Common Core Intervention Activities

Common Core Intervention Activities
K-2 Math
Common Core
Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools
2011-2012
Table of Contents
Counting and Cardinality
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Know Number Names and Count the Sequence
Count to Tell the Number of Objects
Compare Numbers
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
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Understand Addition as Putting Together and Adding to, and Understand
Subtraction as Taking Apart and Taking From
Represent and Solve Problems Involving Addition and Subtraction
Understand and Apply Properties of Operations and the Relationship
Between Addition and Subtraction
Add and Subtract Within 20
Work with Addition and Subtraction Equations
Work with Equal Groups of Objects to Gain Foundations for Multiplication
Number and Operations in Base Ten
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Work with Numbers 11-19 to Gain Foundations for Place Value
Extend the Counting Sequence
Understand Place Value
Use Place Value Understanding and Properties of Operations to Add and
Subtract
Measurement and Data
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Describe and Compare Measurable Attributes
Classify Objects and Count the Number of Objects in Categories
Measure Lengths Indirectly and by Iterating Length Units
Tell and Write Time
Represent and Interpret Data
Measure and Estimate Lengths in Standard Units
Relate Addition and Subtraction to Length
Work with Time and Money
Geometry
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Identify and Describe Shapes
Analyze, Compare, Create, and Compose Shapes
Reason with Shapes and Their Attributes
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Counting
and
Cardinality
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Around the World
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Know Number Names and the Count Sequence
Materials:
Number cards to 100 (These may be written on index cards or use
numbers big enough for the students to see from a short distance.)
Directions:
The children can be sitting at their assigned seat or in a circle. Have two
students that are next to each other stand up. Then show a number on
one of the cards. The student that says the number first moves on to the
person next to them. If there is a tie, the two students get another
number until there is a winner. Continue until all students get a turn or a
set time runs out.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
You can differentiate the numbers being used based on your students
level by using numbers up to 20, 50, or 75. You can also do this in a
small group setting to make sure students get multiple turns.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Counting On
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Know Number Names and the Count Sequence
Materials:
1-100 Numeral Cards (You can use index cards to make your own.)
Directions:
Have students sit in a circle (this can be done small or large group).
Choose a student to pick a card from the pile of numeral cards. The next
student says the next number and so on until the students get to 100. If a
student makes an error in counting, have the next student pick another
number from the numeral card pile and start again from that number.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
You can use lower numeral cards for struggling counters and have them
count up to a lower number.
Another way to play the game is counting backwards from the number
on the numeral card that has been picked by the student. The students
can count down to 0 before picking a new numeral card.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Matching Card Game
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Know Number Names and the Count Sequence
Materials:
2 sets of Number Cards up to 100
A deck of playing cards (2-10 only)
Directions:
Start by putting out 2 sets of numbers 1-10 (20 cards in all) in 4 rows of
5. Have one student flip over 2 cards to see if they match. If the cards
match the student keeps them and goes again. If they do not match flip
the cards back over and the next student has a turn. Keep playing until
all cards are matched. Use different numbers next time you play
depending on your student’s level.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use the deck of playing cards for students that have difficulty. Lay out 2
of each number in 3 rows of 6. Have a student flip over 2 cards and
count the symbols on the cards to see if they match. Keep playing with
the same directions as above.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Popcorn Counting
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Know the Number Names and the Count Sequence
Materials:
None
Directions:
Have a small group of students sit in a circle. A student starts by saying
1, then the next student says 2, then the next student says 3, then the next
student says 4, and etc… When a student gets to a decade number (10,
20, 30, 40, etc…) they pop up and say that number. Continue counting
until a student makes an error when counting. You can either play again
starting at 1 or stop playing the game.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
If a student makes an error, you can correct it and keep playing the
game. For beginning counters, you can give each student a number line
or hundreds chart to follow along as students count.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Bears in a Jar
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Count to Tell the Number of Objects
Materials:
Colored counting bears
Jar
Directions:
Begin with a low number of bears in the jar such as 5. Shake the jar and
ask students how many bears there are now? If students need to count
the bears, then they do not understand the concept of cardinality. If
students respond “5”, then they understand cardinality. Continue to
practice with different numbers of bears in the jar. After shaking the jar
pour bears out and ask how many. Once students consistently respond
with the number without recounting then they have mastered cardinality.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
You could substitute different manipulatives in the jar such as cubes,
counters or dot cubes.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Dashing Dots
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Count to Tell the Number of Objects
Materials:
Dot plates
Directions:
Show a dot plate for only a few seconds. Teacher asks “how many?”
Students need to name the number of dots within a few seconds.
Students should begin to recognize patterns quickly.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Teacher can have students name one more or one less than on the dot
plate shown. Eventually teacher could have students name two more or
two less than on the dot plate shown.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Dot Cube Subitizing
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Count to Tell the Number of Objects
Materials:
Two dot cubes
Paper for recording points
Directions:
Students take turns rolling the dot cubes. When the dot cubes stop the
student calls out the number of dots within a few seconds. If correct,
student gets a point. Second student rolls the dot cubes and calls out
number of dots. If correct, that student earns a point. If incorrect,
student rolls again. If students have to count the number of dots on the
dot cubes they have not mastered subitizing. Continue playing and
practicing the skill. Student with most points is the winner.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
This can also be practiced without playing for points just teaching
students to recognize dot patterns.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Domino Subitize
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Count to Tell the Number of Objects
Materials:
Set of Dominoes
Directions:
Make sure all dominoes are face down on the table. The first student
flips over a domino and says the number of dots. If he/she is correct
then they keep the domino. The second student flips a domino over and
says the number of dots. If correct that student keeps the domino. If
student doesn’t name correct number of dots then domino remains face
down on table. The student with the most dominos at the end is the
winner.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Try using double-nine dominoes for a challenge.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Number Show and Tell
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Compare Numbers
Materials:
2 Number cubes (labeled 1-10)
Index cards
Marker
10 frame
Counters
Popsicle sticks
Directions:
Three students are needed to play this game. First player rolls the
number cube, shows the other players the number, and writes the
number on index card. The second player represents the number with
popsicle sticks shown as tally marks. The third player represents the
number with counters on a ten frame. Players check to make sure all
representations are correct. Players can trade and represent numbers in
different ways. Play continues until all numbers have been represented.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Represent numbers only 1 or 2 ways. For higher levels have students
represent 2 digit numbers with beans, sticks or base ten blocks.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Number Scale
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Compare Numbers
Materials:
Number scale
Directions:
Pick a student and have them place a blue weight on each side of the
scale. Discuss what happens once the scale stops moving. The side of
the scale that is up has the smaller number (lesser than) and the side of
the scale that is down is the bigger number (greater than). If the scale
stays the same that means the two numbers are equal.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students write out the numbers and symbol for greater than (>),
less than (<), or equal to (=) in a math journal or white board.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
War
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Compare Numbers
Materials:
Set of playing cards
Directions:
Distribute even number of cards to each player. First player flips card
over, and then player two flips card over. Whoever has the larger
number keeps both cards. If both players flip cards over with the same
number, then they each flip another card over. Whoever has the larger
card keeps all of the cards. Continue play until all cards are used up.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
You could modify this by having the lower number win.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Nifty Number Lines
Domain: Counting and Cardinality
Cluster Statement: Compare Numbers
Materials:
Laminated number line with numbers from 1-10.
Two number or dot cubes with numbers 1-10
Directions:
Have students roll the number or dot cube. Have them put a finger on
the number rolled. Ask them questions about greater or less than. Ask
them how they know? For example 7 is less than ten because it comes
before ten on the number line. It’s greater than 5 because it comes after
5 on the number line. Discuss relationships between numbers. Five is
the middle because it’s halfway between 1 and 10. Five and five equals
10. Five is greater than 4, but less than 6 etc.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Modify number lines. You can use number lines from 1-5 or 1-20 for
higher levels.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Operations
and Algebraic
Thinking
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Tic-Tac-Toe Tens
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Understand Addition as Putting Together and
Adding to, and Understand Subtraction as Taking Apart and Taking
From
Materials:
Dry erase board
Two different colored dry erase markers
Directions:
Students will practice adding and subtracting by ten in this game. One
player designs tic-tac-toe board on dry erase board. The first player
writes a 2-digit number in one of the spaces. The second player adds or
subtracts one or ten to write a related number in one of the spaces. Each
player takes a turn writing in numbers until there is a winner. The
winner has three numbers correctly written in a row. For example,
25 26 27
35 36 37
45 46 47
The numbers in italics represent those chosen by Student A. The bolded
numbers represent those chosen by student B.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Allow students to use a hundreds chart as a resource.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Sums of Ten
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Understand Addition as Putting Together and Adding
to, and Understand Subtraction as Taking Apart and Taking From
Materials:
Playing cards (Ace -10) or numeral cards 0-10
White board
Dry erase marker
Erasers
Directions:
Students will choose top two cards from deck. They will add the two
numbers and if the sum is ten a point is earned. Record points on
whiteboard. If the two cards flipped do not equal ten, then no point is
earned. Players continue to take turns flipping and adding their two
cards. Player with the most points after all cards are flipped wins.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
You can change the number to fit whatever number bonds the class is
focusing on that day.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Double Fun
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Understand Addition as Putting Together and Adding
to, and Understand Subtraction as Taking Apart and Taking From
Materials:
Paper
Crayons or pencil
Directions:
Students will add doubles and identify sums that equal 20 by creating
visual representations. Discuss different situations when students may
need to double a number. For example, a child may need two teddy bear
counters to play a game. How many would two children need? After
brainstorming have students draw different animals or objects to create
doubles posters. For example for 2’s students could draw two faces with
eyes, for 5’s two hands etc.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
If 20 is too high have students create doubles posters to 10.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Domino Fact Families
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Understand Addition as Putting Together and Adding
to, and Understand Subtraction as Taking Apart, and Taking From
Materials:
Dominoes set
Dry erase board
Dry erase marker
Directions:
Students need to record and model fact families. Use dominoes to
model the commutative property of addition. For example, show
students using dominoes how 2 + 3 = 5 and 3 + 2 = 5. Give each student
a domino with three dots on one side and two dots on the other side.
Have students use different dominoes to model various number
sentences. Students will record number sentences for at least five facts
families under 10.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Students could work with fact families under 5 or fact families 11-20 if
they need more challenge.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Dominoes
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Understand addition as putting together and adding
to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from
Materials:
Complete set of Dominoes
Directions:
Play dominoes; only change the rules to one more or two more. For
example, if a “3” is on the table, the students needs a “4” or “5” to make
the play depending on if the rule is one more or two more.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
This activity should be played in small groups of 3-5. This lesson can be
used to teach one less or two less in subtraction too! If students are not
familiar with dominoes, start with teaching them the original game first
to get them familiar with how to play.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Let’s Go Back
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Represent and Solve Problems Involving Subtraction
Materials:
Unifix® cubes
Directions:
Make up a story problem. “There were 10 children in line. 3 children
went to the office. How many children were left in line?” Give each
child a 10 Unifix® cubes. Have each child count back 3 from 10 and
take away 3 cubes. Tell children to count the remaining cubes. Discuss
their answer. Try several different story problems using different
numbers.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use smaller numbers for students that are beginning subtraction and
larger numbers to challenge advanced students. This activity could be
done with addition as well by telling students something has joined the
group.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Race to Twenty
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Represent and Solve Problems Involving Addition
and Subtraction
Materials:
2 ten frames for each child
Tiles or another type of counter
Spinner + or – (1st Grade Numeracy Board Resource Packet, p. 62)
1 dot cube for each student
Pencil
Paper clip
Directions:
Have each child roll a dot cube and place that number of counters on one
of their ten frames. Then each child spins the spinner to determine if the
operation is plus or minus. Then they roll the dot cube again to use that
number to place or take away counters from their ten frames. Keep
rolling the dot cube and spinning until a student reaches 20 exactly. If a
student does not have enough counters to take away from their ten
frames or tries to add too much to their ten frames, they lose their turn
for that round.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Younger students can just use one ten frame and call the game “Race to
Ten”. Another differentiation could be to just add using the dot cube
and not the spinner. You could also start with 10 or 20 counters and
subtract using the number rolled on the dot cube.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
How Much More
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Represent and Solve Problems Involving Addition
Materials:
A cup and counters
Directions:
Put number counters in a line and cover up some with a cup (no more
than 18). Have the students count the number of counters they see and
then ask them “How many counters will I need to make ___?” Lift the
cup to show them the counters they need to make the number after
students have time to figure out the answer. Use different amounts of
counters or use one number with different variations under the cup.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use smaller numbers with struggling students.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Construct It
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Represent and Solve Problems Involving Addition
Materials:
Work mat
Unifix® cubes
Directions:
Give each student the same number of Unifix® cubes and a work mat.
Then have students break the Unifix® cubes into two parts. Write down
and discuss the different combinations for that number. Make sure to
write down all number combinations before moving onto another
number.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Make sure to use numbers below 10 for struggling students. You can
also have advanced students break a number up into more than two
parts. For a challenge you can use numbers greater than 10.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Are You Ready to Rumble?
Domain: Operations in Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Understand and Apply Properties of Operations and
the Relationship between Addition and Subtraction
Materials:
Overhead projector/Document camera
White boards and markers (1 per student)
Directions:
The teacher has the overhead/document camera set up at the front of the
class. On it, she writes an addition or subtraction math fact, leaving out
the operation sign. For example, 4 __ 5 = 9 or 10 __ 4 = 6 needs to be
written on the overhead. Students will write the sign that goes into the
math fact on their white boards then turn their white boards over. Next,
once the teacher sees that everyone is ready, she says “Are you ready to
RUMBLE?” Students hold up their white boards so that the teacher can
see it. Have a student explain their thinking to the class. Repeat!
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students work in pairs and discuss why choose the addition sign or
the subtraction sign prior to writing it down.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Opposites
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Understand and Apply Properties of Operations and
the Relationship between Addition and Subtraction
Materials:
Index cards (with addition/subtraction number sentences up thru 10)
White dry erase board
Dry erase markers
Overhead projector/Document camera
Directions:
Teacher will create addition/subtraction number sentences on index
cards up thru facts of 10. The teacher will pass out white dry erase
boards and markers. The teacher will place a number sentence on the
overhead projector or Elmo and the students will write a number
sentence opposite of what they see. For example; the teacher displays
4 + 2 = 6, the students will have to write a subtraction (opposite of
addition) number sentence for the same numbers 6 – 2 = 4 or 6 – 4 = 2.
The student who gets the opposite number sentence correct first will win
the card. The teacher will repeat this process using different number
sentence cards. At the end of the activity, the student with the most
cards wins.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
This can be done as whole group or small groups up to 5. To challenge
your students create addition/ subtraction cards up thru 20. This can also
be done with the students showing the teacher the opposite using
manipulatives (teddy bears, centimeter cubes, colored tiles) showing
part-part-whole or whole-part-part.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Flip It
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Add and Subtract within 20
Materials:
A deck of playing cards (remove all the face cards)
Directions:
The teacher will deal out all the cards between both players. The players
will then organize their cards in their hands, as many as they can hold,
the others will be in a stack in front of them face-down. One player will
call out “FLIP IT" and at the same time both players will flip a card out
of their hand and on to the table face-up. The first player who can add
the two cards together correctly will get the set of cards. After all the
cards have been flipped, then you can begin a new round. The winner of
each round is the player with the most cards.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
This activity should be done in small groups of 2-3 students. This can
be used to teach subtraction and helping the students understand that
they have to subtract from the bigger number first. Teacher can choose
to work with a smaller amount of cards instead of a whole deck for
beginner practice.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Dirty Domino Dozens
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Add and Subtract within 20
Materials:
Set of Double-Six Dominoes
Directions:
Play dominoes. Place all dominoes face down so the dots can not be
seen. The teacher will flip one domino at random. The first player flips
a domino and joins the sets of dots on both dominoes. If the total
number of dots on both dominoes equal 12 or a dozen, the player will
keep both dominoes. If the total number dots on dominoes do not equal
12 or a dozen, the player will leave them face up on the table. The
second player will flip one domino and looks for any face-up domino
that could be joined with another face-up domino to make 12 or a dozen.
If a combination of 12 or a dozen can be made, the player takes those
two dominoes, if 12 or a dozen can not be made, the player will leave
those dominoes face-up. Play continues to until all dominoes have been
flipped face-up. The winner is the player with the most dominoes at the
end.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Focus on joining smaller sets of dots to equal numbers such as 4, 6, 8,
and 10. For higher level students, have each student write an equation
for each of their flips or look for higher combinations up to 20.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Bear Fact Family Fun
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Add and Subtract Within 20
Materials:
Bear Fact Resource Page (48 total bears 5-12)
Craft sticks
Tape
Teddy bear counters
Directions:
Cut out the bears and tape each bear on a craft stick. All bears will be
placed face down on the table. The first player will choose a bear and
flip it over. The other player has to name two numbers that make up the
number on the bear’s belly (they may use the teddy bear counters to
help them decompose the flipped number). The player receives one
point for each fact in the fact family that is named correctly. Players
take turns choosing bears and naming facts in the fact family. The first
player to reach 20 or more points wins.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
This activity should be done in small groups of 2-5 students. Teacher
can choose to work with a smaller amount of bears instead of all 48
bears (ex. 5-10).
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
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Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
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Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
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Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
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Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Number Line Jump!
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Work with Addition and Subtraction Equations
Materials:
Laminated number lines (1-10)
Dot cube (one, numbered 1-6)
Cards numbered 1-9
Directions:
Teacher will supply laminated number-lines to the group. The teacher
will then pull a card and call out the number. The student will place a
colored counter on the number. The teacher will then roll the dot cube
and call out that number. The student will jump with his or her finger
the number of spaces forward on the number line. The teacher will then
ask key questions:
• What number did we land on?
• How many spaces did we jump with our finger?
• Can we write an addition number sentence for these numbers?
Repeat with using different number cards and dot cube rolls.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
This activity should be played in small groups of 3-5. This activity can
be used to teach subtraction by moving backwards on the number-line!
For groups that are lower start with number-line 1-5 and for group that
are higher use number-lines 1-20.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
What’s Missing!
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Work with Addition and Subtraction Equations
Materials:
Linking cubes (12 for each player)
Dot cubes (Two, numbered 1-6)
Directions:
First player will roll the dot cube, add the two rolls together and then call
out the number. All players will then build a tower using the stated
number. Once the towers are complete, each student will hold their
tower behind their back and break it into two pieces. One at a time, each
player will put one piece of their broken tower out in front of them. The
other players will try to guess the missing piece. The first one to guess
the missing piece correctly gets a point. Once all players have shown
their towers, the round is over. Roll a new set of numbers for the next
round. When the game is over, the student with the most points wins the
game.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
This activity should be played in small groups of 3 or more. This
activity can be used for teaching part-part-whole and subtraction.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
How Many More
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Work with Addition and Subtraction Equations
Materials:
Clear plastic jars
Centimeter cubes
Directions:
Teacher will say, “Let’s count out 3 centimeter cubes and put them in
front of us.” Students and teachers will count aloud 3 cubes together (1,
2, 3). Next, the teacher and students will place the “3” centimeter cubes
in their jar and screw the top on tightly. Then the teacher will ask the
students to shake the jar and say, “I have 3 cubes in the jar.” Teacher
will then ask, “Can we count on using this jar. Watch. We don’t have to
count these in the jar, because we already know how many we have,
right?” Have individual students recall to the teacher how many cubes
are in the jar. Now the teacher will ask, “If we add one cube, how many
do we have altogether?” The students will put the cube next to the jar
not in it. Without shaking the jar, see if the students can figure out they
only have to add 1 to the 3 in the jar. Have the students yell out how
many they have now (i.e., “I have four.”). Repeat with a different
number up to 10.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
This activity should be played in small groups of 3-5. This activity can
be used for teaching part-part-whole and subtraction. For higher level
students do number up to 20.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Using Addition to Multiply
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Work with Equal Groups of Objects to Gain
Foundations for Multiplication
Materials:
Colored chips
Number cards
Directions:
Give each student 20 colored chips. Explain the link of repeated
addition to multiplication. Hold up a number card, for example 3. What
is our answer if we double it, 3 + 3? Wait for students to discuss and get
a unanimous answer of 6. Explain that they just multiplied 3 × 2 … two
groups of 3. Move on to a new number card, skipping the addition step
and see if they are able to multiply it by 2.
This is best done in small group. Teacher asks a student for answer, if
she/he is able to correctly answer then she/he receives the number card.
If not, ask the student to check his/her work using the colored chips.
The student with the most number cards at the end wins. ** Students
can use colored chips to figure out answer.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use larger number cards.
Have students multiply by 3 or 4.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Multiplication and the Zero Rule
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Work with Equal Groups of Objects to Gain
Foundations for Multiplication
Materials:
Colored chips
Bags – Ziploc® or brown lunch bags
Directions:
Give each table/group a handful of colored chips and several bags.
Teacher models a set number (e.g., 2) in one bag. Then, teacher puts the
same number of chips in another bag. Ask the children how many chips
we have in both bags. Do the children agree that we have 4 chips
altogether? Discuss that we just multiplied 2 chips times 2 bags (2 × 2).
Empty the bags. What would happen if we had 2 bags with 0 chips in
each bag? How many chips would we have altogether? Does everyone
agree that we would have 0 chips? Discuss that we just multiplied 0
chips times 2 bags (0 × 2). Repeat this step with 5 bags, 7 bags, and 0
chips. Why do we get the same answer? Is there a number that is
staying the same?
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use this game to illustrate a variety of multiplication situations (not just
zero).
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Multiplication and the Identity Rule
Domain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster Statement: Work with Equal Groups of Objects to Gain
Foundations for Multiplication
Materials:
Colored chips
Bags – Ziploc® or brown lunch bags
Directions:
Explain the identity rule. Give each table or group a handful of colored
chips and several bags. Model using one bag and placing chips (e.g., 4)
in it. We have 1 bag and 4 chips, how many chips do we have
altogether? Make sure everybody agrees on 4. We just multiplied 1 bag
× 4 chips (1 × 4). Repeat steps with new numbers and have students
follow along with their tables or groups. Discuss what the students
noticed and whether they observed any patterns. Make sure all students
understand the identity rule.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use this activity to discover other multiplication situations/story
problems.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Number and
Operations in
Base Ten
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Making Twenty
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Work With Numbers 11-19 to Gain Foundations for
Place Value
Materials:
Ten frames, (2 per student)
10-20 numeral cards
Two-color counters
Directions:
Each student needs to have two ten frames. Students draw a number
card and construct the number on their ten frames. Teacher asks
questions, “How far away from ten?” “How many more to make
twenty?”
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use one ten frame and numeral cards 1-10.
Use three tens frames and numeral cards 20-30.
Have students write down math facts that they discover while using one,
two or three tens frames and their two-color counters.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Let’s Count by Tens!
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Work With Numbers 11-19 to Gain Foundations for
Place Value
Materials:
100 chart
Ten frames
Multiple of ten numeral cards
Directions:
Students count to 100 by 10’s while pointing to the numbers on the 100
chart. Student draws a multiple of ten numeral card, counts to that
number while laying down a ten frame with each count. When the child
is done counting, the teacher asks, “How many?” “How many tens?”
Have the child note that in the number sixty there are six groups of ten
and that the six ten frames show the same as sixty.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Focus on numbers ten, twenty and thirty for an introduction.
Use numbers thirty to one hundred thirty for an extension, use this as an
opportunity to introduce hundreds place value.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Creating Groups
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Work With Numbers 11-19 to Gain Foundations for
Place Value
Materials:
Collection of objects up to 20 (cubes, bears, double sided counters)
Directions:
Students count objects in a variety of ways (1’s, 2’s, 5’s, and 10’s). Ask
how many groups of each and how many are not in a group. For
example, if you have twenty counters, and count them by 5’s, you have
four groups of five with zero left over.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Try this game with a different number of counters. You can try an odd
number for more of a challenge, a smaller number than twenty or a
number larger than 20.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
What is the Number?
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Work With Numbers 11-19 to Gain Foundations for
Place Value
Materials:
Base ten blocks
Two-color counters
Index cards (3 per group)
Crayons (3 per group)
Directions:
Ask children to give an example of ways they can represent an amount
by using a word, a number, a tally mark or a model (base ten blocks).
Hand out materials and tell students we are going to use the materials to
represent the same number in multiple ways.
Example: Teacher calls out the number 15. Give blocks to one child in
a group, the counters to another, index cards to another and crayons to
another child in the group. The two children with blocks and counters
show how to make the number 15. The children with the index cards
work together to show 15 in three ways (write the number 15, make 15
tally marks and write the word fifteen). The students then check each
other’s work.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Children can grab a handful of counters and represent the number of
counters in three ways (word, write the number, use tally marks, use
another set of counters, etc.).
Have sets of counters around the room. Students rotate to sets of
counters, counting each set and writing down the number and number
word.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Place Value
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Work with Numbers 11-19 to Gain Foundations for
Place Value.
Materials:
Cuisenaire Rods
Place value mats
Directions:
Teacher models representing a number using Cuisenaire rods. Assign a
value to each rod (ex: white 1, orange 10). After discussion and working
through a few examples together have students work with a partner and
build assigned quantities with the Cuisenaire rods. Encourage students
to exchange smaller value rods for larger value rod while leaving
remaining rods in one place.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Simplify by using smaller numbers and challenge with larger numbers.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Looking at Place Value
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Work With Numbers 11-19 to Gain Foundation for
Place Value
Materials:
Base ten blocks (20 units and 1 rod per pair)
Place value mat
Directions:
Pose this problem:
George has 12 oranges in his basket. His friend Kayla didn’t know that
George had so many oranges. She went to the store and bought 5 more
oranges. When Kayla added the 5 oranges to George’s basket of 12
oranges, how many oranges did they have in all? How many different
ways can you represent or show this number?
Introduce the base ten blocks, stating that the block stands for one unit.
Have the students make a group of 12 and a group of 5. Tell your
students that counting all of the blocks is one way to represent or show
how many oranges you have in all. Students count all of the units. Tell
your students you can show this problem in a different way. Introduce
the rod by saying that it has 10 blocks or units and it is worth 10. Ask
your students to replace 10 units with a rod by placing the rod in the tens
column on their mat. Make it a point to explain that the 1 in the number
17 represents a group of ten because it is in the tens place. Ask: How
many tens are in 12? After you replace 10 units with a rod, have your
students count again. Do they come up with the same answer? Why?
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use Unifix® cubes to represent different numbers. Ask your student to
get 14 snap cubes. Have your student count out 10 snap cubes and place
them in a small box. Then, count on from 10 to 14. Did the student get
the same amount as they did when counting by 1’s?
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Counting Using Base Ten Symbols
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Extend the Counting Sequence (1-120)
Materials:
White board/maker
Or
Paper/pencil
Projector
Directions:
Using a projector the teacher will display different numbers using base
ten symbols (e.g.,  │•••• is 114), and call on students to read the
number in two ways, grouping (1 hundred 1 ten and 4 ones) and
standard (one hundred fourteen). Students will write symbols and
display on either white board or paper.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Students can count on together as teacher adds unit to the symbol
displayed with projector. With projector, teacher will display how to
regroup when ones symbol reaches 10.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Constructing a Number
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Extend the Counting Sequence (1-120)
Materials:
Place value mats
100’s, 10’s, & 1’s base ten blocks
Directions:
Teacher will state a number based on students understanding at the
moment, and ask them to construct the quantity using the base ten
blocks. Once the students have created a number, for example 23, have
the students’ show 23 in a different way. So, if a child uses two tens and
3 ones to represent 23 the first time they might show 23 a different way
by using 1 ten and 13 ones.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Depending on student understanding, simplify the numbers (up to 50) or
challenge the student (up to 1,000).
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Round Robin Counting
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Extend the Counting Sequence (1-120)
Materials:
Number chart
Directions:
Teacher begins on a given number and points to one student at a time to
state the next number in the sequence.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Skip count by 2’s, 5’s or 10’s.
Have each student count a row or column.
Count without the number chart.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Constructing a 100’s Chart
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Extend the Counting Sequence (1-120)
Materials:
100 number charts copied on card stock
Scissors
Small baggies
Directions:
Teacher will pre-cut 100’s charts either by rows or columns. Each
student will receive a baggie and be instructed to put the rows or
columns in sequential order, to recreate the 100 chart.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
To simplify have students work with a couple partners and only use one
baggie. Students will work together to construct the 100 chart.
You may choose to use a 99 chart, along with the 100 chart for this
activity.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Building Numbers with a Friend
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Extend the Counting on Sequence (1-120)
Materials:
Base ten mats
100’s, 10’s, & 1’s base ten blocks
Number cards (1-100)
Directions:
Students will work with a partner. Number cards will be placed face
down in a pile. Students will take turns picking cards, but build the
quantity together using the base ten mat and blocks. After teacher
assesses work students can continue picking cards and creating numbers.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
To simplify, use number cards between 1 and 50. To challenge students
use number cards between 100 and 1000.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
What is the Value of That Digit?
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Understand Place Value
Materials:
White boards/markers
Base Ten Mat
100’s, 10’s, & 1’s base ten blocks
Directions:
In order for students to complete this task they first must understand
base ten symbols (, │, ●). Teach if needed.
Have students build a number using base ten materials. Ask student to
write the number and represent the number using the base ten symbols.
Call on students to state the number in the hundreds place, tens place,
and ones place. Make sure students also state what number represents.
For example, if the number is 63, that means that there are 6 groups of
ten and 3 ones.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Simplify number (1-50) students are building or challenge student with a
larger number (100-1,000).
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Who Has More?
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Understanding Place Value
Materials:
Place value mats (2 per pair of students)
Base ten blocks (rods and block/units)
Post-it® notes
Pencils
Directions:
Read this story to students: John and Ann are best friends who like to
collect rocks. John has 34 rocks in his collection and Ann has 68 rocks.
Who has more rocks, John or Ann? How do you know? How can you
show me?
One student in the partnership shows John’s rocks using the base ten
blocks and the place value mat while the other partner shows Ann’s
rocks. Next, the students write the numbers of each on a sticky note and
place the sticky note below the place value mat that shows their number.
On another sticky note, the pair of students decide which is more, draw
and place a greater than or less than sign (<, >) in-between the two
numbers and corresponding place value mats. Have student pairs do the
same for a different set of numbers, 38 and 32. One student shows 38
and the other partner shows 32. Ask the students to compare the number
of ones in each number. Compare the ones and then insert the correct
symbol (<, >).
Differentiation/Accommodations:
You may want to practice using the greater than and less than symbols
before doing this activity if your students have not had prior experiences
using these symbols.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Representing Numbers
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Understand Place Value
Materials:
Collections of counters in baggies, 20-100
Small index cards
Directions:
Students count objects and group objects by tens and say the total. On
an index card, students record the number of tens and ones and write the
symbol (2 tens 8 ones, write 28).
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use smaller or larger collections of counters.
Create collections of counters in sequential order (20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
etc.) and have students place their index cards in a number line.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Making Sense of Place Value Terminology
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Understand Place Value
Materials:
Collections of counters in baggies, amounts from 20-100
Directions:
Students count the objects in their baggie by 1’s.
Students state total and their partner double checks their counting.
Then, student pairs group objects by tens. Teacher uses both grouping
language, talking about how many groups of tens and how many ones
followed by 5 tens and 4 ones is fifty-four. Illustrate to the students that
54 is the same as 5 tens and 4 ones. Repeat activity with different
collections of counters.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Group counters by fives then talk about how many groups of fives make
ten.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Grouping
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Understand Place Value
Materials:
Collection of counters in baggies with amounts 20-100
White boards/markers
Directions:
Students count their objects and then group by tens. Record the number
in groups of tens and ones on white board. Have students hold up white
boards to assess that numbers were written correctly. For example: 4
tens and 3 ones. Repeat.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students create a group of objects for their partner. Use white
boards to show groups of tens and ones.
Use tally marks to illustrate number in a different way.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Counting with Groups of Ten
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Understand Place Value
Materials:
Collections of counters in baggies with amounts between 10-100
Paper with small empty ten frames (10 on each page)
Directions:
Have students count their collections, and then color in that number on
the ten frames. For example, if a child counts a collection of 47 bears,
they should color in four ten frames and seven on the next ten frame.
Ask, “How many tens? How many ones?”
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use collections of objects up to 10 if beginning place value.
Have students color in ten frames first then count a collection of objects
to match.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Count a Different Way
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Understand Place Value
Materials:
None
Directions:
Teacher shows student how to count orally:
34 is 3 tens and 4 ones
35 is 3 tens and 5 ones
36 is 3 tens and 6 ones
Students count along with teacher and continue the counting pattern on
their own.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Students round robin count using this format.
Have partners count back and up taking turns, using this format.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
What is the Quantity?
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Understand Place Value
Materials:
Base ten mats
100’s 10’s, & 1’s base ten blocks
White boards or paper
Overhead Projector/Document camera
Directions:
Teacher displays a number with the base ten blocks placing them on an
overhead projector/document camera. Students write the number they
think the blocks represent on their white board. Ask students to hold
their white boards above their heads to check student answers.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Simplify numbers using 1-50, or challenge students with larger numbers
100-1,000.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
How Many all Together?
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Use Place Value Understanding and Properties of
Operations to Add and Subtract.
Materials:
Place value mats (one per student)
Base ten blocks
Paper and pencils
Directions:
Students work with a partner. Read the following story problem to
students: Steve needs 20 blocks to play a game. He dumped red blocks
and blue blocks on the dining room table and added them together. He
counted 15 red blocks and 3 blue blocks. What is the total number of
blocks Steve has? Are there enough blocks to play the game?
Teacher models on the board as students work with place value mats.
One student displays the number 15 and the other the number 3 on their
place value mat. Teacher asks questions about which number is in the
ones and tens place (how many tens, how many ones). Teacher asks
students to combine their numbers to one chart, again asking how many
tens and ones now? Teacher helps students understand they just added
15 and 3 together. Teacher writes the problem on board putting numbers
in columns and guide how to combine numbers. Students also write the
problem on paper and add together.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Teacher will write several two-digit addition problems on board.
Groups can choose two problems they would like to work on together.
They will solve the problem using place value mats and base ten blocks.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Subtracting With the Ten Frame
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Use Place Value Understanding and Properties of
Operations to Add and Subtract
Materials:
Small ten frame cards filled from 1-10 (1 set per pair)
Directions:
Review the ‘make ten strategy’ when adding using one and two ten
frames. Challenge students to use the same idea to add on to a two-digit
number. You may choose to have students work in pairs. Students first
make a two-digit number with the small ten frame cards. They stack up
all of the less-than-ten cards and turn them over one at a time. For
example, if you have 73 – 7 and take off 3 to get to 70, then 4 more is
66. Repeat and challenge students to use a different strategy to try to
find the strategy that is most efficient.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use one-digit and two-digit numbers.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Ordering
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Understand Place Value
Materials:
Small ten frames filled from 1-10 (2 sets per pair of students)
Filled ten frames (10 per pair of students)
Directions:
Read this problem to your class: Maggie has a set of number cards
labeled 0-20. She counts them and sees that three of the cards are
missing. How can Maggie determine which cards are missing?
Brainstorm with your class about the different ways Maggie can tell
which ten frames are missing. After creating and trying different ways,
ask the kids to put the ten frames in sequential order. Have each child
touch the tens frames as they say the corresponding number.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students complete this activity with numbers up to 100.
Use Unifix® cubes to make numbers 1-30 and put in sequential order.
Make sure to group cubes by 10.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Let’s Subtract without Regrouping
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Use Place Value Understanding and Properties of
Operations to Add and Subtract
Materials:
Base ten blocks
Place value mats
Directions:
Read this problem to your students:
Jose and Lana are partners for a project. They got 15 markers and their
teacher told them to select the 12 that they like the best, then give back
the ones that they don’t want to use. How many markers should the kids
give back to their teacher?
Distribute the base ten blocks and the place value mats to the students.
Instruct the kids to show the 15 markers with the single units. Ask your
students, “How many units do you need to exchange it for a rod”? Have
students exchange their units. Ask, “Where on the place value mat
should we put the rod? Where should we put the single units?”
Ask the students to take away the 12 units from the chart, reminding the
students that the rod is 10. Ask, “How many units are left in the ones
column of the place value chart?”
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Complete this activity using markers then, use the base ten blocks to
illustrate place value.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Let’s Subtract with Regrouping
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Use Place Value Understanding and Properties of
Operations to Add and Subtract
Materials:
Base ten blocks
Place value mat
Directions:
Read this problem aloud to your students:
James has 37 red bouncy balls. He decided to give 8 balls to his friend.
How many balls will James have left?
Handout base ten blocks to each pair of students along with a place
value mat. Instruct the children to show 37 on their place value mats.
Write the answer on the board with the math fact. Ask the children to
take away or subtract 8 from the rods and units on the place value mats.
When the students realize they can’t take away 8 from the single units
because they only have 7 units in the ones column, ask: Why can’t we
subtract 8 from the blocks in the ones column on this place value mat?
Ask the children to take away one rod from the tens column and replace
it with ten ones. Then have them place the ten units in the ones column.
Explain to the kids that the value of the total has not changed, recount to
reinforce idea. Have students figure out if there are 8 to subtract.
Students take away 8 from the 37 units from the ones column. Then
have the children figure out the remaining value on the chart of the tens
and ones combined. Repeat as needed.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use snap cubes or colored tiles to make the groups of numbers. Then,
have the students put the counters into groups of ten. Then subtract with
regrouping.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Let’s Add with Regrouping
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Use Place Value Understanding and Properties of
Operations to Add and Subtract
Materials:
Base ten blocks
Place-value mat (2 per pair)
Directions:
Read this problem aloud to your students:
David plays basketball for the Irish, his third grade team. He scored 16
points in the first half of the game. He scored 17 points in the second
half. How many points did David score during the game?
Handout base ten blocks to each pair of students along with two place
value Mats. Remind and model for your students that when the ones
place value has ten units, the students should exchange the ten units for a
rod then move it to the tens column. Write the addition problem 16 + 17
in column form on the board or overhead. One student in the pair needs
to represent 17 and the other student needs to represent 16. Read this to
your students: Let’s add these numbers together. Move all of the ones
from one chart to the other then move all of the tens from one chart to
the other. How many ones are there? How many tens are there?
Count the ones, exchange ten ones for a rod and put the rod in the tens
place. How many tens and ones do we have all together? Teacher says,
16 blocks added to 17 blocks is the same as 33. Write the answer on the
board with the math fact.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use snap cubes or colored tiles to make the groups of numbers. Then,
have the students put the counters into groups of ten.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Adding With the Ten Frame
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Use Place Value Understanding and Properties of
Operations to Add and Subtract
Materials:
Small ten frame cards
Directions:
Review the ‘make ten strategy’ when adding using one and two ten
frames. Challenge students to use the same idea to add on to a two-digit
number. You may choose to have students work in pairs. Students first
make a two-digit number with the small ten frame cards. They stack up
all of the less-than-ten cards and turn them over one at a time. Together
they talk about how to get to the total quickly. Share students’ strategies
with the class. Repeat and challenge students to use a different strategy
to try to find the strategy that is most efficient.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use one-digit and two-digit numbers.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Subtracting from 100
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Use Place Value Understanding and Properties of
Operations to Add and Subtract.
Materials:
Place value mat
Counters-chips
Dice (you can either use the dice with dot arrangements or blank dice
and you write the numeral):
• One numbered 1-6
• Other - cover 4, 5, & 6 dots with sticker. Write 1, 2 & 3.
Mini ten frames (filled in)
Directions:
Students work with a partner. The goal of the game is to be the first
student to get to zero. Begin with the 100 block in hundreds column. A
student rolls the dice and subtracts the sum of dice from 100. Before
doing so student will need to trade 100 block for 10 ten frames and place
in tens column then student will be able to subtract number.
Ex: A 4 and a 2 were rolled, the sum is 6. The student will take 6 away
from 100. The student will trade one ten frame for 10 ones. After
subtracting 6 from ones column it will leave 9 ten frames in tens column
and 4 ones in ones column.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Take 100 column away to simplify or add 1,000 column to challenge
students.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Adding to 100
Domain: Number and Operations in Base Ten
Cluster Statement: Use Place Value Understanding and Properties of
Operations to Add and Subtract.
Materials:
Place value mat (with hundreds, tens and ones columns)
Counters-chips
Two number cubes
• One numbered 1-6
• Other - cover 4, 5, & 6 with stickers and create a number cube with
numbers 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3.
Mini ten frames (filled in)
Directions:
Students work with a partner. The goal of game is to get to 100. A
student rolls the dice and adds the sum of the numbers then places the
counters on his/her place value mat to represent the number. The
second student rolls and does the same thing. There should not be more
than nine chips in the ones column. Make sure students are exchanging
their ones for a filled tens frame. Once there are ten filled ten frames in
the tens column, put the 10 ten frames together with a paperclip and
place in the hundreds column. Once students understand how to play the
game they will continue playing until they reach 100 on their mat.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Take the 100 column away to simplify, or add 1000 column to challenge
students.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Measurement
and
Data
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Water Overflow!
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Describe and Compare Measurable Attributes
Materials:
Mr. Archimedes’ Bath by Pamela Allen (optional)
Large container
Medium container
Water
Variety of manipulatives – different shapes and sizes
Directions:
Place the medium sized container inside of the large container. Fill the
medium sized container with water and fill it to the top. Have the
students begin placing the manipulatives in the medium container to
observe the displacement of water. How does the size of the
manipulative affect the amount of water that overflows from the
container? Discuss what makes the water spill over the sides.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
You may want to use this as a small group activity or allow the students
to go outside and do it all together.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Like a Day in the Park
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Classify Objects and Count the Number of Objects in
Categories
Materials:
Attached worksheet
Directions:
Have the students look at the objects found in the park and complete a
tally chart based on their observations.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
You could take your class for a walk around the school and have
students make their own observations and tally chart.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Name _________________________________ Date __________
Like a Day in the Park
The pictures below represent items seen at the park. Fill in the
chart below with the appropriate number of tally marks.
Items Observed at the Park
Items at the Park
Number of Items
Bench
Bird
Flower
Tree
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Classifying Solid Figures
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Classify Objects and Count the Number of Objects in
Categories
Materials:
Assortment of geometric solids – cones, cubes, spheres, rectangular
prisms, cylinders, and pyramids
Directions:
Allow the students to observe and examine each solid. Use the chart
below (or create your own) to identify the characteristics of each solid.
Cone
Cube
Cylinder
Pyramid
Rectangular
Prism
Sphere
Roll
Slide
Spin
Stack
Differentiation/Accommodations:
If you have enough manipulatives, you could do this as a small group
activity.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Button Sort
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Classify Objects and Count the Number of Objects in
Categories
Materials:
The Button Box by Margarette S. Reid (optional)
Variety of buttons or pictures of several different buttons
Directions:
Read The Button Box by Margarette S. Reid. Discuss the buttons you
see as you read the story. Give each student 5 buttons. Ask them to
discuss the attributes of their buttons. How are your buttons
alike/different from your neighbor’s buttons? How could you sort your
buttons? Have the students sort the buttons by color, shape, material,
number of holes, etc. After the students have sorted the buttons, have
them observe how they are all the same in certain characteristics but
how do they remain different?
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Give the students more/less buttons to sort.
Sort by more than one attribute.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Book Sort
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Classify Objects and Count the Number of Objects in
Categories
Materials:
The Tall, Tall Tree by Anna Cook
Flowers in the Spring by Jackson Brown
The Happy Caboose by Laura Smith
Trains All Around Us by Jared Waters
Springtime Is Fun by Anna Cook
Animals Found in Africa by Warren Smith
Cars, Trucks, and Planes by Meg Cook
Tigers and Lions Roam Free by Warren Smith
Tulips, Pansies, and Roses by Pete Nguen
Helicopters Twirl by Julio Martinez
Wonderful Animals by Sam Mondo
Flowers and Other Plants by Jesse Washington
Directions:
Talk about these books with your students. How could we sort them?
Look at the covers, content, etc. Decide on a way to sort them into
different groups. Discuss and describe how you are sorting and then
make a list of the books in each group.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Give the students more/less books.
Have them sort by more than one attribute at a time.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
String Around the Bunny
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Measure Lengths Indirectly and by Iterating Length
Units
Materials:
Stuffed Bunny (or animal of choice)
Meter stick or ruler
Yarn
Directions:
Talk to students about measuring a stuffed bunny around his body. Why
can we not measure around the bunny with a ruler or meter stick? We
usually measure using a ruler, so why can’t we measure around our
animal with a ruler? Show them the yarn. How could this be useful to
measure the bunny? After discussion, demonstrate how to measure
around the bunny with the string, and then measure the string on the
meter stick.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have different animals for different groups, and compare the results with
a bar graph.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Inching Around the Room
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Measure Lengths Indirectly and by Iterating Length
Units
Materials:
1” grid paper
Glue
Tag board strips or strips cut from a file folder
Ruler
Directions:
Give each student a strip of tag board and part of a sheet of 1” grid
paper. Students create a ruler to measure items around the room.
Students cut out a row with 6 squares from the 1” grid paper. The strip
is then glued to the tag board strip provided. Students walk around the
classroom and measure different items with the ruler they created.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students find items that are approximately the size of their
inchworm.
Students needing to work with shorter lengths or smaller units can cut
one or two 1” squares to create their ruler.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Cube Measurement
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Measure Lengths Indirectly and by Iterating Length
Units
Materials:
Unifix® cubes
Attached worksheet
Directions:
Students collect a handful of Unifix® cubes. Have students connect
them to create a stick. They will use this stick to measure items in the
room. Use the worksheet attached as a guide to collect objects that are
longer than their stick, shorter than their stick, and the same length as
their stick.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Students can add cubes to make their stick longer and measure taller
items. How many more cubes did you need to measure the height of the
table, chair, etc.?
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Race Around the Clock
Domain: Measurement and Write Time
Materials:
2 dot cubes
Attached worksheet
Directions:
Roll 2 dot cubes and find the sum. Write this number on the appropriate
space on the clock. Continue rolling the dot cubes until every space is
filled on the clock. When you only have 1 left, you may use 1 dot cube.
Continue tossing the cube until the clock is complete.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use the dot cubes to take numbers off of a number on the clock, take
apart the clock.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Name _______________________________ Date ___________
Race Around the Clock
Roll 2 dot cubes and find the sum. Write this number on the appropriate space on
the clock. Continue rolling the dot cubes until every space is filled on the clock.
When you only have 1 left, you may use 1 dot cube. Continue tossing the cube
until the clock is complete.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Literacy and Telling Time
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Tell and Write Time
Materials:
The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle
Get Up and Go! by Stuart J. Murphy
Judy clocks – clocks that children use in your room
Chart paper
Markers/crayons
Directions:
Read The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle aloud to your class. As you
read, discuss the time as new characters enter the book. Have your
students use individual clocks to follow the storyline or time of the
characters in the book. If you do not have Judy clocks available, have
individual students move your teaching clock. (You can also do a
similar activity using Clocks and More Clocks by Pat Hutchins.)
Get Up and Go! – Read this book aloud to class. Read it again,
encouraging them to recognize the timeline on each page. As a class,
create a timeline of your school day. Have each child illustrate a
timeline for their morning, evening, or weekend. Allow students to
share their timelines with the class.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Get Up and Go! by Stuart J. Murphy – Depending on the level of your
students, their timelines may be by the minute or by the hour.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Create a Clock!
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Tell and Write Time
Materials:
12 white index cards (5” × 7”)
12 yellow, pink, blue, or green index cards (3” × 5”)
4 different colored sticky dots (15 of each color)
Paper fasteners
Hole punch
Directions:
Use 15 of one color sticky dot and place 5 on the long side of 3 white
index cards (see image A). Repeat with 3 different colors of sticky dots.
In the corner of each card, punch 2 holes (see image B). Using paper
fasteners, connect each card so they form a circle. Once assembled,
write the numerals 1-12 on the colored index cards and place them
around the clock.
Image A
Image B
Differentiation/Accommodations:
You can ask 12 students to volunteer and stand in a line next to each
other. Have each student hold up their hand with 5 fingers spread apart.
How many fingers do you think your friends are holding up? How could
we figure this out? Encourage them to count by 5’s. Starting with 5, ask
which person would be 15, 45? Give the students the numeral cards and
ask them to arrange themselves in a circle so the 12 is opposite the 6 and
the 3 is opposite the 9. Talk about the 5 minute intervals between each
numeral. Have a new volunteer walk around from 12 to 1 while class
counts by 5’s, then 1 to 2, 2 to 3, etc. Placing the index card clock on
the floor, have students place their numeral around the clock. Talk
about the different colors of sticky dots and what they may signify. Split
the circle into fourths and show the relationships between the fourths of
the circle and the fourths of the floor clock. What part of an hour has
passed if 15 minutes, 30 minutes, or 45 minutes have passed?
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Graph Search
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Represent and Interpret Data
Materials:
Newspapers/magazines that include graphs
Construction paper
Scissors
Glue
Directions:
Place a stack of newspapers/magazines, construction paper, scissors, and
glue in the center of each table. Discuss as a class the different types of
graphs. Instruct students to look through the newspapers and magazines
to find a graph. Once they have found a graph, have students cut it out
and paste it on a piece of construction paper. As they are finishing up,
have the students discuss what their graph shows as a small group. When
everyone has found a graph, discuss what each graph represents and
some of the similarities and differences.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Cut out some extra graphs in case your students are unable to find a
graph in their newspapers or magazines.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Data Collection That Matters
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Represent and Interpret Data
Materials:
Chart paper
Markers/crayons
Data collection worksheet
Directions:
Instruct students to use the data collection sheet to interview the students
in their class to find their classmates’ favorite sport. Talk about how to
collect data, the use of tally marks, and what this data might be useful
for. Allow students to talk to one another and collect data about their
classmates’ favorite sport. When the data is collected have the student
count the tally marks and write the total in each column. Use the data to
create a bar graph and discuss the results with the class.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Complete this task in groups. Give a list of data for the students to use
to make their bar graphs. Introduce other types of graphs that could be
used to represent this data.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Data Collection Sheet
Name __________________________
Favorite Sport
Type of Sport
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Tally
Total
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Creating Unifix® Bar Graphs
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Represent and Interpret Data
Materials:
Unifix® cubes of different colors
Data collected by teacher
Directions:
Put students in groups of two and give each group a set of different
colored Unifix® cubes. Using the data provided by you, instruct
students to create a bar graph using the Unifix® cubes. For example if
your data reads “Students’ Favorite Fruits,” and 7 students like
blueberries, 5 like strawberries, and 2 like bananas, then your students
would stack 7 blue Unifix® cubes, 7 red Unifix® cubes, and 2 yellow
Unifix® cubes. Place them side by side to create a bar graph.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Create a chart with more or less data for the kids to represent. Give
students paper to put their Unifix® bar graphs on and have them label
each axis.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Data Analysis
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Represent and Interpret Data
Materials:
Attached worksheets
Directions:
Use the attached worksheets to have your students analyze the data
provided. Discuss their results.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students create their data and swap with a classmate. They can
then read/interpret each other’s information.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Name _________________________________ Date __________
Favorite Sports
Baseball
Soccer
Golf
Basketball
What are you able to observe from the data above?
Which two sports are liked the most by students?
Which sport is liked the least by students?
How many students like soccer?
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Name _________________________________ Date __________
Kids on the Bus
Bus Number
Bus # 209
Number of Kids
Bus # 99
Bus # 104
Bus # 74
= 10 students
What are two observations from the data above?
1.
2.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Inches or Feet
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Measure and Estimate Lengths in Standard Units
Materials:
Attached flashcards
Ruler
Yard stick
Directions: Discuss with the class some of the different units for
measurements, highlighting inches and feet. Hold up a flash card with
an image on it (e.g., a pencil). Ask students if they think the item is 6
inches long or six feet long. Discuss what students know about feet and
inches to help them come up with their answer. Allow students to get
into groups and use the flash cards to answer the length question on each
card. Come back as a whole class and talk about what the students have
discovered.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Allow students to estimate the length of each object on their own.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
6 inches or 6 feet
1 inch or 1 foot
3 inches or 3 feet
24 inches or 24 feet
2 inches 2 feet
10 feet 10 inches
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Estimating Shapes
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Measure and Estimate Lengths in Standard Units
Materials:
Yarn or string cut in all different lengths
Ruler
Directions:
Assign students to groups of two. Have each group find five items the
length of a standard ruler or shorter. Have the students pick a string that
they think is about the length of their object. Once all students have
picked out their items and estimated the lengths with string, have a
discussion on how to use the ruler correctly to measure in inches.
Instruct the students to measure their objects with the strings that they
selected and then with the ruler. Have the small groups discuss the
difference between the two distances. Instruct each group to bring the
object that they were closest on their estimation to a whole class
discussion. Have a whole class discussion about students’ strategies to
estimate as well as strategies to check their estimations.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have the students cut their own strings to estimate the length of their
objects. Have the students choose more or less items to estimate and
measure.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Beans…Beans…Everywhere!
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Measure and Estimate Lengths in Standard Units
Materials:
Dried beans (5 per student all different sizes, and types)
Pencils
Rulers
Measuring tapes
Yardsticks
Student Recording Sheet
Literary Connection: Jack and the Beanstalk
Directions:
Read Jack and the Beanstalk. After reading the story, tell students they
will get a magic bean to practice their measurement skills. Teacher will
need to talk about and review vocabulary such as; inches, centimeters,
yard, foot, length, distance and estimation. Teacher will explain to the
students that they will be flicking their beans from their area, recording
estimates, and doing actual measurements. Teacher will demonstrate
these steps first. Students will flick their beans, write down an estimate
of how far they think it traveled, and then do an actual measurement
with a ruler, tape measure, or a yardstick (the key is the student has to
decide what to use according to their estimation and the distance
they think their bean has traveled). After students have completed 10
trials with flicking their beans and recorded their measurements, the
group can talk about the different distances, estimations, and the
different tools they used to measure. Questions a teacher may ask are;
• Why are there differences in our measurements?
• Why did I use a ruler and not a tape measure or yardstick?
• What bean type went the farthest, and why do you think that?
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Students can be divided into 2 teams. Each team can be assigned a bean
bag, pencil and a clipboard. The teams will have a start and a finish line.
The first teams to reach the finish line with all the correct recordings
(estimate measurement and the actual measurement) recorded correctly
using the right tool wins.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Measuring Centimeters and Millimeters
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Relate Addition and Subtraction to Length
Materials:
Centimeter/millimeter ruler
Attached worksheet
Directions:
Put students in groups of two and have them identify objects around the
room to measure. Model how to measure one item such as a pencil,
water bottle, etc. in both centimeters and millimeters. Be clear which
marks on the ruler the students should use. Instruct groups of two to
find five objects to measure and fill in the chart with both centimeters
and millimeters. When students are finished, or time is up, have
students come together and have a whole class discussion about the
items measured. Each group will share and model how they measured
one item on their list. Ask questions such as: which is larger, a
millimeter or centimeter? How many millimeters are in a centimeter?
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Put limits on the size of objects to be measured. Have students measure
in inches instead of centimeters/millimeters. Split activity into two days
and have them measure the same objects one day in centimeters and the
next in millimeters.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Name:________________ Date:______________________
Objects:
1.)_______________________
________cm _________mm
2.)_______________________
________cm _________mm
3.)_______________________
________cm _________mm
4.)_______________________
________cm _________mm
5.)_______________________
_________cm ________mm
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Perimeter Inch by Inch
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Relate Addition and Subtraction to Length
Materials:
1” color tiles
Different sized rectangular paper (measured in inches)
Directions:
Put students in groups of two. Give each group a handful of 1” colored
tiles and a variety of different sized rectangular pieces of paper. Discuss
the idea of perimeter and have the students measure the perimeter of
their paper using the tiles.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use rulers to measure the shape and add each side together to come up
with the perimeter. Measure the perimeter with several different shapes.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Adding and Subtracting Using Unifix® Cubes
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Relate Addition and Subtractions to Length
Materials:
Unifix® cubes at least two different colors
Paper
Pencil
Directions:
Students work with a partner to complete addition/subtraction problems
using Unifix® cubes as units of measurement. Teacher will introduce a
story problem: During math class students were working with Unifix®
cubes to create a snake that is 9 units long. They already have 6 Unifix®
cubes connected to make their snake. How many more Unifix® cubes
would they need to complete their nine unit long snake? Create other
appropriate story problems based on your students needs. The students
complete the problem using Unifix® cubes and record both the
addition/subtraction problem as well as the answers. Model how to use
addition to check your subtraction problems.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Use story problems that involve larger or smaller numbers based on
students’ needs. Have students create their own addition or subtraction
problems using Unifix® cubes as units of measurement.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
What’s in a Dollar?
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Work with Time and Money
Materials:
Attached worksheet
Highlighters
Directions:
Give 3 copies of the attached worksheet to each student. On the first
worksheet, have the students circle five 1¢ boxes to equal a nickel until
all the boxes are circled. Repeat this process on the other worksheets for
dimes and quarters. Discuss how many nickels, dimes, and quarters are
in one dollar. How do you know?
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Name _________________________________ Date __________
What’s in a Dollar?
On the first sheet, circle/color a group of five 1¢ boxes to equal a nickel.
Repeat these steps for making dimes and quarters.
How many nickels are in a dollar?
_______
How many dimes are in a dollar?
_______
How many quarters are in a dollar?
_______
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Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Show Me the Money!
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Work with Time and Money
Materials:
Attached worksheet
Play money (optional)
Directions:
Use the attached worksheet to have the students demonstrate their ability
to make money in a variety of ways. They can either draw money
images to show their configurations or you can provide them with play
money to manipulate what they know.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Add or take away the last problem based on the level of your students.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Name _________________________________ Date __________
Show Me the Money!
A popsicle costs $0.75. In your wallet
you have lots of nickels, dimes, and
quarters. Show 2 ways you could buy
the popsicle.
Orange juice from the vending machine
costs $1.25. You can only use coins to
purchase the juice (no bills). Show 2
ways you could buy the orange juice.
1.
1.
2.
2.
A bag of crackers costs $0.95. You
have lots of nickels, dimes, and
quarters. Show 2 ways you could buy
the crackers.
If you wanted to buy both the popsicle
and the juice, how much money would
you have spent? Show how you
figured this out.
1.
2.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Add Up to $10.00
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Work with Time and Money
Materials:
Attached worksheet
Dot cube
Marker for game board
Play money
Directions:
Split students into groups of three and give each group a game board,
dot cube, set of fake money, and game board maker for each student.
Assign one student to be the banker and two students to play the game.
Instruct the students to take turns rolling the dot cube and moving
around the game board. When the student lands on a space, they are to
read the amount of money aloud. If the student read the amount of
money correctly, the banker will give the student that amount of money.
If the student identifies the amount of money incorrectly, they will not
receive the money and the turn will go the next player. The game goes
on until one student has ten dollars.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have the goal amount of money at the end of the game be a higher
amount. Start with larger amounts of money and have the student
subtract their money until they reach a lower amount of money. Make a
new game board that includes even amounts of money.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
$0.75 $1.59 $2.73 $0.99 $1.02
$4.77 $0.44 $5.30 $1.23 $3.33
$2.73 $3.21
START
$4.44 $0.09
$7.25 $0.75 $4.65 $0.66 $4.89
$0.55 $1.33 $2.99 $1.99 $6.50
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Trade for Ten
Domain: Measurement and Data
Cluster Statement: Work with Time and Money
Materials:
A set of play money
Dot cubes
Attached worksheet
Directions:
Assign students to groups of two. Give each group a handful of play
money, two dot cubes and one worksheet per student. Instruct students
to take turns rolling the two dot cubes and adding them together. Using
the sum of the two dot cubes instruct students to place the number of
pennies on the Pennies side of their worksheet. Every time a student
gets ten pennies they can be traded for one dime. Once a student has ten
dimes the game is over. Have students discuss in small groups what it
means to have ten dimes and then get together and discuss as a class.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students complete this activity using nickels, and quarters instead
of dimes.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Trade for Ten
Dimes
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Pennies
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Geometry
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Geometric Designs
Domain: Geometry
Cluster Statement: Identify and Describe Shapes
Materials:
Attribute Blocks
Picture created with geometric shapes
Directions:
Show students a picture that contains geometric shapes and ask them
what shapes they see (square, rectangle, triangle, circle, etc.). Then ask
them how many of each shape they see. Ask students what other types
of pictures they could make using those shapes. Give students attribute
blocks and allow them to experiment with the shapes asking them if they
could make a boat or an ice cream cone. Ask students to think about
what shapes they would use to make a house. Have students create a
house with the shapes, trace the shapes and then color their picture.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Students who are struggling to create their own house can be given a
pattern block picture of a house. They would just lay the shapes on top
of the picture and identify how many of each shape they used. Students
who need challenged could create their own picture or design, trace it,
and then trade it with a partner to solve each others.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Two-Dimensional Scavenger Hunt
Domain: Geometry K, 1, 2
Cluster Statement: Identify and Describe Shapes
Materials:
Create spy glasses in the shape of a circle, square, rectangle, and triangle
Paper
Pencil or Crayons
Directions:
Children go on a scavenger hunt around the room to look for and
identify two-dimensional shapes. The shape of their spy glass is the
shape they are hunting for (i.e. circle spy glass, look for circles in room).
After students are done, have students return to their seats and draw
what they found and write where they saw it in the room.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Students who are struggling should be paired with a partner/buddy to do
the activity.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Spheres & Cubes
Domain: Geometry
Cluster Statement: Identify and Describe Shapes
Materials:
1” Color cubes (1 per group)
Rubber balls, such as tennis balls (1 per group)
Paper bags (2 per group)
Directions:
Have a class discussion about solid and flat shapes and how they are
different. For example, show students a sphere and circle and ask
students how they are different. Discuss how many sides and vertices a
cube and sphere have.
Introduce the following scenario to the students:
Sam brought a block and ball to school to play with during recess.
When it was time to go outside, he reached into his bag and pulled out
one of the toys. It had no sides. Which toy did Sam grab?
1. Students work in groups. Give each group a bag with a cube in it
(write 1 on outside of bag). Have students reach into the bag and
feel the shape without looking. Ask students to describe what they
feel and record their responses. Ask them what shape they think it
is and why.
2. Give groups a bag with a ball in it (write 2 on outside of bag) and
repeat the steps in step 1.
3. Have the students look in the bags and remove the shapes.
Students examine and discuss the shapes.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Students may have trouble saying the word sphere, so practice it as a
class. Students who struggle to identify a sphere and cube should be
given the geometric solids to hold as they describe them.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Shape Train
Domain: Geometry
Cluster Statement: Analyze, Compare, Create, and Compose Shapes
Materials:
Set of attribute blocks
Set of number cards 1, 2, and 3
Directions:
Put students in groups of four to five. Give each group a set of attribute
blocks and a set of number cards. Have one student start with a shape.
The next student draws a number card and places it next to the original
shape. They then pick a shape that has one, two, or three differences
from the original shape (based on the number on the number card
drawn) and place it next to the number card. The next student repeats
these steps and so on until a shape train has been created, or as long as
time allows.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students connect the shape train at the end, so they consider the
shape at the beginning of the train and at the end of train.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Shape Congruency
Domain: Geometry
Cluster Statement: Analyze, Compare, Create, and Compose Shapes
Materials:
Geoboards
Rubber bands
Directions:
Pair students in groups of two and give each group a geoboard and two
rubber bands. Talk about the three basic shapes that the students will be
working with during this activity (triangle, square, and rectangle). Talk
about what it means to be congruent – equal shape and size. Instruct the
first partner to create a shape on their geoboard, and then have the
second student create a congruent shape to the first student’s shape.
Have the pair discuss how they know that the two shapes are congruent.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students create shapes that are more complex on the geoboards
(e.g., hexagon, octagon, irregular shapes, etc.). Have students discuss
why we are not using a circle as one of the shape to create.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
Shape Grab Bag
Domain: Geometry
Cluster Statement: Reason with Shapes and their Attributes
Materials:
Variety of manipulative shapes with all different attributes
Grocery bag
Directions:
Pair students in groups of two and give each group a bag full of shapes
with different attributes. Instruct the first student to reach into the bag
and pull out one shape. Have the student identify that shape and
describe the attributes of the shape including color, size, thickness,
number of sides, and number of corners. Instruct the same student to
reach into the bag pull out another shape that is congruent to the first
shape they pulled out. (Explain/discuss the meaning of congruent
shapes.) Make sure the shape has the same number of sides and corners
to confirm that it is congruent. Repeat these steps with the other student.
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students reach into the bag and grab a shape. Instruct students to
identify the shape without looking at it but by feeling the sides and
corners.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
How Many Sides/Corners?
Domain: Geometry
Cluster Statement: Reason with Shapes and their Attributes
Materials:
Set of basic shape manipulatives
Teddy bear counters
Directions:
Pair students in groups of two and give each group manipulatives – one
of each shape and a handful of teddy bear counters. Instruct students to
place the square on the table and put one teddy bear counter on each side
of the square. Ask, how many teddy bear counters are placed on your
square? How many sides does a square have? Instruct students to place
one teddy bear counter on each vertex of the square. Ask, how many
teddy bear counters are placed on your square? How many vertices does
a square have? Instruct students to repeat steps with the triangle and
circle. Discuss how many teddy bear counters are on the circle. Why do
you not place teddy bear counters on the circle?
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Have students explore the sides and corners of more complex shapes
such as a trapezoid, hexagon, octagon, etc.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
What Shape Am I?
Domain: Geometry
Cluster Statement: Reason with Shapes and their Attributes
Materials:
Set of attribute blocks
Directions:
Place a set of attribute blocks in the center of each table. Create
descriptive riddles in order to get your students to guess the correct
shape that you are thinking of. Once the students think they know the
shape that you are thinking of, have your students choose the shape and
hold it up in the air. Give more descriptions in order to rule out some of
the shapes that were picked. Examples:
1.) I am a shape with no vertices or sides
2.) I am blue, thick, and have three sides
3.) I am a shape that has four sides, but not all of my sides are equal
Differentiation/Accommodations:
Give more or fewer details in order for the students to guess the correct
shape. Have students create a set of clues for a specific shape.
Primary Math Intervention Activities
Columbus City Schools 2011-2012
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