Radio Shack | Scanner PRO-29 | User's Manual | Radio Shack Scanner PRO-29 User's Manual

Radio Shack Scanner PRO-29 User's Manual
Cat. No. 20-509
OWNER’S MANUAL
PRO-29
60-Channel
Direct Entry Programmable Scanner
Please read before using this equipment.
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FEATURES
Your new Radio Shack PRO-29 60-Channel Direct Entry Programmable Scanner lets you in on all the action! This scanner gives you direct
access to 30,000 exciting frequencies that include police department,
fire department, ambulance, amateur radio, and transportation services.
You can select up to 60 channels for your scanner to scan and you can
change your selection at any time.
The secret to your scanner’s ability to scan so many frequencies is its
custom-designed microprocessor — a tiny, built-in computer. Your
scanner also has these special features:
Frequency Search — scans through every available frequency.
Six Channel-Storage Banks — let you store 10 channels in each of six
banks to group frequencies. This helps you identify calls.
Monitor Memories — let you temporarily save up to six channels you
locate during a frequency search.
Two-Second Automatic Scan Delay — delays scanning for 2 seconds
before moving to another channel, so you can hear more replies.
Memory Backup — keeps the channel frequencies stored in memory
for up to 1 hour during a power loss.
Lock-Out Function — keeps channels you select from being scanned.
Priority Channel — checks your most important channel every 2 seconds so you don’t miss important calls on a channel you specify.
Weather Band Key — scans seven preprogrammed weather frequencies so you can hear about current weather conditions.
Display Backlight — makes the scanner easy to read in low light situations.
Search Skip — lets you select up to 30 frequencies for the scanner to
skip during a limit or direct search to avoid unwanted frequencies.
 1995 Tandy Corporation.
All Rights Reserved.
Radio Shack is a registered trademark used by Tandy Corporation.
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Your scanner can receive all of these bands:
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29–29.7 MHz (10-Meter Amateur Radio)
29.7–50 MHz (VHF Lo)
50–54 MHz (6-Meter Amateur Radio)
108–136.975 MHz (Aircraft)
137–144 MHz (Government)
144–148 MHz (2-Meter Amateur Radio)
148–174 MHz (VHF Hi)
406–420 MHz (Government)
420–450 (70-cm Amateur Radio)
450–470 MHz (UHF Standard)
470–512 MHz (UHF “T” Band)
806–823.9375 MHz (Public Service)
851–868.9375 MHz (UHF Hi)
896.1125–956 MHz (UHF Hi)
In addition, your scanner is preprogrammed with the following weather
service channels:
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162.400 MHz (NFM)
162.425 MHz (NFM)
162.450 MHz (NFM)
162.475 MHz (NFM)
162.500 MHz (NFM)
162.525 MHz (NFM)
162.550 MHz (NFM)
This owner’s manual also includes the section “A Guide to the Action
Bands,” which lets you target services in your area by giving you frequency ranges to search. You can then store any of these frequencies
into memory for easy scanning.
For your records, we recommend you record your scanner’s serial number in the space provided. The serial number is on the scanner’s back
panel.
Serial Number __________________
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FCC NOTICE
Your scanner might cause TV or radio interference even when it is operating properly. To determine whether your scanner is causing the interference, turn off your scanner. If the interference goes away, your
scanner is causing the interference. Try the following methods to eliminate the interference.
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Move your scanner away from the receiver
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Connect your scanner to an outlet that is on a different electrical
circuit from the receiver
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Contact your local Radio Shack store for help
If you cannot eliminate the interference, the FCC requires that you stop
using your scanner.
Note: Mobile use of this scanner is unlawful or requires a permit in some
areas. Check the laws in your area.
SCANNING LEGALLY
Your scanner covers frequencies used by many different groups including police and fire departments, ambulance services, government agencies, private companies, amateur radio services, military operations,
pager services, and wireline (telephone and telegraph) service providers. It is legal to listen to almost every transmission your scanner can
receive. However, there are some transmissions you should never intentionally listen to. These include:
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Telephone conversations (either cellular, cordless, or other private
means of telephone signal transmission)
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Pager transmissions
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Any scrambled or encrypted transmissions
According to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), you
are subject to fines and possible imprisonment for intentionally listening
to, using, or divulging the contents of such a transmission unless you
have the consent of a party to the conversation (unless such activity is
otherwise illegal). Radio Shack encourages responsible, legal scanner
use.
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CONTENTS
Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Power Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Using Internal Batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Important Information About the External Power Jacks . . . . . . 7
Using Standard AC Power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Using Vehicle Battery Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Charging Nickel-Cadmium Batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Connecting the Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Connecting an Earphone/Headphones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Connecting an Extension Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Using the Belt Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Understanding Your Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
A Look at the Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
A Look at the Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Banks and Memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Channel-Storage Banks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Monitor Memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Turning on the Scanner and Setting Squelch . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Storing Frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Searching For and Temporarily Storing Active Frequencies . . 19
Listening to Monitor Memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Moving a Frequency from a Monitor Memory to a Channel . . 22
Manually Selecting a Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Special Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Using the Keylock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Locking Out Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Turning Channel-Storage Banks On and Off. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Search Skip Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Using the Display Backlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Listening to the Weather Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
A General Guide to Scanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Guide to Frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Guide to the Action Bands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Band Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Avoiding Image Frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Frequency Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Resetting the Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Care and Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
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PREPARATION
POWER SOURCES
You can power your scanner from any of three sources:
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Internal batteries
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Standard AC power (using an optional AC adapter)
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Vehicle battery power (using an optional DC adapter)
USING INTERNAL BATTERIES
You can power your scanner with four AA batteries. For the longest operation and best performance, we recommend alkaline batteries (Radio
Shack Cat. No. 23-552). Or, you can use rechargeable nickel-cadmium
batteries (Cat. No. 23-125).
Warning: The scanner has a built-in circuit that lets you recharge nickel-cadmium batteries inside the battery compartment. However, you
must never use this circuit when you have installed non-rechargeable
batteries in the scanner. Be sure to read “Important Information about
the External Power Jacks” and “Charging Nickel-Cadmium Batteries.”
Follow these steps to install or replace batteries.
1. Press down the tab on the battery compartment cover, and lift
open the compartment.
2. Remove any old batteries from the compartment and cover.
Caution: Always dispose of old non-rechargeable batteries
promptly and properly. Do not bury or burn them.
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3. Install two batteries in the compartment and two in the cover as
indicated by the polarity symbols (+ and –) marked inside.
Caution: Use only fresh, AA alkaline, nickel-cadmium, or general
purpose batteries of the required size. Never mix fresh and old
batteries or different types of batteries.
4. Replace the cover.
If BATT.Lo flashes on the display and the scanner beeps every 15
seconds, immediately replace or recharge all four batteries.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT THE
EXTERNAL POWER JACKS
The scanner has two external power jacks — POWER and CHARGE. It
is important that you understand the purpose of each jack before you
connect any adapter to the scanner.
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POWER
CHARGE
The POWER jack powers the scanner and disconnects the internal batteries. You can use this jack to connect an external power source (AC
or DC adapter) regardless of the type of batteries you install.
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The CHARGE jack supplies power to operate the scanner and also
charges the internal batteries. Use the CHARGE jack only when you install rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries.
Warning: Never use the CHARGE jack with non-rechargeable batteries.
If you try to recharge non-rechargeable batteries, they become very hot
and could explode.
USING STANDARD AC POWER
To power the scanner from AC power, you need an AC adapter such as
Radio Shack Cat. No. 20-188. Plug the adapter’s barrel plug into the
scanner’s DC 9V POWER jack. Then plug the adapter’s power module
into a standard AC outlet.
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POWER
Warning: Do not use an AC adapter’s polarized plug with an extension
cord, receptacle, or other outlet unless the blades can be fully inserted
to prevent blade exposure.
Cautions:
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You must use an AC adapter that supplies 9 volts and delivers at
least 300 milliamps. Its center tip must be set to negative, and its
plug must correctly fit the scanner’s DC 9V POWER jack. The recommended adapter meets these specifications. Using an adapter
that does not meet these specifications could seriously damage
the scanner or the adapter.
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When you finish using the AC adapter, disconnect it from the AC
outlet first. Then disconnect it from the scanner.
Note: If you installed rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries in the
scanner, remove the cap from the CHARGE jack and connect the AC
adapter to it. This powers the scanner and recharges the batteries at the
same time. See “Charging Nickel-Cadmium Batteries.”
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USING VEHICLE BATTERY POWER
You can power the scanner from your vehicle’s battery power, if the vehicle has a 12-volt, negative ground electrical system. To do so, you
need a Radio Shack DC Universal Adapter, Cat. No. 270-1560.
Cautions:
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You must use a DC adapter that supplies (regulated) 9-volt power
and delivers at least 300 milliamps. Its center tip must be set to
negative, and its plug must correctly fit the scanner’s DC 9V
POWER jack. The recommended adapter meets these specifications. Using an adapter that does not meet these specifications
could seriously damage your scanner or the adapter.
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To protect your vehicle’s electrical system, always plug the adapter into the scanner before you plug it into your vehicle’s cigarettelighter socket. Always unplug the adapter from the vehicle’s
cigarette-lighter socket before you unplug it from the scanner.
1. Connect the DC adapter’s orange barrel-plug to the adapter’s
cable, with the tip set to –.
2. Set the adapter’s voltage switch to 9V.
3. Insert the barrel plug into the scanner’s DC 9V POWER jack.
4. Plug the other end of the adapter into your vehicle’s cigarettelighter socket.
Notes:
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If you installed rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries in the scanner, remove the cap from the CHARGE jack and connect the AC
adapter to it. This powers the scanner and recharges the batteries
at the same time. See “Charging Nickel-Cadmium Batteries.”
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If the scanner does not operate properly when you use a DC
adapter, unplug the adapter from the cigarette-lighter socket and
clean the socket to remove ashes and other debris.
CHARGING NICKEL-CADMIUM BATTERIES
The scanner has a built-in charging circuit that lets you recharge nickelcadmium batteries while they are in the scanner. To charge the batteries, remove the plug from the scanner’s CHARGE jack and simply connect an AC adapter or a DC Universal Adapter to the jack (see “Using
Standard AC Power” or “Using Vehicle Battery Power”).
Warning: Do not connect either adapter to the scanner’s CHARGE jack
if you installed non-rechargeable batteries (standard, extra-life, or alkaline). Non-rechargeable batteries become hot and can even explode if
you try to recharge them.
It takes about 14 to 16 hours to recharge batteries that are fully discharged. You can operate the scanner while recharging the nickelcadmium batteries, but the charging time is lengthened.
Note: Nickel-cadmium batteries last longer and deliver more power if
you occasionally let them fully discharge. To do this, simply use the
scanner until it begins beeping every 15 seconds and BATT.LO appears on the display. Then fully charge the batteries.
Important! At the end of a rechargeable battery’s useful life, it must be
recycled or disposed of properly. Contact your local, county, or state
hazardous waste management authorities for information on recycling
or disposal programs in your area. Some options that might be available
are: municipal curb-side collection, drop-off boxes at retailers, recycling
collection centers, and mail-back programs.
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CONNECTING THE ANTENNA
Follow these steps to attach the supplied flexible antenna to the connector on the top of your scanner.
1. Align the slots around the antenna’s connector with the tabs on the
jack.
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2. Press the antenna down over the jack and rotate the antenna’s
base clockwise until it locks into place.
Connecting an Optional Antenna
The antenna connector on your scanner makes it easy to use the scanner with a variety of antennas. Instead of the supplied antenna, you can
attach a different one, such as an external mobile antenna or outdoor
base antenna. Your local Radio Shack store sells a variety of antennas.
Always use 50-ohm coaxial cable, such as RG-58 or RG-8, to connect
an outdoor antenna. For lengths over 50 feet, use RG-8 low-loss dielectric coaxial cable. If your antenna’s cable does not have a BNC connector, you will also need a BNC adapter (available at your local Radio
Shack store).
Warning: Use extreme caution when installing or removing an outdoor
antenna. If the antenna starts to fall, let it go! It could contact overhead
power lines. If the antenna touches a power line, contact with the antenna, mast, cable or guy wires can cause electrocution and death! Call the
power company to remove the antenna. Do not attempt to do so yourself.
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CONNECTING AN EARPHONE/
HEADPHONES
For private listening, you can plug an earphone or mono headphones
(such as Radio Shack Cat. No. 33-175 or 20-210) into the jack on top
of your scanner. This automatically disconnects the internal speaker.
Listening Safely
To protect your hearing, follow these guidelines when you use an earphone or headphones:
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Do not listen at extremely high volume levels. Extended high-volume listening can lead to permanent hearing loss.
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Set the volume to the lowest setting before you begin listening.
After you begin listening, adjust the volume to a comfortable level.
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Once you set the volume, do not increase it. Over time, your ears
adapt to the volume level, so a volume level that does not cause
discomfort might still damage your hearing.
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Traffic Safety
Do not wear an earphone or headphones while you drive a vehicle or
ride a bicycle. This can create a traffic hazard and is illegal in some areas.
Even though some earphones and headphones are designed to let you
hear some outside sounds when you listen at normal levels, they still
present a traffic hazard.
CONNECTING AN EXTENSION SPEAKER
In a noisy area, an extension speaker (such as Radio Shack Cat. No.
21-549) or an amplified speaker (such as Radio Shack Cat. No. 21541), positioned in the right place, might provide more comfortable listening. Plug the speaker cable’s 1/8-inch mini-plug into your scanner’s
jack.
USING THE BELT CLIP
You can attach the supplied belt clip to make the scanner easier to use
when you are on the go. Use the two supplied screws to attach the belt
clip to the scanner. Then slide the belt clip over your belt or waistband.
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UNDERSTANDING YOUR SCANNER
A LOOK AT THE KEYPAD
Your scanner’s keys might seem confusing at first, but this information
should help you understand each key’s function.
HI LO AIR
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SCAN — scans through the programmed channels.
MANUAL — stops scanning and lets you directly enter a channel num-
ber.
LOCKOUT/S/S — lets you lock out a selected channel. Skips a specified
frequency during limit or direct search.
PRIORITY — sets and turns on and off priority for a particular channel.
CLEAR/. — clears an incorrect entry or enters the decimal point neces-
sary when programming frequencies.
MONITOR/0 — accesses the six monitor memories. See “Moving a Fre-
quency from a Monitor Memory to a Channel.”
WX/E (enter) — scans through the preprogrammed weather channels or
enters frequencies into channels.
— locks/unlocks the keypad to prevent accidental entries
or turns on the display light for 15 seconds. See “Using the Keylock” and
“Using the Display Backlight.”
KEYLOCK/
PROGRAM — programs frequencies into channels.
t, LIMIT, and s — search for active frequencies. See “Searching For and
Temporarily Storing Active Frequencies.”
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Number Keys — each key has a single-digit label, and keys 1-6 have
a range of numbers printed above them. The single digits refer to the
number of a channel or frequency entered. The number range (21-30,
for example) show the channels that make up a memory bank. In addition, the keypad has different functions in manual mode, scan mode,
and program mode. See “Banks and Memories.”
A LOOK AT THE DISPLAY
The display has several indicators that show the scanner’s current operating mode. A quick look at the display will help you understand how
to operate your scanner.
MON
BANK
KEYLOCK
BATT.Lo
CH
MHz
MON — appears when you listen to a monitor memory. A number (1-6)
appears to the right of MON indicating which monitor memory you are listening to.
BANK — shows which channel-storage banks are turned on for the scan
mode. See “Banks and Memories.”
KEYLOCK — appears when you lock the keypad.
BATT.Lo — appears when the batteries are low.
CH — digits that precede this indicator show which of the 60 channels
the scanner is tuned to.
P — appears when you listen to the priority channel.
MHz — digits that precede this indicator show which frequency the
scanner is tuned to.
SCAN — appears when you scan channels.
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MAN — appears when you manually select a channel.
PGM — appears while you program frequencies into the scanner’s channels.
PRI — appears when you select the priority feature.
L/O — appears when you manually select a locked-out channel, or during a search hold when the frequency is stored in search skip memory.
WX — appears when you scan the preprogrammed weather channels.
t and s — indicate the search direction.
SRCH — appears during a limit search, a direct search, and a weather
band search. See “Searching For and Temporarily Storing Active Frequencies.”
-L- — appears instead of the channel number during a limit search.
-d- — appears instead of the channel number during a direct search.
Hi — appears with a frequency to show the upper limit of the frequency
range to search.
Lo — appears with a frequency to show the lower limit of the frequency
range to search.
-H- — appears during a limit search hold.
-h- — appears during a direct search hold.
Error — appears when you make an entry error.
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BANKS AND MEMORIES
Your scanner can store up to 66 frequencies. You store each frequency
in either a memory called a channel, or a temporary memory called a
monitor. This scanner has 60 channels and six monitor memories.
CHANNEL-STORAGE BANKS
To make it easier to identify and select the channels you want to listen
to, channels are divided into six channel-storage banks of 10 channels
each. Use each channel-storage bank to group frequencies, such as the
police department, fire department, ambulance services, or aircraft
band (see “Guide to the Action Bands”).
For example, the police might use four frequencies, one for each area
of town. You could program the police frequencies starting with Channel
1 (Bank 1) and then program the fire department frequencies starting
with Channel 11 (the first channel in Bank 2).
MONITOR MEMORIES
The scanner also has six monitor memories. Use these memories to
temporarily store frequencies while you decide whether or not to save
them into channels. This is handy for quickly storing an active frequency
when you are searching through an entire band.
When you are in the search mode, MON appears and the flashing number at the top of the display indicates the currently selected monitor
memory. Once you have stored a frequency into that monitor memory,
press t or s. The scanner shifts to the next monitor memory and restarts
the search mode.
Note: To store frequencies into a monitor memory, you must first perform a limit or direct search. See “Searching For and Temporarily Storing Active Frequencies.”
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OPERATION
TURNING ON THE SCANNER AND SETTING
SQUELCH
1. Make sure that SQUELCH is turned fully counterclockwise before
you turn on the scanner.
2. Turn VOLUME clockwise until you hear a hissing sound.
3. Turn SQUELCH clockwise, just until the hissing sound stops.
Note: If you want to listen to a weak or distant station, turn SQUELCH
counterclockwise. If reception is poor, turn SQUELCH clockwise.
STORING FREQUENCIES
Follow these steps to store frequencies into channels.
1. Press MANUAL. Enter the channel number where you want to
store a frequency.
HI LO AIR
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2. Press PROGRAM. PGM appears on the display to indicate the
scanner is in the programming mode.
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3. Use the number keys and CLEAR/. to enter the frequency (including the decimal point) you want to store.
HI LO AIR
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4. Press WX/E to store the frequency.
Notes:
• If you made a mistake in Step 3, Error appears on the display
and the scanner sounds three beeps. Simply start again from
Step 3.
• Your scanner automatically rounds the entered frequency to the
nearest valid frequency. For example, if you try to enter a frequency of 151.473, your scanner accepts it as 151.475.
5. Repeat Steps 1-4 to program more channels. Or, if you want to
program the next channel in sequence, repeat Steps 2-4.
To listen to a frequency you have stored, press MANUAL, the channel
number, then MANUAL again.
SEARCHING FOR AND TEMPORARILY
STORING ACTIVE FREQUENCIES
Good references for active frequencies are Radio Shack’s “Police Call
Radio Guide Including Fire and Emergency Services,” “Aeronautical
Frequency Directory,” and “Maritime Frequency Directory.” We update
these directories every year, so be sure to get a current copy.
If you do not have a reference to frequencies in your area, or if you want
to search for unlisted frequencies, use a limit search or direct search.
See also “Guide to the Action Bands” in this manual.
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Limit Search
A limit search lets you search for active frequencies between upper and
lower limits that you set. -L- appears on the display during a limit
search.
1. Press PROGRAM, then LIMIT. Lo appears on the display.
2. Enter the lower limit of the frequency range you want to search.
3. Press WX/E, then LIMIT. Hi appears on the display.
Note: If the frequency you entered is not a valid frequency,
Error appears. To enter a different frequency, start again from
Step 2.
4. Enter the upper limit of the frequency range.
5. Press WX/E, then LIMIT. Lo and the lower limit frequency appear
on the display.
6. Press t to search from the upper to the lower limit, or s to search
from the lower to the upper limit. The current monitor memory
number starts flashing at the top of the display.
7. When the scanner stops on a transmission you want to save,
press MONITOR to store the frequency in the current monitor memory. The monitor number then stops flashing.
8. Press either t or s to continue the search. If you saved a frequency
in a monitor memory, then the monitor memory number on the display advances by one and starts flashing again. (If the last monitor
memory was 6, the scanner returns to monitor memory 1.)
9. To hold the frequency, press LIMIT. -H- appears on the display.
To exit the hold mode and resume the limit search, press LIMIT
again.
Notes:
• You can press t or s during the hold mode to step through the
frequencies toward the upper or lower limits.
• If you tune to a search skip frequency, the display shows L/O
(see “Search Skip Memory”).
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Direct Search
When you listen to a channel, you can search up or down from the currently displayed frequency. -d- appears on the display during a direct
search.
1. Press MANUAL, the channel number, then MANUAL to select a frequency stored in a channel.
HI LO AIR
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2. Press t or s to search up or down from the selected frequency.
3. When the scanner stops on a transmission, press MONITOR to
store that frequency in the current monitor memory. Or, press t or s
to continue the search.
4. To hold the frequency, press LIMIT. -h- appears on the display.
To exit the hold mode and resume the direct search, press LIMIT
again.
Notes:
• You can press t or s during the hold mode to step through the
frequencies toward the upper or lower limits.
• If you tune to a search skip frequency, the display shows L/O
(see “Search Skip Memory”).
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LISTENING TO MONITOR MEMORIES
Once you have stored frequencies into monitor memories using a direct
or limit search, you can listen to the monitor memories by pressing MANUAL, MONITOR, and then the number for the monitor memory you want
to listen to.
MOVING A FREQUENCY FROM A MONITOR
MEMORY TO A CHANNEL
Follow these steps to move a frequency stored in a monitor memory to
a permanent channel.
1. Press MANUAL.
2. Enter the number for the channel where you want to store the
monitor frequency. The channel number appears.
HI LO AIR
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3. Press PROGRAM.
4. Press MONITOR and the number of the monitor memory number
that has the frequency you want to store. The channel number
starts flashing.
5. Press WX/E. The scanner stores the frequency in the selected
channel, and the channel number stops flashing.
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MANUALLY SELECTING A CHANNEL
You can continuously monitor a specific channel without scanning. This
is useful if you hear an emergency broadcast on a channel and do not
want to miss any details — even though there might be periods of silence — or if you want to monitor a specific channel.
Follow these steps to manually select a channel.
1. Press MANUAL.
2. Enter the channel number.
3. Press MANUAL again.
Or, if your scanner is scanning and stops at the desired channel, press
MANUAL one time. (Pressing MANUAL additional times causes your
scanner to step through the channels.)
To resume automatic scanning after manually selecting a channel,
press SCAN. Your scanner then scans through all non-locked channels
in the activated banks.
23
SPECIAL FEATURES
USING THE KEYLOCK
Once you program your scanner, you can protect it from accidental program changes by turning on the keylock feature. In this mode, the only
controls that operate are SCAN, MANUAL, KEYLOCK/
, VOLUME, and
SQUELCH.
Note: The keylock does not prevent the scanner from scanning channels.
To turn on the keylock, press and hold KEYLOCK/
until the scanner
beeps and KEYLOCK appears on the display. To turn it off, press and
hold KEYLOCK/
until the scanner beeps and KEYLOCK disappears
from the display.
LOCKING OUT CHANNELS
You can increase the effective scanning speed by locking out individual
channels that have a continuous transmission, such as a weather channel. To lock out a channel, manually select the channel and press LOCKOUT/S/S so L/O appears on the display.
To remove the lock-out from a channel, manually select the channel and
press LOCKOUT/S/S so L/O disappears from the display.
Note: You can manually select locked-out channels.
To remove the lock-out from all channels in a memory bank, follow this
procedure.
1. While scanning, press the number key corresponding to the memory bank you want to unlock.
2. Press MANUAL to enter the manual mode.
3. Press and hold LOCKOUT for more than 3 seconds. The scanner
beeps twice, and all locked out memory channels in the selected
bank are unlocked.
24
TURNING CHANNEL-STORAGE BANKS ON
AND OFF
You can turn each channel-storage bank on and off. When you turn off
a bank, the scanner does not scan any of the 10 channels in that bank.
While scanning, press the number key corresponding to the bank you
want to turn on or off. If the memory bank indicator is on, the bank is
turned on and the scanner scans all channels within that bank that are
not locked out. If the indicator is off, the scanner does not scan any of
the channels within that bank.
Memory Banks 3 & 4 are Turned Off
Notes:
•
You can manually select any channel in a bank, even if the bank is
turned off.
•
You cannot turn off all banks. One bank is always active.
SEARCH SKIP MEMORY
You can skip specified frequencies during a limit or direct search. This
lets you avoid unwanted frequencies or ones you have already stored
in a channel. You can program up to 30 skip frequencies into the scanner’s memory.
To skip a frequency, press LOCKOUT/S/S when the scanner stops on the
frequency during a limit or direct search.
To clear a single frequency from skip memory so the scanner can stop
on it during a limit or direct search, press LIMIT to hold the search, press
t or s to select the frequency, then press LOCKOUT/S/S until L/O disappears from the display.
25
To clear all the skip frequencies at once, while in the search mode,
press and hold LOCKOUT/S/S until the scanner beeps twice.
Notes:
•
If you program more than 30 skip frequencies, each new frequency replaces ones you stored earlier, starting from the first
stored frequency.
•
You can select the skipped frequency when the scanner is in the
hold mode. The scanner displays L/O when you select a skipped
frequency.
PRIORITY
You can scan through channels and still not miss an important or interesting call on a specific channel. When a channel is selected as the priority channel and the priority feature is turned on, the scanner checks
that channel every 2 seconds, and stays on the channel if there is activity. PRI appears on the display whenever the scanner is set to the priority mode.
To program a channel as the priority channel, press PROGRAM, the desired channel number, then PRIORITY. P appears beside the channel
number.
To turn on the priority feature, press PRIORITY while the scanner is in
either manual or scan mode. To turn off the priority feature, press PRIORITY until PRI disappears from the display.
Notes:
•
You can only select one channel at a time as the priority channel.
•
Channel 1 is initially set as the priority channel.
•
You cannot select a monitor memory when priority is turned on.
26
USING THE DISPLAY BACKLIGHT
You can turn on the display’s backlight for easy viewing in the dark.
Press KEYLOCK/
to turn on the display light for 15 seconds. To turn
off the light before 15 seconds elapses, press KEYLOCK/
again.
Note: Do not hold down KEYLOCK/
or it will lock up the keypad. If this
happens, press and hold KEYLOCK/
until the scanner beeps and
KEYLOCK disappears from the display.
LISTENING TO THE WEATHER BAND
The FCC (Federal Communications Commission) has allocated 11
channels for use by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). We have preprogrammed your scanner with the seven frequencies most commonly used by NOAA.
To hear your local forecast and regional weather information, simply
press WX/E. Your scanner begins scanning through the weather band,
and WX appears on the display.
Your scanner should stop within a few seconds, and then you hear the
local weather broadcast. If the broadcast is weak, you can press WX/E
again to scan through the rest of the weather band.
27
A GENERAL GUIDE TO SCANNING
Reception of the frequencies covered by your scanner is mainly “line-ofsight.” That means you usually cannot hear stations that are beyond the
horizon.
GUIDE TO FREQUENCIES
National Weather Frequencies
161.650*
162.440*
162.525
161.775*
162.450
162.550
162.400
162.475
163.275*
162.425
162.500
* Not preprogrammed in this scanner, but you can manually program
them.
Ham Radio Frequencies
Ham radio operators often transmit emergency information when other
means of communication break down.
The following chart shows the frequencies this scanner receives that
Hams normally use:
Wavelength
(meters)
10-meter
6-meter
2-meter
70-cm
33-cm
Frequency
(MHz)
28.000–29.700
50.000–54.000
144.000–148.000
420.000–450.000
902.000–928.000
Note: Your scanner cannot receive some types of transmissions on
these bands.
28
Birdie Frequencies
Every scanner has birdie frequencies. Birdies are signals created inside
the scanner’s receiver. These operating frequencies might interfere with
broadcasts on the same frequencies. If you program one of these frequencies, you hear only noise on that frequency. If the interference is
not severe, you might be able to turn SQUELCH clockwise to cut out the
birdie.
The birdie frequencies on this unit to watch for are:
31.05
41.40
51.75
To find the birdies in your receiver, begin by disconnecting the antenna
and moving it away from the receiver. Make sure that no other nearby
radio or TV sets are turned on near the receiver. Use the search function
and scan every frequency range from its lowest frequency to the highest. Occasionally, the searching will stop as if it had found a signal, often
without any sound. That is a birdie. Make a list of all the birdies in your
scanner for future reference.
29
GUIDE TO THE ACTION BANDS
Typical Band Usage
HF Band (3.00–30.0 MHz)
10-Meter Amateur
High Range
29.00–29.70 MHz
29.70–29.90 MHz
VHF Band (30.00–300.0 MHz)
Low Range
6-Meter Amateur
Aircraft
U.S. Government
2-Meter Amateur
High Range
30.00–50.00 MHz
50.00–54.00 MHz
108.00–136.97 MHz
137.00–144.00 MHz
144.00–148.00 MHz
148.00–174.00 MHz
UHF Band (300.00 MHz–3.0 GHz)
U. S. Government
0.6-Meter Amateur
Low Range
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band
Public Service
Conventional Systems
Conventional/Trunked Systems
Trunked Systems
Public Safety
High Range
33-Centimeter Amateur
Private Trunked
General Trunked
Fixed Services
Studio-to-Transmitter Broadcast Links
Private Fixed Services Paging
30
406.00–450.00 MHz
420.00–450.00 MHz
450.00–470.00 MHz
470.00–512.00 MHz
806.00–823.93 MHz
851.00–856.00 MHz
856.00–861.00 MHz
861.00–866.00 MHz
866.00–868.93 MHz
896.11–902.00 MHz
902.00–928.00 MHz
935.00–940.00 MHz
940.00–941.00 MHz
941.00–944.00 MHz
944.00–952.00 MHz
952.00–956.00 MHz
Primary Usage
As a general rule, most of the radio activity is concentrated on the following frequencies:
VHF Band
Activities
Government, Police, and Fire
Emergency Services
Railroad
Frequencies
153.785–155.980 MHz
158.730–159.460 MHz
160.000–161.900 MHz
UHF Band
Activities
Land-Mobile “Paired” Frequencies
Base Stations
Mobile Units
Repeater Units
Control Stations
Frequencies
450.000–470.000 MHz
451.025–454.950 MHz
456.025–459.950 MHz
460.025–464.975 MHz
465.025–469.975 MHz
Note: Remote control stations and mobile units operate at 5 MHz higher
than their associated base stations and relay repeater units.
Specified Intervals
Frequencies in different bands are accessible only at specific intervals.
For example:
Band Type
VHF, HAM, and Government
All Others
Aircraft
Specified Interval
5.0 kHz steps
12.5 kHz steps
25.0 kHz steps
Note: Your scanner rounds the entered frequency to the nearest valid
frequency. For example, if you try to enter 151.473, the scanner accepts
this as 151.475.
31
BAND ALLOCATION
To help decide which frequency ranges to scan, use the following listing
of the typical services that use the frequencies your scanner receives.
These frequencies are subject to change, and might vary from area to
area. For a more complete listing, refer to the “Police Call Radio Guide
including Fire and Emergency Services,” available at your local Radio
Shack store.
Abbreviations
Services
AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aircraft
BIFC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boise (ID) Interagency Fire Cache
BUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business
CAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Civil Air Patrol
CB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Citizens Band
CCA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Common Carrier
CSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conventional Systems
CTSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conventional/Trunked Systems
FIRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fire Department
HAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amateur (Ham) Radio
GOVT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Federal Government
GMR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Mobile Radio
GTR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Trunked
IND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Industrial Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . (Manufacturing, Construction, Farming, Forest Products)
MAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Military Amateur Radio
MARI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maritime Limited Coast
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Coast Guard, Marine telephone,
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shipboard Radio, Private stations)
MARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Military Affiliate Radio System
MED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emergency/Medical Services
MIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .U.S. Military
MOV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Motion Picture/Video Industry
NEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .New Mobile Narrow
NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Relay Press (Newspaper reporters)
OIL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil/Petroleum Industry
POL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Police Department
PUB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . (Public Safety, Local Government, Forestry Conservation)
PSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public Safety
PTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Private Trunked
ROAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Road & Highway Maintenance
RTV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Radio/TV Remote Broadcast Pickup
TAXI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Taxi Services
TELB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mobile Telephone
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Aircraft, Radio Common Carrier, Landline companies)
TELC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cordless Phones
TELM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Telephone Maintenance
TOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tow Trucks
TRAN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(Trucks, Tow Trucks, Buses, Railroad, Other)
TSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trunked Systems
TVn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FM-TV Audio Broadcast
32
USXX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Government Classified
UTIL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power & Water Utilities
WTHR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Weather
High Frequency (HF) Hi — (3 MHz–30 MHz)
10-Meter Amateur Band—(28.0––29.7 MHz)
29.000–29.700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HAM
Very High Frequency (VHF)—(30 MHz–300 MHz)
Low Band—(29.7–50 MHz—in 5 kHz steps)
29.700–29.790 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND
29.900–30.550 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
30.580–31.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, PUB
32.000–32.990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
33.020–33.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BUS, IND, PUB
34.010–34.990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
35.020–35.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS, PUB, IND, TELM
36.000–36.230 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
36.250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil Spill Clean up
36.270–36.990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
37.020–37.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PUB, IND
38.000–39.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
39.020–39.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PUB
40.000–42.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GOVT, MIL, MARI
42.020–42.940 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .POL
42.960–43.180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND
43.220–43.680 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TELM, IND, PUB
43.700–44.600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRAN
44.620–46.580 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POL, PUB
46.600–46.990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GOVT, TELC
47.020–47.400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PUB
47.420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .American Red Cross
47.440–49.580 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, PUB
49.610–49.990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MIL, TELC
6-Meter Amateur Band— (50–54 MHz)
50.00–54.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HAM
Aircraft Band (108–136 MHz)
108.000–121.490 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AIR
121.500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .AIR Emergency
121.510–136.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AIR
U.S. Government Band (138–144 MHz)
137.000–144.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
2-Meter Amateur Band (144–148 MHz)
144.000–148.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HAM
VHF-Hi BAND (148–174 MHz)
148.050–150.345 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CAP, MAR, MIL
150.775–150.790 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
150.815–150.965 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOW
150.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil Spill Clean up
33
150.995–151.130 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ROAD
151.145–151.475 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .POL
151.490–151.955 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, BUS
151.985 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELM
152.0075 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
152.030–152.240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELB
152.270–152.465 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, TAXI
152.480 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BUS
152.510–152.840 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELB
152.870–153.020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, MOV
153.035–153.725 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, OIL, UTIL
153.740–154.445 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PUB, FIRE
154.490–154.570 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, BUS
154.585 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil Spill Clean-Up
154.600–154.625 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BUS
154.655–156.240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED, ROAD, POL, PUB
156.255 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OIL
156.275–157.425 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MARI
157.450 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
157.470–157.515 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOW
157.530–157.725 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, TAXI
157.740 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BUS
157.770–158.100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELB
158.130–158.460 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS, IND, OIL, TELM, UTIL
158.490–158.700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELB
158.730–159.465 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POL, PUB, ROAD
159.480 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OIL
159.495–161.565 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRAN
161.580 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OIL
161.600–162.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MARI, RTV
162.0125–162.35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, USXX
162.400–162.550 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WTHR
162.5625–162.6375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, USXX
162.6625 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
162.6875–163.225 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, USXX
163.250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
163.275–166.225 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, USXX
166.250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, RTV, FIRE
166.275–169.400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, BIFC
169.445 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wireless Mikes
169.500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT
169.505 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wireless Mikes
169.55–169.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, USXX
170.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIFC
170.025–170.150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, RTV, FIRE
170.175–170.225 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT
170.245–170.305 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wireless Mikes
170.350–170.400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
170.425–170.450 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIFC
170.475 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PUB
170.4875–173.175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GOVT, PUB, Wireless Mikes
173.225–173.375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MOV, NEWS, UTIL
173.3875–173.5375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MIL
173.5625–173.5875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MIL Medical/Crash Crews
173.60–173.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT
34
U. S. Government Band (406–450 MHz)
406.125–419.975 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, USXX
70-cm Amateur Band (420–450 MHz)
420.000–450.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HAM
Low Band (450–470 MHz)
450.050–450.925 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RTV
451.025–452.025 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IND, OIL, TELM, UTIL
452.0375–453.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, TAXI, TRAN TOW, NEWS
453.0125–453.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PUB
454.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OIL
454.025–454.975 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELB
455.050–455.925 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .RTV
457.525–457.600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BUS
458.025–458.175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
460.0125–460.6375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIRE, POL, PUB
460.650–462.175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BUS
462.1875–462.450 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS, IND
462.4625–462.525 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IND, OIL, TELM, UTIL
462.550–462.725 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GMR
462.750–462.925 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BUS
462.9375–463.1875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
463.200–467.925 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BUS
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, UHF Wide Band (470–512 MHz)
(Channels 14 through 69 in 6 MHz steps)
475.750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Channel 14
481.750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Channel 15
487.750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Channel 16
.
.
.
.
512.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Channel 20
Note: Some cities use the 470–512 MHz band for land/mobile service.
Conventional Systems Band—Locally Assigned
851.0125–855.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CSB
Conventional/Trunked Systems Band —Locally Assigned
856.0125–860.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTSB
Trunked Systems Band—Locally Assigned
861.0125–865.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TSB
Public Safety Band—Locally Assigned
866.0125–868.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PSB
Common Carrier
869.010–894.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CCA
Private Trunked
935.0125–939.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PTR
General Trunked
940.0125–940.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GTR
35
AVOIDING IMAGE FREQUENCIES
You might discover one of your regular stations on another frequency
that is not listed. It might be what is known as an image frequency. For
example, you might find a service that regularly uses a frequency of
453.075 also on 474.675.
To see if it is an image, do a little math.
Note the new frequency.
Double the intermediate frequency of 10.8 MHz (21.600)
and subtract it from the new frequency.
474.675
If the answer is the regular frequency,
then you have tuned to an image.
453.075
–21.600
Occasionally you might get interference on a weak or distant channel
from a strong broadcast 21.6 MHz below the tuned frequency. This is
rare, and the image signal is usually cleared whenever there is a broadcast on the actual frequency.
FREQUENCY CONVERSION
The tuning location of a station can be expressed in frequency (kHz or
MHz) or in wavelength (meters). The following information can help you
make the necessary conversions.
1 MHz (million) = 1,000 kHz (thousand)
To convert MHz to kHz, multiply by 1,000:
9.62 MHz × 1000 = 9620 kHz
To convert from kHz to MHz, divide by 1,000.
2780 kHz ÷ 1000 = 2.780 MHz
To convert MHz to meters, divide 300 by the number of megahertz.
300 ÷ 7.1 MHz = 42.25 meters
36
TROUBLESHOOTING
If you have problems, here are some suggestions which might help.
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Scanner is totally inoperative.
No power.
Check the batteries, or
make sure you
plugged the scanner
into a working outlet.
Scanner is on but will
not scan.
SQUELCH is not correctly adjusted or
channels are locked
out.
Adjust SQUELCH
clockwise or remove
the lock-out.
In the scan mode, the
scanner locks on frequencies that have an
unclear transmission.
“Birdies.”
Avoid programming
frequencies listed
under “Birdie Frequencies” on Page 29 or
only listen to them
manually.
If none of these suggestions help, take your scanner to your local Radio
Shack store for assistance.
RESETTING THE SCANNER
If the scanner’s display locks up or does not work properly after you connect a power source, you might have to reset the scanner.
Caution: This procedure clears all the information you have programmed into the scanner. Before you reset the scanner, try turning it
off and on to see if it begins working properly. Use the following procedure only when you are sure your scanner is not working properly.
1. Turn off the scanner.
2. While you press and hold down the 2 and 9 keys, turn on the scanner.
37
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Your Radio Shack PRO-29 60-Channel Direct Entry Programmable
Scanner is an example of superior design and craftsmanship. The following suggestions will help you care for the PRO-29 so you can enjoy
it for years.
Keep the scanner dry. If it gets wet, wipe it dry immediately.
Liquids can contain minerals that can corrode the electronic
circuits.
Use only fresh batteries of the recommended size and type.
Always remove old and weak batteries. They can leak
chemicals that destroy electronic circuits.
Handle the scanner gently and carefully. Dropping it can
damage circuit boards and cases and can cause the scanner to work improperly.
Use and store the scanner only in normal temperature environments. Temperature extremes can shorten the life of
electronic devices, damage batteries, and distort or melt
plastic parts.
Keep the scanner away from dust and dirt, which can cause
premature wear of parts.
CLEANER
Wipe the scanner with a damp cloth occasionally to keep it
looking new. Do not use harsh chemicals, cleaning solvents,
or strong detergents to clean the scanner.
Modifying or tampering with the scanner’s internal components can
cause a malfunction and might invalidate the scanner’s warranty and
void your FCC authorization to operate it. If your scanner is not operating as it should, take it to your local Radio Shack store for assistance.
38
SPECIFICATIONS
Frequency Coverage:
VHF Lo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29–54 MHz (in 5.0 kHz steps)
Aircraft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108–136.975 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)
VHF Hi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137–174 MHz (in 5.0 kHz steps)
UHF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406–512 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)
800 MHz . . . . . . . . . 806.0000–823.9375 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)
851.0000–868.9375 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)
896.1125–956 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)
Channels of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Any 60 channels in any band
combinations (10 channels x 6 banks) and 6 monitor channels
Sensitivity (20 dB S/N with 60% modulation for AM;
3 kHz deviation for FM):
29–54 MHz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
108–136.975 MHz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
137–174 MHz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
406–512 MHz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
806–956 MHz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
0.4
1.4
0.6
0.5
0.7
µV
µV
µV
µV
µV
Limit Search Speed/Direct Search Speed . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Steps/Sec.
Scan Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Channels/Sec.
Priority Sampling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Seconds
Delay Time (Automatic) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Seconds
IF Frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.8 MHz and 450 kHz
Audio Power:
FM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 mW Maximum
AM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 mW Maximum
Built-in Speaker . . . . . . . . . . 17/16-inch (36mm) 8-Ohm, Dynamic Type
Power Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . +6 VDC, 4 AA batteries
AC Adapter (Cat. No. 20-188)
DC Adapter (Cat. No. 270-1560)
Dimensions (HWD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61/8 × 27/16 × 111/16 Inches
(155.6 × 61.9 × 42.9 mm)
Weight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.11 oz (230 g)
Specifications are typical; individual units might vary. Specifications are
subject to change and improvement without notice.
39
RADIO SHACK LIMITED WARRANTY
This product is warranted against defects for 1 year from date of purchase from
Radio Shack company-owned stores and authorized Radio Shack franchisees
and dealers. Within this period, we will repair it without charge for parts and
labor. Simply bring your Radio Shack sales slip as proof of purchase date to
any Radio Shack store. Warranty does not cover transportation costs. Nor does
it cover a product subjected to misuse or accidental damage.
EXCEPT AS PROVIDED HEREIN, RADIO SHACK MAKES NO EXPRESS
WARRANTIES AND ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES ARE LIMITED IN DURATION TO THE DURATION OF THE WRITTEN LIMITED WARRANTIES CONTAINED HEREIN. Some states do not permit limitation or exclusion of implied
warranties; therefore, the aforesaid limitation(s) or exclusion(s) may not apply to
the purchaser.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights and you may also have other rights which vary
from state to state.
We Service What We Sell
9/94
RADIO SHACK
A Division of Tandy Corporation
Fort Worth, Texas 76102
8A5
UBZZ01256Z
Printed in the Philippines
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