BTEC Specialist qualifications mixed assessment - Edexcel

BTEC Specialist qualifications mixed assessment - Edexcel

Specification

BTEC Specialist qualifications

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House

Operations (QCF)

For first teaching September 2011

Edexcel, a Pearson company, is the UK’s largest awarding body, offering academic and vocational qualifications and testing to more than 25,000 schools, colleges, employers and other places of learning in the UK and in over 100 countries worldwide. Qualifications include

GCSE, AS and A Level, NVQ and our BTEC suite of vocational qualifications from entry level to BTEC Higher National Diplomas, recognised by employers and higher education institutions worldwide.

We deliver 9.4 million exam scripts each year, with more than 90% of exam papers marked onscreen annually. As part of Pearson, Edexcel continues to invest in cutting-edge technology that has revolutionised the examinations and assessment system. This includes the ability to provide detailed performance data to teachers and students which helps to raise attainment.

References to third party material made in this specification are made in good faith. Edexcel does not endorse, approve or accept responsibility for the content of materials, which may be subject to change, or any opinions expressed therein. (Material may include textbooks,

journals, magazines and other publications and websites.)

Authorised by Martin Stretton

Prepared by Ana Abreu

Publications Code BA028998

All the material in this publication is copyright

© Pearson Education Limited 2011

BTEC Specialist qualification title covered by this specification

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF)

This qualification has been accredited to the Qualifications and Credit Framework

(QCF) and is eligible for public funding as determined by the Department for

Education (DfE) under Section 96 of the Learning and Skills Act 2000.

The qualification title listed above features in the funding lists published annually by the DfE and the regularly updated website www.education.gov.uk/. The QCF

Qualification Number (QN) should be used by centres when they wish to seek public funding for their learners. Each unit within a qualification will also have a QCF unit code.

The QCF qualification and unit codes will appear on learners’ final certification documentation.

The Qualification Number for the qualification in this publication is:

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF) 600/1950/5

This qualification title will appear on learners’ certificates. Learners need to be made aware of this when they are recruited by the centre and registered with

Edexcel.

This qualification is accredited by Ofqual as being Stand Alone.

Welcome to the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in

Front of House Operations (QCF)

We are delighted to introduce our new qualification, which will be available for teaching from September 2011.

This qualification conforms with the requirements of the new QCF (Qualifications and Credit Framework).

Focusing on the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House

Operations (QCF)

In this qualification learners will develop the underpinning skills, knowledge and understanding required to work in the hospitality industry.

The Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF) gives learners opportunities to progress into employment as hospitality staff, or to

Specialist qualifications such as the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Hospitality and Catering Principles (Front of House Reception) (QCF) or the Edexcel BTEC

Level 3 in Hospitality Supervision and Leadership Principles (QCF).

Straightforward to implement, teach and assess

Implementing BTECs couldn’t be easier. They are designed to fit easily into your curriculum and can be studied independently or alongside existing qualifications, to suit the interests and aspirations of learners. The clarity of assessment makes grading learner attainment more simple.

Engaging for everyone

Learners of all abilities flourish when they can apply their own knowledge, skills and enthusiasm to a subject. BTEC qualifications make explicit the link between theoretical learning and the world of work by giving learners the opportunity to apply their research, skills and knowledge to work-related contexts and case studies. These applied and practical BTEC approaches give all learners the impetus they need to achieve and the skills they require for workplace or education progression.

Recognition

BTECs are understood and recognised by a large number of organisations in a wide range of sectors. BTEC qualifications are developed with key industry representatives and Sector Skills Councils (SSC) to ensure that they meet employer and learner needs — in this case the SSC People 1st.

All you need to get started

To help you off to a flying start, we’ve developed an enhanced specification that gives you all the information you need to start teaching BTEC qualifications. This includes:

• a framework of equivalencies, so you can see how this qualification compares with other Edexcel vocational qualifications

• information on rules of combination, structures and quality assurance, so you can deliver the qualification with confidence

• explanations of the content’s relationship with the learning outcomes

• guidance on assessment, and what the learner must produce to achieve the unit.

Don’t forget that we’re always here to offer curriculum and qualification updates, local training and network opportunities, advice, guidance and support.

Contents

What are BTEC Level 2 Specialist qualifications?

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate

Key features of the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House

Operations (QCF)

National Occupational Standards

Rules of combination

Rules of combination for Edexcel BTEC Level 2 qualifications

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF)

Assessment

Quality assurance of centres

Approval

Quality Assurance Guidance

Programme design and delivery

Mode of delivery

Resources

Delivery approach

Access and recruitment

Restrictions on learner entry

Access arrangements and special considerations

Recognition of Prior Learning

Unit format

Unit title

Unit code

QCF level

Credit value

Guided learning hours

Unit aim

Unit introduction

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Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

Unit content

Essential guidance for tutors

Units

Unit 1: Hospitality Front Office Operations

Unit 2: Principles of Customer Service in Hospitality, Leisure, Travel

Unit 3: Front of House and Accommodation Practices

Unit 4: Develop Personal and Organisational Effectiveness

Unit 5: Deal With Customers Across a Language Divide

Unit 6: Maintain and Deal with Payments

Further information

Useful publications

How to obtain National Occupational Standards

Professional development and training

Annexe A

The Edexcel qualification framework for the hospitality industry

Annexe B

Wider curriculum mapping

Annexe C

National Occupational Standards/mapping with NVQs

Annexe D

Glossary of accreditation terminology

Annexe E

BTEC Specialist and Professional qualifications

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What are BTEC Level 2 Specialist qualifications?

BTEC Specialist qualifications are qualifications at Entry Level to Level 3 in the

Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) and are designed to provide specialist work-related qualifications in a range of sectors. They give learners the knowledge, understanding and skills that they need to prepare for employment. The qualifications also provide career development opportunities for those already in work. Consequently, they provide a course of study for full-time or part-time learners in schools, colleges and training centres.

BTEC Specialist qualifications provide much of the underpinning knowledge and understanding for the National Occupational Standards for the sector, where these are appropriate. They are supported by the relevant Standards Setting Body (SSB) or Sector Skills Council (SSC). A number of BTEC Specialist qualifications are recognised as the knowledge components of Apprenticeships Frameworks.

On successful completion of a BTEC Specialist qualification, learners can progress to or within employment and/or continue their study in the same, or related vocational area.

Care needs to be exercised when registering learners as the titling conventions and titles for the revised QCF versions of the BTEC Level 2 Firsts and BTEC Level 3

Nationals have changed.

The QCF is a framework which awards credit for qualifications and units and aims to present qualifications in a way that is easy to understand and measure. It enables learners to gain qualifications at their own pace along flexible routes.

There are three sizes of qualification in the QCF:

• Award (1 to 12 credits)

• Certificate (13 to 36 credits)

Diploma (37 credits and above).

Every unit and qualification in the framework will have a credit value.

The credit value of a unit specifies the number of credits that will be awarded to a learner who has achieved the learning outcomes of the unit.

The credit value of a unit is based on:

• one credit for those learning outcomes achievable in 10 hours of learning

• learning time – defined as the time taken by learners at the level of the unit, on average, to complete the learning outcomes of the unit to the standard determined by the assessment criteria.

The credit value of the unit will remain constant in all contexts, regardless of the assessment method used for the qualification(s) to which it contributes.

Learning time should address all learning (including assessment) relevant to the learning outcomes, regardless of where, when and how the learning has taken place.

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Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate

The Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate (QCF) offers an engaging programme for those who are clear about the vocational area they want to learn more about.

These learners may wish to extend their programme through the study of a related

GCSE, a complementary NVQ or other related vocational or personal and social development qualification. These learning programmes can be developed to allow learners to study complementary qualifications without duplication of content.

For adult learners, the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate (QCF) can extend their knowledge and understanding of work in a particular sector. It is a suitable qualification for those wishing to change career or move into a particular area of employment following a career break.

Key features of the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House

Operations (QCF)

The Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF) has been developed to give learners the opportunity to:

• engage in learning that is relevant to them and which will provide opportunities to develop a range of skills and techniques, personal skills and attributes essential for successful performance in working life

• achieve a nationally recognised, level 2 vocationally-related qualification

• progress to employment in the hospitality industry

• progress to related general and/or vocational qualifications.

National Occupational Standards

Where relevant, Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Specialist qualifications are designed to provide some of the underpinning knowledge and understanding for the National

Occupational Standards (NOS), as well as developing practical skills in preparation for work and possible achievement of NVQs in due course. NOS form the basis of

National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs). Edexcel BTEC Level 2 (QCF) qualifications do not purport to deliver occupational competence in the sector, which should be demonstrated in a work context.

Each unit in the specification identifies links to elements of the NOS in Annexe C.

The Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF) relates to the People 1st Hospitality National Occupational Standards (NOS).

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Rules of combination

The rules of combination specify the credits that need to be achieved, through the completion of particular units, for the qualification to be awarded. All accredited qualifications within the QCF have rules of combination.

Rules of combination for Edexcel BTEC Level 2 qualifications

When combining units for the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House

Operations (QCF), it is the centre’s responsibility to ensure that the following rules of combination are adhered to.

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF)

1 Qualification credit value: 30 credits.

2 All credits must be achieved from the units listed in this specification.

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Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF)

The Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF) is a 30credit and 188-guided-learning-hour (GLH) qualification that consists of six mandatory units providing for a combined total of 30 credits.

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF)

Unit Mandatory units

1

2

3

4

Hospitality Front Office Operations

Principles of Customer Service in Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism

Front of House and Accommodation Practices

Develop Personal and Organisational Effectiveness

5

6

Deal With Customers Across a Language Divide

Maintain and Deal with Payments

5

9

8

2

Credit Level

5

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

4

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Assessment

This qualification has the option of being assessed through a portfolio of evidence, onscreen multiple choice tests or a combination of portfolio of evidence and onscreen multiple choice test for Unit 2: Principles of Customer Service in

Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism. No other form of assessment is available for this qualification.

For the latest information concerning the mode of assessment for units please see separate document on the qualification webpage

(www.edexcel.com/quals/Specialist/front-of-house-lvl2) entitled Assessment details

for units.

The units are criterion referenced, based on the achievement of all the specified learning outcomes.

Each of the units within the qualification has specified assessment criteria. The overall grading in the qualification is a pass, based upon the successful completion of a portfolio of evidence or the external assessment(s) or a combination of both.

External assessment using onscreen multiple choice tests assesses all of the learning outcomes in the individual units and meets the standard determined by the specified assessment criteria in the units.

All of the content in each unit that is being assessed by onscreen multiple

choice tests is mandatory. Therefore tutors must ensure that learners have

covered all the content before sitting any external test.

Information relating to external assessments can be found in the Centre Guidance

for Tested Vocational Qualifications which can be found on Edexcel website

(www.edexcel.com).

Guidance

The purpose of assessment is to ensure that effective learning has taken place to give learners the opportunity to:

• meet the standard determined by the assessment criteria and

• achieve the learning outcomes.

In this qualification the following unit can be externally assessed by onscreen multiple choice tests:

Unit 2: Principles of Customer Service in Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism

All assessments created by centres for the development of portfolio evidence should be reliable and fit for purpose, and should be built on the unit assessment criteria. Assessment tasks and activities should enable learners to produce valid, sufficient and reliable evidence that relates directly to the specified criteria. Centres should enable learners to produce evidence in a variety of forms, which may include performance observation, presentations and posters, along with projects, or time-constrained assessments.

Centres are encouraged to emphasise the practical application of the assessment criteria, providing a realistic scenario for learners to adopt, and making maximum use of practical activities. The creation of assignments that are fit for purpose is vital to achievement and their importance cannot be over-emphasised.

The assessment criteria must be clearly indicated in the assignment briefs. This gives learners focus and helps with internal verification and standardisation

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processes. It will also help to ensure that learner feedback is specific to the assessment criteria.

When designing assignment briefs, centres are encouraged to identify common topics and themes. A central feature of vocational assessment is that it allows for assessment to be:

• current, ie to reflect the most recent developments and issues

• local, ie to reflect the employment context of the delivering centre

• flexible to reflect learner needs, ie at a time and in a way that matches the learner’s requirements so that they can demonstrate achievement.

Qualification grade

Learners who achieve the minimum eligible credit value specified by the rule of combination will achieve the qualification at pass grade.

In the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Specialist qualifications each unit has a credit value which specifies the number of credits that will be awarded to a learner who has achieved the learning outcomes of the unit. This has been based on:

• one credit for those learning outcomes achievable in 10 hours of learning time

• learning time being defined as the time taken by learners at the level of the unit, on average, to complete the learning outcomes of the unit to the standard determined by the assessment criteria

• the credit value of the unit remaining constant regardless of the method of assessment used or the qualification to which it contributes.

Quality assurance of centres

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Specialist qualifications provide a flexible structure for learners enabling programmes of varying credits and combining different levels. For the purposes of quality assurance, all individual qualifications and units are considered as a whole.

Centres delivering Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Specialist qualifications must be committed to ensuring the quality of the units and qualifications they deliver.

The Edexcel quality assurance processes for this qualification will depend on the method of assessment chosen by the centre.

Centre quality assurance and assessment is monitored and guaranteed by Edexcel through the quality review process.

For centres choosing to assess the qualification by a portfolio of evidence

or a combination of a portfolio and an onscreen multiple choice test the

Edexcel quality assurance processes will involve:

• centre approval for those centres not already recognised as a centre for BTEC qualifications

• approval for the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 qualifications and units

compulsory Edexcel-provided training and standardisation for internal verifiers and assessors leading to the accreditation of lead internal verifiers via the OSCA system

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• quality review of the centre verification practice

• Quality Review and Development by Edexcel of overarching processes and quality standards

• remedial training and/or assessment sampling for centres identified through standardisation or risk assessment activities as having inadequate quality, assessment or internal verification processes.

For centres using this qualification as part of an Apprenticeship the Edexcel quality-assurance processes will involve:

• gaining centre recognition and qualification approval if a centre is not currently approved to offer Edexcel qualifications

• annual visits by occupationally competent and qualified Edexcel Standards

Verifiers for sampling of internal verification and assessor decisions for the occupational sector

• the provision of support, advice and guidance towards the achievement of

National Occupational Standards.

Approval

Centres are required to declare their commitment to ensuring the quality of the programme of learning and providing appropriate assessment opportunities for learners that lead to valid and accurate assessment outcomes. In addition, centres will commit to undertaking defined training and online standardisation activities.

Centres already holding BTEC approval are able to gain qualification approval online. New centres must complete a centre approval application.

Quality Assurance Guidance

Details of quality assurance for the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 qualifications are set out in centre guidance which is published on our website (www.edexcel.com).

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Programme design and delivery

Mode of delivery

Edexcel does not normally define the mode of delivery for Edexcel BTEC Entry to

Level 3 qualifications. Centres are free to offer the qualifications using any mode of delivery (such as full-time, part-time, evening only, distance learning) that meets their learners’ needs. Whichever mode of delivery is used, centres must ensure that learners have appropriate access to the resources identified in the specification and to the subject specialists delivering the units. This is particularly important for learners studying for the qualification through open or distance learning.

Learners studying for the qualification on a part-time basis bring with them a wealth of experience that should be utilised to maximum effect by tutors and assessors. The use of assessment evidence drawn from learners’ work environments should be encouraged. Those planning the programme should aim to enhance the vocational nature of the qualification by:

• liaising with employers to ensure a course relevant to learners’ specific needs

• accessing and using non-confidential data and documents from learners’ workplaces

• including sponsoring employers in the delivery of the programme and, where appropriate, in the assessment

• linking with company-based/workplace training programmes

• making full use of the variety of experience of work and life that learners bring to the programme.

Resources

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Specialist qualifications are designed to give learners an understanding of the skills needed for specific vocational sectors. Physical resources need to support the delivery of the programme and the assessment of the learning outcomes, and should therefore normally be of industry standard. Learning resources also need to support the delivery of the programme and the assessment of the learning outcomes. Staff delivering programmes and conducting the assessments should be familiar with current practice and standards in the sector concerned. Centres will need to meet any specific resource requirements to gain approval from Edexcel.

Where specific resources are required these have been indicated in individual units in the Essential resources sections.

Delivery approach

It is important that centres develop an approach to teaching and learning that supports the vocational nature of Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Specialist qualifications, the mode of delivery and assessment. Specifications give a balance of practical skill development and knowledge requirements, some of which can be theoretical in nature. Tutors and assessors need to ensure that appropriate links are made between theory and practical application and that the knowledge base is applied to the sector. This requires the development of relevant and up-to-date teaching

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materials that allow learners to apply their learning to actual events and activity within the sector. Maximum use should be made of learners’ experience.

All of the content in each externally assessed unit is mandatory. Therefore tutors must ensure that learners cover all the content before sitting any

external test.

Access and recruitment

Edexcel’s policy regarding access to its qualifications is that:

• they should be available to everyone who is capable of reaching the required standards

• they should be free from any barriers that restrict access and progression

• there should be equal opportunities for all wishing to access the qualifications.

Centres are required to recruit learners to BTEC qualifications with integrity. This will include ensuring that applicants have appropriate information and advice about the qualifications and that the qualification will meet their needs. Centres should take appropriate steps to assess each applicant’s potential and make a professional judgement about their ability to successfully complete the programme of study and achieve the qualification. This assessment will need to take account of the support available to the learner within the centre during their programme of study and any specific support that might be necessary to allow the learner to access the assessment for the qualification. Centres should consult Edexcel’s policy on learners with particular requirements.

Centres will need to review the entry profile of qualifications and/or experience held by applicants, considering whether this profile shows an ability to progress to a higher level qualification.

Restrictions on learner entry

The Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF) is accredited on the QCF for learners aged 16 and above.

In particular sectors the restrictions on learner entry might also relate to any physical or legal barriers, for example people working in health, care or education are likely to be subject to police checks.

Access arrangements and special considerations

Edexcel’s policy on access arrangements and special considerations for BTEC and

Edexcel NVQ qualifications aims to enhance access to the qualifications for learners with disabilities and other difficulties (as defined by the Equality Act 2010 and the amendments to the Act) without compromising the assessment of skills, knowledge, understanding or competence.

Further details are given in the policy document Access Arrangements and Special

Considerations for BTEC and Edexcel NVQ Qualifications, which can be found on the

Edexcel website (www.edexcel.com). This policy replaces the previous Edexcel policy (Assessment of Vocationally Related Qualifications: Regulations and Guidance

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Relating to Learners with Special Requirements, 2002) concerning learners with particular requirements.

Recognition of Prior Learning

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is a method of assessment (leading to the award of credit) that considers whether a learner can demonstrate that they can meet the assessment requirements for a unit through knowledge, understanding or skills they already possess and so do not need to develop through a course of learning.

Edexcel encourages centres to recognise learners’ previous achievements and experiences whether at work, home or at leisure, as well as in the classroom. RPL provides a route for the recognition of the achievements resulting from continuous learning.

RPL enables recognition of achievement from a range of activities using any valid assessment methodology. Provided that the assessment requirements of a given unit or qualification have been met, the use of RPL is acceptable for accrediting a unit, units or a whole qualification. Evidence of learning must be sufficient, reliable and valid.

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Unit format

All units in Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Specialist qualifications have a standard format.

The unit format is designed to give guidance on the requirements of the qualification for learners, tutors, assessors and those responsible for monitoring national standards.

Each unit has the following sections.

Unit title

The unit title is accredited on the QCF and this form of words will appear on the learner’s Notification of Performance (NOP).

Unit code

Each unit is assigned a QCF unit code that appears with the unit title on The

Register of Regulated Qualifications.

QCF level

All units and qualifications within the QCF will have a level assigned to them, which represents the level of achievement. There are nine levels of achievement, from

Entry Level to Level 8. The level of the unit has been informed by the QCF level descriptors and, where appropriate, the NOS and/or other sector/professional benchmarks.

Credit value

All units have a credit value. The minimum credit value that may be determined for a unit is one, and credits can only be awarded in whole numbers. Learners will be awarded credits for the successful completion of whole units.

Guided learning hours

Guided learning hours are defined as all the times when a tutor, trainer or facilitator is present to give specific guidance towards the learning aim being studied on a programme. This definition includes lectures, tutorials and supervised study in, for example, open learning centres and learning workshops. It also includes time spent by staff assessing learners’ achievements. It does not include time spent by staff in day-to-day marking of practice multiple-choice questions, assignments or homework where the learner is not present.

Unit aim

The aim provides a clear summary of the purpose of the unit and is a succinct statement that summarises the learning outcomes of the unit.

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Unit introduction

The unit introduction gives the reader an appreciation of the unit in the vocational setting of the qualification, as well as highlighting the focus of the unit. It gives the reader a snapshot of the unit and the key knowledge, skills and understanding gained while studying the unit. The unit introduction also highlights any links to the appropriate vocational sector by describing how the unit relates to that sector.

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of a unit set out what a learner is expected to know, understand or be able to do as the result of a process of learning.

Assessment criteria

The assessment criteria of a unit specify the standard a learner is expected to meet to demonstrate that a learning outcome, or set of learning outcomes, has been achieved. The learning outcomes and assessment criteria clearly articulate the learning achievement for which the credit will be awarded at the level assigned to the unit.

Unit content

The unit content identifies the breadth of knowledge, skills and understanding needed to design and deliver a programme of learning to achieve each of the learning outcomes. This is informed by the underpinning knowledge and understanding requirements of the related National Occupational Standards (NOS), where relevant. The content provides the range of subject material for the programme of learning and specifies the skills, knowledge and understanding required for achievement of the unit.

Each learning outcome is stated in full and then the key phrases or concepts related to that learning outcome are listed in italics followed by the subsequent range of related topics.

Relationship between content and assessment criteria

The learner should have the opportunity to cover all of the unit content.

It is not a requirement of the unit specification that all of the content is assessed.

However, the indicative content will need to be covered in a programme of learning in order for learners to be able to meet the standard determined in the assessment criteria.

Content structure and terminology

The information below shows how the unit content is structured and gives the terminology used to explain the different components within the content.

Learning outcome: this is shown in bold at the beginning of each section of content.

Italicised sub-heading: it contains a key phrase or concept. This is content which must be covered in the delivery of the unit. Colons mark the end of an italicised sub-heading.

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Elements of content: the elements are in plain text and amplify the subheading. The elements must be covered in the delivery of the unit. Semi-colons mark the end of an element.

• Brackets contain amplification of content which must be covered in the delivery of the unit.

‘eg’ is a list of examples, used for indicative amplification of an element (that is, the content specified in this amplification could be covered or could be replaced by other, similar material).

Essential guidance for tutors

This section gives tutors additional guidance and amplification to aid understanding and a consistent level of delivery and assessment. It is divided into the following sections.

Delivery – explains the content’s relationship to the learning outcomes and offers guidance about possible approaches to delivery. This section is based on the more usual delivery modes but is not intended to rule out alternative approaches.

Outline learning plans – these have been produced to support centres. Outline learning plans are for guidance only and are not mandatory.

Assessment – gives amplification about the nature and type of evidence that learners need to produce in order to achieve the unit. This section should be read in conjunction with the assessment criteria.

Essential resources – identifies any specialist resources needed to allow learners to generate the evidence required for each unit. The centre will be asked to ensure that any requirements are in place when it seeks approval from Edexcel to offer the qualification.

Indicative resource materials – gives a list of learner resource material that benchmarks the level of study.

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Units

Unit 1: Hospitality Front Office Operations

Unit 2: Principles of Customer Service in Hospitality, Leisure, Travel

Tourism

Unit 3: Front of House and Accommodation Practices

Unit 4: Develop Personal and Organisational Effectiveness

Unit 5: Deal With Customers Across a Language Divide

Unit 6: Maintain and Deal with Payments

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25

33

43

53

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Unit 1:

U

NIT

1: H

OSPITALITY

F

RONT

O

FFICE

O

PERATIONS

Hospitality Front Office

Operations

Unit code:

QCF Level 2:

M/601/0181

BTEC Specialist

Credit value: 5

Guided learning hours: 30

Unit aim

The aim of this unit is to enable learners to gain knowledge of the responsibilities, purpose and roles of the front office and gain skills used in the front office.

Unit introduction

The front office is central to the operation of many hospitality businesses and is commonly known as ‘reception’. It is important for learners studying the hospitality industry to understand that the front office is an integral part of many businesses.

The impressions guests receive from this area can impact hugely on guest satisfaction and ultimately on the success of a business.

The front office includes all the activities involved in administering the different stages of a guest’s stay – before arrival, on arrival, during the stay and on departure – and responding to the individual needs of those guests. It involves taking bookings, checking guests in and out and administering their bills and payments while demonstrating good customer service skills. Learners will investigate the roles and responsibilities of those people working in the front office environment, including reservations, reception, concierge and portering.

Learners will be involved in the practical aspects of the job roles studied either through real or simulated activities, such as welcoming visitors, dealing with enquiries and allocating rooms.

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U

NIT

1: H

OSPITALITY

F

RONT

O

FFICE

O

PERATIONS

Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit.

The assessment criteria determine the standard required to achieve the unit.

On completion of this unit a learner should:

Learning outcomes

1 Know the responsibilities and purpose of the front office

2 Know the roles of the front office

3 Be able to demonstrate skills used in the front office

Assessment criteria

1.1 Describe the responsibilities and purpose of the front office

2.1 Describe the roles of the front office

3.1 Demonstrate guest service skills when meeting and greeting guests and dealing with guest enquiries

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Unit content

1 Know the responsibilities and purpose of the front office

Purpose: welcome; first impressions; guest cycle

Front office: front desk; reception; back office

Job roles: manager; shift leader; receptionist; telephonist; concierge; hall porter; standard dress code

Responsibilities: reservations; check in; registration; guest accounting; check out; guest services; administration; customer service; answering the telephone; security

Legal: Data Protection Act 1998

2 Know the roles of the front office

Meeting customer needs: type of room; disabled facilities; extra beds; special requests eg ground floor, sea view, guest history

Communication: reservation systems (manual, computerised); forecasting; reports; liaison with other departments eg housekeeping, maintenance, banqueting

Documentation: arrival and departure lists; room status reports

Standards: checking areas; use of checklists; quality standards

Statistics: room occupancy; average room rates; forecasting

Security: safe deposit; lost property; data protection; control of keys

3 Be able to demonstrate skills used in the front office

Front office skills: meeting and greeting; handling complaints; dealing with enquiries (face to face, by telephone, email, online bookings, in writing); receiving payments; selling skills; local knowledge; searching for information; carrying out currency exchange; booking travel services eg taxi, train

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery

This unit gives learners an insight into front office operations, focusing mostly but not exclusively on the hotel business as the related activities can also be found in other businesses such as on cruise ships, in care homes and in halls of residence.

Visits to a variety of businesses to observe and experience different providers of front office services are essential so learners understand the diversity of the services provided. These businesses may range from small guest houses to large 4- and 5-star hotels and halls of residence. Guest speakers will also help learners to understand the roles and responsibilities involved in working in the front office.

Watching related TV programmes may benefit some learners who have limited access to hospitality venues.

Learners must have the opportunity to develop and demonstrate practical skills in delivering guest services in a front office environment. This may be through a work placement and/or simulated exercises such as role play. Tutors may find it difficult to arrange placements on the ‘front desk’ as many businesses are unwilling to place untrained people in a high-profile location. The use of simulated activities may therefore be required. These activities will need to be accompanied by relevant witness statements and/or observation reports.

It is not essential at this stage for learners to be able to use sophisticated software when carrying out practical activities. The emphasis should be on the processes involved and the required customer service skills. Therefore these tasks may be carried out by alternative means, such as working on a school reception or reception in a training restaurant, or through hosting a centre open day.

Examples of documentation used in the industry will be required to demonstrate how businesses define and maintain standards in accommodation and how they take bookings and check in guests at the front office.

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Outline learning plan

The outline learning plan has been included in this unit as guidance and can be used in conjunction with the delivery of multiple choice tests.

The outline learning plan demonstrates one way of planning the delivery and assessment of this unit.

Topic and suggested activities

Introduction to unit.

Tutor-led discussion about the purpose of front office services.

Learners to be given a selection of job titles on blue card and job descriptions on yellow card. In groups, learners must match the job with its description. Each group to present their findings to the others and discuss if correct.

Assignment 1 – The Responsibilities and Purpose of the Front Office

Presentation about the responsibilities and purpose of the front office.

Tutor-led discussion on meeting customer needs, communication, standards, statistics and security.

Visit to a large hotel to learn about the front office service it provides and the role of the manager and front office team. Ideally, learners will have the opportunity to observe a guest being checked in and checked out, a reservation procedure etc, and to see relevant documentation being used.

Assignment 2 – The Roles of The Front Office

Produce a flowchart about the roles of the front office and its links with the rest of the business.

Learners to work with front office staff in local hotel.

Learners must be taught how to meet, greet and answer guest enquiries, and demonstrate their understanding practically. A witness statement provided by the hospitality business manager or supervisor will provide evidence for demonstrating the skills required to provide guest services.

Assignment 3 – Front Office Skills

Based on meeting, greeting and answering guest enquiries using real or simulated exercises such as role play or in-tray exercises or participating in related activities.

Tutorial support and feedback.

Review of unit and programme of assignments.

Assessment

Any evidence submitted for assessment criteria requiring the practical demonstration of skills, for example role play or the ability to work independently, must be supported by an observation sheet(s) signed by the assessor identifying how the specific criteria have been met. These may also be supported by a witness testimony from a work placement or work shadow activity that details the learner’s performance, either a checklist or a free written statement.

To provide evidence for AC1.1, learners must describe the responsibilities of people working in the front office and the purpose of the front office. This may be carried

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For AC2.1, learners need to describe the roles of the front office. This could follow the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality venue such as a large hotel.

Learners will be expected to focus on the types of communication required between the departments and on the documentation used to meet customer needs and maintain the standards set by the business.

To achieve AC3.1, learners must be given the opportunity to demonstrate guest service skills when meeting and greeting guests and when dealing with guest enquiries. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement on a hotel reception, by working on a school reception desk or at an event such as an open day, or through simulated activities such as role play. Role play may include checking in or out of a hotel and answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

Programme of suggested assignments

The table below shows a programme of suggested assignments that cover the pass, merit and distinction criteria in the assessment and grading grid. This is for guidance and it is recommended that centres either write their own assignments or adapt any Edexcel assignments to meet local needs and resources.

Criteria covered

Assignment title Scenario Assessment method

Learners prepare a presentation for new staff.

2.1

3.1 and Purpose of the

Front Office

The Roles of The Front

Office

Front Office Skills of a front office manager at a local hotel and are required to prepare a presentation for new staff on the responsibilities and purpose of the front office.

Learners continue in the same role as a front office manager and are required to produce a flowchart showing the roles of the front office.

Learners continue in the same role as a front office manager and show new staff how to meet, greet and answer guest queries.

Learners prepare a flowchart for new staff.

Role play or work placement supported by observation sheets.

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Essential resources

It is essential that learners are able to create or work within a simulated front office environment. This does not have to replicate a real environment, although learners will benefit from having the most realistic environment possible.

Indicative resource materials

Textbooks

Huyton J, Baker S and Bradley P — Principles of Front Office Operations, 2nd

Edition (Cengage Learning, 2001) ISBN 9781844800902

Ismail A — Front Office Operations and Management (Cengage Learning, 2002)

ISBN 9780766823433

Mead T, Holmes S, Wilson P, Batten S, Richer W, Dale G, Ingle S, Neild C, Neild M and Ovenden F — BTEC Level 2 First in Hospitality Student Book (Pearson

Education, 2011) ISBN 9780435026592

Journal

Caterer and Hotelkeeper — Reed Business Publications

Websites

www.bha.org.uk www.icm.ac.uk www.people1st.co.uk

British Hospitality Association

The Institute of Commercial Management

People 1st – Sector Skills Council for

Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism

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Principles of Customer Service in

Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and

Tourism

Unit code:

QCF Level 2:

T/600/1059

BTEC Specialist

Credit value: 1

Guided learning hours: 10

Unit aim

This unit will provide the introductory knowledge to customer service in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector. The unit will be appropriate for staff engaging with internal and/or external customers.

Unit introduction

Customer service is at the heart of a successful business. The hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector relies on excellent customer service to keep customers satisfied and returning. Employees in this sector need to provide excellent customer service and, to do that, they need to understand the needs and expectations of their customers and how these needs can be anticipated and met.

All staff working in customer service in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector will be expected to present themselves in a professional way, have good interpersonal skills and be able to communicate effectively with their customers.

Learners will explore the importance of providing excellent customer service to the business and the characteristics of excellent customer service. They will look at how this can be achieved by meeting the needs and expectations of customers.

Learners will develop an understanding of customer needs and expectations, as well as the factors that influence their choice of products and services. Finally, learners will explore customer complaints and how they should be handled in a positive manner.

On completion of the unit, learners should understand the principles of customer service in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector.

Learners will be able to appreciate the vital role they play, as employees or potential employees in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector, in contributing to the quality of customer service.

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Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit.

The assessment criteria determine the standard required to achieve the unit.

On completion of this unit a learner should:

Learning outcomes

1 Understand the importance to the organisation in providing excellent customer service in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism industries

2 Understand the role of the individual in delivering customer service in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism industries

3 Understand the importance of customers’ needs and expectations in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism industries

Assessment criteria

1.1 Describe the role of the organisation in relation to customer service

1.2 Identify the characteristics and benefits of excellent customer service

1.3 Give examples of internal and external customers in the industries

1.4 Describe the importance of product knowledge and sales to organisational success

1.5 Describe the importance of organisational procedures for customer service

2.1 Identify the benefits of excellent customer service for the individual

2.2 Describe the importance of positive attitude, behaviour and motivation in providing excellent customer service

2.3 Describe the importance of personal presentation within the industries

2.4 Explain the importance of using appropriate types of communication

2.5 Describe the importance of effective listening skills

3.1 Identify what is meant by customer needs and expectations in the industries

3.2 Identify the importance of anticipating and responding to varying customers’ needs and expectations

3.3 Describe the factors that influence the customers’ choice of products and services

3.4 Describe the importance of meeting and exceeding customer expectations

3.5 Describe the importance of dealing with complaints in a positive manner

3.6 Explain the importance of complaint handling procedures

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Unit content

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1 Understand the importance to the organisation in providing excellent

customer service in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism industries

Role of organisation: developing products; setting standards (training, products, services); providing value for money; maximising sales; encouraging repeat custom; staffing

Characteristics of excellent customer service: staff attitude and behaviour; knowledge (products, services, standards, training); quality of services and products; timing; cost; meeting the customers’ needs; locating information; working under pressure; dealing with problems

Benefits: positive influence on business; increase customer spending; repeat business; word of mouth recommendations; customer loyalty

Customers: internal (colleagues, supervisors, staff); external (existing, new, individuals, groups, families, suppliers, agents, business people, non-English speaking); different ages; gender; culture; special requirements

Product knowledge and sales: knowing products; giving advice; answering questions; suggesting products; increasing sales

Organisational procedures: checking availability; booking; delivering customer service; cancellations; payments; complaints

2 Understand the role of the individual in delivering customer service in

the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism industries

Benefits to the individual: motivated staff; increase job satisfaction (teamwork, staff loyalty)

Factors influencing excellent customer service: role of individual’s attitude, behaviour and motivation

Personal presentation: first impressions; personal hygiene; appearance

(uniform, dress, hair, make-up, jewellery)

Communication: body language (posture, expression, gestures, eye contact); voice (tone, pitch, pace); language (appropriate, avoiding slang, jargon); business standards

Listening skills: listening (asking appropriate questions, repeating information back to customer, looking attentive)

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3 Understand the importance of customers’ needs and expectations in the

hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism industries

Customer needs and expectations: type of service (urgent, non-urgent); information; product knowledge; service knowledge; special requirements (non-

English speakers, hearing or sight impaired, mobility impaired, cots, highchairs, children’s food, business equipment, gender specific); cultural (special diet, social customs, dress); factors that influence customers’ choice of products/services (price, specific needs of customer)

Meeting customers’ needs and expectations: anticipating customers’ needs; responding to customers’ needs; meeting customers’ expectations; exceeding customers’ expectations

Complaints: benefit of complaint to the business; positive manner when dealing with a complaint; complaint-handling procedures; avoiding future complaints

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery

This unit introduces learners to the principles of customer service in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector and learners are expected to be either employed or planning to be employed in the sector.

The unit gives learners an introduction to customer service and it is important to emphasise the concept of excellent customer service and the employee’s role in providing it.

Centres should build strong links with employers in the sector who might supply a guest speaker to talk about the business’ approach to customer service and its business policies in relation to customers. Although learners may already be employed in the industry, it would be advantageous for them to visit another business to compare and contrast the different approaches to customer service and the first impressions it gives.

This unit gives learners the opportunity to consider their own experience as a customer, or employee that deals with customers in this industry. For example they could consider their role within the business and how their behaviour and communication can impact on customer service, either negatively or positively.

As a result, learners may reflect on how they could improve their behaviour, communication and skills to improve the customer service experience, which is at the heart of the hospitality industry.

Learners will need to develop the research skills required to investigate information to use in their assignments.

Outline learning plan

The outline learning plan has been included in this unit as guidance and can be used in conjunction with the delivery of multiple choice tests.

The outline learning plan demonstrates one way of planning the delivery and assessment of this unit.

Topic and suggested activities

Introduction to unit.

Group discussion to determine the characteristics of excellent customer service.

Visit to a hospitality business that provides customer service and observation of different types of external customers – production of a follow-up poster showing different types of customers.

Assignment 1 – The Importance to the Organisation in Providing

Excellent Customer Service in the Hospitality Industry

Produce a report raising awareness about hospitality customer service based on the visit.

Group discussion about factors influencing excellent customer service and the benefits of excellent customer service to the individual employee.

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Topic and suggested activities

Group discussion about personal presentation, communication and listening skills.

Assignment 2 – The Role of the Individual in Delivering Customer Service

in the Hospitality Industry

A presentation describing the contribution of excellent customer service to customer satisfaction and how businesses meet the needs and expectations of their customers.

Group discussion to determine needs and expectations of customers for different types of hospitality businesses.

Assignment 3 – The Importance of Meeting Customer Needs and

Expectations in the Hospitality Industry

Based on hospitality businesses visited, learners investigate the importance of meeting customer needs and expectations in the hospitality industry.

Tutorial support and feedback.

Review of unit and programme of assignments.

Assessment

Any evidence submitted for assessment criteria requiring the practical demonstration of skills, for example role play or the ability to work independently, must be supported by observation sheet(s) signed by the assessor identifying how the specific criteria have been met.

For AC1.1, evidence could be in the form of a written piece of work, for example a poster or information bulletin for staff that shows knowledge of the role of the organisation in relation to customer service.

For AC1.2, learners must identify the characteristics and benefits of excellent customer service. Evidence can be in written format.

To achieve AC1.3, learners must give two examples of internal customers and two examples of external customers in the hospitality industry.

For AC1.4, learners need to describe the importance of product knowledge and sales to organisational success. Evidence can be in written format.

For AC1.5, learners need to describe the importance of organisational procedures for customer service in the hospitality industry. Evidence can be in written format.

To achieve AC2.1, learners must identify the benefits to the individual of providing excellent customer service. Learners should identify the steps a business must take to provide consistent and reliable customer service.

AC2.2 requires learners to describe the importance of factors such as positive attitude, behaviour and motivation in providing excellent customer service. This may be carried out following the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality venue such as a large hotel. Evidence can be in written format.

For AC2.3, learners must describe the importance of personal presentation within the hospitality industry. Evidence can be in written format.

For AC2.4, learners must explain the importance of using appropriate types of communication. Learners will be expected to focus on the types of communication used to meet customer needs and maintain the standards set by the business.

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For AC2.5, learners need to describe the importance of effective listening skills.

Evidence can be in written format.

For AC3.1, learners need to identify what customer needs and expectations mean in the hospitality industry. Learners could focus on the needs and expectations of customers in businesses that they have previously investigated, or focus on general customer needs and expectations throughout the industry.

AC3.2 requires learners to identify the importance of anticipating and responding to varying customer needs and expectations. Learners could focus on the same needs and expectations identified for AC3.1.

To achieve AC3.3, learners need to describe the factors that influence customers’ choice of products and services. This could be carried out following the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality venue such as a large hotel. Evidence can be in written format.

For AC3.4, learners must describe the importance of meeting and exceeding customer expectations. Learners should focus on general customer needs and expectations throughout the industry.

For AC3.5, learners must describe the importance of dealing with complaints in a positive manner. Learners should include an account of how complaints can be of benefit to businesses.

To achieve AC3.6 learners must explain the importance of complaint-handling procedures. Evidence can be in written format.

Programme of suggested assignments

The table below shows a programme of suggested assignments that cover the pass, merit and distinction criteria in the assessment and grading grid. This is for guidance and it is recommended that centres either write their own assignments or adapt any Edexcel assignments to meet local needs and resources.

Criteria covered

Assignment title Scenario

1.1, 1.2,

1.3, 1.4,

1.5

The Importance to the

Organisation in

Providing Excellent

Customer Service in the Hospitality

Industry

Learners take the role of a customer service coach and are tasked with producing a report for new staff.

2.1, 2.2,

2.3, 2.4,

2.5

The Role of the

Individual in Delivering

Customer Service in the Hospitality

Industry

Learners continue in the role of a customer service coach and prepare more materials to use with new staff.

3.1, 3.2,

3.3, 3.4,

3.5, 3.6

The Importance of

Meeting Customer

Needs and

Expectations in the

Hospitality Industry

Learners use a business of which they have some experience to investigate how customer needs and expectations are met.

Assessment method

Learners produce a report or other material for use with new staff.

Learners create a presentation for use with new staff.

Learners produce material in a suitable format – booklet, posters or presentation materials.

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Essential resources

It is essential that learners have the opportunity to become familiar with the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector. This could be through work placements, employment, visits to hospitality businesses or interviews with industry spokespeople.

Indicative resource materials

Textbooks

Heppell M — Five Star Service: How To Deliver Exceptional Customer Service, 2nd

Edition (Prentice Hall, 2010) ISBN 9780273734383

Mead T, Holmes S, Wilson P, Batten S, Richer W, Dale G, Ingle S, Neild C, Neild M and Ovenden F — BTEC Level 2 First in Hospitality Student Book (Pearson

Education, 2011) ISBN 9780435026592

Journal

Caterer and Hotelkeeper – Reed Business Publications

Websites

www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone www.bha.org.uk

BBC Learning Zone – programme times

British Hospitality Association www.caterersearch.com Caterersearch – hospitality news www.catersource.com Catersource – education, products and news for caterers www.people1st.co.uk

People 1st – Sector Skills Council for

Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism

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Front of House and

Accommodation Practices

Unit code:

QCF Level 2:

A/503/0293

BTEC Specialist

Credit value: 5

Guided learning hours: 30

Unit aim

The aim of this unit is to enable learners to gain knowledge of how the front of house and accommodation departments link and the requirements of accommodation cleaning and servicing. This unit also covers the guest service skills required when dealing with customers.

Unit introduction

This unit focuses on the provision of front of house and accommodation practices in relation to delivering a quality customer service. The impression guests receive from front of house and accommodation service teams can have a significant impact on guest satisfaction and, ultimately, on the success of businesses. The two departments are linked and support each other in providing these services and the focus of each is summarised below.

The front of house function is central to the operation of many hospitality businesses and is directly involved in administering the different stages of a guest’s stay – before arrival, on arrival, during their stay and on departure – and responding to the individual needs of those guests. Accommodation is centred on providing sleeping accommodation and the related activities of cleaning and servicing rooms. It is important that learners understand how the two departments link in terms of meeting guest needs and maintaining standards through communication and the completion of appropriate documentation.

Learners will be involved in the practical aspects of the job various roles through real or simulated activities, such as welcoming visitors and cleaning rooms.

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Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit.

The assessment criteria determine the standard required to achieve the unit.

On completion of this unit a learner should:

Learning outcomes

1 Know how front of house and accommodation departments link together

2 Know the requirements for cleaning and servicing accommodation

3 Be able to demonstrate skills involved in front of house

Assessment criteria

1.1 Describe how the front of house and accommodation departments of a hotel link together

1.2 State the importance of the front of house and accommodation departments of a hotel working together

2.1 Describe the cleaning and servicing skills required in accommodation services

2.2 Describe the quality standards for the appearance and cleanliness of rooms

3.1 Demonstrate guest service skills when meeting and greeting customers

3.2 Demonstrate guest service skills when dealing with customer enquiries

3.3 Provide customers with accurate information

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Unit content

1 Know how front of house and accommodation departments link

together

Front of house department: welcomes guests to the accommodation section

(meeting and greeting customers, taking and organising reservations, allocating rooms checking guests in and out, organising porter service, issuing keys and other security arrangements, passing on messages to customers, settling accounts)

Accommodation department: providing residential accommodation for people staying away from home for more than a day (safety, storage of luggage, access to common household functions)

Front of house and accommodation links: workflow; support and advice; business audit/evaluation

Importance of links between departments: meeting customer needs (type of room, facilities for customers with disabilities, extra beds, special requests eg ground floor, sea view); communication (reservation systems (manual, computerised), forecasting, reports); documentation (arrival and departure lists, room status reports); standards (checking areas, use of checklists, quality standards); statistics (room occupancy, average room rates, forecasting); security (lost property, data protection, control of keys)

2 Know the requirements for cleaning and servicing accommodation

Cleaning and servicing accommodation skills: cleaning; bed making; using checklists; use of cleaning materials eg duster, mop, polish; relevant legislation eg Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations, health and safety; use of cleaning equipment eg vacuum cleaners; dealing with waste; dealing with contractors eg external window cleaning; cleaning routines; work schedules

Quality standards for rooms: intrinsic quality; condition; physical and personal comfort; attention to detail; guest preferences and ease of use of facilities available; business standards; brand standards

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3 Be able to demonstrate skills involved in front of house

Guest service skills when meeting and greeting customers: attitude; behaviour; giving the right first impression; greeting customers; respect for customers eg courtesy, interest, responding to different customer behaviour, dealing with problems; personal attributes eg patience, tact, diplomacy, team player, honesty, initiative, self-motivation; impact of excellent and poor customer service eg on internal and external customers, business success

Guest service skills when dealing with customer enquiries: dealing with enquiries (face to face, by telephone, in writing); voice eg tone, pitch, pace; language; avoiding the use of jargon; listening; appropriateness to situation; asking appropriate questions; body language eg posture, facial expression, gestures, eye contact; handling complaints; receiving payments eg sterling and cash equivalents; selling skills; booking travel services eg taxi, train

Providing customers with accurate information: health and safety legislation; reducing complaints; improving efficiency; upselling of products/services; increased customer satisfaction; local knowledge; searching for information for customers

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery

This unit gives learners an insight into front of house and accommodation services focusing mostly but not exclusively on the hotel business, as the related activities can also be found in other businesses such as on cruise ships, in care homes and in halls of residence.

Visits to a variety of businesses to observe and experience different providers of front of house and accommodation services are essential to enable learners to understand the diversity of the services provided and the different standards of accommodation available. This may range from small guest houses to large 4- and

5-star hotels and halls of residence. Watching related TV programmes may benefit some learners who have limited access to hospitality venues.

Learners must have the opportunity to develop and demonstrate practical skills in delivering guest services in a front of house environment and in cleaning and servicing accommodation. This may be through a work placement, using simulated exercises such as role play or in-tray exercises or participating in related activities.

Tutors may find it difficult to arrange placements on the ‘front desk’ due to the unwillingness of many businesses to place untrained people in a high-profile location. The use of simulated activities may therefore be required. These activities will need to be accompanied by relevant witness statements and/or observation reports.

It is not essential at this stage for learners to be able to use sophisticated software when carrying out practical activities. The emphasis should be on the processes involved and the required customer service skills. Therefore these tasks may be carried out by alternative means, such as working on a school reception or reception in a training restaurant, or through hosting a centre open day.

Examples of documentation used in the industry will be required to demonstrate how businesses define and maintain standards in accommodation and how they take bookings and check in guests of the front of house.

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Outline learning plan

The outline learning plan has been included in this unit as guidance and can be used in conjunction with the delivery of multiple choice tests.

The outline learning plan demonstrates one way of planning the delivery and assessment of this unit.

Topic and suggested activities

Introduction to unit.

Visit to a large hotel to learn about the accommodation it provides. Ideally, learners will have the opportunity to see a room being serviced and the schedules that the housekeeper uses to check the rooms before customers arrive.

Visit to a large hotel to learn about the front of house service it provides. Ideally, learners will have the opportunity to observe a guest being checked in and checked out, investigate reservation procedures, recognise customer service skills staff use when dealing with customers face to face, on the phone and through other means of communication, and to explore the different documentation front of house staff use when dealing with customer needs.

Assignment 1 – How Front of House and Accommodation Departments

Link Together

Producing a flow chart on how front of house links with the accommodation department accompanied by a description of each stage of the process.

Visit to a hospitality business — learners find out about the quality standards for the appearance and cleanliness of rooms.

Learners work within a housekeeping department, in a local setting, and service guest rooms.

Assignment 2 – Requirements for Cleaning and Servicing

Accommodation

Producing a booklet on the cleaning and servicing skills required in accommodation services and the quality standards for the appearance and cleanliness of rooms.

Learners to work with front of house in local hotel.

Learners must be able to meet, greet and answer guest enquiries and demonstrate their understanding of front of house operations practically including receiving payments eg sterling and equivalents, selling skills, local knowledge, searching for information for guests and booking travel services eg taxi, train. A witness statement provided by the hospitality business manager or supervisor will provide evidence for AC3.1, 3.2 and 3.3.

Assignment 3 – Demonstrating Skills Involved in Front of House

Based on learners demonstrating meeting and greeting skills; responding to guest enquiries, receiving payments; their selling skills and local knowledge; searching for information for guests and booking travel services using hospitality industry situations to generate evidence (such as hotels, hostels, conference centres with accommodation, guest houses) or simulated exercises (such as role play or in-tray exercises) or participating in related activities. However, hospitality industry situations are recommended for assessment activities.

Tutorial support and feedback.

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Topic and suggested activities

Review of unit and programme of assignments.

Assessment

Any evidence submitted for assessment criteria requiring the practical demonstration of skills, for example role play or the ability to work independently, must be supported by observation sheet(s) signed by the assessor identifying how the specific criteria have been met.

For AC1.1, learners must describe how the front of house and accommodation departments of a hotel link. This could follow the investigation of, or visit to, a large hotel. Learners will be expected to focus on the type of communication required between the departments and on the documentation used to meet customer needs and maintain the standards set by the business. Evidence could be a flow chart accompanied by a description of the processes involved.

For AC1.2, learners must state the importance of the front of house and accommodation departments of a hotel working together. Again, this could follow the investigation of, or visit to, a large hotel.

To achieve AC2.1, learners must describe the cleaning and servicing skills required in accommodation services. This is likely to be best met through a work placement where learners work shadow staff in the housekeeping department of a hotel, for example, and describe skills they have observed.

For AC2.2, learners must describe the quality standards for the appearance and cleanliness of rooms. This may include copies of work schedules, a standards manual or checklists.

To achieve AC3.1, learners must have opportunity to demonstrate guest service skills when meeting and greeting guests. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement on a hotel reception, by working on a school reception desk or at an event such as an open day, or through simulated activities such as role play. Role play may include checking a guest in or out of a hotel.

To achieve AC3.2, learners must be given the opportunity to demonstrate guest service skills when dealing with guest enquiries. This could be achieved through simulated activities such as role play with learners answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

For AC3.3, learners must provide customers with accurate information. Again this could be achieved through simulated activities such as role play where customers give accurate information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

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Programme of suggested assignments

The table below shows a programme of suggested assignments that cover the pass, merit and distinction criteria in the assessment and grading grid. This is for guidance and it is recommended that centres either write their own assignments or adapt any Edexcel assignments to meet local needs and resources.

Criteria covered

3.1, 3.2,

3.3

Assignment title

1.1, 1.2 How Front of House and Accommodation

Departments Link

Together

2.1, 2.2 Requirements for

Cleaning and Servicing

Accommodation

Demonstrating Skills

Involved in Front of

House

Scenario

Learners take the role of the manager at a local hotel and are required to prepare a flowchart for new staff on how front of house and accommodation departments are linked.

Learners take the role of head housekeeper in a local hotel and are required to produce a booklet on the requirements for cleaning and servicing accommodation.

Learners take the role of a front office manager in a local hotel and show new staff how to meet and greet, answer queries and provide customers with accurate information.

Assessment method

Learners prepare a flowchart for new staff.

Learners prepare a booklet for new staff.

Role play or work placement supported by observation sheets.

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Essential resources

It is essential that learners be able to create or work within simulated front of house and accommodation services environments. This does not have to replicate a real environment, although learners will benefit from having the most realistic environment possible.

Indicative resource materials

Textbooks

Huyton J, Baker S and Bradley P — Principles of Front Office Operations, 2nd

Edition (Cengage Learning, 2001) ISBN 9781844800902

Ismail A — Front Office Operations and Management (Cengage Learning, 2002)

ISBN 9780766823433

Jones P — An Introduction to Hospitality Operations, 2nd Edition (Cengage

Learning, 2002) ISBN 9780826460776

Mead T, Holmes S, Wilson P, Batten S, Richer W, Dale G, Ingle S, Neild C, Neild M and Ovenden F — BTEC Level 2 First in Hospitality Student Book (Pearson

Education, 2011) ISBN 9780435026592

Raghubalan G — Hotel Housekeeping: Operations and Management, 2nd Edition

(Oxford Higher Education, 2009) ISBN 9780198061090

Journal

Caterer and Hotelkeeper – Reed Business Publications

Websites

www.bha.org.uk British Hospitality Association www.bics.org.uk The British Institute of Cleaning Science www.caterersearch.com Caterersearch – hospitality news www.catersource.com Catersource – education, products and news for caterers www.icm.ac.uk www.instituteofhospitality.org www.people1st.co.uk www.ukha.co.uk

The Institute of Commercial Management

Institute of Hospitality – professional body for hospitality, leisure and tourism industries

People 1st – Sector Skills Council for

Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism

UK Housekeepers Association

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Develop Personal and

Organisational Effectiveness

Unit code:

QCF Level 2:

Y/501/2917

BTEC Specialist

Credit value: 9

Guided learning hours: 45

Unit aim

The aim of this unit is to enable learners to improve their and organisational effectiveness at work by the identification of:

• an individual’s development needs and the activities needed to meet them

• potential improvements to the effectiveness of the organisation.

At Level 2 the competent person can develop personal effectiveness at work and contribute to improving working practices.

Unit introduction

This is a practical unit enabling learners to improve personal attributes and own and organisational effectiveness. Learners will select and participate in personal development activities and understand their roles and responsibilities within their organisation.

Learners will investigate the characteristics and skills which contribute to effectiveness at work. Learners will need to explore characteristics such as adaptability, confidence, dependability, initiative, integrity, self-motivation, positive attitude and tolerance. They will also need to explore skills such as communication, creativity, leadership, negotiation and influencing, numeracy, planning and problem solving. Learners’ varied experiences will be beneficial in identifying those personal attributes that are essential and those that are desirable in the hospitality industry.

Learners will select relevant personal development activities to participate in, including learning or training activities, reading manuals or journals, attending team meetings and having their training needs analysed. They will also maintain and follow their own personal development plan.

Learners will have the opportunity to participate in teamwork within the hospitality industry. This should help learners to identify and suggest potential improvements to working practices. Learners will develop an awareness of organisational aims and objectives relevant to them and their immediate colleagues. Learners will understand their own role in promoting the organisation's brand or image.

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Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit.

The assessment criteria determine the standard required to achieve the unit.

On completion of this unit a learner should:

Learning outcomes

1 Be able to obtain and use feedback on personal attributes and effectiveness at work

2 Be able to select and participate in relevant personal development activities

Assessment criteria

1.1 Describe how personal attributes can contribute to effectiveness at work:

- characteristics such as: adaptability; confidence; dependability; initiative; integrity; self-motivation; positive attitude; tolerance

- skills such as: communication; creativity; leadership; negotiation and influencing; numeracy; planning; problem solving

1.2 Use feedback to improve personal attributes and effectiveness at work. Feedback methods must include:

- self assessment

- formal and regular (eg customer surveys, service reports, appraisals by supervisors or managers, performance data)

- informal (eg verbally from colleagues or customers)

2.1 Select relevant development activities:

- learning or training activities (eg courses, job shadowing, on the job coaching; open learning; seminars, workshops)

- reading manuals or journals

- attending team meetings

- having training needs analysed

2.2 Maintain and follow own personal development plan organisation and roles and responsibilities within it relevant to self and immediate colleagues

3.2 Describe own role in promoting the organisation's brand or image

3.3 Work as part of a team to include:

- interacting with other members of the team in a positive manner

- participating in team activities

- communicating effectively in a team setting

- contributing to team activities

3.4 Identify and suggest potential improvements to working practices

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Unit content

1 Be able to obtain and use feedback on personal attributes and

effectiveness at work

Personal attributes that contribute to effectiveness at work: characteristics eg adaptability, confidence, dependability, initiative, integrity, self-motivation, positive attitude, tolerance; skills eg communication, creativity, leadership, negotiation and influencing, numeracy, planning, problem solving; how personal characteristics and skills contribute to effectiveness at work eg providing excellent customer service

Using feedback to improve personal attributes and effectiveness at work: selfassessment; formal and regular feedback eg customer surveys, service reports, appraisals by supervisors or managers, performance data; informal feedback eg verbally from colleagues or customers; team meetings

2 Be able to select and participate in relevant personal development

activities

Selecting development activities: learning or training activities (eg courses, job shadowing, on-the-job coaching, open learning, seminars, workshops); reading manuals or journals; attending team meetings; having their training needs analysed

Maintaining and following own personal development plan: self-appraisal; current performance; future needs; opportunities and threats to career progression; aims and objectives; achievement dates; review dates; learning programme/activities; action plans; personal development plan; portfolio building; evaluation of progress

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3 Understand their organisation and roles and responsibilities within it

Organisational aims and objectives: future goals; stated, measurable targets for achieving business aims; creation of a mission statement to enable employees, customers and suppliers to understand the basis for the actions of the business; planning to achieve targets, motivate employees, measure progress against aims; SMART (specific, measurable, agreed, realistic, time specific) objectives

Own role in promoting the organisation's brand or image: personal presentation skills; body language; presentation of work area and equipment; personal responsibility; presenting a professional image (accurate details, reducing errors); communication skills; interpersonal skills; customer satisfaction; direct and indirect relationships and adaptability, decision-making processes and skills; ability to learn and develop within the work role; consistency of service/product

Working as part of a team: interacting with other members of the team in a positive manner; participating in team activities; communicating effectively in a team setting; contributing to team activities

Potential improvements to working practices: improvements (setting targets, meeting identified development needs and goals, improving performance, increasing confidence, improving promotion prospects, personal achievement); reviewing working procedures; promoting business’s reputation and ensuring good service

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery

This unit introduces learners to the development of personal and organisational effectiveness. Learners need to be taught how to obtain and use feedback on their personal attributes and effectiveness at work. Selecting and participating in relevant personal development activities are essential aspects of this unit. Learners need an understanding of an organisation they are familiar with and employee roles and responsibilities within it.

Tutors can deliver through lectures and presentations the personal attributes, ie characteristics and skills, that can contribute to effectiveness at work. Group research, discussions and learner presentations on how to use feedback to improve personal attributes and effectiveness at work, would be beneficial to help understanding. Tutors can use case study materials to highlight key areas and issues.

Tutors need to ensure that they provide necessary support and guidance, encouraging learners to select relevant development activities in the hospitality industry. There should be an emphasis on learner-centred role play and smallgroup work throughout this unit.

Learners should produce a personal development plan in which they assess their skills. It is likely that learners will require tutor guidance and support to create these plans. This will enable learners to make an accurate assessment of their skills potential. Again, supportive group discussions will provide an appropriate way of discussing the types of skills, qualifications and personal attributes that are needed in different job roles.

For learners to understand their organisation, they could discuss their own roles and responsibilities within it. Learners should be encouraged to research different types of organisation and their aims and objectives. Role play and simulations can be a practical way to deliver learners’ roles in the promotion of an organisation’s brand or image as well as working as part of a team. Learners can then identify and suggest potential improvements to working practices through presentations and discussions. Visits to hospitality operations can give learners a broader insight into the importance of working in a team and the roles and responsibilities involved in hospitality situations. Audio-visual resources can also illustrate these areas, highlighting where improvements could be made.

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Outline learning plan

The outline learning plan has been included in this unit as guidance and can be used in conjunction with the delivery of multiple choice tests.

The outline learning plan demonstrates one way in planning the delivery and assessment of this unit.

Topic and suggested activities

Introduction to unit.

Tutor-led discussion on how personal attributes can contribute to effectiveness at work.

Group discussion about the use of feedback to improve personal attributes and effectiveness at work.

Assignment 1 – Obtaining and Using Feedback on Personal Attributes and Effectiveness at Work

Based on learners demonstrating the use of self-assessment, formal and regular feedback, and informal feedback to improve personal attributes and effectiveness at work, accompanied by a presentation on how personal characteristics and skills can contribute to effectiveness at work.

Learners to select and participate in relevant personal development activities.

Assignment 2 – Selecting and Participating in Relevant Personal

Development Activities

Based on learners demonstrating the selection of learning or training activities, reading manuals or journals, attending team meetings, having their training needs analysed and maintaining and following own personal development plan.

Group discussion about own organisation and roles and responsibilities within it.

Assignment 3 – Own Organisation and Roles and Responsibilities Within it

Based on learners demonstrating effective teamwork skills through interacting with other members of the team in a positive manner, participating in and contributing to team activities, communicating effectively in a team setting and identifying and suggesting potential improvements to working practices, accompanied by a presentation describing organisational aims and objectives relevant to them and immediate colleagues and their own role in promoting the organisation's brand or image.

Tutorial support and feedback.

Review of unit and programme of assignments.

Assessment

Any evidence submitted for assessment criteria requiring the practical demonstration of skills, for example role play or the ability to work independently, must be supported with observation sheet(s) signed by the assessor identifying how the specific criteria have been met.

For AC1.1 to be achieved, learners must describe how personal attributes can contribute to effectiveness at work. This could follow the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality venue such as a large hotel. Learners will be expected to focus on the characteristics and skills which contribute to effectiveness at work in a

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FFECTIVENESS hospitality environment. A flowchart accompanied by a description of each characteristic and skill, and how these contribute to effectiveness at work could be used as evidence.

For AC1.2, learners must use feedback to improve their personal attributes and effectiveness at work. This is likely to be best met through a work placement where learners use self-assessment, formal and regular feedback, and informal feedback to improve personal attributes and effectiveness at work.

To achieve AC2.1, learners must select relevant development activities, including learning or training activities, reading manuals or journals, attending team meetings and having their training needs analysed. This is likely to be best met through a work placement, where learners select and participate in development activities.

For AC2.2, learners must maintain and follow their own personal development plan.

This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement in a hotel, by working on a school reception desk or at an event such as an open day, or through simulated activities such as role play.

For AC3.1, learners must describe organisational aims and objectives relevant to them and their immediate colleagues. Evidence could be a written piece of work, such as a poster or information bulletin for staff, which shows learner understanding of their organisation’s aims and objectives relevant to them and their colleagues.

To achieve AC3.2, learners must describe own role in promoting the organisation's brand or image. Evidence could be in written format, possibly after a group discussion.

To achieve AC3.3, learners must be given the opportunity to work as part of a team. This could be achieved through simulated activities such as role play.

For AC3.4, learners must identify and suggest potential improvements to working practices. Again, this could be in written format, possibly after a group discussion.

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Programme of suggested assignments

The table below shows a programme of suggested assignments that cover the pass, merit and distinction criteria in the assessment and grading grid. This is for guidance and it is recommended that centres either write their own assignments or adapt any Edexcel assignments to meet local needs and resources.

Criteria covered

1.1, 1.2 Obtaining and Using

2.1, 2.2 Selecting and

Participating in

Relevant Personal

Development Activities

3.1, 3.2,

3.3, 3.4

Assignment title

Feedback on Personal

Attributes and

Effectiveness at Work

Own Organisation and

Roles and

Responsibilities Within it

Scenario Assessment method

Learners take the role of assistant events organiser. They have been asked to describe how personal attributes can contribute to effectiveness at work and demonstrate how to use feedback to improve personal attributes and effectiveness at work at a Career in

Hospitality event for students.

Learners continue in the role of assistant events organiser and are asked to select and participate in relevant personal development activities.

Learners continue in the role of assistant events organiser and are asked to give a presentation to students on their organisation and their roles and responsibilities within it and demonstrate how to work as part of a team.

Learners create a presentation for use with students.

Role play supported by observation sheets.

Role play supported with observation sheets.

Learners create a personal development plan.

Learners create a presentation for use with students.

Role play supported with observation sheets.

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Essential resources

It is essential that learners be able to create or work within a simulated hospitality work environment. This does not have to replicate a real environment, although learners will benefit from having the most realistic environment possible.

Indicative resource materials

Textbooks

Bailey K and Leland K — Customer Service in an Instant (Career Press, 2008)

ISBN 9781601630131

Mead T, Holmes S, Wilson P, Batten S, Richer W, Dale G, Ingle S, Neild C, Neild M and Ovenden F — BTEC Level 2 First in Hospitality Student Book (Pearson

Education, 2011) ISBN 9780435026592

West M — Effective Teamwork, 3rd Edition (John Wiley and Sons, 2011)

ISBN 9780470974971

Journals

Caterer and Hotelkeeper — Reed Business Information

Customerfirst — Institute of Customer Service

Hospitality — Reed Business Information

Websites

www.acas.org.uk www.businessballs.com/tuckmanformingstormingnormingperforming.htm

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Deal With Customers Across a

Language Divide

Unit code:

QCF Level 2:

A/601/1219

BTEC Specialist

Credit value: 8

Guided learning hours: 53

Unit aim

Customer service is frequently delivered across a language divide. Customer service centres may be located in one country but deal mainly with another. In a multicultural society many customers may have a different first language from those delivering customer service to them. This language divide can present a real challenge to those who deliver customer service.

This unit is about preparing to deliver customer service across a language divide and seeing through that delivery. The unit covers the steps that are needed to deal with customers with different language preferences without having full access to the learner’s customer’s first language.

The learner should choose this unit if they frequently deal across a language divide.

The learner should not choose this unit if they come across customers who do not share their first language only occasionally.

Unit introduction

This is a practical unit enabling learners to deal with customers who have a different first language from their own and learn how to deal with customers across a language divide.

Learners will investigate the language or languages, other than their own, that they are most likely to come across when dealing with customers. They will learn a greeting, an expression of thanks and a farewell phrase in the language they expect to encounter. Learners will agree with colleagues informal signing language that may be used in relation to key aspects of their services or products when dealing with customers with a different first language.

Learners will identify their customer’s first language and indicate to them that they are aware of it. They will establish the expectations of the customer regarding whether they expect to deal in the learner’s first language or their own.

Learners will be taught the importance of dealing with customers in their first language, if possible, and of tone, pace and volume when dealing with customers across a language divide. They will also be taught how to identify possible sources of assistance to use when a language barrier demands additional language skills.

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Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit.

The assessment criteria determine the standard required to achieve the unit.

On completion of this unit a learner should:

Learning outcomes

1 Be able to prepare to deal with customers with a different first language

2 Be able to deal with customers who speak a different first language from their own

Assessment criteria

1.1 Identify the language or languages other than their own that they are most likely to come across when dealing with customers

1.2 Learn a greeting, an expression of thanks and a farewell phrase in the language they expect to encounter

1.3 Identify a source of assistance with a language they expect to encounter when delivering customer service

1.4 Agree with colleagues informal signing options that may be used for key aspects of their services or products when dealing with somebody with a different first language

1.5 Log useful words and phrases to support their dealings with a customer with a different first language

1.6 Learn an appropriate phrase to explain to a customer in their first language that they do not speak that language fluently

2.1 Identify their customer’s first language and indicate to the customer that they are aware of this

2.2 Establish the expectations of the customer regarding whether they expect to deal in the learner’s first language or theirs

2.3 Speak clearly and slowly if using a language which is not the first language for either them or their customer

2.4 Maintain a consistent tone and volume when dealing with somebody across a language divide

2.5 Listen closely to their customer to identify any words they may be using in a way that differs from the way the learner would generally use the same words

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Learning outcomes

3 Know how to deal with customers across a language divide

Assessment criteria

2.6 Check their understanding of specific words with their customer using questions for clarification

2.7 Seek appropriate assistance from colleagues if they are unable to complete a customer transaction because of language barriers

2.8 Reword a question or explanation if their customer clearly does not understand their original wording

2.9 Use a few words of their customer’s first language to create a rapport

3.1 List the languages that they are most likely to encounter among groups of their customers

3.2 State how to greet, thank and say farewell to customers in their first languages

3.3 Explain the importance of dealing with customers in their first language if possible

3.4 Describe how to explain to a customer that they cannot hold an extended conversation in their first language

3.5 Explain the importance of tone, pace and volume when dealing with customers across a language divide

3.6 Identify possible sources of assistance to use when a language barrier demands additional language skills

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Unit content

1 Be able to prepare to deal with customers with a different first

language

Languages likely to be encountered: languages eg Chinese, French, German,

Hindi, Italian, Spanish

Greetings, expression of thanks and farewell: hello; thank you; how are you?; can I help you?; goodbye; developing the skill to communicate with people with a different first language over time; ensuring use of the appropriate greeting for the situation; formal and informal greetings; learning the correct pronunciation; avoiding confusion/misunderstandings

Sources of assistance with languages: two-language dictionaries; pocket electronic translators; a system where services, products and information are given to customers in a language that they speak and understand (eg automatic translation of web pages); providing leaflets in a variety of languages; colleagues who speak the same language as a customer’s first language

Informal signing options used for key aspects of services: signs made with the hands and other movements, including facial expressions and postures of the body

Logging useful words and phrases for dealing with customers with a different

first language: recording recurrent words and phrases in a personal or shared folder

Learning a phrase in a customer’s first language to explain they do not speak

that language fluently: studying and learning a phrase and sentence in languages likely to be encountered

2 Be able to deal with customers who speak a different first language

from their own

Indicating awareness of a customer’s first language: letting customers know of awareness of their first language from the start and own limitations in speaking it; asking customers what language they would like to communicate in; reassuring customers

Establishing customer’s expectations regarding the language they expect to deal

in: asking customers what language they would like to communicate in

Speaking clearly and slowly: pronouncing words correctly; avoiding confusion; not covering/hiding the mouth to enable customers to watch how the words are pronounced; avoiding running words together; using simple words; avoiding the use of contractions or short forms; being explicit; articulating words clearly; speaking slower than normal

Maintaining a consistent tone and volume: keeping a friendly attitude; not speaking too quietly/not speaking too loudly; making more gestures than normal when speaking; body language

Listening closely to customers: identifying words that may be used in a way that differs from the way they are generally used; listening and trying not to form a response while customers are talking; looking attentive

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Checking understanding of specific words using questions for clarification: waiting until customers have finished speaking to clarify if needed and give correct information based on all they have said; being patient and smiling; repeating what was said; trying a new, simpler sentence; writing words down

Seeking assistance from colleagues: asking a colleague to translate what needs to be communicated to customers; asking a colleague to take over dealing with the customer; referring customers elsewhere when they require information outside learner abilities

Rewording questions or explanations: trying a new, simpler sentence

Using a customer’s first language’s words to create a rapport: pronouncing words appropriately

3 Know how to deal with customers across a language divide

Languages likely to be encountered: languages eg Chinese, French, German,

Hindi, Italian, Spanish

Greeting, thanking and saying farewell: hello; thank you; how are you?; can I help you?; goodbye; developing the skill to communicate with people with a different first language over time

Importance of dealing with customers in their first language: being able to communicate with customers; avoiding confusion/misunderstandings; meeting customer expectations; showing respect and courtesy to customers; building customer relationships

Explaining to customers about not being able to hold an extended conversation

in their first language: letting customers know of awareness of their first language from the start and own limitations in speaking it; asking customers what language they would like to communicate in; reassuring customers

Importance of tone, pace and volume: tone of voice and gestures help customers take an interest in what is being said; the appropriate tone, pace and volume will make interactions with customers positive and focused

Sources of assistance when a language barrier demands additional language

skills: two-language dictionaries; pocket electronic translators; a system where services, products and information are provided to customers in a language that they speak and understand (eg automatic translation of web pages); providing leaflets in a variety of languages; colleagues who speak the same language as the customer’s first language

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery

This unit gives learners an insight into dealing with customers across a language divide within the hospitality industry.

Visits to a variety of hospitality businesses to observe and experience how to deal with customers with a different first language is essential to enable learners to appreciate the language or languages, other than their own, that they are most likely to encounter when dealing with customers. Guest speakers would also help learners to get to know about sources of assistance for a language they expect to encounter when delivering customer service.

Learners must have the opportunity to learn a greeting, an expression of thanks and a farewell phrase in the language they expect to encounter, and an appropriate phrase to explain to a customer in their first language that they do not speak that language fluently. This may be through a work placement, using simulated exercises such as role play or participating in related activities. The use of simulated activities may be required for learners to practise agreeing with colleagues informal signing options that may be used in relation to key aspects of their services or products when dealing with customers with a different first language. These will need to be accompanied by relevant witness statements and/or observation reports.

When developing skills to deal with customers who speak a different first language, it is not essential for learners to speak the customer’s language fluently. The emphasis should be on maintaining a consistent tone and volume and actively listening to customers, checking their understanding of specific words using questions for clarification, rewording a question or explanation if the customer does not understand their original wording, and using a few words of the customer’s first language to create a rapport. Learners should be aware of their skills and limitations and know when to seek appropriate assistance from colleagues if they are unable to complete a customer transaction because of language barriers.

The importance of dealing with customers in their first language whenever possible is an important part of this unit, and learners should be taught how to explain to a customer with a different first language that they cannot hold an extended conversation in their first language. This information could also be used as part of the teaching and learning for this unit. The importance of tone, pace and volume when dealing with customers across a language divide will help learners appreciate how to make customer interactions positive and focused.

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Outline learning plan

The outline learning plan has been included in this unit as guidance and can be used in conjunction with the delivery of multiple choice tests.

The outline learning plan demonstrates one way of planning the delivery and assessment of this unit.

Topic and suggested activities

Introduction to unit.

Group discussion to determine the language or languages, other than their own, that they are most likely to come across when dealing with customers.

Visit to a hospitality business where customer service is offered and observation of customers with a different first language – follow-up exercise where learners are taught a greeting, an expression of thanks and a farewell phrase in a language that they are most likely to come across when dealing with customers, and an appropriate phrase to explain to a customer in their first language that they do not speak that language fluently.

Tutor-led discussion on sources of assistance for languages that learners are most likely to come across when dealing with customers.

Learners must be able to agree with colleagues the informal signing options that can be used in relation to key aspects of their services or products when dealing with customers with a different first language. They must log useful words and phrases to support their dealings with customers with a different first language.

Assignment 1 – Preparing to Deal with Customers with a Different First

Language

Based on learners identifying the language or languages they are most likely to come across and a source of assistance for a language they expect to encounter; learning a greeting, an expression of thanks and a farewell phrase in the language they expect to encounter and appropriate phrase to explain to a customer in their first language that they do not speak that language fluently; agreeing with colleagues informal signing options; logging words and phrases to support dealings with customers with a different first language.

Visit to a hospitality business where customer service is offered and observation of customers with a different first language – follow-up exercise where learners are taught how to indicate to customers that they are aware of their first language; establish the expectations of the customer regarding whether they expect to deal in the learner’s first language or their own; speak clearly and slowly if using a language which is not the first language for either them or their customer; maintain a consistent tone and volume when dealing with customers across a language divide; listen closely to the customer to identify any words they may be using in a way that differs from the way the learner would generally use the same words.

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Topic and suggested activities

Assignment 2 – Dealing with Customers who Speak a Different First

Language

Based on learners identifying their customer’s first language and indicating to the customer that they are aware of this; establishing the expectations of the customer regarding whether they expect to deal in the learner’s first language or their own; speaking clearly and slowly if using a language which is not the first language for either them or their customer; maintaining a consistent tone and volume when dealing with customers across a language divide; listening closely to the customer to identify any words they may be using in a way that differs from the way the learner would generally use the same words; checking their understanding of specific words with their customer using questions for clarification; seeking appropriate assistance from colleagues if they are unable to complete a customer transaction because of language barriers; rewording a question or explanation if the customer does not understand their original wording; using a few words of the customer’s first language to create a rapport.

Tutor-led discussion on how to deal with customers across a language divide.

Assignment 3 – How to Deal with Customers Across a Language Divide

Presentation about languages that they are most likely to encounter among groups of their customers; how to greet, thank and say farewell to customers in their first language; the importance of dealing with customers in their first language if possible; how to explain to a customer that they cannot hold an extended conversation in the customer’s first language; the importance of tone, pace and volume when dealing with customers across a language divide; and possible sources of assistance to use when a language barrier demands additional language skills.

Tutorial support and feedback.

Review of unit and programme of assignments.

Assessment

Any evidence submitted for assessment criteria requiring the practical demonstration of skills, for example role play or the ability to work independently, must be supported by observation sheet(s) signed by the assessor identifying how the specific criteria have been met.

For AC1.1, evidence could be a written piece of work, such as a poster or information bulletin for staff, which shows at least four languages, other than their own, that learners are most likely to come across when dealing with customers.

For AC1.2, learners must be given the opportunity to learn a greeting, an expression of thanks and a farewell phrase in one of the languages they expect to encounter. This will be in one of the languages for AC1.1.

To achieve AC1.3, learners must identify one source of assistance for one of the languages they have identified for AC1.1. Evidence can be in written format.

AC1.4 requires learners to demonstrate agreeing informal signing options with colleagues that may be used in relation to key aspects of their services or products when dealing with somebody with a different first language. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement on a hotel reception or another hospitality environment, or though simulated activities such as role play.

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For AC1.5, learners need to log useful words and phrases to support their dealings with a customer with a different first language. This must include a greeting, an expression of thanks and a farewell phrase, as well as an appropriate phrase to explain to a customer they do not speak that language fluently. This must be in one of the languages identified for AC1.1.

For AC1.6, learners must be given the opportunity to learn an appropriate phrase to explain to a customer in their first language that they do not speak that language fluently. This will be in one of the languages identified for AC1.1.

To achieve AC2.1, learners must identify their customer’s first language and indicate to the customer that they are aware of it. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement in a hospitality business with a relatively large flow of customers with a different first language, or through simulated activities such as role play. Role play may include checking a guest in or out of a hotel and answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

AC2.2 requires learners to establish customer expectations regarding whether they expect to deal in the learner’s first language or their own. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement in a hospitality business with a relatively large flow of customers with a different first language, or through simulated activities such as role play. Role play may include checking a guest in or out of a hotel and answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

For AC2.3, learners must speak clearly and slowly if using a language which is not the first language for either them or their customer. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement in a hospitality business with a relatively large flow of customers with a different first language, or through simulated activities such as role play. Role play may include checking a guest in or out of a hotel and answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

For AC2.4, learners must maintain a consistent tone and volume when dealing with somebody across a language divide. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement in a hospitality business with a relatively large flow of customers with a different first language, or through simulated activities such as role play. Role play may include checking a guest in or out of a hotel and answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

For AC2.5, learners are required to listen closely to their customer to identify any words they may be using in a way that differs from the way the learner would generally use the same words. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement in a hospitality business with a relatively large flow of customers with a different first language, or through simulated activities such as role play. Role play may include checking a guest in or out of a hotel and answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

For AC2.6, learners need to check their understanding of specific words with their customer using questions for clarification. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement in a hospitality business with a relatively large flow of customers with a different first language, or through simulated activities such as role play. Role play may include checking a guest in or out of a hotel and answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

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AC2.7 requires learners to seek appropriate assistance from colleagues if they are unable to complete a customer transaction because of language barriers. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement in a hospitality business with a relatively large flow of customers with a different first language, or through simulated activities such as role play. Role play may include checking a guest in or out of a hotel and answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

To achieve AC2.8, learners need to reword a question or explanation if the customer clearly does not understand their original wording. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement in a hospitality business with a relatively large flow of customers with a different first language, or through simulated activities such as role play. Role play may include checking a guest in or out of a hotel and answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

For AC2.9, learners must use a few words of their customer’s first language to create a rapport. This could be achieved in a variety of ways, such as through a work placement in a hospitality business with a relatively large flow of customers with a different first language, or through simulated activities such as role play.

Role play may include checking a guest in or out of a hotel and answering guest enquiries for information on local theatres, restaurants, cinemas or transport.

For AC3.1, learners must list the languages that they are most likely to encounter among groups of their customers. Evidence can be in written format.

In order to achieve AC3.2, learners must state how to greet, thank and say farewell to customers in their first languages. Evidence can be in written format.

For AC3.3, learners must explain the importance of dealing with customers in their first language if possible. This may be carried out following the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality business such as a large hotel. Evidence can be in written format.

To achieve AC3.4, learners need to describe how to explain to a customer that they cannot hold an extended conversation in their first language. This may be carried out following the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality business such as a large hotel. Evidence can be in written format.

AC3.5 requires learners to explain the importance of tone, pace and volume when dealing with customers across a language divide. This may be carried out following the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality business such as a large hotel. Evidence can be in written format.

For AC3.6, learners must identify three possible sources of assistance to use when a language barrier demands additional language skills. This may be carried out following the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality business such as a large hotel. Evidence can be in written format.

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Programme of suggested assignments

The table below shows a programme of suggested assignments that cover the pass, merit and distinction criteria in the assessment and grading grid. This is for guidance and it is recommended that centres either write their own assignments or adapt any Edexcel assignments to meet local needs and resources.

Scenario Assessment method Criteria covered

Assignment title

1.1, 1.2,

1.3, 1.4,

1.5, 1.6

Preparing to Deal with

Customers with a

Different First

Language

2.1, 2.2,

2.3, 2.4,

2.5, 2.6,

2.7, 2.8,

2.9

3.1, 3.2,

3.3, 3.4,

3.5, 3.6

Dealing with

Customers who Speak a Different First

Language

How to Deal with

Customers Across a

Language Divide

Learners take the role of a front office manager at a local hotel and are required to prepare to deal with customers with a different first language.

Learners continue in the same role of front office manager and are required to deal with customers who speak a different first language.

Learners continue in the same role of front office manager and are asked to give a presentation to new staff on how to deal with customers across a language divide.

Role play or work placement supported with observation sheets.

Role play or work placement supported with observation sheets.

Learners create a presentation for use with new staff.

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Essential resources

It is essential that learners have the opportunity to become familiar with the hospitality industry. This could be through work placements, employment, visits or interviews with industry spokespeople.

IT resources should be provided to allow for research and the production of written work and presentations. Video cameras would also help to record evidence.

Indicative resource materials

Textbooks

Heppell M — Five Star Service: How To Deliver Exceptional Customer Service, 2nd

Edition (Prentice Hall, 2010) ISBN 9780273734383

Kindred M and Kindred M — 500 Tips for Communicating with the Public (Jessica

Kingsley, 2011) ISBN 9781849051750

Mead T, Holmes S, Wilson P, Batten S, Richer W, Dale G, Ingle S, Neild C, Neild M and Ovenden F — BTEC Level 2 First in Hospitality Student Book (Pearson

Education, 2011) ISBN 9780435026592

Journal

Caterer and Hotelkeeper – Reed Business Publications

Websites

www.bbc.co.uk/learningzon e

BBC Learning Zone – programme times www.bha.org.uk British Hospitality Association www.caterersearch.com Caterersearch – hospitality news www.catersource.com www.customerfirst.org

Catersource – education, products and news for caterers

Customer First – The National Standard for

Customer Service www.people1st.co.uk People 1st – Sector Skills Council for Hospitality,

Leisure, Travel and Tourism

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Unit 6:

Unit code:

QCF Level 2:

F/503/1042

BTEC Specialist

Credit value: 2

Guided learning hours: 20

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Maintain and Deal with Payments

Unit aim

The aim of this unit is to enable learners to gain knowledge of maintaining and dealing with payments, the legal requirements and correct procedures involved.

Unit introduction

In this unit learners will develop the underpinning knowledge required to handle payments with confidence and accuracy.

Attention to detail is essential when operating a payment point and contributes to the financial success of any hospitality business.

Learners will need to know how to set up and operate a payment point, including materials needed to maintain and deal with payments efficiently. Knowing how to deal with problems that may occur, including illegal and fraudulent transactions, is an important aspect of the process.

This unit requires learners to know how to operate security procedures when handling cash and other payments, and why it is important to report errors and deal with any delays efficiently and in a professional manner. It is essential for anyone operating a payment point to know their legal responsibilities and learners must be provided with this information.

Electronic payment systems and non-cash transactions are now in general use across the hospitality industry, therefore learners need to know how to process frequently used payment methods correctly and the problems related to these payment methods.

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Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

In order to pass this unit, the evidence that the learner presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that they can meet all the learning outcomes for the unit.

The assessment criteria determine the standard required to achieve the unit.

On completion of this unit a learner should:

Learning outcomes

1 Know how to maintain payment points

Assessment criteria

1.1 State the legal requirements for operating a payment point

1.2 Describe the security procedures for different types of payments

1.3 Describe how to set up and maintain a payment point

2 Know how to take payments from customers

3 Know how to deal with problems that may occur at payment points

2.1 State the legal requirements for taking payments from customers

2.2 Describe the correct procedures for handling payments

2.3 Describe what to do if there are errors in handling payments

2.4 State the procedures that must be followed if a payment has been declined

2.5 Describe the types of problems that may occur when taking payments

2.6 Explain how to deal with problems that may occur when taking payments

3.1 Describe the types of problems that may occur with a payment point

3.2 Describe how to deal with problems that may occur with a payment point

3.3 State the importance of informing customers of any delays that may occur at a payment point

3.4 Describe how to inform customers of any delays that may occur at a payment point

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Unit content

1 Know how to maintain payment points

Payment point: electronic; manual

Legal requirements for operating payment points: data protection (customers’ personal details, customer PIN numbers); fraud (counterfeit coins, notes, suspect credit and debit cards, retention of credit and debit cards); following payment points safety and security procedures

Security procedures for different types of payments: being alert and vigilant

(watching out for unusual behaviour, do signatures on cards match? are people acting suspiciously? reporting suspicious circumstances to supervisor); obtaining authorisation (for payments over the floor limit, customers wishing to charge to account must show key cards and sign the bill); panic buttons; security buttons; CCTV or video cameras; business policies; restricting access; minimising the amount of cash in the till; never leaving payment point unattended; recording voiding

Setting up and maintaining payment points: opening procedure (counting float, reporting discrepancies, recording cash, checking till roles); closing procedure

(counting float, checking balance against till readings, completing record sheets, reporting procedure for discrepancies, authorised collection by manager/supervisor); efficient service (sufficient change, till roles); importance of procedures (customer satisfaction, efficient service, reducing errors and theft)

Materials for setting up and maintaining payment points: cash; cash equivalents

(cheques, hospitality vouchers, discount vouchers); relevant stationery (pens,

VAT receipts, bill, till/credit/debit rolls); credit card machines; cash registers

Tills contents: float; coins for change (£2.00, £1.00, 50p, 20p, 10p, 5p, 2p,

1p); notes for change (£50, £20, £10, £5); payment receipts; organisation of till drawer

2 Know how to take payments from customers

Legal requirements for taking customer payments: data protection (customers’ personal details, customer PIN numbers); fraud (counterfeit coins, notes, suspect credit and debit cards, retention of credit and debit cards); handling payments according to the business procedures; ensuring payments and refunds are correctly authorised; following payment points safety and security procedures

Procedures for handling payments: entering information (price, payment, tendered price); contingency plans (reverting to manual system, calling manager/supervisor); cash (checking amount tendered, counting change back to customers); cheques (card numbers, signatures, dates, amount in words and figures, payee details, credit limits); credit and debit cards (entering into card machine, following instructions, card processing protocols, Data Protection Act

1998); cash equivalents

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Actions to take if there are errors in handling payments: reporting errors

(minimising losses, maintaining profitability, customer satisfaction); correcting errors

Procedures to follow for declined payments: calling manager/supervisor; following complaints procedure if necessary; business procedures

Types of problems when taking payments: invalid payment methods; refused authorisation; suspected fraud; disputed bills; equipment/power failure; slow connections; insufficient cash; incorrect billing; insufficient change to hand out to customers; incorrect transactions

Dealing with problems when taking payments: determining the problem and its cause; requesting extra resources (human, physical); correcting errors; keeping customers informed of situation; calling manager/supervisor

3 Know how to deal with problems that may occur at payment points

Types of problems with payment points: invalid payment methods; refused authorisation; suspected fraud; disputed bills; equipment/power failure; slow connections; insufficient cash; incorrect billing; insufficient change to hand out to customers; incorrect transactions

Dealing with problems with payment points: determining the problem and its cause; requesting extra resources (human, physical); correcting errors; keeping customers informed of situation; calling manager/supervisor

Importance of informing customers of delays at payment points: ensuring customer satisfaction; avoiding complaints

Informing customers of delays at payment points: providing details of situation to customers (invalid payment methods, refused authorisation, equipment/power failure, slow connections, insufficient change to hand out to customers, incorrect transactions); calling manager/supervisor

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Essential guidance for tutors

Delivery

This unit gives learners an insight into maintaining and dealing with payments.

When delivering this unit, tutors should be aware that learners may be familiar with the operation of a payment point but not necessarily with the payment methods in use across the hospitality industry and the problems they may need to deal with.

A range of interesting and engaging learning strategies should be used in the delivery of this unit to make sure that learners are fully aware of the procedures that must followed when setting up and operating a payment point efficiently and securely. Delivery could include practical sessions to ensure that learners know what materials are needed to set up a payment point and role play and discussions to develop their knowledge of dealing with errors with confidence. The complexities of dealing with collections from payment points could be delivered through role-play activities, to illustrate the consequences of ineffective working procedures.

Learners should be encouraged to think about their own experience of operating a payment point to help develop their knowledge of the legal responsibilities. Access to a range of online and library resources would also give learners essential information relating to current legislation.

Tutors should present learners with a range of situations that they may face when operating a payment point, giving them the opportunity to identify problems and difficulties and how these should be resolved. This could include why they need to protect themselves against misunderstandings, genuine or otherwise. Role play and simulations could be effective methods of learning how to deal with problems that may occur at payment points. It would also be helpful to give learners the opportunity to process a range of payment methods, enabling them to learn which problems relate to the different methods. Visiting speakers from financial institutions could help raise awareness of a range of practical payment problems and make the subject more interesting, for example recognising counterfeit coins and notes and dealing with suspect credit cards.

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Outline learning plan

The outline learning plan has been included in this unit as guidance and can be used in conjunction with the delivery of multiple choice tests.

The outline learning plan demonstrates one way in planning the delivery and assessment of this unit.

Topic and suggested assignments/activities and/assessment

Introduction to unit.

Visit to a hospitality business to learn how to maintain and deal with payments.

Ideally, learners will have the opportunity to see how a payment point is set up, the materials needed to set up and maintain a payment point and how the till/debit/credit machine rolls are changed.

Visit to a hospitality business to learn about the importance of having procedures in place for collecting the contents of the payment point and who to hand payments over to.

Assignment 1 – How to Maintain Payment Points

Producing a booklet on how to set up and maintain a payment point, stating the legal requirements for operating it. A description of the security procedures for different types of payment should be included in the booklet.

Visit to a hospitality business to learn about the legal requirements for taking payments from customers; the correct procedures for handling payments; what to do if there are errors in handling payments; the procedures that must be followed if a payment has been declined; the types of problem that may occur when taking payments and how to deal with these problems.

Assignment 2 – How to Take Payments from Customers

Based on hospitality businesses visited – learners investigate the legal requirements for taking payments from customers; the correct procedures for handling payments; what to do if there are errors in handling payments; the procedures that must be followed if a payment has been declined; the types of problems that can occur when taking payments and how to deal with these problems.

Visit to a hospitality business to learn about problems that may occur with a payment point; how to deal with these problems; the importance of informing customers of any delays that may occur at a payment point; how to inform customers of any delays that may occur at a payment point.

Assignment 3 – How to Deal with Problems that May Occur at Payment

Points

Based on hospitality businesses visited – learners investigate the types of problems that can occur with a payment point; how to deal with these problems; the importance of informing customers of any delays that may occur at a payment point; how to inform customers of any delays that may occur at a payment point.

Tutorial support and feedback.

Review of unit and programme of assignments.

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Assessment

Any evidence submitted for assessment criteria requiring the practical demonstration of skills, for example role play or the ability to work independently, must be supported by observation sheet(s) signed by the assessor identifying how the specific criteria have been met.

For AC1.1, learners must state the legal requirements for operating a payment point. Evidence can be in written format.

For AC1.2, learners must describe the security procedures for different types of payments. This may be carried out following the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality business such as a large hotel.

AC1.3 requires learners to describe how to set up and maintain a payment point.

This could follow the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality venue such as a large hotel. Evidence could be a flowchart accompanied by a description of the required setting up and maintenance procedures.

To achieve AC2.1, learners must state the legal requirements for taking payments from customers. Evidence can be in written format.

To achieve AC2.2, learners need to describe the correct procedures for handling payments. This could follow the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality venue such as a large hotel. Evidence could be a flowchart accompanied by a description of the correct procedures for handling payments.

For AC2.3, learners must describe what to do if there are errors in handling payments. Evidence could be a written piece of work, such as a poster or information bulletin for staff, which shows the actions that should be taken if there are errors in handling payments.

AC2.4 requires learners to state the procedures that must be followed if a payment has been declined. This could follow the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality venue such as a large hotel. Evidence could be a flowchart accompanied by a statement of the procedures that must be followed if a payment has been declined.

For AC2.5, learners must describe the types of problems that may occur when taking payments. This may be carried out following the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality business, such as a hotel.

To achieve AC2.6, learners need to explain how to deal with problems that may occur when taking payments. This may be carried out following the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality business, such as a hotel.

For AC3.1, evidence could be a written piece of work, such as a poster or information bulletin for staff, which shows the learner’s knowledge of the types of problems that may occur with a payment point.

For AC3.2, evidence could be a written piece of work, such as a poster or information bulletin for staff, which shows the learner’s knowledge of how to deal with problems that may occur with a payment point.

For AC3.3, learners must state the importance of informing customers of any delays that may occur at a payment point. This could be carried out following the investigation of, or visit to, a particular hospitality business such as a hotel.

For AC3.4, evidence could be a written piece of work, such as a poster or information bulletin for staff, which shows the learner’s knowledge of how to inform customers of any delays that may occur at a payment point.

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Programme of suggested assignments

The table below shows a programme of suggested assignments that cover the pass, merit and distinction criteria in the assessment and grading grid. This is for guidance and it is recommended that centres either write their own assignments or adapt any Edexcel assignments to meet local needs and resources.

Criteria covered

1.1, 1.2,

1.3

3.1, 3.2,

3.3, 3.4

Assignment title

How to Maintain

Payment Points

2.1, 2.2,

2.3, 2.4,

2.5, 2.6

How to Take Payments from Customers

How to Deal with

Problems that May

Occur at Payment

Points

Scenario

Learners take the role of a customer service coach and are tasked with producing a booklet for new staff on how to maintain payment points.

Learners continue in the role of customer service coach and prepare more materials for use with new staff on how to take payments from customers.

Learners use a business of which they have some experience to investigate how to deal with problems that may occur at payment points.

Assessment method

Learners produce a booklet or other material for use with new staff.

Learners produce material in a suitable format – booklet, posters or presentation materials.

Learners produce material in a suitable format – booklet, posters or presentation materials.

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Essential resources

It is essential that learners have the opportunity to become familiar with the hospitality industry. This may be through work placements, employment, visits or interviews with industry spokespersons.

IT resources should be provided to allow for research and the production of written work and presentations. Video cameras would also help to record evidence.

Indicative resource materials

Textbooks

Huyton J, Baker S and Bradley P — Principles of Front Office Operations, 2nd

Edition (Cengage Learning, 2001) ISBN 9781844800902

Ismail A — Front Office Operations and Management (Cengage Learning, 2002)

ISBN 9780766823433

Lillicrap D and Cousins J – Food and Beverage Service, 8th Edition (Hodder

Education, 2010) ISBN 9781444112504

Mead T, Holmes S, Wilson P, Batten S, Richer W, Dale G, Ingle S, Neild C, Neild M and Ovenden F — BTEC Level 2 First in Hospitality Student Book (Pearson

Education, 2011) ISBN 9780435026592

Journal

Caterer and Hotelkeeper – Reed Business Publications

Websites

www.bha.org.uk www.bics.org.uk www.caterersearch.com Caterersearch – hospitality news www.catersource.com Catersource – education, products and news for caterers www.icm.ac.uk The Institute of Commercial Management www.instituteofhospitality.org www.people1st.co.uk

British Hospitality Association

The British Institute of Cleaning Science

Institute of Hospitality – professional body for hospitality, leisure and tourism industries

People 1st – Sector Skills Council for

Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism

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Further information

For further information please call Customer Services on 0844 576 0026 (calls may be recorded for training purposes) or visit our website (www.edexcel.com).

Useful publications

Related information and publications include:

Guidance for Centres Offering Edexcel/BTEC QCF Accredited Programmes

(Edexcel, distributed to centres annually)

Functional skills publications – specifications, tutor support materials and question papers

Regulatory arrangements for the Qualification and Credit Framework (published by Ofqual) August 2008

• the current Edexcel publications catalogue and update catalogue.

Edexcel publications concerning the Quality Assurance System and the internal and external verification of vocationally related programmes can be found on the

Edexcel website and in the Edexcel publications catalogue.

NB: Some of our publications are priced. There is also a charge for postage and packing. Please check the cost when you order.

How to obtain National Occupational Standards

Please contact:

People 1st

2nd Floor

Armstrong House

38 Market Square

Uxbridge

UB8 1LH

Telephone: 01895 817000

Email: [email protected]

Website: www.people1st.co.uk

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Professional development and training

Edexcel supports UK and international customers with training related to BTEC qualifications. This support is available through a choice of training options offered in our published training directory or through customised training at your centre.

The support we offer focuses on a range of issues including:

• planning for the delivery of a new programme

• planning for assessment and grading

• developing effective assignments

• building your team and teamwork skills

• developing student-centred learning and teaching approaches

• building functional skills into your programme

• building in effective and efficient quality assurance systems.

The national programme of training we offer can be viewed on our website

(www.edexcel.com/training). You can request customised training through the website or by contacting one of our advisers in the Training from Edexcel team via

Customer Services to discuss your training needs.

Our customer service numbers are:

BTEC and NVQ 0844 576 0026

GCSE

GCE

0844 576 0027

0844 576 0025

The Diploma

DiDA and other qualifications

0844 576 0028

0844 576 0031

Calls may be recorded for training purposes.

The training we provide:

• is active – ideas are developed and applied

• is designed to be supportive and thought provoking

• builds on best practice.

Our training is underpinned by the former LLUK standards for those preparing to teach and for those seeking evidence for their continuing professional development.

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Annexe B

Wider curriculum mapping

Edexcel BTEC Level 2 qualifications give learners opportunities to develop an understanding of spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural issues as well as an awareness of citizenship, environmental issues, European developments, health and safety considerations and equal opportunities issues.

Spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural issues

Throughout the delivery of this qualification learners will have the opportunity to actively participate in different kinds of decision making. They will have to consider fair and unfair situations and explore how to resolve conflict. Working in small groups they will learn how to respect and value others’ beliefs, backgrounds and traditions.

Citizenship

Learners undertaking this qualification will have the opportunity to develop their understanding of citizenship issues.

Environmental issues

Developing a responsible attitude towards the care of the environment is an integral part of this qualification. Learners are encouraged to minimise waste and discuss controversial issues.

European developments

Much of the content of the qualification applies throughout Europe, even though the delivery is in a UK context.

Health and safety considerations

Health and safety is embedded within many of the units in this qualification.

Learners will consider their own health and safety at work, how to identify risks and hazards and how to minimise those risks.

Equal opportunities issues

There will be opportunities throughout this qualification to explore different kinds of rights and how these affect both individuals and communities, for example learners will consider their rights at work and the rights of employers and how these rights affect the work community.

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Annexe C

National Occupational Standards/mapping with NVQs

The grid below maps the knowledge covered in the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Front of House Operations (QCF) against the underpinning knowledge of the

Level 2 NVQs in Hospitality.

2FOH8/10

2FOH9/10

2FOH10/10

2FOH11/10

2GEN5/10

2GEN7/10

2GEN8/10

2GEN9/10

2HK1/10

2HK7/10

PERR/10

2FOH7/10

KEY

# indicates partial coverage of the NVQ unit a blank space indicates no coverage of the underpinning knowledge

Units 1 2 3 4 5 6

Level 2 NVQs in Hospitality

1GEN1/09 #

2GEN1/10

1GEN4/09

# # #

# #

2FOH2/10

2FOH3/10

2FOH4/10

2FOH1/10

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

# #

# #

# #

# #

# # #

# #

#

# # #

#

#

#

#

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Annexe D

Glossary of accreditation terminology

The following information about this qualification can also be found on the Edexcel website – see: www.edexcel.com/quals/Specialist/front-of-house-lvl2.

Accreditation start/end date

The first/last dates that Edexcel can register learners for a qualification.

Certification end date

The last date on which a certificate may be issued by Edexcel.

Credit value

Guided Learning

Hours (GLH)

Learning Aims

Database

All units have a credit value. The minimum credit value that may be determined for a unit is one, and credits can only be awarded in whole numbers. Learners will be awarded credits for the successful completion of whole units.

Guided learning hours are defined as all the times when a tutor, trainer or facilitator is present to give specific guidance towards the learning aim being studied on a programme. This definition includes lectures, tutorials and supervised study in, for example, open learning centres and learning workshops. It also includes time spent by staff assessing learners’ achievements. It does not include time spent by staff in day-to-day marking of assignments or homework where the learner is not present.

Link to the Learning Aims Database, which features detailed funding information by specific learning aim reference.

Learning Aim

Reference

Unique reference number given to the qualification by the funding authorities on accreditation.

Level

Performance tables

Qualifications

Number (QN)

The level at which the qualification is positioned in the

Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF).

This qualification is listed on the Department for Education (DfE) website School and College Achievement and Attainment Tables

(SCAAT) as performance indicators for schools and colleges.

Unique reference number given to the qualification by the regulatory authorities on regulation.

Register of

Regulated

Qualifications

Link to the entry on the Register of Regulated Qualifications for a particular qualification. This database features detailed accreditation information for the particular qualification.

Section 96

Section 96 is a section of the Learning and Skills Act 2000. This shows for which age ranges the qualification is publicly funded for under-19 learners.

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Title

UCAS points

The accredited title of the qualification.

This qualification is listed on the Universities and Colleges

Admissions Service (UCAS) tariff for those wishing to progress to higher education.

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Publications Code BA028998 August 2011

For more information on Edexcel and BTEC qualifications please visit our website: www.edexcel.com

BTEC is a registered trademark of Pearson Education Limited

Pearson Education Limited. Registered in England and Wales No. 872828

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