M Series — E Matrix Mixers

M Series — E Matrix Mixers
M Series — E
Matrix Mixers
User/Programmer Manual
Model/Serial Number
Software: Crosspoint ROM
Application ROM
CD ROM
2222 Pleasant View Road
Middleton, WI 53562
(608) 831-0880
fax: (608) 831-1833
e-mail: [email protected]
Toll Free: 1-866-4matmix
Revision
A
04/28/03
M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
Contents
1.0 M-series Hardware ............................................................................................. 11
1.1 M-series Internal hardware ................................................................................................. 12
1.2 Audio Input/Output ............................................................................................................ 15
1.2.1 Audio Input .............................................................................................................. 15
1.2.2 Audio Output ........................................................................................................... 15
1.3 Recommended Input Connections ...................................................................................... 16
1.4 DC Control ........................................................................................................................ 17
2.0 Installing and starting the M-series software ................................................. 18
2.1 Installing the M-series software ........................................................................................... 18
2.1.1 Installing the M-series software from the CDROM ..................................................... 18
2.1.3 Installing the M-series software from the Intelix Web site ............................................ 18
2.2 Running the M-series Software ........................................................................................... 18
3.0 Connecting the Control PC to the M-series .................................................... 19
4.0 Quick Start .......................................................................................................... 21
4.1 Define your application. ..................................................................................................... 21
4.2 Run the M-series Designer Software ................................................................................... 21
4.3 Install the M-series Hardware ............................................................................................. 21
4.3.1 Mount the M-series in the rack. ................................................................................. 21
4.3.2 Connect the Audio sources and outputs ..................................................................... 21
4.3.3 Connect the control PC to the M-series ..................................................................... 21
4.3.4 Download your application to the M-series ................................................................ 21
5.0 M-series Auto Designer ..................................................................................... 22
5.1 M-series Project Name ...................................................................................................... 22
5.2 Audio Matrix Size Screen ................................................................................................... 22
5.3 Audio Sources Screen ........................................................................................................ 23
5.3.1 Naming Audio Sources .............................................................................................. 23
5.3.2 Source Mono/Stereo Selection .................................................................................. 23
5.3.3 Left/Right and Stereo Pairing ...................................................................................... 23
5.3.4 Add/Remove 8 Sources ............................................................................................. 23
5.3.5 The Volume Column .................................................................................................. 23
5.3.6 The Pan Column ........................................................................................................ 24
5.3.6.1 The Volume Column ......................................................................................... 24
5.3.7 Adding/Removing a Mic/Line Card ............................................................................ 25
5.3.7.1 Setting/Monitoring a Mic/Line Card .................................................................. 25
5.3.7.1.1 Gain Setting ............................................................................................. 25
5.3.7.1.2 Auto Setup .............................................................................................. 25
5.3.7.1.3 Phantom Power ....................................................................................... 25
5.4 Audio Outputs Screen ........................................................................................................ 26
5.4.1 Naming Audio Outputs .............................................................................................. 26
5.4.2 Output Mono/Stereo Selection ................................................................................... 26
5.4.3 Left/Right and Stereo Pairing ...................................................................................... 26
M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
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M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
5.4.4 Volume ...................................................................................................................... 26
5.4.5 Add/Delete 8 Outputs ................................................................................................ 26
5.4.6 Balance ..................................................................................................................... 27
5.5 Preset Manager .................................................................................................................. 28
5.5.1 Adding Presets .......................................................................................................... 28
5.5.2 Changing Crosspoint Values ....................................................................................... 28
5.5.3 Crossfade Time ......................................................................................................... 28
5.5.4 Navigating Through Presets ........................................................................................ 28
5.5.5 View ......................................................................................................................... 29
5.5.6 Copy Options ............................................................................................................ 29
5.5.6.1 Copy to Another Preset .................................................................................... 29
5.5.6.2 Copy From Live ............................................................................................... 29
5.5.7 Invoke Preset ............................................................................................................ 29
5.5.8 All No Change/All Off/All On .................................................................................... 29
5.6 Preset Trigger ..................................................................................................................... 30
5.6.1 Preset Select ............................................................................................................. 30
5.6.2 The State Column ...................................................................................................... 30
5.6.3 The Indicators Panel .................................................................................................. 30
5.6.4 Pinout ........................................................................................................................ 30
6.0 Hardware Installation Wizard .......................................................................... 31
6.1 Data Source Selection ........................................................................................................ 31
6.2 Audio Wiring Test ............................................................................................................... 31
6.3 The Audio Path Test ........................................................................................................... 32
6.4 Preset Triggers .................................................................................................................... 32
7.0 M-series Windows® Reference ........................................................................ 33
7.1 The File Menu .................................................................................................................... 34
7.1.1 The New Item ........................................................................................................... 34
7.1.2 The Open Item .......................................................................................................... 34
7.1.3 The Save Item ........................................................................................................... 34
7.1.4 The Save As... Item ................................................................................................... 34
7.1.5 The Print Item ............................................................................................................ 34
7.1.6 The Print Preview ...................................................................................................... 34
7.1.7 The Print Setup .......................................................................................................... 35
7.1.8 The Recent File ......................................................................................................... 35
7.1.10 The Exit Item ........................................................................................................... 35
7.2 The Configuration Menu ..................................................................................................... 36
7.2.1 Audio Matrix Size ...................................................................................................... 37
7.2.2 Audio Sources ................................................................................................................. 38
7.2.2.1 Naming Audio Sources ..................................................................................... 38
7.2.2.2 Source Mono/Stereo Selection ......................................................................... 38
7.2.2.3 Left/Right and Stereo Pairing ............................................................................. 38
7.2.2.4 Volume ............................................................................................................ 38
7.2.2.5 Pan ................................................................................................................. 39
7.2.2.5.1 Mono Panning ......................................................................................... 39
7.2.2.5.2 Stereo Panning ........................................................................................ 39
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M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
7.2.2.6 Add/Delete 8 Sources ...................................................................................... 39
7.2.3 Mic/Line Cards ......................................................................................................... 40
7.2.3.1 Adding a Mic/Line Card ................................................................................... 40
7.2.3.2 Deleting a Mic/Line Card .................................................................................. 40
7.2.3.3 Setting/Monitoring a Mic/Line Card .................................................................. 40
7.2.3.4 Gain Setting ...................................................................................................... 40
7.2.3.5 Phantom Power ................................................................................................ 40
7.2.4 Audio Outputs ........................................................................................................... 41
7.2.4.1 Naming Audio Outputs ..................................................................................... 41
7.2.4.2 Output Mono/Stereo Selection .......................................................................... 41
7.2.4.3 Left/Right and Stereo Pairing ............................................................................. 41
7.2.4.4 Volume ............................................................................................................ 41
7.2.4.5 Balance ............................................................................................................ 41
7.2.4.6 Add/Delete Outputs .......................................................................................... 41
7.2.5 System Preset Manager ............................................................................................. 42
7.2.5.1 Adding A Preset ............................................................................................... 42
7.2.5.2 Changing Crosspoint Values .............................................................................. 42
7.2.5.3 Crossfade Time ................................................................................................ 42
7.2.5.4 Navigating Through Presets ............................................................................... 42
7.2.5.5 View ................................................................................................................ 43
7.2.5.6 Copy to Another Preset .................................................................................... 43
7.2.5.7 Copy from Live ................................................................................................ 43
7.2.5.8 Invoke .............................................................................................................. 43
7.2.5.9 All No Change/All Off/All On ........................................................................... 43
7.2.6 Logic Port ................................................................................................................. 44
7.2.6.1 Preset Select .................................................................................................... 44
7.2.6.2 The State Column ............................................................................................. 44
7.2.6.3 The Indicators Panel ......................................................................................... 44
7.2.6.4 Pinout ............................................................................................................... 44
7.2.7 Schedule Events ........................................................................................................ 44
7.3 The Reports Menu .............................................................................................................. 45
7.3.1 Sales Order ............................................................................................................... 45
7.3.2 Wiring Reports .......................................................................................................... 46
7.3.3 All Reports ................................................................................................................ 46
7.4 The Installation Menu .......................................................................................................... 47
7.4.1 The Hardware Installation Wizard .............................................................................. 47
7.4.2 Upload/Download Item ............................................................................................. 48
7.4.2.1 Read Data from the M-series ............................................................................ 48
7.4.2.2 Write Data to the M-series ................................................................................ 48
7.4.2.3 Operation Progress Bars ................................................................................... 48
7.5 The Diagnostic Menu .......................................................................................................... 49
7.5.1 Communication Diagnostics ....................................................................................... 50
7.5.1.1 Disconnect Button ............................................................................................ 50
7.5.1.2 Clear Buffer ...................................................................................................... 50
7.5.1.3 Decode Buffer .................................................................................................. 50
M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
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M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
7.5.1.4 Configure ......................................................................................................... 50
7.5.1.5 Transmit RS232 Message ................................................................................. 51
7.5.2 The Device Information Screen .................................................................................. 51
7.5.2.1 The Name of the matrix .................................................................................... 51
7.5.2.2 Internal Hardware ............................................................................................. 52
7.5.3 List All Chips ............................................................................................................. 52
7.5.4 Reset ......................................................................................................................... 52
7.5.5 Clear Memory ........................................................................................................... 52
7.5.6 The Live Crosspoint Screen ...................................................................................... 53
7.5.6.1 Changing Crosspoint Values .............................................................................. 53
7.5.6.2 View ................................................................................................................ 53
7.5.6.3 Show Input/Output Volume ............................................................................... 53
7.5.6.4 Copy to Preset ................................................................................................. 53
7.5.6.5 Enable Polling ................................................................................................... 53
7.5.7 Logic Port Control ..................................................................................................... 54
7.5.7.1 Preset Select .................................................................................................... 54
7.5.7.2 The State Column ............................................................................................. 54
7.5.7.3 The Indicators Panel ......................................................................................... 54
7.5.7.4 Pinout ............................................................................................................... 54
7.5.8 Matrix CPU Error History ......................................................................................... 55
7.6 The Options Menu .............................................................................................................. 56
7.6.1 Are You There ........................................................................................................... 56
7.6.2 Communication Setup ................................................................................................ 56
7.6.2.1 Protocols ................................................................................................................ 57
7.6.2.1.1 Comm Port ............................................................................................. 57
7.6.2.1.2 UDP (User datagram Protocol) ................................................................ 57
7.6.2.1.3 TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) ....................................................... 57
7.6.2.1.4 Server Mode ........................................................................................... 57
7.6.2.2 Settings ............................................................................................................ 57
7.6.2.2.1 Local/ Remote ......................................................................................... 57
7.6.2.2.2 IP Address .............................................................................................. 57
7.6.2.2.3 Port ......................................................................................................... 57
7.6.2.2.4 Properties ................................................................................................ 57
7.6.2.2.4.1 Timeout .......................................................................................... 57
7.6.2.2.4.2 Retries ............................................................................................ 57
7.6.2.2.5 Version Information .................................................................................. 58
7.6.2.2.6 Connect Button ....................................................................................... 58
7.6.2.2.7 Find Devices Button ................................................................................ 58
7.6.2.2.8 Edit Settings Button ................................................................................. 58
7.6.3 Device LAN Setup .................................................................................................... 59
7.6.3.3.1 Name ...................................................................................................... 59
7.6.3.3.2 IP Address .............................................................................................. 59
7.6.3.3.3 Subnet Mask ........................................................................................... 59
7.6.3.3.4 Default Gateway ...................................................................................... 59
7.6.3.3.5 Use DHCP checkbox .............................................................................. 59
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M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
7.6.3.3.6 Assign Button .......................................................................................... 59
7.6.4. Connection List Setup ............................................................................................... 59
7.6.4.1 Authorized Client List ....................................................................................... 60
7.6.4.1.1 Add Authorized Client ............................................................................. 60
7.6.4.1.2 Remove Authorized Client ....................................................................... 60
7.6.4.2 Callback List .................................................................................................... 60
7.6.4.2.1 Add Callback .......................................................................................... 60
7.6.4.2.2 Remove Callback .................................................................................... 60
7.6.5 Preferences ............................................................................................................... 60
7.6.5.1 DSP Option Tab ............................................................................................... 61
7.6.5.2 Stereo Partner Selections .................................................................................. 61
7.6.6 Upgrade Flash ........................................................................................................... 6 1
7.6.6 System Recovery ....................................................................................................... 61
8.0 The Event Scheduler .......................................................................................... 62
8.1 Starting and Running the Scheduler ...................................................................................... 62
8.1.1 Starting the Scheduler Software ................................................................................. 62
8.1.2 Scheduling Events ...................................................................................................... 62
8.1.3 Setting System Date and Time .................................................................................... 62
8.1.4 Scheduling a New Event ........................................................................................... 63
8.1.4.1 Name the Event ............................................................................................... 63
8.1.4.2 Select the Interval ............................................................................................ 63
8.1.4.3 Start Date and Time .......................................................................................... 63
8.1.4.4 Action .............................................................................................................. 63
8.1.4.5 Advanced ......................................................................................................... 63
8.2 Scheduler Examples ............................................................................................................ 64
8.2.1 Invoke Preset Example .............................................................................................. 64
8.2.2 Ramp Crosspoint to Volume Example ........................................................................ 64
8.2.3 Set Logic Port Output Example .................................................................................. 65
8.2.4 Set TCP Callout Status Example ................................................................................ 66
8.2.5 Generic Message Example ......................................................................................... 66
8.3 Scheduler Display ............................................................................................................... 67
9.0 Stereo I/O control ............................................................................................... 68
9.1 Input controls ..................................................................................................................... 68
9.2 Output controls ................................................................................................................... 68
9.3 Stereo Control Methods .................................................................................................... 68
9.3.1 Setting control values with RS-232 ............................................................................ 68
9.3.2 Setting Control Values with the GUI ........................................................................... 69
9.3.2.1 Audio Input Panning ........................................................................................ 69
9.3.2.2 Audio Input Width ............................................................................................ 69
9.3.2.3 Output balance ................................................................................................ 69
9.4.1 Input width control ..................................................................................................... 70
9.4.2 Input pan control ....................................................................................................... 71
9.5 Output control ................................................................................................................... 72
9.6 Stereo input to stereo output example ................................................................................. 73
9.7 Mono input to stereo output example ................................................................................. 74
M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
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M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
9.8 Mono input to mono output example .................................................................................. 75
9.9 Stereo input to mono output example ................................................................................. 75
11.0 RS232 Command Summaries ....................................................................... 76
10.0 RS-232 Message Protocol ............................................................................... 85
10.1 RS232 Message Fields ..................................................................................................... 85
10.2 RS-232 Reserved Bytes ................................................................................................... 86
10.3 RS-232 Timing ................................................................................................................. 86
10.3 Hexadecimal Transmission ................................................................................................ 87
10.3.1 Commercial controllers ........................................................................................... 87
10.3.2 ASCII values ........................................................................................................... 87
10.5 Byte Escape Sequence ..................................................................................................... 88
Port 1 Baud Rates .................................................................................................................... 89
10.7 Introduction to using the RS-232 Commands .................................................................... 90
10.7.1 Are You There ......................................................................................................... 90
10.7.2 I Am Here ............................................................................................................... 90
10.7.3 Set_xptvol ............................................................................................................... 91
Class 0: Matrix Mixer Messages ............................................................................ 92
Are You There (ID 0) ............................................................................................................... 93
I Am Here (ID 1) ..................................................................................................................... 94
Set_device_status_LED (ID 18) ............................................................................................... 96
Get_IP_configuration (ID 19) .................................................................................................. 97
Report_of_IP_configuration (ID 20) ........................................................................................ 98
Set IP_address (ID 21) ............................................................................................................ 99
Set Gateway_address (ID 22) ................................................................................................ 100
Set subnet_mask (ID 23) ....................................................................................................... 101
Get_Authorized_IP_clients (ID 24) ........................................................................................ 102
Report_of_Authorized_IP_clients (ID 25) .............................................................................. 103
Add/Delete_Authorized_IP_client (ID 26) .............................................................................. 104
Get_dedicated_TCP_connections (ID 27) ............................................................................. 105
Report_of_dedicated_TCP_connections (ID 28) ................................................................... 106
Add/Delete_Dedicated_TCP_connection (ID 29) ................................................................... 107
Enable/Disable_dedicated_TCP_connection (ID 30) ............................................................... 108
Confirm (ID 31) ..................................................................................................................... 109
Error (ID 32) .......................................................................................................................... 110
Class 1: Audio Input/Output Messages ................................................................ 111
Ramp_i/ovol_internal (ID 5) .................................................................................................... 112
Slew_i/ovol_internal (ID 6) .................................................................................................... 113
Ramp_i/ovol_new (ID 7) ....................................................................................................... 114
Slew_i/ovol_new (ID 8) ........................................................................................................ 115
Set_i/ovol (ID 9) .................................................................................................................... 116
Set_i/otaper (ID 10) .............................................................................................................. 117
Mute/demute_iovol (ID 11) ..................................................................................................... 118
Assign_i/ostereopair (ID 12) ................................................................................................... 119
Set AV_group_audiomember (ID 13) ..................................................................................... 120
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M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
Set_in_panwidth (ID 14) ........................................................................................................ 121
Stop_i/ovol_slewing (ID 17) .................................................................................................. 122
Set_multi_i/ovols_same (ID 18) .............................................................................................. 123
Set_multi_i/ovols (ID 19) ....................................................................................................... 124
Class 2: Crosspoint Messages ............................................................................... 125
Ramp_xptvol_internal (ID 3) ................................................................................................... 129
Slew_xptvol_internal (ID 4) ................................................................................................... 130
Ramp_xptvol_new (ID 5) ....................................................................................................... 131
Slew_xptvol_new (ID 6) ......................................................................................................... 132
Set_xpt_ramptime (ID 7) ........................................................................................................ 133
Set_xptvol (ID 9) ................................................................................................................... 134
Set_xpt_taper (ID 10) ............................................................................................................ 135
Mute/demute_xptvol (ID 11) .................................................................................................. 136
Stop_xptvolslew (ID 12) ........................................................................................................ 137
Set_xptvol_exclusive (ID 13) .................................................................................................. 138
Set_multi_xptvols (ID 14) ....................................................................................................... 139
Set_multiple_xptvols_same (ID 15) ......................................................................................... 140
Class 3: Audio Preset Message Details ................................................................ 141
Set_preset_ramptime (ID 5) ................................................................................................... 143
Set_preset_xptvol (ID 7) ........................................................................................................ 144
Copy_preset (ID 8) ............................................................................................................... 145
Invoke_preset (ID 9) ............................................................................................................. 146
Copy_live_to_preset (ID 13) ................................................................................................. 147
Class 4: Logic Port Messages ............................................................................... 148
Set_LogicPort_reporting (ID 3) ............................................................................................ 149
Set_LogicPort_output_state (ID 5) ........................................................................................ 150
Simulate_LogicPort_input_change (ID 7) .............................................................................. 151
Class 11: Mic/Line Card Messages ...................................................................... 152
Set_inputch_gain (ID 2) ......................................................................................................... 153
Set_inputch_level_reporting (ID 3) ........................................................................................ 154
Report_of_inputch_level (ID 4) .............................................................................................. 155
Class 15: Event Scheduler Messages ................................................................... 156
Set_Date/Time (ID 0) ............................................................................................................. 160
Get_Date/Time (ID 1) ............................................................................................................. 161
Report_of_Date/Time (ID 2) ................................................................................................... 162
Schedule_an_Event (ID 3) ...................................................................................................... 163
Schedule_an_Event (ID 3) cont. ............................................................................................. 164
Get_Event_Schedule_List (ID 4) ........................................................................................... 165
Report_of_Event_Schedule_List (ID 5) .................................................................................. 166
Get_Event_Details (ID 6) ...................................................................................................... 167
Report_of_Event_Details (ID 7) ............................................................................................. 168
Report_of_Event_Details (ID 7) cont. ..................................................................................... 169
Delete_Scheduled_Event (ID 8) ............................................................................................. 170
M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
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M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
Appendix A: Ramp Times and Slew Rates........................................................... 171
Appendix B: M-series Reset Sequence ................................................................. 174
Appendix C: Technical Information ...................................................................... 175
Index..........................................................................................................................177
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M-Series User Manual – Table of Contents
M-Series User Manual – Overview
1.0 M-series Hardware
The Intelix M-series matrix mixer is an RS232 controlled audio matrix slave device.
The audio matrix is a fully controllable crosspoint matrix. At every crosspoint the user can independently
specify variables such as target value, ramp time, slew rate etc. M-series matrices are available in sizes
ranging from 8 X 8 to 128 X 128 in increments of 8 inputs or 8 outputs
Control of the M-series is accomplished either with the supplied Intelix software or via an external RS-232
controller. Common RS-232 commands and protocol are covered in later sections of this manual. Two fully
independent RS-232 ports are provided on the M-series-E.
The M-series-E supports EtherNet control. The EtherNet connection is made via the rear panel RJ-45. This
feature enables the M-series-E to be configured, programmed and controlled over the Internet or a local
LAN.
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M-Series User Manual – Overview
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M-Series User Manual – Overview
1.1 M-series Internal hardware
This drawing shows the layout of the basic matrix 8 X 8 card. Shown are the input and output VCA rows
and columns. The heavy black line shows a typical audio route, input four to output three. This route is
affected by the setting to the parameters of the input, the crosspoint and the output VCAs.
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M-Series User Manual – Overview
M-Series User Manual – Overview
1.1 M-series internal hardware cont.
This drawing shows how the matrix is actually wired. Each input and output is independent of each crosspoint; i.e. a crosspoint affects only a single input/output pair.
M-Series User Manual – Overview
13
M-Series User Manual – Overview
1.1 M-series internal hardware cont.
This drawing shows the a typical audio signal path (input 4 to output 3) and the parameters that control each
crosspoint in the matrix mixer’s grid of crosspoints. Note that each crosspoint has multiple controlling
parameters.
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M-Series User Manual – Overview
M-Series User Manual – Overview
1.2 Audio Input/Output
1.2.1 Audio Input
Any line-level audio input can be routed and mixed using the MZP. The inputs are connected to the Matrix
via removable screw-terminal (“Phoenix-type”) plug receptacles. The audio input to the Matrix can be
either electronically balanced (impedance of 20 KΩ) or you can unbalanced it to 10 KΩ. The correct way
to unbalance the input is to “float” it, i.e. leave the unused pin open, as shown below. (For other methods of
wiring Inputs see the following page.)
Fig. 9. These drawings show how balanced and unbalanced inputs should be connected to the Matrix
audio inputs.
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1.2.2 Audio Output
Audio output devices are connected to the Matrix via removable screw-terminal (“Phoenix-type”) plug
receptacles. The audio output from the Matrix is electronically balanced (impedance of 440 Ω), but it can
be unbalanced (impedance of 220 Ω) by the user. The correct way to unbalance the output is to tie the
negative leg to ground, as shown below.
The Matrix is designed to give a 6 dB boost (which compensates for the signal-level loss due to unbalancing) to a signal unbalanced in this way. Therefore this method of unbalancing is preferable to floating
one side of the pair of leads to unbalance it.
Fig. 10. Matrix output connections for balanced and unbalanced output devices.
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M-Series User Manual – Overview
15
M-Series User Manual – Overview
1.3 Recommended Input Connections
Any line-level audio input can be mixed and routed using the Matrix. The inputs are connected to the
Matrix via screw-terminal (“Phoenix-type”) plug receptacles. The audio input to the Matrix can be either
electronically balanced (impedance of 20KΩ), or it can be unbalanced (impedance of 10KΩ) by the user.
The connection configurations shown below are all possible. Their properties are described so that the user
may choose the one that will work best for a particular input.
Fig. 22. This is the polarity of the Phoenix connector
viewed removed from Matrix chassis.
Fig. 23. These drawings show the best
Ground
ways to connect various types of
Minus audio inputs to the Matrix Phoenix
Plus +
input connectors.
Equivalent Matrix Input Circuits
Sources
Type: isolated ground (unbalanced)
Gain: unity
Property: ground currents and induced
noise rejected from signal
Type: common ground (unbalanced)
Gain: +6 dB
Property: slight gain boost; possible
ground noise in signal
Type: common ground (unbalanced)
Gain: unity
Property: possible ground noise in
signal
Type: isolated ground (balanced)
Gain:+6 dB
Property: slight gain boost; no ground
currents; high induced noise rejection
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M-Series User Manual – Overview
M-Series User Manual – Overview
1.4 DC Control
DC control on the M-series matrix is accomplished through the type 3 PCMCIA slot port on the rear panel.
Intelix provides PCMCIA plug in cards for certain common DC control and expansion functions. Only
Intelix plugin cards are supported. No user designed or third party cards are currently supported.
The logic port pinout as viewed from above.
M-Series User Manual – Overview
17
M-Series User Manual – Installing and Starting
2.0 Installing and starting the M-series software
2.1 Installing the M-series software
There are three main sources for the M-series Designer® software: the Intelix CDROM, and the zipped
downloadable file from the Intelix web site. Instructions for installing from these sources are shown below.
2.1.1 Installing the M-series software from the CDROM
1) From the main screen, click “Installation Software”
2) Click M-Series Matrix to start the installation.
2.1.3 Installing the M-series software from the Intelix Web site
1) Download the file www.Intelix.com -> Technical Library > Software Directory > M-Series Download.
2) Run the file setup.exe
3) Follow the directions on screen.
2.2 Running the M-series Software
To run the M-series Designer software, select it from the Start menu, or doubleclick the M-series icon on
the desktop.
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M-Series User Manual – Installing and Starting
M-Series User Manual – Getting Started
3.0 Connecting the Control PC to the M-series
Before you can program your M-series matrix mixer, you need to have a personal computer (desktop or
laptop) capable of running the M-series program. Although other platforms are supported, Intelix recommends a computer running Windows 2000 or later Your computer must meet these requirements:
√ PC computer (Pentium 133MHz and 32M RAM or better) with a CD ROM drive
√ Windows® ‘98 or later, or NT
√ Serial port connected to RS232 connector (either comm 1 or comm2) on Matrix Mixer
The wiring diagram for an RS232 cable is at the bottom of the page. The drawing you use will depend on
the connector on your PC. Most PCs have either a DB-9 or a DB-25 on the serial port. The cable wiring
for both connectors are shown.
The matrix has two completely independent RS232 serial ports, called comm 1 and comm2. Two comm
ports enable the user to simultaneously connected both a dedicated controller and a PC running the Intelix
GUI (or any two RS232 devices). There is no restriction on which port is used for any device. Additionally comm 2 is mirrored to a third DB-9 connector on the front panel for convenience in connecting to a
racked matrix. Only one device can be connected to comm 2 at one time.Comm 1 and Comm 2 baud
rates are set independently with the rear panel DIP switches as shown in sec. 3.1. If you intend to connect
your matrix to an Ethernet LAN, see section 3.2 below. As shown below you can also connect your PC
directly to the M-Series Ethernet port, using a 100baseT crossover cable. If you do this a static IP address
is required.
RS
23
RS
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2
23
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23
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All RS232 Cables are straight-through cables. Using a null
modem cable will cause communication failure!
The connections of the
M-series’s three DB-9
connectors for RS-232
comm ports 1 and 2 (front
and rear).
2
3
5
Transmit
Receive Ground
M-Series User Manual – Getting Started
19
M-Series User Manual – Getting Started
3.1 DIP Switches
There are eight DIP switches on the rear panel of the Matrix (see drawing below). For all DIP switches, the
“up” position indicates the “on” condition, and the “down” position the “off” condition. The function of these
switches is shown below.
1 2 3 4 5
reserved
Comm 2
Baud Rate
6 7 8
Comm 1
Baud Rate
9600 Baud
38400 Baud
57600 Baud
115200 Baud
Reserved
No checksum
no Escape byte
Use Checksum
and
Escape byte
DIP switches 1,2 and 8 are reserved for use by Intelix.
Baud Rate Selection
Not all baud rates are available to all revision of the M-series matrices. New matrices support more baud
rates than older ones. The baud rates of 9600 baud and 38400 baud are common to both hardware sets.
To distinguish whether you have an old or new hardware, look at the rear panel if there are two DB-9
connectors you have new hardware. If there is only one DB-9 you have older style hardware. If you
cannot tell which type of hardware you have, use 9600 baud as a default, since all hardware support
that rate.
New Hardware baud Rates
The new hardware supports four baud rates: 9600, 38400, 57600, and 115200.
Old Baud Rates
Older hardware supports only three baud rates: 9600, 19200, and 38400.
Port 2 Baud Rates
DIP switches 3 and 4 set the RS232 baud rate of RS232 port comm 2. For available rates see Baud
Rate Selection above. Ports 1 and 2 can have different baud rates if desired.
Port 1 Baud Rates
DIP switches 5 and 6 set the RS-232 baud rate of RS232 port comm 1. For available rates see Baud
Rate Selection above. Ports 1 and 2 can have different baud rates if desired.
DIP switch 7 allows the RS-232 checksum and “escape” byte to be toggled on or off. These should be
turned off in installations which include a permanent RS-232 controller, such as AMX, Crestron or custom
PC program. The RS-232 checksum and escape byte should be turned on in installations where the RS232 communication may be hindered because of cable length (greater than 50 feet) or lack of shielding from
external electronic noise.
3.2 Ethernet Connection
The Intelix matrix provides an RJ 45 Ethernet connector on the rear panel. To connect the matrix to an
Ethernet LAN, connect a cable with two RJ-45 connectors to the matrix on one end and to the local LAN
on the other. Now follow the direction for configuring TCP/IP communication in section 7.6.3. To connect
a PC directly to the M-Series Ethernet port, use a crossover RJ45 cable made of Cat 5.
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M-Series User Manual – Getting Started
M-Series User Manual –Quick Start
4.0 Quick Start
4.1 Define your application.
Before beginning the programming process you must decide on the size and layout of your application You
must know:
a) number and type of all other audio sources and outputs.
b) It is a good idea to decide on names for all audio sources and outputs. Names can greatly
simplify the later manipulation of the design.
4.2 Run the M-series Designer Software
From the M-series Designer main menu, select File -> “New ”. You will be guided through the auto design
wizard (see sec 4.1), a set of screens that will turn your application design into a downloadable .mmm file.
4.3 Install the M-series Hardware
4.3.1 Mount the M-series in the rack.
There should be at least 1-2” of free air space at the sides of the matrix mixer for proper ventilation. Do not
install directly above a power amplifier or other significant heat source.
4.3.2 Connect the Audio sources and outputs
Using your design drawings make all audio source and output connections to the rear panel of the M-series
matrix mixer.
4.3.3 Connect the control PC to the M-series
Connect a serial cable between your PC serial port and the female DB-9 receptacle on the matrix mixer
(labelled either Comm 1 or Comm 2). The cable should be a straight-through configuration. For details on
this connection see section 3.0.
4.3.4 Download your application to the M-series
Download your application file from the control PC to the M-series matrix mixer as explained in section
7.4.1.2. You are now ready to test your application.
M-Series User Manual –Quick Start
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M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
5.0 M-series Auto Designer
This section will walk you through the Windows® screens necessary to produce a new M-series design.
The M-series Designer automatically begins this sequence when you select “New ”. You should already
have designed your system on paper.
5.1 M-series Project Name
This screen presents a text box in which to name your project. When you have typed the name of your
project click the “Forward” button.
5.2 Audio Matrix Size Screen
This screen requires you to select the size of the M-series matrix you will be designing. The size specifies the
number of audio sources and the number of audio outputs. Use the scroll buttons or direct text entry to
change the values. The size of the M-series matrix can only be changed in increments of eight.
Note: Any stereo source or stereo output counts as two sources or outputs.
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M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
5.3 Audio Sources Screen
At this step, the wizard will present an informational screen regarding the definition of audio sources. When
you have read and understood the instructions click the “Forward” button. The audio sources screen
(shown below) appears.
5.3.1 Naming Audio Sources
To name an audio source, click on the name to be changed, type the new name and press Enter.
5.3.2 Source Mono/Stereo Selection
Each audio source can be either monaural or stereo. Stereo sources occupy two matrix inputs. When you
change a source to stereo, the wizard assigns left/right pairing and partner inputs (see section 5.3.3). To
change a source’s mono/stereo attribute, click on the source’s mono/stereo column and select from the pick
list. Two methods of adding stereo pairing to existing input are available; see section 7.6.4.2 — Stereo
Partner Selections.
5.3.3 Left/Right and Stereo Pairing
When a source is defined as stereo, that source is defined as the left member of the pair. The next input in
sequence is defined as the right member of the pair. The names of the two sources are changed to name L
and name R. Both the left/right and stereo pairing attributes are changable. Click on the column and choose
from the pick lists. Two methods of adding stereo pairing to existing input are available; see section 7.6.4.2
— Stereo Partner Selections.
5.3.4 Add/Remove 8 Sources
Clicking the “Add 8 Sources” button, informs the wizard that you wish your matrix expanded by eight
inputs. The new eight inputs will appear with default names at the bottom of the list. Of course this will
expand the size of the matrix mixer needed to accommodate your design. You can add sources in groups of
eight up to a total of 128 sources. The “Remove 8 Sources” button always removes the bottom eight
sources. You cannot delete the first eight sources.
5.3.5 The Volume Column
This column sets the maximum possible level of an audio input. This value controls the virtual VCA on the
input, meaning that this setting effects the entire input row. A typical use for this control is to lower the level
of a particularly hot input across the whole matrix.
M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
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M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
5.3.6 The Pan Column
Each audio input has a pan control. Click on the pan column for that input and the pan control screen
appears. Click and move the slider to the desired level, the range is 1-255. This value determines the way
the input is sent to the outputs. Pan from a mono input to a mono output has no effect. A mono input to a
stereo output can be sent all to one output side, the other, or any point in between. A stereo input to a mono
or stereo output is “balanced” as desired by this control. The speaker images change their relative sizes to
indicate the amount of pan selected. The Default button reverts the pan setting to 127.
5.3.6.1 The Volume Column
Each audio input has a volume control. Volume ranges from 0% - 100% of its maximum.Click on the
volume column for the desired input and a small slider control appears in that cell. Click and move the slider
to the desired level. Altering the volume setting of a member of a stereo pair changes both inputs belonging
to that pair.
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M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
5.3.7 Adding/Removing a Mic/Line Card
The M-series matrix supports the optional mic/line card. The mic/line card provides eight channels of
preamplification for audio sources. The use of mic/line cards obviates the need for microphone mixers in
your application. The gain column reflects the presence/absence of mic/line card and their gain settings.To
add a mic/line card, click on the “Input Type” column of any of the eight sources to be preamplified. This
activates the “Add mic/line Card” button. Click it and the “Input Type” column for the selected group of
eight inputs “mic/line card”. A red button indicates the presence of amplification on the input.
Mic/line cards are added from the top down and removed from the bottom up. To remove the mic/line card,
select an input’s “input type” column, and click the “Remove Mic/Line Card button.
5.3.7.1 Setting/Monitoring a Mic/Line Card
All eight channels of a mic line card are configurable independently. To configure a channel on a mic/line
card, double click on the gain setting of the channel to be changed. The screen below appears.
At any time that the PC is connected to an M-series matrix, this screen can be used to monitor the signal
present on the selected channel. If you use this feature, disable your screen saver since it will interfere with
signal monitoring.
5.3.7.1.1 Gain Setting
There are four gain ranges available. Click on the radio button next to the one desired for this channel.
5.3.7.1.2 Auto Setup
If you are unsure what gain range one of your sources requires. Click the “Auto Setup” button. The software automatically sample the source for three seconds averages the samples and selects the appropriate
gain range to ensure that the average is between the signal present and signal clip levels. The “Auto Setup”
button is disabled if no mic/line card is present in your system.
5.3.7.1.3 Phantom Power
Phantom power is a DC voltage supplied to certain microphones. If this channel requires phantom power,
click the “on” radio button. Note that the Phantom Power selector is only active when Gain range is
set to “mic” or “manual”.
M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
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M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
5.4 Audio Outputs Screen
At this step, the wizard will present an informational screen regarding the definition of audio sources. When
you have read and understood the instructions click the “Forward” button. The audio outputs screen (shown
below) appears.
5.4.1 Naming Audio Outputs
To name an audio output, click on the name to be changed, type the new name and press Enter.
5.4.2 Output Mono/Stereo Selection
Each audio output can be either monaural or stereo. Stereo outputs occupy two matrix outputs. To
change a source’s mono/stereo attribute, click on the source’s mono/stereo column and select from the pick
list.When you change a source to stereo, the wizard assigns left/right pairing and partner inputs (see section
5.4.3). Two methods of adding stereo pairing to existing input are available; see section 7.6.4.2 — Stereo
Partner Selections.
5.4.3 Left/Right and Stereo Pairing
When an output is defined as stereo, that output is defined as the left member of the pair. The next output in
sequence is defined as the right member of the pair. The names of the two outputs are changed to name L
and name R. Both the left/right and stereo pairing attributes are changable. Click on the column and choose
from the pick lists. Two methods of adding stereo pairing to existing input are available; see section 7.6.4.2
— Stereo Partner Selections.
5.4.4 Volume
This column sets the maximum possible level of an audio output. This value controls the virtual VCA on the
output, meaning that this setting effects the entire input column. A typical use for this control is to lower the
level of a particularly hot output across the whole matrix. Click on an output’s volume cell and a small slider
appears in the cell use the slider, or direct text entry to set the desired maximum level.
5.4.5 Add/Delete 8 Outputs
Clicking the “Add 8 Outputs” button informs the wizard that you wish your matrix expanded by eight
outputs. The new 8 outputs will appear with default names at the bottom of the list. Of course this will
expand the size of the physical matrix mixer needed to accommodate your design. You can add outputs in
groups of eight up to a total of 128 outputs. The “Remove 8 Outputs” button always removes the bottom
eight outputs.You cannot delete the first eight outputs.
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M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
5.4.6 Balance
When an output is defined as stereo, that output’s balance control is activated. When you click on the
balance control a balance screen appears. Move the slider to the desired level, the range is 1-255. This
value determines the way the stereo inputs are sent to these stereo outputs. The speaker images change their
relative sizes to indicate the amount of pan selected. The Default button reverts the balance setting to 127.
M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
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M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
5.5 Preset Manager
This step in the wizard displays an informational screen regarding the preset manager. After you have read
and understood it, click the “Forward” button. The preset manager screen (shown below) appears.
5.5.1 Adding Presets
To add a preset, click the “Add Preset” button, and type the new preset’s name. The new name appears
on the “View Preset” list and the “Copy to Another Preset” lists.
5.5.2 Changing Crosspoint Values
To change an audio level at a crosspoint, doubleclick on the crosspoint. A slider and a text box appear.
Either use the slider to set the desired value or type the new value directly in the text box. If the crosspoints
do not respond you may be in dB view mode where crosspoints are display only. Right clicking displays a
menu from which you can select several options including the “No Change” state (see section 5.5.8). You
can also use the “All On” and “All Off” buttons to set crosspoints (see section 5.5.8.)
5.5.3 Crossfade Time
The crossfade time is the amount of time taken to ramp from the current value of the crosspoints to the
values in a preset when the preset is invoked. This time can be set to any value between 0 seconds (slam)
and 30 seconds (very slow fade). Use the up/down arrows, or direct text entry (and the “Enter” key) to set
the crossfade value. Each of the 128 presets has its own crossfade value.
5.5.4 Navigating Through Presets
You can display, modify, copy or invoke any of the 128 presets in the M-series Matrix. Each preset has a
number (1-128) and a name. The “View Preset” pick list allows the display of any selected preset.
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M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
5.5.5 View
There are three view options. They determine how the crosspoint values are displayed. They include:
Percent: Displays values in percent of full volume. Range is 0%-100%
RS232: Displays values in the range 0 (full off)-255 (full on).
dB (result): Displays values in dB. Range is 0dB (full on) to -100 dB (full off). Note: In dB view
mode, crosspoint editing is disabled. This is because in dB (result) view mode, the display is the
summed result of all parameters that effect the crosspoint, including I/O volumes, pan/balance and
the crosspoint value.
5.5.6 Copy Options
There are several ways to copy an existing preset to another. They include:
5.5.6.1 Copy to Another Preset
When you select a preset name or number from this pick list. The currently displayed preset is immediately
copied into the selected preset. A confirmation screen will warn you of the action.
5.5.6.2 Copy From Live
Pressing this button causes the current live crosspoint values to be copied into the currently displayed
preset.
5.5.7 Invoke Preset
This button causes the selected (displayed) preset to become the active audio setup. The preset will take
effect at the crossfade time defined for that preset. Note that this button is only enabled when you are
connected to a physical matrix.
5.5.8 All No Change/All Off/All On
These three buttons make it easy to make global changes to all crosspoints in a preset. Each causes the
named effect: Changes all crosspoints to either off (-100dB), to on (0dB) or to the no change state. The no
change state means that the crosspoint so marked will not be affected by invoking that preset. It will maintain its existing level. These functions speed up the process of creating new presets from existing ones.
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M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
5.6 Preset Trigger
The M-series matrix allows the triggering of presets by external contact closure. This is accomplished
through input pins on the DB-25(units built before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA connector on the rear panel.
The preset trigger screen (shown below) allows setup of the preset trigger function. When you have completed this step the design wizard is complete. You will be prompted to save your design.
5.6.1 Preset Select
This column allows the selection of a preset to be triggered by each pin. To select a preset to be triggered
by a pin, click on the “Preset” column for that pin. Make a selection from the resulting pick list. This preset
will now be invoked whenever this input pin goes active.
5.6.2 The State Column
This column reads either open or closed and indicates the current state of that input pin on the DB-25(units
built before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA connector. If you are connected to an M-series matrix, you can
doubleclick on a the state column to simulate toggling that source pin.
5.6.3 The Indicators Panel
The table in the right hand pane of the window shows the current state of the output pins on the DB-25(units
built before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA connector. If you are connected to M-series hardware, you can
doubleclick these indicators to toggle the actual pins. Any active output pin turns red on the drawing of the
DB-25(units built before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA connector.
5.6.4 Pinout
At the bottom of the screen is a drawing showing the pinout of the connector . The pins on this screen
change colors when they are activated.
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M-Series User Manual – Auto Designer
MSseries User Manual – Hardware Installation
6.0 Hardware Installation Wizard
The Hardware Installation Wizard is largely self explanatory. Each step displays a text explanation of the
purpose of the step. There are five basic operations as shown below.
6.1 Data Source Selection
From the first screen (shown below), you must select a data source. You can open an existing file to be
installed by clicking on the “Open a File for Installation” button. To install the currently open file, click the
“Write Data to M-series device” button. Note: The “Open a File ...” button is disabled if you entered the
wizard directly from the Auto Design Wizard.
6.2 Audio Wiring Test
After an instructional screen, this step shows you a screen (shown below)that allows you to check that the
audio sources and outputs are correctly wired.
M-Series User Manual – Hardware Installation
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M-Series User Manual – Hardware Installation
6.3 The Audio Path Test
The audio test path step displays an instructional screen. After you have read and understood it, click
“Forward” you will see the “Live Crosspoint screen (shown below). Follow the directions from the instructional screen to test your audio paths.
6.4 Preset Triggers
The final step of the Hardware Installation Wizard is to configure preset triggers. Presets can be triggered by
external signals driving input pins on the DB-25 connector on the rear panel of the M-series mixer. The
instructional screen for preset triggers explains the basics of preset triggers. For details on the preset trigger
screen, see section 7.2.4.
This concludes the Hardware Installation Wizard.
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M-Series User Manual – Hardware Installation
M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
7.0 M-series Windows® Reference
This section is organized by menu items. For each item on the main menu, there is a section detailing the use
of the selections under that item. The major divisions are:
File Menu (section 7.1)
Configuration Menu (section 7.2)
Reports Menu (section 7.3)
Installation Menu (section 7.4)
Diagnostics Menu (section 7.5)
Options (section 7.6)
Help
M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
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M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
7.1 The File Menu
7.1.1 The New Item
Selecting the New item from the file menu causes the software to start the auto-design wizard, which is a
series of screens presented in sequence to guide you through the design process. If you click Cancel you
are returned to the M-series main screen.
7.1.2 The Open Item
Selecting the Open item from the file menu causes the software to prompt you for the path and name of the
file you wish to open. After you have specified the path and filename, the software opens that file, showing a
progress bar as it does so. On a fast machine or a small file, this progress indicator may be barely visible.
7.1.3 The Save Item
Choosing the Save item from the File menu causes the software to save the currently open file to disk. All
changes since the last save are updated.
7.1.4 The Save As... Item
Selecting Save as... from the File menu allows the user to create new file based on existing ones. If a new
program requires only a single change to an existing file, open that file with the Open item, make the change
and select the Save As... Item. You will be prompted for a path and filename. The new file will then be
saved under the new name and the original file remains unchanged under the old filename.
7.1.5 The Print Item
Selecting Print from the File menu allows the user to print the reports generated from the file currently open.
These reports include the sales order report, the wiring report audio source and audio output reports.
7.1.6 The Print Preview
Selecting Print Preview from the File menu allows the user to examine the page layout of the reports about
to be printed generated from the file currently open.
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M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
7.1.7 The Print Setup
Selecting Print Setup from the File menu allows the user to select and configure a printer to be used for
printing the M-series reports. The print setup performed in the Windows standard way.
7.1.8 The Recent File
As a user convenience, recently modified M-series files will appear on this list. You can click on them to
open rather than use the “Open” item. Restarting your computer clears the recent Files list.
7.1.10 The Exit Item
Selecting the Exit item from the file menu closes the M-series software and returns you to the desktop. If
you have made changes to a file, the program will ask you if you wish to save the changes.
M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
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M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
7.2 The Configuration Menu
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M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
7.2.1 Audio Matrix Size
The audio matrix size screen allows the designer to set the size of the matrix required by the design. Two
factors determine the needed size: the number of audio sources and the number of audio outputs. To set
these two parameters, use the up/down arrows next to each. Note that sources and outputs can only be
changed in multiples of eight. The M-series matrix is modular and each size increment/decrement adds/
subtracts another eight sources/outputs. Note that a stereo source counts as two inputs and a stereo
output counts as two outputs.
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M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
7.2.2 Audio Sources
7.2.2.1 Naming Audio Sources
To name an audio source click on the name to be changed, type the new name and press Enter. The sources
have default names Source 1 through Source max as shown.
7.2.2.2 Source Mono/Stereo Selection
Each audio source can be either monaural or stereo. Stereo sources occupy two matrix inputs. When you
change a source to stereo, the software assigns left/right pairing and partner inputs (see section 5.3). To
change a source’s mono/stereo attribute, click on the source’s mono/stereo column and select from the pick
list. Certain behaviors of the stereo selection can be set under Main ->Options ->Preferences -> Stereo
Selections (see sec. 7.6.5).
7.2.2.3 Left/Right and Stereo Pairing
When a source is defined as stereo, that source is defined as the left member of the pair. The next input in
sequence is defined as the right member of the pair. The names of the two sources are changed to name L
and name R. Both the left/right and stereo pairing attributes are changeable. Click on the column and choose
from the pick lists. This means that you can define an input as stereo, then pair it with any other audio source
you choose. Certain behaviors of the stereo selection can be set under Main ->Options ->Preferences ->
Stereo Selections (see sec. 7.6.5).
7.2.2.4 Volume
This column sets the maximum possible level of an audio input. Doubleclick on a volume cell and a small
slider and text box appear. Enter the desired value with either the slider or with direct text entry. This value
controls the virtual VCA on the input, meaning that this setting effects the entire input row. A typical use for
this control is to lower the level of a particularly hot input across the whole matrix. When you set the maximum volume for an input that is part of a stereo pair, the volume for the other half of the pair is set automatically to the same value.
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M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
7.2.2.5 Pan
The pan control for an input depends on whether the input is defined as mono or stereo:
7.2.2.5.1 Mono Panning
The input pan control takes a single mono input and by use of a virtual potentiometer, distributes the input to
a pair of outputs. The input control pan is used only with monaural inputs.
A value of 0 on the control will send the input entirely to the left output, and nothing to the right
output. A value of 255 will send the input entirely to the right output and nothing to the left output. The
default value of 127 (center) sends the input equally to left and right outputs. As the slider moves the relative
size of the speaker icons shows the relative volume of the left and right side outputs. See also section 8.4.2
7.2.2.5.2 Stereo Panning
The stereo pan control is used for narrowing or reversing a stereo input signal between two stereo outputs
on the matrix. The control acts like a pair of linked potentiometers; e.g. any change to the pot on one input
causes a corresponding change to the other member of the stereo pair. The action of the control allows full
stereo separation of the two input signals, a summed mix of the two input signals to both outputs, and a
complete stereo reversal of the two inputs. The value of the pots can be set at any value between 0 and
255. The input width control is used with stereo input pairs only. As the slider is moved the speaker icons
grow and shrink to show relative volume and the Left and Right icons move toward and away from each
other to show the changing “width” of the stereo separation. See also section 8.4.1
7.2.2.6 Add/Delete 8 Sources
Clicking the “Add 8 Sources” button informs the matrix that you wish your matrix expanded by eight inputs.
The new 8 inputs will appear with default names below the first eight. You can add sources in groups of
eight up to a total of 128 sources. The “Remove 8 Sources” button always removes the bottom eight
sources. You cannot delete the first eight sources.
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7.2.3 Mic/Line Cards
A mic/line card is an optional eight channel preamplifier card that allows the optimization of input signals for
the M-series matrix.
7.2.3.1 Adding a Mic/Line Card
To add a mic/line card, click on the “Gain” column of any input in the group of eight the mic/line card will
serve. This activates the “Add Mic/Line” button. Click that button and eight channels of gain will be added.
Mic/Line cards are always added from the top and deleted from the bottom.
7.2.3.2 Deleting a Mic/Line Card
To delete a mic/line card, click on the “Remove Mic/Line” button. Mic/Line cards are always added from
the top and deleted from the bottom.
7.2.3.3 Setting/Monitoring a Mic/Line Card
All eight channels of a mic line card are configurable independently. To configure a channel on a mic/line
card, double click on the gain column of the channel to be changed. The screen below appears.
At any time this screen can be used to monitor the signal present on the selected channel. If you use this
feature disable your screen saver since it will interfere with signal monitoring.
7.2.3.4 Gain Setting
There are four gain ranges available. Click on the radio button next to the one desired for this channel.
7.2.3.5 Phantom Power
Phantom power is a DC voltage supplied to certain microphones. If this channel requires phantom power,
click the “on” radio button. Note that the Phantom Power selector is only active when Gain range is set to
“mic” or “manual”. When the manual range is selected, the trim pot locate directly below that input channel
on the rear panel becomes active. It can be accessed and adjusted with a jeweler’s screwdriver
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7.2.4 Audio Outputs
This screen allows the configuration of audio outputs, including names, and stereo/mono status.
7.2.4.1 Naming Audio Outputs
To name an audio output click on the name to be changed, type the new name and press Enter.
7.2.4.2 Output Mono/Stereo Selection
Each audio output can be either monaural or stereo. Stereo outputs occupy two matrix outputs. To
change a source’s mono/stereo attribute, click on the source’s mono/stereo column and select from the pick
list. When you change an output to stereo, the software assigns left/right pairing and partner inputs (see
section 5.3) for details.
7.2.4.3 Left/Right and Stereo Pairing
When a source is defined as stereo, that source is defined as the left member of the pair. The next input in
sequence is defined as the right member of the pair. The names of the two sources are changed to name L
and name R. Both the left/right and stereo pairing attributes are changeable. Click on the column and choose
from the pick lists. Certain behaviors of the stereo selection can be set under Main ->Options ->Preferences -> Stereo Selections (see sec. 7.6.5).
7.2.4.4 Volume
This column sets the maximum possible level of an audio output. This value controls the virtual VCA on the
output, meaning that this setting effects the entire output column. A typical use for this control is to lower the
level of a particularly hot output across the whole matrix.
7.2.4.5 Balance
When an output is defined as stereo, that output’s balance control is activated. When you click on the
balance control a balance screen appears. Use the slider or the three predefined buttons to set the output
balance as desired.
7.2.4.6 Add/Delete Outputs
Clicking the “Add 8 Sources” button informs the wizard that you wish your matrix expanded by eight
outputs. The new 8 outputs will appear with default names below the first eight. You can add outputs in
groups of eight up to a total of 128 outputs. The “Remove 8 Outputs” button always removes the bottom
eight outputs. You cannot delete the first eight outputs, so if your design has only eight outputs, the “Remove 8 Outputs” button will be disabled.
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7.2.5 System Preset Manager
The preset manager (shown below) allows for the creation, modification and invocation of presets in the Mseries matrix. There can be up to 128 separate presets.
7.2.5.1 Adding A Preset
To add a preset, click the “New Preset” button, type the new preset name in the adjacent text box and click
“OK”. The new name appears on the “View Preset” list and the “Copy to Preset” lists.
7.2.5.2 Changing Crosspoint Values
To change an audio level at a crosspoint, click on the crosspoint. A small slider and a text box appear.
Either use the slider or direct text entry to set the desired value. Rightclicking a cell displays a popup menu
of crosspoint operations.
7.2.5.3 Crossfade Time
The crossfade time is the amount of time taken to ramp from the current value of the crosspoints to the
values in a preset when the preset is invoked. This time can be set to any value between 0 seconds (slam)
and 30 seconds (very slow fade). Use the up/down arrows, or direct text entry (and the “Enter” key) to set
the crossfade value. Each of the 128 presets has its own crossfade value.
7.2.5.4 Navigating Through Presets
You can display, modify, copy or invoke any of the 128 presets in the M-series Matrix. Each preset has a
name. To view a preset open the pick list labelled “View Preset”. A preset does not exist until it has been
named.
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7.2.5.5 View
There are three view options. They determine how the crosspoint values are displayed. They include:
Percent: Displays values in percent of full volume. Range is 0%-100%
dB: Displays values in dB. Range is 0 dB (full on) to -100 dB (full off)
RS232 values: Displays values as a numeric value from 0 (full on) to 255 (full off).
7.2.5.6 Copy to Another Preset
This button allows you to save the currently displayed configuration as a preset. Select the target preset
from the “Copy to Another Preset” pick list select the preset to create. You may overwrite presets as
desired.
7.2.5.7 Copy from Live
This button allows you to save the currently live configuration as a preset. Click on the “Copy from Live”
button, and from the pick list select the preset to create. You may overwrite presets as desired. This button
is disabled if you are not connected to a matrix.
7.2.5.8 Invoke
This button invokes a preset. That is, the currently displayed preset ramps up at its audio ramp time and
replaces the current configuration. Clicking this button will display a pick list of all presets, select one by
clicking it. This button will be disabled if you are not connected to a physical matrix.
7.2.5.9 All No Change/All Off/All On
These three buttons make it easy to make global changes to all crosspoints in a preset. Each causes the
named effect: all crosspoints are changed to either off (-100 dB), On (0 dB) or to the no change state. No
change means that any crosspoint with its no change parameter set leave unchanged whatever destination it
is copied to. These functions speed up the process of creating new presets from existing ones.
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7.2.6 Logic Port
The M-series matrix allows the triggering of presets by external contact closure, and monitoring of active
triggers. This is accomplished through input/output pins on the PCMCIA logic port connector card on the
rear panel.. The preset trigger screen (shown below) allows setup of the preset trigger function.
7.2.6.1 Preset Select
This column allows the selection of a preset to be triggered by each pin. To select a preset to be triggered
by a pin, click on the “Preset” column for that pin. Make a selection from the resulting pick list. This preset
will now be invoked whenever this input pin goes active.
7.2.6.2 The State Column
This column reads either open or closed and indicates the current state of that input pin on the DB-25 (units
built before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA. If you are connected to an M-series matrix, you can doubleclick on a
the state column to simulate toggling that source pin.
7.2.6.3 The Indicators Panel
The table in the right hand pane of the window shows the current state of the output pins on the DB-25
(units built before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA connector. If you are connected to M-series hardware, you can
double click these indicators to toggle the actual pins. Any active output pin turns red on the drawing of the
DB-25 (units built before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA connector.
7.2.6.4 Pinout
At the bottom of the screen is a drawing showing the pinout of the connector . The pins on this screen
change colors when they are activated. This pinout is shown below.
7.2.7 Schedule Events
For a full explanation of the M-Series Event Scheduler please refer to section 8.0.
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7.3 The Reports Menu
The reports menu allows access to printable reports on all the configuration screens, the DB-25 (units built
before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA connector and a sales order form.
7.3.1 Sales Order
This form generates an order for the hardware based on your design. The “To” field is fixed in the PC
registry and can be changed, but defaults to the Intelix Order Department. The “Bill To” field is also stored
in the registry, so that you need only fill it in once (but change it if needed). The “Ship To” field defaults to
the “Bill To” field data but can be changed on a file basis. Part numbers and quantities are filled in by the Mseries software automatically, based on the design in the current file.
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7.3.2 Wiring Reports
The Wiring menu item has a submenu as shown below. Each submenu item is a printable report. The report
will be formatted for your default local printer. Select the report you wish to view or print.
7.3.3 All Reports
Selecting this item prints all the reports regarding the design.
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7.4 The Installation Menu
The installation menu contains three items: Installation wizard, Upload/download screen, and Password
screen.
7.4.1 The Hardware Installation Wizard
This item will guide you through the installation and test of a new M-series system. The wizard is treated in
detail in section 6.0.
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7.4.2 Upload/Download Item
This screen allowing reading from the M-series, writing to the M-series.
7.4.2.1 Read Data from the M-series
This item allows the user to load the currently open file with the data from an M-series hooked up to the
PC. There are two requirements for the read data function to work:
a) the PC must already be connected to and communicating with the M-series matrix
b) There must be a file already in the M-series matrix.
After communication is established, the M-series will transfer all its programming to the PC. The
data will be stored in whatever file is open when the “M-series device to PC” command is issued. This can
be an existing file or a new one, as the user wishes. A typical use of upload is to modify an existing M-series
application. The user would transfer the file to the PC; make the modification, and use “Write Data to Mseries” (described below) to send the new configuration back to the M-series.
Note: Before any diagnostic repair or other work, a read operation should be performed followed by a file
save. This ensures that the file can be restored if necessary.
7.4.2.2 Write Data to the M-series
This item allows the user to transfer the current file on the PC to the M-series connected to the PC. After
establishing communication between the PC and the M-series, the PC will send the currently open file to the
M-series, which will store it in its local memory. A typical use of Write Data to PC to M-series device is to
send a new design to the M-series or a new installation.
7.4.2.3 Operation Progress Bars
The current progress bar will label the specific operation being carried out, e. g. read presets. The overall
progress bar will indicate the state of the entire operation of reading or writing the M-series matrix.
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7.5 The Diagnostic Menu
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7.5.1 Communication Diagnostics
The RS232 Diagnostic Screen (shown below) is a grouping of Designer Software functions useful in
troubleshooting problems with the matrix hardware software or application. It contains communication
status and history information and manual RS232 messaging capability. Messages can be examined in
numeric form or decoded to a detailed description of the message. Featured details are explained below.
7.5.1.1 Disconnect Button
The “Disconnect” button provides the functionality to make/break the connection to the matrix. To connect
click “Connect”. To disconnect, click “Disconnect”.
7.5.1.2 Clear Buffer
The “Clear Buffer” button deletes the contents of the RS232 message buffer window. The operation has
no effect on the operation of the matrix. Clearing the buffer becomes necessary when the messages of
interest are scrolled outside of the window’s range.
7.5.1.3 Decode Buffer
The “Decode Buffer” button interprets the numeric strings sent and received by the matrix as ASCII text
and displays the result in a detailed description of the message.
7.5.1.4 Configure
The “Configure ” button is a convenient way to open the Communication Setup screen.
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7.5.1.5 Transmit RS232 Message
The “Transmit RS232 Message” button causes the software to transmit the contents of the “Send Message” window out the currently selected communication port to the matrix. A Windows based programming
tool (InteliTool) is available from Intelix. Message data can be found in the RS232 section starting at section 10.0.
The message window requires the message format shown below.
Message Format:
first number: class number (one decimal number) followed by a space.
second number: message ID (one decimal number) followed by a space.
third and subsequent numbers: message parameters (one decimal number each) each followed by a space.
Note: All numbers are decimal and must be delineated by spaces. Messages with their classes, IDs and
parameters are detailed in this manual. Shown below is an example of a message typed into the message
window ready to send by clicking the Transmit RS232 Message button.
Example: 1 9 0 2 255
This example message represents Class 1, ID 9 Goto I/O Volume. The parameters are i/o flag = 0
(output) i/o number = 2 and new volume = 255. When the Transmit RS232 Message button is preset this
message will be sent to the matrix.
7.5.2 The Device Information Screen
The Device Information Screen displays several sections of information about the matrix. In the Matrix
Mixer Main CPU section is dispayed hardware and software versions, the name, model and serial number
of the matrix. Only the name is alterable.
The ReO section shows status version and state of the ReO (remote) bus. Status can be present/not
present. Version will reflect the current version of the ReO bus controller. If present the state of the ReO bus
can take on either normal or discovery states. If there is no ReO bus, the state will show “Not Present.”
7.5.2.1 The Name of the matrix
The matrix name is a text string of up to 32 characters. You can change the name by clicking on the name,
typing the new name and pressing Enter. The matrix name is for user convenience only, it is never used by
the matrix itself.
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7.5.2.2 Internal Hardware
The Internal Hardware button queries the matrix for its internal configuration and displays it on the screen
shown below.
The screen shows an icon for each of the possible 128 crosspoint boards positions in a matrix system. Each
position will have one of four states: present and passed test; present and failed test; not present or present
and battery low. If you doubleclick on an icon the characteristics of that board position will be displayed.
The screen is scrollable to show all parts of the matrix. This screen will also show any mic/line cards or DSP
cards in the system.
7.5.3 List All Chips
This item shows the names and version numbers of all ROMs in the matrix. This is principly used for system
checking and diagnosis.
7.5.4 Reset
This item is active only if you are connected to a physical matrix. When active, selecting this item causes the
matrix GUI to issue a Class 0 ID 13 message with a 0 parameter. This is a reset command with a preserve
memory parameter. This restarts the embedded matrix application code and is useful if the matrix enters a
bad state or is caught in a loop. This command has exactly the same effect as pressing the reset button on
the matrix rear panel.
7.5.5 Clear Memory
This item is active only if you are connected to a physical matrix. When active, selecting this item causes the
matrix GUI to issue a Class 0 ID 13 message with a 1 parameter. This is a reset command with a clear
memory parameter. You will be prompted to ensure that you don’t clear memory by accident. This message deletes the contents of all internal memory and causes the loss of all program information and internal
variables. Before using this command you should backup your matrix program (using the download
screen Installaton -> Upload/Download). After issuing the clear memory command you must reload
the program to the matrix using the upload screen (Installation -> Upload/Download).
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7.5.6 The Live Crosspoint Screen
The live crosspoint screen allows you to alter the active routing and audio parameters of the audio signals in
the system.
7.5.6.1 Changing Crosspoint Values
To change an audio level at a crosspoint, doubleclick on a crosspoint. A small slider and a text box appear.
Use either the slider or direct text entry to set the desired value.
7.5.6.2 View
There are three view options. They determine how the crosspoint values are displayed. They include:
Percent: Displays values in percent of full volume. Range is 0%-100%
dB: Displays values in dB. Range is 0 dB (full on) to -100 dB (full off) Note: In dB view
mode, crosspoint editing is disabled. This is because in dB (result) view mode, the display is the
summed result of all parameters that effect the crosspoint, including I/O volumes, pan/balance and
the crosspoint value.
RS232 Values: displays values as RS232 values from 0 (full off) to 255 (full on)
7.5.6.3 Show Input/Output Volume
The source column and output rows can be optionally displayed. These crosspoints are used when changing
the audio levels of an entire row or column of the matrix. To display the input volume column, click the
check box for “Input Volume”. To display the output volume row, click the check box for “Output Volume.”
7.5.6.4 Copy to Preset
After a crosspoint configuration has been set up it can be saved for recall at a later time. To save a configuration as a preset, type a preset name in the “Copy to Preset” text box, then click the “Copy” button.
7.5.6.5 Enable Polling
This button enables a constant polling cycle of the live crosspoints to update the screens data. The poll takes
place about every ten seconds. If your matrix is very large, you may wish to turn off polling because of the
long time the poll takes.
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7.5.7 Logic Port Control
The M-series matrix allows the triggering of presets by external contact closure. This is accomplished
through input pins on the DB-25 connector on the rear panel. The preset trigger screen (shown below)
allows setup of the preset trigger function.
7.5.7.1 Preset Select
This column allows the selection of a preset to be triggered by each pin. To select a preset to be triggered
by a pin, click on the “Preset” column for that pin. Make a selection from the resulting pick list. This preset
will now be invoked whenever this input pin goes active.
7.5.7.2 The State Column
This column reads either open or closed and indicates the current state of that input pin on theDB-25 (units
built before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA connector. If you are connected to an M-series matrix, you can
double click on a the state column to simulate toggling that source pin.
7.5.7.3 The Indicators Panel
The table in the right hand pane of the window shows the current state of the output pins on theDB-25 (units
built before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA connector. If you are connected to M-series hardware, you can
double click these indicators to toggle the actual pins. Any active output pin turns red on the drawing of the
DB-25 (units built before 4/1/03) or the PCMCIA connector.
7.5.7.4 Pinout
At the bottom of the screen is a drawing showing the pinout of the connector . The pins on this screen
change colors when they are activated.
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7.5.8 Matrix CPU Error History
This screen is for use by Intelix customer support personnel in troubleshooting customer’s system problems.
It record certain kinds of processor activity. You should never need to access this item unless requested by
Intelix personnel. If you need assistance please call Intelix customer support at 1-800-4MATMIX.
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7.6 The Options Menu
7.6.1 Are You There
A clock in the M-series software periodically (every three seconds) sends a message (Are You There) to
the matrix. This feature allows the software to continually verify the correct communication between the
software and the matrix hardware. When the correct Acknowledgment message (I Am Here) is received,
the software refreshes the connected message in the lower right of the window. If the I Am Here message is
not received, the software assumes a communication failure has occurred and displays the broken link
message.
Normally, the Are You There item should remain active (checked). However when you are doing diagnostic
troubleshooting using the Test manager, you may find that the Are You There messages are filling up the
communication buffer. In this case, simply uncheck the Are You There item for as long as you use the
message buffer, then turn it back on.
7.6.2 Communication Setup
This screen provides for defining a connection from the GUI to an outside device. The screen is shown
below:
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7.6.2.1 Protocols
7.6.2.1.1 Comm Port
Select Com port to use RS232 communication. RS232 is a connectionless packet based communication
standard. This protocol is commonly used when making a connection directly from the matrix GUI to the
matrix. This is also where you configure what port and baud rate your machine is using.
7.6.2.1.2 UDP (User datagram Protocol)
UDP is a connectionless datagram protocol that is supported by the matrix. Whereas TCP sets up a connection and send acknowledgments, UDP does not. UDP can move data very quickly, but TCP guarantees
delivery.
7.6.2.1.3 TCP (Transmission Control Protocol)
The Intelix matrix supports TCP/IP protocol using Berkeley sockets. This protocol is used when making a
connection from the matrix GUI to a matrix installed on a LAN.
7.6.2.1.4 Server Mode
When this item is selected, the matrix is configured to listen for a call from the matrix. If the matrix has the
GUI’s IP address in its callback list, it will attempt to create a connection with the GUI. This item must be
selected for that connection to succeed. If it is not selected, the GUI can initiate a connection to the matrix.
This setting does not affect the matrix’s ability to place calls to addresses on its callback list.
7.6.2.2 Settings
7.6.2.2.1 Local/ Remote
If the local button is selected, the IP address refers to the address of the matrix on the local LAN. If a
remote connection from the GUI to a matrix, click the “remote” button. Now the IP address picklist will
contain any remote addresses that have been configured in the GUI. Select the one you wish to connect to.
In order to associate an address and port number with a device name from the pick list, select a name from
the list, then click the “edit settings” button. If you select the local button, the port number and edit settings
button disappear.
7.6.2.2.2 IP Address
In this field you can enter an IP address to which the matrix GUI should connect.
7.6.2.2.3 Port
In this field you must enter the port number for the device you have selected in the IP address pick list.
7.6.2.2.4 Properties
There are two variable properties associated with trying to create a connection: timeout and retries. These
properties determine how the matrix GUI handles messages that receive no response.
7.6.2.2.4.1 Timeout
Retries is calibrated in milliseconds and is the amount of time the matrix GUI will wait for a response to an
application level message before it tries to resend the message.
7.6.2.2.4.2 Retries
The retry variable sets how many times the matrix GUI will send an application level message when it gets
no response (after the time set by the timeout property).
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7.6.2.2.5 Version Information
The matrix GUI supports two Intelix message formats. Version 3 covers all non networked matrix products.
Version 4 covers all networkable matrix products. To determine which you have, look at the rear panel of
the matrix. If an Ethernet port is present it is a version 4 matrix. If there is no Ethernet port, it is a version 3
matrix. The location of the Ethernet port is shown below.
Ethernet RJ45 port
7.6.2.2.6 Connect Button
This button causes the matrix GUI to attempt to create the connection defined on this screen by the protocol
selection and IP address. If a connection exists, the button becomes “Disconnect”.
7.6.2.2.7 Find Devices Button
This button changes function depending on what protocol has been selected (see sec. 7.6.2.1) When a
network protocol has been selected (TCP or UDP) the button causes the GUI to search the LAN for
Intelix devices. If Comm Port protocol has been selected, the button (labelled “Auto Connect”) will try to
connect through the specified port. If the specified connection fails, it will step through all available ports and
baud rates attempting to connect.
7.6.2.2.8 Edit Settings Button
This button is only available when the remote radio button is selected. This button displays a screen that
allows you to associate an IP address and port number with the device name selected in the IP address pick
list.
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7.6.3 Device LAN Setup
This screen alows you to configure your matrix Ethernet interface in the way most efficient for your system.
7.6.3.3.1 Name
This field holds the name of the Intelix device. Intelix names default to the unit’s serial number, but can be
changed by the user.
7.6.3.3.2 IP Address
This field displays the address of the device on the LAN. This address may be temporary (the DHCP box is
checked) permanent (the DHCP box is unchecked) or null (all 0s). If the address is null you must assign the
matrix an address or no communication outside this screen can take place.To assign a fixed address, type
the address in the IP address field and uncheck the DHCP check box. To use a DHCP server to assign
the address, leave the address at 0 and turn on your network server’s DHCP server, then reboot the matrix.
You should now see a DHCP assigned non-zero address.
7.6.3.3.3 Subnet Mask
The subnet mask determines which parts of the IP address are used to define the Intelix device on the
network.
7.6.3.3.4 Default Gateway
The user should fill this field with the gateway address of the system. No gateway address is needed unless
you need to access the device from outside the LAN on which it resides.
7.6.3.3.5 Use DHCP checkbox
The DHCP checkbox determines whether or not you wish the LAN’s DHCP server to assign a temporary
address to the matrix. If the checkbox is checked, the matrix will request a DHCP address on every
powerup. If the box is unchecked, you must provide a permanent IP address to the matrix in order to
connect to it over the LAN.
7.6.3.3.6 Assign Button
This button must be pressed in order for the settings in the information panel to be transmitted to the matrix.
7.6.4. Connection List Setup
This item can only be accessed when connected to a matrix over a LAN. When selected it displays the
screen below. It is used for setting up the matrix as a server, and for configuring the authorized client list.
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7.6.4.1 Authorized Client List
The Authorized client list acts like a simple firewall. If the list has no addresses, the firewall is disabled. If the
list is non zero, the Device will accept new connections and UDP messages only from source IP addresses
in the list. All others will be ignored. Existing connections will be maintained until terminated.
7.6.4.1.1 Add Authorized Client
Although existing connections will be maintained until terminated, it is prudent that the first address added is
your own. IP addresses can then be added as desired
7.6.4.1.2 Remove Authorized Client
You can delete authorized client addresses as convenient, but although existing connections will be maintained until terminated it is prudent that the last address delete be your own.
7.6.4.2 Callback List
When there are any entries in the callback list, the matrix to become a server which repeatedly (every 5
seconds) calls the IP address in the callback list until a connection is made. This feature is useful when
monitoring/operating a matrix from a remote site. To take the matrix out of server mode, you must delete or
disable the entry(ies) from the callback list. If you intend to use the event schedule feature to initiate call out
events, the target must already be in the call back list.
7.6.4.2.1 Add Callback
The Add button will not be active until you have entered an IP address and port number. To make an entry
to the matrix’s callout list, you must be connected to a matrix. Then click in the callback IP text box and
type the target IP address. Now enter a port number in the port number text box. Now the Add button will
be enabled; click add and click the enable check box
7.6.4.2.2 Remove Callback
Select the entry to be deleted; the Remove button is enabled. Use this button to remove an IP address from
the matrix’s callback list. When the last entry on the callback list, the matrix will cease attempting to initiate
connections.
7.6.5 Preferences
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M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
7.6.5.1 DSP Option Tab
The DSP options tab is not currently active.
7.6.5.2 Stereo Partner Selections
The Stereo Selections Tab allow the customization of stereo partner selection.
Stereo Partner Selection allows the choice of grouping stereo pairs together on the audio sources
screen, or leaving them in their current position. This option is provided to facilitate adding a stereo source
late in the project without having to rewire the matrix rear panel. If you have designed and wired the system
and later discover that you need to change an audio source from mono to stereo, you have two choices. By
selecting the “rearrange sources to be grouped together” option, you must add the new audio source at the
bottom of the list of matrix inputs (this assumes that you have an open audio input on the matrix). This
requires moving all cables from the new source downwards on the rear panel connectors. On the other hand
by selecting option “leave both sources at current positions” You need merely to add the new audio source
at the bottom of the list of matrix inputs; that is connect the new source to the first open connector on the
matrix. No other rewiring is necessary.
As a rule of thumb if you are at the design stage and have not wired the audio sources to the matrix
rear panel, you should select the option of “rearrange sources to be grouped together”. On the other hand, if
you have already wired the rear panel, you should select the option of “leave both sources at current
positions”. This avoids having to move source cables down the matrix.
7.6.6 Upgrade Flash
This item allows you to update the firmware of the Intelix matrix. You will be prompted for a file name. If
you are upgrading the flash memory for the main CPU, the file must be of type .fls. If you are upgrading
DSP flash memory, the file must be of type .fld. After you have selected a file, the matrix GUI will begin to
upload the file to the matrix. You will see a progress bar for the upload. When it is finished you will be
prompted for a restart.
7.6.6 System Recovery
This item allows recovery from a corrupted machine state. You must have an RS232 connection to the
matrix to procede with the recovery operation. The screen below will prompt you to establish a connection.
You then click “contine” button.
M-series User Manual – Windows Reference
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M-series - E User Manual – Event Scheduler
8.0 The Event Scheduler
This section explains the operation of the Intelix M-Series - E event scheduler. The M-series
matrix allows the triggering of events based on a real time clock/calendar. This feature allows you to
schedule certain events on a minute, hourly, daily, monthly or yearly schedule. The Event Scheduler
allows the user to set up the M-Series - E to trigger or undertake actions at a specified time in a
specified way without the need for human presence or intervention. Examples of such actions include changing crosspoint and I/O volume, invoking presets, initiating Ethernet connections and
other tasks. A generic event is also provided to cover unusual requirements. In this section are
explanations of how to accomplish these things and examples of each.
The Event Scheduler maintains a queue of scheduled events in the matrix memory and each
event is triggered as its time arrives. Events that are set up to occur more than once are returned to
the queue for the next occurance.
8.1 Starting and Running the Scheduler
8.1.1 Starting the Scheduler Software
In the M-Series - E GUI, the scheduler is under Main Menu -> Configuration -> Schedule
Events. Click this menu item, and the screen shown below will appear.
8.1.2 Scheduling Events
You will need to perform two major steps to use the Event Scheduler, setting the system date/
time and scheduling the event.
8.1.3 Setting System Date and Time
The set system time controls allow you to set the calendar and clocks functions in the M-series
Matrix. Set the date and time box to the desired settings, then click the “Set Time” button. The Mseries matrix will be updated with the new date/time. If you wish to monitor the M-series calendar
clock, click the “Poll System Time” check box. At the cost of increasing messaging traffic on the Mseries bus, you can watch the M-series clock advance (at a 1 second granularity). If you are connected to a matrix when the Schedule Events menu item is first selected, the M-series Matrix is
queried for its system time, which is displayed on this screen as “Approximate System Time”. If you
are not connected to a matrix, the system time is indeterminate.
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M-series - E User Manual – Event Scheduler
8.1.4 Scheduling a New Event
To add an event to the M-Series - E matrix scheduling queue, click the “New Button on the
scheduler screen. The screen below is displayed. Several items must be set to create a new scheduled
event; you must set an event name, the interval, the start date and start time, the event to be scheduled and the details of that action. All these are discussed below.
8.1.4.1 Name the Event
Select a name by which the schedule event will be known. An example is “Elk’s Lodge Preset”.
Type the name in the name text box. This is the name that will appear in the GUI’s event list.
8.1.4.2 Select the Interval
This selection determines at what interval the scheduled event will take place. From the Select
Interval pick list, chose the interval at which this event should occur. Possible selections are Once,
every second, every minute, every hour, every day, weekly, monthly or yearly. A selection of Once
causes the event to occur one time and never again. This field can be altered for an existing event if
you change your mind about the interval. Setting an interval activates the “Advanced” field which is
discussed in section 8.1.4.5.
8.1.4.3 Start Date and Time
In these boxes, enter the time and date of the first desired occurance of the event.
8.1.4.4 Action
This selection defines what action this event will cause. The action pick list contains all events
that can be sheduled by the M-series Matrix. The list explicitly contains all the events that are likely
to be scheduled: Invoke a preset, copy a preset, ramp a crosspoint volume, ramp an i/o volume, set
TCP callout status, simulate logic port input, and set logic port output. In addition there is a generic
event selection that allows the scheduling of any event of which the matrix is capable. This special
case is discussed below (section 8.2.4).
8.1.4.5 Advanced
When you specify an interval for the scheduled event (section 8.1.4.2), the advanced controls
appear. These controls enable you to add multiple occurances of this event without creating new
events. In a simple example, assume that the Elks meet every Tuesday and that an event to trigger
the Elk’s preset at 7 PM on Tuesday is present. Now further assume that the Elks decide to meet on
Saturday as well as Tuesday. Instead of adding a new event for the Saturday meeting, you simply
click Tuesday and Saturday under the Advanced section. The events will now automatically occur on
Tuesdays and Saturdays. If the Elks want a time other than 7 PM on Saturday, a new event is required. Similar advanced selections are available for most interval selections.
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M-series - E User Manual – Event Scheduler
8.2 Scheduler Examples
Shown below are several of the most common uses of the scheduler.
8.2.1 Invoke Preset Example
Assume that the Elks Club meets at 7 PM every Tuesday in your facility. They have requested
specific audio configurations that have been set up and stored in preset #1. We wish that the Elk’s
preset be automatically triggered and ready to use at 7 PM every Tuesday. Follow the steps below:
1) Open the event scheduler from Main ->Configuration -> Schedule Events.
2) Click the “New” button.
3) In the “Event name” box enter the name “Elks Preset”.
4) From the Interval pick list, select “Weekly”. You will see the Advanced section open. Check
the box for Tuesday.
5) Set the start date to the date of next Tuesday.
6) Set the start time to 6:59 PM. This leaves a minute if you want to check on the event before
your customers begin using it.
7) Open the “Action” pick list and select invoke preset.
8) Click the “Parameters” button. You will be prompted for the preset to be invoked. Select
preset #1.
9) Click OK.Your Elk club preset event is now completely set up.
10) If there are changes needed to this event, such as changing the time, interval, open the
Scheduler (Main ->Configuration -> Schedule Events, click on the Elk’s Club Preset then
click the “Properties” button. You will be taken to the event screen where you can make the
desired modifications.
8.2.2 Ramp Crosspoint to Volume Example
You may wish to change the volume of a particular matrix crosspoint, for example if an audio
setup needs to be louder during rush hour. We say for this example that the food court audio
crosspoint at input 1 and output 5 need to be changed to 100% at 5 PM every day except on weekends. Follow these steps:
1) Open the event scheduler from Main ->Configuration -> Schedule Events.
2) Click the “New” button.
3) In the “Event name” box enter the name “Food Court 5 PM”.
4) From the Interval pick list, select “Weekly”. You will see the Advanced section open.
5) In the advanced section check each day you wish this change to take place. In this example
you check Monday,Tuesday,Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.
6) Set the start date to the first date you wish the action to take place.
7) Set the start time to 5 PM.
8) Open the “Action” pick list and select Ramp Crosspoint to Volume.
9) Click the “Parameters” button. You will be prompted for three data items, the source/output
pair and the target volume. For this example the source is 1 and the output is 5. The maximum
volume is 0 (the matrix is an attenuation controller, so 0 dB of attenuation passes the maximum
volume).
10) Click OK.Your food court event is now completely set up.
12) If there are changes needed to this event, (such as changing the time, or active days), open
the Scheduler (Main ->Configuration -> Schedule Events, click on the Food Court Event then
click the “Properties” button. You will be taken to the event screen where you can make the
desired modifications.
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M-series - E User Manual – Event Scheduler
8.2.3 Set Logic Port Output Example
You may wish to flip the state of a matrix logic port output. This can be useful if you wish to
trigger external equipment at a specific time of day. We say for this example that a message repeater
(connected to logic port output 5) needs to be turned on via a high signal on its logic input at 8 AM
on Saturday and Sunday. Follow these steps:
1) Open the event scheduler from Main -> Configuration -> Schedule Events.
2) Click the “New” button.
3) In the “Event name” box enter the name “Message Repeater”.
4) From the Interval pick list, select “Weekly”. You will see the Advanced section open.
5) In the advanced section check each day you wish this change to take place. In this example
you check Saturday and Sunday.
6) Set the start date to the first date you wish the action to take place.
7) Set the start time to 8 AM.
8) Open the “Action” pick list and select “Set Logic Port Output”.
9) Click the “Parameters” button. You will be prompted for the number of the output you wish
to toggle, the polarity you want the output to switch to. Select output 5 and high.
10) Click OK. Your food court event is now completely set up.
12) If there are changes needed to this event, (such as changing the time, or active days), open
the Scheduler (Main ->Configuration -> Schedule Events, click on the Food Court Event then
click the “Properties” button. You will be taken to the event screen where you can make the
desired modifications.
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M-series - E User Manual – Event Scheduler
8.2.4 Set TCP Callout Status Example
You may wish instruct the matrix to call your office at 9 AM on the first of every month. This
can be done by configuring a TCP callout event. If you set up a callout event you must set up a
corresponding TCP disable event to prevent the matrix from trying forever to create the connection.
To do this follow these steps:
1) Make certain that the connection you wish to schedule is already defined in the matrix under
Main -> Options -> Client/Callback Setup. See Section 7.6.4.2
2) Open the event scheduler from Main ->Configuration -> Schedule Events.
3) Click the “New” button.
4) In the “Event name” box enter the name “Monthly Service Call”.
5) From the Interval pick list, select “Yearly”.
6) In the advance section a list of months appear. Check every month.
7) Set the start date to the 1st of the next month.
8) Set the start time to 9:00 AM.
9) Open the “Action” pick list and select “TCP Callout Status”.
10) Click the “Parameters” button. You will be prompted for an IP address and a port number.
You must already have set these parameters up in the matrix GUI as explained in step 1.
Enter the IP and port number for your office. Select the Enable radio button.
11) Click OK. Your TCP callout event is now completely set up. At 8 AM on the first of
every month the matrix will attempt every 10 seconds to make a contact with the specified IP
address. It will continue to attempt the connection until a disable Callout event occurs.
12) You must create another event disabling the callout event or it will go on attempting to
create the connection indefinitely. Create a new event just like this one named Cancel
Monthly Service Call, and under parameters (step 9) select the Disable radio button. Set the
time of the event to create whatever window of time you wish. That is, if you set the disable
event for the first of every month at 5 PM, you will have a connection window of the entire
work day of the first of each month. If however you set the disable event for 8:10 AM, you
will need to be in the office and have the M-Series-E GUI running during that 10 minute
window on the first of every month.
8.2.5 Generic Message Example
The M-Series-E event scheduler is capable of scheduling any event that the M-series can perform. This is done by referencing the class, ID and parameter list of the message you wish to execute
on schedule. For this information you need either an Intelix RS232 programming manual for the MSeries or a copy of the Intelix InteliTool programming tool (which will automatically generate the
required strings). To demonstrate the creation of a generic message by hand, we choose Ramp
Crosspoint Using a New Ramp Time. This message is similar to the one already demonstrated in
section 8.2.2 Ramp Crosspoint to Volume Example. In that example the crosspoint ramped to the
new volume using the existing ramp time. This slightly more complex example performs the same
action but does so at a new ramp time contained in the message. To do this follow the steps below:
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M-series - E User Manual – Event Scheduler
1) Open the event scheduler from Main -> Configuration -> Schedule Events.
2) Click the “New” button.
4) In the “Event name” box enter the name “Ramp Crosspoint With New Ramp Time”.
4) From the Interval pick list, select “Weekly”. You will see the Advanced section open.
5) In the Advanced section check each day you wish this change to take place. In this example
you check Monday,Tuesday,Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.
6) Set the start date to the first date you wish the action to take place.
7) Set the start time to 5 PM.
8) Open the “Action” pick list and select “Generic Event”.
10) Click the “Parameters” button. You will be given a text box in which to enter the string
that defines your message. In our example, the message and ID of the Ramp_xptvol_new
message are 2 5 followed by the parameters input, output a target volume and a two byte
ramp time. In this example we set the message to act on crosspoint input/output 2/5, a target
volume of 100% and a ramp time of ten seconds. These parameters are defined in the follow
ing string (all values are dlimited by spaces):
2 5 2 5 255 39 16
11)When this string is entered in the text box on the Parameter screen, Click OK. The generic
event is now completely set up.
8.3 Scheduler Display
When the scheduler queue in the matrix is first read (when the Scheduler is opened) all events
that exist in the queue are read out of the matrix and forward calculated to correctly display the
Occurs On date/time column. The last run column will also accurately reflect the last time the event
actually ran (not the last time it was scheduled to run). This means that if for any reason (say a power
failure) an event did not occur as scheduled , that condition can be detected. The scheduler screen
with scheduled events (the examples in this manual) displayed is shown below.
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M-series User Manual – Stereo
9.0 Stereo I/O control
Your Intelix matrix allows a great deal of flexibility when routing and controlling stereo audio. Both inputs
and outputs can be defined as mono or stereo. This gives four possible combinations of inputs and outputs:
1) Mono input to mono output
2) mono input to stereo output
3) stereo input to mono output
4) stereo input to stereo output
In cases 2 and 4, there are input and output controls that can be used to set balance, panning and “width”
of the audio signals. These controls are explained below.
9.1 Input controls
There are two types of input controls: an input width control, and an input pan control. The input width
control is used only for stereo inputs, and the input pan control is used only for mono inputs. Their
internal workings are explained on the following pages.
9.2 Output controls
There is one output control, the output balance control. It is used only with stereo outputs. Mono outputs
have no balance or other control. The output balance control for a stereo output distributes two inputs to
two outputs, in proportion to the setting of the control value.
9.3 Stereo Control Methods
There are two major ways to control stereo functions in the matrix mixer, RS-232 control and GUI control.
Each method is explained below. Both methods are exactly equivalent, that is they both activate the same
hardware features in the matrix mixer. The choice of RS-232 or GUI control is strictly a matter of convenience.
9.3.1 Setting control values with RS-232
The control values for all stereo controls ( input pan control, input width control and output balance control
are set with multiple calls to a single RS-232 command: Set_in_panwidth; this is a Class 1 RS-232
message (ID 14).
The Set_in_panwidth message has a single parameter “pan/width/balance”. The meaning of this parameter
changes depending on the nature of the target. The matrix examines the i/o flag and i/o number to determine
whether the target is an input/output and mono/stereo.
The meaning of the pan/width/balance parameter is determined as follows:
if target is a mono input the meaning is pan
if target is a stereo input the meaning is width
if target is any output the meaning is balance
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M-series User Manual – Stereo
9.3.2 Setting Control Values with the GUI
Stereo control in the matrix mixer GUI live principally on two screens, the audio source screen (Main > Configuration -> Audio Sources) for input panning, and the audi outputs screen (main -> Configuration ->
Audio Outputs) for output balance.
9.3.2.1 Audio Input Panning
On the audio input screen (Main -> Configuration -> Audio Sources) each input has a panning
control. The panning control works differently depending on whether the input is monaural or stereo. If the
input is mono, the panning control (shown below) works as a panning control, that is it distributes the input
to a pair of outputs proportionally to the position of the panning slider. The default button sets panning to
center. The range of slider values from 1-127 correspond to the RS-232 parameter values described in the
RS-232 section below.
9.3.2.2 Audio Input Width
When an audio source is stereo, then the pan control on the audio source screen acts as a width
control. This control acts as a width control on a stereo input pair. Slider positions correspond to normal
stereo (full left), mono (center) and reverse stereo (full right). The range of slider values from 1-127 correspond to the RS-232 parameter values described in the RS-232 section below.
9.3.2.3 Output balance
The output balance control is only available for stereo outputs. The output balance control distributes
two inputs proportionally to the setting of the balance slider control (shown below.)The range of slider
values from 1-127 correspond to the RS-232 parameter values described in the RS-232 section below.
M-series User Manual – Stereo
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M-series User Manual – Stereo
9.4.1 Input width control
The stereo width control is used for narrowing or reversing a stereo input signal between two stereo outputs
on the matrix. The control acts like a pair of linked potentiometers; e.g. any change to the pot on one input
causes a corresponding change to the other member of the stereo pair. The action of the control allow full
stereo separation of the two input signals, a summed mix of the two input signals to both outputs, and a
complete stereo reversal of the two inputs. The value of the pots can be set at any value between 0 and
255. The input width control is used with stereo input pairs only.
The table below shows the result of setting the input width control to a range of values. The default value of
the width control is 0.
control value
0
128
255
70
left bus
left inputl
L+R
R
right bus
right input
L+R
L
Description
normal stereo
mono
reverse stereo
M-series User Manual – Stereo
M-series User Manual – Stereo
9.4.2 Input pan control
As the diagram below shows, the input pan control takes a single mono input and by use of a virtual potentiometer, distributes the input to a pair of outputs. The input control pan is used only with monaural inputs.
A value of 0 on the control will send the input entirely to Tap A, and nothing to Tap B, while a value
of 255 will send the input entirely to Tap B and nothing to Tap A. A value of 127 (center) sends the input
equally to Taps A and B.
The table below shows the result of setting the input pan control to a range of values. The default value for
the control is 127 (centered).
control value
0
127(center)
255
left bus
full signal
[email protected] dB
no signal
M-series User Manual – Stereo
right bus
no signal
[email protected] dB
full signal
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M-series User Manual – Stereo
9.5 Output control
There is one output control, the output balance control. It is used only with stereo outputs. Monaural
outputs have no separate output control. The output balance control takes two inputs and distributes them
to two outputs, in proportion to the setting of the control value. Typical control values and their results are
shown in the table below. The default value for the control is 127 (centered).
control value
0
127(center)
255
72
left bus
full left bus
left bus @-3 dB
no signal
right bus
nothing
right bus @-3 dB
full right bus
M-series User Manual – Stereo
M-series User Manual – Stereo
9.6 Stereo input to stereo output example
This example shows a stereo input pair assigned to a stereo output pair. The input width control allows the
user to define the amount of each member of the input pair to the two output buses; while the output balance
control sets the amount of each bus sent to each member of the output pair.
This table shows the results of extreme control values of 0, 127 (center) and 255.
input control output control left bus
right bus
Left Out
0
0
L
R
L
0
127
L
R
L
0
255
L
R
nothing
127
0
L+R
L+R
L+R
127
127
L+R
L+R
L+R
127
255
L+R
L+R nothing
255
0
R
L
R
255
127
R
L
R
255
255
R
L
nothing
M-series User Manual – Stereo
Right Out
Nothing
R
R
nothing
L+R
L+R
nothing
L
L
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M-series User Manual – Stereo
9.7 Mono input to stereo output example
This example shows a monaural input assigned to a stereo output pair. The input pan control allows the user
to define the amount of the input to the two output buses; while the output balance control sets the amount
of each bus sent to each member of the output pair.
This table shows the results of control values of 0, 127 (center) and 255, when applied to both the input
width control and the output balance control.
input control
0
0
0
127
127
127
255
255
255
74
output control left bus
0
input
127
input
255
input
0
input @-3 dB
127
input @-3 dB
255
input @-3 dB
0
nothing
127
nothing
255
nothing
right bus
nothing
nothing
mothing
input @-3 dB
input @-3 dB
input @-3 dB
input
input
input
Left Out
Input
input @-3 dB
nothing
input @-3 dB
input @-6 dB
nothing
nothing
nothing
nothing
Right Out
Nothing
nothing
nothing
nothing
input @-6 dB
input @-3 dB
nothing
input @-3 dB
input
M-series User Manual – Stereo
M-series User Manual – Stereo
9.8 Mono input to mono output example
When assigning a monaural input to a monaural output, there are no input and output controls other than the
normal crosspoint controls. No pan or balance is possible. Note that the connection dot in the diagram is a
VCA in the Intelix matrix.
9.9 Stereo input to mono output example
When a stereo input pair is assigned to a mono output, no input or output controls are available, except the
normal crosspoint controls which control input and output levels. No panning or balance is possible. Note
that the connection dots in the diagram are VCAs in the Intelix matrix.
M-series User Manual – Stereo
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11.0 RS232 Command Summaries
The following sections show all RS232 control messages that are used to control the M-series matrix
at run time.
Class 0 (Matrix Mixer Messages) summary
Message Name
ID
Are You There
Parameters
0
Size
Range
none
I Am Here
1
none
Reset/clear_device
13
clear memory
1
0-1
Get_input_DSP_info
16
input
1
1-128
Set_device_status_LED
18
device type
I/O location
rate/state
Get_IP_configuration
19
none
Report_of_IP_configuration 20
1 byte
1 byte
1
0-128
0-1
10-255
IP Address State
1 byte
0-2
IP Address
4 bytes
0-255
Subnet Mask
Gateway Address
4 bytes
4 bytes
0-255
0-255
Set IP_address
21
IP Address
Ethernet address
4 bytes
6 bytes
0-255
0-255
Set Gateway_address
22
IP Gateway Address 4 bytes
0-255
Set subnet_mask
23
IP Subnet Mask
4 bytes
0-255
Get_Authorized_IP_clients
24
none
1 Byte
4 Bytes
0-255
Report_of_Authorized_IP_clients 25 Quantity
IP Client
0-255
Class 0 (Matrix Mixer Messages) summary, cont
Message Name
ID
Parameters
Size
Range
Add/Delete_Authorized_IP_client
26
Add/Delete flag
4 bytes
0-255
Get_dedicated_TCP_connections
27
IP client
none
Report_of_dedicated_TCP_connections
28
Quantity
1 byte
0-255
1 byte
Destination IP address
0-1
4 bytes
0-
4.294G
Destination port #
Status
Add/Delete flag
2 bytes
1 byte
IP address
Port #
4 bytes
2 bytes
0-4.294G
0-65535
Enable/Disable_dedicated_TCP_connection 30
Enable/disable flag
IP address
Port #
1 byte
4 bytes
2 bytes
0-1
0-4.294G
0-65535
Confirm
31
Originating Class
Originating ID
1 Byte
1 byte
0-255
0-255
Error
32
Text String code
2 bytes
0-64k
ASCII Text String
20 bytes
ASCII
Add/Delete_Dedicated_TCP_connection
29
0-65535
0-1
1 byte
0-1
Class 1 (Audio Input/Output Messages) summary
Message Name
Ramp_i/ovol_internal
Slew_i/o_vol_internal
Ramp_i/ovol_new
Slew_i/ovol_new
Set_i/ovol
Set_i/otaper
Mute/demute_i/ovol
Assign_iostereopair
ID
Parameters
5
i/o flag
i/o number
target volume
6
i/o flag
i/o number
target volume
Size
Range
1
1
1
0-1
1-129
0-255
1
0-1
1-129
0-255
1
1
2
1
0-1
1-129
0-255
0-30,000
1
1
2
1
0-1
1-129
0-255
1-32640
9
i/o flag
i/o number
current value
1
1
1
0-1
1-129
0-255
10
i/o flag
i/o number
target volume
taper
1
1
1
1
0-1
1-129
0-255
0-2
11
i/o flag
i/o number
mute status
1
1
1
0-1
1-129
0-1
1
1
1
1
0-1
1-129
0-128
0-2
1
1
1
0-1
1-129
0-32
7
i/o flag
i/o number
target
ramp time
8
i/o flag
i/o number
target
slew rate
12
i/o flag
i/o number
stereo partner
is_left
Set_AV_group_audiomember 13
i/o flag
i/o number
video group
1
1
Set_in_panwidth
14
Stop_i/ovol_slewing
Set_multi_i/ovols_same
i/o flag
i/o number
pan/balance
1
1
1
0-1
1-129
0-255
17
i/o flag
i/o number
1
1
0-1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0-1
1-128
0-255
1-128
1-128
1-128
0-1
1-128
1-128
0-255
18
i/o flag
count
Set_multi_iovols
19
value
i/o #1
i/o #2
i/o # [count]
io flag
count
io #1
volume #1
... ...
volume [count]
1
0-1
0-255
Class 2 (Crosspoint Messages) summary
Message Name
ID
Ramp_xptvol_internal
Parameters
Size
Range
3
input
output
target volume
1
1
1
1-129
1-129
0-255
input
output
target volume
1
1
1
1-129
1-129
0-255
Slew_xptvol_internal
4
Ramp_xptvol_new
5
input
output
target value
ramp time
1
1
1
2
1-128
1-128
0-255
0-30,000
Slew_xptvol_new
6
Set_xpt_ramptime
7
input
output
target value
slew rate
input
output
slew rate
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1-128
1-128
0-255
1-32640
1-128
1-128
0-30,000
Set_xptvol
9
input
output
current value
1
1
1
1-128
1-128
0-255
Set_xpt_taper
10
input
output
taper
1
1
1
1-129
1-129
0-1
Mute/demute_xptvol
11
input
output
mute
1
1
1
1-128
1-128
0-1
Stop_xptvolslew
12
input
output
1
1
1-128
1-128
Class 2 summary, cont.
Message Name
ID
Parameters
Size
Range
Set_xptvol_exclusive
13
input
output
level
1
1
1
1-128
1-128
0-255
Set_multi_xptvols
14
count
input 1
output 1
value 1
input 2
output 2
value 2
input n
output n
value n
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1-64
1-129
1-129
0-255
1-129
1-129
0-255
1-129
1-129
0-255
Set_multiple_xptvols_same 15
count
value
input 1
output 1
input n
output n
1
1
1
1
1
1
1-64
0-255
1-129
1-129
1-129
1-129
Class 3 (Audio Preset Messages) summary
Message Name
ID
Parameters
Size
Range
Set_preset_ramptime
5
Set_preset_xptvol
7
preset number
ramp time
input
output
preset number
1
2
1
1
1
value
bitmap
1
1
1-64
0-30,000
1-128
1-128
AVM:1-64
M: 1-128
0-255
0-1
Copy_preset
8
source preset number
destination preset number
1
1
0-64
0-64
Invoke_preset
9
preset number
1
1-64
Copy_live_to_preset
13
destination preset number
preserve
1
1
1-64
0-1
Class 4 (DC Control Messages) summary
Message Name
ID
Parameters
Size
Range
Set_LogicPort_reporting
3
polling
1
0-6
Set_LogicPort_output_state 5
value
1
0-2
Simulate_LogicPort_
input_change
input
new value
1
1
1-8
0-1
7
Class 11 (Mic/Line Messages) summary
Message Name
ID
Parameters
Size
Range
Set_inputch_gain
2
input
range
Phantom Power
1
1
1
1-128
1-4
0-1
Set_inputch_level_reporting 3
input
polling speed
1
1
1-128
0; 50-255
Report_of_inputch_level
input
8
0-42
4
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
10.0 RS-232 Message Protocol
10.1 RS232 Message Fields
All RS232 messages, whether they are transmitted to or from the Matrix Mixer, use the same message
format. Each RS232 message contains five fields. All values are transmitted in hexadecimal format
e.g. 0Ah. For an explanation of transmitting in hexadecimal, please refer to section 10.3.
RS232_START
length (2bytes MSB first) data (1-n bytes) checksum
acknowledge
Communication Details
9600 to 115200 baud
8 data bits
1 stop bit
no parity
DCE unit - straight through RS232 cable
10.1.1 RS-232 Message Fields
The first field of a message is always the RS232_START byte (FAh).
The second field is a 2-byte length, transmitted most significant byte first. The value of the length field is the
number of bytes in the third field, the data field.
The third field, the data field, holds the parameters of the message e.g.
(02h, 03h, 02h, 05h, F2h, 13h, 88h).
The fourth field is a one-byte checksum. The value of the checksum is the additive sum of the bytes in the
first three fields, modulo 256 (the least significant byte).
For example, if the data portion (3rd field) of a message is (2, 3, 2, 5, 239, 19, 136), the length field is (0,
7). The additive sum of the first three fields is (250 + 0 + 7 + 2 + 3 + 2 + 5 + 239 + 19 + 136) = 663 =
297h. The checksum is 663 modulo 256 = 151= 97h.
The checksum feature can be turned off when necessary by setting DIP switch #7 to the down position.
This is recommended to simplify programming when using Crestron or AMX controllers. See section 3.1.
The fifth field is a one-byte acknowledgment field, which is sent by the device which receives the message.
The value of this field is either RS232_ACK (FCh), RS232_BUSY (FDh), or RS232_ERROR (FEh).
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
85
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
10.2 RS-232 Reserved Bytes
The following table lists the bytes which have special meaning in the Intelix Matrix Mixer RS-232 protocol.
Name
RS232_ESCAPE
reserved
RS232_START_V3
reserved
RS232_ACK
RS232_BUSY
RS232_ERROR
unused
Value
F0h
F1h-F9h
FAh
FB
FCh
FDh
FEh
FFh
Meaning
used to transmit data value 240-255
reserved for future needs
first byte of all version 3 messages
reserved
message received and processed
message received but not processed
checksum incorrect; message ignored
unused value; never transmitted
10.3 RS-232 Timing
After a message has been transmitted to the matrix, the matrix will respond with an RS-232_ACK byte
after a delay of 2 milliseconds. If the sent message requires the matrix to return a reply message, the start of
the reply message will begin 1-20 milliseconds after the RS-232_ACK byte. The exact amount of time is
variable depending on the nature of the reply message. These times are independent of baud rate.
To avoid collisions with reply messages, Intelix recommends that your RS-232 controller insert a delay of
approximately 10 milliseconds after messages which do not generate a reply message, and 100 milliseconds
between messages which do.
86
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
10.3 Hexadecimal Transmission
The Intelix Matrix Mixer must receive all message in hexadecimal number code. If messages are transmitted in decimal or ASCII codes, they will fail to work.
Hexadecimal is a base 16 number code that uses numerals 0-10 and letters A, B, C, D, E, F. On the next
page is a conversion table from decimal numbers to hexadecimal. In this document hex numbers are represented in the form “xxh”, where xx are the two hex characters.
10.3.1 Commercial controllers
Most commercial controllers require the use of special codes to represent hex numbers for transmission.
For example, Crestron controllers require the sequence “\xnn” where nn is the hex byte to be sent.
10.3.2 ASCII values
Because computers deal only with numbers, letters must be assigned a numeric code. This code is
called ASCII. When you send commands to the Intelix Matrix Mixer, there is one and only one case when
you use ASCII codes. That case is when you send names. Whenever a name field appears in an example in
this manual, the example is enclosed in quotation marks. Any other use of ASCII values will cause the
command to fail.
For example the command Set Matrix Mixer Name uses as an example name field
“Emmanual Lutheran Church”. The quotes indicate that this data should be sent as ASCII values.
To do this use an ASCII table to obtain the hex value for each character, and transmit these values.
Never transmit the quotation marks.
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87
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
10.5 Byte Escape Sequence
If a byte in the length, data, or checksum fields falls within the range 240h through 255h inclusive, an
escape sequence is used to transmit the value, since those single byte values are reserved. The value is
translated by the sending device into two bytes: the RS232_ESCAPE byte (240) itself, followed by the
difference between the value and the RS232_ESCAPE byte.
value => RS232_ESCAPE, (value - RS232_ESCAPE)
These two bytes are transmitted instead of the single, large-value byte. The receiving device converts the
two bytes back into the original single byte value through simple addition. These operations do not affect
the values of the length or checksum fields.
Note: The escape sequence feature can be disabled if necessary, by putting DIP switch #7 in the
down position. This is recommended when using Crestron or AMX controllers, since it simplifies programming. See section 10.6.
In the following example, the data field of a message is (2, 3, 3, 6, 255). The byte 255 must be “escaped”
into the RS232_ESCAPE byte (240) followed by the difference between 255 and RS232_ESCAPE (255
- 240 = 15 = 0Fh). The bytes actually transmitted are:
RS232_START Length Class Message ID
FAh
00h 05h 02
03h
03h
Input Output
02h
06h
Target Value checksum
F0h, 0Fh
0Ch
Since the second byte of an escape sequence must fall within the range 0 through 15 inclusive, any second
byte outside of that range indicates that a transmission error has occurred, and the message should be
acknowledged by the receiver with RS232_ERROR and ignored.
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M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
3.1 DIP Switches
There are eight DIP switches on the rear panel of the Matrix (see drawing below). For all DIP switches, the
“up” position indicates the “on” condition, and the “down” position the “off” condition. The function of these
switches is shown below.
1 2 3 4 5
reserved
Comm 2
Baud Rate
6 7 8
Comm 1
Baud Rate
9600 Baud
38400 Baud
57600 Baud
115200 Baud
Reserved
No checksum
no Escape byte
Use Checksum
and
Escape byte
DIP switches 1,2 and 8 are reserved for use by Intelix.
Baud Rate Selection
Not all baud rates are available to all revision of the M-series matrices. New matrices support more baud
rates than older ones. The baud rates of 9600 baud and 38400 baud are common to both hardware sets.
To distinguish whether you have an old or new hardware, look at the rear panel if there are two DB-9
connectors you have new hardware. If there is only one DB-9 you have older style hardware. A front panel
RS232 port also indicates new hardware. If you cannot tell which type of hardware you have, use 9600
baud as a default, since all hardware support that rate.
New Hardware baud Rates
The new hardware supports four baud rates: 9600, 38400, 57600, and 155200.
Old Baud Rates
Older hardware supports only three baud rates: 9600, 19200, and 38400.
Port 2 Baud Rates
DIP switches 3 and 4 set the RS232 baud rate of RS232 port comm 2. For available rates see Baud
Rate Selection above. Ports 1 and 2 can have different baud rates if desired. The front panel RS232
connector is paralleled with port 2. Only one device at a time can be connected to port 2; either to the rear
or front panel connector but not both.
Port 1 Baud Rates
DIP switches 5 and 6 set the RS-232 baud rate of RS232 port comm 1. For available rates see Baud
Rate Selection above. Ports 1 and 2 can have different baud rates if desired.
DIP switch 7 allows the RS-232 checksum and “escape” byte to be toggled on or off. These should be
turned off in installations which include a permanent RS-232 controller, such as AMX, Crestron or custom
PC program. The RS-232 checksum and escape byte should be turned on in installations where the RS232 communication may be hindered because of cable length (greater than 50 feet) or lack of shielding from
external electronic noise.
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M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
10.7 Introduction to using the RS-232 Commands
This section introduces three RS-232 commands that are needed to begin programming the M-series. The
three chosen commands will get you started programming the Intelix matrix. Two of the three commands
establish communication, and the third exerts control over a chosen audio crosspoint. After these three
commands are usable you should be able to use the rest of this manual to implement your application.
1) Are You There: This command is sent by the controller to check for the existence of a matrix. If the
matrix receives this message it replies with an I Am Here message.
2) I Am Here: This message is sent by the matrix as a response to the receipt of an Are You There
message. The matrix sends an I Am Here message whenever it is powered up or reset. This fact can be
used as a diagnostic tool when troubleshooting communication, since the matrix can be relied upon to send
the I Am Here message when reset.
3) Set_xptvol: This message sets the attenuation level of an audio crosspoint, and demonstrates control
over the audio matrix after communication has been established.
10.7.1 Are You There
Shown below is the contents of the Are You There message. The format of the message is explained in
section 10.1. The message has no parameters, the length is 2 bytes (1 byte for class, 1 byte for message
ID). The checksum is the sum of all fields: FAh + 2h = FCh.
Since FCh is greater than the RS232 _ESCAPE value of 240, the checksum is “escaped” into
2 bytes (F0h, 0Ch). The escape byte does not effect the length field. The escape process is explained in
section 10.5. Transmitting this message consists of sending the following string of 7 bytes: FAh, 00h, 02h,
00h, 00h, F0h, 0Ch. The meaning of these bytes is shown below.
RS232_START
FAh
data fields
length
class
00h 02h
00h
Checksum
message ID
F0h 0Ch
00h
10.7.2 I Am Here
Shown below is the contents of the I Am Here message. This message is sent by the matrix in
response to an Are You There message. This message is sent whenever the matrix is powered up or reset.
The format of the message is explained in section 10.1. The message has no parameters, the length
is 2 bytes (1 byte for class, 1 byte for message ID). The checksum is the sum of all fields: FAh + 2h + 1h =
FDh. The checksum will be escaped when transmitted by the matrix. Receiving this message consists of
recognizing the following string of 7 bytes: FAh, 00h, 02h, 00h, 01h, F0h, 0Dh. The meaning of these bytes
is shown below.
RS232_START
FAh
90
length
00h 02h
data fields
class
00h
Checksum
message ID
01h
F0h, 0Dh
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
10.7.3 Set_xptvol
The Set_xptvol message allows direct control over the attenuation at a single crosspoint.
To use this message as a control test, select a crosspoint to be set and encode it in the input/output pair.
The example below sets the volume of the crosspoint at input 2 and output 5. The value to which the volume
is set is encoded in the current value parameter. This value can be any value from 0 (full off) to 255 (full on).
The example below sets the crosspoint to 255. Since decimal 255 is hex FF the value is escaped into two
bytes F0h, 0Fh. Sending this message consists of transmitting the following ten bytes: FAh, 00h, 05h, 02h,
0Dh, 02h, 05h, F0h, 0Fh, and 15h. The meaning of these bytes is shown below.
When this message is properly received by the matrix, the current value will be immediately affected, since
this command bypasses ramp time and slew rate. You should immediately hear the change in the level of the
crosspoint. Be sure that your audio source, amplifiers and speakers are all powered and working.
RS232_START
FAh
output
05h
length
00h 05h
data fields
class
02h
message ID
09h
data fields
current value (escaped)
F0h, 0Fh
M-series User’s Manual — RS232 Introduction
input
02h
checksum
14h
91
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Message Details
Class 0: Matrix Mixer Messages
Class 0 messages deal with generic Matrix Mixer information, i.e. information about the Matrix
mixer itself, rather than the audio matrix.
Action Definitions
Each message will be marked with one of the following icons:
Messages that request information from the matrix
Messages that report information from the matrix
Messages that Configure the matrix
Messages to be used by Intelix Developers only.
Messages for Run Time Control; these messages may begin with the
words Goto, Stop, Cancel,
92
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Are You There (ID 0)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Reply:
Notes:
last altered 6/29/00
This message is used as a simple way to verify communication with a Matrix
Mixer.
0
external
none
I Am Here
In the following example, the calculated checksum is 255. Since 255 is
greater than the RS232_ESCAPE value of 240, the checksum is escaped and
transmitted in two bytes (F0h and 0Ch).
Example
RS232_START
length
class
FAh
00h 02h
00h
data fields
Checksum
message ID
0
F0h 0Ch
#0
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
93
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
I Am Here (ID 1)
last altered 6/29/00
This message is sent by the Matrix Mixer as a reply to an Are You There
message. It is also sent when the Matrix Mixer is powered up or reset.
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Reply:
Notes:
1
Matrix Mixer
none
none
the checksum is escaped and
transmitted in two bytes (F0h and 03h).
Example
RS232_START
FAh
length
00h 02h
data fields
class
00h
Checksum
message ID
01h
F0h, 0Dh
00h
#1
94
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
last altered 10/11/02
Description: This message Will cause a warm boot of the entire matrix including the DSP board. The rst/
clr parameter determines whether setup and run data is preserved. A 1 value will cause the
data to be cleared and the matrix to go to a non-application default state. A value of 2 will
clear the application data and cause a default state with out a warm boot.
Warning: If the Matrix Mixer memory is cleared ( a value of 1), all programmed informa
tion will be lost: audio levels, presets, names, and all ReO remote information!
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
13
external
Name
reset/rst+clr
Size Range
1
0-1
Description
0 = reset and preserve memory
1 = reset and clear memory
2 = clear application data only
# 13
Reply:
Class
ID
I Am Here
0
1
Error Reply
Example:
None
RS232_START length
FAh
00h 03h
data fields
class
message ID
reset/rst+clr
00h
0Dh
01h
Checksum
0Bh
Application Layer Frame Example:
reset/rst+clr
1 byte
00h
0Dh
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
01h
95
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Set_device_status_LED (ID 18)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
device type
I/O location
rate/state
last altered 10/21/02
This message sets the status LED for the specified device.
18
external
Size
1 byte
1 byte
1
Range
0-128
0-1
10-255
Description
lowest numbered input of reporting board.
1 = exists
hardware version * 10
# 18
Reply:
none
Example:
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 05h
Device
05h
96
data fields
message ID
class
12h
00h
I/O location
05h
data fields
rate state
checksum
01h
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Get_IP_configuration (ID 19)
This message requests all of the configuration parameters for the TCP/IP Etherenet
port of the matrix. These parameters arre required to operate within a TCP/IP
LAN.
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
last altered 10/18/02
10
matrix
Name
none
Reply:
Notes:
Size Range
Description
Report_of_IP_configuration
This example is an application layer frame example.
# 19
Application Frame Layer Example:
13h
00h
Error Reply:
Class:
Message ID:
0
32
Parameters:
Name
Text String lookup code
ASCII text String
Size
2 bytes
20 bytes
Range
0-64K
any ASCII
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Description
one for each unique text string
“Wrong Mode”
97
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Report_of_IP_configuration (ID 20)
Description:
last altered 10/18/02
This message carries all of the configuration parameters for the TCP/IP Ethernet
port of the matrix. These parameters are required to operate within a TCP/IP.
20
Matrix
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
IP Address State
Size
1 byte
Range
0-2
Description
0 = DHCP Assigned
1 = auto IP address
2 = a fixed IP is assigned
IP Address
4 bytes
0-255
IP address of the form
192.168.1.101.
Subnet Mask
4 bytes
0-255
Subnet mask of the form
255.255.255.0
Gateway Address
4 bytes
0-255
Gateway address of the form
192.168.1.101
# 20
Application Frame Layer Example:
00h
IP address state
1 byte
00h
Reply:
Error Reply:
98
14h
IP address
4 bytes
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh
Subnet Mask
4 bytes
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh
Gateway Address
4 bytes
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh
none
none
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Set IP_address (ID 21)
last altered 10/18/02
This message will permanently set the IP addresses of the device if the Ethernet
address parameter matches the device. The device will test the IP address
before sending the “Confirm” message. The new address becomes effewctive
upon reset of the device.
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
21
Matrix
Size
Range
Description
IP Address
4 bytes
0-255
IP address of the form
192.168.1.101.
Ethernet address
6 bytes
0-255
Ethernet address of the device
Application Layer Frame Example:
15h
00h
Reply:
Name
Confirm
Class
255
# 21
IP Address
4 bytes
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh
6 bytes
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh
ID
10
Error Reply:
Class:
Message ID:
Parameters:
Name
Text String lookup code
ASCII text String
0
32
Size
2 bytes
20 bytes
Range
0-64K
any ASCII
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Description
one for each unique text string
“Wrong Mode”
“Wrong Ethernet Address”
“IP Address in use”
99
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Set Gateway_address (ID 22)
last altered 10/18/02
This message sets the IP Gateway address for the matrix. This address will be
used when the matrix must send a message outside of the local LAN.
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
22
Matrix
IP Gateway Address
Size
Range
Description
4 bytes
0-255
IP address of the form
192.168.1.101
# 22
Application Layer Frame Example:
IP Address
4 bytes
15h
00h
Reply:
Name
Confirm
Class
255
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh
ID
10
Error Reply:
Class:
Message ID:
Parameters:
Name
Text String lookup code
ASCII text String
100
0
32
Size
2 bytes
20 bytes
Range
0-64K
any ASCII
Description
one for each unique text string
“Wrong Mode”
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Set subnet_mask (ID 23)
last altered 10/18/02
This message sets the subnet mask for the matrix.
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
23
Matrix
IP Subnet Mask
Size
Range
Description
4 bytes
0-255
IP address of the form
255.255.255.0
# 23
Application Layer Frame Example:
IP Address
4 bytes
17h
00h
Reply:
Name
Confirm
Class
255
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh
ID
10
Error Reply:
Class:
Message ID:
Parameters:
Name
Text String lookup code
ASCII text String
0
32
Size
2 bytes
20 bytes
Range
0-64K
any ASCII
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Description
one for each unique text string
“Wrong Mode”
101
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Get_Authorized_IP_clients (ID 24)
This message will return all of the IP addresses of the authorized client list. This list
is used as a mini firewall to prevent unauthorized access to the matrix. If the list is
empty, the matrix will respond to a message from any source.
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
last altered 10/21/02
24
external
Name
none
Reply:
Notes:
Size Range
Description
Report_of_Authorized_IP_clients
This example is an application layer frame example.
# 24
Application Frame Layer Example:
18h
00h
Error Reply:
Class:
Message ID:
0
32
Parameters:
Name
Text String lookup code
ASCII text String
102
Size
2 bytes
20 bytes
Range
0-64K
any ASCII
Description
one for each unique text string
“Wrong Mode”
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Report_of_Authorized_IP_clients (ID 25)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
Quantity
IP Client
last altered 10/21/02
This message carries the complete authorized client IP addreess list of the matrix.
25
Matrix
Size
1 Byte
4 Bytes
Range
0-255
0-255
Description
0=None
IP Addresses of clients, 4 bytes per client
Application Frame Layer Example:
Quantity
00h
Reply:
19h
1 byte
Client IP addresses
(4 bytes) x quantity
xxh
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh ...
yyh,yyh,yyh,yyh
none
# 25
Error Reply:
Class:
Message ID:
Parameters:
Name
Text String lookup code
ASCII text String
0
32
Size
2 bytes
20 bytes
Range
0-64K
any ASCII
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Description
one for each unique text string
“Wrong Mode”
103
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Add/Delete_Authorized_IP_client (ID 26)
last altered 10/21/02
This message is used to add or delete an authorized client to the authorized client
list in the matrix. Once the list is non-zero, the matrix will only accept messages
from a xource address in the list. Therefore, the first client address added needs
to be that of the device modifying the list. Likewise, the last address in the list
needs to be of the device performing delete operations to the list. The authorized
client list has a maximum of 256 entries.
26
external
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
Size
Range
Description
Add/Delete flag
1 byte
0-1
0 = delete; 1 = add
IP client
4 bytes
0-255
IP address of client to add/delete
# 26
Application Layer Frame Example:
Add/Del
1 byte
1Ah
00h
Reply:
Name
Confirm
Confirm
Class
255
0-1
Client IP Address
4 bytes
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh
ID
10
Error Reply:
Class:
Message ID:
Parameters:
Name
Text String lookup code
ASCII text String
104
0
32
Size
2 bytes
20 bytes
Range
0-64K
any ASCII
Description
one for each unique text string
“Wrong Mode”
“Does Not Exist”
“List is Full”
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Get_dedicated_TCP_connections (ID 27)
This message will return all of the IP addresses and port numbers of the deicated
TCP connection list. This list defines the destination IP addresses and port numbers
of the outgoing TCP connections. These connwections are established upon various
stimuli.
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
last altered 10/21/02
27
external
Name
none
Reply:
Notes:
Size Range
Description
Report_of_dedicated_TCP_connection
This example is an application layer frame example.
# 27
Application Frame Layer Example:
1Bh
00h
Error Reply:
Class:
Message ID:
255
5
Parameters:
Name
Text String lookup code
ASCII text String
Size
2 bytes
20 bytes
Range
0-64K
any ASCII
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Description
one for each unique text string
“Wrong Mode”
105
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Report_of_dedicated_TCP_connections (ID 28)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
Quantity
This message returns IP addresses and destination port number contained in the
dedicated TCP connections list.
28
Matrix
Destination IP address
Destination port number
Status
Reply:
last altered 10/21/02
Size
1 byte
Range
0-255
4 bytes
2 bytes
1 byte
0-4.294G
0-65535
0-1
Description
number of connections listed; 0 =
none;
Destination IP address
BSD socket destination port #
1 = enabled; 0 = disabled
none
# 28
Application Frame Layer Example:
00h
Quantity
1 byte
1Ch
Destination IP addresses
4 bytes
xxxxxxxxh
xxh
Port #
Status
2 bytes
xxxxh
1 byte
xxh
Error Reply:
Class:
Message ID:
255
5
Parameters:
Name
auto response Error Code
Text String lookup code
ASCII text String
106
Size
1 byte
2 bytes
Range
0-255
0-64K
20 bytes
any ASCII
Description
00h = use text string
one for each unique text
string
“Wrong Mode”
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Add/Delete_Dedicated_TCP_connection (ID 29)
Description:
last altered 10/21/02
This message is used to add or delete a dedicated TCP connection in the matrix.
The connections specified in the list and enabled are established upon powerup of the
matrix. The matrix will continuously attempt to establish the connection until either the
connection is established or the connection is disabled by command. The attempts will
occur periodically. The matrix will begin connection attempts again if a connection is lost/
disrupted. The destination entity must be listening on the specified port number. The
dedicated TCP list has a maximum of 64 entries.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
Size
Range
Description
Add/Delete flag
1 byte
0-1
0 = delete; 1 = add
IP address
Port #
4 bytes
2 bytes
0-4.294G
0-65535
Destination IP address
BSD socket destination port #
29
external
# 29
1Dh
00h
Destination IP Address
Add/Del
1 byte
4 bytes
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh
0-1
Reply:
Name
Confirm
Confirm
Class
255
Port #
2 bytes
xxh,xxh
ID
10
Error Reply:
Class:
255
Message ID:
5
Parameters:
Name
Size
Text String lookup code
2 bytes
ASCII text String
20 bytes
Range
0-64K
any ASCII
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Description
one for each unique text string
“Wrong Mode”
“Does Not Exist”
“List is Full”
107
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Enable/Disable_dedicated_TCP_connection (ID 30)
last altered 10/21/02
This message is used to enable or disable a dedicated TCP connection already
listed in the matrix. The connections specified will be established as soon as the message
is received. The matrix will continuously attempt to establish the connection until either
the connection is established or the connection is disabled by command. The attempts
will occur periodically. The matrix will begin connection attempts again if a connection is
lost/disrupted. The destination entity must be listening on the specified port number. The
dedicated TCP list has a maximum of 64 entries.
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
30
external
Size
Range
Description
Enable/disable flag
1 byte
0-1
0 = disable; 1 = enable
IP address
Port #
4 bytes
2 bytes
0-4.294G
0-65535
destination IP address
BSD socket destination port #
# 30
Application Layer Frame Example:
00h
1Eh
Enable/disable
destination IP Address
1byte
4 bytes
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh
0-1
Reply:
Name
Confirm
Confirm
Class
255
port #
2 bytes
xxh,xxh
ID
10
Error Reply:
Class:
255
Message ID:
5
Parameters:
Name
Size
Text String lookup code
2 bytes
ASCII text String
20 bytes
108
Range
0-64K
any ASCII
Description
one for each unique text string
“Wrong Mode”
“Does Not Exist”
“List is Full”
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Confirm (ID 31)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
This is a generic application confirmation message. It contains the Class and
ID of the message being confirmed. It is sent only after an operation called
for in the originating message is accomplished.
Message ID:
Source:
31
either external or internal
Parameters:
Name
Originating Class
Originating ID
Size
1 Byte
1 byte
Range
0-255
0-255
Description
Class if message being confirmed
ID of message being confirmed
# 31
Application Frame Layer Example:
Originating Message Class
00h
1Fh
1 byte
xxh
Originating Message ID
1byte
xxh
Reply: none
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
109
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
Error (ID 32)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
This message is a general purpose ERROR message sent in response to an
error condition caused by a command message. The message optionally
carries an ASCII text string which can be displayed for users. When not used
this field is 0 filled. A corresponding 2 byte error code field will contain a
code for every defined ASCII text string. This field is to be used in the event
of alternate language translations. A one byte auto response error code field
allows for automated response to certain errors.
Message ID:
Source:
32
internal
Parameters:
Name
Text String lookup code
ASCII Text String
Size
2 bytes
20 bytes
Range
0-64k
ASCII
Description
one for each unique text string
for displayable error messages
# 32
Application Frame Layer Example:
Text String Lookup Code
00h
20h
2 bytes
xxh,xxh
ASCII Text String
20 bytes
“wrong mode”
Reply: none
110
M-series RS232 Programming — Device Messages (Class 0)
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Class 1: Audio Input/Output Messages
Action Definitions
Each message will be marked with one of the following icons:
Messages that request information from the matrix
Messages that report information from the matrix
Messages that Configure the matrix
Messages to be used by Intelix Developers only.
Messages for Run Time Control
The Audio Input/Output Messages deal with generic information about the audio signals
which make up the audio matrix. This information includes overall matrix size (the number of inputs
and outputs). Further there is for each audio input/output there is a 20- byte name and a 1-byte level
multiplier. The multiplier has a value of 0-255, corresponding to 0-100% of the input signal; i.e. it is
an attenuation only multiplier.
I/O flag:
If the i/o flag = 0, then the command is intended for an output.
If the i/o flag = 1. then the message is intended for an input.
The i/o num:
The i/o num specifies the number of the input or output targeted by the message. The i/o num
must be non zero and has a range of 1-129.
Wild Cards
If the i/o num is 129 then the message refers to all inputs or outputs. Not all commands support
the 129 parameter. Wild cards apply only to classes 1, 2, and isolated messages in other classes. An
example of the use of a wild card in a class 1 message is given in the “Set I/O target Using Ramp”
message details (message #5).
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
111
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Ramp_i/ovol_internal (ID 5)
Description:
This message will immediately take an input or output to a specified volusing the existing ramp time(which can be set using message Class 1 #4,
Set_virtual_i/o_parameters).This command supports wild cards.
5
ume,
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
last altered 8/20/02
external
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
target volume
1
0-255
target volume of ramp operation
#5
Reply:
Notes:
none
This example shows the use of a wild card in the i/o number parameter field.
By setting the i/o numberto the wildcard number 129 (81h) all outputs have
their target values set to 128 (80h).
Example:
RS232_START
FAh
length
00h 05h
data fields
class
01h
data fields
i/o num
81h
112
target
80h
message ID
05h
i/o flag
00h
checksum
06h
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Slew_i/ovol_internal (ID 6)
Description:
last altered 8/20/02
This message will immediately take an input or output to a specified volusing the existing slew rate. Slew Rate can be set using message Class 1 #4,
Single I/O Parameters . This command supports wild cards.
6
ume,
Set
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
target volume
1
0-255
target volume of ramp operation
external
#6
Example:
RS232_START
FAh
i/o num
01h
length
00h 05h
data fields
message ID
class
01h
i/o flag
06h
data fields
target
80h
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
01h
checksum
88h
113
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Ramp_i/ovol_new (ID 7)
#7
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets the target volume and ramp time of an input or an output.
Change to volume will take effect immediately. This message supports wild
cards.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
7
external
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
target volume
1
0-255
target volume of ramp operation
ramp time
2
0-30,000
new ramp time (ms)
Example:
Notes: Target value in this example is escaped
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 07h
data fields
message ID
07h
class
01h
data fields
i/o num
0Ah
114
target value
F0h, 0A
ramp time
00h 05h
i/o flag
01h
checksum
13h
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Slew_i/ovol_new (ID 8)
Description:
last altered 8/20/02
This message sets the target value and slew rate of an input or an output.
Change to volume will take effect immediately. This message supports wild
cards.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
8
external
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
target volume
1
0-255
target volume of ramp operation
slew rate
2
0-32640
new slew rate
1 = 3 dB/sec
32640 = 100 dB/millisecond
#8
Example:
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 07h
data fields
message ID i/o flag
08h
01h
class
01h
data fields
i/o num
0Ah
target value
F0h, 0Ah
checksum
ramp time
7Fh 80h
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
0Eh
115
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Set_i/ovol (ID 9)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets the current volume parameter of a single specified “virtual
VCA”. The new value takes effect immediately.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
9
external
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
current volume
1
0-255
new volume to set
#9
Example:
RS232_START
FAh
length
00h 05h
data fields
class
message ID
01h
09h
data fields
i/o flag
00h
116
i/o num
03h
current value
F0h, 0Fh
checksum
0Bh
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Set_i/otaper (ID 10)
Description:
channel.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
last altered 8/20/02
This message sets the audio taper of the virtual VCA of an input or output
10
external
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
target volume
1
0-255
target volume of ramp operation
taper
1
0-2
0 = linear’ 1 = log taper
# 10
Example:
RS232_START
FAh
i/o num
05h
data fields
length
class
00h 05h
01h
message ID
i/o flag
0Ah
data fields
curve index
00h
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
00h
checksum
0Fh
117
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Mute/demute_iovol (ID 11)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets the mute switch of all crosspoints that are tied to the input
or output. The matrix “remembers” the value present at mute time, so a
demute restores the value current at the time of muting.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
11
external
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
mute status
1
0-1
0 = demute; 1 = mute
# 11
Example:
RS232_START
FAh
length
00h 05h
data fields
message ID
class
01h
0Bh
data fields
i/o flag
01h
118
i/o num
03h
checksum
mute status
00h
0Fh
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Assign_i/ostereopair (ID 12)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
last altered 8/20/02
This message links a pair of inputs or outputs as a stereo pair. This
command performs all mirroring and unlinking required by the command. The i/o
num parameter specifies the first input or output of a stereo pair, while the stereo
partner specifies the second. The is_left parameter affects the io num parameter.
12
external
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
stereo partner
1
0-128
0 = mono
is_left_channel
1
0-1
1 = left
# 12
Example:
data fields
RS232_START
length
class
FAh
00h 06h
01h
message ID i/o flag
data fields
i/o num
0Ah
stereo partner
0Bh
01h
0Ch
checksum
is_left_channel
01h
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
24h
119
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Set AV_group_audiomember (ID 13)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets the video group membership for an audio input or output, in an
AVM matrix.
Class:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
1
13
external
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
video group
1
0-32
0 = none
# 13
Example: This example sets output number 5 to be a member of video group number 1.
RS232_START
FAh
i/o num
05h
120
length
00h 05h
data fields
class
01h
data fields
video group
01h
message ID
0Dh
i/o flag
00h
checksum
13h
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Set_in_panwidth (ID 14)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets either input pan values or output balance.For a complete
explanation of the operation of stereo pan and balance see the section
“Stereo I/O control”.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
14
external
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
pan/width/balance
1
0-255
0 = left
255 = right
127 = center
or
0 = stereo
127 = mono
255 = reverse stereo
# 14
Example:
RS232_START
FAh
i/o num
05h
length
00h 05h
data fields
class
01h
data fields
pan/balance
80h
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
message ID
i/o flag
0Eh
00h
checksum
93h
121
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Stop_i/ovol_slewing (ID 17)
Description:
last altered 8/20/02
This message orders a specified input or output to stop slewing.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
i/o number
1
1-129
number of i/o to alter
17
external
# 17
Example:
122
data fields
RS232_START
length
class
FAh
00h 04h
01h
message ID
11h
i/o flag
01h
i/o num
0Ah
Checksum
1Bh
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Set_multi_i/ovols_same (ID 18)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
last altered 8/20/02
This message sets the current volumes of multiple audio inputs or multiple
audio outputs to a single level. To set multiple i/os to different levels, see
Class 1 message 19 (Set_multi_iovols ).
18
external
Name
i/o flag
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-1
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
count
1
1-128
number of i/os to change
volume
1
0-255
volume to change these ios to
i/o #1
1
1-128
first in list of i/os to change
i/o #2
1
1-128
2nd in list of i/os to change
...
i/o # [count]
...
1
1-128
1-128
...
last i/o in list to change
# 18
Example:
This example sets audio inputs 4-6 to 4% (0Ah).
data fields
RS232_START
length
class
message ID
FAh
00h, 08h
01h
12h
i/o flag
01h
data fields
count
03h
i/o #2
05h
level
0Ah
data fields
i/o #3
06h
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
i/o #1
04h
checksum
32h
123
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
Set_multi_i/ovols (ID 19)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets the volume of multiple audio inputs or multiple audio
outputs to different volumes in a single message. Each I/O to be changed is
listed and has a separate volume parameter.
Message ID:
19
Source:
external
Parameters:
Name
i/o flag
count
Size (bytes)
1
1
Range
0-1
1-128
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
number of i/os to be altered
io #1
volume #1
...
volume [count]
1
1
...
1
1-128
0-255
...
0-255
number of first io to be set
volume for first io
...
volume for last i/o
# 19
Example:
This example sets audio inputs 4 and 5 to 0 and 100% respectively.
RS232_START
length
class
message ID
FAh
00h, 08h
01h
13h
count
02h
i/o #2
05h
124
data fields
data fields
i/o #1
04h
data fields
level #2
0Fh, 0Fh
i/o flag
01h
level #1
00h
checksum
32h
M-series RS232 Programming — Matrix Messages (Class 1)
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Class 2: Crosspoint Messages
Action Definitions
Each message will be marked with one of the following icons:
Messages that request information from the matrix
Messages that report information from the matrix
Messages that Configure the matrix
Messages to be used by Intelix Developers only.
Messages for Run Time Control
The Matrix Mixer contains sophisticated audio crosspoints, in that each crosspoint contains a number of parameters (fields), which together define the behavior of the audio signal of the crosspoint.
The crosspoint messages process data associated with individual audio crosspoints within the audio
matrix. The coordinates of an individual audio crosspoint are of the form [input , output ]. The
coordinate values are integral (1-128 inclusive).
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
125
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Audio Crosspoint Parameters
Each audio crosspoint contains six fields which can be viewed and modified (except as noted) by an
external device:
Name
target value
Size (bytes)
1
Range
0-255
ramp_time
2
0-30,000
slew rate
2
1-32640
current value
1
0-255
curve index
mute
DA_value
1
1
1
1-2
0-1
0-255
Description
“goal” value of
ramping and slewing
number of milliseconds
for audio change to take
place.
rate of crosspoint change
per 128 milliseconds.
“ramped” crosspoint value,
before effects of curve.
linear or log curve.
0 = mute; 1 = demute
value actually written to audio
hardware (read only).
Individual Audio Crosspoint Data Flow Path - determines D/A value for crosspoint VCA.
126
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Ramp Times and Slew Rates
The matrix has control over the rate at which a crosspoint changes value. This rate is expressed in two
ways, as a time (ramp time), and as a rate of change (slew rate)
Ramp Time
Ramp time is expressed in units of milliseconds (1/1000 of a second). You can set ramp times
to any value from 0 -30,000. This corresponds to a range of ramp times from 0 to 30 seconds. The
ramping operation begins as soon as a target value is received. During the ramping time, the output
being ramped rises or falls steadily in volume at a fixed rate. The rate of which is dependent on the
distance being traversed by the ramp.
Calculating a ramp time:
The ramp time is a 2 byte hexadecimal number. To calculate a ramp time multiply the number
of seconds you want the ramp to take by 1000, and convert the result to hexadecimal. This number is
the value transmitted to the matrix.
Ramp time example: You wish audio to ramp between states in 5 seconds.
Multiply by 1000, 5 * 1000 = 5000. Convert the number to hexadecimal. 5000 -> 1388h. Use
the result 1388 in the ramp time command. The high byte is 13h and the low byte is 88h.
Slew Rate
Raw slew rate is a rate of change that is expressed in steps (of 255) per 128 milliseconds. Each step causes
a change of approximately .39 dB. This means to get steps per second (rather than milliseconds) multiply S
by 7.81.
It is possible to calculate a desire rate in dB/sec or to calculate the raw step number from a known dB/sec
rate.
To calculate dB/sec resulting from a known raw step number S:
multiply S by .304.
Examples:
1) For S=1 (the minimum value): 1 x .304 = .304 dB/sec
2) For S=32640 (the maximum value): 32640 x .304 = 99 dB/sec
To calculate the number of Steps S for a desired dB/sec rate:
divide S by 3.04.
Examples
1) For 3 dB/sec : 3/3.04 = 1 (the minimum value)
2) For 3000 dB/sec: 3000/3.04 = 986 Steps
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
127
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Conversions of ramp times and slew rates
Ramp times and slew rates are transmitted to and from the matrix mixer as a pair of hexidecimal
bytes. The following section shows how to convert to and from transmission values and decimal
numbers. The pair of bytes is always transmitted and received most significant byte first.
Convert from a known decimal value to a hex transmission value:
To convert a desired decimal value (N) to a 2-byte value to transmit to the matrix mixer:
1) N ÷ 256
2) The integer part of the result from step 1 is the most significant byte of the 2-byte result.
3) The remainder from step 1 is the least significant byte.
4) Convert the two bytes to hexidecimal.
5) The most significant byte is transmitted first.
Example1:
You wish to transmit the slew rate 7:
7 ÷ 256 = 0 with a remainder of 7. The two hexidecimal bytes to transmit are 00h and 07h.
Example 2: You wish to transmit the ramp time 20,000:
20,000 ÷ 256 = 78 with a remainder of 32. Converting 78 and 32 to dexidecimal gives: 4Eh and
20h.
Convert from a two byte transmission value to a decimal value:
1) Convert the most significant byte from hex to decimal and multiply by 256.
2) Convert the least significant byte from hex to decimal and add it to the result of step 1.
Example 1:
You receive the two hex bytes 00h and 09h:
00 * 256 = 0. 0 + 9 = 9. The value represented is 9.
Example 2: You receive the bytes 41h and 21h:
41h => 65d; 65 *256 = 16640.
21h => 33d; 16640 +33 = 16673. The transmitted value was 16673.
128
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Ramp_xptvol_internal (ID 3)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message will immediately take a crosspoint to a specified volume,
using the existing ramp time. Ramp time can be set using message Class 2 #7,
Set_xpt_ramptime. This command supports wild cards.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
3
external
Name
input
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-129
Description
input coordinate of crosspoint
output
1
1-129
output coordinate of crosspoint
target volume
1
0-255
crosspoint target volume (100 dB
range).
Reply:
Notes:
Example:
#3
none
In the following example, because it is greater than 240 the the data value of
241 is escaped into two bytes (F0h and 01h).
data fields
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 05h
class
02h
message ID
03h
data fields
output
0Ah
target value (escaped)
F0h 01h
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
input
01h
checksum
00h
129
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Slew_xptvol_internal (ID 4)
Description:
last altered 8/20/02
This message will immediately take a crosspoint to a specified volume,
using the existing slew rate. Slew rate can be set using message Class 2 #8,
Set_xpt_slew. This command supports wild cards.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
4
external
Name
input
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-129
Description
input coordinate of crosspoint
output
1
1-129
output coordinate of crosspoint
target volume
1
0-255
crosspoint target volume (100 dB
range).
#4
Reply:
none
Notes:
In the following example, a target value of 255 is shown. Since 255 is greater
than the RS232_ESCAPE value of 240, the target value is “escaped” and
transmitted as two bytes.
Example:
data fields
RS232_START length
message ID
input
class
FAh
output
0Ah
130
00h 05h
02h
04h
data fields
target value (escaped)
F0h, 0Fh
01h
checksum
0Fh
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Ramp_xptvol_new (ID 5)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
last altered 8/20/02
This message sets the target value and ramp time of a crosspoint.
When this message is received, volume will begin ramping immediately at the new
ramp time. Wild cards are supported by this message.
5
external
Name
input
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-129
Description
input coordinate of crosspoint
output
1
1-129
output coordinate of crosspoint
target volume
1
0-255
ramp time
2
0-30,000
crosspoint target volume (100 dB
range).
0-30 sec in milliseconds
Reply:
Notes:
none
In the following example, a ramp time of 5000 milliseconds (5 seconds) is
shown. The value 5000 is transmitted as two unsigned bytes (13h and 88h):
5000 = (19 X 256) + 136
Also the target value of 240 is escaped into two bytes ( F0h and 00h).
Example:
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 07h
data fields
message ID
class
02h
target value
F0h
ramp time
13h 88h
input
01h
05h
data fields
output
0Ah
#5
checksum
checksum
9Eh
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
131
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Slew_xptvol_new (ID 6)
Description:
last altered 8/20/02
This message sets the target value and slew rate of a crosspoint.
When this message is received, volume will begin ramping immediately at the new
slew rate. Wild cards are supported by this message.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
6
external
Name
input
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-129
Description
input coordinate of crosspoint; 129
= wildcard.
output
1
1-129
output coordinate of crosspoint;
129 = wildcard.
target volume
1
0-255
crosspoint target volume (100 dB
range).
slew rate
2
1 -32640
1 = 3 dB/sec; 32640 = 100 dB/ms
Reply:
Notes:
none
In the following example, a slew rate of 6 is shown. This corresponds to a rates of
about 18 dB/sec, a nice typical value.
The target value of 240 is escaped into two bytes (F0h and 00h).
#6
Example:
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 07h
output
0Ah
132
data fields
class
02h
message ID
06h
data fields
slew rate
target value(escaped)
F0h, 00h
00h 06h
input
01h
checksum
0Ah
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Set_xpt_ramptime (ID 7)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets the ramp time of an audio crosspoint.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
7
external
Name
input
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-128
Description
input coordinate of crosspoint;
output
1
1-128
output coordinate of crosspoint;
ramp time
2
0-30,000
new ramp time, 0-30 sec in millisec
onds
Reply:
Notes:
none
In the following example, a ramp time of 5000 milliseconds (5 seconds) is
shown. The value 5000 is transmitted as two unsigned bytes:
5000 = (19 X256) + 136
#7
Example:
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 06h
output
0Ah
data fields
class
02h
message ID
07h
input
01h
data fields
ramp time
checksum
13h 88h
AFh
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
133
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Set_xptvol (ID 9)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
#9
This message sets the current value of an audio crosspoint. Using this message to
change the current value of an audio crosspoint will cause an immediate
change to the audio volume.
9
external
Name
input
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-129
Description
input coordinate of crosspoint; 129
= wildcard.
output
1
1-129
output coordinate of crosspoint;
129 = wildcard.
current volume
2
0-255
new current volume
Reply:
Notes:
Example:
none
This message is useful for “show control” applications.
RS232_START
FAh
output
0Ah
134
length
00h 05h
data fields
class
02h
message ID
09h
data fields
current value (escaped)
F0h 0Fh
input
01h
checksum
checksum
14h
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Set_xpt_taper (ID 10)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets the curve index associated with an audio crosspoint.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
10
external
Name
input
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-129
Description
input coordinate of crosspoint; 129
= wildcard.
output
1
1-129
output coordinate of crosspoint;
129 = wildcard.
taper
1
0-1
0 = linear; 1 = log taper
Reply:
Notes:
Example:
none
none
RS232_START
FAh
output
0Ah
# 10
length
00h 05h
data fields
class
02h
message ID
0Ah
data fields
curve index
01h
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
input
01h
checksum
checksum
17h
135
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Mute/demute_xptvol (ID 11)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets the mute value of a specified crosspoint. The coordinates of
the crosspoint are transmitted in the input and output parameters. The current
volume of the crosspoint is preserved when muting, so that a demute returns
the crosspoint to its pre-mute level.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
input
11
external
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-129
Description
input coordinate of crosspoint; 129
= wildcard.
output
1
1-129
output coordinate of crosspoint;
129 = wildcard.
mute
1
0-1
0 = demute; 1 =mute
Reply:
Notes:
none
none
# 11
Example: this example mutes crosspoint (3,3).
RS232_START
FAh
output
05h
136
length
05h
data fields
class
02h
data fields
mute
01h
message ID
input
0Bh
03h
checksum
15h
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Stop_xptvolslew (ID 12)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message tells a specified crosspoint to stop the slewing process. After the
crosspoint stops slewing, the target value is set to the current value. A typical use
for this message is to stop volume changes upon release of an up/down button in a
control panel.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
12
external
Name
input
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-129
Description
input coordinate of crosspoint; 129
= wildcard.
output
1
1-129
output coordinate of crosspoint;
129 = wildcard
Reply:
Notes:
none
none
# 12
Example:
RS232_START length
FAh
data fields
class
00h 05h 02h
message ID
0Ch
input
01h
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
output
0Ah
Checksum
17h
137
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Set_xptvol_exclusive (ID 13)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message turns on a specified crosspoint to a specified level and turns off
all other inputs to the specified output. The change takes place immediately.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
input
13
external
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-129
Description
input coordinate of crosspoint; 129
= wildcard.
output
1
1-129
output coordinate of crosspoint;
129 = wildcard.
volume
1
0-255
crosspoint volume
Reply:
Notes:
none
none
# 13
Example:
RS232_START
FAh
output
0Ah
138
length
00h 04h
data fields
class
02h
message ID
0Dh
data fields
value
25h
input
01h
checksum
3Eh
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Set_multi_xptvols (ID 14)
Description:
last altered 8/20/02
This message sets the audio levels of several crosspoints with a single mes
sage. Target values change to match current values. The number of crosspoints
to change is specified in the “count” variable. Each crosspoint and its new
level are listed as parameters.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
14
external
Name
count
input 1
output 1
volume 1
input 2
output 2
volume 2
input [count]
output [count]
volume [count]
Size (bytes)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Range
1-128
1-128
1-128
0-255
1-128
1-128
0-255
1-128
1-128
0-255
Description
number crosspoints to be set
input coordinate of first crosspoint
output coordinate of first crosspoint
volume of first crosspoint
input coordinate of second crosspoint
output coordinate of second crosspoint
volume of second crosspoint
input coordinate of lastcrosspoint
output coordinate of last crosspoint
volume of last crosspoint
# 14
Example:
This example changes the values of crosspoints (3,6) and (8,3) to 08 and F0 respectively.
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 09h
input 1
03h
output 2
05h
output 1
06h
data fields
class
message ID
02h
0Eh
data fields
value 1
08h
data fields
value 2
F0h, 00h
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
count
02h
input 2
03h
checksum
1Eh
139
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
Set_multiple_xptvols_same (ID 15)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
Count
value
input 1
output 1
input 2
output 2
...
input [count]
output [count]
last altered 8/20/02
This message sets the audio levels of several crosspoints to a single value
with a single message. The number of crosspoints to change is specified in
the “count” variable. The new level is set by the “value” parameter. Each
crosspoint is defined as an input/output pair.
15
external
Size
Range
1
1
1
1
1
1
...
Description
Number of crosspoints to change
new value to set them to
x coordinate of first crosspoint
y coordinate of first crosspoint
x coordinate of second crosspoint
y coordinate of second crosspoint
...
1-129
x coordinate of last crosspoint
1-129
y coordinate of lastcrosspoint
1-128
0-255
1-129
1-129
1-129
1-129
...
1
1
# 15
Example:
This example changes the values of crosspoints (3,6) and (8,3) to EEh.
data fields
RS232_START
length
class
message ID
FAh
00h 08h
02h
0Fh
value
EEh
input 1
03h
data fields
output 1
06h
data fields
output 2
03h
140
count
02h
input 2
08h
checksum
29h
M-series RS232 Programming — Crosspoint Messages (Class 2)
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
Class 3: Audio Preset Message Details
The preset messages deal with information about the characteristics of specified groups of audio
crosspoints called presets. The AVM supports 64 separate audio presets.
Action Definitions
Each message will be marked with one of the following icons:
Messages that request information from the matrix
Messages that report information from the matrix
Messages that Configure the matrix
Messages to be used by Intelix Developers only.
Messages for Run Time Control
Input/Output Coordinates:
Presets are handled in 8X8 (64 byte) increments. The 8X8 section being manipulated is defined by
an input/output pair. Whatever 8X8 section contains the specified crosspoint is the section being
referenced. When a preset message is returned from the matrix, the i/o pair you sent will be translated into the upper left hand corner of the 8X8 section referenced. This calculation is carried out by
the matrix. For example if you send a Get Audio Preset message with the input output pair of 3,1,
the matrix translates this pair to 1,1 which is the beginning crosspoint on the 8X8 section containing
3,1. When the matrix sends you a Audio Preset report, the input/output pair will be reported as 1,1.
No-Change Mask:
Every preset includes a no-change mask. The mask is a bitmap that contains a single bit for every
crosspoint in the matrix. If the bit for a crosspoint 1 then that crosspoint is affected by the preset
when it is invoked. If the bit for a crosspoint is 0 then that crosspoint is not affected by the preset,
even though its corresponding value is non zero. This feature allows the creation of presets that
affect only certain crosspoints while leaving others untouched. The values of the no-change bitmap
can be changed by using the Set Preset Bitmap and Set Audio Preset Crosspoint messages.
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
141
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
Format: The format of the no-change mask is a group of 8 bytes (with 8 mask bits per byte), which
covers an 8X8 section defined by an input/output pair. Byte #1 represents inputs 8-1 at output1, byte
2 represents inputs 8-1 at output 2, etc. Refer to the pseudo-code below, which reads the bitmap from
the Audio Preset report message.
for output 1-8
bitmask = 1
for input = 1-8
no-change[input][output] = buffer[index] AND bitmask
bitmask = bitmask * 2
next input
index = index +1
next output
Preset Name:
The name of an audio preset is a 16 byte ASCII string. If the name is less than 16 characters it must
be padded out (typically with spaces) to be 16 charaters long.
Ramp Time:
Every preset has a ramp time associated with it. The ramp time is the amount of time the matrix
takes to ramp to the preset values when the preset is invoked. There is only one ramp time for all
crosspoints in a preset. The ramp time can range from 0 to 30 seconds and is transmitted as two
unsigned bytes representing the time in milliseconds.
142
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
Set_preset_ramptime (ID 5)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets the ramp time of an audio preset. All 8 X 8 sections of the
preset are affected. The ramp time is transmitted as two bytes. There is a separate
ramp time value for each preset which is defaulted to 0.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
5
external
Name
preset number
Size (bytes)
1
ramp time
2
Reply:
Notes:
Range
M = 1- 128
MZP =
0-30,000
Description
preset being requested
this preset’s new ramp time
0-30 secons in milliseconds
none
In this example, preset #5’s ramp time is set to 5000 milliseconds (5 seconds).
The value 5000 is transmitted as two unsigned bytes:
5000 = (19 X 256) + 136 => 13h, 88h
#5
Example:
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 05h
preset number
05h
data fields
class
03h
message ID
05h
ramp time
13h, 88h
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
checksum
A7h
143
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
Set_preset_xptvol (ID 7)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message sets the audio value and no-change mask value of a single
crosspoint in a preset.
Message ID:
7
Source:
external
Parameters:
Name
input
output
preset number
Size
1
1
1
Range
1-128
1-128
AVM = 1-64
M series = 1-128
Description
input coordinate of 8X8 section requested
output coordinate of 8X8 section requested
preset being requested
value
1
0-255
new audio crosspoint volume
bitmap
1
0-1
no-change value for this crosspoint;
0 =crosspoint is not affected by a preset;
1 =crosspoint is affected by a preset (default.)
Reply:
Notes:
none
This example sets the audio value of crosspoint 1,1 of preset 1 to 200 and its
no-change mask to 1.
#7
Example:
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 07h
data fields
07h
data fields
output
input
01h
01h
value
C8h
144
message ID
class
03h
data fields
bitmap
preset number
01h
checksum
D7h
01h
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
Copy_preset (ID 8)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message copies the values of one preset into another preset. All 8 X 8
section of the preset are affected by the Copy Preset message. All parameters
are copied, including no change masks. Live values are preset 0.
Message ID:
8
Source:
external
Parameters:
Name
source preset
Size (bytes)
1
Range
M = 1-128
AVM 1-64
M= 128
AVM = 1-64
Description
source preset
destination preset
1
Reply:
Notes:
none
Source and destination must be different. Source preset can be 0,
representing current live values. This example shows copying the
live values (preset 0) into preset 8.
destination preset
#8
Example:
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 04h
source preset number
00h
data fields
message ID
class
03h
08h
data fields
destination preset number
08h
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
checksum
checksum
11h
145
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
Invoke_preset (ID 9)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message copies the values of one preset into the “live” crosspoints. All 8
X 8 section of the matrix are affected by the Go To Preset message.
If a preset’s ramp time is zero, the live values change immediately. Otherwise,
the live values are ramped to the preset’s crosspoint values. The preset’s
ramp time is set using the Set Audio Preset Ramp Time message. The
default preset ramp time is zero.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
9
external
Name
Size (bytes)
Range
Description
preset number
1
M = 1- 128
AVM = 1-64
preset being invoked
Reply:
Notes:
none
This example loads preset 5 into the live values.
#9
Example:
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 03h
data fields
class
03h
data fields
message ID
09h
checksum
preset number
05h
146
0Dh
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
Copy_live_to_preset (ID 13)
last altered 8/20/02
Description:
This message copies the current live values into a preset. All 8 X 8
section of
the preset are affected by the Copy Preset message. This command either
preserves or clears the no-change bitmap of the destination preset, depending
on the value of the preserve parameter.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
13
external
Name
destination preset
Size (bytes)
1
preserve
1
Reply:
Notes:
none
This example shows copying the live values (preset 0) into preset 5. The
destination preset’s “no-change” bitmap is preserved by this example.
Range
M = 1- 128
AVM= 1-64
0-1
Description
destination of copy
0 = clear destination bitmap
1 =preserve destination bitmap
# 13
Example:
RS232_START
length
FAh
00h 04h
destination preset number
05h
data fields
class
03h
message ID
0Dh
data fields
preserve
01h
M-series RS232 Programming — Preset Messages (Class 3)
checksum
checksum
14h
147
M-series RS232 Programming — Direct I/O Messages (Class 4)
Class 4: Logic Port Messages
Action Definitions
Each message will be marked with one of the following icons:
Messages that request information from the matrix
Messages that report information from the matrix
Messages that Configure the matrix
Messages to be used by Intelix Developers only.
Messages for Run Time Control
DC control on the M-series - E matrix is accomplished through the type 3 PCMCIA slot port on the
rear panel. Intelix provides PCMCIA plug in cards for certain common DC control and expansion functions. Only Intelix plugin cards are supported. No user designed or third party cards are currently supported.
Digital I/O Reporting
The matrix can be configured to automatically poll the logic port pins of the MARC DB-25. As shown
by the table below, you can have the MARC report when pins change in a variety of ways. The reporting is
controlled with the “polling” variable in the Set Direct I/O Polling message.
0 = no reporting
2 = input reports only
4 = output reports only
6 = both input and output reports.
148
M-series RS232 Programming — Direct I/O Messages (Class 4)
M-series RS232 Programming — Direct I/O Messages (Class 4)
Set_LogicPort_reporting (ID 3)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
last altered 8/20/02
This message sets the reporting status of the logic port pins. The reporting
parameter controls how changes to the I/O pins are reported: 0 = no
reports; 2 = single input reports; 4 single output reports; 6 = both input and
output reports. The reports are event driven; a report occurs when an input
or output changes.
3
external
Name
report
Size (bytes)
1
Reply:
Notes:
Range
0-6
Description
0 = no reports
2 = input reports only
4 = output reoprts only
6 = input and output reports
#3
none
none
Example:
data fields
RS232_START
length
class
message ID
FAh
00h 03h
04h
03h
M-series RS232 Programming — Direct I/O Messages (Class 4)
polling
06h
Checksum
0AFh
149
M-series RS232 Programming — Direct I/O Messages (Class 4)
Set_LogicPort_output_state (ID 5)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
last altered 8/20/02
This message sets the value of a logic port output. The output can be on,
off, or blinking.
5
external
Name
output
value
Size (bytes)
1
1
Range
1-8
0-2
Description
number of input to be changed
0 = off
1 = on
2 = blinking
#5
Reply:
Notes:
none
none
Example:
RS232_START length
FAh
150
00h 04h
data fields
class
message ID
output
04h
05h
04h
value
02h
Checksum
0Dh
M-series RS232 Programming — Direct I/O Messages (Class 4)
M-series RS232 Programming — Direct I/O Messages (Class 4)
Simulate_LogicPort_input_change (ID 7)
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
input
new value
last altered 8/20/02
This message simulates a digital input change. The simulation includes all
effects of a changed input including reporting if reporting is active. A report is
generated by the simulation command, and another report is generated if the
output changes. If the input is configured, the input’s application will be stimulated.
After that point the simulation for that input is cancelled.
7
external
Size (bytes)
1
1
Range
Description
1-8
number of output to be changed
0-1
0 = open (off); 1 = closed (on)
#7
Reply:
Notes:
none
none
Example:
RS232_START length
FAh
00h 04h
data fields
class
message ID
input
04h
07h
01h
M-series RS232 Programming — Direct I/O Messages (Class 4)
new value Checksum
01h
0Bh
151
M-series RS232 Programming — Mic/line Messages (Class 11)
Class 11: Mic/Line Card Messages
Action Definitions
Each message will be marked with one of the following icons:
Messages that request information from the matrix
Messages that report information from the matrix
Messages that Configure the matrix
Messages to be used by Intelix Developers only.
Messages for Run Time Control
The mic/line card is an optional accessory for all Intelix Matrix products that extends and simplifies
the connection of audio sources. The 8-channel mic/line card includes a preamplifier for each channel which
boosts microphone level inputs to the level optimum for use by the matrix. Each channel has four user
selectable input ranges, and is capable of reporting both the current input range and the signal level at each
of the eight channels. The RS232 messages in this class allow the user to set up, manipulate and query the
mic/line card in a wide range of ways.
Included in the parameters available on the mic/line card are:
1) Eight channel preamplifiers, with four ranges: line, aux, mic, and
manual. The range for each channel may be both set and read.
2) Each channel has both signal present and peak indicators. These indicators are visible
LEDs.
3) Each channel has independent phantom power (+15V), which can be selected or
disabled in software.
4) The update rate of the signal level meter is user selectable.
152
M-series RS232 Programming — Mic/line Messages (Class 11)
M-series RS232 Programming — Mic/line Messages (Class 11)
Set_inputch_gain (ID 2)
last altered 8/21/02
Description: This message sets the preamplifier gain ranges and phantom power for a specified
mic/line card channel
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
2
External
Name
input
Size (bytes)
1
Range
1-128
Description
input to change
range
1
1-4
1 = line; 2 = aux; 3 = mic; 4 =
manual
phantom power
1
0-1
0 = off; 1 = on
#2
Reply:
Notes:
none
none
Example:
RS232_START
FAh
length
00h 05h
data fields
class
0Bh
message ID
02h
data fields
input
03h
range
01h
checksum
phantom power
00h
M-series RS232 Programming — Mic/line Messages (Class 11)
10h
153
M-series RS232 Programming — Mic/line Messages (Class 11)
Set_inputch_level_reporting (ID 3)
Description:
This message sets the rate at which a mic/line card reports its meter values. Any
value of the reporting speed parameter less than 50 causes the card to report once
and then stop reporting. The input parameter determines what card in the system
will be set. An invalid input parameter results in no action. All input channels on the
card containing the specified channel report at the same rate. Channels are reported
in ascending order 1-8.
The value reported for each channel has been transformed to a post gain
dB values (see chart on next page). Note that values of 00h and 2A hex are out of
bounds indicators respectively <-19 dB and > 21 dB.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
3
External
Name
input
#3
last altered 8/21/02
Size
1
Polling Speed 1
Reply:
Notes:
Range
1-128
Description
Any input on
the card to be queried
0; 50-255
0 stops reporting
1-49 cause a single read then stops;
50-255 sets reporting speed in milliseconds
Report_of_inputch_level
none
Example:
RS232_START length
FAh
154
00h 04h
data fields
class
0Bh
message ID
03h
input
01h
reporting
speed
00h,12h,02,05,
13h,00h,15h,2Ah
Checksum
D5h
M-series RS232 Programming — Mic/line Messages (Class 11)
M-series RS232 Programming — Mic/line Messages (Class 11)
Report_of_inputch_level (ID 4)
Description:
This message is sent by the mic/line card to report its meter values. It is a response
to a Set_inputch_level_reporting message. All eight channel meter values are
reported starting with channel one first.
4
Application CPU
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
input
value
last altered 8/21/02
Size
1
8 bytes
Range
1-128
0-42 (each byte)
Description
The first input on the reporting card
levels returned channel 1-8 in that order
#4
Reply:
Notes:
none
none
Example:
RS232_START length
FAh
00h 0Bh
data fields
class
0Bh
message ID
04h
M-series RS232 Programming — Mic/line Messages (Class 11)
input
01h
inputs 1-8 Checksum
[8 hex bytes]
??h
155
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Message Details
******************************************************
Class 15: Event Scheduler Messages
Action Definitions
Each message will be marked with one of the following icons:
Messages that request information from the matrix
Messages that report information from the matrix
Messages that Configure the matrix
Messages to be used by Intelix Developers only.
Class
15
Messages for Run Time Control; these messages will begin with verbs such
as:
Set, Ramp, Slew, Mute/demute, Assign, Stop, Copy, Invoke, Select, Start etc.
Event Scheduler Messages
The version 4 system will have a Timed Event Scheduler function which will use the system real time clock.
There will be a scheduled event list in the main application. This list will contain schedules for specific
actions. The schedules can be one time events or recurring events. A 32 bit field will contain the date and
time of the scheduled event in seconds from a zero reference of 12:00 A.M. Jan 1 2000. A second 32 bit
field will contain a calculated interval for recurring events. A zero value in this field indicates a one time
event. The interval value is expressed in seconds from the current scheduled event. There will be one entry
only for recurring events. Each time the event is processed, the interval value is used to calculate a new time
for the next occurrence of the event. This new scheduled time value will be written into the event schedule
field. A last Event field for each schedule entry will contain the 32bit value indicating the last time this event
was executed. A zero will indicate that the event has not or was not processed. This field is set to zero at
creation of its schedule entry and any time the entry is overwritten by a “schedule an event message”.
A Name field will uniquely identify event actions for the user. There can be more than one entry for a name,
however, any set, delete, or details message will affect all entries with that name. This will allow for weekly,
monthly, or yearly recurring events to have multiple occurrences within the interval specified. E.X. A weekly
event scheduled for Tuesday and Thursday of each week would have two entries with a scheduled time of
Tuesday and Thursday each with an interval value of one week.
156
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
The actions are specified by an action ID field and parameter fields for the action. These Action Ids and
parameters will correlate closely with the RS232 message Class, ID, and Parameter field definitions. It is
intended that the current application message handlers would also handle the actions defined in the scheduler. An action field length byte at the beginning of the action field in the messages will allow for blind
copying of the action parameters into and out of the event table. These action parameters can be treated as
command messages by the main application.
The messages defined herein are to manage and setup the event scheduler object. The parameter field data
are defined in terms of a date and time. The internal embedded software will make the conversions to the 32
bit seconds values used in the scheduler table.
Event Scheduler Action Definitions
Event Scheduler Action Definitions are a subset of the matrix RS232 message set. All scheduler
actions correspond directly to a single RS232 message. The event scheduler messages simply encapsulate
these existing messages in their action field.
The Event scheduler Action IDs are defined as follows:
03,08
03,09
03,18
02,03
01,05
04,07
04,05
00,30
Copy System Preset
Invoke System Preset
Invoke I/O Channel Preset
Ramp Xptvol Internal
Ramp I/Ovol Internal
Simulate Logic Port Input
Set Logic Port Output
Enable/Disable dedicated TCP connection
Class
15
A short synopsis of each message used as a scheduler action event is shown below. You can also reference
these message in their full format by class and ID in other sections of this manual.
Invoke System Preset
Action ID: 03,09
Parameters:
Name
Length
Preset Number
1 byte
Range
1-128
Description
The number of the system preset to be invoked.
Reference Class 3 ID 9 in main manual.
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
157
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Copy System Preset
Action ID: 03,08
Parameters:
Name
Length
Range
Source Preset
1 byte
1-128
Destination Preset
1 byte
1-128
Reference Class 3 ID 8 in main manual.
Ramp Crosspoint External
Action ID: 02,03
Parameters:
Name
Length
Range
Input Number
1 byte
1-128
Output Number
1 byte
1-128
Target Value
1 byte
0-255
Reference Class 2 ID 3 in main manual.
Description
The number of the system preset to be invoked.
The number of the system preset to be invoked.
Description
audio input channel
audio output channel
volume to which the crosspoint will ramp
Class
15
Ramp IO Volume Internal
Action ID: 01,05
Parameters:
Name
Length
Range
I/O flag
1 byte
0-1
I/O number
1 byte
1-128
Target volume
1 byte
0-255
Reference Class 1 ID 5 in main manual.
Simulate Logic Port Input
Action ID: 04,07
Parameters:
Name
Length
Range
Input number
1 byte
1-8
new value
1 byte
0-1
Reference Class 4 ID 7 in main manual.
158
Description
0 = output; 1 = input
input/output audio channel number
volume to ramp to; 0 = 0 dB; 255 = -100 dB
Description
logic port input to change
new value of logic port input; 0 = low; 1 = high
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Enable/Disable Dedicated TCP Connection
Action ID: 00,30
Parameters:
Name
Length
Range
enable/disable flag
1 byte
0-1
IP address
4 bytes
xxh,xxh,xxh,xxh,
port number
2 bytes
0-64K
Reference Class 0 ID 30 in main manual.
Description
0 = disable; 1 = enable
The IP address to call
port number at the IP address
Class
15
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
159
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Set_Date/Time (ID 0)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
This message will Set the date and time of the Matrix internal calendar clock.
Message ID:
Source:
Parameters:
Name
Year
Month
Day
Hour
Minute
Second
0
External
Size
2 bytes
1 byte
1 byte
1 byte
1 byte
1 byte
Range
1-64K
1-12
1-31
0-23
0-59
0-59
Description
The year as expressed in a hex number
The month of the year; 1 = Jan, 12 = Dec
The day of the month
The hour of the day (military format)
The minute of the hour
The second of the minute
Class
15
#0
Application Frame Layer Example:
0Fh
Day
1 byte
xxh
00h
Hour
1 byte
xxh
Year
2 bytes
xxh,xxh
Minute
1 byte
xxh
Month
1 byte
xxh
Second
1 byte
xxh
Reply: Confirm
Error Reply: “Scheduler Full”
IPB Message: none
160
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Get_Date/Time (ID 1)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
This message will return The current time registered in the matrix calendar clock.
Message ID:
Source:
1
External
Parameters:
Name
none
Size
Range
Description
Class
15
#1
Application Frame Layer Example:
0Fh
01h
Reply: Report_of_Date/Time
Class: 15
Id: 3
Error Reply: none
IPB Message: none
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
161
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Report_of_Date/Time (ID 2)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
This message reports the current date and time of the Matrix internal calendar
clock.
2
External
Parameters:
Name
Year
Month
Day
Hour
Minute
Second
Size
2 bytes
1 byte
1 byte
1 byte
1 byte
1 byte
Range
1-64K
1-12
1-31
0-23
0-59
0-59
Description
The year as expressed in a hex number
The month of the year; 1 = Jan, 12 = Dec
The day of the month
The hour of the day (military format)
The minute of the hour
The second of the minute
Class
15
#2
Application Frame Layer Example:
0Fh
Day
1 byte
xxh
02h
Hour
1 byte
xxh
Year
2 bytes
xxh,xxh
Minute
1 byte
xxh
Month
1 byte
xxh
Second
1 byte
xxh
Reply: none
Error Reply: none
IPB Message: none
162
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Schedule_an_Event (ID 3)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
This message will Schedule a timed event in the matrix. Events are the actions
defined in the ActionID/Parameter fields. The initial time of the event and the interval
of reoccurrence of the event is also specified. Multiple Time/Interval fields can be
carried for the same Name/Action. Only one Name/Action can be carried in this
message.
3
External
Parameters:
Name
Name
Action Field Length
Size
20 bytes
1 byte
Range
ASCII
1-255
Action ID
2 Bytes
1-65k
Action Param
Variable
Variable
Event Time
7 Bytes
0-23
Interval Type
1 byte
0-7
Interval Value
2 bytes
1-65k
Description
An ASCII Character string
The number of bytes in the Action Field.
This includes the action ID, and all related
action parameters.
The ID number of the Action to be specified
Class
The number is the same as a concatenated
Class/ID RS232 message field. There will be
15
no conflicting actions defined, new unique actions
#3
will reserve one of the class/ID numbers from
the RS232 numbers.
The parameters for the specified action. The
parameter definitions are the same as in the
equivalent RS232 message
Date and Time of the scheduled event. Same
format as in the set time message.
0 = Once, 1 = seconds, 2 = minutes, 3 = hours,
4 = days, 5 = weeks, 6 = months, 7 = years
The number of seconds or days or weeks etc. to
the next occurrence. Value meaning dependent
upon interval type. 0 = Once
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
163
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Schedule_an_Event (ID 3) cont.
Application Frame Layer Example:
0Fh
Action Field Length
1 byte
xxh
03h
Action ID
2byte
xxh, xxh
Name
20 bytes
ASCII
Action Parameter
variable
xxh
Class
15
#3
Below: First Schedule entry; section repeats for each entry of this name/action
Event Time
7byte
Yr,mo,day,hr,min,sec
Interval Type
1 byte
xxh
Interval Value
2 bytes
xxh, xxh
Reply: Confirm
Error Reply: “Scheduler Full”
IPB Message: none
164
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Get_Event_Schedule_List (ID 4)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
This message will return a listing of scheduled events. The listing is presented by the
event Name. Each named event, it’s action type, and it’s schedule type only will be
returned. Get event details will return the remaining information for each event name.
4
External
Parameters:
Name
none
Size
Range
Description
Application Frame Layer Example:
Class
15
0Fh
04h
#4
Reply: Report_of_Event_Schedule_List
Class: 15
Id: 5
Error Reply: none
IPB Message: none
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
165
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Report_of_Event_Schedule_List (ID 5)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
This message carries a listing of all events in the Timed event Scheduler. There is an
entry for every named event.
5
External
Parameters:
Name
Name
Action ID
Size
20 bytes
2 Bytes
Range
ASCII
1-65k
Class
15
Description
A 20 character ASCII name string.
The ID number of the Action to be
specified.The number is the same as a concatenated
Class/ID RS232 message field. There will be no
conflicting actions defined, new unique actions
will reserve one of the class/ID numbers from
the RS232 numbers.
#5
Application Frame Layer Example:
.....First table entry, rrepeats for each entry ........
Name
20 bytes
0Fh
05h
Action ID
2 bytes
ASCII
Reply: none
Error Reply: none
IPB Message: none
166
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Get_Event_Details (ID 6)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
This message will return the detailed information for a particular named event in the
event schedule list. The details include the scheduled time of the event, the action to
be performed and it’s parameters and the status.
6
External
Parameters:
Name
Event Name
Size
20 bytes
Range
ASCII
Description
Event name as ASCII string
Application Frame Layer Example:
Event Name
20 bytes
0Fh
06h
ASCII
Class
15
#6
Reply: Report_of_Event_Schedule_List
Class: 15
Id: 5
Error Reply: none
IPB Message: none
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
167
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Report_of_Event_Details (ID 7)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
Message ID:
Source:
This message carries details of a particular event requested by a get event details
message. The details include the action id and parameters and all schedule entries
for the named event. A field containing a last performed status information is also
returned.
7
External
Parameters:
Name
Name
Action Field Length
Size
20 bytes
1 byte
Range
ASCII
1-255
Action ID
2 Bytes
1-65k
Action Param
Variable
Variable
Event Time
7 Bytes
0-23
Interval Type
1 byte
0-7
Interval Value
2 bytes
1-65k
Last Time run
7 Bytes
0-23
Class
15
#7
168
Description
An ASCII Character string
The number of bytes in the Action Field. This
includes the action ID, and all related action
parameters.
The ID number of the Action to be specified
The number is the same as a concatenated
Class/ID RS232 message field. There will be no
conflicting actions defined, new unique actions
will reserve one of the class/ID numbers from
the RS232 numbers.
The parameters for the specified action. The
parameter definitions are the same as in the
equivalent RS232 message.
Date and Time of the scheduled event. Same
format as in the set time message.
0 = Once, 1 = seconds, 2 = minutes, 3 = hours,
4 = days, 5 = weeks, 6 = months, 7 = years
The number of seconds or days or weeks etc. to
the next occurrence. Value meaning dependent
upon interval type. 0 = Once
Date and Time the event was last executed.
0 value indicates the event was not run.
Same format as Event Time Parameter.
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Report_of_Event_Details (ID 7) cont.
Application Frame Layer Example:
0Fh
Action Field Length
1 byte
xxh
03h
Action ID
2byte
xxh, xxh
Name
20 bytes
ASCII
Class
15
Action Parameter
variable
xxh
#7
Below: First Schedule entry; section repeats for each entry of this name/action
Event Time
7byte
Yr,mo,day,hr,min,sec
Interval Type
1 byte
xxh
Interval Value
2 bytes
xxh, xxh
Last Performed
7byte
Yr,mo,day,hr,min,sec
Reply: none
Error Reply: none
IPB Message: none
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
169
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
Delete_Scheduled_Event (ID 8)
last altered 10/31/02
Description:
This message will delete a scheduled event. All entries under the event name will be
deleted.
Message ID:
Source:
8
External
Parameters:
Name
Event name
Size
20 bytes
Range
ASCII
Description
Event name as ASCII string
Class
15
#8
Application Frame Layer Example:
Event Name
08h
0Fh
20 bytes
ASCII
Reply: Confirm
Error Reply: “Does Not Exist”
IPB Message: none
170
Master RS232 Programmer’s Manual — Event Scheduler (Class 15)
M-series User Manual — Appendix A
Appendix A: Ramp Times and Slew Rates
The matrix has control over the rate at which a crosspoint changes value. This rate is expressed in two
ways, as a time (ramp time), and as a rate of change (slew rate).
Individual Audio Crosspoint Data Flow Path - determines D/A value for crosspoint VCA.
Ramp Times
Ramp time is expressed in units of milliseconds (1/1000 of a second). You can set ramp times to any value
from 0 -30,000. This corresponds to a range of ramp times from 0 to 30 seconds. The ramping operation
begins as soon as a target value is received. During the ramping time, the output being ramped rises or falls
steadily in volume at a fixed rate.
Calculating a ramp time: The ramp time is a 2 byte hexadecimal number. To calculate a ramp time
multiply the number of seconds you want the ramp to take by 1000, and convert the result to hexadecimal.
This 2-byte number is the value transmitted to the matrix.
Ramp time examples: You wish audio to ramp between states in 5 seconds.
Multiply by 1000, 5 * 1000 = 5000. Convert the number to hexadecimal. 5000 -> 1388h. Use
the result 1388 in the ramp time message. The high byte is 13h and the low byte is 88h.
The table below shows several common ramp times and their corresponding two byte values.
Ramp Time in Seconds
High Byte
Low Byte
1
03h
E8h
2
07h
D0h
3
0Bh
B8h
4
0Fh
A0h
5
13h
88h
M-series User Manual— Appendix A
171
M-series User Manual— Appendix A
Slew Rate
The inverse of ramp time is slew rate which is expressed in units of steps (of 255) per 128
milliseconds. The slew rate determines how fast volume changes will take place. Regardless
of the current or target volume levels, any change in output volume will take place at the slew rate. The
advantage of using slew rate instead of ramp time, is that the volume of the output being slewed rises at a
steady rate that is independent of the distance traversed by the slew.
Calculating a slew rate:
The slew rate is a two byte hex number. Start with the desired rate of change in dB/sec. Divide this number
by 3.04 and round to the nearest integer to get the number of steps for your rate.
Example 1) You want a rate of change of 3 dB/sec:
3/3.04 = 1 step (this is the minimum value)
The two hex bytes for this slew rate are 00H and 01H
Example 2) You want a rate of change of 3000 dB/sec:
3000/3.04 = 986 Steps
To get the high byte of the slew rate, divide the number of steps by 255: 986/255 = 3.85 round
down to 3
To get the low byte multiply the high byte times 256 and subtract from the step number: 986(3*256) = 218; change to hex: 218d = DAh
The two slew bytes for this example are 03h DAh.
Listed below are the 2 bytes of several common slew rates.
Slew Rate
Average
Fast
Very Fast
Slow
Very Slow
172
High Byte
00h
00h
01
00h
00
Low Byte
05h
10h
46h
03h
01h
M-series User Manual— Appendix A
M-series User Manual — Appendix A
Conversions of ramp times and slew rates
Ramp times and slew rates are transmitted to and from the matrix mixer as a pair of hexadecimal bytes. The
following section shows how to convert to and from transmission values and decimal numbers. The pair of
bytes is always transmitted and received most significant byte first.
Convert from a known decimal value to a hex transmission value:
To convert a desired decimal value (N) to a 2-byte value to transmit to the matrix mixer:
1) N ÷ 256
2) The integer part of the result from step 1 is the most significant byte of the 2-byte result.
3) The remainder from step 1 is the least significant byte.
4) Convert the two bytes to hexadecimal.
5) The most significant byte is transmitted first.
Example1:
You wish to transmit the slew rate 7:
7 ÷ 256 = 0 with a remainder of 7. The two hexadecimal bytes to transmit are 00h and 07h.
Example 2: You wish to transmit the ramp time 20,000:
20,000 ÷ 256 = 78 with a remainder of 32. Converting 78 and 32 to hexadecimal gives: 4Eh and 20h;
transmit the 4Eh (most significant byte) first.
Convert from a two byte transmission value to a decimal value:
1) Convert the most significant byte from hex to decimal and multiply by 256.
2) Convert the least significant byte from hex to decimal and add it to the result of step 1.
Example 1:
You receive the two hex bytes 00h and 09h:
00 * 256 = 0. 0 + 9 = 9. The value represented is 9.
Example 2: You receive the bytes 41h and 21h:
41h => 65d; 65 *256 = 16640.
21h => 33d; 16640 +33 = 16673. The transmitted value was 16673.
M-series User Manual— Appendix A
173
M-series User Manual—Appendix B
Appendix B: M-series Reset Sequence
Reset Sequence
This section describes the power cycle reset of all Intelix Matrix products, including the Mseries, M series, the MZP and the Psychologist products. This cycle is the same whether the reset
comes as a result of a power failure, or a reset button press.
1) Power goes down, reset button is pressed or a software reset command is received.
2) Within a half second the Matrix stops passing audio.
3) If power has failed, the Matrix memory is switched to battery backup, preserving the current
settings.
4) Power returns to normal levels.
5) The Matrix begins to restore the current settings of crosspoints across a five second ramp up.
6) After the five second ramp time all crosspoints have been restored to their pre reset levels.
At no time will audio levels rise above the level just before the power failure.
Note: If during the five second reset ramp the Matrix receives an external message from any RS232
controller, the external message will override the five second ramp time.
174
M-series User Manual—Appendix B
M-series User Manual—Appendix C
Appendix C: Technical Information
AUDIO SPECIFICATIONS
Signal-to noise Ref +26 dBV, 8X8 system
Frequency Response
+0, -3 dB from 10 Hz to 30 kHz
Crosstalk
Gain Control Range (attenuation only)
Gain Control Resolution
Inputs
Input Impedance
(electronically balanced)
(unbalanced)
Nominal Source Impedance
Nominal Input Level
Maximum Input Level (balanced)
Outputs
Output Impedance (electronically balanced)
(unbalanced)
Nominal Load Impedance
Nominal Output Level
Maximum Output Level (balanced)
(unbalanced)
100dB
± 1 2 dB from 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Better than -80 dB
100 dB
0.4 dB (256 steps)
20 kΩ
10 kΩ
150 Ω
+4 dBV RMS
+26 dBV RMS
440 Ω
600 Ω
220 Ω
+ 4 dBV RMS
+26 dBV RMS
+20 dBV RMS
MISCELLANEOUS SPECIFICATIONS
POWER REQUIREMENTS
8x8 to 16x16
DIMENSIONS
Matrix: (Standard models, 2U chassis)
SHIPPING WEIGHT
Matrix (8 x 8 units, more for other models)
M-series User Manual—Appendix C
18 VAC center-tapped,
3 A, 54 VA
±18 - 24 VDC, 3 A
19" x 3.5" x 14"
(48.2 cm x 35.6 cm x 8.9 cm)
20.3 lb. (9.20 kg)
175
M-series User Manual—Appendix C
Servicing
All repair and other service of Matrix Mixers and Remotes should be provided only by qualified
service personnel. Contact Intelix for a list of authorized service agents. Other attempts at service
or repair may void the warranty.
Warranty
All Intelix products are guaranteed against malfunction due to defects in materials or workmanship for two
years after date of purchase. If such malfunction occurs during the specified period, this product will be
repaired or replaced, at our option, without charge. Further, the “Fresh Start” program (available to U.S.
customers only) ensures that a product which has been repaired/replaced is itself guaranteed for six months.
This six-month guarantee applies even if the warranty repair/replacement occurs within less than six months
of the end of the original two-year warranty period. Dealer is responsible for the cost and other shipping
and insurance associated with shipping goods to Intelix. Intelix will match shipping method and pay associated costs to return goods to dealer location. This warranty does not cover 1) malfunction resulting from use
of the product other than as specified in the user manual; 2) malfunction resulting from abuse or misuse of
the product; 3) exterior chassis appearance; 4) malfunction occurring after repairs have been made by
anyone other than Intelix or any of its authorized dealers; 5) acts of nature; 6) optional embedded software
upgrades or updates. Only qualified service personnel should provide all repair and service of Intelix products and other attempts at service or repair may void the warranty. Contact Intelix for a list of authorized
service agents. Warranty service is only offered after a return authorization number has been generated by
an authorized Intelix representative. Goods being returned for warranty service must be sent in original
packaging. Intelix will not accept liability for those goods shipped in packaging other than the original
factory container.
176
M-series User Manual—Appendix C
Index
A
Acknowledgment field 85
Add/Delete_Authorized_IP_client 104
Add/Delete_Dedicated_TCP_connection 107
Are You There 90, 93
Audio Inputs 15
Audio Matrix screen 22, 23, 26, 38, 41
Audio Matrix Size 23, 26, 37, 38, 41
audio outputs 15, 26
Audio Path Test 32
Audio Preset Messages 141
Audio Sources Screen 23
Authorized Client List 60
Auto Designer 22
B
Balance 27
balance 68
Baud rate 20, 89
C
Cables, RS232 19
Callback, adding 60
Callback Function 60
Callback List 60
checksum field 85
checksum, turning on/off 20, 89
Class 0 (Matrix Class 0 summary 76
Class 0 summary 76
Class 1 summary 78
Class 1 summary 78
Class 11 summary 84
Class 15: Event Scheduler Messages 156
Class 2 summary 80
Class 3 summary 82
Class 4 summary 83
Class 4 summary 83
Commercial controllers 87
Communication Configuration 50
Communication Details 85
Communication Menu
Read data from the AVM 48
Communication Proctocols 57
Communication Setup 56
Configuration Menu 36
Upload/download item 48
Confirm 109
Connecting the Control PC to the AVM 19
Connection List 59
Conversions of ramp times and slew rates 128
Copy Live Values to Preset 147
Copy Preset 144, 145, 147
CPU Error History 55
Crosspoint Parameters, explanation 126
Crosspoint Set Mute 136
D
DC Control 17
Delete_Scheduled_Event 170
Device Information 51
DHCP checkbox 59
Diagnostic Menu 49
diagnostic procedure 48
DIP Switches 20, 89
Download 48
E
Enable/Disable_dedicated_TCP_connection 108
Error 110
Escape byte, turning on/off 20, 89
Escape Sequence 88
Ethernet Connection 20
Event Scheduler 62
Event Scheduler Action Definitions 157
F
File Menu 34
Exit Item 35
New Item 34
Open Item 34
Save As... Item 34, 35
Save Item 34
Flash Memory, upgrade 61
G
Gateway 59
Get Mic Current Values 154
Get Mic Line Information 97, 102, 105
Get_Date/Time 161
Get_Event_Details 167
Get_Event_Schedule_List 165
H
Hardware Installation 31
Hardware, internal 52
hardware, internal 12
Hexadecimal Transmission 87
Commercial controllers 87
I
I Am Here 90, 94
Input Connections 16
Input Connections, recommended 16
Input controls 68
Input pan control 71
Input width control 70
Input/Output Coordinates 141
Installation Menu 47
Introduction to using the RS232 Commands 90
Invoke_preset 146
IP Address 57, 59
Preset Trigger 30, 44, 54, 55
Preset Triggers 32
L
Ramp Input/Output To Target 78, 112
ramp time, calculating 171
Ramp Times 171
Ramp times 171
Ramp times, converting 173
Ramp Times, explanation 127
Ramp_i/ovol_new 114
Ramp_xptvol_internal 129
Report_of_Authorized_IP_clients 103
Report_of_Date/Time 162
Report_of_dedicated_TCP_connections 106
Report_of_Event_Details 168
Report_of_Event_Schedule_List 166
Report_of_inputch_level 155
Report_of_IP_configuration 98
Reports Menu 45
Reserved Bytes 86
Reset Sequence 174
restoring a file 48
Retries 57
RS-232 Message Fields 85
RS-232 Message Protocol 85
RS-232 Timing 86
RS232 baud rate 20, 89
RS232 Cables 19
RS232 Class 0 summary 76
RS232 Class 1 summary 78
RS232 Class 11 summary 84
RS232 Class 2 summary 80
RS232 Class 3 summary 82
RS232 Class 4 summary 83
RS232 Command Summaries 76
RS232 Commands, introduction 90
RS232 Commands, introduction to
Are You There 90
I Am Here 90
Set Current Value 91
RS232 Message Fields 85
RS232 Reserved Bytes 86
RS232 transmit example 51
Live Crosspoint Screen 53
Local/ Remote 57
Logic Port 44
Logic Port Control 54
Logic port Pinout 44
M
MARC software, installing and running 18
matrix name 51
Matrix Reset 52
Message Fields 85
Mic/Line Card 40
Mic/Line, input gain 153
Mic/Line, input level reporting 154
Mic/Line, report of input level 155
Mono input to mono output example 75
Mono input to stereo output example 74
mono output example 75
Mute/demute_iovol 118
MZP software, installing 18
N
New Item 34
No Change 43
no change state, defined 29
No-Change Mask 141
O
Open Item 34
Options Menu 56
Output controls 68
outputs, audio 15
P
Pan 24, 39
pan 68
pan control 71
Personal computer, requirements 19
Phantom Power 40
Pinout, DB-25 30, 44, 54
power cycle reset 174
Preferences 60
Preset Crossfade Time 28
Preset Manager 28
Preset Messages, audio 141
Preset, ramp time set 146
Q
Quick Start 21
R
S
Sales Order 45
Save As... 34
Scheduling an Event 62
Server Mode 57
Servicing 176
Set Audio Preset Crosspoint 144
Set Comet Table Index 76, 96
Set Current Value 91
Set Direct I/O Polling 149
Set input pan/output balance 120, 121
Set Input/Output Curve Index 117
Set Input/Output Stereo Pairs 119
Set Input/Output Target and Slew Rate 115
Set Matrix Mixer Name 76, 99, 100, 101
Set Preset Ramp Time 146
Set Target Value and Ramp Time 131
Set_Date/Time 160
Set_i/ovol 116
Set_inputch_gain 153
Set_LogicPort_output_state 150
Set_multi_i/ovols 124
Set_multi_i/ovols_same 123
Set_multi_xptvols 139
Set_multiple_xptvols_same 140
Set_preset_ramptime 143
Set_xpt_ramptime 133
Set_xpt_taper 135
Set_xptvol 134
Set_xptvol_exclusive 138
Setting control values for I/O controls 68
Simulate direct I/O single input 151
Slew Input/Output To Target 113
Slew Rate 172
slew rate, calculating 172
Slew Rate, explanation 127
Slew rates 171
Slew rates, converting 173
Slew_xptvol_internal 130
Slew_xptvol_new 132
Slewing, stopping 122
Start byte 85
Stereo, audio input panning 69
stereo control values, setting 68
Stereo I/O control 68
Input Width Control 70
Output Control 72
stereo input controls 68
Stereo, input pan control 71
Stereo input to mono output example 75
Stereo input to stereo output example 73
Stereo, input width 69
stereo input width control 70
Stereo, output control 72
stereo output example 73, 74
Stereo, output balance 69
stereo output controls 68
Stereo Pairing 26, 38
Stereo Panning 39
Stereo Selections 61
Stereo, Setting control values with RS-232 68
Stereo, width control 70
Stereopair, assigning 119
Stop Input/Output Slewing 78
Stop_i/ovol_slewing 122
Stop_xptvolslew 137
Subnet Mask 59
System Recovery 61
T
TCP 57
TCP_connection, adding/deleting 107
TCP_connection, enable/disable 108
TCP_connections, report of 106
Technical Information 175
Timeout 57
U
UDP 57
unbalancing the input 15
Upload/Download 48
V
ventilation 21
Version Information 58
Video Matrix, screen 22
Video Matrix Size 22
Volume, input 24
W
Warranty 176
width 68
width control 70
Wild Cards 111
Windows® Reference 33
Wiring Reports 46
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