is not as wrapped-up in this
emissions thing as we are. Remember he just wants a
thumbs-up or thumbs-down. But we are not letting him
off that easy; we are providing context. We tell him, “So,
unlike the yo-yo changes that we have had to endure every
3 to 4 years, the 6.7 engine will be good until the next set
of emissions legislation in 2013.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
“Additionally, consider that the 6.7 engine offers a rocksolid engine-design platform that allows Dodge to ease
into the next generation Ram, to further the stable Dodge/
Cummins relationship, and continue to keep this truck at
the head of the pack.
“It is really uncertain what will happen with the Ford and
Navistar relationship,” you advise Joe NewDiesel; and
therefore you suggest, “You clearly would not want a Ford
truck.” You explain that “the Duramax diesel engine in
GM products will be totally revamped to meet the 2010
emissions standards. You’ll not want to be the first on the
block to own that engine either. Rumor has it that they’ll
offer a V-6 for 1500 trucks and a V-8 for their 2500/3500
trucks. The engine will be a radical departure from the
normal intake-in-the-center and exhaust-out-of-the-side
Vee configuration.”
Joe NewDiesel affects a yawn. (This guy is difficult to bowl
over.)
To keep him engaged, we make a strategic concession: the
new engine is not perfect. “Yes, Mr. NewDiesel, there have
been what you’ve called ‘teething problems’. Admittedly,
vehicles in early production runs were plagued by a flurry
of engine-computer fault codes and the newly designed
diesel particulate filter had initial problems in regeneration
cycles, and turbochargers that were not prepared to deal
with an overburden of soot. In spite of these shake-down
complaints, this engine can safely be pronounced as
Excellent.”
“Excellent?” quizzes Joe NewDiesel with raised eyebrow.
“Yes, excellent,” we maintain, settling back for some morespecific technical stuff. Finally Joe shows his interest and
is prepared to listen to our background facts. We pull out
the stops. From here out, it’s not conversation, it’s factual
recitation.
In April the 6.7-liter engine earned the PACE Award winner
status after an extensive review by an independent panel
of judges, a comprehensive written application, and a site
visit. The 14th annual award was presented in a ceremony in
Detroit, Michigan, by Automotive News and co-sponsors
Microsoft, SAP, and Transportation Research Center Inc.
So, to have the PACE Award given to Cummins means the
automotive community recognizes that Cummins is the
first to meet 2010 emissions (I’m counting, that gem of
a fact has been emphasized three times) by using a NOX
absorber catalyst (NAC) thereby eliminating the necessary
scramble that others will face in 2010.
Nonetheless, as we’ve noted, this engine launch is not as
trouble-free as the previous ’03-’07 5.9-liter engine, which
received a resounding thumbs-up from the beginning,
while the comparable Ford 6.0-liter engine received a big
disappointing thumbs-down. At that time the GM Duramax
got a solid thumbs up.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
But NewDiesel isn’t interested in history—he maintains
that he is not in the market for a used truck. To add depth
to these facts, we identify the Ford and GM diesel web
sites where he can scrutinize the laundry list of problems
that they are having with their ’07.5 and newer engines.
Joe understands our point. He accept the warrant of
Cummins’ reputation, and he feels safe in the support of
TDR members to keep him in the know. He goes straight
to everybody’s bottom line —the big question today—
“How’s the fuel mileage on the new 6.7?”
Mr. NewDeisel is not being coy now: he has his note pad
out. And we don’t spare the details. At this point, I proceed
unabashedly as editor, drawing technical information
from the resources of the TDR to explain the operation
and energy dynamics of the new engine as it compares to
earlier Turbo Diesel engines.
My basis for comparison:
• 110,000 miles behind the wheel of a ’03 2500, Quad Cab, short box, 47RE automatic with 3.54 gearing (.69 × 3.54
= 2.44 overall top gear) and two-wheel drive.
• 2
5,000 miles behind the wheel of a ’07.5, 3500, Mega Cab, long box, 68RFE automatic with 3.73 gearing (.63 ×
3.73 = 2.34 overall top gear) and two-wheel drive.
Engine Data:
• The ’03 5.9-liter engine was rated at 235hp/460 torque.
It had a TST performance module set on level 3
which provided about 40 more horsepower/60 torque
(275hp/520tq). Mileage wise, the TST module modified
the timing of the fuel injection. Injection timing changes
can improve fuel economy, but often do so at the
expense of increased exhaust emissions. (Also note:
Advancing the injection timing will result in higher peak
cylinder pressures and can overstress the power cylinder,
cylinder head and block structure, and engine rod and
main bearings, depending on the amount of injection
timing change.)
• The ’07.5 6.7-liter engine is rated at 350 horsepower/650 torque. No modifications have been made to this engine.
Without changing my driving habits:
• Pulling 12,000 pound/30ft car hauler at 70 mph
12.0mpg with the ’03
10.0mpg with the ’07.5
• Around town (using a light left foot)
16-17.5mpg with the ’03
13.5-15.0mpg with the ’07.5
• Unloaded freeway travel (level ground) at 75 mph
19-20mpg with the ’03
17-18mpg with the ’07.5
Should I have believe that the ’07.5 truck would be as
frugal as the ’03 truck? Sure, why not have unrealistic
expectations. But seriously, the ’07.5 is a dually truck
(bigger aerodynamic block) and is a Mega Cab/Long Box
and, I’m guessing, weighs 1,200 pounds (17%) more than
the ’03. Likewise the ’07.5 engine offers 75 horsepower and
130 torque over the ’03. Do I use that power? You bet. It
would be unrealistic to expect the same mileage results.
Volume 2010-2012
25
Observations:
Back in May of ’06, Cummins’ Executive Engineer of the
Cummins Chrysler Program attended the May Madness
TDR event. In a presentation about the upcoming ’07.5
production of the 6.7-liter engine, he noted “new EPA
emissions standards had some impact on fuel economy,
and that we could expect 17-20mpg empty and 10-12mpg
loaded. Graphs were presented showing that the Cummins
gives one to three miles-per-gallon better than the
competitors, the Ford 6.0-liter and Chevy 6.6-liter engines.”
As I look at my personal miles-per-gallon, the numbers are
very close to those set forth in the presentation.
With the current price of diesel, fuel economy has
become more important to many of you. So, what
can you do?
• Idle time decreases fuel economy. You are burning
fuel while going nowhere, so you get 0 MPG.
• Driving style can have a big impact on fuel economy. Accelerate at a moderate pace
whenever possible.
• Higher speeds burn more fuel. Lowering your speed, especially on the highway, will improve fuel
economy.
those in the previous Cummins engine, working with
help from technical personnel at Cummins, and drawing
on resources as editor of this magazine, including data
from previous TDR articles about how the exhaust aftertreatment components operate.
THE ENGINE’S HARDWARE
Cylinder Block and Hardware
The 6.7-liter engine has a 107mm bore and 124mm stroke
(versus 102mm x 120mm for the 5.9-liter engine). In inches,
these measurements correspond to 4.21 x 4.88 inches
versus 4.016 x 4.724 inches for the 5.9-liter engine. See the
chart below for a comparison of the later 5.9-liter manual
transmission rating (highest output 5.9-liter for Dodge Ram
truck) to the 6.7-liter pickup truck automatic transmission
rating (highest output 6.7-liter for Dodge Ram truck).
Displacement
Bore
Stroke
Max. HP
Max. Torque
Turbo
Fuel System
The 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel Owner’s DVD provides some
good operating tips for better fuel economy. It is available
for viewing at the TDR’s web site www.tdr1.com; site
features; TDR TV.
Regardless of my data or the expectations of the factoryguy, I do have some test data from Dodge that compares
our Cab and Chassis/work trucks to the Ford 6.4-liter
(their new for ’07.5 product) and the Chevy 6.6-liter engine
(for ’07.5).
The data comes from my notes taken at the National Truck
Equipment Association meeting this past spring in Atlanta,
Georgia. I attended a presentation by Dodge discussing
the Cab and Chassis trucks. They had commissioned
an outside testing organization to conduct SAE fuel
consumption testing. The trucks used were the Dodge
5500, Ford 550 and Kodiak 5500 and the trucks were
ballasted to a weight of 15,950 pounds; equivalent options
and identical box configurations. The Dodge proved to be
14% more fuel efficient than the Ford, 23% more efficient
than the Chevy. My apologies, as I can’t recall from my
notes the mpg numbers from the test.
Moving right along now, Joe NewDiesel presses for a
response to the second part of his initial request: that we
provide him a coherent summary of facts on the engine’s
hardware, a sort of digest on parts and design.
It seems to me that the most efficient way to present
this information is to describe the parts and hardware of
the new 6.7-liter engine in terms of how they differs from
26
Volume 2010-2012
6.7L
5.9L
6.7L (409 C.I.D.)
5.9L (359 C.I.D.)
107mm
102mm
124mm
120mm
350 hp @ 3013 RPM
325 hp @ 2900 RPM
650 lb-ft @ 1500-2800 PRM
610 lb-ft @ 1600 RPM
Holset Variable Geometry
Holset Wastegate
Bosch HPCR
Bosch HPCR
To accommodate the larger bore, the cylinder walls are
“siamesed” or cast together with vertical coolant passages
drilled between them. During development of this engine
block, high priority was assigned to considerations of
high strength, proper coolant flow, achieving perfectly
round cylinder bores, and long-term durability. The engine
is built on the architecture and concepts of the 5.9-liter
engine used from ’03 to the present. As I have noted,
the block and head are cast iron, with the block slightly
modified for increased stiffness and noise reduction. The
skirt is re-contoured for improved stiffness and reduced
transmission of noise. Coolant passages were optimized
for coolant flow with the siamesed bores, with crossdrillings for coolant flow between cylinders.
Rod Bearings: The lower bearing stayed the same. The
upper rod bearing is a new bi-metal design.
Crankshaft: Increased stroke for the 24mm increase in
displacement. Counterweight profiles were modified for
reduced noise, vibration, and harshness. A simple design
change to machined counterweights versus “as forged”
made a significant improvement in the linear vibration
levels of the engine in vehicle.
Block Stiffener Plate: Used on all engines to strengthen
block and reduce noise.
Front Crankshaft Seal: Updated lip style that utilizes a
wear sleeve as needed for service repairs.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Connecting Rods: The rods are still of the fracture split
design but because of weight differences, they are not
backward compatible. The benefit of the fracture split
design is a joint between the rod and the cap that is
perfectly matched and more resistant to slip.
Headgasket: Still graded? Pistons graded? There is only
one service headgasket for the 6.7. It is acceptable for all
repairs as long as the head, block, and piston are within
service limits.
The Exhaust Aftertreatment
Oil Pump: The mounting bore in the block for the oil pump
was reduced in size to strengthen the block.
Fuel Pump: The pressure has been increased from 1600
bar (23,200psi) to 1800 bar (26,100psi).
Grid Heater: The grid heater is now incorporated into the
intake plate. If the grid fails, the entire plate will have to be
replaced. With exhaust gas recirculation, the grid heater
has a self-cleaning mode to prevent excessive build-up.
Conditions for self cleaning are as follows:—the engine
has been running for 30 seconds, vehicle speed is less
than 18mph, and intake temperature is greater than 66°.
The engine also has a closed crankcase ventilation system
developed by Cummins Filtration. The system incorporates
a coalescing filter that captures oil mist and returns it to the
crankcase. The filter requires service after approximately
60,000 miles.
Turbocharger
To get an overview of the exhaust aftertreatment components
I went back to Issue 56 and toinformation quoted from the
trade publication Diesel Progress. [Note that the following
descriptions apply primarily to the aftertreatment system in
the pickup. The chassis cab aftertreatment system omits
the NOX Adsorber (NAC), keeping the DOC and DPF which
are both housed in a single canister under the truck.] From
our Issue 56: “The Aftertreatment system is a three-section
unit. All three aftertreatment sections have their own active
regeneration schedules, and the engine ECM controls the
regeneration cycles.
“The system begins with a close-coupled catalyst—
essentially a conventional diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC)
incorporating a metallic substrate—mounted to a short
downpipe just off the back of the turbocharger. A short
distance behind and below the close-coupled catalyst is
the NOX adsorber unit, which is followed by a particulate
filter. Both the NOX adsorber and diesel particulate filter
(DPF) use ceramic substrates.
The turbocharger is now a proprietary Holset variablegeometry design. The sliding nozzle ring in the turbine
housing (exhaust side) allows for continuously variable air
flow and boost pressure. It works with the cooled exhaust
gas recirculation (EGR) system and aftertreatment system
to help reduce exhaust emissions. What you will feel
from the driver’s seat is better response and better
altitude capability. The new turbocharger also provides
an integrated exhaust brake. The braking performance
is better than the optional exhaust brake on a 5.9-liter,
and it now comes standard with every Cummins 6.7-liter
powered Dodge Ram.
Cylinder Head, Pistons and Hardware
The cylinder head has valve seat inserts on both intake and
exhaust ports. High strength, gallery-cooled aluminum
pistons are used, similar to those used since ’03 in the
5.9-liter high output engines. The crankshaft counterweight
profiles have been changed, reducing noise, vibration, and
harshness (NVH). These considerations are important for
penetrating the “mainstream” marketplace, where owners
are less diesel enthusiasts than seekers of smooth, quiet,
powerful, and luxurious pickup trucks.
Valve Lash: The valve lash settings are the same as used
on the later 5.9’s, at 0.010” intake and 0.026” exhaust.
Pistons: The piston pin is offset for reduction in idle noise.
Piston Cooling: Targeted piston cooling nozzles are used
on all ratings, providing oil flow to the piston cooling
galleries. The benefit of gallery-cooled pistons is better
durability because of decreased piston temperature.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
These components were taken from a Cummins test vehicle.
1. diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC)
2. NOX absorber catalyst (NAC)
3. diesel particulate filter (DPF)
“The next part of the system is the NOX adsorber catalyst,
or NAC. The NAC has been cited by the EPA as a promising
technology and as providing a possible key in future rulemaking to solve the daunting nitrous oxide puzzle.
“A NOX adsorber resembles a conventional catalyst,
incorporating a catalytic substrate through which diesel
exhaust is directed. Then the NOX molecules are collected
and held—’adsorbed’—onto the surface of the substrate,
removing them from the exhaust stream. When the surface
area of the substrate is full, the adsorber is regenerated
with heat used to chemically change the NOX into more
benign gases, mostly nitrogen and oxygen.
Volume 2010-2012
27
“The NOX adsorber is regenerated every few minutes at
approximately 600° to 800°F and the process takes about
three to five seconds. The NOX adsorber will also, over
time, collect sulfur from the fuel, which will gradually
reduce its effectiveness. So depending on how much
fuel is burned—typically every two tankfuls,, a separate
regeneration cycle is initiated to remove the sulfur. The
use of high sulfur fuel is not allowed because it results in a
high degradation rate of this catalyst.
“The third part of the aftertreatment is the diesel
particulate filter (DPF). The DPF is regenerated when
differential pressure sensors in the exhaust system detect
a specified amount of loading on the substrate. Unlike
the PM filter systems used on heavy-duty applications,
there is no ash cleaning required, and the PM filter—like
the NOX adsorber and close-coupled catalyst—is rated
for the life of the vehicle.
The “in” and “out” sides of the DPF.
“Cummins itself engineered the entire aftertreatment
system, right down to specifying the washcoat on the
catalyst bricks; and the system was assembled by
Tenneco, which does aftertreatment system packaging
for many segments of DaimlerChrysler.”
So, how does the DPF regeneration process operate?
When the ECM determines that regeneration is needed,
fuel dosing brings the temperature above 950°F. Under
normal conditions the injectors pulse three times for a
given firing event. Pilot occurs just before top dead center,
main injection at TDC and post when the piston is traveling
down on the power stroke. If fuel dosing is necessary for
increase in EGTs, there can be two more fuel injection
events, very late on the power stroke then and during the
exhaust stroke.
Active regeneration is more difficult if the vehicle is
operating in a very low speed drive cycle, and will not
occur with the transmission in Park or with the Parking
Brake set. Improvements in regeneration with later
calibrations have made regenerations more effective in all
drive cycles, including in-town drive cycles.
Later calibrations also have improvements in operation at
idle, making the system much more tolerant to idle time
than it was previously. These changes dramatically reduce
the amount of soot produced when idling is necessary,
and allow the system to reduce the level of soot in the
DPF under conditions of more extended idle. However,
care must still be taken to watch for DPF messages on the
overhead console (EVIC) signaling a need for a change
in drive cycle to enable regeneration. With the latest
calibrations, idle-up should not be used in an attempt to
help the aftertreatment system during extended idle, as
has been common with the 6.7. The new idle modes are
more effective if idle-up is NOT used.
Conclusion
Some or all the foregoing text should answer the probing
question posed by “Joe NewDiesel” and others of his
kind: “What’s up with the new 6.7-liter engine?
EGT, oxygen and pressure sensors monitor the
need for regeneration of the NAC and DPF.
“In another departure from the heavy-duty side, all of
the hydrocarbon dosing (diesel fuel) needed to raise the
temperature for the various aftertreatment regenerations
is handled by the fuel injection system rather than a
separate injection system.”
Should you have questions regarding the 6.7-liter Cummins
engine I would like to forward them on your behalf to our
helpful contacts at Cummins Inc. You can submit your
inquiry to me at [email protected] (other contact
information on page 138) and I will try to coordinate a
response(s) for Issue 63
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
‘It took some time and a lot of work to integrate the control
system,’ said Jim Fier, technical project leader. ‘Some of
the fuel we use to light the catalyst is partially burned, and
any time you burn fuel, you produce power. If this were not
the case, you would feel that extra fuel as power. With both
the air handling and the fueling, we had to adjust those
various pulses in order to keep the power balance and
the torque balance as we go in and do the regenerations.’
28
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Notes on exhaust system regeneration:
The ECM continuously monitors the level of
particulates (soot) and other substances in the
exhaust aftertreatment system. As needed, the
ECM triggers a regeneration to remove them. This
is completely transparent to the driver. There are no
indicators on the instrument cluster or EVIC, and
there is no difference in sound or feel of the engine.
In other words, when things are operating as normal,
as they do for the majority of owners, you will not
know that a regeneration is needed or in-process.
In rare cases, typically due to difficult drive cycles,
a regeneration may not be possible. In those cases,
you may see a message on the overhead console
(EVIC) regarding the aftertreatment system, stating
either ‘CATALYST FULL’ or ‘EXHAUST SYSTEM
REGENERATION REQUIRED NOW’, depending
on the level of software. As long as the percentfull message is less than 100%, the system can
complete a regeneration if you change your drive
cycle to allow it to happen. The most effective
drive cycle for regeneration is highway cruise.
Some trucks, depending on the level of software,
will display ‘REGENERATION IN PROCESS’ if your
drive cycle has changed such that regeneration
has been started. Note that this message will occur
only after the system has gotten full enough to
display the ‘EXHAUST SYSTEM REGENERATION
REQUIRED NOW’, meaning you will not see it on
every regeneration.
A visit to your dealer is necessary only if a message
regarding the exhaust aftertreatment system reading
‘SEE DEALER’ or ‘SERVICE REQD’ is displayed on
the EVIC. In that case, getting the truck to the dealer
sooner, rather than later, may prevent further damage
to the system.
The 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel Owner’s DVD provides
additional detail on the aftertreatment system and
operating tips. Watch it for more information. Visit
the TDR’s web site at www.tdr1.com; site features;
TDR TV.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
29
6.7-LITER ENGINE REPORT
ISSUE 72 – TECHNICAL TOPICS
by Robert Patton
in this issue’s editorial you’ll note the challenge that we
presented to the TDR’s writing staff—provide an all
encompassing view of a topic. The writers were also asked
to maintain their focus with articles that were brief and
to the point. My assignment was to give 6.7-liter engine
owners an update.
In order to present fresh and new information one has to
assume that the reader is up to date on the 6.7-liter engine
and its aftertreatment hardware. To that end, I researched
and reread the materials in past TDR magazines to make
sure that there were no updates needed. So, for those that
need to come up to speed on the engine, the reference
articles are:
Issue 62: pages 74-79, “What’s Up with the New 6.7-Liter
Engine?”
Issue 63: page 46, “The Next Emissions Hurdle”; pages
50, 51, “Ownership Report”; page 54,
“6.7-Liter Update.”
Issue 65: pages 42-43, “6.7-Liter: Ask the Engineer.”
Issue 66: page 40, “The Regeneration Process.”
Issue 67: pages 46-56, “The 2010 Ram HD Trucks, A TDR
Writer Report”; pages 30-34,
“Performance Enhancements for
the 6.7-Liter Engine.”
Issue 68: pages 42-48, “Fourth Generation: Ask the
Engineer – Truck and Engine.”
Issue 69: pages 48-53, “Emissions – Bringing It
Together”
Issue 71: pages 54-58, “The Editor Buys a 4th Generation
Truck.”
Wow, Mister Editor, that is a lot of research. Can you
shorten it down to, maybe, three or four major questions?
Okay, sure. What you really want to know is:
• With four years under-the-belt, how is the engine’s
reliability?
• What is the miles-per-gallon story?
• What is the regeneration story?
• What do I recommend?
Let’s get started.
How is the Engine’s Reliability?
I have noticed that the question of durability typically does
not come up with Turbo Diesel owners or potential owners.
With the exception of the Block 53 problems seen on
30
Volume 2010-2012
’98.5—’01 vintage engines (Issue 62, page 22, and Issue
60, page 114, have the details), durability of the Cummins
5.9-liter or the new 6.7-liter has never been questioned.
Can the Ford and GM customers say the same?
Reliability. Each vintage of Cummins engine has its share
of quirks. From dowel pins, to fuel transfer pumps, to
injector life of 150,000 miles, TDR members have met
the challenge and serve as the resource that alerts other
members to a problem—you show others how to repair
them. That’s the fact. The specific spotlight in this article
is directed onto the 6.7-liter engine and the question of its
reliability. And from what I have observed as editor, the
real issue of this engine’s reliability is not so much engine
components as it is on the emissions control devices
(ECDs) and updates in the engine control module (ECM)
to manage them.
Before I get into the nuts and bolts (or the bits and bytes?) of
my exposition, I want to re-emphasize the overriding
advantages our new 2011 owner has over competitive
Ford or GM trucks. The Dodge and Cummins folks have
four years in the saddle with the 6.7-liter engine, which,
as you know, met the 2010 emissions standards three
long years early. We can certainly conjecture that the
competitors will have their share of teething problems.
But back to the main story: the reliability of the 6.7-liter
engine. First off, we need to note that we are actually
looking at two unique engines with different ECDs based
on emissions testing applied to each one’s respective
product category. Specifically I refer to the difference
between (1) consumer 2500 and 3500 models to which are
applied an EPA emissions test based on a drive cycle; and
(2) commercial cab and chassis 3500, 4500, 5500 models
subject to an EPA emissions test where the engine is on
a stationary dynamometer. Recognizing this distinction, I
will treat each category separately.
First, reliability of the ’07.5–11, 6.7-liter consumer 2500
and 3500 engine: in assessing reliability, we note that
this engine has an additional ECD piece of hardware that
the cab and chassis truck do not have, namely a NAC or
nitrogen oxide (NOx) absorber catalyst. (Issue 62, page
78, has a technical discussion that covers the NAC.)
This engine has had its share of problems traced back
to soot accumulation, problems addressed by Chrysler
in several service bulletins and two recalls. It has been a
fraught issue and received considerable attention before
it could be resolved. Because questions may remain for
some users today, I will put the matter in context and
summarize its history. I am guided by information gained
in discussions with the men who work on the trucks for a
living every day at Dodge dealerships. There is no more
reliable source.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
In my summary, I cite two relevant recalls addressing this
issue: the first, known as G30, was dated October 2007:
the latest, “Emissions Recall J35,” was dated April 2010.
I start with G30 to emphasize that there was period of
nearly three years during which Cummins and Chrysler
analyzed the problem to devise solutions. The most direct
way to understand the initial problem and its eventual fix,
is to review the text of the J35 recall as it was published in
our Issue 70 magazine, re-printed herewith.
Date: April 2010
Models: ‘07.5-’09 (DHID1) Dodge Ram 2500/3500
Pickup Truck
This recall applies only to the above vehicles equipped
with a 6.7-liter diesel engine. The Engine Control
Module (ECM) software program on the above
vehicles may cause illumination of the Malfunction
Indicator Lamp (MIL) when no problem exists or
under certain conditions allow heavy sooting of the
turbocharger, exhaust gas recirculation valve and
diesel particulate filter. Heavy sooting could damage
emissions components and result in increased
emissions.
Repair: The Engine Control Module must be
reprogrammed (flashed). The bulletin describes the
service procedure that the dealership technician
is to follow. Using the dealership’s scan tools, the
time allowance for the reprogramming operation is
less than one hour. As a part of the recall and ECM
update the technician has to verify that the previous
emissions recall, recall G30, October 2007, has been
performed. The G30 recall contains software that
must be installed to prevent damage to the ECM.
There are no parts involved in the J35 recall notice.
As I read it, the most significant statement in the J35 recall
is that “there are no parts involved in the J35 recall notice.”
Prior to the software updates it prescribes, there had been
a series of technical service bulletins (TSBs) instructing
the dealerships in how to clean turbochargers and how
to wrap sensors to retain heat, and prescribing a series
of “flashes” to reprogram the ECU. With the J35 recall,
issued and acted upon a year ago, this vexing issue on
‘07.5 to ‘09 engines seems to have been solved.
For the 2010 and 2011 consumer trucks there are two TSBs
that have been released that involve, you guessed it, a
reflash to the ECM with software updates. These bulletins
are listed on page 66.
chassis were not fitted with the necessary urea injection
until the official emissions due date of 1/1/2010. The report
card on these engines has not been completed.
For the 2011 commercial trucks there is a TSB that has
been released that involves a reflash to ECM with a
software update. This bulletin summary is on page 65.
What is the MPG Story?
As the editor, with firsthand knowledge about the 6.7-liter
engine since 8/07, I’ll tackle this question. I’m going to
share with you the short answer, the competitive story,
and then the long story.
The short answer: The Issue 67 magazine, pages 3033, has a listing of performance items/tuners that are
available for the 6.7-liter engine. It also gives my view on
the hype created by internet town-criers with their claims
of “increased fuel mileage of 5mpg.” My response bears
repeating:
“Yet, with the continuous barrage of criers, magazines
and advertisements, one has to wonder, ‘Is there validity
to such hype?’ Without thinking thoroughly about the
question, I asked a group of Cummins’ engineers. They
were candid in their response. To summarize, one has to
consider the duty cycle of the truck. If it is being used as
intended—moderate to high load in highway travel—the
answer is the obvious: the engine’s output of unburned
fuel (particulates) is very low, the exhaust gas temperature
is high and there is little need to fire-up the self-cleaning
oven known as the diesel particulate filter. Consequently
the mileage penalty is negligible, if any at all.
“If the truck is being used as a grocery-getter or has long
periods of idling there can be an effect on fuel mileage.
How much? The estimate is less than 5%. Five-percent is
nowhere close to the claims of 5mpg.”
Also, the Issue 67 magazine, pages 42-44, had all the
details regarding emissions compliance.
The competitive story: From Issue 71 you likely noted the
reference to a test done by the folks at www.pickuptrucks.
com titled the “Diesel Shootout.”
I have been on the lookout for other apples-to-apples
comparisons but I’ve not seen any better than the one
done by pickuptrucks.com. The following are the numbers
from my Issue 71 summary of their 16 pages of text:
Now, the ’07.5-’09 cab and chassis engines: The emissions
test for a commercial cab and chassis is done on an
engine dyno rather than an EPA driving cycle. Therefore,
these engines do not have the NAC hardware. Would you
believe me if I told you that the problems with this engine
have been minimal?
3/4-Ton
GM
Ford
Ram
Unloaded
19.66
18.55
17.20
w/Trailer
13.28
13.91
12.38
Combined
15.85
15.90
14.39
DEF Consumption
1750 (mL)
360 (mL)
Finally, the new ’11 cab and chassis engine with urea
injection: While it is true that the ’07.5, 6.7-liter consumer
2500 and 3500 trucks met the EPA’s 2010 emissions
standards three years early, the engine in the cab and
1-Ton
GM
Ford
Ram
Unloaded
17.96
17.32
14.53
w/Trailer
11.04
12.69
11.21
Combined
13.67
14.64
12.65
DEF Consumption
2760 (mL)
2650 (mL)
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
31
Granted, our truck was not the winner of the pickuptrucks.
com “Diesel Shootout.” In fairness, to Ram, Cummins and
the TDR audience, I found another publication that tested
all three trucks, WardsAuto.com, at the same event where
the pickuptrucks.com tested the vehicles. The report
from Wards, “In our trailering evaluations, each truck
got roughly the same fuel economy (11.6 mpg) and each
scampered up and down a 20% grade with relative ease.”
If you want to fish for red herrings, you can plug in the cost
for DEF and do some awkward mathematics to try and
compute an overall cost-for-fuel and DEF. The math is not
going to make up a difference (based on their “combined”
results) of 1.5mpg (3/4-ton trucks) or a 1 to 2mpg (one-ton
trucks). Ouch.
The long story, a tale of woe: I have a close friend that read
the words from the internet town criers about “increased
fuel mileage of 5mpg.” His comment, “There is only one
way to find out, right?”
So, armed with credit card, a metal sawzall, and tin snips to cut
and fit some exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) block-off plates,
I sent him to work on his ’07.5 6.7-liter engine.
He had logged about 10,000 miles on the engine prior
to the decision to “walk on the wild side.” He was fully
aware that the emissions control device (ECDs) deletes
were illegal and that he would have no rights to warranty
consideration. The temptation of an additional 5mpg was
too good to pass up.
First up, order the turbo-back ECD delete pipes, dummy
sensors, and the EGR block off plates. The $700 kit was
installed and off he went to tow for a modest 12-hour round
trip. Thirty-minutes into the return trip the overhead console
chimes and the message reads “Diesel Particulate Filter
(DPF) full, See Dealer.” I get the frantic phone call asking
“What should I do?” My answer, “Keep driving and hope
that the truck does not go into a limp-home mode. After all,
you’ve only got 5 hours, 30 minutes remaining on your trip.
Aside from the console chime every 10-minutes, he made
it back to the home base without the inconvenience of
derate. The next day the first order of business was to call
the “ECD delete dudes” and quiz them about their pipes
and sensors. His question, “Why did the message ‘DPF
full’ come up, it no longer has a DPF?” Their answer, “Not
really sure, man. Guess you need to spend another $900
with us and get the Edge Products module that allows
you to reset the fault codes and clear the codes each and
every time you start the truck.”
It looks like the temptation of an additional 5mpg was too
good to be true…
So, my close friend was into this project for a cool $1600
and, should a problem arise, he now had no hope for any
type of future warranty consideration.
Over the next 2.5 years and 30,000 miles the engine ran
without any problems. However, the fuel mileage was, at
32
Volume 2010-2012
best, about .5 mpg better when towing (up from 10.0 to
10.5) and the around town mileage up by .75 mpg (13.5 to
14.25). The around town number is a close approximation
as his truck is used only when towing. Yes, the lure of
5mpg was too good to be true.
But wait, there is more: three years and 35,000 miles into
his ownership the truck starts spitting white smoke and
raw fuel out the exhaust. Again I get the frantic phone call
asking, “What should I do?” My answer, “I don’t know, this
sounds expensive.”
He brought the truck over to our office. Sure enough, no
matter how many times you reset the fault codes, the
engine still would spit out raw fuel within a matter of .2
miles of driving. So, we removed the Edge box and all of
its associated wiring from the vehicle. No difference. Next,
we put the Edge back on. No difference. Then, we took the
Edge off again. No difference. Then I reminded my friend
that “You are your own warranty station.”
He did not see the humor in my comment.
As a part of the Issue 67 report that I did on “Performance
Upgrades for the 6.7-liter Engine” I had purchased a MADS
Electronics “Smarty S67.” I, too, was interested in the
too-good-to-be-true mileage claims and had the best of
intentions to do a Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
type fuel mileage comparison. But, based on the data
collected by my friend that owned the white smoke/raw
fuel truck sitting in the TDR’s parking lot, I had determined
that the money, time and effort to do an SAE mileage test
would not prove anything. So, we decided to put the $685
MADS “Smarty S67” to work on his truck.
The S67 is a downloader that reprograms the ECU. You
plug into the trucks OBDII port and choose one of many
different power levels. The choice we made was “stock
with timing for fuel economy.”
With the download completed, we started the truck and
drove .2 mile before the white smoke/raw fuel came
bellowing out of the tailpipe. This time I made the frantic
phone call. I called my good friend, Mark Chapple, owner
of TST Products (www.tstproducts.com). I had purchased
the S67 from TST and Mark was quick with his what-todo response. “I want you to go to the MADS web site and
download your Smarty S67 with the ‘ME’ program. ME
stands for Middle Eastern where the 6.7 engine operates
without the fancy emission stuff. So the ME program
will likely ignore some sensor or timer that is telling the
engine’s injectors to operate after the combustion event
where it is trying to use fuel to ignite an aftertreatment
device that is no longer on the truck.”
We downloaded the ME program. The white smoke
problem went away.
Subsequent fuel mileage data using the Smarty S67 told
the same story, about .5 mpg better when towing, up from
10.0 to 10.5.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
And, now, the moral of the story: My friend has spent
$2285 in his pursuit of a .5mpg improvement in towing. He
has no rights to warranty consideration and he has spent
lots of time upset by his costly mistake(s).
Is there something to be learned here?
Now, for more on the MPG story continue your reading
with “The Regeneration Story.”
the road that caused all of the emission control devices
(ECDs) to fall off of the truck. Can you think of any other
reason that such a report has not been filed?
With the background discussion out about why such
an observation had not been done, here is my report
on when the regeneration cycle(s) start; when they
stop; the corresponding observed fuel mileage; and the
temperatures associated with regeneration. That’s right
folks; we’re trying to define, “What is normal?”
What is the Regeneration Story?
Did you notice the “Product Showcase” write-up in Issue
71 on pages 146 and 147, about the new gauge package
from Edge Products called the Edge Insight Color Touch
Screen (CTS)?
Chances are you breezed right over it. Had I not written the
article, I would have been guilty of the same. It is seldom that
I can muster enthusiasm for a new electronic gizmo.
However, the Insight is such a product , so I purchased
one for TDR writer Jim Andersen to evaluate for this issue
of the magazine. His report is on pages 134-136.
I am again writing about their product because it offers
several benefits beyond the conventional analog gauges
that we’ve all used in the past:
•
For equal to the cost of a boost, EGT, transmission temp
gauges and the associated pods you can purchase the
Insight CTS (price, less than $400)
•
The Insight CTS gives you (by my count) 17 more items
that can be monitored
•
To install the Insight you simply plug into the truck’s
OBDII port
•
Added benefit—the ability to read and reset diagnostic
trouble codes
•
Added benefit—the ability to do performance testing
However, the Insight feature that is the focus of this article
is the display of the regeneration status, “Regeneration
On or Off.”
The Insight CTS isn’t the first monitor to display this
information; the previous Edge monitor (the “Attitude”
monitor used with the Edge “Juice” performance module)
would do the same. And, likely, there were other brands of
monitors that would display the regeneration status. But,
can you recall a report anywhere in the TDR, or on the
TDR’s web site or anywhere else in print or web where the
author talked about the frequency of regeneration over a
1,000 mile test drive?
Me neither. So, since I am often accused of having my
head in the sand, I asked those that surf the web and
several TDR writers if they could recall such a write-up. I
even asked the product representative at Edge if such an
observation had been done. The consensus as to why:
likely those that purchased a monitor also purchased
the performance box. Likely they ran over a big bump in
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
The observations are based on three different driving
cycles: the in-town loop; the 700 mile and 1,000 mile
interstate trips; and the 600 mile towing trip.
Finally, realize that the following numbers are not scientific
tests, but rather observations on previous trips. I have
verified the truck’s indicated MPG with the fuel required
to fill the tank. However, this series of observations that
you’ll read about make the assumption that the indicated
MPG can be trusted for a less-than-tankfull event.
The in-town loop:
I started this observation in mid-January and the weather
was in the mid-20° to mid-40° range. The cold weather
combined with a driving loop of less than 8 miles per day
put the truck into a regeneration cycle that I will call the
“dufus zone.” The dufus zone looks like this:
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
On
.9
.8
.6
.9
.7
.5
Off
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
Notes
stop – warehouse
stop – home
stop – warehouse
stop – home
stop – warehouse
stop – home
And so it went for eight consecutive trips to and from the
warehouse to home. The regeneration would turn on after
pulling out of the subdivision, still on when parking the
truck at the warehouse or home destination. EGT readings
would be less than 700°, the NOx absorber reading would
climb to 950°.
Finally, I had a chance to drive on the interstate and I
logged the following data:
The regeneration came on as I pulled out of the parking
lot. From there it was 2 miles to the freeway. I settled into
the flow of traffic (approximately 70mph) and reset the
“Fuel Economy MPG.”
The regeneration stayed on for 20.8 miles; indicated MPG,
14.2. The temperature at the NOx rose to, and stayed at
1100°.
The regeneration stayed off for the next 114 miles as
I completed a town-to-town interstate loop: indicated
MPG, 17.3.
Volume 2010-2012
33
The interstate trips:
Next up, the 700+ mile interstate trip and the 1000+mile
interstate trip.
On the tail end of the “off for 114 miles” interstate trip, the
truck putzed around town getting ready for the 700 mile
trip. As I have come to expect, the regeneration came on
almost as soon as I hit the road for the 700 mile trip from
Atlanta, Georgia, to Hilton Head, South Carolina. I set the
cruise control at 75mph.
The regeneration was on for 18 miles;
indicated MPG, 14.7
The regeneration was off for 188 miles:
indicated MPG, 17.6
The regeneration was on for 26 miles;
indicated MPG, 13.9
The regeneration was off for the balance of the
trip to our destination (64 miles) and it stayed
off in around town traffic for another 49 miles,
total off 113, MPG 15.8.
I’m starting to see a pattern, how about you? The balance
of the trip:
MPG
Notes
On for 12 miles,
Off for 87 miles,
12.2 : in town
16.7 : country roads and in town
On for 19 miles,
Off for 52 miles,
13.6 : in town
15.9 : in town to interstate
On for 29 miles, 14.5
Off for 169 miles, 17.1
: interstate travel
: interstate travel, return to home
MPG
Notes
On for 20 miles,
13.0
Off for 240 miles, 15.4
All interstate
“ “
On for 23 miles,
13.1
Off for 237 miles, 15.3
“
“
“
“
On for 21 miles,
12.9
Off for 245 miles, 16.2
“
“
“
“
On for 19 miles,
12.3
Off for 239 miles, 16.5
“
“
“
“
Observations for this trip:
Compared to the MPG of the previous 700 mile trip it is
obvious that speed cost mileage. Perhaps a fuel price of
$4 will slow these drivers down. Scott had some side wind
in both his south and north bound travels. Being on the
interstate in a non-changing environment really brought
out consistency in the on-and-off events. Adding up the
total miles: 1,044
“On” miles – 83; average indicated MPG – 12.82
“Off” miles – 961; average indicated MPG – 15.85
“On” mileage penalty = 3.03
The 600 mile towing trip:
This trip started on the heel of a brief duty cycle of around
town errands and trailer hook-up. The truck was in the
dufus zone that I previously described. The trip is about
300 miles, 275 of interstate, 25 miles of back roads.
Topography: rolling hills from Atlanta to Columbia (area),
South Carolina. The trailer is a 30’ car hauler with a weight
of 12,000 pounds.
MPG Notes
Observation for this trip:
Each time the regeneration comes on the temperature at
the NOx catalyst goes to 1100°, EGT can be 250° cooler
as the truck is going down the interstate at 75mph. The
driving style did not change with the on or off status.
Adding up the total miles: 713
On for 20 miles 9.2 Start of trip on interstate at 70mph
Off for 204 miles 9.5 Continue 70mph interstate
On for 27 miles 8.8 Continue 70mph interstate
Off for 173 miles 8.7 Arrived at destination at 20 miles.
The return portion of trip 153 miles
“On” miles – 104; average* indicated MPG – 13.78
“Off” miles – 609; average* indicated MPG – 16.62
“On” mileage penalty = 2.84
*The average of the “average indicated” is not a weighted
average, but rather the MPG numbers added together and
divided by the number of “Ons” and “Offs.” Not scientific,
but rather, a casual observation.
For the 1000+ mile trip the truck went from Atlanta, Georgia
to Orlando, Florida, a straight shot down Interstate 75.
The driver was Geno’s Garage employee Scott Sinkinson.
Scott set the cruise control on 78mph. After putzing
around town to get ready for the trip the regenerations
came on just as he put the truck onto the interstate.
34
Volume 2010-2012
On for 68 miles* 8.7 Continue 70mph interstate
Off for 45 miles 9.4 Slower traffic as I returned to
destination
Observations:
• What was it that caused the difference in MPG? A tailwind, headwind, slower traffic, uphill, downhill, or
the calculations of the overhead display during the 20,
27, and 68 miles of travel with the regeneration on? My
thought, the mileage penalty when the regeneration is
on while towing is not significant.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
• I made the same temperature observations as I had done for the in-town loop and interstate trip. I had some
time to play with the Edge Insight and added two other
temperature readings; temperature downsteam of the
NOx absorber, at the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC);
and downstream of the DOC at the diesel particulate
filter (DPF). Here is the chart:
EGT
NOx
DOC
DFF
OFF
ON (1)
ON (2)
1200
800
775
760
1200
1050
930
915
1275
875
850
840
(1) The trip east with the wind
(2) The return trip west against the wind
Note: with a digital gauge the temperature is never
constant. The numbers I recorded are those that showed
when I was able to keep the throttle and EGT relatively
constant on level ground.
• Again, I had some time to play with the gauge and watched the relationship of the following display items:
Boost
Fuel pressure
Percent load
Pressure restriction at DPF
What Do I Recommend?
Well, this should come as no surprise to anyone, after all
this is the Ram/Dodge/Cummins Turbo Diesel Register.
To quote from last Issue’s article where I searched for
information to give me “purchase confirmation” about
my new 2010 truck, “Nonetheless, for me the most
compelling reason for a Ram Cummins win is that the
engine and driveline have been in the marketplace for four
years and, aside from turbocharger and ECM flashes for
emission updates, the engine and drivetrain have proven
to be strong and reliable. (There is also the overriding
bona fides of twenty-plus years of close cooperation and
development between the world’s paramount diesel engine
maker and Dodge. I shudder to think what problems Ford
and GM will encounter as their engines strive to fulfill the
2010 emissions regulations. And with Ford’s clean-sheetof-paper, new engine, well, let me say that their previous
6.4 and 6.0 engines were less than stellar and I would not
want to be the guinea pig for this new engine. As Ram/
Cummins owners, let’s enjoy the three-year head start
that we have on the competition.”
Conclusion(s)
If I were a computer geek I could probably find a way to
list and chart these four items. However, my common
sense-o-meter (and three minutes putting the items
on the screen and watching them move in-sync) says
that the chart could be drawn using a magic marker
connected to the big toe on the right foot.
In the section “What is the MPG Story” there was a quote
from the Cummins engineering group that read, “One has
to consider the duty cycle of the truck. If it is being used
as intended—moderate to high load in highway travel—the
answer is the obvious: the engine’s output of unburned
fuel (particulates) is very low, the exhaust gas temperature
is high and there is little need to fire-up the self-cleaning
oven known as the diesel particulate filter. Consequently
the mileage penalty is negligible, if any at all.
• What does the * mean after the 68 mile cycle? It signals two situations that are outside of the limited definition of
“normal” that has been thus far established: First, as I
had previously noted, the cycles are usually 30 miles or
less. Why did the cycle take 68 miles?
“If the truck is being used as a grocery-getter or has long
periods of idling there can be an effect on fuel mileage.
How much? The estimate is less than 5%. Five-percent is
nowhere close to the claims of 5mpg.”
Second, in the 68 mile cycle the alarm on the Insight CTS
would go on when the regeneration was started. You have
to watch the gauge to note the “off” position. In the previous
on-off driving cycles I had become accustomed to a number
of momentary “offs” and the alarm would let me know of a
restart. However, in the 68 mile cycle the alarm went on at
least 25 times. I tried to do a correlation to the load factor.
Was it at 100% load factor for a length of time that it would
go off only to resume operation at a part throttle condition?
Why did it not reach the 1100° temperature that I had seen
in the in-town or interstate trip travel sections that is noted
previously in the “On(1)” column of data?
I wish that I had an explanation for the on/off, on/
off behavior Since there was not an effect on MPG,
I have resolved to realize that there are some things
I cannot explain with my simplistic Edge Insight tool
and my inability to engineer Cummins’ ECU protocol. I
researched Issue 66, page 40 (The Regeneration Story)
and concluded that during this longer 68-mile cycle the
ECU had the engine performing both a De-soot as well as
events sulfur oxidation (DeSOx) events.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Do my simplistic observations agree with this broad-brush
statement?
Let’s take a look at each of the three driving cycles that
were presented.
In-town loop: sorry, I disagree with the assessment “the
estimate is less than 5%.” With the new emissions package
you had better keep the truck on the highway.
• 700+ mile interstate trip: As noted, there was a marked difference in MPG during a regeneration event. The
events happened about 15% of the time the truck was
operational.
• 1000+ mile interstate trip: Again, there was a marked difference in MPG during a regeneration event. Driving
at a faster speed, the events only happened about 10%
of the time the truck was operational. Interesting...
Volume 2010-2012
35
I’m going to look at the 700+ and 1000+ mile interstate
trips and try some backward math to determine the “On”
mileage penalty or cost.
Here goes:
713 Trip as calculated
609 miles
104 miles
÷ 16.62 mpg ÷ 13.78 mpg
36.64 gallons +7.54 gallons = 44.18
713 Ideal trip
713 miles
÷ 16.62 mpg
42.9 gallons
1.27 gallons for regeneration, 1.27 ÷ 42.9 = 3% penalty
1044 Trip as calculated
1044 Ideal trip
961 miles
83 miles
÷ 15.85 mpg ÷ 12.82 mpg
1044 miles
÷ 15.85 mpg
60.63 gallons +6.47 gallons = 67.1
65.86 gallons
To close this article, you already knew what the author
would recommend. The report from Cummins about
the engine’s reliability is good. The miles-per-gallon and
regeneration stories are a collection of observations
by the folks at www.pickuptrucks.com and from yours
truly. And, I’ve given you some advice about town criers,
friends, money and how not to run afoul of the EPA.
Finally, I’ve provided some insight (Edge Insight, pun
intended) into miles-per-gallon and regeneration that
helps us define “what is normal?”
Go forth, collect data and let me know what you find. Feel
confident in your choice of truck and engine.
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
1.24 gallons for regeneration, 1.24 ÷ 65.86 = 1.88%
penalty
• The 600 mile towing trip: As I noted there were too many variables in my limited 600 mile test. The data is
inconclusive and my gut feeling is that there is not a
significant difference. Not to mention, do we trust the
factory’s MPG display feature?
36
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
ENGINE EVOLUTION – EMISSIONS
ISSUE 49 – TECHNICAL TOPICS
by Robert Patton
EPA, NOx, PM, SCR, EGR, DPF, NAC, VGT, ULSD, HPCR,
HCCI, NMHC, ACERT, TITT: Can you pick the abbreviation
that is non-diesel, non-emissions related? It’s easy, TITT
as in “throw in the towel.” The balance of the abbreviations
serves to bewilder your diligent scribe. However, with a
new round of diesel exhaust emission legislation less
than two years away and with ultra low sulfur diesel
fuel (abbreviation: ULSD), due in the summer of ’06, it is
appropriate that we understand what the abbreviations
will mean to the diesel enthusiast.
As TDR subscribers know, emission legislation dates are
the driving force in the changes to the Cummins engine
hardware. To make a boring story into a relevant topic, the
subject matter has to address “what does it mean to me?”
The best way to answer this question is to crank-up the
way-back machine to Issue 40 and look at the progression
of the ever-tightening emissions standards.
After we review the material which answers the question,
“what does it mean to me?” material, I’ll attempt to tie
the big picture together with a look at those annoying
abbreviations and what is on the horizon for 2006 and 2007.
Boring Stuff?
While it might be tempting to skip through this subtitle,
I’ll ask for your concentrated efforts as we simplify
(oversimplify?) the two emissions components that
concern the diesel engineer: oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and
particulate matter (PM). The following paragraphs may
provide us a more informed understanding of these two
emissions components.
Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx)
• One of the primary regulated pollutants from diesel engines.
• Reacts with hydrocarbons in the presence of sunlight to form ozone.
• Formed by reaction between nitrogen and oxygen in the combustion chamber.
• NOx formation increases with higher combustion temperature and cylinder pressures.
• Methods of reduction include lower intake manifold temperature, lower in-cylinder temperature, retarded
fuel injection and combustion optimization. Any incylinder approach to NOx reduction involves lowering
the temperature and limiting the time of the combustion
event.
• Potential impacts can be higher fuel consumption and requirement of a more complex cooling system.
Note the sharp, ten-fold drop in emissions from year 2004 to 2007. I recall that one of the first TDR magazines stated that
emissions were the driving force behind changes to the diesel engine. The 2007 emissions targets nail home that statement.
Certainly ultra-low sulfur fuel will help, but the engineering it will take to meet the targets is difficult to imagine.
12
0.7
NOx Federal
10
0.6
PM
0.5
gm/bhp-hr
8
6
4
0.4
0.3
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
2007
2004
2002
1998
1994
1991
1990
1988
2007
2004
2002
1998
1994
0
1991
0
1990
0.1
1988
2
1985
0.2
1985
gm/bhp-hr
NOx California
Volume 2010-2012
37
Particulate Matter (PM)
• Often visible as black smoke.
• F
ormed when insufficient air or low combustion temperature prohibits complete combustion of the free
carbon.
• Primarily partially burned fuel and lube oil.
• Methods of control include oil consumption reduction, catalytic converters, combustion system development
and higher fuel injection pressures.
To oversimplify, think back to last winter and the many
fireside evenings you enjoyed. As you built the fire, there
was inefficient combustion, characterized by black smoke
and not much heat generation. Thirty minutes into the
exercise you were sitting back in the easy chair, with a
raging fire, no more black smoke, a beautiful yellow and
blue flame, and lots of heat.
Now, refer back to the NOx and PM bullet statements and
reflect on the following: the design engineers could control
particulates (PM) by raising the combustion efficiency
(temperatures and pressures). But, raising temperatures
and pressures causes the formation of oxides of nitrogen
(NOx) to go out of the emissions box. Likewise, efficiency
and heat of combustion can be sacrificed to meet the NOx
legislation, but the particulates go out of the emissions
box. How does the engineer get the teeter-totter level?
As an interesting sidenote, NOx not only is formed in
internal combustion engines, it is the result of elevating
the temperature of air—made up of 79% Nitrogen and
21% Oxygen—high enough for the reaction to occur. One
of the most significant sources of NOx formation in nature
is lightning.
The reaction that forms NOx is also time related; the
longer the temperature remains elevated, the greater the
level of NOx formation.
In the diesel engine, NOx formation can be correlated to
engine performance; the higher the rate of formation, the
more efficient the engine. As most are aware, the impact
of reducing NOx emissions is increased fuel consumption,
which is the result of reduced efficiency.
For a good demonstration of the principle, consider that
in-cylinder temperatures are much higher on two-stroke
engines because fuel is provided on every stroke. Also,
consider the lack of oil control that contributes to too many
particulate emissions. These factors made it impossible
for two-stroke engines to meet emission targets and
maintain fuel consumption and other performance targets.
The 1988 on-highway emissions regulations were the final
blow to the two-stroke diesel in trucking applications.
Two-stroke diesels are now only produced for off-highway
and generator set markets.
The method of attack in reducing NOx formation in the
diesel engine is basically twofold: a) reduce the in-cylinder
temperature and/or, b) reduce the time for the reaction to
occur. Control of the temperature within the cylinder is
38
Volume 2010-2012
managed in part by reduced intake manifold temperature
(an intercooler/charge air cooler). Although not used on
our Cummins diesel engines, exhaust gas recirculation
(EGR) is another method used to control the in-cylinder
temperature and, in turn, NOx formation. Recirculated
exhaust gas is oxygen-depleted and the inert gas acts to
buffer the combustion event thus lowering the in-cylinder
temperature. Reduced reaction time is controlled largely
by retardation of the injector timing. Also note the ’03-‘05
Turbo Diesel engine with its high-pressure, common-rail
(HPCR) fuel injection system gives a pilot shot of fuel
prior to, and post of the larger injection event. The pilot
shots of fuel help control the temperature and reduce
NOx formation. Pilot injection also has greatly reduced
the noise level that is associated with diesel combustion.
As you review the NOx and PM bullets, you can understand
the balancing act the engineer has to perform. Now, add
to the emissions teeter-totter the need for the engineer to
deliver to the market place an engine that can maintain or
show an increase in fuel economy. Further, competition
dictates higher performance from the engine. Quite a job
for the engineering community.
THE LOOK AHEAD
Back to the Basics
For easy understanding and efficient recall, let’s start with
a glossary of terms that will be used in this article.
EPA: Environmental Protection Agency, the governmental
department that is responsible for governing diesel
exhaust emissions.
NOx: oxides of nitrogen, a key pollutant that reacts with
hydrocarbons in the presence of sunlight to form ozone.
PM: particulate matter, another key diesel pollutant that is
primarily soot and other combustion byproducts that form
urban smog.
SCR: selective catalytic reduction, an aftertreatment
technology that uses a chemical reductant (urea) that is
injected into the exhaust stream where it transforms into
ammonia and reacts with NOx on a catalyst, converting
the NOx to nitrogen and water vapor.
EGR: exhaust gas recirculation, a technology that diverts
a small percentage of the oxygen depleted, inert exhaust
gas back into the cylinder to help lower the combustion
temperatures, thus reducing NOx.
DPF: diesel particulate filter, also known as a particulate
trap. DPFs will be used to capture particles of soot
in a semi-porous medium as they flow through the
exhaust system. DPFs are available in passive or active
configurations. Active DPFs use a control system to
actively promote regeneration events.
NAC: NOx absorber catalyst, a catalyst that releases NOx
for a conversion to nitrogen gas and water vapor.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
VGT: variable geometry turbo, turbochargers that
constantly adjust the amount of airflow into the combustion
chamber, optimizing performance and efficiency. In
essence, the turbine casing varies from a small to a large
cross section.
ULSD: ultra low sulfur diesel, this fuel is scheduled to be
available in September 2006. Over the years the sulfur in
diesel fuel has all but been removed. The standards: prior
to 1994 – 5000 ppm; 1994 – 500 ppm; 2006 – 15 ppm. It is
interesting to note that the European standard is 50 ppm
which was enacted in 2004. With ULSD in September 2006
the United States will have the world’s strictest standard.
HPCR: high-pressure, common-rail, this is the type of fuel
system that is currently produced for our Dodge/Cummins
pickup trucks.
HCCI: homogeneous charge compression ignition, a
method of in-cylinder NOx reduction. Think of HCCI as
“massive EGR.”
NMHC: non-methane hydrocarbons, these are primarily
unburned fuel in the exhaust stream and are not a
substantial part of the diesel emissions problem. In 2002
the EPA added the NMHC number to the NOx number for
a total standard of 2.5-g/bhp-hr (NOx + NMHC).
ACERT: advanced combustion emission reduction
technology, the abbreviation for Caterpillar’s emission
control system.
The 2007 EPA Emissions Rules
Looking ahead to 2007-2010, the emissions requirements
will change dramatically for diesel pickup trucks. Both
NOx and PM are reduced by 90% from 2004 levels.
Specifically, NOx must be reduced to 0.2 grams/brake
horsepower-hour by 2010, while the particulate standard
is reduced to 0.01 g/bhp-hr PM beginning in 2007.
The EPA has allowed for NOx phase-in from 2007 through
2009. During this time, 50% of the engines produced
must meet the 0.2 g/bhp-hr NOx standard, while 50%
may continue to meet the current 2.5 g/bhp-hr NOx +
NMHC standard.
Most engine manufacturers will use the NOx phase-in
provisions along with averaging to certify engines to a
NOx value roughly halfway between the 2004 number and
the final 2010 NOx level. This calculates to approximately
1.2 g/bhp-hr NOx.
The PM level is not phased in, and thus all engine
production is required to be at 0.01 g/bhp-hr PM beginning
January 2007.
In addition to the lower NOx and PM levels, crankcase
gases will be included in the emissions measurements.
This requirement will drive closed crankcase systems for
2007 or ultra-low emissions from open systems. Open
systems allow crankcase gases to be vented into the
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
atmosphere through a breather tube. Closed systems
reroute crankcase ventilation gases from the breather
tube back into the engine intake airflow to be used for
combustion.
Likely there will be further EPA regulations which will
require advanced onboard diagnostics, which will lead
to additional sensors to monitor the effectiveness of
emissions systems on the engine.
Ultra-Low Sulfur Fuel
In addition to new exhaust emissions standards and in
support of the new exhaust emissions, the EPA is lowering
the limit for diesel fuel sulfur from 500 parts per million
(ppm) to 15 ppm. The new fuel standard will be phased in
beginning September 1, 2006 (80% participation) through
September 1, 2010 (100% participation). It is expected
that 15-ppm fuel will be widely available. On a volume
basis, over 95% of highway diesel fuel produced in 2006
is projected to meet the 15-ppm sulfur standard. On a
facility basis, over 90% of refineries and importers have
stated that they plan to produce some15-ppm diesel fuel.
It is projected that the additional cost of the new fuel will
be less than 5¢/gallon.
Ultra-low sulfur fuel (ULSD) has several beneficial effects.
It inherently produces less PM from combustion, so it is a
PM control strategy for all in-use equipment. And, just like
unleaded gasoline in the early ‘70s, ULSD enables NOx
absorber catalyst (NAC) technology to be highly effective
and reduces the production of sulfuric acid.
In 1994 there were widespread problems associated with
the introduction of low sulfur diesel. The desulphurization
process that removes the sulfur plays havoc with
the aromatic composition of the fuel. The change in
composition caused shrinking, cracking and oxidation of
rubber compounds, specifically fuel pump o-rings, and
fuel leakage was the result. Manufacturers scrambled to
switch the composition of their fuel pump seals.
Many tried to link the fuel pump leakage problem to the
lower lubricity of ‘94s low sulfur fuel. However, a fuel
lubricity specification was never adopted by the American
Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM). For 2007 the
ASTM has set fuel lubricity standards and these are set to
take effect in early 2006.
Cooled EGR to Reduce NOx
Cooled EGR is an effective NOx control. The EGR system
takes a measured quantity of exhaust gas, passes it
through a cooler before mixing it with the incoming air
charge to the cylinder. The EGR adds heat capacity and
reduces oxygen concentration in the combustion chamber
by diluting the incoming ambient air. During combustion,
EGR has the effect of reducing flame temperatures, which
in turn reduces NOx production since NOx is proportional
to flame temperature.
Volume 2010-2012
39
In order to control both NOx and particulate emissions
accurately, the amount of recirculated exhaust gas and
air has to be precisely metered into the engine under all
operating conditions. This has driven the use of advanced
variable geometry turbochargers (VGT) that continuously
vary the quantity of air delivered to the engine.
Aftertreatment Solutions to Reduce NOx
While cooled EGR is an in-cylinder technology that can
reduce NOx, there are several aftertreatment solutions
which can achieve reduced NOx levels by treating the
exhaust gases after they leave the engine. These include
selective catalytic reduction (SCR), NOx adsorbers and
lean-NOx catalysts.
SCR systems use a chemical reductant, in this case urea,
which converts to ammonia in the exhaust stream and
reacts with NOx over a catalyst to form harmless nitrogen
gas and water. Urea is a benign substance that is generally
made from natural gas and widely used in industry and
agriculture.
nitrate—effectively storing the NOx on the surface of the
catalyst. When the available storage sites are occupied,
the catalyst is operated briefly under rich exhaust gas
conditions (the air-to-fuel ratio is adjusted to eliminate
oxygen in the exhaust). This releases the NOx and allows
it to be converted to nitrogen gas and water vapor. Just
like unleaded fuel in the early 70s, ULSD enables NAC
technology to be implemented.
The elimination of all excess oxygen in the exhaust gas for
a short period of time can be accomplished by operating
the engine in a rich mode. This is done by injecting fuel
directly into the exhaust stream ahead of the adsorber to
consume the remaining oxygen in the exhaust. Either way,
the engine and catalyst must be controlled as a system to
determine exactly when regeneration is needed, and to
control the exhaust parameters during regeneration itself.
NOx adsorbers are expected to appear first in light-duty
applications.
The SCR-urea catalyst is a more mature technology. The
first SCR applications have been implemented in Europe
and Japan. And, while the EPA has not said no to SCR, the
world’s diesel manufacturers have an understanding of
the problems associated with SCR in the US—specifically
distribution at fueling locations, additional tanks and
plumbing on trucks and controls to ensure the operator
refills the SCR tanks. Nevertheless, the European diesel
manufacturers as well as Detroit Diesel are intent on using
SCR technology for the North American market in 2007.
For several reasons Cummins has chosen SCR for
its engine in Europe: the NOx limits in Europe are a bit
more lenient; relative to the cost of diesel fuel, the urea
price is low; and there is a supporting urea distribution
infrastructure.
For the North American market Cummins will continue with
cooled EGR and work with original equipment manufacturers
to select the appropriate NOx aftertreatment.
Caterpillar will continue with their ACERT combustion
technology and the appropriate NOx aftertreatment.
In a November ’04 issue of Transportation Topics,
William Morris, chief engineer for on-highway engines at
Caterpillar responded, “the selective catalytic reduction
process ‘was at the bottom of the list for 2010 solutions.’
Morris said Caterpillar was more interested in modifying
its existing emission control system called ACERT and
that Caterpillar was doing something similar in 2007 with
new designs for ‘pistons, rings and liners’ to improve the
combustion that takes place in the cylinder.”
NOx Adsorber Catalyst to Reduce NOx
The NOx adsorber catalyst (NAC) is a technology
developed in the late 1990s. The NAC uses a combination
of base metal oxide and precious metal coatings to
effect control of NOx. The base metal component (for
example, barium oxide) reacts with NOx to form barium
40
Volume 2010-2012
PM Reduction
Previous reductions in particulate matter emissions have
been achieved through engine combustion improvements
and oxidation catalysts, the stringent 2007 particulate
standards (90% lower than current-day standards) will
require very effective particulate aftertreatment.
The active diesel particulate filter (DPF) is the only current
technical option for meeting the 2007 PM emissions
standards. It is expected that all engine manufacturers will
use this technology.
Filtration of exhaust gas to remove soot particles is
accomplished using porous ceramic media generally made
of cordierite or silicon carbide. A typical filter consists of an
array of small channels that the exhaust gas flows through.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Adjacent channels are plugged at opposite ends, forcing
the exhaust gas to flow through the porous wall, capturing
the soot particles on the surface and inside pores of the
media. Soot accumulates in the filter, and when sufficient
heat is present a regeneration event occurs, oxidizing the
soot and cleaning the filter.
There are several methods to control or raise the
exhaust temperature to manage the regeneration event
in the DPF. The most promising methods for an active
integrated system for 2007 are management of the engine
combustion process in combination with an additional
oxidation catalyst. This will allow regeneration to take
place under low-ambient/low-load conditions when
exhaust temperatures are low, as well as during normal
operation.
As oil is consumed and particulate matter is burned off
through regeneration they become ash and collect in the
filter. The ash must be cleaned from the filter or plugging
will occur. Maintenance may be required on diesel
particulate filters.
Cummins is currently working with oil manufacturers on
the development of low-ash oils and to determine how
different oil additive components may behave with regard
to filter plugging. If maintenance of the diesel particulate
filter is required, it is anticipated that it will be at relatively
high-mileage intervals of 185,000-250,000miles.
2007 Lubricating Oil
New specifications are being developed for lubrication oil
compatible with the low-emissions engines for 2007-2010.
The primary focus will be to make the oils compatible
with aftertreatment devices. For 2007, the immediate
requirement is to reduce ash in order to enable extended
maintenance intervals on the diesel particulate filter
while maintaining the important lubricity capability of the
lubricant.
And the Bottom Line?
Yours truly is not an accomplished prognosticator. I am
often reminded that we incorrectly predicted that the
post 1/1/04 Turbo Diesel would have EGR. While the Ford
and General Motors diesels were saddled with EDR, the
engineers at Cummins were diligent with their in-cylinder
development and avoided adding the recirculated exhaust
gas plumbing and controls to the engine.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
With my qualifications duly noted, as we look toward the
future I will stick with factual data and quotations from
other periodicals.
• ULSD is currently legislated to be available in September of ’06. The problems associated with the introduction of
low sulfur diesel fuel in 1994 have not been forgotten
and the fuel vendors and the ASTM have standards in
place to avert problems.
• Particulate control: according to Diesel Progress,
November 2004: “Major manufacturers such as
Caterpillar, Cummins, Detroit Diesel and International
Truck and Engine have adopted diesel particulate filters
as the preferred strategy/technology for PM reduction,
but there is no consensus on NOx control technologies.
The two most practical and cost-effective approaches to
lower NOx emissions from diesel trucks are in-cylinder
techniques such as a high rate of EGR and exhaust
system technologies such as urea-SCR, which is being
adopted in the European Union staring in 2005.”
• Further, Diesel Progress, December 2004 notes:
“Diesel particulate filter can be considered a relatively
mature technology. At least in light-duty vehicles, DPFs
have been used in high-volume applications in diesel
passenger cars in Europe, with over 850,000 systems
sold since 2000. In the US, several heavy-duty engine
manufacturers have been testing their 2007 truck
prototypes and expressed confidence in the DPF
technology.”
• Confident that PM can be addressed with DPFs? Let’s continue to address NOx. Consider this excerpt
from Successful Dealer, March 2004: “According to
technology chief John Wall, Cummins already has
laboratory engines that can achieve a 1g level for
NOx emissions and he is confident of being able to
manufacture production engines that will meet the 1.2g
“averaging” level without exhaust aftertreatment.
“Furthermore, Wall zsaid highly-advanced
combustion research techniques that actually
use windows on the combustion process, and
the complex modeling they can now do, allow
him to predict that fuel consumption will not
take a hit next time. It may even improve in some
applications. Conclusion: For Cummins the
refinement of the EGR process currently in place
is the right emissions strategy for North America.
“In Europe, Wall says it is likely Cummins will
use the alternative selective catalytic-reduction
(SCR) technology. The requirements for Euro 5
are less stringent on PM and the big differential
between the cost of fuel between European
countries and the United States (their cost per
gallon is four or five times ours) means SCR is
the more economical solution.
“The economics are simply not there for the US.
However, he did not rule out some SCR for 2010
to clean up the NOx from 1.2g down to the 0.2g
levels.”
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41
• Specifically, how about NOx control on our light-duty pickup diesel. Scowering through the trade publication
Transportation Topics—Equipment and Maintenance
Update, March 2004, I found another interview with
Cummins’ John Wall. “John Wall, vice president and chief
technical officer for engine manufacturer Cummins, said
NAC adsorbers would likely go into lighter applications
first because ‘they have a lot of precious metals in them
and they get more expensive as you scale them up to
heavy-duty applications.’”
To conclude: your light-duty Cummins engine will require
some form of exhaust aftertreatment. The allowable NOx
phase-in between years ‘07 to ‘10 make prediction difficult
and complex. Therefore I will refrain from bold statements
laden with abbreviations like, “expect an EGR and VGTequipped engine with a DPF and later a NAC.
Time will tell. I will keep a watchful eye toward press
information and an open ear when in conversation with
others.
“They finally dropped the option in the face of EPA’s
concern over the engine makers’ ability to ensure SCR’s
use when a truck was operating, plus the lack of a
distribution infrastructure for the mixture.”
If we read between the lines it looks like the use of SCR
has not been abandoned, rather pushed back. See if you
come to the same conclusion as we again quote from TT,
“Diesel manufacturers have put the selective catalytic
reduction aftertreatment process on hold, but the
manufacturers said SCR would still be an option for 2010,
when emission standards were set to change again.”
Final Conclusion
Again, I’ll remind you that I am not adept at predicting
the future. However, we’ve provided a paint-by-numbers
guide for the 2007 emissions picture; it’s up to you to
fill in the colors. Will your picture match the one that
Cummins and Dodge are painting? We’ve got about one
year before the 2007 model year truck is introduced. Get
busy with your brush.
The Right Technology
As a postscript to our crystal ball look into the future I
found an article in the 1/3/05 Transportation Topics
magazine that give further insight into the use of SCR
to control NOx emissions. As was mentioned several
times in the article, the EPA would not take a stand on
the technology the manufacturers should use. However,
there was pressure against the SCR concept. How so?
Consider the following from TT: “SCR can reduce levels
of NOx by mixing urea, an ammonia-based solution, into
the exhaust stream ahead of the catalytic converter. SCR
would allow the combustion process to operate in a more
traditional way, proponents have argued.
Credits: Much of the technical information (abbreviation
definitions and emissions solutions) was gleaned from
Cummins bulletin number 4103666, “2007 Emissions:
Choosing the Right Technology.” Copies of this bulletin
can be sourced at your Cummins distributor or by calling
800-DIESELS.
“Detroit Diesel Corporation, a subsidiary of Freightliner,
plus the powertrain units of Mack Trucks and Volvo Trucks
North America had been considering SCR for 2007 engines.
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Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
6.7 HPCR ENGINE
MEETS 2010 EMISSIONS
ISSUE 56 – 6.7 HPCR
It has been a full year since the March ’05 announcement
of the Dodge 3500 Chassis Cab with the 6.7 liter Cummins
engine. The 3500 Chassis Cabs rolled off the assembly
line last fall and we introduced this column in the magazine
to cover developments with the 6.7 HCPR engine.
manufacturer to meet the 2010 EPA standards. This is big
news!
At the Chicago Auto Show in February Dodge announced
their new 4500 and 5500 Chassis Cab that use the same
6.7 HPCR engine. Hand-in-hand was the ’07.5 model year
introduction of the 6.7 HPCR engine in the 2500 and 3500
pickup trucks.
So, unlike the yo-yo changes that we have had to endure
every 3 to 4 years, the ’07 HPCR will be good until the next
set of emissions legislation in 2013.
Somewhat lost in the flurry of announcements, introductions
and hardware hitting the streets was the following press
release from Cummins.
Will GM be able to offer an engine package like this?
“In January Cummins Inc. unveiled the strongest,
cleanest, quietest best-in-class 2007 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel
engine, used exclusively in Dodge Ram 2500 and 3500
Heavy Duty pickup trucks. The engine has increased
displacement providing increased horsepower and torque
while achieving the world’s lowest 2010 Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) NOx standard a full three years
ahead of the requirements.
“Cummins is the first diesel engine manufacturer to have
a product certified to the 2010 EPA heavy-duty engine
standards for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate
matter (PM) emissions, making it the cleanest heavy-duty
diesel engine available in North America. The 2010 EPA
standards for NOx (0.2g) and PM (0.01g) represent a more
than 90 percent reduction in each pollutant, compared to
the 2004 standards.
“‘The application of the right technology on the Dodge
Ram is an extension of the joint clean diesel development
work Cummins and DaimlerChrysler have performed
together for nearly two decades,’ said Cummins President
and Chief Operating Officer Joe Loughrey. ‘The new
best-in-class Cummins Turbo Diesel and the Dodge Ram
will provide the strongest, cleanest, quietest solution for
heavy-duty pickup truck customers.’
“‘This new technology is a significant validation of the
industry’s ability to meet the EPA’s 2010 clean diesel
standards. These innovations help power our economy
and drive our environmental successes,’ said Bill Wehrum,
EPA’s Acting Assistant Administrator for Air and Radiation.”
Cummins, in conjunction with DaimlerChrysler and the
EPA, made this announcement prior to the Washington
DC Auto Show in January.
When I first read the press release my reaction was, “Ho,
hum, another beat-the-chest exercise by the PR folks.” Is
your reaction the same?
Look at the release again. It is important to note that with
the 6.7 HPCR engine Cummins is the first diesel engine
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Let’s say it again, the 6.7 HPCR engine meets the 2010
EPA standards.
Will Ford be able to offer an engine package like this?
Additionally, consider that the 2010 6.7 HPCR engine offers
a solid engine platform that allows Dodge to engineer the
next generation Ram, thus keeping the Dodge/Cummins
relationship stable.
2010 Technology
This is big news. So much so that the February ’07 issue of
Diesel Progress (a trade-only publication, not to be confused
with the plethora of newsstand “glossy” publications)
devoted five pages to the 6.7 HPCR and its technology. The
following are excerpts from the Diesel Progress article by
Mike Brezonick as he talks with several of the Cummins Inc.
personnel behind the 6.7 HPCR project.
“When Dodge and Cummins announced the 2007 engine
months ago, both companies highlighted some of the
notable and apparent changes. Yet both companies kept
very quiet on what is in some ways the most noteworthy
aspect of all, choosing to save that for a more appropriate
stage.
“That stage turned out to be the Washington Automobile
Show in January. Cummins took the wraps off emissions
technology that is being used on the 2007 model year Ram
2500 and 3500 Heavy Duty pickup trucks. The system,
which Dodge and Cummins said will meet EPA’s emissions
regulations for the next six years, is unprecedented in its
sophistication and includes what is considered to be the
first commercially produced NOx adsorber system to be
used on a production vehicle in any market segment in
North America.
The Challenge and Relationships
“‘As we looked ahead to ’07, Dodge’s challenge to us
was to stay up with the competition in the horsepower
and torque wars,’ said Jeff Caldwell, Cummins executive
director – DaimlerChrysler Business. ‘Our challenge was
how do we do that and meet emissions?
“‘Beyond cooled EGR and variable geometry turbos we
knew we were going to add aftertreatment and if we took
the same path that everyone else was taking, it would drive
some pretty significant changes to the cooling system.
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43
You’ve seen that in the 2007/2008 model year trucks from
Dodge’s competition—they’re wider and taller. They’ve
changed the trucks.
“‘We feel terrifically about our relationship with Daimler
Chrysler,’ said Joe Loughrey, Cummins’ president and chief
operating officer. ‘And the decision to use this particular
recipe to meet the 2010 standards in 2007 was a collective
decision between Cummins and DaimlerChrysler after
having reviewed more than one alternative as to what our
approach might be.
“The Aftertreatment system is a three-section unit that is
packaged mostly under the vehicle floor. It begins with a
close-coupled catalyst—essentially a conventional diesel
oxidation catalyst incorporating a metallic substrate—
mounted to a short downpipe just off the back of the
turbocharger. Shortly behind and below the close-coupled
catalyst is the NOx adsorber unit, which is followed by a
particulate filter. Both the NOx adsorber and PM filter use
ceramic substrates.
“‘I have to emphasize that this was not Cummins walking in
to say, hey, here’s the deal. It was us working very closely
with DaimlerChrysler and our partners and determining
this was the best by far course of action to make the best
truck for customers and the cleanest truck you can find
anywhere in America.’
“All three aftertreatment sections have their own active
regeneration schedules, and the engine ECM controls the
regeneration cycles. Even more significant, despite the
use of fuel for regeneration, the overall fuel economy for
the vehicle is virtually unchanged from the 2006 trucks,
Cummins said.
The Technologies
“The NOx adsorber is regenerated every few minutes
at approximately 600° to 800°F and the process takes
about three to five seconds. The NOx adsorber will also,
over time, absorb sulfur from the fuel, which can reduce
its effectiveness over time. So depending on how much
fuel is burned—typically every two tankfuls, a separate
regeneration cycle is initiated to remove the sulfur. The
PM filter is regenerated when mass flow sensors in the
exhaust system detect a specified amount of loading
on the substrate, typically about every four operating
hours. Unlike the PM filter systems used on heavy-duty
applications, there is no ash cleaning required, and the
PM filter—like the NOx adsorber and close-coupled
catalyst—is rated for the life of the vehicle.
“Clearly, the most head-turning part of the vehicle is
the addition of the NOx adsorber to the aftertreatment
system. For the better part of a decade, NOx adsorbers
have been cited as a promising technology for controlling
NOx emissions from diesel engines—indeed, they were
specifically cited as key technology by EPA in its rulemaking.
“A NOx adsorber resembles a conventional catalyst,
incorporating a catalytic substrate through which diesel
exhaust is directed. Then the NOx molecules are collected
and held—“adsorbed”—onto the surface of the substrate,
removing them from the exhaust stream. When the surface
area of the substrate is full, the adsorber is regenerated
with heat used to chemically change the NOx into more
benign gases, mostly nitrogen and oxygen.
“However, for all their potential in principle and in the lab,
NOx adsorbers remained closer to a promise than a real
product. More on the NOx adsorber in a minute.
“Cummins incorporated a range of technologies into the
engine. A variable geometry turbocharger from Cummins
Turbo Technologies contributes to improved engine
breathing. And, because of the robustness of the sliding
vane design, it also can be used to provide engine braking,
a beneficial feature, particularly in towing applications.
“Other changes to the engine include an intake throttle
between the engine and charge-air cooler and a bypass
valve in the EGR circuit that allows the gas flow to bypass
the EGR cooler entirely in some operating conditions. This
allows for more precise control of EGR rates, faster engine
and vehicle warm-up and can also assist in raising exhaust
temperatures for aftertreatment regeneration.
“The engine also has a closed crankcase ventilation system
developed by Cummins filtration. The system incorporates
a coalescing filter that captures oil mist and returns it to the
crankcase. The filter requires service after approximately
60,000 miles.
44
The Aftertreatment System
Volume 2010-2012
“In another departure from the heavy-duty side, all of
the hydrocarbon dosing (diesel fuel) needed to raise the
temperature for the various aftertreatment regenerations
is handled by the fuel injection system rather than a
separate injection system.
“‘It took some time and a lot of work to integrate the control
system,’ said Jim Fier, technical project leader. ‘Some of
the fuel we use to light the catalyst is partially burned, and
any time you burn fuel, you produce power. If we didn’t
you would feel that extra fuel as power. With both the air
handling and the fueling, we had to adjust those various
pulses in order to keep the power balance and the torque
balance as we go in and do the regenerations.’
“Cummins engineered the entire aftertreatment system
down to specifying the washcoat on the catalyst bricks,
and the system was assembled by Tenneco, which does
aftertreatment system packaging for many segments of
DaimlerChrysler.”
At the onset I noted that the news about 2010 emissions
and the 6.7 HPCR engine was noteworthy. The Diesel
Progress article excerpts give us a better understanding
of the technology behind the engine. Go forth and be
proud of the Dodge/Cummins truck that you own.
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
EXHAUST AFTERTREATMENT
PRINCIPLE OF OPERATION
ISSUE 66 – 6.7 HPCR
There has been a lot of misconception and misinformation
posted about the regeneration process on the Dodge
Turbo Diesel pickup with the Cummins 6.7-liter engine.
This post is an effort to try to correct this misinformation
and it will apply only to the pickup version. Although
the Cab and Chassis models are similar, some of the
parameters for regeneration are different.
Regeneration is the process where soot particles trapped
by the diesel particulate filter (DPF) are burned into ash.
This process involves many different components as
well as a program in the engine control module (ECM)
triggered by the pressure differential sensor or by an
internal counter. I’ll explain the different components and
more about the counter later.
There are three types of regeneration: Passive, Active, and
Manual
• Passive regeneration can occur when the engine is operating under load conditions that generate high
enough exhaust temperatures to oxidize the soot
particles trapped in the DPF.
• Active regeneration occurs when the exhaust temperature
is insufficient to achieve passive Regeneration. Under
certain conditions the ECM can automatically activate
the fuel injectors to raise the exhaust temperature to
achieve a successful regeneration while the vehicle
is in motion. The ECM activates the injectors postcombustion.
• Manual regeneration can be performed with a scan tool or some of the aftermarket performance programmers
that have the ability to perform regeneration.
The ECM will start the regeneration process of the DPF if
the soot load exceeds a calibrated value. The calibrated
value is 47 grams of soot. The ECM determines the soot
load of the DPF based on the voltage output of the pressure
differential sensor, and the ECM has an internal counter
that runs anytime the engine is running. This counter is
dependent on engine RPM and exhaust temperature,
so the more RPM the engine is turning or the higher the
exhaust temperature, the faster the counter runs. When
this counter reaches 24000, or the DPF reaches a soot load
of 47 grams, the ECM will try to activate the regeneration
process.
There are four different diesel emissions: Oxides of
Nitrogen (NOx); Oxides of Sulfur (SOx); Particulate Matter
(soot); and Hydrocarbons (in the form of unburned fuel).
With a scan tool there are five modes of regeneration that
can be monitored:
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Normal: The engine is operating in normal condition
De-soot: The ECM is performing a regeneration of the DPF
De-SOx: The ECM is in a regeneration event and is
performing a sulfur oxidation process.
De-NOx: The ECM is in the process of desorption and
regeneration of the NOx Absorber Catalyst (NAC). Although
a De-NOx event can happen shortly after regeneration, it
is independent of regeneration.
HC-Desorption: This is a process by the ECM to eliminate
excess hydrocarbons, in the form of unburned diesel fuel,
in the exhaust system. This is a process that most vehicles
will not see very often.
The two processes involved in a regeneration event are
De-soot and De-SOx. In the regeneration processes,
the exhaust temperature is the main determinant of
regeneration. The oxidation of diesel particulate matter
(soot) begins at 1025° and oxides of sulfur (SOx) oxidation
begin at 1185°. Since many vehicles never get worked hard
enough to raise the exhaust temperature high enough to
reach the threshold, a passive regeneration will never be
achieved. These vehicles will have to depend on the active
regeneration process.
The De-NOx event of NOx desorption requires an exhaust
temperature of approximately 500°. This process also
requires the absence of oxygen in the exhaust system.
To remove the oxygen, the ECM will momentarily dump
exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) gases and sometimes fuel
down the exhaust to displace the oxygen in the exhaust.
This process only takes 5-10 seconds. The timing for a
De-NOx event is based on an algorithm that takes engine
run time, engine load, engine temperature and fuel rate to
determine how often to perform a De-NOx event. This is
why there are oxygen (O2) sensors up-stream and downstream of the NAC.
A De-SOx event during a regeneration process has a trigger
of 4.5 grams of SOx. The ECM determines a SOx load of 4.5
grams based on an algorithm that uses engine run time,
engine load, engine temperature, fuel rate, and ambient
temperature, to determine the SOx load in the NAC.
When either of the triggers reaches their threshold (47
grams of soot or the internal ECM counter reaches 24000),
the ECM will try to initiate regeneration. Once the engine
reaches operating temperature and the vehicle speed
is sufficient the ECM will enable the De-soot portion of
the regeneration process. The internal counter will start
Volume 2010-2012
45
at 24000 and continue to count up until the exhaust
temperature reaches approximately 850°. Then the counter
will start to count down. The ECM will set the variable
geometry turbo (VGT) slide ring at 12% (88% boost), which
is why a slight performance difference is felt. The ECM will
begin adding fuel post combustion. The EGR valve will set
closed. The diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) will start the
fuel burn and, as it continues down the exhaust stream,
the NAC will aid in bringing the exhaust temperature up to
approximately 1175°. The particulate matter will begin to
oxidize and turn into ash. When the counter gets to about
11000, depending on the soot load, the ECM will switch
over to the De-SOx mode. In the De-SOx mode the EGR
valve will open and resume normal operation. The VGT
slide ring resumes normal operation and operates at the
50-70% position. The ECM will continue to try to raise the
exhaust temperature with post combustion fuel injections
until the exhaust temperature reaches approximately
1250°. All of this is variable, if the soot load is high and
the SOx load is at the trigger point, the ECM will keep it in
the De-soot mode longer and the De-SOx mode for less
time. If the vehicle is stopped the ECM will try to start the
regeneration process again when the vehicle is restarted.
It will continue to try and perform regenerations until the
process is completed.
MullenaxM
Editor’s Note: This is an explanation of the regeneration
process written by a Dodge service technician in Texas.
He explains that his knowledge comes from “three
years of nothing but 6.7-liter repairs, every now and
then a little knowledge sticks in the ‘gray matter’.”
46
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
EXHAUST AFTERTREATMENT:
THE COMPONENTS
ISSUE 69 – TECHNICAL TOPICS
BRINGING IT TOGETHER
by Jim Anderson
There have been articles in several previous issues of
this magazine and on the Turbo Diesel Register website
about how emission controls affect engine performance,
longevity, and fuel mileage. These articles have covered
segments of emission controls, particularly diesel
particulate filters (DPF) on 2007 and later trucks, and their
effects on fuel mileage and engine operation; but putting it
all together in a cohesive document should lead to greater
understanding since each previous article dealt with one
system only.
Over the past twelve years, particularly the last three
(2007-2010), emission controls and electronic control of
engine functions have become increasingly common
and increasingly complex. Your writer has found that
the average truck owner doesn’t fully understand these
controls and how the controls and other engine systems
must function properly together for the engine and
the truck to run in a satisfactory manner. Without this
knowledge and understanding of the parts and of the
whole, the average driver is clueless in the event of trouble
in one of these systems. Fortunately, the engine computer
that controls it all can also report trouble codes to lead
to a diagnosis and a proper repair. See Issue 64, pages
46-48, for an example of how complete the diagnostic
trouble code (DTC) list has become for 2010 trucks. Each
trouble code on that list is tied to the reporting of a sensor
somewhere in the system. The computer has powerful
diagnostics built in to simplify the diagnostics involved in
fixing problems.
As an aside, the owner of a 2007.5 or later diesel pickup
truck should think very carefully before deciding to turn
up the power or tamper with emission control devices. In
addition to possibly voiding a valuable engine warranty,
owner experience is proving that modifications to fueling
often results in other unintended consequences whose
cost to repair can run into the thousands of dollars. See
Issue 67, page 30 for more details on fueling modification
boxes, Issue 67, page 33 for the editor’s comments; and
page 42 for emissions non-compliance penalties.
It is now time to put these discussions of the various
parts and systems together and bring to you a better
understanding of the complications and balances
involved, how it all works, and how it affects the newest
trucks and engines. This primer is intended to put it all in
simple language and, hopefully, will assist you in making
decisions about upgrading your old ride to a new one,
or in diagnosing and repairing problems on your out-ofwarranty present truck. The goal is to make emission
control more understandable amid the hodgepodge
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
of regulations engine makers must meet in order to sell
their products in markets around the world. Exhaust
emissions and fuels really are a worldwide concern, and
not so suddenly, except in the U.S., everybody wants their
products to be “green.”
I’ll begin by saying that Cummins Incorporated still has
the best pickup truck engine design in the marketplace,
and has been able to meet all requirements of both the
government and truck builders without undue owner
burdens. In fact, the 6.7 liter Cummins engine in the
newest Ram pickup trucks meets the 2010-2011 emission
standards without the use of urea injection. They are the
only company to do so, while Ford and GM have both
been forced to use urea injection exhaust aftertreatment
on all of their engines slated for use in pickup trucks. The
cost per gallon of urea is said to be in excess of $12, and
7 gallons of the stuff will last about 3500 miles of normal
driving. That would add $84 to the operating costs for 3500
miles of driving, a large hit to your operating bill. Almost
all big rig truck engines built in 2010 and beyond will also
use urea injection. As you can see, this additional and
sizeable added expense raises operation cost per mile by
many cents for the bowtie and blue oval brands. Diesel
Urea Fluid contains 32.5% ammonia and the remainder
is distilled water. This solution helps a NOx catalyst to
reduce harmful exhaust gases to inert ones that can safely
pass out a tailpipe to the atmosphere. The catalyst turns
oxides of nitrogen into nitrogen and water.
If you think that current engine emission standards aren’t
tough to meet in terms of research and development, a
good example to examine is Caterpillar’s engine division.
After many years of research, they decided the latest
emission standards were too tough and the expense too
great for compliance and they got out of the on-road
engine business in 2007 after gaining a 30+% share of the
lucrative trucking and motorhome chassis businesses.
They now concentrate their research energies on the
off-road engine business such as bulldozers, large
generator sets, and drag pans, where emission control
requirements are less stringent (for the time being), and
where profits are apparently greater. They simply could
not make their emissions strategy work using existing
technology and without violating patents of other engine
makers. They walked away from many millions of dollars
of income. Cummins, on the other hand, did the research,
developed some good ideas, and handily made the 2010
emissions cut in 2007 with their 6.7-liter diesel engine
without the use of urea injection for their pickup truck
engines. We, as customers, have surely benefited.
Much of exhaust emission control on current engines
lies in combustion technology and the use of ultra low
sulfur diesel fuel. The more complete the combustion of
Volume 2010-2012
47
fuel particles in the cylinder combustion chamber, the
less exhaust pollutants must be treated to meet emission
standards. The strategy uses several methods to meet the
need. The government decree for 2010-2016 says three
standards must be met for tailpipe emissions.
The first is NOX, oxides of nitrogen, which causes smog.
The Ram pickup is vehicle certified on chassis-dyno,
and the NOX regulation is 0.2 g/mile. The Cab/Chassis is
engine-dyno certified, and that regulation is 0.2 g/bhp-hr.
The second standard is HC, hydrocarbons, unburned fuel
molecules, another contributor to smog, and a known
carcinogen. The third is CO, carbon monoxide, which in
higher concentrations can cause death because the blood
in mammals (that includes us humans) has a greater affinity
for CO than for oxygen (O2). Unfortunately, concentration
of CO in human blood is cumulative, so breathing small
amounts over long periods can be fatal. The blood takes it
in quickly, but exchanges it for oxygen very slowly. For our
’07.5 and newer pickup trucks these standards are met
using a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), a NOX adsorber
catalyst (NAC), and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) to catch
carbon particles.
The emission control strategy for all three pollutants
begins in the cylinder or combustion chamber of a diesel
engine, where the goal is to keep combustion cool enough
to limit NOX, yet hot enough to completely burn as much
HC as possible. CO and CO2 (carbon dioxide) are a natural
byproduct of combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and can
easily be controlled by passing exhaust gases over a
catalyst in a converter which strips away the oxygen
molecule in the case of CO and the two molecules in the
case of CO2 and passes the remaining carbon on to the
diesel particulate trap. The remaining carbon atoms are
dealt with separately, along with the carbon atom in HC
and the nitrogen atom and the remaining oxygen atom
in NOX, by burning them in a diesel particulate filter. The
Nitrogen atoms are passed out the tailpipe as an inert gas.
More about the DPF later.
As emissions controls became tighter, engine makers
developed strategies to more carefully time the
combustion event and to more carefully control the precise
amount of fuel injected for each combustion event. They
also developed combustion chamber designs to induce
a correct amount of swirl to the incoming air to more
completely atomize the fuel charge before combustion was
completed. Thus we saw careful design of the combustion
chamber in the cylinder head and the advent of a “shaped
dish” in the piston top. The dish shape looks similar to
that of an old metal milk pitcher. Research showed that
too much air swirl actually inhibited combustion, while not
enough swirl left unburned fuel particles at the edges of
the combustion chamber, thus leading to higher emissions
out the tailpipe. In the pictures, note that the top of the
piston shows the spray pattern in gray, and favors keeping
the fuel spray away from the edges of the piston top.
48
Volume 2010-2012
Piston top spray pattern area is visible as gray; incomplete
combustion areas are black. This piston is from a vintage
’94-’98 12-valve engine. Notice that the piston bowl is
offset. The reason for this is that the injectors on 12-valve
engines came into the cylinder head at an angle. On
24-valve engines (’98.5-’02) and HPCR engines (’03-current)
the piston bowl is centered to match-up with the injector
that comes into the cylinder head from directly above.
The next photo shows the shape of the bowl in the top of
the piston. Using a blunt center area to disperse fuel and
a carefully shaped bowl periphery, a swirl is induced in
the incoming air to allow maximum combining of fuel and
oxygen.
A close-up of the same 12-valve piston showing the piston
bowl shape. Note the blunt center top, curved sides.
Fuel injector design was also improved to achieve better
fuel atomization and more even dispersion of fuel droplets
throughout the combustion chamber where they can
better combine with their oxygen partners. This was done
by spraying fuel at higher pressures through more holes
at the nozzle to get more even dispersion of finer droplets.
Here’s a little bit of history: Almost all diesel engines up to
1998 used a mechanical injection pump that sent a high
pressure (3,000-14,000 psi) pulse of fuel from the injection
pump, through a steel line, and into the fuel injector. The
pressure rise at the injector opened the injector nozzle and
fuel was sprayed into the cylinder as it neared top dead
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
center where the air was squeezed tightly enough to raise
its temperature high enough to light off the injected fuel.
When air is compressed, it heats up, as discovered by Dr.
Rudolf Diesel (I’ll bet you’ve heard of him before) in the
1800s, and is still the principle of operation of all of today’s
diesel engines. Because the compressed air becomes so
hot, no outside source of energy, such as a spark plug
is required to initiate combustion. Just spray the fuel into
the hot air and it lights off on its own. After 1993, diesel
engines were required to meet an emissions standard,
so there were modifications to limit injector pump fueling
unless ample air was present, and a diesel catalytic
converter was installed in the tailpipe (vintage ’94.5-’98).
Trucks still smoked, sometimes a lot. The smoke is a result
of more fuel being injected into a cylinder than there is air
to completely burn it, or from large fuel droplets sprayed
into the combustion chamber that don’t readily atomize
and combine with available oxygen. Smoke is unburned/
not completely burned fuel hydrocarbons.
In 1998.5, we saw the advent of electronic control of a
mechanical fuel injection pump by means of a computer
which controlled the timing and amount of fuel injected into
the cylinder. The computer offered more precise control
of the fuel charge timing to meet the then-new emission
standard. As time went by, new requirements were made
the law of the land, requiring ever more precise metering
of fuel at the proper time. Maximum efficiency in a diesel
engine is gained through combustion at highest cylinder
temperatures and combustion pressures, but these
parameters caused more exhaust pollution. What to do?
With mechanical injection pumps there was a delay
between the time the pump sent the fuel squirt through the
pipe to the injector and the time the injector took to react
by putting a shot of fuel into the cylinder. To cut this delay
and make the injection event more precise, the computer
was called upon to time the opening and duration of
the injection event by operating a solenoid on top of the
injector. In all Cummins engines since 2003 (the high
pressure, common rail fuel system design), fuel pressure
is supplied by a high pressure pump (up to 26,000 psi) to
a common rail manifold connected to each injector. Since
fuel under high pressure is available at each injector at all
times, the time between injector solenoid opening and the
resulting shot of fuel is lessened.
To further complicate matters, current emission control
strategy (2003 to present) requires that several shots of
fuel be supplied for each combustion event, and that
actual combustion take place over more degrees of
crankshaft rotation rather than supplying one large shot
at or near the piston’s top dead center as was the plan
prior to 2002 emission controls. Geez. A set of injectors
that were formerly required to operate up to 250 times
per minute, now must operate three to five times as often,
and must meter smaller but increasingly precise amounts
of fuel each and every time. The amount of fuel injected
depends on fuel rail pressure and duration of injector
opening. The computer counts its ones and zeros very
fast to compute the fuel timing and duration, making up to
9,000 decisions per minute.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Current emission strategy requires that for each
combustion event, a small amount of fuel is injected
slightly before the piston reaches top dead center. As
this small fuel charge heats up and begins to light off,
the piston has passed top dead center. Another larger
injection event occurs when the piston is just past top
dead center, lighting more quickly than the first shot
because heat has increased in the combustion chamber,
and a third squirt occurs even later to squeeze the last bit
of power out of the event. With the 6.7-liter engine, fuel
can be injected after the combustion event. This raw fuel
is used for the regeneration/cleaning events that occur in
the truck’s emissions control devices. See the next page
for details on the 6.7-liter exhaust aftertreatment system.
Thus with current emission strategy, less peak pressure
is put on the piston to drive it downward, but it is applied
over a longer period of time or over more degrees of
crankshaft rotation. The piston is now doing “work” until
it is almost 90 degrees past the top of its travel as hot
combustion gases continue to expand. The goal is to keep
the combustion chamber cooler by injecting less fuel at
each injection event, yet get the maximum amount of
“work” from the piston as it is forced down in the cylinder.
Meanwhile, other mechanical and electrical bits and pieces
are doing their thing, too. One way to get more power from
a given engine size is to force more air into the cylinder to
allow more fuel to be burned. This is accomplished by use
of a turbocharger. Think of it as a pair of fans on a common
shaft where spent exhaust gases exiting the cylinder turn
a set of fan blades attached to another fan that stuffs more
incoming air into the engine. The drawback (there’s always
at least one) is that when you compress air it gets hot, as
Dr. Diesel found, but in this case, hot air coming into an
engine is an enemy. So intake air going into the engine
from the turbocharger is first run through an intercooler, a
big radiator, where the compressed air is cooled from, say,
350° to under 150° before it enters the engine’s air intake
tract. The cooled air is more dense, contains more oxygen
molecules, and therefore can be combined with more fuel
droplets to make more power. A small turbocharger that
spools up quickly ensures excess air is always present
to burn the injected fuel, although at the expense of high
rpm power. At the same time, the cooled air does its part
in helping control combustion chamber temperatures for
lower NOX emissions.
Focus on the 6.7’s Exhaust Aftertreatment
On the latest engines (’07.5 and newer), under certain
engine operating conditions, some of the exhaust gases
are recirculated into the incoming air intake to further
reduce exhaust emissions. This cooled exhaust gas
recirculation (EGR) puts inert gases into the cylinder that
would otherwise be occupied by oxygen rich air while
a smaller amount of fuel is added to make power. The
recirculated exhaust gas is therefore more completely
burned, lessening exhaust emissions, and the cooled
inert gas further cools the combustion chamber to reduce
NOX emissions. Exhaust Gas Recirculation is controlled
by a valve that is actuated by the engine control computer.
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49
These exhaust gasses are run through a small radiator
mounted on the engine that is also supplied with a constant
flow of coolant from the truck’s radiator. It is a stainless
steel tube with a small radiator mounted inside, where
exhaust gasses up to 1,300° are cooled to around 200°
before being routed into the engine’s air intake manifold. Of
course there is additional coolant plumbing and exhaust
plumbing required for the EGR system. Unfortunately, a
failure of the small EGR radiator will introduce coolant
into the engine cylinders which can damage pistons and
fuel injectors. This failure condition poses a particular
problem with Ford 6.4-liter engine which uses three of
these coolers; the GM Duramax engine uses two; and the
Cummins 6.7-liter engine uses only one.
These components were taken from
a Cummins test vehicle.
1. diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC)
2. NOX adsorber catalyst (NAC)
3. diesel particulate filter (DPF)
EGR cooler. Coolant enters and exits through round
ports while exhaust gases enter and exit at ends.
End view of cooler shows radiator inside.
The other components that make up the 6.7-liter’s exhaust
aftertreatment system were mentioned before, the DOC,
NAC and DPF. The DOC and NAC treat both NOX and HC
emissions by chemically changing them to more inert and
less harmful gases. A catalyst causes chemical changes
in a gas or liquid without changing itself.
How do these components operate? A quick look back at
Issue 67 tells the story:
“The system begins with a close-coupled catalyst—
essentially a conventional diesel oxidation catalyst
(DOC) incorporating a metallic substrate—mounted to
a short downpipe just off the back of the turbocharger.
A short distance behind and below the close-coupled
catalyst is the NOX adsorber unit (NAC), which is
followed by a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Both the
NAC and DPF use ceramic substrates.
50
Volume 2010-2012
“A NAC resembles a conventional catalyst,
incorporating a catalytic substrate through which
diesel exhaust is directed. Then the NOX molecules
are collected and held—‘adsorbed’—onto the surface
of the substrate, removing them from the exhaust
stream. When the surface area of the substrate is
full, the adsorber is regenerated with heat used to
chemically change the NOX into more benign gases,
mostly nitrogen and oxygen.
“The NAC is regenerated every few minutes at
approximately 600° to 800°F and the process takes
about three to five seconds. The NAC will also, over
time, collect sulfur from the fuel, which will gradually
reduce its effectiveness. So depending on how
much fuel is burned—typically every two tankfulls,
a separate regeneration cycle is initiated to remove
the sulfur. The use of high sulfur fuel is not allowed
because it results in a high degradation rate of this
catalyst.”
The final part of the system is the DPF. The diesel
particulate filter catches remaining carbon particles and
burns them up. Where does the DPF get its heat for the
burning process? Sensors in the DPF tell the computer
when to go into its regeneration mode to burn away
accumulated carbon. A few shots of raw diesel fuel are
injected into a cylinder’s combustion chamber while
the exhaust valve is open. The late post-injected fuel is
actually oxidized across the DOC and NAC, creating the
higher temperatures (1050° – 1150°) required to oxidize
the soot (carbon) off of the DPF. The fuel doesn’t actually
burn in the DPF to accomplish the DeSoot regeneration.
About the only thing left to come out of the tailpipe is
some moisture, some nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. The
tailpipe exit on the newest trucks is cleaner than that of a
gasoline engine. Nitrogen, coming out the tailpipe is the
largest component of the air we breathe, so it poses no
problem there as far as the EPA is concerned.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
But wait... there’s more! The engine control computer (ECU)
mentioned earlier controls the whole thing and must have
inputs from sensors in order to make proper decisions if
it is to control the whole process from beginning to end.
Stored in the computer are a bunch of “maps” that tell it
how to operate and what commands to issue under any
given engine operating condition. To know which map to
use and what commands to issue, the computer requires
inputs from a number of sensors, ranging from ambient
air temperature, to intake manifold air temperature and
pressure, to a throttle position sensor, to an engine speed
sensor, and so on. Because it is all related, there must
also be sensors to measure back pressure and oxygen
content in the diesel particulate filter. The computer then
also makes decisions about when to initiate burning off of
the carbon particles in the particulate filter.
to report operation and tank quantity remaining, and DEF
systems may not allow the vehicle to restart if the tank
becomes empty. There is even a sensor that reports if the
tank is filled with another liquid such as water, or fertilizer
mixed in water, so you can’t cheat it. A signal from this
sensor will also prevent restart.
In the latest trucks, because the computer controls battery
charging, a sensor even measures battery temperature
while another measures voltage. There’s a lot of electricity
being used here and the computer must have a dependable
and proper power supply to operate correctly. Yet another
set of sensors inputs signals to the computer which then
issues commands controlling automatic transmission
operation. Of course, engine and transmission operation
are interrelated, so the computer changes to a different
control “map” at every transmission shift and at many
changes in throttle position because engine operation
changes as engine speed and load change.
THE NEXT GENERATION
There’s even computer input from sensors in the brake
system. For example: If vehicle speed is zero and your
foot is on the brake pedal and the transmission is in
gear, engine speed is limited if you simultaneously press
on the “go” pedal. The computer decides this is a nono and limits engine speed to about 1500 rpm to avoid
transmission damage. It seems that the engine’s control
unit has thought of just about everything except how you
like your coffee.
The 6.7-liter Cab and Chassis Engine
Urea injection will be used on Dodge Cab/Chassis models
in 2011 because its EPA “duty cycle” is different than that
of a pickup truck. Although urea is a commonly available
chemical, and is a component of urine and fertilizer,
Diesel Emission Fluid (DEF) is a highly refined, high quality
urea chemical made from synthesizing natural gas. A
spray nozzle with an opening smaller than a pencil lead
dispenses the DEF fluid into the exhaust stream just as it
passes over a catalyst to treat the NOX component.
The urea injection, known as selective catalytic reduction
(SCR), takes the place of the NAC unit that is used on the
6.7-liter engine in the 2500/3500 pickup trucks.
Almost all large truck engines used in 2010 and beyond
will use urea injection in their emission control strategies.
The cost of the system adds about $1,000 to the price of
a diesel powered truck, and there is a space requirement
for the urea tank, pump, and plumbing that must be found
somewhere on the chassis. The system also uses sensors
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
With the 2011 Cab/Chassis truck there is ample warning
time before the engine will not restart. First a low DEF level
warning on the EVIC with occasional chimes, and then a
500 mile countdown, with increasing frequency of chimes.
If the driver ignores the 500 mile countdown warning on
his EVIC display, after hitting zero miles, the engine will
not restart due to starter lock-out. It won’t restart until
enough DEF is added to bring the level above the start of
inducement (~ 2 gallon).
So what are the next generations of engines going to
feature in the never ending quest for greater efficiency
along with ever tougher emissions standards? In the near
future, piezo electric actuators will replace fuel injector
solenoids. In fact, they are already being used in some
truck and automobile engines. Piezo crystals quickly swell
when electricity is applied to them, so they can be used to
operate fuel injectors. They’re faster acting than solenoids
so there would be another improvement in the accurate
metering of fuel, so important in the emissions control
game.
Piezo electric actuators could also be used to operate
engine intake and exhaust valves to open and close at
more precise times than those allowed by a camshaft,
pushrods, and rocker arms, with the attendant “slop”
in linkages. Not only would this eliminate the camshaft,
pushrods, and rocker arms, all weighty pieces, but
electronic control of valve timing would allow varying these
events to further improve engine efficiency at various
engine speeds and loads. The computer technology is
already on board to accomplish these tasks, and variable
valve timing is already proven in use in many gasoline
engines for increased efficiency and power.
To meet upcoming increased fuel mileage mandates,
research is in progress with the goal of cutting internal
engine friction. This would yield more power while building
less internal heat. At present, about 20 percent of fuel
consumed by an engine goes to overcoming friction both
inside the engine and throughout the rest of the drive train,
including the tires.
The next area for further development will be the engine
cooling system. Heat rejection from the combustion
process wastes a large portion of the heat value of the
fuel burned in the combustion chambers. Capturing this
heat to do useful work other than warming your toes on
cold mornings would offer further gains in fuel mileage.
With increasing electronics use comes more electrical
power consumption. Look for future vehicles to use higher
voltage electrical systems, either 24 or 48 volts. Doubling
Volume 2010-2012
51
the voltage means one-half the amperage draw, so
alternators, electrical motors, actuators, and batteries can
all be made smaller, thus saving weight and space. Military
vehicles have used 24 volt systems for many years, so the
technology and hardware already exists.
There is little industry buzz about designing hybrid trucks.
The power density of today’s battery packs is simply too
low to effectively move a load over long distances, and
would be very marginal for even short distances with
heavy loads. Diesel/hydraulic or diesel/electric power
offers better returns as an alternative prime mover.
Today, only about ten percent of the fuel used by an
engine does useful work in moving the vehicle. The other
90 percent is lost by factors mentioned above and by wind
resistance. For example, in a truck moving at 60 miles
per hour, about 50% of the engine’s power is used just
to overcome wind resistance. Cutting all of these losses
means a net gain in fuel mileage and vehicle efficiency.
That translates to good news at the fuel pump.
Jim Anderson
TDR Writer
SIDEBAR
YOUR CUMMINGS ENGINE THE CATALYTIC TRAP
by Robert Patton
Cummings? Mister Editor, you’ve committed a cardinal sin.
Doesn’t it make you cringe when “Cummins” is misspelled
or mispronounced? Actually, it is a tip-off that the
publication or the person in the conversation is not well
versed in all-things-diesel. Throw the publication away or
run…
We have lived with the 6.7-liter engine for almost four years
now. With the passage of time I am becoming more aware
of the public’s misuse of terms as they try to converse
about the auxiliary emission control devices (AECDs
for those that use government-speak). Oh, by the way,
catalytic trap is a misuse of terms. Throw the publication
away or run…
As we learned from Jim’s article, there are three AECDs
used on the ’07.5 and newer 2500/3500 pickups and three
AECDs on the Cab and Chassis trucks.
The trucks share the use of a diesel oxidation catalyst
(DOC) and the diesel particulate filter (DPF). To address
the NOX component of the exhaust, the pickups use
the NOX adsorber catalyst (NAC); the Cab and Chassis
trucks use the urea injection known as selective catalyst
reduction (SCR).
As a diesel enthusiast and as one who is revered for his
diesel knowledge, let’s all pledge to know the meanings of
and to use the terms correctly.
52
Volume 2010-2012
The following is a glossary that you can use in deciphering
the alphabet soup of AECD terminology. (I’m getting good
at sneaking that abbreviation in.)
NOX: oxides of nitrogen, a key pollutant that reacts with
hydrocarbons in the presence of sunlight to form ozone.
PM: particulate matter, another key diesel pollutant that is
primarily soot and other combustion byproducts that form
urban smog.
SCR: selective catalytic reduction, an aftertreatment
technology that uses a chemical reductant (urea) that is
injected into the exhaust stream where it transforms into
ammonia and reacts with NOX on a catalyst, converting
the NOX to nitrogen and water vapor.
EGR: exhaust gas recirculation, a technology that diverts
a percentage of the oxygen-depleted, inert exhaust
gas back into the cylinder to help lower the combustion
temperatures, thus reducing NOX.
DPF: diesel particulate filter, also known as a particulate
trap. DPFs will be used to capture particles of soot
in a semi-porous medium as they flow through the
exhaust system. DPFs are available in passive or active
configurations. Active DPFs use a control system to
actively promote regeneration events.
NAC: NOX adsorber catalyst, a catalyst that traps and
then converts NOX to nitrogen gas and water vapor.
VGT: variable geometry turbo, turbochargers that
constantly adjust the amount of airflow into the combustion
chamber, optimizing performance and efficiency. In
essence, the turbine casing varies from a small to a large
cross section.
ULSD: ultra low sulfur diesel. Over the years the sulfur in
diesel fuel has all but been removed. The standards: prior
to 1994 – 5000 ppm; 1994 – 500 ppm; 2006 – 15 ppm. It is
interesting to note that the European standard is 50 ppm
which was enacted in 2004. With ULSD in September
2006 the United States has the world’s strictest standard.
ULSD has several beneficial effects. It inherently produces
less PM from combustion, so it is a PM control strategy
for all in-use equipment. And, just like unleaded gasoline
in the early ‘70s, ULSD enables NOX adsorber catalyst
(NAC) technology to be highly effective and reduces the
production of sulfuric acid.
HPCR: high-pressure, common-rail, this is the type of fuel
system that is currently produced for our Dodge/Cummins
pickup trucks.
HCCI: homogeneous charge compression ignition, a
method of in-cylinder NOX reduction. Think of HCCI as
“massive EGR.”
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
NMHC: non-methane hydrocarbons, these are primarily
unburned fuel in the exhaust stream and are not a
substantial part of the diesel emissions problem. In 2002
the EPA added the NMHC number to the NOX number for
a total standard of 2.5-g/bhp-hr (NOX + NMHC).
THE AUTO CAT VERSUS THE DIESEL CAT
Through the years the Turbo Diesel pickup trucks have
used a catalyst in the exhaust aftertreatment. To be
technically correct, I consulted the Turbo Diesel Buyer’s
Guide to source the dates where the catalyst was used.
The breakdown:
1/1/1994 – 12/31/1998, All 12-valve engines, all states
1/1/03 – Current, California trucks
1/1/04 – Current, all states
Also, to be technically correct, we should call the diesel
catalyst by the accepted industry vernacular—a diesel
oxidation catalyst (DOC).
“In automotive use a catalytic converter is a device
plumbed into the exhaust system that converts HC, CO
and oxides of nitrogen (NOX ) into harmless carbon dioxide
and water vapor. This is accomplished by routing the
exhaust over catalyst materials (platinum, palladium, and
rhodium) to start a chemical reaction which promotes
further burning of the charge, and converts HC, CO, and
NOX to lower the emissions level of the exhaust gases.
“The first converters (vintage 1974-1979) were simple
two-way units that filtered the exhaust through a bed
of pellets coated with the precious metals. Those early
cats converted only HC and CO and were very restrictive
because the gases had to pass through the bed of pellets,
rather than simply flow across the top of it. Though it was
illegal, removing the first converters did improve engine
performance. And because of this, the free-flowing cats
of today unjustly receive a bad shake.
Catalyst 1: a modification and especially increase in the
rate of a chemical reaction induced by material unchanged
chemically at the end of the reaction.
“Today’s cats use a monolithic substrate instead of the
pellet bed and are very free-flowing. The substrate is a
ceramic honeycomb through which the exhaust gases
must pass. The substrate is coated with the same precious
metals as the pellets were. Many of the muffler and header
companies with which we spoke said that their testing
has found that the current monolithic-type cat adds very
little backpressure, and that removing the cat has little
performance benefit. However, freeing up the exhaust flow
after the converter can have substantial gains. Provided
noise regulations are met, it’s legal to modify the exhaust
plumbing downstream of the cat.”
Note from the definition that with the diesel exhaust
catalyst we are simply trying to “increase the rate of a
chemical reaction induced by a material unchanged at
the end of the reaction,” and this reaction is aimed at the
particulate “component” of the diesel exhaust.
The background information on automobile catalytic
converters was presented for general member knowledge.
We all drive automobiles and it is great to know that today’s
(since 1979) converters combine performance with clean
air and product longevity.
Understanding Automotive Cats
The Diesel Oxidation Catalyst
In my search for a simple explanation of the catalytic
converter system being used in diesel applications, I ran
across this article in the August ’92 edition of Petersen’s
4-Wheel & Off-Road. I know that the diesel and the
automotive catalyst do not promote the same chemical
reaction. But I didn’t fully understand the auto cat or the
differences between the first ones we saw in 1974 and the
technology of today.
Again, introduced in 1994 on Turbo Diesel trucks, the
catalyst used in diesel applications functions as an
oxidation catalyst. In layman’s terms, it uses the precious
metals Palladium, Platinum and Rhodium as a coating
over a honeycomb bee hive structure. The reason for a
DOC is to address the particulate component of the diesel
exhaust. There are two primary components to diesel
particulates: Insolubles and Soluble Organic Fraction, or
SOF. The insoluble portion is from dry soot (black smoke).
The SOF consists of a small portion of unburned fuel,
and mostly lube oil that was left on the cylinder walls or
escapes past the piston rings and becomes entrained in
the exhaust gasses.
For the enlightenment of the audience, I went back to Issue
18 to find out more about the diesel oxidation catalyst,
how it operates, and the difference between the DOC and
a catalytic converter used on an automobile. Let’s start
with the basics:
The automotive catalytic converter: With permission of
Petersen’s 4-Wheel & Off-Road, here are excerpts from
“Exhaustive Research.”
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
53
As exhaust gasses pass over the honeycomb, the SOF
particulates are captured. At exhaust gas temperature
above 300-350°, the catalyst driven chemical reaction
becomes active, converting upwards of 80% of the
SOF into carbon dioxide and water. Keep the 300-350°
temperature in mind and note that prolonged idling/low
exhaust temperature is not healthy for the engine or the
diesel catalyst.
So, if you’ll check your notes from Jim’s write-up, you’ll
find that both the DOC and the DPF are used to address
particulate matter in the exhaust for the ’07 and newer
6.7-liter engines. Technically speaking, the DOC and
DPF are actually very different animals. The DOC works
on unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), including SOF as was
mentioned. However, it does nothing at all to soot. The
DOC is a “flow-through” catalyst. There is no regeneration
required of the DOC.
Introduced for use in ‘07.5 and newer trucks, the DPF
is a “wall flow” catalyst, which is how it traps the soot
particles. The DPF must be regenerated to oxidize the
soot. Think of the DPF as a self-cleaning oven and you
can get a layman’s feel for the principle of operation.
Conclusion
I’m hopeful that Jim’s write-up and my additional
comments have given you a better understanding of the
technology used to address diesel exhaust emissions.
Go forth, but continue to beware of those “Cummings”
people.
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
54
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
THE COST OF REGENERATION
ISSUE 74 – 6.7 HPCR
by Robert Patton
For the past two issues of the magazine I’ve given
you my observations on fuel mileage using the Edge
“Insight” gauge package and the truck’s electronic
vehicle information center (EVIC) fuel mileage display.
As has previously been observed, I used the Insight’s
regeneration-on feature as a trigger to reset the EIVC’s
mpg monitor and to reset the odometer.
And now, the total “cost to regenerate”: $4.68 + $4.56
= $9.64 for 1,757 miles of interstate travel. To do some
further calculations the cost would be $548 per 100K
travelled at $4 per gallon of diesel fuel or .548¢ per mile.
Thus far I have monitored two different types of driving:
a total of 1,757 miles of interstate-only/cruise speed 7578mph no load driving; and 2,415 miles of interstate travel
at 67-69mph with a 12,000 pound trailer in tow. For this
issue I can add some comments on around town mileage;
I can add a 904 mile trip at 70mph pulling a small 4,500
pound trailer (a new category); and 412 additional miles
towing the 12,000 pound trailer.
This new category is simply the record of the trip that was
travelled back in June to the Cummins CMEP Open House
event in Columbus, Indiana. It is approximately a 1,000
mile round-trip. The data is presented as follows:
When I started the fuel mileage observations back in Issue 72,
I gave these driving loops some names to describe the
type of duty cycle. I will use the same descriptive:
Interstate trip (no load)
Interstate trip towing (4,500-pound load)*
Interstate trip towing (12,000-pound load)
*new category
The following are the data from my observations this past
quarter.
Interstate Trip (No Load)
For this issue of the magazine I do not have any new data.
In Issue 72 I did some backwards math to determine the
“cost of regeneration” during two, no load interstate trips.
The data from these no load trips:
713 No-load Trip as calculated
609 miles
104 miles
÷ 16.62 mpg
÷ 13.78 mpg
36.64 gallons + 7.54 gallons = 44.18
713 Ideal trip
713 miles
÷ 16.62 mpg
42.9 gallons
1.27 gallons for regeneration, 1.27 ÷ 42.9 = 3% penalty
1.27 gallons of fuel at $4 per gallon = $4.68
1044 No-load Trip as calculated
1044 Ideal trip
961 miles
÷ 15.85 mpg
60.63 gallons +
83 miles
÷ 12.82 mpg
6.47 gallons= 67.1
1044 miles
÷ 15.85 mpg
65.86 gallons
1.24 gallons for regeneration, 1.24 ÷ 65.86 = 1.88% penalty
1.24 gallons of fuel at $4 a gallon = $4.56
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
New Category – Interstate Trip
Towing 4,500-pound Load
On – 9 miles
N/R*
Off – 117 miles
12.3 mpg
On – 19 miles
11.1
Off – 175 miles
12.3mpg
On – 8 miles
N/R*
Off – 57 miles
12.0mpg
On – 16 miles
10.9
Off – 107 miles
11.3mpg
*no reading
At this point we arrived at our destination and the truck
went into the on-off-on-off cycle that I have described as
the “dufus zone.” To try and be more professional with my
communication, let’s officially call this the city driving cycle.
For the return trip we had a change of drivers and it took
about 150 miles before the regeneration dinger chimed in
and reminded the drivers to collect data for this article.
They reached for the note pad and recorded the following:
On – 16 miles
11.1mpg
Off – 190 miles 12.9mpg
On – 16 miles
9.6mpg
Off – 164 miles 12.3mpg
On – 20 miles
11.7mpg
Arrive at destination.
Again, this is not a scientific collection of data, merely
an observation using the truck’s EVIC mpg feature. And,
admittedly, it is a “lazy” observation in that we aren’t doing
a weighted averaging of the mpg numbers. We just add
them up and divide by the number of driving cycles. So,
the following are the averages from the data we collected:
Off cycles 6: total miles 810, mpg 12.18
On cycles 7: total miles 104, mpg 10.88
Percentage of time on 11%, off 89%
Volume 2010-2012
55
For this issue let’s do the same backwards math to
determine the “cost of regeneration” when towing the
4,500-pound trailer for 904 miles.
The 904 mile, 4,500-pound Towing Trip
904 No-load Trip as calculated
904 Ideal trip
810 miles
104 miles
904 miles
÷ 12.18 mpg
÷ 10.88 mpg
÷ 12.18 mpg
+ 9.56 gallons = 76.06 74.22 gallons
66.50 gallons
1.84 gallons for regeneration, 1.84 + 74.22 = 2.4% penalty
1.84 gallons of fuel at $4 per gallon = $7.36
And now, the total “cost to regenerate”: $7.36 for 904
miles of interstate travel. To do some further calculations
the cost would be $814 per 100K travelled at $4 per gallon
of diesel fuel, or .814¢ per mile.
Existing Category – Interstate Towing
12,000-pound Trailer
In July I did a short trip with the trailer in tow to Charlotte,
North Carolina. The trip covered 412 miles. Putting pencil
to paper, this trip was right in line with the previous data
that covered three trips totaling 2,003 miles.
Previous data for the 2003 miles:
Total miles on, 342 (17% of the time) 9.22 mpg
Total miles off, 1,661 (83% of the time) 9.53 mpg
New data from 412 miles:
Total miles on, 56 (14% of the time) 9.23 mpg
Total miles off, 356 (86% of the time) 9.65 mpg
For this issue let’s do the same backwards math to
determine the “cost of regeneration” when towing the
12,000-pound trailer for 2,415 total miles.
The 2415 mile, 12,000-pound Towing Trips
2003 No-load Trip as calculated
2003 Ideal trip
1661 miles
342 miles
2003 miles
÷ 9.53 mpg
÷ 9.22 mpg
÷ 9.53 mpg
174.3 gallons +
37.09 gallons = 210.4 210.18 gallons
1.22 gallons for regeneration, 1.22 ÷ 210.1 = .58% penalty
1.22 gallons of fuel at $4 = $4.88
412 No-load Trip as calculated
356 miles
56 miles
÷ 9.56 mpg
÷ 9.23 mpg
37.24 gallons +
6.07 gallons = 43.31
412 Ideal trip
412 miles
÷ 9.56 mpg
43.09 gallons
.21 gallons for regeneration, .21 ÷ 43.09 = .48% penalty
.21 gallons of fuel at $4 per gallon = 84¢
When you compare the cost of fuel for the ideal trip against
the additional cost of fuel during the truck’s regeneration
events, I noted that the penalty for regeneration is .58%
and .48%.
56
Volume 2010-2012
I think this quote has been used once or twice before,
from the engineers at Cummins, “If the truck is being used
as intended—moderate to high load in highway travel—the
answer is the obvious: the engine’s output of unburned
fuel (particulates) is very low, the exhaust gas temperature
is high and there is little need to fire-up the self-cleaning
oven known as the diesel particulate filter. Consequently
the mileage penalty is negligible, if any at all.”
And now, the total “cost to regenerate”: $4.88 + .84 =
$5.72 for 2,415 miles of interstate travel. To do some
further calculations the cost would be $236 per 100K
travelled at $4 per gallon of diesel fuel, or .236¢ per mile.
It makes you wonder how much money the Ford or Chevy
owner would have spent in diesel exhaust fluid (DEF or
Urea) when travelling 2,415 miles.
On a final note, when towing a heavy load we’ve seen that it
would be $236 to travel 100,000 miles. One of those fancy
programmer units and an exhaust system retrofit will cost
you at least $1,200. So the real cost to bypass the truck’s
exhaust aftertreatment system: a five year payback; you’ve
lost any rights to warranty consideration; and your truck is
illegal, subjecting you to a steep federal fine. Ouch.
Conclusion
Back in Issue 72 I installed the Edge Insight monitor and
started to note the “regeneration on” events and their
duration. In Issue 72 I wondered why such a report about
regeneration-on events had not been filed since the
introduction of the 6.7-liter engine four years ago. I can
only assume it was because the previous Edge monitor
was also sold with a performance package. And, when the
owner installed the kit, likely the emissions aftertreatment
components “fell off” the truck.
Regardless of the lack of reporting, I’m pleased to say that
data from the Edge Insight has given me the ability to get
us to the bottom-line, the total “cost to regenerate,” which
I noted in the three analysis of driving cycles. The cost was
.548¢; .814¢ and .236¢ per mile respectively.
Now, compare these cost-per-mile numbers to the data on
page 52 that gives us the DEF consumption that member
“Plefever” is seeing with his 4500 series truck. his usage:
1 gallon (at $4 gallon) for 700 miles = .57¢ per mile
or
1 gallon (at $4 gallon) for 900 miles = .44¢ per mile
Next up, I’m going to try to compare our cost to regenerate
to that of the Ford or GM engines and their use of diesel
exhaust fluid (DEF).
Does anyone have a Ford or GM buddy with a new truck
that has been tracking their use and cost of DEF?
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
TECHNICAL SERVICE BULLETINS
FOR 2011
ISSUE 74 – TDRESOURCE
Have we not all heard comments by those unfamiliar
with the Ram Turbo Diesel (a prospective buyer of either
a new or used truck, or a visitor on the internet or at
the truck show) that “the Turbo Diesel certainly has its
share of problems”? To them, no doubt, the grass looks
greener on the other side. However, thanks to the TDR
membership group and the support from Chrysler and
Cummins, we are equipped with answers and solutions,
rather than the dismay and isolation that would exist
without a support group.
THIS YEAR’S TECHNICAL SERVICE BULLETINS
Each year as a service for the TDR membership I purchase
a subscription to Chrysler’s online service and data
system (www.techauthority.com). New for this year, the
TechAuthority site offers an index of factory technical
service bulletins (TSBs) that have been released in the past
year. I scroll through the index and print those bulletins that
are pertinent to all Turbo Diesel trucks (all years, all models
with cab and chassis included). With the bulletins in hand,
I summarize the bulletin for publication in the magazine.
Should you need a complete copy of the bulletin, you can
contact your dealer with Issue 74 in hand, or armed with
your truck’s vehicle identification number (VIN) and a credit
card you can log on to www.techauthority.com and, for
$29.95, you can view/print all of the TSBs that apply to
your vehicle. The $29.95 buys you three consecutive days
of access. However, for 2011 I found theTechauthority
website to be cumbersome to navigate. More on this later.
In an effort to consolidate the TSBs for the magazine,
we’re going to use the same index system categories as
Chrysler. Below are the index categories.
2 Front Suspension
3 Axle/Driveline
5 Brakes
6 Clutch
7 Cooling
8 Electrical
9 Engine
11 Exhaust
13 Frame & Bumpers
14
16
18
19
21
22
23
24
25
26
Fuel
Propeller Shafts and U-Joints
Vehicle Performance
Steering
Transmission
Wheels & Tires
Body
Air Conditioning
Emissions Control
Miscellaneous
A note concerning the TSBs and their use: The bulletins
are intended to provide dealers with the latest repair
information. Often the TSB is specific to the VIN. VIN data
on the Chrysler service network helps the dealer in his
service efforts. A TSB is not an implied warranty.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
WHAT DO THE MODEL CODES MEAN?
Throughout our summary pages you’ll see model codes
listed for the various Dodge trucks. The following is a
chart of the model code meanings.
Series
2500 Pickup
3500 Pickup
3500 C/C
4500 C/C
5500 C/C
’08
DH
D1
DC
DM
DM
’09
DH
D1
DC
DM
DM
’10
DJ
D2
DC
DM
DM
’11
DJ
D2
DD
DP
DP
NEW RELEASES
Again, with the service at www.techauthority.com we’ve
gathered information on Ram Technical Service Bulletins
that have been released only during the past year. If
you wish to review all of the TSBs for Third or Fourth
Generation trucks, we have archived those as well as this
update at the TDR’s web site (Sitze Features: TSBs). Also,
TDR Issues 66 and 58 have larger listings that allow the
Third Generation owner to review the TSBs issued from
2003 to 2009.
Likewise, using Issue 70 as your resource, you can review
the TSBs that were issued in calendar year 2010.
TECH AUTHORITY STUMBLES
I have long sung the praises of Techauthority. Not so for this
year’s review of technical service bulletins. In my previous
yearly updates the system would ask for your VIN and the
VIN number would unlock a world of information. This year
the “search by VIN” resulted in “no items matching your
criteria.” And that was only after 10 attempts to log-in, and
after 10 attempts to purchase the $29.95 subscription.
(Okay, I’m embellishing with the “10 attempts,” but you get
the message, it was not an easy shopping experience.)
And, ask my wife, I am good at purchasing items using
the keyboard and the computer. For 2011, Techauthority
proved to be a real time-waster. However, that is part of
the reason you’re reading the TDR, right? You trust the
TDR’s writers and staff to sift through the minutiae and
bring you only the important details.
I’m hopeful our yearly TSB summary is helpful to you.
Volume 2010-2012
57
CATEGORY 7
COOLING
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
07-003-10
9/9/10
’07-’10 DC/DM
’11 DD/DP
High coolant temperatures on vehicles equipped with snow plows.
Customers that operate their vehicle with a snow plow attached to the vehicle may cause
the airflow passing through the radiator to be disrupted resulting in higher than normal
engine temperatures. The Cummins ECM is equipped with software that can fully engage
the fan clutch to allow an increase of airflow through the radiator. Customers can initiate the
fan clutch operation by performing the following button sequence:
• Turn the ignition key to the run position or start the truck.
• Simultaneously press and release the Cruise Control “Cancel” button/lever and the “Exhaust Brake” button. Repeat this sequence four times within five seconds. The
chime will sound twice as an audible indicator that the function is engaged.
• To disable the function, repeat the same procedure. The chime will sound four times
as an audible indicator that the function is disengaged.
Note: ’07-’09 truck engine ECMs were not equipped with the fan engagement software.
These engines would require the latest software update (18-020-10) in order to have the
fan-on capability.
07-002-11
8/13/11
’11 D J/D2
Transmission cooler hose weepage.
This bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with the Cummins engine and an automatic
transmission built between September 20, 2010, and January 17, 2011. Some of the listed
vehicles have been built with a transmission cooler hose that may experience fluid weepage.
Inspect the upper transmission cooler hose (“Hot” side line that runs near the battery) for
date code 2440. If the upper transmission cooler hose has date code 2440 on the hose,
verify whether or not the hose was built between 21:14 – 23:16 (Time Stamp). The date code
may be on the lower side of the hose. It may be necessary to use a mirror or rotate the hose.
This bulletin involves inspecting the upper transmission cooler hose for a specific date code
and time stamp. If found within the suspect range, the transmission cooler hose must be
replaced.
CATEGORY 8
ELECTRICAL
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
08-014-10
6/29/10
’10 D1/DJ
Radio locks up.
This bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with a radio with sales code REN, REZ. The
problem may be that the radio will not change stations or frequency intermittently. The only
function that will be available is volume control. The repair involves upgrading the software
of the REN/REZ radio.
08-026-10
Rev. A
12/18/10
’11 DD/DJ/DP/D2
Park assist system for message clarity and false messages on 4x4 models.
This bulletin applies to vehicles built with the Parksense Rear Park Assist (sales code XAA). Customers may not understand the EVIC message display “Blinded”. This indicates that the
Parksense Rear Park Assist sensors require cleaning. The EVIC flash will change the display
to indicate “Clean Sensors”. The EVIC may display the message “Press 4 Low” when a shift
into 4x4 is not allowed. This message has no meaning on these vehicles. The EVIC flash will
prevent this message from being displayed.
This bulletin involves reprogramming the EVIC with new software.
58
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
CATEGORY 8
ELECTRICAL
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
08-028-10
Rev. A
11/2/10
’10 DJ/DX/D2
RBZ radio software enhancements.
This bulletin applies to vehicles built with a radio that has a sales code RBZ. The customer
may experience one or more of the following problems:
• The display may appear to be dimly lit when in backup camera mode (if equipped).
• Screen fonts too small or unclear.
• Video playback, display too bright.
• Audio playback, sound quality/frequency response could be improved. • Hands free call information does not display caller ID.
• Bluetooth streaming audio information is incomplete.
The repair involves upgrading the software on the RBZ radio.
08-001-11
Rev. A
3/5/11
’10-’11 DJ/D2
Radio software enhancements.
This bulletin applies to vehicles built with a radio/navigation units with sales codes RER,
REW or REP. The problems experienced:
• The radio may lock up when a U-Connect call ends, this may cause battery drain.
• Intermittent/no sound from audio system.
• Repeated “Updating Channels” message when in satellite radio mode.
• Losing Bluetooth connection intermittently and not displaying accurate caller
ID information when using U-Connect.
This bulletin involves upgrading the software on the RER, REW, or REP Radio.
08-003-11
Rev. B
3/17/11
’10-’11 DD/DJ/DX/D2
’11 D2
Exterior mirror courtesy lamps stay on longer than the customer desires.
This bulletin involves checking the software version and, if necessary, flash reprogramming
front door control modules with new software. This bulletin supersedes bulletin 08-003-11
revision A. This bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with exterior mirror courtesy lights
(sales code LEC) built between January 1, 2010, and December 13, 2010.
08-018-11
Rev. A
7/1/11
’10-’11 DJ/D2
Static, squeal, no sound, or intermittent sound from speakers.
This bulletin applies to DJ and D2 vehicles built between July 15, 2010, and November 30,
2010, equipped with 9 amplified speakers w/subwoofer (sales code RC3) or 9 amplified
speakers (sales code RCZ). This bulletin also applies to DJ, and D2 vehicles built between
July 15, 2010, and February 28, 2011, equipped with Premium I speakers (sales code RCK).
The repair involves removing and replacing the amplifier.
08-024-11
Rev. A
7/1/11
’11 DD/DJ/DP
Flash: Intermittent no start or intermittent RKE function.
This bulletin applies to DD, DJ, and DP vehicles built before April 7, 2011, equipped with
remote keyless entry (sales code GXM). This bulletin involves flash reprogramming the wireless ignition node (WIN) with new software. The service flash corrects the following
conditions
• Intermittent no start.
• Intermittent RKE.
The above conditions may be caused by a software lockup in the module. The lockup
condition may be cleared by removing the reinserting fuse M27. Flash reprogramming the
WIN will correct these conditions.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
59
CATEGORY 8
ELECTRICAL
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
08-015-11
4/6/11
’11 DJ/D2/DD/DP
Loss of communications with the hands free module (HFM).
If there is a loss of the hands free module function the service bulletin involves performing a
USB service flash of the hands free module.
08-033-11
6/22/11
’11 DJ/D2/DD/DP
Intermittent diagnostic trouble code P0201 – Fuel injector 1 circuit open/closed.
This bulletin applies to a small number of vehicles equipped with the Cummins engine built
between March 1, 2011, and March 11, 2011. Suspect vehicles may intermittently set DTC
P0201 – Fuel injector 1 circuit open/closed. This bulletin involves replacing terminal number
26 from the powertrain control module (PCM) 76-way connector.
08-049-11
8/12/11
’11 DJ/D2/DD/DP/DX
Front overhead ambient light intermittent operation or inoperable.
This bulletin applies to vehicles built between February 11, 2011, and March 9, 2011. If there
is intermittent or no operation of the front overhead light this bulletin explains how to remove
and repair the light.
CATEGORY 9
ENGINE
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
09-004-10
11/11/10
’11 DJ/D2/DD/DP
Incorrect engine oil level indicator.
Cummins engines are equipped with an engine oil level indicator that identifies a “Safe”
region on the end of the indicator. Some vehicles were equipped with an engine oil level
indicator end that had “Add, Cold, Hot, and Do Not Add” increments on the end. These
engine oil level indicators will need to be replaced. This bulletin involves inspecting the
engine oil level indicator and replacing it if found to have an incorrect indicator end.
CATEGORY 13
FRAME & BUMPERS
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
13-001-11
5/13/11
’10-’11 DJ
Front axle skid plate to oil pan contact.
This bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with 6.7-liter Cummins engine and TRX package (sales code AMW) built after September 1, 2009, and built prior to September 23, 2010.
The front axle skid plate may contact the oil pan during extreme off road usage. The repair
involves inspection of the oil pan and if necessary replacement of the front skid plate and
oil pan.
CATEGORY 14
FUEL SYSTEM
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
14-005-10
9/21/10
’10-’11 DJ/D2
Fuel filler housing pops out of sheet metal.
This bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with a single wheel rear axle only built before
August 9, 2010. The customer may notice that the fuel filler housing has popped out from
the body on one side or the other. This bulletin involves removing the fuel filler housing to
file some material off of the tabs that will not lock into place. If tab(s) are broken it will be
necessary to replace the fuel filler housing and it still may be necessary to file some material
off of the tab(s) that will not lock into place.
60
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
CATEGORY 18
VEHICLE PERFORMANCE
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
18-004-11
Rev. A
2/18/11
’10 DJ/D2
Diagnostic and system improvements.
This bulletin applies to trucks equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins diesel. The bulletin
describes a number of software improvements/enhancements that are available:
P046C – EGR position sensor performance
P051B – Crankcase pressure sensor circuit range/performance
P0101 – Mass air flow sensor “A” circuit performance
P2002 – Diesel particulate filter efficiency below threshold
P2196 – O2 sensor 1/1 out of range low
P245B – EGR cooler bypass status line intermittent
P2262 – Turbocharger boost pressure not detected – mechanical
P2271 – O2 sensor 1/2 out of range low
This bulletin involves selectively erasing and reprogramming the engine control module
(ECM) with new software.
18-029-11
5/28/11
’11 DD/DP
Engine systems and PTO enhancements.
This bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with a Cummins engine built before January 1,
2011. These cab chassis trucks have a number of software improvements available. This
latest service bulletin will include:
Improvements to prevent unnecessary malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) illumination for:
P0524 – fault for low oil pressure, set during low ambient temperatures.
P051B – fault for crankcase pressure.
Enhanced diagnostics for:
• Variable geometry turbocharger.
• Fuel level sensor.
Other updates:
• Low diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) level EVIC messaging strategy changes.
• Diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) system tampering EVIC messaging strategy changes. • Oil change monitor – updated for easier reset (same basic procedure, easier to reset).
• Scan tool display updates.
• Enable mobile PTO capability.
• Correct operation of remote PTO.
• Correct EVIC messaging related to DEF level reporting.
• System robustness improvements.
• DEF tank level reporting erroneously at high DEF tank level. When DEF tank is overfilled, the EVIC may display low fluid level (20-22%).
This bulletin involves selectively erasing and reprogramming the engine control module
(ECM) with new software.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
61
CATEGORY 19
STEERING
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
19-001-11
Rev. A
8/9/11
’08-’10 DM
’11 D P
’10-’11 DJ/D2/DD
’06-’09 DH/D1
’07-’09 DC
’05 DH
’03-’04 DR
Tie rod ball stud housing alignment procedure.
This bulletin describes the proper procedure to ensure parallel alignment of the right and
left steering tie rod ball stud housings. The bulletin applies to 4x4 models of the 2500/3500
pickup truck and to all 3500/4500/5500 Cab Chassis trucks which have a solid front axle.
The overview of this repair procedure: The right-to-left tie rod ball stud housings must be
aligned parallel to one another and not exceed +/-3 degrees of combined parallelism. This
procedure is required any time service is performed to either the tie rod or when performing
a front end alignment or toe set procedure. Failure to properly perform the parallel alignment
procedure may lead to tie rod damage.
19-003-11
2/2/11
’10-’11 DJ/D2
’11 D D
Steering honk and/or groan sound during low speed parking lot maneuvers.
This bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with 6.7-liter Cummins engine built prior to
November 23,2010. The customer may experience a honk and/or groan sound coming
from the steering system during low speed parking lot maneuvers. This bulletin involves
inspecting and, if necessary, replacing the power steering gear. This bulletin applies to 4x4
models of the 2500/3500 pickup truck.
CATEGORY 20
BODY
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
23-024-11
7/12/11
’11 DD/DP
’10-’11 DJ/D2
’09-’10 DM/DC
’09 DH/D1
Whistle and/or high pitch windnoise at door near windshield A-pillar.
This bulletin applies to vehicles built before April 18, 2011. The customer may experience
whistle and/or high pitch windnoise at door near windshield A-pillar. This bulletin involves
installing a foam stuffer block into door weatherstrip.
CATEGORY 25
EMISSIONS CONTROL
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
25-002-10
9/22/10
’11 DD/DP
Misassembled diesel exhaust fluid engine coolant control valve.
This bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with the Cummins engine built between March
3, 2010, and July 19, 2010. Some trucks may have been built with a DEF engine coolant
control valve that may be internally misassembled which may not be able to completely
shut the flow of coolant passing through the coolant tubes in the DEF tank. This allows
the DEF temperature to rise above its normal operating range. DEF that has been exposed
to elevated temperatures can cause the DEF to degrade. This bulletin involves replacing
the diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) engine coolant control valve assembly. Some of the involved
vehicles may also require draining and adding DEF.
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Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
RECALLS ISSUED IN 2010/2011
SAFETY RECALL K08
WIRELESS IGNITION NODE RECEIVER
Date: August 2010
Models: ’10 (DJ) Ram Truck (2500 Series)
’10 (D2) Ram Truck (3500 Series)
This recall applies only to the above vehicles built at
Saltillo Assembly Plant (“G” in the 11th VIN position)
equipped with an automatic transmission from January 6,
2010 through February 16, 2010. This recall also affected
other Chrysler vehicles.
The Wireless Ignition Node (WIN) receiver on about
8,900 of the above vehicles may experience a condition
where the Frequency Operated Button Integrated Key
(FOBIK) may be removed prior to placing the automatic
transmission gear shift lever in the “PARK” position. This
could result in unintended vehicle movement and cause a
crash without warning.
SAFETY RECALL K28
LEFT TIE ROD END
Date: February 2011
Models: ’08-’10 (DM) Ram Truck (4500/5500 Series Cab/
Chassis)
’11 (DP) Ram Truck (4500/5500 Series Cab/
Chassis)
This recall applies only to the above vehicles built through
September 02, 2010.
The left outer tie rod end on about 15,500 of the above
vehicles may fracture due to a misalignment condition.
Under certain driving conditions, this may lead to a
weakening and eventual fracture of the left outer tie rod
ball stud. A fractured tie rod end could cause a loss of
directional stability and a crash without warning.
The left outer tie rod end must be replaced, toe-in must be
set, and the tie rod ends must be aligned.
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION NOTIFICATION L14
REPROGRAM HVAC CONTROL HEAD
To correct this condition, the Wireless Ignition Node
receiver must be inspected and replaced if necessary.
The new WIN must be programmed and all FOBIK
transponders must be programmed so they are able to
interface with the new WIN receiver.
Date: April 12, 2011
Models: ’10 (D2) Ram Truck (2500 series)
’10 (DJ) Ram Truck (3500 series)
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION NOTIFICATION K17
REPROGRAM HVAC CONTROL HEAD AND INSPECT/
REPLACE ACTUATORS
This notification applies only to the above vehicles built
with Manual Temperature Control (MTC) from March 18,
2010, through June 24, 2010.
Date: September 29, 2010
Models: ’10 (DJ) Ram Truck (2500 series)
’10 (D2) Ram Truck (3500 series)
This recall applies only to the above vehicles built through
May 22, 2010
The HVAC mode door actuator gears on about 52,000 of
the above vehicles may break and result in the inability to
fully control the HVAC functions.
To correct this condition, all involved vehicles must have
updated HVAC control head software installed and the
mode door actuators must be tested and replaced as
required.
The Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
control head software on about 10,330 of the above
vehicles may cause the mode door actuator gears to
make noise and/or break. This could cause the inability to
fully control the HVAC functions.
To correct this condition, the HVAC control head must be
reprogrammed with new software.
SAFETY RECALL K33
POWER STEERING RESERVOIR CAP
Date: February 1, 2011
Models: ’10-’11 (DC/DM/DJ/D2/DD/DP) Ram Truck
This recall applies only to the above vehicles equipped
with a Cummins engine built at the Saltillo Assembly Plant
(“G” in the 11th VIN Position) through October 05, 2010.
The power steering reservoir cap on about 11,300 of the
above vehicles may cause excessive vent pressure levels
in the power steering/hydraulic brake booster system.
This may cause the vehicle to have brake lights that remain
illuminated for an extended period of time after the brake
pedal has been released. Brake lights that are slow to turn
off could increase the risk of a crash.
To correct this condition, the power steering reservoir cap
must be replaced.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
63
EMISSIONS RECALL K34
REPROGRAM ECM – EGR DIAGNOSTIC
Date: February 8, 2011
Models: ’10 (DJ/D2) Ram Truck (2500/3500 Series pickup)
This recall applies only to the above vehicles equipped
with a Cummins engine built from October 1, 2009,
through June 24, 2010.
The Engine Control Module (ECM) on about 1193 of the
above vehicles may have been built with a software error
that prevents the EGR cooler bypass valve diagnostic
from running after detecting a pending fault, disabling
deNOx without illuminating the MIL. This may cause the
vehicle’s exhaust emissions to exceed the allowable limit
for oxides of nitrogen.
To correct this condition, the Engine Control Module
(ECM) must be reprogrammed (flashed).
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Volume 2010-2012
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION NOTIFICATION L03
DOOR LATCHES
Date: March 2011
Models: ’11 (D2) Ram Truck (3500 Series) Pick up
’11 (DD) Ram Truck (3500 Series) Cab Chassis
’11 (DJ) Ram Truck (2500 Series) Pick up
’11 (DP) Ram Truck (4500/5500 Series) Cab
Chassis
This notification applies only to the above vehicles
equipped with power door locks (sales code JPB) built
from July 01, 2010, through November 23, 2010.
The right front door latch, right rear door latch and/or
swing gate latch on about 35,000 of the above vehicles
may develop a ratcheting sound while using the power
door locks.
The right front door latch and right rear door latch must be
inspected and replaced if necessary.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
ONE yEAR FOLLOW-UP
ISSUE 75 – YOUR STORY
by Robert Patton
As I stopped to refuel the truck, from the other side of
the fuel pump the question came, “Hey, buddy, how long
have you had that black truck?” I paused for a second
and replied, “Gee, I’ve had ownership for a little over one
year. It has been a really good truck.” The back-and-forth
conversation continued and I made a mental note to write
a one year follow-up for the TDR audience. The following
is my story.
The truck was introduced in Issue 70. It was purchased
in August of 2010. The truck was on the back lot at the
dealership tucked in with several 1500 trucks with the
same basic ST (read: no frills) trim. My first comment,
“Now that is an ugly truck.”
However, the truck had two redeeming qualities. First,
the truck was cheap. Not counting sales tax, this truck
was $34,316 out-the-door, a mere $2,000 more than my
comparably equipped (albeit with the sport trim) 2003
Dodge 2500 Quad Cab, SLT trim, that I had from 2003 to
August of 2007. The second redeeming quality: The blank
canvas nature of the ST truck would give me endless
topics to write about for the TDR. And, considering the ST
version was $6,000 less than the out-the-door price of the
same truck (Crew Cab, automatic, two-wheel drive) in SLT
trim...well, that’s $6,000 that could be spent on custom
accessories.
However, the truck had
two redeeming qualities.
First, the truck was cheap.
And spend I did. In Issue 71 the “Your Story” feature took
readers through the saga of “Purchase Confirmation
or Buyer’s Remorse” and you could immediately see
the truck’s transformation as 20” wheels and tires were
installed on the truck. This change alone used up $2,000
of the $6,000 budget that I had saved in the purchase price
of the truck. Then, in Issue 72, it did not take long to use
up the other $4,000 when the shopping and installation of
accessories began in earnest. Issue 73 presented “The
Continuing Story of Mr. Schwarz,” and additional exterior
and interior refinements were made to the truck.
Now it is time for the one-year review. What works, what
doesn’t work; what was cost effective and what was a
waste of money; what items were fun to install, what items
were not worth the time.
I have done this style of evaluation in two previous issues
of the magazine, in Issues 59 and 63. The truck that was
accessorized was a 2007.5 Mega Cab, Long Box, 3500 with
the 68RFE automatic transmission and two-wheel drive.
One thing you should remember is my disclaimer about
objectivity. You might ask, do all these articles and
evaluations attest to criteria shared by all the TDR staff,
or have I arbitrarily selected evaluations that make similar
judgments, to project my own criteria? That is, I concede,
a good question. I’ll let you be the judge.
So, for this issue I will accept the challenge to keep my
correspondence brief. The products are listed as they
were in Issue 59 and 63 and my approval rating (one –
least; five – best) using the  symbol to keep the text’s
length to a minimum.
Except where noted, the products were in the
Geno’s Garage catalog or have been added to the
catalog. They are good enough to recommend
to a friend and they are good enough to sell to
a friend.
The second redeeming quality:
The blank canvas nature of the
ST truck would give me endless
topics to write about for the TDR.
Here goes.
Mr. Schwarz, before any modifications.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
65
Interior
Electrical Accessories: Painless Wiring/Fuse Panel

Geno’s Garage. Since Mr. Schwarz did not come with a
big list of options from the factory, I knew that I would
need both of these electrical building blocks. The blocks
are positioned under the dash for easy access. I made
access to these two blocks a quick “snap,” but not
without some modifications to the knee bolster panel.
With the panel on the workbench, I removed several
of the plastic tabs that keep it in place—less is more.
I permanently removed the two Phillips screws that
are over-kill for the positioning of the knee bolster. I
permanently removed the OBDII connector and tie
wrapped it just to the left of the knee bolster. I modified
the tangs on the hood release lever so that it easily drops
off of the knee bolster.
If you have a Fourth Generation truck, and you need
an easy-to-access area for electrical goodies I highly
recommend these modifications to your knee bolster
panel.
Cup Holder

Geno’s Garage. The cup holder continues to be the first
item that I install on a new truck.
Seat Heater: Rostra

Geno’s Garage. The seat heaters would get a good fivestars were it not for the fact that the Ram folks have
changed the way that their seat covers attach to the
seat foam. That is correct: they use those dreaded hogrings instead of the Velcro attachments used on ’03-’09
seats. So, installation is a tad more difficult (Issue 72,
page 73). The hassle of installation is outweighed by the
effectiveness of the heaters on a bad back.
Seat Covers: Covercraft

Geno’s Garage. Great fit. I’ve used Covercraft seat covers
in all of my trucks since 1996.
Stereo Unit: JVC

Crutchfield. I purchased the unit because I was spoiled
by my previous 2003 truck’s remote radio controls and
this JVC stereo has a remote control fob. Occasionally the
remote has a mind of its own and the unit is difficult to
program (time, and radio outputs). It is not user friendly.
However, the smaller size of the unit with the Crutchfield
mounting kit gives you room underneath the stereo for
miscellaneous storage.
Floor Mats: Husky and Avery’s

Geno’s Garage. Either they catch water and muck or they
don’t. Four stars means the Husky liners do the job.
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Volume 2010-2012
The knee bolster panel has been removed and
the Dremel tool will soon be cutting the tab where
the Phillips head screws were located.
Parking Partner: Sonadar

Geno’s Garage. I love this item, but as technology changes,
and as the price of electronic gadgets (see rear view
camera below) does a freefall, the Parking Partner has
reached obsolescence. When I started the accessorizing
of Mr. Schwarz I had to look through all of the Geno’s
product returns to piece together a working unit.
Rear View Camera: V3P/Peak

Pep Boys/Advance/Auto Zone. On writer Sam Memmolo’s
recommendation I purchased the camera kit. I love this
camera because it allows you to hook up to a trailer hitch
without getting out of the truck. There are so many of
these units available and the price can be as low as $59
if you catch the item on sale. The camera installed on Mr.
Schwarz is a wireless unit. I would give it a five-star rating
if it weren’t so temperamental and fuzzy some of the time.
Regardless, it is only needed for hitch-up and the price
was right.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Gauges: Edge Insight

Geno’s Garage. Adding gauges to your truck has never
been so easy. Just plug it into the OBDII sensor and it
is ready to display more information than I care to know
with up to 20+ data points to choose from. With the
Insight ($399) and the addition of an EGT probe ($99), it
accomplishes the big three gauge functions (boost, EGT,
transmission temperature) for about the same price as a
set of independent gauges and a pod.
I know, this sounds like a sales pitch, so I’ll stop and give
you something to think about. The Insight simply displays
data that is available on the OBDII. Why doesn’t Ram
give you access to all of the data at the electronic vehicle
information center (EVIC) display?
Underhood
Compressor and Air Horns: Pacbrake and Chrome City

Purchased direct from Pacbrake. I love the compressor,
air tank and horns. I also love the quick disconnect that I
added at the area of the truck’s license plate. This comes
in real handy when you have to air up a trailer tire on the
side of the road.
Quick Grill Release Kit: Geno’s Garage
Geno’s Garage. Since I’m the guy that developed this kit,
you can rest assured that it gets a five star rating. For the
do-it-yourselfer, the instructions are in Issue 71, pages
141-143. The removal of the grill allows you to use the
bumper as a step—just like the ’94-’09 trucks that we’ve
all become accustomed to.
Compressor and Air Horns: Pacbrake and Chrome City

Purchased direct from Pacbrake. I love the compressor,
air tank and horns. I also love the quick disconnect that I
added at the area of the truck’s license plate. This comes
in real handy when you have to air up a trailer tire on the
side of the road.
The three-star rating comes from my inability to keep
the plumbing air-tight, thus requiring the compressor to
operate too frequently. The horns sound great. Call me lazy
for not crawling under the truck to find the slow air leak.
The three-star rating comes from my inability to keep
the plumbing air-tight, thus requiring the compressor to
operate too frequently. The horns sound great. Call me
lazy for not crawling under the truck to find the slow air
leak.
Engine Oil Drain Valve: Fumoto

Geno’s Garage. This cost-effective item solves the truck’s
infamous oil drain problem.
Condenser Guard: Lanier Metal

Geno’s Garage. The guard goes hand-in-hand with the
QGRK. It keeps the condenser’s fins from getting bent.
Sandwich some nylon window screen between the guard
and the condenser and you can eliminate the bug splatter
problem.
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Cab Fresh Air Filter Kit: Cab Fresh

Geno’s Garage. I like the fact that the filters help clean
the outside air. I do not like the cheap, quick to rust
screws provided with the kit. So the Geno’s folks now
send stainless screws with the kit.
Exterior
Bed Step: AMP Research

Geno’s Garage. With a drop in the price to $199 this easyto-use step is a five-star item. It bolts on in less than five
minutes.
Tailgate Up/Down Assist: Gate Glide II

Geno’s Garage. I’ll start my list of exterior items with a
must-have item. Every truck should have tailgate-up and
tailgate-down assist. Many of the TDR writers have also
given the Gate Glide II a big thumbs-up. If you haven’t
already purchased one, you need to give it a try.
Bed Liner: Spray-in, Line-X brand

Local installation at Super Trucks, Cumming, Georgia.
The Super Trucks guys continue to do a great job on my
trucks. As a side note, have you noticed that a sprayin bed coating is now available as a factory option?
Compare/contrast the thickness of the factory option to
the aftermarket guy in your area and I think you’ll choose to
stay with the aftermarket product. And, although I’ve tried,
I can’t match the Line-X with any of the do-it-yourself kits. (Even the U-POL that I wrote favorably about in Issue 73.)
Foglights: Pilot

Auto Zone. I installed some small sized, inexpensive lights
from the local auto parts store for use on the front and
rear (backup) of the truck. Using relays, the front lights
come on whenever the low beams are operating, and the
rear lights come on whenever reverse is selected.
Bed Cover: Agri-Cover Lite Rider

Geno’s Garage. Cost-effective, 99% waterproof easy to
install, and, most importantly, it rolls/unrolls in about 10
seconds.
Wheels: American Racing ATX-181 Artillery 20”x9”

Tire Barn Custom Wheel Warehouse. The Geno’s staff
purchased these wheels at the 2010 Scheid Diesel
Extravaganza. The offset is not quite right or these wheels
would get a five star rating. Yes, they stick out too far
which necessitated Mopar fender flares to make the
wheels/tires look correct. That is the drawback. The big
plus: the wheels are Teflon coated. Initially I thought this
was a bunch of bunk—kind of like Teflon that was used in
Slick 50 lubricants back in the 90s. But, the ease of clean
up has made me a believer in the Teflon coating idea for
truck wheels. Should I need to purchase wheels in the
future I will look for those with a Teflon coating.
Fender Flares: Mopar

Local Dodge dealer. As noted above, the fender flares
were necessary to compensate for the incorrect (too wide)
offset of the aftermarket wheels. The truck’s wheels/tires
now look acceptable.
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Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Tire: Cooper 275/60/R20 Discover HT Plus

Tire Barn Custom Wheel Warehouse. When the Geno’s
guys returned from the Scheid event with the 20” wheels
and tires I was really concerned that these wider tires
with their somewhat aggressive tread pattern (the stock
tires were Michelin LTXs) would be louder. I was also concerned about the larger diameter, the Cooper’s are
630 revolutions per mile, the OEM Michelins are 690. So
I have effectively changed the rear end gearing by 60rpm
or 60/690 = 8.6%. The stock 3.54 gearing is now a 3.23.
But the truck pulls my 12,000-pound load okay through
the rolling hills of Georgia and the southeast. And, I can
always downshift to fifth-gear.
Lights: Anzo or Recon
The Geno’s folks reported too many warranty problems
with the Anzo lights. I tried the lights from a competitor,
Recon, and I had too many problems with poor electrical
connections. I cannot recommend either light to you.
Conclusion
Any item with four-stars or better you can correctly
assume that I would use on my next truck. Three or less…
time to evaluate the product or the poor workmanship of
the installer. I’m hopeful my list of items is helpful to you as
you upfit your truck.
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
This inset photo shows
the addition of Husky
mud guards.
The correction for a wheel/tire that sticks out too far?
A lighter wallet ($327) and Mopar wheel flares,
part number 82212208 (molded black, grain texture,
same as Power Wagon, wheel flares).
Mudflaps: Husky/Winfield Products

Geno’s Garage. Those mudflaps are perfectly contoured
to the truck’s wheelwells. Pricewise, they are about 25%
less than the Mopar part. You can’t go wrong with that!
Not So Good
All right, you’ve looked at my list of goodies that have a
favorable rating. How about those that did not make the
cut and were not installed on Mr. Schwarz?
I would be remiss if I did not give you an update. Here goes.
Fuel Door: Bully or All Sales
I don’t think a chrome fuel door would look right on this
all-black truck. The Geno’s folks no longer sell the cheap
chrome Bully door as it would rust too easily. The All Sales
polished aluminum doors are a nice addition for those that
like shiny things.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
69
NOTES:
70
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
SOME GOTTA WIN –
RAM 3500 EVALUATION
ISSUE 75 – TDREVIEW
by Robert Patton
Often when I am in the process of writing an article the
lyrics of a song will come to mind. I did a Google search on
“some gotta win, some gotta lose” and the inquiry revealed
the lyrics to “Good Time Charlie’s Got the Blues.” (If you
have time for a diversion, search the internet and you find
the song was written by Danny O’Keefe and recorded by
the likes of Elvis, Dwight Yoakum, Willie Nelson, Charlie
Rich, etc.)
Back to the subject, some gotta win, some gotta lose. In
early September, a few days too late for the close of the
previous magazine, a TDR member asked if I had read
about the evaluation of one-ton, 3500 series pickups that
was done at the web site www.pickuptrucks.com.
The reference to pickuptrucks.com sounded familiar.
When I clicked on to the web site I realized why. If you will
recall, back in Issue 71, I reported that pickuptrucks.com
had done an extensive comparison of 2500 series diesel
trucks that they titled “2010 Diesel Shootout.” I was very
impressed by the test and I used some of their data in my
evaluation of my 2010 Ram 2500 truck.
However, the article referenced by the TDR member was
talking about a one-ton, 3500 truck comparison. Sure
enough, one year later, in August 2011, writers Mike Levine,
Mark Williams, and Kent Sundling did a 2,234 mile towing
test of comparable 3500 series trucks. My compliments
go out to these writers for an excellent evaluation of these
three trucks. Their August 2011 comparison of the 3500
series trucks is titled “The Hurt Locker.”
Quarter-Mile Loaded
Brake Test
Davis Dam Grade Climb
Davis Dam Grade Exhaust Brake
Eisenhower Pass Climb
Eisenhower Pass Exhaust Brake
Fuel Economy
Best Overall
Background
To the point, the writers at www.pickuptrucks.com
described their test as follows: “Our test, the Heavy-Duty
Hurt Locker is based on lessons learned from previous
tests and feedback from readers. It’s a 2,200-mile, fourstate slog towing trailers that weigh almost 10 tons each
and push each truck’s gross combined weight to more
than 90 percent of their gross combined weight rating.
“The test included driving up two of the nastiest mountain
climbs in the U.S.—from hot summer temperatures of
more than 100 degrees in the Arizona desert to the
oxygen-starved peaks of the Colorado Rockies, 11,000
feet above sea level. Through it all, we measured fuel
economy, acceleration, power and braking and evaluated
the confidence that each truck gave its driver.”
Unfortunately, for the Ram/Dodge/Cummins Hoo-Ra
crowd, our truck did not win. (Some gotta win, some gotta
lose.) Regardless, the test was as unbiased as you will find
and it answers many of the fuel mileage and performance
questions that we all have about the 6.7-liter engine in the
Fourth Generation truck.
As mentioned, the test was done in August 2011 and
the newly released Cummins 350/800 engine was pitted
against the Ford 400/800 and GM 397/765 power plants.
Unlike the August 2010 comparison of 2500 series trucks
where the engine numbers were 350/650, 390/735 and
397/765 respectively, this time the performance-type
criteria was closely matched.
So, how did the Ram/Cummins 3500 truck compare?
I’ve got 35 pages that I will summarize for you. To keep it
simple, I’m going to follow the same format that the www.
pickuptrucks.com writers used. The outline:
Background
Specifications
Quarter-Mile Unloaded
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
71
Specifications
Brake Test
As noted in the introductory paragraphs the www.
pickuptrucks.com staff tested these 2011 trucks with the
latest and greatest power ratings. (Emphasis on latest and
greatest—when will the one-upmanship in horsepower
and torque end?) Here are the numbers from their
specification page.
The PUTC staff did the brake test with the 19,400-pound
load in tow and a 40mph to 0 stop. They tested these trucks
with the exhaust brakes on. Each truck was equipped with
the factory integrated brake controller. The brake test was
also done without the trailer brakes connected to give the
audience a feel for what can be expected in a fail-safe
condition. Their results:
Ram
HP
[email protected]
Torque
[email protected]
Axle
4.10
Transmission
1
3.23
2
1.84
3
1.41
4
1.00
5
.82
6
.63
Tire (rpm) 245/75/17 (662)
GCWR
29,000
Trailer
19,400
Price
$58,200
Ford
GMC
[email protected]
[email protected]
3.73
[email protected]
[email protected]
3.73
3.97
3.10
2.32
1.81
1.52
1.41
1.15
1.00
.86
.71
.67
.61
235/80/17 (656) 235/80/17 (656)
30,000
29,200
19,400
19,400
$56,900
$55,710
+The writers at www.pickuptrucks.com (PUTC) started
their report with a quarter-mile test with the 19,400-pound
trailer in tow. Careful consideration was given to make the
testing equal (tow/haul, mirrors, air conditioning, traction
control, launch technique). Their results:
Acceleration
0 to 30 mph
0 to 50 mph
30 to 50 mph
Quarter-Mile
Ram
9.19
23.09
13.90
26.39
@ 53.46mph
Ford
8.42
21.05
12.64
25.63
@ 55.13mph
GMC
9.21
20.60
11.39
25.88
@ 56.75mph
(seconds with trailer)
GMC was judged as the winner.
Ram
40-0
100
40-0 w/o trailer brakes 164
Davis Dam Grade Climb
Did you realize that the Society of Automotive Engineers
has developed a trailer towing capacity test (J2807) so
that truck buyers will have criteria for an apples-to-apples
comparison? According to PUTC, the manufacturers are
expected to implement this test in 2013. (See BITW page
64.) In the meantime the astute PUTC writers implemented
one of the tests, the Davis Dam Grade, for their evaluation.
The steady 5% grade is Highway 68 outside of Bullhead
City, Arizona. The test length is 11.17 miles. The entire
11.17 miles was run at wide-open throttle. Two runs were
made up the grade. Their results:
The GMC’s best time:
11 minutes, 11 seconds; average speed 58.35
The Ford’s best time:
11 minutes, 50 seconds; average speed 54.9
The Ram’s best time:
12 minutes, 54 seconds; average speed 50.6
GMC was the winner.
Davis Dam Grade Exhaust Brake
The PUTC staff noted that this test was the only time the
trucks were unloaded in their 2234 miles of testing. Their
results:
Ram
3.95
10.40
6.46
18.02
@ 79.94mph
(seconds without trailer)
GMC was the winner.
Ford
3.77
9.53
5.76
17.56
@ 83.03mph
GMC
100
165
Ford was the winner.
Quarter-Mile Unloaded
Acceleration
0 to 30 mph
0 to 50 mph
30 to 50 mph
Quarter-Mile
Ford
94
143
GMC
3.86
9.23
5.37
17.22
@ 84.97mph
What goes up must come down. Likely you noticed the
PUTC guys did two trips up the Davis Dam Grade which
gave them two trips down to test the exhaust brakes. The
method to test the effectiveness: start at 55mph; wait for
gravity to take the speed to 60mph; apply service brakes
to 48mph; wait for 60mph; apply service brakes to 48mph
and repeat. The truck with the fewest applications of the
service brakes was the winner. They let the truck “decide”
which gear to be in. Their results:
Ram
GMC
Ford
2
4
5
The Ram was the winner.
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Eisenhower Pass Climb
According to PUTC, Eisenhower Pass, located in Dillon,
Colorado, on I-70, is the highest point in the US interstate
system. The grade starts at 5% for two miles and increases
to 7% for the remaining six miles. It was another wide
open throttle test. Their results:
GMC
Ford
Ram
8 minutes, 47 seconds; average speed 51.7
10 minutes, 17 seconds; average speed 44.5
11 minutes, 20 seconds; average speed 40.4
GMC was the winner.
Eisenhower Pass Exhaust Brake
By this time in the evaluation the Ram faithful of the TDR
are expecting that this will be a category for a Ram win.
Not so.
The PUTC staff noted that the Eisenhower test averages
2% steeper than the Davis Dam test and the finishing
order changed. Their results:
GMC
Ram
Ford
5
12
13
Best Overall
The PUTC scorecard gave points based on a scale of 100
for first and the second and third points were assigned
relative to how close they finished to the leader. The
example they gave: 1/4 mile fastest at 15 seconds, then
a truck at 16 seconds would receive 15/16 or 93.7 points.
Their totals:
GMC
Ford
Ram
807.97
754.60
751.61
If you read the PUTC score sheet you’ll see that the Ford
was killed by its poor exhaust brake performance.
However, I’m not going to get too bogged down in PUTC’s
numbers. Some gotta win, some gotta lose.
In an effort to explain the difference it was noted that the
GMC downshifted to second and the Ram stubbornly
stayed in third and picked up speed; upshifting to fourth
to keep from over-revving Fourth gear took the truck over
60mph and the service brakes were applied.
GMC was the winner.
Fuel Economy
Total up the fuel receipts and it is easy to do the math for
fuel economy
Ford
GMC
Ram
It is also unfortunate that the PUTC staff did not note the
amount of diesel exhaust fluid needed to refill the Ford
or GMC at the end of the test. They started with both the
Ford and GMC eight-gallon tanks at “full” and did not refill,
nor were either low level lights on. To try and level the mpg
disparity, let’s just make an assumption that the Ford and
GMC used 6 gallons. The cost of DEF is $3, so that only
narrows the MPG gap between Ford and Ram by $18.
9.5mpg
9.1mpg
8.5mpg
Although we did not fare well in the test, ours is a group of
informed, level-headed enthusiasts who deserve truthful
reporting. You’ve got the numbers from PUTC. Now if you
are like me, when you weigh them, you will add your triedand-true experience at the wheel, and balance the scales
with your more-subjective appreciation of the Ram’s looks
and its sheer physical presence on the road, as well as our
appreciation of comfort in the cab, room to work under
the hood, faith in the legendary Cummins engine, and the
support of a faithful community of fellow-TDR members.
You get my drift. Yes, we do own a winner.
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
With receipts in hand for the 2000+ mile trip they noted
the Ford to GMC difference of .4mpg cost $22. They noted
the Ford to Ram difference of 1.0mpg cost $115 more to
operate.
(How can this be? Someone’s math is not correct.
A .4mpg only cost $22; where as a 1.0mpg cost $115? By
my calculation if 1.0mppg cost $115 then .4mpg cost $46.
An unfortunate miscalculation or misprint in an otherwise
excellent test.)
To verify for myself, I did some oversimplified math using
$4/gallon as the cost for fuel.
Ford
2000 ÷ 9.5 × $4 = $842
GMC 2000 ÷ 9.1 × $4 = $879
Dodge 2000 ÷ 8.5 × $4 = $941
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Advantage Ford by $37
Advantage Ford by $99
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NOTES:
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A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
“PERFORM SERVICE”
AT 67,500 MILES
ISSUE 75 – 6.7 HPCR
by Robert Patton
Since the 6.7-liter engine has been in the marketplace
for over four years, I am long overdue in writing an article
covering the 67,500 mile maintenance requirements that
are called for in your Owner’s Manual.
What? You did not realize that there were any requirements
at 67,500 miles?
Yes, indeed: change the crankcase vent filter; clean the
EGR valve; and clean the EGR cooler assembly.
The maintenance of these items sounds simple, but the
folks at our sister company were getting reports from
owners that this service would cost from $400 to $800;
$200 for parts and the balance in labor, with the big
variance due to labor rates and shop experience to get
the job done quickly.
The parts involved in the service are as follows:
2) 68028729AA cleaner @ $19.85
2) 68005184AA gasket @ $2.60
1) 68026986AA gasket @ $14.08
1) 68026987AA gasket @ $4.57
1) 68038089AB gasket @ $24.85
Sub-total
1) 68002433AB crankcase vent
(CCV) filter @ $132.00
Total
$39.70
$5.20
$14.08
$4.57
$24.85
$88.40
$132.00
$220.40
This is a magazine/membership group that is dedicated
to the do-it-yourselfer. Can these parts be purchased for
less? Yes. The quote from Cummins/Geno’s Garage: $40
for the gaskets; $76.95 for the CCV filter, or $105 for the
entire kit (cleaning solution not included).
The first service item, change the CCV filter, is very easy
to do. The instructions were covered in the Turbo Diesel
Register, specifically Issue 64, page 40.
In an effort to do a comprehensive 67,500 mile service
article, this is what we found:
The CCV sits on top of the valve cover and, from what
looks like a last minute entry in the ’07.5 Owners Manual,
it requires inspection and/or changing every 67,500 miles.
Furthermore, should the crankcase vent system become
clogged, there are diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs for the
uninitiated) that will be set, causing a malfunction indicator
light (MIL for the uninitiated) to come on. Specifically
the DTCs for CCV problems are: P1507 crankcase filter
restriction; P1508 crankcase filter restriction—replace
filter. If these codes are set the “Perform Service” message
will illuminate on the overhead display.
Likewise, at the 67,500 mile interval the “Perform Service”
will automatically illuminate, alerting you to check and clean
the EGR valve, EGR cooler and to replace the CCV filter.
How do you change the CCV? The inspection and/or
changing of the filter is very easy. The steps are:
• Remove the four 8mm bolts that hold the “batwing” cover in place. Remove the dipstick and then the cover.
• Remove the oil drain hose from the passenger side of the CCV filter. As you inspect the hose you should find
that there is very little oil that makes it this far into the
vent system.
• Remove the eight 8mm bolts that hold the CCV filter in place.
A close inspection of the cleaning solution in the Mopar
bottle yielded a smell and feel that was similar to a cross
between Joy dishwashing detergent and Simple Green
cleaner. With a $40 savings, you can guess that our DIY
service procedure will use the less expensive cleaner(s).
Okay, with the preceding comments about saving money
foremost on your mind, how should I continue with
this article? Let’s break the service down into its three
components:
Part 1: Change the crankcase vent (CCV) filter
Part 2: Remove and clean the exhaust gas recirculation
(EGR) valve
Part 3: Remove and clean the EGR cooler assembly.
Part 4: Change the CCV Filter
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Removing the eight 8mm bolts that hold the
CCV filter in place. DO NOT use the impact tool
to reassemble and tighten the bolts.
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• Remove the oil fill cap. For protection from debris, stuff a paper towel into the oil fill hole.
Part 2: Clean the EGR Valve
• With a large flat blade screwdriver, gently pry the CCV filter up and off.
This service procedure is almost as easy as Part 1,
changing the CCV filter.
• Upon inspection of the CCV filter, you’ll see that it has two O-rings and a reusable V-gasket that effectively
seal the filter in place.
Let’s pick up the instructions from the part where you
have removed the dipstick and then the four 8mm bolts
that hold the “batwing” in place.
• Remove the three 10mm bolts that hold the dipstick bracket in place.
• Next, remove the electrical connector that goes to the EGR valve. With a small pick move/slide the red clip
out, allowing you to pinch the tang down to release the
connector.
• Next remove the four 10mm bolts that hold the EGR valve in place. The bolts and the EGR valve can be
removed. Lift the EGR valve off of the intake horn and it
is ready for cleaning.
• Remove the four Phillips head screws that hold the valve
motor to the EGR assembly. Lift the valve motor off.
New CCV filter on the left. At 30,000 miles the CCV filter
on the right looked clean and was reinstalled.
• Replace the CCV filter.
• Reassemble in reverse order.
Reset the “Perform Service” Message
Oops…wait one minute, we’re not quite finished. How
do you reset the “Perform Service” reminder that is now
illuminated on your overhead display?
The procedure is outlined in your Owner’s Manual and it is
written as follows:
• Turn the ignition switch to the ON position. (Do not start the engine.)
• Press and release the brake pedal two times.
• Fully depress the accelerator pedal slowly two times within 10 seconds.
Several shops that we’ve talked to suggested that you start
the EGR valve cleaning process by blowing the carbon off
of the EGR valve with regulated compressed air. Start at
10psi and increase the pressure as the dust flies—and the
dust will fly. Your blowing should be done in the wide open
spaces or, better yet, blow into an old shop vacuum that
you no longer care about.
With the focus on saving you money, we wanted to test
the effectiveness of the Mopar cleaner as compared to
Simple Green cleaner. We poured two quarts of the Mopar
fluid into a five-gallon bucket. Ditto with Simple Green.
The suggested concentration is 4 parts water to 1 part
solution; the suggested soak time is 2 hours. Based on
tips that we received from service shops, we suggest a
2-to-1 concentration and an overnight soak.
Upon removal of parts from the different solutions, the
Mopar and Simple Green, we could not tell any real
difference. Both solutions did a good job of cleanup.
• Turn the ignition switch to the OFF/LOCK position.
The message should now be erased. You can also do your
favorite dance afterward!
• Drop the EGR housing and valve into the cleaning solution for an overnight soak.
• Remove and do a preliminary cleanup with a toothbrush.
For complete cleaning you’ll want to disassemble the
EGR valve from the housing. The procedure is as follows:
• Using your fingers, a screwdriver or a socket, press down on the valve spring retainer.
• With the retainer pressed completely down the valve keepers should release from the valve. A light tap with
a screwdriver or magnetic pick up tool may be needed.
• Remove the retainer and keepers.
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Disassembling the EGR valve from the housing.
• The valve can now move freely. Clean the valve and the valve seats. We used a toothbrush and a Scotchbrite
pad for cleaning.
• Reassemble the EGR valve. The valve motor is not indexed. Reassemble it so that its connector is pointed
towards the front of the truck.
• For easier access to the exhaust manifold, we started
the project by removing the air snorkel that comes
from the airbox to the turbocharger inlet. To remove
the snorkel you need to disconnect the two sensors,
loosen the hose clamps and disconnect the crankcase
vent line that goes into the snorkel. To prevent debris
from entering the turbocharger, stuff a clean rag into the
turbocharger inlet.
• Reassemble the EGR valve back onto the air intake.
Part 3: Remove and Clean the EGR Cooler
Unlike parts 1 and 2, this service procedure is cumbersome
and time consuming. Notice we did not say “difficult,” as the
procedure is nothing more than removing and reinstalling
parts. There is no heavy lifting; no precise measuring or
alignment; and no machine work/outside services for which
you have to wait. However, if you look at this procedure in
the TDR-o-pedia, it exemplifies and gives definition to the
word cumbersome.
How so?
Here are some examples: Hidden nuts and bolts that you
can’t see, nuts and bolts that are difficult to access; nuts
and bolts that require removal of other parts (air cleaner
assembly) to access; and special flexible tools that you’ll
need to get into the aforementioned tight and awkward
locations.
All right, you’ve been sufficiently warned that the
procedure is cumbersome, but not necessarily difficult.
Here are some general instructions with tips for easier
disassembly.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
• Moving to the passenger side of the engine, remove the 11mm nut from the clamp that holds the EGR cooler
assembly to the exhaust gas crossover pipe.
• Remove the 8mm bolt at the front of the engine that holds the crossover pipe in place. Removing this bolt
loosens the crossover pipe, giving you room to wiggle
the pipe to an out-of-the-way location.
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1
2
• Remove the four 10mm bolts that hold the servo motor
plate to the cast iron butterfly/flex pipe assembly.
• There is a heat shield above the EGR servo control valve.
Remove these two 10mm nuts (#1 and #2) that hold
the heat shield in place. These two bolts also hold the
butterfly onto the 90° elbow.
• Loosen the 11mm bolt on the V-clamp. Remove the clamp and the cast iron butterfly/flexpipe to be separated from
the EGR cooler.
• Remove the top two 10mm bolts (#1 and #2) that hold the cast iron butterfly housing to the 90° elbow.
• Remove the bottom two 10mm bolts (#3 and #4) that hold the cast iron butterfly housing to the 90° elbow.
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• Remove the four 10mm bolts that hold the EGR cooler to
the manifold plate.
• Remove the two 15mm bolts that hold the butterfly/flex
pipe onto the exhaust manifold.
• Remove the remaining 10mm bolt that holds the coolant tube to the side of the manifold plate (see arrow).
• There are several 10mm bolts that hold the front coolant tube to the cooler assembly. Remove the bolts and the
coolant tube can be pulled backward from the O-ringed
nipple that goes into the cooler assembly. Catch the
coolant in a paper cup.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
• Now that the coolant tube is completely loose. Pull the tube up off of the vertical fitting that is on the cylinder
head.
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Vacuum cleaner
inlet hose.
• Remove the CCV hose from over the EGR cooler.
Tape seals
compressed
air hose to
EGR Cooler.
• With carefully regulated compressed air you can blow
carbon into the inlet hose of a vacuum cleaner.
• Remove two 15mm nuts that hold the EGR cooler onto the exhaust manifold. Yes, these are hard to reach.
• Lift the cooler off of the exhaust manifold.
• Plug one end of the cooler with a rubber plug and fill with hot water and cleaning solution. Plug the other end and
soak overnight.
Now that the cooler has been removed, it is time for
the overnight soak. To save cleaning solution and the
associated messy waste, I found two rubber plugs that
fit into the cooler openings. Plug the cooler at both ends;
fill it up with the solution and hot water; shake it like you
would a paint can; and allow it to sit overnight.
• Remove the rear coolant hose from the EGR cooler. Drain the remaining coolant from the EGR Cooler.
The next morning remove the cooler and clean inside
as best you can. A further trip to the local car wash/
pressure washer facility with the cooler and a bit of leftover solution will make sure that it is really clean. For
good housekeeping take the crossover pipe and other
associated EGR hardware for cleaning. Do a final blowout with compressed air.
Reassemble the cooler to the exhaust manifold.
Now, don’t forget to reset the pesky service reminder.
(Forgetting is difficult to do when “Perform Service” is
always illuminated.) The instructions for the reset are back
on page 41.
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
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A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
LUBE OIL UPDATE
ISSUE 76 – TECHNICAL TOPICS
by Robert Patton and John Martin
A New Inquiry
Last October I received an e-mail from TDR member
Desmond Rees:
I am looking for supplemental information following up
John Martin’s article from Issue 57 on engine oil. The
August 2007 article is somewhat dated. With the switch
to the new API requirements for EGR/DPF diesel engines,
are there plans to revisit this topic regarding the best
engine oils meeting the API CJ-4 requirement? John’s
article only looked at a handful of the CJ-4 oils and they
ranked at the bottom of the pile when compared to the
previous generation of oils. Thanks.
Desmond Rees
My response: Prior to Desmond’s letter, there were
no plans to revisit the topic. However, it has been five
years and oils do change. I will purchase and test the CJ
oils and John can comment on the data. We will see if
John’s previous conclusion holds: “If it meets a spec, it
becomes a commodity. Low price can be the purchase
criteria. Change the oil based on the Owner’s Manual
recommendations.”
Thanks to Desmond for the letter.
Background Information
It seems like just yesterday that I met lube oil expert John
Martin and we collaborated on a series of articles about
lube oils.
Ouch! As Desmond reminded me, “yesterday” was Issue
54 of the TDR, which was published in December of 2006.
The four-part series that we wrote took a year to complete.
The reason behind the year-long series of articles was
the forthcoming change from lube oil category CI+4 (an
industry specification that was implemented in 2002) to
the new category CJ. The CJ formula of oil was developed
for the lower diesel exhaust emissions engines that were
being implemented starting 1/1/2007.
I wondered how the lube oil would change. John Martin
was the guy to tell me. (More about John in just a minute.)
In a lengthy telephone conversation he shared his opinion
about the forthcomming CJ lube oil specification. Bottom
line: John felt that the CI+4 oils were some of the best to
come out of the respective refineries. In his discussions
with those in the oil business, he had formed the opinion
that the new CJ oils would not necessarily be new-andimproved.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
As I noted, the CJ formula was developed for the new lower
emissions diesel engines. From John I understood that
the CJ oil would not necessarily be new-and-improved.
Without analysis of the lube oils, I asked John what
were the proposed changes from the highly acclaimed
CI+4 to the new CJ oils. His response: “Robert, this is a
lengthy topic, but it is very important for the audience to
understand what is happening in the oil business.” So, I
looked back to Issue 54 and made a couple of tweaks to
its contents. The following is the updated text that gives
you the insight that you need to understand the CI+4 to
CJ change.
A Little Lube Oil History
Before we talk about what the additive industry and the oil
companies have done to meet the EPA’s latest directive,
we need a brief lube oil history lesson. Years ago diesels
were operated on refined crude oils containing virtually
no additive chemistry. As power density increased oil
companies found they needed to add specific chemical
compounds to the oil to provide performance attributes
that crude oils couldn’t deliver. The additive industry was
born.
Traditionally, each new diesel engine oil specification was
issued because available oils couldn’t provide the lube oil
performance needed. For example, API CE was issued
to create oils which solved an oil consumption problem
in Cummins NTC-400 engines. For fifty years each new
diesel engine oil specification meant a better performing
diesel engine oil was available—all the way from API CD
to API CI+4.
Today diesel engine oils look like the example shown in
figure 1. From 20 to 30% of modern diesel engine oil is
additives designed to improve performance in key areas.
These additives are carefully engineered mixtures of
compounds formulated to pass the various diesel engine
tests which define a new lube oil specification like the
CI+4 or the new CJ.
Typical Diesel Oil Composition
Base Oils:
Performance Package
Viscosity Modifier:
Pour Point Depressant
69-80%
15-20%
5-10%
0-1%
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Pour point depressants are used to keep the oil fluid
at very low temperatures. (They inhibit wax crystal
formation.) Viscosity modifiers are used to make the oil
thin out less as it is heated. This makes an oil which we
call “Multigrade” and it simply means the multigrade oil
acts like a thinner oil at low temperatures and a thicker oil
at high temperatures. Multigrade diesel engine oils were a
key part of the solution to the excessive oil consumption
problem addressed by API formulation CE.
The performance additive package (see figure 2) is a mixture
of 8-12 specialty chemicals, each of which is intended to
impart specific properties to the oil’s performance. The
important thing to remember here is that most additive
chemicals (particularly detergents) deplete or wear out in
service. This is one of the reasons why the oil must be
changed. Life was good.
Typical Diesel Oil Performance Package
• Detergents
Neutralize Combustion
Acids
Minimize Wear
Inhibit Rust Formation
Oxidation Inhibitor
• Dispersants
Prevent Agglomeration
of Soot Particles
Suspend Contaminants
in Oil
• Oxidation Inhibitors
Retard Oil Decomposition
Slow Deposit Formation
• Anti-Wear Agents
Create Sacrificial Film
Between Metal Parts
Minimize Valve Train Wear
• Foam Inhibitors
Prevent Oil Foaming
What Did the EPA Do To Us/Why Do We
Need CJ-4 Oils?
First, let’s discuss why this new oil was developed. The
EPA tightened their exhaust emissions thumbscrew
on diesel engines starting January 1, 2007, to reduce
particulate matter (PM) and oxides of Nitrogen (NOx)
emissions even further. To meet those requirements most
diesel engine manufacturers resorted to the use of diesel
particulate filters (DPFs). A DPF differs from the catalytic
converters we have used for years on gasoline engines in
that a DPF actually filters the entire diesel exhaust stream.
On the surface you wouldn’t think this would be a big
deal—Europeans have been using DPFs for years. The
difference is that Europeans don’t accumulate mileage
like Americans and they will tolerate much more frequent
service intervals. Our EPA has decreed that the new
DPFs must go 150,000 miles before needing removal for
cleaning. This means the soot collected in the DPF must
be burned off in the exhaust system frequently if trap life
is to exceed 150,000 miles without removal and cleaning.
Now, don’t take me wrong—I’m for a cleaner environment
like everyone else is. The problem with the EPA is that
they just decree which emissions will be reduced without
once considering the cost, the technology needed or its
effect on your operation. They refer to that as “Technology
Forcing Legislation.” In the case of diesel engine oils,
the EPA forced the adoption of a low-sulfate ash,
phosphorus, and sulfur (low SAPS) oil whose technology
hasn’t yet been proven extensively in the field.
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I don’t have to tell you that diesel exhaust is relatively dirty.
It consists of lots of soot (That’s what turns your oil black!)
and unburned residues from both the fuel and the oil. Sulfur
in the fuel can significantly hamper DPF performance. That’s
why the ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel was implemented
1/1/2007. Phosphorus and sulfur in the lube oil can shorten
DPF cleaning intervals considerably. Phosphorus (P) can
“glaze over” and plug the tiny holes in the DPF, making the
openings effectively smaller and quicker to plug. Sulfur (S)
can “mask” the DPF, making it temporarily less effective.
Sulfated Ash (SA) in the lube is thought to build up deposits
on the DPF over time. These deposits that originate from
diesel fuel and lube oil then make the DPF effectively
smaller and quicker to plug.
What does this mean to you?
Low P means the Feds placed a limit on the amount of
Zincdithiophosphate (ZDP) additive which can be utilized.
ZDP is the most effective oxidation inhibitor and anti-wear
agent currently available. Additive manufacturers are now
forced to use more expensive and less effective ashless
oxidation inhibitors and anti-wear agents.
Low S means the new oils can’t rely on some of the least
expensive Sulfur-based oxidation inhibitors used in the
past. And, once again, many of the new ashless oxidation
inhibitors haven’t been thoroughly field proven in heavily
loaded trucks. Low S also means more highly refined base
oils, which is a positive thing. Average base oil quality is
now significantly improved.
Low SA (less than 1 percent weight) effectively places a
limit on the amount of detergent which can be used in
these oils. But diesels love detergents. In over 25 years
of inspecting various diesel engines in the field, I’ve yet
to see one which didn’t perform better on oils with higher
levels of detergency.
So, What Oil Should I use?
If you have a diesel engine equipped with a DPF, you
should probably use API CJ-4 oils. You really don’t have a
choice unless you want to clean your particulate trap more
frequently. Pay particular attention to oil change intervals.
I know that the major oil marketers are telling their
customers that CJ-4 oils are backward compatible (you
can use them in pre-2007 engines), and that is somewhat
true. But if you use less detergent in an oil, your oil change
interval should be shortened accordingly. Oil marketers
don’t care if you have to change your oil more frequently—
in fact, they love it! Remember oil companies are really
in the business of moving as much base oil as possible.
They love short oil change intervals.
In closing, remember to change your oil as frequently as
possible, so we all can generate some more profits for
those poor oil companies.
John R. Martin
TDR Writer
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
More About the Previous Series of Articles
Way back in Issue 54 I asked John how we might test the
CI+4 oils and the new CJs. His response: “That’s easy:
You spend the $25 for a complete oil sample evaluation.
Be sure the test includes total base number (TBN) and
viscosity—and send me the results. Don’t tell me what
is what. Let’s see if there is an obvious difference and
let’s see who makes the best lube oil(s). Who knows
what we will find. Will purchasing a lube oil be as easy as
purchasing a commodity? You know, as long as it meets
a specification then it is ‘good,’ therefore you can shop for
your lube oil based on price.”
Answers to these questions gave me the basis for an
excellent article. So, the oil analysis kits were purchased,
$25 x 22 kits ($550) and I went on a shopping spree for oil,
$15 x 22 oils ($330). A cool $880, just so John and Robert
would know about lube oils.
Earlier I stated that John was the oil expert. Prior to
retirement he was an engineer at Lubrizol, one of the
companies that makes and sells the additive packages to
the oil manufacturers. And, at John’s stage in life, he was/
is not beholden to anyone in the industry.
So, what conclusions could one draw from the year-long
Martin and Patton examination of 22 different diesel lube
oils? I’ve talked to many TDR members about the series
of articles and each one has shared with me their own
unique conclusion. Didn’t we all read the same article?
I have often stated that, “changing a person’s opinion
about lube oils is like trying to change their opinion about
religion. It is not going to happen.” My take-away from the
year long, $880 expenditure (oops… perhaps John Martin
has brainwashed me) is as follows:
Back in 1999, it took a series of oil analyses samples before
I was comfortable changing my 3,000 mile change-thelube-oil/guy-on-TV mentality. Then again, it took a series
of 22 oil samples to change my mentality concerning lube
oil by brand name versus lube oil as a commodity.
I’m on the same page as John Martin; if it meets the
specification you can purchase oil like a commodity.
Change the oil based on the Owner’s Manual
recommendations.
LUBE OILS – VERSION 2012
Questions for 2012
So, the long answer to Desmond Rees has thus far
taken 2.5 pages! However, I felt the background data
was necessary before we just jumped into “Lube Oils—
Version 2012.” The following are the questions I wanted
John to help me answer:
Q1 Could I find the good stuff, an old CI-4 specification
oil?
Q2 How would the CJ-4 oils blended today compare
with the same oil that we sampled back in the
summer of 2007?
Q4 What has changed in the world of John Martin in
these past five years?
The Oil Analysis for 2012
As mentioned, back in 2007 we tested 22 different brands
of lube oils: everything from Amsoil to Walmart; Caterpillar
to John Deere; Red Line to Liqui Moly. The prices ranged
from low of Walmart’s Super Tech at $7.68 per gallon to
the high of Red Line Diesel Synthetic at $35 per gallon. If
you want the complete list of CI-4 plus and CJ-4 oils that
were tested you’ll want to look back at Issue 58, pages 52
and 53.
Why 22 oils back then and only 10 oils for 2012? Remember
my comment about lube oils, religion and the change of
opinion? Well, my opinion has been changed! How so?
A look back at Issue 56 gives you some insight into my
mindset prior to the testing of the 22 lube oils. Here is the
recap:
“When new lube oil is analyzed you can get a good idea
of the quality of the additive package that, as learned from
Martin’s experience, makes up 20–25% of the lube oil blend.
Maintaining viscosity at higher temperatures, maintaining
high alkalinity (total base number); and protecting against
wear with the right blend of molybdenum, zinc, phosphorus
and boron are important lube oil attributes. Readings for
calcium are a way to measure dispersion detergency.
“In the blind-sampling-from-the-bottle done by Trailer Life
magazine in January 2005, I was greatly disappointed to
see that Walmart Super Tech 15W40 diesel oil stood toeto-toe with other very respected brand names.
“Why disappointment? First, consider what John Martin
said, ‘Consequently there is less and less difference
between engine oil that barely passes the API certification
test and one that is designed to pass by a significant
margin. Therefore, oils meeting a given performance spec
are approaching commodity status.’
“Second, I am not a big fan of Walmart. I could go into a
long tirade, but I will refrain.
“Third, for all of my vehicle ownership years (let’s see, that
is about 37 years) had I been duped? Had I fallen for the
marketing hype? I did not want to believe that lube oil is
just a commodity. Yet the Trailer Life grid did not lie.”
What story did the forthcoming TDR grid tell?
Had I fallen for the marketing hype?
I did not want to believe that
lube oil is just a commodity
Q3 Who has the best “John Martin” oil for 2012?
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
83
Sample Description
Viscosity @ 100°
TBN
Calcium
Magnesium
Phosphorus
Zinc
Boron
Molybdenum
The previous 22 brand oil test did give me an education.
For 2012 I did not feel the need to test every lube oil in
the marketplace. As a matter of fact, I only went to two
places for the various oils, Autozone (where each oil was
priced at $17.99) and Walmart. The following is the blind
sampling data:
1
14.1
8.84
1050
777
975
1110
82
0
2
15.5
8.17
2183
9
1053
1152
3
1
3
15.1
8.69
1135
783
1020
1172
0
40
4
14.7
9.27
1299
837
941
1069
64
48
5
16.5
8.19
1412
395
1084
1250 503 89
6
15.5
9.15
1171
970
1088
1202
0
43
7
15.0
9.03
2209
10
1039
1156
35
0
8
15.1
9.09
2305
10
1077
1169
58
0
9
15.5
8.7
1134
787
1017
1169
0
40
10
14.3
9.22
770
1119
994
1171
60
58
Product Identification Chart
Item
Product
Viscosity
Price
1
Mobil 1 (Syn)
5W40
$26.33
2
Motorcraft
15W40
20.99
3
Walmart
15W40
10.97
4
Mobil Delvac
15W40
17.99
5
Chevron Delo
15W40
17.99
6
Valvoline
15W40
17.99
7
Shell Rotella
15W40
17.99
8
Castrol Tection
15W40
17.99
9
Warren
15W40
14.99
10
Shell Rotella (Syn)
5W40
27.99
And now, the answers for Lube Oils – Version 2012:
A1) I could not find any CI-4 lube oil.
A2) I’ll turn this answer over to John Martin. John’s
response:
Robert and TDR audience, remember my often-used
statement, “Diesels Love Detergents”? It appears from the
oil analysis data that Samples 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10 all have
total base numbers (TBN) in excess of 9, which suggests
to me that these oil marketers are trying to provide as
much TBN as possible given the 1.0% weight sulfated ash
limitation imposed by the API CJ-4 specification. They
are doing this to satisfy those fleets whose oil change
intervals are based on TBN depletion.
84
Volume 2010-2012
Samples 2 and 5 have the least amount of detergency of
the oils tested. Sample 5 uses either a borated detergent or
a boron-containing oxidation inhibitor. Borated detergents
are thought by some to be more effective than traditional
detergents. It is also possible that data in the last two
columns for sample 5 has been transposed. (Editor’s note:
the 503 and 89 numbers are as printed by the lab.)
My field test experience has taught me that calcium (Ca)
detergents are more effective than magnesium (Mg)
detergents, so, to answer question 2, “Who has the best
oil for 2012?” I think oils 7 and 8 would be the best of
the oils you surveyed. Oils 4, 6, and 10 also have high
TBN values for CJ-4 oils, but they depend heavily on
magnesium detergents, so I don’t think they would yield
diesel performance as good as oils 7 and 8.
Oils 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 10 all contain boron, but I’m certain
that the additive chemistry in sample 5 is different than
the others (or the last two columns of data for sample
5 have been transposed). Boron oxidation inhibitors are
evidently being utilized to improve the high temperature
performance of these CJ-4 oils.
Now, if you allow me to look at the number-to-product
identification report I can tell you that oil 5 has been
completely reformulated, and I know why. Chevron Delo
400 is the most widely used oil in big trucking fleets.
When CJ-4 came about, fleet operators told Chevron they
preferred the old CI-4 oil, particularly when they found
out that Chevron was going to ask more money for their
CJ-4 oil. Neither Chevron nor the fleets would budge off
their positions, and big marketers like Chevron only want
one oil in their distribution systems. Chevron went back to
the drawing board, reformulated, and retested until they
could pass the API CI-4 tests with a CJ-4 oil. Then they
dropped both earlier oils out of their systems and offered
only the new, improved CJ-4 oil. I wonder if the big fleets
paid them more money for the new oil?
Mobil and Shell also supply a lot of oil to truckers. If you
compare sample 1 (a consumer oil, Mobil 1 synthetic) with
sample 4 ((Mobil Delvac) you can see that Mobil added
more detergency to oil 4 (Ca and Mg) to give their big fleets
increased TBN and keep them happy. Fleets wouldn’t use
the Mobil oil in Sample 1. The Shell samples (7 and 10)
are also very interesting. Shell is using different additive
chemistry in their 15W40 (Rotella mineral, sample 7) than
in their 5W40 (Rotella synthetic, sample 10). I’m guessing
that the big fleets are mostly purchasing oil 7. I do not
know why the chemistry is so different in oil 10, other than
perhaps another additive supplier was able to pass the
tests, allowing Shell to get the credentials they desired.
So, once again, my picks are oils 7 and 8. If you religiously
adhere to your manufacturer’s recommended oil change
intervals, oil 3 would be the best performer on a cost per
mile basis. Oils 1, 2, and 10 offer the highest cost per mile,
so I would avoid them altogether.
A3) Now, let’s compare the 2007 oils to the 2012 oils. I
asked Robert to save you from going back to Issue 58 and
present a comparison chart for you.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
The CJ-4 Lube Oils Tested in Issue 58 were:
Shell Rotella T
Castrol Tection
Chevron Delo 400 LE
Cummins/Valvoline Premium Blue
15W40
15W40
15W40
15W40
fuels researchers. The California Air
Resources Board (CARB), a bastion
of the most radical environmentalists
in the world, has actually had their
low carbon fuel standard (LCFS)
overturned by a Federal judge.
Molybdenum
2
Zinc
37
Phosphorus
1108 1147
Magnesium
8
Calcium
15.7 8.77 2488
TBN
Boron
$10.96 Shell Rotella T
Viscosity @ 100°
Description
Price
The following chart gives you the “Then and Now” candidates:
17.99
Same 2012
15.0 9.03 2209
10
1039 1156
35
0
10.80
Castrol Tection
14.7 7.74 2011
6
876
1035
0
0
17.99
Same 2012
15.1 9.09 2305
10
1077 1169
58
0
12.99
Chevron Delo 400 LE 15.7 7.82 1593 416 1156 1268
83
570
17.99
Same 2012
16.5 8.19 1412 395 1084 1250 503
89
9.98
Cummins/Valvoline
15.6 8.42 1109 827
1041
0
41
17.99
Same 2012
15.5 9.15 1171 970 1088 1202
0
43
994
Now, to compare the 2012 results to the 2007 table, it appears that Shell has
dropped their ZDP content by 10% in oil 7. Before interpreting data from this
type of analysis remember that repeatability of these numbers is no better than
10%. Looking at the data in that light, two things could have happened in the
last five years. Either the ZDP level could have been dropped 10% to enable
Shell’s additive supplier to put more detergent in the oil to increase TBN levels,
or the data is on the outer edge of the repeatability limits. When comparing
today’s Shell oils, it looks to me like Shell may be using a different ZDP than
they did in 2007.
But, audience, did you notice from your 2007 to 2012 comparative data that all
of the oils cost more in 2012? Whether or not the oil marketer changed his initial
CJ-4 formulation, he has managed to use the new credentials as a vehicle to
raise the selling price of their oils significantly. As I said before, I don’t know if
oil marketers are getting more for their CJ-4 oils at major fleets, but they are
certainly getting more from retail consumers. (Editor’s note: I looked back to
November 2007 and a barrel of crude oil was $88, today it is $106.) You and
I get to pay for everything!
A4) What has changed in John Martin’s world in the last five years?
For one thing, I spend much more time researching alternate fuels than diesel
lube oils these days. Everyone wants to just jump into the future, be green
and reduce our dependence on foreign sources of crude oil without even
considering what these moves will do to the poor people who design the
vehicles and systems that will have to make that happen.
For example, the public is finally beginning to discover that corn-based ethanol
containing fuels (one of the worst jokes of the modern era) are actually worse
than gasoline regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It has taken the dogooders billions of our tax dollars to discover what they’ve been told long ago by
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Secondly, remember how the dogooders tell us we should all be
driving the Toyota Prius (Pious)?
The latest GHG emissions research
has shown that power plants are
responsible for more GHG emissions
than transportation vehicles. Where
did the do-gooders think that
electricity was coming from? Was it
magic? Left-wing environmentalists
never let facts get in the way of a
good story. These are the same
radicals who are currently stalling
the Keystone pipeline project which
could bring much needed crude
oil from the North to refineries on
the Gulf Coast. After the OPEC
countries, China, and Hugo Chavez
purchase all that valuable Canadian
crude, we will decide to build the
pipeline. Our environmentalists are
getting to the point where they are
very destructive. (My political rant is
over. Don’t send the editor hate mail.)
Our next new diesel lube oil spec
(currently called PC-11) will occur
sometime around 2015. The Federal
government
recently
decreed
that diesel trucks must provide
significantly better fuel economy
by 2016. The Engine Manufacturers
Association (EMA) has already
asked the lube oil industry for some
improved fuel economy (FE) oils by
2015 so they can be field tested prior
to production. Since the major fuel
economy differences are observed
by lowering oil viscosity, expect to
see some very thin (5W30, 5W20)
diesel oils in 2015. Very thin oils
probably won’t work well in current
engines. (More about that in future
TDR magazines?) This, too, won’t
be as easy as the EPA activists
think it will be, but, as long as your
tax money will hold out, they will be
asking you to finance this research.
John Martin
TDR Writer
Volume 2010-2012
85
ADD OIL HERE/PC-11
AND CK-4 UPDATE
ISSUE 83 – TDREVIEW
ADD OIL HERE
by Robert Patton
Next Egan gives the audience the step-by-step process
that he used to tell this tale:
Every now and then you’ll stumble across an automotive
writer that clicks with you. (See Motojournalism
Connection, pages 4-7.)You find that their stories convey
what you would say if you had their literary talent. Some
of my favorite writers: the TDR’s very own Greg Whale (all
things automotive, Whale’s “been there, done that”); Kevin
Cameron (Kevin can make a nut and bolt into a fascinating
story) and Mark Barnes (Mark’s writings have reinforced
that I’m not the only one that enjoys the solitude of a
workshop); Peter Egan from Road & Track and Cycle World
(Egan’s writings can make a trip to the 7-11 store into an
adventure); and Peter DeLorenzo from Autoextremist.com
(his automotive rants/insights challenge the norm).
“Step 1: Place a ‘suitable container’ under the sump or
oil reservoir—which, in the Buell’s case, is in the hollow
swingarm above the end of the muffler—and remove the
plug. A stream of scalding hot oil will run down over the
rear of the muffler and cascade into the pan, like Niagara
Falls in a nightmare. Some will run down to the far end of
the muffler and onto the floor. Or trickle warmly down your
forearm and into your sleeve.
A quick story about Greg, Kevin, and Mark.
Back in the early days of the TDR (think 1994 for Greg
Whale, 1996 for Kevin Cameron, 1998 for Mark Barnes)
I was on the lookout for writers that could bring their
insight to our new member/club organization. To reach
these writers, I sent a request to their respective editors
asking if I could contact them. As I have come to learn,
automotive and freelance writing is not the glamor job you
might envision, and the editors were willing to grant me
access to these talented writers. After all, the TDR did
not compete with the titles that Greg, Kevin or Mark were
writing for. So, now you know the TDR writer story.
Oops, I’m a little off track.
I have here before me a story from Cycle World written
by Egan that reminded me of the oil change woes that
many of us have encountered with the 2013-and newer
Turbo Diesel trucks. However, unlike the TDR’s Donnelly,
Roberts, Redmond or Langan that give you the steps to
perform the task, Egan tells the oil change story of the
average Joe, complete with a handful of mistakes.
Here are just a few excerpts from the story that will help
me transition into a humorous story that was told to me by
our very own Greg Whale.
Egan’s original article in Cycle World was titled “Zen and
the Art of the Oil Change.” He starts the story with a long
introduction and then a question from a CW reader:
“These days, a lot of younger, less experienced riders
come up to me and say, ‘Mr. Egan, you have an almost
legendary reputation for being able to change the oil and
filter on your motorcycles without spilling more than about
30 percent of the oil onto the garage floor or your own
clothing. How the heck do you do it?’”
86
Volume 2010-2012
“Step 2: While oil is dripping from the drain hole and
muffler, remove the small chin fairing and place another
pan under the oil filter. Remove the filter with a web-type
tool and stand back as oil from the engine and filter run
over the front of the muffler and into the pan. Much of the
oil will follow the bottom of the muffler and run onto the
floor. Expect some to drip off the filter wrench onto your
blue jeans. Accidentally drop the slippery, hot filter into the
pan for a nice splash effect.
“Step 3: Carefully fill the new filter with oil, spilling hardly
any at all, then screw it into the engine and put the drain
plug back in. Here’s where you give the drain pan an
accidental kick so that a small tidal wave of oil flops onto
the floor. Then refill the reservoir using a funnel with too
small an opening so that it overflows immediately and
burps oil onto the swingarm. Before putting the chin
spoiler back on, use massive amounts of contact cleaner/
degreaser to clean up the muffler and floor, along with
ecologically friendly piles of oil-soaked paper towels.
“Step 4: Carry the main oil drain pan across the workshop
and dump it down a large funnel into a disgustingly filthy,
oil-streaked, red-plastic five-gallon gas can with the
words ‘DRAIN OIL’ scrawled across it so people don’t
accidentally drink from it.
“Step 5: Check to make sure this can isn’t already almost
full. Otherwise, about two quarts of dirty drain oil will well
up around the sides of the funnel and run onto the floor,
as mine did. Expect some oil to run down the back side
of the pouring spout on the drain pan and drip onto your
running shoes.
“Step 6: Mop up the oil spill with more paper towels and
wring them out over your drain pan. Clean the whole area
with half a spray can of contact cleaner, but don’t breathe
any of the fumes. When everything is cleaned up, start the
bike and check it for oil leaks. Mine was fine; not a sign of
a drip.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
“Step 7: Wipe your tools carefully, put them away and then
go into the house. Throw all your clothes—including the
running shoes—into the washer and then take a shower.
Put on clean clothes and return to the workshop to have
a beer and ponder the evening’s work. Now, you’re done.
Peter Egan
Cycle World
While we’re on the subject of lube oil...
The Motojournalism thing, combined with excerpts
from Mr. Egan and Greg Whale tie-in give you a
humorous look at the mundane oil change(s) that we
all have to endure. I can only imagine those of you
guilty of Steps 3a and 3b, myself included.
Now, let’s move on to the serious look at oil in the
news, the new lube oil specifications that will be
introduced in December. In the update that follows,
our oil-guru, John Martin, tells us about the new CK-4
and FA-4 oils.
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
PC-11 UPDATE
or
You’re Getting Something
Besides Red Socks for Christmas
by John Martin
A “Zen” moment as the editor-dude changes the oil in
his EcoDiesel. (Like it’s big brother, it holds almost three
gallons.) The unattended drain bucket almost overflowed.
As mentioned, I wish I could tell a story like that. The
best I can do is to add a footnote to his yarn. From
TDR’s Greg Whale: “Dear Mr. Egan, please add steps
3a and 3b.
“3a: As you are pouring fresh oil into the engine make
a note that the fresh oil ($8/quart) is leaking from the
location of the oil drain plug. Oops, it’s not leaking, it
is pouring. STOp ADDING FRESH OIL!
“3b: Rush to install the oil drain plug.”
Now, in fairness to the folks at Cycle World and to
peter Egan, I have to give credit where the credit is
due. You can find all of Egan’s books from his Cycle
World days and from his Road & Track editorials by
doing a quick search at Google for your favorite place
to shop for books or go directly to Amazon.com.
The “Zen” quotes came from Egan’s book “Leanings
3: On the Road and in the Garage with Cycle World’s
peter Egan.
While you have your computer fired-up, take a few
minutes to log onto www.cycleworld.com and start a
new subscription! You’ll not be disappointed.
Enjoy Mr. Egan’s writing. Buy one (or all) of his
books. Subscribe to Cycle World. I’m hopeful my
endorsements prompt you to make a purchase.
Again, some great reading material, you won’t be
disappointed!
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
If you readers will recall, I thoroughly discussed the
upcoming new engine lube oil performance category, PC11, in October of last year, TDR Issue 89. I mentioned that
the API (American Petroleum Institute), the ASTM (American
Society for Testing of Materials) and the SAE (Society of
Automotive Engineers) were feverishly working to develop
two new diesel engine oil performance categories as
requested by the EMA (Engine Manufacturers Association)
to improve diesel engine fuel economy. This is part of our
nation’s greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction effort.
Well, folks, on December 1, 2016, it’s finally going to
become a reality. This will be a major change for the diesel
engine oil market for several reasons.
First, there will be two new performance categories, API
CK-4 (PC-11A) for existing diesel engines and API FA-4
(PC-11B) for new/post 2017 engine designs which will
tolerate lower viscosity oils. (Viscosity is still the most
important parameter influencing both fuel economy and
horsepower.)
API CK-4 is no big deal, other than the cost and time it
takes to develop a new diesel engine oil. Current estimates
are that it costs over one million dollars to develop a new
oil even if it passes all the required laboratory tests the
first time out. And that doesn’t count the time and money it
takes to field test the new product in a variety of engines in
different types of service. In this day and age, you need at
least two to three years of field testing to feel comfortable
about the performance of any new diesel engine oil.
Now, the new FA-4 oil is creating quite a stir for several
reasons. Oil marketers get very nervous when someone
suggests putting an FA-4 oil in an older engine design with
looser engine clearances, yet having to spend millions of
dollars to develop a product to be used on only 2017 and
later engine designs doesn’t fully justify the tremendous
expenditures involved.
Volume 2010-2012
87
So both end users and oil marketers will want to see how
many other engines the FA-4 oils can safely be used in to
maximize their investment. In the end it will probably be up
to each engine manufacturer to determine which of their
engines can tolerate FA-4 oils without sacrificing engine
service life. Big Oil will want you to put this oil in everything
to simplify logistics, but most end users will want to make
sure FA-4 oils don’t void their warranties. It’s a shame oil
marketers didn’t better educate the end users ahead of
time so they could make more intelligent selections.
Due to the extremely high costs associated with
developing and marketing two completely new oils,
many oil marketers are taking a closer look at product
line simplification. ConocoPhillips, for example, currently
markets four diesel engine oils under its brand umbrella,
Conoco, Kendall, Phillips, and 76 Lubricants. To minimize
developmental and marketing costs, they have decided
to drop the Conoco and 76 Lubricants brands from their
diesel engine oil lineup.
I’m sure other oil marketers are either reducing product
lines or having a brand represent only one of the new
oils. For example, Shell, which has both their Rimula and
Rotella brands, also owns Pennzoil and Quaker State. Will
they eliminate some oils from this complicated lineup? I
predict that both Rimula and Quaker State won’t offer
the full range of FA-4 products to minimize expenditures.
It’s going to be fun with a lot of to-ing and fro-ing. Take
the time to carefully read the API label on the container
(see examples). Note that the FA-4 label will be shaded
to make it stand out a little. API CJ-4 oils will continue
to be produced and marketed for at least a year before
that performance category is obsoleted. The CK-4 oils
shouldn’t pose any problems for you.
Who knows, once there is product available (both CK-4
and FA-4), I might have the TDR guy go on a spending
spree so we can check the composition of all these newfangled oils and see what is really best for your truck.
John Martin
TDR Writer
88
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
6.7L AFTERTREATMENT DELETE
ISSUE 78 – TECHNICAL TOPICS
by Robert Patton
AND WE’RE OFF TO THE RACES
(Time to Ditch the 6.7-liter’s
Exhaust Aftertreatment System?)
With a title like “Off to the Races” one might assume that I
had just returned from a trip to the Kentucky Derby.
Not so, I was simply having fun using the dictionary of
idioms and phrases, searching for an expression that best
describes the press release sent to our offices by the folks
at Advanced FLOW Engineering (see page 130).
Their new “Atlas Exhaust System” is designed for the ’07.5
and newer Ram/Cummins trucks with the 6.7-liter engine.
Although not mentioned anywhere in the press release,
close examination of their Atlas system reveals that the kit
is a direct bolt-on (turbocharger back) aluminized steel pipe
and muffler. Pipe and muffler—that’s it.
Oops…what happened to the exhaust aftertreatment
devices: the diesel oxidation catalyst; the nitrogen
oxide adsorber; and the diesel particulate filter? Careful
examination of other exhaust system web sites (and I mean
careful), shows that an owner can piece together a turbo
back, non-aftertreatment, non-legal exhaust system for a
6.7-liter engine. But none are so bold as to offer a single
part number kit for such a product.
Perhaps a better idiom for this article: Open the Floodgates.
“To allow water that had been held back to flow freely.” Or,
“If an action opens the floodgates, it allows something to
happen or it allows many people to do something that was
not previously allowed.”
Oops…as the editor I’d better be careful using the second
idiom. Let’s be clear, the idiom says, “to do something
that was not previously allowed.” Removing the 6.7-liter’s
exhaust treatment components is not allowed, nor will it
be allowed, subject to a penalty and fine from the EPA.
(Section 205 of Clean Air Act: Penalty of up to $25,000 per
day for violations.) The chapter and verse from the TDR
where we have covered the subject: TDR’s Turbo Diesel
Buyer’s Guide, pages 70-75, has the complete story.
So, is that the end of this correspondence: the editor
stumbles across a press release; finds some cute idioms to
make his point; cites the vendor for irreverence; identifies
the reason that you should not consider the product; and
then closes the story?
Well, perhaps that is where I should stop. However, to
brush aside the rest of the story would prove—once and for
all—that I am akin to the three wise monkeys: see no evil,
hear no evil, speak no evil.
The following is an example from web site correspondence
of how innocently the subject of the exhaust system delete
comes up:
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Can someone tell me if you can cut off the entire muffler
system on a ’07.5 truck? Will it start if you do it? If you can
do it, who does it so I can get mine done? Has anybody
else done this? If so please show pictures if you have them.
Where I live we don’t have emissions. My truck runs like crap.
Mr. Newbie
If you are asking if you can just delete the exhaust emission
components, the answer is no. You have to do a downloader,
like Smarty or H&S (an alternate engine program) to get the
truck to run correctly without the emission components.
Mr. Experience
Legally a company cannot remove the aftertreatment
system and replace it with standard pipe, it is a federal law.
However, if you do remove the aftertreatment system DPF
then you’ll need a programmer to turn off the sensors. You
also will want to check your state for local emissions testing.
Mr. Caution
I’m not in California. Okay, so let me see. In order to get
the truck running right then, I need to buy and install an
alternate engine program? Have you ever installed one of
these systems in your truck?
Mr. Newbie
I have the Smarty J67 (stock programming) on my truck.
To do the DPF/EGR deletes you’ll need the J67-ME. The
Smarty plugs into the OBDII port and then you select which
programming you want to download. As I understand it, ME
stands for a program used in Middle Eastern countries that
ignore the unlugged sensors. It takes about 3-4 minutes.
Mr. Been There/Done That
Cool, dude! I can delete the system, add a programmer
and experience all the great things I’ve read about at all the
diesel web sites: better performance and better MPG.
Mr. Newbie
Not so fast. Remember the fines that you are subject to and
you might want to reconsider those great “claims” you’ve
heard. Our magazine’s Editor had a close friend that tried it
on his ’07.5 truck. I strongly suggest you read Issue 72, page
34. The results on MPG were nowhere near as substantial
as others would have you believe. If I recall correctly, the
owner had problems at 35K miles with a regeneration when
there was nothing to regenerate into. And, depending on
the manufacturing date of ECM, you may have difficulty
doing a program update (TDR Issue 65, page 42, “Secure
bootloader software, or boot.”).
Mr. Caution
Sorry, man. It’s my truck and I’m going full speed ahead.
I’ll even put the junk back on my truck should I need some
warranty.
Mr. Newbie
Volume 2010-2012
89
Not so quick, Mr. Newbie. You’ve just described the definition
of FRAUD. I suggest you realize that you will be driving an
illegal truck and that you are your own warranty station. You
stated, “It’s my truck,” and you’ve been forewarned of the
consequences of the modification. Accept responsibility
and go ahead and do what you need to do.
Mr. Caution
A final story to consider:
Where I live we’ve seen customers delete the aftertreatment
components and then come in to trade their truck. Imagine
their surprise when we tell ‘em the value is $2500-$3000
less than if the equipment was on the truck. They have to
have us reinstall the hardware or we can’t take it in trade.
Mr. Texas
Conclusion
If you do a web search on “EGR delete,” “6.7-liter
programmer” or “DPF delete” you’ll find that there are
hundreds of posts, threads and conversations that
discuss these topics. I have done my best to caution
against tampering with the emissions controls. And, until
the press release by aFe, I’ve followed the mantra of three
wise monkeys; see, hear and speak no evil.
Truthfully speaking (would you expect anything but the
truth?), you’ve not seen any performance upgrade articles
in the TDR about the 6.7-liter engine. And, considering the
warranty, legal, and drivability implications there really is
nothing to report. I’m still looking for the first vendor to send
me a press release touting their new CARB Executive Order
number (proof of continued low emissions) demonstrating
that their accessory meets the guidelines.
Looking long term, could this hurt the TDR? Well, we’ve lived
through almost six years without turbo-gizmos, injectorwhizzes or tuner stacks and jacks, and, again, I really don’t
see any products of this nature coming down the pike. Yes,
I know folks tweak the 6.7 and, if there is a positive to all this
rambling, unlike the years prior to the 6.7-liter engine, those
that tweak are assuming the responsibility of being“their
own warranty station.”
Would I like to see some factual reports about performance
and fuel mileage? Without a doubt. However who is going
to put their name on an article in which you tell the world,
“Come check out my truck and send me a $25,000 fine?”
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
EPILOGUE – WHY THEN, BUT NOT NOW?
When I gave this issue’s “Technical Topics” to the staff at
Geno’s Garage for review, the feedback I received was,
“Wasn’t/isn’t the 5.9-liter engine owner subject to the same
EPA fines that are discussed in the article?” And “Why did
the TDR talk about performance prior to the 6.7-liter engine,
but not now?”
More on the “yes” answer: Yes, an owner is subject to
the strict $25,000 EPA fine if caught tampering with the
emission control devices on their truck. However, and this
is a big “however,” the way I see it is that the EPA has much
bigger fish to fry than an individual that modifies his truck
or automobile.
If I were from the EPA, the first place I would go to crack down
on non-compliance would be to the Walmart magazine rack
and pick up the latest copy of Diesel-This-and-That. Turn to
any page and you’ll see the advertisement for “BlackSmoke.
com’s” latest Ford, GM or Cummins EGR delete kit. Turn
to the next page and you’ll see the advertisement for an
ECU programmer. Wow, turn to our page 130 and the press
release for an entire exhaust system that deletes the entire
aftertreatment components.
More on the “but” answer: Looking at the big picture, prior
to the 6.7-liter engine, but more specifically the 1/1/2007
emissions legislation date for all the manufacturers, there
was not a central meeting or gathering of the aftermarket
and EPA officials. Since 1/1/07 the aftermarket cannot say
that the EPA has not given out dire warnings. The aftermarket
cannot say that California’s Air Resource Board (CARB)
hasn’t issued strict guidelines. The big meeting where the
announcements about “look the other way” prior to 1/1/07
and “we intend to enforce” after 1/1/07 occur each year
at the Specialty Equipment Market Association’s (SEMA)
meeting that is held in November. We have written about
these meetings several times in the TDR. The reference
location for dialog from previous SEMA meetings: TDBG,
pages 70-75. It is a long and twisted story.
Further, looking at the big picture, emissions tests are done
on a state by state and, in the case of my state, local region
(a metropolitan city) by local region basis. These state
emissions testers don’t have a hot line to the EPA, they just
do their job and send folks home to “clean up their act” if
they do not pass the local test criteria. If my assessment
of the emission test is different in your state, please let me
know.
So, with the exception of California and a handful of other
states, there is not a steadfast emissions check criteria
for engines/trucks prior to 1/1/07. I’ve attended the SEMA
meetings. The editorial staff has heeded the EPA’s warnings.
I’m not going to jeopardize the magazine, this club, or my
family’s financial well being by telling you how to make
illegal modifications. It surprises me the number of folks
that do so on the different internet forums. I’ll be happy
to review and discuss 6.7-liter aftermarket products that
have been through the EPA and CARB EO process. As
mentioned, thus far I have nothing to report. Vendors, if I’ve
missed something, please let me know.
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
The answer(s), “yes” and “but.” (I really wanted to say, “Go
read the TDBG, pages 70-75.)
90
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
CLEANING yOUR DIESEL
PARTICULATE FILTER (DPF)
ISSUE 84 – TECHNICAL TOPICS
by Robert Patton
In this issue I have a letter from TDR member William
Westwood who is looking ahead at doing some
preventive maintenance on his ’07.5 truck’s exhaust
aftertreatment system. “How to?” asks William. I call
the folks at Cummins to try and help with an answer.
The following is my response to William.
I have a ’07.5 Turbo Diesel and it is equipped with the
6.7-liter engine and the associated exhaust aftertreatment
equipment.
I’m looking to do some preventive maintenance on my truck
at 125,000 miles. How can the do-it-yourselfer clean the
diesel particulate filter (DPF)? Would this not be analogous
to the grandparents cleaning ashes and soot from their
chimney?
You can watch video on the internet where folks are shown
using water and a Simple Green solution. Likewise, I have
been told that brake cleaner works well. However, with the
price of a new DPF, I am hesitant to try these shadetree
solutions (literally). Are there some proven alternatives?
A local diesel shop says that they can clean the DPF at a
cost of about $350. Unlike the grandparents’ ashes and
soot, there is concern here in California about disposal
and hazardous waste. Grandpa and Grandma dumped the
ashes in the garden compost. The guys from the video on
the web let the black stuff dissolve into their gravel driveway.
Any ideas? And, clarification please, on the honeycomb
substrate material used in the DPF.
William Westwood
Sonoma, CA
Any ideas on how to clean the DPF?
William asked, “Any ideas?” You bet. First, admit that I
don’t know the answer and ask for some help from
Cummins.
I vividly recall the introduction of the 6.7-liter engine in
January of 2007. And, should you want a history lesson on
Cummins, big oil companies, the EPA, ultra low sulfur fuel,
and this engine’s early introduction to the marketplace (it
met the 2010 emissions guidelines), you’ll want to reread
Issue 78, pages 52-53.
Back to the story: the introduction in January 2007.
The product launch had its share of teething problems.
Cummins and Ram had a series of reflashes to update the
engine’s control of the exhaust aftertreatment. Cummins
and Ram put together a DVD with TDR writer Sam Memmolo
as the host that discussed the engine’s aftertreatment.
The video dispelled the buzz of misinformation about
the engine. The bottom line—use the truck like a truck.
At the time, putzing around town was causing too many
of the bells and whistles to sound. Over time, and with
the approved reflashes to update the controls, the engine
has settled down and warranty numbers are lower than
they have ever been. (Really, lower than the great ’03-’07
engines, lower than 12-valve engines. This isn’t marketing
hype. It is from the blue-collar folks at the plant, CMEP,
whose job it is to track the numbers.)
Okay, let’s get back to the short answer of “never” and the
long, long answer to William Westwood’s inquiry.
Before calling Cummins I did the same research as William
and found the same internet videos that show a liquidtype DPF clean-up. Realizing that Cummins is so much
more than a 6.7-liter engine in a Ram pickup, what were/
are their thoughts on liquid clean-up? Remember now,
they’ve seen it all: from big rigs to construction equipment
to generator sets. The answer: DO NOT use a liquid or
brake cleaner as a clean up method. The concern is the
ash mixed with a liquid can form a paste that, considering
the tight tolerances of the DPF’s honeycomb grid, when
finally dry would render the DPF clogged and useless.
Again, realizing that Cummins is so much more than
the 6.7-liter engine in the Ram pickup, I asked what was
happening elsewhere in the industry and would they
please help me relate the answer to William Westwood’s
“clean the DPF for $350” chimney sweep findings.
The really short answer: whether it be the ’07.5-’12 truck
that uses diesel fuel to lightup and regenerate the diesel
particulate filter (think to yourself, self-cleaning oven), or
the ’13-’14 trucks that inject urea into the DPF, the DPF
should never have to be removed for cleaning. That’s
right, never.
I know, you find that answer to be suspect, after all we
all know, have read about, or have experience with the
“Diesel Particulate Filter full” message on the overhead
display.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
91
I went back to the internet and found several manufacturertype and service organization-type videos to watch. The
$350 “clean it” involves removal of your DPF; mount the
DPF in an enclosed chamber; affix inlet and outlet collars to
the DPF; and then blow high pressure air through the DPF.
A phone call to my local Cummins distributor confirmed
that that’s the way they do it on the big rigs. And, the TDR
audience should realize that the big rigs have a problem
with ash build up in their DPFs. The ash is caused by lube
oil that is burned as it escapes past the piston rings. With
the 6.7-liter engine in the pickup the only problem is soot
and the soot is cleaned in the regeneration process.
SIDEBAR
IS THERE A DIFFERENCE FOR
THE 2013-2014 TRUCKS?
If you read the article closely, the ’13 and ’14 trucks were
discussed in my opening remarks to William (second
paragraph) and the DPF should never have to be removed
for cleaning.
End of conversation?
Not so fast.
As it turns out, the DPF used on ’13 and ’14 trucks is a
bit different than that used in the ’07.5-’12 trucks. When
I discovered this, I immediately (logically?) made the
assumption that the change was made to allow the use of
urea with the DPFs self-cleaning oven. Not so.
For the 2013 and now 2014 trucks the material used inside
the DPF is made of silicon carbide (SiC). The previous
’07.5-’12 DPF used a material known as cordierite.
©Grainger, Inc.
Yes, they make cabinets that will heat and pressure
clean DPFs to clean them if they are contaminated
with lube oil or coolant from a fouled engine.
So, this brings us back to the original short answer from
Cummins—the Ram’s DPF should never have to be
taken off for cleaning. (Our engines do not suffer from oil
consumption problems.)
92
Volume 2010-2012
The new SiC cores are more expensive than those made
of cordierite. However, the smaller packaging area of
the 2013-2014 truck’s undercarriage required the use of
the more expensive SiC core. As a side note, I did learn
that the SiC core also has a higher melting point than the
cordierite core. The higher melting point gives the DPF a
bigger cushion should there be unplanned problems with
the aftertreatment or over-fuelling. The SiC units melt at
approximately 1700°, the cordierite at approximately 1250°.
So, yes, there is a difference in the material used inside
the DPF. However, the change was not necessarily related
to the use of urea in the exhaust aftertreatment.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
TECHNICAL SERVICE BULLETINS
FOR 2012
ISSUE 78 – TDRESOURCE
Have we not all heard comments by those unfamiliar with
the Ram Turbo Diesel (a prospective buyer of either a new or
used truck, or a visitor on the internet or at the truck show)
that “the Turbo Diesel certainly has its share of problems”?
To them, no doubt, the grass looks greener on the other
side. However, thanks to the TDR membership group and
the support from Chrysler and Cummins, we are equipped
with answers and solutions, rather than the dismay and
isolation that would exist without a support group.
THIS YEAR’S TECHNICAL SERVICE BULLETINS
Each year as a service for the TDR membership I
purchase a subscription to Chrysler’s online service and
data system (www.techauthority.com). New for this year,
the TechAuthority site offers an index of factory technical
service bulletins (TSBs) that have been released in
the past year. I scroll through the index and print those
bulletins that are pertinent to all Turbo Diesel trucks (all
years, all models with cab and chassis included). With the
bulletins in hand, I summarize the bulletin for publication
in the magazine. Should you need a complete copy of
the bulletin, you can contact your dealer with Issue 78
in hand; or armed with your truck’s vehicle identification
number (VIN) and a credit card you can log on to www.
techauthority.com and, for $35, you can view/print all of
the TSBs that apply to your vehicle. The $35 buys you
three consecutive days of access. However, just like last
year I found theTechauthority website to be cumbersome
to navigate. More on this later.
In an effort to consolidate the TSBs for the magazine,
we’re going to use the same index system categories as
Chrysler. Below are the index categories.
2 Front Suspension
14 Fuel
3 Axle/Driveline
16 Propeller Shafts and U-Joints
5 Brakes
18 Vehicle Performance
6 Clutch
19 Steering
7 Cooling
21 Transmission
8 Electrical
22 Wheels & Tires
9 Engine
23 Body
11 Exhaust
24 Air Conditioning
13 Frame & Bumpers
25 Emissions Control
26 Miscellaneous
A note concerning the TSBs and their use: The bulletins
are intended to provide dealers with the latest repair
information. Often the TSB is specific to the VIN. VIN data
on the Chrysler service network helps the dealer in his
service efforts. A TSB is not an implied warranty.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
WHAT DO THE MODEL CODES MEAN?
Throughout our summary pages you’ll see model codes
listed for the various Dodge trucks. The following is a
chart of the model code meanings.
Series
2500 Pickup
3500 Pickup
3500 C/C
4500 C/C
5500 C/C
’08
DH
D1
DC
DM
DM
’09
DH
D1
DC
DM
DM
’10
DJ
D2
DC
DM
DM
’11
DJ
D2
DD
DP
DP
‘12
DJ
D2
DD
DP
DP
NEW RELEASES
Again, with the service at www.techauthority.com we’ve
gathered information on Ram Technical Service Bulletins
that have been released only during the past year. If
you wish to review all of the TSBs for Third or Fourth
Generation trucks, we have archived those as well as this
update at the TDR’s web site (Site Features: TSBs). Also,
TDR Issues 66 and 58 have larger listings that allow the
Third Generation owner to review the TSBs issued from
2003 to 2009.
Likewise, using Issue 74 and 70 as your resource, you can
review the TSBs that were issued in calendar years 2011
and 2010.
TECH AUTHORITY STUMBLES
In my previous yearly updates the Tech Authority web site
would ask for your VIN and the VIN number would unlock
a world of information.
After my frustration last year using the VIN for search
purposes, I learned to spend my money ($35) and troll
the site to finally discover the TSBs for 2012. With this
magazine’s summary we’ve saved you from fumbling
around. That is part of the reason you’re reading the TDR,
right? You trust the TDR’s writers and staff to sift through
the minutiae and bring you only the important details.
As a secondary feature to the TSB review, I find myself
saying, “we’ve been there, done that.” So, after my
summary of a TSB, you may find additional commentary
and/or page numbers from TDR magazines to give you
further insight into the story.
I’m hopeful our yearly TSB summary is helpful to you.
Robert Patton
TDR Staff
Volume 2010-2012
93
CATEGORY 8
ELECTRICAL
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
08-011-12
2/8/102
’12 DJ/DD/D2/DP
Radio anti-theft codes.
Starting in model year 2012 radios will come equipped with an anti-theft feature. Once
a radio is installed in a vehicle, it learns the vehicle’s VIN and cannot be used in another
vehicle unless an anti-theft code is applied.
This “information only” TSB tells the dealer how to obtain the radio’s anti-theft code. This
bulletin also supersedes bulletin 08-051-11 dated 8/20/11 by providing updated service
information
Editor’s Comments – Radios
Have you tried to restore a car with a “coded” radio? I’ve been playing with BMW
coded radios from cars that are now 25 years old. What a pain in the tail.
This brings several questions to mind: In today’s market, where a replacement can
be purchased for $69, does theft occur that often? Why is Chrysler 30 years behind
the theft code thing? What implications will this have to Joe-second-owner/Joerestoration who does not have TSB 08-011-12 to tell him how the dealer can unlock a
code?
Geez.
CATEGORY 9
ENGINE
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
09-004-11
9/12/11
Any Cummins diesel
engine that is still
covered under the
provisions of the
factory warranty.
Dust-out diagnosis for Cummins diesel engines.
This “information only” bulletin involves proper inspection procedures to determine engine
failure due to dust-out condition. Engines damaged due to the infiltration of dirt and/or
debris through the air intake system are not warrantable.
Engines that exhibit particular symptoms that may have been caused by improper air
filtration and/or lack of proper maintenance. Some of these symptoms are listed below (not
limited to):
Knocking
Hard or no start
Low power/poor performance
Oil consumption
Lower end bearing failure
Broken rod
Smoking
Blow-by (rings not sealing)
Oil on turbo (dust damage to seal/bearing)
This nine-page bulletin supersedes bulletin 09-001-10 dated 7/2/10 and gives the service
network an easy to print/easy to follow diagnosis procedure. The highlights:
• Major mechanical damage can be caused by fuel, fuel injectors, up-rate kits or programmers. Inspect vehicle for any device that adds more power (fuel), which may
damage the engine mechanically. Check for any aftermarket power enhancer box or
downloader. Repairs performed on engines with failures caused by these devices do not
qualify for warranty coverage.
• Inspect for aftermarket cold air performance air filter housing, duct work and/or air filter type (wrong style air filter which may be used in a stock air filter box).
• Vehicles with extremely large amounts of visible dirt accumulation are candidates for dust out damage if not properly maintained or use of improper filters. Engines with excessive
cylinder and/or ring wear will consume excess oil. Look for oil spilled near filler on valve
cover which may indicate oil has been (or is) added often.
As mentioned, the bulletin continues for nine-pages that show the cause/effect from lack of
proper air filtration.
94
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
CATEGORY 9
ENGINE
Editor’s Comments – Dust Out
If you spend a day answering the tech line at Geno’s Garage you would be surprised at
the number of phone calls asking about air filters and cold air boxes.
The staffs’ answer: If you value your rights to warranty consideration, leave the air
intake system alone.
prior to this TSB there was the 09-001-10 TSB. prior to these TSBs there was the
“K&N story,” the short version being that testing was done on this filter in 1999 by
Dodge and Cummins. prior to the test, K&N was the number two selling item at Geno’s
Garage. After the test, K&N filters were no longer offered by Geno’s. However, folks
still want to know more as aftermarket advertising does an admirable job of selling
these parts. So, if you need to help control exhaust gas temperatures due to the high
horsepower you are making, you should consider a cold air box and a multi-layer filter.
The Geno’s folks do sell a multi-layer filter. See TDR Issue 56, page 150 and Issue 59,
page 130 for the cold air box story. See TDR Issue 34, page 105 and Issue 77, page 56,
for the K&N story.
CATEGORY 14
FUEL SYSTEM
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
14-004-11
4/1/11
’03-’09 (D1/DH/DR)
’07-’10 (DC)
Heavy duty filtration – Mopar retrofit or add on parts available.
This bulletin applies to D1/DH/DR vehicles equipped with a 5.9-liter Cummins engine built
from 2003 model year and D1/DH/DC vehicles equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins engine built
from 2007.5 model year. Several fuel system add-on or retrofit parts are available to enhance
the filtering capability for customers exposing their vehicles to extremely dirty conditions.
The description of parts available for Cummins diesel equipped vehicles is listed below:
5.9-Liter Changes – Air Filter
• 5.9 upgraded air filter. This filter is similar in design to the current 6.7-liter air filter. The part number is: 53034249AA – Element, Air Filter – 2003-2007 5.9-liter
6.7-Liter Changes – Fuel Filter
• New fuel filter. This is the FS2 design. (5 and 10 micron filter-in-filter) fuel filter to retrofit earlier models (shell and element).
68061633AA – FS2 Element, fuel filter and shell.
68061634AA – FS2 Element, fuel filter – This filter to supersede the original 5183410AA
filter when supplies are exhausted.
6.7-Liter and 5.9-Liter Changes – Tank Ventilation
• Fuel tank vent hose. 5.9 and 6.7 add-on or upgraded fuel tank vent hose kit with vent cap.
68068997AA – Fuel Tank Vent ($66.10).
Must be used in conjunction with the appropriate Fuel Tank Vent Kit listed below:
68051906AA – Kit, Severe Duty Fuel Tank Ventilation – DC 52 Gallon Tank ($32.95)
68061341AA – Kit, Severe Duty Fuel Tank Ventilation – D1/DH 35 Gallon Tank ($58.85)
68061342AA – Kit, Severe Duty Fuel Tank Ventilation – D1/DH 34 Gallon Tank ($63.20)
6.7-Liter and 5.9-Liter – Auxiliary Fuel Filter
• Severe duty fuel filter kit. This kit supplies the owner with an auxiliary fuel filter, mounting bracket for under the frame installaiton, hoses, hardware and electrical
connections to add annother fuel filter to the truck.
68083851AA kit, ’07-’12 Cab and Chassis
68083853AA kit, ’04-’12 Pickup (2500/3500)
68026934AA wiring adaptor, for use with kit 6808353AA and in the model years ’04.5-’07
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
95
CATEGORY 14
FUEL SYSTEM
Editor’s Comments – HD filtration
This is one of those “been there, done that” TSBs. We discussed the merits of this
TSB and specifically the “6.7-liter and 5.9-liter – Auxiliary Fuel filter” in last issue’s
magazine, Issue 77, pages 14-16.
In the cost analysis/conclusion part of the article, I closed by saying, “Ding, ding, ding,
bottom line, what is the cost analysis?” The Mopar kit will cost about $450. From last
issue, my “Fool Transfer pump/Boy Scout” project for the ’05 to current trucks cost $625.
“The Fool Transfer pump/Boy Scout project gives you better filtration and a redundant
pump for fuel supply. However, its installation requires removal of the fuel tank.
Nonetheless, for my peace of mind, I’ll spend the $625 and do the extra labor for the
fool solution that I presented in Issue 76. Your decision?”
A lot can happen in the 11 months from the beginning of a project to magazine-in-hand.
However, I continue to stand behind my decision to use the redundant FASS “platinum
08-95G” fuel transfer pump and filter as I wrote about in Issue 76, pages 16-21.
CATEGORY 18
VEHICLE PERFORMANCE
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
18-004-11
Rev. B
12/21/11
’10 (DJ/D2)
Diagnostic and system improvements.
This bulletin supersedes service bulletin 18-004-11 Rev. A, dated February 18, 2011. This
bulletin applies to vehicles equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins engine. The software flash
provides a number of software improvements/enhancements. These include:
P049D – EGR control position exceeded learning limit
P2002 – Diesel particulate filter efficiency below threshold
P2195 – 02 sensor 1/1 out of range high
P2196 – 02 sensor 1/1 out of range low
P2270 – 02 sensor 1/2 out of range high
P2271 – 02 sensor 1/2 out of range low
P241A – 02 sensor 1/1 and 1/2 oxygen concentration mismatch
P2609 – Intake air heater system performance
The previous TSB had software improvements for:
P046C – EGR position sensor performance
P051B – Crankcase pressure sensor circuit range/performance
P0101 – Mass air flow sensor “A” circuit performance
P245B – EGR cooler bypass status line intermittent
P2262 – Turbocharger boost pressure not detected – mechanical
The bulletin involves selectively erasing and reprogramming the engine control module
(ECM) with new software.
96
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
CATEGORY 18
VEHICLE PERFORMANCE
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
18-045-11
10/19/11
All 6.7-liter dieselequipped vehicles
Cummins 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel common diagnostic process.
This bulletin supersedes service bulletins 09-002-09 dated June 13, 2009; 09-003-09 dated
December 2, 2009; and 11-001-09 dated July 23, 2009.
This diagnostic process was developed for any drivability concern with the 6.7-liter engine.
Non-drivability engine issues or engine cooling system issues are not in the scope of this
process.
The process begins by identifying the customer’s concern and applying it to one of the
following symptoms:
• MIL illumination
• Engine cranks but does not start or starts and immediately stalls
• Engine surges, bucks, runs rough – no MIL
• Engine noise – no MIL
• Excessive black smoke out exhaust – no MIL
• Excessive white smoke out exhaust – no MIL
• Excessive blue smoke out exhaust – no MIL
Once the data has been collected and analyzed, the diagnostic process can continue.
The tests are designed to direct the service technician to the diagnostic path that leads to
corrective actions that repair conditions that occur most frequently for that specific concern.
18-005-12
1/28/12
’11 (DD/DP)
Engine systems and PTO enhancements.
This bulletin supersedes service bulletin 18-029-11 dated December 17, 2011. Cab chassis
trucks equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins diesel have a number of software improvements
available. This latest Service bulletin will include:
Improvements to prevent unnecessary malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) illumination for:
• P0524 – Engine oil pressure sensor circuit low
• P051B – Crankcase pressure sensor circuit range/performance
• P20EE – SCR NOx catalyst efficiency below threshold – Bank 1
• U010E – Lost communication with diesel exhaust fluid control unit
• P2609 – Intake air heater system performance
• P061A – ETC level 2 torque performance
• P1123 – Power take off system monitor control error
• P2579 – Turbocharger speed sensor circuit performance
Enhanced diagnostics for:
• Variable geometry turbocharger
• Fuel level sensor
• Misfire without MIL illumination
Other updates:
• Low diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) level EVIC messaging strategy changes
• Diesel Exhaust fluid (DEF) system tampering EVIC messaging strategy changes
• Oil change monitor – updated for easier reset (same basic procedure, easier to reset)
• Scan tool display updates
• Enable mobile PTO capability
• Correct operation of remote PTO
• Correct EVIC messaging related to DEF level reporting
• System robustness improvements
DEF tank level reporting erroneously at high DEF tank level. When DEF tank is overfilled,
the EVIC may display low fluid level (20-22%).
This bulletin involves selectively erasing and reprogramming the engine control module
(ECM) with new software.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
97
CATEGORY 18
VEHICLE PERFORMANCE
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
18-001-12
Rev A
1/28/12
’12 (DD/DP)
Engine systems and PTO enhancements.
This bulletin supersedes service bulletin 18.001/12, dated January 07, 2112. Cab chassis
trucks equipped with a 6.7-liter Cummins diesel have a number of software improvements
available. This latest service bulletin will include:
Improvements to prevent unnecessary malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) illumination for:
• P061A – ETC Level 2 Torque Performance
• P20EE – ACR NOx Catalyst Efficiency Below Threshold – Bank 1
• P229F – Aftertreatment NOx Sensor Circuit Performance – Bank 1 Sensor 2
• P2609 – Intake Air Heater System Performance
• P1123 – Power Take Off System Monitor Control Error
• U010E – Lost Communication With Diesel Exhaust Fluid Control Unit
Enhanced Diagnostics For:
• Selective Catalyst Reduction (SCR) efficiency diagnostic improvements.
Other Update:
• Idle shutdown message on EVIC.
• Turbo protection feature (Not displayed if vehicle is in park or no vehicle speed). Limits RPM at cold ambient to prevent turbo damage.
• Scan tool display updates.
• Correct operation of remote PTO.
• System robustness improvements.
The bulletin involves selectively erasing and reprogramming the engine control module
(ECM) with new software
18-013-12
3/17/12
’12 (DJ/D2)
Diagnostic and system improvements.
This bulletin supersedes service bulletin 18-055-11, dated December 17, 2011. This bulletin
involves selectively erasing and reprogramming the engine control module (ECM) with
new software. The software package has improvements/enhancements available for the
following DTC’s:
• P049D – EGR Control Position Exceeded Learning Limit
• P2002 – Diesel Particulate Filter Efficiency Below Threshold
• P2195 – 02 Sensor 1/1 Out of Range High
• P2196 – 02 Sensor 1/1 Out of Range Low
• P2170 – 02 Sensor 1/2 Out of Range High
• P2171 – 02 Sensor 1/2 Out of Range Low
• P241A – 02 Sensor 1/1 and 1/2 Oxygen Concentration Mismatch
• P2609 – Intake Air Heater System Performance
Vehicles flashed to address the above codes should be driven and repair validated. If code(s)
return, follow diagnostic procedures available in DealerCONNECT/TechCONNECT.
The software also updates the ECU with other improvements:
• Correct water in fuel (WIF) parameter
• ScanTool may report a code as stored, even though the fault has been cleared by completing a significant number of drive cycles without a repeat occurrence.
• Active codes not always displayed correctly.
• Engine derate with IOD removed. This will help prevent turbo damage due to oil thickening in cold climate start up on new vehicles in transit.
• Scan tool readiness reporting issues.
• Other drivability enhancements.
• EGR Valve cleaning and monitoring enhancements to help reduce occurrences of P049D.
• Erroneous, brief brake lamp flash at key on.
• Improve EVIC message regarding idle shut down.
• Ability to read EGR valve gap an wiTECH
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Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
CATEGORY 18
VEHICLE PERFORMANCE
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
18-012-12
3/19/12
’11 (DJ/D2)
Diagnostic and system improvements.
This bulletin supersedes service bulletin 18-002-11 Rev. B, dated December 16, 2011. This
bulletin involves selectively erasing and reprogramming the engine control module (ECM)
with new software. The new software will have improvements/enhancements available for
the following DTC’s:
• P0101 – Mass Air Flow Sensor “A” Circuit Performance
• P2262 – Turbocharger Boost Pressure Not Detected – Mechanical
• P2457 – Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooling System Performance
• P245B – EGR Cooler Bypass Status Line Intermittent
• P049D – EGR Control Position Exceeded Learning Limit
• P2195 – 02 Sensor 1/1 Out of Range High
• P2196 – 02 Sensor 1/1 Out of Range Low
• P2002 – Diesel Particulate Filter Efficiency Below Threshold (for high altitude failures)
• P2270 – 02 Sensor 1/2 Out of Range High
• P2271 – 02 Sensor 1/2 Out of Range Low
• P241A – 02 Sensor 1/1 and 1/2 Oxygen Concentration Mismatch
• P2609 – Intake Air Heater System Performance
Vehicles flashed to address the above codes should be driven and repair validated. If code(s)
return, follow diagnostic procedures available in DealerCONNECT/TechCONNECT.
The software also updates the ECU with other improvements:
• WiTech turbo test revision.
• ScanTool may report a code as stored, even though the fault has been cleared by completing a significant number of drive cycles without a repeat occurrence.
• Active codes not always displayed correctly.
• Engine derate with IOD removed. This will help prevent turbo damage due to oil thickening in cold climate start up on new vehicles in transit.
• Enhancement to reduce shift clunk at stop.
• Other drivability enhancements.
• EGR Valve cleaning and monitoring enhancements to help reduce occurrences of P049D.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
99
CATEGORY 19
STEERING
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
19-002-12
7/12/12
’03-’04 (DR)
’05-’09 (DH)
’06-’09 (D1)
’07-’09 (DC)
’10-’12 (D2/DJ/DD)
The customer may experience steering wheel vibration typically while driving above 50 mph.
Vehicles equipped with a solid front axle (4x4 or cab and chassis trucks) can be susceptible
to steering shimmy. Often this condition is due to modifications to the vehicle that may
involve aftermarket equipment that may not be compatible with the vehicle architecture or is
not intended for on-road use. For original equipment, this condition can be corrected with
routine inspection for properly maintained wheels and tires and replacement of damaged or
worn components.
Troubleshooting of the problem begins with the verification of warranty coverage and
discussion with the customer. The technician is directed to test drive the vehicle to confirm
the complaint
Next, a long series of inspections, questions, verifications and corrections are presented.
The following gives you an example of how the troubleshooting is done:
Is the vehicle equipped with aftermarket components or other modifications (e.g. lift kits,
wheels, suspension components or tires) that can affect the performance of or wear upon
steering components? If the answer is “yes,” the dealer is to notify the owner and document
in the repair order that limited warranties do not cover conditions or damage caused by
the use of aftermarket components, improper maintenance, or impact damage can cause
steering shimmy or otherwise accelerate the wear of steering components that cause
steering shimmy. The dealership can inspect steering components that were supplied by the
manufacturer for defects in material, workmanship and factory preparation and determine
if necessary repairs are covered under the terms of the warranties applicable to the vehicle.
Clearly, aftermarket items may affect who pays for further inspection.
• Inspect the vehicle steering components for any damage.
• Are the tires on the vehicle properly inflated to the correct pressure?
• Do the tires exhibit a condition of excessive wear, cupping or damage?
• Verify proper wheel and tire balance.
• Inspect the steering damper.
• Does the track bar show signs of excessive wear or damage?
• Do the tie rods show signs of excessive wear or damage?
• Does the drag link show signs of excessive wear or damage?
• Verify vehicle wheel alignment is within specification and adjust accordingly.
• Do the ball joints show signs of excessive wear or damage?
Editor’s Comments – Death Wobble
If you spend a day answering the tech line at Geno’s Garage, you would be surprised
at the number of phone calls asking about the “Death Wobble.”
More often than not, the customer wants a one-size-fits-all answer to the problem. It
is not that easy, and the Geno’s staff suggests that they save money by crawling under
the truck to diagnose the problem. So, it is refreshing to see that Dodge has helped us
tackle the problem with a step-by-step repair procedure.
The TDR has also covered the death wobble problem and in Issue 74, pages 12-23, we
presented “Steering Woes.” If you are having death wobble problems, this article is
well worth your reread.
Finally, there is a part not mentioned in the Dodge TSB that can be added to your truck
to help stabilize the front end. My guess as to why Dodge didn’t mention a steering box
stabilizer is that it is an aftermarket item not offered through the Mopar parts system.
100
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
CATEGORY 21
TRANSMISSION AND TRANSFER CASE
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
21-011-11
11/4/11
’11 (DD/DP)
Difficulty climbing steep grades at maximum gross combined weight rating in third and
fourth gear.
This bulletin applies to Cab and Chassis vehicles equipped with a six-speed Aisin automatic
transmission. Customers may notice they have difficulty climbing steep grades at maximum
gross combined weight rating while the vehicle is in third and fourth gear. This usually
happens while towing a trailer. This could also be described as a lug down feeling in third
and fourth gear. A new feature has been added to the TCM logic that allows new downshift
points for the 4-3 and 3-2 downshifts. These new shift points keep the engine at or near
peak horsepower to avoid this performance issue.
This bulletin involves flash reprogramming the transmission control module (TCM) with new
software.
CATEGORY 23
BODY
TSB#
MODEL
SUBJECT/DESCRIPTION
23-006-10
3/10/10
’10 (D2/DJ)
Hood creaking and squeaking sound.
This bulletin applies to D2/DJ vehicles built before January 29, 2010. The customer may
experience a creaking and/or squeaking sound from the hood area when turning the vehicle
and/or going over rough terrain.
This repair involves adding Anti-squeak tape to the hood.
23-003-12
2/07/12
All Chrysler vehicles
Light to moderate paint surface imperfections on factory applied paint finish.
This “information only” bulletin applies to vehicles with isolated light to moderate paint
surface imperfections (scratches, bird dropping stains, chemical etching, etc.) on factory
applied paint. The bulletin outlines a list of Meguiar’s products that can be used to clean
the paint.
Service personnel are reminded to always begin with the least aggressive method to remove
a paint condition. Work one section at a time. Always work on a cool paint surface free
of bonded surface contaminants. Should above surface defects be present; prepare the
surface with Meguiar’s Detailing Clay.
Editor’s Comments – paint Detailing
When it comes to detailing a truck or car, nothing replaces good lighting, a sharp eye
and lots of elbow-grease.
Again, the TDR and its writers have “been there, done that,” and the most recent
article on detailing your truck is found in Issue 68, pages 58-65.
23-019126/19/12
’12 (DJ/DD/D2/DP)
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Shaking motion in left rearview tow mirror assembly.
This bulletin applies to vehicles built before January 10, 2012. This bulletin involves inspecting
and, if necessary, replacing the left rearview tow mirror assembly.
Volume 2010-2012
101
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
D | 39
RAM INTRODUCES “NEW CREW” OF ULTIMATE HEAVY DUTY
PICKUP TRUCKS: 2010 RAM 2500 AND 3500
NEW FOR 2010
Ram continues to raise the bar with the boldest, most powerful and capable pickup
truck lineup on the planet with the introduction of the all-new 2010 Ram Heavy Duty
lineup, offering first-time innovations and features along with new standards of
strength, utility and driveability.
• Choice of legendary diesel- and
gasoline-fueled powerplants
• Available for the first time in a
crew-size cab model
− Available 6.7-liter Cummins® Turbo
Diesel produces 350 horsepower
(261 kW) at 3,000 rpm and
650 lb-ft. of torque (881 N•m) at
only 1,500 rpm. The 6.7-liter meets
the most stringent of 50-state
emission requirements and
includes a segment-exclusive
standard exhaust brake
The backbone of 2010 Ram Heavy Duty pickups is a hydro-formed, fully boxed frame
with advanced torsional rigidity and stiffness. A coil-spring suspension setup is
used up front, while the multi-leaf spring design is maintained in the rear for heavy-duty
capability. Front and rear shocks and springs are tuned for optimum ride quality
and capability.
Customers in the heavy-duty segment have a range of needs, and most of them involve
high levels of capability. The new 2010 Dodge Ram 2500 and 3500 are designed to
deliver a total package:
− Standard 5.7-liter HEMI® V-8
delivers 383 horsepower (286 kW)
at 5,600 rpm and 400 lb.-ft. of
torque (542 N•m) at 4,000 rpm and
features variable-valve timing for
greater efficiency and performance
• Increased Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) on 2500 4x4 crew cab diesel
models to 9,600 pounds from 9,000 pounds
• Increased Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) on 3500 dually models with diesel,
auto transmission and 4.10 rear axle to 24,500 pounds from 24,000 pounds
• Ride greatly improved over
previous generation with re-tuned
suspension components
• Increased GCWR on 3500 4x2 models to 24,000 pounds from 23,000 pounds
• Increased front Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR) on several models:
• New C-pillar with fluid-filled hydro
mounts improves driving dynamics
– To 5,500 pounds from 5,200 pounds on diesel 4x4 pickups
• Handling of fully loaded vehicle greatly
improved over previous generation
with new suspension tuning
– To 5,000 pounds from 4,700 pounds on diesel 4x2 pickups
Suspension upgrades and larger front axle U-joints, combined with increased front GAWR,
result in increased front-weight carrying capability – a must for larger snowplows.
(continued on next page)
MODELS / POWERTRAINS
DIMENSIONS, IN.
TRANSMISSIONS
Regular Cab Shown.
5.7-LITER
HEMI V-8
6.7-LITER
TURBO DIESEL
5-SPEED
AUTO
(545RFE)
6-SPEED
MANUAL
(G56)
6-SPEED
AUTO
(68RFE)
ST
S
O
S
S*
O*
SLT
S
O
S
S*
O*
TRX
S
O
S
S*
O*
Power Wagon
S
–
S
–
–
Laramie
S
O
S
S*
O*
O.A. LENGTH: 231.0 – 259.4 Varies
O.A. HEIGHT:
ENGINES
(continued on next page)
73.3 – 78.4 Varies
MODEL
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Body Style: Regular Cab,
Crew Cab and Mega Cab
Layout: Longitudinal front
engine, 2WD or 4WD
Seat Layout: Regular Cab:
2 or 3, Crew Cab and Mega Cab:
2/3 or 3/3
EPA Vehicle Class: Standard
Pickup Truck
Assembly: Saltillo Assembly
Plant, Coahuila, Mexico
WHEELBASE: 140.0 – 169.4 Varies
O.A. Width(a): 78.9, 79.1
(a)
SgRP front
Track, Front:
68.6 2WD
68.3, 69.5 4WD
Track, Rear: 68.2, 75.8
* Diesel
102
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
40
|D
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY OVERVIEW
• Ram Heavy Duty 3500 with dual-rearwheels, diesel engine, automatic
transmission and 4.10 rear axle has
an increased Gross Combined Weight
Rating (GCWR) of 24,500 pounds from
24,000 pounds
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
• Max Tow Package GCWR increases
to 25,400 pounds (late availability)
• Ram Heavy Duty 3500 offers superior
towing capability at 17,600 pounds
and a maximum payload of
5,150 pounds
• Ram Heavy Duty 2500 Gross Vehicle
Weight Rating (GVWR) increases to
9,600 pounds from 9,000 pounds,
a 600 lb. increase on crew cab and
Mega Cab 4x4 models equipped with
the Cummins Turbo Diesel engine
• Increased front Gross Axle Weight
Rating (GAWR) of 5,500 pounds on
4x4 models equipped with the 6.7-liter
Cummins Turbo Diesel engine allows
for more front-weight carrying capability,
including greater snowplow weights
• Class IV receiver standard on all
Ram Heavy Duty models
• Premium front seats with heat and
ventilation; heated rear seats; heated
steering wheel; automatic temperature
control; two-tone upholstery; memory
seats, radio and mirrors; navigation;
adjustable pedals and numerous
infotainment options, including SIRIUS
Backseat TV™ with three channels of
programming, Uconnect Multimedia
with a 30-gigabyte hard drive and an
available first-in-segment 10-speaker
surround-sound system
• Offered in three cab styles
(regular cab, crew-size cab and
Mega Cab) and two cargo-box sizes
(6 feet 4 inches and 8 feet), single-and
dual-rear-wheel configurations
• All-new integrated trailer brake
controller, offered with trailer tow
package, improves trailer braking
and stability
• Available in five distinct trim levels –
ST, SLT, TRX, Laramie and Power Wagon
• Dual-rear-wheel fenders
(3500 dually only) are new for
2010 and are integrated into the
box stamping providing a sleek
aerodynamic appearance
• B20 package available to fleet
customers only
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Towing capability is a strong suit with the new 2010 Ram 2500 and 3500 pickups,
with the only standard exhaust brake in the segment (diesel-equipped models). This
feature prolongs brake life and provides confidence and safety when hauling heavy
loads on downhill grades. Large front (360 mm) and rear (358 mm) brakes with
integrated Anti-lock Brake System (ABS) increase brake life and braking stability.
An available integrated trailer brake control provides better driver control in towing
situations. Trailer brake control information is conveniently displayed in the
Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC) which is standard on diesel models and
available on gas SLT, TRX and Laramie models.
In addition, new 2010 Ram transmissions include Electronic Range Select, which
enables the driver to manually limit the highest available transmission gear,
allowing manual upshifts and downshifts based on road speed and engine speed.
A tow/haul mode switch enhances tow capability while towing. Tow/haul mode is
standard on both five-speed and six-speed automatic transmissions.
In terms of power, the new 2010 Ram Heavy Duty tops the charts with the legendary
6.7-liter Cummins Turbo Diesel engine, which produces 350 horsepower (261 kW)
at 3,000 rpm and 650 lb.-ft. of torque (881 N•m) at only 1,500 rpm.
The most durable and reliable engine in its class, the 6.7-liter Cummins Turbo Diesel
features standard oil-change intervals of 7,500 miles. It also has life-to-major overhaul intervals of 350,000 miles, providing more than a 100,000-mile advantage over
the competition.
And it’s as clean as it is durable. In order to meet stringent 2010.5 diesel emissions
requirements, the Cummins 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel engine uses a diesel particulate
filter (DPF) to virtually eliminate particulate matter emissions and an absorber
catalyst to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx) by as much as 90 percent.
Backing up the 6.7-liter diesel is a choice of either a G56 six-speed manual
transmission or a 68RFE six-speed automatic transmission. The six-speed
manual has an ultra-low first-gear ratio, which makes it ideal for heavy hauling
requirements, while the six-speed automatic offers ease of driveability and towing.
The other choice for 2010 Ram Heavy Duty customers is the standard 5.7-liter HEMI®
V-8 gasoline engine, delivering 383 horsepower (286 kW) at 5,600 rpm and 400 lb.ft. of torque (542 N•m) at 4,000 rpm.
The 5.7-liter HEMI comes standard with the heavy-duty 545RFE five-speed
automatic. It offers Electronic Range Select and tow/haul capability that provide a
unique shift schedule that minimizes gear hunting while towing heavy loads. It also
provides automatic downshift capability while decelerating.
Ram Power Wagon returns for the 2010 model year, equipped with electric-locking
front and rear differentials, electronic disconnecting sway bar, Bilstein shocks,
32-inch BF Goodrich off-road tires, underbody skid-plate protection, 4.56 axle ratio
for hill climbing and a custom-built Warn® 12,000-lb. winch is accessible through the
front bumper. The exterior has been enhanced with a new two-tone paint scheme
and graphics package.
New dual-rear-wheel fender flares (3500 dually only) are now integrated into the
sheet metal box stamping and offer an appearance that communicates quality and
achieves improved aerodynamics.
Inside, the new 2010 Ram Heavy Duty offers abundant amenities, comfort and
convenience. A new-for-2010 available center console features an upper bin that
is large enough to hold a laptop computer (with an accessible power outlet), and a
lower bin that accommodates hanging files. In addition, the console offers several
other storage compartments.
Volume 2010-2012
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ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
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2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY OVERVIEW
New 2010 Ram 2500 and 3500 Mega Cab models retain their title of best-in-class interior room in the segment – including the
largest, longest cab (143.2 cubic feet,111.1 inches long); largest interior cargo volume (72.2 cubic feet); largest cargo volume
behind rear seat (7.7 cubic feet); largest flat-floor load area (16.8 square feet); largest second-row leg room (44.2 inches); largest
rear-door opening (34.5 inches wide, 35.5 inches high); largest rear-door open angle (85 degrees); and first-ever reclining rear seats
(22- to 37-degree seat-back angle).
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RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Expanding business and commercial work applications, the 2010 Ram 2500 is available in a Box-Off configuration. Combining
“Ram-tough” power and strength with enhanced handling, safety and durability, Ram 2500 Box-Off successfully blends the needs
of the commercial and heavy-duty pickup truck customer.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
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ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
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2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY AT A GLANCE
• The New Crew: the 2010 Ram Heavy Duty is available for
the first time in a crew-size cab model – providing Ram
with a formidable entry in the highest-volume part of the
heavy-duty pickup segment (approximately 50 percent)
• Cummins and HEMI®: Choice of legendary diesel- and
gasoline-fueled powerplants
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
– 6.7-liter Cummins Turbo Diesel produces
350 horsepower (261 kW) at 3,000 rpm and 650 lb-ft.
of torque (881 N•m) at only 1,500 rpm. The 6.7L meets
stringent 50-state emission requirements and includes
a segment-exclusive standard exhaust brake
– 5.7-liter HEMI V-8 delivers 383 horsepower (286 kW) at
5,600 rpm and 400 lb.-ft. of torque (542 N•m) at 4,000
rpm. Features Variable-valve Timing (VVT) for greater
efficiency and performance
• Improved driving dynamics:
– Ride greatly improved with re-tuned
suspension components
– New C-pillar with fluid-filled hydro mounts
– Handling of fully loaded vehicle greatly improved
with new suspension tuning
• Ram 3500 with dual-rear-wheels, diesel engine, automatic
transmission and 4.10 rear axle has an increased Gross
Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) of 24,500 pounds from
24,500 pounds
• Increased front Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR) of
5,500 pounds on 4x4 models equipped with the
6.7-liter Cummins Turbo Diesel engine allows for
more front-weight carrying capability including greater
snowplow weights
• Premium front seating with heat and ventilation; heated
rear seats, heated steering wheel; automatic temperature
control; two-tone upholstery; memory seats, radio and
mirrors; navigation; adjustable pedals and numerous
infotainment options including SIRIUS Backseat TV™
with three channels of programming, Uconnect™
• Multimedia and an available first-in-segment 10-speaker
surround-sound system
• Numerous storage options including in-floor storage
• Ram Heavy Duty 3500 offers superior towing capability at
17,600 pounds and a maximum payload of 5,150 pounds
• Offered in three cab styles (regular cab, crew-size cab and
mega Cab) and two cargo-box sizes (6-foot-4-inches and
8 feet), single and dual-rear-wheel configurations
• Integrated trailer brake controller
• Available in five trim levels – ST, SLT, TRX, Laramie and
Power Wagon
• Exterior styling differentiates light-duty and heavy-duty
models with unique grille, hood and bumpers
• B20 bio-diesel capability available to fleet customers only
• Ram Heavy Duty 2500 Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)
increases to 9,600 pounds from 9,000 pounds, a 600 lb.
increase on Crew Cab and Mega Cab 4x4 models
equipped with the Cummins Turbo Diesel engine
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Volume 2010-2012
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ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
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2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
2010 DODGE RAM HEAVY DUTY 2500/3500 SPECIFICATIONS
All dimensions are in inches (millimeters) unless otherwise noted. All dimensions measured at curb weight with standard tires and wheels.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Regular Cab, Crew Cab and Mega Cab
Assembly Plants
Saltillo Assembly Plant - Coahuila, Mexico
EPA Vehicle Class
Standard Pickup
ENGINE: 5.7-LITER HEMI® V-8
Availability
Standard on 2500 Series Models(a)
Type and Description
Eight-cylinder, 90-degree V-8, liquid-cooled with Variable-valve Timing (VVT)
Displacement
343 cu. in. (5654 cu. cm)
Bore x Stroke
3.92 x 3.58 (99.5 x 90.9)
Valve System
Pushrod-operated overhead valves, 16 valves,
hydraulic lifters with roller followers
Fuel Injection
Sequential, multi-port, electronic, returnless
Construction
Deep-skirt cast-iron block with cross-bolted main bearing caps, aluminum
alloy heads with hemispherical combustion chambers
Compression Ratio
9.6:1
Power (SAE net)
383 bhp (286 kW) @ 5,600 rpm, 2500 Series(b)
Torque (SAE net)
400 lb.-ft. (542 N•m) @ 4,000 rpm, 2500 Series
Max. Engine Speed
5,800 rpm
Fuel Requirement
Unleaded mid-grade, 89 octane (R+M)/2—recommended
Unleaded regular, 87 octane (R+M)/2—acceptable
Oil Capacity
7.0 qt. (6.6L)
Coolant Capacity
18.7 qt. (17.7L)
Emission Control
Dual three-way catalytic converters, internal engine features with knock sensors(b)
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Body Styles
(a) Not available on 3500 Series models.
(b) All manual transmission equipped vehicles meet LEV I chassis-certified emission requirements in California, New York, Massachusetts,
Maine and Vermont. Meets Tier 2 HDV 1, 2 chassis-certified emission requirements in 45 remaining states. Ram 2500 and 3500 models
equipped with automatic transmission and sold in 45 states meet Tier 2 HDV 1, 2 chassis-certified emission requirements. Ram 2500 models
equipped with automatic transmission and sold in California, New York, Massachusetts, Maine and Vermont meet LEV II—MDV 1 category
chassis-certified emission requirements. Ram 3500 models equipped with automatic transmission and sold in California, New York,
Massachusetts, Maine and Vermont meet LEV II—MDV 2 category chassis-certified emission requirements.
ENGINE: 6.7-LITER HIGH OUTPUT CUMMINS® TURBO DIESEL I-6
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Volume 2010-2012
Availability
Standard on 3500 Series
Type and Description
Six-cylinder, inline, liquid-cooled, turbocharged, intercooled
Displacement
408 cu. in. (6690 cu. cm)
Bore x Stroke
4.21 x 4.88 (107 x 124)
Valve System
OHV, 24 valves, solid lifters
Fuel Injection
Electronic high-pressure common rail
Construction
Cast-iron block and head
Compression Ratio
17.3:1
Power (SAE net)
350 bhp (261 kW) @ 3,000 rpm
Torque (SAE net)
650 lb.-ft. (881 N•m) @ 1,500 rpm
Maximum High-idle Engine Speed
3,500 rpm
Fuel Requirement
Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel
Oil Capacity
12.0 qt. (11.3L) with filter
Coolant Capacity
29.5 qt. (28.0L)
Emission Controls
Exhaust after-treatment systems and internal engine features
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
44 | D
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Alternator
Availability
Standard—All
Rating
160-amp
Availability
Optional
Rating
180-amp included with Snow Plow Prep Package
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Battery
Availability
Standard—2500 and 3500 with gasoline engines
Description
Group 65, maintenance-free, 600 CCA
Availability
Standard—All with diesel engines; included in
Heavy Duty Snow Plow and Trailer-tow Groups
Description
Group 65, maintenance-free, 750 CCA
TRANSMISSION: G56—MANUAL SIX-SPEED OVERDRIVE
Availability
Standard with 6.7-liter High-output Diesel
Description
Synchronized in all gears
Gear Ratios ( 6.7L Diesel)
1st
5.94
2nd
3.28
3rd
1.98
4th
1.31
5th
1.0
6th
0.74
Reverse
5.42
TRANSMISSION: 545RFE—AUTOMATIC FIVE-SPEED
Availability
Standard with 5.7-liter engines on 2500 Series models
Description
Three planetary gear-sets, one overrunning clutch, full electronic control,
electronically controlled converter clutch
Gear Ratios
1st
3
2nd
1.67—upshift; 1.50—kickdown
3rd
1
4th
0.75
5th
0.67
Reverse
Overall Top-gear
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
3
2.50 with 3.73 axle ratio; 2.75 with 4.10 axle ratio; 2.14 with 3.42 axle ratio
Volume 2010-2012
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ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
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2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
TRANSMISSION: 68RFE—AUTOMATIC SIX-SPEED
Availability
Optional with 6.7L Cummins Turbo Diesel engine
Description
Three planetary gear-sets, one overrunning clutch, full electronic control,
electronically controlled converter clutch
Gear Ratios
3.231
2nd
1.837
3rd
1.41
4th
1
5th
0.816
6th
0.625
Reverse
Overall Top-gear Ratio
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
1st
4.444
2.33 with 3.73 axle ratio;
2.56 with 4.10 axle ratio
TRANSFER CASES: NV271/NV273
Availability
NV271—Standard 4WD ST
NV273—Standard Laramie; Optional SLT
Type
Part-time
Operating Modes
2WD; 4WD High; Neutral; 4WD Low
Shift Mechanism
NV271—manual; NV273—electric
Low-range Ratio
2.72
Center Differential
None
2010 DODGE RAM HEAVY DUTY 2500 DIMENSIONS AND CAPACITIES
REGULAR CAB 140.5"WB 8' 0" BOX SRW
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Volume 2010-2012
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
140.5
140.0
Track Width - Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width - Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
231.0
231.0
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
78.9
78.9
Overall Height
73.3
75.7
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Front
7.6
7.5
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Rear
7.4
7.4
Approach Angle
16.4
18.1
Ramp Breakover Angle
16.5
16.9
Departure Angle
22.8
27.6
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
46 | D
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
CREW CAB 149.5"WB 6' 4" BOX SRW
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
149.4
148.9
Track Width - Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width - Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
237.4
237.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
73.7
77.7
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Front
7.1
7.4
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Rear
7.3
7.1
Approach Angle
12.5
21.8
Ramp Breakover Angle
15.1
18.2
Departure Angle
23.7
27.0
CREW CAB 169.5"WB 8' 0" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
169.4
168.9
Track Width - Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width - Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
259.4
259.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
73.5
77.6
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Front
7.1
7.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Rear
7.3
7.2
Approach Angle
12.5
21.8
Ramp Breakover Angle
14.1
16.5
Departure Angle
22.7
25.9
MEGA CAB 160.5"WB 6' 4" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
160.5
160.0
Track Width - Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width - Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
248.4
248.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.1
78.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Front
7.8
8.1
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Rear
7.8
7.7
Approach Angle
14.0
23.4
Ramp Breakover Angle
15.8
18.3
Departure Angle
24.2
27.6
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Volume 2010-2012
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ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
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2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
2010 DODGE RAM HEAVY DUTY 3500 DIMENSIONS AND CAPACITIES
REGULAR CAB 140.5"WB 8' 0" BOX DRW
4x4
140.5
140.0
Track Width - Front
68.6
69.5
Track Width - Rear
75.8
75.8
Overall Length
231.0
231.0
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
78.9
78.9
Overall Height
73.6
77.9
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Front
8.0
8.4
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Rear
7.6
7.7
Approach Angle
17.2
25.5
Ramp Breakover Angle
14.4
20.9
Departure Angle
23.1
26.5
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
4x2
Wheelbase
CREW CAB 149.5"WB 6' 4" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
149.4
148.9
Track Width – Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width – Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
237.4
237.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.2
78.4
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Front
7.8
8.1
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Rear
7.8
7.8
Approach Angle
13.9
23.4
Ramp Breakover Angle
16.3
19.4
Departure Angle
24.2
27.7
CREW CAB 169.5"WB 8' 0" BOX SRW
110
Volume 2010-2012
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
169.4
168.9
Track Width – Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width – Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
259.4
259.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.1
78.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Front
7.8
8.1
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Rear
7.8
7.7
Approach Angle
14.1
23.5
Ramp Breakover Angle
15.4
17.6
Departure Angle
23.1
26.4
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
48 | D
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
CREW CAB 169.5"WB 8' 0" BOX DRW
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
169.4
168.9
Track Width – Front
68.6
69.5
Track Width – Rear
75.8
75.8
Overall Length
249.4
259.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.1
78.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Front
7.9
8.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Rear
7.6
7.6
Approach Angle
14.4
23.8
Ramp Breakover Angle
12.0
17.8
Departure Angle
22.9
26.3
MEGA CAB 160.5"WB 6' 4" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
160.5
160.0
Track Width – Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width – Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
248.4
248.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.1
78.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Front
7.8
8.1
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Rear
7.8
7.7
Approach Angle
14.0
23.4
Ramp Breakover Angle
15.8
18.3
Departure Angle
24.2
27.6
MEGA CAB 160.5"WB 6' 4" BOX DRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
160.5
160.0
Track Width – Front
68.6
69.5
Track Width – Rear
75.8
75.8
Overall Length
248.4
248.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.1
78.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Front
7.9
8.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground - Rear
7.6
7.5
Approach Angle
14.3
23.8
Ramp Breakover Angle
12.5
18.5
Departure Angle
23.9
27.3
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
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ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
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2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
2010 RAM 3500 TOWING CHARTS
NOTE: BASE WEIGHTS CAN CHANGE
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - ST
DJ 2L91
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
3,030
Weight
5,769
Front
3,187
Rear
2,581
Front
4,750
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Trail
9,100
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
3,030
5,769
3,187
2,581
4,750
6,500
17,000
11,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,270
6,731
4,066
2,664
5,000
6,500
19,000
12,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,270
6,731
4,066
2,664
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,380
6,622
3,971
2,652
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,380
6,622
3,971
2,652
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,380
6,622
3,971
2,652
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,250
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - SLT
Max
DJ 2H91
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,960
Base
Weight
5,839
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,249
2,590 4,750
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
9,000
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,960
5,839
3,249
2,590
4,750
6,500
17,000
11,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,180
6,819
4,133
2,686
5,000
6,500
19,000
12,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,180
6,819
4,133
2,686
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,290
6,710
4,038
2,673
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,290
6,710
4,038
2,673
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,290
6,710
4,038
2,673
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,150
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Trans
DJ 2P91
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,950
Weight
5,852
Front
3,229
Rear
2,623
Front
4,750
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Trail
9,000
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,950
5,852
3,229
2,623
4,750
6,500
17,000
11,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,130
6,871
4,164
2,707
5,000
6,500
19,000
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,130
6,871
4,164
2,707
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,240
6,763
4,069
2,695
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,240
6,763
4,069
2,695
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,240
6,763
4,069
2,695
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,100
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
Max
DJ 2L92
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,860
Base
Weight
5,942
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,329
2,613 4,750
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
8,900
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,860
5,942
3,329
2,613
4,750
6,500
17,000
10,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,110
6,885
4,189
2,696
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,110
6,885
4,189
2,696
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,190
6,813
4,149
2,665
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,190
6,813
4,149
2,665
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,190
6,813
4,149
2,665
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,050
NOTES: Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 pounds Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 pounds
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 pounds (allowance for driver)
112
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
50 | D
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
DJ 2H92
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,690
Weight
6,114
Front
3,366
Rear
2,747
Front
4,750
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Trail
8,750
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,690
6,114
3,366
2,747
4,750
6,500
17,000
10,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,000
6,998
4,207
2,791
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,000
6,998
4,207
2,791
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,070
6,926
4,167
2,760
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,070
6,926
4,167
2,760
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,070
6,926
4,167
2,760
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,900
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LARAMIE
Max
DJ 2P92
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,610
Base
Weight
6,187
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,416
2,771 4,750
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
8,650
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,610
6,187
3,416
2,771
4,750
6,500
17,000
10,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
1,920
7,083
4,255
2,828
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
1,920
7,083
4,255
2,828
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
1,990
7,011
4,215
2,796
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
1,990
7,011
4,215
2,796
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
1,990
7,011
4,215
2,796
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,850
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
DJ 2L62
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,650
Payload
3,160
Weight
5,492
Front
3,062
Rear
2,430
Front
4,750
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Trail
9,350
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,650
3,160
5,492
3,062
2,430
4,750
6,500
17,000
11,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,490
6,512
4,020
2,492
5,000
6,500
19,000
12,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,490
6,512
4,020
2,492
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,590
6,407
3,926
2,481
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,590
6,407
3,926
2,481
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,590
6,407
3,926
2,481
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,450
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
Max
DJ 2H62
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,650
Payload
3,130
Base
Weight
5,518
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,121
2,397 4,750
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
9,350
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,650
3,130
5,518
3,121
2,397
4,750
6,500
17,000
11,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,430
6,569
4,050
2,519
5,000
6,500
19,000
12,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,430
6,569
4,050
2,519
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,540
6,464
3,955
2,509
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,540
6,464
3,955
2,509
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,540
6,464
3,955
2,509
5,000
6,500
20,000
13,400
NOTES: Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 pounds Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 pounds
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 pounds (allowance for driver)
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
113
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
D | 51
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - ST
DJ 7L91
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,560
Weight
6,239
Front
3,587
Rear
2,652
Front
5,200
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Trail
8,600
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,560
6,239
3,587
2,652
5,200
6,500
17,000
10,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,420
7,176
4,434
2,741
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,420
7,176
4,434
2,741
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,500
7,100
4,348
2,752
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,500
7,100
4,348
2,752
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,500
7,100
4,348
2,752
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,750
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - SLT
Max
DJ 7H91
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,460
Base
Weight
6,340
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,630
2,710 5,200
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
8,500
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,460
6,340
3,630
2,710
5,200
6,500
17,000
10,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,320
7,276
4,546
2,730
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,320
7,276
4,546
2,730
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,400
7,201
4,460
2,741
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,400
7,201
4,460
2,741
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,400
7,201
4,460
2,741
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,650
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
DJ 7P91
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,400
Weight
6,398
Front
3,666
Rear
2,732
Front
5,200
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Trail
8,450
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,400
6,398
3,666
2,732
5,200
6,500
17,000
10,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,250
7,349
4,580
2,769
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,250
7,349
4,580
2,769
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,330
7,274
4,493
2,780
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,330
7,274
4,493
2,780
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,330
7,274
4,493
2,780
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,600
Base
Weight
6,572
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,832
2,740 5,200
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
17,000
Max
Trail
10,300
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - SLT
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Trans
Max
DJ 7H91- POWER WAGON
Axle
Ratio
4.56
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - ST
GVWR
8,510
Payload
1,940
DJ 7L92
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,450
Base
Weight
6,345
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,685
2,660 5,200
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
8,500
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,450
6,345
3,685
2,660
5,200
6,500
17,000
10,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,320
7,280
4,533
2,747
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,320
7,280
4,533
2,747
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,400
7,200
4,444
2,756
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,400
7,200
4,444
2,756
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,400
7,200
4,444
2,756
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,650
NOTES: Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 pounds Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 pounds
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 pounds (allowance for driver)
114
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
52 | D
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
DJ 7H92
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,350
Weight
6,450
Front
3,685
Rear
2,766
Front
5,200
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Trail
8,400
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,350
6,450
3,685
2,766
5,200
6,500
17,000
10,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,260
7,335
4,525
2,810
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,260
7,335
4,525
2,810
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,340
7,256
4,437
2,819
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,340
7,256
4,437
2,819
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,340
7,256
4,437
2,819
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,600
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LARAMIE
Max
DJ 7P92
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,270
Base
Weight
6,535
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,732
2,803 5,200
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
8,300
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,270
6,535
3,732
2,803
5,200
6,500
17,000
10,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,190
7,409
4,575
2,834
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,190
7,409
4,575
2,834
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,270
7,329
4,487
2,843
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,270
7,329
4,487
2,843
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,270
7,329
4,487
2,843
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,500
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED - ST
DJ 7L62
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,650
Payload
2,740
Weight
5,915
Front
3,466
Rear
2,449
Front
5,200
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Trail
8,950
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,650
2,740
5,915
3,466
2,449
5,200
6,500
17,000
10,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,140
6,861
4,322
2,539
5,500
6,500
19,000
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,140
6,861
4,322
2,539
5,500
6,500
20,000
13,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,250
6,746
4,286
2,460
5,500
6,500
17,000
10,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,250
6,746
4,286
2,460
5,500
6,500
20,000
13,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,250
6,746
4,286
2,460
5,500
6,500
20,000
13,100
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
Max
DJ 7H62
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,650
Payload
2,660
Base
Weight
5,994
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,518
2,476 5,200
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
8,850
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,650
2,660
5,994
3,518
2,476
5,200
6,500
17,000
10,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,040
6,962
4,402
2,560
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,040
6,962
4,402
2,560
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,150
6,847
4,366
2,481
5,500
6,500
17,000
10,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,150
6,847
4,366
2,481
5,500
6,500
20,000
13,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,150
6,847
4,366
2,481
5,500
6,500
20,000
13,000
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED - SLT
DJ 2H81
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,570
Base
Weight
6,227
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,381
2,846 4,750
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
8,600
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,570
6,227
3,381
2,846
4,750
6,500
17,000
10,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
1,910
7,090
4,228
2,862
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
1,910
7,090
4,228
2,862
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
1,980
7,019
4,145
2,874
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
1,980
7,019
4,145
2,874
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
1,980
7,019
4,145
2,874
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,850
NOTES: Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 pounds Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 pounds
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 pounds (allowance for driver)
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
115
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
D | 53
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE DJ 2P81
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,540
Weight
6,256
Front
3,410
Rear
2,846
Front
4,750
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Trail
8,600
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,540
6,256
3,410
2,846
4,750
6,500
17,000
10,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
1,810
7,193
4,331
2,861
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
1,810
7,193
4,331
2,861
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
1,880
7,122
4,249
2,873
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
1,880
7,122
4,249
2,873
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
1,880
7,122
4,249
2,873
5,000
6,500
20,000
12,750
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - SLT
Max
DJ 7H81
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,120
Base
Weight
6,683
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,763
2,920 5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
8,150
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,120
6,683
3,763
2,920
5,500
6,500
17,000
10,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,070
7,533
4,563
2,970
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,070
7,533
4,563
2,970
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,140
7,455
4,398
3,057
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,140
7,455
4,398
3,057
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,140
7,455
4,398
3,057
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,400
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Trans
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE DJ 7P81
Engine
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Trans
Type Transmission
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
GVWR
8,800
Payload
2,180
Base
Weight
6,620
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
3,759
2,861 5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
15,000
Max
Trail
8,250
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,180
6,620
3,759
2,861
5,500
6,500
17,000
10,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,030
7,573
4,679
2,895
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,030
7,573
4,679
2,895
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,100
7,495
4,513
2,982
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,100
7,495
4,513
2,982
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,100
7,495
4,513
2,982
5,500
6,500
20,000
12,350
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 pounds Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 pounds
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 pounds (allowance for driver)
116
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
54 | D
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
2010 DODGE RAM HEAVY DUTY 3500 TOWING CHARTS
NOTE: BASE WEIGHTS CAN CHANGE
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - ST
D2 3L91 (SRW)
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
3,360
Weight
6,740
Front
4,031
Rear
2,709
Front
5,000
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Trail
12,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,360
6,740
4,031
2,709
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,460
6,635
3,945
2,690
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,460
6,635
3,945
2,690
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,460
6,635
3,945
2,690
5,000
6,500
24,000
17,200
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - SLT
Max
D2 3H91 (SRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
3,250
Base
Weight
6,846
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,151
2,696 5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,250
6,846
4,151
2,696
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,360
6,741
4,065
2,676
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,360
6,741
4,065
2,676
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,360
6,741
4,065
2,676
5,000
6,500
24,000
17,100
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
D2 3P91 (SRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
3,210
Base
Weight
6,892
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,121
2,771 5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,210
6,892
4,121
2,771
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,310
6,787
4,035
2,752
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,310
6,787
4,035
2,752
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,310
6,787
4,035
2,752
5,000
6,500
24,000
17,050
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
D2 3L92 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
11,500
Payload
4,190
Base
Weight
7,310
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,280
3,030 5,000
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,190
7,310
4,280
3,030
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,280
7,219
4,186
3,033
5,000
9,750
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,280
7,219
4,186
3,033
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,280
7,219
4,186
3,033
5,000
9,750
24,500
17,150
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
D2 3L92 (SRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
3,120
Base
Weight
6,975
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,284
2,691 5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,120
6,975
4,284
2,691
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,220
6,884
4,190
2,694
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,220
6,884
4,190
2,694
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,220
6,884
4,190
2,694
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,950
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
117
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
D | 55
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 3H92 (DRW)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
11,500
Payload
4,180
Base
Weight
7,323
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,301
3,022 5,000
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,180
7,323
4,301
3,022
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,270
7,231
4,207
3,024
5,000
9,750
17,000
9,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,270
7,231
4,207
3,024
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,270
7,231
4,207
3,024
5,000
9,750
24,500
17,100
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 3H92 (SRW)
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
3,110
Weight
6,991
Front
4,307
Rear
2,685
Front
5,000
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,110
6,991
4,307
2,685
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,200
6,900
4,213
2,687
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,200
6,900
4,213
2,687
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,200
6,900
4,213
2,687
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,950
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LARAMIE D2 3P92 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
11,500
Payload
4,030
Base
Weight
7,471
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,348
3,123 5,000
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,030
7,471
4,348
3,123
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,120
7,380
4,254
3,126
5,000
9,750
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,120
7,380
4,254
3,126
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,120
7,380
4,254
3,126
5,000
9,750
24,500
16,950
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LARAMIE D2 3P92 (SRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
3,030
Base
Weight
7,073
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,317
2,756 5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,030
7,073
4,317
2,756
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,120
6,981
4,223
2,759
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,120
6,981
4,223
2,759
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,120
6,981
4,223
2,759
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,850
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
D2 3L62 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
11,500
Payload
4,650
Base
Weight
6,847
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,048
2,799 5,000
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,650
6,847
4,048
2,799
5,000
9,750
21,000
14,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,750
6,745
3,960
2,785
5,000
9,750
17,000
10,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,750
6,745
3,960
2,785
5,000
9,750
21,000
14,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,750
6,745
3,960
2,785
5,000
9,750
24,500
17,600
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 3H62 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
11,500
Payload
4,530
Base
Weight
6,967
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,076
2,892 5,000
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,530
6,967
4,076
2,892
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,630
6,866
3,988
2,878
5,000
9,750
17,000
10,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,630
6,866
3,988
2,878
5,000
9,750
21,000
14,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,630
6,866
3,988
2,878
5,000
9,750
24,500
17,500
NOTES: Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 pounds Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 pounds
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 pounds (allowance for driver)
118
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
56 | D
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - ST
D2 8L91 (SRW)
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
3,050
Weight
7,051
Front
4,300
Rear
2,751
Front
5,500
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Trail
11,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,050
7,051
4,300
2,751
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,130
6,970
4,216
2,754
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,130
6,970
4,216
2,754
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,130
6,970
4,216
2,754
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,900
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - SLT
Max
D2 8H91 (SRW)
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
2,850
Weight
7,254
Front
4,497
Rear
2,756
Front
5,500
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,850
7,254
4,497
2,756
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,930
7,172
4,412
2,760
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,930
7,172
4,412
2,760
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,930
7,172
4,412
2,760
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,700
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE D2 8P91 (SRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
2,790
Base
Weight
7,310
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,546
2,764 5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,790
7,310
4,546
2,764
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,870
7,228
4,461
2,768
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,870
7,228
4,461
2,768
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,870
7,228
4,461
2,768
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,600
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - ST
D2 8L92 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
12,200
Payload
4,680
Base
Weight
7,525
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,465
3,060 5,500
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,200
4,680
7,525
4,465
3,060
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,200
4,760
7,444
4,380
3,064
5,500
9,750
17,000
9,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,200
4,760
7,444
4,380
3,064
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,200
4,760
7,444
4,380
3,064
5,500
9,750
24,500
16,900
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - ST
D2 8L92 (SRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
2,950
Base
Weight
7,152
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,434
2,719 5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,950
7,152
4,434
2,719
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,030
7,071
4,348
2,723
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,030
7,071
4,348
2,723
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,030
7,071
4,348
2,723
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,800
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 8H92 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
12,200
Payload
4,460
Base
Weight
7,743
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,606
3,137 5,500
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,200
4,460
7,743
4,606
3,137
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,200
4,540
7,662
4,520
3,141
5,500
9,750
17,000
9,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,200
4,540
7,662
4,520
3,141
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,200
7,662
4,520
3,141
5,500
9,750
24,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10 12,200
4,540
16,700NOTES: Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 pounds Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 pounds
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 pounds (allowance for driver)
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
119
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
D | 57
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 8H92 (SRW)
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
2,720
Weight
7,379
Front
4,579
Rear
2,800
Front
5,500
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,720
7,379
4,579
2,800
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,800
7,298
4,494
2,805
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,800
7,298
4,494
2,805
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,800
7,298
4,494
2,805
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,550
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LARAMIE D2 8P92 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
12,200
Payload
4,580
Base
Weight
7,618
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,602
3,016 5,500
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,200
4,580
7,618
4,602
3,016
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,200
4,660
7,537
4,516
3,021
5,500
9,750
17,000
9,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,200
4,660
7,537
4,516
3,021
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,200
4,660
7,537
4,516
3,021
5,500
9,750
24,500
16,800
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LARAMIE D2 8P92 (SRW)
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
2,910
Weight
7,190
Front
4,543
Rear
2,648
Front
5,500
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Trail
11,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,910
7,190
4,543
2,648
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,990
7,109
4,457
2,652
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,990
7,109
4,457
2,652
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,990
7,109
4,457
2,652
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,750
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED - ST
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Trans
Max
D2 8L62 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
12,200
Payload
5,050
Base
Weight
7,152
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,234
2,918 5,500
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,200
5,050
7,152
4,234
2,918
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,200
5,130
7,069
4,144
2,925
5,500
9,750
17,000
9,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,200
5,130
7,069
4,144
2,925
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,200
5,130
7,069
4,144
2,925
5,500
9,750
24,500
17,300
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 8H62 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
12,200
Payload
4,940
Base
Weight
7,262
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,340
2,923 5,500
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,200
4,940
7,262
4,340
2,923
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,200
5,020
7,180
4,250
2,929
5,500
9,750
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,200
5,020
7,180
4,250
2,929
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,200
5,020
7,180
4,250
2,929
5,500
9,750
24,500
17,150
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED - SLT
D2 3H81 (SRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
2,970
Base
Weight
7,127
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,254
2,872 5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,970
7,127
4,254
2,872
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,050
7,051
4,175
2,877
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,050
7,051
4,175
2,877
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,050
7,051
4,175
2,877
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,800
NOTES: Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 pounds Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 pounds
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 pounds (allowance for driver)
120
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
58 | D
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED - SLT
D2 3H81 (DRW)
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Type Transmission
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,500
Payload
3,060
Weight
7,442
Front
4,252
Rear
3,190
Front
5,000
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,500
3,060
7,442
4,252
3,190
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
3,130
7,367
4,172
3,195
5,000
9,750
17,000
9,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
3,130
7,367
4,172
3,195
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
3,130
7,367
4,172
3,195
5,000
9,750
24,500
17,000
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE D2 3P81 (SRW)
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Type Transmission
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
2,980
Weight
7,116
Front
4,366
Rear
2,750
Front
5,000
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,980
7,116
4,366
2,750
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,060
7,041
4,286
2,754
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,060
7,041
4,286
2,754
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,060
7,041
4,286
2,754
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,800
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE D2 3P81 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,500
Payload
3,000
Base
Weight
7,496
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,396
3,100 5,000
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,500
3,000
7,496
4,396
3,100
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
3,080
7,421
4,316
3,105
5,000
9,750
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
3,080
7,421
4,316
3,105
5,000
9,750
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
3,080
7,421
4,316
3,105
5,000
9,750
24,500
16,950
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - SLT
D2 8H81 (SRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
2,590
Base
Weight
7,513
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,659
2,853 5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,590
7,513
4,659
2,853
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,670
7,429
4,573
2,856
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,670
7,429
4,573
2,856
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,670
7,429
4,573
2,856
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,400
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - SLT
D2 8H81 (DRW)
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type Transmission
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
Axle
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,500
Payload
2,640
Base
Weight
7,861
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
Front
Rear
Front
4,690
3,171 5,500
GAWR
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Max
Trail
11,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,500
2,640
7,861
4,690
3,171
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
2,720
7,777
4,603
3,174
5,500
9,750
17,000
9,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
2,720
7,777
4,603
3,174
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
2,720
7,777
4,603
3,174
5,500
9,750
24,500
16,550
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 pounds Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 pounds
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 pounds (allowance for driver)
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
121
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
D | 59
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
D2 8P81 (SRW)
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Type Transmission
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,100
Payload
2,590
Weight
7,508
Front
4,699
Rear
2,808
Front
5,500
Rear
6,500
GCWR
19,000
Trail
11,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,590
7,508
4,699
2,808
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,680
7,424
4,612
2,812
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,680
7,424
4,612
2,812
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,680
7,424
4,612
2,812
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,450
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
D2 8P81 (DRW)
Trans
Axle
Base
Base Wt. Base Wt.GAWR
GAWR
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Type Transmission
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
Ratio
3.42
GVWR
10,500
Payload
2,580
Weight
7,920
Front
4,762
Rear
3,158
Front
5,500
Rear
9,750
GCWR
19,000
Trail
10,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,500
2,580
7,920
4,762
3,158
5,500
9,750
21,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
2,660
7,836
4,675
3,161
5,500
9,750
17,000
9,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
2,660
7,836
4,675
3,161
5,500
9,750
21,000
13,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
2,660
7,836
4,675
3,161
5,500
9,750
24,500
16,500
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 pounds Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 pounds
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 pounds (allowance for driver)
122
Volume 2010-2012
Max
Max
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Trans
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
60 | D
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY FEATURE AVAILABILITY
LEGEND: S = Standard, O = Optional, P = Package, — = Not available
Complete package information is listed at the end of the Feature Availability section.
NOTE: Information shown is correct at time of publication and is subject to change.
Some unique exceptions showing Dodge Ram 3500 complexity are included.
ST
SLT
TRX
Power
Wagon®
Laramie
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
EXTERIOR
Bumpers–Front
Painted Mineral Gray
S
–
S
–
–
Chromed
–
S
–
S
S
Bumpers–Rear
Painted Mineral Gray
S
–
S
–
–
Chromed
–
S
–
S
S
Headlamp Filler Panel
Black
S
–
–
S
–
Body-color
–
S
S
–
S
–
O
S
S
S
Chromed Surround with Black Billets
S
S
–
S
–
Body-color Surround with Black Billets
–
–
S
–
–
Chromed Surround with Chrome Billets
–
–
–
–
S
–
Fog Lamps
Grille
Mirrors
2500–Standard Size 6-inch x 9-inch
Manual (Black)
S
–
–
–
Power / Heated (Black)
O
S
S
S
–
Power / Heated / Puddle / Turn / Auto-dim (Black)
–
O
O
O
–
Power / Heated / Puddle / Turn / Auto-dim / Memory (Chromed)
–
–
–
–
S
–
2500–Optional Size 7-inch x 11-inch
Trailer-tow mirrors – two position fold-away with convex edge)
Manual (Black)
O
–
–
–
Power / Heated / Puddle / Turn (Black)
–
O
O
O
–
Power / Heated / Puddle / Turn / Memory (Chromed)
–
–
–
–
O
O
O
O
O
O
–
S
S
S
S
Front Suspension
O
O
S
–
O
Transfer Case
O
O
S
S
O
Fuel Tank
–
–
–
S
–
Colors
Bright White, Brilliant Black, Inferno Red, Bright Silver, Mineral Gray,
Deep Water Blue, Rugged Brown, Austin Tan, Light Graystone
Remote Keyless Entry
Controls for Power Door Locks,
Illuminated Entry System, Panic Alarm
Skid Plate (4x4)
Tow Hooks
6.7L Diesel Engine
S
S
S
S
S
5.7L Gas Engine
O
O
S
S
O
Trailer-tow
4-Pin / 7-Pin Trailer Harness Plug (Combination Receptacle)
S
S
S
S
S
Class IV Receiver
S
S
S
S
S
Electronic Trailer-brake Controller
O
O
O
S
O
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
123
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
D | 61
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY FEATURE AVAILABILITY
ST
SLT
TRX
Power
Wagon®
Laramie
–
Windows
S
–
–
–
–
S
–
–
–
Power Windows, Front One-touch Up/Down (Crew/Mega Cab)
S
S
S
S
S
Rear Fixed Window (Regular Cab Only)
S
S
–
–
–
Rear Fixed Heated Window
–
O
O
O
O
Rear Sliding Window - Manual (Regular Cab)
O
S
–
–
–
Rear Sliding Window – Power Mega Cab® and Crew Cab)
–
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
Air Conditioning (Base A/C)
S
S
S
S
–
Air Conditioning with Dual-zone Control
–
–
–
–
S
Mini Floor Console (with six-speed Manual Transmission Only)
O
O
O
–
O
Full-size Floor Console with Bucket Seats
–
O
O
O
O
–
–
–
–
S
–
O
O
O
O
O*
S
S
S
S
Black Vinyl
S
O
O
O
–
Carpet
O
S
S
S
S
Front, Carpeted
O
S
S
S
S
Front and Rear, Carpeted
O
S
S
S
S
–
O
O
O
S
Windshield Wipers
Variable Intermittent
INTERIOR
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Manual Windows (Regular Cab Only)
Power Windows, Front One-touch Down (Regular Cab)
Console – Floor
Console
Overhead Console with Universal Garage Door Opener
Defroster
Rear window
Door Locks
Power Door Locks (*Regular Cab ST Only)
Floor Covering
Floor Mats
Memory System
Seats, Mirrors, Pedals, Radio Presets
Pedals
Non-adjustable
S
S
S
S
–
Power-adjustable
–
O
O
O
S
Power outlet
12-volt DC Auxiliary (two available)
S
S
S
S
S
115-volt AC Auxiliary
–
O
O
O
S
S
–
–
–
–
Premium Cloth 40/20/40 Manual Split-bench:
Front seat with adjustable head restraints for outboard seating positions,
driver and front passenger recliners and folding center armrest/business
console (Crew Cab & Mega Cab® models include 60/40 split-bench
folding rear seat)
O
S
S
S
–
Seats
Vinyl 40/20/40 Manual Split-bench:
Front seat with adjustable head restraints for outboard seating
positions, driver and front passenger recliners and folding center
armrest (Mega Cab® & Crew Cab models include a folding rear
bench seat)
124
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
62
|D
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY FEATURE AVAILABILITY
SLT
TRX
Power
Wagon®
Laramie
Premium Cloth 40/20/40 Power Split-bench:
Front seat with adjustable head restraints for outboard seating positions,
driver and front passenger recliners and folding center armrest/business
console (Crew Cab & Mega Cab® models include 60/40 split-bench
folding rear seat)
–
O
O
O
–
Premium Cloth Power Bucket:
Seats with adjustable head restraints, driver and front passenger recliners
and folding center armrest/business console (Crew Cab & Mega Cab®
models include 60/40 split-bench folding rear seat)
–
O
O
O
–
Premium Leather 40/20/40 Power Split-Bench:
Front seat with adjustable head restraints for outboard seating positions,
heated, and front passenger recliners, fold-flat steel load floor and folding
center armrest/business console (Crew Cab & Mega Cab® models
include 60/40 split-bench folding rear seat)
–
–
–
–
S
ST
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
Premium Leather High Shoulder Power Bucket:
Heated and ventilated with adjustable head restraints, driver and front
passenger recliners, fixed center console and rear fold-flat steel load floor
(Crew Cab & Mega Cab® models include 60/40 heated split-bench
folding rear seat)
–
–
–
–
O
Ten-way power driver’s seat and six-way power passenger seat
–
O
O
O
S
Power lumbar support (included with all power seats)
–
O
O
O
S
–
Steering Wheel
Urethane
S
S
S
S
Leather-wrapped (Audio Controls)
–
O
O
O
–
Leather-wrapped (Audio Controls and Heated)
–
O
O
O
S
S
S
S
S
S
Stalk-mounted Control – 6.7L Diesel Engine
S
S
S
S
S
Stalk-mounted Control – 5.7L Gas Engine
O
S
S
S
S
Front, Behind Seat (Regular Cab Only)
S
S
–
–
–
Rear, Under-Seat Compartment (Crew Cab Only)
S
S
S
S
S
Rear In-floor Storage Boxes (Crew Cab Only)
S
S
S
S
S
–
O
O
O
O
Steering Column
Tilt Steering
Speed Control
Storage
Sunroof
Power Sunroof
Radios
AM/FM/CD/MP3
S
S
S
S
–
AM/FM/CD/DVD/HDD/MP3
O
O
O
O
S
AM/FM/CD/NAV/MP3
–
O
O
O
O
SIRIUS® Satellite Radio(1)
O
S
S
S
S
Six-speaker System
S
S
S
S
–
Nine Amplified Speakers with Subwoofer (Surround Sound)
–
O
O
O
S
Uconnect Phone
–
O
O
O
S
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
125
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
D | 63
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY FEATURE AVAILABILITY
ST
SLT
TRX
Power
Wagon®
Laramie
POWERTRAIN AND CHASSIS
Alternator
S
S
S
–
S
180-amp
–
O
O
S
O
S
S
S
S
S
O
O
S
–
O
–
–
–
S
–
3.42 Ratio
O
O
–
–
O
3.73 Ratio
O
O
O
–
S
4.10 Ratio (* TRX with 4x4 Only)
O
O
S*
–
O
4.56 Ratio
–
–
–
S
–
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
6.7L Diesel Engine
O
O
O
–
O
6-speed Manual Transmission (G56)
S
S
S
–
S
6-speed Automatic Transmission (68RFE)
O
O
O
–
O
Engine Block Heater
S
S
S
–
S
Exhaust Brake
S
S
S
–
S
Remote Start (Automatic Transmission Only)
–
O
O
–
O
5.7L Gas Engine
S
S
S
S
S
5-speed Automatic Transmission (545RFE)
S
S
S
S
S
Remote Start
O
O
O
O
O
5.7L - Heavy Duty Cooling
S
S
S
S
S
6.7L - Cummins Diesel Cooling
S
S
S
–
S
34-Gal. (128.7 L) Tank (6-foot 4-inch Box)
S
S
S
S
S
35-Gal. (132.5 L) Tank (8-foot Box)
S
S
–
–
S
Power Rack-and-pinion (4x2 Only)
S
S
S
–
S
Power Recirculating Ball (4x4 Only)
S
S
S
S
S
Axle–Front XLE (4x4 Only)
9.25-inch Front Axle
Axle – Rear
Anti-spin Rear Differential
Electronically Locking Differentials
Battery
730-amp, Maintenance-free (Two Required For Diesel)
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
160-amp
Brakes
Anti-lock 4-Wheel Disc Brakes
Engine–6.7L Cummins® Turbo Diesel
Engine–5.7L HEMI® Gasoline
Engine–Cooling
Fuel Tank
Steering
Suspension
Front Electronic Disconnecting Stabilizer Bar
–
–
–
S
–
Front Stabilizer Bar
S
S
S
–
S
5-speed Automatic (545RFE) (5.7L Gas Only)
S
S
S
S
S
6-speed Manual (G56) (6.7L Diesel Only)
S
S
S
–
S
6-speed Automatic (68RFE) (6.7L Diesel Only)
O
O
O
–
O
Transmissions
Transfer Cases (4x4 Only)
126
Volume 2010-2012
Manual Shift-on-the-fly (NV271)
S
–
–
S
–
Electronic Shift-on-the-fly (NV273)
–
S
S
–
S
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
64
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
|D
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY FEATURE AVAILABILITY
ST
SLT
TRX
Power
Wagon®
Laramie
LT245/70R17E BSW All-season Tires
S
–
–
–
–
LT245/70R17E BSW On/Off-road Tires
O
–
–
–
–
LT265/70R17E BSW All-season Tires
–
S
–
–
S
LT265/70R17E OWL On/Off-road Tires
–
O
S
–
O
LT285/70R17D BSW All-terrain Tires
–
–
–
S
–
–
–
–
Tires
2500
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
3500 Single Rear Wheel
LT265/70R17E BSW All-season Tires
S
S
–
–
S
LT265/70R17E OWL On/Off-road Tires
O
O
–
–
O
3500 Dual-Rear-Wheel
LT235/80R17E BSW All-season Tires
S
S
–
–
S
LT235/80R17E OWL On/Off-road Tires
O
O
–
–
O
Wheels Single Rear (2500 and 3500)
17x7.5 Steel Argent Painted
S
–
–
–
–
17x8.0 Chrome-clad Steel Chrome Clad Stainless Steel
O
S
–
–
–
17x8.0 Forged Aluminum Polished
–
O
O
–
–
17x8.0 Forged Aluminum Polished
–
–
S
S
–
17x8.0 Aluminum Polished
–
–
–
–
S
Wheels Dual Rear (3500 only)
17x6.0 Steel Argent Painted
S
–
–
–
–
17x6.0 Steel With Bright Wheel Skin and Cap
O
S
–
–
S
Black
–
–
–
S
–
Mineral Gray
–
–
S
–
–
Light Graystone
–
–
–
–
S
Advanced Multistage Front Airbags(2)
S
S
S
S
S
Supplemental Side-curtain Airbags (All Cabs)
S
S
S
S
S
Wheel Flares
SAFETY AND SECURITY
Airbags
Door Locks
Manual (Regular Cab Only)
S
–
–
–
–
Power
S
S
S
S
S
Locking Tailgate
S
S
S
S
S
–
O
O
O
S
ParkSense® Rear-parking Assist System
Seat Belts
Front, Height-adjustable Shoulder (Outboard Positions Only)
S
S
S
S
S
–
O
O
O
O
–
O
O
O
S
O
S
S
S
S
Base TPM System-Gauge Light Only (2500 Only)
S
–
–
–
–
Premium TPM System – Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC)
Tire-pressure Display (2500 Only)
–
S
S
S
S
Rear Back-up Camera
Security Alarm
Detects Break-In
Sentry Key® Theft Deterrent System
Engine Immobilizer
Tire-pressure Monitoring (TPM)
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
127
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
D | 65
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY FEATURE AVAILABILITY
ST
SLT
TRX
Power
Wagon®
Laramie
Box Delete–2500, Regular Cab, Crew Cab,
5.7L Gas Engine
O
O
–
–
O
Chrome Appearance Group
Chrome Appearance Group includes the following:
• Chromed Front Bumper
• Chromed Rear Bumper
• 17x8 Steel Chrome-clad Wheels
O
–
–
–
–
Chrome Accent Group
Chrome Accent Group includes the following:
• Chromed Exhaust Tip
• Chromed Fuel Filler Door
• Chromed Body-side Molding
• Chromed Tubular Side Steps
O
O
–
–
O
Chrome Side Step and Rail Group
Chrome Side Step and Rail Group includes the following:
• Chromed Steel Bed Rails
• Chromed Tubular Side Steps
O
O
–
–
O
Regional Group (Lone Star and Big Horn)
Regional Group includes the following:
• Luxury Group
• Trailer Brake Control
• Limited-slip Differential
• Chrome Door Handles
• Quad Headlamps
• Bright Grille
• Aluminum Wheels
• Special Badging (Crew Cab & Mega Cab® Only)
–
O
–
–
–
Luxury Group
Luxury Group includes the following:
• Switchable Dome Lamp
• Ashtray Lamp
• Glove Box Lamp
• Under-hood Lamp
• Illuminated Vanity Mirror
• Auto Day/Night Mirror
• Exterior Mirrors With Signal and Puddle Lamps
• Overhead Console With Universal Garage Door Opener (UGDO)
• Leather-wrapped Steering Wheel
–
O
O
O
S
TRX Group
TRX Group includes the following:
• Lower Two-tone Paint
• Limited-slip Differential
• Fog Lamps
• Painted Front and Rear Bumpers
• Body-color Grille
• Painted Fender Flares
• TRX or TRX4 Badging (2WD vs 4WD)
• Tow Hooks
• Skid Plates
• LT265/70R17E OWL All-terrain Tires
• 17-inch Aluminum Wheels
• Premium Cloth Bucket Seats
• Black Door Handles
• Quad Headlamps
–
–
S
–
–
PACKAGES / EQUIPMENT GROUPS
Volume 2010-2012
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
128
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
66
|D
ALL-NEW 2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
2010 RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY FEATURE AVAILABILITY
RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY
ST
SLT
TRX
Power
Wagon®
Laramie
Power Wagon Group
Power Wagon Group includes the following:
• Trailer-tow
• 180-amp Alternator
• Manual Transfer Case
• Tru-Lock Front and Rear Axles
• 4.56 Axle Gears
• Black Door Handles
• Tow Hooks
• Black Fender Flares
• Fuel-tank Skid Plate
• Transfer Case Skid Plate
• Winch 12,000 pounds Capacity
• Special Badging
• Cab Clearance Lamps
• Fog Lamps
• Quad Headlamps
• Headlamp Filler Panel Black
• Uconnect Phone
• Front Electronically Disconnecting Sway Bar
• LT285-70R17D All-terrain Tire
• 17-inch Aluminum Wheels
• GVW = 8510 pounds
–
–
–
S
–
Protection Group (4x4 Only)
Protection Group includes the following:
• Tow Hooks
• Transfer Case Skid Plate
• Front Suspension Skid Plate
–
O
O
O
S
Trailer-tow Group (Canada Only)
Trailer-tow Group includes the following:
• Class IV Hitch Receiver
• Electronic Trailer Brake Controller
O
O
O
S
O
Power Accessory Group (Fleet Only)
Power Accessory Group includes the following:
• Hi Line Door-Trim Panel
• Power Windows (Driver One-touch)
• Power Locks
• Power Mirrors (Regular Cab Only)
O
–
–
–
–
Power and Remote Entry Group (Fleet Only)
Power and Remote Entry Group includes the following:
• Sentry Key® Theft Deterrent
• Remote keyless entry
• Power Windows (Driver One-touch)
• Power Locks
• Power Mirrors (Regular Cab Only)
O
–
–
–
–
S = Standard Equipment
O = Optional Equipment
N/A = Not Available.
(1) Includes one-year subscription provided by SIRIUS®
(2) Certified to the Federal Regulations that allow less forceful front airbags. Always use seat belts. Children 12 and younger can only
be in the front seat with the passenger airbag turned off, or in a back seat, correctly using an infant seat child restraint system,
or a seat belt positioned correctly for the child’s age and weight
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
129
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
2011 RAM 2500 PICKUP
TOWING CHART
NOTE: BASE WEIGHTS CAN CHANGE
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED ST
DJ 2L91
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
3,030
5,769
3,188
2,582
4,750
6,000
15,000
9,100
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
3,030
5,769
3,188
2,582
4,750
6,000
18,000
12,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,270
6,732
4,067
2,665
5,000
6,000
19,000
12,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,270
6,732
4,067
2,665
5,000
6,000
20,000
13,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,370
6,628
3,975
2,653
5,000
6,000
17,000
10,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,370
6,628
3,975
2,653
5,000
6,000
20,000
13,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,370
6,628
3,975
2,653
5,000
6,000
22,000
15,200
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED SLT
Max Trail
DJ 2H91
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,930
5,874
3,233
2,641
4,750
6,010
15,000
9,000
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,930
5,874
3,233
2,641
4,750
6,010
18,000
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,050
6,948
4,210
2,738
5,000
6,010
19,000
11,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,050
6,948
4,210
2,738
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,160
6,845
4,118
2,727
5,000
6,010
17,000
10,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,160
6,845
4,118
2,727
5,000
6,010
20,000
13,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,160
6,845
4,118
2,727
5,000
6,010
22,000
15,000
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
DJ 2P91
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,860
5,940
3,246
2,694
4,750
6,010
15,000
8,900
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,860
5,940
3,246
2,694
4,750
6,010
18,000
11,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
1,990
7,012
4,241
2,772
5,000
6,010
19,000
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
1,990
7,012
4,241
2,772
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,090
6,909
4,148
2,760
5,000
6,010
17,000
9,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,090
6,909
4,148
2,760
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,090
6,909
4,148
2,760
5,000
6,010
22,000
14,950
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
DJ 2R91
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,840
5,960
3,270
2,690
4,750
6,010
15,000
8,900
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,840
5,960
3,270
2,690
4,750
6,010
18,000
11,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,060
6,937
4,156
2,781
5,000
6,010
17,000
9,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,060
6,937
4,156
2,781
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,060
6,937
4,156
2,781
5,000
6,010
22,000
14,900
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue
weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.4. The maximum trailer weight is
5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
130
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
1
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED ST
DJ 2L92
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,800
5,995
3,360
2,635
4,750
6,000
15,000
8,850
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,800
5,995
3,360
2,635
4,750
6,000
18,000
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,110
6,887
4,190
2,697
5,000
6,000
19,000
11,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,110
6,887
4,190
2,697
5,000
6,000
20,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,200
6,796
4,118
2,677
5,000
6,000
17,000
10,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,200
6,796
4,118
2,677
5,000
6,000
20,000
13,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,200
6,796
4,118
2,677
5,000
6,000
22,000
15,050
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED SLT
Max Trail
DJ 2H92
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,680
6,119
3,367
2,752
4,750
6,010
15,000
8,750
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,680
6,119
3,367
2,752
4,750
6,010
18,000
11,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,000
7,004
4,207
2,796
5,000
6,010
19,000
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,000
7,004
4,207
2,796
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,090
6,913
4,136
2,776
5,000
6,010
17,000
9,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,090
6,913
4,136
2,776
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,090
6,913
4,136
2,776
5,000
6,010
22,000
14,950
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED LARAMIE
DJ 2P92
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,610
6,193
3,417
2,776
4,750
6,010
15,000
8,650
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,610
6,193
3,417
2,776
4,750
6,010
18,000
11,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
1,850
7,154
4,326
2,828
5,000
6,010
19,000
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
1,850
7,154
4,326
2,828
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
1,940
7,063
4,255
2,808
5,000
6,010
17,000
9,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
1,940
7,063
4,255
2,808
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
1,940
7,063
4,255
2,808
5,000
6,010
22,000
14,800
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED LONGHORN
DJ 2R92
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,590
6,212
3,440
2,772
4,750
6,010
15,000
8,650
11,650
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,590
6,212
3,440
2,772
4,750
6,010
18,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
1,920
7,085
4,288
2,796
5,000
6,010
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
1,920
7,085
4,288
2,796
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
1,920
7,085
4,288
2,796
5,000
6,010
22,000
14,750
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
2
131
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED ST
DJ 2L62
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,650
3,120
5,532
3,081
2,451
4,750
6,000
15,000
9,300
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,650
3,120
5,532
3,081
2,451
4,750
6,000
18,000
12,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,490
6,513
4,021
2,492
5,000
6,000
19,000
12,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,490
6,513
4,021
2,492
5,000
6,000
20,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,580
6,416
3,951
2,465
5,000
6,000
17,000
10,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,580
6,416
3,951
2,465
5,000
6,000
20,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,580
6,416
3,951
2,465
5,000
6,000
22,000
15,450
Max Trail
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED SLT
Max Trail
DJ 2H62
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,650
3,050
5,596
3,101
2,495
4,750
6,010
15,000
9,250
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,650
3,050
5,596
3,101
2,495
4,750
6,010
18,000
12,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,430
6,575
4,050
2,524
5,000
6,010
19,000
12,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,430
6,575
4,050
2,524
5,000
6,010
20,000
13,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,520
6,478
3,981
2,497
5,000
6,010
17,000
10,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,520
6,478
3,981
2,497
5,000
6,010
20,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,520
6,478
3,981
2,497
5,000
6,010
22,000
15,350
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED ST
DJ 7L91
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,550
6,246
3,618
2,627
5,200
6,000
15,000
8,600
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,550
6,246
3,618
2,627
5,200
6,000
18,000
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,340
7,261
4,573
2,689
5,500
6,000
19,000
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,340
7,261
4,573
2,689
5,500
6,000
20,000
12,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,430
7,175
4,508
2,667
5,500
6,000
17,000
9,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,430
7,175
4,508
2,667
5,500
6,000
20,000
12,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,430
7,175
4,508
2,667
5,500
6,000
22,000
14,700
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED SLT
132
Max Trail
DJ 7H91
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,490
6,311
3,646
2,665
5,200
6,010
15,000
8,550
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,490
6,311
3,646
2,665
5,200
6,010
18,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,220
7,382
4,585
2,797
5,500
6,010
19,000
11,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,220
7,382
4,585
2,797
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,300
7,296
4,520
2,776
5,500
6,010
17,000
9,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,300
7,296
4,520
2,776
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,300
7,296
4,520
2,776
5,500
6,010
22,000
14,550
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
3
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
DJ 7P91
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,360
6,440
3,685
2,755
5,200
6,010
15,000
8,400
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,360
6,440
3,685
2,755
5,200
6,010
18,000
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,140
7,458
4,648
2,810
5,500
6,010
19,000
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,140
7,458
4,648
2,810
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,230
7,372
4,583
2,789
5,500
6,010
17,000
9,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,230
7,372
4,583
2,789
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,230
7,372
4,583
2,789
5,500
6,010
22,000
14,500
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Max Trail
DJ 7R91
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,340
6,459
3,708
2,751
5,200
6,010
15,000
8,400
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,340
6,459
3,708
2,751
5,200
6,010
18,000
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,210
7,386
4,563
2,822
5,500
6,010
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,210
7,386
4,563
2,822
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,210
7,386
4,563
2,822
5,500
6,010
22,000
14,450
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED 2TP
DJ 7X91- POWERWAGON
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.56
8,510
1,780
6,730
3,967
2,763
4,500
6,100
17,000
10,100
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED ST
DJ 7L92
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,450
6,346
3,686
2,660
5,200
6,000
15,000
8,500
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,450
6,346
3,686
2,660
5,200
6,000
18,000
11,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,320
7,281
4,533
2,748
5,500
6,000
19,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,320
7,281
4,533
2,748
5,500
6,000
20,000
12,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,410
7,194
4,466
2,729
5,500
6,000
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,410
7,194
4,466
2,729
5,500
6,000
20,000
12,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,410
7,194
4,466
2,729
5,500
6,000
22,000
14,650
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Max Trail
Volume 2010-2012
4
133
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED SLT
DJ 7H92
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,130
6,669
3,844
2,825
5,200
6,010
15,000
8,200
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,130
6,669
3,844
2,825
5,200
6,010
18,000
11,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
2,040
7,563
4,785
2,779
5,500
6,010
19,000
11,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
2,040
7,563
4,785
2,779
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,120
7,477
4,717
2,760
5,500
6,010
17,000
9,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,120
7,477
4,717
2,760
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,120
7,477
4,717
2,760
5,500
6,010
22,000
14,350
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED LARAMIE
Max Trail
DJ 7P92
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,130
6,669
3,844
2,825
5,200
6,010
15,000
8,200
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,130
6,669
3,844
2,825
5,200
6,010
18,000
11,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,600
1,960
7,637
4,823
2,814
5,500
6,010
19,000
11,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,600
1,960
7,637
4,823
2,814
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,050
7,551
4,755
2,795
5,500
6,010
17,000
9,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,050
7,551
4,755
2,795
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,050
7,551
4,755
2,795
5,500
6,010
22,000
14,300
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED LONGHORN
DJ 7R92
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,110
6,688
3,867
2,821
5,200
6,010
15,000
8,150
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,110
6,688
3,867
2,821
5,200
6,010
18,000
11,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,040
7,560
4,737
2,823
5,500
6,010
17,000
9,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,040
7,560
4,737
2,823
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,040
7,560
4,737
2,823
5,500
6,010
22,000
14,300
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED ST
134
DJ 7L62
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,650
2,650
5,997
3,479
2,518
5,200
6,000
15,000
8,850
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,650
2,650
5,997
3,479
2,518
5,200
6,000
18,000
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
2,140
6,862
4,323
2,539
5,500
6,000
19,000
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
2,140
6,862
4,323
2,539
5,500
6,000
20,000
13,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,220
6,779
4,264
2,515
5,500
6,000
17,000
10,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,220
6,779
4,264
2,515
5,500
6,000
20,000
13,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,220
6,779
4,264
2,515
5,500
6,000
22,000
15,050
Volume 2010-2012
Max Trail
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
5
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED SLT
DJ 7H62
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,650
2,600
6,050
3,509
2,541
5,200
6,010
15,000
8,800
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,650
2,600
6,050
3,509
2,541
5,200
6,010
18,000
11,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
9,000
1,950
7,054
4,430
2,624
5,500
6,010
19,000
11,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
9,000
1,950
7,054
4,430
2,624
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
2,030
6,971
4,371
2,600
5,500
6,010
17,000
9,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
2,030
6,971
4,371
2,600
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
2,030
6,971
4,371
2,600
5,500
6,010
22,000
14,900
Max Trail
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
6
135
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
2011 RAM 3500 PICKUP
TOWING CHART
NOTE: BASE WEIGHTS CAN CHANGE
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - ST
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3L91 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
3,240
6,861
4,158
2,704
5,000
6,500
19,000
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,240
6,861
4,158
2,704
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,340
6,757
4,080
2,677
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,340
6,757
4,080
2,677
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,340
6,757
4,080
2,677
5,000
6,500
24,000
17,100
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - SLT
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3H91 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
3,310
6,785
4,171
2,615
5,000
6,500
19,000
12,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,310
6,785
4,171
2,615
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,420
6,681
4,092
2,589
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,420
6,681
4,092
2,589
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,420
6,681
4,092
2,589
5,000
6,500
24,000
17,150
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3P91 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
3,080
7,019
4,253
2,766
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,080
7,019
4,253
2,766
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,190
6,915
4,175
2,740
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,190
6,915
4,175
2,740
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,190
6,915
4,175
2,740
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,950
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - LONGHORN
D2 3R91 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,100
6,999
4,195
2,804
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,100
6,999
4,195
2,804
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,100
6,999
4,195
2,804
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,850
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
136
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
7
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3L92 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
11,500
4,270
7,235
4,218
3,017
5,000
9,350
19,000
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,270
7,235
4,218
3,017
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,360
7,144
4,147
2,997
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,360
7,144
4,147
2,997
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,360
7,144
4,147
2,997
5,000
9,350
26,900
19,200
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3L92 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
3,110
6,990
4,241
2,749
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,110
6,990
4,241
2,749
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,200
6,899
4,170
2,730
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,200
6,899
4,170
2,730
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,200
6,899
4,170
2,730
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,950
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3H92 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
11,500
4,180
7,323
4,256
3,067
5,000
9,350
19,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,180
7,323
4,256
3,067
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,270
7,232
4,184
3,047
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,270
7,232
4,184
3,047
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,270
7,232
4,184
3,047
5,000
9,350
26,600
18,750
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3H92 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
3,080
7,017
4,258
2,759
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,080
7,017
4,258
2,759
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,170
6,925
4,186
2,739
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,170
6,925
4,186
2,739
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,170
6,925
4,186
2,739
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,900
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
8
137
2
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3P92 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
11,500
4,030
7,471
4,351
3,120
5,000
9,350
19,000
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,030
7,471
4,351
3,120
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,120
7,380
4,280
3,100
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,120
7,380
4,280
3,100
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,120
7,380
4,280
3,100
5,000
9,350
26,000
18,000
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3P92 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
9,350
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,940
7,161
4,372
2,789
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,940
7,161
4,372
2,789
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,030
7,070
4,300
2,769
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,030
7,070
4,300
2,769
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,030
7,070
4,300
2,769
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,800
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3R92 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,050
7,451
4,293
3,158
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,050
7,451
4,293
3,158
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,050
7,451
4,293
3,158
5,000
9,350
25,700
17,650
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3R92 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
9,350
GCWR
Max Trail
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,960
7,140
4,314
2,827
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,700
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,960
7,140
4,314
2,827
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,700
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,960
7,140
4,314
2,827
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,700
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
138
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
9
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3L62 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,000
5,190
6,811
3,944
2,868
5,000
9,350
19,000
12,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,000
5,190
6,811
3,944
2,868
5,000
9,350
21,000
14,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,000
5,290
6,714
3,874
2,840
5,000
9,350
17,000
10,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,000
5,290
6,714
3,874
2,840
5,000
9,350
21,000
14,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,000
5,240
6,756
3,874
2,840
5,000
9,350
30,000
22,700
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3H62 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,000
5,170
6,834
3,957
2,877
5,000
9,350
19,000
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,000
5,170
6,834
3,957
2,877
5,000
9,350
21,000
14,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,000
5,260
6,737
3,887
2,850
5,000
9,350
17,000
10,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,000
5,260
6,737
3,887
2,850
5,000
9,350
21,000
14,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,000
5,240
6,756
3,887
2,850
5,000
9,350
30,000
22,700
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - ST
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8L91 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,930
7,169
4,436
2,733
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,930
7,169
4,436
2,733
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,020
7,083
4,371
2,712
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,020
7,083
4,371
2,712
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,020
7,083
4,371
2,712
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,750
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - SLT
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8H91 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,860
7,241
4,493
2,749
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,860
7,241
4,493
2,749
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,950
7,155
4,428
2,727
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,950
7,155
4,428
2,727
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,950
7,155
4,428
2,727
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,700
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
D2 8P91 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,780
7,323
4,522
2,801
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,780
7,323
4,522
2,801
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,860
7,236
4,457
2,779
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,860
7,236
4,457
2,779
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,860
7,236
4,457
2,779
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,600
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
10
139
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8R91 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,800
7,303
4,464
2,838
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,800
7,303
4,464
2,838
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,800
7,303
4,464
2,838
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,550
Max Trail
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - ST
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8L92 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,300
4,640
7,663
4,601
3,062
5,500
9,350
19,000
11,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,300
4,640
7,663
4,601
3,062
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,300
4,720
7,576
4,533
3,043
5,500
9,350
17,000
9,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,300
4,720
7,576
4,533
3,043
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,300
4,720
7,576
4,533
3,043
5,500
9,350
29,100
21,000
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED ST
D2 8L92 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,810
7,292
4,563
2,729
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,810
7,292
4,563
2,729
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,890
7,206
4,495
2,710
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,890
7,206
4,495
2,710
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,890
7,206
4,495
2,710
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,650
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8H92 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,300
4,590
7,708
4,609
3,098
5,500
9,350
19,000
11,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,300
4,590
7,708
4,609
3,098
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,300
4,680
7,621
4,542
3,079
5,500
9,350
17,000
9,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,300
4,680
7,621
4,542
3,079
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,300
4,680
7,621
4,542
3,079
5,500
9,350
29,000
20,800
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8H92 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,650
7,454
4,634
2,820
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,650
7,454
4,634
2,820
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,730
7,367
4,567
2,801
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,730
7,367
4,567
2,801
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,730
7,367
4,567
2,801
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,500
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
140
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Volume 2010-2012
http://www.media.chrysler.com
|
http://www.ramtrucks.com
11
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8P92 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,300
4,310
7,986
4,856
3,130
5,500
9,350
19,000
10,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,300
4,310
7,986
4,856
3,130
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,300
4,400
7,899
4,788
3,112
5,500
9,350
17,000
8,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,300
4,400
7,899
4,788
3,112
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,300
4,400
7,899
4,788
3,112
5,500
9,350
27,900
19,400
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8P92 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,650
7,446
4,655
2,791
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,650
7,446
4,655
2,791
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,740
7,359
4,587
2,772
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,740
7,359
4,587
2,772
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,740
7,359
4,587
2,772
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,500
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LONGHORN
D2 8R92 (DRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,300
4,330
7,965
4,797
3,168
5,500
9,350
17,000
8,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,300
4,330
7,965
4,797
3,168
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,300
4,330
7,965
4,797
3,168
5,500
9,350
27,600
19,050
Max Trail
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LONGHORN
Max Trail
D2 8R92 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,670
7,425
4,597
2,828
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,670
7,425
4,597
2,828
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,670
7,425
4,597
2,828
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,400
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED - ST
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8L62 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,200
4,970
7,234
4,342
2,892
5,500
9,350
19,000
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,200
4,970
7,234
4,342
2,892
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,200
5,050
7,151
4,283
2,868
5,500
9,350
17,000
9,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,200
5,050
7,151
4,283
2,868
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,200
5,020
7,181
4,283
2,868
5,500
9,350
30,000
22,300
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://www.media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012
|
http://www.ramtrucks.com
12
141
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8H62 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,200
4,940
7,257
4,355
2,902
5,500
9,350
19,000
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,200
4,940
7,257
4,355
2,902
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,200
5,030
7,174
4,296
2,877
5,500
9,350
17,000
9,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,200
5,030
7,174
4,296
2,877
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,200
5,010
7,194
4,296
2,877
5,500
9,350
30,000
22,300
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
142
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
13
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
2011 RAM MEGA CAB PICKUP
TOWING CHART
NOTE: BASE WEIGHTS CAN CHANGE
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED SLT
Engine
Trans
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
DJ 2H81
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,520
6,275
3,405
2,870
4,750
6,010
15,000
8,550
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,520
6,275
3,405
2,870
4,750
6,010
18,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
9,000
1,860
7,138
4,360
2,778
5,000
6,010
19,000
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
9,000
1,860
7,138
4,360
2,778
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
1,950
7,048
4,290
2,758
5,000
6,010
17,000
9,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
1,950
7,048
4,290
2,758
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
1,950
7,048
4,290
2,758
5,000
6,010
22,000
14,800
Max Trail
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Max Trail
DJ 2P81
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,490
6,309
3,420
2,889
4,750
6,010
15,000
8,550
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,490
6,309
3,420
2,889
4,750
6,010
18,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
9,000
1,730
7,272
4,264
3,008
5,000
6,010
19,000
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
9,000
1,730
7,272
4,264
3,008
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
1,820
7,182
4,194
2,989
5,000
6,010
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
1,820
7,182
4,194
2,989
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
1,820
7,182
4,194
2,989
5,000
6,010
22,000
14,650
Max Trail
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
DJ 2R81
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,470
6,329
3,443
2,886
4,750
6,010
15,000
8,500
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,470
6,329
3,443
2,886
4,750
6,010
18,000
11,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,000
1,790
7,206
4,185
3,021
5,000
6,010
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,000
1,790
7,206
4,185
3,021
5,000
6,010
20,000
12,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,000
1,790
7,206
4,185
3,021
5,000
6,010
22,000
14,650
Max Trail
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED SLT
Engine
Trans
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
DJ 7H81
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,080
6,717
3,791
2,926
5,200
6,010
15,000
8,150
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,080
6,717
3,791
2,926
5,200
6,010
18,000
11,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
9,600
1,950
7,647
4,799
2,848
5,500
6,010
19,000
11,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
9,600
1,950
7,647
4,799
2,848
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
2,040
7,561
4,732
2,829
5,500
6,010
17,000
9,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
2,040
7,561
4,732
2,829
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
2,040
7,561
4,732
2,829
5,500
6,010
22,000
14,300
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://www.media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012
|
http://www.ramtrucks.com
14
143
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
DJ 7P81
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,050
6,749
3,804
2,946
5,200
6,010
15,000
8,100
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,050
6,749
3,804
2,946
5,200
6,010
18,000
11,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
9,600
1,840
7,756
4,762
2,994
5,500
6,010
19,000
11,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
9,600
1,840
7,756
4,762
2,994
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
1,930
7,670
4,695
2,976
5,500
6,010
17,000
9,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
1,930
7,670
4,695
2,976
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
1,930
7,670
4,695
2,976
5,500
6,010
22,000
14,200
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
Max Trail
DJ 7R81
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
3.73
8,800
2,030
6,769
3,827
2,942
5,200
6,010
15,000
8,100
11,100
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A5
545RFE 5 sp AUTO (DGQ)
4.10
8,800
2,030
6,769
3,827
2,942
5,200
6,010
18,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
9,600
1,920
7,682
4,677
3,006
5,500
6,010
17,000
9,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
9,600
1,920
7,682
4,677
3,006
5,500
6,010
20,000
12,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
9,600
1,920
7,682
4,677
3,006
5,500
6,010
22,000
14,150
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED SLT
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,940
7,162
4,331
2,831
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,940
7,162
4,331
2,831
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,030
7,072
4,261
2,811
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,030
7,072
4,261
2,811
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,030
7,072
4,261
2,811
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type
D2 3H81 (SRW)
Axle
Ratio
Engine
Transmission
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED SLT
D2 3H81 (DRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
GCWR
Max Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
10,500
3,020
7,478
4,329
3,149
5,000
9,350
19,000
11,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
10,500
3,020
7,478
4,329
3,149
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
3,110
7,388
4,258
3,129
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
3,110
7,388
4,258
3,129
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
3,110
7,388
4,258
3,129
5,000
9,350
26,000
18,450
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
144
D2 3P81 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
GCWR
Max Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,960
7,142
4,396
2,747
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,960
7,142
4,396
2,747
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,050
7,052
4,325
2,727
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,050
7,052
4,325
2,727
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,800
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,050
7,052
4,325
2,727
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,800
Volume 2010-2012
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
15
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
D2 3P81 (DRW)
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
10,500
2,930
7,574
4,370
3,204
5,000
9,350
19,000
11,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
10,500
2,930
7,574
4,370
3,204
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
3,020
7,484
4,299
3,184
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
3,020
7,484
4,299
3,184
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
3,020
7,484
4,299
3,184
5,000
9,350
26,000
18,350
Max Trail
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type
Transmission
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3R81 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,980
7,122
4,338
2,784
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,980
7,122
4,338
2,784
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,980
7,122
4,338
2,784
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,750
Max Trail
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 3R81 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
2,950
7,553
4,312
3,242
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
2,950
7,553
4,312
3,242
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
2,950
7,553
4,312
3,242
5,000
9,350
26,000
18,300
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED SLT
D2 8H81 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
GCWR
Max Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,590
7,508
4,621
2,887
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,590
7,508
4,621
2,887
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,680
7,422
4,554
2,868
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,680
7,422
4,554
2,868
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,680
7,422
4,554
2,868
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,450
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED SLT
D2 8H81 (DRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
GCWR
Max Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
10,500
2,590
7,907
4,671
3,236
5,500
9,350
19,000
10,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
10,500
2,590
7,907
4,671
3,236
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
2,680
7,821
4,604
3,217
5,500
9,350
17,000
9,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
2,680
7,821
4,604
3,217
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
2,680
7,821
4,604
3,217
5,500
9,350
26,000
18,050
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
Volume 2010-2012
16
145
2011 RAM 2500/3500 HD TOWING CHARTS
2
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
D2 8P81 (SRW)
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,510
7,591
4,672
2,919
5,500
5,500
19,000
11,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,510
7,591
4,672
2,919
5,500
5,500
21,000
13,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,590
7,506
4,605
2,900
5,500
5,500
17,000
9,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,590
7,506
4,605
2,900
5,500
5,500
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,590
7,506
4,605
2,900
5,500
5,500
24,000
16,350
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
Trans
Type
Transmission
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
D2 8P81 (DRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
GCWR
Max Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.42
10,500
2,510
7,990
4,722
3,268
5,500
9,350
19,000
10,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU
(DEG)
3.73
10,500
2,510
7,990
4,722
3,268
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
2,600
7,904
4,655
3,249
5,500
9,350
17,000
8,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
2,600
7,904
4,655
3,249
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
2,600
7,904
4,655
3,249
5,500
9,350
26,000
17,950
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8R81 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max Trail
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,530
7,571
4,614
2,957
5,500
5,500
17,000
9,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,530
7,571
4,614
2,957
5,500
5,500
21,000
13,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,530
7,571
4,614
2,957
5,500
5,500
24,000
16,300
Max Trail
3500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8R81 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
2,530
7,970
4,664
3,306
5,500
9,350
17,000
8,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
2,530
7,970
4,664
3,306
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
2,530
7,970
4,664
3,306
5,500
9,350
26,000
17,900
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV
(the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or gooseneck hitch is required for trailers
over 12,000 pounds.
•••
146
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
17
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
2012 Ram 2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
All dimensions are in inches (millimeters) unless otherwise noted.
All dimensions measured at curb weight with standard tires and wheels.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Body Styles
Regular Cab, Crew Cab and Mega Cab
Assembly Plants
Saltillo Assembly Plant - Coahuila, Mexico
EPA Vehicle Class
Standard Pickup
Introduction Date
2010 Model Year
¨
ENGINE: 5.7-LITER HEMI V-8
(a)
Availability
Standard on 2500 Series Models
Type and Description
Eight-cylinder, 90-degree V-8, liquid-cooled with
variable-valve timing (VVT)
Displacement
343 cu. in. (5654 cu. cm)
Bore x Stroke
3.92 x 3.58 (99.5 x 90.9)
Valve System
Pushrod-operated overhead valves, 16 valves, hydraulic lifters with roller
followers
Fuel Injection
Sequential, multi-port, electronic, returnless
Construction
Deep-skirt cast-iron block with cross-bolted main bearing caps,
aluminum alloy heads with hemispherical combustion chambers
Compression Ratio
9.6:1
Power (SAE net)
383 bhp (286 kW) @ 5,600 rpm, 2500 series
Torque (SAE net)
400 lb.-ft. (542 N¥m) @ 4,000 rpm, 2500 series
Max. Engine Speed
5,800 rpm
Fuel Requirement
Unleaded mid-grade, 89 octane (R+M)/2Ñ recommended
Unleaded regular, 87 octane (R+M)/2Ñ acceptable
Oil Capacity
7.0 qt. (6.6L)
Coolant Capacity
18.7 qt. (17.7L)
Emission Control
Dual three-way catalytic converters, internal engine features with
(b)
knock sensors
(b)
(a) Not available on 3500 Series Pickup models.
(b) All manual transmission equipped vehicles meet LEV I chassis-certified emission requirements in California, New York, Massachusetts,
Maine and Vermont. Meets Tier 2 HDV 1, 2 chassis-certified emission requirements in 45 remaining states.
Ram 2500 and 3500 models equipped with automatic transmission and sold in 45 states meet Tier 2 HDV 1, 2 chassis-certified emission
requirements. Ram 2500 models equipped with automatic transmission and sold in California, New York, Massachusetts, Maine and
Vermont meet LEV IIÑ MDV 1 category chassis-certified emission requirements. Ram 3500 models equipped with automatic transmission
and sold in California, New York, Massachusetts, Maine and Vermont meet LEV IIÑ MDV 2 category chassis-certified emission
requirements.
1 / RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
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Volume 2010-2012 147
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
¨
ENGINE: 6.7-LITER HIGH OUTPUT CUMMINS TURBO DIESEL I-6
Availability
Standard on 3500 Series
Type and Description
Six-cylinder, inline, liquid-cooled, turbocharged, intercooled
Displacement
408 cu. in. (6690 cu. cm)
Bore x Stroke
4.21 x 4.88 (107 x 124)
Valve System
OHV, 24 valves, solid lifters
Fuel Injection
Electronic high-pressure common rail
Construction
Cast-iron block and head
Compression Ratio
17.3:1
Power (SAE net)
350 bhp (261 kW) @ 3,000 rpm
Torque (Manual SAE net)
650 lb.-ft. (881 N¥m) @ 1,500 rpm
Torque (Automatic SAE net)
800 lb.-ft. (881 N¥m) @ 1,500 rpm
Maximum High-idle Engine Speed
3,500 rpm
Fuel Requirement
Ultra low sulfur diesel
Oil Capacity
12.0 qt. (11.3L) with filter
Coolant Capacity
29.5 qt. (28.0L)
Emission Controls
No diesel exhaust fluid required
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Alternator
Availability
StandardÑ
All
Rating
160-amp
Availability
Optional
Rating
180-amp included with Snow Plow Prep Package
Battery
148
Availability
StandardÑ
2500 and 3500 with gasoline engines
Description
Group 65, maintenance-free, 600 CCA
Availability
StandardÑ All with diesel engines; included in Heavy Duty Snow Plow and
Trailer-tow Groups
Description
Group 65, maintenance-free, 750 CCA
2 / RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
http://media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
TRANSMISSION: G56Ñ
SPECIFICATIONS
MANUAL SIX-SPEED OVERDRIVE
Availability
Standard with 6.7-liter High-output Diesel
Description
Synchronized in all gears
Gear Ratios ( 6.7L Diesel)
1st
5.94
2nd
3.28
3rd
1.98
4th
1.31
5th
1.00
6th
0.74
Reverse
5.42
TRANSMISSION: 66RFEÑ
AUTOMATIC SIX-SPEED
Availability
Standard with 5.7-liter engines on 2500 series models
Description
Three planetary gear sets, one overrunning clutch, full electronic control,
electronically controlled converter clutch
Gear Ratios
1st
3.231
2nd
1.837
3rd
1.41
4th
1
5
th
6
th
0.625
Reverse
4.444
Overall Top Gear
2.33 with 3.73 axle ratio; 2.56 with 4.10 axle ratio, 2.85 with 4.56 axle ratio
TRANSMISSION: 68RFEÑ
0.816
AUTOMATIC SIX-SPEED
Availability
Optional with 6.7L Cummins Turbo Diesel engine
Description
Three planetary gear-sets, one overrunning clutch, full electronic control,
electronically controlled converter clutch
Gear Ratios
1st
3.231
2nd
1.837
3rd
1.41
4th
1
5
th
6
th
Reverse
Overall Top Gear
0.816
0.625
4.444
2.33 with 3.73 axle ratio; 2.56 with 4.10 axle ratio
3 / RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012
149
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
TRANSFER CASES: NV271/NV273
150
Availability
NV271Ñ
NV273Ñ
Type
Part-time
Operating Modes
2WD; 4WD High; Neutral; 4WD Low
Shift Mechanism
NV271Ñ
Low-range Ratio
2.72
Center Differential
None
Standard 4WD ST
Standard Laramie; Optional SLT
manual; NV273Ñ
electric
4 / RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
http://media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
2012 Ram 2500 Heavy Duty
DIMENSIONS AND CAPACITIES
REGULAR CAB 140.5"WB 8' 0" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
140.5
140.0
Track Width Ð Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width Ð Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
231.0
231.0
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
78.9
78.9
Overall Height
73.3
75.7
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Front
7.6
7.5
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Rear
7.4
7.4
Approach Angle
16.4
18.1
Ramp Breakover Angle
16.5
16.9
Departure Angle
22.8
27.6
CREW CAB 149.5"WB 6' 4" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
149.4
148.9
Track Width Ð Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width Ð Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
237.4
237.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
73.7
77.7
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Front
7.1
7.4
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Rear
7.3
7.1
Approach Angle
12.5
21.8
Ramp Breakover Angle
15.1
18.2
Departure Angle
23.7
27.0
CREW CAB 169.5"WB 8' 0" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
169.4
168.9
Track Width Ð Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width Ð Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
259.4
259.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
73.5
77.6
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Front
7.1
7.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Rear
7.3
7.2
Approach Angle
12.5
21.8
Ramp Breakover Angle
14.1
16.5
Departure Angle
22.7
25.9
5 / RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012 151
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
MEGA CAB 160.5"WB 6' 4" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
160.5
160.0
Track Width Ð Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width Ð Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
248.4
248.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.1
78.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Front
7.8
8.1
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Rear
7.8
7.7
Approach Angle
14.0
23.4
Ramp Breakover Angle
15.8
18.3
Departure Angle
24.2
27.6
Nominal Box Size
6 ft. 4 in. (Crew or Mega)
8 ft. (Regular or Crew)
SAE Volume, cu. ft. (cu m)
57.5 (1.6)
74.7 (2.1)
Length at Floor, Tailgate Closed Ð in. (mm)
76.3 (1938.5)
98.3 (2496.5)
Cargo Width Ð in. (mm)
66.4 (1686.9)
66.4 (1686.9)
Cargo Box
Distance Between Wheelhouses Ð in. (mm)
51 (1295.4)
51 (1295.4)
Depth Ð in. (mm)
20.1 (510.5)
20.2 (513.2)
Tailgate Opening Width in. Ð (mm)
60.4 (1535.3)
60.4 (1535.3)
ACCOMMODATIONS
Model
¨
Regular Cab
Crew Cab
Mega Cab
3/0 or 2/0
3/3 or 2/3
3/3 or 2/3
Head Room Ð in. (mm)
40.3 (1022.6)
41.0 (1040.5)
41.0 (1040.5)
Legroom Ð in. (mm)
41 (1041.3)
41 (1041.3)
41 (1041.3)
Shoulder Room Ð in. (mm)
66 (1676.4)
66 (1676.5)
66 (1676.5)
Hip Room Ð in. (mm)
62.9 (1676.4)
63.2 (1604.6)
63.2 (1604.6)
Seat Travel Ð in. (mm)
7.1 (179.2)
7.1 (179.2)
7.1 (179.2)
Recliner Range (degrees)
14¡
42¡
42¡
Head Room Ð in. (mm)
N/A
39.9 (1013.5)
39.7 (1007.3)
Legroom Ð in. (mm)
N/A
40.3 (1023.6)
34.7 (881.4)
Shoulder Room Ð in. (mm)
N/A
65.7 (1670)
65.7 (1670)
Hip Room Ð in. (mm)
N/A
63.2 (1605.2)
62.9 (1598.3)
Seating Capacity, F/R
Front
Rear
Interior Volume
Front Ð cu. ft. (cu m)
63.0 (1.8)
64.2 (1.8)
64.2 (1.8)
Rear Ð cu. ft. (cu m)
N/A
61.1 (1.7)
52.4 (1.5)
6Volume
/ RAM
2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
2010-2012
152
http://media.chrysler.com
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
BODY AND CHASSIS
Model
2WD
4WD
Layout
Longitudinal, front engine
Longitudinal, front engine, transfer case
Construction
Ladder-type frame, steel cab, doublewall steel pickup box
Ladder-type frame, steel cab, doublewall steel pickup box
Model
2WD
4WD
Front
Upper and lower Ò AÓ arms, coil
springs, stabilizer bar
Five-link with track bar, coil springs,
stabilizer bar, solid axle
Rear
Hotchkiss leaf spring suspension,
solid axle
Hotchkiss leaf spring suspension,
solid axle
Model
2WD
4WD
Box Length
Long
Long
Wheelbase (nominal) Ð in. (mm)
140.5
140.5
45.1
41.6
SUSPENSION
STEERING
Regular Cab Pickup
Turning Diameter Ð ft. (m)
(a)
¨
Crew Cab Pickup
Model
2WD
2WD
4WD
4WD
Box Length
Short
Long
Short
Long
Wheelbase (nominal) Ð in. (mm)
149.5
169.5
149.5
169.5
47.5
53.2
43.9
49.2
Turning Diameter Ð ft. (m)
(a)
Mega Cab Pickup
Model
Wheelbase (nominal) Ð in. (mm)
Turning Diameter Ð ft. (m)
(a)
2WD
4WD
160.5
160.5
50.67
46.86
(a) Turning diameter is measured at the outside of the tires at curb height. Turning diameters and steering wheel turns, lock-to-lock may differ
with optional tires and wheels.
BRAKES
Front
Size and Type Ð in. (mm)
Rotors 14.17 x 1.54-in. disc with twin-piston pin-slider caliper and ABS
Rear
Size and Type Ð in. (mm)
Power-assist Type
Rotors 14.09 x 1.34-inch disc with
twin-piston pin-slider caliper and ABS
Dual-rate, tandem diaphragm vacuum (gas)
Hydro-boost (diesel)
7 / RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012 153
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
2012 Ram 3500 Heavy Duty
DIMENSIONS AND CAPACITIES
154
REGULAR CAB 140.5"WB 8' 0" BOX DRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
140.5
140.0
Track Width Ð Front
68.6
69.5
Track Width Ð Rear
75.8
75.8
Overall Length
231.0
231.0
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
78.9
78.9
Overall Height
73.6
77.9
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Front
8.0
8.4
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Rear
7.6
7.7
Approach Angle
17.2
25.5
Ramp Breakover Angle
14.4
20.9
Departure Angle
23.1
26.5
CREW CAB 149.5"WB 6' 4" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
149.4
148.9
Track Width Ð Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width Ð Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
237.4
237.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.2
78.4
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Front
7.8
8.1
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Rear
7.8
7.8
Approach Angle
13.9
23.4
Ramp Breakover Angle
16.3
19.4
Departure Angle
24.2
27.7
CREW CAB 169.5"WB 8' 0" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
169.4
168.9
Track Width Ð Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width Ð Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
259.4
259.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.1
78.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Front
7.8
8.1
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Rear
7.8
7.7
Approach Angle
14.1
23.5
Ramp Breakover Angle
15.4
17.6
Departure Angle
23.1
26.4
8 / RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
Volume 2010-2012
http://media.chrysler.com
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
CREW CAB 169.5"WB 8' 0" BOX DRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
169.4
168.9
Track Width Ð Front
68.6
69.5
Track Width Ð Rear
75.8
75.8
Overall Length
249.4
259.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.1
78.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Front
7.9
8.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Rear
7.6
7.6
Approach Angle
14.4
23.8
Ramp Breakover Angle
12.0
17.8
Departure Angle
22.9
26.3
MEGA CAB 160.5"WB 6' 4" BOX SRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
160.5
160.0
Track Width Ð Front
68.6
68.3
Track Width Ð Rear
68.2
68.2
Overall Length
248.4
248.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.1
78.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Front
7.8
8.1
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Rear
7.8
7.7
Approach Angle
14.0
23.4
Ramp Breakover Angle
15.8
18.3
Departure Angle
24.2
27.6
MEGA CAB 160.5"WB 6' 3" BOX DRW
4x2
4x4
Wheelbase
160.5
160.0
Track Width Ð Front
68.6
69.5
Track Width Ð Rear
75.8
75.8
Overall Length
248.4
248.4
Overall Width @ SgRP Front
79.1
79.1
Overall Height
74.1
78.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Front
7.9
8.3
Suspension or Axle to Ground Ð Rear
7.6
7.5
Approach Angle
14.3
23.8
Ramp Breakover Angle
12.5
18.5
Departure Angle
23.9
27.3
9 / RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
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Volume 2010-2012
155
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
Cargo Box
Nominal Box Size
6 ft 4 in
(Crew or Mega)
8 ft (Regular or Crew)
SAE Volume, cu. ft. (cu m)
57.5 (1.6)
74.7 (2.1)
Length at Floor, Tailgate Closed Ð in. (mm)
76.3 (1938.5)
98.3 (2496.5)
Cargo Width Ð in. (mm)
66.4 (1686.9)
66.4 (1686.9)
Distance Between Wheelhouses Ð in. (mm)
51 (1295.4)
51 (1295.4)
Depth Ð in. (mm)
20.1 (510.5)
20.2 (513.2)
Tailgate Opening Width in. Ð (mm)
60.4 (1535.3)
60.4 (1535.3)
Model
Regular Cab
Crew Cab
Mega Cab
Seating Capacity, F/R
3/0 or 2/0
3/3 or 2/3
3/3 or 2/3
ACCOMMODATIONS
¨
Front
Head Room Ð in. (mm)
40.3 (1022.6)
41.0 (1040.5)
41.0 (1040.5)
Legroom Ð in. (mm)
41 (1041.3)
41 (1041.3)
41 (1041.3)
Shoulder Room Ð in. (mm)
66 (1676.4)
66 (1676.5)
66 (1676.5)
Hip Room Ð in. (mm)
62.9 (1676.4)
63.2 (1604.6)
63.2 (1604.6)
Seat Travel Ð in. (mm)
7.1 (179.2)
7.1 (179.2)
7.1 (179.2)
Recliner Range (degrees)
14¡
42¡
42¡
Head Room Ð in. (mm)
N/A
39.9 (1013.5)
39.7 (1007.3)
Legroom Ð in. (mm)
N/A
40.3 (1023.6)
34.7 (881.4)
Shoulder Room Ð in. (mm)
N/A
65.7 (1670)
65.7 (1670)
Hip Room Ð in. (mm)
N/A
63.2 (1605.2)
62.9 (1598.3)
Front Ð cu. ft. (cu m)
63.0 (1.8)
64.2 (1.8)
64.2 (1.8)
Rear Ð cu. ft. (cu m)
N/A
61.1 (1.7)
52.4 (1.5)
Rear
Interior Volume
BODY AND CHASSIS
156
Model
2WD
4WD
Layout
Longitudinal, front engine
Longitudinal, front engine, transfer case
Construction
Ladder-type frame, steel cab,
double-wall steel pickup box
Ladder-type frame, steel cab, double-wall steel pickup
box
10 / RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
http://media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
SPECIFICATIONS
SUSPENSION
Model
2WD
4WD
Front
Upper and lower Ò AÓ arms,
coil springs, stabilizer bar
Five-link with track bar, coil springs, stabilizer bar,
solid axle
Rear
Hotchkiss leaf spring
suspension, solid axle
Hotchkiss leaf spring suspension, solid axle
Model
2WD
4WD
Box Length
Long
Long
Wheelbase (nominal) Ð in. (mm)
140.5
140.5
45.1
41.6
STEERING
Regular Cab Pickup
Turning Diameter Ð ft. (m)
(a)
¨
Crew Cab Pickup
Model
2WD
2WD
4WD
4WD
Box Length
Short
Long
Short
Long
149.5
169.5
149.5
169.5
47.5
53.2
43.9
49.2
Wheelbase (nominal) Ð in. (mm)
Turning Diameter Ð ft. (m)
(a)
Mega Cab Pickup
Model
Wheelbase (nominal) Ð in. (mm)
Turning Diameter Ð ft. (m)
(a)
2WD
4WD
160.5
160.5
50.67
46.86
(a) Turning diameter is measured at the outside of the tires at curb height. Turning diameters and steering wheel turns, lock-to-lock may differ
with optional tires and wheels.
BRAKES
Front
Size and Type Ð in. (mm)
Rotors 14.17 x 1.54-in. disc with twin-piston pin-slider caliper and
ABS
Rear
Size and Type Ð in. (mm)
Power-assist type
Rotors 14.09 x 1.34-in. disc with
twin-piston pin-slider caliper and ABS
Dual-rate, tandem diaphragm vacuum (gas)
Hydro-boost (diesel)
¥¥¥
11 / RAM 2500/3500 HEAVY DUTY SPECIFICATIONS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012 157
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED ST
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED SLT
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
DJ 2L91
Transmission
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,930
2,930
2,170
2,170
2,240
2,240
2,240
Base
Weight
5,873
5,873
6,825
6,825
6,762
6,762
6,762
Base Wt.
Front
3,257
3,257
4,128
4,128
4,069
4,069
4,069
Base Wt.
Rear
2,616
2,616
2,697
2,697
2,693
2,693
2,693
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
Base
Weight
5,897
5,897
6,904
6,904
6,841
6,841
6,841
Base Wt.
Front
3,207
3,207
4,193
4,193
4,134
4,134
4,134
Base Wt.
Rear
2,690
2,690
2,711
2,711
2,707
2,707
2,707
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
5,922
5,922
6,985
6,985
6,922
6,922
6,922
Base Wt.
Front
3,230
3,230
4,216
4,216
4,158
4,158
4,158
Base Wt.
Rear
2,692
2,692
2,768
2,768
2,764
2,764
2,764
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,044
6,044
7,026
7,026
7,026
Base Wt.
Front
3,303
3,303
4,195
4,195
4,195
Base Wt.
Rear
2,742
2,742
2,830
2,830
2,830
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
11,000
14,000
12,000
13,000
10,100
13,100
15,100
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,950
13,950
11,950
12,950
10,000
13,000
15,000
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,950
13,950
11,850
12,850
9,950
12,950
14,950
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,800
13,800
9,800
12,800
14,800
DJ 2H91
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
Transmission
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
NOTES:
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,900
2,900
2,100
2,100
2,160
2,160
2,160
DJ 2P91
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,880
2,880
2,020
2,020
2,080
2,080
2,080
DJ 2R91
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,760
2,760
1,970
1,970
1,970
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
158
Volume 2010-2012
1 / RAM 2500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED ST
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED SLT
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
DJ 2L92
Transmission
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,830
2,830
2,050
2,050
2,110
2,110
2,110
Base
Weight
5,966
5,966
6,953
6,953
6,886
6,886
6,886
Base Wt.
Front
3,281
3,281
4,242
4,242
4,182
4,182
4,182
Base Wt.
Rear
2,685
2,685
2,711
2,711
2,704
2,704
2,704
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
Base
Weight
6,137
6,137
7,011
7,011
6,944
6,944
6,944
Base Wt.
Front
3,405
3,405
4,237
4,237
4,177
4,177
4,177
Base Wt.
Rear
2,732
2,732
2,774
2,774
2,767
2,767
2,767
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,175
6,175
7,126
7,126
7,059
7,059
7,059
Base Wt.
Front
3,401
3,401
4,302
4,302
4,242
4,242
4,242
Base Wt.
Rear
2,774
2,774
2,824
2,824
2,817
2,817
2,817
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,299
6,299
7,178
7,178
7,178
Base Wt.
Front
3,475
3,475
4,281
4,281
4,281
Base Wt.
Rear
2,824
2,824
2,897
2,897
2,897
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,900
13,900
11,900
12,900
9,950
12,950
14,950
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,700
13,700
11,850
12,850
9,900
12,900
14,900
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,650
13,650
11,700
12,700
9,800
12,800
14,800
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,550
13,550
9,650
12,650
14,650
DJ 2H92
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED LARAMIE
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
Transmission
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED LONGHORN
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
NOTES:
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,660
2,660
1,990
1,990
2,060
2,060
2,060
DJ 2P92
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,620
2,620
1,870
1,870
1,940
1,940
1,940
DJ 2R92
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,500
2,500
1,820
1,820
1,820
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
2 / RAM 2500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
Volume 2010-2012
http://media.chrysler.com
159
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED ST
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED SLT
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
NOTES:
DJ 2L62
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,650
8,650
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
3,190
3,190
2,550
2,550
2,650
2,650
2,650
Base
Weight
5,464
5,464
6,445
6,445
6,346
6,346
6,346
Base Wt.
Front
3,053
3,053
3,981
3,981
3,904
3,904
3,904
Base Wt.
Rear
2,411
2,411
2,465
2,465
2,442
2,442
2,442
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
Base
Weight
5,616
5,616
6,585
6,585
6,486
6,486
6,486
Base Wt.
Front
3,114
3,114
4,056
4,056
3,980
3,980
3,980
Base Wt.
Rear
2,502
2,502
2,529
2,529
2,506
2,506
2,506
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
11,400
14,400
12,400
13,400
10,500
13,500
15,500
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
11,250
14,250
12,250
13,250
10,350
13,350
15,350
DJ 2H62
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,650
8,650
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
3,030
3,030
2,420
2,420
2,510
2,510
2,510
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
160
Volume 2010-2012
3 / RAM 2500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED ST
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED SLT
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
DJ 7L91
Transmission
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,520
2,520
2,340
2,340
2,410
2,410
2,410
Base
Weight
6,282
6,282
7,257
7,257
7,190
7,190
7,190
Base Wt.
Front
3,576
3,576
4,501
4,501
4,440
4,440
4,440
Base Wt.
Rear
2,706
2,706
2,756
2,756
2,750
2,750
2,750
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
Base
Weight
6,309
6,309
7,278
7,278
7,211
7,211
7,211
Base Wt.
Front
3,592
3,592
4,496
4,496
4,435
4,435
4,435
Base Wt.
Rear
2,717
2,717
2,782
2,782
2,776
2,776
2,776
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,366
6,366
7,386
7,386
7,319
7,319
7,319
Base Wt.
Front
3,626
3,626
4,574
4,574
4,513
4,513
4,513
Base Wt.
Rear
2,741
2,741
2,812
2,812
2,806
2,806
2,806
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,458
6,458
7,429
7,429
7,429
Base Wt.
Front
3,670
3,670
4,554
4,554
4,554
Base Wt.
Rear
2,787
2,787
2,875
2,875
2,875
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,550
13,550
11,600
12,600
9,650
12,650
14,650
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,550
13,550
11,550
12,550
9,650
12,650
14,650
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,500
13,500
11,450
12,450
9,550
12,550
14,550
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,400
13,400
9,400
12,400
14,400
DJ 7H91
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
Transmission
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
NOTES:
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,490
2,490
2,320
2,320
2,390
2,390
2,390
DJ 7P91
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,430
2,430
2,210
2,210
2,280
2,280
2,280
DJ 7R91
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,340
2,340
2,170
2,170
2,170
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED 2TP
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
NOTES:
Transmission
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
Axle
Ratio
4.56
DJ 7X91 POWERWAGON
Base
Payload
Weight
8,510
1,880
6,626
GVWR
Base Wt.
Front
3,874
Base Wt.
Rear
2,752
GAWR
Front
4,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
10,200
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
4 / RAM 2500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
Volume 2010-2012
http://media.chrysler.com
161
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED ST
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED SLT
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
DJ 7L92
Transmission
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,360
2,360
2,210
2,210
2,290
2,290
2,290
Base
Weight
6,440
6,440
7,386
7,386
7,315
7,315
7,315
Base Wt.
Front
3,686
3,686
4,613
4,613
4,549
4,549
4,549
Base Wt.
Rear
2,754
2,754
2,773
2,773
2,766
2,766
2,766
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
Base
Weight
6,597
6,597
7,482
7,482
7,411
7,411
7,411
Base Wt.
Front
3,767
3,767
4,699
4,699
4,636
4,636
4,636
Base Wt.
Rear
2,830
2,830
2,782
2,782
2,775
2,775
2,775
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,671
6,671
7,518
7,518
7,448
7,448
7,448
Base Wt.
Front
3,806
3,806
4,698
4,698
4,635
4,635
4,635
Base Wt.
Rear
2,865
2,865
2,820
2,820
2,813
2,813
2,813
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,773
6,773
7,569
7,569
7,569
Base Wt.
Front
3,852
3,852
4,677
4,677
4,677
Base Wt.
Rear
2,921
2,921
2,892
2,892
2,892
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,400
13,400
11,450
12,450
9,550
12,550
14,550
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,250
13,250
11,350
12,350
9,450
12,450
14,450
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,200
13,200
11,350
12,350
9,400
12,400
14,400
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,100
13,100
9,300
12,300
14,300
DJ 7H92
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED LARAMIE
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
Transmission
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED LONGHORN
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
NOTES:
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,200
2,200
2,120
2,120
2,190
2,190
2,190
DJ 7P92
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,130
2,130
2,080
2,080
2,150
2,150
2,150
DJ 7R92
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,030
2,030
2,030
2,030
2,030
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
162
Volume 2010-2012
5 / RAM 2500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED ST
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED SLT
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
NOTES:
DJ 7L62
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,650
8,650
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,700
2,700
2,090
2,090
2,180
2,180
2,180
Base
Weight
5,954
5,954
6,910
6,910
6,823
6,823
6,823
Base Wt.
Front
3,448
3,448
4,347
4,347
4,277
4,277
4,277
Base Wt.
Rear
2,506
2,506
2,563
2,563
2,547
2,547
2,547
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
Base
Weight
6,048
6,048
6,991
6,991
6,904
6,904
6,904
Base Wt.
Front
3,512
3,512
4,388
4,388
4,318
4,318
4,318
Base Wt.
Rear
2,537
2,537
2,603
2,603
2,587
2,587
2,587
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,900
13,900
11,950
12,950
10,050
13,050
15,050
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,800
13,800
11,850
12,850
9,950
12,950
14,950
DJ 7H62
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,650
8,650
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,600
2,600
2,010
2,010
2,100
2,100
2,100
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
6 / RAM 2500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
Volume 2010-2012
http://media.chrysler.com
163
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED ST
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED SLT
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
W/ RAMBOX
Transmission
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,730
2,730
1,980
1,980
2,040
2,040
2,040
Base
Weight
6,067
6,067
7,019
7,019
6,957
6,957
6,957
Base Wt.
Front
3,253
3,253
4,124
4,124
4,066
4,066
4,066
Base Wt.
Rear
2,814
2,814
2,895
2,895
2,890
2,890
2,890
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
Base
Weight
6,092
6,092
7,098
7,098
7,035
7,035
7,035
Base Wt.
Front
3,204
3,204
4,189
4,189
4,131
4,131
4,131
Base Wt.
Rear
2,888
2,888
2,909
2,909
2,905
2,905
2,905
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,117
6,117
7,179
7,179
7,116
7,116
7,116
Base Wt.
Front
3,227
3,227
4,213
4,213
4,155
4,155
4,155
Base Wt.
Rear
2,890
2,890
2,966
2,966
2,961
2,961
2,961
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,239
6,239
7,220
7,220
7,220
Base Wt.
Front
3,299
3,299
4,192
4,192
4,192
Base Wt.
Rear
2,940
2,940
3,028
3,028
3,028
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,800
13,800
11,850
12,850
9,900
12,900
14,900
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,750
13,750
11,750
12,750
9,800
12,800
14,800
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,750
13,750
11,650
12,650
9,750
12,750
14,750
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,600
13,600
9,650
12,650
14,650
W/ RAMBOX
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
4.10
Transmission
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,710
2,710
1,900
1,900
1,960
1,960
1,960
W/ RAMBOX
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,680
2,680
1,820
1,820
1,880
1,880
1,880
W/ RAMBOX
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,000
9,000
9,000
2,560
2,560
1,780
1,780
1,780
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
164
Volume 2010-2012
7 / RAM 2500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED ST
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED SLT
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
W/ RAMBOX
Transmission
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,320
2,320
2,150
2,150
2,220
2,220
2,220
Base
Weight
6,476
6,476
7,452
7,452
7,385
7,385
7,385
Base Wt.
Front
3,573
3,573
4,498
4,498
4,437
4,437
4,437
Base Wt.
Rear
2,903
2,903
2,954
2,954
2,948
2,948
2,948
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
Base
Weight
6,503
6,503
7,472
7,472
7,406
7,406
7,406
Base Wt.
Front
3,588
3,588
4,493
4,493
4,432
4,432
4,432
Base Wt.
Rear
2,915
2,915
2,980
2,980
2,974
2,974
2,974
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,561
6,561
7,581
7,581
7,514
7,514
7,514
Base Wt.
Front
3,622
3,622
4,571
4,571
4,510
4,510
4,510
Base Wt.
Rear
2,938
2,938
3,010
3,010
3,004
3,004
3,004
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
Base
Weight
6,652
6,652
7,623
7,623
7,623
Base Wt.
Front
3,667
3,667
4,550
4,550
4,550
Base Wt.
Rear
2,985
2,985
3,073
3,073
3,073
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,350
13,350
11,400
12,400
9,450
12,450
14,450
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,350
13,350
11,400
12,400
9,450
12,450
14,450
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,300
13,300
11,250
12,250
9,350
12,350
14,350
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,200
13,200
9,250
12,250
14,250
W/ RAMBOX
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
Transmission
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
NOTES:
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,300
2,300
2,130
2,130
2,190
2,190
2,190
W/ RAMBOX
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,240
2,240
2,020
2,020
2,090
2,090
2,090
W/RAMBOX
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
4.10
GVWR
Payload
8,800
8,800
9,600
9,600
9,600
2,150
2,150
1,980
1,980
1,980
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED 2TP
Trans
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
Transmission
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
Axle
Ratio
4.56
POWERWAGON W/ RAMBOX
Base Base Wt.
GVWR
Payload
Weight
Front
8,510
1,690
6,820
3,871
Base Wt.
Rear
2,949
GAWR
Front
4,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
10,050
NOTES:
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
8 / RAM 2500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
Volume 2010-2012
http://media.chrysler.com
165
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED SLT
Trans
Engine
Transmission
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
4.10
DJ 2H81 W/ RAMBOX
Base
Payload
Weight
8,800
2,340
6,460
8,800
2,340
6,460
9,000
1,690
7,313
9,000
1,690
7,313
9,000
1,750
7,245
9,000
1,750
7,245
9,000
1,750
7,245
Base Wt.
Front
3,399
3,399
4,346
4,346
4,285
4,285
4,285
Base Wt.
Rear
3,061
3,061
2,967
2,967
2,960
2,960
2,960
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
DJ 2P81 W/ RAMBOX
Base
Payload
Weight
8,800
2,300
6,495
8,800
2,300
6,495
9,000
1,630
7,372
9,000
1,630
7,372
9,000
1,700
7,304
9,000
1,700
7,304
9,000
1,700
7,304
Base Wt.
Front
3,366
3,366
4,253
4,253
4,192
4,192
4,192
Base Wt.
Rear
3,130
3,130
3,119
3,119
3,112
3,112
3,112
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
DJ 2R81 W/ RAMBOX
Base
Payload
Weight
8,800
2,200
6,600
8,800
2,200
6,600
9,000
1,590
7,413
9,000
1,590
7,413
9,000
1,590
7,413
Base Wt.
Front
3,471
3,471
4,231
4,231
4,231
Base Wt.
Rear
3,128
3,128
3,182
3,182
3,182
GAWR
Front
4,750
4,750
5,000
5,000
5,000
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
GVWR
GVWR
GVWR
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,400
13,400
11,550
12,550
9,600
12,600
14,600
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,350
13,350
11,500
12,500
9,550
12,550
14,550
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
10,250
13,250
9,450
12,450
14,450
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED SLT
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
3.42
3.73
4.10
2500 RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED LONGHORN
Trans
Transmission
Engine
Type
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
5.7L V8 gas (EZC)
A6
66RFE 6 sp AUTO (DFP)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
Axle
Ratio
3.73
4.10
3.42
3.73
4.10
DJ 7H81 W/ RAMBOX
Base
Payload
Weight
8,800
1,900
6,900
8,800
1,900
6,900
9,600
1,760
7,838
9,600
1,760
7,838
9,600
1,830
7,770
9,600
1,830
7,770
9,600
1,830
7,770
Base Wt.
Front
3,783
3,783
4,684
4,684
4,622
4,622
4,622
Base Wt.
Rear
3,117
3,117
3,154
3,154
3,148
3,148
3,148
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
DJ 7P81 W/ RAMBOX
Base
Payload
Weight
8,800
1,860
6,935
8,800
1,860
6,935
9,600
1,710
7,886
9,600
1,710
7,886
9,600
1,780
7,818
9,600
1,780
7,818
9,600
1,780
7,818
Base Wt.
Front
3,749
3,749
4,732
4,732
4,670
4,670
4,670
Base Wt.
Rear
3,186
3,186
3,154
3,154
3,148
3,148
3,148
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
DJ 7R81 W/ RAMBOX
Base
Payload
Weight
8,800
1,780
7,019
8,800
1,780
7,019
9,600
1,670
7,934
9,600
1,670
7,934
9,600
1,670
7,934
Base Wt.
Front
3,794
3,794
4,714
4,714
4,714
Base Wt.
Rear
3,225
3,225
3,220
3,220
3,220
GAWR
Front
5,200
5,200
5,500
5,500
5,500
GAWR
Rear
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
6,010
GVWR
GVWR
GVWR
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
9,950
12,950
11,000
12,000
9,100
12,100
14,100
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
19,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
9,900
12,900
10,950
11,950
9,050
12,050
14,050
GCWR
Max Trail
17,000
20,000
17,000
20,000
22,000
9,850
12,850
8,900
11,900
13,900
Note that all the payload and Max Trail weights are ESTIMATED values.
1. Payload is rounded to the nearest 10 lbs. Payload = GVWR - Curb Wt.
2. Maximum trailer weights are rounded to the nearest 50 lbs.
Maximum Trailer Weight = GCWR - Curb wt. -150 lbs. (allowance for driver)
3. The recommended tongue weight is between 10 percent and 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. However, the maximum tongue weight on Class III (the bumper ball) is
limited to 500 pounds, and Class IV (the receiver hitch) to 1,200 pounds. Additionally, the GAWRs and GVWRs should never be exceeded.
4. The maximum trailer weight is 5,000 pounds for a weight-carrying hitch. A weight distributing system is recommended for trailers over 5,000 pounds. A fifth-wheel or
gooseneck hitch is required for trailers over 12,000 pounds.
166
Volume 2010-2012
9 / RAM 2500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
3500 TOWING CHARTS
2012 Ram
3500 PICKUP TOWING CHARTS
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - ST
D2 3L91 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
3,250
6,851
4,158
2,694
5,000
6,500
19,000
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,250
6,851
4,158
2,694
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,310
6,790
4,106
2,685
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,310
6,790
4,106
2,685
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,310
6,790
4,106
2,685
5,000
6,500
24,000
17,050
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - SLT
Engine
D2 3H91 (SRW)
Trans
Type
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
3,310
6,785
4,171
2,615
5,000
6,500
19,000
12,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,310
6,785
4,171
2,615
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,380
6,724
4,110
2,614
5,000
6,500
17,000
10,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,380
6,724
4,110
2,614
5,000
6,500
21,000
14,050
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,380
6,724
4,110
2,614
5,000
6,500
24,000
17,150
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
D2 3P91 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
3,080
7,019
4,253
2,766
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,850
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,080
7,019
4,253
2,766
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,140
6,958
4,201
2,757
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,140
6,958
4,201
2,757
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,140
6,958
4,201
2,757
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,900
Max
Trail
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
RAM CREW CAB 2WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE LONGHORN
D2 3R91 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,100
6,999
4,195
2,804
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,850
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,100
6,999
4,195
2,804
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,100
6,999
4,195
2,804
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,850
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED - SLT
D2 3H81 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,940
7,162
4,331
2,831
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,940
7,162
4,331
2,831
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,000
7,101
4,271
2,830
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,000
7,101
4,271
2,830
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,000
7,101
4,271
2,830
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,750
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
1 / RAM 3500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
Volume 2010-2012 167
http://media.chrysler.com
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED SLT
Engine
D2 3H81 (DRW)
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
11,350
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,500
3,020
7,478
4,329
3,149
5,000
9,350
19,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,500
3,020
7,478
4,329
3,149
5,000
9,350
21,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
3,080
7,416
4,268
3,148
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
3,080
7,416
4,268
3,148
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
3,080
7,416
4,268
3,148
5,000
9,350
26,000
18,450
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
11,700
13,700
RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
D2 3P81 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,960
7,142
4,396
2,747
5,000
6,500
19,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,960
7,142
4,396
2,747
5,000
6,500
21,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,020
7,076
4,342
2,734
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,020
7,076
4,342
2,734
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,020
7,076
4,342
2,734
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,750
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
11,300
13,300
RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
D2 3P81 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,500
2,930
7,574
4,370
3,204
5,000
9,350
19,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,500
2,930
7,574
4,370
3,204
5,000
9,350
21,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
2,990
7,507
4,316
3,191
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
2,990
7,507
4,316
3,191
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
2,990
7,507
4,316
3,191
5,000
9,350
26,000
18,350
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
D2 3R81 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,980
7,122
4,338
2,784
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,980
7,116
4,366
2,750
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,980
7,116
4,366
2,750
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,750
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
RAM MEGA CAB 2WD SHORT BED LARAMIE LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
D2 3R81 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
2,950
7,553
4,312
3,242
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,300
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
3,000
7,496
4,396
3,100
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
3,000
7,496
4,396
3,100
5,000
9,350
26,000
18,350
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,930
7,169
4,436
2,733
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,930
7,169
4,436
2,733
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,000
7,096
4,368
2,727
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,000
7,096
4,368
2,727
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,000
7,096
4,368
2,727
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,750
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - ST
D2 8L91 (SRW)
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - SLT
Engine
168
3500 TOWING CHARTS
D2 8H91 (SRW)
Payload
Base
Weight
Base
Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
10,100
2,860
7,241
4,493
2,749
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,600
10,100
2,860
7,241
4,493
2,749
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,600
10,100
2,920
7,180
4,432
2,748
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,650
10,100
2,920
7,180
4,432
2,748
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,650
10,100
2,920
7,180
4,432
2,748
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,650
2 / RAM 3500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
http://media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
3500 TOWING CHARTS
D2 8P91 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,780
7,323
4,522
2,801
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,780
7,323
4,522
2,801
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,850
7,249
4,454
2,795
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,850
7,249
4,454
2,795
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,850
7,249
4,454
2,795
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,600
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
RAM CREW CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8R91 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,800
7,302
4,464
2,838
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,550
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,790
7,310
4,546
2,764
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,550
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,790
7,310
4,546
2,764
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,550
RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - SLT
D2 8H81 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,590
7,508
4,621
2,887
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,590
7,508
4,621
2,887
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,650
7,447
4,561
2,886
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,650
7,447
4,561
2,886
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,650
7,447
4,561
2,886
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,400
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - SLT
Engine
D2 8H81 (DRW)
Trans
Type
GVWR
Payload
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,500
2,590
7,907
4,671
3,236
5,500
9,350
19,000
10,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,500
2,590
7,907
4,671
3,236
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
2,650
7,846
4,610
3,235
5,500
9,350
17,000
9,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
2,650
7,846
4,610
3,235
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
2,650
7,846
4,610
3,235
5,500
9,350
26,000
18,000
RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
D2 8P81 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
1,510
8,591
5,672
2,919
5,500
5,500
19,000
10,250
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
1,510
8,591
5,672
2,919
5,500
5,500
21,000
12,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
1,580
8,516
5,604
2,912
5,500
5,500
17,000
8,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
1,580
8,516
5,604
2,912
5,500
5,500
21,000
12,350
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
1,580
8,516
5,604
2,912
5,500
5,500
24,000
15,350
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8P81 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,500
2,510
7,990
4,722
3,268
5,500
9,350
19,000
10,850
M6
POS G56-6 6sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,500
2,510
7,990
4,722
3,268
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
2,590
7,915
4,654
3,261
5,500
9,350
17,000
8,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
2,590
7,915
4,654
3,261
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
2,590
7,915
4,654
3,261
5,500
9,350
26,000
17,950
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED LARAMIE - LONGHORN
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
D2 8R81 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,530
7,571
4,614
2,957
5,500
5,500
17,000
9,300
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,590
7,508
4,699
2,808
5,500
5,500
21,000
13,350
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,590
7,508
4,699
2,808
5,500
5,500
24,000
16,350
3 / RAM 3500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012
169
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
RAM MEGA CAB 4WD SHORT BED - LARAMIE LONGHORN
D2 8R81 (DRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,500
2,980
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,000
GVWR
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
Engine
Base
Wt.
Rear
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
2,530
7,970
4,664
3,306
5,500
9,350
17,000
8,900
2,980
7,525
4,465
3,060
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,350
7,525
4,465
3,060
5,500
9,350
26,000
18,350
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
5,190
6,811
3,944
2,868
5,000
9,350
19,000
12,050
5,190
6,811
3,944
2,868
5,000
9,350
21,000
14,050
5,280
6,717
3,883
2,835
5,000
9,350
17,000
10,150
Payload
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
D2 3L62 (DRW)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,000
5,280
6,717
3,883
2,835
5,000
9,350
21,000
14,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,000
5,280
6,717
3,883
2,835
5,000
9,350
30,000
22,750
RAM REGULAR CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 3H62 (DRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,000
5,170
6,834
3,957
2,877
5,000
9,350
19,000
12,000
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,000
5,170
6,834
3,957
2,877
5,000
9,350
21,000
14,000
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,000
5,230
6,773
3,897
2,876
5,000
9,350
17,000
10,100
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
Engine
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,000
5,230
6,773
3,897
2,876
5,000
9,350
21,000
14,100
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,000
5,230
6,773
3,897
2,876
5,000
9,350
30,000
22,700
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
D2 3L92 (DRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
11,500
4,270
7,235
4,218
3,017
5,000
9,350
19,000
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,270
7,235
4,218
3,017
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,330
7,171
4,166
3,005
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,330
7,171
4,166
3,005
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,330
7,171
4,166
3,005
5,000
9,350
26,800
19,050
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
GVWR
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - ST
Payload
D2 3L92 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
3,110
6,990
4,241
2,749
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,110
6,990
4,241
2,749
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,170
6,926
4,189
2,737
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,170
6,926
4,189
2,737
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,170
6,926
4,189
2,737
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,900
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
11,500
4,180
7,323
4,256
3,067
5,000
9,350
19,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,180
7,323
4,256
3,067
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,300
7,200
4,135
3,065
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,300
7,200
4,135
3,065
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,300
7,200
4,135
3,065
5,000
9,350
26,700
18,900
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
GVWR
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
Engine
Payload
D2 3H92 (DRW)
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 3H92 (SRW)
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
3,080
7,017
4,258
2,759
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
3,080
7,017
4,258
2,759
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,140
6,955
4,197
2,758
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,140
6,955
4,197
2,758
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,140
6,955
4,197
2,758
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,900
Engine
170
3500 TOWING CHARTS
4 / RAM 3500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
Volume 2010-2012
http://media.chrysler.com
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LARAMIE
Engine
Trans
Type
3500 TOWING CHARTS
D2 3P92 (DRW)
Axle
Ratio
Transmission
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
11,500
4,030
7,471
4,351
3,120
5,000
9,350
19,000
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
11,500
4,030
7,471
4,351
3,120
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,090
7,407
4,299
3,108
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,090
7,407
4,299
3,108
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,090
7,407
4,299
3,108
5,000
9,350
25,800
17,850
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LARAMIE
D2 3P92 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,940
7,161
4,372
2,789
5,000
6,500
19,000
11,700
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,940
7,161
4,372
2,789
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
3,000
7,097
4,320
2,777
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,000
7,097
4,320
2,777
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,750
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,000
7,097
4,320
2,777
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,750
Max
Trail
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LONGHORN
D2 3R92 (DRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
11,500
4,050
7,451
4,293
3,158
5,000
9,350
17,000
9,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
11,500
4,180
7,323
4,301
3,022
5,000
9,350
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
11,500
4,180
7,323
4,301
3,022
5,000
9,350
26,200
18,300
Max
Trail
RAM CREW CAB 2WD LONG BED - LONGHORN
D2 3R92 (SRW)
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,960
7,140
4,314
2,827
5,000
6,500
17,000
9,700
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
3,110
6,991
4,307
2,685
5,000
6,500
21,000
13,850
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
3,110
6,991
4,307
2,685
5,000
6,500
24,000
16,850
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
Engine
Trans
Type
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED - ST
Engine
Trans
Type
D2 8L62 (DRW)
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,200
4,970
7,234
4,342
2,892
5,500
9,350
19,000
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,200
4,970
7,234
4,342
2,892
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,200
5,030
7,170
4,277
2,893
5,500
9,350
17,000
9,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,200
5,030
7,170
4,277
2,893
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,700
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,200
5,030
7,170
4,277
2,893
5,500
9,350
30,000
22,300
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,200
4,940
7,257
4,355
2,902
5,500
9,350
19,000
11,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,200
4,940
7,257
4,355
2,902
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,600
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,200
5,000
7,196
4,295
2,900
5,500
9,350
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,200
5,000
7,196
4,295
2,900
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,200
5,000
7,196
4,295
2,900
5,500
9,350
30,000
22,300
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,300
4,640
7,663
4,601
3,062
5,500
9,350
19,000
11,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,300
4,640
7,663
4,601
3,062
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,300
4,710
7,589
4,533
3,056
5,500
9,350
17,000
9,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,300
4,710
7,589
4,533
3,056
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,250
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,300
4,710
7,589
4,533
3,056
5,500
9,350
29,100
20,950
RAM REGULAR CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 8H62 (DRW)
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - ST
D2 8L92 (DRW)
5 / RAM 3500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
http://media.chrysler.com
Volume 2010-2012
171
2500/3500 Heavy Duty
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - ST
Engine
3500 TOWING CHARTS
D2 8L92 (SRW)
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,810
7,292
4,563
2,729
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,810
7,292
4,563
2,729
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,550
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,880
7,218
4,495
2,724
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,880
7,218
4,495
2,724
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,650
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,880
7,218
4,495
2,724
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,650
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,300
4,590
7,708
4,609
3,098
5,500
9,350
19,000
11,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,300
4,590
7,708
4,609
3,098
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,150
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,300
4,650
7,646
4,549
3,097
5,500
9,350
17,000
9,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,300
4,650
7,646
4,549
3,097
5,500
9,350
21,000
13,200
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,300
4,650
7,646
4,549
3,097
5,500
9,350
28,900
20,650
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 8H92 (DRW)
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - SLT
D2 8H92 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,650
7,454
4,634
2,820
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,650
7,454
4,634
2,820
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,710
7,392
4,574
2,819
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,710
7,392
4,574
2,819
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,710
7,392
4,574
2,819
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,450
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LARAMIE
D2 8P92 (DRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
12,300
4,310
7,986
4,856
3,130
5,500
9,350
19,000
10,850
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
12,300
4,310
7,986
4,856
3,130
5,500
9,350
21,000
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
12,850
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,300
4,390
7,912
4,788
3,125
5,500
9,350
17,000
8,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,300
4,390
7,912
4,788
3,125
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,950
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,300
4,390
7,912
4,788
3,125
5,500
9,350
27,800
19,350
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LARAMIE
Payload
Base
Weight
D2 8P92 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.42
10,100
2,650
7,446
4,655
2,791
5,500
6,500
19,000
11,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
M6
POSG56 6 sp MANU (DEG)
3.73
10,100
2,650
7,446
4,655
2,791
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,400
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,730
7,372
4,587
2,785
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,730
7,372
4,587
2,785
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,500
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,730
7,372
4,587
2,785
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,500
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LARAMIE LONGHORN
D2 8R92 (DRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
Max
Trail
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
12,300
4,330
7,965
4,797
3,168
5,500
9,350
17,000
8,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
12,300
4,330
7,965
4,797
3,168
5,500
9,350
21,000
12,900
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
12,300
4,330
7,965
4,797
3,168
5,500
9,350
27,600
19,050
Max
Trail
RAM CREW CAB 4WD LONG BED - LARAMIE LONGHORN
D2 8R92 (SRW)
Engine
Trans
Type
Transmission
Axle
Ratio
GVWR
Payload
Base
Weight
Base Wt.
Front
Base
Wt.
Rear
GAWR
Front
GAWR
Rear
GCWR
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.42
10,100
2,720
7,375
4,547
2,828
5,500
6,500
17,000
9,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
3.73
10,100
2,720
7,375
4,547
2,828
5,500
6,500
21,000
13,450
6.7L 24V Turbo Diesel (ETJ)
A6
68RFE 6 sp AUTO (DG7)
4.10
10,100
2,720
7,375
4,547
2,828
5,500
6,500
24,000
16,450
¥¥¥
172
6 / RAM 3500 HEAVY DUTY TOWING CHARTS
Volume 2010-2012
http://media.chrysler.com
A Publication of the TURBO DIESEL REGISTER
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