HA028581, Issue 8

HA028581, Issue 8
 
Eurotherm
TM
Mini8
User
Manual
Mini8 Multi-loop Process Controller
Version 2.68.
HA028581/17
May 2016
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Mini8 controller – Multi-Loop Process Controller
CONTENTS
Warning Back up Battery................................................................................................................................................8
1.
CHAPTER 1 INSTALLATION............................................................................................................... 10
1.1
1.2
1.3
What Instrument Do I Have? ........................................................................................................ 10
Mini8 Controller Ordering Code ................................................................................................. 11
How to Install the Controller ........................................................................................................ 12
1.4
Electrical Connections – Common to All Instruments ................................................................ 13
1.5
Electrical Connections for Modbus ............................................................................................. 15
1.6
Electrical Connections for DeviceNet / CANopen ..................................................................... 20
1.7
Electrical Connections for Enhanced DeviceNet Interface ........................................................ 22
1.8
Electrical Connections for Profibus DP ....................................................................................... 23
1.9
Electrical Connections for EtherNet (Modbus TCP) ................................................................... 24
1.10
Electrical Connections for EtherNet/IP ....................................................................................... 25
1.11
Electrical Connections for EtherCAT ........................................................................................... 26
1.12
1.13
1.14
1.15
1.16
1.17
1.18
1.19
1.20
Electrical Connections for Thermocouple Input TC4 and TC8 .................................................. 27
Electrical Connections for RTD .................................................................................................... 27
Electrical Connections for Logic Input DI8 ................................................................................. 28
Electrical Connections for Logic Output DO8 ............................................................................ 28
Electrical Connections for Inductive Loads ................................................................................ 28
Electrical Connections for Relay Output RL8 .............................................................................. 29
Electrical Connections for Analogue Output AO4 and AO8 ..................................................... 29
Electrical Connections for Current Transformer Input Module CT3 ......................................... 30
Adding or Replacing an IO Module. ........................................................................................... 31
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.4.1
1.4.2
1.4.3
1.4.4
1.4.5
1.5.1
1.5.2
1.5.3
1.5.4
1.5.5
1.5.6
1.6.1
1.6.2
1.6.3
1.7.1
1.7.2
1.8.1
1.8.2
1.9.1
2.
Dimensions .............................................................................................................................................................12
To Install the Controller .........................................................................................................................................12
Environmental Requirements ................................................................................................................................12
Power Supply ..........................................................................................................................................................13
Fixed IO Connections ............................................................................................................................................14
Digital Communications Connections..................................................................................................................14
Configuration Port (CC) ........................................................................................................................................14
Screened Communications Cables ......................................................................................................................14
Modbus Connectors ..............................................................................................................................................15
RS485 ......................................................................................................................................................................15
Direct Connection - Master and One Slave .........................................................................................................16
RS485 to RS232 Converter ....................................................................................................................................17
One Master, Multiple slaves Short Network.........................................................................................................18
Wiring Connections for Modbus Broadcast Communications .......................................................................... 19
DeviceNet Connector ............................................................................................................................................20
Network Length ......................................................................................................................................................21
Typical DeviceNet / CANopen Wiring Diagram ..................................................................................................21
Enhanced DeviceNet Connector ..........................................................................................................................22
Switches and LED Indicators .................................................................................................................................22
Profibus Interface (D-Type Connector).................................................................................................................23
Profibus Interface (RJ45 Connector).....................................................................................................................23
Connector: RJ45:....................................................................................................................................................24
1.10.1
Connector: RJ45: ...............................................................................................................................................25
1.11.1
Connector: RJ45: ...............................................................................................................................................26
CHAPTER 2 MINI8 CONTROLLER LED INDICATORS ........................................................................ 32
2.1
Status Indication for Enhanced DeviceNet ................................................................................. 33
2.2
Status Indication for EtherNet/IP ................................................................................................. 34
2.3
Status LEDs for EtherCAT ............................................................................................................ 35
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.3.1
2.3.2
2.3.3
2.3.4
Module Status Indication .......................................................................................................................................33
Network Status Indication ......................................................................................................................................33
Module Status Indication .......................................................................................................................................34
Network Status Indication ......................................................................................................................................34
‘OP’ – Mini8 Run Status Indication .........................................................................................................................35
‘CC’ - Configuration Port Status Indication ..........................................................................................................35
‘RUN’ – EtherCAT Slave Run Status Indication ....................................................................................................35
‘ERR’ – Error Status Indication ...............................................................................................................................35
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16 CN34452
Page 1
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
3.
CHAPTER 3 USING THE MINI8 CONTROLLER .................................................................................. 36
3.1
iTools ............................................................................................................................................ 36
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
Modbus, single register, SCADA addressing ............................................................................. 36
Modbus (Floating Point) .............................................................................................................. 37
Fieldbus ........................................................................................................................................ 37
EtherNet (Modbus TCP) ............................................................................................................... 37
Mini8 Controller Execution .......................................................................................................... 37
The iTools Operator Interface ..................................................................................................... 38
3.8
Recipe Editor ................................................................................................................................ 40
3.9
OPCScope .................................................................................................................................... 41
3.1.1
3.7.1
3.7.2
3.8.1
3.9.1
3.9.2
3.9.3
4.
iTools OPC Open server ........................................................................................................................................36
Scanning..................................................................................................................................................................38
Browsing and Changing Parameter Values .........................................................................................................38
Recipe Menu Commands ......................................................................................................................................40
OPC Scope List Window Context Menu...............................................................................................................42
OPC Scope Chart Window ....................................................................................................................................42
OPC Server .............................................................................................................................................................44
CHAPTER 4 CONFIGURATION USING ITOOLS ................................................................................ 45
4.1
Configuration ............................................................................................................................... 45
4.2
Connecting a PC to the Mini8 Controller ................................................................................... 45
4.3
4.4
Cloning ......................................................................................................................................... 46
Configuring the Mini8 Controller ................................................................................................ 47
4.5
Simple Worked Example ............................................................................................................. 49
4.6
Graphical Wiring Editor ............................................................................................................... 55
4.1.1
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.4.1
4.4.2
4.5.1
4.5.2
On-Line/Off-line Configuration .............................................................................................................................45
Configuration Cable and Clip ...............................................................................................................................45
Scanning..................................................................................................................................................................45
Function Blocks ......................................................................................................................................................47
Soft Wiring ..............................................................................................................................................................48
The I/O ....................................................................................................................................................................49
Wiring ......................................................................................................................................................................52
4.6.1
4.6.2
4.6.3
4.6.4
4.6.5
4.6.6
4.6.7
4.6.8
4.6.9
4.6.10
4.6.11
4.6.12
4.6.13
4.6.14
4.6.15
4.6.16
5.
CHAPTER 5 MINI8 CONTROLLER OVERVIEW .................................................................................. 65
5.1
6.
7.
Graphical Wiring Toolbar ......................................................................................................................................56
Function Block ........................................................................................................................................................56
Wire .........................................................................................................................................................................56
Block Execution Order ...........................................................................................................................................56
Using Function Blocks ............................................................................................................................................56
Tooltips....................................................................................................................................................................57
Function Block State...............................................................................................................................................58
Using Wires .............................................................................................................................................................59
Using Comments ....................................................................................................................................................60
Using Monitors ...................................................................................................................................................61
Downloading......................................................................................................................................................61
Selections ...........................................................................................................................................................61
Colours ...............................................................................................................................................................62
Diagram Context Menu .....................................................................................................................................62
Wiring Floats with Status Information ..............................................................................................................63
Edge Wires .........................................................................................................................................................64
Complete list of Function Blocks. ................................................................................................ 66
CHAPTER 6 ACCESS FOLDER ........................................................................................................... 67
CHAPTER 7 INSTRUMENT FOLDER .................................................................................................. 68
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
Page 2
Instrument
Instrument
Instrument
Instrument
/ Enables .................................................................................................................... 68
Options ...................................................................................................................... 69
/ InstInfo ..................................................................................................................... 69
/ Diagnostics .............................................................................................................. 70
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.
CHAPTER 8 I/O FOLDER .................................................................................................................... 72
8.1
Module ID ..................................................................................................................................... 72
8.2
Logic Input .................................................................................................................................... 73
8.3
Logic Output ................................................................................................................................ 74
8.4
Relay Output ................................................................................................................................. 76
8.5
Thermocouple Input .................................................................................................................... 77
8.6
Resistance Thermometer Input ................................................................................................... 83
8.7
Analogue Output ......................................................................................................................... 85
8.8
8.9
Fixed IO ........................................................................................................................................ 86
Current Monitor ............................................................................................................................ 87
8.1.1
8.2.1
8.3.1
8.3.2
8.3.3
8.4.1
8.5.1
8.5.2
8.5.3
8.5.4
8.5.5
8.5.6
8.5.7
8.5.8
8.6.1
8.6.2
8.6.3
8.7.1
8.9.1
8.9.2
8.9.3
8.9.4
8.9.5
8.9.6
9.
Modules ..................................................................................................................................................................72
Logic Input Parameters ..........................................................................................................................................73
Logic Out Parameters ............................................................................................................................................74
Logic Output Scaling .............................................................................................................................................75
Example: To Scale a Proportioning Logic Output ..............................................................................................75
Relay Parameters ....................................................................................................................................................76
Thermocouple Input Parameters ..........................................................................................................................77
Linearisation Types and Ranges............................................................................................................................79
CJC Type.................................................................................................................................................................79
Sensor Break Value ................................................................................................................................................80
Fallback ...................................................................................................................................................................80
User Calibration (Two Point)..................................................................................................................................81
PV Offset (Single Point) ..........................................................................................................................................81
Using TC4 or TC8 channel as a mV input .............................................................................................................82
RT Input Parameters ...............................................................................................................................................83
Linearisation Types and Ranges............................................................................................................................84
Using RT4 as mA input ...........................................................................................................................................84
Example: 4 to 20mA Analogue Output ...............................................................................................................85
Current Measurement ............................................................................................................................................87
Single Phase Configurations .................................................................................................................................88
Three Phase Configuration....................................................................................................................................90
Parameter Configuration .......................................................................................................................................91
Commissioning.......................................................................................................................................................92
Calibration ..............................................................................................................................................................94
CHAPTER 9 ALARMS .......................................................................................................................... 95
9.1
9.2
Further Alarm Definitions ............................................................................................................ 95
Analogue Alarms .......................................................................................................................... 96
9.3
Digital Alarms ............................................................................................................................... 97
9.4
Alarm Outputs .............................................................................................................................. 97
9.5
Alarm Parameters ......................................................................................................................... 98
9.6
Digital Alarm Parameters ........................................................................................................... 100
9.7
9.8
Alarm Summary .......................................................................................................................... 101
Alarm Log ................................................................................................................................... 103
9.2.1
9.3.1
9.4.1
9.4.2
9.5.1
9.6.1
Analogue Alarm Types ..........................................................................................................................................96
Digital Alarm Types ................................................................................................................................................97
How Alarms are Indicated .....................................................................................................................................97
To Acknowledge an Alarm ....................................................................................................................................97
Example: To Configure Alarm 1 ...........................................................................................................................99
Example: To Configure DigAlarm 1 ..................................................................................................................100
10. CHAPTER 10 BCD INPUT .................................................................................................................. 104
10.1
BCD Parameters ......................................................................................................................... 104
10.1.1
Example: To wire a BCD Input .......................................................................................................................105
11. CHAPTER 11 DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS .................................................................................... 106
11.1
Configuration Port (CC) ............................................................................................................. 106
11.2
Field Communications Port (FC) ............................................................................................... 107
11.3
Modbus ....................................................................................................................................... 108
11.1.1
Configuration Communications Parameters .................................................................................................106
11.2.1
Communications Identity ................................................................................................................................107
11.3.1
11.3.2
11.3.3
11.3.4
11.3.5
Modbus Connections ......................................................................................................................................108
Modbus Address Switch .................................................................................................................................108
Baud Rate .........................................................................................................................................................108
Parity .................................................................................................................................................................108
RX/TX Delay Time ............................................................................................................................................108
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 3
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.4
Modbus Broadcast Master Communications ............................................................................ 109
11.5
11.6
DeviceNet ................................................................................................................................... 111
Enhanced DeviceNet Interface .................................................................................................. 111
11.7
Switch Position in iTools ............................................................................................................ 111
11.8
CANopen .................................................................................................................................... 114
11.9
Profibus ....................................................................................................................................... 130
11.4.1
11.4.2
Mini8 Controller Broadcast Master ................................................................................................................109
Modbus Parameters ........................................................................................................................................110
11.6.1
11.6.2
Address Switch.................................................................................................................................................111
Baud Switch ......................................................................................................................................................111
11.7.1
DeviceNet Parameters.....................................................................................................................................112
11.8.1
11.8.2
11.8.3
11.8.4
11.8.5
11.8.6
11.8.7
11.8.8
11.8.9
11.8.10
11.8.11
Instrument setup ..............................................................................................................................................114
Mini8 Controller CANopen Features .............................................................................................................114
Communication Interface ...............................................................................................................................115
Network Management (NMT) .........................................................................................................................116
Device Profile DS-404 .....................................................................................................................................117
Default PDOs....................................................................................................................................................117
Enabling and Disabling PDO Communications ............................................................................................120
Changing PDO Mapping ................................................................................................................................120
Remapping over the network .........................................................................................................................123
Enabling & Disabling PDO Change of State transmission. ..........................................................................125
General Communication Objects ..................................................................................................................125
11.9.1
Profibus Parameters ........................................................................................................................................130
11.10
EtherNet (Modbus TCP) ........................................................................................................ 131
11.11
EtherNet/IP ............................................................................................................................. 134
11.12
Example - Connect Mini8 Controller to Allen-Bradley PLC via EtherNet/IP ....................... 138
11.13
EtherCAT ................................................................................................................................. 150
11.14
File over EtherCAT ................................................................................................................. 153
11.15
Trademark ............................................................................................................................... 155
11.10.1
11.10.2
11.10.3
11.10.4
11.10.5
11.11.1
11.11.2
11.11.3
11.11.4
11.11.5
11.11.6
Instrument setup ..............................................................................................................................................131
Unit Identity ......................................................................................................................................................131
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Settings ...............................................................................131
iTools Setup......................................................................................................................................................132
EtherNet Parameters .......................................................................................................................................133
Feature Switch..................................................................................................................................................134
Configuration using iTools..............................................................................................................................134
EtherNet/IP Parameters...................................................................................................................................135
Input Definition Table......................................................................................................................................136
Output Definition Table ..................................................................................................................................137
Requested Packet Interval...............................................................................................................................137
11.12.1
11.12.2
11.12.3
11.12.4
11.12.5
11.12.6
11.12.7
11.12.8
11.12.9
11.12.10
11.12.11
Installation ........................................................................................................................................................138
Setting Up The Link Between Windows And The Plc Network ....................................................................138
Updating Firmware ..........................................................................................................................................140
Completing the Link ........................................................................................................................................140
Creating a Network Scanner...........................................................................................................................142
Create or Load a Mini8 Controller Configuration .........................................................................................145
Run Mode .........................................................................................................................................................146
Monitor Parameters .........................................................................................................................................147
Status Indicators...............................................................................................................................................147
Mini8 Controller on an Ethernet/Ip Network ............................................................................................148
TROUBLESHOOTING .................................................................................................................................149
11.13.1
11.13.2
11.13.3
11.13.4
EtherCAT-to-Modbus Interface ......................................................................................................................150
EtherCAT Feature Switch ................................................................................................................................150
EtherCAT Parameters ......................................................................................................................................151
Parameter pick list and IO Mapping ..............................................................................................................152
11.14.1
11.14.2
To produce a UID File .....................................................................................................................................154
Precautions .......................................................................................................................................................154
12. CHAPTER 12
COUNTERS, TIMERS, TOTALISERS, RT CLOCK ...................................................... 156
12.1
Counters ..................................................................................................................................... 156
12.2
Timers ......................................................................................................................................... 158
12.1.1
Counter Parameters ........................................................................................................................................157
12.2.1
12.2.2
12.2.3
12.2.4
12.2.5
Timer Types ......................................................................................................................................................158
On Pulse Timer Mode .....................................................................................................................................158
On Delay Timer Mode .....................................................................................................................................159
One Shot Timer Mode.....................................................................................................................................160
Minimum On Timer or Compressor Mode ....................................................................................................161
Page 4
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
12.2.6
Timer Parameters.............................................................................................................................................162
12.3.1
Totaliser Parameters ........................................................................................................................................164
12.4.1
Real Time Clock Parameters ...........................................................................................................................165
12.3
Totalisers .................................................................................................................................... 163
12.4
Real Time Clock .......................................................................................................................... 165
13. CHAPTER 13 APPLICATIONS .......................................................................................................... 166
13.1
Humidity ..................................................................................................................................... 166
13.2
Zirconia (Carbon Potential) Control .......................................................................................... 168
13.1.1
13.1.2
13.1.3
13.1.4
Overview...........................................................................................................................................................166
Temperature Control of an Environmental Chamber ..................................................................................166
Humidity Control of an Environmental Chamber .........................................................................................166
Humidity Parameters .......................................................................................................................................167
13.2.1
13.2.2
13.2.3
13.2.4
13.2.5
13.2.6
13.2.7
13.2.8
Temperature Control.......................................................................................................................................168
Carbon Potential Control ................................................................................................................................168
Sooting Alarm ..................................................................................................................................................168
Automatic Probe Cleaning .............................................................................................................................168
Endothermic Gas Correction ..........................................................................................................................168
Clean Probe......................................................................................................................................................168
Probe Status .....................................................................................................................................................168
Zirconia Parameters .........................................................................................................................................169
14. CHAPTER 14 INPUT MONITOR ....................................................................................................... 171
14.1
Description ................................................................................................................................. 171
14.2
Input Monitor Parameters .......................................................................................................... 172
14.1.1
14.1.2
14.1.3
Maximum Detect..............................................................................................................................................171
Minimum Detect ..............................................................................................................................................171
Time Above Threshold ....................................................................................................................................171
15. CHAPTER 15 LOGIC AND MATHS OPERATORS. ........................................................................... 173
15.1
Logic Operators ......................................................................................................................... 173
15.2
15.3
Eight Input Logic Operators ...................................................................................................... 176
Maths Operators ........................................................................................................................ 177
15.4
Multiple Input Operator Block................................................................................................... 181
15.5
Eight Input Analog Multiplexers ................................................................................................ 184
15.1.1
15.1.2
15.1.3
Logic 8 ..............................................................................................................................................................173
2 input Logic Operations ................................................................................................................................174
Logic Operator Parameters ............................................................................................................................175
15.3.1
15.3.2
15.3.3
Math Operations ..............................................................................................................................................178
Math Operator Parameters .............................................................................................................................179
Sample and Hold Operation...........................................................................................................................180
15.4.1
15.4.2
15.4.3
Cascaded operation ........................................................................................................................................182
Fallback Strategy .............................................................................................................................................182
Multiple Input Operator Block Parameters ...................................................................................................183
15.5.1
15.5.2
Multiple Input Operator Parameters ..............................................................................................................184
Fallback.............................................................................................................................................................184
16. CHAPTER 16 INPUT CHARACTERISATION ..................................................................................... 185
16.1
Input Linearisation...................................................................................................................... 185
16.2
Polynomial .................................................................................................................................. 188
16.1.1
16.1.2
Compensation for Sensor Non-Linearities ....................................................................................................186
Input Linearisation Parameters .......................................................................................................................187
17. CHAPTER 17 LOAD .......................................................................................................................... 190
17.1
Load Parameters ........................................................................................................................ 190
18. CHAPTER 18 CONTROL LOOP SET UP .......................................................................................... 191
18.1
18.2
18.3
What is a Control Loop? ............................................................................................................ 191
Loop Parameters – Main............................................................................................................. 192
Loop Set up ................................................................................................................................ 193
18.4
PID Control ................................................................................................................................. 194
18.3.1
Types of Control Loop.....................................................................................................................................193
18.4.1
18.4.2
18.4.3
18.4.4
18.4.5
Proportional Band ...........................................................................................................................................195
Integral Term ....................................................................................................................................................195
Derivative Term................................................................................................................................................196
High and Low Cutback ....................................................................................................................................197
Integral action and manual reset ....................................................................................................................197
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 5
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
18.4.6
18.4.7
18.4.8
18.4.9
18.4.10
18.5.1
18.5.2
18.5.3
18.5.4
18.5.5
18.5.6
18.5.7
18.5.8
18.5.9
18.5.10
18.5.11
18.5.12
18.5.13
18.5.14
18.5.15
18.5.16
18.5.17
Relative Cool Gain ...........................................................................................................................................197
Loop Break .......................................................................................................................................................198
Cooling Algorithm ...........................................................................................................................................198
Gain Scheduling ..............................................................................................................................................199
PID Parameters.................................................................................................................................................200
Loop Response ................................................................................................................................................201
Initial Settings ...................................................................................................................................................201
Multi-zone applications. ..................................................................................................................................202
Automatic Tuning ............................................................................................................................................203
Tune Parameters ..............................................................................................................................................204
To Auto Tune a Loop - Initial Settings ............................................................................................................204
To Start Autotune.............................................................................................................................................205
Autotune and Sensor Break ............................................................................................................................205
Autotune and Inhibit........................................................................................................................................205
Autotune and Gain Scheduling ......................................................................................................................205
Autotune from Below SP – Heat/Cool ............................................................................................................206
Autotune From Below SP – Heat Only............................................................................................................207
Autotune at Setpoint – Heat/Cool ..................................................................................................................208
Failure Modes ..................................................................................................................................................209
Manual Tuning .................................................................................................................................................210
Manually Setting Relative Cool Gain ..............................................................................................................210
Manually Setting the Cutback Values ............................................................................................................211
18.6.1
18.6.2
18.6.3
18.6.4
18.6.5
18.6.6
18.6.7
18.6.8
18.6.9
Setpoint Function Block ..................................................................................................................................212
SP Tracking .......................................................................................................................................................213
Manual Tracking ..............................................................................................................................................213
Rate Limit ..........................................................................................................................................................213
Setpoint Parameters ........................................................................................................................................213
Setpoint Limits .................................................................................................................................................215
Setpoint Rate Limit...........................................................................................................................................215
Setpoint Tracking.............................................................................................................................................216
Manual Tracking ..............................................................................................................................................216
18.7.1
18.7.2
18.7.3
18.7.4
18.7.5
18.7.6
Output Limits....................................................................................................................................................220
Output Rate Limit .............................................................................................................................................221
Sensor Break Mode .........................................................................................................................................221
Forced Output .................................................................................................................................................221
Feedforward .....................................................................................................................................................222
Effect of Control Action, Hysteresis and Deadband .....................................................................................223
18.6
Setpoint Function Block ............................................................................................................. 212
18.7
Output Function Block ............................................................................................................... 217
19. CHAPTER 19
SETPOINT PROGRAMMER ....................................................................................... 224
19.1
INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................... 224
19.2
19.3
Mini8 Controller Programmer Block(s) ..................................................................................... 225
Segment Types ........................................................................................................................... 226
19.4
Output Events ............................................................................................................................. 228
19.5
Holdback .................................................................................................................................... 232
19.6
19.7
PID Select.................................................................................................................................... 233
Program Cycles .......................................................................................................................... 233
19.8
Power Fail Recovery ................................................................................................................... 234
19.9
To Run, Hold or Reset a Program .............................................................................................. 235
19.1.1
19.1.2
Time to Target Programmer ...........................................................................................................................224
Ramp Rate Programmer ..................................................................................................................................225
19.3.1
19.3.2
19.3.3
19.3.4
19.3.5
19.3.6
19.3.7
Rate ...................................................................................................................................................................226
Dwell .................................................................................................................................................................226
Step ...................................................................................................................................................................226
Time ..................................................................................................................................................................226
GoBack .............................................................................................................................................................226
Wait ...................................................................................................................................................................227
End ....................................................................................................................................................................227
19.4.1
19.4.2
19.4.3
Digital Events ...................................................................................................................................................228
PV Event & User Value .....................................................................................................................................229
Time Event ........................................................................................................................................................230
19.5.1
Guaranteed Soak .............................................................................................................................................232
19.7.1
Servo .................................................................................................................................................................233
19.8.1
19.8.2
19.8.3
Ramp (Power fail during Dwell segments.) ...................................................................................................234
Ramp (power fail during Ramp segments) ....................................................................................................234
Ramp (power fail during Time-to-target segments) .....................................................................................234
Page 6
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
19.9.1
19.9.2
19.9.3
19.9.4
19.9.5
19.9.6
Run ....................................................................................................................................................................235
Reset .................................................................................................................................................................235
Hold ..................................................................................................................................................................235
Skip segment ...................................................................................................................................................235
Advance segment ............................................................................................................................................236
Fast ....................................................................................................................................................................236
19.10
19.11
19.12
19.13
19.14
PV Start .................................................................................................................................... 236
Configuring the Programmer ................................................................................................ 237
Programmer Run Status ......................................................................................................... 240
Creating a Program ................................................................................................................ 241
Program Editor ....................................................................................................................... 241
19.15
Wiring the Programmer Function Block. ............................................................................... 246
19.14.1
19.14.2
19.14.3
19.14.4
Analog View .....................................................................................................................................................242
Digital View ......................................................................................................................................................244
Saving & Loading Programs ...........................................................................................................................244
Printing a Program ...........................................................................................................................................245
20. CHAPTER 20 SWITCH OVER............................................................................................................. 248
20.1
Switch Over Parameters ............................................................................................................. 249
21. CHAPTER 21 TRANSDUCER SCALING ............................................................................................ 250
21.1
21.2
21.3
21.4
Auto-Tare Calibration ................................................................................................................ 250
Load Cell ..................................................................................................................................... 251
Comparison Calibration............................................................................................................. 251
Transducer Scaling Parameters ................................................................................................. 251
21.4.1
21.4.2
21.4.3
21.4.4
Parameter Notes ..............................................................................................................................................253
Tare Calibration ...............................................................................................................................................253
Load Cell...........................................................................................................................................................254
Comparison Calibration ..................................................................................................................................254
22. CHAPTER 22 USER VALUES ............................................................................................................. 255
22.1
User Value Parameters ............................................................................................................... 255
23. CHAPTER 23 CALIBRATION ............................................................................................................ 256
23.1
TC4 / TC8 User calibration ........................................................................................................ 256
23.2
23.3
To Return to TC4/TC8 Factory Calibration ............................................................................... 257
RT4 User calibration ................................................................................................................... 257
23.4
23.5
To Return to RT4 Factory Calibration ........................................................................................ 257
Calibration Parameters .............................................................................................................. 258
23.1.1
23.1.2
23.1.3
23.1.4
23.1.5
Set Up ...............................................................................................................................................................256
Zero Calibration ...............................................................................................................................................256
Voltage Calibration..........................................................................................................................................256
CJC Calibration ................................................................................................................................................256
Sensor-Break Limit Check ...............................................................................................................................256
23.3.1
23.3.2
Set Up ...............................................................................................................................................................257
Calibration ........................................................................................................................................................257
24. CHAPTER 24 OEM SECURITY .......................................................................................................... 259
24.1
24.2
24.3
24.4
24.5
24.6
24.7
Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 259
Using OEM Security ................................................................................................................... 259
Step 1 – View iTools OPC Server ............................................................................................... 260
Step 2 – Create Custom Tags .................................................................................................... 261
Step 3 – Activate OEM Security ................................................................................................. 263
Step 4 – Deactivate OEM Security ............................................................................................. 264
Erasing Memory ......................................................................................................................... 264
25. APPENDIX A MODBUS SCADA TABLE ........................................................................................... 265
25.1
25.2
Comms Table ............................................................................................................................. 265
SCADA Table .............................................................................................................................. 265
25.3
Modbus Function Codes ........................................................................................................... 309
25.2.1
25.2.2
Programmer Address Ranges - Decimal .......................................................................................................295
Version 2.xx Programmer Addresses - Hexadecimal ...................................................................................302
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 7
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
26. APPENDIX B DEVICENET PARAMETER TABLES ............................................................................. 310
26.1
26.2
IO Re-Mapping Object ............................................................................................................... 310
Application Variables Object .................................................................................................... 311
26.2.1
Table Modification ...........................................................................................................................................315
27. APPENDIX C CANOPEN PARAMETER TABLES .............................................................................. 316
27.1
Manufacturer Object – Pick List ................................................................................................. 316
28. APPENDIX D VERSION 1.XX PROGRAMMER .................................................................................. 320
28.1
Version 1.xx Parameter Tables .................................................................................................. 320
28.2
SCADA addresses for Programmer Version 1.xx ..................................................................... 322
28.1.1
28.1.2
28.1.3
28.1.4
Configuring the Programmer (V1.xx) .............................................................................................................320
To Select, Run, Hold or Reset a Program (V1.xx). .........................................................................................321
Creating a Program (V1.xx) .............................................................................................................................321
To Select, Run, Hold or Reset a Program (Version 1.xx) ..............................................................................322
29. APPENDIX E SAFETY AND EMC INFORMATION ........................................................................... 328
30. APPENDIX F TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION ..................................................................................... 331
30.1
30.2
30.3
30.4
30.5
30.6
30.7
30.8
30.9
30.10
30.11
30.12
30.13
30.14
30.15
30.16
30.17
Environmental Specification ...................................................................................................... 331
Network Communications Support ........................................................................................... 331
Configuration Communications Support .................................................................................. 331
Fixed I/O Resources ................................................................................................................... 332
TC8 8-Channel and TC4 4-Channel TC Input Card .................................................................. 332
DO8 8-Channel Digital Output Card ........................................................................................ 333
RL8 8-Channel Relay Output Card ............................................................................................ 333
CT3 3-Channel Current-Transformer Input Card ..................................................................... 333
Load Failure Detection .............................................................................................................. 333
DI8 8-Channel Digital Input Card .......................................................................................... 334
RT4 Resistance Thermometer Input Card ............................................................................. 334
AO8 8-Channel and AO4 4-Channel 4-20mA Output Card ................................................ 334
Recipes .................................................................................................................................... 334
Toolkit Blocks ......................................................................................................................... 335
PID Control Loop Blocks ........................................................................................................ 335
Process Alarms ....................................................................................................................... 335
Setpoint Programmer ............................................................................................................. 335
31. PARAMETER INDEX ........................................................................................................................... 336
Page 8
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Issue Record of this Manual
Issue 6 includes Enhanced Devicenet Communications.
Issue 7 corrects terminal numbers in Example 2 section 8.9.2.1, adds references to iTools in sections 1.12 and 1.13 and
adds to section 11.8 ‘Note: from July 09 CANopen option has been discontinued’.
Issue 8 clarifies and completes table 1.6.1.1 (Module status indication), and modifies the specification for Digital inputs
in sections 30.4 and 30.10.
Issue 9 Section 1.6 thin trunk line length changed from 100m to 40m for baud rate of 1M.
Issue 10 adds two parameters ‘ServoToPV’ and ‘SPIntBal’ to the Setpoint Parameter List, update to order code, improve
fallback description, timer and sample and hold diagrams.
Issue 11 adds EtherNet/IP.
Issue 12 adds the Battery Warning below:
!
Warning
Back up Battery
Maintenance Schedule
This instrument is fitted with a
battery designed to retain
configuration and other settings
in the event of a failure of the
instrument power supply.
A battery failure is only evident following a failure of the instrument power supply.
This battery has an expected life
of 10 years minimum at a
nominal ambient working
O
temperature (e.g. 25 C).
On older instruments contact your supplier to have the battery replaced prior to
failure. The age of the instrument is shown on the side label. This contains a
serial number, where the last four characters either show the week number and
year of manufacture WW YY, or a date in the format UK YYWW.
The battery life may be reduced
if it is consistently operated in
an elevated ambient
temperature environment.
The battery should be replaced at regular intervals. Between 6 and 10 years is
recommended depending on usage and operating temperature. The battery is
not user serviceable, contact your local service centre to make suitable
arrangements.
It is important to maintain a record of instrument configurations or use
Eurotherm iTools to make clone copies of fully working instruments. This is
described in section 4.3. Store this securely as a back up to be used to
restore the configuration.
Issue 13 adds section 1.16 Inductive Loads.
Issue 14 adds EtherCat communications and additional Modbus connection details.
Issue 15 adds the Precautions statement in section 11.14.2.
Issue 16 adds Pt1000; Additional parameters - Devicenet Shutdown Enable parameter (section 11.7.1); Internal crc Error
Count and Internal UART Error Count (section 7.4).
Issue 17 adds section 25.3 Modbus Function Codes
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 9
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Mini8 Multi-Loop Process Controller
1. Chapter 1 Installation
1.1
What Instrument Do I Have?
Thank you for choosing this Mini 8 Controller.
The Mini8 controller is a compact DIN rail mounting multi-loop PID controller and data acquisition unit. It offers a choice
of I/O and a choice of field communications.
The Mini8 controller mounts on 35mm Top Hat DIN Rail. It is intended for permanent installation, for indoor use only,
and to be enclosed in an electrical panel or cabinet.
The Mini8 controller is pre-assembled in the factory to give the I/O required for the application as specified in the order
code. With standard applications the Mini8 controller is also supplied configured. Alternatively, the Mini8 controller is
configured using Eurotherm’s iTools configuration suite running on a personal computer.
All Safety & EMC information is in Appendix E.
The full Technical Specification is in Appendix F.
Whenever the symbol
Page 10
 appears in this handbook it indicates a helpful hint
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.2
Mini8 Controller Ordering Code
MINI8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
1
Basic Product
11
Application
MINI8
Mini8 Controller
STD
2
Control Loops
No configuration (always available)
8 Loop extrusion controller (EC8 is a preconfigured
version offering 8 control loops with heat/cool logic
outputs).
Requires 8LP and 250 wires
Slot 1 = TC8
Slot 2 = CT3 or None
Slot 4 = DO8
Slot 3 = DO8
8 Loop furnace controller with analogue outputs
Requires 8LP and 250 wires
Slot 1 = TC8
Slot 4 = AO8
ACQ
4LP
8LP
16LP
IO Acquisition only (not with EC8). No
loops enabled.
4 Control loops
8 Control loops
16 Control loops
EC8
FC8
3
Programs
0PRG
1PRG
No Programs
1 Profile – 50 programs
12
Wires
XPRG
Multi-profile – 50 programs
If 4 loops are ordered, 4 programmers are
supplied. If 8 or 16 loops are ordered 8
programmers are supplied
30
60
120
250
30 User Wires
60 User Wires
120 User Wires
250 User Wires
4
PSU
13
Recipes
VL
24Vdc
5
Communications
None
RCP
No Recipes
8 Recipes
MODBUS
ISOLMBUS
DEVICENET
Non Isolated Modbus RTU slave
Isolated Modbus RTU slave
DeviceNet Slave
Profibus Slave RJ45 (Profibus motherboard
fitted)
Profibus Slave 9 pin D type (Profibus
motherboard fitted)
EtherNet Modbus TCP /IP Slave
CANopen Slave (no longer available)
DeviceNet M12 connector slave
EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT (Slave) (Available from version
V2.7)
PBUSRJ45
PBUS9PIN
ENETMBUS
DNETMI2
ENETIP
ETHERCAT
6
Temperature Units
C
F
Centigrade
Fahrenheit
7 - 10
IO Slots 1, 2, 3, 4
XXX
TC4
TC8
RT4
RTT
AO4
AO8
DO8
CT3
RL8
DI8
No module fitted
4 Channel TC Input
8 Channel TC Input
4 Channel RTD input
4 Channel RTD input, Pt1000
4 Channel 4-20mA output
(slot 4 only)
Not EC8
8 Channel 4-20mA output
8 Channel logic output
3 Channel CT input (only 1 CT per Mini8)
8 Channel relay (slots 2, 3 only)
8 Channel logic input
19
14
Manual
ENG
GER
FRA
SPA
ITA
English
German
French
Spanish
Italian
15
Configuration Software
NONE
ITOOLS
No configuration software
Itools licence only
16
Warranty
XXXXX
WL005
Standard
Extended
17
Calibration Certificates
XXXXX
CERT1
CERT2
None
Certificate of conformity
Factory input calibration per input. (5 point calibration)
18
Special
XXXXX
YYNNNN
No special
Special number
19
Label
XXXXX
YYNNN
No custom label
Custom label
Accessories
SubMini8/Mechanics/Mtgplate
Bulkhead mounting plate
SubMini8/Cable/RJ45/0.5
Network 0.5m RS485 cable
SubMini8/Shunt/249R.1
2.49Ω 0.1% Burden resistor
Modbus load terminator
Profibus load terminator
Network 3.0m RS485 cable
SubMini8/CD/Std
Config tools and manuals
SubMini8/Cable/Config
SubMini8/Manual/Inst
SubMini8/Manual/Eng
Config cable
Installation booklet
Engineering manual
SubMini8/Resistor/Term/Mbus/RJ45
SubMini8/Resistor/Term/Pbus/RJ45
SubMini8/Cable/RJ45/3.0
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 11
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.3
How to Install the Controller
This instrument is intended for permanent installation, for indoor use only, and to be enclosed in an electrical panel.
o
Select a location where minimum vibrations are present and the ambient temperature is within 0 and 50 C (32 and
o
122 F).
Please read the safety information, Appendix E at the end of this manual, before proceeding and refer to the EMC
Booklet part number HA025497 for further information.
1.3.1
Dimensions
Allow a minimum of 25mm
above and below each unit
Allow a minimum of
25mm for terminals
and cables
A
B
C
Dimension
mm
A
108
B
124
C
115
Figure 1-1: Mini8 Controller Dimensions
1.3.2
To Install the Controller
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
1.3.3
Environmental Requirements
Mini8 controller
Minimum
Maximum
Temperature
0°C
55°C
Humidity (non condensing)
5% RH
95% RH
Altitude
Page 12
Use 35mm symmetrical DIN Rail to EN50022-35 x 7.5 or 35 x 15,
Mount the DIN Rail horizontally as indicated in Figure 1.1. The Mini8 controller is NOT designed to be
mounted in other orientations.
Hook the upper edge of the DIN rail clip on the instrument on the top of the DIN rail and push.
To remove use a screwdriver to lever down the lower DIN rail clip and lift forward when the clip has
released.
A second unit on the same DIN rail may be mounted adjacent to the unit.
A second unit mounted above or below the unit requires a gap of at least 25mm between the top of
the lower one and the bottom of the higher one.
2000m
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.4
Electrical Connections – Common to All Instruments
The Mini8 controller is intended for operation at safe low voltage levels, except the RL8 relay module. Voltages in
excess of 42 volts must not be applied to any terminals other than the RL8 relay module.
A protective earth connection is required.
Do not replace the battery. Return to factory if replacement battery is required.
Communications
LEDs
section 2
Communications
Configuration port
Section 4.2
Instrument
LEDs
section 2
Power
Supply
Section 1.4.1
Fixed IO
Section 1.4.2
I/O Slots I to 4
Sections 1.12 to 1.19
Communications
connector
DeviceNet shown
Communications
settings
DeviceNet shown
Figure 1-2: Terminal Layout for Mini8 Controller
1.4.1
Power Supply
The power supply requires a supply between 17.8 to 28.8 V dc, 15 watts maximum
Power Supply
User Terminals
24V
Ø
24 V dc
24V
24V
Ø
24 V dc
24V
0V
Ø
0 V dc
0V
GND
Ø
Ground
GND
Power Supply
Male Connector
Connector terminals will accept wire sizes from 0.2 to 2.5, 24 to 12 awg.
Note: If the Min8 is used with the VT505 panel ensure that the power supply connectors cannot be mistakenly changed
over. The connectors are physically the same, but the electrical connections are not compatible. Plugging the connector
into the Mini8 controller will short-circuit the 24 volt supply.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 13
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.4.2
Fixed IO Connections
These I/O are part of the power supply board and are always fitted.
Digital Input 1
D1
Digital Input 2
D2
Digital Input common
C
Relay A n/open
A1
Relay A n/closed
A2
Relay A common
A3
Relay B n/open
B1
Relay B n/closed
B2
Relay B common
B3
Digital Inputs : ON requires +10.8V to +28.8V.
OFF requires -28.8V to +5V
+5V to +10.8v is undefined
Typical drive 2.5mA at 10.8V.
Relays contacts: 1 amp max, 42Vdc. These contacts are NOT rated for mains operation.
1.4.3
Digital Communications Connections
Two communications connections are fitted – a Modbus Configuration port (RJ11) and a Fieldbus port.
The Fieldbus is either Modbus (2 x RJ45 ), DeviceNet, CANopen, Profibus, EtherNet Modbus TCP (10baseT) or EtherNet
IP.
1.4.4
Configuration Port (CC)
The configuration port (Modbus) is on an RJ11 socket. It is always fitted just to the right of the power supply
connections. It is a point to point RS232 connection. Eurotherm supply a standard cable to connect a serial COM port
on a computer to the RJ11 socket, part no. SubMin8/cable/config.
9 pin DF to PC
COM port
(RS232)
RJ11
Pin
Function
-
6
N/C
3 (Tx)
5
Rx
2 (Rx)
4
Tx
5 (0v)
3
0v (gnd)
2
N/C
1
N/C (Reserved)
Pin 6
Pin 1
See also section 11.1
1.4.5
Screened Communications Cables
Screened cables should be used. In order to reduce the effects of RF interference the transmission line should be
grounded at both ends of the screened cable. However, care must be taken to ensure that differences in earth
potentials do not allow circulating currents to flow as these can induce common mode signals in the data lines. Where
doubt exists it is recommended that the screen (shield) be grounded at only one section of the network. This applies to
all communications protocols.
Page 14
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.5
Electrical Connections for Modbus
For Modbus operation see section 11.3.
P
LED Indicators
See section 2
Configuration Port
See section 1.4.4
A
B
RN CC FC
24V
1
2
3
4
A
A
A
A
H
H
H
H
CC
24V
0V
GND
Modbus
communications
ports RJ45
D1
D2
C
1
A 2
3
1
B 2
3
1
2
3
4
I
I
I
I
P
P
P
P

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON
Address Switch
See section 11.3.2
FC

ModBus
Mini8
Figure 1-3: Front Panel Layout Modbus
1.5.1
Modbus Connectors
In the Mini8 controller two RJ45 sockets are provided on the front panel for modbus connections. One is for the
incoming connection to a PC acting as a master, the second may be used either to loop onto the next instrument or for a
line terminator, see Figure 1-9.
The wiring of the RJ45 plug allows both RS485 3-wire or RS485 4-wire (also known as RS422) connections.
To construct a cable for RS485/RS422 operation use a screened cable with twisted pairs plus a separate core for
common.
RJ45 pin
8
3 wire
5 wire
RxA
7
RxB
6
Ground
Pin 8
5
4
3
Ground
Ground
2
A
TxA
1
B
TxB
Pin 1
Plug shroud to cable screen
The 2000 series Communications Handbook, part number HA026230, gives further information on digital
communications and is available on www.eurotherm.co.uk.
1.5.2
RS485
RS485 also referred to as EIA485 is a standard defining the electrical characteristics of drivers and receivers for use in
balanced digital multipoint systems. A balanced line consists of two identical conductors, other than ground, to transmit
and receive the signal. This is usually referred to as a 2-wire system, or sometimes 3-wire. The two wires consist of a
screened twisted pair of equal length and equal impedances designed to reduce the effects of radiated and received
electromagnetic interference. Terminating resistors are required at either end of the transmission line to reduce the
effects of reflected signals. The EIA-485 standard is, thus, suited for use over long distances and in electrically noisy
environments.
The Mini8 controller also provides connections for RS485 4-wire (RS422). This system consists of two screened twisted
pairs. One pair is used for transmit and the second for receive. A common is also provided.
One or more devices configured as network slaves may be connected to such a network in a linear, multi drop
configuration as described in sections 1.5.4 and 1.5.5.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 15
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.5.3
Direct Connection - Master and One Slave
It is a common requirement to connect one master and one slave. Termination resistors (RT) should be installed at both
the transmitter end and receiver end of the cable. These are particularly required for long cable runs (e.g. 2m to 200m)
although for short local connections it may be found that these are not strictly necessary.
A Modbus terminator is available from your supplier which is designed to fit into the spare RJ45 connector on the Mini8
controller. The order code is SubMin8/RESISTOR/MODBUS/RJ45. It is coloured black.
Example 1: This connection uses 2-wire RS485.
For 2-wire both master and slave ends act as Tx and Rx
A
RT
Master
A
Twisted
pair
RT
Slave
B
B
0V
0V
Earth at
one end
Screen
RT = Termination resistor
Figure 1-4: RS485 two-wire Connections
Example 2: This connection uses 4-wire RS485 (RS422).
A
RX
Master
0V
TX
RT
A
Twisted
pair
B
A
B
A
Twisted
pair
B
Earth at
one end
B
Screen
TX
0V
Slave
RX
RT
RT = Termination resistor
Figure 1-5: RS485 Four-wire Connections
Page 16
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.5.4
RS485 to RS232 Converter
In practice it is often necessary to use a buffer to convert RS485 (or RS422) connections from the Mini8 controller to the
RS232 port of the PC. The Eurotherm Controls KD485 Communications Adapter unit is recommended for this purpose.
The use of a RS485 board built into the computer is not recommended since this board may not be isolated and the RX
terminals may not be biased correctly for this application. This may cause noise problems or damage to the computer,
In order to make the connections between the KD485 convertor and the RJ45 connection on the Mini8 controller, either
cut a patch cable and connect the open end to the KD485 converter or, using twin screened cable, crimp an RJ45 plug
on the Mini8 controller end.
Connections for a KD485 convertor are shown in the following diagrams.
220 Ohm termination resistor on
the Rx of the converter unit
RS232
Tx
Rx
Com
RS485
RxA
A (2)
RxB
Com
B (1)
Com (3)
TxA
TxB
Type KD485
converter
RJ45
connector
Mini8
controller
RJ45
terminator
Screened cable,
see section 1.4.5
Figure 1-6: KD485 Communications Convertor - 2-wire Connections
220 Ohm termination resistor
on the Rx of the converter unit
RS232
Tx
Rx
Com
Mini8
controller
RS485
RXA
TXA (2)
RXB
TXB (1)
Com
Com (3)
TXA
RXA (8)
RXB (7)
TXB
Type KD485
converter
Screened cable,
see section 1.4.5
RJ45 connector
(size exaggerated
for clarity)
RJ45
terminator
Figure 1-7: KD495 Communications Convertor - 4-wire Connections
The above diagrams assume a serial port on the PC. For a PC using USB a USB to serial convertor is required between
the PC and KD485.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 17
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.5.5
One Master, Multiple slaves Short Network
The RS485 standard allows one or more instruments to be connected (multi dropped) using a 2-wire or 4-wire
connection, with cable length of less than 1200m. Up to 31 slaves and one master may be connected. Slaves may be
Mini8 controllers or other instruments such as Eurotherm controllers or indicators.
The communication line must be daisy chained from device to device and, if the communications line is more than
around two meters long, it must be correctly terminated. A Modbus terminator containing the correct termination
resistors is available from Eurotherm, order code: SubMin8/RESISTOR/MODBUS/RJ45.
The Modbus terminator is coloured BLACK.
Master
Daisy chained,
screened, twisted
pair cables
Slave 1
Slave 2
Line terminator on the last
instrument in the line
Slave n
Figure 1-8: Multiple Slaves - Overview
220 Ohm termination resistor on
the Rx of the converter unit
RS232
Tx
Rx
Com
RS485
RxA
A (2)
RxB
Com
B (1)
Com (3)
Mini8 (1)
TxA
TxB
Type KD485
converter
RJ45
connector
A (2)
Screened cable,
see section 1.4.5
B (1)
Com (3)
A (2)
B (1)
RJ45
connector
RJ45
connector
Com (3)
Mini8 (n)
RJ45
terminator
Figure 1-9: Multiple Slaves - RS485 2-wire Connections
Page 18
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.5.6
Wiring Connections for Modbus Broadcast Communications
The Digital Communications module for the master must be the Field Comms and is only RS485/RS422. RS232 is not
available.
The Digital Communications module for the slave can be the Config port (RS232 only) or the Field Comms port (Not
RS232).
Standard patch cables cannot be used, as the connections do not ‘cross over.’ Wire using twisted pair(s) cable and
crimp on the appropriate RJ45 or RJ11 plug.
RS485 2-wire
Connect A (+) in the master to A (+) of the slave
Connect B (-) in the master to B (-) of the slave
This is shown diagrammatically below
Mini8
Master
RS485
A
A
B
B
Slave 1
RS485
Com
Com
Figure 1-10: Rx/Tx Connections RS485 2-wire
RS422, RS485 4-wire
Rx connections in the master are wired to
Tx connections of the slave
Tx connections in the master are wired to
Rx connections of the slave
Mini8
Master
RS422
RS485
4-wire
TxA
TxA
TxB
TxB
RxA
RxA
RxB
RxB
Com
Com
Slave 1
RS422
RS485
4-wire
Figure 1-11: Rx/Tx Connections for RS422, RS485 4-wire
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 19
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.6
Electrical Connections for DeviceNet / CANopen
Instruments supplied after July 2009 no longer support CANopen interface. Information is included here to cover
instruments supplied previously with CANopen.
DeviceNet and CANopen both use a 5 way, 5.08mm pitch, connector/screw terminal. The DeviceNet bus is powered
(24V) from the system network, not from the instrument. The Mini8 controller requirement is a load of around 100mA.
For the address switch see section 11.5.
P
LED Indicators
See section 2
A
B
RN CC FC
24V
Configuration Port
See section 1.4.4
1
2
3
4
A
A
A
A
H
H
H
H
CC
24V
0V
GND
DeviceNet
Connector
FC
D1
D2
C
1
A 2
3
1
B 2
3
2
3
4
I
I
I
I
P
P
P
P

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON
Address Switch
See section 11.5.
1

DeviceNet
Mini8
Figure 1-12: Front Panel Layout Devicenet
1.6.1
DeviceNet Connector
Pin
Legend
Function
5
V+
V+
4
CH
CAN HIGH
3
DR
DRAIN
2
CL
CAN LOW
1
V-
V-
5
1
Mini8 controller
Label
Colour
Description
V+
Red
Network power positive terminal. Connect the red wire of the DeviceNet / CANopen cable
here. If the network does not supply the power, connect the positive terminal of an external
11-25 Vdc power supply.
CAN_H
White
CAN_H data bus terminal. Connect the white wire of the DeviceNet / CANopen cable here.
SHIELD
None
Shield/Drain wire connection. Connect the DeviceNet cable shield here. To prevent ground
loops, the network should be grounded in only one location.
CAN_L
Blue
CAN_L data bus terminal. Connect the blue wire of the DeviceNet / CANopen cable here.
V-
Black
Network power negative terminal. Connect the black wire of the DeviceNet / CANopen cable
here. If the DeviceNet network does not supply the power, connect the negative terminal of
an external 11-25 Vdc power supply.
The DeviceNet specification states that the bus terminators of 121 ohm should not be included as any part of a master
or slave. They are not supplied but should be included in the cabling between CAN_H and CAN_L where required.
The CANopen Cabling and Connector Pin Assignment specification specifies that the minimum termination resistance is
118 ohm with the following guidelines. They are not supplied but should be included in the cabling where required.
Page 20
Bus length (m)
Termination resistance (ohms)
0 – 40
124
40 – 100
150 - 300
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.6.2
Network Length
Network length depends on Baud rate:Network Length
1.6.3
Varies w/speed, up to 4000m possible w/repeaters
Baud Rate
125
250
500
1M (CANopen)
Thin trunk
100m (328ft)
100m (328ft)
100m (328ft)
40m
Max drop
6m (20ft)
6m (20ft)
6m (20ft)
6m(20ft)
Cumulative drop
156m (512ft)
78m (256ft)
39m (128ft)
19m (64ft)
Typical DeviceNet / CANopen Wiring Diagram
DeviceNet Trunk Cable
V-
Shield
V+
CAN-L CAN-H
↑
Further Devices
Mini8_1
* 121 1% 1/4W terminating resistor
must be connected across the blue
and white wires at each end of the
DeviceNet trunk cable.
*
Drop Line
Note: this resistor is sometimes
included in the master or other
devices but should only be switched
into circuit on the last device on the
trunk cable.
V+
CAN_H
MASTER
DRAIN
Can_L
V-
Mini8_2
Drop Line
V+
Drop Line
CAN_H
DRAIN
Can_L
V+
V-
V-
DeviceNet Power
Supply
Gnd
250mV p-p Ripple
24Vdc (+/- 1%)
max
Further Devices
↓
*
Note:
The DeviceNet network is powered by an external independent 24V supply which is separate from the internal powering
of the individual controllers.
Note: Power taps are recommended to connect the DC power supply to the DeviceNet trunk line. Power taps include:
A Schottky Diode to connect the power supply V+ and allows for multiple power supplies to be connected.
2 fuses or circuit breakers to protect the bus from excessive current which could damage the cable and connectors.
The earth connection, HF, to be connected to the main supply earth terminal at one point only.
See also the DeviceNet Communications Handbook HA027506
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 21
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.7
Electrical Connections for Enhanced DeviceNet Interface
This version of DeviceNet has been added for use in the Semiconductor industry. Configuration for both versions is the
same and is described in the DeviceNet Handbook HA027506 which can be downloaded from www.eurotherm.com.
The Enhanced DeviceNet interface uses a different connector, as described below, but cabling, cable specification and
termination are the same as described in the previous section.
LED Indicators
See section 2
P A B
Configuration Port
See section 1.4.4
24V
Specific LED Indicators
for Enhanced DeviceNet.
See section 2.1
0V
RN CC
1
2
3
4
A
A
A
A
H
H
H
H
CC
24V
NET MOD
GND
500
Baud Rate Switch,
see section 11.6.2
Prog
250
Address Switch
See section 11.6.1
A
B
ADDRESS
125
D1
D2
C
1
2
3
1
2
3
0
E
C
A 8
0
E
C
A 8
O/R
2
4
6
MSD
I
2
4
6
LSD
DEV ID

1
2
P
3
4
I
I
I
P
P
P
DeviceNet
Mini8
DeviceNet
Connector
Figure 1-13: Enhanced DeiceNet Panel Layout
1.7.1
Enhanced DeviceNet Connector
The 5-way connector shown in the previous section is replaced by a ‘Micro-Connect’ circular 5-pin M12 male connector
mounted in the module.
Pin
Legend
Function
5
CAN_L
CAN LOW
4
CAN_H
CAN HIGH
3
V-
V-
2
V+
V+
1
DR
DRAIN
Plug
Key
2
1
5
3
4
View from front
1.7.2
Switches and LED Indicators
The Enhanced DeviceNet interface also uses different Module and Network Status indicators, address and baud rate
switches.
To set the Address and Baud Rate, see section 11.6.
For Module and Network Status indication see section 2.1.
Page 22
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.8
Electrical Connections for Profibus DP
Two Profibus communications board options are available for the Mini8 controller.
1.
Standard Profibus 3 wire RS485 9 pin D connector intended for installation using standard Profibus cabling.
Note that in this arrangement line terminations must be catered for in the cabling.
2.
Profibus 3 wire RS485 via 2 paralleled RJ45 sockets. The front panel layout for this version is the same as
Modbus (Figure 1-3). Instruments may be daisy chained in the same way as shown in the Modbus sections
using suitable RJ45 cables and the RJ45 termination plug to terminate the line.
P
LED Indicators
See section 2
Configuration Port
See section 1.4.4
A
B
RN CC FC
24V
1
2
3
4
A
A
A
A
H
H
H
H
CC
24V
0V
GND
Standard Profibus
Connector
D1
D2
C
1
A 2
3
1
B 2
3
1
2
3
4
I
I
I
I
P
P
P
P

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON
Address Switch
See section 11.9
FC

Profibus
Mini8
Figure 1-14: Profibus Panel Layout - Standard D Connector
1.8.1
Profibus Interface (D-Type Connector)
Connector: 9-Way D-Type, R/A, Female, 4-40 UNC Studs:
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1.8.2
Function
Shield (Case)
N/C
RxD/TxD+ P (B)
N/C
GND (0V)
VP (+5V)
N/C
RxD/TxD- N (A)
N/C
Terminations should be included in the cabling
as follows:
R1
390Ω
6
R2
220Ω
3
R3
390Ω
8
5
D-Type connectior Pin
Profibus Interface (RJ45 Connector)
Connector: Two RJ45, parallel connected (for daisy-chain):
Pin
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
3-Wire
(do not use)
(do not use)
VP (+5V)
GND
RxD/TxD+ P (B)
RxD/TxD- N (A)
8
One connector may be used to
terminate line using
SubMini8/Term/Profibus/RJ45
This terminator is grey.
1
Page 23
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.9
Electrical Connections for EtherNet (Modbus TCP)
The EtherNet connection uses standard Cat5E patch cables (RJ45). These would be used with a 10BaseT hub to create
a network.
A crossover patch cable may be used ‘point-to-point’ i.e. to connect a single instrument directly to a PC.
P
LED Indicators
See section 2
A
B
RN CC FC
24V
Configuration Port
See section 1.4.4
1
2
3
4
A
A
A
A
H
H
H
H
CC
24V
0V
GND
RJ45 Socket
FC
D1
D2
C
1
A 2
3
1
B 2
3
2
3
4
I
I
I
I
P
P
P
P

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON
Address Switch
See section 11.10.3
1
MODBUS/TCP

Mini8
Figure 1-15: EtherNet TCP Front Panel Layout
1.9.1
Connector: RJ45:
Pin
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Page 24
Function
8
Network activity
(yellow)
RX-
RX+
TXTX+
1
Controller communicating
(green)
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.10
Electrical Connections for EtherNet/IP
P
LED Indicators
See section 2
Configuration Port
See section1.4.4
A
B
RN CC
24V
1
2
3
4
A
A
A
A
H
H
H
H
CC
24V
0V
GND
NET MOD
Status Indication
See section 2.2
RJ45 Socket
D1
D2
C
1
A 2
3
1
B 2
3
1
2
3
4
I
I
I
I
P
P
P
P

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON
Feature Switch
See section 11.11.1
FC
EtherNet/IP

Mini8
Figure 1-16: EtherNet/IP Front Panel Layout
1.10.1
Connector: RJ45:
This is the same as the connector shown in section 1.9
Pin
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Function
8
Network activity (yellow)
RX-
RX+
TXTX+
1
Controller communicating
(green)
Note: Screened cable should be used, see section 1.4.5 for further details.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 25
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.11
Electrical Connections for EtherCAT
1
EtherCAT stands for Ethernet for Control Automation technology. A further description is given in section 11.13.
The EtherCAT slave uses full duplex Ethernet physical layers. EtherCAT slaves can be daisy chained using RJ45 sockets
in a wide Variety of network topologies.
P A B
LED Indicators
See section 2
CC = Configuration
Port
See section 1.4.4
OP CC
1
2
3
4
A
A
A
A
H
H
H
H
24V
CC
24V
0V
RUN ERR
GND
LA
IN
Two RJ45 Sockets
See section 1.11.1
1
A
B
LA
D1
D2
C
1
2
3
1
2
3
X10
X1

A
9
8
7
6
A
9
8
7
6
BCD
5 4 3
BCD
5 4 3
2
3
4
I
OUT
I
I
I
P
P
P
P
E
2
F
0
1
E
F
0
1
2
DEV ID
EtherCAT
Mini8
Feature Switch
See section 11.13.2
1.11.1
Connector: RJ45:
This is the same as the connector shown in section 1.9
Pin
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Function
8
Always off (yellow)
Rx-
Rx+
TxTx+
1
8
1
Link activity (green)
Always off (yellow)
Link activity (green)
Note 1: Screened cable should be used, see section 1.4.5 for further details.
Note 2: Where EtherCAT is used in a network, switches/hubs must be EtherCAT compatible.
Page 26
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.12
Electrical Connections for Thermocouple Input TC4 and TC8
TC1+
A
TC1-
B
TC2+
C
TC2-
D
Up to 4 modules may be fitted in a Mini8 controller.
TC3+
E
Each input can be configured to any thermocouple type or a linear mV input.
TC3-
F
TC4+
G
TC4-
H
See subsequent chapters in this manual and specifically example 1 given in section 4.5.1 for
further information.
TC5+
I
The TC4 module offers TC1 to TC4, on terminals A to H.
TC5-
J
TC6+
K
TC6-
L
TC7+
M
TC7-
N
TC8+
O
TC8-
P
The TC8 thermocouple module takes 8 thermocouples.
The TC4 module takes 4 thermocouples.
They may be placed in any slot in the Mini8 controller.
Note: Configuration of Mini8 Controller is performed using ‘iTools’ configuration suite
running on a personal computer.
1.13
Electrical Connections for RTD
The RT4 module provides 4 RTD / Pt100 or 4 RTD / Pt1000 inputs
for 2, 3 or 4 wire connections.
Each input can be configured for Pt100 standard linearisation or
Pt1000 standard linearisation. When configured for Pt100 the
input will accept up to 420 ohms. When configured for Pt1000 the
input will accept up to 4200 ohms.
Up to 4 modules may be fitted in a Mini8 controller and they may
be placed in any slot.
Note: Configuration of Mini8 Controller is performed using ‘iTools’
configuration suite running on a personal computer.
See subsequent chapters in this manual and specifically example 2
given in section 4.5.1 for further information.
CH1 Current +
A
CH1 Sense +
B
CH1 Sense -
C
CH1 Current -
D
CH2 Current +
E
CH2 Sense +
F
CH2 Sense -
G
CH2 Current +
H
CH3 Current +
I
CH3 Sense +
J
CH3 Sense -
K
CH3 Current -
L
CH4 Current +
M
CH4 Sense +
N
CH4 Sense -
O
CH4 Current +
P
2-wire
3-wire
4-wire
2-wire
3-wire
4-wire
 Tip:
Spare RT4 input channels may be configured as mA inputs using a
2.49 ohm resistor, order code SubMini8/resistor/Shunt/249R.1 and
setting the Resistance Range to Low (see section 8.6.3.)
+
mA in
_
A
B
2.49 ohm
C
D
E
F
G
H
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 27
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.14
Electrical Connections for Logic Input DI8
D1+
A
D1-
B
The DI8 module provides 8 logic inputs.
D2+
C
They may be placed in any slot in the Mini8 controller.
D2-
D
Up to 4 modules may be fitted in a Mini8 controller.
D3+
E
D3-
F
D4+
G
D4-
H
D5+
I
D5-
J
D6+
K
D6-
L
D7+
M
D7-
N
D8+
O
D8-
P
Digital Inputs : ON requires +10.8V to +28.8V.
OFF requires -28.8V to +5V
+5V to +10.8v is undefined
Typical drive 2.5mA at 10.8V.
1.15
+24V
0V
+24V
0V
+24V
0V
+24V
0V
+24V
0V
+24V
0V
+24V
0V
+24V
0V
Electrical Connections for Logic Output DO8
24V
The DO8 module provides 8 logic outputs.
Supply In +
A
They may be placed in any slot in the Mini8 controller.
Supply In +
B
Up to 4 may be fitted in a Mini8 controller.
OP1 +
C
Each output can be configured to Time Proportioning or On/Off.
OP2 +
D
OP3 +
E
OP4 +
F
Supply & OP -
G
Supply & OP -
H
+
–
SSRs
2 to 7
0V
Supply In + (A,B,I,J) are all linked internally.
Supply In – (G,H,O,P) are all linked internally.
Supply In +
I
Supply In +
J
OP1 +
K
OP2 +
L
OP3 +
M
OP4 +
N
Supply & OP -
O
Supply & OP -
P
SSR 1
24V
+
SSR 8
–
0V
1.16
Electrical Connections for Inductive Loads
24V
Supply In +
A
Supply In +
B
Some inductive loads may produce a large back EMF when
switching off. If the back EMF is >30V this may cause damage to
the switching transistor in the module.
OP1 +
C
OP2 +
D
OP3 +
E
For this type of load it is recommended to add ‘snubbers’ across
the coils as shown. A snubber typically consists of a 15nF
capacitor in series with a 100Ω resistor.
OP4 +
F
Supply & OP -
G
Supply & OP -
H
This note applies if logic outputs are used to switch inductive
loads.
Snubbers are available to order from your supplier by quoting
part number SUB32-snubber.
Snubber
+
Inductive
load
–
0V
It is the user’s responsibility to determine the type of load which
is to be used.
Page 28
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.17
Electrical Connections for Relay Output RL8
The RL8 module provides 8 relay outputs.
RLY1 A
A
Up to 2 modules may be fitted and in slots 2 and/or 3 only
RLY1 B
B
RLY2 A
C
RLY2 B
D
Maximum 264V ac 2amps with snubber fitted.
RLY3 A
E
Minimum 5V dc, 10mA
RLY3 B
F
RLY4 A
G
RLY4 B
H
RLY5 A
I
RLY5 B
J
RLY6 A
K
RLY6 B
L
RLY7 A
M
RLY7 B
N
RLY8 A
O
RLY8 B
P
The AO8 modules provides 8 analogue outputs and the AO4 provides 4
analogue outputs.
OP1 +
A
OP1 -
B
Each output is configurable within 0 to 20 mA , max load 360 ohm.
OP2 +
C
The AO4 offers OP1 to OP4 on terminals A to H.
OP2 -
D
Only one module may be fitted and in slot 4 only.
OP3+
E
OP3 -
F
OP4 +
G
OP4 -
H
OP5 +
I
OP5 -
J
OP6 +
K
OP6 -
L
OP7+
M
OP7 -
N
OP8 +
O
OP8 -
P
Relay contacts for full contact life:
Snubbers are used to prolong the life of relay contacts and to reduce
interference when switching inductive devices such as contactors or solenoid
valves. If the relay is used to switch a device with a high impedance input, no
snubber is necessary.
All relay modules are fitted internally with a snubber since these are
generally required to switch inductive devices. However, snubbers pass
0.6mA at 110V and 1.2mA at 230Vac, which may be sufficient to hold on high
impedance loads. If this type of device is used it will be necessary to remove
the snubber from the circuit.
The relay module has to be removed from the instrument, see section 1.20.
The snubber is removed from the relay module by inserting a screwdriver
into one of the pair of slots either side of the track of each snubber network.
Twist the screwdriver to break out this track between the slots.
This action is not reversible.
1.18
Electrical Connections for Analogue Output AO4 and AO8
 Tip:
A 0 to 10 volt output can be obtained by scaling the drive to 0 to 10mA and
fitting an external 1kohm resistor (for example). Low load impedance may
alter the results but this can be corrected by adjusting the output range
accordingly.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 29
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.19
Electrical Connections for Current Transformer Input Module CT3
This provides inputs for 3 current transformers.
The heater load cables are threaded through the transformers.
Each input is 50mA max into 5 ohms.
Reserved
A
Reserved
B
Reserved
C
Reserved
D
Reserved
E
The current transformers provide channel isolation; there is no channel
to channel isolation in the module.
Reserved
F
Reserved
G
It is recommended that the current transformer is fitted with a voltage
limiting device such as two back to back zener diodes between 3 and 10
volts, rated for 50mA.
Reserved
H
There are 3 CT inputs, one for each phase. Up to a maximum of 16
heaters may be threaded through the CTs but with a further limit of 6
heater wires through each individual CT.
In 1 A
I
In 1 B
J
No connection
K
In 2 A
L
In 2 B
M
No connection
N
In 3 A
O
In 3 B
P
See Section 8.9 for typical circuit arrangements.
CT1
CT2
CT3
Page 30
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.20
Adding or Replacing an IO Module.
Modules contain static sensitive electronic devices. Take full antistatic protection when replacing modules by
working on an earthed mat with an earthed wrist strap. Avoid touching components, keep fingers on the green
connectors or the edge of the printed circuit boards.
Remove screw →
←
Rem o ve screw
Figure 1-17: Mini8 controller Cover Retaining Screws
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Remove all connectors.
Remove the 2 screws indicated above
Remove the cover.
If removing a module gently prise it out using the green connectors.
Insert the new module carefully using the guides on the side of the case to help to line up the lower
connector with its mate on the motherboard. This requires great care as the guides provide
mechanical support rather than being plug in guides.
Once you are certain the two connectors are lined up, push the module gently into place. Do NOT
force.
Replace cover and the 2 cover screws.
Replace all connectors onto their correct modules.
Page 31
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
2. Chapter 2 Mini8 Controller LED Indicators
LED indicators P, A and B are common to all Mini8 controllers and indicate the power and the state of the output relays
as shown in the following table.
P
A
B
P
A
B
Colour
Green
Red
Red
OFF
Power off
Relay A De-energised
Relay B De-energised
ON
Power on (24V)
Relay A Energised
Relay B Energised
LED indicators RN (OP for EtherCAT) and CC are common to all Mini8 controllers and show the status of the Mini8
controller and communications activity.
FC is replaced by Network and Module Status LEDs when DeviceNet or EtherNet/IP communications modules are fitted.
RN CC
FC
RN
CC
FC
Modbus/
Profibus
DeviceNet/
CANopen
Ethernet
Colour
Green
Green
Green
Green
Green
Function
Run mode
Configuration
activity (RS232)
Field comms
activity
Status
Field comms
activity
OFF
Not running
--
Offline
Offline
No port traffic
Blinking
Standby
Config traffic
Traffic
Ready
Port traffic
excluding
local
housekeeping
ON
Running
--
Connected
Note: The Modbus/EtherNet/EtherCAT connector itself has two in-built LEDs (sections 1.9 /1.10/1.11):
The Mini8 controller is controlling normally ONLY if the green RN LED is permanently ON.
Note: In iTools the parameter ‘Comms Network Status’ is available enumerated as shown in the following table. The
enumerations correspond to the FC indicator as shown in the final column:-
Page 32
‘Status’ Parameter Enumeration
Meaning
Corresponding FC
LED
RUNNING (0)
Network connected and running
On
INIT (1)
Network initialising
Off
READY (2)
DeviceNet traffic detected but not
for this address
Blinking
OFFLINE (3)
No DeviceNet traffic detected
Off
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
2.1
Status Indication for Enhanced DeviceNet
If an Enhanced DeviceNet module is fitted (section 1.7), two bi-colour LEDs are
used to indicate Module and Network status.
NET MOD
These two LEDs replace the single LED shown as FC on other modules. See
previous section.
2.1.1
Module Status Indication
The module status LED (MOD) has the functionality shown below:
2.1.2
LED State
OFF
Green/Red flashing
Device State
Off
Self test
Green ON
Red ON
Operational
Unrecoverable fault
Red/off flashing
Recoverable fault
Description
No power applied to DeviceNet network.
Irregular flash: LED power-up test.
Regular flash: Interface module initialising. If the LED remains
in this flashing state indefinitely, check the Baud rate switch
setting.
DeviceNet interface is operational.
Mini8 Controller not powered.
Nvol checksum failure.
Communications error between the network and the
DeviceNet module.
Network Status Indication
The network status LED (NET) indicates the status of the DeviceNet communications link as shown in the table below.
Note: The final column shows the enumerated values for the ‘Comms Network Status’ parameter available in iTools.
LED State
Network State
Description
OFF
Green flashing
Off
On-line, not connected
Green ON
On-line and connected
Red flashing
Connection timed out
Red ON
Critical link failure
Green/Red
Communications fault
Module is not on line
Module is on line but has no
connections established
Module is on line and has
connections established
One or more connections have
timed out
Communication error that has
rendered the device incapable of
communicating on the network
Communications fault but the
device has received an Identify
Communication Faulted Request
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‘Status’ Parameter
Enumerations
OFFLINE (10)
READY (11)
ONLINE (12)
IO TIMEOUT (13)
LINK FAIL (14)
COMM FAULT (15)
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2.2
Status Indication for EtherNet/IP
NET MOD
If an EtherNet/IP module is fitted (section 1.10) two bi-colour LEDs are used to
indicate Module and Network status.
These two LEDs replace the single LED shown as FC on other modules. See
previous section.
2.2.1
Module Status Indication
The module status LED (MOD) has the functionality shown below:
MOD LED State
OFF
Flashing green
Steady green
Flashing red
Steady red
Flashing green and red
Description
Module has no power
Module is not configured
Module is on line and operating correctly
Module has minor (1) recoverable fault
Module has a major (2) non-recoverable fault
Module is performing power up testing
Note (1): MOD LED minor faults include the following:DHCP server is unavailable
Ethernet link is lost.
Invalid sub net mask.
Invalid IP Address.
Error on an Explicit message. E.g. bad parameter address, writing to a read only parameter.
Note (2): MOD LED major fault:Internal fault – return to your supplier for service
2.2.2
Network Status Indication
The network status LED (NET) indicates the status of the EtherNet/IP communications link as shown in the table below.
Note: The final column shows the enumerated values for the ‘Comms Network Status’ parameter available in iTools.
NET LED
State
OFF
Flashing
Green
Steady Green
Flashing Red
Steady Red
Flashing
Green/Red
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Mnemonic
Description
Off
No connections
Module is not on line
Module is on line but has no EtherNet/IP
connections established
Module is on line and has at least one
EtherNet/IP connection established
A connection has timed out
A duplicate IP address has been detected
Module is initialising
Online
Connection timeout
Duplicate IP
Initialisation
‘Status’ Parameter
Enumerations
20 OffLine
21 NoConns
22 OnLine
23 Timeout
24 DupIP
25 Init
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2.3
Status LEDs for EtherCAT
OP CC
If an EtherCAT module (section 1.11) is fitted, the status of the module is indicated
by four LEDs which have the meanings listed below:
RUN ERR
2.3.1
‘OP’ – Mini8 Run Status Indication
Note: This indicator is equivalent to ‘RN’ in other protocols.
LED State
On
Off
Blinking
2.3.2
Colour
Green
State Name
Mini8 run mode
Not running
Standby
Description
The device is running normally
‘CC’ - Configuration Port Status Indication
Note: This indicator is the same as in other protocols.
LED State
Blinking
Off
On
2.3.3
Description
EIA232 configuration port activity
Configuration inactive
Not applicable
‘RUN’ – EtherCAT Slave Run Status Indication
LED State
Off
Blinking
Single Flash
On
Blinking
2.3.4
Colour
Green
Colour
Green
Green
Green
Green
Slave State
Initialisation
Pre-Operational
Safe Operational
Operational
Initialisation or Bootstrap
Description
The device is in state INIT
The device is in state PRE OPERATIONAL
The device is in state SAFE OPERATIONAL
The device is in state OPERATIONAL
The device is booting and has not entered
the INIT state, or:
The device is in state bootstrap.
Clone download operation in progress.
Description
‘ERR’ – Error Status Indication
LED State
Off
On
Double flash
Colour
Single flash
Red
Error Name
No error
Application failure
EtherCAT Process Data watchdog
timeout
Local error
Blinking
Red
Invalid configuration
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Red
Red
No communication with the Mini8 controller
Communication with EtherCAT master has
failed
The EtherCAT comms has changed the
EtherCAT state autonomously
Mini8 controller and EtherCAT master
configuration do not match
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3. Chapter 3 Using the Mini8 controller
The Mini8 controller does not have a display. The only means of configuring it, and of interfacing with it during normal
operation is via digital communications.
The auxiliary communications port CC (RJ11) gives a Modbus interface, usually connected to iTools, for configuration
and commissioning.
The main communications port, FC, offers Modbus, DeviceNet, CANopen, Profibus, EtherNet TCP or EtherNet/IP and is
normally connected to the system of which the Mini8 controller is a part. It is the means by which the Mini8 controller is
operated.
Below are ways the Mini8 controller may be used in a system. iTools is the best PC based solution. The Modbus single
register addressing is best for Operator panels, PLCs where floating point may not be available or necessary. Some
parameters may also be read this way as floats or long integers.
3.1
iTools
iTools offers a pc based solution. The iTools suite allows configuration, commissioning, trend graphs and logging with
OPC Scope, Program Editing, Recipes and User pages with View Builder.
3.1.1
iTools OPC Open server
With an OPEN OPC server running on a PC all the Mini8 controller parameters are available to any third party package
with an OPC client. The advantage of this is that all the parameters are addressed by name – the iTools OPC server
handles all the physical communication addresses. An example would be with Wonderware inTouch using OPCLink. In
this situation the user would not have to know any of the parameter addresses, and would just select a parameter by
browsing through the namespace.
e.g. Eurotherm.ModbusServer.1.COM1.ID001-Mini8.Loop.1.Main.PV.
3.2
Modbus, single register, SCADA addressing
The key parameters of the Mini8 controller are available at a fixed single 16 bit register address, independent of its
configuration. These can be used with any device with a serial Modbus master. The parameters are listed in full with
their addresses in Appendix A.
By default iTools displays the SCADA address of those parameters which are available.
As shown, not all the parameters within the instrument are available. If other parameters are required they can be
obtained by using the Commstab folder. This allows up to 250 other parameters to be made available using indirection
addressing. This is explained in Appendix A.
Also note that in this area the resolution (number of decimal points) has to be configured and the serial Master has to
scale the parameter correctly.
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3.3
Modbus (Floating Point)
If the application requires the extra resolution, the Commstab folder also offers an alternative solution where a
parameter can be indirectly addressed and communicated either as a floating point or as a double integer value – its
‘Native’ format. This can be used with any device e.g. PC or plc, with a serial Modbus master, able to decode a double
register for floating point numbers and long integers. See Appendix A.
3.4
Fieldbus
The Mini8 controller may be ordered with the option of DeviceNet, Profibus, EtherNet/IP or EtherCAT.
DeviceNet comes pre-configured with the key parameters of 8 PID loops and alarms (60 input parameters process
variables, alarm status etc and 60 output parameters – setpoints etc.). Loops 9-16 are not included in the DeviceNet
tables as there are insufficient attributes for the DeviceNet parameters. See Appendix B.
CANopen offers 4 receive & 4 Transmit PDOs and 1 server SDO with a 200 parameter pick list. See Appendix C.
Profibus is set up using a GSD editor included on the iTools CD. The GSD editor sets up the instrument parameters that
are required to be communicated with the master.
3.5
EtherNet (Modbus TCP)
The Mini8 controller may be ordered with an EtherNet connection (10baseT) running ModbusTCP as the protocol. An
instrument can therefore have a unique identity on the EtherNet network as well as a unique Modbus address for the
Modbus master.
3.6
Mini8 Controller Execution
The nominal update of all inputs and function blocks is 110ms. However, in complex applications the Mini8 controller
will automatically extend this time in multiples of 110ms.
For example, eight simple heat/cool loops each with two alarms (40 wires) will run at 110ms, while the full EC8
configuration will run at 220ms because of the extra wiring and functionality.
The communications traffic will also have some effect on the update rate.
For example, an application using every function block and all 250 wires will run at 220ms with light communications
traffic but may be slowed to 330ms with heavy traffic.
Note that as loading changes, the sample rate may increase or decrease automatically. In order to recover to a faster
sample rate, the Mini8 controller must be running consistently with processing power to spare for at least 30s.
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3.7
The iTools Operator Interface
Much of this manual is about configuring the Mini8 controller with iTools. However iTools also provides an excellent
commissioning tool and can be used as a long-term operator view if convenient.
First it is necessary to go ‘on-line’ to the Mini8 controller(s). This assumes the communication ports have been wired up
to the COM port on the iTools computer (Chapter 11).
3.7.1
Scanning
Open iTools and, with the controller connected, press
on the iTools menu bar. iTools will search the
communications ports for recognisable instruments. Controllers connected using the RJ11 configuration port or with
the configuration clip (CPI), may be found at address 255 (as a single point to point connection) or on a multidrop RS485
or RS422 network will be found at the address configured in the controller.
The iTools handbook, part no. HA028838, provides further step by step instructions on the general operation of iTools.
This and the iTools software may be downloaded from www.eurotherm.co.uk.
When an instrument is found on the network it will be shown as, for example
‘COM1.ID001-Min8’ which represents <computer com port>.ID<instrument address>-<Instrument type>
Stop the scan once all the instruments have been found.
Once an instrument is found on the network a message ‘’sync pending’ or synchronizing’ is displayed next to it whilst
iTools extracts the exact configuration from the instrument. Wait until this message disappears.
3.7.2
Browsing and Changing Parameter Values
Once the instrument is synchronized the parameter navigation tree is displayed. The contents of this tree will vary
depending on the actual configuration of the instrument.
The folders shown will be some of those which are
always present –
e.g Instrument, IO, Comms, Access
as well as the configuration dependent onese.g. Loops, Alarm, Lgc2 etc. which have
been configured.
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To view or change a parameter:
1.
Highlight the folder
2.
Press
to get the parameter window or open up the parameter list by clicking on the
required folder. Right click in the parameter list to reveal or hide columns.
3.
To change the value of a parameter,
a.
click the parameter value,
b.
write in the new value. Note a pop-up window indicates the current value, and the high and low limits.
c.
Hit <Enter> to enter the new value or <Escape> to cancel.
The ‘Access’ button puts the controller into configuration mode. In this mode the controller can be set up without its
outputs being active. Press ‘Access’ again to return to operating level.
To find a parameter use the ‘Find’ tab at the bottom of the folder list.

Tip:
In parameter lists:
Parameters in BLUE are read only
Parameters in BLACK are read/write.
 Tip:
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Every parameter in the parameter lists has a detailed description in the help file – just click on a
parameter and hit Shift-F1 on the keyboard or right click and select parameter help.
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3.8
Recipe Editor
Press
for this feature. Up to 8 recipes can be stored. They can also be named by the user. Recipes
allow the operator to change the operating values of up to 24 parameters in an instrument for different batch
items/processes by simply selecting a particular recipe to load. Recipes are important for reducing error in setup and
they remove the need for operator instructions fixed to the panel next to the instrument.
Note: Loading a recipe set causes the instrument to enter Standby mode momentarily during which time it does not
control.
The Recipe Editor is used during configuration to assign the required parameters and to set up the values to be loaded
for each recipe.
3.8.1
Recipe Menu Commands
Command
Load Recipe
Save
Edit Parameter
Delete Parameter
Edit Parameter Value
Rename Parameter Tag
Parameter Properties
Copy Parameter
Paste Parameter
Columns
Load Access Level
Level1
Config
Never
Edit Data Set Value
Clear Data Set Value
Rename Data Set
Clear Data Set
Snapshot Values
Copy Data Set
Paste Data Set
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Description
Used to load a recipe file into the instrument
Used to save the current recipe configuration into a file
Used to assign a parameter to a Tag. Parameters can also be assigned by 'drag and drop' from
the iTools parameter list
Used to delete an assigned parameter from the recipes
Used to edit the current value of the assigned parameter
Allows the user to rename the Tag of the associated parameter. This tag is used on the instrument
to identify assigned parameters (default Value1 - Value24)
Used to find the properties and help information of the selected parameter
Used to copy the currently selected parameter
Used to assign a previously copied parameter to the selected Tag
Used to hide/show the Description and Comment Columns
Used to configure the lowest access level in which the selected recipe is allowed to load
Permitted to load when the instrument is in any of the access levels
Permitted to load when the instrument is in the Config access level
Never permitted to load
Used to edit the value of the selected assigned parameter within the selected recipe. Values can
also be edited via double left clicking the value itself
Used to clear the value of the selected assigned parameter within the selected recipe, thus
disabling it from loading when the recipe is selected to load
Allows the user to rename the selected recipe. This name is used to identify individual recipes
(default Set1 - Set8). Note: Number of recipes dependent upon features
Used to clear all values in the selected recipe, thus disabling all from loading when the recipe is
selected to load
Used to copy all of the assigned parameters current values into the selected recipe
Used to copy all values of the selected recipe
Used to paste all values of a previously copied recipe into the selected recipe
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3.9
OPCScope
OPC scope is a standalone OPC client that can be used to attach to the iTools OPCserver. It offers real time trend charts
and data logging to disc in a .csv (comma separated variable) format which can easily be opened by a spreadsheet such
as Excel.
With iTools open OPC Scope can be started using the icon
.
But it can also be started on its own using the Windows Start/Programs/Eurotherm iTools/OPC Scope
and the OPC server will start up (if it is not running) and will display
Select Server/Connect or click the icon
the active ports on the computer. Opening the COM port will show the attached instruments as shown below.
The ‘ID001-Mini8’ folder will contain all the same folders for the instrument that would have been seen in iTools itself.
Expand the folder and double click on the blue item tag to add to the List Window. The List Window shows all the
selected parameters and their current value.
Right click on a parameter to get the context menu.
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3.9.1
OPC Scope List Window Context Menu
Command
Description
Save
Saves the OPC Scope configuration as <filename>.uix See Section 3.9.3
Copy Item DDE link
Saves the DDE path to the clipboard.
‘Paste Special’ in an Excel cell and select ‘Paste Link’ and the current
parameter value will be displayed in the cell.
Copy/Paste Item
Copy & Paste
Add Item
Add a new variable by name (easier to browse the navigation tree)
Remove Item
Remove the selected item.
Write Value
Write a new value (not if the item is Read Only).
Item appears on
Chart
Up to 8 items can be trended on the Chart Window
Item Properties
Gives the item properties as seen by OPC
The OPC List can contain parameters from any instrument attached to the Modbus network.
If you have iTools Open (not iTools Standard) then OPC Scope can run on a remote networked computer. Enter the
name of the server computer (attached to the instruments) the ‘Computer’ window and browse for the
‘Eurotherm.ModbusServer1’.
3.9.2
OPC Scope Chart Window
Click the Chart tab
at the bottom of the display window and select Chart Control Panel.
1.
Items. Includes all the items in the list window. Those
items ticked (up to 8) will appear on the chart.
2.
Axes. Allows time intervals from 1 minute to 1 month.
Vertical axes can be ‘auto’ scaled or a fixed range
may be entered.
3.
General. Allows selection of colours, grid, legends and
a data box.
4.
Plot. Allows selection of line thickness and printing
5.
Review. Allows review of early history charts.
These are also available on the toolbar.
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iTools Trend Graph showing Loop1 SP and PV
The
icon allows the chart to occupy all the window space.
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3.9.3
OPC Server
iTools and OPC Scope all use the Eurotherm OPC Server to provide the connection between the instruments and the
computer displays. When you ‘scan’ for instruments on iTools it is in fact the OPC Server that is actually doing the work
in background (the window is not usually displayed).
OPC Scope can run on its own but for it to find the instruments on the network it is necessary to tell the server where
they are.
1.
Start OPC Server (Windows Start/Programs/Eurotherm iTools/OPC Server)
2.
On the menu go to ‘Network’ and select ‘Start One-Shot Scan’
3.
Stop the scan when all the instruments have been found.
4.
On the menu go to ‘File’ and select ‘Save As’ and save the file with a suitable name.
5.
Once saved you will be asked ‘Would you like to make this file the default start server address
file?’ – select ‘Yes’.
6.
Close the server.
Now if you double click on an OPC Scope file e.g. Mini8 Project.uix then this file will open OPC Scope and in turn, in
background, OPC scope will open the OPC Server with this instrument file loaded. OPC Scope will then be active with
live data from the instrument(s).
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4. Chapter 4 Configuration Using ITools
WARNING
Configuration level gives access to a wide range of parameters that match the controller to the process.
Incorrect configuration could result in damage to the process being controlled and/or personal injury. It is
the responsibility of the person commissioning the process to ensure that the configuration is correct.
In configuration level the controller may not be controlling the process or providing alarm indication. Do
not select configuration level on a live process.
4.1
Configuration
The Mini8 controller is supplied unconfigured, unless ordered preconfigured, e.g. EC8. An unconfigured Mini8
controller has to be configured for use in an application. This is performed using iTools.
The iTools handbook, part no. HA028838 provides further step by step instructions on the general operation of iTools.
This and the iTools software may be downloaded from www.eurotherm.co.uk.
4.1.1
On-Line/Off-line Configuration
If iTools is connected to a real Mini8 controller then all the parameter changes made will be written to the device
immediately. Once the Mini8 controller is configured and working as required, its final configuration can be saved to
disk as a ‘clone’ file of the format <name>.uic.
Alternatively iTools can be used ‘off-line’ without a real Mini8 controller connected at all. This virtual Mini8 controller can
be created in iTools and again saved to disk as a clone file. This file can later be loaded into a real Mini8 controller to
create the required real application. See Section 4.3.
4.2
Connecting a PC to the Mini8 Controller
4.2.1
Configuration Cable and Clip
The controller may be connected to the PC running iTools using the Eurotherm cable SubMin8/Cable/Config from the
RJ11 port connecting to a serial port on the PC.
Alternatively a Configuration Clip is available from Eurotherm that can be fitted into the rear of the controller.
The benefit of using this arrangement is that it is not necessary to power the controller, since the clip provides the power
to the internal memory of the controller.
4.2.2
Scanning
Open iTools and, with the controller connected, press
on the iTools menu bar. iTools will search the
communications ports and TCP/IP connections for recognisable instruments. Controllers connected using the RJ11
configuration port or with the configuration clip (CPI), will be found at address 255 regardless of the address configured
in the controller. These connections only work from iTools to a single controller.
The iTools handbook, part no. HA028838, provides further step by step instructions on the general operation of iTools.
This and the iTools software may be downloaded from www.eurotherm.co.uk.
In the following pages it is assumed that the user is familiar with iTools and has a general understanding of Windows.
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4.3
Cloning
Saving a Clone File
On the iTools menu ‘File – Save to File’ allows the clone file of the attached Mini8 controller to be saved to disc as <user
name>.UIC file. This can be loaded into another Mini8 controller.
Note that after synchronization iTools using uses a ‘quick’ save and will only resave parameters that have been changed
through iTools itself. If there is any chance that parameters have been changed through the other port then it is
necessary to resave all the parameters. On the menu bar under Options – Cloning ensure Reload is selected. The safest
option is to keep Ask selected.
Loading a clone file
On the iTools menu ‘File – Load values File’ allows a clone file of the form <user name>.UIC to be loaded into an
attached Mini8 controller unit. Whilst loading, the report window will indicate what is happening. It makes a number of
attempts to load all the values and may report some errors. This is generally not an issue. If for some reason the load
fails iTools will report specifically that the load ‘Failed’
Communications port parameters
A Mini8 controller clone file contains information on both the CC and FC port config settings. Depending on which
comms port is used to load a clone file cloning will behave in a different manner.
Loading the clone file through the FC port will cause the CC port settings to be updated
Loading the clone file through the CC port will cause the FC port settings to be updated
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4.4
Configuring the Mini8 Controller
Once iTools is successfully connected to a Mini8 controller, it can be configured for the application in hand.
Configuration involves selection of the required elements of functionality called ‘function blocks’ and setting their
parameters to the correct values. The next stage is to connect all the function blocks together to create the required
strategy of control for the application.
4.4.1
Function Blocks
The controller software is constructed from a number of ‘function blocks’. A function block is a software device that
performs a particular duty within the controller. It may be represented as a ‘box’ that takes data in at one side (as
inputs), manipulates the data internally (using internal parameter values) and ‘outputs’ the results. Some of these
internal parameters are available to the user so that they can be adjusted to suit the characteristics of the process that is
to be controlled.
A representation of a function block is shown below.
Name –
corresponds to
Folder
Output
Parameters
Input
Parameters
Internal Parameters
Figure 4-1: Example of a Function Block
In the controller, parameters are organised in simple lists. The top of the list shows the list header. This corresponds to
the name of the function block and is generally presented in alphabetical order. This name describes the generic
function of the parameters within the list. For example, the list header ‘AnAlm’ contains parameters that enable you to
set up analogue alarm conditions.
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4.4.2
Soft Wiring
Soft Wiring (sometimes known as User Wiring) refers to the connections that are made in software between function
blocks. Soft wiring, which will generally be referred to as ‘Wiring’ from now on is created during the instrument
configuration using the iTools configuration package.
In general every function block has at least one input and one output. Input parameters are used to specify where a
function block reads its incoming data (the ‘Input Source’). The input source is usually wired from the output of a
preceding function block. Output parameters are usually wired to the input source of subsequent function blocks.
All parameters shown in the function block diagrams are also shown in the parameter tables, in the relevant chapters, in
the order in which they appear in iTools.
Figure 3.2 shows an example of how the thermocouple is wired to the PID Loop input and the PID Loop channel 1 (heat)
output is wired to the time proportioning logic output.
PID output to
logic output
t/c to PID input
Figure 4-2: Function Block Wiring
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4.5
Simple Worked Example
Using function blocks and wiring the following sections will show a blank Mini8 controller being configured to have one
PID loop.
4.5.1
The I/O
With the Mini8 controller successfully connected to iTools configuration can begin.
 Tip:
In parameter lists:
Parameters in BLUE are read only
Parameters in BLACK are read/write.
 Tip:
Every parameter in the parameter lists has a detailed description in the help file – just click on a
parameter and hit Shift-F1 on the keyboard or right click and select parameter help.
The I/O will already have been installed in the Mini8 controller and can be checked in iTools.
Example 1: Thermocouple Input Configuration
In the IO list ModIDs select the type of module. Thermocouple modules may be 4 input modules or 8 input
modules.
Figure 4-3: Mini8 controller I/O Modules
This unit has an 8 thermocouple input board in slot 1, a CT3 input card in slot 2, and 2 DO8 output cards in
slot 3 and slot 4. Clicking on the ‘Mod’ tab will enable the first channel of the thermocouple card to be
configured. Firstly the Mini8 controller has to be put into configuration mode. Go to
Device/Access/Configuration or click on the Access button:
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Figure 4-4: Thermocouple Input
Select the I/O type, linearisation, units, resolution etc. required. Parameter details are in Section 8.5.
The other thermocouple channels can be found by using the 2, 3, 4…7, 8 tabs on the top of the parameter window.
Slot 2 in the Mini8 controller has a CT3 input card and this is configured elsewhere so the Tabs 9 to 16 are not shown.
Slot 3 has a DO8 output card and the first channel of this will be on tab 17 (to 24)
Slot 4 has a DO8 output card and the first channel of this will be on tab 25 (to 32)
Figure 4-5: Digital Output Channel
Set this channel up as required, IOType, MinOnTime etc. as required. The parameters are detailed in Section 8.3.
The remaining channels on this slot will be found under the tabs 18 to 24.
Slot 4 also contains a DO8 output card with outputs under tabs 25 to 32.
The fixed I/O is always there and there is nothing that has to be configured.
The Current Monitor is covered in Chapter 8.9.
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Example 2: RTD Input Configuration
In the IO list ModIDs select the type of module. RTD modules are 4 input modules [RT4Mod (173)].
Figure 4-6: Mini8 Controller IO Module1 Defined as RTD
RTDs can be defined as 2-wire [RTD2 (32)], 3-wire [RTD3 (33)] or 4-wire [RTD4 (34)] in the module definition list. It is
important that the ‘IO Type’ and the ‘Resistance Range’ is configured to match the RTD in use so that the correct lead
compensation calculation is selected.
Figure 4-7: Module 1 defined as RTD4
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4.5.2
Wiring
The IO that has been configured now needs to be wired to PID loops and other function blocks.
Select
(GWE) to create and edit instrument wiring.
The Graphical Wiring Editor window
To add a function block drag it from the list and drop it on
this editor.
To add IO first expand the IO block (click the + ) and then
expand the Mod to show the IO channels 1 to 32
Similarly to add a loop first expand the loop block (click
the +) to show loops 1 to 8
Figure 4-8: List of Function Blocks & Graphical Wiring Window
The left window now contains a list of the function blocks available.
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Use drag and drop to select the first thermocouple from IOMod 1, the Cool output from IOMod 17 and the Heat output
from IOMod 25 and drop them on the wiring window.
Finally take the first PID block from Loop/Loop 1 and drop it on the wiring window. Note that as each block is used it
greys out on the list.
There should now be 4 blocks on the window. Those blocks are shown with dotted lines, as they have not been loaded
into the Mini8 controller.
First make the following wire connections.
1.
Click on IO.Mod1.PV and move the pointer to Loop 1.MainPV and click again. A dotted
wire will have connected the two together.
2.
Similarly join Loop1.OP.Ch1Out to IOMod 25.PV (heat output)
3.
Enable the Cool output by clicking the select arrow to the top of the loop block:
click here
and select PID output
4.
Loop1.OP.Ch2Out to IOMod 17.PV (cool output)
Figure 4-9: Wired Blocks before download
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5.
Right click on the Loop 1 function Block and select ‘Function Block View’. This opens the
Loop parameter list on top of the wiring editor.
Figure 4-10: PID Function Block
This enables the PID function block to be set up to suit the required application. See Chapter 18 for details.
Page 54
6.
Click on the instrument button to download the application:
7.
Once downloaded the dotted lines around the function blocks and the wires will become
solid to show that the application is now in the Mini8 controller. The upper status line also
shows that 3 wires have been used out of those available. Max is 250 but quantity depends
on number of wires ordered (30, 60, 120 or 250).
8.
Put the Mini8 controller back into Operating mode by clicking the Access button:
9.
The Mini8 controller will now control the Loop1 as configured.
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4.6
Graphical Wiring Editor
Select
parameter values.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
(GWE) to view and edit instrument wiring. You can also add comments and monitor
Drag and drop required function blocks into the graphical wiring from the list in the left pane
Click on parameter to be wired from and drag the wire to the parameter to be wired to (do not hold mouse
button down)
Right click to edit parameter values
Select parameter lists and switch between parameter and wiring editors
Download to instrument when wiring completed
Add comments and notes
Dotted lines around a function block show that the application requires downloading
Add
comment and
notes
Blocks ‘clear’
when used
Indicates
execution
order
Right click to
edit parameter
values
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Click this
button to wire
unshown
parameters
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
4.6.1
Download
Graphical Wiring Toolbar
Grab & Pan
Pan Drawing
Delete, Undo & Redo
Cut
Select
IO Setup
4.6.2
Zoom Drawing
Grid on/off
Copy a Diagram Fragment to a File
Copy
Paste
Paste a Diagram Fragment to a File
Create a Compound
Function Block
A Function Block is an algorithm that may be wired to and from other function blocks to make a control strategy. The
Graphical Wiring Editor groups the instrument parameters into function blocks. Examples are: a control loop and a
mathematical calculation.
Each function block has inputs and outputs. Any parameter may be wired from, but only parameters that are alterable
may we wired to.
A function block includes any parameters that are needed to configure or operate the algorithm.
4.6.3
Wire
A wire transfers a value from one parameter to another. They are executed by the instrument once per control cycle.
Wires are made from an output of a function block to an input of a function block. It is possible to create a wiring loop,
in this case there will be a single execution cycle delay at some point in the loop. This point is shown on the diagram by
a || symbol and it is possible to choose where that delay will occur.
4.6.4
Block Execution Order
The order in which the blocks are executed by the instrument depends on the way in which they are wired.
The order is automatically worked out so that the blocks execute on the most recent data.
4.6.5
Using Function Blocks
If a function block is not faded in the tree then it can be dragged onto the
diagram. The block can be dragged around the diagram using the mouse.
A labelled loop block is shown here. The label at the top is the name of the
block.
When the block type information is alterable, click on the box with the arrow
in it on the right to edit that value.
The inputs and outputs that are considered to be of most use are always
shown. In most cases all of these will need to be wired up for the block to
perform a useful task. There are exceptions to this and the loop is one of
those exceptions.
If you wish to wire from a parameter, which is not shown as a recommended
output click on the icon in the bottom right, and a full list of parameters in
the block will be shown, click on one of these to start a wire.
To start a wire from a recommended output just click on it.
Click the icon in the bottom right hand corner to wire other function block
parameters not shown on the list on the right hand side.
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4.6.5.1 Function Block Context Menu
Right clicking displays the context menu with the following entries.
Function Block View
Brings up an iTools parameter list which shows all the parameters in the function block. If
the block has sub-lists these are shown in tabs
Re-Route Wires
Throw away current wire route and do an auto-route of all wires connected to this block
Re-Route Input Wires
Only do a re-route on the input wires
Re-Route Output
Wires
Only do a re-route on the output wires
Show wires using tags
Shows the beginning and end of each wire with a descriptor showing the source or
destination. Used to simplify a diagram with many wires.
Hide Unwired
Connections
Hides function block pins that are not used.
Cut
Cut the selected function block
Copy
Right click over an input or output and copy will be enabled, this menu item will copy the
iTools "url" of the parameter which can then be pasted into a watch window or OPC Scope
Paste
Add a new copy of the function block
Delete
If the block is downloaded mark it for delete, otherwise delete it immediately
Undelete
This menu entry is enabled if the block is marked for delete and unmarks it and any wires
connected to it for delete
Bring To Front
Bring the block to the front of the diagram. Moving a block will also bring it to the front
Push To Back
Push the block to the back of the diagram. Useful of there is something underneath it
Edit Parameter Value
This menu entry is enabled when the mouse is over an input or output parameter. When
selected it creates a parameter edit dialog so the value of that parameter can be changed
Parameter Properties
Selecting this entry brings up the parameter properties window. The parameter properties
window is updated as the mouse is moved over the parameters shown on the function block
Parameter Help
Selecting this entry brings up the help window. The help window is updated as the mouse is
moved over the parameters shown on the function block. When the mouse is not over a
parameter name the help for the block is shown
4.6.6
Tooltips
Hovering over different parts of the block will bring up tooltips describing the part of the block beneath the mouse.
If you hover over the parameter values in the block type information a tooltip showing the parameter description, its
OPC name, and, if downloaded, its value will be shown.
A similar tool-tip will be shown when hovering over inputs and outputs.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
4.6.7
Function Block State
The blocks are enabled by dragging the block onto the diagram, wiring it up, and downloading it to
the instrument
When the block is initially dropped onto the diagram it is drawn with dashed lines.
When in this state the parameter list for the block is enabled but the block itself is not executed by
the instrument.
Once the download button is pressed the block is added to the instrument function block execution
list and it is drawn with solid lines.
If a block which has been downloaded is deleted, it is shown on the diagram in a ghosted form until
the download button is pressed.
This is because it and any wires to/from it are still being executed in the instrument. On download it
will be removed from the instrument execution list and the diagram. A ghosted block can be
undeleted using the context menu.
When a dashed block is deleted it is removed immediately.
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4.6.8
Using Wires
4.6.8.1 Making A Wire Between Two Blocks
•
Drag two blocks onto the diagram from the function block tree.
•
Start a wire by either clicking on a recommended output or clicking on the icon at the
bottom right corner of the block to bring up the connection dialog. The connection
dialog shows all the connectable parameters for the block, if the block has sub-lists the
parameters are shown in a tree. If you wish to wire a parameter which is not currently
available click the red button at the bottom of the connection dialog. Recommended
connections are shown with a green plug, other parameters which are available are
yellow and if you click the red button the unavailable parameters are shown red. To
dismiss the connection dialog either press the escape key on the keyboard or click the
cross at the bottom left of the dialog.
•
Once the wire has started the cursor will change and a dotted wire will be drawn from
the output to the current mouse position.
•
To make the wire either click on a recommended input to make a wire to that
parameter or click anywhere except on a recommended input to bring up the
connection dialog. Choose from the connection dialog as described above.
•
The wire will now be auto-routed between the blocks.
New wires are shown dotted until they are downloaded
4.6.8.2 Wire Context Menu
The wire block context menu has the following entries on it.
Force Exec
Break
If wires form a loop a break point has to be
found where the value which is written to the
block input comes from a block which was
last executed during the previous instrument
execute cycle thus introducing a delay. This
option tells the instrument that if it needs to
make a break it should be on this wire
Re-Route Wire
Throw away wire route and generate an
automatic route from scratch
Use Tags
If a wire is between blocks which are a long
way apart, then, rather than drawing the
wire, the name of the wired to/from
parameter can be shown in a tag next to the
block. Draw the wire first then use this menu
to toggle this wire between drawing the
whole wire and drawing it as tags
Find Start
Find the source of the selected wire
Find End
Find the destination of the selected wire
Delete
If the wire is downloaded mark it for delete,
otherwise delete it immediately
Undelete
This menu entry is enabled if the wire is
marked for delete and unmarks it for delete
Bring To Front
Bring the wire to the front of the diagram.
Moving a wire will also bring it to the front
Push To Back
Push the wire to the back of the diagram
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4.6.8.3 Wire Colours
Wires can be the following colours:
Black
Normal functioning wire.
Red
The wire is connected to an input which is not alterable when the instrument is in operator
mode and so values which travel along that wire will be rejected by the receiving block
Blue
The mouse is hovering over the wire, or the block to which it is connected it selected. Useful
for tracing densely packed wires
Purple
The mouse is hovering over a 'red' wire
4.6.8.4 Routing Wires
When a wire is placed it is auto-routed. The auto routing algorithm searches for a clear path between the two blocks. A
wire can be auto-routed again using the context menus or by double clicking the wire.
If you click on a wire segment you can drag it to manually route it. Once you have done this it is marked as a manually
routed wire and will retain it's current shape. If you move the block to which it is connected the end of the wire will be
moved but as much of the path as possible of the wire will be preserved.
If you select a wire by clicking on it, it will be drawn with small boxes on it's corners.
4.6.8.5 Tooltips
Hover the mouse over a wire and a tooltip showing the names of the parameters which are wired and, if downloaded,
their current values will also be shown.
4.6.9
Using Comments
Drag a comment onto the diagram and the comment edit dialog will appear.
Type in a comment. Use new lines to control the width of the comment, it is shown
on the diagram as typed into the dialog. Click OK and the comment text will
appear on the diagram. There are no restrictions on the size of a comment.
Comments are saved to the instrument along with the diagram layout information.
Comments can be linked to function blocks and wires. Hover the mouse over the
bottom right of the comment and a chain icon will appear, click on that icon and
then on a block or a wire. A dotted wire will be drawn to the top of the block or
the selected wire segment.
4.6.9.1 Comment Context Menu
The comment context menu has the following entries on it.
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Edit
Open the comment edit dialog to edit this
comment
Unlink
If the comment is linked to a block or wire this will
unlink it
Cut
Remove the comment
Copy
To make a copy of the comment
Paste
To Paste a new copy of the comment
Delete
If the comment is downloaded mark it for delete,
otherwise delete it immediately
Undelete
This menu entry is enabled if the comment is
marked for delete and unmarks it for delete
Bring To
Front
Bring the comment to the front of the diagram.
Moving a comment will also bring it to the front
Push To
Back
Push the comment to the back of the diagram.
Useful if there is something underneath it
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4.6.10
Using Monitors
Drag a monitor onto the diagram and connect it to a block input or output or a wire as described in ‘Using Comments’.
The current value (updated at the iTools parameter list update rate) will be shown in the monitor. By default the name of
the parameter is shown, double click or use the context menu to not show the parameter name.
4.6.10.1 Monitor Context Menu
The monitor context menu has the following entries on it.
4.6.11
Show
Names
Show parameter names as well as values
Unlink
If the monitor is linked to a block or wire this will unlink it
Cut
Remove the monitor
Copy
Make a copy of the monitor
Paste
Paste the copy of the monitor
Delete
If the monitor is downloaded mark it for delete,
otherwise delete it immediately
Undelete
This menu entry is enabled if the monitor is marked for
delete and unmarks it for delete
Bring To
Front
Bring the monitor to the front of the diagram. Moving a
monitor will also bring it to the front
Push To
Back
Push the monitor to the back of the diagram. Useful if
there is something underneath it
Downloading
The wires have to be downloaded to the instrument together. When the wiring editor is opened the current wiring and
diagram layout is read from the instrument. No changes are made to the instrument function block execution or wiring
until the download button is pressed.
When a block is dropped on the diagram instrument parameters are changed to make the parameters for that block
available. If you make changes and close the editor without saving them there will be a delay while the editor clears
these parameters.
When you download, the wiring is written to the instrument that then calculates the block execution order and starts
executing the blocks. The diagram layout including comments and monitors is then written into instrument flash
memory along with the current editor settings. When you reopen the editor the diagram will be shown positioned the
same as when you last downloaded.
4.6.12
Selections
Wires are shown with small blocks at their corners when selected. All other items have a dotted line drawn round them
when they are selected.
4.6.12.1 Selecting Individual Items
Clicking on an item on the drawing will select it.
4.6.12.2 Multiple Selection
Control click an unselected item to add it to the selection, doing the same on a selected item unselects it.
Alternatively, hold the mouse down on the background and wipe it to create a rubber band, anything which isn't a wire
inside the rubber band will be selected.
Selecting two function blocks also selects any wires which join them. This means that if you select more than one
function block using the rubber band method any wires between them will also be selected.
Pressing Ctrl-A selects all blocks and wires.
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4.6.13
Colours
Items on the diagram are coloured as follows:
Red
Function blocks, comments and monitors which partially obscure or are partially obscured by other
items are drawn red. If a large function block like the loop is covering a small one like a math2 the
loop will be drawn red to show that it is covering another function block. Wires are drawn red when
they are connected to an input which is currently unalterable. Parameters in function blocks are
coloured red if they are unalterable and the mouse pointer is over them
Blue
Function blocks, comments and monitors which are not coloured red are coloured blue when the
mouse pointer is over them. Wires are coloured blue when a block to which the wire is connected is
selected or the mouse pointer is over it. Parameters in function blocks are coloured blue if they are
alterable and the mouse pointer is over them
Purple
A wire which is connected to an input which is currently unalterable and a block to which the wire is
connected is selected or the mouse pointer is over it is coloured purple (red + blue)
4.6.14
Diagram Context Menu
Highlight an area of the graphical wiring by left clicking the mouse button and dragging around the required area.
Right click in the area to show the Diagram Context Menu. The diagram context menu has the following entries:Cut
To delete the selected area
Copy
To make a copy of the selected area
Paste
To paste the selected area
Re-Route Wires
Throw away current wire route and do an auto-route
of all selected wires. If no wires are selected this is
done to all wires on the diagram
Align Tops
Line up the tops of all the selected items except
wires
Align Lefts
Line up the left hand side of all the selected items
except wires
Space Evenly
This will space the selected items such that their top
left corners are evenly spaced. Select the first item,
then select the rest by control-clicking them in the
order you wish them to be spaced, then choose this
menu entry
Delete
Marks all selected items for deletion (will be deleted
on next download).
Undelete
This menu entry is enabled if any of the selected
items are marked for deletion and unmarks them
when selected
Select All
To select the complete graphical wiring
Create Compound
Create a new tab (Compund 1, 2, etc) of the selected
area
Rename
To customise the Compound name.
Copy Graphic
If there is a selection it is copied to the clipboard as a
Windows metafile, if there is no selection the whole
diagram is copied to the clipboard as a Windows
metafile. Paste into your favourite documentation
tool to document your application. Some programs
render metafiles better than others, the diagram may
look messy on screen but it should print well
Save Graphic
Same as Copy Graphic but saves to a metafile rather
than putting it on the clipboard
Copy Fragment to
File
To make a copy of the selected area and save it to
file
Paste Fragment
from File
To paste the selected area from file
Center
To place the selected area in the centre of the
graphical wiring view.
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4.6.15
Wiring Floats with Status Information
There is a subset of float values which may be derived from an input which may become faulty for some reason, e.g.
sensor break, over-range, etc. These values have been provided with an associated status which is automatically
inherited through the wiring. The list of parameters which have associated status is as follows:Block
Loop.Main
Loop.SP
Math2
Programmer.Setup
Poly
Load
Lin16
Txdr
IPMonitor
SwitchOver
Total
Mux8
Multi-oper
Lgc2
UsrVal
Humidity
IO.MOD
Input Parameters
PV
In1
In2
PVIn
In
In
InVal
In
In1
In2
In
In1 to 8
In1 to 8
In1
In2
Val
WetTemp
DryTemp
PsychroConst
Pressure
1.PV to 32.PV
Output Parameters
PV
TrackPV
Out
Out
PVOut1
PVOut2
Out
OutVal
Out
Out
SumOut, MaxOut, MinOut, AverageOut
Val
RelHumid
DewPoint
1.PV to 32.PV
Parameters appear in both lists where they can be used as inputs or outputs depending on configuration. The action of
the block on detection of a ‘Bad’ input is dependent upon the block. For example, the loop treats a ‘Bad’ input as a
sensor break and takes appropriate action; the Mux8 simply passes on the status from the selected input to the output,
etc.
The Poly, Lin16, SwitchOver, Multi-Operator, Mux8, IO.Mod.n.PV blocks can be configured to act on bad status in
varying ways. The options available are as follows:0: Clip Bad
The measurement is clipped to the limit it has exceeded and its status is set to ‘BAD’, so that any function block using
this measurement can operate its own fallback strategy. For example, a control output may be held at its current value.
1: Clip Good
The measurement is clipped to the limit it has exceeded and its status is set to ‘GOOD’, such that any function block
using this measurement may continue to calculate and not employ its own fallback strategy.
2: Fallback Bad
The measurement will adopt the configured fallback value that has been set by the user. In addition the status of the
measured value will be set to ‘BAD’, such that any function block using this measurement can operate its own fallback
strategy. For example, control loop may hold its output to the current value.
3: Fallback Good
The measurement will adopt the configured fallback value that has been set by the user. In addition the status of the
measured value will be set to ‘GOOD’, such that any function block using this measurement may continue to calculate
and not employ its own fallback strategy
4: Up Scale
The measurement will be forced to adopt its high limit. This is like having a resistive pull up on an input circuit. In
addition the status of the measured value will be set to ‘BAD’, such that any function block using this measurement can
operate its own fallback strategy. For example, the control loop may hold its output to the current value.
5: Down Scale
The measurement will be forced to adopt its low limit. This is like having a resistive pull down on an input circuit. In
addition the status of the measured value will be set to ‘BAD’, such that any function block using this measurement can
operate its own fallback strategy. For example, the control loop may hold its output to the current value.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
4.6.16
Edge Wires
If the Loop.Main.AutoMan parameter were wired from a logic input in the conventional manner it would be impossible
to put the instrument into manual via communications. Other parameters need to be controlled by wiring but also need
to be able to change under other circumstances, e.g. Alarm Acknowledgements. for this reason some Boolean
parameters are wired in an alternative way.
These are listed as follows:SET DOMINANT
When the wired in value is 1 the parameter is always updated. This will have the effect of overriding any changes
through digital communications. When the wired in value changes to 0 the parameter is initially changed to 0 but is not
continuously updated. This permits the value to be changed through digital communications.
Loop.Main.AutoMan
Programmer.Setup.ProgHold
Access.StandBy
RISING EDGE
When the wired in value changes from 0 to 1, a 1 is written to the parameter. At all other times the wire does not update
the parameter. This type of wiring is used for parameters that start an action and when once completed the block clears
the parameter. When wired to, these parameters can still be operated via digital communications.
Loop.Tune.AutotuneEnable
Programmer.Setup.ProgRun
Programmer.Setup.AdvSeg
Programmer.Setup.SkipSeg
Txdr.ClearCal
Txdr.StartCal
Txdr.StartHighCal
Txdr.StartTare
Alarm.Ack
DigAlarm.Ack
AlmSummary.GlobalAck
Instrument.Diagnostics.
ClearStats
IPMonitor.Reset
BOTH EDGE
This type of edge is used for parameters which may need to be controlled by wiring or but should also be able to be
controlled through digital communications. If the wired in value changes then the new value is written to the parameter
by the wire. At all other times the parameter is free to be edited through digital communications.
Loop.SP.RateDisable
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Loop.OP.RateDisable
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
5. Chapter 5 Mini8 controller Overview
Input and output parameters of function blocks are wired together using software wiring to form a particular control
strategy within the Mini8 controller. An overview of all the available functions and where to get more detail is shown
below.
Thermocouples
Inputs
Control Processes
Outputs
Mod.1 to Mod.32
T/C, RTD, mA, mV
Chapter 8.5, 8.6
Loops 1 to 16
Loop Folder
Mod.1 to Mod.32
Logic Output
Setpoint
Loop/SP folder
Folder
Chapter 18.6
Input Linearisation
Lin 16 Folder
Chapter 16
Chapter 18
Programmer
Prog Folder
Chapter 19
Mod.25 to
Mod.32
Analogue OP
FixedIO /IO
Relay O/P
Polynomial
Poly Folder
Chapter 13
Chap. 8.8, 8.4
Chapter 16
Alarm(s)
Alarm Folder
Logic Input
Chap. 8.8, 8.2
BCD Input
BCD In Folder
Chapter 10
Switchover
SwOver Folder
To plant
devices
Chapter 8.7
Application specific
Humidity Zirconia
FixedIO / IO
Dig Inputs
Chapter 8.3
Chapter 9
Digital Alarms
Dig Alm Folder
Chapter 9.3
Alarm Summary
Alarm Summary
Folder
Chapter 9.7
Chapter 20
Transducer Scaling
Txdr Folder
Maths
Math2 & Mux8 Folder
Chapter 15
Chapter 21
User Values
UsrVal Folder
Maths
Lgc2 & Lgc8 Folder
Chapter 15
Chapter 22
Current
Transformers
Current I/p
IO.Current Monitor
Folder
Chapter 8.9
Timer/Clock/
Counter/Totaliser
Chapter 12
Field Comms
Comms/FC Folder
Chapter 11
PC, plc
Figure 5-1: Controller Example
Mini8 controllers are supplied unconfigured, and with those blocks included in the order code. Option EC8 is supplied
with function blocks pre-wired to give an 8 loop heat/cool controller suitable for Extrusion. See data sheet HA028519.
The purpose of the PID control blocks is to reduce the difference between SP and PV (the error signal) to zero by
providing a compensating output to the plant via the output driver blocks.
The timer, programmer and alarms blocks may be made to operate on a number of parameters within the controller,
and digital communications provides an interface to data collection and control.
The controller can be customised to suit a particular process by ‘soft wiring’ between function blocks.
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5.1
Complete list of Function Blocks.
The list opposite represents an unconfigured Mini8
controller that has been ordered with all features
enabled.
If a particular block or blocks do not appear in your
instrument then the option has not been ordered.
Check the order code of your instrument and
contact Eurotherm.
Examples of features that may not have been
enabled are:
Loops
Programmer
Recipe
Humidity
Once a block is dragged and dropped onto the
graphical wiring window, the block icon in the block
list opposite will be greyed out. At the same time a
folder containing the blocks parameters will have
been created in the Browse List.
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6. Chapter 6 Access Folder
Folder: Access
Sub-folder: none
Name
Parameter
Description
Value
ClearMemory
Cold start the
instrument
No
Disabled
App
Mini8 controller memory reset but comms
and linearisation tables retained
LinTables
Custom Linearisation tables are deleted
InitComms
Comms ports reset to default
configurations
Wires
Clear all wiring
AllMemory
All instrument memory is set to default
values
Programs
All Programs cleared
Default
Access Level
No
Conf
CustomerID
Customer
Identifier
Reference number for customer use
0
Oper
Standby
Set Instrument
to standby
No / Yes
No
Oper
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7. Chapter 7 Instrument Folder
7.1
Instrument / Enables
The following table lists the options that can be enabled in the instrument.
Enable flags are one bit for each item – i.e.Bit (0=1) enables item 1, Bit 1 (=2) item 2, Bit(3=4) item 3 and so on to
Bit7(=128) enables Item 8. All 8 items enabled adds up to 255.
 Tip:
Features are not normally enabled this way. Dragging and dropping a function block onto
the graphical wiring window automatically sets the required enable flag.
Folder: Instrument
Sub-folder: Enables
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
AlarmEn1
Analogue alarms Enable
Flags
Alarms 1 to 8 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
AlarmEn2
Analogue alarms Enable
Flags
Alarms 9 to 16 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
AlarmEn3
Analogue alarms Enable
Flags
Alarms 17 to 24 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
AlarmEn4
Analogue alarms Enable
Flags
Alarms 25 to 32 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
BCDInEn
BCD switch input Enable
Flags
BCD input 1 and 2
0
Conf
CounterEn
Counters Enable Flags
Counters1 and 2 0 (none) to 3 (both)
0
Conf
CurrentMon
(Only if CT3
module fitted)
Current Monitor Enable
Flag
0 = Off 1 = On
0
Conf
DigAlmEn1
Digital alarms Enable Flags
Dig Alarms 1 to 8 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
DigAlmEn2
Digital alarms Enable Flags
Dig Alarms 9 to 16 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
DigAlmEn3
Digital alarms Enable Flags
Dig Alarms 17 to 24 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
DigAlmEn4
Digital alarms Enable Flags
Dig Alarms 25 to 32 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
HumidityEn
Humidity control Enable
Flag
0 = off 1 = On
0
Conf
IP Mon En
Input monitor Enable Flags
Input Monitor 1 and 2
0
Conf
Lgc2 En1
Logic operators Enable
Flags
Logic operators 1 to 8 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
Lgc2 En2
Logic operators Enable
Flags
Logic operators 9 to 16 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
Lgc2 En3
Logic operators Enable
Flags
Logic operators 17 to 24 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
Lgc8 En
Logic 8 operator Enable
Flags
8 input Logic operators 1 & 2 0 (none) to 3 (both)
0
Conf
Lin16Pt En
Input linearisation 16 point
Input Linearisation 1 and 2
0
Conf
Load En
Load Enable Flags
Loads 1 to 8 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
As order
code
Conf
Load En2
Load Enable Flags
Loads 9 to 16
As order
code
Conf
Loop En
Loop Enable Flags
Loops 1 to 8 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
As order
code
Conf
Loop En2
Loop Enable Flags
Loops 9 to 16
As order
code
Conf
Math2 En1
Analogue (Maths)
Operators Enable Flags
Analogue operators 0 to 8 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
Math2 En2
Analogue (Maths)
Operators Enable Flags
Analogue operators 9 to 16 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
Math2 En3
Analogue (Maths)
Operators Enable Flags
Analogue operators 17 to 24 0 (none) to 255 (all
8)
0
Conf
MultiOperEn
Analogue Multi- Operator
Enable Flags
Multi-operators 0 to 4 0 (none) to 15 (all 4)
0
Conf
Mux8 En
Multiplexor Enable Flags
8 input multiplexor 1 and 2 0 (none) to 3 (both)
0
Conf
Page 68
0 (none) to 3 (both)
0 (none) to 3 (both)
0 (none) to 3 (both)
0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Folder: Instrument
Sub-folder: Enables
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
Poly En
Polynomial linearisation
block Enable Flags
Poly Linearisation 1 and 2 0 (none) to 3 (both)
0
Conf
Prog En
Programmer Enable Flags
0 = off, 1 to 8 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
RTClock En
Real time clock Enable
Flags
0 = off 1 = On
0
Conf
SwOver En
Switch over block Enable
Flags
0 = off 1 = On
0
Conf
Timer En
Timers Enable Flags
Timers 1 to 4 0 = none to 15 = 4
0
Conf
Totalise En
Totalisers Enable Flags
Totalisers 1 & 2
0
Conf
TrScale En
Transducer scaling Enable
Flags
Transducer scalers 1 and 2 0 (none) to 3 (both)
0
Conf
UsrVal En1
User values Enable Flags
User Values 1 to 8 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
UsrVal En2
User values Enable Flags
User Values 9 to 16 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
UsrVal En3
User values Enable Flags
User Values 17 to 24 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
UsrVal En4
User values Enable Flags
User Values 25 to 32 0 (none) to 255 (all 8)
0
Conf
Zirconia En
Zirconia Input Functions
0 = off 1 = On
0
Conf
Default
Access Level
7.2
0 (none) to 3 (both)
Instrument Options
Folder: Instrument
Sub-folder: Options
Name
Value
Parameter Description
Units
Units
°C,°F or Kelvin scale for all temperature parameters
DegC
Oper
ProgPVstart
To enable PV start
No, Yes – see section 19
No
Conf
Default
Access Level
7.3
Instrument / InstInfo
Folder: Instrument
Sub-folder: InstInfo
Name
Parameter
Description
Value
InstType
Instrument Type
MINI8
NONE
Version
Version Identifier
-
NONE
Serial No
Serial Number
Passcode1
Passcode1
0 to 65535
Oper
Passcode2
Passcode2
0 to 65535
Oper
Passcode3
Passcode3
0 to 65535
Oper
CompanyID
CompanyID
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
NONE
1280
NONE
Page 69
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
7.4
Instrument / Diagnostics
This list provides fault finding diagnostic information as follows:Folder: Instrument
Sub-folder: Diagnostics
Name
Parameter Description
CPUFree
This is the amount of free CPU Time left. It shows the percentage of the tasks ticks that are
idle.
MinCPUFree
A benchmark of the lowest reached value of the CPU free percentage.
CtrlTicks
This is the number of ticks that have elapsed while the instrument was performing the control
Task.
Max Con Tick
A benchmark of the maximum number of ticks that have elapsed while the instrument was
performing the control Task
Clear Stats
Resets the instrument performance benchmarks.
ErrCount
The number of errors logged since the last Clear Log. Note: If an error occurs multiple times
only the first occurrence will be logged each event will increment the count.
Err1
The first
error to
occur
Err2
The second
error to
occur
Err3
The third
error to
occur
Err4
The fourth
error to
occur
Err5
The fifth
error to
occur
Err6
The sixth
error to
occur
Err7
Err8
The seventh
error to
occur
The eight
error to
occur
0 There is no error
1 Bad or unrecognised module ident. A module has been inserted and has a
bad or unrecognised ident. Either the module is damaged or the module is
unsupported.
3 Factory calibration data bad. The factory calibration data has been read
from an I/O module and has not passed the checksum test. Either the module
is damaged or has not been initialised.
4 Module changed for one of a different type. A module has been changed
for one of a different type. The configuration may now be incorrect
10 Calibration data write error. An error has occurred when attempting to
write calibration data back to an I/O module's EE.
11 Calibration data read error. An error occurred when trying to read
calibration data back from the EE on an I/O module.
18 Checksum error. The checksum of the NVol Ram has failed. The NVol is
considered corrupt and there the instrument configuration may be incorrect.
20 Resistive identifier error. An error occurred when reading the resistive
identifier from an i/o module. The module may be damaged.
43 Invalid custom linearisation table. One of the custom linearisation tables is
invalid. Either it has failed checksum tests or the table downloaded to the
instrument is invalid.
55 The Instrument wiring is either invalid or corrupt.
56 Non-vol write to volatile. An attempt was made to perform a checksummed
write to a non-checksummed area
58 Recipe load failure. The selected recipe failed to load
59 Bad User CT calibration data. Corrupted or invalid user calibration data for
the current monitor
60 Bad Factory CT calibration data. Corrupted or invalid factory calibration
data for the current monitor
62 to 65 Slot1 card DFC1 to DFC4 error
66 to 69 Slot2 card DFC1 to DFC4 error
70 to 73 Slot3 card DFC1 to DFC4 error
The generic I/O DFC chip will not
communicate. This could
indicate a build fault.
74 to 77 Slot4 card DFC1 to DFC4 error
Clear Log
Clears the error log entries and count. Value options No: Yes
UserStringCount
Number of User Strings Defined
UserStringCharsLeft
Space Available For User Strings.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Folder: Instrument
Sub-folder: Diagnostics
Name
Parameter Description
Segments Left
Number of Available Program Segments
Gives the number of unused program segments. Each time a segment is allocated to a
program, this value is reduced by one.
CtrlStack
Control Stack Free Space (words)
The number of words of un-used stack for the control task
CommsStack
Comms Stack Free Space (words)
The number of words of un-used stack for the comms task
IdleStack
Idle Stack Free Space (words)
The number of words of un-used stack for the idle (background) task.
MaxSegments
The maximum number of setpoint programmer segments available given the features security
settings for the connected instrument.
MaxSegsPerProg
Specifies the maximum number of segments that can be configured for a single program
CntrlOverrun
Indicates the amount of control overrun.
PSUident
Shows type of PSU fitted 0 = Mains 1= 24V dc
PwrFailCount
Counts the number of times the instrument power has been switched off. Can be used to see
if the supply to the instrument has failed.
IntCRCErr
Internal crc Error Count. A count of crc errors seen on the internal Modbus channel for the FC
port.
IntUARTErr
Internal UART Error Count. A count of uart errors (overrun, framing or parity) seen on the
internal Modbus channel for the FC port.
Cust1Name
Name for custom linearisation table 1
Cust2Name
Name for custom linearisation table 2
Cust3Name
Name for custom linearisation table 3
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8. Chapter 8 I/O Folder
This lists the modules fitted into the instruments, all the IO channels, the fixed IO and the current monitoring.
The IO folder lists all the channels of each of the IO boards in the 4 available slots. Each board has up to 8 inputs or
outputs making a maximum of 32 channels. The channels are listed under Mod1 to Mod32.
Slot
Channels
1
IO.Mod.1 to IO.Mod.8
2
IO.Mod.9 to IO.Mod.16
3
IO.Mod.17 to IO.Mod.24
4
IO.Mod.25 to IO.Mod.32
Note that the current transformer input, CT3, is not included in this arrangement. There is a separate folder for current
monitoring under IO.CurrentMonitor. If this board is fitted into slot 2 the IO.Mod.9 to Mod.16 would not exist.
8.1
Module ID
Folder: IO
Sub-folder: ModIDs
Name
Parameter
Description
Value
Default
Access Level
Module1
Module1Ident
0 NoMod – No Module
0
Read Only
0
Read
Only
0
Read
Only
0
Read
Only
24 DO8Mod – 8 logic outputs
18 RL8Mod – 8 relay outputs
Module2
Module2Ident
60 DI8 – 8 logic inputs
90 CT3Mod – 3 current transformer inputs
131 TC8Mod – 8 thermocouple/mV inputs
133 TC4Mod – 4 thermocouple/mV inputs
Module3
Module3Ident
173 RT4 – 4 PT100 or PT1000 inputs
201 AO8Mod – 8 0-20 mA outputs (Slot 4 only)
203 AO4Mod – 4 0-20 mA outputs (Slot 4 only)
Module4
8.1.1
Module4Ident
Modules
The content of the Mod folders depends on the type of IO module fitted in each slot. These will be covered in the
following sections.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.2
Logic Input
Each DI8 card provides 8 logic input channels (voltage controlled) to the system. These can be wired to provide digital
inputs to any function block within the system.
8.2.1
Logic Input Parameters
Folder – IO
Sub-folder Mod.1 to .32
Name
Parameter Description
Ident
Channel Identity
LogicIn
IOType
IO Type
OnOff
On off input
Invert
Sets the sense of the logic input
No
Yes
No inversion
Inverted
No
Conf
Measured Val
Measured Value
On/Off
Value seen at the
terminals
Off
Read
Only
PV
Process Variable
On/Off
Value after allowing for
Invert
Off
Read Only
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Value
Default
Access Level
Read Only
Conf
Page 73
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.3
Logic Output
If a slot is fitted with a DO8 board then 8 channels will be available to be configured and connected to Loop outputs,
alarms or other logic signals.
8.3.1
Logic Out Parameters
Folder – IO
Sub-folder Mod.1 to .32
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Ident
Channel Identity
LogicOut
IOType
IO Type
OnOff
On off output
Time Prop
Time proportioning
output
Access Level
Read Only
Conf
Invert
Sets the sense of the logic input or
output
No
Yes
No inversion
Inverted
No
Conf
SbyAct
Action taken by output when
instrument goes into Standby Mode
Off, On
Continue
Switches On/Off
Remains in its last state
Off
Conf
Auto
Oper
The next five parameters are only shown when ‘IO Type’ = ‘Time Prop’ outputs
MinOnTime
Prevents relays from switching too
rapidly
Auto
0.01 to 150.00
seconds
DisplayHigh
The maximum displayable reading
0.00 to 100.00
100.00
Oper
DisplayLow
The minimum displayable reading
0.00 to 100.00
0.00
Oper
RangeHigh
The maximum (electrical)
input/output level
0.00 to 100.00
100
Oper
RangeLow
The minimum (electrical)
input/output level
0.00 to 100.00
0
Oper
MeasuredVal
The current value of the output
demand signal to the hardware
including the effect of the Invert
parameter.
0
1
PV
This is the desired output value,
before the Invert parameter is
applied
0 to 100
or
0 to 1 (OnOff)
Minimum output on/off time.
Auto = 20ms. This is the
fastest allowable update
rate for the output
Always displayed
Off
On
Read only
Oper
PV can be wired from the output of a function block. For example if it is used for control it may be wired from the control
loop output (Ch1 Output).
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.3.2
Logic Output Scaling
If the output is configured for time proportioning control, it can be scaled such that a lower and upper level of PID
demand signal can limit the operation of the output value.
By default, the output will be fully off for 0% power demand, fully on for 100% power demand and equal on/off times at
50% power demand. You can change these limits to suit the process. It is important to note, however, that these limits
are set to safe values for the process. For example, for a heating process it may be required to maintain a minimum level
of temperature. This can be achieved by applying an offset at 0% power demand which will maintain the output on for a
period of time. Care must be taken to ensure that this minimum on period does not cause the process to overheat.
If Range Hi is set to a value <100% the time proportioning output will switch at a rate depending on the value - it will not
switch fully on.
Similarly, if Range Lo is set to a value >0% it will not switch fully off.
PID Demand signal
Disp Hi
eg 100%
Disp Lo
eg 0%
Output state
Range Lo = 0%
Output permanently off

Range Hi = 100%
Output permanently on

Figure 8-1: Time Proportioning Output
8.3.3
Example: To Scale a Proportioning Logic Output
Access level must be configuration.
In this example the output will switch on for 8% of the time when the PID demand wired to ‘PV’ signal is at 0%.
Similarly, it will remain on for 90% of the time when the demand signal is at 100%
HA028581
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Page 75
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.4
Relay Output
If slot 2 and/or 3 is fitted with a RL8 board then 8 channels will be available to be configured and connected to Loop
outputs, alarms or other logic signals.
8.4.1
Relay Parameters
Folder – IO
Sub-folder Mod.9 to .24
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Ident
Channel Identity
Relay
IOType
IO Type
OnOff
On off output
Time Prop
Time proportioning
output
Access Level
Read Only
Conf
Invert
Sets the sense of the logic input or
output
No
Yes
No inversion
Inverted
No
Conf
SbyAct
Action taken by output when
instrument goes into Standby Mode
Off, On
Continue
Switches On/Off
Remains in its last state
Off
Conf
Auto
Oper
The next five parameters are only shown when ‘IO Type’ = ‘Time Prop’ outputs
MinOnTime
Prevents relays from switching too
rapidly
Auto
0.01 to 150.00
seconds
DisplayHigh
The maximum displayable reading
0.00 to 100.00
100.00
Oper
DisplayLow
The minimum displayable reading
0.00 to 100.00
0.00
Oper
RangeHigh
The maximum (electrical)
input/output level
0.00 to 100.00
100
Oper
RangeLow
The minimum (electrical)
input/output level
0.00 to 100.00
0
Oper
MeasuredVal
The current value of the output
demand signal to the hardware
including the effect of the Invert
parameter.
0
1
PV
This is the desired output value,
before the Invert parameter is
applied
0 to 100
or
0 to 1 (OnOff)
Minimum output on/off time.
Auto = 220ms. This is the
fastest allowable update
rate for the output
Always displayed
Page 76
Off
On
Read only
Oper
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.5
Thermocouple Input
A TC4 offers 4 channels and the TC8 board offers 8 channels which may be configured as thermocouple inputs or mV
inputs.
8.5.1
Thermocouple Input Parameters
Folder – IO
Sub-headers: Mod .1 to .32
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Ident
Channel Ident
TCinput
IO Type
IO Type
Thermocouple
mV
Lin Type
Input linearisation
see section 8.5.2
Conf
Units
Display units used for
units conversion
see section 16.1.2
Conf
Resolution
Resolution
XXXXX to X.XXXX
Sets scaling for digital
communications using the
SCADA table
CJC Type
To select the cold
junction compensation
method
Internal
0o C
45oC
50oC
External
Off
See description in section 8.5.3.
for further details
SBrk Type
Sensor break type
Low
Sensor break will be detected
when its impedance is greater
than a ‘low’ value
High
Sensor break will be detected
when its impedance is greater
than a ‘high’ value
SBrk Alarm
Sets the alarm action
when a sensor break
condition is detected
Default
Access Level
Read Only
For direct t/c connection
For mV inputs, usually linear,
scaled to engineering units.
Off
No sensor break
ManLatch
Manual
latching
NonLatch
No
latching
Off
No sensor break alarm
Conf
Conf
Internal
Conf
Conf
see also the alarm
Chapter 9 Alarms
Oper
AlarmAck
Sensor Break alarm
acknowledge
No
Yes
No
Oper
DisplayHigh
The maximum display
value in engineering units
-99999 to 99999
100
Oper
DisplayLow
The minimum display
value in engineering units
-99999 to 99999
0
Oper
RangeHigh
The maximum (electrical)
input mV
RangeLow to 70
70
Oper
RangeLow
The minimum (electrical)
input mV
-70 to RangeHigh
0
Oper
Fallback
Fallback Strategy
See also section 8.5.5.
Downscale
Meas Value = Input range lo 5% of the mV signal received
from the PV input.
Upscale
Meas Value = Input range Hi +
5% of the mV signal received
from the PV input.
Fall Good
Meas Value = Fallback PV
Fall Bad
Meas Value = Fallback PV
Clip Good
Meas Value = Input range Hi/lo
+/- 5%
Clip Bad
Meas Value = Input range Hi/lo
+/- 5%
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
For IO Type mV only
Limits apply to Linear and
SqRoot linearisation.
See 7.3.7
Conf
Page 77
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Folder – IO
Sub-headers: Mod .1 to .32
Name
Parameter Description
Fallback PV
Fallback value
See also section 8.5.5.
Instrument range
Filter Time
Constant
Input filter time.
An input filter provides damping of the input
signal. This may be necessary to prevent the
effects of excessive noise on the PV input.
Off to 500:00 (hhh:mm)
s:ms to hhh:mm
Measured Val
The current electrical value of the PV input
PV
The current value of the PV input after
linearisation
Instrument range
LoPoint
Low Point
LoOffset
Low Offset
HiPoint
High Point
Lower cal point (See 7.5.6)
Offset at lower point
Higher cal point
Offset at Higher point
HiOffset
High Offset
Offset
Used to add a constant offset to the PV
see section 8.5.7
CJC Temp
Reads the temperature of the rear terminals at
the thermocouple connection
R/O
SBrk Value
Sensor break Value
Used for diagnostics only, and displays the
sensor break trip value
R/O
Cal State
Calibration State.
Calibration of the PV
Input is described in
section 23.5
Idle
Conf
Status
PV Status
The current status of the
PV.
0 - OK
1 - Startup
2 - SensorBreak
4 – Out of range
6 - Saturated
8 – Not Calibrated
25 – No Module
SbrkOutput
Sensor Break Output
Off /On
Page 78
Value
Default
Access Level
Conf
1s600ms
Oper
R/O
Instrument range
Normal operation
Initial startup mode
Input in sensor break
PV outside operating limits
Saturated input
Uncalibrated channel
No Module
R/O
0.0
Oper
0.0
Oper
0.0
Oper
0.0
Oper
0.0
Oper
R/O
R/O
HA028581
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.5.2
Linearisation Types and Ranges
Input Type
J
K
L
R
B
N
T
S
PL2
C
Linear
SqRoot
Custom
8.5.3
Thermocouple type J
Thermocouple type K
Thermocouple type L
Thermocouple type R
Thermocouple type B
Thermocouple type N
Thermocouple type T
Thermocouple type S
Thermocouple Platinel II
Custom
mV linear input
Square root
Customised linearisation
tables
Min
Range
-210
-200
-200
-50
0
-200
-250
-50
0
Max
Range
1200
1372
900
1768
1820
1300
400
1768
1369
Units
-70
70
mV
o
C
C
o
C
o
C
o
C
o
C
o
C
o
C
o
C
o
Min
Range
-346
-328
-328
-58
32
-328
-418
-58
32
Max
Range
2192
2501
1652
3214
3308
2372
752
3214
2496
Units
o
F
F
o
F
o
F
o
F
o
F
o
F
o
F
o
F
o
CJC Type
A thermocouple measures the temperature difference between the measuring junction
and the reference junction. The reference junction, therefore, must either be held at a
fixed known temperature or accurate compensation be used for any temperature
variations of the junction.
Measuring
junction
8.5.3.1 Internal Compensation
The controller is provided with a temperature sensing device which senses the
temperature at the point where the thermocouple is joined to the copper wiring of the
instrument and applies a corrective signal.
Reference
junction
Where very high accuracy is needed and to accommodate multi-thermocouple
installations, larger reference units are used which can achieve an accuracy of ±0.1°C or better. These units also allow
the cables to the instrumentation to be run in copper. The reference units are contained basically under three
techniques, Ice-Point, Hot Box and Isothermal.
8.5.3.2 The Ice-Point
There are usually two methods of feeding the EMF from the thermocouple to the measuring instrumentation via the icepoint reference, the bellows type and the temperature sensor type.
The bellows type utilises the precise volumetric increase which occurs when a known quantity of ultra pure water
changes state from liquid to solid. A precision cylinder actuates expansion bellows which control power to a
thermoelectric cooling device. The temperature sensor type uses a metal block of high thermal conductance and mass,
which is thermally insulated from ambient temperatures. The block temperature is lowered to 0°C by a cooling element,
and maintained there by a temperature sensing device.
Special thermometers are obtainable for checking the 0°C reference units and alarm circuits that detect any movement
from the zero position can be fitted.
8.5.3.3 The Hot Box
Thermocouples are calibrated in terms of EMF generated by the measuring junctions relative to the reference junction
at 0°C. Different reference points can produce different characteristics of thermocouples, therefore referencing at
another temperature does present problems. However, the ability of the hot box to work at very high ambient
temperatures, plus a good reliability factor has led to an increase in its usage. The unit can consist of a thermally
insulated solid aluminium block in which the reference junctions are embedded.
The block temperature is controlled by a closed loop system, and a heater is used as a booster when initially switching
on. This booster drops out before the reference temperature, usually between 55°C and 65°C, is reached, but the
stability of the hot box temperature is now important. Measurements cannot be taken until the hot box reaches the
correct temperature.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 79
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.5.3.4 Isothermal Systems
The thermocouple junctions being referenced are contained in a block which is heavily thermally insulated. The
junctions are allowed to follow the mean ambient temperature, which varies slowly. This variation is accurately sensed
by electronic means, and a signal is produced for the associated instrumentation. The high reliability factor of this
method has favoured its use for long term monitoring.
8.5.3.5 CJC Options in Mini8 Controller Series
0 – Internal
CJC measurement at instrument terminals
1 – 0C
CJC based on external junctions kept at 0C (Ice Point)
2 – 45C
CJC based on external junctions kept at 45C (Hot Box)
3 – 50C
CJC based on external junctions kept at 50C (Hot Box)
4 – External
CJC based on independent external measurement
5 – Off
CJC switched off
8.5.4
Sensor Break Value
The controller continuously monitors the impedance of a transducer or sensor connected to any analogue input. This
impedance, expressed as a % of the impedance which causes the sensor break flag to trip, is a parameter called
‘SBrkValue’.
The table below shows the typical impedance which causes sensor break to trip for various types of input and high and
low SBrk Impedance readings. The impedance values are only approximate (±25%) as they are not factory calibrated.
TC4/TC8 Input
Range -77 to
+77mV
8.5.5
SBrk Impedance – High
SBrk Impedance – Low
~ 12KΩ
~ 3KΩ
Fallback
A Fallback strategy may be used to configure the default value for the PV in case of an error condition. The error may be
due an out of range value, a sensor break, lack of calibration or a saturated input.
The Status parameter would indicate the error condition and could be used to diagnose the problem.
Fallback has several modes and may be associated with the Fallback PV parameter
The Fallback PV may be used to configure the value assigned to the PV in case of an error condition. The Fallback
parameter should be configured accordingly.
The fallback parameter may be configured so as to force a Good or Bad status when in operation. This in turn allows the
user to choose to override or allow error conditions to affect the process.
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8.5.6
User Calibration (Two Point)
All ranges of the controller have been calibrated against traceable reference standards. However in a particular
application it may be necessary to adjust the displayed reading to overcome other effects within the process. A two
point calibration is offered allowing offset and slope adjustment. This is most useful where the setpoints used in a
process cover a wide range. The Low and High points should be set on or near the extremities of the range.
Display
Reading
High offset
(e.g. 2.9°)
Factory
calibration
Low offset
(e.g. 1.1°)
Low point
(e.g. 50°)
8.5.7
High point
(e.g. 500°)
Measured
Reading
PV Offset (Single Point)
All ranges of the controller have been calibrated against traceable reference standards. This means that if the input type
is changed it is not necessary to calibrate the controller. There may be occasions, however, when you wish to apply an
offset to the standard calibration to take account of known errors within the process, for example, a known sensor error
or a known error due to the positioning of the sensor. In these instances it is not advisable to change the reference
calibration, but to apply a user defined offset.
A single point offset is most useful where the process setpoint remains at nominally the same value.
PV Offset applies a single offset over the full display range of the controller and can be adjusted in Operator Mode. It
has the effect of moving the curve up a down about a central point as shown in the example below:Display
Reading
Factory
calibration
Fixed offset
(e.g. 2.1°)
Measured
Reading
8.5.7.1 Example: To Apply an Offset:
Connect the input of the controller to the source device which you wish to calibrate to

Set the source to the desired calibration value

The controller will show the current measurement of the value

If the value is correct, the controller is correctly calibrated and no further action is necessary. If you wish to
offset the reading use the Offset parameter where
Corrected value (PV) = input value + Offset.
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8.5.8
Using TC4 or TC8 channel as a mV input
Example – a pressure sensor provides 0 to 33mV for 0 to 200 bar.
1.
Set IO type as mV
2.
Set the Linearisation Type as Linear
3.
Set DisplayHigh to 200 (bar)
4.
Set DisplayLow to 0 (bar)
5.
Set RangeHigh to 33 mV
6.
Set RangeLow to 0 mV
Note maximum input range is ± 70 mV
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8.6
Resistance Thermometer Input
The RT4 module offers 4 resistance inputs which can be linear or PT100/PT1000.
8.6.1
RT Input Parameters
Folder – IO
Sub-headers: Mod .1 to .32
Name
Parameter
Description
Value
Default
Ident
Channel Ident
RTinput
IO Type
IO Type
RTD2
RTD3
RTD4
For 2 wire, 3 wire or 4 wire connections.
ResistanceRange
Resistance Range
Low
Selects a PT100
High
Selects a PT1000
Access
Level
Read Only
Conf
Low
Conf
Lin Type
Linearisation Type
See section
8.6.2
Conf
Units
Display units used for
units conversion
See section
16.1.2
Conf
Resolution
Resolution
XXXXX to
X.XXXX
Sets scaling for digital communications
using the SCADA table
Conf
SBrk Type
Sensor break type
Low
Sensor break will be detected when its
impedance is greater than a ‘low’ value
Conf
High
Sensor break will be detected when its
impedance is greater than a ‘high’
value
Off
No sensor break
SBrk Alarm
Sets the alarm action
when a sensor break
condition is detected
ManLatch
Manual latching
NonLatch
No latching
see also the alarm
Chapter 8 Alarms
Off
No sensor break alarm
AlarmAck
Sensor Break alarm
acknowledge
No
Yes
Fallback
Fallback Strategy
See also section 8.5.5.
Downscale
Meas Value = Input range lo - 5%
Upscale
Meas Value = Input range Hi + 5%
Fall Good
Meas Value = Fallback PV
No
Fall Bad
Meas Value = Fallback PV
Clip Good
Meas Value = Input range Hi/lo +/- 5%
Clip Bad
Meas Value = Input range Hi/lo +/- 5%
Fallback PV
Fallback value
See also section 8.5.5.
Instrument range
Filter Time
Constant
Input filter time.
An input filter provides damping of
the input signal. This may be
necessary to prevent the effects of
excessive noise on the PV input.
Off to 500:00 (hhh:mm)
s:ms to hhh:mm
Measured Val
The current electrical value of the PV
input
PV
The current value of the PV input after
linearisation
Instrument range
LoPoint
Low Point
LoOffset
Low Offset
HiPoint
High Point
Lower cal point (See section 8.5.6)
Offset at lower cal point
Higher cal point
Offset at Higher cal point
HiOffset
High Offset
Offset
Used to add a constant offset to the
PV
see section 8.5.7
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Oper
Oper
Conf
Conf
1.6 seconds
Oper
R/O
Instrument range
R/O
0.0
Oper
0.0
Oper
0.0
Oper
0.0
Oper
0.0
Oper
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Folder – IO
Sub-headers: Mod .1 to .32
Name
Parameter
Description
SBrk Value
Sensor break Value
Used for diagnostics only, and
displays the sensor break trip value
R/O
Cal State
Calibration State.
Calibration of the PV
Input is described in
Chapter 23.5
Idle
Conf
Status
PV Status
The current status of
the PV.
0 - OK
1 - Startup
2 - SensorBreak
4 – Out of range
6 - Saturated
8 – Not Calibrated
25 – No Module
SbrkOutput
Sensor Break Output
8.6.2
Value
Default
Access
Level
Normal operation
Initial startup mode
Input in sensor break
PV outside operating limits
Saturated input
Uncalibrated channel
No Module
R/O
Off /On
R/O
Linearisation Types and Ranges
Input Type
PT100
100 ohm platinum bulb
Min Range
Max Range
Units
Min Range
Max Range
Units
-242
850
o
-328
1562
o
Linear
F
Linear
0
420
ohms
PT1000
1000 ohm platinum bulb
-242
850
o
-328
1562
o
F
Linear
Linear
0
4200
ohms
8.6.3
C
C
Using RT4 as mA input
Wire the input with a 2.49 ohm resistor as shown in section 1.13.
1. Set the Resistance Range to Low.
2. Set the Lin Type to Linear.
The PV is mapped from the input using
User Cal – see section 8.5.6
Approximate Values for 4-20mA input
with 2.49 ohm resistor.
PV
range
4 to 20
0 to
100
LoPoint
35.4
35.4
LoOffset
-31.4
-35.4
HiPoint
169.5
169.5
HiOffset
-149.5
-69.5
For best accuracy the input should be
calibrated against a reference.
Resistor values up to 5 ohms may be
used.
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8.7
Analogue Output
The AO4 offers 4 channels and the AO8 module 8 channels which maybe configured as mA outputs. An AO4 or AO8
may only be fitted in Slot 4.
Folder – IO
Sub-folder: Mod.25 to Mod.32
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Ident
Channel ident
mAout
IO Type
To configure the output
drive signal
mA
milli-amps dc
Conf
Resolution
Display resolution
XXXXX to X.XXXX
Determines scaling for
SCADA communications
Conf
Disp Hi
Display high reading
Disp Lo
Display low reading
-99999 to 99999 decimal points depend on
resolution
Range Hi
Electrical high input level
Range Lo
Electrical low input level
Meas Value
The current output value
R/O
0 to 20
100
Oper
0
Oper
20
Oper
4
Oper
R/O
PV
Oper
Status
8.7.1
Access Level
PV Status
The current status of the PV.
0 - OK
1 - Startup
2 - SensorBreak
4 – Out of range
6 - Saturated
8 – Not Calibrated
25 – No Module
Normal operation
Initial startup mode
Input in sensor break
PV outside operating limits
Saturated input
Uncalibrated channel
No Module
R/O
Example: 4 to 20mA Analogue Output
In this example 0% (=Display Low) to 100% (=Display High) from a Loop PID Output is wired to this output channel PV
input which will give a 4mA (=Range Low) to 20mA (=Range High) control signal.
Here the PID demand is 50% giving a MeasuredVal output of 12mA.
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8.8
Fixed IO
There are two digital inputs, designated D1 and D2.
Folder: IO
Sub-folder: Fixed IO.D1 and .D2
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
Ident
Channel Ident
LogicIn
LogicIn
Read Only
IO Type
IO Type
Input
Input
Read
Only
Invert
Invert
No/Yes – input sense is inverted
No
Conf
Measured Val
Measured Value
On/Off
Value seen at the terminals
Off
Read
Only
PV
Process Variable
On/Off
Value after allowing for Invert
Off
Read Only
There are two fixed relay outputs, designated A and B
Folder: IO
Sub-folder: Fixed IO.A and .B
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
Ident
Channel Ident
Relay
Relay
Read Only
IO Type
IO Type
OnOff
OnOff
Read
Only
Invert
Invert
No/Yes = output sense is inverted.
No
Conf
Measured Val
Measured Value
On/Off
Value seen at the terminals
after allowing for Invert.
Off
Read
Only
PV
Process Variable
On/Off
Requested output before
Invert
Off
Oper
SbyAct
Action taken by output when
instrument goes into Standby Mode
Off, On
Continue
Switches On/Off
Remains in its last state
Off
Conf
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8.9
Current Monitor
The Mini8 controller, with a CT3 card, has the capability of detecting failures of up to 16 heater loads by measuring the
current flowing through them via 3 current transformer inputs. The failures that can be detected are:
SSR Fault
If current is detected flowing through the heater when the controller is requesting it to be off then this indicates that the
SSR has a short circuit fault. If current is not detected when the controller is requesting the heater to be on it indicates
that the SSR has an open circuit fault.
Partial Load Fault (PLF)
If less current is detected flowing through the heater than the PLF threshold, which has been set for that channel, then
this indicates that the heater has a fault; in applications that use multiple heater elements in parallel then it indicates that
one or more of the elements has an open circuit fault.
Over Current Fault (OCF)
If more current is detected flowing through the heater than the OCF threshold then this indicates that the heater has a
fault; in applications that use multiple heater elements in parallel then it indicates that one or more of the elements has
lower than expected resistance value.
It should be noted that if the loop associated with a CT monitored output is inhibited, then that output will be excluded
from the CT measurements and fault detection.
Heater failures are indicated via individual load status parameters and via four status words. In addition, a global alarm
parameter will indicate when a new CT alarm has been detected, which, will also be registered in the alarm log.
8.9.1
Current Measurement
Individual LoadCurrent parameters indicate the current measured for each heater. The Current Monitor function block
utilises a cycling algorithm to measure the current flowing through one heater per measurement interval (default 10s,
user alterable). Compensation within the control loop minimises the disturbance to the PV when current through a load
is being measured.
The interval between successive measurements is dependent upon the average output power required to maintain SP.
The recommended absolute minimum interval can be calculated as follows:
Minimum interval (s) > 0.25 * (100/average output power to maintain SP).
For example, if average output power to maintain SP is 10%, using the above rule, the recommended minimum interval
is 2.5 seconds. The interval may need to be adjusted depending upon the response of the heaters being used.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.9.2
Single Phase Configurations
8.9.2.1 Single SSR triggering
With this configuration, failures of individual heater loads can be detected. For example, if the current detected flowing
through Heater 3 is less than its PLF threshold then this will be indicated as Load3PLF.
Example1 – Using one CT input
L
N
CT1
MINI8
controller
H1
OP1
H2
OP2
H3
OP3
H4
OP4
H5
OP5
All time proportioning outputs assigned
to a single CT input
H6
OP6
Note: Maximum of 6 Heaters can be connected to one CT input
Example2 – Using three CT inputs
L
CT1
CT2
CT3
MINI8
controller
OP1
H1
H2
OP2
H3
OP3
H4
OP4
OP5
This configuration also
identifies individual heater
failures
H5
H6
OP6
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8.9.2.2 Multiple SSR triggering
With this configuration, failure of a set of heater loads can be detected. For example, if the current detected flowing
through Heater Set 1 is less than Load1’s PLF threshold then this will be indicated as Load1PLF. Further investigation will
then be required to determine which heater within Set 1 has failed.
L
N
CT1
H1
H2
OP1
Heater Set 1
H3
MINI8
controller
H4
H5
OP2
Heater Set 2
H6
8.9.2.3 Split Time Proportioning Outputs
This is where a single power demand is split and applied to two time proportioning outputs, that have been scaled,
allowing the loads to switch on incrementally as the output power increases. For example, Heater1 will deliver any
demand from 0-50%, and Heater2 will deliver any demand from 50-100% (with Heater1 fully on).
CurrentMonitor
L
CT1
Mod.17
50
H1
PV
Loop
0
Pre-Scaling
0
100
Ch1Out
Mod.18
100
MINI8
controller
PV
50
H2
Pre-Scaling
0
100
As the Mini8 controller has the capability of detecting faults with up to 16 heater loads it can handle this type of
application even if all 8 loops have split time proportioning outputs.
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8.9.3
Three Phase Configuration
Configuration for Three Phase supply applications is similar to that for Single phase using three CT inputs.
Ph1
Ph2
Ph3
CT1
All currents passed
through an individual CT
must come from the
same phase
CT2
CT3
MINI8
controller
H1
OP1
H2
OP2
H3
OP3
OP4
OP5
N/Ph
Star with neutral or delta
connection is possible
H4
H5
N/Ph
OP6
H6
N/Ph
Note: Maximum of 6 Heaters can be connected to one CT input
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.9.4
Parameter Configuration
If Current Monitor is enabled in the folder Instrument/Options/Current Monitor then the current monitor configuration
folder appears as a subfolder in IO.
Folder: IO
Sub-folder: CurrentMonitor/Config
Name
Parameter
Description
Value
Commission
Commission CT
No
Auto
Manual
Accept
Abort
CommissionStatus
Commission
Status
Not commissioned
Not commissioned
Commissioning
Commissioning in progress
NoDO8orRL8cards
There are no DO8/RL8 cards
installed in the instrument.
NoloopTPouts
The digital outputs are either not
configured as time proportioning
or are not wired from loop heater
channels.
SSRfault
Either a SSR short circuit or open
circuit fault is present.
MaxLoadsCT1/2/3
More than 6 heaters have been
connected to CT input 1or 2 or 3.
NotAccepted
Commissioning failed
Passed
Successfully auto commissioned
ManuallyConfigured
Configured manually
See section 8.9.5
Default
Access Level
No
Oper
0
Read
Only
Interval
Measurement
Interval
1s to 1m
10s
Oper
Inhibit
Inhibit
No – current is measured
Yes –current measurement is inhibited
No
Oper
MaxLeakPh1
Max Leakage
Current Phase 1
0.25 to 1 amp
0.25
Oper
MaxLeakPh2
Max Leakage
Current Phase 2
0.25 to 1 amp
0.25
Oper
MaxLeakPh3
Max Leakage
Current Phase 3
0.25 to 1 amp
0.25
Oper
CT1Range*
CT input 1
range
10 to 1000 amps (Ratio to 50mA)
10
Oper
CT2Range*
CT input 2
range
10 to 1000 amps (Ratio to 50mA)
10
Oper
CT3Range*
CT input 3
range
10 to 1000 amps (Ratio to 50mA)
10
Oper
CalibrateCT1
Calibrate CT1
Idle
See section 23.5
0mA
-70mA
LoadFactorCal
SaveUserCal
Idle
Oper
CalibrateCT2
Calibrate CT2
As CT1
Idle
Oper
CalibrateCT3
Calibrate CT3
As CT1
Idle
Oper

The current rating of the CT used for each of the CT input channels should cover only the single largest
load current proposed for its group of heaters. e.g. if CT1 has heaters of 15A, 15A & 25A it would need a
CT capable of at least 25A.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.9.5
Commissioning
8.9.5.1 Auto Commission
Auto commissioning of the Current Monitor is a feature that automatically detects which time proportioning outputs
drive individual heaters (or heater sets), detects which CT input individual heaters are associated with and determines
the Partial Load and Over Current thresholds using a 1:8 ratio. If auto commissioning fails, a status parameter indicates
the reason why.
Note: In order for the auto commissioning to operate successfully the process must be enabled for full operation of the
heating circuit with the digital outputs configured as Time Proportioning and ‘soft’ wired to the appropriate loop
heater channels. During auto commissioning digital outputs will switch on and off.
How to Auto Commission
1.
Put instrument into Operator Mode.
2.
Set Commission to Auto and CommissionStatus will display ‘Commissioning’.
3.
If successful, CommissionStatus will display Passed and configured load parameters will become
available. If unsuccessful, CommissionStatus displays the offending fault.
If unsuccessful, CommissionStatus displays the offending fault:
Page 92
NoDO8orRL8Cards
Indicates that there are no DO8 or RL8 cards installed in the instrument.
NoLoopTPOuts
Indicates that the digital outputs are either not configured as time
proportioning or are not wired from loop heater channels.
SSRFault
Indicates that either a SSR short circuit or open circuit fault is present.
MaxLoadsCT1
Indicates that more than 6 heaters have been connected to CT input 1
(or 2,3)
(or 2,3)
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.9.5.2 Manual Commission
Manual Commissioning is also available and is intended for those users who want to commission the Current Monitor
off-line or do not want to accept auto commissioned settings.
How to Manual Commission
1.
Set Commission to Manual. CommissionStatus will display Commissioning and Load1 configuration
parameters will become available
2.
Set Load1DrivenBy to the IO Module that is connected to the heater load.
3.
Set Load1CTInput to the CT input number that is connected to the heater load.
4.
Set Load1PLFthreshold and Load1OCFthreshold to appropriate values for the heater load.
5.
Repeat for other loads.
6.
To use the commissioned settings set Commission to ‘Accept’. CommissionStatus will display
ManuallyConfigured.
7.
To stop manual commissioning set Commission to ‘Abort’. CommissionStatus will display
NotCommissioned.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
8.9.6
Calibration
A Mini8 controller supplied from factory with the CT3 card already installed the CT inputs will have been factory
calibrated. If the CT3 card is installed at a later date then default calibration values are automatically loaded into the
instrument. However, three calibration parameters, one for each CT input, are provided to allow the inputs to be
calibrated in the field.
Note: DC Current Source, capable of outputting a –70mA signal, is required to calibrate the inputs.
The 3 CT inputs are calibrated individually.
How to Calibrate
1.
Apply the stimulus (0mA or –70mA) from the DC current source to the CT input to be calibrated.
2.
Set CalibrateCT1, to reflect the stimulus being applied to the input.
3.
CalibrateCT1 displays ‘Confirm’. Select ‘Go’ to proceed with the calibration process.
4.
After selecting Go, CalibrateCT1 displays ‘Calibrating’.
5.
If calibration was successful, CalibrateCT1 displays ‘Passed’. Select ‘Accept’ to keep the calibration
values.
6.
If calibration was unsuccessful, CalibrateCT1 displays ‘Failed’. Select ‘Abort’ to reject the calibration.
7.
Select ‘SaveUserCal’ to save the calibration values into non-volatile memory.
8.
Select ‘LoadFactCal’ to restore calibration values to the factory calibrated or default settings.
9.
Note: It is possible to stop the calibration process at anytime by selecting ‘Abort’.
Follow the same procedure for CT2 and CT3.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
9. Chapter 9 Alarms
Alarms are used to alert the system when a pre-set level has been exceeded or a particular condition has changed state.
As the Mini8 controller has no display to show alarms the alarm flags are all available over communications in status
words See Alarm Summary (Section 9.7). They may also be wired directly or via logic to an output such as a relay.
Alarms can be divided into two main types. These are:Analogue alarms - operate by monitoring an analogue variable such as the process variable and comparing it with a set
threshold.
Digital alarms – operate when the state of a boolean variable changes, for example, sensor break.
Number of Alarms - up to 32 analogue and 32 digital alarms may be configured.
9.1
Further Alarm Definitions
Hysteresis
is the difference between the point at which the alarm switches ‘ON’ and the point at
which it switches ‘OFF’. It is used to provide a definite indication of the alarm condition
and to prevent alarm relay chatter.
Latch
used to hold the alarm condition once an alarm has been detected. It may be
configured as:None
Non
latching
A non latching alarm will reset itself when the alarm condition is
removed
Auto
Automatic
An auto latching alarm requires acknowledgement before it is
reset. The acknowledgement can occur BEFORE the condition
causing the alarm is removed.
Manual
Manual
The alarm continues to be active until both the alarm condition
is removed AND the alarm is acknowledged. The
acknowledgement can only occur AFTER the condition causing
the alarm is removed.
Event
Event
Alarm output will activate.
Block
The alarm may be masked during start up. Blocking prevents the alarm from being
activated until the process has first achieved a safe state. It is used, for example, to
ignore start up conditions which are not representative of running conditions. A
blocking alarm is re-initiated after a setpoint change.
Delay
A short time can be set for each alarm which prevents the output from going into the
alarm state. The alarm is still detected as soon as it occurs, but if it cancels before the
end of the delay period then no output is triggered. The timer for the delay is then
reset. It is also reset if an alarm is changed from being inhibited to uninhibited.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
9.2
Analogue Alarms
Analogue alarms operate on variables such as PV, output levels, etc. They can be soft wired to these variables to suit the
process.
9.2.1
Analogue Alarm Types
Absolute High - an alarm occurs when the PV exceeds a set high threshold.
Absolute Low - an alarm occurs when the PV exceeds a set low threshold.
Deviation High - an alarm occurs when the PV is higher than the setpoint by a set threshold
Deviation Low - an alarm occurs when the PV is lower than the setpoint by a set threshold
Deviation Band - an alarm occurs when the PV is higher or lower than the setpoint by a set threshold
These are shown graphically below for changes in PV plotted against time. (Hysteresis set to zero)
Alarm Type
PV
Abs High
Process Variable (PV)
Dev High
Dev
Bnd
Setpoint (SP)
Dev Low
Abs Low
Time
Output State
Abs Low
Dev Low
On
On
Dev High
Dev Bnd
Abs High
Page 96
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
9.3
Digital Alarms
Digital alarms operate on Boolean variables. They can be soft wired to any suitable Boolean parameter such as digital
inputs or outputs.
9.3.1
9.4
Digital Alarm Types
Pos Edge
The alarm will trigger when the input changes from a low to high condition
Neg
Edge
The alarm will trigger when the input changes from a high to low condition
Edge
The alarm will trigger on any change of state of the input signal
High
The alarm will trigger when the input signal is high
Low
The alarm will trigger when the input signal is low
Alarm Outputs
Alarms can operate a specific output (usually a relay). Any individual alarm can operate an individual output or any
combination of alarms can operate an individual output. They are wired as required in configuration level.
Each source may be
chosen from:Analogue Alarms 1 to 32
Digital Alarms 1 to 32
Any alarms
New alarm/ New CT
Alarm
Loop break alarms
9.4.1
No
OR
Invert
Output
Yes
How Alarms are Indicated
Alarm states are all embedded in 16 bit status words. See Alarm Summary in Section 9.7.
9.4.2
To Acknowledge an Alarm
Set the appropriate alarm acknowledge flag to acknowledge that particular alarm. Alternatively the GlobalAck in the
AlmSummary folder can be used to acknowledge ALL alarms that require acknowledging in the instrument.
The action, which now takes place, will depend on the type of latching, which has been configured.
9.4.2.1 Non Latched Alarms
If the alarm condition is present when the alarm is acknowledged, the alarm output will be continuously active. This
state will continue for as long as the alarm condition remains. When the alarm condition clears the output will go off.
If the alarm condition clears before it is acknowledged the alarm output goes off as soon as the condition disappears.
9.4.2.2 Automatic Latched Alarms
The alarm continues to be active until both the alarm condition is removed AND the alarm is acknowledged. The
acknowledgement can occur BEFORE the condition causing the alarm is removed.
9.4.2.3 Manual Latched Alarms
The alarm continues to be active until both the alarm condition is removed AND the alarm is acknowledged. The
acknowledgement can only occur AFTER the condition causing the alarm is removed.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
9.5
Alarm Parameters
Four groups of eight analogue alarms are available. The following table shows the parameters to set up and configure
alarms.
Folder: Alarm
Sub-folders: 1 to 32
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Type
Selects the type of alarm
None
Alarm not configured
Abs Hi
Full Scale High
Abs Lo
Full Scale Low
Dev Hi
Deviation High
Dev Lo
Deviation Low
Dv Bnd
Deviation band
Access Level
Conf
In
This is the parameter that will be monitored and
compared against the threshold value to see if an
alarm condition has occurred
Instrument range
Oper
Reference
The reference value is used in deviation alarms and
the threshold is measured from this reference and
not from its absolute value.
Instrument range
Oper
Threshold
The threshold is the value that the input is
compared against to determine if an alarm has
occurred.
Instrument range
Oper
Out
The output indicates whether the alarm is on or off
depending on:
the alarm condition, latching and acknowledge,
inhibiting and blocking.
Off
Alarm output
deactivated
R/O
On
Alarm output activated
Inhibit
Inhibit is an input to the Alarm function. It allows
the alarm to be switched OFF. Typically the Inhibit
is connected to a digital input or event so that
during a phase of the process alarms do not
activate. For Example, if the door to a furnace is
opened the alarms may be inhibited until the door
is closed again.
No
Yes
Alarm not inhibited
Inhibit function active
Hysteresis
Hysteresis is used to prevent signal noise from
causing the Alarm output to oscillate. Alarm
outputs become active as soon as the PV exceeds
the Alarm Setpoint. They return to inactive after
the PV has returned to the safe region by more
than the hysteresis value. Typically the Alarm
hysteresis is set to a value that is greater than the
oscillations seen on the instrument display
Instrument range
Oper
Latch
Determine the type of latching the alarm will use, if
any. Auto latching allows acknowledgement while
the alarm condition is still active, whereas manual
latching needs the condition to revert back to safe
before the alarm can be acknowledged.
See also the description at the beginning of this
chapter
None
No latching is used
Oper
Auto
Automatic
Manual
Manual
Event
Event
Ack
Used in conjunction with the latching parameter. It
is set when the user responds to an alarm.
No
Yes
Not acknowledged
Acknowledged
Oper
Block
Alarm Blocking is used to prevent alarms from
activating during start-up. In some applications,
the measurement at start-up is in an alarm
condition until the system has come under control.
Blocking causes the alarms to be ignored until the
system is under control (in the safe state), after this
any deviations trigger the alarm
No
Yes
No blocking
Blocking
Oper
Delay
This is a small delay between sensing the alarm
condition and displaying it. If in the time between
the two, the alarm goes safe, then no alarm is
shown and the delay timer is reset. It can be used
on systems that are prone to noise.
0:00.0 to 500
mm:ss.s
hh:mm:ss
hhh:mm
Page 98
Oper
0:00.0
Oper
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Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
9.5.1
Example: To Configure Alarm 1
Change Access level to configuration.
In this example the high alarm will be detected when the measured value exceeds 100.00.
The current measured value is 27.79 as measured by the ‘Input’ parameter. This parameter will normally be wired to an
internal source such as a thermocouple input. In this example the alarm will set when the measured value exceeds the
threshold 100.0 and will clear when the input decreases 0.50 units below the threshold level (i.e. at 99.5 units).
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
9.6
Digital Alarm Parameters
Four groups of eight digital alarms are available. The following table shows the parameters to set up and configure
alarms.
Folder: DigAlarm
Sub-folders: 1 to 32
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Type
Selects the type of alarm
None
Alarm not configured
PosEdge
On rising edge
NegEdge
On falling edge
Edge
On change
High
High (1)
Low
Low (0)
Access Level
Conf
In
This is the parameter that will be monitored and
checked according to the AlarmType to see if an
alarm condition has occurred
0 to 1
Oper
Out
The output indicates whether the alarm is on or off
depending on:
the alarm condition, latching and acknowledge,
inhibiting and blocking.
Off
Alarm output
deactivated
On
Alarm output
activated
Inhibit
Inhibit is an input to the Alarm function. It allows
the alarm to be switched OFF. Typically the Inhibit
is connected to a digital input or event so that
during a phase of the process alarms do not
activate. For Example, if the door to a furnace is
opened the alarms may be inhibited until the door
is closed again.
No
Yes
Alarm not inhibited
Inhibit function active
Oper
Latch
Determine the type of latching the alarm will use, if
any. Auto latching allows acknowledgement while
the alarm condition is still active, whereas manual
latching needs the condition to revert back to safe
before the alarm can be acknowledged.
See also the description at the beginning of this
chapter
Oper
None
No latching is used
Auto
Automatic
Manual
Manual
Event
Event
R/O
Ack
Used in conjunction with the latching parameter. It
is set when the user responds to an alarm.
No
Yes
Not acknowledged
Acknowledged
Oper
Block
Alarm Blocking is used to prevent alarms from
activating during start-up. In some applications,
the measurement at start-up is in an alarm
condition until the system has come under control.
Blocking causes the alarms to be ignored until the
system is under control (in the safe state), after this
any deviations trigger the alarm
No
Yes
No blocking
Blocking
Oper
Delay
This is a small delay between sensing the alarm
condition and displaying it. If in the time between
the two, the alarm goes safe, then no alarm is
shown and the delay timer is reset. It can be used
on systems that are prone to noise.
0:00.0 to 500
mm:ss.s
hh:mm:ss
hhh:mm
9.6.1
0:00.0
Oper
Example: To Configure DigAlarm 1
Change Access level to configuration.
In this example the digital alarm will come on if Timer 1 expires.
Timer.1.Out is wired to the alarm input. The DigAlarm.1.Out will turn on if the timer expires.
Page 100
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
9.7
Alarm Summary
This is a summary of all the alarms in the Mini8 controller. It provides global alarm and acknowledge flags as well as 16
bit status words which can be read over communications by the supervisory system.
Folder: AlmSummary
Sub-folders: General
Name
Parameter Description
Value
NewAlarm
A new alarm has occurred since the last
reset (excludes CT alarms)
Off/On
RstNewAlarm
Resets the NewAlarm flag
Yes / No
NewCTAlarm
A new Current alarm has occurred
since the last reset
Off/On
RstNewCTAlarm
Resets the NewCTAlarm flag
Yes / No
AnyAlarm
Any new alarm since the last reset
Off/On
GlobalAck
Acknowledges every alarm in the Mini8
controller requiring acknowledgement.
Also resets NewAlarm and
NewCTAlarm flags.
No
Yes
Not acknowledged
Acknowledged
Oper
AnAlarmStatus1
16 bit word for analogue alarms 1 to 8
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
Bit 8
Bit 9
Bit 10
Bit 11
Bit 12
Bit 13
Bit 14
Bit 15
Alarm 1 active
Alarm 1 not ack’d
Alarm 2 active
Alarm 2 not ack’d
Alarm 3 active
Alarm 3 not ack’d
Alarm 4 active
Alarm 4 not ack’d
Alarm 5 active
Alarm 5 not ack’d
Alarm 6 active
Alarm 6 not ack’d
Alarm 7 active
Alarm 7 not ack’d
Alarm 8 active
Alarm 8 not ack’d
R/O
AnAlarmStatus2
16 bit word for analogue alarms 9 to
16
Same format as above
R/O
AnAlarmStatus3
16 bit word for analogue alarms 17 to
24
Same format as above
R/O
AnAlarmStatus4
16 bit word for analogue alarms 25 to
32
Same format as above
R/O
DigAlarmStatus1
16 bit word for digital alarms 1 to 8
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
Bit 8
Bit 9
Bit 10
Bit 11
Bit 12
Bit 13
Bit 14
Bit 15
R/O
DigAlarmStatus2
16 bit word for digital alarms 9 to 16
Same format as above
DigAlarmStatus3
16 bit word for digital alarms 17 to 24
Same format as above
R/O
DigAlarmStatus4
16 bit word for digital alarms 25 to 32
Same format as above
R/O
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Default
Access Level
R/O
No
Oper
R/O
No
Oper
R/O
Alarm 1 active
Alarm 1 not ack’d
Alarm 2 active
Alarm 2 not ack’d
Alarm 3 active
Alarm 3 not ack’d
Alarm 4 active
Alarm 4 not ack’d
Alarm 5 active
Alarm 5 not ack’d
Alarm 6 active
Alarm 6 not ack’d
Alarm 7 active
Alarm 7 not ack’d
Alarm 8 active
Alarm 8 not ack’d
R/O
Page 101
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Folder: AlmSummary
Sub-folders: General
Name
Parameter Description
Value
SBrkAlarmStatus1
16 bit word for IO channels Mod.1 to 8
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
Bit 8
Bit 9
Bit 10
Bit 11
Bit 12
Bit 13
Bit 14
Bit 15
SbrkAlarmStatus2
16 bit word for IO channels Mod.9 to
16
Same format as above
R/O
SbrkAlarmStatus3
16 bit word for IO channels Mod.17 to
24
Same format as above
R/O
SbrkAlarmStatus4
16 bit word for IO channels Mod.25 to
32
Same format as above
R/O
CTAlarmStatus1
16 bit word for CT alarms 1 to 5
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
Bit 8
Bit 9
Bit 10
Bit 11
Bit 12
Bit 13
Bit 14
Bit 15
Load1 SSR fail
Load1 PLF
Load1 OCF
Load2 SSR fail
Load2 PLF
Load2 OCF
Load3 SSR fail
Load3 PLF
Load3 OCF
Load4 SSR fail
Load4 PLF
Load4 OCF
Load5 SSR fail
Load5 PLF
Load5 OCF
-
R/O
CTAlarmStatus2
16 bit word for CT alarms 6 to 10
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
Bit 8
Bit 9
Bit 10
Bit 11
Bit 12
Bit 13
Bit 14
Bit 15
Load6 SSR fail
Load6 PLF
Load6 OCF
Load7 SSR fail
Load7 PLF
Load7 OCF
Load8 SSR fail
Load8 PLF
Load8 OCF
Load9 SSR fail
Load9 PLF
Load9 OCF
Load10 SSR fail
Load10 PLF
Load10 OCF
-
R/O
CTAlarmStatus3
16 bit word for CT alarms 11 to 15
Same format as CTAlarmStatus1
R/O
CTAlarmStatus4
16 bit word for CT alarm 16
Same format as CTAlarmStatus1
R/O
Page 102
Default
Mod.1 fault
Alarm 1 not ack’d
Mod.2 fault
Alarm 2 not ack’d
Mod.3 fault
Alarm 3 not ack’d
Mod.4 fault
Alarm 4 not ack’d
Mod.5 fault
Alarm 5 not ack’d
Mod.6 fault
Alarm 6 not ack’d
Mod.7 fault
Alarm 7 not ack’d
Mod.8 fault
Alarm 8 not ack’d
Access Level
R/O
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
9.8
Alarm Log
A list of the last 32 alarms to have occurred is maintained in an Alarm Log.
Folder: AlmSummary
Sub-folder: AlmLog
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
ClearLog
Clear Alarm Log
Yes/No
No
Oper
Entry1Ident
Most recent alarm activation
All analogue alarms
All digital alarms
All sensor break alarms
All current alarms
NoEntry
R/O
Entry1Day
The day the first entry activated
NoEntry,
Monday/Tuesday…Sunday.
NoEntry
R/O
Entry1Time
The time the first entry activated
hh:mm:ss
0
R/O
Entry2Ident
2nd most recent alarm activation
All analogue alarms
All digital alarms
All sensor break alarms
All current alarms
NoEntry
R/O
Entry2Day
The day the second entry activated
NoEntry,
Monday/Tuesday…Sunday.
NoEntry
R/O
Entry2Time
The time the second entry activated
hh:mm:ss
0
R/O
Entry32Ident
32nd most recent alarm activation
All analogue alarms
All digital alarms
All sensor break alarms
All current alarms
NoEntry
R/O
Entry32Day
The day the 32nd entry activated
NoEntry,
Monday/Tuesday…Sunday.
NoEntry
R/O
Entry32Time
The time the 32nd entry activated
hh:mm:ss
0
R/O
…etc
Note that EntryDay and EntryTime parameters require the Real Time Clock to be set up (Section 12.4) to record
meaningful values.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
10.
Chapter 10 BCD Input
The Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) input function block uses a number of digital inputs and combines them to make a
numeric value. A very common use for this feature is to select a setpoint program number from panel mounted BCD
decade switches.
The block uses 4 bits to generate a single digit.
Two groups of four bits are used to generate a two digit value (0 to 99)
The block outputs four results
1.
Units Value: The BCD value taken from the first four bits (range 0 – 9)
2.
Tens Value: The BCD value taken from the second four bits (range 0 – 9)
3.
BCD Value: The combined BCD value taken from all 8 bits (range 0 – 99)
4.
Decimal Value: The decimal numeric equivalent of Hexadecimal bits (range 0 – 255)
The following table shows how the input bits combine to make the output values.
Input 1
Input 2
Units value ( 0 – 9)
Input 3
BCD value (0 – 99)
Input 4
Decimal value (0 –
255)
Input 5
Input 6
Tens value ( 0 – 9)
Input 7
Input 8
Since the inputs cannot all be guaranteed to change simultaneously, the output will only update after all the inputs have
been stable for two samples.
10.1
BCD Parameters
Folder – BCDInput
Sub-Folders: 1 and 2
Name
Parameter Description
Value
In 1
Digital Input 1
On or Off
In 2
Digital Input 2
On or Off
In 3
Digital Input 3
In 4
In 5
Default
Access Level
Off
Oper
Off
Oper
On or Off
Off
Oper
Digital Input 4
On or Off
Off
Oper
Digital Input 5
On or Off
Off
Oper
In 6
Digital Input 6
On or Off
Off
Oper
In 7
Digital Input 7
On or Off
Off
Oper
Alterable from the operator
interface if not wired
In 8
Digital Input 8
On or Off
Dec Value
Decimal value of the inputs
0 – 255
See examples below
BCD Value
Reads the value (in BCD) of
the switch as it appears on
the digital inputs
0 – 99
See examples below
Units
Units value of the first switch
0–9
See examples below
R/O
Tens
Units value of the second
switch
0–9
See examples below
R/O
In 1
Page 104
In 2
In 3
In 4
In 5
Off
In 6
In 7
In 8
Oper
R/O
Dec
BCD
Units
Tens
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
15
9
9
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
240
90
0
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
255
99
9
9
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
10.1.1
Example: To wire a BCD Input
The BCD digital input parameters may be wired to digital input terminals of the controller. A DI8 module may be used
and there are also two standard digital input terminals in FixedIO, D1 and D2.
This example shows a BCD switch selecting one of eight values, In1 to In8 on the Mux8.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 105
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.
Chapter 11 Digital Communications
Digital Communications (or ‘comms’ for short) allows the Mini8 controller to be part of a system by communicating with
a PC or a programmable logic controller (PLC).
The Mini8 controller also has a configuration port for ‘cloning’ or saving/loading instrument configurations for future
expansion of the plant or to allow you to recover a system after a fault.
11.1
Configuration Port (CC)
The configuration port is on an RJ11 socket, just to the right of the power supply connections. This will normally be
connected to a personal computer running iTools. When connecting to iTools the instrument on this port will be found
at address 255. iTools will also optimise the baud rate to suit the conditions.
Eurotherm supply a standard cable to connect a serial COM port on a computer to the RJ11 socket, part no.
SubMini8/cable/config.
This port conforms to MODBUS RTU  protocol a full description of which can be found on www.modbus.org.
Pin connections for the RJ11 connector are shown in section 1.4.4.
This port can be used as a ‘permanent’ connection but it is limited to one instrument, it is a RS232 point to point
connection.
The baud rate of the configuration port defaults to 19k2. Ensure that the comms port in the pc is set to the correct rate.
Configuration is also possible through the Field Communications port but ONLY if that port is Modbus or ModbusTCP.
In that situation the Mini8 controllers can be multi-dropped to iTools.
11.1.1
Configuration Communications Parameters
Folder - Comms
Sub-folders: CC (Config Comms)
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Ident
Comms module identity
Protocol
Digital communications
protocol
Communications baud
rate
Modbus
Non isoltaed Modbus module
non-iso
Modbus. The CC channel only supports
Modbus slave protocol.
4800
9600
19k2 (19200)
None
No parity
Even
Even parity
Odd
Odd parity
1 to 254
No
No delay
Fixed delay. This inserts a
Yes
delay between Rx and Tx to
ensure that the drivers used
by intelligent RS232/RS485
converters have sufficient
time to switch over.
Off
If enabled, safe mode will
activate at power up and
On
when the comms watchdog is
latched.
While in safe mode, all loops
will be set to manual,
allpowers willo be set to
SafeModePower value and all
setpoints will be set to
SafeModeSP value
Baud
Parity
Communications parity
Address
Wait
Instrument address
Rx/Tx wait states
SafeMod
eEnable
Safe mode enable
Page 106
Default
Access
Level
R/O
Modbus
R/O
19200
Conf
None
Conf
1
No
Oper
Conf
Off
Conf
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.2
Field Communications Port (FC)
The Min8 controller has a number of communication options. These have to be ordered from the factory as part of the
instrument build. A change of protocol is not usually possible in the field. The physical port and the connections will
vary depending on the field communications protocol. These are shown in the wiring section of the manual section 1.4.
Mini8 controller version 1.xx offers Modbus and DeviceNet, Version 2.xx adds CANopen, Profibus, EtherNet ModbusTCP, EtherNet/IP and EtherCAT. These protocols are described in the following sections.
Folder - Comms
Sub-folders: FC (Config Comms)
Name
Parameter
Description
Value
Ident
Identification of
the module fitted.
(The most used
are listed)
None
Ethernet
No module detected
EthernetIP
Devicenet
Profibus RJ45
Ethernet IP module
DeviceNet module
Profibus Dtype
Profibus Comms module with a
9 way D-type connector
Modbus non iso
Modbus
isolated
Non isolated Modbus module
Protocol
Digital
communications
protocol
Default
Access
Level
Oper
Ethernet comms using the
Modbus TCP protocol.
Profibus Comms module with
an RJ45 connector
Modbus module with electrical
isolation.
Supports both Modbus and Bisynch protocols
DeviceNet Enh
Enhanced DeviceNet module
with M12 connector,
EtherCAT
None
Modbus
EtherIP
Profibus
DeviceNet
Ethernet
EtherCAT
EtherCAT module
R/O
Parameters between Protocol and SafeModeEnable depend on the module fitted.
SafeMode
Enable
Safe mode
enable
SafeMode
Power
SafeMode
SP
Safe mode power
11.2.1
Safe mode
setpoint
Off
On
If enabled, safe mode will activate at
power up and when the comms
watchdog is latched.
While in safe mode, all loops will be set
to manual, all powers will be set to
SafeModePower value and all setpoints
will be set to SafeModeSP value.
When in safe-mode, the power output
level of all loops will be set to this value.
Off
Conf
Default = 0
While in safe-mode, the Setpoint of all
loops will be set to this value. It will be
set immediately with no ramp or servo
action.
Communications Identity
The instrument recognizes the type of communication board fitted. The identity ‘Ident’ is displayed to show that the
instrument is built as required.
HA028581
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Page 107
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.3
Modbus
This port conforms to MODBUS RTU  protocol a full description of which can be found on www.modbus.org.
11.3.1
Modbus Connections
This uses two parallel RJ45 connectors for use with screened Cat5e patch cables. The connection is usually 2 wire but 4
wire is also available. This is selected by the top switch of the address switches below the RJ45 ports – OFF (to the left) 2
wire, ON (to the right) 4 wire.
RJ45 pin connections are shown in section 1.5
11.3.2
Modbus Address Switch
On a network of instruments an address is used to specify a particular instrument. Each instrument on a network MUST
have a unique address. Address 255 is reserved for configuration using the configuration port or the configuration clip
11.3.3
Sw
OFF
ON
8
3 wire
4 wire
7
NO Parity
Parity
6
Even
Odd
5
-
Address 16
4
-
Address 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON
The switch is situated at the bottom of the Comms module. The switch gives addresses from 1 to 31. If Address 0 is set
the Mini8 controller will then take the address and parity settings entered in the configuration of the instrument, see
section 11.4.2. This allows for addresses above 31.
3
-
Address 4
OFF ↔ ON
2
-
Address 2
1
-
Address 1

Example shows 4 wire
and address 1
Baud Rate
The baud rate of a communications network specifies the speed that data is transferred between instrument and master.
A baud rate of 9600 equates to 9600 Bits per second. Since a single character requires 8 bits of data plus start, stop,
and optional parity, up to 11 bits per byte may be transmitted. 9600 baud equates approximately to 1000 Bytes per
second. 4800 baud is half the speed – approx. 500 Bytes per second.
In calculating the speed of communications in your system it is often the Latency between a message being sent and a
reply being started that dominates the speed of the network.
For example, if a message consists of 10 characters (10msec at 9600 Baud) and the reply consists of 10 characters, then
the transmission time would be 20 msec. However, if the Latency is 20msec, then the transmission time has become
40msec.
Baud rate is set in the parameter list see section 11.4.2.
11.3.4
Parity
Parity is a method of ensuring that the data transferred between devices has not been corrupted.
Parity is the lowest form of integrity in the message. It ensures that a single byte contains either an even or an odd
number of ones or zero in the data.
In industrial protocols, there are usually layers of checking to ensure that the first byte transmitted is good. Modbus
applies a CRC (Cyclic Redundancy Check) to the data to ensure that the package is correct.
Parity is set in the parameter list see section 11.4.2.
11.3.5
RX/TX Delay Time
In some systems it is necessary to introduce a delay between the instrument receiving a message and its reply. This is
sometimes caused by communications converter boxes which require a period of silence on the transmission to switch
over the direction of their drivers.
Page 108
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.4
Modbus Broadcast Master Communications
Broadcast master communications allow the Mini8 controllers to send a single value to any slave instruments using a
Modbus broadcast using function code 6 (Write single value). This allows the Mini8 controller to link through digital
communications with other products without the need for a supervisory PC to create a small system solution.
Example applications include multi-zone profiling applications or cascade control using a second controller. The facility
provides a simple and precise alternative to analogue retransmission.
!
Warning
When using broadcast master communications, be aware that updated values are sent many times a second.
Before using this facility, check that the instrument to which you wish to send values can accept continuous writes.
Note that in common with many third party lower cost units, the Eurotherm 2200 series and the 3200 series prior
to version V1.10 do not accept continuous writes to the temperature setpoint. Damage to the internal nonvolatile memory could result from the use of this function. If in any doubt, contact the manufacturer of the device
in question for advice.
When using the 3200 series fitted software version 1.10 and greater, use the Remote Setpoint variable at Modbus
address 26 if you need to write to a temperature setpoint. This has no write restrictions and may also have a local
trim value applied. There is no restriction on writing to the 2400, 3500 or Mini8 controller series.
11.4.1
Mini8 Controller Broadcast Master
The Mini8 controller broadcast master can be connected to up to 31 slaves if no segment repeaters are used. If
repeaters are used to provide additional segments, 32 slaves are permitted in each new segment. The master is
configured by selecting a Modbus register address to which a value is to be sent. The value to send is selected by
wiring it to the Broadcast Value. Once the function has been enabled, the instrument will send this value out over the
communications link every control cycle typically every 110ms.
Notes:1.
The parameter being broadcast must be set to the same decimal point resolution in both master and
slave instruments.
2.
If iTools, or any other Modbus master, is connected to the port on which the broadcast master is
enabled, then the broadcast is temporarily inhibited. It will restart approximately 30 seconds after
iTools is removed. This is to allow reconfiguration of the instrument using iTools even when broadcast
master communications is operating.
A typical example might be a multi zone application where the setpoint of each zone is required to follow, with digital
accuracy, the setpoint of a master.
Master
Min8
1
Mini8
2
Mini8
31
Figure 11-1: Broadcast Comms
Wiring Connections for Broadcast Communications are shown in section 1.5.6.
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11.4.2
Modbus Parameters
The following table shows the parameters available for Modbus.
Folder – Comms
Sub-folder: FC (Field Communications)
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
Ident
Protocol
Modbus
Modbus
Modbus
Modbus
Read only
Read only
Baud
Parity
Comms Module Identity
Digital communications
protocol
Communications baud rate
Communications parity
9600
None
Conf
Conf
Address
Instrument address
1
Oper
Wait
Rx/tx delay time
No
Conf
Broadcast
Enabled
To enable broadcast master
communications.
(See section 11.4)
Address of the parameter
being written to slaves.
Modbus: 4800, 9600 or 19k2 (19200)
No parity
None
Even parity
Even
Odd parity
Odd
1 to 254
Only writable if DIP switches are set to Off.
No
No delay
Fixed delay. This inserts a
Yes
delay between Rx and Tx to
ensure that the drivers used by
intelligent RS232/RS485
converters have sufficient time
to switch over.
No
Not enabled
Yes
Enabled
Broadcast
Address
Broadcast
Value
WDFlag
WDAct
WDTime
Page 110
Value to be sent to
instruments on the network.
This would normally be
wired to a parameter within
the master.
Network watchdog flag
0 to
32767
See Appendix A for addresses
of all Mini8 controller
parameters.
Range of the parameter wired.
In the case of a Boolean the value will be
0 or 1.
Off
On
This flag is ON when the
Network communications have
stopped addressing this
instrument for longer than the
Timeout time.
It will be set by the Watchdog
process and may be cleared
Automatically or Manually
according to the value of the
Watchdog Action parameter.
The Watchdog Flag must be
cleared manually - either by a
parameter write or a wired
value.
The Watchdog Flag will be
automatically cleared when the
Network Comms resume according to the value in the
Recovery Timer.
Network watchdog action.
The Watchdog Flag may be
cleared Automatically upon
reception of valid messages
or Manually by a parameter
write or a wired value.
Man
Network Watchdog Timeout
If the Network
communications stop
addressing the instrument
for longer than this value,
the Watchdog Flag will
become active.
h:m:s:ms
A value of 0 disables the watchdog
Auto
No
0
0.00
Only shown
if Broadcast
is enabled.
Only shown
if Broadcast
is enabled.
Conf
Conf
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11.5
DeviceNet
Only 2 parameters have to be set on the Mini8 controller for use with DeviceNet, baud rate and address. Both can be
set on the hardware address switch situated under the DeviceNet connector. Each Mini8 controller must have a unique
address on the DeviceNet network and all units must be set to the same Baud rate. The switch gives addresses from 0 to
63.
Sw
OFF
ON
8
Baud rate
Baud rate
Baud rate
Baud rate
6
-
Address 32
5
-
Address 16
4
-
Address 8
3
-
Address 4
2
-
Address 2
1
-
Address 1
Sw
11.6
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON

Example shows 500k baud
rate and address 5
OFF ↔ ON
Address 0 is a valid DeviceNet address but Mini8
controller addresses can be set via iTools, when all
switches are set to 0.
Baud rate
125k
250k
500k
8
OFF
OFF
ON
7
OFF
ON
OFF
Use 500k unless the total length of the DeviceNet network
is longer than 100m.
Enhanced DeviceNet Interface
See also section 1.7. In this version of DeviceNet the slider switch is replaced by rotary BCD switches to set Node ID
(address) and Baud Rate.
11.6.1
Address Switch
The Node ID (address) is set via two BCD rotary switches, one for each digit.
For example, an address of 13 is configured by setting the MSD to 1 and LSD to
3.
Valid DeviceNet address range is 0 - 63. If the switches are set in the range 64 99 the value will be ignored and the node address will be configured by the
Mini8 controller via iTools.
When the address is changed the DeviceNet interface will automatically restart.
11.6.2
Baud Switch
The baud rate is selected by a single BCD rotary switch, and can be set to 125K,
250K or 500K.
The ‘Prog’ position is selected when it is required to upgrade the Mini8
controller firmware.
The O/R position is selected when it is required to set Baud Rate using iTools
configuration software.
When the baud rate is changed or the ‘Prog’ position is selected the instrument must be power cycled for the change to
be activated.
Make sure that the switch is set to valid positions as marked on the panel.
11.7
Switch Position in iTools
The value of the Baud Rate and Address is returned so that it can be read by iTools.
Please note, however, that if the DeviceNet network is unpowered for any reason, any changes to the Baud Rate
and Address will NOT be seen in iTools even though the Mini8 controller is powered and communicating
normally via the CC port or config clip.
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11.7.1
DeviceNet Parameters
Folder – Comms
Sub-folder: FC (Field Communications)
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Ident
Comms Module Identity
DeviceNet
Protocol
Digital communications
protocol
Baud
Default
Access Level
DeviceNet
Read only
DeviceNet
DeviceNet
Read only
Communications baud
rate
125k, 250k, 500k
125k
Conf
Address
Instrument address
0 to 63
Only writable if DIP switches are set to Off.
1
Oper
Status
Comms network status
Offline
Network Offline
Init
Network Initialising
Ready
Network ready to accept
connection
Running
Network connected and
running
Online
The device is on line and has
connections in the Established
state.
IO
Timeout
One or more IO connections have
timed out.
Link fail
Critical link failure: an error has
been detected that has made the
module incapable of
communicating.
Comm
fault
Comms port is in the faulted
condition and has accepted an
Identify Comms Fault Request
Off
This flag is ON when the
Network communications have
stopped addressing this
instrument for longer than the
Timeout time.
It will be set by the Watchdog
process and may be cleared
Automatically or Manually
according to the value of the
Watchdog Action parameter.
WDFlag
Network watchdog flag
On
WDAct
WDTime
Page 112
DeviceNet Enhanced
Network watchdog action.
The Watchdog Flag may
be cleared Automatically
upon reception of valid
messages or Manually by
a parameter write or a
wired value.
Man
The Watchdog Flag must be
cleared manually - either by a
parameter write or a wired
value.
Auto
The Watchdog Flag will be
automatically cleared when the
Network Comms resume according to the value in the
Recovery Timer.
Network Watchdog
Timeout
If the Network
communications stop
addressing the instrument
for longer than this value,
the Watchdog Flag will
become active.
h:m:s:ms
A value of 0 disables the watchdog
Read only
Conf
Conf
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Folder – Comms
Sub-folder: FC (Field Communications)
Name
Parameter Description
Value
SafeMode
Enable
Safe Mode Enable
Off
On
SafeMode
Power
Default
Access Level
If enabled, safe-mode will
activate at power up and when
the comms watchdog is
latched.While in safe-mode, all
loops will be set to manual, all
powers will be set to
SafeModePower value and all
SPs will be set to SafeModeSP
value.
Off
Conf
Safe mode power
When in safe-mode, the power
output level of all loops will be
set to this value.
Default = 0
Conf
SafeMode
SP
Safe mode setpoint
While in safe-mode, the Setpoint
of all loops will be set to this
value. It will be set immediately
with no ramp or servo action.
Devicenet
Shutdown
Devicenet Shutdown
Enable
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Enable
Disable
If an unrecoverable error occurs
on the internal DeviceNet port,
the module is able to send a
Devicenet Shutdown message.
Some Masters are unable to
process this message, so this
parameter gives the ability for it
to be disabled.
Conf
Enable
Conf
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.8
CANopen
Note: from July 09 CANopen option has been discontinued. It is included here for existing systems.
11.8.1
Instrument setup
Up to 127 Nodes can be connected to a standard CANopen Network, for nodes 1 – 31 the address can be set
via the comms DIP switches. For nodes 32 – 127 the address switches must be set to OFF making the Address
parameter alterable in the Config Comms List, which then can be used to set the Node address.
OFF
ON
8
Baud rate
Baud rate
7
Baud rate
Baud rate
6
-
Address 32
5
-
Address 16
4
-
Address 8
3
-
Address 4
2
-
Address 2
1
-
Address 1
Sw

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON
Sw
Example shows 1M baud
rate and address 4
OFF ↔ ON
Baud rate
8
7
125k
250k
500k
1M
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
A standard CANopen Network is designed to work at data transfer rates of up to 1Mbits/s (depending upon bus length).
Four baud rate settings are set on the comms DIP switches: 125K, 250K, 500K and 1M.
11.8.2
Mini8 Controller CANopen Features
The main features of the Mini8 controller CANopen Slave Interface are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CANopen-to-Modbus Gateway
Generic Device
4 Receive PDOs (dynamic)
4 Transmit PDOs (dynamic)
PDO communication and mapping object values can be stored in non-volatile memory
1 Server SDO
200 Parameter Pick List (re-definable)
PDO Mappings cloneable via CommsTab function block
CANopen is a higher layer object based CAN network protocol that supports direct access to device parameters,
transmission of time critical process data and network management diagnostics via a standardised object dictionary.
The generic CANopen model shows that the device (Node) is connected to a CAN network on one side and application
specific I/O data on the other.
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11.8.3
Communication Interface
CANopen is based on communication profiles, which specifies the basic communication mechanisms (PDOs, SDOs and
NMT messages) and an object directory that specifies device parameters and functions.
11.8.3.1 Object Dictionary
The object dictionary is divided into a section containing general device information (device identification, manufacturer
name etc), communication parameters, and a section that describes the specific device data/functionality whether by a
device profile (part of CANopen specifications) or manufacturer specified.
Index
Description
0000h
Reserved
0001h – 025Fh
Data Type Definitions
0260h – 0FFFh
Reserved
1000h – 1FFFh
General communication parameters
1200h – 127Fh
Communication parameters for server SDOs
1280h – 12FFh
Communication parameters for client SDOs
1300h – 13FFh
Reserved
1400h – 15FFh
Communication parameters for receive PDOs
1600h – 17FFh
Mapping parameter for receive PDOs
1800h – 19FFh
Communication parameters for transmit
PDOs
1A00h – 1BFFh
Mapping parameter for transmit PDOs
1C00h – 1FFFh
Reserved for extensions (i.e. DSP-302)
2000h – 5FFFh
Manufacturer Specific Profile objects
6000h – 9FFFh
Standardised Device Profiles
A000h - BFFFh
Interface profile specific objects
C000h - FFFFh
Reserved
Range
Data Types
Communication
Profile
Application Objects
Interface Profile
11.8.3.2 Process Data Objects (PDOs)
The transfer of process data between devices on a network is the main purpose of a CAN-based communication system.
In CANopen, this is performed by PDOs, which map process data from an application object(s) (similar to DeviceNet
Class 0x64) into communication objects (similar to DeviceNet Class 0x66).
PDOs are separated into two groups, Transmit PDOs and Receive PDOs. Each PDO message is capable of containing 8
bytes of data (four 16-bit scaled integer parameters). Transmit PDOs are typically used to transmit critical instrument
data to other nodes on the network, for example, alarm status’. Receive PDOs are typically used to configure instrument
settings, for example, TargetSP.
For the Mini8 controller the number of PDOs is limited to 4 transmit PDOs and 4 receive PDOs, giving a maximum of 16
transmit and 16 receive scaled integer parameters.
Note Transmit PDO = transmitted from the Mini8 (READ), Receive PDO = received by Mini8 (WRITE).
11.8.3.3 Service Data Objects (SDOs)
To access entries in the Object dictionary CANopen uses SDOs, peer to peer communication channels (similar to explicit
messaging in DeviceNet), generally used during system configuration or to request non-critical process data.
This gives access to Network Management, Device & Manufacturer Information, Error Messages, Reconfiguration and
control of PDOs, Store & restore of configuration, Heartbeat & Node Guarding,
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.8.4
Network Management (NMT)
CANopen slave nodes include the following state machine, which allows the slaves to be in different operating states.
Initialisation
Boot Up
FC LED: Off
Pre-operational
SDO communications
Emergency
Heartbeat/Node Guard
Sync
FC LED: blinking
Stopped
Heartbeat/Node Guard
FC LED: Off
Operational
PDO communications
SDO communications
Heartbeat/NG
Emergency
Sync
FC LED: On
Transitions between some states are made automatically by the slaves themselves, whereas others can only be made
upon receiving the corresponding NMT Master message.
Upon power-up the slave node comes out of the Power-On Reset state and goes into initialisation. It then initialises the
application and communication interface. It then attempts to transmit a boot-up message. When the boot-up message
has been successfully transmitted the node enters the Pre-Operational state where it is possible for the network master
to configure individual nodes via SDO messages. The master can then switch individual nodes or all nodes to the
Operational state (allowing PDO communications i.e. the running state) or the Stopped state.
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11.8.4.1 Heartbeat & Node Guarding
The Mini8 controller interface supports both Node Guarding and the Heartbeat Protocol. With Node Guarding it is the
responsibility of a Master device to guard (poll) all connected slaves for their current NMT state. With the Heartbeat
method, each slave device transmits a heartbeat (a 1-byte message containing the current NMT state) periodically.
The Heartbeat protocol is the most widely used.
11.8.4.2 Emergencies (EMCY)
Each CANopen slave device is assigned an emergency message. If the slave device has recognised that a fault/error
exists it transmits an emergency message to inform the network of the problem.
11.8.5
Device Profile DS-404
DS-404 is the Device Profile for Measuring Devices and Closed Loop Controllers. It specifies in which object each Input,
Output, Alarm and Control parameters for each channel should reside. DS-404 is not considered appropriate for the
Mini8 controller due to its inherent modular and versatile architecture which allows different alarms, IO etc to be
associated with different channels.
The Mini8 controller is classed as a Generic Device as its CANopen application objects have been specified by
Eurotherm using the range from 2000h.
11.8.6
Default PDOs
Transmit PDOs are typically used to transmit critical instrument data to other nodes on the network, for example, alarm
status’. Receive PDOs are typically used to configure instrument settings, for example, TargetSP.
The Mini8 controller PDOs are preconfigured with a standard set of parameters. PDO blocks may be Enabled or
Disabled via SDO communications. In the Mini8 controller the transmit PDOs can also be set to transmit cyclically, or on
change of state, or both.
The parameters in the PDO blocks may be replaced by other ones if required. There are 2 methods to achieve this:
-
using Commstab blocks to redirect the CANopen object to a different Modbus parameter. This has
the advantage that an instrument clone will behave in the same way as the original.
-
using CANopen communications to reconfigure the PDO block.
Both of these methods will be described.
11.8.6.1 Letter Boxing
The number of PDOs is limited to 4 transmit PDOs and 4 receive PDOs, giving a maximum of 16 transmit and 16 receive
scaled integer parameters. This is very restrictive for the Mini8 controller, which has up to 16 loops, therefore, some
loop parameters are ‘letter boxed’ whereby the user can specify to which loop the data is intended.
For example in Transmit PD03 if the parameter ‘Loop Number’ has the value 0 then the PV, TargetSP and ActiveOut are
all from Loop 1. This will cycle around all enabled loops at a rate set in the Mini8 controller parameter
Comms.FC.TxPDO3InstTime. If this time is zero then the CANopen master may write a value to the Loop Number
parameter to get whichever Loop PV, TargetSP and ActiveOut it requires.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.8.6.2 Transmit PDO1
This contains the Analogue Alarm Status words. As default it is Enabled and configured to transmit when any of the
status word values change.
Object
Index
Sub Index
Parameter
Data Type
1A00h
00h
Number of Supported Entries [4]
Unsigned8
01h
AlmSummary.AnAlarmStatus1
Integer16
02h
AlmSummary.AnAlarmStatus2
Integer16
03h
AlmSummary.AnAlarmStatus3
Integer16
04h
AlmSummary.AnAlarmStatus4
Integer16
11.8.6.3 Transmit PDO2
This contains the Sensor Break Alarm Status words. As default it is Enabled and configured to transmit when any of the
status word values change.
Object
Index
Sub Index
Parameter
Data Type
1A01h
00h
Number of Supported Entries [4]
Unsigned8
01h
AlmSummary.SBrkAlarmStatus1
Integer16
02h
AlmSummary.SBrkAlarmStatus2
Integer16
03h
AlmSummary.SBrkAlarmStatus3
Integer16
04h
AlmSummary.SBrkAlarmStatus4
Integer16
11.8.6.4 Transmit PDO3
This contains Loop.n operational data. As default it is Enabled and configured to transmit cyclically. The Loop Number
will be cycled round the enabled loops with the time between each change in the loop number being set by
Comms.FC.TxPDO3InstTime. If this time is set to ‘0’ then the loop number will not be cycled, instead the user sets the
loop number via SDO communications.
Object
Index
1A02h
Sub Index
Parameter
Data Type
00h
Number of Supported Entries [4]
Unsigned8
01h
Loop Number [0….15 corresponding to n=1….16]
Integer16
02h
Loop.n.Main.PV
Integer16
03h
Loop.n.Main.WorkingSP
Integer16
04h
Loop.n.Main.ActiveOut
Integer16
11.8.6.5 Transmit PDO4
This contains Programmer.n operational data. As default it is Enabled and configured to transmit cyclically. The
Programmer Number will be cycled round the enabled programmers with the time between each change in
programmer number being set by Comms.FC.TxPDO4InstTime. If this time is set to ‘0’ then the programmer number
will not be cycled, instead the user sets the programmer number via SDO communications.
Page 118
Object
Index
Sub Index
Parameter
Data Type
1A03h
00h
Number of Supported Entries [4]
Unsigned8
01h
Programmer Number [0.…7 corresponding to n=1….8]
Integer16
02h
Programmer.n.Run.CurProg
Integer16
03h
Programmer.n.Run.ProgStatus
Integer16
04h
Programmer.n.Run.ProgTimeLeft
Integer16
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11.8.6.6 Receive PDO1
This contains control loop Operational parameters, the loop number must be specified in order for the Mini8 controller
to set the correct loop instance parameters.
Object
Index
1600h
Sub Index
Parameter
Data Type
00h
Number of Supported Entries [4]
Unsigned8
01h
Loop Number [0.…15 corresponding to n=1….16]
Integer16
02h
Loop.n.Main.TargetSP
Integer16
03h
Loop.n.Main.AutoMan
Integer16
04h
Loop.n.OP.ManualOutVal
Integer16
11.8.6.7 Receive PDO2
This contains control loop PID parameters, the loop number must be specified in order for the Mini8 controller to set the
correct loop instance parameters.
Object
Index
Sub Index
Parameter
Data Type
1601h
00h
Number of Supported Entries [4]
Unsigned8
01h
Loop Number [0.…15 corresponding to n=1….16]
Integer16
02h
Loop.n.PID.ProportionalBand
Integer16
03h
Loop.n.PID.IntegralTime
Integer16
04h
Loop.n.PID.DerivativeTime
Integer16
11.8.6.8 Receive PDO3
This will contain control loop SP parameters, the loop number must be specified in order for the Mini8 controller to set
the correct loop instance parameters.
Object
Index
Sub Index
Parameter
Data Type
1602h
00h
Number of Supported Entries [4]
Unsigned8
01h
Loop Number [0.…15 corresponding to n=1….16]
Integer16
02h
Loop.n.SP.SP1
Integer16
03h
Loop.n.SP.SP2
Integer16
04h
Loop.n.SP.SPSelect
Integer16
11.8.6.9 Receive PDO4
This contains Programmer Operational parameters, the programmer number must be specified in order for the Mini8
controller to set the correct programmer instance parameters.
Object
Index
Sub Index
Parameter
Data Type
1603h
00h
Number of Supported Entries [4]
Unsigned8
01h
Programmer Number [0.…7 corresponding to n=1….8]
Integer16
02h
Programmer.n.SetUp.ProgRun
Integer16
03h
Programmer.n.SetUp.ProgHold
Integer16
04h
Programmer.n.SetUp.ProgReset
Integer16
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.8.7
Enabling and Disabling PDO Communications
The Mini8 controller is supplied with all 8 PDOs enabled.
Every PDO has a mapping object and a communication object as shown. The PDO is enabled by resetting the
appropriate bit and disabled by setting the appropriate bit. This is done using SDO communications.
PDO
11.8.8
Mapping Object
Communication
Object
PDO Enable
Object Sub-index /
bit
Receive PDO1
1600h
1400h
1400h 1h /31
Receive PDO2
1601h
1401h
1401h 1h /31
Receive PDO3
1602h
1402h
1402h 1h /31
Receive PDO4
1603h
1403h
1403h 1h /31
Transmit PDO1
1A00h
1800h
1800h 1h /31
Transmit PDO2
1A01h
1801h
1801h 1h /31
Transmit PDO3
1A02h
1802h
1802h 1h /31
Transmit PDO4
1A03h
1803h
1803h 1h /31
Changing PDO Mapping
If the parameters included as default above are not those required they may be replaced by others. The recommended
way to do this is to redirect using the Commstab tables.
The Manufacturer Object Pick List is in Appendix C. The first 32 items map directly onto the default PDOs which use
Modbus addresses 15816 to 15847. The Commstab tables can map any instrument parameter onto these addresses.
Modbus Address
Manufacturer
Object Pick List
Default PDOs
Mapping Object
15816 - 15819
2000h 01h – 04h
1600h 01h – 04h
15820 - 15823
2000h 05h – 08h
1601h 01h – 04h
15824 - 15827
2000h 09h – 0Ch
1602h 01h – 04h
15828 - 15831
2000h 0Dh – 104h
1603h 01h – 04h
15832 - 15835
2000h 11h – 14h
1A00h 01h – 04h
15836 - 15839
2000h 15h – 18h
1A01h 01h – 04h
15840 - 15843
2000h 19h – 1Ch
1A02h 01h – 04h
15844 - 15847
2000h 0Dh – 20h
1A03h 01h – 04h
15840
2000h 21h
to
to
16015
2000h C8h
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11.8.8.1 Commstab Example 1
Remap Receive PDO 1 with UsrVal.1-4.Vals:
Receive PDO1 from the Object pick list in Appendix C is shown below
Object
Index
Sub
Index
Parameter
Data Type
SCADA
2000h
Receive PDO1 Note: Sub indices 02h – 04h are letter boxed via sub index 01h.
Address
01h
Loop Number (Comms.InstNum1)
Integer16
15816
02h
Loop.n.Main.TargetSP
Integer16
15817
03h
Loop.n.Main.AutoMan
Integer16
15818
04h
Loop.n.OP.ManualOutVal
Integer16
15819
Similarly with Commstab 3 and 4 which will give a final Receive PDO 1 as shown in the diagram below. Note there is now
no letterbox parameter as the indexing parameter has been replaced.
CommsTab Source
Modbus Address
Pick List
Rx PDO 1
1
UsrVal.1.Val
15816
2000h 01h
1600h 01h
2
UsrVal.2.Val
15817
2000h 02h
1600h 02h
3
UsrVal.3.Val
15818
2000h 03h
1600h 03h
4
UsrVal.4.Val
15819
2000h 04h
1600h 04h
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.8.8.2 Commstab Example 2
Remap Transmit PDO 3 sub index 04h with Loop.Main.AutoMan, using letter boxing for the loop instance.
Receive PDO3 from the Object pick list in Appendix C is shown below.
Object
Index
Sub
Index
Parameter
Data Type
2000h
Transmit PDO3 Note: Sub indices 1Ah – 1Ch are letter boxed via
sub index 19h.
SCADA
Address
19h
Loop Number (Comms.InstNum5)
Integer16
15840
1Ah
Loop.n.Main.PV
Integer16
15841
1Bh
Loop.n.Main.WorkingSP
Integer16
15842
1Ch
Loop.n.Main.ActiveOut
Integer16
15843
Enter 15843 as the Modbus Destination, and pick Loop.1.Main.AutoMan for the Source and set LetterBox to Yes.
CommsTab Source
5
1
Modbus Address
Pick List
Tx PDO 3
15843
2000h 1Ch
1A02h 04h
Loop.1.Main.AutoMan
11.8.8.3 Commstab Example 3
Remap Transmit PDO 3 sub index 04h with UsrVal.3.Val, not using letter boxing so that no matter what the loop instance
UsrVal.3.Val will be transmitted:
CommsTab Source
5
1
Modbus Address
Pick List
Tx PDO 3
15843
2000h 1Ch
1A02h 04h
UsrVal.3.Val
 Use Commstab to remap PDO blocks.
Page 122
It is simpler and the remapping is saved in the Mini8 controller clone file.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.8.9
Remapping over the network
11.8.9.1 Using SDO communications
It is possible to remap any of the PDOs with entries from the Pick List using SDO communications. The following
procedure must be followed:
1.
Disable PDO by setting bit 31 sub index 1 of the PDOs communication object.
2.
Deactivate PDO mapping object by writing ‘0’ to sub index 0 of the PDOs mapping object.
3.
Re-map sub indices 1 – 4 with the new mappings
4.
Activate PDO mapping object by writing the number of entries to sub index 0 of the PDOs mapping
object
5.
Enable PDO by resetting bit 31 sub index 1 of the PDOs communication object.
For example, remapping Receive PDO1 of a Mini8 controller with a node address of 1 with UsrVal.1-4.Vals the following
8 “writes” must be executed:
This is the screen shot of the first write in 3 above.
This uses the Node Manager (a simple CANopen master) to
write the values.
The Node Manager is a software tool supplied by IXXAT
IXXAT
Leibnizstr. 15
D 88250
Weingarten.
www.ixaat.de
[email protected]
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.8.9.2 Using Device Configuration Software.
This shows one step of the example above using configuration software.
From the CANopen parameter tables in Appendix C UserVal 1 to 4 have sub-ibex C3h to C6h, or 195 to 198 so delete
the existing elements in the Mapped Objects and add elements 195 to 198.
Screen shot of the CANopen Configuration Studio, a software tool supplied by IXXAT.
The remapping of a PDO, as shown in both examples above, is retained in RAM and would be lost if the instrument was
turned off or if the PDO was remapped again. If the remapping needs to be retained then it must be ‘STORED’ in Non
Volatile memory. See Store & Restore in General Communication Parameters.
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11.8.10
Enabling & Disabling PDO Change of State transmission.
It is possible to change the way a transmit PDO works – either cyclically or on change of state (COS), or both. Object
Index 2002h allows COS transmission of PDOs to be enabled or disabled.
Object Index
Sub Index
Parameter
Data Type
Values
2002h
00h
TxPDO COS
Enables
Unsigned8
Bit Mask i.e.
0 = No TxPDOs transmitted on COS
1 = TxPDO 1 transmitted on COS
2 = TxPDO 2 transmitted on COS
3 = TxPDOs 1 & 2 transmitted on
COS
...
16 = TxPDOs 1- 4 transmitted on
COS
As default PDO 1 & 2 only transmit on
change of state, 3 & 4 transmit cyclically
so the default bit mask value is 3 (0011).
To make PDO 3 also transmit on change
of state the third bit must be set so the
value must be written as 7 (0111).
In order for PDOs to be transmitted cyclically, sub-index 05h of the PDOs communication object should be set with the
time required in multiples of 1ms. A value of 0 will disable the cyclic PDO transmission.
11.8.11
General Communication Objects
11.8.11.1 Device Type Information
Index
Sub Index
1000h
00h
Bit
0 – 15
16 – 31
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Description
Value (U32)
Device Profile
Number:
0 (Generic Device)
Additional Information:
0 (Generic Device)
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.8.11.2 Error Register
Index
Sub Index
Bit
Description
Value (U32)
Bit set = error
1001h
00h
0
Generic Error:
Mandatory
Bit set = ANY error
1
Current:
not supported
2
Voltage:
not supported
3
Temperature:
not supported
4
Communication Error:
Bit set = error
5
Device Profile Defined
Error:
not supported
6
Reserved:
Always zero
7
Manufacture Specific
Error:
not supported
11.8.11.3 Manufacturer Device Name
Index
Sub Index
Description
Value (String)
1008h
00h
Manufacturer Device Name
EurothermMini8
Select ASCII as the
format and the text
name will be displayed.
11.8.11.4 Manufacturer Hardware Version
This will indicate the issue of the CANopen daughter board.
Page 126
Index
Sub Index
Description
Value (String)
1009h
00h
Manufacturer Hardware Version
e.g. Iss1
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11.8.11.5 Manufacturer Software Version
This will indicate the software version of the instrument firmware.
Index
Sub Index
Description
Value (String)
100Ah
00h
Formal Release (n: Phase m: Minor Revision)
Vn.mm
Engineering Release (n: Phase m: Minor
Revision)
En.mm
11.8.11.6 Store & Restore
The Mini8 controller CANopen Interface allows the saving of PDO Mapping and Communication objects in non-volatile
memory giving them three possible settings: Factory/Default settings, Power-On settings and Current settings. This
allows the specified objects to be loaded with or set to different values upon certain events. The following diagram
depicts the operational usage of each of the three settings:
Factory/Default Settings
(Hard Coded)
Copy initiated by Restore
Power-On Settings
(NVOL)
Copy initiated by Store
Copy upon hardware reset
Current Settings
(RAM)
Object Index
Sub Index
Parameter
Data Type
Values
2001h
00h
Non-volatile
Memory Status
Unsigned8
0 = Nonvol Data Invalid
1 = Data in the process of being
stored
2 = Nonvol Data Valid
Index
Sub Index
Description
1010h
00h
Largest Sub-Index supported (1)
01h
Save all parameters (PDO mapping & Communication Objects)
Store
The Mini8 controller CANopen Interface supports the saving of parameters on request only i.e. does not support the
saving of parameters autonomously. This is indicated when sub-index 01h is read:
Bit
Value
Meaning
31 - 2
0
Reserved
1
0
Device does not save parameters autonomously
0
1
Device saves parameters on command
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In order to avoid saving parameters by mistake, saving is only executed when a specific signature is written to sub-index
01h. The signature is “save”:
MSB
LSB
ASCII:
e
v
a
s
Hex:
65h
76h
61h
73h
Or Using the IXXAT Node Manager, select ASCII Data and write ‘save’
It should be noted that whilst in the process of saving the parameter data to non-volatile memory it is not possible to
write to the parameters that are currently being saved.
Restore
Index
Sub
Index
Description
1011h
00h
Largest Sub-Index supported (1)
01h
Restore all parameters (PDO mapping & Communication
Objects)
In order to avoid restoring parameters back to default settings by mistake, restoring is only executed when a specific
signature is written to sub-index 01h. The signature is “load”:
MSB
LSB
ASCII:
d
a
o
l
Hex:
64h
61h
6Fh
6Ch
On reception of the correct signature the default parameter values are set to valid but will only take effect upon device
reset or after a power cycle.
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11.8.11.7 Heartbeat Time
A heartbeat message will be generated cyclically at this interval (specified in ms). The default value is 0 indicating that
the heartbeat messages are disabled.
Index
Sub Index
Description
Value milli-secs (U32)
1017h
00h
Heartbeat Message Interval
0 = disabled.
0
11.8.11.8 Identity Object
Index
SubIndex
Description
1018h
0
Number of Sub Index entries = 4
1
Unique Vendor ID = 0x000001BC
2
Product Code = E800
3
Revision Number =
Bits
4
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Description
0 – 15
Minor Revision Number (Initially: 0001h)
16 – 31
Major Revision Number (Initially: 0001h)
Serial Number (32-bit interface board number entered by
Eurotherm)
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.9
Profibus
Up to 127 Nodes can be connected to a Profibus Network and the address is set via the comms DIP switches. The Baud
Rate is auto-detected and set by the master.
OFF
ON
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Not Used
Address 64
Address 32
Address 16
Address 8
Address 4
Address 2
Address 1

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON
Sw
Example shows an address 68
OFF ↔ ON
A further description of Profibus is given in the Profibus Communications Handbook Part No HA026290.
11.9.1
Profibus Parameters
Folder – Comms
Sub-folder: FC (Field Communications
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
Ident
Comms Module Identity
Profibus RJ45
Profibus
R/O
Protocol
Digital communications
protocol
Profibus
Profibus
Conf
Address
Instrument address
0 to 126
Only writable if DIP switches are set to 0.
1
Oper
Network
Status
Network Status
See section 26 DeviceNet parameters
for the list
WDFlag
Network watchdog flag
Off
On
WDAct
WDTime
Page 130
Profibus D-type
R/O
This flag is ON when the
Network communications
have stopped addressing this
instrument for longer than the
Timeout time.
It will be set by the Watchdog
process and may be cleared
Automatically or Manually
according to the value of the
Watchdog Action parameter.
Network watchdog action.
The Watchdog Flag may be
cleared Automatically upon
reception of valid messages
or Manually by a parameter
write or a wired value.
Man
The Watchdog Flag must be
cleared manually - either by a
parameter write or a wired
value.
Auto
The Watchdog Flag will be
automatically cleared when
the Network Comms resume according to the value in the
Recovery Timer.
Network Watchdog Timeout
If the Network
communications stop
addressing the instrument
for longer than this value,
the Watchdog Flag will
become active.
h:m:s:ms
A value of 0 disables the watchdog
Conf
Conf
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.10
EtherNet (Modbus TCP)
11.10.1
Instrument setup
It is recommended that you setup the communications settings for each instrument before connecting it to any EtherNet
network. This is not essential but network conflicts may occur if the default settings interfere with equipment already on
the network. By default the instruments are set to a fixed IP address of 192.168.111.222 with a default SubNet Mask
setting of 255.255.255.0.
IP Addresses are usually presented in the form "xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx". In the instrument Comms folder each element of the IP
Address is shown and configured separately.
"IP address 1" relates to the first set of three digits, IP address 2 to the second set of three digits and so on. This also
applies to the SubNet Mask, Default Gateway and Preferred master IP Address.
Each EtherNet module contains a unique MAC address, normally presented as a 12 digit hexadecimal number in the
format "aa-bb-cc-dd-ee-ff".
In the Mini8 controllers MAC addresses are shown as 6 separate decimal values in iTools. MAC1 shows the first pair of
digits in decimal, MAC2 shows the second pair of digits and so on.
11.10.2
Unit Identity
The Modbus TCP Specification includes the ‘normal’ Modbus address as part of the packaged Modbus message – where
it is called the Unit Identifier. If such a message is sent to an EtherNet / Serial gateway, the Unit Ident is essential to
identify the slave instrument on the serial port. When a stand alone EtherNet instrument is addressed however, the Unit
Ident is surplus to requirements since the IP address fully identifies the instrument. To allow for both situations the Unit
Ident Enable parameter is used to enable or disable checking of the Unit Ident received from TCP. The enumerations
produce the following actions:
‘Instr’: the received Unit Ident must match the Modbus address in the instrument or there will be no response.
‘Loose’:
the received Unit Ident value is ignored, thus causing a reply regardless of the received Unit Ident.
‘Strict’:
the received Unit Ident value must be 0xFF or there will be no reply.
11.10.3
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Settings
IP addresses may be ‘fixed’ – set by the user, or dynamically allocated by a DHCP server on the network.
This is set by Switch 8 on the DIL address switch.
If the IP Addresses are to be dynamically allocated the server uses the instrument MAC address to uniquely identify it.
For fixed IP Addresses set the IP address as well as the SubNet Mask. These must be configured into the instrument
using iTools. Remember to note the allocated addresses.
11.10.3.1 Fixed IP Addressing
Address Switch 8 OFF. In the "Comms" folder of the instrument the "DHCP enable" parameter will be set to "Fixed".
Set the IP address and SubNet Mask as required.
11.10.3.2 Dynamic IP Addressing
Address Switch 8 ON. In the "Comms" folder of the instrument the "DHCP enable" parameter will be set to "Dynamic".
Once connected to the network and powered, the instrument will acquire its "IP address", "SubNet Mask" and "Default
gateway" from the DHCP Server and display this information within a few seconds.
11.10.3.3 Default Gateway
The "Comms" tab also includes configuration settings for "Default Gateway", these parameters will be set automatically
when Dynamic IP Addressing is used. When fixed IP addressing is used these settings are only required if the
instrument needs to communicate wider than the local area network i.e. over the internet.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.10.3.4 Preferred Master
The "Comms" tab also includes configuration settings for "Preferred Master". Setting this IP address to the IP Address
of a particular PC will guarantee that one of the 4 available EtherNet sockets will always be reserved for that PC
(reducing the number of available sockets for anonymous connections to 3).
OFF
DHCP fixed
Not used
Not used
-
ON
DHCP dynamic
Modbus Address 16
Modbus Address 8
Modbus Address 4
Modbus Address 2
Modbus Address 1

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON
Sw
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Example shows dynamic
DHCP and Modbus
address 5
OFF ↔ ON
11.10.4
iTools Setup
iTools configuration package, version V5.60 or later, may be used to configure EtherNet communications.
The following instructions configure EtherNet.
To include a Host Name/Address within the iTools scan:1. Ensure iTools is NOT running before taking the following steps
2. Within Windows, click ‘Start’, the ‘Settings’, then ‘Control Panel’
3. In control panel select ‘iTools’
4. Within the iTools configuration settings select the ‘TCP/IP’ tab
5. Click the ‘Add’ button to add a new connection
6. Enter a name for this TCP/IP connection
7. Click the ‘Add’ button to add the IP address of the instrument in the ‘Host Name/ Address’ section
8. Click ‘OK’ to confirm the new IP Address you have entered
9. Click ‘OK’ to confirm the new TCP/IP port you have entered
10. You should now see the TCT/IP port you have configured within the TCP/IP tab of the iTools control panel
settings
iTools is now ready to communicate with an instrument at the IP Address you have configured.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.10.5
EtherNet Parameters
These are listed in the ‘Comms’  ‘FC’ list in iTools.
Folder - Comms
Sub-folder: FC
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
Ident
Identifies that the EtherNet
comms module is fitted.
EtherNet
EtherNet
Read only
Protocol
Digital communications protocol
EtherNet
EtherNet
Read only
Address
Comms Address
1 to 253
1
Oper
WDFlag
Network watchdog flag
Same as previous protocols – see section 11.4.2 for example.
WDAct
Network watchdog action
WDTime
Network watchdog timeout
UnitID Enable
Unit Identity Enable
Enable/disable checking of the
ModbusTCP Unit Identity field.
DHCP enable
DHCP Type
Select whether IP address /
subnet mask etc are as
configured (Fixed) or supplied
from EtherNet server (Dynamic).
Strict
Disable - Unit ID must be 0xFF
(255)
Loose
Disable - Unit ID ignored
Instr
Enable - Unit ID must be
instrument address
Fixed
Manually set IP addresses
(Address Switch 8 = OFF)
Dynamic
IP addresses set by DCHP server
(Address Switch 8 = ON)
Strict
Conf
RO
IP Address 1
1st Byte IP address
IP address format is
192
IP Address 2
2nd Byte IP address
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
168
IP Address 3
3rd Byte IP address
1st Byte. 2nd Byte. 3rd Byte. 4th Byte.
111
IP Address 4
4th Byte IP address
Range 0 to 255
222
Subnet Mask 1
1st Byte Subnet Mask
Subnet mask format is
255
Subnet mask 2
2nd Byte Subnet Mask
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
255
Subnet Mask 3
3rd Byte Subnet Mask
1st Byte. 2nd Byte. 3rd Byte. 4th Byte.
255
Subnet Mask 4
4th Byte Subnet Mask
Range 0 to 255
0
Default Gateway 1
1st Byte Default Gateway
Default gateway format is
Conf
Default Gateway 2
2nd Byte Default Gateway
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
0
Default Gateway 3
3rd Byte Default Gateway
1st Byte. 2nd Byte. 3rd Byte. 4th Byte.
Default Gateway 4
4th Byte Default Gateway
Range 0 to 255
Pref mstr IP 1
1st Byte Preferred Master IP
address
0
Conf
Pref mstr IP 2
2nd Byte Preferred Master IP
address
Prefered master IP address format is
Pref mstr IP 3
3rd Byte Preferred Master IP
address
1st Byte. 2nd Byte. 3rd Byte. 4th Byte.
Pref mstr IP 4
4th Byte Preferred Master IP
address
MAC1
MAC address 1
0
R/O
MAC2
MAC address 2
MAC3
MAC address 3
A unique MAC address is allocated to every
EtherNet device.
MAC addresses are 6 bytes in length and are
shown in HEX format, for example:
MAC4
MAC address 4
A A - B B - C C - D D - E E - F F
MAC5
MAC address 5
1st Byte 2nd Byte 3rd Byte 4th Byte 5th Byte 6th Byte
MAC6
MAC address 6
EtherNet Status
EtherNet network status
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Conf
Conf
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
Range 0 to 255
Running
Network connected and working
Offline
Network not connected or working
Init
Network initialising
Ready
Network ready to accept
connection
R/O
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.11
EtherNet/IP
EtherNet/IP (EtherNet/Industrial Protocol) is a communication system suitable for use in industrial environments. It
allows industrial devices to exchange time-critical application information. These devices include simple I/O devices
such as sensors/actuators, as well as more complex control devices such as robots or PLCs.
EtherNet/IP makes use of the CIP (Common Industrial Protocol), common network, transport and application layers
currently implemented by DeviceNet and ControlNet. EtherNet/IP then makes use of the standard EtherNet and TCP/IP
technology to transport CIP communications packets. The result is a common, open application layer on top of open
and highly popular EtherNet and TCP/IP protocols.
EtherNet/IP provides a producer-consumer model for exchange of time-critical control data. The producer-consumer
model allows the exchange of application information between a sending device (producer) and many other receiving
devices (consumers) without the need to send data multiple times to multiple destinations.
A gateway communications option card is installed in the Mini8 controller to implement the EtherNet/IP server
(Adapter).
11.11.1
Feature Switch
An 8-pole lever operated DIP switch is used to set the DHCP feature to off or on, and to force start up in the boot mode
for software upgrades.
All other switches are normally in the off state.
The boot mode requires all switches to be on.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON
Switch 8 is used to switch DHCP mode ON (Dynamic) or OFF (Fixed).
Example shows dynamic
DHCP ‘Fixed’.
OFF ↔ ON
11.11.2
Configuration using iTools
iTools configuration package, version V8.68 or later, may be used to configure EtherNet communications.
Using the RJ11 configuration port (CC), connect the Mini8 controller to the serial comms port of a pc running iTools.
Ensure the Feature switch is set as shown in the diagram above and scan for the instrument in the normal way.
11.11.2.1 Explicit Messaging Inactivity Timeout
The encapsulation message (TCP packet) maximum size is 300 bytes. If a received message length is greater than 300
bytes then the TCP connection is closed.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.11.3
EtherNet/IP Parameters
EtherNet/IP parameters are shown under ‘Comms’  ‘FC ‘as shown in
Figure 11-2 below.
Figure 11-2: EtherNet/IP Parameters
The parameter list is similar to the EtherNet TCP section 11.10.5 without the Preferred Master IP addresses (PrefMstr).
There are three additional parameters:Folder - Comms
Sub-folder: FC
Name
Parameter Description
Value and enumeration
Default
Access Level
InputSize
Etherne t IP Input Block Size
Range 1 to 100
See Input Definition Table below
1
Conf
OutputSize
EtherNet/IP Output Block Size
Range 1 to 100
See Output Definition Table below
1
Conf
ModVer
Module firmware version
This is an integer value where the least
two significant digits are the minor
version.
For example: A value of 201 indicates
2.01 – major revision 2, minor revision 01.
R/O
The definitions are shown in the following two sections.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.11.4
Input Definition Table
The following table shows the Default Input parameter list:
Item
Description
Modbus Address decimal / (HEX) Notes
1
Loop.1.Main.PV
15360 / (3C64)
2
Loop.1.Main.WorkingSP
15361 / (3C01)
3
Loop.1.Main.ActiveOut
15362 / (3C02)
4
Loop.2.Main.PV
15363 / (3C03)
5
Loop.2.Main.WorkingSP
15364 / (3C04)
6
Loop.2.Main.ActiveOut
15365 / (3C05)
7
Loop.3.Main.PV
15366 / (3C06)
8
Loop.3.Main.WorkingSP
15367 / (3C07)
9
Loop.3.Main.ActiveOut
15368 / (3C08)
10
Loop.4.Main.PV
15369 / (3C09)
11
Loop.4.Main.WorkingSP
15370 / (3C0A)
12
Loop.4.Main.ActiveOut
15371 / (3C0B)
13
Loop.5.Main.PV
15372 / (3C0C)
14
Loop.5.Main.WorkingSP
15373 / (3C0D)
15
Loop.5.Main.ActiveOut
15374 / (3C0E)
16
Loop.6.Main.PV
15375 / (3C0F)
17
Loop.6.Main.WorkingSP
15376 / (3C10)
18
Loop.6.Main.ActiveOut
15377 / (3C11)
19
Loop.7.Main.PV
15378 / (3C12)
20
Loop.7.Main.WorkingSP
15379 / (3C13)
21
Loop.7.Main.ActiveOut
15380 / (3C14)
22
Loop.8.Main.PV
15381 / (3C15)
23
Loop.8.Main.WorkingSP
15382 / (3C16)
24
Loop.8.Main.ActiveOut
15383 / (3C17)
25
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus1
15384 / (3C18)
26
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus2
15385 / (3C19)
27
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus3
15386 / (3C1A)
28
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus4
15387 / (3C1B)
29
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus1
15388 / (3C1C)
30
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus2
15389 / (3C1D)
31
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus3
15390 / (3C1E)
32
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus4
15391 / (3C1F)
33
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus1
15392 / (3C20)
34
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus2
15393 / (3C21)
35
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus3
15394 / (3C22)
36
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus4
15395 / (3C23)
37
AlmSummary.General.NewAlarm
15396 / (3C24)
38
AlmSummary.General.AnyAlarm
15397 / (3C25)
39
AlmSummary.General.NewCTAlarm
15398 / (3C26)
40
Programmer.Run.ProgStatus
15399 / (3C27)
41 to 100
These parameters are undefined by default
15400 to 15459 / (3C28-3C63)
The default Input Block Size value
(Comms.InputSize) matches this
list.
All of this area may be redefined
by use of the CommsTab Function
Block, do not forget to set the
Input Block Size value for the
configured number of parameters.
The Commstab Data Format
option must be set to "Integer" to
work with EtherNet/IP
Total Length 100 words = 200 bytes
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
11.11.5
Output Definition Table
The following table shows the Default Output parameter list:
Item
Description
Modbus Address / (HEX)
Notes
1
Loop.1.Main.TargetSP
15460 / (3C64)
2
Loop.1.Main.AutoMan
15461 / (3C65)
The default Output Block Size
value (Comms.OutputSize)
matches this list.
3
Loop.1.OP.ManualOutVal
15462 / (3C66)
4
Loop.2.Main.TargetSP
15463 / (3C67)
5
Loop.2.Main.AutoMan
15464 / (3C68)
6
Loop.2.OP.ManualOutVal
15465 / (3C69)
7
Loop.3.Main.TargetSP
15466 / (3C6A)
8
Loop.3.Main.AutoMan
15467 / (3C6B)
9
Loop.3.OP.ManualOutVal
15468 / (3C6C)
10
Loop.4.Main.TargetSP
15469 / (3C6D)
11
Loop.4.Main.AutoMan
15470 / (3C6E)
12
Loop.4.OP.ManualOutVal
15471 / (3C6F)
13
Loop.5.Main.TargetSP
15472 / (3C70)
14
Loop.5.Main.AutoMan
15473 / (3C71)
15
Loop.5.OP.ManualOutVal
15474 / (3C72)
16
Loop.6.Main.TargetSP
15475 / (3C73)
17
Loop.6.Main.AutoMan
15476 / (3C74)
18
Loop.6.OP.ManualOutVal
15477 / (3C75)
19
Loop.7.Main.TargetSP
15478 / (3C76)
20
Loop.7.Main.AutoMan
15479 / (3C77)
21
Loop.7.OP.ManualOutVal
15480 / (3C78)
22
Loop.8.Main.TargetSP
15481 / (3C79)
23
Loop.8.Main.AutoMan
15482 / (3C7A)
24
Loop.8.OP.ManualOutVal
15483 / (3C7B)
25 to 100
These parameters are undefined by default
15484 to 15559 / (3C7B-3CC7)
All of this area may be redefined
by use of the CommsTab
Function Block, do not forget to
set the Output Block Size value
for the configured number of
parameters.
The Commstab Data Format
option must be set to "Integer"
to work with EtherNet/IP
TOTAL LENGTH 100 words = 200 bytes.
11.11.6
Requested Packet Interval
The EtherNet/IP module can support Requested Packet Interval (RPI) values down to 100ms. However, depending upon
the size of Input/Output blocks, the maximum rate at which a new value will be produced/consumed is every 500ms.
RPI values less than 500ms will, therefore, repeat previously produced values.
To minimise network traffic, it is recommended to set the RPI to as large a value as is reasonable for the application.
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11.12
Example - Connect Mini8 Controller to Allen-Bradley PLC via EtherNet/IP
11.12.1
Installation
1. Install the PLC software according to the instructions supplied with the PLC. For this particular PLC, once
installation is complete, the ‘RSLinx Classic’ and ‘RSLogix 5000’ software items (AMONGST OTHERS) must be
present. RSLinx classic is used to provide a link between the PLC network and Windows, and RSLogix 5000 is
configuration and programming software for the PLC.
2. Use a cross-over type serial cable to connect one of the pc ports to the serial port (typically a 9-way D-Type
connector) of the PLC
3. Connect an EtherNet cable between the EtherNet port on the PLC (typically an RJ45 socket) and the Mini8
controller. For a connection via a switch, a hub or directly to a Master, a Cat5e (straight through or cross-over)
cable can be used.
4. Power up the PLC and the controller. Switch the PLC to ‘Programmer’ mode.
11.12.2
Setting Up The Link Between Windows And The Plc Network
5. Click on Start/All Programs/Rockwell software/RSLinx/RSLinx Classic. The ‘RSLinx Classic’ window opens.
6. Click on ‘Communications’ and select ‘Configure Drivers’. When the ‘Configure Drivers’ window opens, select
‘RS232 DF1 devices’ in the ‘Available Drive Types’ pull down menu (Figure 11-3).
Figure 11-3: Configure Drivers
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7. Click on ‘Add New’ and enter a suitable Driver Name in the pop-up window that then appears. Click on ‘OK’. The
‘Configure RS-232 DF1 devices’ window opens (Figure 11-4).
Figure 11-4: Configure RS232 DFI Devices
8. In the ‘Device:’ field pull-down menu, select the relevant device name. Select the PC COM port, and the relevant
Baud Rate, Parity etc. (normally the defaults are acceptable). Click on ‘Auto-Configure’.
9. When the Auto-Configure process is complete, click on ‘OK’, to close the ‘Configure Drivers’ window, and then
minimise the ‘RSLinx Classic window.
10. Start the RSLogix 5000 program (from ‘Start/All programs/... /RSLogix 5000). When the ‘Quick Start’ window
opens, close it.
11. At the top of the RSLogix 5000 window, click on the ‘Who active’ icon or click on ‘Who Active’ in the
‘Communications’ drop down menu. The ‘Who Active’ window opens.
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11.12.3
!
Updating Firmware
Power must be maintained during the Update process (which may take some tens of minutes). Loss of
power during update may render the PLC inoperative.
1. Select the relevant instrument (Figure 11-5) and click on ‘Update Firmware’. In the ‘Choose Firmware Revision’
window, select the latest version. Click on ‘Update’.
2. Click on ‘Yes’ or ‘OK’ as appropriate to accept all the warnings and notes, and wait for the process to complete and
to be validated.
3. When the update process is complete, close the ‘Who Active’ window.
Figure 11-5: Who Active Window
11.12.4
Completing the Link
1. In the ‘File’ menu select ‘New’, or click on the ‘New Tool’ icon. The ‘New Controller’ window opens (Figure 11-6).
Figure 11-6: New Controller
2. Select the relevant PLC from the drop-down menu. Enter a name, if required and click on ‘OK’. After some seconds,
the selected controller’s window opens.
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3. Open the ‘Who active’ window. This is found under the Communications menu or the
icon. Select the
relevant instrument from the hierarchy. At this point it is possible to download the project to the controller (PLC).
Click on ‘Download’.
4. When the download is complete, right click on the relevant EtherNet port in the left pane ‘tree’, and select
‘Properties’ (Figure 11-7).
Figure 11-7: Properties
5. The Module Properties window opens. Select the ‘Port Configuration’ tab (shown if the configuration is being done
through the serial port) . For fixed IP Address applications, ‘uncheck’ the ‘Enable BootP’ check box, and enter an
appropriate IP address and Subnet mask for the PLC.
6. Click on ‘Set’, and click on ‘OK’ on the warnings and notes displays.
7. Click on ‘OK’ to close the Properties window.
8. Left click on the ‘Program’ icon (Figure 11-8) and select ‘Go OffLine’ from the menu which appears.
This view is shown if the local switch is set to PROG.
Figure 11-8: 'Go OffLine' 'Go OnLine'
9. Connect the PLC to the EtherNet port (RJ45) of the PC.
10. Restore the RSLinxClassic window. To configure the PLC as an EtherNet driver, in the ‘Communications’ menu select
‘Configure Drivers’ then ‘EtherNet/IP Driver’.
11. Click on ‘Add New’ and enter a name for the driver.
12. Select ‘Browse local subnet’ if this is not already selected.
13. Click on the relevant Network Card and Click on ‘OK’.
This associates the
software drivers with the
physical hardware.
14. Minimise the RSLinx window.
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11.12.5
Creating a Network Scanner
1. In the left pane tree-view of the RSLogix 5000
window, right click on the EtherNet symbol and
select ‘New Module...’ from the menu (Figure
11-9).
Figure 11-9: New Module
2. Expand the communications list (click on the +
symbol)
Figure 11-10: Select Module
3. Using the scroll bar as necessary, click on the
‘Generic EtherNet Module’ item and click on
‘OK’ (or double click on the selected item).
Figure 11-11: Generic EtherNet Module
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4. In the New Module page that appears (Figure 11-12), enter a name for the module, and set Connection Parameter
values:
Figure 11-12: New Module
Enter data for the Mini8 controller as follows:1. Select the Comm Format first as: Data – INT – the Size is then defined as a 16-bit number. Note, this box is greyed
when once the module has been established.
2. Address/Host name: The IP address of the Mini8 controller (this can be found in iTools, Comms menu  IP address).
3. Input:
100;
Size: 40 (see Note 1)
4. Output:
112;
Size: 24 (see Note 1)
(Size MUST match the Input Output definitions shown in iTools Comms menu)
5. Configuration: 103;
Size 0 (see Note 1)
6. Tick (click on) the ‘Open Module Properties’ checkbox if it is not already ticked.
7. Click on ‘OK”
The ‘Module Properties’ window is now shown
(Figure 11-13).
Set the Requested Packet Interval (RPI) to 1000
(1 second) and click ‘OK’.
See also section 11.11.6.
Figure 11-13: Module Properties
At this point the PLC is configured.
It is then necessary to create or load a pre-determined application for the Mini8 controller application using iTools, go to
section 11.12.6.
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NOTE 1:-
This note shows how the above values can be found using the EZ-EDS tool, as follows:-.
The Connection Parameters are fixed for a Mini8 controller, but may be found from the EDS file relevant to the
Mini8 controller in use. The figure below shows an example of the EDS file for the Input Assembly Instance. Click
Create/Decode Path button to show the ‘Path’ pop up window. The instance is shown in Hex as 64. Note: in the
New Module selection (Figure 11-2) it is entered in decimal as 100.
A similar page is available for the Output Assembly Instance.
Figure 11-14: EZ-EDS
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11.12.6
Create or Load a Mini8 Controller Configuration
1. Ensure an EtherNet/IP comms module is fitted and recognized by the instrument.
2. Configure the Mini8 controller using iTools. In the example below the all 8 loops in the Mini8 controller slave have
been setup for temperature control as shown for Loop 1 in the iTools Graphical Wiring (
Figure 11-15).
Figure 11-15: Mini8 Controller Graphical Wiring
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11.12.7
Run Mode
1. Set the PLC into either ‘Remote’ or ‘Run’ mode. This can be done using the key switch on the PLC or in the
RSLogix5000 menu.
2. Set the PLC online.
At this point you may be asked to download the file if it is different
Figure 11-16: Go online
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11.12.8
Monitor Parameters
It is possible to check that the PLC is communicating with the Mini8 controller using the ‘Tags’ display to write values to
the Mini8 controller and to receive values from it. Once it is proved that the link is working, the pc may be disconnected
from the PLC.
1. In the left pane tree-view of the RSLogix 5000 window, double click on the Controller Tags symbol.
2. Set the PLC online
3. Expand the Name list (click on the + symbol) to view parameter values. Some non zero values should appear next to
input data
Figure 11-17: Monitor Inputs and Outputs via Controller Tags
11.12.9
Status Indicators
The status indicators at the top left corner of the RSLogix 5000 Page show the status of the link between the pc and the
PLC.
Figure 11-18: Status Indicators
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11.12.10 Mini8 Controller on an Ethernet/Ip Network
To obtain a graphical representation of the network configuration (if required)
proceed as follows:
1. Start the RSNetWorx for EtherNet/IP program (from ‘Start/All programs/...
/RSNetWorx for EtherNet/IP).
2. In the ‘Tools’ menu select EDS Wizard.
3. Locate the EDS file in the Hardware list. In the Vendor list select
InvensysEurothermMini8 and register the Mini8 controller EDS file and icon.
The EDS file is available from Eurotherm. After successful registration, an
entry will appear in the Generic Device list.
4. Drag and Drop devices from the registered Hardware list to create your
network. Figure 11-19 shows an example of two Mini8 controllers on a
network together with a nanodac controller.
Figure 11-19: Example of Eurotherm Products on an EtherNet/IP Network
Implicit (Cyclic) Messaging
Using the RSLogix 5000, the user can write a Ladder program to read (get) and write (set) Implicit (Cyclic) messages
between the PLC master and Mini8 controller slave.
Expilict (Acyclic) Messaging
Using the RSNetWorx for EtherNet/IP, in the 'Device' menu, select Class Instance Editor, to read (get) and write (set)
Explicit (Acyclic) messages to the Mini8 controller. The target controller MUST be selected.
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11.12.11 TROUBLESHOOTING
1. Ensure Instruments are Powered On and Online and the PLC is set to RUN mode.
2. Ensure no error Indicators are active on instrument(s)
3. Ensure an EtherNet/IP comms module is fitted and recognized by the instrument
4. Ensure all instruments have unique EtherNet/IP addresses.
5. Ensure subnet Mask is not prohibiting connections.
6. Ensure Input and Output Size of EtherNet Module match exactly the Input and output Definitions (see Figure 11-12
New Module).
7. Ensure Assembly Instance values are supported by the Mini8 controller (see Figure 11-12 New Module)
8. Ensure EtherNet cables are not disconnected or damaged.
9. Use PING command from a PC with a similar EtherNet/IP address to verify instrument is responding.
10. Ensure any user program running on PLC is not performing illegal operations.
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11.13
EtherCAT
EtherCAT (Ethernet for Control Automation Technology) is an open real-time technology that realizes the specific
transfer of data. It offers real-time performance and is aimed to maximize the utilization of high-speed full-duplex
Ethernet data transfer through twisted pair or fibre optic cable for industrial process control needs.
EtherCAT is based on the Ethernet technology and possesses advantages such as ease of implementation, cost of
ownership and standardization. This makes it a perfect solution for industrial applications, to maximize the performance
of control systems.
Medium access control employs the Master/Slave principle, where the Master node (typically the control system) sends
the Ethernet frames to the slave nodes, which extract data from and insert data into these frames on the fly. A complete
range of topologies can be used for EtherCAT applications.
An EtherCAT segment is a single Ethernet device, from an Ethernet point of view, which receives and sends standard
ISO/IEC 802-3 Ethernet frames. This Ethernet device may consist of a large number of EtherCAT slave devices, which
process the incoming frames directly and extract the relevant user data, or insert data and transfer the frame to the next
EtherCAT slave device. The last EtherCAT slave device within the segment sends the fully processed frame back, so that
it is returned by the first slave device to the Master as a response frame.
This procedure utilizes the full duplex mode of Ethernet, which allows communication in both directions independently.
Direct communication without a switch between a Master device and an EtherCAT segment consisting of one or several
slave devices may be established.
EtherCAT slave (adaptor) is implemented as a Mini8 gateway communications option card.
W
EtherCAT slave controllers will reflect any frame back onto the network, therefore, it should not be
connected to an office network as this may result in a broadcast storm.
11.13.1
EtherCAT-to-Modbus Interface
The card can be considered a 3-port "black box", supporting an internal Modbus RTU port and 2 external EtherCAT
slave ports, with an active circuit between, acting as a "translator", converting the information in EtherCAT packets to
and from Modbus messages:
Comms Card
Mini8
controller
motherboard
EtherCAT
slave
External
network
devices
Modbus
master
Modbus
slave
From the Mini8 controller point of view the comms card looks like a Modbus Master. For the external network, the Mini8
controller Comms card looks like an EtherCAT Slave (adapter) at a minimum of 100BaseT.
11.13.2
EtherCAT Feature Switch
A
9
8
7
6
A
9
8
7
6
Page 150
B CD
5 4 3
B CD
5 4 3
The feature switch consists of two HEX rotary switches. The upper switch is the
most significant digit and the lower the least significant digit.
E
F
0
1
2
E
F
0
1
2
X10 MSD
There are three conditions where the switches can be set:
12. 0xFF: Boot mode
X1 LSD
13. 0x01 to 0xFE: Master will use this value as the “Requesting ID”. The
example shown in the diagram sets the Explicit Device ID of A6 (166),
configured by setting the MSD to A and LSD to 6.
14. 0x00: Invalid setting
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11.13.3
EtherCAT Parameters
Folder – Field Comms (FC)
Name
Parameter
Description
Value
Ident
Identification of the
module fitted.
Digital
communications
protocol
EtherCAT device ID
Network watchdog
flag
EtherCAT. Used to set the Program being
accessed via the comms channel.
EtherCAT
Network watchdog
action
Man
Protocol
Device ID
WDFlag
WDAct
Default
As selected by the module switches
Off
On
The Network communications have
stopped addressing the instrument
for longer than the Timeout time.
Set by the Watchdog process. For
EtherCAT,the watchdog will timeout
if the ECStatus is not "Op".
Auto
Access
Level
Conf
R/O
Off
R/O
Oper
Man
Conf
0:0:0:0
Conf
Safe-mode will activate at power up
and when the comms watchdog is
latched. While in safe-mode, all
loops will be set to manual, all
powers will be set to the last
received values and all SPs will be
set to SafeModeSP value.
Off
Conf
Default =
0
The Watchdog Flag must be cleared
manually - either by a parameter
write or a wired value.
The Watchdog Flag will be
automatically cleared when the
Network Comms resume - according
to the value in the Recovery Timer.
If the Network communications stop
addressing the instrument for longer
than the set value, the Watchdog
Flag will become active.
WDTime
Network watchdog
timeout
h:m:s:ms
SafeModeEn
able
Safe mode enable
On
Off
SafeMode
Power
Safe mode power
When in safe-mode, the power
output level of all loops will be set to
this value.
SafeMode
SP
Safe mode setpoint
While in safe-mode, the Setpoint of
all loops will be set to this value. It
will be set immediately with no ramp
or servo action.
ECModVer
EtherCAT Module
Version
ECStatus
EtherCAT Network
Status
CloneLiteEn
Enable clone Lite
process
This is a 16 bit hex integer value where the top
byte indicates the major revision and the bottom
byte the minor revision.
Init
No data transferred to/from
EtherCAT master.
Preop
Only acyclic (SDO) communications
to/from EtherCAT master
Safeop
Acyclic and cyclic communications
are available but Outputs are
ignored.
Op
Full communication is established
Disable
The clone Lite process enables a
simplified clone file to be sent to the
Enable
Mini8 via EtherCAT using the File
over EtherCAT process, FoE. See
also section 11.14
1303
R/O
Init
R/O
Disable
Conf
Note: All output parameters controlled by EtherCAT will retain the last value transmitted in EtherCAT OPERATIONAL
mode.
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11.13.4
Parameter pick list and IO Mapping
The EtherCAT protocol shares the 200 address parameter area with EthernetIP at 15360 to 15559. These are listed in
sections 11.11.4 and 11.11.5.
For EthernetIP this is divided into Input and Output parameters and this remains the default setting. However, EtherCAT
does not need to maintain this organisation as the IO Mapping blocks determine the Input and Output block contents
and size.
Each entry in the IOMapping blocks identifies a parameter index into the pick list. As such, valid indexes are 0 to 199.
The module will treat any value >=200 as an end of block marker.
The Default Input block for EthernetIP is configured from 15360 to 15399 giving a block size of 40. To match this in
EtherCAT, the default values for MapIn0 to MapIn39 returns 0 to 39; MapIn40 returns 0XFF at address 15400.
Similarly, the Default Output block, for Ethernet IP, is from 15460 to 15483 giving a block size of 24. Default MapOut0 to
MapOut23 returns 100 to 123; MapOut24 returns 0xFF at address 15484.
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11.14
File over EtherCAT
The master may be used to clone mini8 controllers over EtherCAT. A special file must be passed to the EtherCAT
master for sending via File over EtherCAT. This file can be produced using iCloneLite available in iTools and has the file
extension .uid.
iCloneLite is, by definition, a light-weight version of iTools cloning. It is not a replacement for instrument cloning using
iTools as described in section 4.3.
The iCloneLite engine imposes the following limitations and assumptions:
•
•
•
Single Pass cloning process
Limited reporting of parameters write failures (if any!)
Cannot cope cloning from vastly different device configuration (e.g. cross-coupled range limits)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Example – Range High/Low change from 100/0 to -100/-200
Assumes the target device is of a known configuration (e.g. cold-started or default/standard configuration)
Requires compatible hardware module configuration
Requires compatible software features configuration (or superset)
Requires exact device firmware
Custom Linearisation data will not be cloned
iTools GWE (Graphical Wiring Editor) data will not be cloned
Following successful clone, the mini8 will be placed into Operator Mode (IM=0). If the clone fails, the
mini8 will be left in Config Mode (IM=2).
If iTools cannot successfully clone the device in a single pass, then iCloneLite will most likely fail too.
In order to ensure that cloning over EtherCAT has the best chance of success the following procedure should be
employed when preparing a UID Clone Lite file:
1.
Connect a target mini8 controller, which has exact matching firmware and hardware configuration for the
clone file selected, to iTools
2.
Using iTools:
a.
Load the required UIC Clone File (for example mini8_1.uic) into the target device
i. Correct any errors reported
b. Ensure the device is in Configuration Mode
c. Save the configuration to a new UIC Clone File (for example mini8_2.uic)
d. Cold-Start the target device
e. Issue an iTools Re-synchronise request for the device (or delete device, re-add device)
f. Load the new UIC Clone File (mini8_2.uic)
i. Ensure the clone completes with zero (0) errors, ideally using a single clone pass. If ANY errors
are reported, adjust/correct configuration, then repeat steps b onwards. If errors persist or
requires more than a single clone pass, consider generating an intermediate base
configuration which can be pre-loaded into devices using iTools prior to using iCloneLite.
3.
Use UIC-To-UID converter (iCloneLite Convertor) to convert the UIC Clone File (from step c above) to a UID
file.
15. Cold-Start the device
16. Use the iCloneLite tool to send the UID file to the device
a.
Ensure the clone succeeds with zero errors
17. Using iTools:
a.
Connect to the device
b.
Save the configuration to a new UIC Clone File (for example mini8_3.uid)
c.
Perform a difference (WinMerge) between the newly saved UIC Clone File and the clone file saved in
stage 1.c (mini8_2.uic)
i. Verify that differences can be accounted for (e.g. configuration values match, any differences
are in runtime values such as PV)
If all is well, the uid file should now transfer successfully over EtherCAT using File over EtherCAT.
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11.14.1
To produce a UID File
Open iCloneLite as follows:
Start  All Programs  Eurotherm  iTools Advanced  iCloneLite Tools  Clone File to
iCloneLite Convertor
iCloneLite starts with the opening page shown below:
Browse to a previously produced UIC file (in this
example mini8_2.uic) and press Convert
The file mini8_2.uid is produced in the same folder
as the .uic file.
This file may now be used by the EtherCAT master.
11.14.2
Page 154
Precautions
1.
iTools should not be connected to the instrument via either the RJ11 socket on the front of the controller
or the configuration clip at the back at the same time as EtherCAT is operating as this may make EtherCAT
operations slower.
2.
iTools should not be connected while loading a clone file over FoE transfer (cloneLite).
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11.15
Trademark
Terms of trademark for EtherCAT
• English: "EtherCAT® is registered trademark and patented technology, licensed by Beckhoff Automation
GmbH, Germany."
• German: „EtherCAT® ist eine eingetragene Marke und patentierte Technologie lizensiert durch die Beckhoff
Automation GmbH, Deutschland.“
• French: „EtherCAT® est une marque déposée et une technologie brevetée sous licence de Beckhoff
Automation GmbH, Allemagne."
• Italian: „EtherCAT® è un marchio registrato, la tecnologia è brevettata ed è concessa in licenza da Beckhoff
Automation GmbH, Germania.”
• Spanish: „EtherCAT® es una marca registrada y una tecnología patentada, bajo licencia de Beckhoff
Automation GmbH, Alemania.”
• Japanese: „EtherCAT®は、ドイツBeckhoff Automation
GmbHによりライセンスされた特許取得済み技術であり登録商標です。"
• Korean: „EtherCAT® 독일 Beckhoff Automation GmbH의 허가를 받은 등록 상표이자 특허 기술입니다.“
• Chinese: „EtherCAT® 是注册商标和专利技术,由德国倍福自动化有限公司授权。"
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12.
Chapter 12
Counters, Timers, Totalisers, RT Clock
A series of function blocks are available which are based on time/date information. These may be used as part of the
control process.
12.1
Counters
Up to two counters are available. They provide a synchronous edge triggered event counter.
Direction
Enable
Clock
Target
Count
Counter
Function
Block
Overflow
RippleCarry
Reset
Clear Overflow
Figure 12-1: Counter Function Block
When configured as an Up counter, Clock events increment Count until reaching the Target. On reaching Target
RippleCarry is set true. At the next clock pulse, Count returns to zero. Overflow is latched true and RippleCarry is
returned false.
When configured as a down counter, Clock events decrement Count until it reaches zero. On reaching zero RippleCarry
is set true. At the next clock pulse, Count returns to the Target count. Overflow is latched true and RippleCarry is reset
false
Counter blocks can be cascaded as shown in the diagram below
Direction
Direction
Enable
Counter
Function
Block 1
Clock
Target
Count
Overflow
RippleCarry
Enable
Clock
Target
Reset
Reset
Clear Overflow
Clear Overflow
Counter
Function
Block 1
Count
Overflow
RippleCarry
Figure 12-2: Cascading Counters
The RippleCarry output of one counter acts as an enabling input for the next counter. In this respect the next counter in
sequence can only detect a clock edge if it was enabled on the previous clock edge. This means that the Carry output
from a counter must lead its Overflow output by one clock cycle. The Carry output is, therefore, called a RippleCarry as
it is NOT generated on an Overflow (i.e. Count > Target) but rather when the count reaches the target (i.e. Count =
Target). The timing diagram below illustrates the principle for the Up Counter.
Clock
Count =
Target -1
Count =
Target
Count = 0
RippleCarry
Overflow
Figure 12-3: Timing Diagram for an Up Counter
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12.1.1
Counter Parameters
Folder - Counter
Sub-folders: 1 to 2
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Enable
Counter enable.
Counter 1 or 2 is enabled in the
Instrument Options folder but
they can also be turned on or off
in this list
Yes
No
Direction
Defines count up or count down.
This is not intended for dynamic
operation (i.e. subject to change
during counting). It can only be
set in configuration level.
Up
Down
Ripple Carry
Ripple carry to act as an enabling
input to the next counter. It is
turned On when the counter
reaches the target set
Off
Overflow
Overflow flag is turned on when
the counter reaches zero
Clock
Tick period to increment or
decrement the count. This is
normally wired to an input source
such as a digital input.
0
1
Target
Level to which the counter is
aiming
0 to 99999
Count
Counts each time a clock input
occurs until the target is reached.
0 to 99999
Reset
Resets the counter
No
Yes
Not in reset
Reset
No
Oper
Clear
Overflow
Clear overflow flag
No
Yes
Not cleared
Cleared
No
Oper
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Issue 17 May 16
Default
Access
Level
Enabled
Disabled
No
Oper
Up counter
Down counter
Up
Conf
R/O
R/O
No clock input
Clock input present
0
R/O if wired
9999
Oper
R/O
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
12.2
Timers
Up to eight timers can be configured. Each one can be configured to a different type and can operate independently of
one another.
12.2.1
Timer Types
Each timer block can be configured to operate in four different modes. These modes are explained below
12.2.2
On Pulse Timer Mode
This timer is used to generate a fixed length pulse from an edge trigger.
•
The output is set to On when the input changes from Off to On.
•
The output remains On until the time has elapsed
•
•
If the ‘Trigger’ input parameter recurs while the Output is On, the Elapsed Time will reset to zero and the
Output will remain On
The triggered variable will follow the state of the output
The diagram illustrates the behaviour of the timer under different input conditions.
Input
Output
Time
Time
Elapsed Time
Triggered
Input Interval > Time
Input
Output
Time
Elapsed Time
Triggered
Figure 12-4: On Pulse Timer Under Different Input Conditions
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
12.2.3
On Delay Timer Mode
This timer provides a delay between the trigger event and the Timer output. If the input pulse is less than the set delay
time there is no output pulse.
•
The Output is set to Off when the Input changes from Off to On.
•
The Output remains Off until the Time has elapsed.
•
If the Input returns to Off before the time has elapsed, the Timer will cease and there will be no output.
•
If the Input remains on until the Time has elapsed, the Output will be set to On.
•
•
The Output will remain On until the Input is cleared to Off.
The Triggered variable will be set to On by the Input changing from Off to On. It will remain On until both
the Time has elapsed and the Output has reset to Off.
The diagram illustrates the behaviour of the timer under different input conditions.
Time
Input
When the elapsed time is
less than the set time no
Output is generated
Time
Output
Elapsed Time
Triggered
Figure 12-5: On Delay Timer under Different Input Conditions
This type of timer is used to ensure that the output is not set unless the input has been valid for a pre-determined period
of time, thus acting as a kind of input filter.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
12.2.4
One Shot Timer Mode
This timer behaves like a simple oven timer.
•
When the Time is edited to a non-zero value the Output is set to On
•
The Time value is decremented until it reaches zero. The Output is then cleared to Off
•
The Time value can be edited at any point to increase or decrease the duration of the On time
•
Once set to zero, the Time is not reset to a previous value, it must be edited by the operator to start the
next On-Time
•
The Input is used to gate the Output. If the Input is set, the time will count down to zero. If the Input is
cleared to Off, then the Time will hold and the Output will switch Off until the Input is next set.
Note: since the Input is a digital wire, it is possible for the operator to NOT wire it, and set the Input value to On which
permanently enables the timer.
•
The Triggered variable will be set to On as soon as the Time is edited. It will reset when the Output is
cleared to Off.
The behaviour of the timer under different input conditions is shown below.
Input
Time Edited
Time Edited
Output
A
Time
B
A+B = Time
Time
Elapsed Time
Triggered
This diagram shows how the Input can be used to gate the Timer as a type of hold
Input
Time Edited
Output
A+B+C+D = Time
A
B
C
D
Figure 12-6: One Shot Timer
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
12.2.5
Minimum On Timer or Compressor Mode
This type of timer may also be known as an ‘Off Delay’ function where the output goes ‘on’ when the input goes active
and remains on for a specified period after the input goes inactive.
It may be used, for example, to ensure that a compressor is not cycled excessively.
•
The output will be set to On when the Input changes from Off to On.
•
When the Input changes from On to Off, the elapsed time will start incrementing towards the set Time.
•
The Output will remain On until the elapsed time has reached the set Time. The Output will then switch
Off.
•
If the Input signal returns to On while the Output is On, the elapsed time will reset to 0, ready to begin
incrementing when the Input switches Off.
•
The Triggered variable will be set while the elapsed time is >0. It will indicate that the timer is counting.
The diagram illustrates the behaviour of the timer under different input conditions.
Input
Output
Time
Time
Elapsed Time
Triggered
Figure 12-7: Minimum On Timer Under Different Input Conditions
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
12.2.6
Timer Parameters
Folder – Timer
Sub-folders: 1 to 4
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
Type
Timer type
Off
On Pulse
Off
Conf
Time
Duration of the timer.
For re-trigger timers
this value is entered
once and copied to
the time remaining
parameter whenever
the timer starts. For
pulse timers the time
value itself is
decremented.
0:00.0
Oper
Elapsed
Time
Timer elapsed time
0:00.0 to 99:59:59
In
Trigger/Gate input.
Turn On to start timing
Off
On
Off
Start timing
Out
Timer output
Off
On
Output off
Timer has timed out
R/O
Triggered
Timer triggered
(timing). This is a
status output to
indicate that the timers
input has been
detected
Off
On
Not timing
Timer timing
R/O
Timer not configured
Generates a fixed length pulse from
an edge trigger
Off Delay Provides a delay between input
trigger event and timer putput
One
Simple oven timer which reduces to
Shot
zero before switching off
Min-On
Compressor timer guaranteeing that
the output remains ON for a time
Ti
after the input signal has been
removed
0:00.0 to 99:59:59
R/O
Off
Oper
The above table is repeated for Timers 2 to 4.
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12.3
Totalisers
There are two totaliser function blocks which are used to measure the total quantity of a measurement integrated over
time. A totaliser can, by soft wiring, be connected to any measured value. The outputs from the totaliser are its
integrated value and an alarm state. The user may set a setpoint which causes the alarm to activate once the integration
exceeds the setpoint.
The totaliser has the following attributes:1.
Run/Hold/Reset
In Run the totaliser will integrate its input and continuously test against an alarm setpoint.
In Hold the totaliser will stop integrating its input but will continue to test for alarm conditions.
In Reset the totaliser will be zeroed, and alarms will be reset.
2.
Alarm Setpoint
If the setpoint is a positive number, the alarm will activate when the total is greater than the setpoint.
If the setpoint is a negative number, the alarm will activate when the total is lower (more negative) than the setpoint.
If the totaliser alarm setpoint is set to 0.0, the alarm will be off. It will not detect values above or below.
The alarm output is a single state output. It may be cleared by resetting the totaliser, or by changing the alarm setpoint.
3.
Limits
The total is limited to a maximum of 9,999,999,999 and a minimum of -9,999,999,999.
4.
Resolution
The totaliser ensures that resolution is maintained when integrating small values onto a large total.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
12.3.1
Totaliser Parameters
Folder – Total
Sub-Folders: 1 to 2
Name
Parameter Description
Value
TotalOut
The totalised value
±9,999,999,999
R/O
In
The value to be
totalised
-9999.9 to 9999.9.
Note:- the totaliser stops accumulating if the input is
‘Bad’.
Oper
Units
Totaliser units
None
AbsTemp
V, mV, A, mA,
PH, mmHg, psi, Bar, mBar, %RH, %, mmWG, inWG,
inWW, Ohms, PSIG, %O2, PPM, %CO2, %CP, %/sec,
RelTemp
mBar/Pa/T
sec, min, hrs,
Conf
Resolution
Totaliser resolution
XXXXX
XXXX.X
XXX.XX
XX.XXX
X.XXXX
Alarm SP
Sets the totalised value
at which an alarm will
occur
±9,999,999,999
AlarmOut
This is a read only
value which indicates
the alarm output On or
Off.
The totalised value can
be a positive number
or a negative number.
If the number is
positive the alarm
occurs when
Total > + Alarm
Setpoint
If the number is
negative the alarm
occurs when
Total > - Alarm
Setpoint
Off
On
Alarm inactive
Alarm output active
Off
Oper
Run
Runs the totaliser
No
Yes
Totaliser not running
Select Yes to run the totaliser
No
Oper
Hold
Holds the totaliser at
its current value
Note:
The Run & Hold
parameters are
designed to be wired
to (for example) digital
inputs. Run must be
‘on’ and Hold must be
‘off’ for the totaliser to
operate.
No
Yes
Totaliser not in hold
Hold totaliser
No
Oper
Reset
Resets the totaliser
No
Yes
Totaliser not in reset
Totaliser in reset
No
Oper
Page 164
Default
XXXXX
Access Level
Conf
Oper
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
12.4
Real Time Clock
A real time clock (day of week and time only) is used to provide a daily and weekly scheduling facility and provides two
corresponding outputs. The configuration for an output is an On-Day and an On-Time and an Off-Day and an Off-Time.
The Real Time Clock also provides the time stamping in the AlarmLog (Section 9.8).
The day options supported are:Day Option
Description
Never
Disables the output feature
Monday
Output will only be available on a Monday
Tuesday
Output will only be available on a Tuesday
Wednesday
Output will only be available on a Wednesday
Thursday
Output will only be available on a Thursday
Friday
Output will only be available on a Friday
Saturday
Output will only be available on a Saturday
Sunday
Output will only be available on a Sunday
Mon-Fri
Output will only be available between Monday to Friday
Mon-Sat
Output will only be available on between Monday to Saturday
Sat-Sun
Output will only be available on between Saturday to Sunday
Everyday
Output always available
For example, it is possible to configure an output to be activated at 07:30 on Monday and deactivated at 17:15 on
Friday
The output from the Real Time Clock outputs may be used to place the instrument in standby or to sequence a batch
process.
The Real Time Clock function will set/clear the outputs only at the configured time. Therefore it is possible to override
the outputs manually, by editing the output to On/Off between output activations.
The Real Time Clock does not display date or year.
12.4.1
Real Time Clock Parameters
Folder – RTClock
Sub Folders: None
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Mode
This parameter can be
used to set the clock
Running
Normal operation
Edit
Allows the clock to be set
Stopped
Clock stopped (saves battery life)
Default
Access
Level
Stopped
Oper
Day
Displays the day or allows
the day to be set when in
Edit mode
Monday to Sunday
Oper
Time
Displays the time or allows
the time to be set when in
Edit mode
00:00:00 to 23:59:59
Oper
On Day1
On Day2
Days when output 1 and 2
are activated
See table above
Oper
On Time1
On Time2
Time of day when output
1 and 2 are activated
00:00:00 to 23:59:59
Oper
Off Day1
Off Day2
Days when output 1 and 2
are de-activated
See table above
Oper
Off Time1
Off Time2
Time of day when output
1 and 2 are de-activated
00:00:00 to 23:59:59
Oper
Out1
Out2
Output 1 and 2
Off
On
Oper
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Output not activated
Output activated
Page 165
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
13.
Chapter 13 Applications
13.1
Humidity
13.1.1
Overview
Humidity (and altitude) control is a standard feature of the Mini8 controller. In these applications the controller may be
configured to generate a setpoint profile (see Section 19 ‘Setpoint Programmer’).
Also the controller may be configured to measure humidity using either the traditional Wet/Dry bulb method or it may
be interfaced to a solid state sensor.
The controller output may be configured to turn a refrigeration compressor on and off, operate a bypass valve, and
possibly operate two stages of heating and/or cooling
13.1.2
Temperature Control of an Environmental Chamber
The temperature of an environmental chamber is controlled as a single loop with two control outputs. The heating
output time proportions electric heaters, usually via a solid state relay. The cooling output operates a refrigerant valve
which introduces cooling into the chamber. The controller automatically calculates when heating or cooling is required.
13.1.3
Humidity Control of an Environmental Chamber
Humidity in a chamber is controlled by adding or removing water vapour. Like the temperature control loop two control
outputs are required, i.e. Humidify and Dehumidify.
To humidify the chamber water vapour may be added by a boiler, an evaporating pan or by direct injection of atomised
water.
If a boiler is being used adding steam increases the humidity level. The humidify output from the controller regulates
the amount of steam from the boiler that is allowed into the chamber.
An evaporating pan is a pan of water warmed by a heater. The humidify output from the controller humidity regulates
the temperature of the water.
An atomisation system uses compressed air to spray water vapour directly into the chamber. The humidify output of the
controller turns on or off a solenoid valve.
Dehumidification may be accomplished by using the same compressor used for cooling the chamber. The dehumidify
output from the controller may control a separate control valve connected to a set of heat exchanger coils.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
13.1.4
Humidity Parameters
List Folder – Humidity
Sub-folder: None
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Resolution
Resolution of the relative
humidity
XXXXX
XXXX.X
XXX.XX
XX.XXX
X.XXXX
Psychro
Const
The psychrometric constant at
a given pressure (6.66E-4 at
standard atmospheric
pressure). The value is
dependent on the speed of
air-flow across the wet bulb,
and hence the rate of
evaporation. 6.66E-4 is for
the ASSMANN ventilated
Psychrometer.
0.0 to 10.0
6.66
Oper
Pressure
Atmospheric Pressure
0.0 to 2000.0
1013.0
mbar
Oper
WetTemp
Wet Bulb Temperature
Range units
WetOffset
Wet bulb temperature offset
-100.0 to 100.0
0.0
Oper
100
R/O
Default
Access Level
Conf
DryTemp
Dry Bulb Temperature
Range units
RelHumid
Relative Humidity is the ratio
of actual water vapour
pressure (AVP) to the
saturated water vapour
pressure (SVP) at a particular
temperature and pressure
0.0 to 100.0
DewPoint
The dew point is the
temperature to which air
would need to cool (at
constant pressure and water
vapour content) in order to
reach saturation
-999.9 to 999.9
R/O
Sbrk
Indicates that one of the
probes is broken.
No
Yes
Conf
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No sensor break detection
Sensor break detection
enabled
Page 167
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
13.2
Zirconia (Carbon Potential) Control
A Mini8 Controller has a Zirconia function block which may be used to control Carbon potential. The controller is often a
programmer which generates carbon potential profiles. In this section it is assumed that a programmer is used.
Calculation of PV: The Process Variable can be Carbon Potential, Dewpoint or Oxygen concentration. The PV is
derived from the probe temperature input, the probe mV input and remote gas reference input values. Various probe
makes are supported. In the Mini8 Controller Carbon Potential and Dewpoint can be displayed together.
The following definitions may be useful:13.2.1
Temperature Control
The sensor input of the temperature loop may come from the zirconia probe but it is common for a separate
thermocouple to be used. The controller provides a heating output which may be connected to gas burners or
thyristors to control electrical heating elements. In some applications a cooling output may also be connected to a
circulation fan or exhaust damper.
13.2.2
Carbon Potential Control
The zirconia probe generates a millivolt signal based on the ratio of oxygen concentrations on the reference side of the
probe (outside the furnace) to the amount of oxygen in the furnace.
The controller uses the temperature and carbon potential signals to calculate the actual percentage of carbon in the
furnace. This second loop generally has two outputs. One output is connected to a valve which controls the amount of
an enrichment gas supplied to the furnace. The second output controls the level of dilution air.
13.2.3
Sooting Alarm
In addition to other alarms which may be detected by the controller, the Mini8 Controller can trigger an alarm when the
atmospheric conditions are such that carbon will be deposited as soot on all surfaces inside the furnace. The alarm may
be connected to an output (e.g. relay) to initiate an external alarm.
13.2.4
Automatic Probe Cleaning
The Zirconia function block has a probe clean and recovery strategy that can be programmed to occur between batches
or manually requested. At the start of the cleaning process a ‘snapshot’ of the probe mV is taken, and a short blast of
compressed air is used to remove any soot and other particles that may have accumulated on the probe. A minimum
and maximum cleaning time can be set by the user. If the probe mV has not recovered to within 5% of the snapshot
value within the maximum recovery time set then an alarm is given. This indicates that the probe is ageing and
replacement or refurbishment is due. During the cleaning and recovery cycle the PV is frozen, thereby ensuring
continuous furnace operation. A flag ‘PvFrozen’ is set which can be used in an individual strategy, for example to hold
the integral action during cleaning.
13.2.5
Endothermic Gas Correction
A gas analyser may be used to determine the CO concentration of the endothermic gas. If a 4-20mA output is available
from the analyser, it can be fed into the Mini8 Controller to automatically adjust the calculated % carbon reading.
Alternatively, this value can be entered manually.
13.2.6
Clean Probe
As these sensors are used in furnace environments they require regular cleaning. Cleaning (Burn Off) is performed by
forcing compressed air through the probe. Cleaning can be initiated either manually or automatically using a timed
period. During cleaning the PV output is frozen.
13.2.7
Probe Status
After cleaning an alarm output, MinCalcT, is generated if the PV does not return to 95% of its previous value within a
specified time. This indicates that the probe is deteriorating and should be replaced.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
13.2.8
Zirconia Parameters
Folder - Zirconia
Sub-folders: None
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Probe Type
Configures the type of probe to be
used
Resolution
Resolution of the calculated result
Drayton
Accucarb
SSI
MacDhui
%O2
LogO2
BoschO2
ZircoDew
ProbeMV
BoschCarb
BarberC
MMICarb
AACC
X
X.X
X.XXX
X.XXX
Default
Access Level
Op
Drayton
Accucarb
SSI
MacDhui
Oxygen
Log Oxygen
Bosch Oxygen
Dewpoint.
Probe mV
Bosch Carbon
Barber-Colman
MMI Carbon
AACC
X
Op
-9999.9 to 9999.9
-9999.9 to 9999.9
0
Internal
1
External
20.0
0.0
0
Op
-99999 to 99999
720
Op
1.0
4:00:00
Op
0:00:00
Op
0:00:00
Op
0:10:00
Op
X.XXXX
Parameters shown in shaded rows below are not applicable to O2 probes
GasRef
RemGasRef
RemGasEn
MinCalTemp
OxygenExp
Tolerance
CleanFreq
CleanTime
MinRcovTime
MaxRcovTime
TempInput
TempOffset
ProbeInput
ProbeOffset
Oxygen
CarbonPot
DewPoint
SootAlm
ProbeFault
PvFrozen
CleanValve
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Gas reference value
Remote gas reference value
Enable the remote gas reference. This
can be an internal value from the user
interface or from an external source
Minimum calculation temperature
The exponent units of the log oxygen
type calculation
Tolerance of the sooting
Frequency of the cleaning process
-9999.9 to 9999.9
0:00:00 to 99:59:59 or 100:00
to 500:00
Sets the duration of the clean
0:00:00 to 99:59:59 or 100:00
to 500:00
Minimum recovery time after purging
0:00:00 to 99:59:59 or 100:00
to 500:00
Maximum recovery time after purging
0:00:00 to 99:59:59 or 100:00
to 500:00
Zirconia probe temperature input value Temp range
Sets a temperature offset for the probe -99999 to 99999
Zirconia probe mV input
Zirconia probe mV offset
-99999 to 99999
Calculated oxygen
Calculated carbon potential
Zirconia control process value
The O2 or dew point value derived
from temperature and remote gas
reference inputs
Probe sooting alarm output
No
No alarm output
Yes
In alarm
Probe fault
No
Yes
This is a Boolean which freezes the PV
No
during a purging cycle. It may have
Yes
been wired, for example, to disable
control output during purging
Enable the clean valve.
No
Yes
Op
Op
Op
Op
0
Op
Op
0
0
0
0
Op
No
R/O
No
Op
No
R/O
No
R/O
R/O
R/O
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Folder - Zirconia
Sub-folders: None
Name
Parameter Description
Value
CleanState
The burn off state of the zirconia probe
CleanProbe
Time2Clean
Enable clean probe.
This may be wired to initiate
automatically or if un-wired can be set
by the user
Time to next clean.
Waiting
Cleaning
Recovering
No
Yes
ProbeStatus
Indicates the status of the probe.
Page 170
Default
Do not clean
No
probe
Initiate probe
clean
0:00:00 to 99:59:59 or 100:00
0
to 500:00
OK
Normal working
mVSbr
Probe input in
sensor break
TempSbr
Temperature
input in sensor
break
MinCalcT
Probe
deteriorating
Access Level
R/O
Op
R/O
R/O
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
14.
Chapter 14 Input Monitor
14.1
Description
There are two Input monitors. Each input monitor may be wired to any variable in the controller. It then provides three
functions:-
14.1.1
1.
Maximum detect
2.
Minimum detect
3.
Time above threshold
Maximum Detect
This function continuously monitors the input value. If the value is higher than the previously recorded maximum, it
becomes the new maximum.
This value is retained following a power fail.
14.1.2
Minimum Detect
This function continuously monitors the input value. If the value is lower than the previously recorded minimum, it
becomes the new minimum.
This value is retained following a power fail.
14.1.3
Time Above Threshold
This function increments a timer whenever the input is above a threshold value. If the timer exceeds 24 hours per day, a
counter is incremented. The maximum number of days is limited to 255. A time alarm can be set on the timer so that
once the input has been above a threshold for a period, an alarm output is given.
Applications include:•
Service interval alarms. This sets an output when the system has been running for a number of days (up to
255 days)
•
Material stress alarms - if the process cannot tolerate being above a level for a period. This is a style of
‘policeman’ for processes where the high operating point degrades the life of the machine.
•
In internal wiring applications in the controller
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
14.2
Input Monitor Parameters
Folder - IPMonitor
Sub-Folders: 1 or 2
Name
Parameter Description
Value
In
The input value to be
monitored
May be wired to an input source. The
range will depend on the source
Oper R/O if
wired
Max
The maximum measured
value recorded since the
last reset
As above
R/O
Min
The minimum measured
value recorded since the
last reset
As above
R/O
Threshold
The input timer accumulates
the time the input PV
spends above this trigger
value.
As above
Oper
Days Above
Accumulated days the input
has spent above threshold
since the last reset.
Days is an integer count of the 24 hour
periods only. The Days value should be
combined with the Time value to make
the total time above threshold.
R/O
Time Above
Accumulated time above
the ‘Threshold’ since last
reset.
The time value accumulates from 00:00.0
to 23:59.9. Overflows are added to the
days value
R/O
AlarmDays
Days threshold for the
monitors time alarm. Used
in combination with the
Alarm Time parameter. The
‘Out’ is set to true if the
inputs accumulated time
above threshold is higher
than the timer high
parameters.
0 to 255
0
Oper
AlarmTime
Time threshold for the
monitors time alarm. Used
in combination with the
Alarm Days parameter. The
‘Out’ is set to true if the
inputs accumulated time
above threshold is higher
than the timer high
parameters.
0:00.0 to 99:59:59
0:00.0
Oper
Out
Set true if the accumulated
time that the input spends
above the trigger value is
higher than the alarm
threshold.
Off
On
Normal operation
time above setpoint exceeded
Reset
Resets the Max and Min
values and resets the time
above threshold to zero.
No
Yes
Normal operation
Reset values
In Status
Monitors the status of the
input
Good
Bad
Normal operation
The input may be incorrectly
wired
Page 172
Default
Access Level
R/O
No
Oper
R/O Oper
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.
15.1
Chapter 15 Logic and Maths Operators.
Logic Operators
Logic Operators allow the controller to perform logical calculations on two input values. These values can be sourced
from any available parameter including Analogue Values, User Values and Digital Values.
The parameters to use, the type of calculation to be performed, input value inversion and ‘fallback’ value are determined
in Configuration level.
There are 24 separate calculations – they do not have to be in sequence. When logic operators are enabled a Folder
‘Lgc2’ exists where the 2 denotes two input logic operators.
Logic input 1
Invert
Logic input 2
Invert
Logic operator
(Oper)
Output Value
(result of calculation)
Figure 15-1: 2 Input Logic Operators
Logic Operators are found under the folder ‘Lgc2’. Note that the logic operators can also be enable by dragging a block
onto the graphical wiring screen in iTools.
15.1.1
Logic 8
Logic 8 operators can perform logic calculations on up to eight inputs. The calculations are limited to AND,OR,XOR.
Up to two 8 input operators can be enabled. The folder is labelled ‘Lgc8’ to denote eight input logic operators.
Logic input 1
Invert
Logic input 2
Invert
Logic input 3
Invert
Logic input 4
Invert
Logic input 5
Invert
Output Value
(result of calculation)
Logic operator
(Oper)
Invert
Logic input 6
Invert
Logic input 7
Invert
Logic input 8
Invert
Figure 15-2: 8 Input Logic Operators
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.1.2
2 input Logic Operations
The following calculations can be performed:
Oper
Operator description
0: OFF
The selected logic operator is turned off
1: AND
The output result is ON when both Input
1 and Input 2 are ON
2: OR
The output result is ON when either
Input 1 or Input 2 is ON
3: XOR
Exclusive OR. The output result is true
when one and only one input is ON. If
both inputs are ON the output is OFF.
4: Latch
Input 1 sets the latch, Input 2 resets the
latch.
5: Equal (==)
The output result is ON when Input 1 =
Input 2
6: Not equal
(<>)
The output result is ON when Input 1
does not equal Input 2
7: Greater than
(>)
The output result is ON when Input 1 >
Input 2
8: Less than (<)
The output result is ON when Input 1 <
Input 2
9: Equal to or
Greater than
(=>)
The output result is ON when Input 1 >
Input 2
10: Less than or
Equal to (<=)
The output result is ON when Input 1 <
Input 2
Input 1
Input 2
Output Invert = None
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
Off
Off
Off
On
Off
On
On
On
Off
On
On
Off
On
Off
Off
On
Off
On
On
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
Off
Off
On
Off
On
On
Off
On
On
Off
On
On
Note 1: The numerical value is the value of the enumeration
Note 2: For options 1 to 4 an input value of less than 0.5 is considered false and greater than or equal to 0.5 as true.
Page 174
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.1.3
Logic Operator Parameters
Folder – Lgc2 (2 Input Operators)
Sub-Folders: 1 to 24
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
Oper
To select the type of
operator
See previous table
None
Conf
In1
Input 1
0
OPER
In2
Input 2
Normally wired to a logic, analogue or user
value. May be set to a constant value if not
wired.
FallbackType
The fallback state of the
output if one or both of
the inputs is bad
Invert
The sense of the input
value, may be used to
invert one or both of the
inputs
0: FalseBad
The output value is FALSE
and the status is GOOD.
1: TrueBad
The output value is FALSE
and the status is BAD
2: FalseGood
The output value is TRUE
and the status is GOOD
3: TrueGood
The output value is TRUE
and the status is BAD.
0: None
Neither input inverted
1: Input1
Invert input 1
2: Input2
Invert input 2
3: Both
Invert both inputs
Output activated
Output not activated
Out
The output from the
operation is a boolean
(true/false) value.
On
Off
Status
The status of the result
value
Good
Bad
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Conf
Conf
R/O
R/O
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.2
Eight Input Logic Operators
The eight input logic operator may be used to perform the following operations on eight inputs.
Oper
Operator description
0: OFF
The selected logic operator is turned off
1: AND
The output result is ON when ALL eight inputs are ON
2: OR
The output result is ON when one or more of the 8
inputs are ON
3: XOR
Exclusive OR – the output is true if an odd number of
inputs are true.
(In1 ⊕ In2) ⊕ (In3 ⊕ In4) ⊕ (In5 ⊕ In6) ⊕ (In7 ⊕ In8)
Eight Input Logic Operator Parameters
Folder – Lgc8 (8 Input Operators)
Sub-Folders: 1 to 4
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Oper
To select the type of
operator
0: OFF
1: AND
2: OR
3: XOR
NumIn
This parameter is used to
configure the number of
inputs for the operation
InInvert
Used to invert selected inputs
prior to operation.
This is a status word with one
bit per input, the left hand bit
inverts input 1.
Default
Access Level
OFF
Conf
1 to 8
2
Conf
The invert parameter is interpreted as a bitfield
where:
1 (0x1) - input 1
2 (0x2) - input 2
4 (0x4) - input 3
8 (0x8) - input 4
16 (0x10) - input 5
32 (0x20) - input 6
64 (0x40)- input 7
0
Oper
Operator turned off
Output ON when all inputs are ON
Output ON when one input is ON
Exclusive OR
128 (0x80)- input 8 (e.g. 255 = all eight)
Out Invert
Invert the output
No
Yes
Output not inverted
Output inverted
No
Oper
In1 to In8
Input state 1 to 8
Normally wired to a logic, analogue or user
value.
When wired to a floating point, values less
than or equal to –0.5 or greater than or
equal to 1.5 will be rejected (e.g. the value
of the lgc8 block will not change).
Values between –0.5 and 1.5 will be
interpreted as ON when greater than or
equal to 0.5 and OFF when less than 0.5.
May be set to a constant value if not wired.
Off
Oper
Out
Output result of the
operator
On
Off
Page 176
Output activated
Output not activated
R/O
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.3
Maths Operators
Maths Operators (sometimes known as Analogue Operators) allow the controller to perform mathematical operations
on two input values. These values can be sourced from any available parameter including Analogue Values, User Values
and Digital Values. Each input value can be scaled using a multiplying factor or scalar.
The parameters to use, the type of calculation to be performed and the acceptable limits of the calculation are
determined in Configuration level. In normal operation the values of each of the scalars may be changed via
communications or iTools.
There are 24 separate calculations – they do not have to be in sequence. When maths operators are enabled (in
Instrument/Options folder) a Folder ‘Math2’ exists (where the 2 denotes two input maths operators).
Output Value
(result of calculation)
Input 1
Input 1 Scalar
Math operator
Input 2
Input 2 Scalar
Figure 15-3: 2 Input Math Operators
8 input multiplexers are also available and are described in section 15.5.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.3.1
Math Operations
The following operations can be performed:
0: Off
The selected analogue operator is turned off
1: Add
The output result is the addition of Input 1 and Input 2
2: Subtract (Sub)
The output result is the difference between Input 1 and Input 2
where Input 1 > Input 2
3: Multiply (Mul)
The output result is the Input 1 multiplied by Input 2
4: Divide (Div)
The output result is Input 1 divided by Input 2
5: Absolute Difference
(AbsDif)
The output result is the absolute difference between Input 1 and 2
6: Select Max (SelMax)
The output result is the maximum of Input 1 and Input 2
7: Select Min (SelMin)
The output result is the minimum of Input 1 and Input 2
8: Hot Swap (HotSwp)
Input 1 appears at the output provided input 1 is ‘good’. If input 1 is ‘bad’ then input 2
value will appear at the output. An example of a bad input occurs during a sensor break
condition.
9: Sample and Hold
(SmpHld)
Normally input 1 will be an analogue value and input B will be digital.
The output tracks input 1 when input 2 = 1 (Sample).
The output will remain at the current value when input 2 = 0 (Hold).
If input 2 is an analogue value then any non zero value will be interpreted as ‘Sample’.
10: Power
The output is the value at input 1 raised to the power of the value at input 2. I.e. input
input 2
1
11: Square Root (Sqrt)
The output result is the square root of Input 1. Input 2 has no effect.
12: Log
The output is the logarithm (base 10) of Input 1. Input 2 has no effect
13: Ln
The output is the logarithm (base n) of Input 1. Input 2 has no effect
14: Exp
The output result is the exponential of Input 1. Input 2 has no effect
15: 10 x
The output result is 10 raised to the power of Input 1 value. I.e. 10
effect
51: Select
Select input is used to control which Analogue Input is switched to the output of the
Analogue Operator. If the select input is true input 2 is switched through to the output.
If false input 1 is switched through to the output. See example below:-
input 1
. Input 2 has no
Select input
An
input 1
An
input 2
Select
Logic
1
If Select Input = 1, then An input 2 is selected
If Select Input = 0, then An input 1 is selected
An Op 1
When Boolean parameters are used as inputs to analogue wiring, they will be cast to 0.0 or 1.0 as appropriate. Values
<= -0.5 or >= 1.5 will not be wired. This provides a way to stop a Boolean updating. Analogue wiring (whether simple
re-routing or involving calculations) will always output a real type result, whether the inputs were booleans, integers or
reals.
Note: The numerical value is the value of the enumeration
Page 178
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.3.2
Math Operator Parameters
Folder – Math2 (2 Input Operators)
Sub-Folders: 1 to 24
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
Oper
To select the type of
operator
See previous table
None
Conf
In1Mul
Scaling factor on input 1
Limited to max float *
1.0
Oper
In2 Mul
Scaling factor on input 2
Limited to max float *
1.0
Oper
Units
Units applicable to the
output value
None
AbsTemp
V, mV, A, mA,
PH, mmHg, psi, Bar, mBar, %RH, %, mmWG,
inWG, inWW, Ohms, PSIG, %O2, PPM,
%CO2, %CP, %/sec,
RelTemp
mBar/Pa/T
None
Conf
sec, min, hrs,
Resolution
Resolution of the output
value
XXXXX. XXXX.X, XXX.XX, XX.XXX, X.XXXX
Conf
LowLimit
To apply a low limit to the
output
Max float* to High limit (decimal point
depends on resolution)
Conf
HighLimit
To apply a high limit to the
output
Low limit to Max float* (decimal point
depends on resolution)
Conf
Fallback
The state of the Output and
Status parameters in case of
a fault condition. This
parameter could be used in
conjunction with fallback
value
Clip Bad
Clip Good
Fall Bad
Fall Good
Upscale
DownScale
Fallback Val
Defines (in accordance with
Fallback) the output value
during fault conditions.
Limited to max float * (decimal point
depends on resolution)
Conf
In1
Input 1 value (normally
wired to an input source –
could be a User Value)
Limited to max float * (decimal point
depends on resolution)
Oper
In2
Input 2 value (normally
wired to an input source –
could be a User Value)
Limited to max float * (decimal point
depends on resolution)
Oper
Out
Indicates the analogue
value of the output
Between high and low limits
R/O
Status
This parameter is used in
conjunction with Fallback to
indicate the status of the
operation. Typically, status
is used to flag fault
conditions and may be used
as an interlock for other
operations.
Good
Bad
R/O
Descriptions, see section
8.5.5
Conf
* Max float in this instrument is +9,999,999,999
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.3.3
Sample and Hold Operation
The diagram below shows the operation of the sample and hold feature.
10
5
0
-5
-10
IP1
True
False
IP2
10
5
0
-5
-10
Result
Figure 15-4: Sample and Hold
Page 180
HA028581
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.4
Multiple Input Operator Block
The Multiple Input Operator Block simultaneously outputs the Sum, Average, Minimum and Maximum values of up to 8
valid inputs. The outputs will be clipped to user-defined limits or be replaced by a fallback value based on the selected
fallback strategy.
Num Casc In
Casc In
In1
Num Valid Ins
MultiOper Block
Sum
Min
In2
Max
In3
Average
In4
Input status
In5
In6
In7
In8
Units
Res’n
Out Hi Limit
Out Lo Limit
Fallback Val
Fallback Typ
Figure 15-5: Multi Operator Function Block
‘Num In’ determines the number of inputs made available for use. This is settable by the user and is defaulted to two.
The user should be careful not to set this number to a value higher than the desired number of inputs as any unused
inputs are seen as valid inputs to the block (zero value by default). Num Casc In and Casc In will always be available.
‘Input Status’ gives an indication of the status of the inputs in priority order. Casc In has the highest priority, In1 the next
highest up to In8 the lowest. Should more than one input be bad then the input with the highest priority is shown as
bad. When the highest priority bad status is cleared the next highest priority bad status is shown. When all inputs are OK
a status of OK is shown.
‘Number of valid inputs’ provides a count of the number of inputs used to perform the calculation within the block. This
is required for cascaded operation and is detailed below.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.4.1
Cascaded operation
Multiple input operator blocks may be cascaded to allow operations on more than eight inputs (33 max for four
instances of the block). shows how two blocks should be configured to find the average of more than eight inputs. If
required the second block could then be cascaded to a third to provide up to eight more inputs.
MultiOper
NumCascIn
NumValid
NumCascIn
MultiOper
NumValid Ins
Sum
Casc In
In1
Min
In1
Min
In2
Max
In2
Max
Casc In
Sum
Average
Average
Input status
Input status
Figure 15-6: Cascaded Multi Operator Function Blocks
If ‘CascIn’ is has Good status, and ‘NumCascIn’ is not equal to zero we can assume that the block is in cascade and these
values are used for calculations within the block, and the value given by ‘NumCascIn’ is added to ‘NumValidIns’. When
in cascade the sum, min, max and average outputs treat Casc In as an additional input to the block. For example if Casc
In is greater than any number on the rest of the inputs then its value will be output as the max.
15.4.2
Fallback Strategy
The user is able to select the fallback strategy during config. The options are:Clip Good
The status of the outputs is always good
If an output is out of range then it is clipped to limits
If all inputs are bad, all outputs = 0 (Or clipped to limits if 0 is not within the output range)
Clip Bad
The status of all outputs is bad if one or more of the inputs are bad
If an output is out of range then it is clipped to limits and the status of that output is set to bad
If all inputs are bad, all outputs = 0 and all status’ are set to bad (Or clipped to limits if 0 is not within the
output range)
Fall Good
The status of the outputs is always good
If an output is out of range then it is set to the fallback value
If all inputs are bad, all outputs = fallback value
Fall Bad
The status of all outputs is bad if one or more of the inputs are bad
If an output is out of range then it is set to the fallback value and the status is set to bad
If all inputs are bad, all outputs are set to the fallback value and all statuses are set to bad
Page 182
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15.4.3
Multiple Input Operator Block Parameters
Folder – MultiOper (Multi Operator)
Sub-folders: 1 to 4
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access Level
NumIn
Number of inputs selected
to use.
2 to 8
2
Config
CascNumIn
Number of cascaded inputs
from the previous block
0 to 255
0
R/O
CascIn
The cascaded input from a
previous block
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point
depends on Resolution)
0
R/O
In 1 to In 8
Input 1
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point
depends on Resolution)
0
R/O
Units
Selected units for the I/O
Unit8 (nvol)
None
Config
Resolution
Selected resolution of the
Outputs
X to X.XXX
X
Config
OutHi Limit
Upper limit of the outputs.
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point
depends on Resolution). Minimum
setting is limited by ‘OutLoLimit’.
0
Config
OutLo Limit
Lower limit of the outputs.
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point
depends on Resolution). Maximum
setting is limited by ‘OutHiLimit’.
0
Config
Fallback Val
Value to be output
depending on Input status
and fallback type selected.
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point
depends on Resolution)
0
Config
Fallback Typ
Fallback Type selected.)
Clip Bad
Clip Good
Fall Bad
Fall Good
Upscale
DownScale
Clip Good
Config
NumValidIn
Number of inputs used in
the calculated outputs
(Output)
2 to 8
0
R/O
Sum Out
Sum of the valid inputs
(Output)
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point
depends on Resolution)
0
R/O
Max Out
Maximum value of the valid
inputs (Output)
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point
depends on Resolution)
0
R/O
Min Out
Minimum value of the valid
inputs (Output)
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point
depends on Resolution)
0
R/O
Average Out
Average value of the valid
inputs (Output)
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point
depends on Resolution)
0
R/O
Input Status
Status of the inputs (Output)
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point
depends on Resolution)
0
R/O
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See section 15.4.2
Page 183
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
15.5
Eight Input Analog Multiplexers
The eight Input analogue multiplexers may be used to switch one of eight inputs to an output. It is usual to wire inputs
to a source within the controller that selects that input at the appropriate time or event.
15.5.1
Multiple Input Operator Parameters
Folder – Mux8 (8 Input Multiplexers)
Sub-folders: 1 to 4
Name
Parameter Description
Value
LowLimit
The low limit for all inputs
and the fall back value.
-99999 to High limit (decimal point
depends on resolution)
Conf
HighLimit
The high limit for all inputs
and the fall back value.
Low limit to 99999 (decimal point depends
on resolution)
Conf
Fallback
The state of the Output and
Status parameters in case of
a fault condition. This
parameter could be used in
conjunction with Fallback
Val.
Clip Bad
Clip Good
Fall Bad
Fall Good
Upscale
DownScale
Fallback Val
Used (in accordance with
Fallback) to define the
output value during fault
conditions
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point depends
on resolution)
Conf
Select
Used to select which input
value is assigned to the
output.
Input1 to Input8
Oper
In1 to 8
Input values (normally wired
to an input source)
-99999 to 99999 (decimal point depends
on resolution)
Oper
Out
Indicates the analogue
value of the output
Between high and low limits
R/O
Status
Used in conjunction with
Fallback to indicate the
status of the operation.
Typically, status is used to
flag fault conditions and
may be used as an interlock
for other operations.
Good
Bad
R/O
15.5.2
Default
Descriptions see section
15.4.2.
Access Level
Conf
Fallback
The fallback strategy will come into effect if the status of the input value is bad or if the input value is outside the range of
Input Hi and Input Lo.
In this case the fallback strategy may be configured as:-
Page 184
Fall Good
If the input value is above ‘High Limit’ or below ‘Low Limit’, then the output value is set
to the ‘Fallback’ value, and the ‘Status’ is set to ‘Good’.
Fall Bad
If the input value is above ‘High Limit’ or below ‘Low Limit’, then the output value is set
to the ‘Fallback’ value, and the ‘Status’ is set to ‘Bad’.
Clip Good
If the input value is above ‘High Limit’ or below ‘Low Limit’, then the output value is set
to the appropriate limit, and ‘Status’ is set to ‘Bad’. If the input signal is within the
limits, but its status is bad, the output is set to the ‘Fallback’ value.
Clip Bad
If the input value is above ‘High Limit’ or below ‘Low Limit’, then the output value is set
to the appropriate limit, and ‘Status’ is set to ‘Good’. If the input signal is within the
limits, but its status is bad, the output is set to the ‘Fallback’ value
Upscale
If the input status is bad, or if the input signal is above ‘High Limit’ or below ‘Low Limit’,
the output value is set to the ‘High Limit’.
Downscale
If the input status is bad, or if the input signal is above ‘High Limit’ or below ‘Low Limit’,
the output value is set to the ‘Low Limit’.
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Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
16.
16.1
Chapter 16 Input Characterisation
Input Linearisation
The Lin16 function block converts an input signal into an output PV using a series of up to 15 straight lines to
characterise the conversion.
The function block provides the following behaviour.
1.
The Input values must be monotonic and constantly rising.
2.
To convert the MV to the PV, the algorithm will search the table of inputs until the matching segment is
found. Once found, the points either side will be used to interpolate the output value.
3.
If during the search, a point is found which is not above the previous (below for inverted) then the
search will be terminated and the segment taken from the last good point to the extreme (In Hi-Out Hi)
see following diagram.
Out Hi
Terminated
search
Output 1 ( to 14)
Ignored data
points
Out Lo
In Lo
Input 1( to 14)
In Hi
Figure 16-1: Linearisation Example
Notes:
1.
The linearisation block works on rising inputs/rising outputs or rising inputs/falling outputs. It is not
suitable for outputs which rise and fall on the same curve.
2.
Input Lo/Output Lo and Input Hi/Output Hi are entered first to define the low and high points of the
curve. It is not necessary to define all 15 intermediate points if the accuracy is not required. Points not
defined will be ignored and a straight line fit will apply between the last point defined and the Input
Hi/Output Hi point. If the input source has a bad status (sensor break, or over-range) then the output
value will also have a bad status.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
1.
2.
3.
If the input value is outside the
translated range then the output status
will indicate Bad, and the value will be
limited to the nearest output limit.
Out Low
The units and resolution parameters will
be used for the output values. The input
values resolution and units will be
specified by the source of the wire.
Note:
Out Low > Out
High
If the ‘Out Low’ is higher than the ‘Out
High’ then the translation will be
inverted.
First nonmonatonic
data point
Ignored
data
points
Terminated
search
Out High
In Low
In High
Figure 16-2: How an Inverted Curve will Terminate its search when it detects non-monatonic data
16.1.1
Compensation for Sensor Non-Linearities
The custom linearisation feature can also be used to compensate for errors in the sensor or measurement system. The
intermediate points are, therefore, available in Level 1 so that known discontinuities in the curve can be calibrated out.
The diagram below shows an example of the type of discontinuity which can occur in the linearisation of a temperature
sensor.
Output Hi
eg 1000oC
Cal Point 6
Output 1 ( to 14)
Cal Point 5
Cal Point 4
Cal Point 3
Cal Point 2
Cal Point 1
Input 1 ( to 14)
Output Lo
eg 0oC
Input Lo eg 0oC
Input Hi eg 1000oC
Figure 16-3: Compensation for Sensor Discontinuities
The calibration of the sensor uses the same procedure as described above. Adjust the output (displayed) value against
the corresponding input value to compensate for any errors in the standard linearisation of the sensor.
Note:
Do not exceed the range of the instrument when choosing the compensation range. For example, whereas type K
O
O
tables show mV values up to -270 C the instrument range is limited to -200 C so that errors may occur in the mid range
O
if -200 C is exceeded.
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16.1.2
Input Linearisation Parameters
List Folder – Lin16
Sub-folders: 1 to 2
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
Units
Units of the linearised
output
None
AbsTemp
V, mV, A, mA,
PH, mmHg, psi, Bar, mBar, %RH, %, mmWG,
inWG, inWW, Ohms, PSIG, %O2, PPM,
%CO2, %CP, %/sec,
RelTemp
mBar/Pa/T
sec, min, hrs,
Conf
Resolution
Resolution of the output
value
XXXXX. XXXX.X, XXX.XX, XX.XXX, X.XXXX
Conf
In
Input measurement to
linearise. Wire to the source
for the custom linearisation
Between InLowLimit and InHighLimit
0
Oper
FallbackType
Fallback Type
The fallback strategy will
come into effect if the status
of the input value is bad or if
the input value is outside
the range of input high
scale and input low scale. In
this case the fallback
strategy may be configured
as shown:-
Clip Bad
If the input is outside a limit
the output will be clipped to
the limit and the status will
be BAD
ClipBad
Oper
Clip Good
If the input is outside a limit
the output will be clipped to
the limit and the status will
be GOOD
Fall Bad
The output value will be the
fallback value and the
output status will be BAD
Fall Good
The output value will be the
fallback value and the
output status will be GOOD
Upscale
The output value will be
output high scale and the
output status will be BAD
DownScale
The output value will be the
output low scale and the
output status will be BAD
0
Oper
Fallback Value
In the event of a bad status, the output may be configured to adopt the
fallback value. This allows the strategy to dictate a safe output in the event
of a fault being detected.
Out
Linearisation Result
Between OutLowLimit and OutHighLimit
InLowLimit
Adjust to the low input
value
-99999 to InHighLimit
0
Conf
OutLowLimit
Adjust to correspond to the
low input value
-99999 to OutHighLimit
0
Conf
InHighLimit
Adjust to the high input
value
InLowLimit to 99999
0
Conf
OutHighLimit
Adjust to correspond to the
high input value
OutLowLimit to 99999
0
Conf
In1
Adjust to the first break
point
0
Oper
Out1
Adjust to correspond to
input 1
0
Oper
…etc up to
In14
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0
Adjust to the last break
point
0
Oper
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
List Folder – Lin16
Sub-folders: 1 to 2
Name
Parameter Description
Out14
Adjust to correspond to
input 14
Status
Status of the block. A value
of zero indicates a healthy
conversion.
Value
Good
Bad
Default
Access
Level
0
Oper
Within operating limits
A bad output may be caused
by a bad input signal (perhaps
the input is in sensor break) or
an output which is out of range
R/O
The 16 point linearisation does not require you to use all 16 points. If fewer points are required, then the curve can be
terminated by setting the first unwanted value to be less than the previous point.
Conversely if the curve is a continuously decreasing one, then it may be terminated by setting the first unwanted point
above the previous one.
16.2
Polynomial
Folder – Poly
Sub-Folders: 1 to 2
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
LinType
To select the input type.
The linearisation type selects
which of the instruments
linearisation curves is applied
to the input signal. The
instrument contains a number
of thermocouple and RTD
linearisations as standard. In
addition there are a number of
custom linearisations that may
be downloaded using iTools to
provide linearisations of nontemperature sensors.
J , K, L, R, B, N, T, S, PL2, C, PT100,
PT1000, Linear, SqRoot
J
Conf
Units
Units of the output
None
AbsTemp
V, mV, A, mA,
PH, mmHg, psi, Bar, mBar, %RH, %,
mmWG, inWG, inWW, Ohms, PSIG,
%O2, PPM, %CO2, %CP, %/sec,
RelTemp
mBar/Pa/T
sec, min, hrs,
None
Conf
Resolution
Resolution of the output value
XXXXX. XXXX.X, XXX.XX, XX.XXX,
X.XXXX
XXXXX
Conf
In
Input Value
The input to the linearisation
block
Range of the input wired from
Oper
Out
Output value
Between Out Low and Out High
R/O
InHighScale
Input high scale
In Low to99999
0
Oper
InLowScale
Input low scale
-99999 to In High
0
Oper
OutHighScale
Output high scale
Out Low to 99999
0
Oper
OutLowScale
Output low scale
-99999 to Out High
0
Oper
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Folder – Poly
Sub-Folders: 1 to 2
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Fallback Type
Fallback Type
The fallback strategy will come
into effect if the status of the
input value is bad or if the input
value is outside the range of
input high scale and input low
scale. In this case the fallback
strategy may be configured as:
Clip Bad
If the input is outside a limit
the output will be clipped to
the limit and the status will
be BAD
Clip
Good
If the input is outside a limit
the output will be clipped to
the limit and the status will
be GOOD
Fall Bad
The output value will be the
fallback value and the
output status will be BAD
Fall
Good
The output value will be the
fallback value and the
output status will be GOOD
Upscale
The output value will be
output high scale and the
output status will be BAD
DownScale
The output value will be the
output low scale and the
output status will be BAD
FallbackValue
Value to be adopted by the
output in the event of Status =
Bad
Status
Indicates the status of the
linearised output:
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Default
Access
Level
Conf
Oper
Good
Good indicates the value is
within range and the input is
not in sensor break.
Bad
Indicates the Value is out of
range or the input is in
sensor break.
Note: This is also effected
by the configured fallback
strategy
R/O
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
17.
Chapter 17 Load
The load simulation block provides styles of load which can be used to allow an instrument configuration to be tested
before connection to the process plant. In the current issue of firmware the simulated loads available are Oven and
Furnace.
17.1
Load Parameters
Folder – Load
Sub-Folders: None
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Type
The type of load simulation to use.
Oven is a simple load of 3 first order lags, providing a
single process value for connection to the control loop.
Furnace consists of 12 interactive first order lags giving
a slave PV, followed by 6 interactive first order lags
giving a master PV.
Oven
Simulates the
characteristics of a
typical oven
Furnace
Simulates the
characteristics of a
typical furnace
Default
Access
Level
Oven
Conf
Resolution
The display resolution of the resultant PV Out.
Units
The Units of the resultant PV.
Conf
Conf
Gain
The gain of the load, the input power is multiplied by
gain, before use by the load.
Oper
TimeConst1
The time constant of lag 1 in the Oven load and slave
lags (1-12) of the Furnace load. The time constant has
units of seconds.
Oper
TimeConst2
The time constant of lag 2/3 of the Oven load and
master lags (13-18) of the furnace load.
Oper
Attenuation
(Furnace load
only)
Attenuation Between PV1 and PV2 Stages.
Used in the advanced furnace load and defines an
attenuation factor between the slave and master lags
Oper
Ch 2 Gain
Defines the relative gain when cooling is requested,
applied to the input power when the power requested
is < 0.
Oper
PVFault
The load function block provides 2 PV outputs, sensor
fault can be used to generate a fault condition on these
PV's such that the bad status is passed along a wire to
be consumed by another block such as the loop. The
sensor fault can be configured as:
None
No fault conditions.
PVOut1
Fault on the first
output (slave).
PVOut2
Fault on the second
output (master).
Both
A fault on first and
second outputs
(master and slave).
Oper
PV Out1
First Process Value
The PV in Process Value an Oven load or the Slave PV
in a furnace load.
R/O
PV Out2
(Furnace load
only)
Second Process Value
Second process value, lagged from PVOut1, used as a
cascade master input. The Master PV in the Furnace
load.
R/O
LoopOutCh1
Loop output channel 1 input.
The output of the loop as wired to the load simulation,
this is the power requested of the load. This can be
used as the heat demand.
Oper
LoopOutCh2
Loop output channel 2 input.
The output of the loop as wired to the load simulation,
this is the power requested of the load. This can be
used as the cool demand.
Oper
Noise
Noise Added to PV
This is used to make the PV of the load appear noisy,
and hence more like a real measurement.
Offset
Process offset
Used to configure an offset in the process. In a
temperature application this could represent the
ambient operating temperature of the plant.
Page 190
Off
1 to
99999
The amount of noise
is specified in
engineering units.
Off
Oper
Oper
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18.
Chapter 18 Control Loop Set Up
The Mini8 controller has up to 16 loops of control. Each Loop has two outputs, Channel 1 and Channel 2, each of which
can be configured for PID or On/Off.
The control function block is divided into a number of sections the parameters of which are all listed under the Folder
‘Loop’.
The ‘Loop’ folder contains sub-folders for each section as shown diagrammatically below.
18.1
What is a Control Loop?
An example of a heat only temperature control loop is shown below:-
Control Method
PID/OnOff
Control
Output
Error
Setpoint
Generator
Power
Regulator
Control
Loop
PV
Simplified Control Function Block
Process
under
control
Heater
Measured
temperature
Figure 18-1: Single Loop Single Channel
The actual temperature measured at the process (PV) is connected to the input of the controller. This is compared with a
setpoint (or required) temperature (SP). If there is an error between the set and measured temperature the controller
calculates an output value to call for heating or cooling. The calculation depends on the process being controlled but
normally uses a PID algorithm. The output(s) from the controller are connected to devices on the plant which cause the
heating (or cooling) demand to be adjusted which in turn is detected by the temperature sensor. This is referred to as
the control loop.
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18.2
Loop Parameters – Main
Folder – Loop.1 to Loop.16
Sub-Folder: Main
Name
Parameter Description
Value
AutoMan
To select Auto or Manual operation.
Auto
Automatic (closed loop)
operation
Man
Manual (output power
adjusted by the user)
operation
Default
Access Level
Auto
Oper
PV
The process variable input value.
This is typically wired from an
analogue input.
Range of the input source
Inhibit
Used to stop the loop controlling. If
enabled the loop will stop control
and the output of the loop will be set
to the safe output value. On exit
from inhibit the transfer will be
bumpless.
This may be wired to an external
source
No
Yes
TargetSP
The value of setpoint at which the
control loop is aiming. It may come
from a number of different sources,
such as internal SP and remote SP.
Between setpoint limits
Oper
WorkingSP
The current value of the setpoint
being used by the control loop. It
may come from a number of
different sources, such as internal SP
and Remote SP. The working
setpoint is always read-only as it is
derived from other sources.
Between setpoint limits
R/O
ActiveOut
The actual output of the loop before
it is split into the channel 1 and
channel 2 outputs.
IntHold
Stops Integral action
Page 192
Inhibit disabled
Inhibit enabled
Oper
No
Oper
R/O
No
Oper
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18.3
Loop Set up
These parameters configure the type of control.
Folder – Loop.1 to Loop.16
Sub-folder: Setup
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Ch1
ControlType
Selects the channel 1 control
algorithm. You may select
different algorithms for channels
1 and 2. In temperature control
applications, Ch1 is usually the
heating channel, Ch2 is the
cooling channel.
Off
OnOff
PID
Ch2
ControlType
Control type for channel 2
Control
Action
Control Action
PB Units
Proportional band units.
Derivative
Type
Selects whether the derivative
acts only on PV changes or on
Error (either PV or Setpoint
changes).
Default
Access
Level
Channel turned off
On/off control
3 term or PID control
PID
Conf
Rev
Reverse acting. The output
increases when the PV is
below SP. This is the best
setting for heating control.
Rev
Conf
Dir
Direct acting. The output
increases when the PV is
above SP. This is the best
setting for cooling control
EngUnits
Engineering units eg C or F
Eng
Conf
Percent
Per cent of loop span (range
Hi - Range Lo)
PV
Only changes in PV cause
changes to the derivative
output.
PV
Conf
Error
Changes to either PV or SP
will cause a derivative
output.
The above two parameters appear if either Ch1 or Ch2 are configured for PID control
18.3.1
Types of Control Loop
18.3.1.1 On/Off Control
On/Off control simply turns heating power on when the PV is below setpoint and off when it is above setpoint. If cooling
is used, cooling power is turned on when the PV is above setpoint and off when it is below. The outputs of such a
controller will normally be connected to relays – hysteresis may be set as described in the Alarms section to prevent
relay chatter or to provide a delay in the control output action.
18.3.1.2 PID Control
PID control, also referred to as ‘Three Term Control’, is a technique used to achieve stable straight line control at the
required setpoint. The three terms are:
P = Proportional band
I = Integral time
D = Derivative time
The output from the controller is the sum of the contributions from these three terms. The combined output is a function
of the magnitude and duration of the error signal, and the rate of change of the process value. It is possible to turn off
integral and derivative terms and control on only proportional, proportional plus integral or proportional plus derivative.
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18.4
PID Control
The PID controller consists of the following parameters:Parameter
Page 194
Meaning or Function
Proportional
Band ‘PB’
The proportional term, in display units or %, delivers an output that is proportional
to the size of the error signal.
Integral Time
‘Ti’
Removes steady state control offsets by ramping the output up or down in
proportion to the amplitude and duration of the error signal.
Derivative
Time ‘Td’
Determines how strongly the controller will react to the rate of change in the
measured value. It is used to prevent overshoot and undershoot and to restore the
PV rapidly if there is a sudden change in demand.
High Cutback
‘CBH’
The number of display units, above setpoint, at which the controller will increase the
output power, in order to prevent undershoot on cool down.
Low Cutback
‘CBL’
The number of display units, below setpoint, at which the controller will cutback the
output power, in order to prevent overshoot on heat up.
Relative Cool
Gain ‘R2G’
Only present if cooling has been configured. Sets the cooling proportional band,
which equals the heat proportional band value divided by the cool gain value.
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18.4.1
Proportional Band
The proportional band, or gain, delivers an output which is proportional to the size of the error signal. It is the range
over which the output power is continuously adjustable in a linear fashion from 0% to 100% (for a heat only controller).
Below the proportional band (PB) the output is full on (100%), above the proportional band the output is full off (0%) as
shown in Figure 17-2.
The width of the proportional band determines the magnitude of the response to the error. If it too narrow (high gain)
the system oscillates by being over responsive. If it is too wide (low gain) the control is sluggish. The ideal situation is
when the proportional band is as narrow as possible without causing oscillation.
Output
Temperature
Proportional band
wide
Setpoint
narrow
100%
Increasingly narrower
proportional band
50%
Temperature
0%
Time
Setpoint
Figure 18-2: Proportional Action
Figure 17-2 also shows the effect of narrowing proportional band to the point of oscillation. A wide proportional band
results in straight line control but with an appreciable initial error between setpoint and actual temperature. As the band
is narrowed the temperature gets closer to setpoint until finally becoming unstable.
The proportional band may be set in engineering units or as a percentage of the controller range.
18.4.2
Integral Term
In a proportional only controller, an error between setpoint and PV must exist for the controller to deliver power.
Integral is used to achieve zero steady state control error.
The integral term slowly shifts the output level as a result of an error between setpoint and measured value. If the
measured value is below setpoint the integral action gradually increases the output in an attempt to correct the error. If
it is above setpoint integral action gradually decreases the output or increases the cooling power to correct the error.
Figure 17-3 shows the result of introducing integral action.
Temperature
Setpoint
Proportional
only control
Proportional + Integral
control
Time
Figure 18-3: Proportional + Integral Control
The units for the integral term are measured in time (1 to 99999 seconds in Mini8 controllers). The longer the integral
time constant, the more slowly the output is shifted and results in a sluggish response. Too small an integral time will
cause the process to overshoot and even oscillate. The integral action may be disabled by setting its value to Off.
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18.4.3
Derivative Term
Derivative action, or rate, provides a sudden shift in output as a result of a rapid change in error, whether or not this is
caused by PV alone (derivative on PV) or on SP changes as well (derivative on error selection). If the measured value falls
quickly derivative provides a large change in output in an attempt to correct the perturbation before it goes too far. It is
most beneficial in recovering from small perturbations.
Temperature
Temperature
SP
SP
Proportional + Integral
response
Response with derivative
action included
Time
Time
Figure 18-4: Proportional + Integral + Derivative Action
The derivative modifies the output to reduce the rate of change of error. It reacts to changes in the PV by changing the
output to remove the transient. Increasing the derivative time will reduce the settling time of the loop after a transient
change.
Derivative is often mistakenly associated with overshoot inhibition rather than transient response. In fact, derivative
should not be used to curb overshoot on start up since this will inevitably degrade the steady state performance of the
system. Overshoot inhibition is best left to the approach control parameters, High and Low Cutback, section 18.4.4.
Derivative is generally used to increase the stability of the loop, however, there are situations where derivative may be
the cause of instability. For example, if the PV is noisy, then derivative can amplify that noise and cause excessive output
changes, in these situations it is often better to disable the derivative and re-tune the loop.
If set to Off(0), no derivative action will be applied.
Derivative can be calculated on change of PV or change of Error. If configured on error, then changes in the setpoint
will be transmitted to the output. For applications such as furnace temperature control, it is common practice to select
Derivative on PV to prevent thermal shock caused by a sudden change of output as a result of a change in setpoint.
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18.4.4
High and Low Cutback
Cutback high ‘CBH’ and Cutback low ‘CBL’ are values that modify the amount of overshoot, or undershoot, that occurs
during large step changes in PV (for example, under start-up conditions). They are independent of the PID terms which
means that the PID terms can be set for optimal steady state response and the cutback parameters used to modify any
overshoot which may be present.
Cutback involves moving the proportional band towards the cutback point nearest the measured value whenever the
latter is outside the proportional band and the power is saturated (at 0 or 100% for a heat only controller). The
proportional band moves downscale to the lower cutback point and waits for the measured value to enter it. It then
escorts the measured value with full PID control to the setpoint. In some cases it can cause a ‘dip’ in the measured value
as it approaches setpoint as shown in Figure 17-5 but generally decreases the time to needed to bring the process into
operation.
The action described above is reversed for falling temperature.
If cutback is set to Auto the cutback values are automatically configured to 3*PB.
Temperature
Upper cutback point, CBH
Setpoint
0% output level
100% output level
Lower cutback point, CBL
Time 
Figure 18-5: High and Low Cutback
18.4.5
Integral action and manual reset
In a full three-term controller (that is, a PID controller), the integral term automatically removes steady state errors from
the setpoint. If the controller is set as a PD controller, the integral term will be set to ‘OFF’. Under these conditions the
measured value may not settle precisely at setpoint. The Manual Reset parameter (M R ) represents the value of the
power output that will be delivered when the error is zero. You must set this value manually in order to remove the
steady state error.
18.4.6
Relative Cool Gain
The gain of channel 2 control output, relative to the channel 1 control output.
Relative Ch2 Gain compensates for the different quantities of energy needed to heat, as opposed to that needed to
cool, a process. For example: water cooling applications might require a relative cool gain of 4 (cooling is 4 times faster
than the heat-up process).
(This parameter is set automatically when Autotune is used). A nominal setting of around 4 is often used.
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18.4.7
Loop Break
The loop is considered to be broken if the PV does not respond to a change in the output in a given time. Since the time
of response will vary from process to process the Loop Break Time (LBT – PID list) parameter allows a time to be set
before a Loop Break Alarm (Lp Break - Diag list) is initiated.
The Loop Break Alarm attempts to detect loss of restoring action in the control loop by checking the control output, the
process value and its rate of change. This is not to be confused with Load Failure and Partial Load Failure. The loop
break algorithm is purely software detection.
Occurrence of a loop break causes the Loop Break Alarm parameter to be set. It does not affect the control action
unless it is wired (in software or hardware) to affect the control specifically.
It is assumed that, so long as the requested output power is within the output power limits of a control loop, the loop is
operating in linear control and is therefore not in a loop break condition.
However, if the output becomes saturated then the loop is operating outside its linear control region.
Furthermore if the output remains saturated at the same output power for a significant duration, then this could indicate
a fault in the control loop. The source of the loop break is not important, but the loss of control could be catastrophic.
Since the worst case time constant for a given load is usually known, a worst case time can be calculated over which the
load should have responded with a minimum movement in temperature.
By performing this calculation the corresponding rate of approach towards setpoint can be used to determine if the
loop can no longer control at the chosen setpoint. If the PV was drifting away from the setpoint or approaching the
setpoint at a rate less than that calculated, the loop break condition would be met.
If an autotune is performed the loop break time is automatically set to Ti*2 for a PI or PID loop alternatively 12*Td for a
PD loop. For an On/Off controller loop break detection is also based on loop break time as 0.1*SPAN where SPAN =
Range High – Range Low. Therefore, if the output is at limit and the PV has not moved by 0.1*SPAN in the loop break
time a loop break will occur.
If the loop break time is 0(off) the loop break time is not set.
If the output is in saturation and the PV has not moved by >0.5*Pb in the loop break time, a loop break condition is
considered to have occurred.
18.4.8
Cooling Algorithm
The method of cooling may vary from application to application.
For example, an extruder barrel may be cooled by forced air (from a fan), or by circulating water or oil around a jacket.
The cooling effect will be different depending on the method. The cooling algorithm may be set to linear where the
controller output changes linearly with the PID demand signal, or it may be set to water, oil or fan where the output
changes non-linearly against the PID demand. The algorithm provides optimum performance for these methods of
cooling.
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18.4.9
Gain Scheduling
Gain scheduling is the automatic transfer of control between one set of PID values and another. It may be used in very
non-linear systems where the control process exhibits large changes in response time or sensitivity, see diagram below.
This may occur, for example, over a wide range of PV, or between heating and cooling where the rates of response may
be significantly different. The number of sets depends on the non-linearity of the system. Each PID set is chosen to
operate over a limited (approximately linear) range.
In the Mini8 controller, this is done at a preset strategy defined by the parameter ‘Scheduler Type’. The choices are:
No.
Type
Description
0
Off
Just one fixed set of PID values
1
Set
The PID set can be selected manually or from a digital input
2
SP
The transfer between one set and the next depends on the value of the SP
3
PV
The transfer between one set and the next depends on the value of the PV
4
Error
The transfer between one set and the next depends on the value of the error
5
OP
The transfer between one set and the next depends on the value of the OP
demand
6
Rem Sched IP
The transfer between one set and the next depends on the value from a
remote source for example, a digital input
The Mini8 controller has three sets of PID values for each loop – the maximum number, which you may wish to use, is set
by ‘Num Sets’ parameter.
Plant Dynamics e.g. PV
2 / 3 Boundary
1 / 2 Boundary
Plant Operating Position
PID Set 1
PID Set 2
PID Set 3
Figure 18-6: Gain Scheduling in a Non-Linear System
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18.4.10
PID Parameters
Control loops must be specifically ordered – Order Code MINI8 – 4LP, 8LP or 16LP. To enable a loop place one of the
Loop function blocks on the graphical wiring page.
Folder – Loop
Sub-folders: Loop1.PID to Loop16.PID
Name
Parameter Description
Value
SchedulerType
To choose the type of gain
scheduling
Off
Set
SP
PV
Error
OP
Rem
See above for explanation
Default
Access
Level
Off
Oper
Parameters displayed will
vary depending on type of
scheduling selected.
Num Sets
Selects the number of PID sets to
present.
Allows the lists to be reduced if
the process does not require the
full range of PID sets.
1 to 3
1
Oper
Scheduler
RemoteInput
Scheduler Remote Input
1 to 3 (if SchedulerType is ‘Remote’)
1
R/O
Active Set
Currently working set
Set1
Set2
Set3
Set1
R/O except
type ’Set’
Boundary 1-2
Sets the level at which PID set
1 changes to PID set 2
Range units
0
Oper
Boundary 2-3
Sets the level at which PID set
2 changes to PID set 3
Range units
0
Oper
ProportionalBand1,
2, 3
Proportional band
Set1/Set2/Set3
0 to 99999 Eng units
300
Oper
IntegralTime 1, 2, 3
Integral term Set1/Set2/Set3
360s
Oper
DerivativeTime 1, 2,
3
Derivative term
Set1/Set2/Set3
60s
Oper
RelCh2Gain 1, 2, 3
Relative cool gain
Set1/Set2/Set3
1
Oper
CutbackHigh 1, 2, 3
Cutback high Set1/Set2/Set3
Auto
Oper
CutbackLow 1, 2, 3
Cutback low Set1/Set2/Set3
Auto
Oper
ManualReset 1, 2, 3
Manual reset Set1/Set2/Set3.
This must be set to 0.0 when
the integral term is set to a
value
0.0
Oper
LoopBreakTime 1, 2,
3
Loop break time
Set1/Set2/Set3
100
Oper
OutputHi 1, 2, 3
Output High Limit
Set1/Set2/Set3
100
Oper
OutputLo 1, 2, 3
Output Low Limit
Set1/Set2/Set3
-100
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18.5
Tuning Function Block
Tuning involves setting the following parameters.
Proportional Band ‘PB’, Integral Time ‘Ti’, Derivative Time ‘Td’, Cutback High ‘CBH’, Cutback Low ‘CBL’, and Relative
Cool Gain ‘R2G’ (applicable to heat/cool systems only).
The controller is shipped with these parameters set to default values. In many cases the default values will give
adequate stable straight line control, however, the response of the loop may not be ideal. Because the process
characteristics are fixed by the design of the process it is necessary to adjust the control parameters in the controller to
achieve best control. To determine the optimum values for any particular loop or process it is necessary to carry out a
procedure called loop tuning. If significant changes are later made to the process which affect the way in which it
responds it may be necessary to retune the loop.
Users have the choice of tuning the loop automatically or manually. Both procedures require the loop to oscillate and
both are described in the following sections.
18.5.1
Loop Response
If we ignore the situation of loop oscillation, there are three categories of loop performance:
Under Damped - In this situation the terms are set to prevent oscillation but do lead to an overshoot of the Process
Value followed by decaying oscillation to finally settle at the Setpoint. This type of response can give a minimum time to
Setpoint but overshoot may cause problems in certain situations and the loop may be sensitive to sudden changes in
Process Value. This will result in further decaying oscillations before settling once again.
Critically Damped - This represents an ideal situation where overshoot to small step changes does not occur and the
process responds to changes in a controlled, non oscillatory manner.
Over Damped - In this situation the loop responds in a controlled but sluggish manner which will result in a loop
performance which is non ideal and unnecessarily slow.
The balancing of the P, I and D terms depends totally upon the nature of the process to be controlled.
In a plastics extruder, for example, a barrel zone will have a different response to a die, casting roll, drive loop, thickness
control loop or pressure loop. In order to achieve the best performance from an extrusion line all loop tuning
parameters must be set to their optimum values.
Gain scheduling is provided to allow specific PID settings to be applied at the different operating points of the process.
18.5.2
Initial Settings
In addition to the tuning parameters listed in section 18.5 above, there are a number of other parameters which can
have an effect on the way in which the loop responds. Ensure that these are set before either manual or automatic
tuning is initiated. Parameters include, but are not limited to:Setpoint. Before starting a tune the loop conditions should be set as closely as practicable to the actual conditions
which will be met in normal operation. For example, in a furnace or oven application a representative load should be
included, an extruder should be running, etc.
Heat/Cool Limits. The minimum and maximum power delivered to the process may be limited by the parameters
‘Output Lo’ and ‘Output Hi’ both of which are found in the Loop OP list, section 18.7. For a heat only controller the
default values are 0 and 100%. For a heat/cool controller the defaults are -100 and 100%. Although it is expected that
most processes will be designed to work between these limits there may be instances where it is desirable to limit the
power delivered to the process. For example, if driving a 220V heater from a 240V source the heat limit may be set 80%
to ensure that the heater does not dissipate more than its maximum power.
Remote Output Limits. ‘RemOPL’ and ‘RemOPHi’ (Loop OP List). If these parameters are used they should be set
within the Heat/Cool Limits above.
Heat/Cool Deadband. In controllers fitted with a second (cool) channel a parameter ‘Ch2 DeadBand’ is also available
in the Loop OP folder, section 18.7, which sets the distance between the heat and cool proportional bands. The default
value is 0% which means that heating will turn off at the same time as cooling turns on. The deadband may be set to
ensure that there is no possibility of the heat and cool channels being on together, particularly when cycling output
stages are installed.
Minimum On Time. If either or both of the output channels is fitted with a relay or logic output, the parameter
‘MinOnTime’ will appear in the relevant output folder – Chapter 8. This is the cycling time for a time proportioning
output and should be set correctly before tuning is started.
Input Filter Time Constant. The parameter ‘Filter Time Constant’ is found in the IO folder section 8.5.1.
Output Rate limit. Output rate limit is active during tuning and may affect the tuning results. The parameter ‘Rate’ is
found in the Loop OP folder.
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Other Considerations
•
If a process includes adjacent interactive zones, each zone should be tuned independently.
•
It is always better to start a tune when the PV and setpoint are far apart. This allows start up
conditions to be measured and cutback values to be calculated more accurately.
•
If the two loops are connected for cascade control, the inner loop may tuned automatically but the
outer should be tuned manually.
•
In a programmer/controller tuning should only be attempted during dwell periods and not during
ramp stages. If a programmer/controller is tuned automatically put the controller into Hold during
each dwell period whilst autotune is active. It may be worth noting that tuning, carried out in dwell
periods which are at different extremes of temperature may give different results owing to non
linearity of heating (or cooling). This may provide a convenient way to establish values for Gain
Scheduling (see section 18.4.9).
 If an auto tune is initiated there are two further parameters which need to be set. These are ‘OutputHigh Limit’ and
‘OutputLow Limit’.. These are found in the ‘Tune’ folder, see also section 18.5.5.
18.5.3
Multi-zone applications.
The tuning of one loop can be unduly influenced by the controlling effect of adjacent zone(s). Ideally the zone either
side of the one being tuned should be turned OFF, or put in manual with the power level set to keep its temperature at
about the usual operating level.
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18.5.4
Automatic Tuning
Auto Tune automatically sets the following parameters:Proportional Band ‘PB’
Integral Time ‘Ti’
Derivative Time ‘Td’
Cutback High ‘CBH’
Cutback Low ‘CBL’
If ‘Ti’ and/or ‘Td’ is set to OFF, because you wish to use PI, PD or P only
control, these terms will remain off after an autotune.
If CBH and/or CBL is set to ‘Auto’ these terms will remain at Auto after an
autotune, i.e. 3*PB.
For autotune to set the cutback values, CBH and CBL must be set to a value
(other than Auto) before autotune is started.
Autotune will never return cutback values which are less than 1.6*PB.
Relative Cool Gain
‘R2G’
R2G is only calculated if the controller is configured as heat/cool.
Loop Break Time ‘LBT’
Following an autotune, ‘LBT’ is set to 2*Ti (assuming the integral time is not
set to OFF). If ‘Ti’ is set to OFF then ‘LBT’ is set to 12*Td.
Following an autotune, ‘R2G’ is always limited to between 0.1 and 10. If the
calculated value is outside this limit a ‘Tune Fail’ alarm is given. In software
releases up to and including 2.30, if the calculated value is outside this limit,
R2G remains at its previous value but all other tuning parameters are
changed.
Auto tune uses the ‘one-shot’ tuner which works by switching the output on and off to induce an oscillation in the
process value. From the amplitude and period of the oscillation, it calculates the tuning parameter values. The autotune
sequence for different conditions is described in sections 18.5.11 to 18.5.13.
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18.5.5
Tune Parameters
Folder – Loop.Loop.1 to Loop.16
Sub-folder: Tune
Name
Parameter Description
Value
AutoTune
Enable
To start self tuning
Off
On
OutputHigh
Limit
Default
Access
Level
Stop
Start
Stop
Oper
Set this to limit the maximum
output power level which the
controller will supply during the
tuning process.
If the high output power limit
set in the output list is lower the
autotune high limit will be
clipped to this value.
Between Low Output and 100.0
100.0
Oper
OutputLow
Limit
Set this to limit the minimum %
output power level which the
controller will supply during the
tuning process.
If the low output power limit set
in the output list is higher the
autotune low limit will be
clipped to this value.
Between High Output and 0.0
0.0
Oper
State
Shows if self tuning is in
progress
Off
Off
R/O
Reset
R/O
Not running
Ready
Running
In progress
Complete
Auto tune completed
successfully
Timeout
Error conditions, see section
18.5.14 – Failure Modes.
TI_Limit
R2G_Limit
Stage
Shows the progress of the self
tuning
Reset
Settling
Displayed during the first
minute
To SP
Heat (or cool) output on
Wait Min
Power output off
Wait Max
Power output on
Timeout
Error conditions, see section
18.5.14 – Failure Modes.
TI Limit
R2G Limit
Stage Time
18.5.6
Time in the particular stage
R/O
To Auto Tune a Loop - Initial Settings
Set parameters listed in section 18.5.2.
‘Output High Limit’ and ‘Output Low Limit’ (‘OP’ List section 18.7) set the overall output limits. These limits apply at all
times during tuning and during normal operation.
Set ‘OutputHigh Limit’ and ‘Output Low Limit’ ( ‘Tune’ list section 18.5.5). These parameters set the output power
limits during Autotune.
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
The ‘tighter’ power limit will always apply. For example if ‘OutputHigh Limit’ (Tune List) is set to 80%
and ‘Output High Limit’ (OP List) is set to 70% then the output power will be limited to 70%.

The measured value must oscillate to some degree for the tuner to be able to calculate values. The
limits must be set to allow oscillation about the setpoint.
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18.5.7
To Start Autotune
a. Select the loop to be tuned,
b. Set AutoTune Enable to On
A One-shot Tune can be performed at any time, but normally it is performed only once during the initial commissioning
of the process. However, if the process under control subsequently becomes unstable (because its characteristics have
changed), it may be necessary to tune again for the new conditions.
The auto tune algorithm reacts in different ways depending on the initial conditions of the plant. The explanations given
in this section are for the following conditions:1. Initial PV is below the setpoint and, therefore, approaches the setpoint from below for a heat/cool
control loop
2. Initial PV is below the setpoint and, therefore, approaches the setpoint from below for a heat only
control loop
3. Initial PV is at the same value as the setpoint. That is, within 0.3% of the range of the controller if
‘PB Units’ (Setup list) is set to ‘Percent’ or +1 engineering unit (1 in 1000) if the ‘PB Units’ is set to
‘Eng’. Range is defined as ‘Range Hi’ – ‘Range Lo’ for process inputs or the full temperature range
defined for the relevant temperature input section 8.5.2.

18.5.8
If the PV is just outside the range stated above the autotune will attempt a tune from above or
below SP.
Autotune and Sensor Break
When the controller is autotuning and sensor break occurs, the autotune will abort and the controller will output the
sensor break output power ‘Sbrk OP’ set up in the OP List. Autotune must be re-started when the sensor break
condition is no longer present.
18.5.9
Autotune and Inhibit
If the controller is in autotune when inhibit is asserted the tune goes to the OFF state (Stage = Reset). On inhibit being
released the controller will re-start autotune.
18.5.10
Autotune and Gain Scheduling
When gain scheduling is enabled and an autotune is performed, the calculated PID values will be written into the PID set
that is active on completion of the tune. Therefore, the user may tune within the boundaries of a set and the values will
be written into the appropriate PID set. However, if the boundaries are close, since the range of the loop is not large,
then, at the completion of the tune, it cannot be guaranteed that the PID values will be written to the correct set
particularly if the schedule type is PV or OP. In this situation the scheduler (‘SchedulerType’) should be switched to ‘Set’
and the ‘Active Set’ chosen manually.
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18.5.11
Autotune from Below SP – Heat/Cool
The point at which Automatic tuning is performed (Tune Control Point) is designed to operate just below the setpoint at
which the process is normally expected to operate (Target Setpoint). This is to ensure that the process is not
significantly overheated or overcooled. The Tune Control Point is calculated as follows:Tune Control Point = Initial PV + 0.75(Target Setpoint – Initial PV).
The Initial PV is the PV measured at ‘B’ (after a 1 minute settling period)
Examples:
O
O
O
If Target Setpoint = 500 C and Initial PV = 20 C, then the Tune Control Point will be 380 C.
O
O
O
If Target Setpoint = 500 C and Initial PV = 400 C, then the Tune Control Point will be 475 C.
This is because the overshoot is likely to be less as the process temperature is already getting close
to the target setpoint.
The sequence of operation for a tune from below setpoint for a heat/cool control loop is described below:First
overshoot
Target Setpoint
Peak
to
Peak
Tune Control Point
Hysteresis
High Output
Zero Output
Low Output
A – B = 1 min.
C
D
E
F
A - Start of
Autotune
G H
H - End of
Autotune
Figure 18-7: Autotune - Heat/Cool Process
Period
Action
A
Start of Autotune
A to B
Both heating and cooling power remains off for a period of 1 minute to allow the algorithm to
establish steady state conditions.
B to D
First heat/cool cycle to establish first overshoot.
‘CBL’ is calculated on the basis of the size of this overshoot (assuming it is not set to Auto in
the initial conditions).
B to F
Two cycles of oscillation are produced from which the peak to peak response and the true
period of oscillation are measured. PID terms are calculated
F to G
An extra heat stage is provided and all heating and cooling power is turned off at G allowing
the plant to respond naturally.
Measurements made during this period allow the relative cool gain ‘R2G’ to be calculated.
‘CBH’ is calculated from CBL*R2G.
H
Autotune is turned off at and the process is allowed to control at the target setpoint using the
new control terms.
Autotune can also occur when the initial PV is above SP. The sequence is the same as tuning from below setpoint except
that the sequence begins with full cooling applied at ‘B’ after the first one minute settling time.
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18.5.12
Autotune From Below SP – Heat Only
The sequence of operation for a heat only loop is the same as that previously described for a heat/cool loop except that
the sequence ends at ‘F’ since there is no need to calculate ‘R2G’.
At ‘F’ autotune is turned off and the process is allowed to control using the new control terms.
Relative cool gain, ‘R2G’, is set to 1.0 for heat only processes.
First
overshoot
Target Setpoint
Peak
to
Peak
PV
Tune Control Point
Hysteresis
High Output
Zero Output
C
A – B = 1 min.
A - Start of
Autotune
D
C to D calculate
CBL
E
D to F calculate
PID
F
F - End of
Autotune
Figure 18-8: Autotune from below SP – Heat Only
For a tune from below setpoint ‘CBL’ is calculated on the basis of the size of the overshoot (assuming it was not set to
Auto in the initial conditions). CBH is then set to the same value as CBL.
Note:- As with the heat/cool case, Autotune can also occur when the initial PV is above SP. The sequence is the same as
tuning from below setpoint except that the sequence starts with natural cooling applied at ‘B’ after the first one minute
settling time.
In this case CBH is calculated – CBL is then set to the same value as CBH.
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18.5.13
Autotune at Setpoint – Heat/Cool
It is sometimes necessary to tune at the actual setpoint being used. This is allowable in Mini8 Controller and the
sequence of operation is described below.
Pk to Pk
Hysteresis
Target Setpoint
High Output
Zero Output
Low Output
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
A – B =1 min
A - Start of
Autotune
I - End of
Autotune
Figure 18-9: Autotune at Setpoint
Period
Action
A
Start of Autotune.
A test is done at the start of autotune to establish the conditions for a tune at setpoint.
The conditions are that the SP must remain within 0.3% of the range of the controller if ‘PB Units’
(Setup list) is set to ‘Percent’. If ‘PBUnits’ is set to ‘Eng’ then the SP must remain within +1
engineering unit (1 in 1000). Range is defined as ‘Range Hi’ – ‘Range Lo’ for process inputs or the
range defined in section 8.5.2 for temperature inputs.
A to B
The output is frozen at the current value for one minute and the conditions are continuously
monitored during this period. If the conditions are met during this period autotune at setpoint is
initiated at B. If at any time during this period the PV drifts outside the condition limits a tune at
setpoint is abandoned. Tuning is then resumed as a tune from above or below setpoint depending
on which way the PV has drifted.
Since the loop is already at setpoint there is no need to calculate a Tune Control Setpoint – the loop
is forced to oscillate around the Target Setpoint
C to G
Initiate oscillation - the process is forced to oscillate by switching the output between the output
limits. From this the period of oscillation and the peak to peak response is measured. PID terms
are calculated
G to H
An extra heat stage is provided and all heating and cooling power is turned off at H allowing the
plant to respond naturally.
Measurements made during this period allow the relative cool gain ‘R2G’ to be calculated.
I
Autotune is turned off and the process is allowed to control at the target setpoint using the new
control terms.
For a tune at setpoint autotune does not calculate cutback since there was no initial start up response to the application
of heating or cooling. The exception is that the cutback values will never be returned less than 1.6*PB.
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18.5.14
Failure Modes
The conditions for performing an autotune are monitored by the parameter ‘State’ (Tune folder). If autotune is not
successful error conditions are read by this parameter as follows:Timeout
This will occur if any one stage is not completed within one hour. It could be due to the loop
being open or not responding to the demands from the controller. Very heavily lagged systems
may produce a timeout if the cooling rate is very slow.
TI Limit
This will be displayed if Autotune calculates a value for the integral term greater than the
maximum allowable integral setting i.e. 99999 seconds. This may indicate that the loop is not
responding or that the tune is taking too long.
R2G
Limit
The calculated value of R2G is outside the range 0.1 and 10.0. In versions up to and including
V2.3, R2G is set to 0.1 but all other PID parameters are updated.
R2G limit may occur if the gain difference between heating and cooling is too large. This could
also occur if the controller is configured for heat/cool but the cooling medium is turned off or not
working correctly. It could similarly occur if the cooling medium is on but heating is off or not
working correctly.
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18.5.15
Manual Tuning
If for any reason automatic tuning gives unsatisfactory results, you can tune the controller manually. There are a number
of standard methods for manual tuning. The one described here is the Ziegler-Nichols method.
Adjust the setpoint to its normal running conditions (it is assumed this will be above the PV so that heat only is applied)
Set the Integral Time ‘Ti’ and the Derivative Time ‘Td’ to ‘OFF’.
Set High Cutback ‘CBH’ and Low Cutback ‘CBL’ to ‘Auto’.
Ignore the fact that the PV may not settle precisely at the setpoint.
If the PV is stable, reduce the proportional band so that the PV just starts to oscillate. Allow enough time between each
adjustment for the loop to stabilise. Make a note of the proportional band value ‘PB’ and the period of oscillation ‘T’. If
PV is already oscillating measure the period of oscillation ‘T’, then increase the proportional band until it just stops
oscillating. Make a note of the value of the proportional band at this point.
Set the proportional band, integral time and derivative time parameter values according to the calculations given in the
table below:Type of control
18.5.16
Proportional band
(PB)
Integral time
(Ti) seconds
Derivative time
(Td) seconds
Proportional
only
2xPB
OFF
OFF
P + I control
2.2xPB
0.8xT
OFF
P + I + D control
1.7xPB
0.5xT
0.12xT
Manually Setting Relative Cool Gain
If the controller is fitted with a cool channel this should be enabled before the PID values, calculated from the table
above, are entered.
Observe the oscillation waveform and adjust R2G until a symmetrical waveform is observed.
Then enter the values from the table.
Temperature
Setpoint
T
R2G is correct
R2G is too large
R2G is too small
Time
Figure 18-10: Setting Relative Cool Gain
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18.5.17
Manually Setting the Cutback Values
Enter the PID terms calculated from the table in section 18.5.15 before setting cutback values.
The above procedure sets up the parameters for optimum steady state control. If unacceptable levels of overshoot or
undershoot occur during start-up, or for large step changes in PV, then manually set the cutback parameters.
Proceed as follows:
Initially set the cutback values to one proportional bandwidth converted into display units. This can be calculated by
taking the value in percentage that has been installed into the parameter ‘PB’ and entering it into the following formula:PB/100 * Span of controller = Cutback High and Cutback Low
O
For example, if PB = 10% and the span of the controller is 0 -1200 C, then
Cutback High and Low = 10/100 * 1200 = 120
If overshoot is observed following the correct settings of the PID terms increase the value of ‘CBL’ by the value of the
overshoot in display units. If undershoot is observed increase the value of the parameter ‘CBH’ by the value of the
undershoot in display units.
Display Units
PV approaching SP from
above – adjust CBH
Setpoint
Initial overshoot
Initial
undershoot
PV approaching SP from
below – adjust CBL
Time
Figure 18-11: Manual Setting of Cutback
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18.6
Setpoint Function Block
For each of the 16 loops, the controller setpoint is the Working Setpoint that may come from a number of alternative
sources. This is the value ultimately used to control the process variable in each loop.
The working setpoint may be derived from:1.
SP1 or SP2, both of which are individually set, can be selected by an external signal or via the SPSelect
parameter over communications.
2.
From an external (remote) analogue source
3.
The output of a programmer function block and will, therefore, vary in accordance with the program in use.
The setpoint function block also provides the facility to limit the rate of change of the setpoint before it is applied to the
control algorithm. It will also provide upper and lower limits. These are defined as setpoint limits for the local setpoints
and instrument range high and low for other setpoint sources. All setpoints are ultimately subject to a limit of range hi
and range lo.
User configurable methods for tracking are available, such that the transfer between setpoints and between operational
modes will not cause a bump in the setpoint.
18.6.1
Setpoint Function Block
Programmer SP
PSP1
PSP2
PSP3
PSP High Lim
Enable Rem SP
Prog
Range Max
Local
PSP Low Lim
Local
Target SP
SP2 High Limit
Remote
Range Min
SP2
SP2 Enab
SP2 Low Limit
SP1 Enab
SP1 High Limit
SP1
SP1 Low Limit
Trim High
Local SP +
RemoteTrim
+
Trim Low
Remote SP
Remote only
Remote Type
Local Trim
+
Remote + Local
Trim
Other inputs:
PV
Ramp rate
Servo
SP changed
Range Max
Target SP
Ramp
Working SP
Range Min
Ramp Status
Figure 18-12: Setpoint Function Block
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18.6.2
SP Tracking
When setpoint tracking is enabled and the local setpoint is selected, the local setpoint is copied to ‘TrackSP’. Tracking
now ensures that the alternate SP follows or tracks this value. When the alternate setpoint is selected it initially takes on
the tracked value thus ensuring that no bump takes place. The new setpoint is then adopted gradually. A similar action
takes place when returning to the local setpoint.
18.6.3
Manual Tracking
When the controller is operating in manual mode the currently selected SP tracks the PV. When the controller resumes
automatic control there will be no step change in the resolved SP.
18.6.4
Rate Limit
Rate limit will control the rate of change of setpoint. It is enabled by the ‘Rate’ parameter. If this is set to Off then any
change made to the setpoint will be effective immediately. If it is set to a value then any change in the setpoint will be
effected at the value set in units per minute. Rate limit also acts on SP2 and when switching between SP1 and SP2.
When rate limit is active the ‘RateDone’ parameter will display ‘No’. When the setpoint has been reached this
parameter will change to ‘Yes’.
When ‘Rate’ is set to a value (other than Off) an additional parameter ‘SPRate Disable’ is displayed which allows the
setpoint rate limit to be turned off and on without the need to adjust the ‘Rate’ parameter between Off and a value.
18.6.5
Setpoint Parameters
Folder – Loop.1 to Loop.16
Sub-folder: SP
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Range High
The Range limits provide a set of
absolute maximums and minimums
for setpoints within the control loop.
Any derived setpoints are ultimately
clipped to be within the Range limits.
If the Proportional Band is
configured as % of Span, the span is
derived from the Range limits.
Full range of the input type
SP Select
Select local or alternate setpoint
SP1
SP2
SP1
Primary setpoint for the controller
Between SP high and SP low limits
SP2
Setpoint 2 is the secondary setpoint
of the controller. It is often used as a
standby setpoint.
SP HighLimit
Maximum limit allowed for the local
setpoints
SP LowLimit
Minimum limit allowed for the local
setpoints
Alt SP Select
To enable the alternative setpoint to
be used. This may be wired to a
source such as the programmer Run
input.
Alt SP
This may be wired to an alternative
source such as the programmer or
remote setpoint
Rate
Limits the maximum rate at which the
working setpoint can change.
The rate limit may be used to protect
the load from thermal shock which
may be caused by large step
changes in setpoint.
Off or 0.1 to 9999.9 engineering units
per minute
RateDone
Flag which indicates when the
setpoint is changing or completed
No
Yes
Setpoint changing
Complete
R/O
Rate Disable
Setpoint rate disable
No
Yes
Enabled
Disabled
Oper
Range Low
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Default
Access
Level
Conf
Conf
Setpoint 1
Setpoint 2
SP1
Oper
Oper
Oper
Between Range Hi and Range Lo
Oper
Oper
No
Yes
Alternative setpoint disabled
Alternative setpoint enabled
Oper
Oper
Off
Oper
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Folder – Loop.1 to Loop.16
Sub-folder: SP
Name
Parameter Description
Value
ServoToPV
Servo to PV Enable
When Rate is set to any value other
than Off and Servo to PV is enabled,
changing the active SP will cause the
working SP to servo to the current PV
before ramping to the new target SP.
No
Yes
SP Trim
Trim is an offset added to the
setpoint. The trim may be either
positive or negative, the range of the
trim may be restricted by the trim
limits
Setpoint trims may be used in a
retransmission system. A master
zone may retransmit the setpoint to
the other zones, a local trim may be
applied to each zone to produce a
profile along the length of the
machine
Between SP Trim Hi and SP Trim Lo
SPTrim
HighLimit
Setpoint trim high limit
Oper
SPTrim
LowLimit
Setpoint trim low limit
Oper
ManualTrack
To enable manual tracking. When
the loop is switched from Manual to
Auto, the Setpoint is set to the
current PV. This is useful if the load
is started in Manual Mode, then later
switched to Auto to maintain the
operating point.
Off
On
Manual tracking disabled
Manual tracking enabled
R/O
SP Track
Setpoint tracking ensures bumpless
transfer in setpoint when switching
between a local and an alternate
setpoint such as the programmer.
This enables the tracking interface
provided by TrackPV and TrackVal,
which is used by the programmer
and other setpoint providers
external to the control loop
Off
On
Setpoint tracking disabled
Setpoint tracking enabled
Conf
Track PV
The programmer tracks the PV when
it is servoing or tracking.
R/O
Track SP
Manual Tracking Value.
The SP to track for manual tracking.
R/O
SPIntBal
SP Integral Balance
This is also known as debump in
some instances. It forces the integral
to be balanced upon changes in
target setpoint
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Off
On
Disabled
Enabled
Default
Access
Level
No
Conf
R/O in L3
Oper
Off
L3 R/O
Alterable
in config
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18.6.6
Setpoint Limits
The setpoint generator provides limits for each of the setpoint sources as well as an overall set of limits for the loop.
These are summarised in the diagram below.
Range High
SP
HighLimit
Remote
SP1
SPTrim
HighLimit
TgtSP
SP2
SP LowLimit
WSP
LoopAlm
setpoints
SP Trim
SPTrim
LowLimit
Range Low
Figure 18-13: Setpoint Limits

18.6.7
‘Range High’ and ‘Range Low’ provide the range information for the control loop. They are used in
control calculations to generate proportional bands. Span = Range High – Range Low.
Setpoint Rate Limit
Allows the rate of change of setpoint to be controlled. This prevents step changes in the setpoint. It is a simple
symmetrical rate limiter and is applied to the working setpoint which includes setpoint trim. It is enabled by the ‘Rate’
parameter. If this is set to Off then any change made to the setpoint will be effective immediately. If it is set to a value
then any change in the setpoint will be effected at the value set in units per minute. Rate limit applies to SP1, SP2 and
Remote SP.
When rate limit is active the ‘RateDone’ flag will display ‘No’. When the setpoint has been reached this parameter will
change to ‘Yes’. This flag will be cleared if the target setpoint subsequently changes.
When ‘Rate’ is set to a value (other than Off) an additional parameter ‘Rate Disable’ is displayed which allows the
setpoint rate limit to be turned off and on without the need to adjust the ‘Rate’ parameter between Off and a value.
If the PV is in sensor break, the rate limit is suspended and the working setpoint takes the value of 0. On sensor break
being released the working setpoint goes from 0 to the selected setpoint value at the rate limit.
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18.6.8
Setpoint Tracking
The setpoint used by the controller may be derived from a number of sources. For example:1.
Local setpoints SP1 and SP2. These may be selected using the parameter ‘SP Select’ in the SP folder,
through digital communications or by configuring a digital input which selects either SP1 or SP2. This
might be used, for example, to switch between normal running conditions and standby conditions. If
Rate Limit is switched off the new setpoint value is adopted immediately when the switch is changed.
2.
A programmer generating a setpoint which varies over time, see Chapter18. When the programmer is
running the ‘Track SP’ and ‘Track PV’ parameters update continuously so that the programmer can
perform its own servo (see also section 19.7.1). This is sometimes referred to as ‘Program Tracking’.
3.
From a Remote analogue source. The source could be an external analogue input into an analogue
input module wired to the ‘Alt SP’ parameter or a User Value wired to the ‘Alt SP’ parameter. The
remote setpoint is used when the parameter ‘Alt SP Select’ is set to ‘Yes’.
Setpoint tracking (sometimes referred to as Remote Tracking) ensures that the Local setpoint adopts the Remote
setpoint value when switching from Local to Remote to maintain bumpless transfer from Remote to Local. Bumpless
transfer does not take place when changing from Local to Remote. Note, that if Rate Limit is applied the setpoint will
change at the rate set when changing from Local to Remote.
18.6.9
Manual Tracking
When the controller is operating in manual mode the currently selected SP (SP1 or SP2) tracks the PV. When the
controller resumes automatic control there will be no step change in the resolved SP. Manual tracking does not apply to
the remote setpoint or programmer setpoint.
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18.7
Output Function Block
The output function block allows you to set up output conditions from the control block, such as output limits, hysteresis,
output feedforward, behaviour in sensor break, etc.
Folder – Loop.1 to Loop.16
Sub-folder: OP
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
Output High
Limit
Maximum output power delivered
by channels 1 and 2.
By reducing the high power limit, it
is possible to reduce the rate of
change of the process, however,
care should be taken as reducing
the power limit will reduce the
controllers ability to react to
disturbance.
Between Output Lo and 100.0%
100.0
Oper
Output Low
Limit
Minimum (or maximum negative)
output power delivered by
channels 1 and 2
Between Output Hi and -100.0%
-100.0
Ch1 Out
Channel 1 (Heat) output.
The Ch1 output is the positive
power values (0 to Output Hi) used
by the heat output. Typically this is
wired to the control output (time
proportioning or DC output).
Between output Hi and Output Lo
R/O
Ch2 Out
The Ch2 output is negative portion
of the control output (0 – Output
Lo) for heat/cool applications. It is
inverted to be a positive number
so that it can be wired into one of
the outputs (time proportioning or
DC outputs).
Between output Hi and Output Lo
R/O
Ch2
DeadBand
Ch1/Ch2 Deadband is a gap in
percent between output 1 going
off and output 2 coming on and
vice versa.
For on/off control this is taken as a
percentage of the hysteresis.
Off to 100.0%
Off
Oper
Rate
Limits the rate at which the output
from the PID can change in %
change per minute. Output rate
limit is useful in preventing rapid
changes in output from damaging
the process or the heater elements.
Off to 9999.9 percent per minute
Off
Oper
Rate Disable
Output rate disable
No
Yes
Ch1 OnOff
Hysteresis
Channel hysteresis only shown
when channel 1 is configured as
OnOff.
Hysteresis sets the difference
between output on and output off
to prevent (relay) chatter.
0.0 to 200.0
10.0
Oper
0.0 to 200.0
10.0
Oper
SensorBreak
Mode
Defines the action taken if the
Process Variable is bad, i.e. the
sensor has failed. This can be
configured as hold, in which case
the output of the loop is held at its
last good value. Alternately the
output can switch to a safe output
power defined at configuration.
Safe
Safe
Oper
Safe OP Val
Sets the output level to be
adopted when loop is inhibited
Between output Hi and Output Lo
0
Oper
Ch2 OnOff
Hysteresis
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Hold
Enabled
Disabled
To select the level set by
‘Safe OP’
To hold the current
output level at the point
when sensor break
occurs
Oper
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Folder – Loop.1 to Loop.16
Sub-folder: OP
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
SbrkOp
Sets the output level to be
adopted when in sensor break
condition.
Between output Hi and Output Lo
0
Oper
Manual Mode
Selects the mode of manual
operation.
Track
In auto the manual
output tracks the control
output such that a
change to manual mode
will not result in a bump
in the output.
Step
On transition to manual
the output will be the
manual op value as last
set by the operator.
ManualOutVal
The output when the loop is in
manual.
Note: In manual mode the
controller will still limit the
maximum power to the power
limits, however, it could be
dangerous if the instrument is left
unattended at a high power
setting. It is important that the
over range alarms are configured
to protect your process.
Oper
Between output Hi and Output Lo
R/O
We recommend that all processes
are fitted with an independent over
range "policeman"
ForcedOP
Forced manual output value.
When ‘Man Mode’ = ‘Step’ the
manual output does not track and
on transition to manual the target
output will step from its current
value to the ‘ForcedOP’ value.
-100.0 to 100.0
Cool Type
Selects the type of cooling channel
characterisation to be used. Can
be configured as water, oil or fan
cooling.
Linear
Oil
Water
Fan
These are set to match
the type of cooling
medium applicable to
the process
FeedForward
Type
Feedforward type
The following four parameters
appear if FF Type ≠ None
None
No signal fed forward
Remote
A remote signal fed
forward
SP
Setpoint fed forward
PV
PV fed forward
0.0
Oper
Conf
None
Conf
FeedForward
Gain
Defines the gain of the
feedforward value, the feed
forward value is multiplied by the
gain
Conf
FeedForward
Offset
Defines the offset of the
feedforward value this is added to
the scaled feedforward.
Oper
FeedForward
Trim Limit
Feedforward trim limits the effect
of the PID output.
Defines symmetrical limits around
the PID output, such that this value
is applied to the feedforward
signal as a trim.
Oper
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Folder – Loop.1 to Loop.16
Sub-folder: OP
Name
Parameter Description
Value
FF_Rem
Remote Feedforward signal.
Allows an another signal to be
used as Feedforward.
This is not affected by FeedForward
Gain or Offset
FeedForward
Val
The calculated Feedforward Value.
TrackOutVal
Value for the loop output to track
when OP Track is Enabled.
Track Enable
When enabled, the output of the
loop will follow the track output
value. The loop will bumplessly
return to control when tracking is
turned off.
Off
On
RemOPL
Remote output low limit.
Can be used to limit the output of
the loop from a remote source or
calculation. This must always be
within the main limits.
-100.0 to 100.0
Oper
RemOPH
Remote output high limit
-100.0 to 100.0
Oper
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Default
Access
Level
R/O
R/O
Disabled
Enabled
Oper
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18.7.1
Output Limits
The diagram shows where output limits are applied.
PID List
Including Gain
Scheduling output
limits
OPHi +100
Diag List
OPLo -100
OPHi2 +100
Output
Level 3
Writable NOT
Wireable
SchedOPHi
SchedOPLo
OPLo2 -100
OPHi3 +100
Writable NOT
Wireable
Min
OPLo3 -100
Output High
limit
Output Low Lim
Diagnostics
Read only
WrkOPHi
Working
output
WrkOPLo
Output List
OPL limiting to +ve
RemOPH +100%
RemOPL –100%
Tune
Writable AND
Wireable
TuneOPH
TuneOPL
Figure 18-14: Output Limits
•
Individual output limits may be set in the PID list for each set of PID parameters when gain scheduling is
used.
•
The parameters ‘SchedOPHi’ and ‘SchedOPHLo’, found the Diagnostics folder, may be set to values which
override the gain scheduling output values.
•
A limit may also be applied from an external source. These are ‘RemOPH’ and ‘RemOPLo’ (Remote output
high and low) found in the Output folder. These parameters are wireable. For example they may be wired
to an analogue input module so that a limit may applied through some external strategy. If these
parameters are not wired +100% limit is applied every time the instrument is powered up.
•
The tightest set (between Remote and PID) is connected to the output where an overall limit is applied
using parameters ‘Output High Limit’ and ‘Output Low Limit’ settable in Oper Level.
•
‘Wrk OPHi’ and ‘Wrk OPHLo’ found in the Diagnostics folder are read only parameters showing the overall
working output limits.
The tune limits are a separate part of the algorithm and are applied to the output during the tuning process. The overall
limits ‘Output High Limit’ and ‘Output Low Limit’ always have priority.
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18.7.2
Output Rate Limit
The output rate limiter is a simple rate of change limiter which will prevent the control algorithm demanding step
changes in output power. It may be set in percent per minute.
The rate limit is performed by determining the direction in which the output is changing, and then incrementing or
decrementing the Working Output (‘ActiveOut’ in the Main folder) until ‘ActiveOut’ = the required output.
The amount by which to increment or decrement will be calculated based on the sampling rate of the algorithm (i.e.
110ms) and the rate limit that has been set. If the change in output is less than the rate limit increment the change will
take effect immediately.
The rate limit direction and increment will be calculated on every execution of the rate limit. Therefore, if the rate limit is
changed during execution, the new rate of change will take immediate effect. If the output is changed whilst rate
limiting is taking place, the new value will take immediate effect on the direction of the rate limit and in determining
whether the rate limit has completed.
The rate limiter is self-correcting such that if the increment is small and is lost in the floating point resolution, the
increment will be accumulated until it takes effect.
The output rate limit will remain active even if the loop is in manual mode
18.7.3
Sensor Break Mode
Sensor break is detected by the measurement system and a flag is passed to the control block which indicates sensor
failure. On the loop being informed that a sensor break has occurred it may be configured using ‘SensorBreak Mode’
to respond in one of two ways. The output may go to a pre-set level or remain at its current value.
The pre-set value is defined by the parameter ‘SbrkOP’. If rate limit is not configured the output will step to this value
otherwise it will ramp to this value at the rate limit.
If configured as ‘Hold’ the output of the loop will stay at its last good value. If Output Rate Limit (Rate) has been
configured a small step may be seen as the working output will limit to the 2 second old value.
On exit from sensor break the transfer is bumpless – the power output will ramp from its pre-set value to the control
value.
18.7.4
Forced Output
This feature enables the user to specify what the output of the loop should do when moving from automatic control to
manual control. The default is that the output power will be maintained and is then editable by the user. If forced
manual is enabled, two modes of operation can be configured. The forced manual step setting means the user can set a
manual output power value and on transition to manual the output will be forced to that value. If ‘Track Enable’ is
enabled the output steps to the forced manual output and then subsequent edits to the output power are tracked back
into the manual output value.
The parameters associated with this feature are ‘ForcedOP’ and ‘ManualMode’ = ‘Step’.
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18.7.5
Feedforward
Feedforward is a value, which is scaled and added to the PID output, before any limiting. It can be used for the
implementation of cascade loops or constant head control. Feedforward is implemented such that the PID output is
limited to trim limits and acts as a trim on a FeedForward Value. The FeedForward Val is derived either from the PV or
setpoint by scaling the PV or SP by the ‘FeedForward Gain’ and ‘FeedForward Offset’. Alternatively, a remote value
may be used for the FeedForward Val, this is not subject to any scaling. The resultant FeedForward Val is added to the
limited PID OP and becomes the PID output as far as the output algorithm is concerned. The feedback value then generated
must then have the FF contribution removed before being used again by the PID algorithm. The diagram below shows how
feedforward is implemented
FeedForward Offset
FeedForward Type
Remote
FeedForward Gain
SP
PV
Gain
+
+
-
TrimHI
SP1
PID
PV
FeedForward Type
+
+
+ Feedback
Output
Algorithm
Output
TrimLo
FeedForward Trim Limit
Figure 18-15: Implementation of Feedforward
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18.7.6
Effect of Control Action, Hysteresis and Deadband
For temperature control ‘Loop.1.Control Action’ will be set to ‘Reverse’. For a PID controller this means that the heater
power decreases as the PV increases. For an on/off controller output 1 (usually heat) will be on (100%) when PV is below
the setpoint and output 2 (usually cool) will be on when PV is above the setpoint
Hysteresis applies to on/off control only. It defines the difference in temperature between the output switching off and
switching back on again. The examples below show the effect in a heat/cool controller.
Deadband (Ch2 DeadB) can operate on both on/off control or PID control where it has the effect of widening the
period when no heating or cooling is applied. However, in PID control its effect is modified by both the integral and
derivative terms. Deadband might be used in PID control, for example, where actuators take time to complete their
cycle thus ensuring that heating and cooling are not being applied at the same time. Deadband is likely to be used,
therefore, in on/off control only. The second example below adds a deadband of 20 to the above example.
HYST.C
Heating and Cooling Type
both on/off
o
SP 300 C
HYST.H
Setpoint = 300oC
Control Action = reverse
Heating Hysteresis = 8oC
Cooling Hysteresis = 10oC
Deadband = OFF
OP1 On Heating 100%
No OP
OP2 On Cooling 100%
Heating
off at SP
o
(300 C)
Cooling on at
SP + HYST.C
(310oC)
Cooling
off at SP
(300oC)
Heating on at
SP – HYST.H
(292oC)
Figure 18-16: Deadband OFF
HYST.C
Heating and Cooling Type
both on/off
D.BAND
SP 300oC
Setpoint = 300oC
HYST.H
Control Action = reverse
Heating Hysteresis = 8oC
Cooling Hysteresis = 10oC
Deadband 50% of cooling
hysteresis = 5oC
OP1 On Heating 100%
No OP
OP2 On Cooling 100%
Power deadband
Heating
off at SP
(300oC)
Cooling on at
SP + HYST.C
(310oC)
Cooling off
at D.BAND
(305oC)
Heating on at
SP – HYST.H
(292oC)
o
Figure 18-17: Deadband ON set at 50% of Cooling. Hysteresis =5 C
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19.
Chapter 19
19.1
Setpoint Programmer
INTRODUCTION
In a setpoint programmer you can set up a profile in the controller in which the setpoint varies in a pre-determined way
over a period of time. Temperature is a very common application where it is required to ‘ramp’ the process value from
one level to another over a set period of time.
The Program is divided into a flexible number of Segments - each being of a single time duration.
It is often necessary to switch external devices at particular times during the program. Up to eight digital ‘event’ outputs
can be programmed to operate during those segments.
An example of a program and two event outputs is shown below.
Program
PV
Segment
Segment 1
Time
Profile
Setpoint
Segment 1
Target
Start (Run)
1h
2h
3h
4h
5h
6h
7h
8h
Time
1
2
8 X Digital Events
Figure 19-1: A Setpoint Program
19.1.1
Time to Target Programmer
Each segment consists of a single duration parameter and a set of target values for the profiled variables.
1.
2.
3.
The duration specifies the time that the segment takes to change the profiled variables from their current
values to the new targets.
A dwell type segment is set up by leaving the target setpoint at the previous value.
A Step type segment is set up by setting the segment time to zero.
A program with all segments configured as Time-to-Target is shown below.
Setpoint
Time
100
Time
Time
Time
50
0
4 min
3 min
4 min
2 min
Time
Figure 19-2: Time to Target Programmer
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19.1.2
Ramp Rate Programmer
A ramp rate programmer specifies it's ramp segments as maximum setpoint changes per time unit.
Each segment can be specified by the operator as Ramp Rate, Dwell or Step.
1. Ramp Rate – the setpoint changes at a rate in units/time
2. Dwell – the time period is set – there is no need to set the target value as this is inherited from the previous
segment
3. Step – specify target setpoint only – the controller will use that setpoint when the segment is reached
The diagram below shows an example of a ramp rate programmer.
Setpoint
100
Ramp
Dwell
Ramp
Ramp
50
0
25 per min
3 min
12.5 per min
25 min
Time
Figure 19-3: Ramp Rate Programmer
19.2
Mini8 Controller Programmer Block(s)
Mini8 Controller Version 2.xx have 8 programmer blocks available. Each of these blocks has one program of up to 16
segments. One block may be wired to all 16 loops or up to 8 loops may have their own programmer block. In this
situation Loop 1, Programmer block 1 and program 1 are associated together, Loop 2, Programmer block 2 and
program 2 are associated together, and so on up to Loop 8, Programmer block 8 and program 8 being associated
together.
Mini8 Controller Version 1.xx have a single programmer block. The total number of segments available is 200 or 50
per program and it is possible to store up to 50 separate programs. Parameter tables of this version are included in
Appendix D.
Note: Version 1.xx Mini8 controller clone files with programs included will not load correctly into a version 2.xx
Mini8.
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19.3
Segment Types
Depending on the type of program configured, a segment may be set as:19.3.1
Rate
A Ramp segment provides a controlled change of setpoint from an original to a target setpoint. The
duration of the ramp is determined by the rate of change specified. Two styles of ramp are possible in
the range, Ramp-Rate or Time-To-Target.
The segment is specified by the target setpoint and the desired ramp rate. The ramp rate parameter is
o
o
presented in engineering units ( C, F, Eng.) per real time units (Seconds, Minutes or Hours). If the units
are changed, all ramp rates are re-calculated to the new units and clipped if necessary
19.3.2
Dwell
The setpoint remains constant for a specified period at the specified target. The operating setpoint of a
dwell is inherited from the previous segment.
19.3.3
Step
The setpoint changes instantaneously from its current value to a new value at the beginning of a segment.
A Step segment has a minimum duration of 1 second.
19.3.4
Time
A time segment defines the duration of the segment. In this case the target setpoint is defined and the time taken to
reach this value. A dwell period is set by making the target setpoint the same value as the previous setpoint.
19.3.5
GoBack
Go Back allows segments in a program to be repeated a set
number of times. The diagram shows an example of a program
which is required to repeat the same section a number of times
and then continue the program.
Segments 3 to 6
Segment 1 Segment 2
Segment 7
At this point Go Back To
segment 3
When planning a program it is advisable to ensure that the end
and start setpoints of the program are the same otherwise it will
step to the different levels. A Go Back segment is defined when
editing a program.
Segment 6 is defined as a
Go Back segment
‘Goback Seg’ specifies the segment to go back to
This section is repeated ‘n’
times
‘Goback Cycles’ specifies the number of times the goback loop
is executed
Overlapping Goback loops are disallowed
Not
allowable
Note 1. If a second or more ‘Go Back’ segments are created, they
cannot return to a segment before the previous ‘Go Back’
segment as shown.
In this diagram a Go Back segment can be created from 3 to 2 or
1. Go Back segments can also be created from 7 to 6 or 5 or 4
but not from 7 to 2 or 1
OK
OK
1
2
OK
3 - Go Back 4
OK
OK
5
6
7 - Go Back
Segments
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19.3.6
Wait
Wait specifies the criterion for which a segment cannot proceed to the next segment. Any segment can be defined as
‘Wait’ in the ‘Program Edit’ page. The next parameter is then ‘Wait For’ and here you define the criterion.
‘Wait For’ criteria:None
No action
PrgIn1
Wait until Input 1 is true
PrgIn2
Wait until Input 2 is true
PrgIn1n2
Wait until Input 1 AND Input 2 are true
PrgIn1or2 Wait until Input 1 OR Input 2 is true
PVWaitIP Wait until PV has met the criteria against the parameter ‘WaitVal’ as shown:
‘Wait For’ set to ‘PVWaitIP’
PSP = 100
‘WaitVal’ = 5
PVWait
Segment will wait until
Abs Hi
PVWaitIP >= 5
Dev Lo
PVWaitIP >= 95
Abs Lo
PVWaitIP <= 5
Dev Hi
PVWaitIP <= 105
Example where the temperature must have reached 550 °C before the program continues:
This and subsequent screen shots are from the Programmer editor in iTools.
Wait segments do not have Events or Holdback.
19.3.7
End
A program may contain one End segment. This allows the program to be truncated to the number of segments
required.
The end segment can be configured to have an indefinite dwell at the last target setpoint or to reset to the start of the
program or to go to a defined level of power output (SafeOP). This is selectable by the user.
If a number of program cycles are specified for the program, then the End segment is not executed until the last cycle
has completed
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19.4
Output Events
Program segments have configurable events. ‘Wait’ ‘GoBack’ and ‘End’ segments do not have events.
There are up to 8 digital events, PV Events and Time Events.
19.4.1
Digital Events
These are digital flags which can be set on or off for each of the segments.
These are enabled by setting Programmer.n.Setup.MaxEvents to the required maximum number of events (>0 and
<=8).
Clicking the icon on the right in an ‘EventOuts’ cell opens digital events window:
In this example Programmer.n.Setup.MaxEvents has been set to 4. Tick the boxes of the outputs that are required. The
value shown is the bit mask for the outputs (10 = 2 + 8 I.e. outputs 2 and 4)
The EventOuts row above shows this setup for each segment.
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19.4.2
PV Event & User Value
PV Events are essentially a simplified analogue alarm per segment based on the programmer PV input. For this feature
the Programmer.n.Setup.EnablePVEvent must be set to ‘Yes’. The PV Event Output (PVEventOP) may be used to trigger
the required response.
•
•
Each Segment has one PV Event Type (Off, Hi, Lo, Dev Hi, Dev Lo, Dev Band*)
Each Segment has one PV Threshold
* Dev refers to deviation of the PV parameter from Programmer Setpoint (i.e. there is no reference input).
If the PVEvent type is set to None in a segment then the User value may be used as a general purpose analogue value
per segment. For this feature the Programmer.n.Setup.EnableUValue must be set to ‘Yes’. By default, the parameter is
named ‘UserVal’ – it may be renamed in Programmer.n.Setup.UValName.
In segment 1 there is no PVEvent so the UserVal may be set but in segment 3 the PVEvent type is not ‘None’ so only the
PVThreshold may be set.
The event output is Programmer.n.Setup.PVEventOP, the UserVal output is Programmer.n.Setup.UserValOP
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19.4.3
Time Event
Digital events can simply be the turning on of a digital output for the duration of a segment. An extension of this is the
Time Event. For this feature Programmer.n.Setup.MaxEvents must be > 0 and the
Programmer.n.Setup.EnableTimeEvent must be set to ‘Yes’. In this case the first digital event Event1 can have a delay
(On Time) and an (Off Time) specified. ‘On Time’ defines when the digital output will turn on after the beginning of the
segment and ‘Off Time’ defines when the digital output will turn off. The reference point for the On and Off times is the
start of the segment.
•
•
•
Only the first digital event Event1 may be configured as a Time Event.
Each segment has one Time Event parameter (OFF, Event1).
The first digital event cannot be set (read only if TimeEvent is not OFF).
The following example of a timed event in segment 3 shows that Programmer.n.Setup.EventOut1 will be on for 10
minutes during segment 3 starting 10 minutes after segment 3 begins.
Editing of the Time Events follows a number of simple rules to make programming easier for the operator - these are
shown in the 3 diagrams below:
Segment
1
2
TimeEvent = Event1
TimeEvent = Off
TimeEvent = Event1
TimeEvent = Off
OffTime = 0
Event Output
OnTime = 0
OffTime = 0
Event Output
OnTime = t1
t1
TimeEvent = Event1
TimeEvent = Off
OffTime = t2
Event Output
t2
OnTime = t1
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Segment
OffTime
1
2
TimeEvent = Event1
OffTime * = 0
TimeEvent = On
Event Output
OffTime
OnTime=0
OnTime
Time Event = Event1
Time Event = Off
Time Event = Event1
TimeEvent = Off
OffTime
Event Output
OnTime = 0
OffTime
Error : OffTime > segment 1 duration
Event Output
OnTime
•
To configure an event which straddles two segments configure Ton in Segment n and Toff in segment n+1.
Segment
1
2
Time Event = Event1
Time Event = Off
OffTime
OnTime
Error : OnTime = OffTime
Event OP = Off
Event Output Off
Time Event = Event1
Time Event = Off
OffTime
OnTime
Event Output Off
Error : OnTime > OffTime
Event OP = Off
Time Event = Event1
Time Event = Off
OffTime
OnTime
Error : OnTime > seg 1 duration
Event OP = Off
Event Output Off
OnTime and OffTime are extended by G.Soak periods. If OnTime = 0, the output goes hi at the start of the segment but
OffTime is not decremented while Gsoak Wait is applied. Timed event outputs are on a total of Gsoak Wait + (OffTime –
OnTime).
In the event of a power fail, time events timing will be unaffected.
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19.5
Holdback
Holdback freezes the program if the process value (PV) does not track the setpoint (SP) by more than a user defined
amount. The programmer will remain in HOLDBACK until the PV returns to within the requested deviation from
setpoint.
In a Ramp it indicates that the PV is lagging the SP by more than the set amount and that the program is
the process to catch up.
waiting for
Holdback maintains the correct soak period for the product – see Guaranteed Soak below.
Each program can be configured with a holdback value. Each segment determines the holdback function.
Holdback will cause the execution time of the program to extend, if the process cannot match the demanded profile.
Holdback state will not change access to the parameters. The parameters will behave as if in the RUN state.
The diagram below demonstrates that the demanded setpoint (SP) will only change at the rate specified by the program
when the PV's deviation is less than the holdback value. When the Deviation between the setpoint and PV is greater
than the holdback value (HBk Val) the setpoint ramp will pause until the deviation returns to within the band.
The next segment will not start until the deviation between Setpoint and PV is less than the holdback value.
Four types of Holdback are available:None Holdback is disabled for this segment.
High Holdback is entered when the PV is greater than the Setpoint plus HBk Val.
Low
Holdback is entered when the PV is lower than the Setpoint minus HBk Val.
Band
19.5.1
Holdback is entered when the PV is either greater than the Setpoint plus HBk Val or lower than the
Setpoint minus HBk Val
Guaranteed Soak
Guaranteed Soak (guaranteed time workpiece stays at SP within a specified tolerance) is achieved in the previous single
programmer version by using Holdback Band during a dwell segment. Since only one holdback value per program is
available, this imposes a limitation where different tolerance values are required to guarantee the soak.
In 2.xx Mini8 controller Holdback Type in Dwell segments is replaced by a Guaranteed Soak Type (G.Soak) which can be
set as Off, Lo, Hi or Band. A Guaranteed Soak Value (G.Soak Val) is available in Dwell segments and this provides the
ability to set different values in any Dwell segment.
Dwell starts when PV reaches
correct value
SP/PV
PV lags SP.
Holdback stops the ramp
until SP catches up.
Set Holdback Type to low
Dwell held if PV falls
beyond limits
Dwell extended by
t1+t2
t2
t1
PV
SP as set in the program
SP as modified by holdback follows the rate at
which the process is capable
Time
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19.6
PID Select
It is possible to set up three sets of PID values, see section 18.4.9. Any one of these sets may be activated in any
segment of the program, except if the segment is configures as Wait, Goback or End. For this feature
Programmer.n.Setup.EnablePIDSched must be set to ‘Yes’. The last PID set in the program (SET1 by default) will be
applied during these segments. When reset the usual PID strategy for the loop takes over.
In the following example the ramp uses PID set 1 and the dwell uses PID set 2.
It also shows that the segment 2 dwell guarantees that the PV will be above 595 °C for the full 30 minutes.
19.7
Program Cycles
If the Program Cycles parameter is chosen as greater than 1, the program will execute all its segments then repeat from
the beginning. The number of cycles is determined by the parameter value. The Program Cycles parameter has a range
of 0 to 999 where 0 is enumerated to CONTinuous.
19.7.1
Servo
Servo can be set in configuration so that when a program is run the setpoint can start from the initial controller setpoint
or from the current process value. Whichever it is, the starting point is called the servo point. This can be set in the
program.
Servo to PV will produce a smooth and bumpless start to the process.
Servo to SP may be used in a Ramp Rate programmer to guarantee the time period of the first segment. (Note: in a
Time to Target programmer the segment duration will always be determined by the setting of the Segment Duration
parameter.)
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19.8
Power Fail Recovery
In the event of power fail to the Mini8 controller, a strategy may be set in configuration level, which defines how the
controller behaves on restoration of the power.
The action on power failure is selecte3d using Programmer.n.Setup.PowerFailAct and offers:
19.8.1
Ramp
This will servo the program setpoint to the measured value (the PV Input parameter
value), then return to the target setpoint at the current (or previous) ramp rate.
(Default). The setpoint is not allowed to step change the program setpoint. The
outputs will take the state of the segment which was active before power was
interrupted. See examples below.
Reset
The process is aborted by resetting the program. All event outputs will take the reset
state.
Continue
The program setpoint returns immediately to its last value prior to the power down.
This may cause full power to be applied to the process for a short period to heat the
process back to its value prior to the power failure.
Ramp (Power fail during Dwell segments.)
If the interrupted segment was a Dwell, then the ramp rate will be determined by
the previous ramp segment.
Setpoint
T1 + T2 = segment Dwell time
T1
On achieving the Dwell setpoint, the dwell will continue from the point at which
the power was interrupted.
T2
Note: If a previous ramp segment does not exist, i.e. the first segment of a
program is a dwell, then the Dwell will continue at the "servo to PV" setpoint.
19.8.2
Ramp (power fail during Ramp segments)
If the interrupted segment was a ramp, then the programmer will servo the
program setpoint to the PV, then ramp towards the target setpoint at the
previous ramp rate. Previous ramp rate is the ramp rate at power fail.
Time
Power Off
Seg n+1
Seg n
Setpoint
Target Setpoint
Servo to new PV
level
Time
Power Off
19.8.3
Ramp (power fail during Time-to-target segments)
If the programmer was defined as a Time-to-Target programmer then when the
power is returned the previous ramp rate will be recovered. The Time remaining
will be recalculated. The rule is to maintain RAMP RATE, but alter TIME
REMAINING.
Setpoint
Ramp Rate
Tgt SP
Servo to PV level
Power Off
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19.9
To Run, Hold or Reset a Program
The program is operated via parameters found in the Program Setup lists, Programmer.n.Setup.ProgRun, .ProgReset,
.ProgHold, .ProgRunReset and .ProgRunHold. These parameters can be wired to digital inputs or written to over
comms.
The status of the program is in Program.n.Run.ProgStatus
19.9.1
Run
A program will always run – non configured programs will default to a single Dwell end segment. In run the programmer
working setpoint varies in accordance with the profile set in the active program. Parameters are
Programmer.n.Setup.ProgRun or Programmer.n.Setup.ProgRunReset.
ProgRun runs the program when input goes from false to true.
ProgRunReset runs the program if true, resets it if false.
19.9.2
Reset
In reset the programmer is inactive and the controller behaves as a standard controller. It will:1.
Continue to control with the setpoint determined by the next available source, SP1, SP2, Alternative
Setpoint.
2.
Allow edits to all segments
3.
Return all controlled outputs to the configured reset state.
Parameters are Programmer.n.Setup.ProgReset or Programmer.n.Setup.ProgRunReset.
ProgReset resets the program when input goes from false to true.
ProgRunReset resets the program if false, runs it if true.
19.9.3
Hold
A programmer may only be placed in Hold from the Run or Holdback state. In hold the setpoint is frozen at the current
programmer setpoint and the time remaining parameter frozen at its last value. In this state you can make temporary
changes to program parameters such as a target setpoint, ramp rates and times. These changes will only remain
effective until the end of the currently running segment, when they will be overwritten by the stored program values.
Parameters are Programmer.n.Setup.ProgHold or Programmer.n.Setup.ProgRunHold.
ProgHold holds the program when input goes from false to true.
ProgRunHold runs the program if true, holds it if false.
19.9.4
Skip segment
Skip jumps immediately to the beginning of next segment and starts that segment from the current setpoint value.
Parameter is Programmer.n.Setup.SkipSeg and will skip to next segment when input goes from false to true.
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19.9.5
Advance segment
Advance sets the program setpoint equal to the target setpoint and moves to the next segment.
Parameter is Programmer.n.Setup.AdvSeg and will advance to next segment when input goes from false to true.
19.9.6
Fast
Executes the program at 10x the normal speed. It is provided so that programs can be tested but the process should
not be run in this state.
Parameter is Programmer.n.Run.FastRun .
19.10
PV Start
When Run is initiated PV start (for each channel) allows the program to automatically advance to the correct point in the
profile which corresponds to the current PV. For example, if the process is already at PV3 when run is initiated then the
program will start from the third segment as shown in the diagram below.
Initial PV
PV3
Seg 2
PV2
Rising PV
Seg 3
Rising PV
Seg 1
Rising PV
PV1
The user may specify the start point based on a Rising PV as shown in the diagram above or on a Falling PV as
shown below depending on type of profile being run.
Initial PV
PV1
PV2
PV3
Falling PV
Falling PV
Falling PV
When PV Start is used, the program always servos to PV (i.e. servo to SP will be ignored).
PV Start is enabled by setting parameter Instrument.Options.ProgPVstart to ‘Yes’.
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19.11
Configuring the Programmer
Programmer.n.Setup contains the general configuration settings for the Programmer Block and the parameters used to
operate the programmer.
Programs are created and stored in the Program Folder.
The Programmer status can be viewed using the parameters in the Programmer.n.Run folder.
The program can also be operated by setting the Programmer.n.Run.ProgStatus parameter to the required state.
Folder – Programmer.1 to .8
Sub-folder: Setup
Name
Parameter Description
Value
SyncIn
The synchronise input is a way of
synchronising programs. At the end
of a segment the programmer will
inspect the sync. input, if it is True (1)
then the programmer will advance to
the next segment. It is typically wired
from the end of segment output of
another programmer.
0
1
Units
Units of the Output
Resolution
Programmer Output resolution
RateResolution
Default
This will normally be
wired to the ‘End of Seg’
parameter.
Access
Level
Oper
None
Conf
X to X.XXXX
X
Conf
Ramp Rate Resolution
X to X.XXXX
X.X
Conf
PVIn
The programmer uses the PV input for
a number of functions
In holdback, the PV is monitored
against the setpoint, and if a deviation
occurs the program is paused.
The programmer can be configured to
start its profile from the current PV
value (servo to PV).
The programmer monitors the PV
value for Sensor Break. The
programmer holds in sensor break.
The PV Input is normally wired
from the loop TrackPV parameter.
Note: This input is automatically
wired when the programmer and
loop are enabled and there are no
existing wires to track interface
parameters.
Track interface parameters are
Programmer.Setup, PVInput,
SPInput, Loop.SP, AltSP, Loop.SP,
AltSPSelect.
Conf
SPIn
The programmer needs to know the
working setpoint of the loop it is trying
to control. The SP input is used in the
servo to setpoint start type.
SP Input is normally wired from the
loop Track SP parameter as the PV
input.
Conf
Servo
The transfer of program setpoint to PV
Input (normally the Loop PV) or the SP
Input (normally the Loop setpoint).
PV
SP
See also section
19.7.1.
Conf
PowerFailAct
Power fail recovery strategy
Ramp
Reset
Cont
See section 19.8
Conf
Max Events
To set the maximum number of output
events required for the program. This
is for convenience to avoid having to
scroll through unwanted events when
setting up each segment
1 to 8
EnablePVevent
Enable PV Event provides an alarm
facility on Programmer's PVInput. PV
Event Type and Threshold are defined
in each Segment.
No
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Yes
Conf
No
Conf
PV Event
parameters are
listed in the
Program Edit page.
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Folder – Programmer.1 to .8
Sub-folder: Setup
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
EnableTime
Event
Enables the first Event Output to be
configured as a Time Event - each
segment may then specify an on and
an off time, with respect to the start of
the segment, for the event.
No
No
Conf
EnableUserVal
Enables a single analogue value to be
set in every segment.
It is only available if Ch1/Ch2Event =
None in the Program Edit page.
No
Conf
UserVal
Conf
No
Conf
No
Conf
No
Conf
UValName
User Value Name
EnableGsoak
Enable Guaranteed soak ensures that
the work piece remains at the
specified dwell setpoint for a
minimum of the specified duration.
This parameter is only shown for
SyncStart programmers
Enable
DelayedStart
Enables a time period to be set
between starting Run and the program
actually running
Yes
Time Event
parameters are
listed in the
Program Edit page
No
User value not
shown
Yes
User value shown
in every segment
No
No guaranteed
Yes
Guaranteed soak
parameters are
listed in the
Program Edit page
for all Dwell
segments.
No
The program will
run immediately
Yes
Delayed start is
listed in the
Program Status
page. It is also
listed in the pop up
associated with the
RUN/HOLD key.
No
Each segment uses
the same PID
values
Enable
PID Set
Enables PID set. The setting
configured in each segment will
automatically select the relevant PID
Set for the loop wired to the
Programmer.
Upon completion of the program, PID
setting of the loop will be reset to
values prior to execution of the
program
EnableImmPSP
Enable immediate PSP
Prog Reset
Resets program on transition to true
No/Yes
Prog Run
Runs program on transition to true
No/Yes
Prog Hold
Holds program on transition to true
No/Yes
ProgRunHold
Program runs if true
Program holds if false
ProgRunReset
No
Yes
Oper
No
Oper
No
Oper
No/Yes
No
Oper
Program runs if true
Program holds if false
No/Yes
No
Oper
AdvSeg
Set output to target setpoint and
advance to next segment
No/Yes
Oper
SkipSeg
Skip to the next setpoint and start the
segment at the current output value.
No/Yes
Oper
PrgIn1 & 2
Programmer Digital Input 1 and 2
These are events and can be wired to
any parameter. They are used in ‘wait’
segments to prevent the program
continuing until the event becomes
true
Off/On
Page 238
Can be wired from
logic inputs to
provide remote
program control
Used in Wait
segment
off
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Folder – Programmer.1 to .8
Sub-folder: Setup
Name
Parameter Description
Value
EventOut1 to 8
Flags showing event states
No/Yes
R/O
End of Seg
Flag showing end of segment state
No/Yes
R/O
ProgError
Program Error
0 No error
1 Sensor
Break
2 Empty
Program
3 Overrange
R/O
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Default
Access
Level
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
19.12
Programmer Run Status
The ‘Run’ folder shows the current program status. The program can also be operated by setting the ProgStatus
parameter to the required state.
Folder – Programmer.1 to .8
Sub-folder: Run
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
CurProg
Current Program Number
1
1
R/O
DelayedStart
Time for Delayed start. Enabled in
Programmer.n.Setup.EnableDelayed
Start
hh:mm:ss
0
Oper
CurrSeg
Current Running Segment
1 to 255
1
R/O
ProgStatus
Program Status
Reset –
Run –
Hold –
Holdback –
End –
CurSegType
Current Segment type
End
Rate
Time
Dwell
Step
Call
PSP
Programmer Setpoint
CyclesLeft
Number of Cycles Remaining
SegTimeLeft
Segment Time Remaining
SegDuration
Time remaining to end of segment
SegTarget
Current Target Setpoint Value
SegRate
Segment Ramp Rate
0.1 to 9999.9
0
R/O
ProgTimeLeft
Program Time Remaining
Hrs Min Sec Millisec
0
R/O
CyclesLeft
Number of cycles remaining
R/O
Goback
CyclesLeft
Number of go back cycles left
R/O
FastRun
Fast Run
No (0) Normal
Yes (1) Program executes at 10
times real time
No
Oper
EndOutput
End Output
Off (0) Program not in End
On (1) Program at End
Off
R/O
EventsOut
Event Outputs
0 to 255, each bit represents an
output.
0
R/O
ResetEventOuts
Reset Event Outputs
0 to 255, each bit resets its
corresponding output
0
Oper
ResetUVal
Reset User Value
Page 240
Oper
End
R/O
0
R/O
0 to 1000
0
R/O
Hr Min Sec Millisec
0
R/O
R/O
R/O
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19.13
Creating a Program
A folder exists for each Program containing a few key parameters listed below. This folder would normally be viewed via
the iTools Program Editor under the Program Parameters tab. The Program Editor is used to create the segments of
Program itself using the Segment Editor tab.
Folder – Program
Sub-folder: 1 to 50
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
Name
Program Name
Up to 8 characters
Null
Oper
Holdback
Value
Deviation between SP and PV at which
holdback is applied. This value applies
to the whole program.
Minimum setting 0
0
Oper
Ramp Units
Time units applied to the segments
Sec
Min
Hour
Seconds
Minutes
Hours
sec
Oper
Cycles
Number of times the whole program
repeats
Cont (0)
1 to 999
Repeats continuously
Program executes
once to 999 times
1
Oper
19.14
Program Editor
The Program Editor in iTools provides the method of entering and editing programs directly in the controller. Setpoint
programs can be created graphically, stored and downloaded into the controller. From the iTools menu select ‘Program
Editor OR Press
to create/edit a Program.
Figure 19-4: Blank Programmer editor – use
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19.14.1
Analog View
This view is used for editing the analogue setpoints.
- 1 in this example.
1.
Select a program number using
2.
Double click
and enter a name for the program - “Example”
3.
Double click
and enter a name for the TargetSP - “Temperature”
4.
Right click in the blank area and choose ‘Add Segment’
Segment
Type
Description
Parameters
Values
End
Ends Program
Reset
Reset – returns to Loop setpoint
Dwell – remains at final setpoint
SafeOP – goes to SafeOP value
Rate
Ramp at a rate
Target SP
Ramp rate
SP range
0.1 – 9999.9
Time
Ramp to a target over
an interval
Target SP
Duration
SP range
hh:mm:ss
Dwell
Soak at a fixed SP
Duration
hh:mm:ss
Wait
Waits for an event
Wait For
In 1
In 2
In1 AND In 2
In1 OR In 2
PV wait
PrgIn1
PrgIn2
PrgIn1n2
PrgIn1or2
PVWaitIP
5.
Use the drop down to select segment type. Each segment type has the necessary parameters to suit.
6.
Right click to insert more segments. End with an ‘End’ segment.
Figure 19-5: Spreadsheet Editor with 4 different segment types
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Note PSP1 tab shown in Config
mode.
This tab displays all the
parameters in
Programmer.1.Setup folder.
With 8 Programmers enabled 8
PSP tabs would be shown.
Figure 19-6: PSP tabs
7.
Click on ‘EventOuts’ to set up the event outputs for each segment. Note only 4 events have been enabled.
Figure 19-7: EventOuts with Out 4 set
In the Example program, the dots in EventOuts show which are on in each segment – O/P 1 in segment 1, O/P in
segment 2 etc.
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19.14.2
Digital View
Alternatively click the icon and the Digital Editor is shown (or hit Cntrl D)
Figure 19-8: Digital Editor showing event outputs
8.
19.14.3
Once the program is complete it may be saved to file, or loaded to another programmer in this Mini8
controller or in any other Min8 also connected.
Saving & Loading Programs
If you are online to an instrument the program is already ‘loaded’. Use
to save it to file. This example would be
saved as ‘Example.uip’ and the programs for ALL the enabled programmer blocks will be saved to this file.
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Use
to load a set of programs from disk to ALL the programmer blocks.
Use
to copy a program from one programmer to another. For this to succeed the source and destination
programmer blocks must have the same features enabled – i.e. EventsOut, UserVal etc.
Firstly select the instrument on the network, COM1.ID001-Mini8 (or any other Mini8 controller on the network).
Then set the target programmer number and click OK. In this case the program in Programmer 1 will be sent to
Programmer 2. Note it could be sent to a programmer block in any instrument on the network.
19.14.4
Printing a Program
 If you select all segments, Cntrl A (or right click ‘Select All’) and copy spreadsheet cells they are put on the clipboard
as tab separated values which can be pasted into Microsoft Excel.
There is no direct printing support in the Programmer Editor, but you can generate a report using Microsoft Excel as
follows:
•
Right click on the graph and choose 'Copy Chart'.
•
Open a new spreadsheet in Excel and paste the chart, position to taste.
•
Go back to the Programmer Editor and Choose 'Edit|Select All' followed by 'Edit|Copy'.
•
Switch to Excel, choose the top left cell for the segment data and then choose 'Edit|Paste'.
•
Optionally delete any columns that have no settings and format the cells.
•
Print the spreadsheet.
The program is listed down rather than across the page so long programs can be printed.
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19.15
Wiring the Programmer Function Block.
The Programmer block is invariably used with the Loop blocks. When a programmer block is placed on the graphical
wiring editor it will automatically make the essential connections between itself and its associated Loop block i.e.
Programmer 1 with Loop1 etc.
These connections ensure that the program setpoint goes to the loop and that ‘servo’ and other program options work
correctly. Note that for 8 loops & 8 programmers at least 60 wires are required.
Figure 19-9: Wiring Programmer to Loop Block
When placing a loop block and a programmer block on the graphical wiring editor, if they are the same number (i.e.
Loop.1 and Programmer.1), they will automatically wire themselves together as shown. Use this if you require up to 8
loops, each with their own programmer.
In the situation where there are multiple programmer blocks, it is possible to synchronise the programmer blocks by
wiring the AND of all the ‘Programmer.n.Setup.EndOfSeg’ outputs to all the ‘Programmer.n.Setup.SyncIn’ Inputs.
Programmer 1
Programmer 2
Programmer 3
Sync Input
Sync Input
Sync Input
End Of Segment
End Of Segment
End Of Segment
Figure 19-10: Synchronisation of programmer blocks
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If a single programmer block is used, wired to several loops then a plan has to be made about the SP & PV feedback to
the programmer block. In the design below the AVERAGE PV of the 3 loops has been used for the PV but for the
Setpoint Loop1 has been selected as the ‘master’ and the programmer SP feedback just taken from Loop 1.
Figure 19-11: Single Programmer with 3 loops.
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20.
Chapter 20 Switch Over
This facility is commonly used in temperature applications which operate over a wide temperature range. A
thermocouple may be used to control at lower temperatures and a pyrometer then controls at very high temperatures.
Alternatively two thermocouples of different types may be used.
The diagram below shows a process heating over time with boundaries which define the switching points between the
two devices. The higher boundary (2 to 3) is normally set towards the top end of the thermocouple range and this is
determined by the ‘Switch High’ parameter. The lower boundary (1 to 2) is set towards the lower end of the pyrometer
(or second thermocouple) range using the parameter ‘Switch Low’. The controller calculates a smooth transition
between the two devices.
Input 1
Low temperature
thermocouple
Mini8 Module
Input 2
High temperature
thermocouple

Controller operates entirely
on the higher temperature
device

Temperature
Boundary 2/3
Controller operates on a
combination of both devices
Boundary 1/2
Controller operates entirely
on the lower temperature
device

Time 
Figure 20-1: Thermocouple to Pyrometer Switching
Example: To Set the Switch Over Levels
Set Access to configuration level
1.
Open the ‘SwitchOver’ Folder
2.
Set ‘SwitchHigh’ to a value which is suitable for the pyrometer (or high temperature thermocouple) to take
over the control of the process
3.
Set ‘SwitchLow’ to a value which is suitable for the low temperature thermocouple to control the process
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20.1
Switch Over Parameters
Folder – SwitchOver
Sub-folders: .1
Name
Parameter Description
Value
InHigh
Sets the high limit for the
switch over block. It is the
highest reading from input
2 since it is the high range
input sensor.
Input range
InLow
Sets the low limit for the
switch over block. It is the
lowest reading from input 1
since it is the low range
input sensor
Switch High
Defines the high boundary
of the switchover region
Switch Low
Defines the low boundary of
the switchover region.
In1
The first input value. This
must be the low range
sensor.
In2
The second input value.
This must be the high range
sensor
Fallback
Value
In the event of a bad status,
the output may be
configured to adopt the
fallback value. This allows
the strategy to dictate a safe
output in the event of a fault
being detected
Between Input Hi and Input Lo
0.0
Oper
Fallback
Type
Fall back type
Clip Bad
Clip Good
Fall Bad
Fall Good
Upscale
Downscale
Clip Bad
Conf
SelectIn
Indicates which input is
currently selected
Input 1
0: Input 1 has been selected
1: Input 2 has been selected
Input 2
2: Both inputs are used to
calculate the output
UseGood
0: Assumes the value of a good
input
If the currently selected input is
BAD the output will assume the
value of the other input if it is
GOOD
ShowBad
1: If selected input is BAD the
output is BAD
ErrMode
The action taken if the
selected input is BAD
Out
Output produced from the
2 input measurements
Status
Status of the switchover
block
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Default
Access
Level
Oper
Oper
Between Input Hi and Input Lo
Oper
Oper
These will normally be wired to the
thermocouple/pyrometer input sources via
the PV Input or Analogue Input Module. The
range will be the range of the input chosen.
R/O if
wired
R/O if
wired
R/O
Use
Good
Conf
R/O
Good
Bad
R/O
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21.
Chapter 21 Transducer Scaling
The Mini8 controller includes two transducer calibration function blocks. These are a software function blocks that
provide a method of offsetting the calibration of the input when compared to a known input source. Transducer scaling
is often performed as a routine operation on a machine to take out system errors. For this reason it can be carried out in
operator mode.
Transducer scaling can be applied to any TC8 input set up as a linear PV input. They can be wired to the transducer
scaling inputs.
Three types of calibration are explained in this chapter:•
Auto-tare
•
Load Cell Calibration
•
Comparison Calibration
21.1
Auto-Tare Calibration
The auto-tare function is used, for example, when it is required to weigh the contents of a container but not the
container itself.
The procedure is to place the empty container on the weigh bridge and ‘zero’ the controller. Since it is likely that
following containers may have different tare weights the auto-tare feature is always available.
Further parameters are available which are used to pre-configure the tare measurement or for interrogation purposes.
Tare calibration may be carried out no matter what type of transducer is in use.
New Scale High
Tare
offset
Scale High
New Scaling
Tare value
PV at tare point
New Scale Low
Scale Low
Original
Scaling
Tare
offset
Tare
offset
Input Low
Input at autotare point
Input High
Figure 21-1: Effect of Auto Tare
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21.2
Load Cell
A load cell provides a mV analogue output which may be connected to a linear TC8 input.
When no load is placed on the cell the output is normally zero. However, in practice there may be a residual output and
this can be calibrated out in the controller.
The high end is calibrated by placing a reference weight on the load cell and performing a high end calibration in the
controller.
21.3
Comparison Calibration
Comparison calibration is used to calibrate the controller against a second reference instrument.
The load is removed (or taken to a minimum) from the reference device. The controller low end calibration is done
using the ‘Cal Enable’ parameter and entering the reading from the reference instrument.
Add a weight and when the reading has become stable select the ‘Cal Hi Enable’ parameter then enter the new reading
from the reference instrument.
21.4
Transducer Scaling Parameters
Folder – Txdr
Sub-folders: .1 or .2
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Cal Type
Used to select the type of
transducer calibration to perform
See descriptions at the
beginning of this chapter.
1: Off
Transducer type
unconfigured
1: Shunt
Shunt calibration
2: Load Cell
Load Cell
3: Compare
Comparison
Not ready
Ready
Default
Access
Level
Off
Conf
No
Conf
Cal Enable
To make the transducer ready for
calibration.
Must be set to Yes to allow
calibration to be done at L1. This
includes Tare Cal.
No
Yes
Range Max
The maximum permissible range
of the scaling block
Range min to 99999
1000
Conf
Range Min
The minimum permissible range
of the scaling block
-19999 to Range max
0
Conf
Start Tare
Begin tare calibration
No
Yes
No
Start tare calibration
Oper if
‘Cal
Enable’ =
‘Yes’
Starts the Calibration process.
Note: for Load Cell and
Comparison calibration ‘Start Cal’
starts the first calibration point.
No
Yes
No
Start calibration
Oper if
‘Cal
Enable’ =
‘Yes’
Start
HighCal
For Load Cell and Comparison
calibration the ‘Start High Cal’
must be used to start the second
calibration point.
No
Yes
No
Start high calibration
Oper if
‘Cal
Enable’ =
‘Yes’
Clear Cal
Clears the current calibration
constants. This returns the
calibration to unity gain
No
Yes
No
Oper
Start Cal
To delete previous
calibration values
Tare Value
Enter the tare value of the
container
Conf
InHigh
Sets the scaling input high point
Oper
InLow
Sets the scaling input low point
Oper
20.4
Sets the scaling output high
point. Usually the same as the
‘Input Lo’
Oper
Scale Low
Sets the scaling output low point.
Usually 80% of ‘Input Hi’
Oper
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Folder – Txdr
Sub-folders: .1 or .2
Name
Parameter Description
Cal Band
The calibration algorithms use
the threshold to determine if the
value has settled. When
switching in the shunt resistor,
the algorithm waits for the value
to settle to within the threshold
before starting the high
calibration point.
CalAdjust
The adjust is used in the
Comparison Calibration method.
When edited, the Adjust parameter can
be set to the desired value. On confirm,
the new adjust value is used to set the
scaling constants
Oper
ShuntOut
Indicates when the internal shunt
calibration resistor is switched in.
Only appears if ‘Cal Type’ =
‘Shunt’
Off
On
Resistor not switched in
Resistor switched in
Oper
Cal Active
Indicates calibration taking place
Off
On
Inactive
Active
R/O
InVal
The input value to be scaled.
-9999.9 to 9999.9
OutVal
The Input Value is scaled by the
block to produce the Output
Value
Status
The status of the output
accounting for sensor fail signals
passed to the block and the state
of the scaling.
Good
Bad
Cal Status
Indicates the progress of
calibration
0:
1:
2:
3:
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Value
Default
Access
Level
Conf
Oper
Oper
Idle
Active
Passed
Failed
Conf
No calibration in progress
Calibration in progress
Calibration Passed
Calibration Failed
L1 R/O
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21.4.1
Parameter Notes
Enable Cal
This may be wired to a digital input for an external switch. If not wired, then the value may
be changed.
When enabled the transducer parameters may be altered as described in the previous
sections. When the parameter has been turned On it will remain on until turned off
manually even if the controller is powered cycled.
Start Tare
This may be wired to a digital input for an external switch. If not wired, then the value may
be changed.
Start Cal
This may be wired to a digital input for an external switch. If not wired, then the value may
be changed.
It starts the calibration procedure for:
Shunt Calibration
The low point for Load Cell Calibration
The low point for Comparison Calibration
Start Hi Cal
This may be wired to a digital input for an external switch. If not wired, then the value may
be changed.
It starts:The high point for Load Cell Calibration
The high point for Comparison Calibration
Clear Cal
This may be wired to a digital input for an external switch. If not wired, then the value may
be changed.
When enabled the input will reset to default values. A new calibration will overwrite the
previous calibration values if Clear Cal is not enabled between calibrations.
21.4.2
Tare Calibration
The Mini8 controller has an auto-tare function that is used, for example, when it is required to weigh the contents of a
container but not the container itself.
The procedure is to place the empty container on the weighbridge and ‘zero’ the controller. The procedure is as
follows:1.
Place container on weighbridge
2.
Go to Txdr.1 (or .2) Folder.
3.
Transducer calibration Type must be ‘Load Cell’.
4.
CalEnable must be set to ‘Yes’.
5.
Set StartTare to ‘yes’
6.
The controller automatically calibrates the to the tare weight which is measured by the transducer and
stores this value.
7.
During this measurement Cal Status will show progress. If the cal fails it is probably an ‘out of range’
problem.
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21.4.3
Load Cell
A load cell output must be within the range 0 to 77 mV to go into a TC8 input. Use a shunt for mA inputs, mV can
possibly go direct, Volt inputs must use a potential divider.
To calibrate a load cell.
1.
Remove all load from the transducer to establish a zero reference.
2.
Go to Txdr.1 (or .2) Folder.
3.
Transducer calibration Type must be ‘Load Cell’.
4.
CalEnable must be set to ‘Yes’.
5.
Set Start Cal to ‘yes’
6.
The controller will calibrate the low point.
7.
Set StartHighCal to ‘yes’
8.
The controller will calibrate the high point.
Cal Status advises progress and result.
21.4.4
Comparison Calibration
Comparison calibration is used to calibrate the input against a second reference instrument. Typically this might be a
local display on the weighing device itself.
To calibrate against a known reference source:1.
Add a load at the low end of the scale range
2.
Go to Txdr.1 (or .2) Folder.
3.
Transducer calibration Type must be ‘Comparision’.
4.
CalEnable must be set to ‘Yes’.
5.
Enter the reading from the reference instrument into ‘Cal Adjust’.
6.
Add a load at the high end of the scale.
7.
Set StartHighCal to ‘yes’
8.
The controller will calibrate the high point.
Cal Status advises progress and result.
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22.
Chapter 22 User Values
User values are registers provided for use in calculations. They may be used as constants in equations or temporary
storage in extended calculations. Up to 32 User Values are available. They are arranged in 4 groups of 8. Each User
Value can then be set up in the ‘UserVal’ folder.
22.1
User Value Parameters
Folder – UsrVal
Sub-Folders: .1 to .32
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
Units
Units assigned to the User
Value
None
o
o o
Abs Temp C/ F/ K,
V, mV, A, mA,
PH, mmHg, psi, Bar, mBar, %RH, %, mmWG,
inWG, inWW, Ohms, PSIG, %O2, PPM, %CO2,
%CP, %/sec,
o
o o
RelTemp C\ F\ K(rel),
Custom 1, Custom 2, Custom 3, Custom 4,
Custom 5, Custom 6,
sec, min, hrs,
Conf
Resolution
Resolution of the User Value
XXXXX to X.XXXX
Conf
High Limit
The high limit may be set for
each user value to prevent
the value being set to an
out-of-bounds value.
Oper
Low Limit
The low limit of the user
value may be set to prevent
the user value from being
edited to an illegal value.
This is important if the user
value is to be used as a
setpoint.
Oper
Val
To set the value within the
range limits
See note 1
Status
Can be used to force a
good or bad status onto a
user value. This is useful for
testing status inheritance
and fallback strategies.
Good
Bad
Oper
See note 1
Oper
Note 1.
If ‘Val’ is wired into but ‘Status’ is not, then, instead of being used to force the Status it will indicate the status of the value
as inherited form the wired connection to ‘Val’.
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23.
Chapter 23 Calibration
In this chapter calibration refers to calibration of the inputs of the TC4 / TC8 modules and the RT4 module. Calibration is
accessed using the ‘Cal State’ parameter that is only available in configuration level. Since the controller is calibrated
during manufacture to traceable standards for every input range, it is not necessary to calibrate the controller when
changing ranges. Furthermore, a continuous automatic check and correction of the calibration during the controllers’
normal operation means that it is calibrated for life.
However, it is recognised that, for operational reasons, it may be a requirement to check or re-calibrate the controller.
This new calibration is saved as a User Calibration. It is always possible to revert to the factory calibration if necessary.
 Tip: Consider using the ‘Offset’ parameter for User Cal (e.g. Mod.1.Offset). This can be set to correct any measured
difference between the Mini8 controller given PV and a calibration value obtained from another source. This is useful
where the process setpoint remains at about the same value during use.
Alternatively, if the setpoint range is wide use the two point calibration with the ‘LoPoint’, ‘LoOffset’, and ‘HiPoint’,
‘HiOffset’ parameters.
23.1
TC4 / TC8 User calibration
23.1.1
Set Up
No pre-calibration warm-up is required.
As calibration is a single-point on 8 channels, quick enough (a few minutes) to avoid self-heating effects, there are no
special environmental, mounting position or ventilation requirements for calibration.
o
o
Calibration should be performed at a reasonable ambient temperature (15 C to 35 C). Calibration outside these limits
will compromise the expected working accuracy.
Every channel of every TC8 card must be individually connected to the calibrator source using thick copper wire (so the
sensor-break voltage drop in the wires and source impedance is minimal).
The voltage source, monitor DVM and the target Mini8 controller should be at the same temperature (to eliminate
added series e.m.f. due to thermocouple effects).
Calibration of mini8 requires the use of iTools.
The Mini8 controller must be in Configuration Mode.
23.1.2
Zero Calibration
No “zero” calibration point is required for TC4/TC8 input channels
23.1.3
Voltage Calibration
The iTools view below is shown for Module 1.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Set the Calibrator voltage source
to an accurate 50.005mV. (The
extra 5uV is to compensate for
self-heating tempco effect).
Connect the 50mV to channel 1
Set ‘CalState’ to ‘HiCa’l and then
select ‘Confirm’
When complete set ‘CalState’ to
‘SaveUser’
Exit configuration mode.
23.1.4
CJC Calibration
o
No CJC calibration required; the sampled values are ratio metric, providing uncalibrated uncertainty of ±1 C.
23.1.5
Sensor-Break Limit Check
Apply a 900Ω resistor to each channel in turn, ‘Sensor Break Type’ to ‘Low’, filter to off. Verify the SBrkValue is greater
than 24.0 and less than 61.0
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23.2
To Return to TC4/TC8 Factory Calibration
To clear the User calibration and restore the calibration from the factory.
1.
Put Mini8 controller into Configuration Mode.
2.
Set the ‘Calibration State’ to ‘LoadFact’.
3.
Return Instrument to Operating Mode.
23.3
RT4 User calibration
23.3.1
Set Up
No pre-calibration warm-up is required.
There are no special environmental, mounting position or ventilation requirements for calibration.
o
o
Calibration should be performed at a reasonable ambient temperature (15 C to 35 C). Calibration outside these limits
will compromise the expected working accuracy.
Each channel of the RT4 card must be individually connected to the calibrated resistance box using the 4 wire
connection.
The Mini8 controller must be in Configuration Mode.
23.3.2
Calibration
1. Set the Resistance Range to Low or High as required.
2. Wire the resistance box to channel 1 using the four wire connection.
3. Set the Resistance box to 150.0 ohms ±0.02% for Low Resistance calibration or 1500 ohms ±0.02% for High
Resistance calibration.
4. Set ‘CalState’ to’ LoCal’ and then select ‘Confirm’ followed by ‘Go’.
The instrument will show ‘Busy’ followed by ‘Passed’ assuming the calibration is succesful or ‘Failed’ if
not. If ‘Failed’ check that the correct calibration resistance has been selected.
5. When complete set ‘CalState’ to’ SaveUser’.
6. Set the Resistance box to 400.0 ohms ±0.02% for Low Resistance calibration or 4000 ohms ±0.02% for High
Resistance calibration.
7. Set ‘CalState’ to ‘HiCal’ and then select ‘Confirm’ followed by ‘Confirm’ followed by ‘Go’.
The instrument will show ‘Busy’ followed by ‘Passed’ assuming the calibration is succesful or ‘Failed’ if
not. If ‘Failed’ check that the correct calibration resistance has been selected.
8. When complete set ‘CalState’ to’ SaveUser’. This will enable the new calibration data to be used following a
power down of the instrument. If the data is not saved it will be lost at power down.
Exit configuration mode.
23.4
To Return to RT4 Factory Calibration
To clear the User calibration and restore the calibration from the factory for RTDs it is necessary to set the Resistance
Range to the one in use – Low or High.
For PT100
1.
Put Mini8 controller into Configuration Mode.
2.
For Low Resistance select ‘Resistance Type’ = ‘Low’. This selects the previously saved (SaveUser)
calibration data for PT100.
3.
Set the ‘Calibration State’ to ‘LoadFact’.
4.
After a few seconds the ‘CalSate’ parameter returns to ‘Idle’. The Factory calibration data is now
restored, overwriting the previously stored User Calibration.
5.
Return Instrument to Operating Mode.
1.
Put Mini8 controller into Configuration Mode.
2.
For High Resistance select ‘Resistance Type’ = ‘High’. This selects the previously saved (SaveUser)
calibration data for PT1000.
3.
Set the ‘Calibration State’ to ‘LoadFact’.
4.
After a few seconds the ‘CalSate’ parameter returns to ‘Idle’. The Factory calibration data is now
restored, overwriting the previously stored User Calibration.
5.
Return Instrument to Operating Mode.
For PT1000
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23.5
Calibration Parameters
List Header - IO
Sub-headers: Mod.1 to Mod.32
Name
Parameter
Description
Value
Cal State
Calibration state
of the input
Idle
Normal operation
Hi-50mV
High input calibration for mV ranges
Load Fact
Restore factory calibration values
Save User
Save the new calibration values
Confirm
To start the calibration procedure when one
of the above has been selected
Go
Starting the automatic calibration procedure
Busy
Calibration in progress
Passed
Calibration successful
Status
PV Status
The current status
of the PV.
Failed
Calibration unsuccessful
0
Normal operation
1
Initial startup mode
2
Input in sensor break
3
PV outside operating limits
4
Saturated input
5
Uncalibrated channel
6
No Module
Default
Access
Level
Idle
Conf
R/O
The above list shows the values of CalState, which appear during a normal calibration procedure. The full list of possible
values follows – the number is the enumeration for the parameter.
1: Idle
35: User calibration stored
2: Low calibration point for Volts range
36: Factory calibration stored
3: High calibration point for Volts range
41: Idle
4: Calibration restored to factory default values
42: Low calibration point for RTD calibration (150 ohms for Low
Resistance range, 1500ohms for High Resistance range)
5: User calibration stored
43: High calibration point for RTD calibration (400 ohms for Low
Resistance range, 4000-ohms for High Resistance range)
6: Factory calibration stored
44: Calibration restored to factory default values
11: Idle
45: User calibration stored
12: Low calibration point for HZ input
46: Factory calibration stored
13: High calibration point for the HZ input
51: Idle
14: Calibration restored to factory default values
52: CJC calibration used in conjunction with Term Temp
parameter
15: User calibration stored
54: Calibration restored to factory default values
16: Factory calibration stored
55: User calibration stored
20: Calibration point for factory rough calibration
56: Factory calibration stored
21: Idle
200: Confirmation of request to calibrate
22: Low calibration point for the mV range
201: Used to start the calibration procedure
23: Hi calibration point for the mV range
202: Used to abort the calibration procedure
24: Calibration restored to factory default values
210: Calibration point for factory rough calibration
25: User calibration stored
212: Indication that calibration is in progress
26: Factory calibration stored
213: Used to abort the calibration procedure
30: Calibration point for factory rough calibration
220: Indication that calibration completed successfully
31: Idle
221: Calibration accepted but not stored
32: Low calibration point for the mV range
222: Used to abort the calibration procedure
33: High calibration point for the mV range
223: Indication that calibration failed
34: Calibration restored to factory default values
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24.
24.1
Chapter 24 OEM Security
Introduction
OEM security allows users, typically OEMs or distributors, to be able to protect their intellectual property by preventing
unauthorised cloning of controller configurations.
OEM security is only available as a special order and is identified by special number EU0725 which appears on the label
showing the order code.
The feature provides the user with the ability to enter an OEM Security Password, after which, unless the password is
entered, it inhibits iTools from communicating with the controller in its normal way.
Notes:
24.2
1.
It will still be possible to access communication parameters via the SCADA table.
2.
If features such as OPC Scope are required then Custom Tags may be used to access the SCADA area.
Using OEM Security
The OEM Security feature enables three new addresses to become active in the SCADA region. These are:1.
Address 16116, ‘Locked’: this is a read only Boolean parameter that returns 1 (TRUE) when the
instrument is OEM secured.
2.
Address 16117, ‘Lock Code’: this is a write only parameter which will read back as 0. When the
instrument is unlocked, a value entered here will lock the instrument and defines the code needed to
unlock. The code and locked status will be saved in non-volatile memory.
3.
Address 16118, ‘Unlock Code’: this is a write only parameter which will read back as 0. When the
instrument is locked, a value entered here will be compared with the lock code. If it is the same, the
instrument will be unlocked. If the value is different, this parameter will become unavailable for a time
period. This time will increase for each failed attempt.
These addresses are not available by default in iTools. It is, therefore, necessary to create Custom Tags in iTools to be
able to write or read these parameters. The following procedure shows how to do this and how to use the OEM security
features.
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24.3
Step 1 – View iTools OPC Server
With iTools open and connected to the target instrument open the iTools OPC server using Options>Advanced>Show
Server.
Click on the OPC Server application on your windows Taskbar to view the server.
ID001-Mini8
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24.4
Step 2 – Create Custom Tags
Expand the connected instrument to show all folders. Close to the bottom of the tree you will find a folder called
CustTags.
Mini8
Tag Icon
CustTags Folder
Click on CustTags then click on the Tag icon on the Toolbar. Enter the name of the Tag as ‘Locked’ and its address as
16116 then press OK. Repeat for the ‘Lock’ and ‘Unlock Code’ addresses
Mini8
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When all three Tags are created you will see the following:-
Mini8
Minimise (do not close) the OPC server to the taskbar and return to iTools. You can now select CustTags on the
connected instrument by double clicking on the folder when in the browse tab.
COM1.ID001-Mini8
Mini8 v.2.3
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
24.5
Step 3 – Activate OEM Security
At the same time as viewing the CustTag parameters double click on another folder and position it show that you can
see parameters from both.
COM1.ID001-Mini8
Mini8 v.2.3
Enter a numerical code for the parameter ‘Lock Code’ and notice that the ‘Locked’ parameter now shows true(1) and the
parameters in the other folder now show question marks indicating that iTools is no longer reading them.
Mini8
Mini8
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 263
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
24.6
Step 4 – Deactivate OEM Security
Enter the code you used in step 3 into ‘Unlock Code’ to enable full iTools communication.
If an incorrect code is entered this parameter will become unavailable for a time period, indicated by a warning message
‘Failed to write data to device’. This time will increase for each failed attempt limited to 1 minute. If the correct code is
entered while the time delay is in operation it will not be accepted. It will be necessary to wait until the time delay is no
longer operative (up to 1 minute) or to power cycle the controller.
24.7
Erasing Memory
Since the OEM Lock/Unlock code is retained in ‘normal’ non-volatile memory, it may be erased by use of the
Access.ClearMemory (Cold Start) parameter. Using this parameter to erase AllMemory will not only unlock the OEM
Security but it will also erase the application being protected.
Note that the instrument must be in Config mode to accept the ClearMemory command. This process may also be done
via the SCADA area. The Instrument Mode parameter is already in the SCADA area at address 199 - write a value of 2 to
set Config mode. The Clear Memory parameter will be found at address 16119. Set a value of 5 (AllMemory) to clear
the memory.
Page 264
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
25.
Appendix A MODBUS SCADA TABLE
These parameters are single register Modbus values for use with Third Party Modbus masters in SCADA packages or
plcs. Scaling of the parameters has to be configured – the Modbus master scaling has to match the Mini8 controller
parameter resolution to ensure the decimal point is in the correct position.
If a parameter has no address the CommsTab feature can be used to map the parameter to a modbus address,
however, it should be noted that the address field will not be updated.
25.1
Comms Table
The tables that follow do not include every parameter in the Mini8 controller. The Comms Table is used to make most
parameters available at any SCADA address.
Folder – Commstab
Sub-folders: .1 to .250
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
Destination
Modbus Destination
Not Used
0 to 16064
Not
used
Conf
Source
Source Parameter
Taken from source parameter
Native
Native Data Format
0 Integer
1 Native (i.e. Float or long)
Integer
Conf
ReadOnly
Read Only
Read/Write only if source is R/W
0 Read/Write
1 Read Only
R/W
Conf
Minutes
Minutes
Units in which time is scaled.
0 Seconds
1 Minutes
Seconds
.
Conf
Conf
Entering a value in the Source parameter may be done in two ways:
1 - drag the required parameter into the Source
2 - right click the Source parameter, select Edit Wire and browse to the required parameter.
In the Example below the PV of Loop 1 would be available at addresses 200 and 201 as a two register floating point
number - its native data type.
There are 250 comms table entries available.
25.2
SCADA Table
The parameters in the tables following are available in scaled integer format, accessed via their associated Modbus
address.
Wherever possible use an OPC client with the iTools OPCserver as the server. In this arrangement the parameters are all
referenced by name and the values are floating point so the decimal point for all parameters is inherited.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 265
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Access.CustomerID
4739
0x1283
Alarm.6.Inhibit
10327
0x2857
Access.InstrumentMode
199
0x00c7
Alarm.6.Latch
10324
0x2854
Alarm.1.Ack
10250
0x280a
Alarm.6.Out
10329
0x2859
Alarm.1.Block
10246
0x2806
Alarm.6.Reference
10323
0x2853
Alarm.1.Delay
10248
0x2808
Alarm.6.Threshold
10321
0x2851
Alarm.1.Hysteresis
10242
0x2802
Alarm.6.Type
10320
0x2850
Alarm.1.Inhibit
10247
0x2807
Alarm.7.Ack
10346
0x286a
Alarm.1.Latch
10244
0x2804
Alarm.7.Block
10342
0x2866
Alarm.1.Out
10249
0x2809
Alarm.7.Delay
10344
0x2868
Alarm.1.Reference
10243
0x2803
Alarm.7.Hysteresis
10338
0x2862
Alarm.1.Threshold
10241
0x2801
Alarm.7.Inhibit
10343
0x2867
Alarm.1.Type
10240
0x2800
Alarm.7.Latch
10340
0x2864
Alarm.2.Ack
10266
0x281a
Alarm.7.Out
10345
0x2869
Alarm.2.Block
10262
0x2816
Alarm.7.Reference
10339
0x2863
Alarm.2.Delay
10264
0x2818
Alarm.7.Threshold
10337
0x2861
Alarm.2.Hysteresis
10258
0x2812
Alarm.7.Type
10336
0x2860
Alarm.2.Inhibit
10263
0x2817
Alarm.8.Ack
10362
0x287a
Alarm.2.Latch
10260
0x2814
Alarm.8.Block
10358
0x2876
Alarm.2.Out
10265
0x2819
Alarm.8.Delay
10360
0x2878
Alarm.2.Reference
10259
0x2813
Alarm.8.Hysteresis
10354
0x2872
Alarm.2.Threshold
10257
0x2811
Alarm.8.Inhibit
10359
0x2877
Alarm.2.Type
10256
0x2810
Alarm.8.Latch
10356
0x2874
Alarm.3.Ack
10282
0x282a
Alarm.8.Out
10361
0x2879
Alarm.3.Block
10278
0x2826
Alarm.8.Reference
10355
0x2873
Alarm.3.Delay
10280
0x2828
Alarm.8.Threshold
10353
0x2871
Alarm.3.Hysteresis
10274
0x2822
Alarm.8.Type
10352
0x2870
Alarm.3.Inhibit
10279
0x2827
Alarm.9.Ack
10378
0x288a
Alarm.3.Latch
10276
0x2824
Alarm.9.Block
10374
0x2886
Alarm.3.Out
10281
0x2829
Alarm.9.Delay
10376
0x2888
Alarm.3.Reference
10275
0x2823
Alarm.9.Hysteresis
10370
0x2882
Alarm.3.Threshold
10273
0x2821
Alarm.9.Inhibit
10375
0x2887
Alarm.3.Type
10272
0x2820
Alarm.9.Latch
10372
0x2884
Alarm.4.Ack
10298
0x283a
Alarm.9.Out
10377
0x2889
Alarm.4.Block
10294
0x2836
Alarm.9.Reference
10371
0x2883
Alarm.4.Delay
10296
0x2838
Alarm.9.Threshold
10369
0x2881
Alarm.4.Hysteresis
10290
0x2832
Alarm.9.Type
10368
0x2880
Alarm.4.Inhibit
10295
0x2837
Alarm.10.Ack
10394
0x289a
Alarm.4.Latch
10292
0x2834
Alarm.10.Block
10390
0x2896
Alarm.4.Out
10297
0x2839
Alarm.10.Delay
10392
0x2898
Alarm.4.Reference
10291
0x2833
Alarm.10.Hysteresis
10386
0x2892
Alarm.4.Threshold
10289
0x2831
Alarm.10.Inhibit
10391
0x2897
Alarm.4.Type
10288
0x2830
Alarm.10.Latch
10388
0x2894
Alarm.5.Ack
10314
0x284a
Alarm.10.Out
10393
0x2899
Alarm.5.Block
10310
0x2846
Alarm.10.Reference
10387
0x2893
Alarm.5.Delay
10312
0x2848
Alarm.10.Threshold
10385
0x2891
Alarm.5.Hysteresis
10306
0x2842
Alarm.10.Type
10384
0x2890
Alarm.5.Inhibit
10311
0x2847
Alarm.11.Ack
10410
0x28aa
Alarm.5.Latch
10308
0x2844
Alarm.11.Block
10406
0x28a6
Alarm.5.Out
10313
0x2849
Alarm.11.Delay
10408
0x28a8
Alarm.5.Reference
10307
0x2843
Alarm.11.Hysteresis
10402
0x28a2
Alarm.5.Threshold
10305
0x2841
Alarm.11.Inhibit
10407
0x28a7
Alarm.5.Type
10304
0x2840
Alarm.11.Latch
10404
0x28a4
Alarm.6.Ack
10330
0x285a
Alarm.11.Out
10409
0x28a9
Alarm.6.Block
10326
0x2856
Alarm.11.Reference
10403
0x28a3
Alarm.6.Delay
10328
0x2858
Alarm.11.Threshold
10401
0x28a1
Alarm.6.Hysteresis
10322
0x2852
Alarm.11.Type
10400
0x28a0
Page 266
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Alarm.12.Ack
10426
0x28ba
Alarm.17.Out
10505
0x2909
Alarm.12.Block
10422
0x28b6
Alarm.17.Reference
10499
0x2903
Alarm.12.Delay
10424
0x28b8
Alarm.17.Threshold
10497
0x2901
Alarm.12.Hysteresis
10418
0x28b2
Alarm.17.Type
10496
0x2900
Alarm.12.Inhibit
10423
0x28b7
Alarm.18.Ack
10522
0x291a
Alarm.12.Latch
10420
0x28b4
Alarm.18.Block
10518
0x2916
Alarm.12.Out
10425
0x28b9
Alarm.18.Delay
10520
0x2918
Alarm.12.Reference
10419
0x28b3
Alarm.18.Hysteresis
10514
0x2912
Alarm.12.Threshold
10417
0x28b1
Alarm.18.Inhibit
10519
0x2917
Alarm.12.Type
10416
0x28b0
Alarm.18.Latch
10516
0x2914
Alarm.13.Ack
10442
0x28ca
Alarm.18.Out
10521
0x2919
Alarm.13.Block
10438
0x28c6
Alarm.18.Reference
10515
0x2913
Alarm.13.Delay
10440
0x28c8
Alarm.18.Threshold
10513
0x2911
Alarm.13.Hysteresis
10434
0x28c2
Alarm.18.Type
10512
0x2910
Alarm.13.Inhibit
10439
0x28c7
Alarm.19.Ack
10538
0x292a
Alarm.13.Latch
10436
0x28c4
Alarm.19.Block
10534
0x2926
Alarm.13.Out
10441
0x28c9
Alarm.19.Delay
10536
0x2928
Alarm.13.Reference
10435
0x28c3
Alarm.19.Hysteresis
10530
0x2922
Alarm.13.Threshold
10433
0x28c1
Alarm.19.Inhibit
10535
0x2927
Alarm.13.Type
10432
0x28c0
Alarm.19.Latch
10532
0x2924
Alarm.14.Ack
10458
0x28da
Alarm.19.Out
10537
0x2929
Alarm.14.Block
10454
0x28d6
Alarm.19.Reference
10531
0x2923
Alarm.14.Delay
10456
0x28d8
Alarm.19.Threshold
10529
0x2921
Alarm.14.Hysteresis
10450
0x28d2
Alarm.19.Type
10528
0x2920
Alarm.14.Inhibit
10455
0x28d7
Alarm.20.Ack
10554
0x293a
Alarm.14.Latch
10452
0x28d4
Alarm.20.Block
10550
0x2936
Alarm.14.Out
10457
0x28d9
Alarm.20.Delay
10552
0x2938
Alarm.14.Reference
10451
0x28d3
Alarm.20.Hysteresis
10546
0x2932
Alarm.14.Threshold
10449
0x28d1
Alarm.20.Inhibit
10551
0x2937
Alarm.14.Type
10448
0x28d0
Alarm.20.Latch
10548
0x2934
Alarm.15.Ack
10474
0x28ea
Alarm.20.Out
10553
0x2939
Alarm.15.Block
10470
0x28e6
Alarm.20.Reference
10547
0x2933
Alarm.15.Delay
10472
0x28e8
Alarm.20.Threshold
10545
0x2931
Alarm.15.Hysteresis
10466
0x28e2
Alarm.20.Type
10544
0x2930
Alarm.15.Inhibit
10471
0x28e7
Alarm.21.Ack
10570
0x294a
Alarm.15.Latch
10468
0x28e4
Alarm.21.Block
10566
0x2946
Alarm.15.Out
10473
0x28e9
Alarm.21.Delay
10568
0x2948
Alarm.15.Reference
10467
0x28e3
Alarm.21.Hysteresis
10562
0x2942
Alarm.15.Threshold
10465
0x28e1
Alarm.21.Inhibit
10567
0x2947
Alarm.15.Type
10464
0x28e0
Alarm.21.Latch
10564
0x2944
Alarm.16.Ack
10490
0x28fa
Alarm.21.Out
10569
0x2949
Alarm.16.Block
10486
0x28f6
Alarm.21.Reference
10563
0x2943
Alarm.16.Delay
10488
0x28f8
Alarm.21.Threshold
10561
0x2941
Alarm.16.Hysteresis
10482
0x28f2
Alarm.21.Type
10560
0x2940
Alarm.16.Inhibit
10487
0x28f7
Alarm.22.Ack
10586
0x295a
Alarm.16.Latch
10484
0x28f4
Alarm.22.Block
10582
0x2956
Alarm.16.Out
10489
0x28f9
Alarm.22.Delay
10584
0x2958
Alarm.16.Reference
10483
0x28f3
Alarm.22.Hysteresis
10578
0x2952
Alarm.16.Threshold
10481
0x28f1
Alarm.22.Inhibit
10583
0x2957
Alarm.16.Type
10480
0x28f0
Alarm.22.Latch
10580
0x2954
Alarm.17.Ack
10506
0x290a
Alarm.22.Out
10585
0x2959
Alarm.17.Block
10502
0x2906
Alarm.22.Reference
10579
0x2953
Alarm.17.Delay
10504
0x2908
Alarm.22.Threshold
10577
0x2951
Alarm.17.Hysteresis
10498
0x2902
Alarm.22.Type
10576
0x2950
Alarm.17.Inhibit
10503
0x2907
Alarm.23.Ack
10602
0x296a
Alarm.17.Latch
10500
0x2904
Alarm.23.Block
10598
0x2966
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 267
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Alarm.23.Delay
10600
0x2968
Alarm.28.Threshold
10673
0x29b1
Alarm.23.Hysteresis
10594
0x2962
Alarm.28.Type
10672
0x29b0
Alarm.23.Inhibit
10599
0x2967
Alarm.29.Ack
10698
0x29ca
Alarm.23.Latch
10596
0x2964
Alarm.29.Block
10694
0x29c6
Alarm.23.Out
10601
0x2969
Alarm.29.Delay
10696
0x29c8
Alarm.23.Reference
10595
0x2963
Alarm.29.Hysteresis
10690
0x29c2
Alarm.23.Threshold
10593
0x2961
Alarm.29.Inhibit
10695
0x29c7
Alarm.23.Type
10592
0x2960
Alarm.29.Latch
10692
0x29c4
Alarm.24.Ack
10618
0x297a
Alarm.29.Out
10697
0x29c9
Alarm.24.Block
10614
0x2976
Alarm.29.Reference
10691
0x29c3
Alarm.24.Delay
10616
0x2978
Alarm.29.Threshold
10689
0x29c1
Alarm.24.Hysteresis
10610
0x2972
Alarm.29.Type
10688
0x29c0
Alarm.24.Inhibit
10615
0x2977
Alarm.30.Ack
10714
0x29da
Alarm.24.Latch
10612
0x2974
Alarm.30.Block
10710
0x29d6
Alarm.24.Out
10617
0x2979
Alarm.30.Delay
10712
0x29d8
Alarm.24.Reference
10611
0x2973
Alarm.30.Hysteresis
10706
0x29d2
Alarm.24.Threshold
10609
0x2971
Alarm.30.Inhibit
10711
0x29d7
Alarm.24.Type
10608
0x2970
Alarm.30.Latch
10708
0x29d4
Alarm.25.Ack
10634
0x298a
Alarm.30.Out
10713
0x29d9
Alarm.25.Block
10630
0x2986
Alarm.30.Reference
10707
0x29d3
Alarm.25.Delay
10632
0x2988
Alarm.30.Threshold
10705
0x29d1
Alarm.25.Hysteresis
10626
0x2982
Alarm.30.Type
10704
0x29d0
Alarm.25.Inhibit
10631
0x2987
Alarm.31.Ack
10730
0x29ea
Alarm.25.Latch
10628
0x2984
Alarm.31.Block
10726
0x29e6
Alarm.25.Out
10633
0x2989
Alarm.31.Delay
10728
0x29e8
Alarm.25.Reference
10627
0x2983
Alarm.31.Hysteresis
10722
0x29e2
Alarm.25.Threshold
10625
0x2981
Alarm.31.Inhibit
10727
0x29e7
Alarm.25.Type
10624
0x2980
Alarm.31.Latch
10724
0x29e4
Alarm.26.Ack
10650
0x299a
Alarm.31.Out
10729
0x29e9
Alarm.26.Block
10646
0x2996
Alarm.31.Reference
10723
0x29e3
Alarm.26.Delay
10648
0x2998
Alarm.31.Threshold
10721
0x29e1
Alarm.26.Hysteresis
10642
0x2992
Alarm.31.Type
10720
0x29e0
Alarm.26.Inhibit
10647
0x2997
Alarm.32.Ack
10746
0x29fa
Alarm.26.Latch
10644
0x2994
Alarm.32.Block
10742
0x29f6
Alarm.26.Out
10649
0x2999
Alarm.32.Delay
10744
0x29f8
Alarm.26.Reference
10643
0x2993
Alarm.32.Hysteresis
10738
0x29f2
Alarm.26.Threshold
10641
0x2991
Alarm.32.Inhibit
10743
0x29f7
Alarm.26.Type
10640
0x2990
Alarm.32.Latch
10740
0x29f4
Alarm.27.Ack
10666
0x29aa
Alarm.32.Out
10745
0x29f9
Alarm.27.Block
10662
0x29a6
Alarm.32.Reference
10739
0x29f3
Alarm.27.Delay
10664
0x29a8
Alarm.32.Threshold
10737
0x29f1
Alarm.27.Hysteresis
10658
0x29a2
Alarm.32.Type
10736
0x29f0
Alarm.27.Inhibit
10663
0x29a7
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus1
10176
0x27c0
Alarm.27.Latch
10660
0x29a4
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus2
10177
0x27c1
Alarm.27.Out
10665
0x29a9
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus3
10178
0x27c2
Alarm.27.Reference
10659
0x29a3
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus4
10179
0x27c3
Alarm.27.Threshold
10657
0x29a1
AlmSummary.General.AnyAlarm
10213
0x27e5
Alarm.27.Type
10656
0x29a0
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus1
4192
0x1060
Alarm.28.Ack
10682
0x29ba
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus2
4193
0x1061
Alarm.28.Block
10678
0x29b6
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus3
4194
0x1062
Alarm.28.Delay
10680
0x29b8
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus4
4195
0x1063
Alarm.28.Hysteresis
10674
0x29b2
AlmSummary.General.DigAlarmStatus1
10188
0x27cc
Alarm.28.Inhibit
10679
0x29b7
AlmSummary.General.DigAlarmStatus2
10189
0x27cd
Alarm.28.Latch
10676
0x29b4
AlmSummary.General.DigAlarmStatus3
10190
0x27ce
Alarm.28.Out
10681
0x29b9
AlmSummary.General.DigAlarmStatus4
10191
0x27cf
Alarm.28.Reference
10675
0x29b3
AlmSummary.General.GlobalAck
10214
0x27e6
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HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
AlmSummary.General.NewAlarm
10212
0x27e4
DigAlarm.7.Inhibit
11367
0x2c67
AlmSummary.General.NewCTAlarm
4196
0x1064
DigAlarm.7.Latch
11364
0x2c64
AlmSummary.General.RstNewAlarm
10215
0x27e7
DigAlarm.7.Out
11369
0x2c69
AlmSummary.General.RstNewCTAlarm
4197
0x1065
DigAlarm.7.Type
11360
0x2c60
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus1
10200
0x27d8
DigAlarm.8.Ack
11386
0x2c7a
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus2
10201
0x27d9
DigAlarm.8.Block
11382
0x2c76
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus3
10202
0x27da
DigAlarm.8.Delay
11384
0x2c78
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus4
10203
0x27db
DigAlarm.8.Inhibit
11383
0x2c77
BCDInput.1.BCDVal
5072
0x13d0
DigAlarm.8.Latch
11380
0x2c74
BCDInput.2.BCDVal
5073
0x13d1
DigAlarm.8.Out
11385
0x2c79
Comms.FC.Ident
12963
0x32a3
DigAlarm.8.Type
11376
0x2c70
DigAlarm.1.Ack
11274
0x2c0a
DigAlarm.9.Ack
11402
0x2c8a
DigAlarm.1.Block
11270
0x2c06
DigAlarm.9.Block
11398
0x2c86
DigAlarm.1.Delay
11272
0x2c08
DigAlarm.9.Delay
11400
0x2c88
DigAlarm.1.Inhibit
11271
0x2c07
DigAlarm.9.Inhibit
11399
0x2c87
DigAlarm.1.Latch
11268
0x2c04
DigAlarm.9.Latch
11396
0x2c84
DigAlarm.1.Out
11273
0x2c09
DigAlarm.9.Out
11401
0x2c89
DigAlarm.1.Type
11264
0x2c00
DigAlarm.9.Type
11392
0x2c80
DigAlarm.2.Ack
11290
0x2c1a
DigAlarm.10.Ack
11418
0x2c9a
DigAlarm.2.Block
11286
0x2c16
DigAlarm.10.Block
11414
0x2c96
DigAlarm.2.Delay
11288
0x2c18
DigAlarm.10.Delay
11416
0x2c98
DigAlarm.2.Inhibit
11287
0x2c17
DigAlarm.10.Inhibit
11415
0x2c97
DigAlarm.2.Latch
11284
0x2c14
DigAlarm.10.Latch
11412
0x2c94
DigAlarm.2.Out
11289
0x2c19
DigAlarm.10.Out
11417
0x2c99
DigAlarm.2.Type
11280
0x2c10
DigAlarm.10.Type
11408
0x2c90
DigAlarm.3.Ack
11306
0x2c2a
DigAlarm.11.Ack
11434
0x2caa
DigAlarm.3.Block
11302
0x2c26
DigAlarm.11.Block
11430
0x2ca6
DigAlarm.3.Delay
11304
0x2c28
DigAlarm.11.Delay
11432
0x2ca8
DigAlarm.3.Inhibit
11303
0x2c27
DigAlarm.11.Inhibit
11431
0x2ca7
DigAlarm.3.Latch
11300
0x2c24
DigAlarm.11.Latch
11428
0x2ca4
DigAlarm.3.Out
11305
0x2c29
DigAlarm.11.Out
11433
0x2ca9
DigAlarm.3.Type
11296
0x2c20
DigAlarm.11.Type
11424
0x2ca0
DigAlarm.4.Ack
11322
0x2c3a
DigAlarm.12.Ack
11450
0x2cba
DigAlarm.4.Block
11318
0x2c36
DigAlarm.12.Block
11446
0x2cb6
DigAlarm.4.Delay
11320
0x2c38
DigAlarm.12.Delay
11448
0x2cb8
DigAlarm.4.Inhibit
11319
0x2c37
DigAlarm.12.Inhibit
11447
0x2cb7
DigAlarm.4.Latch
11316
0x2c34
DigAlarm.12.Latch
11444
0x2cb4
DigAlarm.4.Out
11321
0x2c39
DigAlarm.12.Out
11449
0x2cb9
DigAlarm.4.Type
11312
0x2c30
DigAlarm.12.Type
11440
0x2cb0
DigAlarm.5.Ack
11338
0x2c4a
DigAlarm.13.Ack
11466
0x2cca
DigAlarm.5.Block
11334
0x2c46
DigAlarm.13.Block
11462
0x2cc6
DigAlarm.5.Delay
11336
0x2c48
DigAlarm.13.Delay
11464
0x2cc8
DigAlarm.5.Inhibit
11335
0x2c47
DigAlarm.13.Inhibit
11463
0x2cc7
DigAlarm.5.Latch
11332
0x2c44
DigAlarm.13.Latch
11460
0x2cc4
DigAlarm.5.Out
11337
0x2c49
DigAlarm.13.Out
11465
0x2cc9
DigAlarm.5.Type
11328
0x2c40
DigAlarm.13.Type
11456
0x2cc0
DigAlarm.6.Ack
11354
0x2c5a
DigAlarm.14.Ack
11482
0x2cda
DigAlarm.6.Block
11350
0x2c56
DigAlarm.14.Block
11478
0x2cd6
DigAlarm.6.Delay
11352
0x2c58
DigAlarm.14.Delay
11480
0x2cd8
DigAlarm.6.Inhibit
11351
0x2c57
DigAlarm.14.Inhibit
11479
0x2cd7
DigAlarm.6.Latch
11348
0x2c54
DigAlarm.14.Latch
11476
0x2cd4
DigAlarm.6.Out
11353
0x2c59
DigAlarm.14.Out
11481
0x2cd9
DigAlarm.6.Type
11344
0x2c50
DigAlarm.14.Type
11472
0x2cd0
DigAlarm.7.Ack
11370
0x2c6a
DigAlarm.15.Ack
11498
0x2cea
DigAlarm.7.Block
11366
0x2c66
DigAlarm.15.Block
11494
0x2ce6
DigAlarm.7.Delay
11368
0x2c68
DigAlarm.15.Delay
11496
0x2ce8
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 269
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
DigAlarm.15.Inhibit
11495
0x2ce7
DigAlarm.23.Inhibit
11623
0x2d67
DigAlarm.15.Latch
11492
0x2ce4
DigAlarm.23.Latch
11620
0x2d64
DigAlarm.15.Out
11497
0x2ce9
DigAlarm.23.Out
11625
0x2d69
DigAlarm.15.Type
11488
0x2ce0
DigAlarm.23.Type
11616
0x2d60
DigAlarm.16.Ack
11514
0x2cfa
DigAlarm.24.Ack
11642
0x2d7a
DigAlarm.16.Block
11510
0x2cf6
DigAlarm.24.Block
11638
0x2d76
DigAlarm.16.Delay
11512
0x2cf8
DigAlarm.24.Delay
11640
0x2d78
DigAlarm.16.Inhibit
11511
0x2cf7
DigAlarm.24.Inhibit
11639
0x2d77
DigAlarm.16.Latch
11508
0x2cf4
DigAlarm.24.Latch
11636
0x2d74
DigAlarm.16.Out
11513
0x2cf9
DigAlarm.24.Out
11641
0x2d79
DigAlarm.16.Type
11504
0x2cf0
DigAlarm.24.Type
11632
0x2d70
DigAlarm.17.Ack
11530
0x2d0a
DigAlarm.25.Ack
11658
0x2d8a
DigAlarm.17.Block
11526
0x2d06
DigAlarm.25.Block
11654
0x2d86
DigAlarm.17.Delay
11528
0x2d08
DigAlarm.25.Delay
11656
0x2d88
DigAlarm.17.Inhibit
11527
0x2d07
DigAlarm.25.Inhibit
11655
0x2d87
DigAlarm.17.Latch
11524
0x2d04
DigAlarm.25.Latch
11652
0x2d84
DigAlarm.17.Out
11529
0x2d09
DigAlarm.25.Out
11657
0x2d89
DigAlarm.17.Type
11520
0x2d00
DigAlarm.25.Type
11648
0x2d80
DigAlarm.18.Ack
11546
0x2d1a
DigAlarm.26.Ack
11674
0x2d9a
DigAlarm.18.Block
11542
0x2d16
DigAlarm.26.Block
11670
0x2d96
DigAlarm.18.Delay
11544
0x2d18
DigAlarm.26.Delay
11672
0x2d98
DigAlarm.18.Inhibit
11543
0x2d17
DigAlarm.26.Inhibit
11671
0x2d97
DigAlarm.18.Latch
11540
0x2d14
DigAlarm.26.Latch
11668
0x2d94
DigAlarm.18.Out
11545
0x2d19
DigAlarm.26.Out
11673
0x2d99
DigAlarm.18.Type
11536
0x2d10
DigAlarm.26.Type
11664
0x2d90
DigAlarm.19.Ack
11562
0x2d2a
DigAlarm.27.Ack
11690
0x2daa
DigAlarm.19.Block
11558
0x2d26
DigAlarm.27.Block
11686
0x2da6
DigAlarm.19.Delay
11560
0x2d28
DigAlarm.27.Delay
11688
0x2da8
DigAlarm.19.Inhibit
11559
0x2d27
DigAlarm.27.Inhibit
11687
0x2da7
DigAlarm.19.Latch
11556
0x2d24
DigAlarm.27.Latch
11684
0x2da4
DigAlarm.19.Out
11561
0x2d29
DigAlarm.27.Out
11689
0x2da9
DigAlarm.19.Type
11552
0x2d20
DigAlarm.27.Type
11680
0x2da0
DigAlarm.20.Ack
11578
0x2d3a
DigAlarm.28.Ack
11706
0x2dba
DigAlarm.20.Block
11574
0x2d36
DigAlarm.28.Block
11702
0x2db6
DigAlarm.20.Delay
11576
0x2d38
DigAlarm.28.Delay
11704
0x2db8
DigAlarm.20.Inhibit
11575
0x2d37
DigAlarm.28.Inhibit
11703
0x2db7
DigAlarm.20.Latch
11572
0x2d34
DigAlarm.28.Latch
11700
0x2db4
DigAlarm.20.Out
11577
0x2d39
DigAlarm.28.Out
11705
0x2db9
DigAlarm.20.Type
11568
0x2d30
DigAlarm.28.Type
11696
0x2db0
DigAlarm.21.Ack
11594
0x2d4a
DigAlarm.29.Ack
11722
0x2dca
DigAlarm.21.Block
11590
0x2d46
DigAlarm.29.Block
11718
0x2dc6
DigAlarm.21.Delay
11592
0x2d48
DigAlarm.29.Delay
11720
0x2dc8
DigAlarm.21.Inhibit
11591
0x2d47
DigAlarm.29.Inhibit
11719
0x2dc7
DigAlarm.21.Latch
11588
0x2d44
DigAlarm.29.Latch
11716
0x2dc4
DigAlarm.21.Out
11593
0x2d49
DigAlarm.29.Out
11721
0x2dc9
DigAlarm.21.Type
11584
0x2d40
DigAlarm.29.Type
11712
0x2dc0
DigAlarm.22.Ack
11610
0x2d5a
DigAlarm.30.Ack
11738
0x2dda
DigAlarm.22.Block
11606
0x2d56
DigAlarm.30.Block
11734
0x2dd6
DigAlarm.22.Delay
11608
0x2d58
DigAlarm.30.Delay
11736
0x2dd8
DigAlarm.22.Inhibit
11607
0x2d57
DigAlarm.30.Inhibit
11735
0x2dd7
DigAlarm.22.Latch
11604
0x2d54
DigAlarm.30.Latch
11732
0x2dd4
DigAlarm.22.Out
11609
0x2d59
DigAlarm.30.Out
11737
0x2dd9
DigAlarm.22.Type
11600
0x2d50
DigAlarm.30.Type
11728
0x2dd0
DigAlarm.23.Ack
11626
0x2d6a
DigAlarm.31.Ack
11754
0x2dea
DigAlarm.23.Block
11622
0x2d66
DigAlarm.31.Block
11750
0x2de6
DigAlarm.23.Delay
11624
0x2d68
DigAlarm.31.Delay
11752
0x2de8
Page 270
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
DigAlarm.31.Inhibit
11751
0x2de7
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load4DrivenBy
4118
0x1016
DigAlarm.31.Latch
11748
0x2de4
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load4OCFthreshold
4121
0x1019
DigAlarm.31.Out
11753
0x2de9
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load4PLFthreshold
4120
0x1018
DigAlarm.31.Type
11744
0x2de0
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load4Resolution
4204
0x106c
DigAlarm.32.Ack
11770
0x2dfa
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load5CTInput
4123
0x101b
DigAlarm.32.Block
11766
0x2df6
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load5DrivenBy
4122
0x101a
DigAlarm.32.Delay
11768
0x2df8
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load5OCFthreshold
4125
0x101d
DigAlarm.32.Inhibit
11767
0x2df7
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load5PLFthreshold
4124
0x101c
DigAlarm.32.Latch
11764
0x2df4
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load5Resolution
4205
0x106d
DigAlarm.32.Out
11769
0x2df9
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load6CTInput
4127
0x101f
DigAlarm.32.Type
11760
0x2df0
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load6DrivenBy
4126
0x101e
Humidity.DewPoint
13317
0x3405
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load6OCFthreshold
4129
0x1021
Humidity.DryTemp
13318
0x3406
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load6PLFthreshold
4128
0x1020
Humidity.Pressure
13313
0x3401
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load6Resolution
4206
0x106e
Humidity.PsychroConst
13315
0x3403
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load7CTInput
4131
0x1023
Humidity.RelHumid
13316
0x3404
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load7DrivenBy
4130
0x1022
Humidity.Resolution
13320
0x3408
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load7OCFthreshold
4133
0x1025
Humidity.SBrk
13314
0x3402
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load7PLFthreshold
4132
0x1024
Humidity.WetOffset
13312
0x3400
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load7Resolution
4207
0x106f
Humidity.WetTemp
13319
0x3407
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load8CTInput
4135
0x1027
Instrument.Diagnostics.CntrlOverrun
4737
0x1281
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load8DrivenBy
4134
0x1026
Instrument.Diagnostics.ErrCount
4736
0x1280
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load8OCFthreshold
4137
0x1029
Instrument.Diagnostics.PSUident
13027
0x32e3
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load8PLFthreshold
4136
0x1028
Instrument.InstInfo.CompanyID
121
0x0079
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load8Resolution
4208
0x1070
Instrument.InstInfo.InstType
122
0x007a
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load9CTInput
4139
0x102b
Instrument.InstInfo.Version
107
0x006b
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load9DrivenBy
4138
0x102a
Instrument.Options.Units
4738
0x1282
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load9OCFthreshold
4141
0x102d
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.CalibrateCT1
4170
0x104a
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load9PLFthreshold
4140
0x102c
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.CalibrateCT2
4171
0x104b
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load9Resolution
4209
0x1071
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.CalibrateCT3
4172
0x104c
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load10CTInput
4143
0x102f
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Commission
4096
0x1000
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load10DrivenBy
4142
0x102e
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.CommissionStatus
4097
0x1001
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load10OCFthreshold
4145
0x1031
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.CT1Range
4103
0x1007
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load10PLFthreshold
4144
0x1030
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.CT1Resolution
4198
0x1066
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load10Resolution
4210
0x1072
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.CT2Range
4104
0x1008
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load11CTInput
4147
0x1033
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.CT2Resolution
4199
0x1067
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load11DrivenBy
4146
0x1032
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.CT3Range
4105
0x1009
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load11OCFthreshold
4149
0x1035
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.CT3Resolution
4200
0x1068
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load11PLFthreshold
4148
0x1034
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Inhibit
4099
0x1003
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load11Resolution
4211
0x1073
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Interval
4098
0x1002
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load12CTInput
4151
0x1037
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load1CTInput
4107
0x100b
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load12DrivenBy
4150
0x1036
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load1DrivenBy
4106
0x100a
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load12OCFthreshold
4153
0x1039
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load1OCFthreshold
4109
0x100d
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load12PLFthreshold
4152
0x1038
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load1PLFthreshold
4108
0x100c
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load12Resolution
4212
0x1074
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load1Resolution
4201
0x1069
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load13CTInput
4155
0x103b
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load2CTInput
4111
0x100f
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load13DrivenBy
4154
0x103a
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load2DrivenBy
4110
0x100e
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load13OCFthreshold
4157
0x103d
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load2OCFthreshold
4113
0x1011
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load13PLFthreshold
4156
0x103c
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load2PLFthreshold
4112
0x1010
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load13Resolution
4213
0x1075
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load2Resolution
4202
0x106a
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load14CTInput
4159
0x103f
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load3CTInput
4115
0x1013
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load14DrivenBy
4158
0x103e
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load3DrivenBy
4114
0x1012
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load14OCFthreshold
4161
0x1041
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load3OCFthreshold
4117
0x1015
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load14PLFthreshold
4160
0x1040
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load3PLFthreshold
4116
0x1014
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load14Resolution
4214
0x1076
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load3Resolution
4203
0x106b
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load15CTInput
4163
0x1043
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load4CTInput
4119
0x1017
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load15DrivenBy
4162
0x1042
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 271
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load15OCFthreshold
4165
0x1045
IO.Mod.4.HiOffset
4423
0x1147
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load15PLFthreshold
4164
0x1044
IO.Mod.4.HiPoint
4391
0x1127
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load15Resolution
4215
0x1077
IO.Mod.4.LoOffset
4359
0x1107
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load16CTInput
4167
0x1047
IO.Mod.4.LoPoint
4327
0x10e7
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load16DrivenBy
4166
0x1046
IO.Mod.4.MinOnTime
4295
0x10c7
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load16OCFthreshold
4169
0x1049
IO.Mod.4.PV
4231
0x1087
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load16PLFthreshold
4168
0x1048
IO.Mod.5.AlarmAck
4264
0x10a8
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.Load16Resolution
4216
0x1078
IO.Mod.5.HiOffset
4424
0x1148
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.MaxLeakPh1
4100
0x1004
IO.Mod.5.HiPoint
4392
0x1128
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.MaxLeakPh2
4101
0x1005
IO.Mod.5.LoOffset
4360
0x1108
IO.CurrentMonitor.Config.MaxLeakPh3
4102
0x1006
IO.Mod.5.LoPoint
4328
0x10e8
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load1Current
4173
0x104d
IO.Mod.5.MinOnTime
4296
0x10c8
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load2Current
4174
0x104e
IO.Mod.5.PV
4232
0x1088
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load3Current
4175
0x104f
IO.Mod.6.AlarmAck
4265
0x10a9
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load4Current
4176
0x1050
IO.Mod.6.HiOffset
4425
0x1149
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load5Current
4177
0x1051
IO.Mod.6.HiPoint
4393
0x1129
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load6Current
4178
0x1052
IO.Mod.6.LoOffset
4361
0x1109
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load7Current
4179
0x1053
IO.Mod.6.LoPoint
4329
0x10e9
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load8Current
4180
0x1054
IO.Mod.6.MinOnTime
4297
0x10c9
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load9Current
4181
0x1055
IO.Mod.6.PV
4233
0x1089
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load10Current
4182
0x1056
IO.Mod.7.AlarmAck
4266
0x10aa
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load11Current
4183
0x1057
IO.Mod.7.HiOffset
4426
0x114a
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load12Current
4184
0x1058
IO.Mod.7.HiPoint
4394
0x112a
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load13Current
4185
0x1059
IO.Mod.7.LoOffset
4362
0x110a
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load14Current
4186
0x105a
IO.Mod.7.LoPoint
4330
0x10ea
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load15Current
4187
0x105b
IO.Mod.7.MinOnTime
4298
0x10ca
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load16Current
4188
0x105c
IO.Mod.7.PV
4234
0x108a
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Ph1AllOff
4189
0x105d
IO.Mod.8.AlarmAck
4267
0x10ab
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Ph2AllOff
4190
0x105e
IO.Mod.8.HiOffset
4427
0x114b
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Ph3AllOff
4191
0x105f
IO.Mod.8.HiPoint
4395
0x112b
IO.FixedIO.A.PV
4226
0x1082
IO.Mod.8.LoOffset
4363
0x110b
IO.FixedIO.B.PV
4227
0x1083
IO.Mod.8.LoPoint
4331
0x10eb
IO.FixedIO.D1.PV
4224
0x1080
IO.Mod.8.MinOnTime
4299
0x10cb
IO.FixedIO.D2.PV
4225
0x1081
IO.Mod.8.PV
4235
0x108b
IO.Mod.1.AlarmAck
4260
0x10a4
IO.Mod.9.AlarmAck
4268
0x10ac
IO.Mod.1.HiOffset
4420
0x1144
IO.Mod.9.HiOffset
4428
0x114c
IO.Mod.1.HiPoint
4388
0x1124
IO.Mod.9.HiPoint
4396
0x112c
IO.Mod.1.LoOffset
4356
0x1104
IO.Mod.9.LoOffset
4364
0x110c
IO.Mod.1.LoPoint
4324
0x10e4
IO.Mod.9.LoPoint
4332
0x10ec
IO.Mod.1.MinOnTime
4292
0x10c4
IO.Mod.9.MinOnTime
4300
0x10cc
IO.Mod.1.PV
4228
0x1084
IO.Mod.9.PV
4236
0x108c
IO.Mod.2.AlarmAck
4261
0x10a5
IO.Mod.10.AlarmAck
4269
0x10ad
IO.Mod.2.HiOffset
4421
0x1145
IO.Mod.10.HiOffset
4429
0x114d
IO.Mod.2.HiPoint
4389
0x1125
IO.Mod.10.HiPoint
4397
0x112d
IO.Mod.2.LoOffset
4357
0x1105
IO.Mod.10.LoOffset
4365
0x110d
IO.Mod.2.LoPoint
4325
0x10e5
IO.Mod.10.LoPoint
4333
0x10ed
IO.Mod.2.MinOnTime
4293
0x10c5
IO.Mod.10.MinOnTime
4301
0x10cd
IO.Mod.2.PV
4229
0x1085
IO.Mod.10.PV
4237
0x108d
IO.Mod.3.AlarmAck
4262
0x10a6
IO.Mod.11.AlarmAck
4270
0x10ae
IO.Mod.3.HiOffset
4422
0x1146
IO.Mod.11.HiOffset
4430
0x114e
IO.Mod.3.HiPoint
4390
0x1126
IO.Mod.11.HiPoint
4398
0x112e
IO.Mod.3.LoOffset
4358
0x1106
IO.Mod.11.LoOffset
4366
0x110e
IO.Mod.3.LoPoint
4326
0x10e6
IO.Mod.11.LoPoint
4334
0x10ee
IO.Mod.3.MinOnTime
4294
0x10c6
IO.Mod.11.MinOnTime
4302
0x10ce
IO.Mod.3.PV
4230
0x1086
IO.Mod.11.PV
4238
0x108e
IO.Mod.4.AlarmAck
4263
0x10a7
IO.Mod.12.AlarmAck
4271
0x10af
Page 272
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
IO.Mod.12.HiOffset
4431
0x114f
IO.Mod.20.HiOffset
4439
0x1157
IO.Mod.12.HiPoint
4399
0x112f
IO.Mod.20.HiPoint
4407
0x1137
IO.Mod.12.LoOffset
4367
0x110f
IO.Mod.20.LoOffset
4375
0x1117
IO.Mod.12.LoPoint
4335
0x10ef
IO.Mod.20.LoPoint
4343
0x10f7
IO.Mod.12.MinOnTime
4303
0x10cf
IO.Mod.20.MinOnTime
4311
0x10d7
IO.Mod.12.PV
4239
0x108f
IO.Mod.20.PV
4247
0x1097
IO.Mod.13.AlarmAck
4272
0x10b0
IO.Mod.21.AlarmAck
4280
0x10b8
IO.Mod.13.HiOffset
4432
0x1150
IO.Mod.21.HiOffset
4440
0x1158
IO.Mod.13.HiPoint
4400
0x1130
IO.Mod.21.HiPoint
4408
0x1138
IO.Mod.13.LoOffset
4368
0x1110
IO.Mod.21.LoOffset
4376
0x1118
IO.Mod.13.LoPoint
4336
0x10f0
IO.Mod.21.LoPoint
4344
0x10f8
IO.Mod.13.MinOnTime
4304
0x10d0
IO.Mod.21.MinOnTime
4312
0x10d8
IO.Mod.13.PV
4240
0x1090
IO.Mod.21.PV
4248
0x1098
IO.Mod.14.AlarmAck
4273
0x10b1
IO.Mod.22.AlarmAck
4281
0x10b9
IO.Mod.14.HiOffset
4433
0x1151
IO.Mod.22.HiOffset
4441
0x1159
IO.Mod.14.HiPoint
4401
0x1131
IO.Mod.22.HiPoint
4409
0x1139
IO.Mod.14.LoOffset
4369
0x1111
IO.Mod.22.LoOffset
4377
0x1119
IO.Mod.14.LoPoint
4337
0x10f1
IO.Mod.22.LoPoint
4345
0x10f9
IO.Mod.14.MinOnTime
4305
0x10d1
IO.Mod.22.MinOnTime
4313
0x10d9
IO.Mod.14.PV
4241
0x1091
IO.Mod.22.PV
4249
0x1099
IO.Mod.15.AlarmAck
4274
0x10b2
IO.Mod.23.AlarmAck
4282
0x10ba
IO.Mod.15.HiOffset
4434
0x1152
IO.Mod.23.HiOffset
4442
0x115a
IO.Mod.15.HiPoint
4402
0x1132
IO.Mod.23.HiPoint
4410
0x113a
IO.Mod.15.LoOffset
4370
0x1112
IO.Mod.23.LoOffset
4378
0x111a
IO.Mod.15.LoPoint
4338
0x10f2
IO.Mod.23.LoPoint
4346
0x10fa
IO.Mod.15.MinOnTime
4306
0x10d2
IO.Mod.23.MinOnTime
4314
0x10da
IO.Mod.15.PV
4242
0x1092
IO.Mod.23.PV
4250
0x109a
IO.Mod.16.AlarmAck
4275
0x10b3
IO.Mod.24.AlarmAck
4283
0x10bb
IO.Mod.16.HiOffset
4435
0x1153
IO.Mod.24.HiOffset
4443
0x115b
IO.Mod.16.HiPoint
4403
0x1133
IO.Mod.24.HiPoint
4411
0x113b
IO.Mod.16.LoOffset
4371
0x1113
IO.Mod.24.LoOffset
4379
0x111b
IO.Mod.16.LoPoint
4339
0x10f3
IO.Mod.24.LoPoint
4347
0x10fb
IO.Mod.16.MinOnTime
4307
0x10d3
IO.Mod.24.MinOnTime
4315
0x10db
IO.Mod.16.PV
4243
0x1093
IO.Mod.24.PV
4251
0x109b
IO.Mod.17.AlarmAck
4276
0x10b4
IO.Mod.25.AlarmAck
4284
0x10bc
IO.Mod.17.HiOffset
4436
0x1154
IO.Mod.25.HiOffset
4444
0x115c
IO.Mod.17.HiPoint
4404
0x1134
IO.Mod.25.HiPoint
4412
0x113c
IO.Mod.17.LoOffset
4372
0x1114
IO.Mod.25.LoOffset
4380
0x111c
IO.Mod.17.LoPoint
4340
0x10f4
IO.Mod.25.LoPoint
4348
0x10fc
IO.Mod.17.MinOnTime
4308
0x10d4
IO.Mod.25.MinOnTime
4316
0x10dc
IO.Mod.17.PV
4244
0x1094
IO.Mod.25.PV
4252
0x109c
IO.Mod.18.AlarmAck
4277
0x10b5
IO.Mod.26.AlarmAck
4285
0x10bd
IO.Mod.18.HiOffset
4437
0x1155
IO.Mod.26.HiOffset
4445
0x115d
IO.Mod.18.HiPoint
4405
0x1135
IO.Mod.26.HiPoint
4413
0x113d
IO.Mod.18.LoOffset
4373
0x1115
IO.Mod.26.LoOffset
4381
0x111d
IO.Mod.18.LoPoint
4341
0x10f5
IO.Mod.26.LoPoint
4349
0x10fd
IO.Mod.18.MinOnTime
4309
0x10d5
IO.Mod.26.MinOnTime
4317
0x10dd
IO.Mod.18.PV
4245
0x1095
IO.Mod.26.PV
4253
0x109d
IO.Mod.19.AlarmAck
4278
0x10b6
IO.Mod.27.AlarmAck
4286
0x10be
IO.Mod.19.HiOffset
4438
0x1156
IO.Mod.27.HiOffset
4446
0x115e
IO.Mod.19.HiPoint
4406
0x1136
IO.Mod.27.HiPoint
4414
0x113e
IO.Mod.19.LoOffset
4374
0x1116
IO.Mod.27.LoOffset
4382
0x111e
IO.Mod.19.LoPoint
4342
0x10f6
IO.Mod.27.LoPoint
4350
0x10fe
IO.Mod.19.MinOnTime
4310
0x10d6
IO.Mod.27.MinOnTime
4318
0x10de
IO.Mod.19.PV
4246
0x1096
IO.Mod.27.PV
4254
0x109e
IO.Mod.20.AlarmAck
4279
0x10b7
IO.Mod.28.AlarmAck
4287
0x10bf
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 273
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
IO.Mod.28.HiOffset
4447
0x115f
Lgc2.3.Out
4830
0x12de
IO.Mod.28.HiPoint
4415
0x113f
Lgc2.4.In1
4831
0x12df
IO.Mod.28.LoOffset
4383
0x111f
Lgc2.4.In2
4832
0x12e0
IO.Mod.28.LoPoint
4351
0x10ff
Lgc2.4.Out
4833
0x12e1
IO.Mod.28.MinOnTime
4319
0x10df
Lgc2.5.In1
4834
0x12e2
IO.Mod.28.PV
4255
0x109f
Lgc2.5.In2
4835
0x12e3
IO.Mod.29.AlarmAck
4288
0x10c0
Lgc2.5.Out
4836
0x12e4
IO.Mod.29.HiOffset
4448
0x1160
Lgc2.6.In1
4837
0x12e5
IO.Mod.29.HiPoint
4416
0x1140
Lgc2.6.In2
4838
0x12e6
IO.Mod.29.LoOffset
4384
0x1120
Lgc2.6.Out
4839
0x12e7
IO.Mod.29.LoPoint
4352
0x1100
Lgc2.7.In1
4840
0x12e8
IO.Mod.29.MinOnTime
4320
0x10e0
Lgc2.7.In2
4841
0x12e9
IO.Mod.29.PV
4256
0x10a0
Lgc2.7.Out
4842
0x12ea
IO.Mod.30.AlarmAck
4289
0x10c1
Lgc2.8.In1
4843
0x12eb
IO.Mod.30.HiOffset
4449
0x1161
Lgc2.8.In2
4844
0x12ec
IO.Mod.30.HiPoint
4417
0x1141
Lgc2.8.Out
4845
0x12ed
IO.Mod.30.LoOffset
4385
0x1121
Lgc2.9.In1
4846
0x12ee
IO.Mod.30.LoPoint
4353
0x1101
Lgc2.9.In2
4847
0x12ef
IO.Mod.30.MinOnTime
4321
0x10e1
Lgc2.9.Out
4848
0x12f0
IO.Mod.30.PV
4257
0x10a1
Lgc2.10.In1
4849
0x12f1
IO.Mod.31.AlarmAck
4290
0x10c2
Lgc2.10.In2
4850
0x12f2
IO.Mod.31.HiOffset
4450
0x1162
Lgc2.10.Out
4851
0x12f3
IO.Mod.31.HiPoint
4418
0x1142
Lgc2.11.In1
4852
0x12f4
IO.Mod.31.LoOffset
4386
0x1122
Lgc2.11.In2
4853
0x12f5
IO.Mod.31.LoPoint
4354
0x1102
Lgc2.11.Out
4854
0x12f6
IO.Mod.31.MinOnTime
4322
0x10e2
Lgc2.12.In1
4855
0x12f7
IO.Mod.31.PV
4258
0x10a2
Lgc2.12.In2
4856
0x12f8
IO.Mod.32.AlarmAck
4291
0x10c3
Lgc2.12.Out
4857
0x12f9
IO.Mod.32.HiOffset
4451
0x1163
Lgc2.13.In1
4858
0x12fa
IO.Mod.32.HiPoint
4419
0x1143
Lgc2.13.In2
4859
0x12fb
IO.Mod.32.LoOffset
4387
0x1123
Lgc2.13.Out
4860
0x12fc
IO.Mod.32.LoPoint
4355
0x1103
Lgc2.14.In1
4861
0x12fd
IO.Mod.32.MinOnTime
4323
0x10e3
Lgc2.14.In2
4862
0x12fe
IO.Mod.32.PV
4259
0x10a3
Lgc2.14.Out
4863
0x12ff
IO.ModIDs.Module1
12707
0x31a3
Lgc2.15.In1
4864
0x1300
IO.ModIDs.Module2
12771
0x31e3
Lgc2.15.In2
4865
0x1301
IO.ModIDs.Module3
12835
0x3223
Lgc2.15.Out
4866
0x1302
IO.ModIDs.Module4
12899
0x3263
Lgc2.16.In1
4867
0x1303
IPMonitor.1.Max
4915
0x1333
Lgc2.16.In2
4868
0x1304
IPMonitor.1.Min
4916
0x1334
Lgc2.16.Out
4869
0x1305
IPMonitor.1.Reset
4919
0x1337
Lgc2.17.In1
4870
0x1306
IPMonitor.1.Threshold
4917
0x1335
Lgc2.17.In2
4871
0x1307
IPMonitor.1.TimeAbove
4918
0x1336
Lgc2.17.Out
4872
0x1308
IPMonitor.2.Max
4920
0x1338
Lgc2.18.In1
4873
0x1309
IPMonitor.2.Min
4921
0x1339
Lgc2.18.In2
4874
0x130a
IPMonitor.2.Reset
4924
0x133c
Lgc2.18.Out
4875
0x130b
IPMonitor.2.Threshold
4922
0x133a
Lgc2.19.In1
4876
0x130c
IPMonitor.2.TimeAbove
4923
0x133b
Lgc2.19.In2
4877
0x130d
Lgc2.1.In1
4822
0x12d6
Lgc2.19.Out
4878
0x130e
Lgc2.1.In2
4823
0x12d7
Lgc2.20.In1
4879
0x130f
Lgc2.1.Out
4824
0x12d8
Lgc2.20.In2
4880
0x1310
Lgc2.2.In1
4825
0x12d9
Lgc2.20.Out
4881
0x1311
Lgc2.2.In2
4826
0x12da
Lgc2.21.In1
4882
0x1312
Lgc2.2.Out
4827
0x12db
Lgc2.21.In2
4883
0x1313
Lgc2.3.In1
4828
0x12dc
Lgc2.21.Out
4884
0x1314
Lgc2.3.In2
4829
0x12dd
Lgc2.22.In1
4885
0x1315
Page 274
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Lgc2.22.In2
4886
0x1316
Lin16.In12
4940
0x134c
Lgc2.22.Out
4887
0x1317
Lin16.In13
4941
0x134d
Lgc2.23.In1
4888
0x1318
Lin16.In14
4942
0x134e
Lgc2.23.In2
4889
0x1319
Lin16.InHighLimit
4943
0x134f
Lgc2.23.Out
4890
0x131a
Lin16.InLowLimit
4928
0x1340
Lgc2.24.In1
4891
0x131b
Lin16.Out
4961
0x1361
Lgc2.24.In2
4892
0x131c
Lin16.Out1
4945
0x1351
Lgc2.24.Out
4893
0x131d
Lin16.Out2
4946
0x1352
Lgc8.1.In1
4894
0x131e
Lin16.Out3
4947
0x1353
Lgc8.1.In2
4895
0x131f
Lin16.Out4
4948
0x1354
Lgc8.1.In3
4896
0x1320
Lin16.Out5
4949
0x1355
Lgc8.1.In4
4897
0x1321
Lin16.Out6
4950
0x1356
Lgc8.1.In5
4898
0x1322
Lin16.Out7
4951
0x1357
Lgc8.1.In6
4899
0x1323
Lin16.Out8
4952
0x1358
Lgc8.1.In7
4900
0x1324
Lin16.Out9
4953
0x1359
Lgc8.1.In8
4901
0x1325
Lin16.Out10
4954
0x135a
Lgc8.1.Out
4902
0x1326
Lin16.Out11
4955
0x135b
Lgc8.2.In1
4903
0x1327
Lin16.Out12
4956
0x135c
Lgc8.2.In2
4904
0x1328
Lin16.Out13
4957
0x135d
Lgc8.2.In3
4905
0x1329
Lin16.Out14
4958
0x135e
Lgc8.2.In4
4906
0x132a
Lin16.OutHighLimit
4959
0x135f
Lgc8.2.In5
4907
0x132b
Lin16.OutLowLimit
4944
0x1350
Lgc8.2.In6
4908
0x132c
Loop.1.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
119
0x0077
Lgc8.2.In7
4909
0x132d
Loop.1.Diag.Error
113
0x0071
Lgc8.2.In8
4910
0x132e
Loop.1.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
118
0x0076
Lgc8.2.Out
4911
0x132f
Loop.1.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
116
0x0074
Lgc8.3.In1
5054
0x13be
Loop.1.Diag.LoopMode
114
0x0072
Lgc8.3.In2
5055
0x13bf
Loop.1.Diag.PropOutContrib
117
0x0075
Lgc8.3.In3
5056
0x13c0
Loop.1.Diag.SBrk
120
0x0078
Lgc8.3.In4
5057
0x13c1
Loop.1.Diag.SchedCBH
32
0x0020
Lgc8.3.In5
5058
0x13c2
Loop.1.Diag.SchedCBL
33
0x0021
Lgc8.3.In6
5059
0x13c3
Loop.1.Diag.SchedLPBrk
35
0x0023
Lgc8.3.In7
5060
0x13c4
Loop.1.Diag.SchedMR
34
0x0022
Lgc8.3.In8
5061
0x13c5
Loop.1.Diag.SchedOPHi
37
0x0025
Lgc8.3.Out
5062
0x13c6
Loop.1.Diag.SchedOPLo
38
0x0026
Lgc8.4.In1
5063
0x13c7
Loop.1.Diag.SchedPB
29
0x001d
Lgc8.4.In2
5064
0x13c8
Loop.1.Diag.SchedR2G
36
0x0024
Lgc8.4.In3
5065
0x13c9
Loop.1.Diag.SchedTd
31
0x001f
Lgc8.4.In4
5066
0x13ca
Loop.1.Diag.SchedTi
30
0x001e
Lgc8.4.In5
5067
0x13cb
Loop.1.Diag.TargetOutVal
115
0x0073
Lgc8.4.In6
5068
0x13cc
Loop.1.Main.ActiveOut
4
0x0004
Lgc8.4.In7
5069
0x13cd
Loop.1.Main.AutoMan
10
0x000a
Lgc8.4.In8
5070
0x13ce
Loop.1.Main.Inhibit
20
0x0014
Lgc8.4.Out
5071
0x13cf
Loop.1.Main.PV
1
0x0001
Lin16.In
4960
0x1360
Loop.1.Main.TargetSP
2
0x0002
Lin16.In1
4929
0x1341
Loop.1.Main.WorkingSP
5
0x0005
Lin16.In2
4930
0x1342
Loop.1.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
84
0x0054
Lin16.In3
4931
0x1343
Loop.1.OP.Ch1Out
82
0x0052
Lin16.In4
4932
0x1344
Loop.1.OP.Ch2Deadband
16
0x0010
Lin16.In5
4933
0x1345
Loop.1.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
85
0x0055
Lin16.In6
4934
0x1346
Loop.1.OP.Ch2Out
83
0x0053
Lin16.In7
4935
0x1347
Loop.1.OP.CoolType
93
0x005d
Lin16.In8
4936
0x1348
Loop.1.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
91
0x005b
Lin16.In9
4937
0x1349
Loop.1.OP.FeedForwardGain
95
0x005f
Lin16.In10
4938
0x134a
Loop.1.OP.FeedForwardOffset
96
0x0060
Lin16.In11
4939
0x134b
Loop.1.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
97
0x0061
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 275
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.1.OP.FeedForwardType
94
0x005e
Loop.1.Setup.DerivativeType
25
0x0019
Loop.1.OP.FeedForwardVal
98
0x0062
Loop.1.Setup.LoopType
21
0x0015
Loop.1.OP.FF_Rem
103
0x0067
Loop.1.Setup.PBUnits
24
0x0018
Loop.1.OP.ManualMode
90
0x005a
Loop.1.SP.AltSP
68
0x0044
Loop.1.OP.ManualOutVal
3
0x0003
Loop.1.SP.AltSPSelect
69
0x0045
Loop.1.OP.MeasuredPower
92
0x005c
Loop.1.SP.ManualTrack
75
0x004b
Loop.1.OP.OutputHighLimit
80
0x0050
Loop.1.SP.RangeHigh
12
0x000c
Loop.1.OP.OutputLowLimit
81
0x0051
Loop.1.SP.RangeLow
11
0x000b
Loop.1.OP.Rate
86
0x0056
Loop.1.SP.Rate
70
0x0046
Loop.1.OP.RateDisable
87
0x0057
Loop.1.SP.RateDisable
71
0x0047
Loop.1.OP.RemOPH
102
0x0066
Loop.1.SP.RateDone
79
0x004f
Loop.1.OP.RemOPL
101
0x0065
Loop.1.SP.SP1
13
0x000d
Loop.1.OP.SafeOutVal
89
0x0059
Loop.1.SP.SP2
14
0x000e
Loop.1.OP.SBrkOP
123
0x007B
Loop.1.SP.SPHighLimit
66
0x0042
Loop.1.OP.SensorBreakMode
88
0x0058
Loop.1.SP.SPLowLimit
67
0x0043
Loop.1.OP.TrackEnable
100
0x0064
Loop.1.SP.SPSelect
15
0x000f
Loop.1.OP.TrackOutVal
99
0x0063
Loop.1.SP.SPTrack
76
0x004c
Loop.1.PID.ActiveSet
28
0x001c
Loop.1.SP.SPTrim
72
0x0048
Loop.1.PID.Boundary1-2
26
0x001a
Loop.1.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
73
0x0049
Loop.1.PID.Boundary2-3
27
0x001b
Loop.1.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
74
0x004a
Loop.1.PID.CutbackHigh
18
0x0012
Loop.1.SP.TrackPV
77
0x004d
Loop.1.PID.CutbackHigh2
46
0x002e
Loop.1.SP.TrackSP
78
0x004e
Loop.1.PID.CutbackHigh3
56
0x0038
Loop.1.Tune.AutotuneEnable
108
0x006c
Loop.1.PID.CutbackLow
17
0x0011
Loop.1.Tune.OutputHighLimit
105
0x0069
Loop.1.PID.CutbackLow2
47
0x002f
Loop.1.Tune.OutputLowLimit
106
0x006a
Loop.1.PID.CutbackLow3
57
0x0039
Loop.1.Tune.Stage
111
0x006f
Loop.1.PID.DerivativeTime
9
0x0009
Loop.1.Tune.StageTime
112
0x0070
Loop.1.PID.DerivativeTime2
45
0x002d
Loop.1.Tune.State
110
0x006e
Loop.1.PID.DerivativeTime3
55
0x0037
Loop.1.Tune.StepSize
109
0x006d
Loop.1.PID.IntegralTime
8
0x0008
Loop.1.Tune.Type
104
0x0068
Loop.1.PID.IntegralTime2
44
0x002c
Loop.2.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
375
0x0177
Loop.1.PID.IntegralTime3
54
0x0036
Loop.2.Diag.Error
369
0x0171
Loop.1.PID.LoopBreakTime
40
0x0028
Loop.2.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
374
0x0176
Loop.1.PID.LoopBreakTime2
49
0x0031
Loop.2.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
372
0x0174
Loop.1.PID.LoopBreakTime3
59
0x003b
Loop.2.Diag.LoopMode
370
0x0172
Loop.1.PID.ManualReset
39
0x0027
Loop.2.Diag.PropOutContrib
373
0x0175
Loop.1.PID.ManualReset2
48
0x0030
Loop.2.Diag.SBrk
376
0x0178
Loop.1.PID.ManualReset3
58
0x003a
Loop.2.Diag.SchedCBH
288
0x0120
Loop.1.PID.NumSets
64
0x0040
Loop.2.Diag.SchedCBL
289
0x0121
Loop.1.PID.OutputHi
41
0x0029
Loop.2.Diag.SchedLPBrk
291
0x0123
Loop.1.PID.OutputHi2
51
0x0033
Loop.2.Diag.SchedMR
290
0x0122
Loop.1.PID.OutputHi3
61
0x003d
Loop.2.Diag.SchedOPHi
293
0x0125
Loop.1.PID.OutputLo
42
0x002a
Loop.2.Diag.SchedOPLo
294
0x0126
Loop.1.PID.OutputLo2
52
0x0034
Loop.2.Diag.SchedPB
285
0x011d
Loop.1.PID.OutputLo3
62
0x003e
Loop.2.Diag.SchedR2G
292
0x0124
Loop.1.PID.ProportionalBand
6
0x0006
Loop.2.Diag.SchedTd
287
0x011f
Loop.1.PID.ProportionalBand2
43
0x002b
Loop.2.Diag.SchedTi
286
0x011e
Loop.1.PID.ProportionalBand3
53
0x0035
Loop.2.Diag.TargetOutVal
371
0x0173
Loop.1.PID.RelCh2Gain
19
0x0013
Loop.2.Main.ActiveOut
260
0x0104
Loop.1.PID.RelCh2Gain2
50
0x0032
Loop.2.Main.AutoMan
266
0x010a
Loop.1.PID.RelCh2Gain3
60
0x003c
Loop.2.Main.Inhibit
276
0x0114
Loop.1.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
65
0x0041
Loop.2.Main.PV
257
0x0101
Loop.1.PID.SchedulerType
63
0x003f
Loop.2.Main.TargetSP
258
0x0102
Loop.1.Setup.CH1ControlType
22
0x0016
Loop.2.Main.WorkingSP
261
0x0105
Loop.1.Setup.CH2ControlType
23
0x0017
Loop.2.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
340
0x0154
Loop.1.Setup.ControlAction
7
0x0007
Loop.2.OP.Ch1Out
338
0x0152
Page 276
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.2.OP.Ch2Deadband
272
0x0110
Loop.2.PID.RelCh2Gain
275
0x0113
Loop.2.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
341
0x0155
Loop.2.PID.RelCh2Gain2
306
0x0132
Loop.2.OP.Ch2Out
339
0x0153
Loop.2.PID.RelCh2Gain3
316
0x013c
Loop.2.OP.CoolType
349
0x015d
Loop.2.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
321
0x0141
Loop.2.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
347
0x015b
Loop.2.PID.SchedulerType
319
0x013f
Loop.2.OP.FeedForwardGain
351
0x015f
Loop.2.Setup.CH1ControlType
278
0x0116
Loop.2.OP.FeedForwardOffset
352
0x0160
Loop.2.Setup.CH2ControlType
279
0x0117
Loop.2.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
353
0x0161
Loop.2.Setup.ControlAction
263
0x0107
Loop.2.OP.FeedForwardType
350
0x015e
Loop.2.Setup.DerivativeType
281
0x0119
Loop.2.OP.FeedForwardVal
354
0x0162
Loop.2.Setup.LoopType
277
0x0115
Loop.2.OP.FF_Rem
359
0x0167
Loop.2.Setup.PBUnits
280
0x0118
Loop.2.OP.ManualMode
346
0x015a
Loop.2.SP.AltSP
324
0x0144
Loop.2.OP.ManualOutVal
259
0x0103
Loop.2.SP.AltSPSelect
325
0x0145
Loop.2.OP.MeasuredPower
348
0x015c
Loop.2.SP.ManualTrack
331
0x014b
Loop.2.OP.OutputHighLimit
336
0x0150
Loop.2.SP.RangeHigh
268
0x010c
Loop.2.OP.OutputLowLimit
337
0x0151
Loop.2.SP.RangeLow
267
0x010b
Loop.2.OP.Rate
342
0x0156
Loop.2.SP.Rate
326
0x0146
Loop.2.OP.RateDisable
343
0x0157
Loop.2.SP.RateDisable
327
0x0147
Loop.2.OP.RemOPH
358
0x0166
Loop.2.SP.RateDone
335
0x014f
Loop.2.OP.RemOPL
357
0x0165
Loop.2.SP.SP1
269
0x010d
Loop.2.OP.SafeOutVal
345
0x0159
Loop.2.SP.SP2
270
0x010e
Loop.2.OP.SBrkOP
379
0x017B
Loop.2.SP.SPHighLimit
322
0x0142
Loop.2.OP.SensorBreakMode
344
0x0158
Loop.2.SP.SPLowLimit
323
0x0143
Loop.2.OP.TrackEnable
356
0x0164
Loop.2.SP.SPSelect
271
0x010f
Loop.2.OP.TrackOutVal
355
0x0163
Loop.2.SP.SPTrack
332
0x014c
Loop.2.PID.ActiveSet
284
0x011c
Loop.2.SP.SPTrim
328
0x0148
Loop.2.PID.Boundary1-2
282
0x011a
Loop.2.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
329
0x0149
Loop.2.PID.Boundary2-3
283
0x011b
Loop.2.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
330
0x014a
Loop.2.PID.CutbackHigh
274
0x0112
Loop.2.SP.TrackPV
333
0x014d
Loop.2.PID.CutbackHigh2
302
0x012e
Loop.2.SP.TrackSP
334
0x014e
Loop.2.PID.CutbackHigh3
312
0x0138
Loop.2.Tune.AutotuneEnable
364
0x016c
Loop.2.PID.CutbackLow
273
0x0111
Loop.2.Tune.OutputHighLimit
361
0x0169
Loop.2.PID.CutbackLow2
303
0x012f
Loop.2.Tune.OutputLowLimit
362
0x016a
Loop.2.PID.CutbackLow3
313
0x0139
Loop.2.Tune.Stage
367
0x016f
Loop.2.PID.DerivativeTime
265
0x0109
Loop.2.Tune.StageTime
368
0x0170
Loop.2.PID.DerivativeTime2
301
0x012d
Loop.2.Tune.State
366
0x016e
Loop.2.PID.DerivativeTime3
311
0x0137
Loop.2.Tune.StepSize
365
0x016d
Loop.2.PID.IntegralTime
264
0x0108
Loop.2.Tune.Type
360
0x0168
Loop.2.PID.IntegralTime2
300
0x012c
Loop.3.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
631
0x0277
Loop.2.PID.IntegralTime3
310
0x0136
Loop.3.Diag.Error
625
0x0271
Loop.2.PID.LoopBreakTime
296
0x0128
Loop.3.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
630
0x0276
Loop.2.PID.LoopBreakTime2
305
0x0131
Loop.3.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
628
0x0274
Loop.2.PID.LoopBreakTime3
315
0x013b
Loop.3.Diag.LoopMode
626
0x0272
Loop.2.PID.ManualReset
295
0x0127
Loop.3.Diag.PropOutContrib
629
0x0275
Loop.2.PID.ManualReset2
304
0x0130
Loop.3.Diag.SBrk
632
0x0278
Loop.2.PID.ManualReset3
314
0x013a
Loop.3.Diag.SchedCBH
544
0x0220
Loop.2.PID.NumSets
320
0x0140
Loop.3.Diag.SchedCBL
545
0x0221
Loop.2.PID.OutputHi
297
0x0129
Loop.3.Diag.SchedLPBrk
547
0x0223
Loop.2.PID.OutputHi2
307
0x0133
Loop.3.Diag.SchedMR
546
0x0222
Loop.2.PID.OutputHi3
317
0x013d
Loop.3.Diag.SchedOPHi
549
0x0225
Loop.2.PID.OutputLo
298
0x012a
Loop.3.Diag.SchedOPLo
550
0x0226
Loop.2.PID.OutputLo2
308
0x0134
Loop.3.Diag.SchedPB
541
0x021d
Loop.2.PID.OutputLo3
318
0x013e
Loop.3.Diag.SchedR2G
548
0x0224
Loop.2.PID.ProportionalBand
262
0x0106
Loop.3.Diag.SchedTd
543
0x021f
Loop.2.PID.ProportionalBand2
299
0x012b
Loop.3.Diag.SchedTi
542
0x021e
Loop.2.PID.ProportionalBand3
309
0x0135
Loop.3.Diag.TargetOutVal
627
0x0273
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 277
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.3.Main.ActiveOut
516
0x0204
Loop.3.PID.OutputHi2
563
0x0233
Loop.3.Main.AutoMan
522
0x020a
Loop.3.PID.OutputHi3
573
0x023d
Loop.3.Main.Inhibit
532
0x0214
Loop.3.PID.OutputLo
554
0x022a
Loop.3.Main.PV
513
0x0201
Loop.3.PID.OutputLo2
564
0x0234
Loop.3.Main.TargetSP
514
0x0202
Loop.3.PID.OutputLo3
574
0x023e
Loop.3.Main.WorkingSP
517
0x0205
Loop.3.PID.ProportionalBand
518
0x0206
Loop.3.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
596
0x0254
Loop.3.PID.ProportionalBand2
555
0x022b
Loop.3.OP.Ch1Out
594
0x0252
Loop.3.PID.ProportionalBand3
565
0x0235
Loop.3.OP.Ch2Deadband
528
0x0210
Loop.3.PID.RelCh2Gain
531
0x0213
Loop.3.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
597
0x0255
Loop.3.PID.RelCh2Gain2
562
0x0232
Loop.3.OP.Ch2Out
595
0x0253
Loop.3.PID.RelCh2Gain3
572
0x023c
Loop.3.OP.CoolType
605
0x025d
Loop.3.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
577
0x0241
Loop.3.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
603
0x025b
Loop.3.PID.SchedulerType
575
0x023f
Loop.3.OP.FeedForwardGain
607
0x025f
Loop.3.Setup.CH1ControlType
534
0x0216
Loop.3.OP.FeedForwardOffset
608
0x0260
Loop.3.Setup.CH2ControlType
535
0x0217
Loop.3.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
609
0x0261
Loop.3.Setup.ControlAction
519
0x0207
Loop.3.OP.FeedForwardType
606
0x025e
Loop.3.Setup.DerivativeType
537
0x0219
Loop.3.OP.FeedForwardVal
610
0x0262
Loop.3.Setup.LoopType
533
0x0215
Loop.3.OP.FF_Rem
615
0x0267
Loop.3.Setup.PBUnits
536
0x0218
Loop.3.OP.ManualMode
602
0x025a
Loop.3.SP.AltSP
580
0x0244
Loop.3.OP.ManualOutVal
515
0x0203
Loop.3.SP.AltSPSelect
581
0x0245
Loop.3.OP.MeasuredPower
604
0x025c
Loop.3.SP.ManualTrack
587
0x024b
Loop.3.OP.OutputHighLimit
592
0x0250
Loop.3.SP.RangeHigh
524
0x020c
Loop.3.OP.OutputLowLimit
593
0x0251
Loop.3.SP.RangeLow
523
0x020b
Loop.3.OP.Rate
598
0x0256
Loop.3.SP.Rate
582
0x0246
Loop.3.OP.RateDisable
599
0x0257
Loop.3.SP.RateDisable
583
0x0247
Loop.3.OP.RemOPH
614
0x0266
Loop.3.SP.RateDone
591
0x024f
Loop.3.OP.RemOPL
613
0x0265
Loop.3.SP.SP1
525
0x020d
Loop.3.OP.SafeOutVal
601
0x0259
Loop.3.SP.SP2
526
0x020e
Loop.3.OP.SBrkOP
635
0x027B
Loop.3.SP.SPHighLimit
578
0x0242
Loop.3.OP.SensorBreakMode
600
0x0258
Loop.3.SP.SPLowLimit
579
0x0243
Loop.3.OP.TrackEnable
612
0x0264
Loop.3.SP.SPSelect
527
0x020f
Loop.3.OP.TrackOutVal
611
0x0263
Loop.3.SP.SPTrack
588
0x024c
Loop.3.PID.ActiveSet
540
0x021c
Loop.3.SP.SPTrim
584
0x0248
Loop.3.PID.Boundary1-2
538
0x021a
Loop.3.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
585
0x0249
Loop.3.PID.Boundary2-3
539
0x021b
Loop.3.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
586
0x024a
Loop.3.PID.CutbackHigh
530
0x0212
Loop.3.SP.TrackPV
589
0x024d
Loop.3.PID.CutbackHigh2
558
0x022e
Loop.3.SP.TrackSP
590
0x024e
Loop.3.PID.CutbackHigh3
568
0x0238
Loop.3.Tune.AutotuneEnable
620
0x026c
Loop.3.PID.CutbackLow
529
0x0211
Loop.3.Tune.OutputHighLimit
617
0x0269
Loop.3.PID.CutbackLow2
559
0x022f
Loop.3.Tune.OutputLowLimit
618
0x026a
Loop.3.PID.CutbackLow3
569
0x0239
Loop.3.Tune.Stage
623
0x026f
Loop.3.PID.DerivativeTime
521
0x0209
Loop.3.Tune.StageTime
624
0x0270
Loop.3.PID.DerivativeTime2
557
0x022d
Loop.3.Tune.State
622
0x026e
Loop.3.PID.DerivativeTime3
567
0x0237
Loop.3.Tune.StepSize
621
0x026d
Loop.3.PID.IntegralTime
520
0x0208
Loop.3.Tune.Type
616
0x0268
Loop.3.PID.IntegralTime2
556
0x022c
Loop.4.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
887
0x0377
Loop.3.PID.IntegralTime3
566
0x0236
Loop.4.Diag.Error
881
0x0371
Loop.3.PID.LoopBreakTime
552
0x0228
Loop.4.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
886
0x0376
Loop.3.PID.LoopBreakTime2
561
0x0231
Loop.4.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
884
0x0374
Loop.3.PID.LoopBreakTime3
571
0x023b
Loop.4.Diag.LoopMode
882
0x0372
Loop.3.PID.ManualReset
551
0x0227
Loop.4.Diag.PropOutContrib
885
0x0375
Loop.3.PID.ManualReset2
560
0x0230
Loop.4.Diag.SBrk
888
0x0378
Loop.3.PID.ManualReset3
570
0x023a
Loop.4.Diag.SchedCBH
800
0x0320
Loop.3.PID.NumSets
576
0x0240
Loop.4.Diag.SchedCBL
801
0x0321
Loop.3.PID.OutputHi
553
0x0229
Loop.4.Diag.SchedLPBrk
803
0x0323
Page 278
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.4.Diag.SchedMR
802
0x0322
Loop.4.PID.LoopBreakTime
808
0x0328
Loop.4.Diag.SchedOPHi
805
0x0325
Loop.4.PID.LoopBreakTime2
817
0x0331
Loop.4.Diag.SchedOPLo
806
0x0326
Loop.4.PID.LoopBreakTime3
827
0x033b
Loop.4.Diag.SchedPB
797
0x031d
Loop.4.PID.ManualReset
807
0x0327
Loop.4.Diag.SchedR2G
804
0x0324
Loop.4.PID.ManualReset2
816
0x0330
Loop.4.Diag.SchedTd
799
0x031f
Loop.4.PID.ManualReset3
826
0x033a
Loop.4.Diag.SchedTi
798
0x031e
Loop.4.PID.NumSets
832
0x0340
Loop.4.Diag.TargetOutVal
883
0x0373
Loop.4.PID.OutputHi
809
0x0329
Loop.4.Main.ActiveOut
772
0x0304
Loop.4.PID.OutputHi2
819
0x0333
Loop.4.Main.AutoMan
778
0x030a
Loop.4.PID.OutputHi3
829
0x033d
Loop.4.Main.Inhibit
788
0x0314
Loop.4.PID.OutputLo
810
0x032a
Loop.4.Main.PV
769
0x0301
Loop.4.PID.OutputLo2
820
0x0334
Loop.4.Main.TargetSP
770
0x0302
Loop.4.PID.OutputLo3
830
0x033e
Loop.4.Main.WorkingSP
773
0x0305
Loop.4.PID.ProportionalBand
774
0x0306
Loop.4.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
852
0x0354
Loop.4.PID.ProportionalBand2
811
0x032b
Loop.4.OP.Ch1Out
850
0x0352
Loop.4.PID.ProportionalBand3
821
0x0335
Loop.4.OP.Ch2Deadband
784
0x0310
Loop.4.PID.RelCh2Gain
787
0x0313
Loop.4.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
853
0x0355
Loop.4.PID.RelCh2Gain2
818
0x0332
Loop.4.OP.Ch2Out
851
0x0353
Loop.4.PID.RelCh2Gain3
828
0x033c
Loop.4.OP.CoolType
861
0x035d
Loop.4.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
833
0x0341
Loop.4.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
859
0x035b
Loop.4.PID.SchedulerType
831
0x033f
Loop.4.OP.FeedForwardGain
863
0x035f
Loop.4.Setup.CH1ControlType
790
0x0316
Loop.4.OP.FeedForwardOffset
864
0x0360
Loop.4.Setup.CH2ControlType
791
0x0317
Loop.4.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
865
0x0361
Loop.4.Setup.ControlAction
775
0x0307
Loop.4.OP.FeedForwardType
862
0x035e
Loop.4.Setup.DerivativeType
793
0x0319
Loop.4.OP.FeedForwardVal
866
0x0362
Loop.4.Setup.LoopType
789
0x0315
Loop.4.OP.FF_Rem
871
0x0367
Loop.4.Setup.PBUnits
792
0x0318
Loop.4.OP.ManualMode
858
0x035a
Loop.4.SP.AltSP
836
0x0344
Loop.4.OP.ManualOutVal
771
0x0303
Loop.4.SP.AltSPSelect
837
0x0345
Loop.4.OP.MeasuredPower
860
0x035c
Loop.4.SP.ManualTrack
843
0x034b
Loop.4.OP.OutputHighLimit
848
0x0350
Loop.4.SP.RangeHigh
780
0x030c
Loop.4.OP.OutputLowLimit
849
0x0351
Loop.4.SP.RangeLow
779
0x030b
Loop.4.OP.Rate
854
0x0356
Loop.4.SP.Rate
838
0x0346
Loop.4.OP.RateDisable
855
0x0357
Loop.4.SP.RateDisable
839
0x0347
Loop.4.OP.RemOPH
870
0x0366
Loop.4.SP.RateDone
847
0x034f
Loop.4.OP.RemOPL
869
0x0365
Loop.4.SP.SP1
781
0x030d
Loop.4.OP.SafeOutVal
857
0x0359
Loop.4.SP.SP2
782
0x030e
Loop.4.OP.SBrkOP
891
0x037B
Loop.4.SP.SPHighLimit
834
0x0342
Loop.4.OP.SensorBreakMode
856
0x0358
Loop.4.SP.SPLowLimit
835
0x0343
Loop.4.OP.TrackEnable
868
0x0364
Loop.4.SP.SPSelect
783
0x030f
Loop.4.OP.TrackOutVal
867
0x0363
Loop.4.SP.SPTrack
844
0x034c
Loop.4.PID.ActiveSet
796
0x031c
Loop.4.SP.SPTrim
840
0x0348
Loop.4.PID.Boundary1-2
794
0x031a
Loop.4.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
841
0x0349
Loop.4.PID.Boundary2-3
795
0x031b
Loop.4.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
842
0x034a
Loop.4.PID.CutbackHigh
786
0x0312
Loop.4.SP.TrackPV
845
0x034d
Loop.4.PID.CutbackHigh2
814
0x032e
Loop.4.SP.TrackSP
846
0x034e
Loop.4.PID.CutbackHigh3
824
0x0338
Loop.4.Tune.AutotuneEnable
876
0x036c
Loop.4.PID.CutbackLow
785
0x0311
Loop.4.Tune.OutputHighLimit
873
0x0369
Loop.4.PID.CutbackLow2
815
0x032f
Loop.4.Tune.OutputLowLimit
874
0x036a
Loop.4.PID.CutbackLow3
825
0x0339
Loop.4.Tune.Stage
879
0x036f
Loop.4.PID.DerivativeTime
777
0x0309
Loop.4.Tune.StageTime
880
0x0370
Loop.4.PID.DerivativeTime2
813
0x032d
Loop.4.Tune.State
878
0x036e
Loop.4.PID.DerivativeTime3
823
0x0337
Loop.4.Tune.StepSize
877
0x036d
Loop.4.PID.IntegralTime
776
0x0308
Loop.4.Tune.Type
872
0x0368
Loop.4.PID.IntegralTime2
812
0x032c
Loop.5.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
1143
0x0477
Loop.4.PID.IntegralTime3
822
0x0336
Loop.5.Diag.Error
1137
0x0471
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 279
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.5.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
1142
0x0476
Loop.5.PID.CutbackLow2
1071
0x042f
Loop.5.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
1140
0x0474
Loop.5.PID.CutbackLow3
1081
0x0439
Loop.5.Diag.LoopMode
1138
0x0472
Loop.5.PID.DerivativeTime
1033
0x0409
Loop.5.Diag.PropOutContrib
1141
0x0475
Loop.5.PID.DerivativeTime2
1069
0x042d
Loop.5.Diag.SBrk
1144
0x0478
Loop.5.PID.DerivativeTime3
1079
0x0437
Loop.5.Diag.SchedCBH
1056
0x0420
Loop.5.PID.IntegralTime
1032
0x0408
Loop.5.Diag.SchedCBL
1057
0x0421
Loop.5.PID.IntegralTime2
1068
0x042c
Loop.5.Diag.SchedLPBrk
1059
0x0423
Loop.5.PID.IntegralTime3
1078
0x0436
Loop.5.Diag.SchedMR
1058
0x0422
Loop.5.PID.LoopBreakTime
1064
0x0428
Loop.5.Diag.SchedOPHi
1061
0x0425
Loop.5.PID.LoopBreakTime2
1073
0x0431
Loop.5.Diag.SchedOPLo
1062
0x0426
Loop.5.PID.LoopBreakTime3
1083
0x043b
Loop.5.Diag.SchedPB
1053
0x041d
Loop.5.PID.ManualReset
1063
0x0427
Loop.5.Diag.SchedR2G
1060
0x0424
Loop.5.PID.ManualReset2
1072
0x0430
Loop.5.Diag.SchedTd
1055
0x041f
Loop.5.PID.ManualReset3
1082
0x043a
Loop.5.Diag.SchedTi
1054
0x041e
Loop.5.PID.NumSets
1088
0x0440
Loop.5.Diag.TargetOutVal
1139
0x0473
Loop.5.PID.OutputHi
1065
0x0429
Loop.5.Main.ActiveOut
1028
0x0404
Loop.5.PID.OutputHi2
1075
0x0433
Loop.5.Main.AutoMan
1034
0x040a
Loop.5.PID.OutputHi3
1085
0x043d
Loop.5.Main.Inhibit
1044
0x0414
Loop.5.PID.OutputLo
1066
0x042a
Loop.5.Main.PV
1025
0x0401
Loop.5.PID.OutputLo2
1076
0x0434
Loop.5.Main.TargetSP
1026
0x0402
Loop.5.PID.OutputLo3
1086
0x043e
Loop.5.Main.WorkingSP
1029
0x0405
Loop.5.PID.ProportionalBand
1030
0x0406
Loop.5.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
1108
0x0454
Loop.5.PID.ProportionalBand2
1067
0x042b
Loop.5.OP.Ch1Out
1106
0x0452
Loop.5.PID.ProportionalBand3
1077
0x0435
Loop.5.OP.Ch2Deadband
1040
0x0410
Loop.5.PID.RelCh2Gain
1043
0x0413
Loop.5.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
1109
0x0455
Loop.5.PID.RelCh2Gain2
1074
0x0432
Loop.5.OP.Ch2Out
1107
0x0453
Loop.5.PID.RelCh2Gain3
1084
0x043c
Loop.5.OP.CoolType
1117
0x045d
Loop.5.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
1089
0x0441
Loop.5.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
1115
0x045b
Loop.5.PID.SchedulerType
1087
0x043f
Loop.5.OP.FeedForwardGain
1119
0x045f
Loop.5.Setup.CH1ControlType
1046
0x0416
Loop.5.OP.FeedForwardOffset
1120
0x0460
Loop.5.Setup.CH2ControlType
1047
0x0417
Loop.5.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
1121
0x0461
Loop.5.Setup.ControlAction
1031
0x0407
Loop.5.OP.FeedForwardType
1118
0x045e
Loop.5.Setup.DerivativeType
1049
0x0419
Loop.5.OP.FeedForwardVal
1122
0x0462
Loop.5.Setup.LoopType
1045
0x0415
Loop.5.OP.FF_Rem
1127
0x0467
Loop.5.Setup.PBUnits
1048
0x0418
Loop.5.OP.ManualMode
1114
0x045a
Loop.5.SP.AltSP
1092
0x0444
Loop.5.OP.ManualOutVal
1027
0x0403
Loop.5.SP.AltSPSelect
1093
0x0445
Loop.5.OP.MeasuredPower
1116
0x045c
Loop.5.SP.ManualTrack
1099
0x044b
Loop.5.OP.OutputHighLimit
1104
0x0450
Loop.5.SP.RangeHigh
1036
0x040c
Loop.5.OP.OutputLowLimit
1105
0x0451
Loop.5.SP.RangeLow
1035
0x040b
Loop.5.OP.Rate
1110
0x0456
Loop.5.SP.Rate
1094
0x0446
Loop.5.OP.RateDisable
1111
0x0457
Loop.5.SP.RateDisable
1095
0x0447
Loop.5.OP.RemOPH
1126
0x0466
Loop.5.SP.RateDone
1103
0x044f
Loop.5.OP.RemOPL
1125
0x0465
Loop.5.SP.SP1
1037
0x040d
Loop.5.OP.SafeOutVal
1113
0x0459
Loop.5.SP.SP2
1038
0x040e
Loop.5.OP.SBrkOP
1147
0x047B
Loop.5.SP.SPHighLimit
1090
0x0442
Loop.5.OP.SensorBreakMode
1112
0x0458
Loop.5.SP.SPLowLimit
1091
0x0443
Loop.5.OP.TrackEnable
1124
0x0464
Loop.5.SP.SPSelect
1039
0x040f
Loop.5.OP.TrackOutVal
1123
0x0463
Loop.5.SP.SPTrack
1100
0x044c
Loop.5.PID.ActiveSet
1052
0x041c
Loop.5.SP.SPTrim
1096
0x0448
Loop.5.PID.Boundary1-2
1050
0x041a
Loop.5.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
1097
0x0449
Loop.5.PID.Boundary2-3
1051
0x041b
Loop.5.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
1098
0x044a
Loop.5.PID.CutbackHigh
1042
0x0412
Loop.5.SP.TrackPV
1101
0x044d
Loop.5.PID.CutbackHigh2
1070
0x042e
Loop.5.SP.TrackSP
1102
0x044e
Loop.5.PID.CutbackHigh3
1080
0x0438
Loop.5.Tune.AutotuneEnable
1132
0x046c
Loop.5.PID.CutbackLow
1041
0x0411
Loop.5.Tune.OutputHighLimit
1129
0x0469
Page 280
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.5.Tune.OutputLowLimit
1130
0x046a
Loop.6.OP.TrackOutVal
1379
0x0563
Loop.5.Tune.Stage
1135
0x046f
Loop.6.PID.ActiveSet
1308
0x051c
Loop.5.Tune.StageTime
1136
0x0470
Loop.6.PID.Boundary1-2
1306
0x051a
Loop.5.Tune.State
1134
0x046e
Loop.6.PID.Boundary2-3
1307
0x051b
Loop.5.Tune.StepSize
1133
0x046d
Loop.6.PID.CutbackHigh
1298
0x0512
Loop.5.Tune.Type
1128
0x0468
Loop.6.PID.CutbackHigh2
1326
0x052e
Loop.6.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
1399
0x0577
Loop.6.PID.CutbackHigh3
1336
0x0538
Loop.6.Diag.Error
1393
0x0571
Loop.6.PID.CutbackLow
1297
0x0511
Loop.6.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
1398
0x0576
Loop.6.PID.CutbackLow2
1327
0x052f
Loop.6.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
1396
0x0574
Loop.6.PID.CutbackLow3
1337
0x0539
Loop.6.Diag.LoopMode
1394
0x0572
Loop.6.PID.DerivativeTime
1289
0x0509
Loop.6.Diag.PropOutContrib
1397
0x0575
Loop.6.PID.DerivativeTime2
1325
0x052d
Loop.6.Diag.SBrk
1400
0x0578
Loop.6.PID.DerivativeTime3
1335
0x0537
Loop.6.Diag.SchedCBH
1312
0x0520
Loop.6.PID.IntegralTime
1288
0x0508
Loop.6.Diag.SchedCBL
1313
0x0521
Loop.6.PID.IntegralTime2
1324
0x052c
Loop.6.Diag.SchedLPBrk
1315
0x0523
Loop.6.PID.IntegralTime3
1334
0x0536
Loop.6.Diag.SchedMR
1314
0x0522
Loop.6.PID.LoopBreakTime
1320
0x0528
Loop.6.Diag.SchedOPHi
1317
0x0525
Loop.6.PID.LoopBreakTime2
1329
0x0531
0x053b
Loop.6.Diag.SchedOPLo
1318
0x0526
Loop.6.PID.LoopBreakTime3
1339
Loop.6.Diag.SchedPB
1309
0x051d
Loop.6.PID.ManualReset
1319
0x0527
Loop.6.Diag.SchedR2G
1316
0x0524
Loop.6.PID.ManualReset2
1328
0x0530
Loop.6.Diag.SchedTd
1311
0x051f
Loop.6.PID.ManualReset3
1338
0x053a
Loop.6.Diag.SchedTi
1310
0x051e
Loop.6.PID.NumSets
1344
0x0540
Loop.6.Diag.TargetOutVal
1395
0x0573
Loop.6.PID.OutputHi
1321
0x0529
Loop.6.Main.ActiveOut
1284
0x0504
Loop.6.PID.OutputHi2
1331
0x0533
Loop.6.Main.AutoMan
1290
0x050a
Loop.6.PID.OutputHi3
1341
0x053d
Loop.6.Main.Inhibit
1300
0x0514
Loop.6.PID.OutputLo
1322
0x052a
Loop.6.Main.PV
1281
0x0501
Loop.6.PID.OutputLo2
1332
0x0534
Loop.6.Main.TargetSP
1282
0x0502
Loop.6.PID.OutputLo3
1342
0x053e
Loop.6.Main.WorkingSP
1285
0x0505
Loop.6.PID.ProportionalBand
1286
0x0506
Loop.6.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
1364
0x0554
Loop.6.PID.ProportionalBand2
1323
0x052b
Loop.6.OP.Ch1Out
1362
0x0552
Loop.6.PID.ProportionalBand3
1333
0x0535
Loop.6.OP.Ch2Deadband
1296
0x0510
Loop.6.PID.RelCh2Gain
1299
0x0513
Loop.6.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
1365
0x0555
Loop.6.PID.RelCh2Gain2
1330
0x0532
Loop.6.OP.Ch2Out
1363
0x0553
Loop.6.PID.RelCh2Gain3
1340
0x053c
Loop.6.OP.CoolType
1373
0x055d
Loop.6.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
1345
0x0541
Loop.6.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
1371
0x055b
Loop.6.PID.SchedulerType
1343
0x053f
Loop.6.OP.FeedForwardGain
1375
0x055f
Loop.6.Setup.CH1ControlType
1302
0x0516
Loop.6.OP.FeedForwardOffset
1376
0x0560
Loop.6.Setup.CH2ControlType
1303
0x0517
Loop.6.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
1377
0x0561
Loop.6.Setup.ControlAction
1287
0x0507
Loop.6.OP.FeedForwardType
1374
0x055e
Loop.6.Setup.DerivativeType
1305
0x0519
Loop.6.OP.FeedForwardVal
1378
0x0562
Loop.6.Setup.LoopType
1301
0x0515
Loop.6.OP.FF_Rem
1383
0x0567
Loop.6.Setup.PBUnits
1304
0x0518
Loop.6.OP.ManualMode
1370
0x055a
Loop.6.SP.AltSP
1348
0x0544
Loop.6.OP.ManualOutVal
1283
0x0503
Loop.6.SP.AltSPSelect
1349
0x0545
Loop.6.OP.MeasuredPower
1372
0x055c
Loop.6.SP.ManualTrack
1355
0x054b
Loop.6.OP.OutputHighLimit
1360
0x0550
Loop.6.SP.RangeHigh
1292
0x050c
Loop.6.OP.OutputLowLimit
1361
0x0551
Loop.6.SP.RangeLow
1291
0x050b
Loop.6.OP.Rate
1366
0x0556
Loop.6.SP.Rate
1350
0x0546
Loop.6.OP.RateDisable
1367
0x0557
Loop.6.SP.RateDisable
1351
0x0547
Loop.6.OP.RemOPH
1382
0x0566
Loop.6.SP.RateDone
1359
0x054f
Loop.6.OP.RemOPL
1381
0x0565
Loop.6.SP.SP1
1293
0x050d
Loop.6.OP.SafeOutVal
1369
0x0559
Loop.6.SP.SP2
1294
0x050e
Loop.6.OP.SBrkOP
1403
0x057B
Loop.6.SP.SPHighLimit
1346
0x0542
Loop.6.OP.SensorBreakMode
1368
0x0558
Loop.6.SP.SPLowLimit
1347
0x0543
Loop.6.OP.TrackEnable
1380
0x0564
Loop.6.SP.SPSelect
1295
0x050f
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 281
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.6.SP.SPTrack
1356
0x054c
Loop.7.OP.Rate
1622
0x0656
Loop.6.SP.SPTrim
1352
0x0548
Loop.7.OP.RateDisable
1623
0x0657
Loop.6.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
1353
0x0549
Loop.7.OP.RemOPH
1638
0x0666
Loop.6.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
1354
0x054a
Loop.7.OP.RemOPL
1637
0x0665
Loop.6.SP.TrackPV
1357
0x054d
Loop.7.OP.SafeOutVal
1625
0x0659
Loop.6.SP.TrackSP
1358
0x054e
Loop.7.OP.SBrkOP
1659
0x067B
Loop.6.Tune.AutotuneEnable
1388
0x056c
Loop.7.OP.SensorBreakMode
1624
0x0658
Loop.6.Tune.OutputHighLimit
1385
0x0569
Loop.7.OP.TrackEnable
1636
0x0664
Loop.6.Tune.OutputLowLimit
1386
0x056a
Loop.7.OP.TrackOutVal
1635
0x0663
Loop.6.Tune.Stage
1391
0x056f
Loop.7.PID.ActiveSet
1564
0x061c
Loop.6.Tune.StageTime
1392
0x0570
Loop.7.PID.Boundary1-2
1562
0x061a
Loop.6.Tune.State
1390
0x056e
Loop.7.PID.Boundary2-3
1563
0x061b
Loop.6.Tune.StepSize
1389
0x056d
Loop.7.PID.CutbackHigh
1554
0x0612
Loop.6.Tune.Type
1384
0x0568
Loop.7.PID.CutbackHigh2
1582
0x062e
Loop.7.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
1655
0x0677
Loop.7.PID.CutbackHigh3
1592
0x0638
Loop.7.Diag.Error
1649
0x0671
Loop.7.PID.CutbackLow
1553
0x0611
Loop.7.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
1654
0x0676
Loop.7.PID.CutbackLow2
1583
0x062f
Loop.7.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
1652
0x0674
Loop.7.PID.CutbackLow3
1593
0x0639
Loop.7.Diag.LoopMode
1650
0x0672
Loop.7.PID.DerivativeTime
1545
0x0609
Loop.7.Diag.PropOutContrib
1653
0x0675
Loop.7.PID.DerivativeTime2
1581
0x062d
Loop.7.Diag.SBrk
1656
0x0678
Loop.7.PID.DerivativeTime3
1591
0x0637
Loop.7.Diag.SchedCBH
1568
0x0620
Loop.7.PID.IntegralTime
1544
0x0608
Loop.7.Diag.SchedCBL
1569
0x0621
Loop.7.PID.IntegralTime2
1580
0x062c
Loop.7.Diag.SchedLPBrk
1571
0x0623
Loop.7.PID.IntegralTime3
1590
0x0636
Loop.7.Diag.SchedMR
1570
0x0622
Loop.7.PID.LoopBreakTime
1576
0x0628
Loop.7.Diag.SchedOPHi
1573
0x0625
Loop.7.PID.LoopBreakTime2
1585
0x0631
Loop.7.Diag.SchedOPLo
1574
0x0626
Loop.7.PID.LoopBreakTime3
1595
0x063b
Loop.7.Diag.SchedPB
1565
0x061d
Loop.7.PID.ManualReset
1575
0x0627
Loop.7.Diag.SchedR2G
1572
0x0624
Loop.7.PID.ManualReset2
1584
0x0630
Loop.7.Diag.SchedTd
1567
0x061f
Loop.7.PID.ManualReset3
1594
0x063a
Loop.7.Diag.SchedTi
1566
0x061e
Loop.7.PID.NumSets
1600
0x0640
Loop.7.Diag.TargetOutVal
1651
0x0673
Loop.7.PID.OutputHi
1577
0x0629
Loop.7.Main.ActiveOut
1540
0x0604
Loop.7.PID.OutputHi2
1587
0x0633
Loop.7.Main.AutoMan
1546
0x060a
Loop.7.PID.OutputHi3
1597
0x063d
Loop.7.Main.Inhibit
1556
0x0614
Loop.7.PID.OutputLo
1578
0x062a
Loop.7.Main.PV
1537
0x0601
Loop.7.PID.OutputLo2
1588
0x0634
Loop.7.Main.TargetSP
1538
0x0602
Loop.7.PID.OutputLo3
1598
0x063e
Loop.7.Main.WorkingSP
1541
0x0605
Loop.7.PID.ProportionalBand
1542
0x0606
Loop.7.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
1620
0x0654
Loop.7.PID.ProportionalBand2
1579
0x062b
Loop.7.OP.Ch1Out
1618
0x0652
Loop.7.PID.ProportionalBand3
1589
0x0635
Loop.7.OP.Ch2Deadband
1552
0x0610
Loop.7.PID.RelCh2Gain
1555
0x0613
Loop.7.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
1621
0x0655
Loop.7.PID.RelCh2Gain2
1586
0x0632
Loop.7.OP.Ch2Out
1619
0x0653
Loop.7.PID.RelCh2Gain3
1596
0x063c
Loop.7.OP.CoolType
1629
0x065d
Loop.7.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
1601
0x0641
Loop.7.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
1627
0x065b
Loop.7.PID.SchedulerType
1599
0x063f
Loop.7.OP.FeedForwardGain
1631
0x065f
Loop.7.Setup.CH1ControlType
1558
0x0616
Loop.7.OP.FeedForwardOffset
1632
0x0660
Loop.7.Setup.CH2ControlType
1559
0x0617
Loop.7.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
1633
0x0661
Loop.7.Setup.ControlAction
1543
0x0607
Loop.7.OP.FeedForwardType
1630
0x065e
Loop.7.Setup.DerivativeType
1561
0x0619
Loop.7.OP.FeedForwardVal
1634
0x0662
Loop.7.Setup.LoopType
1557
0x0615
Loop.7.OP.FF_Rem
1639
0x0667
Loop.7.Setup.PBUnits
1560
0x0618
Loop.7.OP.ManualMode
1626
0x065a
Loop.7.SP.AltSP
1604
0x0644
Loop.7.OP.ManualOutVal
1539
0x0603
Loop.7.SP.AltSPSelect
1605
0x0645
Loop.7.OP.MeasuredPower
1628
0x065c
Loop.7.SP.ManualTrack
1611
0x064b
Loop.7.OP.OutputHighLimit
1616
0x0650
Loop.7.SP.RangeHigh
1548
0x060c
Loop.7.OP.OutputLowLimit
1617
0x0651
Loop.7.SP.RangeLow
1547
0x060b
Page 282
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.7.SP.Rate
1606
0x0646
Loop.8.OP.FeedForwardType
1886
0x075e
Loop.7.SP.RateDisable
1607
0x0647
Loop.8.OP.FeedForwardVal
1890
0x0762
Loop.7.SP.RateDone
1615
0x064f
Loop.8.OP.FF_Rem
1895
0x0767
Loop.7.SP.SP1
1549
0x060d
Loop.8.OP.ManualMode
1882
0x075a
Loop.7.SP.SP2
1550
0x060e
Loop.8.OP.ManualOutVal
1795
0x0703
Loop.7.SP.SPHighLimit
1602
0x0642
Loop.8.OP.MeasuredPower
1884
0x075c
Loop.7.SP.SPLowLimit
1603
0x0643
Loop.8.OP.OutputHighLimit
1872
0x0750
Loop.7.SP.SPSelect
1551
0x060f
Loop.8.OP.OutputLowLimit
1873
0x0751
Loop.7.SP.SPTrack
1612
0x064c
Loop.8.OP.Rate
1878
0x0756
Loop.7.SP.SPTrim
1608
0x0648
Loop.8.OP.RateDisable
1879
0x0757
Loop.7.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
1609
0x0649
Loop.8.OP.RemOPH
1894
0x0766
0x0765
Loop.7.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
1610
0x064a
Loop.8.OP.RemOPL
1893
Loop.7.SP.TrackPV
1613
0x064d
Loop.8.OP.SafeOutVal
1881
0x0759
Loop.7.SP.TrackSP
1614
0x064e
Loop.8.OP.SBrkOP
1915
0x077B
Loop.7.Tune.AutotuneEnable
1644
0x066c
Loop.8.OP.SensorBreakMode
1880
0x0758
Loop.7.Tune.OutputHighLimit
1641
0x0669
Loop.8.OP.TrackEnable
1892
0x0764
Loop.7.Tune.OutputLowLimit
1642
0x066a
Loop.8.OP.TrackOutVal
1891
0x0763
Loop.7.Tune.Stage
1647
0x066f
Loop.8.PID.ActiveSet
1820
0x071c
Loop.7.Tune.StageTime
1648
0x0670
Loop.8.PID.Boundary1-2
1818
0x071a
Loop.7.Tune.State
1646
0x066e
Loop.8.PID.Boundary2-3
1819
0x071b
Loop.7.Tune.StepSize
1645
0x066d
Loop.8.PID.CutbackHigh
1810
0x0712
Loop.7.Tune.Type
1640
0x0668
Loop.8.PID.CutbackHigh2
1838
0x072e
Loop.8.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
1911
0x0777
Loop.8.PID.CutbackHigh3
1848
0x0738
Loop.8.Diag.Error
1905
0x0771
Loop.8.PID.CutbackLow
1809
0x0711
Loop.8.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
1910
0x0776
Loop.8.PID.CutbackLow2
1839
0x072f
Loop.8.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
1908
0x0774
Loop.8.PID.CutbackLow3
1849
0x0739
Loop.8.Diag.LoopMode
1906
0x0772
Loop.8.PID.DerivativeTime
1801
0x0709
Loop.8.Diag.PropOutContrib
1909
0x0775
Loop.8.PID.DerivativeTime2
1837
0x072d
Loop.8.Diag.SBrk
1912
0x0778
Loop.8.PID.DerivativeTime3
1847
0x0737
Loop.8.Diag.SchedCBH
1824
0x0720
Loop.8.PID.IntegralTime
1800
0x0708
Loop.8.Diag.SchedCBL
1825
0x0721
Loop.8.PID.IntegralTime2
1836
0x072c
Loop.8.Diag.SchedLPBrk
1827
0x0723
Loop.8.PID.IntegralTime3
1846
0x0736
Loop.8.Diag.SchedMR
1826
0x0722
Loop.8.PID.LoopBreakTime
1832
0x0728
Loop.8.Diag.SchedOPHi
1829
0x0725
Loop.8.PID.LoopBreakTime2
1841
0x0731
Loop.8.Diag.SchedOPLo
1830
0x0726
Loop.8.PID.LoopBreakTime3
1851
0x073b
Loop.8.Diag.SchedPB
1821
0x071d
Loop.8.PID.ManualReset
1831
0x0727
Loop.8.Diag.SchedR2G
1828
0x0724
Loop.8.PID.ManualReset2
1840
0x0730
Loop.8.Diag.SchedTd
1823
0x071f
Loop.8.PID.ManualReset3
1850
0x073a
Loop.8.Diag.SchedTi
1822
0x071e
Loop.8.PID.NumSets
1856
0x0740
Loop.8.Diag.TargetOutVal
1907
0x0773
Loop.8.PID.OutputHi
1833
0x0729
Loop.8.Main.ActiveOut
1796
0x0704
Loop.8.PID.OutputHi2
1843
0x0733
Loop.8.Main.AutoMan
1802
0x070a
Loop.8.PID.OutputHi3
1853
0x073d
Loop.8.Main.Inhibit
1812
0x0714
Loop.8.PID.OutputLo
1834
0x072a
Loop.8.Main.PV
1793
0x0701
Loop.8.PID.OutputLo2
1844
0x0734
Loop.8.Main.TargetSP
1794
0x0702
Loop.8.PID.OutputLo3
1854
0x073e
Loop.8.Main.WorkingSP
1797
0x0705
Loop.8.PID.ProportionalBand
1798
0x0706
Loop.8.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
1876
0x0754
Loop.8.PID.ProportionalBand2
1835
0x072b
Loop.8.OP.Ch1Out
1874
0x0752
Loop.8.PID.ProportionalBand3
1845
0x0735
Loop.8.OP.Ch2Deadband
1808
0x0710
Loop.8.PID.RelCh2Gain
1811
0x0713
Loop.8.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
1877
0x0755
Loop.8.PID.RelCh2Gain2
1842
0x0732
Loop.8.OP.Ch2Out
1875
0x0753
Loop.8.PID.RelCh2Gain3
1852
0x073c
Loop.8.OP.CoolType
1885
0x075d
Loop.8.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
1857
0x0741
Loop.8.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
1883
0x075b
Loop.8.PID.SchedulerType
1855
0x073f
Loop.8.OP.FeedForwardGain
1887
0x075f
Loop.8.Setup.CH1ControlType
1814
0x0716
Loop.8.OP.FeedForwardOffset
1888
0x0760
Loop.8.Setup.CH2ControlType
1815
0x0717
Loop.8.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
1889
0x0761
Loop.8.Setup.ControlAction
1799
0x0707
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 283
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.8.Setup.DerivativeType
1817
0x0719
Loop.9.OP.Ch2Deadband
2064
0x0810
Loop.8.Setup.LoopType
1813
0x0715
Loop.9.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
2133
0x0855
Loop.8.Setup.PBUnits
1816
0x0718
Loop.9.OP.Ch2Out
2131
0x0853
Loop.8.SP.AltSP
1860
0x0744
Loop.9.OP.CoolType
2141
0x085D
Loop.8.SP.AltSPSelect
1861
0x0745
Loop.9.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
2139
0x085B
Loop.8.SP.ManualTrack
1867
0x074b
Loop.9.OP.FeedForwardGain
2143
0x085F
Loop.8.SP.RangeHigh
1804
0x070c
Loop.9.OP.FeedForwardOffset
2144
0x0860
Loop.8.SP.RangeLow
1803
0x070b
Loop.9.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
2145
0x0861
Loop.8.SP.Rate
1862
0x0746
Loop.9.OP.FeedForwardType
2142
0x085E
Loop.8.SP.RateDisable
1863
0x0747
Loop.9.OP.FeedForwardVal
2146
0x0862
Loop.8.SP.RateDone
1871
0x074f
Loop.9.OP.FF_Rem
2151
0x0867
Loop.8.SP.SP1
1805
0x070d
Loop.9.OP.ManualMode
2138
0x085A
Loop.8.SP.SP2
1806
0x070e
Loop.9.OP.ManualOutVal
2051
0x0803
Loop.8.SP.SPHighLimit
1858
0x0742
Loop.9.OP.MeasuredPower
2140
0x085C
Loop.8.SP.SPLowLimit
1859
0x0743
Loop.9.OP.OutputHighLimit
2128
0x0850
Loop.8.SP.SPSelect
1807
0x070f
Loop.9.OP.OutputLowLimit
2129
0x0851
Loop.8.SP.SPTrack
1868
0x074c
Loop.9.OP.Rate
2134
0x0856
Loop.8.SP.SPTrim
1864
0x0748
Loop.9.OP.RateDisable
2135
0x0857
Loop.8.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
1865
0x0749
Loop.9.OP.RemOPH
2150
0x0866
Loop.8.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
1866
0x074a
Loop.9.OP.RemOPL
2149
0x0865
Loop.8.SP.TrackPV
1869
0x074d
Loop.9.OP.SafeOutVal
2137
0x0859
Loop.8.SP.TrackSP
1870
0x074e
Loop.9.OP.SBrkOP
2171
0x087B
Loop.8.Tune.AutotuneEnable
1900
0x076c
Loop.9.OP.SensorBreakMode
2136
0x0858
Loop.8.Tune.OutputHighLimit
1897
0x0769
Loop.9.OP.TrackEnable
2148
0x0864
Loop.8.Tune.OutputLowLimit
1898
0x076a
Loop.9.OP.TrackOutVal
2147
0x0863
Loop.8.Tune.Stage
1903
0x076f
Loop.9.PID.ActiveSet
2076
0x081C
Loop.8.Tune.StageTime
1904
0x0770
Loop.9.PID.Boundary1-2
2074
0x081A
Loop.8.Tune.State
1902
0x076e
Loop.9.PID.Boundary2-3
2075
0x081B
Loop.8.Tune.StepSize
1901
0x076d
Loop.9.PID.CutbackHigh
2066
0x0812
Loop.8.Tune.Type
1896
0x0768
Loop.9.PID.CutbackHigh2
2094
0x082E
Loop.9.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
2167
0x0877
Loop.9.PID.CutbackHigh3
2104
0x0838
Loop.9.Diag.Error
2161
0x0871
Loop.9.PID.CutbackLow
2065
0x0811
Loop.9.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
2166
0x0876
Loop.9.PID.CutbackLow2
2095
0x082F
Loop.9.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
2164
0x0874
Loop.9.PID.CutbackLow3
2105
0x0839
Loop.9.Diag.LoopMode
2162
0x0872
Loop.9.PID.DerivativeTime
2057
0x0809
Loop.9.Diag.PropOutContrib
2165
0x0875
Loop.9.PID.DerivativeTime2
2093
0x082D
Loop.9.Diag.SBrk
2168
0x0878
Loop.9.PID.DerivativeTime3
2103
0x0837
Loop.9.Diag.SchedCBH
2080
0x0820
Loop.9.PID.IntegralTime
2056
0x0808
Loop.9.Diag.SchedCBL
2081
0x0821
Loop.9.PID.IntegralTime2
2092
0x082C
Loop.9.Diag.SchedLPBrk
2083
0x0823
Loop.9.PID.IntegralTime3
2102
0x0836
Loop.9.Diag.SchedMR
2082
0x0822
Loop.9.PID.LoopBreakTime
2088
0x0828
Loop.9.Diag.SchedOPHi
2085
0x0825
Loop.9.PID.LoopBreakTime2
2097
0x0831
Loop.9.Diag.SchedOPLo
2086
0x0826
Loop.9.PID.LoopBreakTime3
2107
0x083B
Loop.9.Diag.SchedPB
2077
0x081D
Loop.9.PID.ManualReset
2087
0x0827
Loop.9.Diag.SchedR2G
2084
0x0824
Loop.9.PID.ManualReset2
2096
0x0830
Loop.9.Diag.SchedTd
2079
0x081F
Loop.9.PID.ManualReset3
2106
0x083A
Loop.9.Diag.SchedTi
2078
0x081E
Loop.9.PID.NumSets
2112
0x0840
Loop.9.Diag.TargetOutVal
2163
0x0873
Loop.9.PID.OutputHi
2089
0x0829
Loop.9.Main.ActiveOut
2052
0x0804
Loop.9.PID.OutputHi2
2099
0x0833
Loop.9.Main.AutoMan
2058
0x080A
Loop.9.PID.OutputHi3
2109
0x083D
Loop.9.Main.Inhibit
2068
0x0814
Loop.9.PID.OutputLo
2090
0x082A
Loop.9.Main.PV
2049
0x0801
Loop.9.PID.OutputLo2
2100
0x0834
Loop.9.Main.TargetSP
2050
0x0802
Loop.9.PID.OutputLo3
2110
0x083E
Loop.9.Main.WorkingSP
2053
0x0805
Loop.9.PID.ProportionalBand
2054
0x0806
Loop.9.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
2132
0x0854
Loop.9.PID.ProportionalBand2
2091
0x082B
Loop.9.OP.Ch1Out
2130
0x0852
Loop.9.PID.ProportionalBand3
2101
0x0835
Page 284
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.9.PID.RelCh2Gain
2067
0x0813
Loop.10.Main.ActiveOut
2308
0x0904
Loop.9.PID.RelCh2Gain2
2098
0x0832
Loop.10.Main.AutoMan
2314
0x090A
Loop.9.PID.RelCh2Gain3
2108
0x083C
Loop.10.Main.Inhibit
2324
0x0914
Loop.9.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
2113
0x0841
Loop.10.Main.PV
2305
0x0901
Loop.9.PID.SchedulerType
2111
0x083F
Loop.10.Main.TargetSP
2306
0x0902
Loop.9.Setup.CH1ControlType
2070
0x0816
Loop.10.Main.WorkingSP
2309
0x0905
Loop.9.Setup.CH2ControlType
2071
0x0817
Loop.10.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
2388
0x0954
Loop.9.Setup.ControlAction
2055
0x0807
Loop.10.OP.Ch1Out
2386
0x0952
Loop.9.Setup.DerivativeType
2073
0x0819
Loop.10.OP.Ch2Deadband
2320
0x0910
Loop.9.Setup.LoopType
2069
0x0815
Loop.10.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
2389
0x0955
Loop.9.Setup.PBUnits
2072
0x0818
Loop.10.OP.Ch2Out
2387
0x0953
Loop.9.SP.AltSP
2116
0x0844
Loop.10.OP.CoolType
2397
0x095D
Loop.9.SP.AltSPSelect
2117
0x0845
Loop.10.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
2395
0x095B
Loop.9.SP.ManualTrack
2123
0x084B
Loop.10.OP.FeedForwardGain
2399
0x095F
Loop.9.SP.RangeHigh
2060
0x080C
Loop.10.OP.FeedForwardOffset
2400
0x0960
Loop.9.SP.RangeLow
2059
0x080B
Loop.10.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
2401
0x0961
Loop.9.SP.Rate
2118
0x0846
Loop.10.OP.FeedForwardType
2398
0x095E
Loop.9.SP.RateDisable
2119
0x0847
Loop.10.OP.FeedForwardVal
2402
0x0962
Loop.9.SP.RateDone
2127
0x084F
Loop.10.OP.FF_Rem
2407
0x0967
Loop.9.SP.SP1
2061
0x080D
Loop.10.OP.ManualMode
2394
0x095A
Loop.9.SP.SP2
2062
0x080E
Loop.10.OP.ManualOutVal
2307
0x0903
0x095C
Loop.9.SP.SPHighLimit
2114
0x0842
Loop.10.OP.MeasuredPower
2396
Loop.9.SP.SPLowLimit
2115
0x0843
Loop.10.OP.OutputHighLimit
2384
0x0950
Loop.9.SP.SPSelect
2063
0x080F
Loop.10.OP.OutputLowLimit
2385
0x0951
Loop.9.SP.SPTrack
2124
0x084C
Loop.10.OP.Rate
2390
0x0956
Loop.9.SP.SPTrim
2120
0x0848
Loop.10.OP.RateDisable
2391
0x0957
Loop.9.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
2121
0x0849
Loop.10.OP.RemOPH
2406
0x0966
Loop.9.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
2122
0x084A
Loop.10.OP.RemOPL
2405
0x0965
Loop.9.SP.TrackPV
2125
0x084D
Loop.10.OP.SafeOutVal
2393
0x0959
Loop.9.SP.TrackSP
2126
0x084E
Loop.10.OP.SBrkOP
2427
0x097B
Loop.9.Tune.AutotuneEnable
2156
0x086C
Loop.10.OP.SensorBreakMode
2392
0x0958
Loop.9.Tune.OutputHighLimit
2153
0x0869
Loop.10.OP.TrackEnable
2404
0x0964
Loop.9.Tune.OutputLowLimit
2154
0x086A
Loop.10.OP.TrackOutVal
2403
0x0963
Loop.9.Tune.Stage
2159
0x086F
Loop.10.PID.ActiveSet
2332
0x091C
Loop.9.Tune.StageTime
2160
0x0870
Loop.10.PID.Boundary1-2
2330
0x091A
Loop.9.Tune.State
2158
0x086E
Loop.10.PID.Boundary2-3
2331
0x091B
Loop.9.Tune.StepSize
2157
0x086D
Loop.10.PID.CutbackHigh
2322
0x0912
Loop.9.Tune.Type
2152
0x0868
Loop.10.PID.CutbackHigh2
2350
0x092E
Loop.10.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
2423
0x0977
Loop.10.PID.CutbackHigh3
2360
0x0938
Loop.10.Diag.Error
2417
0x0971
Loop.10.PID.CutbackLow
2321
0x0911
Loop.10.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
2422
0x0976
Loop.10.PID.CutbackLow2
2351
0x092F
Loop.10.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
2420
0x0974
Loop.10.PID.CutbackLow3
2361
0x0939
Loop.10.Diag.LoopMode
2418
0x0972
Loop.10.PID.DerivativeTime
2313
0x0909
Loop.10.Diag.PropOutContrib
2421
0x0975
Loop.10.PID.DerivativeTime2
2349
0x092D
Loop.10.Diag.SBrk
2424
0x0978
Loop.10.PID.DerivativeTime3
2359
0x0937
Loop.10.Diag.SchedCBH
2336
0x0920
Loop.10.PID.IntegralTime
2312
0x0908
Loop.10.Diag.SchedCBL
2337
0x0921
Loop.10.PID.IntegralTime2
2348
0x092C
Loop.10.Diag.SchedLPBrk
2339
0x0923
Loop.10.PID.IntegralTime3
2358
0x0936
Loop.10.Diag.SchedMR
2338
0x0922
Loop.10.PID.LoopBreakTime
2344
0x0928
Loop.10.Diag.SchedOPHi
2341
0x0925
Loop.10.PID.LoopBreakTime2
2353
0x0931
Loop.10.Diag.SchedOPLo
2342
0x0926
Loop.10.PID.LoopBreakTime3
2363
0x093B
Loop.10.Diag.SchedPB
2333
0x091D
Loop.10.PID.ManualReset
2343
0x0927
Loop.10.Diag.SchedR2G
2340
0x0924
Loop.10.PID.ManualReset2
2352
0x0930
Loop.10.Diag.SchedTd
2335
0x091F
Loop.10.PID.ManualReset3
2362
0x093A
Loop.10.Diag.SchedTi
2334
0x091E
Loop.10.PID.NumSets
2368
0x0940
Loop.10.Diag.TargetOutVal
2419
0x0973
Loop.10.PID.OutputHi
2345
0x0929
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 285
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.10.PID.OutputHi2
2355
0x0933
Loop.11.Diag.SchedMR
2594
0x0A22
Loop.10.PID.OutputHi3
2365
0x093D
Loop.11.Diag.SchedOPHi
2597
0x0A25
Loop.10.PID.OutputLo
2346
0x092A
Loop.11.Diag.SchedOPLo
2598
0x0A26
Loop.10.PID.OutputLo2
2356
0x0934
Loop.11.Diag.SchedPB
2589
0x0A1D
Loop.10.PID.OutputLo3
2366
0x093E
Loop.11.Diag.SchedR2G
2596
0x0A24
Loop.10.PID.ProportionalBand
2310
0x0906
Loop.11.Diag.SchedTd
2591
0x0A1F
Loop.10.PID.ProportionalBand2
2347
0x092B
Loop.11.Diag.SchedTi
2590
0x0A1E
Loop.10.PID.ProportionalBand3
2357
0x0935
Loop.11.Diag.TargetOutVal
2675
0x0A73
Loop.10.PID.RelCh2Gain
2323
0x0913
Loop.11.Main.ActiveOut
2564
0x0A04
Loop.10.PID.RelCh2Gain2
2354
0x0932
Loop.11.Main.AutoMan
2570
0x0A0A
Loop.10.PID.RelCh2Gain3
2364
0x093C
Loop.11.Main.Inhibit
2580
0x0A14
Loop.10.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
2369
0x0941
Loop.11.Main.PV
2561
0x0A01
Loop.10.PID.SchedulerType
2367
0x093F
Loop.11.Main.TargetSP
2562
0x0A02
Loop.10.Setup.CH1ControlType
2326
0x0916
Loop.11.Main.WorkingSP
2565
0x0A05
Loop.10.Setup.CH2ControlType
2327
0x0917
Loop.11.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
2644
0x0A54
Loop.10.Setup.ControlAction
2311
0x0907
Loop.11.OP.Ch1Out
2642
0x0A52
Loop.10.Setup.DerivativeType
2329
0x0919
Loop.11.OP.Ch2Deadband
2576
0x0A10
Loop.10.Setup.LoopType
2325
0x0915
Loop.11.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
2645
0x0A55
Loop.10.Setup.PBUnits
2328
0x0918
Loop.11.OP.Ch2Out
2643
0x0A53
Loop.10.SP.AltSP
2372
0x0944
Loop.11.OP.CoolType
2653
0x0A5D
Loop.10.SP.AltSPSelect
2373
0x0945
Loop.11.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
2651
0x0A5B
Loop.10.SP.ManualTrack
2379
0x094B
Loop.11.OP.FeedForwardGain
2655
0x0A5F
Loop.10.SP.RangeHigh
2316
0x090C
Loop.11.OP.FeedForwardOffset
2656
0x0A60
Loop.10.SP.RangeLow
2315
0x090B
Loop.11.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
2657
0x0A61
Loop.10.SP.Rate
2374
0x0946
Loop.11.OP.FeedForwardType
2654
0x0A5E
Loop.10.SP.RateDisable
2375
0x0947
Loop.11.OP.FeedForwardVal
2658
0x0A62
Loop.10.SP.RateDone
2383
0x094F
Loop.11.OP.FF_Rem
2663
0x0A67
Loop.10.SP.SP1
2317
0x090D
Loop.11.OP.ManualMode
2650
0x0A5A
Loop.10.SP.SP2
2318
0x090E
Loop.11.OP.ManualOutVal
2563
0x0A03
Loop.10.SP.SPHighLimit
2370
0x0942
Loop.11.OP.MeasuredPower
2652
0x0A5C
Loop.10.SP.SPLowLimit
2371
0x0943
Loop.11.OP.OutputHighLimit
2640
0x0A50
Loop.10.SP.SPSelect
2319
0x090F
Loop.11.OP.OutputLowLimit
2641
0x0A51
Loop.10.SP.SPTrack
2380
0x094C
Loop.11.OP.Rate
2646
0x0A56
Loop.10.SP.SPTrim
2376
0x0948
Loop.11.OP.RateDisable
2647
0x0A57
Loop.10.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
2377
0x0949
Loop.11.OP.RemOPH
2662
0x0A66
Loop.10.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
2378
0x094A
Loop.11.OP.RemOPL
2661
0x0A65
Loop.10.SP.TrackPV
2381
0x094D
Loop.11.OP.SafeOutVal
2649
0x0A59
Loop.10.SP.TrackSP
2382
0x094E
Loop.11.OP.SBrkOP
2683
0x0A7B
Loop.10.Tune.AutotuneEnable
2412
0x096C
Loop.11.OP.SensorBreakMode
2648
0x0A58
Loop.10.Tune.OutputHighLimit
2409
0x0969
Loop.11.OP.TrackEnable
2660
0x0A64
Loop.10.Tune.OutputLowLimit
2410
0x096A
Loop.11.OP.TrackOutVal
2659
0x0A63
Loop.10.Tune.Stage
2415
0x96F
Loop.11.PID.ActiveSet
2588
0x0A1C
Loop.10.Tune.StageTime
2416
0x0970
Loop.11.PID.Boundary1-2
2586
0x0A1A
Loop.10.Tune.State
2414
0x096E
Loop.11.PID.Boundary2-3
2587
0x0A1B
Loop.10.Tune.StepSize
2413
0x096D
Loop.11.PID.CutbackHigh
2578
0x0A12
Loop.10.Tune.Type
2408
0x0968
Loop.11.PID.CutbackHigh2
2606
0x0A2E
Loop.11.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
2679
0x0A77
Loop.11.PID.CutbackHigh3
2616
0x0A38
Loop.11.Diag.Error
2673
0x0A71
Loop.11.PID.CutbackLow
2577
0x0A11
Loop.11.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
2678
0x0A76
Loop.11.PID.CutbackLow2
2607
0x0A2F
Loop.11.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
2676
0x0A74
Loop.11.PID.CutbackLow3
2617
0x0A39
Loop.11.Diag.LoopMode
2674
0x0A72
Loop.11.PID.DerivativeTime
2569
0x0A09
Loop.11.Diag.PropOutContrib
2677
0x0A75
Loop.11.PID.DerivativeTime2
2605
0x0A2D
Loop.11.Diag.SBrk
2680
0x0A78
Loop.11.PID.DerivativeTime3
2615
0x0A37
Loop.11.Diag.SchedCBH
2592
0x0A20
Loop.11.PID.IntegralTime
2568
0x0A08
Loop.11.Diag.SchedCBL
2593
0x0A21
Loop.11.PID.IntegralTime2
2604
0x0A2C
Loop.11.Diag.SchedLPBrk
2595
0x0A23
Loop.11.PID.IntegralTime3
2614
0x0A36
Page 286
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.11.PID.LoopBreakTime
2600
0x0A28
Loop.12.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
2934
0x0B76
Loop.11.PID.LoopBreakTime2
2609
0x0A31
Loop.12.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
2932
0x0B74
Loop.11.PID.LoopBreakTime3
2619
0x0A3B
Loop.12.Diag.LoopMode
2930
0x0B72
Loop.11.PID.ManualReset
2599
0x0A27
Loop.12.Diag.PropOutContrib
2933
0x0B75
Loop.11.PID.ManualReset2
2608
0x0A30
Loop.12.Diag.SBrk
2936
0x0B78
Loop.11.PID.ManualReset3
2618
0x0A3A
Loop.12.Diag.SchedCBH
2848
0x0B20
Loop.11.PID.NumSets
2624
0x0A40
Loop.12.Diag.SchedCBL
2849
0x0B21
Loop.11.PID.OutputHi
2601
0x0A29
Loop.12.Diag.SchedLPBrk
2851
0x0B23
Loop.11.PID.OutputHi2
2611
0x0A33
Loop.12.Diag.SchedMR
2850
0x0B22
Loop.11.PID.OutputHi3
2621
0x0A3D
Loop.12.Diag.SchedOPHi
2853
0x0B25
Loop.11.PID.OutputLo
2602
0x0A2A
Loop.12.Diag.SchedOPLo
2854
0x0B26
Loop.11.PID.OutputLo2
2612
0x0A34
Loop.12.Diag.SchedPB
2845
0x0B1D
Loop.11.PID.OutputLo3
2622
0x0A3E
Loop.12.Diag.SchedR2G
2852
0x0B24
Loop.11.PID.ProportionalBand
2566
0x0A06
Loop.12.Diag.SchedTd
2847
0x0B1F
Loop.11.PID.ProportionalBand2
2603
0x0A2B
Loop.12.Diag.SchedTi
2846
0x0B1E
Loop.11.PID.ProportionalBand3
2613
0x0A35
Loop.12.Diag.TargetOutVal
2931
0x0B73
Loop.11.PID.RelCh2Gain
2579
0x0A13
Loop.12.Main.ActiveOut
2820
0x0B04
Loop.11.PID.RelCh2Gain2
2610
0x0A32
Loop.12.Main.AutoMan
2826
0x0B0A
Loop.11.PID.RelCh2Gain3
2620
0x0A3C
Loop.12.Main.Inhibit
2836
0x0B14
Loop.11.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
2625
0x0A41
Loop.12.Main.PV
2817
0x0B01
Loop.11.PID.SchedulerType
2623
0x0A3F
Loop.12.Main.TargetSP
2818
0x0B02
Loop.11.Setup.CH1ControlType
2582
0x0A16
Loop.12.Main.WorkingSP
2821
0x0B05
Loop.11.Setup.CH2ControlType
2583
0x0A17
Loop.12.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
2900
0x0B54
Loop.11.Setup.ControlAction
2567
0x0A07
Loop.12.OP.Ch1Out
2898
0x0B52
Loop.11.Setup.DerivativeType
2585
0x0A19
Loop.12.OP.Ch2Deadband
2832
0x0B10
Loop.11.Setup.LoopType
2581
0x0A15
Loop.12.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
2901
0x0B55
Loop.11.Setup.PBUnits
2584
0x0A18
Loop.12.OP.Ch2Out
2899
0x0B53
Loop.11.SP.AltSP
2628
0x0A44
Loop.12.OP.CoolType
2909
0x0B5D
Loop.11.SP.AltSPSelect
2629
0x0A45
Loop.12.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
2907
0x0B5B
Loop.11.SP.ManualTrack
2635
0x0A4B
Loop.12.OP.FeedForwardGain
2911
0x0B5F
Loop.11.SP.RangeHigh
2572
0x0A0C
Loop.12.OP.FeedForwardOffset
2912
0x0B60
Loop.11.SP.RangeLow
2571
0x0A0B
Loop.12.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
2913
0x0B61
Loop.11.SP.Rate
2630
0x0A46
Loop.12.OP.FeedForwardType
2910
0x0B5E
Loop.11.SP.RateDisable
2631
0x0A47
Loop.12.OP.FeedForwardVal
2914
0x0B62
Loop.11.SP.RateDone
2639
0x0A4F
Loop.12.OP.FF_Rem
2919
0x0B67
Loop.11.SP.SP1
2573
0x0A0D
Loop.12.OP.ManualMode
2906
0x0B5A
Loop.11.SP.SP2
2574
0x0A0E
Loop.12.OP.ManualOutVal
2819
0x0B03
Loop.11.SP.SPHighLimit
2626
0x0A42
Loop.12.OP.MeasuredPower
2908
0x0B5C
Loop.11.SP.SPLowLimit
2627
0x0A43
Loop.12.OP.OutputHighLimit
2896
0x0B50
Loop.11.SP.SPSelect
2575
0x0A0F
Loop.12.OP.OutputLowLimit
2897
0x0B51
Loop.11.SP.SPTrack
2636
0x0A4C
Loop.12.OP.Rate
2902
0x0B56
Loop.11.SP.SPTrim
2632
0x0A48
Loop.12.OP.RateDisable
2903
0x0B57
Loop.11.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
2633
0x0A49
Loop.12.OP.RemOPH
2918
0x0B66
Loop.11.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
2634
0x0A4A
Loop.12.OP.RemOPL
2917
0x0B65
Loop.11.SP.TrackPV
2637
0x0A4D
Loop.12.OP.SafeOutVal
2905
0x0B59
Loop.11.SP.TrackSP
2638
0x0A4E
Loop.12.OP.SBrkOP
2939
0x0B7B
Loop.11.Tune.AutotuneEnable
2668
0x0A6C
Loop.12.OP.SensorBreakMode
2904
0x0B58
Loop.11.Tune.OutputHighLimit
2665
0x0A69
Loop.12.OP.TrackEnable
2916
0x0B64
Loop.11.Tune.OutputLowLimit
2666
0x0A6A
Loop.12.OP.TrackOutVal
2915
0x0B63
Loop.11.Tune.Stage
2671
0x0A6F
Loop.12.PID.ActiveSet
2844
0x0B1C
Loop.11.Tune.StageTime
2672
0x0A70
Loop.12.PID.Boundary1-2
2842
0x0B1A
Loop.11.Tune.State
2670
0x0A6E
Loop.12.PID.Boundary2-3
2843
0x0B1B
Loop.11.Tune.StepSize
2669
0x0A6D
Loop.12.PID.CutbackHigh
2834
0x0B12
Loop.11.Tune.Type
2664
0x0A68
Loop.12.PID.CutbackHigh2
2862
0x0B2E
Loop.12.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
2935
0x0B77
Loop.12.PID.CutbackHigh3
2872
0x0B38
Loop.12.Diag.Error
2929
0x0B71
Loop.12.PID.CutbackLow
2833
0x0B11
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 287
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.12.PID.CutbackLow2
2863
0x0B2F
Loop.12.Tune.OutputLowLimit
2922
0x0B6A
Loop.12.PID.CutbackLow3
2873
0x0B39
Loop.12.Tune.Stage
2927
0x0B6F
Loop.12.PID.DerivativeTime
2825
0x0B09
Loop.12.Tune.StageTime
2928
0x0B70
Loop.12.PID.DerivativeTime2
2861
0x0B2D
Loop.12.Tune.State
2926
0x0B6E
Loop.12.PID.DerivativeTime3
2871
0x0B37
Loop.12.Tune.StepSize
2925
0x0B6D
Loop.12.PID.IntegralTime
2824
0x0B08
Loop.12.Tune.Type
2920
0x0B68
Loop.12.PID.IntegralTime2
2860
0x0B2C
Loop.13.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
3191
0x0C77
Loop.12.PID.IntegralTime3
2870
0x0B36
Loop.13.Diag.Error
3185
0x0C71
Loop.12.PID.LoopBreakTime
2856
0x0B28
Loop.13.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
3190
0x0C76
Loop.12.PID.LoopBreakTime2
2865
0x0B31
Loop.13.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
3188
0x0C74
Loop.12.PID.LoopBreakTime3
2875
0x0B3B
Loop.13.Diag.LoopMode
3186
0x0C72
Loop.12.PID.ManualReset
2855
0x0B27
Loop.13.Diag.PropOutContrib
3189
0x0C75
Loop.12.PID.ManualReset2
2864
0x0B30
Loop.13.Diag.SBrk
3192
0x0C78
Loop.12.PID.ManualReset3
2874
0x0B3A
Loop.13.Diag.SchedCBH
3104
0x0C20
Loop.12.PID.NumSets
2880
0x0B40
Loop.13.Diag.SchedCBL
3105
0x0C21
Loop.12.PID.OutputHi
2857
0x0B29
Loop.13.Diag.SchedLPBrk
3107
0x0C23
Loop.12.PID.OutputHi2
2867
0x0B33
Loop.13.Diag.SchedMR
3106
0x0C22
Loop.12.PID.OutputHi3
2877
0x0B3D
Loop.13.Diag.SchedOPHi
3109
0x0C25
Loop.12.PID.OutputLo
2858
0x0B2A
Loop.13.Diag.SchedOPLo
3110
0x0C26
Loop.12.PID.OutputLo2
2868
0x0B34
Loop.13.Diag.SchedPB
3101
0x0C1D
Loop.12.PID.OutputLo3
2878
0x0B3E
Loop.13.Diag.SchedR2G
3108
0x0C24
Loop.12.PID.ProportionalBand
2822
0x0B06
Loop.13.Diag.SchedTd
3103
0x0C1F
Loop.12.PID.ProportionalBand2
2859
0x0B2B
Loop.13.Diag.SchedTi
3102
0x0C1E
Loop.12.PID.ProportionalBand3
2869
0x0B35
Loop.13.Diag.TargetOutVal
3187
0x0C73
Loop.12.PID.RelCh2Gain
2835
0x0B13
Loop.13.Main.ActiveOut
3076
0x0C04
Loop.12.PID.RelCh2Gain2
2866
0x0B32
Loop.13.Main.AutoMan
3082
0x0C0A
Loop.12.PID.RelCh2Gain3
2876
0x0B3C
Loop.13.Main.Inhibit
3092
0x0C14
Loop.12.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
2881
0x0B41
Loop.13.Main.PV
3073
0x0C01
Loop.12.PID.SchedulerType
2879
0x0B3F
Loop.13.Main.TargetSP
3074
0x0C02
Loop.12.Setup.CH1ControlType
2838
0x0B16
Loop.13.Main.WorkingSP
3077
0x0C05
Loop.12.Setup.CH2ControlType
2839
0x0B17
Loop.13.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
3156
0x0C54
0x0C52
Loop.12.Setup.ControlAction
2823
0x0B07
Loop.13.OP.Ch1Out
3154
Loop.12.Setup.DerivativeType
2841
0x0B19
Loop.13.OP.Ch2Deadband
3088
0x0C10
Loop.12.Setup.LoopType
2837
0x0B15
Loop.13.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
3157
0x0C55
Loop.12.Setup.PBUnits
2840
0x0B18
Loop.13.OP.Ch2Out
3155
0x0C53
Loop.12.SP.AltSP
2884
0x0B44
Loop.13.OP.CoolType
3165
0x0C5D
Loop.12.SP.AltSPSelect
2885
0x0B45
Loop.13.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
3163
0x0C5B
Loop.12.SP.ManualTrack
2891
0x0B4B
Loop.13.OP.FeedForwardGain
3167
0x0C5F
Loop.12.SP.RangeHigh
2828
0x0B0C
Loop.13.OP.FeedForwardOffset
3168
0x0C60
Loop.12.SP.RangeLow
2827
0x0B0B
Loop.13.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
3169
0x0C61
Loop.12.SP.Rate
2886
0x0B46
Loop.13.OP.FeedForwardType
3166
0x0C5E
Loop.12.SP.RateDisable
2887
0x0B47
Loop.13.OP.FeedForwardVal
3170
0x0C62
Loop.12.SP.RateDone
2895
0x0B4F
Loop.13.OP.FF_Rem
3175
0x0C67
Loop.12.SP.SP1
2829
0x0B0D
Loop.13.OP.ManualMode
3162
0x0C5A
Loop.12.SP.SP2
2830
0x0B0E
Loop.13.OP.ManualOutVal
3075
0x0C03
Loop.12.SP.SPHighLimit
2882
0x0B42
Loop.13.OP.MeasuredPower
3164
0x0C5C
Loop.12.SP.SPLowLimit
2883
0x0B43
Loop.13.OP.OutputHighLimit
3152
0x0C50
Loop.12.SP.SPSelect
2831
0x0B0F
Loop.13.OP.OutputLowLimit
3153
0x0C51
Loop.12.SP.SPTrack
2892
0x0B4C
Loop.13.OP.Rate
3158
0x0C56
Loop.12.SP.SPTrim
2888
0x0B48
Loop.13.OP.RateDisable
3159
0x0C57
Loop.12.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
2889
0x0B49
Loop.13.OP.RemOPH
3174
0x0C66
Loop.12.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
2890
0x0B4A
Loop.13.OP.RemOPL
3173
0x0C65
Loop.12.SP.TrackPV
2893
0x0B4D
Loop.13.OP.SafeOutVal
3161
0x0C59
Loop.12.SP.TrackSP
2894
0x0B4E
Loop.13.OP.SBrkOP
3195
0x0C7B
Loop.12.Tune.AutotuneEnable
2924
0x0B6C
Loop.13.OP.SensorBreakMode
3160
0x0C58
Loop.12.Tune.OutputHighLimit
2921
0x0B69
Loop.13.OP.TrackEnable
3172
0x0C64
Page 288
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.13.OP.TrackOutVal
3171
0x0C63
Loop.13.SP.SPTrack
3148
0x0C4C
Loop.13.PID.ActiveSet
3100
0x0C1C
Loop.13.SP.SPTrim
3144
0x0C48
Loop.13.PID.Boundary1-2
3098
0x0C1A
Loop.13.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
3145
0x0C49
Loop.13.PID.Boundary2-3
3099
0x0C1B
Loop.13.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
3146
0x0C4A
Loop.13.PID.CutbackHigh
3090
0x0C12
Loop.13.SP.TrackPV
3149
0x0C4D
Loop.13.PID.CutbackHigh2
3118
0x0C2E
Loop.13.SP.TrackSP
3150
0x0C4E
Loop.13.PID.CutbackHigh3
3128
0x0C38
Loop.13.Tune.AutotuneEnable
3180
0x0C6C
Loop.13.PID.CutbackLow
3089
0x0C11
Loop.13.Tune.OutputHighLimit
3177
0x0C69
Loop.13.PID.CutbackLow2
3119
0x0C2F
Loop.13.Tune.OutputLowLimit
3178
0x0C6A
Loop.13.PID.CutbackLow3
3129
0x0C39
Loop.13.Tune.Stage
3183
0x0C6F
Loop.13.PID.DerivativeTime
3081
0x0C09
Loop.13.Tune.StageTime
3184
0x0C70
Loop.13.PID.DerivativeTime2
3117
0x0C2D
Loop.13.Tune.State
3182
0x0C6E
Loop.13.PID.DerivativeTime3
3127
0x0C37
Loop.13.Tune.StepSize
3181
0x0C6D
Loop.13.PID.IntegralTime
3080
0x0C08
Loop.13.Tune.Type
3176
0x0C68
Loop.13.PID.IntegralTime2
3116
0x0C2C
Loop.14.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
3447
0x0D77
Loop.13.PID.IntegralTime3
3126
0x0C36
Loop.14.Diag.Error
3441
0x0D71
Loop.13.PID.LoopBreakTime
3112
0x0C28
Loop.14.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
3446
0x0D76
Loop.13.PID.LoopBreakTime2
3121
0x0C31
Loop.14.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
3444
0x0D74
Loop.13.PID.LoopBreakTime3
3131
0x0C3B
Loop.14.Diag.LoopMode
3442
0x0D72
Loop.13.PID.ManualReset
3111
0x0C27
Loop.14.Diag.PropOutContrib
3445
0x0D75
Loop.13.PID.ManualReset2
3120
0x0C30
Loop.14.Diag.SBrk
3448
0x0D78
Loop.13.PID.ManualReset3
3130
0x0C3A
Loop.14.Diag.SchedCBH
3360
0x0D20
Loop.13.PID.NumSets
3136
0x0C40
Loop.14.Diag.SchedCBL
3361
0x0D21
Loop.13.PID.OutputHi
3113
0x0C29
Loop.14.Diag.SchedLPBrk
3363
0x0D23
Loop.13.PID.OutputHi2
3123
0x0C33
Loop.14.Diag.SchedMR
3362
0x0D22
Loop.13.PID.OutputHi3
3133
0x0C3D
Loop.14.Diag.SchedOPHi
3365
0x0D25
Loop.13.PID.OutputLo
3114
0x0C2A
Loop.14.Diag.SchedOPLo
3366
0x0D26
Loop.13.PID.OutputLo2
3124
0x0C34
Loop.14.Diag.SchedPB
3357
0x0D1D
Loop.13.PID.OutputLo3
3134
0x0C3E
Loop.14.Diag.SchedR2G
3364
0x0D24
Loop.13.PID.ProportionalBand
3078
0x0C06
Loop.14.Diag.SchedTd
3359
0x0D1F
Loop.13.PID.ProportionalBand2
3115
0x0C2B
Loop.14.Diag.SchedTi
3358
0x0D1E
Loop.13.PID.ProportionalBand3
3125
0x0C35
Loop.14.Diag.TargetOutVal
3443
0x0D73
Loop.13.PID.RelCh2Gain
3091
0x0C13
Loop.14.Main.ActiveOut
3332
0x0D04
Loop.13.PID.RelCh2Gain2
3122
0x0C32
Loop.14.Main.AutoMan
3338
0x0D0A
Loop.13.PID.RelCh2Gain3
3132
0x0C3C
Loop.14.Main.Inhibit
3348
0x0D14
Loop.13.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
3137
0x0C41
Loop.14.Main.PV
3329
0x0D01
Loop.13.PID.SchedulerType
3135
0x0C3F
Loop.14.Main.TargetSP
3330
0x0D02
Loop.13.Setup.CH1ControlType
3094
0x0C16
Loop.14.Main.WorkingSP
3333
0x0D05
Loop.13.Setup.CH2ControlType
3095
0x0C17
Loop.14.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
3412
0x0D54
Loop.13.Setup.ControlAction
3079
0x0C07
Loop.14.OP.Ch1Out
3410
0x0D52
Loop.13.Setup.DerivativeType
3097
0x0C19
Loop.14.OP.Ch2Deadband
3344
0x0D10
Loop.13.Setup.LoopType
3093
0x0C15
Loop.14.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
3413
0x0D55
Loop.13.Setup.PBUnits
3096
0x0C18
Loop.14.OP.Ch2Out
3411
0x0D53
Loop.13.SP.AltSP
3140
0x0C44
Loop.14.OP.CoolType
3421
0x0D5D
Loop.13.SP.AltSPSelect
3141
0x0C45
Loop.14.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
3419
0x0D5B
Loop.13.SP.ManualTrack
3147
0x0C4B
Loop.14.OP.FeedForwardGain
3423
0x0D5F
Loop.13.SP.RangeHigh
3084
0x0C0C
Loop.14.OP.FeedForwardOffset
3424
0x0D60
Loop.13.SP.RangeLow
3083
0x0C0B
Loop.14.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
3425
0x0D61
Loop.13.SP.Rate
3142
0x0C46
Loop.14.OP.FeedForwardType
3422
0x0D5E
Loop.13.SP.RateDisable
3143
0x0C47
Loop.14.OP.FeedForwardVal
3426
0x0D62
Loop.13.SP.RateDone
3151
0x0C4F
Loop.14.OP.FF_Rem
3431
0x0D67
Loop.13.SP.SP1
3085
0x0C0D
Loop.14.OP.ManualMode
3418
0x0D5A
Loop.13.SP.SP2
3086
0x0C0E
Loop.14.OP.ManualOutVal
3331
0x0D03
Loop.13.SP.SPHighLimit
3138
0x0C42
Loop.14.OP.MeasuredPower
3420
0x0D5C
Loop.13.SP.SPLowLimit
3139
0x0C43
Loop.14.OP.OutputHighLimit
3408
0x0D50
Loop.13.SP.SPSelect
3087
0x0C0F
Loop.14.OP.OutputLowLimit
3409
0x0D51
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 289
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.14.OP.Rate
3414
0x0D56
Loop.14.SP.Rate
3398
0x0D46
Loop.14.OP.RateDisable
3415
0x0D57
Loop.14.SP.RateDisable
3399
0x0D47
Loop.14.OP.RemOPH
3430
0x0D66
Loop.14.SP.RateDone
3407
0x0D4F
Loop.14.OP.RemOPL
3429
0x0D65
Loop.14.SP.SP1
3341
0x0D0D
Loop.14.OP.SafeOutVal
3417
0x0D59
Loop.14.SP.SP2
3342
0x0D0E
Loop.14.OP.SBrkOP
3451
0x0D7B
Loop.14.SP.SPHighLimit
3394
0x0D42
Loop.14.OP.SensorBreakMode
3416
0x0D58
Loop.14.SP.SPLowLimit
3395
0x0D43
Loop.14.OP.TrackEnable
3428
0x0D64
Loop.14.SP.SPSelect
3343
0x0D0F
Loop.14.OP.TrackOutVal
3427
0x0D63
Loop.14.SP.SPTrack
3404
0x0D4C
Loop.14.PID.ActiveSet
3356
0x0D1C
Loop.14.SP.SPTrim
3400
0x0D48
Loop.14.PID.Boundary1-2
3354
0x0D1A
Loop.14.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
3401
0x0D49
Loop.14.PID.Boundary2-3
3355
0x0D1B
Loop.14.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
3402
0x0D4A
Loop.14.PID.CutbackHigh
3346
0x0D12
Loop.14.SP.TrackPV
3405
0x0D4D
Loop.14.PID.CutbackHigh2
3374
0x0D2E
Loop.14.SP.TrackSP
3406
0x0D4E
Loop.14.PID.CutbackHigh3
3384
0x0D38
Loop.14.Tune.AutotuneEnable
3436
0x0D6C
Loop.14.PID.CutbackLow
3345
0x0D11
Loop.14.Tune.OutputHighLimit
3433
0x0D69
Loop.14.PID.CutbackLow2
3375
0x0D2F
Loop.14.Tune.OutputLowLimit
3434
0x0D6A
Loop.14.PID.CutbackLow3
3385
0x0D39
Loop.14.Tune.Stage
3439
0x0D6F
Loop.14.PID.DerivativeTime
3337
0x0D09
Loop.14.Tune.StageTime
3440
0x0D70
Loop.14.PID.DerivativeTime2
3373
0x0D2D
Loop.14.Tune.State
3438
0x0D6E
Loop.14.PID.DerivativeTime3
3383
0x0D37
Loop.14.Tune.StepSize
3437
0x0D6D
Loop.14.PID.IntegralTime
3336
0x0D08
Loop.14.Tune.Type
3432
0x0D68
Loop.14.PID.IntegralTime2
3372
0x0D2C
Loop.15.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
3703
0x0E77
Loop.14.PID.IntegralTime3
3382
0x0D36
Loop.15.Diag.Error
3697
0x0E71
Loop.14.PID.LoopBreakTime
3368
0x0D28
Loop.15.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
3702
0x0E76
Loop.14.PID.LoopBreakTime2
3377
0x0D31
Loop.15.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
3700
0x0E74
Loop.14.PID.LoopBreakTime3
3387
0x0D3B
Loop.15.Diag.LoopMode
3698
0x0E72
Loop.14.PID.ManualReset
3367
0x0D27
Loop.15.Diag.PropOutContrib
3701
0x0E75
Loop.14.PID.ManualReset2
3376
0x0D30
Loop.15.Diag.SBrk
3704
0x0E78
Loop.14.PID.ManualReset3
3386
0x0D3A
Loop.15.Diag.SchedCBH
3616
0x0E20
Loop.14.PID.NumSets
3392
0x0D40
Loop.15.Diag.SchedCBL
3617
0x0E21
Loop.14.PID.OutputHi
3369
0x0D29
Loop.15.Diag.SchedLPBrk
3619
0x0E23
Loop.14.PID.OutputHi2
3379
0x0D33
Loop.15.Diag.SchedMR
3618
0x0E22
Loop.14.PID.OutputHi3
3389
0x0D3D
Loop.15.Diag.SchedOPHi
3621
0x0E25
Loop.14.PID.OutputLo
3370
0x0D2A
Loop.15.Diag.SchedOPLo
3622
0x0E26
Loop.14.PID.OutputLo2
3380
0x0D34
Loop.15.Diag.SchedPB
3613
0x0E1D
Loop.14.PID.OutputLo3
3390
0x0D3E
Loop.15.Diag.SchedR2G
3620
0x0E24
Loop.14.PID.ProportionalBand
3334
0x0D06
Loop.15.Diag.SchedTd
3615
0x0E1F
Loop.14.PID.ProportionalBand2
3371
0x0D2B
Loop.15.Diag.SchedTi
3614
0x0E1E
Loop.14.PID.ProportionalBand3
3381
0x0D35
Loop.15.Diag.TargetOutVal
3699
0x0E73
Loop.14.PID.RelCh2Gain
3347
0x0D13
Loop.15.Main.ActiveOut
3588
0x0E04
Loop.14.PID.RelCh2Gain2
3378
0x0D32
Loop.15.Main.AutoMan
3594
0x0E0A
Loop.14.PID.RelCh2Gain3
3388
0x0D3C
Loop.15.Main.Inhibit
3604
0x0E14
Loop.14.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
3393
0x0D41
Loop.15.Main.PV
3585
0x0E01
Loop.14.PID.SchedulerType
3391
0x0D3F
Loop.15.Main.TargetSP
3586
0x0E02
Loop.14.Setup.CH1ControlType
3350
0x0D16
Loop.15.Main.WorkingSP
3589
0x0E05
Loop.14.Setup.CH2ControlType
3351
0x0D17
Loop.15.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
3668
0x0E54
Loop.14.Setup.ControlAction
3335
0x0D07
Loop.15.OP.Ch1Out
3666
0x0E52
Loop.14.Setup.DerivativeType
3353
0x0D19
Loop.15.OP.Ch2Deadband
3600
0x0E10
Loop.14.Setup.LoopType
3349
0x0D15
Loop.15.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
3669
0x0E55
Loop.14.Setup.PBUnits
3352
0x0D18
Loop.15.OP.Ch2Out
3667
0x0E53
Loop.14.SP.AltSP
3396
0x0D44
Loop.15.OP.CoolType
3677
0x0E5D
Loop.14.SP.AltSPSelect
3397
0x0D45
Loop.15.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
3675
0x0E5B
Loop.14.SP.ManualTrack
3403
0x0D4B
Loop.15.OP.FeedForwardGain
3679
0x0E5F
Loop.14.SP.RangeHigh
3340
0x0D0C
Loop.15.OP.FeedForwardOffset
3680
0x0E60
Loop.14.SP.RangeLow
3339
0x0D0B
Loop.15.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
3681
0x0E61
Page 290
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.15.OP.FeedForwardType
3678
0x0E5E
Loop.15.Setup.DerivativeType
3609
0x0E19
Loop.15.OP.FeedForwardVal
3682
0x0E62
Loop.15.Setup.LoopType
3605
0x0E15
Loop.15.OP.FF_Rem
3687
0x0E67
Loop.15.Setup.PBUnits
3608
0x0E18
Loop.15.OP.ManualMode
3674
0x0E5A
Loop.15.SP.AltSP
3652
0x0E44
Loop.15.OP.ManualOutVal
3587
0x0E03
Loop.15.SP.AltSPSelect
3653
0x0E45
Loop.15.OP.MeasuredPower
3676
0x0E5C
Loop.15.SP.ManualTrack
3659
0x0E4B
Loop.15.OP.OutputHighLimit
3664
0x0E50
Loop.15.SP.RangeHigh
3596
0x0E0C
Loop.15.OP.OutputLowLimit
3665
0x0E51
Loop.15.SP.RangeLow
3595
0x0E0B
Loop.15.OP.Rate
3670
0x0E56
Loop.15.SP.Rate
3654
0x0E46
Loop.15.OP.RateDisable
3671
0x0E57
Loop.15.SP.RateDisable
3655
0x0E47
Loop.15.OP.RemOPH
3686
0x0E66
Loop.15.SP.RateDone
3663
0x0E4F
Loop.15.OP.RemOPL
3685
0x0E65
Loop.15.SP.SP1
3597
0x0E0D
Loop.15.OP.SafeOutVal
3673
0x0E59
Loop.15.SP.SP2
3598
0x0E0E
Loop.15.OP.SBrkOP
3707
0x0E7B
Loop.15.SP.SPHighLimit
3650
0x0E42
Loop.15.OP.SensorBreakMode
3672
0x0E58
Loop.15.SP.SPLowLimit
3651
0x0E43
Loop.15.OP.TrackEnable
3684
0x0E64
Loop.15.SP.SPSelect
3599
0x0E0F
Loop.15.OP.TrackOutVal
3683
0x0E63
Loop.15.SP.SPTrack
3660
0x0E4C
Loop.15.PID.ActiveSet
3612
0x0E1C
Loop.15.SP.SPTrim
3656
0x0E48
Loop.15.PID.Boundary1-2
3610
0x0E1A
Loop.15.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
3657
0x0E49
Loop.15.PID.Boundary2-3
3611
0x0E1B
Loop.15.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
3658
0x0E4A
Loop.15.PID.CutbackHigh
3602
0x0E12
Loop.15.SP.TrackPV
3661
0x0E4D
Loop.15.PID.CutbackHigh2
3630
0x0E2E
Loop.15.SP.TrackSP
3662
0x0E4E
Loop.15.PID.CutbackHigh3
3640
0x0E38
Loop.15.Tune.AutotuneEnable
3692
0x0E6C
Loop.15.PID.CutbackLow
3601
0x0E11
Loop.15.Tune.OutputHighLimit
3689
0x0E69
Loop.15.PID.CutbackLow2
3631
0x0E2F
Loop.15.Tune.OutputLowLimit
3690
0x0E6A
Loop.15.PID.CutbackLow3
3641
0x0E39
Loop.15.Tune.Stage
3695
0x0E6F
Loop.15.PID.DerivativeTime
3593
0x0E09
Loop.15.Tune.StageTime
3696
0x0E70
Loop.15.PID.DerivativeTime2
3629
0x0E2D
Loop.15.Tune.State
3694
0x0E6E
Loop.15.PID.DerivativeTime3
3639
0x0E37
Loop.15.Tune.StepSize
3693
0x0E6D
Loop.15.PID.IntegralTime
3592
0x0E08
Loop.15.Tune.Type
3688
0x0E68
Loop.15.PID.IntegralTime2
3628
0x0E2C
Loop.16.Diag.DerivativeOutContrib
3959
0x0F77
Loop.15.PID.IntegralTime3
3638
0x0E36
Loop.16.Diag.Error
3953
0x0F71
Loop.15.PID.LoopBreakTime
3624
0x0E28
Loop.16.Diag.IntegralOutContrib
3958
0x0F76
Loop.15.PID.LoopBreakTime2
3633
0x0E31
Loop.16.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
3956
0x0F74
Loop.15.PID.LoopBreakTime3
3643
0x0E3B
Loop.16.Diag.LoopMode
3954
0x0F72
Loop.15.PID.ManualReset
3623
0x0E27
Loop.16.Diag.PropOutContrib
3957
0x0F75
Loop.15.PID.ManualReset2
3632
0x0E30
Loop.16.Diag.SBrk
3960
0x0F78
Loop.15.PID.ManualReset3
3642
0x0E3A
Loop.16.Diag.SchedCBH
3872
0x0F20
Loop.15.PID.NumSets
3648
0x0E40
Loop.16.Diag.SchedCBL
3873
0x0F21
Loop.15.PID.OutputHi
3625
0x0E29
Loop.16.Diag.SchedLPBrk
3875
0x0F23
Loop.15.PID.OutputHi2
3635
0x0E33
Loop.16.Diag.SchedMR
3874
0x0F22
Loop.15.PID.OutputHi3
3645
0x0E3D
Loop.16.Diag.SchedOPHi
3877
0x0F25
Loop.15.PID.OutputLo
3626
0x0E2A
Loop.16.Diag.SchedOPLo
3878
0x0F26
Loop.15.PID.OutputLo2
3636
0x0E34
Loop.16.Diag.SchedPB
3869
0x0F1D
Loop.15.PID.OutputLo3
3646
0x0E3E
Loop.16.Diag.SchedR2G
3876
0x0F24
Loop.15.PID.ProportionalBand
3590
0x0E06
Loop.16.Diag.SchedTd
3871
0x0F1F
Loop.15.PID.ProportionalBand2
3627
0x0E2B
Loop.16.Diag.SchedTi
3870
0x0F1E
Loop.15.PID.ProportionalBand3
3637
0x0E35
Loop.16.Diag.TargetOutVal
3955
0x0F73
Loop.15.PID.RelCh2Gain
3603
0x0E13
Loop.16.Main.ActiveOut
3844
0x0F04
Loop.15.PID.RelCh2Gain2
3634
0x0E32
Loop.16.Main.AutoMan
3850
0x0F0A
Loop.15.PID.RelCh2Gain3
3644
0x0E3C
Loop.16.Main.Inhibit
3860
0x0F14
Loop.15.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
3649
0x0E41
Loop.16.Main.PV
3841
0x0F01
Loop.15.PID.SchedulerType
3647
0x0E3F
Loop.16.Main.TargetSP
3842
0x0F02
Loop.15.Setup.CH1ControlType
3606
0x0E16
Loop.16.Main.WorkingSP
3845
0x0F05
Loop.15.Setup.CH2ControlType
3607
0x0E17
Loop.16.OP.Ch1OnOffHysteresis
3924
0x0F54
Loop.15.Setup.ControlAction
3591
0x0E07
Loop.16.OP.Ch1Out
3922
0x0F52
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 291
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Loop.16.OP.Ch2Deadband
3856
0x0F10
Loop.16.PID.RelCh2Gain
3859
0x0F13
Loop.16.OP.Ch2OnOffHysteresis
3925
0x0F55
Loop.16.PID.RelCh2Gain2
3890
0x0F32
Loop.16.OP.Ch2Out
3923
0x0F53
Loop.16.PID.RelCh2Gain3
3900
0x0F3C
Loop.16.OP.CoolType
3933
0x0F5D
Loop.16.PID.SchedulerRemoteInput
3905
0x0F41
Loop.16.OP.EnablePowerFeedforward
3931
0x0F5B
Loop.16.PID.SchedulerType
3903
0x0F3F
Loop.16.OP.FeedForwardGain
3935
0x0F5F
Loop.16.Setup.CH1ControlType
3862
0x0F16
Loop.16.OP.FeedForwardOffset
3936
0x0F60
Loop.16.Setup.CH2ControlType
3863
0x0F17
Loop.16.OP.FeedForwardTrimLimit
3937
0x0F61
Loop.16.Setup.ControlAction
3847
0x0F07
Loop.16.OP.FeedForwardType
3934
0x0F5E
Loop.16.Setup.DerivativeType
3865
0x0F19
Loop.16.OP.FeedForwardVal
3938
0x0F62
Loop.16.Setup.LoopType
3861
0x0F15
Loop.16.OP.FF_Rem
3943
0x0F67
Loop.16.Setup.PBUnits
3864
0x0F18
Loop.16.OP.ManualMode
3930
0x0F5A
Loop.16.SP.AltSP
3908
0x0F44
Loop.16.OP.ManualOutVal
3843
0x0F03
Loop.16.SP.AltSPSelect
3909
0x0F45
Loop.16.OP.MeasuredPower
3932
0x0F5C
Loop.16.SP.ManualTrack
3915
0x0F4B
Loop.16.OP.OutputHighLimit
3920
0x0F50
Loop.16.SP.RangeHigh
3852
0x0F0C
Loop.16.OP.OutputLowLimit
3921
0x0F51
Loop.16.SP.RangeLow
3851
0x0F0B
Loop.16.OP.Rate
3926
0x0F56
Loop.16.SP.Rate
3910
0x0F46
Loop.16.OP.RateDisable
3927
0x0F57
Loop.16.SP.RateDisable
3911
0x0F47
Loop.16.OP.RemOPH
3942
0x0F66
Loop.16.SP.RateDone
3919
0x0F4F
Loop.16.OP.RemOPL
3941
0x0F65
Loop.16.SP.SP1
3853
0x0F0D
Loop.16.OP.SafeOutVal
3929
0x0F59
Loop.16.SP.SP2
3854
0x0F0E
Loop.16.OP.SBrkOP
3963
0x0F7B
Loop.16.SP.SPHighLimit
3906
0x0F42
Loop.16.OP.SensorBreakMode
3928
0x0F58
Loop.16.SP.SPLowLimit
3907
0x0F43
Loop.16.OP.TrackEnable
3940
0x0F64
Loop.16.SP.SPSelect
3855
0x0F0F
Loop.16.OP.TrackOutVal
3939
0x0F63
Loop.16.SP.SPTrack
3916
0x0F4C
Loop.16.PID.ActiveSet
3868
0x0F1C
Loop.16.SP.SPTrim
3912
0x0F48
Loop.16.PID.Boundary1-2
3866
0x0F1A
Loop.16.SP.SPTrimHighLimit
3913
0x0F49
Loop.16.PID.Boundary2-3
3867
0x0F1B
Loop.16.SP.SPTrimLowLimit
3914
0x0F4A
Loop.16.PID.CutbackHigh
3858
0x0F12
Loop.16.SP.TrackPV
3917
0x0F4D
Loop.16.PID.CutbackHigh2
3886
0x0F2E
Loop.16.SP.TrackSP
3918
0x0F4E
Loop.16.PID.CutbackHigh3
3896
0x0F38
Loop.16.Tune.AutotuneEnable
3948
0x0F6C
Loop.16.PID.CutbackLow
3857
0x0F11
Loop.16.Tune.OutputHighLimit
3945
0x0F69
Loop.16.PID.CutbackLow2
3887
0x0F2F
Loop.16.Tune.OutputLowLimit
3946
0x0F6A
Loop.16.PID.CutbackLow3
3897
0x0F39
Loop.16.Tune.Stage
3951
0x0F6F
Loop.16.PID.DerivativeTime
3849
0x0F09
Loop.16.Tune.StageTime
3952
0x0F70
Loop.16.PID.DerivativeTime2
3885
0x0F2D
Loop.16.Tune.State
3950
0x0F6E
Loop.16.PID.DerivativeTime3
3895
0x0F37
Loop.16.Tune.StepSize
3949
0x0F6D
Loop.16.PID.IntegralTime
3848
0x0F08
Loop.16.Tune.Type
3944
0x0F68
Loop.16.PID.IntegralTime2
3884
0x0F2C
Math2.1.In1
4750
0x128e
Loop.16.PID.IntegralTime3
3894
0x0F36
Math2.1.In2
4751
0x128f
Loop.16.PID.LoopBreakTime
3880
0x0F28
Math2.1.Out
4752
0x1290
Loop.16.PID.LoopBreakTime2
3889
0x0F31
Math2.2.In1
4753
0x1291
Loop.16.PID.LoopBreakTime3
3899
0x0F3B
Math2.2.In2
4754
0x1292
Loop.16.PID.ManualReset
3879
0x0F27
Math2.2.Out
4755
0x1293
Loop.16.PID.ManualReset2
3888
0x0F30
Math2.3.In1
4756
0x1294
Loop.16.PID.ManualReset3
3898
0x0F3A
Math2.3.In2
4757
0x1295
Loop.16.PID.NumSets
3904
0x0F40
Math2.3.Out
4758
0x1296
Loop.16.PID.OutputHi
3881
0x0F29
Math2.4.In1
4759
0x1297
Loop.16.PID.OutputHi2
3891
0x0F33
Math2.4.In2
4760
0x1298
Loop.16.PID.OutputHi3
3901
0x0F3D
Math2.4.Out
4761
0x1299
Loop.16.PID.OutputLo
3882
0x0F2A
Math2.5.In1
4762
0x129a
Loop.16.PID.OutputLo2
3892
0x0F34
Math2.5.In2
4763
0x129b
Loop.16.PID.OutputLo3
3902
0x0F3E
Math2.5.Out
4764
0x129c
Loop.16.PID.ProportionalBand
3846
0x0F06
Math2.6.In1
4765
0x129d
Loop.16.PID.ProportionalBand2
3883
0x0F2B
Math2.6.In2
4766
0x129e
Loop.16.PID.ProportionalBand3
3893
0x0F35
Math2.6.Out
4767
0x129f
Page 292
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Math2.7.In1
4768
0x12a0
MultiOper.1.In2
5007
0x138f
Math2.7.In2
4769
0x12a1
MultiOper.1.In3
5008
0x1390
Math2.7.Out
4770
0x12a2
MultiOper.1.In4
5009
0x1391
Math2.8.In1
4771
0x12a3
MultiOper.1.In5
5010
0x1392
Math2.8.In2
4772
0x12a4
MultiOper.1.In6
5011
0x1393
Math2.8.Out
4773
0x12a5
MultiOper.1.In7
5012
0x1394
Math2.9.In1
4774
0x12a6
MultiOper.1.In8
5013
0x1395
Math2.9.In2
4775
0x12a7
MultiOper.1.MaxOut
5015
0x1397
Math2.9.Out
4776
0x12a8
MultiOper.1.MinOut
5016
0x1398
Math2.10.In1
4777
0x12a9
MultiOper.1.SumOut
5014
0x1396
Math2.10.In2
4778
0x12aa
MultiOper.2.AverageOut
5029
0x13a5
Math2.10.Out
4779
0x12ab
MultiOper.2.In1
5018
0x139a
Math2.11.In1
4780
0x12ac
MultiOper.2.In2
5019
0x139b
Math2.11.In2
4781
0x12ad
MultiOper.2.In3
5020
0x139c
Math2.11.Out
4782
0x12ae
MultiOper.2.In4
5021
0x139d
Math2.12.In1
4783
0x12af
MultiOper.2.In5
5022
0x139e
Math2.12.In2
4784
0x12b0
MultiOper.2.In6
5023
0x139f
Math2.12.Out
4785
0x12b1
MultiOper.2.In7
5024
0x13a0
Math2.13.In1
4786
0x12b2
MultiOper.2.In8
5025
0x13a1
Math2.13.In2
4787
0x12b3
MultiOper.2.MaxOut
5027
0x13a3
Math2.13.Out
4788
0x12b4
MultiOper.2.MinOut
5028
0x13a4
Math2.14.In1
4789
0x12b5
MultiOper.2.SumOut
5026
0x13a2
Math2.14.In2
4790
0x12b6
MultiOper.3.AverageOut
5041
0x13b1
Math2.14.Out
4791
0x12b7
MultiOper.3.In1
5030
0x13a6
Math2.15.In1
4792
0x12b8
MultiOper.3.In2
5031
0x13a7
Math2.15.In2
4793
0x12b9
MultiOper.3.In3
5032
0x13a8
Math2.15.Out
4794
0x12ba
MultiOper.3.In4
5033
0x13a9
Math2.16.In1
4795
0x12bb
MultiOper.3.In5
5034
0x13aa
Math2.16.In2
4796
0x12bc
MultiOper.3.In6
5035
0x13ab
Math2.16.Out
4797
0x12bd
MultiOper.3.In7
5036
0x13ac
Math2.17.In1
4798
0x12be
MultiOper.3.In8
5037
0x13ad
Math2.17.In2
4799
0x12bf
MultiOper.3.MaxOut
5039
0x13af
Math2.17.Out
4800
0x12c0
MultiOper.3.MinOut
5040
0x13b0
Math2.18.In1
4801
0x12c1
MultiOper.3.SumOut
5038
0x13ae
Math2.18.In2
4802
0x12c2
MultiOper.4.AverageOut
5053
0x13bd
Math2.18.Out
4803
0x12c3
MultiOper.4.In1
5042
0x13b2
Math2.19.In1
4804
0x12c4
MultiOper.4.In2
5043
0x13b3
Math2.19.In2
4805
0x12c5
MultiOper.4.In3
5044
0x13b4
Math2.19.Out
4806
0x12c6
MultiOper.4.In4
5045
0x13b5
Math2.20.In1
4807
0x12c7
MultiOper.4.In5
5046
0x13b6
Math2.20.In2
4808
0x12c8
MultiOper.4.In6
5047
0x13b7
Math2.20.Out
4809
0x12c9
MultiOper.4.In7
5048
0x13b8
Math2.21.In1
4810
0x12ca
MultiOper.4.In8
5049
0x13b9
Math2.21.In2
4811
0x12cb
MultiOper.4.MaxOut
5051
0x13bb
Math2.21.Out
4812
0x12cc
MultiOper.4.MinOut
5052
0x13bc
Math2.22.In1
4813
0x12cd
MultiOper.4.SumOut
5050
0x13ba
Math2.22.In2
4814
0x12ce
Recipe.LastDataset
4913
0x1331
Math2.22.Out
4815
0x12cf
Recipe.LoadingStatus
4914
0x1332
Math2.23.In1
4816
0x12d0
Recipe.RecipeSelect
4912
0x1330
Math2.23.In2
4817
0x12d1
SwitchOver.SelectIn
4927
0x133f
Math2.23.Out
4818
0x12d2
SwitchOver.SwitchHigh
4925
0x133d
Math2.24.In1
4819
0x12d3
SwitchOver.SwitchLow
4926
0x133e
Math2.24.In2
4820
0x12d4
Timer.1.ElapsedTime
4995
0x1383
Math2.24.Out
4821
0x12d5
Timer.1.Out
4996
0x1384
MultiOper.1.AverageOut
5017
0x1399
Timer.1.Time
4994
0x1382
MultiOper.1.In1
5006
0x138e
Timer.2.ElapsedTime
4998
0x1386
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 293
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Parameter Description / Modbus address
DEC
HEX
Timer.2.Out
4999
0x1387
Zirconia.1.ProbeStatus
13262
0x33CE
Timer.2.Time
4997
0x1385
Zirconia.1.ProbeType
13258
0x33CA
Timer.3.ElapsedTime
5001
0x1389
Zirconia.1.ProcFactor
13275
0x33DB
Timer.3.Out
5002
0x138A
Zirconia.1.PVFrozen
13272
0x33D8
Timer.3.Time
5000
0x1388
Zirconia.1.RemGasEn
13257
0x33C9
Timer.4.ElapsedTime
5004
0x138C
Zirconia.1.RemGasRef
13267
0x33D3
Timer.4.Out
5005
0x138D
Zirconia.1.Resolution
13273
0x33D9
Timer.4.Time
5003
0x138B
Zirconia.1.SootAlm
13264
0x33D0
UsrVal.1.Val
4962
0x1362
Zirconia.1.TempInput
13269
0x33D5
UsrVal.2.Val
4963
0x1363
Zirconia.1.TempOffset
13266
0x33D2
UsrVal.3.Val
4964
0x1364
Zirconia.1.Time2Clean
13249
0x33C1
UsrVal.4.Val
4965
0x1365
Zirconia.1.Tolerence
13276
0x33DC
UsrVal.5.Val
4966
0x1366
Zirconia.1.WrkGas
13265
0x33D1
UsrVal.6.Val
4967
0x1367
Zirconia.2.CarbonPot
13288
0x33E8
UsrVal.7.Val
4968
0x1368
Zirconia.2.CleanFreq
13283
0x33E3
UsrVal.8.Val
4969
0x1369
Zirconia.2.CleanProbe
13280
0x33EO
UsrVal.9.Val
4970
0x136a
Zirconia.2.CleanState
13300
0x33F4
UsrVal.10.Val
4971
0x136b
Zirconia.2.CleanTime
13284
0x33E4
UsrVal.11.Val
4972
0x136c
Zirconia.2.CleanValve
13295
0x33EF
UsrVal.12.Val
4973
0x136d
Zirconia.2.DewPoint
13306
0x33FA
UsrVal.13.Val
4974
0x136e
Zirconia.2.GasRef
13286
0x33E6
UsrVal.14.Val
4975
0x136f
Zirconia.2.MaxRcovTime
13285
0x33E5
UsrVal.15.Val
4976
0x1370
Zirconia.2.MinCalTemp
13302
0x33F6
UsrVal.16.Val
4977
0x1371
Zirconia.2.MinRcovTime
13287
0x33E7
UsrVal.17.Val
4978
0x1372
Zirconia.2.Oxygen
13293
0x33ED
UsrVal.18.Val
4979
0x1373
Zirconia.2.OxygenExp
13292
0x33EC
UsrVal.19.Val
4980
0x1374
Zirconia.2.ProbeFault
13303
0x33F7
UsrVal.20.Val
4981
0x1375
Zirconia.2.ProbeInput
13291
0x33EB
UsrVal.21.Val
4982
0x1376
Zirconia.2.ProbeOffset
13282
0x33E2
UsrVal.22.Val
4983
0x1377
Zirconia.2.ProbeStatus
13294
0x33EE
UsrVal.23.Val
4984
0x1378
Zirconia.2.ProbeType
13290
0x33EA
UsrVal.24.Val
4985
0x1379
Zirconia.2.ProcFactor
13307
0x33FB
UsrVal.25.Val
4986
0x137a
Zirconia.2.PVFrozen
13304
0x33F8
UsrVal.26.Val
4987
0x137b
Zirconia.2.RemGasEn
13289
0x33E9
UsrVal.27.Val
4988
0x137c
Zirconia.2.RemGasRef
13299
0x33F3
UsrVal.28.Val
4989
0x137d
Zirconia.2.Resolution
13305
0x33F9
UsrVal.29.Val
4990
0x137e
Zirconia.2.SootAlm
13296
0x33F0
UsrVal.30.Val
4991
0x137f
Zirconia.2.TempInput
13301
0x33F5
UsrVal.31.Val
4992
0x1380
Zirconia.2.TempOffset
13298
0x33F2
UsrVal.32.Val
4993
0x1381
Zirconia.2.Time2Clean
13281
0x33E1
Zirconia.1.CarbonPot
13256
0x33C8
Zirconia.2.Tolerence
13308
0x33FC
Zirconia.1.CleanFreq
13251
0x33C3
Zirconia.2.WrkGas
13297
0x33F1
Zirconia.1.CleanProbe
13248
0x33CO
Zirconia.1.CleanState
13268
0x33D4
Zirconia.1.CleanTime
13252
0x33C4
Zirconia.1.CleanValve
13263
0x33CF
Zirconia.1.DewPoint
13274
0x33DA
Zirconia.1.GasRef
13254
0x33C6
Zirconia.1.MaxRcovTime
13253
0x33C5
Zirconia.1.MinCalTemp
13270
0x33D6
Zirconia.1.MinRcovTime
13255
0x33C7
Zirconia.1.Oxygen
13261
0x33CD
Zirconia.1.OxygenExp
13260
0x33CC
Zirconia.1.ProbeFault
13271
0x33D7
Zirconia.1.ProbeInput
13259
0x33CB
Zirconia.1.ProbeOffset
13250
0x33C2
Page 294
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
25.2.1
Programmer Address Ranges - Decimal
The following table shows the addresses set aside for programmers.
PROGRAM NUMBER
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Comms.n.ProgramNumber
DECIMAL ADDRESSES (2.xx)
5568
5632
5696
5760
5824
5888
5952
8
6016
Program.n.HoldbackVal
5569
5633
5697
5761
5825
5889
5953
6017
Program.n.RampUnits
5570
5634
5698
5762
5826
5890
5954
6018
Program.n.DwellUnits
5571
5635
5699
5763
5827
5891
5955
6019
Program.n.Cycles
5572
5636
5700
5764
5828
5892
5956
6020
Programmer.n.PowerFailAct
5573
5637
5701
5765
5829
5893
5957
6021
Programmer.n.Servo
5574
5638
5702
5766
5830
5894
5958
6022
Programmer.n.ResetEventOuts
5576
5640
5704
5768
5832
5896
5960
6024
Programmer.n.CurProg
5577
5641
5705
5769
5833
5897
5961
6025
Programmer.n.CurSeg
5578
5642
5706
5770
5834
5898
5962
6026
Programmer.n.ProgStatus
5579
5643
5707
5771
5835
5899
5963
6027
Programmer.n.PSP
5580
5644
5708
5772
5836
5900
5964
6028
Programmer.n.CyclesLeft
5581
5645
5709
5773
5837
5901
5965
6029
Programmer.n.CurSegType
5582
5646
5710
5774
5838
5902
5966
6030
Programmer.n.SegTarget
5583
5647
5711
5775
5839
5903
5967
6031
Programmer.n.SegRate
5584
5648
5712
5776
5840
5904
5968
6032
Programmer.n.ProgTimeLeft
5585
5649
5713
5777
5841
5905
5969
6033
Programmer.n.PVIn
5586
5650
5714
5778
5842
5906
5970
6034
Programmer.n.SPIn
5587
5651
5715
5779
5843
5907
5971
6035
Programmer.n.EventOuts
5588
5652
5716
5780
5844
5908
5972
6036
Programmer.n.SegTimeLeft
5589
5653
5717
5781
5845
5909
5973
6037
Programmer.n.EndOfSeg
5590
5654
5718
5782
5846
5910
5974
6038
Programmer.n.SyncIn
5591
5655
5719
5783
5847
5911
5975
6039
Programmer.n.FastRun
5592
5656
5720
5784
5848
5912
5976
6040
Programmer.n.AdvSeg
5593
5657
5721
5785
5849
5913
5977
6041
Programmer.n.SkipSeg
5594
5658
5722
5786
5850
5914
5978
6042
Program.n.PVStart
5597
5661
5725
5789
5853
5917
5981
6045
Programmer.n.PrgIn1
5602
5666
5730
5794
5858
5922
5986
6050
Programmer.n.PrgIn2
5603
5667
5731
5795
5859
5923
5987
6051
Programmer.n.PVWaitIP
5604
5668
5732
5796
5860
5924
5988
6052
Programmer.n.ProgError
5605
5669
5733
5797
5861
5925
5989
6053
Programmer.n.PVEventOP
5606
5670
5734
5798
5862
5926
5990
6054
Programmer.n.GoBackCyclesLeft
5645
5709
5773
5837
5901
5965
6029
6093
Programmer.n.DelayTime
5685
5749
5813
5877
5941
6005
6069
6133
Programmer.n.ProgReset
5726
5790
5854
5918
5982
6046
6110
6174
Programmer.n.ProgRun
5768
5832
5896
5960
6024
6088
6152
6216
Programmer.n.ProgHold
5811
5875
5939
6003
6067
6131
6195
6259
Programmer.n.ProgRunHold
5855
5919
5983
6047
6111
6175
6239
6303
Programmer.n.ProgRunReset
5900
5964
6028
6092
6156
6220
6284
6348
Segment.1.Type
6080
6592
7104
7616
8128
8640
9152
9664
Segment.1.Holdback
6081
6593
7105
7617
8129
8641
9153
9665
Segment.1.Duration
6084
6596
7108
7620
8132
8644
9156
9668
Segment.1.RampRate
6085
6597
7109
7621
8133
8645
9157
9669
Segment.1.TargetSP
6086
6598
7110
7622
8134
8646
9158
9670
Segment.1.EndAction
6087
6599
7111
7623
8135
8647
9159
9671
Segment.1.EventOutputs
6088
6600
7112
7624
8136
8648
9160
9672
Segment.1.WaitFor
6089
6601
7113
7625
8137
8649
9161
9673
6090
6602
7114
7626
8138
8650
9162
9674
Segment.1.PVEvent
6093
6605
7117
7629
8141
8653
9165
9677
Segment.1.PVThreshold
6094
6606
7118
7630
8142
8654
9166
9678
Segment.1.UserVal
6095
6607
7119
7631
8143
8655
9167
9679
Segment.1.GsoakType
6096
6608
7120
7632
8144
8656
9168
9680
Segment.1.GsoakVal
6097
6609
7121
7633
8145
8657
9169
9681
Segment.1.TimeEvent
6098
6610
7122
7634
8146
8658
9170
9682
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 295
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
PROGRAM NUMBER
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Segment.1.OnTime
DECIMAL ADDRESSES (2.xx)
6099
6611
7123
7635
8147
8659
9171
9683
Segment.1.OffTime
6100
6612
7124
7636
8148
8660
9172
9684
Segment.1.PIDSet
6101
6613
7125
7637
8149
8661
9173
9685
Segment.1.PVWait
6102
6614
7126
7638
8150
8662
9174
9686
Segment.1.WaitVal
6103
6615
7127
7639
8151
8663
9175
9687
Segment.2.Type
6112
6624
7136
7648
8160
8672
9184
9696
Segment.2.Holdback
6113
6625
7137
7649
8161
8673
9185
9697
Segment.2.Duration
6116
6628
7140
7652
8164
8676
9188
9700
Segment.2.RampRate
6117
6629
7141
7653
8165
8677
9189
9701
Segment.2.TargetSP
6118
6630
7142
7654
8166
8678
9190
9702
Segment.2.EndAction
6119
6631
7143
7655
8167
8679
9191
9703
Segment.2.EventOutputs
6120
6632
7144
7656
8168
8680
9192
9704
Segment.2.WaitFor
6121
6633
7145
7657
8169
8681
9193
9705
6122
6634
7146
7658
8170
8682
9194
9706
6123
6635
7147
7659
8171
8683
9195
9707
Segment.2.GobackSeg
Segment.2.GobackCycles
6124
6636
7148
7660
8172
8684
9196
9708
Segment.2.PVEvent
6125
6637
7149
7661
8173
8685
9197
9709
Segment.2.PVThreshold
6126
6638
7150
7662
8174
8686
9198
9710
Segment.2.UserVal
6127
6639
7151
7663
8175
8687
9199
9711
Segment.2.GsoakType
6128
6640
7152
7664
8176
8688
9200
9712
Segment.2.GsoakVal
6129
6641
7153
7665
8177
8689
9201
9713
Segment.2.TimeEvent
6130
6642
7154
7666
8178
8690
9202
9714
Segment.2.OnTime
6131
6643
7155
7667
8179
8691
9203
9715
Segment.2.OffTime
6132
6644
7156
7668
8180
8692
9204
9716
Segment.2.PIDSet
6133
6645
7157
7669
8181
8693
9205
9717
Segment.2.PVWait
6134
6646
7158
7670
8182
8694
9206
9718
Segment.2.WaitVal
6135
6647
7159
7671
8183
8695
9207
9719
Segment.3.Type
6144
6656
7168
7680
8192
8704
9216
9728
Segment.3.Holdback
6145
6657
7169
7681
8193
8705
9217
9729
Segment.3.Duration
6148
6660
7172
7684
8196
8708
9220
9732
Segment.3.RampRate
6149
6661
7173
7685
8197
8709
9221
9733
Segment.3.TargetSP
6150
6662
7174
7686
8198
8710
9222
9734
Segment.3.EndAction
6151
6663
7175
7687
8199
8711
9223
9735
Segment.3.EventOutputs
6152
6664
7176
7688
8200
8712
9224
9736
Segment.3.WaitFor
6153
6665
7177
7689
8201
8713
9225
9737
6154
6666
7178
7690
8202
8714
9226
9738
6155
6667
7179
7691
8203
8715
9227
9739
Segment.3.GobackSeg
Segment.3.GobackCycles
6156
6668
7180
7692
8204
8716
9228
9740
Segment.3.PVEvent
6157
6669
7181
7693
8205
8717
9229
9741
Segment.3.PVThreshold
6158
6670
7182
7694
8206
8718
9230
9742
Segment.3.UserVal
6159
6671
7183
7695
8207
8719
9231
9743
Segment.3.GsoakType
6160
6672
7184
7696
8208
8720
9232
9744
Segment.3.GsoakVal
6161
6673
7185
7697
8209
8721
9233
9745
Segment.3.TimeEvent
6162
6674
7186
7698
8210
8722
9234
9746
Segment.3.OnTime
6163
6675
7187
7699
8211
8723
9235
9747
Segment.3.OffTime
6164
6676
7188
7700
8212
8724
9236
9748
Segment.3.PIDSet
6165
6677
7189
7701
8213
8725
9237
9749
Segment.3.PVWait
6166
6678
7190
7702
8214
8726
9238
9750
Segment.3.WaitVal
6167
6679
7191
7703
8215
8727
9239
9751
Segment.4.Type
6176
6688
7200
7712
8224
8736
9248
9760
Segment.4.Holdback
6177
6689
7201
7713
8225
8737
9249
9761
Segment.4.Duration
6180
6692
7204
7716
8228
8740
9252
9764
Segment.4.RampRate
6181
6693
7205
7717
8229
8741
9253
9765
Segment.4.TargetSP
6182
6694
7206
7718
8230
8742
9254
9766
Segment.4.EndAction
6183
6695
7207
7719
8231
8743
9255
9767
Segment.4.EventOutputs
6184
6696
7208
7720
8232
8744
9256
9768
Segment.4.WaitFor
6185
6697
7209
7721
8233
8745
9257
9769
Page 296
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Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
PROGRAM NUMBER
DECIMAL ADDRESSES (2.xx)
Segment.4.GobackSeg
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
6186
6698
7210
7722
8234
8746
9258
8
9770
6187
6699
7211
7723
8235
8747
9259
9771
Segment.4.GobackCycles
6188
6700
7212
7724
8236
8748
9260
9772
Segment.4.PVEvent
6189
6701
7213
7725
8237
8749
9261
9773
Segment.4.PVThreshold
6190
6702
7214
7726
8238
8750
9262
9774
Segment.4.UserVal
6191
6703
7215
7727
8239
8751
9263
9775
Segment.4.GsoakType
6192
6704
7216
7728
8240
8752
9264
9776
Segment.4.GsoakVal
6193
6705
7217
7729
8241
8753
9265
9777
Segment.4.TimeEvent
6194
6706
7218
7730
8242
8754
9266
9778
Segment.4.OnTime
6195
6707
7219
7731
8243
8755
9267
9779
Segment.4.OffTime
6196
6708
7220
7732
8244
8756
9268
9780
Segment.4.PIDSet
6197
6709
7221
7733
8245
8757
9269
9781
Segment.4.PVWait
6198
6710
7222
7734
8246
8758
9270
9782
Segment.4.WaitVal
6199
6711
7223
7735
8247
8759
9271
9783
Segment.5.Type
6208
6720
7232
7744
8256
8768
9280
9792
Segment.5.Holdback
6209
6721
7233
7745
8257
8769
9281
9793
Segment.5.Duration
6212
6724
7236
7748
8260
8772
9284
9796
Segment.5.RampRate
6213
6725
7237
7749
8261
8773
9285
9797
Segment.5.TargetSP
6214
6726
7238
7750
8262
8774
9286
9798
Segment.5.EndAction
6215
6727
7239
7751
8263
8775
9287
9799
Segment.5.EventOutputs
6216
6728
7240
7752
8264
8776
9288
9800
Segment.5.WaitFor
6217
6729
7241
7753
8265
8777
9289
9801
6218
6730
7242
7754
8266
8778
9290
9802
6219
6731
7243
7755
8267
8779
9291
9803
Segment.5.GobackSeg
Segment.5.GobackCycles
6220
6732
7244
7756
8268
8780
9292
9804
Segment.5.PVEvent
6221
6733
7245
7757
8269
8781
9293
9805
Segment.5.PVThreshold
6222
6734
7246
7758
8270
8782
9294
9806
Segment.5.UserVal
6223
6735
7247
7759
8271
8783
9295
9807
Segment.5.GsoakType
6224
6736
7248
7760
8272
8784
9296
9808
Segment.5.GsoakVal
6225
6737
7249
7761
8273
8785
9297
9809
Segment.5.TimeEvent
6226
6738
7250
7762
8274
8786
9298
9810
Segment.5.OnTime
6227
6739
7251
7763
8275
8787
9299
9811
Segment.5.OffTime
6228
6740
7252
7764
8276
8788
9300
9812
Segment.5.PIDSet
6229
6741
7253
7765
8277
8789
9301
9813
Segment.5.PVWait
6230
6742
7254
7766
8278
8790
9302
9814
Segment.5.WaitVal
6231
6743
7255
7767
8279
8791
9303
9815
Segment.6.Type
6240
6752
7264
7776
8288
8800
9312
9824
Segment.6.Holdback
6241
6753
7265
7777
8289
8801
9313
9825
Segment.6.Duration
6244
6756
7268
7780
8292
8804
9316
9828
Segment.6.RampRate
6245
6757
7269
7781
8293
8805
9317
9829
Segment.6.TargetSP
6246
6758
7270
7782
8294
8806
9318
9830
Segment.6.EndAction
6247
6759
7271
7783
8295
8807
9319
9831
Segment.6.EventOutputs
6248
6760
7272
7784
8296
8808
9320
9832
Segment.6.WaitFor
6249
6761
7273
7785
8297
8809
9321
9833
6250
6762
7274
7786
8298
8810
9322
9834
6251
6763
7275
7787
8299
8811
9323
9835
Segment.6.GobackSeg
Segment.6.GobackCycles
6252
6764
7276
7788
8300
8812
9324
9836
Segment.6.PVEvent
6253
6765
7277
7789
8301
8813
9325
9837
Segment.6.PVThreshold
6254
6766
7278
7790
8302
8814
9326
9838
Segment.6.UserVal
6255
6767
7279
7791
8303
8815
9327
9839
Segment.6.GsoakType
6256
6768
7280
7792
8304
8816
9328
9840
Segment.6.GsoakVal
6257
6769
7281
7793
8305
8817
9329
9841
Segment.6.TimeEvent
6258
6770
7282
7794
8306
8818
9330
9842
Segment.6.OnTime
6259
6771
7283
7795
8307
8819
9331
9843
Segment.6.OffTime
6260
6772
7284
7796
8308
8820
9332
9844
Segment.6.PIDSet
6261
6773
7285
7797
8309
8821
9333
9845
Segment.6.PVWait
6262
6774
7286
7798
8310
8822
9334
9846
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 297
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
PROGRAM NUMBER
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Segment.6.WaitVal
DECIMAL ADDRESSES (2.xx)
6263
6775
7287
7799
8311
8823
9335
8
9847
Segment.7.Type
6272
6784
7296
7808
8320
8832
9344
9856
Segment.7.Holdback
6273
6785
7297
7809
8321
8833
9345
9857
Segment.7.Duration
6276
6788
7300
7812
8324
8836
9348
9860
Segment.7.RampRate
6277
6789
7301
7813
8325
8837
9349
9861
Segment.7.TargetSP
6278
6790
7302
7814
8326
8838
9350
9862
Segment.7.EndAction
6279
6791
7303
7815
8327
8839
9351
9863
Segment.7.EventOutputs
6280
6792
7304
7816
8328
8840
9352
9864
Segment.7.WaitFor
6281
6793
7305
7817
8329
8841
9353
9865
6282
6794
7306
7818
8330
8842
9354
9866
Segment.7.GobackSeg
6283
6795
7307
7819
8331
8843
9355
9867
Segment.7.GobackCycles
6284
6796
7308
7820
8332
8844
9356
9868
Segment.7.PVEvent
6285
6797
7309
7821
8333
8845
9357
9869
Segment.7.PVThreshold
6286
6798
7310
7822
8334
8846
9358
9870
Segment.7.UserVal
6287
6799
7311
7823
8335
8847
9359
9871
Segment.7.GsoakType
6288
6800
7312
7824
8336
8848
9360
9872
Segment.7.GsoakVal
6289
6801
7313
7825
8337
8849
9361
9873
Segment.7.TimeEvent
6290
6802
7314
7826
8338
8850
9362
9874
Segment.7.OnTime
6291
6803
7315
7827
8339
8851
9363
9875
Segment.7.OffTime
6292
6804
7316
7828
8340
8852
9364
9876
Segment.7.PIDSet
6293
6805
7317
7829
8341
8853
9365
9877
Segment.7.PVWait
6294
6806
7318
7830
8342
8854
9366
9878
Segment.7.WaitVal
6295
6807
7319
7831
8343
8855
9367
9879
Segment.8.Type
6304
6816
7328
7840
8352
8864
9376
9888
Segment.8.Holdback
6305
6817
7329
7841
8353
8865
9377
9889
Segment.8.Duration
6308
6820
7332
7844
8356
8868
9380
9892
Segment.8.RampRate
6309
6821
7333
7845
8357
8869
9381
9893
Segment.8.TargetSP
6310
6822
7334
7846
8358
8870
9382
9894
Segment.8.EndAction
6311
6823
7335
7847
8359
8871
9383
9895
Segment.8.EventOutputs
6312
6824
7336
7848
8360
8872
9384
9896
Segment.8.WaitFor
6313
6825
7337
7849
8361
8873
9385
9897
6314
6826
7338
7850
8362
8874
9386
9898
Segment.8.GobackSeg
6315
6827
7339
7851
8363
8875
9387
9899
Segment.8.GobackCycles
6316
6828
7340
7852
8364
8876
9388
9900
Segment.8.PVEvent
6317
6829
7341
7853
8365
8877
9389
9901
Segment.8.PVThreshold
6318
6830
7342
7854
8366
8878
9390
9902
Segment.8.UserVal
6319
6831
7343
7855
8367
8879
9391
9903
Segment.8.GsoakType
6320
6832
7344
7856
8368
8880
9392
9904
Segment.8.GsoakVal
6321
6833
7345
7857
8369
8881
9393
9905
Segment.8.TimeEvent
6322
6834
7346
7858
8370
8882
9394
9906
Segment.8.OnTime
6323
6835
7347
7859
8371
8883
9395
9907
Segment.8.OffTime
6324
6836
7348
7860
8372
8884
9396
9908
Segment.8.PIDSet
6325
6837
7349
7861
8373
8885
9397
9909
Segment.8.PVWait
6326
6838
7350
7862
8374
8886
9398
9910
Segment.8.WaitVal
6327
6839
7351
7863
8375
8887
9399
9911
Segment.9.Type
6336
6848
7360
7872
8384
8896
9408
9920
Segment.9.Holdback
6337
6849
7361
7873
8385
8897
9409
9921
Segment.9.Duration
6340
6852
7364
7876
8388
8900
9412
9924
Segment.9.RampRate
6341
6853
7365
7877
8389
8901
9413
9925
Segment.9.TargetSP
6342
6854
7366
7878
8390
8902
9414
9926
Segment.9.EndAction
6343
6855
7367
7879
8391
8903
9415
9927
Segment.9.EventOutputs
6344
6856
7368
7880
8392
8904
9416
9928
Segment.9.WaitFor
6345
6857
7369
7881
8393
8905
9417
9929
6346
6858
7370
7882
8394
8906
9418
9930
Segment.9.GobackSeg
6347
6859
7371
7883
8395
8907
9419
9931
Segment.9.GobackCycles
6348
6860
7372
7884
8396
8908
9420
9932
Segment.9.PVEvent
6349
6861
7373
7885
8397
8909
9421
9933
Page 298
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
PROGRAM NUMBER
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Segment.9.PVThreshold
DECIMAL ADDRESSES (2.xx)
6350
6862
7374
7886
8398
8910
9422
9934
Segment.9.UserVal
6351
6863
7375
7887
8399
8911
9423
9935
Segment.9.GsoakType
6352
6864
7376
7888
8400
8912
9424
9936
Segment.9.GsoakVal
6353
6865
7377
7889
8401
8913
9425
9937
Segment.9.TimeEvent
6354
6866
7378
7890
8402
8914
9426
9938
Segment.9.OnTime
6355
6867
7379
7891
8403
8915
9427
9939
Segment.9.OffTime
6356
6868
7380
7892
8404
8916
9428
9940
Segment.9.PIDSet
6357
6869
7381
7893
8405
8917
9429
9941
Segment.9.PVWait
6358
6870
7382
7894
8406
8918
9430
9942
Segment.9.WaitVal
6359
6871
7383
7895
8407
8919
9431
9943
Segment.10.Type
6368
6880
7392
7904
8416
8928
9440
9952
Segment.10.Holdback
6369
6881
7393
7905
8417
8929
9441
9953
Segment.10.Duration
6372
6884
7396
7908
8420
8932
9444
9956
Segment.10.RampRate
6373
6885
7397
7909
8421
8933
9445
9957
Segment.10.TargetSP
6374
6886
7398
7910
8422
8934
9446
9958
Segment.10.EndAction
6375
6887
7399
7911
8423
8935
9447
9959
Segment.10.EventOutputs
6376
6888
7400
7912
8424
8936
9448
9960
Segment.10.WaitFor
6377
6889
7401
7913
8425
8937
9449
9961
6378
6890
7402
7914
8426
8938
9450
9962
Segment.10.GobackSeg
6379
6891
7403
7915
8427
8939
9451
9963
Segment.10.GobackCycles
6380
6892
7404
7916
8428
8940
9452
9964
Segment.10.PVEvent
6381
6893
7405
7917
8429
8941
9453
9965
Segment.10.PVThreshold
6382
6894
7406
7918
8430
8942
9454
9966
Segment.10.UserVal
6383
6895
7407
7919
8431
8943
9455
9967
Segment.10.GsoakType
6384
6896
7408
7920
8432
8944
9456
9968
Segment.10.GsoakVal
6385
6897
7409
7921
8433
8945
9457
9969
Segment.10.TimeEvent
6386
6898
7410
7922
8434
8946
9458
9970
Segment.10.OnTime
6387
6899
7411
7923
8435
8947
9459
9971
Segment.10.OffTime
6388
6900
7412
7924
8436
8948
9460
9972
Segment.10.PIDSet
6389
6901
7413
7925
8437
8949
9461
9973
Segment.10.PVWait
6390
6902
7414
7926
8438
8950
9462
9974
Segment.10.WaitVal
6391
6903
7415
7927
8439
8951
9463
9975
Segment.11.Type
6400
6912
7424
7936
8448
8960
9472
9984
Segment.11.Holdback
6401
6913
7425
7937
8449
8961
9473
9985
Segment.11.Duration
6404
6916
7428
7940
8452
8964
9476
9988
Segment.11.RampRate
6405
6917
7429
7941
8453
8965
9477
9989
Segment.11.TargetSP
6406
6918
7430
7942
8454
8966
9478
9990
Segment.11.EndAction
6407
6919
7431
7943
8455
8967
9479
9991
Segment.11.EventOutputs
6408
6920
7432
7944
8456
8968
9480
9992
Segment.11.WaitFor
6409
6921
7433
7945
8457
8969
9481
9993
6410
6922
7434
7946
8458
8970
9482
9994
Segment.11.GobackSeg
6411
6923
7435
7947
8459
8971
9483
9995
Segment.11.GobackCycles
6412
6924
7436
7948
8460
8972
9484
9996
Segment.11.PVEvent
6413
6925
7437
7949
8461
8973
9485
9997
Segment.11.PVThreshold
6414
6926
7438
7950
8462
8974
9486
9998
Segment.11.UserVal
6415
6927
7439
7951
8463
8975
9487
9999
Segment.11.GsoakType
6416
6928
7440
7952
8464
8976
9488
10000
Segment.11.GsoakVal
6417
6929
7441
7953
8465
8977
9489
10001
Segment.11.TimeEvent
6418
6930
7442
7954
8466
8978
9490
10002
Segment.11.OnTime
6419
6931
7443
7955
8467
8979
9491
10003
Segment.11.OffTime
6420
6932
7444
7956
8468
8980
9492
10004
Segment.11.PIDSet
6421
6933
7445
7957
8469
8981
9493
10005
Segment.11.PVWait
6422
6934
7446
7958
8470
8982
9494
10006
Segment.11.WaitVal
6423
6935
7447
7959
8471
8983
9495
10007
Segment.12.Type
6432
6944
7456
7968
8480
8992
9504
10016
Segment.12.Holdback
6433
6945
7457
7969
8481
8993
9505
10017
Segment.12.Duration
6436
6948
7460
7972
8484
8996
9508
10020
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 299
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
PROGRAM NUMBER
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2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Segment.12.RampRate
DECIMAL ADDRESSES (2.xx)
6437
6949
7461
7973
8485
8997
9509
10021
Segment.12.TargetSP
6438
6950
7462
7974
8486
8998
9510
10022
Segment.12.EndAction
6439
6951
7463
7975
8487
8999
9511
10023
Segment.12.EventOutputs
6440
6952
7464
7976
8488
9000
9512
10024
Segment.12.WaitFor
6441
6953
7465
7977
8489
9001
9513
10025
6442
6954
7466
7978
8490
9002
9514
10026
Segment.12.GobackSeg
6443
6955
7467
7979
8491
9003
9515
10027
Segment.12.GobackCycles
6444
6956
7468
7980
8492
9004
9516
10028
Segment.12.PVEvent
6445
6957
7469
7981
8493
9005
9517
10029
Segment.12.PVThreshold
6446
6958
7470
7982
8494
9006
9518
10030
Segment.12.UserVal
6447
6959
7471
7983
8495
9007
9519
10031
Segment.12.GsoakType
6448
6960
7472
7984
8496
9008
9520
10032
Segment.12.GsoakVal
6449
6961
7473
7985
8497
9009
9521
10033
Segment.12.TimeEvent
6450
6962
7474
7986
8498
9010
9522
10034
Segment.12.OnTime
6451
6963
7475
7987
8499
9011
9523
10035
Segment.12.OffTime
6452
6964
7476
7988
8500
9012
9524
10036
Segment.12.PIDSet
6453
6965
7477
7989
8501
9013
9525
10037
Segment.12.PVWait
6454
6966
7478
7990
8502
9014
9526
10038
Segment.12.WaitVal
6455
6967
7479
7991
8503
9015
9527
10039
Segment.13.Type
6464
6976
7488
8000
8512
9024
9536
10048
Segment.13.Holdback
6465
6977
7489
8001
8513
9025
9537
10049
Segment.13.Duration
6468
6980
7492
8004
8516
9028
9540
10052
Segment.13.RampRate
6469
6981
7493
8005
8517
9029
9541
10053
Segment.13.TargetSP
6470
6982
7494
8006
8518
9030
9542
10054
Segment.13.EndAction
6471
6983
7495
8007
8519
9031
9543
10055
Segment.13.EventOutputs
6472
6984
7496
8008
8520
9032
9544
10056
Segment.13.WaitFor
6473
6985
7497
8009
8521
9033
9545
10057
6474
6986
7498
8010
8522
9034
9546
10058
Segment.13.GobackSeg
6475
6987
7499
8011
8523
9035
9547
10059
Segment.13.GobackCycles
6476
6988
7500
8012
8524
9036
9548
10060
Segment.13.PVEvent
6477
6989
7501
8013
8525
9037
9549
10061
Segment.13.PVThreshold
6478
6990
7502
8014
8526
9038
9550
10062
Segment.13.UserVal
6479
6991
7503
8015
8527
9039
9551
10063
Segment.13.GsoakType
6480
6992
7504
8016
8528
9040
9552
10064
Segment.13.GsoakVal
6481
6993
7505
8017
8529
9041
9553
10065
Segment.13.TimeEvent
6482
6994
7506
8018
8530
9042
9554
10066
Segment.13.OnTime
6483
6995
7507
8019
8531
9043
9555
10067
Segment.13.OffTime
6484
6996
7508
8020
8532
9044
9556
10068
Segment.13.PIDSet
6485
6997
7509
8021
8533
9045
9557
10069
Segment.13.PVWait
6486
6998
7510
8022
8534
9046
9558
10070
Segment.13.WaitVal
6487
6999
7511
8023
8535
9047
9559
10071
Segment.14.Type
6496
7008
7520
8032
8544
9056
9568
10080
Segment.14.Holdback
6497
7009
7521
8033
8545
9057
9569
10081
Segment.14.Duration
6500
7012
7524
8036
8548
9060
9572
10084
Segment.14.RampRate
6501
7013
7525
8037
8549
9061
9573
10085
Segment.14.TargetSP
6502
7014
7526
8038
8550
9062
9574
10086
Segment.14.EndAction
6503
7015
7527
8039
8551
9063
9575
10087
Segment.14.EventOutputs
6504
7016
7528
8040
8552
9064
9576
10088
Segment.14.WaitFor
6505
7017
7529
8041
8553
9065
9577
10089
6506
7018
7530
8042
8554
9066
9578
10090
Segment.14.GobackSeg
6507
7019
7531
8043
8555
9067
9579
10091
Segment.14.GobackCycles
6508
7020
7532
8044
8556
9068
9580
10092
Segment.14.PVEvent
6509
7021
7533
8045
8557
9069
9581
10093
Segment.14.PVThreshold
6510
7022
7534
8046
8558
9070
9582
10094
Segment.14.UserVal
6511
7023
7535
8047
8559
9071
9583
10095
Segment.14.GsoakType
6512
7024
7536
8048
8560
9072
9584
10096
Segment.14.GsoakVal
6513
7025
7537
8049
8561
9073
9585
10097
Page 300
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
PROGRAM NUMBER
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Segment.14.TimeEvent
6514
7026
7538
8050
8562
9074
9586
10098
Segment.14.OnTime
6515
7027
7539
8051
8563
9075
9587
10099
Segment.14.OffTime
6516
7028
7540
8052
8564
9076
9588
10100
Segment.14.PIDSet
6517
7029
7541
8053
8565
9077
9589
10101
Segment.14.PVWait
6518
7030
7542
8054
8566
9078
9590
10102
Segment.14.WaitVal
6519
7031
7543
8055
8567
9079
9591
10103
Segment.15.Type
6528
7040
7552
8064
8576
9088
9600
10112
Segment.15.Holdback
6529
7041
7553
8065
8577
9089
9601
10113
Segment.15.Duration
6532
7044
7556
8068
8580
9092
9604
10116
Segment.15.RampRate
6533
7045
7557
8069
8581
9093
9605
10117
Segment.15.TargetSP
6534
7046
7558
8070
8582
9094
9606
10118
Segment.15.EndAction
6535
7047
7559
8071
8583
9095
9607
10119
Segment.15.EventOutputs
6536
7048
7560
8072
8584
9096
9608
10120
Segment.15.WaitFor
6537
7049
7561
8073
8585
9097
9609
10121
6538
7050
7562
8074
8586
9098
9610
10122
Segment.15.GobackSeg
6539
7051
7563
8075
8587
9099
9611
10123
Segment.15.GobackCycles
6540
7052
7564
8076
8588
9100
9612
10124
Segment.15.PVEvent
6541
7053
7565
8077
8589
9101
9613
10125
Segment.15.PVThreshold
6542
7054
7566
8078
8590
9102
9614
10126
Segment.15.UserVal
6543
7055
7567
8079
8591
9103
9615
10127
Segment.15.GsoakType
6544
7056
7568
8080
8592
9104
9616
10128
Segment.15.GsoakVal
6545
7057
7569
8081
8593
9105
9617
10129
Segment.15.TimeEvent
6546
7058
7570
8082
8594
9106
9618
10130
Segment.15.OnTime
6547
7059
7571
8083
8595
9107
9619
10131
Segment.15.OffTime
6548
7060
7572
8084
8596
9108
9620
10132
Segment.15.PIDSet
6549
7061
7573
8085
8597
9109
9621
10133
Segment.15.PVWait
6550
7062
7574
8086
8598
9110
9622
10134
Segment.15.WaitVal
6551
7063
7575
8087
8599
9111
9623
10135
Segment.16.Type
6560
7072
7584
8096
8608
9120
9632
10144
Segment.16.Holdback
6561
7073
7585
8097
8609
9121
9633
10145
Segment.16.Duration
6564
7076
7588
8100
8612
9124
9636
10148
Segment.16.RampRate
6565
7077
7589
8101
8613
9125
9637
10149
Segment.16.TargetSP
6566
7078
7590
8102
8614
9126
9638
10150
Segment.16.EndAction
6567
7079
7591
8103
8615
9127
9639
10151
Segment.16.EventOutputs
6568
7080
7592
8104
8616
9128
9640
10152
Segment.16.WaitFor
6569
7081
7593
8105
8617
9129
9641
10153
6570
7082
7594
8106
8618
9130
9642
10154
Segment.16.GobackSeg
6571
7083
7595
8107
8619
9131
9643
10155
Segment.16.GobackCycles
6572
7084
7596
8108
8620
9132
9644
10156
Segment.16.PVEvent
6573
7085
7597
8109
8621
9133
9645
10157
Segment.16.PVThreshold
6574
7086
7598
8110
8622
9134
9646
10158
Segment.16.UserVal
6575
7087
7599
8111
8623
9135
9647
10159
Segment.16.GsoakType
6576
7088
7600
8112
8624
9136
9648
10160
Segment.16.GsoakVal
6577
7089
7601
8113
8625
9137
9649
10161
Segment.16.TimeEvent
6578
7090
7602
8114
8626
9138
9650
10162
Segment.16.OnTime
6579
7091
7603
8115
8627
9139
9651
10163
Segment.16.OffTime
6580
7092
7604
8116
8628
9140
9652
10164
Segment.16.PIDSet
6581
7093
7605
8117
8629
9141
9653
10165
Segment.16.PVWait
6582
7094
7606
8118
8630
9142
9654
10166
Segment.16.WaitVal
6583
7095
7607
8119
8631
9143
9655
10167
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
DECIMAL ADDRESSES (2.xx)
Page 301
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
25.2.2
Version 2.xx Programmer Addresses - Hexadecimal
PROGRAM NUMBER HEXADECIMAL ADDRESS (2.xx)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Comms.n.ProgramNumber
15C0
1600
1640
1680
16C0
1700
1740
8
1780
Program.n.HoldbackVal
15C1
1601
1641
1681
16C1
1701
1741
1781
Program.n.RampUnits
15C2
1602
1642
1682
16C2
1702
1742
1782
Program.n.DwellUnits
15C3
1603
1643
1683
16C3
1703
1743
1783
Program.n.Cycles
15C4
1604
1644
1684
16C4
1704
1744
1784
Programmer.n.PowerFailAct
15C5
1605
1645
1685
16C5
1705
1745
1785
Programmer.n.Servo
15C6
1606
1646
1686
16C6
1706
1746
1786
Programmer.n.ResetEventOuts
15C8
1608
1648
1688
16C8
1708
1748
1788
Programmer.n.CurProg
15C9
1609
1649
1689
16C9
1709
1749
1789
Programmer.n.CurSeg
15CA
160A
164A
168A
16CA
170A
174A
178A
Programmer.n.ProgStatus
15CB
160B
164B
168B
16CB
170B
174B
178B
Programmer.n.PSP
15CC
160C
164C
168C
16CC
170C
174C
178C
Programmer.n.CyclesLeft
15CD
160D
164D
168D
16CD
170D
174D
178D
Programmer.n.CurSegType
15CE
160E
164E
168E
16CE
170E
174E
178E
Programmer.n.SegTarget
15CF
160F
164F
168F
16CF
170F
174F
178F
Programmer.n.SegRate
15D0
1610
1650
1690
16D0
1710
1750
1790
Programmer.n.ProgTimeLeft
15D1
1611
1651
1691
16D1
1711
1751
1791
Programmer.n.PVIn
15D2
1612
1652
1692
16D2
1712
1752
1792
Programmer.n.SPIn
15D3
1613
1653
1693
16D3
1713
1753
1793
Programmer.n.EventOuts
15D4
1614
1654
1694
16D4
1714
1754
1794
Programmer.n.SegTimeLeft
15D5
1615
1655
1695
16D5
1715
1755
1795
Programmer.n.EndOfSeg
15D6
1616
1656
1696
16D6
1716
1756
1796
Programmer.n.SyncIn
15D7
1617
1657
1697
16D7
1717
1757
1797
Programmer.n.FastRun
15D8
1618
1658
1698
16D8
1718
1758
1798
Programmer.n.AdvSeg
15D9
1619
1659
1699
16D9
1719
1759
1799
Programmer.n.SkipSeg
15DA
161A
165A
169A
16DA
171A
175A
179A
Program.n.PVStart
15DD
161D
165D
169D
16DD
171D
175D
179D
Programmer.n.PrgIn1
15E2
1622
1662
16A2
16E2
1722
1762
17A2
Programmer.n.PrgIn2
15E3
1623
1663
16A3
16E3
1723
1763
17A3
Programmer.n.PVWaitIP
15E4
1624
1664
16A4
16E4
1724
1764
17A4
Programmer.n.ProgError
15E5
1625
1665
16A5
16E5
1725
1765
17A5
Programmer.n.PVEventOP
15E6
1626
1666
16A6
16E6
1726
1766
17A6
Programmer.n.GoBackCyclesLeft
160D
164D
168D
16CD
170D
174D
178D
17CD
Programmer.n.DelayTime
1635
1675
16B5
16F5
1735
1775
17B5
17F5
Programmer.n.ProgReset
165E
169E
16DE
171E
175E
179E
17DE
181E
Programmer.n.ProgRun
1688
16C8
1708
1748
1788
17C8
1808
1848
Programmer.n.ProgHold
16B3
16F3
1733
1773
17B3
17F3
1833
1873
Programmer.n.ProgRunHold
16DF
171F
175F
179F
17DF
181F
185F
189F
Programmer.n.ProgRunReset
170C
174C
178C
17CC
180C
184C
188C
18CC
Segment.1.Type
17C0
19C0
1BC0
1DC0
1FC0
21C0
23C0
25C0
Segment.1.Holdback
17C1
19C1
1BC1
1DC1
1FC1
21C1
23C1
25C1
Segment.1.CallProgNum
17C2
19C2
1BC2
1DC2
1FC2
21C2
23C2
25C2
Segment.1.Cycles
17C3
19C3
1BC3
1DC3
1FC3
21C3
23C3
25C3
Segment.1.Duration
17C4
19C4
1BC4
1DC4
1FC4
21C4
23C4
25C4
Segment.1.RampRate
17C5
19C5
1BC5
1DC5
1FC5
21C5
23C5
25C5
Segment.1.TargetSP
17C6
19C6
1BC6
1DC6
1FC6
21C6
23C6
25C6
Segment.1.EndAction
17C7
19C7
1BC7
1DC7
1FC7
21C7
23C7
25C7
Segment.1.EventOutputs
17C8
19C8
1BC8
1DC8
1FC8
21C8
23C8
25C8
Segment.1.WaitFor
17C9
19C9
1BC9
1DC9
1FC9
21C9
23C9
25C9
17CA
19CA
1BCA
1DCA
1FCA
21CA
23CA
25CA
Segment.1.PVEvent
17CD
19CD
1BCD
1DCD
1FCD
21CD
23CD
25CD
Segment.1.PVThreshold
17CE
19CE
1BCE
1DCE
1FCE
21CE
23CE
25CE
Segment.1.UserVal
17CF
19CF
1BCF
1DCF
1FCF
21CF
23CF
25CF
Segment.1.GsoakType
17D0
19D0
1BD0
1DD0
1FD0
21D0
23D0
25D0
Segment.1.GsoakVal
17D1
19D1
1BD1
1DD1
1FD1
21D1
23D1
25D1
Page 302
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Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
PROGRAM NUMBER HEXADECIMAL ADDRESS (2.xx)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Segment.1.TimeEvent
17D2
19D2
1BD2
1DD2
1FD2
21D2
23D2
25D2
Segment.1.OnTime
17D3
19D3
1BD3
1DD3
1FD3
21D3
23D3
25D3
Segment.1.OffTime
17D4
19D4
1BD4
1DD4
1FD4
21D4
23D4
25D4
Segment.1.PIDSet
17D5
19D5
1BD5
1DD5
1FD5
21D5
23D5
25D5
Segment.1.PVWait
17D6
19D6
1BD6
1DD6
1FD6
21D6
23D6
25D6
Segment.1.WaitVal
17D7
19D7
1BD7
1DD7
1FD7
21D7
23D7
25D7
Segment.2.Type
17E0
19E0
1BE0
1DE0
1FE0
21E0
23E0
25E0
Segment.2.Holdback
17E1
19E1
1BE1
1DE1
1FE1
21E1
23E1
25E1
Segment.2.Duration
17E4
19E4
1BE4
1DE4
1FE4
21E4
23E4
25E4
Segment.2.RampRate
17E5
19E5
1BE5
1DE5
1FE5
21E5
23E5
25E5
Segment.2.TargetSP
17E6
19E6
1BE6
1DE6
1FE6
21E6
23E6
25E6
Segment.2.EndAction
17E7
19E7
1BE7
1DE7
1FE7
21E7
23E7
25E7
Segment.2.EventOutputs
17E8
19E8
1BE8
1DE8
1FE8
21E8
23E8
25E8
Segment.2.WaitFor
17E9
19E9
1BE9
1DE9
1FE9
21E9
23E9
25E9
17EA
19EA
1BEA
1DEA
1FEA
21EA
23EA
25EA
Segment.2.GobackSeg
17EB
19EB
1BEB
1DEB
1FEB
21EB
23EB
25EB
Segment.2.GobackCycles
17EC
19EC
1BEC
1DEC
1FEC
21EC
23EC
25EC
Segment.2.PVEvent
17ED
19ED
1BED
1DED
1FED
21ED
23ED
25ED
Segment.2.PVThreshold
17EE
19EE
1BEE
1DEE
1FEE
21EE
23EE
25EE
Segment.2.UserVal
17EF
19EF
1BEF
1DEF
1FEF
21EF
23EF
25EF
Segment.2.GsoakType
17F0
19F0
1BF0
1DF0
1FF0
21F0
23F0
25F0
Segment.2.GsoakVal
17F1
19F1
1BF1
1DF1
1FF1
21F1
23F1
25F1
Segment.2.TimeEvent
17F2
19F2
1BF2
1DF2
1FF2
21F2
23F2
25F2
Segment.2.OnTime
17F3
19F3
1BF3
1DF3
1FF3
21F3
23F3
25F3
Segment.2.OffTime
17F4
19F4
1BF4
1DF4
1FF4
21F4
23F4
25F4
Segment.2.PIDSet
17F5
19F5
1BF5
1DF5
1FF5
21F5
23F5
25F5
Segment.2.PVWait
17F6
19F6
1BF6
1DF6
1FF6
21F6
23F6
25F6
Segment.2.WaitVal
17F7
19F7
1BF7
1DF7
1FF7
21F7
23F7
25F7
Segment.3.Type
1800
1A00
1C00
1E00
2000
2200
2400
2600
Segment.3.Holdback
1801
1A01
1C01
1E01
2001
2201
2401
2601
Segment.3.Duration
1804
1A04
1C04
1E04
2004
2204
2404
2604
Segment.3.RampRate
1805
1A05
1C05
1E05
2005
2205
2405
2605
Segment.3.TargetSP
1806
1A06
1C06
1E06
2006
2206
2406
2606
Segment.3.EndAction
1807
1A07
1C07
1E07
2007
2207
2407
2607
Segment.3.EventOutputs
1808
1A08
1C08
1E08
2008
2208
2408
2608
Segment.3.WaitFor
1809
1A09
1C09
1E09
2009
2209
2409
2609
180A
1A0A
1C0A
1E0A
200A
220A
240A
260A
Segment.3.GobackSeg
180B
1A0B
1C0B
1E0B
200B
220B
240B
260B
Segment.3.GobackCycles
180C
1A0C
1C0C
1E0C
200C
220C
240C
260C
Segment.3.PVEvent
180D
1A0D
1C0D
1E0D
200D
220D
240D
260D
Segment.3.PVThreshold
180E
1A0E
1C0E
1E0E
200E
220E
240E
260E
Segment.3.UserVal
180F
1A0F
1C0F
1E0F
200F
220F
240F
260F
Segment.3.GsoakType
1810
1A10
1C10
1E10
2010
2210
2410
2610
Segment.3.GsoakVal
1811
1A11
1C11
1E11
2011
2211
2411
2611
Segment.3.TimeEvent
1812
1A12
1C12
1E12
2012
2212
2412
2612
Segment.3.OnTime
1813
1A13
1C13
1E13
2013
2213
2413
2613
Segment.3.OffTime
1814
1A14
1C14
1E14
2014
2214
2414
2614
Segment.3.PIDSet
1815
1A15
1C15
1E15
2015
2215
2415
2615
Segment.3.PVWait
1816
1A16
1C16
1E16
2016
2216
2416
2616
Segment.3.WaitVal
1817
1A17
1C17
1E17
2017
2217
2417
2617
Segment.4.Type
1820
1A20
1C20
1E20
2020
2220
2420
2620
Segment.4.Holdback
1821
1A21
1C21
1E21
2021
2221
2421
2621
Segment.4.Duration
1824
1A24
1C24
1E24
2024
2224
2424
2624
Segment.4.RampRate
1825
1A25
1C25
1E25
2025
2225
2425
2625
Segment.4.TargetSP
1826
1A26
1C26
1E26
2026
2226
2426
2626
Segment.4.EndAction
1827
1A27
1C27
1E27
2027
2227
2427
2627
Segment.4.EventOutputs
1828
1A28
1C28
1E28
2028
2228
2428
2628
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2
3
4
5
6
7
Segment.4.WaitFor
1829
1A29
1C29
1E29
2029
2229
2429
8
2629
182A
1A2A
1C2A
1E2A
202A
222A
242A
262A
Segment.4.GobackSeg
182B
1A2B
1C2B
1E2B
202B
222B
242B
262B
Segment.4.GobackCycles
182C
1A2C
1C2C
1E2C
202C
222C
242C
262C
Segment.4.PVEvent
182D
1A2D
1C2D
1E2D
202D
222D
242D
262D
Segment.4.PVThreshold
182E
1A2E
1C2E
1E2E
202E
222E
242E
262E
Segment.4.UserVal
182F
1A2F
1C2F
1E2F
202F
222F
242F
262F
Segment.4.GsoakType
1830
1A30
1C30
1E30
2030
2230
2430
2630
Segment.4.GsoakVal
1831
1A31
1C31
1E31
2031
2231
2431
2631
Segment.4.TimeEvent
1832
1A32
1C32
1E32
2032
2232
2432
2632
Segment.4.OnTime
1833
1A33
1C33
1E33
2033
2233
2433
2633
Segment.4.OffTime
1834
1A34
1C34
1E34
2034
2234
2434
2634
Segment.4.PIDSet
1835
1A35
1C35
1E35
2035
2235
2435
2635
Segment.4.PVWait
1836
1A36
1C36
1E36
2036
2236
2436
2636
Segment.4.WaitVal
1837
1A37
1C37
1E37
2037
2237
2437
2637
Segment.5.Type
1840
1A40
1C40
1E40
2040
2240
2440
2640
Segment.5.Holdback
1841
1A41
1C41
1E41
2041
2241
2441
2641
Segment.5.Duration
1844
1A44
1C44
1E44
2044
2244
2444
2644
Segment.5.RampRate
1845
1A45
1C45
1E45
2045
2245
2445
2645
Segment.5.TargetSP
1846
1A46
1C46
1E46
2046
2246
2446
2646
Segment.5.EndAction
1847
1A47
1C47
1E47
2047
2247
2447
2647
Segment.5.EventOutputs
1848
1A48
1C48
1E48
2048
2248
2448
2648
Segment.5.WaitFor
1849
1A49
1C49
1E49
2049
2249
2449
2649
184A
1A4A
1C4A
1E4A
204A
224A
244A
264A
Segment.5.GobackSeg
184B
1A4B
1C4B
1E4B
204B
224B
244B
264B
Segment.5.GobackCycles
184C
1A4C
1C4C
1E4C
204C
224C
244C
264C
Segment.5.PVEvent
184D
1A4D
1C4D
1E4D
204D
224D
244D
264D
Segment.5.PVThreshold
184E
1A4E
1C4E
1E4E
204E
224E
244E
264E
Segment.5.UserVal
184F
1A4F
1C4F
1E4F
204F
224F
244F
264F
Segment.5.GsoakType
1850
1A50
1C50
1E50
2050
2250
2450
2650
Segment.5.GsoakVal
1851
1A51
1C51
1E51
2051
2251
2451
2651
Segment.5.TimeEvent
1852
1A52
1C52
1E52
2052
2252
2452
2652
Segment.5.OnTime
1853
1A53
1C53
1E53
2053
2253
2453
2653
Segment.5.OffTime
1854
1A54
1C54
1E54
2054
2254
2454
2654
Segment.5.PIDSet
1855
1A55
1C55
1E55
2055
2255
2455
2655
Segment.5.PVWait
1856
1A56
1C56
1E56
2056
2256
2456
2656
Segment.5.WaitVal
1857
1A57
1C57
1E57
2057
2257
2457
2657
Segment.6.Type
1860
1A60
1C60
1E60
2060
2260
2460
2660
Segment.6.Holdback
1861
1A61
1C61
1E61
2061
2261
2461
2661
Segment.6.Duration
1864
1A64
1C64
1E64
2064
2264
2464
2664
Segment.6.RampRate
1865
1A65
1C65
1E65
2065
2265
2465
2665
Segment.6.TargetSP
1866
1A66
1C66
1E66
2066
2266
2466
2666
Segment.6.EndAction
1867
1A67
1C67
1E67
2067
2267
2467
2667
Segment.6.EventOutputs
1868
1A68
1C68
1E68
2068
2268
2468
2668
Segment.6.WaitFor
1869
1A69
1C69
1E69
2069
2269
2469
2669
186A
1A6A
1C6A
1E6A
206A
226A
246A
266A
Segment.6.GobackSeg
186B
1A6B
1C6B
1E6B
206B
226B
246B
266B
Segment.6.GobackCycles
186C
1A6C
1C6C
1E6C
206C
226C
246C
266C
Segment.6.PVEvent
186D
1A6D
1C6D
1E6D
206D
226D
246D
266D
Segment.6.PVThreshold
186E
1A6E
1C6E
1E6E
206E
226E
246E
266E
Segment.6.UserVal
186F
1A6F
1C6F
1E6F
206F
226F
246F
266F
Segment.6.GsoakType
1870
1A70
1C70
1E70
2070
2270
2470
2670
Segment.6.GsoakVal
1871
1A71
1C71
1E71
2071
2271
2471
2671
Segment.6.TimeEvent
1872
1A72
1C72
1E72
2072
2272
2472
2672
Segment.6.OnTime
1873
1A73
1C73
1E73
2073
2273
2473
2673
Segment.6.OffTime
1874
1A74
1C74
1E74
2074
2274
2474
2674
Segment.6.PIDSet
1875
1A75
1C75
1E75
2075
2275
2475
2675
Page 304
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Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
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2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Segment.6.PVWait
1876
1A76
1C76
1E76
2076
2276
2476
2676
Segment.6.WaitVal
1877
1A77
1C77
1E77
2077
2277
2477
2677
Segment.7.Type
1880
1A80
1C80
1E80
2080
2280
2480
2680
Segment.7.Holdback
1881
1A81
1C81
1E81
2081
2281
2481
2681
Segment.7.Duration
1884
1A84
1C84
1E84
2084
2284
2484
2684
Segment.7.RampRate
1885
1A85
1C85
1E85
2085
2285
2485
2685
Segment.7.TargetSP
1886
1A86
1C86
1E86
2086
2286
2486
2686
Segment.7.EndAction
1887
1A87
1C87
1E87
2087
2287
2487
2687
Segment.7.EventOutputs
1888
1A88
1C88
1E88
2088
2288
2488
2688
Segment.7.WaitFor
1889
1A89
1C89
1E89
2089
2289
2489
2689
188A
1A8A
1C8A
1E8A
208A
228A
248A
268A
Segment.7.GobackSeg
188B
1A8B
1C8B
1E8B
208B
228B
248B
268B
Segment.7.GobackCycles
188C
1A8C
1C8C
1E8C
208C
228C
248C
268C
Segment.7.PVEvent
188D
1A8D
1C8D
1E8D
208D
228D
248D
268D
Segment.7.PVThreshold
188E
1A8E
1C8E
1E8E
208E
228E
248E
268E
Segment.7.UserVal
188F
1A8F
1C8F
1E8F
208F
228F
248F
268F
Segment.7.GsoakType
1890
1A90
1C90
1E90
2090
2290
2490
2690
Segment.7.GsoakVal
1891
1A91
1C91
1E91
2091
2291
2491
2691
Segment.7.TimeEvent
1892
1A92
1C92
1E92
2092
2292
2492
2692
Segment.7.OnTime
1893
1A93
1C93
1E93
2093
2293
2493
2693
Segment.7.OffTime
1894
1A94
1C94
1E94
2094
2294
2494
2694
Segment.7.PIDSet
1895
1A95
1C95
1E95
2095
2295
2495
2695
Segment.7.PVWait
1896
1A96
1C96
1E96
2096
2296
2496
2696
Segment.7.WaitVal
1897
1A97
1C97
1E97
2097
2297
2497
2697
Segment.8.Type
18A0
1AA0
1CA0
1EA0
20A0
22A0
24A0
26A0
Segment.8.Holdback
18A1
1AA1
1CA1
1EA1
20A1
22A1
24A1
26A1
Segment.8.Duration
18A4
1AA4
1CA4
1EA4
20A4
22A4
24A4
26A4
Segment.8.RampRate
18A5
1AA5
1CA5
1EA5
20A5
22A5
24A5
26A5
Segment.8.TargetSP
18A6
1AA6
1CA6
1EA6
20A6
22A6
24A6
26A6
Segment.8.EndAction
18A7
1AA7
1CA7
1EA7
20A7
22A7
24A7
26A7
Segment.8.EventOutputs
18A8
1AA8
1CA8
1EA8
20A8
22A8
24A8
26A8
Segment.8.WaitFor
18A9
1AA9
1CA9
1EA9
20A9
22A9
24A9
26A9
18AA
1AAA
1CAA
1EAA
20AA
22AA
24AA
26AA
Segment.8.GobackSeg
18AB
1AAB
1CAB
1EAB
20AB
22AB
24AB
26AB
Segment.8.GobackCycles
18AC
1AAC
1CAC
1EAC
20AC
22AC
24AC
26AC
Segment.8.PVEvent
18AD
1AAD
1CAD
1EAD
20AD
22AD
24AD
26AD
Segment.8.PVThreshold
18AE
1AAE
1CAE
1EAE
20AE
22AE
24AE
26AE
Segment.8.UserVal
18AF
1AAF
1CAF
1EAF
20AF
22AF
24AF
26AF
Segment.8.GsoakType
18B0
1AB0
1CB0
1EB0
20B0
22B0
24B0
26B0
Segment.8.GsoakVal
18B1
1AB1
1CB1
1EB1
20B1
22B1
24B1
26B1
Segment.8.TimeEvent
18B2
1AB2
1CB2
1EB2
20B2
22B2
24B2
26B2
Segment.8.OnTime
18B3
1AB3
1CB3
1EB3
20B3
22B3
24B3
26B3
Segment.8.OffTime
18B4
1AB4
1CB4
1EB4
20B4
22B4
24B4
26B4
Segment.8.PIDSet
18B5
1AB5
1CB5
1EB5
20B5
22B5
24B5
26B5
Segment.8.PVWait
18B6
1AB6
1CB6
1EB6
20B6
22B6
24B6
26B6
Segment.8.WaitVal
18B7
1AB7
1CB7
1EB7
20B7
22B7
24B7
26B7
Segment.9.Type
18C0
1AC0
1CC0
1EC0
20C0
22C0
24C0
26C0
Segment.9.Holdback
18C1
1AC1
1CC1
1EC1
20C1
22C1
24C1
26C1
Segment.9.Duration
18C4
1AC4
1CC4
1EC4
20C4
22C4
24C4
26C4
Segment.9.RampRate
18C5
1AC5
1CC5
1EC5
20C5
22C5
24C5
26C5
Segment.9.TargetSP
18C6
1AC6
1CC6
1EC6
20C6
22C6
24C6
26C6
Segment.9.EndAction
18C7
1AC7
1CC7
1EC7
20C7
22C7
24C7
26C7
Segment.9.EventOutputs
18C8
1AC8
1CC8
1EC8
20C8
22C8
24C8
26C8
Segment.9.WaitFor
18C9
1AC9
1CC9
1EC9
20C9
22C9
24C9
26C9
18CA
1ACA
1CCA
1ECA
20CA
22CA
24CA
26CA
Segment.9.GobackSeg
18CB
1ACB
1CCB
1ECB
20CB
22CB
24CB
26CB
Segment.9.GobackCycles
18CC
1ACC
1CCC
1ECC
20CC
22CC
24CC
26CC
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7
8
Segment.9.PVEvent
18CD
1ACD
1CCD
1ECD
20CD
22CD
24CD
26CD
Segment.9.PVThreshold
18CE
1ACE
1CCE
1ECE
20CE
22CE
24CE
26CE
Segment.9.UserVal
18CF
1ACF
1CCF
1ECF
20CF
22CF
24CF
26CF
Segment.9.GsoakType
18D0
1AD0
1CD0
1ED0
20D0
22D0
24D0
26D0
Segment.9.GsoakVal
18D1
1AD1
1CD1
1ED1
20D1
22D1
24D1
26D1
Segment.9.TimeEvent
18D2
1AD2
1CD2
1ED2
20D2
22D2
24D2
26D2
Segment.9.OnTime
18D3
1AD3
1CD3
1ED3
20D3
22D3
24D3
26D3
Segment.9.OffTime
18D4
1AD4
1CD4
1ED4
20D4
22D4
24D4
26D4
Segment.9.PIDSet
18D5
1AD5
1CD5
1ED5
20D5
22D5
24D5
26D5
Segment.9.PVWait
18D6
1AD6
1CD6
1ED6
20D6
22D6
24D6
26D6
Segment.9.WaitVal
18D7
1AD7
1CD7
1ED7
20D7
22D7
24D7
26D7
Segment.10.Type
18E0
1AE0
1CE0
1EE0
20E0
22E0
24E0
26E0
Segment.10.Holdback
18E1
1AE1
1CE1
1EE1
20E1
22E1
24E1
26E1
Segment.10.Duration
18E4
1AE4
1CE4
1EE4
20E4
22E4
24E4
26E4
Segment.10.RampRate
18E5
1AE5
1CE5
1EE5
20E5
22E5
24E5
26E5
Segment.10.TargetSP
18E6
1AE6
1CE6
1EE6
20E6
22E6
24E6
26E6
Segment.10.EndAction
18E7
1AE7
1CE7
1EE7
20E7
22E7
24E7
26E7
Segment.10.EventOutputs
18E8
1AE8
1CE8
1EE8
20E8
22E8
24E8
26E8
Segment.10.WaitFor
18E9
1AE9
1CE9
1EE9
20E9
22E9
24E9
26E9
18EA
1AEA
1CEA
1EEA
20EA
22EA
24EA
26EA
18EB
1AEB
1CEB
1EEB
20EB
22EB
24EB
26EB
Segment.10.GobackSeg
Segment.10.GobackCycles
18EC
1AEC
1CEC
1EEC
20EC
22EC
24EC
26EC
Segment.10.PVEvent
18ED
1AED
1CED
1EED
20ED
22ED
24ED
26ED
Segment.10.PVThreshold
18EE
1AEE
1CEE
1EEE
20EE
22EE
24EE
26EE
Segment.10.UserVal
18EF
1AEF
1CEF
1EEF
20EF
22EF
24EF
26EF
Segment.10.GsoakType
18F0
1AF0
1CF0
1EF0
20F0
22F0
24F0
26F0
Segment.10.GsoakVal
18F1
1AF1
1CF1
1EF1
20F1
22F1
24F1
26F1
Segment.10.TimeEvent
18F2
1AF2
1CF2
1EF2
20F2
22F2
24F2
26F2
Segment.10.OnTime
18F3
1AF3
1CF3
1EF3
20F3
22F3
24F3
26F3
Segment.10.OffTime
18F4
1AF4
1CF4
1EF4
20F4
22F4
24F4
26F4
Segment.10.PIDSet
18F5
1AF5
1CF5
1EF5
20F5
22F5
24F5
26F5
Segment.10.PVWait
18F6
1AF6
1CF6
1EF6
20F6
22F6
24F6
26F6
Segment.10.WaitVal
18F7
1AF7
1CF7
1EF7
20F7
22F7
24F7
26F7
Segment.11.Type
1900
1B00
1D00
1F00
2100
2300
2500
2700
Segment.11.Holdback
1901
1B01
1D01
1F01
2101
2301
2501
2701
Segment.11.Duration
1904
1B04
1D04
1F04
2104
2304
2504
2704
Segment.11.RampRate
1905
1B05
1D05
1F05
2105
2305
2505
2705
Segment.11.TargetSP
1906
1B06
1D06
1F06
2106
2306
2506
2706
Segment.11.EndAction
1907
1B07
1D07
1F07
2107
2307
2507
2707
Segment.11.EventOutputs
1908
1B08
1D08
1F08
2108
2308
2508
2708
Segment.11.WaitFor
1909
1B09
1D09
1F09
2109
2309
2509
2709
190A
1B0A
1D0A
1F0A
210A
230A
250A
270A
Segment.11.GobackSeg
190B
1B0B
1D0B
1F0B
210B
230B
250B
270B
Segment.11.GobackCycles
190C
1B0C
1D0C
1F0C
210C
230C
250C
270C
Segment.11.PVEvent
190D
1B0D
1D0D
1F0D
210D
230D
250D
270D
Segment.11.PVThreshold
190E
1B0E
1D0E
1F0E
210E
230E
250E
270E
Segment.11.UserVal
190F
1B0F
1D0F
1F0F
210F
230F
250F
270F
Segment.11.GsoakType
1910
1B10
1D10
1F10
2110
2310
2510
2710
Segment.11.GsoakVal
1911
1B11
1D11
1F11
2111
2311
2511
2711
Segment.11.TimeEvent
1912
1B12
1D12
1F12
2112
2312
2512
2712
Segment.11.OnTime
1913
1B13
1D13
1F13
2113
2313
2513
2713
Segment.11.OffTime
1914
1B14
1D14
1F14
2114
2314
2514
2714
Segment.11.PIDSet
1915
1B15
1D15
1F15
2115
2315
2515
2715
Segment.11.PVWait
1916
1B16
1D16
1F16
2116
2316
2516
2716
Segment.11.WaitVal
1917
1B17
1D17
1F17
2117
2317
2517
2717
Segment.12.Type
1920
1B20
1D20
1F20
2120
2320
2520
2720
Segment.12.Holdback
1921
1B21
1D21
1F21
2121
2321
2521
2721
Page 306
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
PROGRAM NUMBER HEXADECIMAL ADDRESS (2.xx)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Segment.12.Duration
1924
1B24
1D24
1F24
2124
2324
2524
8
2724
Segment.12.RampRate
1925
1B25
1D25
1F25
2125
2325
2525
2725
Segment.12.TargetSP
1926
1B26
1D26
1F26
2126
2326
2526
2726
Segment.12.EndAction
1927
1B27
1D27
1F27
2127
2327
2527
2727
Segment.12.EventOutputs
1928
1B28
1D28
1F28
2128
2328
2528
2728
Segment.12.WaitFor
1929
1B29
1D29
1F29
2129
2329
2529
2729
192A
1B2A
1D2A
1F2A
212A
232A
252A
272A
Segment.12.GobackSeg
192B
1B2B
1D2B
1F2B
212B
232B
252B
272B
Segment.12.GobackCycles
192C
1B2C
1D2C
1F2C
212C
232C
252C
272C
272D
Segment.12.PVEvent
192D
1B2D
1D2D
1F2D
212D
232D
252D
Segment.12.PVThreshold
192E
1B2E
1D2E
1F2E
212E
232E
252E
272E
Segment.12.UserVal
192F
1B2F
1D2F
1F2F
212F
232F
252F
272F
Segment.12.GsoakType
1930
1B30
1D30
1F30
2130
2330
2530
2730
Segment.12.GsoakVal
1931
1B31
1D31
1F31
2131
2331
2531
2731
Segment.12.TimeEvent
1932
1B32
1D32
1F32
2132
2332
2532
2732
Segment.12.OnTime
1933
1B33
1D33
1F33
2133
2333
2533
2733
Segment.12.OffTime
1934
1B34
1D34
1F34
2134
2334
2534
2734
Segment.12.PIDSet
1935
1B35
1D35
1F35
2135
2335
2535
2735
Segment.12.PVWait
1936
1B36
1D36
1F36
2136
2336
2536
2736
Segment.12.WaitVal
1937
1B37
1D37
1F37
2137
2337
2537
2737
Segment.13.Type
1940
1B40
1D40
1F40
2140
2340
2540
2740
Segment.13.Holdback
1941
1B41
1D41
1F41
2141
2341
2541
2741
Segment.13.Duration
1944
1B44
1D44
1F44
2144
2344
2544
2744
Segment.13.RampRate
1945
1B45
1D45
1F45
2145
2345
2545
2745
Segment.13.TargetSP
1946
1B46
1D46
1F46
2146
2346
2546
2746
Segment.13.EndAction
1947
1B47
1D47
1F47
2147
2347
2547
2747
Segment.13.EventOutputs
1948
1B48
1D48
1F48
2148
2348
2548
2748
Segment.13.WaitFor
1949
1B49
1D49
1F49
2149
2349
2549
2749
194A
1B4A
1D4A
1F4A
214A
234A
254A
274A
Segment.13.GobackSeg
194B
1B4B
1D4B
1F4B
214B
234B
254B
274B
Segment.13.GobackCycles
194C
1B4C
1D4C
1F4C
214C
234C
254C
274C
Segment.13.PVEvent
194D
1B4D
1D4D
1F4D
214D
234D
254D
274D
Segment.13.PVThreshold
194E
1B4E
1D4E
1F4E
214E
234E
254E
274E
Segment.13.UserVal
194F
1B4F
1D4F
1F4F
214F
234F
254F
274F
Segment.13.GsoakType
1950
1B50
1D50
1F50
2150
2350
2550
2750
Segment.13.GsoakVal
1951
1B51
1D51
1F51
2151
2351
2551
2751
Segment.13.TimeEvent
1952
1B52
1D52
1F52
2152
2352
2552
2752
Segment.13.OnTime
1953
1B53
1D53
1F53
2153
2353
2553
2753
Segment.13.OffTime
1954
1B54
1D54
1F54
2154
2354
2554
2754
Segment.13.PIDSet
1955
1B55
1D55
1F55
2155
2355
2555
2755
Segment.13.PVWait
1956
1B56
1D56
1F56
2156
2356
2556
2756
Segment.13.WaitVal
1957
1B57
1D57
1F57
2157
2357
2557
2757
Segment.14.Type
1960
1B60
1D60
1F60
2160
2360
2560
2760
Segment.14.Holdback
1961
1B61
1D61
1F61
2161
2361
2561
2761
Segment.14.Duration
1964
1B64
1D64
1F64
2164
2364
2564
2764
Segment.14.RampRate
1965
1B65
1D65
1F65
2165
2365
2565
2765
Segment.14.TargetSP
1966
1B66
1D66
1F66
2166
2366
2566
2766
Segment.14.EndAction
1967
1B67
1D67
1F67
2167
2367
2567
2767
Segment.14.EventOutputs
1968
1B68
1D68
1F68
2168
2368
2568
2768
Segment.14.WaitFor
1969
1B69
1D69
1F69
2169
2369
2569
2769
196A
1B6A
1D6A
1F6A
216A
236A
256A
276A
Segment.14.GobackSeg
196B
1B6B
1D6B
1F6B
216B
236B
256B
276B
Segment.14.GobackCycles
196C
1B6C
1D6C
1F6C
216C
236C
256C
276C
Segment.14.PVEvent
196D
1B6D
1D6D
1F6D
216D
236D
256D
276D
Segment.14.PVThreshold
196E
1B6E
1D6E
1F6E
216E
236E
256E
276E
Segment.14.UserVal
196F
1B6F
1D6F
1F6F
216F
236F
256F
276F
Segment.14.GsoakType
1970
1B70
1D70
1F70
2170
2370
2570
2770
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 307
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
PROGRAM NUMBER HEXADECIMAL ADDRESS (2.xx)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Segment.14.GsoakVal
1971
1B71
1D71
1F71
2171
2371
2571
2771
Segment.14.TimeEvent
1972
1B72
1D72
1F72
2172
2372
2572
2772
Segment.14.OnTime
1973
1B73
1D73
1F73
2173
2373
2573
2773
Segment.14.OffTime
1974
1B74
1D74
1F74
2174
2374
2574
2774
Segment.14.PIDSet
1975
1B75
1D75
1F75
2175
2375
2575
2775
Segment.14.PVWait
1976
1B76
1D76
1F76
2176
2376
2576
2776
Segment.14.WaitVal
1977
1B77
1D77
1F77
2177
2377
2577
2777
Segment.15.Type
1980
1B80
1D80
1F80
2180
2380
2580
2780
Segment.15.Holdback
1981
1B81
1D81
1F81
2181
2381
2581
2781
Segment.15.Duration
1984
1B84
1D84
1F84
2184
2384
2584
2784
Segment.15.RampRate
1985
1B85
1D85
1F85
2185
2385
2585
2785
Segment.15.TargetSP
1986
1B86
1D86
1F86
2186
2386
2586
2786
Segment.15.EndAction
1987
1B87
1D87
1F87
2187
2387
2587
2787
Segment.15.EventOutputs
1988
1B88
1D88
1F88
2188
2388
2588
2788
Segment.15.WaitFor
1989
1B89
1D89
1F89
2189
2389
2589
2789
198A
1B8A
1D8A
1F8A
218A
238A
258A
278A
198B
1B8B
1D8B
1F8B
218B
238B
258B
278B
Segment.15.GobackSeg
Segment.15.GobackCycles
198C
1B8C
1D8C
1F8C
218C
238C
258C
278C
Segment.15.PVEvent
198D
1B8D
1D8D
1F8D
218D
238D
258D
278D
Segment.15.PVThreshold
198E
1B8E
1D8E
1F8E
218E
238E
258E
278E
Segment.15.UserVal
198F
1B8F
1D8F
1F8F
218F
238F
258F
278F
Segment.15.GsoakType
1990
1B90
1D90
1F90
2190
2390
2590
2790
Segment.15.GsoakVal
1991
1B91
1D91
1F91
2191
2391
2591
2791
Segment.15.TimeEvent
1992
1B92
1D92
1F92
2192
2392
2592
2792
Segment.15.OnTime
1993
1B93
1D93
1F93
2193
2393
2593
2793
Segment.15.OffTime
1994
1B94
1D94
1F94
2194
2394
2594
2794
Segment.15.PIDSet
1995
1B95
1D95
1F95
2195
2395
2595
2795
Segment.15.PVWait
1996
1B96
1D96
1F96
2196
2396
2596
2796
Segment.15.WaitVal
1997
1B97
1D97
1F97
2197
2397
2597
2797
Segment.16.Type
19A0
1BA0
1DA0
1FA0
21A0
23A0
25A0
27A0
Segment.16.Holdback
19A1
1BA1
1DA1
1FA1
21A1
23A1
25A1
27A1
Segment.16.Duration
19A4
1BA4
1DA4
1FA4
21A4
23A4
25A4
27A4
Segment.16.RampRate
19A5
1BA5
1DA5
1FA5
21A5
23A5
25A5
27A5
Segment.16.TargetSP
19A6
1BA6
1DA6
1FA6
21A6
23A6
25A6
27A6
Segment.16.EndAction
19A7
1BA7
1DA7
1FA7
21A7
23A7
25A7
27A7
Segment.16.EventOutputs
19A8
1BA8
1DA8
1FA8
21A8
23A8
25A8
27A8
Segment.16.WaitFor
19A9
1BA9
1DA9
1FA9
21A9
23A9
25A9
27A9
19AA
1BAA
1DAA
1FAA
21AA
23AA
25AA
27AA
19AB
1BAB
1DAB
1FAB
21AB
23AB
25AB
27AB
Segment.16.GobackSeg
Segment.16.GobackCycles
19AC
1BAC
1DAC
1FAC
21AC
23AC
25AC
27AC
Segment.16.PVEvent
19AD
1BAD
1DAD
1FAD
21AD
23AD
25AD
27AD
Segment.16.PVThreshold
19AE
1BAE
1DAE
1FAE
21AE
23AE
25AE
27AE
Segment.16.UserVal
19AF
1BAF
1DAF
1FAF
21AF
23AF
25AF
27AF
Segment.16.GsoakType
19B0
1BB0
1DB0
1FB0
21B0
23B0
25B0
27B0
Segment.16.GsoakVal
19B1
1BB1
1DB1
1FB1
21B1
23B1
25B1
27B1
Segment.16.TimeEvent
19B2
1BB2
1DB2
1FB2
21B2
23B2
25B2
27B2
Segment.16.OnTime
19B3
1BB3
1DB3
1FB3
21B3
23B3
25B3
27B3
Segment.16.OffTime
19B4
1BB4
1DB4
1FB4
21B4
23B4
25B4
27B4
Segment.16.PIDSet
19B5
1BB5
1DB5
1FB5
21B5
23B5
25B5
27B5
Segment.16.PVWait
19B6
1BB6
1DB6
1FB6
21B6
23B6
25B6
27B6
Segment.16.WaitVal
19B7
1BB7
1DB7
1FB7
21B7
23B7
25B7
27B7
Page 308
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
25.3
Modbus Function Codes
Mini8 supports the following function codes:
3, 4
6
7
8
16
Multiple parameter read
Single parameter write
Status read
Loop back
Multiple parameter write
Function codes 103 and 106 are special codes used by iTools. These should not be used.
Mini8 does not support function code 23.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 309
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
25.4
26.
Appendix B DeviceNet PARAMETER TABLES
26.1
IO Re-Mapping Object
DeviceNet comes pre-configured with the key parameters of 8 PID loops and alarms (60 input parameters
process variables, alarm status etc and 60 output parameters – setpoints etc.). Loops 9-16 are not included in the
DeviceNet tables as there are insufficient attributes for the DeviceNet parameters
The Mini8 controller DeviceNet communicates is supplied with a default input assembly table (80 bytes) and
output assembly table (48 bytes). The parameters included are listed below.
To modify these tables see the next section.
The default Input assembly table:Input Parameter
PV – Loop 1
Working SP – Loop 1
Working Output – Loop 1
PV – Loop 2
Working SP – Loop 2
Working Output – Loop 2
PV – Loop 3
Working SP – Loop 3
Working Output – Loop 3
PV – Loop 4
Working SP – Loop 4
Working Output – Loop 4
PV – Loop 5
Working SP – Loop 5
Working Output – Loop 5
PV – Loop 6
Working SP – Loop 6
Working Output – Loop 6
PV – Loop 7
Working SP – Loop 7
Working Output – Loop 7
PV – Loop 8
Working SP – Loop 8
Working Output – Loop 8
Analogue Alarm Status 1
Analogue Alarm Status 2
Analogue Alarm Status 3
Analogue Alarm Status 4
Sensor Break Alarm Status 1
Sensor Break Alarm Status 2
Sensor Break Alarm Status 3
Sensor Break Alarm Status 4
CT Alarm Status 1
CT Alarm Status 2
CT Alarm Status 3
CT Alarm Status 4
New Alarm Output
Any Alarm Output
New CT Alarm Output
Program Status
TOTAL LENGTH
Page 310
Offset
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
62
64
66
68
70
72
74
76
78
80
Value (Attr ID)
0
1
2
14 (0EH)
15 (0FH)
16 (10H)
28 (1CH)
29 (1DH)
30 (1EH)
42 (2AH)
43 (2BH)
44 (2CH)
56 (38H)
57 (39H)
58 (3AH)
70 (46H)
71 (47H)
72 (48H)
84 (54H)
85 (55H)
86 (56H)
98 (62H)
99 (63H)
100 (64H)
144 (90H)
145 (91H)
146 (92H)
147 (93H)
148 (94H)
149 (95H)
150 (96H)
151 (97H)
152 (98H)
153 (99H)
154 (9AH)
155 (9BH)
156 (9CH)
157 (9DH)
158 (9EH)
184 (B8H)
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
The default output assembly table.
Output Parameter
Target SP – Loop 1
Auto/Manual – Loop 1
Manual Output – Loop 1
Target SP – Loop 2
Auto/Manual – Loop 2
Manual Output – Loop 2
Target SP – Loop 3
Auto/Manual – Loop 3
Manual Output – Loop 3
Target SP – Loop 4
Auto/Manual – Loop 4
Manual Output – Loop 4
Target SP – Loop 5
Auto/Manual – Loop 5
Manual Output – Loop 5
Target SP – Loop 6
Auto/Manual – Loop 6
Manual Output – Loop 6
Target SP – Loop 7
Auto/Manual – Loop 7
Manual Output – Loop 7
Target SP – Loop 8
Auto/Manual – Loop 8
Manual Output – Loop 8
TOTAL LENGTH
26.2
Offset
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
Value
3
7
4
17 (11H)
21 (15H)
18 (12H)
31 (1FH)
35 (23H)
32 (20H)
45 (2DH)
49 (31H)
46 (2EH)
59 (3BH)
63 (3FH)
60 (3CH)
73 (49H)
77 (4DH)
74 (4AH)
87 (57H)
91 (5BH)
88 (58H)
101 (65H)
105 (69H)
102 (66H)
Application Variables Object
This is the list of parameters available to be included in the input and output tables.
Parameter
Process Variable – Loop 1
Working Setpoint – Loop 1
Working Output – Loop 1
Target Setpoint – Loop 1
Manual Output – Loop 1
Setpoint 1 – Loop 1
Setpoint 2 – Loop 1
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 1
Proportional Band – Loop 1 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 1 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 1 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 1 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 1 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 1 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 2
Working Setpoint – Loop 2
Working Output – Loop 2
Target Setpoint – Loop 2
Manual Output – Loop 2
Setpoint 1 – Loop 2
Setpoint 2 – Loop 2
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 2
Proportional Band – Loop 2 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 2 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 2 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 2 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 2 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 2 working Set
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Attribute ID
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
Page 311
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter
Process Variable – Loop 3
Working Setpoint – Loop 3
Working Output – Loop 3
Target Setpoint – Loop 3
Manual Output – Loop 3
Setpoint 1 – Loop 3
Setpoint 2 – Loop 3
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 3
Proportional Band – Loop 3 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 3 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 3 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 3 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 3 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 3 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 4
Working Setpoint – Loop 4
Working Output – Loop 4
Target Setpoint – Loop 4
Manual Output – Loop 4
Setpoint 1 – Loop 4
Setpoint 2 – Loop 4
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 4
Proportional Band – Loop 4 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 4 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 4 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 4 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 4 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 4 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 5
Working Setpoint – Loop 5
Working Output – Loop 5
Target Setpoint – Loop 5
Manual Output – Loop 5
Setpoint 1 – Loop 5
Setpoint 2 – Loop 5
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 5
Proportional Band – Loop 5 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 5 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 5 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 5 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 5 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 5 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 6
Working Setpoint – Loop 6
Working Output – Loop 6
Target Setpoint – Loop 6
Manual Output – Loop 6
Setpoint 1 – Loop 6
Setpoint 2 – Loop 6
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 6
Proportional Band – Loop 6 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 6 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 6 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 6 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 6 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 6 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 7
Working Setpoint – Loop 7
Working Output – Loop 7
Target Setpoint – Loop 7
Page 312
Attribute ID
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter
Manual Output – Loop 7
Setpoint 1 – Loop 7
Setpoint 2 – Loop 7
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 7
Proportional Band – Loop 7 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 7 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 7 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 7 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 7 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 7 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 8
Working Setpoint – Loop 8
Working Output – Loop 8
Target Setpoint – Loop 8
Manual Output – Loop 8
Setpoint 1 – Loop 8
Setpoint 2 – Loop 8
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 8
Proportional Band – Loop 8 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 8 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 8 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 8 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 8 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 8 working Set
Module PV – Channel 1
Module PV – Channel 2
Module PV – Channel 3
Module PV – Channel 4
Module PV – Channel 5
Module PV – Channel 6
Module PV – Channel 7
Module PV – Channel 8
Module PV – Channel 9
Module PV – Channel 10
Module PV – Channel 11
Module PV – Channel 12
Module PV – Channel 13
Module PV – Channel 14
Module PV – Channel 15
Module PV – Channel 16
Module PV – Channel 17
Module PV – Channel 18
Module PV – Channel 19
Module PV – Channel 20
Module PV – Channel 21
Module PV – Channel 22
Module PV – Channel 23
Module PV – Channel 24
Module PV – Channel 25
Module PV – Channel 26
Module PV – Channel 27
Module PV – Channel 28
Module PV – Channel 29
Module PV – Channel 30
Module PV – Channel 31
Module PV – Channel 32
Analogue Alarm Status 1
Analogue Alarm Status 2
Analogue Alarm Status 3
Analogue Alarm Status 4
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Attribute ID
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
Page 313
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter
Sensor Break Alarm Status 1
Sensor Break Alarm Status 2
Sensor Break Alarm Status 3
Sensor Break Alarm Status 4
CT Alarm Status 1
CT Alarm Status 2
CT Alarm Status 3
CT Alarm Status 4
New Alarm Output
Any Alarm Output
New CT Alarm Output
Reset New Alarm
Reset New CT Alarm
CT Load Current 1
CT Load Current 2
CT Load Current 3
CT Load Current 4
CT Load Current 5
CT Load Current 6
CT Load Current 7
CT Load Current 8
CT Load Status 1
CT Load Status 2
CT Load Status 3
CT Load Status 4
CT Load Status 5
CT Load Status 6
CT Load Status 7
CT Load Status 8
PSU Relay 1 Output
PSU Relay 2 Output
PSU Digital Input 1
PSU Digital Input 2
Program Run
Program Hold
Program Reset
Program Status
Current Program
Program Time Left
Segment Time Left
User Value 1
User Value 2
User Value 3
User Value 4
User Value 5
User Value 6
User Value 7
User Value 8
User Value 9
User Value 10
User Value 11
User Value 12
Page 314
Attribute ID
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
26.2.1
Table Modification
Make a list of parameters required in the input and output tables to suit the application. If the parameter is listed
in the predefined list then use the attribute number of that parameter.
To set up the controller so
that the required parameters
are available on the network
requires setting up the INPUT
and OUTPUT data assembly
tables with the IDs from the
Application Variable Object.
Mini8 controller
Application
Variable Object
Mini8 controller
IO Remapping
Object
List of available
parameters
USER OUTPUT
assembly table
Predefined #0
(Max 60)
to
USER INPUT
assembly table
(Max 60)
#199
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 315
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
27.
Appendix C CANOPEN PARAMETER TABLES
Instruments supplied after July 2009 no longer support CANopen interface. Information is included here to
cover instruments supplied previously with CANopen.
27.1
Manufacturer Object – Pick List
Object
Index
2000h
Sub
Index
Parameter
Data Type
SCADA
Address
Receive PDO1 Note: Sub indices 02h – 04h are letter boxed via sub index 01h.
01h
02h
03h
04h
Loop Number (Comms.InstNum1)
Loop.n.Main.TargetSP
Loop.n.Main.AutoMan
Loop.n.OP.ManualOutVal
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15816
15817
15818
15819
Receive PDO2 Note: Sub indices 06h – 08h are letter boxed via sub index 05h.
05h
06h
07h
08h
Loop Number (Comms.InstNum2)
Loop.n.PID.ProportionalBand
Loop.n.PID.IntegralTime
Loop.n.PID.DerivativeTime
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15820
15821
15822
15823
Receive PDO3 Note: Sub indices 0Ah – 0Ch are letter boxed via sub index 09h.
09h
0Ah
0Bh
0Ch
Loop Number (Comms.InstNum3)
Loop.n.SP.SP1
Loop.n.SP.SP2
Loop.n.SP.SPSelect
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15824
15825
15826
15827
Receive PDO Note: Sub indices 0Eh – 10h are letter boxed via sub index 0Dh.
0Dh
0Eh
0Fh
10h
Programmer Number (Comms.InstNum4)
Programmer.n.SetUp.ProgRun
Programmer.n.SetUp.ProgHold
Programmer.n.SetUp.ProgReset
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15828
15829
15830
15831
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15832
15833
15834
15835
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15836
15837
15838
15839
Tramsmit PDO1
11h
12h
13h
14h
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus1
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus2
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus3
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus4
Transmit PD02
15h
16h
17h
18h
AlmSummary.General.SbrkAlarmStatus1
AlmSummary.General.SbrkAlarmStatus2
AlmSummary.General.SbrkAlarmStatus3
AlmSummary.General.SbrkAlarmStatus4
Transmit PDO3 Note: Sub indices 1Ah – 1Ch are letter boxed via sub index 19h.
19h
1Ah
1Bh
1Ch
Loop Number (Comms.InstNum5)
Loop.n.Main.PV
Loop.n.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.n.Main.ActiveOut
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15840
15841
15842
15843
Transmit PDO4 Note: Sub indices 1Eh – 20h are letter boxed via sub index 1Dh.
1Dh
1Eh
1Fh
20h
21h
22h
23h
24h
25h
26h
27h
28h
29h
2Ah
Page 316
Programmer Number (Comms.InstNum6)
Programmer.n.Run.CurProg
Programmer.n.Run.ProgStatus
Programmer.n.Run.ProgTimeLeft
Loop.1.Main.PV
Loop.2.Main.PV
Loop.3.Main.PV
Loop.4.Main.PV
Loop.5.Main.PV
Loop.6.Main.PV
Loop.7.Main.PV
Loop.8.Main.PV
Loop.9.Main.PV
Loop.10.Main.PV
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15844
15845
15846
15847
15848
15849
15850
15851
15852
15853
15854
15855
15856
15857
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Object
Index
2000h
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Sub
Index
Parameter
Data Type
SCADA
Address
2Bh
2Ch
2Dh
2Eh
2Fh
30h
31h
32h
33h
34h
35h
36h
37h
38h
39h
3Ah
3Bh
3Ch
3Dh
3Eh
3Fh
40h
41h
42h
43h
44h
45h
46h
47h
48h
49h
4Ah
4Bh
4Ch
4Dh
4Eh
4Fh
50h
51h
52h
53h
54h
55h
56h
57h
58h
59h
5Ah
5Bh
5Ch
5Dh
5Eh
5Fh
60h
61h
62h
63h
64h
Loop.11.Main.PV
Loop.12.Main.PV
Loop.13.Main.PV
Loop.14.Main.PV
Loop.15.Main.PV
Loop.16.Main.PV
Loop.1.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.2.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.3.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.4.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.5.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.6.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.7.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.8.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.9.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.10.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.11.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.12.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.13.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.14.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.15.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.16.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.1.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.2.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.3.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.4.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.5.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.6.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.7.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.8.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.9.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.10.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.11.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.12.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.13.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.14.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.15.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.16.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.1.Main.TargetSP
Loop.2.Main.TargetSP
Loop.3.Main.TargetSP
Loop.4.Main.TargetSP
Loop.5.Main.TargetSP
Loop.6.Main.TargetSP
Loop.7.Main.TargetSP
Loop.8.Main.TargetSP
Loop.9.Main.TargetSP
Loop.10.Main.TargetSP
Loop.11.Main.TargetSP
Loop.12.Main.TargetSP
Loop.13.Main.TargetSP
Loop.14.Main.TargetSP
Loop.15.Main.TargetSP
Loop.16.Main.TargetSP
Loop.1.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.2.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.3.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.4.OP.ManualOutVal
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15858
15859
15860
15861
15862
15863
15864
15865
15866
15867
15868
15869
15870
15871
15872
15873
15874
15875
15876
15877
15878
15879
15880
15881
15882
15883
15884
15885
15886
15887
15888
15889
15890
15891
15892
15893
15894
15895
15896
15897
15898
15899
15900
15901
15902
15903
15904
15905
15906
15907
15908
15909
15910
15911
15912
15913
15914
15915
Page 317
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Object
Index
2000h
Page 318
Sub
Index
Parameter
Data Type
SCADA
Address
65h
66h
67h
68h
69h
6Ah
6Bh
6Ch
6Dh
6Eh
6Fh
70h
71h
72h
73h
74h
75h
76h
77h
78h
79h
7Ah
7Bh
7Ch
7Dh
7Eh
7Fh
80h
81h
82h
83h
84h
85h
86h
87h
88h
89h
8Ah
8Bh
8Ch
8Dh
8Eh
8Fh
90h
91h
92h
93h
94h
95h
96h
97h
98h
99h
9Ah
9Bh
9Ch
9Dh
9Eh
Loop.5.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.6.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.7.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.8.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.9.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.10.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.11.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.12.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.13.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.14.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.15.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.16.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.1.Main.AutoMan
Loop.2.Main.AutoMan
Loop.3.Main.AutoMan
Loop.4.Main.AutoMan
Loop.5.Main.AutoMan
Loop.6.Main.AutoMan
Loop.7.Main.AutoMan
Loop.8.Main.AutoMan
Loop.9.Main.AutoMan
Loop.10.Main.AutoMan
Loop.11.Main.AutoMan
Loop.12.Main.AutoMan
Loop.13.Main.AutoMan
Loop.14.Main.AutoMan
Loop.15.Main.AutoMan
Loop.16.Main.AutoMan
IO.Mod.1.PV
IO.Mod.2.PV
IO.Mod.3.PV
IO.Mod.4.PV
IO.Mod.5.PV
IO.Mod.6.PV
IO.Mod.7.PV
IO.Mod.8.PV
IO.Mod.9.PV
IO.Mod.10.PV
IO.Mod.11.PV
IO.Mod.12.PV
IO.Mod.13.PV
IO.Mod.14.PV
IO.Mod.15.PV
IO.Mod.16.PV
IO.Mod.17.PV
IO.Mod.18.PV
IO.Mod.19.PV
IO.Mod.20.PV
IO.Mod.21.PV
IO.Mod.22.PV
IO.Mod.23.PV
IO.Mod.24.PV
IO.Mod.25.PV
IO.Mod.26.PV
IO.Mod.27.PV
IO.Mod.28.PV
IO.Mod.29.PV
IO.Mod.30.PV
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15916
15917
15918
15919
15920
15921
15922
15923
15924
15925
15926
15927
15928
15929
15930
15931
15932
15933
15934
15935
15936
15937
15938
15939
15940
15941
15942
15943
15944
15945
15946
15947
15948
15949
15950
15951
15952
15953
15954
15955
15956
15957
15958
15959
15960
15961
15962
15963
15964
15965
15966
15967
15968
15969
15970
15971
15972
15973
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Object
Index
2000h
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Sub
Index
Parameter
Data Type
SCADA
Address
9Fh
A0h
A1h
A2h
A3h
A4h
A5h
A6h
A7h
A8h
A9h
AAh
ABh
ACh
ADh
AEh
AFh
B0h
B1h
B2h
B3h
B4h
B5h
B6h
B7h
B8h
B9h
BAh
BBh
BCh
BDh
BEh
BFh
C0h
C1h
C2h
C3h
C4h
C5h
C6h
C7h
C8h
IO.Mod.31.PV
IO.Mod.32.PV
IO.FixedIO.A.PV
IO.FixedIO.B.PV
IO.FixedIO.D1.PV
IO.FixedIO.D2.PV
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load1Current
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load2Current
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load3Current
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load4Current
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load5Current
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load6Current
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load7Current
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load8Current
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load1Status
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load2Status
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load3Status
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load4Status
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load5Status
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load6Status
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load7Status
IO.CurrentMonitor.Status.Load8Status
AlmSummary.General.AnyAlarm
AlmSummary.General.NewAlarm
AlmSummary.General.NewCTAlarm
AlmSummary.General.RstNewAlarm
AlmSummary.General.RstNewCTAlarm
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus1
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus2
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus3
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus4
AlmSummary.General.DigAlarmStatus1
AlmSummary.General.DigAlarmStatus2
AlmSummary.General.DigAlarmStatus3
AlmSummary.General.DigAlarmStatus4
AlmSummary.General.GlobalAck
UserVal.1.Val
UserVal.2.Val
UserVal.3.Val
UserVal.4.Val
UserVal.5.Val
UserVal.6.Val
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
Integer16
15974
15975
15976
15977
15978
15979
15980
15981
15982
15983
15984
15985
15986
15987
15988
15989
15990
15991
15992
15993
15994
15995
15996
15997
15998
15999
16000
16001
16002
16003
16004
16005
16006
16007
16008
16009
16010
16011
16012
16013
16014
16015
Page 319
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
28.
Appendix D Version 1.xx Programmer
28.1
28.1.1
Version 1.xx Parameter Tables
Configuring the Programmer (V1.xx)
Programmer.1.Setup contains the general configuration settings for the Programmer Block. Programs are
created and stored in the Program Folder. Once a Program exists it can be run using the parameters in the
Programmer.1.Run folder.
Folder – Programmer.1
Sub-folder: Setup
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Units
Units of the Output
Resolution
Programmer Output resolution
X to X.XXXX
Conf
PVIn
The programmer uses the PV input for a
number of functions
In holdback, the PV is monitored against the
setpoint, and if a deviation occurs the
program is paused.
The programmer can be configured to start
its profile from the current PV value (servo to
PV).
The programmer monitors the PV value for
Sensor Break. The programmer holds in
sensor break.
The PV Input is normally wired
from the loop TrackPV parameter.
Note: This input is automatically
wired when the programmer and
loop are enabled and there are
no existing wires to track interface
parameters.
Track interface parameters are
Programmer.Setup, PVInput,
SPInput, Loop.SP, AltSP, Loop.SP,
AltSPSelect.
Conf
SPIn
The programmer needs to know the working
setpoint of the loop it is profiling. The SP
input is used in the servo to setpoint start
type.
SP Input is normally wired from
the loop Track SP parameter as
the PV input.
Conf
Servo
The transfer of program setpoint to PV Input
(normally the Loop PV) or the SP Input
(normally the Loop setpoint).
PV
SP
See also section
19.7.1
Conf
PowerFailAct
Power fail recovery strategy
Ramp
See section 19.8.
Conf
This will normally be
wired to the ‘End of
Seg’ parameter.
Oper
Default
Access Level
None
Conf
Reset
Cont
SyncIn
The synchronise input is a way of
synchronising programs. At the end of a
segment the programmer will inspect the
sync. input, if it is True (1) then the
programmer will advance to the next
segment. It is typically wired from the end of
segment output of another programmer.
0
1
Max Events
To set the maximum number of output events
required for the program. This is for
convenience to avoid having to scroll
through unwanted events when setting up
each segment
1 to 8
Prog Reset
Flag showing reset state
No/Yes
Prog Run
Flag showing run state
No/Yes
Prog Hold
Flag showing hold state
No/Yes
AdvSeg
Set output to target setpoint and advance to
next segment
No/Yes
SkipSeg
Skip to the next setpoint and start the
segment at the current output value.
No/Yes
Oper
EventOut1 to 8
Flags showing event states
No/Yes
R/O
End of Seg
Flag showing end of segment state
No/Yes
R/O
Page 320
Conf
Can be wired to logic
inputs to provide
remote program
control
Oper
Oper
Oper
Oper
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
28.1.2
To Select, Run, Hold or Reset a Program (V1.xx).
The ‘Run’ folder allows an existing program to be selected and run. The folder also shows the current program
status:
Folder – Programmer.1
Sub-folder: Run
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
CurProg
Current Program Number
0 to 50. Change only when
Programmer is in Reset.
0
Oper
R/O
CurrSeg
Current Running Segment
1 to 255
1
R/O
ProgStatus
Program Status
Reset –
Run –
Hold –
Holdback –
End –
PSP
Programmer Setpoint
CyclesLeft
Number of Cycles Remaining
0 to 1000
0
R/O
CurSegType
Current Segment type
End
Rate
Time
Dwell
Step
Call
End
R/O
SegTimeLeft
Segment Time Remaining
Hr Min Sec Millisec
0
R/O
ResetEventOP
Reset Event Outputs
0 to 255, each bit resets its
corresponding output
0
Oper
Oper
0
R/O
SegTarget
Current Target Setpoint Value
SegRate
Segment Ramp Rate
0.1 to 9999.9
0
R/O
ProgTimeLeft
Program Time Remaining
Hrs Min Sec Millisec
0
R/O
FastRun
Fast Run
No (0) Normal
Yes (1) Program executes at 10 times
real time
No
Conf
EndOutput
End Output
Off (0) Program not in End
On (1) Program at End
Off
R/O
EventsOut
Event Outputs
0 to 255, each bit represents an
output.
0
R/O
28.1.3
R/O
Creating a Program (V1.xx)
A folder exists for each Program containing a few key parameters listed below. This folder would normally be
viewed via the iTools Program Editor under the Program Parameters tab. The Program Editor is used to create
the segments of Program itself using the Segment Editor tab.
Folder – Program
Sub-folder: 1 to 50
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
Name
Program Name
Up to 8 characters
Null
Oper
Holdback
Value
Deviation between SP and PV at which
holdback is applied. This value applies to the
whole program.
Minimum setting 0
0
Oper
Ramp Units
Time units applied to the segments
Sec
Min
Hour
Seconds
Minutes
Hours
sec
Oper
Cycles
Number of times the whole program repeats
Cont (0)
1 to 999
Repeats continuously
Program executes once
to 999 times
1
Oper
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 321
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
28.1.4
To Select, Run, Hold or Reset a Program (Version 1.xx)
The ‘Run’ folder allows an existing program to be selected and run. The folder also shows the current program
status:
Folder – Programmer.1
Sub-folder: Run
Name
Parameter Description
Value
Default
Access
Level
CurProg
Current Program Number
0 to 50. Change only when
Programmer is in Reset.
0
Oper
R/O
CurrSeg
Current Running Segment
1 to 255
1
ProgStatus
Program Status
Reset –
Run –
Hold –
Holdback –
End –
PSP
Programmer Setpoint
CyclesLeft
Number of Cycles Remaining
0 to 1000
0
R/O
CurSegType
Current Segment type
End
Rate
Time
Dwell
Step
Call
End
R/O
SegTimeLeft
Segment Time Remaining
Hr Min Sec Millisec
0
R/O
ResetEventOP
Reset Event Outputs
0 to 255, each bit resets its
corresponding output
0
Oper
0.1 to 9999.9
0
R/O
R/O
Oper
0
SegTarget
Current Target Setpoint Value
SegRate
Segment Ramp Rate
R/O
R/O
ProgTimeLeft
Program Time Remaining
Hrs Min Sec Millisec
0
R/O
FastRun
Fast Run
No (0) Normal
Yes (1) Program executes at 10 times
real time
No
Conf
EndOutput
End Output
Off (0) Program not in End
On (1) Program at End
Off
R/O
EventsOut
Event Outputs
0 to 255, each bit represents an
output.
0
R/O
28.2
SCADA addresses for Programmer Version 1.xx
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Program.Cycles
8196
2004
Programmer.Run.SegTarget
8207
200F
Program.DwellUnits
8195
2003
Programmer.Run.SegTimeLeft
8213
2015
Program.HoldbackVal
8193
2001
Programmer.Setup.AdvSeg
8217
2019
Program.RampUnits
8194
2002
Programmer.Setup.EndOfSeg
8214
2016
Programmer.CommsProgNum
8192
2000
Programmer.Setup.PowerFailAct
8197
2005
Programmer.Run.CurProg
8201
2009
Programmer.Setup.PVIn
8210
2012
Programmer.Run.CurSeg
8202
200A
Programmer.Setup.Servo
8198
2006
Programmer.Run.CurSegType
8206
200E
Programmer.Setup.SkipSeg
8218
201A
Programmer.Run.CyclesLeft
8205
200D
Programmer.Setup.SPIn
8211
2013
Programmer.Run.EventOuts
8212
2014
Programmer.Setup.SyncIn
8215
2017
Programmer.Run.FastRun
8216
2018
Programmer.Run.ProgStatus
8203
200B
Recipe.LastDataset
4913
1331
Programmer.Run.ProgTimeLeft
8209
2011
Recipe.LoadingStatus
4914
1332
Programmer.Run.PSP
8204
200C
Recipe.RecipeSelect
4912
1330
Programmer.Run.ResetEventOuts
8200
2008
Segment.1.CallCycles
8259
2043
Programmer.Run.SegRate
8208
2010
Segment.1.CallProg
8258
2042
Page 322
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Segment.1.Duration
8260
2044
Segment.7.CallProg
8354
20A2
Segment.1.EndType
8263
2047
Segment.7.Duration
8356
20A4
Segment.1.EventOuts
8264
2048
Segment.7.EndType
8359
20A7
Segment.1.Holdback
8257
2041
Segment.7.EventOuts
8360
20A8
Segment.1.RampRate
8261
2045
Segment.7.Holdback
8353
20A1
Segment.1.SegType
8256
2040
Segment.7.RampRate
8357
20A5
Segment.1.TargetSP
8262
2046
Segment.7.SegType
8352
20A0
Segment.2.CallCycles
8275
2053
Segment.7.TargetSP
8358
20A6
Segment.2.CallProg
8274
2052
Segment.8.CallCycles
8371
20B3
Segment.2.Duration
8276
2054
Segment.8.CallProg
8370
20B2
Segment.2.EndType
8279
2057
Segment.8.Duration
8372
20B4
Segment.2.EventOuts
8280
2058
Segment.8.EndType
8375
20B7
Segment.2.Holdback
8273
2051
Segment.8.EventOuts
8376
20B8
Segment.2.RampRate
8277
2055
Segment.8.Holdback
8369
20B1
Segment.2.SegType
8272
2050
Segment.8.RampRate
8373
20B5
Segment.2.TargetSP
8278
2056
Segment.8.SegType
8368
20B0
Segment.3.CallCycles
8291
2063
Segment.8.TargetSP
8374
20B6
Segment.3.CallProg
8290
2062
Segment.9.CallCycles
8387
20C3
Segment.3.Duration
8292
2064
Segment.9.CallProg
8386
20C2
Segment.3.EndType
8295
2067
Segment.9.Duration
8388
20C4
Segment.3.EventOuts
8296
2068
Segment.9.EndType
8391
20C7
Segment.3.Holdback
8289
2061
Segment.9.EventOuts
8392
20C8
Segment.3.RampRate
8293
2065
Segment.9.Holdback
8385
20C1
Segment.3.SegType
8288
2060
Segment.9.RampRate
8389
20C5
Segment.3.TargetSP
8294
2066
Segment.9.SegType
8384
20C0
Segment.4.CallCycles
8307
2073
Segment.9.TargetSP
8390
20C6
Segment.4.CallProg
8306
2072
Segment.10.CallCycles
8403
20D3
Segment.4.Duration
8308
2074
Segment.10.CallProg
8402
20D2
Segment.4.EndType
8311
2077
Segment.10.Duration
8404
20D4
Segment.4.EventOuts
8312
2078
Segment.10.EndType
8407
20D7
Segment.4.Holdback
8305
2071
Segment.10.EventOuts
8408
20D8
Segment.4.RampRate
8309
2075
Segment.10.Holdback
8401
20D1
Segment.4.SegType
8304
2070
Segment.10.RampRate
8405
20D5
Segment.4.TargetSP
8310
2076
Segment.10.SegType
8400
20D0
Segment.5.CallCycles
8323
2083
Segment.10.TargetSP
8406
20D6
Segment.5.CallProg
8322
2082
Segment.11.CallCycles
8419
20E3
Segment.5.Duration
8324
2084
Segment.11.CallProg
8418
20E2
Segment.5.EndType
8327
2087
Segment.11.Duration
8420
20E4
Segment.5.EventOuts
8328
2088
Segment.11.EndType
8423
20E7
Segment.5.Holdback
8321
2081
Segment.11.EventOuts
8424
20E8
Segment.5.RampRate
8325
2085
Segment.11.Holdback
8417
20E1
Segment.5.SegType
8320
2080
Segment.11.RampRate
8421
20E5
Segment.5.TargetSP
8326
2086
Segment.11.SegType
8416
20E0
Segment.6.CallCycles
8339
2093
Segment.11.TargetSP
8422
20E6
Segment.6.CallProg
8338
2092
Segment.12.CallCycles
8435
20F3
Segment.6.Duration
8340
2094
Segment.12.CallProg
8434
20F2
Segment.6.EndType
8343
2097
Segment.12.Duration
8436
20F4
Segment.6.EventOuts
8344
2098
Segment.12.EndType
8439
20F7
Segment.6.Holdback
8337
2091
Segment.12.EventOuts
8440
20F8
Segment.6.RampRate
8341
2095
Segment.12.Holdback
8433
20F1
Segment.6.SegType
8336
2090
Segment.12.RampRate
8437
20F5
Segment.6.TargetSP
8342
2096
Segment.12.SegType
8432
20F0
Segment.7.CallCycles
8355
20A3
Segment.12.TargetSP
8438
20F6
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 323
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Segment.13.CallCycles
8451
2103
Segment.18.TargetSP
8534
2156
Segment.13.CallProg
8450
2102
Segment.19.CallCycles
8547
2163
Segment.13.Duration
8452
2104
Segment.19.CallProg
8546
2162
Segment.13.EndType
8455
2107
Segment.19.Duration
8548
2164
Segment.13.EventOuts
8456
2108
Segment.19.EndType
8551
2167
Segment.13.Holdback
8449
2101
Segment.19.EventOuts
8552
2168
Segment.13.RampRate
8453
2105
Segment.19.Holdback
8545
2161
Segment.13.SegType
8448
2100
Segment.19.RampRate
8549
2165
Segment.13.TargetSP
8454
2106
Segment.19.SegType
8544
2160
Segment.14.CallCycles
8467
2113
Segment.19.TargetSP
8550
2166
Segment.14.CallProg
8466
2112
Segment.20.CallCycles
8563
2173
Segment.14.Duration
8468
2114
Segment.20.CallProg
8562
2172
Segment.14.EndType
8471
2117
Segment.20.Duration
8564
2174
Segment.14.EventOuts
8472
2118
Segment.20.EndType
8567
2177
Segment.14.Holdback
8465
2111
Segment.20.EventOuts
8568
2178
Segment.14.RampRate
8469
2115
Segment.20.Holdback
8561
2171
Segment.14.SegType
8464
2110
Segment.20.RampRate
8565
2175
Segment.14.TargetSP
8470
2116
Segment.20.SegType
8560
2170
Segment.15.CallCycles
8483
2123
Segment.20.TargetSP
8566
2176
Segment.15.CallProg
8482
2122
Segment.21.CallCycles
8579
2183
Segment.15.Duration
8484
2124
Segment.21.CallProg
8578
2182
Segment.15.EndType
8487
2127
Segment.21.Duration
8580
2184
Segment.15.EventOuts
8488
2128
Segment.21.EndType
8583
2187
Segment.15.Holdback
8481
2121
Segment.21.EventOuts
8584
2188
Segment.15.RampRate
8485
2125
Segment.21.Holdback
8577
2181
Segment.15.SegType
8480
2120
Segment.21.RampRate
8581
2185
Segment.15.TargetSP
8486
2126
Segment.21.SegType
8576
2180
Segment.16.CallCycles
8499
2133
Segment.21.TargetSP
8582
2186
Segment.16.CallProg
8498
2132
Segment.22.CallCycles
8595
2193
Segment.16.Duration
8500
2134
Segment.22.CallProg
8594
2192
Segment.16.EndType
8503
2137
Segment.22.Duration
8596
2194
Segment.16.EventOuts
8504
2138
Segment.22.EndType
8599
2197
Segment.16.Holdback
8497
2131
Segment.22.EventOuts
8600
2198
Segment.16.RampRate
8501
2135
Segment.22.Holdback
8593
2191
Segment.16.SegType
8496
2130
Segment.22.RampRate
8597
2195
Segment.16.TargetSP
8502
2136
Segment.22.SegType
8592
2190
Segment.17.CallCycles
8515
2143
Segment.22.TargetSP
8598
2196
Segment.17.CallProg
8514
2142
Segment.23.CallCycles
8611
21A3
Segment.17.Duration
8516
2144
Segment.23.CallProg
8610
21A2
Segment.17.EndType
8519
2147
Segment.23.Duration
8612
21A4
Segment.17.EventOuts
8520
2148
Segment.23.EndType
8615
21A7
Segment.17.Holdback
8513
2141
Segment.23.EventOuts
8616
21A8
Segment.17.RampRate
8517
2145
Segment.23.Holdback
8609
21A1
Segment.17.SegType
8512
2140
Segment.23.RampRate
8613
21A5
Segment.17.TargetSP
8518
2146
Segment.23.SegType
8608
21A0
Segment.18.CallCycles
8531
2153
Segment.23.TargetSP
8614
21A6
Segment.18.CallProg
8530
2152
Segment.24.CallCycles
8627
21B3
Segment.18.Duration
8532
2154
Segment.24.CallProg
8626
21B2
Segment.18.EndType
8535
2157
Segment.24.Duration
8628
21B4
Segment.18.EventOuts
8536
2158
Segment.24.EndType
8631
21B7
Segment.18.Holdback
8529
2151
Segment.24.EventOuts
8632
21B8
Segment.18.RampRate
8533
2155
Segment.24.Holdback
8625
21B1
Segment.18.SegType
8528
2150
Segment.24.RampRate
8629
21B5
Page 324
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Segment.24.SegType
8624
21B0
Segment.30.RampRate
8725
2215
Segment.24.TargetSP
8630
21B6
Segment.30.SegType
8720
2210
Segment.25.CallCycles
8643
21C3
Segment.30.TargetSP
8726
2216
Segment.25.CallProg
8642
21C2
Segment.31.CallCycles
8739
2223
Segment.25.Duration
8644
21C4
Segment.31.CallProg
8738
2222
Segment.25.EndType
8647
21C7
Segment.31.Duration
8740
2224
Segment.25.EventOuts
8648
21C8
Segment.31.EndType
8743
2227
Segment.25.Holdback
8641
21C1
Segment.31.EventOuts
8744
2228
Segment.25.RampRate
8645
21C5
Segment.31.Holdback
8737
2221
Segment.25.SegType
8640
21C0
Segment.31.RampRate
8741
2225
Segment.25.TargetSP
8646
21C6
Segment.31.SegType
8736
2220
Segment.26.CallCycles
8659
21D3
Segment.31.TargetSP
8742
2226
Segment.26.CallProg
8658
21D2
Segment.32.CallCycles
8755
2233
Segment.26.Duration
8660
21D4
Segment.32.CallProg
8754
2232
Segment.26.EndType
8663
21D7
Segment.32.Duration
8756
2234
Segment.26.EventOuts
8664
21D8
Segment.32.EndType
8759
2237
Segment.26.Holdback
8657
21D1
Segment.32.EventOuts
8760
2238
Segment.26.RampRate
8661
21D5
Segment.32.Holdback
8753
2231
Segment.26.SegType
8656
21D0
Segment.32.RampRate
8757
2235
Segment.26.TargetSP
8662
21D6
Segment.32.SegType
8752
2230
Segment.27.CallCycles
8675
21E3
Segment.32.TargetSP
8758
2236
Segment.27.CallProg
8674
21E2
Segment.33.CallCycles
8771
2243
Segment.27.Duration
8676
21E4
Segment.33.CallProg
8770
2242
Segment.27.EndType
8679
21E7
Segment.33.Duration
8772
2244
Segment.27.EventOuts
8680
21E8
Segment.33.EndType
8775
2247
Segment.27.Holdback
8673
21E1
Segment.33.EventOuts
8776
2248
Segment.27.RampRate
8677
21E5
Segment.33.Holdback
8769
2241
Segment.27.SegType
8672
21E0
Segment.33.RampRate
8773
2245
Segment.27.TargetSP
8678
21E6
Segment.33.SegType
8768
2240
Segment.28.CallCycles
8691
21F3
Segment.33.TargetSP
8774
2246
Segment.28.CallProg
8690
21F2
Segment.34.CallCycles
8787
2253
Segment.28.Duration
8692
21F4
Segment.34.CallProg
8786
2252
Segment.28.EndType
8695
21F7
Segment.34.Duration
8788
2254
Segment.28.EventOuts
8696
21F8
Segment.34.EndType
8791
2257
Segment.28.Holdback
8689
21F1
Segment.34.EventOuts
8792
2258
Segment.28.RampRate
8693
21F5
Segment.34.Holdback
8785
2251
Segment.28.SegType
8688
21F0
Segment.34.RampRate
8789
2255
Segment.28.TargetSP
8694
21F6
Segment.34.SegType
8784
2250
Segment.29.CallCycles
8707
2203
Segment.34.TargetSP
8790
2256
Segment.29.CallProg
8706
2202
Segment.35.CallCycles
8803
2263
Segment.29.Duration
8708
2204
Segment.35.CallProg
8802
2262
Segment.29.EndType
8711
2207
Segment.35.Duration
8804
2264
Segment.29.EventOuts
8712
2208
Segment.35.EndType
8807
2267
Segment.29.Holdback
8705
2201
Segment.35.EventOuts
8808
2268
Segment.29.RampRate
8709
2205
Segment.35.Holdback
8801
2261
Segment.29.SegType
8704
2200
Segment.35.RampRate
8805
2265
Segment.29.TargetSP
8710
2206
Segment.35.SegType
8800
2260
Segment.30.CallCycles
8723
2213
Segment.35.TargetSP
8806
2266
Segment.30.CallProg
8722
2212
Segment.36.CallCycles
8819
2273
Segment.30.Duration
8724
2214
Segment.36.CallProg
8818
2272
Segment.30.EndType
8727
2217
Segment.36.Duration
8820
2274
Segment.30.EventOuts
8728
2218
Segment.36.EndType
8823
2277
Segment.30.Holdback
8721
2211
Segment.36.EventOuts
8824
2278
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 325
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Segment.36.Holdback
8817
2271
Segment.42.EventOuts
8920
22D8
Segment.36.RampRate
8821
2275
Segment.42.Holdback
8913
22D1
Segment.36.SegType
8816
2270
Segment.42.RampRate
8917
22D5
Segment.36.TargetSP
8822
2276
Segment.42.SegType
8912
22D0
Segment.37.CallCycles
8835
2283
Segment.42.TargetSP
8918
22D6
Segment.37.CallProg
8834
2282
Segment.43.CallCycles
8931
22E3
Segment.37.Duration
8836
2284
Segment.43.CallProg
8930
22E2
Segment.37.EndType
8839
2287
Segment.43.Duration
8932
22E4
Segment.37.EventOuts
8840
2288
Segment.43.EndType
8935
22E7
Segment.37.Holdback
8833
2281
Segment.43.EventOuts
8936
22E8
Segment.37.RampRate
8837
2285
Segment.43.Holdback
8929
22E1
Segment.37.SegType
8832
2280
Segment.43.RampRate
8933
22E5
Segment.37.TargetSP
8838
2286
Segment.43.SegType
8928
22E0
Segment.38.CallCycles
8851
2293
Segment.43.TargetSP
8934
22E6
Segment.38.CallProg
8850
2292
Segment.44.CallCycles
8947
22F3
Segment.38.Duration
8852
2294
Segment.44.CallProg
8946
22F2
Segment.38.EndType
8855
2297
Segment.44.Duration
8948
22F4
Segment.38.EventOuts
8856
2298
Segment.44.EndType
8951
22F7
Segment.38.Holdback
8849
2291
Segment.44.EventOuts
8952
22F8
Segment.38.RampRate
8853
2295
Segment.44.Holdback
8945
22F1
Segment.38.SegType
8848
2290
Segment.44.RampRate
8949
22F5
Segment.38.TargetSP
8854
2296
Segment.44.SegType
8944
22F0
Segment.39.CallCycles
8867
22A3
Segment.44.TargetSP
8950
22F6
Segment.39.CallProg
8866
22A2
Segment.45.CallCycles
8963
2303
Segment.39.Duration
8868
22A4
Segment.45.CallProg
8962
2302
Segment.39.EndType
8871
22A7
Segment.45.Duration
8964
2304
Segment.39.EventOuts
8872
22A8
Segment.45.EndType
8967
2307
Segment.39.Holdback
8865
22A1
Segment.45.EventOuts
8968
2308
Segment.39.RampRate
8869
22A5
Segment.45.Holdback
8961
2301
Segment.39.SegType
8864
22A0
Segment.45.RampRate
8965
2305
Segment.39.TargetSP
8870
22A6
Segment.45.SegType
8960
2300
Segment.40.CallCycles
8883
22B3
Segment.45.TargetSP
8966
2306
Segment.40.CallProg
8882
22B2
Segment.46.CallCycles
8979
2313
Segment.40.Duration
8884
22B4
Segment.46.CallProg
8978
2312
Segment.40.EndType
8887
22B7
Segment.46.Duration
8980
2314
Segment.40.EventOuts
8888
22B8
Segment.46.EndType
8983
2317
Segment.40.Holdback
8881
22B1
Segment.46.EventOuts
8984
2318
Segment.40.RampRate
8885
22B5
Segment.46.Holdback
8977
2311
Segment.40.SegType
8880
22B0
Segment.46.RampRate
8981
2315
Segment.40.TargetSP
8886
22B6
Segment.46.SegType
8976
2310
Segment.41.CallCycles
8899
22C3
Segment.46.TargetSP
8982
2316
Segment.41.CallProg
8898
22C2
Segment.47.CallCycles
8995
2323
Segment.41.Duration
8900
22C4
Segment.47.CallProg
8994
2322
Segment.41.EndType
8903
22C7
Segment.47.Duration
8996
2324
Segment.41.EventOuts
8904
22C8
Segment.47.EndType
8999
2327
Segment.41.Holdback
8897
22C1
Segment.47.EventOuts
9000
2328
Segment.41.RampRate
8901
22C5
Segment.47.Holdback
8993
2321
Segment.41.SegType
8896
22C0
Segment.47.RampRate
8997
2325
Segment.41.TargetSP
8902
22C6
Segment.47.SegType
8992
2320
Segment.42.CallCycles
8915
22D3
Segment.47.TargetSP
8998
2326
Segment.42.CallProg
8914
22D2
Segment.48.CallCycles
9011
2333
Segment.42.Duration
8916
22D4
Segment.48.CallProg
9010
2332
Segment.42.EndType
8919
22D7
Segment.48.Duration
9012
2334
Page 326
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Version 1.xx Programmer Parameters
DEC
HEX
Segment.48.EndType
9015
2337
Segment.48.EventOuts
9016
2338
Segment.48.Holdback
9009
2331
Segment.48.RampRate
9013
2335
Segment.48.SegType
9008
2330
Segment.48.TargetSP
9014
2336
Segment.49.CallCycles
9027
2343
Segment.49.CallProg
9026
2342
Segment.49.Duration
9028
2344
Segment.49.EndType
9031
2347
Segment.49.EventOuts
9032
2348
Segment.49.Holdback
9025
2341
Segment.49.RampRate
9029
2345
Segment.49.SegType
9024
2340
Segment.49.TargetSP
9030
2346
Segment.50.CallCycles
9043
2353
Segment.50.CallProg
9042
2352
Segment.50.Duration
9044
2354
Segment.50.EndType
9047
2357
Segment.50.EventOuts
9048
2358
Segment.50.Holdback
9041
2351
Segment.50.RampRate
9045
2355
Segment.50.SegType
9040
2350
Segment.50.TargetSP
9046
2356
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Issue 17 May 16
Page 327
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
29.
Appendix E Safety and EMC Information
Eurotherm Controls Ltd manufactures this controller in the UK.
Please read this section carefully before installing the controller
This controller is intended for industrial temperature and process control applications where it will meet the
requirements of the European Directives on Safety and EMC. If the instrument is used in a manner not specified
in this manual, the safety or EMC protection provided by the instrument may be impaired. The installer must
ensure the safety and EMC of any particular installation.
The Mini8 controller is intended for operation at safe low voltage levels, except the RL8 relay module.
Voltages in excess of 42 volts must not be applied to any terminals other than the RL8 relay module.
Protective Earth Connection is required.
Safety
This controller complies with the European Low Voltage Directive 2006/95/EC, by the application of the safety
standard EN 61010. The earth stud should be connected to safety earth before other connections are made.
Electromagnetic compatibility
This controller conforms with the essential protection requirements of the EMC Directive 2004/108/EC, by the
application of EMC standard EN61326
Unpacking and storage
The packaging should contain an instrument and an Installation guide. It may contain a CD.
If on receipt, the packaging or the instrument is damaged, do not install the product but contact your supplier.
If the instrument is to be stored before use, protect it from humidity and dust in an ambient temperature range of
o
o
-10 C to +70 C.
SERVICE AND REPAIR
This controller has no user serviceable parts. Contact your supplier for repair.
Cleaning
Do not use water or water based products to clean labels or they will become illegible. Isopropyl alcohol may be
used to clean labels. A mild soap solution may be used to clean other exterior surfaces of the product.
GENERAL
The information contained in this manual is subject to change without notice. While every effort has been made
to ensure the accuracy of the information, your supplier shall not be held liable for errors contained herein.
Page 328
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
INSTALLATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS
Safety Symbols
Various symbols are used on the instrument, they have the following meaning:
!
Caution (refer to the accompanying documents
Protective Conductor Terminal
Personnel
Installation must only be carried out by suitably qualified personnel.
Mounting
The Mini8 controller should be mounted in a suitable enclosure with suitable ventilation to ensure the ambient
temperature remains below 50ºC.
Wiring
It is important to connect the controller in accordance with the wiring data given in this guide. Take particular
care not to connect AC supplies to the low voltage sensor input or other low level inputs and outputs. Only use
copper conductors for connections (except thermocouple inputs) and ensure that the wiring of installations
comply with all local wiring regulations. For example in the UK use the latest version of the IEE wiring regulations,
(BS7671). In the USA use NEC Class 1 wiring methods.
Power Isolation
The installation must include a power isolating switch or circuit breaker. The device should be mounted in close
proximity to the controller, within easy reach of the operator and marked as the disconnecting device for the
instrument.
Overcurrent protection
The power supply to the system should be fused appropriately to protect the cabling to the units.
Voltage rating
The maximum continuous voltage applied between any of the following terminals must not exceed:
•
24 V dc ± 10% on the power supply terminals
•
42V peak on analogue and digital I/O terminals, and fixed resource I/O terminals;
•
264V rms on Relay card fitted in I/O slot 2 or 3.
The case MUST be wired to a protective earth.
Conductive pollution
Electrically conductive pollution must be excluded from the cabinet in which the controller is mounted. For
example, carbon dust is a form of electrically conductive pollution. To secure a suitable atmosphere, install an air
filter to the air intake of the cabinet. Where condensation is likely, for example at low temperatures, include a
thermostatically controlled heater in the cabinet.
This product has been designed to conform to BSEN61010 installation category II, pollution degree 2. These are
defined as follows:Installation Category II
The rated impulse voltage for equipment on nominal 24V dc supply is 800V.
Pollution Degree 2
Normally only non conductive pollution occurs. Occasionally, however, a temporary
conductivity caused by condensation shall be expected.
Over-Temperature Protection
When designing any control system it is essential to consider what will happen if any part of the system should
fail. In temperature control applications the primary danger is that the heating will remain constantly on. Apart
from spoiling the product, this could damage any process machinery being controlled, or even cause a fire.
Reasons why the heating might remain constantly on include:
•
the temperature sensor becoming detached from the process
•
thermocouple wiring becoming short circuit;
•
the controller failing with its heating output constantly on
•
an external valve or contactor sticking in the heating condition
•
the controller setpoint set too high.
Where damage or injury is possible, we recommend fitting a separate over-temperature protection unit, with an
independent temperature sensor, which will isolate the heating circuit.
Please note that the alarm relays within the controller will not give protection under all failure conditions.
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 329
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS FOR EMC
To ensure compliance with the European EMC directive certain installation precautions are necessary as follows:
•
For general guidance refer to EMC Installation Guide, HA025464.
•
When using relay outputs it may be necessary to fit a filter suitable for suppressing the conducted
emissions. The filter requirements will depend on the type of load.
•
If the unit is used in table top equipment which is plugged into a standard power socket, then it is
likely that compliance to the commercial and light industrial emissions standard is required. In this
case to meet the conducted emissions requirement, a suitable mains filter should be installed.
Routing of wires
To minimise the pick-up of electrical noise, the low voltage DC connections and the sensor input wiring should
be routed away from high-current power cables. Where it is impractical to do this, use shielded cables with the
shield grounded at both ends. In general keep cable lengths to a minimum.
Page 330
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Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
30.
Appendix F Technical Specification
The I/O electrical specifications are quoted as factory calibrated worst-case; for life, over full ambient
temperature range and supply voltage. Any “typical” figures quoted are the expected values at 25°C ambient and
24Vdc supply.
The nominal update of all inputs and function blocks is every 110ms. However, in complex applications the Mini8
controller will automatically extend this time in multiples of 110ms.
30.1
Environmental Specification
Power Supply Voltage
17.8Vdc min to 28.8Vdc max.
Supply Ripple
2Vp-p max.
Power Consumption
15W max.
Max. applied voltage any terminal
42Vpk.
Operating Temperature
0 to 55°C
Storage Temperature
-10°C to +70°C
Relative Humidity
5% to 95% RH non-condensing
Altitude
<2000m
Approvals
CE
cUL
GOST
Safety
Meets EN61010-1: 2010 and UL 61010-1: 2012
Installation Category II
Pollution Degree 2.
EMC
EN61326: 2006 and IEC 61326-1: 2004
Emmissions: Heavy Industrial
Immunity: Industrial
Protection
IP20
The Mini8 controller must be mounted in a protective enclosure.
Packaging
Conforms to RD005
Packaging Free Fall
Conforms to RD005
RoHS Comliance
EU (RoHS 2)
China
30.2
Network Communications Support
Modbus RTU: RS485, 2 x RJ45, user select switch for 3-wire or 5-wire.
DeviceNet: CAN, 5-pin standard "open connector" with screw terminals.
CANopen: CAN, 5-pin standard "open connector" with screw terminals.
Profibus DP: RS485 via standard 9 pin D connectopr OR 2 RJ45 connectors
Baud rates: 4800, 9600, 19200
Baud rates: 125k, 250k, 500k
Baud rates: 125k, 250k, 500k, 1M
Baud rates: Up to 12M set by the
Master
EtherNet: Standard EtherNet RJ45 connector.
Baud rate: 10baseT
EtherNet/IP: Standard EtherNet RJ45 connector.
Baud rates: 10baseT
100baseT
EtherCAT: 2 x Standard EtherNet RJ45 connector
Baud rates: 10baseT
100baseT
Isolation between RJ45 connector and system
1500Vac.
Modbus, DeviceNet , CANopen , Profibus , EtherNet, EtherNet/IP, EtherCAT are mutually exclusive options; refer
to the Mini8 controller order code document.
30.3
Configuration Communications Support
Modbus RTU: 3-wire RS232, through RJ11 configuration port.
Baud rates: 4800, 9600, 19200
All versions of Mini8 controller support one configuration port.
The configuration port can be used simultaneously with the network link.
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
30.4
Fixed I/O Resources
The PSU card supports 2 independent and isolated relay contacts
Relay Output Types
On/Off (C/O contacts, "On" closing the N/O pair)
Contact Current
<1A (resistive loads)
Terminal Voltage
<42Vpk
Contact Material
Gold
Snubbers
Snubber networks are NOT fitted.
Contact Isolation
42Vpkmax.
The PSU card supports 2 independent and isolated logic inputs
Input Types
Logic (24Vdc)
Input Logic 0 (off)
-28.8V to + 5Vdc.
Input Logic 1 (on)
+10.8V to +28.8Vdc.
Input Current
2.5mA (approx.) at 10.8V; 10mA max at 28.8V supply.
Detectable Pulse Width
110ms min.
Isolation to system
42Vpkmax.
30.5
TC8 8-Channel and TC4 4-Channel TC Input Card
The TC8 supports 8 independently programmable and electrically isolated channels, catering for all standard and
custom thermocouple types. The TC4 supports 4 channels to the same specification.
Channel Types
TC, mV Input Range: -77mV to +77mV.
Resolution
20 bit ( Σ∆ converter), 1.6µV with 1.6s filter time
Temperature Coefficient
Cold Junction Range
CJ Rejection
CJ Accuracy
Linearisation Types
Total accuracy
Channel PV Filter
Sensor Break: AC detector
Input Resistance
Input Leakage Current
Common mode rejection
Series mode rejection
Isolation channel-channel
Isolation to system
Page 332
< ±50ppm (0.005%) of reading/ °C
-10°C to +70°C
> 30:1
± 1°C
C, J, K, L, R, B, N, T, S, LINEAR mV, custom.
± 1°C ± 0.1% of reading (using internal CJC)
0.0 seconds (off) to 999.9 seconds, 1st order low-pass.
Off, Low or High resistance trip levels.
>100 M
<100nA (1nA typical).
>120dB, 47 - 63Hz
>60dB, 47 - 63Hz
42Vpkmax
42Vpkmax
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
30.6
DO8 8-Channel Digital Output Card
The DO8 supports 8 independently programmable channels, the output switches requiring external power
supply. Each channel is current and temperature protected, foldback limiting occurring at about 100mA.
The supply line is protected to limit total card current to 200mA.
The 8 channels are isolated from the system (but not from each other). To maintain isolation it is essential to use
an independent and isolated PSU.
Channel Types
On/Off, Time Proportioned
Channel Supply (Vcs)
15Vdc to 30Vdc
Logic 1 Voltage Output
> (Vcs - 3V) (not in power limiting)
Logic 0 Voltage Output
< 1.2Vdc no-load, 0.9V typical
Logic 1 Current Output
100mA max. (not in power limiting)
Min. Pulse Time
20ms
Channel Power Limiting
Current limiting capable of driving short-circuit load
Terminal Supply Protection
Card supply is protected by 200mA self-healing fuse
Isolation (channel-channel)
N/A (Channels share common connections)
Isolation to system
42Vpk max.
30.7
RL8 8-Channel Relay Output Card
The RL8 supports 8 independently programmable channels. This module may only be fitted in slot 2 or 3, giving
a maximum of 16 relays in a Mini8 controller.
The Mini8 controller chassis must be earthed (grounded) using the protective earth stud.
Channel Types
On/Off, Time Proportioned
Maximum contact voltage
264 volt ac
Maximum contact current
2 amps ac
Contact snubber
Fitted on module
Minimum contact wetting
5 volt dc, 10mA
Min. Pulse Time
220ms
Isolation (channel-channel)
264V
Isolation to system
264V.
30.8
230V nominal
CT3 3-Channel Current-Transformer Input Card
The CT3 supports 3 independent channels designed for heater current monitoring. A scan block allows periodic
test of nominated outputs to detect load (failure) changes.
Channel Types
A (current)
Factory set accuracy
better than ±2% of range
Current Input Range
0mA to 50mA rms, 50/60Hz nominal
Transformer Ratio
10/0.05 to 1000/0.05
Input Load Burden
1W
Isolation
None (provided by CT)
30.9
Load Failure Detection
Requires CT3 module
Max number of loads
16 Time Proportioned Outputs
Max loads per CT
6 loads per CT input
Alarms
1 in 8 Partial load failure, Over current, SSR short circuit, SSR open
circuit
Commissioning
Automatic or manual
Measurement interval
1 sec - 60 sec
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MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
30.10
DI8 8-Channel Digital Input Card
The DI8 supports 8 independent input channels.
Input Types
Logic (24Vdc)
Input Logic 0 (off)
-28.8V to +5Vdc.
Input Logic 1 (on)
+10.8V to +28.8Vdc.
Input Current
2.5mA (approx.) at 10.8V; 10mA max at 28.8V supply.
Detectable Pulse Width
110ms min.
Isolation channel-channel
42Vpkmax
Isolation to system
42Vpkmax.
30.11
RT4 Resistance Thermometer Input Card
The RT4 supports 4 independently programmable and electrically isolated resistance input channels. Each
channel may be connected as 2 wire, 3 wire or 4 wire and either Low or High Resistance range.
Channel Types
Low Resistance/PT100
High Resistance/PT1000
Input Range
0 to 420 Ω,
-242.02°C to +850°C for PT100
0 to 4200 Ω,
-242.02°C to +850°C for PT1000
Calibration Error
±0.1Ω ±0.1% of reading, 22Ω to 420 Ω
±0.3°C ±0.1% of reading, -200°C to
+850°C
±0.6Ω ±0.1% of reading, 220 Ω to 4200 Ω
±0.2°C ±0.1% of reading, -200°C to +850°C
Resolution
0.008 Ω, 0.02°C
0.6 Ω, 0.15°C
Measurement Noise
0.016 Ω, 0.04°C peak to peak,
1.6s channel filter
0.06 Ω, 0.15°C peak to peak, no filter
0.2 Ω, 0.05°C peak to peak,
1.6s channel filter
0.6 Ω, 0.15°C peak to peak, no filter
Linearity error
±0.02 Ω, ±0.05°C
±0.2 Ω, ±0.05°C
Temp coefficient
±0.002% of Ω reading per °C ambient
change relative to normal ambient 25°C
±0.002% of Ω reading per °C ambient
change relative to normal ambient 25°C
Lead resistance
22 Ω max in each leg. Total resistance
including leads is restricted to the 420
ohm maximum limit. 3 wire connection
assumed matched leads.
22 Ω max in each leg. Total resistance
including leads is restricted to the 4200
ohm maximum limit. For the 3 wire
connection it is assumed that the leads are
matched.
Maximum Bulb current
300μA
300μA
Isolation channelchannel
42Vpkmax
42Vpkmax
Isolation to system
42Vpkmax
42Vpkmax
30.12
AO8 8-Channel and AO4 4-Channel 4-20mA Output Card
The AO8 supports 8 independently programmable and electrically isolated mA output channels for 4-20mA
current-loop applications. The AO4 supports 4 channels to the same specification. The AO4 and AO8 modules
may only be fitted in slot 4.
Channel Types
mA (current) Output
Output Range
0-20mA, 360Ω load max.
Setting Accuracy
±0.5% of reading
Resolution
1 part in 10000 (1uA typical)
Isolation channel-channel
42Vpkmax
Isolation to system
42Vpkmax
30.13
Recipes
Recipes are a software orderable option
Number of recipes
8
Tags
24 tags in total
Page 334
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
30.14
Toolkit Blocks
User Wires
Orderable options of 30, 60 120 or 250
User values
32 real values
2 Input Maths
24 blocks
Add, subtract, multiply, divide, absolute difference, maximum, minimum,
hot swap, sample and hold, power, square root, Log, Ln, exponential,
switch
2 Input Logic
24 blocks
AND, OR, XOR, latch, equal, not equal, greater than, less than, greater
than or equal to, less than or equal to
8 Input Logic
4 blocks
AND, OR, XOR
8 Input Multiple
Operator
4 blocks
Maximum, Minimum, Average. Input/Outputs to allow cascading of blocks
8 Input Multiplexer
4 blocks
8 sets of 8 values selected by input parameter
BCD Input
2 blocks
2 decades (8 inputs giving 0 to 99).
Input monitor
2 blocks
Max, min, time above threshold
16 Point Linearisation
2 blocks
16-point linearisation fit
Polynomial Fit
2 blocks
Characterisation by Poly Fit table
Switchover
1 block
Smooth transition between two input values
Timer blocks
8 blocks
OnPulse, OnDelay, OneShot, MinOn Time
Counter blocks
2 blocks
Up or down, Directional flag
Totaliser blocks
2 blocks
Alarm at Threshold value
Real time clock
1 block
Day & time, 2 time based alarms
Transducer Scaling
2 blocks
Transducer Auto-tare, calibration & comparision cal.
30.15
PID Control Loop Blocks
Number of Loops
0, 4, 8 or 16 Loops (order options)
Control modes
On/Off, single PID, Dual channel OP
Control Outputs
Analogue 4-20mA, Time proportioned logic
Cooling algorithms
Linear, water, fan, or oil
Tuning
3 sets PID, One-shot auto-tune.
Auto manual control
Bumpless transfer or forced manual output available
Setpoint rate limit
Ramp in units per sec, per min or per hour.
Output rate limit
Ramp in % change per second
Other features
Feedforward, Input track, Sensor break OP, Loop break alarm, remote SP,
2 internal loop setpoints
30.16
Process Alarms
Number of alarms
32 analogue, 32 digital, 32 Sensor break
Alarm types
Absolute high, absolute low, deviation high, deviation low, deviation
band, sensor break, logic high, logic low, rising edge, falling edge, edge
Alarm modes
Latching or non-latching, blocking, time delay
30.17
Setpoint Programmer
The Setpoint Programmer is a software orderable option
Number of programs
8
Number of segments
128
Number of event outputs
8 per program (64 total)
Digital inputs
Run, Hold, Reset, Run/Hold, Run/Reset, Program Advance, Skip, Segment,
Sync
Power failure action
Ramp, Reset, Continue
Servo start
PV, SP
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Page 335
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
31.
Parameter Index
Parameter
Folder
Section
Ch2 OnOff Hysteresis
Output function block
17.7
Parameter
Folder
Section
Ch2 Out
Output function block
17.7
Ack
Analogue alarms
8.5
CJC Temp
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Ack
Digital alarms
8.6
CJC Type
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Active Set
Loop PID
17.4.10
CleanFreq
Zirconia
12.2.8
ActiveOut
Loop - main
17.2
CleanProbe
Zirconia
12.2.8
Address
Comms - CC (config)
10.1.1
CleanState
Zirconia
12.2.8
Address
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
CleanTime
Zirconia
12.2.8
Address
Comms - Devicenet
10.7.1
CleanValve
Zirconia
12.2.8
Address
Comms - Profibus
10.9.1
Clear Cal
Transducer scaling
20.4
Address
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Clear Log
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
AdvSeg
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Clear Overflow
Counter
11.1.1
Alarm SP
Totaliser
11.3.1
Clear Stats
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
AlarmAck
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
ClearLog
Alarm log
8.8
AlarmAck
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
ClearMemory
Access
5.0
AlarmDays
Input monitor
13.2
Clock
Counter
11.1.1
AlarmEn1
Instrument - Enables
6.1
CntrlOverrun
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
AlarmEn2
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Commission
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
AlarmEn3
Instrument - Enables
6.1
CommissionStatus
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
AlarmEn4
Instrument - Enables
6.1
CommsStack
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
AlarmOut
Totaliser
11.3.1
CompanyID
Instrument - InstInfo
6.3
AlarmTime
Input monitor
13.2
Control Action
Loop set up
17.3
Alt SP
Setpoint
17.6.5
Cool Type
Output function block
17.7
Alt SP Select
Setpoint
17.6.5
Count
Counter
11.1.1
AnAlarmStatus1
Alarm summary
8.7
CounterEn
Instrument - Enables
6.1
AnAlarmStatus2
Alarm summary
8.7
CPUFree
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
AnAlarmStatus3
Alarm summary
8.7
CT1Range*
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
AnAlarmStatus4
Alarm summary
8.7
CT2Range*
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
AnyAlarm
Alarm summary
8.7
CT3Range*
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
Attenuation
Load
16.1
CTAlarmStatus1
Alarm summary
8.7
AutoMan
Loop - main
17.2
CTAlarmStatus2
Alarm summary
8.7
AutoTune Enable
Loop tune
17.5.5
CTAlarmStatus3
Alarm summary
8.7
Average Out
Multi operators
14.4.3
CTAlarmStatus4
Alarm summary
8.7
Baud
Comms - CC (config)
10.1.1
CtrlStack
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Baud
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
CtrlTicks
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Baud
Comms - Devicenet
10.7.1
CurProg
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
BCD Value
BCD Input
9.1
CurrentMon
Instrument - Enables
6.1
BCDInEn
Instrument - Enables
6.1
CurrSeg
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
Block
Analogue alarms
8.5
CurSegType
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
Block
Digital alarms
8.6
Cust1Name
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Boundary 1-2
Loop PID
17.4.10
Cust2Name
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Boundary 2-3
Loop PID
17.4.10
Cust3Name
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Broadcast Address
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
CustomerID
Access
5.0
Broadcast Enabled
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
CutbackHigh 1, 2, 3
Loop PID
17.4.10
Broadcast Value
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
CutbackLow 1, 2, 3
Loop PID
17.4.10
Cal Active
Transducer scaling
20.4
CyclesLeft
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
Cal Band
Transducer scaling
20.4
CyclesLeft
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
Cal Enable
Transducer scaling
20.4
Day
Real time clock
11.4
Cal State
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Days Above
Input monitor
13.2
Cal State
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Dec Value
BCD Input
9.1
Cal State
Calibration
22.5
Default Gateway 1
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Cal Status
Transducer scaling
20.4
Default Gateway 2
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Cal Type
Transducer scaling
20.4
Default Gateway 3
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
CalAdjust
Transducer scaling
20.4
Default Gateway 4
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
CalibrateCT1
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
Delay
Analogue alarms
8.5
CalibrateCT2
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
Delay
Digital alarms
8.6
CalibrateCT3
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
DelayedStart
Programmer - Setup
18.1
CarbonPot
Zirconia
12.2.8
DelayedStart
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
CascIn
Multi operators
14.4.3
Derivative
Loop set up
17.3
CascNumIn
Multi operators
14.4.3
DerivativeTime 1, 2, 3
Loop PID
17.4.10
Ch 1 ControlType
Loop set up
17.3
Destination
Comms - SCADA Table
24.1
Ch 2 Gain
Load
16.1
DewPoint
Humidity
12.1.4
Ch1 OnOff Hysteresis
Output function block
17.7
DewPoint
Zirconia
12.2.8
Ch1 Out
Output function block
17.7
DHCP enable
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Ch2 ControlType
Loop set up
17.3
DigAlarmStatus1
Alarm summary
8.7
Ch2 DeadBand
Output function block
17.7
DigAlarmStatus2
Alarm summary
8.7
Page 336
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter
Folder
Section
Parameter
Folder
DigAlarmStatus3
Alarm summary
8.7
FallbackType
Input linearisation
Section
15.1.2
DigAlarmStatus4
Alarm summary
8.7
FallbackValue
Polynomial
15.2
DigAlmEn1
Instrument - Enables
6.1
FastRun
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
DigAlmEn2
Instrument - Enables
6.1
FeedForward Gain
Output function block
17.7
DigAlmEn3
Instrument - Enables
6.1
FeedForward Offset
Output function block
17.7
DigAlmEn4
Instrument - Enables
6.1
FeedForward Trim Limit
Output function block
17.7
Direction
Counter
11.1.1
FeedForward Type
Output function block
17.7
Disp Hi
IO - Analogue output
7.7
FeedForward Val
Output function block
17.7
Disp Lo
IO - Analogue output
7.7
FF_Rem
Output function block
17.7
DisplayHigh
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
Filter Time Constant
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
DisplayHigh
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
Filter Time Constant
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
DisplayHigh
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
ForcedOP
Output function block
17.7
DisplayLow
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
Friday
Real time clock
11.4
DisplayLow
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
Gain
Load
16.1
DisplayLow
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
GasRef
Zirconia
12.2.8
DryTemp
Humidity
12.1.4
GlobalAck
Alarm summary
8.7
Elapsed Time
Timer
11.2.6
Goback CyclesLeft
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
Enable
Counter
11.1.1
High Limit
User values
21.1
Enable
Programmer - Setup
18.1
HighLimit
Maths operators
14.3.2
Enable
Programmer - Setup
18.1
HighLimit
Mux8 operators
14.5.1
EnableGsoak
Programmer - Setup
18.1
HiOffset
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
EnableImmPSP
Programmer - Setup
18.1
HiOffset
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
EnablePVevent
Programmer - Setup
18.1
HiPoint
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
EnableTime
Programmer - Setup
18.1
HiPoint
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
EnableUserVal
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Hold
Totaliser
11.3.1
End of Seg
Programmer - Setup
18.1
HumidityEn
Instrument - Enables
6.1
EndOutput
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
Hysteresis
Analogue alarms
8.5
Entry1Day
Alarm log
8.8
Ident
IO - Logic input
7.2.1
Entry1Ident
Alarm log
8.8
Ident
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
Entry1Time
Alarm log
8.8
Ident
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
Entry2Day
Alarm log
8.8
Ident
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Entry2Ident
Alarm log
8.8
Ident
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Entry2Time
Alarm log
8.8
Ident
IO - Analogue output
7.7
Entry32Day
Alarm log
8.8
Ident
IO - Fixed IO
7.8
Entry32Ident
Alarm log
8.8
Ident
Comms - CC (config)
10.1.1
Entry32Time
Alarm log
8.8
Ident
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
Err1
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Ident
Comms - Devicenet
10.7.1
Err2
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Ident
Comms - Profibus
10.9.1
Err3
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Ident
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Err4
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
IdleStack
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Err5
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
In
Analogue alarms
8.5
Err6
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
In
Digital alarms
8.6
Err7
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
In
Timer
11.2.6
Err8
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
In
Totaliser
11.3.1
ErrCount
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
In
Input monitor
13.2
ErrMode
Switch over
19.1
In
Input linearisation
15.1.2
EtherNet Status
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
In
Polynomial
15.2
Event
Programmer - Setup
18.1
In 1
BCD Input
9.1
EventOut1 to 8
Programmer - Setup
18.1
In 1 to In 8
Multi operators
14.4.3
EventsOut
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
In 2
BCD Input
9.1
Everyday
Real time clock
11.4
In 3
BCD Input
9.1
Fallback
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
In 4
BCD Input
9.1
Fallback
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
In 5
BCD Input
9.1
Fallback
Maths operators
14.3.2
In 6
BCD Input
9.1
Fallback
Mux8 operators
14.5.1
In 7
BCD Input
9.1
Fallback PV
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
In 8
BCD Input
9.1
Fallback PV
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
In Status
Input monitor
13.2
Fallback Typ
Multi operators
14.4.3
In1
Logic operators
14.1.3
Fallback Type
Polynomial
15.2
In1
Maths operators
14.3.2
Fallback Type
Switch over
19.1
In1
Switch over
19.1
Fallback Val
Maths operators
14.3.2
In1 to 8
Mux8 operators
14.5.1
Fallback Val
Multi operators
14.4.3
In1 to In14
Input linearisation
15.1.2
14.2
Fallback Val
Mux8 operators
14.5.1
In1 to In8
Input operators
Fallback Value
Input linearisation
15.1.2
In1Mul
Maths operators
14.3.2
Fallback Value
Switch over
19.1
In2
Logic operators
14.1.3
FallbackType
Logic operators
14.1.3
In2
Maths operators
14.3.2
Page 337
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter
Folder
Section
Parameter
Folder
Section
In2
Switch over
19.1
MAC4
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
In2 Mul
Maths operators
14.3.2
MAC5
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Inhibit
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
MAC6
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Inhibit
Analogue alarms
8.5
Manual Mode
Output function block
17.7
Inhibit
Digital alarms
8.6
ManualOutVal
Output function block
17.7
Inhibit
Loop - main
17.2
ManualReset 1, 2, 3
Loop PID
17.4.10
InHigh
Switch over
19.1
ManualTrack
Setpoint
17.6.5
InHigh
Transducer scaling
20.4
Math2 En1
Instrument - Enables
6.1
6.1
InHighLimit
Input linearisation
15.1.2
Math2 En2
Instrument - Enables
InHighScale
Polynomial
15.2
Math2 En3
Instrument - Enables
6.1
InInvert
Input operators
14.2
Max
Input monitor
13.2
InLow
Switch over
19.1
Max Con Tick
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
InLow
Transducer scaling
20.4
Max Events
Programmer - Setup
18.1
InLowLimit
Input linearisation
15.1.2
Max Out
Multi operators
14.4.3
InLowScale
Polynomial
15.2
Max segments
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
InputSize
EtherNet IP
10.11.3
MaxLeakPh1
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
Input Status
Multi operators
14.4.3
MaxLeakPh2
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
InstType
Instrument - InstInfo
6.3
MaxLeakPh3
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
IntegralTime 1, 2, 3
Loop PID
17.4.10
MaxRcovTime
Zirconia
12.2.8
Interval
IO - Current monitor
7.9.4
MaxSegsPerProg
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
IntHold
Loop - main
17.2
Meas Value
IO - Analogue output
7.7
7.2.1
InVal
Transducer scaling
20.4
Measured Val
IO - Logic input
Invert
IO - Logic input
7.2.1
Measured Val
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Invert
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
Measured Val
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Invert
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
Measured Val
IO - Fixed IO
7.8
Invert
IO - Fixed IO
7.8
MeasuredVal
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
Invert
Logic operators
14.1.3
MeasuredVal
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
IO Type
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Min
Input monitor
13.2
IO Type
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Min Out
Multi operators
14.4.3
IO Type
IO - Analogue output
7.7
MinCalTemp
Zirconia
12.2.8
IO Type
IO - Fixed IO
7.8
MinCPUFree
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
IOType
IO - Logic input
7.2.1
MinOnTime
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
IOType
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
MinOnTime
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
IOType
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
MinRcovTime
Zirconia
12.2.8
IP Address 1
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Minutes
Comms - SCADA Table
24.1
IP Address 2
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Mode
Real time clock
11.4
IP Address 3
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Module1
IO - ModIDs
7.1
IP Address 4
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Module2
IO - ModIDs
7.1
IP Mon En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Module3
IO - ModIDs
7.1
Latch
Analogue alarms
8.5
Module4
IO - ModIDs
7.1
Latch
Digital alarms
8.6
Monday
Real time clock
11.4
Lgc2 En1
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Mon-Fri
Real time clock
11.4
Lgc2 En2
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Mon-Sat
Real time clock
11.4
Lgc2 En3
Instrument - Enables
6.1
MultiOperEn
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Lgc8 En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Mux8 En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Lin Type
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Native
Comms - SCADA Table
24.1
Lin Type
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Network Status
Comms - Profibus
10.9.1
Lin16Pt En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Never
Real time clock
11.4
8.7
LinType
Polynomial
15.2
NewAlarm
Alarm summary
Load En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
NewCTAlarm
Alarm summary
8.7
Load En2
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Noise
Load
16.1
LoOffset
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Num Sets
Loop PID
17.4.10
LoOffset
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
NumIn
Input operators
14.2
Loop En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
NumIn
Multi operators
14.4.3
Loop En2
Instrument - Enables
6.1
NumValidIn
Multi operators
14.4.3
LoopBreakTime 1, 2, 3
Loop PID
17.4.10
Off Day1 & 2
Real time clock
11.4
LoopOutCh1
Load
16.1
Off Time1 & 2
Real time clock
11.4
LoopOutCh2
Load
16.1
Offset
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
LoPoint
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Offset
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
LoPoint
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Offset
Load
16.1
Low Limit
User values
21.1
On Day1 & 2
Real time clock
11.4
LowLimit
Maths operators
14.3.2
On Time1 & 2
Real time clock
11.4
LowLimit
Mux8 operators
14.5.1
Oper
Logic operators
14.1.3
MAC1
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Oper
Input operators
14.2
MAC2
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Oper
Maths operators
14.3.2
MAC3
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Out
Analogue alarms
8.5
Page 338
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter
Folder
Section
Parameter
Folder
Out
Digital alarms
8.6
PSP
Programmer - Run Status
Section
18.1
Out
Timer
11.2.6
PSUident
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Out
Input monitor
13.2
Psychro Const
Humidity
12.1.4
Out
Logic operators
14.1.3
PV
IO - Logic input
7.2.1
Out
Input operators
14.2
PV
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
Out
Maths operators
14.3.2
PV
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
Out
Mux8 operators
14.5.1
PV
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Out
Input linearisation
15.1.2
PV
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Out
Polynomial
15.2
PV
IO - Analogue output
7.7
Out
Switch over
19.1
PV
IO - Fixed IO
7.8
Out Invert
Input operators
14.2
PV
Loop - main
17.2
Out1 & 2
Real time clock
11.4
PV Out1
Load
16.1
Out1 to Out14
Input linearisation
15.1.2
PV Out2
Load
16.1
OutHi Limit
Multi operators
14.4.3
PVFault
Load
16.1
OutHighLimit
Input linearisation
15.1.2
PvFrozen
Zirconia
12.2.8
18.1
OutHighScale
Polynomial
15.2
PVIn
Programmer - Setup
OutLo Limit
Multi operators
14.4.3
PwrFailCount
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
OutLowLimit
Input linearisation
15.1.2
Range Hi
IO - Analogue output
7.7
OutLowScale
Polynomial
15.2
Range High
Setpoint
17.6.5
Output High Limit
Output function block
17.7
Range Lo
IO - Analogue output
7.7
Output Low Limit
Output function block
17.7
Range Low
Setpoint
17.6.5
OutputHi 1, 2, 3
Loop PID
17.4.10
Range Max
Transducer scaling
20.4
OutputHigh Limit
Loop tune
17.5.5
Range Min
Transducer scaling
20.4
OutputLo 1, 2, 3
Loop PID
17.4.10
RangeHigh
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
OutputLow Limit
Loop tune
17.5.5
RangeHigh
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
OutputSize
EtherNet IP
10.11.3
RangeHigh
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
OutVal
Transducer scaling
20.4
RangeLow
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
Overflow
Counter
11.1.1
RangeLow
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
Oxygen
Zirconia
12.2.8
RangeLow
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
OxygenExp
Zirconia
12.2.8
Rate
Setpoint
17.6.5
Parity
Comms - CC (config)
10.1.1
Rate
Output function block
17.7
Parity
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
Rate Disable
Setpoint
17.6.5
Passcode1
Instrument - InstInfo
6.3
Rate Disable
Output function block
17.7
Passcode2
Instrument - InstInfo
6.3
RateDone
Setpoint
17.6.5
Passcode3
Instrument - InstInfo
6.3
RateResolution
Programmer - Setup
18.1
PB Units
Loop set up
17.3
ReadOnly
Comms - SCADA Table
24.1
PID Set
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Reference
Analogue alarms
8.5
Poly En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
RelCh2Gain 1, 2, 3
Loop PID
17.4.10
PowerFailAct
Programmer - Setup
18.1
RelHumid
Humidity
12.1.4
Pref mstr IP 1
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
RemGasEn
Zirconia
12.2.8
Pref mstr IP 2
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
RemGasRef
Zirconia
12.2.8
Pref mstr IP 3
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
RemOPH
Output function block
17.7
Pref mstr IP 4
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
RemOPL
Output function block
17.7
Pressure
Humidity
12.1.4
RemoteInput
Loop PID
17.4.10
PrgIn1 & 2
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Reset
Counter
11.1.1
Probe Type
Zirconia
12.2.8
Reset
Totaliser
11.3.1
ProbeFault
Zirconia
12.2.8
Reset
Input monitor
13.2
ProbeInput
Zirconia
12.2.8
ResetEventOuts
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
ProbeOffset
Zirconia
12.2.8
ResetUVal
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
ProbeStatus
Zirconia
12.2.8
Resolution
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Prog En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Resolution
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Prog Hold
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Resolution
IO - Analogue output
7.7
Prog Reset
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Resolution
Totaliser
11.3.1
Prog Run
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Resolution
Humidity
12.1.4
ProgError
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Resolution
Zirconia
12.2.8
ProgPVstart
Instrument - Options
6.2
Resolution
Maths operators
14.3.2
ProgRunHold
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Resolution
Multi operators
14.4.3
ProgRunReset
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Resolution
Input linearisation
15.1.2
ProgStatus
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
Resolution
Polynomial
15.2
ProgTimeLeft
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
Resolution
Load
16.1
ProportionalBand1, 2, 3
Loop PID
17.4.10
Resolution
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Protocol
Comms - CC (config)
10.1.1
Resolution
User values
21.1
Protocol
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
Ripple Carry
Counter
11.1.1
Protocol
Comms - Devicenet
10.7.1
RstNewAlarm
Alarm summary
8.7
Protocol
Comms - Profibus
10.9.1
RstNewCTAlarm
Alarm summary
8.7
Protocol
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
RTClock En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Page 339
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter
Folder
Section
Parameter
Folder
Run
Totaliser
11.3.1
Status
Transducer scaling
Section
20.4
Safe OP Val
Output function block
17.7
Status
User values
21.1
Sat-Sun
Real time clock
11.4
Status
Calibration
22.5
Saturday
Real time clock
11.4
Subnet Mask 1
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Sbrk
Humidity
12.1.4
Subnet mask 2
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
SBrk Alarm
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Subnet Mask 3
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
SBrk Alarm
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Subnet Mask 4
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
SBrk Type
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Sum Out
Multi operators
14.4.3
SBrk Type
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Sunday
Real time clock
11.4
SBrk Value
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
Switch High
Switch over
19.1
SBrk Value
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
Switch Low
Switch over
19.1
SBrkAlarmStatus1
Alarm summary
8.7
SwOver En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
SbrkAlarmStatus2
Alarm summary
8.7
SyncIn
Programmer - Setup
18.1
SbrkAlarmStatus3
Alarm summary
8.7
Tare Value
Transducer scaling
20.4
SbrkAlarmStatus4
Alarm summary
8.7
Target
Counter
11.1.1
SbrkOp
Output function block
17.7
TargetSP
Loop - main
17.2
SbrkOutput
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
TempInput
Zirconia
12.2.8
SbrkOutput
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
TempOffset
Zirconia
12.2.8
SbyAct
IO - Logic output
7.3.1
Tens
BCD Input
9.1
SbyAct
IO - Relay output
7.4.1
Threshold
Analogue alarms
8.5
SbyAct
IO - Fixed IO
7.8
Threshold
Input monitor
13.2
Scale Low
Transducer scaling
20.4
Thursday
Real time clock
11.4
Scheduler
Loop PID
17.4.10
Time
Timer
11.2.6
SchedulerType
Loop PID
17.4.10
Time
Real time clock
11.4
SegDuration
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
Time Above
Input monitor
13.2
Segments Left
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Time2Clean
Zirconia
12.2.8
SegRate
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
TimeConst1
Load
16.1
SegTarget
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
TimeConst2
Load
16.1
SegTimeLeft
Programmer - Run Status
18.1
Timer En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Select
Mux8 operators
14.5.1
Tolerance
Zirconia
12.2.8
SelectIn
Switch over
19.1
Totalise En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
SensorBreak Mode
Output function block
17.7
TotalOut
Totaliser
11.3.1
Serial No
Instrument - InstInfo
6.3
Track Enable
Output function block
17.7
Servo
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Track PV
Setpoint
17.6.5
ServoToPV
Setpoint
17.6.5
Track SP
Setpoint
17.6.5
ShuntOut
Transducer scaling
20.4
TrackOutVal
Output function block
17.7
SkipSeg
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Triggered
Timer
11.2.6
SootAlm
Zirconia
12.2.8
TrScale En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Source
Comms - SCADA Table
24.1
Tuesday
Real time clock
11.4
8.5
SP HighLimit
Setpoint
17.6.5
Type
Analogue alarms
SP LowLimit
Setpoint
17.6.5
Type
Digital alarms
8.6
SP Select
Setpoint
17.6.5
Type
Timer
11.2.6
SP Track
Setpoint
17.6.5
Type
Load
16.1
SP Trim
Setpoint
17.6.5
Type
Loop set up
17.3
SP1
Setpoint
17.6.5
UnitID Enable
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
SP2
Setpoint
17.6.5
Units
Instrument - Options
6.2
SPIn
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Units
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
SPIntBal
Setpoint
17.6.5
Units
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
SPTrim HighLimit
Setpoint
17.6.5
Units
BCD Input
9.1
SPTrim LowLimit
Setpoint
17.6.5
Units
Totaliser
11.3.1
Stage
Loop tune
17.5.5
Units
Maths operators
14.3.2
Stage Time
Loop tune
17.5.5
Units
Multi operators
14.4.3
Standby
Access
5.0
Units
Input linearisation
15.1.2
Start Cal
Transducer scaling
20.4
Units
Polynomial
15.2
Start HighCal
Transducer scaling
20.4
Units
Load
16.1
Start Tare
Transducer scaling
20.4
Units
Programmer - Setup
18.1
State
Loop tune
17.5.5
Units
User values
21.1
Status
IO - Thermocouple input
7.5.1
UserStringCharSpace
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Status
IO - PRT input
7.6.1
UserStringCount
Instrument - Diagnostics
6.4
Status
IO - Analogue output
7.7
UsrVal En1
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Status
Comms - Devicenet
10.7.1
UsrVal En2
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Status
Logic operators
14.1.3
UsrVal En3
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Status
Maths operators
14.3.2
UsrVal En4
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Status
Mux8 operators
14.5.1
UValName
Programmer - Setup
18.1
Status
Polynomial
15.2
Val
User values
21.1
Status
Switch over
19.1
Version
Instrument - InstInfo
6.3
Page 340
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
MINI8 CONTROLLER: ENGINEERING HANDBOOK
Parameter
Folder
Wait
Comms - CC (config)
10.1.1
Wait
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
WDAct
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
WDAct
Comms - Devicenet
10.7.1
WDAct
Comms - Profibus
10.9.1
WDAct
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
WDFlag
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
WDFlag
Comms - Devicenet
10.7.1
WDFlag
Comms - Profibus
10.9.1
WDFlag
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
WDTime
Comms - Modbus
10.4.2
WDTime
Comms - Devicenet
10.7.1
WDTime
Comms - Profibus
10.9.1
WDTime
Comms - EtherNet
10.10.5
Wednesday
Real time clock
11.4
WetOffset
Humidity
12.1.4
WetTemp
Humidity
12.1.4
WorkingSP
Loop - main
17.2
Zirconia En
Instrument - Enables
6.1
Page 341
Section
HA028581
Issue 17 May 16
Eurotherm: International sales and support
Contact Information
Represented by:
Worldwide Offices
Eurotherm Head
Office
Faraday Close,
Durrington,
Worthing, West
Sussex,
BN13 3PL
Sales Enquiries
T +44 (01903)
695888
F 0845 130 9936
www.eurotherm.com
www.eurotherm.com/worldwide
General
Enquiries
T +44 (01903)
268500
F 0845 265982
Scan for local contacts
©Copyright Invensys Eurotherm Limited 2016
Invensys, Eurotherm, the Eurotherm logo, Chessell, EurothermSuite, Mini8, Eycon, Eyris, EPower, EPack nanodac, piccolo, versadac, optivis, Foxboro, and
Wonderware are trademarks of Invensys plc, its subsidiaries and affiliates. All other brands may be trademarks of their respective owners.
All rights are strictly reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, modified or transmitted in any form by any means, neither may it be stored in
a retrieval system other than for the purpose to act as an aid in operating the equipment to which the document relates, without the prior written
permission of Invensys Eurotherm Limited.
Eurotherm Limited pursues a policy of continuous development and product improvement. The specifications in this document may therefore be changed
without notice. The information in this document is given in good faith, but is intended for guidance only.
Eurotherm Limited will accept no responsibility for any losses arising from errors in this document..
HA028581/17 (CN34452)
Mini8 User Manual
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