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ETC II
Modbus Communications Protocol
Reference Guide
 SATEC Ltd.
BG0595 Rev. A1
Every effort has been made to ensure that the material herein is complete and accurate.
However, the manufacturer is not responsible for any mistakes in printing or faulty
instructions contained in this book. Notification of any errors or misprints will be received
with appreciation.
For further information regarding a particular installation, operation or maintenance of
equipment, contact the manufacturer or your local representative or distributor.
Modbus is a trademark of Modicon, Inc.
2
Table of Contents
1 GENERAL .......................................................................................... 5
2 MODBUS PROTOCOL IMPLEMENTATION...................................... 6
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
Transmission Modes ....................................................................................... 6
Address Field .................................................................................................. 6
Function Field ................................................................................................. 6
Exception Responses ..................................................................................... 6
Modbus Register Addresses .......................................................................... 6
Data Formats .................................................................................................. 7
Password Protection ....................................................................................... 7
3 DATA SERVER .................................................................................. 8
3.1
3.2
Data Server Features ..................................................................................... 8
Using Real-time Data Exchanges ................................................................... 9
3.2.1 Configuring Real-time Data Exchanges ...................................................................... 9
3.2.2 Accessing Real-time Data Exchanges ........................................................................ 9
3.2.3 Accessing Data Log Files ......................................................................................... 10
3.3
Using Status Event Exchanges and Event Logs .......................................... 11
3.3.1 Configuring Event Exchanges................................................................................... 11
3.3.2 Accessing the Event Log File.................................................................................... 11
3.4
Using Data Write Exchanges ........................................................................ 12
4 MODBUS REGISTER MAP .............................................................. 13
4.1
Data Server Registers .................................................................................. 13
Real-time Data Exchange Block ..................................................................... 13
Data Write Exchange Block ............................................................................ 13
Data Log Transfer Blocks ............................................................................... 13
Event Log Transfer Blocks .............................................................................. 14
4.2 Device Control and Status Registers ............................................................ 14
Device Mode Control Registers (factory set) .................................................. 14
Device Diagnostics Register (bit map) ........................................................... 14
Device Authorization Register ........................................................................ 15
Factory Diagnostic Registers .......................................................................... 15
4.3 Device Setup Registers ................................................................................ 15
Factory Device Settings and Identification ..................................................... 15
Device Options Setup ..................................................................................... 15
Time/Date Setup ............................................................................................. 16
Clock Setup and Status .................................................................................. 16
Modem Setup.................................................................................................. 16
Communication Ports Setup ........................................................................... 17
Network Setup ................................................................................................ 17
Dial-up/GPRS Modem Setup (future) ............................................................. 18
Password Setup .............................................................................................. 18
Expert Power Service Setup ........................................................................... 18
Internet Service Provider (ISP) Accounts ....................................................... 18
SNTP Client Setup (future) ............................................................................. 18
Data Server Setup .......................................................................................... 19
Gateway Setup ............................................................................................... 19
Device Routing Table ..................................................................................... 20
Routing IP Table ............................................................................................. 20
3
5 DATA FORMATS ............................................................................. 22
Timestamp ...................................................................................................... 22
Event Type ID ................................................................................................. 22
Event Data ...................................................................................................... 22
Device Diagnostics (bitmap) ........................................................................... 22
Shared Access Rules ..................................................................................... 23
4
1 General
This document specifies a subset of the Modbus serial communications protocol used to transfer
data between a master computer station and the ETC II. The document provides the complete
information necessary to develop third-party communications software capable of communication
with the ETC II. Additional information concerning communications operation, configuring the
communications parameters, and communications connections is found in "ETC II Installation and
Operation Manual".
IMPORTANT
Most of the advanced features are configured using multiple setup parameters that can be accessed in a
number of contiguous registers. When writing the setup registers, it is recommended to write all the
registers at once using a single request.
5
2 Modbus Protocol Implementation
For detailed information about Modbus protocol, Modbus message framing and error checking,
refer to the "Modicon Modbus Protocol Reference Guide". It can be downloaded from the
Modicon's Web site at www.modicon.com. The following paragraphs outline some issues
concerning the implementation of the Modbus protocol in the ETC II.
2.1 Transmission Modes
The ETC II can be set up to communicate on a Modbus network using ASCII or RTU transmission
mode. Refer to the "ETC II Installation and Operation Manual" on how to select the transmission
mode in your device.
2.2 Address Field
The address field contains a user assigned address of the instrument (1-247) on a Modbus network.
Broadcast mode using address 0 is not supported.
2.3 Function Field
The Modbus functions implemented in the ETC II are shown in Table 2-1. Function 04 can be
used in the same context as function 03.
Table 2-1 Modbus Function Codes
Code (decimal)
03
04
06
16
081
1The
Meaning in Modbus
Read holding registers
Read input registers
Preset single register
Preset multiple registers
Loop-back test
Action
Read multiple registers
Read multiple registers
Write single register
Write multiple registers
Communications test
ETC II supports only diagnostic code 0 - return query data.
2.4 Exception Responses
The instrument sends an exception response when an error is detected in the received message. To
indicate that the response is notification of an error, the high order bit of the function code is set to
1.
Implemented exception response codes:
1 2 3 10 -
Illegal function
Illegal data address
Illegal data value
Gateway is busy. Remote access is temporarily unavailable.
When the character framing, parity, or redundancy check detects a communication error,
processing of the master's request stops. The instrument will not act on or respond to the message.
2.5 Modbus Register Addresses
The ETC II Modbus registers are numbered in the range of 0 to 65535. From the Modbus
applications, the ETC II Modbus registers can be accessed by simulating holding registers of the
Modicon 584, 884 or 984 Programmable Controller, using a 5-digit “4XXXX” or 6-digit “4XXXXX”
addressing scheme. To map the ETC II register address to the range of the Modbus holding registers,
add a value of 40001 to the ETC II register address. When a register address exceeds 9999, use a 6digit addressing scheme by adding 400001 to the ETC II register address.
6
2.6 Data Formats
The ETC II uses two data formats to pass data between a master application and the device: 16-bit
short integer and 32-bit long integer formats. Data logged by the ETC II Data Server is collected
from instruments in 16-bit short integer format.
2.7 Password Protection
The ETC II has a password protection option allowing you to protect your setups and logs from
being changed or cleared through communications. You can disable or enable password protection
through communications or via the Terminal. For details, refer to the ETC II “Installation and
Operation Manual”. When password protection is enabled, the user password you set in the ETC II
should be written into the device authorization register (44378-44379) before another write request
is issued. If the correct password is not supplied while password protection is enabled, the ETC II
will respond to all write requests with the exception code 01 (illegal operation). It is recommended to
clear the password register after you have completed your changes in order to activate password
protection.
7
3 Data Server
3.1 Data Server Features
The Data server allows the user to save the time required for polling multiple devices, especially via
slow serial interfaces, by utilizing the ETC II non-volatile memory for automatic acquiring data.
The user application can then read blocks of ready data directly from the ETC II memory without
the need to wait until slow devices respond to master requests. The Data server can also perform a
delayed write of data so the application needs not to wait until the device would be accessible, but
rather can write data to the ETC II memory exchanges, and then the ETC II takes responsibility
for delivering data to the target devices. The Data server can also periodically poll device status
registers and record events to a log file or give alerts on specific events.
The following table lists the configurable Data server options.
Table 3-1 Data Server Options
Description
Data server enabled
Continuous polling
Data polling interval
Data logging interval, polls
Range
1=enabled, 0=disabled
1=enabled, 0=disabled
1-1000 min
0-1000, 0=logging disabled
When the Data server is enabled, it acquires data from the connected devices either continuously,
or on a periodic basis. If continuous polling is disabled, the devices are requested periodically at
predefined poll intervals. If continuous polling is enabled, the ETC II retrieves data from the
devices in turn without pauses.
Acquired real-time data is normally stored in the ETC II exchanges (memory blocks) and is
periodically refreshed at programmed intervals. The ETC II provides up to 250 real-time data
exchanges of 1 to 114 registers long. These exchanges can be directly accessed by the master
application.
If the user wishes, acquired data can be periodically moved to historical circular files where it will be
kept for a long time until it is overwritten by newer data. Data is stored to historical files at regular
intervals. The logging interval is always represented as a whole number of data polling intervals
even if the polling itself is not synchronized with polling intervals like in the event of continuous
polling. Since the ETC II tries to synchronize polling devices with the beginning of an hour, it is
recommended to program a logging interval in such a manner that it would be a whole divisor of 60
minutes. Historical records can be accessed one record at a time either in an arbitrary order, or in a
sequential manner.
The ETC II also provides up to 250 write data exchanges, of 1 to 12 registers long, and up to 250
status event data exchanges of 1 register long. Table 3-2 gives a summary of the available data
exchanges.
Table 3-2 Data Server Exchanges
Exchange Type
Real-time data exchange
Status event exchange
Data write exchange
Number of
Exchanges
250
250
250
Exchange Block
Size, registers
1-114
1
1-12
NOTE:
The real-time, status event and write data exchanges with the same exchange number are
internally linked in the ETC II to the same device ID. If you change the device ID for one of
the exchanges, the same ID will be taken for other configured exchanges that have the same
exchange number.
8
3.2 Using Real-time Data Exchanges
3.2.1 Configuring Real-time Data Exchanges
Real-time data exchanges are used for periodic retrieving data from the connected devices. The
following table shows the parameters that should be configured before enabling a data exchange.
Table 3-3 Real-time Data Exchange Setup
Description
Exchange number
Start device register address
Exchange block size, registers
Device ID
Polling enabled
RTC update enabled (optional)
Range
0-249
0-65535
1-114
1-247
1=enabled, 0=disabled
1=enabled, 0=disabled
A data exchange can store from 1 to 114 contiguous 16-bit registers retrieved from a single device.
A block of registers for an exchange is defined by the start register address and the exchange block
size. Refer to Modbus guides for specific devices for available address ranges.
You can individually enable or disable polling data for a specific exchange. If the device has an
onboard real-time clock, you can enable periodic RTC updates from the ETC II clock.
Each data exchange utilizes 6 extra registers for time stamping and identification as shown in
Table 3-4, so the actual memory required for one data exchange is 6 + exchange block size. The
total size of all exchanges should not exceed 9000 registers.
Table 3-4 Data Exchange Record
Description
Range
Record heading
Record status
0=no data, -1=corrupted record,
1-65534 = device response code
Record time, seconds since 1/1/1970
Record sequence number
Data block (variable size)
Data registers (up to 114)
0- 65535
If data logging is globally enabled in the Data server, the retrieved data is periodically moved from
the data exchange to a log file in the same format, as it is stored in the exchange (see Table 3-4).
Each exchange is provided with a separate data log file.
A data record is always preceded by a status register that indicates whether the data is healthy. Each
record may be identified in a file by a unique 16-bit sequence number that is incremented modulo
65536 with each new record.
3.2.2 Accessing Real-time Data Exchanges
Real-time data exchanges occupy a single continuous block of registers without gaps and are located
in the ETC II memory in the address range of 0 to 9000. Since exchanges may have different size,
the location of each exchange in the memory depends on the size of all preceding exchanges. Use
the following formula to define the location of the data exchange:
N 1
ExchangeN Address   (Exchangen Block Size  6)
n0
Note that a location of the exchange in the memory is changed when you change the data exchange
setup, so the previously acquired data would be lost.
9
3.2.3 Accessing Data Log Files
Each data exchange is provided with a separate circular data log file. The Data server allocates a total
of 1.5 Mbytes of non-volatile memory for all data log files, which will be equally divided between all
active exchanges.
File transfers are performed through two blocks of registers: a master request block and a read-only
file transfer block, which are shared by all files. After a master application has written the request
with a file exchange number (and possibly a file position) into the file request block, the requested
data is available for a read through the file transfer block registers. File transfer functions allow
changing the file position in order to point to the desired record in a selected log file. The sequence
number of the first (oldest) record available in a file may be inspected via the file request block after
the file exchange number is written into the block.
The file transfer block occupies 120 registers in the address range of 9000 to 9119. The following
table shows a layout of the data log request block. Refer to Table 3-3 for the file transfer block layout.
Table 3-5 Data Log Request Block
Description
Function
Record sequence number (with functions 3, 11)
First (oldest) record sequence number
Exchange number
Range
3 = set file position
5 = reset file position
11 = read record
0-65535
0-65535
0-249
Data log files can be read either in a sequence record-by-record, or in a random order. Every write
to the file request block fills the file transfer block with the data of the record pointed to by the file
read pointer. If you want to begin reading a file from a particular record, which sequence number is
known, you can change the pointer position by issuing the Set-File-Position request with the desired
sequence number. If you want to read a file from the beginning, write the Reset-File-Position request
that moves the pointer to the oldest file record. If you use the Read-Record request that does not
change the file position, then you will continue reading the file from the record following the one
you have read the last time you accessed the file.
You need not explicitly move the file position to the following record if you want to continue reading
a file in sequence after you have uploaded the current record. Instead, continue reading the record
data through the file transfer block: each access to the file transfer block automatically advances the
file pointer to the next record. That’s why you should read all data in the file transfer block by a single
request: the next read will give you the following file record.
The file transfer is completed after you have read the last record of the file. Before storing a file
record to your database, always check the record status word. This word set to 0 indicates that the
file read pointer does not point to any record within the file, and you should not store any record
that has this word set to 0 or to -1.
The following gives a summary of steps you should perform to read a data log file:
1) If you want to begin reading a file from a particular record or from the first record, use either
the Set-File-Position request with the desired record sequence number, or the Reset-FilePosition request; otherwise use the Read-Record request.
2) Read the record data from the file transfer block. The file pointer will be moved to the next
file record.
3) Repeat step 2 until all the file records are read, i.e., until the record status word indicates the
end-of-file.
10
3.3 Using Status Event Exchanges and Event Logs
3.3.1 Configuring Event Exchanges
The Data server can provide recording binary events asserted by the connected devices and give a
notification to the eXpertPower server.
The Data server can periodically poll device status registers and detect a change in the status bits to
recognize asserted device events. A binary event mask specifies the critical event bits. Whenever the
Data server detects a change in the status bits selected by the event mask, it records an event record
to the circular Event log file. If the eXpertPower service is enabled in the ETC II, this event will
initiate a connection to the eXpertPower server.
Polling status events is performed via the status event exchanges. The Data server provides up to
250 event exchanges, each one of 1 register long, with a separate event mask. Table 3-6 shows the
setup parameters that are used for configuring status event exchanges.
Table 3-6 Status Event Exchange Setup
Description
Exchange number
Device status register address
Event mask
Device ID
Polling enabled
Options flags:
Bit 0 – Auto reset enabled (1=enabled, 0=disabled)
Bit 1 – Register type:
0=coils (Modbus request type 1)
1=holding register (Modbus request type 3)
Range
0-249
0-65535
0x00000000–0x0000FFFF
1-247
1=enabled, 0=disabled
The Data server supports the auto reset option you can use to clear a latched device status register
after it has been read. In most devices, critical events are latched into a status register, so the new
events are not generated until the register is explicitly cleared by a master application.
Since status registers may be implemented in the device either as coils, or as holding registers, you
should specify a register type for each event exchange via the option flags.
3.3.2 Accessing the Event Log File
All event records are stored in a single circular event log file. Along with device status events, the file
may contain the ETC II self-diagnostic events.
File transfers are performed through two blocks of registers: a master request block and a read-only
file transfer block. The file transfer block occupies 12 registers in the address range of 10000-10011.
Tables 3-7 and 3-8 show a layout of the event log request block and a layout of the event log record.
Table 3-7 Event Log Request Block
Description
Function
Record sequence number (with functions 3, 11)
Range
3 = set file position
5 = reset file position
11 = read record
0-65535
Table 3-8 Event Log Record Layout
Description
Event Log status
Event sequence number
Event type ID
Device ID
Event time, seconds since 1/1/1970
Event data
Range
0 = no new events, 1 = have new events,
-1 = record corrupted
0-65535
F2 (See Section 5)
0-247
F1 (See Section 5)
F3 (See Section 5)
11
The event log file is accessed in the same manner as data log files. Refer to Section 3.2.3 for details.
3.4 Using Data Write Exchanges
The Data server can provide remote writing data to serviced devices upon user requests. Up to 250
write exchanges are supported with a size of 1 to 12 registers. Table 3-9 shows configuration
parameters that can be defined for each write exchange.
Table 3-9 Write Exchange Setup
Description
Exchange number
Start device register address
Exchange block size, registers
Device ID
Write enabled
Range
0-249
0-65535
1-12
1-247
1=enabled, 0=disabled
Configured data exchanges are accessed via the data write exchange block. It occupies 14 registers in
the address range of 9200 to 9213. Table 3-10 shows the write exchange layout.
Table 3-10 Write Exchange Block
Description
Exchange number
Write flag
Range
0-249
0 – Data has been written
1 – Data is waiting to be written
Data register 1
...
Data register 12
To send data to a device via a write exchange, write data to the write exchange block with the write
flag being set to 1. The write flag is automatically cleared after the data has been successfully
transferred to the device. Always check this flag before writing new data to the exchange to ensure it
is empty, otherwise previously written data may be lost.
12
4 Modbus Register Map
4.1 Data Server Registers
Address
Point ID Description
Real-time Data Exchange Block
0-9000
Data Exchange #1
…
…
Data Exchange #N
Exchange Layout (120 registers maximum):
+0,1
Record status
+2,3
+4,5
+6
Record time, seconds since 1/1/1970
Record sequence number
Data register
...
+119
Data register
Data Write Exchange Block
9200-9213
+0
Exchange number
+1
Write flag
+2
Data register
...
Data register
+13
Data Log Transfer Blocks
9120-9135
File Request Block
+0
Function
+1
+2-12
+13
+14
+15
9000-9119
Record sequence number (with functions 3, 11)
Reserved
First (oldest) record sequence number
Next sequence number to be used
Data exchange number
Options/Range
Type
R/W
Notes
UINT32
R
Device response: function code or
exception code (See 2.3-2.4)
UINT32
UINT32
UINT16
R
R
R
0-65535
UINT16
R
0-249
0 – Data has been written
1 – Data is waiting to be written
0-65535
UINT16
UINT16
R/W
R/W
UINT16
R/W
0-65535
UINT16
R/W
3 = set file position
5 = reset file position
11 = read file
UINT16
R/W
0-65535
UINT16
R/W
0-249
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R
R
R/W
0=No data, -1=corrupted record,
1-65534 = device response code
F1
0-65535
0-65535
Units
sec
Defines accessed exchange number
3 - changes the file position
5 - sets the file position at the first
(oldest) record
11 - opens the file for reading from
the present file position
The record sequence number with
function 11 does not change the file
position
Write – sets new exchange number
Read – returns exchange number
File Transfer Block
13
Address
Point ID
+0,1
Description
Record status
+2,3
+4,5
+6
Record time, seconds since 1/1/1970
Record sequence number
Data register
...
+119
Data register
Event Log Transfer Blocks
10016-10031
File Request Block
+0
Function
+1
+2-12
+13
+14
+15
10000-10009
+0,1
+2,3
+4,5
+6,7
+8,9
+10,11
Record sequence number (with functions 3, 11)
Reserved
First (oldest) record sequence number
Next sequence number to be used
Reserved
File Transfer Block
Event log status
Event sequence number
Event type ID
Device ID
Event time, seconds since 1/1/1970
Event data
Options/Range
0= No new data, -1=corrupted
record,
1-65534 – device response code
F1
0-65535
0-65535
Units
Type
UINT32
R/W
R
sec
UINT32
UINT32
UINT16
R
R
R
0-65535
UINT16
R
3 = set file position
5 = reset file position
11 = read file
UINT16
R/W
0-65535
UINT16
R/W
UINT16
UINT16
R
R
UINT32
R
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
R
R
R
R
R
0 - no new events, 1 – data is valid,
-1 – current record corrupted
0-65535
F2
0-247
F1
sec
F3
Notes
Device response: function code or
exception code (See 2.3-2.4)
3 - changes the file position
5 - sets the file position at the first
(oldest) record
11 - opens the file for reading from
the present file position
The record sequence number with
function 11 does not change the file
position
4.2 Device Control and Status Registers
Address
Point ID Description
Device Mode Control Registers (factory set)
44134
ETC options
44135
Modem
44136-44165
Reserved
44166-44326
Reserved
Device Diagnostics Register (bit map)
44326-44327
Device self-diagnostics flags.
14
Options/Range
Units
Type
R/W
Notes
Bit0 = 1 - COM5 enabled
Bit1 = 1 - IP-LINK enabled
0 = disabled, 1 = enabled
UINT16
R
The secondary master port may be
either COM5, or IP-LINK enabled
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R
F4
UINT32
R/W
Address
Point ID
Description
When read: 0 = no faults logged, 1 = a fault bit has
been set at least once since the last reset.
When written: 0 = clear a fault bit, 1 = no effect.
44328-44341
Reserved
Device Authorization Register
44378-44379
When write: 8-digit password. When read: 0 = access
permitted, -1 = authorization required.
44380-44385
Reserved
44386-45951
Reserved
Factory Diagnostic Registers
45952-46079
Factory diagnostic registers
Options/Range
Units
Type
R/W
INT32
R/W
UINT32
R
Type
R/W
UINT32
UINT32
CHAR16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R
R
R
R
R
R
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R
R
R
R
0x0500
0x00F0
0x0000-0xFFFF
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R
R
R
Bit 0 =
Bit 2 =
Bit 3 =
Bit 4 =
Bit 5 =
Bit 6 =
0-200
0-24
UINT16
R/W
0 - 99999999 (write)
0/-1 (read)
Notes
4.3 Device Setup Registers
Address
Point ID Description
Factory Device Settings and Identification
46080-46207
+0, 1
Device serial number
+2, 3
Device model ID
+4-11
Device model name
+12-19
Reserved
+20
Device firmware version number
+21
Device firmware build number
+22,23
Reserved
+24
Boot loader version number
+25
Boot loader build number
+26
RF firmware version number
+27
RF firmware build number
+28-95
Reserved
+96
Ethernet MAC address 0-1
+97
Ethernet MAC address 2-3
+98
Ethernet MAC address 4-5
+99-128
Reserved
Device Options Setup
46256-46271
+0
Log output
+1
+2
Number of XP faults for reset
Global reset timer (in hours)
Options/Range
2014
“ETC II”
Dumping to console,
Server Log
XP log
IPLINK log
Data Server log
Sharing log
Units
Notes
Null-terminated string
0 – never (50 - default)
0 – never (24 - default)
15
Address
Point ID
+3-15
Time/Date Setup
46400-46415
+0
Description
Reserved
Options/Range
Local time offset, min
0-+/-720
+1
Daylight savings time (DST) option
+2
+3
DST start month
DST start week of the month
+4
+5
+6
DST start weekday
DST end month
DST end week of the month
+7
+8
DST end weekday
Clock synchronization source (future)
0 = DST disabled (standard time
only), 1 = DST enabled
1 - 12
1 - 4 = 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th week,
5 = the last week of the month
1-7 (1= Sun, 7 = Sat)
1 - 12
1 - 4 = 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th week,
5 = the last week of the month
1-7 (1= Sun, 7 = Sat)
0xfffe = SNTP,
0xffff = none
+9-15
Clock Setup and Status
46416-46447
+0, 1
+2, 3
+4
+5
+6
+7
+8
+9
+10
+11
+12
Reserved
+13-31
Modem Setup
46448-46479
+0,1
+2,3
+4,5
+6,7
+8,9
+10,11
+12,13
Reserved
16
Local time, in seconds, since Jan 1, 1970
Fractional seconds, µsec
Fractional seconds, milliseconds
Seconds
Minutes
Hour
Day of month
Month
Year (calendar year minus 2000)
Weekday
Daylight savings time status
Device IP Address
Network subnet mask
Network default gateway
Number of dial attempts
Connection timeout, sec
Delay between redials, sec
Idle connection timeout, sec
Units
µsec
Type
UINT16
R/W
R/W
Notes
UINT16
R/W
Offset in minutes from UTC
(Universal Coordinated or
Greenwich Mean time)
UINT16
R/W
UINT16
UINT16
R/W
R/W
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R/W
R/W
R/W
UINT16
UINT16
R/W
R/W
UINT16
F1
0-999
0-59
0-59
0-23
1-31
1-12
0-99
1-7 (Sun = 1, Sat = 7)
0 = standard time, 1 = daylight
savings time is active
sec
µsec
UINT32
UINT32
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R
R
UINT16
0x01000000-0xFFFFFFFF
0x00000001-0xFFFFFFFF
0x00000000-0xFFFFFFFF
0–1000, 0-dial forever
0-9999
0-9999
0-9999
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Address
Point ID Description
+14,15
Number of rings before answer
+16-23
Modem init string
+24-31
Reserved
Communication Ports Setup
46464-46575
+0
Communication protocol
+1
Interface
+2
Device address
+3
Baud rate
+4
Data format
+5
+6
+7
+8
+9-15
46464-46479
46480-46495
46496-46511
46512-46527
46528-46575
Network Setup
46576-46703
+0, 1
+2, 3
+4, 5
+6, 7
+8, 9
+10,11
+12,13
+14-31
Port direction
Receive timeout (COM4 master and COM5 only)
Minimum delay before sending data
Inter-character timeout
Reserved
COM2 Setup (future)
COM3 Setup
COM4 Setup
COM5 Setup
Reserved
Device IP Address
Network subnet mask
Network default gateway
Use DHCP
TCP service port
Primary DNS IP address
Secondary DNS IP address
Reserved
Options/Range
0-2
“ATZ0&F”
Units
Type
UINT32
CHAR16
R/W
R/W
R/W
0 = Modbus RTU, 1 = Modbus
ASCII, 2 = DNP3.0, 7=IEC 60870-5
0 = RS-232, 1 = RS-422, 2 = RS485, 3 = infrared, 4 = dialup
modem, 8 = GSM/GPRS/CDMA2000
Modbus: 1-247
DNP3.0: 0–65532
IEC 60870-5: 1-254 (1 octet),
1-65532 (2 octets)
1 = 300 bps, 2 = 600 bps, 3 = 1200
bps, 4 = 2400 bps, 5 = 4800 bps,
6 = 9600 bps, 7 = 19200 bps,
8 = 38400 bps, 9 = 57600 bps,
10 = 115200 bps
0 = 7 bits/even parity,
1 = 8 bits/no parity,
2 = 8 bits/even parity
0 = master, 1 = slave (COM4 only)
500-30000
ms
0-1000 (default = 5)
ms
1-1000 (default = 4)
ms
UINT16
R/W
UINT16
R/W
UINT16
R/W
UINT16
R/W
UINT16
R/W
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
0x01000000-0xFFFFFFFF
0x00000001-0xFFFFFFFF
0x00000000-0xFFFFFFFF
0 = NO, 1 = YES
502 = Modbus/TCP,
20000 = DNP3.0/TCP
0x00000000-0xFFFFFFFF
0x00000000-0xFFFFFFFF
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
UINT32
UINT32
UINT16
R/W
R/W
R/W
Notes
Null-terminated string
0 - default
500 - default
17
Address
Point ID Description
Dial-up/GPRS Modem Setup (future)
46640-46671
+0,1
Device IP Address
+2,3
Network subnet mask
+4,5
Network default gateway
+6,7
Number of dial attempts
+8,9
Connection timeout, sec
+10,11
Delay between redials, sec
+12,13
Idle connection timeout, sec
+14,15
Number of rings before answer
+16-23
Modem initialization string
+24,25
Auto-reset period, hours
+26-31
Reserved
Password Setup
46704-46715
+0,1
Communications password (8 digits)
+2
Password protection enabled
+3
Reserved
+4-11
ETC II local Login name
Expert Power Service Setup
46768-46783
+0,1
Expert Power server IP Address
+2,3
Expert Power server TCP service port
+4,5
Expert Power client enabled
+6,7
Expert Power client interval
+8,9
Expert Power client time to next session
+10
Security Key
+11-15
Reserved
Internet Service Provider (ISP) Accounts
46784-46879
+0-15
ISP telephone number
+16-31
Login name
+32-47
Login password
46784-46831
Account No1
46832-46879
Account No2
SNTP Client Setup (future)
46880-46895
+0,1
SNTP client enabled
+2,3
Polling interval
+4-7
Reserved
+8,9
Primary SNTP server IP address
+10,11
Secondary SNTP server IP address
18
Options/Range
Units
Type
R/W
0x01000000-0xFFFFFFFF
0x00000001-0xFFFFFFFF
0x00000000-0xFFFFFFFF
0–1000, 0-dial forever
0-9999
0-9999
0-9999, 0 = never
0-20, 0 = never answer
“AT&F&D1&C1”
1-24, 0 = never
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
CHAR16
UINT32
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
0 - 99999999
0 = disabled, 1 = enabled
UINT32
UINT16
UINT16
CHAR16
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
R/W
R/W
R/W
UINT32
UINT32
UINT16
R/W
R
W
CHAR32
CHAR32
CHAR32
R/W
R/W
R/W
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
UINT32
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
“”
0x01000000-0xFFFFFFFF
0-65535 (5001 – default)
0=client disabled,
1=client enabled
1- 99999 (0 = close client)
1- 99999
0-7 (0 = disabled)
0=disabled, 1=enabled
60-86400
0
0x01000000-0xFFFFFFFF
0x01000000-0xFFFFFFFF
min
min
s
Notes
Null-terminated string
Default = 600 s
Default = 192.36.143.151
Default = 130.149.17.21
Address
Point ID
+12-15
Data Server Setup
46928-46943
+0
+1
+2,3
+4,5
+6
+7
+8
+9-15
46944-46959
+0
+1
+2,3
+4,5
+6
+7
+8
Description
Reserved
Real-time Data Exchange Setup
Exchange number
Reserved
Start device register address
Exchange block size, registers
Device ID
Polling enabled
RTC update enabled (optional)
Reserved
Status Event Exchange Setup
Exchange number
Reserved
Device status register address
Event mask
Device ID
Polling enabled
Options flags (bitmap)
+9-15
46960-46975
+0
Reserved
Write Data Exchange Setup
Exchange number
+1
+2,3
+4,5
+6
+7
+8-15
46976-46991
+0
+1
+2
+3
+4-15
Gateway Setup
46992-46999
Reserved
Start device register address
Exchange block size, registers
Device ID
Write enabled
Reserved
Data Server Options
Polling interval
Logging interval, polls
Data Server Enabled
Continuous polling
Reserved
Options/Range
Units
Type
R/W
Notes
0-249
UINT16
R/W
Write an exchange number before
reading the setup registers
0-65535
1-114
1-247
1=enabled, 0=disabled
1=enabled, 0=disabled
UINT32
UINT32
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
0-249
UINT16
R/W
UINT16
UINT32
UINT32
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
0-249
UINT16
R/W
0-65535
1-12
1-247
1=enabled, 0=disabled
UINT16
UINT32
UINT32
UINT16
UINT16
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
0-65535
0x00000000–0x0000FFFF
1-247
1=enabled, 0=disabled
Bit 0 – auto reset:
0=disabled
1=enabled
Bit 1 – register type:
0=holding register (request 3)
1=coils (request 1)
1-1000
0-1000, 0=logging disabled
1=enabled, 0=disabled
1=enabled, 0=disabled
min
Write an exchange number before
reading the setup registers
Lower 16 bits are used
Write an exchange number before
reading the setup registers
1 min default
1 - default
0- default
0- default
19
Address
Point ID
+0
+1
+2
+3
+4
+5
+6-7
Device Routing Table
47000-47249
+0
+1
+246
+247-249
Routing IP Table
47250-47299
+0,1
+2,3
+30,31
+32-49
47300-52149
Description
ETC II device address
Gateway device address range start
Gateway device address range end
Shared device access enabled 1, 2
Temporarily override device access restrictions
Routing table enabled 2
Reserved
Device 1 rout path
1
Options/Range
1-247
1-247
1-247
0=enabled, 1=disabled
0=disabled, 1=enabled
0=disabled, 1=enabled
Type
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
UINT16
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
UINT16
R/W
UINT16
R/W
UINT16
R/W
0x00000000-0xFFFFFFFF
0x00000000-0xFFFFFFFF
UINT32
UINT32
R/W
R/W
0x00000000-0xFFFFFFFF
UINT32
R/W
Bits 0–3 - destination port:
0=none, 1=Ethernet, 4=COM4,
5=COM5
Bits 4-7 - shared device access rule
(see F5) 2
Bits 8-15 - IP entry number in the
Routing IP Table for the Ethernet
port
Device 2 rout path
…
Device 247 rout path
Reserved
IP Address 1
IP Address 2
…
IP Address 16
Reserved
Reserved
Units
Notes
99 default
1 default
247- default
0 - default
Active only within current session
0 - default
1
Shared device access allows several clients to simultaneously access device registers either for a read or a write. It is normally enabled, so different clients can poll data registers
in the same device without collisions. However, simultaneous file accesses to the same device could destroy device file buffers so both clients may receive corrupted data. To
prevent such collisions, the user can disable shared device accesses so the ETC II will reject any additional requests addressed to a device that is being accessed by another client.
In this event, the ETC II will return an exception response with the error code 10 = “Gateway is busy” until the first client closes the session or points to a different device.
2
Starting with V21.5.4. If the routing table is enabled in the ETC II and shared device access is also enabled, then the ETC II manages shared device accesses according to the
access rules defined in the routing table individually for each device.
20
21
5 Data Formats
Format
Code
Timestamp
F1
Value
Local time in a UNIX-style format. Represents the
number of seconds since midnight (00:00:00),
January 1, 1970. The time is valid after January 1,
2000.
Event Type ID
F2
0x1400-0x1463
0x5D00
0x5E00
0x6000
0x6200
0x6300
Event Data
F3
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
24
25
26
27
28
29
Device Diagnostics (bitmap)
F4
Bit 0 = 1
Bit 1 = 1
Bit 2 = 1
Bit 3 = 1
Bit 4
Bit 5 = 1
Bit 6
Bit 7 = 1
Bit 8 = 1
Bit 9 = 1
Bit 10 = 1
Bit 11 = 1
Bit 12 = 1
22
Description
Data Server Events
Status polling event (masked), low byte = exchange
number. Event data contains the event status value
Self-Check Diagnostics Event
Action/Cause (See F3 for Event data contents)
Self-Update Event
RTC DST/Standard time update
Run-time Error
Run-time exception
Hardware Diagnostics Event
Action/Cause (See F3 for Event data contents)
External Event
Action/Cause (See F3 for Event data contents)
Power down
Reserved
RAM/Data error
CPU Watchdog reset
Reserved
CPU exception
Reserved
Software Watchdog
Power up
Device reset
Configuration reset
RTC fault
Configuration fault
XP fault counter
Reset Timer expired
MASTER EEPROM fault
Event Log corrupted
Data Log corrupted
Data Server setup
Reserved
C Library error
RTOS Kernel fatal error
Task error
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
XP session started
XP session completed successfully
XP session failed
Reserved
Permanent fault
RAM/Data error
CPU Watchdog reset
Reserved
CPU exception
Reserved
Software watchdog
Power down
Device reset
Configuration reset
RTC fault
Configuration fault
Notes
Format
Code
Value
Bit 13
Bit 14
Bit 15
Bit 16
Bit 17
Bit 18
Bit 19
Bit 20
Bit 21
Bit 22
Bit 23
Shared Access Rules
F5
0
1
2
=1
=1
=1
=1
Description
Notes
Reserved
Reserved
Master EEPROM fault
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
C Library error
RTOS Kernel error
Task error
Reserved
No access limitation
PM296 Family (PM171, PM172, PM295,
PM296/RPM096) locked registers:
1120-1791
3916-4035
4608-5930
6144-6655
28160-28927
29440-32896
35456-35743
SA300 Family (SA300, EM610, BFM136, PM174,
PM175) locked registers:
3072-3259
63120-65151
23
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