iPad and iPhone Video: Film, Edit, and Share the

iPad and iPhone Video: Film, Edit, and Share the
VIDEO
Film, Edit, and Share the Apple Way
Anyone who has ever used an iPhone or iPad knows there is a
powerful video camera inside that can shoot phenomenal HD video.
But shooting video is only one step to realizing your creative vision.
In the iPad and iPhone Video guide, bestselling author Jeff Carlson
shows you how to harness the powers of these remarkable devices.
He explores all the steps of shooting great video, including techniques
for controlling focus and exposure, using Slo-Mo mode on the iPhone 5s,
creating Vine and Instagram videos, and taking advantage of the
cameras’ hidden features using FiLMiC Pro. Jeff also explains everything
you need to know about editing the results to tell your story and how
to add polish with attention to color, light, audio, and more.
JEFF CARLSON is a columnist
for the Seattle Times, a senior
editor of TidBITS, and a frequent
contributor to publications such
as Macworld and Photographic
Elements Techniques magazines.
He is also the author of numerous
•Immerse yourself in a video crash course, including the
fundamentals of composing and the types of shots that add impact
of The iPad for Photographers,
•Improve your device’s camera, with suggestions for add-on lenses,
tripods, and other cool hardware
•Capture video with the right apps, and know the difference
between iPad and iPhone features
•Learn the ins and outs of audio to improve your sound quality
or add external microphones
books, including three editions
four editions of The iPad Pocket
Guide, OS X Mavericks Pocket
Guide, and Canon EOS M: From
Snapshots to Great Shots. Find more
information at jeffcarlson.com, and
follow him on Twitter at @jeffcarlson.
•Edit your footage in iMovie and compose your soundtrack in
GarageBand
•Share the video via YouTube or Vimeo and follow best practices
for keeping friends, family, and other audiences in the loop
The iPad and iPhone are powerful video tools—and this guide will
help every videographer take advantage of their full capabilities!
LEVEL: Beginning / Intermediate
Peachpit Press
www.peachpit.com
ISBN-13: 978-0-13-385476-3
ISBN-10:
0-13-385476-0
CATEGORY: Digital Video
COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: Baranq/Shutterstock, Jeff Carlson
COVER DESIGN: Aren Straiger
9
780133 854763
5 2 4 9 9
CARLSON
US $24.99 CAN $28.99
iPad and iPhone
VIDEO
Film, Edit, and Share the Apple Way
Film, Edit, and Share the Apple Way
In iPad and iPhone Video you will:
iPad and iPhone VIDEO
iPad and iPhone
JEFF CARLSON
iPad and iPhone
VIDEO
Film, Edit, and Share the Apple Way
JEFF CARLSON
PEACHPIT PRESS
iPad and iPhone Video:
Film, Edit, and Share the Apple Way
Jeff Carlson
Peachpit Press
www.peachpit.com
To report errors, please send a note to [email protected]
Peachpit Press is a division of Pearson Education
Copyright © 2015 by Jeff Carlson
Senior Editor: Susan Rimerman
Production Editor: David Van Ness
Copyeditor/Proofreader: Scout Festa
Indexer: Karin Arrigoni
Composition: Jeff Carlson
Cover Design: Aren Straiger
Interior Design: Mimi Heft
Notice of Rights
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of
the publisher. For information on getting permission for reprints and excerpts, contact [email protected]
peachpit.com.
Notice of Liability
The information in this book is distributed on an “As Is” basis, without warranty. While every
precaution has been taken in the preparation of the book, neither the author nor Peachpit shall
have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be
caused directly or indirectly by the instructions contained in this book or by the computer software
and hardware products described in it.
Trademarks
iPad and iPhone are registered trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.
Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed
as trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and Peachpit was aware of a trademark
claim, the designations appear as requested by the owner of the trademark. All other product names
and services identified throughout this book are used in editorial fashion only and for the benefit of
such companies with no intention of infringement of the trademark. No such use, or the use of any
trade name, is intended to convey endorsement or other affiliation with this book.
ISBN 13: 978-0-133-85476-3
ISBN 10: 0-133-85476-0
987654321
Printed and bound in the United States of America
For family, near and far
Acknowledgments
If you’re an aficionado of Acknowledgments pages (and if you’re reading
this, you probably are), you know that no book happens without the help
of a lot of people. Sure, I do the word-writing. And I’m something of an
anomaly in that I also do all the layout, screenshots, photos, and other
artwork. Sounds like a one-man show, yes?
Oh heavens no. You’d be reading far too many occurrences of “that” and
instances when I typed “dialog” instead of “dialogue” without the precise
and speedy work of my copyeditor, Scout Festa.
If it weren’t for editors Susan Rimerman and Karyn Johnson, this book
wouldn’t exist at all. Don’t forget the rest of the team at Peachpit Press,
including Nancy Davis and Nancy Aldrich-Ruenzel, who keep the whole
operation running.
Although I do the layout, David Van Ness ensures that I didn’t screw
anything up and, more important, shepherds the InDesign files to the
printer and ebook production teams. (And this time around he did it on
a tight schedule, although perhaps in book publishing it’s always a tight
schedule.)
Speaking of layout, Mimi Heft designed a wonderful InDesign template
that is, honestly, a joy to work in. Trust me, I’ve had to work with templates
that are a nightmare—it makes a huge difference.
Before you go further, flip to the end of the book and look over the index
created by Karin Arrigoni. Indexers are typically unheralded, but in a book
like this, a top-notch index is invaluable. (A search feature is just not the
same as an index.)
Closer to home, I owe a huge debt (repaid in hard cider and chocolate, no
doubt) to my friends and colleagues Jeff Tolbert and Agen G.N. Schmitz.
Jeff, a master of technology and music, wrote the chapter on using
GarageBand. Agen, a master of all things, tackled the chapter on sharing
projects and videos.
I also want to thank my friend Mason Marsh for his ideas, his
encouragement, and the loan of his GoPro.
And most of all, I must thank my wife, Kimberly, and my daughter, Eliana,
not only for being impromptu models and for being exceptionally patient
at times, but for providing fulfillment to my already fortunate life.
Contents
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
This Book Is for You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Notes About This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
CHAPTER 1: VIDEO CRASH COURSE
3
Intent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Video Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
The Rule of Thirds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Mind the Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Lead into the Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Shot Variety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Microphones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
A Step Up: Røde VideoMic Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
External Recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Improve the Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Shoot Steady . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
GorillaPod adjustable tripods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
The Glif . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
iStabilizer Dolly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Mobislyder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Padcaster and Padcaster mini . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
mCAMLITE and Phocus Accent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Lenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Olloclip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
iPro Lens System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
PhotoProX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Extra Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
CHAPTER 2: CAPTURE VIDEO
21
Camera App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Choose Video Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Use the Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Focus and Exposure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Portrait Orientation, or What Not to Do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Review a Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Trim a Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Review and Adjust a Slo-Mo Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Delete a Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Rolling with the Rolling Shutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
FiLMiC Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Focus and Exposure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Zoom Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Zoom speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Zoom presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Recording Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Choose a recording speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Video bit rates and audio quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Other Helpful FiLMiC Pro Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Exporting Videos from FiLMiC Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Another Step Up: Ultrakam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
ZeroShake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
8mm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Horizon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Instagram and Vine Videos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Shoot Using a GoPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Set Up the GoPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Set Up iOS-Friendly Video Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Control the GoPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Import Footage from the GoPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
vi
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
CHAPTER 3: EDIT VIDEO
51
Stabilize Footage with Emulsio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Adjust Color in VideoGrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Edit Video in iMovie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Review and Mark Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Create a Trailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Transfer Clips Between Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Create a Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Add Clips from the Media Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Capture Video Directly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Play and Skim Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Move a Clip on the Timeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Trim a Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Split a Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Duplicate a Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Reframe a Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Remove a Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Add a Cutaway, Picture-in-Picture,
or Split-Screen Overlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Cutaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Picture-in-picture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Split-screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Remove an overlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Change a Clip’s Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Create a Freeze Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Edit Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Apply a Fade In or Fade Out to the Movie . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Use the Precision Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Add a Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Add a title to just a portion of a clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Specify a Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Add and Edit Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Edit the Ken Burns Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Disable the Ken Burns Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
CONTENTS
vii
Change a Clip’s Volume Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Detach an Audio Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Fade an Audio Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Split an Audio Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Add Background Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Add automatic theme music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Add a background music clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Add Foreground Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Move audio clips between
foreground and background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Add a Voiceover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Add Just Audio from a Video Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Pinnacle Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
CHAPTER 4: COMPOSE A SOUNDTRACK IN GARAGEBAND
97
Open the Garage(Band) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Test-Drive the Touch Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Calculate Tempo from Movie Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Build a Soundtrack Using Loops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Create a New Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Browse Through the Loops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Add Loops to Your Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Build the Soundtrack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Change the Duration of a Loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Change the Volume of a Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Add a Bassline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Extend Your Song Using Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Add Loops to Existing Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Change Loop Duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Rearrange Regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Mix the Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Record Your Own Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Record Acoustic Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Connect an Electric Guitar or Bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
viii
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
Share the Song with iMovie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Going Further with GarageBand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Share via iCloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Share via iTunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
CHAPTER 5: CREATE STOP-MOTION AND
TIME-LAPSE MOVIES
129
Stop-Motion Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Build the Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Choose and lock down your camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Accessibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Lock the Capture Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Choose a Frame Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Record the Movie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Edit as You Capture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Add Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Import to Audio Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Record audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Position audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Remove the audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Share the Animation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Time-Lapse Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
CHAPTER 6: SHARE VIDEOS
145
Save to the Camera Roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Send to an iCloud Shared Photo Stream . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Share to Internet Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Share to Facebook, YouTube, Vimeo, or CNN iReport . 148
Share via Messages or Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Share via Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Share via Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Share to iMovie Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Export a Project to iMovie Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
CONTENTS
ix
Export a Clip to iMovie Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Share from iMovie Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Delete from iMovie Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Share via Other Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Upload a Video to Tumblr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Watch on an Apple TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Watch Using iMovie Theater on Apple TV . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Stream iMovie Projects via AirPlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Stream iMovie Theater Titles via AirPlay . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Stream Video Clips via AirPlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Send the Project to iTunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Export a Project to iTunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Import the Project into iMovie
on Another iOS Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Telling Stories Beyond iMovie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Adobe Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Storehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
APPENDIX: APP AND EQUIPMENT REFERENCE
175
Chapter 1: Video Crash Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Chapter 2: Capture Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Chapter 3: Edit Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Chapter 4: Compose a Soundtrack
in GarageBand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Chapter 5: Create Stop-Motion
and Time-Lapse Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Chapter 6: Share Videos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
INDEX
x
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
181
Introduction
In 2001, I was on vacation in Alaska with a brand-new compact Canon
camcorder that recorded video to tiny MiniDV cassette tapes. I could
fit the camera in one of the many big pockets of my cargo pants (which
might say as much about the fashion of the time as about the state of
technology). Although I always try my best to disconnect my work brain
when I’m on vacation, I couldn’t help noticing the other cameras that
people were carrying: many compact point-and-shoot cameras, a few
larger SLR (single-lens reflex) or digital SLR models, and a smattering of
compact camcorders like mine.
And then I saw that one guy. He looked perfectly normal, a middle-aged
man also on vacation, but balanced on his shoulder was a Canon XL1S.
This camera was the top-of-the-line professional model, sporting three
recording sensors (one for each color of light: red, green, and blue) to
capture glorious standard-definition interlaced video, interchangeable
lenses, and a $5000 price tag. Nothing about that guy looked like a
professional photographer, so I imagined he was probably a doctor or
lawyer or some other monied mucky-muck who would be in a position to
tell an underling, “Get me the best camcorder for my vacation.”
I’m sure you know where this is headed.
The video capability of the iPhone in my pocket absolutely blows away that
man’s camera. I know it’s not a fair comparison, since more than a dozen
years of technological advancement occurred between the two cameras.
But I rarely see camcorders of any variety today. Granted, camcorders
still have their uses—optical zoom if nothing else—but the reality is this:
People no longer need to buy a separate video recorder when the camera
on their phone or tablet performs as well or better.
And yet, the technology isn’t the real story here. When you can record
video anywhere using an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch that’s already at
hand, you’ll shoot more video and take more photos. Many of those will
be snapshots and short clips, or maybe micro-compositions like those
created in Vine and Instagram. But as you become more comfortable with
shooting video, the more you’ll want to take a more active role in shaping
the movies that result. Do you want to share a hundred photos of your
last vacation, or cut together a three-minute highlight video? (Answer:
Probably both.)
INTRODUCTION

xi
And here’s the kicker: You can do it all on the same device you use to
capture the footage—not just hacking together a clip or two, but making
a professional-looking high-definition movie with features that were, just a
few years ago, available only on desktop computers.
This Book Is for You
Some books are written like manuals (remember those?), detailing
everything a product can do: Here’s the information, in some structured
order; do what you want with it. That approach assumes anyone can pick
up the book, regardless of experience or skill level.
I prefer to think you’re reading this book—yes, you, a real person who’s
interested in learning about shooting and editing video on an iPad, iPhone,
or iPod touch. To do that, I’ve needed to make some assumptions about
you, which I’ve used to shape the focus and content of this book:
xii
••
First of all, you’re smart, you’re intellectually curious, and you have
good taste (for choosing my book; I’m not above flattery!).
••
You already know the basics of using an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch—
using gestures such as taps and swipes, syncing with a computer,
connecting to the Internet, charging the battery, and otherwise taking
care of your device. (Another book of mine, The iPad Air & iPad mini
Pocket Guide, can get you up to speed on this front if you need.)
••
You’re new to recording video, or to working with video using iOS
devices. Or, you’re a casual shooter who wants to learn more—and
there’s plenty to learn.
••
You want to learn how to capture better video using an iPhone, iPad,
or iPod touch, and edit the footage using the same device. You can
certainly take the video you shoot, import it into a Mac or Windows
PC, and edit a movie using something like iMovie, Adobe Premiere
Elements, or Final Cut Pro X. But that ability is beyond the scope of
this book.
••
You’re not an advanced videographer. That means you’re probably
interested in considering a few add-ons (lenses, a tripod) for shooting
video, but you don’t have shelves of more advanced gear. This
book covers a lot of information that pushes beyond the basics, but
it doesn’t go into advanced options. For that, I highly recommend
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
buying the book Hand Held Hollywood’s Filmmaking with the iPad &
iPhone, by Taz Goldstein.
One thing I’m not assuming is the type of movie you have in mind. You may
be documenting a vacation, grabbing quick video clips when inspiration
strikes, conducting interviews, producing a podcast, or filming a short or
feature-length movie. You don’t have to be an expert to make a movie, so
the advice in this book applies to all types of videos. There’s no reason the
next Oscar-winning short film can’t be shot and edited on portable devices
instead of traditional equipment.
Notes About This Book
As you read, you’ll run into examples where I’ve adopted general terms or
phrases to avoid getting distracted by details. For example, I may refer to
the “computer” or the “desktop” as shorthand for any traditional computer
that isn’t an iPad or iPhone. Although an iOS device is most certainly a
computer, I’m making the distinction between it and other computing
devices, such as laptops, towers, all-in-one machines, and other hardware
that runs OS X or Windows. When those details are important to a task, I
note specific applications or computers.
The same general rule applies to iPad and iPhone models. For example, the
iPad mini, despite its size, is still a fully functional iPad, so when I refer to
“iPad” in general it applies to the iPad mini as well as to the larger, flagship
model. Similarly, I don’t always refer to specific models. Sometimes it’s
important, such as when I’m discussing the Slo-Mo feature of the iPhone
5s, the only model that offers it (as of publication time). Mostly, though, I’m
talking about the models that run the latest version of iOS.
I also frequently refer to just the iPhone even though the information applies
equally well to the iPod touch. I’m not being lazy, for two reasons: If I had
to always type “iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch” I’d need to ask my publisher
for more pages and it would test your patience and mine. Also, as I write
this, the latest iPod touch Apple sells is the fifth-generation model, which
was originally released in 2012. (In 2013 the company released an entry-level
model with just 16 GB of storage and no camera.) I suspect that unless Apple
has something up its sleeve, the iPod touch as we know it will soon disappear.
INTRODUCTION
xiii
Don’t be surprised when you frequently run across the phrase, as
you just did, “As I write this.” iOS devices and the software useful to
photographers and videographers are advancing rapidly, which makes this
an exciting topic to cover.
When directing you to specific areas within iOS, I use a shorthand for
locating them. For example, to access the preferences for the Camera app,
I’ll point you to Settings > Photos & Camera. That translates to “open the
Settings app and tap the Photos & Camera button” (1).
1 Photos & Camera
settings
I mention many apps and products throughout the book, so instead of
cluttering up the text with Web addresses, you’ll find links in the “App and
Equipment Reference” appendix.
To stay abreast of the changing field, be sure to visit my Web site,
jeffcarlson.com, where I post updates and information related to books
and projects.
Lastly, please sign up for my low-volume newsletter, where I keep readers
updated on new projects and giveaways: http://eepurl.com/KYLFv.
Have fun recording and editing, and please feel free to contact me via my
site or at [email protected] with feedback!
xiv
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
iOS 8
Right before this book went to press, Apple announced iOS 8, the next major
version of the operating system that runs the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.
iOS 8 promises to bring several interesting changes to how the iPhone and iPad
work with video.
For example, Apple will be rolling out iCloud Photo Library, a new way to store
your photos and videos without the often confusing limitations of iOS 7’s iCloud
Photo Stream. The only limit to what can be stored in the cloud is how much you’re
willing to pay for storage; 5 GB is free, and paid plans begin at $0.99 a month.
The architecture of iOS 8 will become very important, too. Third-party developers
will be able to offer extensions that make their products work within other apps.
So, for instance, while you’re working in iMovie you may be able to process a clip
using Emulsio’s tools for removing camera shake right in iMovie, without having
to exit the app.
The Camera app also gains a new Time-lapse mode for creating time-lapse
videos, something you need to turn to third-party apps to accomplish now (see
Chapter 5).
iOS 8 isn’t expected until fall 2014, so even though some information about the
changes are public, I couldn’t include them in this book (both because of the
­publishing schedule and because, as a registered iOS developer, I’m bound by
non-disclosure agreements). When the time comes, I’ll post updates to
jeffcarlson.com detailing what’s different from the information in this book.
INTRODUCTION

xv
CHAPTER 4
Compose a
Soundtrack in
GarageBand
You don’t have to be a musician to create music for
your movies. Using Apple’s GarageBand app on the iPhone or iPad,
you can easily assemble a song or specific musical cues out of prerecorded loops.
If the included loops don’t cut it, GarageBand also includes a bunch
of Smart Instruments that let you play preset grooves or individual
notes that seamlessly conform to the song’s tempo and key.
If you are a musician, even better! Connect an instrument—like a
guitar or a MIDI keyboard—or a microphone to the iOS device and
record your own compositions. GarageBand Includes guitar amp
simulations that can make you and your electric guitar sound like
anything from a surf-rocker to a hair-metal god. It also has vocal
effects that can give a professional polish to your voice or make
you sound like a monster or a robot. And for you keyboard players, the included piano, synthesizer, and string sounds will add lush
beauty or a techno edge to your movie soundtrack.
97
Open the Garage(Band)
Don’t be intimidated if you can’t even fumble through “­Chopsticks.”
GarageBand has a few tricks up its sleeve even for the musically inept.
The app is built around what Apple calls Touch Instruments. These are
instruments you can play directly on the iPad or iPhone, and they’re a natural for the Multi-Touch interface. You need to open one of the instruments
in order to get to the included loops, so let’s start there.
Open GarageBand. If this is your first time in the app, it will open to the
Touch Instrument browser (4.1). Choose Keyboard.
4.1 Instruments at
your fingertips
CC
NOTE If you’ve played with GarageBand before, you may wind up on a
different screen. If you see a group of song previews, possibly with names
like “My Song” and “My Song 2,” tap the + in the upper-left corner of the
screen to create a new song and open the Touch Instrument browser. In
most other screens, tap the word Instruments in the upper-left corner to
open the browser.
98
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
Test-Drive the Touch Instruments
Allow me a moment to extol the virtues of GarageBand before we jump into
building a song out of loops. If the app were just an instrument synthesizer, that
would be fine. But you’ll find that GarageBand is a remarkably deep program. Yes,
you can play a keyboard that sounds like a grand piano, but there are also modes
that help you avoid making it sound like you’ve never touched an instrument in
your life (even if that’s true). For example, you can switch to different scales that
eliminate the “bad” notes and leave you with only the notes of that particular
scale. This makes it impossible to play a wrong note!
1. Tap the Scale button to the right of the screen, above the keyboard. It shows
two musical notes. On the iPad, it conveniently says “Scale.”
2. Choose Major Blues from the list of options (4.2).
3. The keyboard changes from the usual collection of black and white keys to a
set of all white keys with periodic gray keys labelled C3, C4, and so on. Slide
your finger back and forth along the keyboard and the piano plays a jazzy
scale that sounds like a smoky St. Louis bar in the 1930s.
4. Tap the Grand Piano icon in the top half of the screen to change to a d
­ ifferent
keyboard instrument; on the iPhone, tap the triangle in the upper left and then
tap Grand Piano. In addition to pianos, you’ll find two electric pianos, a few
organs, and a bunch of synthesizers. To find the synths, tap one of the category
tabs (such as Classics or Bass). Each reveals a different species of synth sound.
Try out a few and see what they each sound like.
Some of the synth sounds have a Pitch option enabled that lets you slide your
finger across the keyboard to bend from note to note. Spectrum Echo, under the
Classics tab, is a great example.
4.2 Choosing a
­keyboard scale
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
99
Calculate Tempo from Movie Length
While working in iMovie, you’ll no doubt encounter a situation where you
need a piece of music to fill a specific chunk of time. While GarageBand on
the Mac lets you change the ruler to show minutes and seconds, the iOS
version does not. There are ways around this restriction, though, if you’re
willing to do a few easy calculations.
If you know you have, say, 8 seconds of video to fill, and you need to c­ reate
a piece of music to fit, the trick is figuring out how many measures and
what tempo your song needs to be. Fortunately, an app called A
­ udiofile
Calc can calculate this for you. The app conveniently includes a song length
calculator (4.3). In most cases, you need to use a little trial and error to get
a workable solution, since the length is a product of the equation and not a
variable you can enter yourself.
4.3 Audiofile Calc
The vast majority of songs (and almost all the Apple Loops in GarageBand)
are four beats per bar, so you can usually leave the last field set to 4.
Working backwards, the number of bars refers to the length of your piece
in musical “measures.” A measure is a segment of musical time defined
by the number of beats per bar, set in the bottom field. Each measure, or
each count of “1-2-3-4,” helps define the musical pulse of a song and the
pattern of strong and weak beats that give a song its rhythm. Most Western music is broken up into subsections of four, eight, or sixteen measures,
100
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
so sticking with multiples of four is a good idea unless you have a good
reason to do otherwise.
The Tempo field determines how fast your piece is. Anything below 70 or
80 beats per minute (BPM) is considered slow, 80–112 BPM is a medium
tempo, and 112–140 BPM is fast. Anything above 140 BPM or so is quite
fast, and 180 BPM and above is extremely fast. If you haven’t already
worked out a rough tempo in GarageBand, it may be useful to play with
some options and see what feels right for your movie. Tempo is an important consideration and has a huge impact on the emotional impact of the
music.
Once you’ve entered all the required information, Audiofile Calc gives you
the resulting length. Adjust the Tempo and Bars fields until you arrive at
your video length, then input the resulting information into GarageBand.
Open the Settings menu (on the iPad, tap the wrench icon; on the iPhone,
tap the gear and then choose Song), and tap the Tempo button (4.4). Listen
to how it works musically. You may find that the tempo is too fast or that
the ­number of bars doesn’t feel right and you need to adjust accordingly.
CC
TIP It’s not difficult to calculate the exact BPM yourself using a simple math
formula: BPM = Number of Measures x 240 / Length in Seconds. 240 is the
number of beats per measure (4) times 60 (seconds in a minute), and dividing that by the ultimate length of the piece gives you the number of beats
per minute of your GarageBand song. Easy!
4.4 Changing tempo
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
101
Build a Soundtrack Using Loops
Okay, it’s time to build a soundtrack for your video. In addition to playable
instruments, GarageBand includes a number of pre-recorded loops that
make it easy to build a song from scratch. The trick is, the Loop browser is
a bit harder to find on the iPad and iPhone version of GarageBand than it
is on the Mac. It also has fewer loops available, but there are still plenty to
get you started.
Create a New Song
When you opened the Keyboard instrument earlier, GarageBand automatically created a new song using that instrument. Since you’re building a
brand new song, you want to make sure you begin with an empty canvas.
1. In the upper-left corner of the Keyboard window, tap My Songs; on the
iPhone, tap the disclosure triangle to reveal My Songs. GarageBand
automatically saves your current creation as “My Song,” but that’s okay.
You can delete it later if you like.
2. Tap the + icon in the upper-left corner to create a new, empty song
and reopen the Touch Instrument browser (4.5). Since you’re going to
be working with loops, it doesn’t really matter which instrument you
choose.
3. Tap Keyboard again to open the Keyboard instrument.
4.5 Create a
new song.
102
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
Browse Through the Loops
Since the Loop browser isn’t available from any of the Instrument screens,
switch to Tracks view by tapping the Tracks view button in the control bar
across the top of the screen. Tracks view shows your song as a timeline,
much like iMovie displays your movie. The left side of the screen is the
beginning of your song, and the instruments stack from top to bottom.
On the iPhone, Tracks view isn’t visible in a new song until you record
something. Tap the Record button, play a few notes, and tap Play again to
stop recording. Now the View button should be visible on the left side of
the control bar.
At first, you see a fairly empty screen, with a timeline across the top and a
small piano icon in the upper-left corner. In the control bar, tap the Loop
browser button (4.6). The Loop browser contains several hundred Apple
Loops in a wide variety of musical genres, from rock and electronic to
orchestral and world music. These can be great starting points for your
own compositions or can even form complete soundtracks in their own
right. Tap a few of the loop names to hear what they sound like.
CC
TIP Use the volume slider at the bottom of the Loop browser to audition
loops at a louder or softer volume (4.7).
Tracks view button
Loop browser
4.6 Browsing loops
4.7 Preview volume
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
103
Add Loops to Your Song
As you’re about to see, building a song from loops is a fast and easy way
to create a simple soundtrack for your video. You don’t need any musical
skill, and there are no rules to follow. The only requirement is that you end
up with something that you like and that works with your video project.
I’m going to build a song using specific loops by way of example, but of
course you can use whichever loops you want.
1. In the Loop browser, scroll through the list until you get to Cheerful
Mandolin 10. Tap the name to preview it. Tap the loop again to stop
playback.
2. Drag the loop below the piano track in the timeline (4.8). Align the left
edge of the loop—which at this point looks like an empty blue rectangle—with the left edge of the timeline, so it starts at 1 on the ruler.
3. Tap the Play button at the top of the screen to hear your song so far.
If you hear a tick-tock sound as your mandolin is playing, that’s the
metronome. It’s turned on by default to make it easier to play Touch
Instruments in time with the beat. Since you’re using loops, which are
automatically in time, turn off the metronome by tapping the Settings
button in the upper-right corner and turning the Metronome switch
off. Now you should only hear the mandolin.
4.8 Adding a loop
104
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
Before you add another track to the piece, it might look nicer if you delete
the empty piano track at the top of the timeline. Tap the piano icon in the
track header, then tap it again. Tap Delete to remove the track (4.9).
4.9 Removing the
piano track
Build the Soundtrack
The mandolin is a great start, but it’s a little boring on its own. It would
sound better if it had some company. Drums could add some energy. Let’s
find a good drum beat to add to the song.
1. Tap Play in the control bar to hear your song, which continues to play
until you tap Stop. This lets you audition new loops in context with the
mandolin part.
2. Open the Loop browser.
3. Since there are hundreds of loops in the list, it can be helpful to narrow down your selection to make it easier to find what you’re looking
for. At the top of the Loop browser, tap Instrument, then tap Kits to
hide all the loops except drum kits.
4. Tap Crowd Groove Drumset 06 to hear it alongside the mandolin.
5. Drag it to the timeline under the mandolin. Remember to align the
beginning of the loop with the 1 on the ruler (4.10).
4.10 Second
loop added
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
105
6. With the song still playing, tap the Loop browser again.
7. Tap Instrument at the top of the browser, then tap Tambourine.
8. Drag Tambourine 02 to the timeline under the drum track.
CC
TIP If you need more precision while editing, zoom in on the timeline by
pinching out with your fingers from anywhere in the arrange area.
CC
TIP While many Apple Loops sound great together, not all of them will
work in every context. If you come across two loops that sound awful
together, don’t panic. This is the nature of making music with loops. You
never know if two loops will work together until you try them, and sometimes a combination that makes no sense on paper will end up being the
best part of your song.
Change the Duration of a Loop
In some cases, you may not want a loop to continue through the entire
section. To shorten a loop, tap to select it; a tiny circular arrow appears on
the right handle. Drag the handle to the left to shorten it (4.11).
4.11 Shortening the
loop length
Change the Volume of a Track
The piece is getting more interesting, but it still needs more. One of my
favorite techniques when writing soundtracks is to mix instruments that
don’t technically belong together. So far, you’ve got a fairly mellow acoustic
song. What would happen if you added a distorted guitar? Open the Loop
browser again, narrow your selection to Guitars, and drag Classic Attitude
Rock 18 to the beginning of the song.
When you play back your piece now, the electric guitar dominates the other
instruments and sounds far too loud. Wouldn’t it be great if there were a
way to turn it down without affecting the volume of the other instruments?
This is where having each instrument on its own track becomes helpful.
106
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
If one instrument is too loud or too quiet, you can adjust the volume of that
one instrument while keeping the others at their original levels.
Drag one of the track icons to the right to reveal the track controls
(4.12).
4.12 Track volume
controls
Mute
Solo
Volume
In addition to the instrument name, the track controls feature a Mute button, which mutes the track, a Solo button, which mutes all the other tracks
and allows you to hear one track in isolation, and a volume slider, which
adjusts the volume of the track.
Turn down the Electric Guitar track by dragging the volume slider to the left
until it sits nicely in the background. While you’re at it, adjust the volume of
other tracks if you wish. I turned down the tambourine a little as well.
CC
TIP To hear your song with and without the electric guitar, tap the Mute
button on the guitar track. That silences the guitar and grays out the region
to make it easy to see which tracks are muted (4.13). Un-mute the track to
hear the energy and bite the guitar adds to the song.
4.13 Track muted
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
107
Add a Bassline
To finish the song, it might be good to have a bass for some low-frequency
grounding. Instead of adding a loop this time, you’re going to experiment
with Smart Instruments. Smart Instruments are a bit like loops, but they give
you a lot more flexibility to add your own spin to a track. They’re perfect for
non-musicians who don’t know how to play a particular instrument but still
want the chance to be creative and do something a bit more personal than
just adding loops to a song.
1. Tap Instruments in the control bar. Scroll through the Smart Instruments until you find Smart Bass, and tap the icon to open the
instrument.
2. Tap the Liverpool icon in the upper-left corner of the screen and select
the Picked bass (4.14).
4.14 Smart Bass
Notice that instead of a normal bass guitar neck, the Smart Bass
displays four strings intersected by vertical gray stripes. Each of these
stripes is labeled with the name of a chord in the key of your song.
Smart Instruments have several playback options including an Autoplay
mode, which plays back pre-recorded sequences of notes in whatever
chord you choose. This makes them act a bit like loops but with a lot
more flexibility.
108
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
CC
NOTE By default, new GarageBand songs open in the key of C, which uses
all the white keys on a piano. The “C” stripe on the Smart Bass instrument
represents the C chord, which is the root, or “home,” key in C. The other
chords are all in the key of C as well, meaning that whatever chord you
choose will sound harmonious.
3. Tap the 1 on the Autoplay knob
fretboard.
(4.15).
The strings disappear from the
4. Tap the C chord and listen to the fancy groove.
To record the bassline and add it to the song, you have to do something a little different than you did when adding loops. You need to
actually record the bass to add it to the song.
5. Tap the Go to Beginning button in the control bar to make sure you
start recording from the start of the song.
6. Tap the Record button and then quickly tap the C chord on the bass.
You should hear the metronome count in for four beats and then hear
the song start playing with the new Smart bassline.
Once the recording reaches the end of the eight-bar section, playback loops back to the beginning of the song and GarageBand stops
recording the bass and switches to playback mode.
Go to Beginning
Record
4.15 Autoplay
engaged
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
109
4.16 Smart Bass
track added to
the song
7. Switch back to Tracks view to see the new track in place
CC
(4.16).
TIP The current song sounds good with the bass playing just one chord,
but the idea behind Smart Instruments is that you can tap a new chord
every measure or two to build a harmonic framework to your song. If you
choose to play more with Smart Instruments, make sure you tap each chord
a little early to give GarageBand a chance to change chords before the
start of the new measure.
CC
110
NOTE Notice that the new bass track is green instead of blue like the
other tracks. That’s because it’s what Apple calls a Software Instrument.
The blue tracks are actual recordings of mandolins, drums, and tambourines—audio files that can’t be modified aside from changing their volume.
Green Software Instrument regions, on the other hand, are made up of
individual notes that GarageBand plays back in real time. This means you
can edit the notes in these regions if you want to change the part that a
Smart Instrument played.
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
Extend Your Song Using Sections
Often, you’ll want your song to be longer than the default eight measures.
GarageBand organizes songs into sections like intro, verse, and chorus. Song Sections in GarageBand allow you to duplicate, lengthen, repeat, and move sections
as you work to make writing and arranging your song easier.
You can access the Song Sections menu by tapping the Song Section button on
the right side of the ruler. If you’ve been following along, your song currently contains only one eight-bar section. From the Song Section menu, you have several
options:
•
You can extend the current section by tapping the arrow to the right of
Section A. The Automatic option is available for the last section in a song. It
allows you to improvise as you record and lets GarageBand adjust the length
of the new section to match your playing. With Automatic disabled, tap or
swipe the number in the Manual field to shorten or lengthen the current
section (4.17).
•
Duplicate creates a copy of the current section and adds it to the end of the
piece. This is handy if you want to create a variation of an existing section
and don’t want to redo all your hard work. To adjust the length of the new
section, tap the Info button next to the section length.
•
Add creates a new, blank section at the end of the song. Again, tapping the
Info button allows you to alter the length of the new section.
•
Once you have created new sections, tapping Edit lets you delete or
­rearrange them.
4.17 Extending
the section
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
111
Add Loops to Existing Tracks
Now that all the tracks are in place, the song is beginning to sound a bit
repetitive. It might be appropriate to add a drum fill or two to break up
the monotony. Fortunately, GarageBand comes with drum loops ­specifically
recorded for this purpose. Scroll through the Loop browser and notice the
names of the two loops directly after Crowd Groove Drumset 06. Crowd
Groove Fill 04 and Crowd Groove Fill 07 sound like they’ll work perfectly.
Adding these loops to the existing drum track is extremely easy. Just as you
did with the other loops, simply drag the loop from the browser into the
timeline, only this time, drag it on top of the existing drum loop. GarageBand intelligently makes room for the new loop, and even continues the
existing drum loop after the fill. Add Crowd Groove Fill 07 at measure 4
on the ruler, and Crowd Groove Fill 04 at measure 8 (4.18). If you need help
­lining up the loops as you drag them, remember to use the yellow line
marking the beginning of the loop. Line it up with the 4 and the 8 on the
ruler and the fills will be in perfect sync.
4.18 Fill added to
the drum kit
112
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
CC
TIP Much of Western music is written in phrases of four, eight, or sixteen
bars. In pop music, ornamentation like drum and guitar fills are often used
at the end of these phrases to add excitement and anticipation and to lead
the listener into the next section.
Change Loop Duration
Sometimes, an Apple Loop you add to your song isn’t the correct length.
Perhaps you only want to use the first half of the loop and have that
repeat. Or maybe you recorded a Smart Instrument track and want to loop
only a portion of it. In these cases, you can edit the length of your region
to customize the part.
In the case of Apple Loops that are already looping two or more times, tap
the region to select it, then tap it again. Select Trim from the options that
appear to select the original region and exclude the portion that’s looping.
Drag the end of the selected region to shorten it (4.19).
4.19 Changing loop
duration
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
113
Rearrange Regions
In certain cases, you may want to rearrange the regions in your song—­
perhaps an active section needs to appear one measure earlier. When
­dealing with a track that’s already full, this requires a bit of fancy maneuvering, but it’s easy once you know the technique. If you just drag one
region to a new spot on top of another, that deletes the second region.
Instead, copy that region first.
This techniques works for regions that are separate (not looped copies of
the same region).
1. Tap the region you want to move once to select it, tap it again, and
choose Cut (4.20).
2. Drag the other region into the now vacant section.
3. Now drag the playhead to the beginning of the new opening, tap the
vacant area in the track, and select Paste. Voilà! Regions swapped.
4.20 Rearrange
regions.
If you instead need to rearrange parts of a longer contiguous region,
you need to split the region into pieces. Tap the region to select it, and
tap it again to bring up the editing menu. Select Split, and drag the Split
marker to the point where you want to split the regions (4.21). Drag the
Split marker down to make the cut. You can continue to move the Split
114
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
marker and make additional cuts as long as they’re in the same region. To
split a different region, select the region and choose Split again. Finally, to
re­arrange the resulting regions, follow the steps on the previous page.
4.21 Splitting a
region
Mix the Song
Listen to the song a few times and use the volume sliders to adjust the
levels of the various tracks until they sound good together. When you feel
good about the final mix, tap My Songs to save your creation. In the My
Songs browser, tap the name of your new song to rename it (4.22). It’s a
good idea to rename songs you like, otherwise you may end up with “My
Song 1” through “My Song 418” and it will become very difficult to locate
a particular piece. If you recorded a song for a specific movie, it makes
sense to put the movie name in the song title.
4.22 Give the piece
a name.
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
115
Record Your Own Material
If you happen to sing or play a musical instrument, GarageBand becomes
an even more powerful tool. Not only can you build a song from loops and
Smart Instruments, you can also record your own performance. In some
cases, this requires an extra piece of gear or two, but many of these accessories are quite affordable, and should be within the range of even modest
budgets.
Record Acoustic Instruments
If you sing or play piano, acoustic guitar, violin, or any other acoustic instrument, adding yourself to a recording isn’t difficult. You can either use the
built-in mic on the iPad or iPhone or purchase a better-sounding option
that connects to your device. Numerous options are available, from small
mics that plug into the headphone jack to larger, more professional options
that connect to the dock. In general with audio gear, the more you spend
the better quality you get, so don’t expect a professional-sounding recording from a $10 microphone. But with some care you can achieve excellent
recordings with mics costing $150 or less.
CC
TIP Before you make a purchase, think about what options you want from a
microphone. In many cases, acoustic instruments sound better recorded in
stereo—guitars and pianos in particular. If you’d like the option of recording in stereo, make sure the mic you choose offers that option. If you’re
mostly going to be recording yourself singing or speaking, a mono microphone may be all you need.
Once you have a microphone, recording an acoustic instrument is a fairly
easy process.
1. Find a good spot to record in. Generally speaking, you want a quiet
location with good acoustics. Recordings of acoustic instruments
always include at least some of the sound of the room. If you like the
sound of your guitar in your living room, record yourself there. If it
sounds even better in the closet, try that. The one thing you don’t
want to do is plop yourself somewhere without any consideration of
how the environment sounds.
116
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
2. Connect your mic or use the built-in microphone. If you do use the
built-in mic, know that the recording quality will not be as high as it
would be with an external microphone.
3. Tap Instruments and select the Audio Recorder.
The Audio Recorder is the simplest instrument in GarageBand. It has
no controls, and the interface consists entirely of a large VU (volume
unit) meter measuring the level of the incoming sound (4.23).
4.23 Recording audio
through a microphone
4. Play or sing at the same volume you will be recording. Watch the VU
meter. If it peaks into the red, turn down the input on the microphone
(if possible), play or sing more quietly, or move the mic farther away.
5. If this is the first instrument in a new song, you may want to turn on
the metronome to make it easier to sync other instruments with your
playing. Tap the Song Settings button and turn on the metronome. You
can also enable Count In if you want the metronome to tap for one
measure before recording begins. This helps you internalize the tempo
and lets you know when to start playing.
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
117
CC
TIP Headphones are useful when you need to hear the metronome or
the other tracks in your song (an argument against a mic that uses the
headphone jack). Otherwise, the recording will pick up the sound of the
metronome.
6. When you’re ready to record, tap the Go to Beginning button to move
the playhead to the start of the section.
7. Tap Record and start playing or singing. Tap Stop when you’re done.
Carefully listen to the recorded take with headphones or speakers, and
make sure the recording sounds the way you want it to. If you made a mistake, re-record the section. If the sound quality is poor, try to assess what
went wrong:
••
Is the recording too loud? If so, it will likely sound distorted and look
like a block of sound rather than distinct waveforms (4.24). Turn down
the mic or move it farther from the source, and re-record your part.
••
Is the recording too quiet? In this case, turn up the mic, play or sing
louder, or move the mic closer to the source.
••
Is the sound echoey or boomy? You may be recording in too “live” a
room. Large rooms with hard surfaces often sound quite reverberant
and may not be right for certain instruments. Try moving to a different
location.
4.24 Loud like
golf pants
118
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
••
Is the sound quality poor? If you’re using the built-in mic or a cheap
external option, you may need a better alternative. Try moving the mic
to a different location relative to the instrument. Sometimes even an
inch or two can make a huge difference.
CC
TIP To add preset effects to your voice or recorded instrument, double-tap
its track header. This opens up the previously viewed Audio Recorder, but
now with eight effect options to choose from. Small Room and Large Room
sound great on vocals, and Telephone is a favorite of mine on drum loops. If
you’re looking for additional effects, see “Going Further with GarageBand”
to learn how to export your project to GarageBand for Mac.
CC
NOTE If you want to get really wacky, try out the Sampler instrument. It lets
you record any sound you want and play it back on a musical keyboard. You
can record yourself sneezing or your cat meowing and play it back melodically. It’s a great, fun way to make almost any sound musical.
Connect an Electric Guitar or Bass
If you’re the axe-wielding type, it’s also a snap to use GarageBand to
record your guitar or bass, provided you have the right tools. Since the
iPad doesn’t have an audio input, you need an audio interface designed for
use with an iPad or iPhone (4.25). Apogee Digital and IK Multimedia make
some of the more popular options, and many other companies have similar
offerings. Most are plug-and-play, meaning all you have to do is plug the
interface into your iPhone or iPad and you’re ready to start jamming.
4.25 Apogee Jam
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
119
For guitarists, a great recording option is GarageBand’s virtual guitar amp
collection (4.26). GarageBand comes with eight different amps, all emulations of classic guitar rigs from the likes of Vox, Fender, Marshall, and
Orange. With this kind of variety on offer, it’s possible to get a huge range
of sounds even if you only have one guitar. GarageBand includes clean
tones, crunchy and distorted options, and even heavily processed sounds.
4.26 Virtual guitar
amps
In addition to amps, the Guitar Amp instrument includes 10 virtual stomp
boxes (4.27). Many of the most popular effects are represented, i­ncluding
fuzz and distortion, chorus, and echo. To find all these goodies, tap the
Stompbox button in the upper-right corner of the guitar amp screen.
The guitar amp also includes a tuner so you can quickly tune your guitar
between takes (4.28).
If you’re a bass player, your options are more limited. Unlike the Mac version of GarageBand, the iOS version doesn’t include any bass amps. But
that doesn’t mean you can’t record your bass. You still have the option of
choosing the Audio Recorder, which is a basic audio track with no bells and
whistles.
The process is simple. Connect your bass as you would an electric guitar,
and instead of choosing the Guitar Amp instrument, select Audio Recorder.
Tap the Record button and groove!
120
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
4.27 Stomp boxes
4.28 Guitar tuner
CC
TIP Don’t be disappointed about the lack of bass amps in the iOS version
of GarageBand. Thousands of famous recordings feature bass recorded
directly into the recording console instead of through an amp, and many
bass players prefer the cleaner, punchier sound that results from recording
this way.
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
121
Share the Song with iMovie
When it’s time to get your musical masterpiece out of GarageBand and
into iMovie, you can share the song directly between apps.
Sharing a song with iMovie is a relatively simple process.
1. Open the My Songs browser.
2. Tap Select, and tap the song you want to open in iMovie
(4.29).
4.29 Yes, those icons
are askew. They shake
when you’re in the
selection mode.
3. Tap the Share button.
4. Tap the Open In button.
5. Enter the optional artist, composer, and album info, and select an
appropriate audio quality (4.30).
4.30 Adding info and
choosing audio quality
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
123
6. Tap Share. GarageBand exports the song.
7. When prompted, select Open in iMovie
(4.31).
8. In iMovie, select a project or create a new movie
dropped onto the audio track (4.33).
4.31 Open in iMovie.
4.32 Choose an
iMovie project.
4.33 Song added
in iMovie
124
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
(4.32).
The song is
CC
TIP Higher quality settings result in larger audio files, and often you’ll need
to balance quality and size. For final audio, select High Quality and above.
If your song isn’t finished and you just need to check timing and feel, one
of the lower quality settings will work fine.
CC
TIP Your soundtrack doesn’t need to be completely finished to add it to
your video. You’ll often want to import a rough version into iMovie to make
sure everything lines up or that the music feels right. In these cases, follow
the same instructions for sharing with iMovie, but know that you may need
to open the song again in GarageBand, make changes, and then re-share
(possibly even multiple times) in order to finalize your soundtrack.
Going Further with GarageBand
Since this book is about video and not music, it isn’t possible to cover all
the nuances of GarageBand here. There are, however, great resources available, even within the program itself. The manual is always only a few taps
away. On the iPad, tap the Info button, and then tap “Learn more about the
control bar.” You can access the complete manual by tapping the Table of
Contents icon in the upper left, or search the manual by tapping the Search
button. On the iPhone, tap the Settings button and scroll to the bottom of
the Song settings to open GarageBand Help.
The iOS version of GarageBand has a lot of great features, but many more
editing and mixing options are available on the Mac version. To share
a GarageBand for iOS project with GarageBand for Mac, you have two
options: iCloud and iTunes.
Share via iCloud
To share a project via iCloud, navigate to the My Songs window and tap
Select. Choose the song, tap the iCloud button, and choose Upload Song
to iCloud (4.34, on the next page). The song becomes available on all devices
that use your iCloud account.
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
125
4.34 iCloud upload
Share via iTunes
In this scenario, iTunes acts as a go-between to transfer the project file
from the iPhone or iPad to GarageBand on the Mac.
1. Open the My Songs window and select the project.
2. This time, tap the Share icon and select iTunes, then choose the
GarageBand option to save the multitrack GarageBand project (4.35).
The song’s file is saved in a special storage area of the device reserved
for GarageBand that iTunes can access.
3. Connect your iOS device to your computer.
4. On your Mac, select the device in iTunes and click the Apps tab.
5. Scroll down to the File Sharing section and click the GarageBand icon.
6. Select the project and drag it to your desktop; or, click the Save To
button and choose a location (4.36).
You may see a message saying that GarageBand has to download
additional content to your Mac for compatibility. This shouldn’t take
long, and only has to happen the first time you open GarageBand for
iOS projects on your Mac.
126
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
4.35 Saving the file
for iTunes
4.36 The project
in iTunes
CHAPTER 4: Compose a Soundtrack in GarageBand
127
INDEX
8mm app, 41
8mm for iPad, 177
8mm movies, 41
8mm Vintage Camera, 177
720p video, 5, 37, 149, 154
1080i video, 5
1080p video, 5, 149, 154
A
acoustic instruments, 116–119
adapters, 60
Add to Theater option, 149, 150
Adobe Voice for iPad, 168–172, 180
AirDrop, 60
AirPlay
activating/deactivating, 162
preparing movies for, 161
selecting through Control Center,
162
streaming movies via AirPlay,
160–163
streaming titles via, 163
streaming video clips via, 164–165
Airport Express Wi-Fi base station, 163
aliases, 155
animated GIFs, 140
animations, sharing, 140–141
Apogee Jam guitar input, 119, 179
app reference, 175–180
Apple Fair-Play DRM scheme, 90
Apple Lightning to USB Camera
Adapter, 12
Apple Loops. See also loops
beats per bar, 100
changing duration of, 113
considerations, 106
Apple TV, 159–165
Apple TV remote, 162
aspect ratio, 38–39, 42
audio. See also GarageBand
adding from video clips, 94
adding to Audio Library, 138
background, 85, 89–91, 92
building soundtrack, 102–115
clip speed and, 74
considerations, 10
cutaway clips, 70
dialogue, 137, 138
external recording, 13
fading in/out, 87, 91, 140
FiLMiC Pro app, 38
foreground, 91–92
loops. See loops
microphones. See microphones
music. See music
narratives. See narratives
overview, 10
processed, 10
quality of, 38, 119, 125
recording. See recording audio
in stop-motion movies, 138–140
voiceovers, 92–93
volume. See volume
waveforms, 85, 86, 88, 118, 140
audio clips. See also clips
background audio, 85, 89–91, 92
detaching, 86
foreground audio, 91–92
moving between foreground/
background, 92
splitting, 88–89
audio files, 110, 125, 138
INDEX
181
Audio Library, 138
Audio Recorder, 117, 119, 120
audio tracks
adding loops to, 112–113
changing volume of, 106–107
deleting, 105
muting, 107
Audiofile Calc app, 100–101, 179
B
background
objects in, 137
tips for, 7
background music, 85, 89–91, 92
bass, adding, 119–122
bass amps, 120, 121
bassline, 108–110
batteries
charging, 18
considerations, 18, 46
efficiency of, 38
battery chargers, 18
beats per minute (BPM), 101
Benny Hill effect, 73
bitrates, 38
Boinx iStopMotion for iPad, 130
BPM (beats per minute), 101
B-roll shots/footage, 4, 9
buffering, 163
C
cables, 60
camcorders, xi
Camera app, 22–30
Airplane mode, 22
deleting clips, 29
facial recognition, 24
focus/exposure, 24–25
182
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
grid display, 6–7
image quality, 25–26
overview, 22
playing video, 27
recording video, 25–26
reviewing clips, 27
Slo-Mo mode, 23, 28–29
Time-lapse mode, xv
trimming clips, 28
using flash, 23–24
video modes, 23
camera cases
mCAMLITE, 16, 176
PhotoProX, 18, 177
waterproof, 18
Camera Connection Kit, 12, 60
Camera Roll
saving movies to, 64, 146, 157
saving stop-motion movies to,
140–141
transferring clips between
devices, 60
camera shots/footage
B-roll shots, 4, 9
close-ups, 4, 8, 9
cutaway shots, 9, 67, 69–70
establishing shot, 4, 8, 9
medium shot, 8
stabilizing. See image stabilization
surrounding area, 4
underwater, 18
variety, 8–9
cameras. See also iOS devices
8mm, 177
cases for. See camera cases
front vs. rear, 6
GoPro, 45
lenses. See lenses
stabilizing. See image stabilization
tips for recording video on,
13–18
capturing video, 21–49. See also
recording video
with 8mm app, 41
with Camera app, 22–30
considerations, 21
directly with iMovie, 63–64
with FiLMiC Pro app, 31–40
with GoPro app, 45–49
with Horizon app, 42
with Instagram app, 43–44
for stop-motion movies, 135–136
with Vine app, 43–44
with ZeroShake app, 40
clapper, 13
clip overlays
cutaway shots, 69–70
matte, 38–39
picture-in-picture, 71
removing, 73
split-screen, 72–73
Clipboard, 151
clips. See also audio clips; video clips
adding from Media Library, 62–63
adding portions of, 63
adding to timeline, 63
changing speed of, 73–74
changing volume level, 85
deleting in Camera app, 29
deleting in iMovie, 69
deleting in iStopMotion, 137
duplicating, 67
exporting to iMovie Theater, 156
favorite, 56, 57, 62
grouping into albums, 57
moving on timeline, 65
music, 89–91
muting/unmuting in iMovie, 59
previewing, 63
reframing, 68
removing, 69
re-using, 67
reviewing in Camera app, 27
sharing. See sharing video
Slo-Mo, 23, 28–29, 73
splitting, 66–67
timing of, 77
transferring between devices, 60
trimming, 28, 66
zooming in/out, 68
close-up shots, 4, 8, 9
Closing title style, 79
CNN iReport, 148–152
color grading, 54
color temperature
adjusting with FiLMiC Pro, 33
adjusting with iStopMotion, 133
adjusting with VideoGrade, 54–55
composition, 6–9
background, 7
considerations, 3, 21
cropping and, 68
grids, 6
leading into frame, 7–8
rule of thirds, 6–7
compression, 5
compression algorithms, 5
computer, 68
contact information, author, xiv
conventions, in book, xiii–xiv
cross dissolve transitions, 76, 77
cutaway shots, 9, 67, 69–70
D
desktop computers, xiii
devices. See iOS devices
dialogue, 137, 138
directional microphones, 10
distortion, 30
dollies, 15, 16, 176
DropBox, 138, 140
duplicating clips, 67
INDEX
183
E
earbuds, 12
editing photos, 83
editing video. See video editing
effects
Benny Hill, 73
Ken Burns, 84–85
onion-skin, 135
picture-in-picture, 71
rolling shutter, 30
slow motion, 23, 28–29, 73, 74
transitions. See transitions
electric guitar, 119–122
email, sharing movies via, 140, 152,
153–154
Emulsio app, 52–53, 178
equipment reference, 175–180
establishing shot, 4, 8, 9
exporting
clips to iMovie Theater, 156
projects to iMovie Theater, 154–156
projects to iTunes, 165–166
video from FiLMiC Pro, 39
video from VideoGrade, 55
exposure
Camera app, 24–25
FiLMiC Pro app, 31–33
iStopMotion, 132–133
external battery chargers, 18
external power source, 18
external recording, 13
F
Facebook, 148–152
faces, detecting, 24, 83
FaceTime video calls, 6
fading audio, 87, 91, 140
fading music, 91
fading video, 78
Fair-Play DRM scheme, 90
184
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
favorite clips/sections, 56, 57, 62
Favorites button, 57, 62
file formats, 5
files
audio, 110, 125, 138
video, 55, 60
FiLMiC Pro app, 31–40
audio quality, 38
battery efficiency, 38
content management, 39
exporting videos from, 39
focus/exposure, 31–33
image stabilization, 38
overview, 31
recording speed, 35–38
resolution, 37
video bitrates, 38
Web site info, 177
zoom control, 33–35
Final Cut Pro X, 177
flash, 23–24
Flashback app, 44
focus
Camera app, 24–25
FiLMiC Pro app, 31–33
focus point, 137
footage. See camera shots/footage
foreground audio, 91–92
formats. See video formats
fps (frames per second), 6
frame rates
FiLMiC Pro app, 37
for stop-motion movies, 134–135
frames
capturing for stop-motion movies,
135–136
deleting in stop-motion movies, 137
duplicating in stop-motion movies,
137
freeze, 75, 76
leading into, 7–8
reversing order in stop-motion
movies, 137
frames per second (fps), 6
Freeze feature, 75
freeze frames, 75, 76
G
GarageBand, 97–127. See also music
acoustic instruments, 116–119
adding bassline, 108–110
adding electric guitar/bass, 119–122
Audio Recorder, 117, 119, 120
building soundtrack for video,
102–115
calculating tempo from movie
length, 100–101
creating songs, 102
importing songs from, 138
keyboard scale, 99
loops. See loops
metronome, 104, 117–118
microphones, 116, 117
Mute button, 107
opening, 98
overview, 97
preset effects for, 119
recording music, 109
recording your own material,
116–122
resources, 125–127
Sampler instrument, 119
sharing projects via iCloud, 125–126
sharing projects via iTunes, 126–127
sharing songs with iMovie, 123–127
Smart Instruments, 108–110
Software Instruments, 110
Solo button, 107
song previews, 98
Touch Instruments, 98, 99, 104
Tracks view, 103
Web site for, 179
GIFs, animated, 140
Glif tripod mount, 14–15, 176
Google authentication, 152
GoPro app, 45–49
capturing video, 48
importing footage from, 49
iOS-friendly video settings, 47
previewing video, 48
Protune feature, 47
setting up, 46
Web site info, 177
GoPro cameras, 45
GorillaPod tripod, 14, 176
Grid switch, 6
grids, 6, 38
Guitar Amp instrument, 120
guitar, electric, 119–122
H
handheld microphones, 10
HD resolution, 37, 163
HD video, 5, 156. See also video
headphone connector, 11
headphone jack, 12
headphones, 118
Horizon app, 42, 178
hotshoe, 10, 16
I
iCloud
iTunes Match service, 90–91
Photo Library, xv, 156
Photo Stream, xv, 147
removing videos from, 158
sharing GarageBand projects via,
125–126
sharing video via, 147
iFrame format, 37
image stabilization, 14–17
dollies, 15, 16, 176
with Emulsio, 52–53
FiLMiC Pro app, 38
INDEX
185
image stabilization (continued)
stop-motion movies, 130, 131
tripods. See tripods
ZeroShake app, 40, 52
images. See photos
iMovie for iOS, 56–95
adding clips from Media Library,
62–63
adding titles, 79–81
adding/editing still photos, 83
capturing video directly, 63–64
changing clip speed, 73–74
clip overlays, 69–73
considerations, 56
creating trailers, 57–59
deleting clips in, 69
duplicating clips, 67
editing environment, 61
editing transitions in, 76–77
embedding location data, 81–82
fading in/out, 78
Freeze feature, 75
importing projects into, 166–167
Ken Burns effect, 84–85
making video available to projects/
apps, 64
marking clips, 56–57
movie creation in, 61–62
moving clips on timeline, 65
muting/unmuting clips, 59
picture-in-picture effect, 71
Precision Editor, 78–79
Projects browser, 61
reframing clips, 68
removing clips, 69
reviewing clips, 56–57
saving movies to Camera Roll, 64,
146, 157
sharing GarageBand songs with,
123–127
skimming video, 64–65
splitting clips, 66–67
186
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
transferring clips between
devices, 60
trimming clips, 66
Video browser, 61, 62
Viewer, 61–62, 64, 84
Web site for, 179
iMovie projects. See projects
iMovie Theater
Add to Theater option, 149, 150
deleting from, 158
exporting projects to, 154–156
sharing movies via, 154–158
streaming titles via AirPlay, 163
importing
audio to Audio Library, 138
audio to timeline, 92–93
projects into iMovie, 166–167
songs from GarageBand, 138
video from GoPro, 49
voiceovers, 92–93
Instagram, 43–44, 178
Instagram app, 43–44
intent, 4–5
interlaced video, 5
Internet Services, 148–152
interviews, microphones for, 11
iOS, xiv
iOS 8, xv
iOS devices. See also cameras;
specific devices
choosing for stop-motion
movies, 130
considerations, xiii
importing projects on, 166–167
removing videos from, 158
transferring clips between, 60
variations in features, 23
iPad. See also iOS devices
audio interface for, 119
importing projects on, 166–167
iStopMotion for iPad, 130
microphone on, 10
models, xiii
Padcaster mounts, 16, 17, 177
screen, 6, 38
streaming videos via AirPlay,
160–163
iPad Camera Connection Kit, 12, 60
iPad mini, xiii, 15
iPhone. See also iOS devices
importing projects on, 166–167
microphone on, 10
models, xiii, 23
Phocus Accent, 16, 177
screen, 6
streaming videos via AirPlay,
160–163
tips for recording video on, 13–18
video capability of, xi
iPod touch, xiii, 5, 130
iPro Lens System, 17, 176
iRig microphone, 10, 11, 176
iRig Pre adapter, 11
iRig Pre microphone interface, 176
iStabilizer dolly, 15, 16, 176
iStopCamera app, 130
iStopMotion for iPad, 130–141, 179
iStopMotion Remote Camera, 180
iTunes
deleting projects in, 166
exporting projects to, 165–166
importing projects onto other
devices, 166–167
sharing GarageBand projects via,
126–127
sharing iMovie projects via, 165–167
iTunes Library, 138
iTunes Match service, 90–91
iTunes Store, 175
J
Jam guitar input, 119, 179
jeffcarlson.com, xiv
Jelly Legs tripod, 15
Juice Pack, 18
K
Ken Burns effect, 84–85
keyboard scale, 99
KV Connection, 176
L
landscape orientation, 26, 42, 61
Lapse It, 180
lavalier microphones, 11, 177
layering sound effects, 138
leading into frame, 7–8
lenses, 17–18
iPro Lens System, 17, 176
mCAMLITE, 16, 176
Olloclip, 17, 18, 176
Padcaster, 16, 17
Phocus Accent, 16, 177
PhotoProX, 18, 177
lighting, 32, 131–132
Lightning to USB Camera Adapter,
12, 60
location data, 81–82
Loop browser, 102, 103
loops. See also Apple Loops
adding to existing tracks,
112–113
adding to songs, 104–105
auditioning, 103
browsing through, 103
building soundtrack with,
102–115
changing duration of, 106, 113
changing volume of, 103
considerations, 106
pre-recorded, 102
volume, 103
INDEX
187
M
Mail, 140, 152, 153–154
matte overlays, 38–39
mCAMLITE case, 16, 176
measures, 100–101
Media Library, 61, 62–63, 65
medium shot, 8
Messages, 152–153
metronome, 104, 117–118
Micro Ball Head, 15
microphones, 10–12
adapters, 11
built-in, 10, 116, 117, 119
considerations, 116
directional, 10
earbuds, 12
handheld, 10
for interviews, 11
on iPad/iPhone, 10
iRig Mic, 10, 11
lavalier, 11, 177
mono, 116
recording audio, 10–12, 116, 117
recording music, 116–119
shotgun, 10
smartLav, 177
stereo, 116
USB, 12
VideoMic Pro, 11, 177
Middle title style, 79
mixing songs, 115
Mobislyder track, 15, 176
Mophie Juice Pack, 18
movies. See also iMovie; projects;
video
8-millimeter, 41
adding/editing still photos, 83
aliases, 155
creating in iMovie, 61–62
exporting. See exporting
fading in/out, 78
188
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
importing. See importing
old-fashioned look, 41
playing. See playing movies
portrait vs. landscape orientation,
26, 42, 61
preparing for AirPlay, 161
recording. See recording video
saving to Camera Roll, 64, 146, 157
sharing, 140–141
stop-motion. See stop-motion
movies
streaming via AirPlay, 160–163
themes, 61
time-lapse, xv, 129, 142
MovieSlate, 13, 176
music. See also GarageBand; songs
acoustic instruments, 116–119
background, 85, 89–91, 92
calculating tempo from movie
length, 100–101
fading, 91
Fair-Play DRM scheme, 90
foreground, 91–92
iTunes Match service, 90–91
measures, 100–101
Smart Instruments, 108–110
theme, 89–91
Music app, 170
music clips, 89–91
Music Library, 138
Mute button, 107
My Song browser, 115, 123
N
narratives
adding voiceover, 92–93
in Adobe Voice, 168–172
in Storehouse, 172–173
newsletter, xiv
Nexvio 8mm Vintage Camera, 177
O
Olloclip lenses, 17, 18, 176
onion-skin effect, 135
Opening title style, 79
Optrix PhotoProX case, 18, 177
overlays
clip. See clip overlays
matte, 38–39
P
Padcaster iPad mounts, 16, 17, 177
Padcaster mini, 16
Phocus Accent, 16, 177
Photo Stream. See iCloud
PhotoProX case, 18, 177
photos
adding/editing, 83
capturing from within iPhoto, 83
Ken Burns effect, 84–85
portrait vs. landscape orientation,
26, 42, 61
previewing, 83
still, 83
thumbnails, 83
Photos app, 146
picture-in-picture effects, 71
Pinnacle Studio for iPad, 95, 179
pixels, 5
playhead, 76, 118
playing movies
on Apple TV, 161–162
in iMovie, 64–65
in Photos app, 146
stop-motion movies, 136
portrait orientation, 26, 42, 61
power source, external, 18
Precision Editor, 78–79
previews
audio recordings, 139
clips, 63
photos, 83
stop-motion movies, 136
progressive video, 5
projects. See also movies; video
creating in iMovie, 61–62
deleting in iTunes, 166
duplicating, 167
exporting. See exporting
importing into iMovie, 166–167
streaming via AirPlay, 160–163
Projects browser, 61
Protune feature, 47
R
recording audio
with Adobe Voice, 168–172
considerations, 10
in GarageBand, 116–121
with iPhone microphone, 10
with iStopMotion, 139
music, 116–119
with separate microphone, 10–12,
116, 117
for stop-motion movies, 139
volume level, 118
recording, external, 13
recording video. See also capturing
video
with Camera app, 25–26
rolling shutter and, 30
stop-motion movies, 135–136
tips for recording on smartphone,
13–18
reference, app/equipment, 175–180
regions, song, 110, 113–115
resolution
FiLMiC Pro app, 37
HD, 37, 163
sharing videos and, 154
Ultrakam app, 40
video, 156
INDEX
189
Røde microphones, 11, 177
rolling shutter effect, 30
rule of thirds, 6–7, 38
rule of thirds grid, 38
S
Sampler instrument, 119
screen, 6, 38
servers, WebDAV, 140
sharing GarageBand projects
songs with iMovie, 123–127
via iCloud, 125–126
via iTunes, 126–127
sharing video, 145–173
iMovie projects via iTunes, 165–167
overview, 145
stop-motion movies, 140–141
via Adobe Voice for iPad, 168–172
via AirDrop, 60
via CNN iReport, 148–152
via email, 140, 152, 153–154
via Facebook, 148–152
via iCloud Photo Stream, 147
via iMovie Theater, 154–158
via Internet Services, 148–152
via Messages, 152–153
via Storehouse for iPad, 172–173
via text messages, 152–153
via Tumblr, 158–159
via Vimeo, 148–152
via YouTube, 148–152
watching on Apple TV, 159–165
shooting video
considerations, 3, 4–5
intent, 4–5
stabilization, 14–17
shotgun microphone, 10
shots. See camera shots
skimming timeline, 64
skimming video, 64–65
slate, 13, 39, 176
190
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
Slo-Mo mode, 23, 28–29, 73, 74
Smart Instruments, 108–110
smartLav microphone, 177
smartphone cameras. See cameras
Software Instruments, 110
Solo button, 107
Song Sections menu, 111
songs. See also GarageBand; music
adding bassline, 108–110
adding instruments to, 105–106
adding loops to, 104–105
adding titles to, 115
background, 85, 89–91, 92
choosing in Adobe Voice, 170
creating in GarageBand, 102
extending with sections, 111
Fair-Play DRM scheme, 90
importing from GarageBand, 138
iTunes Match service, 90–91
length of, 100
mixing, 115
previews, 98
rearranging regions in, 114–115
saving, 115
sharing with iMovie, 123–127
splitting regions in, 114–115
tempo, 100–101
sound. See audio
sound effects, layering, 138
SoundCloud, 138
soundtracks
adding instruments to, 105–106
building with GarageBand, 102–115
split-screen overlay, 72–73
splitting audio clips, 88–89
splitting regions, 114
splitting video clips, 66–67
Spring Tripod Mount, 15
stabilization. See image stabilization
stands, 15
still photos, 83
stomp boxes, 120, 121
Stop Motion Studio app, 130, 180
stop-motion movies, 130–141
accessibility, 131
building set for, 130–131
changing focus point, 137
choosing camera for, 130
described, 129, 130
editing while capturing, 137
examples of, 129
on the fly, 134
frame rates for, 134–135
iStopCamera app, 130
iStopMotion for iPad, 130
lighting, 131, 132
locking capture settings, 132–134
moving objects in, 135–136
naming/renaming, 141
playing/reviewing, 136
previewing, 136
recording audio, 139–140
recording movie, 135–136
removing audio, 140
sharing, 140–141
stabilizing camera, 130, 131
Stop Motion Studio app, 130, 180
Storehouse for iPad, 172–173, 180
storytelling apps
Adobe Voice, 168–172
Storehouse, 172–173, 180
streaming
bandwidth issues, 156
iMovie Theater titles via AirPlay, 163
video clips via AirPlay, 164–165
videos to iPhone/iPad, 160–163
videos via AirPlay, 160–163
sync cable, 60
T
tempo, 100–101
terminology, xiii
text messages, 152–153
theme music, 89–91
themes, 61, 170
thumbnails, 27, 65, 155, 164, 171
timecode, 13
time-lapse movies, xv, 129, 142
timeline
adding clips to, 63
adding Slo-Mo clips to, 74
importing audio to, 92–93
importing voiceovers to, 92–93
moving clips on, 65
skimming, 64
titles
adding in iMovie, 79–81
adding in Pinnacle Studio, 95
adding to portion of clip, 80–81
adding to trailers, 58
Closing, 79
Middle, 79
Opening, 79
styles, 79
Touch Instruments, 98, 99, 104
trailers, creating in iMovie, 57–59
transitions
adding in Pinnacle Studio, 95
adjusting duration of, 78
clip timing and, 77
cross dissolve, 76, 77
editing in iMovie, 76–77
Precision Editor, 78–79
settings, 76
types of, 76
trimming clips, 28, 66
tripods
Glif, 14–15, 176
GorillaPod, 14, 176
iPad mini, 15
Jelly Legs, 15
Micro Ball Head, 15
Spring Tripod Mount, 15
Tumblr, 158–159, 180
Twitter, 151
INDEX
191
U
Ultrakam app, 40, 178
underwater photography, 18
USB adapters, 12
USB connections, 60
USB microphones, 12
V
video. See also movies; projects
720p, 5, 37, 149, 154
1080i, 5
1080p, 5, 149, 154
basics, 3–18
capturing. See capturing video
compressed, 5
deleting everywhere, 158
distortion, 30
exporting. See exporting
HD, 5, 156
importing. See importing
intent, 4–5
interlaced, 5
making available to
projects/apps, 64
playing. See playing movies
portrait vs. landscape orientation,
26, 42, 61
progressive, 5
recording. See recording video
removing from devices, 158
removing from iCloud, 158
resolution. See resolution
saving to Camera Roll, 64, 146, 157
sharing. See sharing video
shooting. See shooting video
skimming, 64–65
specifying location, 81–82
time-lapse, xv, 129, 142
tips for recording on smartphone, 13
uploading to Tumblr, 158–159
192
iPAD AND iPHONE VIDEO
visualizing end result, 4–5
watching on Apple TV, 159–165
video bitrates, 38
Video browser, 61, 62
video calls, FaceTime, 6
video cameras, xi. See also cameras
video clips. See also clips
adding audio only from, 94
ideas for, 4
marking in iMovie, 56–57
reviewing in iMovie, 56–57
sharing via Mail, 140, 152, 153–154
sharing via Messages, 152–153
splitting, 66–67
streaming via AirPlay, 164–165
video editing, 51–95
adjusting color with VideoGrade,
54–55
creating trailers, 57–59
with iMovie. See iMovie
Ken Burns effect, 84–85
overview, 51
Precision Editor, 78–79
stabilizing footage with Emulsio,
52–53
stop-motion movies, 137
transitions, 76–77
video files, 55, 60
video formats, 5–6
video recorders, xi
video recording. See recording video
video shoots. See shooting video
VideoGrade app, 54–55, 179
VideoMic Pro, 11, 177
Videos album, 146
Viewer, 61–62, 64, 84
Vimeo, 148–152, 180
Vine app, 43–44, 178
voice recording
in Adobe Voice, 168–172
in Storehouse, 172–173
voiceovers, 92–93
volume
changing in clips, 85
changing in loops, 103
changing in tracks, 106–107
recorded music, 118
W
waterproof camera cases, 18
waveforms, 85, 86, 88, 118, 140
Web site, companion to book, xiv
WebDAV server, sharing via, 140
white balance, 33, 54, 133
The Wirecutter site, 18
wireless connections, 60
X
XLR-style plug, 11
Y
YouTube, 140, 148–152, 180
Z
ZeroShake app, 40, 52, 178
ZeroShake for iPad, 178
ZeroShake for iPhone, 178
zoom control, 33–35, 69
INDEX
193
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement