"i" Series Product Description
1: The Basics
2: The Components
3: Features
4: Specifications
Product Description
92600PDG07
Issue 1-0, August 2001
Printed in U.S.A.
This manual has been developed by NEC America, Inc. It is intended for the use of its customers and
service personnel, and should be read in its entirety before attempting to install or program the system. Any comments or suggestions for improving this manual would be appreciated. Forward your
remarks to:
NEC America, Inc., Corporate Networks Group
4 Forest Parkway
Shelton, CT 06484
cng.nec.com
Nothing contained in this manual shall be deemed to be, and this manual does not constitute, a warranty of, or representation with respect to, any of the equipment covered. This manual is subject to
change without notice and NEC America, Inc. has no obligation to provide any updates or corrections
to this manual. Further, NEC America, Inc. also reserves the right, without prior notice, to make
changes in equipment design or components as it deems appropriate. No representation is made that
this manual is complete or accurate in all respects and NEC America, Inc. shall not be liable for any
errors or omissions. In no event shall NEC America, Inc. be liable for any incidental or consequential
damages in connection with the use of this manual. This document contains proprietary information
that is protected by copyright. All rights are reserved. No part of this document may be photocopied
or reproduced without prior written consent of NEC America, Inc.
©2001 by NEC America, Inc.. All Rights Reserved.
Printed in U.S.A.
Section 1: The Basics
Table of Contents
Introducing the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Feature Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Calling a Co-Worker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Outside Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Handling and Rerouting Your Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
When Your Call Can't Go Through . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Placing Calls Quickly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
When You Work In Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Have a Telephone Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Streamlining Your Telephone's Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Managing The System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Other Powerful System Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Product Description
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1
Section 1: The Basics
— For Your Notes —
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Product Description
Section 1: The Basics
1
Introducing the System
Powerful office communications . . .
Ready for world-wide networking . . .
Easily tailored for every user . . .
he i-Series ISDN compatible office communications systems from NEC are ready today to meet the
challenges of tomorrow. Unique system architecture, enhanced with Digital Signal Processor (DSP)
technology, provides a solid yet flexible foundation for reliability, adaptability and performance. With
up to three 64K channels at each extension (depending on configuration), the i-Series is poised to integrate
with the growing voice and data networks. The security of your investment today is assured by NEC's
ongoing commitment to enhancements like the Windows-based PC Attendant, as well as by an open system architecture which encourages third party application development.
T
The unparalleled power and flexibility built into each system are further enhanced by Traveler integrated
wireless PCS communication and the new generation of i-Series telephones. These telephones offer interactive Soft Keys, built-in Speakerphone, and an integrated wall/desk stand. In addition, i-Series telephones can
accept optional snap-in modules; an Analog Module (to directly connect modems, cordless telephones, single
line sets or fax machines), a Data Module (for CTI applications), or an Off-Hook Voice Announce Module.
All i-Series systems are built in our ISO 9002 approved manufacturing facilities to uphold the legendary
NEC reliability standards. Using rugged common equipment, these systems are built smart and built to last.
Port-based design, single-pair wiring and modular components allow for easy expansion of the basic systems. Perfect for the small growing office, 28i has 28 ports and provides up to a maximum of 16 trunks or
16 extensions. The 124i can grow to a 124 port, 52 trunk by 72 station full-featured system. The 704i can
expand to a 704 port, 192 trunk by 512 station communications network. With 28i, 124i and 704i, you'll
always get the right combination of trunks, stations and peripherals.
Product Description
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Section 1: The Basics
Configured as a compact key system, 28i is perfect for the small, active office. Step up to 124i, add telephone data devices and multi-port data modules and you’ll get an instant voice/data hybrid network.
Migrate into 704i common equipment, add digital and analog single line telephones and achieve PBX
capabilities suitable for large offices. This makes 704i your logical choice for growing office complexes
and multi-location corporations.
With its expansive feature set, you can quickly customize the i-Series to meet the most demanding
application challenges. ISDN Primary Rate Interface (PRI) and Basic Rate Interface (BRI), along with
T1 capability (including ANI/DNIS), simplify the most intensive trunking requirements. Advanced features like Automatic Route Selection (ARS) are built right into the system, not expensive options. Other
features like Conferencing (four and eight party), Repeat Dialing and the six-port Voice Announce Unit
make call handling a breeze. In addition, i-Series systems are fully integrated with NEC's powerful
NVM-Series of Voice Mail/Automated Attendant systems.
Offering a wide variety of station instruments, the i-Series has the right phone for every desk. The iSeries telephones can feature interactive Soft Keys, built-in Speakerphone and Wall/Desk Stand, and a
choice of analog, data, and Off-Hook Voice Announce snap-in modules.
For the power user, there is the Super Display Telephone with its fully interactive display. A receptionist
and dispatcher will surely take advantage of the 34-button keyset with its two-line alphanumeric display.
You'll also appreciate the flexibility and economy of the 28-button and 22-button display and standard
models. All keysets come equipped with Speakerphone, Dual Color LEDs for identifying calls, Voice
Over, Handsfree reply on Intercom calls and volume controls. Co-workers always on the move will
appreciate the mobility and flexibility of the 900i fully integrated 900 MHz digital cordless telephone.
Use the Door Box to conveniently monitor an entrance door. The Digital Single Line Telephone rounds
out the product line with its attractive value and adaptability.
Feature Overview
Calling a Co-Worker
Easily get in touch with co-workers over the Intercom. The party you call can have their
phone ring, or they can respond without touching the phone using Handsfree
Answerback. With a Hotline button, you can Intercom frequently called co-workers,
Transfer a call and even see at a glance if they're on another call. If you must leave your
desk, use your Alphanumeric Display to find out who called while you were out. When
you must get through to an associate right away, you can Barge In to get through even if
they are on another call.
Outside Calls
You can answer Outside Calls that ring your phone or flash your line/loop keys. Your
Ring Group sets the way incoming calls ring your phone, and they can ring differently
during the day, at night or on weekends and holidays. Caller ID (with TAPI compatible
third-party software) can display your caller's account information before you even
answer their call. While you're on a call, use Reverse Voice Over to talk privately to a
co-worker without putting your call on Hold.
Place Outside Calls by pressing your line/loop keys, dialing simple codes or just lifting
the handset. To control costs, your system may have you enter Account Codes before
your call goes through. Once your call goes through, the Call Timer shows how long
you're on the phone.
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Product Description
Section 1: The Basics
Handling and Rerouting Your Calls
Use Hold to have your call wait at your phone, or Park it in orbit for a co-worker. Don't
know where a co-worker is? With Meet Me Paging Transfer, they can pick it up where
ever they are. Serial Call can have the call automatically come back when your coworker is done.
When you leave your desk, forward your calls to a co-worker, Off-Premise to your car
phone or home office, or to your NVM-Series voice mailbox. NVM-Series offers the
industry’s finest integrated Voice Mail, offering powerful productivity tools such as
Return Call with Caller ID, Park and Page and One Touch Mailbox Access. While at a
co-worker’s desk, Call Forwarding with Follow Me will bring your calls to their phone.
Your system may be programmed with Fixed Call Forwarding that reroutes your calls
automatically when they're not picked up.
In a hurry? Think about leaving your co-worker a Message Waiting, or use the
NVM-Series voice mail to record a voice message for them. Enable Conversation
Record to have your voice mailbox record your own conversations.
When Your Call Can't Go Through
Don't just hang up when your call can't get through to a co-worker! Use Call Waiting to
wait without hanging up. Send your co-worker Off Hook Signals or an Off Hook Voice
Announcement to let them know you're waiting, or use Voice Over for a private
announcement. If you don't have time to wait, leave a Callback request that automatically rings you when they become free. You can optionally just lift the handset to have
your call go through. There's no need to keep redialing your outside call if it's busy or
unanswered — use Repeat Redial to have the system retry it automatically.
With Voice Over, talk to a busy user — while they keep talking to their initial caller.
Also while you're busy, your phone's keys show when there is another call waiting.
With the Off-Hook Voice Announce Module installed, you’ll even hear an off-hook
voice announcement from your co-worker while you’re on the phone.
Placing Calls Quickly
Store numbers you call often and easily dial them with just a few key presses. To quickly retry the number you just dialed, try Last Number Redial. Use Memo Dial to jot a
number down in your phone's memory — instead of writing it down. With Directory
Dialing, select a co-worker or outside call from a list of names, rather than dialing the
phone number.
When You Work In Groups
If you and your co-workers handle each other's calls, set up an ACD or Department Calling
group. With ACD, you’ll get such advanced workgroup features as Call Queuing (with programmable overflow announcements), System and Group Supervisors, automatic agent
Rest Mode and Work Time, and Flexible Group Scheduling. You can also add an optional
PC-based Supervisor with Reports. Someone calling your group's number goes through to
anyone in the group who's available. A unique Selectable Ring Tone for your phone lets
you know which calls are for you. To answer a call ringing a co-worker's phone, use Group
Call Pickup, Directed Call Pickup or a Call Coverage key. When you're on a call and want
others in your area to listen in on the conversation, activate Handsfree or Group Listen.
Product Description
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1
Section 1: The Basics
Have a Telephone Meeting
Conference allows you to quickly set up a telephone meeting. Voice Call Conference
lets others join your outside call just by pressing a line key. Use Meet Me Conference to
set up a meeting which lets others join if they choose. Also, you can use Meet Me
Paging to set up a meeting on a page zone.
Streamlining Your Telephone's Operation
Your telephone provides you with options that can dramatically streamline the way you
handle calls. For example, you can program One-Touch Keys for one-button access to
co-workers, outside calls, Abbreviated Dialing and certain features. Or record any dialing steps in a "macro" key with One-Touch Serial Operation.
Want to automate Callback, Message Waiting or other features? Just assign these functions to available Programmable Function Keys. Need one-button Transfer and calling
for a co-worker? Program Hotline on another function key.
Managing The System
Set up Automatic Route Selection (ARS) to choose the most cost-effective service for
outgoing calls. Or, you can use Toll Restriction to block those expensive, unnecessary
long distance calls. Account Codes will help you keep track of trunk usage and calling
patterns. These codes can be optional, forced (required) or verified (checked against a
programmed list). The system can enforce verified codes for all calls or just long distance calls.
To monitor traffic patterns, have Station Message Detail Recording or Traffic
Management Reports print a record of your system's calls. Control the power and flexibility of system extensions through Class of Service. Some sites have unique numbering
considerations — like matching phone numbers to room numbers in a school. If yours
does, you'll appreciate Flexible System Numbering.
Other Powerful System Options
Add digital recording and playback capabilities with a Voice Announce Unit (VAU).
You'll get Voice Prompting Messages, Personal Greeting, Automated Attendant with single digit dialing and Park and Page.
Set up a data network using the Data Communications Interface (DCI). Install a DCI
Module into any Super Display, 34-button or 28-button phone, or plug a stand-alone 3DCI Module into an available digital station port.
Use analog Single Line Telephones to set up a traditional PBX-type system. With the 2OPX Module, you can connect the Single Line Telephones to the same common equipment used for digital phones. The 2-OPX Module also lets you connect to fax machines
or an off-site extension.
Connect multiple music sources for Music on Hold using a 3-ACI analog interface. It
also gives you more external paging ports and relays for amplifier control.
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Product Description
Section 2: The Components
Table of Contents
The Telephones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
34-Button Super Display Telephone – P/N 92773 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
34-Button Display Telephone — P/N 92783 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
28-Button Display Telephone — P/N 92763 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
28-Button Standard Telephone — P/N 92760 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
22-Button Display Telephone — P/N 92753 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
22-Button Standard Telephone — P/N 92750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Digital Single Line Telephone — P/N 92550A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
ST4 Analog Telephone — P/N 85403W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Cordless Telephone (900i) — P/N 85456D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Snap-In Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Other Station Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Data Module (DCI) — P/Ns 92266B and 92267 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Analog Module (DCI-L) — (P/N 92767) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Speakerphone Module — (Future) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Off-Hook Voice Announce (OHVA) Module — P/N 92765 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Recording Jack Module (REJ) — P/N 80175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
PC Attendant Console — P/N 92690 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Direct Station Selection (DSS) Console — P/Ns 92755 (110 Button) and 92756 (24 Button) . . .21
Door Box — P/N 92245 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Video Door Box — P/N 85850 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
3-Port Data Module (3-DCI) — P/N 92258 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Main VAU Module — P/N 92136 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
VAU Expansion Board — P/N 92137 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
2-OPX Module — P/N 92177 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
3-Port Analog Interface (3-ACI) — P/N 92259 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Wall Mount Kit — P/Ns 92559 and 85409 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Labelmaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
704i Common Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Main Cabinet — P/N 92100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Expansion Cabinet — P/N 92120 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
XL Main Power Supply — P/N 92106A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
XL Expansion Power Supply — P/N 92126A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Ring Supply Cable and Power Supply — P/Ns 92111 and 85870A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
TAPI Kit — P/N 92966B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Windows-Based Remote Programming Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Remote Programming Kit — P/Ns 92366 (US) and 92366 (REM/KIT) (Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . .27
InDepth and inDepth+ — P/Ns 94100A and 94105A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
inView LAN Wallboard Software (P/Ns 94130 and 94131UP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
inDepth+ Sub-Supervisor Authorization Code (P/N 94110A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Product Description
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2
Section 2: The Components
704i Common PCBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
CPU PCB with System Software — P/N 92132 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
4PGDU Page/Door Box (4 Circuit) PCB — P/N 92135 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
CDTU-A Conference/DTMF Receiver PCB — P/N 92140 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
CDTU-B DTMF Receiver PCB (w/o Conference) — P/N 92145 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
CDTU-C Conference PCB (w/o DTMF Receivers) — P/N 92150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
4LAPBU Open Architecture Interface PCB — P/N 92156 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
704i Station PCBs
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
32DSTU Digital Station PCB (32 Circuit) — P/N 92380 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
16DSTU Digital Station PCB (16 Circuit) — P/N 92180A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
24ASTU Analog Station PCB (24 Circuit) — P/N 92375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
16ASTU Analog Station PCB (16 Circuit) — P/N 92175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
8ASTU Analog Station PCB (8 Circuit) — P/N 92176 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
16ASTU-B Analog Message Wait PCB (16 Circuit) — P/N 92178A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Message Wait Power Supply PCB — P/N 92112 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
704i 4PACSU Traveler Interface PCB — P/N 92330 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
96FU Station Filter Unit (96 Circuit) — P/N 92365 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
48FU Station Filter Unit (48 Circuit) — P/N 92165 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Filter Unit Adaptor Cable — P/N 92367 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
704i Trunk (CO) PCBs
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
8ATRU CO Loop Start PCB (8 Circuit) — P/N 92170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
ATRU-EM E&M Trunk PCBs (4 Circuit) — P/Ns 92186 (2-wire) and 92189 (4-wire) . . . . . . .37
4ATRU-LD DID Trunk PCB (4 Circuit) — P/N 92187 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
T1/PRI Interface PCB (1 Circuit) — P/N 92190A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
T1 Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
PRI Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
2-Circuit BRI Interface PCB — P/N 92191 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
4-Circuit BRI Interface PCB — P/N 92193 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
8-Circuit BRI Interface PCB — P/N 92192 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
4PFTU Power Failure Daughter Board (4 Circuit) — P/N 92174 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
8GSAU Ground Start Daughter Board (8 Circuit) — P/N 92185 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Caller ID Daughter Board (8 Circuit) — P/N 92188 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
24FU Trunk Filter Unit (24 Circuit) — P/N 92160 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
124i Common Equipment
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
124i Cabinet — P/N 92000A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
124i DOS-Based Remote Programming Software — P/N 92096 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
TAPI Kit — P/N 92966B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Remote Programming Kit — P/Ns 92066B (US Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
DDK Installation Cable — P/Ns 82492 (US) and 93090 (Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
InDepth and inDepth+ — P/Ns 94100A and 94105A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
124i Common PCBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
124i Enhanced 32CPRU Central Processing Unit — P/N 92007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
32CPRU Central Processing Unit — P/N 92005 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
EXIFU Expansion Interface — P/N 92029 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
EXCPRU Memory Expansion Module — P/N 92025 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
LAPBU Remote Programming Module — P/N 92006
LAPBU Remote Programming Module with Com Port — P/N 92008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
124i PC Programming Cable Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
4LAPBU Open Architecture Interface PCB — P/N 92056 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
4PGDU Page/Door Box PCB — P/N 92030 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
4DTDU DTMF Receiver / Dial Tone Detection PCB — P/N 92035 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
8
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
28i Common Equipment
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
28i Cabinet — P/N 92700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
28i Power Supply — P/N 92701 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
28i DOS-Based Remote Programming Software — P/N 92796 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
TAPI Kit — P/N 92966B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
DDK Installation Cable — P/Ns 82492 (US) and 93090 (Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
28i Common PCBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Load Factor Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
8CPRU Central Processing Unit — P/N 92705 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
LAPBU Remote Programming Module with Com Port — P/N 92706 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
28i PC Programming Cable Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
4PGDU Page/Door Box PCB — P/N 92030 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
4DTDU DTMF Receiver / Dial Tone Detection PCB — P/N 92035 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
28i/124i Station PCBs
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
8DSTU Digital Station PCB — P/N 92021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
4ASTU Analog Station PCB — P/N 92040 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
124i Enhanced 2PACSU Traveler Interface PCB — P/N 92033 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
28i/124i Trunk PCBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
4ATRU Analog Trunk PCB — P/N 92011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
2EMTU E&M Trunk PCB (2 Circuit) — P/N 92017A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
2DIDU-S DID Trunk PCB (2 Circuit) — P/N 92016A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
T1/PRI Interface PCB (1 Circuit) — P/N 92060A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
T1 Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
PRI Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
2BRIU 2 Circuit BRI Interface PCB — P/N 92061A
4BRIU 4 Circuit BRI Interface PCB — P/N 92062 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
4GSAU Ground Start Daughter Board (4 Circuit) — P/N 92015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Caller ID Daughter Board (4 Circuit) — P/N 92012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Optional Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Product Description
9
2
Section 2: The Components
— For Your Notes —
10
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
Station Equipment
34-Button Super Display
34-Button Display
28-Button Display
28-Button Standard
22-Button Display
22-Button Standard
Digital Single Line
ST4 Analog Telephone
900i Cordless
Traveler
Other Station Equipment
2-OPX
3-ACI
DCI and 3-DCI
Door Box
VAU Module
Video Door Box
PC Attendant Console
DSS Console
Snap In Modules
2
28i
Common PCBs
Station & Trunk PCBs
Digital Station
8DSTU
Central Processing
8CPRU
Remote Programming
LAPBU
Page/Door Box
4PGDU
Dial Tone Detection
Analog Station
4ASTU
Analog Trunk
(Loop Start)
4ATRU
Caller ID
Ground Start
DID Trunks
2DIDU-S
4DTDU
BRI Services
BRI PCB
Product Description
11
Section 2: The Components
704i
Station and
Common PCBs
Trunk PCBs
Analog Trunks
8ATRU
Caller ID
Ground Start (4GSAU)
Power Failure (4PFTU)
Central Processing
CPU
Expansion
Cabinet 2
E&M Tie Lines
Expansion Power
Supply
2ATRU-EM
4ATRU-EM
Digital Stations
16/32DSTU
Analog Stations
8/16/24ASTU
Analog Message Wait
Message Wait PS
DID Trunks
4ATRU-LD
Expansion
Cabinet 1
T1/PRI Services
Expansion Power
Supply
T1/PRI PCB
Paging and Door Box
4PGDU
BRI Services
Conference
BRI PCB
CDTUA/B/C
CPU
Main
Cabinet
Main Power
Supply
Open Architecture
4LAPBU
Traveler
4PACSU
Common PCBs
Station & Trunk PCBs
Digital Station
Central Processing
Expansion
Cabinet 2
32CPRU
Enhanced 32CPRU
Expansion Interface
8DSTU
Analog Station
4ASTU
Analog Trunk
(Loop Start)
EXIFU
Memory Expansion
EXCPRU
Expansion
Cabinet 1
Remote Programming
LAPBU
4ATRU
Caller ID
Ground Start
E&M Tie Lines
2EMTU
DID Trunks
Page/Door Box
2DIDU-S
4PGDU
T1/PRI Services
Dial Tone Detection
Main
Cabinet
4DTDU
Open Architecture
4LAPBU
T1/PRI PCB
BRI Services
BRI PCB
Traveler
2PACS PCB
CPRU
12
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
The Telephones
✍
Make a note. . .
For your convenience. . . there is a Configuration Guide and Parts List and Order
Form at the end of this guide. You should find these forms helpful when selecting system equipment. More detailed tools are also available — ask your Account
Representative for the specifics. In 704i, the total of all station ports used for telephones
and other station equipment cannot exceed 512. In 124i, the total cannot exceed 72. The
total of all station ports in 28i depends on system loading, but in general cannot exceed
20. See Load Factor Calculations on page 54 for more.
34-Button Super Display Telephone – P/N 92773
2
The Super Display Telephone is the system's premier telephone
instrument, featuring an interactive eight-line, twenty-character
display with 12 associated interactive keys. As the Super Display
Telephone user processes calls, the interactive key functions
change to provide intuitive access to the system's most sophisticated features. Every Super Display Telephone has a built in speakerphone for full
Handsfree operation. Handsfree Answerback and Intercom voice-announce capability is
also standard.
The telephone's 24 programmable function keys can be customized by the user for onebutton access to co-workers, features like Paging or Park or specific outside lines. The
Dual LEDs in each programmable key help the user see which calls are for them and
which features are active. Access to other commonly used features is simplified by 14
fixed feature keys.
The Super Display Telephone accepts the following optional snap-in modules:
● The Analog Module (P/N 92767) directly connects modems, cordless telephones,
single line sets or fax machines. The telephone can have either an Analog Module or
a Data Module. See page 19 for more.
● Use the Data Module (P/Ns 92266B and 92267) for CTI applications. The telephone
can have either an Analog Module or a Data Module. See page 19 for more.
● Add a Speakerphone Module (future) if you need full-duplex speakerphone operation on Handsfree calls. This module also provides Off-Hook Voice Announce with
Handsfree Answerback through the telephone speaker. The telephone can have either
a Speakerphone Module or an Off-Hook Voice Announce Module. See page 20 for
more.
● Install an Off-Hook Voice Announce (OHVA) Module (P/N 92765) to enable incoming voice announcements through the telephone speaker while you’re busy on a handset call. The telephone can have either a Speakerphone Module or an Off-Hook
Voice Announce Module. See page 20 for more.
●
Connect a Recording Jack (REJ) Module (P/N 80175) if you need external voice
recording or broadcast capability.
Directly connect DSS Consoles to the Super Display Telephone to set up a complete
one-touch answering station. In addition, the Super Display Telephone has an integrated
Wall/Desk Stand.
Product Description
13
Section 2: The Components
✍
At a glance
Super Display Telephone — Part Number 92773
Function Keys: 24
Accepts DSS: ✔
OHVA Module ✔
Handsfree (Speakerphone): ✔
Analog Module: ✔
Speakerphone Module: ✔
Dual LEDs: ✔
Data Module: ✔
Accepts REJ: ✔
34-Button Display Telephone — P/N 92783
The 34-Button Display Telephone has a two-line, twenty-character display with four interactive soft keys for intuitive feature
access. In addition, the 34-Button Display Telephone has 24
user-programmable function keys (with Dual LEDs) for one-button access to co-workers, features and outside lines. The telephone also provides 10 user-programmable One-Touch (Personal Speed Dial) keys and
14 additional fixed feature keys.
The 34-Button Display Telephone has a built in speakerphone and can accept snap-in
modules. You can also connect DSS Consoles. Like the Super Display, the 34-Button
Display provides Handsfree Answerback, Intercom voice-announcements and has a
built-in Wall/Desk Stand.
✍
At a glance
34-Button Display Telephone — Part Number 92783
Function Keys: 24
Accepts DSS: ✔
OHVA Module ✔
Handsfree (Speakerphone): ✔
Analog Module: ✔
Speakerphone Module: ✔
Dual LEDs: ✔
Data Module: ✔
Accepts REJ: ✔
28-Button Display Telephone — P/N 92763
The 28-Button Display Telephone has a two-line, twenty-character display with four interactive soft keys. In addition, the 28Button Display Telephone has 18 user-programmable function
keys (with Dual LEDs) for one-button access to co-workers, features and outside lines. The telephone also provides 10 user-programmable One-Touch (Personal Speed Dial) keys and 14 additional fixed feature keys.
The 28-Button Display Telephone has a built in speakerphone and can accept snap-in
modules. You can also connect DSS Consoles. Like the Super Display and 34-Button
Display, the 28-Button Display provides Handsfree Answerback, Intercom voiceannouncements and has a built-in Wall/Desk Stand.
✍
At a glance
28-Button Display Telephone — Part Number 92763
Function Keys: 18
Accepts DSS: ✔
OHVA Module ✔
14
Handsfree (Speakerphone): ✔
Analog Module: ✔
Speakerphone Module: ✔
Dual LEDs: ✔
Data Module: ✔
Accepts REJ: ✔
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
28-Button Standard Telephone — P/N 92760
The 28-Button Telephone offers similar capabilities as the 28Button Display Telephone, but excludes the alphanumeric display
and soft keys.
✍
At a glance
28-Button Standard Telephone — Part Number 92760
Function Keys: 18
Accepts DSS: ✔
OHVA Module ✔
Handsfree (Speakerphone): ✔
Analog Module: ✔
Speakerphone Module: ✔
Dual LEDs: ✔
Data Module: ✔
Accepts REJ: ✔
22-Button Display Telephone — P/N 92753
2
The 22-Button Display Telephone features a a two-line, twentycharacter display with four interactive soft keys for intuitive feature access, in addition to 12 function keys with Dual LEDs.
The function keys are user-programmable and can provide onebutton access to co-workers, features and outside lines. The telephone additionally provides 10 user-programmable One-Touch (Personal Speed Dial)
keys and 14 additional fixed feature keys.
The 22-Button Display Telephone has a built in speakerphone, provides Handsfree
Answerback, Intercom voice-announcements and has a built-in Wall/Desk Stand. This
telephone will not accept snap-in modules or DSS Consoles.
✍
At a glance
22-Button Display Telephone — Part Number 92753
Function Keys: 12
Accepts DSS: No
OHVA Module No
Handsfree (Speakerphone): ✔
Analog Module: No
Speakerphone Module: No
Dual LEDs: ✔
Data Module: No
Accepts REJ: No
22-Button Standard Telephone — P/N 92750
The 22-Button Telephone offers similar capabilities as the 22Button Display Telephone, but excludes the alphanumeric display
and soft keys.
✍
At a glance
22-Button Standard Telephone — Part Number 92750
Function Keys: 12
Accepts DSS: No
OHVA Module No
Product Description
Handsfree (Speakerphone): ✔
Analog Module: No
Speakerphone Module: No
Dual LEDs: ✔
Data Module: No
Accepts REJ: No
15
Section 2: The Components
Digital Single Line Telephone — P/N 92550A
The Digital Single Line Telephone offers many keyset features
and conveniences at an analog station set price. Handsfree
Answerback lets users answer Intercom calls without touching
the phone. The four fixed feature keys provide quick access to
many essential features, and the Message Waiting lamp always
shows when there are unanswered messages.
✍
At a glance
Digital Single Line Telephone — Part Number 92550A
Function Keys: 0
Accepts DSS: No
OHVA Module No
Handsfree (Speakerphone): No
Analog Module: No
Speakerphone Module: No
Dual LEDs: No
Data Module: No
Accepts REJ: No
ST4 Analog Telephone — P/N 85403W
You can connect NEC's ST4 or other 2500 type single line analog
sets to the system. The ST4 features attractive styling, a high voltage Message Waiting lamp, Flash key, and Last Number Redial
key. Analog telephones connect to ASTU PCBs (pages 32 and 59)
or 2-OPX Modules (see Other Station Equipment) below. The
ST4 is available in white.
The ST4 is only available in the United States.
Cordless Telephone (900i) — P/N 85456D
The 900i (P/N 85456D) is a 900 MHz digital cordless telephone that
provides mobility, flexibility and convenience for those who spend
much of the workday away from their desk. Fully integrated with
the telephone system, the 900i offers many standard features such as
Park, Do Not Disturb, Hotline, Voice Over and Voice Mail.
Normally paired with a companion keyset for improved one-button
call coverage capabilities, the 900i will also work as a stand-alone
telephone.
Complemented by four fully programmable function keys (with LEDs), the 900i
achieves a whole new level of convenience and mobility. An easy-to-read LCD display,
volume controls, a rechargeable lead acid battery and a handy belt clip round out the
elegant and affordable 900i.
16
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
Snap-In Modules
Super Display, 34-Button Display and both 28
Button Telephone Models accept the following
snap in modules. The telephone can have up to
three modules installed: a Recording Jack
Module, an Analog or a Data Module, in addition to a Speakerphone or an OHVA module.
You can install one of these . . .
● Recording Jack Module (P/N 80175)
The Recording Jack Module connects to an external tape recorder or speaker. Turn to
page 20 for more.
In addition to either one of these . . .
● Analog Module (P/N 92767)
The Analog Module directly connects modems, cordless telephones, single line sets
or fax machines. Turn to page 19 for more.
● Data Module (P/Ns 92266B and 92267)
The Data Module is for CTI/data applications. Turn to page 19 for more.
2
Plus either one of these . . .
● Speakerphone Module (future)
The Speakerphone Module adds a full-duplex speakerphone operation for Handsfree
calls. See page 20 for more on this module.
● Off-Hook Voice Announce (OHVA) Module (P/N 92765)
Install an Off-Hook Voice Announce Module (see page 20) to enable incoming voice
announcements through the telephone speaker while you’re busy on a handset call.
The telephone can have either a Speakerphone Module or an Off-Hook Voice
Announce Module.
Product Description
17
Section 2: The Components
Traveler
Traveler provides integrated wireless PCS communications for the
704i and 124i Enhanced systems. With your Traveler handset and
strategically placed cell units, you'll enjoy the convenience of
crystal-clear PCS communication throughout your large, intrafacility areas. Each Traveler handset features unique built-in features, a 2 line alphanumeric display, call key function, voice mail
key operation, vibration alert, and a lithium ion battery.
The Traveler handsets communicate with strategically placed
Traveler Remote Cell Units. These cell units are in turn wired to
Traveler Interface PCBs in the 704i or 124i Enhanced Main
Equipment. The 704i supports up to 192 simultaneous Traveler
conversations. The 124i Enhanced supports up to 54 simultaneous
Traveler conversations.
The following Traveler components are available:
Traveler Handset without Battery — P/N 85425
The Traveler handset does not include the required rechargeable battery.
Traveler Handset Battery — P/N 85426
One rechargeable handset battery is required for each Traveler handset.
Traveler Remote Cell Unit — P/N 85420
Each cell unit can support up to 3 simultaneous Traveler conversations. The 704i
accepts up to 64 cell units, while 124i Enhanced accepts up to 18.
Traveler Handset Charger — P/N 85429
Each Traveler handset requires a separate charger/base unit.
704i 4PACSU Traveler Interface PCB — P/N 92330
The 4PACSU PCB plugs into a universal slot in the 704i Main or Expansion Cabinets.
Each 4PACSU PCB connects 4 cell units, and each cell unit provides for 3 simultaneous
conversations. The 704i accepts 16 Traveler interface PCBs, for a total of up to 192
simultaneous Traveler conversations.
124i Enhanced 2PACSU Traveler Interface PCB — P/N 92033
The 2PACSU PCB plugs into slots 4, 6, or 8 in the 124i Enhanced Main or Expansion
Cabinets. Each 2PACSU PCB connects 2 cell units, and each cell unit provides for 3
simultaneous conversations. The 124i Enhanced accepts 9 Traveler interface PCBs, for a
total of up to 54 simultaneous Traveler conversations. (When installing a 2PACSU PCB
in slots 4 or 6, the next adjacent slot can only be used for a DTDU or 4LAPBU PCB.)
✍
Make a note. . .
The FCC has mandated additional regulatory requirements on PCS communications
equipment (such as Traveler) that operate in the 1910-1930 MHz range. They have designated UTAM (Unlicensed Transition and Management) to administer these additional
requirements, which include:
● Evaluating the location and suitability of the installation site.
● Completing various forms prior to installation and cutover.
● Obtaining a LVP (Location Verification Process) code for the site prior to programming.
Contact your NEC Sales Representative for more on these additional FCC requirements.
18
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
Other Station Equipment
Data Module (DCI) — P/Ns 92266B and 92267
Data Modules (DCIs) provide 28-Button, 34-Button and
Super Display keysets with data capabilities for Networking,
TAPI, Local and Remote Programming and Station Message
Detail Recording. The Data Module is compatible with the
standard Hayes command set and programmable S and X.25
registers. In addition, the DCI provides some unique integrated data features such as:
● Keyset and Terminal Originated Data Calling
● Telemarketing Dial
● DCI Department Calling (pooling)
● DCI Hotline
● Speed Conversion
There are two versions of Data Modules: Serial and Parallel. The Serial Data Module
(P/N 92266B) has an RS-232-C port for serial data communications. The Parallel Data
Module (P/N 92267) has a 14-pin Centronics connector for parallel communication.
● You can plug a DCI only into a 28-Button, 34-Button or Super Display Telephone.
● The 704i system allows up to 144 Data Modules. The 124i system allows up to 36
Data Modules. In 28i, the system allows up to 36 Data Modules, limited by the system load factor. See page 54 for more on system loading.
● A 28-Button, 34-Button or Super Display keyset can have either a Data Module or an
Analog Module installed, but not both.
● The Data Module does not use a station port.
For information on the 3-port stand-alone data module, see page 22.
Analog Module (DCI-L) — (P/N 92767)
The Analog Module lets you connect a modem, cordless telephone, single line set or fax machine to any 28-Button, 34Button or Super Display keyset. This additional analog port
has its own extension number for Intercom, call Transfer and
other system features.
Using the Analog Module, you could set up a convenience phone at a reception desk
without cabling a separate extension port. Or, you could put a fax machine on your desk
without the cabling and equipment required by a separate analog port installation. If you
need quick internet access, plug your modem into the Analog Module and dial your service provider through the system, without a dedicated outside line.
● A 28-Button, 34-Button or Super Display keyset can have either an Analog Module
or a Data Module installed, but not both.
●
The 704i system allows up to 128 DCI-L Analog Modules. The 124i Enhanced system allows up to 24 DCI-L Analog Modules. The 124i and 28i systems allow up to 4
DCI-L Analog Modules.
●
The Analog Module does not use a station port.
Product Description
19
2
Section 2: The Components
Speakerphone Module — (Future)
Check with your Sales Representative for the availability of this option.
The Speakerphone Module offers 28-Button, 34-Button and Super Display keysets full
duplex Speakerphone capability. This means that both parties on a Handsfree call can
speak simultaneously —providing the same natural conversation available to handset
callers. (Although the telephone is already equipped with a built-in half duplex speakerphone, which seamlessly switches between speak and listen, it does not allow both parties to talk at the same time.) The module also provides Off-Hook Voice Announce with
Handsfree Answerback through the telephone speaker.
● A 28-Button, 34-Button or Super Display keyset can have either a Speakerphone
Module or an Off-Hook Voice Announce Module, but not both.
●
The Speakerphone Module does not use a station port.
Off-Hook Voice Announce (OHVA)
Module — P/N 92765
While busy on a handset call, a 28-Button, 34-Button or
Super Display keyset with an Off-Hook Voice Announce
Module can receive a second call over the built-in speaker and microphone. The user can respond to the second
call just by speaking toward the phone, without hanging up the handset call. (With the
built-in Handsfree Answerback, the phone can receive voice-announcements only when
it is idle.)
● A 28-Button, 34-Button or Super Display keyset can have either an Off-Hook Voice
Announce Module or a Speakerphone Module, but not both.
●
The Off-Hook Voice Announce Module does not use a station port.
Recording Jack Module (REJ) — P/N 80175
Connect a Super Display, 34-Button Display or 28-Button
keyset to an external tape recorder or speaker by adding a
Recording Jack Module (REJ). The REJ output is a miniature
phone connector which you can cable to an AUX level input
on a recorder or page amplifier.
● The REJ does not use a station port.
20
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
PC Attendant Console — P/N 92690
The PC Attendant Console is a Windows-based call processing workstation for "power users" such as attendants and
receptionists. The intuitive graphical interface combined with
tightly integrated keyboard/mouse operation and a rich feature
set ease the burden of handling high call volumes.
The PC Attendant is available as a kit that contains PC
Attendant software and the PC Interface PCB. You install the
kit in a PC of your choosing which meets the following minimum requirements:
- Windows 3.1 or higher
- 486/66 processor
- 8 MByte RAM
- VGA video card with 2 MByte VRAM
- 8 MByte free disk space
- 1 full length ISA slot available on the PC's mother board
You can install up to two PC Attendant Consoles per system.
2
Direct Station Selection (DSS) Console — P/Ns 92755
(110 Button) and 92756 (24 Button)
The DSS Console gives a keyset additional programmable keys
which provide a Busy Lamp Field (BLF) and one-button access
to extensions, trunks and system features. The 110-Button DSS
Console provides an additional 100 programmable keys, while
the 24-Button DSS Console provides 24 programmable keys.
The 110-Button DSS also has 10 fixed feature keys for Paging,
calling Door Boxes, activating Night Service and enabling DSS Console Alternate
Answer. In addition, it has two additional keys that allow "shifting" between the first
and second set of 100 extensions.
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
Product Description
You cannot connect DSS Consoles to 22 Button Telephones.
DSS Consoles do not use a station port.
The 704i allows up to 4 DSS Consoles per extension (64 maximum per system). Up
to 16 extensions can have DSS Consoles.
The 28i and 124i can have 2 consoles per extension (8 maximum per system). Up to
4 extensions can have DSS Consoles.
When installing 110-Button DSS Consoles, the second, third and fourth 110-button
consoles require their own power supply (P/N 92556).
In 704i, the fourth console should be set up for Direct Line Selection (DLS). In 28i
and 124i, the second console should be set up for Direct Line Selection (DLS).
If the extension to which the DSS Console is connected also has a DCI-A/B, DCI-L
Analog Module, OR OHVA module installed, the first DSS Console requires its own
power supply (P/N 92556).
21
Section 2: The Components
Door Box — P/N 92245
The Door Box is a self-contained Intercom unit that is normally placed
near an entrance door. When a visitor at the door presses the Door Box
call button, the system sends chime tones to all extensions programmed to
receive them. In addition to allowing conversation with visitors at the
door, the Door Box also allows remote control of an electric door strike.
● The system allows up to 8 Door Boxes (including Video Door Boxes described below).
● Each Door Box requires a circuit on a PGDU PCB and does not use a Station Port.
Video Door Box — P/N 85850
The Video Door Box is a self-contained video intercom unit
typically used to monitor an entrance door. A visitor at the door
can press the Video Door Box call button (like a door bell) and
the system will send chime tones to all extensions programmed
to receive chimes. In addition, the person with the Monitor
Phone can view the image of the visitor on their monitor. Or,
they have the option of calling the Video Door Box at any time to listen to the sounds and
view the image picked up by the Video Door Box.
● The system allows up to eight Door Boxes (including the standard Door Boxes
described above).
● Each Video Door Box requires a circuit on a PGDU PCB and does not use a Station
Port. Each Video Door Box consists of a separate Door Box and Monitor unit.
● Each Video Door Box provides for up to four optional monitor cameras.
3-Port Data Module (3-DCI) — P/N 92258
The 3-Port Data Module is a stand-alone unit with three
RS-232-C DCI ports. Each port offers the same features and
capabilities as the Serial Data Module.
● In 704i, you can install up to 48 3-Port Data Modules (for
144 additional data ports).
● In 124i, you can install up to four 3-Port Data Modules per cabinet (12 total).
● In 28i, you can install up to three 3-Port Data Modules. This total may be limited by
the system load factor. Turn to page 54 for more.
● Each 3-Port Data Module uses a Station Port.
Main VAU Module — P/N 92136
The Voice Announce Unit provides digital voice recording
and playback capabilities. This enhances the system with:
● The General Message
● Personal Greetings
● Park and Page
● Automated Attendant (without Voice Mail)
● Voice Prompting Messages
● 900 Preamble
● Time, Date and Station Number Check
● ACD Greetings
22
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
The Main VAU Module has three independent channels. This means, for example, the
Automated Attendant can answer and play greetings to three callers simultaneously. The
Main VAU provides 128 seconds of system message storage and 256 seconds of
Personal Greeting storage.
● You can install one Main VAU Module.
● The Main VAU Module uses a Station Port and automatically reserves the next adjacent station port. You cannot use the adjacent port for connecting extensions. In 28i
and 124i, you can install the Main VAU Module in an odd numbered port only.
● In 28i, the capability to install a Main VAU Module may be limited by the system
load factor. Turn to page 54 for more.
VAU Expansion Board — P/N 92137
The VAU Expansion Board plugs into the Main VAU Module and offers an additional
three VAU channels. By adding a VAU Expansion Board, for example, the Automated
Attendant can answer and play greetings to six callers simultaneously. The Expansion
Board also adds another 256 seconds of Personal Greeting storage (512 seconds total).
● You can install one VAU Expansion Board.
● The VAU Expansion Board uses a Station Port (i.e., the adjacent port that is reserved
by the Main VAU Module).
● In 28i, the capability to install a VAU Expansion Board may be limited by the system
load factor. Turn to page 54 for more.
2-OPX Module — P/N 92177
With each 2-OPX Module you get two 2500 type analog circuits for connecting single line sets, modems and fax
machines. It is a stand-alone unit with its own internal DTMF
receivers, ring generator and power supply. The 2-OPX
Module is a true OPX and can connect to telco OL13B/C OPX circuits.
● The 2-OPX uses two consecutive Digital Ports. In 28i and 124i, you can install
2-OPX Modules in odd numbered ports only.
● In 28i, the capability to install a 2-OPX Module may be limited by the system load
factor. Turn to page 54 for more.
3-Port Analog Interface (3-ACI) — P/N 92259
Use the 3-Port Analog Interface (3-ACI) when you need to connect additional Music on Hold sources, External Paging outputs
and auxiliary control circuits. You can also use the 3-ACI for
ACD call recording. The 3-ACI is a stand-alone unit with phono
connectors for the audio options and a miniature phone connector for relay control.
● Each 3-Port Analog Interface uses one Station Port.
● A 704i system can have up to 64 3-ACI Modules. The 28i and 124i can have two
3-ACI Modules.
● In 28i, the capability to install a 3-Port Analog Interface may be limited by the system load factor. Turn to page 54 for more.
Product Description
23
2
Section 2: The Components
Wall Mount Kit — P/Ns 92559 and 85409
If you have Digital Single Line or ST4 telephones that you want to mount on the wall,
you’ll need to order Wall Mount Kits. These kits consist of a secure wall mounting bracket, a snap-in plastic base, handset hanger, short line cord and necessary mounting hardware. There are two types of Wall Mount Kits:
● Digital Single Line Wall Mount Kit (P/N 92559)
● ST4 Telephone Wall Mount Kit (P/N 85409)
All i-Series telephones have integrated Wall/Desk Stands and do not require separate
Wall Mount Kits. Consult with your sales representative for information on additional
hardware that may be required to mount an i-Series telephone to a standard wall plate.
Labelmaker
The -Series Labelmaker consists of template software (P/N 92218D) which, in combination with separately available pre-cut forms allows you to make custom key labels for
each key telephone and DSS Console. These custom labels can include key functions,
Hotline names or your own company's imprinted logo.
The following pre-cut forms are available:
● 34-Button Super Display Telephone Laser Label (P/N 92825-S34)
● 34-Button Telephone Laser Label (P/N 92825-34)
● 28-Button Telephone Laser Label (P/N 92825-28)
● 22-Button Telephone Laser Label (P/N 92825-22)
● 110-Button DSS Console Laser Label (P/N 92825-DSS)
● 24-Button DSS Console Laser Label (P/N 92825-24DSS)
The Labelmaker requires:
● A Windows-compatible sheet fed printer (e.g., laser or ink jet)
● Microsoft Windows 95/98/2000
● Microsoft Excel (Office 97 version or higher)
OR
Lotus 123 Release 5 or higher
24
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
704i Common Equipment
Main Cabinet — P/N 92100
The Main Cabinet is the system's control center. It houses the
Main Power Supply, has eight PCB slots and provides for
connection to trunks and extensions. The first slot in the
Main Cabinet is dedicated to the CPU. The next slot is a universal slot reserved for a Digital Station Card. The remaining
six slots are also universal: you can assign them to any combination of Common, Trunk or Station PCBs. The Main
Cabinet should be floor mounted only.
●
You must plug a Digital Station Card into the first universal slot.
2
Expansion Cabinet — P/N 92120
The Expansion Cabinet has nine additional universal slots.
The system can have two Expansion Cabinets, for a total of
25 universal slots (seven in the Main Cabinet and nine in
each Expansion Cabinet). The Expansion Cabinet mounts on
top of the Main Cabinet or another Expansion Cabinet.
XL Main Power Supply — P/N 92106A
The XL Main Power Supply provides the DC voltage for the Main Cabinet
PCBs and all telephones connected to the Main Cabinet Station PCBs.
XL Expansion Power Supply — P/N 92126A
The XL Expansion Power Supply provides the DC voltage for the
Expansion Cabinet PCBs and all telephones connected to the Expansion
Cabinet Station PCBs.
●
You must order an Expansion Power Supply for each Expansion Cabinet
(2 maximum).
Ring Supply Cable and Power Supply — P/Ns 92111 and 85870A
If the system has ASTU (Analog Station) PCBs connected to devices that must ring,
you'll need a 90V AC ring supply (P/N 85870A) and a Ring Supply Cable (P/N 92111).
● If the analog devices connected to the ASTU PCBs don't need to ring (e.g., an outgoing modem), you don't need a ring supply or ring supply cable.
Product Description
25
Section 2: The Components
TAPI Kit — P/N 92966B
Order the TAPI Kit when you need to set up Computer Telephony Interface (CTI) applications. This kit provides you with a Serial DCI Module (P/N 92266B) and the TAPI Driver
(P/N 94000). When used with TAPI-compliant third party software on your Windows
computer, the driver allows TAPI commands to control your telephone and PC.
The TAPI Driver is compatible with Windows 3.1, Windows 95 and Windows 98. Use
TAPI-compliant third party software such as Symantec’s ACT! as your TAPI application.
Windows-Based Remote
Programming Software
The Windows-Based Remote
Programming Software elegantly
combines the ease-of-use of an allnew programming interface with the
system’s renowned software flexibility. This new breakthrough in system
programming uniquely accommodates
both the technical depth demanded by
the most serious system programmers
with the speed and simplicity required
for CSR and related end-user training.
The unique Graphical User Interface, rich in intuitive graphical buttons and drop-down
menus, consolidates related programming on single or linked screens. For example, the
comprehensive extension editor combines one-touch and programmable key programming on a single screen. Additionally, the Class of Service screen shows all of an extension’s COS options at a glance for easy selection and troubleshooting.
✍
26
The PC you choose for the Windows-Based Remote Programming Software must meet
the following minimum requirements:
● Software
- Windows 95/98/NT
- Internet Explorer 3.0 or higher
● Hardware
- 100 MHz Pentium processor
- 16 MByte RAM
- Video card capable of 800 x 600 display
- 20 MByte free disk space
Make a note. . .
● There are separate Windows-Based Remote Programming Software versions available for:
- 28i/124i software version 6.00.08 or higher (P/N 92095V*.**.**)
- 124i Enhanced (P/N 92097V*.**.**)
- 704i (P/N 92217V*.**.**)
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
Remote Programming Kit — P/Ns 92366 (US) and
92366 (REM/KIT) (Canada)
The Remote Programming Kit contains the components you'll need to set up communications with a DCI port in a remote system. With this kit, you'll get:
Windows-Based Remote Programming Software (P/N 92217).
Modem (P/N 85862C)
DCI to Modem Adaptor Plug (P/N 92268A)
Use this customized null modem adaptor to connect the Modem to a system DCI port.
● Complete installation instructions to help you quickly set up the Remote
Programming Kit.
●
●
●
Note that if you want to use a DCI Module in the remote system, the remote system
must have a 28- or 34-button telephone to accept the module.
2
InDepth and inDepth+ — P/Ns 94100A
and 94105A
InDepth and inDepth+ are Windows-based
Management Information Systems that work in
conjunction with the built in 124i/704i ACD.
These ACD/MIS systems enhance the 124i/704i
ACD with real time statistics and reports on
ACD group traffic patterns and usage. The
inDepth and inDepth+ are an extensive set of
user-configurable Real Time Windows and Reporter subsystems. Refer to Section 3,
Features for more on these powerful enhancements.
InDepth and inDepth+ require:
● 704i with LAPB PCB (P/N 92156)
OR
124i EXCPRU with 4LAPBU PCB (P/N 92056) and software 6.00.08 or higher
OR
124i Enhanced
● Computer with the following:
- Intel Pentium processor or greater
- 16MB RAM or more
- 540MB Hard Drive or more
- CD-ROM drive
- SVGA Monitor (for optimum viewing)
- Sound Card (recommended: Creative Labs Sound Blaster) and Speakers or P.C.
Speaker (for alarms)
- Windows 95 (version 4.00.950A or higher), Windows 98, or Windows NT (version
4 or higher)
- Keyboard and mouse
- Minimum 2 Serial Ports and 1 Parallel Port (1 serial port for the mouse, 1 serial
port for 704i DCI input/event port, 1 parallel port for the dongle)
- Modem and Symantec’s pcANYWHERE for remote programming off site (recommended)
- Display Adapter (recommended: Cirrus Logic Card)
Product Description
27
Section 2: The Components
Certain applications may also require the following optional equipment:
● NE2000 Compatible Network Card (required for multi-supervisor setups)
● Remote Access Module comprising: V34 Modem (28K baud)
● RS232 Lines Drivers (required when the inDepth computer is located more than 60’
from the telephone system)
An inDepth Demo Package (P/N 94106A) including Demonstration Guide is also available.
inView LAN Wallboard Software (P/Ns 94130 and 94131UP)
The inView LAN Wallboard Software provides an agent’s desktop PC with ACD/MIS
wallboard capability. InView software is installed on an agent’s PC, which is then connected via LAN to the inDepth computer. This allows the agent’s PC to display real time ACD
group activity in an on-screen PC wallboard. Refer to Section 3, Features for more on the
power and flexibility of the inView LAN Wallboard. Each PC with an inView LAN
Wallboard installed has the same requirements as the PC dedicated to the inDepth system.
InView is available in the following increments:
● 94130-5
Authorization Code for 5 agents
● 94130-10
Authorization Code for 10 agents
● 94130-15
Authorization Code for 15 agents
● 94130-20
Authorization Code for 20 agents
● 94130-25
Authorization Code for 25 agents
● 94130-30
Authorization Code for 30 agents
● 94130-40
Authorization Code for 40 agents
● 94130-50
Authorization Code for 50 agents
You can upgrade an existing inView installation in the following increments:
● 94131UP-5
Authorization Code for 5 agents
● 94131UP-10
Authorization Code for 10 agents
● 94131UP-15
Authorization Code for 15 agents
● 94131UP-20
Authorization Code for 20 agents
● 94131UP-25
Authorization Code for 25 agents
● 94131UP-30
Authorization Code for 30 agents
● 94131UP-40
Authorization Code for 40 agents
inDepth+ Sub-Supervisor Authorization Code (P/N 94110A)
The inDepth+ Sub-Supervisor extends all the capabilities of the inDepth+ computer to a
second, networked PC. This provides all the inDepth+ capabilities to a second supervisor
without having to install a second inDepth+ system. The inDepth+ Sub-Supervisor PC has
the same requirements as the PC dedicated to the inDepth system (including the NE2000
compatible network card). Refer to Section 3, Features, for more on the Sub-Supervisor.
28
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
704i Common PCBs
CPU PCB with System Software — P/N 92132
Located in the Main Cabinet, the CPU PCB is the control center for
the system. The CPU PCB contains the system's main processor and
the 3 1/2" floppy disk drive used to store and load the system software
and site database. (The system software is provided on two disks, one
for system software and one to store customer data.) The CPU PCB
has the system's reset (warm boot) switch, a load switch used for initial system startup or when upgrading, and diagnostics LEDs. There is
also a 10-pin connector which has BGM and MOH inputs, a relay for
the Night Mode Switch, and additional connectors for terminal programming and the DIM-U diagnostic unit. A Lithium battery on the CPU backs up the
RAM. If commercial power should fail, the system will restart with all the programming
intact. The CPU also has a jumper for selecting the music source and volume controls for
setting the level of Background Music and Music on Hold.
2
For PMSi applications, use CPU PCB w/Software P/N 92132-PMS. Turn to page 122 for
more on PMSi.
4PGDU Page/Door Box (4 Circuit) PCB — P/N 92135
If the system requires Door Boxes, External Paging or alarm/fax sensors, it must have a 4PGDU PCB. Each PCB has four circuits that are
individually switchable between Door Boxes and External Paging.
Every Door Box/External Paging circuit has an associated set of dry
relay contacts. These contacts can control a customer-provided Paging
amplifier or an entrance door strike. Volume controls allow you to set
the level of the External Paging signal or Door Box chimes. The
PGDU also has eight sensors that are individually programmable for
alarm or fax. (See External Alarm Sensors and Fax Machine
Compatiblity on page 117 for more.) A status LED on the outboard edge of the card shows
when the PCB is in or out of service. The 4PGDU requires 16 circuits on a 96FU PCB for
Door Box, Paging or sensor connections. The 4PGDU PCB plugs into a universal slot.
Since the system allows up to two 4PGDU PCBs, you can have:
● Eight Door Boxes, eight External Paging Zones or some combination of the two not
to exceed eight. Each circuit will have an associated set of dry relay contacts.
● 16 alarm sensors, 16 fax sensors or some combination of the two not to exceed 16.
CDTU-A Conference/DTMF Receiver PCB — P/N 92140
Providing Conference, DTMF receiver and dial tone detection capabilities, you should consider the CDTU-A an essential component of
your system. You can set up the system to provide either four-party
or eight-party conferences. The CDTU-A also has 16 DSP circuits
that are programmable (in blocks of four) for either DTMF reception or dial tone detection. Dial tone detection is recommended for
outgoing trunk calls. You'll require DTMF receivers for:
● Analog devices (e.g., single line phones, fax machines and Voice Mail ports) not connected to 2-OPX Modules
Product Description
29
Section 2: The Components
●
●
●
DISA
DTMF DID and tie trunks
T1 circuits with ANI/DNIS
The CDTU-A PCB requires one universal slot. You can install up to eight CDTU PCBs
total per system. A status LED on the outboard edge of the card shows when the PCB is
in or out of service.
CDTU-B DTMF Receiver PCB (w/o Conference) — P/N 92145
Install CDTU-B PCBs when you need additional DTMF receivers or dial tone detection
circuits. This PCB has an additional 16 DSP circuits (like the CDTU-A) but has no
Conference circuits. A status LED on the outboard edge of the card shows when the
PCB is in or out of service.
The CDTU-B PCB requires one universal slot. You can install up to eight CDTU PCBs
total per system.
CDTU-C Conference PCB (w/o DTMF Receivers) — P/N 92150
Each CDTU-C PCB gives the system an additional 4 four-party or 2 eight-party
Conference circuits, but no additional DTMF receivers. If users occasionally complain
that they cannot set up a Conference, you might want to add another one of these PCBs.
Keep in mind that Conference circuits are also used for Voice Over, Reverse Voice Over
and Personal Answering Machine Emulation. Like the other CDTU PCBs, CDTU-C has a
status LED on the outboard edge of the card to show when the PCB is in or out of service.
The CDTU-C PCB requires one universal slot. You can install up to eight CDTU PCBs
total per system.
4LAPBU Open Architecture Interface PCB — P/N 92156
The 4LAPBU PCB provides Open Architecture Interface (OAI) capabilities for Hotel/Motel PMS and the inDepth and inDepth+
ACD/MIS systems. Each 4LAPBU has four OAI circuits. The
4LAPBU PCB has a status LED on the outboard edge of the card to
show when the PCB is in or out of service.
The 4LAPBU PCB requires one universal slot.
30
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
704i Station PCBs
32DSTU Digital Station PCB (32 Circuit) — P/N 92380
Each 32DSTU PCB provides 32 digital station circuits. The
32DSTU has 32 station status LEDs. The LEDs for stations 1-16
are on the main PCB, and the LEDs for stations 17-32 are on the
daughter board. There is an in-service/out-of-service switch on the
outboard edge of the card, as well as an additional LED that shows
when the PCB is in or out of service. The 32DSTU requires 32 circuits on a 96FU PCB for station connections. The PCB is shipped
with two filter cables. The shielded filter cable attached to the
PCB’s daughter board provides connection for station ports 17-32.
The other filter cable is for station ports 1-16.
2
A 32DSTU circuit can directly connect to a:
● Digital system telephone (including the 900i cordless)
● VAU Module
● 3-ACI Module
● 3-DCI Module
● 2-OPX Module
The first 8 32DSTU ports provide 3 64K “B” channels. The remaining 24 ports provide
a single 64K “B” channel. This means that multi-channel devices must be installed in
the first 8 32DSTU ports. These devices include:
● 28-Button, 34-Button, or Super Display Telephone with the following installed:
- DCI Module (serial or parallel)
- DCI-L Analog Module
- Off-Hook Voice Announce Module
● VAU Module, 3-ACI Module, 3-DCI Module, or 2-OPX Module
The 32DSTU requires one universal slot, with 16 maximum per system (512 digital stations). In addition, the first universal slot in the Main Cabinet must have a 32DSTU or
16DSTU installed.
✍
At a glance
32DSTU Digital Station PCB — Part Number 92380
Station ports: 32
96FU circuits required: 32
Product Description
Maximum allowed: 16
24FU circuits required: 0
31
Section 2: The Components
16DSTU Digital Station PCB (16 Circuit) — P/N 92180A
Each 16DSTU PCB provides 16 digital station circuits. The
16DSTU has 16 station status LEDs and an in-service/out-of-service
switch on the outboard edge of the card. It also has an additional
LED that shows when the PCB is in or out of service. The 16DSTU
requires 16 circuits on a 96FU PCB for station connections. A
16DSTU circuit can directly connect to a:
● Digital system telephone (including the 900i cordless)
● VAU Module
● 3-ACI Module
● 3-DCI Module
● 2-OPX Module
All 16DSTU ports provide 3 64K “B” channels, allowing multi-channel devices to be
connected to any port. In addition, the first universal slot in the Main Cabinet must have
either a 16DSTU or 32DSTU PCB installed.
The 16DSTU requires one universal slot, with 16 maximum per system (256 digital stations). The 704i assigns 32 ports to each station PCB (DSTU or ASTU). This means that
each 16DSTU PCB installed uses the first 16 ports of a 32 port block (e.g., 1-16). The
remaining 16 ports in the block (e.g., 17-32) are unavailable. Using the standard number
plan, a 16DSTU PCB installed in the first universal slot supports extensions 301-316.
Extensions 317-332 are unavailable.
✍
At a glance
16DSTU Digital Station PCB — Part Number 92180
Station ports: 16
96FU circuits required: 16
Maximum allowed: 16
24FU circuits required: 0
24ASTU Analog Station PCB (24 Circuit)
— P/N 92375
Each 24ASTU PCB provides 24 analog station circuits.
ASTU circuits directly connect to analog devices like single
line telephones, fax machines and modems. The 24ASTU
has 24 station status LEDs. The LEDs for stations 1-16 are
on the main PCB, and the LEDs for stations 17-24 are on
the daughter board. There is an in-service/out-of-service
switch on the outboard edge of the card, as well as an additional LED that shows when the PCB is in or out of service.
The 24ASTU requires 32 circuits on a 96FU PCB for station
connections, although only the first 24 are used. The PCB is
shipped with two filter cables. The shielded filter cable attached to the PCB’s daughter
board provides connection for station ports 17-24. The other filter cable is for station
ports 1-16.
The 24ASTU requires one universal slot, with 15 maximum per system (360 analog stations). Remember, the first universal slot in the Main Cabinet must have a 32DSTU or
16DSTU installed.
32
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
The 704i assigns 32 ports to each station PCB (DSTU or ASTU). This means that each
24ASTU PCB installed uses the first 24 ports of a 32 port block (e.g., 1-24). The
remaining 8 ports in the block (e.g., 25-32) are unavailable. Using the standard number
plan, a 24ASTU PCB initially installed in the second universal slot supports extensions
317-340. Extensions 341-348 are unavailable.
You can use this PCB for most types of high-voltage Message Waiting analog telephones. When an analog telephone has messages waiting, this PCB switches the 90
VDC signal required to light the telephone’s Message Waiting lamp. The 24ASTU does
not provide the 90 VDC signal, so be sure you have a Message Wait Power Supply PCB
(P/N 92112) installed to provide the Message Waiting voltage for the analog sets.
When connecting DTMF (2500 type) sets, be sure the system has either a CDTU-A
PCB (P/N 92140) or CDTU-B PCB (P/N 92145) to provide DTMF receivers. In addition, the system will require a 90V AC Ring Generator (P/N 85870A) and Ring Supply
Cable (P/N 92111).
✍
At a glance
24ASTU Analog Station PCB — Part Number 92375
Station ports: 24
96FU circuits required: 32
Maximum allowed: 15
24FU circuits required: 0
16ASTU Analog Station PCB (16 Circuit) — P/N 92175
Each 16ASTU PCB provides 16 analog station circuits. The
16ASTU has 16 station status LEDs and an in-service/out-of-service
switch on the outboard edge of the card. It also has an LED that
shows when the PCB is in or out of service. ASTU circuits directly
connect to analog devices like single line telephones, fax machines
and modems. The 16ASTU requires 16 circuits on a 96FU PCB for
station connections.
The 16ASTU requires one universal slot, with 15 maximum per
system (240 analog stations). Remember, the first universal slot in
the Main Cabinet must have either a 32DSTU or a 16DSTU installed.
The 704i assigns 32 ports to each station PCB (DSTU or ASTU). This means that each
16ASTU PCB installed uses the first 16 ports of a 32 port block (e.g., 1-16). The
remaining 16 ports in the block (e.g., 17-32) are unavailable. Using the standard number
plan, a 16ASTU PCB initially installed in the second universal slot supports extensions
317-332. Extensions 333-348 are unavailable.
When connecting DTMF (2500 type) sets, be sure the system has either a CDTU-A
PCB (P/N 92140) or CDTU-B PCB (P/N 92145) to provide DTMF receivers. In addition, the system will require a 90V AC Ring Generator (P/N 85870A) and Ring
Supply Cable (P/N 92111).
✍
At a glance
16ASTU Analog Station PCB — Part Number 92175
Station ports: 16
96FU circuits required: 16
Product Description
Maximum allowed: 15
24FU circuits required: 0
33
2
Section 2: The Components
8ASTU Analog Station PCB (8 Circuit) — P/N 92176
The 8ASTU PCB is identical to the 16ASTU PCB except that it provides only eight
analog circuits (although it uses 16 station ports). Consider using this PCB if your system has a limited requirement for analog devices. The 8ASTU requires 8 circuits on a
96FU PCB for station connections.
The 8ASTU requires one universal slot, with 15 maximum per system. Remember, the
first universal slot in the Main Cabinet must have either a 32DSTU or 16DSTU installed.
The 704i assigns 32 ports to each station PCB (DSTU or ASTU). This means that each
8ASTU PCB installed uses the first 8 ports of a 32 port block (e.g., 1-8). The remaining
24 ports in the block (e.g., 9-32) are unavailable. Using the standard number plan, an
8ASTU PCB initially installed in the second universal slot supports extensions 317-324.
Extensions 325-348 are unavailable.
When connecting DTMF (2500 type) sets, be sure the system has either a CDTU-A
PCB (P/N 92140) or CDTU-B PCB (P/N 92145) to provide DTMF receivers. In addition, the system will require a 90V AC Ring Generator (P/N 85870A) and Ring
Supply Cable (P/N 92111).
✍
At a glance
8ASTU Analog Station PCB — Part Number 92175
Station ports: 8
96FU circuits required: 8
Maximum allowed: 15
24FU circuits required: 0
16ASTU-B Analog Message Wait PCB
(16 Circuit) — P/N 92178A
For systems with most types of analog message waiting telephones,
use the 16ASTU-B PCB. This PCB switches the 90 VDC signal
required to light the Message Waiting lamps on analog telephones
that have messages waiting. You must also have a Message Wait
Power Supply PCB (P/N 92112) installed in the system to provide
the 90 VDC power source. In all other respects, the 16ASTU-B
PCB is identical to the 16ASTU PCB. The 16ASTU-B requires 16
circuits on a 96 FU PCB for station connections.
The 16ASTU-B requires one universal slot, with 15 maximum per
system (240 analog stations). The Message Wait Power Supply PCB also requires one
universal slot. Remember, the first universal slot in the Main Cabinet must have either a
32DSTU or 16DSTU installed.
The 704i assigns 32 ports to each station PCB (DSTU or ASTU). This means that each
16ASTU-B PCB installed uses the first 16 ports of a 32 port block (e.g., 1-16). The
remaining 16 ports in the block (e.g., 17-32) are unavailable. Using the standard number
plan, a 16ASTU-B PCB initially installed in the second universal slot supports extensions 317-332. Extensions 333-348 are unavailable.
34
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
When connecting DTMF (2500 type) sets, be sure the system has either a CDTU-A
PCB (P/N 92140) or CDTU-B PCB (P/N 92145) to provide DTMF receivers. In addition, the system will require a 90V AC Ring Generator (P/N 85870A) and Ring
Supply Cable (P/N 92111).
✍
At a glance
16ASTU-B Analog MWait PCB — Part Number 92178
Station ports: 16
96FU circuits required: 16
Maximum allowed: 15
24FU circuits required: 0
Message Wait Power Supply PCB — (P/N 92112)
Be sure to install a Message Wait Power Supply PCB (P/N 92112)
if the system uses 24ASTU or 16ASTU-B PCB to light message
lamps on analog telephones. This PCB provides the 90 VDC power
source required by Message Waiting. When an analog telephone has
a message, the 24ASTU or 16ASTU-B PCB switches the 90 VDC
lamping voltage to the single line set.
2
The Message Wait Power Supply PCB requires one universal slot,
with one maximum per system. Remember, the first universal slot
in the main cabinet must have either a 32DSTU or 16DSTU PCB.
✍
Make a note. . .
Certain older 704i cabinets may require one Message Wait Power Supply PCB per
shelf. If you have an older cabinet, check with your Sales Representative.
✍
At a glance
Message Wait Power Supply PCB — Part Number 92112
Station ports: 0
96FU circuits required: 0
Maximum allowed: 1
24FU circuits required: 0
704i 4PACSU Traveler Interface PCB — P/N 92330
See Traveler on page 18 for more.
Product Description
35
Section 2: The Components
96FU Station Filter Unit (96 Circuit) — P/N 92365
The 96FU Station Filter Unit has 96 circuit filters, connectors for
6 34-conductor PCB ribbon cables and 4 Amphenol 50-pin connectors for on-premise wiring. The 6 34-pin connectors (CN1CN6) connect through filter circuits to the 4 Amphenol 50-pin
connectors (CNB1-CNB4) as follows:
. . . . . . . . .Amphenol Connectors
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CNB1 (1st 16 pairs)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CNB1 (last 8 pairs)
CNB2 (1st 8 pairs)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CNB2 (last 16 pairs)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CNB3 (1st 16 pairs)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CNB3 (last 8 pairs)
CNB4 (1st 8 pairs)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CNB5 (last 16 pairs)
34-Pin Connectors
CN1
CN2
CN3
CN4
CN5
CN6
The 96FU 34-pin connectors (CN1-CN6) can directly connect only to the ribbon cables
used with the 32DSTU and 24ASTU PCBs. To connect other station and trunk PCBs,
you must use the Filter Unit Adaptor Cable (P/N 92367).
Filter units snap in the cabinets above the universal slots. Each cabinet accepts four filter units.
✍
Make a note. . .
The 34-pin 96FU connectors and the 34-conductor ribbon cables use only the first 32
pins. The last two pins are not used.
48FU Station Filter Unit (48 Circuit) — P/N 92165
A 48FU 48 circuit Station Filter Unit (P/N 92165) is also available. It has 48 circuit filters, connectors for 6 16-conductor station PCB ribbon cables and 2 50-pin Amphenol connectors for
on-premise wiring. The circuits in the first three ribbon cables
connect to the first Amphenol connector. The last three ribbon
cable circuits connect to the second Amphenol connector.
The 48FU 16-pin connectors (CN1-CN6) cannot directly connect to the ribbon cables
used with the 32DSTU and 24ASTU PCBs. To connect the 32DSTU and 24ASTU
PCBs to the 48FU, you must use the Filter Unit Adaptor Cable (P/N 92367).
Filter Unit Adaptor Cable — P/N 92367
Use the Filter Unit Adaptor Cable (P/N 92367) when you need to:
● Connect 32DSTU and 24ASTU PCBs to 48FU Station Filter Units.
OR
● Connect 16DSTU, 16ASTU, and 8ASTU PCBs to 96FU Station Filter Units.
The Filter Unit Adaptor Cable has 2 16-pin connectors on one end and 1 34-pin connector on the other.
36
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
704i Trunk (CO) PCBs
8ATRU CO Loop Start PCB (8 Circuit) — P/N 92170
The 8ATRU PCB supports 8 analog loop start trunk circuits. The
PCB has 8 trunk status LEDs and an in-service/out-of-service switch
on the outboard edge of the card. It also has an additional LED that
shows when the PCB is in or out of service, as well as connectors
for the Power Failure, Ground Start or Caller ID daughter boards.
The 8ATRU requires one universal slot, with 24 maximum per system (192 trunks). The 8ATRU requires 8 circuits on a 24FU PCB for trunk connections.
✍
At a glance
2
8ATRU Loop Start PCB — Part Number 92170
Trunk ports: 8
96FU circuits required: 0
Maximum allowed: 24
24FU circuits required: 8
ATRU-EM E&M Trunk PCBs (4 Circuit) —
P/Ns 92186 (2-wire) and 92189 (4-wire)
The 2ATRU-EM PCB (P/N 92186) connects to 2-wire (four lead)
tie lines. The 4ATRU-EM PCB (P/N 92189) connects to either 2wire (four lead) or 4-wire (six lead) tie lines. Each ATRU-EM PCB
has a four circuit tie line interface and an on-board power supply.
The PCB has 4 trunk status LEDs and an in-service/out-of-service
switch on the outboard edge of the card. It also has an additional
LED that shows when the PCB is in or out of service.
The ATRU-EM requires one universal slot, with 11 maximum per system (44 tie trunks).
For DTMF tie line service, make sure the system also has a CDTU A/B PCB installed.
Each ATRU-EM requires 8 circuits on a 24FU PCB for trunk connections.
✍
At a glance
2ATRU-EM 2-Wire Tie Line PCB — Part Number 92186
4ATRU-EM 4-Wire Tie Line PCB — Part Number 92189
Trunk ports: 4
96FU circuits required: 0
Maximum allowed: 11
24FU circuits required: 8
4ATRU-LD DID Trunk PCB (4 Circuit) — P/N 92187
The 4ATRU-LD PCB supports four Direct Inward Dialing (DID)
trunk circuits. The PCB has 4 trunk status LEDs and an inservice/out-of-service switch on the outboard edge of the card. It
also has and an additional LED that shows when the PCB is in or
out of service. Like the 4ATRU-EM, the 4ATRU-LD has an onboard power supply.
The 4ATRU-LD requires one universal slot, with 24 maximum
PCBs per system (96 DID trunks). For DTMF DID service, make
Product Description
37
Section 2: The Components
sure the system also has a CDTU A/B PCB installed. Each ATRU-LD requires 8 circuits on a 24FU PCB for trunk connections.
✍
At a glance
4ATRU-LD DID PCB — Part Number 92187
Trunk ports: 4
96FU circuits required: 0
Maximum allowed: 24
24FU circuits required: 8
T1/PRI Interface PCB (1 Circuit) — P/N 92190A
✍
Make a note. . .
ISDN is an emerging technology on the leading edge of international digital communications networking. Always check with
your NEC Technical Service Representative before setting up your
ISDN application. Working together will ensure maximum compatibility and reliable ISDN performance.
For T1 and ISDN Primary Rate Interface (PRI) applications, install
a T1/PRI Interface PCB. This PCB has a single 24 channel circuit
which you can configure for either T1 trunking or PRI. The T1/PRI
Interface PCB does not require any 96FU or 24FU connections. Instead, it uses a unique
cable to connect to one of the CSU/DSU kits listed below.
T1 Applications
When set for T1, the T1/PRI PCB gives the system a maximum of 24 trunks in a single
universal slot. These trunks include:
● Loop Start or Ground Start
● DID
● E&M or ANI/DNIS tie lines
T1 gives the system the advantages of advanced digital trunking as well as conserving
universal slots. For example, a system with 12 loop start trunks, two tie lines and six
DID trunks would use up five universal slots. With T1, all these trunks would be available in a single universal slot, freeing up four additional universal slots for stations,
DTMF receivers or options like Door Boxes and External Paging. (ANI/DNIS, DTMF
DID and DTMF tie line service require the installation of CDTU A/B PCBs.)
PRI Applications
If set for PRI, each T1/PRI PCB provides 23 B channels and one D channel (23B + D)
and supports the following PRI services:
● Basic PRI Call Control (BCC)
● Display of incoming caller's name and number
● Routing based on the number the caller dials
● ISDN maintenance functions (e.g., In Service/Out of Service Messaging)
● Speech and 3.1 KHz audio
The T1/PRI Interface PCB requires the CSU/DSU equipment listed below.
1 Port T1/CSU Kit (P/N 92310) provides 24 voice channels. Use this kit for sites that
require only voice call capability. It consists of:
- 704i T1/PRI PCB (P/N 92190A)
38
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
- T-Serve II CSU (P/N 85950)
- T-Serve II Power Supply (P/N 85951)
- CSU/DSU RJ48-DB15 Cable (P/N 85953)
- T1/PRI Installation Cable (P/N 92197)
OR
T1 CSU Kit (P/N 92313) also provides 24 voice channels. Use this kit for sites that
require only voice call capability. It consists of:
- 704i T1/PRI PCB (P/N 92190A)
- T1/PRI Installation Cable (P/N 92197)
- Kentrox Satellite 931 CSU with Power Supply and CO Cable (P/N 85945)
- DB-15 Mod Adaptor for Kentrox Satellite 931 (P/N 85944)
OR
T1/DSU Kit (P/N 92311) provides 24 voice and/or data channels and two V.35 data
connectors. Use this kit for sites that require voice call capability and up to two data
connections. It consists of:
- 704i T1/PRI PCB (P/N 92190A)
- Datasmart DSU Add/Drop Unit (P/N 85955A)
- CSU/DSU RJ48-DB15 Cable (P/N 85953)
- T1/PRI Installation Cable (P/N 92197)
OR
T1 Quad DSU Kit (P/N 92312) provides 24 voice and/or data channels and four V.35
data connectors. Use this kit for sites that require voice call capability and up to four
data connections. It consists of:
- 704i T1/PRI PCB (P/N 92190A)
- Quad Datasmart DSU (P/N 85956)
- CSU/DSU RJ48-DB15 Cable (P/N 85953)
- T1/PRI Installation Cable (P/N 92197)
The 704i T1/PRI Interface PCB uses the first block of 24 consecutive trunks. For example, if you have an ATRU PCB installed for trunks 1-8, the T1/PRI Interface PCB will
automatically use trunks 9-32. If you have ATRU PCBs installed for trunks 1-8 and
17-24, the T1/PRI PCB will use trunks 25-48. The T1/PRI Interface cannot use trunks
9-6 (even if available) since they are not part of a consecutive block of 24 trunks.
The T1/PRI PCB requires one universal slot with 8 maximum PCBs per system (192 T1
trunks or 184 PRI trunks). The PCB has an in-service/out-of-service switch on the outboard edge of the card.
✍
At a glance
T1/PRI Interface PCB — Part Number 92190
Circuits per PCB: 1
Maximum PCBs allowed: 8
24FU circuits required: 0
Product Description
Channels per PCB: 24
96FU circuits required: 0
39
2
Section 2: The Components
2-Circuit BRI Interface PCB — P/N 92191
✍
Make a note. . .
ISDN is an emerging technology on the leading edge of international digital communications networking. Always check with
your NEC Technical Service Representative before setting up your
ISDN application and for the availability of this option. Working
together will ensure maximum compatibility and reliable ISDN performance.
The 2-Circuit BRI Interface PCB provides two 2-channel (2B+D)
circuits for connecting to ISDN BRI services. BRI Services supported include:
● Basic BRI Call Control (BCC)
● Point-to-Point BRI Terminal Connection (no daisy-chaining)
● Point-to-Multipoint BRI Terminal Connection (daisy-chaining)
The BRI Interface PCB has two circuit status LEDs and an in-service/out-of-service
switch on the outboard edge of the card. An additional LED shows when the PCB is in
or out of service. The PCB has four sets of jumpers to set the channel termination and a
dip switch for selecting the function of each circuit (i.e., T-bus or S-bus).
The 2-Circuit BRI Interface PCB connects to the network via an NT1 Network
Termination. The PCB does not connect to a 24FU PCB. The BRI Interface PCB
requires one universal slot. You can install up to 16 PCBs maximum per system (32 BRI
circuits and 64 BRI channels). S-Bus applications require the addition of an S-Bus
Power Supply (P/N 92194).
✍
At a glance
BRI Interface PCB — Part Number 92191
BRI circuits: 2
96FU circuits required: 0
BRI channels: 4
24FU circuits required: 0
4-Circuit BRI Interface PCB — P/N 92193
The 4-Circuit BRI Interface PCB has the same features and functions as the 2-circuit
model, except that it provides four 2-channel (2B+D) circuits for connecting to ISDN
BRI services.
The 4-Circuit BRI Interface PCB connects to the network via an NT1 Network
Termination. The PCB does not connect to a 24FU PCB. The BRI Interface PCB requires
one universal slot. You can install up to 24 PCBs maximum per system (96 BRI circuits and
192 BRI channels). S-Bus applications require the addition of an S-Bus Power Supply
(P/N 92194).
At a glance
BRI Interface PCB — Part Number 92193
BRI circuits: 4
96FU circuits required: 0
40
BRI channels: 8
24FU circuits required: 0
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
8-Circuit BRI Interface PCB — P/N 92192
The 8-Circuit BRI Interface PCB has the same features and functions as the 2-circuit
model, except that it provides eight 2-channel (2B+D) circuits for connecting to ISDN
BRI services.
The 8-Circuit BRI Interface PCB connects to the network via an NT1 Network
Termination. The PCB does not connect to a 24FU PCB. The BRI Interface PCB requires
one universal slot. You can install up to 12 PCBs maximum per system (96 BRI circuits and
192 BRI channels). S-Bus applications require the addition of an S-Bus Power Supply
(P/N 92194).
At a glance
BRI Interface PCB — Part Number 92192
BRI circuits: 2
96FU circuits required: 0
BRI channels: 16
24FU circuits required: 0
2
4PFTU Power Failure Daughter Board
(4 Circuit) — P/N 92174
When Power Failure Transfer is needed, install 4PFTU Power
Failure daughter boards. The 4PFTU is a board that plugs into an
8ATRU loop start trunk PCB. Each 4PFTU gives the system four
power-failure cut-through circuits. When commercial power fails,
relays on the power failure PCB automatically switch the four trunks to four cross-connected analog telephones. When calls ring in on the trunks, they ring the analog telephones directly.
The system allows one 4PFTU PCB per cabinet (3 maximum). With the 4PFTU daughter board plugged in, the 8ATRU PCB cannot be used for either ground start operation
or Caller ID.
✍
At a glance
4PFTU Power Failure PCB — Part Number 92174
PF circuits: 4
Maximum allowed: 3
96FU circuits required: 4
24FU circuits required: 0
ATRU daughter board – replaces ground start or Caller ID on the
ATRU PCB.
8GSAU Ground Start Daughter Board
(8 Circuit) — P/N 92185
The 8GSAU Ground Start Daughter Board converts the eight loop
start circuits on an 8ATRU PCB to ground start operation. Every
8ATRU in the system can have ground start operation, if desired.
With the 8GSAU daughter board plugged in, you cannot use the 8ATRU PCB for either
Power Failure Transfer or Caller ID. Also, you cannot mix ground start and loop start
trunks on the same 8ATRU PCB.
Product Description
41
Section 2: The Components
✍
At a glance
8GSAU Ground Start PCB — Part Number 92185
Ground start circuits: 8
Maximum allowed: 24
96FU circuits required: 0
24FU circuits required: 0
ATRU daughter board – replaces power failure or Caller ID on the
ATRU PCB.
Caller ID Daughter Board (8 Circuit) — P/N 92188
For Caller ID capability, install Caller ID daughter boards on the
8ATRU PCBs. When you add the Caller ID daughter board, all the
trunk circuits on the 8ATRU have Caller ID capability. Every
8ATRU PCB in the system can have a Caller ID daughter board.
With the Caller ID daughter board plugged in, you cannot use the 8ATRU PCB for
either Power Failure Transfer or ground start operation. You can, however, enable or disable Caller ID on a trunk-by-trunk basis in system programming.
✍
At a glance
Caller ID PCB — Part Number 92188
Caller ID circuits: 8
Maximum allowed: 24
96FU circuits required: 0
24FU circuits required: 0
ATRU daughter board – replaces power failure or ground start on the
ATRU PCB.
24FU Trunk Filter Unit (24 Circuit) — P/N 92160
The 24FU Trunk Filter Unit has fuses and MOVs for secondary
lightning protection of 24 trunk circuits. It also has three trunk ribbon cable connectors and an Amphenol connector for cabling those
24 trunks to the telco.
Filter units snap in the cabinets above the universal slots. Each cabinet accepts four filter units.
42
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
124i Common Equipment
124i Cabinet — P/N 92000A
The 124i Cabinet is the system's control center. The
system can have up to three cabinets: the Main Cabinet
and Expansion Cabinets #1 and #2. Each cabinet has 9
slots. In the Main Cabinet, the first slot (called the
CPRU slot) is for the system's Central Processing Unit
(CPRU) PCB. In each expansion cabinet, the first slot
is for the Expansion Interface (EXIFU) PCB. This PCB
allows you to interconnect a multi-cabinet system. The
remaining slots in all cabinets are numbered 1-8. Slots
1-3 are 24-channel digital/analog slots used for combinations of Digital Station (DSTU), Analog Station
(ASTU) or Analog Trunk (ATRU) PCBs. Slots 4-8 are four-channel analog slots used
for Analog Station (ASTU), Analog Trunk (ATRU), BRI Interface, Tie Line (EMTU),
DID Trunk (DIDU), Page/Door Box (PGDU), DTMF/Dial Tone Detect (DTDU), and
the 4LAPBU PCBs. The T1/PRI Interface PCB only uses slot 3, and the Traveler
Interface 2PACSU PCB only uses slots 4, 6 and 8. Refer to 124i PCBs for more information on the system's PCBs.
2
Each cabinet has its own built-in power supply.
124i DOS-Based Remote Programming Software — P/N 92096
Use the 124i Remote Programming Software for local and remote off-line 124i system
programming. Similar to the 28i Remote Software, the 124i Remote Programming
Software has:
●
●
●
●
A graphical full-screen display for easy navigation through system programs.
On-line help describing each programming option.
Soft keys for one-touch access to important features (like saving data).
Remote maintenance tools for uploading and downloading your customer's data.
The 124i Remote Programming Software is available on a single high-density 3 1/2"
diskette (1.44 MByte) and is compatible with any AT class PC or laptop. The Remote
Programming Software User Guide is also contained on the same diskette.
✍
Make a note. . .
● Do not use the 124i DOS-Based Remote Programming Software with 28i, 124i
Enhanced or 704i systems.
● The 124i (version 6.00.08 and above) is also compatible with the Windows-Based
Remote Programming Software (see page 26). Check with your Sales Representative
for availability.
Product Description
43
Section 2: The Components
TAPI Kit — P/N 92966B
Order the TAPI Kit when you need to set up Computer Telephony Interface (CTI) applications. This kit provides you with a Serial DCI Module (P/N 92266B) and the TAPI
Driver (P/N 94000). When used with TAPI-compliant third party software on your
Windows computer, the driver allows TAPI commands to control your telephone and PC.
The TAPI Driver is compatible with Windows 3.1, Windows 95 and Windows 98. Use
TAPI-compliant third party software such as Symantec's ACT! when setting up your
TAPI application.
Remote Programming Kit — P/Ns 92066B (US Only)
The Remote Programming Kit contains the components you'll need to set up communications with a remote system. With this kit, you'll get:
● LAPBU Remote Programming Module with Com port (P/N 92008)
● DOS-Based Remote Programming Software (P/N 92096)
● Modem (P/N 85862C)
● 8-Pin Circular Mini-DIN to Mod-8 Cable (P/N 80893)
● DB25-to-Mod-8 Adaptor (P/N 85981)
● Complete installation instructions to help you quickly set up the Modem Kit.
✍
Make a note. . .
● You must have a Remote Programming (LAPBU) Module in order to use the 124i
Remote Programming Software (Windows or DOS). See 124i Common PCBs for more.
DDK Installation Cable — P/Ns 82492 (US) and 93090 (Canada)
The DDK Installation Cable is a 25 pair cable which has 25 two-conductor DDK connectors on one end and is unterminated on the other. Use these cables to connect telephones, trunks and auxiliary equipment to the system's PCBs. The DDK connectors plug
directly to the PCBs and the unterminated ends punch down in standard color-code
order on 66M1-50 blocks. Generally, you'll need two of these cables for each cabinet.
InDepth and inDepth+ — P/Ns 94100A and 94105A
Available with 124i EXCPRU (software version 06.00.08 and higher) and 124i
Enhanced systems. See page 27 for more.
44
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
124i Common PCBs
Each cabinet has eight PCB slots (see the chart and illustration below). Use digital/analog slots 1-3 for combinations of Digital Station (DSTU), Analog Station (ASTU) or
Analog Trunk (ATRU) PCBs. You should always reserve slot 1 for a DSTU PCB. The
T1/PRI Interface PCB only uses slot 3, and the Traveler Interface 2PACSU PCB only
uses slots 4, 6 and 8. Use analog slots 4-8 for Analog Station (ASTU), Analog Trunk
(ATRU), BRI Interface, Page/Door Box (PGDU), Dial Tone Detect (DTDU), DID
(DIDU), E&M (EMTU), and 4LAPBU PCBs.
2
2DIDU-S (DID Trunk)
or
2EMTU (E&M Trunk)
or
BRI Interface PCB
or
4LAPBU PCB
T1/PRI Interface PCB
2PACSU Traveler Interface PCB
(Slots 4, 6 or 8)
124i Enhanced 32CPRU Central Processing
Unit — P/N 92007
The 124i Enhanced systems use a unique CPU which offers 32-bit
performance, on-board flash memory and a platform for Traveler
wireless PCS communication. The 124i Enhanced 32CPRU PCB is the
system's control center. Located in the Main Cabinet’s first (CPRU) slot,
the 124i Enhanced CPRU PCB incorporates the EXCPRU and LAPBU
daughter board functions and provides:
●
The system's central processing, stored program (ROM) and memory
for the customer's site-specific data.
A load switch for initial system startup or when upgrading system
software.
Battery for short term (14 day) backup of the customer's site-specific data. If commercial power should fail (and the mode switch
is set for hot), the system will restart with all the programming intact.
Music on Hold jumper for selecting an external or internal source for Music on Hold,
in addition to volume Controls for Music on Hold and Background Music.
A MOH relay that provides a contact closure whenever a line is placed on Hold.
Product Description
45
●
●
●
●
Section 2: The Components
●
●
●
●
●
DDK connectors for external Background Music or Music on Hold music sources, as
well as the MOH relay.
An 8-pin DIN connector for PC programming, as well as an additional connector for the
DIM-U diagnostic unit.
A reset switch used to reset the system.
A PC card slot that accepts the PC (PCMCIA) card. Use the PC card to store the customer’s site-specific data and to reload that data to the Flash memory. You can also use
the PC card slot to update system software.
32 Conference circuits.
The CPRU has a Power-On LED and Processor LED on the outboard edge of the card.
The Power-On LED lights (green) when the Main Cabinet is plugged in. The Processor
LED indicates that the processor is running.
32CPRU Central Processing Unit — P/N 92005
The CPRU PCB is the 124i system's control center.
Located in the Main Cabinet’s first (CPRU) slot, the
CPRU PCB provides:
● The system's central processing, stored program (ROM)
and memory for the customer's site-specific data.
● Mode switch for hot (customer data) or cold (default
data) start on power-up.
● Battery for short term (14 day) backup of the customer's site-specific data. If commercial power should fail (and the mode switch is set for hot), the system will restart
with all the programming intact.
● Music on Hold jumper for selecting an external or internal source for Music on Hold,
in addition to volume Controls for Music on Hold and Background Music.
● DDK connectors for external Background Music or Music on Hold music sources.
● An additional connector for the DIM-U diagnostic unit.
● 32 Conference circuits.
The CPRU has a Power-On LED and Processor LED on the outboard edge of the card.
The Power-On LED lights (green) when the Main Cabinet is plugged in. The Processor
LED flashes slowly (red) after initial power-up.
EXIFU Expansion Interface — P/N 92029
Use the EXIFU Expansion Interface to link the
Expansion Cabinets to the Main Cabinet. The EXIFU
installs in the CPRU slot in place of the CPRU PCB in
Expansion Cabinets #1 and #2. The ribbon cables on the
EXIFU connect to the cabinet beneath it. For example,
the EXIFU ribbon cables in Expansion Cabinet #2 connect to the top of Expansion Cabinet #1. The EXIFU ribbon cables in Expansion Cabinet #1 connect to the top of
the Main Cabinet. You'll need one EXIFU Expansion
Interface in each Expansion Cabinet.
46
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
124i PCB Configuration
Max Trunks = 52
Max. Extensions = 72
Item
Description
Location
Max.
32CPRU
8DSTU
4ASTU
2PACSU
4ATRU
2DIDU-S
2EMTU
T1/PRI
2BRI
4BRI
4CIDU
4GSAU
4PGDU
4DTDU
EXIFU
EXCPRU
LAPBU
4LAPBU
Product Description
Central
Processing Unit
8 Digital Stations
CPRU slot in
1
Main
Slots 1-3 in any
3 per cabinet
cabinet
9 per system
4 Analog Stations Slots 1-8 in any
8 per cabinet
cabinet
15 (with DSTU) or
16 (w/o DSTU) per
system
Traveler
Slots 4, 6, or 8
3 per cabinet
Interface PCB
in any cabinet
9 per system
4 Analog Trunks
Slots 1-8 in any
8 per cabinet
cabinet
13 per system
DID Trunks
Slots 4-8 in any
5 per cabinet
cabinet
13 per system
(26 trunks)
E&M Tie Trunk
Slot 4-8 in any
5 per cabinet
cabinet
13 per system
(26 trunks)
T1/PRI Interface
Slot 3 in any
1 per cabinet
PCB
cabinet
2 per system
(48 trunks)
2 Circuit
Slots 4-8 in any
5 per cabinet
BRI Interface
cabinet
13 per system
PCB
26 BRI circuits
4 Circuit
Slots 4, 6, 8 in any 3 per cabinet
BRI Interface
cabinet
9 per system
PCB
36 BRI circuits
Caller ID
1 per 4ATRU
8 per cabinet
Daughter Board
Trunk PCB
13 per system
OR
Ground Start
1 per 4ATRU
8 per cabinet
Daughter Board
Trunk PCB
13 per system
4 Page/Door Box Slots 4-8 in any
2 per system
cabinet
Dial Tone Detect Slots 4-8 in any
2 per system
cabinet
Expansion
CPRU slot in 1 per exp. cabinet
Interface
Expansion
2 per system
Cabinet
CPRU Memory Installs on 92005
1 per system
Expansion
CPRU PCB
LAPBU Unit
Installs on 92005
1 per system
CPRU PCB
4 Circuit
Slots 4-8 in any
2 per system
OAI PCB
cabinet
2
47
Section 2: The Components
EXCPRU Memory Expansion Module — P/N 92025
The EXCPRU Memory Expansion Module is a daughter board that
plugs into the P/N 92005 CPRU PCB. It provides the system with
advanced capabilities, including:
● Automatic Call Distribution (ACD)
● Tie lines
● ISDN Capability
● T1
Install the EXCPRU Module on the CPRU PCB if you need any of these capabilities.
The EXCPRU Module is not required with the 124i Enhanced CPRU (P/N 92007).
LAPBU Remote Programming Module — P/N 92006
LAPBU Remote Programming Module with Com Port
— P/N 92008
You'll need to install the LAPBU Remote Programming Module if you
want to use the 124i Remote Programming Software (local or remote).
Like the EXCPRU Module, the LAPBU Module is also a daughter
board that plugs in the P/N 92005 CPRU PCB. You can install both
the LAPBU and EXCPRU Modules on the same CPRU PCB. The
LAPBU Remote Programming Module is not required with the 124i
Enhanced CPRU (P/N 92007). There are two versions of the LAPBU
Module: P/N 92008 has a built-in RS-232 serial communications port,
P/N 92006 does not.
124i PC Programming Cable Sets
DB9-to-8-Pin PC Cable Set (P/N 92009-DB9)
This cable set consists of the following two components:
● 8-Pin Circular Mini-DIN to Mod-8 Cable (P/N 80893)
This 10’ long cable has an 8-pin DIN connector on one end (for connecting to the
LAPBU) and a standard 8-pin modular plug on the other end.
● DB9-to-Mod-8 Adaptor (P/N 85980)
One end of this adaptor accepts an 8-pin modular plug. The other end is a standard
DB9 female connector that you can plug into the 9-pin PC RS232 port typically
found on a laptop PC.
DB25-to-8-Pin Modem Cable Set (P/N 92009-DB25)
This cable set consists of the following two components:
● 8-Pin Circular Mini-DIN to Mod-8 Cable (P/N 80893)
This 10’ long cable has an 8-pin DIN connector on one end (for connecting to the
LAPBU) and a standard 8-pin modular plug on the other end.
● DB25-to-Mod-8 Adaptor (P/N 85981)
One end of this adaptor accepts an 8-pin modular plug. The other end is a standard
DB25 male connector that you can plug into a 25-pin PC RS232 port typically found
on a modem (for remote programming).
48
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
4LAPBU Open Architecture Interface PCB — P/N 92056
The 4LAPBU PCB provides Open Architecture Interface (OAI) capabilities for Hotel/Motel PMS and the inDepth and inDepth+
ACD/MIS systems. Each 4LAPBU has four OAI circuits. The
4LAPBU PCB has a status LED on the outboard edge of the card to
show when the PCB is in or out of service.
The 4LAPBU PCB installs in slots 4-8 in any cabinet, with 2 maximum per system.
4PGDU Page/Door Box PCB
— P/N 92030
The 4PGDU Page/Door Box PCB is a multifunction
PCB which adds External Paging and Door Box
options to the system. This PCB provides:
● DDK connectors for four External Paging Zones or
Door Boxes.
● Selector switches to enable each port for External
Paging or Door Box. Each of the four PCB ports can be either an External Paging
port or a Door Box port — not both.
● DDK connectors for four dry contact External Paging control relays (one for each
zone). These contacts can control a customer-provided Paging amplifier or an
entrance door strike.
● Volume controls for setting the level of each External Paging/Door Box circuit.
● DDK connectors for four individually programmable alarm/fax sensors. (See External
Alarm Sensors and Fax Machine Compatiblity on page 117 for more.)
✍
At a glance
4PGDU Page/Door Box PCB — Part Number 92030
Maximum allowed: 2 per cabinet
2 per system
Uses slots: 4-8
The 124i system allows up to two PGDU PCBs, plugged into slots 4-8 in any installed
cabinet. This means you can have eight External Paging zones, eight Door Boxes or
some combination of the two not to exceed eight. In addition, you can have eight alarm
sensors, eight fax sensors or some combination of the two not to exceed eight.
Product Description
49
2
Section 2: The Components
4DTDU DTMF Receiver / Dial Tone
Detection PCB — P/N 92035
Use the 4DTDU PCB if you need outbound dial tone
detection. (In the default program, outbound dial tone
detection is disabled.) The 4DTDU also provides
DTMF receivers for the following trunk types:
● DISA
● DTMF DID
● DTMF tie lines
● T1 DNIS, DTMF DID and DTMF tie lines
You don't need a 4DTDU for analog station DTMF receivers or Conference circuits.
The DTMF receivers are included on the 4ASTU PCBs. Conference circuits are on the
32CPRU PCB.
There is a status LED on the outboard edge of the DTDU PCB which indicates that the
board is functioning properly.
The 124i system allows up to two DTDU PCBs, plugged into slots 4-8 in any installed
cabinet.
✍
At a glance
4DTDU Dial Tone Detection PCB — Part Number 92035
Maximum allowed: 2 per cabinet
2 per system
Uses slots: 4-8
50
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
28i Common Equipment
28i Cabinet — P/N 92700
The compact 28i cabinet contains the power supply and
all the system PCBs. The 28i cabinet has five PCB slots.
Slot 1 is reserved for the system's Central Processing
Unit (8CPRU) PCB. (This PCB also provides 8 digital
stations.) Slot 2 is a 24-channel digital/analog slot used
for a Digital Station (DSTU), Analog Station (ASTU),
and Analog Trunk (ATRU) PCBs. Slots 3-5 are fourchannel analog slots that accept all system PCBs except
the DSTU and 8CPRU. All of these PCBs (with the
exception of the 8CPRU) are the same as those used in
the 124i.
2
The 28i system has the same feature capabilities as the comparable level of 124i base
software. All features available in the 124i base are available in a 28i system with the
same software level.
28i Power Supply — P/N 92701
The 28i Power Supply PCB provides the DC voltages for the 28i
Cabinet PCBs and all telephones connected to the 28i Cabinet
Station PCBs.
28i DOS-Based Remote Programming Software —
P/N 92796
Use the 28i Remote Programming Software for local and remote
off-line 28i system programming. Similar to the 124i Remote
Software, the 28i Remote Programming Software has:
● A graphical full-screen display for easy navigation through system programs.
● On-line help describing each programming option.
● Soft keys for one-touch access to important features (like saving data).
● Remote maintenance tools for uploading and downloading your customer's data.
The 28i Remote Programming Software is available on a single high-density 3 1/2"
diskette (1.44 MByte) and is compatible with any AT class PC or laptop. The Remote
Programming Software User Guide is also contained on the same diskette.
✍
Make a note. . .
● You must have a Remote Programming (LAPBU) Module with Com Port (P/N 92706)
in order to use the 28i Remote Programming Software. See page 55 for more.
● Do not use the 28i Remote Programming Software with 124i,124i Enhanced or 704i.
● The 28i (software version 06.00.08 and above) is also compatible with the
Windows-Based Remote Programming Software (see page 26). Check with your
Sales Representative for availability.
Product Description
51
Section 2: The Components
TAPI Kit — P/N 92966B
The 28i uses the same TAPI kit as the 124i and 704i. Use this TAPI Kit when you need
to set up Computer Telephony Interface (CTI) applications. This kit provides you with a
Serial DCI Module (P/N 92266B) and the TAPI Driver (P/N 94000). When used with
TAPI-compliant third party software on your Windows computer, the driver allows TAPI
commands to control your telephone and PC.
The TAPI Driver is compatible with Windows 3.1, Windows 95 and Windows 98. Use
TAPI-compliant third party software such as Symantec's ACT! when setting up your TAPI
application.
DDK Installation Cable — P/Ns 82492 (US) and 93090 (Canada)
The DDK Installation Cable is a 25 pair cable which has 25 two-conductor DDK connectors on one end and is unterminated on the other. Use these cables to connect telephones, trunks and auxiliary equipment to the system's PCBs. The DDK connectors plug
directly to the PCBs and the unterminated ends punch down in standard color-code
order on 66M1-50 blocks. Generally, you'll need two of these cables for a 28i system.
52
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
28i Common PCBs
Each cabinet has five PCB slots (see the chart and illustration below). Slot 1 is for the
Central Processing Unit (8CPRU) PCB, which also provides 8 digital stations. Use digital/analog slot 2 for a Digital Station (DSTU), Analog Station (ASTU), or Analog Trunk
(ATRU) PCB. Use analog slots 3-5 for any PCBs except for the DSTU and CPRU PCBs.
0-
01
70
92
8CPRU with optional
LAPB PCB
4 ASTU (Analog Station)
or
4 ATRU (Analog Trunk)
or
4 PDGU (Page/Door Box)
or
4 DTDU (Dial Tone Det.)
or
2 DIDU (DID)
or
2 or 4 BRIU (BRI Trunk)
1
2
3
4
2
5
8 DSTU (Digital Station)
or
4 ASTU (Analog Station)
or
4 ATRU (Analog Trunk)
28i PCB Configuration
Max Trunks = 16
Max. Extensions = 20
Item
Description
Location
Max.
8CPRU
8DSTU
4ASTU
4ATRU
2DIDU
2BRIU
4BRIU
4PGDU
4DTDU
LAPBU
4GSAU
4CIDU
Product Description
Central Processing
Slot 1
Unit and 8
Digital Stations
8 Digital Stations
Slot 2
4 Analog Stations
Slots 2-5
4 Analog Trunks
Slots 2-5
2 DID Trunks
Slots 3-5
2 BRI Circuits
Slots 3-5
4 BRI Circuits
Slots 3-5
4 Page/Door Box
Slots 3-5
Dial Tone Detect
Slots 3-5
LAPBU Unit
Installs on CPRU
Ground Start
Installs on
4ATRU PCB
Caller ID
Installs on
4ATRU PCB
1
1
2
4
2
3
3
2
2
1
1 per PCB
4 per system
1 per PCB
4 per system
53
Section 2: The Components
Load Factor Calculations
The 28i is unique because the maximum system configuration depends on the components you have installed. Each component has a load factor (i.e., power requirement), as
outlined in the table below. To find out if you have an acceptable configuration:
● Don’t install more than 2 station PCBs. (This is the total of DSTU and ASTU PCBs.)
Note that the 2 station PCBs are in addition to the 8CPRU PCB.
● Don’t connect more than 20 telephones. (This is the total of all analog telephones
and keysets.)
● Review the chart below and write down the load factor of each component installed.
● Add up the load factor total.
● If the load factor totals 23 or less (and you have met the other requirement above),
you have an acceptable configuration.
OR
If the load factor is more than 23, you’ll have to eliminate some components to
bring it in line — or consider switching to a 124i.
Load Factor Worksheet
Component
Part
Number
Load
Factor
Any key telephone
1
110 Button DSS Console
92755
1.5
24 Button DSS Console
TBD
1
Door Box
92245
0
Video Door Box
85850
0
Main VAU Module
92136
2
VAU Expansion Board
92137
.5
2-OPX Module
92177
4
3-ACI Module
92259
.5
3-DCI Module
92258
2
DCI-L Module
92767
3
All other snap-in modules
.5
2DIDU DID PCB
92016
8
4ASTU PCB
92040
3
(Each SLT adds an additional load factor of 1)
4PGDU PCB
92030
.5
2BRI PCB
92061A
8 (4 per ckt)
(For S-Bus terminals, add 1 per terminal)
4BRI PCB
92062
16 (4 per ckt)
(For S-Bus terminals, add 1 per terminal)
All other PCBs
0
Total load cannot exceed 23.
54
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
✍
Make a note. . .
Always be aware of the load factor when you are expanding the system. For example, a
system with an 8CPRU, 8DSTU and 4ASTU with all telephones connected has a load
factor of 23 (which is acceptable). You cannot, however, add snap-in modules or a 2OPX Module without exceeding the allowable load factor.
8CPRU Central Processing Unit — P/N 92705
The 8CPRU PCB is the system's control center. Located in the first
(CPRU) slot, the 8CPRU PCB provides:
● The system's central processing, stored program (ROM) and memory for the customer's site-specific data.
● Circuitry and DDK connectors for eight digital stations.
● Mode switch for hot (customer data) or cold (default data) start
on power-up.
● A system reset switch.
● Battery for short term (14 day) backup of the customer's site-specific data. If commercial power should fail (and the mode switch is
set for hot), the system will restart with all the programming intact.
● Music on Hold jumper which allows selecting an external or
internal source for Music on Hold.
● DDK connector for an external Music on Hold/Background Music source.
● Volume Control for the external music source.
● An additional connector for the DIM-U diagnostic unit.
2
The CPRU has a Power-On LED and Processor LED on the outboard edge of the card.
The Power-On LED lights (green) when the Main Cabinet is plugged in. The Processor
LED flashes slowly (red) after initial power-up.
LAPBU Remote Programming Module with Com Port
— P/N 92706
You'll need to install the LAPBU Remote Programming Module
if you want to use the 28i Remote Programming Software (local
or remote). The LAPBU Module is a daughter board that plugs
in the 8CPRU PCB. You connect the programming PC or modem
to the LAPBU using one of the cable sets listed below.
28i PC Programming Cable Sets
DB9-to-8-Pin PC Cable Set (P/N 92708-DB9)
This cable set consists of the following two components:
● 8-Pin DIN to Mod-8 Connector (P/N 92707A)
This 10’ long cable has an 8-pin DIN right angle connector on one end (for connecting to the LAPBU) and a standard 8-pin modular plug on the other end.
● DB9-to-Mod-8 Adaptor (P/N 85980)
One end of this adaptor accepts an 8-pin modular plug. The other end is a standard
DB9 female connector that you can plug into a 9-pin PC RS232 port t typically found
on a laptop PC.
Product Description
55
Section 2: The Components
DB25-to-8-Pin Modem Cable Set (P/N 92708-DB25)
This cable set consists of the following two components:
● 8-Pin DIN to Mod-8 Connector (P/N 92707A)
This 10’ long cable has an 8-pin DIN right angle connector on one end (for connecting to the LAPBU) and a standard 8-pin modular plug on the other end.
● DB25-to-Mod-8 Adaptor (P/N 85981)
One end of this adaptor accepts an 8-pin modular plug. The other end is a standard
DB25 male connector that you can plug into a 25-pin PC RS232 port typically found
on a modem (for remote programming).
4PGDU Page/Door Box PCB — P/N 92030
The 4PGDU Page/Door Box PCB is a multifunction
PCB which adds External Paging and Door Box
options to the system. This is the same PCB used in
the 124i. This PCB provides:
● DDK connectors for four External Paging Zones or
Door Boxes.
● Selector switches to enable each port for External
Paging or Door Box. Each of the four PCB ports can be either an External Paging
port or a Door Box port — not both.
● DDK connectors for four dry contact External Paging control relays (one for each
zone). These contacts can control a customer-provided Paging amplifier or an
entrance door strike.
● Volume controls for setting the level of each External Paging/Door Box circuit.
● DDK connectors for four individually programmable alarm/fax sensors. (See External
Alarm Sensors and Fax Machine Compatiblity on page 117 for more.)
✍
At a glance
4PGDU Page/Door Box PCB — Part Number 92030
Maximum allowed: 2 per system
Uses slots: 3-5
The 28i system allows up to two PGDU PCBs, plugged into slots 3-5. This means you
can have eight External Paging zones, eight Door Boxes or some combination of the
two not to exceed eight. In addition, you can have eight alarm sensors, eight fax sensors
or some combination of the two not to exceed eight.
56
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
4DTDU DTMF Receiver / Dial Tone
Detection PCB — P/N 92035
Use the 4DTDU PCB if you need outbound dial tone
detection. (In the default program, outbound dial tone
detection is disabled.) This is the same PCB used in
the 124i. The 4DTDU also provides DTMF receivers
for the following trunk types:
● DISA
● DTMF DID
You don't need a 4DTDU for analog station DTMF receivers or Conference circuits.
The DTMF receivers are included on the 4ASTU PCBs. Conference circuits are on the
8CPRU PCB.
There is a status LED on the outboard edge of the DTDU PCB which indicates that the
board is functioning properly. The 28i system allows up to two DTDU PCBs, plugged
into slots 3-5.
✍
At a glance
4DTDU Dial Tone Detection PCB — Part Number 92035
Maximum allowed: 2 per system
Uses slots: 3-5
Product Description
57
2
Section 2: The Components
28i/124i Station PCBs
8DSTU Digital Station PCB — P/N 92021
Each 8DSTU Digital Station PCB provides eight digital station circuits and associated DDK connectors for
connecting any of the following devices:
● Digital system telephone (including the 900i
cordless)
● VAU Module
● 3-ACI Module
● 3-DCI Module
● 2-OPX Module
In 124i, you can plug an 8DSTU PCB into slots 1-3 in any cabinet. Each cabinet can
have up to three 8DSTU PCBs (24 stations maximum). The system (all three cabinets)
can have up to nine 8DSTU PCBs (72 stations maximum). You should normally reserve
slot 1 in the Main Cabinet for an 8DSTU PCB.
In 28i: you can install an 8DSTU PCB in slot 2. Always observe the load factor requirements when installing 28i system components.
✍
At a glance
8DSTU Digital Station PCB — Part Number 92021
Maximum allowed: 124i: 3 per cabinet, 9 per system
28i: 1 per system
Uses slots: 124i: 1-3, 28i: 2
58
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
4ASTU Analog Station PCB — P/N 92040
The 4ASTU PCB provides four analog station circuits
and associated DDK connectors for connecting analog
devices like single line telephones, fax machines,
modems and voice mail ports.
Remember:
● Two DTMF receivers are built into each ASTU
PCB. You do not need to add DTDU PCBs to get
DTMF reception for analog devices.
● Slot 1 in the 124i Main Cabinet is normally reserved for an 8DSTU PCB.
● 4ASTU PCBs do not require a ring generator — it is generated on each PCB.
There is a status LED on the outboard edge of the DTDU PCB which indicates that the
board is functioning properly.
In 124i: you can plug a 4ASTU PCB into slots 1-8 in any cabinet. Each cabinet can
have up to eight 4ASTU PCBs (32 stations maximum). The system (all three cabinets)
can have up to 16 4ASTU PCBs (64 analog stations). With one 8DSTU installed, the
system can support 15 ASTU PCBs and up to 66 analog stations (if you connect three 2OPX Modules to the DSTU installed in the Main Cabinet slot 1).
In 28i: you can install a 4ASTU PCB in slots 2-5 (two PCBs and 8 analog stations maximum). Always observe the load factor requirements when installing 28i system components.
✍
At a glance
4ASTU Analog Station PCB — Part Number 92040
Maximum allowed: 124i: 8 per cabinet (except Main). 16 per system
15 per system with DSTU installed
28i: 2 per system
Uses slots: 124i: 1-8, 28i: 2-5
✍
Make a note. . .
In124i, the total of all digital station (DSTU) and analog station (ASTU) ports installed cannot exceed 72. You should always reserve slot 1 in the Main Cabinet for an 8DSTU PCB.
124i Enhanced 2PACSU Traveler Interface PCB — P/N 92033
For 124i Enhanced systems only. See Traveler on page 18 for more.
Product Description
59
2
Section 2: The Components
28i/124i Trunk PCBs
4ATRU Analog Trunk PCB — P/N 92011
When you need to connect loop start analog trunks to
the system, install 4ATRU Analog Trunk PCBs. Each
PCB provides four analog trunk circuits and associated
DDK connectors. There is a status LED on the 4ATRU
PCB which indicates that the board is functioning
properly. The 4ATRU PCB accepts either a Ground
Start or Caller ID daughter board and provides a DDK
connector for power failure cut-through.
✍
At a glance
4ATRU Analog Trunk PCB — Part Number 92011
Maximum allowed: 124i: 8 per cabinet (except Main), 13 per system
28i: 4 per system
Uses slots: 124i: 1-8, 28i: 2-5
In 124i, you can plug 4ATRU PCBs into either digital/analog or analog slots in any cabinet. Since slot 1 in the Main Cabinet is normally reserved for an 8DSTU PCB, the
Main Cabinet can have up to seven 4ATRU PCBs (28 trunks) maximum. Each expansion cabinet can have up to eight 4ATRU PCBs (32 trunks) maximum. The system can
have up to 13 4ATRU PCBs (52 trunks) maximum.
In 28i, you can plug 4ATRU PCBs into slots 2-5. The system can have up to four
4ATRU PCBS (16 trunks) maximum. Always observe the load factor requirements when
installing 28i system components.
2EMTU E&M Trunk PCB (2 Circuit) — P/N 92017A
Use the 2EMTU PCB if the system connects to two 2-wire
(four-lead) or 4-wire (six lead) E&M tie lines. Each
2EMTU has two tie line interfaces and an on-board power
supply. The strapping option on the PCB allows the use of
either Type 1 or Type 2 signaling. The PCB has 2 trunk status LEDs and an additional LED that shows when the PCB
is in or out of service. This PCB is not available in 28i.
The 2EMTU plugs into slots 4-8, with 13 maximum PCBs per system (26 tie trunks).
Each PCB uses up four trunk ports. You can connect to the first two trunk ports (1 and
2) and the system automatically disables the last two (3 and 4).
In 124i, tie lines require the installation of the EXCPRU PCB (P/N 92025). Also
install one or two 4DTDU PCBs (P/N 92035) if using DTMF tie line services.
60
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
✍
At a glance
2EMTU Tie Line PCB — Part Number 92017
Trunk ports: 124i: 2
Uses slots: 124i: 4-8
Maximum allowed: 124i: 13
2DIDU-S DID Trunk PCB (2 Circuit) — P/N 92016A
The 2DIDU-S PCB provides two Direct Inward Dialing
(DID) trunk circuits and associated DDK connectors.
The PCB has an LED that shows when the PCB is in or
out of service. Like the 2EMTU PCB, the 2DIDU-S has
an on-board power supply.
In 124i: the 2DIDU-S plugs into slots 4-8, with 13 maximum PCBs per system (26 DID
trunks). Install one or two 4DTDU PCBs (P/N 92035) if using DTMF DID services.
In 28i, the DIDU-S uses slots 3-5, with 2 maximum PCBs per system (4 DID trunks).
Be sure to install a 4DTDU PCB (P/N 92035) if using DTMF DID services. Always
observe the load factor requirements when installing 28i system components.
✍
At a glance
2DIDU-S DID PCB — Part Number 92016
Trunk ports: 2
Maximum allowed: 124: 13
28i: 2
Uses slots: 124i:4-8, 28i: 3-5
T1/PRI Interface PCB (1 Circuit) — P/N 92060A
✍
Make a note. . .
ISDN is an emerging technology on the leading edge
of international digital communications networking.
Always check with your NEC Technical Service
Representative before setting up your ISDN application.
Working together will ensure maximum compatibility
and reliable ISDN performance. The T1/PRI Interface
PCB is not available in 28i.
For T1 and ISDN Primary Rate Interface (PRI) applications, install a T1/PRI Interface PCB.
This PCB has a single 24 channel circuit which you can configure for either T1 trunking or
PRI. The T1/PRI Interface PCB requires the installation of the EXCPRU PCB (P/N 92025).
Install a 4DTDU PCB (P/N 92035) if using T1 ANI/DNIS, DTMF DID or DTMF tie lines.
T1 Applications
When configured for T1, the T1/PRI PCB gives the system 24 trunks in a single slot
(slot 3 of any cabinet). These trunks can be:
● Loop Start or Ground Start
● DID
● Tie Lines
● ANI/DNIS Tie Lines
Product Description
61
2
Section 2: The Components
T1 gives the system the advantages of advanced digital trunking as well as conserving
slots. For example, a system with 12 loop start trunks, two tie lines and six DID trunks
would use up five universal slots. With T1, all these trunks would be available in a single slot, freeing up two additional slots for stations, DTMF receivers or options like
Door Boxes and External Paging.
PRI Applications
Check with your Sales Representative for the availability of this option.
If set for PRI, each T1/PRI PCB provides 24 PRI channels and supports the following
PRI services:
● Basic PRI Call Control (BCC)
● Display of incoming caller's name and number
● Routing based on the number the caller dials
● ISDN maintenance functions (e.g., In Service/Out of Service Messaging)
● Speech and 3.1 KHz audio
The T1/PRI Interface PCB requires the CSU/DSU equipment and interconnecting cables
listed below.
124i T1/CSU Kit (P/N 92070) provides 24 voice channels. Use this kit for sites that
require only voice call capability. It consists of:
- 124i T1/PRI PCB (P/N 92060)
- T-Serve II CSU (P/N 85950)
- T-Serve II Power Supply (P/N 85951)
- CSU/DSU RJ48-DB15 Cable (P/N 85953)
- 124i T1 Installation Cable (P/N 92067)
OR
T1 CSU Kit (P/N 92079) also provides 24 voice channels. Use this kit for sites that
require only voice call capability. It consists of:
- 124i T1/PRI PCB (P/N 92060)
- 124i T1 Installation Cable (P/N 92067)
- Kentrox Satellite 931 CSU with Power Supply and CO Cable (P/N 85945)
- DB-15 Mod Adaptor for Kentrox Satellite 931 (P/N 85944)
OR
124i T1/DSU Kit (P/N 92071) provides 24 voice and/or data channels and two V.35
data connectors. Use this kit for sites that require voice call capability and up to two
data connections. It consists of:
- 124i T1/PRI PCB (P/N 92060)
- Datasmart DSU Add/Drop Unit (P/N 85955A)
- CSU/DSU RJ48-DB15 Cable (P/N 85953)
- 124i T1/PRI Installation Cable (P/N 92067)
OR
124i T1 Quad DSU Kit (P/N 92072) provides 24 voice and/or data channels and two
V.35 data connectors. Use this kit for sites that require voice call capability and up to
four data connections. It consists of:
- 124i T1/PRI PCB (P/N 92060)
- Quad Datasmart DSU (P/N 85956)
- CSU/DSU RJ48-DB15 Cable (P/N 85953)
- 124i T1/PRI Installation Cable (P/N 92067)
62
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
You can install a 124i T1/PRI Interface PCBs in the third slot of any cabinet with a
maximum of two PCBs per system. The first T1/PRI Interface PCB installed uses the
last available group of 24 consecutive trunks (29-52). The second PCB installed uses
the next available group of 24 consecutive trunks (5-28).
✍
At a glance
T1/PRI Interface PCB — Part Number 92060
Circuits per PCB: 1
Maximum PCBs allowed: 124i: 2
Channels per PCB: 24
2BRIU 2 Circuit BRI Interface PCB — P/N 92061A
4BRIU 4 Circuit BRI Interface PCB — P/N 92062
✍
2
Check with your Sales Representative for the availability of this option.
Make a note. . .
ISDN is an emerging technology on the leading edge of
international digital communications networking.
Always check with your NEC Technical Service
Representative before setting up your ISDN application
and for the availability of this option. Working together
will ensure maximum compatibility and reliable ISDN
performance.
The 2BRI Interface PCB provides two 2-channel circuits for connecting to ISDN BRI
services. The 4BRI Interface PCB provides four 2-channel circuits. BRI Services supported include:
● Basic BRI Call Control (BCC)
● Point-to-Point BRI Terminal Connection (no daisy-chaining)
● Point-to-Multipoint BRI Terminal Connection (daisy-chaining)
The BRI Interface PCB has two sync/status LEDs and an LED that shows when the
PCB is in or out of service. The PCB also has a dip switch for selecting the function of
each circuit (i.e., T or S).
The BRI Interface PCB connects to the network via an NT1 Network Termination.
S-Bus applications require the addition of an S-Bus Power Supply (P/N 92194).
In 124i, the 2BRI Interface PCB plugs into slots 4-8 of any installed cabinet. You can
install up to 5 PCBs per cabinet, and up to 13 PCBs maximum per system (26 BRI circuits and 52 BRI channels). The 4BRI Interface PCB plugs into slots 4, 6, or 8 of any
installed cabinet. You can install up to 3 PCBs per cabinet, and up to 9 per system (36
BRI circuits and 64 BRI channels).
In 28i, the BRI Interface PCB plugs into slots 3-5. You can install up to 3 PCBs maximum
per system. With the 2BRI Interface PCB, this provides 6 BRI circuits and 12 BRI channels.
With the 4BRI Interface PCB, this provides 12 BRI circuits and 24 BRI channels. Always
observe the load factor requirements when installing 28i system components.
Product Description
63
Section 2: The Components
✍
At a glance
2BRI Interface PCB — Part Number 92061
BRI circuits: 2
96FU circuits required: 0
BRI channels: 4
24FU circuits required: 0
4BRI Interface PCB — Part Number 92062
BRI circuits: 4
96FU circuits required: 0
BRI channels: 8
24FU circuits required: 0
4GSAU Ground Start Daughter Board
(4 Circuit) — P/N 92015
The 4GSAU Ground Start Daughter Board converts the four
loop start circuits on a 4ATRU PCB to ground start operation.
Every 4ATRU in the system can have ground start operation,
if desired.
With the 4GSAU daughter board plugged in, you cannot use the 4ATRU PCB for Caller
ID. Also, you cannot mix ground start and loop start trunks on the same 4ATRU PCB.
✍
At a glance
4GSAU Ground Start Daughter Board PCB — Part Number 92015
Ground start circuits: 4
Maximum allowed: 1 per ATRU
124i: 13 per system, 28i: 4 per system
Caller ID Daughter Board (4 Circuit) — P/N 92012
For Caller ID capability, install Caller ID daughter boards on
the 4ATRU PCBs. When you add the Caller ID daughter
board, all the trunk circuits on the 4ATRU have Caller ID
capability. Every 4ATRU PCB in the system can have a
Caller ID daughter board.
With the Caller ID Daughter Board plugged in, you cannot use the 4ATRU PCB for
ground start operation.
✍
At a glance
Caller ID PCB — Part Number 92012
Caller ID circuits: 4
Maximum allowed: 1 per ATRU
124i: 13 per system, 28i: 4 per system
64
Product Description
Section 2: The Components
Optional Equipment
Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS)
A customer-provided Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS) maintains system operation
during a commercial power failure. A UPS provides power during short-term power outages and power fluctuations (brown-outs). Size the 704i UPS at 460 VA per cabinet.
Size the 124i UPS at 180 VA per cabinet. Size the 28i UPS at 80 VA. Note that a connected NVM-Series Voice Mail system will put an additional load on the UPS requirements. Consult with your Sales Representation for more information on the Voice Mail
UPS requirements.
2
Product Description
65
Section 3: Features
Calling a Co-Worker
Alphanumeric Display
Barge In
Direct Station Selection
Console
Door Box
Intercom
Intercom Abandoned
Call Display
Multiple Directory
Numbers
Paging
Placing Calls
Quickly
Abbreviated Dialing
Last Number Redial
Hotline, External
Memo Dial
Save Number Dialed
When Your Call
Can’t Go Through
Call Waiting/Camp On
Callback
Continued Dialing
Dual Line Appearance
Forced Trunk Disconnect
Message Waiting
Off Hook Signaling
Off Hook Voice Announce
Pulse to Tone Conversion
Repeat Redial
Reverse Voice Over
Trunk Queuing
Voice Mail
Voice Over
If You Need Privacy
Do Not Disturb
Microphone Cutoff
Outside Calls
Account Codes
Call Timer
Caller ID (with TAPI
Compatibility)
Central Office Calls,
Placing and Answering
Dial Number Preview
Direct Inward Dialing
Direct Inward Lines
Direct Inward System Access
Directory Dialing
Flash
ISDN Compatibility
Line Preference
Loop Keys
Music On Hold
Night Service
PBX Compatibility
Prime Line Selection
Private Line
Pulse to Tone Conversion
Ring Groups
Using the
Handsfree Options
When You
Work in Groups
Handsfree and Monitor
Handsfree Answerback
Automatic Call Distribution
Department Calling,
Enhanced
Department Step Calling
Directed Call Pickup
Group Call Pickup
Group Listen
Powerful
System Options
Analog Communications
Interface (ACI)
Data Communications
Interface (DCI)
External Alarm Sensors
E911 Compatibility
Fax Machine Compatibility
Room Monitor
Single Line Telephones
and the 2-OPX
TAPI Compatibility
Voice Announce Unit (VAU)
Streamlining Your
Telephone’s Operation
Headset Operation
Hotline
One-Touch Calling
One-Touch Serial Operation
Programmable Function Keys
Secretary Call
Secretary Call Pickup
Voice Mail
Answer Machine Emulation
Automated Attendant
Conversation Record
Mailbox Transfer
One-Touch Call Forward
One-Touch Message Retrieval
Park and Page
66
Personalizing Your
Telephone
Handling and
Rerouting Your Calls
Attendant Call Queuing
Call Forwarding
Call Forwarding, Fixed
Call Forwarding with Follow Me
Call Forwarding, Off-Premise
Call Forwarding/Do Not Disturb
Override
Hold
Meet Me Paging
Transfer
Park
Selectable Display Message
Serial Call
Transfer
Have a
Telephone Meeting
Conference
Conference, Voice Call
Meet Me Conference
Meet Me Paging
Tandem Trunking
Pesonalizing Your Telephone
Alarm
Background Music
Dial Pad Confirmation
Tones
Name Storing
Selectable Ring Tones/
Distinctive Ringing
Volume Controls
Managing The System
Automatic Route Selection
Class of Service
Flexible System Numbering
InDepth and inDepth+
Networking
Station Message Detail
Recording
Tenant Service
Time and Date
Toll Restriction
Toll Restriction Override
TMS Reports
Trunk Group Routing
Trunk Groups
Warning Tone For Long
Conversation
Year 2000 Compliance
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Table of Contents
Certain features may be optional, available at a future date or require specific hardware
and software configurations. Always read your Software Manual or check with your Sales
Representative for the specifics.
In this section, the icon bar indicates to which system and software level a feature is
applicable. If there is no icon bar, the feature or option is available in all software versions. Note that 124i Enhanced refers to 124i systems using enhanced 32CPRU
PCB (P/N 92007).
All
G3
All
All
Abbreviated Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Using a Programmable Function Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
DSS Console Chaining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Storing a Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Account Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Optional Account Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Forced Account Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Verified Account Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Hidden Account Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Account Codes and Redialed Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Alphanumeric Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Analog Communications Interface (ACI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Music on Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
External Paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Auxiliary Device Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Physical Ports and Software Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
Attendant Call Queuing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
Automatic Call Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
ACD Call Queuing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
ACD Overflow (With Announcements) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Agent Log In and Log Out Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Emergency Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Enhanced DSS Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Flexible Time Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Headset Operation (With Automatic Answer) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Incoming Call Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Rest Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Supervisor, ACD Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Supervisor, ACD System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Traffic Management Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Work Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
ACD - The Second Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Product Description
67
3
Section 3: Features
Automatic Route Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
ARS Feature Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Call Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Dialing Translation (Special Dialing Instructions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Time of Day Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Hierarchical Class of Service Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Forced Authorization Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Separate Routing for Selected Call Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Separate Routing for Equal Access (10XXX) Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Separate Routing for 976 Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Basic ARS Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Background Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Barge In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Barge In with Service Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Additional Barge In Enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Call Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Call Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Personal Answering Machine Emulation (Option 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Call Forwarding when Busy or Not Answered (Option 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Call Forwarding with Follow Me (Option 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Call Forwarding Immediate (Option 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
Call Forwarding when Unanswered (Option 6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
Call Forwarding with Both Ringing (Option 7) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
Call Forward Chaining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
Call Forwarding, Fixed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
Fixed Call Forwarding Chaining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Call Forwarding, Off-Premise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Call Forwarding with Follow Me . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Call Forwarding/Do Not Disturb Override . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Call Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Call Waiting / Camp On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Callback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Callback Automatic Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Caller ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Caller ID Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Caller ID Message Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
The Caller ID Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Caller ID and CTI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Second Call Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Hardware Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Central Office Calls (Answering) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Delayed Ringing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Enhanced Overflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Universal Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Central Office Calls (Placing) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Enhanced Outbound Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Changing by Service Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
Computer Telephony
Integration (CTI) Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Personal Computer Interface (PCI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Telemarketing Dial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Database Lookup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
68
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Open Architecture Interface (OAI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Barge Into Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Split Between Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Transfer Call Into Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Increased Conference Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Additional Enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Conference, Voice Call/Privacy Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Privacy Mode Toggle Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Continued Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Continued Dialing for Intercom Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Continued Dialing for Trunk Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Cordless Telephone (900i) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Data Communications Interface (DCI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
RS-232-C DCI Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Centronics DCI Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
3-Port DCI Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
DCI Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Keyset-Originated Data Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Terminal-Originated Data Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Terminal-Originated Voice Call (Telemarketing Dial) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
DCI Department Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Hayes Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
DCI Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Speed Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Physical Ports and Software Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
DCI Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
3DCI Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Department Calling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Department Group Hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Busy (Option 0) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Not answered (Option 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Busy or not answered (Option 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Simultaneous ringing (Option 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Department Step Calling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Dial Number Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Dial Pad Confirmation Tone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Direct Inward Dialing (DID) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
DID Dialed Number Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Flexible DID Service Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
DID Intercept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
DID Camp-On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
DID Routing through the VAU Automated Attendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
SMDR Includes Dialed Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Direct Inward Line (DIL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
DIL Delayed Ringing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
Direct Inward System Access (DISA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
DISA Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Trunk Group Routing/ARS Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Trunk Group Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Common Abbreviated Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Operator Calling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Product Description
69
3
Section 3: Features
Direct Trunk Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Forced Trunk Disconnect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
DISA Toll Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
DISA Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Warning Tone for Long DISA Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Department Calling with Overflow Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Direct Station Selection (DSS) Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Additional Digit Storing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
System Capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Customizable DSS Console Lamping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
24-Button DSS Toggle Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Directed Call Pickup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Directory Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Distinctive Ringing, Tones and Flash Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Do Not Disturb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Do Not Disturb Override . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Door Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Dual Line Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
E911 Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
External Alarm Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Fax Machine Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Transfer to Fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Direct Inward Line to Fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Bridged Fax/Modem Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Flexible System Numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Forced Trunk Disconnect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Group Call Pickup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Group Listen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Handsfree and Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Picking Up Call Coverage or Parked Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Handsfree Answerback /
Forced Intercom Ringing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Headset Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
System Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Exclusive Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Group Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Intercom Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Held Calls Reroute to Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Hotel/Motel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Do Not Disturb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Message Waiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Room Telephone Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Room to Room Call Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Room Status with Printout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Single Digit Extension Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Toll Restriction Changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Wake-up Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Property Management System Integration (PMSi) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Hotline, External . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
InDepth and inDepth+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
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Product Description
Section 3: Features
Hardware, Software and System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
inView LAN Wallboard Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Status View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Wallboard View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
inDepth+ Sub-Supervisor (P/N 94110A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Intercom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Intercom Abandoned Call Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
ISDN Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
Primary Rate Interface (PRI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
Basic Rate Interface (BRI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Labelmaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
Last Number Redial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
Line Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
Incoming Line Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Outgoing Line Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Auto-Answer of Non-Ringing Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Loop Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Incoming Only Loop Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Outgoing Only Loop Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Both Ways Loop Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
Meet Me Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
Meet Me Paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
Meet Me Paging Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Memo Dial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Message Waiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Single Line Telephone Message Waiting Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Microphone Cutoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Multiple Directory Numbers / Call Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Call Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Call Coverage for Second Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Call Coverage for a Virtual Extension’s Camped-on Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Call Coverage Key for Incoming Only or Both Ways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Call Coverage follows DND and Off-Hook Signaling Options . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Ringing Line Preference for Call Coverage Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Music on Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
Name Storing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
Night Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
Automatic Night Service Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
Assigned Night Answer (ANA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
Universal Night Answer (UNA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
Transfer to UNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
Off Hook Signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
Called Extension Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
Automatic Signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
Manual Signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
Selectable Off Hook Signaling Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
Off Hook Signaling Enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
DID Off Hook Ringing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
DID Call Waiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
Block Manual Off Hook Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
Block Camp On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
Product Description
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Section 3: Features
One-Touch Calling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
Storing Names and Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
One-Touch Serial Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
Paging (Combined) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Combined Paging on a Function Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Paging (External) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Paging (Internal) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Extended Park Orbit Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Splitting Between Parked Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
Enhanced Dial Buffering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
PBX Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
PBX Trunk Access Code Screening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
PBX Trunk Toll Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
PBX Call Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
Automatic Pause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
PC Attendant Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Prime Line Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Outgoing Prime Line Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Incoming Prime Line Preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Private Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Incoming only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Outgoing only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Both ways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Programmable Function Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
Pulse to Tone Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Repeat Redial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Reverse Voice Over . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
Ring Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
Ringdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
Room Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
Save Number Dialed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
Secretary Call (Buzzer) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
Secretary Call Pickup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
Selectable Display Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
Selectable Ring Tones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
Serial Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
Single Line Telephones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
2-OPX Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Analog Module (DCI-L) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Soft Keys and i-Series Telephones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
Station Message Detail Recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
Abandoned Call Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
Blocked Call Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Call Costing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Customized Date Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Transferred Call Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Data Call Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Digit Counting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Digit Masking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Duration Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Extension Exclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
PBX Call Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
72
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Serial and Parallel SMDR Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
Trunk Exclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
Usage Summaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
Expanded Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
T1 Trunking (with ANI/DNIS Compatibility) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
ANI/DNIS Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
SMDR Includes Dialed Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
Tandem Trunking (Unsupervised Conference) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
TAPI Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159
NEC TAPI Service Provider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159
Proprietary Mode Telephony SPV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159
32-Bit NAMTIS TAPI Driver, Version 1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159
Tie Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Tie Line Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
First Digit Absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Trunk Group Routing/ARS Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Direct Trunk Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Common Abbreviated Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Operator Calling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Tie Line Outgoing Call Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Tie Line Toll Restriction Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Flexible Tie Line Service Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Time and Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Toll Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Common Permit Code Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Common Restrict Code Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Restrict Code Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Permit Code Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
International Call Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Toll Restriction for Abbreviated Dialing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Local Call Digit Counting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Toll Call Digit Counting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Toll Free Trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
PBX Call Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Toll Restriction Override . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Traffic Management Report (TMS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
TMS Report Timed Print Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Screened Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Unscreened Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Extension (Department) Groups Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Transfer Without Holding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Optional Ringback or MOH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Automatic On-Hook Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Prevent Recall of Transferred Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Traveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Trunk Group Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Trunk Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
Trunk Queuing/Camp On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
Video Door Box — P/N 85850 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Product Description
73
3
Section 3: Features
Voice Announce Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
VAU Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
General Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Personal Greeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Park and Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
Automated Attendant (Operator Assistance) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171
Transfer to the VAU Automated Attendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172
Voice Prompting Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172
900 Preamble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
Time, Date and Station Number Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
Voice Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
Call Forwarding to Voice Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
Leaving a Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
Message Center Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
Transferring to Voice Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
Conversation Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
Personal Answering Machine Emulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
Voice Mail Overflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
Return Call with Caller ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
Caller ID to ANI/DNIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
Voice Mail Queuing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
Park and Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179
Digital Voice Mail Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179
Voice Over . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179
Volume Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
Warning Tone For Long Conversation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
Windows-Based Remote Programming Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181
Hardware Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
Year 2000 Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
74
Product Description
Section 3: Features
In this section, the icon bar indicates to which system and software level a
feature is applicable. If there is no icon bar, the feature or option is available
in all software versions.
All
G3
All
All
All
All
Abbreviated Dialing
All
All
Abbreviated Dialing gives an extension user quick access to frequently called numbers.
This saves time, for example, when calling a client with whom they deal often. Instead
of dialing a long telephone number, the extension user just dials the Abbreviated Dialing
code. Each Abbreviated Dialing bin can store a number up to 24 digits long.
Common Abbreviated Dialing bins are available to all users. Group Abbreviated Dialing
bins are available to all extensions within an Extension (Department) Group. The following table shows the Abbreviated Dialing capacities.
Abb. Dialing Groups
28i 6.00.08 or higher
28i prior to 6.00.08
124i 6.00.08 or higher
124i prior to 6.00.08
124i Enhanced
704i
8
8
8
8
16
64
Common Bins
Total Bins
200
200
500
200
Up to 1000
1000
1000
360
1000
360
1000
2000
When placing an Abbreviated Dialing call, the system normally routes the call through
Trunk Group Routing or ARS (whichever is enabled). Or, the user can preselect a specific trunk for the call. In addition, the system can optionally force Common
Abbreviated Dialing numbers to route over a specific Trunk Group.
Using a Programmable Function Key
All
G3
All
All
To streamline dialing frequently-called numbers, an Abbreviated Dialing Programmable
Function Key can also store an Abbreviated Dialing bin number. When the extension
user presses the key, the phone automatically dials out the stored number. This provides
true one-touch calling via a phone’s function keys.
DSS Console Chaining
All
G2
All
All
DSS Console Chaining allows an extension user with a DSS Console to chain to an
Abbreviated Dialing number stored under a DSS Console key. The stored number dials
Product Description
75
3
Section 3: Features
out (chains) to the initial call. This can, for example, simplify dialing when calling a
company with an Automated Attendant. The user can store the company number under
one DSS Console key and the client’s extension number under the other. The user presses the first key to call the company, waits for the Automated Attendant to answer, then
presses the second key to call the client.
Storing a Flash
All
G2
All
All
To enhance compatibility with connected Centrex and PBX lines, an extension user can
store an optional Flash command in an Abbreviated Dialing bin. To do this, the user
presses FLASH while entering the number they want to store. For example, storing 9
FLASH 926 5400 will dial 9, flash the line and then dial 926 5400.
Account Codes
All
G3
All
All
Account Codes are user-dialed codes that help the system administrator categorize
and/or restrict trunk calls. The system has the following types of Account Codes:
Optional Account Codes
Optional Account Codes allow a user to enter an Account Code while placing a trunk
call or anytime while on a call. This type of Account Code is optional; the system does
not require the user to enter it.
Forced Account Codes
Forced Account Codes require an extension user to enter an Account Code every time
they place a trunk call. If the user does not enter the code, the system prevents the call.
As with Optional Account Codes, the extension user can elect to enter an Account Code
for an incoming call. However, the system does not require it. The system does not verify Forced Account Codes. With G3 software, Forced Account codes can apply to all outside calls or just long distance calls.
Verified Account Codes
All
1000 codes max.
G3
1000 codes max.
All
1000 codes max.
All
2000 codes max.
With Verified Account Codes, the system compares the Account Code the user dials to a list
of pre-programmed codes. If the Account Code is in the list, the call goes through. If the
code dialed is not in the list, the system prevents the call from going through. The system
can automatically notify the operator each time this type of dialing violation occurs. You
program Verified Account Codes on a trunk-by-trunk basis for all calls or just long distance
calls. Use “wild cards” to streamline entering codes into system memory. For example, the
entry 123W lets users dial Verified Account Codes from 1230 through 1239.
76
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Hidden Account Codes
All
G3
All
All
Account Codes can be optionally hidden from a telephone’s display. This would prevent,
for example, an unauthorized co-worker from obtaining a Verified Account Code by
watching the display and making note of the digits that dial out.
Account Codes print along with the other call data on the SMDR record after the call
completes. Account Codes can be from 1-16 digits long, using 0-9 and #.
Account Codes and Redialed Calls
Requires 5.05
Requires 5.05
All
All
For additional security, Last Number Redial, Save Number Dialed and Repeat Redial
do not retain Account Code information. The user must reenter the Account Code when
using these features. This prevents an unauthorized user from using a co-worker’s phone
to place a call that would normally require an Account Code.
Alarm
All
All
All
All
Alarm lets a display keyset extension work like an Alarm clock. An extension user can have
an Alarm remind them of a meeting or an appointment. There are two types of Alarms:
● Alarm 1 (sounds only once at the preset time)
● Alarm 2 (sounds every day at the preset time)
Alphanumeric Display
All
All
All
All
Multibutton Display telephones have a 2-line, 20 character per line alphanumeric display that provides various feature status messages. Super Display telephones have an
eight-line, 20 character display (with soft keys). The displayed messages help the user
process calls, identify callers and customize features.
Analog Communications Interface (ACI)
2 ACIs and 6 ports
4 ACI Groups
2 ACIs and 6 ports
4 ACI Groups
2 ACIs and 6 ports
4 ACI Groups
64 ACIs and 192 ports
32 ACI Groups
The Analog Communications Interface (ACI) provides three analog ports (with associated relays) for Music on Hold, External Paging, ACD announcements or auxiliary devices
Product Description
77
3
Section 3: Features
such as tape recorders and loud bells. The 704i system allows up to 64 ACIs, for a maximum of 192 analog ports. The 28i and 124i systems allow up to two ACIs for a total of 6
analog ports. Each ACI unit requires an unused port on a DSTU PCB. The ACI gives
you more flexibility when connected to auxiliary devices since it doesn't use up resources
on PGDU (Page/Door Box) or ASTU (Analog Station) PCBs.
Music on Hold
You can connect up to three customer-provided Music on Hold sources to an ACI. This
lets you add additional music sources if the external source on the CPU PCB or the internal source are not adequate. By using ACIs, you could even have a different music source
for each trunk (6 ACI ports maximum in 28i/124i and 192 ACI ports maximum in 704i).
An ACI can also provide music to ACD callers while they wait on Hold.
When the system switches the ACI analog port to a trunk on Hold, the ACI relay associated with the ACI analog port closes. You can use this capability to switch on the music
source, if desired.
Extension users can dial the ACI analog port extension number and listen to the connected
music source. The ACI relay associated with the port closes when the call goes through.
For Music on Hold, connect the music source to the ACI analog port IN (Input) jack.
Connect the music source control leads to the CTL (control relay) jack. Refer to the
Hardware Manual for additional details.
External Paging
An ACI analog port can also be an External Page output. When connected to customerprovided External Paging equipment, the ACI port provides External Paging independent
of the PGDU PCB. To use the External Paging, an extension user just dials the ACI analog port extension number and makes the announcement. The system broadcasts the
announcement from the ACI analog port and simultaneously closes the associated ACI
relay. You can use the relay closure to control the External Paging amplifier, if required.
Since ACI External Paging is not part of the system’s All Call Paging system, it cannot
broadcast All Call announcements, Background Music, external ringing or alarms.
For External Paging, connect the Paging amplifier to the ACI analog port OUT (output)
jack. Connect the amplifier control leads to the CTL (control relay) jack.
Auxiliary Device Control
The ACI can control a customer-provided tape recorder. When an extension user dials
the ACI analog port extension number, they can automatically start the recorder and
activate the record function. When the user hangs up, the recording stops and the tape
recorder turns off. For tape recording, connect the tape recorder AUX input jack to the
ACI analog port OUT (output) jack. Connect the recorder control leads (if available) to
the CTL (control relay) jack. Refer to the Hardware Manual for additional details. (The
ACI can also record automatically, without relying on auxiliary device control.)
By using Department Calling, you can arrange multiple tape recorders into a pool.
When an extension user dials the Department Group pilot number, they reach the first
available tape recorder in the pool.
The relays on the ACI can optionally control customer-provided external ringers (loud
bells) and buzzers. When an extension user dials the ACI analog port extension number,
the associated ACI relay closes and activates the ringer. For example, you could use
this capability to control an emergency buzzer for a noisy machine shop floor.
78
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Physical Ports and Software Ports
PORT 3
LINE
To DSTU
PCB Port
IN
OUT
PORT 2
CTL
IN
Software
Port 3
OUT
PORT 1
CTL
Software
Port 2
IN
OUT
CTL
9200 - 166
Each ACI consists of a physical port for connection to the phone system and three analog ports. For programming purposes, the analog ports are also called software ports
(see the illustration below). The physical port connects to a station position on a DSTU
PCB. During installation, the first ACI you set up is physical port 1; the second ACI is
physical port 2, etc. Each ACI has three software ports, which are numbered independently of the physical ports. Normally, the first ACI set up has software ports 1-3; the
second ACI has software ports 4-6, etc. In 704i, there are a total of 192 software ports
(64 ACIs x 3 ports each). In 28i and 124i there are six software ports.
Software
Port 1
Physical
Port 1
During programming, you assign ACI extension numbers and Department Group
options to ACI software ports, not physical ports. During installation, you connect
equipment to the jacks on the ACI that correspond to the software port.
3
Attendant Call Queuing
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
Attendant extensions can have up to 32 incoming calls queued before additional callers
hear busy tone. This helps minimize call congestion in systems that use the attendant as
the overflow destination for unanswered calls. For example, you can program Direct
Inward Lines and Voice Mail calls to route to the attendant when their primary destination is busy. With Attendant Call Queuing, these unanswered calls would normally
"stack up" for the attendant until they can be processed.
The 32 call queue total includes Intercom, DISA, DID, DIL, tie line and transferred
calls. If the attendant doesn't have an appearance for the queued call, it waits in line on a
CALL key. If the attendant has more than 32 calls queued, an extension can Transfer a
call to the attendant only if they have Busy Transfer enabled.
Automatic Call Distribution
N/A
Base: N/A
EXCPRU requires G2
8 ACD Groups and 36
ACD Agents
All
8 ACD Groups and 72
ACD Agents
All
64 ACD Groups and 512
ACD Agents
Automatic Call Distribution (ACD) uniformly distributes calls among member agents of a
programmed ACD Group. When a call rings into an ACD Group, the system automatically
routes the call to the agent that has been idle the longest. Automatic Call Distribution is
Product Description
79
Section 3: Features
much more sophisticated and comprehensive than Department Calling and other group services - it can accurately judge the work load at each agent and distribute calls accordingly.
The 704i system allows up to 64 ACD Groups and 512 ACD agents. The 124i Enhanced
allows up to 8 ACD groups and 72 agents. The 124i (with EXCPRU) allows up to 8 ACD
Groups and 36 ACD agents. You can put any agent in any group. In addition, an agent can
be in a different group at different times of the day. This allows, for example, a Technical
Service representative to answer Customer Service calls at lunch time when many of the
Customer Service reps are unavailable.
The ACD Master Number is the "extension number" of the whole group. Calls directly
ringing or transferred to the ACD Master number enter the group and are routed accordingly. Although the master number can be any valid extension number, you should
choose a number that is out of the normal extension range.
Automatic Call Distribution operation is further enhanced by:
ACD Call Queuing
When all agents in an ACD Group are unavailable, an incoming call will queue and
cause the Queue Status Display to occur on the ACD Group Supervisor's display. The
display helps the supervisor keep track of the traffic load within their group. The Queue
Status Display shows (see the Queue Status Display illustration below):
● The number of calls queued for an available agent in the group.
● The trunk that has been waiting the longest, and how long it has been waiting.
For each ACD Group, you can set the following conditions:
● The number of trunks that can queue before the Queue Status Display alarm occurs.
● How often the time in queue portion of the display reoccurs (see the illustration below).
● Whether or not the supervisor should hear the Queue Alarm when the time in queue
portion of the display reoccurs (see below). This alarm is a single beep tone that
reminds the supervisor to check the condition of the queue.
The number of
calls in queue.
How long the longest queued
call has been waiting.
002 LINE-001 01:30
Name of trunk that has
been queued the longest.
This part of the display
periodically disappears
and then refreshes.
ACD Overflow (With Announcements)
ACD offers extensive overflow options for each ACD Group. For example, a caller
ringing in when all agents are unavailable can hear an initial announcement (called the
1st Announcement). This announcement can be a general greeting like, "Thank you for
calling. All of our agents are currently busy helping other customers. Please stay on the
line and we will help you shortly." If the caller continues to wait, you can have them
hear another announcement (called the 2nd Announcement) such as, "Your business is
important to us. Your call will be automatically answered by the first available agent.
Please stay on the line." If all the ACD Group's agents still are unavailable, the call can
automatically overflow to another ACD Group or the Voice Mail Automated Attendant.
If all agents in the overflow ACD Group are busy, Lookback Routing ensures that the
waiting call will ring into the first agent in either group that becomes free.
80
Product Description
Section 3: Features
You can assign an ACD Group with any combination of 1st Announcement, 2nd
Announcement and overflow method. You can have, for example, a Technical Service
group that plays only the 2nd Announcement to callers and then immediately overflows
to Voice Mail. At the same time, you can have a Customer Service group that plays both
announcements and does not overflow.
Agent Log In and Log Out Services
An ACD Agent can log in and log out of their ACD Group. While logged in, the agent is
available to receive ACD Group calls. When logged out, the agent is excluded from the
group's calls. The programmable keys and alphanumeric display on an agent's phone
show at a glance when they are logged in or logged out.
Emergency Call
If an ACD Agent needs assistance with a caller, they can place an Emergency Call to their
ACD Group Supervisor. Once the supervisor answers the Emergency Call, they automatically monitor both the ACD Agent and the caller. If the agent needs assistance, the supervisor can join in the conversation. Emergency Call can be a big help to inexperienced
ACD Agents that need technical advice or assistance with a difficult caller. The supervisor
can easily listen to the conversation and then "jump in" if the situation gets out of hand.
Enhanced DSS Operation
An ACD Supervisor (Group or System) can use their DSS Console to monitor the status
of the ACD Agents within a group. The DSS Console is an essential tool for supervisors. Once you assign a DSS Console to a supervisor, the 10 function keys in the last
row become ACD Group select buttons (see the illustration below). When the supervisor
presses a button for an ACD Group, the console key flash rates tell the supervisor at a
glance which of the group's agents are:
● Logged onto the group (i.e., in service)
● Logged out of the group (i.e., out of service)
● Busy on a call
● Placing an Emergency Call to the supervisor
● Not available or installed
The ACD Supervisor can also use their console for placing and transferring calls - just
like any other extension user.
Flexible Time Schedules
An ACD Work Schedule lets you divide a day into segments (called Work Periods) for
scheduling the activity in your ACD Groups. You can set up four distinct Work Schedules,
with up to eight Work Periods in each Work Schedule. Each day of the week has one Work
Schedule, but different days can share the same schedule. For example, your Monday
through Friday Work Schedule could consist of only two Work Periods. Work Period 1
could be from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM - when your business is open. Work Period 2 could be
from 5:00 PM to 8:00 AM - which covers those times when your business is closed.
Headset Operation (With Automatic Answer)
An ACD Agent or ACD Group Supervisor can utilize a customer-provided headset in
place of the handset. The headset conveniently frees up the user's hands for other work
and provides privacy while on the call. In addition, an ACD Agent with a headset can
have Automatic Answer. This allows an agent busy on a call to hear a beep and automatically connect to the next waiting call when they hang up.
Product Description
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3
Section 3: Features
Incoming Call Routing
Incoming trunk calls can automatically route to ACD Groups. Trunks can ring directly into
the ACD Group without being transferred by a co-worker or the Automated Attendant.
Rest Mode
Rest Mode temporarily logs-out an ACD agent's phone. There are two types of Rest Mode:
● Manual Rest Mode
An ACD Agent can enable Manual Rest Mode anytime they want to temporarily log
out of the ACD Group. They might want to do this if they go to a meeting or get
called away from their work area. While logged out, calls to the ACD Group will not
ring the agent's phone.
● Automatic Rest Mode
When an ACD Group has Automatic Rest Mode, the system will automatically put an
agent's phone in Rest Mode if it is not answered. This ensures callers won't have to
wait while ACD rings an extension that won't be answered. For keysets, the system
enables Automatic Rest Mode for all phones with Rest Mode keys. For SLTs, you
must set an option in programming to enable Automatic Rest Mode.
Supervisor, ACD Group
You can designate an extension in an ACD Group to be the group's supervisor. Once
assigned as an ACD Group Supervisor, the user can:
● Take the entire ACD Group out of service.
● Check the log out status of each agent after the group is taken out of service.
● Restore the ACD Group to service.
During programming, you can choose one of three modes of operation for each ACD
Group supervisor:
● Supervisor's extension cannot receive calls to the ACD Group.
● Supervisor's extension can only receive ACD Group calls during overflow conditions.
● Supervisor's extension receives calls just like any other ACD Group agent (mode 2).
An ACD Group can have only one supervisor. In addition, an extension can be a supervisor for only one ACD Group.
Supervisor, ACD System
You can designate an extension as an ACD System Supervisor. The system can have only
one ACD System Supervisor. Once assigned as an ACD System Supervisor, the user can:
● Take all the system's ACD Groups out of service simultaneously.
● Check the log out status of each agent after the groups are taken down.
● Restore all the ACD Groups to service simultaneously.
Traffic Management Reports
The system provides comprehensive Traffic Management (TMS) Reports that help when
analyzing ACD traffic, system usage and calling patterns. The TMS report is in five sections:
● Trunk Calls Sorted by Extension
● Trunk Calls Sorted by Trunk
● ACD Calls Sorted by Agent
● ACD Calls Sorted by ACD Group
● All Trunks Busy Report
82
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Work Time
Work Time temporarily busies-out an ACD agent's phone so they can work at their desk
uninterrupted. This gives the agent time to fill out important logs and records as soon as
they are finished with their call. There are two types of Work Time:
Manual Work Time
An ACD Agent can enable Manual Work Time any time they need to work at their desk
undisturbed. You might prefer this Work Time mode if an agent only occasionally has to
fill out follow-up paper work after they complete their call. When the agent is through
catching up with their work, they manually return themselves to the ACD Group.
● Automatic Work Time
The system implements Automatic Work Time for the agent as soon as they hang up
their current call. This is helpful in applications (such as Tech Service groups) where
follow-up paperwork is a requirement for every call. When the agent is done with
their work, they manually return themselves to the ACD Group.
●
ACD - The Second Generation
N/A
Base N/A
EXCPRU requires G3
All
All
The second generation of ACD provides a host of new call management productivity tools:
● ACD Group Call Coverage Keys
To help cover calls during peak periods, a keyset can have Call Coverage keys for
ACD Groups. When a call rings into a covered ACD Group, it rings the appropriate
ACD Group Call Coverage key. The key can ring immediately, ring after a delay or
just flash. The Call Coverage key also facilitates one-button Transfer to an ACD
Group. The covering extension does not have to be a member of the ACD Group.
● Hotline Key Shows Agent Status
An extension’s Hotline keys provide the “normal” Busy Lamp Field (BLF) for co-workers and a unique BLF for ACD Agents. Similar to the supervisor’s DSS Console BLF,
the unique BLF shows when the covered agent is in service, out of service or busy on a
call. This enhanced BLF gives a department manager, for example, ACD Group monitoring capabilities without having to become a supervisor with a DSS Console.
● Enhanced Supervisor Options
An ACD supervisor can individually assign extensions to ACD Groups, and set an
agent’s status once assigned. This provides the supervisor with tremendous flexibility
to reassign agents as work loads vary. In G4 software, ACD Agents can also log in
and out of any ACD Group.
● Queue Status Display with Scrolling
To aid in keeping track of call volumes, a display keyset user can view any ACD Group’s
Queue Status Display by pressing a uniquely programmed Programmable Function Key.
The user can then press VOL ▲ or VOL ▼ to scroll through all the system’s ACD Group
queues. The display keyset does not have to be an ACD agent or supervisor.
● Overflow Announcements from Voice Mail
The NVM-Series Voice Mail system can provide the ACD overflow announcements
in systems that do not have a Voice Announce Unit installed. When a caller queues
for an available agent, designated Voice Mail ACD Announcement Mailboxes provide the overflow messages.
● Escape From Queue with NVM-Series
Escape From Queue uses NVM-Series Call Routing Mailboxes for announcement
messages to provide callers with enhanced options while in queue. After listening to
Product Description
83
3
Section 3: Features
this type of announcement, they can either wait in queue or dial a digit for an alternate destination. This destination is typically the operator, a mailbox or an extension.
● Programmable Wrap-up Timer
When an agent finishes their call, the system automatically starts a wrap-up timer and
blocks any ACD calls to the agent. This gives them time to complete important logs
and records before a new call comes in. When the timer expires, the system returns
the agent to the ACD Group to handle new callers.
● InDepth and inDepth+
N/A
N/A
All
All
InDepth and inDepth+ are Windows-based Management Information Systems that
work with the 704i and 124i Enhanced built-in ACD. These ACD/MIS systems
enhance the system with real time statistics and reports on ACD Group traffic patterns and usage. Refer to inDepth and inDepth+ later in this chapter for more.
Automatic Route Selection
All
All
All
All
Automatic Route Selection (ARS) provides call routing and call restriction based on the
digits a user dials. ARS gives the system the most cost-effective use of the connected
long distance carriers.
ARS is an on-line call routing program that you can customize (like other system options)
from a display telephone. ARS accommodates over 14,000 theoretical call routing choices
- without a custom-ordered rate structure database. With ARS, you can modify the system's routing choices quickly and easily. This is often necessary in today's telecommunications world where the cost structure and service choices frequently change.
ARS Feature Summary
ARS provides:
● Call Routing
ARS can apply 3-digit (area code) or 6-digit (area code and local exchange) analysis
to every number dialed. For programming, ARS provides separate 3-digit and 6digit tables. Each table can have as many numbers as the installation requires.
Dialing Translation (Special Dialing Instructions)
ARS can automatically execute stored dialing instructions (called Dial Treatments)
when it chooses a route for a call. The system allows up to 15 Dial Treatments. The
Dial Treatments can:
- Automatically insert or delete a leading 1
- Insert or delete an area code (NPA)
- Add digits, pauses and waits to the dialing sequence
- Require the user to enter an authorization code when placing a call (see Forced
Authorization Code below)
● Time of Day Selection
For routing purposes, ARS provides eight different time of day selections (called
Rate Periods). You can assign these Rate Periods to any time of day (in 1/2 hour
intervals) or day of week (Monday-Friday, Saturday, Sunday or Holiday).
●
84
Product Description
Section 3: Features
●
Hierarchical Class of Service Control
ARS allows or denies call route choices based on an extension's ARS Class of
Service. This allows lower Classes of Service (e.g., 1) to access routes unavailable
to higher Classes of Service (e.g., 27). The system provides up to 28 (0-27) ARS
Classes of Service.
●
Forced Authorization Code
The Dial Treatment for designated routes may require the user to enter an ARS
Authorization Code before ARS allows routing. This code is verifiable and is
enforced by an extension's ARS Class of Service. Each extension can have its own
unique ARS Authorization Code.
Separate Routing for Selected Call Types
To provide unique control, you can program separate routing instructions for:
- Operator assisted (0 +) calls
- International (011) calls
- Directory assistance (411, 1411 and 555) calls
- Emergency (911) calls
● Separate Routing for Equal Access (10XXX) Calls
Choose different routing for directly-dialed (10XXX + 1) and operator-assisted
(10XXX + 0) Equal Access calls.
●
●
Separate Routing for 976 Calls
Restriction for 976 calls is hierarchical according to an extension's ARS Class of Service.
Basic ARS Operation
When a user places an outside call, ARS analyzes the digits dialed and assigns one of 64
Selection Numbers to the call. The Selection Number chosen depends on which digits
the user dialed. ARS then checks the time of day, the day of week and the extension's
ARS Class of Service. Based on these call routing options, ARS selects a trunk group
for the call and imposes the Dial Treatment instructions (if any).
Background Music
All
All
All
All
Background Music (BGM) sends music from a customer-provided music source to
speakers in keysets. If an extension user activates it, BGM plays whenever the user's
extension is idle.
Barge In
All
All
All
All
Barge In permits an extension user to break into another extension user's established
call. This sets up a three-way conversation between the intruding extension and the two
parties on the initial call. With Barge In, an extension user can get a message through to
a busy co-worker right away.
There are two Barge In modes: Monitor Mode and Speech Mode. With Monitor Mode,
Product Description
85
3
Section 3: Features
the caller Barging In can listen to another user's conversation but cannot participate.
With Speech Mode, the caller Barging In can listen and join another user's conversation.
CAUTION
Unauthorized intrusion on calls using this feature may
be interpreted as an invasion of privacy.
Barge In with Service Code
All
Requires G3 (5.02)
All
All
An extension user can Barge In on a co-worker’s call by dialing the Barge In Service
Code (normally 810) or pressing the Barge In Programmable Function Key just before
dialing the extension. To Barge In on a busy co-worker, the user lifts the handset, dials
810 (or presses the key) and then dials the co-worker’s extension number.
Additional Barge In Enhancements
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
An extension user may be able use the following Barge In enhancements:
● Barge In from busy tone or busy/ring tone.
● Press a Barge In key before calling an extension.
● Barge into a Conference call.
● Transfer a call into a Conference.
Call Coverage
Turn to the Multiple Directory Numbers/Call Coverage feature in this section.
Call Forwarding
All
All
All
All
Call Forwarding permits an extension user to redirect their calls to another extension.
Call Forwarding ensures that the user's calls are covered when they are away from their
work area. There are six types of Call Forwarding:
● Personal Answering Machine Emulation (Option 1)
A keyset can emulate a personal answering machine. See "Voice Mail" for more.
86
●
Call Forwarding when Busy or Not Answered (Option 2)
All calls forward when the extension is busy or not answered.
●
Call Forwarding with Follow Me (Option 3)
While at a co-worker's desk, a user can redirect their calls to the co-worker's extension. See "Call Forwarding with Follow Me" for more.
Product Description
Section 3: Features
●
Call Forwarding Immediate (Option 4)
All calls forward immediately to the destination, and only the destination rings.
●
Call Forwarding when Unanswered (Option 6)
Calls forward only if they are unanswered (Ring No Answer).
●
Call Forwarding with Both Ringing (Option 7)
All calls forward immediately to the destination, and both the destination and the forwarded extension ring. This option is not for Voice Mail.
Call Forwarding can reroute all outside calls ringing an extension, including calls transferred from another extension.
If the system has a VAU Module installed, a reminder message can periodically remind
the user that their calls are forwarded.
Call Forward Chaining
N/A
N/A
N/A
All
The 704i allows the chaining of Call Forwards. For example, if extension 302 forwards
to extension 303, and extension 303 in turn forwards to extension 304, calls to 302 automatically forward to 304. In all other systems, chaining can occur only if the second
extension in the chain is Call Forwarded Off-Premise.
Call Forwarding, Fixed
All
All
All
All
Fixed Call Forwarding is a type of forwarding that is permanently in force at an extension. Calls to an extension with Fixed Call Forwarding enabled automatically reroute without any user action. Unlike normal Call Forwarding (which is turned on and off by
extension users), Fixed Call Forwarding is set by the administrator in system programming. Fixed Call Forwarding complements Voice Mail, for example. The administrator
can program Fixed Call Forwarding to send a user's unanswered calls to their Voice
Mail mailbox. Each individual user no longer has to manually set this operation.
In system programming, the administrator can set the Fixed Call Forwarding destination
and type for each extension and virtual extension. The forwarding destination can be an onor off-premise extension port or Voice Mail port. The Fixed Call Forwarding Types are:
● Fixed Call Forwarding with Both Ringing
● Fixed Call Forwarding when Unanswered
● Fixed Call Forwarding Immediate
● Fixed Call Forwarding when Busy/No Answer
Fixed Call Forwarding reroutes the following types of incoming calls:
● Intercom calls from co-worker's extensions
● Calls routed from the Automated Attendant (VAU) or Voice Mail
● Direct Inward Lines
Product Description
87
3
Section 3: Features
●
●
DISA, DID and tie line calls to the forwarded extension
Transferred calls
Fixed Call Forwarding Chaining
All
Requires 4.02 or higher
All
All
Fixed Call Forwarding Chaining allows Fixed Call Forwards to loop from one extension
to the next, providing basic hunting between co-workers. For example, you could have
the chain 301 -> 302 -> 303 -> 304 set up for Fixed Call Forwarding when busy. If 301
is busy, calls to 301 route to 302. If 302 is busy, the calls route to 303 and so on.
Call Forwarding, Off-Premise
All
All
All
All
Off-Premise (OPX) Call Forwarding allows an extension user to forward their calls to an offsite location. By enabling OPX Call Forwarding, the user can stay in touch by having the
system forward their calls while they are away from the office. The forwarding destination
can be any phone number the user enters, such as a car phone, home office, hotel or meeting
room. Off-Premise Call Forwarding can route the off-site phone number over a specific
trunk or through a trunk group, Automatic Route Selection or Trunk Group Routing.
Off-Premise Call Forwarding reroutes the following types of incoming calls:
● Intercom calls from co-worker's extensions
● Calls routed from the Automated Attendant (VAU) or Voice Mail
● Direct Inward Lines
● DISA, DID and tie line calls to the forwarded extension
● Transferred calls
(Off-Premise Call Forwarding can reroute an incoming trunk call only if the outgoing trunk selected has disconnect supervision enabled.)
Call Forwarding with Follow Me
All
All
All
All
While at a co-worker's desk, a user can have Call Forwarding with Follow Me redirect
their calls to the co-worker's extension. This helps an employee who gets detained at a
co-worker's desk longer than expected. To prevent losing important calls, the employee
can activate Call Forwarding with Follow Me from the co-worker's phone.
Call Forwarding with Follow Me reroutes calls from the destination extension. To
reroute calls from the initiating (forwarding) extension, use Call Forwarding.
88
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Call Forwarding/Do Not Disturb Override
All
All
All
All
An extension user can override Call Forwarding or Do Not Disturb at another extension. This is helpful, for example, to dispatchers and office managers that always need
to get through.
Call Timer
All
All
All
All
Call Timer lets a keyset user time their trunk calls on the telephone display. This helps
users that must keep track of their time on the phone. For incoming trunk calls, the Call
Timer begins as soon as the user answers the call. For outgoing trunk calls, the Call
Timer starts about 10 seconds after the user dials the last digit.
Call Waiting / Camp On
All
All
All
All
With Call Waiting, an extension user may call a busy extension and wait in line (CampOn) without hanging up. When the user Camps-On, the system signals the busy extension with two beeps indicating the waiting call. The call goes through when the busy
extension becomes free. Call Waiting helps busy extension users know when they have
additional waiting calls. It also lets callers wait in line for a busy extension without
being forgotten.
Callback
All
All
All
All
When an extension user calls a busy extension, the user may leave a Callback request
for a return call. The user does not have to repeatedly call the busy extension back,
hoping to find it idle.
The system processes Callback requests as follows:
1. Caller at extension A leaves a Callback at busy extension B.
(Caller can place or answer additional calls in the meantime.)
2. When extension B becomes idle, the system rings extension A. This is the Callback ring.
3. Once caller A answers the Callback ring, the system rings (formerly busy) extension B.
(If caller A doesn't answer the Callback ring, the system cancels the Callback.)
4. As soon as caller B answers, the system sets up an Intercom call between A and B.
Product Description
89
3
Section 3: Features
Callback Automatic Answer
Callback Automatic Answer determines how an extension user answers the Callback
ring. When Callback Automatic Answer is enabled, a user answers the Callback ring
when they lift the handset. When Callback Automatic Answer is disabled, the user must
press the ringing line appearance to answer the Callback ring.
Caller ID
200 Caller ID bins
200 Caller ID bins
400 Caller ID bins
1000 Caller ID bins
Caller ID allows a display keyset to show an incoming caller's telephone number (called
the Directory Number or DN) and optional name. The Caller ID information is available
as either a post-answer or pre-answer display. Normally, the system provides the Caller ID
post-answer display. With the post-answer display, the user sees the incoming caller's
number/name after they answer the call. With the pre-answer display, the user can preview
the caller's number before picking up the ringing line. The pre-answer display is only
available if the system has Automatic Handsfree for incoming line/loop keys disabled.
Caller ID Services
Caller ID supports the telco's Called Number Identification (CNI) and Called Number
Delivery (CND) service, when available. These services provide the Caller ID information (i.e., messages) between the first and second ring burst of an incoming call.
Caller ID Message Formats
All
G2 required for Multiple
Message Format and 12
digit DN.
All
All
There are two types of Caller ID message formats currently available: Single Message
Format and Multiple Message Format. With Single Message Format, the telco sends
only the caller's phone number (DN). The DN is up to 12 digits long for non-ACD calls
and 10 digits for ACD calls. In Multiple Message Format, the telco sends the DN and
the caller's name. The DN for this format is also up to 12 digits long for non-ACD calls
and 10 digits for ACD calls. The name provided consists of up to 15 ASCII characters.
The Caller ID Table
The system provides either 1000 (704i), 400 (124i Enhanced), or 200 (28i and 124i)
Caller ID Table bins that associate an incoming Caller ID number with a stored name.
When the Caller ID call rings in, the system searches this table for a match. If it finds the
number in table, it sends the associated name to the telephone's display. This allows for
caller name display capability without relying on Multiple Message Format Caller ID.
If you have a display keyset, you can easily edit the Caller ID Table to ensure it is kept
up to date. In addition, you can:
● Check to see if any Caller ID calls rang your phone while you were away.
● Automatically return the missed Caller ID call, or erase the call record without
returning it.
90
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Caller ID and CTI
Caller ID is an essential component in many Computer Telephony Integration (CTI)
applications. Turn to Computer Telephony Integration (CTI) Applications for more.
Second Call Display
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
While busy on a call, the telephone display can show the identity of an incoming trunk
or Intercom call. For incoming trunk calls, the display will show the Caller ID or ANI
data, or the trunk’s name if Caller ID or ANI are not installed. (See the T1 Trunking feature in this section for more on ANI compatibility.) For incoming Intercom calls, the
display will show the calling extension’s name. You can set up the system to display the
second call data automatically, or manually when the user presses CHECK followed by
the flashing key.
Hardware Considerations
Once installed and programmed, Caller ID is enabled for all analog trunk calls. For
Caller ID Type operation for T1 trunks, see T1 Trunking (with ANI/DNIS Compatibility)
later in this section.
In 704i, Caller ID requires a Caller ID daughter board that installs on an 8ATRU Loop
Start Trunk PCB. In 28i and 124i, Caller ID also requires a Caller ID daughter board
that installs on a 4ATRU PCB. In either case, the PCB provides Caller ID only for the
trunks on the ATRU PCB into which it is plugged.
Central Office Calls (Answering)
16 trunks
52 trunks
52 trunks
192 trunks
The system provides flexible routing of incoming CO (trunk) calls to meet the exact
site requirements. This lets trunk calls ring and be answered at any combination of
system extensions. For additional information on making trunks ring, refer to the Ring
Group feature.
Delayed Ringing
Extensions in a Ring Group can have delayed ringing for trunks. If the trunk is not
answered at its original destination, it can ring the DIL No Answer Ring Group. This
could help a secretary that covers calls for their boss. If the boss doesn't answer the call,
it rings the secretary's phone after a programmable interval. You can also set up the system to have unanswered calls overflow to Voice Mail.
Enhanced Overflow
All
G3
All
All
Ring Group calls can optionally overflow to the Voice Announce Unit Automated
Attendant or Voice Mail if not answered.
Product Description
91
3
Section 3: Features
Universal Answer
Auto Answer COS
control requires 5.03
G3
All
All
Universal Answer allows an employee to answer a call by going to any keyset and dialing a unique Universal Answer code, or, with Auto Answer enabled, just by lifting the
handset. Normally, you’ll set up Universal Answer along with Universal Night Answer.
For example, when an employee hears a night mode call ringing the External Paging,
they can go to any phone and answer the call.
Central Office Calls (Placing)
16 trunks
52 trunks
52 trunks
192 trunks
The system provides each extension user with flexibility in the methods they use to
place outgoing trunk calls. This lets you customize the call placing options to meet site
requirements and each individual's needs. A user can place a call by:
● Pressing a line key or a Trunk Group (i.e., loop) key
● Dialing a Trunk Service Code
● Dialing a Trunk Group Service Code
● Pressing a Trunk Group Routing (dial 9) key
● Dialing a Trunk Group Routing Service Code
Enhanced Outbound Routing
N/A
N/A
N/A
All
With Enhanced Outbound Routing, outbound Trunk Group calls route to another trunk if
dial tone is not detected. If enabled in system programming, this operation is automatic
and requires no user action.
Class of Service
10 Classes of Service
10 Classes of Service
15 Classes of Service
15 Classes of Service
Class of Service (COS) sets various features and dialing options (called items) for
extensions. In 704i, the system allows 15 Classes of Service. In 28i and 124i, the system allows 10 Classes of Service. Any number of extensions can share the same Class
of Service. An extension can have a different Class of Service for each of the Night
Service modes. This lets you program a different set of dialing options for daytime
operation, nighttime operation and even during lunch breaks.
92
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Changing by Service Code
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
Any extension that can set the system’s Time and Date can also change their own or another extension’s Class of Service. To maintain security, priority extensions can have their
Class of Service set up to block this capability. Normally, you would only provide administrators or supervisors with the capability to change another extension’s Class of Service.
3
Product Description
93
Section 3: Features
Class of Service Options
94
This option . . .
Is used with . . .
Default
Common Abbreviated Dialing
Abbreviated Dialing
Enabled
Group Abbreviated Dialing
Abbreviated Dialing
Enabled
Storing Abbreviated Dialing Entries
Abbreviated Dialing
Enabled
Account Code / Toll Restriction
Operator Alert
Account Codes
Disabled
ACD Queue Status Display
ACD
Disabled
ACD Supervisor’s Position
Enhancement
ACD
Disabled
Alarm
Alarm
Enabled
Background Music
Background Music
Enabled
Barge In Mode
Barge In
Speech
Barge In, Initiate
Barge In
Enabled
Barge In, Receive
Barge In
Enabled
Call Forward When Busy
Call Forwarding
Enabled
Call Forwarding (Both Ringing)
Call Forwarding
Enabled
Call Forwarding When Unanswered
Call Forwarding
Enabled
Call Forwarding with Follow Me
Call Forwarding with Follow Me
Enabled
Call Forwarding Off-Premise
Call Forwarding, Off-Premise
Disabled
Call Forwarding/DND Override
Call Forwarding/DND Override
Enabled
Call Timer
Call Timer
Enabled
Extension Camp On / Callback
Call Waiting / Camp On / Callback
Enabled
Call Waiting Tones
Call Waiting/Camp On
Enabled
Caller ID Display
Caller ID
Enabled
Edit Caller ID
Caller ID
Enabled
Trunk Name Display, Incoming
Central Office Calls (Answering)
Name Storing
Enabled
Trunk Name Display, Seizing
Central Office Calls (Answering)
Name Storing
Enabled
Trunk Calls
Central Office Calls (Placing)
Enabled
Allow COS to be Changed
Class of Service
Disabled
Conference
Conference
Meet Me Conference
Enabled
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Class of Service Options
This option . . .
Is used with . . .
Default
Continued Dialing
Continued Dialing
Enabled
DCI Auto Answer
Data Communications
Enabled
Department Calling
Department Calling
Enabled
Department Group Step Calling
Department Group Step Calling
Enabled
Dial Number Preview
Dial Number Preview
Enabled
Dial Pad Confirmation Tone
Dial Pad Confirmation Tone
Disabled
DSS Console Alternate Answer
Direct Station Selection (DSS) Console
Enabled
Do Not Disturb
Do Not Disturb
Enabled only for attendants
Clear E911 Alarm Ring
E911 Compatibility
Disabled
Display 911 Dialed Station Name and
Number
E911 Compatibility
Disabled
E911 Alarm Ring
E911 Compatibility
Disabled
Flash for Single Line Telephones
Flash
Enabled
Forced Trunk Disconnect
Forced Trunk Disconnect
Enabled only for attendants
Group Call Pickup
Group Call Pickup
Enabled
Group Call Pickup (Another Group)
Group Call Pickup
Enabled
Group Call Pickup (Specific Group)
Group Call Pickup
Enabled
Group Call Pickup (Within Group)
Group Call Pickup
Enabled
Group Call Pickup Information Display
Group Call Pickup
Enabled
Group Listen
Group Listen
Disabled
Automatic Handsfree Incoming
Handsfree and Monitor
Disabled only for attendants
Setting Handsfree Answerback and
Forced Intercom Ringing
Handsfree Answerback/Forced Intercom
Ringing
Enabled
Switching from Handsfree Answerback
to Forced Intercom Ringing
Handsfree Answerback/Forced Intercom
Ringing
Enabled
Group Hold Answer
Hold
Enabled
Group Hold Initiate
Hold
Enabled
Intercom Calls
Intercom
Enabled
Intercom Abandoned Call Display
Intercom Abandoned Call Display
Enabled
Extension Name Display, Answer
Intercom
Name Storing
Enabled
Product Description
3
95
Section 3: Features
Class of Service Options
96
This option . . .
Is used with . . .
Default
Selectable Ring Tone Selection
Selectable Ring Tones
Enabled
Manual Tandem Trunking
Tandem Trunking (Unsupervised
Conference)
Disabled
Tandem Trunking on Hand Up
Tandem Trunking (Unsupervised
Conference)
Disabled
TAPI Auto Idle Mode (Driver ID)
TAPI Compatibility
Nitsuko TAPI Service
Provider enabled
Time and Date
Time and Date
Enabled
Toll Restriction Override
Toll Restriction Override
Enabled only for attendants
Automatic On Hook Transfer
Transfer
Enabled
Transfer Callback Display
Transfer
Enabled only for attendants
Transfer Display
Transfer
Enabled
Transfer Without Holding
Transfer
Disabled
Unscreened Transfer
Transfer
Enabled
Trunk Queuing (Camp On)
Trunk Queuing
Enabled
Universal Answer
Universal Answer
Disabled
General Message Listen
Voice Announce Unit
Enabled
General Message Record
Voice Announce Unit
Enabled only for attendants
Personal Greeting
Voice Announce Unit
Enabled
VAU Record
Voice Announce Unit
Enabled only for attendants
VAU Reminder Messages
Voice Announce Unit
Disabled
Voice Call Conference
Voice Call Conference
Enabled
Voice Over Initiate
Voice Over
Enabled only for attendants
Voice Over Receive
Voice Over
Disabled only for attendants
Long Conversation Alarm
Warning Tone for Long Conversation
Disabled
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Class of Service Options
This option . . .
Is used with . . .
Default
Intercom Name Display, Incoming
Intercom
Name Storing
Enabled
Last Number Redial
Last Number Redial
Enabled
Meet Me Conference and Paging
Meet Me Conference and Paging
Enabled
Memo Dial
Memo Dial
Enabled
Message Waiting
Message Waiting
Enabled
Microphone Cutoff
Microphone Cutoff
Enabled
Changing the Music on Hold Tone
Music On Hold
Enabled only for attendants
Extension Name
Name Storing
Enabled
Manual Night Service Enable
Night Service
Enabled only for attendants
Automatic Off Hook Signaling
Off-Hook Signaling
Automatic (except for
attendants)
Block Camp On
Off-Hook Signaling
Block disabled
Block Manual Off Hook Signaling
Off-Hook Signaling
Block disabled
DID Call Waiting
Off-Hook Signaling
Disabled
DID Off Hook Ringing
Off-Hook Signaling
Disabled
Off-Hook Signals (Receiving)
Off-Hook Signaling
Disabled only for attendants
External Paging
Paging (External)
Enabled
Internal Paging
Paging (Internal)
Enabled
Enhanced Dial Buffering
Park
Disabled
Data Privacy
Privacy
Enabled
Programmable Function Key
Programming
Programmable Function Keys
Enabled
Repeat Redial
Repeat Redial
Enabled
Extension Ringdown
Ringdown Extension
Disabled
Room Monitor, Extension Being
Monitored
Room Monitor
Disabled
Room Monitor, Initiating Extension
Room Monitor
Disabled
Save Number Redial
Save Number Dial
Enabled
Secretary Call
Secretary Call
Enabled
Selectable Display Messaging
Selectable Display Messaging
Enabled
Checking Selectable Ring Tones
Selectable Ring Tones
Enabled
Product Description
3
97
Section 3: Features
Computer Telephony
Integration (CTI) Applications
All
All
All
All
Computer Telephony Integration (CTI) applications automate your office with TAPI
compatibility and external PC control. CTI puts your telephone system on the cutting
edge of modern office productivity with:
Personal Computer Interface (PCI)
Use a DCI Module installed in your i-Series Display or Super Display keyset as a
Personal Computer Interface. Installing NEC's TAPI software driver (P/N 94000) and
TAPI compatible software in your personal computer will allow your PC to operate your
telephone. NEC's TAPI software driver provides all TAPI Basic Services and a host of
TAPI Supplemental Services.
Note: You can obtain the TAPI Driver (P/N 94000) separately or as part of the TAPI
Kit (P/N 92966B). The TAPI Kit consists of the TAPI Driver in addition to a DCI
Module (P/N 92266B).
Telemarketing Dial
Telemarketing Dial is PC-based dialing that enables your staff to canvas prospects
quickly and efficiently. Use third-party database software installed on your PC as autodialer which can automatically look up your clients and dial their numbers.
Database Lookup
Provided through Caller ID and TAPI Compatible third-party software (such as
Symantec's ACT!), Database Lookup displays your caller's account information before
their call is even answered.
Open Architecture Interface (OAI)
OAI allows unique PC-based system functions via third-party development.
Conference
8 4-party or 4 8-party
8 4-party or 4 8-party
8 4-party or 4 8-party
32 4-party or 16 8-party
Conference lets an extension user add additional inside and outside callers to their conversation. With Conference, a user may set up a multiple-party telephone meeting without leaving the office. The system allows either four or eight parties maximum per conference. In 704i, Conference requires the installation of a CDTU-A or CDTU-C PCB.
98
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Barge Into Conference
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
If a user’s extension has Barge In capability enabled, they can also Barge In on an established Conference. This permits, for example, an attendant or supervisor to join a
Conference in an emergency. It also allows a co-worker to leave a Conference — and
then rejoin the telephone meeting when it is convenient to do so.
Split Between Calls
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
By using the CONF key to place calls on Hold, an extension user can easily Split
(Alternate) between two calls. The user can talk to the first call, switch to the second
call, and continue to switch between the callers as often as desired. This would allow,
for example, a dispatcher to talk to a customer on one line and a service tech on the
other, without having to join the two in Conference.
3
Transfer Call Into Conference
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
An extension with Barge In capability can Transfer a call into an existing Conference.
This would allow, for example, an attendant to locate co-workers and then Transfer
them into an existing telephone meeting. There is no need for the attendant to locate all
the parties at the same time and sequentially add them into the Conference.
Increased Conference Capacity
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
An extension user can set up a Conference with either four or eight parties maximum
per Conference, and any number of the parties in Conference can be outside callers. In
software versions without this enhancement, only two of the parties in Conference can
be outside callers.
Additional Enhancements
SLT trunk answer code
and adding parked call
requires 4.02.
● Initiator cannot place
Conferenced trunks on
Hold.
●
Product Description
SLT trunk answer code
and adding parked call
requires 4.02.
● Initiator cannot place
Conferenced trunks on
Hold.
●
SLT trunk answer code
and adding parked call
available.
● Initiator cannot place
Conferenced trunks on
Hold.
●
SLT trunk answer code
and adding parked call
available.
● Initiator can place
Conferenced trunks on
Hold.
●
99
Section 3: Features
Conference, Voice Call/Privacy Release
8 4-party or 4 8-party
8 4-party or 4 8-party
8 4-party or 4 8-party
32 4-party or 16 8-party
Voice Call Conference lets extension users in the same work area join in a trunk
Conference. To initiate a Voice Call Conference, an extension user just presses the Voice
Call Conference key and tells their co-workers to join the call. The system releases the
privacy on the trunk, and other users can just press the trunk's line key to join the call.
Voice Call Conference does not use the telephone system features to announce the call.
The person initiating the Voice Call Conference just announces it "through the air."
Privacy Mode Toggle Option
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
The Privacy Mode Toggle Option allows an extension user to quickly change an outside
call from the non-private mode to the private mode. This would help a workgroup
supervisor, for example, that needed to quickly monitor any group member’s outside
call. The supervisor would press the line key to join in on any member’s call. If the
supervisor wanted to make a “secure” call, however, they could quickly toggle the line’s
mode and be assured that their call would not be monitored. If the outside call is on a
line key, the user just presses the line key to switch modes. If the call is on a loop key,
the user presses their Privacy Release function key instead.
Continued Dialing
All
All
All
All
CAUTION
Continued Dialing may make the system more susceptible to toll fraud.
Continued Dialing allows an extension user to dial a call, wait for the called party to
answer and then dial additional digits. This helps users that need services like Voice
Mail and automatic banking.
There are two types of Continued Dialing:
● Continued Dialing for Intercom Calls
Depending on an extension's Class of Service, a keyset user may be able to dial additional digits after their Intercom call connects. In systems with Voice Mail, for
example, Continued Dialing lets extension users dial the different options after the
Voice Mail answers. Without Continued Dialing, extension users cannot access these
Voice Mail options.
100
Product Description
Section 3: Features
●
Continued Dialing for Trunk Calls
Continued Dialing gives a user access to outside services like automatic banking, an
outside Automated Attendant, bulletin boards and Other Common Carriers (OCCs).
After the outside service answers, the user can dial digits for whatever options the
service allows. Without Continued Dialing, the system's Toll Restriction will cut off
the call after a specific number of dialed digits.
Cordless Telephone (900i)
All
G2
All
All
The 900i (P/N 85456D) is a 900 MHz digital cordless telephone
that provides mobility, flexibility and convenience for those who
spend much of the workday away from their desk. Fully integrated with the telephone system, the 900i offers many standard
features such as Park, Page, Do Not Disturb, Hotline, Voice
Over and Voice Mail. The 900i is normally paired with a companion keyset during installation for improved one-button call
coverage capabilities.
Complemented by four fully programmable function keys
(with LEDs), the 900i achieves a whole new level of convenience and mobility. An easy-to-read LCD display, volume
controls, a rechargeable battery and a handy belt clip round
out the elegant and affordable 900i.
Data Communications Interface (DCI)
All
All
All
All
With the Data Communications Interface (DCI), you can use your telephone system to
set up a data network. DCI networking lets system users share common office resources
such as PCs, modems and printers. Since the phone system handles the network communications, you can eliminate the expense of separate wiring, network adapters and
network driver software. The DCIs can switch asynchronous RS-232-C data at speeds
from 300 to 19.2K baud. Internal X.25 packet switching ensures maximum data reliability with a minimum of disruption to other system activities.
Product Description
101
3
Section 3: Features
920 - 168f
3DCI
16DSTU
Modem
Serial Printer
PC
3DCI
ASTU
Modem
Modem
Modem
704i Connections Shown
There are three types of DCIs:
RS-232-C DCI Module
36 in 6.00.08 or higher
15 prior to 6.00.08
36 in 6.00.08 or higher
72 prior to 6.00.08
36
144
The DCI-A is a single port data module that installs in a multibutton phone for serial
(RS-232-C) communications. Use DCI-A to easily add RS-232-C data capabilities to
any keyset. Although it installs in the phone, the DCI-A has its own unique software
port and extension number. Note that the total of DCI Modules allowed includes DCI-A
plus DCI-B (see below). In addition, the total in 28i depends on system loading.
102
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Centronics DCI Module
36 in 6.00.08 or higher
15 prior to 6.00.08
36 in 6.00.08 or higher
72 prior to 6.00.08
36
144
The DCI-B is also a single port data module that installs in a multibutton telephone, but
it is used for parallel (Centronics) communication. Like the DCI-A, DCI-B also has its
own unique software port and extension number. Use the DCI-B to connect a parallel
printer to your data network. The DCI-B operates in one direction only. A switch on the
DCI-B lets you send data OUT (from DCI-B to printer) or IN (from printer to DCI-B).
Note that the total of DCI Modules allowed includes DCI-A plus DCI-B (see above). In
addition, the total in 28i depends on system loading.
3-Port DCI Unit
3 max
12 max (4 per cabinet)
12 max (4 per cabinet)
48
The 3DCI-A is a stand-alone unit that connects to a single DSTU PCB port and provides
three RS-232-C ports. The 3DCI units are helpful in areas that have a high concentration of data devices. Since you can have three devices connected to each 3DCI, you use
up 1/3 the number of DTSU PCB ports (when compared to the DCI Module). Keep in
mind, however, that 3DCI Units do not have an associated telephone. The 704i can have
up to 48 3DCI Units (144 data ports). The 124i can have up to 12 3DCI Units (four per
cabinet). The 28i can have up to three 3DCI Units.
DCI Features
●
Keyset-Originated Data Call
Place a call to another DCI by using your telephone dial pad. The data call automatically sets up if the called DCI answers.
●
Terminal-Originated Data Call
Place data calls directly from your PC. You can dial using Hayes compatible dialing
commands (e.g., ATDT) or use the powerful auto-dialing features of your communications software.
●
Terminal-Originated Voice Call (Telemarketing Dial)
Use your PC to place an outgoing call, then switch to a voice call after the number
dials out. This is a great feature for telemarketers that have a list of names to call
stored in their communications software. Let the communications software dial the
call - then switch it to a voice call after the stored number dials out. Refer to
"Computer Telephony Integration (CTI) Applications" for more on your system's
office automation features.
●
DCI Department Group
Group DCIs into departments for pooled DCI operation. For example, you can program several network printers into a DCI Department Group. When a user calls the
department, they connect to the first available printer.
DCI Department Groups also allow modem pooling for trunk calls without using a
proprietary Modem Pooling PCB. Users placing outside calls select one of the
pooled modems as part of the dialing sequence.
Product Description
103
3
Section 3: Features
●
Hayes Compatibility
The DCI is compatible with many Hayes AT commands. For example, you can use
S-registers to change DCI communications parameters. In addition, Result Codes
help you monitor the progress of your call. You can also enter over 20 Hayes commands from your terminal to control dialing and terminal options, Result Code display and S-register programming.
●
DCI Hotline
DCI Hotline sets up a "nailed-up" (permanent) connection between a DCI Module
and another DCI. During programming, you set the DCI Module as the "source" and
the other DCI as the "target." When the user at the source presses the keyset data
key, the system automatically sets up the data link to the target DCI. You could use a
DCI Hotline at a terminal connected through the phone system to a mini-computer.
When the terminal user presses the keyset Hotline key, the terminal goes on-line to
the mini-computer.
●
Speed Conversion
The system can automatically compensate for speed differences between two connected data devices. For example, a PC receiving at 2400 baud can accept files sent
by another PC at 19.2K baud. There is no need for the two devices to match their
communications speed.
Physical Ports and Software Ports
Software ports 1-72 in
6.00.08 or higher
1-16 prior to 6.00.08
Software ports 1-72
Software ports 1-72
Software ports 1-288
DCIs have physical ports and corresponding software ports. The software ports (shown
on the icon bar above) are used during system programming.
PORT 3
PORT 2
Software
Port 147
Software
Port 146
PORT 1
FG
LINE
To DSTU
PCB Port
920 - 166A
DCI Modules
For DCI Modules, the physical port is the same as the phone port into which the module
is installed. The software port depends on the installation order set up in programming.
Order 1 specifies software port 1; order 2 specifies software port 2, etc. Normally, you'll
assign DCI Order 1 to the first DCI Module you install. Then, proceed sequentially,
using up the first half of the available software ports (e.g., 1-144 in 704i). (Note that in
28i and 124i systems prior to 6.00.08, the software port is the same as the host telephone’s physical port.)
Software
Port 145
Physical
Port (Order 1)
(704i System Shown)
3DCI Units
Each 3DCI consists of a physical port for connection to the phone system and three software ports. The physical port is the station port into which the 3DCI line cord is
104
Product Description
Section 3: Features
plugged. The 3DCIs have a software port numbering scheme unique from the DCI
Modules which is also determined by the installation order set up in programming. It
starts with the second half of available software ports (e.g., 145 in 704i). In 704i, for
example, the 3DCI with order 1 has software ports 145, 146 and 147. The 3DCI with
order 48 (the highest 3DCI order number available) has software ports 286, 287 and 288.
Normally, you assign 3DCI Order 1 to the first 3DCI you install and Order 48 to the last.
(Note that in 28i and 124i systems prior to 6.00.08, the software port is the same as the
extension port to which the module is connected and the next two consecutive ports.)
28i/124i Data Communications Interface Devices
Device
Total
Number of
Physical
Ports
DCI
Modules
36 (in
phone)
3DCI Units
36
Installation
Order
Numbers
Software
Ports
1-36
1-36
1-36
37-72
3
704i Data Communications Interface Devices
Device
Total
Number of
Physical
Ports
Installation
Order
Numbers
Software
Ports
DCI
Modules
144 (in
phone)
1-144
1-144
3DCI Units
48
1-48
145-288
During programming, you assign DCI extension numbers and Department Group options
to DCI software ports, not physical ports. During installation, the equipment plugged into
the connectors corresponds to the DCI software ports.
Department Calling
8 Department Groups
8 Department Groups
16 Department Groups
64 Department Groups
With Department Calling, an extension user can call an idle extension within a preprogrammed Department Group by dialing the group's pilot number. The call rings the first
available extension in the group. For example, this lets a caller dial the Sales
Department just by knowing the Sales Department's pilot number. The caller does not
have to know any of the Sales Department's extension numbers.
There are two types of routing available with Department Calling: Priority Routing and
Circular Routing. With Priority Routing, an incoming call routes to the highest priority
extensions first. Lower priority extensions ring only if all high priority extensions are
busy. With Circular Routing, each call rings a new extension. In a Department Group
with extensions 310 (Priority 1), 311 (Priority 2) and 312 (Priority 3), for example:
Product Description
105
Section 3: Features
●
●
●
●
The first call rings 310.
The second call rings 311.
The third call rings 312.
The fourth call rings 310 and the cycle repeats.
Department Calling also provides overflow routing for extensions within the group. If a
user directly dials a busy extension within a Department Group, the system can optionally route the call to the first available group member.
Department Group Hunting
All
G2
All
All
Hunting sets the conditions under which calls to a Department Group pilot number will
cycle through the members of the group. The hunting choices are:
● Busy (Option 0)
A call to the pilot number will hunt past a busy group member to the first available
extension.
●
Not answered (Option 1)
A call to the pilot number will cycle through the idle members of a Department
Calling group. The call will continue to cycle until it is answered or the calling party
hangs up. If the Department Group has Priority Routing enabled, and the highest priority member is busy, the call will not route.
●
Busy or not answered (Option 2)
A call to the pilot number will cycle through the idle members of a Department Calling
group. The call will continue to cycle until it is answered or the calling party hangs up.
Calls into groups with Priority Routing and Circular Routing route identically.
●
Simultaneous ringing (Option 3)
All idle members of the Department Group ring simultaneously. Calls do not cycle
between group members.
If all members of the Department Group are busy, an incoming or transferred call to the
group's pilot number will queue for an available member. If the system has a VAU
Module installed, the queued caller will hear, "Please hold on. All lines are busy. Your
call will be answered when a line becomes free." Each group has a queue that can hold
up to 10 waiting calls.
The VAU Automated Attendant can also Transfer calls to Department Groups.
The system prevents hunting to a Department Group extension if it is:
● Busy on a call
● In Do Not Disturb
● Call Forwarded
106
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Department Step Calling
All
All
All
All
After calling a busy Department Calling Group member, an extension user can have
Department Step Calling quickly call another member in the group. The caller does not
have to hang up and place another Intercom call if the first extension called is unavailable.
Dial Number Preview
All
All
All
All
Dialing Number Preview lets a display keyset user dial and review a number before the
system dials it out. Dialing Number Preview helps the user avoid dialing errors.
Dial Pad Confirmation Tone
All
All
3
All
All
For an extension with Dial Pad Confirmation Tone enabled, the user hears a beep each
time they press a dial pad key. This is helpful for Intercom calls and Dial Pulse trunk
calls, since these calls provide no Call Progress tones. You can change the tone in system programming.
Direct Inward Dialing (DID)
All
All
All
All
Direct Inward Dialing (DID) lets outside callers directly dial system extensions. DID
saves time for callers who know the extension number they wish to reach. To place a
DID call, the outside caller dials the local exchange (NNX) and additional digits to ring
the telephone system extension. For example, DID number 926-5400 can directly ring
extension 400. The caller does not have to rely on attendant or secretary call screening
to complete the call.
In addition to direct dialing of system extensions, DID provides:
● DID Dialed Number Translation
● Flexible DID Service Compatibility
● DID Intercept
● DID Camp-On
Direct Inward Dialing requires DID service from telco.
Product Description
107
Section 3: Features
DID Dialed Number Translation
4 translation tables
200 table entries
4 translation tables
200 table entries
8 translation tables
800 table entries
16 translation tables
2000 table entries
DID allows either 16 (704i), 8 (124i Enhanced), or 4 (28i and 124i) different tables for
DID number translation. This gives you more flexibility when buying DID service from
telco. If you can't buy the exact block of numbers you need (e.g., 301-456), use the
translation tables to convert the digits received. For example, a translation table could
convert digits 501-656 to extension numbers 301-456.
The system has either 2000 (704i), 800 (124i Enhanced), or 200 (28i and 124i) DID
Translation Table entries that you can allocate among the DID Translation Tables. There
is one translation made in each entry. For a simple installation, you can put all entries
in the same table. For more flexibility, you can optionally distribute the entries among
the tables.
In addition to number conversion, each DID Translation Table entry can have a name
assigned to it. When the DID call rings the destination extension, the programmed
name displays.
Flexible DID Service Compatibility
You can program the system to be compatible with three and four digit DID service. With
four digit service, the telco sends four digits to the system for translation. With three digit
service, the telco sends three digits to the system for translation. Be sure to program your
system for compatibility with the provided telco service. For example, if the telco sends
four digits, make sure you set up the translation tables to accept the four digits.
The system is compatible with Dial Pulse (DP) and DTMF DID signaling. DID trunks
can be either wink start or immediate start.
DID Intercept
All
●
●
G2for basic features.
Routing to VAU Auto
Attendant requires G3.
All
All
DID Intercept automatically reroutes DID calls under certain conditions. There are four
types of DID Intercept:
● Vacant Number Intercept
If a caller dials an extension that does not exist or misdials, Vacant Number Intercept
can reroute the call to the programmed DID Intercept extension ring group, Voice
Mail or VAU Automated Attendant. Without Vacant Number Intercept, the caller
hears error tone after misdialing.
●
108
Busy Intercept
Busy Intercept determines DID routing when a DID caller dials a busy extension. If
Busy Intercept is enabled, the call immediately routes to the programmed DID
Intercept extension ring group, Voice Mail or VAU Automated Attendant. If Busy
Intercept is disabled, the call follows DID Camp-On programming (see below).
Product Description
Section 3: Features
●
Ring-No-Answer Intercept
Ring-No-Answer Intercept sets the routing options for DID calls that ring unanswered at the destination extension. With Ring-No-Answer Intercept enabled, the
unanswered call reroutes to the DID Intercept extension ring group, Voice Mail or
VAU Automated Attendant after the DID Ring-No-Answer Time interval. If RingNo-Answer Intercept is disabled, the unanswered call rings the destination until the
outside caller hangs up.
DID Camp-On
DID Camp-On sets what happens to DID calls to busy extensions when you have Busy
Intercept disabled. With DID Camp-On enabled, a call to a busy extension camps-on
for the DID Ring No Answer Time interval. It then diverts to the programmed DID
Intercept extension ring group. Without DID Camp-On, the caller to the busy extension
just hears busy tone.
In 704i, DTMF DID service requires the installation of a CDTU-A/B PCB . In 28i and
124i, DTMF DID service requires the installation of a 4DTDU PCB. Refer to Section 2,
The Components for more.
DID Routing through the VAU Automated Attendant
3
All
G3
All
All
DID calls can optionally route through the Automated Attendant. The DID caller hears
an initial Automated Attendant Greeting explaining their dialing options. If the caller
misdials, they hear a second greeting with additional instructions. For example, the first
greeting can be, “thank you for calling. Please dial the extension number you wish to
reach or dial 0 for the operator.” If the caller inadvertently dials an extension that doesn’t exist, they could hear, “The extension you dialed is unavailable. Please dial 0 for
assistance or dial # to leave a message so we can call you back.”
SMDR Includes Dialed Number
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
The SMDR report can optionally print the trunk’s name (entered in system programming) or the number the incoming caller dialed (i.e., the dialed DID digits). This gives
you the option of analyzing the SMDR report based on the number your callers dial.
(This option also applies to ISDN trunk, as well.)
Product Description
109
Section 3: Features
Direct Inward Line (DIL)
All
G2for basic features.
Overflow to VAU Auto
Att. requires 6.00.08.
● Overflow to Voice
Mail requires G3.
●
All
All
●
A Direct Inward Line (DIL) is a trunk that rings an extension or Department Group directly.
Since DILs only ring the DIL destination, employees always know which calls are for them.
For example, a company operator can have a Direct Inward Line for International Sales
Information. When outside callers dial the DIL's phone number, the call rings the operator
on the International Sales line key. The DIL does not ring other extensions. If unanswered
the DIL can overflow to a trunk Ring Group, Voice Mail, or the VAU Automated Attendant.
DIL Delayed Ringing
Extensions in a Ring Group can have delayed ringing for another extension's DIL. If
the DIL is not answered at its original destination, it rings the DIL No Answer Ring
Group. This could help a Technical Service Department, for example, that covers calls
for an Inside Sales Department. If the Inside Sales calls are not answered, they ring into
the Technical Service Department.
Direct Inward System Access (DISA)
All
G2for basic features.
Overflow to VAU Auto
Att. requires 6.00.08.
● Overflow to Voice
Mail requires G2.
●
All
All
●
Direct Inward System Access permits outside callers to directly dial system extensions,
trunks and selected features. This could help an employee away from the office who
wants to directly dial co-workers or use the company's trunks for long distance calls. To
use DISA, the employee:
●
●
●
●
●
Dials the telephone number that rings the DISA trunk
Waits for the DISA trunk to automatically answer with a unique dial tone
Dials the 6-digit DISA password (access code)
Waits for a second unique dial tone
Accesses a system trunk, uses a selected feature or dials a system extension
DISA calls ring system extensions like other outside calls. If an extension has a line key
for the DISA trunk, the call rings that key. If the extension does not have a line key, the
call rings an idle CALL key. If unanswered, the DISA call can overflow to a trunk Ring
Group, Voice Mail, or the VAU Automated Attendant.
You can set DISA operation differently for each Night Service mode. For example, a
trunk can be a normal trunk during the day and a DISA trunk at night. You can also set
the routing for DISA trunks when the caller dials a busy or unanswered extension, dials
incorrectly or forgets to dial.
110
Product Description
Section 3: Features
In 704i, DISA requires the installation of a CDTU-A/B PCB. In 28i and 124i, DISA
requires the installation of a 4DTDU PCB. Refer to Section 2, The Components for more.
DISA Class of Service
15 users, 10 DISA COS
15 users, 10 DISA COS
15 users, 15 DISA COS
15 users, 15 DISA COS
DISA Class of Service provides features and dialing restrictions for DISA callers. This
allows you to control the capabilities of the DISA callers dialing into your system.
When a DISA caller first accesses the system, they must enter a DISA password before
proceeding. The system associates the password entered with a specific user number,
which in turn has a Class of Service. If the Class of Service allows the action (such as
making outgoing trunk calls), the call goes through. If the DISA Class of Service does
not allow the action, the system prevents the call. The 704i and 124i Enhanced systems
have 15 DISA Classes of Service; the 28i and 124i have 10. The DISA Class of Service
options are:
●
Trunk Group Routing/ARS Access
When a DISA caller dials into the system, they may be able to dial 9 and place outside calls. Any toll charges are incurred by the system. The call follows the system's
Trunk Group Access or Automatic Route Selection - whichever is enabled.
●
Trunk Group Access
DISA callers may be able to access a specific trunk group for outgoing calls through
the system. To access a Trunk Group, the user dials Service Code 804 followed by
the Trunk Group number (e.g., 1). This allows the DISA caller to place an outgoing
call over the selected group. Trunk Group Access bypasses the system's Trunk
Group Routing/ARS. As with dial 9 access, any toll charges are incurred by the system. Also see Direct Trunk Access below.
●
Common Abbreviated Dialing
The system's Common Abbreviated Dialing bins may be available to DISA callers.
This could save the DISA caller time when dialing.
●
Operator Calling
A DISA caller may be able to dial 0 for the system's operator.
●
Paging
Internal and External Paging may be available to DISA callers. This allows co-workers in adjacent facilities, for example, to broadcast announcements to each other.
●
Direct Trunk Access
DISA callers may be able to select a specific trunk for outgoing calls through the
system. To directly access a trunk, the user dials Service Code #9 followed by the
trunk's number (e.g., 001). This allows the DISA caller to place an outgoing call
over the selected trunk. Direct Trunk Access bypasses the system's Trunk Group
Routing/ARS. As with dial 9 access, any toll charges are incurred by the system.
Also see Trunk Group Access above.
●
Forced Trunk Disconnect
If a DISA caller uses Direct Trunk Access and the requested trunk is busy, they may
be able to disconnect the active call on that trunk. The DISA caller can then call
back into the system and place the call again.
Product Description
111
3
Section 3: Features
DISA Toll Restriction
The digits a DISA caller dials for an outgoing call may be subject to the system's Toll
Restriction. For example, Toll Restriction can prevent users from dialing a 1-900 service. When an incoming DISA caller tries to use system trunks to dial 1-900, Toll
Restriction will deny the call.
DISA Operating Modes
The DISA Operating Modes determine what happens when a DISA caller forgets to dial,
calls a busy or unanswered extension or dials incorrectly. The system can either drop
the call or send it to a preset Ring Group.
Warning Tone for Long DISA Calls
All
G3 (5.02)
All
All
You can set up the system to provide a warning tone to DISA callers that have been on a
call too long. The warning tone can be just a reminder (which the caller can ignore) or can
be followed by a forced disconnect of the call. When the DISA caller hears the warning
tone, they have the option of dialing a code to continue the conversation or disconnect.
Department Calling with Overflow Message
All
All
All
All
If a DISA caller dials a busy Department Calling Group, while the caller waits the system
can periodically play the voice prompt, “Please hold on. All lines are busy. Your call will
be answered when a line becomes free.” When an extension in the Department Group
becomes free, the call automatically goes through. If the Department Group remains busy,
the DISA call routes to the programmed overflow destination or disconnects. This feature
requires the installation of the VAU Module.
Direct Station Selection (DSS) Console
8 consoles max.per
system, 2 max. per
extension
8 consoles max.per
system, 2 max. per
extension
8 consoles max.per
system, 2 max. per
extension
64 consoles max.per
system, 4 max. per
extension
The DSS Console gives a keyset user additional programmable keys which provide a
Busy Lamp Field (BLF) and one-button access to extensions, trunks and system features. This saves time for users that do a lot of call processing (e.g., operators or dispatchers). The 110-Button DSS Console provides an additional 100 programmable keys,
while the 24-Button DSS Console provides 24 programmable keys. The 110-Button
DSS also has 10 fixed feature keys for Paging, calling Door Boxes, activating Night
Service and enabling DSS Console Alternate Answer. (This lets the console user quickly
reroute their calls to an assigned co-worker by pressing ALT to place their console offduty.) In addition, the 110-Button DSS Console also has two additional keys that allow
“shifting” between the first and second set of 100 extensions.
112
Product Description
Section 3: Features
The DSS Console simplifies:
● Calling extensions and Door Boxes
● Placing, answering and transferring outside calls
● Making an External or Internal Page
● Switching the Night Service mode
● Activating DSS Console Alternate Answer
You can also program the DSS Console keys to store Service Codes and Programmable
Feature Key codes (up to four digits long). This provides the DSS Console user with
many of the features available on One-Touch and Programmable Feature Keys.
Additional Digit Storing
All
G2
All
All
You can store additional digits along with Service Codes. For example, storing 8041
accesses Trunk Group 1 when the user presses the DSS Console key.
System Capacities
3
The system allows a specific number of extensions to have DSS Consoles. These are
called the DSS Console Installations (see the chart below).
In 704i, each extension can have up to four consoles. The maximum number of DSS
Consoles allowed in 704i is 64, and up to 16 can be unique. When installing 110-Button
DSS Consoles, the second, third and fourth consoles require their own power supply. The
fourth console should be set up for Direct Line Selection.
The 28i and 124i can have two consoles per extension, with eight maximum per system, and
up to 4 can be unique. If an extension’s second console is a 110-button, it requires its own
power supply. Normally, the second console should be set up for Direct Line Selection.
It’s recommended that a separate AC/DC adapter be used with any keyset which has a DSS
Console installed and is also using a DCI-A/B or OHVA module.
DSS Console Capacities
System
Console
Installations
Max. per
Extension
704i
16
4
Max. per
System
64
(48 DSS/16DLS)
28i/124i
4
8
2
Customizable DSS Console Lamping
All
G3
All
All
You can customize the DSS Console’s lamping patterns to meet specific site requirements. This is particular helpful when setting up advanced ACD applications and
Hotel/Motel.
Product Description
113
Section 3: Features
24-Button DSS Toggle Key
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
N/A
A keyset with a 24-Button DSS Console can have a unique Programmable Function Key
that toggles the console between DSS and DLS mode. When the key is on (i.e., the key
LED lights), the attached console is in the DLS mode. When the key is off, the attached
console is in the DSS mode.
Directed Call Pickup
All
All
All
All
Directed Call Pickup permits an extension user to intercept a call ringing another extension. This allows a user to conveniently answer a co-worker's call from their own telephone. With Directed Call Pickup, an extension user can pick up:
●
●
●
●
●
Trunk calls (i.e., Ring Group calls and DIDs)
Direct Inward Lines
Transferred trunk calls
Transferred Intercom calls
Ringing and voice-announced Intercom calls
Directory Dialing
All
G2
All
All
Directory Dialing allows a display or Super Display keyset user to select a co-worker or
outside call from a list of names, rather than dialing the phone number. There are four
types of Directory Dialing:
C - Company (Common) Abbreviated Dialing
D - Department (Group) Abbreviated Dialing
P - Personal Abbreviated Dialing (One-Touch) Keys
X - Co-worker's extensions
Directory Dialing sorts directory names in alphabetical order (based on the first four
characters of the name) when the system starts up or reboots. In addition, the system
will re-sort extension names when:
● You change Program 0502 (Extension Numbers and Names).
● Any user dials 800 and changes their extension's name.
Directory Dialing follows all the programmed options and conditions for Abbreviated
Dialing, Intercom Calling and One-Touch Calling.
114
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Distinctive Ringing, Tones
and Flash Patterns
All
G2 required to
customize tones
All
All
Distinctive Ringing, Tones and Flash Patterns provide extension users with audible and
visual call status signals. This lets users tell the types of calls by listening to the ringing/tones and watching the keys. It also helps users monitor the progress of their calls.
In addition, Distinctive Ringing lets keyset users customize their Intercom and trunk call
ringing. This is helpful for users that work together closely. For example, if several coworkers set their keysets to ring at different pitches, the co-workers can always tell
which calls are for them.
There are six Distinctive Ringing tones available at each extension: three for outside
calls and three for Intercom calls. The user can listen to and select which tone they want
for each type of call. During installation, the system assigns a default Intercom ring tone
for each extension and trunk ring tone for each trunk. System programming allows you
to assign different tones (from the six available) or create new choices.
Do Not Disturb
All
All
All
All
Do Not Disturb blocks incoming calls and Paging announcements. DND permits an
extension user to work by the phone undisturbed by incoming calls and announcements.
The user can activate DND while their phone is idle or while on a call. Once activated,
incoming trunk calls still flash the line keys. The user may use the phone in the normal
manner for placing and processing calls. There are four Do Not Disturb options available at each extension:
1
Incoming trunk calls blocked
2
Paging, incoming Intercom and transferred trunk
calls blocked
3
Paging, incoming trunk and Intercom calls blocked
4
Incoming Call Forwards blocked
Do Not Disturb Override
Refer to Call Forwarding / Do No Disturb Override on page 89.
Product Description
115
3
Section 3: Features
Door Box
8 max.
8 max.
8 max.
8 max.
The Door Box is a self-contained Intercom unit typically used to monitor an entrance
door. A visitor at the door can press the Door Box call button (like a door bell). The
system then sends chime tones to all extensions programmed to receive chimes. To
answer the chime, the called extension user just lifts the handset. This lets the extension
user talk to the visitor at the Door Box. The Door Box is convenient to have at a delivery entrance, for example. It is not necessary to have company personnel monitor the
delivery entrance; they just answer the Door Box chimes instead.
Each Door Box has a pair of normally open relay contacts that can connect to an electric
door strike. Use these contacts to remotely control the entrance door. After answering
the Door Box chimes, a keyset user can press FLASH to activate the Door Box contacts.
This in turn releases the electric strike on the entrance door. The device connected to the
Door Box contacts cannot exceed the contact ratings (24 VDC @ 500 mA). The system
can have up to eight Door Boxes.
Dual Line Appearance
All
All
All
All
Each keyset has two line appearance keys (CALL1 and CALL2) for placing and
answering calls. These line appearance keys, assigned to the extension's number, simplify operations for busy users. For example, the user can easily process a new call on
one appearance with a call in progress on the other.
E911 Compatibility
All
G3 (4.06)
All
All
E911 Capability ensures that emergency calls always get through. If an emergency
occurs, a user simply goes to any phone, lifts the handset and dials 911. The system’s
built-in E911 compatibility places the emergency call even if the user forgets to dial an
access code or press a line key. The E911 capabilities include:
116
●
Attendant Notification
The attendant receives a notification each time a co-worker dials an emergency 911 call.
This notification can be either the co-worker’s name and number display or an audible
alarm. Notification occurs regardless of whether the attendant is idle or busy on a call.
●
Emergency Routing
When an extension user dials 911, the system can automatically find a trunk for the
call. The system can choose a route to which the user normally does not have access.
If all normal routes are busy, the system can even disconnect an active call and place
the emergency call.
Product Description
Section 3: Features
●
Calling Party identification
With ISDN installed, the system can provide the calling party’s telephone number
and extension number. No additional customer-provided E911 equipment is required.
External Alarm Sensors
●
8 sensors max. (4 per
PGDU PCB, 2 PCBs
max. per system)
8 sensors max. (4 per
PGDU PCB, 2 PCBs
max. per system)
● G2 required to change
Alarm Ring Tone
●
●
8 sensors max. (4 per
PGDU PCB, 2 PCBs
max. per system)
●
16 sensors max. (8 per
PGDU PCB, 2 PCBs
max. per system
The system provides alarm sensors that you can connect to customer-provided alarm
contacts. When the alarm contact activates, designated extensions and/or External
Paging speakers broadcast a unique alert tone. This indicates that the alarm has been
activated. External Alarm Sensors could help a receptionist, for example, that frequently has to leave the reception desk to do some filing. When a visitor opens the company's door, an alarm contact on the door could signal a telephone in the filing area.
When the receptionist hears the alarm alert tone, they know it's time to return to the
reception area and greet the visitor. The alarm alert tone continues as long as the door
remains open. The 704i provides up to 16 sensors, while 28i and 124i provide up to 8.
Refer to Section 2, Components for more.
Fax Machine Compatibility
8 sensors max. (4 per
PGDU PCB, 2 PCBs
max. per system
8 sensors max. (4 per
PGDU PCB, 2 PCBs
max. per system
8 sensors max. (4 per
PGDU PCB, 2 PCBs
max. per system
16 sensors max. (8 per
PGDU PCB, 2 PCBs
max. per system
Fax Machine Compatibility lets you integrate a customer-provided fax machine into
your telephone system. You have the following options:
Transfer to Fax
Transfer to Fax allows an extension user to Transfer their active voice call to a company
fax machine. After the Transfer completes, the user's outside caller can start their fax
machine and send the fax. This would benefit a salesperson on the road, for example.
The salesperson could call their secretary and give a general report - and then fax
detailed figures when the conversation is over.
Direct Inward Line to Fax
DILs provide direct routing to fax machines installed as system extensions. Use a DIL
for a "fax only" line for unattended sending and receiving of faxes.
Bridged Fax/Modem Line
With a Bridged Fax/Modem Line, a trunk is shared by the fax machine or modem and
the system. When a call comes in, both the system and the fax machine or modem ring.
If the fax machine or modem answers the call, a relay closure in the fax machine or
modem (if provided) signals the system. The system then busies out the line to other
Product Description
117
3
Section 3: Features
users. Since a Bridged Fax Line is in front of the system, fax or modem operation is not
affected by a system power failure or programming.
The Bridged Fax Line feature uses a fax sensor circuit in the PGDU PCB. The PGDU
fax sensor circuit requires a DC power supply in series with the fax machine relay contacts. Refer to the Hardware Manual for additional details. (Most fax machines and
modems do not provide a contact closure, and require a “loop-sensing” device. This
device detects when the fax or modem is in use and provides a contact closure.)
Flash
All
All
All
All
Flash allows an extension user access to certain CO and PBX features by interrupting
trunk loop current. Flash lets an extension user take full advantage of whatever features
the connected telco or PBX offers. You must set the Flash parameters for compatibility
with the connected telco or PBX.
Flexible System Numbering
All
●
G2 required for
complete numbering
flexibility.
All
All
Flexible System Numbering lets you reassign the system's port-to-extension assignments. This allows an employee to retain their extension number if they move to a different office. In addition, you can make the following comprehensive changes to your
system's number plan:
● Set the number of digits in internal (Intercom) functions. For example, extension
numbers can be up to four digits long
● Change your system's Service Code numbers
● Assign single digit access to selected Service Codes
You can also use Flexible System Numbering to change the system's Trunk Group
Routing code. Although the default code of 9 is suitable for most applications, you can
alter the code if required.
Forced Trunk Disconnect
All
All
All
All
Forced Trunk Disconnect allows an extension user to disconnect (release) another extension's active outside call. The user can then place a call on the released trunk. Forced
Trunk Disconnect lets a user access a busy trunk in an emergency, when no other trunks
are available. Maintenance technicians can also use Forced Trunk Disconnect to release
a trunk on which there is no conversation. This can happen if a trunk does not properly
disconnect when the outside party hangs up.
118
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Group Call Pickup
8 Pickup Groups
8 Pickup Groups
16 Pickup Groups
64 Pickup Groups
Group Call Pickup allows an extension user to answer a call ringing an extension in a
Pickup Group. This permits co-workers in the same work area to easily answer one
another’s calls. The user can intercept the ringing call by dialing a code or pressing a
programmed Group Call Pickup key.
With Group Call Pickup, a user can intercept the following types of calls:
● A call ringing the user's own pickup group
● A call ringing another pickup group when the user knows the group number
● A call ringing another pickup group when the user doesn't know the group number
Group Listen
All
G2
All
3
All
Group Listen permits a keyset user to talk on the handset and have their caller's voice
broadcast over the telephone speaker. This lets co-workers listen to the conversation.
Group Listen turns off the keyset's Handsfree microphone so the caller does not pick up the
co-worker's voices during a Group Listen. To activate Group Listen, the user just presses
the SPK key twice while on a call. Pressing SPK a third time cancels Group Listen.
Handsfree and Monitor
All
All
All
All
Handsfree allows a keyset user to process calls using the speaker and microphone in the
telephone (instead of the handset). Handsfree is a convenience for workers who don't
have a free hand to pick up the handset. For example, a terminal operator could continue to enter data with both hands while talking on the phone.
The system provides three variations of Handsfree operation:
Product Description
Handsfree
User can place and answer calls by
pressing SPK instead of using the
handset.
Automatic Handsfree
User can press a line or line
appearance key without first lifting the
handset or pressing SPK.
Monitor
User can place a call without lifting
the handset, but must lift the handset
to speak.
119
Section 3: Features
Picking Up Call Coverage or Parked Calls
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
An extension with Automatic Handsfree will answer a covered call when the user presses the flashing Call Coverage key. In addition, the user can answer a call parked in orbit
just by pressing the flashing Park Orbit key. In either case, there is no need to press SPK
or lift the handset first.
Handsfree Answerback /
Forced Intercom Ringing
All
All
All
All
Handsfree Answerback permits an extension user to respond to a voice-announced
Intercom call by speaking toward the phone, without lifting the handset. Like Handsfree,
this is a convenience for workers who don't have a free hand to pick up the handset.
Handsfree Answerback does not require a Speakerphone. Forced Intercom Ringing
forces incoming Intercom calls to ring an extension.
Headset Operation
All
All
All
All
A keyset user can utilize a customer-provided headset in place of the handset. Like
using Handsfree, using the headset frees up the user's hands for other work. However,
Headset Operation provides privacy not available with Handsfree. An extension in the
headset mode has two options that determine when it will appear busy to incoming
callers. The headset extension can be:
Busy to incoming callers when only one extension appearance is busy (i.e., Off-Hook
Signaling prevented)
OR
● Busy to incoming callers only when both extension appearances are busy (i.e., Off
Hook Signaling allowed)
●
Hold
All
All
All
All
Hold lets an extension user put a call in a temporary waiting state. The caller on Hold
hears silence or Music on Hold, not conversation in the extension user's work area. While
the call waits on Hold, the extension user may process calls or use a system feature. If a
call is left on Hold too long, it recalls the extension that initially placed it on Hold.
120
Product Description
Section 3: Features
There are four types of Hold:
System Hold
An outside call a user places on Hold flashes the line key (if programmed) at all other
keysets. Any keyset user with the flashing line key can pick up the call.
Exclusive Hold
When a user places a call on Exclusive Hold, only that user can pick up the call from
Hold. The line appears busy to all other keysets that have a key for the line. Exclusive
hold is important if a user doesn't want a co-worker picking up their call on Hold.
Group Hold
If a user places a call on Group Hold, another user in the Department Group can dial a code
to pick up the call. This lets members of a department easily pick up each other's calls.
Intercom Hold
A user can place an Intercom call on Hold. The Intercom call on Hold does not appear
at any other extension.
Held Calls Reroute to Operator
3
All
G2
All
All
Unanswered Hold recalls can optionally route to the operator.
Hotel/Motel
Basic Hotel/Motel
requires 6.00.08
Basic Hotel/Motel
requires 6.00.08
All
All
The system can provide comprehensive hotel/motel services in addition to the features
normally available to business users. Hotel/motel features include:
Do Not Disturb
A guest can enable and disable Do Not Disturb for their room telephone. In addition, a
hotel/motel employee with a keyset can enable and disable Do Not Disturb for a specific
room telephone.
Message Waiting
A hotel/motel employee with a keyset can send a Message Waiting to a room telephone. The
message lamp on the room telephone flashes until the guest answers the Message Waiting.
Room Telephone Status
To better manage room usage, an employee with a keyset can change the status of a
room telephone, including:
●
●
●
Product Description
Room Available
Room Occupied
Room Ready to be Cleaned
121
Section 3: Features
Room to Room Call Restriction
To control inter-room guest calling, a hotel/motel employee with a keyset can enable
and disable room-to-room calling.
Room Status with Printout
An employee's DSS Console can indicate the status of the hotel/motel rooms.
Optionally, a printer connected to a DCI Module can print out room status reports:
● Room Status (occupied, available, ready and to be cleaned)
● Room Telephone Call and Toll Restriction Information
● Do Not Disturb and Clean Up Extension List
● Message Waiting Report
● Wake-up Call No-Answer Report
Single Digit Extension Access
To simplify guest calling, room telephones can have single digit access to selected
extensions. For example, this allows guests to dial 1 for the front desk, 2 for house
cleaning, etc.
Toll Restriction Changing
An employee can change the Toll Restriction for a guest's telephone. For example, the
receptionist can enable long distance calling for each room telephone as the guests
check in.
Wake-up Call
A guest can set or cancel a wake-up call request. A hotel/motel employee with a keyset
can also set or cancel a wake-up call for a room telephone.
Property Management System Integration (PMSi)
N/A
Base: N/A
EXCPRU: Requires
6.00.08 and LAPB PCB
All
All
Requires LAPB PCB
With Property Management System Integration (PMSi), the phone system is the cornerstone of a fully integrated lodging management system team. Add the NVM-Series with
optional lodging software for basic Hotel/Motel Voice Mail services. Check-in at the
front desk activates a guest mailbox. Check-out archives unanswered messages.
Additionally, each guest has a Wake Up Call with snooze alarm and a First Time
Tutorial to guide them through Voice Mail features.
In more sophisticated applications, PMSi allows your phone system, optional NVMPMSi Voice Mail and third-party PMS system to work together in providing comprehensive facility management. PMSi automates many routine facility management tasks by
instantly exchanging room status, guest services and call record data. For example,
check-in at the reservation terminal can automatically update room status, call restriction
and enable the guest’s mailbox. At check-out, PMSi can notify housekeeping, add outside toll charges to the guest’s bill and automatically deactivate the mailbox.
PMSi requires NVM-Series Voice Mail version 7.0 or higher.
122
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Hotline
24 Hotlines max
24 Hotlines max
50 Hotlines max
200 Hotlines max
Hotline gives a keyset user one-button calling and Transfer to another extension (the
Hotline partner). Hotline helps co-workers that work closely together. The Hotline
partners can call or Transfer calls to each other just by pressing a single key.
When the key is . . .
The extension is . . .
Off
Idle
On
Busy or ringing
Fast Flash
DND
Hotline, External
3
5 Hotlines max
5 Hotlines max
10 Hotlines max
50 Hotlines max
With External Hotline, an extension automatically dials a Common Abbreviated Dialing
number when the user lifts the handset. External Hotline would be beneficial in an
Airport Lobby, for example, to provide simplified access to an off-site Reservation
Desk. A traveler need only lift the handset on the External Hotline phone to automatically ring for reservations. (If the Reservation Desk is an extension on the same system,
use Ringdown Extension instead.)
The system allows up to 10 External Hotline extensions. All extensions can share the
same Common Abbreviated Dialing number, if desired.
InDepth and inDepth+
N/A
Base: N/A
EXCPRU: Requires
6.00.08 and LAPB PCB
All
All
InDepth (P/N 94100A) and inDepth+ (P/N 94105A) are Windows-based Management
Information Systems that work in conjunction with the built in phone system’s ACD.
These ACD/MIS systems enhance ACD with real time statistics and reports on ACD
group traffic patterns and usage. Communicating through the system’s Open
Architecture Interface (OAI), inDepth and inDepth+ are an extensive set of user-configurable Real Time Windows and Reporter subsystems.
InDepth+ is the more comprehensive and capable of the the ACD/MIS systems and offers:
Product Description
123
Section 3: Features
●
Real Time Status Window
This window displays ACD agent status, state and connection state.
●
Real Time Statistics Window
The statistics window provides a visual
performance summary for lines, agents
and ACD Groups.
●
Call Queue and Wait Time Windows
These windows show the number of
calls in queue, the longest wait time, as
well as the number of calls answered
and abandoned.
●
Wallboard Template
Use the wallboard template display to motivate and inform ACD agents through a
dynamic display of real time statistics and messages.
●
Reporter
ACD administrators can create fully-configurable reports for display and printing.
Similar in many respects to inDepth+, inDepth is streamlined for more modest ACD
applications. InDepth provides a single real time screen template and up to seven
reports for tracking data. InDepth includes ACD/MIS features like Report View/Print
and Audible/Visual Alarms, but excludes the Sub-Supervisor Positions and the
Wallboard Support.
Hardware, Software and System Requirements
InDepth and inDepth+ require:
●
●
LAPBU PCB
Computer with the following:
- Intel Pentium processor or greater
- 16MB RAM or more
- 540MB Hard Drive or more
- 3 1/2” 1.44 MB Floppy Drive
- SVGA Monitor (for optimum viewing)
- Sound Card (recommended: Creative Labs Sound Blaster) and Speakers or P.C.
Speaker (for alarms)
- Windows 95 (version 4.00.950A or higher), Windows 98, or Windows NT (version
4 or higher)
- Keyboard and mouse
- Minimum 2 Serial Ports and 1 Parallel Port (1 serial port for the mouse, 1 serial
port for 704i DCI input/event port, 1 parallel port for the dongle)
- Modem and Symantec’s pcANYWHERE for remote programming off site (recommended)
- Display Adapter (recommended: Cirrus Logic Card)
Certain applications may also require the following optional equipment:
●
●
●
124
NE2000 Compatible Network Card (required for multi-supervisor setups)
Remote Access Module comprising: V34 Modem (28K baud)
RS232 Lines Drivers (required when the inDepth computer is located more than 60’
from the telephone system)
Product Description
Section 3: Features
inView LAN Wallboard Software
The inView LAN Wallboard Software (P/N 94130) provides an agent’s desktop PC with
ACD/MIS wallboard capability. InView software is installed on an agent’s PC, which is
then connected via LAN to the inDepth computer. This allows the agent’s PC to display
real time ACD group activity in an on-screen PC wallboard. Each PC with an inView
LAN Wallboard installed has the same requirements as the PC dedicated to the inDepth
system. The inView LAN Wallboard provides two different views: the Status View and
the Wallboard View.
Status View
The Status View
allows the inView
user to monitor the
status of an ACD or
extension group.
Wallboard View
The Wallboard
View provides the
inView user with a
display of any of
the large character
windows available
in inDepth+. The
user can customize
the Wallboard View to meet their exacting application requirements. The Wallboard
View can also receive messages and pop-up alarms.
3
Refer to Section 2, The Components for additional inView LAN Wallboard part numbers.
inDepth+ Sub-Supervisor (P/N 94110A)
The inDepth+ Sub-Supervisor (P/N 94110A) extends all the capabilities of the inDepth+
computer to a second, networked PC. This provides all the inDepth+ capabilities to a second supervisor without having to install a second inDepth+ system. The inDepth+ SubSupervisor PC has the same requirements as the PC dedicated to the inDepth system
(including the NE2000 compatible network card).
Intercom
20 extensions
72 extensions
G2 required to change
Intercom ring tone
72 extensions
512 keyset extensions
Intercom gives extension users access to other extensions. This provides the system
with complete internal calling capability.
Product Description
125
Section 3: Features
Intercom Abandoned Call Display
All
All
All
All
Intercom Abandoned Call Display shows a list of unanswered Intercom calls. This is a
convenience if a user has to temporarily leave their desk. When they return, they can
display the list to find out who called while they were out.
Intercom Abandon Call Display remembers the last five Intercom calls to an extension.
ISDN Compatibility
IMPORTANT
ISDN is an emerging technology on the leading edge of international
digital communication's networking. Always check with your NEC
Technical Service Representative before setting up your ISDN application. Working together will ensure maximum compatibility and reliable
ISDN performance.
Primary Rate Interface (PRI)
N/A
Base: N/A
EXCPRU: Requires G4
46 PRI B channels
All
46 PRI B channels
All
184 PRI B channels
The system is compatible with ISDN Primary Rate Interface (PRI) services. With PRI,
the system provides 23 high-speed state-of-the-art digital trunks on 2 pairs. PRI services
currently supported include:
● Basic PRI Call Control (BCC)
● Display of incoming caller's number
● Routing in the system based on the number the caller dialed
● ISDN maintenance functions (such as In Service/Out of Service Messaging)
● Speech and 3.1 KHz audio
● Capacity of 5 PRI circuits and 120 PRI channels
PRI capability requires the installation of T1/PRI Interface PCBs (P/N 92190A in 704i,
P/N 92060 in 124i). Each PCB (also called a PRI circuit) provides 24 PRI channels
(23B + D) with 64K Clear Channel response. Each T1/PRI Interface PCB provides 23
voice (B) and 1 data (D) channel. The T1/PRI Interface PCB uses a single universal slot.
When installed in 704i, the T1/PRI Interface PCB uses the first available block of 24
consecutive trunks. Additional T1/PRI Interface PCBs also require blocks of 24 consecutive trunks. In 124i, the first T1/PRI PCB uses the last 24 consecutive trunks (29-52).
The second T1/PRI PCB uses the preceding block of 24 consecutive trunks (5-28).
126
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Notes:
● In addition to T1/PRI Interface PCBs, PRI also requires a CSU/DSU Unit and interconnecting cables to interface with the telco. Refer to Section 2, The Components for more.
● Each T1/PRI Interface PCB is switch selectable between T1 and PRI operation. For
more on T1 Trunking, turn to T1 Trunking later in this section.
Basic Rate Interface (BRI)
Requires 6.00.08
Base: Requires 6.00.08
EXCPRU: G3 (4.11)
All
All
Check with your Sales Representative for the availability of this option.
Your system also provides compatibility with ISDN Basic Rate (BRI) services. BRI
ports typically connect to high-speed ISDN modems for maximum data transmission
capability. These high data rates dramatically enhance your on-line services and Internet
access. You can also connect BRI ports to G4 ISDN fax machines. BRI services supported include:
●
●
●
●
Basic BRI Call Control (BCC)
Point-to-Point BRI Terminal Connection (no daisy-chaining)
Multipoint BRI Terminal Connection (daisy-chaining)
Capacity of 32 BRI circuits and 64 BRI channels
3
In 704i, BRI services require the installation of a 2 circuit (P/N 92191), 4 circuit (P/N
92193) or 8 circuit (P/N 92192) PCB. In 28i and 124i, BRI requires the installation of 2
circuit (P/N 92061) or 4 circuit (P/N 92062) BRI PCB. In each PCB there are two channels (ports) per circuit (2B + D), providing 64K Clear B-Channel and 16K Clear DChannel response.
The 704i supports up to 48 BRI circuits (96 BRI channels). The 124i supports up 26 BRI
circuits (52 BRI channels). The 28i supports up to 6 BRI circuits (12 BRI channels). Refer to
Section 2, Components for more.
When installed, the BRI Interface PCB uses a block of eight consecutive trunks ports.
Only the first four trunks in the block are available. For example, if your 2 circuit BRI
Interface PCB is the first trunk PCB installed, it reserves trunk ports 1-8. Trunk ports 14 are available - trunk ports 5-8 are not.
Note: In addition to BRI Interface PCBs, BRI Services require the installation of NT1
Network Terminators and interconnecting cabling.
Product Description
127
Section 3: Features
Labelmaker
All
All
All
All
The i-Series Labelmaker consists of template software (P/N 92218D) which, in combination with separately available pre-cut forms, allows you to make custom key labels for
each key telephone and DSS Console. These custom key labels can include key functions, Hotline names or your own company's imprinted logo.
The following pre-cut forms are available:
●
●
●
●
●
●
34-Button Super Display Laser Label (P/N 92825-S34)
34-Button Display Laser Label (P/N 92825-34)
28-Button Laser Label (P/N 92825-28)
22-Button Laser Label (P/N 92825-22)
110-Button DSS Laser Label (P/N 92825-DSS)
24-Button DSS Laser Label (P/N 92825-24DSS)
The Labelmaker requires:
A Windows-compatible sheet fed laser or ink jet printer.
Microsoft Windows 95/98/2000
Microsoft Excel (Office 97 version or higher)
OR
● Lotus 123 (Release 5 or higher)
●
●
●
Last Number Redial
All
All
All
All
Last Number Redial allows an extension user to quickly redial the last number dialed.
For example, a user may quickly recall a busy or unanswered number without manually
dialing the digits.
Last Number Redial saves in system memory the last 24 digits a user dials. The number can be any combination of digits 0-9, # and *. The system remembers the digits
regardless of whether the call was answered, unanswered or busy. The system normally
uses the same trunk group as for the initial call. However, the extension user can preselect a specific trunk if desired.
Line Preference
All
All
All
All
Line Preference determines how a keyset user places and answers calls. There are two
types of Line Preference: Incoming Line Preference and Outgoing Line Preference.
128
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Incoming Line Preference
Incoming Line Preference establishes how a keyset user answers calls. When a call
rings the keyset, lifting the handset answers either the ringing call (for Ringing Line
Preference) or seizes an idle line (for Idle Line Preference). The idle line can provide
either Intercom or trunk dial tone (see Outgoing Line Preference below). Ringing Line
Preference helps users whose primary function is to answer calls (such as a receptionist). Idle Line Preference is an aid to users whose primary function is to place calls
(such as a telemarketer).
Outgoing Line Preference
Outgoing Line Preference sets how a keyset user places calls. If a keyset has Outgoing
Intercom Line Preference, the user hears Intercom dial tone when they lift the handset. If
a keyset has Outgoing Trunk Line Preference, the user hears trunk dial tone when they
lift the handset. Outgoing Line Preference also determines what happens at extensions
with Idle Line Preference. The user hears either trunk ("dial 9") or Intercom dial tone.
Auto-Answer of Non-Ringing Lines
With Auto-Answer of Non-Ringing Lines, an extension user can automatically answer
trunk calls that ring other extensions (not their own). This would help a user that has to
answer calls for co-workers that are away from their desks. When the user lifts the
handset, they automatically answer the ringing calls based on Trunk Group Routing programming. The extension user's own ringing calls, however, always have priority over
calls ringing other co-workers' extensions.
If a keyset extension has more than one call ringing its line keys, Ringing Line
Preference answers the calls on a first-in first-answered basis.
Loop Keys
All
All
All
All
Loop keys are uniquely programmed function keys that simplify placing and answering
trunk calls. There are three types of loop keys: Incoming Only, Outgoing Only and
Both Ways.
Incoming Only Loop Keys
Incoming Only loop keys are for answering trunk calls. An extension can have an
incoming loop key for a specific trunk group (fixed) or a "catch all" key for any trunk
group (switched). Fixed loop keys allow an extension user to tell the type of call by the
ringing key. Switched loop keys are ideal for an extension with a large number of feature keys. In addition, switched loop keys are a destination for any trunk not on a line
key or fixed loop key. Without a switched loop key, calls not appearing on a line key or
fixed loop key will ring only the CALL key. Incoming Only loop keys also receive
transferred trunk calls.
Outgoing Only Loop Keys
Outgoing Only loop keys are for placing trunk calls. An extension can have outgoing
loop keys for a specific trunk group or for ARS access. When a user presses the loop
key, they get dial tone from the first available trunk in the group (or from ARS if pro-
Product Description
129
3
Section 3: Features
grammed). Outgoing Only loop keys help ensure that an extension will always have a
key available for placing calls.
Both Ways Loop Keys
Both Ways loop keys combine the functions of both Incoming Only and Outgoing Only
loop keys. Both Ways loop keys work well for extension users that handle a moderate
amount of calls and don't need separate keys for incoming and outgoing calls. Both
Ways loop keys also receive transferred trunk calls.
An extension can have many loop keys - of any type. You can program an operator, for
example, with four loop keys for incoming calls and four for outgoing calls.
Once a loop key is set up, the user can handle it like any other trunk call. For example,
the user can place the call on Hold, Transfer it to a co-worker or send it to a Park Orbit.
An incoming call will ring the first available loop key, beginning with the lowest numbered key.
Meet Me Conference
8 4-party or 4 8-party
8 4-party or 4 8-party
8 4-party or 4 8-party
32 4-party or 16 8-party
With Meet Me Conference, an extension user can set up a Conference with their current
call and up to six other inside parties. Each party joins the Conference by dialing a
Meet Me Conference code. Meet Me Conference lets extension users have a telephone
meeting -- without leaving the office.
The system permits up to eight parties to join in a Meet Me Conference.
In 704i, Conference requires a Conference PCB.
Meet Me Paging
All
All
All
All
Meet Me Paging allows an extension user to Page a co-worker and privately meet with
them on a Page zone. The Paging zone is busy to other users while the meeting takes
place. While the co-workers meet on the zone, no one else can hear the conversation,
join in or make an announcement using that zone. Meet Me Paging is a good way to talk
to a co-worker when their location is unknown. If the co-worker can hear the Page,
they can join in the conversation.
Meet Me Paging only permits two-party conversations.
130
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Meet Me Paging Transfer
All
All
All
All
If a user wants to Transfer a call to a co-worker but they don't know where the co-worker is, they can use Meet Me Paging Transfer. With Meet Me Paging Transfer, the user
can Page the co-worker and have the call automatically transfer when the co-worker
answers the Page. Since Meet Me Paging Transfer works with both Internal and
External Paging, a call can be quickly extended to a co-worker anywhere in the facility.
Meet Me Paging Transfer only permits two-party conversations.
Memo Dial
All
All
All
All
While on an outside call, Memo Dial lets an extension user store an important number
for easy redialing later on. The telephone can be like a note pad. For example, a user
could dial Directory Assistance and ask for a client's telephone number. When
Directory Assistance plays back the requested number, the caller can use Memo Dial to
jot the number down in the telephone's memory. They can quickly call the Memo Dial
number after hanging up. When a user enters a Memo Dial number, the dialed digits do
not output over the trunk. Dialing Memo Dial digits does not interfere with a call in
progress.
Message Waiting
All
●
COS control for VAU
reminder requires G2.
All
All
An extension user can leave a Message Waiting indication at a busy or unanswered
extension requesting a return call. The indication is a flashing MW lamp at the called
extension and a steadily lit MW lamp on the calling extension. Answering the Message
Waiting automatically calls the extension which left the indication. Message Waiting
ensures that a user will not have to recall an unanswered extension. It also ensures that
a user will not miss calls when their extension is busy or unattended. A periodic VAU
announcement controlled by an extension’s Class of Service may remind users that they
have Messages Waiting.
Additionally, Message Waiting lets extension users:
● View and selectively answer messages left at their extension (display keyset only)
● Cancel all messages left at their extension
● Cancel messages they left at other extensions
An extension user can leave Messages Waiting at any number of extensions. Also, any
number of extensions can leave a Message Waiting at the same extension.
Product Description
131
3
Section 3: Features
Single Line Telephone Message Waiting Options
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
N/A
This feature provides Message Waiting indications at single line telephones without
Message Waiting lamps. These indications are:
● Special dial tone
● Intermittent ringing
● VAU announcement
Microphone Cutoff
All
All
All
All
Microphone Cutoff lets a keyset user turn off their phone's handsfree or handset microphone at any time. When activated, Microphone Mute prevents the caller from hearing
conversations in the user's work area. The user may turn off the microphone while their
telephone is idle, busy on a call or ringing. The microphone stays off until the user
turns it back on.
Multiple Directory Numbers / Call Coverage
24 virtual extensions
24 virtual extensions
48 virtual extensions
256 virtual extensions
Multiple Directory Numbers let a keyset have more than one extension number. Calls can
route to the keyset's installed number or to the keyset's "virtual extension" Multiple Directory
Number key. This helps users identify incoming calls. For example, in 124i Enhanced an
extension installed at 304 (Sales) could have a virtual extension for 510 (Service). Calls to
304 ring the extension normally. Calls to 510 ring the Multiple Directory Number key. This
lets the user at extension 304 differentiate Sales calls from Service calls.
Call Coverage
A keyset can have Multiple Directory Number keys set up as Call Coverage keys for coworker's extensions. The Call Coverage key lights when the extension or group is busy
and flashes slowly when the co-worker or group has an incoming call. The Call Coverage
key can ring immediately when a call comes into the covered extension or group, ring
after a delay or not ring at all. In addition, the keyset user can press the Call Coverage key
to intercept their co-worker's or group's incoming call. The user can also go off hook and
press the Call Coverage key to call the covered extension.
The Call Coverage keys may (depending the your system’s software version) be able to
follow the extension’s Do Not Disturb and Off-Hook Signaling programming.
A keyset can have Multiple Directory Number/Call Coverage keys for many different
extensions and virtual extensions. In addition, co-workers can share the same Multiple
Directory Numbers. For example, everyone in the Service Department could have a key
for the Sales Department's virtual extension.
132
Product Description
Section 3: Features
More than one extension can share the same Multiple Directory Number. In addition, an
extension can have more than one Multiple Directory Number (limited only by the number of available function keys).
●
Call Coverage for Second Call
All
Requires G3 (4.02)
All
All
If the covered extension is busy and they receive a second call, the covering extension’s
Call Coverage key will flash. The user just presses the flashing key to pick up the call.
●
Call Coverage for a Virtual Extension’s Camped-on Calls
All
Requires G3 (4.06)
All
All
An extension can have a Call Coverage Key for a virtual extension. When the virtual
extension is busy, the Call Coverage Key will ring for additional calls Camped-on to the
virtual extension. The system allows up to 10 calls to Camp On to a virtual extension.
When the virtual extension is also a Department Group pilot number, Voice Mail
Automated Attendant callers can directly access the department.
●
Call Coverage Key for Incoming Only or Both Ways
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
An extension’s Call Coverage keys can be either Incoming Only or Both Ways. When
assigned with Incoming Only operation, the user can press the Call Coverage key only
to pick up a call ringing the covered extension. If assigned for Both Ways operation, the
user can press the key to pick up calls to the covered extension and, while idle, press
the key to place an Intercom call to the covered extension.
●
Call Coverage follows DND and Off-Hook Signaling Options
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
A call ringing a Call Coverage Key follows the Do Not Disturb and Off-Hook Signaling
options in force at the extension. For example, a Call Coverage Key call will not ring an
extension in Do Not Disturb. In addition, if the user is busy on a call, Call Coverage
Ringing will follow the Off-Hook Signaling options already set up at the extension.
●
Ringing Line Preference for Call Coverage Keys
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
An extension’s Call Coverage Keys can be programmed with Ringing Line Preference.
When the key rings for a covered call, the user just lifts the handset to answer the call.
So as not to interfere with ringing trunk or Intercom calls, the system automatically
assigns Call Coverage Key ringing with the lowest answering priority. If multiple Call
Coverage Keys are ringing, answering priority is set first by the assigned ring pattern
and then by the key position.
Product Description
133
3
Section 3: Features
Music on Hold
All
All
All
All
Music on Hold (MOH) sends music to calls on Hold and parked calls. The music lets
the caller know that their call is waiting, not forgotten. Without Music on Hold, the system provides silence to these types of calls. Music on Hold can use the internal music
source or a customer-provided music source (i.e., tape deck, receiver, etc.).
You can connect Music on Hold to the system via a set of terminals on the CPRU or analog
ports on 3-ACI Modules. Normally, use the CPRU terminals when you have a common
music source that you want to play on all trunks. The 124i and 704i have separate CPRU
terminals for MOH and BGM. In 28i, BGM and MOH share the same CPRU terminals.
Use ports on 3-ACI Modules when you need to assign different MOH sources to different
trunks. This would allow your system, for example, to play a sales message to your Sales
Department trunks on Hold and broadcast technical tips to the held Tech Service trunks.
Name Storing
All
All
All
All
Extensions and trunks can have names instead of just circuit numbers. These names
show on a keyset's display when the user places or answers calls. Extension and trunk
names make it easier to identify callers. The user does not have to refer to a directory
when processing calls. A name can be up to 10 characters long, consisting of alphanumeric characters, punctuation marks and spaces.
134
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Networking
N/A
Base: N/A
EXCPRU: Requires
6.00.08
All
All
Use the built in networking feature to integrate multiple telephone systems into a single
“virtual” communications system. Interconnected with tie lines, each phone system
becomes a node on the network that can communicate with any other phone system
node.
●
Centralized Network Attendant
Centralized Network Attendant allows multiple networked systems to share a single
centralized attendant. This centralized attendant can receive calls from and transfer
calls to any destination in any network node. Unanswered calls recall and route as if
they were part of a single, much larger system.
●
Shared (Common) Voice Mail (NVM-2000)
With Shared Voice Mail, a single NVM-2000 (version 7.0 or higher) can handle the
voice messaging requirements of an entire network. Many powerful Voice Mail integration features are available over the network, including:
- Voice Mail key operation (including message lamps)
- Call Forward to Voice Mail
- Personal Answering Machine Emulation
- Conversation Record
Optionally, up to four Voice Mail systems can share the voice messaging requirements of the entire network. Each of the Voice Mail systems is dedicated to a portion
of the total network and is responsible only for supporting that portion.
●
Flexible Network Routing using Networking Routes
Use the Networking Routes to set up “single channel” networking between separate
systems — or use multiple networking channels per system for greater network performance. Data tables in the system program define the routing for each extension in
each network node. These tables are easily customized to meet the requirements of
each networking configuration.
●
Common Intercom Dialing Plan
Much of the expansive Intercom feature set is also available in the networked environment between networked systems. This feature set includes:
- Call Forwarding
Product Description
135
3
Section 3: Features
- Caller ID and ANI with the initial caller’s number preserved through the network.
- Off Hook Signaling
- Handsfree Answerback (voice announce) and Forced Intercom Ringing, including
voice-to-tone signaling
- Transfer (with recall)
-Voice Over
Note: Networking does not provide inter-system BLF for Hotline or Call Coverage
keys. In addition, each networked system has separate ARS programming, Park
orbits, Page zones and SMDR records. Keep in mind also that for ACD applications
all agents in an ACD Group must be in the same system.
Night Service
4 Night Service Modes
4 Night Service Modes
8 Night Service Modes
8 Night Service Modes
Night Service lets system users activate one of the Night Service modes. Night Service
redirects calls to their night mode destination, as determined by Assigned and Universal
Night Answer programming. A user typically activates Night Service after normal
working hours, when most employees are unavailable to answer calls. In addition, the
system can automatically change the Night Service mode at preset times.The system
also provides external contacts for Night Service control.
Any extension user with the proper Class of Service and password can change the Night
Service mode. With this capability, the attendant could enable Night Mode when they leave
their console. The night guard could then select Midnight Mode when their shift ends. The
attendant could reactivate Day mode first thing in the morning when returning to work.
There are up to eight Night Service modes, depending on the system.
Automatic Night Service Backup
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
Automatic Night Service programming is stored in battery backed-up system RAM.
This means that the system’s Night Service state is automatically restored after a commercial power failure.
Assigned Night Answer (ANA)
With Assigned Night Answer, Night Service has calls ring extensions directly. Assigned
Night Answer provides an answering point for Night Service calls. For certain applications, this may be more appropriate than Universal Night Answer. For example, you
could program trunks to ring the security station telephone during off hours.
Universal Night Answer (UNA)
Universal Night Answer makes incoming calls ring over the External Paging speakers
connected to PGDU PCBs. With UNA, an employee can go to a telephone and press the
flashing line key.
136
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Transfer to UNA
Requires 5.03
Requires 5.03
All
All
An extension user can Transfer their call to UNA (i.e., External Paging at night). Once
transferred, the call will ring the External Paging speakers like any other UNA call and
can be picked up at any extension. You can also set up Transfer to UNA through the
VAU Automated Attendant. This lets outside callers, answered by the VAU Automated
Attendant, dial a code to have their call ring External Paging.
Off Hook Signaling
All
All
All
All
When a user calls an extension busy on a handset call, they can send an off hook signal
indicating they are trying to get through. The signal is either off hook ringing or a voice
announcement over the idle (second) line appearance. Off Hook Signaling helps important callers get through, without waiting in line for the called extension to become free.
The i-Series 28- and 34-button telephones with the Off Hook Voice Announce Module
installed provide both off hook voice announcement and off hook ringing capability.
Also see the Call Waiting / Camp On feature on page 89, which does not require the
installation of the Off Hook Voice Announce Module.
There is another type of off-hook announcing called Voice Over. Voice Over lets an
extension user speak to a co-worker busy on a call without using either of the Off Hook
Signaling options. Voice Over is available on all keysets. Refer to the "Voice Over" feature for more.
The system provides the following Off Hook Signaling options:
● Called Extension Block
The called extension's Class of Service may block incoming Off Hook Signaling
attempts. This is beneficial to users that don't want interruptions while on a call.
●
Automatic Signaling
Calling a busy extension automatically initiates Off Hook Signaling. This option is
useful to receptionists, operators and others that must quickly process calls. This is
set in the calling extension's Class of Service.
●
Manual Signaling
After reaching a busy extension, manual signaling gives the caller the choice of
using Off Hook Signaling or activating other features. Extensions without automatic
signaling have manual signaling.
●
Selectable Off Hook Signaling Mode
The Off Hook Signal can be idle channel ringing or a voice announcement - at the
caller's discretion.
Product Description
137
3
Section 3: Features
Off Hook Signaling Enhancements
All
G3 (5.02)
All
All
DID Off Hook Ringing
This option enables or disables an extension’s Off Hook Signaling for incoming DID
calls. If enabled, Off Hook Signaling occurs normally. If disabled, DID calls queue
behind the extension’s busy line appearance and the user gets no Off Hook Signaling
indication. The second line appearance stays idle and the DID caller hears ringback
while their call waits.
DID Call Waiting
Use this option to provides a visual indication for DID calls. If enabled, the busy user
will see a flashing line/loop key for the incoming DID call. If disabled, the user will
have no indication that a DID calls is waiting. An extension can have this option only if
DID Off Hook Ringing is disabled.
Block Manual Off Hook Signals
An extension can block off hook signals manually sent from a co-worker. If this option
is disabled (not blocked), callers to the extension can dial 7 at busy or busy/ring to signal the extension. If enabled (blocked), nothing happens when the caller dials 7.
Block Camp On
When an extension has Block Camp On enabled, a caller to the extension cannot dial 2
to Camp On after hearing busy or busy/ring. When Block Camp On is disabled, callers
are not prevented from dialing 2 to Camp On after hearing busy or busy/ring.
One-Touch Calling
All
All
All
All
One-Touch Calling gives a keyset user one button access to extensions, trunks and
selected system features. This saves users time when accessing co-workers, clients and
features they use most often. Instead of dialing a series of codes, the user need only
press the One-Touch Key.
An extension user can have One-Touch Keys programmed for:
138
Product Description
Section 3: Features
●
●
●
●
●
Direct Station Selection: one button access to extensions (without BLF)
Personal Speed Dial: One button access to stored numbers (up to 25 digits long)
Abbreviated Dialing: One button access to stored Abbreviated Dialing numbers
Trunk Calling: One button access to trunks or trunk groups
Service Codes: One button access to specific Service Codes
An extension user can chain dial with One-Touch Keys. For example, a user can store
the number for a company's Automated Attendant in key 1 and employee extension
numbers in keys 2-5. The users presses key 1 to call the company, then one of keys 2-5
to ring the employee with whom they want to speak.
One-Touch Calling is the first level of operation of One-Touch Keys. In other words,
One-Touch Calling occurs when the user just presses the key. There is a second level of
One-Touch Key operation called One-Touch Serial Calling. The user accesses these
functions by first pressing the Serial Operation key. Refer to the One-Touch Serial
Operation feature.
Storing Names and Flash
All
G2
All
All
Users can store names along with their One-Touch Keys. The stored name displays when
the user presses the key. The system also allows a user to press the FLASH key to store a
Flash command in a One-Touch Key. The Flash command is often helpful in accessing
Centrex and PBX features when the system is installed behind a Centrex or PBX.
One-Touch Serial Operation
All
All
All
All
An extension user can have One-Touch Serial Operation store a series of feature steps
under a One-Touch Key. This simplifies extension operation by giving each user the
ability to have customized feature keys. For example, an extension user could have a
One-Touch Serial Operation Key automatically forward all their calls to extension 310.
The user can optionally set up One-Touch Serial Operation to provide an additional 10
Personal Speed Dial buttons. In this application, the One-Touch Serial Operation function key functions as a "shift" key. Without pressing the "shift" key, the user can quickly
access the numbers stored under the One-Touch Keys. By pressing the "shift" key, the
user gets one-touch access to a second set of stored numbers.
Each One-Touch Serial Operation Key can store up to 24 of the following operations:
●
●
●
●
●
Product Description
Service Codes
Digits 0-9, # and *
One-Touch Keys
Function Keys
Pause (by pressing MIC)
●
The following fixed function keys:
SPK, DND, CALL1, CALL2,
HOLD, DIAL, FLASH, LND,
CONF, CHECK, CLEAR,
VOLUME ▲, VOLUME ▼
139
3
Section 3: Features
One-Touch Serial Operation is the second level of operation of One-Touch Keys. The
user must press the Serial Operation function key before the One-Touch Key. The first
level of operation is One-Touch Calling, which occurs when the user just presses the
One-Touch key. Refer to the One-Touch Calling feature.
Paging (Combined)
All
COS option to show or
hide Paging display
requires 6.00.08.
All
COS option to show or
hide Paging display
requires 6.00.08.
All
COS option to show or
hide Paging display is
available.
All
COS option to show or
hide Paging display is
not avaialble..
Use Combined Paging when you want to simultaneously Page into an internal and corresponding external zone. For example, you can Page your company's warehouse and
outside loading dock at the same time. Combined Paging is available for Paging zones
1-8 and All Call. In 704i, Combined Paging can page external zones even if the internal
zones are busy.
Combined Paging on a Function Key
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
Programmable Function Keys assigned for External Paging automatically execute
Combined Paging. The key follows the programmed Combined Paging assignments. For
example, if External Paging Zone 1 is associated with Internal Paging Zone 4, you’ll automatically broadcast into Internal Zone 4 when you press the External Paging Zone 1 key.
Combined Paging is not available through external speakers connected to 3ACI
Modules. Refer to the Analog Communications Interface feature on page 77 for more.
Paging (External)
All
COS option to show or
hide Paging display
requires 6.00.08.
All
COS option to show or
hide Paging display
requires 6.00.08.
All
COS option to show or
hide Paging display is
available.
All
COS option to show or
hide Paging display is
not available.
With External Paging, a user can broadcast announcements over paging equipment connected to external paging zones. When a user pages one of these external zones, the
system broadcasts the announcement over the speakers. Like Internal Paging, External
Paging allows a user to locate another employee or make an announcement without calling each extension individually.
The system allows up to eight External Paging zones. Each zone requires a port on a
PGDU PCB, with a maximum of four external paging circuits per PCB. You must have
two PGDU PCBs to get all eight external zones. In addition, each external zone has an
associated relay contact. When a user pages to a zone, the corresponding contact activates (closes). This provides for Paging amplifier control. Refer to the system
Hardware Manual for additional details.
140
Product Description
Section 3: Features
External Paging requires PGDU PCBs and customer-provided Paging equipment.
Paging through external speakers in also available with 3ACI Modules. Refer to the
Analog Communications Interface feature on page 77 for more.
Paging (Internal)
8 internal zones max
COS option to show or
hide Paging display
requires 6.00.08.
8 internal zones max
COS option to show or
hide Paging display
requires 6.00.08.
16 internal zones max
COS option to show or
hide Paging display is
available.
64 internal zones max
COS option to show or
hide Paging display is
not available.
Internal Paging lets extension users broadcast announcements to other keyset users. In
704i, the system allows All Call (all zone) Paging and up to 64 separate Internal Paging
Zones. In 124i Enhanced, the system allows All Call (all zone) and up to 16 separate
Internal Paging Zones. In 28i and 124i, the system allows All Call (all zone) and up to 8
separate Internal Paging Zones. When a user makes a Zone Paging announcement, the
announcement broadcasts to all idle extensions in the zone dialed. With All Call
Paging, the announcement broadcasts to all idle extensions programmed to receive All
Call Paging. An extension can be a member of only one Internal Paging Zone. Like
External Paging, Internal Paging allows a user to locate another employee or make an
announcement without calling each extension individually.
Park
All
32 orbits in 6.00.08, 8
orbits in prior versions
Personal Park requires G2
32 orbits in 6.00.08, 8
orbits in prior versions
All
16 orbits
All
64 orbits
Park places a call in a waiting state (called a Park Orbit) so that an extension user may
pick it up. There are two types of Park: System and Personal. Use System Park to have
the call wait in a system orbit. Personal Park allows a user to Park a call at their own
extension so a co-worker can pick it up. After parking a call in orbit, a user can Page the
person receiving the call and hang up. The paged party dials a code or presses a programmed Park Orbit key to pick up the call. With Park, it is not necessary to locate a
person to handle their calls.
A call parked for too long will recall the extension that initially parked it.
Extended Park Orbit Time
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
An extension’s Class of Service determines whether it will use the normal Park Orbit
Recall time or the Extended Park Orbit Recall time. The timers are set up in system programming. When an extension with Extended Park Recall Class of Service option parks
a call, it recalls after the Extended Park Orbit Recall time. When an extension with the
Normal Park Orbit Recall Class of Service option parks a call, it recalls after the normal
Park Orbit Recall time.
Product Description
141
3
Section 3: Features
Splitting Between Parked Calls
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
A keyset user can retrieve two calls from Park Orbit (for which they don’t have line
appearances) and easily split (alternate) between them. The split operation brings the
calls to the user’s telephone and frees up the Park Orbits.
Enhanced Dial Buffering
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
In certain high traffic sites (i.e., with a high volume of dialed paging and parking),
Enhanced Dial Buffering provides an additional level of dial buffering to help ensure
that the system processes all digits a user dials.
PBX Compatibility
All
All
All
All
You can connect your phone system trunks to Centrex/PBX lines, rather than to telco
trunk circuits. This makes the trunk inputs into the system 500/2500 type compatible
Centrex/PBX extensions, rather than telco circuits. PBX Compatibility lets the system
be a node (i.e., satellite) in a larger private telephone network. To place outside calls
when the system is behind a PBX, phone system users must first dial the PBX's trunk
access code (usually 9).
The system provides the following PBX Compatibility options:
PBX Trunk Access Code Screening
The system can monitor the numbers users dial and screen for PBX trunk access codes.
The 704i system can screen for up to 10 trunk access codes. The 28i and 124i can
screen for up to four trunk access codes. The codes can be one or two digits long, consisting of the digits 0-9, # and *. (You use the FLASH key as a wild card or “don’t
care” entry.)
PBX Trunk Toll Restriction
The system can provide the Toll Restriction for the PBX trunk, or restriction can be handled solely by the connected PBX. If the phone system provides the restriction, it
restricts the digits dialed after the PBX access code.
PBX Call Restriction
When the phone system does the Toll Restriction, it can further restrict users from dialing PBX extensions. In this case, the only valid numbers are those dialed after the PBX
trunk access code. The only PBX facility phone system users can access are the PBX's
outside trunks.
142
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Automatic Pause
The system automatically pauses when it sees a PBX trunk access code during manual
dialing, Abbreviated Dialing, Last Number Redial, Repeat Redial and Save Number
Dialed. This gives the connected PBX time to set up its trunk circuits.
PC Attendant Console
2 max (requires 6.00.08
or higher)
2 max (requires 6.00.08
or higher)
2 max
2 max
The PC Attendant Console (P/N 92690) is a
Windows-based call processing workstation
for the system's "power users" - your attendants and receptionists. The intuitive graphical interface combined with tightly integrated keyboard and mouse operation ease the
burden of handling high call volumes.
Unique features of the PC Attendant include:
3
On-screen DSS/BLF display
Transfer by name
Incoming calls grouped by type
User programmable function keys
Tab metaphor internal, external, feature
and function key directories
● Text messaging
● Multi-tasking operation
●
●
●
●
●
The PC Attendant Console is a kit that contains PC Attendant software and the PC
Interface PCB. You install the kit in a PC of your choosing which meets the following
minimum requirements:
● Windows 3.1 or higher
● 486/66 processor
● 8 MByte RAM
● VGA video card with 2 MByte VRAM
● 8 MByte free disk space
● 1 full length ISA slot available on the PC's mother board
Product Description
143
Section 3: Features
Prime Line Selection
All
All
All
All
Prime Line Selection allows an extension user to place or answer a call over a specific
trunk by just lifting the handset. The user does not have to first press keys or dial codes.
This simplifies handling calls on a frequently used trunk.
Prime Line Selection has the following two modes of operation:
Outgoing Prime Line Preference
Lifting the handset seizes the Prime Line. Outgoing Prime Line Preference would help
a telemarketer who always needs a free line to call prospective clients. The telemarketer
just lifts the handset and the Prime Line is always available. You can set up Outgoing
Prime Line Preference to access a line key, loop key or Intercom dial tone.
Incoming Prime Line Preference
When the Prime Line rings the extension, lifting the handset answers the call. Incoming
Prime Line Preference could benefit the Service Department dispatcher who must quickly answer Customer's Service calls and then dispatch repair technicians. The dispatcher
would have the assurance that whenever a customer calls in, the dispatcher just lifts the
handset to get their call. (Incoming Prime Line Preference can optionally seize an idle
line appearance.)
Private Line
All
All
All
All
A Private Line is a trunk reserved for a keyset for placing and answering calls. A user
with a Private Line always knows when important calls are for them. Additionally, the
user has their own trunk for placing calls that is not available to others in the system.
There are three types of Private Lines:
Incoming only
The keyset has a Private Line only for incoming calls. The user cannot place calls on
the Private Line.
Outgoing only
The keyset has a Private Line only for outgoing calls. The Private Line does not ring
for incoming calls.
Both ways
The keyset has a Private Line for both incoming and outgoing calls.
144
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Programmable Function Keys
All
All
All
All
Each keyset has Programmable Function Keys. Programmable Function Keys simplify
placing calls, answering calls and using certain features. You can customize the function
of a keyset's programmable keys from your administration telephone, or the extension user
can do it themselves. Depending on your telephone, you either have 12, 18 or 24
Programmable Function Keys. The following table shows the Programmable Function
Key options:
Product Description
145
3
Section 3: Features
Programmable Function Keys
For this feature . . .
Use this key when you are . . .
Dialing a stored Common Abbreviated Dialing number
Abbreviated Dialing
Dialing a stored Group Abbreviated Dialing number
Account Codes
Entering Account Codes
Logging in or out of an ACD Group
Turning ACI Call Recording on or off
Placing or receiving an Emergency Call
Enabling/disabling Rest Mode
Taking ACD groups out of service
Automatic Call Distribution
Monitoring an ACD Agent’s conversation
Switching between an ACD Agent and their outside caller after an
Emergency Call
Enabling or disabling Work Time
Using a BLF indication to view an agent’s status
Checking the status of an ACD Group’s queue
Barge In
Barging In on a co-worker’s conversation
Call Forwarding to extension or Voice Mail
Call Forwarding
Call Forwarding / Do Not Disturb
Override
Call Forwarding to device (e.g., Off-Premise, Selectable Display
Message, VAU Park and Page or VAU Personal Greeting
Overriding an extension’s Call Forwarding or Do Not Disturb
Callback / Camp On / Trunk Queuing
Leaving a Callback request at a busy extension, Camping On to a
busy extension, or Queuing for a busy trunk.
Caller ID
Changing, deleting or adding new numbers to the Caller ID Table
Central Office Calls
Conference
Conference, Voice Call
Pressing a line key to place or answer a trunk call (where trunks are
0001-0128)
Setting up a ‘Conference or a Meet Me Conference
Setting up a Voice Call Conference
Placing a data call
Data Communications
On a data call and wish to block Barge In and Off Hook Signaling
Using your PC for Telemarketing Dial
Department Calling
Department Step Calling
146
Logging in or out of your Department Calling Group
Step calling through a Department Group for an idle member
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Programmable Function Keys
For this feature . . .
Directory Dialing
Use this key when you are . . .
Accessing the Directory Dialing choices
Answering a call ringing another phone in your Pickup Group
Group Call Pickup
Answering a call ringing a phone in another Pickup Group if you
don’t know the group number
Answering a call ringing a phone in a specific Pickup Group
Hotline
Headset Operation
Hold
Placing a call to your Hotline partner
Enabling or disabling Headset Operation
Putting a call on System Hold (if your phone’s Hold key is
reassigned)
Putting a call on Exclusive Hold
Loop Keys
Placing or answering a trunk call
Meet Me Conference (also see
Conference), Meet Me Paging
Joining a Meet Me Conference or Meet Me Page
Memo Dial
Storing, using or checking a Memo Dial number
Message Waiting
Microphone Cutoff
Multiple Directory Numbers
3
Leaving or answering a Message Waiting
Using Microphone Cutoff
Placing or answering a call to your virtual (phantom) extension
Activating Day Mode / Day Mode 2
Activating Night Mode / Night Mode 2
Night Service
Activating Midnight Mode / Midnight Mode 2
Activating Rest Mode / Rest Mode 2
Off Hook Signaling
One-Touch Serial Operation
Signaling a busy extension
Storing, using or clearing a One-Touch Serial Operation
Making an External Zone Page
Paging, External
Making an External All Call Page
Broadcasting to an Internal Paging Zone
Paging, Internal
Broadcasting to all Internal Paging Zones
Park
Repeat Redial
Reverse Voice Over
Room Monitor
Save Number Dialed
Product Description
Placing a call into or retrieving a call from a Park Orbit
Activating Repeat Redial while on a call
Initiating Reverse Voice Over
Activating Room Monitor
Saving, redialing or checking a saved number
147
Section 3: Features
Programmable Function Keys
For this feature . . .
Secretary Call (Buzzer)
Secretary Call Pickup
Serial Call
Transfer
Trunk Group Routing
Use this key when you are . . .
Calling your secretary (using the buzzer)
Activating Secretary Call Pickup
Placing a Serial Call to a co-worker
Transferring a call (if CONF is not set for Transfer)
Accessing a trunk using Trunk Group Routing
Trunk Groups
Using a loop key to access a Trunk Group
Trunk Queuing
Camping On or queuing for a trunk
Calling Voice Mail or leaving a message
Voice Mail
Using Voice Mail Record
Voice Over
Initiating or responding to Voice Over
Pulse to Tone Conversion
All
All
All
All
An extension can use Pulse to Tone Conversion on trunk calls. Pulse to Tone
Conversion lets a user change their extension's dialing mode while placing a call. For a
system in a Dial Pulse area, for example, this permits users to dial into a client’s Voice
Mail and use the Voice Mail options. The user can, for example:
Place a call to the client’s Voice Mail over a DP trunk.
Depending on programming:
Manually implement Pulse to Tone Conversion
OR
Wait 10 seconds for automatic implementation.
● Dial the client’s Voice Mail system options. The system dials the digits after the conversion as DTMF.
●
●
Repeat Redial
All
All
All
All
If a keyset user places a trunk call that is busy or unanswered, they can have Repeat Redial
try it again later. The user doesn't continually have to try the number again - hoping it will
go through. Repeat Redial automatically retries the call until the called party answers.
148
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Reverse Voice Over
All
All
All
All
While on a handset call, Reverse Voice Over lets a busy keyset user make a private
Intercom call to an idle co-worker. The idle co-worker can be at a keyset or 500/2500
set. The busy user just presses and holds down a programmed Reverse Voice Over key
to make a private call to a specified co-worker. The initial caller cannot hear the
Reverse Voice Over conversation. The private Intercom call continues until the Reverse
Voice Over caller releases the key again. The initial call can be an outside call or an
Intercom call.
Reverse Voice Over could help a salesman, for example, when placing a call to an
important client. The salesman can talk with the client and give special instructions to a
secretary - without interrupting the initial call.
When the keyset is idle, the Reverse Voice Over key functions the same as a Hotline
key. A keyset's Reverse Voice Over key also shows at a glance the status of the associated extension:
When the key is. . .
The associated extension is . . .
Off
Idle
Slow Flash
Busy or call ringing
Fast Flash
In Do Not Disturb
Ring Groups
16 Ring Groups
16 Ring Groups
26 Ring Groups
96 Ring Groups
Ring Groups determine how trunks ring extensions. Generally, trunks ring extensions
only if Ring Group programming allows. For example, to make a trunk ring an extension:
●
●
Assign the trunk and the extension to the same Ring Group
In the extension's Ring Group programming, assign ringing for the trunk.
Extensions and trunks can be in only one Ring Group at a time.
If an extension has a line key for the trunk, Ring Group calls ring the extension's line
keys. If the extension doesn't have a line key, the trunk rings the line appearance key
(i.e., CALL1 or CALL2). If an extension has a key for a trunk that is not in its ring
group, the trunk follows Access Map programming.
Product Description
149
3
Section 3: Features
Ringdown
24 ringdowns max
24 ringdowns max
50 ringdowns max
50 ringdowns max
With Ringdown, a user can call a co-worker or outside party by just lifting the handset on
their telephone. The call goes through automatically - there is no need to dial digits or
press additional keys. There are two types of Ringdown: Ringdown Extension and
External Hotline. With Ringdown Extension, the user (typically a lobby or service phone)
reaches another extension when they lift the handset. If their phone has External Hotline,
the phone automatically dials a specified Common Abbreviated Dialing number instead.
When a user lifts the handset on a Ringdown Extension, the ringdown occurs after an
interval that is set in system programming. Try to monitor this operation. If the interval
is too long, unauthorized users may have time to call your co-workers or use system features. (External Hotline always occurs as soon as you lift the handset.)
Room Monitor
All
All
All
All
Room Monitor lets a keyset extension user listen to the sounds in a co-worker's area.
For example, the receptionist could listen for sounds in the warehouse when it's left
unattended. To use Room Monitor, both the initiating extension and the receiving extension must activate it. An extension user can only Monitor one extension at a time.
However, many extensions can Monitor the same extension at the same time.
Room Monitor is for listening only. It does not allow for conversation between the
monitoring and monitored extensions.
Save Number Dialed
All
All
All
All
Save Number Dialed permits an extension user to save their last outside number and
easily redial it later. For example, an extension user can recall a busy or unanswered
number without manually dialing the digits. The system retains the saved number until
the user stores a new one in its place.
Save Number Dialed saves in system memory a dialed number up to 24 digits. The
number can be any combination of digits 0-9, # and *. The system remembers the digits
regardless of whether the call was answered, unanswered or busy. The system normally
uses the same trunk group as for the initial call. However, the extension user can preselect a specific trunk if desired.
150
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Secretary Call (Buzzer)
All
All
All
All
Secretary Call lets two co-workers alert each other without disturbing their work. To
have Secretary Call, both co-workers must have keysets with Secretary Call buzzer keys.
When a user presses their buzzer key, the system alerts the called extension by sending a
splash tone and flashing the called extension's buzzer key. The called user can respond
by placing an Intercom call to the calling party. The called extension's buzzer key continues to flash until the user cancels the Secretary Call. A secretary could use this feature, for example, to get a message through to the boss in an important meeting. After
being alerted, the boss could call the secretary when it's most convenient.
An extension can have Secretary Call keys for any number of extensions, limited only
by the available number of programmable keys.
Secretary Call Pickup
3
All
All
All
All
Secretary Call Pickup lets a keyset user easily reroute calls intended for a co-worker to
themselves. By pressing a Secretary Call Pickup key, the user can have all calls to a coworker's phone ring or voice-announce theirs instead. Secretary Call Pickup is a simplified type of Call Forward with Follow Me for employees that work closely together.
This feature could be helpful to customer service representatives that must frequently
cover each other's clients. When a representative leaves their desk, an associate could
press the Secretary Call Pickup key to intercept all their calls.
An extension can have Secretary Call Pickup keys for any number of extensions, limited
only by the available number of programmable keys.
Selectable Display Messaging
All
100 simultaneous
messages max in
6.00.08, 50 in prior
versions
All
100 simultaneous
messages max in
6.00.08, 50 in prior
versions
All
100 simultaneous
messages max
All
100 simultaneous
messages max
An extension user can select a preprogrammed Selectable Display Message for their
extension. Display keyset callers see the selected message when they call the user's
extension. Selectable Display Messaging provides personalized messaging. For example, an extension user could select the message "GONE FOR THE DAY". Any display
keyset user calling the extension would see the message. Other than displaying the message, the system puts the call through normally. See the list of the standard messages
below. There are a total of 20 Selectable Display Messages. The system allows up to 50
Selectable Display Messages to be active at any one time.
Product Description
151
Section 3: Features
An extension user can add digits for date, time or phone number after messages 1-8 and
10. For example, an extension user could select the message "ON VACATION UNTIL"
and then enter the date. Callers see the original message followed by the appended date.
They would then be able to tell when the user was coming back from vacation. The
default messages are:
No.
Message
Appended with...
1
IN MEETING UNTIL
Time (when meeting done)
2
OUT UNTIL
Time (when returning)
3
OUT-PLEASE CALL
8 digits (phone number)
4
PLEASE CALL ME ON
8 digits (phone number)
5
BUSY CALL AFTER
8 digits
6
OUT FOR LUNCH
BACK AT
Time (when returning)
7
BUSINESS TRIP UNTIL Date (when returning)
8
BUSINESS TRIP CALL
9
GONE FOR THE DAY
10
ON VACATION UNTIL
11-20
8 digits (where reached)
Date (when returning)
MESSAGE 11-20
Selectable Ring Tones
All
All
All
All
An extension user can change the way calls ring their phone. Selectable Ring Tones
allows an extension user to set up unique ringing for their calls. This is important in a
crowded work area where several phones are close together. Because their phone has a
characteristic ring, the user always can tell when it's their phone ringing.
In addition, Distinctive Ringing lets keyset users customize their Intercom and trunk call
ringing. This is helpful for users that work together closely. For example, if several coworkers set their keysets to ring at different pitches, the co-workers can always tell
which calls are for them.
There are six Distinctive Ringing tones available at each extension: three for outside
calls and three for Intercom calls. The user can listen to and select which tone they want
for each type of call. During installation, the system assigns a default Intercom ring tone
for each extension and trunk ring tone for each trunk. System programming allows you
to assign different tones (from the six available) or create new choices.
Serial Call
All
All
All
All
Serial Call is a method of transferring a call so it automatically returns to the transferring
extension. Serial Calling saves transferring steps between users. For example, a
Customer Service Representative (CSR) has a client on the phone who needs technical
advice. The CSR wants to send the call to Tech Service, but needs to advise the client of
152
Product Description
Section 3: Features
certain costs when Tech Service is done. Rather than transferring the call back and forth,
the CSR can use Serial Call to Technical Service and announce, "I have Ted on the phone.
I need to talk to him again. Just hang up when you're done and I'll get him back."
Single Line Telephones
All - 8 SLTs max.
Analog message waiting
not available.
All - 70 SLTs max.
Analog message waiting
not available.
All - 70 SLTs max.
Analog message waiting
not available.
All - 374 SLTs max.
Analog message waiting
available.
The system is compatible with 500 type (Dial Pulse) and 2500 type (DTMF) analog single line telephones such as NEC's ST-4. You can install single line telephones as OnPremise or Off-Premise extensions. Single line telephone users can dial codes to access
many of the features available to keyset users. With Single Line Telephone
Compatibility, you can have your system simulate PBX type operation.
When installing single line telephones as On-Premise (ONS) Extensions, you must have:
● A port on an ASTU PCB for each single line telephone installed.
● (704i Only) If the telephones have Message Waiting lamps, you must also have a
Message Wait Power Supply PCB installed to provide lamp voltage.
● (704i Only) A customer-provided ring generator (refer to the Hardware Manual for
installation details). Up to 48 SLTs can ring simultaneously.
● (704i Only) If you have 2500 sets, a CDTU PCB with at least one block reserved for
analog extension DTMF receivers
2-OPX Modules
All
All
All
All
Loop disconnect
Loop disconnect
Loop disconnect
Loop disconnect
supervision not available supervision not available supervision not available supervision not available
If setting up single line telephones as Off-Premise (OPX) Extensions, you must install a
2-OPX Module. Each 2-OPX Module provides two OPX ports and requires two DSTU
PCB ports: the physical port to which the module is connected and the next adjacent
physical port. In addition, the 2-OPX Module has its own DTMF receivers (one for each
port), internal ring generator and power supply. In 28i and 124i, you can install 2-OPX
Modules only in odd numbered ports.
Analog Module (DCI-L)
Requires 6.00.08
4 DCI-L modules max
Requires 6.00.08
4 DCI-L modules max
All
24 DCI-L modules max
All
128 DCI-L modules max
The DCI-L Module snaps into a 28-Button, 34-Button or Super Display keyset and
allows you to connect a modem, cordless telephone, single line set or fax machine. This
additional analog port has its own extension number for Intercom, call Transfer and other
system features. The DCI-L is intended for on-premise single line applications only.
Product Description
153
3
Section 3: Features
Soft Keys and i-Series Telephones
Requires 5.02
Requires 5.02
All
All
Each i-Series 22, 28 and 34-Button Display Telephone provides interactive soft keys for
intuitive feature access. It is no longer necessary to remember feature codes to access
the telephone’s advanced features because the function of the soft keys change as the
user processes calls. For example, just press a soft key to Page, Park a call, leave a message or Camp On to a busy co-worker.
System options allow you to set up a telephone to show the idle mode display or the initial menu while idle. Additional options allow you to “fine tune” the keyset’s volume
levels for handset receive and transmit, speaker volume, ringer and handset volume,
and headset volume levels. You can also customize the point at which the built-in speakerphone switches from transmit to receive; a boon for noisy environments. The i-Series
telephones also have a contrast control for the LCD display.
Station Message Detail Recording
All
All
All
All
Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR) provides a record of the system's trunk calls.
Typically, the record outputs to a customer-provided printer, terminal or SMDR data collection device. SMDR allows you to monitor the usage at each extension and trunk.
This makes charge-back and traffic management easier.
SMDR provides the following options:
Abandoned Call Reporting
The SMDR report includes calls that called into the system but were unanswered (i.e.,
abandoned). SMDR can include all abandoned calls or only those abandoned calls that
rang longer than the specified duration. The Abandoned Call Report helps you keep
track of lost business.
154
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Blocked Call Reporting
When Toll Restriction blocks a call, you can have SMDR print the blocked call information. Or, you can have SMDR exclude these types of calls. With Blocked Call
Reporting, you can better customize Toll Restriction for the site's application.
Call Costing
For systems with Automatic Route Selection, the SMDR report can show costing information for long distance calls. Call costing does not apply to systems without ARS.
Use costing when you need to set up call accounting.
Customized Date Format
The SMDR header can show the report date in one of three formats: American,
European or Japanese. Set the format for your preference.
Transferred Call Tracking
SMDR shows each extension's share of a transferred call. If an outside call is transferred
among four extensions, SMDR shows how long each of the extensions stayed on the call.
Data Call Tracking
Data Call Tracking can log the system's internal data calls. Since SMDR normally logs
external (trunk) data calls, Data Call Tracking lets you get a complete picture of data
terminal activity.
Digit Counting
With Digit Counting, SMDR can selectively keep track of toll calls. For example, if the
digit count is nine, SMDR won't include toll calls within the home area code. Digit
Counting permits SMDR to include only the types of calls you want to monitor.
Digit Masking
Digit Masking lets you "X" out portions of the number dialed on the SMDR report. A
digit mask of seven, for example, masks out all exchange codes (NNXs) and local
addresses. Digit Masking makes it easier to keep track of calling patterns, without having to interpret each individual number. You can also use Digit Masking to block out
access and security codes.
Duration Monitoring
SMDR can include calls of any duration, or only those that last longer than the interval
you specify. If you want to keep track of all trunk activity, use a short duration. To
keep track of only significant usage, use a longer duration.
Extension Exclusion
You can selectively exclude extensions from the SMDR report. This ensures privacy for
high-profile callers. For example, the company attorney negotiating a merger may not
want his calls to show up on an in-house report.
PBX Call Reporting
If your system is behind a PBX, you can have SMDR monitor all traffic into the PBX or
just calls placed over PBX trunks. The SMDR record can include all PBX calls (including calls to PBX extensions) or just calls that include the PBX trunk access code.
Product Description
155
3
Section 3: Features
Serial and Parallel SMDR Communication
The system is compatible with both serial and parallel SMDR devices. This gives you
many SMDR output options. For example, you can output the SMDR report to a high
speed parallel printer or send it to disk through a PC's serial port.
Trunk Exclusion
Use Trunk Exclusion to exclude certain trunks not subject to per-call charges (like
WATS lines) from the SMDR report. This makes call accounting easier, since you
review only those calls with variable costs.
Usage Summaries
SMDR can automatically print daily, weekly and monthly call activity summaries. Each
summary includes the total number of regular trunk calls and ISDN trunk calls, and the
costs for each type. The daily report prints every day at midnight. The weekly report
prints every Sunday night at midnight. The monthly report prints at midnight on the last
day of the month.
SMDR (by default) includes:
- All outgoing calls - regardless of number of digits dialed, and no digits are masked.
- Outgoing calls of any duration print.
- All "No Answer" calls print.
- SMDR report includes all calls blocked by Toll Restriction.
- If system is behind a PBX, all calls to the PBX print on SMDR report.
- Internal data calls print on the SMDR report.
- All report summaries enabled.
- All extensions and trunks print out on the SMDR report.
● The SMDR report does not include voice Intercom calls.
● SMDR requires the installation of a DCI (Data Communications Interface).
● The SMDR call buffer stores 300 calls.
●
Expanded Fields
16 character Account
Code requires G3
20 character dialed
number N/A
16 character Account
Code requires G3
20 character dialed
number N/A
16 character Account
Code requires G3
20 character dialed
number N/A
16 character Account
Code available
20 character dialed
number available
To enhance call accounting flexibility, the SMDR Account Code column (ACCOUNT)
is expanded from 8 to 16 characters. In addition, the dialed number column (DIALED
NO.CLI) is expanded from 16 to 20 characters.
156
Product Description
Section 3: Features
T1 Trunking (with ANI/DNIS Compatibility)
N/A
Base: N/A
EXCPRU: G2
All
All
The T1/PRI Interface PCB gives the system T1 trunking capability. This PCB uses a single slot and provides up to 24 trunk circuits. In addition to providing digital-quality
trunking, the T1/PRI Interface PCB allows you to have maximum trunking capability
with fewer PCBs. This in turn makes more slots available for other functions.
You can program each T1/PRI PCB for any combination of the following trunks:
● CO loop start
● CO ground start
● Direct Inward Dialing
● Tie lines
When installed in 704i, the T1/PRI Interface PCB uses the first block of 24 consecutive trunks (1-24). Additional T1/PRI Interface PCBs require succeeding blocks of 24
consecutive trunks (25-48). In 124i, the T1/PRI PCB uses the last available block of
24 consecutive trunks (29-52). The second T1/PRI PCB uses the preceding block of
24 consecutive trunks (5-28).
T1 trunking also requires a CSU/DSU to interface with the telco. Read Section 2, The
Components for the specifics.
T1 DNIS (see below), DID and tie lines require DTMF receivers (CDTU-A/B PCBs in
704i, 4DTDU PCBs in 124i).
ANI/DNIS Compatibility
N/A
Routing to VAU AA
requires EXCPRU 4.02.
● Voice Mail Caller ID
with ANI/DNIS
requires EXCPRU G2.
●
Routing to VAU Auto
Att. available.
● Voice Mail Caller ID
with ANI/DNIS
available.
●
Routing to VAU Auto
Att. available.
● Voice Mail Caller ID
with ANI/DNIS
available.
●
The system is compatible with telco's T1 Automatic Number Identification (ANI) and
Dialed Number Information Service (DNIS) services. ANI/DNIS Compatibility provides:
● Selectable Receive Format
You can set up the system for compatibility with any combination of ANI, DNIS and
Dialed Number (Address) data provided by the telco.
●
Product Description
Flexible Routing
Based on the data received, the system can route the incoming ANI/DNIS call to:
- An extension
- An ACD or Voice Mail master extension number
- The VAU Automated Attendant
- A Department Group pilot number
- A trunk Ring Group
157
3
Section 3: Features
Route According to DID Translation Table or Separate ANI/DNIS Routing
Tables
● ANI/DNIS Data Displayed as Caller ID Data
● Data Error and Unanswered Call Handling
If a call can't be completed, send it to a predetermined Ring Group or play supervisory tones to the caller.
In 704i, ANI/DNIS Compatibility requires the use of system DTMF receivers on CDTU
A/B PCBs. When all receivers are busy, the incoming ANI/DNIS call waits for a receiver to become available.
●
The ANI/DNIS/Address data received from the telco can be up to 10 digits long. If the
system receives more than 10 digits, it interprets the data as an error and handles the call
according to the settings you make in system programming.
SMDR Includes Dialed Number
N/A
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
The SMDR report can optionally print the trunk’s name (entered in system programming) or the number the incoming caller dialed (i.e., DNIS digits). This gives you the
option of analyzing the SMDR report based on the number your callers dial.
Tandem Trunking (Unsupervised
Conference)xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
8 4-party or 4 8-party
8 4-party or 4 8-party
8 4-party or 4 8-party
32 4-party or 16 8-party
Tandem Trunking allows an extension user to join two outside callers in a trunk-to-trunk
Conference. The extension user can then drop out of the call, leaving the trunks in an
Unsupervised Conference. The extension user that established the Conference is not part
of the conversation. The Conference continues until either outside party hangs up. In addition, the extension user that set up the Conference can end the tandem call at any time.
Tandem Trunking could help an office manager, for example, put two outside sales people in touch. The office manager could:
● Answer a call from one salesperson
● Place a call to the second salesperson
● Set up the trunk-to-trunk Conference
● Drop out of the call
The office manager could rejoin or terminate the Conference at any time.
Tandem Trunking requires either loop start trunks with disconnect supervision or ground
start trunks.
158
Product Description
Section 3: Features
TAPI Compatibility
The system has Telephony Programming Applications Interface (TAPI) capability. NEC
offers two versions of its TAPI driver software: The NEC TAPI Service Provider and the
Proprietary Mode Telephony SPV. In addition to TAPI compliant telephone system software and one of the two drivers, you must also have:
● An i-Series Display or Super Display Telephone containing an RS-232-C DCI
Module (P/N 92266) with TAPI compliant firmware
● PC running Windows 3.x or higher with the NEC TAPI Driver installed
● A TAPI compatible Windows application
NEC TAPI Service Provider
All
All
All
All
The NEC TAPI Service Provider offers:
● Basic TAPI Commands (i.e., a reduced TAPI Feature Set)
● Caller ID data to the PC for data base lookups and screen pops
● Telephone control (off-hook, on-hook and dialing).
3
Proprietary Mode Telephony SPV
All
G3
All
All
In addition to the TAPI capabilities provided by the NEC TAPI Service Provider, the
Proprietary Mode Telephony SPV also offers:
● Additional TAPI commands
● Enhanced Caller ID information
● Limited Hold and Transfer functions
32-Bit NAMTIS TAPI Driver, Version 1.5
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
The 32-bit NAMTIS (NEC AT Mode TSPI Interface Specification) TAPI driver, version
1.5, can run on Windows 95, Windows 98 or Widows NT. The following TAPI functions
as well as the Hold and Transfer features are supported with this version:
● Incoming Redirect (TSPI_lineRedirect)
● Swap Hold (TSPI_lineSwapHold)
Product Description
159
Section 3: Features
Tie Lines
N/A
EXCPRU only
All
All
Tie lines directly link a local telephone system with one or more remote systems. The
link is independent of the telco's switched network. When a local system user seizes a tie
line, they hear Intercom dial tone from the remote system. The user may then be able to:
● Dial extensions in the remote system
● Use the remote system's trunks for outgoing calls
● Access Common Abbreviated Dialing bins in the remote system
● Use the remote system's Internal and External Paging
In 704i, tie lines require the installation of a 4ATRU-EM PCB. Two versions are available: P/N 92186 (2-wire/four lead) and P/N 92189 (2-wire/four lead or 4-wire/six lead).
DTMF tie line services require a CDTU-A or CDTU-B PCB. In 124i, tie lines require
the installation of a 2EMTU PCB and an EXCPRU PCB. The 2EMTU PCB connects
either 2-wire/four lead or 4-wire/six lead tie lines. DTMF tie line services require a
4DTDU PCB. Refer to Section 2, The Components for more.
Tie Line Class of Service
N/A
11 Tie Line COS
16 Tie Line COS
16 Tie Line COS
Tie Line Class of Service provides features and dialing restrictions for incoming tie
lines. This allows you to control the capabilities of callers dialing into your system.
The tie line Class of Service options are:
First Digit Absorption
A tie line can ignore (absorb) the first digit received, which helps when setting up a tie
line network. For example, your system can have tie lines to two other systems with the
same extension numbering plan. Use the first digit to differentiate between the systems.
Tie line callers can dial 3301-3456 for the first system's extensions and 4301-4456 for
the second system's extensions. The receiving system ignores the first digit and routes
calls correctly to the extension dialed (i.e., 4301 is received as 301).
Trunk Group Routing/ARS Access
When a tie line user calls the remote system, they may be able to dial 9 and place outside calls through the remote system. Any toll charges are incurred by the remote system. The call follows the remote system's Trunk Group Access or Automatic Route
Selection - whichever is enabled.
Direct Trunk Access
Tie line callers may be able to directly access trunks in the remote system. This allows
the callers to select a specific trunk for an outgoing call. Direct Trunk Access bypasses
the remote system's Trunk Group Routing/ARS. As with dial 9 access, any toll charges
are incurred by the remote system.
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Product Description
Section 3: Features
Common Abbreviated Dialing
The remote system's Common Abbreviated Dialing bins may be available to tie line
callers. Use this capability to set up centralized Abbreviated Dialing control - or just
save time when dialing.
Operator Calling
A tie line caller may be able to dial 0 for the remote system's operator.
Paging
Internal and External Paging may be available to tie line callers. This allows co-workers in adjacent facilities connected by tie lines, for example, to broadcast announcements to each other.
Tie Line Outgoing Call Restriction
You can selectively deny incoming tie lines access to your system's outgoing trunk
groups. Incoming tie line callers could be able to access your outgoing WATS lines, for
example, but not your DDD trunks. The system allows you to set up a restriction matrix
for each of your incoming tie lines - for each of your outgoing trunk groups.
Tie Line Toll Restriction Class
N/A
8 tie toll classes
3
15 tie toll classes
15 tie toll classes
Incoming tie lines can have a Toll Restriction Class and be subject to the system's toll
restriction. For example, Toll Restriction can prevent users from dialing 1-900 calls.
When an incoming tie line caller tries to use system trunks to dial a 1-900 service, Toll
Restriction will deny the call.
Flexible Tie Line Service Compatibility
N/A
Requires EXCPRU
DTMF tie lines require
DTDU PCB
DTMF tie lines require
DTDU PCB
All
You can individually program tie lines for Dial Pulse (DP) or DTMF incoming or outgoing signaling. Outgoing tie lines can be either wink start or immediate start.
Product Description
161
Section 3: Features
Time and Date
All
All
All
All
15 Toll Classes
15 Toll Classes
The system uses Time and Date for:
● Central Office Calls (Access Maps)
● Class of Service
● Direct Inward Lines
● Display Telephones
● Fax Machine Compatibility
● Night Service (Automatic)
● Programmable Trunk Parameters
● Ring Groups
● Station Message Detail Recording
● System Reports
● Toll Restriction (Class)
● Trunk Group Routing
● Voice Announce Unit
Toll Restriction
8 Toll Classes
8 Toll Classes
Toll Restriction limits the numbers an extension user may dial. By allowing extensions
to place only certain types of calls, you can better control long distance costs. The system applies Toll Restriction according to an extension's Toll Restriction Class. The 704i
and 124i Enhanced systems have 15 Toll Restriction Classes. The 28i and 124i have 8
Toll Restriction Classes.
Toll Restriction offers the following capabilities:
Common Permit Code Table
Use the Common Permit Code Table when you have numbers you want all Toll
Restriction Classes to dial. To let all users dial the directory assistance number 411, for
example, put 411 in the Common Permit Code Table. The Common Permit Code Table
overrides the Restrict Code and Common Restrict Code Tables. There are 10 entries in
the table. Each code is 4 digits max., using 0-9, #, * and FLASH (as a wild card or
“don’t care” digit).
Common Restrict Code Table
The Common Restrict Code Table lets you globally restrict certain numbers for all Toll
Restriction Classes. To prevent all users from dialing directory assistance (411), for
example, put 411 in the Common Restrict Code Table. Be sure you don't allow the
codes you want to restrict in the Permit Code Table or the Common Permit Code Table.
There are 10 entries in the table. Each code is 4 digits max., using 0-9, #, * and FLASH
(as a wild card or “don’t care” digit).
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Product Description
Section 3: Features
Restrict Code Table
When you want Toll Restriction to allow most calls and restrict only selected calls, use
the Restrict Code Table. To block only 1-900 calls, for example, enter 1900 in the
Restrict Code Table. (If the same Toll Restriction Class has both Permit and Restrict
Code Tables, the system restricts numbers that you enter only in the Restrict Code
Table. Numbers entered in both tables are allowed.) There are four tables, with 60
entries (restricted codes) in each table. A restricted code is 12 digits maximum, using 09, #, * and FLASH (as a wild card or “don’t care” digit).
Permit Code Table
The Permit Code Table lets you set up Toll Restriction so that users can dial only selected (permitted) telephone numbers. Use this table when you want to restrict most calls.
To allow all users to dial only area code 203, for example, enter 1203 in the Permit
Code Table. 1 + 203 + NNX + nnnn are the only numbers users can dial. (If the same
Toll Restriction Class has both Permit and Restrict Code Tables, the system restricts
numbers that you enter only in the Restrict Code Table. Numbers entered in both tables
are allowed.) There are four tables, with 60 entries (permitted codes) in each table. A
permitted code is 12 digits maximum, using 0-9, #, * and FLASH (as a wild card or
“don’t care” digit).
International Call Restriction
International Call Restriction lets you limit the international calls an extension user may
dial. You can build a restrict table to prevent only certain calls, or you can build a permit table to allow only certain calls. To allow most international calls, use the
International Call Restrict Table. To prevent most international calls, use the
International Call Allow Table. There is one International Call Restrict table and one
International Call Allow table, with up to 10 digits in each table entry. Valid entries are
0-9, #,* and FLASH (for a wild card or “don’t care” digit).
Toll Restriction for Abbreviated Dialing
Abbreviated Dialing can bypass or follow Toll Restriction. If you allow many users to
program Abbreviated Dialing, consider Toll Restricting the numbers they dial. If only
administrators can program Abbreviated Dialing, Toll Restriction may not be necessary.
You can separately restrict Group and Common Abbreviated Dialing.
Local Call Digit Counting
Use Local Call Digit Counting to limit the number of digits local callers can dial. You
can use this option to prevent users from accessing local dial-up services. For example,
set the Maximum Number of Digits in Local Calls to 7 to limit local callers to dialing
the exchange code (NNX) and local address (nnnn) only. You can make four entries for
this option. The range is 4-8 digits.
Toll Call Digit Counting
With Toll Call Digit Counting, you can limit the number of digits long distance callers
can dial. This lets you prevent callers from dialing extensively into long distance dialup services. You can make four entries ( 4-30 digits).
Toll Free Trunks
Certain trunks can be completely unrestricted, such as the company president's Private
Line. Users can place calls on Toll Free Trunks anytime - to anywhere, without inadvertently being toll restricted.
Product Description
163
3
Section 3: Features
PBX Call Restriction
Toll Restriction programming lets you enable/disable PBX Call Restriction and enter
PBX access codes. You only need to do this if your system is behind a PBX and you
have trunks programmed for behind PBX operation. Refer to PBX Compatibility feature for the specifics.
Toll Restriction Override
All
All
All
All
Toll Restriction Override lets a user temporarily bypass an extension's Toll Restriction.
This helps a user that must place an important call while at a co-worker's phone. Toll
Restriction Override lets the user:
Go to a Co-worker's phone
Dial a Service Code followed by the Toll Restriction Override Code to implement
Toll Restriction Override
● Place a trunk call the extension normally restricts
●
●
Traffic Management Report (TMS)
All
Requires G3
All
All
The system provides comprehensive Traffic Management (TMS) Reports that help when
analyzing system usage, calling patterns and Automatic Call Distribution (ACD) activity. The TMS report is in five sections:
● Trunk Calls Sorted by Extension
● Trunk Calls Sorted by Trunk
● ACD Calls Sorted by Agent
● ACD Calls Sorted by ACD Group
● All Trunks Busy Report
Traffic Management Reports require the installation of a DCI and a customer-provided
printer or terminal. Refer to the "Data Communications Interface (DCI)" feature for
more on DCI Units and 3-DCI Modules.
TMS Report Timed Print Options
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
You can set up the Traffic Management Report to start and stop at a preset time, and to
periodically print out during the “active” time period. For example, the TMS can print at
60 minute intervals between 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM, and then be off-line until 8:00 the
following morning. The time the report was printed is indicated along with date and
page number on each page of the TMS report.
164
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Transfer
All
All
All
All
Transfer permits an extension user to send an active Intercom or outside call to any
other extension in the system. With Transfer, any extension user can quickly send a call
to the desired co-worker. A call a user transfers automatically recalls if not picked up at
the destination extension. This assures that users do not lose or inadvertently abandon
their transfers.
The system allows the following types of transfers:
Screened Transfer
The transferring user announces the call to the destination before hanging up.
Unscreened Transfer
The transferring party extends the call without an announcement.
Extension (Department) Groups Transfer
The Transferring party sends the call to a Department instead of an extension.
Transfer Without Holding
A user presses a busy line key and waits for the call to complete. When the initial internal party hangs up, the system automatically sends the outside call to the waiting user.
Optional Ringback or MOH
All
G2
All
All
Transferred callers can optionally hear ringback tone or Music on Hold as their call
rings the destination extension.
Automatic On-Hook Transfer
All
All
All
All
With Automatic On-Hook Transfer, a Transfer goes through as soon as the transferring
user hangs up. For example, extension 304 can answer a trunk, press HOLD, dial 305
and hang up. The system extends the call to extension 305. Without Automatic On-Hook
Transfer, the call would stay on Hold at extension 304 when the user hangs up. To
extend the call, the user at extension 304 would have to press CONF or a Transfer function key before hanging up.
Each method has advantages. Automatic On-Hook Transfer makes transferring calls easier. However, users have to be more aware of how they handle their calls on Hold.
Without Automatic On-Hook Transfer, extending a call becomes a two-step operation —
but separate from placing calls on Hold.
Product Description
165
3
Section 3: Features
Prevent Recall of Transferred Call
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
An extension’s Class of Service can allow or prevent the ability of a transferred call
from recalling the originating extension if the call is not answered.
Traveler
N/A
N/A
All
All
Traveler provides integrated wireless PCS communications
for the 704i and 124i Enhanced systems. With your Traveler
handset and strategically placed cell units, you'll enjoy the
convenience of crystal-clear PCS communication throughout
your large, intra-facility areas. Each Traveler handset features
unique built-in features, a 2 line alphanumeric display, call
key function, voice mail key operation, vibration alert, and a
lithium ion battery.
The 704i accepts 16 Traveler interface PCBs, connecting 4
cell units per PCB, for up to 192 simultaneous Traveler conversations.
The 124i Enhanced accepts 9 Traveler interface PCBs, connecting 2 cell units per PCB, for up to 54 simultaneous
Traveler conversations.
Trunk Group Routing
36 Routes
Alternate code available
36 Routes
Alternate codes require
G2
26 Routes
Alternate code available
96 Routes
Alternate code available
Trunk Group Routing sets outbound call routing options for users that dial the Trunk
Group Routing code (9 or the programmed alternate code) for trunk calls. Trunk Group
Routing routes calls in the order specified by system programming. If a user dials 9 and
all trunks in the first group are busy, the system may route the call to another group.
When you're setting up your system, Trunk Group Routing will help you minimize the
expense of toll calls. For example, if your system has outbound WATS lines and DDD
lines, use Trunk Group Routing to route calls to the WATS lines first.
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Product Description
Section 3: Features
Trunk Groups
16 trunk groups
16 trunk groups
26 trunk groups
96 trunk groups
Trunk Groups let you optimize trunk usage for incoming and outgoing calls. With
Trunk Groups, users can have loop keys for trunk calls. Incoming trunk group calls ring
these loop keys. For outgoing calls, the user presses a loop key to access the first available trunk within the group. You set the access order in trunk group programming. The
704i system allows 96 trunk groups. The 124i Enhanced allows 26 trunk groups. The
28i and 124i systems allow up to 16 trunk groups.
Loop keys give an extension user more available function keys, since the user doesn't
need a separate line key for each trunk. The user only needs one loop key for each trunk
group. This simplifies placing and answering calls.
Like Trunk Group Routing, Trunk Groups help you minimize the expense of toll calls.
For example, if your system has outbound WATS lines and DDD lines, program the
trunk group to route to the WATS lines first:
Priority
Type of Trunk
1
WATS
2
DDD
3
Trunk Queuing/Camp On
All
All
All
All
Trunk Queuing permits an extension user to queue (wait in line) on hook for a busy
trunk or trunk group to become free. The system recalls the queued extension as soon
as the trunk is available. The user does not have to manually retry the trunk later.
Trunk Queuing lets the caller know when the call can go through. If the extension user
does not answer the Trunk Queuing ring, the system cancels the queue request.
With Trunk Camp On, an extension user can queue (wait in line) off hook for a busy
trunk or trunk group to become free. The caller connects to the trunk when the trunk
becomes free. As with Trunk Queuing, the user does not have to manually retry the
trunk later.
Any number of extensions may simultaneously queue or Camp On for the same trunk or
trunk group. When a trunk becomes free, the system connects the extensions in the
order that the requests were left.
Product Description
167
Section 3: Features
Video Door Box — P/N 85850
All
All
All
All
The Video Door Box is a self-contained video intercom
unit typically used to monitor an entrance door. A visitor
at the door can press the Video Door Box call button
(like a door bell). The system then sends chime tones to
all extensions programmed to receive chimes. In addition, the person with the Monitor Phone can view the
image of the visitor on their monitor. Or, they have the
option of calling the Video Door Box at any time to listen to the sounds and view the image picked up by the
Video Door Box. The system allows up to eight Video and/or standard Door Boxes. In
addition, each Video Door Box provides for up to four optional monitor cameras. See
Section 2, Components for more.
Voice Announce Unit
All
All
All
All
The Voice Announce Unit (VAU) Module gives the system voice recording and playback capability. This enhances the system with:
● VAU Messages
VAU Messages are the 16 system messages used for the General Message,
Automated Attendant greetings and the 900 Preamble.
168
●
General Message
Provides a prerecorded message to which any user can listen.
●
Personal Greeting
Lets an extension user record a message and forward their calls. Callers to the extension hear the recorded message and are then redirected.
●
Park and Page
Parks a call at an extension and automatically pages the user to pick it up.
●
Automated Attendant (Operator Assistance)
Answers incoming calls, plays a greeting to the caller and then lets the caller directly
dial a system extension.
●
Voice Prompting Messages
Plays call and feature status messages to users.
●
900 Preamble
Alerts callers using 900 lines of the cost and features of the "pay-per-call" service.
Also use this option to set up Auto-Answer with Greeting. In this application, the
VAU Automated Attendant automatically answers the incoming call and plays a standard company greeting. The attendant then listens for the callers response and handles the call accordingly.
Product Description
Section 3: Features
●
Time, Date and Station Number Check
Lets a keyset extension user quickly hear a recording for the time, date, or the extension's number.
The Main VAU Module has three channels, 256 seconds of VAU Message storage and
256 seconds of Personal Greeting storage. By adding the Plug-in Expansion Board, the
VAU capacity increases to six channels and 512 seconds of Personal Greeting storage
capacity. Both the Main VAU Module and Plug-in Expansion Board provide three DTMF
receivers. This helps ensure, for example, that the Automated Attendant will promptly
process the options a caller dials. The Main VAU Module and Plug-in Expansion Board
do not require the use of system (CDTU or DTDU PCB) DTMF receivers.
When you install a VAU Module, the system reserves the next adjacent port for the
Plug-in Expansion Board. In all versions of 28i and 124i, install the VAU Module in an
odd numbered port only.
In the Main VAU Module, all three channels can play messages simultaneously, or users
can record on two while the third plays a message. By installing the Plug-in Expansion
Board, six channels can play messages simultaneously, or users can record on four while
the fifth and sixth play messages. With Automated Attendant, for example, a system with a
Main VAU Module can answer and route three calls at the same time. A system with the
Plug-in Expansion Board installed can answer and route six calls at the same time.
The Main VAU Module allows recording on two channels simultaneously. The Main Module
with the Plug-in Expansion Board allows recording on four channels simultaneously.
VAU Messages
The VAU Module allows you to record up to 16 VAU messages. You allocate these messages for Automated Attendant greetings, the General Message and the 900 Preamble
Message. The total storage time for all 16 messages is 256 seconds. The maximum duration
of any one VAU message is programmable, but normally limited to 16 seconds. VAU messages are battery backed up. Once recorded, the VAU Module will retain the VAU Messages
in memory for up to 14 days provided the battery in the module is fully charged. (To fully
charge the battery, plug the VAU Module into a working system for about 24 hours.)
Any on-premise extension, DISA or DID caller can listen, record and erase VAU
Messages (unless restricted in programming). DISA and DID callers use the same procedures as on-premise users, except that they must additionally enter a VAU password.
General Message
A General Message is a prerecorded message available to all callers. A General Message
typically contains important company information that all employees should hear. To
hear the General Message, an employee can go to any keyset and press 4 (for General
Message). You can restrict the ability to record the General Message in an extension's
Class of Service. This allows you to give recording capability to the System
Administrator or Communications Manager, for example, but not any employee.
Personal Greeting
Personal Greeting allows an extension user to record a message and forward their calls.
Callers to the extension hear the recorded message and are then forwarded to the new destination. With Personal Greeting, an extension user can add a personal touch to their Call
Forwards. For example, a user can record: "Hi. This is John Smith. I'll be out of the office
today. In my absence, Mary Jones can answer all your questions. Please hold on for Mary."
Product Description
169
3
Section 3: Features
After they record their Personal Greeting, the extension user selects the destination for
their calls. The choices are:
● A co-worker's extension
● Personal Greeting only (without forwarding)
● The extension user's own subscriber mailbox (if Voice Mail is installed)
● Off-Premise via Common Abbreviated Dialing
After selecting a forwarding destination, the extension user chooses the condition that
will activate Personal Greeting. Personal Greeting can activate for:
● Calls to the extension when it is busy
● Calls to the extension that are unanswered
● Calls to the extension when it is busy or unanswered
● All calls immediately
In addition, the user can have Personal Greeting activate automatically for all calls or
just CO (trunk) calls. When the user implements Personal Greeting for all calls, the system plays the greeting and reroutes:
● Calls transferred from the Automated Attendant (OPA)
● DISA calls ringing the extension
● DID calls ringing the extension
● Direct Inward Lines (DILs) ringing the extension
● Intercom calls
With Personal Greeting for only CO (trunk) calls, the system reroutes all of the calls
listed above except Intercom calls.
If the system has the Main VAU Module, there are 256 seconds available for Personal
Greeting storage. If the system has the Plug-in Expansion Board installed, there are 512
seconds of Personal Greeting storage. The maximum length of a single Personal
Greeting is programmable, but is normally 16 seconds. Personal Greetings are not battery backed up. If the VAU Module is unplugged, if there is a commercial power failure
or if the system resets, any recorded Personal Greetings are lost.
Unique Personal Greeting Conditions
If a call comes into the extension when there are no VAU
ports available to play the Personal Greeting, the system
forwards the call without playing the recorded message to
the caller.
If an extension has Personal Greeting (RNA) enabled,
Intercom calls that voice announce are not subject to
Personal Greeting rerouting.
Personal Greeting does not reroute calls transferred from a
co-worker, normal Ring Group calls and calls transferred by
the Voice Mail Automated Attendant.
Park and Page
When an extension user is away from their phone, Park and Page can let them know
when they have a call waiting to be answered. To enable Park and Page, the user records
a Personal Greeting along with an additional Paging announcement. Park and Page will
then answer an incoming call and play the Personal Greeting to the caller. The caller
170
Product Description
Section 3: Features
then listens to Music on Hold (if available) while the system broadcasts the prerecorded
Paging announcement. When the extension user hears the Page, they can go to any telephone and use Directed Call Pickup to intercept the call.
For example, John Smith could record a Personal Greeting that says: “Hello, this is
John Smith. I am away from my phone right now but please hold on while I am automatically paged."
The prerecorded Paging announcement could say: "John Smith, you have a call waiting
on your line."
The incoming caller hears the first message and listens to Music on Hold while the system broadcasts the second message. John Smith could then walk to any phone and pick
up his call. If John doesn't pick up the call, the Page periodically repeats.
Park and Page follows the rules for Personal Greeting for All Calls, immediately rerouted. This means that Park and Page will activate for ringing Intercom calls, DID calls and
DISA calls. It will also activate for calls transferred from the Automated Attendant.
Additionally, calls from the Automated Attendant follow Automatic Overflow routing if
not picked up. Park and Page will not activate for transferred outside calls. If a call
comes in when the specified Page zone is busy, the system broadcasts the announcement
when the zone becomes free.
3
Automated Attendant (Operator Assistance)
Automated Attendant automatically answers outside calls, plays a prerecorded greeting
and then lets the outside callers directly dial system extensions. Automated Attendant
provides immediate answering and routing of outside calls without the need for an operator or dispatcher. Automated Attendant provides:
●
Simultaneous Call Answering
With the Main VAU Module installed, the Automated Attendant can answer up to
three calls simultaneously. Adding the Plug-in Expansion Board lets the Automated
Attendant answer up to six calls simultaneously.
●
Flexible Routing
The outside caller can directly dial any system extension or Department Group. If the
caller dials a busy extension, Automated Attendant allows them to dial another extension or wait for the busy extension to become free. If the busy extension is a display
keyset, the outside caller can optionally leave their number on the called extension's
display for a return call. The VAU Module has integral DTMF receivers for detecting
the digits that the callers dial. The Main VAU Module has three receivers; the Main
Module with the Plug-in Expansion Board has six receivers. Automated Attendant
does not require circuits on a CDTU or DTDU PCB for DTMF reception.
●
Automatic Overflow
Automatic Overflow can automatically redirect a call if it can't go through. This can
happen if all VAU Module ports are busy, if the called extension doesn't answer, or if
the caller misdials or waits too long to dial. (This would occur if the caller is using a
dial pulse telephone.) When the call overflows, it rings a designated Ring Group or
the Voice Mail system. By default, selecting Ring Group 1 rings only the operator.
●
Programmable Automated Attendant Greetings
You can record a different greeting for each trunk answered by the Automated
Attendant. The greetings can be different in the day, at night or on holidays or weekends. You can also have a special greeting if the caller misdials. You record the
greetings just the way you want. For example, "Dial the three-digit extension num-
Product Description
171
Section 3: Features
ber you wish to reach, dial 500 for sales or dial 600 for Customer Service." When
assigning and recording Automated Attendant greetings, you can choose among the
16 VAU messages.
Transfer to the VAU Automated Attendant
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
All
Any extension user can Transfer their outside call to the VAU Automated Attendant.
This lets their caller take advantage of the Automated Attendant’s extensive routing
capabilities. To Transfer the call, the user simply places the call on Hold, dials the
unique VAU Automated Attendant service code (set up in system programming) and
hangs up.
Voice Prompting Messages
The VAU Module provides the system with Voice Prompting Messages. These Voice
Prompting Messages tell the extension user the status or progress of their call. For example, if a user calls extension 300 when it is busy, they hear, "Station 300 is busy. For
Callback, dial 2." The following table shows the available Voice Prompting Messages.
172
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Voice Prompting Messages
Message
No.
Message
This message will play when . . .
01
Oh
A user dials 6 for the extension number or 8 for
the time, or as part of a spoken code (e.g., 804).
02
Zero
Not currently used
03
1
04
2
A user dials 6 for the extension number, 8 for the
time and date or as part of a spoken code (e.g.,
114).
05
3
06
4
07
5
08
6
09
7
10
8
11
9
12
10
13
11
14
12
15
13
16
14
17
15
18
16
19
17
20
18
21
19
22
20
23
30
24
40
25
50
26
60
27
70
28
80
29
90
30
Hundred
31
Thousand
Product Description
3
A user dials 8 for the time and date.
A user dials 8 for the time and date.
Not currently used.
173
Section 3: Features
Voice Prompting Messages
174
Message
No.
Message
This message will play when . . .
32
Sunday
A user dials 8 for the time and date.
33
Monday
34
Tuesday
35
Wednesday
36
Thursday
37
Friday
38
Saturday
39
This is station
A user dials 6 for the extension number.
40
The date is
A user dials 8 for the time and date.
41
The time is
42
AM
43
P.M.
44
Dial
A command is spoken (e.g., "dial 2").
45
Star
Not currently used.
46
Pound
47
Station
A user dials 6 for the extension number.
48
Is busy, for callback dial
A user is calling a busy extension.
49
All lines are busy, for callback dial
A user dials 9 or 804 (+ trunk group) and all
trunks are busy
50
Please do not disturb
A user calls an extension that has enabled Do
Not Disturb.
51
Please hold on, all lines are busy, your call will
be answered when a line becomes free
ACD message
52
Please hold on, your call is being rerouted
Call Forwarding Off-Premise is rerouting your
call
53
The lowest cost line is busy, please wait for the
next one
ARS tries to reroute the user’s call and the least
costly route is busy.
54
The number you have dialed is not in service
User dials a Service Code that Class of Service
prevents.
55
You have a message
User with the proper Class of Service has a Voice
Mail message or Message Waiting
56
Your call cannot go through, please call the
operator
Toll Restriction has denied a call.
57
Your calls have been forwarded
Not currently used.
58
Vacant number
An extension user has dialed an extension that
does not exist.
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Voice Prompting Messages
Message
No.
Message
This message will play when . . .
59
Is unavailable
An outside caller dials an extension through the
Automated Attendant and the extension is busy.
60
Please dial a new station
61
Or dial
An outside caller dials an extension through the
Automated Attendant and the extension is busy.
62
To wait
63
To leave your number
64
Dial # to call you back at
Not currently used.
65
Please enter your area code and telephone
number
An outside caller dials an extension through the
Automated Attendant and the extension is busy.
66
Please enter your password
Not currently used.
67
Please enter an account code
A user tries to place an outside call and the
system has Forced Account Codes enabled.
68
Please start recording
A user has dialed the code to record a VAU
message or Personal Greeting
69
Recording finished
A user is recording a VAU message or Personal
Greeting and they have exceeded the maximum
allowed recording length.
70
Audio file is full
There is no more space available in the VAU for
storing messages.
71
To listen dial
72
To erase dial
A user is trying to record a VAU message or
Personal Greeting and the recording already
exists.
73
To re-record dial
74
To save dial
Not currently used.
75
To leave a message
Not currently used.
76
Just a moment
Not currently used.
77
Hello
Not currently used.
78
Thank you
Not currently used.
79
Good-bye
Not currently used.
Product Description
3
175
Section 3: Features
900 Preamble
If the system has trunks that are part of a 900 (caller paid) service, the VAU Module can
automatically play a prerecorded message when a user answers the call. This prerecorded message should describe the 900 service features and cost. The 900 Preamble ensures
that the caller is always aware that they have accessed a 900 "pay-per-call" service. A
system user cannot converse with the caller until the preamble message ends. If the
caller hangs up before the message completes, they are not charged for the call. If the
caller waits for the message to end, they can talk to a system user and call charging
begins. The system will answer as many 900 calls as there are available VAU ports. If a
900 call comes in when all VAU ports are busy, the call will not appear on an extension
until a VAU port is available.
You can also use the 900 Preamble message to set up an Auto-Answer with Greeting application. When a receptionist answers a call, the VAU can play a preamble message such as,
"Welcome to ABC Company. How can I help you?" When the caller replies, the receptionist answers, "One moment please," and quickly extends the call to the desired party. This
ensures that all incoming calls are answered quickly, courteously and consistently.
Time, Date and Station Number Check
If the system has a VAU Module installed, any keyset user can find out the time, date or
the extension's number while their phone is idle (on hook). The time and date check
saves the user time since they don't have to look for a clock or calendar. Hearing the
extension number conveniently identifies non-display keysets. For their extension number, the user presses 6 (for Number). To listen to the time and date, the user presses 8
(for Time). In 28i and 124i systems prior to G3, users had to dial * for the time and 3
for the date.
Voice Mail
48 ports max in 6.00.08
or higher, 16 in prior
versions
48 ports max in 6.00.08
or higher, 16 in prior
versions
48 ports max
48 ports max
The system is fully compatible with the NVM-Series Integrated Voice Mail Systems.
NVM-Series provides telephone users with comprehensive Voice Mail and Automated
Attendant features. Voice Mail ends the frustration and cost of missed calls, inaccurate
written messages and telephone tag. This frees a company's busy receptionists and secretaries for more productive work. If the system has a VAU Module installed, a voice
prompt can periodically remind the extension user that they have new messages waiting
in their mailbox. In all systems (except 124i prior to G2), the ability to hear the
reminder is controlled by an extension’s Class of Service.
Automated Attendant automatically answers the system's incoming calls. After listening
to a customized message, an outside caller can dial a system extension or use Voice Mail.
NVM-Series enhances the telephone system with the following features:
Call Forwarding to Voice Mail
An extension user can forward their calls to Voice Mail. Once forwarded, calls to the
extension connect to that extension's mailbox. The caller can leave a message in the
mailbox instead of calling back later. The extension user can enable Call Forwarding for
176
Product Description
Section 3: Features
all calls, just outside calls or only Intercom calls. Forwarding can occur immediately, for
unanswered calls or when the extension is busy. When a user transfers a call to an
extension forwarded to Voice Mail, the call waits for the Intercom Interdigit time before
routing to the called extension's mailbox. This gives the transferring party the option of
retrieving the call instead of having it go directly to the mailbox.
Leaving a Message
Voice Mail key flashes
green when user has
messages.
In G3, the Voice Mail
key flashes green when
user has messages.
The Voice Mail key
flashes green when user
has messages.
Voice Mail key flashes
green when user has
messages.
Voice Mail lets a keyset extension user easily leave a message at an extension that is
unanswered, busy or in Do Not Disturb. The caller just presses their Voice Mail key to
leave a message in the called extension's mailbox. There is no need to call back later.
The co-worker receiving the message sees a flashing Message Waiting key indicating
that they have Voice Mail messages left.
Message Center Mailbox
All
G3
All
3
All
A Message Center Mailbox is a mailbox shared by more than one extension. Any keyset
that has a Message Center Key for the shared mailbox can:
● Listen to the messages stored in the shared mailbox
● Transfer calls to the shared mailbox
● Use many other Voice Mail features previously available only at an extension’s individual mailbox
A Message Center Mailbox helps co-workers that work together closely — such as
members of the same Department Hunt Group or ACD Group. For example, an ACD
Group Supervisor can send important messages to the shared Message Center Mailbox,
to which any ACD Group member can respond when time allows. Each ACD Agent’s
Message Center Key flashes (red) when messages are waiting. (The Message Center
Mailbox can be a mailbox for an installed, uninstalled or virtual extension.)
Transferring to Voice Mail
By using Transfer to Voice Mail, a keyset extension user can Transfer a call to the user's
own or a co-worker's mailbox. After the Transfer goes through, the caller can leave a
message in the mailbox.
Conversation Record
While on a call, an extension user can have Voice Mail record the conversation. The keyset
user just presses the Voice Mail Record key; the DSL user dials a code. Once recorded, the
Voice Messaging System stores the conversation as a new message in the user's mailbox.
After calling their mailbox, a user can save, edit or delete the recorded conversation.
Personal Answering Machine Emulation
A keyset user can have their idle extension emulate a personal answering machine. This
lets Voice Mail screen their calls, just like their answering machine at home. If activat-
Product Description
177
Section 3: Features
ed, the extension's incoming calls route to the user's subscriber mailbox. Once the mailbox answers, the user hears two alert tones followed by the caller's incoming message.
The keyset user can then:
● Let the call go through to their mailbox
● Intercept the call before it goes to their mailbox (Except for 124i prior to G2, the line
key changes from red to green when AME intercepts the call.)
● Reject the call before it goes to their mailbox
Voice Mail Overflow
If Voice Mail automatically answers trunks, Voice Mail Overflow can reroute those
trunks to other extensions when all Voice Mail ports are busy. During periods of high
traffic, this prevents the outside calls from ringing Voice Mail for an inordinate amount
of time. There are two types of Voice Mail Overflow: Immediate and Delayed. With
immediate overflow, calls immediately reroute to other extensions when all Voice Mail
ports are busy. With delayed overflow, calls reroute after a preset interval.
Voice Mail requires ASTU PCBs or Dual OPX Modules. In 704i, Voice Mail also
requires a customer-provided ring generator.
Return Call with Caller ID
If an outside caller leaves a message from a Caller ID capable trunk, the caller’s telephone number is stored along with the voice message. After the extension user listens to
the message, they can:
● Dial a two-digit code to hear the number.
● Dial another code to return the call without even dialing the caller’s number.
Caller ID to ANI/DNIS
N/A
Base: N/A
EXCPRU: Requires G2
All
All
The system can provide the Caller ID information required for Return Call also to
ANI/DNIS services.
Voice Mail Queuing
Requires 6.00.08
Requires 6.00.08
All
G4
When all Voice Mail ports are busy, additional callers to Voice Mail will automatically
wait in queue until a port becomes free. As ports become available, the system services the queued calls in the order in which they were received. This means the call
that has been waiting the longest is the first one sent through. Voice Mail queuing uses
many of the features available to Department Calling Groups and can handle up to 10
waiting calls.
178
Product Description
Section 3: Features
Park and Page
Park and Page string can
accomodate pagers
Park and Page string
expanded in G2 to
accomodate pagers
Park and Page string can Park and Page string can
accomodate pagers
accomodate pagers
With Park and Page, the NVM-Series Voice Mail Automated Attendant parks a call at
an extension and then pages the user with a prerecorded paging announcement. The
extension user can then pick up the call at any extension by dialing their Personal
Park Orbit code. Park and Page can also notify pagers.
Digital Voice Mail Link
Check for availability.
Check for availability.
Check for availability.
Check for availability.
The Digital Voice Mail Link provides the digital clarity and reliability while freeing up
the system’s analog ports for other applications. Enabled through any LAPB PCB supported DCI port, the digital link provides interactive soft key operation between i-Series
display telephones and the Voice Mail features.
Voice Over
All
Gain control avaialble
All
G3 required for gain
control
All
Gain control available
All
Gain control not
available
Voice Over lets a user speak privately with a keyset extension user busy on another call.
With Voice Over, the busy keyset extension user hears the Voice Over alert tone followed by the voice of the calling co-worker. The keyset extension user can respond in
private without being heard by the original caller. If desired, the keyset extension user
can easily switch between their original caller and the co-worker. The original caller and
the co-worker can never hear each other's conversation.
Voice Over could help a lawyer, for example, waiting for an urgent call. While on a call
with another client, the lawyer's paralegal could announce the urgent call as soon as it
comes in. The lawyer could then give the paralegal instructions how to handle the situation - all without the original client hearing the conversation.
Either a keyset or 500/2500 set user can initiate a Voice Over, but only a keyset user can
receive a Voice Over.
To enable Voice Over, a keyset should have a function key programmed for Voice
Over. In addition to one-touch Voice Over operation, the key shows the Voice Over
status as follows:
Product Description
179
3
Section 3: Features
When the key is . . .
You are . . .
Off
Not using Voice Over
Flashing
Listening to the interrupting
party
On
Responding to the
interrupting party
In 704i, Voice Over uses a circuit on a CDTU-A or CDTU-C PCB while active.
Volume Controls
All
All
All
All
You can control the volume of incoming ringing, splash tone, Paging, Background
Music, Handsfree and your handset. The i-Series telephones consolidate all adjustments
into the volume buttons. Adjust these volumes anytime while the feature is active. Set
them for their most comfortable level.
Warning Tone For Long Conversation
All
Warning tone for long
DISA calls available
All
Warning tone for long
DISA calls requires 4.11
All
Warning tone for long
DISA calls available
All
Warning tone for long
DISA calls available
The system can broadcast warning tones to a trunk caller warning them that they have
been on the call too long. The tones are just a reminder - the user can disregard the tones
and continue talking if they choose. The outside caller does not hear the warning tones.
In addition, warning tones do not occur for Intercom calls and incoming trunk calls.
180
Product Description
Section 3: Features
There are two types of warning tones: Alarm Tone 1 and Alarm Tone 2. Alarm Tone 1
is the first set of tones that occur after the user initially places a trunk call. Alarm Tone
2 broadcasts periodically after Alarm Tone 1 as a continued reminder. Each alarm tone
consists of three short beeps.
Windows-Based Remote
Programming Software
All
All
All
All
Check with your Sales
Representative for the availability
of this option.
The Windows-Based Remote
Programming Software elegantly
combines the ease-of-use of an allnew programming interface with
the system’s renowned software
flexibility. This new breakthrough
in system programming uniquely
accommodates both the technical
depth demanded by the most serious system programmers with the
speed and simplicity required for
CSR and related end-user training.
3
The unique Graphical User Interface, rich in intuitive graphical buttons and drop-down
menus, consolidates related programming on single or linked screens. For example, the
comprehensive extension editor combines one-touch and programmable key programming on a single screen. Additionally, the Class of Service screen shows all of an extension’s COS options at a glance for easy selection and troubleshooting.
The extensive on-line help is fully integrated with the system’s Software Manual, providing click-and-browse access to complete details on the programmable options.
Additionally, on-screen balloon help quickly identifies each programming button and field.
The Windows-Based Remote Programming Software is compatible with 28i, 124i and
704i. Check with your Sales Representative for availability.
Product Description
181
Section 3: Features
Hardware Requirements
The PC you choose for the Windows-Based Remote Programming Software must meet
the following minimum requirements:
● Software
- Windows 95/98/NT
- Internet Explorer 3.0 or higher
● Hardware
- 100 MHz Pentium processor
- 16 MByte RAM
- Video card capable of 800 x 600 display
- 20 MByte free disk space
Year 2000 Compliance
All
G3 (4.06)
All
All
The 28i, 124i and 704i systems provide Year 2000 Compliance. The change of the date
from one century to the next is handled by the system software and is no different than
the change from one year to the next. The day following 12/31/99 will be 01/01/00. The
system will process the leap year correctly and will not require an upgrade or reprogramming. The Voice Announce Unit prompts will correctly announce the year. In addition, all date sensitive reports will properly show the years in the 21st century as 20xx.
The reports include:
182
●
Station Message Detail Recording
- SMDR page banner
- SMDR summary banner
●
Hotel/Motel
- Hotel Room Status banner
●
System Reports
- Alarm Report page banner
- System Information page banner
●
Traffic Management Reports (TMS)
- Traffic Management Report page banner
Product Description
Section 4: Specifications
Table of Contents
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185
FCC Registration Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190
704i Configuration Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192
124i Configuration Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193
28i Configuration Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
Parts List and Order Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
4
Product Description
183
Section 4: Specifications
— For Your Notes —
184
Product Description
Section 4: Specifications
Specifications
System Capacities
1
Description
28i
124i
704i
Tenants
1
1
4
Cabinets
1
Universal PCB Slots
4
3 (Main and up to 2 Expansion Cabinets)
Main Cabinet: 1-8
Expansion Cabinet #1:
1-8
Expansion Cabinet #2:
1-8
Talk Timeslots (Intercom/
trunk)
Main Cabinet: 1-7 (not
including CPU)
Expansion Cabinet #1: 8-16
Expansion Cabinet #2: 1725
Non-blocking
Analog Trunks (CO/PBX
lines)
16
52
192
Digital Telephones
16
72
512
Analog Telephones
8
64
360
DSS Consoles
2 max. per extension (8 max per system)
Up to 4 extensions can have DSS Consoles
4 max. per extension
(64 max. per system)
Up to 16 e xtensions can
have DSS Consoles
DCI A/B Units
36 in 6.00.08 or higher
15 in prior versions
36 in 6.00.08 or higher
72 in prior versions
144
3-DCI Modules
(3 ports per module)
3 max. per system
4 max. per cabinet
12 max. per system
48
3- ACI Modules
(3 ports per module)
2 max. per system
2 max. per system
64
Power Failure Telephones
4 (one per 4 ATRU
PCB)
13 (one per 4 ATRU
PCB)
4 max. per cabinet
12 max. per system
VAU Module
1
VAU Plug-In Expansion
Board
1 (installs in VAU Module)
Door Boxes
8 (4 per 4PGDU PCB)
8
Door Box/External Page
Contacts
8 (4 per 4PGDU PCB)
8
Alarm/Fax Sensors
8 (4 per 4PGDU PCB)
16
External Paging Zones
8 (4 per 4PGDU PCB)
8
Internal Paging Zones
8
64
Product Description
4
185
Section 4: Specifications
System Capacities (Continued) 1
Description
28i
Conference Circuits
The system provides either four-party or eight-party
conferences. Conference circuits provided on CPRU
PCB (Main Cabinet only)
The system provides
either four-party or
eight-party conferences. Conference circuits provided on
CDTU PCBs.
Dial Tone Detection (Outbound)
Provided by DTDU (2PCBs max.). Outbound dial
tone detection may be required for OPX extensions
and analog trunks.
128 (Provided on
CDTU-A/B PCBs.)
Required for single line
sets (with trunk access)
and immediate start tie
lines.
DTMF Receivers
Provided by DTDU (2 PCBs max.). Required only for certain types of inbound trunks (e.g., DISA).
128 (Provided on
CDTU-A/B PCBs.)
Required for single line
sets, DISA trunks and
tie lines.
1.Maximum
124i
704i
system capacity depends on your system’s PCB configuration.
Environmental Requirements
Meeting established environmental standards maximizes the life of the system. Refer to the Standard Practices
Manual for further information. Be sure that the site is not:
1.
In direct sunlight or in hot, cold, or humid places.
2.
In dusty areas or in areas where sulfuric gases are produced.
3.
In places where shocks or vibrations are frequent or strong.
4.
In places where water or other fluid come in contact with the main equipment.
5.
In areas near high-frequency machines or electric welders.
6.
Near computers, telexes, microwaves, air conditioners, etc.
7.
Near radio antennas (including short-wave).
Power Requirements
A dedicated 110 VAC 60 Hz circuit located within 7 feet of the Main Cabinet is required. In 124i, you should
have a separate dedicated outlet for each cabinet.
704i Site Requirements
The 704i system must be floor-mounted. Brackets secure each cabinet to a wall.
186
Product Description
Section 4: Specifications
Environmental Specifications
Cabinet and key Telephones
Temperature: 0 to 45o C (32 to 113o F)
Humidity: 10 to 95% (non-condensing)
Door Chime Box
Temperature: -20 to 60o C (-4 to 140o F)
Humidity: 10 to 95% (non-condensing)
Electrical Specifications
28i
Power Supply
Power Requirements
124i
704i
120 VAC+ 10% @ 50-60 Hz
120 VAC @.66A
(79.2 VA)
120 VAC + 10% @ 57/
63 Hz
120 VAC @ 1.53A (184
VA) max. per cabinet
120 VAC @ 6A (460
VA) max. per cabinet
No. 14 AWG copper wire
Grounding
Requirements
4
External Zone Paging
28i/124i
704i
Output Impedance:
600 Ohm
600 Ohm
Maximum Output:
400 mV RMS
+ 3 dBM
Output Level:
Nominal 250 mV (-10 dBm)
Nominal 250 mV (-10 dBm)
External Control Relay Contact
28i/124i
704i
—
60 mA @ 30 VDC
10mA @ 90 VDC
Maximum Initial
Contact Resistance:
—
50 mOHMS
Output Impedance
600 Ohm
600 Ohm
Maximum Load:
Product Description
187
Section 4: Specifications
External Control Relay Contact (Continued)
28i/124i
704i
Output Level
Nominal 250 mV (-10 dBm)
Nominal 250 mV (-10 dBm)
Maximum Output
400 mV RMS
400 mV RMS
Configuration
Normally open
Normally open
Mechanical Specifications
Type of Equipment
Width
Depth
Height
Weight
704i Main Cabinet
704i Expansion Cabinet
124i Cabinet
28i Cabinet
23 1/4”
23 1/4”
16 1/2”
10 3/4”
13 1/4”
13 1/4”
6”
6 1/8”
26 1/2”
15 3/4”
13 1/2”
13 13/16”
66 lbs
44 lbs
7 lbs
4 lbs 5 oz
i-Series Keyset
Super Display
DSS Console (110 but.)
Digital Single Line
Door box
7 7/8””
7 7/8”
7 7/8”
6 3/4”
4”
9 1/4”
9 1/4”
9 1/4”
8 5/8”
1 1/2”
3 5/8”
4 1/8”
3 3/16”
3 3/4”
5 3/16”
2 lbs 4 oz
2 lbs 6 oz
1 lb 4 oz
1 lb 7 oz
10 oz
3 ACI-A /3 DCI/2-OPX
Module
9 3/8”
7 3/8”
1 1/4”
3 lbs
Cabling Requirements
1.
Do not run station cable in parallel with the AC source, telex, or computer, etc. If the cables runs are near
those devices, use shielded cable with grounded shields or install the cable in conduit.
2.
When cables must be run on the floor, use cable protectors.
3.
Cable runs for key telephones, single line telephones, Door Chime Boxes and 3 DCI-A adapters must be a
dedicated, isolated cable pair.
In 704i
The Telco RJ21X and cross-connect blocks should install to the right of the Main Cabinet.
Extension blocks and cross-connect blocks should be installed to the left of the Main Cabinet.
188
Product Description
Section 4: Specifications
Device
Cable type
Cable run length (ft)
Key telephone, 3-ACI
Module and 3-DCI Module
2-wire 26 AWG
2-wire 24 AWG
2-wire 22 AWG
704i = 1300, 28i/124i = 650
704i = 2000, 28i/124i = 1000
704i = 2600, 28i/124i = 1300
Single line telephone
2-wire 26 AWG
2-wire 24 AWG
2-wire 22 AWG
2-wire 26 AWG
2-wire 24 AWG
2-wire 22 AWG
13,100
21,000
34,750
6,500
10,500
17,400
Door Box
2-wire 26 AWG
2-wire 24 AWG
2-wire 22 AWG
200
330
550
Notes
at constant 20 Ma
at constant 20 Ma
at constant 20 Ma
at constant 35 Ma
at constant 35 Ma
at constant 35 Ma
4
Product Description
189
Section 4: Specifications
FCC Registration Information
FCC Registration
Model
28i
124i
704i
28i
124i
704i
Manufacturer:
NEC Infrontia, Inc.
FCC Part 15
Registration:
Class A
Sample FCC
Registration Number:1
1.
NIFMUL-43088-MF-E
NIFMUL-43088-MF-E
NIFMUL-43085-MF-E
Refer to the label on the Main Cabinet for FCC Registration number.
MTS/WATS
Interfaces
Mfrs. Port
Identi er
Ringer
Eq.
Number
SOC
Network
Jacks
02LS2
4 ATRU
0.9B
9.0FAS26.0P
RJ11C
Original
02LS2
4ATRU-LSI
0.9B (ac);
0.1 (dc)
RJ21X
Original
02LS2
8ATRU-LSI
0.9B (ac);
0.1 (dc)
RJ2IX
Original
02GS2
8GSAU-AL
4.0B
RJ21X
Original
02RV2-T
4ATRU-LDI
0.0B
Reg.
Analog Private
Mfrs. Port
Status
Line Interfaces
Original
TL11M
Reg.
Status
28i/124i
Original
704i
AS.2
RJ21X
Network
Jacks
Identi er
Service
Order
Code
4ATRU-EMI
9.0F
RJ2EX
Federal Communications Commission DID Requirements
This equipment must operate in a manner that is not in violation of part 68 rules. This equipment returns answer
supervision to the Public Switched network when the DID trunk is: (1) answered by the called station; (2)
answered by the attendant; (3) routed to a recorded announcement that can be administered by the CPE user; (4)
routed to a dial prompt.
The equipment returns answer supervision on all DID calls forwarded back to the public Switched Telephone
Network except when: (1) a call is unanswered; (2) a busy tone is received; (3) a reorder tone is received.
190
Product Description
Section 4: Specifications
When ordering DID Service, provide the telco with the following information:
FCC Registration Number
NIFMUL-nnnnnKF-E
DID Facility Interface Code
02RV2-T
DID Service Order Code
9.0F
DID Answer Supervision Code
AS.2
DID USOC Jack Type
RJ21X
Please note the following:
1.
DID services must be purchased from the local telephone company.
2.
(28i/124i) Each 2DIDU provides two DID trunk circuits and utilizes two consecutive software ports.
(704i) Each 4ATRU-LD provides four DID trunk circuits and utilizes eight consecutive software
ports. For example, a 4ATRU-LD1 providing DID circuits 9-12 uses ports 9-16. The 4SATRU-LD
has an on-board 48 VDC power supply for talk battery.
3.
Refer to the Software manual for detailed DID description, conditions, and programming instructions.
4
Product Description
191
Section 4: Specifications
704i Configuration Guide
Expansion Cabinet 2
Filter Unit Assignment
Universal Slot Assignment
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
14
15
16
5
6
7
Expansion Cabinet 1
Filter Unit Assignment
Universal Slot Assignment
8
9
10
11
12
13
Main Cabinet
Filter Unit Assignment
DSTU
PCB
CPU PCB
Universal Slot Assignment
1
192
2
3
4
Product Description
Section 4: Specifications
124i Configuration Guide
Expansion Cabinet 2
EXIFU Expansion
Interface
Slot Assignment
24-Channel Digital/Analog
Slots
1
2
3
Four-Channel Analog Slots
4
5
6
7
8
Expansion Cabinet 1
EXIFU Expansion
Interface
Slot Assignment
24-Channel Digital/Analog
Slots
Four-Channel Analog Slots
4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Main Cabinet
Slot Assignment
Four-Channel Analog Slots
CPRU
24-Channel Digital/Analog
Slots
1
Product Description
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
193
Section 4: Specifications
28i Configuration Guide
28i Cabinet
Slot Assignment
Four-Channel Analog Slots
CPRU
24-Channel
Digital/Analog Slot
1
194
2
3
4
5
Product Description
Section 4: Specifications
Traveler
The Telephones
Parts List and Order Form
Parts List and Order Form
Part No.
34-Button Super Display Telephone
92773
/1 each
34-Button Display Telephone
92783
/1 each
28-Button Display Telephone
92763
/1 each
28-Button Standard Telephone
92760
/1 each
22-Button Display Telephone
92753
/1 each
22-Button Standard Telephone
92750
/1 each
Digital Single Line Telephone
92550A
/1 each
ST4 Analog Telephone
85403W
Cordless Telephone (Nitsuko 900i)
85456D
Traveler Handset without Battery
85425
Traveler Handset Battery
85426
Traveler Remote Cell Unit
85420
Traveler Handset Charger
85429
Traveler Headset
85432
Traveler Ear Plug and Cord
85433
Traveler Spare AC Adaptor
85428
Traveler Carrying Case
85427
Traveler Wall Mount Kit
85421
Traveler Cell Locator Site Survey Kit
85430
Traveler Pseudo Cell Site
85420
PLACE
Traveler Pseudo Telephone
85425
PLACE
Traveler Pseudo Battery
85426
PLACE
704i 4PACSU Interface PCB
92330
/16 max.
124i Enhanced 2PACSU Interface PCB
92033
/9 max.
Product Description
Quantity
Digital Ports
Analog
Ports
Trunk
Ports
/1 each
/1 each
4
195
Section 4: Specifications
Parts List and Order Form
(Continued)
Part No.
Quantity
Digital Ports
PC Attendant Console
92690
/2 max
/1 each
110-Button DSS Console
92555
/64 max. 704i
/8 max. 28i/124i
Other Station Equipment
24-Button DSS Console
Analog
Ports
Trunk
Ports
/16 max. 704i
/8 max. 28i/124i
DSS Console Power Supply
92556
Door Box
92245
/8 max
Video Door Box
85850
/8 max
Data Module (Serial)
92266B
/144 max in 704i
/36 max in 124i
/36 max in 28i
Data Module (Parallel)
92267
/144 max in 704i
/36 max in 124i
/36 max in 28i
Recording Jack Module (REJ)
80175
/1 per 34/28 btn
Off-Hook Voice Announce (OHVA)
92765
/1 per ext.
Analog Module (DCI-L)
92767
/1 per ext.
Speakerphone Module
Future
/1 per ext.
3-Port Data Module (3-DCI)
92258
/48 max in 704i
/12 max in 124i
/3 max in 28i
Main VAU Module
92136
/1 max
/1 each
VAU Expansion Board
92137
/1 max
/1 each
2-OPX Module
92177
/Set by load factor in 28i
/2 each
3-Port Analog Interface (3-ACI)
92259
/64 max in 704i
/2 max in 124i
/2 max in 28i
/1 each
Digital Single Line Telephone Wall
Mount Kit
92559
ST4 Wall Mount Kit
85409
Labelmaker
196
Product Description
704i Common PCBS
704i Common Equipment
Section 4: Specifications
Parts List and Order Form
(Continued)
Part No.
Quantity
Main Cabinet
92100
/1max
Expansion Cabinet
92120
/2 max
XL Main Power Supply
92106A
/1 max
XL Expansion Power Supply
92126A
/2 max
Ring Supply Cable
92111
/3 max
Ring Generator (90 VAC)
85870
/1 max
704i Windows-Based Remote Programming Software
92217
V*.**.**
/1 max
TAPI Kit, including Serial Data Module (P/N 92266B) TAPI Driver P/N
94000
92966B
/1 max
Remote Programming Kit, including
Modem (P/N 85862C)
Programming Software (P/N 92216)
92366
1
inDepth ACD/MIS
94100A
/1 max
inDepth+ACD/MIS
94105A
/1 max
inView LAN Wallboard
94130
94131UP
inDepth Sub-Supervisor
94110A
CPU PCB w/Software
92132
1
4PGDU Page/Door Box (4 Circuit) PCB
92135
/2 max
CDTU-A Conference/DTMF Receiver
PCB
92140
/8 max
CDTU-B DTMF Receiver PCB
92145
/8 max
CDTU-C Conference PCB
92150
/8 max
4LAPBU OAI PCB
92156
1
Product Description
Digital Ports
Analog
Ports
Trunk
Ports
4
197
Section 4: Specifications
704i Station PCBs
Parts List and Order Form
(Continued)
Part No.
Quantity
Digital Ports
32DSTU Digital Station PCB (32 Circuit) 92380
/16 max total
of all types
16DSTU Digital Station PCB (16 Circuit) 92180A
/16 max total
of all types
24ASTU Analog Station PCB (24 Circuit) 92375
/15 max total
of all types
16ASTU Analog Station PCB (16 Circuit) 92175
/15 max total
of all types
8ASTU Analog Station PCB (8 Circuit)
92176
/15 max total
of all types
16ASTU-B Analog MWait PCB (16
Circuit)
92178A
/15 max total
of all types
Message Wait Power Supply PCB
92112
/1 max
96FU Station Filter Unit (96 Circuit)
92365
48FU Station Filter Unit (48 Circuit)
92165
Filter Unit Adaptor Cable
92367
Analog
Ports
Trunk
Ports
/12 max total of 24FUs+ 48FUs
198
Product Description
704i Trunk PCBs
Section 4: Specifications
Parts List and Order Form
(Continued)
Part No.
8ATRU CO Loop Start PCB (8 Circuit)
92170
/24 max total
of all types
/8 each
2ATRU-EM & 4ATRU-EM PCB (4
Ckt.)
92186/
92189
/11 max
/4 each
4ATRU-LD DID Trunk PCB (4 Circuit)
92187
/24 max total
of all types
/4 each
T1/PRI Interface PCB (1Circuit)
92190A
704i 1 Port 704i T1/CSU Kit
92310
704i T1 CSU Kit
92313
704i T1/DSU Kit
92311
704i T1 Quad DSU Kit
92312
T1/PRI Installation Cable
92197
T-Serve II CSU
85950
T-Serve II Power Supply
85951
CSU/DSU RJ48 - DB15 Cable
85953
Datasmart DSU Add/Drop Unit
85955A
Quad Datasmart DSU
85956
Kentrox Satellite 931 CSU with Power
Supply and CO Cable
85845
DB-15 Mod Adaptor for Satellite 931
85944
2BRI Interface PCB (2 Circuit)
92191
/24 max
4BRI Interface PCB (4 Circuit)
92193
/12 max
8BRI Interface PCB (8 Circuit)
92192
S-Bus Power Supply
92194
4PFTU Power Failure Daughter Board
(4 Ckt)
92174
8GSAU Group Start Daughter Board
(8 Ckt)
92185
Caller ID Daughter Board (8 Circuit)
92188
24FU Trunk Filter Unit
92160
Product Description
Quantity
Digital Ports
Analog
Ports
Trunk
Ports
/24 each
4
/1 max per
trunk PCB
/12 max total of 24FUs + 48FUs
199
124i Common Equipment
Section 4: Specifications
Parts List and Order Form
(Continued)
Part No.
Quantity
124i Cabinet (Main and Expansion)
92000A
/3 max
124i DOS-Based Remote Programming
Software (not for 124i Enhanced)
92096
1
124i Enhanced Windows-Based Remote
Programming Software
92097
V*.**.**
28i/124i Windows-Based Remote Programming Software
92095
V*.**.**
TAPI Kit, including Serial Data Module
(P/N 92266B) TAPI Driver (P/N 94000)
92966B
/1 max
Remote Programming Kit, including
LAPBU Prog. Module (P/N 92008)
Modem (P/N 85862C)
Adapter Cable (P/N80893)
Mod-8/DB25M Adapter (P/N 85981)
Programming Software (P/N 92096)
92066B
1
DDK Installation Cable (US)
82492
DDK Installation Cable (Canada)
93090
Enhanced 32CPRU CPU
92007
32CPRU CPU
92005
EXIFU Expansion Interface
92029
/2 max
EXCPRU Memory Expansion
92025
/1 max
LAPBU Remote Programming Module
92006
LAPBU Remote Programming Module
with Com Port
92008
124i DB9-to-8-Pin PC Cable Set
92009DB9
124i DB25-to-8-Pin Modem Cable Set
92009DB25
4LAPBU OAI Interface PCB
92056
/1 max
4PGDU Page/Door Box PCB
92030
/2 max
4DTDU DTMF Receiver PCB
92035
/2 max
Digital Ports
Analog
Ports
Trunk
Ports
124i Common PCBs
1
200
/1 max
Product Description
28i Common PCBs
28i Common Equipment
Section 4: Specifications
Parts List and Order Form
(Continued)
Part No.
Quantity
28i Cabinet
92700
1
28i Power Supply
92701
1
28i DOS-Based Remote Programming
Software
92796
1
28i/124i Windows-Based Remote Programming Software
92095
V*.**.**
TAPI Kit, including Serial Data Module
(P/N 92266B) TAPI Driver (P/N 94000)
92966B
DDK Installation Cable (US)
82492
DDK Installation Cable (Canada)
93090
8CPRU Central Processing Unit
92705
1
LAPBU Remote Programming Module
with Com Port
92706
/1 max
28i DB9-to-8-Pin PC Cable Set
92708DB9
28i DB25-to-8-Pin Modem Cable Set
92708DB25
4PGDU Page/Door Box PCB
92030
/2 max
4DTDU Dial Tone Detection PCB
92035
/2 max
Product Description
Digital Ports
Analog
Ports
Trunk
Ports
/1 max
4
201
28i/124i Station and Trunk PCBs
Section 4: Specifications
202
Parts List and Order Form
(Continued)
Part No.
Quantity
8DSTU Digital Station PCB
92021
/9 max in 124i
/1 max in 28i
4ASTU Analog Station PCB
92040
/16 max in 124i
/2 max in 28i
4ATRU Analog Trunk PCB (loop start)
92011
/13 max in 124i
/4 max in 28i
2EMTU E&M Trunk PCB (124i only)
92017A
/13 max in 124i
2DIDU-S DID Trunk PCB
92016A
/13 max in 124i
/2 max in 28i
T1/PRI Interface PCB (124i only)
92060A
/2 max
124i T1/CSU Kit
92070
T1/CSU Kit
92079
124i T1/DSU Kit
92071
124i T1 Quad DSU Kit
92072
T-Serve II CSU
85950
T-Serve II Power Supply
85951
CSU/DSU RJ48-DB15 Cable
85953
124i T1 Installation Cable
92067
Kentrox Satellite 931 with Power Supply and CO Cable
85945
Datasmart DSU Add/Drop Unit
85955A
Quad Datasmart DSU
85956
DB-15 Mod Adaptor for Satellite 931
85944
2BRI Interface PCB (2 Circuit)
92061
/13 max in 124i
/3 max in 28i
4BRI Interface PCB (4 Circuit)
92060
/9 max in 124i
/3 max in 28i
S-Bus Power Supply
92194
4GSAU Ground Start Daughter Board
92015
/13 max in 124i
/4 max in 28i
Caller ID Daughter Board (4 Circuit)
92012
/13 max in 124i
/4 max in 28i
Digital Ports
Analog
Ports
Trunk
Ports
Product Description
Section 4: Specifications
Parts List and Order Form
(Continued)
Part No.
Quantity
Digital Ports
Analog
Ports
Trunk
Ports
Optional Customer - Provided Equipment
Uninterruptable Power Supply
66M1-50 Connecting Blocks
704i Totals
— + — (512 max)
— (192
max)
124i Totals
— +— (72 max)
— (52
max)
28i Totals
——— +———
(Depends on Load Factor
Totals)
— (16
max)
4
Product Description
203
Section 4: Specifications
204
Product Description
NEC America, Inc., Corporate Networks Group
4 Forest Parkway, Shelton, CT 06484
Tel: 800-365-1928 Fax: 203-926-5458
cng.nec.com
Other Important Telephone Numbers
Sales: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customer Service: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customer Service FAX: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Technical Service: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discontinued Product Service: . . . . . . . . . .
Technical Training: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency Technical Service (After Hours)
(Excludes discontinued products)
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. .203-926-5450
. .203-926-5444
. .203-926-5454
. .203-925-8801
. .900-990-2541
. .203-926-5430
. .203-929-7920
Have any comments, suggestions or corrections for this guide?
Forward your comments, suggestions or corrections to:
NEC America, Inc., Corporate Networks Group
4 Forest Parkway, Shelton, CT 06484
Tel: 800-365-1928 Fax: 203-926-5458
cng.nec.com
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