VAX 4000 Model 300
VAX 4000 Model 300
•
Operation
Order Number:
EK~36AB-OP-O02
VAX 4000 Model 300
Operation
Order Number EK-336AB-OP-O02
Digital Equipment Corporation
Maynard, Massachusetts
March 1990, July 1990
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be
construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation.
Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in
this document.
The software, if any, described in this document is furnished under a license and may be used
or copied only in accordance with the terms of such license. No responsibility is assumed
for the use or reliability of software or equipment that is not supplied by Digital Equipment
Corporation or its affiliated companies.
Restricted Rights: Use, duplication or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to
restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c)(1Xii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013.
Copyright @1990. Digital Equipment Corporation All rights reserved.
Printed in U.S.A.
The Reader's Comments form at the end of this document requests your critical evaluation to
assist in preparing future documentation.
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation.
CompacTape
DDCMP
DEC
DEC direct
DECnet
DECserver
DECsystem 5400
DECUS
DECwriter
DEQNA
DESTA
DSSI
IVI8
MicroVAX
PDP
Professional
Q-bus
ReGIS
DELNI
DELQA
ThinWire
RQDX
ULTRIX
UNIBUS
VAX
VAX 4000
VAXcluster
VAX DOCUMENT
VAXELN
VAXlab
VM8
VT
the Digital Logo
X Window System is a trademark of Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
FCC NOTICE: The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and may emit radio
frequency energy. The equipment has been type tested and found to comply with the limits for
a Class A computing device pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC Rules, which are designed
to provide reasonable protection against such radio frequency interference when operated in
a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause
interference, in which case the user at his own expense may be required to take measures to
correct the interference.
81466
This document was prepared using VAX. DOCUMENT, Version 1.2.
Contents
Preface
ix
Chapter 1 System Overview
1.1
Front View and Physical Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1.1
The BA440 Enclosure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1.1.1
Mass Storage Shelf ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.1.1.2
Card Cage .......................... . . . . . . . . .
1.1.1.3
Console Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.1.1.4
DSSI Connector (DSSI Bus 0) .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.1.1.5
Power Supply Controls and Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.1.1.6
Fans ........................................
1.2 Functional Description of Base System ...... . . . . . . . . . ..
1.2.1
Base System Components .........................
1.2.1.1
Central Processing Unit (CPU) ...................
1.2.1.2
Console Serial Line Unit (SLU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.2.1.3
Main Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.2.1.4
Network Controller ............................
1.2.1.5
Embedded DSSI Host Adapters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.2.2
Optional Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.2.2.1
Mass Storage Devices and Controllers. . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.2.2.2
Mass Storage Subsystems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.2.2.3
Mass Storage Expanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.2.2.4
Communications Controllers .....................
1.2.2.5
Real-Time Controllers ..........................
1.2.2.6
Printer Interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.2.2.7
Other Available Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1.3
Dual-Host Capability (VMS Systems Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
1-1
1-6
1-8
1-9
1-11
1-14
1-15
1-18
1-19
1-19
1-20
1-20
1-20
1-20
1-21
1-21
1-21
1-22
1-22
1-23
1-24
1-25
1-25
1-25
iii
Chapter 2 Operating the System
2.1
2.2
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.3
2.4
2.4.1
2.4.2
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
Before You Operate the System ...................... .
Switch Settings .................................. .
Normal Operation .............................. .
Special Operation ............................... .
Turning On the System ............................ .
Booting the System ............................... .
Autobooting the System .......................... .
Booting the System from Console Mode .............. .
Using the System ................................. .
Halting the System ............................... .
Restarting the System ............................. .
Turning Off the System ............................ .
Recovering from an Over Temperature Condition ........ .
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-4
2-6
2-6
2-11
2-12
2-12
2-13
2-13
2-14
Chapter 3 Operating the System Options
3.1 Mass Storage Options ..............................
3.1.1
RF-Series Integrated Storage Assemblies .............
3.1.2
TK70 Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3.1.2.1
Design of the Drive ............................
3.1.2.2
Labeling a Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3.1.2.3
Write-Protecting a Tape Cartridge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.2.4
Tape Cartridge Handling and Storage Guidelines. . . ..
3.1.2.5
Inserting a Tape Cartridge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3.1.2.6
Removing a Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3.1.2.7
Summary ofTK70 Tape Drive Controls and Indicator
Lights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3.1.3
TLZ04 Tape Drive ...............................
3.1.3.1
Proper Handling of Cassette Tapes ................
3.1.3.2
Setting the Write-Protect Tab on the Cassette Tape. . ..
3.1.3.3
Inserting a Cassette Tape into the Drive. . . . . . . . . . ..
3.1.3.4
System Software ..............................
3.1.3.5
Cleaning the Heads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ..
3.1.4
RV20 Optical Disk Subsystem ......................
3.1.5
RRD40 Digital Disk Subsystem .....................
Iv
3-1
3-2
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-11
3-11
3-14
3-16
3-17
3-19
3-20
3-21
3-22
3-23
3-24
3-25
TVS05 Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3.1.6
TU81-Plus Tape Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3.1.7
Communications Controller Options ...................
3.2
Asynchronous Serial Controllers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3.2.1
Without Modem Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3.2.1.1
With Modem Support ...........................
3.2.1.2
Synchronous Controllers ......................... .
3.2.2
Network Controllers ............................. .
3.2.3
Real-Time Options ................................ .
3.3
Printer Options .................................. .
3.4
3.5 Adding Options .................................. .
Appendix A
3-25
3-25
3-25
3-25
3-26
3-27
3-28
3-28
3-29
3-30
3-30
Related Documentation
Appendix B Programming Parameters for RF-Series ISAs
Appendix C Backup Procedures
C.1 Overview of Standalone BACKUP .................... .
Installing Standalone BACKUP on System Disk ....... .
C.1.1
C.1.2
Booting Standalone BACKUP from the System Disk .... .
C.1.3
Installing Standalone BACKUP on a Tape Cartridge .... .
C.1.4
Booting Standalone BACKUP from a Tape Cartridge ... .
C.2 Backing Up the System Disk ........................ .
C.2.1
Backing Up the System Disk ...................... .
C.2.2
Restoring the System Disk ........................ .
C--1
C--2
C--2
C-3
C-5
~
C--7
C--9
Appendix D Removing Unwanted VMS Files
D.1
Using VMSTAILOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
0-1
Glossary
v
Index
Examples
B-1
B-2
B-3
B-4
B-5
B-6
B-7
SHOW DSSI Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. B-5
Starting the DUP Driver Utility ...................... B-6
Setting Allocation Class for a Specified ISA . . . . . . . . . . . . .. B-7
Setting a Unit Number for a Specified ISA .. . . . . . . . . . . .. B-8
Changing a Node Name for a Specified ISA . . . . . . . . . . . . .. B-9
Exiting the DUP Driver Utility for a Specified ISA ........ B-10
SHOW DSSI Display ............................... B-10
Figures
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-7
1-8
1-9
1-10
1-11
1-12
1-13
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
3-1
3-2
3-3
vi
VAX. 4000 System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Positions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upper Door Opened. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entire Door Opened. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Front View of the BA440 Enclosure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mass Storage Shelf. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Card Cage .......................................
Console Module Controls and Connectors ...............
Connector for nSSI Bus 0 ...........................
Power Supply Controls and Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Sample Power Bus Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
System Air Circulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Dual-Host Configuration ............................
Language Selection Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Error Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Successful Power-On and Automatic Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Successful Power-On to List of Bootable Devices . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Bootable Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample SHOW DEVICE Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Successful Power-On to Console Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
RF-Series ISA Controls and Indicators .................
Inserting Bus Node ID Plugs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TK70 Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-7
1-8
1-10
1-12
1-15
1-16
1-18
1-19
1-26
2-3
2-6
2-7
2-7
2-8
2-10
2-11
3-3
3-5
3-7
3-4
3-5
Labeling a Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tape Cartridge Write-Protect Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3-6 Inserting a Tape Cartridge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3-7 Removing a Tape Cartridge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3-8 TLZ04 Tape Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3-9 Setting the Write-Protect Tab on the Cassette Tape. . . . . . ..
3-10 Inserting a Cassette Tape into the Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
3-11 Inserting the Head Cleaning Cassette. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
B-1 DSSI Busses for an Expanded VAX 4000 System. . . . . . . . ..
B-2 Attaching a Unit Number Label to the ISA Front Panel. . ..
3-8
3-10
3-13
3-15
3-18
3-21
3-22
3-24
B-4
B-8
Tables
2-1
2-2
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
C-1
Normal Power-On Indications
Device Names ................................... .
RF-Series Controls and Indicators .................... .
TK70 Tape Drive Controls .......................... .
TK70 Tape Drive Indicator Lights .................... .
TLZ04 Drive Indicators (Normal Conditions) ............ .
TLZ04 Drive Indicators (Abnormal Conditions) . . . . . . . . . ..
Standalone BACKUP Qualifiers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
2-4
2-10
3-4
3-16
3-16
3-19
3-19
C-7
vII
Preface
This manual describes how to use VAX. 4000 Model 300 timesharing and
VAXserver 4000 Model 300 server systems. The hardware and software
for each of these systems differs slightly, according to the function of the
system. The VAX. 4000 is a multiuser system that uses the VMS operating
system. The VAXserver 4000 system is a single-user system that uses VMS
or VAXELN operating systems. Both systems can function as an end- or
full-function node on an Ethernet network.
The manual is structured as follows:
•
Chapter 1 provides an overview of the systems.
•
Chapter 2 describes how to use each system.
•
Chapter 3 describes how to use options installed in the systems.
•
Appendix A lists related documentation.
•
Appendix B describes how to set and examine internal parameters for
RF-series ISAs.
•
Appendix C describes procedures for creating backup files.
•
Appendix D describes how to use VMSTAILOR to remove unwanted
VMS files from the system disk.
•
A glossary explains key tenns.
NOTE: VAXserver systems are designed to offer maximum performance for
applications that do not require timesharing. Some of the devices referred to
in this manual are designed for multiuser systems and may not be suitable
for server systems. Contact your Digital service representative if you have
any questions about whether use of a specific device is appropriate for your
server system.
Ix
Conventions
The following conventions are used in this manual:
Convention
Meaning
A symbol denoting a terminal key used in text and examples in this book.
For example, Break indicates that you press the Break key on your terminal
keypad. Return indicates that you press the Return key on your terminal
keypad.
A symbol indicatins that you hold down the Ctrl key while you press the
Ckey.
BOLD
This bold type indicates user input. For example:
»>BOOT MUAO
This line shows that the user must enter BOOT MUAO at the console
prompt.
NOTE
Provides general information about the CUlTent topic.
CAUTION
Provides information to prevent damage to equipment or software.
WARNING
Provides information to prevent personal iIUury.
x
Chapter 1
System Overview
VAX 4000 systems house all components in a BA440 enclosure.
enclosure is a free-standing pedestal that houses the following:
•
Card cage
•
System controls
•
•
Central processing unit (CPU) module
Memory modules
•
Communications controller modules
•
•
Tape drive controller module
•
RF-series Integrated Storage Assemblies
•
•
•
TK70 or TLZ04 tape drive
This
Console module
Power supply
Fans
Up to four RF-series Integrated Storage Assemblies (ISAs), or three RFseries ISAs and a tape drive, can be mounted inside the BA440 enclosure.
This chapter describes the VAX 4000 system components and their
functions.
Chapters 2 and 3 describe how to use the system and options.
1.1 Front View and PhYSical Description
The front of the system has a divided door that restricts access to the system
controls. Figure 1-1 shows the system with the front door closed.
System Overview
1-1
Figure 1-1: VAX 4000 System
MLO-004032
A three-position rotary lock allows you to lock both the upper and lower
doors, or to lock just the lower door. Opening the upper door allows
you to access the controls for the RF-series Integrated Storage Assemblies
(ISAs), TK70 or TLZ04 tape drive, and the System Control Panel (SCP).
Opening the entire door allows you to access all system controls and cable
connections.
Figure 1-2 shows the three key positions and the controls accessible in each
position.
1-2 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Figure 1-2: Key Positions
Door Handle ----------I~~~~;;~====~
Rotary Key Lock --------=::I!!§§~I~
Top Key Position: -------:::==-Access to SCP, ISAs, and
Tape Drive Controls and
Indicators (Upper Door)
Middle Key Position: ---:--~;.---=~.::r1III
No Access to Controls
Bottom Key Position: -----'==----../
Access to Power Switch;
All Controls and Indicators
(Both Doors)
Opening and Closing the Divided Door
The divided door allows you to access the mass storage devices and system
control panel (SCP), while restricting access to the power switch and the
console module. Open and close the door as follows:
1.
Insert the key in the lock on the front door. Turn the key to the top
position to open just the upper portion of the door, or to the bottom
position to open the entire door.
With the key in the bottom position, the upper and lower portions of
the door will open together.
2. Swing the door open.
3. To close the door, simply reverse the procedure. When pushing the
doors closed, push gently at the top right of the upper door and the
bottom right of the lower door.
Figure 1-3 shows the system with the upper portion of the door opened.
Figure 1-4 shows the system with the entire door opened.
System Overview
1-3
Figure 1-3: Upper Door Opened
0:
0
~
Top Key Position
1-4 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
MLO-OO4034
Figure 1-4:
Entire Door Opened
O:a...
Bottom Key Position
MlO-004035
The next section describes the BA440 enclosure, which is exposed when you
open the entire door.
System Overview
1-5
1.1.1 The BA440 Enclosure
. Opening the front door enables you to access the components housed in the
BA440 enclosure. Figure 1-5 shows a typical configuration.
The BA440 enclosure can contain the following:
•
Mass storage - TK70 or TLZ04 tape drive and up to three RF-series
Integrated Storage Assemblies (ISAs), or four RF-series ISAs and no
tape drive
All VAX 4000 systems contain the following:
•
System control panel (SCP)
•
Card cage containing modules
CPU, memory, communications
controllers, mass storage controllers
•
Console module
•
Power supply
•
Fans
1-6 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Figure 1-5:
Front View of the BA440 Enclosure
Integrated Storage Assemblies (ISAs)
Tape Drive
I~!...!.i~~-
System Control
Panel (SCP)
....!:-!..i-!~-
Power Supply
:....;....:......:.,:....-:~-=--
Console Module
i:§~:~::~.::i«. Card Cage
ML0-004018
System Overview
1-7
1.1.1.1 Mass Storage Shelf
The mass storage shelf extends across the top of the enclosure. The shelf
contains a system control panel (SCP), tape drive, and up to three RF-series
ISAs (tapeless systems can have up to four RF-series ISAs). Each ISA has
its own panel with controls and indicators. Instructions for using ISAs and
the TK70 or TLZ04 tape drive are in Chapter 3. The SCP is to the right of
the storage devices. Figure 1-6 shows the mass storage shelf.
Figure 1-6: Mass Storage Shelf
ISA 0
Tape Drive
Over Temperature
Warning Indicator
DC OK Indicator
Halt Button
Restart Button
1~:~~:~:~:i:~1:~1 System Control Panel (SCP)
MLO"()04036
The SCP has two indicators: the Over Temperature Warning light and
the DC OK light. The red Over Temperature Warning indicator flashes to
indicate that the system's internal temperature is approaching a level that
may cause system components to overheat. In addition to the flashing Over
Temperature Warning light, an audible alarm also provides warning of a
possible over temperature condition. If the components continue to heat,
the system will automatically shut down to prevent components from being
damaged. Chapter 2 provides instruction for turning on the system after a
preventive shutdown due to overheat conditions.
The green DC OK light indicates that the power supply voltages are within
the correct operating range. If the DC OK light is not lit when the system
power is on, refer to the VAX 4000 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics manual
included in the Customer Hardware Information Kit.
Below the indicators are the Halt and Restart buttons. The Halt button is
a two-position button. When you press the button, the system halts. A red
indicator on the Halt button lights when the button is set to the in position.
Before you can enter console commands, press the Halt button again to
1-8 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
return it to the out position. When the Halt button is returned to the out
position, the console mode prompt »> is displayed on the console terminal
screen. Now you can enter console commands. If you inadvertently press
the Halt button, type "c IReturn I" to continue. Chapter 2 describes halting the
system in more detail.
CAUTION: Pressing the Halt button halts the system regardless of the
setting of the Break Enable / Disable switch on the console module.
Below the Halt button is the Restart button. The Restart button has a
green indicator. When you press the Restart button, the system returns to
a power-on condition and self-tests are run. If you have specified a device
as the boot device and if the BreaklEnable Disable switch is set to disable,
the system will reboot system software. Further instructions on restarting
your system are in Chapter 2.
NOTE: The Halt and Restart buttons can be disabled to prevent accidental
activation. Contact your Digital service representative if you want to disable
the controls on the SCP.
1.1.1.2 Card Cage
The modules in your system are mounted in a 12-slot card cage under the
mass storage shelf, as shown in Figure 1-7.
System Overview
1-9
Figure 1-7: Card Cage
Slots 12 - 6
Slots 5 - 1
__-----A------~~----~A~--__\
•
MLO·004037
The first four slots are reserved for memory modules. The fifth slot is
reserved for the central processing unit (CPU). A console module with
system controls and connectors covers these first five slots. Slots 6 through
12 are available for Q-bus option modules.
The number and type of modules installed in your system depend on your
configuration. Each Q-bus slot, even an empty one, is protected by a module
cover. Together the covers form a shield with a three-fold purpose:
•
To protect external devices from electrical interference generated by the
system
•
To protect the system from electrical interference generated by external
devices
•
To maintain air flow integrity
CAUTION: Do not operate the system without Digital-supplied module
covers. The covers are required to protect the equipment and to meet
international regulatory standards. Do not substitute other module covers
as they may not meet the required specifications.
1-10 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Operating the system without the module covers has the following
consequences:
•
The system may overheat due to improper air circulation.
•
The system will not comply with FCC and VDE requirements for
electrostatic shielding and may produce electrical interference that
affects other equipment.
•
The system is susceptible to electrical interference or damage from
external sources.
The design of the module covers varies, depending on the type of module
installed in the slot. Modules requiring external cable connections, such as
communications controllers, have recessed covers that are riveted directly
to the module. The recessed module covers allow space for connecting
cables. Modules requiring no external cable connections, such as mass
storage controllers, are covered by flush covers. Empty slots are also
covered by flush covers which may be single or double width. All covers,
except those covering empty slots, have a label identifying the module
installed in the slot.
Cables connecting your system to peripheral devices (such as terminals,
modems, and printers) are attached to communications controllers. Each
cable can contain multiple lines. The cables run under the BA440 enclosure
and out the back or side of the enclosure, where the cables are split into
individual lines. Chapter 3 describes these connections in more detail.
1.1.1.3 Console Module
Your system can have up to four memory modules. The memory modules
occupy the first four slots of the card cage and are followed by the CPU.
The memory and CPU modules are behind the console module that covers
the first five slots. The console module, shown in Figure 1-8, has several
system controls and connectors.
System Overview
1-11
Figure 1-8: Console Module Controls and Connectors
Console Module
III
II ~iJ
~§
~ II
==:::::;;;::::=,
I I " II
""Tr===
Power-On -';""':"---......
Mode Switch
=:"__
Baud Rate
5d
Modifiecj
Modular Jack
=.
Break Enablel
~.pI
"Disable Switch
"'1!!J ~ .., iY Bus Node
t----t,;";,,I"i1 10 Plugs
Select Switch
LED Display
I
I
I
~Ethernet
~I y.~ I I
DSSI
Connectors
IN; IL
I
0
'--
0
'---
I
Connector
1-,-;;;:
=1
~)
Connector
e
I I
ThinWire
Ethernet
Connector
MLO-004038
The console module has the following components:
•
Power-On Mode switch - This three-position rotary switch
determines how the system responds at power-on:
Language Inquiry Mode (in the top position, indicated
by a profile of a face) causes the system to display a
language selection menu at power-on if your console
terminal supports multiple languages. Also, if a default
boot device has not been selected, this mode causes the
system to issue a list of bootable devices and prompts you
to select a device from the list. Once a device is selected,
the sY$tem autoboots from that device each time you turn
it on.
1-12 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
-t>
Run Mode (in the middle position, indicated by an arrow)
is the nonnal operating setting.
Loop Back Test Mode (in the bottom position, indicated by
a T in a circle) causes the system to run loopback tests on
the console serial line at power-on. This setting requires
specialloopback connectors and is for Digital Customer
Services use only.
•
Baud Rate Select switch - The Baud Rate Select switch is
used to set the system's baud rate to match that of the console
terminal. The factory setting is position 5 (9600).
Modified modular jack (MMJ) - This console terminal connector
provides the connection for the console tenninal.
The light-emitting diode (LED) display shows the testing
sequence during power-on.
Break EnablelDisable switch - When the switch is down
(position 0), breaks are disabled. When the switch is up (position
1), breaks are enabled. When breaks are enabled, pressing
IBreak I on the console terminal halts the processor and transfers
control to the console program. Using the console command SET
CONTROLP, you can specify the control character, ICtrllP I, rather than
IBreak I to initiate a break signal.
The Break EnablelDisable switch also controls what happens at
power-on. When breaks are disabled (down, position 0), the
system attempts to automatically boot software at power-on.
When breaks are enabled (up, position 1), the system enters
console mode (indicated by the »>prompt) at power-on.
Using the console command, SET HALT REBOOT or SET HALT
you can set your system to automatically boot
software after the system is halted due to pressing IBreak I.
RESTART_REBOOT,
•
Bus node ID plugs - VAX 4000 systems have two separate
Digital Storage System Interconnect (DSSI) busses. 1\vo DSSI
bus node ID plugs, one for the internal DSSI bus, Bus 0, and
one for the external bus, Bus 1, identify the bus node of the
System Overview
1-13
CPU. These plugs are configured at the factory. For single-host
systems, Bus 0 is identified as bus node 6, bus 1 is identified as
bus node 7; for dual-host systems, both busses on the first host
are identified as bus node 7, and both busses on the second host
are identified as bus node 6.
•
DSSI connectors (DSSI Bus 1) - Two Digital Storage System
Interconnect (DSSI) connectors, labeled X and Y, on the console
module allow you to expand your system by connecting additional
mass storage devices to the second DSSI bus. '
Ethernet connectors - The console module has two Ethernet
connectors: a BNe-type connector for ThinWire Ethernet, and
a 15-pin connector for a standard Ethernet transceiver cable.
The Ethernet connector switch allows you to set the type of
connection. To use the standard transceiver cable connection,
set the switch to the up position. To use the ThinWire cable
connection, set the switch to the down position. A green indicator
light (LED) for each connector indicates which connection is
active.
1.1.1.4 DSSI Connector (DSSI Bus 0)
To the left of the card cage is the nSSI connector for DSSI Bus O. Bus
o provides the nSSI bus for ISAs installed in the system enclosure. The
connector allows you to expand your system by connecting additional mass
storage devices to the bus. You can also share mass storage devices with a
second system by forming a dual-host configuration. Figure 1-9 shows the
location of the nSSI connector for nSSI Bus O.
1-14 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Figure 1-9: Connector for DSSI Bus 0
DSSI Bus 0
MLO-004039
1.1.1.5 Power Supply Controls and Indicators
To the right of the card cage is the power supply. The power supply provides
power to the mass storage devices, the modules installed in the card cage,
and the fans.
To prevent damage due to overheating, the power supply monitors the
internal temperature and the speed of the fans. If the power supply detects
overheating or a fan failure, the power supply will shut down the system.
Figure 1-10 shows the controls and indicators on the power supply.
System Overview
1-15
Figure 1-10; Power Supply Controls and Indicators
7'1
---e--~
o
I
00.
o~ ~
gYI
I
GJ~O
o
n'1
I
Power Switch
AC Pr....nt Indicator
DC OK Indicator
Fan Failure
Indicator
OVer Temperatur.
Condition Indicator
~MO
-:--:-:-- Power Cable
Connector
MLO-o04040
The controls and indicator lights function as follows:
Power switch - The power switch is used to tum system power
on and off. The off position is indicated by a 0; the on position is
indicated by a 1.
The power switch also functions as the system circuit breaker.
In the event of a power surge, the breaker will trip, causing the
power switch to return to the off position (0). Turning the system
on resets the circuit breaker. If the circuit breaker trips, wait one
minute before turning on the system back on.
•
AC Present Indicator - The orange AC Present indicator lights
when the power switch is set to on and voltage is present at the
input of the power supply. If the AC Present indicator does not
1-16 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
light when the power switch is set to on, refer to your VAX 4000
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics manual.
DC OK - When the green DC OK indicator is lit, the power
supply voltages are within the correct operating range. If the
DC OK indicator does not light when the power switch is set
to on, refer to your VAX 4000 7roubleshooting and Diagnostics
manual.
+
Fan Failure indicator - The amber Fan Failure indicator lights
if either of the two cooling fans stop working. The power supply
will automatically shut down the system as a precautionary
measure when a fan failure is detected. Call your Digital service
representative if a fan failure occurs.
t
Over Temperature Condition indicator - The amber Over
Temperature Condition indicator lights if the enclosure has shut
down due to an over temperature condition. Section 2.9 provides
instructions on recovering from an over temperature condition.
•
Power bus connectors - Three power bus connectors allow you
to configure a power bus for systems expanded with the R400X
or B400X expander. The power bus allows you to turn power
on and off for one or more expanders through the power supply
designated as the main power supply: this way, one power switch
can control power for an entire expanded system. Figure 1-11
illustrates a possible power bus configuration for an expanded
system.
NOTE: Dual-host systems should not be configured with a power
bus. Inadvertently shutting off a host system defeats the added
reliability of a dual-host system.
MO
The main out (MO) connector sends the power control
bus signal to the expander. One end of a power bus
cable is connected here, the other end is connected to the
secondary in (81) connector of an expander power supply.
81
The secondary in (81) connector receives the power bus
control signal from the main power supply. In a power
bus with more than one expander, the power control bus
signal is passed along, using the secondary in and out
connectors as shown in Figure 1-11.
System Overview
1-17
so
The secondary out (SO) connector sends the signal down
the power bus for configurations of more than one
expander.
Figure 1-11: Sample Power Bus Configuration
gMO
Expander 1
System
Expander 2
MO
gSI
gso
so
MLO·004041
1.1.1.6 Fans
1\vo fans located under the card cage draw air in through the top of the
enclosure, down through the card cage, and out the bottom. The speed of
the fans varies, depending on the surrounding room temperature. To reduce
the load on the fans, keep the system away from heat sources. Figure 1-12
shows the air flow through the system enclosure.
NOTE: The power supply monitors the fans. If either fan stops working,
the Fan Failure indicator on the power supply lights, and the system
automatically shuts down as a precautionary measure. Call your Digital
service representative if a fan fails.
NOTE: The fan speed control can be set so that the fans will run at their
maximum speed. This setting is recommended ifyou want potentially higher
system module reliability~ and do not object to the increased fan noise.
Contact your Digital service representative to override the fan speed control.
1-18 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Figure 1-12: System Air Circulation
•
MLO-G04042
1.2 Functional Description of Base System
Each VAX 4000 system includes base system components common to all
systems. Your system may have optional components as well. Your system
was configured at the factory, based on your order.
The following sections describe base system components and options, in
turn.
1.2.1 Base System Components
Base system components include the following:
•
Central processing unit (CPU)
•
Console serial line unit (SL U)
•
Main memory
•
Network controller
•
Embedded DSSI host adapters
System Overview
1-19
1.2.1.1
Centra~
Processing Unit (CPU)
The central processing unit (CPU) controls the execution of all instructions
and processes. The CPU circuits contain the logic, arithmetic, and control
functions used by the system.
1.2.1.2 Console Serial Line Unit (SLU)
Each system has a serial line unit connecting the console terminal to the
system. The SLU connector (a modified modular jack) is located on the
console module. The console serial line provides a means of communicating
with the CPU.
1.2.1.3 Main Memory
Main memory provides the electrical storage area for data and instructions
used by the CPU. When you start your system, the operating system is
loaded into main memory. Application programs must also be loaded into
memory.
When the system cannot load everything into memory at once, it reads
in units of data called pages (512 bytes of data) from disk. A large main
memory increases the efficiency of processing, since fewer pages must be
copied to and from the disk. Each configuration comes with a standard
memory option. There is room for up to four memory modules. By adding
more main memory, you can increase efficiency.
The contents of memory are volatile. This means they are lost when
you turn off power to the system. Use mass storage devices, such as
integrated storage assemblies and tape cartridges, to store software and
data permanently.
1.2.1.4 Network Controller
Network communications controllers allow you to connect to an Ethemet
network. With a network connection and appropriate DECnet software, you
can use network services, such as mail; access data stored on other systems;
perform operations, such as editing and printing on remote systems; and
share resources, such as laser printers. Your system comes with an onboard
Ethemet controller that is part of the CPU. The system can connect to
an Ethernet network through either standard Ethemet cable or ThinWire
Ethemet cable. Connectors for both types of cables are on the console
module.
.
1-20 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
1.2.1.5 Embedded DSSI Host Adapters
Your system has two Digital Storage System Interconnect (DSSI) adapters
built into the CPU. The DSSI adapters provide two separate DSSI busses
(Bus 0 and Bus 1) through which the CPU can communicate with the RFseries ISAs. Each nSSI bus can support seven RF-series ISAs.
The DSSI host adapters also allow you to link one of the DSSI busses
to a second host to form a dual-host configuration. When a nSSI bus is
extended to a second system, both systems can share up to six ISAs. Refer
to Section 1.3 for further discussion of dual-host systems.
1.2.2 Optional Components
System options can include multiples of components that are part of the
base system (for example, additional memory modules or ISAs) and the
following kinds of options:
•
Mass storage devices and controllers
•
Mass storage subsystems
•
Mass storage expanders
•
Communications controllers and adapters
•
Real-time controllers
•
Printer interfaces
1.2.2.1 Mass Storage Devices and Controllers
Mass storage devices record data on magnetic media. The data recorded is
not lost when you turn off the system, but can be altered or erased if you
record over the data. Use mass storage devices to store data and software
permanently. When the data or software is needed, the CPU transfers it
from the mass storage device into main memory. The two primary types
of mass storage devices are the RF-series ISAs and devices with removable
!D.edia, such as tape cartridges and compact disks.
Integrated Storage Assemblies
Up to four RF-series ISAs can be installed in your system. An ISA is
an intelligent storage device that contains its own controller and server.
Special mounting bracketry allows the device to plug directly into the
BA400-series backplane.
Devices with Removable Media
Devices with removable media, such as tape cartridges, are used as both
input and output devices. In addition, compact optical disks are used as
System Overview
1-21
input devices when you install software or copy data to your system. You
use tape cartridges and tapes as output devices when you copy software or
data from your system. You can copy individual files or programs, or you
can copy (back up) the contents of an entire fixed disk. Tapes are commonly
used to archive data.
Mass Storage Controllers and Adapters
All mass storage devices require a controller, a device that controls activity
between the CPU and the mass storage devices. While the controller
for each RF-series ISA is built into the storage assembly, other storage
options require a controller module located in your system's card cage. The
controller for the TK70 tape drive is the TQK70j the KDA50 is a controller
for RA-series disk drives. Each KDA50 controller supports up to four RAseries disk drives.
The KZQSA adapter allows the CPU to communicate with the TLZ04 tape
drive or RRD40 digital compact disk drive through a Small Computer
System Interface (SCSI). Each KZQSA adapter can support up to three
drives.
The CPU communicates with the ISAs through a Digital Storage System
Interconnect (DSSI) adapter, which is built into the CPU. Your VAX 4000
system has two DSSI adapters, and hence, two separate DSSI busses. Each
DSSI bus is capable of supporting seven integrated storage assemblies. A
third and fourth DSSI bus can be added to your system by using up to two
KFQSA DSSI storage adapter modules. Each KFQSA storage adapter can
support up to seven RF-series ISAs.
1.2.2.2 Mass Storage Subsystem.
Several optional mass storage subsystems are available for VAX 4000
systems. Such subsystems include RRD40 Digital Disk Subsystems, the
RV20 Optical Disk Subsystem, TS05 and TUB1 tape drives, and the SA600
Storage Array (with up to eight RA90 disk drives). If your system includes
an optional mass storage subsystem, refer to the user's guide or owner's
manual for that subsystem for instructions on how to operate the device.
1.2.2.3
Mal. Storage Expander.
You can expand the mass storage and Q-bus capacity of your VAX 4000
system by using expanders. The R400X mass storage expander provides
space for up to seven additional RF-series ISAs. Using R400X expanders,
you can fill both DSSI busses for a total of 14 ISAs.
The B400X expander provides 11 additional Q-bus slots and space for up
to four additional RF-series ISAs. Refer to the addendum shipped with the
expander for more information.
1-22 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
1.2.2.4 Communications Controllers
Besides the console serial line, most systems have additional communications controllers for connecting additional terminals, and for communicating with other systems over telephone or network lines. Communications
controllers provide standard interfaces between peripheral devices and the
system. Many communications controllers provide support for multiple
data lines.
The following types of communications controllers are available:
•
Asynchronous serial controllers
•
Synchronous serial controllers
•
DECservers
•
Network controllers
Serial controllers transmit data one character at a time. A device at the
transmitting end breaks bytes of data into bits. A device at the receiving
end assembles incoming bits into bytes of data.
Asynchronous Serial Controllers
Asynchronous serial controllers provide low-speed connections between
peripheral devices and the system. Asynchronous communication between
the system and the peripheral depends' on recognition of a pattern of start
and stop bits, not on a time interval.
Asynchronous serial controllers may be divided into those without modem
support and those with modem support.
You use serial controllers without modem support to connect additional
terminals and printers to your system. For example, the CXA16 module
provides connections for up to 16 serial lines with no modem support.
NOTE: Printers equipped with a microprocessor (intelligent printers) may
require modem control signals to function correctly. Do not attach a printer
requiring modem control signals to a controller with no modem support.
Check your printer documentation to determine the proper communications
interface for your printer.
Communications controllers with modem support allow you to communicate
over telephone lines. With a modem connected to your system, you can
access other computers and you can dial into your system from a remote
terminal or computer.
Computers transmit digital signals, while telephone lin~s (with the
exception of digital leased lines) transmit analog signals. When two
System Overview
1-23
computers communicate over telephone lines, a modem is required at both
the transmitting and receiving ends of the line. At the transmitting end, the
modem converts digital signals from the computer (or terminal) to analog
signals prior to transmission. At the receiving end, another modem converts
the analog signals back into digital signals the computer can process.
The degree of modem support depends on the number of modem control
signals recognized by the device. Full modem support (according to Digital
standards) requires recognition of eleven signals. The CXYOB module
supports up to eight serial lines with full modem support.
Synchronous Serial Controllers
Synchronous serial controllers provide high-speed connections between
systems. Communication between synchronous devices depends on time
intervals that are synchronized before transmission of data begins.
Synchronous devices can also have modem support.
DECservers
DECservers are terminal servers (a combination of hardware and software)
that allow you to connect multiple terminals or printers to hosts in an
Ethernet Local Area Network (LAN).
Terminal servers perform the functions of traditional data terminal
switches but multiplex the lines over the Ethernet. Using a DECserver
offloads communications processing from the host system.
Network Controllers
Network communications controllers allow you to connect to an Ethernet
LAN or other network type. With a network connection and appropriate
DECnet software, you can use network services, such as mail; access data
stored on other systems; perform operations, such as editing and printing on
remote systems; and share resources, such as laser printers. The network
controller function for your system is implemented on the CPU module, but
a second network controller, the DESQA Ethernet, adapter module can be
added to your system.
1.2.2.5 Re.I-Tlme Controllers
Real-time controllers interface with devices that monitor or control
particular processes, lor example, laboratory equipment or manufacturing
equipment connected to the system. Typically, real-time controllers are
parallel devices, not serial devices.
1-24 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
1.2.2.6 Printer Interfaces
Some printers require specific interfaces to communicate with the system.
For example, the LGOl, LG02, and LP25-LP29 printers require the LPVllSA interface module.
1.2.2.7 Other Available Options
Your system arrives configured with the options you ordered. As your needs
change, you can add more options. Your Digital sales representative can
advise you on available options. VAX 4000 Model 300 Thchnical Information
describes the options currently available for VAX 4000 systems. Digital
provides installation for additional options that you order.
1.3 Dual-Host Capability (VMS Systems Only)
A dual-host system consists of two systems in a VAXcluster sharing their
ISAs via a Digital Storage System Interconnect (DSS!) bus. Each system
can have direct access to any of the ISAs in either system; this can include
a shared common system disk.
The primary application for such a configuration is a VAXcluster system.
The simplest dual-host configuration, for example, is to configure one
system disk to be used as the system disk by both systems. The system
disk physically resides in one enclosure, however, both systems have equal
access to the system disk and to any other DSSI mass storage device in
either enclosure.
A DSSI ISA, such as the RF71, has a built-in dual-host capability that
allows it to connect to two DSSI host adapters. The DSSI storage adapter,
embedded in the system's CPU, allows you to extend a DSSI bus by
physically connecting it to a second system.
Using an external DSSI cable, any two DSSI-based systems can be
connected to form a dual-host configuration. Figure 1-13 shows a dualhost configuration with two VAX 4000 systems.
NOTE: Dual-host capability for VAX 4000 systems is only supported under
VMS (version 5.3-2 and later) when the two systems are configured into the
same VAXclus ter.
The benefits of a dual-host configuration are:
•
VAXcluster features such as shared data across systems and satellite
nodes.
•
Higher system availability - If one of the DSSI-based systems is
unavailable, for example, due to a system malfunction, the satellites
System Overview
1-25
booted through it are able to continue operating through the other
system.
. If one of the nSSI-based systems fails, all satellite nodes booted through
that system lose connections to the system disk. Each satellite node knows,
however, that the system disk is also available through a second path. The
satellite nodes establish a new connection through the other system and
continue operation.
To increase system availability, a second system disk may be added to each
boot node. In the event of one system disk failure, the remaining system
disk would continue to serve one nSSI-based system and the satellite nodes
booted through it. As with any VAXcluster, however, a second system disk
improves availability while increasing system management tasks.
Figure 1-13:
Dual-Host Configuration
MLO·OOo404S
VAX 4000 Dual·Host Systems provides more information on dual·host
configurations.
1-26 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Chapter 2
Operating the System
This chapter describes how to operate your VAX 4000 system once
the system software has been installed or you have completed startup
procedures for factory-installed VMS.
2.1 Before You Operate the System
This chapter assumes that your system has been properly installed.
Installation includes running the diagnostic software shipped with your
system and installing the base operating system, or completing the first
time startup procedures for factory-installed VMS. Refer to Appendix A of
the VAX 4000 Model 300 Installation manual for instructions on starting up
factory-installed VMS. To install other operating system options or layered
products, see the instructions in your system software installation manual
or layered product installation manual. Some of the instructions may
require you to open the front door of the system to change switch settings
on the console module.
The remainder of this chapter assumes that system software has been
installed and first time startup procedures for factory-installed VMS have
been completed.
2.2 Switch Settings
Switch settings vary, depending on the operation being performed. The next
two sections describe switch settings for normal and for special operations.
Set the switches according to your needs.
2.2.1 Normal Operation
Switch settings for nonnal operation are the following:
•
The Break EnablelDisable switch on the console module is set to disable
(down, position 0). Digital recommends you run the system with breaks
disabled to prevent the user from inadvertently halting the system by
pressing IBreak I on the console terminal. Halting the system causes all
activity to stop.
Operating the System
2-1
With breaks disabled, the system automatically boots system software
when powered on.
NOTE: You can use the console command SET CONTROLP to specify
the control character, IClrvpl, rather than IBreakl, to initiate a break signal.
Using the console command, SET HALT REBOOT or SET HALT
RESTART_REBOOT, you can set your ~stem to automatically boot
software after the system is halted due to pressing IBreak I.
•
The Power-On Mode switch on the console module is set to Run
(indicated by an arrow).
•
The Baud Rate Select switch on the console module is set to 9600
(indicated by a switch setting of 5).
•
The Write-Protect button for each RF-series ISA is set to out (not lit).
This setting allows system software to write to the storage element.
•
The RunlReady button for each RF-series ISA is set to in (glows green
when the storage element is not being used). This setting makes the
storage element available for use.
•
The Halt button on the SCP is set to out (not lit).
•
For expanded systems using power bus cables to link the R400X or
B400X expander, the power switches on all expander power supplies
should remain on (set to 1) at all times. The system power supply
sends the power bus signal needed to turn the expanders on or off.
2.2.2 Special Operation
Certain operations require that you change some of the normal operating
settings.
•
If you need the ability to halt the system from the console terminal, for
example, when installing system software or performing certain types
of backup, set the Break EnablelDisable switch to enable (up, position
1). This allows you to halt the system by pressing IBreak! on the console
terminal.
NOTE: You can use the console command SET CONTROLP to specify
the control character, ICtrvpI, rather than IBreak I, to initiate a break si6nal.
Using the console command, SET HALT REBOOT or SET HALT
RESTART_REBOOT, you can set your system to automatically boot
software after the system is halted due to pressing IBreakl.
2-2 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
•
If you want data on a particular ISA to be write-protected, you must
set the Write-Protect switch to in (glows).
NOTE: ISAs containing system software and user accounts must remain
write-enabled. ISAs containing applications or sensitive data may be
write-protected.
•
If you want to use the Language Selection Menu to select a new
language for the console program, before you turn on your system, set
the Power-On Mode switch to Language Inquiry Mode. A human profile
indicates the language inquiry mode. When you tum on your system,
a Language Selection Menu appears, as shown in Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-1 : Language Selection Menu
KA670-A Vn.n VMB n.n
1) Dansk
2) Deutsch (Deutschland/Osterreich)
3) Deutsch (Schweiz)
4) English (United Kingdom)
5) English (United States/Canada)
6) Espaiiol
7) Fran9ais (Canada)
8) Fran9ais (France/Belgique)
9) Fran9ais (Suisse)
10) Italiano
11) Nederlands
12) Norsk
13) Portugues
14) Suomi
15) Svenska
(1 •. 15):
Select a language by typing in the number listed next to the language.
Save the language you have selected by rotating the Power-On Mode
switch to Run Mode, indicated by an arrow.
NOTE: If you do not select a language within thirty seconds, the system
defaults to English (United States / Canada).
If the Power-On Mode switch is set to Run Mode (indicated by an arrow),
then the language selected is saved and is automatically used during
subsequent reboots of the system.
Operating the System
2-3
NOTE: If the Power-On Mode switch is set to Language Inquiry Mode
(indicated by the human profile), the system will prompt for the language
at each power-on.
In addition to the Language Selection Menu, the system may issue a
list of bootable devices and prompt you to select a device from the list.
If this happens, refer to Section 2.4.1 for more information.
If your system has been powered off for more than 10 days, the
battery unit that saves the system clock and the language selection may
have run down. The Language Selection Menu will be automatically
displayed when you power on your system, regardless of the Power-On
Mode switch setting. Once the system is booted, reset the system clock
as described in your system software manual.
2.3 Turning On the System
Once you have set the switches correctly, you are ready to tum on the
system. Use the following procedure:
1. Turn on the console terminal and wait for it to complete its self-tests.
2. Turn on the system by setting the power'switch to 1.
NOTE: For systems using the R400X or B400X expander linked by a
power bus cable, the power switch on the VAX 4000 provides the power
control bus signal to the expander(s). Setting the power switch to on (1)
on the VAX 4000 will cause the expander(s) to power on as well. The
power switch on the expander(s) should always remain in the on position
(1).
When you tum on the power, you should see the indications listed in Table
2-1.
Table 2-1: Normal Power-On Indications
Indicator
Normal Indication
System DC OK lights (power supply and SCP)
Glow green
AC Present light (power supply)
Glows orange
RF-series ISA Run/Ready lights
Glow green steadily within 20
seconds
RF-series ISA Fault light
Lights temporarily at power-on.
2-4
VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Table 2-1 (Cont.): Normal Power-On Indications
Indicator
Normal Indication
TK70 tape drive indicator lights
Orange, yellow, and green lights
glow during self-tests. The green
light remains on.
TLZ04 tape drive indicators
Tape and drive indicators llash
during self-tests.
The drive
indicator glows green when selftests are successfully completed.
If you do not observe the indications in Table 2-1, refer to VAX 4000
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics.
Every time you turn on your system, it runs a series of self-tests on the
CPU and memory. Your console tenninal first displays a line of information
identifying the CPU, the version of the firmware, and the version ofVMBthe primary bootstrap program. In the sample screens provided in this
chapter, the CPU is identified as a KA670-A, and the versions of the
firmware and primary bootstrap are indicated as n.n. Your system will
display actual version numbers. The console terminal then displays a
countdown as the system tests itself. When the self-tests are successful,
the system either autoboots system software or goes into console mode, as
described in Sections 2.4.1 and 2.4.2.
If your system detects an error during its self-tests, it displays an error
summary consisting of several lines of hexadecimal numbers. A Digital
service representative can use the error summary to diagnose the system.
Depending on the type of error, one or more error summaries may display
on the console terminal. A sample error summary is shown in Figure 2-2.
Operating the System
2-5
Figure 2-2:
KA670-A
Sample Error Summary
Vn.n
VMB n.n
Performing normal system tests.
66 •. 65 .• 64 .• 63 .. 62 •• 61 •. 60 .• 59 •. 58 .. 57 .. 56 .• 55 .. 54 •. 53 .. 52 .. 51. •
50 .• 49 •• 48 •• 47 .• 46 .. 45 •• 44 •. 43 •. 42 •• 41. .40 .• 39 •. 38 .. 37 .• 36 •. 35 ..
34 •• 33 .• 32 .. 31. .30 .. 29 •. 28 .. 27 •• 26 .• 25 .• 24 .• 23 .. 22 .. 21 •. 20 .. 19 .•
18 •• 1 7 .. 16 .. 15 .. 14 •. 13 •• 12 •• 11 •• 10 .• 09 •• 08 .• 07 ••
?5F 2 15 FF 0000 0000 02
P1=00000000 P2=00000002 P3=5839FFOO
P6=00000000 P7=00000000 P8=00000000
rO=00000054 r1=20084019 r2=00008206
r5=00000044 r6=000048DC r7=20008000
06 •• 05 •. 04 •• 03 ••
Normal operation not possible.
P4=00000000 P5=00000000
P9=0000080A P10=00000003
r3=00000000 r4=00004210
r8=00008000 EPC=FFFF90D6
»>
If possible, print out the error summary and give it to your Digital service
representative.
2.4 Booting the System
VAX 4000 systems boot in one of two ways. You can configure the system
to autoboot on power-on or you can manually boot the system from console
mode. The Break EnablelDisable switch setting determines how the system
boots.
2.4.1 Autobaoting the System
When the Break EnablelDisable switch is set to disable (the normal
operating setting), the system runs self-tests and, on completion, attempts
to load system software. Additionally, if the Break EnablelDisable switch
is set to enable, and the halt action REBOOT or RESTART REBOOT has been
defined using the SET HALT command, the system will automatically attempt
to load system software.
Depending on whether or not a boot device has been selected, the system
loads system software or prompts you to select a boot device.
Loading System Software (With Boot Device Selected)
When a boot device has been selected, the system identifies the boot device
and the number "2" displays on the screen. As the system begins booting,
the countdown continues from 1 to O.
2-6 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Figure 2-3 shows a successful power-on and automatic boot when DIAO has
been selected as the boot device.
Figure 2-3: Successful Power-On and Automatic Boot
KA670-A Vn.n, VMB n.n
Performing normal system tests.
66 •• 65 .• 64 •. 63 .• 62 •• 61 •• 60 .• 59 •• 58 .• 57 .• 56 •• 55 •. 54 .• 53 .• 52 •• 51 .•
50 •• 49 •. 48 •. 47 •. 46 •• 45 •• 44 .. 43 •• 42 •• 41. .40 •• 39 .• 38 .• 37 .• 36 •• 35 ..
34 •• 33 .. 32 .• 31 .• 30 •• 29 •. 28 .• 27 •• 26 •• 25 •• 24 .• 23 •. 22 .• 21. .20 •• 19 .•
18 •• 17 •. 16 •• 15 •. 14 •• 13 •• 12 .• 11 •• 10 •• 09 •. 08 •• 07 •• 06 •• 05 •• 04 •• 03 ••
Tests completed.
Loading system software.
(BOOT/R5:0 DIAO)
2 ••
-DIAO
1 •• 0 ••
Loading System Software (No Boot Device Selected)
If you have not selected a boot device when the Break. EnablelDisable switch
is set to disable, the system runs self-tests and, on completion, issues a list
of bootable devices. You are prompted to select a boot device from the list,
as shown in Figure 2-4.
Figure 2-4: Successful Power-On to List of Bootable Devices
KA670-A Vn.n VMS n.n
Performing normal system tests.
66 .• 65 .. 64 •. 63 .. 62 .. 61. .60 •. 59 •• 58 .• 57 •• 56 •. 55 •. 54 •• 53 •. 52 •• 51 ••
50 .. 49 •. 48 •. 47 .. 46 •• 45 •• 44 .. 43 •• 42 •. 41. .40 •• 39 •. 38 •• 37 •. 36 .• 35 ••
34 •• 33 .• 32 .. 31 .• 30 •• 29 •• 28 .• 27 •• 26 •. 25 •• 24 .• 23 •. 22 .• 21 •• 20 •• 19 ••
18 .• 17 .. 16 •. 15 •. 14 •• 13 •• 12 .. 11 •• 10 •. 09 •• 08 •. 07 •. 06 .• 05 •. 04 •• 03 •.
Tests completed.
Loading system software.
No default boot device has been specified.
Available devices.
-DIAO (RF71)
-DIAl (RF71)
-MUAO (TK70)
-EZAO (08-00-2B-06-10-42)
Device? [EZAO]:
To select a boot device, enter a device name at the system prompt. When you
have selected a boot device, the system boots from that device. Figure 2-5
shows a successful power-on when DIAO has been selected as the boot
Operating the System
2-7
device. The next time the system is turned on, it will autoboot from the
device you have just selected.
NOTE: If you do not enter a device name within thirty seconds, the system
attempts to boot from the Ethernet device, EZAO.
Figure 2-5:
Selecting a Bootable Device
KA670-A Vn.n VMB n.n
Performing normal system tests.
66 .. 65 .. 64 •. 63 .. 62 .• 61 .• 60 .. 59 •. 58 •• 57 .. 56 •• 55 •• 54 •• 53 .. 52 •• 51 ••
50 .. 49 .. 48 •. 47 .. 46 •. 45 .. 44 •. 43 .. 42 •. 41. .40 •• 39 •. 38 .• 37 .• 36 •. 35 •.
34 .. 33 .. 32 •. 31. .30 •• 29 •• 28 •. 27 .. 26 •• 25 •• 24 •. 23 •. 22 •• 21 .• 20 •. 19 •.
18 .• 17 •• 16 •. 15 .. 14 •. 13 .• 12 •. 11. .10 •• 09 •• 08 •• 07 •• 06 •• 05 •• 04 •• 03 ••
Tests completed.
Loading system software.
No default boot device has been specified.
Available devices.
-DIAO (RF71)
-DIAl (RF71)
-MUAO (TK70)
-EZAO (08-00-2B-06-10-42)
Device? [EZAO]:DIAO
(BOOT/R5:0 DIAO)
2 ••
-DIAO
1 •• 0 •.
Changing the Boot Device
Once a boot device is identified, the system autoboots from that device each
time you turn it on, until you do one of the following:
•
Change the setting of the Break EnablelDisable switch to enable (up,
position 1). If you do so, the system will not autoboot but will enter
console mode after completing self-tests (assuming you have not defined
a halt action of REBOOT or RESTART_REBOOT using the SET HALT console
command). Refer to Section 2.4.2 for instructions on booting from
console mode.
•
Change the boot device by using the SET BOOT command.
2-8 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Using the SET BOOT Command
To direct the system to boot automatically from a specific device or to change
the setting of the default boot device, put the system into console mode and
at the »> prompt, enter "SET BOOT device-name". For example,
»>SBT BOOT BZAO
sets the system default boot device to be the Ethernet controller.
Once you have selected a boot device, the system autoboots from that device
each time you turn it on.
Using "SET BOOT device-name,device-name,device-name", you can also
specify a string of default boot devices (up to 32 characters, with devices
separated by commas and no spaces) for which the system will check for
bootable software. The system checks the devices in the order specified and
boots from the first one that contains bootable software. For example,
»>SBT BOOT DtJAO,DIAO,MtJAO,BZAO
directs the system to use DUAO, DIAO, MUAO, and EZAO as the default
boot devices. When the system autoboots, or if the BOOT command is used
without specifying a device, the system will boot from the first default boot
device that contains bootable software.
NOTE: If included in a string of boot devices, the Ethernet device, EZAO,
should only be placed as the last device of the string. The system will
continuously attempt to boot from EZAO.
To determine the name of the device from which to boot the system, refer
to Table 2-2, or enter the SHOW DEVICE command at the console prompt
»>. Figure 2-6 shows a sample list of devices. The system displays the
logical device name, preceded by a dash (-), for each device.
NOTE: Selecting a default boot device other than the Ethernet device, EZAO,
is not appropriate for diskless and tapeless systems which must boot software
over the network.
Operating the System
2-9
Figure 2..0: Sample SHOW DEVICE Display
»>SROW DBVICB
DSSI Bus 0 Node 0 (CLYDE)
-DIAO (RF71)
DSSI Bus 0 Node 1 (BONNIE)
-DIAl (RF71)
DSSI Bus 0 Node 6 (*)
DSSI Bus 1 Node 7 (*)
UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)
-MUAO (TK70)
SCSI Adaptor 0 (761400), SCSI ID 7
-MKAO (DEC TLZ04 1989(c)DEC)
Ethernet Adapter
-EZAO (08-00-2B-06-10-42)
Table 2-2: Device Names
Device Type
CODtrone~~pter
Device Logical Name
RF -series ISA
Embedded DSSI host adapter
(part of CPU)
DImnl
RF-series ISA
KFQSA storage adapter
DUm2
TK70 tape drive
TQK70
MUms
TLZ04 tape drive
KZQSA adapter
MKAn
PROM (programmable
read only memory)
MRVll module
PRAn
Ethernet adapter
On-board (part of CPU)
EZAO
Ethernet adapter
DESQA Ethernet controller
XQAn
RA-series drives
KDA50
DUm2
= DSS! bus adapter (A = first bus (0») B = second bus (1), and so on.)
n = unit number
When under operating system control) Dffin devices are recognized as DIAn devices.
2c = MSCP controller designator (A = first) B = second) and so on.)
n = unit number
3 c =TMSCP controller designator (A = first) B = second) and 80 on.)
n =unit number
1m
For more information about the VAX. 4000 system's booting process, refer
to VAX 4000 Model 300 Technical Information.
2-10 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
2.4.2 Booting the System from Console Mode
When the Break EnablelDisable switch is set to enable,
powers on to console mode (indicated by the »> prompt) after
completing its self-tests (assuming you have not defined a
of REBOOT or RESTART REBOOT using the SET HALT console
Figure 2-7 shows a sucCessful power-on to console mode.
Figure 2-7:
the system
successfully
halt action
command).
Successful Power-On to Console Mode
KA670-A Vn.n VMB n.n
Performing normal system tests.
66 •• 65 •• 64 •• 63 •. 62 .• 61 •• 60 .• 59 •• 58 .• 57 •. 56 .• 55 .• 54 •• 53 •. 52 .• 51. •
50 •• 49 •• 48 •• 47 •• 46 •• 45 •• 44 •• 43 •• 42 •• 41 •• 40 •• 39 •• 38 .• 37 •• 36 •• 35 ••
34 •• 33 •• 32 •• 31. .30 •• 29 •• 28 •• 27 •• 26 •• 25 •• 24 •• 23 •• 22 .• 21 •• 20 •. 19 ••
18 •• 17 •• 16 •• 15 •• 14 •• 13 •• 12 •• 11 •• 10 •• 09 •• 08 •• 07 •• 06 •• 05 •• 04 •• 03 ••
Tests completed.
»>
Loading System Software
To load system software from console mode, enter the BOOT command,
"BOOT device name". For example,
»>8001' NOAO
tells the system to boot software from a cartridge in the TK70 tape drive.
If you enter the BOOT command without specifying a device, the system
will attempt to boot from the default boot device, or string of devices defined
by the SET BOOT command.
Using "BOOT device-name,device-name1device-name", you can also specify
a string of boot devices (up to 32 characters, with devices separated by
commas and no spaces) for which the system will attempt to boot software.
The system checks the devices in the order specified and boots from the
first one that contains bootable software. For example,
»>8001' DOAO, DIAO, NOAO, EZAO
directs the system to boot from the first device in the list that contains
bootable software.
NOTE: If included in a string of boot devices the Ethernet device, EZA01
should only be placed as the last device of the string. The system will
continuously attempt to boot from EZAO.
l
Operating the System
2-11
NOTE: 7b determine the name ofthe device from which to boot the system,
refer to 7hble 2-2.
Software manuals may instruct you to power on with break enabled and to
use the BOOT command.
2.5 Using the System
Once the system software is loaded, the first display for the system software
appears on the console terminal after a few seconds. That display is
described in the system software documentation.
You are now ready to use the system. Refer to the system software manuals
and application manuals for more specific instructions on using the system.
Your system software manuals cover the following:
•
Installing software on your system
•
Running software to perform tasks
•
Making and restoring backup copies of system software or data files
•
Accessing devices and utilities in your system
2.6 Halting the System
Halting the system interrupts all processes and returns control to the
console program. You may need to halt the system during software
installation. Or, you may want to boot the system from another device, for
example, a tape cartridge containing MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor (MDM)
software.
CAUTION: Halting your system without following the shutdown procedure
described in your system software manuals may result in loss of data.
You can halt the system in two ways:
•
You can press the Halt button twice - in to halt the system, and out
to enter console mode.
•
If the Break EnablelDisable switch on the console module is set to
enable (indicated by 1) you can press the IBreak I key on the console
terminal. If the Break EnablelDisable switch is not set to enable and
you wish to halt the system by.pressingIBreakl, change the setting of the
Break EnablelDisable switch from disable to enable.
2-12 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
NOTE: You can use the console command SET CONTROLP to specify
the control character, IctrllPl, rather than jBreakl, to initiate a break signal.
CAUTION: If you shut off your console terminal while breaks are enabled,
the system interprets the action as a break, and the system halts.
If you are using a system that is part of a VAXcluster, do not halt, restart,
or turn off the system without consulting the cluster manager. Performing
any of these activities will interrupt the processes of the entire cluster.
When the console mode prompt (»» is displayed on your screen, the
system is halted.
If you inadvertently halt the system, type "c IRetuml" at the console prompt.
The processes interrupted by the halt will continue.
2.7 Restarting the System
NOTE: Restarting the system aborts all current and pending operations. 7b
prevent loss of data, warn all users to log off prior to restarting the system.
Follow the shutdown procedure described in your system software manuals
before restarting the system.
Restarting returns the system to a povrer-on condition. All current and
pending operations are aborted and the usual power-on tests are run.
You restart the system by pressing the Restart button on the system control
panel.
NOTE: The Halt button must be out (not lit) to effect a restart operation.
2.8 Turning Off the System
CAUTION: Turning off your system without following the shutdown
procedure described in your system software manuals may result in loss
of data.
Once you have completed the recommended procedure, you can turn off
your system by setting the power switch to O.
NOTE: For systems expanded with the R400X or B400X expander and
linked by a power bus cable, you need only turn off the system unit: The
expander(s) will power off when you set the system power switch to off (0).
Note that the orange ac indicator on the expander power supply should
remain lit even though the system is powered off.
Operating the System
2-13
2.9 Recovering from an Over Temperature
Condition
If your system's internal temperature approaches a level that may cause
components to overheat, an audible alarm will sound and the Over
Temperature Warning indicator on the SCP will flash. If the temperature
continues to increase, the system will automatically shut down.
If the overheat warnings are activated, the alarm sounds and the Over
Temperature Warning indicator flashes.
When the system shuts down due to overheating, the Over Temperature
Condition indicator on the power supply remains lit. To recover from a
shutdown, set the power switch to off (0) and wait five minutes before
turning on the system.
To prevent an over temperature condition, use the following precautions:
•
Make sure your system is away from heat sources.
•
Check that the system's air vents are not blocked.
•
Check that the room temperature is within acceptable limits as specified
in your VAX 4000 Site Preparation manual.
2-14 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Chapter 3
Operating the System Options
This chapter describes how to use options that may already be part of your
system, or that you can add to your system. The following types of options
are covered:
•
Mass storage devices and controllers
•
Communications controllers
•
Real-time con trollers
•
Printers
NOTE: Some of these options may not be appropriate for VAXserver 4000
systems. Contact your Digital representative if you have any questions about
whether a specific option is appropriate for your system.
3.1 Mass Storage Options
The following mass storage options are included with VAX 4000 systems:
•
RF-series Integrated Storage Assembly (lSA)
•
TK70 or TLZ04 tape drive
NOTE: In addition, the RV20 Optical Disk Subsystem, RRD40 Digital Disk
Subsystems, and TSV05 and TUB1 tape drives can be attached to the VAX
4000 system. If your system contains one of these options, refer to the user's
guide or owner's manual for instructions on how to operate the device.
This chapter describes how to use the controls for the RF-series ISAs
and the TK70 and TLZ04 tape drives. In the case of the tape drives, it
also describes how to insert and remove the tape cartridge. To use any
mass storage device, you must properly identify the device to the operating
system and use appropriate operating system commands. Refer to your
system software documentation for details.
Operating the System Options
3-1
3.1.1 RF-Series Integrated Storage Assemblies
Your system may have up to four RF-series ISAs, or up to three RF-series
ISAs and a TK70 tape drive. When your system has multiple ISAs, Digital
recommends that you separate them according to function. For example, if
your system has two ISAs, you may want to use them as follows:
•
ISA 0 contains the operating system and applications installed on the
system.
•
ISA 1 contains work areas for each user with an account on the system.
The storage capacities and other specifications for RF-series ISAs are listed
in VAX 4000 Model 300 '1echnical Information.
Refer to Appendix B of this manual for information on setting or examining
internal parameters for RF-series ISAs.
RF-Serles Controls and Indicators
Each RF-series ISA has controls and indicators on its front panel. To access
the ISA controls you need only open the upper door (top key position).
Figure 3-1 shows the front panel of an RF-series ISA
NOTE: If your system has less than the maximum number of I8As: three if
you have a TK70 tape drive, or four without the tape drive, a blank [SA front
panel with no controls or indicators is used to cover the empty [SA cavities.
The front panels are required to meet international regulatory standards.
3-2 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Figure 3-1: RF·Serles ISA Controls and Indicators
Bus Node
10 Plug
Fault Indicator
MLO-004044
Each ISA has the following controls and indicators on its front panel.
•
Bus node ID plug
•
Fault indicator
•
Write-Protect button
•
Run/Ready button
Bus node ID plugs identify the bus node number of the ISAs to the system,
as well as the unit number by default. Bus node numbers are configured
at the factory in consecutive order from right to left: the rightmost ISA as
0, the center ISA as 1, and the leftmost ISA as 2. (Tapeless systems can
have up to four ISAs, with the leftmost ISA as 3.)
Table 3-1 lists RF-series controls and indicators.
Operating the System Options
3-3
Table 3-1: RF-Serles Controls and Indicators
Control
Position
Function
Bus Node ID Plug
Installed
The bus node ID plug identifies the bus node
ID number of the ISA to the system and is.
by default, the unit number. The ISA bus
node ID is factory set to a number 0 through
6.
Not Installed
The ISA bus node number is undefined. The
ISA fault indicator lights.
Lit
Indicates an error condition in the ISA
The light is on temporarily during poweron sequence (normal condition).
Not lit
Indicates an error-free condition in the ISA
In (lit. green)
ISA is on-line. When the ISA is available
for use. the green indicator light in the
switch is on. Under normal operation the
green indicator flashes as seek operations
are performed.
Out (not lit)
ISA is off-line and cannot be accessed. The
green indicator light cannot be lit when the
Run/Ready button is out.
In (lit. amber)
ISA is write-protected. Prevents system
software from writing to the ISA
Out (not lit)
ISA is not write-protected. Normal position
for software operation. System software is
free to read from or write to the ISA
Fault
RunlReady
Write-Protect
The Write-Protect button controls whether the system can write data to
the ISA. The system can read from the ISA regardless of the setting of the
Write-Protect button. When the Write-Protect button is out (not lit), the
system can write to the ISA. Your system disk (the ISA containing system
software) and ISAs containing work areas for users should be write-enabled,
the normal operating setting.
If you want to write-protect an ISA containing sensitive data that you do
not want changed or accidentally erased, set the Write-Protect button to in
(lit).
Changing the Bus Node 10 Plugs
Spare bus node ID plugs are supplied with your system. Use the spare
plugs to renumber your ISAs if you reconfigure your system with an R400X
expander, or if you create a dual-host configuration.
3-4 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
The bus node ID plugs have prongs on the back that indicate the bus node
number (and by default, the unit number) of the ISA. To remove a bus node
ID plug, grasp it firmly and pull straight out. To insert a bus node ID plug,
align the two center prongs with the two center slots and press the plug
into the slots. See Figure 3-2.
Figure 3-2: Inserting Bus Node 10 Plugs
MLO-004045
Use the rules below for renumbering your storage assemblies:
•
For each DSSI bus, do not duplicate bus node numbers for your storage
assemblies. You can only have one storage assembly on bus 0 identified
as bus node 1, one storage assembly as 2, and so on; you can only have
one storage assembly on bus 1 identified as bus node 1, one storage
assembly as 2, and so on.
•
By convention, the ISAs are numbered in increasing order from right
to left.
NOTE: If you change the bus node ID plugs while the system is operating,
you must turn off the system and then turn it back on for the new plug
positions to take effect.
Operating the System Options
3-5
3.1.2 TK70 Tape Drive
The TK70 tape drive is located behind the upper door of the system. To use
the drive, move the key to the top position and open the door.
The TK70 tape drive holds one removable magnetic tape cartridge. The
drive can read data written on either a CompacTape II or CompacTape
cartridge. You can identify the type of cartridge by the label on the
cartridge.
You can use a CompacTape II or CompacTape cartridge as an input device
to load software or data into your system. The TK70 drive can read data
on both types of cartridges, written by either a TK70 drive or a TK50 drive.
(The TK50 drive records data in a format different from that of the TK70.)
You should use a CompacTape II as an output device to make copies or
backups of software or data. The TK70 drive cannot write to a CompacTape
II or CompacTape that has been previously written by a TK50 tape drive.
TK70 Tape Drive Controls
The tape drive has two primary controls: the cartridge insert/release handle
(subsequently referred to as "the handle") and the Unload button. You use
the handle to insert or remove cartridges and lock them into position. Pull
the handle open to insert or remove a tape cartridge. Push the handle
closed to lock a tape cartridge into position and load the tape.
You use the Unload button to rewind and unload the tape. Unloading and
rewinding can also be controlled by software. Refer to your system software
manuals for appropriate commands.
The drive also has three indicator lights that tell you the status of the drive.
•
Orange light (Write-Protected): A steady orange light indicates that the
cartridge is write-protected.
•
Yellow light (Tape in Use): A steady yellow light indicates that the tape
is loaded. A blinking yellow light indicates that the tape is in motion.
•
Green light (Operate Handle): A steady green light indicates that you
can move the handle to insert or remove a tape. A blinking green light
indicates a cartridge load fault. You can also move the handle when
the green light is blinking.
All three lights blinking simultaneously indicates a fault condition.
Figure 3-3 shows the TK70 tape drive with the controls and indicator lights
labeled.
3-6 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
To operate the drive properly, you must carefully monitor the indicator
lights. The instructions for inserting and removing cartridges, which
appear later in this section, tell you what should happen at each step. A
table at the end of the section summarizes light and control combinations.
Figure 3-3: TK70 Tape Drive
Orange Light - - - - - /
Yellow Light - - - - /
Green Light - - - - Unload Button - - - -
Handle - - - - - - - . ; : . . . .
MLO-OO2292
3.1.2.1 Design of the Drive
The TK70 tape drive operates like a reel-to-reel tape deck. Inside the drive
is a take-up reel with a leader attached. Inside the cartridge is a single
reel containing the magnetic tape. When you insert the cartridge and push
in the handle, the leader in the drive automatically couples with the leader
in the cartridge, and the tape winds onto the take-up reel. The coupling
and winding process is called loading. When the automatic loading process
is complete, the tape is ready to use.
Once the cartridge is loaded, you cannot remove it without rewinding and
uncoupling the leaders, a process called unloading. Even if you have not
used the tape, you must unload it before you can remove the cartridge.
When you press the Unload button, the tape rewinds into the cartridge
and the leaders uncouple.
Operating the System Options
3-7
3.1.2.2 labeling a Tape Cartridge
When recording data on a cartridge, label its contents.
For your
convenience, a slot for the label is provided on the front of the cartridge.
Write the identification on the label and insert the label in the slot on the
front of the cartridge, as shown in Figure 3-4. The label is visible when
the tape is in the drive.
Figure 3-4:
Labeling a Tape Cartridge
MLO-OOOIMIO
To indicate that the tape was recorded on a TK70 tape drive, ~'teck the box
labeled 296MB. The 95MB box is used for tapes recorded on a TK50 drive.
NOTE: Do not write on the tape cartridge or attach labels to the top, bottom,
or sides of the cartridge.
3-8 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
3.1.2.3 Write-Protecting a Tape Cartridge
Write-protecting a tape cartridge prevents accidental erasure ofinfonnation
stored on the tape. You can write-protect a tape cartridge in two ways:
•
Set the write-protect switch on the cartridge to the write-protect
position.
•
Write-protect the cartridge by using operating system commands
described in your system software manuals.
Your system can read information on the tape regardless of the position of
the write-protect switch or whether writing is software-disabled. However,
the system cannot write data to the tape when the write-protect switch is
set to the write-protect position, or when writing is software disabled.
When you use a cartridge to install software, make sure the cartridge is
write-protected. Two icons on the switch indicate the write-protect status,
as shown in Figure 3--5. An orange rectangle is visible when the switch is
in the write-protect position. If you do not see an orange rectangle, slide
the switch toward the label slot.
When you insert a write-protected cartridge into the drive, the orange
indicator light comes on. The system recognizes the tape as being writeprotected under anyone of the following conditions:
•
The write-protect switch on the cartridge is set to the write-protect
position.
•
An operating system command has write-protected the tape.
•
A tape recorded on a TK50 tape drive is inserted into the drive.
Removing write-protection depends on how the tape was recorded and
how it is write-protected. You cannot write-enable a tape recorded on a
TK50 tape drive either by moving the write-protect switch on the cartridge
or by using software commands. The TK70 drive always recognizes a
tape recorded on a TKSO drive as write-protected. You can remove writeprotection on tapes recorded on a TK70 drive as follows:
•
If the cartridge is write-protected only by the write-protect switch on
the cartridge and not the operating system, moving the switch to the
write-enabled position causes the orange light to go out at the end of
the executing command.
Operating the System Options
3-9
Figure 3-5: Tape Cartridge Write-Protect Switch
•
If the cartridge is write-protected only by a software command and
not the write-protect switch, l"emoving the operating system restriction
causes the orange light to go out.
•
If the cartridge is write-protected by both the switch on the cartridge
and a software command, you must change the switch setting and
remove the operating system restriction.
3-10 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
When you use a CompacTape II cartridge to make a backup copy of files,
make sure the orange write-protect light on the TK70 drive is off. If the
light is not off, check for any of the write-protect conditions described above.
Change the switch setting and/or operating system restriction as necessary.
Do not begin your operation until the orange light goes off.
3.1.2.4 Tape Cartridge Handling and Storage Guidelines
•
Do not touch the exposed surface of the tape.
•
Do not drop the tape cartridge. The impact from a fall can damage the
tape cartridge.
•
Allow new tapes to stabilize at room temperature for 24 hours before
using them.
•
Place an identification label only in the label slot on the front of the
tape cartridge.
•
Store tape cartridges in a dust-free environment.
•
Keep tape cartridges away from direct sunlight, heaters, and other
sources of heat. Store tape cartridges in a stable temperature between
10° and 40°C (50° and 104°F).
•
Store tape cartridges where the relative humidity is between 20 and 80
percent.
•
Keep tape cartridges away from magnets and equipment that generate
magnetic fields, such as motors, transformers, terminals, and audio
equipment.
•
Keep tape cartridges away from x-ray equipment.
3.1.2.5 Inserting a Tape Cartridge
Before you use the tape drive, make sure the system is turned on (the
power switch glows). During power-on, the TK70 drive runs self-tests that
last a few seconds. All three lights (orange, yellow, and green) come on
momentarily, then the yellow light blinks during the self-tests. At the
end of the tests, the yellow light goes off and the green light comes on,
accompanied by a short beep. The green light and the beep indicate that
you can move the cartridge release handle.
CAUTION: Move the handle only when the green indicator light is on.
Moving the handle while the yellow light is on could damage the drive.
If all three lights blink rapidly at any time, a fault condition exists. Press
the Unload button once. If the fault is cleared, the tape unloads. The yellow
light blinks during unloading, then the green light comes on. If the fault
Operating the System Options
3-11
is not cleared, the three lights continue to flash. Do not attempt to use
the tape drive or to remove the tape cartridge. Call your Digital service
representative.
Use the following procedure to insert a tape cartridge (see Figure 3-6):
1. Pull the handle open.
2. Position the cartridge so the arrow on the cartridge faces left and points
toward the drive. Insert the cartridge into the TK70 tape drive until
you feel the cartridge lock into place.
3. Push the handle closed.
The green light goes off and the yellow light blinks as the tape loads.
When the yellow light glows steadily, the tape is ready to use.
NOTE: If the green light blinks rapidly when you push the handle
closed, the drive has detected a cartridge fault. Pull the handle open
and remove the cartridge. Use another cartridge.
Refer to Appendix C of this manual for instructions on how to create backup
files on a tape cartridge.
NOTE: If a cartridge is new, the drive performs a calibration sequence that
takes approximately 30 seconds when the drive receives the first command
from the operating system. The yellow light blinks rapidly and irregularly
during calibration.
3-12 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Figure 3-6: Inserting a Tape Cartridge
1
Green Light is on
Handle
---.....;--~~-=--1..... ~
-------;---=--
2
Cartridge Arrow
is Facing Left _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _- - J
3
Yellow Light Blinks
----=:-~...::....:;.~=-
MLO-OO2459
Operating the System Options
3-13
3.1.2.6 Removing a Tape Cartridge
You must unload a tape before you can remove the cartridge from the tape
drive. Use the following procedure (see Figure 3-7):
1. Press the Unload button. You can also issue a software command to
unload the cartridge. Refer to your system software manuals for the
appropriate command.
The yellow light blinks slowly, as the tape rewinds and unloads into the
cartridge. This may take up to 90 seconds.
2. When the yellow light goes off and the green light comes on (you also
hear a beep), pull the handle open.
CAUTION: Move the handle only when the yellow indicator light is off
and the green indicator light is on. Moving the handle while the yellow
light is blinking could damage the drive.
3. Remove the tape cartridge and store it in its container.
4. Push the handle closed.
The green light remains on, indicating that there is power to the drive and
that you can safely move the handle.
CAUTION: Remove the tape cartridge from the tape drive when the cartridge
is not in use or before you turn off the system. Failure to remove the cartridge
may damage the tape cartridge.
3-14
VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Figure 3-7:
Removing a Tape Cartridge
1
'--=---
Unload Button
1:1:::.,,':7----:--- Yellow Light Blinks
2
Green Light is on
--~-""';--:'::~=-f
Handle -----~-_:_:~~
3
• . , - - - Cartridge Arrow is Facing left
4
Green Light is on ----'".
Operating the System Options
3-15
3.1.2.7 Summary of TK70 Tape Drive Controls and Indicator Lights
Table 3-2 summarizes the TK70 tape drive controls. Table 3--3 describes
the meaning of the indicator lights.
Table 3-2: TK70 Tape Drive Controls
Control
Position
Function
Handle
Open
Lets you insert or remove a tape after rewind and
unload operations are completed.
Closed
Locks tape in operating position and begins load
sequence.
Momentary
contact switch
Rewinds and unloads the tape.
Unload button
Table 3-3: TK70 Tape Drive Indicator Lights
Orange
Yellow
Green
Condition
Oft'
Oft'
Oft'
No power to the tape drive.
Oft'
Oft'
On steadily
Safe to move cartridge release
handle. Power is present.
Oft'
Oft'
Blinkjng
Load fault. The cartridge leader
may be defective. Pull out the
handle and remove the cartridge.
Do not use the cartridge.
On/Off
On steadily
Oft'
Tape is loaded but not in motion.
On/Off
Blinking
Oft"
Tape is in motion.
On
On steadilyl
blinJdng
On
Cartridge is write-protected.
Blinking
Blinking
Blinking
A fault is occurring. Press the
Unload button to unload the tape
cartridge. If the fault is cleared,
the yellow light blinks while the
tape rewinds. When the green light
cames on, you can move the handle
to remove the cartridge. If the
fault is not cleared, all three liahta
CQDtinue to bliDk. Do Dot attempt
to remove the tape cartridp. CaD
your Dicital ..mce rep.nMIDtative.
3-16 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
3.1.3 TLZ04 Tape Drive
The TLZ04 tape drive is located behind the upper door of the system. To
use the drive, move the key to the top position and open the door.
The TLZ04 tape drive is a backup device that uses digital data storage
(DDS) and digital audio tape (DAT) recording technologies. Digital audio
tape, such as TLZ04 cassettes, takes advantage of the TLZ04 tape drive's
helical scan technology. This technology allows more data to be stored
on tape by recording data diagonally. DAT recording also minimizes
"crosstalk," providing you with higher data integrity.
Digital data storage uses a recording format that supports the use of digital
audio tape for computer applications. The DDSIDAT format allows you to
backup 1.2 gigabytes of data in approximately 2 hours with no operator
intervention. In addition, this format has three levels of error correction,
which ensures high data integrity.
TLZ04 Tape Drive Controls and Indicators
Figure 3-8 shows the TLZ04 tape drive.
Operating the System Options
3-17
Figure 3-8:
Unload
Button
TLZ04 Tape Drive
----:--,:IEJ IJ
On nnnmII II
~ =u IIIII
Drive Indicator
JII
I:i-':::..!:!..-~-
Tape Indicator
MLO-005328
The Unload button is used to eject the cassette tape. The Tape and Drive
indicators show the status of the TLZ04 and can indicate possible error
conditions.
CAUTION: Pressing the Unload button during normal tape operations may
halt the tape operation in progress.
Table 3-4 describes the TLZ04 drive indicators as they apply to normal
operating conditions. Table 3-5 describes the TLZ04 drive indicators as
they apply to abnormal operating conditions.
3-18 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Table 3-4: TLZ04 Drive Indicators (Normal Conditions)
Indicator
Color(s)
Meaning
Indicates status of cassette tape as follows.
Tape
Solid green
Tape loaded.
Solid yellow
Tape loaded and write protected.
Indicates status of TLZ04 drive as follows.
Drive
Solid green
Drive ready/power on.
FlashiDg green
Drive active.
Flashing yellow
Power-on self-test in progress.
Table 3-5: TLZ04 Drive Indicators (Abnormal Conditions)
Indicator
Color(s)
Meaning
Tape
Slow flashing
green or yellow
Excessive tape errors. Use the head cleaning cassette.
If failure repeats itself, use another cassette tape.
Tape and Drive
Solid yellow
High humidity. Adjust operating environment.
Tape
Flashing yellow
1-3 times
Power-on self-test failed.
Drive
Solid yellow
Power-on self-test failed.
3.1.3.1 Proper Handling of Cassette Tapes
Digital Equipment Corporation recommends that you use TLZ04 cassette
tapes. '1b ensure optimal performance from your cassette tapes, observe
the following guidelines when handling them.
•
Avoid placing the cassette tapes near sources of electromagnetic
interference, such as terminals, and video or X-ray equipment.
Emissions from such equipment can erase data on the tape.
•
Keep cassette tapes out of direct sunlight and away from heaters and
other sources of heat.
•
Store cassette tapes (and cleaning cassette) where the room
temperatures are between 5°C and 32°C (40°F and gO°F).
•
Store cassette tapes in a dust-free environment where the relative
humidity is 20% to 60%.
Operating the System Options
3-19
3.1.3.2 Setting the Write-Protect Tab on the Cassette Tape
If you wish to read or copy from a tape, set the write-protect tab on the
cassette to write protect. This disables writing to tape, and ensures data
integrity. Use a pen (not pencil) to set the write-protect tab (Figure 3-9) to
the desired position.
Observe the following guidelines when setting the write-protect tab.
•
If you are reading data (copying from tape), set the write-protect tab to
write protected.
•
If you are writing data, set the write-protect tab to write enabled.
•
Write-protect tab position displays in front panel tape indicator.
3-20 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Figure 3-9: Setting the Write-Protect Tab on the Cassette Tape
3.1.3.3 Inserting a Cassette Tape Into the Drive
Insert the TLZ04 cassette tape into the drive with the cassette's writeprotect tab at the top, as shown in Figure 3-10.
Operating the System Options
3-21
Figure 3-10:
Inserting a Cassette Tape Into the Drive
MLO-OO5331
3.1.3.4 System Software
System software allows you to execute commands to read and write data to
the cassette tape. Your operating system documentation describes specific
commands that allow you to do the following:
•
Back up data from disk drives to a tape drive
•
Copy data from disk to tape, or tape to disk
3-22 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
3.1.3.5 Cleaning the Heads
Statistics show that over ninety percent of drive-related problems are
associated with the media. Therefore, Digital Equipment Corporation
strongly recommends that you follow the instructions for handling cassette
tapes and cleaning the heads of the drive.
This section shows you how to perform TLZ04 head cleaning. The heads
are the components, in a drive, that magnetically read and write data to
and from the media (in this case, a cassette tape).
NOTE: Digital Equipment Corporation recommends that you perform the
head cleaning procedure about every two weeks, or after every 25 hours of
drive usage.
Under normal conditions, it should not be necessary to exceed this cleaning
schedule. If a particular cassette causes problems, try changing to another
cassette.
CAUTION: Never attempt to clean the heads in a manner other than
described herein. Doing so will void the product warranty.
To clean the heads, use the head cleaning cassette as follows:
1. Observe that the drive indicator is lit solid green.
2. Insert the head cleaning cassette (part number TLZ04-HA) into the
drive as shown in Figure 3-11.
3. With the head cleaning cassette inserted, the drive automatically
cleans the head. The drive ejects the head cleaning cassette after
approximately 30 se~ondf!.
4. In the space provided. on the card enclosed with the head cleaning
cassette, place a check mark every time you use the head cleaning
cassette.
Under normal conditions, the head cleaning cassette performs for
approximately 25 cleanings. Additional cassettes are available from
your Digital sales representative or DECdirect.
If the head cleaning cassette has been used more times than it was
designed to be used, the drive will eject the cartridge in approximately
8 to 10 seconds. No cleaning action will occur.
CAUTION: Do not exceed the recommended 25 uses of the cleaning
cassette. After 25 uses, the cleaning cassette no longer cleans the heads.
You must use a new cassette.
Operating the System Options
3-23
Figure 3-11:
Inserting the Head Cleaning Cassette
MLO-OO5332
3.1.4 RV20 Optical Disk Subsystem
If your system includes an RV20 Optical Disk Subsystem, refer to the RV20
Optical Disk Subsystem Owner's Manual for instructions on how to operate
the device.
3-24
VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
3.1.5 RRD40 Digital Disk Subsystem
If your system includes an RRD40 Digital Disk Subsystem, refer to its
user's guide for instructions on operating the device.
3.1.6 TVS05 Tape Drive
If your system includes a TVS05 tape drive, refer to the TVS05 '.fupe
Transport System User's Guide for instructions on how to operate the device.
NOTE: The TSV05 is a data interchange device and is not supported as a
backup device.
3.1.7 TU81-Plus Tape Drive
If your system includes a TU81-Plus tape drive, refer to the TU81-Plus
7bpe Subsystem User's Guide for instructions on how to operate the device.
3.2 Communications Controller Options
The following types of communications controllers are available for the VAX
4000 systems:
•
Asynchronous serial controllers (with or without modem support)
•
Synchronous serial controllers (with or without modem support)
•
Network controllers
3.2.1 Asynchronous Serial Controllers
The following asynchronous controllers are available for your VAX 4000
system, with and without modem support:
•
CXAl6-16-line multiplexer, Q-bus controller
•
CXBl6-16-line multiplexer
•
CXY08-8-line multiplexer with modem control, Q-bus controller
•
DFAOl-2-line controller with integral modems, Q-bus controller
•
DSRVB-8-line terminal server, Ethernet device
Operating the System Options
3-25
3.2.1.1 Without Modem Support
Before using any peripheral device connected to a serial communications
controller, check the following:
•
Make sure the peripheral device is properly connected to the system.
•
Make sure the peripheral device is properly installed, plugged into an
appropriate power source, and turned on.
•
Make sure the peripheral device is properly set up. Set-up involves
choosing how the device operates. Some set-up choices are matters of
personal choice, for example, the number of columns that display on
a terminal screen. Others, like baud rate (a measure of the speed at
which data is transmitted over a data line), must match the system
setting if the peripheral device and system are to communicate. Refer
to your tenninal or printer manual for complete set-up instructions.
Generally, the default settings for your terminal are acceptable.
While most default settings are acceptable, you should perform the setup procedure for your terminal to ensure appropriate set-up values.
The two examples below provide set-up instructions for VT300-series
and VT200-series terminals:
For VT300-Serles Terminals:
1. Press ISet-up! to display the Set-Up Directory screen.
2.
Use the arrow keys to select the "Communications Set-Up" option
and press IEnt.l.
3. Make sure the "Transmit Speed" option in the "Current Setting"
column is set to 9600. Use the left and right arrow keys to change
the setting.
4. Make sure the "Receive Speed" option in the "Current Setting"
column is set to "receive=transmit." Use the down arrow to move
the cursor to this option, and the left and right arrows to change
the setting.
5.
6.
7.
Press
ISelect! to return to the Set-Up Directory screen.
Use the arrow keys to select the "Global Set-Up" option and press
IEnter I.
Select the option "Comm Port."
8. If the port in the "Current Setting" column is selected for "RS-232,"
press IEnter! to select the "DEC-423" port.
9. Press ISelect! to return to the Set-Up Directory screen.
3-26
VAX 4000 ModeJ 300 Operation
10. Use the arrow keys to select the "Save Current Settings" option.
Press IEnter! to save all current settings; then press ISet-Up I to exit the
Set-Up Directory.
For VT20G-Serles Terminals:
1. Press ISet-Up I to display the Set-Up Directory screen.
2. Use the arrow keys to select the "Default" option and presslEnterI.
Default correctly sets all values except transmit speed.
3. Use the arrow keys to select the "Comm" option and press IEnter I to
display the Communications Set-Up menu.
4. Use the arrow keys to select the "Transmit" option and presslEnteri
to set the speed to 9600.
5. Use the arrow keys
lenter!.
to select the "To Directory" option and press
6. Use the arrow keys to select the "Save" option and press IEnterl; this
option stores the set-up values. Then press ISet-Up I to exit the Set-Up
Directory.
Your operating system may have other requirements for using serial
communications devices. Refer to your system software manual.
3.2. 1.2 With Modem Support
Using serial devices with modem support requires that you install two
modems: one connected to the system and one connected to the remote
terminal. Both must be connected to phone lines.
Before using modems with your system, check the following:
1. Make sure each modem. is connected to the system.
2. Make sure the modem is properly installed and connected to a phone
jack.
3. Set controls on the modem according to instructions in the modem user's
guide.
Before using the modem connected to the remote terminal, check the
following:
1. Make sure the modem is properly installed and connected to a phone
jack.
2. Set controls on the modem according to instructions in the modem user's
guide.
Operating the System Options
3-27
3. Check the settings on the terminal attached to the modem. Depending
on the type of modem and the type of lines used, the baud rate may
be 300, 1200, or 2400. Other settings should be the same as those
described in the previous section.
Before using a phone line with modem support, you must set certain
parameters such as line speed. See your system software manuals for
details.
3.2.2 Synchronous Controllers
The following synchronous controllers are available for your VAX 4000
system:
•
DPV11-Single-line programmable controller
•
DSV11-Dual-line controller
•
KMVlA-Programmable communications interface, Q-bus controller
Before using a synchronous controller you must verify the following:
•
The system you want to communicate with has an appropriate
synchronous controller.
Synchronous communications require a
synchronous controller on both the transmitting and receiving system.
•
Both the transmitting and receiving systems must have supporting host
software installed. Synchronous communications operate under specific
protocols that define how data is interpreted. Two common protocols
are X.25 and PSI. Appropriate host software is required to interpret
the protocol.
3.2.3 Network Controllers
NOTE: VAX 4000 systems contain an Ethernet controller embedded in the
CPU module. You can have a second optional Ethernet controller, the
DESQA module, included with your system.
Before using a network controller you must do the following:
1. Make sure the Ethernet cable (either standard transceiver cable or
ThinWire cable) is connected to the console module (or optional DESQA
module). The light next to the connector should be lit, indicating an
active connection. If not lit, move the Ethernet Connector switch to the
proper position.
3-28 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
2. Make sure the Ethernet cable is properly connected to the network. A
transceiver cable can be connected in one of the following ways:
•
To an H4000 or H4005 transceiver located on a traditional Ethernet
•
To a local network interconnect (DELNI), which can be connected
to a larger Ethernet or can serve to connect up to eight systems in
a local area network
A ThinWire cable can be connected as follows:
•
To a ThinWire Ethernet multiport repeater (DEMPR) or ThinWire
single port repeater (DESPR), which can be connected to a larger
Ethernet or can serve to connect many systems in a local area
network
•
To an available connection on a T-connector of other ThinWire nodes
3. Have the DECnet application installed on your system.
4. Register your node with the network manager so that your node is
recognized by other systems in the network.
Some software products, for example, Ethernet-based VAXcluster systems,
use the Ethernet hardware address of other systems to operate properly.
To find the hardware address of your Ethernet device, use the command
SHOW ETHER from console mode. The hardware address of your Ethernet
device displays on the terminal as shown in the following example:
»>SBOW E'l'BBRNE'I'
EZAO (Oa-OO-2B-03-S0-SC)
Refer to your software manuals and DECnet manuals for other
requirements and further instructions on using a network connection.
3.3 Real-Time Options
The following real-time options are available for your VAX 4000 system:
•
DRQ3B-High-speed interface with two unidirectional 16-bit data
channels
•
DRVIW-General purpose interface with one 16-bit input port, one 16hit output port
•
IEQI1-DMA controller that connects a Q-bus to two independent
busses
•
IBQ01-DMA controller that connects a Q-bus to RS-485 control
Operating the System Options
3-29
•
AAVll-S-Digital-to-analog converter with DMA capability
•
ADVll-S-Analog-to-digital converter with DMA capability
•
KWVll--S-Programmable clock that can count from one to five
frequencies
•
AXVII-Input/output circuit board for analog devices
•
ADQ32-Analog-to-digital converter with DMA capability
Before using a real-time controller, make sure the devices connected to the
controller are properly set up. Refer to the documentation for the real-time
device.
3.4 Printer Options
Before using a printer, make sure it is properly set up and passes any selftests. Verify that the printer is connected to an appropriate controller.
Some printers, such as the LGOI and LG02, require the LPVll-SA
interface. Other printers require modem control signals. Consult your
printer documentation for the interface requirements.
The VAX. 4000 systems have several printer options available. Consult the
VAX 4000 Model 300 Technical Information for a list of printers and printer
interface requirements.
3.5 Adding Options
If you have available Q-bus slots, you may be able to add modules to your
system. Possible limitations to adding modules include the following:
•
Power limitations
•
Physical space limitations
•
Bus limitations (addc loading)
Your Digital sales representative can advise you about modules available for
your system and what you need to order. A Digital service representative
should perform the installation, since the system must be properly
configured to work correctly.
CAUTION: Do not attempt to remove, rearrange, or install modules. Contact
your Digital service representative for assistance.
3-30 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Appendix A
Related Documentation
Order Number
Document
Hardware Documentation
KA670 CPU Systems Maintenance
EK-347AA-MG
KA670 CPU Module Technical Manual
EK-KA670-TM
R400X Expander Addendum to Customer Hardware Information
EK-R400X-CM
TSV05 Tape Transport System User's Guide
EK-TSV05-UG
RF301RF'11 User Guide
EK-RF71D-UG
Software Documentation
Overview of VMS Documentation
AA-LA95A-TE
VMS VAXcluster Manual
AA-LA27A-TE
VMS Networking Manual
AA-LA48A-TE
Guide to DECnet-VAX Networking
AA-LA47AA-TE
VMS Installation and Operations
AA-LB35B-TE
VAXELN Host System Guide
AA-JG87B-TE
VAXELN Run-Time Facilities Guide
AA-JM81B-TE
Microcomputer Handbook Series
VAX Architecture Handbook
EB-19580-20
VAX Software Handbook
EB-21812-20
Documentation specific to supported options is listed with the option in VAX
4000 Model 300 Thchnical Information.
Related Documentation
A-1
Appendix B
Programming Parameters for RF-Series
ISAs
This appendix describes the procedures for setting and examining
parameters for RF-series ISAs.
VAX. 4000 Model 300 systems have two DSSI host adapters built into the
CPU. Each host adapter provides a separate DSSI bus that can support up
to seven RF-series ISAs. The host adapters make a connection between the
CPU and the requested ISA on their respective DSSI bus. Each ISA has its
own controller and server that contain the intelligence and logic necessary
to control data transfers over the DSSI bus.
Four principal parameters are associated with each RF-series ISA:
•
ALLCLASS
•
UNITNUM
•
NODENAME
•
Bus Node ID
The ALL CLASS parameter determines the device allocation class. The
allocation class is a numeric value from 0 to 255 that is used by the VMS
operating system to derive a path-independent name for multiple access
paths to the same ISA. RF-series ISAs are shipped from the factory with
a default allocation class of zero. Each RF-series ISA to be served to the
cluster should have an allocation class that matches the allocation class
of the host system. Refer to the VMS VAXcluster manual for rules for
specifying allocation class values.
The UNITNUM parameter determines the unit number of the ISA. By
default, the ISA unit number is supplied by the bus node ID plug on the
ISA front panel. To set unit numbers and override the default values, you
use the console-based diagnostic and utility protocol (DUP) driver utility
to supply values to the UNITNUM parameter and to set a value of zero to
ISA parameter FORCEUNI.
The NODENAME parameter allows each ISA to have an alphanumeric
node name of up to eight characters. RF-series ISAs are shipped from the
Programming Parameters for RF-Series ISAs
B-1
factory with a unique identifier, such as R7CZZC, R7ALUC, etc. You can
provide a node name of your choosing if you prefer.
The Bus Node ID parameter is provided by the bus node ID plug on the
lSA front panel. Each DSSI bus can support up to seven lBAs, bus nodes
o through 6. Refer to Section 3.1.1 for instructions on changing bus node
ID plugs.
NOTE: All lSA parameters, with the exception of the Bus Node 1D, are
programmed and emmined usiT16 the console-based DUP driver utility. The
lSA Bus Node 1D is physically determined by the numbered bus node ID
plUII that inserts into the 1& front panel.
With an allocation class of zero, the operating system can use the default
parameter values to provide each ISA with a unique device name. The
operating system uses the node name along with the device logical name
in the following m~~er:
NODENAME$DIAu
where
NODENAME is a unique node name and u is the unit number.
With a nonzero allocation class, the operating system relies on unit number
values to create a unique device name. The operating system uses the
allocation class along with the device logical name in the following manner:
$ALLCLASS$DIAu
where
ALLCLASS is the allocation class for the system and ISAs, and u is a
unique unit number.
.
Using mass storage expanders, you can fill both DSSI busses (0 and 1),
giving a total of 14 RF-series ISAs. Each bus can have seven ISAs (bus
nodes 0-6). When devices are added to the second bus (bus 1), and your
system is using a nonzero allocation class. you need to assign new unit
numbers for ISAs on one of the busses. as the unit numbers for lSAs
throughout the system must be unique. The following table illustrates
the need to program unit numbers for a system using both DSSI busses (0
and 1). and a nonzero allocation class. In the case of the nonzero allocation
class. the operating system sees the ISAs as having duplicate device names.
B-2 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Allocation Class=O
Nonzero Allocation Class
(E~ample: ALLCLASS=l)
R7CZZC$DIAO
$1$DIAO
R7ALUC$DIAI
$1$DIAI
R7EB3C$DIA2
$1$DIA2
R7IDFC$DIAO
$1$DIAO
R7mZC$DIA1
$1$DIAl
R7IKJC$DIA2
$l$DIA2
R7ID3C$DIA3
$1$DIA3
R7XA4C$DIA4
$1$DIA4
R7QIYC$DIA5
$1$DIA5
R7DA4C$DIA6
$l$D1A6
The following instructions describe how to change ISA parameters using
the DUP driver utility. In the sample procedures, the allocation class will
be set to 2, the ISAs for bus 0 (in the VAX 4000) will be assigned new unit
numbers, and the system disk will be assigned a new node name.
Figure B-1 shows the DSSI busses and bus node IDs for an expanded VAX
4000 system.
NOTE: Your system need not have the maximum number of ISAs, as do the
examples in this appendix.
Programming Parameters for
RF-S~ries
ISAs
B-3
Figure B-1:
DSSI Busses for an Expanded VAX 4000 System
E·xpander
System
_BusO
mBBus1
DSSIOable
MLo.o0404l
1. Enter the console mode.
The procedure for programming internal parameters for RF-series ISAs
requires that you issue commands to those RF-series ISAs at the console
prompt (»». You may type these commands in either uppercase or
lowercase letters. Unless otherwise instructed, type each command,
then press IR81Urnl.
Enter console mode as follows.
a. Set the Break EnablelDisable switch on the console module of the
VAX 4000 system to the enable position (up, position 1).
b. Set the power switch for each unit (both hosts for a dual-host
system, and any R400X expanders for expanded systems) to on (1).
Wait for the system to display the console prompt (»».
2. Make sure the lSAs for which you want to set parameters are on line
and are not write-protected. The RunlReady button should be in (lit).
and the Write-Protect button should be out (not lit).
B-4 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
3. At the console prompt, enter SHOW DSSI for a display of all DSSI devices
in your expanded system.
The firmware displays two lines of information for each ISA. The first
line contains the bus number, node number, and node name. The second
line contains the device name and unit number followed by the device
type in parentheses. The device name consists of the letters DIA or
DIB-devices on bus 0 are listed as DIA, devices on bus 1 are listed as
DIB. The DSSI host adapter for each bus is identified by an asterisk
(*).
In Example B-1, the system contains three RF71 ISAs (unit numbers
0-2), and the R400X expander contains seven RF71 ISAs (unit numbers
0-6).
Example B-1:
SHOW DSSI Display
»>SBOW DSSI
DSSI Bus 0 Node
-DIAO (RF7l)
DSSI Bus 0 Node
-DIAl (RF7l)
DSSI Bus 0 Node
-DIA2 (RF7l)
DSSI Bus 0 Node
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIBO (RF7l)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIBl (RF7l)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIB2 (RF7l)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIB3 (RF7l)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIB4 (RF7l)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIBS (RF7l)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIB6 (RF7l)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
0 (R7CZZC)
1 (R7ALUC)
2 (R7EB3C)
6 (*)
0
(SNEEZY)
1 (DOPEY)
2 (SLEEPY)
3 (GRUMPY)
4 (BASHFUL)
S (HAPPY)
6 (DOC)
7 (*)
»>
In this example, each ISA will be assigned an allocation class of 2, and the
system disk will be given a new node name. When both DSSI busses (0
and 1) contain devices, and a nonzero allocation is used, each DSSI device
with the same allocation class must have a unique unit number. This is to
guarantee that all device names in the cluster are unique.
Programming Parameters for RF-Series ISAs
B-5
In this example, the ISAs in the VAX. 4000, DIAO, DIAl, and DIA2 will be
assigned unit numbers 10, 11, and 12.
Entering the DUP Driver Utility
To examine and change internal RF-series ISA parameters, you must first
activate the DUP driver utility by setting host to the specific ISA for which
you want to modify or examine parameters.
Use the command
SET HOST/DOP/DSSI/BOS : <BUS_NUMBER> <NODE_NUMBER> PARAMS
where
<bus_number> is the DSSI bus number (0 or 1). and <node_number> is the
bus node ID (0-6) for the !SA on the bus.
In Example B-2, SET HOST/DOP/DSSI/BUS:O 0 PARAMS is entered at the
console prompt to start the DUP server for the ISA at bus 0, node O.
Example B-2: Starting the DUP Driver Utility
»>SBT BOST/DUP/DSSI/BOS:O 0 IARaNS
Starting DOP server •••
Copyright (0) 1990 Digital Equipment
Corporatio~
PARAMS>
Setting Allocation Class
After entering the DUP driver utility for a specified ISA, you can examine
and set the allocation class for the ISA as follows:
1. At the PARAMS> prompt, enter SHOW ALLCLASS to check the allocation
class of the ISA to which you are currently connected.
2. Enter
SET ALLCLASS 2
3. Enter
SHOW ALLCLASS
(or enter the allocation class you desire).
to verify the new allocation class.
Example B-3 shows the steps examining and changing the allocation
class for a specified lSA. In the example, the allocation class is changed
from an allocation class of 0 to an allocation class of 2.
B-6 VAX 4000 Model 300
Operatio~
Example B-3:
Setting Allocation Class for a Specified ISA
PARAMS> SHOW ALLCLASS
Parameter
Current
Default
o
ALLCLASS
Type
o
Byte
Radix
Dec
B
P ARAMS> SET ALLCLASS 2
PARAMS> SHOW ALLCLASS
Parameter
Current
Default
2
ALLCLASS
Type
o
Byte
Radix
Dec
B
Setting Unit Number
Mter entering the DUP driver utility for a specified ISA, you can examine
and set the unit number for the ISA as follows:
PARAMS> prompt, enter SHOW UNITNUM to check the unit number
of the ISA to which you are currently connected.
1. At the
2. Enter
SET UNITNUM 10
(or enter the unit number you desire).
3. Enter SET FORCEUNI 0 to override the default unit number value
supplied by the bus node ID plug.
4. Enter
SHOW UNITNUM
to verify the new unit number.
5. Enter SHOW FORCEUNI to verify that the current value for the
parameter is O.
FORCEUNI
Example B-4 shows the steps for changing the unit number of a
specified ISA from unit number 0 to unit number 10.
6.
Label the ISA with its unit number using the unit number labels
shipped with your system and R400X expander. Figure B-2 shows
where to affix a unit number label on the ISA front panel.
Programming Parameters for RF-Series ISAs
B-7
Figure B-2: Attaching a Unit Number Label to the ISA Front Panel
Attach Unit ---:-;'-;1"':
Number Label
ML()'o04237
Example 8-4: Setting a Unit Number for a Specified ISA
PARAMS> saow
Parameter
OHITHOM
Current
Default
o
UN I TNOM
Type
o
Word
Radix
Dec
0
PARAMS> SaT OHI~ 10
PARAMS> saT rORCSOHI 0
PARAMS> saow OHlDUK
Parameter
Current
Default
Type
---------------------------------------0 -------UN I TNOM
Word
10
PARAMS> saow I'ORC&tJKI
Parameter
Current
Default
Type
--------- ----------------0 ----------------1 -------FORCEONI
Boolean
B-8 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Radix
Dec
0
Radix
0/1
0
Setting Node Name
Mter entering the DUP driver utility for a specified ISA, you can examine
and set the node name for the ISA as follows:
1. At the P ARAMS> prompt, enter SHOW NODENAME to check the node name of
the ISA to which you are currently connected.
2.
Enter SET NODENAME SYSDSK (or enter the desired alphanumeric node
name of up to B characters).
3. Enter SHOW NODENAME to verify the new node name.
Example B-5 shows the steps for changing the node name of a specified
ISA from the factory-supplied name to SYSDSK
Example 8-5:
Changing a Node Name for a Specified ISA
PARAMS> SHOW
Parameter
NODENAME
Current
NODENAME
R7CZZC
Default
RF71
Type
String
Radix
Ascii
B
PARAMS> SET NODENAME SYSDSK
PARAMS> SHOW NODENAME
Parameter
NODENAME
Current
Default
SYSDSK
RF71
Type
String
Radix
Ascii
B
Exiting the DUP Server Utility
Mter you have completed setting and examining internal ISA parameters,
enter the WRITE command at the PARAMS> prompt to save the ISA
parameters you have changed using the SET command. The changes are
recorded to nonvolatile memory.
If you have changed the allocation class or node name of an ISA, the DUP
driver utility will ask you to initialize the controller. Answer Yes (Y) to
allow the changes to be recorded, and to exit the DUP driver utility.
If you have not changed allocation class or node name, enter the EXIT
command at the PARAMS> prompt to exit the DUP driver utility for the
specified ISA. Example B-6 shows the procedure for saving parameter
changes. In the example, the controller is initialized.
Programming Parameters for RF-Series ISAs
8-9
Example 8-6:
Exiting the DUP Driver Utility for a Specified ISA
. PARAMS> WRITS
Changes require controller initialization, ok? [Y/(N)] Y
Stopping DUP server ••.
»>
NOTE: ~u must repeat the procedures in this appendix for each [SA for
which you want to change parameters.
Example B-7 shows the display for the SHOW DSSI command after the
unit numbers for the ISAs on bus 0 have been changed from 0, 1, and 2 to
10, 11, and 12. Notice that the bus 0 device names are now DIA10, DIA11,
and DIA12.
Example B-7: SHOW DSSI Display
»>BROW DBB!
DSSI Bus 0 Node
-DIA10 (RF71)
DSSI Bus 0 Node
-DIA11 (RF71)
DSSI Bus 0 Node
-DIA12 (RF71)
DSSI Bus 0 Node
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIBO (RF71)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIB1 (RF71)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIB2 (RF71)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIB3 (RF71)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
-DIB4 (RF71)
DSS I Bus 1 Node
-DIB5 (RF71)
DSS I Bus 1 Node
-DIB6 (RF71)
DSSI Bus 1 Node
0 (SYSDSK)
1 (R7ALUC)
2 (R7EB3C)
6 (*)
0 (SNEEZY)
1 (DOPEY)
2 (SLEEPY)
3 (GRUMPY)
4 (BASHFUL)
5 (HAPPY)
6 (DOC)
7 (*)
»>
8-10 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operatiora
Appendix C
Backup Procedures
This appendix describes the following procedures:
•
Installing and booting standalone BACKUP on the system disk
•
Installing and booting standalone BACKUP on a TK50 tape cartridge
•
Backing up and restoring the system disk
C.1 Overview of Standalone BACKUP
The Backup Utility lets you create and restore backup copies of files,
directories, and user disks. Because the Backup Utility copies only what
is on the disk and ignores sections of any open files contained in memory,
you should use it to back up user disks, not the system disk. If you use
the Backup Utility to back up the system disk, the portions of the files that
were in memory and data about files not yet written back to the disk (cache)
will not be recorded on the resulting backup copy.
Use standalone BACKUP to make a complete backup of the system disk.
Standalone BACKUP is a version of the Backup Utility that runs without
the support of the entire VMS operating system. Before you use standalone
BACKup, you must shut down the VMS operating system. The shutdown
procedure sends the contents of the caches back to the disk and closes any
open files. By shutting down the system and using standalone BACKup,
you can make an exact copy of the system disk.
You can keep standalone BACKUP on the system disk, a TK50 tape
cartridge, or any other media the system supports. DIGITAL recommends
that you keep standalone BACKUP on the system disk and on a tape
cartridge.
Usually you boot standalone BACKUP from the system disk because it
saves time. You should, however, keep a copy of standalone BACKUP on a
tape cartridge in case the system disk becomes damaged.
Backup
~rocedures
C-1
C.1.1 Installing Standalone BACKUP on System Disk
You can install standalone BACKUP in any available root directory on
the system disk from [SYSI] to [SYSE]. However, Digital has established
[SYSE] as the standard directory for standalone BACKUP.
To install standalone BACKUP in [SYSE] on the system disk, use the
following procedure.
1. Log in to the SYSTEM account.
2. Enter the following command:
$ @SYS$OPDATB:STABACKIT SYS$SYSDBVIC8: I~~I
The procedure places the files in the directories [SYSE.SYSEXE] and
[SYSE.SYS$LDR] on the system disk. It lists the files as they are
copied. When the procedure finishes, the system displays the following
message:
The kit is complete.
3. To boot standalone BACKUP from the system disk, see Section C.1.2.
C.1.2 Booting Standalone BACKUP from the System Disk
To boot standalone BACKUP from the system disk, use the following
procedure.
1. If the VMS operating system is not running, go to step 2.
If the VMS operating system is running, enter the following command
to shut down the system:
$ @SYS$SYSTBM:SBOTD01IN lRetuml
Answer the questions. When the procedure asks if an automatic system
reboot should be performed, press Return for No. When the procedure
is finished, the system displays the following message:
SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE - USE CONSOLE TO HALT SYSTEM
2. Stop the system by pressing the Halt button on the SCPo
3. Enter the BOOT command in the following format:
»> B/BOOOOOOO device_name IReturn I
Substitute the device name of the system disk for device_name. For
example, if the system disk has a device name of DIAO, enter the
following:
C-2 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
»> B/20000000
D~O
I~NmI
4. Standalone BACKUP displays a message similar to the following:
VAX/VMS Version V5.3-2 Major version id
=1
Minor version id
=0
5. A few minutes later the procedure asks for the date and the time. Enter
the date and time using the 24-hour clock format, for example:
PLEASE ENTER DATE AND TIME (DD-MMM-YYYY HH:MM)
19-APR-1990 13:00 I~NmI
6. The system displays a list of the local devices on your system, for
example:
Available device MUAO:
Available device DIAO:
device type TK70
device type RF71
Check the list of devices. If the list is incomplete, make sure that all
the devices are connected properly to the system. See the VAX 4000
Model 300 Installation manual for details.
7. When standalone BACKUP finishes booting, it displays an identification message followed by the dollar-sign prompt ($):
%BACKUP-I-IDENT, stand-alone BACKUP V5.3--2; the date is
19-APR-1990 13:00:00.00
$
To back up the system disk, see Section C.2.1.
To restore the system disk, see Section C.2.2.
C.1.3 Installing Standalone BACKUP on a Tape Cartridge
If your system has a tape drive, Digital recommends that you keep
standalone BACKUP on a tape cartridge in case the system disk becomes
damaged. To install standalone BACKUP on tape cartridge, use the
following procedure.
NOTE: If you have a tape cartridge distribution kit, you already have
standalone BACKUP on a tape cartridge. If the original tape cartridge
becomes damaged, or if you need to make extra copies, use the procedure in
this section.
1.
Obtain a blank tape cartridge. Write the name on the paper label. For
example, you would use the name SfA BKUP V5.3-2 TK50 to build a
version 5.3-2 kit. Insert the label into the label slot.
Backup Procedures
C-3
2. Write-enable the tape cartridge.
. 3. Insert the tape cartridge labeled s/A BKUP V5.3-2 TK50 in the tape
cartridge drive.
4. Log in to the SYSTEM account.
5. Enter the following command:
$ @SYS$tJPDATB: STABAC1tIT
IReunI
6. The system asks for the name of the target device. Enter MUAO, for
example:
%STABACKIT-I-SYMDEL, all global symbols deleted
Enter the name of the devioe on whioh to build the kit:
MOAO
l!!!!ffi
NOTE: If your system uses the TLZ04 tape drive, enter the device
1147ne
MKAO.
7. The system displays the following message:
Please plaoe the soratoh tape oartridge in drive MUAO:
This volume will reoeive the volume label SYSTEM.Enter "YES" when ready:
8. When you are ready to continue, enter Y (for YES) and press Return.
9. The system displays verification messages informing you that files are
being copied.
10. When standalone BACKUP is installed, the system displays a message
similar to the following:
Ending time
19-APR-1990 13:45:29.90
Starting time 19-APR-1990 13:22:39.05
The kit is oomplete.
$
11. Remove the tape cartridge labeled SfA BKUP V5.3-2 TK50 from the
tape cartridge drive.
12. Write-protect the tape cartridge and store it in a safe place.
C-4 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
C.1.4 Booting Standalone BACKUP from a Tape Cartridge
If the system disk containing standalone BACKUP should become unusable,
you can boot standalone BACKUP from a tape cartridge.
Booting
standalone BACKUP from a tape cartridge takes approximately 20 minutes.
You need a tape cartridge that contains standalone BACKUP (either the
distribution tape cartridge or one that you created). To boot standalone
BACKUP from a tape cartridge, use the following procedure.
1. If the VMS operating system is not running, go to step 2.
If the VMS operating system is running, enter the following command
to shut down the operating system:
$ @SYS$SYS'l'BM:SBO'l'DOWN IRetum I
Answer the questions. When the procedure asks if an automatic system
reboot should be perfonned, press Return for No. When the procedure
is finished, the system displays the following message:
SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE - USE CONSOLE TO HALT SYSTEM
2. Stop the system by pressing the Halt button on the SCPO
3. Insert the tape cartridge containing standalone BACKUP in the tape
cartridge drive.
4. To boot standalone BACKUP, enter the following command at the
console prompt (»»:
»>
B MOAO
IRetuml
5. Standalone BACKUP displays a message similar to the following:
VAX/VMS Version VS.3--2 Major version id=l Minor version id=O
6. The procedure asks for the date and the time. Enter the date and time
using the 24-hour clock format, for example:
PLEASE ENTER DATE AND TIME (DD-MMM-YYYY HH:MM)
19-APR-1990 13 :00 IReturn I
7. The system displays a list of the local devices on your system, for
example:
Available device MUAO:
Available device DIAO:
device type TK70
device type RF71
Backup Procedures
C-5
8. When standalone BACKUP finishes booting, it displays an identification message followed by the dollar-sign prompt ($):
%BACKUP-I-IDENT, stand-alone BACKUP V5.3--2; the date is
19-APR-1990 13:00:00.00
$
9. Remove the tape cartridge containing standalone BACKUP from the
tape cartridge drive.
To back up the system disk, see Section C.2.1.
To restore the system disk, see Section C.2.2.
C.2 Backing Up the System Disk
There are several reasons to back up a system disk:
•
In case a problem occurs during a VMS upgrade or update, or during
the installation of other software prodllcts: Before you attempt any of
these procedures, you should back up the system disk. If a problem
occurs, you can restore the backup copy of the system disk.
•
To prevent loss of system files if they are deleted accidentally: After
you install or upgrade the VMS operating system, or any other software
products, you should back up the system disk. If a system file is deleted
and renders the system disk inoperable, you can restore the backup copy
and continue to use the system.
•
In case the system disk malfunctions: If you have a backup copy of
the VMS operating system, you can restore it to a functioning disk and
continue to use the system.
•
To eliminate disk fragmentation: Fragmentation happens when files
are not stored contiguously on the disk. Back up the system disk to a
tape cartridge, diskettes, or another disk. Then restore the files to the
original system disk. The BACKUP command creates a copy on which
files are stored contiguously.
Digital recommends that you use standalone BACKUP, which uses a subset
of Backup Utility qualifiers, to back up and restore the system disk. It is
especially important that you understand the functions of the !IMAGE and
!PHYSICAL qualifiers to the BACKUP command before using standalone
BACKUP.
C-6 VAX 4000 Mode\300 Operation
Table C-1 : Standalone BACKUP Qualifiers
Qualifier
Function
!IMAGE
Allows you to create a functionally equivalent copy of the entire
system disk
!PHYSICAL
Copies, saves, restores, or compares the entire system disk in
terms of logical blocks, ignoring any file structure
For a complete description of the Backup Utility and its qualifiers, see the
VMS Backup Utility Manual.
C.2.1 Backing Up the System Disk
To back up the system disk, use the following procedure:
1. Decide whether you want to back up the system to another fixed disk or
to a tape cartridge. If you are using a tape cartridge, obtain a scratch
tape that you can use for the backup copy. A scratch tape cartridge is a
tape cartridge that is either blank or contains files that you no longer
need.
2. If you are using a tape cartridge, write-enable it. To write-enable a tape
cartridge, slide the write-protect switch away from the tape cartridge
label. Insert the tape cartridge in the tape cartridge drive.
3. Determine the device name of the drive holding the system disk and
the drive holding the backup disk or tape cartridge. Enter the SHOW
DEVICE command at the console prompt (»».
4. Boot standalone BACKUP as described in Section C.1.2 or Section C.1.4.
5. Enter the BACKUP command in one of the following formats:
$
BACKOP/I~GE/VERIFY
source_drive: target_drive:
$ BACKOP/I~GE/VERIFY source drive: target drive:-$ saveset .BCIt/LABEL--volume_Iabel/REWIND JR;tuml
IR.~rnl
I~wml
where:
•
source_ dr i ve is the location of the files that you want to back up.
Use the device name of the drive holding the system disk.
•
target drive is the destination. Use the device name of the drive
holdingthe backup disk or tape cartridge.
Backup Procedures
C-7
•
saveset.BCK is the name of the saveset (the name should reflect
the contents of the backup tape and cannot exceed 17 characters in
length).
•
volume label is the volume label of the tape cartridge in the tape
drive. if the tape has been initialized already, use the same volume
label that was assigned by the INITIALIZE command. If the tape
has not been initialized, you can assign a volume label at this time.
The volume label cannot have more than six characters.
The following example uses the BACKUP command to make a backup
disk. You can use a backup disk as the system disk:
$ BACKUP /IJIlAGB/V&P.IFY DIAO: DIAl IReturn I
The following example uses the BACKUP command to make a backup
tape cartridge. The contents of the backup tape cartridge must be
restored to a disk before you can use them. For more information,
see Section C.2.2.
$ BACKUP /ItfIAGB/V&P.IFY DIAO: MOAO: - IRetum I
-$ APR_lg_lgg0 • BCK/LABBL=l gAPRJ' /RBWINn IRetum I
6. The system displays the following message:
%BACKUP-I-STARTVERIFY, starting verification pass
7. If you are backing up the system disk to another disk, proceed to step
8.
If you are backing up your system disk to a tape cartridge and the
contents of the system disk fit on one tape cartridge, remove the backup
tape cartridge from the drive. Label the tape COMPLETE SYSTEM
BACKUP, number it, and include the date. Proceed to step 8.
If you are backing up your system disk to a tape cartridge and the
system disk contains more data than one tape cartridge can store, the
system displays the following messages:
%BACKUP-l-RESUME, Resuming operation on volume 2
%BACKUP-l-READYWRITE, Mount volume 2 on MUAO: for writing
Enter "YES" when ready:
Do the following:
a. Remove the backup tape cartridge from the drive.
h. Label the tape COMPLETE SYSTEM BACKup, number it, and
include the date.
c.
Write-protect the tape cartridge.
C-8 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
d. Write-enable another scratch tape cartridge and insert it in the
drive.
e. When you are ready to continue, enter Y (for Yes) and press Return.
The procedure displays the following message:
%BACKUP-I-STARTVERIFY, starting verification pass
Each time the procedure displays a mount request, follow steps
a through e.
8. When the procedure is finished, the system displays the following
message:
%BACKUP-I-PROCDONE, operation completed. Processing finished at
19-APR-1990 15:00:00.00
If you do not want to perform another standalone BACKUP operation,
use the console to halt the system.
If you do not want to perform another standalone BACKUP operation,
ensure the standalone application volume is online and ready.
Enter "YES" to continue:
9. Press the Halt button
10. Reboot the system.
Store the backup tape cartridge in a safe place.
NOTE: The BACKUP command creates a system disk that includes a
Digital-provided set of volume parameters including a CLUSTER_SIZE
(disk access scheme) of value 1. (The CLUSTER_SIZE parameter refers
to the way files are stored on the disk, NOT to VAXcluster environments.)
You can change most volume parameters later with the SET VOLUME
command. However to change the CLUSTER_SIZE parameter, you must
back up the system disk that has been initialized previously with the
CLUSTER_SIZE value that you want. 7b prevent the BACKUP command
from reinitializing the target disk, use the / NOINITIALIZE qualifier. For
more information about initializing a disk, see the Guide to Maintaining
a VMS System. For more information on the BACKUP command, see the
VMS Backup Utility Manual.
l
l
C.2.2 Restoring the System Disk
To restore the system disk from a tape cartridge, use the following
procedure.
Backup Procedures
C-9
1. Determine the device names of the drive holding the system disk and
the drive holding the backup disk or tape cartridge. Enter the
command at the console prompt (»».
SHOW
DEVICE
2. Boot standalone BACKUP as described in Section C.1.2 or Section C.1.4.
3. If you have a backup tape cartridge, make sure it is write-protected.
Insert it in the drive.
4. Enter the BACKUP command in one of the following formats:
$ BACKUP/IMaGB/VBRIFY source_drive: target_drive:
IR.~nl
$ BACKUP/IMaGE/VERIFY source_drive:- I~wml
-$ saveset.BCK/SAV/RBWXND target_drive: IR.~nl
where:
•
source_drive is the location of the files that you want to restore.
Use the device name of the drive holding the backup disk or tape
cartridge.
•
target drive is the destination. Use the device name of the drive
holdingthe system disk.
•
saveset • BCK is the name of the saveset, if you have a backup tape
cartridge.
$ BACKUP/DIJAGE/VERII'Y DIAO: DIAl: IReturn!
The following example uses the BACKUP command to restore the
system disk from a backup tape cartridge:
$ u.CKtJP /IMa.cm/VDDY- !Retum!
-$ MOAO:APR_19_1990.BCK/SAV/UWIND DIAO: I~turnl
5. The system displays the following message:
%BACKUP-I-STARTVERIFY, starting verification pass
If you are backing up to a disk or if your saveset fits on one tape, proceed
to step 7.
6. If you have more than one backup tape cartridge, the system displays
the following message:
%BACKUP-l-RESUME, Resuming operation on volume 2
%BACKUP-l-READYWRITE, Mount volume 2 on MUAO: for reading
Enter "YES" when ready:
C-10 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Remove the backup tape cartridge from the drive. Insert the next
backup tape cartridge in the drive, enter Y (for Yes) and press Return.
Each time you receive a mount request, repeat this step.
7. When the procedure is finished, the system displays the following
message:
%BACKUP-I-PROCDONE, operation completed.
Processing finished at 19-APR-1990 15:00:00.00
If you do not want to perform another standalone BACKUP
operation, use the console to halt the system.
If you do not want to perform another standalone BACKUP
operation, ensure the standalone application volume is
online and ready.
Enter "YES" to continue:
8. Press the Halt button.
9. Reboot the system.
Backup Procedures
C-11
Appendix D
Removing Unwanted VMS Files
D.1 Using VMSTAILOR
Read this appendix if you want to remove the VMS operating system and
DECwindows files that you do not need from the system disk. For example,
if you are not running DECnet-VAX, you do not need the network support
files. You can remove unwanted files with the VMSTAILOR program. Enter
the following command to log in to the SYSTEM account:
$ RON SYS$UPDA'l'B: VNS'l'AILOR
IReturn I
The VMSTAILOR program asks you if you want to tailor files ON or OFF.
Type OFF to remove unwanted files.
CAUTION: Do not delete files from the factory-installed software (FIS)
system until you have backed up your software. A VMS distribution
kit is needed to return files to the system disk. Also, VMSTAILOR and
DECW$TAIWR procedures cannot restore files from a backup set. It may
be necessary to reload the system software from a backup set if files are
incorrectly deleted and if a VMS distribution kit is not available.
The VMSTAILOR program lists each group of files and its size in blocks.
Files are grouped according to their function. For example, all the files
required for cluster support are in one group. A file group is made up of
many small subgroups. You can eliminate an entire group of files, or you
can eliminate one or more of its subgroups.
Decide which file groups or subgroups you do not need to support your
system. The VMSTAILOR program displays step-by-step instructions that
are easy to follow.
VMSTAILOR displays the names of the files it deletes. After it finishes,
AUTOGEN runs automatically to make the adjustments that are necessary
after system files are deleted.
NOTE: You can use VMSTAILOR at any time to delete or add groups of
VMS files to the system disk. After adding files to the system disk, you
should apply any updates that affect them.
Removing Unwanted VMS Files
0-1
For example, suppose you do not need the VMS Version 5.0 MAIL utility
and you run VMSTAILOR to remove those files. Later on, if you decide
you want to use mail, you can run VMSTAILOR to return the MAIL files
to the system disk. You then apply any VMS upgrade or update that has
occurred since Version 5.0 that affected the MAIL utility. To remove VMS
DECwindows files from the system disk, enter the following command:
$ RON SYS$OPDA'fB:DBCW$TAILOR IRetuml
The DECW$TAILOR program works just like the VMSTAILOR program.
0-2 VAX 4000 Model 300 Operation
Glossary
Application program
A program designed to meet specific user needs, such as a program that
monitors a manufacturing process.
Allocation class
The allocation class is used by the VMS operating system to derive a
common lock resource name for multiple access paths to the same device.
Backplane
1. The connector block that printed circuit boards plug into.
2. A printed circuit board containing the bus.
Back up
The process of making copies of the data stored in the ISA(s) so that you
can recover that data after an accidental loss. You make these copies on a
tape cartridge and then store it in a safe place.
Backup copy
A duplicate copy of data on the ISA that is stored on a tape cartridge.
Baud rate
The speed at which signals are transmitted serially over a communication
line.
Binary
A number system that uses only two digits: 0 and 1. These digits, are
usually represented in circuitry by two voltage levels.
Bit
A binary digit, the smallest unit of information in a binary system of
notation, designated as a 0 or a 1.
Boot
To use a bootstrap program to start a computer system.
Glossary-1
Bootabla medium
A fixed disk or magnetic tape containing software (such as an operating
system) that the bootstrap program can load into the system memory.
Bootnoda
The management center for the cluster and its major resource provider.
Bootstrap
A program that you start when you tum on the system. The bootstrap loads
software contained on a fixed disk or magnetic tape cartridge into memory.
The system then stops executing the bootstrap and starts executing the
software in memory. The software usually loads an operating system or
other software into memory, so that the system can start processing.
Bug
An error in the design or implementation of hardware or software system
components.
Bus
The connection between the central processing unit (CPU) and input/output
devices in the system. Information signals such as address, data, and
control signals are carried through the bus.
Byte
A group of eight binary digits (bits). A byte is one-half the size of a word
and one-quarter the size of a longword.
Central processing unit (CPU)
The part of a computer system that controls the interpretation and
execution of instructions.
Cluster
A group of computers networked together that share disk storage,
application programs, and other computer resources. Also called a
VAXcluster.
Command
An order given by a user to a computer, often through a terminal keyboard.
Communication lin.
A cable along which electrical signals are transmitted. Systems or devices
connected by communication lines can share information and resources.
Glossary-2
Computer system
A combination of computer hardware, software, and external devices that
performs specific operations or tasks.
Console terminal
The terminal you use when installing software and running diagnostic
programs.
Controller
A component that regulates the operation of one or more peripheral devices.
Controllers are often called interface units.
CPU
See Central processing unit.
Data
A representation of facts, concepts, or instructions, suitable for
communication, interpretation, or processing by human beings or by
machines.
DAT
Digital audio tape. Used in digital data storage recording technology.
Data transmission
The movement of data, in the form of electrical signals, along a
communication line.
DDS
Digital data storage.
Debug
To detect, locate, and correct errors (bugs) in system hardware or software.
DECnet
Digital networking software that runs on nodes in both local and wide area
networks.
DECWlndows
Digital's workstation management product, a superset of the industry
standard X Window System. It can be used to run windowing applications
efficiently on single workstations, or in distributed processing networks of
workstations and non-workstations systems.
Glossary-3
Default
A value or setting that in most cases is nonnal or expected.
Device
The general name for any entity connected to a system that is capable of
receiving, storing, or transmitting data.
Device name
The name by which a device or controller is identified within a system. You
use the device name to refer to that device when communicating with the
system.
Diagnostic program
A program that detects and identifies abnormal hardware operation.
The MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor software contains several diagnostic
programs.
Disk
A flat circular plate with a coating on which data is stored magnetically in
concentric circles (tracks).
Disk drive
A device that contains a fixed disk or one or more diskettes. The drive
contains mechanical components that spin the disk or diskettes and move
the read/write heads that store and read information on the surface of the
disk or diskettes.
DSSI
Digital Storage System Interconnect (DSSI) is the technology used for
efficient management of integrated disk storage products. DSSI is a
member of the Digital Storage Architecture (DSA) product family.
EIA
Electronic Industries Association.
Error message
A message displayed by the system to indicate it has detected an error or
malfunction.
File
A collection of related information treated by the computer as a single item.
Glossary-4
Firmware
Software instructions stored in a fixed form, usually in read-only memory
(ROM). In a VAX 4000 system, the power-on self-tests and bootstrap
program are firmware.
Formatted data
Data laid out in a particular pattern to conform to a predetermined
structure. The structure is dictated by the system software.
Hardware
The physical components - mechanical and electrical computer system. Compare Software.
that make up a
Head
The part of a fixed-disk drive, diskette drive, or tape drive that reads,
records, and erases data. Also called read/write head.
Input device
A piece of equipment used to transfer data into the computer. A keyboard
is an input device.
Input/Output (1/0) device
A piece of equipment that accepts data for transmission both to and from
a computer. A terminal is an input/output device.
Interactive
The method of communicating with a computer system. You enter a
command at the keyboard, the system executes the command, and then
responds with a message or prompts for another command.
Integrated Storage Assembly
Integrated Storage Assemblies are intelligent storage devices that contain
their own controller and MSCP server.
Interface
A device or piece of software that lets different components of a computer
communicate with one another.
1/0
Abbreviation for input/output.
ISA
See Integrated Storage Assembly.
Glossary-5
Kbyte
1024 bytes.
LED
Light-emitting diode.
An LED on the console module displays a
hexadecimal countdown during the power-on sequence.
Load
1. 'lb move software, usually from a peripheral device into memory.
2. 'lb place a disk in a disk drive, or tape in a tape drive.
Longword
A group of 32 bits, equal to two words or four bytes.
Magnetic tape
A long strip of plastic coated with magnetic oxide, used for storing data.
Often called magtape. The tape contained in a tape cartridge.
Mbyte
1,048,576 bytes.
Memory
The area where a computer finds the instructions and data it will process.
Menu
A displayed list of options. The list usually contains commands you can
enter.
Network
A group of individual computer systems that are connected by
communications lines to share information and resources.
Network coordinator
The network coordinator manages the network, assigns unique node names
and addresses for each system on the network, and provides administrative
assistance to network users.
Node
An individual information processing unit, such as a computer, workstation,
or device, that is connected to a network. A node is an end point to any
branch of a network or a junction common to two or more branches.
Glossary-6
Off line
Pertaining to equipment, devices, and events that are not under direct
control of the computer system.
Operating system
A collection of programs that controls the overall operation of a computer
and performs such tasks as:
•
Assigning places in memory to programs and data
•
Processing requests, scheduling jobs
•
Controlling the operation of input and output devices
Output device
A device by means of which data can be extracted from a computer system,
for example, a printer.
Peripheral device
Any device distinct from the central processing unit that provides it with
additional memory storage or communication capability. Examples are disk
and diskette drives, video terminals, and printers.
Power-on sequence
A series of ordered events that occurs when you supply power to a system
by turning it on.
Printer
A peripheral device that provides paper copies of information stored in a
computer.
Product Authorization Key (PAK)
A PAK is a printed certificate containing information that must be input to
the VMS License Management Facility to authorize the VMS user to run a
particular software product.
Program
The complete sequence of instructions necessary for a computer to perform
a task. See Software.
Prompt
A character(s) or word(s) that a computer displays to indicate it is waiting
for you to type a command.
Glossary-7
Quorum disk
A quorum disk acts as a virtual nOde in a system using the quorum scheme.
See the VMS VAXcluster Manual for further information on quorum disks
and the quorum scheme.
Read-only memory (ROM)
A memory that does not allow modification of its contents. The computer
can use data in a ROM but cannot change it.
Reboot
1b restart a computer system.
system.
Pressing the Reset button reboots the
Record
A set of related data that a program can treat as a unit. A file consists of
a number of records.
ROM
See Read-only memo,.,.
Aun
1. A single continuous execution of a program.
2. To execute a program.
Satellite system
A system that is booted remotely from the system disk on the boot node. A
computer system that obtains a specific set of services from a server system.
Server
Hardware or software that provides a specific set of services to a satellite.
Server system
In a VAXcluster, a computer that is used to start the satellite systems and
to manage their use of common resources.
Software
Programs executed by a computer system to perform a chosen or required
function. Compare Hardware.
Software package
A set of related programs that performs a specific task.
Glossary~
Storage medium
Any device capable of recording information, for example, a tape cartridge.
Store
To enter data into a storage device, such as a disk, or into memory.
System
A combination of computer hardware and software and external devices
that performs specific processing operations.
System Disk
The disk or ISA that holds VMS factory-installed software.
System management
Tasks performed by the operating system to control the overall operation
of the computer system.
Tailoring
Using the VMSTAILOR program to remove the VMS operating system and
DECwindows files that you do not need from the system disk.
Terminal
An inputJoutput device generally used for communication between the users
of a computer system and the system itself.
Video terminal
A terminal that displays information on the screen of a cathode ray tube
(CRT).
VMS
Digital's proprietary operating system.
Word
A word is I6-bits long.
Write-protect
To protect a disk, diskette, or other storage medium against the addition,
revision, or deletion of information.
Glossary-9
Index
A
Air circulation, 1-18
Autobooting the system, 2-6
B
Backing up system disk
using standalone BACKUP, C-7
Backup
reasons for, C-6
system disk, C-6
BACKUP commands
backing up, C-7
restoring the system disk, C-I0
Base system components
function, 1-19
BOOT command
standalone BACKUP on tape
cartridge, C-5
standalone BACKUP on the
system disk, C-2
uses, 2-12
Booting from console mode, 2-11
Booting the system
autobooting, 2-6
from console mode, 2-11
Break EnablelDisable switch, 1-13
Bus node ID plugs
changing, 3-4
removing, 3-4
c
Card cage
location, 1-9
slots, number of, 1-9
Cartridge release handle, 3-6
Cassette tape
handling of, 3-19
Central processing unit (CPU)
function, 1-20
Circuit breaker
function, 1-16
location, 1-16
operation, 1-16
Communications controllers
asynchronous serial devices, 1-23
CXA16 , 1-23
CXY08, 1-24
function, 1-23
network devices, 1-23
set-up required, 3-26
synchronous serial devices, 1-23
types, 1-23,3-25
using controllers with modem
support, 3-27
using controllers without modem
support, 3-26
using network controllers, 3-28
Console module, 1-11
Console terminal connector
function, 1-13
location, 1-13
CPU
See Central processing unit
location, 1-11
CXA16
communications controller, 1-23
CXY08
communications controller, 1-24
D
DC OK light
Index-1
DC OK light (Cont.)
function, 1-16
on power supply, 1-15, 1-16
system, 1-8
DECW$TAILOR
using, D-2
DEC windows
removing unwanted files, D-2
DELNI
connecting to an Ethernet cable,
3-29
DESQA
before using, 3-28
Door
front door, 1-1 to 1-5
DSSI
host adapter, 1-21
Dual-host capability, 1-25
E
Enclosure
front view, 1-6
Error messages
at power-on, 2-4
F
Fans, 1-18
function, 1-18
location, 1-18
Front door
description, 1-1
opening, 1-8
H
Halting the system, 2-12
description, 2-12
Indicator lights
on TK70 tape drive, 3-6
Inserting a tape cartridge, 3-11
Integrated storage assemblies, 3-3
controller, 1-22
Index-2
Integrated storage assemblies
(Cont.)
description, 1-21
function, 1-21
Integrated storage elements
location, 1-8
L
Labeling a TK70 tape cartridge, 3-8
Language Inquiry Mode
setting of Power-On Mode switch,
1-12
LED display
on CPU cover panel, 1-13
Loading a TK70 tape cartridge, 3-7
Loading system software
with BOOT command, 2-12
Locking the door, 1-1
Loop Back Test Mode
setting of Power-On Mode switch,
1-18
M
Main memory, 1-20
Mass storage, 1-21
controllers, 1-22
devices, 1-21, 3-6
options, 3-1
subsystems, 1-22
Mass storage devices
RF-series ISAs, 8-2
Mass storage shelf
description, 1-8
Modems
function, 1-28
using, 3-27
Module cover
types, 1-11
Module Cover
labels, 1-11
Module identification labels, 1-11
Multihost capability, 1-25
N
Network
communications controllers 1-20
1-24
J'
New system
using, 2-1
Restoring system disk (Cont.)
from tape cartridge, 0-9
RF71 Integrated Storage Assemblies
changing the bus node ID plugs,
3-4
Opening the door, 1-1
Optional devices
adding to system, 1-25
Over Temperature Condition light
system, 1-8
controls and indicators, 3-3
write-protecting, 3-4
RF71 Integrated Storage Assembly
description, 1-21
RF-series Integrated Storage
Assemblies, 8-2
Run Mode
setting of Power-On Mode switch,
1-13
p
s
Pages and memory management,
1-20
Power-on indicators
normal, 2-4
Power-On Mode switch, 1-12
Power-on self-tests
description, 2-5
Power supply
and system controls, 1-15
location, 1-15
Printers
use of, 3-30
Serial controllers
with modem control support,
1-23
without modem control support,
1-23
SET BOOT device name command
use of, 2-9
Shutdown procedure
when turning off system, 2-13
Standalone BACKUP
booting from system disk, 0-2
booting from tape cartridge, C-5
installing on system disk, 0-2
installing on tape cartridge, C-3
overview, 0-1
qualifiers, C-6
storage media, 0-1
use, 0-1
Switch settings, 2-1
normal operation, 2-1
special operation, 2-2
System components
optional, 1-21
System disk
backing up to disk, 0-7
backing up to tape cartridge, 0-7
restoring from disk, 0-9
o
Q
Qualifiers
standalone BACKUP, C-6
R
Removable media
function, 1-21
Removing a tape cartridge, 3-14
Removing unwanted files
VMSTAILOR utility, D-1
Restarting the system
description, 2-13
Restoring system disk
from disk, 0-9
Index-3
System disk (Cont.)
restoring from tape cartridge,
0-9
Using a new system, 2-1
T
VMSTAILOR
AUTOGEN, 0-1
using, 0-1
VMSTAILOR utility, 0-1
Tape cartridge
handling instructions, 8-11
inserting, 8-11
removing, 8-14
storage guidelines, 8-11
TK50170 tape cartridge
calibration, 8-12
write-protect switch, 8-9
TK70 tape cartridge
labeling, 3-8
write-protecting, 3-9
TK70 tape drive
access to, 3-6
controls, 3-6
indicator lights, 3-6
loading, 8-7
location, 1-8
operation, 8-7
summary of indicator lights, 8-16
uses of, 3-6
TLZ04 cassette tape
setting the write-protect tab,
8-19
write-protect tab, 8-19
TLZ04 cassette tape drive
indicators, 8-18
TLZ04 tape drive
head cleaning, 8-28
head cleaning cassette, 8-2S
location, 1-8
Turning off the system, 2-18
Turning on the system, 2-4
TZL04 Drive indicator, 8-18
TZL04 Tape indicator, 3-18
u
Unload button, 3-6
Unloading a TK70 tape cartridge,
3-7
Index-4
v
W
Write-enabling
a storage element, 3--3
Write-protecting
a storage element, 3-3
a TK70 tape cartridge, 3-9
Write-protect switch
on a TK50170 tape cartridge, 3-9
HOW TO ORDER ADDmONAL DOCUMENTATION
From
Call
Write
Alaska, Hawaii,
or New Hampshire
603-884-6660
Digital Equipment Corporation
P.O. Box CS2008
Nashua NH 03061
Rest of U.S.A
and Puerto Rico!
800-DIGITAL
IPrepaid orders from Puerto Rico, call Digital's local subsidiary (809-754-7575)
Canada
800-267-6219
(for software
documentation)
Digital Equipment of Canada Ltd.
100 Herzberg Road
Kanata. Ontario, Canada K2K 2A6
Attn: Direct Order Desk
613-592-5111
(for hardware
documentation)
Internal orders
(for software
documentation)
DTN: 241-3023
508-874-3023
Software Supply Business (SSB)
Digital Equipment Corporation
Westminster MA 01473
Internal orders
(for hardware
documentation)
DTN: 234-4323
508-351-4323
Publishing & Circulation Services (P&CS)
NRO~lIW3
Digital Equipment Corporation
Northboro MA 01532
Reader's Comments
VAX 4000 Model 300
Operation
EK-336A~P-002
Your comments and suggestions help us improve the quality of our publications.
Please rate the manual in the
following categories:
Accuracy (product works as described)
Completeness (enough information)
Clarity (easy to understand)
Organization (structure of subject matter)
Figures (useful)
Examples (useful)
Table of contents (ability to find topic)
Index (ability to find topic)
Page design (overall appearance)
Print quality
Excellent
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Good
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
What I like best about this manual:
What I like least about this manual:
Additional comments or suggestions:
I found the following errors in this manual:
Page
Description
For which tasks did you use this manual?
o Installation
o Maintenance
o Marketing
o Operation/Use
o Programming
o System Management
o Training
o Other (please specify)
Namell'itle
Company
Address
Phone
Date
Fair
Poor
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
DoNotTear-FoldHereandTape
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
momoamo
-
-
-
-
NO POSTAGE
NECESSARY
IF MAILED
IN THE
UNITED STATES
BUSINESS REPLY MAIL
FIRST CLASS PERMrr NO. 33 MAYNARD MASS.
POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE
DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION
CORPORATE USER PUBLICATIONS
PK03-11D30
129 PARKER STREET
MAYNARD, MA 01754-8975
11111111" 11111111" I " 1111111 II d11111 ddd11111 "
Do Not Telll' - Pold Be... aD.cl Tape -
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Related manuals

Download PDF

advertisement