Sierra Wireless MP 595 User's Manual

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Sierra Wireless MP 595 User's Manual | Manualzz
MP 595 Modem
User Guide
2130795
Rev 1.3
Preface
Important Notice
Due to the nature of wireless communications, transmission
and reception of data can never be guaranteed. Data may be
delayed, corrupted (i.e., have errors) or be totally lost.
Although significant delays or losses of data are rare when
wireless devices such as the Sierra Wireless modem are used in
a normal manner with a well-constructed network, the Sierra
Wireless modem should not be used in situations where
failure to transmit or receive data could result in damage of
any kind to the user or any other party, including but not
limited to personal injury, death, or loss of property. Sierra
Wireless accepts no responsibility for damages of any kind
resulting from delays or errors in data transmitted or received
using the Sierra Wireless modem, or for failure of the Sierra
Wireless modem to transmit or receive such data.
Safety and Hazards
Do not operate the Sierra Wireless modem in areas where
blasting is in progress, where explosive atmospheres may be
present, near medical equipment, near life support equipment,
or any equipment which may be susceptible to any form of
radio interference. In such areas, the Sierra Wireless modem
MUST BE POWERED OFF. The Sierra Wireless modem can
transmit signals that could interfere with this equipment.
Do not operate the Sierra Wireless modem in any aircraft,
whether the aircraft is on the ground or in flight. In aircraft, the
Sierra Wireless modem MUST BE POWERED OFF. When
operating, the Sierra Wireless modem can transmit signals that
could interfere with various onboard systems.
Note: Some airlines may permit the use of cellular phones while the
aircraft is on the ground and the door is open. Sierra Wireless
modems may be used at this time.
The driver or operator of any vehicle should not operate the
Sierra Wireless modem while in control of a vehicle. Doing so
will detract from the driver or operator's control and operation
of that vehicle. In some states and provinces, operating such
communications devices while in control of a vehicle is an
offence.
Limitation of
Liability
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
The information in this manual is subject to change without
notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of
Sierra Wireless. SIERRA WIRELESS AND ITS AFFILIATES
SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM LIABILITY FOR ANY AND ALL
DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, GENERAL, INCIDENTAL,
CONSEQUENTIAL, PUNITIVE OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, LOSS OF PROFITS OR
3
MP 595 Modem User Guide
REVENUE OR ANTICIPATED PROFITS OR REVENUE
ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE ANY
SIERRA WIRELESS PRODUCT, EVEN IF SIERRA WIRELESS
AND/OR ITS AFFILIATES HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES OR THEY ARE
FORESEEABLE OR FOR CLAIMS BY ANY THIRD PARTY.
Notwithstanding the foregoing, in no event shall Sierra
Wireless and/or its affiliates aggregate liability arising under
or in connection with the Sierra Wireless product, regardless of
the number of events, occurrences, or claims giving rise to
liability, be in excess of the price paid by the purchaser for the
Sierra Wireless product.
Patents
Portions of this product may be covered by some or all of the
following US patents:
5,515,013
5,629,960
5,845,216
5,847,553
5,878,234
5,890,057
5,929,815
6,169,884
6,191,741
6,199,168
6,339,405
6,359,591
6,400,336
6,516,204
6,561,851
6,643,501
6,653,979
6,697,030
6,785,830
6,845,249
6,847,830
6,876,697
6,879,585
6,886,049
6,968,171
6,985,757
7,023,878
7,053,843
7,106,569
7,145,267
7,200,512
D442,170
D459,303
and other patents pending.
This product includes
technology licensed from:
QUALCOMM® 3G
Licensed by QUALCOMM Incorporated under one or more of
the following United States patents and/or their counterparts
in other nations:
4,901,307
5,056,109
5,101,501
5,109,390
5,228,054
5,267,261
5,267,262
5,337,338
5,414,796
5,416,797
5,490,165
5,504,773
5,506,865
5,511,073
5,535,239
5,544,196
5,568,483
5,600,754
5,657,420
5,659,569
5,710,784
5,778,338
Manufactured or sold by Sierra Wireless or its licensees under
one or more patents licensed from InterDigital Group.
Licensed under the following Nortel Networks Limited
patents:
United States patent numbers: 5128925, 5398247
France patent numbers: 2665993, 2653959, 2659812, 2745091
Copyright
4
© 2007 Sierra Wireless. All rights reserved.
2130795
Preface
Trademarks
AirCard® and “Heart of the Wireless Machine®” are registered
trademarks of Sierra Wireless. Watcher® is a trademark of
Sierra Wireless, registered in the European Community.
Sierra Wireless, the Sierra Wireless logo, the red wave design,
and the red-tipped antenna are trademarks of Sierra Wireless.
Windows® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
QUALCOMM® is a registered trademark of QUALCOMM
Incorporated. Used under license.
Other trademarks are the property of the respective owners.
Contact
Information
Sales Desk:
Phone: 1-604-232-1488
Hours: 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Pacific Time
E-mail: [email protected]
Post: Sierra Wireless
13811 Wireless Way
Richmond, BC
Canada
V6V 3A4
Fax: 1-604-231-1109
Web: www.sierrawireless.com
Consult our website for up-to-date product descriptions,
documentation, application notes, firmware upgrades, trouble­
shooting tips, and press releases:
www.sierrawireless.com
Revision History
Revision
number
1.3
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
Release
date
August 2007
Changes
•
Removed detail about AT command parameters, instead
directing users to the MP 3G Modems AT Command Reference.
(Document #2130810.)
•
Updated regulatory information for Canada and the USA. (See
“Regulatory Information” on page 63.).
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
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2130795
Contents
Introducing the MP 595 Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
About CDMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
CDMA account and coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Supported CDMA radio frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Receive diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
USB, Ethernet, or serial computer connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Virtual serial port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
VPN support for RNAP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
MP Modem Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Hardware and Software Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Package contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Required equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
System requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
MP Modem accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Installation overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MP Modem housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connector panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GPS and I/O options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview of installation steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
23
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23
24
24
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
Install the MP modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 1—Mount the MP modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select a location for the MP modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mounting procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ground the MP modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 2—Mount the antennas and install the cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RF antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GPS antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Antenna locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the antennas and cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 3—Install the Power Harness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power connector (Molex) pinouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ignition sense on/off wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ignition sense options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ground the power harness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Correct wire splicing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crimp terminals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 4—Connect MP modem to computer cable to the MP modem . .
Serial connector (DB9) pinouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the USB, Ethernet or serial cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O port connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 5—Install the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 6—Activate your account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Activation Wizard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automated activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 7—Test the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
24
24
25
26
26
27
27
27
28
28
29
29
30
30
31
31
31
31
32
33
33
34
34
34
34
35
35
35
Operating the MP Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Turning the MP modem on and off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Reading the status indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Resetting the MP modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
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2130795
Contents
3G Watcher software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3G Watcher Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Launching 3G Watcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3G Watcher window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
39
40
40
Establishing connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Configuring the MP Modem to Report GPS and I/O Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
GPS configuration and reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GPS protocols and commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GPS display in 3G Watcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GPS TAIP quick reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
42
42
43
I/O device installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connector pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Port specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital input devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example: panic button connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital output devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog input devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example: analog sensor connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O configuration using AT or 3G Watcher commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog input setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital I/O setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
44
44
44
45
45
46
47
47
48
49
Sending Data to Your Network Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Configuring the MP modem to route data to a server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Report frequency timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring and Tracking configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IP Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The problem created by Network Address Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Solutions to the NAT problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
51
54
54
55
56
Retrieving the Unique Mobile Device ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
9
MP 595 Modem User Guide
Support and Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Technical support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Technical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Regulatory, radio frequency and electrical specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Environmental specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Weight and dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Host interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Other interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
GPS specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
I/O port characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
3G Watcher software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Regulatory Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
U.S.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
10
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Contents
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
11
MP 595 Modem User Guide
12
2130795
1: Introducing the MP 595 Modem
1
• About CDMA
• CDMA account and
coverage
• Receive diversity
• USB, Ethernet, or
serial computer
connection
• Virtual serial port
• VPN support for RNAP
• Software
• Documentation
Note: Do not connect the MP
modem to a USB port on a
computer before installing the
software. (See “Step 5—Install
the software” on page 34.)
The Sierra Wireless MP modem provides a wireless network
connection for portable computers installed in vehicles.
The MP modem is usually installed in the vehicle’s trunk and
connected to a notebook computer in the passenger
compartment. A radio frequency (RF) antenna mounted on the
roof of the vehicle enables the MP modem to communicate
through a wireless network to a host computer.
A built-in Global Positioning System (GPS) module provides
location and heading data that can also be remotely monitored.
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
13
MP 595 Modem User Guide
The following diagram illustrates how the system works:
GPS satellite
Antenna
MP Modem
MP modem installed in vehicle with a notebook computer
Base station
Network
VPN over
Internet
Computer/Host
Firewall
and
Router
Network operations center
Private /
dedicated link
Host
Customer fixed end system
Figure 1-1: The MP modem and the network.
The MP modem has a rugged design that allows it to
withstand the vibration, shock, humidity, and extremes of
temperature experienced in the normal operation of police,
emergency, utility, and field service vehicles.
You can use the network connection provided by the MP
modem to access shared data, browse the Internet, and send
and receive e-mail and text messages. The MP modem also
allows for sensors, gauges, and alarms (such as panic buttons)
to be installed in vehicles and remotely monitored from a
central location.
About CDMA
The MP 595 modem operates over a type of wireless network
called Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). CDMA Third
Generation (3G) technology provides a variety of connectivity
features, depending on your service provider and account:
• 1x Evolution-Data Optimized Revision A
(1xEV-DO Rev. A) supports Internet connections with data
14
2130795
Introducing the MP 595 Modem
rates up to 3.1 Megabits per second (Mbps) downlink from
the network and 1.8 Mbps uplink to the network. Average
data rates are 450-800 kilobits per second (kbps) downlink
and 300-400 kbps uplink. Actual speed depends on
network conditions.
• 1xEV-DO Revision 0 (Rev. 0) supports Internet connections
with data rates up to 2.4 Mbps downlink and 153 kbps
uplink. Average data rates are 400–700 kbps downlink and
40-80 kbps uplink. Actual speed depends on network
conditions.
• 1x supports Internet connections with data rates up to
153 kbps. Actual speed depends on the network condi­
tions.
• Circuit switched (dial-up) data, using the earlier CDMA
IS-95 specification, supports data connections to any dial­
up service at rates up to 14.4 kbps.
The MP 595 modem is primarily designed to provide 1x or
better data connections but it also allows for Circuit
Switched Data (CSD) connections in areas that have
CDMA IS-95 coverage but no 3G (1xEVDO or 1x) highspeed packet service.
Quick Net Connect (QNC) provides a simplified way to
dial into an Internet connection using CSD, assuming CSD
is supported by your service provider.
Once a connection is established, you can open your browser
and connect to web sites and access other Internet services
such as e-mail.
CDMA account and coverage
You must set up an account with a CDMA service provider for
each MP 595 modem you install. After installing the MP 595
modem software, you must configure it to use an account.
The ability of the MP 595 modem to obtain service and the
type of service obtained in any area is determined by several
factors:
Network proximity and 1xEV-DO CDMA availability To
obtain service, you must be within the coverage area of a
network operating in one of the radio frequency bands
supported by the MP 595 modem. The type of connection
depends on the service available in that area. For example,
there are areas with 1x service in which 1xEV-DO has not yet
been implemented.
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
15
MP 595 Modem User Guide
Roaming If you are within the coverage of a network
operated by a different service provider, your ability to obtain
service depends on whether a roaming agreement exists
between your service provider and the one operating your
current local network. There may be additional fees for
roaming service. Contact your reseller or service provider for
information.
Account provisions Your account may restrict usage of
certain networks or may limit your connection time or data
transmission.
Supported CDMA radio frequencies
CDMA networks operate on two sets of radio frequency
bands. The MP 595 modem is a dual-band product that
operates on both bands:
• 1900 MHz (also called the PCS, or Personal Communica­
tions Services, band)
• 800 MHz (Cellular band)
Receive diversity
The MP 595 modem supports receive diversity for improved
signal reception. Receive diversity uses two antennas to
enhance the quality of the signal, but does not extend the MP
modem’s coverage area.
USB, Ethernet, or serial
computer connection
You can connect the MP modem to a USB, Ethernet (RJ45), or
serial (DB9) port on a computer. When connected to a USB or
Ethernet port, the MP modem behaves like a network card.
When connected to a serial port, the MP modem behaves like a
dial-up modem.
Virtual serial port
The MP modem supports four virtual serial ports (VSPs).
Three are reserved for internal use by the MP modem. The
remaining VSP, which is called Sierra Wireless Application
Interface 2, is assigned to a specific COM port that varies
between users. This VSP can be used, for example, to send AT
commands, or to run applications such as HyperTerminal®.
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Introducing the MP 595 Modem
Special MP modem modes such as GPS that are supported on
a serial port are also available on the virtual port. For example,
with the virtual port enabled, a mapping application on your
computer that normally listens for GPS messages on a serial
port listens for those same messages on the virtual port.
The MP modem virtual serial port is available on both USB
and Ethernet interfaces. For information on enabling a virtual
serial port, see the MP 3G Modems AT Command Reference
(document #2130810).
VPN support for RNAP
This feature allows for the exchange of Remote Network
Access Protocol (RNAP1) data between the MP modem and a
remote server accessible only through a Virtual Private
Network (VPN) connection. When using this feature, you must
have 3G Watcher running on the computer.
The MP modem sends RNAP data over Ethernet or USB to 3G
Watcher on the computer. 3G Watcher places the RNAP data in
a User Datagram Protocol/Internet Protocol (UDP/IP) packet
and sends it over the VPN connection to the server. When 3G
Watcher receives a UDP/IP packet containing RNAP data over
the VPN connection, it disassembles the packet and sends the
RNAP data to the MP modem.
You can enable this option using 3G Watcher software or AT
commands. See the 3G Watcher online help and the MP 3G
Modems AT Command Reference (document #2130810) for
details.
Software
The MP modem comes with the following software:
• 3G Watcher, the software for the MP modem which allows
you to manage and monitor your connections.
• The driver that forms the interface between the MP
modem and your Windows operating system.
• The firmware that is stored in non-volatile memory.
The MP 595 modem has an embedded radio module (a
Mini Card 5725), also made by Sierra Wireless, Inc. There
are two firmware programs on the MP 595 modem—one
1. RNAP is a Sierra Wireless proprietary protocol that encapsulates the
MTP data that is sent to and from the MP modem. It ensures that the
MP modem and remote host alike recognize the data packets. See The
Monitoring and Tracking Protocol Guide on page 19.
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
stored on the controller board of the MP modem and one
on the radio module.
The firmware was loaded into the radio module and con­
troller board when the MP modem was assembled. As new
versions of the software and firmware are released, they
are posted at www.sierrawireless.com.
MP Modem Manager
MP Modem Manager is a web-based diagnostic and
management tool that allows you to remotely monitor and
configure a fleet of MP modems. With MP Modem Manager
you can:
• Diagnose and troubleshoot field issues.
• Identify MP modem firmware versions and remotely
upgrade firmware.
• Organize MP modems into groups for table viewing of
modem and network status.
• Configure GPS settings.
MP Modem Manager software is available free of charge. To
request this software, complete and submit the form at:
https://www.sierrawireless.com/product/
mp_modem_mgr_request.aspx.
Documentation
This MP 595 Modem User Guide describes how to:
• Install the MP modem hardware.
• Connect the radio and GPS antennas.
• Connect a notebook computer and other input/output
(I/O) devices.
• Install the software.
• Configure the software to use a CDMA account.
• Interpret the LEDs on the MP modem and the indicators in
the 3G Watcher software.
• Configure the MP modem to report GPS and/or I/O data
(from sensors, gauges, or panic buttons).
• Use the MP modem to connect to a network.
• Collect and use GPS and I/O data from a fleet of vehicles in
which MP modems are installed.
This User Guide is provided as a PDF (Portable Document
Format) file on the installation CD.
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Introducing the MP 595 Modem
Online help is provided with 3G Watcher. It describes all the
icons and indicators in 3G Watcher and provides detailed
instructions on using 3G Watcher to make data connections.
When using 3G Watcher, you can access help through the
menu system or by pressing the <F1> key.
The MP 3G Modems AT Command Reference (document
#2130810) describes the available AT command set.
The MP Modem Manager User Guide (document #2130554)
provides information on how to install, configure, and use the
MP Modem Manager software to manage a fleet of modems.
The Monitoring and Tracking Protocol Guide describes the
protocols used in data transmissions between the MP modem
and the network server. It provides the information necessary
to develop host applications that process GPS and digital input
from a fleet of MP modems. For more information contact
[email protected].
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
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2: Hardware and Software
Installation
• Installation overview
• Install the MP modem
2
This chapter shows you how to install the MP modem in a
vehicle, how to install the 3G Watcher software, and how to
activate your account. Before you begin the installation, ensure
that you have all the necessary components and equipment
listed in the following sections, and have read the “Installation
overview” on page 23.
Package contents
Each MP modem box contains:
• The MP modem
• A mounting template
• Mounting screws and washers
• An installation and documentation CD
• A power harness
If any of these are missing, please contact your account
manager.
Required equipment
To install the MP 595 modem, you need the power harness (or
existing MP 555 Series power harness), mounting template,
and the screws and washers that come with the device.
You also require:
• A USB, Ethernet, or 9-pin serial cable. This must be long
enough to run from the mounting location of the MP
modem to the computer.
· The maximum length for the serial or USB cable is 5.5-m
(18 feet). The USB cable must have a Type A male
connector at the computer end and a Type B male
connector at the MP modem end.
· The Ethernet cable should have RJ-45 connectors. The
MP modem’s performance is affected by the type of
Ethernet card in the computer and the type of cable
used. The minimum requirement for the Ethernet cable
is an unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable, category 3 or
4. For better performance, use a shielded, category 5
cable. The maximum length is 100-m (328 feet).
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
Note: If GPS is being imple
mented, you require either two
antennas or a combination RF
and GPS antenna.
• Radio frequency (RF) antenna and cable. The antenna
must have the appropriate regulatory approval, 50 ohm
impedance, and a male TNC connector. It may be a hard or
magnetic-mounted antenna.
• Additional Diversity RF antenna (optional). This is
required if you use the receive diversity feature. The
additional antenna must have a male SMA connector.
• GPS antenna and cable (optional). This is necessary if you
use the built-in GPS module.
• Power supply. This is usually the vehicle’s battery.
• Appropriate electrical grounding. If a ground wire is
necessary, use a 16-gauge wire and connect it to a ground
screw.
• I/O cable (optional). This is required if a panic button,
sensor, gauge, or other I/O device is installed.
System requirements
Before you begin the installation, ensure your computer has
the following system requirements necessary for the instal­
lation and running of 3G Watcher software:
Note: Do not connect the MP
modem to a USB port on a
computer before installing the
software.
• Operating systems:
· Windows® Vista™
· Windows 2000 Professional (with Service Pack 4 or later)
· Windows XP (Home or Professional)
• Available USB, Ethernet, or DB9 serial port
• CD-ROM drive (installation only)
• 32 MB RAM memory
MP Modem accessories
For information about accessories for your MP modem—
including cables and antennas—contact your account manager
or visit www.sierrawireless.com.
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Hardware and Software Installation
Installation overview
The following diagram illustrates the overall installation.
RF/GPS
antenna
MP modem
Note: The MP modem is
designed for negative-ground
vehicles only. It will not function
in a positive-ground vehicle.
Figure 2-1: Installation of the MP modem in a vehicle equipped with a
notebook computer and a combination antenna, using the car battery for
power and ignition-sense wiring for power on/off.
MP Modem housing
The MP modem has a rectangular metal housing. There is a
connector panel on the rear of the housing, an indicator panel
on the front of the housing, a reset button on top, and
mounting holes along the bottom edges on either side.
Connector panel
The MP 595 modem has the following connectors at the rear of
the MP modem:
RS-232 serial (female DB9)
GPS antenna (female SMA)
USB (Type B)
USB Host
Serial Host
Diversity
I/O connector (DB15HD)
Ethernet
GPS
I/O
Ethernet Host
Power
RF
Power harness (Molex connector)
Diversity antenna (SMA)
RF antenna (female TNC)
Figure 2-2: MP 595 modem rear connectors
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
GPS and I/O options
The MP modem provides support for GPS (Global Positioning
System) and for attaching input/output devices.
GPS. If you plan to use the MP modem’s built-in GPS module,
you must connect a GPS antenna using an antenna cable, or
use a combination antenna that can connect to both the GPS
and RF connectors on the MP modem housing.
Other I/O devices. Other devices, such as panic buttons,
sensors, or gauges may also be installed with the MP modem
and connected with an I/O cable to the I/O port. (See “I/O port
connections” on page 34.)
Overview of installation steps
Note: Electrical installations are
potentially dangerous and
should be performed by
personnel thoroughly trained in
safe electrical wiring procedures
for vehicles.
The installation process for the MP modem varies depending
on how you plan to use it, where it best fits in your vehicle,
and which of its features you plan to use. The main steps are:
1. Mount the MP modem.
2. Mount the antennas and connect the cables.
· RF antenna and cable.
· Additional RF antenna and cable, if you plan to use
receive diversity.
· GPS antenna and cable, if you plan to use GPS.
3. Connect the power harness.
4. Connect the cable that will run between the MP modem
and your computer to the MP modem.
Do not connect the cable to the computer until you have
installed the software.
5. Install the software.
6. Start 3G Watcher and activate your account.
7. Test the system.
Install the MP modem
Step 1—Mount the MP modem
Note: Power off the MP modem,
your computer, and any other
devices while you are connecting
cables.
The MP modem is usually mounted in the trunk of the vehicle,
but other possibilities are under the dashboard or a seat.
Select a location for the MP modem
When selecting a mounting location, remember the following:
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Hardware and Software Installation
• Do not expose the MP modem to weather and environ­
mental conditions beyond the ranges listed in the environ­
mental specifications on page 60. Avoid excessive heat
from the engine compartment, heaters, or the exhaust
system, and extreme cold from direct contact with air
conditioners or other cooling systems. Never immerse it in
any liquid.
• If you are replacing a MP modem, you can mount the new
MP modem in the same location using the existing
mounting holes.
• Every device connected to the MP modem, as well as the
MP modem itself, should be grounded. (See “Ground the
MP modem” on page 26 and “Ground the power harness”
on page 31.)
• Route cables to their destinations without using excess
wiring.
• Make sure all connectors and the reset button are easy to
reach and the indicator lights are visible.
Mounting procedure
To mount the MP modem:
1. Use the provided mounting template to mark the location
of the mounting holes.
2. Drill 5/32" pilot holes (unless you are reusing holes from a
previous MP modem mounting).
3. Use the supplied mounting screws and washers to secure
the MP modem through the holes along the edge of the
case bottom.
Figure 2-3: Mounting the MP modem. Arrows indicate the mounting holes.
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
Ground the MP modem
Note: Electrical installations are potentially dangerous and should be
performed by personnel thoroughly trained in safe electrical wiring
procedures for vehicles.
Automotive installations usually provide a good quality
ground for each piece of electrical equipment. In most cases,
ground the MP modem by connecting the black ground wire
of the power harness to either the vehicle chassis or to the
negative terminal of the battery.
If a device connected to the MP modem, such as a notebook
computer, is not properly grounded, it may ground itself
through the cable connecting it to the MP modem. This creates
a hazard and could cause equipment damage. If you cannot
properly ground a device, a potential solution is to install a
fuse in the ground return wire.
The power harness has 5 A fuses on the red power wire and
the white ignition sense wire, but not on the black ground
return wire. (See “Step 3—Install the Power Harness” on
page 28.)
You can also use a ground screw on the connector panel of the
MP modem. Use a 16-gauge wire if you choose to use a ground
screw. A ground screw is not required as long as the power
harness is properly grounded.
I/O
Power
If you are using a ground screw,
insert it here.
Figure 2-4: The ground screw connector on the connector panel.
Note: Tighten cables connected
to the MP modem by hand. Do
not use tools.
Step 2—Mount the antennas and install
the cables
The MP 595 modem has two RF antenna connectors and one
GPS antenna connector. The MP modem requires an RF
antenna to connect to the wireless network. The second RF
connector is optional and allows for receive diversity.
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Hardware and Software Installation
The built-in GPS module requires a dedicated GPS antenna or
a combination antenna with cables to both the RF and GPS
antenna connectors on the MP modem.
If you already have an MP Modem Combo GPS antenna, you
can re-use it with your new MP modem. This antenna has two
leads—one for RF (TNC connector) and one for GPS (SMA
connector).
RF antennas
Use an approved RF antenna to connect to the wireless
network. The antenna must have 50 ohms impedance and a
cable with a TNC connector (or SMA connector if the antenna
is being used for receive diversity), as well as the following
characteristics:
• The total maximum gain, including cable loss, must not
exceed 4.15 dBi (if the antenna operates on the PCS band)
or 5.1 dBi (if the antenna operates only on the Cellular
band).
• The antenna must transmit and receive on the necessary
frequency bands in your coverage area. The MP 595
modem supports these RF bands:
· 1900 MHz (PCS)
· 800 MHz (Cellular)
You can use a dual-band antenna that supports both fre­
quencies. If your MP modem will only be connected to net­
works that use one of the bands, an appropriate singleband antenna is sufficient. Contact your service provider
for information about radio bands used in your area.
For more information about antennas for your installation
contact your account manager.
GPS antennas
The GPS antenna connects to the MP modem using a male
SMA connector. Contact your account manager for more infor­
mation about compatible GPS antennas.
Antenna locations
When selecting locations for the RF and GPS antennas:
• Refer to the documentation provided with each antenna to
determine whether it requires a ground plane.
• Ensure that the RF antenna is mounted at least 20 cm
(8 inches) from vehicle occupants and bystanders.
• Ensure that all radio antennas (RF, GPS, CB radio, car
radio) are mounted at least 30 cm (12 inches) or more
apart.
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
• If you are using receive diversity, connect an additional RF
antenna to the diversity antenna connector (SMA) on the
back of the MP 595 modem. Ensure that the two RF
antennas are 30 to 60 cm (12 to 24 inches) apart.
Install the antennas and cables
Note: When connecting the cables, hand-tighten the connectors; do
not use tools.
To install the RF and GPS antennas:
1. Mount each antenna according to the instructions
provided with it.
2. Thread the antenna cables through the car to reach the MP
modem. Secure the cables as necessary.
Note: To avoid RF interference
problems and possible damage
to the MP modem, do not power
on the MP modem before
connecting the RF antenna.
3. Connect the RF antenna cable to the TNC connector on the
rear of the MP modem.
4. If you are using receive diversity, connect the diversity RF
antenna cable to the diversity connector at the rear of the
MP modem.
5. If you are using GPS, connect the GPS antenna cable to the
SMA connector on the rear of the MP modem.
GPS antenna
Serial Host
Diversity
Diversity RF antenna
USB Host
GPS
RF
RF antenna
Figure 2-5: The MP 595 modem’s SMA connector for the GPS antenna (top),
and the TNC connector for the RF antenna (bottom right).
Step 3—Install the Power Harness
In a typical installation, the MP modem is connected to the
vehicle’s battery with the power harness. The MP modem
supports a voltage range between 9 volts, direct current (VDC)
and 36 VDC, and is designed for both 12 VDC and 24 VDC
vehicle electrical systems.
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Hardware and Software Installation
Note: Electrical installations are potentially dangerous and should be
performed by personnel thoroughly trained in safe electrical wiring
procedures for vehicles.
Power connector
Note: Connector part numbers:
39-01-2040 or 39-01-2045. Pins
part number: 39-00-0039.
The power harness connects to the MP modem with a Molex
connector.
Power connector (Molex) pinouts
The pinouts for the Molex connector on the power harness are:
White wire
(Ignition sense)
Unused
Red wire
(Battery)
Black wire
(Ground)
Figure 2-6: Pinouts for the power harness.
The battery (red) and ignition sense (white) wires in the power
harness include 5 A fuses. The black ground wire is not fused.
(See “Ground the power harness” on page 31.) Replacement
power harnesses are available from Sierra Wireless.
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
Ignition sense on/off wiring
Note: Do not install an on/off
switch on the main (red) battery
line, or connect the white ignition
sense wire to the red battery
wire. Both configurations bypass
the MP modem's controlled
shutdown sequence, and may
cause data loss and subsequent
power-on problems. Incorrect
wiring may also drain the vehicle
battery.
The MP modem’s power on/off is controlled by the ignition
sense line (white wire) using internal software, rather than a
hard on/off switch on the red power line. The red, black, and
white wires connect to the battery and ignition switch as
shown in the power harness wiring diagram.
Switch (vehicle
ignition key, or
separate)
Red wire
(Battery)
5 A fuses (on red
and white only)
MP modem
White wire
(Ignition sense)
Black unfused wire
(Ground)
Vehicle battery
Figure 2-7: Wiring for the power harness.The white wire is the ignition sense.
• When the white ignition sense line is pulled high (5 to
36 V), the MP modem powers on.
• When the ignition sense line is pulled low (less than 2 V),
the MP modem performs a controlled shutdown sequence
(under software control), de-registering and saving any
relevant operational data before powering off.
Ignition sense options
There are three ways to connect the ignition sense wiring:
• Engine on only. Connect the white ignition sense wire to
the vehicle’s ignition switch so that the MP modem is
powered on only when the ignition key is switched to the
full “On” position, that is, when the engine has been
started. In this configuration, the engine must be running for
the MP modem to be on.
—or—
• Accessory on. Connect the white ignition sense wire to the
vehicle’s ignition switch so that the MP modem is powered
on when the ignition is switched to “Accessory” mode. In
this configuration, the MP modem is on whenever other
vehicle electrical devices can be switched on—such as when the
radio and windshield fan can run.
—or—
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Hardware and Software Installation
Note: If you choose to install a
separate switch, it must be
connected to the white ignition
sense wire, not the red battery
wire, so that the MP modem can
perform a controlled shutdown,
as described on page 30.
• Separately switched. Connect the white ignition sense
wire to a separate switch mounted in a convenient
location, which allows the MP modem to be turned on or
off regardless of the position of the ignition key. In this
configuration, the MP modem can be powered on or off
even if the key is not in the ignition.
The MP modem also has a “Power Off Timer”. When power is
removed from the ignition sense wire, the MP modem remains
on for the period defined by the Power Off Timer, up to a
maximum of 240 minutes. The Power Off Timer is configured
in 3G Watcher. See the online help in 3G Watcher for details.
Ground the power harness
You must connect the black ground wire from the power
harness to the grounded negative terminal of the vehicle
battery, or another appropriate electrical ground. Failing to
ground the power harness properly may damage the MP
modem, may cause radio interference, and can be dangerous.
(See “Ground the MP modem” on page 26.)
The ground wire in the MP modem power harness is not
fused.
Power connections
Connecting the MP modem’s power wires properly is
important—poor connections can damage the wiring, the MP
modem, or the vehicle’s electrical system, and can be
dangerous.
Note: Ensure that all wires are
correctly spliced or crimped.
Improper grounding and wire
connections may lead to
equipment damage or safety
hazards.
Correct wire splicing
You can splice the wires of the power harness to the car wiring.
Proper splicing is essential to reliable operation of the MP
modem. Do NOT use “quick taps”; they reduce the integrity of
the wire that is cut and let moisture into the cable.
An appropriate method of splicing is to strip a small portion of
the insulation, solder the wires together, then heat-shrink the
connection to re-insulate it.
Crimp terminals
If suitable terminal connection points are available on the
vehicle for power and ignition sense, then using automotive
crimp terminals is recommended. When using crimp
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
terminals, do not leave bare wire exposed. Do not use a crimp
terminal for more than one wire unless it is designed for that
purpose.
Step 4—Connect MP modem to
computer cable to the MP modem
The MP modem connects to:
• A computer through a USB, Ethernet, or serial port.
• Other optional devices through the DB15HD I/O
connector.
Note: Do not connect the MP modem to the computer until you have
installed the software.
The MP modem connects to a computer using:
• A USB cable (with a Type A connector on the computer
end and a Type B connector on the MP modem end). The
maximum of the USB cable is 5.5-m (18 feet). These cables
are readily available from many suppliers.
• An Ethernet cable with RJ-45 connectors. The type of cable
you use affects the performance of the MP modem. The
minimum requirement for the Ethernet cable is an
unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable, category 3 or 4. For
better performance, use a shielded, category 5 cable. The
theoretical maximum length is 100-m (328 feet).
You can connect the MP modem Ethernet port directly to a
computer or other Ethernet device with either a cross-over
or a straight-through cable.
Note: 5-m part number:
6000083.
32
• A serial cable (with a DB9 connector on the MP modem
end). The maximum length of the serial cable is 5.5-m
(18 feet). Sierra Wireless sells suitable serial cables in 5-m
(16-feet) lengths.
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Hardware and Software Installation
Serial connector (DB9) pinouts
The MP modem is configured as DCE (Data Communications
Equipment) and uses the standard RS232 pin designations:
DB9 MALE
1
DB9 female connector
5
9
6
1. Data Carrier Detect (DCD)
2. Transmitted Data (TxD)*
3. Received Data (RxD)*
4. Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
5. Signal Ground (GND)
6. Data Set Ready (DSR)
7. Clear To Send (CTS)
8. Request To Send (RTS)
9. Ring Indicator (RI)
Serial Host
Diversity
USB Host
RF
* RxD and TxD are named with respect to the MP modem
(that is, RxD is the Receive Data input to the MP modem,
and TxD is the transmit data out of the MP modem)
Figure 2-8: Pinouts for an RS232 male DB9 serial cable (left) that connects to
the MP 595 modem’s female DB9 serial connector (right). Note that the two
figures’ pinouts are mirror images of each other, since they plug together.
The serial connector uses these voltage specifications:
RS-232-C
Driver
RS-232-C
Receiver
+15 V
Space logic 0
+5 V
2V
noise margin
Space logic 0
⎬
Transmission
region
+15 V
Transmission
region
+3 V
-3 V
-5 V
Mark logic 1
Mark logic 1
-15 V
-15 V
Figure 2-9: Voltage specifications for the MP modem’s serial connector.
Install the USB, Ethernet or serial cable
Note: Ensure that the MP
modem and your computer are
powered off while installing
cables.
To install the USB, Ethernet, or serial cable, thread the cable
through the vehicle and attach it to the USB, Ethernet, or serial
connector on the MP modem.
Note: Do not connect the cables to the computer until you have
installed the software.
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
I/O port connections
The MP modem’s I/O port is a standard female DB15HD
connector for remote monitoring of gauges, sensors, and
alarms. If you are planning to use these devices, you need to
create a custom I/O cable. See “Configuring the MP Modem to
Report GPS and I/O Data” on page 41.
Step 5—Install the software
Note: You must be logged in
with administrative privileges to
install the software.
Follow these steps to install 3G Watcher and the MP modem
driver:
1. Ensure that the computer has the necessary system
requirements. (See “System requirements” on page 22.)
2. Close any Windows applications that are open on your
computer.
3. Insert the MP modem CD in your CD-ROM drive.
The CD should automatically launch and display a menu.
If not, select Start > Run from the Windows taskbar and
type d:\setup.exe (where d is the drive letter of your
CD-ROM drive).
4. From the CD start-up menu, select installation and
documentation and then MP 3G Watcher installation to launch
the Installation Wizard.
5. Use the Next and Back buttons to navigate through the
wizard.
6. Click Finish in the final window. To close the CD start-up
menu, select the taskbar button to re-display the window,
then select exit in the lower right corner of the window.
7. Power on the MP modem and connect it to your computer.
Windows then completes driver installation.
Step 6—Activate your account
After you install the 3G Watcher software, you must set up
(activate) your account. If you purchased the MP 595 modem
directly from a service provider you may already have an
account; your MP modem may be pre-activated.
The MP 595 modem allows you to configure two accounts.
The Activation Wizard
The Activation Wizard guides you through the process of
setting up your account.
There are two methods of activation:
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Hardware and Software Installation
• Manual activation involves you phoning your service
provider, exchanging information, and entering your
account information into the appropriate fields in the
wizard.
• Automated activation involves the MP 595 modem
placing a call to a special number at the service provider.
Much of the process is automated.
The wizard varies based on your service provider, and it may
be that only one option is available to you.
To start the activation wizard:
Note: If the version of firmware
on your MP modem is not
current with your version of 3G
Watcher, you will be prompted to
update your firmware when you
launch the program. This update
is important to ensure proper
operation of your MP modem.
The update may take as long as
fifteen minutes.
1. Start 3G Watcher by choosing Start > Programs > Sierra
Wireless > 3G Watcher> 3G Watcher, or double click the
desktop shortcut.
2. If the wizard does not launch automatically, select Tools >
Activation Wizard….
3. On the first window, select the manual or automated
activation option (if available) and select Next.
Manual activation
The wizard advises you of the information you need to
complete the activation, and the phone number you should
dial. Follow the instructions in the wizard to complete the
process.
Automated activation
The wizard advises you of the information you need to
complete the activation and dials the number. Follow the
instructions in the wizard to complete the process.
Step 7—Test the system
Finally, test the system to:
• Confirm that the MP modem can connect to and transmit
data over the network.
• Confirm that the MP modem can determine its location (if
you have connected a GPS antenna).
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
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3: Operating the MP Modem
• Reading the status
indicators
• 3G Watcher software
• Establishing
connections
3
Operating the MP modem requires some knowledge of both
the MP modem hardware and the 3G Watcher software. This
chapter describes the basics of each.
Turning the MP modem on and off
The way in which the MP modem is wired determines how it
is powered on and off. In most cases the power supply for the
MP modem is the vehicle's electrical system and the MP
modem is powered on and off in one of these ways:
• Engine on. The MP modem is powered only when the
ignition is on. (The MP modem is only on when the engine
is on.)
—or—
• Accessory on. The MP modem is powered when the
ignition is switched to "Accessories". (This allows the MP
modem to be powered when the engine is off.)
—or—
• Separately switched. The MP modem is connected to a
separate on/off switch so that it can be turned on and off
independently of the engine and vehicle accessories.
Rather than cutting power to the MP modem, the ignition key
or power switch allows the MP modem to perform a controlled
shutdown sequence that avoids data loss. (You can also set the
MP modem to wait up to 240 minutes after the power switch
has been turned off before it shuts down.)
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
Reading the status indicators
The MP modem’s indicator panel includes four indicator
lights:
GPS indicator
Power indicator
Transmit (Tx) Receive (Rx)
indicator
indicator
Figure 3-1: The indicator panel of the MP 595 modem.
The following table shows the behavior of the LEDs during
normal MP modem operation:
Table 3-1: LED operation
LED
Power
38
Behavior
Indicates
Off
MP modem is not powered.
Rapid flashing
MP modem is powered and has not acquired
network service.
Slow flashing (about 1.5 seconds
between flashes)
MP modem has acquired IS-95 service.
On solid
MP modem has acquired 1x, 1xEV-DO Rev. 0, or
1xEV-DO Rev. A service.
Tx
Flashing
MP modem is transmitting data.
Rx
Flashing
MP modem is receiving data.
GPS
Off
GPS module is not active.
Flashing
GPS module is active but not receiving valid
fixes.
Solid
GPS module is active and providing valid fixes.
2130795
Operating the MP Modem
Resetting the MP modem
The reset button for the MP modem is on the top of the
housing.
To reset the MP modem, press the
button until all four indicator
lights illuminate. (Do not use
sharp implements that might
puncture the rubber.)
Resetting the MP modem is equiv­
alent to turning the MP modem off
and on. This terminates any data
connection and causes the MP
modem to perform a self-test.
(Stored settings are not lost.)
Figure 3-2: The MP modem reset button.
3G Watcher software
3G Watcher is the program used to manage and monitor the
MP modem. For information about installing 3G Watcher, see
“Step 5—Install the software” on page 34.
3G Watcher allows you to:
Note: Depending on the
operating mode, it may not be
necessary to run 3G Watcher to
use the MP modem, but it does
provide useful status information.
• Determine signal strength, roaming status, and other
network connection parameters.
• Monitor the status of the MP modem and network
services.
• Initiate data connections.
• Set 3G Watcher notification options.
• Configure the I/O ports.
• View GPS information.
3G Watcher Help
3G Watcher has a well-indexed and detailed online help
system.
To access help in 3G Watcher, select Help > Help Topics or press
the <F1> key.
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
Launching 3G Watcher
To launch 3G Watcher:
1. Start 3G Watcher by choosing Start > Programs >
Sierra Wireless Inc > 3G Watcher > 3G Watcher, or
double click the desktop shortcut.
3G Watcher window
The main 3G Watcher window includes a number of elements
that let you control and monitor your MP modem and your
connection to the network.
Menu bar
Minimize button
Full / Compact button
Close button
Service icons
Connection
drop-down list
Service Provider
Connect button
GPS icon
Establishing connections
The connection drop-down list on the main 3G Watcher
window provides a connection option(s) depending on your
profile(s):
• WWAN - Name of your service provider
Depending on the operating mode and settings in 3G Watcher,
a connection may be automatically established when 3G
Watcher is launched. Otherwise, you can establish a
connection by selecting the connection type and clicking the
Connect button.
40
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4: Configuring the MP Modem to
Report GPS and I/O Data
• GPS configuration and
reporting
• I/O device installation
and configuration
4
The MP modem is capable of reporting position and heading
information using the embedded GPS module, as well as the
status of sensors, gauges, and alarms connected to the I/O
(Input/Output) port. The MP modem is typically installed in a
fleet of vehicles with the GPS and/or I/O data being sent to a
central office or dispatch for processing.
This chapter describes how to implement local reporting of
GPS and I/O data. Chapter 5 describes how to configure your
MP modem to exchange data with your private network.
GPS configuration and
reporting
GPS receivers use an array of orbiting satellites operated by the
United States Department of Defense to triangulate their
coordinates on the earth’s surface. In order to use the GPS
module in the MP modem, a GPS antenna must be connected
to the MP modem. (The installation requires either two
antennas—one RF and one GPS—or a single combination RF/
GPS antenna.)
For more information about GPS, see the Primer on GPS Opera
tions (document #2130313) on the Sierra Wireless web site,
www.sierrawireless.com.
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
GPS protocols and commands
Note: The “MP 3G Modems
TAIP Reference” (document
#2130312) provides a
description of the TAIP
commands that can be used with
the MP modem. This is available
at www.sierrawireless.com.
Information about Trimble GPS
modules, including more
documentation on TAIP
commands, is available at
www.trimble.com.
More information on NMEA
message standards is available
at www.nmea.org.
The GPS module supports two methods of reporting naviga­
tional information, using either the TAIP (Trimble ASCII
Interface Protocol) or NMEA (National Marine Electronics
Association) protocols. The GPS module is pre-configured for
TAIP. If you are using a GPS application that requires data to
be reported according to the NMEA protocol, the MP modem
must be reconfigured using an AT command. (See the MP 3G
Modems AT Command Reference, document #2130810.)
NMEA is a reporting protocol only, while TAIP provides the
ability to send commands to the module to query for infor­
mation and configure reports. When the MP modem is set for
TAIP, commands can be sent to the MP modem in these ways:
• Using 3G Watcher.
•
Using AT commands.
TAIP commands can be used to:
• Query the MP modem for its current position, heading,
and speed.
• Enable and disable automatic reporting of GPS data, and
set the interval at which automatic reports are sent.
•
Configure the format of reports.
GPS display in 3G Watcher
To view 3G Watcher’s GPS Display window, which reports
latitude, longitude, speed, direction, altitude, and local and
UTC time1, select Tools > Display GPS or double-click the GPS
icon on the main 3G Watcher window.
From a cold start (where the MP modem is powered on with
no stored navigational data), it may take up to 39 seconds for
the GPS module to obtain satellite fixes and begin reporting.
1. UTC replaces Greenwich Mean Time as the basis for
standard time throughout the world. UTC, which uses
atomic measurements rather than the earth’s rotation, is
the equivalent of mean solar time at the prime meridian
(0° longitude).
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Configuring the MP Modem to Report GPS and I/O Data
GPS TAIP quick reference
The following table is a quick summary of the TAIP message
identifiers. For detailed information and message syntax, see
the MP 3G Modems TAIP Reference (document #2130312) and
the GPS documentation on TAIP commands available at
www.trimble.com.
TAIP Message Identifiers
AL
Altitude/Vertical Velocity
CP
Compact Position Solution
ID
Identification Number
IP
Initial Position
LN
Long Navigation Message
PV
Position/Velocity Solution
RM
Reporting Mode
RT
Reset
ST
Status
TM
Time / Date
VR
Version Number
I/O device installation and
configuration
The I/O port on the MP modem allows for remote monitoring
of gauges, sensors, and alarms. You can use this feature to
display readings on instruments or gauges and to remotely
monitor panic buttons or alarms.
This section describes how to connect and configure these I/O
devices to work with the MP modem.
Connecting these devices requires that you make a customized
I/O cable. The cable must have, at one end, whatever connector
is required by the I/O device, and at the other end, the High
Density DB15 connector. The cable wires must pin to the
appropriate pin numbers on the I/O connector. The pinouts are
described in the next section.
The maximum length of the I/O cable is 15 feet.
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
Before using the digital input/output lines, you must configure
them as inputs or outputs.
Connector pinouts
The MP modem’s I/O port is a female DB15HD connector with
eight active I/O pins:
•
Two (2) digital I/O pins.
•
Two (2) digital input pins.
•
Four (4) analog input pins.
There are also six reserved pins and one ground pin.
1
6
11
5
10
15
DB15HD male cable
DB15HD female connector
on rear of MP modem
1. Reserved—do not connect
2. Reserved—do not connect
3. Digital Input/Output 1
4. Digital input 3
5. Reserved—do not connect
6. Reserved—do not connect
7. Analog input 2
8. Analog input 4
9. Reserved—do not connect
10. Ground (GND)
11. Digital Input/Output 2
12. Digital input 4
13. Reserved—do not connect
14. Analog input 1
15. Analog input 3
Figure 4-1: Pinouts for a male DB15HD I/O cable (left) that connects to the MP
modem’s female DB15HD I/O connector (right). Note that the two figures’
pinouts are mirror images of each other, since they plug into one another.
Port specifications
Note: No more than 36 VDC
should be applied to any I/O
pins.
See “I/O port characteristics” on page 62 for the technical
specifications of the I/O ports, including input voltages.
Digital input devices
Digital input devices are those that have only two states and
send a signal to the MP modem in one of those states. An
example of a digital input device might be a gun rack alarm
that sends a signal to the MP modem any time the gun rack is
open. Another example would be a panic button that sends a
signal to the MP modem when it is pushed.
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Configuring the MP Modem to Report GPS and I/O Data
A digital input can be connected to four of the pins on the
DB15HD connector: Pins 3, 4, 11, and 12. (Pins 3 and 11 could
alternatively be used for digital output.)
Note: Before using the input/output lines, you must configure them as
inputs or outputs.
Typically a digital input device should be connected between
Ground (Pin 10) and the input port (Pin 3, 4, 11, or 12).
Figure 4-2: A button wired to Pin 4 (digital input) and Pin 10 (Ground).
The pins report a logic high on an input of 3.45 VDC. An
internal pull-up resistor provides a high condition when the
switch is open.
The digital input pins report a logic low on an input between
0 VDC and 0.8 VDC. Sinking the input pin to ground yields a
logic low (0x00) when the port is polled.
If you configure the MP modem to send data to a network
server, digital input data can be remotely monitored.
Example: panic button connections
An I/O cable for a panic button requires a wire to one of the
digital input or I/O pins (such as #3) and one wire to the
Ground pin (#10).
Digital output devices
Digital output devices are those that have only two states and
the state is controlled by a signal from the MP modem. Any
device that is to be switched on and off from 3G Watcher
would be installed as a digital output device.
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
A digital output can be connected to two of the pins on the
DB15HD connector: Pins 3 and 11. (These can be used for
either input or output.)
Note: Before using the input/output lines, you must configure them as
inputs or outputs.
Typically a digital output device should be connected between
Ground (pin 10) and the output port (Pin 3 or 11).
Figure 4-3: Wiring for using Pin 3 (digital output) as an electronic switch. Pin
10 is Ground.
The digital I/O ports provide open-collector output to a
maximum of 500 mA.
Analog input devices
Analog input devices are those that generate a signal of
varying voltage, based on the state of an instrument or gauge.
An example of an analog input device might be a sensor that
detects the vehicle’s speed.
An analog input can be connected to four of the pins on the
DB15HD connector: Pins 7, 8, 14, and 15.
46
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Configuring the MP Modem to Report GPS and I/O Data
~
Typically an analog input device should be connected between
Ground (pin 10) and the input port (Pin 7, 8, 14, or 15).
Figure 4-4: A sensor wired to Pin 7 (analog input) and Pin 10 (Ground).
The analog input ports use a 10-bit (1024-step) analog-to­
digital converter over a range from 0 to 3.45 VDC, yielding a
digital step resolution of 0.0032 V.
Example: analog sensor connections
An I/O cable for an analog sensor requires a wire to one of the
analog input pins (such as #7) and one wire to the Ground pin
(#10).
I/O configuration using AT or 3G Watcher
commands
Once a sensor, gauge, button, or switch is physically connected
to the MP modem, the MP modem must be configured to
manage the input from, or output to, the device. This configu­
ration can be done using either AT commands or using 3G
Watcher.
For a list of AT commands, please see the MP 3G Modems AT
Command Reference (document #2130810).
There are separate windows in 3G Watcher for configuring the
analog and digital ports.
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
Analog input setup
The Analog Input window (Tools > Options > MP > Input/Output)
is used to configure devices on the four analog inputs. Each tab
corresponds to a pin:
Analog Tab
Connector Pin
Input 1
14
Input 2
7
Input 3
15
Input 4
8
To configure an analog sensor or gauge, select the tab that
corresponds to the pin you are using and complete the fields as
follows:
• Label: Enter a description of the sensor or gauge (Measured
Voltage, Vehicle Speed, etc.), up to 20 characters long.
• Raw value: Shows the analog value from the input (read­
only). The analog input has a 10-bit (1024-step) resolution,
so the raw value range is between 0 and 1023.
• Zero scale: Enter the minimum value for the units you are
reporting (used to convert the raw analog value of zero).
• Full scale: Enter the maximum value for the units you are
reporting (used to convert the raw value of 1023).
• Current value: Shows the resulting converted value using
the zero and full scales entered.
• Unit: Specify the units of the input (volts, km/h, etc.), up to
20 characters long.
Example
If you are measuring temperature, and the thermometer you
have connected to the I/O connector measures between -30
(raw value 0) and +50 (raw value 1023) degrees Celsius, then
your zero scale is -30.0 and your full scale is 50.0. Your label
could be “Temperature”, and units, “degrees C”.
The measurements are calculated for the 80-degree range
(between -30 and +50), which is divided into 1024 steps
(0.0781 degrees per unit step). A reading of 25 degrees
(55 degrees above the minimum) would therefore show a raw
value of 704 (55 degrees/0.0781 degrees per unit).
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Configuring the MP Modem to Report GPS and I/O Data
Digital I/O setup
The Digital Input/Output window (Tools > Options > MP >
Input/Output > Digital I/O) is used to configure devices on the two
digital I/O and two digital input ports. Each tab corresponds to
a pin:
Digital Tab
Connector Pin
I/O 1
Input or output on pin 3
I/O 2
Input or output on pin 11
Input 3
Input on pin 4
Input 4
Input on pin 12
To configure a digital sensor or gauge, select the tab that corre­
sponds to the pin you are using and complete the fields as
follows:
• Label: Provide a description of the sensor or gauge, up to
20 characters in length.
• Type: Select Input, Output, or Not used. (Output is not
available on tabs 3 and 4.)
• Logic low name: Describe the state of the device at logic
level low, up to 20 characters in length. (For example, if a
switch in the off position leads to a logic low, you could
choose to label it Switched Off.)
• Logic high name: Describe the state of the device at logic
level high, up to 20 characters in length (such as Switched
On).
• Alarm logic level: Assign an action associated with the I/O
port:
· high: A notification is sent, and the event is logged, if the
state changes from a logic low to a logic high.
· low: A notification is sent, and the event is logged, if the
state changes from a logic high to a logic low.
· log only: No notification is sent, but any change in logic
level is logged.
The name and location of the log file is specified in the
Input/Output window (Tools > Options > MP > Input/Output).
By default, the log file is located in the program folder or
user folder and is and called MpIoLog.txt.
• Current value: Shows the current value of the port.
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
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5: Sending Data to Your Network
Application
• Configuring the MP
modem to route data
to a server
• Retrieving the Unique
Mobile Device ID
5
This chapter discusses how to configure the MP modem to
send GPS and I/O data to a network server. This is a simple
process, but if there are any firewalls on your or your service
provider’s network, the data must be routed through or
around the firewall. A general discussion of some methods of
dealing with firewalls is provided.
This chapter also explains how to retrieve the Unique Mobile
Device ID from the MP modem. This is the number that
uniquely identifies each MP modem. Any application that uses
the GPS and I/O data from the MP modem requires this
number.
Configuring the MP modem to
route data to a server
Note: For a full list of AT
commands and their parameters,
see the MP 3G Modems AT
Command Reference, document
#2130810
The protocol that defines how MP modem data is packaged is
called MTP (Monitoring and Tracking Protocol). You can
configure MTP in 3G Watcher by selecting Tools > Options >
MP > Monitor and Tracking, or by using the AT command
AT!MPMTCONF and the appropriate parameters.
The MP modem provides four independent reporting engines,
allowing data to be sent to four different destinations. You can
specify the destination IP address and port number for each
engine. This allows, for example, GPS data to be sent to one
host application, and I/O data to be sent to another.
You can also specify the values for the timers that determine
the frequency with which the data is to be sent.
Report frequency timers
Note: You must configure alarm
triggers locally on the MP
modem using either 3G Watcher
or an AT command.
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
The low rate timer, alert rate timer, and GPS timer control the
interval between reports from the MP modem.
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
The low rate timer sets the interval at which reports are sent in
the absence of any other trigger or timer. It is in minutes with a
default of five minutes.
The fast rate timer only becomes active when an alarm
condition is triggered by a rise or drop in the level of one of the
digital I/O channels. The default for the fast rate timer is three
seconds.
Note: When the fast rate timer is set to 0, a single report is sent when
an I/O alarm is triggered.
If the GPS timer is set to a value other than 0, it controls the
frequency of reports in the absence of any alarm or event
triggers. (However, if the GPS timer is set to a longer interval
than the low rate timer, the value for the low rate timer will
determine report frequency.)
MP Modem
Host
Fast rate timer = 3 seconds
Low rate timer = 5 minutes
GPS timer = 10 seconds
TM_SUM_REG_IND
10 seconds
TM_SUM_REG_IND
10 seconds
TM_SUM_REG_IND
Digital I/O alarm
TM_SUM_REG_IND
3 seconds
TM_SUM_REG_IND
3 seconds
TM_SUM_REG_IND
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Sending Data to Your Network Application
Note: The “MP 3G Modems
TAIP Reference” (document
#2130312) provides a
description of the TAIP
commands you can use. This is
available at
www.sierrawireless.com.
Information about GPS modules,
including more documentation
on TAIP commands, is available
at www.trimble.com.
If the GPS timer is set to 0, the reporting interval is determined
by the configuration of the GPS module. If the module is
configured for TAIP, you can issue TAIP commands to change
the interval. An advantage of configuring the report frequency
with TAIP commands is that the interval between reports can
be based on elapsed time and/or distance travelled.
You can issue TAIP commands to the module locally through
3G Watcher using the AT command AT!MPGPSCMD. They
can also be sent remotely using MP Modem Manager. (See
“MP Modem Manager” on page 18.)
Reporting configurations set by sending TAIP commands will
be erased if the MP modem is powered off unless the
commands are included in the initialization strings for the MP
modem. These are executed each time the MP modem is
powered on. You can configure them locally by using 3G
Watcher (Tools > Options > GPS) or the AT command
AT!MPGPSINIT, or remotely with MP Modem Manager.
MP Modem
Host
Low rate timer = 5 minutes
Fast rate timer = 3 seconds
GPS timer = 0 seconds
TAIP report frequency =
every 200 meters or 10 seconds
TM_SUM_REG_IND
10 seconds
TM_SUM_REG_IND
200 meters
TM_SUM_REG_IND
200 meters
TM_SUM_REG_IND
Digital I/O alarm
TM_SUM_REG_IND
3 seconds
TM_SUM_REG_IND
3 seconds
TM_SUM_REG_IND
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
Note: More information on
NMEA message standards is
available at www.nmea.org.
If the module is configured for NMEA, data is sent at fivesecond intervals. (The interval cannot be changed when the
module is configured for NMEA because NMEA is strictly a
reporting protocol.)
Monitoring and Tracking configuration
You can use 3G Watcher to configure the MP modem to send
MTP data to a network server:
1. Select Tools > Options > MP > Monitor and Tracking and
complete the appropriate fields.
—or—
1. Issue the AT command AT!MPMTCONF along with the
required parameters.
IP Addressing
To send data to the MP modem, a host application on a
network server requires the IP address of the MP modem.
Service providers usually do not provide a static IP address to
each device on the network. The IP address is dynamically
assigned each time the MP modem registers on the network.
This means that the host application must identify each MP
modem by its Unique Mobile Device ID (discussed on page 56)
and capture its IP address as it registers.
If the MP modem has a public IP address, the host application
can simply check the IP address on the incoming data packets
to determine the IP address of the MP modem. However, if
NAT (Network Address Translation) is in use, the IP address
assigned to the MP modem is likely to be a private IP address.
This may present problems, as discussed in the next section.
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Sending Data to Your Network Application
The problem created by Network Address
Translation
Note: A similar problem may
occur if NAT is in use on your
network. The host application
may reside on a server that has
a private IP address. You must
configure the MP modem to
send data to a server on your
network with a public IP address,
and configure the server to
recognize the MTP data and
route it appropriately.
Many service providers use NAT (Network Address Translation) which effectively creates a firewall in front of the
network. Inside the network, the service providers assign
private IP addresses to registered devices, since public IP
addresses are not needed to route data within the network.
(This saves the service provider the expense of having a large
pool of public IP addresses.) A public IP address is substituted
for the private IP address when data packets pass through the
gateway between the network and the Internet. This public IP
address might be used on data transmissions from many
different devices. Therefore, the network server is only aware
of the substituted public IP address. If the server replies to this
address, the network cannot identify the device for which the
data was intended.
Assume, for example, an MP modem is registered on a
network. The MP modem is assigned a private IP address of
10.95.236.1. When the MP modem sends MTP data to the
network server, a public IP address of 24.7.6.30 is substituted at
the gateway to the Internet. When the network server receives
the data, the host application is only aware of the public IP
address, 24.7.6.30. However, if the network server sends data
back to the IP address 24.7.6.30, the network has no way of
identifying the MP modem for which it is intended and is
unable to route the data appropriately.
Firewall
Network
Internet
Figure 5-1: An MP modem connected to a network server. In this scenario, the
IP address is “NAT’d” from 10.95.236.1 to 24.7.6.30. The network server is
only aware of the address 24.7.6.30, but if it sends data to that address the
network cannot route the data to the MP modem.
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MP 595 Modem User Guide
Note: NetMotion Wireless, Inc.
develops client-server applications that attempt to overcome
the issues caused by NAT
addressing by assigning its own
consistent private IP addresses.
This software offers a potential
solution to NAT issues, but it is
untested by Sierra Wireless, and
Sierra Wireless does not provide
support for it.
Solutions to the NAT problem
If your service provider is using NAT, it is best to work with
the provider in devising a solution. Some service providers
offer, on request, accounts with public IP addresses. (There
may be additional charges for this.)
Another solution is to implement a frame relay connection
between your network and your service provider’s network.
The frame relay connection bypasses the address translation,
and is a method of overcoming NAT issues encouraged by
some service providers.
Firewall
Network
Internet
Frame relay
Retrieving the Unique Mobile
Device ID
In order to associate GPS and I/O data with a particular
vehicle, you must create a database on your server that links
each MP modem’s Unique Mobile Device ID to the vehicle in
which it is installed. The Unique Mobile Device ID is a number
derived from the ESN (Electronic Serial Number).
Use the AT command ATI4 to obtain the Unique Mobile Device
ID from each MP modem you deploy.
Note: See “MP Modem
Manager” on page 18.
56
You may also want to assign a device name to the MP modem
that identifies the vehicle in which it is installed. You can
assign this name locally using 3G Watcher or remotely using
MP Modem Manager. The device name is included in the MTP
data sent to the network server.
2130795
6: Support and Warranty
• Technical support
• Warranty
6
Technical support
To obtain technical support for your MP modem, and firmware
and software upgrades, please contact your account manager.
Online technical support resources are also available at
www.sierrawireless.com.
Warranty
Sierra Wireless, Inc. warrants the MP modem against all
defects in materials and workmanship for a period of three (3)
years from the date of purchase.
The sole responsibility of Sierra Wireless, Inc. under this
warranty is limited to either repair or, at the option of Sierra
Wireless, Inc., replacement of the MP modem. There are no
expressed or implied warranties, including those of fitness for
a particular purpose or merchantability, which extend beyond
the face hereof.
Sierra Wireless, Inc. is not liable for any incidental or conse­
quential damages arising from the use, misuse, or installation
of the MP modem.
This warranty does not apply if the serial number label has
been removed, or if the MP modem has been subjected to
physical abuse, improper installation, or unauthorized modifi­
cation.
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7: Technical Specifications
7
This chapter provides technical data for the MP 595 modem.
Note: The technical specifications are subject to change without
notice.
Regulatory, radio frequency and
electrical specifications
Approvals
FCC
Industry Canada
EU RoHS
Network compliance
CDMA 1xEV-DO Revision A (IS-856-A)
CDMA 1xEV-DO Revision 0 (IS-856)
CDMA 1X (IS-2000)
CDMA IS-95A
Voltage range
9–36 VDC
Reverse polarity
protection
Compliant
Current draw
Max transmit (23 dBm output)a
Cellular: 375 mA
PCS: 395 mA
Typical transmit: 250 mA average
Receive: 215 mA
Idle (Ignition Sense off): 2 mA
Maximum output
power
23 dBm (200 mW)
Transmit
PCS: 1850 to 1910 MHz
Cellular: 824 to 849 MHz
Receive
PCS: 1930 to 1990 MHz
Cellular: 869 to 894 MHz
a. This applies to a typical installation with a well-matched antenna.
All current values are measured with an input voltage of 12 V.
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
59
MP 595 Modem User Guide
Environmental specifications
Operating
temperature
-30°C to +70°C
(-22°F to +158°F)
Storage
temperature
-40°C to +85°C
(-40°F to +185°F)
Humidity
95% RH non-condensing
MIL 202G, Sections 103B and 106G
Rain / splash
MIL 810F, Section 506.4, Procedure III
SAE KJ1455, Section 4.4
Drop
MIL 810F, Section 516.5
SAE J1455, Section 4.10.3.1
Shock
MIL 202G, Section 213B
MIL 810F, Section 516.5
SAE J1455, Sections 4.10.3.2 and 4.10.3.4
Vibration
MIL 202G, Section 214
MIL 810F, Section 514.5
SAE J1455, Section 4.9
Sand / dust
bombardment
MIL 810F, Section 510.4, Procedures I-III
Salt fog
MIL 810F, Section 509.4
ESD
Operational ± 6 kV contact, as per
IEC 61000-4-2
EU RoHS
Compliant
Weight and dimensions
60
Weight
0.9 kg (2 lbs)
Height
49 mm (1.93 in)
Width
138 mm (5.43 in)
Length
176 mm (6.93 in)
Case material
Metal
Case surface
Scratch-resistant powder coat paint
2130795
Technical Specifications
Host interfaces
Serial
One — DB9 female
USB
One — USB Type B, USB 1.1/2.0 compliant
Ethernet
One — RJ45 female
Other interfaces Input / output
One — High-density DB15 female
Network antenna
One — TNC female
Receive diversity antenna
One — SMA female
GPS antenna
One — SMA female
Reset
One — Manual reset button
Power
One — Molex 39-01-0029 female
GPS specifications Rev 1.3 Aug.07
Satellite channels
12 channel, continuous tracking
Protocols
TSIP, TAIP, NMEA 0183 V3.0
Acquisition times
Re-acquisition: 2 sec.
Hot start: 9 sec.
Warm start: 35 sec.
Cold start: 39 sec.
Accuracy
Horizontal: < 3-m (50%), < 8-m (90%)
Altitude: < 10-m (50%), < 16-m (90%)
Velocity: 0.06 m/sec
Sensitivity
Tracking: –152 dBm
Acquisition: –142 dBm
Operational limits
Velocity: 515 m/sec.
61
MP 595 Modem User Guide
I/O port characteristics
Absolute maximum voltage
-0.3 VDC to 36 VDC
Digital I/O count
Total: 4; two dedicated inputs, two
configurable input/outputs
Digital inputs
Open collector, max current 500 mA
Vih, min 2 VDC
Vil, max 0.8 VDC
Vih, max 36 VDC
Digital outputs
Open collector
Analog input count
Total: 4
Analog input
Zero-scale: 0 VDC
Full-scale: 3.3 VDC
Leakage current: 66 µA
3G Watcher software
62
Operating systems:
laptops
Microsoft® Windows® Vista™, 2000, and XP
Language
English, French
2130795
8: Regulatory Information
• Canada
• U.S.A.
Note: Unauthorized modifica
tions or changes not expressly
approved by Sierra Wireless,
Inc. could void compliance with
regulatory rules, and thereby
your authority to use this
equipment.
8
Canada
To ensure that the MP modem meets Health Canada’s Safety
Code 6 requirements, a separation distance of at least 20 cm
(8 inches) must be maintained between the modem’s CDMA
antenna and the body of the user and any nearby persons at all
times and in all applications and uses. Additionally, the
maximum antenna gain in the PCS band, including cable loss,
must not exceed 4.15 dBi, and in the Cellular band, must not
exceed 5.1 dBi, to comply with Industry Canada and Health
Canada regulations limiting both maximum RF output power
and human exposure to RF radiation.
U.S.A.
To comply with FCC regulations limiting both maximum RF
output power and human exposure to RF radiation, the
maximum antenna gain, including cable loss, in the PCS band,
must not exceed 4.15 dBi, and in the Cellular band, must not
exceed 5.1 dBi.
The CDMA antenna must be mounted such that there is a
separation distance of at least 20 cm (8 inches) between the
CDMA antenna and the body of the user or any nearby
persons.
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the
limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC
Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a
commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accor
dance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to
radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential
area is likely to cause harmful interference in which case the user will
be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
63
MP 595 Modem User Guide
64
2130795
Index
Numerics
E
1X, 15
1x-EVDO Rev. 0, 15
1x-EVDO Rev. A, 14
3G Watcher, 39– 40
electrostatic discharge (ESD), 60
A
account, 34
activation, 34
activation, 34
alert rate timer, 51
analog input
configuration, 48
wiring, 46
analog sensor, 47
antenna, 26
antenna connector, 23
approvals, 59
AT commands
I/O configuration, 47
MTP configuration, 51
unique mobile device ID, 56
audio connector, 23
C
CDMA, 14
connectors, 23
current, 59
D
DB15HD
connector, 23
DB9
connector, 23
pinouts, 33
DB9. See serial
device name, 56
dial-up connections, 15
digital input
configuration, 49
wiring, 44
digital output
configuration, 49
wiring, 45
dimensions, 60
documentation, 18
F
firewall, 55
frequencies
receive, 59
transmit, 59
frequency bands, 16, 59
G
gauges. See I/O devices
GPS
antenna, 27
configuration and reporting, 41– 43
connector, 23
performance, 61
GPS timer, 51
grounding, 26, 31
H
headset
connector, 23
height, 60
Host interfaces, 61
humidity, 60
I
I/O
cable, 34
connector, 23
I/O devices, 43– 49
alarm, 52
analog, 46
digital, 44
I/O port characteristics, 62
ignition options, 37
ignition wiring, 29, 30
inputs. See I/O devices
interfaces, 61
IS-95, 15
L
LEDs, 38
low rate timer, 51
Rev 1.3 Aug.07
65
MP 595 Modem User Guide
M
manuals, 18
mounting, 24– 26
mounting (the modem), 24
MTP
configuring, 51
report frequency, 51
N
NAT, 55
NMEA, 42
O
on/off switch, 30
output power, 59
outputs. See I/O devices
P
panic button, 45
pinouts (on I/O connector), 44
power connector, 23, 29
power harness, 29, 31
power on options, 37
power supply, 22
power wiring, 28
private IP address, 55
public IP address, 55
R
receive diversity, 16
receive frequencies, 59
regulatory information, 63
report frequency, 51
reporting engines, 51
reset button, 38, 39
roaming, 16
S
sensors. See I/O devices
serial
versus USB, 16
66
serial cable
maximum length, 21
serial connector, 23
shock, 60
SIM
insertion, 35
SMA connector, 23
specifications, 59– 62
status indicators, 38
T
TAIP
reporting protocol, 42
technical specifications, 59– 62
temperature
operating, 60
storage, 60
timers
report frequency, 51
TNC connector, 23
transmit frequencies, 59
U
unique mobile device ID, 56
USB
versus serial connection, 16
USB cable
maximum length, 21
USB connector, 23
V
vibration, 60
virtual serial port, 16
voltage, 44
voltage range, 59
voltage specifications (serial cable), 33
VPN support, 17
W
warranty, 57
Watcher, 39– 40
weight, 60
width, 60
wire splicing, 31
2130795

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