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RECORDING

VOL.

3

No.

2

JANUARY -FEBRUARY, 1956

MILDRED STAGG,

New York Editor

MARK MOONEY, JR.

Editor and Publisher

CHARLES

D.

SIGSBEE

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By

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1

Brahms was highly dissatisfied with his

D -minor concerto and vowed. after its pre- mier,

"The next one will sound different."

Twenty two years and 68 compositions later it appeared, and it was different. Different than any previous work for piano and or- chestra by any composer.

Because of its major proportions. four movement form and the apparently minor role given to the solo instrument, it has often been referred to as

"a symphony with piano obligato." Perhaps so with a pianist of lesser abilities than Mr.

Rubinstein, but here the piano is of the master, dominant permitting the in the hands orchestra to share the score, but no more than that.

Together the pianist and conductor com- bine their understanding of the composer's intent to produce a work of the first mag- nitude. This together with RCA's superb sound is cause to label it as a major record- ing, a fact to be considered when building your basic tape library.

BRAHMS

Symphony

#1, in

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68

NBC Symphony Orchestra

Arturo

Toscanini,

Conductor

RCA VICTOR CC

-8

Although the critics do not agree,

I feel that here is the definitive interpretation of this work in our time. And, speaking of our time, let me point out to those who are inclined to doubt the productivity of men past forty, that Brahms was past forty when he produced this First Symphony and

Toscanini was in his

85th year when he recorded it! a

Toscanini conducts this recording with drive and brilliance that is unmatched in any other recording of the work. The "old man" takes hold of his orchestra at the out- set and doesn't relinquish his control for as much as one semidemiquaver throughout the entire work.

The engineer-

\s no were challenged in every recording to meet

Toscaninï s speci- fications, have made this one of the very best.

I don't imagine that there will be a better recording of Brahm's 1st to come along for quite some time.

GERSHWIN

An

American

In Paris

Porgy

And

Bess

(Suite)

Pro

Musica

Symphony of Hamburg

Hans Jurgen

-Walther, Conductor

PHONOTAPES -SONORE PM -IO2

The conductor is conducting, the musi- cians are playing their very best but, at its best, the music is not George Gershwin.

At least, not to my ears it isn't.

The ques- tion is, why not? The orchestra plays well, the conductor has been applauded in this column for other things and the recording is excellent, so what happened?

My guess is that Gershwin's music is so idiomatic that when it is given a literal interpretation it becomes pedestrian. Gersh- win is so

American ican mind to that it takes the Amer- interpret (or appreciate) him.

This theory is somewhat substantiated by the fact that the "Porgy

And

Bess" suite, arranged by

Robert Russell Bennett fares better because here only the thematic mate- rial is

Gershwin's, the score is

Bennett s.

HAYDN

Concerto for

Trumpet in

E

-flat

Helmut Wobitsch, trumpet

Vienna State Opera Orchestra

Anton Heiller, Conductor

HAYDN

Concerto for Horn in

D

Franz

Koch, horn

Vienna Symphony

Orchestra

Anton Heiller, Conductor

BACH

Concerto for

Three Harpsichords in

C

VIVALDI -BACH

Concerto for

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A

Vienna Chamber Orchestra

Anton Heiller,

Conductor

BERKSHIRE BH 1003

The trumpet concerto displays an amaz- ine amount of virility in its construction as demonstrated here by Wobitsch and Heil- ler.

The trumpet is flawlessly presented by the soloist and recorded better than most

I have heard. It has a clear, natural sound without any of the piercing effect so often encountered in recordings of the instru- ment.

The orchestra and soloist are well pre- sented, with good balance and chromatic control. In short, I don't believe that it could he done much better.

The horn concerto comes off fairly well. although the horn is not as well recorded as the trumpet. The balance between or- chestra and soloist is about the same in both concerti.

The two Bach concerti are a positive delight to the ear. Heiler conducts Bach with a firm hand and pulls more from his www.americanradiohistory.com

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....STATE tos to all remittances. orchestra than might be expected under the circumstances.

The solo instruments are back far enough so as not to be overpowering when alone, yet are in evidence during orchestral tutti.

The harpsichordists are not identified, yet all seem to be virtuosi of the instrument.

Berkshire Tapes are, based on this, ap- parently going to be everything they claim in their advertising.

If

they can maintain the quality evident here, at their price

(6.95), they have accomplished a tour de force.

MOZART

Concerto

#20, k.466

Sondra Bianca,

Hans pianist

Jurgen- Walther, conductor

Pro

Musica burg

Chamber Orchestra of Ham-

PHONOTAPES -SONORE

PM 5003

Miss Bianca and the orchestra get as much out of the second movement of this work as

I have ever heard.

A sentimental and understanding approach that thorough- ly charms the listener.

The third movement keeps pace with the style set in the second, but the first finds some complete little disagreement between piano and orchestra. Perhaps not re}-earsed as well, it does not impart the feeling of unity and rapport that exists in the last two movements.

I find that the balance between piano and orchestra, and sections leaves in the latter, nothing to be desired.

The record- ing is clean and crisp. but with a slight hiss present unless the treble control is shaded a bit; on my copy, at least.

The minor faults mentioned should not deter anyone from getting the recording, as there aren't any better interpretations available at this time.

MOZART

Don Giovanni (Arias)

The

The

Vienna Symphony Orchestra

Vienna State Opera Chorus conducted by Hans Swarowsky

BERKSHIRE BH -1006

Although billed as

"arias," the tape ac- tually includes duets, trios, quartets and the whole first act finale as well. Thirteen selections in all, culled from

Berkshire's recording made of the complete opera which was from the master tapes of the Hayden

Society. at

Performance -wise the recording is not all bad, which does not mean that it is all good.

Mariano

Stabile's work as

Giovanni is not what one would expect to hear in a title role.

True, he is identified with the role through his performances at

Milan's La Scala, so perhaps he should be seen in performance to Bain an understand- ing of his apparent lack of control in this recording.

On the other extreme. is the maenificenr voice of Alois Pernerstorfer as

Leporello.

He is a dramatic basso, whose spine

-ting- ling first act aria,

Madamina, it catalogo

è questo, would be hard to beat anywhere.

The rest of the performances on this excerpt recording are quite good but the most outstanding things about the entire reel are the recorded sound and the en- thusiasm of the performance. The dramatic interpretation of Hans Swarowsky is ad- mirably enhanced by the clean, clear and chromatic sound.

Considering the fact that this is one of the few operatic recordings on tape only Don

(the

Giovanni), coupled with

Berk- shire's low price

I good buy, in spite would consider this a of the deficiencies men- tioned.

RACHMANINOFF

Concerto

#2 in

C- minor, Opus

18

Geza Anda, pianist

The Philharmonia Orchestra

Alceo Galliera

COLUMBIA (BRITISH EMI) CAT

253

This tape was very kindly loaned to me by A. E. Foster

Engineering of the

Newark College of with a suggestion that my re- views have refused to face more than a tech- nical superiority. For awhile the American tape record industry than that, but didn't have much more it was that that brought about the current trend toward musical excellence.

I wouldn't claim that this

EMI tape is any better, necessarily, than it's American breth- ren, certainly the ones received in this issue. for review

It is, however, an excellent tape and we were happy to have the opportunity to review it.

Geza unique

Anda delivers a sensitive and interpretation.

I would say that the performance is, to date, my favorite, par- ticularly the second movement, performed with infinite beauty and understanding of the composer's intent.

The orchestra and soloist are perfectly balanced and, together, deliver a definitive masterpiece that will last for some years to come.

STRAUSS

(Richard)

Don Quixote

Boston Symphony

Orchestra

Gregor Piatigorsky,

Cellist

Richard Burgin,

Violinist

Joseph de Pasquale,

Violist

Charles Munch,

RCA VICTOR

BC

-3

Conductor

I don't see how sound on tape could pos- sibly get any better than this.

I don't see it, but it undoubtedly will.

A powerfully beautiful recording that stand will definitively alone for some time to come.

Piatigorsky is without peer as the

Don and the better,

Boston Orchestra has never sounded not even under Koussevitsky.

But most magnificent is the big, rich sound without a hint of distortion or fre- quency restriction anywhere.

It is neces- sary to cut back the treble control about

10db even on

NARTB equalized equip- ment.

TCHAIKOWSKY

Symphony

#6

in

B- minor, Opus 74

(Pathetique)

Oberammergau

Festival Orchestra

Kurt Schwertfeger, Conductor

BERKSHIRE

B

-2107

Recording sleuths should have a good time with this one.

To think that a little

Bavarian village of 5000 souls has been harboring, and hiding, an orchestra of mas- www.americanradiohistory.com

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Schwertfeger

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Kurt

The recording is magnificent, one of the best.

It's chromatic mass, soaring strings and pyrotechnic bass should be exercising high fidelity equipment for some time to come.

Coupled with

Berkshires low price

(

$6.95) its excellence should make it a big seller.

As to the recording's interpretive values. perhaps one should listen to it before buy- ing because there are as many interpreta- tions of the

"Pathetique" as there are record- ings. is a

Which one is the definitive recording moot point because there are almost as many choices as there are critics,

Personally,

I like it.

For the average music -lover the symphony's principal ap- peal has always been an emotional one and this recording arouses the emotions, as do few others, no matter how cynically you approach it.

Sound system demonstrators, particularly those with the mammoth speaker rigs, should watch their volume when first play- ing this tape as the bass is quite lusty.

If the volume control is too high during the quiet opening passages, the uninitiated literally jump out of their shoes during will the sudden, dramatic crescendo in the middle of the movement. The third movement will also cause labored breathing and twitching hair follicles under certain circumstances.

Because of its universal appeal to both music -lover and high fidelity fan,

I feel that Berkshire has produced, in this record- ing, a solid hit.

FROM YOUR

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FAVORITE

FIDELITY

RECORDINGS

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ANY PHONO

SYSTEM

FOLK MUSIC

BALLADS OF THE

Sung

CIVIL WAR by Hermes Nye with Guitar

PHONOTAPES

P7T F5004

This is a

Folkway's production that is as visual as it is aural.

With the reel comes a

30

-page booklet containing not only the words to the ballads but a great deal of in- teresting historical background as well.

Hermes Nye, an attorney by profession, is an engaging singer from Dallas who handles these songs in an authentic manner that will hold the listener spellbound throughout. included in the collection is a ballad,

"Davy Crockett." not the one that drove you mad a few months ago, but one that was making the rounds in about 1836. It has to do with a fight that Davy had one day

(lasted a day and a night) and is filled with

19th century Tennessee colloquialisms that arouse many a chuckle.

If you like the current hit song, "My

Bonnie Blue Belle," then you may he in- terested to know that in its original, unex- purgated version it was a rousing song of secession.

In all, a successful recording and one that is a must for folk music collectors.

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EARLY ENGLISH

FOLK SONGS

Sung by

AV

802

B

AV Tape

Cynthia Gooding

Libraries

Cynthia Gooding is an uncommonly good folk singer. Her voice contains such a degree of timbre and clarity as to gain and com- mand complete attention from her audience.

Singing in her natural contralto register, she presents the story line with such enthusiasm that you find yourself listening to the narra- tive unfold without paying much attention, necessarily, to the musical development.

POPULAR

DICK STEWART

SINGS

George Wright, pipe organ

Trefoni

Rizzi,

Raymond guitar and electric guitar

Clevenger, drums, finger cym- bals, effects

Verlye Mills, harp

Sam

Cheifetz, bass

William Hamilton,

Jr., saxophone, clarinet, flute

HIFITAPE

R

-40I

An exciting adventure in sound from this new Hollywood recording company.

In spite of the title, the outstanding fea- ture of the recording is the unusual instru- mentation, not the singer. George

Wright's arrangements of,

"Ritual Fire Dance," "On

A

Little Street In Singapore," "At Long

Last Love," and "Baia," along with the won- derful engineering job, make this a hi

-fi tape find to complement the

Wright organ re- cordings.

Stewart is not a had singer but, at this stage of his development, he is no world beater either. However, he is good enough

- to uphold his end of this recording and, as we said, here the recording's the thing.

EASY

LISTENING MUSIC

Bill

Andrews, Hammond

Organ

CONSOLE TAPE

(Wayne, Pa.)

A full hour -plus of electric organ from the company that has set the standard for recording this instrument. A different or- ganist this time, but his style is easy to take and pretty original on the second side.

Side

#1

consists of straight arrangements of selections from the Operettas, "Student

Prince.» "Desert Song." and "New Moon."

I will label these, "Sing -A-

Longs," because that is just what you will do for the most part.

I only wish that Mr. picked up the tempo a sustained notes.

Williams had bit at spots,

I fiat on

Wonder how "Sing

-A-

Longs" would go as a commercial record- ing idea? Hi

-fi in the bathroom!

Side

#2

is more stylized than the first, with some of the selections sounding suspi- ciously like multiple track recording. In all, a highly satisfactory tape.

MISCELLANEOUS

A

Child's Garden of

Verses-

Stevenson

Sung by Russell

Oberlin

TAPE -OF- THE

-MONTH B509

-A

Robert L.

The record jacket says absolutely nothing about the method of presentation. Here are the familiar lines in a new dress; sung by tenor Oberlin, accompanied by piano and brass!

I am not sure that

I prefer it this way, al- though

I haven't lived with it long enough to say for sure.

I feel that

I would rather hear them from a spoken voice, or perhaps a different approach to the music.

The way they are presented upsets my dream illusion of them after all these years, but perhaps it will suit you just fine,

The recording is excellent and, as I say, it's all there, it's just that those doggoned

trumpets....

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TAPE IN EDUCATION

BY JOHN J. GRADY, JR.

between an ordinary performance and

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THIS being the time when both predictions and resolutions for the

New Year are in order, a few predictions are presented relative to Tape Recording in Education.

They are completely logical and are capable of attainment.

The educators of the nation, many many thousands as of them

-administrators as well teachers

-welcome the proved efficiency of tape recording as an instructional func- tion. And thousands upon thousands of schools and colleges, particularly those with huge student bodies, where teachers are handicapped by large classes and double sessions, all of them are ready for the installation of tape recording and playback equipment.

The following predictions, if accompanied by parallel resolutions of co-operation from the Tape Recording Industry are certain to be speeding towards attainment in

1956.

Educators- parents, too

-are

urged to use this

Educational

Section of TAPE RECORD-

ING to present added predictions, to make suggestions, information to file peeves, and to seek relative to Tape Recording

Education.

Address mail to in

Educational

Section,

Park, Md.

TAPE RECORDING,

Severna

1.

Every classroom in the nation will be equipped with a playback unit for auditioning

17,13,

33q,

71/2 and

15 IPS tapes.

2. Tape recorders, designed for

17/i-33/4

¡PS taping, so satisfactory and economical for speech practice and instruction, will be easily available.

3.

Instructors in

Speech, Music

Drama, all and will have tape recorders.

(Let's have a lot of support on this one. Why should

Physical Ed. rate

ALL the equip- ment?)

4.

Adult

Education will be expedited by

Tape Recording.

5.

Top notch Audio

-Visual instructors, capable of producing auditorium -filling programs will begin to approach the salaries of football coaches.

(

"Note: begin to approach

")

6.

Some department nostalgic university or college music will produce a magnificent

CAMPUS MEMORIES tape, featuring glee club, chorus, choir, band and orchestra in Alma Mater favorites. Blended with cheering section yells, pep talks, and the narration covering the old well, the petrified toad stool, the malt joint and such like, the tape will be a

"must" for alumni.

EDUCATIONAL NOTES

A new presented

PENTRON tape recorder was to Brattleboro, Vt.,

High

School, by the Class at a of

1905.

This class of oldsters,

50th reunion, recognizing the value of being articulate in the highly competitive commercial life, which graduates enter after schooldays, a recommended tape recording as modern instructional procedure for the benefit of ambitious students of

Speech.

Leland

C.

Smith,

Professor,

Design

Industrial

Division,

Alabama Polytechnic In- stitute, notes

Auburn,

Ala., desires to compare with other Audio-Visual experi- menters. and

Synchronization of both moving still projections, with sound in a single mobile automatic unit for educational lec- tures, is an objective. Here's an opportunity for a

TR manufacturer, with a shop well

- equipped co- operate for research and parts- making, to with an in- the -field designer.

Prof, Smith has roughed a serviceable but mechanical refinements will unit, result in a valuable piece of equipment. What an instructional tool for medical schools and clinics!

Robert M. Coleman, Brookyn, N. Y., is proving better days are on the way for teachers.

In addition to tape

-recording various current from -the -air programs. ap- propriate musical and historical material for his classes, he personally records tapes for future class work. Where a feminine voice is advantageous he utilizes the vocal talent of a younger sister. Pictures and illus- trations associated with the taped subjects are class filed along discussion. with a list of questions for

That's smart organization.

Mr.

Coleman states that his tape recorder pi-educes available free time for him. This time is for more parent conferences, for individual instruction where needed, and to dispose of teachers' pet plague- routine desk work.

Francis

E.

X.

Dance, M. A., Instructor in

Speech,

Graduate School, U.

S.

Dept. of

Agriculture, Arlington, Va. Many speech instructors feel as you do about the personal ownership of economical -in

-tape 1-

S,

-33.,

IPS tape recorders. They are available, but not many dealers stock them, nor are sales personnel trained to cater to the huge mar- ket of

Speech devotees.

An inquiry to manu- facturers advertising in TAPE RECORD-

ING will get action. Re pre -recorded educational tapes:

The Dept. of

Ed. in some states are establishing splendid libraries of master tapes.

In other states there will have to be considerable needling.

More on this subject next issue.

Helen

F.

Cutting,

Department of

Ro- mance Languages,

The Woman's College, U. of

North Carolina, Greensboro, N. C., desires a

Spanish language brochure describ- ing a tape recorder. Suggestion: Contact

Prof.

James

A. Cuneo, U.

Minneapolis

14,

Minn. of Minnesota, is a

Lucky

Ed dared

Krist, lucky at this time of year, to send a photo of students using tape recorder under palm tress, by a swimming pool, in fabulous sunny Palm

Springs,

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WE'RE back again Teen -Tapers, and more enthused than ever. I've heard from a number of you since the last issue, and it's great to know that you have interest and en- thusiasm for that's the most important item.

Last time we said that we'd talk about start- ing some school recording clubs so let's get right at it.

We feel that one of the best ways for teens interested in recording to become more ac- tive is to start a tape club at school. I've started one at my school and it's going along great, and there's no reason why you can't do the same thing. Briefly, here's what it takes.

First we assume that your school either owns or has access to a tape recorder, some tape, and a microphone. The only other things needed are some interest and a little hard work to start out with. Now, contact the person in your faculty who would most likely be interested in this project. Likely people are, audio -visual directors, science teachers, speech teachers, or any other in- terested teacher. Once you have this faculty member interested you have a great share of the work done.

He can stir up interest and get the cooperation of other faculty members. He can also help with another im- portant thing, getting permission to operate the club. Now you're set to call your first meeting. to

Get an enthusiastic announcement made the effect that a new, different, and inter- esting group is being formed for those stu- dents who are interested in tape -recording, radio broadcasting, dramatic reading, tape correspondence, and so forth. At the first meeting your big job is to retain the obvious interest in the group shown by those who attend.

Throw some suggestions out for discus- sion as to what the club could do around school both for fun and for school service.

Some ideas are: learn how to operate equip- ment and make good recordings; make a memory album of interesting events (a sort of yearbook in sound); produce taped radio programs for broadcast throughout the school; exchange tapes with schools through- out the country and world; provide record- ings for departments of the school.

With these suggestions you'll be surprised at the interest you'll start up and before you know it the members will have many more ideas of their own and will be very anxious to get started. At this point, you should end the first meeting on a high note of enthusiasm, and make plans for the second meeting at which time the club will really get organ- ized.

At meeting number two, we really get rolling. An election of officers is in order, and all necessary action is started to get the club officially recognized. In my school, per- mission must be obtained from the student council after a charter is drawn up. Once the president is selc.tc,'.

I,.,,,,un

should be opened as to just what areas the club wishes to specialize in, be it general record- ing, radio broadcasting, tape responding, or what have you.

This choice will govern your actions.

Whatever you choose you should make immediate plans to start at it right away. A lot of discussion will cause the members to get bored, while imme- diately starting out on a project will bolster interest.

If you're going to broadcast, plan a show; if you decide to begin a memory album, pick out the next important event coming up and plan to record it.

Also plan on having the audio visual di- rector, principal, dealer, or some one else well versed in recording, drop around at your next meeting and give a demonstration and short course on recording. Since your activities center around recording, this is very important.

There you have the basic idea.

We've told you how to set up the organization, and get started. Once you're started you'll naturally proceed along your own special interests and can have as much fun as you care to provide for yourself.

Teen- Tapers is here for you and to help you we with your interests. All through the year will be giving to you suggestion aids and projects.

We'll exchange ideas, and answer your questions. in the

We have planning right a number of things now. In short order, we'll have the official

Teen -Tapers Club charter, and membership cards ready, as well as a detailed outline on how to oper- ate your club. Tape Recording is also going to offer us a special Tape Club group scription rate.

Once you have your sub- dub planned or organized, let us know about it so that we can include your group as an offi- cial

Teen

Taper Club.

All Teen -Taper Clubs will be requested to write to us telling of their activities so we can compare notes. Outside of the op- portunity of exchanging ideas, the services of Teen -Tapers column, the reduced sub- scription rate, and the opportunity for meet- ing other tape clubs around the world, the clubs will be independent and unrestricted.

How about it? Sound interesting? Get going now and start a tape club among your schoolmates and when you do, be sure and let us know so you can become a member of our group.

We want to take a minute here to thank those who dropped us a line. Alan Caruba, down at the University of Miami in sunny

Florida, says the column looks interesting to him. Garry

Ball, at the University of

Nebraska Ag school, writes to tell us that when some of these clubs get going the radio station at the U will be glad to exchange tapes.

We heard from

John

L.

Ott out Pitts- burgh, Pa., way, and

John is also very en- thusiastic.

My very good friend via tape,

Roy

Trumbull, in

Corte Madera, California,

14 www.americanradiohistory.com

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And backed up

1001. by ATLAS stands,

-world stability, leader in mike public address loud- speakers and accessories for

21

Years.

Compare them all at your dis- tributor-

You'll make your nee mike stand on ATLAS.

AT LAS

SOUND CORP. t.klyn

18,

New York

1446

: r.

. m eado Corp. ud.

Toronlo, one

NOTICE

New price reductions on plastic tapes in regular and long play have been an- nounced. Also new mil

"super" thinner

1 mil and

I/2 mylar tapes are now available.

For full information send for our 1956 price sheet.

*

USED TAPE, plastic and mylar bought and sold.

New empty plastic reels in boxes.

22c; ca.

Reel

5"

3"

24c;

10e;

7"

101/2" fiberglass

$1.49. EMPTY

BOXES:

3"

3e; 4

",

27e

5

4"

",

7"

Sc ca.;

10!4".

25e ea.

"Tope Recording" magasine,

35c

(back issue available

).

Audio

Devices 1956

TAPE

RECORDING DIRECTORY free.

I- lielude

Su fit it nt

PtvClCe,

COMMISSIONED

ELECTRONICS, INC.

2503

Champlain

St.

N.W., Washington

9,

D.

C.

Tape

Splicer

DUTY

FAIT

F. REITER COMPANY

3340 Donnie

Hill

Driva

Hollywood

28,

California

CCUTTERYAUTOMATIC

CUTTER has ious also sent in a lot of ideas and he is anx- to see what we teens can do.

You'll be interested in the story which appears on pages 40 and 41 of this issue.

Jimmy Sterrett, a high school student, found a way to make his tape recordinc hobby pay and had a lot of fun doing it

There's no reason why other teen alters

I n high school couldn't do exactly the same thing. All it takes is a recorder, a bit of imagination and some leg work.

Let us hear from you now, and tell us it your interests. If your school wants some suggestions let us know, and also write in tor our Teen -Tapers kit with more detailed information. It is now in preparation and will be sent as soon as it is ready.

We're anxious to hear from all teens, whether in clubs or not, and whether in high school or college. Keep 'em spinning gang and we'll be taping you soon.

Ten Steps

To

A Tape

Club

I. Get a faculty sponsor interested.

2.

Round up a tape recorder.

3.

Publicize the group.

4. Call a club. meeting and discuss the

5.2nd meeting: organize and elect officers.

6.3rd meeting: start rolling. Have demonstration on recording.

7.

Plan into the future for projects.

8.

Read Teen- Tapers for suggestions and ideas.

9.

Write to

Teen -Tapers, c/o

TAPE

RECORDING

Magazine, Severna

Park, Md., for details, charter, and membership cards, which will be ready shortly.

Be among the first to have your name listed to receive these.

10.

Have loads of fun with your club.

STATEMENT REQUIRED

BY TILE ACT

US'

AUGUST

'4, 1912. AS

1933, de, Section

233)

'menu

AMENDEZ) BY TILE

Park.

Md.

ACTS UP 3Ltl1CH

AND JULY

2. 1946 ITMLI° 29, United

States

SHOWING TILE OWNERSHIP.

\ÌANAGESIENT, AND CIIICU1.A1'tQN

Oh'

Magnetic

Ibn and lape

Recording published

In-monthly at

1.

The names and addresses of the publisher, editor, and business managers a lianaging Mooney. Jr..

Severna Punk. Md.

Managing t

:ditor

Mark

Mounel'. Jr.,

Severna

t

2.

The

I.rew1.1er oing or stock. o r Is dmrsses ut the individual

..I. le

Md.;

.more ils editor

I.iues-i manager none

It

'whorl mana

Sc la.

Park,

ili

The holding nut owned by a

V,.nle)- Ituwnn

W.

I. Sid.; noue

Md.;

A. be

J. stated and also lln names and addresses of stockholders

1 owned

(If percent or

Chas. E.

Emery.

7

Lapharn, nlding, Baltimore

1.

Owned bp a partllerahip rein-bloat member, must he

Publication.

19 e or as given.)

Inc.,

W.

Thomas Grogan,

Md.; t.

Morin, lark, by

.1. a mc loll

Stark of

274

Md. total

1:.

Severna ltallúltun

Madissu edit corporation. its iuediately a, [trot armada

;It o:

Park,

Street.

Mooney.

Mf

Wardour Drive.. Annapolis.

Ital-

Jr.. Baltimore Life

Jr..

Ave.,

The known bondholders. mortgagees. and other vrity holders owning or holding I percent or more total amount of bonds. mortgages. or other securities

.chou) the ud is lu a

3. preceding

The date shown atmve was: required from weekly newspapers

Swo

(If then, are none. so state.)

Nono.

I.

Paragraphs

2 and

3 stockholder or include, in cases wliere the security holder appears upon the books of

The Company as trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, not stitch gpear

Septe the name of the person or corporation such trustee is paragraphs belief as upotr to the otherwise. to paid acting; show daily, the subscribers also the statements affiant's circumstances and during

I weekly. sersi full the

12 sretly, and

In knowledge conditions under stockholders and security holders who do the huais bona fide moiler.

The average number of the ruin pray as for not trustees. stork and securities in a capacity other than that of copies of earl, issue of tais publication sold or distributed, through the mails or months

This intoni,al inn tri- only./

MARK MUUNE:Y, JR.. Publisher and subscribed before me

JEAN

MARIE this

30th clay of

CUYEn,

Notary Put,'

(My commission expires May

G.

II)-_

the famous

errograp

t

HIGH

FIDELITY professional quality at nominal cost

The world -famous

FERROGRAPH magnetic tape recorder, designed and developed pri- re- styled for

YOU

- the use, has been discriminating audiophile, the progressive educator, the efficient businessman, the music lover.

Standard equipment with the

British

Broad- casting Corporation, it is a byword with cultural, educational and scientific users throughout

Europe. The

FERROGRAPH is unconditionally guaranteed to meet the most critical performance requirements.

Two models of this versatile dual -speed, dual track recorder are now available in

LIMITED QUANTITIES, with tape speeds of

33A" and 71/2" or 71/2" and

15" per second.

Both models feature the employment of a synchronous hysteresis capstan motor pro- viding unparalleled long -term speed stability, thus avoiding pitch errors on playback.

`'

i

7 v- w

FERROCRAPH RECORDERS

AND TAPE DECKS also available for custom installation or rack mounting to meet your special requirements.

Custom Model 3A

/DT

(illus.) with tape speeds of

7112 and

15" /sec.

Write for performance specifications and the name of the franchised dealer in your area.

ERCONA CORPORATION

(Eleetronlc Division)

551

Fifth Ave.,

Dept.

F-'

New York,

N.

Y. www.americanradiohistory.com

NEW PRODUCTS

THE

TELLS

THE

TURNER STORY

-

VALUE

DYNAMU

STEREO

PLAYBACK

ORRADIO

FOLDER

A new folder entitled

Tape is

"How

Magnetic

Made,' which completely describes and illustrates in six photos every step in the tape, manufacture of magnetic recording from start to finish, is being offered free on request by

ORRadio Industries, the manufacturers of Irish Ferro -Sheen tapes.

It contains a great deal of information about the quality control. as well as the manufac- ture, of the tape. For your tree copy, write to OR Radio Industries. Inc.,

Department

72,

Opelika, Alabama.

PERMOFLUX MAESTRO

TURNER

MODEL 57

MICROPHONE

DYNAMIC

RESPONSE:

50- 13,000 c.o.s.

LEVEL:

-55 db.

IMPEDANCE:

Wired for tion of high pedance. quick or selec- low im-

CABLE: shielded

Cannon connect

XL

conductor

cable

-4 plug. with quick -dis-

CASE:

Modern, with chrome

MOUNTING'

60

B

S

tandard

thread. nu,api

S;ONoS

9.

Car

-

1'

e'

WEIGH4 :pz. less cable.

USE

TV, Broadcast,

P.A.

PRICE:

ExceP tionolly

Low;

57.00

Desk stand

$7.50 extra

Rugged

Sound dependability,

Modern styling, performance at a value price

-

TURNER MICROPHONES

THE

COMPANY

948

17th Street,

N.E.

Cedar Rapids,

Iowa

Dynamu Nlagnetronics Corporation,

Nlai co

Building, Minneapolis I, Minn., has in- troduced the

Dynamu Duosonic stereo- phonic tape playback.

It is a

2

-piece unit, encased features in mahogany wood cabinets, and a binaural tape transport with extended range Dynamu playback heads and a matched set of two preamps, two ampli- fiers and two speakers. The unit also plays monaural tapes, and

For it is priced at

$249.50. complete specifications and information, contact the manufacturer at the above ad- dress.

EMERSON 900

Emerson Radio and Phonograph Corp.,

Fifth Avenue at

59th

Street,

New

York

19,

N.

Y., recently introduced the Emerson

Model 900 tape recorder.

This machine fea- tures a single central control that selects the tape direction; auxiliary controls which se- lect playing speed, set volume, record or play back, adjust bass- treble response, and, when desired, cut out the speaker during record- ing; and an automatic locking device to pre- vent accidental tape erasure.

Model 900 is housed in a handsome, compact, scuff -re- sistant cabinet, smartly styled in shades of green.

It is priced at

5192, and comes com- plete with a crystal microphone, power sup- ply cord, a reel of sound recording tape and one take -up reel. For and specifications, additional information write to Emerson.

OMISSION

Acknowledgment of photographs used in the article entitled "Tape

Dance

Your Way to Folk

Fun." in the last issue, was omitted.

Credit is due Sandra

Rosebrook, Jud Spen- cer, and Ross

Wagar for most of the pic

- tu res.

Permoflux

Corporation,

4900 West

Grand Avenue, Chicago 39,

Illinois, has announced the release of the "Maestro" speaker- headset the use control box which permits of headphones with any high -fidel- ity installation. The

"Maestro" contains a volume control; has two jacks, and the case has a mahogany finish and gold finished perforated front panel.

The control box is priced at

$10.50 net and additional in- formation is available from Permoflux.

SCOTCH

150

TAPE

Minnesota

Mining and

Manufacturim,

Company, 900 Fauquier Ave., St.

Paul h,

Minn., has introduced "Scotch" magnetic tape No.

I

50, which offers 50 per cent mure recording time than conventional tapes.

It features one

-mil polyester "weather-bal- anced" hacking made from DuPont Mylar film for resistance to changes in tempera- ture and humidity and also for greater strength.

This tape is maroon in color and is available in lengths of 900,

1800, 3600, and

'200 feet.

It is priced at

S

-.95 for 1800 feet on a reel.

Further information may he obtained from the manufacturer. www.americanradiohistory.com

Meet

Hermon Hosmer Scott,

Audio Pioneer!

Are

You

MACARONIC?

a sure cure

ATTA-

GLANCE DISCS

approved by leading Tape

&

Recorder Mfrs.

FOR

5 /NGLE

-

-

-_

7RACK

.

FOR

GOAL

T4.1CA

FEN

-TONE

TAPE DECK for editing, indexing, cataloging popular demand has cut costs

5" or 7"

5" or 7"

Postage

Discs-

Discs

2

-11 for for

25c

$1.00

Prepaid

-so

order Today

HALVICK

INDUSTRIES

189

Miller

Ave.,

Mill Valley,

California

OPPORTUNITIES UNLIMITED

&

Tv

NI

,,..

'C

al

Earnings of Radio and announcers,

TV sportscasters, newscasters, and eys are fabulous. for one of these jobs disc jock-

Train now glamorous while the demand is jobs at its highest. Many more than applicants means im- mediate placement after your

MIDWESTERN extension course.

Personal

"Tape" your instructor. contact

Two with weeks resi- dent study at end of course. w for derails

Write

LEARN AT

HOME WITH

YOUR

TAPE RECORDER

Yes, vacy your entire course is conducted in the of your home, assignments recorded on tape. Recorded cisms

OWN instructor top professionals.

CATALOG

It

117. at on your learning speed. and demonstrations returned by same rape.

Send today for

All pri-

Your criti-

YOUR instructors

EXTENSION

MIDWESTERN

BROADCASTING SCHOOL, Dept.20A

228

S.

Wabash Avenue, Chicago a,

Illinois

GIBSON

GIRL

TAPE

SPLICERS splices in a

wink!

NO SCISSORS,

NO RAZOR BLADES! and Irons splIce

OS Be

Bly,

ROSINS INDUSTRIES CORP.

RECORDS FROM YOUR TAPES

Meetings. concerts, training aids, etc economically re- recorded on perms nent hu-hdetdy discs. Professional quality

-overnight service

-all speeds

-any quantity. Writeforf reef oldetand Prices

"7'

RECORDED PUBLICATIONS

1

56-1570

LABS.

Pi«e.

Ave., Camden

3,

N.I.

Fenton Co.,

15

York

-1,

Moore

St.,

New

N.

Y., has introduced a new

3

-speed tape deck, the

Fen

-tone Brenell three independent motors

-

Hi

-Fi. It has capstan, feed and take -up; is provided with instantaneous braking; permits either mechanical

.3 and

7I or 7!

; and 15 ips operation; has fre- quency response 50- 12,000 cps at 7!.2 and

30-

15,000 cps at 15 ips; well under wow and flutter is

0.2'7; and the

Brenell Hi

-Fi heads are completely mumetal- shielded to eliminate any 60 cycle hum and they meet all

NARTB requirements.

This unit is priced at 579.511 audiophile net.

Additional information is available from the manufacturer.

TURNER

"CHIEF"

The

Turner

Company, 948 17th

Street,

N.E., Cedar Rapids,

.1 new desk

Iowa, is marketing mike designated

'The

Chief," which is recommended by

Turner engineers for amateur, P.A., tape recording and sim- ilar uses.

Model 807 is

"The Chief" with a ceramic interior which has a frequency re- sponse db; of

80 -7,000 cps with a level of

-55

Model 308 has a crystal interior which provides a response level of

70.7,000 cps with a of -16 db; Model 809 of "The Chief" series has a new magnetic interior, response of 100

-8.0110 cps and a level of

-52 db,

All models have a die

-cast alloy case, baked -on grey enamel finish,

6 feet attached fabric covered cable and standard adapter sá" 27- thread for stand mounting.

Prices range as follows:

514.95

510.85-

Models 807 and

808;

-Model

809. Further inquiries may be made to the Turner

Company.

Mi. Scott is well known for his significant contributions in measuring and reducing noise. Scott noise level meters and ana- lyzers are widely used in industrial labora- tories and

Scott's remarkable invention, the

Dynamic Noise Suppressor, uncannily elimi- nates noise from all records and poor broad. cast reception without any loss of music. As every audiophile knows, Scott manufactures a most distinguished line of audio equipment.

Typical of the quality components that bear the Scott name is the versatile

210

-D, a combination preamp -equalizer, power ampli. fier,

Dynamic Noise Suppressor, and featur- ing unusually complete tape recording facilities. "In designing equipment for per- fectionists," says

Scott, "associated com- ponents must be of equivalent caliber. We find the wide dynamic range and tonal response of the Berlant Concertone most useful in our laboratory test and design work. Of equal importance, we find we can depend on it in continuous daily operation."

Visit your Berlant -Concertone distributor this week for a demonstration of the unusual features that have made

Berlant -Concertone the first choice of audiophiles, according to a recent independent survey

The Concertone recorder is priced from $445. The

Berlant

Recorder with hysteresis synchronous motor, specifically designed for broadcast and recording use, from $595. Both recorders are speakers.

For

H. H. im.

210

-D

Scott detailed describing these recorders, available as complete sound systems with matching playback amplifiers and literature fully write Dept.15.J

BerlanRConcertone personal choice

'

.'

Amplifier

, of leading audio manufacturers

Audio Division of

American Electronics, Inc.

655 West

Washington Boulevaid

Los Angeles

15.

California

Consult Rerordata Disision for industrial requirements

17 www.americanradiohistory.com

TAPER TREND TABLE

MAGNECORD CITATION

p<<

ín pk

`pt d`ro1"

°c

PO"e

°, trice

INVERTERS

for changing your stor- age battery current to

A.C. lforldeKOCK

ELECTRICITY

figlallere

in your own car!

Taper Trend

Products, 320 N. Webster,

Naperville, Illinois, is marketing a new steel table which is adjustable to various sizes etc. of TV sets, recorders, phonographs,

This table has

3

-sided triangular ta- pered legs which are rubber tipped and will not mar floors or carpets, and is available in black, gold bronze, or maroon finish.

The table dimensions are 18" high, 21" deep, with an adjustable width. Corn

- plete by information and price is obtainable writing to Taper Trend, above address.

A new streamlined tape recorder, the

"Citation,"

F35

-B model, has been intro- duced by

Magnecord,

Inc,

1101

S.

Kil- bourn Ave., Chicago 24, Illinois. This ma- chine is two speed: at 31$ ips frequency response is from

50 to over 5,000 cps, plus or minus

2 db; and at

71

ips frequency response is from

50 to over 10,000 cps, plus or minus

2 db. It also has a phone jack on front, high impedance microphone in- put, an illuminated V.U. meter, a built

-in pre -amplifier, a

6" x

9" speaker, and a con- trol knob with safety interlock to prevent accidental erasing. The "Citation" has a signal to noise ratio of 45 db

-half

track,

.3S7; flutter, is styled in a brown leather case face with a satin gold and ivory paneled with ivory controls and inset detail in gold, and is priced at $349. Complete in- formation is available from Magnecord.

Inc., above address.

E

-V

PATRICIAN

IV

AMPRO "CONSOLETTE" mounted out of sight under dash or in

trunk

compartment!

ATR

INVERTERS

especially designed for

standard

1

10 volt

A.

operating

C...

.

DICTATING MACHINES

TAPE RECORDERS

for

WIRE RECORDERS

EXECUTIVES

ELECTRIC RAZORS

OUTDOOR MEN

REPORTERS

SALESMEN

FIELD INSPECTORS

PUBLIC OFFICIALS

DOCTORS

POLICEMEN

LAWYERS, ETC.

FIREMEN

See voua joó6ea or

ueacYe

jactaav

\

NEW MODELS NEW DESIGNS

NEW

LITERATURE

"A"

Battery Eliminators, DC -AC

Inverters, Auto Rada Vibrators

AMERICAN

TELEVISION

t

RADIO CO.

2.444 Psa

ara

SZ eve

193!

SAINT

PAUL

1,

MINNESOTA, U.

S.

A.

Ampro Corporation, 2835 N.

V'estern

Ave., Chicago 18,

Ill., has introduced two new model "Consolette" tape recorders, the

757M and 757B. Designed to fit into any home decor, these handsome instruments are available in either Honduras red mahogany or "Prima-Vera" blond wood finished cabi- nets. They feature an electronically- balanced two -speaker system, an amplifier bypass for high fidelity hook -ups, frequency response of 40- 12,500 cycles per second,

3 and

71/2 inches per second speeds, electro- magnetic piano

-key controls, automatic selection loca- tor, and an electron eye recording level in- dicator.

The price of the "Consolette" models is

$279.95 for either; matching stands are available at $17.50; and recorder -radio com- binations are also available at $34.50 extra.

Write to

Ampro for complete details.

The Patrician IV high -fidelity

4

-was loudspeaker system has been announced by

Electro- Voice, Buchanan, Michigan. This unit is tailored to fit the corner of a room, and it has three special controls for proper balance to room acoustics.

The manufac- turer claims that it provides a tremendous sweep and brilliance of reproduction and minimizes intermodulation and transient distortion. The Patrician IV features the finest hardwoods with Blonde or Mahogany veneers in hand -rubbed finish and is priced at $772.50 net. For complete information, write to

Electro- Voice, above address.

1eAMPEX

PLAYBACK"

Ampex Corporation, 934 Charter Street,

Redwood City, Calif., is now issuing a small pamphlet called the "Ampex Playback," which features information concerning Am- pex advancements, activities, facilities and personnel.

This monthly publication will be an up to date summation of Ampex prod- ucts and policies. A copy may be had free of charge by writing to Ampex.

19 www.americanradiohistory.com

ALLI

E

on Save at

Everything in

;,

í

.

RECORDING

.7kY

BEST

BUY only

$8995

NEW

BEL

CLEER TAPE i

HIGH

F1D

ITY

PUSH- BUTTON

KNIGHT

TOP

QUALITY

AUTOMATIC

TAPE RECORDER

Itoy.. :m4mg rreoriling e. arts. I,,,tunes lush- liuLIun keyboard for instant recording with remarkably reproduction. cording

For push mechanism instant

-button stop functions.

Records from mike. radio or phonograph. lias playback, control of forward,

Compact- microphone,

Ii4Nl reel.

%ß267S.

(1n1v

-ft.

2

-speed and tem. Records up to

2 hours reel just only of dual efficient on talc a

2:1

:nul faithful

-track erase re- sys- single tape. push a button; reverse and

Ills. With take-up

ay y

5

324

-PAGE

1956

ALLIED CATALOG

Buying guide to everything in elec- tronics, including all equipment for the recordist: complete recorders, tape basic mechanisms, amplifiers, mixers, microphones, head demagnetizers, telephone pickups, recording tape, splicers, leader and liming tape, acces- sories. Write for

Free copy today.

100

ALLIED

RADIO

N.

Western Ave.,

Chicago

80,

Dept.

Illinois

83

-A

-6

The Saint Cecilia

Co.,

Ltd., P.O. Box

55, tape

Westwood, N.

J., a newcomer to the field, is now marketing "Bel Cleer" sound recording tape. It is available in either acetate or Mylar hase, and in stand- ard sizes or bulk. Mylar base features claimed by the manufacturer include ex- tended frequency range, virtual elimina- tion of drop -outs, head wear reduction, and unexcelled adhesion of oxide to the film, as well as protection against tempera- ture changes. Each reel in a dust proof of tape polyethylene is bag packaged prior to being placed in its attractive hinged box.

For to additional information and price, write

The Saint Cecilia

Co.,

Ltd., above ad- dress.

UNIVERSITY MASTER

NEW!

PENTRON

3 Speaker

Hi

-Fi

Tape Recorder

With

SEPARATE

"ROVING"

SPEAKER

LETTERS

REPORTS

SURVEYS

INTERVIEWS

RECORDS

INSTRUCTIONS

WHEN YOU'RE die

-tlse-

Road

TAKE

A

"RECORDER" and a

CONVERTER

In your

CAR

Dont leave your r der idle when you're "on the road." working

Thousands of fives, adj

"in the

,

1 field" progressive salesmen, newsca find they can

- and others make more calls, more ground, work more efficiently

RECORDER or

DICTATING MACHINE in with the car. a

Operated by a CARTER ROTARY CONVERTER from your car battery, you can easily

DOUBLE the useful- ness of your recorder if you joke it along.

Carter Converters are used in cars, boats, planes, supplying

110 v. AC from storage battery power.

Sold by radio parts for d' full details and nearest distributor. Carter Motor

Co., Chicago 47.

' butors everywhere. Moil Coupon

I-

Carter Motor

Co,

2655 N. Maplewood Ave.

Chicago

47,

Illinois

Please send illustrated circular and tion on

Carter Converters. full informa-

Nome

Address

City-

Sfate

J

University

Loudspeakers, Inc., 80

S.

Ken

- sico Ave.,

White

Plains, N. Y., has just introduced the Master, a

"Decor- Coustic"

',way speaker system. The speaker and network components used in the Master are the woofer

University C15W dual impedance for rich sonorous bass, the 4409

"reciprocating

Bares" horn speaker bodied mid- range, and the

HF for

-206 full

- super

- tweeter for smooth, brilliant highs to beyond the range

.tnd of audibility.

Crossing over at

700

5000 cycles through the

N

-3

Acoustic

Baton, precise

IS maintained adjustment to room acoustics with the built -in "brilliance" and "presence" controls.

Available finishes are Cherry and

Blond Mahogany, and the system measures only 37" H. x 28"

W. x

191/4" price,

D. For additional information and write to University

Loudspeakers, Inc.

$24950

LIST

Most complete line

.

$139.95

UP

Other '56 models.

$129.50

$595.00 to

... exclusive UniMagic Control

Only

the new

Pentron Emperor

recorder offers this newest concept in audio pleasure. The Emperor's

"rov-

ing"

tweeter in a separate baffle, perfectly balanced with

2 heavy duty woofers in the recorder, reweaves the whole complex beauty even at of the music low volume. Don't miss the experience. Hear and feel this ence in audio dimension differ-

-see

the

Emperor's bold incomparable styling at your Pentron dealer.

Push

pull

10

-watt amplifier, VU meter, Automatic index counter.

Instantaneous braking.

Frequency re- sponse 40. 12,000 cps.

GEST

EXCLUSIVE

OF

TAPE

RECORDER

116 -55

PENTRON CORPORATION

787

South

Tripp

Av.,

Chicago

24, III. www.americanradiohistory.com

QUESTIONS

&

ANSWERS

MANY

SURPRISES

HIGHEST

Fl

LOWEST

PRICES

T-

%t

-E071e -%IPP/l

//H

F

THREE -SPEED TAPE DECK

At last,

YOU can have tape in your

High Fidelity system.

Here is the tape deck that meets

NARTB re- quirements and actually is in world

-wide. use in broadcast sta- tions.

Three speeds

(33/4 ips,

71/2 ips,

15 ips), mu three motors, heads in

-metal shields which effectively eliminate any 50 or 60 cycles hum of motors and transformers.

Rec- ord

/Playback head has novel azimuth adjustment making it ideal for playback of all makes of pre- recorded tapes. 7" reels.

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MOTEK and position equalization. Outstanding features:

VU-

Record level meter;

-62 db

Hi -Z mike input; 0.5 volt

Hi -Level high input;

3

-way switch selected inputs; all inputs on front panel and

-

2

Response 30 db. another

Hi

-

on

17,500 rear cps,

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S79.50

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1956

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The above are only samples of the many terrific values

1956

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FENTON

15

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20

Sold through better

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See yours today!

West of prices

Rockies, slightly higher.

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L', +un 4:,c

Questions for this department may be sent on tape or by means of a postcard or letter.

Please address your queries to, "Questions and

Answers,"

Film and

TAPE RECORDING,

Severna Park, Maryland.

The most interesting and widely applicable questions will be used in this department and all inquiries will receive a tape or letter reply.

1

QI would appreciate your opinion of how permanent recordings on tape are. have been offered a fair price for my record collection and was wondering if

I could transfer the records to tape, sell the records and then depend upon the tape to store my on the tape collection. Would the sound evenually fade

?

-J.

W.

S.,

Amarillo,

Texas.

AThere are quite a number of people who have already done what you are contemplating, not only to dispose of the records but to save space.

Tape recordings made years ago are good as new and with the recent still advent of the new Afylar

-based tapes the storage and aging problems are completely nated. elimi-

The tapes should be kept at room temperature or lower and au ay from any magnetic fields which would affect the re- cordings. Otherwise no special precautions are necer far),

Recently a friend and I each pur- chased friend's recorder is a double track and mine is a full track. I have tried to make dupli- cate tapes the same make of recorder. My on both of these recorders in connection to another make of recorder.

On the newly recorded tape on my recorder there is be a no quality whatsoever. Could it mis- match?

What would you advise me rape

? to do to get a good quality duplicate

-L.

F.

B., Saginaw,

Mich.

A-Your

trouble can be one of three dif- ferent things which can happen be-

1 tween any two recorders regardless of make.

-ln

making your connection be sure you connect the high impedance output of one recorder to the the other.

2 high impedance input on

-Be

sure that both machines are connected to the same power supply.

If the two are plugged into different light outlets noise and hum can develop which will interefere with the quality of the re- cording.'.

3

-The

proper type of cord must be used be a for the interconnection. This should shield. sineh-- conductor miçrophone cord with the proper type of plug at each end. rug the shield of the microphone cable to the frame of the microphone.

If

this is already placed and sloes not eliminate the hum your only recourse is a one -to -one isolation transformer having ance or high imped- low to high used with a low im- pedance microphone provided, of course, that your recorder pre

-amplifier has suffi- cient gain. The isolation also applies to your mixer problem in which you are get- ting some of the ground return noise. is a

I have a rather odd bit of trouble about which

I do not know what to do. There

21"

TV set nearby which is not on the same power line yet it causes my radio to oscillate and ruins some recordings.

What would cause this and how can it be cor- rected?-J.

T. Z., Micco,

Fla.

Certain types of oscillators in TV sets do radiate a signal especially in the region of 15,750 cycles per second. We are unable to say how it is getting into your radio but we rather suspect it is travel- ing the power lines. We would suggest that you try a

"brute-force" filter on the

AC line to determine

if

this is the cause of the trouble. The sweep circuit of the set

TV should be shielded also. A second pos- sibility is that either the the power line is acting

TV as a antenna or radiator, ac- tually broadcasting a signal that your radio picks up. You can call your Mead FCC agent to find the name of your local committee to whom you can

TV! tell your prob- lem. These committees are usually made up of radio hams who keep

TV set owners happy by interference caused by ham radio stations.

In your case the shoe is of the other foot you have a fixing filters on the sets to trap

-

TV set that is causing inter- in the broadcast band. ference n

-When

I use my recorder and the mia;.- phone with the wire supplied

I get ex- ellent results.

If

I add one or more exten- sions I get a very cables I am annoying hum. The using are heavy duty, shielded and plastic covered.

The line jacks and plugs are also shielded. Can you advise what the cause of the hum is and what

1 can do to correct it?

This hum is also i';

4cnt when

, mixing several mikes thru an ironic mixer.

-E.

A.

L.,

Shillington,

Pa.

A

Some of

N impedance the ccrystal mikes and are are particularly high nucept- to hum, as are some pre -amplifier.( due to design characteristics.

Try ground.

TAPE NO.

4

BILL ANDREWS

"EASY LISTENING

MUSIC"

all;

Shlu Su.

1. i leynnd The Blue roc

Canarc

-10 r

I loriznn. Tie

Penthouse Serenade.

As

Tithe when, r

T,, all:

T,ru

IO.

The

Side. No.

2.

7L'.

Iarnv

I

.

\LS

/I:

Tape Nit. and 'Tape So.

2.

Orean

S. nuns ht

Ralph Bonds. You'll like tw s.

-.

7" Reel.

7./2 i.p.s..

Dual Track.

S10.95 ea.

Dealer

I nnuirs

1 rrvited

CONSOLE RECORDING STUDIOS

Wayne, Penna. www.americanradiohistory.com

TAPES

TO THE EDITOR

When sending tapes to the editor please use the

3 reel and indicate the speed of which it was recorded and whether it is dual or in this column and then reply on single track.

We will listen fo your tape, make notes from it for use your tape. Please keep tapes reasonably brief.

If you do not own a recorder a letter will be acceptable. Address tapes or letters to: The Editor.

Film and

TAPE RECORDING, Severna Park, Md.

To the

Editor:

The uses varied of a recorder are but here is a use that many and will be new to many of the readers of

TAPE. RECORDING magazine. This subject is one which a few years ago was many laughed off as a joke.

Today thinking people including scientists, find much food for thought in this study.

It is the study of flying saucers.

Thousands and thousands of sightings have been made, many books have been written about it and flying saucer research up all over the groups have sprung world. This may seem like science fiction to many but they have not studied the vast amount of material that is rapidly accumulating.

In California there is a

Mr.

George

Adamski who has written two books on flying saucers, the first entitled "The Flying

Saucers

Have Landed," and the second, a new book, "Inside the

Space

Ship," in which he relates message the startling experiences of meet- ing the visitors in from outer space and riding their space ships. He brings a wonderful from the space people to the earth people.

Of course this has caused a great deal this of controversy and criticism.

Much of criticism has been directed against these books and

Mr.

Adamski.

But now those who have tape recorders may hear

Mr. Adamski speak for himself.

He has prepared a series of tape- recorded lectures, the

These lectures first of which is now ready. will help remove the veil of secrecy that now surrounds the flying sau- cers.

The most unusual feature of this an- nouncement is that these lectures may be obtained free of charge by any who desire to hear them. This is what you should do.

First, send myself, your written request to either

Dr. A.

G.

Dittmar,

Ausable Forks,

New south. send

York,

if

you live in the east or in the

If

you live in the west or midwest your request to Mr. Henry

M.

Henrik- sen, 1312

Those

Grove Ave., Racine

4, Wisconsin. living in foreign countries may choose either source.

The second thing to do is to send a reel of plastic tape having a recording time of

45 minutes. Third, to include a sufficient amount ence. for return postage and correspond-

Fourth: state the track and speed re- quirements of your recorder.

It is suggested that

7.5 ips be used whenever possible for higher fidelity. Fifth: state the size of the listening audience.

All requests from indi- viduals and smaller groups will be honored but it is suggested that as large a group as possible be it will be

Preference formed to hear the tape so that performing the greatest service. will he given to those who re- quest recordings to be played groups and for larger will be answered in that order

-

however, all requests these copies will be honored. Since will be made upon your own tape they you may will become your propene

.uni play and copy them as desired.

We hope you will along to the readers pass this information of

TAPE RECORDING magazine as we believe a great many of them will be saucers. interested in details on the flying

--Dr.

A.

G.

Dittmar,

Ausable Forkr.

New

York.

How

good

will your new

\

recorder

be?

\\I

tape

1

To the Editor:

Regarding a suggestion made in letter to the a recent editor,

I have been reading for the blind for some time.

If everyone would do it, it would be a fine thing, Then the blind would be able to enjoy current up -to- date magazines. available

There is plenty of material for the blind on discs but these are all books. They appreciate being up

-to -date as

7" much as anyone and I make up a 3 hour

Mylar tape every week or so for a blind friend.

Your correspondent suggested getting someone to read material on to the tape pay, perhaps a for high school student.

I would be glad to read wants it but

I for pay for anyone who will not accept any pay from the blind.

I would be glad to have readers write or tape me

if

they want someone to read to them on tape. I am quite sure I would be unable to take on many people to read to but perhaps I could act as a ing house for both parties and get a folks together that way. clear- lot of to

Such a program might be very helpful blind people and give others an oppor- tunity to help the blind.

Also, it could be a source of income for a

"reader" in serv- ing someone willing to pay the bill who is not blind.

-Phil

Keltner, 10037 Samoa

Avenue, Tulunga, California.

There's a double barreled opportunity for those who would rather listen than look

-or

for those who would like to help the blind by reading current literature on tape.

1f you're inclined in tape or either direction drop letter to Mr. Keltner.

Ed. a

To the

Editor:

I have me, a just read my first copy magazine. I think it is really "great!"

I only wish

I had back copies your wonderful articles. They of it. Keep up are helpful to neophyte in the hobby.

-R.

of your

Floyd,

Englewood, N.

J.

The

Back Issues department still has some left and will be glad to take care of reader requests at the regular newsstand price.

Ed.

One of the answers lies in the quality of the magnetic recording head basic and

-a important part

of

all

recorders.

The better the head, the better the performance you can expect. A Shure magnetic recording head insures a close tolerances fications unit constructed to

...

precision speci-

...

optimum performance of your recorder.

An

outstanding

example is the

"Micro-

Gap," a new, high quality magnetic recording head specifically designed and fine for use in professional studio quality home tape recorders.

It

provides excellent response over an extremely wide frequency range

...

long operating life at maximum efficiency. For home recordings of professional stature. or for precision data recording equipment, the

"Micro

-Gap" cannot be excelled.

The

"Micro

Shure

-Gap" is the latest family of fine

-quality mag- netic recording heads. When a of the tape recorder manufacturer announces model equipped a

kith

any of them, you can he assured of the high ity of the tape recorder choice

...

qual- for the of a

Shure head is proof that the manufacturer is giving you the very best.

c.x:ol#141

6/(247/4

To the

Editor:

Perhaps some of your readers have taped

Robert Weede would make a copy. singing Rigoletto. If so

I like very much to borrow one to

Will

you ask any readers who might have such a tape to write to me.

Pioneers in

Magnetic Recording

Since

1939

SHURE BROTHERS, Inc.

725 west

Huron Street, Chicago

10,

Illinois

21 www.americanradiohistory.com

Carrel

Bratman holds the device used to produce the sound of an army on the march.

It consists simply of a frame which holds wooden blocks strung on flexible cords. This device has been used since the earliest days of radio.

Wanna

Btu`

A

Noise?

by

Mildred Stagg

New

York Editor

....

Carroll Brannan sells noises and has the world's largest collection of sound effects.

"HAT

do we use for a

cats

meow!" This was one tile of the the telephone while he was demonstrating a animal -call questions that Carroll Bratman answered horn for your reporter. largest collection of sound effects, noise -makers on versa-

Bratman has the and honest- to- goodness drums in the whole world. His warehouse bins contain more than eight hundred varieties of meows, barks, baaas, and moos: whistles, chimes, screeches and moans.

The

only sound that he can't make is

"no!"

Whatever

a cus- tomer demands, be it possible or not, Bratman supplies it- usually within 24 hours.

A quick run through of his reference catalogue reveals

28 categories. It begins with ACCESSORIES and ends with

WHISTLES

(1)

Imitations

In

(2)

Decoys, etc. between there are such exotic sound effects as

Fretted

In« struments, Gongs and ments.

Tam

Tams, and Vibra- Cussion Instru-

Bratman offers 24 -hour delivery service and many of his customers take advantage of this offer.

When

a customer asked for a record

with nothing

on it but repeated wolf calls, all that Bratman asked was

"What

22 www.americanradiohistory.com

species of wolf ?" was the

When

he was told that the desired sound

mating

call

of

the male, human species, he whistled his way day.

through

an entire record and delivered

it

the next

The record, he learned later, was designed to teach a parakeet.

Its owner hoped

that

by constantly repeating the record the bird would include the long, low whistle in his vocabulary.

It

worked too.

A large

part

of the Carroll Musical

Instrument

Service,

(the

correct if slightly misleading name of the

company),

has to do with music and musicians. In addition to owning the largest collection of drums that can be found anywhere,

Bratman's warehouse is crammed with marimbas, banjoes, guitars, celestas and xylophones to say

nothing

of the more usual

string

and wind instruments.

While

he was explaining the various instruments and their uses, Bratman was also

gathering

a half dozen mutes.

They had been ordered for the brass section of the New

York Philharmonic Orchestra. Kostelanetz was conducting

Ferdie Grofe's Grand

Canyon Suite and he is one of the many conductors who depend on

Bratman for special in- struments.

In addition to orchestras and conductors, the Victor

-RCA,

Decca, MGM, Columbia and other recording companies order

equipment

and musical instruments from Carroll

Service. The musical

part of

the business comes naturally to its owner. Bratman was a professional drummer and he played

with

many

important

concert orchestras before he turned to music and noise. Every man who works for him must also be a musician so he can understand the cus- tomer's problems subjectively.

Brarman left the band business after he successfully an- swered his to conductor's request for an authentic bee sound accompany the "Flight of the Bumble

Bee." Everyone was stumped but Bratman. He thought that the sound could be supplied

without

non

-musical too much difficulty.

So he bought a

little

"Razzer."

instrument

known as a

"Bronx Cheer" or

He

breathed into it softly and out came a realistic bumble bee

that

buzzed

right

through the selection. He practically stopped the show with his buzzing. future in supplying sound effects for orchestras and others.

He went into the inventory stantly replenished and amplified through agents the world and he still hasn't learned serve by

On

further

consideration he thought there might be a business about eight years ago. Today his of noise and music is nationally famous. to say expert carpenters and machinists. Tuners are always on hand. These men can tiniest aberration in pitch. spot

"no."

Its

con- him from this dread fate he employs a large staff assistants. In men, he has a addition to the musicians who double as sales- complete carpentry and machine shop manned

of

all

To

all over pre- of kinds and rectify the

Not

all sounds require large, elaborate or expensive struments to simulate. "You have to learn how to instrument," Carroll Bratman explained, "or you able to

point

imitate the sound you want."

He

won't in- use an be

This is called a

"Barnyard Whistle" and it comes equipped with a reed. An adjustable slide fits over the reed. can with one of his best sellers. produce ten different barnyard

It's a noises demonstrated the small wooden in- strument about the size and shape of a wooden doorstop. any

of

which eye of a is guaranteed to

Bratman with the whistle, bring nostalgic farm boy who lives in the city. tears to the

The sounds are produced by breathing into piece at the and adjusting the slide over the reed. bottom of the

With

mouth- the slide the reed the whistle produces several low

Top. is with held close fo the mike horse

Mr. ordinary sandpaper will make is

Bratman used.

The necessary cadence demonstrates how the marching simulated by plopping two cocoanut men sound of marching. Center:

Two wooden blocks effect frame is raised and lowered rhythmically to produce during recording.

Lower:

The clop -clop the faced quite a realistic train sound when of a halves on a wooden board.

The shells may also be worked to suggest the horse traveling on a in gravel or other material road, across a bridge, etc.

23 www.americanradiohistory.com

Upper left: the best sound effect for sleigh bells is just sleigh bells.

The shop has bells and gongs of all shapes and sizes to produce any effect that might be wanted by a re- cording studio, radio station or orchestra.

Upper right: practical sounds, such as the in- audible dog whistle that can call a dog without disturbing the neighbors ere sold in the store.

Another practical sound device with a purpose is the

Audubon bird call which produces a squeaking noise to harmless.

The attract birds. Left: a realistic rattlesnake that's perfectly fiberboard box contains the batteries and a vibrator.

On the end of the vibrator is a twist of cellophane containing bird gravel. When the current is applied the vibrator shakes the gravel inside the cellophane producing the sound made by a angry rattlesnake. Lower very left: Mr. Bratman works an alarm clock bell on a wooden block while his assistant sets the wind to howling by turning the crank on the wind machine.

Lower right: you are looking at two dog bark devices.

The small horn can be made sound like a dog and to

Mr. Bratman is making a short stroke with a canvas pad on a ros'ned string which is attached to a can that is in turn attached to a wooden box to amplify the sound.

7

4 www.americanradiohistory.com

notes; an oink, or the growl of a bear, or a doleful moo.

Near the top

of

the reed the whistle sounds like a soprano squeal and a horse it simulates a chicken cackling, a baby crying or whinnying.

All these sound effects cost only $4.25.

"But

don't

expect to press a button and have the right sound come out," Bratman warned. "You have to practice on any of these whistles before you can produce exactly the effect you want when you want it."

In experienced hands, however, these gadgets are far more reliable than the mechanical sound effects that are sold in trick stores.

The cat's meow that he was asked about on the telephone can be supplied in any of several ways.

"The best way is to have it live," Bratman said.

"That means

hiring

someone like Donald

Bain. He specializes in animal noises and the big radio and TV companies use him all the time. Or you can rent a record of a real cat meowing.

The

record is marked so you can cut it in accurately when you want the sound. The cheapest and least reliable is this."

He ferreted out a square of oilcloth, gaily decorated with a colored lithograph of a cat and horse. It was a toy dating back many years.

By moving the toy up or down or sideways a kind of meow or whinny came out but it was neither realis- tic nor did it perform every time it was moved.

Another popular, low -priced item is a smaller whistle that simulates only three barnyard noises, a duck quacking, a horse whinnying or a chicken cackling.

A whistle so tiny that it's almost invisible produces a snipe's call. Any noise is for rent or sale, but there are some that Bratman would probably be reluctant to part with permanently because many can never be duplicated. a

There are many modem horns available that reproduce train or ship's whistle.

But there's one antique horn that's so close to the real feel thing that you can close your eyes and the motion of a train or ship

getting under

way.

To carry out the train effect he provides a box with tin sides that can be scraped to simulate the sound of a train rush- ing along. This gadget also has a whistle so that two people can operate it and produce the train racing along with its whistle blowing, or an effect that is often used to set a mood accompany the music on radio or TV.

One of the more interesting items in the huge Latin

American collection of instruments is a

"Pico." This is a black a metal instrument about

18 inches long. It looks like trowel and is popular among Cuban orchestras when played with the clavas. But under the label that reveals that it was imported from Cuba, there's a metal stamp, "Made in

Eng- land." Actually the Pico is made land and from a plowshare in Eng- shipped to Cuba. From Cuba it's sent to the U.S.A. to be sold finally to a

Cuban orchestra.

If you need a set bells or a quarry blast warning horn, you can find them and hundreds of other sounds or music at the Carroll Musi- cal

Instrument of

tuned automobile horns, some yacht

Service, 209

West 48th

that's hardly audible to human ears.

St.,

New York

36,

N.

Y. You can even buy a dog -whistle for calling dogs

Top: need the skirl of the bagpipes?

This unusual shop there isn't any sound effect except a real bagpipe that has can them imitate one.

Center:

Frank

Muccio shows how to operate the gadget that can

It is produce a a lion's roar, an single headed drum with forced in the center where the rope comes through. unit is played with a a heavy fiber shell. The skin

The is rein

- and the canvas pad. Lower: There are plenty of actual orchestra instruments such as this kettle drum which Mr.

Bratman is tuning. elephant's trumpet or a bear growl. rope is rosined www.americanradiohistory.com

25

Inside this giant United the mid

-west.

DC

-7

Mainliner the passengers are enjoying music from tape while the craft speeds along at 365 miles an hour over

There's

Music in the

Air

...

United Airlines equips its fleet of forty

-tw o DC

-7's with background music on tape.

THIS year travelers are being carried away, literally, on wings of a song.

The ancient

minstrels' dreams of

wafting their

lis- teners along with melody is a modern reality, dramatized by the recent announcement that

United Air

Lines is in- stalling Travel Muzak in its fleet of forty -two spanking

- new Douglas DC

-7

Mainliners.

United's action brings to six the number of airlines carrying music by

Muzak to all parts of the United

States and overseas to all parts of the producers on its "prestige" non

-stop, coast -to -coast deluxe flights when it first inagurated the DC -7's last year. huge Douglas planes were equipped make to flights was so enthusiastic fleet

the

cross- of DC -7's

continent with

The with

every device to flights truly luxurious. According

the air

line, passenger reaction to the music on these

that it

decided to

equip

its

entire

tape reproducers and Muzak travel music.

In addition to being a source of delight for the passen- world.

The heart

of these flying music systems is a tape re- producer no larger than a shoe box and weighing only 27 pounds. It was designed by the Presto Recording Corpora- tion especially for service on planes, trains and other mov- gers, the installation of music in airliners is a tremendous achievement in

both

the technical and artistic senses.

Though

the concept is similar for ships and trains and planes, installation in aircraft is far more difficult

than

in the other two.

Naturally, in an airplane, space is at a pre- mium and weight is an extremely

important

factor. ing vehicles.

United

uses the music to set the mood for travelers as they come aboard,

during dinner

and cocktail hours and before landing. Muzak designed two ings."

distinct

grams for United's flights. For long distance popular numbers, semi- classics and a healthy types of pro-

trips

tunes from the latest Broadway musicals such as the pro-

gramming

experts planned and recorded tapes featuring

sprinkling

of the cur-

rent hits

"Damn Yankees" and Cole

Porter's

"Silk Stock-

Given the problem of designing a tape system small enough and light enough for aircraft uses,

the Presto

en- gineers worked

out

the APB -12. From the time the steward- ess turns it on at the it off

beginning

of the flight

until

she shuts

after

landing, the

unit

requires no tending.

It

plays one half of the dual track tape reverses itself when

at

33/4 ips and automatically

that

track is completed,

then

plays the

other

half track

through to the

end. Altogether a total of two hours of continuous background music are provided on both tracks, after which the reproducer can be set to re-

For the flights between the

US and Hawaii the programs are

built

around typical Hawaiian selections played by out- standing Hawaiian groups. Soothing hulas, serenades and dances are carried to

put

travelers in the languorous mood of the exotic islands.

Originally United installed the Presto APB

-12 tape re-

Reprinted, with additions, from cycle or to shut itself off.

The unit

consists of a

transport

mechanism and a

built

-in preamplifier contained in a standard one -unit closure which fits response is from

50

ATR

en-

the

standard aircraft rack.

The

frequency

to

7500 cycles and the general audio

"The Presto Recorder"

16 www.americanradiohistory.com

quality is equal to any hi

-fi radio or phonograph system.

The output of the

unit

is connected to the airplane's public address system and remote control starting and stopping is possible. A new device is about to make its appearance which will give each passenger complete control over the volume level of the music at each seat in the plane.

The reproducer operates from the

271/2 volt DC supply in the airplane.

The

tape speed is kept constant, despite variations in the

DC supply by means of a governor on the capstan motor. The plate voltage for the preamplifier is taken from the plane's public address system amplifier.

The unit has two playback heads, one for each track.

The upper crack head is used when the tape is passing from the left hand reel.

When the tape reaches the end of its run in this direction, a reversing contact

strip

previously affixed to the tape makes electrical contact with the left reversing post. This automatically changes the direction of the tape and starts playing back the lower track of the tape utilizing the lower track head.

A second reversing tact with the

right

reversing post at

strip

makes con- the end of the tape and starts the cycle over again. The reversing strips are made of

aluminum

foil strip, such as a Brady Quick -Label, or silver

paint

applied to the tape. One long

strip

or two or three shorter strips provide the necessary contact.

The unit

has three motors, one for the capstan and one for each of the reels.

Microswitches on the tape tension arms will shut off the recorder should the tape break.

One sticky problem the engineers had to overcome were the variations in

the

supply voltage aboard planes. If nor licked, the slow fluctuations would cause the tape machine to down and speed up, producing the horrible wailing effect so common on the wind

-up phonographs of twenty years ago. specially

To lick the problem, the engineers installed the designed governor which permits a very wide fluctuation in

the current

supply

without

affecting the speed of the recorder.

Plane cabins present unique, and tough acoustic prob- lems.

The

noise level in aircraft, for example, is very strong in the bass- baritone register and the sound absorbing ma- terial in the cabin not only soaks up the noise but the music as well.

It was here that Muzaks' years of research and experi- mentation paid off.

They have discovered that music must have a tonal range much greater than the noise it competes with so

that

the melody can "go around" the noise instead of

competing with

it, or trying to "push through" it. As a result, music for travel is orchestrated so that the rich har- monics in by using

the tenor

and soprano registers are emphasized

string

and woodwind ensembles to best advantage.

This scientifically tested and proved technique is so suc- cessful in airliners that the music can be heard distinctly at low volume in any

part

of the cabin.

United

is

the

latest airline to add music to its flights.

The first was

National Airlines that installed music on its east coast Florida runs in 1952. Pan American

World

Air- ways followed in 1953 and has used it ever since on its overseas flights.

Western

Air

Lines, when they inaugurated an ultra -luxurious service known as

"Champagne Flights," where passengers were pampered with succulent filet mignons and champagne to the accompaniment of "Cham- pagne Music" by Muzak.

Other

airlines which use music aloft include

Seaboard and

Western

airlines, on its east coast system and Japan

Air

Lines which is now installing Muzak on its Pacific and Alaska flights.

Top: the Presto APB

-12 shoe tape reproducer which is no larger than a box and has been designed to fit an aircraft instrument rack.

It plays a 7 inch reel of

Muzak music and will automatically reverso itself when one track has been played. Center:

Stewardess

Jeanette

Meyers flips the switch that activates the unit and send the tunes through the plane's P.A. system. A new device will permit each pas- senger to control the volume at his own seat. Lower:

The of the DC

-7. inferior

Today more than ever there is music in the air

15,000 feet and

365 miles an hour. it is now possible to have music

-even at

Through

the use of tape

that

is not interrupted by the motion of the craft or by vibration. In addition, the continuous playing features of tape and its trouble -free operation have made it a natural for mobile installations.

27 www.americanradiohistory.com

WEBCOR

VERIFIED

HIGH

FIDELITY!

ROYAL

CORONET

Portable

Tape

Recorder

TWO MOTORS!

TWO RECORDING

HEADS!

NEW

TAPE

COUNTER!

THREE SPEAKERS!

NO REEL

TURNOVER!

For matchless, professional -type performance at moderate price, the

Webcor

ROYAL Coronet is the finest value on the market today! Actually, it offers you features no other tape recorder of comparable or even higher price has!

Balanced sound system with three speakers and omni

-directional sound repro- duce music with the thrilling effect of stereofonic dimensions.

Two motors maintain constant speeds at

71/2 and

33/4 ips. Two recording heads eliminate the nuisance of reel turnover

...

permit instant change from one track to the other.

Easiest operation with one -knob controls. Input, output jacks. New Veedor Root

Tape Counter. Switch permits monitoring with or without recording. Tone control.

Fast forward and rewind. Super- sensitive system.

Multiple negative feedback cir- cuits assume minimum distortion.

See your Webcor dealer soon for a demonstration of the

Webcor

ROYAL

Coro- net. Ask him too, about the Webcor Library of pre- recorded tapes, with their fine musical selections.

All music sounds

better on

a

WE

B

C

R

www.americanradiohistory.com

tape

recorders

EASIEST

OPERATION!

ROYAL

Portable

Tape

Recorder

The ROYAL is the most popular tape re- ccrder in the world today.

The ideal tape recorder for all- purpose re:ording.

High fidelity reproduction.

Two re

:ording heads, two motors for constant spsted. No reel turnover.

Input, output jacks.

M

:.nitor switch.

New Veedor

Root Tape

Cc unter. Dual speeds at

71/2 and

334 ips.

AL tomatic stops at end of tape.

Easy one

- kr ab controls. Safety button to prevent ac- ci: entai erasure. Multiple negative feed

- bcck circuits for minimum distortion.

Top quality construction for years of trouble

- free service.

FANTASY

Posh

-

Button

Tape

Recorder

Table

Model

(Also available in portable model)

Wit:lout doubt, the world's best value push

- but on tape recorder.

Easiest operation.

Editing switch.

Fast forward and rewind.

Twc speeds:

71/2 and

334 ips.

Monitor con- trol High fidelity sound system.

See the

Tony

Martin

TV

Show

Every Monday Night

-NBC

Network

www.americanradiohistory.com

SOUND SOURCE

MIKES

TAPE

AMPLIFIER

SPEAKERS

RECREATED

SOUND

STERE

-O

-MATIC

PRE

-AMP

RADIO,TV

OR HI

-FI

AMPLIFIER

RECORDING

MPLIFIERS

RECORDING HEADS

COMMERCIAL

RECORDING SYSTEM

V-M STERE-O-MATIC PLAYBACK SYSTEM

The stereo system used in conversions, including the

V

-M recorder for which it was originally designed.

Pickup is made with two mikes and recordings made on separate tracks. On playback, one track is played through the recorder, the other is picked up by the new head and fed fo a pre

-amplifier and then to a radio,

TV or

Hi

-Fi amplifier and speaker.

This will play the "staggered- head" tapes.

What

About

Binaural

Conversions? by Jack

Bayha

Development Engineer, l'

-N Corp.

Vois

hare tit(' hr-ml room or al.-11 recorder you can conrert to stereophonic playback.

version as an

unit

available.

We

have used the Tape-O-Matic example of a typical conversion.

The

basic ideas set forth can readily

<nmrrr many other machines,

but

F you are the average tape recording fan, you have most likely heard a binaural or stereophonic playback demon- stration at one time or another. At the same time, you have looked at the price tags and have gone back to trying to enjoy monaural tapes.

It

is not the author's

intent to

make you believe you can duplicate a

$700 machine for a song, but you may be able to convert your tape recorder to binaural, using the proven fact

that binaural

sound does not require the ultimate in hi

-fi a very adequate job in your home.

equipment

to do

Our

conversion system is based on the

V

-M method, developed to convert their Tape

-O

-Matic Recorders for binaural playback. This requires the installation of an addi- tional head to the tape machine, the installation of a pre- amplifier, and the utilization of the power amplifier of a radio,

TV

set, or a phonograph, as well as

the tape

ma- chine's own power amplifier. An examination of the bi- naural recording and play back process diagram will show how this is achieved.

The

V -M machine was originally designed with binaural conversion in mind, and

mounting

provisions for the addi- tional head and the amplifier were provided for right from the first introduction of this machine on the market. Its manufacturers only recently made the Stere

-O

-Matic con-

30

The V

-M adapter kit which, while designed specifically for the

V

-M recorder, may be applied to machines of other makes providing there is sufficient room to take the extra head. www.americanradiohistory.com

After the knobs and cover plates have been removed, the head is installed in line with the existing heads as shown. There must be sufficient space between the playback head and the new head to clear the capstan and roller. When installation is made, great care should be taken so to align the heads properly that maximum response will be had. The use of a test tape is advised. with varying degrees of difficulty. In several cases conver- sion will be obviously impossible, and whether this is

the

case with your machine or not, you will have to judge by reading the text given here.

Binaural starts

with

a second playback head.

The

space for this head must be available or you will have to add two new heads to the machine, new tape guides, and pressure pads, as the sketches show.

Where

space is at a

premium

you may be able

to

squeeze in a

Maico Dynamu head, where

no other

will fit.

Remember the head to be added must play

the bottom

crack of the pre -recorded tape, and its gap must be

1

-7/32

inches from the

gap

of the present head. Study the diagram shown.

(We

have delib- erately

not

considered the use of a

'stacked' head, where

both

tracks are one over

the

other, since these heads are

not

readily available, and even when available are very

prohibitive

in cost and afford no advantage.

To

the con- trary, they create complications causing cross -talk due to pole flux leakage and couplings and

require

special pre-

cautions).

It will be necessary to find a place

to mount the

head and make some form of

mount

for it. A

number

of suggestions are shown; only your ingenuity limits the pos- sibilities. Remember azimuth adjustment is necessary, also a pressure pad and a way of removing it for

threading

will be necessary on the new head. In this respect an examina- tion of your tape machine will show whether or version is possible. If head

mounting

can be made,

not

we con- can proceed to the next consideration.

Under

no circumstances

attempt

to install a conversion on an

A/C

-

D/C

tape recorder. Only units which use power transformers and have a

6.3 volt filament supply are capable of conversion by using the unit's own power supply, as indicated.

Most tape machines, while not designed with the con- version in mind, will have enough excess power in

their power

supply to handle conversion amplifier.

This

is even more apt to be the case, since we no longer need the power drained by the bias oscillator which is inoperative in play-

GNDE

3300

+

40

MFD

250

V

+

_

'

BO

'

MFD

250

V

22

N

MERIT

3046

TO

FILAMENT

6.3

--

RECTIFIER Soma.

SELENIUM

AUXILIARY POWER SUPPLY

Left: the hum bucking coil that is supplied with the kit. If to convert to binaural and make your own parts the coil you is want wound on a

%

/g" coil form and consists of

30 turns of No.

20 wire. Above: this is the schematic be necessary drawing of an auxiliary power supply that may if your recorder does not have enough reserve power to take care of the added drain imposed by the additional equipment.

This supplies both the filament and plate voltage adapter hookup shown on the next page. for the binaural

31 www.americanradiohistory.com

SCHEMATIC

BINAURAL ADAPTOR

VM 12512

RECORD

HEAD

HUM

BUCK

COIL

VM

12525

B

100K 220K

I

/2

I2AX7

3

.047 MFD

500

MMF

/I

220K

10%

01

MFD

4-5'

'9

10

MEO

1/2

I2AX7 e

OU/PUT

MEG

1500

50MFO

/!

back. In some

If you're in the mood to do

One if yourself, above is the hookup for the binaural adaptor.

I2AX7 tube is used and this must be shielded.

The hum bucking coil is mounted in the recorder cabinet and turned to produce the least amount of hum. Both the auxiliary power supply and the binaural adaptor may be mounted outside the recorder in a box. tape machines the bias oscillator and the final amplifier

output

tube are the same unir, being switched in and out of the circuit.

Tape

machines using this corn- mon bias and

output

may be sorely pressed to supply this additional drain, and a separate power supply is deemed advisable. A check of your machine's schematic will indi- cate whether or

not this condition

is present.

If you are the very handy type and want to build your own

pre

-amplifier,

the

detailed schematic is shown. If not, you

might

buy a

V -M Stere -O -Matic kit, and use

the

ready wired pre -amplifier supplied. and contains a new head,

(This

kit sells for $16.95,

pre

-wired amplifier, brackets, con- necting cable, hum buck coil, etc., as well as detailed in- structions for installation in V -M

machines). If

your

tape

machine amplifier has room for

the

pre- amplifier you

might

punch a socket hole to fit, using a

Greenlee punch, and install it in your

present

machine. If no space is available, a utility box obtainable from your local parts supplier may be used as a chassis. tails for all makes of

It is, of course, impossible tape recorders; you

to

give de- will have

to

check your individual situation. If you are

going

to

put the

amplifier into your tape machine, keep it away from the power transformer and the motor as far as possible.

An examination of the V -M Stere-O-Matic

kit

shown will indicate

the

amplifier is

built around

a 9

pin

socket with the addition of two terminal strips; this method of construction works tion on

quite

well when the

unit

is

for

installa-

the tape recorder

chassis.

If

a separate chassis is used, wire the

unit

as desired. about the layout in any way.

There

is

Naturally nothing

critical good solder con-

Upper: the

V

-M recorder for which this adaptor was originally de- signed.

The face plates and knobs must be removed to install the heads used or any competent technician can do it.

Lower: the spacing for commercial

"staggered head" tapes. The distance is meas- ured from gap to gap and must be exact for good results.

32 www.americanradiohistory.com

nections and sound as in any

wiring

practice is necessary in this

unit other

piece of equipment.

The input

lead from the head should be grounded at the amplifier chassis only, at first.

It

should then be grounded at

the

head end to see if any

reduction

in hum is effected; if so, leave grounded at the head also.

It

is, of course, essential that the

output

cable be of shielded wire, and about

12 feet long. Single conductor inside a wrapped or braided shield is adequate.

Terminate the

end which is to plug into the power ampli- fier in a cinch male

phono

plug.

When

soldering, avoid possible shorts in the cable. Excess heat in installing this type

plug

will often cause the wire insulation to melt, and a short will result.

In

wiring

this type of

equipment

it is generally best practice to make all

ground

connections at one

point

only.

This results in the lowest possible amount of circulating hum fields, and thus the least hum.

It

is, of course, neces- sary to use a shield over the 12AX7 tube.

Hum

will in most machines be picked up by the added playback head from the motor and power transformer,

If

you are using the

V -M Stere -O -Matic kit, the hum buck coil in supplied should be used; follow the instructions given the

kit

to

the letter

-this

will greatly reduce the hum problem.

If the kit

is

not being

used, a coil as shown should be made and connected as shown in the schematic

not help

in all makes of machines

-it

may

-but

an

attempt

at its use is well worth while.

It

should be moved around close

to

the

motor

by

bending

and twisting the bracket until a minimum amount of hum is heard.

Once the

pre

-amplifier has been wired and installed, it should be checked very carefully to be sure

that

no shorts are present. Once you are satisfied

that

no shorts are pres-

ent

and

that

it is ready for use, you may

plug

the

output

cable

into

an amplifier, radio, or TV phono jack and check

it

for operation. In some machines it may be necessary

to

isolate tion the

pre

-amplifier

to prevent

its

going into

oscilla-

(refer

to the schematic for

details).

In all cases take the

B+

from the last section of filter capacitor,

not

from a tube point.

If

the amplifier screeches at you, isolate it as shown. go ahead;

If it

seems to be normal, run a piece of tape past the head, hear anything? If you do, you are ready to

if

not, check over the amplifier to the schematic.

Once you have corrected the

wiring

error, we all make at least one every so often, make sure everything is perform- ing well in both channels.

Now

we must adjust azimuth. This is a high sounding way

of

saying 'line up the head.' To do this

right

we must have a binaural test tape or at least a regular binaural tape.

We

must

get

the slit in the head lined up

with

the record- ing on the tape. This is done by adjusting the tilt head so that it is absolutely parallel

with

of

the

the tape's recorded information. Adjust a

until

you hear maximum highs, or if test tape is being used, adjust for maximum signal from the constant tone portion.

(V

-M

Tape

No. 8476 provides a complete binaural demonstration and a section of head

alignment recording).

Once the head has been aligned you are ready for binaural or stereophonic sound.

While

this is a

rather

involved job for many tape fans, it is well you are

within

the

grip

of many others. trained to perform this operation

If

are capable of doing the job, however, you

don't

on V -M

don't

feel tackle it.

You might, however, have a friend who is a little more capable in the realm of electronics who can do the job for you. In the case of V -M recorders, all service agencies machines.

BEND BRACKET

TO ADJUST

TURN

SHURE

SHURE MICROGAP

SPACER

USE SCREWS TO ADJUST

MAICO

BRENNEL

HEAD MOUNTING AND ADJUSTMENT

PRE

ANP.

e

+

PRE- AMPGND

10 K

+ IO

NFD

350v

e

PLATE

TIGHTEN TO

ADJUST

--

WASHER

TAPE

B +

TAPE

GND

IF

OSCILLATION

OCCURS ADD TO

PRE-AMP.

DECOUPLING NETWORK

Top: heads which may be used as binaural sound.

The

Maico head the second head to pick up the k the smallest and may sometimes be squeezed in where others would not fit.

Center: if the preamp squeals at you after consisting it is hooked up, add the decoupling network of the

10K resistor and a 10 mfd. 350 v. capacitor.

Lower: final adjustment of the heads consists of aligning them so the gap is vertical. With the

Shure head this may be accomplished by bending the frame as necessary.

33 www.americanradiohistory.com

Talk

About

Shep

Shepherd

NAVE you ever wondered how a foreign movie scar can be brought to America and appear in a

Hollywood pro- duction within a short time, speaking good

English?

Or how an American star can play a drawling cowpoke in one picture, a crisp -speaking business man in another and a bumbling hill -billy in a third? How do they overcome those accents and dialects?

Where

do they learn the tricks of speech and diction that enable them to adapt to any role?

It

isn't done with mirrors.

These results are accomplished by a small most

group

of the

patient

people in Hollywood, the voice coaches. Best known, and in the

opinion

of this writer, most efficient among them, is

Miss

Gertrude

Fogler, voice coach at Metro

-

Goldwyn

-Mayer studios for the past 14 years.

Miss Fogler, as she is fondly called on the lot, is held in high regard by everyone who knows her, from the producers on down.

With

those who are, or have been, her students, esteem is tempered with a

bit

of awe, somewhat like a school- child regards a stern but lovable teacher.

Voice teachers use no tools of trade other than books, and some method of recording the voice so himself can hear and study his own mistakes

that

the student

-and

mark his progress. In records, a the beginning this was accomplished with disc somewhat cumbersome and costly method.

With

the advent of tape recorders the path of the voice coach was considerably eased. lesson

Now

it is possible to record any given over and over on one tape, and finally, to preserve periodic recordings for later study.

The storage problem is lessened, loss from breakage eliminated and the cost lowered appreciably.

Miss

Fogler has been a prodigious user of magnetic tape since its inception.

Her

sessions are conducted in a closed room in a small building jammed in between film vaults and a huge sound stage.

There are no outside noises or ac- tivities to distract attention.

In this remote domain Miss Fogler has taught correct speech to over

300 students, among them producers, ex- ecutives and directors as well as performers. Katherine Hep- burn, Marlon Brando, Esther Williams, Ava

Gardner

and

Fernando Lamas are just a few of the name stars who have

'taken"

from the little white- haired lady with the crystal

34

Miss

Gertrude Folger has at

M

-G -M and has taught voice for

14 years

"graduated" over

300 students, among them producers, executives and directors, in addition to hundreds of name stars and feature performers. tones and the "know -how" they need.

Fernando

Lamas, the polished Mexican star, is perhaps the best example of Miss Fogler's mastery of the spoken word and her ability to transmit it to others.

Lamas arrived on the big Culver City lot

without

a single word of English at his command. In just

18 months he was before the cam- eras in his first lines flawlessly.

English -speaking picture and

handling

his

It

is

important to

note that those 18 months were

not

all given

to mastering

the language.

There

were a number of

other

duties and other people consuming his time; drama coaches, photographers, publicity men, etc.

Voice lessons

Lamas had to be sandwiched in. The

point

is

that

learned the English language and learned it well; not just the lines

of

a movie script as is sometimes

the

case with foreign performers brought in for one or two pictures.

Miss

Fogler considers the tape recorder the best

thing that

has happened to her profession in years. Because of it the student has a record

of

his progress which he can hear with his own ears. Oddly, few people ever hear

their

own voices as

other

people hear them, and few persons recognize their own voice the first time in a playback.

This is due to the fact

that

we hear our own voice from

within, through

the inner ear, as it were.

When

a new student appears in Miss Fogler's office her very first act is to record a few paragraphs in the student's own natural voice, diction and tones.

That

recording be- comes a guide, revealing speech faults to be remedied and serving as a comparison chart

with

later recordings to indi- cate progress. Playbacks of periodic tapes enable both teacher and student to note improvement and thereby stream- line sessions.

More

important,

they are valuable to producers or studio executives in

timing

the start of a costly production in which the

student

is to appear.

While

students may have speech faults different from one another there are certain rudimentary corrective meas- ures (Miss Fogler dislikes the word exercises) applicable to all cases.

She prescribes practice of lip and tongue control in relation to individual consonants and vowels. Once these are mastered the correct comes easily.

pronunciation

of whole words

But the vocal cords and oral cavity are

but

a part of the whole. She sees the human body as a fine instru- www.americanradiohistory.com

Talking!

Gertrude Folger, voice coach of

M -G -M

Studios, says the tape record- er is the best thing to happen to her profession in years. Here is how she helps foreign stars to master the

Eng- lish language.

Miss Folger tapes Miss Montevecchi during a coaching period.

The tapes let the performer hear how she sounds, indicate progress, reveal faults, serve as textbooks and show improvements to producers and executives grooming foreign stars for the movies. ment whose components are of speech and tone.

important

to the production

Good posture, she says, is an aid to good speech, in reso- nance and

power

at least. She advises standing or

sitting with

body correctly aligned,

but not

"at attention," and teaches a trick

of lifting

the voice from deep

within

the diaphragm rather than "squeezing" it out of the voice box.

Posture aids greatly in this.

The

body should be relaxed, says

Miss

Fogler, but some- times students have an erroneous conception of what relax- ation means. "They

don't

relax," she says, "they collapse."

"That's not the idea at all," she goes on, "Relaxing is some-

thing

like

running

an automobile.

When

the brakes are released and the gears engaged the car rolls freely along,

35 www.americanradiohistory.com

-

r_

s

;-

Fernando Lamas, polished Latin actor, was Miss Fogler's challenge, since he arrived at

M

-G -M without a single word greatest of

Eng- lish at his command. Speaking only Spanish with its fluid mingling of soft consonants and vowels, Lamas ran into trouble with our hard consonants. His now almost perfect speech and mastery of

English is a monument to the patience and pertinacity of the little white

- haired lady with the ready smile and crystal tones. Perhaps for that very reason she has become one of his devoted fans. completely relaxed, yet under controlled power. Only when the brakes are applied does tension occur. It is this tension, or holding back, that

I want my students to overcome.

It

is often called stagefright."

Power is another word students are apt to misunder- stand. In striving for volume at the beginning they try to

"throw" their voices at some distant point.

Miss Fogler again uses an automobile motor example in clarifying the meaning

of

sound volume. "It's like feeding gasoline to the carburetor," she explains. "As you feed more gas you

get

more power, and naturally, more sound.

With

the into water, causing wavelets to spread outward. voice it should be done by feeding more power

from

the diaphragm into the vocal cords.

The result is similar to tossing a pebble

The

more power there is behind the pebble the farther will the waves travel. It is the same with sound waves."

The tape recorder plays an

important part

in this phase of the work. Once the student grasps the trick of increasing volume from within he notes an immediate change for the better in speech form.

From here on the playbacks show steady improvement. The original recording of the student's voice should, of course, be compared

with

these later re- cordings at frequent intervals.

The

tapes are

important

too, in dealing with accents and dialects. A dialect is often as difficult to correct as is a foreign accent. Both spring from life

-long customs and speech habits.

Both respond to the same treatment; a series of instructions in good English.

Anyone who has both a dialect and a tape recorder should be able to correct the former with the help of the latter, says Miss Fogler.

36 www.americanradiohistory.com

The first step would be to record a bit of monologue about, say your old home, or maybe a pet you once had.

Don't

write it

out

first.

Just talk about it as the

thoughts

occur to you.

Now

listen to the playback and note where the speech faults occur. Better yet, have some

other

fair

- minded person

point

them out.

Write

down the words

that

are troublesome, then pronounce each individual letter in

that

word repeatedly until its sound is familiar.

Next

pro- nounce the word itself over and over, sounding each letter as you do so.

In a short time the lips and tongue will be- come accustomed to forming the word properly. Persons from the south, who usually sound R as

H, find this method especially beneficial,

but

it works well with any speech fault.

Miss Fogler uses three methods of recording a student's voice for study and practice; first, reading; second, mono- logue; third, conversation. There is no singing, though the musical scale is sometimes used in "toning," with no notes being spoken. Rather a humming of the musical scale with the mouth open.

Lessons are spaced as closely together as possible, once daily for five days

per

week at the start. Length of lesson is adjusted to the student's particular needs at the moment, averaging about 45 minutes. Many former students return for refresher courses, often coming back to Miss Fogler from

other

studios. She finds this advisable since there is a tendency to lapse into old habits of speech.

Tape plays still another important role in Miss

Fogler's profession.

As a schoolboy has his books, so must the voice student have his study matter. These are tape recordings of good English perfectly spoken

(or

as near perfectly as

possible).

Such recordings may be the voice of an accom- plished newscaster, or anyone accustomed to speaking clear- ly to large audiences. Students are advised to listen closely to each word, words, pay no

rather

than sentences as a whole. In

other attention

to what he says,

but

how he says it.

Listening to broadcasters as they perform on

either radio

or TV is also valuable.

With

a tape recorder it is a simple matter to record the voice of any newscaster preferred, and since there is no commercial use involved there is no legal objection to such use of the voice.

The student

who has his own tape recorder invariably progresses more rapidly than others. Miss Fogler, who came

to

the

United

States 22 years ago from France, where she had taught foreign languages, finds one

point

of similarity among people everywhere. And a

rather

odd one, at that. They are willing, she says to change anything about themselves except their manner of speech. For some obscure reason they associate

their

way of talking with per- sonality. Actually, she expains, they are ality confusing person- with individuality. Personality is something inborn, a spark

that

will shine through no matter what habits you clothe it with. old or new

This is the most difficult factor of all to explain to the person whose voice you are trying to improve. Often they point to such living examples as

Gary Cooper, whose drawl has become a decided asset, never seeming to realize

that

while Cooper may drawl, he also speaks clearly, distinctly and correctly (unless, of course, the script reads

otherwise).

Once Miss Fogler gets the idea across that it is not the individuality or personality she wants to eliminate, but the speech faults that may be a hindrance to those very things, a hard

part

of the job is done.

From there on the final goal is reached

with

the help of an astonishing quota of patience and a good tape recorder.

Photos by Axel Bahnten

Dave Jones making a arrangement used recording of the Gin Bottle

Seven at the Turf Room for binaural recording. in the

Hitching

Post in Dayton, Ohio. Note the double microphone

Meet

"The Monster" at

Empirical Recording by

C. E.

Smiley

.

lion Dare Jones of Empirical nicely solred the problem of taking his recording equipment on location

UNUSUAL among tape recording enthusiasts is

Dave

Jones of Yellow Springs, Ohio.

His hobby of record- ing and his great enthusiasm for good Dixieland

Jazz have literally forced him into starting a full -fledged re- cording business, including production of recorded tape and long

-play records on his own label,

Empirical. The operation of Empirical Recording is unique in that its re- cordings are generally made

"on location,"

requiring

com- plete portability of the recording equipment. This sulted in assembly the construction acter of this story. of "The Monster," a has re- portable rack for the recorders. Perhaps it is the central char-

The establishment of the recording business became a near necessity several years ago when two of the better young Dixieland

Bands in the country, the Dixieland

Rhythm Kings and the

Gin

Bottle

Seven, both located in

Ohio and well -known to Dave, reached levels of profici- ency which seemed to demand the existence of records.

Like many others of the bands' friends, Dave hoped that recordings would be made so he collection. However, there seemed to be no indication of interest on the

part might

have them for his of the established recording companies, and Dave undertook the production of records, explaining that he "needed an excuse for buying a good tape recorder."

37 www.americanradiohistory.com

a

For recording the first record, of the full -track

Gin

Bottle Seven,

Ampex 350 replaced the low -cost machine which had been used for experimentation and practice.

A variety of microphones controlled

through

a mixer were used.

Although several of the mikes were of good quality, others were not, and the quality of recording varied as the various mixer control settings were changed.

Thus, for the second record, of the Dixieland Rhythm

Kings, a single condenser mike was used, following the

"roving mike" technique.

During

recording, the mike was moved to follow the action of the band, in order to record the

point

of best overall sound balance.

Meanwhile, the recorded sound was being monitored continuously with head- phones. fine

The

results were excellent, since the band was in form at the recording session, and the new system of recording worked very well.

It

was so successful, in fact,

that

it has been used for all of the recordings which have followed.

The

second record had been made "on location," at the

Hitching

Post in Dayton,

during

a special recording ses- sion outside regular business hours. From some experi- mental results, it appeared worthwhile to try for record- ings made with the bands playing on club jobs in order to have music

their regular night with greater

spontaniety.

Because of the ordinary bandstand lineups

under

those con- ditions, the recording balance occasionally presented a near- ly impossible situation,

with one

or more of the instru- ments being too far away from the microphone. The use of two mikes

with

a mixer appeared to be the answer, except for the problem of making the mix exactly

right

on the first try.

To

have time to work out the best mix from

the

two mikes, separate recordings to be mixed later were indicated. For this purpose a second Stephens micro-

phone

and a 2- channel Ampex

350 were added to the sys- tem.

Obviously, in addition to its intended function, this new system was all set for making stereophonic recordings. took only a small amount of experimentation to show

It that

stereo was much more fun than monaural recordings.

Also, by this time, arrangements had been made for the produc- tion and

distribution

of Empirical recordings on prere- corded tape by

Livingston Electronic Corporation.

With

this outlet for tape, and its accent on stereophonic releases, the new system was

put

to work

making

them. All new recordings are now made available as stereophonic tapes, as well as single track tapes and records. For stereo record- ing sessions, the mikes are handled together as a single unit, using the headphone monitoring system.

With the addition

of the

2- channel recorder a perma-

nent

rack assembly became a necessity, just to cur down the time involved in plugging the various assemblies. In addition, the rack had to be able to be moved anywhere, because of the great variety of recording locations.

To meet this need "The Monster" was created.

To mount

the two complete Ampex machines, Dave built up a close -fitting, tailor made rack which is spring -mounted on a specially made hand truck. All of the recorder cabling and interconnections are permanently attached as

part

of the spring assembly, making it necessary to plug only the power. microphones and headset to be ready for action. The life expectancy of the various cables is greatly increased, since they are not subject to flexing, and the connectors do not suffer from the normal wear and tear. The rig supports the recorders for either vertical or horizontal operation.

For

editing

and easiest operation the flat position is pre- ferred. The vertical setup is required by the cramped space of many of the recording locations.

In addition to the traveling required by recording the various groups on their home grounds, more travel is in- volved in

providing

for the commercial release of records and tapes. For the production of records, the music is transferred from tape to the master disc by playing it from

The Monster into the superb disc recorder of Mr.

E.

D.

Nunn,

the producer of

Audiophile records, at his

Wis- consin studio. For the production of recorded tapes by

Livingston Electronic Corporation, copying masters are transferred from The Monster to the Livingston recorders at their New

Jersey laboratory.

For transit, the recorder assembly slides easily into a station wagon.

The spring mounting cushions the equip- ment from the vibration of highway travel and helps re- duce the rate of deterioration of the

12SJ7 tubes used in the Ampex electronic assemblies.

To

date, after travel of well over 15,000 miles, only one of these tubes has been lost, probably from normal usage. Before The Monster was completed, tube replacement was a big item in the budget,

The roving mike technique usually employed by

Dave Jones works very well. The mike is moved to follow the action of the band and the recording is monitored continuously with headphones.

This roving mike technique, invented on the spur of the moment, has worked so well that it is now employed in making many recordings.

38 www.americanradiohistory.com

"The

Monster" can be used either horizontally or vertically. On loca- tion it is used in an upright posi- tion as this is most convenient for reading the

VU meters and con- trolling the tapes.

For editing, etc. the unit is placed horizontally as shown in the picture at left. and sometimes the carnage was truly frightening.

Once the Empirical label was established, Dave continued making new records as quickly as time would allow. So far, there have been two Empirical records by each of the two Ohio bands, and one by

Robin Wetterau, pianist with the Dixieland Rhythm Kings. Now, because of Dave's continuing interest in

the

music, the schedule covers bands from other locations as well, including the Red Onion

Jazz Band of

New York

City, Bob Mielke's Bearcats of

San Francisco,

New Orleans. and the George

Lewis

Ragtime

Band of

With

the catalog grown so large, full na- tional along

distribution

of the records has been achieved to go with Livingston's thorough

distribution

of the tapes.

In addition to his musical recording activities, Dave is a spelunker (cave

explorer)

in his spare time from his job as

Secretary- Treasurer of the Yellow

Springs Instru- ment Company, a

desgaer

and manufacturer of precision electronic equipment.

As a spelunker he is

working

with a

group exploring

deep inside Floyd Collins' Crystal Cave in

Kentucky. eral

There, phone lines have been carried for sev- miles into the cave from its entrance, and the explora- tion goes far beyond. As communications man and ex- plorer, he rigged a sound powered phone adaption which requires the explorers to carry only a single small

phone unit

for signalling, talking and receiving. The Monster goes along for the ride on many of the caving trips for recording the various phone conversations between the explorers underground and the surface operators.

Other activities for The Monster include some operation doing custom recording for Dayton and Yellow Springs clients. Also, some work is done for the benefit of students and the drama and music departments at Antioch College in Yellow Springs. And, as

might

be expected of any re- corder, this one turns up at some of the better parties, both for recording and occasionally to provide the entertain- ment.

At first glance it would seem that the rig would not fit in the station wagon and the quizical look on

Dave Jones' face might have been there the first time he tried loading it.

But now, after months of use, he slips it in and out with ease.

Right: the unit in position in the car.

Web straps passed across "The

Monster" at the from shock or vibration in thousands front of miles of travel. hold it in place.

The rig is spring mounted and no trouble has been encountered

39 www.americanradiohistory.com

For

The jobs away recorder is from power lines

Jimmy Sterrett uses power from an

ATR inverter in his father's car. a standard home

-type RCA machine with dual speed and dual track. As the radio station has single track equipment. Jimmy records on only one track of

Ms tapes.

MAKE MONEY

WITH YOUR OWN RADIO

SHOW by

John Murphy eenager Jimmy

Sterrett using a home type recorder is successfully producing his own shores

SHORTLY after Jimmy Sterrett purchased his

RCA tape recorder, he decided to try his hand at earning money with it, not a great fortune,

but enough

to keep the hobby alive and pay its own way.

His

first thought was a radio program, something suitable to his locality. As a start, he chose to build a program around high school football.

Jimmy went to his local radio station,

WHJB,

in

Greens- burg, Pa., and explained his idea to the station manager.

He inquired whether or not the station would be interested in buying the show, and the manager explained that they did not buy programs.

"Where

do you obtain your programs ?" asked

Jim. The manager proceeded to explain the cost of station time, how a sponsor pays for air time, and the cost of producing the show, plus whatever profit you expected to make. "Once you locate a sponsor,

bring

the program back and we'll be

40 www.americanradiohistory.com

glad to

put

it on the air," promised the manager.

It took all of two weeks for

Jimmy to locate a sponsor.

He

made a sample program to demonstrate his idea, and visited store after store, trying to stir interest. Finally, an insurance company in a neighboring town was sold.

They bought the program for the complete football season.

Complete

with

sponsor,

Jim returned

to the station man- ager, and a 15 minute program was scheduled on

Fri- days,

beginning

at

6:15. The

first half of the show was to be devoted to one school's football team, and the second half to its rival.

Outlining

his ideas for the program, Jim proceeded with his plans by visiting his home school first.

There he re- corded the school victory song, which he later had put on a disc.

Using this as introductory background, he planned to simply play the record, at the same time his recorder

was spinning, and lower the volume of the phonograph while he made the opening announcement on the show. Al- though far from professional, this method proved satisfac- tory.

Jim's budget did not have allowance for a mike mixer at

that

time, but with his tape recorder earnings, he plans to steadily increase his accumulation of sound equipment.

Jim then took his recorder to the school's locker room to interview the coaches and players. few

He

timed this visit a minutes before practice period when they were all to- gether, and he did not prepare written questions.

All inter- views were informal and friendly.

Jim prompted

informa- tion such as what the coach thought of his team's chances to win, if he considered the players in good condition, how their weights compared, etc.

The men were most agreeable and were enthused at the idea of being on the radio.

After talking

to the coaches and team captain, Jim got five team members to give their names and state that they were confident of a win. They enjoyed listening to the im- mediate playback of their voices.

Comments by the school's principal, regarding the num- ber how of games his school's team had won in the past season, it compared with other schools, etc. were next on the agenda.

Jim explained that

he wished to present these as a by

part

of the program, and the principal, being impressed the whole idea. was glad to cooperate. After recording these,

Jim hurried

to the school's auditorium. Here he picked up school cheers, which he

thought

would add color to his program.

For recording the school band inside,

Tim

during

practice,

put

his mike in the balcony, or as far back as he could

get

it.

He

found that recording close picked up too much of one instrument.

When

the band was practicing outside, however, Jim found recording rather difficult due to interferences, such as wind blast.

Then too, when the men were marching, he could not get close enough and there was much distortion.

This same recording procedure was followed at the rival school and from his recordings, Jim edited his show.

During

the commercials at the beginning, middle and end of the show,

Jim

used march music for background, fading it down under his voice, and, at the end of the com- mercial, increasing the volume of the music to normal.

Since

Jim's

recorder was dual track, and the Magnecords at the radio station were single, he could record on one track only.

In most cases, he was close enough to an AC ourlet, and he did not have to use the inverter in his dad's car.

He found that his recorder took a large amount of current, which dis- charged the car battery unless the motor ran, but he could not do without it for many of his on- the -spot pickups.

For the first few shows,

Jim

used the mike that carne with his

-er machine, but eventually he purchased another bet

- mike with a longer cable.

With

a

100 foot extension

.ord he obtained for $7 in a hardware store, he found he

:ould maneuver

quite

freely.

He believes

that

most recorders oday come equipped with competent mikes.

Besides earning money from this type show, Jim got into tames free and rode in the bus with the players.

He

gained great deal of know -how on recording from his football program experience.

Recently, he prepared a

Christmas tape of an operetta.

Recording it at dress rehearsal, he played it on the air at the same time the live show was going on, and people at home

thought

the broadcast was coming direct from the school.

He

is now

planning

an interview program, talking to people as they enter the city at bus and railway terminals.

In the spring, he plans a man -on- the -street show.

Jim

says that recording radio programs is much easier than most recording fans think, and suggests that you visit your local station to see what they charge for air time. In his opinion, there is no greater satisfaction than to sit at home and listen to yourself on the radio.

Top: editing of the material collected in the field is necessary be- fore the show goes on the air. Here Jimmy listens to the tape and makes notes on which cuts to use.

Programs must be accurately timed for broadcast use. The

71/2 inch per second speed is used for all recording.

Lower: the record playing outfit in the rear supplies background music behind the voice.

The school victory song is used to open and close the show. Jimmy invested in a better mike and a longer mike cord to make his operations more flexible.

41 www.americanradiohistory.com

How to Match

Room and

Orchestra

for

Recording lt,

I..

Farka.

... the room acoustics can

,hake

a

bit, diferenee in vara recordings

VERY often an orchestra is set up for recording

without

any serious consideration of its suroundings. In some cases this will cause no difficulties and

the

quality of the recording will be relatively good. But when

optimum

results are desired, then the room must definitely be fitted to the orchestra, or vice -versa.

Now it

might

seem ridiculous

to

place a three

-piece band in a huge hall, and equally absurd to

attempt

picking up a large band squeezed

into

a small space; yet these may be the conditions under which an acceptable recording must be made.

Let us first see what happens when a small orchestra is placed in a very large room whose acoustics are poor. By this

I mean in a room with large smooth walls, a high ceiling, and possibly a tile floor.

Recording a small orchestra in such a place, particularly if a duo- directional type of microphone were used, would result in a very badly distorted pick -up. Low tones would boom, highs would sound tinny, while notes of the middle register would frequently come through so loud they would spill over

-that

is, they would appear suddenly choked.

Now

this may seem like an extreme condition, still you may be confronted by such room characteristics of varying de- grees. So you should be ready to cope with them.

The first remedy is to place the instruments in one end of the room, bunching them as closely as practicable. In this way the combined tones of the orchestra are

kept

sounding solid.

Then make a very close set -up.

With the microphone

set very near

the front

row of instruments, the sound has only a short distance to travel before being picked up.

This will cut down a

great

deal of echo.

Then, by

hanging

drapes or any other kind of sound absorbing material on the wall directly behind the orchestra, you can prevent a good portion of the sound from being re-

Ray seen

Bloch's orchestra set up in the dead side of a

CBS studio. Here at the side and the rear. reverberation is cut down by the louvered -type panels which can be

Note the curtain which can be stretch ed across the panels for further deadening of the studio.

42 www.americanradiohistory.com

A close set -up, with the saxo- phones up close, but the brass and bass instruments pushed back.

Note the curtains all around the orchestra and the rugs on the floor to reduce reverberation and give the effect of a small room.

Elected into the open

further

echo.

part

of the room, thus

eliminating

If

these actions still do not improve the recorded tones

of

the instruments, then you must ask the musicians to play softly.

Keeping down the

overall volume of the or- chestra reduces the intensity

at

which various sound waves will strike

the surrounding

walls and ceiling, and naturally cut down

the resultant

reverberation.

Under

these conditions

the unidirectional microphone

can prove

quite

an asset. Its property of picking up sound from only one direction helps to eliminare tones reflected from the open end of

the

room.

Of course

there

are other ways of reducing reverbera- tion. Rugs can be laid on

the

floor, screens placed at vari- ous distances across the hall, canvas hung from the ceiling, or the place can be tightly packed with people. Any one or several of these means will reduce echoes in a large live room and will therefore improve the recording.

Difficulties are also encountered at the

other

extreme: when a large orchestra is squeezed into a small room.

There

so many instruments are playing close to the microphone that

their

combined tones will blast.

And even when this effect does not occur, the tones of the brass section, bounc- ing off the walls, will almost invariably distort. This is caused by

the

cancellation and doubling of overtones, re- sulting in a peculiar orchestral quality often referred to as

"canned music."

The remedy depends on the type of orchestra you happen to be recording.

With

a

"Pop" outfit, the

intimate

split set -up will prove most effective.

The instruments

are grouped on both sides of a duo -directional microphone, or around an omnidirectional unit, like a crystal micro-

phone with

its face set horizontally. They are bunched as close together as possible to concentrate their combined tones and, except for the brass section and the bass, placed so near to the microphone

that

they are barely beyond the critical blasting distance. bass are also

The

brass instruments and

the

tightly grouped,

but

they should be separated by all the space available from the rest of the orchestra.

This will cut down the tendency of these instruments to blast, and if, in addition, you ask the brass musicians to keep their tones below normal level, you may also be able

to

reduce the reverberation of the brass tones to a

point

where they will not distort.

If you want to decrease reverberation still further, you can of course use the same means

that

were utilized to make the small orchestra fit the large live room, although in most cases you will need to hang sound absorbing mate- rial behind the brass section only.

The resultant

balance will undoubtedly be far from perfect, but it may still pro- duce an acceptable recording.

With

an drchestra

that

plays classical or semi- classical music, the split set -up at close quarters will seldom pro- duce a good balance.

There

it is again preferable to con- centrate the pick

-up in only one direction.

A up is used,

with straight

the strings, then the woodwinds and set- brass sections arranged in successive rows facing the microphone.

There is one modification. Normally, to obtain the sing- ing sweep of the strings, the microphone must be set either at a fairly good distance from the instruments or raised to such a height in

front

and above the violins

that

the distant pick

-up is maintained. But in a small room it is often impossible not only to obtain the necessary distance between microphone and strings,

but

the microphone may be so close that its beam does

not

even encompass all of the strings.

The solution lies in the use of two microphones.

Set about a foot apart and raised as high as practicable,

the microphones

are tilted toward the violins so

that

each beam covers one half of the

string

section.

By checking this dual pick -up on a trial recording, slight adjustments can then be made in the height, position and angle of each microphone until the two levels are balanced and

the

desired string quality is obtained.

The

woodwinds are then crowded directly

behind

the strings, while the brass and percussion instruments are again pushed as far back as the limited space permits. a

Of course this arrangement will hall close and

not

give you a symphony type of pick

-up;

at

best it is a compromise between distant perspective. Nevertheless, it will per-

43 www.americanradiohistory.com

Top

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3ludio mit you to obtain a reasonably good balance in which a great deal of the original string brilliance will be retained.

The orchestra may even acquire a slight roomy quality which will not only eliminate any

"canned music" aspect in its tones, but should also create the illusion that the or- chestra is playing in a hall larger than the one it occupies.

In this way some of the detrimental effects produced by the mismatch of the orchestra to its surroundings can be partially if not completely remedied.

This leads us directly to the subject of room simulation.

There are times when you may not want to correct defects caused by the wrong type of room, but rather to simulate completely different surroundings in order to make the orchestra fit an imagined room. For instance, you may want to create the effect of an orchestra in a small live room.

One way to do this is to set the instruments very close together and then to hem them in from all sides by large smooth wooden panels. Such hard surfaces will readily act as reflectors for the various tones of the instruments and will thus duplicate the "canned music" aspect of a small live room.

If a small dead room is required, then you can hang thick drapes over the panels, place rugs under the instru- ments, and even hang sheets of linen, awning- fashion. over the whole orchestra.

By using these or other sound absorbing materials, you should be able to reduce echo to a

minimum

so

that

the orchestra will seem to be playing in a small, completely dead room.

Now

just as you may have wanted to shrink a large room to make it sound like a small one, you may also want to blow up a small room into an auditorium. One

Above: the drawing shows the placament of the mikes for a symphonic orchestra pickup in a small studio. The mikes are placed two or three feet apart and, at a height of

10 feet with the faces tilted toward the musicians. Below: note the drapes hung from the balcony and sound screens to absorb reverberations which might mar the recording.

44 www.americanradiohistory.com

Making a room seem smaller than room but with the microphones it is by using two microphones close in to pick up the strings.

The same set -up can be used in a small farther back, to simulate the singing sweep of the strings as would be heard in an auditorium. way to create this illusion is to introduce a pronounced echo artificially into the orchestra pick -up.

This is done by means of a second microphone which can be located anywhere in the set -up, although preferably as far as pos- sible and facing away from the orchestra microphone. Now all you have to do to produce the desired echo is to open this second microphone while the orchestra is being picked

up

directly on the first unit.

As the tones of the various instruments will strike both microphones at different times, there will also be a time lag between the dual pick -ups of each mally tone. This, plus the slight feedback which will nor- occur

with

the two microphones open at the same time, will produce reverberation on the recording which will closely imitate sound bouncing around a hall or audi- torium, particularly one not very well soundproofed. And since the larger the hall the more echo it will have, you can control the simulated size of your recording room by in- creasing or decreasing the amount of sound picked up by the second microphone. You can create an even more

truthful reproduction

of room size by changing the dis- tance between the two microphones so

that

the time lag of the echo introduced more closely duplicates that of the room being imitated.

A second means to create the illusion of room size on a recording is the echo chamber.

Briefly, this device consists of a series of connected corridors like a labyrinth with a loudspeaker at one end and a microphone at the other ex- treme. Sound picked

up

on the regular recording micro- phone is fed from the external speaker

output

of the re- corder into the loudspeaker in the echo chamber.

The

sound waves travel along the corridors of the chamber and are picked up at the other end by the microphone. The sound from this last microphone is mixed with the sound picked up by the original pick

-up unit and

the

combined tones recorded. Here again the delay incurred by the sound travelling through the echo chamber corresponds to the time lag of an echo in a large hall.

You can make an acceptable echo chamber by placing the loudspeaker and microphone at opposite ends of any long hall or corridor, particularly one that has smooth walls and uncarpeted floor.

In a pinch you may also use a bath room with its hard reflecting surfaces.

By changing the relative positions of the loudspeaker and microphone in the echo chamber you can readily vary the reverberation time and thus reproduce the effect of rooms of different sizes. You can obtain even finer con- trol by varying

either

the volume of the loudspeaker or that of the microphone input.

As a live room will produce a louder echo than a dead or sound- treated room, chang- ing the volume of the echo, will also change the simulated

properties

of the room. Thus by introducing the correct amounts of time lag and volume, you can make your re- corded orchestra sound as though it were playing in a room of any desired type and size.

All these are tricks of the trade which you can use only to to distort orchestra pick

-ups for mere amusement, important, to match the room to the orchestra so that

not but

create legitimate effects for dramatic scenes and. most

the

best recording can be obtained under the particular cir- cumstances.

45 www.americanradiohistory.com

Build Your

Own

Mike Stand by

C.

P. Hofmann

The small, round microphone that came with my

"Crescent

Compact" recorder was inconvenient to use because it could not be adapted to a standard mike stand. Consequently,

I made a wood stand which serves the purpose very well.

The construction of the stand is very simple, consisting of three parts: the holder, the stem and the base.

If you care to make one like it, follow this procedure:

THE STEM

Saw a piece of 1,'," diameter dowel stock to

51/2" length.

THE

HOLDER

Take a piece of wood

1" thick and saw out a square with

31/4" sides.

Cut a 2

1/8" diameter hole in the center.

(I

cut the hole by drilling a series of

1

/4" diameter holes all around the circumference just inside of the

2

1/8" diameter layout line. Then,

I chiseled and filed the hole clean.)

1/4" x

1/4"

Next,

chisel a wire notch. After the hole and notch have been

Photos by

L.

H. Becker cut all the way place. through, nail a solid

1/4" back -up piece in

Then saw

1" x 1" diagonal cuts on all four corners.

THE

BASE

Saw a a

1/2" piece of

W

or 1" wood to

6" diameter and bore diameter hole in the center. Glue a piece of felt or rubber on the bottom.

(I

used felt from an old hat.)

ASSEMBLY

When

assembling the stern, glue it to the holder, but do not glue it to the base.

Make the stem fit neatly into the base, so that it can be removed easily for use as a hand mike.

Use any type of retainers which will keep the mike in the holder.

(I

used two mirror hangers which were purchased in the

10

-cent store.) Finally,

paint

the entire mike stand with aluminum, gray or black. Sandpaper smooth before painting. A two -tone effect may be had by

painting

the base a different color than the stand and holder.

25 llW

,l.r

.ArlM. ed l

}J

The mike stand takes very little material and is easily made. drawing above shows the suggested dimensions for the parts,

The and the photo at right shows the stand before assembly. The small ceramic mike, furnished with some brands of recorders, is held in place by the metal lugs.

It may easily be removed, if necessary, from the holder.

This same design may be adapted to hold other types of small microphones.

46

;,} en4`. i i l,

.,. www.americanradiohistory.com

iP;,

'

IiÍi'i;f 1!'i4 :;iR; lülai:lli

t.;;;

ü ti i!w:ti;l

:'ró

ísïít

TAPE CLUB NEWS

Jim Greene, new secretary of Tape Respond- ents,

International.

Tape Respondents, International has a new executive secretary in the person of

Jim Greene, who hails from Little Rock,

Arkansas. Jim succeeds Fred Goetz in this capacity. Fred regretfully resigned due to failing health, and has been re- admitted to a San Francisco hospital, never having fully recovered from a serious operation in 1954.

His illness has prevented him from answer- ing a considerable amount of mail, and we are sure all members will understand the unfortunate delay in receiving a reply.

The new secretary expects to get T

-R

-I back in full swing within a short time, and plans to catch up on back correspondence as soon as possible. There will, however, be a short further delay, necessitated by the trans- ference of all dub records from

San Fran- cisco to Little Rock. Meanwhile, anyone wishing to contact

Jim may write to

P.O.

Box 21, Dept. T, Little Rock, Arkansas.

Jim requests that any

T

-R

-I members whose addresses have been changed since the last membership roster was issued notify him immediately in order to incorporate the changes in the forthcoming 1956 roster.

World

Tape

Pal

Ed Bush and daughter,

Gloria, behind counter of Club exhibit at the recent Indianapolis Hobby

Show. by

An exhibit for

World

Tape Pals, prepared member

Ed

Bush, was presented at the

Indianapolis Annual Hobby Show, which ran for nine days beginning November

12.

He was assisted by his wife,

"Jerry," his daughter, Gloria, and fellow club mem- bers, Hal Fisher and Paul Bonham.

According to

Ed, an estimated 9,000 vis- itors listened, through headphones, to folk music and specially arranged tapes from 20 countries, containing songs and messages from local residents in each land.

Twenty hours of visitors' comments were recorded by Ed, via a lapel mike worn neck- lace fashion. When edited, these will be about three hours long.

Ed was interviewed by radio station

WIBC announcer

Sid

Collins, regarding a program concerning tape exchange. He was also in- vited to record a Ladies' Day program of the Rotary Club of Indianapolis, which they wished to send to Rosebud Australia Rotary in an exchange of tapes.

Ed successfully carried through this invitation on Decem- ber 6, 1955.

Voicespondent Charlie Swink, Radio

Sta- tion WGAR,

Cleveland, Ohio, as chairman of

The Voicespondence Club's Blind

Ac- tivities Committee, would appreciate your letting him list your name as a reader for the blind, should you wish to help in this work. If you read well and will contact

Charlie, giving him a list of what kinds of periodical literature or books you have available, he'll see to it that you are assigned to a such blind member who would like to have things read to him.

A copy of the recorded edition of "The

Voicespondent' may be obtained by all blind members, if they will send a 60- minute tape to the club at Noel, Virginia, on the first of

October, January, April and July.

Free membership is being offered by In- ternational Tape Worms to anyone who is blind or physically disabled and cannot af- ford the membership fee.

They will also receive one

3" reel of Irish LP tape, free of charge, to get started in this interesting hobby with as little expense as possible. Nat- urally, all such persons will be considered and treated as any paying member of the

Club.

JOIN A

CLUB

TAPE RESPONDENTS

INTERNATIONAL

Jim Greene, Secretary

P.O.

Box 21,

THE

Dept.

T.,

Little

Rock,

Ark.

VOICESPONDENCE CLUB

Charles Owen, Secretary

Noel,

Virginia

WORLD

TAPE PALS

Harry Matthews, Secretary

P.

O.

Box

9211, Dallas,

Texas

INTERNATIONAL

TAPE

WORMS

Art

Rubin,

National Chairman

P.

O.

Box 215,

Cedarhurst,

L.

I., N. Y.

GLOBAL RECORDING

FRIENDS

Alfred

L.

Sferra, D.D.S., Secretary

125

Hamilton

Street, Bound Brook, N. J.

tape

CONVERT your standard recorder unit into

a

STEREOPHONIC

Tape Player Unit

o

SENSATIONAL new development using standard stacked system at a

LOW, LOW cost. o

Will not interfere with normal operation of your tape recorder.

Install

it

yourself in

10 minutes.

Also available are

STEREOPHONIC

MUSIC

TAPES recorded in

HOLLYWOOD especially for you.

0

For in formation and low cost writ,

LOS ANGELES

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521

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48,

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DEALER

INQUIRIES WELCOMED

HAVE FUN AT

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Tape

record this old fash- ioned melodrama and play it back.

Good for

a

hundred laughs. Has

male,

five parts, three two female

... and

a

donkey.

Full

directions for

sound

effects. Complete

set

of scripts

(six

copies)

as

pre- sented

on

the air sent by First

Class mail.

Only

$2.95 postpaid

Order Yours Today

BOOK DEPARTMENT

TAPE RECORDING

Severna

Park,

Md. www.americanradiohistory.com

NEW PRODUCT REPORT

STA0'1(TED

Product: Ampex

612

Stereo

Tape

Phonograph

Price:

$699 in

custom designed

cab-

inets;

$694

in Samsonite

cases.

Phonograph only

$395

in either.

Manufacturer: Ampex Corporation,

934

Charter

Street, Redwood City,

Cal.

AMPEX

... and superb

612 STEREO SOUND sound from

FUR auractive

appearance and case of operation this unit would be hard to beat.

The same may be said of its performance.

The

612 is available in two forms, one, the portable type which is shown above and which is contained in three matching Samsonite cases and two, in the matching wood cabinets shown on the facing page.

There are no words to describe stereo sound, you simply have to hear it

-it is an experience. There is no question in our minds that the serious music lover who has gone as far as he can with his hi

-fi system and records is going to switch to tape and stereo sound in droves.

This Ampex outfit is not inexpensive but to make the

unit

available to those who

might not

have $700 to

put out

all at one time the company has instituted a time payment plan through its deal- ers.

Actually, stereo sound itself is not new but only now has it become practi- cal since the advent and growth of the

the

SYSTEM

612 tape phonograph two matched amplifier- speakers. heads,

11/2

ips speed.

"In -line"

Will also play monaural tapes.

tape industry in rector years. For stereo, tape is the only logical medium.

The 612 and its accompanying am- plifier- speakers are of the best crafts- manship and show evidence of quality control in the factory. All are well and carefully made.

The controls and threading are such that even a child could operate the unit.

The feed reel is at the left and the tape simply passes from it, across the heads, between the capstan and roller onto the take -up reel.

Two levers control the play modes, one for play and ward and rewind. the other for fast for-

At the other end of the tape deck are the selector switch for either single track

or

stereo and the volume control.

Two heads are mounted under the shield, the one at the left being used to pick up dual and full track signals and the one at the

right

to play the in -line stereo tapes.

In a recess on case are the side of the 612 the plug for the 110 volt line and the two outlets for the left and right speakers.

These are marked left and right so that the user will be sure to have the

right

sounds coming from proper speakers.

If the leads are re- versed, the orchestra is likewise reversed left to right.

One

thing

we like very much about this outfit is that the master volume control on the tape trols equally

phonograph

con- the volume of both speak- ers.

We

also appreciated the fact

that

the two speakers were matched. Once the controls have been set on the

right

and left individual speakers all volume adjustments are made with the single volume control on the tape phono- graph. Anyone who has ever tried stereo sound using two different speaker sys- tems, each with its individual controls will appreciate this feature as we did.

The connecting cables are of gen- erous length and will take care of most set -ups. Shielded wire is used and should longer cables be needed they can easily be made up. A standard plug is on one end and a cinch phono plug on the other.

The model 612 machine has a re-

The tape path is uncluttered and threading is rapid and used, the foolproof. No pressure pads are tape being held against the heads by regulated tape tension.

48 www.americanradiohistory.com

The play controls are to the right of the heads. One lever controls the play and the other the fast forward and rewind.

They are interlocked to assure correct operation.

The volume volume control and selector switch.

The control acts as a master control for both speakers, a great convenience.

The se- lector switch has two positions, one for stereo and one full track. for monaural tapes, either dual or any tone will be reproduced within

2 cycles per thousand.

The reproducer will play either full or dual track tapes, in addition to the stereo tapes.

With

the selector switch placed on "single" the dual track tapes may be played in may single the usual fashion, as

(or

full track) tapes.

With

the knob in this position the signal from the tape is fed to one pre- amplifier but the pre

-amplifier

output

is fed to both

output

receptacles. This permits playing these tapes through both amplifier -speakers which improve the results obtained over a single speak- er

but

still do not even begin to ap- proach the effect of the stereo tapes.

With

the selector switch in "stereo" position, both pre

-amplifiers are in use and the individual

outputs

are chan- neled to the right and left speaker jacks.

As the heads are of the stacked variety with the gaps in alignment, full track tapes will play with the selector switch in the "stereo" position.

No

difficulties were encountered in operating the unit over a period of months. The reproducer is

quiet

and there is no hum generated between components, as sometimes happens when unmatched units are used.

We

have no hesitation whatever in recommending this unir.

RIDER'S

TAPE RECORDER

MANUAL

The Only Recorder

Service

Manual

Complete servicing and trouble- shooting information on all mod- els from

1950 through

1954 of

Bell &

Howell, TDC, Columbia,

Brush, Eicor,

Crescent, Crest- wood, Pentron, RCA,

Revere,

V

-M, Webcor, Webster

Electric,

Wilcox -Gray.

8'h"

x

11" 286 pages sponse of 40 to 15,000 cycles relative to the Ampex

5563 standard tape. As the unit is a reproducer only some such standard is necessary. The

output

is rated at 1.25 volts into a load of 100,000 ohms or more at program level. This is enough to drive any standard power amplifier.

If the home already has a high fidelity music system, the 612 can be added to play the stereo tapes provided another power amplifier and speaker system matching the existing one, is added to take care of the second channel.

The placement of the speakers in the room is of importance. The basic

prin-

ciple is to have the sound seem to come from between the speakers. The speak- ers should be placed straight out in the room, not facing toward each other and the use of corner horns is not advised.

The maximum size reel the machine will accommodate is the standard

7

-inch reel

32 which will give a playing time of minutes with regular thickness tape.

Particular attention has been paid to the timing accuracy which is such that

The home unit is attractively designed and may be had in finish, the either mahogany or blond latter at a slightly higher price.

Only one speaker is shown above. postpaid

HIGH

FIDELITY

TECHNIQUES by

John

H. Newitt

Readable, authoritative and concise, this 494 page book covers the whole field of hi

-fi including suggestions on choosing, buying and setting up equip- ment.

The servicing information is valuable to the technician and service shop.

$7.50

postpaid

BOOK DEPARTMENT

TAPE RECORDING MAGAZINE

SEVERNA PARK, MD.

49 www.americanradiohistory.com

NEW PRODUCT REPORT

S

TA(F)'1(TED

Product: Pentron "Clipper," "Pace- maker," and "Emperor"

Price: Clipper

$139.95,

Pacemaker

S199.95,

Emperor

$249.50.

Manufacturer: Pentron Corp.,

777

S.

Tripp

Ave.,

Chicago, Ill.

THREE NEW

PENTRON RECORDERS

.

.

.

completely redesigned line features single control operation, dual track, dual speed, attractive appearance.

corders. with both reels

turning

in a clockwise

straight

line. direction. Threading is

On this recorder the volume indi- cator is a

"magic eye" which furnishes a good indication of recording level.

Inputs include microphone and radio and outputs are for external speaker and amplifier. Standard

phone

jacks are used and all are mounted along the front panel where they are easily ac- cessible.

Tone and volume controls are

GETTING away from the dual con- trols found in previous models, such as the 9TC3, the new

Pentron line features a single control knob for all functions of tape travel.

First to make its bow to the public was the Model

RWN,

the Clipper, which is the lowest priced recorder in the line.

This unit has a lever which is used in much the same fashion as on a car. the shift

When

the lever is placed in the slot at the far left the machine goes into fast forward.

The

next slot is the

33/4 ips position and next to this is

the 7th

ips.

These slots are dual as the lever can be thrown forward to play at those speeds

or

backward to record.

The safety interlock to prevent acci- dental recording is the red button on

top

of

the

lever which must be de- pressed in order to throw the lever in record position. At the right is the re- wind position.

Cinch type jacks on the front panel accommodate the microphone connec- tion and an

input

is also provided for radio.

Outputs

include external speak- er and external amplifier.

The tape threading on the recorder is unusual in that the feed is taken from the left side of the reel which brings the oxide side of the tape to- ward the front of the machine. Both reels revolve in a direction.

A neon counter clockwise

light

furnishes the recording indication.

The maximum frequency response is from 50 to 9000 cps.

The recorder we tested met the manufacturer's claims.

Considering the price, the re- corder is a satisfactory buy.

The

Model

T

-90, the "Pacemaker" has a single lever "Unimagic" control which is a refinement over the one found on the Clipper.

As can be seen in the photo, the single lever needs only to be tilted to right, left or for- ward to move the tape in the desired direction. The safety recording inter- lock is controlled by the red button to the left of the lever.

This recorder has two speakers and the response measured on the

unit

we tested exceeded the manufacturer's specifications of 10,500 maximum at the 71h ips speed.

The general tone quality using recorded tapes was good.

Threading on this recorder is from right to left, as on

other Pentron

re-

50 www.americanradiohistory.com

r.r.

,

^+

The controls of the three new recorders are shown in this picture.

Top: the

"Clipper," center: the

"Pacemaker," lower: the "Em- peror."

operated by wheel type knobs to the right and left of the recorder face.

The case is attractively finished in two tones of grey.

With

this machine was furnished a reel of Pentron's

"Moods in Music" which was especially recorded for use on tape recorders.

An odometer

-type counter is built in which makes

the

finding of selec- tions on reels very easy.

It has a zero reset on the counter.

All also three of the recorders in this re- view have good braking systems which prevent the spillage of tape. All three have heads with removable pole pieces worn which may be replaced when

without

buying a whole new head.

The Model

HF

-400, the "Emperor" is the largest and heaviest of the group and also carries the largest price tag.

It uses the same type of tape transport and control

that

the Pacemaker has but is equipped with a good VU meter for recording level control in place of the magic

-eye.

The

input

and

output

jacks are the same type and in the same locations as on the Pacemaker,

but

there is one ad- ditional jack on the top edge of the case which takes

the plug

for the small tweeter contained in a separate case.

This speaker has an extension cord of good length on it which enables the user to place

it

at a distance from the recorder to improve the sound.

The

tweeter is a four inch speaker and is fed from a crossover network which allows it to take the highs.

Two six inch speakers are contained in the case and unlike the Clipper and

Pacemaker, they face the sides rather than the front. The

unit

has a ten watt push -pull amplifier which provides plenty of volume.

The response is from 40 to 12,000 cycles

per

second at the

71h ips speed.

t

A

The the

"gear shift" control on the Clipper was first of the single control units to appear.

The knob in the fop of the lever is the safety interlock to prevent accidental erasure.

Top: the

"Unimagic" control lever which is featured on the

"Pacemaker" and the

"Emperor" models.

To the left is fast for- ward, to the right, rewind and toward the operator play and rate jack is record.

Lower: a sepa- provided for plugging in the external tweeter furnished with the "Em- peror."

On the Pacemaker and

Emperor the change in speed is effected by raising or lowering the speed change lever.

The lever is turned clockwise and lifted for slow speed and depressed for fast speed.

When

the recorder is not in use the speed control should be set half

-way between

the

two speed po- sitions. This will prevent fiats from forming on the drive rollers.

The amplifier pedance

output

is a high im-

output

which is designed to connect to an external amplifier, radio or TV receiver or a PA system. If the sound coming from the recorder speakers is not desired, insert a dummy plug in the external speaker jack.

The recorder may also be used as a

PA system by plugging the mike into the radio

input

jack.

By plugging an external speaker into the external speaker jack at the same time, greater volume may be obtained and better placement in relation to the mike, to avoid feedback.

If

you are considering a recorder in the low or medium price class we feel that these machines are worthy of your consideration.

-e4

RECORDING TAPES

.lust out your rec. ing of sou tear of

::. h,o to handle the flange

'mil and eorueutient damage to tape. l'ennita unwinding and wrinkling.

Banishes cumbersome methods such of

¡vomited use. as vrurd

;ape tape, any size

Introductory

Prices s. mall nm..king tape, rubber bands.

Toni] reel

.1 it magnetic metal in and place. Prevents anywhere, or store will need one

4

10

30 la.0 for for for clip it to hold unwind- without

Indefinitely with

31.00

32.00

Clips

$5.00 pod. over a for each reel. Better order a supply today. Not sea sold In stores.

Order now. Send name. address and remittance (cash, check or coon,

-y delivery. tinier order,. Satisfaction guaranteed. Prompt

Isom'.

NIBLACK THORNE

CO., Box

525.

Scottsdale, Arizona.

w'HIGH

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HOME TAPE RECORDER

NED,

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15,000 cycles at 7.5

I.P.S. to

Input of

Home

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System

DYNAMU

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FOR YOUR

Pentron,

R ,

Wilcox Gay, Knight, etc.

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Musimart of Canada.

901

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RECORDED

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Y.

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Write for

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270

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Concord

Ave. West Hempstead.

N. Y.

51 www.americanradiohistory.com

Minglo

MTI -M PRESTO SPLICER

Now available for magnetic

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Acetate

Tapes

A

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Inaudible with playback amplifier gain at maxi- mum

Also splices leader to magnetic tape without adhesives.

A,k for brochure

& aplir-

PRESTOSEAL

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3721 33rd st

,Long Island City

1,N.Y.

(Continued from page 19)

FEDERAL 47

-A

STEREOTAPE

a new line of pre- recorded tape devoted entirely to two channel stereo -binaural write for free catalog demonstration test tape

S2.00 p.p.

STERE

OTAPE

Dept. A. 5607 melrose ave.. hollywood, cal.

Federal Manufacturing &

Engineering

Corp., 1055 Stewart Ave., Garden City,

L.

1.,

N. Y., is now marketing their

47 -A, dual

- track recorder. This machine has a frequency range of 50 to

12,000 cps,

33/4 and

71/2 ips speeds, less than

.5% wow, single knob con- trol, fast foward and rewind, radio -phono input jack, erase safety lock, straight in- line threading and a power pilot light. It also features a reversible automatic counter, and comes complete with a ceramic micro- phone, reel of tape, take -up reel, detachable cord, and patch cord. The price is

$159.50.

For additional information, write to

Fed- eral Manufacturing &

Engineering Corp., above address.

lav'e

(.4" with 'i'aa2

MAGNA

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Record your own dramatic productions at home

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Bring up the theme the opening scene.

... lade in the mood music

Turn on the rain

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for bring up the thunder and lightning.

Crowd noises, animal sounds, train whistles

. . all at your fingertips with "Major" Production aids.

Your friends will enjoy your broadcasting party when they hear how they sound

"ON THE AIR

"!

THOMAS

1,

VALENTINO, Inc.

Dept.

TR

150 West 46th

Street.

New York 36,

N. Y.

REEASE SEND NIE TREE

(Check Boxes)

Map

Sound Effects Catalogue plus

Tips

On

Turntables fl

Mood Music Catalogue

Name

Address lone State

The Gaertner Company of Los

Angeles is manufacturing a new Magna amplifier kit incorporating the latest in circuit design.

The

Magna hi

-fi amplifier covers a range of 20 to 100,000 cycles, plus or minus

1 db, and has less than 1% distortion at full volume.

The circuit uses two selenium rectifiers, it has a built in pre -amp, loud- ness, bass and treble controls, and will feed a

4, 8 or 16 ohm speaker.

The kit comes complete with all necessary parts for sim- plified assembly and is provided with sim- plified step -by

-step instructions and large, detailed pictorial diagram. The Magna amplifier may also be used as an easily portable public address system for small auditoriums, ballrooms, churches, etc.; it is sold in kit form only at a price of $31.95 postpaid. An illustrated catalog of Magna

Electronic Kits is offered free upon request from the

A & M

Company, 616 So. Ser- rano

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5,

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52

FULL OR PART TIME PROFITS!

Recorder owners interested in

Freelance

Radio announcing or lending machines lo- cally on time rental basis!

FREE literature'.

Broadlances

Reg.,

5120

Bourret.

Box

2.

Montreal

29.

Canada

BACK

ISSUES

AVAILABLE

Articles of Lasting lot

35ç

Each

-Any

3 for

$1

00

ISSUE HIGHLIGHTS

Volume

1,

No. 1: How to Record Your

Voice, to ing,

Secret Recording, Add Sound

Your Movies,

Full Range

Join a

Tape Club.

Record-

Volume

1,

No.

4:

What a db Is.

Starting

a

Tape Library, Recording

Choral

Groups.

Volume

1,

No. 5:

Recording Euro- pean Trip, Recording In

Your Car,

Portable Recording, How to Record

Dramatic Skits.

Volume

2,

No.

1:

Radio work, Choosing a

Mike

How to

Erase Tapes.

Tape Net-

-Part

II,

Volume

2,

No.

2:

Building an Elec- tronic Mixer, Mike Stands, Orches-

tra

Recording.

Volume

2,

No 3: Music Can Make

Your

Mood,

School Use of

Recorder,

Orchestra Recording, Tape Record- ing Glossary.

Volume

2,

No. b:

Tony

Master Recordist, How to Avoid

Hum,

Your

Schwartz

Capturing Yesterday's

-

Build This Recording Center, Thesis on Tape.

Volume

2,

No. 5A:

Sounds to Keep

Trip

Alive,

Music,

Recording Bands

Outdoors,

Capturing Insect

Songs.

Volume

2.

No.

6:

Recording Radio and

TV

Bloopers,

Automatic

Slide

Shows,

Beautify Your Recorder, Tape

Filing System, Stereophonic

Tape,

Volume

3,

No.

1:

How

Tony

Uses Recorders,

Club, Tape

Joining

A

Tape

For Folk cording Xmas Music.

Martin

Dancing,

Re-

Order from:

Back Issues

Deparfineef sprrial ntirr on i,ader .,,sire page

Ser

Tape Recording

Magazine

Severna Park, Maryland

HARRISON

CATALOG

The Harrison Catalog of

Recorded Tapes is published by M. &

N. Harrison Inc., 274

Madison Ave.,

New York 16,

N.

Y.

This handy publication lists every currently avail- able recorded tape in three groupings: First, according to "Composer and Artist "; second, according to "Type of Music ", and third, under the manufacturer's name.

Informa- tion about the contents of each recorded tape such as composer, titles of all compositions, performing artist and label number is given.

Also, information about prices appears di- rectly underneath the name of each com- pany. This catalog may be available where

- ever recorded tape is sold or it may be ob- tained by

It writing directly to the publisher. measures

5!.;" x

84,"

is paper bound and is priced at

15C a copy. www.americanradiohistory.com

FOR

YOUR

AUDIO

BOOKSHELF

YOUR TAPE

RECORDER

by

Robert and Mary Marshall

5'e"

x

8

", cloth bound,

288 pp.

Illustrated.

This is the first book for nonprofessional users and Includes the photographs and specifica- tions of

55 after recorders some

2500 as a guide experiments to selecting the proper machine for various uses. The book does not deal with ten technicalities. It was writ- had been con- ducted. using recorders in the fields of educa- tion, camps, meetings, business and the home.

Part of the book is devoted to an explanation of hi

-fl principles and terminology.

S4.95

HIGH

FIDELITY

HOME MUSIC SYSTEMS

by William

R.

Wellman

The book describes the functions each of unit of a home music system, giv- ing of advice on clude:

An the good and bad various kinds of units. Chapters in-

Introduction features to High Fidelity.

Loudspeakers, Loudspeaker Enclosures,

Record Players, Radio Tuners, Tape

Re- corders, Amplifiers, etc.

Also included are plans for installing a home music system.

6" a

9

192

", cloth pp. bound,

Illustrated.

$3.95

5

"2" x

8'/2", paper bound.

208 pp. Illus- trated.

$2.50

HIGH FIDELITY

SIMPLIFIED by

Harold

D.

Weiler

This book has sold more copies and is one of books on

How,

Amplifier, The Amplifier, The

Record Player, Tuners,

Use of a

Home

Music

System, and is the most the subject. It

What. Why and Where of HI -Fi.,

Sound, Acoustics, The Simple Loud- speaker,

The High speaker. Loudspeaker Enclosures. The

Basic illustrated

-Fidelity

Tape than

65,000 popular covers the

Loud-

Recorders.

It with numerous drawings, charts and pictures. While authorita- tive,

It is style. written in an easy -to -read

THE NEW

HIGH FIDELITY HANDBOOK by

Irving

Greene and

James

Radcliffe

This is a practical guide for the pur- chase, assembly, maintenance of a installation and high fidelity home music system. and a

Record by Harold

Home chapter recording chapter. Tips on plans for

HI -FI system to tion, etc. subject of the are

It on is lustrations drawings the is profusely illus- more

C. buying than and and has a foreword by Deems

High covered

250 in il- diagrams

Taylor

Fidelity

Schronberg. components. furniture, fitting home interior one the decora- well covered, as trouble shooting. is the

8'2"

x

11" cloth bound.

193 pp.

Illustrated.

$4.95

THE

RECORDING AND

REPRODUCTION

OF SOUND

by

Oliver

Read

The largest selling book in its field; favorably reviewed by

:eading authorities on audio. Widely used by Sound engineers,

High -Fidelity enthusiasts, Public

Address technicians, broad- casting stations, recording studios, and students of audio.

Au- thoritative chapters cover: behavior of sound waves; basic recording methods; lateral disc recording; cording; the decibel; phono micro -groove re- reproducers; cutting stylli; micro- phones; loud speakers and enclosures; dividing networks and filters; attenuators and mixers; home music address systems; amplifiers;

AM and

FM recorders and recording film recorders subjects.

A standard reference work. systems; public tuners, tape and wire

-plus

hundreds of other

810 pages. 6" x 9

", illustrated

$7.95

BOOK DEPARTMENT

TAPE RECORDING

MAGAZINE

Severna Park, Md.

I

Please ship immediately the books checked. enclose

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

ZONE

....STATE

All books shipped postpaid from stock same day order satisfied return books within

5 days and money will is be received. refunded.

If

not

BASIC ELECTRICITY by

Van

Valkenburgh, Nooger and

These tronics trated listed below on Basic Elec- the use of complicated mathematics.

Vol. tion,

Meters.

Vol.

Electric

Power.

Vol.

Capacitance and Inductance, Reactarce,

DC

1 live volumes, and the are the texts

-Where

Current

AC

Generators of those subjects

Electricity

2-DC

3-

live is are

Comes

Circuits, Resonance,

Neville, as simplified,

From,

AC

Inc. currently taught at a clearly time

Electricity

Kirchofi's

Alternating Current. and Motors,

Transformers.

Alternators.

AC

Meters. illus- without

In Ac-

DC

Laws,

Resistance,

Vol.

Vol.

4-

Vol.

Dry Metal Rectifiers, lators.

Vol.

1-

4-

Introduction

Vol.

3

-Video

Transmitters, Transmission

Transmission

BASIC ELECTRONICS to Electronics, Diode Vacuum Tubes.

Power

Supplies.

2-Introduction

Filters,

Lines and Amplitude Modulation.

&

Voltage Regu- to Amplifiers, Triode Tubes.

5-

$9

CW

Receiver

TRF

Receivers, Superhets.

6" at

9".

128 pp.

Each Volume $2.00.

Complete set,

5 volumes

Vol.

High

Fidelity

Home

Music

Systems

Recording and Reproduction of Sound

New

High Fidelity

Handbook

High

Fidelity Simplified

Your Tape Recorder

Basic Electricity

Vols.

Basic Electronics

Vols.

Set

0

Set

1-z

53 www.americanradiohistory.com

SHOP

OR

SWAP

Adar r swaps. etc.. are thin

,

. -s uprn t, h,ah amateur and commercial ads.

TAPE RECORDING does not guarantee any offer advertised in this column and all strictly between

Individuals.

RATES:

Commercial ads.

5.30 per word.

Individual ads, non -commercial,

$.05 s word. be

Remittances in full should accompany copy. Ada will inserted in next available issue. Please print or type your copy to avoid error. Address ad or Swap. Tape Recording Magazine.

Severna to:

Park.

Shoo

Mil.

TIMPANI

PROFESSIONAL RECORDING TAPE.

Formerly sold only to stations. Better sound quality or money back. List 55.50

(1200 ft.)

Special trial: Two

Reels

$5.00. Bob Freund, 56

-B Ben- nett Avenue, New

York

35,

N.

Y.

FOR SALE: Concertone Model 1501 professional hi -fi tape recorder. Good condition,

71

í"

and

15" per second, dual track, takes up to

101 reels.

Carrying case with monitor amplifier and miscellaneous equipment.

Will sell for $275 f.o.b.

P. E.

Keedy,

Maryland.

3116 Grindon Ave_ Baltimore 11.

DO

YOU

HAVE

TWO FRIENDS

...

...

who are interested in recording and who would enjoy receiving a

FREE sample copy of

WILL

SWAP

Estes'

Reed

Organ (portable. bellows operated.

.112 octaves) for either good

2

-speed tape recorder or

AM

-FM tuner.

228

So.

Quince Street,

Dr.

Philadelphia

Sid

7.

Saltzman.

Pa.

WANTED:

Record -Tape

"Where was

I" and

"Lilac Time."

State price. John Callahan,

1(16

Kirk

Avenue,

Syracuse 5.

N. Y.

WANTED

TO BUY: Transcription music of the following orchestras: Xavier Cugat. Lud Gluskin.

Chiquito. Senor Clemente and Clyde Lucas

Marimba

Orchestras.

Will accept disk or tape dubbings.

Mail titles of selections available and prices for same first letter.

Sam

Pelham 65. N. Y.

Kiamie, 950 Grant Avenue.

FOR

SALE: Five

7" reels Scotch recording tape.

Sill;

Revere T

-118) tape recorder,

$85;

Electro-

Voice 635 dynamic microphone. $35; Pickering

25(1 -H preamplifier, $17.50;

Airline portable ¡- speed record- changer, f.o.b.

Illinois.

$35.

All excellent, priced

Marilyn Phillips,

311 Penfield, Rockford,

PICTAPE: A tape. Broadcast

-

Telemetering

-

recording

Computer quality. Sample 1800 ft. reel

$5.75.

Guaranteed.

Corporation,

152 West

42nd

St., Pictape Products

New York 36.

FIRST

15 issues

"Tape Recording" magazine.

55.50; Trav -Ler

S

-tube table radio, 515: RCA

45EY2 amplified

45

-rpm record- changer. 522.511;

Cascade

2

-speed

SSO. disc recorder -radio-phonograph.

All items guaranteed new condition, priced

FOB.

V.

R.

Hein. 418

Gregory. Rockford.

Illinois.

HELP: Tapeworm in Congo badly needs

Tape

Recording Volume

1 issues number

2

&

3.

Write

Mr.

Vandenbossche or Otraco, Matadi. Belgian

Congo.

WANTED:

Magnetorder rape recorder. professional type, used. Please send model number, etc.

Also state price desired. Roland

F.

1210 Warren

St,

Roselle, New Jersey. condition.

Harriston.

TAPE

RECORDING

Magazine?

If you do, just send us the names on a postcard or use the coupon below.

FOR SALE: Ampex 600 tape recorder, guaranteed used only

21 hours. full track. positively like rew or

Reason for selling

-

Will pay express charges. want binaural. Reference:

Whitman National

Bank, C.

Harlow,

17

Laurel,

Whitman,

Mass.

-5450.

BRAND NEW 1956 Model

Hi

-Fi

VM

-700 tape recorder, never used. Cost

5158.00. Jack Fives,

$179.95, yours for

2916

Rockrose Avenue.

Baltimore

15,

Maryland.

TAPE

RECORDING

Severna Park,

Md.

Please send a copy of Tape Record- ing without charge to:

FOR SALE: Webcor Model 210 -1B tape recorder,

$55.00 worth of

Scotch sound tape.

$11.25 of accessories,

2!/+ years old. In good condition.

All for 5150.00.

Rev.

Ralph A. Bobbin, 112 W.

Ontario

St.,

Philadelphia 40,

Pa,. Regent 9

-6577,

FOR SALE: Model 2030.1

3 speakers,

Webcor tape recorder. like new,

5150.

Large

Walnut Hi

-Fi cabinet, 540. S.

Holland, 9333 N.E.

Miami

Shores,

Florida.

9th

Place.

Name

Add rase

City

Zone State

NEW PORTABLE heavy duty transcription player. housed in handsome leatherette carrying case. Plays

33

-1/3,

78 rpm records up to

16

".

Operates into any amplifier system.

Heavy

-I

-pole motor, weighted turntable, balanced arm. Reg. 593 value

-first

560 takes

Kalamazoo, it.

R.

G. Forman, 210 Burr Oak St.,

Mich.

Nam.

Address

City

Your Name

Address

City

Zone

Zone

Stat.

Stat.

WANTED: A copy of the

TV broadcast aired on

Sunday afternoon, November 6, 1955, of former president Hoover. title of broadcast:

"Hoover

Con- servation." ings or

Will swap will buy according to your terms.

1 can duplicate it and mail other historical type record- original back.

Drop a card to:

L.

Norman

Gray, 1241 English Avenue, In dianapolis

3,

Indiana.

SELL: Tapesonic

"O.A

I

S i professional recorder,

ì heads,

3 speeds,

3 motors. dual track.

I(Ii reels,

VU meter, complete mixing. monitoring and playback facilities with S" speaker.

Special filter network. Everything in a one- piece, luggage- style, carrying case with two removable covers. Perfect condition,

5 months old. Cost,

5.

5110.

Sell. 5295.

Gary Gottlieb, Carnegie Institute of Technology,

Pittsburgh 15,

Pa.

NEW INEXPENSIVE! GUARANTEED! "End. of-Tape" automatic shutoff control, only

5

-1.95.

Build

ROI lot

'2" reel adapter. instructions

SI.00.

LE

ENGINEERING,

Box 251, Elmhurst,

Illinois.

FOR SALE: New Penn-on

"Emperor" recorder. List price $249.511, yours

HF -400 tape for S149.50.

Dr. Stasior, 621 Water St., New York, N. Y.

STAMP DEALER stamps will swap fine U.S. and foreign

-want professional tape recorder, REL

Precedent, and other items. George Wentz, 417

Comanche,

San

Marcos, Texas.

FOR.

SALE: Model 180 Webster

Operates and looks wire recorder. like new. Complete with extra spools wire, 546. Owner needs cash.

O.

J.

Vins,

709

E.

Potomac St., Brunswick, Maryland.

WANTED: World transcriptions, will offer $10 each for early untitled discs. Ask for list.

James

Orlando, Dickerson Run,

Pa.

FOR SALE:

1 have a few deMars speaker en- closures hogany or still in the carton. They are solid ma- with beautiful piano finish. Both corner wall type and about 10 cu. ft. Sacrifice for 560. plus shipping. Earl nue,

W. Magoun. 520 Park Ave-

Arlington 74, Mass.,

MI 8.598 ".

I

WOULD LIKE a

Cincinnati reader with good tape equipment to record

"Moon River" for me.

Earl

W.

Magoun, 320 Park Ave..

Arlington

"4,

Mass.

DISCS FROM your tape.

51.00 up. Send stamped envelope for free list of services.

Sales

Recording

Service,

3540

W.

Jackson Blvd., Chicago 24,

Ill.

TAPE RECORDERS, tapes and accessories, na- tionally advertised brands. Free catalog upon re- quest. Satisfaction guaranteed. Dressner. Box

Peter Stuyvesant

Station, New

York. N. Y.

66A,

PRECISION

MAGNETIC HEADS,

Erase-

Record-

Playback. Stancil-

Hoffman Corporation,

Holly

- wood 38, California.

NOW

YOU can make 5100 weekly spare time with your tape recorder. Send 25c refundable.

LP

DISCS

MADE FROM TAPES.

24 hour service guaranteed. 10 inch -30 minutes,

.15 minutes,

$4.25;

12 inch

-

55.75. Write for other speeds.

Artistic

Sound, 24110 Rensselaer, Oak Park,

Michigan.

SYNCHRONIZER HOOKUP: Make sound movies with your tape recorder,

$10.00. Anderson, 2424

Phelps Street, Stockton,

Calif.

WEBCOR

"ROYAL CORONET" Model 2612 portable tape recorder. Three speaker

Hi

-Fi with tape counter.

Brand new 1956 model.

Cost will sell for $189.00.

Also brand new

$255.00,

Webcor

"Royal" Model 2611 portable tape re- corder. Cost $225.00, will sell for $169.00. Both in original cartons.

Write

James J.

Michael, 2445

Lakeview Ave.,

Baltimore 17. Maryland.

CIRCUS CALLIOPE tions played on an brochure,

( ous illustrations

\ and photographs),

History of The American Circus Parade \X'agon and Steam waukee

5,

Calliope."

\'iso(mm.

RECORDING:

Four selec- original circus calliope. Plus,

Collectors item. paid. Demo Records. I-121

"Glori-

$2.00 post-

N.

21st Street,

Mil-

MAGNECORD PT6.BAH

Binaural or can be used

Monaural in beautiful enclosure extension, used 20 hours. take

$-

725.110, excellent with

101;"

New 5637.50 and reel will condition, lust like new.

For more

La information, write

F.

A. Mason, Box 7,

Sierra Sta..

Arlington, California.

TAPE RECORDERS

&

TAPES

EXCLUSIVES!

Tape Packaged in Cans. lo.

7,

5" Empty Cans.

Meted (Tape) Storage Cheats.

FREE

CATALOGUE:

CARSTON COMPANY,

215

E.

88,

New

York 28

3 -1

54 www.americanradiohistory.com

FAKE

A

GOOD

LOOK

YOU CAN ACTUALLY

SEE

THE

DIFFERENCE!

HAS

THE

OF

ALL

RECORDING

TAPES!

These are unretouched photo- micrographs (not artist's concep- tions) of FERRO -SHEEN tape and ordinary tape taken under identical conditions. Magnification. is 50X.

See how irregular the eggshell sur- face of the ordinary tape appears in comparison with the smooth

FERRO

-SHEEN tape.

See how much smaller are the shadows and highlights of the FERRO -SHEEN tape. This indicates a much greater uniformity of oside coating and an unparalleled super

-smooth surface.

What

Does

This

Super

Mean

-Smoothness to

YOU?...

1

GREATLY REDUCED HEAD

WEAR:

the face mirror

-smooth

FERRO -SHEEN sur- virtually eliminates disastrous head

-

wear caused by the abrasive surface of ordinary tapes.

MAKE

YOUR OWN

IN TWENTY

TEST'

SECONDS!..!

I

Send

for free

Comparator

Card which

has

strips of all of the leading tapes mounted

side

by side for your direct visual comparison.

You

You

will

SEE the

obvious difference at

a

glance. will instantly recognize that

irish

FERRO

-SHEEN process

tape with

its

obvious smoother surface

is

the finest tape your recorder

can use!

2

NO

SHEDDING OF

OXIDE:

unlike ordinary tapes which shed oxide particles that gum up the heads, the

FERRO

-SHEEN process anchors the oxide to off the base so that and deposit itself on it the cannot head. come

3

FLATTER FREQUENCY RESPONSE:

the super- smooth surface of FERRO

-

SHEEN tape makes the recording head, better contact with resulting in higher output, a very flat frequency response.

4

REDUCED

"PRINT-

"Print- through" is virtually eliminated, even of at excessive unparalleled input oxide levels,

FERRO -SHEEN process tape. because uniformity in

FERRO -SHEEN

IS

NOW AVAILABLE

IN THESE THREE QUALITY irish

TAPES:

SHAMROCK

=300:

The ultimate in premium, professional tape for broadcast and studio use. 1.5 mil plastic base. Comes with 5'

IMylar leader in dust-proof polyethylene bag.

1200 feet on

7" reel

LONG-PUY

it

SOO:

Extends playing time 50% over conventional tapes on same size reel.

Same premium qualities as Shamrock

X300, but on

Duoont's new miracle film mo-,,

1800 feel on

7" reel

SOUND PLATE x220:

The supertough tape pioneered by ORRadio, now on 1.5 mil Mylar.

Used for tape-masters, and recording under adverse climate conditions

1200 feet on

7" reel

ff

not available at your local dealer,

Irrite:

ORRADIO INDUSTRIES, INC.,

Opelika, Alabama

l$'arld'r !.arpent Exclunire

.Llagnet is Tape Manufacturer

EXPORT DIVISION:

IN CANADA:

Morhan Exporting Corp.,

N. Y. C.

Atlas

RADIO CORP., Ltd., Toronto, Ontario www.americanradiohistory.com

Prcec

ut!

$

SAVE

00

ON EVERY REEL

Here's your favorite recording tape

"SCOTCH" Brand

Magnetic Tape 111 at a new low price!

-

"SCOTCH" Brand

slashes the price from $5.50 to

just

$3.50! Take advantage of this giant saving to stock

up

on the tape used by radio stations the world over.

"SCOTCH" Brand Magnetic

Tape

111

offers you superior recording results

...

reel-to- reel uniformity, higher fidelity and the exclusive new

"Loop -Lok" reel for easier threading. No wonder it's the first choice of engineers here and in almost every country abroad!

Buy now.

See your dealer and treat yourself and your recorder to the best in sound. And

don't

forget you save $2.00 on every reel!

ScoTc

N

Magnetic

Tape

111

The term

"SCOTCH" and the plaid design are registered trademarks for Magnetic Tape made in

U.S.A. by

MINNESOTA

MFG.

CO.,

St. Paul

6,

Minn.

Export

Sales Office: 99

Park

Avenue, New York 16,

N.Y.

MINING

AND www.americanradiohistory.com

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