XE–700 SBC connectors and switches

XE–700 SBC connectors and switches
XE–700 Single Board Computer
Reference manual
Manual part #6835, rev. A05
CONTACT INFORMATION
Front Desk: 303–430–1500
Technical Support: 303–426–4521
[email protected]
www.octagonsystems.com
1
Copyright
OS Embedder™ is a trademark, and Octagon Systems Corporation®, and the
Octagon logo are registered trademarks of Octagon Systems Corporation. ROM–
DOS™ is a trademark of Datalight. QNX® is a registered trademark of QNX
Software Systems Ltd. Windows 2000®, Windows NT®, Windows XP® and
Windows CE.net® are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
HyperTerminal ™ is a copyright of Hilgraeve, Inc. CompactFlash™ is a trademark
of San Disk Corporation. Ethernet® is a registered trademark of Xerox
Corporation.
Disclaimer
Copyright 2005—Octagon Systems Corporation. All rights reserved. However, any
part of this document may be reproduced, provided that Octagon Systems
Corporation is cited as the source. The contents of this manual and the
specifications herein may change without notice.
The information contained in this manual is believed to be correct. However,
Octagon assumes no responsibility for any of the circuits described herein, conveys
no license under any patent or other right, and makes no representations that the
circuits are free from patent infringement. Octagon makes no representation or
warranty that such applications will be suitable for the use specified without
further testing or modification.
Octagon Systems Corporation general policy does not recommend the use of its
products in life support applications where the failure or malfunction of a
component may directly threaten life or injury. It is a Condition of Sale that the
user of Octagon products in life support applications assumes all the risk of such
use and indemnifies Octagon against all damage.
Technical Support
Carefully recheck your system before calling Technical Support. Run as many tests
as possible; the more information you can provide, the easier it will be for Technical
Support staff to help you solve the problem. For additional technical assistance, try
the following:
Technical Support telephone: 303–426–4521
E-mail Technical Support: [email protected]
Applications Notes (via web): www.octagonsystems.com
Revision History
Revision
A05
2
Reason for Change
Production release
Date
05 / 05
IMPORTANT!
Please read the following section before installing your product:
Octagon’s products are designed to be high in performance while consuming very
little power. In order to maintain this advantage, CMOS circuitry is used.
CMOS chips have specific needs and some special requirements that the user must
be aware of. Read the following to help avoid damage to your card from the use of
CMOS chips.
Using CMOS circuitry in industrial control
Industrial computers originally used LSTTL circuits. Because many PC
components are used in laptop computers, IC manufacturers are exclusively using
CMOS technology. Both TTL and CMOS have failure mechanisms, but they are
different. Described below are some of the failures that are common to all
manufacturers of CMOS equipment.
The most common failures on CPU control cards are over voltage of the power
supply, static discharge, and damage to the serial and parallel ports. On expansion
cards, the most common failures are static discharge, over voltage of inputs, over
current of outputs, and misuse of the CMOS circuitry with regards to power supply
sequencing. In the case of the video cards, the most common failure is to miswire
the card to the flat panel display. Miswiring can damage both the card and an
expensive display.
Multiple component failures: The chance of a random component failure is
very rare since the average MTBF of an Octagon card is greater than 11 years.
In a 7 year study, Octagon has never found a single case where multiple IC
failures were not caused by misuse or accident. It is very probable that multiple
component failures indicate that they were user-induced.
Testing “dead” cards: For a card that is “completely nonfunctional”, there is
a simple test to determine accidental over voltage, reverse voltage or other
“forced” current situations. Unplug the card from the bus and remove all
cables. Using an ordinary digital ohmmeter on the 2,000 ohm scale, measure
the resistance between power and ground. Record this number. Reverse the
ohmmeter leads and measure the resistance again. If the ratio of the
resistances is 2:1 or greater, fault conditions most likely have occurred. A
common cause is miswiring the power supply.
Improper power causes catastrophic failure: If a card has had reverse
polarity or high voltage applied, replacing a failed component is not an
adequate fix. Other components probably have been partially damaged or a
failure mechanism has been induced. Therefore, a failure will probably occur in
the future. For such cards, Octagon highly recommends that these cards be
replaced.
Other over-voltage symptoms: In over-voltage situations, the
programmable logic devices, EPROMs and CPU chips, usually fail in this order.
3
The failed device may be hot to the touch. It is usually the case that only one IC
will be overheated at a time.
Power sequencing: The major failure of I/O chips is caused by the external
application of input voltage while the power is off. If you apply 5V to the input
of a TTL chip with the power off, nothing will happen. Applying a 5V input to a
CMOS card will cause the current to flow through the input and out the 5V
power pin. This current attempts to power up the card. Most inputs are rated
at 25 mA maximum. When this is exceeded, the chip may be damaged.
Failure on power-up: Even when there is not enough current to destroy an
input described above, the chip may be destroyed when the power to the card is
applied. This is due to the fact that the input current biases the IC so that it
acts as a forward biased diode on power-up. This type of failure is typical on
serial interface chips but can apply to any IC on the card.
Under-rated power supply: The board may fail to boot due to an underrated power supply. It is important that a quality power supply be used with
the XE–700 SBC that has sufficient current capacity, line and load regulation,
hold up time, current limiting, and minimum ripple. It is extremely important
to select a supply that ramps up in 10ms or less. This assures that all the
circuitry on the CPU control card sequences properly and avoids system lockup.
Excessive signal lead lengths: Another source of failure that was identified
years ago at Octagon was excessive lead lengths on digital inputs. Long leads
act as an antenna to pick up noise. They can also act as unterminated
transmission lines. When 5V is switched onto a line, it creates a transient
waveform. Octagon has seen sub-microsecond pulses of 8V or more. The
solution is to place a capacitor, for example 0.1 µF, across the switch contact.
This will also eliminate radio frequency and other high frequency pickup.
Avoiding damage to the heatsink or CPU
WARNING!
When handling any Octagon Single Board Computer, extreme care
must be taken not to strike the heatsink (if installed) against another
object, such as a table edge. Also, be careful not to drop the Single
Board Computer, since this may cause damage to the heatsink or
CPU as well.
Note
Any physical damage to the single board computer card is not covered under
warranty.
Excessive thermal stress
This card is guaranteed to operate over the published temperature ranges and
relevant conditions. However, sustained operation near the maximum temperature
specification is not recommended by Octagon or the CPU chip manufacturer due to
well known, thermal related, failure mechanisms. These failure mechanisms,
common to all silicon devices, can reduce the MTBF of the cards. Extended
operation at the lower limits of the temperature ranges has no limitations.
4
Table of Contents
Copyright ........................................................................................................................................................... 2
Disclaimer.......................................................................................................................................................... 2
Technical Support ............................................................................................................................................. 2
Revision History ................................................................................................................................................ 2
Using CMOS circuitry in industrial control ........................................................................................................ 3
Avoiding damage to the heatsink or CPU............................................................................................................ 4
Excessive thermal stress................................................................................................................................... 4
Table of Contents .................................................................................................................................................. 5
List of Figures........................................................................................................................................................ 9
List of Tables........................................................................................................................................................ 10
Overview: Section 1 – Installation ................................................................................................................. 11
Chapter 1: Overview.......................................................................................................................................... 12
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 12
XE–700 SBC major hardware features.............................................................................................................. 12
CPU.................................................................................................................................................................. 12
SDRAM ............................................................................................................................................................ 12
On-board flash ................................................................................................................................................. 12
CompactFlash socket ...................................................................................................................................... 12
Hard disk and floppy ports ............................................................................................................................. 12
USB ports ........................................................................................................................................................ 13
Multifunctional printer port ........................................................................................................................... 13
Digital I/O ........................................................................................................................................................ 13
Ethernet........................................................................................................................................................... 13
Serial ports ...................................................................................................................................................... 13
PC/104 interface .............................................................................................................................................. 13
Video ................................................................................................................................................................ 13
Keyboard and mouse port ............................................................................................................................... 14
Real time calendar/clock with battery backup............................................................................................... 14
Setup information stored in Flash for high reliability .................................................................................. 14
User-available EEPROM ................................................................................................................................ 14
Watchdog timer added for safety.................................................................................................................... 14
Hardware reset................................................................................................................................................ 14
5 Volt only operation lowers system cost ....................................................................................................... 14
Rugged environmental operation ................................................................................................................... 15
Size................................................................................................................................................................... 15
XE–700 SBC major software features................................................................................................................ 16
Diagnostic software verifies system integrity automatically ........................................................................ 16
Phoenix software BIOS ................................................................................................................................... 16
Octagon BIOS extensions................................................................................................................................ 16
Boot sequence .................................................................................................................................................. 16
Chapter 2: Quick start ...................................................................................................................................... 17
Component diagrams, connectors, switches and cables.................................................................................... 17
XE–700 SBC connectors and switches ........................................................................................................... 21
Cables............................................................................................................................................................... 22
Mounting the XE–700......................................................................................................................................... 23
Equipment required ........................................................................................................................................ 23
Hardware mounting ........................................................................................................................................ 24
XE–700 SBC power supply requirements ...................................................................................................... 25
Connecting a monitor and keyboard .................................................................................................................. 26
Monitor ............................................................................................................................................................ 26
Keyboard and mouse ....................................................................................................................................... 27
Installing an operating system........................................................................................................................... 27
OS on CD-ROM onto a hard drive or CompactFlash ........................................................................................ 27
Chapter 3: Setup programs.............................................................................................................................. 30
Operating systems other than DOS ................................................................................................................... 30
5
Setup.................................................................................................................................................................... 30
Main menu....................................................................................................................................................... 31
Hard drive submenus...................................................................................................................................... 32
Advanced menu ............................................................................................................................................... 33
I/O Device Configuration submenu ................................................................................................................ 34
Chipset Configuration submenu..................................................................................................................... 35
Boot menu........................................................................................................................................................ 36
Expanded Boot screen ..................................................................................................................................... 36
Exit menu ........................................................................................................................................................ 37
Overview: Section 2 – Hardware .................................................................................................................... 38
Chapter 4: Serial ports...................................................................................................................................... 39
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 39
Mating receptacles .......................................................................................................................................... 39
Serial port configurations ................................................................................................................................... 41
Setup menu for COM ports ............................................................................................................................. 41
Function and use of serial ports ......................................................................................................................... 44
COM1 as serial console device ........................................................................................................................ 44
COM1 through COM4 as RS–232 I/O ............................................................................................................ 44
COM3/4 as RS–422 and RS–485 networks .................................................................................................... 44
RS–422 ............................................................................................................................................................. 44
RS–485 ............................................................................................................................................................. 45
Chapter 5: LPT1 parallel port, LCD and keypad ........................................................................................ 47
LPT1 parallel port............................................................................................................................................... 47
Installing a printer ............................................................................................................................................. 47
Display................................................................................................................................................................. 48
Installing a display.......................................................................................................................................... 48
Keypad................................................................................................................................................................. 49
Installing a keypad.......................................................................................................................................... 49
Chapter 6: Console devices .............................................................................................................................. 50
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 50
Selecting console devices .................................................................................................................................... 50
Monitor and keyboard console ........................................................................................................................ 50
Serial console ................................................................................................................................................... 51
Chapter 7: CompactFlash, SDRAM, and battery backup........................................................................... 54
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 54
CompactFlash ..................................................................................................................................................... 54
Creating a bootable CompactFlash ................................................................................................................ 54
SDRAM................................................................................................................................................................ 55
Battery backup for real time calendar clock...................................................................................................... 55
Installing an AT battery ................................................................................................................................. 55
Chapter 8: External drives............................................................................................................................... 56
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 56
Hard disk controller............................................................................................................................................ 56
Master/slave designation for IDE devices ...................................................................................................... 56
Installing a hard drive........................................................................................................................................ 58
Floppy disk controller ......................................................................................................................................... 58
Power requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 58
Installing a floppy disk drive .......................................................................................................................... 58
Chapter 9: Bit-programmable digital I/O...................................................................................................... 59
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 59
Interfacing to switches and other devices.......................................................................................................... 62
Opto-module rack interface ............................................................................................................................ 62
Organization of banks......................................................................................................................................... 64
Port addressing................................................................................................................................................ 64
I/O lines pulled low.......................................................................................................................................... 64
Configuring and programming the I/O port ...................................................................................................... 65
Programming the I/O ...................................................................................................................................... 65
Configuring the I/O ......................................................................................................................................... 65
Writing and reading from I/O ......................................................................................................................... 66
6
I/O output program examples ......................................................................................................................... 66
I/O input program examples ........................................................................................................................... 67
Enhanced INT 17h function definitions............................................................................................................. 67
Initialize I/O .................................................................................................................................................... 67
Write I/O .......................................................................................................................................................... 68
Read I/O ........................................................................................................................................................... 69
Chapter 10: CRTs and TFT flat panels .......................................................................................................... 70
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 70
Video features ..................................................................................................................................................... 70
Simultaneous mode operation ........................................................................................................................ 70
Connecting a monitor.......................................................................................................................................... 70
Connecting a flat panel display.......................................................................................................................... 72
Flat panels requiring bias voltage.................................................................................................................. 73
Connecting the flat panel to the XE–700 SBC............................................................................................... 73
Programming the video BIOS ............................................................................................................................ 75
Additional notes on video BIOS...................................................................................................................... 75
Chapter 11: Ethernet......................................................................................................................................... 76
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 76
Chapter 12: PC/104 expansion......................................................................................................................... 77
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 77
Chapter 13: USB ................................................................................................................................................. 78
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 78
Overview: Section 3 – System management................................................................................................. 79
Chapter 14: Watchdog timer and hardware reset ...................................................................................... 80
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 80
Booting, power down, and strobing the watchdog timer ............................................................................... 80
Watchdog function definitions using enhanced INT 17h handler .................................................................... 81
Enable watchdog ............................................................................................................................................. 81
Strobe watchdog .............................................................................................................................................. 82
Disable watchdog............................................................................................................................................. 82
Hardware reset ................................................................................................................................................... 83
Chapter 15: Serial EEPROM............................................................................................................................ 84
Description .......................................................................................................................................................... 84
Enhanced INT 17h function definitions............................................................................................................. 84
Serial EEPROM .................................................................................................................................................. 84
Read a single word from the serial EEPROM................................................................................................ 84
Write a single word to the serial EEPROM ................................................................................................... 85
Read multiple words from the serial EEPROM............................................................................................. 85
Write multiple words to the serial EEPROM ................................................................................................ 86
Return serial EEPROM size ........................................................................................................................... 87
Chapter 16: System switches, user switch, BIOS update, system functions, CPU speed, CPU fan
and LEDs............................................................................................................................................................... 88
System switches .................................................................................................................................................. 88
System switch.................................................................................................................................................. 88
Extended BIOS switch .................................................................................................................................... 89
Video switch..................................................................................................................................................... 89
User switch ...................................................................................................................................................... 89
BIOS recovery switch ...................................................................................................................................... 89
BIOS programming using PHLASH.EXE...................................................................................................... 89
INT17 calls to read user switch ...................................................................................................................... 90
INT17 calls to read BIOS version................................................................................................................... 90
System functions................................................................................................................................................. 91
Return CPU Type ............................................................................................................................................ 91
CPU speed ........................................................................................................................................................... 93
CPU fan ............................................................................................................................................................... 93
LEDs.................................................................................................................................................................... 93
Chapter 17: Troubleshooting........................................................................................................................... 94
Boot Block Recovery............................................................................................................................................ 94
Memory conflicts using operating system other than DOS .............................................................................. 94
7
No system LED activity...................................................................................................................................... 94
No CRT or flat panel video ................................................................................................................................. 94
Video is present but is distorted ..................................................................................................................... 95
No serial console activity .................................................................................................................................... 96
Garbled serial console screen activity................................................................................................................ 96
System generates a BIOS message but locks up when booting........................................................................ 96
System will not boot from CompactFlash .......................................................................................................... 96
System locks up on power-up; may or may not respond to reset switch .......................................................... 97
System locks up after power-down/power-up .................................................................................................... 97
LED signaling of “beep” codes ............................................................................................................................ 97
Technical assistance ......................................................................................................................................... 101
Overview: Section 4 – Appendices................................................................................................................ 102
Appendix A: XE–700 SBC technical data .................................................................................................... 103
Technical specifications .................................................................................................................................... 103
CPU................................................................................................................................................................ 103
PCI bus clock ................................................................................................................................................. 103
ISA bus clock ................................................................................................................................................. 103
BIOS............................................................................................................................................................... 103
SDRAM .......................................................................................................................................................... 103
On-board flash ............................................................................................................................................... 103
Hard drive...................................................................................................................................................... 103
Floppy drive................................................................................................................................................... 103
CompactFlash socket .................................................................................................................................... 103
Parallel port................................................................................................................................................... 103
USB ................................................................................................................................................................ 103
Serial I/O........................................................................................................................................................ 103
Digital I/O ...................................................................................................................................................... 103
Keyboard and mouse ports............................................................................................................................ 103
Ethernet......................................................................................................................................................... 104
Video .............................................................................................................................................................. 104
Watchdog timer ............................................................................................................................................. 104
Real time clock............................................................................................................................................... 104
Expansion ...................................................................................................................................................... 104
Operating systems......................................................................................................................................... 104
PCI bus mastering......................................................................................................................................... 104
Power requirements ...................................................................................................................................... 104
Environmental specifications ....................................................................................................................... 104
Size................................................................................................................................................................. 104
Weight............................................................................................................................................................ 104
Excessive thermal stress............................................................................................................................... 104
Mating connectors............................................................................................................................................. 105
Maps .................................................................................................................................................................. 106
Switch settings.................................................................................................................................................. 108
Connector pin–outs ........................................................................................................................................... 110
Appendix B: Software utilities...................................................................................................................... 118
Introduction....................................................................................................................................................... 118
Support commands........................................................................................................................................ 118
I17HNDLR.EXE................................................................................................................................................ 119
PHLASH.EXE ................................................................................................................................................... 119
RESET.COM ..................................................................................................................................................... 120
VGA700.EXE..................................................................................................................................................... 120
Appendix C: Accessories.................................................................................................................................. 121
Warranty ............................................................................................................................................................. 122
Limitations on warranty................................................................................................................................... 122
Service policy..................................................................................................................................................... 122
Returning a product for repair ......................................................................................................................... 122
Returns.............................................................................................................................................................. 123
Governing law ................................................................................................................................................... 123
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List of Figures
Figure 2–1
Figure 2–2
Figure 2–3
Figure 2–4
Figure 2–5
Figure 2–6
Figure 4–1
Figure 4–2
Figure 4–3
Figure 4–4
Figure 5–1
Figure 5–2
Figure 6–1
Figure 6–2
Figure 8–1
Figure 9–1
Figure 9–2
Figure 10–1
Figure 10–2
Figure 12–1
XE–700 SBC component diagram (top) ..........................................................................18
XE–700 SBC component diagram (bottom) ....................................................................19
XE–700 SBC dimensions .................................................................................................20
Power connector, J13 .......................................................................................................24
Connecting a monitor and keyboard ...............................................................................26
Installing an operating system........................................................................................29
COM ports ........................................................................................................................40
VTC-20F cable and null modem adapter ........................................................................40
Typical RS–422 four-wire interface circuit .....................................................................45
Typical RS–485 two–wire half duplex interface circuit .................................................46
LPT1 as a printer port .....................................................................................................48
LPT1 as a display or keypad port....................................................................................49
Monitor and keyboard as console ....................................................................................51
The XE–700 SBC and a serial console ............................................................................53
XE–700 SBC with external drives ..................................................................................57
Typical digital I/O configurations ...................................................................................61
Organization of banks......................................................................................................64
The XE–700 SBC and a VGA monitor ............................................................................72
The XE–700 SBC and a flat panel display......................................................................74
Typical PC/104 module stack ..........................................................................................77
9
List of Tables
Table 2–1
Table 2–2
Table 2–3
Table 4–1
Table 4–2
Table 4–3
Table 4–4
Table 4–5
Table 5–1
Table 7–1
Table 9–1
Table 9–2
Table 9–3
Table 9–4
Table 10–1
Table 10–2
Table 11–1
Table 16−1
Table 16−2
Table 16–3
Table 17–1
Table A–1
Table A–2
Table A–3
Table A–4
Table A–5
Table A−6
Table A–7
Table A–8
Table A–9
Table A–10
Table A–11
Table A–12
Table A–13
Table A–14
Table A–15
Table A–16
Table A–17
Table A–18
Table A–19
Table A–20
Table A–21
Table A–22
Table A–23
Table A–24
Table A–25
Table C–1
Table C–2
10
XE–700 SBC connector functions....................................................................................21
XE–700 SBC switch functions.........................................................................................21
Power connector: J13 .......................................................................................................25
Serial port configurations ................................................................................................42
COM1 and COM2 connector pin-outs (J12 connector) ...................................................42
COM3 and COM4 connector pin-outs (J17 connector) ...................................................43
COM3 and COM4 RS–422/485 connector pin-outs ........................................................43
COM3/4 switches, Switch 2 .............................................................................................43
LPT1 connector: J19 ........................................................................................................47
J6 – Battery connector.....................................................................................................55
J9 arranged by function – digital I/O connector .............................................................59
J9 arranged by pins – digital I/O connector....................................................................60
Digital I/O opto-rack interface ........................................................................................63
I/O port byte .....................................................................................................................65
J3 – CRT connector ..........................................................................................................71
Flat panel connector: J5 ..................................................................................................74
Ethernet LEDs .................................................................................................................76
System configuration switches, Switch 4........................................................................88
CPU clock speed switch, Switch 3...................................................................................93
J10 – CPU fan connector .................................................................................................93
BIOS beep codes...............................................................................................................98
Table 2–1 XE–700 SBC connector functions ................................................................105
XE–700 SBC DMA map.................................................................................................106
XE–700 SBC I/O map ....................................................................................................106
XE–700 SBC interrupt map ..........................................................................................107
XE–700 SBC memory map ............................................................................................108
COM3/4 switches, Switch 2 ...........................................................................................108
CPU clock speed switch, Switch 3.................................................................................108
System configuration switches, Switch 4......................................................................109
J3 – CRT connector ........................................................................................................110
J4 – EIDE .......................................................................................................................110
J5 – Flat panel connector ..............................................................................................111
J6 – Battery connector...................................................................................................111
J7 – Ethernet connector.................................................................................................112
J8 – USB connector........................................................................................................112
J9 – Digital I/O connector..............................................................................................112
J10 – CPU fan connector ...............................................................................................113
J11 – PC/104 connector..................................................................................................113
J12 – COM1 and COM2.................................................................................................114
J13 – Power connector ...................................................................................................114
J14 and J15 – COM3 and COM4 RS–422/485 connectors ...........................................114
J16 – PS/2 keyboard mouse ...........................................................................................115
J17 – COM3 and COM4 connector................................................................................115
J18 – Floppy drive..........................................................................................................116
J19 – LPT1 .....................................................................................................................116
J500 – CompactFlash ....................................................................................................117
Cables and accessories...................................................................................................121
Digital I/O accessories ...................................................................................................121
Overview: Section 1 – Installation
Section 1 provides installation and programming instructions, startup options, and
system configuration program examples. The following chapters are included:
Chapter 1: Overview
Chapter 2: Quick start
Chapter 3: Setup programs
11
Chapter 1: Overview
Description
The XE–700 is a Single Board Computer (SBC) in the EPIC™ form factor. It is
intended for higher-performance, low-power embedded control applications. The
XE–700 SBC integrates serial communications, Ethernet, IDE hard disk port,
CompactFlash socket, floppy port, LPT parallel port, digital I/O, two USB ports,
PS/2 keyboard and mouse port, and video. The XE–700 SBC can be used in a standalone mode or expanded through a PC/104 interface.
The XE–700 SBC comes with a BIOS loaded on a flash device for easy updates. It is
fully compatible with many popular operating systems.
XE–700 SBC major hardware features
CPU
The CPU is a high-performance, low-power STPC Atlas processor with a switchselectable clock speed of either 66 or 133 MHz. It uses the 83977 Super I/O for
some of the peripherals. The XE–700 SBC has an ISA bus speed of 8.33 MHz and a
PCI bus speed of 33 MHz.
SDRAM
The XE–700 comes with 64 MB surface-mount SDRAM.
On-board flash
On board is a 512 KB surface-mount boot flash that contains the BIOS.
CompactFlash socket
The CompactFlash socket accepts a Type I or Type II 3V CompactFlash card. The
CompactFlash appears as an IDE device to the system. It is implemented with an
ATA-4 compliant IDE controller, and appears in Setup as the Primary IDE device.
Hard disk and floppy ports
The XE–700 has two ATA-4 compliant IDE controllers. The primary channel is
dedicated to the CompactFlash. The secondary channel supports two additional
IDE devices through a 2 mm, 44-pin connector. This connector supplies power to
the devices. Octagon Systems has a 44-pin to 40-pin Hard Drive Adapter cable
(part #4080 or #6246) to connect IDE devices with a 40-pin interface.
The floppy port is terminated with a standard 34-pin connector and supports one
floppy drive.
12
USB ports
The XE–700 provides two USB 1.1 channels, accessed through a 10-pin header.
USB 1.1 provides speeds up to 12 Mbps. The Octagon Systems two-port USB cable
provides a direct connection from the 10-pin connector to two USB devices. USB is
available when using an operating system that supports USB. There is no support
from Octagon Systems for DOS legacy USB.
Both channels are Open HCI compliant.
Multifunctional printer port
The XE–700 incorporates the latest enhanced parallel port and includes
unidirectional, bidirectional, ECP and EPP modes.
The following represent applications for the multifunctional parallel port:
LPT1 for PC compatible printers
17 general purpose digital I/O lines
Up to a 4 x 4 matrix keypad
4-line alphanumeric display
Digital I/O
The 24 digital I/O lines will interface with logic devices, switch inputs, LEDs and
industry standard opto module racks. The I/O lines are 0–5V logic compatible. Each
line can sink or source 15mA. They can be individually programmed as inputs or
outputs.
Ethernet
The XE–700 provides one 10/100BaseT Ethernet port and supports the IEEE 802.3
Ethernet standard.
Serial ports
The XE–700 SBC has four serial ports, which provide one 8-wire and three 4-wire
RS–232C ports. COM3 and COM4 can also be configured as RS–422 or RS–485.
PC/104 interface
The PC/104 interface accepts an 8- or 16-bit PC/104 expansion board. Numerous
PC/104 expansion boards are available from Octagon Systems. PC/104 expansion
boards may be stacked on the XE–700 SBC to form a fully-integrated system.
Video
The XE–700 SBC supports CRT monitors up to 1280 x 1024 x 24 bpp (bits per
pixel) resolution, and TFT-compatible flat panel displays with up to 1024 x 1024 x
18 bpp resolution. Simultaneous mode is supported for viewing CRT and flat panel
at the same time.
13
Keyboard and mouse port
The keyboard controller accepts an AT style keyboard. The mouse port is combined
with the keyboard port. The PS/2 Keyboard Mouse Cable, 8-Pin Header has a PS/2
connector for keyboard support. A “Y” cable, available at any computer store,
attaches to the Keyboard Mouse Cable and provides mouse support.
Real time calendar/clock with battery backup
The real time clock is fully AT compatible. An optional off-card battery powers the
real time clock when the 5 volt supply is removed.
Setup information stored in Flash for high reliability
Loss of Setup data is serious in industrial applications. Most PCs store Setup
information in battery-backed CMOS RAM. If the battery fails or is replaced
during routine maintenance, this information is lost. Without a keyboard and
monitor in embedded applications, time consuming re-initialization is required.
The XE–700 SBC stores the Setup information in serial EEPROM.
User-available EEPROM
An EEPROM has 1024 words available to the user. Software routines to use this
available memory come with the XE–700 SBC.
Watchdog timer added for safety
The watchdog timer resets the system if the program stops unexpectedly. The
watchdog is enabled, disabled and strobed under software control; it can also be
enabled or disabled in Setup. The time-out period is programmable for 1, 10 or 60
seconds.
Hardware reset
A hardware reset ensures complete reset of the system and all attached
peripherals. A hardware reset can be done by any of the following methods:
An expired watchdog timer cycle
Depressing the reset switch
Cycling power
Power supervisor reset
5 Volt only operation lowers system cost
5V ±5%
±12V supplied to PC/104 connector from the power connector; not required for
XE–700 SBC operation
14
Rugged environmental operation
Operating temperature
–40° to +85°C; Octagon recommends the
conductive cooling kit for prolonged operation
near the upper limit.
Nonoperating temperature
–55° to 95°C, nonoperating
Relative humidity
5% to 95% noncondensing
Shock
40g, 3 axis
Vibration
5g, 3 axis
Size
115 mm x 165 mm x 29.5 mm, EPIC™ form factor
15
XE–700 SBC major software features
Diagnostic software verifies system integrity automatically
The XE–700 SBC has built-in diagnostic software that can be used to verify on-card
I/O and memory functions. On power-up, a series of tests is performed. If a problem
occurs, the failed test can be identified by a flashing LED or a beep code. The test is
performed automatically every time the system is reset or powered up. Memory
verification does not require software, test equipment, monitor, keyboard, disks, or
test fixtures. See the “Troubleshooting” chapter for a listing of tests and failures
and their descriptions.
Phoenix software BIOS
The XE–700 SBC has a Phoenix Software BIOS with Octagon BIOS extensions.
The BIOS extensions support the INT17 functions.
Octagon BIOS extensions
On-board BIOS extensions allow easy access to watchdog timer functions, serial
EEPROM, digital I/O, etc.
Boot sequence
An XE–700 SBC can be configured to boot from CompactFlash, a hard disk, a
floppy, or a CD–ROM.
16
Chapter 2: Quick start
This chapter covers the basics of setting up an XE–700 SBC system. The following
topics are discussed:
Component diagrams, connectors, switches and cables
Mounting the XE–700 SBC
Connecting a monitor and keyboard
Installing an operating system
Component diagrams, connectors, switches and cables
Figures 2–1 and 2–2 show the connectors and switches and their locations on the
XE–700 SBC. Figure 2–3 shows the dimensions of the XE–700 SBC in inches and
millimeters. The sections immediately following those figures describe the
connectors and switches, and some cables that you might require.
WARNING!
The XE–700 SBC contains static-sensitive CMOS components. To
avoid damaging your card and its components:
Ground yourself before handling the card
Disconnect power before removing or inserting a PC/104 expansion
board.
17
Figure 2–1
18
XE–700 SBC component diagram (top)
Figure 2–2
XE–700 SBC component diagram (bottom)
19
Figure 2–3
20
XE–700 SBC dimensions
XE–700 SBC connectors and switches
Table 2–1 lists the connector reference designators and function for each of the
connectors. Table 2–2 lists the DIP switch reference designators and functions for
each of the switches. To view the physical location of each connector and switch
block refer to the illustration on page 18. For information on mating connectors see
page 105. For information on custom cables see the following section.
Table 2–1
XE–700 SBC connector functions
Connector
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J6
J7
J8
J9
J10
J11
J12
J13
J14
J15
J16
J17
J18
J19
J500
Table 2–2
Function
For factory use only
For factory use only
VGA video
Hard drive
TFT flat panel video
PC battery
Ethernet
USB1/2
Digital I/O
CPU fan (optional load)
PC/104
COM1/2
Power
COM4 RS–422/485
COM3 RS–422/485
PS/2 Keyboard / Mouse
COM3/4
Floppy drive
LPT parallel port
CompactFlash
XE–700 SBC switch functions
Switch
SW1
SW2
SW3
SW4
Function
Reset
COM3/4 termination
CPU clock speed
System selections
21
Cables
The cables listed below connect to the XE–700 SBC and provide industry-standard
interfaces. For ordering information see page 121.
COM PORT VTC-20F Cable. This cable connects to the 20-pin COM1/2 or
COM3/4 ports and provides two DB-9 female connectors. A VTC-20M provides
two DB-9 male connectors.
0.100-inch RS-422/485 Cable. This cable connects to the 5-pin header for RS422/485 on COM3 or COM4 and provides a standard DB-9 interface.
CMA-26 Ribbon Cable. Connects the 26-pin digital I/O port to an STB-26
Termination Board to provide access for field wiring.
2 mm VGA-12 Cable. Provides a standard 15-pin VGA interface.
44-pin to 40-pin IDE Cable. Converts the 44-pin IDE header to a 40-pin IDE
header.
PS/2 Keyboard Mouse Cable, 8-Pin Header. Connects to the
keyboard/mouse port to provide PS/2 keyboard interface. A “Y” cable, available
at any computer store, attaches to the Keyboard Mouse Cable and provides
mouse support.
ATX Power Cable. Connects to the 10-pin ATX power connector and provides
a standard 20-pin ATX connector.
Two-port USB Cable. Converts the 10-pin header for USB1,2 into two
standard USB connectors.
Caution
USB devices are hot-swappable when a device is plugged into a
standard USB connector, as pins on the connectors determine the
order in which they make contact. Devices are not hot-swappable
when connected to a non-standard header. You can hot swap a
device through the USB connector on the two port USB cable, or
through another USB connector wired to the 10-pin header, but you
cannot hot swap at the 10-pin header itself.
22
Mounting the XE–700
WARNING!
The XE–700 contains static-sensitive CMOS components. To avoid
damaging your card and its components:
Ground yourself before handling the card and observe proper ESD
precautions
Disconnect power before removing or inserting a PC/104 expansion
board
Equipment required
To install the XE–700 SBC you will need the following equipment (or equivalent):
XE–700 SBC
+5V power supply – see the XE–700 SBC power supply requirements section.
You might also need an ATX power cable, part #6537.
A device with an operating system. The device could be a CompactFlash, hard
disk, floppy or CD ROM. The operating system can be Windows CE.net, Linux,
QNX, or DOS.
PS/2 style keyboard, and PS/2 Keyboard Mouse Cable, part #6837
SVGA monitor
2 mm VGA-12 Cable, part #6392
Octagon Products, Manuals, and Catalog CD
VTC-20F Cable, part #4866 (for serial console)
Null modem adapter, #2740 (for serial console)
Windows HyperTerminal or equivalent terminal emulation software (for serial
console)
Your PC (for serial console)
Hardware components required to mount the XE–700 SBC (not included):
9 threaded hex standoffs (4–40 x 3/4”)
9 screws (4–40 x 3/16”)
9 internal star lock washers (#4)
9 nuts (4–40)
Refer to the XE–700 SBC component diagram, figure 2–1 on page 18, for the
location of various connectors, and to the mounting hole diagram, figure 2–3 on
page 20, for mounting the XE–700 SBC system.
23
Hardware mounting
1. Use the standoffs, washers, and screws and place them in the nine holes on the
XE–700 SBC board. Refer to Figure 2–3 for the center-to-center mounting hole
dimensions and for the location of the designated holes used for mounting the
hardware.
WARNING!
All nine standoffs, screws and washers must be used to secure the
XE–700 SBC. The standoffs ensure full support of the board.
WARNING!
Verify that the washers and standoffs do not touch any of the
component pads adjacent to the mounting holes. Damage will occur
at power-up.
2. Connect a 5V power source to the XE–700 SBC. Refer to the Power Supply
Requirements section, page 25. The power supply connector is located at J13.
Refer to Figure 2–4 and Table 2–3.
Note
The +12V and –12V signals are routed to the PC/104 bus only.
WARNING!
Make sure the power supply is OFF when connecting the power
cable to the XE–700 SBC board. Damage to the XE–700 SBC may
occur if the power is ON when connecting the power cable.
WARNING!
Accidentally crossing the wires, i.e., plugging +5V wires into the
ground connector or the ground wires into the +5V connector will
damage the XE–700 SBC.
Figure 2–4
Power connector, J13
5
10
J13
1
24
6
Table 2–3
Power connector: J13
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
Function
nc
GND
GND
+12V
nc
Function
nc
+5v
+5v
–12V
GND
Pin
6
7
8
9
10
XE–700 SBC power supply requirements
The XE–700 SBC is designed to operate from a single +5 VDC supply, connected at
J13. If you are using the PC/104 interface, you may also require ±12 VDC. The
connector is a 10-pin ATX PC power supply connector, and connects to a 10-pin
ATX power supply, or with an adapter cable, to a standard 20-pin ATX power
supply. The typical current requirement for the XE–700 SBC is listed in the
Technical Data appendix.
The user should consider factors such as the power cable conductor gauge, number
and length of conductors, mating connectors, and the power requirements of
external devices such as hard drives, floppy drives, displays, mouse, and keyboard.
It is important that a quality power supply be used that has sufficient current
capacity, line and load regulation, hold up time, current limiting, and minimum
ripple.
It is extremely important to select a supply that ramps up in 10ms or less. This
assures that all the circuitry on the XE–700 SBC sequences properly and avoids
system lockup.
Also, select a power supply that discharges quickly. If large power supply output
capacitors are used, powering the system down and then up may lock up the XE–
700 SBC. If the power supply does not drain below 0.7V, the CMOS components on
the XE–700 SBC will act like diodes and forward bias, potentially damaging the
XE–700 SBC circuitry.
The proper selection of a quality power supply and power supply cable ensures
reliability and proper functioning of the XE–700 SBC.
25
Connecting a monitor and keyboard
Figure 2–5 shows the XE–700 SBC with a monitor and keyboard. The following
sections describe how to connect these items.
WARNING!
The video connector on the XE–700 is keyed, but some cables are not
keyed and can be plugged in incorrectly. Ensure that pin 1 of the
cable is connected to pin 1 of the connector (indicated by the dot).
Incorrect connection could damage your equipment.
Figure 2–5
Connecting a monitor and keyboard
VGA Monitor
2 mm VGA-12 cable
Power Supply
.
Dot indicates
pin 1
PS/2 Keyboard
PS/2 Keyboard Mouse
Cable
XE–700
Monitor
The XE–700 SBC interfaces to a standard SVGA monitor through the J3 connector
using a 2 mm VGA-12 cable. Connect one end of the 2 mm VGA-12 cable into J3
and connect the other end to a SVGA monitor cable.
Note
26
The video switch, SW4 position 3, must be ON to use a monitor. This is the default
configuration.
Keyboard and mouse
The XE–700 SBC accepts an AT style keyboard. The mouse port shares the
keyboard connector. The PS/2 Keyboard Mouse Cable, 8-Pin Header has a PS/2
type connector, and will connect directly to a keyboard. To connect a mouse, use a
laptop-style “Y” connector, available at computer stores, that splits the signals into
keyboard and mouse connectors.
Note
With some “Y” cables you may have to plug the mouse into the keyboard
icon, and the keyboard into the mouse icon; if the mouse and keyboard do
not function at power up, try switching them.
Installing an operating system
The XE–700 SBC does not come with an installed operating system. You can install
an operating system onto a hard drive or CompactFlash. Octagon Systems has OS
Embedder™ kits available for several operating systems. These kits directly
support the unique features of Octagon products, such as digital I/O, watchdog
timer, etc., eliminating the need to write special drivers. Contact Octagon Systems
for information concerning OS Embedder™ kits.
To install an operating system you will need:
2 mm VGA-12 video cable, #6392
PS/2 style keyboard, and PS/2 Keyboard Mouse Cable, part #6837
VGA monitor
CD-ROM drive
Operating system media
Hard drive or CompactFlash to install the operating system on to
If installing onto a hard drive, an IDE cable with master and slave connectors
OS on CD-ROM onto a hard drive or CompactFlash
Refer to Figure 2–6 on page 29 for the following:
1. Attach the 2 mm VGA-12 video cable to J3.
2. Connect the PS/2 keyboard and PS/2 Keyboard Mouse Cable to J16, a VGA
monitor to the VGA-12 video cable, and a CD-ROM drive to J4. Configure the
CD-ROM drive as a master.
3. If using a hard drive, configure it as a slave device and install it on the IDE
cable connected to J4.
Note
IDE devices have a jumper or a switch that designates whether the device is a
master or a slave device. If only one device is connected to a port, it must be
configured as a master. If two devices are connected, one must be configured as a
master and one as a slave. The XE–700 does not use the CS signal (Cable Select) to
designate master or slave on a multi-connector cable. You can use BIOS Setup to
designate either the master or the slave as a boot device.
27
4. If using a CompactFlash, install it into the CompactFlash socket.
5. Apply power to the XE–700 SBC system. A logon message similar to the one
below will appear on your PC monitor:
Copyright 1985-2001 Phoenix Technologies Ltd.
All Rights Reserved
Octagon Systems: XE–700 V1.00
CPU =Cyrix CX486DX2 133MHz
637K System RAM Passed
62M Extended RAM Passed
System BIOS shadowed
Video BIOS Shadowed
6. Enter Setup by pressing the F2 key during BIOS POST sequence (this occurs
between the memory test and bootup).
Main
Advanced
Boot
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Exit
System Time:
System Date:
[00:00:36]
[01/01/1988]
Item Specific Help
Legacy Diskette A:
[Disabled]
<Tab>, <Shift-Tab>, or
<Enter> selects field.
>
>
>
>
[None]
[None]
[None]
[None]
Primary Master
Primary Slave
Secondary Master
Secondary Slave
System Memory:
Extended Memory:
F1 Help
Esc Exit
Note
↑ ↓ Select Item
→ Select Menu
640 KB
64000 KB
-/+
Change Values
Enter Select > Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
Your display message may be slightly different
7. Configure the CD-ROM as a master device in BIOS Setup, and change the boot
sequence to CD-ROM drive first. Save the changes and exit Setup.
8. Insert the operating system media into the CD-ROM drive.
9. Reboot the system. The system should boot to the CD-ROM.
10. Follow the on-screen dialog to load the operating system. Refer to the OS
documentation for further information.
28
Figure 2–6
Installing an operating system
VGA Monitor
2 mm VGA-12 cable
Power Supply
.
Dot indicates
pin 1
PS/2 Keyboard
PS/2 Keyboard Mouse
Cable
XE–700
CompactFlash installed into
CompactFlash socket on back of board
IDE ribbon cable for two devices, or
one device directly into J4
CD-ROM
and / or
Hard Drive
29
Chapter 3: Setup programs
This chapter discusses running the Setup configuration program on the XE–700
SBC. Setup configures devices set up by the BIOS such as serial ports, floppy
drives, etc.
Operating systems other than DOS
If you are using an operating system other than DOS the X switch should be Off.
The X switch maps the INT17 extended BIOS into the 0xD8000-0xDFFFF memory.
This can cause problems with applications or hardware running on other operating
systems if they attempt to use this memory range. Setting the X switch Off frees
this memory for use by other operating systems.
Setup
Setup can be entered by pressing the “F2” key during the BIOS POST sequence
(this occurs between the memory test and boot).
Also, by setting the “S” switch Off, you will force the setup to revert to the factory
programmed defaults shown in the following menus. This allows the user to
reconfigure the setup.
Note
The Setup defaults might vary slightly from those shown in the following menus
depending on the BIOS revision on your card.
The system will display the XE–700 SBC PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility Main menu.
Select the submenu by using the up/down arrows, then press <ENTER> (when
using a monitor connected to the XE–700 SBC). For a serial console configuration,
Ctrl + E is up and Ctrl + X is down.
30
Main menu
The Main menu allows you to set the basic system configuration. Default values
are shown in the menu below.
Main
Advanced
Boot
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Exit
System Time:
System Date:
[00:00:36]
[01/01/1988]
Item Specific Help
Legacy Diskette A:
[Disabled]
<Tab>, <Shift-Tab>, or
<Enter> selects field.
>
>
>
>
[None]
[None]
[None]
[None]
Primary Master
Primary Slave
Secondary Master
Secondary Slave
System Memory:
Extended Memory:
F1 Help
Esc Exit
640 KB
64000 KB
↑ ↓ Select Item
→ Select Menu
-/+
Change Values
Enter Select > Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
System Time:
Sets the time for the system clock.
System Date:
Sets the date for the system clock.
Legacy Diskette A:
Enables or disables a legacy floppy disk drive. Choices are Disabled, 360
KB 5 ¼”, 1.2 MB 5 ¼”, 720 KB 3 ½”, 1.44/1.25 MB 3 ½”, 2.88 MB 3 ½”.
>Primary Master
Accesses submenu for a Primary Master disk drive. Options are None, CDROM, ATAPI Removable, IDE Removable, Other ATAPI, User, and Auto.
This channel is hardwired to the CompactFlash, and cannot be used for
other devices.
>Primary Slave
This channel is reserved and cannot be used.
>Secondary Master Same as Primary Master. Note that the XE–700 SBC only supports three
IDE devices total (CompactFlash as primary Master and two Secondary
devices.)
>Secondary Slave
Same as Primary Master. Note that the XE–700 SBC only supports three
IDE devices (CompactFlash as primary Master and two Secondary devices.)
System Memory:
Displays the amount of system memory which is on the card.
Extended Memory:
Displays the amount of extended memory on the card.
31
Hard drive submenus
The Hard drive submenus allow you to set the primary/secondary/master/slave
parameters. Except for older disk drives, the Auto selection will detect and display
the correct parameters. Default values are shown in the menu below.
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Main
Primary Master
[3253MB]
Type:
[Auto]
Multi-Sector Transfers:
LBA Mode Control:
32 Bit I/O:
Transfer Mode:
Smart Monitoring
[16 Sectors]
[Enabled]
[Disabled]
[Fast PIO 4]
[Disabled]
F1 Help
Esc Exit
Type:
32
↑ ↓ Select Item
→ Select Menu
-/+
Change Values
Enter Select > Sub-Menu
Item Specific Help
User = you enter
parameters of hard-disk
drive installed at this
connection.
Auto = autotypes
hard-disk drive
installed here.
CD-ROM = a CD- ROM drive
is installed here.
ATAPI Removable =
removable disk drive is
installed here.
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
Specifies types of hard drives. Choices are None, Auto, CD-ROM, ATAPI
removable, Other ATAPI, and User. Selecting User allows you to specify
the parameters of your hard drive.
Advanced menu
The Advanced menu allows you to set advanced system configuration. Note that if
items are incorrectly set in this menu, the system might malfunction. Default
values are shown in the menu below.
Main
Advanced
Boot
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Exit
Item Specific Help
Setup Warning
Setting items on this menu to incorrect
values may cause your system to malfunction.
Serial Video:
[Enabled]
Baud Rate:
[38.4K]
Boot-time Diagnostic Screen:
QuickBoot Mode
Installed O/S:
Reset Configuration Data:
Enables redirection of
video and keyboard to
serial port COM1.
[Disabled]
[Disabled]
[Other]
[No]
>I/O Device Configuration
>Chipset Configuration
Watchdog:
F1 Help
Esc Exit
[Disabled]
↑ ↓ Select Item
→ Select Menu
-/+
Change Values
Enter Select > Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
Serial Video:
Enabled, Disabled. Enables redirection of video and keyboard to
COM1.
Baud Rate:
9600, 19.2K, 38.4K, 57.6K, 115K. Selects baud rate for serial
console.
Boot-time Diagnostic Screen:
QuickBoot Mode:
Installed O/S:
Disabled, Enabled. Displays the diagnostic screen during boot.
Enabled, Disabled. When disabled, allows the system to skip
certain tests during boot. This decreases the time needed to boot
the system.
`
Other, Win2000, WinMe, Win98, Win95. Selects the operating
system you use most often. Note that the XE–700 only has 64MB
ram, and might not support some versions of Windows.
Reset Configuration Data: Yes or No. Yes erases all configuration data in a section of memory
for ESCD (Extended System Configuration Data) which stores the
configuration settings for non-PnP plug in devices. Select Yes when
required to restore the manufacturer’s defaults.
Watchdog:
Enabled, Disabled. Enables watchdog timer.
33
I/O Device Configuration submenu
The I/O Device Configuration submenu allows you to set the I/O configurations.
Default values are shown in the menu below.
Main
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Advanced
Boot
Exit
I/O Device Configuration
Item Specific Help
Serial port C:
Interrupt:
Interface:
[Enabled]
[IRQ 9]
[RS-232]
Serial port D:
Interrupt:
Interface:
[Enabled]
[IRQ 9]
[RS-232]
Parallel port:
Mode:
Base I/O address:
Interrupt:
[Disabled]
[Bi-directional]
[378]
[IRQ 7]
Floppy disk controller:
Base I/O address:
[Enabled]
[Primary]
F1 Help
Esc Exit
↑ ↓ Select Item
→ Select Menu
-/+
Change Values
Enter Select > Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
Serial port C:
Enabled, Disabled
Interrupt:
IRQ4, IRQ9, None
Interface:
RS-232, RS-485
Serial port B:
Enabled, Disabled
Interrupt:
IRQ9, IRQ3, IRQ10, None
Interface:
RS-232, RS-485
Parallel port:
Disabled, Enabled, Auto, OS controlled. Enabled allows user to set
configuration, while Auto uses the BIOS or OS configuration.
Mode:
Output only, Bi-directional, EPP, ECP. If ECP mode is selected another
menu item appears for selection of DMA channel, with choices of DMA1 or
DMA3.
Base I/O address:
378, 278, 3BC
Interrupt:
IRQ5, IRQ7
Floppy disk controller:
Base I/O address:
34
Enabled, Disabled
Primary, Secondary. Selects the floppy base I/O address.
Chipset Configuration submenu
The Advanced Chipset Control submenu allows you to set the video and PS/2
mouse configurations. Default values are shown in the menu below.
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Advanced
Boot
Exit
Chipset Configuration
Item Specific Help
Main
Graphics Memory Size
TV Type
TV Mode
[4096K]
not applicable
not applicable
ISA
DMA
DMA
DMA
[14 MHz / 2]
[ISA Clock / 2]
[1 Clock]
[1 Clock]
Clock
Clock
8 Bit Wait State
16 Bit Wait State
PCI to Host Read Prefetch
PCI to Host Write Posting
CAS Latency
RAS Recharge
RAS to CAS Delay
RAS Cycle Timing
Keep RAS Active
F1 Help
Esc Exit
↑ ↓ Select Item
→ Select Menu
[Disabled]
[Disabled]
[1 Clock]
[1 Clock]
[1 Clock]
[8 Clocks]
[Yes]
-/+
Change Values
Enter Select > Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
Graphics Memory Size:
4096K, 3072K, 2048K, 1024K, 512K. Selects the VGA frame buffer
size, which is deducted from main memory.
TV Type, TV Mode:
These functions are not supported on the XE–700.
ISA Clock:
14 MHz / 2, PCI Clock / 4. Selects the ISA bus clock frequency.
DMA Clock:
ISA Clock / 2, ISA Clock. Selects the DMA clock frequency.
DMA 8 Bit Wait State:
1 Clock, 2 Clocks, 3 Clocks, 4 Clocks. Selects the number of wait
states for the 8-bit DMA.
DMA 16 Bit Wait State:
1 Clock, 2 Clocks, 3 Clocks, 4 Clocks. Selects the number of wait
states for the 16-bit DMA.
PCI to Host Read Prefetch: Disabled, Enabled. Enables PCI to Host Read Prefetch.
PCI to Host Write Posting: Disabled, Enabled. Enables PCI to Host Write Posting.
CAS Latency:
3 Clocks, 2 Clocks, 1 Clock. Sets the number of clocks for CAS
latency.
RAS Recharge:
3 Clocks, 2 Clocks, 1 Clock. Sets the number of clocks for RAS
recharge.
RAS to CAS Delay:
3 Clocks, 1 Clock. Sets the number of clocks for RAS to CAS
recharge.
RAS Cycle Timing:
8 Clocks, 7 Clocks, 6 Clocks, 5 Clocks, 4 Clocks, 3 Clocks. Sets the
number of clocks for RAS cycle timing.
Keep RAS Active:
Yes, No. Keeps RAS active.
35
Boot menu
The Boot menu allows you set the order of drives for booting. Default values are
shown in the menu below.
Main
Advanced
Boot Order
Boot
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Exit
Item Specific Help
+Removable Devices
+Hard Drive
CD-ROM Drive
F1 Help
Esc Exit
Keys used to view or
configure devices:
<Enter> expands or
collapses devices with
+ or <Ctrl+Enter> expands
all
³
<Shift + 1> enables or
disables a device.
<+> and <-> moves the
device up or down.
<n> May move removable
device between Hard
Disk or Removable Disk
<d> Remove a device
that is not installed.
↑ ↓ Select Item
→ Select Menu
-/+
Change Values
Enter Select > Sub-Menu
a
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
Expanded Boot screen
The expanded screen allows you set the order of drives for booting. Default values
are shown in the menu below.
Main
Advanced
Boot Order
Boot
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Exit
Item Specific Help
-Removable Devices
Legacy Floppy Drives
-Hard Drive
Bootable Add-in Cards
CD-ROM Drive
F1 Help
Esc Exit
36
↑ ↓ Select Item
→ Select Menu
Same description as Boot
menu.
-/+
Change Values
Enter Select > Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
Exit menu
The Exit menu allows you to save or discard changes made during Setup. Esc does
not exit this menu, you must select one of the menu items and press Enter. You can
also press F9 or F10 at any time to exit Setup. When using the serial console F9
and F10 are not available; you must press down/up arrow to get to the proper
option then press enter.
Main
Advanced
Boot
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Exit
Item Specific Help
Exit System Setup and
save your changes to
CMOS.
Exit Saving Changes
Exit Discarding Changes
Load Setup Defaults
Discard Changes
Save Changes
F1 Help
Esc Exit
↑ ↓ Select Item
→ Select Menu
-/+
Change Values
Enter Select > Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
37
Overview: Section 2 – Hardware
Section 2 discusses usage, functions, and system configurations of the
XE–700 SBC major hardware features. The following chapters are included:
38
Chapter 4:
Serial ports
Chapter 5:
LPT1 parallel port, LCD and keypad
Chapter 6:
Console devices
Chapter 7:
CompactFlash, SDRAM, and battery backup
Chapter 8:
External drives
Chapter 9:
Bit-programmable digital I/O
Chapter 10:
CRTs and TFT flat panels
Chapter 11:
Ethernet
Chapter 12:
PC/104 expansion
Chapter 13:
USB
Chapter 4: Serial ports
Description
The XE–700 SBC has four serial ports, COM1 through COM4. COM1 is a dedicated
8-wire RS–232C. COM2 is a dedicated 4-wire RS–232C. COM3 and COM4 can be 4wire RS–232C, RS–422 or RS–485.
COM1 and COM2 are accessed at the 20-pin connector at J12. COM3 and COM4
are accessed at the 20-pin connector at J17 for RS–232C. COM3 and COM4 have
separate connectors for RS–422 or RS–485. Refer to the table on page 21 for which
connector to use for the various interfaces. Refer to the Cables section on page 22
for a description of cables that mate with these connectors.
These serial ports interface to serial device. All ports support 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-bit
word lengths, 1, 1.5, or 2 stop bits, and baud rates up to 115.2K.
The serial ports have the following specifications:
16C550 compatible
16-byte FIFO buffers
IEC 1000, level 3, ESD protection
— Contact discharge ±6 kV
— Air–gap discharge ±8 kV
Backdrive protection
Up to 115.2k baud operation
Mating receptacles
Use a VTC–20F or VTC–20M cable to connect the 20-pin COM ports to external
serial equipment. The P2 and P3 connectors on these cables are DB–9 female
(VTC–20F) or DB–9 male (VTC–20M) connectors which plug directly into a 9-pin
serial cable. For RS-422 or RS-485 on COM3 or COM4, use a 0.100 inch RS422/485
Cable (part #6683).
Figure 4–1 (following page) shows serial devices connected to the XE–700 SBC. It
also shows the schematic for connecting RS–422 or RS–485 devices. Note that you
cannot use COM3 or COM4 for two different interfaces at the same time.
Figure 4–2 shows a null modem adapter connected to the COM1 port of a VTC–
20F. A null modem adapter is required when connecting a serial console.
39
Figure 4–1
COM ports
COM2
COM1
COM4, COM3
RS–232C
XE–700
Serial Device
on COM2
Serial Device
on COM1
VTC-20F cable
0.100 in. RS–422/485 cable
RS–422 or RS–485
device on COM4
COM3 RS–422 or RS–485
Up to four serial devices total; two to four
RS–232, one or two RS–422 or RS–485.
Figure 4–2
VTC-20F cable and null modem adapter
P3
P2
Null Modem Adapter,
required for serial console
40
VTC-20F Cable
Serial port configurations
COM1 and COM2 are dedicated RS–232C interfaces. They are always enabled.
COM1 uses address 3f8 and IRQ4, COM2 uses address 2f8 and IRQ3.
COM3 and COM4 can be configured as RS–232C, RS–422 or RS–485. The COM3/4
ports are enabled and configured in BIOS Setup.
If COM3 or COM4 are used for RS–422 or RS–485, and the XE–700 is at the end of
the network, these ports will have to be terminated. Switch 2 terminates the
network. The default setting is terminated. If the XE–700 is not at the end of the
network the switch must be set to unterminated.
The COM ports configurations are shown in Table 4–1. Tables 4–2 through 4–4
show the COM pin-outs for the COM ports, and Table 4–5 shows the switch
settings.
Setup menu for COM ports
The I/O Device Configuration submenu allows you to set the I/O configurations.
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Advanced
I/O Device Configuration
Serial port C:
Interrupt:
Interface:
[Enabled]
[IRQ 9]
[RS-232]
Serial port D:
Interrupt:
Interface:
[Enabled]
[IRQ 9]
[RS-232]
Parallel port:
Mode:
Base I/O address:
Interrupt:
[Disabled]
[Bi-directional]
[378]
[IRQ 7]
Floppy disk controller:
Base I/O address:
[Enabled]
[Primary]
F1 Help
Esc Exit
↑ ↓ Select Item
→ Select Menu
-/+
Change Values
Enter Select > Sub-Menu
Item Specific Help
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
41
Table 4–1
Serial port configurations
COM
Port
COM1
COM2
COM3
Address
IRQ
Interface
RS–232 – 8 wire
RS–232 – 4 wire
RS–232 – 4 wire
BIOS
Setup
N/A
N/A
RS232*
3F8h*
2F8h*
3E8h*
COM3
3E8h*
COM4
2E8h*
COM4
2E8h*
IRQ4*
IRQ3*
IRQ4
IRQ9*
none
IRQ4
IRQ9*
none
IRQ3
IRQ9*
IRQ10
none
IRQ11
J12
J12
J17
RS–422/485 – 4 wire
RS422/485
J15
RS–232 – 4 wire
RS232*
J17
RS–422/485
– 4 wire
RS422/485
J14
* default
Table 4–2
COM1 and COM2 connector pin-outs (J12 connector)
COM1
Pin#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
42
RS–232
signal
DCD
DSR
RxD
RTS
TxD
CTS
DTR
RI
GND
nc
COM2
Pin#
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
RS–232
signal
nc
nc
RxD
RTS
TxD
CTS
nc
nc
GND
nc
Connector
Table 4–3
COM3 and COM4 connector pin-outs (J17 connector)
COM3
Pin#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Table 4–4
RS–232
signal
nc
nc
RxD
RTS
TxD
CTS
nc
nc
GND
nc
COM4
Pin#
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
RS–232
signal
nc
nc
RxD
RTS
TxD
CTS
nc
nc
GND
nc
COM3 and COM4 RS–422/485 connector pin-outs
J15 COM3
connector
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
Signal
TXD+
TXD–
GND
RXD+
RXD–
J14 COM4
connector
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
Signal
TXD+
TXD–
GND
RXD+
RXD–
Table 4–5 COM3/4 switches, Switch 2
Switch 2 – COM3/4 termination
COM Port
Interface
Switch 4 Settings
RS–422/RS–485
Position 1 Off
no termination
Position 2 Off
COM3
RS–422/RS–485
Position 1 On*
with termination
Position 2 On*
RS–422/RS–485
Position 3 Off
no termination
Position 4 Off
COM4
RS–422/RS–485
Position 3 On*
with termination
Position 4 On*
* Default. These switches terminate the network. If
the XE–700 SBC is not at an end of the network, set
these switches to Off .
43
Function and use of serial ports
COM1 as serial console device
You can use COM1 as a console device to communicate with another PC. For COM1
to be a serial console, the “V” video switch (Switch 4 position 3) must be set to Off.
See the Console Devices chapter for more information.
Note
When interfacing the XE–700 SBC to your desktop PC, you must use a null modem
adapter. The default settings are 38.4K baud, 8-bit, no parity, 1 stop bit.
COM1 through COM4 as RS–232 I/O
COM1 is an 8-wire RS–232 interface. COM2 is a dedicated 4-wire RS–232
interface. COM3 and COM4 can be configured through Setup as a 4-wire RS–232
interface. You can connect up to four RS–232 serial I/O devices.
COM3/4 as RS–422 and RS–485 networks
COM3 and COM4 can also be used as RS–422 or RS–485. RS–422 and RS–485 use
differential signaling to communicate between the devices on a network.
Differential signal reduces the effect of environmental noise, allowing
communication over distances up to 1200 meters.
The RS–422 and RS–485 receivers provide an active high (space) condition for
shorted, open, or inactive lines. Note that RTS is used differently by RS–422 and
RS–485. Review the information in the following sections regarding RTS.
RS–422 is a point-to-point configuration. RS–485 is a multi-node configuration that
allows up to 32 nodes on a network. COM3 and COM4 can be configured in BIOS
Setup for RS–422 / RS–485. Refer to Table 4–5 on page 43 for switch settings for
terminating an RS–422/485 network.
RS–422
RS–422 is typically point to point configuration. RS–422 is also specified for multidrop (party-line) applications where only one driver is connected to, and transmits
on, a “bus” of up to 10 receivers. The device at the end of an RS–422 network must
be terminated. The XE–700 SBC optionally terminates with a 110 ohm resistor.
Refer to Table 4–5. Figure 4–3 shows a typical RS–422 four-wire interface circuit.
The RTS* signal is used to control the transmitter and receiver in RS–422 mode.
The RTS* signal is controlled by the Modem Control Register bit 1 (MCR[1], which
is offset 0x04 from the UART base address). Writing MCR[1] to 0 (default state)
sets RTS* to an inactive state (RTS* = logic high) which ENABLES both the RS–
422 Transmitter and Receiver. Writing MCR[1] to 1 sets RTS* to an active state
(RTS* = logic low) which DISABLES both the RS–422 Transmitter and Receiver.
44
Figure 4–3
Typical RS–422 four-wire interface circuit
RX +
TX +
110 Ω
Xmitter
TX –
RX –
TX +
RX +
110 Ω
Receiver
100 Ω
Receiver
Xmitter
RX –
TX –
100 Ω
Gnd
RS–485
An application may implement a node as either the “host” node or as a “remote”
node in an RS–485 network. There can be as many as 32 nodes without any bus
repeaters in the network. A host is referred to as the node that initiates
communication; a remote is referred to as a node that is addressed by the host.
In any given communication sequence in an RS–485 network, there can only be one
host. The host is responsible for initiating communication, maintaining network
registration, and providing housekeeping tasks with other nodes. Remotes,
however, cannot initiate a communication. They can only respond to messages that
are addressed to them from the host.
The devices at each end of an RS–485 network must be terminated. Any node
located between the end points should not be terminated. The XE–700 SBC
optionally terminates with a 110 ohm resistor. Refer to Table 4–5 on page 43.
Figure 4–4 shows a typical RS–485 network. Note that for 2-wire RS–485 networks
the transmit and receive pairs must be connected together external to the XE–700
(TXD+ tied to RXD+, TXD– tied to RXD–).
The RTS* signal is used to control the transmitter and receiver in RS–485 mode.
The RTS* signal is controlled by the Modem Control Register bit 1 (MCR[1], which
is offset 0x04 from the UART base address). Writing MCR[1] to 0 (default state)
sets RTS* to an inactive state (RTS* = logic high) and DISABLES the RS–485
Transmitter and ENABLES the Receiver. Writing MCR[1] to 1 sets RTS* to an
active state (RTS* = logic low), and ENABLES the RS–485 Transmitter and
DISABLES the RS–485 Receiver.
45
Figure 4–4
Typical RS–485 two–wire half duplex interface circuit
DE
DI
110 Ω
110 Ω
TX +
RX
Xmitter
110 Ω RX
110 Ω
TX –
RE
RO
DE
TX
Receiver
Receiver
Xmitter
DE
DI
Xmitter
RE RO
DE
DI
RE RO
RO
TX +
Xmitter
Receiver RX +
RX –
46
RE
Receiver
DI
Chapter 5: LPT1 parallel port, LCD and keypad
LPT1 parallel port
LPT1 uses a 26-pin connector. It supports the unidirectional standard mode, bidirectional mode, enhanced parallel port (EPP) mode, and extended capabilities
port (ECP) mode. The default I/O address for LPT1 is 378h, with the default
interrupt is IRQ7. You can choose the addresses 378h, 278h, or 3BCh, or interrupt
IRQ5 in Setup.
The LPT1 port supports a number of devices including a PC compatible printer, an
LCD display, or a keypad.
Table 5–1
LPT1 connector: J19
J19 – LPT1 connector
Pin #
Pin Name
Pin Name
1
STB*
AFD*
3
PD[0]
ERR*
5
PD[1]
INIT*
7
PD[2]
SLIN*
9
PD[3]
Gnd
11
PD[4]
Gnd
13
PD[5]
Gnd
15
PD[6]
Gnd
17
PD[7]
Gnd
19
ACK*
Gnd
21
BUSY
Gnd
23
PE
Gnd
25
SLCT
VCC5
* = active low
Pin #
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
Installing a printer
1. Make sure that the LPT1 port is in standard or bi-directional mode.
2. Connect an Octagon VTC–5/IBM cable from the LPT1 port (J19) to the 25-pin
connector on your printer cable.
3. Connect the cable to your printer.
47
Figure 5–1
LPT1 as a printer port
XE–700
Display
The LPT1 port supports either a 4 x 20 or a 4 x 40 liquid crystal display (LCD). To
interface the displays to the XE–700 SBC, use the Octagon 2010 interface board. A
CMA–26 cable is required to connect the interface board to the XE–700 SBC. The
program DISPLAY.EXE (found on the Octagon Products CD ROM) provides an
easy method to use the display. Refer to the file DISPLAY.DOC on the Octagon
Products CD ROM for information on initializing and using the display. Also, refer
to the 2010 product sheet for more information on the interface board.
Installing a display
1. Connect a CMA–26 cable from the LPT1 port on the XE–700 SBC (J19) to J3 on
the 2010. See Figure 5–2.
2. Connect the display cable to either the 14-pin or 16-pin header on the 2010.
The size of the display will determine which header to use.
3. Refer to the file DISPLAY.DOC for more information on initializing and using
the display.
48
Figure 5–2
LPT1 as a display or keypad port
XE–700
2010 Interface
4x4 Keypad
LCD display
Keypad
LPT1 also supports 4 x 4 matrix keypads. To interface the keypad to the XE–700
SBC, use the Octagon 2010 interface board. A CMA–26 cable is required to connect
the interface board to the XE–700 SBC. The program DISPLAY.EXE (found on the
Octagon Products CD ROM) provides an easy method to use the keypad. Refer to
the file DISPLAY.DOC on the Octagon Products CD ROM for information on
initializing and using the keypad. Also, refer to the 2010 product sheet for
information on the interface board.
Installing a keypad
1. Connect a CMA–26 cable from the LPT1 port on the XE–700 SBC (J19) to J1 on
the 2010. See Figure 5–2.
2. Connect the keypad cable to the 10-pin header on the 2010.
3. Refer to the DISPLAY.DOC file for more information on reading the keypad.
49
Chapter 6: Console devices
Description
The XE–700 SBC has three options for console devices. You can use a monitor and
a keyboard as your console. You can use COM1 as the console, or you can run the
system without a console device.
Selecting console devices
The following represent the options on the XE–700 SBC for console devices:
A standard VGA/SVGA monitor and a keyboard.
Serial console from COM1. A serial cable/null modem adapter plugged into a
host PC running HyperTerminal (or equivalent) provides both input and
output. The local keyboard also allows input but is not required.
No console device means no video output, either from a monitor or the serial
console. A local keyboard allows input but is not required.
Monitor and keyboard console
To use a monitor and keyboard as the console, you will need the following
equipment (or equivalent):
XE–700 SBC
2 mm VGA-12 video cable, part #6392
PS/2 style keyboard, and PS/2 Keyboard Mouse Cable, part #6837
VGA monitor
WARNING!
The video connector is keyed, but some connectors are not keyed
and can be plugged in incorrectly. Ensure that pin 1 of the cable is
connected to pin 1 of the connector (indicated by the dot). Incorrect
connection could damage your equipment.
To connect a monitor and keyboard:
1. Refer to Figure 2–1 on page 18 for the location of various connectors and
switches before installing the XE–700 SBC.
2. Make sure that the “V” video switch, Switch 4 position 3, is set to On.
3. Connect the VGA-12 video cable into J3.
4. Connect a VGA monitor to the VGA-12 cable, and a PS/2 style keyboard and
PS/2 Keyboard Mouse Cable to J16.
50
Figure 6–1
Monitor and keyboard as console
VGA Monitor
2 mm VGA-12 cable
Power Supply
.
Dot indicates
pin 1
PS/2 Keyboard
PS/2 Keyboard Mouse
Cable
XE–700
Serial console
COM1 is used as the console device if the serial console is enabled in BIOS Setup.
To use COM1 as the console, you will need the following equipment (or equivalent):
XE–700 SBC
VTC-20F cable, #4866
Null modem adapter, #2470 (9–pin to 9–pin)
Host computer running HyperTerminal (or equivalent)
Serial cable to connect XE–700 SBC COM1 to host computer serial port
PS/2 style keyboard, and PS/2 Keyboard Mouse Cable, part #6837 (optional)
Refer to Figure 2–1 on page 18 for the location of various connectors and switches
before installing the XE–700 SBC.
1. Set the “V” video switch, Switch 4 position 3, to Off.
2. Connect a VTC-20F cable to J12 of the XE–700.
3. Connect the null modem adapter to P2 (COM1 side) of the VTC-20F cable.
51
4. Connect the serial cable between the null modem adapter and the serial port of
the host computer.
Follow these steps to use the serial console:
5. For communication using HyperTerminal (or equivalent), the following settings
must be used:
Connect using:
Direct to COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4
(select the port the serial cable is connected to)
Baud rate:
38400
Communications
parameters:
Flow control:
no parity, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit
Terminal support:
ANSI
ANSI terminal option–
Wrap lines that exceed
terminal width:
Yes (uncheck box)
none
6. Start HyperTerminal. You are now ready to establish communications between
the host PC and the XE–700 SBC.
7. Power on the XE–700 SBC. Console data will be redirected to COM1 and will
be displayed on the host computer.
8. If you do not get the proper logon message check the HyperTerminal serial
parameters of the host PC to make sure they match the settings in step 5. You
might also try setting the “S” switch, Switch 4 position 1, to Off to force the
XE–700 SBC card to the system defaults, which includes 38400 baud rate.
Note
52
Some function keys entered on the host computer do not transmit across a serial
console. The F2 key for entering Setup does transmit across a serial console.
Figure 6–2
The XE–700 SBC and a serial console
HyperTerm
or other
terminal emulator
COM2
COM1
VTC-20F cable
XE–700
Desktop PC
Keyboard
COM1 and Null
Modem Adapter
53
Chapter 7: CompactFlash, SDRAM, and battery backup
Description
The XE–700 SBC is shipped with a 512 KB surface mount flash. This flash
contains the BIOS. The board is shipped with 64 MB surface mounted SDRAM.
A battery backup connector is provided at J6 for an AT battery to back up the real
time clock.
CompactFlash
The CompactFlash socket supports 3.3V devices. The CompactFlash appears to the
system as an IDE device. It should be automatically detected and configured as a
hard drive during bootup. To configure the XE–700 SBC to boot from a
CompactFlash, refer to the following section “Creating a Bootable CompactFlash.”
The CompactFlash socket is connected to the Primary IDE channel. This channel is
configured for a Master device only. Therefore, if a CompactFlash device is
installed, it will show up as a Master on the Primary IDE channel. Any additional
IDE devices will show up as Secondary IDE devices.
Note
Octagon Systems only recommends Industrial Grade CompactFlash (NAND
technology) that implements ECC error code correction, and wear level technology.
Creating a bootable CompactFlash
A CompactFlash as shipped from the factory may or may not be formatted; even if
formatted, it may or may not be bootable. The following sequence shows how to
create a bootable CompactFlash, and how to configure the XE–700 SBC to boot
from the CompactFlash.
CAUTION
You must use an external drive such as a hard drive or CD to sys the
CompactFlash. See step 5.
1. Create a bootable external device.
Note
Octagon offers OS Embedders that include a CD boot disk for a variety of operating
systems. Contact your Octagon representative for additional information.
2. Change the boot sequence in BIOS Setup so the XE–700 SBC boots from the
external drive first. Reboot from the external device.
3. Use the appropriate commands/utility to create partitions on the
CompactFlash. Refer to your operating system manual for the appropriate
parameters. You might also have to refresh the MBR (Master Boot Record).
4. Reboot, using the external device.
5. Format the CompactFlash. Follow the on-screen instructions for your operating
system to format the CompactFlash.
54
6. Copy your operating system from the external device to the CompactFlash.
7. Change the boot sequence in Setup so that the CompactFlash (hard drive) is
first. Power off the XE–700 SBC and remove the external device.
8. Reboot.
SDRAM
The XE–700 SBC is shipped with 64 MB surface mounted SDRAM.
Battery backup for real time calendar clock
An AT battery can be installed to back up the CMOS real time clock. The battery
can be installed at J6.
Installing an AT battery
1. Power off the XE–700 SBC.
2. Install the 3.6V AT clock battery at J6.
Table 7–1
J6 – Battery connector
J6 – Battery connector
Pin #
1
2
3
4
Note
Pin Name
Battery +
Key
Battery –
Battery –
See Appendix A: Mating connectors for mating information on the battery
connector.
55
Chapter 8: External drives
Description
The XE–700 SBC is compatible with any standard floppy drive, and any IDE hard
drive that has a 16-bit IDE interface. This includes CD-ROMs, CompactFlashes,
and other IDE-compatible drives. The BIOS supports all IDE devices so no
additional software is needed.
Note
The BIOS supports three IDE devices (which includes a CompactFlash),
and one floppy drive.
Hard disk controller
The XE–700 SBC supports three 16-bit IDE devices. Since the CompactFlash is
connected to the primary IDE channel with a dedicated IDE controller, additional
IDE devices connected through J4 will be secondary IDE devices (master and
slave).
Standard IDE devices such as hard drives and CD-ROM drives are interfaced via a
44-pin connector at J4. For those IDE devices that use a 40-pin interface, use the
Octagon Systems IDE cable, #4080 or #6246.
IDE combinations:
2 hard drives
1 hard drive and 1 CD-ROM drive
2 CD-ROM drives
CompactFlash and any of the above combinations
Master/slave designation for IDE devices
IDE devices have a jumper or a switch that designates whether the device is a
master or a slave device. If only one device is connected to a port, it must be
configured as a master. If two devices are connected, one must be configured as a
master and one as a slave. The XE–700 does not use the CS signal (Cable Select) to
designate master or slave on a multi-connector cable. You can use BIOS Setup to
designate either the master or the slave as a boot device.
56
Figure 8–1
XE–700 SBC with external drives
VGA Monitor
2 mm VGA-12 cable
Power Supply
.
Dot indicates
pin 1
PS/2 Keyboard
XE–700
Floppy drive on J18
IDE ribbon cable for two devices, or
one device directly into J4
CD-ROM
and / or
Hard Drive
57
Installing a hard drive
1. Disconnect power to the XE–700 SBC.
2. Insert one end of the hard drive cable into the back of the hard drive. Make
sure pin 1 on the cable is connected to pin 1 of the drive.
3. Insert the other end of the cable into J4.
4. If you are connecting two IDE devices, ensure that one of them is configured as
a master and one is configured as a slave. If connecting one IDE device, ensure
that it is configured as a master. The BIOS will not be able to detect an IDE
device that is configured as a slave unless a master device is also installed.
5. The BIOS should automatically detect a hard drive that is properly installed. If
you want to change the configuration for the hard drive, execute the BIOS
Setup program. You can execute this program by pressing “F2” during system
bootup. The system steps you through the configuration. Also, refer to the
Setup programs chapter for more information on the BIOS Setup program.
6. If you want to boot the system from the hard drive, you need to format the
drive accordingly, and change the boot order in Setup.
Floppy disk controller
The XE–700 can interface directly to 3.5 in. or 5.25 in. floppy drives at J18. The
BIOS supports one floppy disk drive.
Note
See Appendix A: Mating connectors for mating information on the floppy disk
connector.
Power requirements
You supply power to the floppy drive through an external source. Refer to your
floppy drive manual for specific instructions.
Installing a floppy disk drive
1. Disconnect power to the XE–700.
2. Insert the 34–pin floppy drive cable into the rear of the floppy drive. Make sure
pin 1 on the cable is connected to pin 1 on the drive. Insert the other end into
connector J18.
4. Connect power to the floppy drive.
5. Power on the XE–700. The BIOS should automatically detect a floppy drive
that is properly installed. If you want to change the configuration for the floppy
drive, execute the BIOS Setup program. You can execute this program by
pressing “F2” during system bootup. The system steps you through the
configuration. Also, refer to the Setup programs chapter for more information
on the BIOS Setup program.
58
Chapter 9: Bit-programmable digital I/O
Description
The bit-programmable digital I/O lines can be used to sense switch closures, turn
on lamps and LEDs, and interface with other devices that have TTL input or
output such as printers and scales. The digital I/O lines drive the Octagon MPB
series opto-isolation module racks directly, controlling AC and DC loads to 240V at
3A. Tables 9–1 and 9–2 show the pinout for the digital I/O connector, arranged by
function and by pin number. Figure 9–1 shows typical I/O configurations.
The I/O lines have the following specifications:
The I/O chip has 24 I/O lines, grouped into 3 ports of 8 bits
Each bit is programmable as either 5V input or 5V output
Read back state of each pin
Easy-to-program
Each line can sink and source 15 mA
Table 9–1
J9 arranged by function – digital I/O connector
J9 Digital I/O
Pin #
19
21
23
25
24
22
20
18
Pin # Port C
13
Bit 0
16
Bit 1
15
Bit 2
17
Bit 3
14
Bit 4
11
Bit 5
12
Bit 6
9
Bit 7
2
+5V safe*
26
Gnd
* +5V safe is fused through a 750 mA automatic, resetting fuse
Note
Port A
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
Pin #
10
8
4
6
1
3
5
7
Port B
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
See the Accessories appendix for connector information for the digital I/O
connector.
59
Table 9–2
J9 arranged by pins – digital I/O connector
J9 Digital I/O
Pin #
Pin Name
Pin Name
Pin #
1
Port B, bit 4
Vcc (+5V)*
2
3
Port B, bit 5
Port B, bit 2
4
5
Port B, bit 6
Port B, bit 3
6
7
Port B, bit 7
Port B, bit 1
8
9
Port C, bit 7
Port B, bit 0
10
11
Port C, bit 5
Port C, bit 6
12
13
Port C, bit 0
Port C, bit 4
14
15
Port C, bit 2
Port C, bit 1
16
17
Port C, bit 3
Port A, bit 7
18
19
Port A, bit 0
Port A, bit 6
20
21
Port A, bit 1
Port A, bit 5
22
23
Port A, bit 2
Port A, bit 4
24
25
Port A, bit 3
Gnd
26
* +5V safe is fused through a 750 mA automatic, resetting fuse
60
Figure 9–1
Typical digital I/O configurations
XE–700
CMA-26
Ribbon Cable
MPB-8, -16, or -24 Opto Rack
XE–700
CMA-26
Ribbon Cable
STB-26
MPB-8, -16, or -24 Opto Rack
XE–700
CMA-26
Ribbon Cable
STB-26
61
Interfacing to switches and other devices
The STB-26 terminal board provides a convenient way of interfacing switches or
other digital I/O devices to the I/O ports. I/O lines at the connector can be
connected to an STB-26 with a CMA-26 cable. Parallel I/O devices are then
connected to the screw terminals on the STB-26. The illustration on page 61 shows
an STB-26 terminal board connected to the digital I/O. Refer to the STB-26 product
sheet for more information.
Opto-module rack interface
You can interface digital I/O lines to an 8-, 16-, or 24-position opto-module rack.
One end of the CMA-26 cable plugs into the I/O connector and the other plugs into
an MPB–8, MPB–16, or an MPB–24 opto rack. Refer to the MPB opto racks data
sheet for more information.
You can also use a CMA–26 cable to connect the I/O port to an STB–26 terminal
board and then to the opto rack. The STB–26 has two 26-pin connectors, one of
which connects to the I/O port, the other which connects to the opto rack. The
illustration on page 61 shows both of these configurations.
For either configuration, run a separate power line to +5V and ground on the optorack.
Use the following table to determine the corresponding opto-channel position for
ports A, B, and C.
62
Table 9–3
Digital I/O opto-rack interface
Digital I/O opto-rack interface
MPB opto rack
I/O port
Connector pin
Opto-module position
Port C
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
13
16
15
17
14
11
12
9
MPB-16
Port A
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
19
21
23
25
24
22
20
18
MPB-24
Port B
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
10
8
4
6
1
3
5
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
MPB-08
63
Organization of banks
The I/O digital bank has a total of 24 I/O lines connected to a 26-pin header. The
lines are configured into three groups: ports A, B and C, each group consisting of 8
bits. Any of the lines at ports A, B or C can be configured individually as inputs or
outputs.
Figure 9–2
Organization of banks
Base
120h
Port A
8
Base + 1
121h
Port B
8
Base + 2
122h
Port C
8
Base + 3
123h
Control
Register
J9, Digital I/O
Port addressing
Ports A, B, C and the control register are addressable. The base I/O address is fixed
at address 120h. Ports A, B, C and the control register are addressable, with
reference to the base address.
I/O lines pulled low
The I/O lines at ports A, B, and C are always pulled low. This allows a known state
upon powerup. 10K ohm resistor networks are used to configure the I/O lines as
low.
64
Configuring and programming the I/O port
The I/O chip has three ports with eight parallel I/O lines (bits) per port. All lines
can be programmed as all inputs, all outputs or individually as inputs or outputs.
You can alter which bits are inputs or outputs by writing a control command to the
control register of the I/O bank. When a line is configured as an output, it can sink
a maximum of 15 mA at 0.4V or can source 15 mA at 2.4V. On powerup and
software or hardware reset, all digital I/O lines are reset as inputs.
Programming the I/O
Follow these steps to program the I/O chip:
1. Configure the I/O port bit directions, either as inputs or outputs.
2. Write to port A, B, or C with the desired level or read the bit level from the
desired port.
Configuring the I/O
Follow these steps to configure the I/O chip.
Note
In the following examples, “base” for I/O always refers to the base address as 120h.
1. Write a “2” to the control register (base address + 3). This places the I/O chip in
“direction” mode: (base address = 120h)
OUT 123h, 2
(control register, direction mode)
2. Set the direction of each bit. A “0” written to the corresponding line indicates
an input and a “1” bit indicates an output. Each bit corresponds to the
equivalent I/O line.
Table 9–4
I/O port byte
Bit
7
X
Bit
6
Bit
5
Bit
4
Bit
3
Bit
2
Bit
1
Bit
0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Port I/O
Line
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
For example, writing 00011100 to port C (base address + 2) will configure port C
I/O lines 0, 1, 5, 6, and 7 to be inputs and lines 2, 3, and 4 to be outputs:
OUT 122h, 1Ch (00011100 binary = 1C hexadecimal)
3. Write a “1” to the control register (base register + 3). This places the I/O chip
into “preset” mode:
65
OUT 123h, 1
(control register, preset mode)
4. Write a bit pattern to appear at the outputs of the desired I/O port when the
I/O chip is put in “operation” mode; all input bits are unaffected. This step
ensures that known values appear when the I/O chip is placed in operation
mode.
5. Write a “3” to the control register (base register + 3). This places the I/O chip
back into “operation” mode:
OUT 123h, 3
(control register)
Writing and reading from I/O
Writing to or reading from the desired I/O port is accomplished with single
program statements:
1. To write a bit pattern to the desired I/O port:
OUT 122h, FFh
All output bits of port C go high; all input bits are unaffected.
2. To read a bit pattern from the desired I/O port:
PORTC = INP(122h)
The byte read from port C is assigned to variable PORTC.
I/O output program examples
To configure ports A, B, and C as all outputs, issue the commands:
OUT 123h, 2
‘Direction’ Mode
OUT 120h, FFh ‘PortA’
OUT 121h, FFh ‘PortB’
OUT 122h, FFh ‘PortC’
OUT 123h, 3
‘Operation’ Mode
Ports A, B, and C will now output all “1”s after issuing the following commands:
OUT 120h, FFh (portA)
OUT 121h, FFh (portB)
OUT 122h, FFh (portC)
or all “0”s after:
OUT 120h, 0 (portA)
OUT 121h, 0 (portB)
OUT 122h, 0 (portC)
66
I/O input program examples
To configure ports A and C as inputs and port B as outputs, issue the following
commands:
OUT 123h, 2
‘Direction Mode’
OUT 120h, 0
OUT 121h, FF
OUT 122h, 0
OUT 123h, 3
‘Operation Mode’
To read ports A and C, issue the following commands:
PORTA = INP(120h)
(port A)
PORTC = INP(122h)
(port C)
Enhanced INT 17h function definitions
This section provides definitions for the following functions using the INT17
handler, I17HNDLR.EXE: Initialize I/O, Write I/O, and Read I/O.
I17HNDLR.EXE is a TSR program and is called out by the XE–700 SBC BIOS. By
default, when the “X” switch is on, the INT17 extended BIOS is operational. If the
“X” switch is Off and DOS is the operating system, the I17HNDLR.EXE TSR can be
used. Once executed, the TSR is active, but it must be executed each time the
system is rebooted. Copy the I17HNDLR.EXE utility to your boot device and add it
to your AUTOEXEC.BAT.
Note
The INT17 functions can only be used with DOS operating systems. If you use a
different operating system, the INT17 functionality can still be used by your
application but must be integrated into your software.
Initialize I/O
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
Calling registers:
efh
00h
To set the directions and to program the
initial values of an I/O port.
Ah
efh
AL
00h
DI
Port A configuration
Initial Data Direction Mask
xxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxB
direction: 1=output, 0=input
BX
Port B configuration
Initial Data Direction Mask
xxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxB
direction: 1=output, 0=input 0->input
CX
Port C configuration
Initial Data Direction Mask
67
Return registers:
Comments:
xxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxB
direction: 1=output, 0=input
DX
ffffh
Carry flag cleared if successful
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
This function is used to initialize the
I/O before normal use.
Programming example:
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1 */
asm {
mov
ax,0ef00h
mov
di,00ffh
/*port A all outputs,
init data=all 0’s */
mov
bx,55ffh
/*port B all outputs,
init data=55h*/
mov
cx,0000h
/*port C all inputs*
mov
dx,0ffffh
int
17h
}
Write I/O
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
Calling registers:
Return registers:
Comments:
efh
01h
To write a value to an I/O port.
AH
efh
AL
01h
DI
Port A mask and data
Mask
Data
xxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxB
Mask: 1=bit to be changed
BX
Port B mask and data
Mask
Data
xxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxB
Mask: 1=bit to be changed
CX
Port C mask and data
Mask
Data
xxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxB
Mask: 1=bit to be changed
DX
ffffh
Carry flag cleared if successful
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
This function is used to initialize the
I/O.
Programming example:
/* Inline assembly code for
asm {
mov
ax,0ef01h
mov
di,00ffh
mov
bx,8000h
mov
cx,0202h
68
Borland C++ 3.1 */
/*port A: no change */
/*port B: bit 7 set to 0*/
/*port C: bit 1 set to 0*/
mov
int
dx,0ffffh
17h
}
Read I/O
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
Calling registers:
efh
02h
To read from an I/O port.
AH
efh
AL
02h
DX
ffffh
Return registers:
AL
Port A data
Ah
Port B data
BL
Port C data
Carry flag cleared if successful
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
Comments:
This function is used to read from the
I/O.
Programming example:
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1 */
asm {
mov
ax,0efoch
mov
dx,0ffffh
int
17h
mov
aData,al
mov
bData,ah
mov
cData,bl
}
69
Chapter 10: CRTs and TFT flat panels
Description
The video system on the XE–700 SBC supports CRTs and TFT flat panel displays.
Displays from CGA through XVGA are supported. The XE–700 SBC supports 3V
flat panel displays through the connector. 5V panels must be powered from an
alternate source.
Standard VGA monitors with analog inputs are connected using a 2 mm VGA–12
cable (p/n 6392) connected to J3. Flat panel displays are connected using a 40-pin
connector.
Video features
Below is a list of standard video features installed on the XE–700 SBC:
CRT support with resolutions to 1280 x 1024 x 16 at 60 Hz
Flat panel support with resolutions to 1024 x 1024 x 18
Simultaneous mode operation for CRT and flat panel (see below)
Simultaneous mode operation
The STPC Atlas CPU supports simultaneous mode video operation. Once a flat
panel driver has been programmed into the video BIOS, both a CRT and a flat
panel can be viewed at the same time. Note, however, that the CRT display might
not fit the screen properly if the resolution for the flat panel does not match the
resolution of the CRT.
Connecting a monitor
To use a monitor or a flat panel, the Video switch SW4 position 3 must be On. This
is the default configuration. The 10-pin connector at J3 supports an analog
CGA/VGA/SVGA/XVGA CRT color or monochrome monitor. The 2 mm VGA–12
cable connects to J3 and provides a DB–15 video mating connector for a CRT. Refer
to figure 10–1 for a diagram of connecting a CRT, and Table 10–1 for the pinout for
J3.
The XE–700 SBC supports both an analog monitor and/or a flat panel display. The
default video BIOS shipped on the XE-700 supports CRT only. The TFT enabled
video BIOS supports both TFT and CRT interfaces. This BIOS is user programmed.
70
To connect a monitor you will need the following equipment (or equivalent):
XE–700 SBC
2 mm VGA-12 cable, p/n 6392
VGA/SVGA monitor
To connect a monitor:
1. Ensure that the Video switch SW4 position 3 is On.
2. Plug the VGA–12 adapter cable into J3 on the XE–700 SBC.
3. Plug the DB–15 end of the VGA–12 cable into the VGA cable of the monitor.
Refer to Figure 10–1.
Table 10–1
J3 – CRT connector
J3, CRT Connector
Pin #
Pin Name
Pin Name
Pin #
1
Red
Green
2
3
Blue
GND
4
5
+5V
GND
6
7
H SYNC OUT
DDC SDA
8
9
DDC SCL
V SYNC OUT
10
71
Figure 10–1
The XE–700 SBC and a VGA monitor
VGA Monitor
2 mm VGA-12 cable
Power Supply
.
Dot indicates
pin 1
PS/2 Keyboard
PS/2 Keyboard Mouse
Cable
XE–700
Connecting a flat panel display
Due to the varied selection of available flat panels, the XE–700 SBC is factory
configured and programmed for a VGA/SVGA/XVGA CRT monitor. If you are using
a flat panel, you must reprogram the video BIOS with the appropriate flat panel
driver. To reprogram your video BIOS refer to Programming the video BIOS in this
chapter. Note that 3V flat panels are supported through the connector, while 5V
panels require an alternate power source.
The Octagon CD-ROM \700\BIOS subdirectory contains text files for each of the
supported flat panels. These text files include wiring diagrams specific to
individual flat panels. Refer to the specific text file associated with your flat panel
to build an interface cable. Flat panel displays are connected using a 40-pin
connector at J5.
Table 10–2 shows the pinout for the connector for flat panels.
72
Flat panels requiring bias voltage
Some flat panels require a bias voltage. To determine if your flat panel requires
bias voltage, refer to the text file on the Octagon CD ROM \XE–700\BIOS which is
specific to your flat panel or refer to your flat panel information. If your flat panel
requires a bias voltage, refer to the manufacturer’s documentation for procedures
on supplying the proper bias voltage.
WARNING!
Since improper voltage levels can severely damage the flat panel,
make sure the bias voltage is correct before the flat panel is
connected to the XE–700 SBC.
Connecting the flat panel to the XE–700 SBC
Text files are located on the Octagon CD ROM \XE–700\BIOS disk. These text
files include wiring diagrams specific to individual flat panels. Refer to the specific
text file associated with your flat panel to build your cable. The maximum
recommended cable length is 18 inches. Table 10–2 shows the pinout for the flat
panel connector.
1. Ensure that the Video switch SW4 position 3 is On.
2. Refer to the text file associated with your flat panel to determine the supply
voltage for your panel, and whether a bias voltage is required.
3. Program the BIOS for a flat panel (see following section).
4. Connect a cable from the flat panel to the flat panel connector. Refer to Figure
10–2.
Warning
Improper wiring or connection from the flat panel to the XE–700 SBC
can damage the XE–700 SBC and the flat panel. Verify the flat panel
cable connections before connecting the cable to the XE–700 SBC and
applying power to the system.
Note
See Appendix A – Connectors for mating information.
73
Table 10–2 Flat panel connector: J5
J5 – flat panel connector
Pin #
Pin Name
Pin Name
Pin #
1
FPCLK
Gnd
2
3
Gnd
FPDATA[12], R0
4
5
FPDATA[0], B0
FPDATA[13], R1
6
7
FPDATA[1], B1
FPDATA[14], R2
8
9
FPDATA[2], B2
nc
10
11
FPDATA[3], B3
nc
12
13
Gnd
FPDATA[15], R3
14
15
FPDATA[4], B4
FPDATA[16], R4
16
17
FPDATA[5], B5
FPDATA[17], R5
18
19
FPDATA[6], G0
Gnd
20
21
FPDATA[7], G1
TFTDE
22
23
Gnd
VCC3
24
25
FPDATA[8], G2
VCC3
26
27
FPDATA[9], G3
FPFRAME
28
29
FPDATA[10], G4
Gnd
30
31
FPDATA[11], G5
FPLINE
32
33
Gnd
VCC3
34
35
PCIRST*
VCC3
36
37
Gnd
Gnd
38
39
Gnd
Gnd
40
* Pulled low by 0 ohm resistor. Can be configured as an
active PCIRST* signal as a special order from factory.
Figure 10–2
The XE–700 SBC and a flat panel display
TFT Flat Panel Display
XE–700
74
Programming the video BIOS
The XE–700 SBC BIOS is factory configured and programmed for a 640 x 480 CRT
monitor. If you wish to use a flat panel you must reprogram the video BIOS with
the appropriate flat panel driver. To reprogram your video BIOS, load the
appropriate driver from the Octagon CD ROM \700\VIDEO\BIOS subdirectory.
Note
Refer to the README.DOC file on the disk for a list of the supported flat panel
displays. If your particular display is not currently listed, contact Octagon
Technical Support (303–426–4521) for assistance.
To load a new BIOS to support a different flat panel:
1. Attach a CRT monitor, a PS/2 compatible keyboard, and a CompactFlash to the
XE–700 SBC.
Note
If a monitor and keyboard are not available, connect the XE–700 SBC to your PC
by using a remote serial console. Refer to the Serial Console section in the Console
devices chapter.
2. Power on the XE–700 SBC.
3. Select the correct .DAT file (located on the Octagon CD ROM \XE–700\BIOS
disk). Example: LQ12S31.DAT
4. Run VIDEO700. Example:
XE–700 SBC C:\> VIDEO700 BIOS.ROM A1_TFT.BIN
5. Reset the XE–700 SBC.
6. Use PHLASH to program the new BIOS into the XE-700. See the BIOS
programming using PHLASH.EXE section in Chapter 16.
7. Power off the system.
8. Install the flat panel and then apply power to the system.
Additional notes on video BIOS
If the new video BIOS does not work correctly, set the V switch (SW4, position 3) to
Off and boot to serial console on COM1. Reprogram a known good BIOS (such as
the BIOS provided on the Octagon Product CD) set the V switch to on, and reset
the system. See the BIOS programming using PHLASH.EXE section in Chapter
16.
75
Chapter 11: Ethernet
Description
The XE–700 SBC provides a 10/100BaseT Ethernet port and supports the IEEE
802.3 Ethernet standard. The XE–700 SBC uses the Intel 82551ER Ethernet chip.
This chip is fully Plug-N-Play compatible.
The Ethernet controller IC chip provides the following:
8K x 16 SRAM buffer
Integrated 10/100 BaseT transceiver interface
Two LEDs for link and traffic status integrated into connector
The XE–700 SBC Ethernet uses twisted–pair wiring cable. The interface
terminates at the standard, 8–position, RJ–45 latching jack.
The Ethernet port uses IRQ11.
For more information on programming the Ethernet port, see the README file in
the \XE–700\ directory on the Octagon Products, Manuals, and Catalog CD, and
select 82559 or readme.htm.
Table 11–1 Ethernet LEDs
Ethernet LEDs
Function
Activity LED
Link LED
76
Color
Amber
Green
Description
Activated by access to I/O space
Activated by network link
Chapter 12: PC/104 expansion
Description
The PC/104 connector allows you to interface expansion modules such as A/D
converters, CardBus, digital I/O, serial ports, etc. Modules can be stacked to form a
highly integrated control system.
Note
Figure 12–1
The actual maximum number of modules in a stack is limited primarily to the
capacitive loading on the bus and the electrical noise environment. This is
especially true when wide temperature operation is required. Good design practice
dictates that the modules present only one load to each bus signal. Unfortunately,
there are modules on the market that violate this practice by loading the bus more
heavily. Typically, it is the IOW*, IOR*, MEMW*, and RSTDRV* lines. For
example, if the IOW* line is routed to four ICs on the module without a buffer, then
the loading is equivalent to four PC/104 modules. Stacks with three or more
expansion modules should be carefully tested under all environmental conditions.
If possible, query the manufacture of the expansion module regarding loading. All
Octagon products present one load.
Typical PC/104 module stack
PC/104 expansion
Standoff
Standoff
PC/104 Connectors
XE–700
WARNING!
When installing any PC/104 module, avoid excessively flexing the
XE–700 SBC. Mate pins correctly and use the required mounting
hardware.
Note
See Appendix A - Connectors for mating information.
77
Chapter 13: USB
Description
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is a hardware interface for peripherals such as a
keyboard, mouse, joystick, scanner, printer, and telephony devices. USB 1.1 has a
maximum transfer rate of 12 Mbits/sec. Peripherals can be plugged in and
unplugged while power is applied to the system (see Caution below). The XE–700
SBC contains two USB 1.1 compliant ports.
The USB ports are accessed via a 10-pin, 0.1” pitch connector at J8 (USB 1 and 2).
Octagon provides a cable that routes the J8 signals to standard USB connectors
(Octagon p/n 6288). This cable consists of two five-pin connectors that mate with
the J8 connector on one end, and two USB connectors at the other end. Ensure that
the arrow on the five-pin connectors is matched to the pin 1 end of J8. Any USB
device can then plug into either USB interface on the USB adapter cable, or into a
multi-port hub that then plugs into the USB adapter cable.
An operating system capable of utilizing the USB ports and USB devices is
required for USB operation.
Caution
USB devices are hot-swappable when a device is plugged into a
standard USB connector, as pins on the connectors determine the
order in which they make contact. Devices are not hot-swappable
when connected to a non-standard header (J8). You can hot swap a
device through the USB Adapter cable connected to J8, or through
another USB connector wired to the 10-pin header, but you cannot
hot swap at the 10-pin header itself.
78
Overview: Section 3 – System management
Section 3 provides information on managing the XE–700 SBC in the areas of
internal control and troubleshooting. The following chapters are included:
Chapter 14:
Watchdog timer and hardware reset
Chapter 15:
Serial EEPROM
Chapter 16:
System switches, user switch, BIOS update, system functions, CPU
speed, CPU fan and LEDs
Chapter 17:
Troubleshooting
79
Chapter 14: Watchdog timer and hardware reset
Description
The watchdog timer is a fail-safe against program crashes or processor lockups. It
has programmable timeout periods of 1, 10 and 60 seconds. The watchdog timer
can be enabled or disabled in Setup. INT17 software calls (a DOS TSR) or an
operating system driver can be used to enable and set the timeout period, strobe
the watchdog, and disable the watchdog timer from your application. If the timer
expires, it performs a hardware reset.
Booting, power down, and strobing the watchdog timer
When the watchdog is enabled in Setup, it sets the timeout period for 60 seconds.
The BIOS will strobe the watchdog during the boot process and once more just
before booting is finished. The user’s application must then begin strobing. The
watchdog will continue until it is disabled or power down occurs.
If the watchdog is enabled in Setup and your operating system cannot load up
before the timer expires, your system could reset. Also, if you do not disable the
watchdog and your strobing application ends before power down you could again
reset. If these watchdog situations should occur, set the “S” switch, Switch 4
position 1, to Off and reboot. This causes the XE–700 SBC to boot using Setup
defaults (watchdog disabled). Enter Setup, then change and save the watchdog
settings in Setup.
80
Watchdog function definitions using enhanced INT 17h handler
This section provides definitions for the watchdog functions using the INT17
handler, stored in the extended BIOS area that is enabled by the X switch, or the
I17HNDLR.EXE utility. I17HNDLR.EXE is a TSR program. Once executed it is
active, but it must be executed each time the system is rebooted. If you use a
different BIOS, the INT17 functions can still be used by your application. Copy the
I17HNDLR.EXE utility to your hard drive and add it to your AUTOEXEC.BAT.
The INT17 handler is designed for DOS based applications. If you use a different
operating system and the watchdog functions are required for your application,
source code is available on the Octagon Product CD-ROM to access the watchdog.
OS Development Kits are available from Octagon for Linux, QNX, and Windows
CE.net that have watchdog drivers for these operating systems. Contact Octagon
Systems for more information.
Enable watchdog
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
Calling registers:
Return registers:
Comments:
fdh
01h
To enable the watchdog.
AH
fdh
AL
01h
BX
timeout (0=1 second, 1=10 seconds, 2=60
seconds)
DX
ffffh
None
This function enables the watchdog. Once
the watchdog is enabled, it has to be strobed at
a period greater than the timeout period
specified or until the watchdog is disabled.
Otherwise, a system reset will occur.
Programming example:
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1 */
/* set watchdog to 10 second timeout */
asm {
mov ax,0fd01h
mov bx,1
mov dx,0ffffh
int 17h
}
81
Strobe watchdog
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
Calling registers:
Return registers:
Comments:
fdh
02h
To strobe the watchdog.
AH
fdh
AL
02h
DX
ffffh
None
This function strobes the watchdog. Once the
watchdog is enabled, it has to be strobed at a
period greater than the timeout period or until
the watchdog is disabled. Otherwise, a system
reset will occur.
Programming example:
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1 */
asm {
mov ax,0fd02h
mov dx,0ffffh
int 17h
}
Disable watchdog
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
Calling registers:
Return registers:
Comments:
fdh
03h
To disable the watchdog.
AH
fdh
AL
03h
DX
ffffh
None
This function disables the watchdog. Once the
watchdog is enabled, it has to be strobed at a
period greater than the timeout period or until
the watchdog is disabled. Otherwise, a system
reset will occur.
Programming example:
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1 */
asm {
mov ax,0fd03h
mov dx,0ffffh
int 17h
}
82
Hardware reset
The reset switch (Switch SW1) allows you to reset the system without turning off
the power. This provides a more complete reset than the <CTRL><ALT><DEL>
method.
The RESET command accomplishes the same thing as the reset button. Refer to
the component diagram in the Quick start chapter for the location of the reset
switch, and to Appendix B, Software utilities, for information on the Reset utility.
WARNING!
When using COM1 as the console, the <CTRL><ALT> <DEL>
commands on the host system keyboard only reset the host system.
Use the RESET command to issue a hardware reset on the XE–700
SBC.
83
Chapter 15: Serial EEPROM
Description
A 1024-word serial EEPROM is available to the user. The serial EEPROM does not
require battery backup to maintain the data when the system power is off. The
serial EEPROM is easily accessible via software interrupts by most programming
languages.
Enhanced INT 17h function definitions
The serial EEPROM definitions include the following functions: Read a single word
from serial EEPROM, Write a single word to serial EEPROM, Read multiple words
from serial EEPROM, Write multiple words to serial EEPROM, and Return serial
EEPROM size.
Serial EEPROM
Read a single word from the serial EEPROM
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
fch
00h
To read a single word from the on–board serial
EEPROM.
Calling registers:
AH
fch
AL
00h
BX
Word address (zero based)
DX
ffffh (User area relative address)
9876h (Absolute address)
Return registers:
Carry flag cleared if successful
AX
Word read
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
Error code
Meaning
ffh
Unknown error
01h
Function not implemented
02h
Defective serial EEPROM
03h
Illegal access
Comments:
This function reads a word from the user area of
the serial EEPROM.
Programming example:
/* Read word 2*/
unsigned int seeData;
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1*/
asm {
mov ax,0fc00h
mov bx,02h /* Read word 2*/
mov dx,0ffffh
int 17h
mov seeData,ax/* store data in c environment */
84
}
Write a single word to the serial EEPROM
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
Calling registers:
Return registers:
Comments:
fch
01h
To write a single word to the on–board serial
EEPROM.
AH
fch
AL
01h
BX
Word address (zero based)
CX
Data word to write
DX
ffffh (User area relative address)
9876h (Absolute address)
Carry flag cleared if successful
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
Error code
Meaning
ffh
Unknown error
01h
Function not implemented
02h
Defective serial EEPROM
03h
Illegal access
This function writes a word to the user area of
the serial EEPROM.
Programming example:
/* Write 0x1234 to word 3*/
unsigned int seeData = 0x1234;
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1*/
asm {
mov ax,0fc01h
mov bx,03h /* Write word 3*/
mov cx,seeData/* Get write data from c environment */
mov dx,0ffffh
int 17h
}
Read multiple words from the serial EEPROM
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
fch
02h
To read multiple words from the on–board serial
EEPROM.
Calling registers:
AH
fch
AL
02h
BX
Word address (zero based)
CX
Word count
DX
ffffh (User area relative address)
ES:DI Destination pointer
Return registers:
Carry flag cleared if successful
AX
Word read
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
Error Code
Meaning
ffh
Unknown error
01h
Function not implemented
85
Comments:
02h
Defective serial EEPROM
03h
Illegal access
This function reads multiple words from the user
area of the serial EEPROM.
Programming example:
/* Read 10 words starting at word 5*/
unsigned int far*seeDataPtr = new unsigned int[10];
/* Allocate storage /
/ Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1*/
asm {
mov ax,0fc02h
mov bx,05h /* Read starts at word 5*/
mov cx,10 /* Read 10 words */
mov dx,0ffffh
les di,seeDataPtr
int 17h
}
Write multiple words to the serial EEPROM
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
fch
03h
To write multiple words to the on–board serial
EEPROM.
Calling registers:
AH
fch
AL
03h
BX
Word address (zero based)
CX
Word count
DX
ffffh
DS:SI Source pointer
Return registers:
Carry flag cleared if successful
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
Error Code
Meaning
ffh
Unknown error
01h
Function not implemented
02h
Defective serial EEPROM
03h
Illegal access
Comments:
This function writes multiple words to the
user area of the serial EEPROM.
Programming example:
/* Write 8 words starting at word 6*/
unsigned int far*seeDataPtr = new unsigned int[8];
/* Allocate storage /
unsigned int far tmpPtr = seeDataPtr;
for(int I=0;I<8;I++)
seeDataPtr = I; / initialize data /
/ Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1*/
asm {
push
ds
mov ax,0fc03h
mov bx,06h /* Write starts at
word 6*/
mov cx,8
/* Write 8 words */
mov dx,0ffffh
lds si,seeDataPtr
int 17h
pop ds
86
}
Return serial EEPROM size
Function:
Subfunction:
Purpose:
fch
04h
To obtain the size (bytes) of the on–board serial
EEPROM.
Calling registers:
AH
fch
AL
04h
DX
ffffh
Return registers:
Carry flag cleared if successful
AX
Size of the serial EEPROM (1536 + 512)
BX
Size available to user (512 bytes)
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
Error code
Meaning
ffh
Unknown error
01h
Function not implemented
02h
Defective serial EEPROM
03h
Illegal access
Comments:
This function returns the size (in bytes) of the
serial EEPROM. Since the user cannot access all
of the serial EEPROM, this function determines
how much space is available to the user. This
avoids the user from accessing unavailable
addresses.
Programming example:
unsigned int seeUserSize;
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1*/
asm {
mov ax,0fc04h
mov dx,0ffffh
int 17h
mov seeUserSize,bx
}
87
Chapter 16: System switches, user switch, BIOS update, system
functions, CPU speed, CPU fan and LEDs
System switches
Various system function options are selected with Switch 4.
The “S” switch selects whether the card boots from user defined parameters
(defined in the Setup Programs chapter), or the BIOS defaults. Setting this switch
Off allows the user to return to factory programmed defaults.
The “X” switch enables or disables the BIOS extension area. The default is enabled,
which uses the INT17 calls..
The “V” switch enables or disables the on-card video, allowing an external video
card, or the serial console to be used.
The “U” switch is user defined and can be used for program control.
The “R” switch, when set to Off, allows the BIOS to be reinstalled from a remote
system over a serial console connection.
Table 16−1 System configuration switches, Switch 4
System configuration switches, Switch 4
Label
S
Description
System parameters option switch:
On = enable User Setup options*
Off = enable BIOS Setup default
X
BIOS extension enable
On = enable extended BIOS*
allows use of INT17 calls without
loading I17HNDLER.EXE
Off = disables extended BIOS
frees location D8000 - DFFFF
V
Video switch:
On = enable on-card video*
Off = disable on-card video
U1
User switch 1, default On*
R
BIOS recovery switch:
On = normal BIOS operation*
Off = allows new BIOS to be installed
* = default
Position
1
2
3
4
5
System switch
The system switch is position 1. When this switch is On the system boots using the
parameters stored in Setup. When this switch is Off the system boots using the
factory defaults for all parameters in Setup. Note that if you must set the system
switch Off to recover your system, the user-defined parameters in Setup will not be
changed unless you enter Setup, make the changes, and exit saving changes.
88
Extended BIOS switch
The extended BIOS switch is position 2. The extended BIOS memory region
(D8000h to DFFFFh) contains the Octagon INT17 functions. When this switch is
Off, this memory region is freed up for other uses. Note that if you want to use the
INT17 functions, you must either leave the switch On or copy those functions
elsewhere.
You can also modify the extended BIOS using the MAKEBIOS.BAT file, located in
the XE–700 SBC subdirectory of the Octagon CD. Type MAKEBIOS ? for a list of
available options.
Note
If you are using an operating system other than DOS the X switch should be Off.
The X switch maps the INT17 extended BIOS into the 0xD8000-0xDFFFF memory.
This can cause problems with applications or hardware running on other operating
systems if they attempt to use this memory range. Setting the X switch Off frees
this memory for use by other operating systems.
Video switch
The video switch is position 3. When this switch is On the on-card video is enabled.
To use a serial console, or an extension-card video only without using the onboard
video controller (such as a PC/104), set this switch Off.
User switch
The user switch is position 4 and is associated with GPIO23 on the Atlas processor
IC. The INT17 functions provide an easy method to implement software routines
according to whether or not a switch is On. Refer to the INT17 calls to read user
switch on page 90.
BIOS recovery switch
The BIOS recovery switch on the XE–700 SBC is position 5. This switch allows you
to reinstall the BIOS from a floppy disk. When the BIOS recovery switch is Off, the
system will use the boot block recovery process to program a new BIOS.
The BIOS recovery process uses the embflash.exe utility. This utility can be
obtained from Octagon Technical Support. To use the BIOS recovery switch follow
the instructions in CRISIS.HTM on the Octagon Product CD in the \700\EXT
BIOS\CRISIS directory.
BIOS programming using PHLASH.EXE
The BIOS on the XE–700 SBC can be reprogrammed using the PHLASH.EXE
utility. This utility can be found on the Octagon Product CD-ROM in the \XE–
700\EXTBIOS subdirectory. To program the new BIOS the following steps must be
taken:
1. Copy PHLASH.EXE, PLATFORM.BIN, and BIOS.ROM from the
\XE700\EXTBIOS subdirectory to the root of a bootable CompactFlash disk.
2. Boot the XE–700 SBC from the CompactFlash disk with a CRT monitor or flat
panel connected to the system. Note that HIMEM.SYS or other memory
89
managers cannot be used in CONFIG.SYS.
3. At the DOS prompt for the “C” drive type phlash <enter>.
The utility will display a progress screen and tell you when the process is done. You
may need to push the reset button or cycle the power on the system to boot from
the updated BIOS.
INT17 calls to read user switch
The INT17 functions provide an easy method to implement software routines
according to whether or not a user switch is On.
Function:
Sub-Function:
Purpose:
0fbh
0bh
To read user switch
Calling Registers:
AH
AL
DX
0fbh
0bh
0ffffh
Return Registers:
Carry flag cleared if successful
AL
Switch data
bit 0 user switch 1. 1=on, 0=off
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
Comments:
This function shall be used to read the user
switch
Programming example:
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1 */
unsigned char aData;
asm {
MOV AX, 0fb0bh
MOV DX, 0ffffh
INT 17h
MOV aData, AL
}
if (aData & 1)
printf(“U1 switch is ON\n”);
INT17 calls to read BIOS version
The INT17 functions provide the version number of the currently-installed BIOS.
90
Function:
Sub-Function:
Purpose:
0fbh
00h
To obtain the version number of the INT 17 BIOS
extension
Calling Registers:
AH
AL
DX
Return Registers:
Carry flag cleared if successful
AL
Major version number (e.g. Version 2.10
0fbh
00h
0ffffh
AH
BL
returns 2)
Minor version number (e.g. Version 2.10
returns 10)
Version letter (e.g. Version 2.10B returns
‘B’)
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
Comments:
This function returns the version number of the
BIOS extension
Programming example:
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1 */
unsigned char majorVersion;
unsigned char minorVersion;
unsigned char versionLetter;
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1 */
asm {
MOV AX, 0fb00h
MOV DX, 0ffffh
INT 17h
MOV majorVersion, AL
MOV minorVersion, AH
MOV versionLetter, BL
}
System functions
The XE–700 has two additional INT 17 functions; Return CPU Type and Get
Functions Implemented.
Return CPU Type
This function returns the CPU type and the system clock speed.
Function:
Sub-Function:
Purpose:
0fbh
01h
To obtain the CPU type and clock speed
Calling Registers:
CL
AL
DX
Return Registers:
Carry flag cleared if successful
A1
Hclock speed
0x00 = 25 MHz
0x04 = 50 MHz
0x08 = 60 MHz
0x0C = 66 MHz
CL
0x01 STPC Atlas
0x00 not Atlas
CH
Clock multiplier
01h
01h
0ffffh
91
0x80 multiplier is x1
0xC0 multiplier is x2
Carry flag set if error
AL
Error code
Comments:
This function returns the CPU type.
Programming example:
unsigned char cpuMajor;
unsigned char cpuMinor;
/* Inline assembly code for Borland C++ 3.1 */
asm {
MOV AX, 0fb01h
MOV DX, 0ffffh
INT 17h
MOV cpuType, AH
}
if (cpuType == 0x01)
printf(“CPU type is STPC Atlas”);
92
CPU speed
The XE–700 is switch selectable to run at 66 and 133 MHz. Switch 3 selects the
lower or upper frequency for the clock speed.
Table 16−2 CPU clock speed switch, Switch 3
CPU clock speed switch, Switch 3
Position
1
2
3
1
2
3
Setting
Off*
On*
Off*
On
Off
On
66/133 CPU speed
133 MHz
66 MHz
CPU fan
The XE–700 can use an optional cooling fan on the CPU. The fan runs continuously
when power is applied to the card. Note that this connector is not loaded on the
standard XE–700.
Table 16–3 J10 – CPU fan connector
J10 – CPU fan connector
Pin #
1
2
3
Pin Name
GND
+5V
nc
LEDs
The XE–700 has three on-board LEDs, in addition to the LEDs on the Ethernet
connector. See page 18 for the location of the LEDs.
CR1 is a power on LED. This indicates the system is powered.
CR2 contains an amber and a green LED. The amber is an activity indicator for the
CompactFlash. The green is an activity indicator for the secondary IDE drive
devices (hard drive, CD ROM, etc.)
CR6 is a bicolor User LED. The amber LED is connected to GPIO16 of the 83977,
and the green LED is connected to GPIO15 of the 83977. These GPIOs are located
at address A0, bits 5 and 6. CR6 is also used by the BIOS during booting to indicate
the status of the boot process.
93
Chapter 17: Troubleshooting
If your system is not working properly, check the following items.
Boot Block Recovery
If your boot block becomes corrupted, refer to Crisis.htm on the Octagon Product
CD in the \700\EXTBIOS\Crisis directory.
Memory conflicts using operating system other than DOS
If you are using an operating system other than DOS the X switch should be Off.
The X switch maps the INT17 extended BIOS into the 0xD8000-0xDFFFF memory.
This can cause problems with applications or hardware running on other operating
systems if they attempt to use this memory range. Setting the X switch Off frees
this memory for use by other operating systems.
No system LED activity
If there is no LED activity, check the following:
Make sure all PC/104 expansion cards are removed from the XE–700 SBC. This
ensures that other cards are not interacting with the XE–700 SBC.
Turn the “S” switch Off.
Check all power connections to the XE–700 SBC card.
Measure the supply voltage at the J13 power connector and verify that the
voltage at the XE–700 SBC card is +5V (+/–0.25V).
Make sure your power module provides +5V (+/–0.25V) and at least 5A of
current.
No CRT or flat panel video
If the LEDs appear to be functioning properly, but there is no video activity, check
the following:
Make sure all PC/104 expansion cards are removed from the XE–700 SBC. This
ensures that other cards are not interacting with the XE–700 SBC.
Turn the “S” switch Off.
If using a CRT monitor, check the cable and connections going from the J3
connector to the monitor.
If using a flat panel display, check the following:
Check the power and cables going to the flat panel display.
Make sure that the power module has enough current capacity to power both
the XE–700 SBC card and the flat panel.
94
If a flat panel BIOS has been programmed into the XE–700 SBC that is
incorrect for the flat panel being used and an analog monitor is not present or
is not displaying the video data correctly, the system can be booted via the
serial console by doing the following:
1. Set the “S” and the “V” switches to Off.
2. Connect the COM port of a host computer running HyperTerminal or some
other terminal software to COM1 on the XE–700 SBC using a serial console
(see page 51.) The serial port settings on the host computer should be 38.4K
baud, 8, N, and none.
3. Power up the XE–700 SBC; it will boot using the serial console interface.
Once the system has successfully booted you can use the pgmvideo.exe
utility to either program the desired flat panel VIDEO BIOS into the XE–
700 SBC or program in the CRT.DAT file for analog monitor support to
recover the system.
4. Set the “S” and “V” switches to On and re-boot the system.
Video is present but is distorted
If video is present but is distorted, check the following:
Make sure all PC/104 expansion cards are removed from the XE–700 SBC. This
ensures that other cards are not interacting with the XE–700 SBC.
Turn the “S” switch Off.
If using a CRT monitor, check the cable and connections going from the J3
connector to the monitor.
If using a flat panel display, check the following:
1. Cable and connections going from the XE–700 SBC to the flat panel
display.
2. Power cable going to the flat panel display.
3. Power module for the flat panel. Make sure that the power module has
enough current capacity to power both the XE–700 SBC and the flat panel.
95
No serial console activity
If the serial console does not appear to be functioning correctly, check the following:
Make sure all PC/104 expansion cards are removed from the XE–700 SBC. This
ensures that other cards are not interacting with the XE–700 SBC.
Turn the “S” switch Off.
Make sure the COM1/2 connector on the XE–700 SBC is used.
Make sure a null modem adapter is installed between COM1 of the VTC-20F
cable and the serial port of your PC.
Make sure that your terminal emulator (such as HyperTerminal) on your PC is
set up properly. Refer to the Console devices chapter. Refer to the
HyperTerminal manual for information on setting up communication
parameters.
After verifying the above conditions, you can monitor voltage levels by
connecting an oscilloscope between the TxD* line on COM1 and ground. After
power-up, you should see a burst of activity on the oscilloscope screen. The
voltage level should switch between +/–8V.
Garbled serial console screen activity
If you do get activity on your console screen but the message is garbled, check the
following:
Turn the “S” switch Off to ensure the default settings for COM1.
Make sure that your terminal emulator (such as HyperTerminal) on your PC is
set up properly. Refer to the Console devices chapter. Refer to the
HyperTerminal manual for information on setting up communication
parameters.
System generates a BIOS message but locks up when booting
Turn the “S” switch Off and reboot.
Verify that all the necessary boot files exist on the boot device. Copy any
missing files to the boot device.
If no files are missing, overwrite any files which may have become corrupted.
In addition, you may want to format the boot device.
System will not boot from CompactFlash
Many CompactFlash devices as shipped from the factory are not bootable devices.
Refer to the CompactFlash, SDRAM, and battery backup chapter to make your
CompactFlash bootable.
96
System locks up on power-up; may or may not respond to reset switch
A common cause is using a non-Octagon power supply such as a PC desktop supply.
Most of these PC supplies are rated at 5V at 20A or more. Switching supplies
usually requires a 20% load to operate properly, that is, 4A or more. Since a typical
Octagon system takes less than 2A, the supply does not regulate properly. Output
drift up to 6–7V and/or 7–8 voltage spikes have been reported. If the power supply
comes up slowly (that is, longer than 10 ms), the sequencing of ICs on the board
may be out of sync, thus, causing the system to lock up.
System locks up after power-down/power-up
If the power supply does not drain below 0.7V, the CMOS components on the card
will act like diodes and forward bias. This is typically caused by using power
supplies that have large output capacitors. Either use a different power supply that
discharges faster, leave the power off until the supply has adequate time to
discharge or place a 100 ohm, large wattage resistor across the output capacitor.
LED signaling of “beep” codes
Description
The XE–700 SBC has a bicolor LED that is used by the BIOS to indicate the BIOS
processing state.
Immediately after the XE–700 SBC powers on, the amber LED is on and the green
LED is off. Once the card boots, the CR9 amber LED turns off and the green LED
is on.
If the BIOS finds an error during the power on self test (POST) the amber LED is
flashed in a pattern indicating the POST code failure. The visual beep codes are
defined in Table 17–1.
Count the number of flashes in each of four sets. Subtract one from each set, the
resulting number matches the POST error found in the Table 17–1.
For example:
Flash–Flash pause
Flash–Flash–Flash–Flash pause
Flash–Flash–Flash–Flash–Flash pause
Flash–Flash–Flash–Flash
Is counted as 2–4–5–4. After subtracting one from each set the result is 1–3–4–3.
This is a failure of the first 64K of base RAM.
97
Table 17–1 BIOS beep codes
Port 80
Code
02h
03h
04h
06h
07h
08h
09h
0Ah
0Bh
0Ch
OEh
0Fh
10h
11h
12h
13h
14h
16h
17h
18h
1Ah
1Ch
20h
22h
24h
28h
29h
2Ah
2Ch
2Eh
2Fh
32h
33h
36h
38h
3Ah
3Ch
3Dh
41h
42h
45h
46h
47h
48h
49h
4Ah
98
Beep
Sequence
1-2-2-3
1-3-1-1
1-3-1-3
1-3-3-1
1-3-4-1
1-3-4-3
2-1-2-3
POST Routine Description
Verify Real Mode
Disable Non-Maskable Interrupt (NMI)
Get CPU type
Initialize system hardware
Disable shadow and execute code from the ROM
Initialize chipset with initial POST values
Set IN POST flag
Initialize CPU registers
Enable CPU cache
Initialize caches to initial POST values
Initialize I/O component
Initialize the local bus IDE
Initialize Power Management
Load alternate registers with initial POST values
Restore CPU control word during warm boot
Initialize PCI Bus Mastering devices
Initialize keyboard controller
BIOS ROM checksum
Initialize cache before memory Auto size
8254 timer initialization
8237 DMA controller initialization
Reset Programmable Interrupt Controller
Test DRAM refresh
Test 8742 Keyboard Controller
Set ES segment register to 4 GB
Auto size DRAM
Initialize POST memory manager
Clear 512 KB base RAM
ROM failure on address line xxxx
RAM failure on data bits xxxx of low byte of memory bus
Enable cache before system BIOS shadow
Test CPU bus-clock frequency
Initialize Phoenix Dispatch Manager
Warm start shutdown
Shadow system BIOS ROM
Auto size cache
Advanced configuration of chipset registers
Load alternate registers with CMOS values
Initialize extended memory for ROMPilot
Initialize interrupt vectors
POST device initialization
Check ROM copyright notice
Initialize I20 support
Check video configuration against CMOS
Initialize PCI bus and devices
Initialize all video adapters in system
4Bh
4Ch
4Eh
4Fh
50h
51h
52h
54h
55h
58h
59h
5Ah
5Bh
5Ch
60h
62h
64h
66h
67h
68h
69h
6Ah
6Bh
6Ch
6Eh
70h
72h
76h
7Ch
7Dh
7Eh
80h
81h
82h
83h
84h
85h
86h
87h
88h
89h
8Ah
8Bh
8Ch
8Fh
90h
91h
92h
93h
95h
2-2-3-1
QuietBoot start (optional)
Shadow video BIOS ROM
Display BIOS copyright notice
Initialize MultiBoot
Display CPU type and speed
Initialize EISA board
Test keyboard
Set key click if enabled
Enable USB devices
Test for unexpected interrupts
Initialize POST display service
Display prompt “Press F2 to enter Setup”
Disable CPU cache
Test RAM between 512 and 640 KB
Test extended memory
Test extended memory address lines
Jump to UserPatch1
Configure advanced cache registers
Initialize Multi Processor APIC
Enable external and CPU caches
Setup System Management Made (SMM) area
Display external L2 cache size
Load custom defaults (optional)
Display shadow-area message
Display possible high address for UMB recovery
Display error messages
Check for configuration errors
Check for keyboard errors
Set up hardware interrupt vectors
Initialize Intelligent System Monitoring
Initialize coprocessor if present
Disable onboard Super I/O ports and IRQs
Late POST device initialization
Detect and install external RS232 ports
Configure non-MCD IDE controllers
Detect and install external parallel ports
Initialize PC-compatible PnP ISA devices
Re-initialize onboard I/O ports
Configure Motherboard Configurable Devices (optional)
Initialize BIOS Data Area
Enable Non-Maskable Interrupts (NMIs)
Initialize Extended BIOS Data Area
Test and initialize PS/2 mouse
Initialize floppy controller
Determine number of ATA drives (optional)
Initialize hard-disk controllers
Initialize local-bus hard-disk controllers
Jump to UserPatch2
Build MPTABLE for multi-processor boards
Install CD-ROM for boot
99
96h
97h
98h
99h
9Ah
9Ch
9Dh
9Eh
9Fh
A0h
A2h
A4h
A8h
Aah
Ach
Aeh
B0h
B1h
B2h
B4h
B5h
B6h
B7h
B9h
Bah
BBh
BCh
BDh
Beh
BFh
C0h
C1h
C2h
C3h
C4h
C5h
C6h
C7h
C8h
C9h
Cah
CBh
CCh
CDh
Ceh
D2h
100
1-2
1
Clear huge ES segment register
Fix up Multi Processor table
Search for option ROMs. One long, two short beeps on checksum
failure.
Check for SMART drive (optional)
Shadow options ROMs
Set up Power Management
Initialize security engines (optional)
Enable hardware interrupts
Determine number of ATA and SCSI drives
Set time of day
Check key lock
Initialize typematic rate
Erase F2 prompt
Scan for F2 keystroke
Enter Setup
Clear Boot flag
Check for errors
Inform ROMPilot about the end of POST
POST done - prepare to boot operating system
One short beep before boot
Terminate QuietBoot (optional)
Check password (optional)
Initialize ACPI BIOS
Prepare Boot
Initialize SMBIOS
Initialize PnP Option ROMs
Clear parity checkers
Display MultiBoot menu
Clear screen (optional)
Check virus and backup reminders
Try to boot with Int 19h
Initialize POST Error Manager (PEM)
Initialize error logging
Initialize error display function
Initialize system error handler
PnP dual CMOS (optional)
Initialize note dock (optional)
Initialize note dock late
Force check (optional)
Extended checksum (optional)
Redirect Int15h to enable remote keyboard
Redirect Int 13h to Memory Technologies Devices such as ROM,
RAM, PCMCIA, and serial disk
Redirect Int 10h to enable remote serial video
Re-map I/O and memory for PCMCIA
Initialize digitizer and display message
Unknown interrupt
Technical assistance
Carefully recheck your system before calling Technical Support. Run as many tests as
possible; the more information you can provide, the easier it will be for Technical Support
staff to help you solve the problem. For additional technical assistance, try the following:
Technical Support telephone: 303–426–4521
E-mail Technical Support: [email protected]
Applications Notes (via web): www.octagonsystems.com
101
Overview: Section 4 – Appendices
Section 4 contains a series of appendices which provides additional information
about the XE–700 SBC.
102
Appendix A:
Technical data
Appendix B:
Software utilities
Appendix C:
Accessories
Appendix A: XE–700 SBC technical data
Technical specifications
CPU
STPC Atlas, 66/133 MHz
PCI bus clock
33 MHz
ISA bus clock
8.33 MHz
BIOS
AT compatible with industrial extensions
SDRAM
64 MB SDRAM supplied
On-board flash
512 KB surface mount flash, contains system BIOS
Hard drive
EIDE hard drive support with on-card hard drive controller and BIOS. Accessed
via 44-pin connector. Supports up to three EIDE devices. CompactFlash appears as
the primary EIDE device.
Floppy drive
Supports one floppy drive
CompactFlash socket
Supports Type I and Type II CompactFlash devices
Parallel port
LPT1 is PC compatible with multifunctional capability
USB
2 ports USB 1.1 compatible
Serial I/O
One port dedicated 8-wire RS–232, one port dedicated 4-wire RS–232, two ports
configurable as RS–232, RS–422 or RS–485 interfaces
IEC1000, level 3, ESD protection specification
— Contact discharge ±6 kV
— Air–gap discharge ±8 kV
Backdrive protection
16C550 compatible
Up to 115.2K baud
16-byte FIFO buffers
Switch-selectable terminations for RS–422/485 on COM3/4
Digital I/O
24 I/O lines, sink/source 15mA per line
Keyboard and mouse ports
PS/2 compatible
103
Ethernet
One 10/100BaseT port supporting IEEE 802.3
Video
Supports CRTs displays with resolutions up to 1280 x 1024 x 24 bpp, and TFT flat
panel displays with resolutions up to 1024 x 1024 x 18 bpp.
Watchdog timer
Time-out periods of 1, 10 or 60 seconds. Strobed through built–in, enhanced INT
17h function calls.
Real time clock
AT compatible with external battery backup.
Expansion
PC/104
Operating systems
Compatible with Windows CE.net, Linux, QNX, and DOS.
PCI bus mastering
Bus mastering is not supported
Power requirements
5V ±0.25V; 1.6 Amps @ 133 MHz
Note
It is extremely important to select a supply that ramps up in 10ms or less. This
assures that all the circuitry on the XE–700 SBC sequences properly and avoids
system lockup.
Environmental specifications
Operating temperature
–40° to +85°C; Octagon recommends the
conductive cooling kit for prolonged operation
near the upper limit.
Nonoperating temperature
–55° to 95°C, nonoperating
Relative humidity
5% to 95% noncondensing
Shock
40g, 3 axis
Vibration
5g, 3 axis
Size
115 mm x 165mm x 29.5 mm, EPIC™ form factor
Weight
6 oz.
Excessive thermal stress
This card is guaranteed to operate over the published temperature ranges and
relevant conditions. However, sustained operation near the maximum temperature
specification is not recommended by Octagon or the CPU chip manufacturer due to
well known, thermal related, failure mechanisms. These failure mechanisms,
common to all silicon devices, can reduce the MTBF of the cards. Extended
operation at the lower limits of the temperature ranges has no limitations.
104
Mating connectors
Table A–1
XE–700 SBC connector functions
Connector
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J6
J7
J8
J9
J10
Function
JTAG
PIC_ICP port
VGA video
Hard drive
TFT flat panel video
PC battery
Ethernet
USB1/2
Digital I/O
CPU fan
J11
PC/104
J12
J13
J14
J15
J16
J17
J18
J19
J500
COM1/2
Power
COM4 RS–422/485
COM3 RS–422/485
PS/2 Keyboard / Mouse
COM3/4
Floppy drive
LPT parallel port
CompactFlash
Mating Connector
For factory use
For factory use
Molex 87568-1073
Amp 1-111626-0
Molex 87568-4093
Berg #65039-033
RJ45
Octagon #6288 cable
Amp 746288-6
Supplied with units
requiring fans; not
loaded on stock
product
Comm Conn 50711C104G
Amp 746288-4
Molex 39-01-2100
Molex 22-01-3057
Molex 22-01-3057
Octagon #6837 cable
Amp 746288-4
Amp 746288-8
Amp 746288-6
Compact flash device
105
Maps
Table A–2
Table A–3
XE–700 SBC DMA map
Channel
Channel 0
Channel 1
Channel 2
Channel 3
Description
available *
available *
available *
available *
Channel 4
Channel 5
Channel 6
Channel 7
Slave
available
available
available
XE–700 SBC I/O map
Start Addr
(Hex)
0000
0020
0040
0060
0080
00a0
00c0
0170
0120
02e8
02f8
0386
03c0
03e8
03f8
a000
0cf8
ef00
efa0
f000
106
XE–700 SBC DMA map
* One of the lower DMA channels (0 through 3)
must be disabled (reserved by the system) and
will be unavailable to the expansion bus. By
default, DMA Channel 2 will be disabled. The
user may use Setup to change this selection to
any other low DMA channel.
End Addr
(Hex)
001f
0021
005f
006f
008f
00a1
00df
0177
0123
02ef
02ff
0376
03df
03ef
03ff
a100
0cff
ef4b
efaf
fbff
XE–700 SBC I/O map
Function
DMA controller 1
PIC 1
Timer
Keyboard Controller
DMA Page register
PIC 2
DMA controller 2
IDE
Digital I/O
COM 4 (Optional)
COM 2
IDE
VGA
COM 3
COM 1
GPIO (Watchdog, Switches, LEDs, etc)
PCI Config
Hardware Monitoring
SMBUS
PCI Assignable
Table A–4
XE–700 SBC interrupt map
XE–700 SBC interrupt map
IRQ
IRQ0
IRQ1
IRQ2
IRQ3
IRQ4
IRQ5
Default Device
System Timer
Keyboard
Cascade to IRQ9
COM2
COM1
LPT
IRQ6
IRQ7
unused
LPT default
IRQ8
IRQ9
RTC Alarm
COM3-4
IRQ10
COM4
IRQ11
Ethernet and
USB
Aux Port (mouse)
Reserved for FPU
IDE Primary
(CompactFlash)
IDE Secondary
IRQ12
IRQ13
IRQ14
IRQ15
Alternate
not available
not available
not available
not available
not available
PC/104 when not
selected for LPT in
Setup
PC/104 or PCI
PC/104 when not
selected for LPT in
Setup
not available
Available if not used for
COM3/4 in Setup
PC/104 when not
selected for COM4 in
Setup
not available
PC/104 or PCI
not available
PC/104 or PCI
PC/104 or PCI
107
Table A–5
XE–700 SBC memory map
XE–700 SBC memory map
Address
00000H to 9FFFFH
A0000H to BFFFFH
C0000H to CBFFFH
CC000H to D7FFFH
D8000H to DFFFFH
Size
640KB
128KB
48KB
48KB
32KB
E0000H to FFFFFH
10000H to FFFFFFFFH
128KB
4GB
Description
DOS and extended BIOS RAM
Off Card Memory (shadowable)
Video BIOS
Off Card Memory
Extended BIOS Area when X jumper
installed or off card shadowable
System BIOS
Addressable Extended Memory
Switch settings
Table A−6 COM3/4 switches, Switch 2
COM3/4 switches, Switch 2
COM Port
Interface
Switch 4 Settings
RS–422/RS–485
Position 1 Off
no termination
Position 2 Off
COM3
RS–422/RS–485
Position 1 On*
with termination
Position 2 On*
RS–422/RS–485
Position 3 Off
no termination
Position 4 Off
COM4
RS–422/RS–485
Position 3 On*
with termination
Position 4 On*
* Default. These switches terminate the network. If
the XE–700 SBC is not at an end of the network, set
these switches to Off .
Table A–7
CPU clock speed switch, Switch 3
CPU clock speed switch, Switch 3
Position
1
2
3
1
2
3
* default
108
Setting
Off*
On*
Off*
On
Off
On
66/133 CPU speed
133 MHz
66 MHz
Shadowing
ENABLED
ENABLED
Table A–8
System configuration switches, Switch 4
System configuration switches, Switch 4
Label
S
X
V
U1
R
Description
System parameters option switch:
On = enable User Setup options*
Off = enable BIOS Setup default
BIOS extension enable
Installed = enable extended BIOS*
allows use of INT17 calls without
loading I17HNDLER.EXE
Removed = disables extended BIOS
frees location D8000 - DFFFF
Video switch:
On = enable on-card video*
Off = disable on-card video
User switch 1, default On*
BIOS recovery jumper:
Installed = normal BIOS operation*
Removed = allows new BIOS to be installed
Position
1
2
3
4
5
* default
109
Connector pin–outs
The following tables show the pin–outs for the connectors on the XE–700 SBC.
Table A–9
J3 – CRT connector
J3, CRT Connector
Pin #
Pin Name
Pin Name
Pin #
1
Red
Green
2
3
Blue
GND
4
5
+5V
GND
6
7
H SYNC OUT
DDC SDA
8
9
DDC SCL
V SYNC OUT
10
Table A–10 J4 – EIDE
J4 – EIDE
Pin #
Pin Name
Pin Name
Pin #
44
VCC5
NC
43
42
VCC5
VCC5
41
40
Gnd
IDESLED
39
38
IDESCS3*
IDESCS1*
37
36
IDESA(2)
IDESA(0)
35
34
NC
IDESA(1)
33
32
NC
IDESINTR
31
30
Gnd
IDESDACK*
29
28
NC
IDESIORDY
27
26
Gnd
IDESIOR*
25
24
Gnd
IDESIOW*
23
22
Gnd
IDESDRQ
21
20
KEY
Gnd
19
18
IDEDS(15)
IDEDS(0)
17
16
IDEDS(14)
IDEDS(1)
15
14
IDEDS(13)
IDEDS(2)
13
12
IDEDS(12)
IDEDS(3)
11
10
IDEDS(11)
IDEDS(4)
9
8
IDEDS(10)
IDEDS(5)
7
6
IDEDS(9)
IDEDS(6)
5
4
IDEDS(8)
IDEDS(7)
3
2
Gnd
IDESRST*
1
* = active low
110
Table A–11 J5 – Flat panel connector
J5 – flat panel connector
Pin #
Pin Name
Pin Name
Pin #
1
FPCLK
Gnd
2
3
Gnd
FPDATA[12], R0
4
5
FPDATA[0], B0
FPDATA[13], R1
6
7
FPDATA[1], B1
FPDATA[14], R2
8
9
FPDATA[2], B2
nc
10
11
FPDATA[3], B3
nc
12
13
Gnd
FPDATA[15], R3
14
15
FPDATA[4], B4
FPDATA[16], R4
16
17
FPDATA[5], B5
FPDATA[17], R5
18
19
FPDATA[6], G0
Gnd
20
21
FPDATA[7], G1
TFTDE
22
23
Gnd
VCC3
24
25
FPDATA[8], G2
VCC3
26
27
FPDATA[9], G3
FPFRAME
28
29
FPDATA[10], G4
Gnd
30
31
FPDATA[11], G5
FPLINE
32
33
Gnd
VCC3
34
35
PCIRST*
VCC3
36
37
Gnd
Gnd
38
39
Gnd
Gnd
40
* Pulled low by 0 ohm resistor. Can be configured as an
active PCIRST* signal as a special order from factory.
Table A–12 J6 – Battery connector
J6 – Battery connector
Pin #
1
2
3
4
Pin Name
Battery +
Key
Battery –
Battery –
111
Table A–13 J7 – Ethernet connector
J7 – Ethernet connector
RJ pin
Pin Name
1
TxD +
2
TxD –
3
RxD +
4
comm. mode term.
5
comm. mode term.
6
RxD –
7
comm. mode term.
8
comm. mode term.
Table A–14 J8 – USB connector
J8 – USB connector
Pin #
Pin Name
Pin Name
Pin #
1
USB2 power
USB1 power
2
3
USB2 –
USB1 –
4
5
USB2 +
USB1 +
6
7
Gnd
Gnd
8
9
Gnd
Gnd
10
Table A–15 J9 – Digital I/O connector
J9 – Digital I/O
Pin #
Pin Name
Pin Name
1
Port B, bit 4
Vcc (+5V)*
3
Port B, bit 5
Port B, bit 2
5
Port B, bit 6
Port B, bit 3
7
Port B, bit 7
Port B, bit 1
9
Port C, bit 7
Port B, bit 0
11
Port C, bit 5
Port C, bit 6
13
Port C, bit 0
Port C, bit 4
15
Port C, bit 2
Port C, bit 1
17
Port C, bit 3
Port A, bit 7
19
Port A, bit 0
Port A, bit 6
21
Port A, bit 1
Port A, bit 5
23
Port A, bit 2
Port A, bit 4
25
Port A, bit 3
Gnd
* +5V safe is fused through a 750 mA automatic, resetting fuse
112
Pin #
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
Table A–16 J10 – CPU fan connector
J10 – CPU fan connector
Pin #
1
2
3
Pin Name
GND
+5V
nc
Table A–17 J11 – PC/104 connector
Some signals on the XE–700 do not match the PC/104 specification. In those
instances, the signals are shown below in gray boxes. The PC/104 specified signal is
listed first, and the XE–700 signal follows.
Pin
Pin
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
PC/104 Connector
D
C
GND
GND
MEMCS16*
SBHE*
IOCS16*
LA23
IRQ10
LA22
IRQ11
LS21
IRQ12
LS20
IRQ15
LS19
IRQ14
LA18
DACK0*
LA17
DRQ0
MEMR*
DACK5*
MEMW*
DRQ5
SD8
DACK6*
SD9
DRQ6
SD10
DACK7*
SD11
DRQ7
SD12
+5V
SD13
MASTER*
SD14
GND
SD15
GND
KEY
PC/104 Connector
A
B
1
2
3
4
5
6
IOCHCK*
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
GND
RSTDRV
+5V
IRQ9
-5V
DRQ2
7
8
D2
D1
-12V
SRDY* / ZWS*
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
D0
IOCHRDY
AEN
A19
A18
A17
A16
A15
A14
A13
A12
A11
A10
A9
A8
A7
A6
A5
A4
A3
+12V
KEY
SMEMW*
SMEMR*
IOW*
IOR*
DACK3*
DRQ3
DACK1*
DRQ1
REFRESH*
SYSCLK
IRQ7
IRQ6
IRQ5
IRQ4
IRQ3
DACK2*
TC
BALE
29
30
31
32
A2
A1
A0
GND
+5V
OSC
GND
GND
113
Table A–18 J12 – COM1 and COM2
COM1
Pin#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
RS–232
signal
DCD
DSR
RxD
RTS
TxD
CTS
DTR
RI
GND
nc
COM2
Pin#
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
RS–232
signal
nc
nc
RxD
RTS
TxD
CTS
nc
nc
GND
nc
Table A–19 J13 – Power connector
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
Function
nc
GND
GND
+12V
nc
Function
nc
+5V
+5V
–12V
GND
Pin
6
7
8
9
10
Table A–20 J14 and J15 – COM3 and COM4 RS–422/485 connectors
J15 COM3
connector
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
114
Signal
TXD+
TXD–
GND
RXD+
RXD–
J14 COM4
connector
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
Signal
TXD+
TXD–
GND
RXD+
RXD–
Table A–21 J16 – PS/2 keyboard mouse
J16 – PS/2 Keyboard Mouse
Pin #
Pin Name
1
GND
2
KCLK
3
KDATA
4
MCLK
5
MDATA
6
nc
7
+5V
8
nc
Table A–22 J17 – COM3 and COM4 connector
COM3
Pin#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
RS–232
signal
nc
nc
RxD
RTS
TxD
CTS
nc
nc
GND
nc
COM4
Pin#
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
RS–232
signal
nc
nc
RxD
RTS
TxD
CTS
nc
nc
GND
nc
115
Table A–23 J18 – Floppy drive
J18 – Floppy drive
Pin #
Pin Name
Pin Name
Pin #
1
GND
DENSEL
2
3
GND
NC
4
5
GND
NC
6
7
GND
INDEX*
8
9
GND
MTR0*
10
11
GND
DR1*
12
13
GND
DR0*
14
15
GND
MTRI*
16
17
GND
DIR*
18
19
GND
STEP*
20
21
GND
WDATA*
22
23
GND
WGATE*
24
25
GND
TRK0*
26
27
GND
WP*
28
29
GND
RDATA*
30
31
GND
HDSEL*
32
33
GND
DSKCHG*
34
* = active low
Table A–24 J19 – LPT1
J19 – LPT1
Pin # Name
1
OSTB*
3
OPD[0]
5
OPD[1]
7
OPD[2]
9
OPD[3]
11
OPD[4]
13
OPD[5]
15
OPD[6]
17
OPD[7]
19
ACK*
21
BUSY
23
PE
25
SLCT
* = active low
116
Name
AFD*
ERR*
INIT*
SLIN*
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
VCC5
Pin #
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
Table A–25 J500 – CompactFlash
J500 – CompactFlash connector
Pin#
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
Signal
GND
DD4
DD6
HDCS0*
GND
GND
+3V
GND
GND
A1
DD0
DD2
GND
DD11
DD13
DD15
GND
IOW
IRQ14
GND
RST*
DRQ
45
ACTLED
47
DD8
49
DD10
51
NC
*active low
Signal
DD3
DD5
DD7
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
A2
A0
DD1
NC
NC
DD12
DD14
HDCS1*
IOR*
+3V
+3V
NC
IORDY
IDE_DAC
K_P
NC
DD9
GND
NC
Pin#
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
117
Appendix B: Software utilities
Introduction
The Octagon Products, Manuals, and Catalog CD comes with the utilities listed
below. This chapter describes these utilities and their use.
Support commands
I17HNDLR.EXE
PHLASH.EXE
RESET.COM
VGA700.EXE
118
I17HNDLR.EXE
Purpose
This support command is an alternate way to use the INT 17h functions when the
extended BIOS area is disabled (i.e., the switch at the “X” position is Off at Switch
4). Also, use this support command to reprogram the extended BIOS area with
another BIOS.
Syntax
I17HNDLR
Remarks
This command is used if the extended BIOS area (D8000–DFFFF) is not used. The
I17HNDLR allows the system to use the INT 17h functions.
PHLASH.EXE
Purpose
This support command will program a BIOS image from a floppy drive or a
subdirectory to the 512K flash EEPROM.
Syntax
PHLASH
Remarks
Phlash.exe must have two files that are located the same directory as the
Phlash.exe file. These files are BIOS.ROM, a 256K BIOS image, and platform.bin,
a support file that locates the BIOS.ROM file in the 512K flash EPROM. These
files can be found on the Octagon Product CD. Phlash.exe must be run with the
video enabled on the target system, and HIMEM.SYS must be disabled. The
PHLASH.EXE command will only work with DOS.
119
RESET.COM
Purpose
This support command enables the watchdog timer and allows time–out to expire,
thus restarting the system.
Syntax
RESET
Remarks
The RESET command also restarts all the expansion I/O cards on the bus. This
differs from a <CTRL><ALT><DEL> reboot of the system which only restarts the
system but not the expansion cards. The RESET button on the XE–700 SBC also
accomplishes the same thing as the RESET command.
VGA700.EXE
Purpose
This support command enables the watchdog timer and allows time–out to expire,
thus restarting the system.
Syntax
VGA700 <BIOS_FILE.*> <TFT_FILE.*>
Remarks
The VGA700 command buids a new BIOS with the “TFT_FILE.*” BIOS file
included. To use the new BIOS you must also run PHLASH and then reset the
system.
120
Appendix C: Accessories
Table C–1 Cables and accessories
Product
COM Port VTC-20F Cable
COM Port VTC-20M Cable
0.100 in RS-422/485 Cable
USB Cable
IDE Cable
2 mm VGA-12, Cable, Ribbon, 12”
Null Modem Adapter, 9 Pin
AT battery
ATX Power Cable
PS/2 Keyboard/mouse cable, 8-pin
header
Table C–2
Description
Dual serial cable (female)
Dual serial cable (male)
Serial cable for RS-422/485
Two-port USB cable
44-pin to multi-connector cable:
one 40-pin and one 44-pin
two 40-pin and one 44-pin
VGA video cable
9-pin to 9-pin
Calendar/clock battery backup
10-pin to 20-pin ATX cable
8-pin to PS2 keyboard. “Y” adapter
will provide PS/2 mouse
Octagon p/n
4866
4989
6683
6288
4080
6246
6392
2470
3186
6537
6837
Digital I/O accessories
Product
Description
Octagon p/n
Cables
CMA-26-12
CMA-26-24
12” cable for digital IO port, 26-pin
24” cable for digital IO port, 26-pin
2776
1257
Terminal board, 26-position
Terminal board, 20-position
Terminal board with LED
indicators
2905
2904
1183
Input module, 90-140 VAC
Input module, 180-280 VAC
Input module, 15-32 VDC
Input module, 4-16 VDC
Input module, 2.5-28 VDC
Output module, 12-140 VAC
Output module, 24-280 VAC
Output module, 5-60 VDC
Output module, 5-200 VDC
Opto Rack, 8-position
Opto Rack, 16-position
Opto Rack, 24-position
2395
2396
2397
2511
2529
2398
2399
2400
2503
2512
2513
2514
Terminal Boards
STB-26
STB-20
TBD-100
Opto Modules and Racks
G4-IAC5
G4-IAC5A
G4-IDC5
G4-IDC5B
G4-IDC5D
G4-OAC5
G4-OAC5A
G4-ODC5
G4-ODC5A
MPB-08
MPB-16
MPB-24
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Warranty
Octagon Systems Corporation (Octagon), warrants that its standard hardware
products will be free from defects in materials and workmanship under normal use
and service for the current established warranty period. Octagon’s obligation under
this warranty shall not arise until Buyer returns the defective product, freight
prepaid to Octagon’s facility or another specified location. Octagon’s only
responsibility under this warranty is, at its option, to replace or repair, free of
charge, any defective component part of such products.
Limitations on warranty
The warranty set forth above does not extend to and shall not apply to:
1. Products, including software, which have been repaired or altered by other
than Octagon personnel, unless Buyer has properly altered or repaired the
products in accordance with procedures previously approved in writing by
Octagon.
2. Products which have been subject to power supply reversal, misuse, neglect,
accident, or improper installation.
3. The design, capability, capacity, or suitability for use of the Software. Software
is licensed on an “AS IS” basis without warranty.
The warranty and remedies set forth above are in lieu of all other warranties
expressed or implied, oral or written, either in fact or by operation of law, statutory
or otherwise, including warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular
purpose, which Octagon specifically disclaims. Octagon neither assumes nor
authorizes any other liability in connection with the sale, installation or use of its
products. Octagon shall have no liability for incidental or consequential damages of
any kind arising out of the sale, delay in delivery, installation, or use of its
products.
Service policy
1. If a product should fail during the warranty period, it will be repaired free of
charge. For out of warranty repairs, the customer will be invoiced for repair
charges at current standard labor and materials rates.
2. Customers that return products for repairs, within the warranty period, and
the product is found to be free of defect, may be liable for the minimum current
repair charge.
Returning a product for repair
1. The customer must call Tech Support at 303-426-4521 to determine if repair
service is necessary.
2. If repair service is required, Tech Support will require the customer’s name,
address, telephone number, email address and a list of problems found.
122
3. Tech Support will forward this information to the RMA Administrator who will
contact the customer to issue the RMA number.
4. The customer must carefully package the product in an antistatic container.
Failure to package in antistatic packaging will VOID all warranties. Then
package in a safe container for shipping.
5. Write the RMA number on the outside of the shipping container.
6. The customer pays for shipping to Octagon. Octagon pays for shipping back to
the customer.
7. Other conditions and limitations may apply to international shipments.
Note
PRODUCTS RETURNED TO OCTAGON FREIGHT COLLECT OR WITHOUT AN
RMA NUMBER CANNOT BE ACCEPTED AND WILL BE RETURNED FREIGHT
COLLECT.
Returns
There will be a 15% restocking charge on returned product that is unopened and
unused, if Octagon accepts such a return. Returns will not be accepted 30 days
after purchase. Opened and/or used products, non–standard products, software and
printed materials are not returnable without prior written agreement.
Governing law
This agreement is made in, governed by and shall be construed in accordance with
the laws of the State of Colorado.
The information in this manual is provided for reference only. Octagon does not
assume any liability arising out of the application or use of the information or
products described in this manual. This manual may contain or reference
information and products protected by copyrights or patents. No license is conveyed
under the rights of Octagon or others.
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