null  null
Adult Basic Education:
A Guide to Upgrading in
British Columbia’s
Public Post-Secondary Institutions
An Articulation Handbook
2013/14 Edition
Produced by the
Province of British Columbia
Ministry of Advanced Education
Copyright © 2013
Province of British Columbia,
Ministry of Advanced Education
Permission granted to photocopy.
For further information, contact:
Post-Secondary Programs Branch
Ministry of Advanced Education
PO Box 9877 STN PROV GOVT
VICTORIA BC V8W 9T6
Tel: (250) 356-9733
Fax: (250) 952-6110
Email: AVED.TeachingUniversInstits&[email protected]
Websites:
http://www.aved.gov.bc.ca/abe/welcome.htm
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/adult_graduation/
ABE in BC – 2013/14 Articulation Handbook
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................. 6
HISTORY OF ADULT BASIC EDUCATION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA’S
PUBLIC POST-SECONDARY SYSTEM .............................................................. 7
THE ABE ARTICULATION PROCESS .............................................................. 11
THE PURPOSE OF ARTICULATION ............................................................... 11
THE GOALS OF ABE ARTICULATION ............................................................ 11
STEERING COMMITTEE BUSINESS .............................................................. 11
WORKING COMMITTEE BUSINESS: TERMS OF REFERENCE ................... 12
ARTICULATION TASK CHECKLIST ................................................................ 14
ABE PROGRAM FRAMEWORK........................................................................ 16
THE BC ADULT GRADUATION DIPLOMA: “THE ADULT DOGWOOD” ....... 17
THE BC ADULT GRADUATION DIPLOMA: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ... 17
ABE POST-SECONDARY COURSES AUTHORIZED AS EQUIVALENT TO
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION COURSES .......................................................... 21
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION CREDIT .............................................................. 22
RECOGNITION OF THE BC ADULT GRADUATION DIPLOMA....................... 23
TRANSFER GUIDES .......................................................................................... 26
COMPUTER STUDIES TRANSFER GUIDE .................................................... 26
EDUCATION & CAREER PLANNING TRANSFER GUIDE.............................. 27
ENGLISH TRANSFER GUIDE ......................................................................... 29
INDIGENOUS RANGE OF COURSES ............................................................. 31
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL (ALF) LEVEL TRANSFER GUIDE ......... 33
MATHEMATICS TRANSFER GUIDE ............................................................... 35
GENERAL & APPLIED SCIENCE TRANSFER GUIDE .................................... 37
BIOLOGY TRANSFER GUIDE ......................................................................... 38
CHEMISTRY TRANSFER GUIDE .................................................................... 39
PHYSICS TRANSFER GUIDE ......................................................................... 40
SOCIAL SCIENCES TRANSFER GUIDE ......................................................... 41
GENERIC TOPIC OUTLINES............................................................................. 42
COMPUTER STUDIES ....................................................................................... 42
COMPUTER STUDIES: INTERMEDIATE LEVEL - COMPUTER SKILLS ....... 44
COMPUTER STUDIES: ADVANCED LEVEL ................................................... 45
COMPUTER STUDIES: PROVINCIAL LEVEL - COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
.......................................................................................................................... 49
COMPUTER SCIENCE: PROVINCIAL LEVEL ................................................. 52
EDUCATION & CAREER PLANNING................................................................54
CAREER PLANNING (CP) ............................................................................... 54
STUDENT SUCCESS (SS) .............................................................................. 56
ENGLISH ............................................................................................................ 61
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
3
INDIGENOUS STUDIES ..................................................................................... 68
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL LEVELS.................................................. 73
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL ENGLISH (ALFE) ................................... 74
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL ENGLISH (ALFE) LEVEL 1 .................... 79
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL ENGLISH (ALFE) LEVEL 2 .................... 74
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL ENGLISH (ALFE) LEVEL 3 ................... .75
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL ENGLISH (ALFE) LEVEL 4 .................... 76
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL ENGLISH (ALFE) LEVEL 5 ................... .76
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL ENGLISH (ALFE) LEVEL 6 ................... .77
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS (ALFM) ........................ 79
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS (ALFM) LEVEL 1 ......... 79
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS (ALFM) LEVEL 2 ......... 81
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS (ALFM) LEVEL 3 ......... 82
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS (ALFM) LEVEL 4 ......... 84
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS (ALFM) LEVEL 5 ......... 86
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS (ALFM) LEVEL 6 ......... 88
MATHEMATICS ................................................................................................. 90
MATHEMATICS: INTERMEDIATE LEVEL—DEVELOPMENTAL
MATHEMATICS ................................................................................................ 90
MATHEMATICS: INTERMEDIATE LEVEL—ALGEBRAIC MATHEMATICS .... 95
MATHEMATICS: ADVANCED LEVEL—ALGEBRAIC MATHEMATICS ........... 95
MATHEMATICS: ADVANCED LEVEL—BUSINESS/TECHNICAL
MATHEMATICS ................................................................................................ 99
MATHEMATICS: ADVANCED LEVEL—DEVELOPMENTAL
MATHEMATICS .............................................................................................. 101
MATHEMATICS: ADVANCED LEVEL—FOUNDATIONS OF
MATHEMATICS .............................................................................................. 104
MATHEMATICS: PROVINCIAL LEVEL—ALGEBRA AND
TRIGONOMETRY .......................................................................................... 106
MATHEMATICS: PROVINCIAL LEVEL—CALCULUS ................................... 110
SCIENCE .......................................................................................................... 112
SCIENCES: GENERAL AND APPLIED SCIENCE ....................................... 112
GENERAL AND APPLIED SCIENCE: INTERMEDIATE LEVEL .................... 112
GENERAL AND APPLIED SCIENCE: ADVANCED LEVEL ........................... 114
GENERAL AND APPLIED SCIENCE: PROVINCIAL LEVEL ......................... 114
SCIENCES: BIOLOGY......................................................................................116
SCIENCES: CHEMISTRY.................................................................................119
SCIENCES: PHYSICS ...................................................................................... 123
PHYSICS: ADVANCED LEVEL ...................................................................... 123
PHYSICS: PROVINCIAL LEVEL .................................................................... 125
SOCIAL SCIENCE ........................................................................................... 127
SOCIAL SCIENCE: INTERMEDIATE LEVEL ................................................. 128
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
4
SOCIAL SCIENCE: ADVANCED LEVEL ........................................................ 129
SOCIAL SCIENCE: PROVINCIAL LEVEL ...................................................... 130
COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP ........................................................................... 138
STEERING COMMITTEE ............................................................................... 138
COMPUTER STUDIES WORKING COMMITTEE .......................................... 141
EDUCATION AND CAREER PLANNING WORKING COMMITTEE .............. 142
ENGLISH WORKING COMMITTEE ............................................................... 144
INDIGENOUS ABE WORKING COMMITTEE................... ..............................148
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL LEVEL WORKING COMMITTEE ......... 148
MATHEMATICS WORKING COMMITTEE ..................................................... 150
SCIENCE WORKING COMMITTEES............................................................. 152
SOCIAL SCIENCES WORKING COMMITTEE .............................................. 156
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
5
INTRODUCTION
This is the twenty-eighth edition of the Articulation Handbook for British Columbia’s public postsecondary institutions. It has been updated for 2013-2014 through the dedicated efforts of the
educators who participate in the working and steering committees. Articulation is a dynamic
process that will never be completed. It brings order to the Adult Basic Education program area
offered by the post-secondary system and facilitates the transfer of course work and credits
between participating institutions. The articulation process facilitates dialogue and sharing
among professionals and it has effectively raised the status of this program area. The biggest
beneficiaries, however, are our students.
Articulation has been supported by development of curriculum resources in the various disciplines
that include:
Computer Studies
Education and Career Planning
English
Indigenous ABE
Adult Literacy Fundamental Studies
Science: Biology, Chemistry and Physics
Mathematics
Social Science: First Nations, Geography, History, Law and Psychology
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
6
HISTORY OF ADULT BASIC EDUCATION IN BRITISH
COLUMBIA’S PUBLIC POST-SECONDARY SYSTEM
Since the early 1960s, British Columbians have had a rich history of Adult Basic Education (ABE)
courses and programs. ABE provides access to courses and skills training ranging from basic
literacy through to provincial level and adult secondary school completion. ABE programs support
learners to achieve one or more of the following goals: high school graduation, further education,
employability skills, and life management skills. These courses are offered both in the public
post-secondary institutions and British Columbia (BC) school districts. In both systems, ABE
courses are offered in a variety of settings and with a variety of delivery methods.
In the school district system (K-12), adult graduation programs are offered through all 60 school
districts. The focus of these adult programs is graduation, but adults can also take courses in the
K-12 system to upgrade. Adult students have a choice of completing the regular BC Certificate of
Graduation, or the BC Adult Graduation Diploma (BCAGD), which has the same foundational
course requirements but requires fewer electives.
In the PSE system, ABE programs are delivered by 18 post-secondary institutions, and include
programs focused on literacy, basic education or academic upgrading, employment preparation,
English as a Second Language and Adult Special Education. These programs provide flexible
learning opportunities for adult learners and are designed for the large number of British
Columbians in need of basic skills or language training to participate fully in society and the
economy. ABE programs in the PSE system are offered in a variety of formats ranging from
semester classes to self-paced individualized instruction, including distance (online) education
and community outreach with tutoring assistance. Programs are fully articulated, allowing for
course transferability around the province. Adult learners may choose to take courses as
prerequisites for other programs in the PSE or work toward their BCAGD.
The following chronology of events highlights the development of ABE in British Columbia’s public
post-secondary system.
Highlights of the History of Adult Basic Education in British Columbia’s
Public Post-Secondary System
YEAR
EVENT
1960
The federal government passed the Technical and Vocational Training Assistance
Act, enabling it to partner with the provinces to fund capital costs for vocational
training facilities. Many institutes of technology created through this Act were later
converted to community colleges.
1963
The provincial government amended The Public Schools Act and established
“regional colleges”.
1967
The federal government introduced the Adult Occupational Training Act to provide
short-term retraining for unemployed and underemployed workers. This program
revealed that most people in need of vocational training did not have the basic
academic skills needed to participate in vocational programs.
1973
The federal government funded 1) the Basic Training and Skills Development (BTSD)
which provided upgrading for students in grades K-12 and enabled them to gain the
prerequisites for vocational training, and 2) Basic Job Readiness Training (BJRT)
programs to help adult learners, who needed more than short-term training programs,
gain literacy and life skills, job search techniques and work experience leading to
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
7
employment.
1976
A provincial discussion paper, Helping to Develop a Provincial Continuing and
Community Education Policy made recommendations to MEd on continuing and
community education policy.
The Report of the Committee on Continuing and Community Education in BC
highlighted ABE as a “high priority special program”.
1977
The government passed the new comprehensive College and Institute Act.
1979
The inaugural meeting of the Adult Basic Education Association of British Columbia
(ABEABC) was held. The first of its kind in Canada, ABEABC was comprised of ABE
and literacy instructors and community members who wanted to help build the quality
of programming available in the province.
1982
The government report Ministerial Policy on the Provision of Adult Basic Education
Programs including English Language Training in the Public Education System of
British Columbia stated that it was the responsibility of the ministry to provide, to adult
citizens and landed immigrants residing in the province, reasonable access to high
quality ABE programs.
It also noted that responsibility for the development, administration and delivery of
ABE programs resided with the colleges, the institutes and the public schools.
1983
The ABE articulation process was launched in British Columbia. The ABE
Articulation Development Committee produced a provincial framework and common
terminology as a foundation to the process by early 1985.
The ABE Articulation Steering Committee was established to oversee the
implementation and on-going process of articulation across the post-secondary
system. The ABE Steering Committee established working committees in each of the
major discipline areas, with members from 18 colleges and the Open Learning
Agency. The discipline working committees developed generic outlines and a grid of
equivalencies by subject and course for the participating institutions.
1986
Responsibility for education of all adults except those in secondary schools, the
General Education Development (GED) challenge exam, and some adult English
Language Training programs, was transferred to the newly created Ministry of
Advanced Education and Labour Market Development (ALMD) from MEd.
The Ministry of Advanced Education and Job Training validated the articulation
process by producing the ABE Provincial Diploma to be awarded to any student
completing the requirements for secondary school graduation as laid out by the ABE
framework.
1987
The ABE Framework and Diploma were presented to the provincial universities and
British Columbia Institute of Technology. These institutions recognized the Diploma
as an official credential for entry into university studies.
1988
ALMD Minister established the Provincial Literacy Advisory Committee (PLAC) to
develop a literacy strategy.
Tuition fees were abolished for adult learners who had not graduated and were
enrolled in MEd’s ABE programs. This policy was one of the recommendations from
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
8
the 1988 Report of the Royal Commission on Education.
1991
Fundamental ABE became tuition free as a result of the recommendations in the
Provincial Literacy Advisory Committee’s 1989 Report.
The ABE Steering Committee implemented a review of the whole ABE Articulation
process. This culminated in a report presented to the Steering Committee in June
1992.
19921995
In 1992, The Rivers Report identified some difficulties in the delivery of ABE
programs by MEd and ALMD and that same year, The Faris Report offered
recommendations for overcoming those difficulties.
The 1993 Articulation Handbook included a revised statement on the purpose of
articulation.
In 1994, The government established the MEd/ALMD Joint Committee on ABE to
conduct a review and make recommendations on: the two systems’ funding and fee
structures; a common credential; records management, transferability and certificate
granting; articulation of ABE courses; program quality, evaluation, and guidelines for
good practice; and in addition, ensure cooperation between the two ministries on
issues related to ABE.
In 1995, a Ministry of Education/Ministry of Skills, Training and Labour Joint
Committee on Adult Basic Education made recommendations that included, among
others, a common adult graduation credential and an articulation process between
school district adult programs and the public post-secondary institutions.
1998
ABE became tuition-free in the PSE system and for online learners through
LearnNowBC.
The ABE Transitions Project was set up between MEd and ALMD. The overall goal
of the project was to work towards a coordinated ABE system for BC by developing a
more integrated, learner-centred approach to ABE programming. Two of the specific
objectives of the project were the implementation of a common credential for adults
and improved articulation of courses.
1999
The British Columbia Adult Graduation Diploma (BCAGD) – “The Adult Dogwood” –
became the common credential for ABE learners and would replace the old Adult
Dogwood and the ABE Provincial Diploma. This credential allowed adult learners to
earn a graduation diploma with a mix of appropriate courses from either or both
systems- MEd/ALMD.
2000
Amendments were made to the School Act, College and Institute Act, Institute of
Technology Act, and Open Learning Agency Act to accommodate the granting of the
BCAGD. Amendments were made to the School Act and the Independent School
Act to recognize the credential as well.
New developments such as the Provincial “e-merge initiative” for ABE on-line delivery
(2000), and the introduction of block funding (ABE funding was rolled into the block
funding model) in the PSE system (2002) presented new challenges for ABE in the
province.
2003
The Ministry gave public post-secondary institutions autonomy to charge tuition fees
for students taking ABE courses if they already had a high school diploma. However,
fundamental level ABE (literacy) programs and employment preparation programs
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
9
were to remain tuition-free.
2004
The Premier’s Advisory Panel on Literacy was created to assess the literacy
challenges in BC, highlight the most urgent needs and develop recommendations for
a provincial literacy strategy that will address those challenges.
2007
In response to the recommendations made by the Premier’s Advisory Panel on
Literacy, the provincial ministries encouraged the PSE and K-12 systems to work
together to improve the planning and coordination of ABE and community adult
literacy programs in their respective regions.
In September 2007, the Province announced that all students had access to tuitionfree ABE in the public post-secondary institutions beginning in January 2008.
2008
ABE courses in both the PSE and K-12 systems became tuition free for all learners,
regardless of their graduation status.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
10
THE ABE ARTICULATION PROCESS
The Purpose of Articulation
The purpose of ABE articulation is to ensure learners have access to quality courses, receive
appropriate credits and are able to transfer easily among publicly-funded colleges, universities
and institutes in British Columbia. Articulation also involves liaison with the school system’s ABE
programs to facilitate transfer of students back and forth between school district and college ABE
programs.
NOTE: The BC Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) works to further the aim of
transitions of adult learners.
For further information on the work and publications of BCCAT, visit the website:
http://www.bccat.bc.ca
The Goals of ABE Articulation
The goals of ABE articulation are:
1. to facilitate the transfer of students from one educational institution to another;
2. to facilitate entry of students into further education programs;
3. to lend credibility to the ABE Certificates/Diplomas for students seeking employment or
further education;
4. to provide a common terminology throughout the province for levels of achievement;
5. to provide for exchange of information;
6. to set and maintain learning outcomes which respect the autonomy of colleges and
institutes to create equivalent course content;
7. to set course requirements for diplomas and certificates;
8. to assist, through working committees, in the development of guidelines for the content of
courses identified for different levels of certification;
9. to provide a forum for the discussion of ABE issues;
10. to provide a common voice when addressing external bodies;
11. to encourage development and exchange of curriculum materials.
Steering Committee Business
I. Representatives to the ABE Steering Committee
Appointment/Membership:
1. The ABE Steering Committee Chairperson requests a representative and an alternate
from each institution through the Chief Executive Officer of the institution.
2. A formal appointment is made by the institution and recorded by the Steering Committee
Chairperson.
3. The desirable attributes in a representative should include:
• knowledge of field and programs in ABE
• knowledge about the institution’s development of ABE
• commitment to the articulation process.
4. Appointment is for a two-year term that is renewable.
5. A representative carries a single, institutional vote.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
11
Role of a Representative:
As the prime contact person for ABE articulation within the college, between colleges and for
other related groups, committees or agencies in the field which may be affected by
articulation, the representative:
1. attends Steering Committee meetings;
2. brings institution’s concerns, plans and continuing progress in articulation work to the
Steering Committee;
3. encourages and facilitates institutional participation in articulation working committees;
4. facilitates articulation work in the college by:
• communicating with all parts and persons in ABE or relating to ABE,
• promoting the rationalization of ABE in the light of continuing articulation, and
• assisting in the update of college brochures, services, etc. regarding ABE articulation.
5. maintains contact with the college’s member of BCCAT;
6. provides regular reports to his/her college on articulation activity;
7. prepares and submits an annual report to the Steering Committee on changes, progress
etc. in his/her institution that have occurred because of ABE articulation;
8. advises his/her institute’s Administration in matters relating to articulation.
II. Chairperson of the Steering Committee
Role of the Chairperson:
The Chairperson of the ABE Steering Committee:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
prepares the agendas for meetings;
sends out a notice of a meeting and its agenda well in advance of each meeting;
orients new Working Committee Chairs;
submits recommendations and concerns with respect to the articulation process to the
BCCAT;
chairs meetings of the Steering Committee;
keeps informed of all articulation developments in relation to Working Committee
developments, local college developments, liaison with receiving institutions;
represents the ABE Articulation process when needed and as appropriate;
confers with Working Chairpersons on agendas for all meetings;
attends as many Working Committee meetings as possible as a non-voting member;
attends meetings of the Deans and Directors of Developmental Education;
deals with problems and inquiries regarding articulation that arise in the field;
liaises with the Ministry on information and problems related to articulation;
keeps the ABE articulation policy manual up to date.
Working Committee Business: Terms of Reference
I. Tasks of a Working Committee
A subject Working Committee:
1. reviews college course outlines at the respective levels;
2. comes to a consensus on learning outcomes derived from existing courses at each level
of the framework;
3. if appropriate, reviews related curriculum which may impact upon articulation, i.e. Ministry
of Education;
4. articulates college courses with the described learning outcomes and produces a
provincial course transfer guide;
5. makes recommendations through the chairperson to the Steering Committee about such
things as curriculum development, course development;
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
12
6. understands that course articulation (Advanced & Provincial Levels) with the universities
and institutes is ultimately the responsibility of each college;
7. understands that the process of articulation is primarily one of the exchange of
information and setting of learning outcomes, and not one of prescription of length of
course, instructional methodology or materials;
8. establishes and maintains links with other articulation committees in the same discipline
whenever feasible on issues related to university transfer, career/ technical/vocational
areas, K-12, and Continuing Education ABE.
II. Tasks of a Chairperson
A. Procedure
A Working Committee Chairperson:
1. is elected from within the Working Committee;
2. serves a two year (renewable) term;
3. becomes a member of the Steering Committee and the Executive of the Steering
Committee;
4. calls annual meetings in the Lower Mainland at least two months prior to the annual
Steering Committee meeting;
5. discusses a proposed agenda with the Steering Committee chairperson prior to mail-out;
6. sends a copy of an agenda one month in advance of the meeting to the Working
Committee members, the Steering Committees, the Ministry, and to all College principals;
7. encourages every college and institution to send or designate a representative who will
act as a spokesperson for the institution;
8. writes an annual report which includes a goal statement, a list of generic topics, a course
transfer guide, and the recommendations of the Working Committee to the Steering
Committee that may include any curriculum proposals;
9. brings the annual report for distribution and presentation to the annual meeting of the
ABE Steering Committee;
10. reports in person to the Steering Committee;
11. provides updated material to the Ministry for the Articulation Handbook (transfer guide,
committee lists, course changes, etc.).
B. Responsibilities
A Working Committee Chairperson:
1. represents an institution;
2. orients new members of the Working Committee;
3. notifies Steering Committee members when colleges are not represented on Working
Committees;
4. ensures there is a recorder for the Working Committee to summarize the results of the
meetings, including items for action;
5. seeks the advice of the System Liaison Person, BCCAT, or the Ministry as and when
appropriate, and invites such non-voting representatives to a meeting when necessary;
6. keeps updated course outlines at all levels for each college;
7. ensures the Working Committee stays on task.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
13
List of Working Committees
Currently, there are eight working committees. They are:








Computer Studies
Education and Career Planning
English
Adult Literacy Fundamental Level
Mathematics
Science
Social Science
Indigenous ABE
Articulation Task Checklist
The following checklist is provided to facilitate effective ABE articulation within and between postsecondary education institutions.
1. Within the ABE Division
Within the ABE division or department in the institution, there should be a plan for general
information sessions, including:





regular subject area meetings, particularly after representatives return from Working
Committee meetings;
prompt and efficient distribution of reports from the Working Committee and Steering
Committee minutes and reports;
change of terminology on certificates, transcripts, calendars, application forms, and
other documents;
development of a new ABE brochure to use in orientation meetings internally and
externally;
submission of course, program, or procedural changes to the respective college
committees, i.e. Program Advisory Committee, Standards and Admissions
Committee, etc.
2. Regarding Students

Provide orientation for:
o ABE students already enrolled in ABE;
o potential ABE students currently enrolled in other programs.
3. Within the Rest of the Institution

Provide information on an on-going basis to:
o Coordinators or heads of other departments;
o Dean or Vice-president of Instruction;
o Counsellors/Advisors;
o Registrar/Admissions;
o Financial Aid Officer.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
14
4.
Planning and Tracking for the BCAGD

Appropriate departments of the institution should plan to:
o
o
o
o
identify a list of required and elective courses at this level;
establish a procedure for dealing with electives;
ensure that students are well-advised or counseled in their course selection;
establish a procedure for applying for the Diploma (an application form, college
transfer credit policy, application of 100 or higher level courses);
o approve student applications (coordinator, committee, registrar);
o establish a procedure for tracking diploma recipients.
5. Community

Provide information on an on-going basis to:
o Ministry of Housing and Social Development offices;
o school districts;
o aboriginal band administration officers;
o other funding agencies.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
15
ABE PROGRAM FRAMEWORK
List 1: Options may be chosen from social sciences, another science, trades training at the occupational
level, a language, accounting, education and career planning, etc., at the advanced level or higher.
List 2: Courses may be chosen from academic subjects at the Provincial level or higher in the areas of
science, languages, humanities, social sciences, mathematics, and computer science or studies. Courses
for credit may also be chosen from other subjects at the Provincial level or higher such as education and
career planning, trades training at the specialty level, business administration, visual, graphic and performing
arts. (Specific lists of options will be available at individual colleges & institutions.)
* Each certificate and diploma is independent and not prerequisite for another.
** As of Sept. 1, 2000, the ABE Provincial Diploma was no longer granted. The BC Adult Graduation
Diploma (“The Adult Dogwood”) was effective Sept. 1, 1999. See the next pages for more
information.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
16
THE BC ADULT GRADUATION DIPLOMA:
“The Adult Dogwood”
This common credential was introduced in September 1999. To be eligible to graduate from this
program, adult students (18 years of age or over) must earn at least 20 credits in the secondary
system or five courses in the post-secondary system. Courses and credits can be counted from
either or both of the following areas:
BC POST-SECONDARY SYSTEM
Qualifying Courses
A Provincial Level English or higher
An Advanced or Provincial Level or
higher Mathematics*
Three additional courses at the
Provincial Level or higher
or
Advanced Social Sciences and two
Provincial level courses or higher
Total: 5 courses
OR
OR
OR
BC SECONDARY SCHOOL SYSTEM
Qualifying Courses
A Language Arts 12
A Mathematics 11 or 12
4 credits
4 credits
Three Grade 12
Ministry-authorized Courses (4 credits each)
or
Social Studies 11 (4 credits) and two Grade
12 Ministry-authorized Courses (4 credits
each)
12
credits
12
credits
20
credits
Total:
* A student is able to take and obtain credit towards the BCAGD for both Advanced level and Provincial level
(or higher) Mathematics. In the latter case, Mathematics would be one of the electives. Notes:

To be eligible for the BC Adult Graduation Diploma (BCAGD), a person must be 18 years or
older.

Three courses must be completed after enrolling in an adult program. Prior Learning
Assessment may be used to meet any of the requirements for the BCAGD. Prior Learning
Assessment involves a variety of techniques including equivalency reviews, challenge
processes, in-depth interviews, etc.

In the secondary school system Provincial Exams are optional for students on an adult
program. If the student chooses not to write a provincial exam, the grade will be reported
with a “Q” code. It should be noted that some post-secondary institutions might not accept
examinable courses for admission purposes unless the secondary system provincial exam
has been written.

Any 4-credit course that is authorized by the Ministry of Education (MEd), or the Ministry of
Advanced Education (AVED) as requirements for graduation may be used towards the
BCAGD.

For Ministry of Education information see the following section: “BC Adult Graduation
Diploma: Questions and Answers.”

Accounting 11 or a college course equivalent to Accounting 11 can be used for the
Mathematics 11 credit for the BCAGD.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
17
The BC Adult Graduation Diploma: Questions and
Answers
What is the name of the adult credential?
The official name of the adult credential is the British Columbia Adult Graduation Diploma, but it is
also known informally as the “Adult Dogwood.”
What about the regular Dogwood Diploma?
Adults may choose to do the regular Dogwood Diploma through the MEd. All articulated postsecondary ABE courses can be used for credit towards either the regular or Adult Dogwood.
What about the GED?
The GED (General Educational Development) certificate is not the same as the Adult Dogwood
diploma.
When was the BC Adult Graduation Diploma (BCAGD) implemented?
The BCAGD was implemented on September 1, 1999.
Who will issue the BC Adult Graduation Diploma?
Post-secondary institutions will request the diplomas from AVED (at 250-387-6186) and issue
them from the registrar’s office. The BCAGD is a joint AVED/MEd document signed by both
ministers. Students may take their post-secondary course(s) back to the school district and apply
for their diploma through the school district and MEd.
Who will issue the transcripts for the diploma?
The institution issuing the diploma identifies which courses have been used to qualify for the
diploma, both internal and transfer courses. Students combining courses from the two systems
for the diploma will need to include all relevant transcripts in situations where they need to verify
their courses and grades.
Does a student have to take at least 3 of the courses used towards the Adult Dogwood as
an adult?
Yes, 3 courses should have been completed after turning 18 years old. A student may use Prior
Learning Assessment (where available) as an adult to get credit for up to 3 courses used towards
the diploma.
What if a student is missing one or two courses from his/her high school graduation?
This student could take the missing course(s) at the college or school district and take them back
to the high school towards the regular Dogwood Diploma.
Does a student have to take a minimum number of courses used towards the Adult
Dogwood from the institution granting the Adult Dogwood?
Yes, at least one course from the institution granting the diploma. The other eligible courses may
be brought from another institution or institutions.
Can a student use courses taken a long time ago for credit towards the Adult Dogwood?
Yes, as long as they were Ministry-authorized courses at the time, and s/he has completed three
courses as an adult.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
18
Will college ABE students be able to write MEd provincial exams?
No, not through a college.
If a student wishes to write a provincial exam the student must register for the provincially
examinable course at a school district.
What courses are eligible? Can Communications 12 be used as the Language Arts 12?
Can Accounting 11 be used for the Mathematics 11?
Any course that is Ministry-authorized by either MEd (4 credits) or AVED (see the handbook
information below) as a requirement for graduation may be used towards the diploma.
Yes, Communications 12 and Accounting 11 are eligible for Language Arts 12 and Mathematics
11 respectively.
Can Work Experience designated courses be counted for credit towards the BCAGD?
The only work experience courses allowed for graduation credit for the BCAGD is Work
Experience 12A or 12B (WEX 12A or WEX 12B) or Secondary School Apprenticeship 12A (SSA
12A).
What is meant by “Three additional courses at the Provincial Level or higher”?
The Provincial level means that the course has to be articulated as an ABE Provincial Level
course and be listed on a transfer grid in the ABE Articulation Handbook (either this Handbook
or a previous one). A higher level course means that the course is a university transfer course
and listed on the BCCAT website.
For non-academic courses, refer to List 2 on the Framework.
For the trades and other programs, courses can be used if there is a written agreement with the
school, or if the course is listed in the college’s calendar and is used towards a credential for a
certificate, diploma or degree.
Do the three additional Post Secondary courses at the Provincial Level or higher have to
be from different subject areas?
No they could all be from the same subject area.
Does an additional Post Secondary course have to be a particular length of time before it
can be used towards the BCAGD?
In the case of the trades or other program courses, the course must be 100-120 hours. Courses
with less than these may be ‘bundled’ up to equal the 100-120 hours requirement.
Where can I find out more information about course requirements and graduation
requirements?
Ministry of Advanced Education:
This Articulation Handbook is the AVED authorized guide to ABE course information and
graduation requirements. Eligible courses include any advanced Mathematics or higher, any
provincial English or higher, and any provincial level courses or higher. Higher than provincial
level courses may or may not be accepted for university transfer if they have also been used
towards the BCAGD. Students using the Articulation Handbook need to check with the receiving
department/institution.
Ministry of Education:
The main MEd website for the Adult Graduation Program is
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/adult_graduation/
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
19
The graduation requirements are also included in the Handbook of Procedures (Chapter 3)
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/exams/handbook/
The MEd has determined that all ABE courses from British Columbia’s public post-secondary
institutions will be recognized for credit toward completion of the BCAGD.
All four-credit grade 12 courses that are listed in Chapter 1 (ministry-authorized) and Chapter 2
(external courses) of Course Information book, plus Social Studies 11 can meet the BCAGD
requirements. See: http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/graduation/courseinfo/
CAPPA 12 is now over, but adult students can use the new Planning 12 course to replace
CAPPA 12.
The books mentioned above can be purchased through Queen's Printer Publications
Services, 563 Superior Street Victoria, BC, V8W 9V7, Tel 250 387-6409. Fax 250 3871120. Toll Free 1-800-663-6105. Order online:
http://www.publications.gov.bc.ca/pubdetail.aspx?nato=7530879271
For the BC Post Secondary System Qualifying Courses, what courses (other than the
academic ones) are eligible from List 2?
For the trades and other programs, courses can be used if there is a written agreement with the
school, or if the course is listed in the college’s calendar and is used towards a credential for a
certificate, diploma or degree.
What English course can be used as the BC post secondary Provincial Level English?
As long as the English course has been articulated as a Provincial level English course by the
ABE English Working Group and is on the ABE English transfer grid, then it can be used.
What math course can be used as the BC post secondary math towards the Adult
Dogwood?
As long as the math course has been articulated as an Advanced level math course, or higher, by
the ABE Mathematics Working Group and is on the ABE Mathematics transfer grid, then it can be
used.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
20
The tables below indicate which ABE post-secondary courses have been deemed equivalent
(80% match of learning outcomes) to the MEd courses and which ones are external (MEd
authorized for credit towards a graduation diploma).
ABE Post-Secondary Courses Authorized as Equivalent to
Ministry of Education Courses
MEd
Course
Code
ABE Post-Secondary
Course
Title
MEd
Equivalent
Course
Credits
Meets
Foundation
Studies
MATHEMATICS
MA 11
QMA 12
ABE Advanced Business/
Technical Mathematics
ABE Advanced
Developmental
Mathematics
ABE Advanced Algebraic
Mathematics
ABE Provincial
Mathematics
*
4
Mathematics
*
4
Mathematics
Pre-Calculus 11
4
Mathematics
Pre-Calculus 12
4
Mathematics
ABE Advanced Biology
ABE Provincial Biology
ABE Advanced Chemistry
ABE Provincial Chemistry
Biology 11
Biology 12
Chemistry 11
Chemistry 12
4
4
4
4
Science
Science
Science
Science
Planning 12
4
Planning 10
SCIENCE
BI 11
QBI 12
CH 11
QCH 12
EDUCATION AND CAREER PLANNING
PLAN 12
ABE Provincial Education
and Career Planning
* As of September 2011, Applications of Math, Essentials of Math and Principles of Math are all
being phased out, replaced with Workplace and Apprenticeship Math, Foundations of Math and
Pre-Calculus. These new courses will need to be reviewed in the upcoming year, but for now,
please use the chart above as a rough guide. ABE courses at the “advanced level or higher”
taken in the post-secondary system count for external credit and can be used for the math credit
in the BCAGD.
N.B.: MEd course equivalency policies are outlined at the beginning of chapter 2 of the Handbook
of Procedures. http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/exams/handbook/
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
21
External ABE Post-Secondary Courses Authorized for
Ministry of Education Credit
MEd
Course
Code
UABEA 11
UABEC 11
UABEC 12
UABEE 11
UABEE 12
UABEP 11
UABEP 12
UABEG 11
UABES 11
UABES 12
ABE Post-Secondary
Course
Title
ABE Advanced Accounting
(11)
ABE Advanced Computer
Studies (11)
ABE Provincial Computer
Studies (12)
ABE Advanced English
(11)
ABE Provincial English
(12)
ABE Advanced Physics
(11)
ABE Provincial Physics
(12)
ABE Advanced General
and Applied Science (11)
ABE Advanced Social
Studies (11)
ABE Provincial Social
Studies (12)
Meets
Foundation
Studies
Applied Skills
4
Applied Skills
4
Applied Skills
4
Language Arts
11
Language Arts
12
Science
4
EN 11
4
EN 12
4
PH 11
Science
4
PH 12
Science
4
Social Studies
4
Credits
Credit
Restrictions
by Code
SS 11
4
N.B.: A Ministry of Education (MEd) approved External course is a MEd-authorized course. These
courses are of equivalent or higher standard to other MEd-authorized senior secondary courses,
but the learning outcomes differ. Other MEd approved External course lists can be found in
chapter 2 of the Course Information book. http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/graduation/courseinfo/
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
22
RECOGNITION of the BC ADULT GRADUATION
DIPLOMA
The British Columbia Adult Graduation Diploma (BCAGD) is recognized by colleges, institutes
and universities in the British Columbia public post-secondary system. Entries below are taken
from recent calendars.
British Columbia Institute of Technology
2013/14 Academic Calendar
Acceptable alternative to a high school diploma
The B.C. Adult Graduation Diploma (BCAGD) is also considered equivalent to high-school
graduation.
See http://www.bcit.ca/counsellorsguide/admissionreq/ and
http://www.bcit.ca/admission/requirements/
Simon Fraser University
2013/14 Academic Calendar
British Columbia Adult Graduation Diploma
This credential is available to adults who take courses to complete graduation through a
secondary school, adult education centre or a community college.
If you have completed the diploma and are at least 19 years of age, you may be admitted
if you have completed:




four courses (16 credits) at grade 11 or advanced level to include English, mathematics,
social studies or First Nations 12, an experimental or laboratory science; a language
other than English is not required
four courses (16 credits) at the grade 12 or provincial level to include English and three
additional subjects selected from: biology, mathematics, chemistry, English literature,
languages, statistics, geography, history, physics.
BC First Nations Studies 12, Calculus 12, Comparative Civilization 12, Economics 12,
English Literature 12, Foundations of Math 12, French 12 or français langue seconde 12,
German 12, History 12, Japanese 12, Law 12, Mandarin 12, Principles of Math 12 or PreCalculus 12, Philosophy 12, Punjabi 12, Social Justice 12, Spanish 12, Sustainable
Resources 12.
Sciences: Biology 12, Chemistry 12, Geography 12, Geology 12, Physics 12.
In addition, all applicants must meet the English admission requirement, and Quantitative skills
requirement.
All four grade 12 or provincial level subjects must be graded: a minimum average of C+
or 67% is required, based on the Ministry of Education grading scale. Program-specific
admission requirements parallel those for BC secondary school graduates.
See http://students.sfu.ca/admission/requirements/special-other.html
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
23
University of British Columbia
2013/14 Academic Calendar
British Columbia Adult Graduation Diploma
The University recognizes the BCAGD Provincial Diploma for admission to the first year
of an undergraduate degree. Applicants who have completed the BCAGD must be at
least 19 years of age and meet the following admission requirements:
1. Four Adult Basic Education (ABE) Advanced Level or Grade 11 courses, which must include
1
English; Algebraic Mathematics (ABE) or Principles of Mathematics 11; one Science ; and
one of Social Science (ABE), Social Studies 11, Civic Studies 11, Language 11, or First
Nations 12.
2. Four Provincial Level (ABE) or Grade 12, including English, or English 12 First Peoples, and
three additional subjects chosen from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics (ABE) or
Principles of Mathematics 12, Calculus 12, Computer Science (ABE), Economics, Geology,
Geography, History, Law 12, English Literature, and Languages.
1
Excludes ABE General and Applied Science and Grade 11 Resource Science.
A minimum final course grade of 70% in either English 11 or English 12 is required for all
programs.
The admission average will be calculated on ABE Provincial Level English, or English 12,
or English 12 First Peoples, and three other ABE Provincial Level or Grade 12 courses,
each of which must be graded.
A minimum average of 67% is required for admission to all programs. However, due to
limited enrolment, a higher average is required in most programs. All courses must be
completed by June. Summer school courses or grades obtained in supplemental
examinations will not be considered.
Entrance requirements to specific programs parallel those for BC/Yukon secondary
school graduates and applicants should refer to the table Specific Program Requirements
for Applicants Following the BC/Yukon Secondary School Curriculum to ensure they have
the required courses.
See http://www.calendar.ubc.ca/vancouver/index.cfm?tree=2,22,67,0
University of Northern British Columbia
2013/14 Academic Calendar
British Columbia Adult Graduation Diploma
Applicants must be at least 19 years of age, and have successfully completed the BC Adult
Graduation Diploma and the appropriate entrance requirements for Degree Group at the Grade
12 level with an overall average of 65% or better. Applicants in this category are not required to
complete a fifth grade 12 course as noted in the Admission Requirements by Degree Group table
above.
See
http://www.unbc.ca/calendar/undergraduate/admissions/high_school.html#BritishColumbiaAdultG
raduationDiploma
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
24
University of Victoria
2013/14 Academic Calendar
British Columbia Adult Graduation Diploma
Applicants with a BC Adult Graduation Diploma (the Adult Dogwood) may apply for admission if
the following minimum requirements are met:
1. The applicant is at least 19 years of age.
2. Successful completion of English, Mathematics (academic), a laboratory Science, and
Social Studies 11 or equivalent at the advanced or grade 11 level. Courses done through
the secondary system must each be worth 4 credits.
3. Successful completion of English plus three approved academic subjects at the grade 12
level. Courses done through the secondary system must each be worth 4 credits, and
provincial examinations must be written if mandatory in the subject taken. All courses
presented for admission must be graded. A minimum average of 67% is required for
consideration.
All applicants must have the appropriate prerequisites for the program to which they have
applied. Admission requirements for the Faculty of Engineering, the Faculty of Science
and the Health Information Science program parallel those for BC secondary school
graduates.
See http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2011/FACS/UnIn/UnAd/AdRe.html
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
25
TRANSFER GUIDES
Computer Studies Transfer Guide
INSTITUTION:
FUNDAMENTAL
INTERMEDIATE
BC Institute of
Technology
Camosun College
Capilano University
COMP 030
BCMP 021
COMP 040
BCMP 031
COMP 060
BCMP 041
College of New
Caledonia
College of the Rockies
Nicola Valley Institute of
Technology
North Island College
Northern Lights College
Northwest Community
College
Okanagan College
COMP 020
COMP 030
COMP 045
COMP 080
COMP 050
COMP 090 (app)
COMP 040
BIP 090
CPST 030
CPST 030
CPST 040
CPST 040
COST 070
COST 011
Selkirk College
CPST 02
CPST 10
CPST 50 or
CPST 52 &
CPST 53
COMP 0500
CPST 050 (app)
CPST 050 (app)
CPST 055 (app)
COSC 012 (prog)
COST 012 (app)
CPST 60 or
CPST 62 &
CPST 63
COMP 0600
(prog)
COMP 0640
(app)
COMP 0650 (app)
CPS 025
CPST 020
CPST 020
Thompson Rivers
University
Thompson Rivers
University – Open
Learning
University of the Fraser
Valley
Vancouver Community
College
COMP 0400
COMP 061
ADVANCED
COMP 071
COMP 080
BCMP 052 (prog)
or
BCMP 051 (app)
or
BCMP 053 (app)
COMP 091
COMP 0982
COMP 0984
COMP 0311 &
COMP 0312
Native Education
College
PROVINCIAL
CST 041 &
CST 051
Vancouver Island
University
Yukon College
(app) = Applied Computer Studies at the Provincial Level
(prog) = Programming (Computer Science) at the Provincial level.
CST 061 &
CST 071
CST 081 &
CST 091
COST 047
COST 067 (app)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
26
Education & Career Planning Transfer Guide
INSTITUTION:
FUNDAMENTAL
BC Institute of
Technology
Camosun College
Capilano University
BEST 040 (CP)
BEST 041 (CP)
BEST 042 (CP)
BEST 043 (CP)
BEST 044 (CP)
BEST 045 (CP)
EDCP 020(CP)
BECP 021(CP)
College of New
Caledonia
College of the Rockies
Thompson Rivers
University
Thompson Rivers
University – Open
Learning
Thompson Rivers
University -Tl'azt'en
Nation
Thompson Rivers
University--Prince
George Native
Friendship Centre
University of the Fraser
Valley
BEST 040 (CP)
EDCP 080(CP)
EDCP 041(CP) &
EDCP 051(CP)
CEP 030 (CP)
CEP 031 (CP)
BEST 031 (CP)
Northern Lights College
Okanagan College
Educacentre
Selkirk College
ADVANCED
EDCP 020 (CP)
EDCP 02 (CP)
PROVINCIAL
BEST 040 (CP)
EDCP 040(CP)
BECP 041(CP)
EDCP 070(CP)
Douglas College
Native Education
College
Kwantlen Polytechnic
University
Langara College
Nicola Valley Institute
of Technology (includes
courses formerly
delivered by the
Institute of Indigenous
Government – All
Nations Institute)
North Island College
Northwest Community
College
Okanagan College
INTERMEDIATE
EDCP 090(CP)
COSU 090(SS)
EDCP 081 (CP) &
EDCP 091 (CP)
CRLS 050 (CP)
CRLS 060 (CP)
EDCP 1200 (CP)
BEST 041 (CP)
EDCP 050 (CP)
BEST 051 (CP)
EDCP 050 (CP)
EDCP 030 (CP)
EDCP 71(CP)
EDCP 72 (CP)
EDCP 73(CP)
EDCP 74 (CP)&
EDCP 75(CP)
EDCP 81(CP)
EDCP 82(CP)
EDCP 83(CP)
EDCP 84(CP)&
EDCP 85(CP)
APDC 010(CP)
APDC 020(CP)
APDA 030(CP)
EDCP 49 (CP)
EDCP 50 (CP)
EDCP 60 (CP)
EDSS 60
EDCP 040(CP)
STSS 050(CP)
EDCP 024(CP)
PGEC 010(CP)
ECP 064(CP)
ECP 074(CP)
PGEC 020(CP)
ECP 094(CP)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
27
Vancouver Community
College
EEAW 041(CP) &
EEAW 051(CP)
BEST 041(CP) &
BEST 051(CP)
EEAW 061(CP)
& EEAW
071(CP)
BEST 061 (CP)
& BEST
071(CP)
EEAW 081(CP) &
EEAW 091(CP)
BEST 081(CP) &
BEST 091(CP)
Vancouver Island
University
Yukon College
EDCP 030(CP)
EDCP 047(CP)
EDCP 067(CP)
Course levels are differentiated by the level of language and the requirements of the assignments. Thus, the
Provincial level will require a higher level of language ability and the assignments will be more demanding than
the Intermediate level.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
28
English Transfer Guide
INSTITUTION:
BC Institute of
Technology
Camosun College
FUNDAMENTAL
INTERMEDIATE
ADVANCED
PROVINCIAL
Eng 021, Eng 022,
Eng 023, Eng 024,
Eng 025, Eng 033*
BENF 001, BENF
002, BENF 003,
BENF 004, BENF
005, BENF 006*,
BENG 021*
ENGL 020*
ENGL 021
ENGL 022
ENGL 023
ENGL 024
ENGL 025
ENGL 026*
Engl 050
Engl 130
BENG 031
BENG 040 or
BENG 041
ENG 030
ENG 045
ENG 050 (L)
College of the Rockies
ENG 10 & ENG 20,
ENG 30 & ENG 40,
ENG 50 & ENG 60*
ENGL 070
ENGL 080
ENGL 090 (L)
ENGL 091 (T)
ELT 089 (L)
ENGL 92
Douglas College
ENGU 0100,
ENGU 0115,
ENGU 0125,
ENGU 0146,
ENGU 0156,
ENGU 0245,
ENGU 0256*
ENGQ 0045,
ENGQ 0055,
ENGQ 0065*
ENGQ 0044,
ENGQ 0054,
ENGQ 0064*,
ENGQ 0056,
ENGQ 0066*
ENG 020,
ENG 030*
ENG 013,
ENG 014,
ENG 015,
ENG 025,
ENG 026,
ENG 027*
ENG 011,
ENG 012,
ENG 013,
ENG 024,
ENG 025,
ENG 026*
ENG 021,
ENG 022,
ENG 023,
ENG 024,
ENG 025,
ENG 026*
ENGL 040 OR
ENGL 041 &
ENGL 042
ENGL 050 or
ENGU 0350 &
0360,
ENGU 355
ENGU 0455
ABEE 0070
ABEE 0081
ENGQ 1091
ENGQ 1092
ENG 40
ENG 50
ENG 60
ENG 032 &
ENG 033 &
ENG 034
ENG 039
ENG 052
ENG 060 (L)
or ENG 098
ESL 090
ENG 096
ENGL 030
ENG 040
ENG 050 (L)
or ENG 051 (T)
ENG 030
First Nations 030
ENG 040 or
ENG 045
ENG 050 (L)
or ENG 055 (T)
ENG 056
ENG 070 or
ENG 071 &
ENG072
ENG 080 or
ENG 081 & 082
or
Comp 011 or
ENLG 012 (L) or
EAPR 042 &
EAPW 041 (L)
Capilano University
College of New
Caledonia
Kwantlen Polytechnic
University
Nicola Valley Institute of
Technology
North Island College
Northern Lights College
Northwest Community
College
Okanagan College
Engl 092/094 &
Engl 140 (T)
Engl 096
BENG 052 (L)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
29
Selkirk College
University of BC
Thompson Rivers
University
Thompson Rivers
University – Open
Learning
University of the Fraser
Valley
Vancouver Community
College
Vancouver Island
University
ENGL 051 &
ENGL 052
ENGL 060 or
ENGL 061 &
ENGL 062
LSK 01, RSK 01,
SSK 01, LSK 02,
RSK 02, SSK 02,
LSK 03, RSK 03,
SSK 03, LSK 04,
RSK 04, SSK 04,
LSK 05, RSK 05,
SSK 05, LSK 06*,
RSK 06*, SSK 06*
ENGL 030*
ENGL 0300*
ENG 042, 043, 052,
053, 062, and 063*
ENGL 0311,
ENGL0312,
ENGL 0313,
ENGL 0314,
ENGL 0315,
ENGL 0316*
ENGL 011,
ENGL 012,
ENGL 013,
ENGL 014,
ENGL 015,
ENGL 016*
Yukon College
* = “exit” course for the Fundamental Level
Professional
Engl 011
ENG 10
ENGL 50 or
ENGL 52 &
ENGL 53
ENGL 0400
ENGL 0500
ENGL 0401
ENGL 0501
ENGL 0601
ENGL 0641
ENGL 071
ENGL 081
ENGL 091
ENG 0741,
ENG 0751
ENG 0861 &
0871
ENGL 0981 &
ENGL 0991
ENGL 0994
ENGL 098 (ESL)
ENGL 099 (ESL)
ENGL 037
(prereq:
completion of
ENGL 025 or
assessment)
ENG 047
ENG 067 (L)
ENGL 030
ENGL 050
ENGL 060 (L)
L = Literature
ENGL 60 or
ENGL 62 & 63 or
ENGL 051
or ENGL 65 (T)
FN ENGL 012
ENGL 0600
ENGL 0620
T = Technical and
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
30
Indigenous Range of Courses
INSTITUTION
COMPUTER
STUDIES
EDUCATION
& CAREER
PLANNING
ENGLISH
SCIENCE
SOCIAL SCIENCES
FINE ARTS/
LANGUAGE
INTERMEDIATE
NVIT
Northwest
Community
College
Tl'azt'en Nation
Vancouver
Community
College
COMP 040
ENG 040
First Nations 030
ENG 014 (OLA)
CST 041 &
051
EDCP 041 &
051
Native Education
College
First Nations
ENG 041 &
ENG 051
SC 051
FNST 041
FNST 051
SGV 081
SGV 091*
ADVANCED
NVIT
COMP 050
CRLS 050
ENG 050
BIOL 050
Northwest
Community
College
Thompson River
University
INST 051
Nsyilxcen
NSYL 050
HALQ 050
FNS 033
NAST 0500
EDCP 024
(OLA)
FOSC 020
(OLA)
Tl'azt'en Nation
Vancouver
Community
College
CST 061 &
071
First Nations
ENG 061 &
ENG 071 (OLA)
Native Education
College
SC 061 &
SC 071,
FNST I & II (061071)
FNST 11
BIOL 061 &
BIOL 071,
CHEM 061 &
CHEM 071,
PHYS 061 &
PHYS 071
PROVINCIAL
Camosun College
NVIT (includes
courses formerly
delivered by the
Institute of
Indigenous
Government – All
Nations Institute)
North Island
College
Northern Lights
College
Northwest
Community
College
ENGL 096
CRLS 060
ENG 060
IST 171,
IST 172
IST 092
NAST 060
INST 061
Nsyilxcen FNST
1200
NSYL 060
FINA 060
FINA 061
FINA 062
FINA 063
FINA 064
FINA 065
FNS 065
FNST 051
FNST 050
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
31
Okanagan
College
Thompson Rivers
University Open
Learning
FNS 012
FOSC 030
(OLA)
Tl'azt'en Nation
Thompson Rivers
University
University of the
Fraser Valley
Vancouver
Community
College
ENGL 0620
NAST 0600
FNST 091
CST 081 &
CST 091
EDCP 081 &
EDCP 091
Native Education
College
FNLIT 12
ENGL 12 COMP
BIOL 083 &
BIOL 093,
CHEM 083 &
CHEM 093
FNST 12,
CUL 081 &
CUL 091,
SOC 081 &
SOC 091
SGV 081
SGV 091*
NOTE: These courses are already articulated courses within the system but are presented in this template to
show the range of offerings of ABE courses at aboriginal institutions as well as specific First Nations courses
throughout the system. For Mathematics courses at NVIT and NEC see above.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
32
Adult Literacy Fundamental (ALF) Transfer Guide
INSTITUTION:
BC Institute of
Technology
Camosun
College
COMPUTER
STUDIES
EDUCATION &
CAREER
PLANNING
COMP 030
Capilano
University
BCMP 021
College of New
Caledonia
COMP 020
College of the
Rockies
COMP 60
Eng 021, Eng 022,
Eng 023, Eng 024,
Eng 025, Eng 033*
EDCP 020(CP)
BECP 021(CP)
Douglas College
Northern Lights
College
BENF 001,
BENF 002,
BENF 003,
BENF 004,
BENF 005,
BENF 006*,
BENG 021*
ENGL 020*
ENGL 021
ENGL 022
ENGL 023
ENGL 024
ENGL 025
ENGL 026*
ENG 10 & ENG 20,
ENG 30 & ENG 40,
ENG 50 & ENG 60*
ENGU 0100,
ENGU 0115,
ENGU 0125,
ENGU 0146,
ENGU 0156,
ENGU 0245,
ENGU 0256*
ENGQ 0045,
ENGQ 0055,
ENGQ 0065*,
ENGQ 0044,
ENGQ 0054,
ENGQ 0064*,
ENGQ 0056,
ENGQ 0066*
English 020 &
English 030*
Kwantlen
Polytechnic
University
Nicola Valley
Institute of
Technology
North Island
College
ENGLISH
CPS 025
Eng 013,
Eng 014,
Eng 015,
Eng 025,
Eng 026,
Eng 027*
CPST 020*
ENG 011,
ENG 012,
ENG 013,
MATH
MATH 021,
MATH 022,
MATH 023,
MATH 024,
MATH 025,
MATH 026*,
MATH 034*
BMAF 01,
BMAF 02,
BMAF 03,
BMAF 04,
BMAF 05,
BMAF 06*
MATH 020*
MATH 021
MATH 022
MATH 023
MATH 024
MATH 025
MATH 026*
MATH 10,
MATH 20,
MATH 30,
MATH 40,
MATH 50,
MATH 60*
MATU 0110
MATU 0210*
MATQ 0001,
MATQ 0002,
MATQ 0003,
MATQ 0004,
MATQ 0005,
MATQ 0006*
Math 020 &
Math 030*
MAT 017,
MAT 018,
MAT 019,
MAT 025*
MAT 027,
MAT 028,
MAT 029*,
MATH 020*
MATH 020A
MATH 020B
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
33
Northwest
Community
College
CPST 020
EDCP 020(CP)
Okanagan
College
Selkirk College
Thompson
Rivers University
Thompson
Rivers University
– Open Learning
University of the
Fraser Valley
Vancouver
Community
College
CPST 02*
COMP 061
EDCP 02 (CP)
ECP 064 (CP)
COMP 0311,
COMP 0312
Native Education
College
Vancouver Island
University
ENG 024,
ENG 025,
ENG 026*
ENG 021,
ENG 022,
ENG 023,
ENG 024,
ENG 025,
ENG 026*
ENGL 040 or
ENGL 041 & ENGL 042
ENGL 50 or
ENG 51 & ENG 52
ENGL60* or
ENGL 61 & ENGL 62*
LSK 01, RSK 01, SSK01,
LSK 02, RSK 02, SSK 02,
LSK 03, RSK 03, SSK 03,
LSK 04, RSK 04, SSK 04,
LSK 05, RSK 05, SSK 05,
LSK 06*, RSK 06*, SSK 06*
MATH 020C
MATH 023
MATH 024
MATH 025
MATH 026*
Math 041,
Math 042,
Math 051,
Math 052,
Math 061,
Math 062*
MSK 01,
MSK 02,
MSK 03,
MSK 04,
MSK 05,
MSK 06*
ENGL 0300*
MATH 0300*
ENGL 042,
ENGL 043,
ENGL 052,
ENGL 053,
ENGL 062,
ENGL 063*
ENGL 0311,
ENGL 0312,
ENGL 0313,
ENGL 0314,
ENGL 0315,
ENGL 0316*
MA 052,
MA 053,
MA 062,
MA 063*
ENGL 011,
ENGL 012,
ENGL 013,
ENGL 014,
ENGL 015,
ENGL 016*
MATH 011
MATH 012
MATH 013
MATH 014
MATH 015
MATH 016*
MATH 0311,
MATH 0312,
MATH 0313,
MATH 0314,
MATH 0315,
MATH 0316*
MATH 021
MATH 031
Note: Asterisk (*) denotes the required exit level by the specific institution.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
34
Mathematics Transfer Guide
Note: The ALF Math has been divided into six levels. This change will continue to be reflected in
this transfer guide in the coming years.
INSTITUTION:
FUNDAMENTAL INTERMEDIATE
ADVANCED
PROVINCIAL
BC Institute of
Technology
Camosun College
Capilano University
College of New
Caledonia
College of the Rockies
Douglas College
Kwantlen Polytechnic
University
Langara College
Nicola Valley Institute
of Technology
(includes courses
formerly delivered by
the Institute of
Indigenous
Government – All
Nations Institute)
North Island College
Northern Lights
College
Northwest Community
College
MATH 021
MATH 022
MATH 023
MATH 024
MATH 025
MATH 026*
MATH 034*
BMAF 01
BMAF 02
BMAF 03
BMAF 04
BMAF 05
BMAF 06*
MATH 052 &
MATH 053 (A)
MATH 072 &
MATH 073(A) or
MATH 137 (A)
MATH 092 &
MATH 093 or
MATH 105 or
MATH 107 or
MATH 115
BMTH 033 &
BMTH 034 (A)
BMTH 053 &
BMTH 054
or
MATH 105
MATH 020*
MATH 021
MATH 022
MATH 023
MATH 024
MATH 025
MATH 026*
MATH 10
MATH 20
MATH 30
MATH 40
MATH50
MATH 60*
MATU 0110
MATU 0210*
MATQ 0001,
MATQ 0002,
MATQ 0003,
MATQ 0004,
MATQ 0005,
MATQ 0006*
MATH 030 (A)
BMTH 041 (bus/tec)
or BMTH 043 &
BMTH 044 (A) or
MATH 091 &
MATH 096
BMTH 047
BMTH 048
MATH 044 (dev) or
MATH 045 (A) or
MATH 042
MATH 070
MATH 080 (A) or
MATH 081(bus/tec)
or MATH 082 (dev)
MATH 090
MATU 0310 (A)
MATU 0410 (dev) or
MATU 0411(A)
MATQ 0011 (A)
MATQ 1094
MATU 0412
Math 020 &
Math 030*
MATH 040 (dev) &
MATH 041(A)
MATH 1150 (dev)
MATH 050 (dev) &
MATH 051 (A)
MATH 053
MATH 055
MATH 057
MATH 059
MATH 1152
MATH 060 & 061
MATH 063
MATH 065
MAT 017, MAT
018, MAT 019,
MAT 028, MAT
029*, MAT 025*
MATH 020*
MATH 020A
MATH 020B
MATH 020C
MATH 023
MATH 024
MATH 025
MAT 033 &
MAT 034 (A) or
MATH 036 (tec)
MAT 053 (A) or
MAT 054
(Bus/Tech) or
MAT 046 (dev)
MATH 040
(Algebraic)
MATH 044 (bus/tec)
MAT 060
MATH 0401 &
MATH 0402 (A) or
MATH 043 (Health)
MATH 0501 &
MATH 0502 or
MATH 053 (calc)
MATQ 0010 (A)
MATH 030
MATH 031
MATH 0301 &
MATH 0302 (A) or
MATH 031 (bus) or
MATH 050
MATH 1112
MATH 050
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
35
MATH 026*
Okanagan College
MATH 041,
MATH 042,
MATH 051,
MATH 052,
MATH 061,
MATH 062*
Selkirk College
MSK 01,
MSK 02,
MSK 03,
MSK 04,
MSK 05,
MSK 06*
MATH 0300*
Thompson Rivers
University
Thompson Rivers
University – Open
Learning Division
University of the
Fraser Valley
Vancouver Community
College
Native Education
College
Vancouver Island
University
MATH 032 (tec) or
MATH 033 (Health)
MATH 71 & 72 (A)
or
MATH 71 & 73
or
MATH 046 (bus/tec)
MATH 011 (A) or
MATH 84 &
MATH 85 (dev) or
ALGE 011 (dev)
MATH 084 &
MATH 086 (bus/tec)
MATH 10
MATH 49 (A)
MATH 50 (A), or
MATH 52(A) &
MATH 53(A) or
MATH 050(A) or
MATH 5 (Bus/Tech)
MATH 60 or
MATH 62 &
MATH 63 or
MATH 051
MATH 0400
MATH 0500 (dev) or
MATH 0510 (A)
MATH 0523 or
MATH 0510 (A)
MATH 0600 & 0610
MATH 0401
MATH 012
or
MATH 120
MATH 0633
MA 052
MA 053
MA 062
MA 063*
MATH 072 (A)
MATH 075 &
MATH 076
MATH 084 (dev) or
MATH 085 (A)
MATH 094 &
MATH 095 or
MATH 096 or
MATH 110
MATH 0311
MATH 0312
MATH 0313
MATH 0314
MATH 0315
MATH 0316*
MATH 021
MATH 031*
MATH 0750 &
MATH 0751 (A)
MATH 0750 &
0755 (trades)
MATH 0861 &
MATH 0871(A)
or
MATH 0862 & 0863
(bus)
MATH 0983 &
MATH 0993
MATH 0996 &
MATH 0997 (calc)
MATH 050 & 051
(A)
MATH 083 & 093
MATH 011
MATH 012
MATH 013
MATH 014
MATH 015
MATH 016*
MATH 030
MATH 061 & 071(A)
or
MATH 062 & 072
(bus)
or
MATH 061 & 071
(dev)
MATH 62--72
(bus/tech)
MATH 047 (A) or
MATH 040 (bus) or
MATH 044 (tec) or
MATH 041 (dev) or
MATH 045 & 046
(A)
MATH 050 (A)
Yukon College
MATH 030
MATH 067
or
MATH 151 & 152
MATH 060
MATH 070 (calc)
* = “exit” course for the Fundamental Level.
(A) = Algebra option; (bus) = business/consumer math; (tec) = technical math;
(dev) = developmental; (calc) = introduction to calculus
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
36
General & Applied Science Transfer Guide
INSTITUTION:
BC Institute of
Technology
Camosun College
Capilano University
College of New
Caledonia
College of the Rockies
Douglas College
Kwantlen Polytechnic
University
Langara College
Nicola Valley Institute of
Technology
North Island College
Northern Lights College
Northwest Community
College
Okanagan College
Selkirk College
Thompson Rivers
University
Thompson Rivers
University – Open
Learning
Tl'azt'en Nation
Vancouver Community
College
INTERMEDIATE
ABSCI INTER
BSCI 033 &
BCHM 036 &
BPHY 036
SC 030
SCIE 070
DVST 370
ABES 0010
PROVINCIAL
BESC 041
SCIE 082
DVST 470
BIOL 050
SCI 031
SCI 030
SCI 030
SCI 033
SC 70
SCIE 10
SINC 0400
SC 051
SC 051
Native Education
College
Vancouver Island
University
Yukon College
ADVANCED
SC 030
SCIE 040
SC 80 or
Science & Tech 011
SINC 0500
SC 061 &
SC 071
SC 061 &
SC 071
SC 040 or SC 044 or
SC 047
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
37
Biology Transfer Guide
INSTITUTION:
BC Institute of
Technology
Camosun College
Capilano University
College of New
Caledonia
College of the Rockies
Douglas College
Kwantlen Polytechnic
University
Langara College
Nicola Valley Institute of
Technology
North Island College
Northern Lights College
Northwest Community
College
Okanagan College
Selkirk College
Thompson Rivers
University
Thompson Rivers
University – Open
Learning
University of the Fraser
Valley
Vancouver Community
College
Native Education
College
Vancouver Island
University
Yukon College
ADVANCED
Provincial
Ecology
PROVINCIAL
Human Biology
BBIO 043 &
BBIO 044
BIO 045
BBIO 053 &
BBIO 054
BIO 050
BIO 080
DVST 472 &
DVST 473
ABEB 0011
BIO 090
BIOL 050
BIOL 060
BIO 051
BIO 040
BIOL 040
BIO 060
BIO 050
BIOL 050 or
BIOL 0501 &
BIOL 0502
BIO 012
BIOL 60 or
BIOL 62 &
BIOL 63 or
BIOL 051
BIOL 0600
BIO 011
BIOL 50 or
BIOL 52 &
BIOL 53 or
BIOL 050
BIOL 0500
ABEB 0012
BIOL 0620
BIOL 0501
BIOL 0601
BIO 083
BIO 093
BIO 0861
(Biology 11-Part 1)
BIO 0871
(Biology 11-Part 2)
BIO 0996
(Biology 12-Human
Ecology)
BIOL 061 &
BIOL071
BIO 047
BIO 0983
(Biology 12-Part 1)
BIO 0993
(Biology 12-Part 2)
BIO 1094
(Biology 12 for health
care)
BIOL 083 &
BIOL 093
BIO 067
BIOL 050
BIOL 060
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
38
Chemistry Transfer Guide
INSTITUTION:
BC Institute of Technology
Camosun College
Capilano University
College of New Caledonia
College of the Rockies
Douglas College
Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Langara College
Nicola Valley Institute of
Technology
North Island College
Northern Lights College
Northwest Community College
Okanagan College
Selkirk College
Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University Open Learning
University of the Fraser Valley
Vancouver Community College
Native Education College
Vancouver Island University
Yukon College
ADVANCED
CHEM 0001
CHEM 060
BCHM 043 &
BCHM 044
CHEM 045
CHEM 080
CHEM 110
BCHM 053 &
BCHM 054
CHEM 050
CHEM 090
CHEM 0094
CHEM 1105
CHEM 050
CHEM 060
CHE 051
CHEM 040
CHEM 040 or
CHEM 0401 & 0402
CHEM 011
CHEM 52 & CHEM 53 or
CHEM 50
CHEM 0500
CHEM 0501
CHE 060
CHE 050
CHE 050
CHEM 083
CHEM 0861
(Chemistry 11-Part 1)
CHEM 0871
(Chemistry 11-Part 2)
CHEM 061 & CHEM 071
CHEM 047
CHEM 50
PROVINCIAL
CHEM 012
CHEM 60 or
CHEM 62 & CHEM 63
CHEM 0600
CHEM 0983
(Chemistry 12-Part 1)
CHEM 0993
(Chemistry 12-Part 2)
CHEM 083 & CHEM 093
CHEM 067
CHEM 60
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
39
Physics Transfer Guide
INSTITUTION:
BC Institute of Technology
Camosun College
Capilano University
College of New Caledonia
College of the Rockies
Douglas College
Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Langara College
Nicola Valley Institute of
Technology
North Island College
Northern Lights College
Northwest Community College
Okanagan College
Selkirk College
Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University –
Open Learning
University of the Fraser Valley
Vancouver Community College
Native Education College
Vancouver Island University
Yukon College
ADVANCED
PHYS 060
BPHY 043 & BPHY 044
PHYS 045
PHYS 080
DVST 476
ABEP 0011
PROVINCIAL
BPHY 053 & BPHY 054
PHYS 050
PHYS 090
PHYS 1100
PHYS 050
PHY 050
PHYS 040
PHYS 040
PHYS 011
PHYS 50 or
PHYS 52 & PHYS 53
or PHYS 050
PHYS 0500
PHYS 0501
PHY 060
PHYS 050
PHYS 050
PHYS 012
PHYS 60 or
PHYS 62 & PHYS 63
or PHYS 060
PHYS 0600
PHYS 0601`
PHYS 083
PHYS 0861
(Physics 11–Part 1)
PHYS 0871
(Physics 11-Part 2)
PHYS 061 & PHYS 071
PHYS 047
PHYS 050
PHYS 093
PHYS 0983
(Physics 12-Part 1)
PHYS 0993
(Physics 12-Part 2)
PHYS 067
PHYS 060
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
40
Social Sciences Transfer Guide
INSTITUTION:
BC Institute of
Technology
Camosun College
INTERMEDIATE
Capilano University
BSOC 031
College of New
Caledonia
College of the Rockies
CNST 030
SOST 070
ADVANCED
BSOC 041
BESC 041
HIST 090,
GEOG 090,
Social Psychology 090
INST 050
INST 051 Nsyilxcen
INST 060
INST 061 Nsyilxcen
FNST 1200
GEO 060,
HIS 060,
FNS 065
GEOG 050,
HIST 050,
LAW 050
GEOG 050,
HIST 050,
FNST 050
EC 012,
HIST 012,
GEOG 012,
LAW 012
HIST 60 or
HIST 62 & HIST 63,
SOST 60 (P)
SOSC 0600 or
NAST 0600 or
BBUS 0610
FNST 030,
FNST 040
SOC 030
SOC 050
Northern Lights College
SOST 030
SOST 040
Northwest Community
College
SOSC 030
SS 040
Okanagan College
SS 70
SS 011
Selkirk College
SOST 10
SOST 050 or
SOST 52 & SOST 53
Thompson Rivers
University
SS 0400
SOST 0110,
PSYCH 0500
SOST 010
SOC SC 051
Native Education College
PSYC 080
FNHE 112
First Nations Health
and Education Issues
BGEO 042 or
BGEO 052,
BHST 042 or
BHST 052
SOST 080
Douglas College
Kwantlen Polytechnic
University
Langara College
Nicola Valley Institute of
Technology (includes
courses formerly
delivered by the Institute
of Indigenous
Government – All Nations
Institute)
North Island College
Thompson Rivers
University - Open
Learning
Vancouver Community
College
PROVINCIAL
ENG 098 & 099,
FNST I & II (061-071)
FNS 061 & 071
PSY 081 & 091
LAW 082 & 092
FNS 081 & FNS 091
CUL 081 & CUL 091
SGV 081 & SGV 091*
SOC 081 & SOC 091
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
41
PSY 081 & PSY 091
Vancouver Island
University
SOST 030
SOST 047
HIST 067,
GEOG 067
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
42
GENERIC TOPIC OUTLINES
COMPUTER STUDIES
Computer Studies: Fundamental Level
Goal Statement
Computers are increasingly becoming a pervasive part of daily life in personal, work and
educational situations. Computer skills are introduced at the fundamental level to help students
gain the confidence to perform basic computer operations.
Core Skills
Students will be able to demonstrate the following skills:
A. Basic Knowledge of Computers
 list the basic parts of a computer system (system unit, monitor, keyboard, mouse, USB
drive, hard disk drive and printer)
 demonstrate the ability to properly start and shut down a computer system
 demonstrate the ability to start and close a program
 describe some common uses of computers in society
 use a mouse/pointing device
 demonstrate the ability to operate a printer (power on, put on line/off line and load paper)
B. Word Processing
 create a new word processing document
 edit a document
 save a document to a storage drive
 print a document
 retrieve a document
 use tools such as a spell checker or thesaurus
C. Electronic Communication
 internet
o Favorites/bookmark bar
o Online forms
o Searches
 send and receive email including attachments
D. Options
1. Ergonomics
 Identify workspace ergonomics conditions
2. Identify software maintenance issues
 software updates and patches
 deleting browser cache and history files
 defragmenting hard drives
 backing up important files
3. Keyboarding
 use correct touch typing techniques and procedures for letters but not for top row
numbers/symbols
 achieve an adjusted typing speed of 10 wpm
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
43
4. Internet
 Examine the Internet from a security perspective
 Identify the potential consequences of disclosing personal information on-line
 Evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, and bias on electronic information
sources such as You Tube.
 Filling in on-line forms
5. Social Networking
 Identify and discuss the benefits and dangers of social networking (chat rooms, instant
messaging, Twitter, Facebook.)
 Increase knowledge and real-world technical skills by using social networking
technology
6. E-commerce
 Explain advantages and disadvantages of selling and buying on the Internet
 List steps involved in making an on-line purchase (print and save proof of
transactions; archive and print emails)
 Create a checklist of questions to ask before making an on-line purchase (e.g.,
reliability of supplier, shipping and handling, delivery times, warranty information,
return policy, Canada customs, privacy policies, business practices record)
 List security indicators for on-line credit cards, PayPal, and other online payment
forms
 Investigate online banking options
 Navigate websites to plan a trip: book a flight, hotel and/or a car rental.
7. On-line services
 Use library websites to search for, request, and renew books and other resources
8. File Management
 Create and name folders and files to organize images
 Describe the differences between file types and sizes
 Perform file backups
9. Digital Photography
 Transfer and organize pictures from a digital camera to the computer
 Manipulate and improve basic digital images
 Build and manage photos on a photo sharing site
 Send images via Email
10. Communication
 Describe online synchronous communication (such as Skype or Google+ Hangouts)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
44
Computer Studies: Intermediate Level - Computer Skills
Goal Statement
Computers are increasingly becoming a part of daily life in personal, work and educational
environments. The goal of an Intermediate Level computer course is to introduce adult learners to
the use of the computer as a tool so that they will become more self-confident and therefore able
to function more efficiently with a computer.
Core Skills
Students will be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes:
A. Keyboarding
 use correct touch typing techniques and procedures
 achieve an adjusted typing speed of 20 wpm
B. Introduction to Computers
 list the basic parts of a computer system (system unit, monitor, keyboard, mouse, USB
drive, hard disk drive and printer)
 demonstrate the ability to properly start and shut down a computer system
 demonstrate the ability to launch and terminate an application program
 develop an appreciation of the evolution of computer technology and the range of
applications in society
 describe commonly used computer terminology and acronyms
 describe the difference between hardware and software
 demonstrate the use of the features of a mouse including left click, right click and scroll
 demonstrate the ability to operate a printer (power on, put on line/off line and load paper)
C. Operating System
 describe the basic operations of an Operating System (launching applications programs
and managing system resources)
 demonstrate the ability to correctly name and locate files and folders
 demonstrate the ability to perform basic file operations using the operating system (copy,
move, erase and rename)
D. Word Processing
 create a new word processing document
 edit a document, including cutting and pasting text
 print a document
 save a document to a specified location
 retrieve a document from a specified location
 use tools such as a spell checker or thesaurus
 format a page using basic page layout properties (margins, justification, boldfacing and
line spacing)
 demonstrate the ability to use help features and tutorials
 create headers, footers and page numbering
 manipulate margins
 create tables, columns, page and section breaks
E. Electronic Communications
 browse and search the Internet
 send and receive email with file attachments
F. Options
 importing information from other sources such as graphs, graphics, spreadsheets,
databases and the Internet
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
45





perform basic spreadsheet and database operations
prepare and deliver a presentation using a computer
demonstrate the ability to participate in an online course
identify workspace ergonomics conditions
Identify software maintenance issues (software updates and patches, deleting browser
cache and history files, defragmenting hard drives, backing up important files, etc.)
Computer Studies: Advanced Level
Goal Statement
The goals of Computer Studies at the Advanced Level are:
 to provide students with a survey of the major applications of computers
 to develop an understanding of computers and concepts to aid the students’ employment
opportunities, personal productivity, and enjoyment;
 to enable the student to acquire skills to contribute to, and participate productively in
society.
Learning Outcomes
1. Hardware
A. Computer System Overview
It is expected that learners will be able to:

identify, name and describe basic components of a computer system:
 system unit
 memory and secondary storage devices
 input and output devices
B. System Unit Components
It is expected that learners will be able to:

identify, name and describe basic components of a computer system unit:
 motherboard
 expansion slots and buses
 Central Processing Unit (CPU)
 memory (RAM)
 peripheral connections (parallel, serial, SCSI, USB, firewire)
C. Memory and Secondary Storage
It is expected that learners will be able to:

identify, name and describe Secondary Storage Devices, including:
hard disks (fixed and removable)
USB devices (e.g. flash drives and USB hard drives)
Memory cards (e.g. SD, SC)
Online storage
Optical and magneto-optical storage devices (e.g. CD-ROM, DVD)


recognize and use capacity descriptors (KB, MB, GB, TB)
distinguish between and describe the function of RAM, ROM and BIOS.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
46
D. Input and Output
It is expected that learners will be able to:

identify, name, describe, and distinguish among input and output devices (and associated
software):
 keyboard, pointing devices, scanners
 video adapters and displays (CRT, LCD)
 printers (various types)
 voice
 describe how various input and output devices can be used to assist people with
disabilities
 digital camera
2. Operating a Computer
It is expected that learners will be able to:







distinguish between System Software, Utility Software and Application Software and
describe the purpose of an operating system
differentiate among various commonly used operating systems
employ operating system(s) to perform basic operations of disk and file management.
 Assign meaningful file and folder names
 employ wildcard characters in file management
 organize files on storage devices and designate drives, folders and files
 perform management functions to locate, list, display properties of, copy,
rename, move, (un)delete folders and files
 describe disc formatting (sectors, tracks, index) and defragment a disc
 recognize a variety of common program and data file types and their associated
extension
describe the problem of computer viruses and spyware, and methods to detect and
remove them
demonstrate care, maintenance, and protection of computer equipment
demonstrate the ability to back up data to a CD or other media
option: identify workspace ergonomics conditions
3. Computers in Society
It is expected that learners will be able to:





identify the effect of computers on their everyday lives (e.g. databases-subscription lists,
ATMs, the Internet, computer record systems, income tax)
give examples of how computers are affecting career opportunities
trace the history of computer technology and identify current trends
state the purchasing considerations from the perspective of an informed consumer (e.g.
warranty, service, licensing, needs assessment, market trends)
provide examples of ethical issues involving computers in society, such as protection of
privacy, social networking sites, identity theft, phishing sites, spam and copyright
4. Word Processing
It is expected that learners will be able to perform basic operations of word processing:



create a word processing document and save it to a specified location and directory
select any amount of text and format the character attributes
format the indentation, the alignment, and the spacing of lines and paragraphs
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
47
















identify non-printing characters (space, tab, new line, new paragraph) as displayed on the
screen
move, copy, and delete text
insert a page break and section break into a document
insert, format and manipulate a table
use bulleted and numbered lists
use footnotes/endnotes
apply lines, shading and colour to a document
use the find and the replace functions
use the spell checker/thesaurus
insert a graphic into a document
set page margins
use headers and footers (including page numbering, filename, and date codes) with
multiple sections
preview and print a document
recognize different document output devices (printers and faxes)
recognize that different file formats originating from different word processors and
versions may be incompatible, requiring file conversion routines
save as a web document
5. Spreadsheets
It is expected that learners will be able to:









perform basic spreadsheet operations:
enter and format data (numbers, text, data series)
create simple formulas (using basic operators and functions)
copy or move data and/or formulas, utilizing absolute and relative cell addresses and
ranges
change cell characteristics (column widths, alignments, fonts, etc.)
control page layout such as orientation, scaling, grid lines
use a spreadsheet to predict outcomes based on specific parameters (e.g. mortgages,
investments, financial forecasting and planning)
create several kinds of charts based on spreadsheet data
save as a web document
6. Internet
It is expected that learners will be able to:










describe the basic structure and functioning of the Internet and define current terminology
such as URL, ISP, WWW
describe the implementation of online commerce, including ATM cards, online banking,
online shopping and online auctions
describe the various options for computer connectivity (e.g. cable modems, ISDN, XDSL,
routers, wireless, 3G, 4G(LTE)
send and receive Email (including attachments) using proper etiquette
use a web browser to access and navigate through a web site
use search engines to locate and bookmark information
save text and graphical information from a web site
describe how business is conducted on the Internet, including security issues
recognize security problems associated with Internet use (e.g. spyware, viruses, spam,
firewall)
understanding how the internet was developed and how it functions
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
48
Options
1. Databases
It is expected that learners will be able to:



describe the structure of a database: tables, records, fields, primary keys and foreign
keys
perform simple database procedures:
 design a form
 enter, edit and format data
 examine, manipulate records in different views; delete and insert records; sort
records in different ways
 design database tables and fields
 design, create, and print a report consisting of selected fields
search and query a database for information based on specified parameters
2. Computer Programming
It is expected that learners will be able to:




create simple programs in a given programming language such as BASIC or Visual Basic
describe the purpose of compilers and/or interpreters
create and make use of computer designs or algorithms
write basic input, processing and output instructions
3. Keyboarding
It is expected that learners will be able to:


significantly increase their typing speed
demonstrate proper keyboarding techniques
4. Presentation Software
It is expected that the learners will be able to:
 Create, manipulate and deliver a presentation
5. Graphics Applications
It is expected that learners will be able to:


create and manipulate a graphic image (e.g. Paintbrush, Draw)
differentiate between various bit-mapped and vector- based graphic file formats (e.g.
BMP, JPG and WMG)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
49
Computer Studies: Provincial Level - Computer Applications
Goal Statement
The goals for the Provincial Level Computing Studies are:


to develop problem solving/critical thinking skills utilizing computer application software
as a tool. Towards this end, project work will be emphasized.
to build on computer software skills and outcomes as described by the learning outcomes
of the advanced level computing studies.
Learning Outcomes
Because of the wide and ever expanding nature of computing applications, it is both impossible
and undesirable to include all outcomes in a single course. A computing studies course at the
provincial level will consist of a minimum of two from the following categories:
1. Current Technologies
It is expected that the learner will be able to:










Search all facets of the web efficiently (text, images, videos) for material relevant to a
specific inquiry.
Analyze websites critically for value, accuracy, potential malware, and bias.
Critically evaluate "crowd sourcing" sites as research tools, e.g. opinions on consumer
products, travel, health issues, political issues...
Identify privacy & security issues related to social networking and an online presence.
Effectively communicate with email utilizing: address books, distribution lists, cc: and bcc:
fields, attachments, effective subject lines, spam control
Identify email examples of phishing and other online fraudulent activity.
Use folder (directory) management techniques for computer files, email, etc.
Compare and contrast a variety of techniques, hardware and software that can be used
to back-up computer data.
Describe the importance of operating system and driver patches, and the processes by
which these patches are downloaded and installed.
Describe anti-virus and anti-malware software, virus & malware risks, scheduled scans
and automatic updates.
2. Publishing
It is expected that the learner will be able to:









organize and present a variety of text, graphic and other data following appropriate
design and layout procedures
demonstrate the use of templates, “wizards” and other productivity tools
merge documents and integrate tables, charts and graphics
know the various file formats used for text, graphics and publication files
demonstrate the ability to change file formats where possible
create, modify and manipulate digital graphic images (e.g. scan, draw, paint)
retrieve a graphic/animation/sound file through using either CD-ROM or the Internet
apply, where appropriate, correct typographic principles involving font selection, point
size, justification, kerning, bullets, headers and footers
generate cross references, footnotes, indexes and tables of contents where appropriate
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
50
3. Advanced Spreadsheets
It is expected that the learner will be able to:







enter, format and edit data
use and write formulas
create and modify charts
create reports
manage and analyze data
create macros or use a programming language to customize a spreadsheet
design a spreadsheet to analyze, interpret and project outcomes in an applied situation
4. Database Management
It is expected that the learner will be able to:






design and create flat file and relational databases
maintain and modify the structure of existing databases
correctly formulate queries
create and edit forms
create and edit reports
be aware of various social and ethical issues involving databases
5. Networking
The learner will be able to:








state advantages and disadvantages of using networks
describe different network configurations (printer network, LAN, WAN, etc.)
describe and diagram different network topologies (point-to-point, star, bus, etc.)
describe the advantages and disadvantages of different network data transmission media
(twisted pair, coaxial cable, optical fibre, and wireless)
list and describe common network operating systems and network protocols
describe various server models, including file servers and client/server systems
list Internet/intranet similarities and differences
describe management issues, including traffic analysis and security
6. Programming*
*A Note of Caution: The Programming option must not be considered as equivalent to or as a
replacement for the Computer Science course articulated at the provincial level.
This option introduces the learner to programming fundamentals. The learner will write programs
in a high level language that demonstrate output only and input-process- output operations. While
the emphasis of the Computer Science course is software engineering, this option focuses
primarily on the elements of programming.
It is expected that the learner will be able to:







test, debug and modify program code
define data types and assign meaningful identifiers to constants and variables
use input statements to access the keyboard and use output statements to display text
and graphics
use conditional expressions to alter program flow
use iteration structures to create loops
write simple procedures
write programs to demonstrate mathematical processing and simple character and
graphic manipulations
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
51
7. Graphics
It is expected that the learner will be able to:













acquire images using a scanner
operate a digital camera and/or camcorder
describe important specifications of a digital camera, including megapixels, optical zoom
and digital zoom
transfer digital pictures to a computer
demonstrate understanding of the resolution of a digital image
demonstrate understanding of aspect ratio
identify various graphic file formats and perform conversions from one type to another
crop a digital picture
resize a digital image
rotate a digital image
convert a colour to a grey scale image
adjust brightness and contrast of a digital photograph
apply a variety of filter effects to a digital photograph
8. Online Technologies
It is expected that the learner will be able to:










Develop an online electronic portfolio which contains projects that demonstrate the
learner’s proficiency with computer software.
Describe the concept of cloud computing, and utilize cloud-based applications such as:
word processing, spreadsheets, online collaboration, photo-editing, online storage.
Utilize electronic means for time and calendar management, task (to do) lists, user ID
management, notes and bookmark (favourite) synchronization.
Create and publish a blog, which includes text, pictures, and hyperlinks.
Add and update an entry on a wiki.
Create and publish an online video (podcast).
Describe software that can be used to remotely access another computer.
Describe the process for setting up a home wireless network, configuring encryption, and
having computers connect to the network. Connect to wireless networks in other
locations.
Describe the benefits of Bluetooth technology, examples of Bluetooth devices, and
Bluetooth setup procedures.
Compare and contrast various mobile computing technologies
9. Web Publishing
It is expected that the learner will be able to:











create web pages to present text, graphics and other data using appropriate design
and layout
appropriately use fonts, font sizes, headings, justification and tables in a web page
use both a WYSIWYG editor and an HTML editor in the creation of web pages (as
appropriate)
recognize the various file formats used for text, graphics, sound and animation
create, modify and manipulate graphic images (e.g. re-size, compress, crop, change
format)
locate and retrieve files (graphics, animations, sounds) from the Internet
demonstrate an understanding of the implications of copyright & copyleft (e.g. GNU
GPL, Creative Commons, etc.) with respect to the re-use of resources on the Internet
create hyperlinks on text
create hyperlinks on graphics
create internal (relative) and external (absolute) hyperlinks in a web page
create a navigation scheme to move between web pages on a web site
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
52


utilize accessibility features (e.g. alt text)
employ meta tags (e.g. description, keywords, title)
Optional:




use JavaScript in web pages
employ Cascading Style Sheets (CSS)
use templates, “wizards” and other productivity tools in the creation of web pages
create an image map
10. Digital Art and Graphics
It is expected that the learner will be able to:











create basic digital shapes
describe the difference between bitmap and vector images
select, move and align objects
transform objects, including rotation, scaling and reflecting
create and format graphic text
position text on a path
create colours and gradients
apply colours and gradients to text and other digital objects
draw straight and curved lines
trace a scanned object or digital photograph
create and manipulate layers
Computer Science: Provincial Level
Goal Statement
The goals for the provincial level Computer Science course are:


to develop problem solving skills whereby the student is able to analyze a problem,
devise an algorithm or process to solve the problem, use this process to write a computer
implementation of the solution and to test the solution;
to adequately prepare students for a career or program of studies where logical thought
and structured design processes are required.
Generic Topic Outline
Core Topics
A. Software Engineering (Problem Analysis and Design of Solution)
Given a problem suitable for a computer programming solution, the student shall:







analyze the problem so that it is clearly understood;
identify the inputs, outputs and appropriate data structures;
break down the solution of the problem into component modules;
design the structure of each module, documenting it in structured English, using a
method such as pseudo-code or top-down charts. It shall describe in detail all inputs,
processes or algorithms used and format of outputs;
design an appropriate user interface;
produce computer source code as a software design implementation. A structured highlevel language will be used. Differences between source code and machine code will be
understood;
test, debug and modify program code until error free;
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
53

document the solution, both internally and externally.
B. Elements of a programming language
The student shall demonstrate knowledge of the following program elements through use of a
high level programming language. Please note that any high level Programming Language (e.g.
Java, Visual Basic, C++, Pascal or QBASIC) may be used.









data types (including Integer, Real, Boolean, Character and String) and their
representation as bits and bytes;
meaningful identifier names for constants, variables, procedures (or subroutines) and
programs;
the process of breaking down a computer program into a series of subprograms directly
corresponding to the modules identified in the software design. The subprograms shall be
written as procedures, functions, subroutines and the like;
the advantages and disadvantages of, and differences between global variables, local
variables and parameters. The scope of variables and the occurrence of side effects shall
be explained;
input and output statements shall access the keyboard, printer, disk and disk files while
output devices are the monitor, printer and disk files;
arithmetic expressions using the addition (+), subtraction ( - ), multiplication ( * ), and
division ( /, DIV and MOD ) operators as applied to real and/or integer operands. Includes
order of operation (including use of parentheses) string and character manipulation and
processing. Use of substrings, concatenation and other language-specific program
features; built-in and programmer-defined functions and constants. Existence of the builtin PI constant;
conditional expressions used to alter program flow. (e.g. If...Then...Else or case
structures). Included in this is use of the relational operators (=, < >, >, <, >=, and <= ) the
logical operators (AND, OR, NOT) and Boolean variables (True/False) and nested
conditional statements (e.g. If...Then...Else...If...Then)
iteration structures (e.g. For...Do, While...Do and Repeat...Until). Definite (e.g. For...Do)
vs. Indefinite (e.g. While...Do and Repeat...Until) loops. Nested loops. Avoidance of
infinite loops;
one-dimensional arrays.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
54
EDUCATION & CAREER PLANNING
CAREER PLANNING (CP)
Goal Statement
The goal of Career Planning is to enhance the life and employment readiness skills of adult
learners. Students will be prepared to pursue occupational and educational goals in a changing
and diverse world.
Generic Topic Outline
Education and Career Planning involves the development of a broad range of foundation skills.
These skills are appropriate for Fundamental, Intermediate, Advanced and Provincial levels. Of
the nine skill areas listed, 1 and 2 are considered mandatory, as well as five of the remaining
seven. All outcomes listed in the two mandatory skills areas must be met. While suggestions for
specific topics are provided for each major skill area, it is recognized that the exact content of
courses may vary.
Mandatory Skills
1. Communication Skills
Students will:
 identify and practice active listening skills in a variety of situations
 demonstrate a knowledge of the range of effective speaking strategies
 extract, assess and exchange information using visual and electronic media
 recognize diverse cultural styles of communication
 identify and interpret non-verbal communication
 develop and apply effective writing processes in a variety of contexts
 develop self-awareness of personal qualities, values, interests and abilities
 apply critical thinking skills
2. Education and Career Exploration Skills
Students will:
 analyze current labour market and future trends
 investigate and develop a personal network
 undertake occupational and educational research
 identify available funding supports
 apply personal values, aptitudes and interests to optional career paths
 recognize entrepreneurial options
 investigate and utilize work-related community resources
 familiarize themselves with student support services
 demonstrate the ability to set short and long term educational and career goals
Optional Skills (complete 5 of 7)
3. Study Skills
Students will:
 recognize how personal learning style affects perception and processing information
 develop strategies to effectively work in all learning styles
 identify and practice active reading skills necessary to gather information
 develop and apply effective note-taking strategies
 identify strategies for effective time management
 identify and use a variety of memory techniques and strategies
 perform tasks in word processing
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
55



describe student responsibilities in a college environment
increase their understanding of the value of life long learning
develop and apply effective test taking strategies
4. Personal Awareness Skills
Students will:
 recognize that self-esteem is a life long process
 recognize personal feelings and their influence
 employ strategies to deal with anger
 assess and manage stress
 analyze and utilize time management strategies
 explore and connect personal assumptions with behaviour
 clarify personal values and their impact on choices
 create awareness of the spiritual, physical, intellectual and emotional dimensions of self
5. Interpersonal Skills
Students will:
 examine group process and practice the skills necessary for successful group
experiences
 review problem solving models and develop group decision making strategies
 research and use the various methods of conflict resolution and demonstrate their use
 clarify the definition of assertiveness and implement successful techniques
 analyze the reasons for bias and develop the ability to recognize it in everyday situations
 identify issues around all forms of prejudice and practice non-discrimatory interpersonal
skills
 investigate the various types of relationships and interaction they have with others
 identify methods of developing positive relationships, including effective communication
techniques
 examine the diversity of relationships and cultures in Canadian society
6. Living Skills
Students will:
 design and implement a personal budget
 formulate financial planning for the future
 investigate nutrition and impact on personal health
 assess personal wellness
 investigate and utilize community resources
 strengthen personal support system and advocacy options
 examine the impact of lifestyles choices
 explore techniques for being an effective consumer
7. Job Search
Students will:
 identify and plan the major steps of the job search process
 develop effective interview strategies
 develop and maintain job search networks
 create effective resume and cover letter
8. Work/Training Experience
Students will:
 gain exposure to a work or training situation
 demonstrate appropriate work habits
 gather information about vocational choices
 demonstrate interpersonal skills with co workers and supervisors
 identify work adjustment needs and strategies for success
 explore and/or participate in required industry training certificates
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
56
9. Career Management
Students will:
 examine labour/union negotiation and human rights
 review Labour Standards Act
 investigate entrepreneurial options
 develop strategies preparing for career transition
 identify rights and responsibilities for employees and employers
 develop strategies and attitudes to maintain employment
 identify workplace ethics
STUDENT SUCCESS (SS)
Goal Statement
The goal of Student Success is to develop the learning skills, study strategies and self awareness
necessary for students to experience success as life- long learners.
Generic Topic Outline
Student Success involves the development of a broad range of core skills. These skills are
appropriate for Intermediate, Advanced and Provincial levels. Of the 14 skill areas listed, 1 – 10
are considered CORE and required outcomes. The additional 4 learning skill areas are optional. It
is recognized that the exact content of courses may vary.
Required Learning Outcomes:
1. Adult Learner Awareness
Students will:
 Explore the challenges and advantages of adult learning
 Appreciate the value of life-long learning
 Describe student responsibilities in a college/university environment
 Create awareness of the spiritual, physical, intellectual and emotional dimensions of
self and how each of these are impacted by returning to school
 Create awareness of impact on family, friends and coworkers by returning to school
 Identify personal supporters and recognize significance of their encouragement in
pursuing goals
 Investigate personal wellness (nutrition, fitness, stress, and habits) and recognize its
impact on learning
2. Learning Challenges
Students will:
 Identify barriers to education (addictions, poverty, abuse, physical limitations, etc.)
 Recognize different learning disabilities and their impact on learners
 Identify personal learning challenges
 Express the importance of drawing on learners’ strengths
 Examine different applicable strategies
3. Learning Styles
Students will:
 Recognize the properties of visual, auditory and kinesthetic learners
 Identify own learning styles
 Identify student strategies for each style
 Recognize how personal learning style affects perception and processing information
4. Communication Skills
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
57
Students will:
 Demonstrate active listening
 Ask effective questions to facilitate understanding
 Analyze the reasons for bias and develop the ability to recognize it in everyday
situations
 Identify issues around all forms of prejudice and practice non-discriminatory
interpersonal skills
 Examine the diversity of relationships and cultures in Canadian society and
recognize diverse cultural styles of communication
 Identify and interpret non-verbal communication
 Review writing process
5. Study Skills
Students will:
 Develop critical reading skills (e.g. SQ3R, KWL)
 Navigate textbooks by recognizing and emphasizing key concepts, highlighted
sections, chapter summaries, glossaries and indexes
 Utilize a variety of different memory techniques and strategies and apply them to
meaningful content (e.g. flashcards, mnemonics, self- testing)
 Create a learning environment conducive to effective study.
 Practice the skills necessary for successful group study experiences.
 Apply effective note taking strategies from listening (e.g.: classroom lecture &
workshops, media sources)
 Apply effective note taking strategies from print (e.g.: textbooks, articles)
 Implement solid study habits (e.g.; reviewing, recording, rewriting, summarizing,
study partners use of glossary & index, etc.)
6. Test Taking
Students will:
 Identify sources and effects of test anxiety
 Use effective strategies to manage test anxiety
 Actively use study techniques to prepare for tests throughout the term (ongoing
cumulative review)
 Use effective study techniques prior to a test
 Use effective strategies during a test (e.g.: Pre-reading test questions, jotting down
key things from memory at beginning of test, using weight of question to determine
depth of answer required, use of required formulas, using time effectively during a
timed test, tips on answering questions)
7. Time Management
Students will:
 Identify and apply strategies for effective time management
 Identify different scheduling tools and evaluate which ones will work for learners’
personal needs
 Demonstrate the ability to set long and short term goals
 Create personal schedules including study times, assignments, tests and personal
obligations
8. Research
Students will:
 Find information and research topics using various sources
 Compile, evaluate and review information
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
58


Identify plagiarism
Reference their sources appropriately understanding the different referencing styles
(MLA, APA)
9. Support and Resources
Students will:
 Familiarize themselves with student support services including financial aid officers,
education advisors, learning disability coordinators, learning specialists, employment
services etc.
 Familiarize themselves with course supports available within the institution including
writing labs, tutorials, instructor office hours etc.
 Identify and access personal support systems
10. Technology Skills
Students will:
 Perform tasks in word processing
 Use spelling and grammar checks
 Research information on the Internet
 Access and utilize library services
 Use electronic communication (emails, social networks, college email, student
portals)
 Create and use folders for organizing course work (e.g. storage on student drives,
USB memory and cloud services)
 Bookmark useful references
Optional Learning Outcomes:
1. Online Learning
Students will:
 Compare the pros and cons of online learning
 Evaluate if online learning is a good personal option.
 Identify important strategies for online success
 Explore at least one online learning platform (e.g.: Moodle, Blackboard)
2. Presentation Skills
Students will:
 Recognize and practice using factors that affect physical presence (eye contact, face
audience, body language)
 Practice speaking skills including projection, speed, tone, clarity and enthusiasm
 Use humor and practical examples to engage audience
 Use a variety of visual back up in their presentations (e.g.: handouts, props, posters,
Power Point presentation)
 Promote discussion & questions from the audience
3. Financial Aid & Funding Options
Students will:
 Develop a personal budget for the duration of school program
 Identify available funding supports including student loans, bursaries, grants,
scholarships, aboriginal funding etc.
 Analyze criteria for eligibility and recognize personal accomplishments (eg: identify all
community service & volunteer work, awards, affiliations etc.)
 Create a personal list of suitable funding sources
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
59
4. BC Transfer Process
Students will:
 Understand the BC transfer process.
Students will:
 examine labour/union negotiation and human rights
 review Labour Standards Act
 investigate entrepreneurial options
 develop strategies preparing for career transition
 identify rights and responsibilities for employees and employers
 develop strategies and attitudes to maintain employment
 identify workplace ethics
Directions to Submitters of Courses
A generic form should be used and received by the chair of the working committee one month
before the meeting. The form needs to list 1 and 2 as mandatory skills as well as five of the
remaining seven for EDCP. Proposal submissions will identify how these mandatory core skills
are met.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
60
ENGLISH
Goal Statement
Mastering English at the ABE Intermediate, Advanced and Provincial levels is an ongoing
process that involves development of a variety of core skills in:




critical and creative thinking
speaking and listening
reading, research and reference, and
written communication.
As students progress through each level of study, they will apply these skills to more challenging
materials and tasks. Although these skills are listed as learning outcomes under discrete
headings, they are usually integrated into a course, reflecting a holistic approach to language skill
acquisition.
Reading, in particular, is a dynamic and interactive process. The reader integrates personal
knowledge and experience with information from text to construct meaning. Reading skills are
developed in conjunction with critical thinking, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Students
should read to understand periodicals, reports, technical materials, and/or literature.
A number of related skills in the areas of cooperative communication, media literacy, and
computer literacy are also part of effective personal, academic and workplace communication.
Learning outcomes under these skill areas are not required outcomes, but they are highly
recommended for inclusion whenever possible in ABE English courses.
English—Intermediate Level
Required Learning Outcomes
1. Critical and Creative Thinking
 recall and interpret information
 identify subject/topic, main ideas, supporting ideas, and sequence
 summarize
 make inferences
 compare and contrast
 classify
 define
 draw conclusions
 analyze information and solve problems (create solutions, identify impact of
solutions, modify solutions)
 identify and discuss examples of fact and of opinion
 support a position
2. Speaking and Listening
 ask questions to clarify meaning
 demonstrate effective listening and paraphrasing skills
 use voice and body language effectively
 respond effectively to listener feedback
 deliver an effective oral presentation to inform or persuade
 provide useful input and feedback in a variety of situations (peer editing,
group discussion, classroom participation)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
61
3. Reading, Research, Reference
 use context clues and word structure analysis (prefix, suffix, root) to determine
meaning
 recognize homonyms, antonyms and synonyms
 use a dictionary and a thesaurus to expand vocabulary
 read to locate specific information
 use a variety of reference materials
 use in-book reference tools (index, table of contents, glossary)
 use skimming and scanning techniques
 develop skills in outlining, memorizing, exam taking and note-taking
 recognize point of view, illogical argument, fallacies, stereotypes, bias and propaganda
4. Written Communication
 understand and use the steps of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising,
and editing
 gather ideas; define and narrow a topic; evaluate, select and organize source materials
 adjust content and style of writing to suit purpose, audience and situation.
 revise and edit work to improve content, organization, word choice, phrasing, sentence
and paragraph structure, spelling, punctuation, and mechanics.
 write effective paragraphs in a range of rhetorical modes (may include narrative,
descriptive, process, compare/contrast, cause/effect, classification, expository, and
persuasive)
 write a summary
 write an essay
 understand and avoid plagiarism
Recommended Learning Outcomes
5. Co-operative Communication
 establish co-operative working relationships with others
 recognize and respect diversity and individual differences
 establish goals and priorities
 respond appropriately to thoughts, opinions, non-verbal cues, and work of others
 challenge assumptions constructively
6. Media Literacy
 identify and track a theme, topic, or specified content from a variety of media
 interpret common graphics (graphs, charts, tables)
 review a book, movie, play, television program, documentary, piece of music, or other
non-print material
7. Computer Literacy
 use computer programs to create, edit, and publish
 use electronic communication
 format assignments appropriately
8. Creative Writing
 write a creative piece (poetry, blog, journal, story)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
62
English—Advanced Level
Students who have completed the Advanced Level will have the skills necessary to enter
Provincial Level courses and some vocational, career, and technological programs.
Required Learning Outcomes
1. Critical and Creative Thinking
 recall and interpret information (identify subject/topic, main ideas, supporting ideas,
and sequence)
 summarize information
 make inferences
o using prior knowledge
o identifying purpose and audience
o evaluating information for accuracy, relevance, and importance
o recognizing underlying assumptions (bias and tone)
o synthesizing information
 compare and contrast
 classify
 define
 draw conclusions
 respond to information (create solutions, identify impact of solutions, modify solutions)
 identify and discuss examples of fact and opinion
2. Speaking and Listening
 ask questions to clarify meaning
 demonstrate effective listening skills and respond appropriately to listener feedback
 effectively use voice and body language
 provide useful input and feedback in a variety of situations (peer editing,
group discussion, classroom participation)
 respond appropriately to thoughts, opinions, and work of others
 paraphrase ideas
 deliver an effective oral presentation to inform or persuade
3. Reading, Research, Reference
 use context clues and word structure analysis (prefix, suffix, root) to determine
meaning
 use a dictionary and a thesaurus to expand vocabulary and to learn
homonyms, antonyms and synonyms
 use in-book reference tools (index, table of contents, glossary)
 use skimming and scanning techniques
 read to locate specific information
 recognize point of view, illogical argument, fallacies, stereotypes, bias and propaganda
 use variety of reference materials
 develop note-taking skills
 develop research skills (internet and library catalog searches)
 critically evaluate, make inferences, and draw conclusions
4. Written Communication
 use the steps of the writing process (prewrite, outline, draft, revise, edit)
 write paragraphs and essays in a variety of rhetorical modes including exposition and
persuasion
 write a summary
 adjust content and style of writing to suit purpose, audience, and situation
 revise and edit work to improve content, organization, word choice, phrasing,
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
63










grammar, sentence and paragraph structure, spelling, and punctuation
recognize and edit for clichés, jargon, slang, and wordiness
use complex and compound sentence structures
use parallel constructions and correct misplaced or dangling modifiers
develop advanced spelling strategies
write a review of a book, movie, play, television program, documentary, piece of music, or
other non-print material
write paragraphs and essays on demand
identify, discuss, and evaluate literary elements (plot, theme, character, setting, conflict)
analyze and respond to editorial comment, magazine articles, technical or
investigative writing, or advertising
gather, evaluate, and organize information into a research assignment
using appropriate documentation (MLA or APA)
understand and avoid plagiarism
Recommended Learning Outcomes
5. Co-operative Communication
 establish co-operative working relationships with others
 recognize and respect diversity and individual differences
 recognize non-verbal cues
 problem-solve
 challenge assumptions constructively
6. Media Literacy
 identify and track a theme, topic, or specified content from a variety of media
 interpret common graphics (graphs, charts, tables)
 critique a variety of media messages
7. Computer Literacy
 use computer programs to create, edit, and publish
 format assignments appropriately
 use electronic communication
8. Creative Writing
 write a creative piece (poetry, blog, journal, story)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
64
English—Provincial Level
The following framework describes learning outcomes for three different English courses at the
Provincial level:



Literature-based English (L)
Technical and Professional English (T)
Essential English (E)
Any of the three courses will fulfill the Provincial Level English requirement; the choice depends
upon the focus of the course and the needs of the student.
The Literature-based English course (L), models the traditional academic English course,
develops skills in the context of reading and writing about literature, including Canadian literature,
from a variety of genres, and prepares students for post-secondary academic English courses.
The Technical and Professional English course (T) develops skills required in the context of
reading and writing technical, professional and academic documents generated in the modern
workplace, and it prepares students for entry into postsecondary courses in many academic,
career, and technical programs.
The Essential English course (E) develops skills that will enable students to perform the tasks
required by their occupation or other aspects of daily life and to graduate with the Adult
Graduation Diploma, but is not recommended for entry into post-secondary education.
Sub-headings in the Learning Outcomes that follow serve to identify:
those outcomes that are shared by more than one course. (e.g. Literature and Technical)
those outcomes that are unique to one course (e.g. Essential).
Required Learning Outcomes
1. Critical and Creative Thinking
Literature and Technical
 recognize tone, including irony and understatement in poetry, short stories, drama or
writing for technical and professional purposes.
 evaluate argument for validity, reliability, currency and objectivity
 recognize structural elements associated with particular standard formats for literary or
technical and professional communications
 demonstrate an awareness and understanding of the power of language in literary or in
technical and professional communications; the importance of word choice and
organization in furthering the problem solving process (initiating, developing and
organizing thought); and the influence of communication formats on language choices
and usage
Literature

analyze literary elements in various genres
Essential
 recognize elements of clear communication
 demonstrate organizational thought processes to solve problems
 evaluate argument for validity, reliability, currency and objectivity
 demonstrate an understanding of how communication formats influence language
choices and usage
 record, organize and store information read, heard or viewed
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
65






support a position by citing specific details from what has been read, heard or viewed
explore diverse perspectives to develop or modify one’s point of view
assess one’s own knowledge and use of language
assess information for completeness, accuracy, currency, relevance, balance or
perspectives and bias
analyse different presentations of the same information to reconsider positions
assess ways in which language reflects and influences values and behaviour
2. Speaking and Listening
Literature, Technical and Essential
 interact effectively in formal or informal situations
 adjust speaking style to suit audience, purpose, and situation
 use effective presentation aids (e.g. diagrams, line drawings, overheads) to enhance
communications
Literature and Technical
 deliver a research-based oral presentation to inform or persuade and respond effectively
to feedback
 give and respond effectively to feedback during oral presentations
 demonstrate a critical understanding of arguments
3. Reading, Research and Reference
Literature, Technical and Essential

evaluate the effectiveness of one’s own and others’ written material (literary, technical,
business, or informational) using criteria that include the following:
o plain language
o coherence and organization
o consistency in the application of usage conventions
o relevance to argument of supporting evidence and examples
o appropriateness to intended purpose and audience
o attention to detail
 summarize, make inferences, draw conclusions and critically evaluate
 paraphrase main ideas in written material
 distinguish between implicit and explicit messages
 apply prior knowledge and experience to assist understanding of new material
 use a variety of strategies and sources to gather and evaluate information, including print
 sources, library resources and the internet
Literature and Technical

evaluate the influences, writing style and background of particular authors in order to
understand their writings.
Literature
 read and demonstrate an understanding of short stories, poetry, drama and the novel,
including works by Canadian authors.
 place a piece of literature in its historical and cultural context
 describe the social and personal benefits of reading literature
Technical
 read and analyze the content, purpose and organization of a variety of written material
used in workplace and professional situations (e.g. letters, memos, email, reports,
proposals)
 interpret technical and professional information conveyed in graphic and other non-verbal
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
66
ways
Essential
 interpret details in and draw conclusions from information presented in a variety of print
and graphic formats, including electronic formats
 read articles, books, stories and poetry
4. Written Communication
Literature and Technical
 apply a writing process approach (pre-write, draft, revise, edit)
 produce work that demonstrates effective organization, support (eg. examples, evidence)
and sentence structure.
 gather, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information into a research paper or report of
approximately 1500 words using an appropriate documentation style ( e.g. APA, MLA or
Chicago)
 understand and avoid plagiarism
 produce writing on demand (e.g. business writing, essays, exams)
Literature
 write literary essays using appropriate structure, development techniques, and literary
conventions.
 discuss literary terms (such as conflict, theme, character, mood, tone, irony,
foreshadowing, point of view, and setting) in the analysis of works studied
Technical
 create a variety of effective technical and professional documents
 recognize and use language specific to technical and professional writing
Technical and Essential
 gather information and organize it into functional writing assignments, for example,
simple reports, letters and memos
 edit own work fully for coherence and accuracy
 monitor spelling, grammar, mechanics and syntax using appropriate techniques and
resources as required, including electronic technology
 write effectively, adjusting for audience, purpose and situation to inform, persuade, and
interact in formal and informal situations
 organize information and ideas to clarify thinking and achieve desired effect
Recommended Learning Outcomes
5. Cooperative Communication
Literature, Technical and Essential
 describe the value and limitations of collaborative work
 collaborate and consult effectively with others in completing communications tasks
through means that include:
 interacting confidently
 assuming responsibility for roles in teams
 respecting and promoting respect for the contributions of other team members
 demonstrating a commitment to the team and to project goals
 employ advanced problem-solving skills in cooperative communication activities (e.g.
cooperative team development of business proposal)
 use a variety of resources and technologies when working with others
 evaluate group processes and individual roles in and contributions to group processes
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
67
INDIGENOUS STUDIES
Vision Statement
Both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students will become more aware of First Nations peoples
and their ways of knowing, their relationship with community and the land, and their history before
and after European contact.
Background
In 2001, the ABE Social Sciences Working Committee determined that there were a number of
Social Sciences courses with First Nations content and focus coming forward for articulation and
recognized the need for more First Nations input. A working group was formed to gain input from
First Nations educators in order to design a structure for First Nations goals and objectives within
the Social Sciences and to come up with topics and specific learning outcomes for intermediate,
advanced and provincial level First Nations Studies courses. After much discussion, the First
Nations Working Group felt that First Nations Studies courses or courses with First Nations
content needed to have its own articulation working committee in order to honour the holistic,
multidisciplinary nature of First Nations Studies as an academic discipline. Courses in First
Nations Studies may encompass the goals, content, and objectives of one or more disciplines
such as the sciences, social sciences, humanities, and fine arts.
In 2002, the chairs of the First Nations working group made presentations to the Social Sciences
Working Committee, the ABE Articulation Steering Committee and the Deans and Directors of
Developmental Education, with all three groups passing motions supporting the establishment of
a First Nations ABE Articulation Working Committee. Support was also obtained from the British
Columbia First Nations Coordinators and the First Nations Articulation Committee at the postsecondary level.
In 2004, the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer approved the establishment of
a First Nations ABE articulation working committee. The committee met for the first time in March
2005 at the Native Education Centre.
In 2011, the First Nations ABE Articulation Working Committee was renamed the Indigenous
Adult Basic Education articulation working committee.
Overview
The Indigenous Adult Basic Education articulation (IABE) working committee has a primary
mandate to review curriculum in ABE programming to ensure that knowledge of First Nations
peoples and their ways of knowing, their relationship with community and the land, and their
history before and after European contact is present in any First Nations curriculum approved by
this working committee. For curriculum submission in First Nations studies, this is a straightforward process; however, the committee also receives curriculum that spans two articulation
committees’ areas of responsibility.
Curriculum submitted for approval will include programs and courses where this committee has
primary approval responsibility, i.e. First Nations Studies at the ABE level. This curriculum will be
reviewed against our primary mandate and using the broad learning objectives identified for First
Nations studies. Additionally the IABE committee will work with other subject-related working
group articulation committees. The IABE working group will review the curriculum against the
committee’s primary purpose, while the relevant working group will review the curriculum against
its specific content and skill objectives. For example, First Nations English courses must be
approved by both IABE and English ABE Articulation before being submitted to the ABE Steering
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
68
Committee for approval. Ethno-Botany or Indigenous Science courses will be reviewed by IABE
and Science/Biology Articulation Committees.
The interest of the IABE committee is to support the development of curriculum across ABE
programming that is respectful of First Nations people and that promotes success of First Nations
learners. As such, the First Nations ABE articulation working committee provides a listing of
learning outcomes, primarily applicable to First Nations Studies courses, but they may also be
useful to the curriculum designer who is preparing materials that will proceed to other articulation
committees.
Articulation Process
The IABE Articulation Committee identifies two different pathways for curriculum submissions:


Curricula focusing on First Nation Studies articulated solely by the IABE committee. This
curriculum is community-collaborated, culturally relevant content based curricula.
Multiple articulations, where curriculum such as English, sciences or math with a FN
focus, will require articulation through both the IABE Committee and other articulation
committee(s).
Refer to Appendix A for a flowchart describing the IABE articulation process. It is recommended
courses be submitted using the course template available on the BCCAT website and that course
submissions indicate which type of course it is (of the two bulleted types shown above). It is also
recommended that courses be submitted to committee members via email previous to the annual
meeting date. Course outline form available at http://www.bccat.bc.ca/outline/index.cfm
All courses will be reviewed according to the general vision, overview, goals, and learning
objectives. Each course that is specifically First Nations in focus will be articulated against the
specific learning objectives for its level.
The IABE committee shall follow protocol by requesting the host institution invite a First Nations
community representative, such as an Elder, to welcome and participate with the committee, in
order to represent the host territory and its worldview.
Goal Statements
The committee:





Provides support to all educators and students in BC for the development of culturally
relevant curricula.
Assists other working committees in course development outcomes by integrating First
Nations wisdom and knowledge to meet IABE articulation committee standards.
Considers the academic outcomes identified at the Fundamental through Provincial levels
in other content areas (English, math, sciences) but focuses specifically on the goals
identified by this articulation committee.
Supports student achievement of course outcomes with a focus on local First Nations
content whenever possible.
Requires that curriculum submitted will:
o Display evidence of direct and experiential methods that reinforce First Nations
perspectives through use of First Nations paradigms.
o Demonstrate First Nations involvement in course development, such as fluent
speakers, community resource persons, and culturally relevant materials.
o Demonstrate creative ways to assess and evaluate achievement of students that
encourage and acknowledge First Nations ways of knowing.
o Address the points listed below as applicable to the discipline. It is understood that
any course generally addresses at least 80% of the following generic objectives:
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
69
Required Learning Outcomes
The goals of the curriculum are broadly applicable to all levels, fundamental through provincial.
Participants in all First Nations courses should be encouraged to acquire a range of skills and
abilities. The skills and abilities listed here apply in general to all levels, fundamental through
provincial, with the recognition that particular outcomes may be more or less applicable at each
level.
Learners in any First Nations course will be able to:
1.
2.
3.
Identify and articulate past and present forces shaping First Nation identity, such as
culture, land, family, community, language, holistic perspectives, protocol, resistance,
hegemony, values, worldview, knowledge, wisdom, and technology.
Identify the history, elements, and intergenerational effects of colonization and
decolonization.
Recognize that while First Nations groups share some common values and
perspectives, they are also distinct, diverse, dynamic and evolving.
For courses to be articulated solely by INABE the committee reserves the right to use Social
Science learning outcomes as a standard.
Fundamental Level of Indigenous Studies
The committee acknowledges that BC colleges and institutions will not likely offer separate
Fundamental First Nations Studies courses. We will develop and share an ongoing list of
guidelines and resources for integrating Indigenous ways of knowing, learning, and teaching into
Fundamental curricula which will be added to this section.
Examples of Outcomes at the Intermediate Level of Indigenous
Studies
Students will be able to:
I.
II.
III.
IV.
First Nations Diversity in B.C.
A. Demonstrate of an awareness of First Nations diversity within B.C.
B. Identify leaders and accomplishments of B.C. First Nations
C. Discuss various ways of identifying Indigenous peoples (Métis, First Nations,
Aboriginal, Indigenous, Inuit, etc.)
D. Locate and name B.C. First Nations and language families
E. Identify B.C. tribal associations
Values, Traditions, and Roles in Community & Family
A. Describe family and cultural background
B. Explore the clan system and other social structures
C. Read for meaning and clarify values regarding law and justice
D. Identify roles and responsibilities in community (chief, headman, healer, midwife,
hunter, warrior, etc.)
E. Discuss roles and responsibilities in the family (parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle,
etc.)
History of First Nations in B.C.
A. Discuss the pre- and post-contact history of Aboriginal people living in B.C.
B. Explain the impacts of European contact and settlement.
Trade, Language, Culture, and Relationship with the Land
A. Identify the impact of fur trade, the gold rush, and resource extraction.
B. Locate inter-tribal trade routes in B.C.
C. Explain the importance and significance of social gatherings in First Nations
communities.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
70
D. Compare coastal and interior lifestyles (seasonal rounds, settlements, housing,
transportation, etc.)
Examples of Outcomes for Advanced Level of Indigenous
Studies
Students will be able to:
1. Compare and contrast theories of origin of First Nations people.
2. Define terms used to identify First Nations people.
3. Identify appropriate protocol(s) of distinct First Nations communities, such as
recognizing the traditional territories of host First Nations.
4. Identify how First Nations peoples are classified, such as language families and cultural
groups of Canada.
5. Identify the effects of contact and colonization on First Nations people, including the
impact of certain policies such as the residential school system.
6. Explain the significance of languages and oral traditions in First Nations cultures.
7. Review key issues regarding Aboriginal rights and titles, such as the land question.
8. Describe the traditional technologies within an area of study, such as ethnobotany.
9. Discuss the relationship of First Nations communities with the natural and spiritual world.
10. Discuss the challenges of economic development, while recognizing traditional
relationships with the land, plants and animals.
Examples of Outcomes at the Provincial level of Indigenous
Studies
Students will be able to:
1. Practice appropriate protocol(s) of distinct First Nations communities, such as recognizing
the traditional territories of host First Nations.
2. Analyze how First Nations peoples are classified, such as language families and cultural
groups of Canada.
3. Analyze the effects of contact and colonization on First Nations people, including the
impact of certain policies such as the residential school system.
4. Examine challenges faced by specific First Nations populations such as women,
veterans, elders, and youth.
5. Explain the significance of languages and oral traditions in First Nations cultures.
6. Compare and contrast traditional and contemporary methods and systems of governance
7. Analyze key issues regarding Aboriginal rights and titles, such as the land question.
8. Investigate the traditional technologies within an area of study, such as ethnobotany.
9. Analyze the relationship of First Nations communities with the natural and spiritual world.
10. Evaluate the challenges of economic development, while recognizing traditional
relationships with the land, plants and animals.
11. Examine family structures and child rearing practices, including kinship roles and
obligations within First Nations.
12. Distinguish between gender roles in First Nations contemporary and traditional culture.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
71
Appendix A
Indigenous ABE Provincial Articulation Process
Course has been
approved by
Institutional Ed.
Council/Senate
Primarily First
Nations content
Submit to IABE
Working Group
Primarily other
subject area
specialty with First
Nations content
Submit to
appropriate
subject area
working group.
Once approved
may be
submitted to
IABE Working
Group
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
72
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL LEVELS
Goal Statement
I. ALF General Statement
II. Fundamental Math Statement
I. ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL LEVEL (ALF)
Goal Statement
Adult Basic Education at the Adult Literacy Fundamental (ALF) level is designed to provide
reading, writing (ALFE), and mathematics skills (ALFM) along with associated skills and
strategies for communication and learning. Both English and math have six designated levels that
range, in English, from non-reading and –writing to readiness for the Intermediate ABE level and,
in mathematics, from pre-numeracy to readiness for the Intermediate ABE level.
Areas defined within ALF are: English (Reading and Writing), Mathematics, and Skills and
Strategies for Learning. Recommended computer skills are included within these areas. While
Social Studies and Science are not delineated as discrete content areas, an integrated approach
will incorporate such content. An integrated approach also assists learners to acquire a better
understanding of themselves, their communities and their participation in Canadian society by
using real-life materials, activities and experiences in their studies, which students then can apply
in their daily lives. Desired results include improved self-confidence, self-reliance and selfevaluation. Students’ personal literacy goals should be reflected in the design of any ALF
program. The topics listed with each skill are neither exhaustive nor exclusive.
Prerequisites
Ability to speak and understand English.
Outcomes
Learning outcomes for Adult Literacy Fundamental English and Math are illustrated in the
following tables:
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
73
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL ENGLISH (ALFE)
ALFE Level 1 – The student will demonstrate the ability to:
Pre-Reading
Pre-Writing




recognize, count and sequence individual
sounds in a carefully spoken word
identify rhyming words
name the letters in the alphabet (in
alphabetical order) and recognize/give the
sounds of the letters
recognize and name initial consonant
sounds in words
Reading












hold and use pencil/pen and adjust paper as
needed
orient on page: left to right, top, bottom, lines,
margin, double spacing, indentation
Writing
hear and read short vowel
sounds
read regular consonantvowel-consonant (CVC)
words including some with
endings
read some long vowel words,
e.g., CVC & e
read simple consonant
blends
read 100-150 basic and
personal sight words,
including some functional
words
name some common
symbols (e.g., &, $)
read simple sentences,
experience stories and
paragraphs with common
sight and regular CVC words
describe the sequence of a
simple story
answer literal questions about
a simple story
state opinion about readings









print the alphabet: upper
and lower case
print or write own name,
address and phone
number
print or write CVC words
and 50-75 sight words
copy short sentences
complete sentences by
adding subject or verb
recognize and use
period and question
mark
use capitals for
beginning a sentence or
a name when copying
give sentence answers
to questions using
words and phrases in
the question
dictate and copy
experience stories
Skills and Strategies for
Learning







identify short and long
term personal literacy
goals
participate in group
discussion and activities
work with help and
independently for short
periods of time on
assigned tasks
organize work for ready
access, with help
receive and respond to
feedback
treat classmates and
instructor with respect
identify personal learning
strengths
ALFE Level 2 – The student will demonstrate the ability to:
Reading
Writing
Skills and Strategies for
Learning



read simple passages and
stories with some fluency
and recognize end
punctuation
use phonic and context clues
in reading simple passages
read and follow simple



print or write complete
sentences
participate in
brainstorming to
generate writing
print or write short
messages and



identify short and long
term personal literacy
goals
work independently, even
with some distraction in
the classroom
ask for help when needed
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
74




written directions
identify main idea, characters
and events from reading
state opinion on readings
read 150-300 personal and
functional words
use phonics to decode
unknown words







paragraphs
write sentences to
questions on reading
such as who, what,
when, where and why
use assigned vocabulary
in sentence writing
write about 150 sight
words
use end punctuation
use capitals for proper
nouns
write some CVC words
with basic suffixes
write some CVC and e
words







attend to and participate
in group discussion and
activities
move on to other tasks
while waiting for help
give and receive help
from classmates in a
cooperative manner
communicate respectfully
during group work
use time-management
skills to complete
homework
begin to employ
strategies for learning and
remembering
look up words for spelling
and meaning in dictionary
and glossary
Computer Skills
 learn basic word
processing skills
 name hardware
components
 turn the computer on and
off
 open word processing
programs, type and save
documents
ALFE Level 3 - The student will demonstrate the ability to:
Reading
Writing
Skills and Strategies for
Learning









identify subject, main idea,
details and sequence of a
short passage
pre-read and reflect on
short written passages
summarize short passages
apply critical thinking for
fact vs. opinion
begin to use context clues
accurately read words using
a variety of word attack
skills
recognize and use
antonyms, synonyms and
homonyms
use dictionary skills to find
meaning
demonstrate strategies for
learning and remembering
words









generate, organize and
write ideas (the writing
process)
use paragraph format:
topic sentence, supporting
details, and conclusion
complete a variety of
simple forms and
documents
write complete simple
sentences
identify subject and verb
in a simple sentence
correctly use simple past
and continuous present
and future verb tenses
use capitals for proper
nouns
use a dictionary to find
spelling
use compound words and









identify short and long
term goals for literacy
learning
work independently
attend to and participate
in group discussion and
activities
move on to other tasks
while waiting for help
give and receive help from
classmates in a
cooperative manner
communicate respectfully
during group work
use time-management
skills to complete
assigned work
employ strategies for
learning and remembering
demonstrate awareness
of personal learning
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
75

contractions
accurately copy short
messages and text (i.e.
phone, class notes)

strengths
follow simple directions
and instructions
Computer Skills
 use word processing skills
to complete some writing
assignments
ALFE Level 4 - The student will demonstrate the ability to:
Reading
Writing
Skills and Strategies for
Learning












pre-read and reflect on
short written passages
identify subject, main idea,
detail, sequence of a short
passage and fact and
opinion
answer comprehension
questions based on text
summarize longer passages
analyze characters in text
differentiate between literal
and inferential meaning
use a dictionary
actively build new
vocabulary
recognize and use
antonyms, synonyms and
homonyms
continue learning and
remembering new words
expand the use of context
clues
increase use of word attack
skills












generate and organize
 set short and long term
ideas
goals
use paragraph format:
 work independently
topic sentence, supporting
 attend to and participate
details, conclusion
in group discussion and
activities
write short narrative and
descriptive paragraphs
 move on to other tasks
while waiting for help
complete a variety of
forms and documents
 give and receive help from
identify subjects and
classmates in a
verbs in simple sentences
cooperative manner
and use modifiers
 communicate respectfully
effectively
during group work
write complete simple and
 use time-management
compound sentences
skills to meet assigned
use commas in a series
deadlines and complete
and in compound
homework
sentences
 employ strategies for
use consistent verb tense
learning and remembering
correctly use most
 continue to develop
irregular verbs
awareness of personal
learning strengths
use capitals for proper
nouns
Computer Skills
use dictionary and
thesaurus for spelling and
meaning
 use word processing skills
use compound words,
to complete assigned
contractions, possessives
writing
and plurals
ALFE Level 5 - The student will demonstrate the ability to:
Reading
Writing
Skills and Strategies for
Learning




express and support
opinions about text
begin to draw inferences
and conclusions
begin to distinguish
between fact and opinion
detect tone of story and
emotional reactions of




organize their writing
using the writing process
write personal letters
using standard format
produce coherent
descriptive, narrative and
expository paragraphs
write an 8-10 sentence




complete assignments out
of classroom setting
manage time
set goals
develop strategies to write
tests in a variety of
formats
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
76










character
answer comprehension
questions on main idea,
details, sequence
identify subject/topic, main
ideas, supporting details
and sequence
use pre-reading strategies
self-monitor reading for
comprehension
independently and fluently
read extended expository
passages
independently read longer
text
begin to recognize different
purposes for reading
employ strategies for
learning and remembering
new words
use context clues
apply phonemic awareness












paragraph (topic
 apply personal learning
sentence, supporting
strategies
details and conclusion)
 use critical thinking skills
edit written work
while listening and/or
summarize main ideas
viewing
after reading and
 give concise sequential
discussion
oral instructions
identify and write simple,
compound and complex Computer Skills
sentences
 keyboard comfortably
use a broad range of
 word process and print a
punctuation, including
document
quotation marks
 begin to use a search
identify and correct
engine to find information
fragments and run-ons in
writing
use subject-verb
agreement and consistent
verb tense
use comma rules
spell a variety of
homonyms and common
irregularly spelled words
use effective spelling
strategies
use contractions correctly
use a dictionary as a
spelling tool
identify synonyms and
antonyms
ALFE Level 6 - The student will demonstrate the ability to:
Reading
Writing
Skills and Strategies for
Learning






summarize short stories,
articles, video and audio
tapes
draw inferences and
conclusions
argue for and against in
discussions and written
assignments
read and critically discuss a
variety of materials in terms
of purpose, cause and
effect, logic, fact and
opinion, character analysis,
point of view (including
validity of computer source)
recognize comparison and
contrast, outcome and
sequence
identify and discuss writer’s
point of view, appraise
validity of material from own







use standard pronoun
reference and
agreement
use a variety of
processes for organizing
writing (i.e.
brainstorming, outlining,
mapping, etc.)
write expanded
paragraphs with more
sophisticated detail and
vocabulary
summarize a writing
sample (article, short
story, etc.)
produce coherent
paragraphs including
expository paragraphs
write business letters
using standard format
respond to selected








manage time and meet
goals
use a variety of test-taking
strategies
develop strategies to
enhance capacity as a
learner (i.e. stress
management, time
management, problem
solving)
establish purpose for
listening and/or viewing
use inferential thinking skills
distinguish between
conversational (colloquial)
and more formal (standard)
spoken language
give concise, purposeful
explanations
use critical thinking skills to
determine validity of
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
77





experience
read and discuss selected
short stories, articles,
poetry, songs, etc.
evaluate own
comprehension, through
self-reflection, relate to
previous knowledge
use common reference
materials such as
dictionary, thesaurus, atlas,
computer search engines
locate information using
guide words, headings,
glossary, table of contents,
index, computer menu, etc.
use structural analysis (e.g.
roots, affixes, syllabication,
stress, compound words,
contractions)









material after reading,
information
viewing and listening
Computer Skills
edit written work
 word process a document
use a broad range of
(create, edit, save, retrieve
punctuation including
and print)
quotations and semicolon
 use a variety of search
engines to find relevant
use a variety of simple,
information
compound and complex
sentences in written
paragraphs
identify and correct
fragments and run-ons in
writing
use subject/verb
agreement and
consistent verb tense
use commas correctly in
written work
use apostrophes
correctly to show
possession
use a dictionary as a
spelling tool
use a thesaurus to
locate synonyms
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
78
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS (ALFM)
Goal Statement
Adult Literacy Fundamental Level Mathematics (ALF-M) will give students a strong foundation of
basic skills, concepts, mathematical vocabulary, and problem solving strategies to prepare them
to meet personal, career or further academic goals.
The ALF-M levels are six designated levels that range from pre-numeracy to readiness for the
Intermediate ABE level. Learning Outcomes for all six levels are categorized as CONCEPTS,
OPERATIONS/APPLICATIONS or SKILLS & STRATEGIES FOR LEARNING. The outcomes in
each of the six ALF-M levels are cumulative and reflect all the skills encompassed by the
previous ALF-M level. In many cases, it is necessary to spiral back to review concepts mastered
at previous ALF-M levels.
Students are expected to develop conceptual understanding as well as skills. They are expected
to apply the learned mathematical concepts and skills to a variety of problem-solving situations.
They are to be encouraged to develop automaticity and estimation skills in order to increase their
confidence and competence in mathematics.
Adult Literacy Fundamental Mathematics (ALFM) LEVEL 1
Students need to demonstrate competency in these outcomes before progressing to the next
level. In assessment, it may be determined that some of the outcomes have already been met.
In this case, students will focus on the outcomes which still need to be achieved.
In Level 1 the student will be able to:
NUMBER & NUMBER
OPERATIONS
 Explain or use examples of keywords:
CONCEPTS
o digit, place value, rounding, estimating, greater than, less than,
equal, not equal, odd , even, zero, horizontal, vertical, operation,
sum, difference, addition, subtraction, increase , decrease
 Identify place value to 100
 Recognize vertical and horizontal format for adding and subtracting
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
PATTERNS,
FUNCTIONS &
RELATIONS
CONCEPTS







Read and write digits 0 to 9
Count to 100
Read and write whole numbers to 100
Compare and order whole numbers to 100
Add whole numbers whose sum is 20 or less without carrying
Subtract whole numbers that are 20 or less, without borrowing/trading in
Round whole numbers to the nearest 10

Use and apply patterns (shapes, letter and numbers)

Count by 2’s; 5’s; 10’s; up to 100



Recognize coins and their values
Show the relationship between manipulatives and numbers to 20
Estimate (ex. “It takes me about an hour to get to work in the morning”)
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
REAL LIFE
APPLICATIONS
CONCEPTS
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
79
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS



GEOMETRY
CONCEPTS
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
TIME
CONCEPTS
SKILLS &
STRATEGIES FOR
LEARNING

















Use estimation in situations such as transportation and time management
(ex. estimating commuting time per day)
Apply addition (to 20) to one step word problems in real life situations
Apply subtraction (20 or less) to one step word problems in real life
situations
Explain or use examples of keywords:
o Rectangle, square, triangle, circle, perimeter
Identify rectangle, square, triangle, circle
Recognize am/pm clock notation
Recognize common base time units and their relationship to each other
(seconds to minutes, etc)
Apply logical thinking to math operations
Use critical thinking skills
Give and receive help in a respectful manner
Organize work, with help, for easy access
Work independently for short periods of time
Receive feedback and respond appropriately
Identify personal short-term numeracy goals
Ask for help appropriately
Recognize personal learning strengths
Recognize math anxiety
Use strategies to manage math anxiety
Locate information in a text book with help
Manage frustrations of learning
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
80
Adult Literacy Fundamental Mathematics (ALFM) LEVEL 2
Students need to demonstrate competency in these outcomes before progressing to the next level. In
assessment, it may be determined that some of the outcomes have already been met. In this case,
students will focus on the outcomes which still need to be achieved.
In Level 2 the student will be able to:
NUMBER & NUMBER
OPERATIONS
 Explain or use examples of keywords:
CONCEPTS
o multiplier, multiplicand, multiple, multiplication, multiply, product,
double, triple, twice, carrying, borrowing, of (ex: 2 groups of 3),
times, by
 Place value to 1,000,000
 Show the relationship between multiplication and repeated addition
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
 Read and write whole numbers to 1,000,000 in digits and words
 Compare and order whole numbers to 1,000,000 (use <; >; =; ≠)
 Round whole numbers up to and including 1,000,000
 Add whole numbers without carrying
 Subtract whole numbers without borrowing
 Add whole numbers with carrying
 Subtract whole numbers with borrowing
 Estimate a sum using whole numbers
 Estimate a difference using whole numbers
 Multiply two whole numbers that are less than or equal to 10
 Memorize 10 X 10 multiplication chart
PATTERNS, FUNCTIONS
& RELATIONS
 Explain or use examples of keywords:
CONCEPTS
o expanded notation
 Show the relationship between multiplication and repeated addition
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
REAL LIFE
APPLICATIONS
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
TIME
CONCEPTS
 Write numbers in expanded notation to 10,000
 Write numbers as repeated additions or multiplication (ex: 12=6+6 or
12=2x6)
 Multiply one digit numbers by 10; 100; 1000
 Apply addition to solve multi-step word problems reflecting real life
situations
 Apply subtraction to solve multi-step word problems reflecting real life
situations
 Apply multiplication to one-step word problems reflecting real life situations
 Make change up to $1.00
 Use manipulatives to explain multiplication
 Recognize time using an analog clock
 Recognize 24 hour system International clock notation
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS




GEOMETRY
CONCEPTS
 Explain or use examples of keywords:
o perimeter
OPERATIONS AND
Calculate perimeter of a square
Convert units of time
Convert to and from 12 hour notation to 24 hour notation
Add time units
Subtract time units
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
81
APPLICATIONS
SKILLS & STRATEGIES
FOR LEARNING
Calculate perimeter of a rectangle














Apply logical thinking to math operations
Work independently
Ask for help
Receive and respond to feedback
Manage time to complete work
Identify short-term personal numeracy goals
Identify personal learning strengths and styles
Use a multiplication table grid
Use “Answer Key” to mark and self assess
Locate information in a text book
Check that the question was accurately transferred
Organize computation effectively
Use critical thinking skills
Manage frustrations of learning
Adult Literacy Fundamental Mathematics (ALFM) LEVEL 3
Students need to demonstrate competency in these outcomes before progressing to the next level. In
assessment, it may be determined that some of the outcomes have already been met. In this case,
students will focus on the outcomes which still need to be achieved.
In Level 3 the student will be able to:
NUMBER & NUMBER
OPERATIONS
 Explain or use examples of keywords:
CONCEPTS
o quotient, remainder, dividend, divisor, division, divide, go into, by,
factors
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
PATTERNS,
FUNCTIONS &
RELATIONS
CONCEPTS








Multiply whole numbers with carrying
Estimate products
Memorize division facts
Divide whole numbers without remainder
Divide whole numbers with remainder
Check a division question using multiplication
Estimate quotients
Check multiplication with division
 Recognize the relationship between multiplication and division
 Divide whole numbers by 10’s ; 100’s; 1000’s
 Determine a number’s divisibility by 2; 3; 5; and 9
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
REAL LIFE
APPLICATIONS
CONCEPTS
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
 Demonstrate division by regrouping
 Make change up to $100
 Apply multiplication to real life situations
 Apply multiplication to solve multi-step word problems reflecting real life
situations
 Use manipulatives to explain division
 Solve division word problems reflecting real life situations
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
82
 Solve multi-operation word problems
 Calculate unit prices using whole numbers
 Calculate best buy using whole numbers
MEASUREMENT
CONCEPTS
GEOMETRY
CONCEPTS
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
SKILLS & STRATEGIES
FOR LEARNING





Explain or use examples of keywords:
basic prefixes of metric system
Recognize basic metric units
Define basic prefixes of metric system
Explain or use examples of keywords:
o area
 Calculate area of a square
 Calculate area of a rectangle
 Compare and contrast perimeter and area informally, using a drawing or
shape
















Apply logical thinking to math operations
Work independently
Ask for help
Receive and respond to feedback
Manage time to complete assignments in and out of class
Recognize personal learning strengths and styles
Use an answer key to mark and self assess
Locate information in a textbook
Develop a variety of test taking strategies
Check that the question was accurately transferred
Organize computation effectively
Set learning goals to manage time to complete assignments in and out of
class
Give and receive help in a respectful manner
Use a variety of test taking strategies
Use critical thinking skills
Manage frustrations of learning
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
83
Adult Literacy Fundamental Mathematics (ALFM) LEVEL 4
Students need to demonstrate competency in these outcomes before progressing to the next level. In
assessment, it may be determined that some of the outcomes have already been met. In this case,
students will focus on the outcomes which still need to be achieved.
InLevel 4 the student will be able to:
NUMBER & NUMBER
OPERATIONS
 Explain or use examples of keywords:
CONCEPTS
O Decimal, decimal place value (ths), per, of, by,
 Identify decimals as part of a whole
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
PATTERNS,
FUNCTIONS &
RELATIONS
CONCEPTS
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
REAL LIFE
APPLICATIONS
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
MEASUREMENT
CONCEPTS
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS










Read and write decimals to 10 000ths
Round decimals to a given place
Add decimals
Subtract decimals
Multiply decimals by whole numbers
Multiply decimals by decimals
Divide decimals by whole numbers
Divide decimals by decimals
Divide whole numbers by decimals
Apply decimals to multi-operation problems
 Use the number line to order and compare
 Identify place value to 10 000ths
 Compare decimal in order of place value
 Multiply decimals by 10;100;1000
 Divide decimals by 10;100;1000










Write a cheque and record transactions
Calculate unit price
Use unit price to find the best buy
Calculate expenses (phone, utilities, and groceries)
Convert between dollars and cents
Apply addition of decimals in word problems
Apply subtraction of decimals in word problems
Apply multiplication of decimals in word problems
Apply division of decimals in word problems
Apply decimal to multi-operation word problems






Explain, using an example, length
Explain, using an example, mass
Explain, using an example, capacity
Explain, using an example, temperature
Convert measurements within the metric system using a conversion chart
Convert measurements within the imperial system



Measure length using an appropriate metric measuring device
Measure length using an appropriate imperial measuring device
Measure mass using an appropriate metric measuring device
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
84














GEOMETRY
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
SKILLS & STRATEGIES
FOR LEARNING
Measure mass using an appropriate imperial measuring device
Measure capacity using an appropriate metric measuring device
Measure capacity using an appropriate imperial measuring device
Measure temperature using an appropriate metric measuring device
Measure temperature using an appropriate imperial measuring device
Add same metric units
Add same imperial units
Subtract same metric units
Subtract same imperial units
Use metric conversion without a conversion chart
Add mixed metric units
Subtract mixed metric units
Add mixed imperial units
Subtract mixed imperial units
 Calculate perimeter and area of squares and rectangles with decimals







Apply logical thinking to math operations
Independently track progress and set learning goals
Manage time to complete assignments in and out of class
Give and receive help in a respectful manner
Use a variety of test taking strategies
Use critical thinking skills
Manage frustrations of learning
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
85
Adult Literacy Fundamental Mathematics (ALFM) LEVEL 5
Students need to demonstrate competency in these outcomes before progressing to the next level. In
assessment, it may be determined that some of the outcomes have already been met. In this case,
students will focus on the outcomes which still need to be achieved.
In Level 5 the student will be able to:
NUMBER & NUMBER
OPERATIONS
 Explain or use examples of keywords:
CONCEPTS
O Fraction, numerator, denominator, of (multiplication), proper fraction,
improper fraction, mixed number , equivalent fractions, LCD, LCM,
reciprocal, prime, composite, GCF, simplify
 Identify common fraction as part of a whole
 Relate common fractions to decimals
OPERATIONS AND
 Use a graphic to show a proper fraction (ex: a drawing)
APPLICATIONS
 Use a graphic to show a mixed number
 Reduce proper fractions
 Convert improper fractions to mixed numbers
 Convert mixed numbers to improper fractions
 Write equivalent fractions
 Write mixed numbers as improper fractions
 Multiply proper fractions
 Multiply improper fractions
 Multiply mixed numbers
 Divide proper fractions
 Divide improper fractions
 Divide mixed numbers
 Solve multiplication word problems using fractions
 Solve division word problems using fractions
 Find lowest common multiple
 Find greatest common factors
 Express a number as a product of prime factors
 Add proper fractions with like denominators
 Add proper fractions with different denominators
 Add mixed numbers with like denominators
 Add mixed numbers with different denominators
 Subtract proper fractions with like denominators
 Subtract proper fractions with different denominators
 Subtract mixed numbers with like denominators
 Subtract mixed numbers with different denominators
 Subtract fractions with borrowing
 Solve addition word problems using fractions
 Solve subtraction word problems using fractions
 Convert fraction to decimals
 Convert decimals to fractions
PATTERNS,
FUNCTIONS &
 Compare fractions to decimals (<,>,=,≠)
RELATIONS
 Compare decimals to fractions (<,>,=, ≠)
CONCEPTS
 Compare fractions (<,>,=, ≠)
 Compare fractions and mixed numbers (<,>,=,≠)
REAL LIFE
APPLICATIONS
OPERATIONS AND


Divide a whole into parts (pizza, cake)
Apply operations with fractions to recipes (double, half)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
86
APPLICATIONS
GEOMETRY
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
SKILLS & STRATEGIES
FOR LEARNING

Determine whether it is more appropriate to express a number as a
decimal or common fraction in a given situation (ex: $2.50 rather than 2 ½
dollars )




Calculate perimeter of squares with correct formula
Calculate perimeter of rectangles with correct formula
Calculate area of squares with correct formula
Calculate area of rectangles with correct formula









Use critical thinking skills
Independently set goals
Independently track progress
Apply logical thinking to fractional operations
Build math confidence
Move onto other tasks while waiting for help
Write tests in a variety of formats
Locate and correct errors
Manage frustrations of learning
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
87
Adult Literacy Fundamental Mathematics (ALFM) LEVEL 6
Students need to demonstrate competency in these outcomes before progressing to the next level. In
assessment, it may be determined that some of the outcomes have already been met. In this case,
students will focus on the outcomes which still need to be achieved.
In Level 6 the student will be able to:
NUMBER & NUMBER
 Explain or use examples of keywords:
OPERATIONS
O Ratio & Proportion: ratio, rate, proportionPercent: percent, of,
CONCEPTS
commission, tax, discount, simple interest
 Compare fractions, decimals and percents
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
PATTERNS,
FUNCTIONS &
RELATIONS
CONCEPTS
REAL LIFE
APPLICATIONS
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
DATA ANALYSIS
CONCEPTS
OPERATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS
Ratio & Proportion
 Write the relationship between two numbers or quantities as a ratio
 Write the relationship between two numbers or quantities with different
units as a rate
 Write proportion as a statement of equivalence between two ratios
 Determine if a proportion is true using both common denominators &
cross multiplying
 Solve a proportion for a missing term
Percent
 Convert a decimal to a percent
 Convert a percent to a decimal
 Convert a fraction to a percent
 Convert a percent to a fraction
 Find a percent of a number
 Find what percent one number is of another
 Find a number when a percent is given
 Apply ratio and proportion to solve problems involving real-life
situations including percent increase and decrease
 Read and obtain information from a bar graph
 Read and obtain information from a line graph
 Read and obtain information from a circle graph
 Read and obtain information from a table
 Recognize percent notation as a denominator of 100
 Express the relationship between two numbers as a percent






Estimate percentages (mental shopping)
Calculate discounts on purchases
Calculate tips on service
Calculate tax
Calculate wage increase
Calculate budget






Explain or show with examples: the different elements of a graph
Identify bar graph
Identify line graph
Identify circle graph
Identify pictograph
Identify histogram
 Read and obtain information from a bar graph
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
88
SKILLS & STRATEGIES
FOR LEARNING









 Read and obtain information from a line graph
 Read and obtain information from a circle graph
 Read and obtain information from a table
Set further numeracy goals
Use critical thinking skills
Build math confidence
Move on to other tasks while waiting for help
Write tests in a variety of formats
Locate and correct errors
Use strategies to manage test-taking anxiety
Manage frustrations of learning
Apply logical thinking to math operations
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
89
Mathematics
Mathematics: Intermediate Level—Developmental Mathematics
Goal Statement
The goal of Intermediate Mathematics is to enable adult learners to acquire mathematical
knowledge, skills, and strategies needed to enter appropriate higher level courses or to satisfy
personal or career goals.
An Integrated Resource Package, containing learning outcomes, suggested instructional and
assessment strategies and suggested resources, has been developed for use in Intermediate
Level Mathematics.
Learning Outcomes
1. Estimating Skills/Calculator Use
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. estimate answers to problems
b. use a scientific calculator to calculate and solve problems involving adding, subtracting,
multiplying and dividing whole numbers, fractions and decimals
c. check that answers and solutions to problems are reasonable in the context of the given
question
2. Measurement
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. use the common metric units for temperature, length, area, volume/capacity, and mass
b. use the common Imperial units for temperature, length, area, volume/capacity, and force
c. convert between and within metric and Imperial units using tables and/or calculators
d. take and read measurements with common measuring tools (e.g. thermometer, ruler,
measuring tape, triple beam balance, bathroom scale, stop watch, Vernier caliper,
micrometer) (optional)
e. describe and apply precision, accuracy and tolerance (optional)
f. estimate in metric and Imperial units of measurement (optional)
3. Perimeter, Area, and Volume
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. find perimeters of triangles, squares, rectangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, circles and
composite figures by measuring and using formulas
b. find areas of the above shapes by measuring and using formulas
c. find the surface areas of cubes, rectangular solids, cylinders, cones, spheres, and
composite solids by using formulas
d. find the volumes of cubes, rectangular solids, cylinders, cones, spheres, and composite
solids by using formulas
e. distinguish between concepts of perimeter and area and their respective units
4. Ratio and Proportion
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. read, write, interpret, and compare ratios
b. read, write and identify proportions and use them to solve problems
c. use ratio and proportion to interpret and make scale drawings
d. use proportions to solve problems involving similar triangles
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
90
5. Percent
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. use ratios and proportions to solve problems involving:
i. finding percent when part and whole are known
ii. finding part when percent and whole are known
iii. finding whole when part and percent are known
6. Geometry
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. name and draw points, lines, rays, segments, and angles
b. name and draw triangles, quadrilaterals, other common polygons and circles
c. construct with a compass and straight edge:
i. the perpendicular bisector of a line segment
ii. the bisector of an angle
iii. a copy of an angle (optional)
iv. parallel lines (optional)
v. 30°, 45°, and 60° angles (optional)
d. classify and distinguish among acute, right, obtuse, straight, reflex, complementary and
supplementary, and vertically opposite angles
e. describe the angle relationships created when parallel lines are cut by a transversal
f. measure angles with a protractor
g. classify triangles according to sides and angles
h. identify similar and congruent figures
7. Statistics
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. conduct a survey to collect data
b. tabulate the data
c. calculate median, mean, mode, and range
d. graph the data
e. interpolate and extrapolate from the information provided
8. Signed (Rational) Numbers
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. add, subtract, multiply, and divide signed (rational) numbers
b. demonstrate order of operations with signed (rational) numbers
c. graph signed (rational) numbers on the number line
d. define absolute value
9. Algebra
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a) explain the use of variables
b) evaluate algebraic expressions using substitution
c) combine like terms and remove parentheses
d) solve first degree equations in one variable
e) translate a problem into an equation
f) use equations to solve problems
g) solve simple formulas for one variable
h) use formulas to solve problems
PLUS:
Units 1 to 9 of the Learning Outcomes are the core units of the Intermediate Level Math course.
To complete the course, students should choose one from A, or B, or C below.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
91
Selection A prepares the student for Advanced Level Algebraic Math or Advanced Level
Developmental Math. Selection B is intended for students exiting the ABE structure at the
Intermediate Level. Section C is self-explanatory.
A 10.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
Powers, Roots, and Scientific Notation
read and write numbers expressed as powers
calculate powers with integral exponent
use the rules of exponents to calculate products and quotients of powers with the same
base
use the rules of exponents to calculate the powers of powers
express numbers using scientific notation
convert between scientific and standard notation
read and write numbers expressed as roots
calculate using roots
Polynomials
a. add and subtract polynomials
b. multiply and divide polynomials by a monomial
c. remove common factors from polynomials
Trigonometry
a. name the parts of a right triangle
b. find the missing side of a right triangle using the Pythagorean Theorem
c. find the measure of an unknown side or angle of a right triangle using sine, cosine, or
tangent ratios
d. solve problems using right angle trigonometry
Graphing
a) draw a Cartesian co-ordinate system
b) plot and name points in a Cartesian co-ordinate system
c) given an equation in two variables:
a. determine if an ordered pair is a solution
b. find ordered pairs which are solutions
c. create a table of values
d) graph linear equations
e) determine the slope of a line given two points on the line
f) relate slope to grade and pitch
g) find x- and y-intercepts
h) solve problems using graphs of linear equations
B 10. Additional material pertaining to specific vocations
C 10. Additional material in preparation for optional topics A and B in Advanced Level-Algebraic
Mathematics
Mathematics: Intermediate Level—Algebraic Mathematics
Estimation is a skill that should be emphasized. Students should also be strongly encouraged to
check answers and that solutions are reasonable in the context.
1. Operations with Rational Numbers
It is expected that learners be able to:
a) write fractions as decimals and decimals as fractions
b) add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers
c) use order of operations
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
92
d) graph rational numbers on the number line
e) define absolute value
2. Measurement
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a) use the common metric units for temperature, length, area, volume/capacity, and mass
b) use the common Imperial units for temperature, length, area, volume/capacity, and
force
c) convert between and within metric and Imperial units using tables and/or calculators
d) use proportional reasoning for conversions
3. Perimeter, Area, and Volume
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a) find perimeters of triangles, squares, rectangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, circles and
composite figures using formulas
b) find areas of the above shapes using formulas
c) find the surface areas of cubes, rectangular solids, right cylinders and cones, spheres,
and composite solids using formulas
d) find the volumes of cubes, rectangular solids, right cylinders and cones, spheres, and
composite solids using formulas
e) distinguish between concepts of perimeter and area and their respective units
4. Ratio, Proportion and Percent
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a) read, write, interpret, and compare ratios
b) read, write and identify proportions and use them to solve problems
c) use ratio and proportion to interpret and make scale drawings
d) use ratio and proportion to solve problems involving similar triangles
e) use ratios and proportions to solve problems involving:
i) finding percent when part and whole are known
ii) finding part when percent and whole are known
iii) finding whole when part and percent are known
5. Algebra
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a) explain the use of variables
b) evaluate algebraic expressions using substitution
c) combine like terms and remove parentheses
d) solve first degree equations in one variable
e) translate a problem into an equation
f) use equations to solve problems
g) solve simple formulas for one variable
h) use formulas to solve problems
6. Linear Equations and Graphing
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a) draw a Cartesian co-ordinate system
b) plot and name points in a Cartesian co-ordinate system
c) given an equation in two variables:
i) determine if an ordered pair is a solution
ii) find ordered pairs which are solutions
d) graph equations of the form x = a and y = b,
e) graph linear equations using
i) slope y-intercept
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
93
f)
g)
h)
i)
ii) two intercepts
iii) a table of values
relate slope to grade and pitch
find x- and y-intercepts
determine the equation of a line, y = mx + b, given
i) its graph
ii) its slope and a point on the line
iii) two points on the line
solve problems using graphs of linear equations
7. Powers, Roots, and Scientific Notation
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a) read and write numbers expressed as powers
b) evaluate powers with integral exponents
c) apply laws of exponents to simplify expressions
d) express numbers using scientific notation
e) convert between scientific and standard notation
f) determine the square root of a perfect square
g) express a square root as a mixed radical in simplest form (numerical radicands only)
h) approximate square roots of real numbers using a calculator
8. Polynomials
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a) distinguish between monomials, binomials, trinomials and other polynomials (in one
variable only)
b) apply the laws of exponents to variable expressions with integral exponents
c) evaluate polynomials by substitution
d) add, subtract, and multiply polynomials in one variable
e) factor polynomials by removing the largest common factor
f) factor binomials of the form a x – b y
g) factor trinomials of the form ax + bx + c with a = 1 ONLY
h) divide a polynomial by a monomial
2
2
2
2
2
9. Trigonometry
It is expected that learners will be able to
a) name parts of a triangle
b) find missing side of a right triangle using the Pythagorean Theorem
c) find the measure of an unknown side or angle of a right triangle using sine, cosine, or
tangent ratios solve problems using right angle trigonometry
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
94
Mathematics: Advanced Level—Algebraic Mathematics
Goal Statement
The goals for Advanced Algebraic Mathematics are (1) to provide students with sufficient
mathematical knowledge for academic, career, and technical programs whose admission
requirements include Math 11 equivalence and (2) to prepare students to enter Provincial Level
mathematics courses.
Learning Outcomes
It is expected that learners will use a scientific calculator to evaluate complex expressions with
emphasis on using special keys to perform a variety of functions. The use of a graphing calculator
or other technology is optional.
1. Basic Algebraic Skills Review
Note: A review of the following basic algebraic skills is suggested but not required. It is expected
that learners will be able to:
a. perform operations with real numbers including absolute value and exponential notation
b. simplify expressions using rules for order of operations and properties of exponents
c. translate common language into algebraic expressions
d. evaluate algebraic expressions by substitution
e. simplify algebraic expressions with nested parentheses
2. Solving Linear Equations and Inequalities
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve first degree/linear equations in one variable
b. solve simple formulas for a given variable
c. solve and graph linear inequalities in one variable
d. write set-builder and/or interval notation for the solution set or graph of an inequality
e. use linear equations, formulas and linear inequalities to solve applied problems
f. find the union or intersection of two sets
g. solve and graph compound inequalities (conjunctions and disjunctions)
h. solve absolute value equations
3. Graphing, Relations, and Functions
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. write linear equations in slope-intercept form
b. graph linear equations and non-linear equations using a table of values
c. graph linear equations using the y-intercept and slope and using x- and y-intercepts
d. graph horizontal and vertical lines
e. find the slope of a line given two points on the line
f. find the equation of a line given graphic data: the slope and y-intercept, the slope and
one point, or two points on the line
g. determine whether a pair of lines is parallel, perpendicular or neither
h. find the equation of a line parallel or perpendicular to a given line and through a given
point
i. use the definition of function and the vertical line test to distinguish between functions
and non-functions
j. use and interpret function notation to evaluate functions for given x-values and find xvalues for given function values
k. determine the domain and range of a function
l. graph linear functions and non-linear functions such as quadratic, cubic, square root,
reciprocal, and absolute value functions
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
95
m. graph linear inequalities in two variables
Optional Outcomes:
n. graph exponential functions
o. analyze functions to determine line of symmetry, vertices, asymptotes, and intercepts
p. understand and demonstrate transformations in graphs resulting from the following
changes in the defining equation: translation, reflection, dilation
q. use a graphing calculator or other appropriate technology to graph equations
r. identify an appropriate graph for a given relation
s. develop a model function from a given graph or set of data
t. perform linear regression using a graphing calculator to fit a linear function to data
4. Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve systems of linear equations in two variables by graphing, substitution and
elimination methods
b. determine if a system of equations will have no, one or an infinite number of solutions
c. use systems of equations to solve applied problems
Optional Outcomes:
d. solve systems of equations in three variables and applied problems using such systems
e. graph the solution for a system of linear inequalities in two variables
f. use a graphing calculator or other appropriate technology to solve systems of equations
and inequalities
5. Polynomials and Polynomial Functions
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. determine the degree of a polynomial
b. distinguish between monomials, binomials, trinomials, and other polynomials
c. add, subtract, multiply polynomials
d. divide polynomials by monomials
e. factor polynomials using an appropriate strategy or a combination of techniques: common
factors, difference of squares, difference and sum of cubes, perfect square trinomials,
trial/error, or grouping
f. solve polynomial equations using the principle of zero products
g. solve applied problems using polynomial equations/ functions
Optional Outcomes:
h. divide polynomials and binomials using long division
i. divide polynomials and binomials using synthetic division
6. Rational Expressions and Equations and Variation
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. identify situations and find values for which a rational expression will be undefined
b. simplify rational expressions
c. add, subtract, multiply and divide rational expressions
d. solve rational equations and check
e. solve formulas involving rational expressions for a given variable
f. solve applied problems that can be modeled with rational equations
g. simplify complex fractions
h. express variations in the form of equations (direct, inverse, joint, combined)
i. solve problems involving direct, inverse, joint and combined variation
7. Radical Expressions and Equations
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
96
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. write radicals as powers with rational exponents and vice versa
b. use rational exponents to simplify radical expressions
c. simplify, add, subtract, multiply and divide radical expressions (numeric or algebraic)
d. rationalize denominators in fractional expressions containing radicals (including the use
of conjugates)
e. solve equations involving radical expressions or powers with rational exponents and
check for extraneous roots
f. solve formulas involving powers and square roots for a given variable
g. solve applied problems which can be modeled by radical equations, and determine if
solutions are reasonable given the context of the problem
Optional Outcomes:
h. identify imaginary and complex numbers and express them in standard form
i. add, subtract, multiply, and divide complex numbers
8. Quadratic Equations and Quadratic Functions
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve quadratic equations by factoring, principle of square roots, completing the square
and the quadratic formula
b. use the discriminate to identify the number and type of solutions of a quadratic equation
c. write a quadratic equation given its solutions
d. solve rational and radical equations reducible to a quadratic pattern and check that
answers are reasonable
e. solve selected polynomial equations that can be factored simplifying to linear and/or
quadratic factors
f. graph quadratic functions of the form f(x) = a(x -h)² + k and demonstrate translations,
reflections and stretching/shrinking resulting from changes in the function equation
g. find the vertex, line of symmetry, minimum or maximum values, x- and y-intercepts,
domain and range, given the function f(x) = a(x -h)² + k
h. rewrite f(x) = ax² + bx + c as f(x) = a(x -h)² + k by completing the square
i. solve problems that can be modeled using quadratic equations including maximum and
minimum problems
Optional Outcomes:
j. solve quadratic equations having complex number solutions
k. use a graphing calculator or other appropriate technology to graph and solve quadratic
equations
l. solve quadratic inequalities by graphing
m. solve polynomial and rational inequalities algebraically
9. Trigonometry
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. label the sides of a right triangle with respect to a given angle
b. determine sine, cosine, and tangent ratios of an angle in a right triangle using the side
lengths
c. use a scientific calculator to find the trigonometric value for a given angle and to find an
angle given its trigonometric value
d. solve right triangles and applied problems using the basic trigonometric ratios, the
Pythagorean theorem, and sum of the angles (180°)
e. use the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines to solve non-right (oblique) triangles and
applied problems
Optional Outcomes:
f. use A = 1/2bcsinA to find the area of a triangle
g. determine the quadrant for positive and negative angles in standard position
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
97
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
identify coterminal angles
determine primary trigonometric function values for angles in standard position
identify reference angles
evaluate primary trigonometric functions for any angle in a variety of conditions
solve trigonometric equations involving the primary functions over a specific domain
use the trigonometric definitions to deduce unknown trigonometric values from given
values
10. Optional Topics
Learners may wish to complete either A or B but these outcomes are not required.
A. Geometry
a. recall the properties of parallel lines, similar and congruent figures, polygons, angle
relationships, angle measurements, and basic compass and straightedge construction
b. demonstrate an understanding of the following properties of a circle:
 the perpendicular bisector of a chord passes through the centre of the circle
 the line joining the midpoint of a chord to the centre is perpendicular to the chord
 the line through the centre, perpendicular to a chord, bisects the chord
 central angles containing equal chords or arcs are equal (the converse is also
true)
 inscribed angles containing the same or equal chords (on the same side of
chord) or arcs are equal
 an inscribed angle equals half the central angle containing the same or equal
chords (on the same side of chord) or arcs are equal
 an inscribed angle in a semicircle measures 90°
 opposite angles of a cyclic (inscribed) quadrilateral are supplementary
 a tangent is perpendicular to the radius at the point of contact (the converse is
also true)
 tangents from an external point are equal
 the angle between a chord and tangent equals the inscribed angle of the
opposite side of the chord (the converse is also true)
c. demonstrate and clearly communicate deductive reasoning in the solution of applied
problems
B. Data Analysis
a. explain the uses and misuses of statistics
b. demonstrate an understanding of mean, median, mode, range, quartiles, percentiles,
standard deviation, the normal curve, z-scores, sampling error and confidence intervals
c. graphically present data in the form of frequency tables, line graphs, bar graphs, and
stem and leaf plots
d. design and conduct statistics project, analyze the data, and communicate the outcomes
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
98
Mathematics: Advanced Level—Business/Technical
Mathematics
Goal Statement
The goal of Advanced Business/Technical Mathematics is to provide the student with practical
applications useful in future vocational training, careers, or personal life.
Learning Outcomes
1. Operations with Real Numbers
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. add, subtract, multiply and divide rational numbers
b. evaluate powers with rational bases and integer exponents
c. demonstrate the order of operations with rational numbers
d. evaluate radicals and distinguish between exact answers and approximate answers
e. write numbers in scientific notation, convert from scientific notation to decimal notation,
and multiply and divide numbers expressed in scientific notation
f. use a scientific calculator
2. First Degree Equations and Inequalities
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve first degree equations, in one variable, including those involving parentheses
b. solve formulas for a given variable
c. solve first degree inequalities in one variable
d. solve practical problems using a first degree equation
3. Equations and their graphs
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. plot points on a coordinate system
b. use number pairs to name points on the coordinate system
c. determine whether a given point is a solution to an equation in two variables
d. (optional) create an appropriate table of values and recognize the graph of the following
relations:
• y =ax+ b
(linear)
2
• y =ax + bx+ c (quadratic)
• y =a/x
(reciprocal)
• y =a(bx)1/2
(square root)
x
• y =a(b )
(exponential) where a, b, and c are real numbers
e. (optional) given the graph of an equation, determine, where appropriate, the following:
• x- and y-intercepts
• vertex
• slope
Optional Learning Outcomes
Learners must complete a minimum of three of the following:
A. Consumer Mathematics
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve consumer problems involving unit prices, wages earned in various situations,
taxation simple and compound problems, and exchange rates
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
99
b. reconcile financial statements
c. solve budget problems
d. solve investment and credit problems involving interest
B. Finance
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve problems involving compound interest
b. find the effective interest rate
c. solve annuity problems
d. solve loan and mortgage problems
e. determine the finance charge on a loan
C. Data Analysis
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. determine the mean, median, mode and range from a set of data
b. interpret and/or construct frequency tables, broken line graphs, bar graphs, and stemplots from a set of data
c. (optional) find quartiles and the percentile represented by a given data value
d. (optional) calculate the standard deviation of a set of data using appropriate technology
e. (optional) use z-scores to analyze normally distributed data
f. design a statistical experiment, collect the data, analyze and communicate the results
D. Measurement
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve problems involving composite shapes and solids, with reference to perimeter, area,
volume and surface area
b. calculate maximum and minimum values, using tolerances, for lengths, areas and
volumes
c. enlarge or reduce a dimensional object according to a specified scale
E. Geometry
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. use any of the following angle properties to determine an angle in a drawing:
• vertically opposite angles
• corresponding angles, alternate interior angles, and angles on the same side of the
transversal
• angles on a line
• angles on a point
• complementary and supplementary angles
• angle sum of a triangle
b. classify triangles and quadrilaterals according to their sides and angles
c. draw triangles given:
• three sides
• two sides and an included angle
• two angles and a side
d. draw quadrilaterals given various combinations of sides, angles, and diagonals
F. Trigonometry
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve right triangles using one or more of
i. the sine ratio
ii. the cosine ratio
iii. the tangent ratio
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
100
iv. the Pythagorean theorem
v. the angle sum property of triangles
b. (optional) solve triangles using the Law of Sines and/or the Law of Cosines (excluding the
ambiguous case)
G. Systems of Equations
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve systems of linear equations in two variables graphically and/or algebraically
b. graph linear inequalities in two variables
c. solve graphically, systems of linear inequalities
d. solve practical problems
H. Trades Option
It is expected that learners will be able to solve applied problems (as
related to a specific trade) using:
a. algebra
b. geometry
a. right triangle trigonometry
b. ratio and proportion
c. percentage
I. Health Option
It is expected that learners will be able to solve applied problems (as
related to the health field) using:
a. ratio and proportion
b. unit conversion
c. percentage
Mathematics: Advanced Level—Developmental Mathematics
Goal Statement
The goal of Advanced Developmental Mathematics is to provide students with sufficient algebra,
geometry, and trigonometry to satisfy grade 11 prerequisites for some vocational, career,
technical, and/or further academic programs.
Learning Outcomes
1. Operations with Real Numbers
It is expected that learners be able to:
a. write fractions as decimals and repeating decimals as fractions
b. add, subtract, multiply and divide rational numbers
c. evaluate powers with rational bases and integer exponents
d. demonstrate the order of operations with rational numbers
e. evaluate radicals with rational radicands and distinguish between exact answers and
approximate answers
f. simplify, add, subtract, multiply and divide square roots
2. First Degree Equations and Inequalities
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve first degree equations, in one variable, including those involving parentheses
b. solve formulas for a given variable when other variables are known
c. solve formulas for a given variable
d. solve first degree inequalities in one variable
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
101
e. solve practical problems that can be solved using a first degree equation
3. Polynomials
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. distinguish between monomials, binomials, trinomials and other polynomials (in one
variable only)
b. apply the laws of exponents to variable expressions with integral exponents
c. evaluate polynomials by substitution
d. add, subtract, and multiply polynomials
e. factor polynomials by removing the largest common factor
2 2
2 2
2
f. factor binomials of the form a x – b y and trinomials of the form x + bx + c
g. solve quadratic equations using the law of zero products
2
h. (optional) factor trinomials of the form ax + bx + c
4. Rational Expressions
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. simplify, by factoring, rational expressions consisting of polynomial numerators and either
monomial, binomial, or trinomial denominators
b. determine values for which a rational expression is undefined
c. multiply and divide rational expressions
d. add and subtract rational expressions consisting of monomial and/or binomial
denominators
e. solve simple rational equations and check solutions
5. Linear Equations
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. graph a linear equation including the forms x = a and y = b
b. given a linear equation or its graph, determine its
i. slope
ii. x- and y-intercepts
c. determine the equation of a line, y = mx + b, given
i. its graph
ii. its slope and a point on the line
iii. two points on the line
6. Systems of Linear Equations
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve a system of first degree equations in two unknowns by graphing, substitution, and
elimination methods
b. solve practical problems that can be solved using a system of equations
7. Radical Expressions
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. simplify square roots with variable radicands
b. add, subtract, multiply and divide square roots with variable radicands
c. solve equations with one square root containing a polynomial radicand and check for
extraneous solutions
8. Trigonometry
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve right triangles using one or more of
i. the sine ratio
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
102
ii. the cosine ratio
iii. the tangent ratio
iv. the Pythagorean theorem
v. the angle sum property of triangles
b. evaluate sine and cosine for angles from 0º to 180º (optional)
c. solve triangles using the Law of Cosines or the Law of Sines, excluding the ambiguous
case (optional)
9. Optional Learning Outcomes
Students must complete one of the following four optional topics:
A. The Quadratic Equation
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve quadratic equations by factoring
2
b. solve equations of the form x + bx + c = 0 by completing the square
c. solve quadratic equations by using the quadratic formula
2
d. graph y = ax + bx + c and determine its
i. x- and y-intercepts
ii. vertex
e. solve practical problems that can be solved using a quadratic equation
B. Statistics
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. determine the mean, median, mode, range and standard deviation of a set of data
b. represent data graphically using broken line graphs and bar graphs
c. understand how the normal curve can be used to describe a normally distributed
population
d. calculate z-scores and determine areas under the normal curve
e. use areas under the normal curve to analyze data in terms of the probability of various
events
C. Financial Mathematics
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. solve simple interest problems using the formula, i = prt (for any variable)
 r
b. solve compound interest problems for A or P using A  P 1  
 n
nt
n
 r
c. find the effective interest rate using E.R.  1    1
 n
 r  n 
nP 1    1
 n 

d. solve annuity problems using A 
r
(for A or P only)
r
A 
n
e. find periodic payment using P 
 nt
 r
1  1  
 n
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
103
f. determine the finance charge on a loan
g. determine the interest rate on a loan using tables or appropriate technology
D. Geometry
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. classify triangles according to angles and sides
b. use the properties of triangles to determine the measure of sides and angles
c. determine the measure and/or congruence of angles given a transversal and two parallel
lines
d. use the triangle congruence theorems in simple guided proofs
Mathematics: Advanced Level—Foundations of Mathematics
Learning Outcomes:
It is expected that learners will use various problem solving strategies throughout the course
o guess and check
o look for a pattern
o make a systematic list
o draw or model
o eliminate possibilities
o simplify the original problem
o work backward
o develop alternative approaches.
CORE LEARNING OUTCOMES
1) Basic Algebra
It is expected that learners will be able to
a) use the terms rational, irrational, and integer to classify numbers
b) use order of operations with real numbers
c) solve first degree equations and inequalities
d) solve word problems by translating them into mathematical equations
e) solve simple formulae for a given variable
2) Rates
It is expected that learners will be able to
a) interpret rates in a given context, such as the arts, business, and health sciences
b) solve rate problems using proportions
c) determine unit rates
d) convert units by dimensional analysis (multiplying by one)
e) solve a contextual problem that involves rate or unit rates
3) Linear Relations
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a) write linear equations in slope-intercept form
b) graph linear equations using a table of values
c) graph linear equations using the y-intercept and slope and using x- and y-intercepts
d) given a graph, find the slope of the line
e) draw a graph to represent a rate.
f) interpret slope as an average rate of change
g) interpret domain and range from a graph
h) solve problems that involve linear relations
i) use function notation
j) determine whether a relation is a function
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
104
4) Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities
It is expected that learners will be able to
a) solve a system of first degree equations in two unknowns by graphing, substitution
and/or elimination
b) solve practical problems that can be solved using a system of equations
c) graph a linear inequality in two variables
d) graph the solution for a system of linear inequalities in two variables
e) use the graph to solve optimization problems.
5) Quadratic Functions
It is expected that learners will be able to
2
a) factor (GCF, difference of squares, trinomials of the form ax + bc + c with a = 1 only)
b) solve quadratic equations by factoring or using the quadratic formula
c) identify, from a graph, the vertex, intercepts, domain, range, and axis of symmetry
d) determine the vertex using the vertex formula
e) determine whether the y-coordinate of the vertex is a maximum or minimum
f) graph a quadratic function using the vertex, intercepts, or a table of values
g) solve problems that involve the characteristics of a quadratic function
6) Geometry
It is expected that learners will be able to
a) classify and distinguish among acute, right, obtuse, straight, reflex, complementary
and supplementary, and vertically opposite angles
b) generalize, using inductive reasoning, the angle relationships created when parallel
lines are cut by a transversal and the angle sum property of a triangle
c) use deductive reasoning to determine the measures of angles in a diagram that
d) involves parallel lines,angles and triangles
e) measure angles with a protractor
f) classify triangles according to sides and angles
g) explain the difference between similar and congruent shapes
h) solve problems that involve similar triangles
OPTIONAL LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learners must complete a minimum of four of the following seven options, at least one of
which is trigonometry or statistics:
A) Financial Math
It is expected that learners will be able to
a) solve consumer problems involving percentage (sales tax, discounts, etc.)
b) determine and or compare wages in various situations
c) solve simple and compound interest problems
d) solve problems involving different forms of credit
B) Measurement
It is expected that learners will be able to
a) draw a scale diagram of a 2-D shape
b) solve problems involving scale diagrams of 2-D shapes and 3-D objects
c) use proportions to determine the scale factor or a missing dimension of a 2-D shape
or 3-D object
d) determine from a scale diagram the area of 2-D shapes and the volume of 3-D objects
e) determine the effect of a change in scale factor on area and volume
C) Statistics
It is expected that learners will be able to
a) determine and interpret the mean, median, mode, range and standard deviation of a
set of data
b) represent data graphically
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
105
c) interpret and analyze graphs and identify bias
d) understand how the normal curve can be used to describe a normally distributed
population
e) calculate z-scores
f) solve problems that involve standard deviation and normal distribution
D) Logical Reasoning
It is expected that learners will be able to
a) make conjectures by observing patterns
b) find a counterexample to disprove a given conjecture
c) determine if a given argument is valid, and justify the reasoning.
d) compare, using examples, inductive and deductive reasoning.
e) prove a conjecture, using deductive reasoning
f) use problem solving strategies to solve problems or play games
E) Trigonometry
It is expected that learners will be able to
a) solve problems involving right triangles, using sine, cosine, or tangent ratios, the angle
sum property of triangles and the Pythagorean Theorem
b) solve triangles using Law of Cosines or Law of Sines, excluding the Ambiguous Case.
c) solve contextual problems involving Law of Cosines or Law of Sines
F) Permutations, Combinations, and Simple Probability
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a) evaluate factorial notation
b) evaluate permutation and combination notation
c) solve related applied problems
d) compute the probability of a simple event
e) distinguish between experimental and theoretical probability
G) Project
Possible topics might include
Create a variation on a puzzle or a game
Research a historical event or person involving math
Research an area of interest that involves math
Collect and interpret data, using statistical methods
Mathematics: Provincial Level—Algebra and Trigonometry
Goal Statement
The goals of the Provincial Algebra and Trigonometry are to prepare adult learners with the
knowledge and skills in algebra and trigonometry necessary for entry to technical, vocational and
career programs that require Math 12 equivalency as a prerequisite and for future study in higherlevel math courses at college/university.
Learning Outcomes
1. Algebra Review
Note: A review of the following outcomes is suggested, but not required.
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. recognize subsets and identify properties of real numbers
b. use interval notation to write a set of numbers
c. evaluate absolute value of a real number and find the distance between two real numbers
d. use rules for order of operations and properties of exponents to simplify expressions
e. add, subtract, and multiply polynomials and factor a polynomial completely
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
106
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
p.
q.
determine the domain of a rational expression, simplify rational expressions, perform
operations with rational expressions and simplify complex rational expressions
use properties of exponents to simplify radical expressions
rationalize the denominator or numerator in a rational expression
use properties of radicals to simplify and combine radicals
define imaginary and complex numbers, express them in standard form, and perform
operations with complex numbers
solve linear equations, equations with absolute value, quadratic equations, radical
equations, and equations reducible to a quadratic form
solve linear inequalities, combined inequalities, and absolute value inequalities and graph
the solutions on a number line
solve applied problems using linear and quadratic equations
solve equations of variation and applied problems involving variation
solve systems of linear equations in two variables and in three variables
distinguish between consistent/inconsistent and dependent/independent systems
use systems of linear equations to solve applied problems
2. Functions and Graphs
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. find the distance between two points in the plane and find the midpoint of a segment
b. apply the distance formula and mid-point formula to solve problems
c. recognize graphs of common functions: linear, constant, quadratic, cubic, square root,
absolute value, reciprocal
d. use the vertical line test to identify functions
e. graph functions and analyze graphs of functions, identifying: domain and range; intervals
on which the function is increasing, decreasing or constant
f. write formulas or functions to model real life applications
g. determine whether a graph is symmetric with respect to the x-axis, y-axis, and the origin
h. identify even or odd functions and recognize their symmetries
i. graph transformations of functions: translations, reflections, stretchings and shrinkings
j. graph functions defined piecewise
k. find the sum, difference, product and quotient of two functions and determine their
domains
l. find the composition of two functions f and g, finding formulas for f(g(x)) and g(f(x)),
identifying the domain of the composition and evaluating the composite function
m. given an equation defining a relation, write an equation of the inverse relation
n. given a graph of a relation or function, sketch a graph of its inverse
o. use the horizontal line test to determine if a function is one-to-one and therefore has an
inverse that is a function
p. find a formula for the inverse of a function
--1
--1
q. find f (f(x)) and f(f (x)) for any number x in the domains of the functions when the
inverse of a function is also a function
Optional Learning Outcomes:
r. use a graphing utility to graph functions
s. decompose a function as a composition of two functions
3. Polynomial and Rational Functions
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. graph quadratic functions and analyze graphs of quadratic functions identifying the
vertex, line of symmetry, maximum/minimum values, and intercepts
b. solve applied problems involving maximum and minimum function values
c. determine the behaviour of the graphs of polynomial functions of higher degree using the
leading coefficient test
d. determine whether a function has a real zero between two real numbers
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
107
e. recognize characteristics of the graphs of polynomial functions including real zeros, yintercept, relative maxima and minima, domain and range
f. divide polynomials using long division
g. use synthetic division to divide a polynomial by x – r
h. use the remainder and factor theorems to find function values and factors of a polynomial
i. list the possible rational zeros for a polynomial function with integer coefficients
j. factor polynomial functions and find the zeros
k. find a polynomial with specified zeros
l. solve polynomial and rational inequalities
Optional Learning Outcomes:
m. fit a quadratic function to data when three data points are given
n. use a graphing utility to graph polynomial functions, determine the real zeros and
estimate the relative maxima and minima of a function
o. graph a rational function identifying all asymptotes
4. Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. evaluate exponential functions including functions with base e
b. recognize the inverse relationship between exponential and logarithmic functions
c. graph exponential and logarithmic functions including transformations and analyze the
graphs in terms of: x- or y-intercepts, asymptotes, increasing or decreasing, domain and
range
d. convert between exponential and logarithmic equations
e. find common and natural logarithms using a calculator
x
log x
f. use basic and inverse properties of logarithms: logb b =1, logb 1=0, logb b =x, b b =x
g. use the product rule, quotient rule and power rule to expand or condense logarithmic
expressions
h. use the change of base property to find a logarithm with base other than 10 or e
i. solve exponential and logarithmic equations
j. use exponential and logarithmic equations to model and solve real-life applications
including exponential growth and decay
Optional Learning Outcomes
k. use a graphing utility to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
l. use a graphing utility to solve exponential and logarithmic functions
5. Trigonometric Functions
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. identify angles in standard position, positive and negative angles, coterminal angles and
reference angles
b. convert between degree and radian measures of angles
c. find the length of an arc, radian measure of central angle, or radius of a circle using the
formula s = r 
d. identify special angles on a unit circle
e. determine the six trigonometric functions of an angle in standard position given a point on
its terminal side
f. find the exact values of the trigonometric functions of special acute angles 30 (/6), 45
(/4), and 60 (/3) or any angles that are multiples of these special angles
g. graph the six trigonometric functions and state their properties
h. graph transformations of the sine and cosine functions and determine period, amplitude,
and phase shift
i. recognize and use the reciprocal, quotient and Pythagorean identities
j. apply the sum or difference formulas and double angle formulas to find exact values and
to verify trigonometric identities
k. recognize and use inverse trigonometric function notation
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
108
l.
m.
n.
o.
use a calculator to evaluate inverse trigonometric functions
find exact values of composite functions with inverse trigonometric functions
solve trigonometric equations over the interval (0, 2)
use trigonometric functions to model and solve real-life problems
Optional Learning Outcomes
p. use the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines to solve oblique triangles
q. solve applied problems using the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines
r. find the area of a triangle given the lengths of any two sides and the measure of the
included angle: Area = ½(bcsin A) = ½(ac sin B) = ½(ab sin C)
s. convert between linear speed and angular speed of an object moving in circular motion
using the formula v = r
t. use the graphing utility to graph trigonometric functions
u. use half-angle formulas to find exact values
v. use a graphing utility to verify or to approximate the solutions of a trigonometric equation
6. Sequences and Series
It is expected that learners will be able to:
th
a. find terms of sequences given the general or n term
th
b. find a formula for the general or n term of a given sequence
c. use summation notation to write a series and evaluate a series designated in summation
notation
d. construct the terms of a sequence defined by a recursive formula
e. recognize and write terms of arithmetic and geometric sequences
th
f. use n term formulas for arithmetic and geometric sequences to find a specified term, or
th
to find n when an n term is given
g. find the sum of the first n terms of arithmetic and geometric sequences
h. find the sum of an infinite geometric series, if it exists
i. use sequences and series to model and solve real-life problems
Optional Learning Outcomes:
j. use a graphing utility to find the sum of n terms of a sequence
7. Optional Topics
Learners may wish to complete any of the following topics but these outcomes are not required:
A. Conic Sections
a. recognize the equations of the four basic conics: circles, ellipses, hyperbola and
parabola
b. write the standard forms of equations of circles, ellipses, and hyperbola with centre
at origin and translated centre (h, k)
c. find the centre and radius of a circle, given its equation, and sketch the graph
d. find the centre, vertices and foci of an ellipse, given its equation, and sketch the
graph
e. find the centre, vertices, foci and asymptotes of a hyperbola, given its equation, and
sketch the graph
f. find the vertex, focus and directrix of a parabola, given its equation, and sketch the
graph
g. solve nonlinear systems of equations
h. use nonlinear systems of equations to solve applied problems
i. use a graphing utility to graph conic sections
j. use a graphing utility to solve non linear systems
B. Permutations and Combinations
a. evaluate factorial notation
b. evaluate permutation and combination notation
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
109
c. solve related applied problems
d. use the fundamental counting principle (factorial)
C. Binomial Expansion
a. expand a power of a binomial using Pascal’s triangle or factorial notation
b. find a specific term of a binomial expansion
c. find the total number of subsets of a set of n objects
D. Probability
a. compute the probability of a simple event
b. distinguish between experimental and theoretical probability
c. classify events as dependent or independent
E. Calculus
a. understand and find the limits of polynomial and rational expressions
b. find the slope of a line tangent to a curve at a point on the curve
c. determine the equation of a line tangent to a curve at a given point
d. use the definition of a derivative to find the derivative of certain polynomials
e. find derivatives using the power rule
f. use the derivative to graph and analyze functions in terms of: increasing/decreasing
intervals, minimum/maximum points, concave up/concave down intervals, and
inflection points
g. solve applied maximum/minimum problems
Mathematics: Provincial Level—Calculus
Goal Statement
ABE Provincial Level Calculus is designed to (1) provide students with the mathematical
knowledge and skills needed for post-secondary academic and career programs and (2) ease the
transition from Provincial level Mathematics to first year calculus at college/university.
1. Prelude to Calculus
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. demonstrate an understanding of the concept of the limit and notation used in expressing
the limit of a function
b. evaluate the limit of a function analytically, graphically and numerically
c. distinguish between the limit of a function as x approaches a and the value of the function
at x  a .
d. demonstrate an understanding of the concept of one and two-sided limits
e. evaluate limits at infinity
f. determine vertical and horizontal asymptotes using limits
g. determine continuity of functions at a point x  a .
h. determine discontinuities and removable discontinuities
i. determine continuity of polynomial, rational, and composite functions
Optional Outcomes:
j. determine continuity of trigonometric functions
k. determine limits of trigonometric functions
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
110
2. The Derivative
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. define and evaluate the derivative at x  a as: f ( x)  lim
x a
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
f ( x)  f (a )
xa
distinguish between continuity and differentiability of a function
determine the slope of a tangent line to a curve at a given point
calculate derivatives of elementary, rational and algebraic functions
distinguish between rate of change and instantaneous rate of change
apply differentiation rules to applied problems
use Chain Rule to compute derivatives of composite functions
solve rate of change application problems
determine local and global extreme values of a function
solve applied optimization (max/min) problems
Optional Outcomes:
k. calculate derivatives of trigonometric functions and their inverses
l. calculate derivatives of exponential and logarithmic functions
m. use logarithmic differentiation
n. calculate derivatives of functions defined implicitly
o. solve related rates problems
p. use Newton’s Method
3. Applications of the Derivative
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. determine critical numbers and inflection points of a function
b. compute differentials
c. use the First and Second Derivative Tests to sketch graphs of functions
d. use concavity and asymptotes to sketch graphs of functions
Optional Outcomes:
e. differentiate implicitly
f. understand and use the Mean Value Theorem
g. apply L’Hopital’s Rule to study the behaviour of functions
4. Antiderivatives
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. compute antiderivatives of linear combinations of functions
b. use antidifferentiation to solve rectilinear motion problems
c. use antidifferentiation to find the area under a curve
d. evaluate integrals using integral tables and substitutions
Optional Outcomes:
e. use antidifferentiation to find the area between two curves
f. compute Riemann sums
g. apply the Trapezoidal Rule
h. solve initial value problems
Optional Outcomes:
5. Differential Equations
It is expected that learners will be able to:
a. derive a general solution of differential equations and find a particular solution satisfying
initial conditions
b. derive differential equations that explain mathematical models in the applied sciences
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
111
SCIENCE
SCIENCES: GENERAL and APPLIED SCIENCE
Adult Education in the natural sciences recognizes the worth of adult experience and the desire to
further understand the world around us, ourselves, and our relationship to the natural world.
General Science programs can best promote such understanding by offering courses that provide
opportunities for students:
A. to develop critical thinking skills;
B. to increase their understanding of the concepts and principles of science;
C. to recognize the uses and limitations of scientific methods;
D. to acquire the skills and understand the processes and applications of science.
An applied science course will stress the practical applications of scientific concepts and skills,
enabling adult learners to pursue further education, training, and/or employment opportunities.
General and Applied Science: Intermediate Level
Learning Outcomes
The learner will be able to:

Understand and gain an appreciation for the methods by which scientific knowledge is
obtained and organized, so that the learner can apply these methods of problem solving
to everyday life.

Understand the fundamental concepts and terminology from the three primary branches
of science: biology, chemistry, and physics. Some learners may also study other
branches of science such as astronomy, geology, or meteorology. The exposure to these
subject areas should show the variation, diversity and similarities between all branches of
science as well as illustrate the effects of science in the learner’s everyday life.

Understand the methodology of a controlled experiment, and the necessity of performing
experiments in order to acquire scientific knowledge.
The course is not limited to units in biology, chemistry and physics, but may be expanded to suit
individual or local needs. No time allotments have been suggested, but it is assumed that the
average completion time for Intermediate Science will be similar to that for the same level
subjects in English and Mathematics.
Generic Topic Outline
At least 5 units are required including one from each of the topics A,B,C and D. Additional units
may be added as desired. The following are outlines of suitable units.
A. Introductory Science
 Define science and its limits
 Explain and use the scientific method
 Demonstrate the skills and techniques of science. (experimental design, use of tables,
graphs and calculations)
 Use appropriate instruments to make measurements
 Solve problems using SI units
 Relate Science and Technology to our modern world
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
112
B. Human Biology
Explain the importance of and inter-dependence between biological systems as covered in one of
the following units:
1. Nutrition
 Describe the energy needs of the body
 Identify nutrients needed by the body
 Plan a healthy diet
 Identify special foods and diets
 Describe worldwide food needs
2. Human Biology
 Identify the parts of the skeletal and muscular systems
 Explain the function of blood and trace its circulation
 Identify the parts and functions of the respiratory system
 Describe the digestive system and the function of the digestive organs
 Identify the parts of the nervous system
(This topic may be substituted for one of the above: identify and explain the
reproductive system)
3. The Cell
 Identify the parts of the microscope and demonstrate its use.
 Explain the theory, structure and function of the cell
 Describe cellular processes
 Define cell division
 Diagram cell organization
C. Chemistry
 To acquire a general understanding of the structure of matter and the organization of the
Periodic Table.
 Describe the different states of matter
 Describe how matter is organized into elements, compounds and mixtures.
 Identify the subatomic components of atoms
 Use the periodic table to determine the properties of elements and their characteristic
behaviours
 Describe the organization of the periodic table
 Categorize compounds as ionic or covalent
 Name a simple compounds from its formula
 Write the formula for a simple compound
D. Physics
Do one of the following:
1. Machines
 Define force and work
 Apply the concept of work to simple machines to solve quantitative problems
 Solve problems involving simple machines, levers, inclined planes, wedges, pulleys,
wheels and axles
 Solve problems involving other machines: gears, pulley systems, hydraulic systems
2. Energy
 Define basic concepts: force, work, energy, conservation law, power
 Distinguish between forms of energy
 Solve quantitative problems involving thermal energy
 Solve quantitative problems involving electrical energy
 Solve quantitative problems involving conservation of energy
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
113
3.
Electrical Circuits
Distinguish between AC and DC circuits
Choose and use appropriate instruments to measure voltage and current
Solve quantitative problems involving Ohm’s Law
Solve quantitative problems involving circuits
Explain the use of switches, fuses, and other components of an electrical circuit
Demonstrate appropriate safety precautions






4. Motion in one dimension
 Solve quantitative problems involving velocity
 Solve quantitative problems involving acceleration
E. The fifth unit
May be chosen from the above or from other topics such as disease, drugs, chemical reactions
and equations, weather, astronomy, earth science, environmental issues, etc.
All Intermediate General Science courses must include experiment and/or field time of at least
10% of the total time. Experiment and/or field exercises should be relevant to the selected units
and emphasize those techniques and skills appropriate for this level of course.
General and Applied Science: Advanced Level
Adult learners will demonstrate their knowledge, skill and understanding of science at an
Advanced Level. (For outcomes at an Advanced level see the relevant outcomes for specific
sciences in this guide.) This material may be organized around a central unifying theme. All
courses must include experiments and/or field activities of at least 10% of the total time or
contents as appropriate. Experiments and/or field activities should be relevant to the course and
emphasize those techniques and skills appropriate for the level of the course.
General and Applied Science: Provincial Level
Adult learners will demonstrate their knowledge, skill and understanding of science at a Provincial
Level. Courses will include provincial level material from one or more of Biology, Chemistry,
Physics or Earth Sciences. (For outcomes at a Provincial level in these sciences see the relevant
outcomes in this guide.) This material may be organized around a central unifying theme. All
courses must include experiments and/or field activities of at least 10% of the total time or
contents as appropriate. Experiments and/or field activities should be relevant to the course and
emphasize those techniques and skills appropriate for the level of the course.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
114
SCIENCES: BIOLOGY
Goal Statement
Biology is the study of living organisms and life processes. The life and cultural experiences of
adult learners serve as a basis for further study of macro and micro environments. Students gain
the knowledge and skills to build an appreciation and understanding of the natural world and their
role in it. Development of critical thinking skills facilitates an ability to make sound and ethical
decisions about themselves, their homes, workplaces and the global community. The courses
should inspire further discovery and exploration in the life sciences.
An Integrated Resource Package, containing learning outcomes, suggested instructional and
assessment strategies and suggested resources, has been developed for use in Advanced Level
Biology.
Learning Outcomes
Biology learners will:
 Obtain the prerequisite body of knowledge and skills that will provide a basis for further
academic and career / vocational education and training
 Demonstrate awareness of the diversity and interconnectedness of organisms
 Use scientific method to evaluate information and to analyze experiences
 Communicate about life sciences in their own words and cite references appropriately
 Work independently and also as part of a team, where appropriate
 Evaluate media regarding issues in life sciences
 Demonstrate an awareness of ethical issues relevant to life sciences
 All biology courses must include a minimum of seven dedicated laboratory and /or
fieldwork activities, wherein biology learners will:
o Demonstrate familiarity with common lab and field equipment and its use
o Conduct lab and field procedures safely and ethically
o Demonstrate microscope skills
o Collect and record data effectively
o Analyze and interpret data collected
o Communicate results and conclusions
Biology: Advanced Level
Core Topics
A. Cell Biology
 Describe the cell theory
 Identify the levels of biological organization
 Describe and compare major structures and their functions in prokaryotic and
eukaryotic cells
 Outline the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration and explain their
roles in living systems
 Explain cell division in terms of sexual and asexual reproduction
B. Evolution
 Cite evidence for evolutionary theory
 Explain the mechanisms of evolution
 Discuss the origin of life
C. Diversity of Life


Demonstrate an understanding of classification
Identify major taxonomic groups
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
115

Identify structures and distinguishing characteristics and describe life processes for the
following groups:
o
o
o
o
o
o
Viruses
Bacteria
Protists
Fungi
Plants – nonvascular and vascular
Animals – invertebrates and vertebrates
D. Ecology
 Describe energy flow and nutrient cycles within ecosystems
 Characterize ecosystems and the interactions therein
 Describe ecological changes over time
 Define biosphere and characterize biomes
 Identify and evaluate ecological issues
Options
The following topics may be included:
 Bioethics
 Ethnobotany
 Resource management
 Applied ecology
 Methods in ecology
 Behavioural ecology
 Genetics
 Parasitology
 Local topics
Laboratory Skills
All biology courses must include a minimum of seven dedicated laboratory and/or fieldwork
activities, wherein biology learners will:
 Demonstrate familiarity with common lab and field equipment and its use
 Conduct lab and field procedures safely and ethically
 Demonstrate microscope skills
 Collect and record data effectively
 Analyze and interpret data collected
 Communicate results and conclusions
Biology: Provincial Level
Human Biology:
Core Topics
A. Cell Biology
 Explain the role of molecules, including water, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic
acids
 Describe major structures and functions of cells and their components, including
o the basic mechanisms of protein synthesis
o the basic mechanisms of membrane transport
o the basic mechanisms of DNA replication
 Describe the role of enzymes and their importance to cellular processes.
 Outline the processes of cellular respiration
 Describe and compare mitosis and meiosis
B. Genetics
 Describe the principles of inheritance
 Solve basic genetics problems
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
116

Describe the role of DNA
C. Human Biology
 Apply the concept of homeostasis
 Demonstrate knowledge of integration of tissues, organs, and systems
 Identify structures and describe functions of at least six of the following:
o Skeleto-muscular system
o Digestive system
o Cardiovascular system
o Blood and immunity
o Respiratory system
o Endocrine system
o Nervous and sensory system
o Excretory system
o Reproductive system
Options
The following topics may be included:
 Bioethics
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Human development
 Local topics
 Nutrition
 Photosynthesis
 Public health issues
Laboratory Skills
All biology courses must include a minimum of seven dedicated laboratory and /or fieldwork
activities, wherein biology learners will:
 Demonstrate familiarity with common lab and field equipment and its use
 Conduct lab and field procedures safely and ethically
 Demonstrate microscope skills
 Collect and record data effectively
 Analyze and interpret data collected
 Communicate results and conclusions
Biology: Provincial Level
Ecology:
Core Topics
A. Cell Biology
 Explain the role of molecules, including water, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic
acids
 Describe major structures and functions of cells and their components, including
o the basic mechanisms of protein synthesis
o the basic mechanisms of membrane transport
o the basic mechanisms of DNA replication
 Describe the role of enzymes and their importance to cellular processes.
 Outline the processes of cellular respiration
 Describe and compare mitosis and meiosis
B. Bioenergetics
Outline the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration and their relationship to one
another
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
117
C. Plant Anatomy and Physiology
 Describe the major plant tissue types and their functions
 Describe the functions of plant control and reproductive systems
D. Animal Anatomy and Physiology
 Apply the concept of homeostasis
 Demonstrate knowledge of integration of tissues, organs and systems
 Identify structures and describe functions of the following systems:
 Respiratory system
 Cardiovascular system
 Skeleton-muscular system
 Reproductive system
 Nervous and sensory systems
E. Ecology
 Use fundamentals of classification to identify organisms
 Explain how plant and animal diversity enables adaptation to environments
 Explain the principles of population dynamics: population growth, density, distribution,
and regularity
 Explain ecosystem dynamics: energy flow and nutrient cycling
 Explain community dynamics, including community structure, diversity, and interspecific
relationships
 Demonstrate knowledge of the challenges to biome integrity”
Laboratory Skills
All Provincial Biology courses must include a minimum of seven dedicated laboratory and /or
fieldwork activities. The learning outcomes for these are described in the Overall Learning
Outcomes for biology.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
118
SCIENCES: CHEMISTRY
Goal Statement
Chemistry is an essential part of the everyday world. A knowledge and understanding of its
principles is the base on which applications in health, environment and industrial development are
founded. The chemistry courses will foster understanding of science as a vital part of a
sustainable society and provide a basis for further academic and career/vocational training.

The Learning Outcomes
Chemistry learners will:
o Obtain the prerequisite body of knowledge and skills that will provide a basis for further
academic and career/ vocational training
o Demonstrate an awareness of chemistry in everyday life
o Demonstrate an awareness of chemistry in solutions to environmental challenges
o Apply scientific method to investigate phenomena
o Communicate effectively using the language of chemistry
o Carry out all duties in an ethical, professional manner, including the collection and
treatment of data
o Work independently and also as part of a team, where appropriate
o Handle equipment and chemicals in a safe and effective manner with regard to personal
safety and the safety of others
Chemistry: Advanced Level
Core Topics
A. Measurement
 Demonstrate the concepts of precision and accuracy and how they differ, utilizing
significant figures
 Perform calculations using scientific notation
 Perform conversions with the SI system
B. Properties of Substances
 Differentiate between the phases of matter
 Identify chemical or physical properties of substances
 Describe Dalton’s Atomic Theory and the Law of Constant Composition
C. Periodic Trends
 Use the periodic table to determine atomic composition of isotopes
 Use the periodic table to predict electron arrangement of chemical families in order to
predict trends in ion charge, reactivity, ionization energy, electronegativity, atomic radii,
and ionic radii
D.
Atomic Structure
 Analyze the historical development of atomic theory
 Describe the Bohr and Wave Mechanical model of the atom and cite evidence for these
models including absorption and emission spectra and their use in modern technology
E. Mole Concept
 Define a mole and its significance
 Perform calculations including molar and formula mass, mole to mass conversions, and
percent composition by mass of compounds
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
119
F. Bonding
 Define covalent and ionic bonding
 Construct the formulas of compounds
 Use electronegativity to predict bond types
 Draw Lewis structures, predict molecular shapes, and determine polarity
G. Nomenclature
 Write names for compounds given the formulae and write formulae for compounds given
the names for the following types of compounds:
 Covalent compounds
 Ionic compounds
 Compounds containing polyatomic ions
 Compounds containing transition metals
 Acids
H. Chemical Reactions
 Balance equations
 Classify and predict single and double replacement reactions, combustion reactions, and
acid-base neutralizations
 Classify synthesis, decomposition, exothermic and endothermic reactions
 Perform stoichiometric calculations including mass-to-mass, limiting reagent, and percent
yield
I.
Solutions
 Predict solubility and conductivity of polar and non-polar compounds
 Define Arrhenius acids and bases
 Relate the pH scale to acids and bases
 Perform calculations involving dilutions
 Perform stiochiometric calculations involving solutions including titrations
J.
Organic Chemistry
 Classify substances as organic
 Differentiate the various types of bonding between carbon atoms
 Write names and draw structures of hydrocarbons
 Categorize organic compounds based on their functional groups
Options
Options may include additional organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, gas laws, and
environmental ethics
Laboratories
Chemistry laboratories are an essential component of the study of chemistry.
During laboratories, students reinforce theory through practice. Laboratories develop skills in
safety, procedures, techniques, data collection, analysis, and communication.
In the laboratory exercises, students will:
 List the safety and protective equipment available in a laboratory setting
 Demonstrate the appropriate procedures and techniques for dealing with particular
hazards and hazardous materials
 Follow instructions and procedures
 Handle appropriate equipment for measuring mass, volume, and temperature
 Prepare solutions
 Perform titrations
 Collect and record data effectively
 Analyze and interpret data
 Communicate results and conclusions
A minimum of eight labs are to be completed covering the core concepts.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
120
Chemistry: Provincial Level
Core Topics
A. Reaction Kinetics
 Describe the collision model of chemical reactions
 Describe activation energy, endo and exothermic reactions using potential and kinetic
energy diagrams
 Describe the factors that effect reaction rate including temperature, concentration,
surface area, and catalysts
B. Equilibrium
 Explain the nature of chemical equilibrium using examples
 Apply Le Chatelier’s Principle
 Calculate equilibrium constants of homogenous and heterogeneous systems and
equilibrium concentrations from equilibrium constants
 Ksp and solubility
C. Acid-Base
 Describe Bronsted-Lowry acids and bases including acid-bases pairs
 Predict the relative strengths of acids
 Calculate [H+], [OH-], pH, and pOH from any one known
 Calculate pH from Ka
 Describe the characteristics of a buffer system
D. Oxidation-Reduction
 Assign oxidation states to elements in compounds
 Identify oxidizing and reducing agents
 Balance redox equations
 Describe the components of electrochemical and electrolytic cells
 Predict the voltage, Eo, of electrochemical and electrolytic cells
 Describe the applications of oxidation-reduction to everyday and industrial processes
E. Gas Laws
 Use the appropriate units and conversions for pressure, volume and temperature
 Apply Boyle’s, Charles’, Guy-Lussac’s and the Combined Gas Laws to predict pressure,
volume, or temperature
 Describe an ideal gas and make calculations using the Ideal Gas Law
Options
Options may include: organic functional groups, thermochemistry, nuclear chemistry,
biochemistry, environmental ethics, and industrial applications
Laboratories
Chemistry laboratories are an essential component of the study of chemistry.
During laboratories, students reinforce theory through practice. Laboratories develop skills in
safety, procedures, techniques, data collection, analysis, and communication.
In the laboratory exercises, students will:
 List the safety and protective equipment available in a laboratory setting
 Demonstrate the appropriate procedures and techniques for dealing with particular
hazards and hazardous materials
 Follow instructions and procedures
 Handle appropriate equipment for measuring mass, volume, and temperature
 Prepare solutions
 Perform titrations
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
121




Collect and record data effectively
Analyze and interpret data
Communicate results and conclusions
Write formal laboratory reports
A minimum of eight labs are to be completed covering the core concepts.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
122
SCIENCES: PHYSICS
Goal Statement
Since physics is the study of the fundamental laws of nature, it is relevant to a wide range of
human concerns and achievements. Technological change, which stems from an understanding
of physics, is often accompanied by extensive social change, to which each of us must adapt.
Moreover, the concepts of physics have profound effects on the way we think about the universe,
our societies, our work and ourselves. At the most immediate level, physics is essential to
academic studies and career training in a wide range of fields.
Advanced and Provincial Level Physics should therefore aim to foster and develop, as part of
general education, a scientific way of thinking and a basic knowledge of scientific ideas.
Numerical examples and derivation of formulae will be algebra based. The courses should also
nurture an understanding of science as an integral part of society’s culture and provide
groundwork for further academic, career, or vocational training.
An Integrated Resource Package, containing learning outcomes, suggested instructional and
assessment strategies and suggested resources, has been developed for use in Advanced Level
Physics.
Learning Outcomes
Physics learners will
 Use the language and concepts of physics to describe how physical processes, devices
and phenomena work
 Obtain the prerequisite body of knowledge and skills that will provide a basis for further
academic and career/vocational training
 Use scientific processes in an ethical and appropriate manner
 Appreciate and apply the physics of everyday phenomena
 Link physics to their own practical experience
 Work effectively as a member of a team in a responsible and respectful manner
 Handle equipment and lab materials in a responsible and effective manner with regard to
their own safety and the safety of others
 Apply scientific concepts, recognizing their strengths and weaknesses, to broader
societal issues
 Critically evaluate controversial points of view around issues where science offers
information or perspective
 Apply mathematical skills to solve physics based problems
 Develop critical thinking skills
Physics: Advanced Level
Core topics
A) Measurement
 Solve problems involving SI units
 Maintain the correct number of significant numbers in calculations
 Use uncertainties in measurement
B) Kinematics
 Use the language and concepts of kinematics to describe motion
 Analyze and solve kinematics in one dimension
 Construct and interpret displacement versus time curves
 Construct and interpret velocity versus time graphs
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
123

Solve problems involving uniform acceleration
C) Dynamics
 Use the language and concepts of dynamics to describe forces and energy
 Analyze and solve dynamics in one dimension using free body diagrams
 Apply Newton’s laws of motion in one dimension
 Solve problems involving:
 Friction forces
 Gravity forces including Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation
 Elastic forces
 Analyze and solve problems in kinetic and potential energy
 Analyze and solve problems in energy conservation
 Solve problems involving work and power
 Solve problems involving impulse and conservation of momentum in one dimension.
D) Electricity
 Use the language and concepts of electricity to describe electrical phenomena
 Analyze and solve problems using Coulomb’s law
 Analyze and solve problems involving Ohm’s law
 Define and distinguish between electric potential difference, resistance and current
 Solve simple DC resistance problems involving series, parallel and combination circuits
E) Heat
 Use the language and concepts of thermodynamics to describe the transfer of heat
energy
 Define and distinguish between temperature, heat energy and specific heat capacity
 Analyze and solve problems in heat energy
 Demonstrate an understanding of the different mechanisms of heat transfer
Options:
The following topics may be useful to students going on to further physics courses:
 Wave phenomena applied to light and sound
 Atomic and nuclear physics
 Modern physics
Laboratories:
There should be one laboratory from each topic and a minimum of seven laboratories. Laboratory
skills must include:
 Collecting data through observation:
 Record a measurement to the appropriate level of precision
 Recognize that all measured values have an uncertainty

Constructing graphs:
 Choose appropriate scales
 Determine line of best fit
 Label correctly

Drawing conclusions from observations and data:
 Identify and discuss sources of error
 Calculate and interpret the slope of a line
 Relate conclusion to objectives

Calculating experimental error:
 Determine % error and % difference where appropriate
Completing formal lab reports

ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
124
Physics: Provincial Level
Core topics
A) Kinematics in Two Dimensions
 Use the language and concepts of kinematics to describe motion in two dimensions
 Resolve, add and subtract vectors
 Analyze and solve kinematics in two dimensions
B) Dynamics in Two Dimensions
 Use the language and concepts of dynamics to describe forces, energy and momentum
 Analyze and solve dynamics in two dimensions using free body diagrams
 Two-dimensional equilibrium – translational and rotational
 Momentum in two dimensions
 Energy conservation
 Uniform circular motion
C) Electrostatics
 Use the language and concepts of physics to describe electrostatic phenomena
 Analyze and solve electrostatic forces and electric fields in two dimension
 Analyze and solve electric potential and electric potential energy
D) Electromagnetism
 Use the language and concepts of physics to describe electromagnetic phenomena
 Analyze and solve problems involving magnetic forces and magnetic fields in two
dimensions
 Analyze and solve problems involving electromagnetic induction – Faraday’s Law and
Lenz’s law
 Describe devices that operate using electromagnetic induction
E) Waves and Optics
 Use the language and concepts of physics to describe wave phenomena
 Define and distinguish between amplitude, wavelength, frequency, wave speed and
period
 Analyze and solve problems involving wave phenomena – refraction, reflection, total
internal reflection
 Describe various wave phenomena and the conditions which produce them
 Construct ray diagrams for mirrors and lenses
Options:
The following topics may be useful to students going on to further physics courses:
 AC circuits
 Relativity
 Quantum physics
 Electronics
 Fluids
 Nuclear physics
 Kirchhoff’s laws
Laboratories:
There should be one laboratory from each topic and a minimum of seven laboratories. Laboratory
skills must include:
 Collecting data through observation:
 Record a measurement to the appropriate level of precision
 Recognize that all measured values have an uncertainty
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
125

Constructing graphs:
 Choose appropriate scales
 Determine line of best fit
 Label correctly

Drawing conclusions from observations and data:
 Identify and discuss sources of error
 Calculate and interpret the slope of a line
 Relate conclusion to objectives



Calculating experimental error:
Determine % error and % difference where appropriate
Completing formal lab reports
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
126
SOCIAL SCIENCE
General Statement
The ABE Social Science curriculum provides an analytic and critical approach to social science
topics. The overall purpose is to encourage learners to explore society from many perspectives.
ABE Social Science provides learners with a variety of conceptual tools to analyze and assess
these perspectives. It allows learners to assemble these perspectives and articulate a point of
view. Finally, it enables learners to revise their points of view through experiencing the different
values and cultures of other people.
An integrated resource package containing learning outcomes, instructional and assessment
strategies and resources has been developed for use in Social Science instruction.
Goal Statement
The goals of the curriculum are broadly applicable to all levels, Fundamental through Provincial.
Learners will:
1. Become aware of some past and present forces shaping society
2. Experience different perspectives on these shaping forces: cultural, economic, gender,
3. Geographic, historic, legal, political, psychological, racial, spiritual, etc.
4. Analyze and assess these issue perspectives to build a point of view
5. Revise their point of view through experiencing other social and cultural perspectives
Outcomes
Participants in all Social Science courses should be encouraged to acquire a range of skills and
abilities. The skills and abilities listed here apply in general to all levels, Fundamental through
Provincial, with the recognition that particular outcomes may be more or less applicable at each
level. In addition, there is a second list of outcomes that are required of all Provincial level
courses and students.
It is expected that Social Science students will:
1. Identify sources of information from:
i. Libraries by using resource books, texts and periodicals
ii. Media sources by using computers, video and audio materials
iii. Direct sources such as interviews, surveys and observation
2. Extract, summarize and report information from a variety of media, such as:
i. Regional, national and global maps
ii. Details of latitude and longitude, scale and distance
iii. Contour and relief maps
iv. Artifacts and documents
v. Historical and contemporary media, art, literature, cartoons, etc.
vi. Electronic media: Internet resources, software
3. Organize information into a range of formats, such as:
i. Notes, outlines, and reviews
ii. Maps, graphs, and tables
iii. Research summaries
4. Analyze information in a variety of ways by:
i. Finding main ideas
ii. Asking evocative questions
iii. Comparing main ideas with other material and sources of information
5. Demonstrate the ability to communicate through a variety of methods by:
i. Writing summaries
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
127
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
ii. Preparing short essays and papers
iii. Utilizing a variety of presentation methods (e.g. graphs, tables, tapes, drawings,
posters, computer-based presentations, etc.)
Clarify and discuss personal values with respect to social issues.
Identify avenues for democratic participation.
Clarify personal values and positions in society.
Recognize and respect the right of others to hold personal values and positions.
Establish hypotheses concerning values and bias.
Distinguish between fact and opinion.
Display skills at handling content. Students should be conversant with the subject matter
of the course; specifically they should:
i. Demonstrate knowledge of the materials
ii. Demonstrate the ability to comment on and question the material
iii. Identify statements that reflect consistent or contradictory views
iv. Demonstrate the ability to generate inferences from many sources
Provincial Outcomes
In addition to the generic outcomes for all Social Science students, Provincial level students are
expected to be able to:
1. Establish and test hypotheses concerning values
2. Extrapolate a common theme from disparate information
3. Report on research using MLA/APA standards
4. Write essays that demonstrate a synthesis of complex information
5. Generate a personal point of view about some aspect of society based on their research
6. Create or apply strategies to compare aspects of society
Social Science: Intermediate Level
Canada from 1815 to World War I
Identity, Culture and Society:
Analyze Canadian society in terms of gender roles, ethnicity, daily life, and the arts.
Evaluate the impact of interactions among Aboriginal peoples, European explorers,
settlers and their cultures.
Evaluate the influence of immigration on Canadian society
Governance
Describe the evolution of government in Canada, including the BNA Act.
Examine political, economic, social, and geographical factors that led to Confederation
and to the development of Canada’s provinces and territories, including the Red River
and Northwest Rebellions.
Describe the structure and function of Canada’s federal, provincial, and local
governments.
Describe the roles and responsibilities of the three branches of Canadian government
(executive, legislative and judicial).
Economy and Industrialization
Assess the impact of Macdonald’s National Policy on Canada
Analyse the influence of industrialization on Canada’s economy
Describe the development of British Columbia’s economy
Geography and Environment
Identify and describe the political divisions and physiographic regions of Canada as well
as the geological processes that formed these regions.
Evaluate attitudes and practices in resource development in British Columbia
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
128
Social Science: Advanced Level
I. Canadian History
A. Discuss the history of Aboriginal people living in Canada
B. Discuss the effects of European settlement.
C. Identify Canada‘s international contributions from World War 1 to the present,
including participation in peace keeping roles.
D. Describe major social, economic, and political changes within Canada and their impact
including: The Great Depression, the evolution of Womens’ rights, technological
advancement, globalization, climate change.
II. Culture
A. Describe Canadian multiculturalism.
B. Identify ethnic groups and their accomplishments in Canada.
C. Discuss the distinct cultures and values of local Aboriginal groups
D. Explain the meaning of racism, assimilation, inequity and integration.
E. Discuss Canadian identity.
III. Canadian Government, Law and Citizenship
A. Understand the purpose and origins of government.
B. Identify political ideologies and Canadian political parties.
C. Describe major features of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
D. Outline the roles and responsibilities of each of the levels and branches of Federal,
Provincial, Territorial, Municipal and Aboriginal governments in Canada.
E. Identify the rationale for law in a democratic society.
F. Outline the stages of passing a law.
G. Understand the avenues to affect change within the current political system.
IV. Economics
A. Identify micro and macroeconomic terms and concepts including: capital, labour,
technology and transport.
B. Differentiate between needs and wants.
C. Describe supply and demand economics by giving a historical overview
D. Demonstrate an awareness of community and regional development.
E. Identify issues in economics such as planning, taxation, government
spending, free and fair trade practices and conserver society.
F. Identify current economic issues including globalization, climate change
Psychology - Generic Topic Outline
I.
Relationships
II. Human Development
III. Culture
IV. Self Esteem
V. Group Dynamics
VI. Conflict Resolution
VII. Decision Making/Problem Solving
VIII. Assertiveness
IX. Fields of Psychology
X. Communication
XI. Perception
XII. Health and Wellness
XIII. Definitions
The above list of topics is intended to reflect an applied approach to psychology at the advanced
level. A list of applied interest areas for each topic will be developed by the working committee to
further expand psychology at the advanced level.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
129
Social Science: Provincial Level
Geography - Generic Topic Outline
The focus is on Physical and Human Geography.
I.
Demography: By the end of this unit the student will be able to
A. Distribution and density
1. Explain factors which influence population distribution and density
2. Understand the relevance and limits of methods used to measure the distribution
and growth of human populations.
B. Population growth and control
1. Describe how population growth, the standard of living of a country or region, and
the rate of consumption of resources are all related.
2. Discuss the various predictions for population growth and the various ideas for
limiting the rate of population growth.
C. Food consumption and Distribution; Discuss factors that determine food consumption
and distribution.
D. Migration
1. Describe the movements and the motives for the movement away from migrants’
original locations.
2. Discuss the impact of emigration on the country or region of origin and immigration
on the new country or region.
3. Describe current migration patterns and the reasons for this migration
II. Meteorology & Climatologic: By the end of this unit the student will be able to
A. Earth and sun relationships
1. Describe the relationships between the earth and the sun.
2. Describe how the energy from the sun and from within the Earth is distributed
and changed by Earth’s systems.
B. Atmosphere, structure and composition
1. Understand how the Earth’s atmosphere evolved and its relationship to the
hydrosphere, the lithosphere and the biosphere.
2. Describe the structure and function of the atmosphere and explain why the
temperature of the atmosphere increases and decreases as you go through the
various layers.
C. Insolation and temperature
1. Describe the relationship between insolation, topography and the temperature of
various parts of the Earth’s surface.
2. Explain how energy is transferred and transformed as it moves through the Earth’s
atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere.
D. Atmospheric pressure and winds
1. Describe the major atmospheric circulation patterns in the upper and lower
atmosphere and explain the differences between surface and upper atmospheric
winds.
2. Explain how surface winds affect the ocean currents and how the oceans affect air
pressure and therefore wind direction and velocity.
E. Moisture, humidity and precipitation
1. Explain the relationship between moisture, humidity and precipitation.
2. Describe the various forms and patterns of precipitation and the geographic
conditions that determine what type and pattern of precipitation occurs.
F. Weather Systems and Hazards
1. Be able to map weather and be able to interpret a weather map.
2. Describe the Earth’s major weather systems and the various mechanisms that
drive these systems
3. Describe and explain major weather events such as El Nino, cyclonic storms and
monsoons.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
130
4. Appreciate the possible impacts of weather especially storms on humans.
5. Know some precautions to take to prevent loss of life or damage to property from
storms.
G. Climate and Climate Change
1. Differentiate between climate and weather.
2. Describe the numerous geographic factors that determine the climate of various
regions of the Earth including geomorphology and ecology.
III. Geomorphology: By the end of this unit the student will be able to
A. Rocks:
1. Describe the formation of various igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks
and classify common rocks based on their mineralogy and texture
B. Tectonic forces
1. Discuss the evidence for the Plate Tectonic theory and how it explains many of
Earth’s major processes such as volcanism and earthquakes.
2. Describe the tectonic forces and the resultant landforms.
C. Weathering and Gradational forces
1. Discuss the physical and chemical processes that break rock down into
sediments and soils.
2. Identify and describe landforms caused by erosive forces such as moving water,
glaciers and wind and describe how each is formed.
3. Identify and describe landforms caused by deposition by moving water, glaciers
and wind and describe how each is formed.
4. Describe the changes to the land surfaces of the Northern Hemisphere during
and after the last Ice Age.
D. Geophysical hazards
1. Relate the location, depth and intensity of earthquakes to plate margins.
2. Discuss the factors that determine the amount of destruction caused by an
earthquake and the other geologic processes that may result from an earthquake
including tsunamis.
3. Describe the conditions that lead to a flood and how humans can be protected
from erosion by water including flood events
4. Describe how human activity often causes or contributes to geophysical hazards
such as landslides and increases their effects.
5. Know the steps that people in high-risk areas should take to minimize the impact
of geophysical hazards on their person and property.
IV. Cartography: By the end of this unit the student will be able to
A. Types of maps: Explain the various types of maps and the strengths and weaknesses
of each type.
B. Scale
1. Explain the scale on a map and use the scale to calculate distances.
2. Define and describe the uses of small and large scale maps.
C. Grids
1. Discuss the purpose of map grids.
2. Use latitude and longitude and UTM coordinates to describe the location of
various features.
V. Resources: By the end of this unit the student will be able to
A. Renewable/non renewable
1. Explain the difference between renewable and non renewable resources.
2. Give examples of renewable and non renewable resources.
3. Describe the environmental, economic and social aspects of resource
management and use.
4. Understand the importance of an integrated and sustainable approach to
resource management.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
131
B. Energy types
1. Understand the relationship between increased energy use and the economic
development of some countries.
2. Understand the impacts on the environment and the limits of non-renewable
energy resource development.
3. Describe the benefits and costs of using alternate energy resources.
4. Describe the benefits of energy conservation and reduced consumption to the
economy and the environment.
5. Evaluate how you can play your part in sustaining energy resources.
History - Generic Topic Outline
The focus is on world history since 1900.
General Outcomes for Provincial Level History
1. Interpret and evaluate information from artifacts, oral tradition, original documents and other
primary sources.
2. Explain Canada’s role and place during each period of world history.
I.
The World at the Beginning of the Century
A. Explain the role of nationalism and imperialism leading up to Great War.
B. Discuss the role of technological change leading up to and during the course of
World War I.
C. Discuss the importance and results of the Russian Revolution and civil war.
II. The World after World War I
A. Describe Treaty of Versailles and League of Nations and explain their importance.
B. What was the impact of war reparations on Germany?
C. Discuss rise of Japanese imperialism.
D. Discuss Indian nationalism and the problems of China in the context of imperialism.
E. What were the economic and social changes in Europe and North America in the
20s.
III. The World in the 30s: Depression & Dictatorship
A. Discuss the Great Depression including its causes and consequences.
B. Explain the rise of Hitler and the Nazi Party out of the Weimar Republic in Germany.
C. Discuss Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal.
D. Trace Stalin’s rise to power and modernization of Russia.
IV. World War II
A. What were the origins and causes of World War II?
B. Discuss the events and results of World War II.
V. The Cold War and Reconstruction
A. Discuss the origins and major events of the Cold War.
B. What was the Iron Curtain?
C. Trace Western Europe’s move towards the European Union.
D. Discuss the rise of the Asian economies.
The Third World and China
A. Discuss the rise of the Peoples’ Republic of China.
B. Discuss the end of the European empires and its impact on Africa and southern Asia.
C. Explain the advent of globalization.
D. Discuss the events leading to the current situation in the Middle East.
VI. Contemporary Issues
A. Discuss the rise of fundamentalism in world religions..
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
132
B. Discuss current events in a historical context.
Economics - Generic Topic Outline
The focus is on providing an introduction to some of the basic concepts of economics.
I.
Introduction
A. Origins and history of economics
B. Terminology
C. Definitions of economic terms
D. Scarcity
E. Modern economic systems and their evolution - communism, socialism,
capitalism,fascism
II. Production
A. Explanation of production
B. Factors of production (land, labour, capital, entrepreneur)
C. Organizations of production (single ownership, partnership, corporation, state
ownership, cooperatives)
D. Large-scale production - advantages and disadvantages
E. Monopoly - an assessment of its various forms (pool, holding company, merger) and
its growth
III. Exchange
A. The price system
B. Money
C. Credit and banking
D. Marketing and transportation
E. International trade and foreign exchange
IV. Distribution
A. Elements of distribution, such as:
1. National income
2. Wage determination
3. Interest and savings
4. Interest rates
5. Profits
B. The Labour Movement (history and development)
C. Labour problems
D. Labour legislation
1. Collective bargaining
2. Contracts
3. The right to strike
4. Strike alternatives, labour laws
V. Consumption of Goods
A. Principles of consumption
B. Saving and investing
VI. The Role of Government
A. Federal, provincial and municipal expenditures
B. Increasing public expenditures
1. Social services
2. National defense
3. Crown corporations
4. Debts - national and provincial
C. Sources of government revenue
1. Advantages and disadvantages of various types of taxation
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
133
2. Federal taxation
3. Provincial taxation
4. Municipal taxation
VII. Economics and Business
A. The balance sheet (assets and liabilities)
B. Costs and cost control
C. Reasons for business failure
VIII. Current Events
A. Domestic issues (issues of local and national concern)
B. International issues
Psychology - Generic Topic Outline
1. Critical thinking
2. Psychology as a Science
3. History of Psychology
4. Contemporary issues in Psychology
5. Biological bases of behaviour and mental processes
6. Thinking and intelligence
7. Learning and Memory
8. Social and cultural psychology
9. Theories of personality
10. Motivation and Emotion
11. Development throughout the lifespan
12. Stress, health and healing
13. Psychological disorders and treatment
I. In general terms:
A. “Natural”
B. Contrast basic concepts and major issues between contemporary and historical
perspectives in psychology
II. And specifically:
C. Distinguish between conscious, subconscious and non conscious processes.
D. Describe three types of biological rhythm
E. Describe the differences between evolutionary psychology and behavioural genetics
F. Define thinking and intelligence
G. Discriminate among the various theories and models of memory
H. Explain the various models of learning
I. Describe and assess the biological, cultural and social influences on behaviour.
J. Discuss the connection between culture, gender and biology
K. List and discuss the major theories of psychology
L. Distinguish between extrinsic and intrinsic motivation and discuss the impact of
motivation on love, sex, food and work.
M. Discuss the relationship between biology, culture and thought processes in the
expression of emotion.
N. Understand the steps and stages in our lives.
O. Define stress and the major methods of coping with stress.
P. Describe major perspectives on psychological disorders and their treatment
Law - Core Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course the learner will be able to explain basic features and demonstrate
an understanding of the Canadian legal system through the following learning outcomes
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
134
I.
Assess the history and purpose of law in Canadian Society by explaining and
differentiating among the following terms.
A. Differentiate between laws and rules
B. Explain the need for laws
C. Differentiate between law and justice
D. Differentiate between law and morality
E. Identify the divisions of law
F. Examine the historical influences on and development of Canadian law: early British
law, the feudal system, common law, legal reforms, and aboriginal law
II.
Analyze the evolution of human rights and how this relates to the Canadian
Constitution through the following
A. Discuss the BNA Act, the Statute of Westminster, and the Bill of Rights as it relates
to the evolution of human rights
B. Identify the various sections of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
(CCORAF), including the reasonable limits clause and notwithstanding clauses
C. Compare and contrast the federal and provincial divisions of power
D. Describe the methods of enforcing rights and freedoms and explain how this relates
to rights guaranteed by the CCORAF and human rights legislation and grounds for
discrimination
III. Examine how the federal government is structured and relate it to how new laws are
made
A. Explain what roles the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the federal
government each have in the formation of law
B. Describe the steps as to how a federal law is passed
C. Identify the various levels within the Canadian federal and provincial court systems
D. Analyze the role of individuals and interest groups in creating new laws
IV. Classify the various types of Canadian law
A. Identify and explain sources of Canadian law: common, statute, and constitutional
B. Identify the categories of law: international, domestic, substantive, procedural, public,
and private
V.
Examine the nature of crime
A. Summarize key aspects of the Criminal Code
B. Classify “summary, indictable, and hybrid” offences
C. Differentiate the elements of a criminal offense: actus reus and mens rea
D. Identify “parties” to an offence
E. Explain the criminal court system
VI. Examine the process of police investigation, arrest, and bringing the accused to trial
A. Discriminate the levels of police: federal, provincial, municipal, aboriginal
B. Explain key features of a police investigation and the identification and collection of
evidence including the following steps
i. arrest and detention procedures
ii. legal rights and bail procedures
VII. Differentiate among the following Criminal Offences
A. offences against the person and property
B. other offences, including drug, gambling, fraud, and mischief, driving, and prostitution
Classify and examine the following criminal defences
C. mental state defences
D. justification defences
E. other defences, including mistake of law and fact, double jeopardy, alibi, and
entrapment
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
135
VIII. Examine the various roles of the following in trial procedure
A. courtroom participants and their roles
B. the role of juries and jury selection
C. presentation of evidence and types of evidence
D. charges to the jury
E. reaching a verdict
IX
Demonstrate an awareness of the process and objectives of the following in the
Correctional system
A. sentencing
B. appeals and the types of traditional sentences
C.
restorative justice and victims of crime
D.
the provincial and federal correctional system
E.
parole and pardons
IX. Recognize and differentiate key features of the youth criminal justice system t through
the following documents and procedures
A. the current youth justice act
B. the legal rights of youths
C. youth trial procedures
D. youth sentencing options
X. Explain and differentiate civil law disputes and resolution through the following
processes
A. crime and torts
B. private law procedures
C. civil courts and trial procedures
D. civil remedies and sentencing
E. alternative dispute resolutions
XI. Differentiate and explain negligence and unintentional torts through the following
legal terminologies
A. negligence, duty of care, standard of care, and causation
B. types of liability
C. the defences to negligence
D. intentional interference with the person and with property
E. the defences to intentional interference
F. defamation to character and defences to defamation to character
XII.
Examine marriage, divorce, and the family in a legal framework as they relate to
the following terms
A. the changing family structure
B. the essential and formal legal requirements for marriage
C. annulment, separation, access, and divorce
D. the division of family property and asset
E. spousal and child support
F. domestic contracts and common law contracts
XIII. Distinguish contract law from other types of law as they relate to the following
legal terms
A. the types of contracts
B. the elements of a contract
C. invalidating factors
D. carrying out the contract
E. the sale of goods
F. consumer protectionism
G. landlord and tenant law
H. employment law
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
136
Law - Non-Core Outcomes
I.
Identify and explain key legal features of wills, including the following
A. the requirements for preparing a will
B. who can make, change, and revoke a will
C. the terms and duties associated with a will
D. provisions in a will
E. death without a will
F. contesting a will
II.
Explain how Canadian law relates to First Nations, Metis and Inuit Peoples
(Aboriginal) in the following areas
A. Identify the purpose and provisions of the current act pertaining to aboriginals
B. Examine the history of treaty making
C. Examine the arguments for and against recognition of aboriginal title
D. Discuss the process of negotiating land claim agreements
E. Describe the relationship of the present Constitution to aboriginal and treaty rights.
III. Explain Canadian emigration and immigration law including the following events and
issues
A. the main events in the history of immigration and immigration policy and law
B. the main provisions of the current act pertaining to immigrants
C. the terms associated with immigration and emigration
D. the ‘points system’ for selecting immigrants
E. how refugee claims are made and decided upon
F. the appeals procedures
G. Identify key issues in Canadian immigration law
IV. Discuss current law as it relates to the environment with consideration of
A. major legal, social, and economic issues related to protecting the environment
B. how tort law is applicable to protecting the environmental
C. Canada’s current environmental protection act
D. Canada’s law as it relates to parks and endangered species
E. the need for international cooperation and laws
F. the effect of globalization on Canadian law
Directions to Future Submitters of Courses under the Social Science
Section
Please submit course proposals to the chair of the committee at least one month prior to the
annual meeting. If this is not possible, contact the chair. Please ensure that the course proposals
reflect the goal statements, competencies and generic skills as outlined in the Articulation
Handbook.
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
137
COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
STEERING COMMITTEE
The Steering Committee is made up of institutional representatives. Chairs of the articulation working
committees also attend. Where two or more names are listed for an institution, the first person named is the
institutional representative; this person exercises the institutional vote.
BC INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY
Stephen Salem
Supervisor, Admissions
Department, Full-time Programs
3700 Willingdon Avenue
Burnaby, BC V5G 3H2
Tel: (604) 451-6930
Fax: (604) 431-6917
Email: [email protected]
CAMOSUN COLLEGE
Jill Auchinachie
4461 Interurban Rd
Victoria, BC V9E 2C1
Tel: (250) 370-4048
Fax : (250) 370-4938
Email: [email protected]
CAPILANO UNIVERSITY
Don Bentley
2055 Purcell Way
North Vancouver, BC V7J 3H5
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 2588
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email [email protected]
Colin Gilker
(Chair, English Working
Committee)
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 2572
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email: [email protected]
Carol Schoen (Co-Chair, Social
Science Working Committee)
Developmental Studies
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 3451
Fax: (604) 986-1718
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE OF NEW
CALEDONIA
Alison Anderson
3330 - 22nd Avenue
Prince George, BC V2N 1P8
Tel: (250) 562-2131
Fax: (250) 561-5816
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE OF THE ROCKIES
Mary Shier (Co-Chair, EDCP)
Box 1770
Fernie, BC V0B 1M0
Tel: (250) 423-4691 local 5108
Fax: (250) 423-3932
Email: [email protected]
DOUGLAS COLLEGE
Hilary Rourke
P.O. Box 2503
New Westminster, BC V3L 5B2
Tel: (604) 527-5506
Fax: (604) 527-5095
Email:
[email protected]
Donna Lowndes (Co-Chair,
EDCP)
Address (see above)
Tel: (604) 527-5692
Email:
[email protected]
KWANTLEN POLYTECHNIC
UNIVERSITY
Jim Beaton
12666 72 Avenue
Surrey, BC V3W 2M8
Tel: (604) 599-2706
Fax: (604) 599-2068
Email: [email protected]
NICOLA VALLEY INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY
Stefan Zabek
Merritt Campus
4155 Belshaw St
Merritt BC V1K 1R1
Tel: (250) 378-3339
Fax: (250) 378-3332
Email: [email protected]
NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE
Pat Corbett-Labatt
Mount Waddington Regional
Campus
Box 901
Port Hardy, BC V0N 2P0
Tel: (250) 949-7192 local 2861
Fax: (250) 949-2617
Email:
[email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
138
NORTHERN LIGHTS
COLLEGE
David Szucsko
Box 2138, Tumbler Ridge, BC
Tel: (250) 243-5591
Fax: (250) 242-3109
Email: [email protected]
NORTHWEST COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Vena Hachkevich
th
353 5 Street
Prince Rupert, BC V8J 3L6
Tel: (250) 624-6054 local 5726
Fax: (250) 624-4920
Email: [email protected]
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
Dan Chetner
583 Duncan Avenue West
Penticton, BC V2A 8E1
Tel: (250) 492-4305 local 3211
Fax: (250) 490-3950
Email:
[email protected]
SELKIRK COLLEGE
Allison Alder (Co-Chair, ABE
Steering Committee)
2001 Silver king Rd.
Nelson, BC V1L 1C8
Tel: (250) 354-3214
Fax: (250) 352-3180
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY
Jane Horton
University and Employment Preparation
Chair
PO Box 3010
Kamloops, BC V2C 5N3
Tel: (250) 828-5261
Fax: (250) 371-5514
Email: [email protected]
UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER
VALLEY
Trudy Archie (Co-Chair, ABE
Steering Committee)
33844 King Road
Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M8
Tel: (604) 854-4533
Fax: (604) 855-7558
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY –
OPEN LEARNING
John Patterson
Box 3010, Kamloops BC V2C 5N3
Tel: 1.888.828.3399 local 6924
Fax: (604) 215-4314
Email: [email protected]
Beverly Jones Redekop
(2013/14 Co-Chair, Computer
Studies Working Committee)
45635 Yale Road
Chilliwack, BC V2T 6M4
Tel: (604) 792-0025 local 2418
Fax: (604) 792--2388
Email:
[email protected]
Brad McVittie
(2013/14 Co-Chair, Computer
Studies Working Committee)
301 Frank Beinder Way
Castlegar, BC V1N 4L3
Tel: (250) 365-7292 local 474
Email: [email protected]
Greg St. Hilaire (Chair, Science
Working Committee)
33844 King Road
Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M8
Tel: (604) 504-7441 local 4417
Fax: (604) 855-7558
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Costa Karavas (Co-Chair,
Mathematics Working
Committee)
1155 E Broadway
Vancouver BC V5T 4V5
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 2543
Fax: (604) 871-8700
Email: [email protected]
Jan Weiten (Co-Chair, Adult
Literacy Fundamental Working
Committee)
Address: (see above)
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7371
Fax: (604) 871-7367
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER ISLAND UNIVERSITY
Vicki Noonan
Chair, Career and Academic
Preparation
Career & Academic Prep
Cowichan Campus
2011 University Way
Duncan BC V9L 0C7
Phone: (250) 746-3527 local 3527
Fax: (250) 746-3529
Email: [email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
139
YUKON COLLEGE
Robert Ferro (Co-Chair,
Mathematics Working
Committee)
Box 2799
Whitehorse, Yukon
Y1A 5K4
Tel: (867) 668-8841
Fax: (867) 456-8634
Email:
r[email protected]
EX OFFICIO
Dr. Sue Brigden (SLP)
University of the Fraser Valley
Dean, Faculty of Access and Open
Studies
338844 King Rd
Abbotsford BC V2S 7M8
Tel: (604) 864-4643
Email: [email protected]
Education Officer
Ministry of Advanced Education
PO Box 9894 Stn Prov Govt
Victoria BC V8W 9T6
Tel: (250) 356-9733
Fax: (250) 952-6110
Email:
AVED.TeachingUniversInstits&Aborigin
[email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
140
COMPUTER STUDIES WORKING COMMITTEE
CAMOSUN COLLEGE
Marc Bissley
3100 Foul Bay Road
Victoria, BC V8P 5J2
Tel: (250) 384-3211
Fax: (250) 370-3291
Email: [email protected]
CAPILANO UNIVERSITY
Don Bentley
2055 Purcell Way
North Vancouver, BC V7J 3H5
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 2588
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE OF NEW CALEDONIA
Meizhong Wang
3330 - 22nd Avenue
Prince George, BC V2N 1P8
Tel: (250) 562-2131 local 5321
Fax: (250) 561-5816
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE OF THE ROCKIES
Ed Swanson
Box 8500
Cranbrook, BC V1C 5L7
Tel: (250) 489-1790
Fax: (250) 489-1790
Email: [email protected]
DOUGLAS COLLEGE
Gordon Danskin
P.O. Box 2503
New Westminster, BC V3C 5B2
Tel: (604) 527-5463
Fax: (604) 527-5095
Email:[email protected]
ca
KWANTLEN POLYTECHNIC
UNIVERSITY
Newton Wainman
12666 - 72 Avenue
Surrey, BC V3W 2M8
Tel: (604) 599-2176
Fax: (604) 599-2068
Email:
[email protected]
NICOLA VALLEY INSTITUTE
OF TECHONOLOGY
Roman Erinburg
4155 Belshaw Street
Merritt BC, V1K 1R1
Toll free: 877-682-3300
Fax: (250) 378-3332
Email: [email protected]
NORTHERN LIGHTS COLLEGE
Catherine Mooney
th
11401 – 8 Street
Dawson Creek, BC V1G 2G4
Tel: (250) 784-7539
Fax: (250) 782-6069
Email: [email protected]
NORTHWEST COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Gordon Jack
Career & College Prep
4815 Swannell Drive
PO Box 338
Hazelton, BC V0J 1Y0
Tel: (250) 842-5291
Fax: (250) 842-5813
Email: [email protected]
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
Steve Smith
1000 KLO Road
Kelowna, BC V1Y 4X8
Tel: (250) 762-5445
Fax: (250) 490-3950
Email: [email protected]
SELKIRK COLLEGE
Brad McVittie
Co-Chair, Year 1 of 2
301 Frank Beinder Way
Castlegar, BC V1N 4L3
Tel: (250) 365-7292 local 474
Fax: (250) 365-6568
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS
UNIVERSITY
Joseph Morong
Box 3010
Kamloops, BC V2C 5N3
Tel: (250) 371-5927
Fax: (250) 371-5514
Email: [email protected]
UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER
VALLEY
Beverly Jones Redekop
Co-Chair, Year 2 of 2
45190 Caen Avenue
Chilliwack, BC V2R 0N3
Tel: (604) 792-0025 local 2410
Email:
[email protected]
VANCOUVER COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Brock Elliott
1155 East Broadway
Vancouver, BC V5T 4V5
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 8546
Fax: (604) 871-7100
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER ISLAND
UNIVERSITY
Carol Ramey
900 Fifth Street
Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5
Tel: (250) 753-3245 local 2495
Fax: (250) 740-6486
Email: [email protected]
YUKON COLLEGE
Simone Rudge
500 College Drive, Box 2799
Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5K4
Tel: (867) 456-8606
Fax: (867) 668-8828
Email:
[email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
141
EDUCATION AND CAREER PLANNING WORKING COMMITTEE
CAMOSUN COLLEGE
Pamela Johnson
4461 Interurban Road
Victoria, BC V9E 2C1
Tel: (250) 370-3850
Email:
[email protected]
CAPILANO UNIVERSITY
Debby Vollbrecht
2055 Purcell Way
North Vancouver, BC V7J 3H5
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 3430
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE OF NEW CALEDONIA
Marcia Timbres
3330 - 22nd Avenue
Prince George, BC V2N 1P8
Tel: (250) 561-5826
Fax: (250) 561-5866
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE OF THE ROCKIES
Mary Shier
Fernie Campus
Box 1770
Fernie, BC V0B 1M0
Tel: (250) 423-4691 local 5108
Fax: (250) 423-3932
Email: [email protected]
DOUGLAS COLLEGE
Donna Lowndes (Chair)
New Westminster Campus
700 Royal Avenue
New Westminster, BC V3L 5B2
Tel: (604) 527-5692
Fax: (604) 527-5095
Email:[email protected]
KWANTLEN POLYTECHNIC
UNIVERSITY
Lorraine Irvine
12666 - 72nd Avenue
Surrey, BC V3W 2M8
Tel: (604) 599-2100
Fax: (604) 599-2902
Email: [email protected]
NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE
Please contact the Steering
Committee members (see
above) for North Island College
NICOLA VALLEY INSTITUTE OF
TECHONOLOGY
John Chenoweth
4155 Belshaw Street
Merritt, BC V1K 1R1
Tel: 250-378-3331
Email: [email protected]
NORTHERN LIGHTS COLLEGE
Val Keeler
Box 860
Fort Nelson, BC V0C 1R0
Tel: (250) 774-2741
Fax (250) 774-2750
Email: [email protected]
NORTHWEST COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Sandi Lavallie
5331 McConnell Avenue
Terrace BC, V8G 4X2
Tel: (250) 635-6511
Email: [email protected]
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
Ruth Chambers
1000 KLO Road
Kelowna, BC V1Y 4X8
Tel: (250) 762-5445 local 4336
Fax: (250) 862-5432
Email: [email protected]
SELKIRK COLLEGE
Debra Scheidel
2001 Silver King Road
Nelson, BC V1L 1C8
Tel: (250) 352-6601 local 229
Fax: (250) 352-3180
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS
UNIVERSITY
Please contact the Steering
Committee members (see
above) for Thompson Rivers
University
UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER
VALLEY
Jan Oosterhof-Contant
33844 King Road
Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M8
Tel: (604) 854-4597
Fax: (604) 855-7558
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Dianne Schwartz
Downtown Campus
250 West Pender Street
Vancouver, BC
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 8301
Fax: (604) 443-8586
Email: [email protected]
NATIVE EDUCATION COLLEGE
John Pateman
2012 Wall Street
Vancouver, BC V5L 1B1
Tel: (604) 253-9676
Email:
[email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
142
VANCOUVER ISLAND
UNIVERSITY
Lynn Redford
th
900—5 Street
Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5
Tel: (250) 753-3245
Fax: (250) 741-2425
Email: [email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
143
ENGLISH WORKING COMMITTEE
BC INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY
Nargis Abraham
3700 Willingdon Avenue
Burnaby, BC V5G 3H2
Tel: (604) 451-6893
Fax: (604) 432-9173
Email: [email protected]
CAMOSUN COLLEGE
Debbie Hlady
Jennifer Bennett
3100 Foul Bay Road
Victoria, BC V8P 5J2
Tel: (250) 370-3355
Email: [email protected];
Tel: (250) 370-3489
Email: [email protected];
CAPILANO UNIVERSITY
Colin Gilker (Chair)
2055 Purcell Way
North Vancouver, BC V7J 3H5
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 2572
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE of NEW
CALEDONIA
Keith Tedford
Carolyn Bax
3320 - 22nd Avenue
Prince George, BC V2N 1P8
Tel: (250) 562-2131 local 5203
Fax: (250) 561-5816
Email: [email protected]
Tel: (250) 562-2131 local 5570
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE of the ROCKIES
Sharon Richardson
Box 8500
Cranbrook V1C 5L7
Tel : (250) 489-2751 local 3416
Email:
[email protected]
DOUGLAS COLLEGE
Judy Crawford
PO Box 2503
New Westminster, BC
Tel: (604) 777-6017
Fax: (604) 527-5095
Email:
[email protected]
KWANTLEN POLYTECHNIC
UNIVERSITY
Sherry Schoenberger
12666 - 72nd Avenue
Surrey, BC V3W 2M8
Tel: (604) 599-3338
Fax: (604) 599-3277
Email:
[email protected]
ca
NICOLA VALLEY INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY
Don Vincent and Mil Juricic
4155 Belshaw Street,
Merritt, BC V1K 1R1
Tel: 877-682-3300
Fax: (250)-378-3332
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE
Leslie Watts
2300 Ryan Rd.
Courtenay, BC V9N 8N6
Tel: (250) 334-5034
Email: [email protected]
NORTHERN LIGHTS
COLLEGE
David Szucsko
180 Southgate
Tumbler Ridge, BC V0C 2W0
Tel: (250) 242-5591 local 4404
Fax: (250) 242-3109
Email: [email protected]
NORTHWEST COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Katherine Staiger
Box 3606
Smithers, BC V0J 2N0
Tel: 1-877-277-2288 local 5817
Email: [email protected]
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
Ruth Chambers
th
2552 10 Ave NE (TCH)
Salmon Arm, BC V1E 2S4
Tel: (250) 832-2126
Email: [email protected]
SELKIRK COLLEGE
Christy Luke
PO Box 968
Grand Forks BC V0H 1H0
Tel: (250) 442 2704 local 227
Fax: (250) 442 2877
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY
Mary Madden
900 McGill Road
Kamloops, BC V2C 0C8
Tel: (250) 371-5703
Email: [email protected]
UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER
VALLEY
Anna Wauthy
33844 King Rd
Abbotsford, BC V2S 7N8
Tel: (604) 504-7441 local 4780
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY
– OPEN LEARNING AGENCY
John Patterson
900 McGill Road
Kamloops, BC V2C 0C8
Tel: (250) 828-7965
Email: [email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
144
VANCOUVER COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
John Patterson
College Foundations
1155 E. Broadway
Vancouver, BC V5N 5T9
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7291
Fax: (604) 871-7100
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER ISLAND
UNIVERSITY
Colleen Harris
900 – Fifth Street
Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5
Tel: (250) 740-6245
Email: [email protected]
YUKON COLLEGE
Andrew Richardson
500 College Drive
Box 2799
Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5K4
Tel: (867) 456-8615
Fax: (871) 688-8828
Email:
[email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
145
INDIGENOUS ABE WORKING COMMITTEE
CAMOSUN COLLEGE
Michele Mundy
3100 Foul Bay Road
Victoria, BC V8P 5J2
Tel : (250) 544-2192
Email :
[email protected]
CAPILANO UNIVERSITY
Lynda Sampson
Ts’zil Learning Centre
PO Box 232
Mount Currie, BC V0N 1B4
Tel : (604) 894-2300
Email : [email protected]
COLLEGE of NEW CALEDONIA
Susan Hatfield
3330 - 22nd Ave
Prince George, BC V2N 1P8
Tel: (250) 562-2131 local 536
Fax: (250) 562-2131
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE of the ROCKIES
Sharon Richardson
2700 College Way
Box 8500
Cranbrook, BC V1C 5L7
Tel: (250) 489-2751;
1-877-489-2687 local 3416
Email: [email protected]
DOUGLAS COLLEGE
Hilary Rourke
P.O. Box 2503
New Westminster, BC V3L 5B2
Tel: (604) 527-5506
Email: [email protected]
Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Please contact the Steering
Committee member for Kwantlen.
(See contact list above.)
NICOLA VALLEY INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
Mil Juricic
4155 Belsaw Street
Merritt, BC V1K 1R1
Tel:877-682-3360
Fax: (250) 378-3332
Email: [email protected]
NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE
Wilma Keitlah
2300 Ryan Road
Courtenay, BC V1G 8N6
Tel: (250) 724-8750
Email: [email protected]
NORTHERN LIGHTS COLLEGE
Please contact the Steering
Committee member for Northern
Lights. (See contact list above.)
NORTHWEST COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Julie Morris
th
353 5 Street
Prince Rupert, BC V8J 3L6
Tel: (604) 624-6054 local 5797
Email: [email protected] or
[email protected]
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
Barb Bailey
100 KLO Rd
Kelowna, BC V1Y 4X8
Tel: (250) 762-5445
Email : [email protected]
SELKIRK COLLEGE
Allison Alder
2001 Silver King Road
Nelson, BC V1L 1C8
Tel: (250) 354-3214
Fax: (250) 352-3180
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS
UNIVERSITY
Karen Simon
1250 Western Ave.
Williams Lake, BC V2G 1H7
Tel: (250) 392-8162
Email: [email protected]
UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER
VALLEY
Sheryl Newton (Vice-Chair)
33844 King Rd.
Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M8
Tel: (604) 504-7441 local 4776
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Kory Wilson
1155 East Broadway
Vancouver, BC V5T 4V5
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 5047
Email: [email protected]
Stefan Zabek
(Same address as above)
Tel : (250) 378-3339
Fax : (250) 378-3332
[email protected]
NATIVE EDUCATION COLLEGE
Dennis Contois (Chair)
285 East 5th Ave.
Vancouver, BC V5T 1H2
Tel: (604) 873-3772 local 320
Email: [email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
146
VANCOUVER ISLAND
UNIVERSITY
Janet Sinclair
900 Fifth Street
Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5
Tel: (250) 753-3245 local 2193
Email: [email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
147
ADULT LITERACY FUNDAMENTAL WORKING COMMITTEE
CAMOSUN COLLEGE
Jill Auchinachie
4461 Interurban Road
Victoria, BC V9E 2C1
Tel: (250)-370-4048
Fax: (250)-370-4938
Email:
[email protected]
CAPILANO UNIVERSITY
Carol Schoen
2055 Purcell Way
North Vancouver, BC V7J 3H5
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 3451
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE of NEW CALEDONIA
Melinda Worfolk
nd
3330-22 Avenue
Prince George, BC V2N 1P8
Tel: (250) 562-2131 local 5412
Email: [email protected]
Richard Brand
2055 Purcell Way
North Vancouver, BC V7J 3H5
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 3005
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE OF THE ROCKIES
Leanne Caillier-Smith
(Co-Chair)
rd
Box 1770 342-3 Avenue
Fernie, BC V0B 1M0
Tel: (250) 423-4691 local 5106
Fax: (250) 423-3932
Email: [email protected]
DOUGLAS COLLEGE
Helen Dempster
P.O. Box 2503
New Westminster, BC V5L 5B2
Tel: 604-527-5414
Fax: 604-527-5095
Email:
[email protected]
KWANTLEN POLYTECHNIC
UNIVERSITY
Tanya Boboricken
12666-72 Avenue
Surrey, BC V3W 2M8
Tel: (604) 598-6154
Email:
[email protected]
Terry Gideon
(Address as above.)
Tel : (604) 527-5506
Email : [email protected]
Diane Walsh
(Address as above.)
Tel: (604) 599-2238
Email: [email protected]
NICOLA VALLEY INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
Faye Ahdemar, Instructor
Faculty of Developmental
Studies
NVIT - Merritt Campus
4155 Belshaw Street
Merritt, BC V1K 1R1
Tel: (250) 378-3362
Email: [email protected]
NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE
Sandy Faust
Port Alberni Campus
3699 Roger Street
Port Alberni, BC V9Y 8E3
Tel: (250) 724-8709
Fax: (250) 724-8700
Email: [email protected]
NORTHERN LIGHTS COLLEGE
Val Keeler
Box 860
Fort Nelson, BC V0C 1R0
Tel: (250) 774-2741
Fax: (250) 774-2750
Email: [email protected]
NORTHWEST COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Mercedes De la Nuez
Prince Rupert Campus
353 5th Street, BC V8J 3L6
Tel: (250) 624-6054 local 5725
Email: [email protected]
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
René Dahms
th
2552 10 Ave. NE
Salmon Arm, BC V1E 2S4
Tel: (250) 832-2126 local 8219
Email: [email protected]
SELKIRK COLLEGE
Wendy Tagami
2001 Silver King Road
Nelson, BC V1L 1C8
Tel: (250) 354-3223
Fax: (250) 352-3180
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS
UNIVERSITY
Kim Tamblyn
Box 3010
Kamloops, BC V2C 5N3
Tel: ((250) 828-5295
Email: [email protected]
UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER
VALLEY
Julia Dodge
45190 Caen Avenue
Chilliwack, BC V2R 0N3
Tel: (800) 504-7441 local 2553
Fax : (604) 824-7931
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Jan Weiten (Co-Chair)
1155 East Broadway
Vancouver, BC V5T 4V5
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7371
Email: [email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
148
Native Education College
Lillian Prince
th
285 East 5 Avenue
Vancouver, BC V5T 1H2
Tel: 604.873.3772 local 332
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER ISLAND
UNIVERSITY
Joanna Lord
2011 University Way
Duncan, BC V9L 0C7
Tel: (250-746-3500
Fax: (250) 746-3563
Email: [email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
149
MATHEMATICS WORKING COMMITTEE
BC INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY
Winona Cordua-von Specht
3700 Willingdon Avenue
Burnaby, BC V5G 3H2
Tel: (604) 451-7142
Fax: (604) 432-9173
Email: [email protected]
CAMOSUN COLLEGE
Alison Bowe
4461 Interurban Road
Victoria, BC V9E 2C1
Tel: (250) 370-4911
Fax: (250) 370-4938
Email: [email protected]
CAPILANO UNIVERSITY
Richard Brand (ABE)
Sylvie Trudel (CUP)
2055 Purcell Way
North Vancouver, BC V7J 3H5
Tel: (604) 986-1911
Email: [email protected]
Email: [email protected]
Cathy Frost
3100 Foul Bay Rd.
Victoria, BC V9P 5J2
Tel : (250) 370 3404
Email : [email protected]
COLLEGE OF NEW
CALEDONIA
John Pacheco
nd
3330 22 Ave
Prince George, BC V2N 1P8
Tel: (250) 562-2131 local 5373
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE OF THE ROCKIES
Deb Heal
2700 College Way
Cranbrook, BC V1C 5L7
Tel: 1-877-489-2687 local 3370
Email: [email protected]
DOUGLAS COLLEGE
Mary Frances Smith
P.O. Box 2503
New Westminster, BC V3L 5B2
Tel: (604) 527-5506 or (604) 7776199
Fax: (604) 527-5095
Email: [email protected]
KWANTLEN POLYTECHNIC
UNIVERSITY
Tanya Boboricken
12666 72nd Avenue
Surrey, BC V3W 2M8
Tel: (604) 598-6154
Email:[email protected]
len.ca
NICOLA VALLEY INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY
Stefan Zabek
4155 Belsaw Street
Merritt, BC V1K 1R1
Tel: (250) 378-3339
Fax: (250) 378-3332
Email:[email protected]
NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE
Pat Corbett-Labatt
Mount Waddington Regional
Campus Box 901
Port Hardy, BC V0N 2P0
Tel: (250) 949-7912 ext 2861
Fax: (250) 949-2617
Email: [email protected]
NORTHERN LIGHTS
COLLEGE
David Batterham
Box 1000
Fort St. John BC V1J 6K1
Tel: 250-785-6981 local 2110
Fax: 250-785-1294
Email: [email protected]
NORTHWEST COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Trudy Dolan
353-5th Street
Prince Rupert BC V8J 3L6
Tel: (250) 624-6054 local 5745
Fax: (250) 624-4920
Email: [email protected]
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
Donna-Leigh Goodman
7000 College Way
Vernon, BC V1B 2N5
Tel: (250) 545-7291 local 2258
Fax: (250) 862-5432
Email:
[email protected]
SELKIRK COLLEGE
Paul Idle
Box 968
Grand Forks BC V0H 1H0
Tel: (250) 442-2704
Fax: (250) 442-2877
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY
Kim Moshenko
900 McGill Road
Kamloops, BC V2H 1R3
Tel: (250) 828-5293
Email: [email protected]
UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER
VALLEY
Judy Larsen
33844 King Road
Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M8
Tel: (604) 504-7441 local 4812
Fax: (604) 855-7558
Email: [email protected]
Vida Robillard
Box 2539
Mackenzie BC
V0J 2C0
Tel : (250) 997-7200
Email : [email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
150
THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY
– OPEN LEARNING
Bruce Irving
165 Gair Road
Victoria, BC V9B 1N5
Tel: (250) 727-9592
Fax: (604) 431-3388
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Costa Karavas (Co-Chair)
1155 E. Broadway
Vancouver, BC V5T 4V5
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7281
Fax: (604) 871-7100
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER ISLAND
UNIVERSITY
Bob Darling
Cowichan Campus
Duncan BC
Tel: (250) 746-3500
Email: [email protected]
YUKON COLLEGE
Robert Ferro (Co-Chair)
500 College Drive
Box 2799
Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5K4
Tel: (867) 668-8841
Fax: (867) 456-8634
Email: [email protected]
Jean MacLeod
Address (see above)
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7294
Fax: (604) 871-7100
Email: [email protected]
Peter Herd
Address (see above)
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7358
Fax: (604) 871-7100
Email: [email protected]
NATIVE EDUCATION
COLLEGE
Lillian Prince
285 E. 5th Avenue
Vancouver, BC V5T 1H2
Tel: (604) 873-3772
Fax: (604) 873-9152
Email:
[email protected]
Mitchell Kahn
Address (see above)
Email:[email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
151
SCIENCE WORKING COMMITTEES
NOTE: In the listing below, Science Working Committee member names appear in boldface with their
addresses. Representatives on the Biology (B), Chemistry (C) Physics (P) and General Science (GS)
subcommittees follow in italics. If no name appears, that institution was not represented at subcommittee
meetings.
BC INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY
Jimmy Lowe
3700 Willington Avenue
Burnaby, BC V5G 3H2
Tel: (604) 412-7487
Email: [email protected]
C) Jimmy Lowe
Address (see above)
P) Jimmy Lowe (see above)
CAMOSUN COLLEGE
Larry Anthony, PhD
Chair, Department of Biology
Camosun College, Office F252B
3100 Foul Bay Road
Victoria, BC V8P 5J2
Tel: (250) 370-3388
Email: [email protected]
CAPILANO UNIVERSITY
Rick Brand (Co-Chair, General
Science Sub-Committee)
2055 Purcell Way
North Vancouver, BC V7J 3H5
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 3005
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email: [email protected]
B) Larry Anthony (see above)
B) Michelle Gunness
Tel: (604) 986-7977 local 2552
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email: [email protected]
C) Neil Meanwell
(Lansdowne Campus, see above)
Tel: (250) 370-3448
Fax: (250) 370-3417
Email: [email protected]
P) Wilfrid Nienaber
4461 Interurban Road, RR 3
Victoria, BC V8X 3X1
Tel: (250) 370-4435
Fax: (250) 370-3417
Email: [email protected]
C) Rick Brand (see above)
P) Charles Hooge
Email: [email protected]
GS) Michelle Gunness
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 2552
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email: [email protected]
GS) Larry Anthony (see above)
COLLEGE OF NEW
CALEDONIA
Alison Anderson
3330 - 22nd Avenue
Prince George, BC V2N 1P8
Tel: (250) 562-2131 local 5663
Fax: (250) 561-5816
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE OF THE ROCKIES
Wendy Panchyshyn
Box 8500
Cranbrook, BC V1C 5L7
Tel: (250) 489-2751 local 3350
Toll Free: 1-877-489-2687
Fax: (250) 489-1790
Email: [email protected]
B) Alison Anderson (see
above)
B) Wendy Panchyshyn (see
above)
C) John Pacheco
Tel: (250) 561-5848 local 5373
Fax: (250) 561-5816
Email: [email protected]
C) Ed Swanson
Tel: (250) 489-2751
Fax: (250) 489-1790
Email: [email protected]
P) John Pacheco
Tel: (250) 562-5813 local 5373
Fax: (250) 561-5816
Email: [email protected]
P) Deb Heal
Tel: (250) 489-2751
Fax: (250) 489-1790
Email: [email protected]
GS) Dani Michael-Didier
Tel: (250) 561-5848 local 275
Fax: (250) 991-7502
Email: [email protected]
GS) Rob Tillman (see above)
KWANTLEN POLYTECHNIC
UNIVERSITY
Peter Robbins (Co-Chair, General
Science Sub-Committee)
nd
12666 – 72 Avenue
Surrey, BC V3W 2M8
Tel: (604) 599-2952
Fax: (604) 599-3107
Email: [email protected]
B) Peter Robbins (see above)
C) Peter Robbins (see above)
P) Peter Robbins (see above)
GS) Peter Robbins (see above)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
152
NICOLA VALLEY INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
B) Stefan Zabek, MA
Department Head—College
Readiness (Merrit and
Vancouver Campus),
College Readiness (Merritt and
Vancouver Campus)
Instructor CR,
Admin Studies
Academic Studies
NORTHERN ALBERTA
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Jocelyn Crocker
11762 – 106 Street
Edmonton, Alberta T5G 2R1
Email: [email protected]
NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE
Sherrie Wang
2300 Ryan Road
Courtenay, BC V9N 8N6
Tel: (250) 334-5052
Fax: (250) 724-8762
Email: [email protected]
B) Christine Hodgson, MSc
Math-Science Department
North Island College
2300 Ryan Road
Courtenay, BC V9N 8N6
Tel: (250) 334-5043
Email:
[email protected]
Tel: (250) 378-3339
Fax: (250) 378-3332
Email: [email protected]
B) Phyllinda Drummond
Port Alberni Campus
Tel: (250) 724-8718
Email:
[email protected]
C) Sherrie Wang (see above)
P) Dennis Lightfoot
2300 Ryan Road
Courtenay, BC V9N 8N6
Tel. (250) 334-5044
Fax (250) 923-9703
Email: [email protected]
NORTHERN LIGHTS
COLLEGE
Jeanette Landry
Box 1000
9820 – 120th Ave.
Fort St. John, BC V1J 6K1
Tel: (250) 787-6216
Fax: (250) 785-1294
Email: [email protected]
NORTHWEST COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Dietmar Ordowski
4815 Swannell Drive
Box 338
Hazelton, BC V0J 1Y0
Tel: (250) 842-5291
Fax: (250) 638-5440
Email: [email protected]
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
Jessica Morcom
1000 KLO Road
Kelowna, BC V1Y 4X8
Tel: (250) 762-5445
Fax: (250) 862-5432
Email: [email protected]
B) Email: Jeanette Landry (see
above)
B) Dietmar Ordowski (see above)
C) Natasha Hansen
7000 College Way
Vernon, BC V1B 2N5
Tel: (250) 545-7291
Email:[email protected]
C) Dietmar Ordowski (see above)
C) Email: Jeanette Landry (see
above)
P) David Batterham
Address (see above)
Tel: (250) 785-6981
Fax: (250) 785-1294
Email: [email protected]
P) Dietmar Ordowski (see above)
GS) Dietmar Ordowski (see
above)
B) Jessica Morcom (see above)
GS) Jessica Morcom (see above)
P) Natasha Hansen (see above)
GS) Jeanette Landry (see
above)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
153
SELKIRK COLLEGE
Allison Alder
2001 Silver King Road
Nelson BC V1L 1C8
Tel: (250) 354-3214
Fax: (250) 352-3180
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY
Jane Horton
Box 3010
Kamloops, BC V2C 5N3
Tel: (250) 828-5261
Fax: (250) 371-5514
Email: [email protected]
B) Allison Alder (See above)
B) Janie Schumacher
Address (see above)
Tel: (250) 371-5597
Fax: (250) 371-5514
Email: [email protected]
C) Ron Greavison
301 Frank Beinder Way
Castlegar, BC V1N 4L3
Tel: (250) 368-5236
Email: [email protected]
GS) Allison Alder (see above)
C) Jane Horton (see above)
P) Kevin Barrie
Tel: (250) 371-5686
Fax: (250) 371-5514
Email: [email protected]
UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER
VALLEY
Greg St. Hilaire (Chair, Science
Committee)
33844 King Road
Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M8
Tel: (604) 504-7441 local 2551
Fax: (604) 855-7558
Email: [email protected]
B) Greg St. Hilaire (see above)
C) David Fenske
Head, Chemistry Department
Office: B362
33844 King Road
Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M8
Tel: (604) 864-4641
Email: [email protected]
GS) Eric Villeneuve
Tel: (250) 371-5795
Fax: (250) 371-5514
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY
– OPEN LEARNING
Derek Knox
Box 3010
Kamloops BC V2C 5N3
Tel: (250) 852-6935
Email: [email protected]
B) Michael Looney, BSc, MSc
Program Coordinator, Arts and ABE
Thompson Rivers University,
Open Learning Division
Tel: (250) 852-6832
Toll free: 1-800-663-1663 ext. 6832
Fax: (250) 371-5514
Email: [email protected]
C) Derek Knox (see above)
P) Derek Knox (see above)
GS) Michael Looney (see above)
VANCOUVER COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Michele Mackenzie
1155 E. Broadway
Vancouver, BC V5T 4V5
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7282
Fax: (604) 871-7100
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER ISLAND
UNIVERSITY
Glenda Hunter
900 Fifth Street
Nanaimo, BC V9R 555
Tel: (250) 753-3245
Fax: (250) 740-6486
Email: [email protected]
B) Gary Lawrence
Address (see above)
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7292
Fax: (604) 871-7100
B) Karen Burns
2011 University Way
Duncan BC, V9L 6P4
Tel: (250) 746-3565
Fax: (250) 746-3563
UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Carol Pollock
UBS Biological Sciences
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
Tel: (604) 822-4984
Email: [email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
154
Email: [email protected]
Email:[email protected]
C) Judith Wallace
Address: (see above)
Tel: (604) 871- 7000 local 7292
Fax: (604) 871-7100
Email: [email protected]
C) Glenda Hunter
Address (see above)
Tel: (250) 753-3245
Fax: (250) 740-6486
Email: [email protected]
P) Andy Sellwood
(Chair, Physics sub-committee)
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7285
Fax: (604) 792-2388
Email: [email protected]
P) Linda Neilson
Address (see above)
Tel: (250) 753-3245
Fax :(250) 740-6486
Email: [email protected]
GS) Peter Herd
Address (see above)
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7358
Fax: (604) 871-7000
Email: [email protected]
GS) Karen Burns
Address (see above)
NATIVE EDUCATION
COLLEGE
285 East 5 Avenue
Vancouver, BC V5T 1H4
B) Mitchell Kahn
Associate Dean of Curriculum
Development
Tel: (604) 873-3772 local 352
Email:
[email protected]
C) Neha Bharadwaj
Email :
[email protected]
YUKON COLLEGE
Simone Rudge
Box 2799
Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5K4
Tel: (867) 456-8606
Fax: (867) 668-8828
Email:
[email protected]
B) Gerald Haase
Tel: (867) 668-8831
Fax: (867) 668-8828
Email:
[email protected]
C) Tom McBee (Chair,
Chemistry subcommittee)
Tel: (867) 668-8831
Fax: (867) 668-8828
Email:
[email protected]
P) Tom McBee (see above)
GS) Simone Rudge (see
above)
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
155
SOCIAL SCIENCES WORKING COMMITTEE
CAPILANO UNIVERSITY
Carol Schoen (Co-Chair)
Developmental Studies
Capilano University
2055 Purcell Way,
North Vancouver, BC V7J 3H5
Tel: (604) 986-1911 local 3451
Fax: (604) 984-1718
Email: [email protected]
COLLEGE OF THE ROCKIES
Sharon Richardson
Box 8500
Cranbrook, BC V1C 5L7
Tel: (250) 489-2751 local 3416
Fax: (250) 489-1790
Email: [email protected]
NICOLA VALLEY INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY
Stefan Zabek
4155 Belshaw Street
Merritt, BC V1K 1R1
Toll Free: 877-682-3300
Fax: (250) 378-3332
Email:[email protected]
NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE
Please contact the Steering
Committee member for North
Island College.
(See contact list above.)
NORTHERN LIGHTS COLLEGE
David Szucsko
Box 2138,
Tumbler Ridge, BC V0C 2W0
Tel: (250) 242-5591 local 4404
Email: [email protected]
NORTHWEST COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Gordon Urban
Career and College Preparation
PO Box 338
Hazelton, BC V0J 1Y0
Tel: (250) 842-5291 local 5506
Fax: (250) 842-5819
Email: [email protected]
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
Chantale Hutchinson (CoChair)
1000 KLO Road
Kelowna, BC V1Y 4X8
Tel: (250) 762-5445 local 4487
Fax: (250) 862-5432
Email:
[email protected]
SELKIRK COLLEGE
Jennifer Cliff-Marks
900 Helena Street
Trail, BC V1R 4S6
Tel: (250) 364-5785
Fax: (250) 368-4983
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS
UNIVERSITY
Jane Barley, Instructor
Division of Student Development
301 - 383 Oliver Street
Williams Lake, BC V2G 1M4
Tel: (250) 371-5596
Fax: (250) 371-5772
Email: [email protected]
THOMPSON RIVERS
UNIVERSITY – OPEN LEARNING
John Patterson
VCC, Broadway Campus
1155 E. Broadway
Vancouver, BC V5N 5T9
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7289
Fax: (604) 871-7100
Email: [email protected]
VANCOUVER COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
John Patterson
King Edward Campus
1155 E. Broadway
Vancouver, BC V5N 5T9
Tel: (604) 871-7000 local 7289
Fax: (604) 871-7100
Email: [email protected]
NATIVE EDUCATION
COLLEGE
Dennis Contois
th
285 East 5 Ave
Vancouver, BC V5T 1H2
Tel: (604) 873-3772 local 320
Fax: (604) 876-9152
Email:
[email protected]
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
156
ABE in BC--2013/14 Articulation Handbook
157
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement