Hayward Electric Company Tailgate Safety Meeting for Year 2012

Hayward Electric Company Tailgate Safety Meeting for Year 2012
Hayward Electric Company
Tailgate Safety Meeting for Year 2012
California law requires employers to hold regular tailgate safety meetings for construction
workers. But running an effective tailgate meeting can be a challenge. It takes preparation and a
real desire to involve your crew in health and safety.
Tips for Trainers: Getting the Crew Involved
Tailgate safety meeting work best if the whole crew actively participates. Here are some ways to
encourage everyone to get involved.
•
ARE YOU WELL PREPARED, DON’T FAKE IT. Have you reviewed the material so
that you can lead the meeting and not just read the topic? If someone has a question and
you do not know the answer, don’t guess or fake an answer. Promise that you will get
back to the person, and then make sure you do.
•
DO YOU GET THE CREW ACTIVELY INVOLVED IN THE MEETING?
o Invite the crew to ask questions and make suggestions related to the topic?
Ask questions instead of lecturing; use the answers as a springboard for discussion.
o Ask about personal experience. If you ask a question and no one has an answer,
rephrase the question. It may be too abstract. Try to make it more direct and
personal. Ask if someone has had any personal experience that can help the group
figure out an answer.
For example, suppose no one can answer the question, “What are the health
effects of breathing asbestos?” You could try to make the question more
personal by asking, “Have you ever known anyone who got sick from
working with asbestos? What kind of illness did they have?”
o
o
o
•
Limit the amount of time any one person can talk. If a crew member is talking
too much, invite someone else to speak. Do it tactfully. For example, wait until
the person takes a breath, quickly say “thank you,” and then move along.
Never make fun of anyone or put anyone down, especially for asking questions.
Stick to the topic. If the crew’s questions and comments move too far from the
topic, tell them that their concern can be addressed later – either in private
conversation or in an upcoming safety meeting.
DO YOU FOLLOW UP ON EACH MEETING?
o Look into complaints, concerns, and suggestions that the crew brought up?
o Report back later to let the crew know what will be done?
HAYWARD ELECTRIC COMPANY
MEDICAL RESPONSE LOCATIONS FOR YEAR
2012
Occupational Health Center Locations and Contact Phone Numbers
ANTIOCH- Contra Costa Industrial Medical Clinic
2339 Buchanan Rd
Antioch, CA 94509
Tel# (925)777-9194
Fax# (925)777-1120
MARTINEZ- C B Tang Md Inc, Dba CareOnSite
1805 Arnold Dr
Martinez, CA 94553
Tel# (562)437-0831
Fax # (925)335-5060
BAKERSFIELD- Us Healthworks Medical Group
Bakersfield
1800 Westwind Dr Ste 301
Bakersfield, CA 93301
Tel# (661)327-9617
Fax # (661)327-5701
MILPITAS- Us Healthworks Medical Group
Milpitas
1717 S Main St
Milpitas, CA 95035
Tel# (408)957-5700
Fax # (408)946-5476
FONTANA- Metropolitan Industrial Medical
10444 Live Oak Ave
Fontana, CA 92337
Tel# (909)770-8293
Fax# (909)770-8298
MODESTO- Us Healthworks Medical Group
Modesto 1
1524 McHenry Ave Ste 500
Modesto, CA 95350
Tel# (209)575-5801
Fax # (209)575-0115
NAPA- Work Health
1100 Trancas St Ste 300
Napa, CA 94558
Tel# (707)257-4084
Fax# (707)254-7162
FREMONT- Fremont Urgent Care Center
3161 Walnut Ave
Fremont, CA 94538
Tel#( 510)796-1000
Fax#(510)796-1050
FRESNO- Concentra Medical Center
2555 S East Ave
Fresno, CA 93706
Tel# (559)499-2400x0
Fax# (559)264-9241x0
OAKLAND- US Healthworks Medical Group
Oakland
7817 Oakport St Ste 140
Oakland, CA 94621
Tel# (510)638-0701
Fax# (510)638-1209
HAYWARD/UNION CITY- Us Healthworks Medical
Group Union City
33560 Alvarado Niles Rd
Union City, CA 94587
Tel# (510)489-8700
Fax# (510)-489-2643
PETALUMA/ROHNERT PARK- Concentra Medical
Center
6174 State Farm Dr
Rohnert Park, CA 94928
Tel#( 707)586-4320
Fax#( 707)586-4328
LIVERMORE- Livermore Medical Clinic
87 Fenton St Ste 210
Livermore, CA 94550
Tel# (925)373-0337x0
Fax # (925)373-0257
PLEASANTON- Valleycare Health SystemsOccupational Health
5565 W Las Positas Blvd Ste 150
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Tel# (925)416-3562
Fax# (925)416-3603
Occupational Health Center Locations and Contact Phone Numbers
RICHMOND- Concentra Medical CenterRichmond-CA
2970 Hilltop Mall Rd Ste 203
Richmond, CA 94806
Tel# (510)222-8000
Fax # (510)222-2690
SAN RAFAEL/CORTE MADERA- Medical Center Of
Marin
101 Casa Buena Dr
Corte Madera, CA 94925
Tel# ( 415)924-4525
Fax#( 415)924-8167
SANTA CLARA- Us Healthworks Medical Group
Santa Clara
988 Walsh Ave
Santa Clara, CA 95050
Tel# (408)988-6868
Fax# (408)492-9825
ROSEVILLE- Medcare Medical Center
1907 Douglas Blvd Ste 70
Roseville, CA 95661
Tel# (916)783-0101
Fax# (916)783-6049
SANTA ROSA -Concentra Medical Center
1221 N Dutton Ave
Santa Rosa, CA 95401
Tel# (707)543-8360
Fax# (707)543-8361
SACRAMENTO- Us Healthworks Medical Group
Sacramento-Downtown
1675 Alhambra Blvd Ste B
Sacramento, CA 95816
Tel# (916)451-4580
Fax# (916)451-3119
STOCKTON- Us Healthworks Medical Group
Stockton
3663 E Arch Rd Ste 400
Stockton, CA 95215
Tel# (209)943-2202
Fax# (209)943-2209
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO- Us Healthworks Medical
Group South San Francisco
192 Beacon St
South San Francisco, CA 94080
Tel# (650)589-6500
Fax# (661)678-4564
VACAVILLE- Solano Care
600 Nut Tree Rd Ste 320
Vacaville, CA 95687
Tel# (707)449-6373
Fax# (707)449-0839
SAN FRANCISCO -Concentra Medical Center
110 Sutter St Ste 300
San Francisco, CA 94104
Tel# (415)781-7077
Fax# (415)781-7099
WALNUT CREEK- Muir Diablo Occupational
Medicine
Address 1981 N Broadway Ste 190
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
Tel# (925)932-7715
Fax# (925)932-0603
REDWOOD CITY- Us Health works Medical Group
192 Beacon St
South San Francisco, CA 94080
Tel# (650)-589-6500
Fax#( 661)-678-4564
SAN JOSE- Us Healthworks Medical Group
1893 Monterey Rd Ste 200
San Jose, CA 95112
Tel# (408)288-3800
Fax# (408)288-3814
EMERGENCY CARE FACILITIES AND CONTACT PHONE NUMBERS
ANTIOCH- Sutter Delta Memorial Hospital
3901 Lone Tree Way
Antioch, CA 94509
Tel # (925)779-7200
Fax# (925)779-7276
MARTINEZ- John Muir Medical Center
2540 East St
Concord, CA 94520
Tel# (925)-682-8200
Fax# (925)674-2318
BAKERSFIELD- HealthSouth Baker
5001 Commerce Dr
Bakersfield, CA 93309
Tel# (661)323-5500
Fax # (661)323-0252
MILPITAS- Regional Medical Center of San Jose
FONTANA/SAN BERNARDINO- Community
Hospital of San Bernardino
Fax# (909)806-1035
MODESTO- Doctors Medical Center
1441 Florida Ave
Modesto, CA 95350
Tel# (209)576-3601
Fax# (209)576-3680
FREMONT- Washington Hospital Fremont
Address 2000 Mowry Ave
Fremont, CA 94538
TEL# (510)797-1111
Fax# (510)791-3455
NAPA- Queen of the Valley Hospital
1000 Trancas St
Napa, CA 94558
Tel# (707)252-4411
Fax# (707)257-4172
FRESNO- Community Medical Center-Fresno
2823 Fresno St
Fresno, CA 93721
Tel# (559)459-6000
Fax# (559)4592420
OAKLAND- Alta Bates Summit Medical Center
2450 Ashby Ave
Berkeley, CA 94705
Tel# (510)204-4444
Fax# (510)204-1651
HAYWARD/UNION CITY- St. Rose Hospital
27200 Calaroga Ave
Hayward, CA 94545
Tel# (510)264-4000
Fax# (510)264-4091
PETALUMA- Petaluma Valley Hospital
400 N McDowell Blvd
Petaluma, CA 94954
Tel# (707)778-1111
Fax# (707)778-2653
LIVERMORE- ValleyCare Medical Center
5555 W Las Positas Blvd
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Tel#( 925)847-3000
Fax#( 925)416-3533
PLEASANTON- ValleyCare Medical Center
5555 W Las Positas Blvd
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Tel# (925)847-3000
Fax # (925)416-3533
1805 Medical Center Dr
San Bernardino, CA 92411
Tel#(909)887-6333
225 N Jackson Ave
San Jose, CA 95116
Tel# (408)259-5000
Fax# (408)928-7082
EMERGENCY CARE FACILITIES AND CONTACT PHONE NUMBERS
REDWOOD CITY- Sequoia Hospital
170 Alameda De Las Pulgas
Redwood City, CA 94062
Tel# (650)369-5811
Fax# (650)780-0532
SAN RAFAEL- Marin General Hospital
250 Bon Air Rd
Greenbrae, CA 94904
Tel# (415)925-7000
Fax# (415)925-7457
RICHMOND- Doctors Medical Center-San Pablo
Campus
Fax#(510)970-5729
SANTA CLARA- Santa Clara Valley Med Center
751 S Bascom Ave
San Jose, CA 95128
Tel# (408)885-5000
Fax# (408)885-4514
ROSEVILLE- Mercy Hospital of Folsom
1650 Creekside Dr
Folsom, CA 95630
Tel# (916)983-7400
Fax# (916)983-7554
SANTA ROSA -Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital
1165 Montgomery Dr
Santa Rosa, CA 95405
Tel# (707)546-3210
Fax# (707)522-1531
SACRAMENTO- Methodist Hospital of Sacramento
7500 Hospital Dr
Sacramento, CA 95823
Tel# (916)423-3000
Fax# (916)423-5954
STOCKTON- St. Josephs Medical Center
1800 N California St
Stockton, CA 95204
Tel# (209)943-2000
Fax# (209)461-5137
SAN BRUNO/SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO- Seton
Medical Center
1900 Sullivan Ave
Daly City, CA 94015
Tel# (650)992-4000
Fax# (650)991-6817
VACAVILLE- North Bay VacaValley Hospital
1000 Nut Tree Rd
Vacaville, CA 95687
Tel# (707)624-7000
Fax# (707)646-5310
SAN FRANCISCO -California Pacific Medical Center
Pacific Campus
2333 Buchanan St
San Francisco, CA 94115
Tel# (415)600-6000
Fax# (415)600-1309
SAN JOSE- Regional Medical Center of San Jose
225 N Jackson Ave
San Jose, CA 95116
Tel# (408)259-5000
Fax# (408)928-7082
Vallejo-Sutter Solano Medical Center
300 Hospital Dr
Vallejo, CA 94589
Tel#(707)554-4444
Fax#(707)554-5514
2000 Vale Rd
San Pablo, CA 94806
Tel# (510)970-5000
WALNUT CREEK -John Muir Medical Center,
Walnut Creek
1601 Ygnacio Valley Rd
Walnut Creek, CA 94598
Tel# (925)939-3000
Fax# (925)947-4492
Antioch-DIABLO AREA
ANTIOCH- Contra Costa Industrial Medical
Clinic
2339 Buchanan Rd
Antioch, CA 94509
Tel# (925)777-9194
Fax# (925)777-1120
ANTIOCH- Sutter Delta Memorial Hospital
3901 Lone Tree Way
Antioch, CA 94509
Tel # (925)779-7200
Fax# (925)779-7276
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Bakersfield-KERN COUNTY AREA
BAKERSFIELD- Us Healthworks Medical
Group Bakersfield
1800 Westwind Dr Ste 301
Bakersfield, CA 93301
Tel# (661)327-9617
Fax # (661)327-5701
BAKERSFIELD- HealthSouth Baker
5001 Commerce Dr
Bakersfield, CA 93309
Tel# (661)323-5500
Fax # (661)323-0252
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Fontana-INLAND EMPIRE AREA
FONTANA- Metropolitan Industrial
Medical
10444 Live Oak Ave
Fontana, CA 92337
Tel# (909)770-8293
Fax# (909)770-8298
FONTANA/SAN BERNARDINO- Community
Hospital of San Bernardino
1805 Medical Center Dr
San Bernardino, CA 92411
Tel#(909)887-6333
Fax# (909)806-1035
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Fremont-OAKLAND AREA
FREMONT- Fremont Urgent Care Center
3161 Walnut Ave
Fremont, CA 94538
Tel#( 510)796-1000
Fax#(510)796-1050
FREMONT- Washington Hospital Fremont
Address 2000 Mowry Ave
Fremont, CA 94538
TEL# (510)797-1111
Fax# (510)791-3455
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Fresno-CENTRAL CALIFORNIA AREA
FRESNO- Concentra Medical Center
2555 S East Ave
Fresno, CA 93706
Tel# (559)499-2400x0
Fax# (559)264-9241x0
FRESNO- Community Medical CenterFresno
2823 Fresno St
Fresno, CA 93721
Tel# (559)459-6000
Fax# (559)4592420
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Hayward-OAKLAND AREA
HAYWARD/UNION CITY- Us Healthworks
Medical Group Union City
33560 Alvarado Niles Rd
Union City, CA 94587
Tel# (510)489-8700
Fax# (510)-489-2643
HAYWARD/UNION CITY- St. Rose Hospital
27200 Calaroga Ave
Hayward, CA 94545
Tel# (510)264-4000
Fax# (510)264-4091
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Livermore-DIABLO AREA
LIVERMORE- Livermore Medical Clinic
87 Fenton St Ste 210
Livermore, CA 94550
Tel# (925)373-0337x0
Fax # (925)373-0257
LIVERMORE- ValleyCare Medical Center
5555 W Las Positas Blvd
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Tel#( 925)847-3000
Fax#( 925)416-3533
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Martinez-DIABLO AREA
MARTINEZ- C B Tang Md Inc, Dba
CareOnSite
1805 Arnold Dr
Martinez, CA 94553
Tel# (562)437-0831
Fax # (925)335-5060
MARTINEZ- John Muir Medical Center
2540 East St
Concord, CA 94520
Tel# (925)-682-8200
Fax# (925)674-2318
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Milpitas-SAN JOSE AREA
MILPITAS- Us Healthworks Medical Group
Milpitas
1717 S Main St
Milpitas, CA 95035
Tel# (408)957-5700
Fax # (408)946-5476
MILPITAS- Regional Medical Center of San
Jose
225 N Jackson Ave
San Jose, CA 95116
Tel# (408)259-5000
Fax# (408)928-7082
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Modesto-CENTRAL CALIFRONIA AREA
MODESTO- Us Healthworks Medical
Group Modesto 1
1524 McHenry Ave Ste 500
Modesto, CA 95350
Tel# (209)575-5801
Fax # (209)575-0115
MODESTO- Doctors Medical Center
1441 Florida Ave
Modesto, CA 95350
Tel# (209)576-3601
Fax# (209)576-3680
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Napa-NAPA AND SOLANO AREA
NAPA- Work Health
1100 Trancas St Ste 300
Napa, CA 94558
Tel# (707)257-4084
Fax# (707)254-7162
NAPA- Queen of the Valley Hospital
1000 Trancas St
Napa, CA 94558
Tel# (707)252-4411
Fax# (707)257-4172
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Oakland-OAKLAND AREA
OAKLAND- US Healthworks Medical Group
Oakland
7817 Oakport St Ste 140
Oakland, CA 94621
Tel# (510)638-0701
Fax# (510)638-1209
OAKLAND- Alta Bates Summit Medical
Center
2450 Ashby Ave
Berkeley, CA 94705
Tel# (510)204-4444
Fax# (510)204-1651
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Petaluma-MARIN AND NORTH AREA
PETALUMA/ROHNERT PARK- Concentra
Medical Center
6174 State Farm Dr
Rohnert Park, CA 94928
Tel#( 707)586-4320
Fax#( 707)586-4328
PETALUMA- Petaluma Valley Hospital
400 N McDowell Blvd
Petaluma, CA 94954
Tel# (707)778-1111
Fax# (707)778-2653
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Pleasanton-DIABLO AREA
PLEASANTON- Valleycare Health SystemsOccupational Health
5565 W Las Positas Blvd Ste 150
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Tel# (925)416-3562
Fax# (925)416-3603
PLEASANTON- ValleyCare Medical Center
5555 W Las Positas Blvd
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Tel# (925)847-3000
Fax # (925)416-3533
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Redwood City-SAN FRANCISCO PENINSULA AREA
REDWOOD CITY- Us Health works Medical
Group
192 Beacon St
South San Francisco, CA 94080
Tel# (650)-589-6500
Fax#( 661)-678-4564
REDWOOD CITY- Sequoia Hospital
170 Alameda De Las Pulgas
Redwood City, CA 94062
Tel# (650)369-5811
Fax# (650)780-0532
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Richmond-OAKLAND AREA
RICHMOND- Concentra Medical CenterRichmond-CA
2970 Hilltop Mall Rd Ste 203
Richmond, CA 94806
Tel# (510)222-8000
Fax # (510)222-2690
RICHMOND- Doctors Medical Center-San
Pablo Campus
2000 Vale Rd
San Pablo, CA 94806
Tel# (510)970-5000
Fax#(510)970-5729
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Roseville-SACRAMENTO AREA
ROSEVILLE- Medcare Medical Center
1907 Douglas Blvd Ste 70
Roseville, CA 95661
Tel# (916)783-0101
Fax# (916)783-6049
ROSEVILLE- Mercy Hospital of Folsom
1650 Creekside Dr
Folsom, CA 95630
Tel# (916)983-7400
Fax# (916)983-7554
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Sacramento-SACRAMENTO AREA
SACRAMENTO- Us Healthworks Medical
Group Sacramento-Downtown
1675 Alhambra Blvd Ste B
Sacramento, CA 95816
Tel# (916)451-4580
Fax# (916)451-3119
SACRAMENTO- Methodist Hospital of
Sacramento
7500 Hospital Dr
Sacramento, CA 95823
Tel# (916)423-3000
Fax# (916)423-5954
Traveler's Insurance 2012
San Francisco-SAN FRANCISCO AREA
SAN FRANCISCO -Concentra Medical
Center
110 Sutter St Ste 300
San Francisco, CA 94104
Tel# (415)781-7077
Fax# (415)781-7099
SAN FRANCISCO -California Pacific Medical
Center Pacific Campus
2333 Buchanan St
San Francisco, CA 94115
Tel# (415)600-6000
Fax# (415)600-1309
Traveler's Insurance 2012
San Jose-SAN JOSE AREA
SAN JOSE- Us Healthworks Medical Group
1893 Monterey Rd Ste 200
San Jose, CA 95112
Tel# (408)288-3800
Fax# (408)288-3814
SAN JOSE- Regional Medical Center of San
Jose
225 N Jackson Ave
San Jose, CA 95116
Tel# (408)259-5000
Fax# (408)928-7082
Traveler's Insurance 2012
San Rafael-MARIN AND NORTH AREA
SAN RAFAEL/CORTE MADERA- Medical
Center Of Marin
101 Casa Buena Dr
Corte Madera, CA 94925
Tel# ( 415)924-4525
Fax#( 415)924-8167
SAN RAFAEL- Marin General Hospital
250 Bon Air Rd
Greenbrae, CA 94904
Tel# (415)925-7000
Fax# (415)925-7457
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Santa Clara-SAN JOSE AREA
SANTA CLARA- Us Healthworks Medical
Group Santa Clara
988 Walsh Ave
Santa Clara, CA 95050
Tel# (408)988-6868
Fax# (408)492-9825
SANTA CLARA- Santa Clara Valley Med
Center
751 S Bascom Ave
San Jose, CA 95128
Tel# (408)885-5000
Fax# (408)885-4514
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Santa Rosa-MARIN AND NORTH AREA
SANTA ROSA -Concentra Medical Center
1221 N Dutton Ave
Santa Rosa, CA 95401
Tel# (707)543-8360
Fax# (707)543-8361
SANTA ROSA -Santa Rosa Memorial
Hospital
1165 Montgomery Dr
Santa Rosa, CA 95405
Tel# (707)546-3210
Fax# (707)522-1531
Traveler's Insurance 2012
South San Francisco-SAN FRANCISCO PENINSULA AREA
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO- Us Healthworks
Medical Group South San Francisco
192 Beacon St
South San Francisco, CA 94080
Tel# (650)589-6500
Fax# (661)678-4564
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO- Seton Medical
Center
1900 Sullivan Ave
Daly City, CA 94015
Tel# (650)992-4000
Fax# (650)991-6817
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Stockton-CENTRAL CALIFORNIA AREA
STOCKTON- Us Healthworks Medical
Group Stockton
3663 E Arch Rd Ste 400
Stockton, CA 95215
Tel# (209)943-2202
Fax# (209)943-2209
STOCKTON- St. Josephs Medical Center
1800 N California St
Stockton, CA 95204
Tel# (209)943-2000
Fax# (209)461-5137
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Vacaville-NAPA SOLANO AREA
VACAVILLE- Solano Care
600 Nut Tree Rd Ste 320
Vacaville, CA 95687
Tel# (707)449-6373
Fax# (707)449-0839
VACAVILLE- North Bay VacaValley Hospital
1000 Nut Tree Rd
Vacaville, CA 95687
Tel# (707)624-7000
Fax# (707)646-5310
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Vallejo-NAPA SOLANO AREA
Vallejo-Sutter Solano Medical Center
300 Hospital Dr
Vallejo, CA 94589
Tel#(707)554-4444
Fax#(707)554-5514
Vallejo-Sutter Solano Medical Center
300 Hospital Dr
Vallejo, CA 94589
Tel#(707)554-4444
Fax#(707)554-5514
Traveler's Insurance 2012
Walnut Creek-DIABLO AREA
WALNUT CREEK- Muir Diablo
Occupational Medicine
Address 1981 N Broadway Ste 190
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
Tel# (925)932-7715
Fax# (925)932-0603
WALNUT CREEK -John Muir Medical
Center, Walnut Creek
1601 Ygnacio Valley Rd
Walnut Creek, CA 94598
Tel# (925)939-3000
Fax# (925)947-4492
Traveler's Insurance 2012
HAYWARD ELECTRIC COMPANY
TAILGATE SAFETY MEETING ATTENDANCE
SHEETS FOR YEAR 2012
HAYWARD ELECTRIC
SAFETY MEETING DATES FOR 2012
MTG. DATE
4-Jan-12
11-Jan-12
18-Jan-12
25-Jan-12
1-Feb-12
8-Feb-12
15-Feb-12
22-Feb-12
29-Feb-12
7-Mar-12
14-Mar-12
21-Mar-12
28-Mar-12
4-Apr-12
11-Apr-12
18-Apr-12
25-Apr-12
2-May-12
9-May-12
16-May-12
23-May-12
30-May-12
6-Jun-12
13-Jun-12
20-Jun-12
27-Jun-12
4-Jul-12
11-Jul-12
18-Jul-12
25-Jul-12
1-Aug-12
8-Aug-12
15-Aug-12
22-Aug-12
29-Aug-12
5-Sep-12
12-Sep-12
19-Sep-12
26-Sep-12
3-Oct-12
10-Oct-12
17-Oct-12
24-Oct-12
31-Oct-12
7-Nov-12
14-Nov-12
21-Nov-12
28-Nov-12
5-Dec-12
12-Dec-12
19-Dec-12
26-Dec-12
WEEK END DATE
8-Jan-12
15-Jan-12
22-Jan-12
29-Jan-12
5-Feb-12
12-Feb-12
19-Feb-12
26-Feb-12
4-Mar-12
11-Mar-12
18-Mar-12
25-Mar-12
1-Apr-12
8-Apr-12
15-Apr-12
22-Apr-12
29-Apr-12
6-May-12
13-May-12
20-May-12
27-May-12
3-Jun-12
10-Jun-12
17-Jun-12
24-Jun-12
1-Jul-12
8-Jul-12
15-Jul-12
22-Jul-12
29-Jul-12
5-Aug-12
12-Aug-12
19-Aug-12
26-Aug-12
2-Sep-12
9-Sep-12
16-Sep-12
23-Sep-12
30-Sep-12
7-Oct-12
14-Oct-12
21-Oct-12
28-Oct-12
4-Nov-12
11-Nov-12
18-Nov-12
25-Nov-12
2-Dec-12
9-Dec-12
16-Dec-12
23-Dec-12
30-Dec-12
SAFETY TOPIC
1 - Assured Equipment Grounding
2 - Fall Protection & Inspection
3 - Lockout/Tagout Procedures
4 - Rigging
5 - Reporting Injuries and Incidents
6 - Working Around /On Energized Equipment
7 - Personal Protective Equipment
8 - Hard Facts on Hard Hats
9 - Concrete
10 - Good Housekeeping Practices
11 - Hazards of Confined Space
12 - Hand Tools - Powder Actuated
13 - Safety Rules & Responsibilities
14 - First Aid/CPR
15 - Eye Protection
16 - Crane Safety
17 - Ladders
18 - Chemical Hazard Communication
19 - Scaffolds
20 - Gas Cylinders
21 - Trenches / Excavations
22 - Benzene - Know The Signs
23 - Noise
24 - Working in the Heat
25 - Lead Abatement
26 - Electrical Safety
27 - Foot Protection
28 - Hazarous Atmospheres
29 - Safety Meeting Responsibilities / Incentives
30 - OSHA 300 Log
31 - MSDS Information
32 - Hand Protection
33 - Construction Safety
34 - Safe Lifting Basics
35 - Hand Tools
36 - Thinking About Drinking / Substance Abuse
37 - NFPA 70E - What Is It?
38 - Road Safety
39 - High Voltage Accidents
40 - Falls - Causes and Cures
41 - Welding and Cutting
42 - Respiratory Protection
43 - Machines and Machine Guarding
44 - Chemical Burns
45 - Tips For Operators
46 - Fire Protection
47 - Hexevalent Chromium
48 - Process Safety Management
49 - Forklift Safety
50 - Bloodborne Pathegens
51 - Asbestos Safety
52 - Jobsite Safety Quiz
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
1 - Assured Equipment Grounding
MEETING DATE :
4-Jan-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #1
Assured Equipment Grounding
Scope
The purpose of this procedure is to establish a standardized program for Assured
Grounding protection on all job sites; to protect employees from electrical hazards
associated with 120V AC current.
Intent
As an alternate to, or in addition to, using GFCI protection on all 120V, 60 hertz, 15 and 20
amp electrical outlets which are not a part of the building’s permanent wiring we have
decided to institute an Assured Equipment Grounding Conductor Program. The
program shall comply with the following minimum requirements:
1. This written description of the program, including the specific procedures
adopted by the company, shall be made available at all times for inspection.
2. Employees shall be instructed to visually inspect each cord set, plug and
receptacle of cord sets and all equipment connected by cord and plug before each
day’s use for external defects such as deformed or missing pins or insulation
damage and for indication of internal damage. When there is evidence of damage,
the damaged item shall be taken out of service, tagged for testing by wrapping the
Quarterly Color tape around the male prongs. The item shall not be returned to
service until repaired and tested. After proper repairs have been made the item
shall display a ring of the correct quarterly tape attached around the cord near the
male end.
3. Test Performed:
a. All equipment grounding conductors shall be tested for continuity and
shall be electrically continuous.
b. Each receptacle and plug shall be tested for correct attachment of the
equipment grounding conductor. The equipment grounding conductor shall
be connected to its proper terminal.
4. Testing Schedule - All required tests shall be performed:
a. Before first use.
b. Before equipment is returned to service following any repairs.
Topic 1-1
c. Before equipment is used after any incident which can be reasonably
suspected to have caused damage (for example, when a cord set has been
run over).
d. At regular intervals not to exceed 3 months (normally at the beginning of
the quarter).
5. Test Records - Test performed as required in this paragraph shall be recorded
as follows. Each receptacle, cord set, and cord-connected equipment that passed
the test shall indicate on the cord by use of color tape the quarter in which it was
tested in accordance with the following color scheme.
6. Color Coding Scheme for assured grounding test record:
Month or Quarter
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Color Coding Quarterly
Yellow
Yellow
Yellow
Blue
Blue
Blue
Green
Green
Green
Red
Red
Red
Be sure that the last quarter’s color tape is removed before new quarter’s coding is
applied.
7. The employer shall not make available or permit the use by employees of any
equipment which has not met the requirements of paragraph (b)(1)(iii) of OSHA
requirements.
Topic 1-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
2 - Fall Protection & Inspection
MEETING DATE :
11-Jan-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #2
Fall Protection & Inspection
As a general rule, any time a worker is at a height greater than 6 feet, a fall
hazard exists. Where a fall hazard exists, there are two acceptable options; (1)
eliminate the hazard, or (2) provide protection against it. Ideally, it is best to totally
eliminate the hazard. Since that is often not possible, Hayward Electric requires that
fall protection be required when an employee has the potential of falling a distance
of 6 feet or greater.
Fall System Specification
Safety harness lanyards shall be a minimum of 1/2-inch nylon, or equivalent,
with the maximum length to provide for a fall of no greater than 6 feet, with a
nominal breaking strength of 5,400 pounds. A Body harnesses consist of
components made of nylon straps such as but not limited to: chest, shoulder, thigh,
and waist strap designed with a tensile strength of 5000 pounds. The harness shall
be designed to allow for suspension by a fall, and prevent the employee from tilting
or falling out of the harness while suspended. All safety harness and lanyard
hardware shall be drop forged or pressed steel, cadmium plated in accordance with
type1, Class B plating specified in Federal Specification QQ-P-416. Surface shall be
smooth and free of sharp edges. Lanyard hardware except for rivets shall be
capable of withstanding a tensile loading of 4,000 pounds without cracking,
breaking, or taking a permanent deformation.
Rules And Guidelines
In compliance with OSHA’s Fall Protection Requirements, Hayward Electric
requires that all employees conform to 100% fall protection when working at an
elevation of 6 feet or greater by means of guardrails, safety nets or personal fall
arrest systems. A full body harness with a shock absorbing double lanyard shall be
used for 100% fall protection. Lanyards are not to be connected to each other by
means of the snap hook. Training shall include proper use as well as proper fitting
according to size. Maximum working load is 310 pounds, unless labeled
otherwise.
All equipment must be visually inspected before each use. Equipment must
not be altered in any way. Repairs must be performed only by the manufacturer or
authorized agent. This includes adding wire or other foreign material to any
part of a harness or lanyard, alterations to the double locking snap-hook or
tying knots in lanyards is also not permitted.
Fall arrest systems are designed for personal fall protection. Never use fall
protection equipment for purposes other than those for which it was
designed. Fall protection equipment should never be used for tag lines,
hoisting, securing, or towing.
Topic 2-1
Harnesses and lanyards are designed be used as a unit; do not use a
mixture of various manufacturers’ components (i.e. Miller harness with a Rose
lanyard). Manufacturers will not assure safe use or liability for such mixtures.
Point of attachment shall not be conduit, lines too small to carry the load,
which may be imposed on the line, or hot lines, which may damage or alter its ability
to support a worker. The point of attachment must be capable of supporting a
minimum dead weight of 5,400 pounds per person attached
Always check for obstructions below the work area to make sure potential fall
path is clear. When utilizing shock-absorbing lanyards, the lanyards units may
elongate as much as 3-1/2 ft. during the shock-absorption process.
Inspection Process
In order to ensure a harness will perform the ultimate function it is intended
for—saving a life—it must be inspected prior to every use. Remember that all
harnesses have a limited life. However, the length of wearable life will vary greatly,
depending on the amount of wear it receives and in what type of environment it is
worn. For example, a harness worn only indoors, or only a couple of times in a
week, will have a much longer life than one worn outdoors every day. A harness
worn outdoors endures a variety of environmental forces and may even show visible
signs of damage or corrosion in a matter of months.
Company-owned full body harnesses, D-ring straps, and shock absorbing
lanyards will be inspected on a quarterly basis at the same time and same method
as the Assured Equipment Grounding Conductor Program. This program shall
specifically comply with the following minimum requirements:
1. Employees shall be instructed to visually inspect each harness and lanyard
before first use, before each day’s use, on a quarterly basis, and/or after any
incident that may have damaged the integrity of the harness and/or lanyard
for external defects such as loose stitching, frayed webbing, damaged Drings, or other damage. When there is evidence of damage, the damaged
item shall be taken out of service and sent to the shop for disposal.
2. Steps for Inspection
Step 1: Inspect component hardware for damage, distortion, broken
pieces, sharp edges, burns, cracks, worn parts, or corrosion.
Step 2: Inspect webbing—material must be free of frayed, cut, or broken
fibers, tears, abrasions, mold, burns, discoloration, etc. Check for
chemical, heat, and ultraviolet damage (may be indicated by brown or
discolored areas, brittle, or splinters).
Topic 2-2
Step 3: Inspect labels—all labels should be present and fully legible.
Step 4: Inspect each system component or subsystem per
manufacturers’ instructions.
Step 5: Color code a harness that passes inspection with the correct
color for the quarter.
NOTE: IF INSPECTION REVEALS A DEFECTIVE CONDITION,
REMOVE THE UNIT FROM SERVICE IMMEDIATELY AND CONTACT
YOUR SUPERVISOR.
3. Color Coding Method for Fall Protection Inspection Program
Quarter
Color Coding
1st Quarter-January, February, March
2nd Quarter-April, May, June
3rd Quarter-July, August, September
4th Quarter-October, November,
December
Yellow
Blue
Green
Red
4. The employer shall not make available or permit the use by employees of
any equipment, which has not met the requirements of this program and
OSHA requirements.
5. Every Hayward Electric employee who uses fall protection equipment must
be trained in fall protection inspection. Training will be documented by the
following fall protection inspection quiz and implemented with the company
Lift Training Program. Training is valid for a period of three years.
More Information
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer
to the Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 18,
Fall Protection.
Topic 2-3
Topic 2-4
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
3 - Lockout/Tagout Procedures
MEETING DATE :
18-Jan-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #3
Lockout/Tagout Procedures
Don’t Just Turn It Off - Lock It Out
Any powered equipment is potentially dangerous - even if it’s supposed to be shut down!
Many needless accidents occur when somebody turns on a machine that someone else
is repairing. “I didn’t know anyone was working on it” is the usual alibi in accident
investigations.
Accidents occurring under these circumstances are not only needless but serious. They
result not in small cuts or scratches, but most often in amputations, serious fractures,
even death. Any energy source - electrical, mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic, or gas can be deadly if not controlled.
There is one sure way to prevent such accidents from happening to you and that is to
make certain that power cannot possibly reach machinery while you are adjusting or
repairing it. How is this accomplished? By locking out and tagging the power at its source.
These procedures are so important that there are federal safety regulations covering
them.
Locking out means placing a lock on a device that prevents the release of any “Stored
Energy”, such as an electric circuit breaker, disconnect switch, a line valve, a block, and
others.
Tagout means attaching a tag on a switch or other shutoff device that warns others not to
start up the equipment. Tagout may only be used together with lockout, unless locking out
the equipment is impossible.
Stored Energy : ENERGY
Energy is Movement or the possibility of movement.
Whether the power switch is on or off, energy of some sort is always
present in any powered equipment.
Energy can come from many different sources, but is always one of two
types.
Kinetic energy- the force caused by the motion of an object.
Potential energy- the force stored in an object that isn’t moving.
Sounds easy? It is, of procedures are followed correctly. Here is a general lockout
procedure that can be adapted to your job:
Topic 3-1
Turn off the equipment at the control panel
Turn off or pull the main disconnect
Attach your safety lock at the main switch
Try to restart the equipment at the control panel
Check the machine for possible residual pressure, particularly for hydraulic systems
Complete your servicing work
·Replace all guards on the machinery
·Remove your safety lock and adapter
·Let others know that the equipment is back in service
No lockout system will be effective if it is undertaken in a hit-or-miss fashion.
You need special training and authorization to perform lockout/tagout. Hayward
Electric strongly recommends that all of our employees be trained in lockout/tagout
procedures. If you do not, you must refrain from performing work on powered equipment
requiring lockout/tagout and call someone who is trained and authorized to perform the
duty for you. Lockout/tagout is performed only by authorized employees who are trained
to : recognize hazardous energy sources and their type and amount of energy; isolate
and control energy to prevent accidents; and perform OSHA’s specific, required,
lockout/tagout steps. Occasionally affected employees are required to work with powered
equipment, but aren’t authorized to apply or remove locks and tags. They must know: why
lockout/tagout is important and how it works; the requirement to lockout/tagout equipment
before performing repairs or service; and the importance of not trying to remove or work
around locks or tags. Other employees aren’t involved with lockout/tagout, but should still
understand: lockout/tagout’s basic procedures and the importance of not trying to restart
locked or tagged equipment.
GROUP LOCK OUT / TAG OUT
In the event that multiple users have the need to lock out in the same location, Group
Lock Out / Tag Out can be used utilizing a “Group Lock Box”. One example of the use
of the Group Lock Out /Tag is as follows:
One appointed representative places his locks and tags at all the energy sources
required to isolate the system to be worked on. The representative then places the key
or keys to his lock or locks in the “Group Lock Out” box. The representative is then
responsible for the system isolation. The representative then demonstrates to all
Topic 3-2
authorized and effected employees the system isolation including showing location of
locks and tags. All employees requiring to place locks and tags on the system then
place their locks on the “Group Lock Out” box. From this point on Lock Out / Tag Out is
used for each individual employee as performed in “Individual Lock Out / Tag Out.
When the system is ready to be restored to the normal operating condition the removal
of locks and tags for all employees is performed as in “Individual” Lock Out / Tag Out.
Once the appointed representative has verified that all authorized and effected
employees has removed their lock from the “Group Lock Out” box he then removes his
key, then removing his locks from the system isolation locations. At this time the system
should be ready for normal start up as performed in the “Individual” Lock Out / Tag Out
Topic 3-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
4 - Rigging
MEETING DATE :
25-Jan-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #4
Rigging
The functions of rigging are to move or support material. When rigging loads,
employees must be able to recognize hazardous conditions, such as:



Improper sling or attachments for the type of load to be lifted and the
environment in which it is being lifted;
Worn slings and attachments or those with damage such as cracks, kinks,
bends, cuts, gouges, and frayed fibers; and
Improper storage of slings and misuses such as resting of loads on the sling or
dragging of slings across abrasive floors.
Employees need to identify and avoid hazardous work practices, such as:


Riding slings or walking under suspended loads.
Using improperly repaired or reconditioned slings and attachments or slings and
attachments that must be removed from service.
TYPES OF SLINGS:
There are several varieties of slings, including: alloy steel chain, wire rope, metal mesh,
natural fiber rope, synthetic fiber rope, synthetic web, and synthetic round slings. Each
type of sling has its advantages and disadvantages.
Many factors come into play when choosing the best sling for the task at hand. These
include size, strength, flexibility, and weight, as well as suitability for the work
environment, shapes of the load, and environmental conditions in which the sling will be
used. Below are the six types of slings.
Alloy Steel Chain Slings – A sling that is durable in almost all conditions, will
mold to the shape of most loads, and easy to adjust. Chains are difficult to
inspect, will damaged some loads, are heavy and bulky.
Wire Rope Slings – A sling that is easy to find, has a good strength to size ratio,
and easy to inspect. Wire rope is stiff, hard to bend around small objects and
sharp corners. Wire rope may not grip slick items such as pipe.
Metal Mesh Slings – A sling that is flat, flexible metal mesh weave that resists
kinking, tangling and twisting. Metal Mesh may not grip slick items such as pipe.
Natural and Synthetic Fiber Rope Slings – A sling with a good strength to size
ratio that is easy to inspect, and will mold to the shape of the load. Rope slings
Topic 4-1
are subject to heat and chemical damage, will stretch under load, and are subject
to cuts or tears.
Synthetic Web Slings – A sling that is extremely flexible and light weight, which
will mold to the shape of the load. Synthetic slings are subject to heat and
chemical damage, will stretch under load, and are subject to cuts or tears.
Synthetic Round Slings - A sling that is extremely flexible and light weight,
which will mold to the shape of the load. Synthetic slings are subject to heat and
chemical damage, will stretch under load, and are subject to cuts or tears.
Inspections of slings and related rigging hardware are to be done before each use.
Any sling that is found unfit for use shall be “red tagged” and returned to the shop.
Some of the things to look for when inspection slings;
 Missing or illegible sling identification
 Melting or charring on any part of the sling
 Holes, tears, cuts, snags, or elongation of the sling
 Broken or worn stitching in load-bearing splices
 Excessive abrasive wear
 Knots in any part of the sling
 Excessive pitting or corrosion, or cracked, distorted or broken fittings
 Distortion of chain links
 Visible indications that cause doubt as to the strength of the sling, such as loss of
color that may indicate the potential for ultraviolet light damage

Distortion, kinking, bird caging, or other evidence of damage to the wire rope
structure. Wire rope shall not be used if, in any length of eight diameters, the total
number of visible broken wires exceeds 10 percent of the total number of wires
During the lift, avoid shock loading by taking up the slack in the sling slowly. Apply
power cautiously so as to prevent jerking at the beginning of the lift, and accelerate or
decelerate slowly. Use taglines that are long enough to control the load, but still keeps
people out of the swing of the load. When using a sling there are several key points to
keep in mind:







Is the sling free of kinks or any other damage?
Is the sling rated for the lift?
Is the load balanced to prevent slipping?
Is the sling securely attached to the load?
Are the sling and the load protected from damage during the lift?
Is there a clear path for the movement of the load?
Are employees and other persons kept clear of the “danger zone” during the lift?
Topic 4-2
SUMMARY
There are good practices to follow to protect yourself while using slings to move
materials. First, learn as much as you can about the materials with which you will be
working. Slings come in many different types, one of which is right for your purpose.
Second, analyze the load to be moved - in terms of size, weight, shape, temperature,
and sensitivity - then choose the sling which best meets those needs. Third, always
inspect all the equipment before and after a move. Fourth, use safe lifting practices. Use
the proper lifting technique for the type of sling and the type of load.
Topic 4-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
5 - Reporting Injuries and Incidents
MEETING DATE :
1-Feb-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #5
Reporting Injuries And Incidents
It is important that you report on-the-job injuries and incidents to your supervisor as soon
as they occur. If you are at home and experiencing complication from something that
happened at work; you should contact the shop. There are many reasons for this:
First, it is important that the injury receive proper treatment. Often
minor injuries that could be handled with simple first aid become major
problems because they were not treated properly.
Second, this starts the documentation process. An employee could
be denied his rights under the Workers Compensation Insurance policy
because the employee failed to report the injury at the time it occurred and,
subsequently, suffered complications at a later date. Remember, injuries
that occur on-the-job are covered under the Workers Compensation Policy
while those injuries occurring off-the-job are covered under the Medical
Insurance Policy and California State Disability Insurance.
Third, nothing is learned from unreported incidents. Hazards, causes
and contributing circumstances are lost if not reported. Employees who don’t
take the time to report near misses they are involved in may not learn from
them. The fact that many incidents come within inches of being disabling
injury accidents makes failing to report them all the more serious.
Why don’t employees report incidents?
• Fear of the Supervisor’s disapproval.
• Not wanting to lose time from the job on piece-work assignments.
• Not wanting the incident on their work records.
• Not wanting to be embarrassed by co-worker ridicule or sarcasm.
• Reluctance to spoil the unit’s safety record.
• Dislike for the red tape involved.
• Failure to understand why incidents should be reported.
• Not recognizing the damage that could result.
Topic 5-1
• Not wanting to be the subject of an incident investigation.
Timely reporting also causes you to answer questions regarding the incident while the
events are still fresh in your mind. Some of the questions you should be prepared to
answer about the incident/near miss include:
• What are the circumstances surrounding the near miss?
• Is there a safety rule covering the situation?
• Did the almost-victim know the rule?
• Were any safety devices, clothing or equipment used improperly or not used at all
when they were called for?
• Have there been other near misses of the same type?
• Was the employee aware of the hazard?
• Did the employee know the safe procedures?
The answers to these questions should be included in the incident report. They will suggest
ways to prevent a recurrence.
Topic 5-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
6 - Working Around /On Energized Equipment
MEETING DATE :
8-Feb-12
JOB NAME:
JOB NUMBER:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
First Aid Kits
Tool Grounding
Fire Extinguishers
SAFETY MOMENT
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #6
Working Around /On Energized Equipment
Employees shall become familiar with the following general guidelines:
1. Only qualified personnel shall work on electrical equipment, systems, and installations.
Direct any questions to your foreman.
2. Electrical systems and equipment shall be treated as energized until tested, grounded
and locked out, tagged-out, or otherwise proven to be de-energized.
3. Electrical work shall be performed with great care to maximize personnel safety during
and after completion of the task. Shortcuts will not be tolerated.
4. Electrical installations and maintenance of electrical systems and equipment shall be
maintained in a safe condition in accordance to applicable guidelines: Cal OSHA/, OSHA,
NEC, etc.
5. Supervisor/Foreman shall be responsible for the enforcement of electrical safety
procedures.
6. Metal jewelry, belt buckles, etc., shall not be worn in close proximity to energized
circuits, systems, equipment, or worn under rubber gloves.
7. Employees shall remain alert at all times when working around or near energized
electrical equipment, systems, or circuits.
8. In the event an electrical accident/injury occurs, rescue/aid shall not be attempted until
the systems or circuit have been de-energized or it is deemed safe to attempt aid by the
rescuer upon examination of the scene.
9. Suitable eye protection and P.P.E. shall be worn by personnel whenever exposed to
electrical flash, or arcing.
10. Safety devices and personal protection devices shall be properly used and stored by all
employees. Employees shall verify "good condition" of all safety equipment before each
use.
11. Never reach blindly into areas that may contain energized parts.
12. Cable reels shall be securely blocked so they cannot roll accidentally.
Topic 6-1
13. No materials or tools shall be carried on the shoulder when working around or near
energized electrical equipment, systems, or circuits.
14. Employees shall become familiar with company/department work procedures and avoid
creating shortcuts that may compromise safety. Your safety is paramount - follow safe work
practices.
Specific Procedures For Working On Energized Equipment
1. Before any energized work is performed you must request an outage. If an outage is
unreasonable and is denied, proceed following the Hayward Electric Energized Work
Procedures as described below. However, if the work creates an unreasonable risk or
compromises safety you may need to postpone the work until an outage is possible
regardless of the clients' desire.
2. The Hayward Electric Energized Work Job Hazardous Analysis (JHA) (Refer to
Appendix 2 - Forms) needs to be completed and reviewed before any work is done on or
near energized wires, equipment, apparatus, etc., “NEAR" means close enough that you or
your tools could accidentally make contact with the energized part because of the lack of
appropriate barricades between you and the energized parts.
3.
A. Work shall not be performed on or near exposed energized parts of equipment or
systems until the following conditions are met:
1. Responsible supervision has determined that the work is to be performed
while the equipment or systems are energized.
2. Involved personnel have received instructions on the work techniques and
hazards involved in working on energized equipment.
3. Suitable personal protective equipment must be provided and used.
Suitable insulated gloves shall be worn for voltages in excess of 300 volts,
nominal, and UV Rated Face Shield and suitable Flame Retardant Clothing
(Flash suit or Nomex) must be worn.
4. Suitable eye protection has been provided and is used.
5. Where required, suitable barriers, barricades, tags, or signs are to be
placed for personal protection.
6. Warning signs and barriers shall be appropriately placed to isolate other
personnel from the electrical hazards. Suitable barricade tape would be Red
Tape with Black letters reading "Danger" or "Warning". Personnel shall
Topic 6-2
obey the warnings.
7. Never re-position, remove, or tamper with warning signs or barricades
unless authorized by your foreman.
8. Do not perform work on energized 480V equipment, circuits, or systems
alone. A minimum of a two man crew is required.
B. After the required work on an energized system or equipment has been
completed, an authorized person shall be responsible for:
1. Removing from the work area any temporary personnel protective
equipment, and
2. Reinstalling all permanent barriers or covers.
Topic 6-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
7 - Personal Protective Equipment
MEETING DATE :
15-Feb-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
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Safety Meeting Topic #7
Personal Protective Equipment
PPE - If You Need It, You’ve Got To Use It
At each of our discussions, there is generally one particular phase of safety being stressed.
The goal is to reduce the number of disabling job injuries - which will benefit both you and
the company.
Today the topic is safety clothing and equipment designed for our personal use as an
important contributing factor toward safety. The abuse, misuse, or nonuse of such
equipment, on the other hand, are contributing causes to many disabling injuries.
It Depends on the Job
The particular type of equipment needed to provide the needed protection depends on the
particular type of work being done. In areas where flying particles are likely to be found,
goggles must be used to protect the eyes. But this won’t provide enough eye protection for
an electric welder; that job calls for a helmet equipped with dark glasses to protect the
worker’s eyes from the blinding light and the sparks from the electric arc.
Similarly, the kind of protection safety shoes are supposed to provide determines what type
of shoe is appropriate. In other words, it must be slip-proof, non-conductive, high-topped,
steel-toed, etc. And the type of helmet to be worn depends on the type of hazard the
wearer is likely to encounter. In some occupations “bump-caps” may be adequate; in many
they are not.
OSHA Says
The regulations established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration for
head, face, eye, hand, arm and foot protection give a very general overall description of
when such protective gear is to be used. (Hearing protection devices and respirators of
various kinds are covered by more extensive and specific rules.) They also describe the
standards the pieces of equipment must meet.
Originally these OSHA rules said only that the required personal protective equipment must
be provided (whether by employer or employee), maintained, and worn. It was pretty much
a matter of our responsibility as employers to require the use of PPE and your
responsibility to actually use it. This made a certain amount of sense because, after all, it’s
your eyes that can be injured if your safety glasses are hanging around your neck. But then
OSHA apparently decided that too many injuries were occurring as the result of failure to
wear protective equipment, so their revised rules call for what they refer to as a hazard
analysis - to make sure we systematically identify all the factors in our work that would call
Topic 7-1
for requiring PPE. On top of that, it’s become the employer’s responsibility not just to state
that the equipment must be worn, but to see to it that it is worn.
No Exceptions, No Excuses
That’s why supervisors are now getting “on the backs” of employees who aren’t wearing
the personal protective equipment they’re supposed to, and why disciplinary action is
forthcoming. Hayward Electric has implemented the “three-strikes” program for making
sure everyone complies with the PPE policy.
But it’s not just a matter of compliance, it’s because we really don’t want you to be injured.
That’s not totally unselfish - we don’t want you hurt, and we do want you on the job. That’s
why we don’t make exceptions or accept excuses. Hayward Electric requires that you wear
your hard hat at all times, whether you need it for your job or not, especially if you go into
areas where falling objects may be a hazard. If your gloves or goggles don’t fit snugly or
are uncomfortable, don’t just leave them in your toolbox. Report it promptly so the situation
can be corrected.
More Information
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 16, Protective
Equipment.
Remember: No excuses, No exceptions - and we all hope - No injuries.
Topic 7-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
8 - Hard Facts on Hard Hats
MEETING DATE :
22-Feb-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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Safety Meeting Topic #8
Hard Facts on Hard Hats
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is a barrier between hazards and you. OSHA
requires employees to identify when workers need PPE as protection, and select PPE that
will protect against identified hazards. Train employees to know when and how to select,
use and care for the PPE.
It’s common sense to wear a hard hat when there’s risk of head injury. Hayward Electric
requires that hard hats be worn at all times while on every jobsite. Hard hats protect your
head when you’re at risk of impact or penetration from bumping your head; from falling
tools or materials when there are workers, machines, conveyor belts, etc. above you; from
objects being carried or swung nearby; and from electrical shock and burn.
Hard hat design and construction resists blows and absorbs shock. The one-piece outer
shell protects your head from blows or penetration. The head band and straps between the
outer shell and your head absorb the shock of the impact. Type I hard hats are intended to
reduce the force of impact resulting from a blow to the top of the head. Type II hard hats
are designed to provide protection against both side impact and blows to the top of the
head.
Hard hat classes identify their level of protection. Class G hard hats protect from voltage up
to 2,200 volts. Class E hard hats protect from voltage up to 20,000 volts. Class G and E
hard hats are both water-resistant and slow to burn if exposed to fire. Class C hard hats
are made of aluminum and are not rated for use around electricity. Class D hard hats are
designed for firefighters, are fire-resistant and won’t conduct electricity.
Make sure a hard hat fits correctly. Get a comfortable fit and adjust the headband so the
hat itself doesn’t touch your head. Wear a hard hat liner, not a hard hat over a hat, if it’s
cold. You can’t get a good fit when a hard hat is worn over a hat, so lose valuable
protection.
Inspect hard hats to maintain their protective ability. Inspect your hat daily for cracks or
dents. Replace a headband that’s stretched or worn, the whole hat if the outer shell is
cracked, broken or punctured; the whole hat if it has taken a heavy blow, whether it shows
visible damage or not.
Care for hard hats properly. Avoid scraping or banging the hat; don’t toss it around. Clean
the hat at least once a month. Dip it in hot soapy water, then scrub, rinse and dry it. Take
out the removable sweatband and wash it periodically. Store the hat in a safe cool place.
Avoid leaving it in the sun (e.g. on the back deck of a car), which will make it deteriorate.
Topic 8-1
Discussion Points: Use your facility’s hard hats for demonstrations during this session.
Conclusion: Choose and use hard hats correctly to protect your head. Use the correct
class of hard hat to protect against impact, penetration and electricity. Inspect and care for
it properly to assure that it keeps its protective qualities.
Topic 8-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
9 - Concrete
MEETING DATE :
29-Feb-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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Safety Meeting Topic #9
Concrete
Do you know how much concrete weighs? A cubic yard (3 feet by 3 feet by 3 feet) weighs
4,000 pounds! That’s 2 tons, more than twice the weight of the average small car on the
road today. Think about that when a concrete truck is placed next to an excavation or
trench and could result in a cave-in. Be on guard during any concrete placement.
When pouring concrete be sure that you wear the proper personal protective equipment.
Rubber boots are a must to prevent you from getting lime burns on your feet and ankles. If
you get wet concrete on your socks, change them immediately to prevent concrete burns.
Your eyes also need protection. Goggles will provide you with excellent coverage.
Another area that has potential for serious injury is when a concrete chute is raised or
lowered at the rear of a concrete truck. Always keep your hands and fingers out of pinch
points. One slip can mean the loss of fingers or even a hand. The same thing applies any
time an extra chute is added to the truck. Watch where you put your hands and get help to
lift the add-on chute.
Pinch points are all around concrete buckets. Never ride a bucket and make sure that no
one is working under the load. If the crane or pump truck operator cannot see the pour be
sure to use a qualified signal person. When placing concrete with a bucket, know the
capacity of the crane and don’t overload. A test lift is advisable. Avoid swinging the bucket
near power lines. Contact with an energized power line can kill or injure.
When applying curing compound to concrete wear the right personal protective equipment.
Chemical additives can cause burns. Check the appropriate MSDS sheet with your
supervisor. Also remember that wet concrete conducts electricity. All tools and cords must
be grounded, and don’t allow metal bull float handles to come into contact with electrical
wiring or light bulbs.
Here is a lengthy list of hazards associated with concrete/masonry work:
 Curing Compounds: Respiratory Problems
 Concrete: Caustic burns to eyes and skin
 Butane: Fires/Explosions
 Fire Watch: Flames Require Constant Watching
 Form Work: Fall Hazards/Ladders
 Footers: Working with Steep Side Walls
 Dismantling Forms: Exposed Nails
 Tilt-Up: Crane Hazards/Rigging
 Cranes: Defective Slings, Center of Gravity
 Fork Lifts: Lifting Capacity
 Load Chart: Crane Capacity
Topic 9-1
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Vibratory Compactors: GFI System
Electric Saws: Defective Power Cords
Rebar: Impailment
Troughing: Exposed Rebar Ends
Concrete Pumper Truck: Overhead Loads/Whiplash
Flagging: Flaggers Exposed to Traffic
Eye Wash Station: Requires Quantities of Water
GFI System: All Power Tools/Cords Grounded
Tower Cranes: Overhead Loads/Signaling
Outriggers: Unstable Cranes/Lifts
Material Hoists: No Riders/ Load Capacities
Leading Edge Work: Only Experience Workers/Authorized
Full-Body Harness: Inspect PPE Daily
Concrete Buckets: Defective Slings/Hardware
On almost every jobsite, where there are exposed rebar ends, there is the ongoing
possibility of “impailment.” Where there is a work station over or in the vicinity of upright
rebar, every single rebar must be “capped” or “troughed.” Caps used to prevent
impailment must have a steel shank inside the rebar otherwise the rebar will punch a hole
through the head of the cap.
It is mandatory, repeat, mandatory, that proper capping and troughing be an ongoing
responsibility of the concrete contractor. Note, too, that horizontal rebar ends are a fall/
tripping hazard, but can also cause deep gashes in workers’ feet, ankles, shins and legs.
Cap these rebar consistently throughout the jobsite.
SAFETY REMINDER: KEEP A SAFE DISTANCE FROM MOVING TRUCKS OR
EQUIPMENT, ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY ARE BACKING UP. THE OPERATOR MAY
HAVE A LIMITED FIELD OF VISION.
Topic 9-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
10 - Good Housekeeping Practices
MEETING DATE :
7-Mar-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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Safety Meeting Topic #10
Good Housekeeping Practices
OSHA makes good housekeeping a workplace safety requirement. OSHA regulations
have such housekeeping requirements as: keeping workplaces clean and orderly and in
a sanitary condition to the extent that the nature of the work allows; maintaining floors
so far as practicable, in a dry condition; keeping floors, working places, and
passageways free from protruding nails, splinters, loose boards, and unnecessary holes
and openings; keeping aisles and passageways clean and in good repair with no
obstructions across or in aisles that could create a hazard; In areas that contain
flammable liquids, keeping combustible wastes to a minimum, stored in covered metal
receptacles and disposed of daily; Keeping outside grounds around buildings free of
weeds, trash, or other unnecessary combustible materials.
Keep work areas neat, organized, and safe. Use provided containers for the collection
and separation of waste, trash, oily and used rags, and other refuse. Containers used
for garbage and other oily, flammable, or hazardous wastes, such as caustics, acids,
harmful dusts, etc. shall be equipped with covers. Garbage and other waste shall be
disposed of at frequent and regular intervals. Don’t leave tools, materials, boxes, cords,
cables, or air hoses on the floor. Report loose floor boards, holes, or other floor
problems that could cause tripping. Clean up all spills immediately, they are slipping
hazards. Clean up small chemical spills according to the MSDS and company
procedures. Alert trained responders to larger spills immediately. Clean up nonchemical spills (coffee, water, etc.) immediately. Never place materials in aisles and
passageways or on stairs. They’re tripping hazards and can block emergency
equipment and evacuation routes. Stack materials carefully, so they don’t fall over or
block access to sprinklers. Have a place to keep all tools and materials, and put them
there whenever you’re not using them. Don’t leave sharp tools lying around with their
edges exposed. Keep tools and equipment away from table or shelf edges, so they
won’t fall. Keep all drawers closed when they’re not in use. Avoid keeping food and
beverages in the work area. They can spill or fall and cause slipping and tripping
hazards. They may also be contaminated by chemicals.
Prevent flammables, combustibles, and electrical equipment from causing fires. Keep all
containers of flammable liquids closed when not in use. Dispose of all combustible scrap,
such as oily rags, in approved, closed metal containers. Be sure all containers are labeled.
Dispose of paper and other trash promptly; empty containers often. Don’t let grease or dirt
build up on machinery and equipment. Keep paper and other combustibles away from
lights and electrical equipment. Smoke only in permitted areas. Put all cigarettes and
matches completely out in ashtrays.
Topic 10-1
Take responsibility for identifying and eliminating hazards. Every employee has a personal
responsibility to: keep his or her own work area neat, clean, and safe. Keep aisles,
passages, and stairways clear and uncluttered. Put tools and materials away in their
assigned places when they’re not being used. Report anything that’s broken or not working
properly immediately so it can be fixed.
Discussion Point: Conduct this session in the work area, where you can point out (and
have participants point out) good and bad examples of safe housekeeping practices.
Conclusion: Good housekeeping is a vital part of safety. OSHA requires neat, clean
workplaces because they’re safer. Just taking a little time to put things in their proper place
can prevent many accidents and injuries.
Topic 10-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
11 - Hazards of Confined Space
MEETING DATE :
14-Mar-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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Safety Meeting Topic #11
Hazards of Confined Space
OSHA defines confined spaces as work areas with certain features: large enough to enter
and work in, limited entry and exit areas, and not designed to be occupied for extended
periods. Examples include: tanks, silos, storage bins, hoppers, vaults, pits, furnaces,
tunnels, sewers, pipelines, crawl spaces, process vessels, or underground areas. Confined
space tasks include: cleaning, painting, welding, scraping, performing repairs, or
maintenance. It becomes a permit-required confined space if, in addition, it presents or has
the potential for any recognized serious hazard.
Employers must test confined spaces to determine if they’re hazardous. Failing to identify
hazards and take precautions causes thousands of serious injuries, and sometimes
deaths, in confined spaces. Certain hazards create permit-required confined spaces.
OSHA allows work only with written permits, entry limits, and specific employee roles and
practices in spaces with one or more of the following: hazardous atmosphere, or potential
for one, material that can potentially engulf a person in the space, slanting walls or sloped
or tapering floor that could trap or asphyxiate an entrant, or any other recognized serious
safety or health hazard.
A confined space’s atmosphere may make it hazardous. Employees could risk death or
serious illness, become incapacitated,, or have trouble escaping if the confined space’s
atmosphere contains: levels of flammable gas, vapor or mist in excess of 10 percent of
their lower flammable limits, airborne dust levels at or above their flammable limits or
permissible exposure limits (PEL’s) or that prevent visibility of fewer than 5 feet, oxygen
concentration above 23.5 percent or below 19.5 percent, any condition immediately
dangerous to life or health that could threaten life, cause irreversible health problems, or
make it difficult to escape the space without help.
A confined space’s atmosphere may pose fire, explosion, and toxicity risks. Anything that
could burn or explode (e.g., gasoline, methane, dust) is more likely to do so in a confined
space. These substances can be ignited by smoking, grinding or welding sparks,
unapproved electrical equipment, or metal friction (even from nails or tacks in shoes).
Inhaling toxic substances above their PEL’s can cause illness, suffocation, or even death
(e.g., from carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, or sulfur dioxide).
Too much or too little oxygen is a major confined space hazard. Oxygen levels over 23.5
percent create a serious fire or explosion risk. Oxygen levels below 19.5 percent are a
dangerous health risk: sixteen percent can cause drowsiness and nausea; twelve percent
unconsciousness; six percent, death. Methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, corrosion, or rust
can displace oxygen.
Topic 11-1
A confined space may be hazardous because of engulfment potential. A person could be
covered, buried, or smothered in a space that contains a liquid, or a flowing solid such as
sand or grain, and ice or snow.
A confined space may be hazardous because of an entrapping design. If a space’s walls
curve in or its floors slope and taper down, you could: slip or fall into a space that its too
tight to escape from, get pushed into machinery in the space.
Confined spaces may have physical hazards. Heat can build up and create danger of
exhaustion or heat stroke. Falls can be fatal if you’re trapped with a serious injury, are in a
toxic or low oxygen area, or you can’t get a foothold on floors or a grip on handholds to get
out. Noise bounces off walls in a space, making it hard to hear directions or warnings and
creating risk of hearing damage. Power equipment creates injury, electrocution, fire, and
explosion risks: that’s why power is turned off, equipment locked out, and pipes and valves
turned off, locked and bled before spaces are entered.
OSHA requires detailed safety precautions for work in confined spaces. When employees
must enter confined spaces to paint, scrape, perform maintenance, etc., employers must:
identify space hazards and remove or control them with ventilation, etc.; develop and post
a detailed entry permit; use barriers and warnings to keep unauthorized employees out of
permit spaces; determine and maintain safe conditions for entering and working in the
space; and train employees to perform jobs in and around permit spaces.
Only trained employees may work in permit-required spaces. Confined Space Tasks
Employees are trained to understand and safely perform the jobs of : authorized entrants,
attendants, and entry supervisors.
Authorized entrants enter and work in permit-required spaces. They must be able to:
identify the space’s hazards and potential consequences, as well as signs and symptoms
of exposure, and properly use any necessary equipment to: test, monitor, and ventilate the
atmosphere in the space; communicate with others working in and outside the space;
protect themselves from exposure to dangerous levels of toxins, power, equipment, etc.;
wear chest or full body harnesses, or, when appropriate, wristlets, to permit rescue; stay in
constant contact with the attendant to assure fast attention to problems; alert the attendant
to signs of personal exposure or danger in the space; and leave the space quickly after
identifying a problem or getting a signal or order from the attendant or entry supervisor.
Attendants stand outside the space to monitor and protect authorized entrants. They must
be able to: remain outside the space during entry operations; maintain accurate count of
authorized entrants in the space; identify the space’s hazards, exposure consequences,
and signs that authorized entrants have been exposed to hazards; stay in constant contact
with workers in the space; monitor activities in and outside the space that could affect
entrant safety; and order entrants to evacuate the space immediately if: conditions in or
outside the space endanger authorized entrants; workers in the space show signs of
Topic 11-2
dangerous exposure and the attendant feels they can’t safely and effectively perform all
duties; summon rescue or emergency services or perform permitted non-entry rescues;
keep unauthorized persons away from the space and alert authorized entrants and entry
supervisor if such people enter the permit space.
Entry supervisor takes responsibility for permits and safety procedures. They: identify the
space’s hazards, consequences, and signs of exposure and make sure the entry permit is
complete and that: listed tests and hazard removal/controls have been completed; listed
procedures are followed; listed safety, communication and rescue equipment is in place;
rescue services are available; sign the permit and allow entry in to the space; cancel the
entry and permit when operations are completed or the permit expires or a dangerous
condition arises; and remove unauthorized individuals form the permit area.
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 6, Confined
Spaces.
Conclusion: Take confined space permits and precautions seriously. A hazardous
confined space can be deadly unless the testing, entry limits, and safety precautions
spelled out on the permit are followed. Authorized entrants, attendants, and entry
supervisors must know how to perform work safely in permit-required confined space.
Topic 11-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
12 - Hand Tools - Powder Actuated
MEETING DATE :
21-Mar-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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Safety Meeting Topic #12
Hand Tools – Powder Actuated
Powder-actuated hand tools probably have as much safety built in to them as practically
any tools on the market. In addition, manufacturers usually provide complete instructions
and training for safe operation of the tools. These two factors alone should make the use of
powder-actuated tools a safe operation. However, there are other precautions that have to
be taken.
To start with, only trained, certified and authorized personnel who are checked out in
correct usage and safety should operate powder-actuated tools. And only tools, shields,
and fasteners that meet state safety standard requirements for hand tools should be used.
The hazards connected with using this type of tools are probably quite apparent to you.
They include accidental discharge, ricocheting studs or chips, explosions from use in
combustible atmospheres, flying particles, and complete penetration of the work material
by the stud. Obviously, protective equipment is necessary. You must wear approved safety
goggles. A face shield and safety hat are also recommended. Hayward Electric requires
that hard hats and safety glasses or goggles be worn at all times.
To protect against flying particles, powder-actuated tools should have interlocked shields
that are designed to fit over the particular shape to be fastened. If a standard shield won’t
work, a special one may be designed but must meet required protection, including
interlock.
Added operator precautions include making sure that:
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The bore is clear before loading
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The cartridge is fully seated
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The breech is closed and locked
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All safety devices are in working order
Powder-actuated tools should be inspected for defect before each use. If you find that a
tool is defective, report it to your supervisor at once. Do not use it.
Before starting work, familiarize yourself with what is behind the surface you’ll be working
on so as not to damage electrical wires or lines.
Topic 12-1
Size up the job to be done, and select the proper stud and cartridge. In case of doubt about
the surface and strength of material, a light trial shot can be taken after all regular safety
precautions are accomplished.
Studs should not be driven into very hard or brittle substances. These include, but are not
limited to: cast iron, glazed tile, hollow tile, face brick, glass block, or surface-hardened
steel. Do not drive studs through existing holes unless a guide is used to secure alignment.
Don’t use powder-actuated tools on materials that are easily penetrated, on concrete under
two inches thick, or on steel less than one-quarter inch think, unless sufficient backing such
as sandbags or timber is placed behind the work.
Don’t drive a fastener into materials such as masonry less than three inches from an
unsupported edge or corner, or into steel surfaces less than one-half inch from an
unsupported edge or corner. (For low-velocity tools, the distances can be lowered to two
inches for masonry and one-quarter inch for steel surfaces).
Obviously, you should never point a powder-actuated tool at anyone, and don’t rest it
against your body. Tools should be carried vertically and every effort made not to drop
them.
Insert a cartridge into the tool only when it is ready to be fired. Before firing the tool, make
sure others in the area are clear and wearing proper eye protection.
In case of misfire, the tool should be held against the work surface in operating position for
at least a 30-second wait, then remove the cartridge. Misfired cartridges should be
disposed of safely to prevent anyone gaining access to them.
When not in use, a tool should never be left unattended. The tools, studs, and cartridges
should be locked in a safe place. Loaded blank cartridges should be transported in a
locked container.
It’s difficult to cover all aspects of powder-actuated hand tool safety in such a few minutes,
but we have touched on many important ones. Remember to follow safety rules and the
manufacturers’ instructions, and use necessary protective equipment. If you’re not quite
sure you remember all the precautions, don’t guess! Check with your supervisor.
Topic 12-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
13 - Safety Rules & Responsibilities
MEETING DATE :
28-Mar-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOBNUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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Safety Meeting Topic #13
Safety Rules & Responsibilities for Employees
It is the policy of Hayward Electric that everything possible will be done to protect you from
accidents, injuries and/or occupational disease while on the job. Safety is a cooperative
undertaking requiring an ever-present safety consciousness on the part of every employee.
If an employee is injured, positive and prompt action must be taken to see that the
employee receives adequate treatment. No one likes to see a fellow employee injured by
an accident. Therefore, all operations must be planned to prevent accidents. To carry out
this policy, the following rules will apply:
1. All employees shall follow the safe practices and rules practices communicated
on the job. All employees shall report all unsafe conditions or practices to their
supervisors on the project. If corrective action is not taken immediately, then
employees should contact the Construction Manager or the Responsible Safety
Officer.
2. Job Supervisor shall be responsible for implementing these policies by insisting
that employees observe and obey all rules and regulations necessary to maintain a
safe work place and safe work habits and practices by developing an attitude and
awareness of safety in the people supervised and seeing that individual safety
responsibilities are fully carried out.
3. Suitable clothing and footwear must be worn at all times. Hard hats and eye
protection will be worn at work at all times. Other personal protection equipment (i.e.
gloves, respirators, welding goggles, etc.) will be worn whenever needed. Work
boots are required (in good, safe condition)
4. Work shall be well planned and supervised to avoid injuries in the handling of
heavy materials and while using equipment. Good housekeeping must be practiced
at all times in the work area. Clean up all waste and eliminate any dangers in the
work area. Stop any operation you believe to be hazardous.
5. Horseplay, scuffling, and other acts which tend to have an adverse influence on
safety or well-being of the other employees are prohibited. Do not throw things,
especially material and equipment. Dispose of all waste properly and carefully.
Bend all exposed nails so they do not hurt anyone removing the waste.
6. Anyone under the influence of intoxicating alcohol or drugs, including prescription
drugs which might impair motor skills and judgment, shall not be allowed on the job.
There will be no consumption of liquor or beer on the job, after work on a jobsite.
Employees should be alert to see that all guards and other protective devices
proper places and adjusted, and shall report deficiencies promptly to the Job
Supervisor.
Topic 13-1
7. Employees should be alert to see that all guards and other protective devices are
in proper places and adjusted, and shall report deficiencies promptly to the Job
Supervisor. Employees shall not handle or tamper with any electrical equipment,
machinery, gas air or water lines in a manner not within the scope of their duties,
unless they have received specific instructions.
8. All employees will participate in a safety meeting conducted by their supervisor
once every week. All injuries should be reported immediately to the job supervisor
so that arrangements can be made for medical or first aid treatment, and then
reported to Human Resources or the Responsible Safety Officer.
Disciplinary Action
Failure to comply with policies and rules set forth by Hayward Electric can result in
the following disciplinary action:
1. The first warning will be verbally issued by the immediate “Onsite”
Supervisor.
2. The second warning will be verbally issued by the Hayward Electric
Construction Manager.
3. The third warning will be issued in writing by the Hayward Electric Construction
Manager.
4. The fourth occurrence can lead to termination of employment.
Topic 13-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
14 - First Aid/CPR
MEETING DATE :
4-Apr-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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Safety Meeting Topic #14
First Aid/CPR
Some of us had first-aid training when we were in the Scouts. Some of us may have had
it in high school, or college, or the military. Or maybe we had a first-aid course at our
church, or maybe even your company has sent you to one or more first-aid training
programs.
Did you know that OSHA requires that there be a “first-aid giver” on each and every jobsite.
And, in addition, these same jobsites must also have a first-aid kit.
If you have had a first-aid training program recently, you’ll remember that this six or eighthour training course covered a lot of material. Some of the more important topics were
CPR (Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation), bandaging, stopping of bleeding, treating for
shock, prevention of spinal injury by keeping the victim stationary, treating for insect
bites/stings, recognizing heat exhaustion and heat stroke, knowing symptoms of
hypothermia and frostbite, snakebite treatment, proper handling of first/second/third degree
burns, and making a phone call for rescue vehicles (9-1-1).
In your prior first-aid training, the instructor spent considerable time discussing Bloodborne
Pathogens, which is the spreading of various diseases through the transmission of bodily
fluids. You’ll remember from this same training that you were urged to wear latex gloves
when administering first-aid to a bleeding victim. If you’re required to administer CPR, you’ll
also need to use a face shield, dispose of used bandages and other items exposed to
bodily fluids using an airtight container (zip-loc sandwich bag, etc.).
Where will you use your first-aid knowledge? On the jobsite, at home, or the shopping
center, or on picnics, or wherever a human being is injured and needs some type of firstaid. Your first-aid knowledge and technique is invaluable.
For those who have attended a first-aid training seminar in the past three or four years,
you probably remember that the instructor stressed that there were as many “don’ts” as
there were “do’s.”
DON’TS
 Don’t move the victim unless absolutely necessary
 Always suspect “spinal injury” (and don’t move the victim)
 Don’t set fractures and breaks (simply immobilize the victim)
 Don’t apply a tourniquet (use “direct” pressure to stop bleeding)
 Don’t remove items imbedded in the eye (cover with a dixie cup)
 Don’t use burn ointments
 Don’t hesitate to call 9-1-1
Topic 14-1
DO’S
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Reassure victim that help is on the way
For major injuries call 9-1-1 immediately
Check victim’s status regularly
Use direct pressure to stop bleeding
Check to see if victim’s airways are clear
If no pulse or respiration, start CPR
To prevent transmission of disease, use latex gloves
Keep victims in shock warm (use blanket, etc.)
Assume spinal injury when blunt force trauma is present
Raise head if bleeding in upper torso area
Raise feet if bleeding in lower torso areas
Flush all burns and chemical injuries with clean water
Have MSDS sheets on the jobsite for 9-1-1 responders
Call the Poison Control Center for chemical ingestion
A person who stops breathing may die or suffer brain damage in minutes without prompt,
proper help. Know whom to contact if someone stops breathing. Make the call quickly.
Have help come to the victim; don’t move the person unless they are in dire peril of further
injury, and then use extreme care. Avoid actions that could further harm the victim. Don’t
provide medication without medical supervision. If you’re not sure what to do, don’t do
anything until medical help arrives.
Obtain CPR training. Take a Red Cross or other course in cardiopulmonary resuscitation
(CPR). Inform management that you’ve been trained and are available to help in an
emergency. The Company will pay for this training. See company incentive program.
Is your jobsite first-aid kit fully stocked? Is it half empty? Do some of the items have
grease or other solvents on them? Are the sterile packages torn open? If any of these
conditions exist, then you might be in trouble with OSHA. They (OSHA) want the first-aid kit
to be in top flight condition, in the event you need to use the items to treat an injured victim.
What are some of the things you should look for to determine if your jobsite kit meets
OSHA approval? Here are some tips:
 Is the kit available to all workers?
 Is it clean/sterile?
 Is the first-aid container fully stocked?
 Does your company inventory “refill kits?”
 Is there an “eye-wash” kit in the first-aid container?
 Are there 4”x 4” sterile pads in the kit (to use along with “direct pressure” to stop
bleeding)?
 Do you have a first-aid kit in each company owned vehicle?
 Does your kit have CPR items?
 Do your workers know the exact location of the first-aid kit on the jobsite?
Topic 14-2
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Are the NAMES of the company’s first-aid givers scotch-taped on the top of the
first-aid container?
While it’s O.K. to have a first-aid kit in the jobsite trailer, it’s not O.K. to have it stored in a
file cabinet? WHY? Because you need the first-aid kit to be in clear view of all workers. If
it’s hidden away somewhere, then OSHA might cite your company for not having it where
all employees can immediately have access to it if an emergency occurs.
More Information
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 4, Employee
First Aid.
Discussion Points: Provide participants with a list of emergency medical phone numbers,
including employees who know CPR, so they’ll be prepared for this type of emergency.
Topic 14-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
15 - Eye Protection
MEETING DATE :
11-Apr-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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Safety Meeting Topic #15
Eye Protection
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) protects you from workplace hazards. OSHA
requires employers to identify when workers need PPE as protection and: select PPE that
will protect employees from identified hazards, and train employees to know when and how
to select, use, and care for the PPE. Eyesight is a precious gift that can not be replaced if
damaged or destroyed. Hayward Electric requires that employees wear ANZI Z87+ eye
protection at all times while on a job site, no exceptions.
Eyes need protection from a variety of workplace hazards. They include: flying objects
such as wood, metal, plastic, stone fragments, and sparks; splashes from chemicals
including acids and corrosives, and molten metal; swinging objects like ropes and chains;
electrical arcs and sparks, dust, fumes, mists, gases, and vapors; radiant energy from
welding, cutting, and ultraviolet or infrared light.
Choose eyewear that protects against the greatest possible hazard level. Hayward Electric
provides approved safety glasses and/or goggles. For flying fragments, objects, chips or
particles: safety glasses with side protection or goggles with side protection. OSHA
requires side protection against flying objects. For chemical splashes: safety goggles. For
dust, fumes, mists, gases, and vapors: off-set ventilated safety goggles worn over face
shields. For hot sparks or splashes: goggles or spectacles with side protection. For radiant
energy: welding goggles with special lenses to filter out the harmful light or radiation. For
any other very serious eye hazard: face shield over safety spectacles or goggles. For
electrical exposure: Don’t wear metal eyewear, which could conduct electricity. For bloodborne hazards: as required by particular hazard.
Protective eyewear should fit well. Safety glasses should fit like other glasses. Goggles
should fit with the bridge on your nose, and the center of the lens in front of your eye.
Adjust straps and place them low on the back of the head for a good fit.
Combine protection with prescription. If you wear prescription eyewear and need eye
protection, you must use either: ANZI Z87+ protective eyewear that has the prescription, or
safety goggles over prescription glasses. You should not wear contact lenses in areas with
dust and/or chemicals.
Inspect eye protection daily to assure it’s in good condition. Replace knotted, twisted, torn
or stretched out goggle straps. Replace your eyewear that has lenses too pitted, scratched,
etc., to see through. If lenses fog up, use lens defogging solution.
Give eye protection equipment good care. Clean lenses after every use with soap or mild
detergent and water, or special solution designed for that purpose. Disinfect eyewear if it’s
contaminated by a hazardous chemical, or if it may be worn by another person. Store clean
eyewear in a closed container protected from dust, moisture, or damage.
Topic 15-1
Act quickly if your eye is splashed or injured. Chemical splashes: flush with water for at
least 15 minutes, and then see a doctor. (Note: In some cases an emergency eye fountain
is required). Particle in the eye: Blink to try to get it out. If you can’t, close and cover the
eye and see a doctor. Object hitting the eye: See a doctor immediately. NEVER rub your
eye, no matter how strong the urge. It will only make matters worse.
Conclusion: Always give eyes the highest possible level of protection. The right PPE will
give your eyes the greatest protection against all possible hazards. Inspect and maintain
this PPE to prevent damage to your eyes.
Topic 15-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
16 - Crane Safety
MEETING DATE :
18-Apr-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #16
Crane Safety
There are three elements involved in any hoisting task that must be considered:
1. The Crane
2. The Operation of the Crane
3. The Rigging of the Crane
The foundation of the “triangle” is the crane itself, and its condition is paramount to assure
it is ready to perform its task.
A pre-operational inspection is required:
 to verify proper condition and configuration,
 that any modification and repairs are sound
 that the controls and safety devices are working properly
 that wire ropes are in good condition
 that clutches and brakes are in good condition
 the rotating systems are working properly and
 the load blocks and reeving systems are adequate for the intended load
The operator of the crane must:
 fully understand the load chart
 assure the crane is properly set up
 must properly utilize outriggers when fitted
 consider his radius, quadrants to operate to minimize shock and dynamic
loading
 take into consideration weather conditions and hazardous surroundings, and
 insist on proper signaling.
And, the individuals attaching the load must know:
 the weight of the load and its center of gravity
 allow for sling angles, and D/d ratios
 select and inspect all slings and rigging hardware
 apply a hitch that will hold and control the load and
 assist in maintaining proper load control
All of this data must be assembled in the minds of the crane operator, the flagger, the
spotter, and anyone else on-site having anything to do with the crane operation itself.
Once this is resolved, it is “time to go to work.”
Rigging Safety Rules
Controlling all of this pre-construction operation is a set of industry-wide “Rigging Safety
Rules,” as follows:
Topic 16-1
1. Know the Weight of the Load
2. Know the Center of Gravity of the Load
3. Make Load Attachments Above Center of Gravity
4. Select Hitch That Will Hold and Control Load
5. Know Rated Capacities of Slings and Rigging Hardware
6. Select Sling Best Suited for Load
7. Inspect All Rigging Gear Prior to Use
8. Protect Sling From Sharp Surfaces
9. Protect Load From Rigging If Necessary
10. Do Not Use Hand-Tucked Slings On Single Leg or With Swivel In System
11. All For Increased Tension Caused by Sling Angles
12. Allow For Low D/d Ratios ON Wire Rope
13. Equalize Loading On Multiple Leg Slings
14. Allow For Reductions When Using Choker Hitches
15. Allow For Sling Angles When Forcing Choker
16. Only Use Alloy Chains When Chain Is Used-Grade 8 (T) Chain
17. Attach Tag Lines Prior to Lift If Required
18. Keep Personnel Clear of Lift Area
19. Lift Load A Few Inches And Check Rigging
20. Know Limitations Of Hoisting Device
21. Start and Stop Slowly
22. Watch For Obstructions And Power Lines
23. Use Proper Hand Signals
24. Do Not Forget The Law of Gravity
One final note: One of the prime considerations in rigging is to know the rated capacity of
the slings and other rigging hardware being utilized.
All rigging equipment should have rated capacity tags or other means to identify its rated
capacity under different hitch configurations. However, many times this identification is
either obliterated or lost during its use.
The result being that many times the field personnel utilizing rigging equipment is without
any idea of the approximate capacity of the equipment.
All of this data is a pretty tall order for the crane operator, the rigger, the spotter, the
flagger, and the ground crew to muster.
Crane operation, and rigging, is a specialty in the construction industry. For the rest of us,
we need to give their operations wide berth. In other words, avoid the radius of the crane,
don’t stand under the overhead loads, and keep all personnel away from all crane
operations.
Topic 16-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
17 - Ladders
MEETING DATE :
25-Apr-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #17
Ladders
Staying Safe with Portable Ladders
Portable ladders are a simple and effective means for safe climbing except for one major
problem. Workers sometimes find portable ladders so easy to use that they neglect normal
precautions and safety rules. The result, too often, is an accident.
Almost all ladder accidents can be avoided by following the three basic rules of ladder
safety:
1. No ladder is safe unless it is the right type and right size for the job.
2. No ladder is safe if it is missing rungs, if its rungs or rails are defective, if it is
poorly built, or if it is in a weakened condition.
3. No ladder is safe unless the person using it takes common sense precautions.
Using the right type of ladder makes the job safer. For example, don’t use a stepladder to
do the job of a straight ladder by leaning it against a support.
Heavy construction jobs call for heavy ladders, not light household types. Metal ladders
must not be used in the vicinity of exposed electrical circuits or power lines, where they
may come in contact.
The right length is important, too - neither too long or too short. Stepladders are safest if
they’re 10 feet or less in length, and they should never be longer than 20 feet. In
construction work, extension ladders can be used to reach up to 44 feet, but, for greater
heights, scaffolds or aerial lifts should be used. Splicing two ladders together is never safe.
A ladder should always be examined before it is used to be sure that there are no defects
that make it unsafe to use. (The reason a ladder should never be painted is that the paint
could conceal significant defects or damage.)
A ladder is unsafe to use if side rails are cracked or split, or if there are sharp edges or
splinters on cleats, rungs or side rails. Check also for missing, broken or weakened cleats,
rungs, or treads. If a defective ladder cannot be repaired, it should be disposed of
permanently, by cutting it in half.
Once the ladder has been checked and found safe, set it at an angle of about 75 degrees
with the floor or ground. The distance from the wall to the foot of the ladder should be
about equal to one-fourth of the ladder’s total length.
After setting the ladder in place, check it for firm and level footing. To prevent slipping,
Topic 17-1
nonslip points or safety shoes are recommended. But, if this is not practical, the ladder
should be secured firmly by lashing it with rope or some other suitable line.
The ordinary straight ladder is not built to support more than one person at a time. In going
up or coming down, always face the ladder and grasp the side rails with both hands.
Never carry tools or material in your hands when going up or down a ladder. Instead, use a
bucket and rope to raise and lower them.
Don’t lean a ladder against an object that might move, and never lean it against a window
sash. If you must work near or on a window, fasten a board securely across the top of the
ladder to give a bearing on each side of the window.
Be sure you keep moving the ladder as needed to reach new areas to be worked. Never
overreach, push, or pull the ladder while working on it. Never straddle the space between
the ladder and another object, or try to work in a high wind. Any of these actions could
upset you and the ladder.
If you’re working in front of a door that opens toward the ladder, the door must be blocked
open, locked, or guarded. In any other situation in which a person or vehicle may bump in
to the ladder, get a helper to stand guard. If you can’t, then be sure to rope off the space
around the ladder.
Some points to remember:
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Always inspect a ladder before using it.
Outdoors, don’t work on a ladder if it’s very windy.
When going up or down, face the ladder, don’t hurry, take one step at a time,
and hold on with at least one hand.
Don’t overreach or try to reposition the ladder while you’re on it. Instead, get
down and move the ladder to a better working position.
Don’t work on any of the top three rungs of a ladder unless you have a firm
handhold or safety belt.
Secure ladder against slipping before you try to use it.
Don’t ever use a metal ladder near live wires or parts.
When a ladder is not in use, store it under cover, horizontally, with supports
to prevent sagging. Don’t let it lie on the ground where heat or dampness
may weaken it.
Topic 17-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
18 - Chemical Hazard Communication
MEETING DATE :
2-May-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #18
Chemical Hazard Communication
You have a legal right to know about chemical hazards and protection. OSHA’s Hazard
Communication Standard (or HAZCOM) requires that everyone who works with a
hazardous chemical has the right to know about its hazards and how to protect against
those hazards - and the responsibility to use that knowledge to work safely.
Chemical manufacturers identify hazards and key precautions. Manufacturers must:
determine the physical and health hazards of their products; identify those hazards and key
safety precautions on chemical container labels and material safety data sheets (MSDS’s).
Employers inform employees about chemical hazards and precautions. Employers must:
develop a written hazard communication program, including a list of hazardous chemicals
used or stored in their facility; train employees to identify chemical hazards and to use
information and procedures to reduce the risks; and assure that all chemicals have proper
labels and complete easily available MSDS’s. When working around chemicals be sure to
request MSDS’s.
Chemicals may present physical hazards. They may catch fire easily; suddenly release
pressure and explode; or react when exposed to heat, air, water, or certain other chemicals
by burning, exploding, or releasing dangerous vapors.
Chemicals may have health hazards. Acute health problems develop quickly after
exposure (e.g., corrosive skin burns). Chronic health problems develop over time, often
after many exposures (e.g., Cancer from inhaling toxic chemicals). Exposure to health
hazards can occur in three ways: skin or eye contact, which can cause burns, rashes, or
even blindness; inhaling, or breathing in, chemical vapors and fumes, which can cause
dizziness, nausea, lung damage, unconsciousness, or even death; swallowing (including
eating or smoking after handling chemicals without first washing), which can cause
poisoning or damage to internal organs.
Chemical container labels are an important source of information. Chemical manufacturers
must provide labels with their products. Employers must make sure each container has a
readable label. Signs, placards, or similar materials may be used instead of labels.
Employees must read the label before using any chemical.
The label identifies the chemical, gives its common and/or chemical name, gives the name
and address of the chemical’s manufacturer or importer.
The label identifies the chemical’s hazards. It warns about the chemical’s possible dangers,
including: physical hazards that could develop if you don’t handle the chemical properly
(e.g., fire, explosion, reactivity if exposed to heat, air water, another chemical), health
hazards if you’re overexposed to the chemical (e.g., headache, nausea, skin burns,
Topic 18-1
breathing problems, Cancer, etc.).
A label’s hazard warnings may use words, pictures, colors, or numbers. Words may list
specific hazards (e.g., flammable, corrosive). Words may signal the level of risk, (e.g.,
danger-can cause immediate serious injury or death; warning-can cause moderate injury;
caution-can cause moderate injury). Pictures may illustrate hazards (e.g., flame for fire,
skull and crossbones for poison, etc.) Colors may be used instead of words or pictures:
(e.g., RED = Fire hazard, YELLOW = Reactivity hazard, BLUE = Health hazard, and
WHITE = Specific hazard such as acid or corrosive, or the personal protective equipment
you need to protect against this hazard. Numbers (which are often combined with colors)
tell how serious the hazard is: 0 = Minimal hazard, 1 = Slight hazard, 2 = Moderate hazard,
3 = Serious hazard, and 4 = Severe hazard.
Labels may also include safety precautions. Safe storage and handling instructions (e.g.,
keep away from sparks, heat or flame); protective clothing and hygiene instructions (e.g.,
use eye protection); emergency instructions (e.g., first aid for exposure, what to use on a
fire or spill).
Always read the label before using or handling a chemical. Read the label and then read
the MSDS so you have full information. Obey label warnings and follow their instructions.
Don’t use a substance in an unlabeled container. Report all missing, dirty or unreadable
labels so they can be replaced. Don’t cover labels so they can’t be read. Place labels on
portable containers used for chemicals such as spray or squirt bottles.
Conclusion: Use label information to work safely with chemicals. Exercise your right to
know about chemical hazards by reading container labels and taking proper precautions.
Use your right to know about chemical hazards and protections. Chemicals can be both
useful and hazardous. Understand the risks and use your training and available information
to protect yourself and others on the job.
Topic 18-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
19 - Scaffolds
MEETING DATE :
9-May-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #19
Scaffolds
Scaffolds Are For Safety
OSHA defines a “scaffold” as “means any temporary elevated platform (supported or suspended) and
its supporting structure (including points of anchorage), used for supporting employees or materials or
both.” But as simple as this definition is, a scaffold is a dangerous piece of fall-protection equipment.
In the OSHA 1926 Construction Standards (Subpart L-Scaffolds), the nomenclature of
scaffolds is quite complex. Scaffolds come in all sizes and shapes, and each serves a
particular purpose in the world of scaffolding.
There are
(a) Tube and Coupler Scaffolds
(b) Suspended Scaffolds
(c) Outrigger Scaffolds
(d) Pole Scaffolds
(e) System Scaffolds
(f) Masons Scaffolds
(g) Pump Jack Scaffolds
(h) Window Jack Scaffolds, and
(i) A myriad of other types of scaffolds and scaffold systems. And, yes, there is a
family of aerial lift scaffolds.
Each one is unique; they have different properties, different techniques of erecting, and
differing safety hazards. To build or modify a scaffold, special training is required. After
construction or modification and before a scaffold can be used it must be inspected by a
competent person. The competent person will inspect the scaffold and tag the scaffold for
use.
Scaffolds must be accessed by means of an extension ladder, a stairwell system, or a built
in ladder that is usually a part of the end-brace system. Inmost cases, when the scaffolding
system goes beyond six to ten feet, the workers must wear full-body harnesses and tie off to
a safety fall-protection system (anchorage, harness, lifeline, lanyard, etc.).
What are some of the common denominators applicable to scaffolds? Let’s talk about some
of them.
Capacity-Each Scaffold and scaffold component shall be capable of resisting
supporting, without failure, its own weight and at least 4 times the maximum intended
load applied or transmitted to it.
Stall Load-The stall load of any scaffold hoist shall not exceed 3 times its rated load.
Topic 19-1
Scaffold Platform Construction-Each platform on all working levels of scaffolds
shall be fully planked or decked between the front uprights and the guardrail
supports.
Criteria for Support-Supported scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more
than four to one (4:1) shall be restrained from tipping by guying, tying, bracing, etc.
Access-Standard required usage of ladders, stairways, stair rail, ramps, etc.
Use-Scaffolds and components shall not be loaded in excess of their maximum
intended loads or rated capacities.
Housekeeping-Debris shall not be allowed to accumulate on platforms.
Falling Objects-In addition to hard hats, each employee shall be protected from
falling objects through the use of toe-boards, screens, nets, canopies, etc.
Training Requirements-A competent person shall train all employees working on
scaffolding to recognize hazards associated with the type of scaffolding being used.
The above-listed safety criteria are a relatively short list of safety hazards associated with
the erecting, dismantling and usage of scaffolding systems. All workers involved with any of
these practices, must, in the opinion of the on-site competent person, be able to
demonstrate his (the employee) comprehension of safety practices.
Note, also, that if in the opinion of the competent person the employee lacks the necessary
training associated with working on scaffolding, the worker shall be removed from the
scaffolding site immediately.
Here’s a wrap-up of general site safety involving working on scaffolding systems:
 All scaffolds must conform to the specifications found in ANSI A10.8 Safety
Requirements for Scaffolding.
 Rolling scaffolds must maintain a 3:1 height to base ratio.
 The footings or anchorage for a scaffold must be sound, rigid, and capable of carrying
the maximum intended load without settling or displacement.
 Unstable objects such as barrels, boxes, loose brick, etc., must not be used to support
scaffolds or planks.
 No scaffold may be erected, moved, dismantled or altered unless supervised by
competent persons.
 Scaffolds and their components must be capable of supporting at least four items the
maximum intended load without failure.
 Guardrails and toe boards must be installed on all open sides and ends of scaffolds and
platforms more than 10 feet above the ground floor.
 Scaffolds 4 feet to 10 feet in height having a minimum horizontal dimension in either
direction of less than 45” must have standard guardrails installed on all open sides and
ends of the platform.
Topic 19-2

Wire, synthetic, or fiber rope used for suspended scaffolds, must be capable of
supporting at least 6 times the rated load.
Safety surrounding scaffolding and scaffolding systems is complex. If you’re engaged in any
aspect of this particular construction procedure, you need a broad range of information and
training to insure that you’re operating in a safe environment, both for you and your fellow
workers.
Scarcely a day passes that we don’t read about or hear of someone being injured or killed in
a scaffold fall. Faulty design and inadequate construction are sometimes involved but, in
most cases, scaffold accidents are caused by careless maintenance and improper use. Help
keep your scaffolds safe by observing these simple procedures:
·
Inspect scaffolds daily prior to use, particularly guardrails, connectors, fastenings,
footings, tie-ins, and bracing.
·
Hayward Electric employees are not to make any modification to scaffolding.
·
Keep platform closely boarded. The space between scaffold planks should not
exceed one-half inch.
·
Keep platforms fenced and securely fastened. Tube and frame scaffolds must be tied
to the permanent structure at intervals of 30 feet horizontally and 26 feet vertically.
·
Don’t stockpile materials on scaffolds; remove all materials at the end of the day.
·
Never overload scaffolds. Pile materials being worked over ledger and bearer points
to minimize platform loading.
·
Don’t work on scaffolds during storms or high winds, and clear platforms of all ice and
snow before using. Sand wet platforms to prevent slipping.
·
Protect scaffolds. Don’t bump or strike against scaffolds with vehicles or materials.
Control hoisted material from the ground with taglines.
·
Prior to moving portable scaffolds, make sure platform planks are securely fastened
or remove them.
·
Keep platforms and the area around scaffolds cleared of debris, unneeded
equipment, material, and other hazards that will cause you to trip or fall.
More Information
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 18, Ladders and
Scaffolds.
Topic 19-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
20 - Gas Cylinders
MEETING DATE :
16-May-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #20
Gas Cylinders
Have you ever seen a gas cylinder explode? Well, have you ever witnessed a Space Shot
at Cape Kennedy in Florida? They’re about the same thing. The only difference is that
those so-called harmless compressed gas cylinders on jobsites go in any/every direction
across the jobsite; whereas those Space Shots and astronauts travel into space hundreds
and thousands of miles into the sky. POWERFUL CYLINDERS, those space missiles and
compressed gas cylinders both start with a powerful boom!!!
All gases must be used in a manner that will not endanger personnel or property in routine
shop use, or on construction sites. Hazards associated with handling and use of
flammable and/or high-pressure gases include the following:
 Injuries caused by flying objects accelerated by an explosion or pressure
release.
 Almost certain death if a flammable mixture is inhaled and then ignited.
 Asphyxiation.
 Secondary accidents such as falls or electrical shocks.
 Fires caused by ignition of flammable gases.
High School chemistry almost always starts off with the teacher illustrating the principal of
the “triangle”:
Fire requires three elements: fuel, oxygen and ignition.
Any experiment that places a flammable gas in the presence of air, oxygen, and an
ignition source (spark, flame, high temperature) is extremely dangerous.
Remove any of the three, and you’ve pretty well ruled out a fire/explosion.
Now let’s get down to basics. How many of you fully realize how dangerous gas cylinders
(of any kind) can be? What about the manner in which you store gas cylinders on
jobsites? Are the “valve covers” in place? Are the cylinders stored in any upright position?
Are the cylinders “secured?”
Are dissimilar gas cylinders stored apart? As an example, when in a storage mode,
acetylene and oxygen (principal ingredients for welding) stored a minimum of 25 feet
apart? Or do you have a fire-rated wall at least six feet high between them? When they
are deemed to be in a “storage mode,” they cannot be kept in the welder’s cart overnight.
They must be separated.
Before you move those cylinders, check the condition of the protective covers. Caps must
be secured, and all welding leads/hoses removed accordingly.
Never move cylinders (of any kind) when regulators are attached unless the cylinders are
Topic 20-1
secured in a cylinder cart/truck. Otherwise, remove the regulator and put on a protective
valve cap. Regulators, on many occasions, can and will break off if they are
jostled/bumped/kicked over/impacted.
Always hoist cylinders by using a cradle or pallet. This is when cylinders almost always are
mishandled by ill-informed workers, resulting in explosions, fires, contamination, and
sometimes death.
Here is a list of where most hazards associated with cylinders occur:
 Refueling (Improper Storage of Drums/Tanks)
 Improper Clothing (Rayon/Nylon Outer Clothing)
 Fires/Flames/Sparks (Near Cylinders)
 Placarding (Incorrect Placards/Misdiagnosing Content)
 Smoking (NO SMOKING Signs Not Posted)
 Valves (Not Capped/Secured)
 Welding Hoses/Gauges (Not Disconnected)
 Dot Placarding (No Placarding/Improper Placarding)
 Fire Extinguishers (None Posted/Near Cylinders)
 Bulk Storage (No Fire Walls/Failure to Advise Fire Marshall of Quantity)
 Air-Supplied Respirators (None On-Site for Emergencies)
 Loading/Unloading (New Hires Used Without Training)
 Fork Lift Operations (Unauthorized/Inexperienced Forklift Operators)
 Tanks Lying on Side (Potential for Explosion)
 Empty or Full (Tanks Not Marked “Empty” on Loading Docks)
 Cylinders Improperly Labeled (Reactivity/Explosivity Not Known)
Drums sometimes explode? A 55-gallon drum that once contained some type of
flammable product (even when empty) can sometimes explode, causing the drum to go sky
high … and if a human being is in its path, be killed instantly. WHY?
Drum containers (or hollow structures which have contained toxic or
flammable substances) before welding, cutting or hearing is undertaken on
them, shall either be filled with water or thoroughly cleaned of such
substances and ventilated and tested.
Additionally, before heat is applied to a drum, container, or hollow structure,
a vent or opening shall be provided for the release of any built-up pressure
during the application of heat.
Topic 20-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
21 - Trenches / Excavations
MEETING DATE :
23-May-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #21
Trenches/Excavations
Excavation and trenching cave-ins result in more than 100 fatalities annually in the United
States. With little or no warning, an unsupported, improperly-shored or sloped trench or
excavation wall can collapse, trapping workers below in seconds.

Let’s talk a little more about the high cost of a cave-in. Have you ever witnessed a
cave-in that buried a worker? Do you know that one cubic yard of soil weighs
approximately 3,000 pounds (the equivalent of a Volkswagen)? And do you know what
happens to a human body when 3,000 pounds of soil explodes onto it. Within two
seconds there is probably no life left in that body. Most trench collapses don‟t result in
broken fingers, abrasions, or twisted knees. Most trench collapses take lives. The facts
are that simple.

Before starting a job, the following conditions should be considered: traffic, nearness
and condition of structures, soil, surface and ground water, the water table, overhead
and underground utilities, and weather.
Soils


OSHA’s standards describe three basic types of soils: “A” Soil, “B” Soil, and “C” Soil.

“A” Soil has compressive strengths of 1.5 tons per square foot or greater. It is very
cohesive, and only has to be laid back at a ratio of 3/4:1 to maintain a safe working
angle.

“B” Soil has compressive strengths of .5 to 1.5 tons per square foot. It is
moderately cohesive, but must be laid back at a ratio of at least 1:1 to maintain a
safe working angle.

“C” Soil, on the other hand, is so unstable (uncohesive), and has an unconfined
compressive strength of .5 or less, and therefore must be laid back at a ratio of 1
1/2:1 to maintain a safe working angle.
Since the bulk of the soil that all of us work in is “C” Soil, it means that we‟re constantly
threatened with the dangers ever present in extremely unstable soil, where the slightest
jar, vibration, rain/moisture, etc., can cause the side walls to collapse at the slightest
provocation. Therefore, a competent person in our industry needs to have a thorough
knowledge and understanding of the inherent dangers surrounding trenching
operations, and must therefore apply the protective steps provided by OSHA in its 1926
(Subpart P) Standards.
Topic 21-1
OSHA Standard 1926.651(k)(1) requires that every trench and or excavation must be
inspected daily by a competent person (someone who is trained and knowledgeable and
has authority to take corrective action), prior to the start of work and as needed throughout
the work shift.
A safe trench or excavation must adhere strictly to all plans and specifications. Soil
conditions must be monitored for changes and location of all existing utilities is mandatory.
A safe means of entry and exit is required if the trench is deeper than 4 feet. See standard
for specifics.
Any of the following could affect your safety when in a trench or excavation:
WARNING SIGNS OF FAILURE: Tension cracks in sidewalls, slopes, and surface
adjacent to excavations; Ground settlement or subsidence; Spilling or sloughing soils;
Changes in wall slope or bulge; Increase in strut loads; excessive seepage and piping of
fine soils; Softening of sidewalls or boiling of trench bottom; Creaking or popping sounds;
Visual deformation of bracing system or trench.
SLOPING / BENCHING - CHECK FOR: Excessive vibration; location of spoil pile and
backfill; signs of distress cracking, bulging, etc.; improper installation procedures or
alignment of members; incorrect installation of connections; workers in unbraced trench or
improper system of bracing being used.
SHORING / BRACING - CHECK FOR: Maintenance of proper slope ratio; excessive
vibrations; location of spoil pile, trees, boulders or structures; equipment location relative to
the excavation; secondary soil or rock structure; presence of water seepage and/or rainfall;
signs of distress.
TRENCH SHIELD / BOX - CHECK FOR: Clearance between shield and trench sidewalls;
adequate freeboard at top of shield; proper slope above shield; current certification of
shield; excessive wear or damage, or improper use of shield; workers in an unshielded
trench or improper shield being used.
SAFETY REMINDERS:
THE COMPETENT PERSON MUST BE KNOWLEDGEABLE. TRAINED, AND
HAVE THE AUTHORITY TO TAKE CORRECTIVE ACTION.
Trench Shield: Has one role in life: To protect the workers in the trench system.
Ladder: To provide safe egress to and from a trench shield, that there be a ladder.
Inside Trench: The ladder must be immediately accessible to the workers in the trench
(and must never be placed outside the shield system).
Topic 21-2
Hard Hats:
A small pebble or hand-tool falling on a worker in a trench can cause concussions, skull
fractures, death. Wear „em.
Locked in Place: Aluminum hydraulic shores, when expanded, must “lock” in place.
Improper Installation/Dismantling: Aluminum hydraulic shoring, as well as timber
shoring must be assembled “from the top down,” and disassembled from “from the
bottom up.”
Ramps: It‟s okay to use “ramps” to enter and exit a trench, providing the ramp surface
is compacted, is not wet, and can be accessed in an upright position.
More Information
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 11, Excavations
and Trenching.
Topic 21-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
22 - Benzene - Know The Signs
MEETING DATE :
30-May-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #22
Benzene - Know the Signs
Benzene, while an important component of many industrial products and motor fuels, is
one of the most hazardous materials in common use today. In fact, it merits its own section
in the OSHA rules at 29 CFR 1910.1028.
Despite its toxic nature, benzene can be safety used when you follow the prescribed safety
rules and procedures.
Physical hazards
Flammability is a prime concern. Vapors can form explosive mixtures.
Benzene is incompatible with oxidizers (nitric acid, oxygen, etc.).
Health hazards
Inhalation (breathing): poisonous. In industry, this is the primary route of exposure.
Eye exposure: severe irritant.
Skin exposure: contact is moderately irritating (can lead to burns and blistering in
extreme cases) and poisonous.
Ingestion (swallowing): moderately toxic.
Described as a narcotic.
Observable effects (from breathing or swallowing)—you may feel: breathless, irritable,
euphoric or giddy; irritation in eyes, nose and respiratory tract; headache, dizziness,
nausea, or intoxicated. Severe exposures may lead to convulsions and loss of
consciousness.
Benzene is noted for the following long-term (chronic) effects:

Blood disorders, including anemia.

Vague symptoms of fatigue, headaches, dizziness, loss of appetite (followed by
weight loss) and weakness. The response is highly individualized.

Cancer, especially leukemia (blood cancer).
Hazard awareness
Signs
Topic 22-1
You must post and maintain signs around regulated areas as well as entrances and access
points. The signs must read:
DANGER
BENZENE
CANCER HAZARD
FLAMMABLE - NO SMOKING
AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL ONLY
RESPIRATOR REQUIRED
Labels
Labels are required on all containers. They must be put on the containers and maintained
in a legible condition. These labels must comply with OSHA's Hazard Communication
standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) and include the legend:
DANGER
BENZENE
CANCER HAZARD
Employee training
OSHA regulations contain specific training requirements for benzene. At 29 CFR
1910.1028(j)(3) the rules say:

You must provide employees with information and training, at the time of their initial
assignment to a work area where benzene is present.

If exposures are above the action level, employees must be provided with
information and training at least annually thereafter.

The training program must be in accordance with the requirements of 29 CFR
1910.1200, Hazard communication.
In addition, you must provide an explanation of the benzene regulation, indicate to workers
where the standard is available, and describe the medical surveillance program required by
the regulation.
Remind employees to follow the requirements of signs and report any faded, missing or
illegible signs. Employees need to know where copies of the Material Safety Data Sheets
are kept, how to get copies and how to read them.
Topic 22-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
23 - Noise
MEETING DATE :
6-Jun-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #23
Noise
High noise levels can damage hearing and cause safety problems. Loud noise, especially if
it’s shrill, can cause: temporary or permanent hearing loss; tinnitis, a constant or periodic
ringing or roaring in the ears; inability to hear signals and safety warnings (interferes with
communication); stress; poor concentration; headaches, etc. from straining to hear.
OSHA requires employers to protect employees from high noise levels. Employers must
measure workplace noise levels. If 8-hour time-weighted average exposures are 85
decibels (dB) or more, a Hearing Conservation Plan is needed. A dishwasher is 65 dB;
power sander is 85 dB; jackhammer is 110 dB, jet engine is 140dB. Employers with
Hearing Conservation Plans must: monitor noise levels and report results to employees;
test employee hearing to set a baseline and identify any losses over time; try engineering
out workplace noise; and provide employees still exposed to high noise levels with hearing
protection devices and training on how to select, use, and care for them.
Cooperate with efforts to reduce workplace noise exposure. These efforts include: placing
noisy machinery or operations in separate areas; lubricating and maintaining equipment to
eliminate rattles and squeaks; replacing worn or loose machine parts; mounting machines
on rubber to reduce vibration; choosing quieter machines when replacements are needed;
installing sound barriers around noisy equipment; using sound absorbing pads, ceiling
materials etc.; and administrative controls, such as reducing the time an individual is
exposed to high levels of noise.
Hearing protection devices cover or go into the ears to block noise. Never use cotton,
stereo headsets, or other makeshift hearing protectors. They don’t protect your ears from
noise. Use one of the following: earplugs are inserted in the ear canal to seal noise out
(Note: frequently, plugs are inserted ineffectively or incorrectly). They may be premolded or
custom molded reusable, or one-use or one-week-use disposables; Earmuffs are the best
protectors. They have a headband with cushioned plastic cups that cover each ear. They
may feel bulky or uncomfortable in hot weather. In tight quarters, they can be an added
problem; Canal caps cover and seal the ear canal entrance with soft flexible pads on a
lightweight headband. Though comfortable, they provide the least protection; Earmuffs plus
ear plugs might be needed in some high-noise areas.
Inspect and care for hearing protection devices. Inspect hearing protectors before each
use. Report and don’t use: earmuffs or canal caps that are loose, cracked, or don’t seal
well; earplugs that are cracked, misshapen, or hard and inflexible. Wash hands thoroughly
before inserting or putting on hearing protectors. Clean hearing protection devices
regularly, following manufacturers’ instructions. Warm, soapy water is often recommended.
Don’t use alcohol, acetone, or other chemicals. Store hearing protection devices where
they’ll stay clean and dry. Don’t squish, doing so will affect fit.
Topic 23-1
Be aware of and report any hearing problems: Noise or ringing in the ears; trouble hearing
voices or high or soft sounds; and needing TV or radio volume so high that others
complain.
Wear hearing protection for off-the-job noise exposure such as power tools, chain saws,
lawn mowers, garden tractors, some vacuum cleaners or appliances, hunting, shooting,
motorcycles, snowmobiles, ATV’s, music concerts, and car and motorcycle races.
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 15, Noise.
Discussion Point: Ask participants to demonstrate how to inspect and put on hearing
protection devices, using those available in your facility.
Conclusion: Always use hearing protection in high-noise situations. Though they may seem
uncomfortable at first, hearing protection devices can help you protect one of your most
important senses.
Topic 23-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
24 - Working in the Heat
MEETING DATE :
13-Jun-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #24
Working in the Heat
Working in hot conditions, indoors or outdoors, creates health risks. Workers who wear
tank tops or no tops at all risk major sunburn, pain, blisters, and tissue damage. But
aren’t sun and sunburn part of working out in the open all day? Yes, but everything has
its limits. Sunburn often leads to sun poisoning and, in some cases, requires long-term
recuperation. Modern medical science has shown that excessive exposure to the sun
can cause skin cancer. Construction workers can inadvertently expose themselves to
excessive sun through failure to wear proper protective clothing while on the jobsite.
Having a nice tan is one thing, having cancer is quite another. You must wear
protective clothing to prevent excessive and painful sunburn.
Heat cramps occur when the body loses too much salt from heavy exertion in heat. Heat
exhaustion occurs when the body can’t replace fluids and/or salt lost in sweating.
Perspiration in heat is important, because it cools the body as it evaporates. Heat stroke
occurs when the body no longer sweats and holds so much heat that the body temperature
reaches dangerous levels. Heat stroke is a medical emergency and can lead to delirium,
convulsions, unconsciousness, or even death. Factors that can increase the risk of these
types of heat stress include: physical exertion; being unaccustomed to working in heat;
wearing protective clothing that traps body heat; and age. Older people may have less
body water and lower sweat gland efficiency; being overweight, which makes you use more
energy to perform tasks; and medications that can interfere with normal body reactions to
heat.
Take precautions to avoid heat stress when working in hot conditions. For work outdoors in
the heat, or indoors in laundries, foundries, or other hot areas: gradually adjust to heat
when new to a job or after a two-week or longer absence; take about five days to gradually
build up time spent working in heat; use general ventilation, cooling fans, and evaporative
cooling whenever possible; shield furnaces and other heat producing equipment; check for
and eliminate any steam leaks; plan the most strenuous work for the coolest part of the
day; wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothes; wear a hat and use sunscreen to work
outdoors; drink water steadily before, during, and after working in the heat. Drink about 16
ounces before starting, and 5 to 7 ounces every 15 to 20 minutes during hot work; Eat wellbalanced meals, avoiding heavy or hot food, alcohol and caffeine; take salt tablets to
replace what’s lost in perspiration, if approved by a doctor; work at a steady pace,
minimizing overexertion; take regular breaks in a cool, well-ventilated area; know your own
limits and ability to work in the heat. Take fast action for symptoms of heat cramps,
exhaustion or heat stroke.
Be alert to heat stress symptoms. Heat exhaustion symptoms include: weakness,
dizziness, sometimes nausea, pale or flushed appearance, sweating, and moist and
clammy skin. Heat stroke symptoms include: dry, not reddish skin, lack of sweating, high
body temperature, strong and rapid pulse, chills, and confusion.
Topic 24-1
Respond quickly and correctly to heat stress symptoms. Heat stroke is a medical
emergency that can be fatal. Act immediately. Move a victim immediately to a cool place
and call for medical help. Cool the person down as much as possible while waiting for
medical help. Use a hose or soak clothes with water and fan the body. Monitor breathing;
don’t give fluids if the person is unconscious. Heat exhaustion requires fast response to
prevent worse problems. Move to a cool place immediately. Loosen clothing and place cool
wet compresses on the skin. Drink water or an electrolyte beverage slowly. Elevate feet 8
to 12 inches. If you experience heat cramps, drink water.
The heat index (see chart below) is the "feels like", or apparent, temperature. As
relative humidity increases, the air seems warmer than it actually is because the body is
less able to cool itself via evaporation of perspiration.
As the heat index rises, so do health risks. Physical activity and prolonged exposure to
the heat increase the risks.
The following chart shows the health risks as temperature and relative humidity rise.
The Heat Index
Air
Temp
(°F)
Relative Humidity (percentage)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
90
95 100
135° 120 126
130° 117 122 131
125° 111 116 123 131 141
120° 107 111 116 123 130 139 148
115° 105 107 111 115 120 127 135 143 151
110°
99 102 105 108 112 117 123 130 137 143 150
105°
95
97 100 102 105 109 113 118 123 129 135 142 149
100°
91
93
95
97
99 101 104 107 110 115 120 126 132 138 144 150
95°
87
88
90
91
93
94
96
98 101 104 107 110 114 119 124 130 136 140 150
90°
83
84
85
86
87
88
90
91
93
95
96
98 100 102 106 109 113 117 122 126 131
85°
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
93
95
97
99 102 105 108
80°
73
74
75
76
77
77
78
79
79
80
81
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
75°
69
69
70
71
72
72
73
73
74
74
75
75
76
76
77
77
78
78
79
79
80
70°
64
64
65
65
66
66
67
67
68
68
69
69
70
70
70
70
71
71
71
71
72
= Heatstroke risk extremely high
= Heat exhaustion possible
= Heat exhaustion likely, heatstroke possible
= Fatigue possible
Topic 24-2
Conclusion: Pay attention to your body when you work in the heat. Work at a slow, steady
pace and drink plenty of water. Remember that heat stroke can be deadly and that
symptoms demand immediate action.
Topic 24-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
25 - Lead Abatement
MEETING DATE :
20-Jun-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #25
Lead Abatement
In OSHA’s 1926 Construction Standards (Subpart D – Occupational Health and
Environmental Controls), it talks a lot about “lead” and how injurious it is to your health,
bordering on lifetime illnesses, and subsequent death from lead poisoning.
More specifically, in Section 1926.62 Lead, it details the manner in which lead must be
controlled on construction jobsites, and how the worker must be protected at all times from
the hazards created by lead exposure.
This section OSHA 1926.62 states that is applies to all construction work where an
employee may be occupationally exposed to lead. Construction work is defined as work
for construction, alteration and/or repair, including painting and decorating.
Additionally, it includes:
1. Demolition
2. Removal or encapsulation of material
3. New construction, alteration, repair or renovation of structures
4. Installation of products containing lead
5. Lead contamination/emergency cleanup
6. Transportation, disposal of lead materials, and
7. Maintenance operations associated with construction, etc.
Lead control and abatement procedures grow in complexity as we enter a workplace that
has obvious lead exposure. Controls involve a broad cross-section of steps to be taken by
the employer, to protect the employee, as follows:
 Permissible Exposure Limit – The employer shall assure that no employee is
exposed to lead at concentration greater than that as predetermined by ANSI
and related agencies.
 Exposure Assessment – Each employer who has a workplace or operation
covered by this Standard shall determine if any employee may be exposed to
lead at or above the “action level.”
 Methods of Compliance – Engineering and work practice controls must be
implemented to reduce and maintain permissible exposure to lead below the
permissible exposure levels.
 Compliance Program – Prior to commencement of the job, each employer shall
establish and implement a written compliance program.
 Respiratory Protection – Where the use of respirators is required, the employer
shall provide and assure the use of respirators.
 Protective Work Clothing and Equipment – Employers shall provide workers with
appropriate work clothing and equipment that prevents contamination of the
employee (i.e. coveralls, gloves, hats, shoes/disposable, face shield, goggles,
etc.).
Topic 25-1



Housekeeping – All surfaces shall be maintained as free as practical of
accumulations of lead.
Medical Surveillance – Employer shall make initial medical surveillance to
employees occupationally exposed to lead at or above the action level.
Employee Information and Training – The employer shall communicate
information concerning lead hazards according to the requirements of OSHA’s
Hazard Communication Standard for the construction industry (i.e. posters,
signs, labels, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), and appropriate lead
training.
Here’s a recap of what employees should look for, and how they should respond to a lead
environment on the jobsite. Must have training on the following:
Lead Abatement
Full-Face Masks
MSDS Sheets
Fit-Testing Procedures
Lead Exposure Clothing Sanitizing of Respirators
HAZWOPER Training
(Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response)
Lead Abatement Training
Medical Questionnaire
As a final note, whenever workers are exposed to a lead environment, and then go into a
lead-abatement program, the entire operation must be orchestrated by a “competent
person” whose primary job is to constantly monitor all of the above-listed lead
contamination procedures.
Topic 25-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
26 - Electrical Safety
MEETING DATE :
27-Jun-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #26
Electrical Safety
On construction jobsites, where do you look for Federal and State “standards” that
cover the workplace? In OSHA’s 29 CFR Part 1926.402 through 449. This is what the
OSHA 1926 Standards call Subpart K—Electrical.
If you want the facts about electrical hazards, and how to control them (the hazards), read
through there Federal standards, and you’ll see that OSHA’s guidelines will help you
understand the countless electrical hazards that literally surround you on almost every
construction jobsite.
Here Subpart K’s Index
1926.400
1926.402
1926.403
1926.404
1926.405
1926.406
1926.407
1926.408
1926.416
1926.417
1926.431
1926.432
1926.441
1926.449
Introduction
Applicability
General Requirements
Wiring Design and Protection
Wiring Methods, Components/Equipment for General Use
Specific Purpose Equipment and Installations
Hazardous (classified) Locations
Special Systems
General Requirements
Lockout and Tagging of Circuits
Maintenance of Equipment
Environmental Deterioration of Equipment
Batteries and Battery Charging
Definitions Applicable to This Subpart
Every worker on a construction site should know about these potential hazards, and how to
avoid them.
Here’s just one of these OSHA Standards (1926.441…Batteries and Battery Charging)
that you should know and understand:
 Batteries of the unsealed type shall be located in enclosures with outsides vents, or in
well ventilated rooms.
 Ventilation shall be treated to make them resistant to the batteries.
 Racks and trays shall be treated to make theme resistant to the electrolyte.
 Floor shall be of acid resistant construction.
 Face shields, aprons, and rubber gloves shall be provided for workers handling acids or
batteries.
 Facilities for quick drenching of the eyes and body shall be provided within 25 feet of
battery-handling areas.
Topic 26-1




Facilities shall be provided for flushing and neutralizing spilled electrolyte and for fire
protection.
Battery charging installations shall be located in areas designated for that purpose.
Charging apparatus shall be protected from damage by trucks.
Vent caps shall be kept in place (when recharging batteries) to avoid electrolyte spray.
Under certain conditions, a small amount of electrical current can cause electrocution.
Less than one-tenth of an ampere can kill. Hundreds of workers are injured or killed in
electricity-related accidents each year. To handle electricity safely, you must understand
how it acts, how it can be detected, what hazards it presents, and how these hazards can
be controlled.
A severe shock can cause considerably more damage to the body than is visible. For
example, a person may suffer internal hemorrhages and destruction of tissue, nerves, and
muscles. And shock is often only the beginning of a chain of events. Electricity can cause
falls, cuts, burns, and broken bones.
In addition to shock and burn hazards, electricity poses other dangers. For example, when
a short circuit occurs, hazards are created from surrounding arcs. If high current is
involved, these arcs can cause injuries and start fires. Extremely high-energy arcs can
damage equipment, sending fragmented metal flying an all directions. Even low-energy
arcs can cause violent explosions in atmospheres that contain flammable gases or vapors
or combustible dusts.
Electrical accidents can be caused by a combination of three possible factors:

Unsafe equipment and/or installation

Workplaces made unsafe by the environment

Unsafe work practices
Look for the following warning signs of a strained or inadequate electrical system:
 Frequent power outages or blown fuses
 Lights that flicker or dim
 Loose plugs
 Discolored outlets
 Overheated power tools
 Cords that are warm to the touch
 Suspicious sizzles, sparks or buzzing sounds
 Lag time before a power tool becomes operational
 Flawed extension cords
 Third prong missing from plug
 Exposed wiring
 Extension cords lying in water
 Too many power tools plugged into a single outlet
Topic 26-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
27 - Foot Protection
MEETING DATE :
4-Jul-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #27
Foot Protection
There are a million hazards on almost all jobsites that can injure your feet. You don’t have
to drop a hundred-pound piece of steel on your toe to break it. You can break your toe just
by stumbling over a small piece of rebar that is jutting out from a concrete footer. But, if
you’re wearing heavy-duty work boots, you’ll come out of these scrapes with nothing more
than a brief twinge. There is no substitute for these heavy-duty boots, and they provide all
workers with extra protection against broken toes, contusions, sprains and a multitude of
potential foot injuries. Steel-toed, heavy-duty work boots, that come up over the ankles,
and are fully laced at all times, are perhaps the single most valuable piece of personal
protective equipment that you’ll put on every day of your life.
Work shoes should be sturdy, in good condition, and fit well. Never wear sandals, tennis
shoes, canvas hiking boots, or thin or worn shoes. Even when special protective footwear
isn’t needed, work shoes or boots should: fit comfortably, without slipping or pinching the
foot or toes; be made of leather, provide good foot support; have 1/2” notched heels and
non-skid soles for good traction; be in good condition, with no rips or holes; and fasten
securely. Laces should never drag on the ground.
Protect feet against impact or punctures. Wear sturdy shoes with an impact-resistant steel
toe-cap if you: work with or around heavy equipment; handle materials that could drop on
your toes, or hand trucks that could roll over toes; or work below work areas from which
tools or materials could fall. If you need added material protection against heavy objects
landing on your feet: wear aluminum alloy, fiberglass, or galvanized steel foot guards over
shoes. If your work area floor has sharp puncture hazards like nails or wire: wear footwear
with metal insoles or reinforced soles, don’t wear footwear that contains metal where
there’s risk of electrical contact.
Select footwear materials that protect against other job hazards. Wear impermeable rubber
or neoprene boots if you work with corrosives or hazardous chemicals. Check MSDS’s for
specific recommendations. Wear impermeable footwear either alone or over other work
shoes. Wear shoes with non-conductive soles and no nails or other metal if you work with
live electric power. Wear rubber boots or shoes or leather shoes with special soles that
provide traction if you work on wet or slippery floors. Wear footwear with heat-resistant
soles if you work on hot floors. Wear insulated footwear if you work in cold or wet areas.
Wear removable over-the-ankle spats if you could get splashed by hot metal or welding
sparks that might land in your shoes or boots. Don’t tuck pants in or wear shoes with
tongues around hot sparks.
Inspect and maintain work shoes. Check footwear before use to be sure there are no rips
or holes. Repair or replace footwear that can’t give you good protection. Decontaminate
boots or boot covers that contact hazardous substances. Keep all components of footwear,
particularly treads on the soles, clean.
Topic 27-1
Prevent foot injuries. Identify foot hazards and select proper protection before starting any
job. Take care not to drop tools, material and heavy objects. Keep aisles clear of spills and
tripping hazards. Walk, don’t run.
Discussion Points: Discuss the foot hazards employees are likely to encounter on the job.
Conclusion: Prevent broken bones, burns, and other foot injuries. Wear sturdy shoes or
boots that are designed to protect your feet from injury and to give you good footing in all
work conditions.
More Information
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 15, Protective
Equipment.
Topic 27-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
28 - Hazarous Atmospheres
MEETING DATE :
11-Jul-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
2
3
4
5
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8
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #28
Dangerous Atmospheres
H2S & N2 Safety
We often take the air we breathe for granted. However, many gases in the
environment have no color or smell, and we can not tell if the air is dangerous
simply by looking at it. These hazardous atmospheres frequently go
unrecognized by workers until it’s too late. Then workers rush in to rescue their
co-workers and often become the victims as well. Indeed, 60% of all workers
who die from such atmospheres are the rescuers themselves.
Hazardous atmospheres include flammable/combustible/explosive, oxygen
deficient environments and toxic environments. Flammable/combustible/
explosive atmospheres contain gases or vapors in a certain concentration that
can catch fire or explode if there is an ignition source. An oxygen-deficient
atmosphere means there is not enough oxygen in the space. Normal air has
20.8% oxygen. Levels below 19.5% are considered oxygen-deficient. Oxygen
deficient atmospheres are dangerous and can cause unconsciousness, brain
damage, and death. Toxic atmospheres contain gases or vapors which, if
breathed in, can make you sick, or even die.
Flammable / combustible explosive atmospheres
• Natural gas from leaking gas lines or natural sources
• Methane from decaying sewage
• Propane gas from leaking cylinders or equipment
• Gasoline vapors from leaking tanks and spills
• Vapors from solvents used for painting, cleaning, refinishing, etc.
Toxic atmospheres
• Solvent vapors
• Hydrogen sulfide from decaying sewage or raw petroleum
• Carbon monoxide from engine exhaust.
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an extremely hazardous, toxic compound. It is a
colorless, flammable gas that can be identified in relatively low concentrations,
by a characteristic rotten egg odor. The gas occurs naturally in coal pits, sulfur
springs, gas wells, and as a product of decaying sulfur containing organic matter,
particularly under low oxygen conditions. It is therefore commonly encountered
in places such as sewers, sewage treatment plants, manure stockpiles, mines,
hot springs, and the holds of fishing ships. Industrial sources of hydrogen sulfide
include petroleum and natural gas extraction and refining, pulp and paper
manufacturing, rayon textile production, leather tanning, chemical manufacturing,
and waste disposal.
Topic 28-1
Hydrogen sulfide has a very low odor threshold, with its smell being easily
perceptible at concentrations well below 1 part per million (ppm) in air. The odor
increases as the gas becomes more concentrated, with the strong rotten egg
smell recognizable up to 30 ppm. Above this level, the gas is reported to have a
sickeningly sweet odor up to around 100 ppm. However, at concentrations
above 100 ppm, a person’s ability to detect the gas is affected by rapid
temporary paralysis of the olfactory nerves in the nose, leading to a loss of the
sense of smell. This means that the gas can be present at dangerously high
concentrations, with no perceivable odor. This property of hydrogen sulfide
makes it extremely dangerous to rely totally on the sense of smell to warn of the
presence of the gas.
Symptoms when exposed at 0-10 ppm include eye, nose, and throat irritation. At
10-50 ppm, symptoms include headaches, dizziness, nausea, vomiting,
coughing, or breathing difficulty. At 50-200 ppm, severe respiratory track
irritation, shock, convulsions, coma, and even death can occur.
Since one cannot rely on the rotten egg smell, regular monitoring of the work
area will help identify possible hazards. With a vapor density of 1.19, hydrogen
sulfide is approximately 20% heavier than air, so this invisible gas will collect in
depressions in the ground and in confined spaces. The use of direct reading gas
detection instrumentation should be required before entering confined spaces
such as manholes, tanks, pits, and reactions vessels.
Additional protection may be required by local jurisdictions. Personal hydrogen
sulfide monitors are available and are designed to be worn at all times. Personal
monitors must be intrinsically safe, provide an audible, visual, and vibration
alarm at 10 ppm H2S. They must be bump checked and calibrated in
accordance with manufacturer guideline.
Oxygen-deficient atmospheres
Oxygen-deficient atmospheres contain less than 19.5% oxygen. Breathing
oxygen deficient air can make you lose judgment, coordination, and
consciousness. In a confined space, oxygen can be displaced by other gases or
used up by rusting metal, combustion, or bacteria digesting sewage. (Oxygenenriched atmospheres contain more than 23% oxygen. They are rare in
construction, and are usually caused by leaking oxygen hoses or cylinders.)
Nitrogen (N2) rich atmospheres and atmosphere containing Hydrogen sulfide
(H2S) are hazardous atmospheres you are likely to encounter.
These
atmospheres can be extremely dangerous and require special training and
precautions when working near.
Nitrogen is an inert gas, which means that it does not react with other chemicals
under most normal circumstances. Nitrogen is often used in industrial settings to
displace other gases that are toxic, corrosive, reactive, or present fire or
explosion hazards, making processes safer.
Topic 28-2
Using nitrogen to remove oxygen from process equipment decreases the
chances of a fire or explosion, but it also can make the atmosphere in and
around the equipment hazardous for humans to breathe.
Nitrogen is non-detectable by any of the human senses (no smell, no taste,
invisible, no sound, no feeling). Nitrogen is not a “poison” in the traditional
sense. It presents a hazard when it displaces oxygen, making the atmosphere
hazardous to humans. Breathing an oxygen deficient atmosphere can have
serious and immediate effects, including unconsciousness after only one or two
breaths. The exposed person has no warning and cannot sense that the oxygen
level is too low.
Should a co-worker be overcome by hazardous atmosphere, do not attempt to
attempt a rescue until you are properly protected. The rescuer can also
succumb to the hazardous atmosphere by venturing into a confined space
without adequate protection. Victims of a hazardous atmosphere must be
immediately rescued and transported to a hospital.
Topic 28-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
29 - Safety Meeting Responsibilities / Incentives
MEETING DATE :
18-Jul-12
JOB NAME:
JOB NUMBER:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
First Aid Kits
Tool Grounding
Fire Extinguishers
SAFETY MOMENT
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
2
3
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5
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #29
Safety Meeting Responsibilities / Incentives
Hayward Electric has weekly Tailgate Safety Meetings. The purpose of the meeting is to
convey safety information and answer employee questions. The format of most meetings
will be to review, in language understandable to every employee, the content of the injury
prevention program, special work site hazards, serious concealed dangers, and material
safety data sheets. Each week, the Job Supervisor will review a portion of the company's
safe work practices contained in this booklet, and other safety related information.
Whenever a new practice or procedure is introduced into the workplace, it will be
thoroughly reviewed for safety. A sign-up sheet will be passed around each meeting.
Employee attendance is mandatory and is compensable unless part of an official state
approved training program or pre-employment requirement.
With regard to the criteria for Tailgate Safety Meetings as they relate to the Safety
Incentive Program:
• An employee can miss only one (1) Tailgate Safety Meeting per Quarter.
• Employee can miss only four (4) Safety Meetings per Year.
Safety meetings can be made up on a quarterly basis (By the 15th of the month following
the end of the quarter). Failure to attend two (2) Safety Meetings in a quarter will be
considered a Recordable Injury as it relates to the Safety Incentive Program, and the
employee’s annual time will start over at the beginning of the next quarter. NOTE: An
employee can go to the home office to make up any outstanding meetings or get them
from their foreman.
Employee Responsibility for Training
Teaching safety is a two-way street. Hayward Electric can preach safety, but only
employees can practice safety. Safety education requires employee participation.
Each week, a meeting of all employees will be conducted for the purpose of safety
instruction. The employees will discuss the application of the Company's injury and
illness prevention program to actual job assignments. They will also read and discuss a
section of the manual and review application of general safety rules to specific situations.
Remember, the following general rules apply in all situations:
a) No employee should undertake a job that appears to be unsafe.
b) No employee is expected to undertake a job until he/she has received adequate safety
instructions, and is authorized to perform the task.
Topic 29-1
c) No employee shall use chemicals without fully understanding their toxic properties and
without the knowledge required to work with these chemicals safely.
d) Mechanical safeguards must be kept in place.
e) Employees must report any unsafe conditions to the jobsite supervisor and the
Responsible Safety Officer.
f) Any work-related injury or illness must be reported to management at once.
g) Personal protective equipment must be used when and where required. All such
equipment must be properly maintained.
Safety Training Incentive
The Company pays a safety incentive of $.25 per hour (review your last pay change to
see if you are in this program) for those individuals who maintain a current CPR/First Aid
card and a BATC (Bay Area Training Corporation) safety orientation card (office clerical
need only maintain a current CPR/First Aid card). Should either of these cards expire
then the incentive pay will cease until the expiring card is renewed.
The company will pay for the cost of a BATC safety orientation class for the employee,
and a CPR/First Aid class for the employee and their spouse. You are not paid for taking
this class.
Safety Incentive Programs
In order to promote company safety, Hayward Electric has a Safety Incentive Program.
This program is tied to each of the employee’s safety record.
Quarterly Award
For each calendar quarter that Hayward Electric does not have a recordable illness or
injury, every employee who worked for the entire quarter shall receive a quarterly safety
award. This award shall be decided by the Safety Committee.
Annual Awards
This program has been in effect as of August 1, 1994. Awards will be calculated from the
employee’s date of hire. An employee will receive the following:
• After one safe year – A company jacket or an allowance budget in luau of.
Topic 29-2
• After two or more safe years – an allowance budget, based upon the number of
consecutive safe years worked, will be allotted to the individual employee toward
the purchase of items of choice from a safety awards catalog chosen by the safety
committee.
In addition, each employee will receive a sticker identifying the number of years that the
employee has had without an injury. Awarding of stickers will be calculated from the
employee’s original date of hire, and adjusted for injuries and/or missed Tailgate Safety
Meetings.
The Annual safety award will be forfeited if one of the following occurs:
• Employee has a OSHA recordable injury.
• Employee is caught three times in a twelve (12) month period in violation of company
safety practices (three strikes), this includes being caught without wearing hard
hats and eye protection.
• Employee does not meet the criteria for attending Tailgate Safety Meetings.
Topic 29-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
30 - OSHA 300 Log
MEETING DATE :
25-Jul-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #30
OSHA 300 Log
Recording Criteria
Employers with 10 or more employees must record any work-related injury or illness
resulting in one of the following:

Death.

Restricted work or transfer to another job.

Days away from work.

Medical treatment beyond first aid.
Incidents are recorded into an OSHA 300 log and kept on file at the home office. This
log must be posted in a visible place within the home office for the prior year. Some
examples of what is defined as recordable or non-recordable are:
Recordable:
1. Loss of consciousness (regardless of medical/first aid treatment).
2. Restriction of work or motion (regardless of medical/first aid treatment).
3. Transfer to another job (regardless of medical/first aid treatment).
4. Termination of employment (regardless of medical/first aid treatment).
5. Antiseptics applied on second or subsequent visit to a doctor or nurse.
6. Burns of second and third degree.
7. Butterfly sutures.
8. Compresses, hot or cold, on second or subsequent visit to a doctor or nurse.
9. Cutting away dead skin (surgical debridement).
10. Diathermy Treatment.
11. Foreign bodies, removal if embedded in eye.
12. Foreign bodies, if removal from wound requires a physician because of
embedment, size or shape of object(s) or location of wound.
13. Infection, treatment for.
14. Use of prescription medications.
15. Soaking, hot or cold, on second or subsequent visit.
16. Sutures (stitches).
17. Whirlpool treatment.
18. X-ray which is positive.
Non-Recordable
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Antiseptics, application of, on first visit to a doctor or nurse.
Bandaging on any visit to a doctor or nurse.
Burns of the first degree.
Compresses, hot or cold, on first visit to a doctor or nurse only.
Elastic bandage, use of, on first visit to a doctor or nurse only.
Topic 30-1
6. Foreign bodies, not embedded, irrigation of eye for removal.
7. Non-prescription medications, use of.
8. Observation of injury on second or subsequent visit.
9. Ointments applied to abrasions to prevent drying or cracking.
10. Tetanus shots, initial or boosters alone.
11. Hospitalization for observation (no treatment other than first aid).
12. X-Ray which is negative.
Work-relatedness is presumed for injuries and illnesses resulting from events or
exposures occurring in the workplace, unless an exception specifically applies.
Exceptions to work relatedness:
 At the time of the injury or illness, the employee was present in the work environment as
a member of the general public rather than as an employee.
 The injury or illness involves signs or symptoms that surface at work but result solely from
a non-work-related event or exposure that occurs outside the work environment.
 The injury or illness results solely from voluntary participation in a wellness program or in
a medical, fitness, or recreational activity such as blood donation, physical examination,
flu shot, exercise class, racquetball, or baseball.
 The injury or illness is solely the result of an employee eating, drinking, or preparing food
or drink for personal consumption (whether bought on the employer's premises or
brought in). For example, if the employee is injured by choking on a sandwich while in the
employer's establishment, the case would not be considered work-related.
Note: If the employee is made ill by ingesting food contaminated by workplace
contaminants (such as lead), or gets food poisoning from food supplied by the employer,
the case would be considered work-related.
 The injury or illness is solely the result of an employee doing personal tasks (unrelated to
their employment) at the establishment outside of the employee's assigned working
hours.
 The injury or illness is solely the result of personal grooming, self-medication for a nonwork-related condition, or is intentionally self-inflicted.
 The injury or illness is caused by a motor vehicle accident and occurs on a company
parking lot or company access road while the employee is commuting to or from work.
 The illness is the common cold or flu (Note: contagious diseases such as tuberculosis,
brucellosis, hepatitis A, or plague are considered work-related if the employee is infected
at work).
 The illness is a mental illness. Mental illness will not be considered work-related unless
the employee voluntarily provides the employer with an opinion from a physician or other
licensed health care professional with appropriate training and experience (psychiatrist,
psychologist, psychiatric nurse practitioner, etc.) stating that the employee has a mental
illness that is work-related.
Topic 30-2
Employee Privacy Protection
Employers are required to establish a procedure for employees to report injuries and
illnesses. Employers are prohibited from discriminating against employees who do
report. The standard protects employee privacy by:

Prohibiting employers from entering an individual's name on Form 300 for certain
types of injuries/illnesses (e.g., sexual assaults, HIV infections, mental illnesses,
etc.);

Providing employers the right not to describe the nature of sensitive injuries
where the employee's identity would be known;

Giving employee representatives access only to the portion of Form 301 which
contains no personal identifiers; and

Requiring employers to remove employees' names before providing the data to
persons not provided access rights under the rule.
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 26, Employee
Records, Accident Investigation and Reporting.
Topic 30-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
31 - MSDS Information
MEETING DATE :
1-Aug-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #31
MSDS Information
OSHA requires a Material Safety Data Sheet (or MSDS) for every chemical and/or
hazardous substance in the workplace. Chemical manufacturers must prepare them
and provide them to users. Employers must have an easily available MSDS for each
workplace chemical. Hayward Electric has an extensive MSDS library. A MSDS
contains eight separate sections:
 SECTION I……..Manufacturer’s Name/Address/Etc.
 SECTION II…….Hazardous Ingredients/Identity Information
 SECTION III……Physical/Chemical Characteristics
 SECTION IV……Fire and Explosion Hazard Data
 SECTION V…….Reactivity Data
 SECTION VI……Health Hazard Data
 SECTION VII….. Precautions for Safe Handling and Use
 SECTION VIII….Control Measures
MSDS hazard and protection information is a guide to working safely with the chemical.
Before starting any job with a chemical, read the MSDS and follow its precautions.
Identification data tells what you’re working with. Chemical name, hazardous ingredients
and date MSDS was prepared; worker exposure limits, such as OSHA’s Permissible
Exposure Limit (PEL); and manufacturer/supplier name, address and emergency phone
number.
Physical and chemical changes can affect the type and degree of hazard. Normal
appearance and odor: any change could mean greater risk. Boiling point/melting point:
temperature at which the chemical changes from liquid to breathable gas or from solid to
liquid - changing the hazard and needed protections. Vapor pressure/vapor density/
evaporation rate: rate and ease with which the chemical evaporates or rises in the air,
which can increase the risk of inhaling the chemical; Solubility in water/specific gravity: the
chemical’s ability to dissolve, sink, or float in water.
The MSDS identifies fire and explosion risk factors and protections. Flash point: Lowest
temperature at which ignition source (e.g., a spark) could make the substance’s vapors
catch fire. The lower the number, the greater the chance of ignition; Flammable and
explosive limits: higher and lower concentrations of vapor in the air that will catch fire or
explode if they contact an ignition source; Firefighting: what material to use (water, foam,
etc.) To put out the fire containing this substance.
Reactivity data tell how the chemical reacts with other substances. Contact with air, heat,
water or another specific chemical could cause fire or explosion, or release flammable or
toxic gases; stability/instability: how well the chemical resists change or disintegration and
situations make it less stable; incompatibility: what substances (including air or water) may
Topic 31-1
cause a dangerous reaction if chemical is exposed to them during their use or storage;
hazardous decomposition/byproducts or polymerization: the kind of hazardous products or
reactions that would result if the chemical breaks down or reacts.
Health hazards explain the potential results of worker exposure: How the chemical enters
the body: inhaling, swallowing, skin or eye contact; Type of health effects: acute (develop
right after exposure, like skin burns) or chronic (develop over time, like Cancer); Signs or
symptoms of exposure: headache, rashes, dizziness, etc.; Cancer-causing potential;
Health conditions exposure might make worse: breathing or heart problems, etc.; What to
do if exposed: first aid measures to take while waiting for medical help; Control measures
include ways to handle the substance safely; Usage precautions: using ventilation, avoiding
heat, practicing good hygiene etc.; Emergency response: what to do if there’s a spill, leak,
or accidental release; Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): what to use to prevent
exposure (type of respirator, gloves, eye protection, protective clothing, etc.)
HOW MANY CHEMICALS ON YOUR JOBSITE?
It’s possible that even a small jobsite has up to 100 separate “chemicals” either stored
or being used by the workers daily. Here’s a short, short list that might surprise you:
● Cement
● PVC Glue
● Mastics
● Glues
● Bleaches
● Asbestos
● Solvents
● Paint
● Thinners
● Kerosene
● Ammonia
● Sulfuric Acid
● Gasoline
● Batteries
● Wiper Fluid
● Anti-Freeze
● Creosote
● Putty
● Oil
● Grease
● Formaldehyde
● Insecticides
● Epoxy Resins
AN EMPLOYEES RESPONSIBILITY
You, the employee, have the following responsibilities under OSHA’s Hazardous
Communication Standard (HazCom):
 Know where MSDS sheets are on your jobsites.
 Report any hazards you spot on your jobsite to your supervisor.
 Know the physical and health hazards of any hazardous materials on your
jobsite, and know and practice the precautions needed to protect yourself from
these hazards.
 Know what to do in an emergency.
 Know the location and content of your employer’s “written” hazard
communication program.
Conclusion: Use MSDS’s to identify chemical hazards and take safety precautions. Always
read the MSDS before you work with a chemical, so you will understand the substance’s
hazards, circumstances that increase the risk of hazards, and equipment and procedures
you can use to prevent accidents and dangerous exposure.
Topic 31-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
32 - Hand Protection
MEETING DATE :
8-Aug-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #32
Hand Protection
Hands and fingers need protection from injuries and other health hazards. OSHA requires
employers to provide employees with hand protection to prevent: absorption of harmful
substances, severe cuts, lacerations, abrasions or punctures, chemical, heat or electrical
burns, extreme heat or cold and blood-borne pathogens.
Gloves are an important form of hand protection. They provide an effective barrier between
the hand and the hazard. Don’t wear gloves if they create a greater hazard (e.g., catching
in a machine).
Select gloves designed to protect against your specific job hazards. Insulated gloves
protect against heat and cold. Choose fire-retardant materials for exposure to open flames.
Choose reflective materials for exposure to radiant heat. Neoprene, rubber, vinyl, and other
materials protect against chemicals. NO gloves protect against ALL chemicals, check the
MSDS for instructions. Special insulated rubber gloves protect against electrical shock and
burns. Metal mesh or other cut-resistant gloves protect against sharp objects. Leather
gloves protect against rough surfaces, chips and sparks, and moderate heat. Cotton gloves
protect against dirt, splinters, and abrasions, and help grip slippery objects. Cotton is not
good protection for use with rough, sharp or heavy materials.
Other PPE can provide added hand protection. Hand pads can protect against heat, rough
surfaces and splinters. You can’t wear hand pads if you’re doing delicate work. Thumb or
finger guards or tapes can provide extra protection on dangerous jobs. Long cuffs,
wristlets, and duct tape can keep chemicals and heat outside the gloves. Barrier creams
can help protect skin when gloves can’t be worn. However, barrier cream is not a substitute
for a glove. Creams must be applied frequently and only on clean skin.
Inspect gloves before putting them on. Don’t wear them if they’re torn, cracked or otherwise
damaged. Make sure they cover hands completely with a snug, but not uncomfortable, fit.
Bandage cuts or scrapes before putting on chemical-resistant gloves.
Remove chemical-protective gloves with special care. Rinse gloves thoroughly before
taking them off. Remove contaminated gloves so contamination doesn’t touch your skin.
Wash hands thoroughly after removing gloves. Place gloves in the proper containers for
decontamination or disposal. Store clean gloves right side out, cuffs unfolded, in a cool,
dark, dry place.
Take other precautions to protect your hands. Don’t clean your hands with solvents or
industrial detergents. Check materials for sharp edges, splinters, hot or cold temperatures
etc., before handling them. Keep your hands away from moving machinery parts. Always
cut away from your body.
Topic 32-1

Respond quickly and correctly to hand injuries. Chemical contact: wash skin
thoroughly for 15 minutes. Cuts: If large and bleeding, apply direct pressure and
raise hand over the shoulder. If small, wash with soap and warm water and cover
with a sterile bandage. Use of antibiotic ointments is optional but suggested. Burns:
soak a minor burn in cold water and cover with a sterile bandage. Get immediate
medical help for a burn that’s charred or blistered. Amputation: Wrap the amputated
part in a dry, sterile gauze or clean cloth. Put the wrapped part in a plastic bag or
waterproof container. Place the plastic bag or waterproof container on ice. The goal
is to keep the amputated part cool but not to cause more damage from the cold ice.
Do not cover the part with ice or put it directly into ice water. Go with it to a hospital
immediately. Broken bones: keep the hand still and get immediate medical
attention.
Conclusion: Hands are always on the job and need protection against hazards. Wear the
proper gloves or other hand protection and take every precaution to protect your hands
against injury, burns, and exposure to hazardous substances.
Topic 32-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
33 - Construction Safety
MEETING DATE :
15-Aug-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting #33
Construction Safety
Unsafe Acts in Construction
While unsafe conditions as well as unsafe acts are responsible for accidents, by far the
largest percentage of construction work injuries are the result of unsafe acts compared to
those caused by unsafe conditions.
If we review the industry’s accident experience over the years, we will find that the
reduction in accident rates has occurred as a result of improved physical inspections of the
jobs, improved safety-minded supervision, and advances in engineering and design. Yet, in
spite of those noteworthy efforts, many accidents - too many - continue to happen each
year.
It would sometimes appear that people want to hurt themselves or to be involved in an
accident. Workers who are protected by safety devices remove them or fail to use them.
People who are told about hazards seem to ignore the warnings. Well-trained,
experienced, workers seem to forget what they have learned. Above all, they forget that
nothing is as important as safety.
Different people treasure different things. Here, one of the things we treasure most is
safety, and keeping our employees safe. Just how valuable is that treasure? How much are
we willing to spend to get to keep it?
Hayward Electric spends a considerable amount of resources, time and effort to ensure
ours is a safe place to work. But none of that investment in equipment, protective gear,
training and so forth can buy the safety for workers whose unsafe acts result in accidents
and injuries. For example:
·
The safety goggles we provide can’t protect the eyes of an employee who leaves
them in his tool box or on the hard hat.
·
All the toeboards and railings in the world can’t guarantee protection from a serious
fall for the workers indulging in horseplay on a scaffold or around a floor opening.
·
Training sessions in how to recognize and guard against chemical hazards won’t
help a worker who fails to consult the MSDS when appropriate, or disregards the
warning on a label.
Each year, OSHA publishes its list of the 10 Most Cited Safety Violations across the
country. The sad thing is that they continue to occur everywhere.
Topic 33-1
Let’s take a look at them:
10 Most Cited Construction Standards
1. Scaffolding – 7,027 violations
2. Hazard Communication – 4,973 violations
3. Fall Protection – 4,797 violations
4. Respiratory Protection – 3,062 violations
5. Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) – 2,937 violations
6. Electrical - Wiring – 2,524 violations
7. Powered Industrial Trucks – 2,437 violations
8. Machine Guarding - General – 2,138 violations
9. Ladders – 2,135 violations
10. Electrical - General Requirements
Now let’s discuss your own worksite situation. On this list of the 10 Most Cited OSHA
Standards, how many of them have you violated? Let’s discuss some more:
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Do you always look at the scaffold tag before using a scaffold?
Do you always use fall protection when needed?
Do you know where the MSDS are and the hazards of the chemicals you are
working around?
Do you understand when, how, and the training needed to use a respiratory?
Do you always follow LOTO when needed?
Do you keep machine guard and handle in place when operating power tools?
Do you ever stand on the top of your stepladder? The top two rungs?
Do you always use a GFCI?
If you answered “no,” or “maybe,” or “sometimes,” then you’ve just scored a failing grade
on this short quiz
One Final Thought: Most of the more serious injuries, and a high number of fatalities, are
connected with victims of the TOP TEN list outlined above. Don’t be a statistic... be a live,
healthy, productive and happy worker.
Topic 33-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
34 - Safe Lifting Basics
MEETING DATE :
22-Aug-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #34
Safe Lifting Basics
Back strain and back injury cause serious pain and disability. The back supports the body.
One wrong move or repeated stress on weak back muscles can cause pain and injury.
Back injuries are one of the most common causes of work-related disability. Back pain is
the second-leading cause of lost work days, after the common cold. Once back strain
occurs, it often returns. Back injury often requires extended bed rest and, in some cases,
surgery.
Personal habits can make back injury more likely. You’re more likely to have a back injury if
you’re in poor physical condition, overweight, under stress, have poor posture, or overexert
yourself. Regular exercise can strengthen back and stomach muscles. Always consult your
doctor before starting an exercise program. Sit and stand straight; poor posture strains the
back. Be realistic about what you can carry and what you can do; overdoing can cause
lasting damage.
Lifting is a major cause of job-related back injury. Lifting too much, or lifting improperly,
puts too much strain on the back.
In spite of the increased use of machinery and equipment in construction work, most
materials put in a structure are moved by hand during some phase of building. If caution is
not observed, severe back injuries and hernias could occur. Avoid lifting manually when
possible. Test the weight and stability of the object you want to move by lifting one corner
slightly. If it’s too heavy for safe manual lifting: use material handling aids like dollies, hand
trucks, or forklifts, or get another person to help you lift.
Plan and prepare before you lift. Stretch and bend gently to loosen muscles. Choose the
straightest, flattest, clearest route to your destination. Remove anything from the route that
could trip or block you. Wear sturdy shoes with non-skid soles, gloves to provide grip, and
clothing you won’t trip over.
Lift properly, so your legs do the work - not your back. Stand close to the load, with feet
shoulder width apart and firmly on the floor. Bend at the hips and knees and squat close to
the load; keep your back straight. Grip the load firmly with both hands, not just your fingers.
Bring the load close to your body, keeping your weight centered over your feet. Stand
slowly with your back straight and let your legs push you up.
Avoid back strain while carrying. Carry the load waist high. Be sure you have a good grip
and can see where you’re going. Walk slowly, take small steps. Stop along the way to rest
if you need it. Move your feet to turn direction. DON’T TWIST! That’s a major cause of
injury.
Unload carefully. Lower the load slowly, with your knees bent.
Topic 34-1
Place your hands so they don’t get caught under the object while unloading. Place the load
on the edge of the surface and slide it back. Stand slowly.
The sprains and strains on jobsites are not always the fault of the employee. Maybe
they’re partially the result of poor supervision. Maybe the “new hire” hasn’t been given any
safety training to help him perform his work site assignments. And, just “maybe,” you are
responsible. We can’t always blame the other guy. Look in the mirror when you first get
up in the morning and say to yourself: “Could I have prevented this accident?”
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 13, Materials
Handling.
Discussion Point: Use light boxes to demonstrate (and have participants demonstrate)
safe lifting techniques.
Conclusion: Proper lifting can prevent back injury. Minimize manual lifting. When you do
lift, do it correctly so that your legs do the work - not your back.
Topic 34-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
35 - Hand Tools
MEETING DATE :
29-Aug-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #35
Hand Tools
Safety with Powered Hand Tools
Year after year, accident records and reports indicate that little hand tools can cause great
injuries. Injuries may include: contact with points of operation, such as saw blades;
electrical shock, fire or electrocution; eye injuries from flying chips, dust or shavings; and
dropping a tool on a body part or straining too hard to lift a heavy tool. Almost all these
injuries can be avoided, though, by following just a few simple rules: select the right tool for
the job; make sure it is in good condition before you start work; use it the right way. There
are many ways that power tools can cause accidents, but some of the more prevalent ways
lead to lost workdays:
Wrong Ways:
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The wrong tool is used for the job,
Tools are not maintained,
Tools are used without proper instruction,
Tools are used negligently,
Tools are carried or stored improperly,
Inappropriate dress is worn, and
Safety guards are purposely eliminated.
So, here are some solutions to ensure that employees are prepared to use tools
properly:
Right Ways:
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Review and understand the manual that came with the tool.
Learn the tool’s applications and limitations before using it.
Disconnect the tool before changing accessories, adjusting or cleaning.
Disconnect the power supply cord when the tool is not in use.
Store tools properly.
When drilling blind, check first for electrical circuits.
Keep the work area free of clutter; otherwise, each worker is building a personal
booby trap.
Regardless of the camaraderie in the work area, never assume that one
employee is looking out for another employee’s safety. Employees must be
responsible for their own safety.
Do not remove tool guards, use tools with their proper accessories.
Don’t use a tool with a malfunctioning switch or part. Give the tool to the
supervisor for repair.
Make sure the switch is off before connecting a tool to a power supply.
Topic 35-1
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Don’t use electric and air-powered tools around combustible materials.
Don’t use electric tools in a damp or wet environment.
Don’t overload the circuit; it will lead to premature failure of the tool.
When a tool is equipped with a three-pronged plug, plug it into a three-hole
electric receptacle or extension cord that is grounded.
Don’t cut the prong off the cord so it fits into an outlet. This action prevents the
tools from being properly grounded.
Don’t use electric tools in broken outlets. Fix the outlets.
Don’t lower tools by the cord. This results in cord failure and possible shock.
Training in hand tool use is frequently overlooked because employers usually assume
that workers know how to use hammers, pliers, saws, and wrenches. However, this is
not necessarily true. Workers do not always know the proper way to use hand tools. A
good training program in tool usage can often reduce the incidence of injuries and
cumulative trauma disorders.
Here are some helpful hints regarding the use of hand held tools:
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Tools should be used with the preferred hand.
Read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
Special purpose tools are more efficient in terms of time and money because they
permit the worker to combine two or more functions.
Special purpose tools require few movements, provide greater rpm, weigh less, and
have more precision and greater power.
Workers should be taught to bend the tool, not the wrist.
Workers should avoid squeezing their fingers, which prevents movement of the tool
in the hand. This strain can be eliminated by using tools with a bearing surface.
Use personal protective equipment. Wear eye protection; and if you’re creating a lot
of dust, wear a respirator suitable for the hazard.
Don’t wear loose clothing, loose hair, gloves, or jewelry that could get caught in the
point of operation.
Use a vise or clamps to secure materials, so both hands can operate the tool.
Safekeeping
Practice good housekeeping. Keep tools clean and in good condition. Have a place for
every tool and keep it there when you’re not using it. Sharp tools don’t belong in your
pockets. Never leave tools lying on the floor or ground - or where they can fall. Keep cords
off the floor, so they don’t become tripping hazards. Many injuries are caused by stepping
on, tripping over, falling on or being struck by tools that have been left lying around.
Discussion Point: Use portable tools to illustrate this session. Ask participants to describe
accidents or near-misses they’ve experienced with portable tools and how they would now
prevent them.
Topic 35-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
36 - Thinking About Drinking / Substance Abuse
MEETING DATE :
5-Sep-12
JOB NAME:
JOB NUMBER:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
First Aid Kits
Tool Grounding
Fire Extinguishers
SAFETY MOMENT
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #36
Thinking About Drinking / Substance Abuse
You are probably not a problem drinker, but like anyone else, you may enjoy a drink or two every
once in awhile. That’s fine and it’s none of anyone’s business, least of all the company that you
work for. It only becomes your employer’s concern when it affects your performance and when it
makes your actions at work less safe - to yourself and others around you.
Substance abuse violates company policy and may violate the law. Company rules ban drug or
alcohol use at work, or working under the influence. It’s illegal for anyone to possess or use drugs
such as cocaine or marijuana. The Drug-Free Workplace Act also bans illegal drug use at firms
with federal contracts. Hayward Electric is a DISA Contractors Consortium (DCC) and DOT/RSPA
compliant contractor. Employees shall be subject to substance abuse testing as follows:
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Pre-Enrollment
Pre-Access
Reasonable Suspicion/Cause
Random
Owner Initiated or Wall to Wall
Post Accident/ Incident
Return to Duty
Follow up
Our advertising industry has painted a pretty positive picture of drinking in our society, connecting
alcohol use with sports and with the high life, the good life. But let’s look at a few facts about the
negative side of alcohol. About 80 percent of all fire deaths, 65 percent of drowning deaths, and
70 percent of fatal falls are all linked to alcohol use. And that’s not even mentioning the deaths on
our highways caused by drivers who have been drinking.
Even when the drinker doesn’t die, which of course means most of us-every drop of alcohol he or
she has consumed finds it’s way to the bloodstream, either immediately (about 20 percent) or
through the digestive system (80 percent). The liver, perhaps the body’s most overworked and
over stressed organ, reacts to alcohol as it would to poison and begins at once to clear it from the
blood. In fighting this deadly substance, alcohol, the liver sets aside other important tasks. Toxins
of other sorts accumulate, and cells, tissues and organs don’t receive the nourishment that they
would with a liver devoted to normal processing.
The cells of the body and the special types of cells making up the nervous system and the brain
react at once to the presence of alcohol. They, too, respond to the substance as a poison and try
defensively to throw off the chemical. If drinking habits are sustained over a period of time, alcohol
saturates the cells and is more and more tolerated, even needed to achieve balance. But
meanwhile, the structure of the cells is becoming weakened. Organs are further at risk and the
delicate cells of the brain begin to break down.
Topic 36-1
But normal social drinking is not a disease, and only about 10 out of 100 drinkers will become
alcoholics.
It’s a 10-to-1 shot that you can control your drinking and need not carry it to excess to the point of
harming yourself or hurting others. How much drinking can you do and not have to label yourself a
problem drinker? The amount of drinking you do is not the guide. The way you function when
drinking is a more informative way to look at it. If you become noisy and quarrelsome when
drinking, have lost a job because of drinking, or have blacked out more than once over the years,
you probably have a drinking problem and should seek help.
Let’s cut down on the number of accidents and injuries caused by someone who’s been drinking not just someone who is drunk - but someone who was drinking yesterday and is hung over, out of
sorts, and still trying to recover - someone, in other words, whose mind is only half on the job.
Remember, Hayward Electric and our customers have zero tolerance for being under the
influence on the job, of alcohol or any other substance that will impair your judgment. If you’ve
been drinking stay home, and stay safe.
Conclusion: Substance abuse puts the user and others in danger. People use alcohol and
drugs to feel better or cope with problems, but substance abuse solves nothing and creates major
new problems, including safety risks. Refer to the Hayward Electric Anti-Drug Plan and
Substance Abuse Policy for additional and detailed information regarding requirements,
responsibilities and procedures.
Topic 36-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
37 - NFPA 70E - What Is It?
MEETING DATE :
12-Sep-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #37
NFPA 70E – What is it?
The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E is a comprehensive
standard that establishes best electrical safety practices standards on how to
protect electricians from electric arc flash and arc blast exposure. It is a
comprehensive electrical safety standard covering the full range of electrical
safety issues, including safety related work practices, maintenance, special
equipment requirements and installation. It focuses on protecting people and
identifies requirements that are considered necessary to provide a workplace
that is free of electrical hazards. OSHA bases its electrical safety mandates,
found in Subpart S part 1910 and Subpart K part 1926, on the comprehensive
information found in the standard. NFPA 70e is recognized as the tool that
illustrates how an employer might comply with these OSHA standards. The
relationship between the OSHA regulations and NFPA 70e can be described as
OSHA is the “shall” and the “how.”
Note: The NEC is intended for use primarily by those who
design, install, and inspect electrical installations. The provisions
within the NEC are not directly related to employee safety and
therefore are of little value for OSHA’s needs.
The NFPA 70e applies to employees who work on or near exposed energized
electrical conductors or circuit parts. This includes electrical maintenance
personnel, operators, troubleshooters, electricians, linemen, engineers,
supervisors, site safety personnel or anyone exposed to energized equipment of
50 volts or more.
NFPA 70e contains four major parts:
Part I is Installation Safety Requirements.
Part II is Safety Related Work Practices.
Part III is Safety-Related Maintenance Requirements.
Part IV is Safety Requirements for Special Equipment.
Part I is further subdivided into six chapters. The chapters look a lot like the NEC;
however, remember the focus is on safe installations. Some safety topics covered
in this part are electrical connections, branch circuits, grounding, wiring methods,
special equipment/systems, and hazardous locations.
Topic 37-1
Part II has five chapters and six appendices. This is a very important part because
is covers such topics as working on or near energized conductors, personal
protective equipment requirements when working on or near energized parts and
lockout/tagout requirements. For example, do you know what PPE is required to
insert an MCC bucket into energized equipment at 480 volt? The answer is that
this is Hazard/Risk Category 3, which requires two layers of Fire Retardant (FR)
clothing, a hard hat with a FR liner, face protection double layer switching hood,
hearing protection, voltage rated gloves, and leather work shoes
Part III has eleven chapters and specifically covers maintenance requirements for
substations, switchgear, fuses, circuit breakers, rotating equipment to name a few.
Part IV has five chapters and covers safety around special equipment such as
battery rooms, lasers, and electronic equipment.
Please discuss the following tables regarding the minimum safety requirements for
various electrical tasks at specified voltages.
Topic 37-2
ARC FLASH PROTECTION GUIDE
240 VOLTS AND BELOW
0
RISK CATEGORY:
1
OPERATE A
OPERATE A
OPEN AND CLOSE
CIRCUIT BREAKER CIRCUIT BREAKER A HINGED COVER
OR FUSED
OR FUSED
TO EXPOSE BARE
TASK: SWITCH WITH
SWITCH WITH
ENERGIZED
COVERS ON
COVERS OFF
PARTS
WORK ON
ENERGIZED
PARTS,
INCLUDING
VOLTAGE
TESTING
REMOVE OR
INSTALL CIRCUIT
BREAKERS OR
FUSES
REMOVE OR
INSTALL BOLTED
COVERS TO
EXPOSE BARE,
ENERGIZED PARTS
PPE REQUIRED:
UNDERGARMENTS
(UNTREATED COTTON)
T-SHIRT (LONG SLEEVE)
SHIRT (LONG SLEEVE)
X
X
X
X
X
PANTS (LONG)
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
FIRE RETARDANT (FR)
CLOTHING
FIRE RETARDANT
COVERALLS (MIN 8 ATPV)
FLASH SUIT JACKET (40
ATPV)
FLASH SUIT PANTS (40
ATPV)
FR PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
HARD HAT
FR HARD HAT LINER
SAFETY GLASSES
FACE PROTECTION (FACE
SHIELD-MIN. 8 ATPV)
FACE PROTECTION (DOUBLELAYER SWITCHING HOOD)
HEARING PROTECTION (EAR
CANAL INSERTS)
LEATHER GLOVES ONLY
X
X
LEATHER GLOVES-worn
external to voltage rated and
tested rubber gloves
X
X
VOLTAGE RATED TOOLS
X
X
X
X
LEATHER WORK SHOES
X
X
X
X
ARC FLASH PROTECTION GUIDE
GREATER THAN 240 VOLTS AND UP TO 600 VOLTS
RISK CATEGORY:
0
2
1
OPERATE A
OPERATE A CIRCUIT OPEN OR CLOSE A
INSERTION OR
WORK ON
CIRCUIT BREAKER
BREAKER OR
HINGED COVER TO REMOVAL (RACKING) ENERGIZED PARTS
OR FUSED SWITCH
FUSED SWITCH
EXPOSE BARE,
OF CB'S FROM
INCLUDING
TASK: WITH COVERS ON WITH COVERS OFF ENERGIZED PARTS CUBICLES, DOORS VOLTAGE TESTING
CLOSED
3
APPLICATION OF
SAFETY GROUNDS,
AFTER VOLTAGE
TEST
REMOVE OR INSTALL
A BOLTED COVER TO
EXPOSE BARE,
ENERGIZED PARTS
INSERTION OR
REMOVAL
(RACKING OF CB'S
FROM CUBICLES,
DOORS OPEN
INSERTION OR
REMOVAL OF
INDIVIDUAL
STARTER
BUCKETS FROM
MCC
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
PPE REQUIRED
UNDERGARMENTS
(UNTREATED COTTON)
T-SHIRT (LONG SLEEVE)
SHIRT (LONG SLEEVE)
X
PANTS (LONG)
X
FIRE RETARDANT (FR)
CLOTHING
FIRE RETARDANT
COVERALLS (MIN 8 ATPV)
FLASH SUIT JACKET (40
ATPV)
FLASH SUIT PANTS (40
ATPV)
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
FR PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
HARD HAT
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
FR HARD HAT LINER
X
X
X
X
X
FACE PROTECTION (DOUBLELAYER SWITCHING HOOD)
X
X
X
X
X
HEARING PROTECTION (EAR
CANAL INSERTS)
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
SAFETY GLASSES
X
FACE PROTECTION (FACE
SHIELD-MIN. 8 ATPV)
LEATHER GLOVES ONLY
X
X
X
X
X
X
LEATHER GLOVES-worn
external to voltage rated and
tested rubber gloves
X
X
X
X
VOLTAGE RATED TOOLS
LEATHER WORK SHOES
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
ARC FLASH PROTECTION GUIDE
GREATER THAN 600 VOLTS
RISK CATEGORY:
2
OPERATE A CIRCUIT
BREAKER OR FUSED
SWITCH WITH COVERS
TASK:
ON
4
ALL OTHER HIGH
VOLTAGE TASKSCONTACT THE SHOP
PPE REQUIRED
UNDERGARMENTS
(UNTREATED COTTON)
X
T-SHIRT (LONG SLEEVE)
SHIRT (LONG SLEEVE)
PANTS (LONG)
FIRE RETARDANT (FR)
CLOTHING
FIRE RETARDANT
COVERALLS (MIN 8 ATPV)
FLASH SUIT JACKET (40
ATPV)
FLASH SUIT PANTS (40
ATPV)
X
X
X
X
X
X
FR PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
HARD HAT
X
X
X
FR HARD HAT LINER
SAFETY GLASSES
X
FACE PROTECTION (FACE
SHIELD-MIN. 8 ATPV)
X
X
FACE PROTECTION (DOUBLELAYER SWITCHING HOOD)
X
HEARING PROTECTION (EAR
CANAL INSERTS)
X
LEATHER GLOVES ONLY
X
LEATHER GLOVES-worn
external to voltage rated and
tested rubber gloves
X
VOLTAGE RATED TOOLS
X
LEATHER WORK SHOES
X
X
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
38 - Road Safety
MEETING DATE :
19-Sep-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
2
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4
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #38
Road Safety
Defensive Driving
You witness it with greater frequency as you drive--aggressive driving, driver insensitivity,
poor driver performance, and the latest term: road rage! Whatever you call it, it is a
growing phenomenon that should concern every driver.
The National Traffic Administration defines aggressive driving as “operating a motor vehicle
in a manner that endangers or is likely to endanger persons or property.” Examples of
aggressive driving include lane weaving, running red lights, speeding, tailgating, and, in
keeping with this “digital” age, the use of obscene hand gestures requiring no translation.
How many examples are you guilty of? One? Two? More?
If you’re driving a company vehicle, you have the responsibility to drive safely and
cautiously at all times. Aggressive driving is dangerous, foolhardy, and a threat to every
driver on the road.
When you’re at the controls of any vehicle, it is important to remember that defensive
driving is a full-time job. The most dangerous mile you have to drive is the one directly
ahead of you. Anyone can drive perfectly for 10 feet or 100 feet or even one mile, but it
takes a real professional to drive perfectly for 10,000 miles or more. To be a professional
driver there are many things you must observe and practice.
A safe driver is not merely someone who has been lucky enough to avoid accidents, but is
one who drives defensively and looks out for others. Today’s driving standards demands
skill, knowledge, and decision-making ability.
Drivers who are safety-conscious have developed good habits and practice them daily.
Every time they get behind the wheel, their driving records are on the line. They must drive
like professionals and be prepared both mentally and physically.
If you are a driver who has a safe attitude about your driving, you will be able to drive with a
sense of security in inclement weather, on difficult roads, and through heavy traffic.
In addition, to be a good driver you should respect all traffic laws and be courteous to
others. Don’t be in a big hurry - that’s just asking for trouble. When bad weather affects
driving conditions, you must adjust your driving time and habits. Driving on wet or slippery
roads is not the same as driving on dry pavement. The number of traffic accidents and cars
running off the road during rainy weather could be reduced if drivers would anticipate the
slippery road conditions and adjust their driving habits.
Stay a safe distance from the vehicle in front of you - one vehicle length for each 10 miles
Topic 38-1
per hour over 25 miles per hour. Start stopping sooner. Take your foot off the accelerator
the instant you see a hazard developing, and apply your brakes gradually so you don’t go
into a spin or grind to a stop so quickly that you risk a rear-end collision.
Defensive driving is driving to prevent accidents, in spite of the incorrect actions of others
or adverse weather conditions. Anticipate driving hazards and know how to protect yourself
from them. Be alert while driving by keeping your mind free of distractions and your
attention focused on driving; alertness involves watching and recognizing accident-causing
factors instantly. The professional driver has foresight, the ability to size up traffic situations
as far ahead as possible. The driver must anticipate traffic problems that are likely to
develop and decide whether these developments could be dangerous.
Many drivers fail to understand why they were given a “preventable” for an accident when
they were not legally at fault. A “preventable accident” is one in which you fail to do
everything you could have done to prevent it. Even though the driver cited with a
“preventable accident” did not violate any traffic laws, the professional driver should have
seen or anticipated the incorrect actions of the other driver in time to take actions to
prevent the accident from happening. However, you may also see valuable lessons that
near-misses offer and make the necessary adjustments in your driving habits.
As a defensive driver you must operate your vehicle in a manner to avoid contributing to an
accident or being involved in a preventable accident.
Awareness of the vehicle’s limitations is essential; pre-trip checklists and inspections can
familiarize you with the vehicle and point out things that might need attention.
Topic 38-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
39 - High Voltage Accidents
MEETING DATE :
26-Sep-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
2
3
4
5
6
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #39
High Voltage Accidents
High voltage accidents occur when workers don’t plan properly. In construction there are
plenty of opportunities to make contact with a high voltage source. Landscapers planting
trees and shrubs, antenna installations, roofer installing roofing materials, crane
operations, scaffold building, underground utility work, and dump trucks unloading are just
a few that can cause problems.
One of the biggest killers in the industry is power lines. Frequently they are strung
overhead and attached to power poles providing primary and secondary service to homes,
businesses, and construction sites. Always provide for safe clearances when working near
electric lines. Keep the lines in your sight or have a worker designated as the spotter.
Consider all lines “hot” even though they look safe. NEVER, NEVER touch a rig in motion
near electric lines and keep co-workers and bystanders away.
Another area of concern is underground electric lines. More and more of them are being
installed around the country. These lines can be severed or damaged and electrical injury
is a real danger. To prevent this type of accident, the local utility locator service should be
contacted. On average they require 72 hours notice to come out and locate the buried
cables. Play it safe, contact them early and follow their locator stakes.
Should contact be made, keep everyone clear of the piece of equipment and any load it
may be handling, and beware of fallen wires or cables. The operator should stay on the rig
and move it away from the line if possible. Don’t touch anyone who is in contact with the rig
or load. Contact the local power company at once. If necessary, contact local emergency
personnel.
OSHA has specific regulations covering minimum distances from electric lines. They can
be found in Subpart K - Electrical and Subpart N - Cranes. As a rule of thumb, for lines
rated 50KV or below, minimum clearance between the lines and any part of the crane or
load shall be 10 feet.
OSHA’s Subpart K addresses electrical safety requirements that are necessary for the
practical safeguarding of employees involved in construction work and is divided into four
major divisions and applicable definitions, as follows:
(1) Installation Safety Requirements include such categories as electric equipment, and
installations used to provide electric power and light on jobsites.
(2) Safety-Related Work Practices cover hazards arising from the use of electricity at
jobsites, also covering the hazards arising from the accidental contact, direct or indirect, by
employees with all energized lines, above or below ground, passing through or near the
jobsite.
Topic 39-1
(3) Safety-Related Maintenance and Environmental Considerations, such as hazardous
locations involving excess dust, ignition sparks, explosions, gases, fumes, vapors, liquids,
etc.
(4) Safety Requirements for Special Equipment such as batteries and battery charging
procedures.
If you want the facts about electrical hazards, and how to control them (the hazards), read
through there Federal standards, and you’ll see that OSHA’s guidelines will help you
understand the countless electrical hazards that literally surround you on almost every
construction jobsite.
By following the rules, we can prevent high voltage accidents.
SAFETY REMINDER: BE ALERT AND ALWAYS PREPARED FOR HAZARDS!
Topic 39-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
40 - Falls - Causes and Cures
MEETING DATE :
3-Oct-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #40
Falls - Causes and Cures
Construction is a potentially high hazard industry for those who work in it, with falls at the
top of the hazards list. In fact, falls are the most frequent cause of fatalities at construction
sites and annually account for one of every three construction-related deaths. Although
there are commonly available methods for preventing falls, the number of construction
workers who fall to their deaths has increased in recent years. According to preliminary
2007 fatality data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there were at least 442
construction worker fatalities during 2007 as a result of falls from all causes.
Accident statistics often blur the distinction between ladder accidents and elevated fall
accidents, the effects of falls are well known. A person falling from any height will
accelerate until he hits a fixed object.
The result depends on several variables, statistics show that in falls of eleven feet or
more, 50 percent of the victims die.

What sometimes contributes to these statistics? A ladder leaning to one
side. A ladder not securely “footed” on the ground (soft soil, uneven soil,
slippery soil). Ladders not “secured” near the top. A ladder too short for the
job involved. And the beat goes on.

And sometimes we see examples of what somebody classifies as a “ladder”
and in reality it looks like a disaster warmed over (jobsite built wood ladders is
what we’re talking about).

According to the Consumer Products Safety Commission, more than 90,000
people receive emergency room treatment for ladder accidents each year.
Elevated fall accidents accounted for over 800 deaths on the job last year.
That number represents 15 percent of total occupational deaths. During this
same time frame, nearly 115,000 persons were injured in elevated falls.

How can we reduce these horrible accident statistics? According to OSHA
research, accidents might be eliminated with proper attention to equipment use
and training.

Although human failure caused most falls, the preventable error is often
administrative....not the fault of the victim.
Has this thought ever crossed your mind? The only way to be safe from falls is to avoid
them! Avoidance is the key word. Let’s explore just a few of the factors contributing to falls
and their serious results. Here are some things to think about.
Topic 40-1
Scaffolds - Never erect a temporary scaffold. Even if the job will last a very short time, the
scaffold should be erected as if you were going to use it indefinitely. Make sure you install
all the cross braces both vertically and horizontally, be sure the scaffold is built on a level
surface and fully decked, and don’t forget to provide proper access.
Ladders - Select the right ladder for the job. Is it the right size, did you tie it off, did you
inspect it prior to use? Always face the ladder when you climb and avoid carrying tools in
your hands when climbing - one slip could send you down - use a hand line or pouch for
the tools. Never stand on the top two steps.
Floor openings - Any floor opening measuring 12 inches across or larger must be covered
or protection provided by a standard guardrail with toe board. A cover must be large
enough and strong enough to prevent failure and be marked so that everyone on the job
will be aware of its purpose. Guard rails must meet minimum strength requirements (See
OSHA Standard 1926.500). Toe boards will prevent tools or materials from falling through
the opening, injuring workers below.
Stairways - Slow down – don’t run up or down. Avoid carrying objects that block your view
of the steps. To help eliminate falls on stairways take your time, look where you step, and
use the handrail. Keep stairways free of clutter to prevent tripping.
Housekeeping - A secure footing is a positive step in avoiding falls and good housekeeping
is essential to secure footing. Debris, trash, oil and water left to accumulate on stairs,
walkways, etc., will lead to certain falls. A clean work site is a safer work site.
Watch your step! Stay Alert! Avoidance and prevention is your first line of defense.
SAFETY REMINDER: BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR SLIPPERY SURFACES AND
WALKWAYS. WINTER’S FROST AND ICE INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF SLIPPING.
Topic 40-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
41 - Welding and Cutting
MEETING DATE :
10-Oct-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
2
3
4
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6
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8
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #41
Welding and Cutting
On far too many occasions, when we’re climbing up a stairwell in a building under
construction, we’re bombarded with a shower of sparks coming from a welder several
floors above us, fabricating a piece of iron sailing. And sometimes we hear the welder say,
“OOPS! Sorry!”
Today’s construction workers in welding and cutting must not only protect themselves from
injury but also must assume responsibility for their helpers, co-workers in other trades, and
in some instances, the sidewalk superintendent. Accident records indicate that other
people near arc welding operations are injured more often than the welder.
There is also the ever present chance of fire. In addition to causing serious injuries, fires
from welding and cutting cost hundreds of thousands, sometimes millions of dollars
annually.
Accident records show that certain conditions and/or actions cause most cutting and
welding accidents. Precautions that will prevent many types of accidents include:
1. Before starting to weld in a confined space, be sure you have the proper permit, your
supervisor’s permission, and that there is proper ventilation.
2. Keep a correct type of fire extinguisher handy and within reach at all times.
3. Inspect all work areas and place required shields or blankets before welding or cutting.
See that there are no explosives, dangerous gasses, or flammable materials nearby.
4. Be sure all floor gratings are covered, with no cracks through which sparks can drop to
levels below.
5. Don’t allow co-workers to stand too near the work or stare at the arc.
6. Your helper must be as well equipped as you are, and must be wearing the proper type
of eye protection.
7. Always inspect cutting and welding equipment before starting to work.
8. Keep oil and grease away from oxygen valves.
9. Oxygen and Acetylene cylinders should be tied off at all times.
10. When welding and cutting there may be times that you need a fire watch assigned to
your work. Check with your supervisor.
Topic 41-1
Let’s talk about jobsite safety, as it applies to welding, welders, and responsibility. What
does OSHA say about welding, and what are important welding safety procedures? Read
on:
 Only authorized and trained personnel are permitted to use welding, cutting or
brazing equipment.
 All operators must have a copy of the appropriate operating instructions and are
directed to follow them.
 Compressed Gas cylinders should be regularly examined for obvious signs of
defects, deep rusting or leakage.
 Use Care in handling and storing cylinders, safety valves, relief valves to prevent
damage.
 Precautions must be Taken to prevent mixture of air or oxygen with flammable
gases, except at a burner or in a standard torch.
 Only approved apparatus (torches, regulators, pressure-reducing valves,
acetylene generators, manifolds) may be used.
 Cylinders must be kept away from sources of heat.
 Empty cylinders must be appropriately marked, their valves closed, and valveprotection caps on.
 Signs reading DANGER-NO SMOKING, matches or open lights, or equivalent,
must be posted.
 Cylinders, Cylinder valves, couplings, regulators, hoses and apparatus must be
kept free of substances.
 Care must be taken not to drop or strike cylinders.
 Unless secured, on special trucks all regulators must be removed and valveprotection caps put in place before moving cylinders.
 All cylinders without fixed hand-wheels must have keys, handles, or nonadjustable wrenches on stem valves when in service.
 ALL EMPLOYEES are instructed never to crack a fuel-gas cylinder valve near
sources of ignition. RED is used to identify the acetylene (and other fuel-gas),
GREEN for oxygen hose, and BLACK for inert gas and air hose.
 GROUNDING OF THE MACHINE frame and safety ground connections of
portable machines must be checked periodically.
 ELECTRODES MUST BE REMOVED from the holders when not is use.
 WHEN THE OBJECT TO BE WELDED cannot be moved, shields must be used
to confine heat, sparks and slag.
 FIREWATCHERS MUST BE ASSIGNED when welding or cutting is performed.
 BEFORE HOT WORK IS BEGUN, used drums, barrels, tanks, etc. must be
thoroughly cleaned so that no substances remain that could explode, ignite or
produce toxic vapors.
SAFETY REMINDER: SAFE WELDERS ALWAYS SET THE EXAMPLE, INSTRUCT
THEIR HELPERS PROPERLY, AND NEVER TAKE CHANCES.
Topic 41-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
42 - Respiratory Protection
MEETING DATE :
17-Oct-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
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10
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #42
Respiratory Protection
Air that’s contaminated or lacks oxygen can be very harmful to your health. Inhaling
chemical vapors, gasses or fumes and dust can irritate and even seriously damage the
lungs, respiratory systems, or other organs, sometimes fatally. Lack of oxygen can cause
death in minutes.
OSHA requires employers to identify and protect against breathing hazards. Engineering
controls are the preferred form of protection; e.g., ventilation, using less toxic measures,
and enclosing operations that create air contaminants. When air measurements reveal that
engineering controls haven’t brought air hazards to safe levels, employers must provide
employees with respirators.
Wear the respirator designed to protect against your specific job hazards. Check job
procedures and/or chemical MSDS’s. Air-purifying or filtering respirators screen out or
“wash” contaminated air, but don’t supply oxygen. A canister, cartridge, or filter color-code
shows what chemical this type of respirator protects against. Disposable surgical-type
masks can be used only for very minimal dust hazards. Air-supplying respirators supply
oxygen when the air contains 19.5% oxygen or less, and in situations termed Immediately
Dangerous to Life or Health (DLH). Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA’s) have
tanks that hold limited amounts of air and signal when air is low. Full-face mask respirators
connect with tanks or compressors that provide an unlimited supply of air. The connecting
hoses, however, can get in the way.
Get a good respirator that fits and that will seal out contaminants. OSHA requires
employees to have fit tests to assure a good seal. A respirator should: be secure, but not
too tight around the chin, not slip, not pinch the nose, and allow you to move your head
and talk.
Not everyone can wear a respirator. You may not be able to get a good fit or use a
respirator safely if you wear eyeglasses. OSHA says you can’t wear contact lenses with a
respirator in contaminated atmospheres, have a beard or sideburns, wear a skull cap, are
missing dentures, have breathing problems or a heart condition, and are heat sensitive or
claustrophobic (fear of confined spaces).
Inspect respirators to be sure they retain protective ability. Inspect respirators before and
after each use, and report: connections that aren’t tight; holes, cracks, tears, or other
damage; wear or deterioration, especially in rubber parts like the face piece seal,
connecting tube, etc.; dents or corrosion in filters, cartridges, or canisters; and less than a
full charge in an air or oxygen canister.
Maintain and store respirators properly. Remove respirators without contaminating your
skin or clean areas. Follow decontamination, cleaning, and disinfecting procedures.
Topic 42-1
Store the respirator so it’s protected from dust, sunlight, heat, extreme cold, excessive
moisture, and damaging chemicals. Respirators stored in lockers or tool boxes must be in
carrying cases or cartons. Rest the respirator’s rubber and plastic parts in their normal
position for storage. Don’t squish. Doing so will deform and impair the seal.
Here’s a digest of the federal OSHA 1910.134 Respiratory Standard Requirements:
FIT TESTING
 Administered by a qualified technician.
 Checks for levels of taste and smell.
 Determines what size respirator you would wear.
 Determines what type of “cartridge” you need to use to screen out certain
respiratory pollutants.
 Provides use/storage/inspection respiratory protocols.
MEDICAL QUESTIONNAIRE
 OSHA-designed form (150 questions regarding your respiratory history).
 Becomes part of your confidential Health Records.
 Requirements regarding need for chest X-rays.
 Questionnaire regarding family history of respiratory problems (smokers cough,
throat cancer, etc.).
 Might result in your ability to work at certain construction trades (confined
spaces, spraying of underbrush, painting, etc.).
WHEN TO WEAR RESPIRATORS (MANDATORY)
 Confined Spaces
 Dusty Conditions
 Sawing/Chipping/Grinding/Drilling
 Painting (Spray, etc.)
 Asbestos Exposure
 Lead Exposure
 Demolition (lead, asbestos, cancer-causing agents, etc.)
 Dry-Wall Sanding
 Blowing Insulation (attics, basements, wall, etc.)
 Mixing Cement.
REASONS YOU MIGHT NOT BE ABLE TO WEAR ESPIRATORS
● Facial Hairs
● High Blood Pressure
● Scars on Face/Neck
● Smokers Cough
● Pony Tail
● Asthma
● Long Hair
● Taste-Smell Impediment
● Moustache
● Prior History
● Allergies
Topic 42-2
TRAINING FOR RESPIRATORY PROGRAM
 Required Annually
 Fit-Testing Procedures
 Use & Maintenance of Respirators
 Use of Respirators in Emergencies
 Differences Between Air-Breathing and Air-Supplied Respirators
 Maintenance and Storage of Respirators
 Medical Signs and Symptoms
 Jobsite Use of Respirators (MANDATORY)
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 6, Confined Spaces.
Discussion Point: Ask participants to demonstrate how to select, inspect, and wear a
respirator, using respirators that protect against your facility’s hazards.
Conclusion: Wear a properly fitted respirator to protect against breathing hazards. Learn
to fit and use respirators to assure safe levels of oxygen and to avoid inhaling harmful
contaminants.
Topic 42-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
43 - Machines and Machine Guarding
MEETING DATE :
24-Oct-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #43
Machines and Machine Guarding
Machine Guards
Guards are installed on machines to protect operators and others in the area from injury.
Today, most machines at most work sites are equipped with guards. The dramatic
improvement in guarding over the past dozen or so years has meant fewer employees
sustaining the crushing injuries that used to occur all too frequently.
Yet even today some operators find ways of putting themselves in danger by removing or
bypassing machine guards, or tampering with interlocks so they can operate their
machines faster. In Hayward Electric Company failure to use the guards provided is
cause for disciplinary action.
Of course, it is often necessary to remove a guard to service or adjust a machine, a tool, or
piece of equipment. When doing this, be sure the power is turned off and the switch is
locked out or tagged out. When the service job is completed, make sure the guard is
replaced securely and is working properly.
Breakdowns, jammed work, and broken parts can sometimes cause us to forget ordinary
safety procedures. Very often, to remedy these conditions it is necessary to get into out-ofthe-way places. Extreme caution is needed, because in some cases the location of the
trouble cannot be guarded. Be sure that basic and added precautions are taken to avoid
any movement of the parts. Among the kinds of setup to be extra careful around are:
·
Meshing gears
·
In-running rollers
·
Reciprocating parts
·
Chain and sprocket drives
·
Cams and rollers
·
Belts and pulleys
·
Flywheels
·
Cutting and abrasive surfaces
·
Cooling fans
Topic 43-1
·
Conveyor equipment
·
Rotating couplings and shifts
·
Worm gear
·
Hot or overheated parts
Guards are there to prevent injuries and should never be tampered with. It is to everyone’s
advantage to make sure all guards are placed properly - and it pays to double-check;
hands, arms, and lives are saved that way. If you see a piece of equipment without a
guard, or any other unsafe condition, report it to your supervisor immediately, whether the
equipment is in your work area or elsewhere.
Let machine guards do the job they were designed for - protecting you and co-workers
from injury.
Topic 43-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
44 - Chemical Burns
MEETING DATE :
31-Oct-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #44
Chemical Burns
Chemical Burns also Burn
Chemical burns burn in the same way that thermal burns do. Both destroy body tissue, and
both remain painful for a long time after the accident.
But unlike burns caused by hot objects or fire, chemical burns don’t end with the moment
of contact. Chemical burns continue to do damage until the chemical reaction is complete
or until the chemical is flushed away. As for some chemicals, not only will they burn you,
but they are toxic when absorbed through the skin.
The best remedy for chemical burns, of course, is to avoid them. Read the MSDS’s of
every chemical you work with, and read the label on a container before you use any
substance. If the chemical has any hazards associated with it, including the risk of being
burned, handle the substance with great respect. Burns, like many other workplace
dangers, can be deadly serious.
Burns, both chemical and thermal, are classified according to how deep the damage is, as
follows:
·
A first-degree burn is not so serious - only the outer layer of the skin is involved.
Still, such a burn can be quite painful and take time to heal.
·
Second-degree burns are much more painful and form blisters; skin may loosen;
infections may occur.
·
Third degree burns involve deeper tissue, with wounds charred or white. These
most serious burns are not really painful when they occur because the nerveendings are usually affected.
If you have gotten any kind of chemical on your skin or on your clothing and (1) you know
that the chemical is a corrosive that may burn you, or (2) you don’t know what the chemical
is that you have spilled, or (3) you feel a tingle or burning at the site where you have been
exposed, your first and fastest reaction must be to flood the area with water for a
minimum of 15 minutes. This is absolutely essential. Do not lose even a few seconds in
flushing the area with large quantities of running water from a shower or tap. Soap can help
too in ridding the skin of chemicals.
Topic 44-1
If a corrosive chemical has splashed on ordinary, non-protective clothing, the contaminated
clothing should be taken off or torn off at once. Then, if the skin has been exposed to the
chemical, or even if you suspect or fear that the chemical has touched your skin, rinse with
water immediately. If it will take any time at all to remove clothing that has been
contaminated with a corrosive chemical, insert a hose under your garments and begin to
rinse the exposed area while removing your clothes.
Remember, flushing with water is the most important - and therefore the first - step that you
must take in treating yourself or a fellow worker for a chemical burn.
If your clothing, shoes, or other leather items have been splashed by a chemical that burns,
thoroughly decontaminate the item or items before wearing them again. If you cannot
decontaminate them completely, throw them away rather than risk a second burn the next
time you put them on.
If the chemical has gotten into your eye the best and first treatment, again, is to flood the
area with clean, clear water. Since the eye is sensitive to pressure though, irrigation should
be with low-pressure water source such as an eyewash fountain. Don’t hesitate to flood the
eye completely for at least 15 minutes, keeping your eye open during the process.
Once the initial flushing with water is finished, further treatment may be needed. If you
have been exposed to a chemical considered toxic, or if the burn is severe and likely to
become infected, you must see a doctor who will prescribe any additional care.
Topic 44-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
45 - Tips For Operators
MEETING DATE :
7-Nov-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #45
Tips for Operators
All jobsite equipment poses potential hazards for the operators and the people around
them. Why? Because most of it is unusually large, moves swiftly, makes sudden
movements, can fall on you, can malfunction, or the operator is just plain careless.
Each piece of construction equipment is different. Each has different functions, and control
mechanisms vary from machine to machine and manufacturer to manufacturer. The key to
knowing your equipment’s peculiarities is the manufacturers manual, which is provided at
the time of purchase. If you’re operating a piece of equipment and don’t have a
manufacturers manual, talk to your supervisor and insist that you have it on the jobsite.
If you were looking at a piece of construction equipment for the first time, what would you
look for? How about:
 Lights
 Guards
 Back-up Alarms
 Fueling Instructions
 Roll-over Protection
 Fall-on Protection
 Mirrors
 Maintenance Outlines
 Seat Belts
 Horns
 Shields
 Broken Glass
Is there a fire extinguisher on the equipment you are operating? Is it fully charged? Do
you know how to use it? Can the fire extinguisher put out a major equipment fire?
Are your equipment’s hydraulic lines defective? Are they leaking? Are they securely
affixed to the portals at either end of the hose? Do you know what type of hydraulic fluid to
use? Your equipment manual will tell you what type of fluid to use under specific
conditions.
Do you smoke when you’re refueling your equipment? Do your fellow workers? You’re in
charge, and you have the responsibility to insure safety.
If you’re moving your equipment from the storage yard to the worksite, do you know
local/state regulations regarding “escorts” and the permits you have to obtain before the
move. Are you familiar with the “Slow Moving Vehicle” sign that is required if your
equipment cannot travel at minimum highway speeds?
Topic 45-1
Is your equipment outfitted with warning/flashing lights when it’s on the highway? How
about other signs?
When you’re on the jobsite, who has the right-of-way? Just because you’re the biggest guy
on the block doesn’t mean that you can bully everyone else. Also, don’t use your
excavator on haul roads designed just for trucks and automobiles.
Who’s behind you? A bird, a plane, Superman? Or just some dumb slob who wandered
up behind your equipment looking for the water cooler and didn’t realize you were going to
back away from the trench. Instead of getting that drink of water, he got run over. Who’s
responsible? If you’re the operator, it’s your responsibility to look in all directions (including
up and down) to see that your equipment doesn’t cause an accident. You’re the captain of
your ship, and you’re responsible for its safe operation.
Each day before you begin your job, you should consider numerous jobsite conditions:
wind, rain, snow, stop signs, direction of travel on the on-site roads, location of other
equipment, activities of other subcontractors, holes, obstructions, water, mud, tools,
electrical lines, open trenches, open manholes, and most of all, people.
As part of your jobsite rules of the road, you must be absolutely familiar with standard hand
signals used by crane operators, flaggers, truck drivers, blasters, and other trades. If
you’re going to be a professional equipment operator, you have to know all aspects of your
job from sunup to sundown.
Whether you’ve been a professional equipment operator for twenty years or twenty days,
there are certain steps to take when preparing to start your equipment. Sometimes we
throw caution to the wind because we’re the “best of the best.” We think we know all there
is to know about operating our rig. But are you operating 100 percent safely?
Do you conduct a personal walk around before you climb into your cab at the start of the
day? Or do you assume it’s in the same condition as when you climbed down from your
cab yesterday? You realize that kids descend on most jobsites after hours and like to push
buttons, pull levers, push pedals, and sometimes break as many things as possible.
And just like the old-fashioned filling station attendant, you clean your windshield, mirrors
and headlights. Do you remove any oil/grease spillage from your cab and the handrails?
What about the cab’s condition? Are there fast-food wrappers scattered on the floor, lunch
buckets lying under the pedals, mud from your boots on the pedals and cab floor? Don’t
turn that key or push that starter button until your cab is clean and looks professional.
Does your equipment have factory-required procedures? If so, do you have the manual
with you to refresh your memory? One industry manual suggests the following cab
checklist:
 Sit in the operators seat and adjust it so you can properly operate all
controls.
 Fasten the seat belt.
Topic 45-2





Familiarize yourself with warning devices, gauges and controls.
Make sure the parking brake is applied and all controls are in neutral.
Clear the area of all people and equipment.
Sound your horn.
Following the manual’s instructions, start the engine.
This is just one sample checklist. All equipment is different, and manufacturers might have
other checks that they recommend before starting their equipment. And does your
company have any equipment operator policies that you are required to follow?
Topic 45-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
46 - Fire Protection
MEETING DATE :
14-Nov-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #46
Fire Protection
It’s much easier to prevent a fire, then it is to “put out a fire.”
Here’s some one-liners about fire prevention:

Prohibit smoking anywhere on the jobsite, including the foreman’s trailer.

Post NO SMOKING signs where there are stored flammable materials.

Establish fire drills to make employees aware of the hazards of fires.

Have fire extinguishers mounted on the jobsite where employees can clearly
see them.

Post emergency phone numbers on the jobsite (fire department, hospital, gas
company).

Prevent “sneaking a smoke” behind the storage trailer.

Remind delivery personnel that this is a NO SMOKING jobsite.

Require that “smoking breaks" take place off the jobsite.

Don’t allow employees to carry cigarettes (or cigars) in their lunch box, or in
their pockets.

Have a company policy that clearly addresses “no smoking” rules on the
jobsite.
Extinguishers
OSHA requires most employers to have and maintain fire extinguishers. Approved, fully
charged, operable extinguishers must be placed and identified, so employees can reach
them easily. Extinguisher must be visually inspected monthly and tested at least yearly to
be sure they’re working properly. Our fire extinguishers are located...[list the locations of
extinguishers in your facility or job site]
Use fire extinguishers only on small, contained fires. If in doubt, sound alarm, evacuate
properly, and let trained firefighters handle it.
Use class A extinguishers on fires of ordinary combustibles.
Topic 46-1
They wet down and cool fires involving paper, cloth, trash, wood, etc. Class A extinguisher
numbers (1-A, 2-A, etc.) Indicate the size fire each can handle. The higher the number, the
larger the fire area it can handle. OSHA requires class A’s to be no more than 75 feet from
the area of likely use.
Use class B extinguishers on fires involving gasses or flammable liquids. They cut off
oxygen to, or reduce flame in, fires involving combustibles such as grease, oil, paint, or
solvents. Class B extinguisher numbers (5-B, 10-B) tell how many square feet each can
handle. OSHA requires class B’s to be no more than 50 feet from the area of likely use.
Use class C extinguishers on fires on or near electrical equipment. They use carbon
dioxide or a dry chemical to put out these fires. Never use water on an electrical fire. Water
conducts electricity and could cause a dangerous shock to the person holding the
extinguisher. Class C’s don’t have numbers.
USE ABC or BC extinguishers on combination fires. The letters identify the type of fire they
can handle.
Use class D extinguishers on combustible metal fires. They’re used on sodium,
magnesium, zinc, potassium, powdered aluminum, titanium, and other combustible metal
fires. They must be within 75 feet of operations that generate combustible metal powders,
flakes, or shavings. Class D’s are considered “special hazard” protection and have no
numbers.
Use extinguishers properly. If you feel a fire is small enough to handle with an extinguisher:
pull the pin, stand about 8 feet from the fire, and aim carefully at the base of the fire; you
probably won’t have a second chance. Squeeze the trigger. Be especially careful not to
spread combustible fires (e.g., by blowing burning paper out of a wastebasket).
Responsibilities
You’ve just put out a fire where paper and cardboard ignited from a welder’s torch.
Although the fire appears to be completely out, you still see wisps of smoke at the base of
the fire. The welder has a bad burn on his hand and forearm, and is complaining of severe
pain. What do you do now?
Here are some definite steps to consider:

Call the fire department (or 911) and report the fire and its current status.
Ask for a fire unit to prevent spreading.

Tell the dispatcher that there is an injured worker and an emergency rescue
squad is needed.

Move the injured person from the vicinity of the fire.
Topic 46-2

Find the nearest first-aid giver on the jobsite and ask him/her to treat the
victim. Burn victims usually enter shock and should be kept calm and warm.

Remove any jewelry from the victim and pour water on the burned area. If
clothing is sticking to the burn do not remove it. Keep the burned area
continually saturated with room temperature water. Do not bandage the
burned area. Keep it continually exposed to air and moist with water.

Find one or more people to monitor the fire area and closely watch for fire
and rescue vehicles.

Keep traffic and unauthorized people from the accident area.
More Information
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 10, Fire Safety.
Discussion Point: Explain locations and types of fire extinguishers in your work area
Topic 46-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
47 - Hexevalent Chromium
MEETING DATE :
21-Nov-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #47
Hexavalent Chromium
Chromium hexavalent (CrVI) compounds, often called hexavalent chromium, exist in
several forms. Industrial uses of hexavalent chromium compounds include chromate
pigments in dyes, paints, inks, and plastics; chromates added as anticorrosive agents to
paints, primers, and other surface coatings; and chromic acid electroplated onto metal
parts to provide a decorative or protective coating. Hexavalent chromium can also be
formed when performing "hot work" such as welding on stainless steel or melting chromium
metal. In these situations the chromium is not originally hexavalent, but the high
temperatures involved in the process result in oxidation that converts the chromium to a
hexavalent state.
Occupational exposures to Cr(VI) can occur from inhaling its mist (such as from chrome
plating), dusts [including inorganic pigments or Cr(VI)-painted surfaces], or fumes (as in
stainless steel welding) and from dermal contact. Recommended controls vary from
operation to operation. The preferred approach is to use engineering controls such as
ventilation or equipment and process modification. If these controls are not sufficient, other
controls may be implemented, including the use of respirators, eye protection, showering,
and changing into street clothes before leaving the plant.
Workers who breathe hexavalent chromium compounds at their jobs for many years may
be at increased risk of developing lung cancer. Breathing high levels of hexavalent
chromium can irritate or damage the nose, throat, and lungs. Irritation or damage to the
eyes and skin can occur if hexavalent chromium contacts these organs in high
concentrations of for prolonged periods of times.
All forms of hexavalent chromium are regarded as carcinogenic to workers. The risk of
developing lung cancer increases with the amount of hexavalent chromium inhaled and the
length of time the worker is exposed. Studies of workers in chromate production, chromate
pigment, and chrome electroplating industries employed before the 1980s show increased
rates of lung cancer mortality. Certain hexavalent chromium compounds produced lung
cancer in animals that had the compounds placed directly in their lungs.
Direct eye contact with chromic acid or chromate dusts can cause permanent eye
damage.
Hexavalent chromium can irritate the nose, throat, and lungs. Repeated or prolonged
exposure can damage the mucous membranes of the nasal passages and result in
ulcers. In severe cases, exposure causes perforation of the septum (the wall separating
the nasal passages). Breathing small amounts of hexavalent chromium even for long
periods does not cause respiratory tract irritation in most people. Some employees
become allergic to hexavalent chromium so that inhaling the chromate compounds can
cause asthma symptoms such as wheezing and shortness of breath.
Topic 47-1
Prolonged skin contact can result in dermatitis and skin ulcers. Some workers develop an
allergic sensitization to chromium. In sensitized workers, contact with even small amounts
can cause a serious skin rash.
Topic 47-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
48 - Process Safety Management
MEETING DATE :
28-Nov-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #48
Process Safety Management
INTRODUCTION
Safety, health, and environmental responsibilities must be managed by line management
as they manage their other responsibilities including production, quality, cost, and
personnel relations. The same basic management techniques are used to manage safety,
health, and environmental requirements as for production and quality management. These
include planning, organizing, leading and controlling assigned responsibilities.
Responsibility for protecting people, property, and the environment begins with the ranking
facility manager and extends through all levels of the line management organization
including employees. The PSM involves a systematic approach to evaluating the entire
process, including the design, technology, operation, maintenance, procedures, emergency
plans, training programs, and other pertinent process elements. A proactive identification,
evaluation and mitigation or prevention of chemical releases is utilized.
The necessary expertise, experience, judgment, and proactive initiative is provided within
the line organization through the owners programs and employees or obtained from
outside resources as needed to assure an effective PSM program. There are continuing
efforts to strengthen and improve the process safety knowledge and expertise within the
line organization.
PROCESS SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
The customer’s facility process safety management system is a part of the facility's safety,
health, and environmental program. Hayward Electric Employees participate in process
safety management by obeying customer safety rules and regulations as well as those set
forth in the Hayward Electric Injury and Illness Prevention Program.
PROCESS SAFETY INFORMATION
A compilation of written process safety information is provided for each facility process to
enable managers, supervisors, and employees to identify and understand the process
hazards. This information includes, but is not limited to:








hazards of highly hazardous chemicals used and processed
process technology
process equipment
toxicity
permissible exposure limits
physical data
reactivity
thermal and chemical stability
Topic 48-1
 hazardous effects of inadvertent mixing of different materials
 block flow diagrams or process flow diagrams
 process chemistry, maximum intended inventory, safe upper and lower limits of
temperature, pressure, flows, compositions, and evaluations of consequences of
deviations, including those affecting employee safety and health
 materials of construction
 piping and instrument diagrams
 electrical classification
 relief system design and design basis
 ventilation system design, design codes and standards employed, material and
energy balances for processes built after May 26, 1992
 safety systems (i.e., interlocks, detection or suppression systems)
All Hayward Electric employees are reminded that processes and systems developed by
the customer are to be considered trade secret information and therefore confidential.
OPERATING PROCEDURES
The facility owners have developed operating procedures and implemented them which
describe tasks to be performed, dates to be recorded, operating conditions to be
maintained, samples to be collected, and safety and health precautions to be taken.
Hayward Electric employees are expected to follow these instructions.
WORK AUTHORIZATIONS
The facility owners have developed work authorizations for work performed in process
areas is controlled in a consistent manner. The hazards identified involving the work to be
accomplished is communicated to those performing the work and to operating personnel
whose work could affect the safety of the process.
A work permit procedure describing the steps the maintenance supervisor, contractor
representative or other person needs to follow to obtain the necessary clearance to get the
job started. The procedure references and coordinates applicable:




lockout/tagout procedures,
line breaking procedures,
confined space entry procedures, and
hot work authorizations.
ACCIDENT REPORTING AND INVESTIGATION
Employees must immediately report all accidents, injuries and near misses. All incident
investigations must be initiated within 48 hours from the occurrence.
Topic 48-2
EMPLOYEE TRAINING
All employees, involved with highly hazardous chemicals are trained to ensure they fully
understand the safety and health hazards of the chemicals and processes they work with
to protect themselves, and citizens living near the facility.
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 1, Process Safety
Management.
Topic 48-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
49 - Forklift Safety
MEETING DATE :
5-Dec-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #49
Forklift Safety
As a forklift operator, you must be aware of many problems every time you power up a unit.
To be safe, you must complete a pre-operation checklist and a safety walk-around. Check
the gauges to make sure you are properly fueled. Are the hydraulics okay? Are the lights
working? Are all safety features in order? Test the forks by lifting and lowering them. Is
everything working to your satisfaction? Now you can turn on the lights, toot your horn to
let nearby workers know that the unit is going live, and head for the pallets, or loads.
Look all around and carefully inspect the work area. Are the aisles clear? Are there any
overhead power lines, dangling cords, or overhangs? If all is clear, raise your forks 3 or 4
inches (higher if you see obstacles on the floor or concrete pad) and proceed slowly. And
always be prepared to back down an incline if you have to exit the building.
Incorrect or careless forklift operations can cause dangerous accidents. Forklifts, unlike
cars and trucks, often steer with rear wheels and can tip easily. Operators or nearby
workers can be injured or even killed if a forklift: tips over, falls off a loading dock and
collides with or drops a load on equipment, a vehicle, or another person. Other forklift
hazards include: operator injuries caused by jumping on or off the forklift, placing arms or
legs outside it, fires or explosions caused by improper refueling or recharging, or using
improper forklift in an area with hazardous substances.
OSHA requires forklift operators to be specially trained and authorized. Hayward Electric
provides that training to employees. Training will includes formal instruction including
lecture, discussion, written materials, practical training, and operator evaluations. Forklift
operators must know: forklift types, controls, uses, designs, capacity/stability, parts and
inspection procedures, safe forklift loading, load stability, unloading, operating, parking,
and refueling procedures.
OSHA requires forklift inspection before use each day or shift. Operators should never use
a forklift that’s damaged or not operating properly.
Forklift operators should always use required protection. Seat belts, if installed; a hard hat;
sturdy shoes with non-skid soles; safety glasses; hearing protection; gloves; or other PPE
required for the job.
Operators must follow general safety rules. Never indulge in stunt driving or horseplay.
Keep arms, hands, and legs inside the forklift. Keep an eye out for surface holes, uneven
patches, and overhead clearances. Don’t drive up to a person standing in front of a bench
or any fixed object.
Operators must follow traffic rules. Obey speed limits. Drive in the assigned lane or on the
right. Yield the right of way to pedestrians and emergency vehicles.
Topic 49-1
Sound the horn at intersections and blind spots. Stay at least three truck lengths behind
the vehicle in front of you. Stay a safe distance from ramp or platform edges. Slow down
for turns. Stop before going into reverse. Don’t pass at intersections or blind spots.
Forklifts aren’t casual transport. OSHA rules state that: no one is permitted to ride directly
on the truck’s forks. No one can stand or walk under elevated forklift parts, even when
empty. Unauthorized persons may not ride on forklift trucks, Passengers may ride only on
forklifts designed to carry them.
OSHA sets rules for safe forklift refueling. Forklift refueling and battery charging or
replacement requires: trained employees wearing proper protective equipment, special
well-ventilated no smoking areas that have working fire extinguishers and no flames or
sparks, and specific step-by-step procedures to protect workers and prevent fires.
Following are several questions that every forklift operator should be able to answer.
Whenever you have doubts, check with your supervisor.
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Does my forklift have functional headlights?
Does my forklift have a strobe light on the top of the cab?
Does the cab have a seat belt, and am I wearing it?
Is there a functional back-up alarm?
Is the cab clear of debris?
Do I always drive with the forks lowered?
Have I performed a walk-around inspection of my forklift before starting it
up?
Do all the gauges in the cab work?
Does the cab have a fire extinguisher?
Have I raised and lowered the forks to test for smooth operation?
Is there a warning sign in my forklift cab reminding me to look for
overhead power lines?
When engaging the forks into the pallet, do I push them all the way under
the load?
Do I tilt the load back on the mast before raising the forks?
Do I know that forklifts have three-point suspension?
Do I know that only trained and authorized individuals can operate a
forklift?
Do I know that pedestrians have the right-of-way?
Do I know that when traveling down a ramp or incline with the load, I
should always back down?
The correct answer to each question is "yes."
Conclusion: Forklift safety rules protect operators and pedestrians. Forklifts effectively lift,
load, stack, and move materials; but they can cause serious accidents if they don’t have
skilled, safe operators and attentive, careful pedestrians.
Topic 49-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
50 - Bloodborne Pathegens
MEETING DATE :
12-Dec-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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Safety Meeting Topic #50
Bloodborne Pathogens
What are Bloodborne Pathogens?
Bloodborne pathogens (BBP) are microorganisms that can cause disease when
transferred from an infected person to another person through blood or other potentially
infected body fluids. The microorganisms are capable of causing serious illness and
death. The most common diseases spread in this manner are Hepatitis B (HBV) and
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Examples of other bloodborne diseases include
malaria, Hepatitis C and syphilis.
Who is at Risk?
Workers in health care and public safety jobs could be potentially exposed to these
disease pathogens. These workers include, but are not limited to, doctors, dentists,
nurses, paramedics, police, laboratory workers and housekeeping workers in the health
care industry. Needlestick injuries are the most common method of exposure for health
care workers. Non-health care workers may become exposed at work while providing
help to an injured co-worker and coming in contact with the injured person’s blood or
body fluids.
How can you become exposed?
Exposure to bloodborne pathogens may occur in many ways. Any kind of opening or
break in the skin provides a place for infected blood or fluids to enter your body.
Scrapes, cuts, rashes, burns and other minor injuries that create an opening in the skin
are entryways for bloodborne pathogens. Your eyes, nose and mouth are mucous
membranes, and are also openings for diseases to enter.
Universal Precautions
Universal precautions are methods of protecting yourself from bloodborne pathogens.
Universal precautions assume all body fluids are infected with bloodborne pathogens.
Universal precautions include:

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – to be used at all times to prevent skin or
mucous membrane contact with bodily fluids. Always inspect PPE for cracks,
holes or other damage. Never use damaged PPE. PPE examples include lab
coats, gloves, eye goggles, face shields, etc.

Wash hands or other skin surfaces thoroughly and immediately if contaminated.

When using sharp items (scalpels, needles, pipettes, etc.) that may be
potentially contaminated, a puncture resistant container must be used for
storage and disposal after use.
Topic 50-1
If you think you’ve been exposed
If you have come in contact with blood or other potentially infectious bodily fluids,
you’ve been involved in an exposure incident. Stay calm, wash yourself thoroughly, and
report to your supervisor right away. Inform your supervisor of how, when, where and
whose blood you came in contact with. If you’ve been involved in an exposure incident,
seek medical attention. A medical professional will provide you with appropriate testing,
treatment and education.
Bloodborne Pathogens Program
In 1991, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) began requiring
employers with workers potentially exposed to blood or other infectious materials to
establish a Bloodborne Pathogens Program. The purpose of a Bloodborne Pathogens
Program is to protect employees from the health hazards associated with bloodborne
pathogens and to provide appropriate treatment and counseling should an employee be
exposed to bloodborne pathogens.
More Information
For more detailed information regarding company policies and procedures, refer to the
Hayward Electric Injury & Illness Prevention Program manual, Chapter 4, Bloodborne
Pathogens.
If you have any health concerns or questions, contact your health care provider.
Topic 50-2
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
51 - Asbestos Safety
MEETING DATE :
19-Dec-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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Safety Meeting Topic #51
Asbestos Safety
An estimated 1.3 million employees in construction and general industry face significant
asbestos exposure on the job. Heaviest exposures occur in the construction industry,
particularly during the removal of asbestos during renovation or demolition. Employees are
also likely to be exposed during the manufacture of asbestos products (such as textiles,
friction products, insulation, and other building materials) and during automotive brake and
clutch repair work. Asbestos is the name of a group of minerals that occur naturally in the
environment. Asbestos deposits can be found throughout the world and it is still mined in
Australia, Canada, South Africa, and the former Soviet Union. It differs from other minerals
in its crystal development, which are long, thin fibers. These fibers are very strong and
resistant to heat and chemicals. For these reasons asbestos was added to many older
building materials including floor tiles, ceiling tiles, insulation on pipes and ducts, acoustical
and decorative coatings, and roofing materials. These types of building materials are
presumed to contain asbestos if installed before 1980, unless testing has proven
otherwise.
When left intact and undisturbed, these materials do not pose a health risk to building
occupants. There is a potential for exposure only when the material becomes damaged to
the extent that asbestos fibers become airborne and are inhaled. Asbestos is more likely
to release fibers when it is friable. The term friable means the material can be easily
crumbled. If powdered or friable forms of asbestos are disturbed and become airborne, an
inhalation hazard may result. Asbestos fibers are very small. If you inhale them, they go
deep into your lungs. They stay there and can cause disease from 10 to 40 years later. In
non-friable materials like floor tile, ceiling tiles, laboratory cabinet tops, and caulks, the
asbestos fibers are tightly bound in a matrix which prevents the release of fibers to the
environment unless the material is abraded, sanded or sawed.
If exposed to asbestos, several factors may influence whether harmful health effects will
occur. These factors include the dose (how much), the duration (how long), and whether
or not you smoke. Generally, adverse health effects from asbestos are the result of longterm exposure to high concentration of airborne fibers.
If asbestos is discovered on a jobsite, all personnel must stop work and clear the area. A
certified expert must be called and only the expert can decide how to handle the situation
safely. Only a properly trained crew can work on asbestos removal. During asbestos
removal, access to the area is restricted and warning signs must be posted to keep out
unauthorized personnel.
Topic 51-1
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
52 - Jobsite Safety Quiz
MEETING DATE :
26-Dec-12
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
Safety Meeting Topic #52
Jobsite Safety Quiz
An inspection determines whether safety (OSHA) violations or hazards exist on the jobsite. Step
one is determining which safety standards apply to conditions, work practices, tools, equipment, and
operations. And don’t forget that shops, warehouses, storage vans/sheds/trailers/vehicles, offices,
and other company facilities should also be inspected for potential safety hazards.
As you read the following checklists, make note of the areas where hazards exist and the steps
to correct the hazards. Your health and welfare depend on your thoroughness.
Jobsite Information
 Are OSHA and other jobsite warnings posted?
 Do you attend safety meetings?
 Have you had first-aid training?
 Where are emergency phone numbers posted?
Housekeeping & Sanitation
 Is there a receptacle for trash disposal?
 Is there adequate lighting?
 Are nails removed from lumber?
 Are oil and grease spills controlled?
 Is drinking water available? Tested?
 Are disposable cups available?
Fire Prevention
 Has there been a jobsite fire drill?
 Are fire extinguishers available? Where?
 Is the fire department’s phone number posted?
 Are “NO SMOKING” signs posted?
Electrical Installations
 Are ground fault circuit interrupters available?
 Are electrical boxes quipped with covers?
 Are only 3-wire-type extension cords being used?
 Is a fire extinguisher for electrical fires available?
 Is all exposed wiring insulated?
Hand Tools
 Are tools properly stored?
 Is there a maintenance program in force?
 Are damaged tools taken out of service?
 Is proper grounding being used?
Power Tools
 Are tools and cords in good condition?
 Is proper grounding being used?
 Are all mechanical safeguards in use?
 Is wiring properly installed?
Topic 52-1
Power-Actuated Tools
 Are all operators (users) qualified? Trained?
 Are safety goggles provided?
 Are these tools stored in locked cabinets?
 Are nearby workers warned that power-actuated tools are being used?
Ladders
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Have ladders been inspected for damage?
Are ladders in trenches within 25 feet of all workers?
Are ladders secured to prevent slipping/falling?
Do you know that metal ladders are not to be used around electrical hazards?
Do ladders in trenches extend at least 3-feet above the trench lip?
Scaffolding
 Is erection of scaffolding supervised by a competent person?
 Is scaffolding tied into a structure?
 Are workers protected from falling objects?
 Is scaffolding plum, square, and equipped with cross-bracing?
 Are guard rails and toe boards in place?
Hoists, Cranes, and Derricks
 Are cables and sheaves inspected daily?
 Are slings, chains, hooks, and eyes in good condition?
 Is equipment firmly supported?
 Are outriggers used?
 Are overhead power lines de-energized/insulated?
 Is equipment properly lubricated and maintained?
 Are signals understood and observed?
 Is there a qualified operator?
 Is a current inspection certificate posted on cranes/derricks?
Heavy Equipment
 Is equipment regularly inspected and maintained?
 Are lights, brakes, and warning signals operative?
 Is equipment protected when not in use?
 Are there shut-off devices on air lines in case of hose failure?
 Are noise arresters used?
Topic 52-2
Motor Vehicles
 Are vehicles regularly inspected and maintained?
 Are operators properly licensed?
 Are local, state and federal vehicle laws observed?
 Do brake lights and warning devices work?
 Are weight limits and load sizes controlled?
 Do all riders have seats?
 Are fire extinguishers installed?
Garages and Repair Shops
 Are fire hazards checked?
 Is there good housekeeping?
 Is adequate lighting provided?
 Are fuels and lubricants in approved containers?
 Is there proper/adequate ventilation?
 Are batteries stored properly?
Barricades
 Are floor openings covered or barricaded?
 Are roadways and sidewalks protected?
 Is there adequate lighting?
 Is traffic controlled?
 Do barricades/cones meet state requirements?
These safety hazards come in all sizes and shapes. Sometimes it’s even an unsafe co-worker … or
maybe even you!
Topic 52-3
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
MEETING DATE :
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
MEETING DATE :
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
MEETING DATE :
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
MEETING DATE :
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
MEETING DATE :
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
MEETING DATE :
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
MEETING DATE :
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
MEETING DATE :
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
MEETING DATE :
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
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SIGN NAME:
HAYWARD ELECTRIC SAFETY MEETING
TOPIC:
MEETING DATE :
JOB NAME:
SUPERVISOR:
Housekeeping
Tool Grounding
SAFETY MOMENT
JOB NUMBER:
First Aid Kits
Fire Extinguishers
GIVEN BY:
Supervisor Signature:
PRINT NAME:
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SIGN NAME:
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