CCMTA Road Safety Report Series

CCMTA Road Safety Report Series
CCMTA Road Safety Report Series
NATIONAL OCCUPANT RESTRAINT PROGRAM 2010
Annual Monitoring Report 2006
Prepared For
Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators
Standing Committee on Road Safety Research and Policies
October 2007
Disclaimer
The material presented in this text was carefully researched and presented. However, no
warranty expressed or implied is made on the accuracy of the contents of their extraction
from reference to publications.
© 2007
Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators/
Conseil canadien des administrateurs en transport motorisé
Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators
2323 St. Laurent Blvd.
Ottawa, Ontario
K1G 4J8
Telephone: (613) 736-1003
Fax: (613) 736-1395
E-mail: [email protected]
Internet: www.ccmta.ca
CANADIAN COUNCIL OF
MOTOR TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATORS
The Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators is a non-profit organization comprising
representatives of the provincial, territorial and federal governments of Canada which, through the
collective consultative process, makes decisions on administration and operational matters dealing with
licensing, registration and control of motor vehicle transportation and highway safety. It also includes
associate members from the private sector and other government departments whose expertise and
opinions are sought in the development of strategies and programs.
The work of CCMTA is conducted by three permanent standing committees which meet twice a year. The
mandates of the standing committees are as follows:
<
The Standing Committee on Drivers and Vehicles is responsible for all matters relating
to motor vehicle registration and control, light vehicle standards and inspections, and
driver licensing and control.
<
The Standing Committee on Compliance and Regulatory Affairs is concerned with
the compliance activities of programs related to commercial driver and vehicle
requirements, transportation of dangerous goods and motor carrier operations in order to
achieve standardized regulations and compliance programs in all jurisdictions.
<
The Standing Committee on Road Safety Research and Policies is responsible for
coordinating federal, provincial and territorial road safety efforts, making
recommendations in support of road safety programs, and developing overall expertise
and strategies to prevent road collisions and reduce their consequences.
CCMTA’s Board of Directors also meets twice per year to attend to the overall management of the
organization, determine policy direction and provide overall guidance and direction to the standing
committees. Recommendations of the standing committees are ratified by the CCMTA Board.
All CCMTA standing committee meetings are open to industry stakeholders. Associate membership
further allows private organizations and other government bodies with an interest in matters dealing with
motor vehicle transportation and highway safety to be kept apprised of CCMTA activities and have
formal access to CCMTA meetings and proceedings.
For further information on CCMTA projects and programs or associate membership, please contact the
Secretariat.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Executive Summary ..................................................................................... 2
Progress Being Made Toward NORP’s RSV 2010 Goals............................ 5
History .......................................................................................................... 7
Purpose of Report ........................................................................................ 7
NORP 2006 Movement Toward The Recommendations ............................. 8
Recommendation #1 .......................................................................... 8
Recommendation #2........................................................................... 9
Recommendation #3......................................................................... 10
Recommendation #4......................................................................... 11
Recommendation #5......................................................................... 13
Recommendation #6......................................................................... 14
Recommendation #7......................................................................... 16
Recommendation #8......................................................................... 16
Information Item: NORP Strategy 2010 Progress Update ................. 19
Appendix I: People Killed or Injured by Jurisdiction Table ......................... 22
Appendix II: Children Killed or Injured Across Canada Graph ................... 23
Appendix III: Fine & Demerit Point Table ................................................... 25
Appendix IV: Child Restraint Exemptions Table ........................................ 26
Appendix V: Seat Belt Exemptions Table .................................................. 27
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation Table ........................................................................................ 28
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
1
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The NORP Task Force requests input from all jurisdictions and reports seat belt and
child passenger safety enforcement and education strategies on an annual basis.
All jurisdictions except for Nunavut and Northwest Territories participated in the 2006
NORP Monitoring Survey, which covers the period of January 1, 2006 through to
December 31, 2006.
The terms of reference developed for “NORP Beyond 2001” include the following
proposals put forward by the NORP Task Force and adopted by the CCMTA Standing
Committee on Road Safety Research and Policies (RSRP):
•
•
•
To develop a strategy to maintain and/or achieve a seat belt usage rate of
95 per cent for all motor vehicle occupants by 2010.
To monitor progress and to review the proposed strategy on a regular and
timely basis and to make recommendations for improvements that will
achieve the stated objective.
To focus on specific areas of occupant protection, including, but not
limited to: rural populations, child passenger safety and legislative,
educational and enforcement strategies.
This report includes information collected based on the proposals included in “NORP
Beyond 2001”. The NORP Monitoring Survey, which was revised in 2003, was used to
collect data from jurisdictions. There are non-reportable gaps in the information that will
require further processes to be developed to make data collection and retrieval more
streamlined and effective.
Transport Canada’s cycle of rural/urban seat belt usage surveys continued in 2006, with
a report on the results of the 2005 urban seat belt results being reported in February of
2006. This survey, which was conducted over the week of September 15 to September
21, 2005, involved two separate observation periods at each of 263 sites. A total of
84,129 vehicles and 118,226 occupants were observed during the course of the study.
It is interesting to note that 87.2% of all occupants of light duty vehicles in urban
communities used seatbelts in 2003 and this increased to 91.1% in 2005, almost 4 %
higher. In 2003, 87.6% of front seat occupants in urban communities wore seatbelts and
this increased to 91.3% in 2005. These numbers seem to indicate we are headed in the
right direction.
Provinces with seat belt usage rates at or above the national average were British
Columbia, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia.
The survey results continue to show a disparity in usage by occupants of light trucks
compared to other vehicle types; males drivers compared to females and those under
the age of 25 compared to older drivers.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
2
Transport Canada’s utilization of a revised sampling design for its annual seat belt use
surveys and separate rural and urban surveys has resulted in considerably more
comprehensive and accurate estimates of occupant restraint use throughout Canada
and hopefully, more targeted resources to address problem areas.
NORP has identified a number of legislative, enforcement and public education
strategies which jurisdictions can use to increase seat belt wearing rates. Jurisdictions
continued to amend child passenger protection measures, including Ontario and Nova
Scotia both of who have passed legislation to make the use of booster seats mandatory.
Ontario’s legislation was effective September 2005. Nova Scotia’s was effective
January 1, 2007. They join Quebec as the first three jurisdictions with child passenger
protection legislation for children to be secured in a booster seat.
Appendices IV - VI show the current deterrents and exemptions in place across Canada
for 2006 for non-use of seat belts and child restraints. Legislative and regulatory
amendments to reduce or eliminate seat belt exemptions have been identified by NORP
as a way of increasing seat belt usage. In 2006, Ontario implemented legislation that
requires every driver and passenger travelling on Ontario roads to wear a seat belt. This
is a very positive step forward from the previous requirement of seat belt use by a
vehicle occupant only if there was an assembly in that seating position.
Legislation that reflects the importance of this public health issue and effectively
addresses areas where improvements can be most helpful in increasing seat belt
compliance remains critical. Although NORP has recommended that jurisdictions
should continue to work towards eliminating seat belt exemptions, jurisdictions are slow
to move in this direction.
All jurisdictions have implemented education and enforcement initiatives to increase
seat belt and child seat use. There is significant jurisdictional variation in the resources
applied to these programs. Educational materials and information are routinely
provided to the police, emergency services, public and health care professionals.
All jurisdictions participated in “Operation Impact” and “Canada Road Safety Week”. All
but one conducted some form of Selective Traffic Enforcement Programs (STEP) during
2006. Operation Impact is a national weekend-long traffic enforcement blitz, which
focuses on the high-risk driver, including the motorist who is not wearing a seat belt.
The fourth annual Canada Road Safety Week was held in 2006, the week leading up to
and including the long weekend in May. All enforcement in Canada participated in
Canada Road Safety Week.
Almost all jurisdictions that reported on STEP programs conducted in 2006 indicated
occupant restraint use and child restraint use were targeted. Some combined other
target areas, most often with impaired driving, speed and intersections or a combination
of driver behaviour issues.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
3
The efforts of the police and other road safety advocates have been instrumental in both
achieving a seat belt usage rate in Canada of over 90 per cent and in raising awareness
of associated issues. Enhanced training of the police community to raise awareness of
this issue is important. In 2006, police in the majority of jurisdictions had some form of
training pertaining to child car seat usage.
Enforcement remains a critical element in the success of Canada’s seat belt compliance
rate, with risk of apprehension a significant factor in encouraging people to buckle up.
However, it is still a struggle to measure the perceived risk of apprehension. Options are
being pursued.
The inventory of public education material on occupant restraints, including child safety
seats available across Canada to both government and stakeholder organizations, is
updated annually by CCMTA. This inventory is on the CCMTA web site, and made
available by hard copy on request. Jurisdictions are responsible for providing relevant
information to CCMTA.
The child passenger safety model legislation serves as basic principles that would best
contribute to improvements in occupant protection within the framework of existing
legislation.
Increasingly, various jurisdictions are exploring ways to reach their rural populations
through public education initiatives, in order to increase seat belt use in this vulnerable
population.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
4
PROGRESS BEING MADE TOWARD NORP’S RSV 2010 GOALS
Sub-target: Minimum seat belt wearing rates and proper use of child restraints of
95% by all motor vehicle occupants1
Although benchmark data do not exist for this sub-target, the application of the
methodology used in a Transport Canada study to estimate seat belt effectiveness
indicates that with gradual annual increases in restraint use to 95% by 2010, an
estimated 715 additional lives will be saved and 1,377 serious injuries avoided during
the timeframe of RSV 2010 (assumes that the level of injuries avoided was the same for
seriously injured occupants as for all injured occupants.)
Baseline Indicators: Results of TC Seat Belt Use Survey among adult occupants:
2005-2006 National
Seat Belt Use Rate
90.8%
2008-2010 Target
95%
Sub-target:
A 40% decrease in the number of unbelted fatally or seriously injured occupants2
RSV 2010 Seat Belt Use Sub-Target
National Estimates of Seat Belt Use - 2002-2006 versus 1996-2001 Baseline
97.0
95.0
93.0
Adult and Child Occupant Restraint Use Sub-Target Objective
90.5
Percent
91.0
90.5
90.8
2005
2006
89.4
89.0
87.4
87.4
2002
2003
2004
Seat Belt Usage Rate
87.0
85.0
83.0
81.0
1996-2001
Note: Seat belt usage rates for the 1996-2001 baseline period are not directly comparable to usage rates cited during 2002 and beyond due
to differences in survey methodologies.
1
It must be pointed out that effective in 2002, Transport Canada dramatically modified the methodology used to estimate national seat belt usage
rates, and consequently data for 2002 and beyond are not directly comparable to seat belt usage rates from previous years. For the first time in 2002,
Transport Canada conducted a rural seat belt use survey, followed by an urban survey in 2003 that utilized a more representative site selection
process than predominantly urban ‘national’ surveys conducted in 2001 or earlier. The combined results of the 2002 rural and 2003 urban observations
were used to estimate the 2002-2003 national figure. The 2002-2003 national figure and subsequent national figures, which utilize weighted results
from both surveys, and include considerably more observation sites (512 versus 240) than seat belt surveys from earlier years, are deemed to be more
accurate than their predecessors. Consequently, unlike all other sub-targets, that compare current year victim figures to the 1996-2001 baseline period,
the 2002-2003 national seat belt usage rate was used as the baseline indicator for this sub-target.
2
Baseline data for the Road Safety Vision 2010 sub-targets are based on average annual fatalities and serious injuries that occurred during the 19962001 period, which was the timeframe of Road Safety Vision 2001. Baseline indicators and target objectives are provided for each of the Vision’s subtargets
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
5
RSV 2010 Unbelted Occupants Sub-Target
Unbelted Fatally/Seriously Injured Occupants - 2002-2005 versus 1996-2001 Baseline
120.0
Unbelted Occupants Sub-Target Objective
100.0
100.0
100.0
94.8
94.0
91.8
89.4
84.7
84.5
83.7
80.6
Index (1996-2001 = 100)
80.0
60.0
40.0
20.0
0.0
1996-2001
2002
2003
Killed
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
2004
2005
Major Injuries
6
HISTORY
In 1989, the Council of Ministers Responsible for Transportation and Highway Safety
agreed to employ all possible means to achieve a 95 per cent seat belt use rate by the
end of 1995. In response, the CCMTA developed and implemented the National
Occupant Restraint Program in 1989. As a first step, a Phase I proposal called for each
jurisdiction to achieve an 80 per cent use rate by the end of 1990. At the same time, a
Phase II proposal was developed which outlined a five-year program aimed at achieving
a 95 per cent use rate by the end of 1995. In October 1996, NORP was extended with
the goal to achieve and maintain a 95 per cent occupant restraint use in all seating
positions in light-duty vehicles (passenger cars, passenger vans and light-trucks) in
each of the provinces and territories to the year 2001.
The focus of NORP’s 95% by ’95 program was primarily on the driver. The focus of
NORP 2001 was on all occupants with particular emphasis on ensuring children are
properly secured. As an addition to NORP 2001 a business case was approved by the
CCMTA Board of Directors in 1999, endorsing further strategies to address seat belt
use, particularly in rural areas.
Subsequently, NORP provided suggestions for aggressive but achievable targets that
have been incorporated into Road Safety Vision 2010.
PURPOSE OF THIS REPORT
As part of the approved strategy, CCMTA was made responsible for producing an
annual monitoring report on NORP’s progress. This report is for January 1, 2006
through to December 31, 2006. This report comments on efforts to meet the goals
outlined in “Road Safety Vision 2010”, successor plan to Road Safety Vision 2001.
RSV 2010 has identified enhanced and specific targets associated with motor vehicle
occupant protection.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
7
NORP 2006 MOVEMENT TOWARD THE RECOMMENDATIONS:
RECOMMENDATION #1:
Each jurisdiction should aim to achieve and maintain:
• A minimum seat belt wearing rate of 95 per cent and proper use of child
restraints by all motor vehicle occupants
• 40 per cent decrease in number of unbelted fatally or seriously injured
occupants
• 40 per cent decrease in the number of road users fatally or seriously
injured on rural roadways.
Based on Road Safety Vision 2010, NORP has set a target of a 95 per cent rate of seat
belt wearing and proper use of appropriate child restraints by all motor vehicle
occupants.
With funding secured by NORP, Transport Canada was able to continue its cycle of
rural/urban seat belt usage surveys. A report on the results of the 2005 urban seat belt
results was issued in February of 2006. This survey, was undertaken in September
2005 in communities with a population over 10,000, plus those communities with a
population of less than 10,000 that are located within a census metropolitan area. Two
separate observation periods of 263 sites were involved. Each observation period was
one hour long and took place during daylight hours (between 6:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.).
A total of 84,129 vehicles and 118,226 occupants were observed during the course of
the study. Therefore, during the two surveys, a total of 123,898 vehicles and 176,969
occupants were observed at 515 sites across Canada.
The survey reported that the Canadian urban seat belt usage rate is estimated at
91.1%. The previous urban seat belt usage survey, in 2003, showed that 87.2% of all
occupants of light duty vehicles in urban communities used seat belts. This increased
by 5% in 2005, a small step in the right direction.
The national seat belt usage rate measured in the 2004-2005 surveys – 90.5% - is
about 4 percentage points higher than that measured in the 2002-2003 surveys.
Jurisdictions with urban seat belt usage rates at or above the national average were
Saskatchewan (94.7%), Ontario (92.6%), Manitoba (92.4%), British Columbia (91.9%)
and Nova Scotia (91.4%).
The survey results continue to show a disparity in usage by occupants of light trucks
compared to other vehicle types; male drivers compared to female and those under the
age of 25 compared to older drivers.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
8
Transport Canada, in conjunction with Dr. Anne Snowdon of Auto 21 and Dr. Andrew
Howard of Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children completed a national child restraint
survey in the summer/fall of 2006. A survey design utilizing both observational and
interview data collection methods was conducted in randomly selected sites across
Canada. A survey using “drive-by” observations of child and driver restraint status was
conducted at 187 randomly selected intersections. Second, vehicles that entered a
parking lot near the intersection being observed were asked to participate in a detailed
inspection and interview to document child restraint use and driver knowledge. Results
were analyzed and initial results were presented at the CCMTA Annual meeting in May
2007.
Education on the correct use and installation of child restraints continues. Most
jurisdictions are maintaining, if not growing, the network of technicians that are trained
to properly install child car seats.
COMMENTARY:
Setting aggressive but achievable targets for Road Safety Vision 2010 is one way of
focusing attention on the importance of occupant restraint use and in achieving
success. Transport Canada’s improved methodology will allow jurisdictions to invest
appropriate resources to address the issues in their jurisdictions that could lead to
making improvements to these targets. Strengthening linkages’ with agencies that are
also involved in occupant restraints so the targets and reasons for them are understood
is another effort towards achieving success.
RECOMMENDATION #2
Each jurisdiction should continue working towards the removal of exemptions for
the non-use of seat belts.
In 2006, Ontario implemented legislation that requires every driver and passenger
travelling on Ontario roads to wear a seat belt. This is a very positive step forward from
the previous requirement of seat belt use by a vehicle occupant only if there was an
assembly in that seating position.
COMMENTARY
Seat belt exemptions fall into three categories:
• Medical/physical
• Occupational (e.g. rural mail delivery, police)
• Situational (e.g. from other jurisdictions, driving in reverse)
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) has indicated that there are no medical
conditions which preclude the wearing of a seat belt.
When seat belt usage was first mandated, seat belts were sometimes difficult to use. In
order to obtain “buy in” from certain stakeholders, such as police officers and taxi
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
9
drivers, exemptions were allowed to address the particular concerns raised by these
groups. Seat belts have become substantially more comfortable and easy to use in the
years since they were introduced. There are few occupations for which seat belt usage
is an obstacle to completing the work required (i.e.: police work).
With all jurisdictions requiring seat belt use, there are no benefits to situational
exemptions. Movement towards removal of exemptions has been very slow over the
past few years. Hopefully, this is not an indication of the priority jurisdictions are giving
to increasing seat belt usage.
RECOMMENDATION #3
Each jurisdiction to target the high-risk driver by increasing the monetary cost of
an infraction and to introduce or increase the number of demerit points for nonuse of seat belts and child car seats.
Sanctions for convictions under occupant restraint legislation continue to vary
throughout the country, ranging from $75 to $247 and from 0 to 4 demerit points. The
slight trend of increased sanctions, both fines and demerit points, for seat belt non-use
since 1999 is continuing. Two jurisdictions increased their fines in 2006. Manitoba
raised their fine from $235 to $247. Nova Scotia raised their fine from $128.75 to
$157.50.
With four demerit points levied against motorists, and seven for motorists in GDL,
Yukon currently has the most stringent demerit point penalties. The number of
jurisdictions that have imposed demerit points far exceeds the number of jurisdictions
that have not. British Columbia and Albert (with the exception of their GDL program)
have not applied demerit points for seat belt or child restraint non-use. Manitoba does
not assign demerit points for child restraint non-use.
The tables in appendices IV - VI show the current (2006) sanctions and exemptions in
place across Canada for non-use of seat belts and child restraints.
COMMENTARY
The imposition of demerit points, in conjunction with increased enforcement and
education, and the removal of seat belt exemptions have been shown to significantly
increase seat belt usage rates. Work still needs to be done to increase demerit point
penalties and remove seat belt exemptions in many jurisdictions.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
10
RECOMMENDATION #4
Each jurisdiction to harmonize and simplify provincial laws and regulations in
accordance with NORP’s recommended model1, and include sustained public
education efforts to reduce the opportunities for misuse and non-use of child car
seats, including ensuring the use of booster seats for children who have
outgrown a child car seat, yet for whom an adult seat belt is not appropriate; and,
ensuring children 12 years of age and under are seated in the back seat of the
vehicle.
In an attempt to make the NORP model legislation more adaptable, NORP wrote to
Transport Canada in 2004 to request that Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standards
(CMVSS) for booster seats include a seated height. The letter also requested that
Transport Canada amend the terminology in CMVSS from “booster cushion” to “booster
seat”. Transport Canada agreed that “booster seat” was a clearer, more effective term
that reflects current usage. TC is just beginning work on an amendment to the
regulations to raise the mass for child seats from the current 40 lbs. The booster seat
issue will be reviewed as part of this project. No definitive time lines have been
assigned to this project as of yet.
Two jurisdictions, Quebec (effective 2002), Ontario (effective 2005) have a mandatory
booster seat requirement. Nova Scotia announced changes to its child restraint
regulations in December of 2005, with an effective date of January 1, 2007 that will
require infants to be rear facing; children of at least 10kg and at least one year old be
forward facing; children under 18 kg must be in a child seat; and children who weigh
more than 18 kg must be in a booster if they are younger than 9 and/or less than 145
cm. tall.
Effective December 1, 2006, Ontario requires everyone in the vehicle to occupy a
seating position with a seat belt and that the seat belt is used properly, as described in
the legislation.
Seven out of the eleven reporting jurisdictions indicated that matching jurisdictional laws
with the NORP recommended model is a priority. However, there is limited legislative
activity. The revisions to the Model of Legislative Provisions for Motor Vehicle
Occupants in 2004 will hopefully guide jurisdictions to make legislative and regulatory
amendments that will strengthen occupant restraint laws.
Jurisdictions continue to implement education and enforcement initiatives aimed at
increasing the proper use of occupant restraints. Many jurisdictions across the country
continue to have enforcement personnel trained as either technicians or instructors in
the national child passenger safety program.
Enforcement activities across the country vary and include participation in provincial
selective traffic enforcement programs as well as the national Operation Impact, and
1
Model of Legislative Provisions for Motor Vehicle Occupants (June 2004)
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
11
Canada Road Safety Week campaigns. Both Operation Impact and Canada Road
Safety Week combine enforcement with a variety of public education initiatives that
focus on occupant restraint use and other high-risk driving behaviours.
Aside from campaigns that include enforcement and the distribution of public education
materials; child seat clinics (in co-operation with public health, firefighters and police)
and the involvement of insurance and other road safety partners, there are several other
noteworthy programs being executed across the country:
•
Besides the two major STEP programs in May and October, Alberta has on-going
STEP programs throughout the year at various locations utilizing various individual
enforcement agencies. Joint force operations are also done. Advertising campaigns
encompassing print, radio, TV and website are used to promote occupant restraint
use. Child seat inspection clinics are on-going at various locations in the province
throughout the year.
•
Besides ongoing provincial and local enforcement blitzes that are held during
regional campaigns, British Colmumbia held an awareness campaign called One
Click which is a multi-media presentation followed by a rollover simulator
demonstration. ICBC and BCAA continued to work with enforcement and health
professionals on education and enforcement of child safety seats.
•
Manitoba used air bag and rollover simulator demonstrations at public and media
events to reinforce the importance of using seat belts. RCMP conducted STEP
campaigns targeting multiple issues, including seat belts.
•
Nova Scotia held “Operation Road Safety in conjunction with police agencies. Rollover simulator demonstrations were done to raise awareness. A comprehensive
awareness campaign, including print, television, radio and internet was held to
promote the new child restraint regulations.
•
RCMP in Saskatchewan, in conjunction with some of the municipal police forces,
initiated a “Click It Or Ticket” campaign from October to December 2006; 1400 seat
belt tickets were issued in the three month period, up from 552 for the same three
months the previous year. Checkstops during Canada Road Safety Week and
Operation Impact were also conducted. Many of the municipal forces hold “focus of
the month” blitzes, which include seat belts.
•
In New Brunswick, roll-over simulator demonstrations were done by the police at
schools and public venues. Police also held covert seat belt enforcement operations
throughout the province. The RCMP held internal training on RSV 2010 priorities,
including seat belt and child restraints.
•
Newfoundland and Labrador established a Road Safety Committee to highlight road
safety issues with representation from Health and Community services, RCMP,
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
12
RNC, Transportation and Works, Newfoundland and Labrador Safety Council, city
engineering department Registrar of Motor Vehicles and special interest guests.
•
RCMP in Yukon conducted regular STEP programs, including Road Safety Week
and Safe Driving Week. A total of 11 child restraint technicians were trained in 2006.
•
Ontario’s held its annual spring and fall provincial seat belt campaigns. The spring
campaign focused on child passenger safety. The theme for the fall campaign was
the 30th anniversary of Ontario’s seat belt law and focused on back seat occupants,
rural males and males under 25 years old. IN May 2006, Ontario conducted a high
profile “SmartLove” advertising campaign. Ads were broadcast across the province
via radio, television and newspapers reminding the public that properly used child
restraint car safety seats save lives. The SmartLove messaging appeared on
overhead traffic signs and printed products were produced and distributed with the
SmartLove logo.
•
In 2006, Transport Canada continued to issue notices regarding safety or user
problems with child safety seats. The notices are listed on the Transport Canada
web site at www.tc.gc.ca. In addition, Transport Canada initiated an increase in the
upper weight limit for forward facing child restraints (CMVSS 213).
RECOMMENDATION # 5
Each jurisdiction to implement measures that focus education and enforcement
activities on rural geographic locations that have been shown by collision
statistics to be high-risk locations.
Alberta, Nova Scotia, Manitoba, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Yukon and
Saskatchewan held awareness/enforcement seat belt programs targeted at the rural
population:
•
Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation, Alberta Occupant Restraint Program and
police and health professionals targeted rural seat belt initiatives, including
education and enforcement.
•
Nova Scotia’s rural seat belt coalition focused on child safety seats.
•
The Yukon RCMP held one child safety seat clinics in a rural community in 2006.
•
Saskatchewan continues to target occupant restraint use in Aboriginal communities
through posters, radio ads in English, Cree and Dene and presentations. A seat belt
radio advertising campaign ran in the spring and fall (during seeding and harvest) in
the rural parts of the province. Closed captioning was run during programming
geared directly to the rural audience. Child car seat clinics are promoted through
print and radio ads. From May to September anyone who attended a car seat clinic
entered a contest where a booster seat was drawn for at each clinic, with a grand
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
13
prize draw at the end of the campaign for a $1,000 registered education savings
plan.
•
Manitoba RCMP used an air bag demonstrator as a tool to reinforce the importance
of seat belts, air bags and transporting children in the back seat.
•
Ontario continued to offer community based grants to groups in urban and rural
areas to encourage them to conduct activities such as child car seat inspection
clinics, workshops, displays, booster seat fitting stations, seat belt usage counts and
to develop promotional pieces.
•
Prince Edward Island saw checkstops involving the RCMP, municipal police and
Highway Safety Enforcement officers in the rural parts of the province.
•
Transport Canada engaged IMPACT (MB) to conduct a promotional child restraint
program in three First Nations communities, with the intention that the program
would serve as a model for increasing restraint use among First Nation communities.
COMMENTARY
Some jurisdictions have been more successful than others in narrowing the gap
between urban and rural seat belt usage. TC’s survey results indicate that Quebec,
Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan appear to have been most successful in bridging
this gap. The improved survey methodology used by TC is allowing jurisdictions to
invest appropriate resources to address the issues in their jurisdictions that could lead
to making improvements in rural seat belt usage, which is apparent by Ontario’s
strategy to focus on rural males.
RECOMMENDATION #6
To increase the perceived risk of apprehension for the non-use of occupant
restraints, jurisdictions should refocus their enforcement efforts to ensure that
they are as effective as possible. Enforcement has been proven to be an
important cornerstone in efforts to increase seat belt compliance and by
increasing the visibility of enforcement, the perceived risk of being
stopped/apprehended is augmented which in turn, will increase compliance. High
visibility seat belt checks by police, supported by public education such as news
releases, media interviews and community outreach, can significantly enhance
the public’s perception of police efforts to increase occupant restraint
compliance.
In 2006, all but one of the eleven reporting jurisdictions conducted some form of STEP.
Occupant restraint use was one of the targeted areas for this enforcement. Nine of the
reporting jurisdictions focussed on seat belt use and child passenger safety. The vast
majority of jurisdictions also targeted impaired driving. Three jurisdictions focussed
STEP’s on intersection safety and speed management. British Columbia also targeted
vulnerable road users such as motorcycles and pedestrians.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
14
The following chart shows the number charges laid and convictions for occupant
restraint offences by jurisdiction in 2006:
Jurisdiction
AB
BC
MB
NS
NB
NL
NT
ON
PE
QC
SK
YT
TOTAL
Adult Occupant Adult Occupant Child Restraint Child Restraint
Restraint
Restraint
Charges Laid
Convictions
Charges Laid
Convictions
Not reported
75,710
n/a
Not reported
n/a
n/a
158
85,080
n/a
n/a
n/a
442
161,232
73,130
3,309
680
n/a
640
115
4,4321
2,077
n/a
n/a
20
662
n/a
n/a
n/a
5
1,367
702
26
67,022
680
37,144 (2005)
8,076
428
196,298
368
13
1,196 (2005)
529
5
2,962
Transport Canada completed Phase I of a proof of concept project to assess the
feasibility and user acceptability of a seat belt interlock system which delays the vehicle
from being put in gear if the seat belt is not being used. Phase II of this project was
completed in the spring of 2006. Initial results will be presented at the CCMTA Annual
Meeting in May 2007. Suggestions for future research include looking at other types of
vehicle functions which could be blocked and testing the devices on different
populations.
COMMENTARY:
A method of accurately measuring the perceived risk of apprehension needs to be
developed. NORP patiently awaits the work done by the CCMTA’s Research Task
Force in developing a method to measure the progress of this recommendation. NORP
will continue to explore technological solutions in order to help increase compliance with
seat belt use laws.
1
2
Fiscal year from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2006
Fiscal year 2005-2006 (under 16 years of age)
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
15
RECOMMENDATION #7
To encourage the involvement of enforcement in combined types of enforcement
programs, such as the Safe and Sober Program in the U.S. where police officers
enforce seat belt and drinking and driving laws within the same campaign (in line
with CCMTA’s Strategy to Reduce Impaired Driving).
Increasingly, enforcement activities are moving toward combined activities. Operation
Impact is an example of a program which has moved, not only from its original focus on
seat belt use alone, to a combination that identifies seat belt non-compliance with other
high risk behaviour, including drinking and driving but also from a day-long to a
weekend-long project. May 2006 saw the fourth annual Canada Road Safety Week,
which resulted in 547 impaired driving related charges (up for 320 in 2005), 5,254
occupant restraint related charges (up from 3,636 in 2005) and 7,870 intersection
related charges (up from 1,498 in 2005). Canada Road Safety Week has RCMP and
other police agencies focus on impaired driving, occupant restraint use, speed and
intersections for the week leading up to and including the Victoria Day long weekend in
May. Operation Impact, in October 2006 resulted in 832 impaired charges (up from 274
in 2005) and 6,388 seat belt charges (up from 2,738 in 2005) as well as 16,995
aggressive driving related charges across the country in RCMP jurisdictions.
The creation of Operation Road Safety in Nova Scotia and the implementation of Click It
or Ticket in Saskatchewan indicate that jurisdictions continue to work with traffic
enforcement to increase and/or maintain seat belt and child restraint use, and to
encourage officers to ticket violators on a continuous basis.
COMMENTARY
The recent increase in this type of programming nationally has led to individual
jurisdictions taking more initiatives to implement these types of operations on a
provincial level. More jurisdictions should be encouraged to use the models that have
been used nationally that see multiple enforcement agencies working together to
address numerous road safety issues, such as drinking driving, seat belt use, speed
and intersection safety. CCMTA can continue to provide a natural link in approaching
the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police to co-ordinate the development and
implementation of police training in these issues across the country.
RECOMMENDATION #8
Each jurisdiction continue activities with enforcement, education and legislative
changes that encourage the use of seat belts and child car seats including
sharing of resources and information among jurisdictions, and evaluating current
programs so that other jurisdictions can gain information about program
effectiveness and move toward a unified voice across the country with regard to
seat belt and child car seat use.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
16
CCMTA continues to maintain an inventory of public education materials pertaining to
occupant restraints, with annual fall updates. This information is available on the
CCMTA website. The following table lists public education materials created or updated
in 2006, by the provinces and territories to promote child occupant restraint use:
Jurisdiction
British Columbia
Item
Web site, brochures, fact
sheets, PSA’s, press
releases, road signage, city
buses, government vehicles,
print and radio ads, posters,
videos, child seat clinics,
enforcement, booths at
events, conferences,
information sessions, tollfree information line
Information available on the
web
Print material and radio
through AORP
Training sessions for health,
enforcement and volunteers
through Alberta
Infrastructure and
Transportation
Target
Enforcement,
health field,
professional,
technicians,
retail, children,
parents,
caregivers,
Ethnic groups,
government.
Saskatchewan
Web site updates of child
restraint clinic locations,
times and dates, updates to
brochures on booster seat
and child restraint use,
posters
Care-givers
Manitoba
TV, web site, seat belt
demonstrations, handouts at
rollover demonstrations
Information provided on the
web, Fall and Spring seat
belt campaigns, car seat
clinics, media events, news
releases, poster series,
growth chart, sizing card. In
May 2006, the high profile
“SmartLove” advertising
campaign was conducted
targeting child passenger
safety. This campaign used
radio, television, print media
ads, highway signage and
other print products.
Une place pour moi – a
program to teach
Drivers,
parents,
caregivers
Parents,
caregivers,
motorists that
transport
children in
Ontario.
Alberta
Ontario
Quebec
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
Distribution Methods
Web site, RCMP, nurses,
hospitals, Band Offices,
Friendship Centres, schools
(CAPP), points of service
(claim centres, broker offices,
licensing offices), ICR
inspection clinics,
conferences, retailers,
restaurants, TSF/BCAA.
Alberta Infrastructure and
Transportation, Think and
Drive, AORP
Educators in
child care
Information on the web was
promoted through all child
passenger safety promotional
material, public health and
network of child passenger
safety technicians,
issuer/broker offices, schools,
enforcement, band offices and
Friendship centers
MPI and MCSC web sites,
brochures, and phone number
Website, MTO regional
planners, daycares, police
services, public health units,
and community groups,
Ontario Early Years Centres,
secondary schools, GO
stations, trains, DriveTest
Centres and licence issuing
offices
Education program in
kindergarten and primary
17
Jurisdiction
Nova Scotia
Prince Edward
Island
Yukon
Item
kindergartens the
importance of their safety
seats, Le caroussel de la
securite – an education
program for primary schools,
exhibitions
Print, TV, radio and web
advertising, promotional
materials, press releases,
growth charts, fact sheets
Brochures, education
courses
1st in a series of "Tips for
installing car seats" handouts
Target
centres, day
care centres
kindergarten
and primary
schools
Distribution Methods
schools
Web sites, public health,
Community Services, school
boards, family resource
centers, day cares
PEI access offices
Parents,
caregivers,
educators in
child care
centers,
general public
Mail and handouts, Daycare
centers, motor vehicle offices,
Pre-Natal classes, Nursing
stations
Use of the Internet has allowed greater access to information and opportunities for
networking. The following jurisdictions indicated they have web sites and information on
child restraints and/or links to child restraint information:
British Columbia: www.icbc.com
Alberta: www.saferoads.com, www.infratrans.gov.ab.ca
Saskatchewan: www.sgi.sk.ca
Manitoba: www.mpi.mb.ca
Ontario: www.mto.gov.on.ca
Quebec: www.saaq.gouv.gc.ca
New Brunswick: www.gnb.ca
Nova Scotia: www.gov.ns.ca, www.momsanddads.ca, www.childsafetylink.ca
Prince Edward Island: www.gov.pe.ca
Newfoundland and Labrador: www.gs.gov.nl.ca
Northwest Territories: www.gov.nt.ca
Yukon: www.hpw.gov.yk.ca (under construction)
Transport Canada: www.tc.gc.ca
Safe Kids Canada: www.safekidscanada.ca
CCMTA: www.ccmta.ca
Canadian Association of Road Safety Professionals: www.carsp.ca
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: www.nhtsa.dot.gov
COMMENTARY:
Transport Canada’s continued combined urban/rural seat belt report should allow
jurisdictions to better target their promotional material. This would help to ensure that
resources are allocated to programs and materials that have the greatest chance for
improvement in seat belt usage. However, anecdotal evidence shows that resources
for program development and implementation are more easily accessed than resources
for evaluation.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
18
INFORMATION ITEM: NORP STRATEGY 2010 PROGRESS UPDATE
In 2001, the NORP Strategy 2010 was revised. Along with the eight recommended
strategies there was a list of support activities that NORP was to initiate to assist in
carrying out the strategies. The activities are:
•
Review and update the current recommended legislative model on child safety
seats.
The NORP Task Force updated the Model of Legislative Provisions for Motor Vehicle
Occupants with booster seat recommendations. The CCMTA Board of Director
approved these changes in May 2004. Nothing has been done with the legislative
model since then.
•
Develop a standardized "Toolkit" for use in provincial and territorial jurisdictions to
provide the mechanism for a more uniform "best practices" approach to seat
belt/child safety seat interventions, and make it easier for jurisdictions and
organizations to undertake initiatives without the resource implications of developing
a new product. A toolkit would also be provided on conducting local surveys and
involving local community partners.
NORP developed and distributed a toolkit to assist jurisdictions in managing media in
the public awareness campaign in May 2005. This toolkit requires revisions to serve the
purpose mentioned above.
•
Develop a national advertising campaign to promote the proper use of seat belts and
child occupant protection with sponsorship support.
NORP ran a public service announcement type campaign, using regional task force
members to distribute ads to local media outlets in 2005. The acquisition of a national
sponsor would allow for future advertising campaigns to run country-wide.
•
Develop strategies to profile special populations, including developing a rural
strategy, profiling rural populations to assess factors associated with consistently
lower seat belt compliance rates. Other populations to profile include developing a
strategy on children’s safety in the vehicle.
Transport Canada’s combined urban and rural seat belt survey report will help in the
identification of specific demographics that need to be targeted with strategies to
increase restraint use. The formation of CCMTA’s Rural Road Safety Task Force will
also benefit this strategy.
•
Support the development of a national training program on child safety seats.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
19
NORP has a number of task force members that are also members of the National Child
Passenger Training Advisory Committee. This committee worked to develop a national
training program and continues to support it by providing maintenance on training
materials and advice to the certifying agency. Almost all jurisdictions use this program
to train technicians to conduct child safety seat checks.
•
Support, encourage the involvement and educate partners such as police, public
health and judiciary to help raise the level of understanding and value of the
importance of wearing seat belts and child safety seats. In addition, support and
encourage the involvement of more community and corporate partners to assist with
the development of national programs and campaigns.
Jurisdictionally, partnerships have been developed or strengthened over the past few
years. The NORP Task Force has representation from SafeKids Canada.
•
Report regularly through a monitoring report on the success in all jurisdictions to
achieve NORP’s objectives and strategies.
NORP prepares an annual monitor report that is presented to CCMTA’s Standing
Committee on Road Safety Research and Policies in the spring of each year.
•
Regularly update the Inventory of Child Occupant Promotion and Awareness
activities chart.
CCMTA maintains an inventory of child occupant restraint promotion and awareness
materials, through the NORP Task Force. Since 2004, this inventory includes not only
child occupants but all occupant restraint materials.
•
Connect with the STRID and High Risk Driver Task Forces to ensure there is
consistency where the strategies of these groups overlap and/or are working to
address the same population.
The creation of the RSV 2010 Communications Task Force in 2004 should help to make
the coordination of consistent messaging across task forces. There is overlap in
membership between the Communications Task Force and NORP.
•
Where technology and changes to the vehicle could help increase seat belt and child
seat safety, NORP will work towards effective and better vehicle solutions.
A seat belt interlock study was undertaken by Transport Canada, NHTSA and the
Centre for Education and Research in Safety. This was a two year study to follow 60
drivers in both Canada and the U.S. who have the device installed in their vehicle to see
if it influences belt usage rates. The focus group results from this study indicated that
the device increased compliance somewhat. Some drivers tried to bypass the system
and some still had difficulty wearing seatbelts on short trips. Further research involving
a larger fleet of drivers and other types of reminder systems is planned.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
20
•
As other forms of occupant protection, such as air bags and head restraints, have
impact on vehicle occupants from children to adults, NORP will monitor and develop
strategies as needed to address these areas, especially in consideration of
technological changes and advances (i.e. side impact air bags).
In reviewing the Model of Legislative Provisions for Motor Vehicle Occupants the issue
of using height as a legislative requirement was discussed. In the process of
discussion, NORP wrote to Transport Canada to request more research in the
anthropometric measurement for booster seat use. Transport Canada is developing a
more up-to-date model with the objectives of assessing current anthropometric studies,
developing a proof of concept and make recommendations on a national level. Next
steps are to find funding partners and make necessary adjustments to the
methodological approach.
•
Review NORP strategy at mid-point of Road Safety Vision 2010 (2006) to determine
appropriate options for next steps.
This task is underway.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
21
APPENDIX I:
Number of People Killed or Injured as Passengers in Motor Vehicles
(light duty vehicles) in Canada, 2005
JURISDICTION DEATHS
AB
BC
MB
NB
NL
NS
NU
NT
ON
PE
QC
SK
YT
Total
342
%
%
%
CORRECTLY INJURIES CORRECTLY
OF
RESTRAINTED*
RESTRAINTED* POPULATION
41.3%
20,146
72.1%
10.1%
306
60.4%
22,811
92.7%
84
57.3%
5,897
95.7%
77
48.1%
3,397
92.5%
28
57.1%
1,746
91.9%
54
100.0%
3,585
99.0%
1
0.0%
15
27.3%
2
50.0%
122
85.5%
550
64.1%
60,042
93.6%
13
46.2%
661
89.6%
497
70.2%
44,387
94.5%
112
45.6%
5,739
76.8%
4
25.0%
155
92.3%
2,070
60.4%
168,703
90.8%
13.2%
3.6%
2.3%
1.6%
2.9%
0.1%
0.1%
38.9%
0.4%
23.5%
3.1%
0.1%
100%
*total excludes unknown category
(Data from Transport Canada)
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
22
APPENDIX II:
Children Aged 0 – 9 Killed or Injured Across Canada (1990 – 2005)
5000
injuries
4000
3000
2000
1000
199 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 199 200 200 200 200 200 200
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
1
2
3
4
5
0-4 Injuries
3811 3622 3599 3488 3345 3412 3085 2847 2717 2837 2730 2563 2494 2458 2349 2237
5-9 Injuries
4738 4549 4771 4585 4429 4464 4404 4115 4117 4060 3986 3789 3832 3466 3319 3173
0-4 Fatalities
53
30
39
39
39
56
24
41
29
26
14
20
19
15
9
18
5-9 Fatalities
36
35
51
29
27
28
38
28 23
years
27
28
32
22
15
21
19
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
fatalities
Children Occupants of LDV
(Data from Statistics Canada and Transport Canada)
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
23
Rates of Children Aged 0 – 9 Killed or Injured Across Canada (1990 – 2005)
3000
injuries
2500
2000
1500
1000
1990
1991
1993
1994
1995
1997
1998
1999
2001
2002
2003
2005
0-4 Injuries
1973
1850
1734
1665
1719
1485
1451
1551
1457
1441
1437
1317
5-9 Injuries
2464
2352
2346
2250
2241
2017
1999
1976
1879
1926
1774
1686
0-4 Fatalities 27.44 15.32 19.38 19.42 28.22 21.38 15.49 14.22 11.37 10.98
5-9 Fatalities 18.72 18.10 14.84 13.71 14.06 13.72 11.17 13.14 15.87 11.06
8.77
10.60
7.68
10.09
100.00
90.00
80.00
70.00
60.00
50.00
40.00
30.00
20.00
10.00
-
fatalities
Rates per 1,000,000 Children
LDV Occupants
years
(Data from Statistics Canada and Transport Canada)
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
24
Appendix III: Fine & Demerit Point Table (updates are in red bold)
Jurisdiction
AB
Fine
Range
$50 $500
$120 +
$18***
BC
MB
NB
NL
Max
$1000
$168 $1000
$100 –
$500
NS
NT
ON
PE
QC
SK
YT
*
**
***
****
Fines for
Non-use
of Seat
Belts
$100 +
$15
$60 $500
$100 $200
$80 $100
Regular Driver
Points for
Non-use of
Seat Belts
Adults 0, New
Drivers – GDL
only 2
0
New Driver Conditions
Points to
Warning
Points to
Interview
Points to
Suspension
Points to
Warning
Points to
Interview
Points to
Suspension
8
n/a
15
GDL 4
n/a
GDL 8
9-14
20+ intent to
prohibit
2-3*
2-3*
**
**
n/a
4-6
1 month
prohibition*
**
****
$168
2 – drivers
only
1
15-19
(probation
letter)
n/a
3, 7
n/a
10
n/a
n/a
$100
2
6&9
n/a
12
3
n/a
4 – 1st year
6 – 2nd year
6
$157.50
(which
includes
all costs)
2
4
10
3 (Optional)
4 (2 for
Learner’s
License)
6 (4 for
Learner’s
Licence)
$100 plus
$15
surcharge
$90 + $20
2
8
6 – 9:
advisory letter
(with re-exam
for at-fault
collision)
12
15
n/a
n/a
2
6
9
15
2
6
6 (1 month)
12 (3 months)
15 (6 months)
9 – in a two
year period
6+ (1st year)
9+ (2nd year)
4
$247
$100 +
$10
$80
3
6,7,8
9,10,11
12
3,4,5
Susp. Level
3
7
n/a
15
n/a
n/a
$165
3
9-14
15-19 (after
interview,
training or
retesting)
20
2
$75
4
8
n/a
15
4
3 – traffic
safety
workshop or
education
session
Any GDL
driver who
has DPS (7
points)
Not based on
points – 4th
incident (traffic
conviction or at
fault collision)
7
New Driver Conditions (within 2 yrs), one 12 hr or 24 hr suspension=1 month driving prohibition; 2 or more suspensions = 1 year driving prohibition
Driver called in for a show cause based on seriousness of record. Automatic show cause for (speeding over 49K, disobey peace officer; careless driving; racing a motor
vehicle; fail to remain).
$120 + $18 victim surcharge. Reduced by $25 if paid within 30 days.
Driver Improvement is based on severity and frequency of incidents added to a driver’s record.
Last updated April 2007 with 2006 data
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
25
Appendix IV: NORP - Child Restraint Exemptions Table (Updates are in red bold)
Exemption in Pace (*)
Registration
Driver not licensed in the
province
Vehicle registered in another
jurisdiction
Registered to someone other
than parent/guardian
Non-resident under 9 kg/rental
vehicle
Non-resident
Type
of Bus (for hire)
Vehicle
School bus
Taxi (child in/driver of)
Motor home
Vehicle manufactured prior to
a certain date
Emergency
Emergency vehicle
Vehicles
Peace/police officer on duty
Ambulance (if seatbelt not
available)
Firefighters
Driver
of Rental less than 14 days
Rental
Rental less than 21 days
Vehicles
Rental less than 30 days
Short Term (< 30 days)
Medical and Physical
Day Care/Pre-school Activity
Seat belt not available to passenger
Driver of vehicle in which seat belt not
required
Other
Legislation Enacted (MM/DD/YY)
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
BC
*
SK
MB
ON
*
1
*
3
2
QC
NB
NS
PE
NL
NT
*
1
1
*
11**
3
3
YT
*
*
*
*
*
7
12/63
7
*
*
*
*
*
*
7
7
*
*
*
12
9
1971
*
*
*
1970
1971
1971
*
*
*
1971
7
*
*
*
*
1965
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
6
3,7
*
*
*
3/1/85
Vehicle registered in jurisdiction which does not require
the use of child restraint systems.
Vehicle is not equipped with child restraint system.
Children between 9-18 kg in vehicle other than
parent/guardian may use lap belt.
Children under 18 kg only.
In rear compartment if under 18 kg.
Providing a letter of exemption is issued from a
qualified medical practitioner.
If seat belt not available.
Temporary exemptions only. No permanent exemptions
given.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
AB
11/13/84
10
7
*
*
*
*
11/1/83
3/84
*
*
*
6
*
*
11/1/84
1985
*
*
11/1/82
11/1/83
10/16/89
1/1/85
In a moving taxi, the child must be restrained by the
seat belt with which the seat is equipped.
10) The administrator may exempt a person if satisfied s/he
is unable to wear a seat belt assembly.
11) Effective Jan. 1, 2007 with the implementation of
the new regulations all caregivers must restrain
young children in the appropriate seat.
12) While transporting a passenger for hire provided
not under contract with school boards or other
authority for the transportation of children.
7/1/87
*
6
*
*
*
*
7/1/82
0/1/88
9/1/87
9)
Last updated: April 2007 with 2006 data
26
NU
Appendix V: NORP – Seat Belt Exemptions Table (Please indicate updates in red bold)
Exemption in Place (*)
BC
AB
SK
MB
ON
QC
NS
PE
NB
NL
YT
NT
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
All Drivers Driving in reverse
Requiring medical certificate/time limited
*
*
1
*
*
*
1
*
*
*
Medical
Physical characteristics: size or build
*
*
1
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
9
Emergency Police – on duty or in performance of duty
*
Transporting someone in care/custody
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Unless protected
*
*
*
Firefighters While in or on a fire truck
3
If not occupying position with seat belt available
*
*
In emergency
*
4
Ambulance Ambulance attendants
4
Attendants When carrying patient
*
*
*
*
4
If not occupying position with seat belt available
*
In emergency
*
Passengers in an ambulance
12
Frequent stops
*
Delivery
Route
Frequent stops and speed under 40 km/h
*
*
2
*
*
*
5
8
*
Drivers
Canada Post employees on rural mail delivery
*
*
Operating a taxi cab for hire
7
*
Taxi
Drivers
In the performance of his work
*
When carrying passengers for hire
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Persons in custody/under arrest
*
10
*
Bus drivers (Transit)
*
Driving instructors
*
Driving examiners
*
*
Parade participants
6
6
6
Pelvic restraint only must be worn
1963
*
*
*
1970
1965
Vehicles manufactured prior to date (no belts)
*
*
Commercial use
10/1/77 7/1/87 7/1/77 3/l/84 1/1/74 8/15/76 1/1/85 7/1/87 11/1/83 7/1/82 7/1/91 3/1/88
Legislation enacted (MM/DD/YY)
12/01/
2006
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
No time limit on medical seat belt exemption.
Exemption for “frequently alighting” from vehicle intended to address police as well.
Conducting specific work activities when occupying a seated position behind the driver's
cab.
Conducting specific work activities when riding in the rear compartment of an ambulance.
Frequent stops and speed under 50 km/h.
For systems in which the pelvic belt is separate from the torso belt.
Speed under 70 km/h.
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
8)
9)
Speed under 30 km/h where distance between stops does not exceed 250m.
Where compliance would endanger him/her or hamper performance of his/her
duties.
10) When traveling under 40km on regular route or believe safety to be at risk.
11) If working in an industry specifically mentioned in legislation.
12) Where attendance to patients makes it impracticable to wear a seat belt.
Last updated: April 2007
27
NU
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
British
Columbia
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Oct. 1, 1977
MOTOR VEHICLE ACT
Seat belt assembly
220 (1) In this section, "seat belt assembly"
means a device or assembly suitably fastened
to the motor vehicle composed of straps,
webbing or similar material that restrains the
movement of a person in order to prevent or
mitigate injury to the person and includes a
pelvic restraint, an upper torso restraint or both
of them.
(2) A person must not sell, offer for sale or
operate on a highway a motor vehicle required
to be registered and licensed only under this
Act and manufactured or assembled after
December 1, 1963, other than a motorcycle,
unless it is equipped with not less than 2 seat
belt assemblies for use in the front seat in
accordance with the regulations.
(3) A person must not drive or operate a motor
vehicle on a highway in which a seat belt
assembly required under this section or the
Motor Vehicle Safety Act (Canada) at the time
the motor vehicle was manufactured,
assembled or imported into Canada has been
removed, rendered partly or wholly inoperative,
or modified to reduce its effectiveness.
(4) A person in a motor vehicle being driven or
operated on a highway must, if the motor
vehicle has properly attached to it a seat belt
assembly for the seating position occupied by
that person, wear the complete seat belt
assembly in a properly adjusted and securely
fastened manner.
(5) Subsection (4) does not apply to a person
(a) driving a motor vehicle in reverse,
(b) who is in possession of, and produces on
request to a peace officer, a valid and
subsisting certificate
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
1985
MOTOR VEHICLE ACT REGULATIONS 26/58
Division 36 — Child Seating and Restraint
Systems
Obligation on driver
36.01 A person shall not drive or operate on a
highway a motor vehicle in which there is a child
under the age of 6 unless the driver or operator
causes that child to be securely fastened by a
properly utilized and adjusted restraint system
which complies with this Division.
Systems for infants
36.02 In respect of children weighing less than 9
kg, the restraint system shall comply with section
213.1 of the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations of
Canada as amended from time to time.
Systems for toddlers
36.03 In respect of all children weighing 9 kg or
more but less than 18 kg,
(a) in the case of a child who is carried in a motor
vehicle driven or operated by the parent or
guardian of the child, the restraint system shall
comply with section 213 of the Motor Vehicle
Safety Regulations of Canada as amended from
time to time, and
(b) in any case, the restraint system shall either
comply with the system referred to in paragraph
(a) or comprise the pelvic restraint of a seat belt
assembly as defined in section 220 (1) of the Act.
Systems for preschoolers
36.04 In respect of all children under the age of 6
not categorized in sections 36.02 and 36.03, the
restraint system shall comprise the pelvic restraint
of a seat belt assembly as defined in section 220
(1) of the Act.
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
CHILD SEATS:
www.icbc.com/Road_Safety/carseat.ht
ml
www.icbc.com/Road_Safety/Child_Pa
ssenger_Safety_TS264T_(012005).pd
f
www.icbc.com/Road_Safety/LP65_(01
2005).pdf
www.icbc.com/Library/research_paper
s/Child_seat/index.html
www.qp.gov.bc.ca/statreg/reg/M/Motor
Vehicle/26_58/26_5812.htm#division39
www.tsfbcaa.com/Content/CustomPages/Hom
e.aspx
www.nhtsa.dot.gov/CPS/CSSRating/In
dex.cfm
www.sja.ca/bc/
SEAT BELTS:
www.icbc.com/buy_car/buycar_seatbe
.html
www.icbc.com/buy_car/TS274S%20(1
02002)web%20seat%20belts.pdf
www.qp.gov.bc.ca/statreg/stat/M/9631
8_04.htm#section220
www.injuryresearch.bc.ca
www.roadsafety.ca/
Non-application — specific
36.05 Sections 36.02 and 36.03 (a) do not apply
28
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
(i) issued by the superintendent on the
recommendation of a medical practitioner, or
(ii) in the form established by the
superintendent,
signed
by
a
medical
practitioner and issued for a period not
exceeding 6 months,
certifying that the person is,
(iii) for the period stated in the certificate,
unable for medical reasons to wear a seat belt
assembly, or
(iv) because of the person's size, build or other
physical characteristic, unable to wear a seat
belt assembly, or
as against a driver or operator of a motor vehicle
which is
(a) not licensed in British Columbia, or
(b) on rental for a period not exceeding 30 days.
Non-application — general
36.06 This Division does not apply as against the
driver or operator
(a) of a motor vehicle which is being operated as
a taxi as defined in section 32.01,
(c) who is actually engaged in work that
requires him or her to alight from and re-enter
the motor vehicle at frequent intervals and who,
while engaged in that work, does not drive or
travel in that vehicle at a speed exceeding
40 km/h, or
(b) who is a peace officer operating the vehicle in
the lawful performance of his duties,
(c) who is in possession of and produces on
request to a peace officer a valid and subsisting
certificate issued by the superintendent or a
medical practitioner certifying that the child is
unable for medical or physical reasons to wear or
be fitted to the restraint system,
(d) under age 16.
(6) A person must not drive on a highway a
motor vehicle in which there is a passenger
who has attained age 6 but is under age 16 and
who occupies a seating position for which a
seat belt assembly is provided unless that
passenger is wearing the complete seat belt
assembly in a properly adjusted and securely
fastened manner.
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
1991
(d) of a motor vehicle which is not required to be
equipped with a seat belt assembly as required by
section 208 of Schedule IV to the Motor Vehicle
Safety Regulations (Canada),
(e) of an emergency vehicle, and
(f) of a bus.
(7) Subsection (6) does not apply if the
passenger
(a) is in possession of, and produces on
request to a peace officer, a valid and
subsisting certificate
(i) issued by the superintendent on the
recommendation of a medical practitioner, or
(ii) in the form established by the
superintendent,
signed
by
a
medical
practitioner and issued for a period not
exceeding 6 months,
certifying that the person is,
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
Division 39-Road Safety
Passenger to be properly seated
39.01 Subject to section 9 of the Passenger
Transportation Regulation, B.C. Reg. 266/2004, a
person on or in a vehicle being driven or operated
on or across a highway shall, while the vehicle is
in motion, remain seated on a seat that has been
securely installed in the passenger compartment
of the vehicle.
Driver prohibited from driving
29
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
(iii) for the period stated in the certificate,
unable for medical reasons to wear a seat belt
assembly, or
(iv) because of the person's size, build or other
physical characteristic, unable to wear a seat
belt assembly, or
(b) is actually engaged in work that requires
him or her to alight from and re-enter the motor
vehicle at frequent intervals and the motor
vehicle does not travel at a speed exceeding
40 km/h.
(8) Despite this section, if a seat belt assembly
consists of a pelvic restraint and a separate
upper torso restraint, only the pelvic restraint
need be worn.
(9) The Lieutenant Governor in Council may
make regulations as follows:
(a) requiring the use of child seating and
restraint systems in motor vehicles on
highways and prescribing the specifications for
them;
(b) defining the age of a child for the purpose of
paragraph (a);
(c) providing for the exemption from any
provision of this section of any
(i) type or class of motor vehicle, and
(ii) class or group of drivers or passengers in
motor vehicles.
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
unless passenger is properly seated
39.02 Subject to section 9 of the Passenger
Transportation Regulation, B.C. Reg. 266/2004,
no person shall drive or operate a vehicle on or
across a highway if there is a person on or in the
vehicle who is not seated on a seat referred to in
section 39.01.
Exceptions
39.03 For the purposes of this section only,
"vehicle" does not include
(a) mobile equipment as defined in section 26 of
the Industrial Health and Safety Regulation, B.C.
Reg. 585/77, or
(b) a conveyance referred to in section 28 of that
regulation that complies with and is being used in
accordance with that regulation.
Seating for a child
39.04 A child to whom Division 36 applies who is
restrained in the manner required by that Division
is deemed to be seated in the manner required by
sections 39.01 and 39.02.
(10) A person who contravenes this section
commits an offence.
MOTOR VEHICLE ACT Regulations 26/58
Division 39-Road Safety
Passenger to be properly seated
39.01 Subject to section 9 of the Passenger
Transportation Regulation, B.C. Reg. 266/2004,
a person on or in a vehicle being driven or
operated on or across a highway shall, while
the vehicle is in motion, remain seated on a
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
30
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
seat that has been securely installed in the
passenger compartment of the vehicle.
1991
Driver prohibited from driving
unless passenger is properly seated
39.02 Subject to section 9 of the Passenger
Transportation Regulation, B.C. Reg. 266/2004,
no person shall drive or operate a vehicle on or
across a highway if there is a person on or in
the vehicle who is not seated on a seat referred
to in section 39.01.
Exceptions
39.03 For the purposes of this section only,
"vehicle" does not include
(a) mobile equipment as defined in section 26
of the Industrial Health and Safety Regulation,
B.C. Reg. 585/77, or
(b) a conveyance referred to in section 28 of
that regulation that complies with and is being
used in accordance with that regulation.
Seating for a child
39.04 A child to whom Division 36 applies who
is restrained in the manner required by that
Division is deemed to be seated in the manner
required by sections 39.01 and 39.02.
Alberta
July 1, 1987
Driver and passengers in a seating position
where a seat belt assembly is provided shall
properly wear the complete seat belt assembly
as required by the Traffic Safety Act – Vehicle
Equipment Regulation Section 78(2)(a)(b)
Jan 1, 1985
It is the driver’s responsibility to ensure that
children 6-16 years or weighing more than 18 kg
(40 lb.) be properly secured in a seat belt
assembly.
www.acicr.uablerta.ca
Children from birth to 18 kg (40 lbs.) or under 6
years of age must be restrained according to
Section 213 of the Motor Vehicle Safety
Regulations.
Saskatchewan
July 1, 1977
Where a motor vehicle being driven on a
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
Nov.1, 1983
Where a motor vehicle has a seating position
www.sgi.sk.ca
31
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
highway is equipped with a seatbelt
assembly in a seating position that is occupied
by the driver, the driver shall
wear the complete seat-belt assembly properly
adjusted and securely fastened.
equipped with a seat-belt
assembly available for a passenger, no person
shall drive that vehicle on a highway
with a passenger under the age of 16 years
unless:
(b) if the passenger weighs less than 18
kilograms:
(i) the passenger occupies a child restraint
system or infant restraint
system, as defined in the regulations made
pursuant to The Vehicle
Administration Act, so that it is properly adjusted
and securely fastened
in
the
manner
recommended
by
the
manufacturer; and
(ii) the child restraint system or infant restraint
system:
(A) is appropriate for the passenger’s weight and
height; and
(B) is secured to the vehicle in the manner
recommended by the
manufacturer.
Where a motor vehicle has a seating position
equipped with a seat-belt
assembly available for a passenger, no person
shall drive that vehicle on a highway
with a passenger under the age of 16 years
unless:
(a) the passenger occupies the seating position
equipped with a seat-belt
assembly and wears the complete seat-belt
assembly properly adjusted and
securely fastened
Where a motor vehicle being driven on a
highway is equipped with a seat-belt
assembly in a seating position that is occupied
by a passenger, the passenger shall
wear the complete seat-belt assembly properly
adjusted and securely fastened.
Manitoba
April 1984
All drivers and passengers are required to wear
seat belts in seating positions that have seat
belts. Some exemptions exist.
Highway Traffic Act:
Seat belt assembly
186(1)
In this Act, "seat belt assembly"
means a seat belt assembly as defined in the
regulations made under the Motor Vehicle
Safety Act (Canada).
Condition of seat belt assembly
186(2)
No person shall, on a highway,
operate or permit the operation of a motor
vehicle in which a seat belt assembly, or an
automatic occupant protection system as
defined in the regulations made under the
Motor Vehicle Safety Act (Canada) and
required by those regulations at the time the
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
April 1984
All children under 5 years of age and 50 pounds
must be restrained in an appropriate device
prescribed in the regulations and the device must
be properly secured to the motor vehicle.
Highway Traffic Act:
Child restraints required
186(9)
No person shall operate, or permit the
operation of, a motor vehicle on a highway unless
every passenger in the vehicle who has not yet
attained the age of 5 years and who is under 50
pounds in weight is properly secured in a
restraining device of a kind prescribed in the
regulations and the device is properly secured to
the motor vehicle.
Child
Restraining
Devices
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
www.preventioninstitute.sk.ca
web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/statutes/ccsm/h
060_3e.php#186
web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/regs/pdf/h060119.92.pdf
web2.gov.mb.ca/laws/regs/pdf/h060411.87r.pdf
www.hsc.mb.ca/impact/
www.mpi.mb.ca
Regulation
32
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
motor vehicle was manufactured in Canada or
imported into Canada, has been removed, or
has been modified or rendered partly or wholly
inoperative so as to reduce its effectiveness.
Seat belt required by driver
186(3)
Subject to subsection (5), every
person who drives on a highway a motor
vehicle in which a seat belt assembly is
provided for the driver shall wear a complete
seat belt assembly in a properly adjusted and
securely fastened manner; but where a seat
belt assembly consists of a separate pelvic and
torso restraint the driver may wear the pelvic
restraint only.
Seat belt required by passenger
186(4)
Subject to subsection (5), every
person who is a passenger in a motor vehicle
while it is being driven on a highway in which a
seat belt assembly is provided for seating
positions occupied by the passenger shall wear
the complete seat belt assembly in a properly
adjusted and securely fastened manner; but
where a seat belt assembly consists of a
separate pelvic and a torso restraint the person
may wear the pelvic restraint only.
Wearing seat belts not required
186(5)
Subsections (3) and (4) do not apply
to a person
(a) driving a motor vehicle in reverse;
(b) who holds a certificate signed by a qualified
medical practitioner certifying that the person is
during the period stated in the certificate,
unable for medical reasons to wear a seat belt
assembly and on request made by a peace
officer produces the certificate;
(c) where the peace officer is satisfied that by
reason of the person's size, build or other
physical characteristics, the person is unable to
wear a seat belt assembly;
(d) while he is engaged in work which requires
him to alight from and re-enter the motor
vehicle at frequent intervals and who while
engaged in the work does not drive at a speed
exceeding 40 kilometres per hour;
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
(M.R.411/87)
Standard
1 For the purpose of subsection 186(9) of the Act,
a child restraining device is one that complies with
the requirements of the Motor Vehicle Safety
Regulations under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act
(Canada) and has been properly installed in a
motor vehicle.
Application
2 Subsection 186(9) of the Act does not apply
(a) where a motor vehicle
(i) is registered in another province or
jurisdiction which does not require the use of
child restraint systems, or
(ii) is a u-drive vehicle rented for a period not
exceeding 21 days, or
(iii) is a taxicab, while it is transporting for
hire a passenger;
(b) where a certificate signed by a qualified
medical practitioner certifying that the person is,
during the period stated in the certificate, unable
for medical reasons to wear a child restraint
system and upon request made by a peace officer
produces the certificate;
(c) where to the satisfaction of a peace officer, the
person is of such size or build or possesses such
other physical characteristics that he would be
unable to be constrained in a child restraint
system;
(d) to the casual and occasional transportation of
a child or children in a vehicle driven by a person
who is not the parent of the child or children and
the vehicle is not equipped with a child restraint
system;
(e) where a motor vehicle is not equipped with
safety belts as required under the Canadian
Motor Vehicle Safety Standards.
33
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
(e) who is a peace officer and the use of a seat
belt assembly would obstruct or hinder him in
the performance of his duties;
(f) who is a driving instructor of a driving
instruction school or any other person while
engaged in driving instruction;
(g) who is a provincial driver examiner while
engaged in driver examination;
(h) who has not attained the age of 5 years; or
(i) who is in the care or custody of a peace
officer.
Age restriction
186(6)
Subject to subsection (7), no person
shall drive on a highway a motor vehicle in
which there is a passenger
(a) who has attained the age of at least 5 years
but has not yet attained the age of 18 years; or
(b) who is under the age of 5 years but whose
weight exceeds 50 pounds;
and who occupies a seating position for which
a seat belt assembly is provided, unless that
passenger is wearing the complete seat belt
assembly in a properly adjusted and securely
fastened manner; but where the seat belt
assembly consists of a separate pelvic and
torso restraint, the passenger may wear the
pelvic restraint only.
Medical or physical restrictions
186(7)
Subsection (6) does not apply where
the passenger
(a) holds a certificate signed by a qualified
medical practitioner certifying that the person
is, during the period stated in the certificate,
unable for medical reasons to wear a seat belt
assembly, and on request made by a peace
officer produces the certificate;
(b) is, to the satisfaction of a peace officer, of
such size or build or possesses such other
physical characteristics that he is unable to
wear a seat belt assembly;
(c) is engaged in work which requires him to
alight from and re-enter the motor vehicle at
frequent intervals and the motor vehicle is not
being
driven
at
a
speed
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
34
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
exceeding 40 kilometres per hour; or
(d) is in the care or custody of a peace officer.
Driving while on duty
186(8)
Subsections (3), (4) and (6) do not
apply to
(a) a peace officer who in the lawful
performance of his duty, is transporting a
person in his care or custody;
(b) a driver where he is transporting a
passenger for hire in a taxicab or livery; or
(c) a medical attendant where he is transporting
a patient in an ambulance.
Seat Belt Exemptions Regulation
Exemptions
1 The provisions of subsections 186(3)
and (4) of The Highway Traffic Act do not
apply:
(a) a person riding on or in a motor vehicle in a
lawfully permitted parade;
(b) an urban transit driver when operating a
transit bus;
(c) a driver and any attendant of a rescue
wagon while responding to or returning from an
emergency.
Application of ss. 186(2) and (11)
2 Subsections 186(2) and (11) of The
Highway Traffic Act do not apply to motor
vehicles which are structurally adapted as
custodial vehicles by the Provincial Sheriff's
Branch or any provincial
or municipal police department, in Manitoba
and are used primarily for the purpose of
conveying persons in lawful custody.
Ontario
1976
Ontario Highway Traffic Act, Section 106:
All vehicle occupants (with limited exceptions)
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
1982
Infants under 9 kg are to travel rear facing.
Toddlers who weigh 9 kg or more but less 18 kg
www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/about/bill7
3.htm
35
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Dec 1, 2006
Quebec
1976
1990
2002
must occupy a seating position with a seat belt
and use the seat belt properly.
Driver to ensure passengers under 16 years old
occupy a seating position with a seat belt and
wear the seat belt as required by legislation.
Driver required to ensure child passenger
secured as prescribed in the regulations.
Passengers who appear to be at least 16 years
of age are now required to identify themselves
to police for seat belt offences by providing
their name, date of birth and address.
A seat belt assembly shall be worn so that,
the pelvic restraint is firmly against the body
and across the hips;
the torso restraint, if there is one, is closely
against the body and over the shoulder and
across the chest;
the pelvic restraint, and the torso restraint, if
there is one, are securely fastened; and
no more than one person is wearing the seat
belt assembly at any one time.
Under the Highway Safety Code, seat belts are
mandatory for all front seat occupants.
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
Passed Dec
6, 2004
Proclaimed
Sept 1, 2005
1990
Under the Highway Safety Code, seat belts are
mandatory for all back seat occupants.
Under section 396 of the Code, in a moving
vehicle any person, except a child targeted by
section 397, must wear a properly fastened
seat belt with which the seat is equipped.
The driver is responsible for ensuring that all
occupants aged 16 or less wear a seat belt and
all children whose sitting height is less than 63
cm are seated in a properly installed safety
seat.
Fines: $80-$100
Demerit points: 3
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
2002
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
(20-40 lbs.) are to travel forward facing. May
travel rear-facing if the manufacturer of the child
car seat being used recommends its use by
toddlers.
Booster seat requirements: children under eight
years old, who weigh 18 kg or more but less than
36 kg (40-80 lbs.) and stand less than 145 cm,
(4’, 9”) tall.
With specific exemptions, most drivers now
required to secure children in a proper child
restraint.
2 demerit points for non-compliance
www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/safety/car
seat/choose.htm
www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/safety/car
seat/tips.htm
www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/safety/car
seat/card.htm
www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/safety/sea
tbelt.htm
Section 397 of the Highway Safety Code : “Every
child under 5 years of age who occupies, in a
road vehicle other than a taxi, a seat that required
to be equipped with a seat belt, must be
restrained by another safety device that conforms
to the standards of installation and use prescribed
by regulation, unless he wears, properly fastened,
the seat belt with which his seat is equipped.”
Amendment to section 397 of the Highway Safety
Code: “ In a moving road vehicle, every child
whose sitting height is less than 63 cm, measured
from the seat to the top of the head, must be
restrained by a restraint system or booster
cushion that complies with the regulations under
the Motor Vehicle Safety Act (Statutes of Canada,
1993, chapter 16). The restraint system or
booster cushion must, in accordance with the
manufacturer's instructions affixed thereon, be
suitable for the child's height and weight and be
securely attached to the vehicle.
Société de l’assurance automobile du
Québec Website:
www.saaq.gouv.qc.ca
under prevention
http://www.saaq.gouv.qc.ca/prevention
/index.html
www.e-laws.gov.on.ca
http://ogov.newswire.ca/ontario/GPOE/
2006/12/01/c2652.html?lmatch=&lang
=_e.html
36
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
The driver is responsible for ensuring that all
children whose sitting height is less than 63 cm
are seated in a properly installed safety seat.
Fines: $80-$100
Demerit points: 3
New
Brunswick
November 1983
200.1(3) Subject to subsection (5), every
person who drives on a highway a motor
vehicle in which a seat belt assembly is
provided for the driver shall wear the complete
seat belt assembly in a properly adjusted and
securely fastened manner.
200.1(4) Subject to subsection (5), every
person, other than a person under the age of
sixteen, who is a passenger in a motor vehicle
being driven on a highway and who occupies a
seating position for which a seat belt assembly
is provided shall wear the complete seat belt
assembly in a properly adjusted and securely
fastened manner.
200.1(6) Subject to subsection (7), no person
shall drive on a highway a motor vehicle in
which there is a passenger who is under
sixteen years of age and occupies a seating
position for which a seat belt assembly is
provided unless that passenger
(a)
is wearing the complete seat belt
assembly in a properly adjusted and securely
fastened manner, or
(b)
is occupying and is properly secured
in a child seating and restraint system
prescribed by regulation, as the case may be.
200.1(8) The Lieutenant-Governor in Council
may make regulations
Nov 1984
(Reg. 83-163
under
the
Motor Vehicle
Act)
6(1) No person shall drive on a highway a motor
vehicle in which there is a passenger
(a) who is under the age of five years, and
(b) who weighs eighteen kilograms or less
unless that passenger is occupying and is
properly secured in a child seating and restraint
system prescribed under section 7.
7 A child seating and restraint system
(a) the use of which is in compliance with the
manufacturer’s specifications as to the weight of
the child,
(b) that is installed in accordance with the
installation information required by section 17 of
the Children’s Car Seats and Harnesses
Regulations under the Hazardous Products Act,
chapter H-3 of the Revised Statutes of Canada,
1970, and
(c) that has indelibly printed on it or permanently
affixed to it
(i) the information prescribed by subsections
16(1) and (2) of the Children’s Car Seats and
Harnesses Regulations under the Hazardous
Products Act, chapter H-3 of the Revised Statutes
of Canada, 1970, or
(ii) a label stating that it meets the Canadian
Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (CMVSS 213.1),
is a prescribed child seating and restraint system
for the purposes of paragraph 200.1(6)(b) of the
Act.
www.gnb.ca/0062/PDF-acts/m-17.pdf
www.gnb.ca/0062/PDF-regs/83163.pdf
www.childsafetylink.ca
(a)
requiring the use of child seating and
restraint systems in motor vehicles on
highways and prescribing the specifications
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
37
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
thereof;
Nova Scotia
June 11, 1984
While a motor vehicle is being operated on a
highway other than in reverse, the driver of the
motor vehicle shall wear a seat belt if a seat
belt is available to the driver.
No person shall operate a motor vehicle on a
highway unless every passenger in the motor
vehicle who is under sixteen years of age is
secured
While a motor vehicle is being operated on a
highway, every passenger in the motor vehicle
who is sixteen years of age or older shall wear
a seat belt if a seating position with a seat belt
is available to that passenger.
Every registered owner of a motor vehicle shall
maintain all seat belts for the vehicle in good
condition.
No person shall modify a seat belt in any way
which reduces its effectiveness or remove a
seat belt except for maintenance or if the
seating position has been removed.
Prince Edward
Island
July 1987
While a vehicle is being operated on a highway
other than in reverse, the driver of the motor
vehicle shall wear a seat belt if available
No person shall operate a vehicle on a highway
unless every passenger who is under 16 is
secured
While a motor vehicle is being operated on a
highway, every passenger 16 and older shall
wear a seat belt if available
Oct 18, 2004*
*Changes to
the existing
child seat belt
regulations
were
published in
the
Royal Gazette
on
Dec 9, 2005.
The current
regulations
will be
effective until
Dec 31, 2006.
The new
regulations
will be
effective Jan
1, 2007.
July, 1982
Bill 121 was amended to provide protection for
children who are between 18 – 27 kg in ensuring
they use a booster seat. The bill was passed but
has not yet been proclaimed.
2006 Legislation
No person shall operate a motor vehicle on a
highway unless every passenger in the motor
vehicle who is under sixteen years of age is
secured
(a) in the prescribed manner in a child restraint
system, where the passenger is of an age, height
or weight for which such a system is prescribed;
or
(b) where the passenger is not of an age, height
or weight for which a child restraint system is
prescribed, in a seat belt if a seating position with
a seat belt is available to that passenger.
Published in the Royal Gazette in 2005 and
EFFECTIVE January 1, 2007:
a) infants: children less than 1 year and those
who weigh less than 10 kg. must be secured in a
rearward facing seat.
b) young children: children who are at least 1 year
and weigh at least 10 kg. and less than 18 kg.
may face forward.
c) older children: Children who weigh more than
18 kg. must be in a booster seat if they are
younger than 9 years and/or less than 145 cm.
tall.
www.gov.ns.ca/tran
An infant (less than 9 kg) shall be secured in a
rearward facing infant restraint system that
conforms to CMVSS and which is used in
accordance to manufactures instructions.
www.gov.pe.ca
www.childsafetylink.ca
www.momdanddads.ca
www.childsafetylink.ca
A toddler (9 kg – 18 kg) shall be secured in a child
restraint system that conforms to CMVSS and
which is used in accordance to manufactures
instructions.
A pre-schooler (18 kg – 23 kg) shall be secured
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
38
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
by a pelvic restraint of a seat belt assembly or a
booster seat system that conforms to CMVSS and
which is used in accordance to manufactures
instructions.
Newfoundland
and Labrador
July 1, 1982
A person shall not operate a vehicle on a
highway in which a seat belt assembly is
required under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act
(Canada) at the time that the vehicle was
manufactured or imported if the seat belt has
been removed, rendered partially or wholly
inoperative or modified to reduce it’s
effectiveness
July 1, 1982
A person shall not operate on a highway a vehicle
in which there is a passenger who is under 5
years of age or whose weight does not exceed 18
kilograms, unless that passenger is occupying
and properly secured in a child seating and
restraint system as prescribed under the
regulations. Info on regulations:
"child seating restraint system" means a system
that meets the requirements of the Motor Vehicle
Safety Regulations under the Motor Safety Act (
Canada );
2001
It is the driver’s responsibility to ensure that
children from birth to 18 kg must be restrained
according to ss.146(4) of the Motor Vehicles Act.
A person who operates a vehicle in which a
seat belt assembly is provided for the driver
shall wear the complete seat belt assembly in a
properly adjusted and securely fastened
manner.
A person who is a passenger of a vehicle in
which a seat belt assembly is provided for the
seating position occupied by the passenger
shall wear the complete seat belt assembly in a
properly adjusted and securely fastened
manner.
Northwest
Territories
2001
The driver of a motor vehicle shall, while the
motor vehicle is being operated on a highway,
wear a complete seat belt assembly in a
properly adjusted and securely fastened
manner. (s.146 of Motor Vehicles Act)
A passenger in a motor vehicle shall wear a
complete seat belt assembly in a properly
adjusted and securely fastened manner. (s.146
of the Motor Vehicles Act)
No person shall operate a motor vehicle on a
highway if there is a passenger who is under 15
years of age, unless the passenger is wearing
a complete seat belt assembly in a properly
adjusted and secured manner or a prescribed
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
In accordance with our Seat Belt Assembly and
Child Restraint System Regulations:
Infants (persons weighing less than 9 kgs) must
be secured in a rearward facing restraint system
that meets the requirements of section 213.1 of
Schedule IV of the Motor Vehicle Safety
Regulations under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act
(Canada).
Toddlers (persons weighing 9 kgs or more but
less than 18 kgs) must be secured in a child
39
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
child restraint system. (s.146 of Motor Vehicles
Act)
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
restraint system that meets the requirements of
section 213 of Schedule IV of the Motor Vehicle
Safety Regulations under the Motor Vehicle
Safety Act (Canada), if being transported in a
vehicle that is owned, leased or regularly used by
his or her parent or legal guardian. If being
transported by a vehicle not owned / used by a
parent or legal guardian, the toddler may be
secured by a pelvic restraint mechanism of a seat
belt assembly.
Fine: $100 + $15 surcharge
Demerits: 2
Restraint system rules do not apply to the
operators of taxicabs, if the infant / toddlers are
being transported for compensation.
Fine: $200 + $30 surcharge
Demerits: 2
Yukon
July 1991
Driver and passengers must wear a seat belt
while travelling in a motor vehicle.
Seat belt is the seat belt assembly or restraint
system for a seat which is specified for the
vehicle by the Motor Vehicle Safety Act of
Canada at the time the vehicle was
manufactured, assembled or imported.
July 1, 1991
Drivers must ensure that child passengers ( 6
years and under) in a motor vehicle are properly
secured with a federally prescribed child restraint
system
Or a child weighing less than nine kilograms;
or nine kilograms or more but less than 22
kilograms;
Drivers are responsible to ensure that
passengers up to the age of 15 years use a
seat belt.
is properly secured for the purposes of the Motor
Vehicle Act if secured in the manner set out in the
Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations.
The registered owner of a vehicle is
responsible for ensuring that all seat belts are
in proper working order.
Children under six years old who are heavier than
22 kg. should use a booster seat or cushion along
with a properly adjusted seat belt.
It is illegal to operate a motor vehicle if the seat
belts have been removed or are not working
properly
or
are
modified
to
reduce
effectiveness.
Fine: $75.00
4 demerit points
Children over six years old may wear the
complete seat belt assembly.
Fine: $75.00
4 demerit points
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
40
Appendix VI: Provincial/Territorial Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint Legislation
Jurisdiction
Motor Vehicle Occupant Restraint
Legislation
Legislation Details
Date*
Child Restraint/Booster Seats (all stages)
Legislation
Legislative Details
Date*
Jurisdictional Web Links for
Information on Motor Vehicle
Occupants and Child
Restraints
Nunavut
NORP 2006 Monitoring Report
October 2007
41
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