TRINITY COLLEGE COLAC CURRICULUM HANDBOOK FOR 2017

TRINITY COLLEGE COLAC CURRICULUM HANDBOOK FOR 2017
TRINITY
COLLEGE COLAC
CURRICULUM HANDBOOK
FOR 2017
VISION
Trinity College is a vibrant learning community where our students are
inspired to reach their potential in a happy and supportive environment.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
GENERAL INFORMATION
Learning Areas at Trinity College ............................................................ 4 - 7
Assessing and Reporting .............................................................................. 8
CURRICULUM OFFERINGS PER YEAR LEVEL
Overview of Curriculum ................................................................................ 9
Year 7 Curriculum ..........................................................................................9
Year 8 Curriculum ........................................................................................10
Year 8 Core Subjects ................................................................... 11 - 13
Year 8 Electives ........................................................................... 14 - 15
Year 9 Curriculum ........................................................................................16
Year 9 Core Subjects .................................................................... 17 - 19
Year 9 Electives ............................................................................ 20 - 23
Year 10 Curriculum ............................................................................... 24 - 25
Year 10 Subjects .......................................................................... 26 - 35
Overview of Year 11 & 12 Curriculum ........................................................ 36
Year 11 and Year 12 Curriculum ....................................................... 37
VCE & VET Subjects Offered at Trinity College ........................... 39 - 69
VCAL .......................................................................................... 70 - 71
VET and SBATs ............................................................................ 72 - 74
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Frequently Asked Questions
Year 7-10 Students ........................................................................... 75
VCE Students ..................................................................................... 76
VCAL Students ................................................................................... 77
Glossary and Acronymns .................................................................... 78 - 79
“Ask, and you will receive; seek, and you will find; knock,
and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks
will receive, and anyone who seeks will find, and the door
will be opened to those who knock.”
Matthew 7: 7-8
Page 2 Trinity College Colac
Dear Trinity College families
We trust that this Curriculum Handbook will assist students in planning for their subject options. We realise that
having to make choices about subject units may, at times, be quite daunting for our students. Please be assured
that our Trinity College staff will support students through their decision-making process.
Our Trinity College timetable is designed to offer our students the best subject choices possible. This means that
subjects which run in the future will be determined by student demand as well as the viability of such demand at
our College.
After receiving this Handbook, students are advised to carefully read the relevant sections about unit
requirements for their year level. These pages detail the unit descriptions as well as listing possible combinations
of subjects. Students should discuss this process with their families and their teachers to clarify any queries they
may have about their choices.
Families can assist students with these discussions as it is acknowledged that, at this stage, students may not
have a clear idea about which career pathway to follow after completing their schooling. It is advisable that
students investigate as many options as possible so that they make an informed decision about their future
career.
When choosing a study course, students should ask themselves the following questions:
•
Content: What is studied in this subject? Refer to the description of the units in this Handbook.
•
Interest: Will I like this subject?
•
Ability: Will I manage this combination of subjects?
•
Future: Will this combination of subjects lead me to a job that I may find appealing? Are there any
subjects that may be prerequisites for university courses in which I am interested?
When investigating which subjects to select, students should:
•
Read this book thoroughly: use the year level grids in the handbook to examine possible preferences.
•
Ask relevant questions: conduct research, consult websites (universities, VCAA and VTAC)
•
Be open to advice: discuss options with family, with teachers and with professionals.
PROCEDURE
Students will attend Information Sessions as listed below to receive additional information about the subject
selection process. Further information will also be detailed in the College newsletter, thus families are
encouraged to regularly read this important means of communication between the College, parents and
students.
Students will receive an email explaining how to lodge their subject selections online. After completing their
online selections, students will be expected to print a copy of their final subject preferences. A parent/guardian
will need to sign this sheet and this final copy must be submitted to the College.
13th July 2016
20th July 2016
21st July 2016
21st July 2016
25th July to 5th August 2016
Distribution of Curriculum Handbook to current students in Years 9 -11
Senior Pathways Night (for parents and students in Years 9 and 10)
Subject Selection Session for Year 11 students (period 5)
Subject Information sessions for students in Years 9 and 10
Year 10 subject interviews at allotted times.
Year 9 and 11 interviews upon request
8th August 2016 (midnight) DUE DATE: Online subject preferences close for current Year 9, 10, 11 students
11th August 2016
• Distribution of Curriculum Handbook to current students in Years 7 and 8
• Subject Information Sessions for current students in Years 7 and 8
29th August 2016 (midnight) DUE DATE: Online subject preferences close for current Year 7 and 8 students
At Trinity College, we remain committed to assisting all students in their pursuit of academic excellence and
relevant future pathways.
Mrs Cheryl Pefanis,
Deputy Principal.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 3
learning areas AT TRINITY COLLEGE
The curriculum at Trinity College is divided into eleven learning areas. Within each of these learning areas,
there are various subjects as listed below and described in more detail throughout this book.
Religious Education
The Religious Education of students at Trinity College is developed through being part of a community whose life, values
and aims are centred upon the inspiration taken from the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the teachings of the Church.
The central aim of the Religious Education Programme is to foster in students the following four aspects of human life:
• awareness of SELF
• awareness of OTHERS
• awareness of THE WORLD
• awareness of THE FAITH COMMUNITY
The programme seeks to teach the content of the Catholic faith in a way which contributes to understanding and provides
opportunities for students to respond in faith. Through immersion of students in the life of the school they can experience
the values of a Christian community and will also be given the opportunity for participation in prayer and worship. The
programme develops religious literacy, incorporating an appreciation, understanding and desire to know more of the
Catholic/Christian tradition, including the symbols and rituals of the community.
The content of the Religious Education Programme at Trinity College:
• is based on the sources of our faith;
• is faithful to the teachings and practices of the Catholic Church;
• reflects the Core Values, Mission, and Vision of the school;
• is sequential and allows for a deepening of understanding, knowledge and experience.
The Religious Education of students at Trinity College uses, as its primary framework for course structure, the Awakenings
Programme as recommended by the Catholic Edcuation Office Ballarat. This programme draws from and incorporates the
many rich developments in Religious Education over recent decades, providing opportunities and understanding relevant to
the individual student, taking into account the needs, interests, abilities, cultural backgrounds and stages of development
of students.
The Arts
Performing Arts: Drama, Music
The Performing Arts subjects are fundamental to the learning of all students. Performing Arts makes a distinct and unique
contribution to each young person’s ability to perceive, imagine, create, think, feel, symbolise, communicate, understand as
well as to become confident and creative individuals. The Performing Arts at Trinity College can be broken into two strands:
Music and Drama. These strands will provide all students with the opportunity to imagine and creatively engage, personally
and collectively, within their real and imagined worlds. Music and Drama assist in developing identity, confidence, social
participation and inclusion. Units explore cultural diversity and indigenous cultural heritage in line with national curriculum.
PERFORMING ARTS
Year 7
Year 8
Drama
Core Unit
08PA01S
Music
Core Unit
08MU01S
Year 9
09PA31S
09PA32S
Year 10
10PA61S
09MU33S
10MU64S
09MU31S
10MU62S
VCE SUBJECTS OFFERED AT TRINITY IN 2017
Drama
Music Performance
Visual Arts: Art, Graphics
Involvement in Visual Arts is an important part of our lives. We can use the arts to express our emotional, social, cultural,
political and religious beliefs and we learn to appreciate experiences of others through their expression in one or other art
form.
Visual Arts at Trinity College can be broken into two strands: Art and Graphics. Within these strands, students learn to
express and communicate their feelings; this provides them with opportunities to gain a sense of their social and individual
identity. Students learn ways of experiencing, developing, representing and understanding emotions, values and cultural
beliefs. They learn to take risks, be imaginative, question, explore solutions, share opinions, develop, practise and refine
Page 4 Trinity College Colac
techniques to help in the development of their own art works and the understanding and appreciation of the work of others.
VISUAL ARTS
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Art
Core Unit
08AR01S
09AR31S
Graphics
Core Unit
08VC01S
09VC31S
Year 10
VCE SUBJECTS OFFERED AT TRINITY IN 2017
10AR68S
Art
10AR69S
Studio Art
10VC62S
Visual Communication Design
English
English focuses on a study of Language and how it works, an appreciation of Literature in its various modes, and the
development of skills for Literacy in our world. The importance of consolidating basic literacy skills is a focus through
skills units and homework sheets. The Year 7 to 10 curriculum links directly to the VCE English Units, ensuring students are
equipped with the skills required to study and respond to texts and communicate effectively in both oral and written forms. A Literature elective in Year 10 is available to allow students who excel in English to further enhance their studies of English.
Year 7
English
Core Unit
Year 8
Core Unit
Year 9
Core Unit
Year 10
10EN61S
Core Unit
10EN63S
10EN64S
VCE/VCAL SUBJECTS OFFERED AT TRINITY IN 2017
English
Literature
VCAL Literacy
Health and Physical Education
The Health and Physical Education (HPE) programme at Trinity College will contribute to students becoming self-confident,
independent, disciplined, healthy and physically fit.
•
•
•
Students in Years 7 to 10 will undertake Health and Physical Education for the whole year.
Assessed HPE learning areas will include: alcohol and other drugs, food and nutrition, health benefits of physical activity,
mental health and wellbeing, relationships and sexuality, safety, challenge and adventure activities, games and sports,
lifelong physical activities, rhythmic and expressive movement activities.
It is highly recommended that students wishing to study VCE Physical Education and/or Health and Human Development,
choose either 10HP63E or 10HP64E as one of their electives in Year 10.
Year 7
Health and Physical
Education
Core Unit
Year 8
Core Unit
Year 9
Year 10
09HP31S
Core Unit
10HP62S
Core Unit
09HP32S
10HP63E
10HP64E
VCE/VET SUBJECTS OFFERED AT TRINITY IN 2017
Physical Education
Health and Human Development
VET Sport and Recreation (Certificate III)
The Humanities: Civics and Citizenship, Economics and Business, Geography, History
Humanities is a broad area of learning which draws upon the areas of Civics and Citizenship, Economics and Business, Geography as well as History. Beyond Secondary Education, the Humanities Learning Area offers strong job prospects and
many university options, including studying Commerce, Law, Politics, Accounting, International Business and Economics –
these courses can lead to many successful career paths in both the private and public sector.
HUMANITIES
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Civics and
Citizenship
Core Unit
Core Unit
09CC30S
10CC61S
Economics and
Business
Core Unit
Core Unit
09EC31S
10EC61S
Geography
Core Unit
Core Unit
09GE31S
10GE61S
History
Core Unit
Core Unit
09HI31S
Core Unit
10HI61S
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
VCE SUBJECTS OFFERED AT TRINITY IN 2017
Accounting
Australian Politics
Business Management
Geography
History - Revolutions
Legal Studies
Page 5
Learning AreaS AT TRINITY COLLEGE (cont)
Languages
In studying a Language, a student has the opportunity to participate in simulated and, where possible, real situations
related to the practical aspects of every day life.
The Language programme at Trinity College enables students to:
• communicate in this language through reading, writing, listening and speaking activities;
• enhance their understanding of culture and language;
• develop an appreciation of Australia as a country with a diversity of languages and cultures;
• gain access to a range of post school options.
Year 7
Indonesian
Core Unit
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Core Unit
09IN31S
09IN32S
10IN63S
10IN64S
VCE SUBJECTS OFFERED AT TRINITY IN 2017
Indonesian
Mathematics
Mathematics pervades all aspects of our lives: as citizens, in our homes and in the workplace. It has applications in all
human activities and provides a universal way of solving problems in diverse areas as science and engineering, business
and finance, technology, arts and crafts and many everyday activities. Competence in mathematics enhances both our
understanding of the world and the quality of our participation in Australian society. Under the Victorian Curriculum in the
Mathematics Learning Area, students in Years 7- 10 complete work from three areas of study: (i) Number and Algebra, (ii)
Measurement and Geometry and, (iii) Statistics and Probability. As Mathematics is an integral part of all students’ education, the aim of the Mathematics Learning Area is to ensure
maximum success and progress.
• Year 9 students may choose to study an extra unit of mathematics called “Thinking Mathematically”, a problem
solving and mathematical strategies unit as one of their non-compulsory units.
• Year 10 students may elect to participate in an advanced class, where they will be further extended. Selection for
an advanced class is made on the basis of teacher reccomendation and the previous year’s assessments and exam
results.
Year 7
Mathematics
Core Unit
Year 8
Core Unit
Year 9
Year 10
09MA33
Core Unit
Core Unit
10MA65S
OR
10MA66S
Elective
09MA35E
Elective
10MA67E
VCE/VCAL SUBJECTS OFFERED AT TRINITY IN 2017
General / Further Mathematics
Maths Methods
Specialist Maths
VCAL Numeracy
Science: Agriculture, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology
A major goal of Science education is to develop citizens who are capable of engaging in informed debate about Science and
its applications.
A fundamental goal for Science education is to stimulate, respond to and nourish curiosity, wonder and questioning. Science
provides us with one view of the world – a view that changes as our knowledge and understanding of science evolves.
It is becoming increasingly important that students understand scientific challenges and redirections, and the implications
of these for their own life choices, the environment and the community (local and global) in which they live. Science extends
our understanding beyond what affects us to include what we cannot see, feel, hear or touch but can only imagine.
Increasing emphasis will be placed on the role of science and the work of Australian and other scientists in addressing issues
of sustainability at a local and global level. Science education provides opportunities for students to develop the skills and
understanding appropriate to service and good citizenship. It also encourages students to articulate science values and
accept the ethical principles embedded in science research. While only some students directly pursue a career in science
and scientific research, all students need to appreciate the significance of science for the long-term future of our society.
Year 7
Science
Page 6 Core Unit
Year 8
Core Unit
Year 9
09SC31S
Year 10
10SC61S
10SC62S
10SC63S
10SC64S
10SC65S
VCE/VET SUBJECTS OFFERED AT TRINITY IN 2017
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
Psychology
VET Agriculture (Certificate II)
Trinity College Colac
Technologies
Design and Technologies: Food, Textiles, Wood
This learning area emphasises engagement in designing, creating and evaluating processes, products and technological
systems using a range of materials as a way of developing creativity and innovation. Creativity can be described as applying
imagination and lateral and critical thinking throughout design and development processes. Design is a vital step in
transforming ideas into creative, practical and commercial realities. Designing and its application involve planning and
organising production, and evaluating products in a real context.
• Food units offer students a chance to approach the use of food as a material and gives them experience using the
technology process to investigate, design, produce and evaluate all of their practical classes.
•
Included in the Textiles units are basic methods of sewing, the use of the sewing machine, garment construction and how
to make it fit, along with many crafty ideas that will enable students to demonstrate their ability to design as an individual.
Textiles is a ‘hands-on’ practical skill learning area that provides a sound grounding for further studies in this area, as well as
pursuing future recreational activities.
•
The units offered in Wood were created to provide as wide a range of design and construction experience as possible,
focusing towards furniture design. In each unit the student will be guided through a variety of processes and techniques
which will include the following criteria:
Each unit will provide the student with the opportunity to experience success and enjoyment by developing courses of work
appropriate to their individual level of skill and interest.
CDT
Year 7
Year 8
Food
Core Unit
08FO01S
Textiles
Core Unit
Wood
Core Unit
Year 9
Year 10
09FO31S
10FO61S
09FO32S
10FO62S
08TX01S
09TX31S
10TX62S
08WO01S
09WO31S
10WO61S
10WO62S
VCE SUBJECTS OFFERED AT TRINITY IN 2017
Food Technology
Product Design and Technology - Textiles
Product Design and Technology - Wood
Digital Technologies
Digital Technologies is the hardware and software that enables data to be digitally processed, stored and communicated.
Digital Technologies can be used to access, process, manage and present information; model and control events; construct
new understanding; and communicate with others. Digital Technologies aims to expose students to a wide range of media
and technologies. These include the use of computers, printers, scanners, various cameras and responsible use of the
Trinity email and intranet system as well as the internet.
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
10IT61S
Digital Technologies
Core Unit
Core Unit
09IT31S
10IT62S
10IT63S
VCE/VET SUBJECTS OFFERED AT TRINITY IN 2017
Computing
Media
Software Development
VET Interactive Digital Media (Certificate III)
We value our Learning.
In forming life-long learners, we cultivate a thirst for knowledge and a quest
for understanding so all will strive to be their best.
Trinity College Colac Core Value
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 7
ASSESSING AND REPORTING
Our Assessment Policy and our Reporting Policy reflect the philosophy of a Catholic School, as framed in the Trinity
College Core Values, Vision and Mission. These policies aim to recognise the Gospel values of community, hope,
justice and dignity for the individual.
Why Do We Assess?
There are several reasons why we assess
student learning, including:
• to improve student performance
and achievement. Teachers will
provide feedback on assessment
tasks to support students’ learning,
including
comments
regarding
areas for improvement and further
development.
• to help students’ monitor their own
progress and development, including
reflecting on their strengths, areas
for improvement and future learning
goals.
•
•
•
to assist teachers in making
judgements on student achievement
against goals and standards.
to inform teaching practices
and identify gaps in student
understanding.
to monitor the effectiveness of
educational
programmes
and
processes.
Reporting
Reporting
is
the
process
of
communicating
the
assessment
of a student’s development to
students and their parents by
providing
constructive
feedback,
to assist growth and understanding.
The confidential nature of reports is
respected at all times. In addition to
formal reports and assessment task
feedback, we provide oral reports at
Parent-Teacher-Student interviews and
on other occasions as required.
The report format will follow the
assessment and reporting requirements
as set out in the Victorian Curriculum
F-10.
Victorian Curriculum F-10 - Reporting for all Year 7-10
The Victorian Curriculum Foundation - 10
(F-10) sets out what every student should
learn during their first eleven years of
schooling. The curriculum is the common
set of knowledge and skills required by
students for life-long learning, social
development and active and informed
citizenship.
The
Victorian
Curriculum
F-10
incorporates the Australian Curriculum
and reflects Victorian priorities and
standards.
The College’s end-of-semester student
reports includes a course description,
work practices, assessment task grades
and a comparison against the Victorian
Curriculum standards. These reports are
available via the Parent Access Module
(PAM) at the end of each semester.
During the semester, assessment task
grades and teacher comments will be
available via PAM. In this way, teachers
will provide timely and directed
comments to students and parents to
improve learning outcomes. This means
that there will be no written comments
on the end of semester reports.
When reporting on the student’s work
produced, such as assessment tasks,
an A-E reporting scale is used. For
consistency, the same scale is applied
across the whole school. This scale is
shown here.
Trinity College Grading Scale
90-100%A+
80-89%
A
75-79%
B+
70-74%
B
65-69%
C+
60-64%
C
55-59%
D+
45-54%
D
35-44%
E+
25-34%
E
0-24%
Ungraded
Parent Access Module (PAM)
The Parent Access Module (PAM)
provides parents with information
on a range of areas relating to their
child’s education, including homework,
assessment tasks, school reports,
attendance, Parent-Teacher-Student
Interviews, the College’s daily messages
and upcoming events.
provided by the College. Should parents
forget their password, it can be reset for
them by contacting the College office.
To access PAM, parents will need a
computer, tablet or handheld device
(such as a smartphone) with internet
access. To login, the parent/guardian
must enter the username and password
STUDENT ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING: Student reports will be available
once they have been released by the
College. Parents can view and print
current and previous year reports for
Page 8 STUDENT TIMETABLE: This option
displays a full student timetable for
the current cycle, a complete list of the
student’s classes and teachers, as well
as the start and end times for all periods.
students from this section.
LEARNING AREAS: Parents can log in
to PAM to see their child’s homework
and current assessment tasks. For
assessment tasks, parents will be able
to see the description of the current
task and the due dates. Comments will
also be available via PAM when the task
has been completed and marked by the
teacher. This provides timely feedback
to parents and can generate discussion
points for the Parent-Teacher-Student
interviews.
Trinity College Colac
OVERVIEW OF CURRICULUM
Trinity College delivers a
curriculum for its students
through stages: Junior School
(Years 7 and 8), Year 9 and the
Senior School (Years 10, 11 and
12).
Junior students (Years 7 and 8)
study their core subjects in their
homeroom groups. In order to
enhance the breadth of their
schooling, students have the
opportunity to progressively
choose electives from various
learning areas.
Students in Year 9 are offered
a variety of subjects across the
learning areas and have a greater
selection on offer compared to
Year 8 students. This enables
students to start mastering skills
to get a sense of subjects they
may like to pursue in the senior
school.
VCE or VCAL pathway. Details of
the various VCE and VET subjects
are contained elsewhere in the
Curriculum Handbook.
Subjects at Trinity College are
based on a timetable structure of
Our senior school starts in Year a ten-day cycle, eight periods per
10, with students able to access a day, each of 38 minutes duration. Victorian Certificate of Education For every year level, in the ten(VCE) or Vocational Education day cycle, there is also:
and Training (VET) subject in • one period for (Skills, Literacy,
addition to their core subjects
Numeracy, Pathways and
and elective options. The Year 10
Study Skills)
curriculum prepares students for
the pathways of VCE or for the • one period for Pastoral Care
Victorian Certificate of Applied • one period for Year Level or
College Assembly.
Learning (VCAL). Students in Year
11 and 12 complete either the
Year 7 Curriculum
Year 7 is a foundation year for secondary
school students. All Year 7 students will
study the same CORE units over two
semesters in all of the learning areas.
These core subjects will be taught in the
students’ homeroom groups to allow
for a smoother transition from primary
schooling. The period allocations for the
core subjects within the ten-day cycle are
listed in the table.
Additionally, Year 7 students will study all
the ELECTIVE units. Students will rotate
their elective classes throughout the year
so they get to sample each learning area.
Each elective consists of 11 periods in the
College’s ten-day cycle.
SUBJECT
C
O
R
E
E
L
E
C
T
I
V
E
S
Periods per cycle
Religious Education
6
Digital Technologies
4
English
Health and Physical Education
Humanities
12
Health
Physical Education
2
5
10
Languages: Indonesian
6
Mathematics
12
Science
9
Art
Drama
Food
Graphics
Music
Students rotate these
classes throughout
the year so they get to
sample each learning
area.
Textiles
Wood
“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use
to change the world.”
Nelson Mandela
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 9
Year 8 Curriculum
The Year 8 curriculum is a progression from their Year 7 studies. Year 8 students will continue to study their core subjects in
their homeroom groupings, similar to their Year 7 curriculum. In addition to the core subjects as listed below, Year 8 students
have a choice of five ‘elective’ subjects over the year. The following pages in this section of the handbook contain learning area
descriptions of the available Year 8 units, which should assist students in making informed decisions about their choice of electives.
CORE SUBJECTS
All Year 8 students will complete the core subjects, with the period allocation within the ten-day cycle as listed below. Please note
that the study of Languages is a compulsory core subject for one semester for Year 8 students.
C
O
R
E
SUBJECT
CODE
PERIODS PER CYCLE
Religious Education
08RE01S
6
Digital Technologies
08IT01S
4
English
08EN01S
11
Health and Physical Education
08HP01S
Humanities
08HI01S
11
Languages: Indonesian
08IN01S
6 periods per cycle
for one semester
Mathematics
08MA01S
11
Science
08SC01S
9
Health
2
Physical
Education
5
ELECTIVE SUBJECTS
During the year, all Year 8 students must study FIVE ELECTIVES over the year. Each elective consists of six periods in the College’s
ten-day cycle.
In order to help students ensure a breadth of curriculum choices, Year 8 students are required to choose:
• ONE elective from The Arts: Performing Arts Learning Area
• ONE elective from The Arts: Visual Arts Learning Area
• ONE elective from the Technologies: Design and Technologies Learning Area
• an additional TWO units to complete the required number of units for the year.
The table below explains the various possibilities for students’ choice of electives.
Learning Area
E
L
E
C
T
I
V
E
S
Students must choose at
least ONE unit from The Arts:
Performing Arts Learning Area.
Students must choose at least
ONE unit from The Arts: Visual
Arts Learning Area.
Students must choose at least
ONE unit from the Technologies:
Design and Technologies Learning
Area.
Page 10 SUBJECT
CODE
Year 8 Drama
08PA01S
Year 8 Music
08MU01S
Year 8 Art
08AR01S
Order of
preference
The Arts: Performing Arts
The Arts: Visual Arts
Year 8 Graphics 08VC01S
Technologies: Design and
Technologies
Year 8 Food
08FO01S
Year 8 Textiles
08TX01S
Year 8 Wood
08WO01S
Trinity College Colac
Year 8 Core Subjects
Religious Education
English
Code: 08RE01S
Code: 08EN01S
This course consists of four units. Each
unit develops a strand of the Awakenings
Programme.
Students will study the three strands of:
Language: focus on knowledge of language
and how it works.
Literature: understanding, appreciating,
responding to, analysing and creating
literature.
Literacy: focus on interpreting and creating
a range of types of texts with accuracy,
fluency and purpose.
Students will engage in the study of set
texts such as novels, mass media and poetry
to share, reflect on, clarify and evaluate
opinions and arguments in literary texts.
Students will explore how texts position
readers and recognise differing viewpoints
about the world, culture, individuals and
issues.
Students will produce a variety of texts
including creative, informative, persuasive
and instructional modes for a particular
purpose in response to challenging themes
and issues. Year 8 has a particular focus
on the understanding of print and visual
media and culminates in the production of
a magazine.
Students will plan, rehearse and deliver
an individual speech and participate in a
debate to become aware of the importance
of audience, purpose, voice, language
features and presentation skills when
delivering a viewpoint.
Students will be encouraged to pursue wide
reading and reflect upon their selections.
Assessment Tasks
• Writing Folio
• Text Responses
•Oral
• Exam
1. God: Jesus, the Human Face of God
Students will examine how Jesus, Word
made flesh, reveals to us the human face of
God. Jesus shows us what it means to be in
loving relationship with God and with each
other. Jesus shows us who God is and what
it means to be human.
2. Church: How do we Experience
Community?
In this unit students study the development
of the early church and the experiences of the
Christian community. After studying
the
early
church,
the
students
critically reflect upon their local
church
and
consider
ways
of
expressing the ideals of the early
Christian
community
in
today’s
world.
3. Scripture: The Covenant Unfolds
This unit introduces and explores the origin
and structure of the Scriptures. Students
examine the nature of the covenant
between God and the chosen people and
reflect on the impact of the living of that
covenant on their own lives and on their
relationship with God. The Scriptures
are investigated in terms of the prevailing
social, geographic and political settings
from which they arose.
4. Religion and Society: Why are there
differences in the World?
Students explore the meaning of religion
and the place of religious practice in
life. Human beings are drawn towards
the search for answers to fundamental
questions such as the meaning and purpose
of life.
Assessment Tasks
From the following:
• Research Assignments
•Projects/Reports
•Tests
• Oral presentations
• Creative and Group Activities
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Digital Technologies
Code: 08IT01S
Computers are integral to modern
communication and consumption of
media. They allow vast amounts of
data to be effectively inputted, stored,
organised and manipulated. This course
encourages students to develop skills
and knowledge relevant to the input and
management of data, programming and
develop understanding of applications
used to communicate effectively. Computer
hardware is also explored. Students will
use a range of software in an integrated
manner.
The software includes;
• Adobe Design Suite
• Microsoft Office Suite
• Animation Software
• Programming Software
A number of communication issues are
also explored. Students will also undertake
a course to develop their skills in effective
keyboarding.
Assessment Tasks
• Digital Products
• Media Reviews
•Assignments
• Keyboarding Skills
Page 11
Year 8 Core Subjects (continued)
Health and Physical
Education
Code: 08HP01S
Health: During semester one, the health
education will aim to promote healthy and
positive relationships. During semester
two, health will explore alcohol and other
drugs. The aim of these units will be to
develop student skills and strategies to
approach relationships and substances in a
healthy, safe and responsible way.
Physical Education at Year 8 will provide an
opportunity for all students to experience
physical activity in a range of sports and
environments for the whole year. The
practical aspect will focus on participation
and enjoyment and also provide a
foundation for developing basic skills and
techniques for a variety of activities.
The following sport/games will be covered
at this year level:
• Athletics
• Rebound Football
•Netball
• Table Tennis
• Sof la-Crosse
• Circuit Training
• Minor Games
• Fitness Testing
• Super 8s Cricket
• Softball
•Soccer
• Ultimate Frisbee
• Indoor Hockey
•Tennis
• Cross Country
Assessment Tasks
• Research Assignments
• Practical skill, effort, participation and
sportsmanship
Page 12 Humanities
Code: 08HU01S
Year 8 Humanities comprises of four areas: History, Geography, Economics and Business
and Civics and Citizenship.
Students continue to develop the ability to question, think critically, solve problems,
communicate effectively, make decisions and adapt to change. They are also encouraged
to think and respond to issues that require an understanding of key historical, geographical,
political, economic and societal factors involved, and how they relate.
History: In History, students explore through an inquiry based learning the end of the
ancient period to the beginning of the modern period, c.650 AD (CE) – 1750, when major
civilisations around the world came into contact with each other. It also was a time when
social, economic, religious, and political beliefs were challenged and significantly changed.
It was the period when the modern world began to take shape. We visit Japan under the
Shoguns and then travel to Europe in the Middle Ages and investigate the causes, effects
and the horror of the Black Death. The history content at this year level involves two
strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills.
Geography: In Geography, students explore ‘Landforms and Landscapes’ and ‘Changing
Nations’. In ‘Landforms and Landscapes’, students examine, through famous mountain
landscapes case studies, the processes that shape different mountains, the cultural
significance placed on these, including our local indigenous people and how hazards can
affect the use and management of mountains, including earthquakes, volcanoes and
tsunamis. In ‘Changing Nations’, students investigate the changing human geography of
countries, how there are shifts in population distribution and the cause and effects of
people movement in both Australia and an Asian region. The content of this year level is
organised into two interrelated strands: Geographical Knowledge and Understanding and
Geographical Inquiry.
Economics and Business: In Economics and Business, students further develop an
understanding of how different markets work within Australia. Students also explore
how participants influence the market’s operation, as well as investigate different types
of businesses and how they affect the way financial records are kept. The economics
and business content is two integrated strands: Economics and Business Knowledge and
Understanding, and Economics and Business Skills.
Civics and Citizenship: We end the unit by investigating the responsibilities and freedoms of
citizens and how Australians can actively participate in their democracy. Students consider
how laws are made and the types of laws used in Australia. Students also examine what it
means to be Australian by identifying the reasons for and influences that shape national
identity. The civics and citizenship has two integrated strands: Civics and Citizenship,
Knowledge and Understanding, and secondly Civics and Citizenship Skills.
Assessment Tasks
• Topic Tests
• Research Assignments
• Essay
• Creative group Tasks
Trinity College Colac
Indonesian
Code: 08IN01S
In this unit, students increase their language
fluency through regular discussion of their
daily routine, by generating questions
and formulating answers. They also gain
an understanding of Indonesian eating
customs and etiquette. Students are able to
consolidate their use of past, present, and
future indicators, use transitive verbs, and
construct and use nouns.
Assessment Tasks
•Tests
•Role-play
•Projects
•Homework
Mathematics
Code: 08MA01S
At year 8 students will be challenged
through skills practice, technology and
practical problem solving to further their
mathematical knowledge in a structured
manner. The activities aim to expand the
student’s understanding, fluency, problem
solving and reasoning strategies. The topics
covered each semester will be drawn
from three areas: Number and Algebra,
Measurement and Geometry and Statistics
and Probability
Number and Algebra: In the Number area
students use both mental and written
strategies to estimate and perform the four
basic operations with integers, and apply
the index laws to whole numbers. Students
estimate answers and solve everyday
problems with and without the use of
digital technology. In the algebra area they
simplify a variety of algebraic expressions
and solve linear equations and graph linear
relationships.
Measurement and Geometry: Students
use units of measurement and find the
perimeter and area of common shapes
including circles. In the geometry section
students identify conditions for the
congruence of triangles.
Statistics and Probability: Students
investigate issues related to the collection
of sample data and discuss the effect of
outliers on means and medians of the data.
In Probability students model situations
with Venn diagrams and two-way tables
and investigate the language of probability.
Assessment Tasks
• Topic tests
• Maths Mate Programme
• Unit Examination
• Tasks chosen from:
• Assignment
• Investigation
• Analysis task
• Application task
• IXL Maths
Science
Code: 08SC01S
Students are introduced to cells as
microscopic structures that explain
macroscopic properties of living systems.
Students link form and function at a cellular
level and explore the organisation of
body systems in terms of flows of matter
between interdependent organs. Similarly,
they explore changes in matter at a particle
level and distinguish between chemical
and physical change. They begin to classify
different forms of energy and describe the
role of energy in causing change in systems,
including the role of heat and kinetic energy
in the rock cycle.
Students use experimentation to isolate
relationships between components in
systems and explain these relationships
through increasingly complex represen­
tations. They make predictions and propose
explanations, drawing on evidence to
support their views.
Assessment Tasks
• Research Projects
• Experimental reports
•Tests
• Exam
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 13
Year 8 Electives
The Arts: Performing Arts and Visual Arts
Drama
Music
Code: 08PA01S
Code: 08MU01S
Student focus on developing the expressive
skill of movement through the study and
development of mime performances.
Students are involved in directing,
performing, costuming, choreographing
and making sets and props to put on a play.
Students will perform the play to family and
friends at the end of the semester.
Students will participate in a wide variety
of performance, composition and listening
activities, investigating sound and sound
production, film and television music,
instruments and world music. Students
will also conduct research and take part
in theory and aural skill development, in
preparation for further music study.
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
• Contribution to class discussions
• Music Elements Mind Map
Assessment Tasks
• Timbral composition
• Film music task
• Instrument design, creation and
performance
• Theory & aural test
Unit Requirements
• Keeping a notebook/journal.
• Satisfactory participation in rehearsal
and performance.
• Willingness to try a variety of tasks such
as performing, directing, designing and
developing, sets etc.
• Research activities.
Assessment Tasks
• Journal / Reviews
• Mime performance
• Mime assessment task
• Play performance
• Play assessment task
Art
Code: 08VC01S
Students will be encouraged to develop
their creativity and understanding of art and
design through the introduction of a wide
range of media, including drawing, painting,
ceramics, printing, and mixed media. An
awareness of the elements and principles of
art will also be pursued.
This unit has been designed to introduce
students to Visual Communication and
Design and the role it plays in our lives,
looking at past and present cultures and
design. Students will also be introduced
to two and three dimensional instrumental
and freehand drawing, rendering, mapping,
charts and graphics, explanatory diagrams,
lettering, symbols giving them good
grounding for the development of their
own visual communications.
Unit Requirements
• Folio: all work to be done on A3 paper
and presented in an A3 display folder.
• Research for assignments and ideas.
• Participation in class discussion.
• Drawing to communicate ideas to a
given audience.
Assessment Tasks
Folio of work, taking into account
• presentation
•neatness
•accuracy
• creativity
• ability to communicate clearly
Research on artists, styles and cultures will
be undertaken. Discussion and self analysis
of works will be encouraged.
Popular themes such as portraiture, still life
and landscape will be investigated through a
variety of 3 dimensional and 2 dimensional
representations of forms.
Units Requirements:
• Sketchbook including all preparatory
sketches and ideas for main works.
• Research on works being studied in the
practical area.
• Folio with individual works.
Assessment Tasks
• Sketchbook which includes all designs
and sketches for folio pieces.
• Research on artists and topics being
studied in practical area.
• Folio which includes all individual topics
models
Page 14 Graphics
Code: 08AR01S
Trinity College Colac
Technologies: Design and Technologies
Food
Wood
Code: 08FO01S
Code: 08WO01S
This unit explores the relationship between
nutrition and good health with the
Australian Guide to Healthy Eating as the
model studied. Students will investigate
the key foods fruit, dairy, meat, vegetables,
eggs, cereals and legumes and explore
ways of optimizing the properties of these
foods. Through practical sessions, students
will build their skill set and achieve personal
success whilst developing life skills.
Unit Requirements
• A selection of evaluated productions
• Research Project
• Digital Recipe Book
Assessment Tasks
• Digital Recipe Book
• Assignment work
• Unit Test
Students in this unit will investigate three
joins and apply the appropriate ones to
seven different products. It will focus on
the development of the students’ skills in:
• Design research and discussion prior to
a detailed drawing
• Construction using the correct hand
and tool skills to complete each product
• Application of finishes to a satisfactory
quality of presentation.
Safety and safe workshop procedures will
be taught and continually stressed
Unit Requirements
• Module - for preparatory notes and
assignments
• Design Plans - completion of all Graphic
Plans and sketches
• Practical Work - on completion of
project, demonstrating the correct use
of tools.
Assessment Tasks
• Module - assignments, certificates and
research notes
• Design Plans - sketches, accuracy of
graphic designs and cutting lists
• Practical Work - Product construction
(design, construction and finish)
Textiles
Code: 08TX01S
Students will experience a wide range
of Textile Crafts including Machining,
Embroidery, Fabric Application and Product
Construction methods in this unit.
Students will develop design skills,
manipulative skills and will be able to put
these into practice when constructing a
number of articles. Various fabrics will
be investigated and their appropriateness
for use in a variety of situations will
demonstrate their versatility. Students
will choose and follow patterns in making
simple articles, thus developing skills in
many aspects of Textiles. All articles will be
evaluated and assessed.
Unit Requirements
• Maintaining a workbook of Design Briefs
• Short Exercises
• Production of Tasks/Articles
• Evaluation of productions
Assessment Tasks
•Workbook
• Productions selected from:
- Constructed garment
- Babushka / Animal / Picasso Cushions
- Research Project
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 15
Year 9 Curriculum
Year 9 students have a wider choice of subject selections than in Year 8. In total, students will be required to complete 14 units for the
year: 9 units will be from their Core Subjects and 5 units from their Elective Subjects. Each unit comprises of 11 periods over the rostered
timetable per fortnight (except for RE and HPE which together comprise the 11 periods). The following pages in this section of the
handbook contain learning area descriptions of the possible units available for Year 9 students. These descriptions should assist students
in making informed decisions about their choice of electives.
CORE SUBJECTS
All Year 9 students must complete the following CORE SUBJECTS: Religious Education, English, Mathematics, Health and Physical
Education, Science and one History unit from Humanities.
Learning Area
SUBJECT
CODE
UNIT NAME
Religious Education
Religious Education
09RE31S
Discipleship (Semesters 1 and 2)
1
English
English
09EN31B/G
Year 9 English (Semesters 1 and 2)
2
O Health & Physical
Physical Education
09HP31S
R
The Humanities
History
09HI31S
E
Mathematics
Mathematics
09MA33
Year 9 Mathematics (Semesters 1 and 2)
2
Science
Science
09SC31S
Year 9 Science (Semesters 1 and 2)
2
C
Education
UNITS
Sport And Health for Everyone
(Semesters 1 and 2)
Shaping Australia (compulsory for all Year 9
students to do for one semester)
TOTAL UNITS (9 units)
1
1
9
YEAR 9 ELECTIVE SUBJECTS
During the year, all Year 9 students must study FIVE ELECTIVES over the year. When completing their online subject selection
process, students must indicate SEVEN choices in PREFERENTIAL ORDER (in the order that students would prefer to study those
units). Please note that, should students choose to study Indonesian, they need to select both elective choices as Indonesian is
studied across the whole year.
The table below explains the various possibilities for students’ choice of electives.
Learning Area
SUBJECT
CODE
UNIT NAME
09PA31S
Performing Arts
09PA32S
Theatricality
09MU33S
Music and Culture
09MU31S
Performance Development
Art
09AR31S
Exploring Materials and Techniques
Graphics
09VC31S
Developing Graphics Skills
Physical Education
09HP32S
Athletic Edge
Civics and Citizenship
09CC30S
Rules and Rulers
Economics and Business
09EC31S
Show Me the Money
Geography
09GE31S
Sustainable Futures
09IN31S
Bahasa Indonesian (Intermediate)
Semester 1
09IN32S
Bahasa Indonesian (Intermediate)
Semester 2
09MA35E
Thinking Mathematically
09FO31S
Eating Well for Life
09FO32S
Cooking Around the World
Textiles
09TX31S
Sewing Made Easy
Wood
09WO31S
Wood and Function
Media
09IT31S
Introduction to Multimedia
Drama
E
The Arts: Performing Arts
Music
L
The Arts: Visual Arts
E
C
Health and Physical Education
The Humanities
T
I
Languages
Students that choose Indonesian
must indicate both units as it is
studied across both semesters.
Indonesian
V
Mathematics
Mathematics
E
Food
Technologies: Design and
Technologies
S
Technologies: Digital
Technologies
May choose only
one food unit
Order of
preference
TOTAL ELECTIVE UNITS (must study 5 but choose 7 in case some options are not available)
Page 16 Trinity College Colac
Year 9 Core Subjects
Religious
Education
Discipleship
Code: 09RE31S
This course consists of four units.
1. God: Stewardship
Students will examine the contributions that Christianity
makes to understanding the place of nature in God’s plan and
the development of an attitude of stewardship towards the
environment.
2. Religion and Society: Celebrating Religious Diversity
In this unit students will investigate key features of the major world
religions. They will use this knowledge to examine the current
relationship between the Christian Churches and other world
religions and the efforts being made toward cooperation and unity.
3. Christian Life 1: Making Christian Decisions – How do you
decide?
Students will investigate the relationship between Christian values,
conscience formation and decision-making. It will seek to inform
the student of the Catholic Christian view of values, morality
and sin. Students will also understand the role of scriptures, the
dignity of the human person and the Church in the establishment
of a personal and informed conscience. Christian decision-making
strategies will be explored.
4. Jesus Christ: Death and New Life
In this unit students will examine the central Christian belief in the
resurrection of Jesus as the foundation of Christian hope. Through
a study of Church teachings on death and eternal life, students
will deepen their understanding of how, for Christians, death has
been transformed by Jesus. Students will develop an awareness of
the grief process and examine Christian funeral rites and practices
within the context of Christian hope and belief in eternal life and
the Kingdom of God.
Health and
Physical
Education
Sport and Health for Everyone
Code: 09HP31S
Health and Physical Education at Year 9 will provide an opportunity
for all students to experience physical activity in a range of sports
and environments for the whole year. The practical aspect will aim
to further develop skills and techniques in various activities. In
semester one the theory component will investigate sexuality. In
semester two the students will gain an understanding of risk taking,
harm minimisation and illicit drugs. Particular emphasis will be on
safe partying and road safety.
These sports/games will be covered at this year level:
•Tennis
•Soccer
•Gridiron
• Euro ball
•Basketball
• Super 8’s cricket
• Athletics
• Cross Country
•Volleyball
•Netball
• Super 12’s Football
•Archery
• Indoor Bowls
Assessment Tasks
• Research Assignments
• Practical skill, effort, participation and sportsmanship
Assessment Tasks
From the following:
• Research Assignments
•Projects/Reports
•Tests
• Oral presentations
• Creative and Group Activities
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 17
Year 9 Core Subjects (continued)
ENGLISH
Single Gender English Classes at Year 9
Trinity College offers the unique opportunity for students to be involved in single-gender English classes at Year 9 level. At
a time when many students become disengaged from school, it is hoped that students of both genders will benefit from
specific resources and learning activities that are directed towards gender interests. The majority of students will complete
the traditional course for their year level.
English - Year 9 - Semesters 1 and 2
Code: 09EN31B or 09EN31G
Students will study the three strands of
Language: focus on knowledge of language and how it works.
Literature: understanding, appreciating, responding to, analysing and creating literature.
Literacy: focus on interpreting and creating a range of types of texts with accuracy, fluency and purpose.
Boys
Girls
Code: 09EN31B
Code: 09EN31G
In keeping with the diversified programme, in Semester 1 boys will
focus on the theme of ‘Resilience’ for the Literature component
of the course. Texts selected will be drawn from a range of novels,
films and poetry which highlight resilience in characters. Students
will also be encouraged to reflect on their personal understanding
of the world and human experience gained from interpreting life
issues presented in novels, films and songs.
‘Masters of our Fate’, the Semester 2 theme, asks students to
explore notions of triumph over adversity through their text
studies. Students will use comprehension strategies to interpret
and analyse situations, issues and characters in different texts
throughout the year.
Students will write expressively and explore different perspectives
of current issues through their study of the media and advertising,
culminating in designing promotional material for a rock band
and a news bulletin script. Creative writing will explore an area of
special interest for each student, using peer editing to refine the
writing process.
Focus will be given to using spoken texts for different purposes to
influence and engage an audience. Each student will plan, rehearse
and participate in a speech and team debate.
Assessment Tasks
• Writing Folio
• Text Responses
•Oral
• Exam
Girls in this programme will focus on the theme of the ‘Who I Am’
in Semester 1, studying the novel ‘Looking for Alibrandi’ and a film
text. Students will produce work demonstrating insight into self
and growth as individuals, as well as an understanding of people
and culture.
‘Change’ will be the literary focus in Semester 2, with students
studying ‘Rose for the ANZAC Boys’ and a selection of Protest
Songs. This theme is designed to have students realise how change
over time impacts people and their lives.
Students’ writing will encourage creativity, analysis and reflection.
Tasks will incorporate self-directed learning tasks based on
developing their own thinking and multiple intelligences as
well as evaluating texts to understand how authors create for
specific purpose and effect. Students will complete a personal
communication folio where they examine how language evolves
over time.
Literacy skills will encourage analysis of spoken texts and the
features used to position and engage listeners. Students will plan,
rehearse and deliver a speech related to the studied themes.
Assessment Tasks
• Writing Folio
• Text Responses
•Oral
• Exam
Page 18 Trinity College Colac
THE
Humanities
History
Shaping Australia
Code: 09HI31S
Students will examine the making of
the modern world from 1750 to 1918,
with particular reference to the people
and events that influenced and shaped
Australian society. They will explore the
journey of the convict story and other
foreigners that were lured by the discovery
of gold. Students will finish this unit by
returning to World War One and the shores
of Gallipoli.
Unit Requirements
• Workbook presentation
• Historical knowledge, understanding &
reasoning
Assessment Tasks
• Convict journal
• Eureka Stockade Essay
• Film Analysis
• Topic Tests
“Education is not
the learning of
facts,
but the training
of the mind to
think.”
Albert Einstein
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Mathematics
Year 9 Mathematics
Code: 09MA33S
This course allows for the further
development of mathematical skills for
everyday life as well as preparation for
future mathematical studies at as variety
of levels. The focus of activities is on
expanding their understanding, fluency,
problem solving and reasoning. Students
will be introduced to using CAS Graphics
calculator technology. The activities aim
to expand the student’s understanding,
fluency, problem solving and reasoning
strategies. The topics covered each
semester will be drawn from three areas:
Number and Algebra, Measurement and
Geometry and Statistics and Probability.
Number and Algebra: Students continue
to consolidate the basic operations, use
the index laws and scientific notation to
solve problems. They will be introduced
to recursive algebra to investigate financial
applications of mathematics, In Algebra
students use the distributive law to expand
algebraic expressions and simplify a range
of algebraic expressions using a range
of strategies including the use of digital
technology. Students sketch and draw
linear and non-linear relations, solve simple
equations.
Measurement and Geometry: Students
solve measurement problems involving
perimeter and area of composite shapes,
surface area and volume of different
objects, with and without the use of
digital technology. Students investigate
similarity of triangles and interpret ratios
and scale factors in similar figures. They
will investigate problems involving angles
and lengths in right-angled triangles using
Pythagoras’s theorem and trigonometry.
Statistics and Probability: Students
compare techniques for collecting data
from primary and secondary sources, and
identify questions and issues involving
different data types. They construct
visual representations of data with and
without the use of digital technology.
Students identify mode, mean and
median using these to describe and
interpret the distribution of the data. They
calculate relative frequencies to estimate
probabilities and assign probabilities for
events.
Assessment Tasks
• Topic tests
•Homework
• Tasks chosen from:
- Assignment
- Investigation
- Analysis task
- Application task
• Unit Exam
Science
Year 9 Science
Code: 09SC31S
Students are introduced to the notion of
the atom as a system of protons, electrons
and neutrons and then examine how this
system can change through nuclear decay.
They learn that matter can be rearranged
through chemical change and that these
changes play an important role in many
systems. They are introduced to the concept
of the conservation of matter and begin
to develop a more sophisticated view of
energy transfer. They explore ways in which
the human body as a system responds to its
external environment
Students use knowledge of body systems
to explain how complex organisms respond
to external changes. They use knowledge
of interrelationships to describe how
changes affect ecosystems. They explain
geological features and events in terms
of geological processes and timescales. They describe interrelationships between
science and technology and give examples
of developments in science which have
affected society. Students will continue to
develop their scientific investigative skills in
the applied unit of Science: ‘Forensics’.
Assessment Tasks
• Research Projects
•Assignments
•Tests
• Exam
Page 19
Year 9 Electives
THE ARTS: PERFORMING ARTS and VISUAL ARTS
Drama
Music
Art
Performing Arts
Music and Culture
Code: 09PA31S
Code: 09MU33S
In this unit, students discover different
styles of Drama and work on developing
character and Play making skills. Students
will create performances from scripts as
well as developing their own plays.
Unit Requirements
• Keeping a notebook/journal.
• Satisfactory participation in rehearsal
and performance.
• Willingness to try a variety of tasks –
performing, direction, design, sets etc.
• Research activities.
Assessment Tasks
• Research Assignment
• Group performance
• Performance Review
In this unit, students will investigate the
various roles of music in everyday life and
its links with culture. The unit focusses on
music both from the students’ immediate
context and around the world. Students will
further their musical understanding and
skills through a wide variety of listening and
composition activities.
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
• Contribution to class discussions
Assessment Tasks
• Music and Culture Research Tasks
• Composition Folio Tasks
• Listening FolioTasks
Theatricality
Performance
Development
Code: 09PA32S
In this unit, students will explore the origins
of Musical theatre and work together
to create a theatrical presentation that
includes Music, Dance and Drama. Students
will work from scripts as well as create their
own plays and explore all aspects of Theatre
including direction, lighting, Costume and
set design.
Unit Requirements
• Keeping a notebook/journal.
• Satisfactory participation in rehearsal
and performance.
• Willingness to try a variety of tasks –
performing, direction, design etc.
• Research activities.
Assessment Tasks
• Research Assignment
• Group Performance
• Performance review
• Stagecraft Assignment
Page 20 Code: 09MU31S
In this unit, students will develop their
identities as musicians and performers
across four complementary streams of
study: performance, composition, listening
and aural/theory skills. Students will work
independently to prepare a programme for
a 10-minute recital at the end of semester
and will work with their peers to rehearse
and perform music in a group. Each student
will compile a folio of their work from the
unit, which will provide evidence of their
development.
Recommended Prerequisite: Successful
completion of Year 8 Music.
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
• Contribution to class discussions
• Practice plans and reflections
• Participation in solo and group
performances
Assessment Tasks
• Performance Recital (including solo
and group performance)
• Composition Folio Tasks
• Music Analysis Assignment
• Theory and Aural Progress Tests
Exploring Materials and
Techniques
Code: 09AR31S
In this unit, students have the opportunity
to explore new techniques and extend their
imagination through two and and three
dimensional techniques both decorative
and functional. They will be encouraged
to be creative and confident within their
practical work and discuss and analyse
work by artists past and present from varied
cultures. A variety of materials will be used
so that students develop an understanding
of the extensiveness of media. The
elements and principles of design will be
the basis of all works.
Unit Requirements
• Sketchbook - Record of all tasks and
designs for folio pieces.
• Research assignments on works being
studied in practical areas including;
drawing, painting, ceramics and printing.
• Folio - All topics and finished pieces.
Assessment Tasks
•Sketchbook
• Research - Assignments
• Folio – All completed works.
Graphics
Developing Graphics
Skills
Code: 09VC31S
This unit further develops the skills
and experiences students have had in
Year 8. It gives them an opportunity to
improve their understanding of the Visual
Communication production process and its
role in developing solutions to a particular
problem through developmental work.
Students will experience exercises involving
instruments and will research existing
Visual Communication to give them an
appreciation of their own work and the
work of others.
Unit Requirements
•Folio
• Research for assignments and ideas
• Participation in class discussion
• Drawing to communicate ideas
Assessment Tasks
Folio of work taking into account
• presentation
• neatness and accuracy
• creativity
• ability to communicate clearly
Trinity College Colac
HEALTH AND
PHYSICAL
EDUCATION
THE HUMANITIES
Civics and Citizenship
Athletic Edge
Code: 09CC30S
Rules and Rulers
Rules and Rulers introduces students to the
fundamental structures and institutions of
This unit will focus on biomechanics, skill Australian society. Students examine our
acquisition and technology to improve civic institutions, their role in society, our
performance. Biomechanics is the study British heritage, and how they attempt
of how to optimise human physical to meet the needs of a changing society.
performance by using scientific principles. Students explore democratic concepts
Students completing this elective will and principles such as human rights,
explore these principles by being both the universal suffrage, equality and fairness,
coach and the athlete working to improve philosophy and ideas, political leadership
their technique and performance. This and representative government. Students
subject will include a mix of scientific will critically analyse and interpret
principles and performing physical contemporary legal and political issues,
activities. The practical component will and work towards an understanding and
allow students to observe, record and edit tolerance of difference perspectives.
their performance like an elite coach or Students should be prepared to listen,
athlete would using technology such as GPS
and slow motion video analysis.
Assessment Tasks
• Research Assignments
• Analysis of practical activities
Code: 09HP32S
analyse, compare, think and to participate
in robust and lively debate.
Unit Requirements
• Bookwork presentation
• Research Skills
• Problem Solving
• Oral Presentation
• Communication Skills
• Creativity
• Analysis and Critical Thinking
Assessment Tasks
• Tests
• Research Projects
• Role Plays
Economics and Business
Show Me the Money
Code: 09EC31S
Students begin with the study of our
economy, an introduction to economic
concepts such as demand and supply and the
basics of budgeting and preparing financial
statements, taxation and superannuation.
They will be involved in small business
activities discussing how different variables
affect different businesses. Students will be
introduced to financial literacy terms with a
focus on factors that affect life expectancy.
They will finish by exploring different types
of jobs with a focus on what the future
might have in store for them.
Unit Requirements
• Workbook presentation
• Assignments (Economics – knowledge,
understanding and reasoning)
• Topic Tests
Assessment Tasks
•Folio
• Research Task
• Topic Tests and Examinations
Geography
Sustainable Futures
Code: 09GE31S
Students explore the question of ‘What
will life be like in the year 2050, when
they will be middle aged adults?’ Further
quandaries presented include; what will
our environment be like, will our cities
have changed, what will life be like? This
unit puts our future environment and cities
under the microscope. Core topics will be:
Coastal sustainability – an environmental
topic challenging students to plan and
promote growth and sustainability to
ensure future use, and
Planning that perfect Place – a practical
unit centred on designing sustainable
housing, transport and cities using current
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
technology.
Both topics incorporate field trips, guest
speakers and model construction.
Unit Requirements
• Research Skills
• Analysis Skills
• Spatial Skills
• Interpersonal Skills
Assessment Tasks
• Research Assignment/s
• Model Construction
• Management Plan/s
• Examination
• Field Work Report/s
Page 21
Year 9 Electives (continued)
Languages: INDONESIAN
PLEASE NOTE
Bahasa Indonesia 09IN31S and 09IN32S are sequential units to be studied
year long in Year 9.
Bahasa Indonesian
Intermediate
Semester 1
Bahasa Indonesian
Intermediate
Semester 2
In this unit, students will increase their
language fluency and confidence by
comparing Australian-Indonesian sport
and entertainment. They will also develop
an understanding of Indonesian grammar
points with proficient use of affixes,
auxiliary verbs and question indicators.
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
•Role-play
•Projects
•Homework
Assessment Tasks
•Tests
•Role-play
•Projects
•Homework
In this unit, students will increase their
confidence in using the Indonesian
language by studying areas, including
holidaying in Indonesia, and celebrations
and festivals in Indonesia. Students will
be introduced to grammar points such as
object focus, me-verbs and object/subject
focus (third person).
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
•Role-play
•Projects
•Homework
Assessment Tasks
•Tests
•Role-play
•Projects
•Homework
Code: 09IN31S
Code: 09IN32S
MATHEMATICS
Thinking Mathematically
Code: 09MA35E
This is an additional Mathematics unit.
Students choosing this unit will still need
to complete the core Mathematics unit.
This elective is intended to help students
develop skills and confidence in using
mathematical processes and mathematical
thinking, and to develop a sense of
mathematical inquiry. It is not confined to
any particular branch of mathematics nor
any specific mathematical topics; rather, it
is about tackling questions conscientiously,
reflecting on this experience, examining
the process of carrying out mathematical
investigations and solving mathematical
problems, and drawing attention to
the important features of thinking
mathematically.
The teaching and learning approach taken
in the course is based on five assumptions:
Page 22 • That anyone can think mathematically
• That mathematical thinking can be
improved with practice
• That mathematical thinking is provoked
by contradiction, tension and surprise
• That mathematical thinking is supported
by an atmosphere of questioning,
challenging and reflecting
• That mathematical thinking helps in
understanding yourself and the world.
The work for the unit will focus on
developing a “toolbox” of strategies to use
when tackling problems. These strategies
will be identified, named and practised
through suitable investigations. Students
will be expected to participate in group
discussions, work with other students to
develop solutions and communicate the
results of their work to the rest of the class.
Investigations will come from a variety of
areas of traditional mathematics, such as
arithmetic and geometry and will be able
to be undertaken using techniques familiar
from school mathematics.
Assessment will be based not on getting
correct answers in tests, but on engaging
with the process by participating in
discussions, by collaborating with others to
find solutions, by seeing that being “stuck”
is an essential part of improving learning
and by reflecting on the thinking process.
Assessment Tasks
A folio of work including:
• Group projects
• Individual projects
• Investigations
• Homework tasks
Trinity College Colac
TECHNOLOGIES: DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGIES
Food
Eating Well for Life
Code: 09FO31S
In this unit, students will investigate and
develop an awareness of the nutritional
value of foods, their place in the diet and
as a way of introducing them to a wide
range of foods, will prepare a number
of nutritionally-based productions. A
sound foundation in terms of methods of
cooking and nutritional value of food will
be established and students will have the
opportunity to improve their culinary skills.
Unit Requirements
• Workbook to be maintained
• A variety of Food Productions
• Research projects
• Evaluations of Food Productions
Assessment Tasks
•Bookwork
• Research projects
• Theoretical Test
Textiles
Cooking Around the
World
Sewing Made Easy
Code: 09FO32S
In this unit, students will have the
opportunity to complete a variety of
articles demonstrating a number of skills,
including garment construction, patchwork,
toy making and decorating straw hats. Testing fabrics for suitability, along with
Australian standards appropriate for sizing
and labelling of garments, will ensure that
articles fulfil their Design Briefs. Evaluation
of completed articles will include ways of
improving or modifying students work.
This unit helps develop skills through
appropriate construction techniques.
Students will be required to supply
materials for their articles, however basic
requirements will be supplied.
Unit Requirements
• Workbooks containing Design Briefs
• Production of Articles
• Short Exercises
• Evaluations
Assessment Tasks
•Workbooks
• Three Production Articles
• Written Evaluations
• Research Project
In this unit, students are introduced to a
wide range of foods and methods of cookery
associated with a variety of ethnic cuisines.
It aims to demonstrate to students, how
traditional Australian foods can be adapted
to suit recipes from other cultures, as well
as investigating ethnic physical, social and
economic characteristics, and factors that
influence food habits and food selection of
different communities.
Unit Requirements
• Maintaining a Workbook
• Food Productions
• Research projects
• Evaluation reports Assessment Tasks
•Bookwork
• Research projects
• Test upon completion of UNIT.
Wood
Wood and Function
Code: 09WO31S
Students will be involved in a more complex
use of joinery and will develop skills and
experience through applying three detailed
joins to six different products. The students
will be able to identify, investigate and
solve practical problems with a certain level
of independence. They will be introduced
to the lathe and router to enhance their
woodworking skills. Each student will
learn to maintain tools and equipment,
while producing products with safety and
precision.
Unit Requirements
• Module - for preparatory notes and
assignments
• Design Plans - completion of all Graphic
Plans and sketches
• Practical Work - on completion of
project, demonstrating the correct use
of tools.
Assessment Tasks
• Module - Assignments, Certificates And
Research Notes
• Design Plans - Sketches, Accuracy Of
Graphic Designs And Cutting Lists
• Practical Work - Product Construction
(design, construction and finish)
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Code: 09TX31S
TECHNOLOGIES: DIGITAL
TECHNOLOGIES
Introduction to Multimedia
Code: 09IT31S
Multimedia is a part of our everyday world.
This unit aims to introduce students to the
various components that are used to create
multimedia products. These elements
include digitalized forms of:
• Sound /music
•Images
• Text
• Animation
•Video
• Programming – Animation and Game
Production
A number of industry standard software
applications are used. Students are
expected to develop their expertise in
using a range of computer hardware such
as printers, scanners, digital cameras, web
cameras and video cameras. This unit of
work is primarily investigative as students
are expected to explore software and
hardware and use them to produce creative
products. They will use the Information
Technology processes of investigating,
planning, producing and evaluating.
Unit Requirements
• Folio – Practical Tasks
•Workbook
• ePortfolio
Assessment Tasks
•Assignments
• Research Projects
• Digital Products
Page 23
Year 10 Curriculum
Year 10 sees our students transitioning
into the Senior end of the school.
The expectation and workload begins
to increase as students tackle more
challenging subject matter and students
have the opportunity to complete an
advanced VCE Unit or VET subject.
Year 10 students are required to complete
14 units for the year: 8 units will be from
their Core Subjects and 6 units from their
Elective Subjects. Each unit comprises 11
periods per fortnight (except for RE and
HPE which together comprise 11 periods). Year 10 students also have the option of
selecting one VCE Unit 1/2 subject or a
VET subject should they show the required
maturity and work ethic.
It is recommended that students who do
choose a VCE/VET subject do not chose a
Year 10 elective that is too similar to their
VCE/VET subject, as there may be some
overlap in content.
The following pages in the handbook
contain learning area descriptions of
the possible units available for Year 10
students as well as descriptions of all
the possible VCE and VET subjects that
are available at Trinity College. These
descriptions should assist students in
making informed decisions about their
choice of subjects.
Page 24 CORE SUBJECTS
All Year 10 students must complete the
following CORE SUBJECTS: Religious
Education, English, Mathematics (either
Course A or B), Health and Physical
Education, one Science unit and one
Humanities unit.
ELECTIVE SUBJECTS
Year 10 students must study SIX ELECTIVE
UNITS over the year. When completing
their online subject selections, students
must indicate EIGHT choices in
PREFERENTIAL ORDER (in the order that
students would prefer to study those
units).
ADVANCED SUBJECTS
Year 10 students are permitted to select
one advanced subject from the VCE or
VET subject selections, although this
choice is not guaranteed. VCE or VET
subjects are advanced units and are not
compulsory at Year 10. Permission to
study a VCE Unit 1/2 or a VET subject
will be at the discretion of the Director of
Learning, the Year Level Coordinator and
the Learning Area Facilitator. Students are
permitted to choose only ONE VCE Unit 1/2
sequence OR ONE VET subject. Students
that select a VCE/VET subject must
select this subject for the entire year and
therefore this choice will count as two
units.
OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Students that choose Indonesian must
indicate both units as it is studied across
both semesters.
Students need to undertake 10WO61S A
Unit of Furniture before doing 10WO62S
Advanced Wood.
MATHEMATICS
In 2017, Trinity College will introduce two
courses in the Mathematics Learning
Area for Year 10. Students will need to
choose between the two courses offered.
Course A: This course of study is
designed for students wishing to follow
pathways in Unit 1 and 2 General Maths,
VCAL Numeracy studies, VET courses,
Pre Apprenticeship or School based
Apprenticeships. Subjects studied in this
course are: Linear algebra, Pythagoras
and Trigonometry, Statistics, Probability,
Financial
Mathematics,
Algebra,
Measurement and Geometry.
Course B: This course of study is designed
for students who enjoy the challenge of
Mathematics and require a more indepth study of Mathematics for their
possible career path and suited for those
wishing to undertake Maths Methods
or Specialist Maths. Subjects covered in
this course are: Number and Algebra,
Measurement and Geometry, Statistics
and Probability.
Trinity College Colac
Learning Area
SUBJECT
CODE
VCE Subject or
VET Certificate
(Optional)
Religious Education
The Arts: Performing Arts
The Arts: Visual Arts
English
Health & Physical Education
The Humanities
Languages
Science
Religious
Education
10RE61S
Scripture
(1 Unit across Semesters 1 and 2)
Drama
10PA61S
Advanced Performing Arts
10MU64S
Music Styles
10MU62S
Music Performance
10AR68S
An Individual Approach to Art
10AR69S
Student Artist, Clay & Canvas
Graphics
10VC62S
Observing, Drawing and Creating
English
10EN61S
Year 10 English (Semesters 1 and 2)
Literature
10EN63S
Introduction to Literature
English
10EN64S
Lights, Camera, Action!
10HP62S
Sport and Health for Everyone
(1 Unit across Semesters 1 and 2)
10HP63E
Peak Fitness
10HP64E
Youth Health and Human Development
10CC61S
People and Power
10EC61S
Action Economics
Geography
10GE61S
Scorched Earth
History
10HI61S
Modern History
10IN63S
Sem 1
Music
Art
Health and
Physical
Education
Civics and
Citizenship
Economics and
Business
Indonesian
Mathematics
10IN64S
10MA66S
Bahasa Indonesian Adv
1
MUST
CHOOSE
2
MUST
CHOOSE
1
MUST
CHOOSE
Bahasa Indonesian Adv
Sem 2
Year 10 Mathematics
(Course A)
Year 10 Mathematics
(Course B)
If choosing
Indonesian
must choose
both units
2
MUST
CHOOSE
A or B
2
Mathematical Reasoning
Biology
10SC61S
It’s all in Your Genes
Physics
10SC62S
Modern Physics
Chemistry
10SC63S
Chemical Connections
Agriculture
10SC64S
Paddock to Plate
Psychology
10SC65S
Psychology in Action
10FO61S
Food Glorious Food
10FO62S
Food for Life
10TX62S
Garments to Go
10WO61S
(Must study this unit before studying 10WO62S)
10WO62S
Advanced Wood (Sem 2)
10IT61S
Game Making
10IT62S
Multimedia
10IT63S
Media in Print
Textiles
Wood
Technologies: Digital
Technologies
Order of
preference
MUST
CHOOSE AT
LEAST ONE
10MA67S
Food
Technologies: Design and
Technology
Units
studied
in year
2 Units for the year
10MA65S
Mathematics
UNIT NAME
Digital
Technologies
Media
MUST
CHOOSE AT
LEAST ONE
A Unit of Furniture
TOTAL UNITS (must study 14 units but choose 16 in case some options are not available)
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 25
Year 10 Subjects
Religious
Education
THE ARTS: PERFORMING ARTS
Drama
Scripture
Code: 10RE61S
This course consists of four units.
1. Who is Jesus?
Students will investigate a synoptic gospel
in terms of its context, content, structure,
purpose, themes and audience. The
particular focus of this unit is the Synoptic
Gospel used for the current liturgical year.
Students will reflect on the impact of this
unique portrait of Jesus for Christians
today. A comparative approach with the
other Synoptic Gospels will be sometimes
used to understand the unique concerns of
the gospel under study.
2. Prophets and Saints
In this unit students investigate the life
stories of people who strive to live out the
message of Jesus. These people challenge,
inspire and motivate us in our own time.
The students will reflect on the lives of
these prophets and saints as examples of
Christian discipleship.
3. The Church Through Time
Students will investigate some major
events in Church history that have shaped
the Church in our society today. They will
examine the impact of the Reformation in
reshaping the structure of the Church and
explore the impact Australian society and
history has had in forming the Australian
Catholic Church.
4. Prayer and Meditation
Students will focus on the concept of prayer
as communication with God, expressing
our relationship with God, both individually
and communally. Such communication
and expression assists in making meaning
of life experiences. In investigating prayer,
students will consider a range of formal and
informal prayer forms.
Assessment Tasks
From the following:
• Research Assignments
• Project / Reports
•Tests
• Oral Presentations
• Multimedia presentations
• Journaling
• Creative responses
• Group productions
Page 26 Advanced Performing Arts
Code: 10PA61S
This is an advanced drama unit that will
prepare students for VCE Drama. The
course explores actor training, theatre
techniques, plays in theatre, playmaking
and building, playwriting, solo and group
devising and stage technology.
Recommended Prerequisites 09PA31S
and 09PA32S
Unit Requirements
• Keeping a notebook/journal.
• Satisfactory participation in rehearsal
and performance.
• Willingness to try a variety of tasks –
performing, direction, design, sets etc.
• Research activities.
Assessment Tasks
• Theatre Review
• Research Assignment
• Group Performance
• Solo Performance
Music
Music Styles
Music Performance
Code: 10MU64S
Code: 10MU62S
This unit follows on from Year 9 Music &
Culture and further develops understanding
of a wide variety of music. Students will
work individually to prepare a research
presentation on a particular music/culture
focus area. Students will also prepare a
composition folio and further their skills in
listening analysis.
This unit facilitates students’ ongoing
development as performers and musicians
and prepares them for the study of VCE
Music Performance. Following on from
Year 9 Performance Development, this
unit will incorporate four study streams:
performance, composition, listening and
aural/theory skills. Students will work
independently to prepare a 15-minute
recital at the end of semester and will
participate in group performance.
Regular in-class performances will act as
preparation for the recital.
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
• Contribution to class discussions
Assessment Tasks
• Research Presentation
• Composition Folio
• Listening FolioTasks
Recommended Prerequisite: Successful
Completion of Year 9 Performance
Development.
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
• Contribution to class discussions
• Practice plans and reflections
• Participation in solo and group
performances
Assessment Tasks
• Performance Recital (including solo and
group performance)
• Composition Folio Tasks
• Music Analysis Assignment
• Theory and Aural Progress Tests
Trinity College Colac
THE ARTS: VISUAL ARTS
Art
Graphics
An Individual Approach to Art
Code: 10AR68S
In this unit students will explore two and
three dimensional art forms with a view
to experimenting and designing through
their own personal interests. Students
will analyse, interpret, and discuss works
of art as well as present a comprehensive
sketch book with developmental ideas and
research of artists and cultures. Students
will develop advanced skills in drawing,
painting and sculptural techniques, which
will culminate in completed pieces of
sculpture, canvas and prints through an
understanding of elements and principles
of design. An excursion to the Geelong
Gallery benefits student understanding of
the visual arts in society.
Use of annotation to express thought
processes, design development and
aesthetic awareness.
A brief introduction to the analytical
frameworks will be introduced.
A variety of materials will be used, pencils,
conte, charcoal, paint, ink, collage and clay.
This unit is generally a prerequisite to VCE
Art.
Recommended Prerequisites
09AR31S or consultation with Arts Learning
Area.
Unit Requirements
• Sketchbook - Comprehensive collection
of designs and developmental work.
• Research - Set assignments on works
being studied in practical areas
including; drawing, painting, ceramics
and printing.
• Folio - All folio pieces.
Assessment Tasks
• Sketchbook - Comprehensive collection
of designs and developmental work.
• Research - Set Assignments on topics
studied in practical areas.
• Folio - All folio pieces.
The Student Artist, Clay & Canvas
Code: 10AR69S
This unit allows students to extend their
skills in painting media particularly oils
and acrylics. Clay techniques include,
hand building, press moulds and primitive
kiln building. Research revolves around
contemporary artists and how they
organise their work, studio techniques and
cultures. An excursion to a Regional Gallery
benefits the students by extending their
awareness of gallery management and a
variety of work, contemporary and past.
A solid understanding of the elements and
principles of art and how inter media and
cross media ideas can be used to express
ideas across cultures.
A brief introduction to the analytical
frameworks will be introduced.
Use of annotation to express thought
processes, design development and
aesthetic awareness.
This unit is a skills advanced unit from
10AR68S.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Recommended Prerequisites 09AR31S
Unit Requirements
• Sketchbook - Comprehensive collection
of designs and developmental work.
• Research - Set assignments on works
being studied in practical areas
including; drawing, painting, ceramics
and printing.
• Folio - All folio pieces.
Assessment Tasks
• Sketchbook - Comprehensive collection
of designs and developmental work.
• Research - Set Assignments on topics
studied in practical areas.
• Folio - All individual folio pieces
Observing, Drawing and
Creating
Code: 10VC62S
This unit will further develop students’ skills
in refining ideas for solutions to set Design
Briefs. They will develop an understanding
of the client and designer relationship
through a range of projects such as
packaging design, company logos, symbols,
analysis of existing Visual Communication
and then develop skills in the use of
a variety of media including markers,
airbrush, computer aided graphics, etc.
Recommended Prerequisites
09VC31S or an approval by Graphics
Teacher.
Unit Requirements
• Folio. All work to be done on A3 paper
and presented in an A3 Display folder.
• Research for assignments and ideas.
• Participation in class discussion
• Drawing to communicate ideas to a
given audience.
Assessment Tasks
Folio of work taking into account
• presentation
•neatness
•accuracy
• creativity
• ability to communicate clearly
Page 27
ENGLISH
English - Year 10
Code: 10EN61S
Students will study the three strands of
Language: focus on knowledge of language
and how it works.
Literature: understanding, appreciating,
responding to, analysing and creating
literature.
Literacy: focus on interpreting and creating
a range of types of texts with accuracy,
fluency and purpose.
Students will analyse and evaluate how
people, cultures, places, events, objects
and concepts are represented in texts
(including media texts) through language
and visual choices.
Students will explore different perspectives
through the study of a set class novel
demonstrating the challenging and
complex themes to evaluate the social,
moral and ethical positions represented.
There will be a close focus on text structure,
characterization and devices used to shape
and interpret texts. Students will interpret
and compare texts.
They will be expected to write expressively
in a range of forms and use effective
language to persuade, entertain and
reflect on issues of importance. Creativity
will be developed through imaginative
prose, personal writing and soliloquy tasks.
Students will evaluate how ‘voice’ is used
as a literary device and create their own
texts focusing on this.
Persuasive language of the media will
be a focus throughout the year, using
newspapers as stimulus for analysis and
presentation of issues. Students will be
expected to plan, rehearse and deliver an
oral presentation using appropriate content
and elements to influence their audience.
Assessment Tasks
• Writing Folio
• Text Responses
•Oral
• Exam
Page 28 Introduction to
Literature
Code: 10EN63S
This is an additional English unit. Students
choosing this unit will still need to
complete the core English unit.
The unit focuses on literary texts and the
reading practices students develop to
deepen their understanding of such texts. Students may study poetry, prose and/
or non-print texts and respond to these
personally, critically and creatively. The
course emphasises students’ engagement
with language and their understanding of
the conventions associated with different
texts. Students will also consider how
culture can influence their interpretations
and may also make comparisons between
texts.
Those students electing this unit will be
likely to pursue Literature studies in VCE.
Assessment Tasks
• Writing Folio
• Text Responses: novels, film, plays,
poetry
• Exam
Lights, Camera, Action!
Code: 10EN64S
This is an additional English unit. Students
choosing this unit will still need to
complete the core English unit.
This is a one semester extension unit for
students of English. The course also acts
as an introduction to VCE Media with
additional strong Drama links. The aim
of the unit is to develop analytical skills
in the area of film. The unit will focus on
understanding narrative, using visual
and sound elements. Students will view
a range of visual texts which may include
films and plays and which concentrate on
how the filmmaker/director has created
the film style, using cinematography, miseen-scène, editing and sound. Students will
be involved in close analysis of scenes to
identify the key elements and explain how
they work together to create an overall
impact on the audience to tell a compelling
story.
Assessment Tasks
• Writing Folio
• Text Responses: Film and plays
• Exam
Trinity College Colac
Health and Physical Education
Sport and Health for Everyone
Code: 10HP62S
Health and Physical Education at Year
10 will provide an opportunity for all
students to experience physical activity
in a range of sports and environments for
the whole year. The aim of this unit is to
encourage participation and enjoyment
in a range of activities and to promote
the health and wellbeing of all students.
An important aspect of this unit is the
opportunity for all students to participate
in an outdoor camp. In semester one
students will take part in activities such
as abseiling, rockclimbing, surfing and
team building initiative activities.
Students will also be trained in first aid
procedures to prepare for the camp,
including the DRSABCD principle. During
second semester students will explore the
many health benefits of physical activity,
especially in regard to mental health
and wellbeing. Year 10 students will
perform alternative cultural sports aimed
at developing life long participation in
physical activity.
These sports/games will be covered at this
year level:
• Outdoor Camp
•Dancing
•Speedaway
•Netball
•Badminton
•Football
• Athletics
• Cross Country
• Ultimate
• Table Tennis
•Pateka
•Tennis
• Gaelic Football
•Basketball
•Golf
• Cultural games/sports
• ‘Lifelong’ sports and activities
Assessment Tasks
• Research Assignments
• Practical skill, effort, participation and
sportsmanship
• Camp preparation, organisation and
participation
Peak Fitness
Code: 10HP63E (Extension Unit)
This elective is offered to students who are
wishing to study Physical Education at VCE
level. It is highly recommended as it gives
a basic foundation of knowledge and skills
that are required for VCE studies in this
area.
A large component of this elective unit will
consist of theory, with one double session
participating in practical activities. Students
will gain an understanding of health related
and skill related components of fitness
and will implement this knowledge in the
completion of a mini triathlon. Students
will gain knowledge in the areas of anatomy
and body systems, fitness components,
fitness programmes, training principles and
methods.
Assessment Tasks
• Research Assignments
• Minor Sports Assignments
• Practical skill, effort, participation and
sportsmanship
•Test
Youth Health and
Human Development
Code: 10HP64E (Extension Unit)
This elective is offered to prepare students
who are considering studying VCE level
Health and Human Development. It will
provide a VCE level introduction to physical,
social and mental health as well as to
physical, social, emotional and intellectual
development.
Students will consider
risk and protective factors for youth
mental health and review strategies and
organisations dedicated to mental health
promotion.
Comparisons will be made between the
health of youth globally and the rationale
for the establishment of national health
priority areas will be explored. Study
may also include the various nutritional
requirements for the health of youth.
Assessment Tasks
• Topic Tests
• Research / Case Study
• Exam
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 29
the Humanities
Civics and Citizenship
People and Power
Code: 10CC61S
People and Power introduces students to
the studies of Politics and Legal Studies.
Students analyse the political system of
Australia, working through the structure
of Government and how decisions are
made – and how decisions are stalled.
Student study party politics, elections, and
where power and decision lie in Australia.
Students also investigate the legal system
of Australia, focussing on Criminal and Civil
law and the concept of ‘the rule of law’ in
contemporary Australia.
Unit Requirements
• Bookwork presentation
• Research Skills
• Problem Solving
• Oral Presentation
• Communication Skills
• Creativity
• Analysis and Critical Thinking
Assessment Tasks
• Tests
• Research Projects
• Role Plays
Economics and Business
Action Economics
Code: 10EC61S
Action Economics provides students with an
introduction to the business environment
in Australia. Students are introduced to the
macro and micro economic environment,
managing a small business, and accounting
and record keeping. Students discover
the challenges that face the Australian
economy and how to navigate running
a small business in this environment,
including how to manage cash resources,
maximize profitability and comply with
financial reporting requirements.
Unit Requirements
• Bookwork Presentation
• Innovation and Initiative
• Research Skills
• Problem Solving
• Communication Skills
• Analysis and Critical Thinking
• Practicality and Pragmatism
Assessment Tasks
• Tests
• Advertisement Productions
• Research Tasks
Geography
Scorched Earth
Code: 10GE61S
This unit provides students with an
introduction to environmental change
and management and human wellbeing
and liveability. Students focus on differing
world views on climate change, Land
Management, Marine Environments, Water
and Urban Development. The second
element of studies focuses on Wellbeing
indicators, how these indicators change,
spatial dispersion and the impact of global
conflicts. Students work both individually
and collaboratively to obtain key knowledge
and skills which are applied to case studies
and practical situations.
Page 30 Unit Requirements
• Bookwork Presentation
• Research Skills
• Problem Solving
• Communication Skills
• Creativity
• Analysis and Critical Thinking
Assessment Tasks
• Group Presentation
• Analysis Task
• Essay
• Report
• Research Projects
History
Modern History
Code: 10HI61S
Modern History takes students on a
journey from the devastating end of the
First World War, through the turbulent
1920s, the fragile world of the 1930s to the
catastrophe of the Second World War, with
a particular focus on the key battlefields
in Europe, Russia and the Pacific. They
will also study in depth the rise of antiSemitism in Nazi Germany and its terrible
conclusion- the Holocaust. Following this,
they will examine the post-war world, with
a focus on how human rights and freedoms
have been ignored, demanded or achieved
in Australia, the United States of America
and beyond.
Unit Requirements
• Research Skills
• Analysis Skills
• Writing Skills
Assessment Tasks
• Document Analysis
• Depth Study Test
• Essay
• Examination
Trinity College Colac
Languages - INDONESIAN
PLEASE NOTE
Bahasa Indonesia 10IN63S and
10IN64S are sequential units to be
studied year long in Year 10.
Bahasa Indonesian Advanced - Semester 1
Code: 10IN63S
In this unit students will increase their
confidence in using the Indonesian
language by covering information such
as student exchange programmes, and
through exploring the contrasting lifestyle
between the city and the village. Students
will also develop an understanding of using
etiquette and learn about time markers,
such as the appropriate use of ‘when’.
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
•Role-play
•Projects
•Homework
Assessment Tasks
•Tests
•Role-play
•Projects
•Homework
Bahasa Indonesian Advanced - Semester 2
Code: 10IN64S
In this unit students will increase their
confidence in using the Indonesian
language by studying areas such as health
and history. Students will be introduced
to grammar points such as supaya and
sehingga and me-kan verbs (causative) and
ke-an nouns (abstract). Grammar points
learnt in Semester 1, such as object focus,
will be revised this Semester.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
•Role-play
•Projects
•Homework
Assessment Tasks
•Tests
•Role-play
•Projects
•Homework
Page 31
Mathematics
Year 10 Students elect either Course A or Course B for the year.
Year 10 Mathematics
Year 10 Mathematics
Course A
Course B
Code: 10MA65S
Course A: this course of study is designed for students wishing to follow pathways in
Unit 1 and 2 General Maths, VCAL Numeracy, VET courses, Pre Apprenticeship or School
Based Apprenticeships and Traineeships.
Semester 1
This unit provides flexible preparation for further mathematical studies or work. The focus
of activities in this course is on expanding student’s understanding, fluency, problem
solving and reasoning skills. Each Semester topics will be drawn from three areas of study:
Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry and Statistics and Probability.
Linear algebra: Students will solve and graph equations and in-equations. Manipulate and
substitute into formulas, finding unknown values and finding the solution to simultaneous
equations, with and without digital technology.
Review Pythagoras and use Trigonometry to solve problems involving right angled angled
triangles. Including problems on bearings and angles of elevation and depression.
Statistics: Students compare univariate data sets by referring to summary statistics and the
shape of their displays.
In Probability students will construct and interpret two-way tables, probability trees and
Venn diagrams in the determination of probabilities.
Semester 2
This unit continues to provide flexible preparation for further mathematical studies
or work. The focus of activities in this course is on expanding student’s understanding,
fluency, problem solving and reasoning skills. Topics will be drawn from three areas of
study: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry and Statistics and Probability.
Financial Mathematics: Students will continue to apply recursive applications to compare
simple and compound interest calculations and investigate depreciation using CAS Graphics
Calculator technology. They will investigate and compare borrowing and investing money
and various forms of credit that are available to consumers.
Algebra: Students will expand and factorise simple algebraic expressions and use CAS
Graphics calculator technology to examine graphs of quadratic functions
Measurement and Geometry: Students will investigate the perimeter, area, surface area
and volume of a variety of shapes. They will convert metric units of measurement and
apply their knowledge to building and engineering applications. They will apply geometrical
reasoning to identify information in triangular shapes.
Statistics: Students will describe bivariate data, create scatterplots and identify the
explanatory and response variables using CSA Graphics calculator technology. They will
investigate how bivariate statistics can be used to create models used in research and
business. Students will also look at the use of statistics in the media. To be able to fulfil the digital technology sections of this course students will need to
have a CAS Graphics Calculator.
Assessment Tasks
• Topic tests
•Homework
• Tasks chosen from:
- Assignment
- Investigation
- Analysis task
- Application task
• Unit Exam
Page 32 Code: 10MA66S
Course B: This course of study is designed
for students who enjoy the challenge of
Mathematics and require a more in-depth
study of Mathematics for their possible
career path and suited for those wishing
to undertake Maths Methods or Specialist
Maths.
Semester 1 and 2
This unit provides flexible preparation for
further mathematical studies. Students
selecting this course of study need to have
a strong interest in Mathematics and/ or
need a higher level mathematics for their
career path. This course will provide good
background for Unit 1 and 2 of General
Specialist Maths and/ or Math Methods.
The focus of activities in this course is
on expanding student’s understanding,
fluency, problem solving and reasoning
skills. Each semester topics will be drawn
from three areas of study: Number and
Algebra, Measurement and Geometry and
Statistics and Probability.
Number and Algebra: Students continue
to make use of basic number operations
in applications to Consumer Mathematics,
calculating simple and compound interest.
In Algebra there is a focus on manipulative
algebraic skills, solving Simultaneous
equations. Quadratic equations and
their graphs are introduced; also Circular
Functions and Exponential expressions
feature in this unit.
Measurement and Geometry: The focus
in this topic is to solve problems involving
surface area and volume for a range of
prisms, cylinders and composite solids.
Statistics and Probability: Students
continue to focus on the analysis of
statistical information, constructing box
plots and making comparisons on centre,
spread and identification of outliers.
Students are also introduced to bi-variate
statistics representation and analysis.
To be able to fulfil the digital technology
sections of this course students will need
to have a CAS Graphics Calculator.
Assessment Tasks
• Topic tests
•Homework
• Tasks chosen from:
- Assignment
- Investigation
- Analysis task
- Application task
• Unit Exam
Trinity College Colac
Mathematics
Mathematical Reasoning
Science
It’s All in Your Genes
Chemical Connections
Code: 10MA67S
Code: 10SC61S
Code: 10SC63S
This is an additional Mathematics unit.
Students choosing this unit will still need
to complete the core Mathematics unit.
Students selecting this elective should
have a strong interest in further developing
their mathematical skills. The course is
intended to assist students to develop
confidence, independent thinking, problem
solving strategies communication and
reasoning skills. Reasoning is at the heart
of Mathematics, this course is not confined
to one particular branch of mathematics or
specific topics, rather it is about continuing
to develop the tool box of strategies,
drawing attention to the thinking and
explanation processes students use to solve
mathematical problems.
This course would provide relevant
mathematical foundations for students
wishing to enter any VCE Mathematics
course of study
Assessment would be based on student
engagement and participation in group
discussion and working collaboratively
with other students to develop and
communicate solutions.
To be able to fulfil the digital technology
sections of this course students will need
to have a CAS Graphics Calculator.
Assessment Tasks:
Folio of work including:
• Group work
• Individual research projects
• Investigations
• Homework
This unit will provide students with a solid
foundation in the area of Biology.
The focus of this unit will be on
comprehensively studying DNA structure
and function, predicting the outcomes
of crosses involving different types of
inheritance (dominant/recessive – partial
dominance – sex-linked), using pedigrees
to analyse why certain traits run in families,
studying the different types of microbes
and their impact on human health and
industry, the components of the immune
system and their function and evidence for
evolution.
Assessment Tasks
• Research Projects
•Assignments
•Tests
• Exam
This unit will provide students with a
solid foundation in the area of Chemistry. The focus will be on Atomic Theory,
Periodic Table, Metals and Non-Metals,
Bonding, Chemical Formula and Reactions,
Hydrocarbons, Acids and Bases and
Nanotechnology.
Assessment Tasks
• Research Projects
•Assignments
•Tests
• Exam
Modern Physics
Code: 10SC62S
This unit explores the following: evolving
theories of the origin of the universe and
the scientists involved in these discoveries,
measuring current, voltage and resistance
in circuits and examining the links between
electricity and electronics. Students will
also examine the motion of objects as they
relate to the laws of physics.
Assessment Tasks
• Research Projects
•Assignments
•Tests
• Exam
Paddock to Plate
Code: 10SC64S
This unit will provide students with an
introduction to Agricultural Science
and a background for further studies in
Agriculture and Horticulture. Students
will study the structure and function of
plants and animals, in a practical handson environment. They will be responsible
for the care and welfare of their own
animals and plants. Students will focus
on the economic importance of different
agricultural and horticultural industries
within Australia, understanding how raw
materials are utilised to add value to
the product. This understanding will be
supported by students preparing different
food dishes based on what they have learnt
within the classroom.
Assessment Tasks
• Practical Task: Vegetable Garden/
Animal care/Cooking lessons
• Research Task: Dairy industry - value
adding
• Presentation: Worm farming
• Opinion piece: Insects as an alternative
source of protein
Psychology in Action
Code: 10SC65S
This unit offers an introduction to some of
the different fields of Psychology in order
to gain a clearer knowledge of the types of
Psychology we encounter on a day to day
basis. Students will be introduced to the
work of Clinical, Developmental, Forensic
and Sports psychologists, and investigate
some of the aspects of human nature
which these psychologists assess, treat and
support through their work. Topics covered
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
include research methods, childhood and
adolescent development, mental health
the workings of the criminal mind and the
pursuit of peak performance in sport.
Assessment Tasks
• Classroom based activities
• Written Tasks
• Tests and Exam
Page 33
TECHNOLOGIES: DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY
These Year 10 Technologies Units
are designed to prepare students
Textiles
for VCE studies.
It is strongly recommended they
are chosen by students planning
to complete a VCE subject in
Food, Textiles or Wood.
Food
Food Glorious Food
Code: 10FO61S
Students choosing this unit will examine the
role of Food Technology in the preparation,
production and presentation of a variety
of foods. Topics include Yeast, Gelatine,
Pasta, Patisserie, Food Preservation, Egg
Cookery and designing meals.
Students will use the Design Process to
design, create and evaluate problems.
Recommended Prerequisites
09FO31S or 09FO32S.
Unit Requirements
• Maintaining a workbook of Design Briefs
• Variety of Food Productions
• Research projects
• Evaluation reports on productions
Assessment Tasks
• Workbook will be assessed
• Research projects
• Test upon completion of UNIT.
Food For Life
Code: 10FO62S
Students choosing this unit will examine
commercial cookery and sustainability.
Topics include: catering for a crowd, food
miles, local produce, organic farming and
introduction to the food service industry.
Recommended Prerequisites
09FO31S or 09FO32S.
Unit Requirements
• Maintain a workbook
• Variety of Productions
• Field Trip
Assessment Tasks
•Workbook
• Research project
•Test
Page 34 Garments To Go
Code: 10TX62S
Students choosing this unit will produce
clothing worn in everyday situations. The
use of the sewing machine is vital and
students will get a chance to extend their
competence in the use of the overlocker.
Selected fabrics will be used to make
garments such as satin pyjamas, a designer
vest and may-be part of an outfit for the
school social. Students will be taught how
to follow commercial patterns, and how
to select these following current fashion
trends. Millinery and Fashion form the basis
for some research investigations. Personal
grooming linked to what to wear will help
students understand “Body Image”. Recommended Prerequisites 09TX31S
Unit Requirements
• Workbook to include Design Briefs
• Production of Garments
• Evaluation of Garment productions
• Research Investigation
• Grooming presentation for Job
Interview
Assessment Tasks
•Bookwork will be assessed
• Completed garments
• Research investigation - “A Study of
Fashions/Fabrics”
Wood
A Unit of Furniture
Code: 10WO61S
Students will analyse and develop ideas
on manufactured materials and processes,
while taking into account the commercial
and environmental requirements. The
students will prepare detailed design
proposals using the appropriate technical
language with the help of computer aided
software. Students will construct three
products of furniture using a selection of
joins, techniques and equipment safely
and responsibly. Students will critically
analyse and evaluate their own products. A
logbook will be kept on a weekly basis.
Recommended Prerequisites
09WO31S
Unit Requirements
• Design Plans - completion of research
data and assignments
• Practical Work - demonstrating an
efficient use of tools and equipment to
display a quality finish.
Assessment Tasks
• Design Plans - quality plans using
perspective, front and side elevation
with a sufficient backup of sketches. Cutting and costing lists.
• Practical Work - Product construction
(design, construction and finish)
Advanced Wood - Semester 2
Code: 10WO62S
The course will be run over two semesters
taking in all the theory of 10WO61S in the
first semester. The students will analyse
and develop ideas on manufactured
materials and processes, while taking into
account the commercial and environmental
requirements. The students will prepare
detailed design proposals using the
appropriate technical language. Students
will complete one or two projects over
the semesters on furniture or building
construction using a selection of joining
techniques and equipment offered in the
previous units.
Prerequisites: 10WO61S.
Unit Requirements
• Completion of Research Data &
Assignments
• Design Plans – Completion of Plans &
Logbook
• Practical Work
Assessment Tasks
•
•
•
•
•
Assignment – Particle Board/Excursion
Assignment – Veneering & Laminating
Design Plans
Projects – Free Project Completion 1
Projects – Free Project Completion 2
Trinity College Colac
TECHNOLOGIES: DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES
Digital
Media
Technologies
Multimedia
Game Making
Code: 10IT61S
This unit is offered as an acceleration unit
to prepare students primarily for VCE
Software Development and for some skills
necessary in VET Interactive Digital Media
and IT applications. Students will explore;
• Game design using Game Maker, Flash
Action Scripting and Microsoft Visual
Basic Net
• Web design using HTML/Java Script and
Adobe Dreamweaver software
• The capabalities and limitations of
software applications
• The uses and components of computers
and other information systems
Recommended Prerequisites
There are no recommened pre-requisites
for this subject although students should
have a basic understanding of computers.
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
• Folio – Practical Tasks
Assessment Tasks
•Assignments
•Projects
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Code: 10IT62S
This unit aims to develop students
understanding of the components of
multimedia. This Unit may lead as a
pathway to VET Interactive Digital Media or VCE Media. Students will aim to:
• Develop an understanding of the
multimedia industry.
•Develop an awareness of the
occupational health, safety and security
procedures relevant to this industry.
• Apply processes of investigating
planning, producing and evaluating.
• Create, manipulate 2D graphics using
Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and
InDesign.
• Create and manipulate sound / music
using Sony Acid Pro.
• Incorporate text, graphics, audio
and animation presentations into
multimedia presentations.
• Use Sony Vegas Movie Studio to design
and produce digital production.
Recommended Prerequisites 09IT31S
Work Requirements:
• Folio – Practical Tasks
•Workbook
• ePortfolio
Assessment Tasks
•Assignments
•Projects
• Digital Products
Media in Print
Code: 10IT63S
In this unit, students will be working as a
team to develop skills needed to create a
professionally printed magazine. Learning
the art of basic photography, layout and
typography, students will collate and
design the Trinity College Yearbook. This
unit is ideal in preparation for VCE subjects
including Media, Visual Communication
and Design as well as English. Students will
learn:
•Photography
• The Design Process
• Image Editing in Adobe Photoshop
• Layout Design in Adobe InDesign
•Typography
• Print Media Skills & Specifications
• Working with a Professional Printshop
• Advertising
Recommended Prerequisites
There are no recommeneded prerequisites
for this subject although students should
have a basic understanding of computers.
Unit Requirements
•Workbook
• Folio – Practical Tasks
Assessment Tasks
•Assignments
• Research Projects
• Work on Magazine
Page 35
overview of year 11 & 12 curriculum
Year 11 and 12 students have the option
of completing either the Victorian
Certificate of Education (VCE) or the
Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning
(VCAL).
The Victorian Certificate of
Education (VCE)
Overview
The VCE (Victorian Certificate of
Education) is divided into four units for
each subject, numbered subsequently
as a student moves towards completing
their VCE. Each unit runs for one
semester, with Units 1 and 2 generally
studied at Year 11 and with Units 3
and 4 studied at Year 12. Students can
undertake their VCE over as many years
as they wish: they may stop and return
as an adult student and they may still
meet the VCE requirements. Because
of this, VCE Unit 1 is especially a time of
exploration of possible future directions.
Students will be able to change subjects
during the Unit 1 and 2 sequences
according to their ability and interest.
However, Unit 3 and 4 sequences must
cover one year for that subject.
In addition to the VCE, there are other
options that can be studied at the senior
level:
• VCAL (Victorian Certificate of
Applied Learning) is a hands-on
option for students in Years 11
and 12. Students who choose
to do VCAL are more likely to be
interested in going to TAFE, in
completing an apprenticeship or
in getting a job after completing
school.
•
•
VET
(Vocational
Education
and Training) along with ASBA
(Australian
School
Based
Apprenticeships) can be completed
within
the
standard
VCE
programme or VCAL programme.
A VET subject means that students
will be undertaking training
in a specific industry, such as
hospitality, information technology,
sport and agriculture. School Based
Apprenticeship and Traineeships
means that students are able to
be employed and trained under
specific
arrangements.
(See
http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/vet/
programs/newapprent.html
Extension
studies
include
university subjects taken with the
Page 36 VCE, mostly by students who are
high achievers and can cope with
a more demanding workload.
Students apply directly to the
university that offers the study of
their choice and should seek the
advice of the Director of Learning
before beginning an extension
study.
Subjects
Religious Education is compulsory for
all students at Trinity College and senior
students will study VCE Religion and
Society over the course of the year. As
part of their learning programme at
Trinity College, Year 11 students will
study ‘Religion in Society’ (Unit 1) and
Year 12 students will study ‘Ethics and
Morality’ (Unit 2). These units will be
studied in addition to students’ elected
programme of study. Students also have
the option of incorporating Religion and
Society (Units 3/4) into their programme
of study.
For successful completion of the VCE,
students must obtain a satisfactory pass
in three English units. English Units 1/2
and/or Literature 1/2 are compulsory for
Year 11 students. Year 12 students may
choose either or both of English Units
3/4 and Literature Units 3/4 as their
compulsory English sequence.
In order for students to have ownership
of their studies, as well as to provide
students with extra time to complete
the required allocated work in each
VCE unit, supervised study periods are
incorporated within the senior students’
study timetable.
It is important that students arm
themselves with as much knowledge as
possible about the various VCE courses
on offer at Trinity College. Further
information about the specific VCE/
VCAL units can be obtained on the VCAA
website.
an ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admission
Rank) and is used for entry into tertiary
education. VTAC (Victorian Tertiary
Admissions Centre) determines the rank
based on:
• English or Literature (Units 3 and
4);
• the next 3 highest scaled scored
subjects at Units 3 and 4, plus
• 10% of the next two highest scaled
scored subjects at Units 3 and 4
level
Further Study
Students are encouraged to be as fully
informed as possible regarding the
various alternatives on offer for further
study at universities and colleges. As this
information is constantly under review,
students should familiarise themselves
with websites such as those hosted by
the VCAA, VTAC and universities and
colleges.
Careers
It is the responsibility of each student to
arm themselves with as much information
as possible in order to make informed
decisions about their future. The Careers
Officer, Year Level Coordinators, subject
teachers and other Trinity College staff
are willing to be of assistance in guiding
students to pertinent information, but
the course of their future course is
ultimately the students’ choice.
There are many valuable resources to
assist students with career education.
Some are available from the careers
office. Online resources that are
recommended include:
www.myfuture.gov.au
www.tcc.vic.edu.au
www.vtac.edu.au
www.jobguide.thegoodguides.com.au
Assessment
All VCE units are assessed on outcomes
which are determined as ‘Satisfactory’
(S) or ‘Not Satisfactory’ (N). Trinity
College will provide graded results at
Units 1 and 2 as this will provide an
indication of the potential each student
has in a particular subject, therefore
assisting subject selection for Units 3
and 4.
Unit 3 and 4 subjects are externally and
internally assessed, thereby providing a
rank for every student in the state who
selects that subject. This rank is called
Trinity College Colac
Year 11 Curriculum
Year 11 students may choose to follow either a VCE or a VCAL pathway. Each unit comprises of 11 periods over the rostered timetable
per fortnight (except for RE which, together with formalised study periods, comprise the 11 periods). All students will study a Religious
Education unit as part of their core programme. The following pages in this section of the handbook contain subject descriptions of
all the possible VCE, VET and VCAL units that are available at Trinity College. These descriptions should assist students in making
informed decisions about their choice of study pathways.
VCE PATHWAY: for their CORE SUBJECTS,
students complete Religious Education
as well as English Units 1/2 or Literature
Units 1/2. For their ELECTIVE SUBJECTS,
students choose an additional FIVE VCE
subjects. When completing their online
subject selection process, students must
indicate SEVEN choices in PREFERENTIAL
ORDER (in the order that students would
prefer to study those units). Year 11
students also have the option of studying
one advanced VCE Unit 3/4 with the
permission of the Director of Learning.
Please note that there are restrictions in
certain subjects and that this possibility
cannot be guaranteed.
The table explains the various possibilities
for Year 11 students’ choice of a VCE
programme.
CORE UNITS
ONE ADVANCED VCE
ELECTIVE
VCE ELECTIVES UNITS 1/2
Year 11 students intending
to follow a VCE course must
choose a possible SEVEN
VCE subjects.
SUBJECT PREFERENCE
SUBJECT
UNITS
Religious Education
English
Preference 1
Preference 2
Preference 1
Preference 2
Preference 3
Preference 4
Preference 5
Preference 6
Preference 7
Religion and Society
English / Literature
Unit 1
Units 1/2
Units 3/4
Units 3/4
Units 1/2
Units 1/2
Units 1/2
Units 1/2
Units 1/2
Units 1/2
Units 1/2
“God doesn’t require us to succeed;
he only requires that you try.”
Mother Teresa
VCAL PATHWAY: Year 11 students will follow the Intermediate VCAL programme and should refer to the section in this handbook
that explains the VCAL options. CORE subjects for VCAL students include Religious Education, Literacy, Numeracy and Personal
Development Skills. Students have various options to complete their Work Related Skills and their Industry Related skills. As there
are many unit possibilities within a VCAL pathway, it is important the each student that wishes to pursue this option has an
interview with the VCAL Coordinator. This is in order to ascertain the best possible individualised learning programme for these
students.
Year 12 Curriculum
Year 12 students may choose to continue to follow either the VCE or a VCAL pathway that many would have started as Year 11
students. All students will study a Religious Education unit as part of their core programme.
VCE PATHWAY: for their CORE SUBJECTS,
students complete Religious Education
as well as a Unit 3/4 English sequence:
English Units 3/4 and/or Literature
Units 3/4. For their ELECTIVE SUBJECTS,
students choose an additional FOUR VCE
subjects. When completing their online
subject selection process, students must
indicate their choices in PREFERENTIAL
ORDER (in the order that students would
prefer to study those units).
The table explains the various possibilities
for Year 12 students’ choice of a VCE
programme.
CORE UNITS
VCE ELECTIVES
Year 12 students
following a VCE
course must
choose a possible
FOUR VCE
subjects.
SUBJECT PREFERENCE
Religious Education
English:
Students must complete a
sequence of English Units 3/4.
This may be either English
or Literature or may be both
subjects.
SUBJECT
Religion and Society
UNITS
Unit 2
English
Units 3/4
Literature
Units 3/4
Preference 1
Units 3/4
Preference 2
Units 3/4
Preference 3
Units 3/4
Preference 4
Units 3/4
VCAL PATHWAY: Year 12 students will follow the Senior VCAL programme and should refer to the section in this handbook
that explains the VCAL options. CORE subjects for VCAL students include Religious Education, Literacy, Numeracy and Personal
Development Skills. Students have various options to complete their Work Related Skills and their Industry Related skills. As there
are many unit possibilities within a VCAL pathway, it is important the each student that wishes to pursue this option has an
interview with the VCAL Coordinator. This is in order to ascertain the best possible individualised learning programme for these
students.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 37
“Our goals can only be
reached through a vehicle
of a plan, in which we must
fervently believe, and upon
which we must vigorously
act. There is no other route
to success.”
Pablo Picasso
“Start by doing what’s
necessary; then do what’s
possible; and suddenly you
are doing the impossible.”
Francis of Assisi
“Desire is the key to
motivation, but it’s
determination and
commitment to an
unrelenting pursuit of your
goal - a commitment to
excellence - that will enable
you to attain the success
you seek.”
Mario Andretti
Page 38 Trinity College Colac
VCE and vet
SUBJECTS
OFFERED
AT TRINITY
COLLEGE
COLAC
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Accounting
Art
Australian Politics
Biology
Business Management
Chemistry
Computing
Drama
English
Food Studies
Geography
Health and Human Development
History Indonesian
Legal Studies
Literature
Mathematics
- General Mathematics
- Mathematical Methods
- Further Mathematics
- Specialist Mathematics
Media
Music Performance
Physical Education
Physics
Product Design and Technology – Wood or Textiles
Psychology
Religion and Society
Studio Art
VET
- Agriculture
- Interactive Digital Media
- Sport and Recreation
Visual Communication Design
Page 39
Accounting
Accreditation Period 2013-2017
Rationale
Accounting is the process of
recording,
reporting,
analysing
and interpreting financial data and
accounting information which is
then communicated to internal and
external users of this information. It
plays an integral role in the successful
operation and management of
businesses.
VCE Accounting focuses on small
business. Unit 1 begins with a small
service business, allowing students
to develop knowledge and skills in
accounting without the complexities
of accounting for trading businesses
or large organisations. Units 2, 3 and 4
then focus on a single activity trading
business where students build on
and extend their accounting skills.
Many students who study VCE
Accounting will go on to further
studies and careers in business and
finance.
Unit 1: Establishing and operating a service business
This unit focuses on the establishment of a small business and the accounting and
financial management of the business. Students are introduced to the processes of
gathering and recording financial data and the reporting and analysing of accounting
information by internal and external users. The cash basis of recording and reporting is
used throughout this unit.
Using single entry recording of financial data and analysis of accounting information,
students examine the role of accounting in the decision-making process for a sole
proprietor of a service business.
Unit 2: Accounting for a trading business
This unit extends the accounting process from a service business and focuses on
accounting for a sole proprietor of a single activity trading business. Students use a
single entry recording system for cash and credit transactions and the accrual method
for determining profit. They analyse and evaluate the performance of the business
using financial and non-financial information. Using these evaluations, students suggest
strategies to the owner on how to improve the performance of the business.
Students develop their understanding of the importance of ICT in the accounting process
by using a commercial accounting software package to establish a set of accounts,
record financial transactions and generate accounting reports.
Unit 3: Recording and reporting for a trading business
This unit focuses on financial accounting for a single activity trading business as
operated by a sole trader and emphasises the role of accounting as an information
system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare
reports using the accrual basis of accounting. The perpetual method of stock recording
with the First In, First Out (FIFO) method is used.
Unit 4: Control and analysis of business performance
This unit provides an extension of the recording and reporting processes from Unit 3
and the use of financial and non-financial information in assisting management in the
decision-making process. The unit is based on the double entry accounting system and
the accrual method of reporting for a single activity trading business using the perpetual
inventory recording system.
Students investigate the role and importance of budgeting for the business and
undertake the practical completion of budgets for cash, profit and financial position.
Students interpret accounting information from accounting reports and graphical
representations, and analyse the results to suggest strategies to the owner on how to
improve the performance of the business.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
Entry
School-assessed coursework and examination:
• Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework: 25 percent
• Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework: 25 percent
• End of year examination: 50 percent.
There are no prerequisites for Units 1, 2
and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3
prior to Unit 4.
It is strongly recommended that
students undertake Unit 1 & 2 prior
to studying Units 3 & 4. Students who
enter the study at Unit 3 may need to
undertake preparatory work related to
Unit 2.
Page 40 Trinity College Colac
Art
Accreditation Period 2017-2021
Rationale
VCE Art introduces the role of art, in
all forms of media, in contemporary
and historical cultures and societies.
Students build an understanding of
how artists, through their practice
and the artworks they produce,
communicate
their
experiences,
ideas, values, beliefs and viewpoints.
In this study, students view artworks
and investigate the working practices
of artists from different cultures and
periods of time.
Students develop skills in research,
analysis, art history and criticism to
interpret and debate the ideas and
issues that are raised in artworks.
Through exploration students develop
skills in creative, critical, reflective
and analytical thinking to explore,
develop and refine visual artworks to
develop an awareness of appropriate
health and safety practices.
VCE Art also offers students
opportunities
for
personal
development and encourages them to
make an ongoing contribution to the
culture of their community through
participation in lifelong art making.
Unit 1: Artworks, experience and meaning
Students focus on artworks as objects and examine how art elements, art principles,
materials and techniques and artistic processes communicate meaning. They examine
artists in different societies and cultures, and historical periods, and develop their
own viewpoints about the meanings and messages of artworks. Students explore the
practices of artists who have been inspired by ideas relating to personal and cultural
identity.
Students apply the Structural Framework and the Personal Framework to interpret the
meanings and messages of artworks and to document the reflection of their own ideas
and art making. In their practical work, students explore areas of personal interest and
the characteristics of materials, techniques and the art process through their visual diary.
Unit 2: Artworks and contemporary culture
Students use the Cultural Framework and the Contemporary Framework to examine
the different ways that artists interpret and present social and personal issues in their
artistic practice. They continue to use the art process and visual language to explore
and experiment with materials and techniques and to develop personal and creative
responses. They explore the way cultural contexts and contemporary ideas and
approaches to art have influenced their artwork.
Students research contemporary artworks, public art, community and collaborative
artworks for festivals, newspaper cartoons, art prizes, curated exhibitions, performance
art, environmental art and street art.
Unit 3: Artworks, ideas and values
In this unit students study selected artists who have produced works before 1990 and
since 1990. Students use Analytical Frameworks for analysing and interpreting the
meaning of artworks.
Students link their growing theoretical understanding of art in Area of Study 1 to their own
practice in Area of Study 2. Students apply imagination and creativity to develop their
ideas through the art process and visual language and a variety of materials, techniques
and processes. Students develop confidence in using the language and content of
the Analytical Frameworks in their reflection of the structural, personal, cultural and
contemporary aspects of their own developing artworks. Complete one outcome.
Unit 4: Artworks, ideas and viewpoints
Students study artworks and develop and expand upon personal points of view. They
build their learning and conceptual understanding around the discussion of broad
themes, ideas and issues related to the role of art in society and consider how ideas
and issues are communicated through artworks. They discuss how art may affect and
change the way people think. Sources should be reliable, recognised and relevant.
Students choose an art idea and issue to explore. Students select the artwork/s of at
least one artist not previously studied in Unit 3, and use this artwork/s and selected
related commentaries and viewpoints to discuss the chosen art idea and related issues.
For foliowork students continue to build upon the ideas and concepts begun in Unit 3 and
further develop their artistic practice. They focus on the development of a body of work
using the art process that demonstrates creativity and imagination, the evolution and
resolution of ideas and the realisation of appropriate concepts. Finally, students present
a body of work and at least one finished artwork accompanied by documentation of
artistic practice with suitable reflection.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Entry
Although there are no prerequisites for
Unit 1, 2 & 3 it is strongly recommended
that students complete 10AR68S or
10AR69S prior to enrolling for Units 1
& 2. It is also strongly encouraged that
students satisfactorily complete Units
1 & 2 prior to enrolling in Unit 3 & 4.
Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to
undertaking Unit 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Unit 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Unit 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework, school-assessed task, and an end of year examination:
• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 10 percent
• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 10 percent
• Units 3 and 4 school-assessed task: 50 percent
• End of year examination: 30 percent.
Page 41
Australian Politics
Accreditation Period Australian Politics 2012-2017
Rationale
VCE Politics offers students the
opportunity to engage with key
political,
social
and
economic
issues, and to become informed
citizens, voters and participants in
their local, national and international
communities.
Australian
Politics
increases
awareness of the nature of power
and its influence. It allows students
to become informed observers of,
and active participants in, their
political system. As students begin
to think critically, they recognise that
democratic ideals are often difficult to
achieve in practice.
Politics provides knowledge and
skills that prepare students for
formal study at the tertiary level
or in vocational education and
training settings. It also leads to
opportunities in a range of careers,
including academia, management,
and government. Students may also
pursue occupations in corporate and
private enterprises in fields such as
journalism, law, research and politics.
Unit 1: The national citizen
Students are introduced to politics; the exercise of power by individuals, groups and
nation-states. Students consider concepts related to power and influence, types of
power, political ideology and values, political involvement and active citizenship. The
ideas behind democracy are studied, as well as contemporary Australian democracy.
Students examine why people seek political power, the characteristics of successful
politicians, and the ideas that motivate them. They examine how political power is used
and challenged and resisted by others. Students also examine the role and influence of
social and political movements.
VCE Australian Politics focuses on twenty-first century and current events, but historical
events, examples and illustrations help students to understand the Australian political
system.
Unit 2: The global citizen
Students examine their place within the modern international community through
considering the debate over the ‘global citizen’. First, they explore the ways their lives
have been affected by increased interconnectedness of the world through globalisation.
Next, students consider how the notion of an international community exists, and
investigate its ability to manage global cooperation and respond to global conflict and
instability.
This unit is concerned with twenty-first century issues and events, but students need to
understand how history has placed us in our current global situations.
Unit 3: Evaluating Australian democracy
This unit provides an overview of the operation of Australian democracy. Area of Study 1
focuses on democratic theory and practice. It compares the practice of Australian politics
and government with democratic ideals. Having evaluated the democratic merits of the
Australian political system, in Area of Study 2 students compare the Australian political
system with one other contemporary democratic nation. Students analyse key aspects
of the United States political system, including the electoral process, the operation of
the legislative branch and the protection of rights and freedoms. They then consider
an aspect of the selected political system that Australia might adopt to strengthen its
democracy.
Unit 4: Australian public policy
This unit focuses on Australian federal public policy formulation and implementation.
During the formulation stage of many public policies, the government is subject to
pressures from competing stakeholders and interests. As the government responds
to these influences and pressures, policy proposals are often subject to change and
compromise. Students investigate the complexities the government faces in putting
public policy into operation.
Area of Study 1 examines domestic policy, that which is largely concerned with Australian
society and affecting people living in Australia. Students investigate a contemporary
Australian domestic policy issue and consider the policy response of the Australian
government to that issue. In Area of Study 2, students consider contemporary Australian
foreign policy. As it deals with Australia’s broad national interests, foreign policy may be
less subject to the pressures and interests of competing stakeholders.
VCE Australian Politics is contemporary in focus. The the focus of this study is the
twenty-first century, however, historical events, examples and illustrations may provide
students with contextual understanding.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry to
Unit 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake
Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.
Page 42 Levels of Achievement
Unit 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Unit 3 and 4
School assessed coursework and an end of year exam
•
Unit 3 school-assessed course work: 25 percent
•
Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
•
End of year examination: 50 percent.
Trinity College Colac
Biology
Accreditation Period 2016–2021
Rationale
VCE Biology enables students to
investigate the processes involved
in sustaining life at cellular, system,
species and ecosystem levels. In
undertaking this study, students
examine how life has evolved over
time and understand that in the
dynamic and interconnected system
of life all change has a consequence
that may affect an individual, a
species or the collective biodiversity
of Earth. The study gives students
insights into how knowledge of
molecular and evolutionary concepts
underpin much of contemporary
biology, and the applications used by
society to resolve problems and make
advancements.
In VCE Biology students develop
a range of inquiry skills involving
practical
experimentation
and
research, analytical skills including
critical and creative thinking, and
communication
skills.
Students
use scientific and cognitive skills
and
understanding
to
analyse
contemporary biology-related issues,
and communicate their views from an
informed position.
VCE Biology provides for continuing
study pathways within the discipline
and leads to a range of careers.
Branches of biology include botany,
genetics, immunology, microbiology,
pharmacology and zoology. In
addition, biology is applied in
many fields of endeavour including
biotechnology, dentistry, ecology,
education, food science, forestry,
health care, horticulture, medicine,
optometry,
physiotherapy
and
veterinary science. Biologists also
work in cross-disciplinary areas such
as bushfire research, environmental
management
and
conservation,
forensic science, geology, medical
research and sports science.
Unit 1: How do living things stay alive?
Students are introduced to some of the challenges to an organism in sustaining life.
Students examine the cell as the structural and functional unit of life, from the single
celled to the multicellular organism. They analyse types of adaptations that enhance
the organism’s survival in a particular environment. Students investigate how a diverse
group of organisms form a living interconnected community. Students consider how the
planet’s biodiversity is classified and the factors that affect the growth of a population.
Unit 2: How is continuity of life maintained?
Students focus on cell reproduction and the transmission of biological information from
generation to generation. Students learn that all cells are derived from pre-existing cells
through the cell cycle. The role of stem cells in the differentiation, growth, repair and
replacement of cells in humans is examined. Students use chromosome theory and
terminology from classical genetics to explain the inheritance of characteristics, analyse
patterns of inheritance, and interpret pedigree charts. They consider the role of genetic
knowledge in decision making about the inheritance of autosomal dominant, autosomal
recessive and sex-linked genetic conditions.
Unit 3: How do cells maintain life?
Students investigate the workings of the cell from several perspectives. Students
consider base pairing specificity, the binding of enzymes and substrates, the response
of receptors to signalling molecules and reactions between antigens and antibodies.
Students study the synthesis, structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins as
key molecules in cellular processes. They explore the chemistry of cells by examining
the nature of biochemical pathways, their components and energy transformations.
Cells communicate with each other using a variety of signalling molecules. Students
consider the types of signals, the transduction of information within the cell and cellular
responses.
Unit 4: How does life change and respond to challenges over time?
How does life change and respond to challenges over time? Students consider the
continual change and challenges to which life on Earth has been subjected. The
accumulation of changes over time is considered as a mechanism for biological
evolution by natural selection that leads to the rise of new species. Students examine
the structural and cognitive trends in the human fossil record and the interrelationships
between human biological and cultural evolution. The biological consequences,
and social and ethical implications, of manipulating the DNA molecule and applying
biotechnologies is explored.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
Individual school decision on levels of achievement.
Units 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and examination:
• Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework: 16 percent
• Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework: 24 percent
• End of year examination: 60 percent
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 43
Business Management
Accreditation Period 2017-2021
Rationale
In contemporary Australian society
there are a range of businesses
managed by people who establish
systems and processes to achieve a
variety of objectives. These systems
and processes are often drawn
from historical experience and
management theories designed to
optimise the likelihood of achieving
success.
In
studying
VCE
Business
Management,
students
develop
knowledge and skills that enhance
their confidence and ability to
participate effectively as socially
responsible and ethical members,
managers and leaders of the business
community, and as informed citizens,
consumers and investors. The study
of Business Management leads to
opportunities across all facets of the
business and management field such
as small business owner, project
manager, human resource manager,
operations manager or executive
manager. Further study can lead
to specialisation in areas such as
marketing, public relations and event
management.
Unit 1: Planning a business
Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of
a nation. Therefore how businesses are formed and the fostering of conditions under
which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation’s wellbeing. Taking a
business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic
and social development. In this unit students explore the factors affecting business
ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses operate, and
the effect of these on planning a business.
Unit 2: Establishing a business
This unit focuses on the establishment phase of a business’s life. Establishing a
business involves complying with legal requirements as well as making decisions
about how best to establish a system of financial record keeping, staff the business
and establish a customer base. In this unit students examine the legal requirements
that must be satisfied to establish a business. They investigate the essential features
of effective marketing and consider the best way to meet the needs of the business in
terms of staffing and financial record keeping. Students analyse various management
practices in this area by applying this knowledge to contemporary business case studies
from the past four years.
Unit 3: Managing a business
In this unit students explore the key processes and issues concerned with managing
a business efficiently and effectively to achieve the business objectives. Students
examine the different types of businesses and their respective objectives. They consider
corporate culture, management styles, management skills and the relationship between
each of these. Students investigate strategies to manage both staff and business
operations to meet objectives.
Students develop an understanding of the complexity and challenge of managing
businesses and through the use of contemporary business case studies from the
past four years have the opportunity to compare theoretical perspectives with current
practice.
Unit 4: Transforming a business
Businesses are under constant pressure to adapt and change to meet their objectives.
In this unit students consider the importance of reviewing key performance indicators
to determine current performance and the strategic management necessary to position
a business for the future. Students study a theoretical model to undertake change, and
consider a variety of strategies to manage change in the most efficient and effective
way to improve business performance. They investigate the importance of leadership
in change management. Using a contemporary business case study from the past four
years, students evaluate business practice against theory.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for Units 1 or
2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3
prior to undertaking Unit 4.
Page 44 Units 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and examination:
• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
• End of year examination: 50 percent
Trinity College Colac
Chemistry
Accreditation Period 2016–2021
Rationale
Unit 1: How can the diversity of materials be explained?
VCE Chemistry enables students
to examine a range of chemical,
biochemical
and
geophysical
phenomena through the exploration of
the nature of chemicals and chemical
processes. In undertaking this study,
students apply chemical principles to
explain and quantify the behaviour of
matter, as well as undertake practical
activities that involve the analysis and
synthesis of a variety of materials.
Unit 2: What makes water such a unique chemical?
Students investigate the chemical properties of a range of materials from metals and
salts to polymers and nanomaterials. Students examine the modification of metals,
assess the factors that affect the formation of ionic crystals and investigate a range of
non-metallic substances and relate their structures to specific applications. Students are
introduced to quantitative concepts in chemistry.
Water is the most widely used solvent on Earth. In this unit students explore the physical
and chemical properties of water, the reactions that occur in water and various methods
of water analysis. Students examine the polar nature of a water molecule and the
intermolecular forces between water molecules. They explore the relationship between
these bonding forces and the physical and chemical properties of water.
In VCE Chemistry students develop
a range of inquiry skills involving
practical
experimentation
and
research specific to the knowledge
of the discipline, analytical skills
including
critical
and
creative
thinking, and communication skills.
Students use scientific and cognitive
skills and understanding to analyse
contemporary
chemistry-related
issues, and communicate their views
from an informed position.
Unit 3: How can chemical processes be designed to optimise
efficiency?
VCE
Chemistry
provides
for
continuing study pathways within
the discipline and leads to a range
of careers. Branches of chemistry
include organic chemistry, inorganic
chemistry,
analytical
chemistry,
physical chemistry and biochemistry.
In addition, chemistry is applied in
many fields of endeavour including
agriculture,
bushfire
research,
dentistry,
dietetics,
education,
engineering,
environmental
sciences, forensic science, forestry,
horticulture, medicine, metallurgy,
meteorology,
pharmacy,
sports
science,
toxicology,
veterinary
science and viticulture.
Students investigate the structural features, bonding, typical reactions and uses of
the major families of organic compounds including those found in food. They process
data from instrumental analyses of organic compounds to confirm or deduce organic
structures, and perform volumetric analyses to determine the concentrations of organic
chemicals in mixtures. Students investigate key food molecules through an exploration
of their chemical structures, the hydrolytic reactions and the condensation reactions in
which they are rebuilt to form new molecules.
Students explore energy options and the chemical production of materials with reference
to efficiencies, renewability and the minimisation of their impact on the environment.
Students compare and evaluate different chemical energy resources. They investigate
the combustion of fuels, including the energy transformations involved, the use
of stoichiometry to calculate the amounts of reactants and products involved in the
reactions, and calculations of the amounts of energy released and their representations.
Students analyse manufacturing processes with reference to factors that influence their
reaction rates and extent.
Unit 4: How are organic compounds categorised, analysed and used?
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
School assessed coursework and an end of year examination.
•
Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 16 percent
•
Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 24 percent
•
End of year examination: 60 percent.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1 and 2, though 10SC63S is
highly recommended). Students who
enter the study at Unit 2 or 3 may
need to undertake preparatory work.
Students must undertake Unit 3 prior
to undertaking Unit 4 and in view of
the sequenced nature of the study it is
strongly advised that students undertake
Units 1 to 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 45
Computing
Accreditation Period 2016-2019
Rationale
The ubiquity and rapid pace of
developments in digital systems, and
the increasing availability of digitised
data and information are having
major influences on many aspects of
society and the economy. This study
equips students with the knowledge
and skills to be discerning users of
digital systems, data and information
and creators of digital solutions. They
are equipped to apply new ways of
thinking as well as technical and
social protocols when developing
intellectual and social capital.
VCE Computing supports students to
participate in a globalised society and
economy as they learn how to exploit
the capabilities of digital systems and
manage risks when communicating
and collaborating with others locally
and globally. The study provides
students with practical opportunities
to create digital solutions for realworld problems in a range of settings,
developing an essential tool set for
current and future learning, work and
social endeavours.
VCE Computing provides a pathway
to further studies in areas such
as computer science, information
systems,
business,
systems
engineering, robotics, linguistics,
logistics, database management and
software development, and to careers
in digital-technologies based areas
such as information architecture, web
design, business analysis and project
management.
Unit 1 & 2: Computing
Students focus on how data, information and networked digital systems can be used
to meet a range of users’ needs. They collect primary data when investigating an issue
and graphically present the findings. Students also examine the technical underpinnings
of networks. They then apply knowledge of information architecture, and together with
web authoring skills create a website.
Students examine data and how the application of computational, design and systems
thinking skills automate data processing. They develop their computational thinking
skills using a programming language. Students also examine a range of software tools
that can be used to manipulate data. They will apply all stages of the problem-solving
methodology to create a solution using database management software.
Unit 3 & 4: Software development
Students focus on the application of a problem-solving methodology and underlying
skills to create purpose-designed solutions using a programming language. In Unit 3
students develop a detailed understanding of the analysis, design and development
stages of the problem-solving methodology and use a programming language to create
working software modules.
Students analyse a need or opportunity, plan and design a solution and develop
computational, design and systems thinking skills. They focus on how the information
needs of individuals and organisations are met through the creation of software solutions.
They evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of a solution. They also assess the
effectiveness of the project plan in monitoring project progress. Students apply systems
thinking skills when explaining the relationship between two information systems.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Unit 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Unit 3 and 4
School assessed coursework, school-assessed task, and an end of year examanination:
•
Unit 3 school-assessed course work: 10 percent
•
Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 10 percent
•
School-assessed task: 30 percent
•
End of year examination: 50 percent.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry to
Unit 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake
Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.
Page 46 Trinity College Colac
Drama
Accreditation Period 2014-2018
Rationale
People tell stories, explore ideas,
make sense of their worlds and
communicate
meaning
through
drama. Drama develops personal and
social identity. VCE Drama connects
students to the traditions of drama
practice and, through the processes
of devising and performing drama,
allows them to explore, understand
and respond to the contexts,
narratives and stories that shape their
worlds. The study requires students
to be creative and critical thinkers.
Through work as solo and ensemble
performers and engagement with
the work of professional drama
practitioners, students develop an
appreciation of drama as an art form
and develop skills of criticism and
aesthetic understanding.
VCE Drama equips students with
knowledge, skills and confidence
to communicate as individuals
and collaboratively in social and
work-related contexts. The study
of drama can provide pathways to
training and tertiary study in acting,
communication and drama criticism.
Unit 1: Dramatic storytelling
This unit focuses on creating, presenting and analysing a devised performance that
includes real or imagined characters, based on personal, cultural and/or community
experiences and stories.
Students examine storytelling through the creation of solo and/or ensemble devised
performance/s and manipulate expressive skills in the creation and presentation of
characters. They develop an awareness and understanding of how characters are
portrayed in naturalistic and non-naturalistic performance style/s.
This unit also involves analysis of a student’s own performance work and analysis of a
performance by professional and other drama practitioners.
Unit 2: Non-naturalistic Australian drama
This unit focuses on the use and documentation of the processes involved in constructing
a devised solo or ensemble performance. Students create, present and analyse a
performance based on a person, an event, an issue, a place, an art work, a text and/or
an icon from a contemporary or historical Australian context.
Students use a range of stimulus material in creating performance and examine
performance styles from a range of cultural and historical contexts. Theatrical conventions
appropriate to the selected performance styles are also explored. Students knowledge
of how dramatic elements are enhanced or manipulated through performance is further
developed in this unit.
Units 3: Devised non-naturalistic ensemble performance
This unit focuses on non-naturalistic drama from a diverse range of contemporary and/
or cultural performance traditions. Non-naturalistic performance styles and associated
theatrical conventions are explored in the creation, development and presentation of
an ensemble performance. Collaboration to create, develop and present ensemble
performance is central to this performance. Students use and manipulate dramatic
elements, expressive skills and performance styles to enhance performance. They select
stagecraft and theatrical conventions as appropriate to the performance. Students also
document and evaluate stages involved in the creation, development and presentation
of the ensemble performance.
A professional performance that incorporates non-naturalistic performance style/s and
production elements selected from the prescribed VCE Unit 3 Drama Playlist published
annually in the VCAA Bulletin will also be analysed.
Units 4: Non-naturalistic solo performance
This unit focuses on the use of stimulus material and resources from a variety of sources
to create and develop character/s within a solo performance. Students complete
two solo performances. For a short solo performance they develop practical skills of
researching, creating, presenting, documenting and analysing a solo performance work.
In the development of a second solo performance, they devise, rehearse and perform
an extended solo performance in response to a prescribed structure published by the
Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority. The processes involved in the creation
and presentation of character/s in solo performance are analysed and evaluated.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of outcomes specified for the unit.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry to
Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake
Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and two end-of year examinations.
•
Unit 3 and 4 school-assessed coursework: 40 percent
•
End of year performance examination: 35 percent
•
End of year written examination: 25 percent
Page 47
English/English as an Additional Language
Accreditation Period 2016-2020
Rationale
The study of English contributes to
the development of literate individuals
capable of critical and creative
thinking, aesthetic appreciation and
creativity. This study also develops
students’ ability to create and analyse
texts, moving from interpretation to
reflection and critical analysis.
Through engagement with texts from
the contemporary world and from the
past, and using texts from Australia
and from other cultures, students
studying English become confident,
articulate
and
critically
aware
communicators and further develop a
sense of themselves, their world and
their place within it. English helps
equip students for participation in
a democratic society and the global
community.
This study will build on the learning
established
through
Victorian
Curriculum English in the key
discipline concepts of language,
literature and literacy, and the
language
modes
of
listening,
speaking, reading, viewing and
writing.
Unit 1
In this unit, students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse
arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts
intended to position audiences. Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken
and multimodal texts.
Unit 2
In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts.
They analyse arguments presented and the use of persuasive language in texts and
create their own texts intended to position audiences. Students develop their skills in
creating written, spoken and multimodal texts.
Unit 3
In this unit students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse
arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts.
Unit 4
In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts.
They create an oral presentation intended to position audiences about an issue currently
debated in the media.
ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE (EAL)
EAL students are those whose first language is a language or dialect other than English
and who require additional support to assist them to develop proficiency in English.
Students who are eligible to complete the VCE EAL study units must fulfil the criteria
of an EAL student as defined by VCAA.
For Units 1 and 2, provision for English as an Additional Language (EAL) students is
a matter for school decision. For Units 3 and 4, EAL students need to meet the VCAA
criteria for enrolment in VCE EAL. EAL students must undertake the study as outlined
in the VCAA study design.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Unit 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Unit 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and examinations:
•
•
•
Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
End of year examination: 50 percent.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Page 48 Trinity College Colac
Food Studies
Accreditation Period 2017-2021
Rationale
Australia has a varied and abundant
food supply, and food and cooking
have become prominent in digital
media and publishing. Globally,
many people do not have access
to a secure and varied food supply
and many Australians, amid a variety
of influences, consume food and
beverage products that may harm
their health. This study examines
the background to this abundance
and explores reasons for our food
choices.
VCE Food Studies is designed to build
the capacities of students to make
informed food choices. Students
develop their understanding of food
while acquiring skills that enable them
to take greater ownership of their food
decisions and eating patterns. This
study complements and supports
further training and employment
opportunities in the fields of home
economics, food technology, food
manufacturing and hospitality.
Unit 1: Food origins
This unit focuses on food from historical and cultural perspectives. Students investigate
the origins and roles of food through time and across the world. In Area of Study 1
students explore how humanity has historically sourced its food, examining the general
progression from hunter-gatherer to rural-based agriculture, to today’s urban living and
global trade in food. Students consider the origins and significance of food through
inquiry into particular food-producing regions of the world.
Unit 2: Food makers
In this unit students investigate food systems in contemporary Australia. Area of Study
1 focuses on commercial food production industries, while Area of Study 2 looks at food
production in small-scale domestic settings, as both a comparison and complement to
commercial production. Students gain insight into the significance of food industries to
the Australian economy and investigate the capacity of industry to provide safe, highquality food that meets the needs of consumers.
Unit 3: Food in daily life
This unit investigates the many roles and everyday influences of food. Area of Study 1
explores the science of food: our physical need for it and how it nourishes and sometimes
harms our bodies. Students investigate the physiology of eating and appreciating food,
and the microbiology of digestion. They also investigate the functional properties of
food and the changes that occur during food preparation and cooking. They analyse the
scientific rationale behind the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Australian Guide
to Healthy Eating (see www.eatforhealth.gov.au) and develop their understanding of
diverse nutrient requirements.
Unit 4: Food issues, challenges and futures
In this unit students examine debates about global and Australian food systems. Area
of Study 1 focuses on issues about the environment, ecology, ethics, farming practices,
the development and application of technologies, and the challenges of food security,
food safety, food wastage, and the use and management of water and land. Students
research a selected topic, seeking clarity on current situations and points of view,
considering solutions and analysing work undertaken to solve problems and support
sustainable futures.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion.
Demonstrated achievement of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
School assessed coursework, a school assessed task and an end of year examination.
•
Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 30 percent
•
Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 30 percent
•
End of year examination: 40 percent.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 49
Geography
Accreditation Period 2016-2020
Rationale
VCE Geography enables students
to examine natural and human
phenomena, how and why they
change, their interconnections and
the patterns they form across the
Earth’s surface. In doing so, they
develop a better understanding of
their own place and its spaces and
those in other parts of the world.
These spatial perspectives, when
integrated with historical, economic,
ecological and cultural perspectives,
deepen understanding of places,
environments and human interactions
with these.
Interpretative
and
analytical
skills enable students to interpret
information presented in a variety
of formats including maps, graphs,
diagrams and images.
Unit 1: Hazards and disasters
In this unit students undertake an overview of hazards before investigating two
contrasting types of hazards and the responses to them by people.
Hazards include a wide range of situations including those within local areas, such as
fast moving traffic or the likelihood of coastal erosion, to regional and global hazards
such as drought and infectious disease. Students examine the processes involved with
hazards and hazard events, including their causes and impacts, human responses to
hazard events and interconnections between human activities and natural phenomena.
This unit investigates how people have responded to specific types of hazards, including
attempts to reduce vulnerability to, and the impact of, hazard events.
Unit 2: Tourism
In this unit students investigate the characteristics of tourism, with particular emphasis
on where it has developed, its various forms, how it has changed and continues to
change and its impacts on people, places and environments.
The study of tourism at local, regional and global scales emphasises the interconnection
within and between places. There is an interconnection between places tourists originate
from and their destinations through the development of communication and transport
infrastructure, employment, together with cultural preservation and acculturation. The
growth of tourism at all scales requires careful management to ensure environmentally
sustainable and economically viable tourism. Students undertake fieldwork in this unit
and report on fieldwork using the structure provided.
Unit 3: Changing the land
This unit focuses on two investigations of geographical change: change to land cover
and change to land use.
Students investigate three major processes that are changing land cover in many
regions of the world.
Students investigate the distribution and causes of these three processes. At a local
scale students investigate land use change using appropriate fieldwork techniques and
secondary sources. They investigate the scale of change, the reasons for change and
the impacts of change. Students undertake fieldwork and produce a fieldwork report
using the structure provided.
Unit 4: Human population – trends and issues
In this unit students investigate the geography of human populations. They explore
the patterns of population change, movement and distribution, and how governments,
organisations and individuals have responded to those changes in different parts of the
world.
Population movements such as voluntary and forced movements over long or short
terms add further complexity to population structures and to economic, social, political
and environmental conditions.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Page 50 Units 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and examinations
•
School-assessed coursework Unit 3: 25 percent
•
School-assessed coursework Unit 4: 25 percent
•
End of year examination: 50 percent
Trinity College Colac
Health and Human Development
Accreditation Period 2014-2017
Rationale
VCE Health and Human Development
provides students with the skills
and knowledge to make informed
decisions about their own health and
to recognise the importance of health
in society. In undertaking this study,
they will be able to actively participate
in making appropriate choices that
allow for good health and be able to
seek appropriate advice.
VCE Health and Human Development
enables students to understand the
current ideologies of health and
human development in contemporary
society. Students critically evaluate
the health and development of the
individual across the lifespan in the
context of both Australia’s and global
health and human development.
VCE Health and Human Development
offers students a range of pathways
and caters to those who wish to pursue
further formal study in areas such as
health promotion, community health
research and policy development,
humanitarian aid work, allied health
practices, education, and the health
profession.
Unit 1: The health and development of Australia’s youth
In this unit students are introduced to the concepts of physical, social and mental health,
and individual human development. Individual human development is a lifelong process
involving a series of orderly and predictable changes, which can be classified as physical,
social, emotional and intellectual. This unit focuses on the health and development of
Australia’s youth and the many factors that influence their health and development. The
health status of Australia’s youth is good and continues to improve as demonstrated by
reductions in morbidity and mortality from communicable diseases, chronic diseases,
suicide, motor vehicle accidents and other injuries. In this unit students identify issues
that have an impact on the health and development of Australia’s youth, investigate one
health issue in detail, and analyse strategies or programmes that address youth health
and individual human development.
Unit 2: Individual human development and health issues
Over the lifespan, individuals accumulate life experiences that affect both their health
(physical, social and mental), and their individual human development (physical, social,
emotional and intellectual). This unit focuses on the health and individual human
development for the lifespan stages of prenatal, childhood and adulthood. During both the
prenatal and childhood stages, health and development is shaped by a range of identified
determinants, which in turn can have an impact on future health and development.
The lifespan stage of adulthood represents a period of great diversity. The health
and development of this group can vary considerably and is influenced by a range of
determinants, which include physical environment, biological, behavioural and social.
Students investigate issues relating to health care in Australia, and analyse strategies and
programmes that impact on the health and development of children and adults.
Unit 3: Australia’s health
Students will explore the way health status is measured and variations in the health
status of Australia’s population compared with that of other developed countries.
Students examine the development of the National Health Priority Areas (NHPAs) and
their relationship to burden of disease in Australia. They analyse initiatives designed
to promote health relevant to the NHPAs, and come to understand that nutrition is an
important factor for a number of the NHPAs. Students use key health measures to
compare health in Australia and analyse how determinants of health, including the
physical, environment, biological, behavioural and social determinants, contribute to
variations in health status.
Students examine different models of health and health promotion and investigate the
roles and responsibilities of governments in addressing health needs and promoting
health for all through the provision of a national health system and health promotion
initiatives. The role of government and non-government organisations are examined in
regard to providing programmes and support for the promotion of healthy eating.
Unit 4: Global health and human development
In exploring global health, human development and sustainability students identify
similarities and differences in the health status between people living in developing
countries and Australians, and analyse reasons for the differences. The role of the
United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals is investigated in relation to achieving
sustainable improvements in health status and human development.
Students explore the role of international organisations including the UN and WHO
in achieving sustainable improvements in health and human development. Students
consider strategies designed to promote health and sustainable human development
globally, as well as Australia’s contribution to international health programmes through
AusAid and contributions to non-government organisations.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for Units 1, 2
and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3
prior to Unit 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and examination:
• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
• End of year examination: 50 percent.
Page 51
History
Accreditation Period 2016-2020
Rationale
The study of VCE History assists
students to understand themselves,
others and their world, and broadens
their perspective by examining
people, groups, events, ideas and
movements. Through studying VCE
History, students develop social,
political, economic and cultural
understanding. They also explore
continuity and change: the world is
not as it has always been, and it will
be subject to change in the future.
In this sense, history is relevant to
contemporary issues. It fosters an
understanding of human agency
and informs decision making in the
present.
The study of history fosters the
ability to ask searching questions,
to engage in independent research,
and to construct arguments about the
past based on evidence. Historical
comprehension enables a source
to be understood in relation to its
context; that is, students make links
between the source and the world in
which it was produced.
We can never know the whole past.
Historical knowledge rests on the
interpretation of sources that are used
as evidence. Furthermore, judgments
of historical significance made by
historians are central to the discipline.
Historians do not always agree about
the meaning that is taken from the
past: historical interpretations are
often subject to academic and public
debate. The study of history equips
students to take an informed position
on such matters, helping them
develop as individuals and citizens.
Unit 1: Twentieth century history 1918-1939
In Unit 1 students explore the nature of political, social and cultural change in the period
between the world wars. World War One is regarded by many as marking the beginning
of twentieth century history since it represented such a complete departure from the
past and heralded changes that were to have an impact for decades to come. Despite
ideals about future peace, reflected in the establishment of the League of Nations, the
world was again overtaken by war in 1939. New fascist governments used the military,
education and propaganda to impose controls on the way people lived, to exclude
particular groups of people and to silence criticism.
Unit 2: Twentieth century history 1945-2000
In Unit 2 students explore the nature and impact of the Cold War and challenges and
changes to existing political, economic and social arrangements in the second half of
the twentieth century. This period saw challenge and changes to the established order in
many countries. The continuation of moves towards decolonisation led to independence
movements in former colonies in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific. New
countries were created and independence was achieved through both military and
diplomatic means. Old conflicts also continued and terrorism became increasingly
global.
Units 3 and 4: Revolutions
In Units 3 and 4 Revolutions students investigate the significant historical causes and
consequences of political revolution. Revolutions represent great ruptures in time and
are a major turning point which brings about the collapse and destruction of an existing
political order resulting in a pervasive change to society. Post-revolutionary regimes
are often threatened internally by civil war and externally by foreign threats. These
challenges can result in a compromise of revolutionary ideals and extreme measures of
violence, oppression and terror.
In these units students develop an understanding of the complexity and multiplicity of
causes and consequences in the revolutionary narrative. They construct an argument
about the past using primary sources as evidence and evaluate the extent to which the
revolution brought change to the lives of people. They consider how perspectives of the
revolution give an insight into the continuity and change experienced by those who lived
through dramatic revolutionary moments. Students evaluate historical interpretations
about the causes and consequences of revolution and the effects of change instigated
by the new order.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Unit 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and examination:
• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
• End of year examination: 50 percent
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Page 52 Trinity College Colac
Indonesian (Second Language)
Accreditation Period 2005-2018
Rationale
This study develops students’
ability to understand and use the
language of a country which is one of
Australia’s closest neighbours and is
one of the most populous countries
in the world. The study of Indonesian
promotes the strengthening of links
between Australia and Indonesia, in
particular in areas such as business,
tourism and education. Studying
a language other than English
contributes to the overall education
of students, particularly in the area
of communication, but also in crosscultural understanding, cognitive
development, and literacy.
Unit 1
The areas of study comprise themes and topics, grammar text types, vocabulary and
kinds of writing. This unit should allow the student to establish and maintain a spoken or
written exchange, listen to, read and obtain information from written and spoken texts
and produce a personal response to a text focusing on real or imaginary experience.
Unit 2
The areas of study comprise themes and topics, grammar text types, vocabulary and
kinds of writing. This unit will allow the student to participate in a spoken or written
exchange, listen to, read and extract and use information and ideas from spoken and
written texts and give expression to real or imaginary experience in written or spoken
form.
Units 3 and 4
The areas of study comprise themes and topics, grammar text types, vocabulary and
kinds of writing. In these units students undertake a detailed study of either Language
and Culture through texts, or Language and Culture through VET. Students should
be able to express ideas through the production of original texts, analyse and use
information from spoken and written texts and exchange information, opinions and
experiences. They should also be able to respond critically to spoken and written texts
which reflect aspects of the language and culture of Indonesian-speaking communities.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and two end-or-year examinations.
•
Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
•
Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
•
Units 3 and 4 examinations: 50 percent
Entry
Indonesian Second Language is
designed for students who do not have an
Indonesian background, that is students
who have learnt all the Indonesian they
know in an Australian school or similar
environment. These students will,
typically, have studied Indonesian for at
least 400 hours at the completion of Year
12. It is possible, however, that some
students with less formal experience will
also be able to meet the requirements
successfully.
Students must complete application
forms giving details of their background
in Indonesian, if they wish to enrol in this
study.
Students must also undertake Unit 3
prior to undertaking Unit 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 53
Legal Studies
Accreditation Period 2011-2017
Rationale
VCE Legal Studies investigates the
ways in which the law and the legal
system relate to and serve individuals
and the community. This knowledge
is central to understanding the
workings of contemporary Australian
society.
Legal
Studies
examines
the
processes of law-making, dispute
resolution and the administration of
justice in Australia. Students develop
an understanding of the impact of the
legal system on the lives of citizens,
and the implications of legal decisions
and outcomes on Australian society.
The study provides students with
an appreciation of how individuals
can be involved in decision-making
within the legal system, encouraging
civic engagement and helping them
to become more informed and active
citizens.
Students develop an understanding
of the complexity of the law and the
legal system and the challenges
faced by our law-makers and dispute
resolution bodies. They investigate
the workings of the Australian legal
system and undertake comparisons
with international structures and
procedures. Students are encouraged
to question these systems and
develop informed judgments about
their effectiveness, as well as
consider reforms to the law and the
legal system.
Legal Studies also focuses on the
development of skills. Students
develop an ability to identify, collect
and process information from a
range of sources and engage in its
interpretation and analysis. Skills
for independent inquiry, critical
thinking and legal reasoning to solve
legal problems are also fostered.
Students are required to apply legal
reasoning and decision-making to
contemporary cases and issues. They
engage in analysis and evaluation of
existing legal processes and form
opinions about the operation of the
legal system.
Unit 1: Criminal law in action
The law influences all aspects of society – at home, at work and in the wider community.
Laws are used by society to preserve social cohesion, and to ensure the protection of
people from harm and from the infringement of their rights. These laws can be grouped
according to their source and whether they are criminal or civil in nature. Following an
overview of the law in general, this unit focuses on criminal law.
Students investigate the processes and procedures followed by courts in hearing and
resolving criminal cases. They explore the main features and operations of criminal
courts and consider the effectiveness of the criminal justice system in achieving justice.
Unit 2: Issues in civil law
The civil law regulates the rights and responsibilities that exist between individuals,
groups and organisations. If legal rights have been infringed, the aggrieved party may
pursue legal action through the court system, through a tribunal, or by using one of the
methods of dispute resolution.
Students examine the rights that are protected by civil law, as well as obligations that
laws impose. They investigate types of civil laws and related cases and issues and
develop an appreciation of the role of civil law in society and how it affects them as
individuals.
Unit 3: Law-making
In this unit students develop an understanding of the institutions that determine our laws,
and their law-making powers and processes. They undertake an informed evaluation of
the effectiveness of law-making bodies and examine the need for the law to keep up to
date with changes in society.
Students develop an appreciation of the complex nature of law-making by investigating
the key features and operation of parliament, and influences on law-making, with a
focus on the role of the individual.
Central to the investigation of law-making is the role played by the Commonwealth
Constitution. Students develop an understanding of the importance of the Constitution
in their lives and on society as a whole, and undertake a comparative analysis with
another country.
Unit 4: Resolution and justice
The legal system provides mechanisms by which legal disputes of both a criminal and a
civil nature can be resolved in a fair and just manner. Dispute resolution bodies such as
courts and tribunals employ a range of means and processes that enables the resolution
of legal disputes.
Students examine the institutions that adjudicate criminal cases and civil disputes. They
also investigate methods of dispute resolution that can be used as an alternative to civil
litigation. Students investigate the processes and procedures followed in courtrooms
and develop an understanding of the adversary system of trial and the jury system, as
well as pre-trial and post-trial procedures that operate in the Victorian legal system.
Using the elements of an effective legal system, students consider the extent to which
court processes and procedures contribute to the effective operation of the legal system.
They also consider reforms or changes that could further improve its effective operation.
Throughout this unit, students examine current or recent cases to support their learning,
and apply legal principles to these illustrative cases.
Assessment
Satisfactory completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry to
Unit 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake
Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.
Page 54 Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
School assessed coursework and an end of year examination
• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
• End of year examination: 50 percent.
Trinity College Colac
Literature
Accreditation Period 2016-2020
Rationale
VCE Literature provides opportunities
for students to develop their
awareness of other people, places
and cultures and explore the way
texts represent the complexity of
human experience. Students examine
the evolving and dialogic nature of
texts, the changing contexts in which
they were produced and notions of
value. They develop an understanding
and appreciation of literature, and
an ability to reflect critically on the
aesthetic and intellectual aspects of
texts.
The study of Literature enables
students to consider the power and
complexity of language, the ways
literary features and techniques
contribute to meaning and the
significance of form and structure.
Unit 1: Approaches to literature
In this unit students focus on the ways the interaction between text and reader creates
meaning. Students’ analyses of the features and conventions of texts help them develop
responses to a range of literary forms and styles. They develop an awareness of how
the views and values that readers hold may influence the reading of a text.
Unit 2: Context and connections
In this unit students explore the ways literary texts connect with each other and with the
world. They deepen their examination of the ways their own culture and the cultures
represented in texts can influence their interpretations and shape different meanings.
Students consider the relationships between authors, audiences and contexts and
analyse the similarities and differences across texts and establish connections between
them. They engage in close reading of texts and create analytical responses that are
evidence-based.
Unit 3: Form and transformation
In this unit students consider how the form of a text affects meaning, and how writers
construct their texts. They investigate ways writers adapt and transform texts and how
meaning is affected as texts are adapted and transformed. They consider how the
perspectives of those adapting texts may inform or influence the adaptations. Students
develop creative responses to texts and their skills in communicating ideas in both
written and oral forms.
Unit 4: Interpreting texts
In this unit students develop critical and analytic responses to texts. They investigate
literary criticism informing both the reading and writing of texts. Students develop an
informed and sustained interpretation supported by close textual analysis.
Assessment
Satisfactory completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
School assessed coursework and an end of year examination
•
Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
•
Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 25 percent
•
End of year examination: 50 percent.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 55
Mathematics
Accreditation Period 2016-2018
Rationale
Mathematics is the study of function
and pattern in number, logic, space
and structure. It provides both a
framework for thinking and a means
of symbolic communication that
is powerful, logical, concise and
precise and a means by which people
can understand and manage their
environment. Essential mathematical
activities
include
calculating,
abstracting,
proving,
applying,
investigating, modelling and problem
solving.
This study is designed to provide
access to worthwhile and challenging
mathematical learning in a way
which takes into account the needs
and aspirations of a wide range
of students. It is also designed to
promote students’ awareness of
the importance of mathematics in
everyday life in an increasingly
technological
society,
and
confidence in making effective use of
mathematical ideas, techniques and
processes.
All students in all the mathematical
units offered will apply knowledge
and skills, model, investigate and
solve problems, and use technology
to support learning mathematics and
its application in different contexts.
General Mathematics Units 1 & 2
Semester 1: This unit involves the study of selected material from Computation and
Practical Arithmetic, Data Analysis, Matrices and Linear Equations.
Semester 2: This unit of study involves the study of material from Geometry and
Trigonometry, Financial Mathematics using recursive techniques, Networks and Decision
Mathematics and modelling using Bivariate Statistics. Students practise mathematical
algorithms, routines and techniques and use them to solve standard problems; apply
mathematical knowledge and skills in unfamiliar situations which require investigative,
modelling or problem-solving approaches and use technology appropriately and
effectively to learn mathematics and apply it in different contexts.
Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2
Unit 1: This unit provides an introductory study of simple elementary functions of a
single real variable, algebra, calculus, probability and statistics and their applications
in a variety of practical and theoretical contexts. The areas of study are ‘Functions and
graphs’, ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’ and ‘Probability and statistics’.
Unit 2: This Unit focuses on the study of simple transcendental functions and the
calculus of simple algebraic functions. The areas of study are ‘Functions and graphs’,
‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’, and ‘Probability and statistics’. Students are expected to be able
to apply techniques, routines and processes with and without the use of technology and
make use of appropriate mathematical symbols.
Specialist Mathematics Units 1 & 2
To study Specialist Mathematics at Unit 1 and 2 students MUST also undertake
the study of Mathematical Methods at Unit 1 and 2 (or have previously done so).
Both Unit 1 and 2 have an emphasis on concepts, skills and processes related to
mathematical structure, modelling, problem solving and reasoning. The areas of study
include two of the prescribed topics from: Number systems and recursion, Vectors in the
plane; Geometry in the plane and proof, and Graphs of non-linear relations and two or
more topics from: Algebra and Structure, Transformations, Trigonometry and Matrices,
Number and Arithmetic, Discrete Mathematics, Graphs and Relations and Statistics.
Students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes with
and without the use of technology. They should use mental and by-hand approaches
to estimation and computation and make use of appropriate mathematical terminology
and symbols.
Page 56 Trinity College Colac
Mathematics
Accreditation Period 2016-2018
Further Mathematics Units 3 & 4
Further Mathematics consists of a compulsory area of study ‘Data analysis’ and then
a Students practise mathematical algorithms, routines and techniques and use them
to solve standard problems; apply mathematical knowledge and skills in unfamiliar
situations which require investigative, modelling or problem-solving approaches, and
use technology appropriately and effectively.
Unit 3 consists of two compulsory areas of study: Data Analysis and Recursion and
Financial Modelling.
Unit 4 students complete two modules selected from the following 4 modules:
• Matrices
• Networks and Decision Mathematics
• Geometry and Trigonometry
• Graphs and Relations
Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4
Students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes with and
without the use of technology and make use of appropriate mathematical symbols and
terminology.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to General Mathematics Units 1 and
2, Mathematical Methods Units 1 and
2 or Specialist Mathematics Unit 1
and 2. However students attempting
Mathematical Methods and/or Specialist
Mathematics, in particular, are expected
to have a sound background in algebra,
function, and probability.
Students studying Further Mathematics
Units 3 & 4 will generally have studied
at least one Mathematics subject at
Units 1 & 2 level (NOT Foundation
Mathematics).
Students
studying
Mathematical
Methods Units 3 & 4 are expected to
have previously studied Mathematical
Methods Units 1 & 2, as a minimum. It
is a distinct benefit if another Unit 1 & 2
of Mathematics has also been studied.
Students studying both Mathematical
Methods Units 3 & 4 and Specialist
Mathematics Units 3 & 4 should, in all
but the most exceptional cases, have
prepared by studying both Mathematical
Methods Units 1 & 2 and Specialist
Mathematics Units 1 & 2.
Units 3 and 4 of a study are designed
to be taken as a sequence. Students
must undertake Unit 3 of a study before
entering Unit 4 of that study.
Enrolment in Specialist Mathematics
Units 3 and 4 assumes a current
enrolment in, or previous completion of,
Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
The material for this subject is completely prescribed Unit 3 and 4 includes the areas
of study ‘Functions and graphs’ and ‘Algebra’, and applications of derivatives and
differentiation, and identifying and analysing key features of the functions and their
graphs from the ‘Calculus’ area of study and the study of random variables and discrete
and continuous probability distributions and the distribution of sample proportions.
Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4
Unit 3 and Unit 4 consist of the areas of study: ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Algebra’,
‘Calculus’, ‘Vectors’, ‘Mechanics’ and ‘Probability and statistics’. The course content
highlights mathematical structure, reasoning and applications across a range of
modelling contexts. Students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and
processes with and without the use of technology. They should use mental and by-hand
approaches to estimation and computation and make use of appropriate mathematical
terminology and symbols.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
Further Mathematics
•
•
•
•
Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 20 percent
Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 14 percent
Unit 3 and 4 Examination 1: 33 percent
Unit 3 and 4 Examination 2: 33 percent
Mathematical Methods
•
•
•
•
Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 17 percent
Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 17 percent
Unit 3 and 4 Examination 1: 22 percent
Unit 3 and 4 Examination 2: 44 percent
Specialist Mathematics
•
Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 17 percent
•
Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 17 percent
•
Unit 3 and 4 Examination 1: 22 percent
• Unit 3 and 4 Examination 2: 44 percent
Page 57
Media
Accreditation Period 2012-2017
Rationale
VCE
Media
provides
students
with the opportunity to analyse
media products and concepts in an
informed and critical way. Students
consider media texts, technologies
and
processes
from
various
perspectives, including an analysis of
structure and features. They examine
industry production and distribution
context, audience reception and the
media’s contribution to and impact
on society. This aspect of the study
is integrated with the individual
and
collaborative
design
and
production of media representations
and products. VCE Media supports
students to develop and refine their
analytical, critical, creative thinking
and expression. Students strengthen
their communication skills and
technical knowledge. This study is
relevant for students who wish to
pursue further formal study at tertiary
level or in vocational education and
training settings. The study provides
knowledge and skills in creative
thinking, planning, analysis, creative
expression
and
communication
valuable for participation in and
contribution towards contemporary
society.
Unit 1: Representation and technologies of representation
In this unit students develop an understanding of the relationship between the media,
technology and the representations present in media forms. They study the relationships
between media technologies, audiences and society. Students develop practical and
analytical skills, including an understanding of the contribution of codes and conventions
to the creation of meaning in media products, the role and significance of selection
processes in their construction, the role audiences play in constructing meaning from
media representations, and the creative and cultural impact of new media technologies.
Unit 2: Media production and the media industry
In this unit students develop their understanding of the specialist production stages and
roles within the collaborative organisation of media production. Students participate in
specific stages of a media production, developing practical skills in their designated role.
Students also develop an understanding of media industry issues and developments
relating to production stages and roles and the broader framework within which
Australian media organisations operate.
Unit 3: Narrative and media production design
In this unit students develop an understanding of film, television or radio drama
production and story elements, and learn to recognise the role and significance of
narrative organisation in fictional film, television or radio drama texts. Students examine
how production and story elements work together to structure meaning in narratives
to engage audiences. Students also develop practical skills through undertaking
exercises related to aspects of the design and production process. They complete a
media production design plan for a specific media form and audience. They present the
relevant specifications as a written planning document, with visual representations that
employ media planning conventions appropriate to the media form in which the student
chooses to work.
Unit 4: Media: process, influence and society’s values
In this unit students further develop practical skills in the production of media products
to realise the production design plan completed during Unit 3. Organisational and
creative skills are refined and applied throughout each stage of the production process.
Students analyse the relationship between media texts, social values and discourses
in the media. The nature and extent of media influence, the relationship between the
media, media audiences and media regulation are also critically analysed in this unit.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Unit 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework, school assessed task and end of year examination:
• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 6 percent
• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 12 percent
• School-assessed task: 37 percent
• End of year examination: 45 percent
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry to
Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake
Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.
However, students need to have a solid
background in Digital Technologies
and it is recommended that students
undertake either 10IT61S, 10IT62S or
10IT63S.
Page 58 Trinity College Colac
Music Performance
Accreditation Period 2017-2021
Rationale
Music is an integral part of all
cultures from the earliest of times,
expressing and reflecting human
experience. Music exists in a myriad
of forms, each able to elicit an array of
intellectual and emotional responses
from its audience. A study of music
enables students to strengthen their
own relationship with music and to be
personally enriched as they develop
greater control of their own musical
expression.
Music learning requires students’
active engagement in the practices of
listening, performing and composing.
As they learn in music, students
apply critical and creative thinking
skills to analyse and critique the
work of contemporary and historical
practitioners and develop their
understanding of the diverse ways in
which music ideas can be shaped to
communicate artistic and expressive
intent.
Students
also
develop
insights into the music traditions of
contemporary and historical global
cultures and form understandings
of ways in which music can interact
with other arts forms and fields of
endeavour.
When students perform the works of
other musicians, they develop skills
in communicating and in working
cooperatively and communally to
achieve creative outcomes. Through
analysing and responding to the work
of other musicians, students develop
knowledge of music, skills in critical
thinking and greater confidence in
written and oral expression.
VCE Music equips students with
personal and musical skills that
enable them to follow pathways
into tertiary music study or further
training in a broad spectrum of music
related careers. VCE Music also offers
students opportunities for personal
development and encourages them to
make an ongoing contribution to the
culture of their community through
participation in life-long music
making.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry to
Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake
Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.
It is recommended that students arrange
for instrumental lessons to compliment
the units.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Unit 1
This unit focuses on building students’ performance and musicianship skills to present
performances of selected group and solo music works using one or more instruments.
They study the work of other performers and explore strategies to optimise their own
approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges
relevant to works they are preparing for performance and endeavour to address these
challenges. Students develop their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship
skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting performances.
Unit 2
This unit focuses on building performance and musicianship skills. Students present
performances of selected group and solo music works using one or more instruments
and take opportunities to perform in familiar and unfamiliar venues and spaces. They
study the work of other performers and refine selected strategies to optimise their own
approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges
relevant to works they are preparing for performance and endeavour to address these
challenges. Students develop their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship
skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting performances.
Unit 3
This unit focuses on building and refining performance and musicianship skills. Students
focus on either group or solo performance and begin preparation of a performance
program they will present in the end-of-year examination. As part of their preparation,
students will also present performances of both group and solo music works using one
or more instruments and take opportunities to perform in familiar and unfamiliar venues
and spaces. They study the work of other performers and refine selected strategies to
optimise their own approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and
stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and endeavour
to address these challenges. Students develop their listening, aural, theoretical and
analytical musicianship skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting
performances.
Unit 4
This unit focuses on further development and refinement of performance and
musicianship skills. Students focus on either group or solo performance and continue
preparation of a performance program they will present in the end-of-year examination.
All students present performances of both group and solo music works using one or
more instruments and take opportunities to perform in familiar and unfamiliar venues
and spaces. Through analyses of other performers’ interpretations and feedback
on their own performances, students refine their interpretations and optimise their
approach to performance. They continue to address challenges relevant to works they
are preparing for performance and to strengthen their listening, aural, theoretical and
analytical musicianship skills.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Unit 3 and 4
School-assessed Coursework, an end of year performance examination and an end of
year aural and written examination.
• Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework: 20 percent
• Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework: 10 percent
• External end of year performance examination: 50 percent
• External end of year aural and written examination: 20 percent
Page 59
Physical Education
Accreditation Period 2017-2021
Rationale
The study of VCE Physical Education
enables students to integrate a
contemporary
understanding
of
the theoretical underpinnings of
performance and participation in
physical activity with practical
application. Through engagement
in physical activities, VCE Physical
Education enables students to
develop the knowledge and skills
required
to
critically
evaluate
influences that affect their own and
others’ performance and participation
in physical activity.
This study equips students with the
appropriate knowledge and skills
to plan, develop and maintain their
involvement in physical activity, sport
and exercise across their lifespan
and to understand the physical,
social, emotional and cognitive health
benefits associated with being active.
The study also prepares students
for employment and/or further study
at the tertiary level or in vocational
education and training settings in
fields such as exercise and sport
science, health science, education,
recreation, sport development and
coaching, health promotion and
related careers.
UNITS 1 AND 2: 2017-2021
Unit 1: The human body in motion
In this unit students explore how the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems
work together to produce movement. Through practical activities students explore the
relationships between the body systems and physical activity, sport and exercise, and
how the systems adapt and adjust to the demands of the activity. They explore how the
capacity and functioning of each system acts as an enabler or barrier to movement and
participation in physical activity.
Unit 2: Physical activity, sport and society
This unit develops students’ understanding of physical activity, sport and society from a
participatory perspective. Students are introduced to types of physical activity and the
role participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviour plays in their own health
and wellbeing as well as in other people’s lives in different population groups.
UNITS 3 AND 4: 2017
Unit 3: Physical activity participation and physiological performance
Students analyse factors contributing to physical activity and sedentary behaviour.
Students identify a range of Australian strategies that are effective in promoting
participation in some form of regular activity. Students investigate the contribution of
energy systems to performance in physical activity. Students explore causes of fatigue
and consider different strategies used to delay and manage fatigue and to promote
recovery.
Unit 4: Enhancing performance
Students undertake an activity analysis. Using the results of the analysis, they then
investigate the required fitness components and participate in a training programme
designed to improve or maintain selected components. Students learn to critically
evaluate different techniques and practices that can be used to enhance performance.
UNITS 3 AND 4: 2018-2021
Unit 3: Movement skills and energy for physical activity
This unit introduces students to the biomechanical and skill acquisition principles
used to analyse human movement skills and energy production from a physiological
perspective. Students use a variety of tools and techniques to analyse movement skills
and apply biomechanical and skill acquisition principles to improve and refine movement
in physical activity, sport and exercise. They use practical activities to demonstrate how
correct application of these principles can lead to improved performance in physical
activity and sport.
Unit 4: Training to improve performance
In this unit students analyse movement skills from a physiological, psychological
and sociocultural perspective, and apply relevant training principles and methods to
improve performance. Improvements in performance, in particular fitness, depend on
the ability of the individual and/ or coach to gain, apply and evaluate knowledge and
understanding of training. Students analyse skill frequencies, movement patterns, heart
rates and work to rest ratios to determine the requirements of an activity. Students
consider the physiological, psychological and sociological requirements of training to
design and evaluate an effective training program.
Assessment
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Unit 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and examination:
•
Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework: 25 percent
•
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework: 25 percent
•
End of year examination: 50 percent.
Page 60 Trinity College Colac
Physics
Accreditation Period 2016–2021
Rationale
Physics is a natural science based
on
observations,
experiments,
measurements and mathematical
analysis with the purpose of
finding quantitative explanations
for phenomena occurring from the
subatomic scale through to the
planets, stellar systems and galaxies
in the Universe. While much scientific
understanding in physics has stood
the test of time, many other areas
continue to evolve. In undertaking
this study, students develop their
understanding of the roles of careful
and systematic experimentation and
modelling in the development of
theories and laws. They undertake
practical activities and apply physics
principles to explain and quantify both
natural and constructed phenomena.
In VCE Physics students develop
a range of inquiry skills involving
practical
experimentation
and
research, analytical skills including
critical and creative thinking, and
communication
skills.
Students
use scientific and cognitive skills
and
understanding
to
analyse
contemporary physics-related issues
and to communicate their views from
an informed position.
VCE Physics provides for continuing
study pathways within the discipline
and leads to a range of careers.
Physicists may undertake research
and development in specialist areas
including acoustics, astrophysics
and cosmology, atmospheric physics,
computational physics, education,
energy
research,
engineering,
instrumentation,
lasers
and
photonics, medical physics, nuclear
science, optics, pyrotechnics and
radiography. Physicists also work
in cross-disciplinary areas such as
bushfire research, climate science,
forensic science, geology, materials
science, neuroscience and sports
science.
Unit 1: What ideas explain the physical world?
Students explore how physics explains phenomena, at various scales, which are not
always visible to the unaided human eye. They examine some of the fundamental
ideas and models used by physicists in an attempt to understand and explain the world.
Students consider thermal concepts by investigating heat, probe common analogies
used to explain electricity and consider the origins and formation of matter. They apply
thermal laws when investigating energy transfers within and between systems, and
assess the impact of human use of energy on the environment. Students examine the
motion of electrons and explain how it can be manipulated and utilised. They explore
current scientifically accepted theories that explain how matter and energy have
changed since the origins of the Universe.
Unit 2: What do experiments reveal about the physical world?
Students explore the power of experiments in developing models and theories. They
investigate a variety of phenomena by making their own observations and generating
questions, which in turn lead to experiments. Students make direct observations
of physics phenomena and examine the ways in which phenomena that may not be
directly observable can be explored through indirect observations.
Unit 3: How do fields explain motion and electricity?
Students explore the importance of energy in explaining and describing the physical
world. They examine the production of electricity and its delivery to homes. Students
consider the applications of concepts related to fields include the transmission of
electricity over large distances and the design and operation of particle accelerators.
They explore the interactions, effects and applications of gravitational, electric and
magnetic fields. They use Newton’s laws to investigate motion, and are introduced
to Einstein’s theories to explain the motion of very fast objects. Students design and
undertake investigations involving at least two continuous independent variables.
Unit 4: How can two contradictory models explain both light and
matter?
Students explore the use of wave and particle theories to model the properties of light
and matter. A wave model is also used to explain the behaviour of matter which enables
students to consider the relationship between light and matter. Students learn to think
beyond the concepts experienced in everyday life to study the physical world and design
and undertake investigations involving at least two continuous independent variables.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and examination:
• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 21 percent
• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 19 percent
• End of year examination: 60 percent
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit
4. Students entering Unit 3 without Units
1 and/or 2 may be required to undertake
additional reading as prescribed by their
teacher.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 61
Product Design and Technology - Wood or Textiles
Accreditation Period 2012-2017
Rationale
Designers play an important part in
our daily lives. They determine the
form and function of the products
we use. They transform ideas into
drawings and plans for the creation
and manufacture of useful products
that fulfil human needs and wants. In
recent history the use of resources
to create an ever-increasing array
of products has given designers
an increased responsibility to think
sustainably.
Students develop an understanding
of the consequences of product
design choices. They develop the
necessary skills to critically analyse
existing products and to develop their
own creative solutions.
VCE Product Design and Technology
can provide a pathway to a range of
related fields such as
industrial, product, interior and
exhibition design, engineering, and
fashion, furniture, jewellery, textile and
ceramic design at both professional
and vocational levels. Moreover, VCE
Product Design and Technology can
inform sustainable behaviours and
develop technical skills to present
multiple solutions to everyday life
situations. It contributes to creating
confident and unique problem solvers
and project managers well equipped
to deal with the multi-disciplinary
nature of modern workplaces.
Unit 1: Product re-design and sustainability
This unit focuses on the analysis, modification and improvement of a product design with
consideration of the materials used and issues of sustainability. Finite resources and the
proliferation of waste require sustainable product design thinking. Many products in use
today have been redesigned to suit the changing needs and demands of users but with
little consideration of their sustainability.
Area of Study 1 - provides an introduction and structured approach towards the Product
design process.
In Area of Study 2 - Students re-design a product.
Unit 2: Collaborative design
In this unit students work in teams to design and develop an item in a product range
or contribute to the design, planning and production of a group product. They focus on
factors including: human needs and wants; function, purpose and context for product
design; aesthetics; materials and sustainability; and the impact of these factors on a
design solution.
In this unit students are able to gain inspiration from an historical and/or a cultural design
movement or style and its defining factors such as ideological or technological change,
philosophy or aesthetics.
In Area of Study 1 - Students will work in a small design.
In Area of Study 2 - The product produced individually or collectively is evaluated.
Unit 3: Applying the Product design process
In this unit students are engaged in the design and development of a product that
meets the needs and expectations of a client and/or an end-user, developed through a
design process and influenced by a range of complex factors. These factors include the
purpose, function and context of the product; human-centred design factors; innovation
and creativity; visual, tactile and aesthetic factors; sustainability concerns; economic
limitations; legal responsibilities; material characteristics and properties; and technology.
Design and product development and manufacture occur in a range of settings. This
unit examines different settings and takes students through the Product design process
as they design for others.
In Area of Study 1 - Students develop and examine a design brief.
In Area of Study 2 - Students examine design and development of products in various
settings.
In Area of Study 3 - Students commence the Product design process.
Unit 4: Product development and evaluation
NOTE: Students can only select wood
or textiles. They cannot undertake both
aspects of Design and Technology.
In this unit students learn that evaluations are made at various points of product design,
development and production. In the role of designer, students judge the suitability and
viability of design ideas and options referring to the design brief and evaluation criteria
in collaboration with a client and/or an end-user.
In Area of Study 1 - Students develop analysis and evaluation methods.
In Area of Study 2 - Students continue to develop and safely manufacture the product
designed in Unit 3.
In Area of Study 3 - Students will evaluate the techniques and quality of their final
product. Students will produce an informative presentation to highlight the product’s
features to the client and/or an end-user and explain its care requirements.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of outcomes specified for the unit.
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Page 62 Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Units 3 and 4
School-assessed tasks, school-assessed coursework and an end of year examination.
•
School-assessed coursework (Units 3 & 4) 20 percent
•
School assessed task (Units 3 and 4) 50 percent
•
End of Year examination 30 percent
Trinity College Colac
Psychology
Accreditation Period 2016–2021
Rationale
Unit 1: How are behaviour and mental processes shaped?
VCE Psychology provides students
with a framework for exploring
the complex interactions between
biological,
psychological
and
social factors that influence human
thought, emotions and behaviour.
In undertaking this study, students
apply their learning to everyday
situations including workplace and
social relations. They gain insights
into a range of psychological health
issues in society.
Unit 2: How do external factors influence behaviour and mental
processes?
In VCE Psychology students develop
a range of inquiry skills involving
practical
experimentation
and
research, analytical skills including
critical and creative thinking, and
communication
skills.
Students
use scientific and cognitive skills
and
understanding
to
analyse
contemporary
psychology-related
issues, and communicate their views
from an informed position.
VCE
Psychology
provides
for
continuing study pathways within
the discipline and leads to a range
of
careers.
Opportunities
may
involve working with children,
adults, families and communities
in a variety of settings such as
academic and research institutions,
management and human resources,
and government, corporate and
private enterprises. Fields of applied
psychology include educational,
environmental,
forensic,
health,
sport and organisational psychology.
Specialist fields of psychology
include counselling and clinical
contexts, as well as neuropsychology,
social psychology and developmental
psychology. Psychologists also work
in cross-disciplinary areas such as
medical research or as part of ongoing or emergency support services
in educational, institutional and
industrial settings.
Students investigate the structure and functioning of the human brain. They consider the
complex nature of psychological development, including situations where psychological
development may not occur as expected. Students examine the contribution that
classical and contemporary studies have made to an understanding of the human brain
and its functions.
Students investigate how perception of stimuli enables a person to interact with the
world around them and how their perception of stimuli can be distorted. They evaluate
the role social cognition plays in a person’s attitudes, perception of themselves and
relationships with others. Students explore a variety of factors and contexts that can
influence the behaviour of an individual and groups.
Unit 3: How does experience affect behaviour and mental
processes?
Students examine both macro-level and micro-level functioning of the nervous system
to explain how a person to interacts with the world around them. They explore how
stress may affect a person’s psychological functioning and consider the causes and
management of stress. Students investigate how mechanisms of memory and learning
lead to the acquisition of knowledge, the development of new capacities and changed
behaviours. They consider the limitations and fallibility of memory and how memory can
be improved.
Unit 4: How is wellbeing developed and maintained?
Students examine the nature of consciousness and how changes in levels of
consciousness can affect mental processes and behaviour. They consider the role
of sleep and the impact that sleep disturbances may have on a person’s functioning.
Students explore the concept of a mental health continuum and apply a biopsychosocial
approach, as a scientific model, to analyse mental health and disorder. They use specific
phobia to illustrate how the development and management of a mental disorder can be
considered as an interaction between biological, psychological and social factors.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Unit 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Unit 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and examination:
• Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework: 16 percent
• Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework: 24 percent
• End of year examination: 60 percent
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 63
Religion and Society
Accreditation Period 2017-2021
Rationale
VCE Religion and Society enables
students to understand the complex
interactions between religion and
society over time. Religion has
played and continues to play a
significant role in the development
and maintenance of society. Students
come to appreciate that religion
can be a positive force of power,
authority and justice. However,
religious institutions have not always
interacted positively with society at
large and have at times supported the
unethical
behaviour
of
other
power structures in society and of
individuals.
The study of religion and society can
assist students in reaching a deeper,
balanced understanding of societies
and cultures in which multiple
worldviews coexist. Students explore
how such societies and their religious
traditions
negotiate
significant
ethical issues. Religious traditions
offer value systems that guide
their interactions with society and
influence society’s decision making.
This study offers an insight into the
religious beliefs and other aspects
of religion that express these value
systems. Students study the role of
religions in supporting adherents
to grapple with the big questions of
human existence and to respond to
significant life experiences.
Through the study of VCE Religion
and Society students come to
acknowledge the role of religion
in shaping historical and present
events. They explore times when
religion dominated societies and the
shifting role of religion in societies
today in which multiple worldviews
coexist and religion may be seen to
have a lesser role.
This study fosters an appreciation
of the complexity of societies where
multiple worldviews coexist and
develops skills in research and
analysis, helping students to become
informed citizens and preparing them
for work and further study in fields
such as anthropology, theology,
philosophy, sociology, journalism,
politics and international relations.
Unit 1: The role of religion in society
In this unit students explore the origins of religions and the role of religions in the
development of society, identifying the nature and purpose of religion over time. They
investigate the contribution of religion generally to the development of human society.
They also focus on the role of religious traditions over time in shaping personal and
group identity. Students examine how individuals, groups and new ideas have affected
and continue to affect religious traditions. The unit provides an opportunity for students
to understand the often complex relationships that exist between individuals, groups,
new ideas and religious traditions broadly and in the Australian society in which they
live. A range of examples are studied throughout the unit. For all areas of study, students
explore detailed examples from more than one religion.
Unit 2: Religion and Ethics
How do we know what is good? How do we make decisions in situations where it is unclear
what is good or not good? Do we accept what society defines as good? Do we do what
feels right? Or do we rely on a definition of what is good from a religious tradition? What
are the principles that guide decision making? Ethics is concerned with discovering the
perspectives that guide practical moral judgment. Studying ethics involves identifying
the arguments and analysing the reasoning, and any other influences, behind these
perspectives and moral judgments. An important influence on ethical perspective is the
method of ethical decision-making, made up of concepts, principles and theories.
In this unit students study in detail various methods of ethical decision-making in at least
two religious traditions and their related philosophical traditions. They explore ethical
issues in societies where multiple worldviews coexist, in the light of these investigations.
Unit 3: The search for meaning
Over time and across cultures humanity has sought to understand the why and how
of existence. In this quest for meaning humans have consistently posed big questions
of life such as: Where did we come from? Is there someone or something greater than
us – an ultimate reality? What is the purpose of our existence? How should we live? Is
there anything beyond death? In response to this quest for meaning, various religious,
philosophical, scientific, and ideological worldviews have been developed. Religion has
developed answers in the form of various beliefs and other aspects that have offered
ways of establishing meaning – not only for human existence, but also for all that exists.
The aspects of religion have also attempted to explain the nature of relationships
between humans individually and collectively, between humans and ultimate reality and
between humans and the rest of the natural world.
In this unit students study the purposes of religion generally and then consider the
religious beliefs developed by one or more than one religious tradition or denomination
in response to the big questions of life. Students study how particular beliefs within
one or more than one religious tradition or denomination may be expressed through
the other aspects of religion, and explore how this is intended to foster meaning for
adherents. Students then consider the interaction between significant life experience
and religion.
Unit 4: Religion, challenge and change
This unit focuses on the interaction over time of religious traditions and the societies of
which they are a part. For a large part of human history religion has been a truth narrative,
offering a means for finding answers to the big questions of life. Religious traditions
are in a dynamic process of engagement and negotiation with members individually
and collectively, as well as with other key institutions in wider society associated with
power, authority and credibility. Religious traditions are living institutions that participate
in and contribute to wider societies – both positively and negatively. They stimulate and
support society, acting as levers for change themselves and embracing or resisting
forces for change within society.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Entry
Unit 1 and 2
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Page 64 Units 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework and examination:
• Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework: 25 percent
• Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework: 25 percent
• End of year examination: 50 percent.
Trinity College Colac
Studio Arts
Accreditation Period 2017-2021
Rationale
The creative nature of the visual
arts provides individuals with the
opportunity for personal growth, the
expression of ideas and a process for
examining identity. Engagement with
artworks facilitates creative thinking
and the development of new ideas;
it also supports connection and
exchange within local, national and
global communities.
VCE Studio Arts encourages and
supports students to recognise their
individual potential as artists and
develop their understanding and
development of art making.
VCE Studio Arts equips students with
the knowledge and skills to pursue an
art studio practice and follow tertiary
and industry pathways in fine art,
research and education. The study
also offers students opportunities
for personal development and
encourages them to make an ongoing
contribution to society and the
culture of their community through
lifelong participation in the making
and viewing of artworks.
Unit 1: Studio inspiration and techniques
Students focus on developing an individual understanding of the stages of studio
practice and learn how to explore, develop, refine, resolve and present artworks.
Students explore sources of inspiration, research artistic influences, develop individual
ideas and explore a range of materials and techniques related to specific art forms.
Using documented evidence in a visual diary, students progressively refine and resolve
their skills to communicate ideas in artworks.
Students also research and analyse the ways in which artists from different times and
cultures have developed their studio practice to interpret and express ideas, source
inspiration and apply materials and techniques in artworks.
Unit 2: Studio exploration and concepts
Students focus on establishing. A studio practice which includes the formulation and use
of an individual approach to documenting sources of inspiration, and experimentation
with selected materials and techniques relevant to specific art forms. Students explore
and record the development of the work in a visual diary as part of the studio process.
Through the study of art movements and styles, students begin to understand the use
of other artists’ work in the making of new artworks. Students also develop skills in the
visual analysis of artworks. Artworks made by artists from different times and cultures are
analysed to understand developments in studio practice. Comparisons of contemporary
art with historical art styles and movements should be encouraged.
Unit 3: Studio practices and processes
Students focus on the implementation of an individual studio process leading to the
production of a range of potential directions. Students develop and use an exploration
proposal to define an area of creative exploration. They plan and apply a studio process
to explore and develop their individual ideas. Analysis of these explorations and the
development of the potential directions is an intrinsic part of the studio process to
support the making of finished artworks in Unit 4.
For this study, the exploration proposal supports the student to identify a direction
for their studio process. This process records trialling, experimenting, analysing and
evaluating the extent to which art practices successfully communicate ideas presented
in the exploration proposal. From this process students progressively develop and
identify a range of potential directions to develop at least two artworks in Unit 4.
The study of artists and their work practices and processes may provide inspiration for
students’ own approaches to art making. Students investigate and analyse the response
of artists to a wide range of source material and examine their use of materials and
techniques.
Unit 4: Studio practice and art industry contexts
In this unit students focus on the planning, production and evaluation required to develop,
refine and present artworks that link cohesively according to the ideas resolved in Unit
3. To support the creation of artworks, students present visual and written evaluation
that explains why they selected a range of potential directions from Unit 3 to produce
at least two finished artworks in Unit 4. Once the artworks have been made, students
provide an evaluation about the cohesive relationship between the artworks.
This unit also investigates aspects of artists’ involvement in the art industry, focusing on
a least two different exhibitions, that the student has visited in the current year of study
with reference to specific artworks in those exhibitions. Students investigate the role
of the artist and/or curator involved in the preparation, presentation and conservation
of artworks displayed in exhibitions in at least two different galleries or exhibitions.
Students examine a range of environments for the presentation of artworks including a
variety of galleries and spaces.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Unit 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Unit 3 and 4
School-assessed tasks and examination:
• Unit 3 school-assessed Coursework: 5 percent
• Unit 4 school-assessed Coursework: 5 percent
• Unit 3 and 4 school-assessed Task: 60 percent
• End of year examination: 30 percent.
Page 65
VET Agriculture
The VCE VET Agriculture program
is drawn from a national training
package
and
offers
portable
qualifications which are recognised
throughout
Australia.
These
qualifications provide students with a
broad range of skills and knowledge
to pursue a career or further training
in related industries.
Qualifications
The following qualifications are available in the VET Agriculture program:
AHC20110 Certificate II in Agriculture
Certificate II in Agriculture provides students with the knowledge and skills that will
enhance their employment prospects in the agriculture industry. Knowledge and skills
are developed in fencing, maintaining livestock feed and water supplies, mustering,
moving and penning up livestock and the operation of a tractor.
Units 1 to 4 Compulsory Study Units
AHCOHS201A - Participate in OHS processes
AHCWRK209A - Participate in environmentally sustainable work practices
Units 1- 4 Elective Study Units
The remainder of the 15 study units for the program is taken from a comprehensive
elective list.
Credit in the VCE
Student who complete AHC20110 Certificate II in Agriculture will be eligible for two or
more units at Units 1 and 2 level and a Units 3 and 4 sequence.
ATAR Contribution
Students who receive a Units 3 and 4 sequence for Program 1, 2 or 3 of VCE VET
Agriculture will be eligible for an increment towards their ATAR (10% of the average of
the primary four scaled studies).
Students who receive a Units 3 and 4 sequence for any of the approved school-based
apprenticeship and traineeship qualifications from the Agriculture industry area will be
eligible for an increment towards their ATAR (10% of the average of the primary four
scaled studies).
The increment is awarded by the Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC). Further
information can be found on the VTAC website: www.vtac.edu.au
Scored Assessment
The VCE VET Agriculture program does not offer scored assessment.
According to the VTAC website, VCE VET Unit 3 and 4 sequences with no scored
assessment available:
• may be counted as fifth and sixth studies. The increment will be 10% of the average
of the primary four VTAC scaled study scores.
Pathways from the qualification
Further training pathways from this qualification include, but are not limited to, Certificate
III in Agriculture (Dairy Production), Certificate III in Pork Production, Certificate III in
Horse Breeding.
This qualification provides an entry level occupational outcome in agriculture. Job roles
and titles vary across different industry sectors, with employment opportunities existing
in a number of designated sectors such a beef, dairy, sheep and wool production.
Possible job titles relevant to this qualification include:
Entry
There are no entry requirements for this
qualification.
Page 66 •
•
•
•
Assistant animal attendant/stockperson
Assistant Farm or Station hand
Assistant Farm or Station worker
Assistant Farm or Station labourer
Trinity College Colac
VET Interactive Digital Media
The VCE VET Interactive Digital
Media program is drawn from a
national training package and offers
portable qualifications which are
recognised throughout Australia.
These qualifications provide students
with a broad range of knowledge and
skills to pursue a career or further
training in the screen and media
industry in areas such as film and
television production, animation,
radio broadcasting and photography.
Qualifications
The following qualifications is available in the VET Interactive Digital Media program:
CUF30107 Certificate III in Media
Units 1 and 2 of the Certificate III in Media include developing and applying creative arts
industry knowledge, working with others and applying critical thinking techniques. Units
3 and 4 offers scored assessment and incorporates units such as 2D digital animations,
writing content for a range of media, authoring interactive sequences and creating
visual design components.
Units 1 to 4 Compulsory Study Units
BSBCRT301A - Develop and extend critical and creative thinking skills
CUFIND301B - Work effectively in the screen and media industries
CUSOHS301A - Follow OHS procedures
CUFDIG303A - Produce and prepare photo images
Units 1- 4 Elective Study Units
The remainder of the study units for the program is taken from a comprehensive
elective list.
Credit in the VCE
Students who complete CUF30107 Certificate III in Media will be eligible for up to four
units of credit at Units 1 and 2 level and a Units 3 and 4 sequence.
ATAR Contribution
Students wishing to receive an ATAR contribution for the Units 3 and 4 sequence of
Program 2: Certificate III in Media must undertake scored assessment for the purpose
of achieving a study score. This study score can contribute directly to the ATAR, either
as one of the student’s best four studies (the primary four) or as a fifth or sixth study.
Note: Where a student elects not to receive a study score for VCE VET Interactive
Digital Media, no contribution to the ATAR will be available.
Scored Assessment
Students wishing to receive a study score for VCE VET Interactive Digital Media must
undertake scored assessment. This consists of three coursework tasks, worth 66% of
the overall study score and an end of year examination, worth 34% of the overall study
score.
Scored assessment is based on the Units 3 and 4 sequence of Program 2: CUF30107
Certificate III in Media.
According to the VTAC website, VCE VET Unit 3 and 4 sequences with scored
assessment:
• study scores are scaled and may be included in the calculation of the ATAR aggregate
• where a scored assessment is available and you decide not to take it, no increment
will be available.
Entry
Note: The Units 3 and 4 sequence of
VCE VET Interactive Digital Media is
not designed as a stand-alone study.
Students are strongly advised against
undertaking the Units 3 and 4 sequence
without first completing Units 1 and 2
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 67
VET Sport and Recreation
The VCE VET Sport and Recreation
program is drawn from the SIS10
Sport, Fitness and Recreation Training
Package and provides students with
the opportunity to acquire and develop
the skills, knowledge and confidence
to work in the areas of sport and
outdoor
recreation.
Leadership,
organisational and specialist activity
skills will be developed through the
units of competency undertaken in
the selected program.
Qualifications
The following qualifications are available in the VET Sport and Recreation program:
SIS30513 Certificate III in Sport and Recreation
Certificate III in Sport and Recreation provides students with the skills and knowledge to
work in the Sport and Recreation industry. In Units 1 and 2, students complete a range
of core units and one elective core unit. Units 3 and 4 offers scored assessment and
includes core units such as conduct basic warm-up and cool-down programs, plan and
conduct sport and recreation sessions and undertake a risk analysis of activities.
Note: The training package is currently under review so some units maybe
superseded by other study units.
Units 1 and 2 Compulsory Study Units
Core Units:
BSBCRT301A - Develop and extend critical and creative thinking skills
BSBWOR301B - Organise personal work priorities and development
HLTAID003 - Provide first aid
ICAWEB201A - Use social media tools for collaboration and management
SISXCCS201A - Provide customer service
SISXEMR201A - Respond to emergency situations
SISXWHS101 - Follow work health and safety policies
Elective Unit:
SISSSCO101 - Develop and update knowledge of coaching practices
Units 3 and 4 Compulsory Study Units
Core Units:
SISXCAI303A - Plan and conduct sport and recreation sessions
SISXCAI306A - Facilitate groups
SITXCOM401 - Manage conflict
SISSSPT303A - Conduct basic warm-up and cool down programs
SISXRES301A - Provide public education on the use of resources
SISXRSK301A - Undertake risk analysis of activities
Elective Unit:
SISSSOF202 - Officiate games or competitions
Credit in the VCE
Students who complete​SIS30513 Certificate III in Sport and Recreation will be eligible
for up to three units of credit towards their VCE at Units 1 and 2 level and up to three units
of credit towards their VCE at Units 3 and 4 level including a Units 3 and 4 sequence.
ATAR Contribution
Students wishing to receive an ATAR contribution for the Units 3 and 4 sequence must
undertake scored assessment for the purposes of achieving a study score. This study
score can contribute directly to the ATAR, either as one of the student’s best four studies
(the primary four) or as a fifth or sixth study.
A student who opts out of scored assessment in the VCE VET Sport and Recreation
program will not be eligible for a contribution towards their ATAR.
Scored Assessment
Entry
Scored Assessment for 2017 will be undertaken in the Units 3 and 4 sequence of
Program 3: SIS30513 Certificate III in Sport and Recreation.
Note: The Units 3 and 4 sequence of
Program 3: SIS30513 Certificate III in
Sport and Recreation is not designed
as a stand-alone study. Students are
strongly advised against undertaking
the Units 3 and 4 sequence without first
completing Units 1 and 2.
Students wishing to receive a study score for VCE VET Sport and Recreation must
undertake scored assessment. This consists of three coursework tasks, worth 66% of
the overall study score and an end of year examination worth 34% of the overall study
score.
Page 68 According to the VTAC website, VCE VET Unit 3 and 4 sequences with scored
assessment:
• study scores are scaled and may be included in the calculation of the ATAR aggregate
• where a scored assessment is available and you decide not to take it, no increment
will be available.
Trinity College Colac
Visual Communication Design
Accreditation Period 2013-2017
Rationale
Visual communication design can
inform people’s decisions about
where and how they live and
what they buy and consume. The
visual presentation of information
influences people’s choices on what
they think they need or want. The
study provides students with the
opportunity to develop an informed, a
critical and a discriminating approach
to understanding and using visual
communications, and nurtures their
ability to think creatively about design
solutions. Design thinking, which
involves the application of creative,
critical and reflective techniques,
processes and dispositions, supports
skill development in areas beyond
design, including science, business,
marketing and management.
The study of Visual Communication
Design
can
provide
pathways
to training and tertiary study in
design and design-related studies,
including graphic design, industrial
and
architectural
design
and
communication design.
Unit 1: Introduction to Visual Communication Design
This unit focuses on using visual language to communicate messages, ideas and
concepts. This involves acquiring and applying design thinking skills as well as drawing
skills to make messages, ideas and concepts visible and tangible. Students practise their
ability to draw what they observe and they use visualisation drawing methods to explore
their own ideas and concepts. Students develop an understanding of the importance of
presentation drawings to clearly communicate their final visual communications.
Unit 2: Applications of Visual Communication Design
This unit focuses on the application of visual communication design knowledge, design
thinking skills and drawing methods to create visual communications to meet specific
purposes in designated design fields.
Students use presentation drawing methods that incorporate the use of technical drawing
conventions to communicate information and ideas associated with the environmental
or industrial fields of design.
Unit 3: Design Thinking and Practice
In this unit students gain an understanding of the process designers employ to
structure their thinking and communicate ideas with clients, target audiences, other
designers and specialists. Through practical investigation and analysis of existing
visual communications, students gain insight into how the selection of methods, media,
materials and the application of design elements and design principles can create
effective visual communications for specific audiences and purposes. They investigate
and experiment with the use of manual and digital methods, media and materials to
make informed decisions when selecting suitable approaches for the development of
their own design ideas and concepts.
Unit 4: Design Development and Presentation
The focus of this unit is the development of design concepts and two final presentations
of visual communications to meet the requirements of the brief. This involves applying
the design process twice to meet each of the stated needs.
Having completed their brief and generated ideas in Unit 3, students continue the design
process by developing and refining concepts for each need stated in the brief. They
utilise a range of digital and manual two- and three-dimensional methods, media and
materials. They investigate how the application of design elements and design principles
creates different communication messages with their target audience.
Assessment
Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.
Levels of Achievement
Units 1 and 2
‘S’ and ‘N’ achievement with graded results.
Entry
Units 3 and 4
School-assessed coursework, school assessed task and an end of year examination:
• Unit 3 school-assessed coursework: 20 percent
• Unit 4 school-assessed coursework: 5 percent
• Unit 4 school-assessed task: 40 percent
• End of year examination: 35 percent.
There are no prerequisites for entry
to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must
undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking
Unit 4.
Trinity College strongly recommends
a satisfactory completion of 10VC62S
prior to undertaking Units 1 & 2 and
satisfactory completion of Units 1 & 2
prior to undertaking Unit 3 & 4.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 69
VCAL
The
VICTORIAN
CERTIFICATE
of
APPLIED
LEARNING
Page 70 The Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) is a
‘hands-on’ option for students in Years 11 and 12. Trinity
College offers two levels of VCAL: Intermediate (Year 11)
and Senior (Year 12). Like the VCE, the VCAL is a recognised
senior qualification. Unlike the VCE which is widely used
by students as a pathway to university, students who
do the VCAL are more likely to be interested in going
to training at a Technical and Further Education (TAFE)
institute, starting an apprenticeship, or getting a job after
completing school.
Upon completion of VCAL, students receive a certificate
and statement of results that details the area of study
completed. Generally it takes one year to complete a level.
At Trinity College, all students are required to complete a
Religious Education unit and VCAL students will complete
VCE Units 1 and 2 Religion and Society.
The VCAL’s flexibility enables students to design a study
programme that suits their interests and learning needs.
Because of the many varied possibilities required to
complete a VCAL programme, it is important that every
student who is considering following a VCAL pathway
meets with the VCAL Coordinator to work out their
individual pathway.
There are numerous options available in these areas and
it is always dependent on the student’s interests as to the
study areas chosen. The VCAL units can be combined with
VCE study units and/or VET certificates. To complement
their senior studies, students may also choose from
auxiliary programmes that run parallel with the VCE and
VCAL. Options available to students include a range of VET
(Vocational Educational and Training) courses and SBATs
(School Based Apprenticeships and Traineeships).
Trinity College Colac
VCAL - Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning
Units are selected from the following four compulsory
strands:
Literacy and Numeracy Skills
The VCAL programme must include literacy and numeracy
subjects. These can be selected from VCAL Literacy Skills
and VCAL Numeracy Skills units and/or VCE English and
Maths units.
must include components of nationally recognised VET
programmes. The range of VET options is extensive and
some examples are automotive, engineering, building and
construction, hospitality, retail, multimedia, information
technology, agriculture, horticulture, warehousing and
hair and beauty. Some VET courses are offered at Trinity
College and details can be found in the VET section of this
book.
Work Related Skills
Trinity College offers a unit in Work Related Skills. This
is especially designed to enable students to develop
employability skills topics include occupational health and
safety and job interview skills, VCAL also gives students
the choice of undertaking a structured work placement
or traineeship. Alternatively, students may choose to
complete a VET Certificate or VCE technology units to
satisfy this requirement.
Personal Development Skills
This is a compulsory for VCAL students and is aimed at
developing students’ teamwork skills, self-confidence
and other skills important for life and work. Some of the
work undertaken in this unit is project based. The learning
gained doing these types of projects counts towards the
VCAL.
Industry Specific Skills
A VCAL programme, at the Intermediate and Senior levels,
The table below explains the various possibilities for Year
11 and 12 students’ choice of a VCAL programme.
Year 11 and Year 12 VCAL Curriculum
VCAL PATHWAY: Year 11 students will follow the Intermediate VCAL programme and will study Religion and Society Unit
1. Year 12 students will follow the Senior VCAL programme and will study Religion and Society Unit 2. CORE subjects for
VCAL students include Religious Education, Literacy, Numeracy and Personal Development Skills. Students have various
options to complete their Work Related Skills and their Industry Related skills. As there are many unit possibilities
within a VCAL pathway, it is important the each student that wishes to pursue this option has an interview with the
VCAL Co-ordinator, in order to ascertain the best possible individualised learning programme for these students.
CORE STRANDS: the following FOUR strands are compulsory.
1
Religious Education
Compulsory
Religion and Society Units 1/2
2
Personal Development Skills
Compulsory
Intermediate/Senior
3
Literacy
Compulsory to choose one option
4
Numeracy
Compulsory to choose one option
VCAL Literacy
VCE English 1/2 or 3/4
VCAL Numeracy
VCE Maths: Units 1/2 or 3/4
ELECTIVE OPTIONS: students must choose three of these options.
VCAL Work Related Skills Unit
Compulsory to choose at least Work Related
Skills and/or a VET Certificate and/or VCE
technology unit.
Industry Specific Skills:
VET Certificate
Students must arrange an
appointment with the VET
Coordinator to discuss VET options.
Compulsory to choose a VET Certificate.
Students can choose from two VET options:
• VET UNITS offered at Trinity College
• VET UNITS offered off campus.
School Based Apprenticeship or
Traineeship (SBAT)
Optional
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Intermediate/Senior
Certificate II in Agriculture
Certificate III in Media
Certificate III in Sport and Recreation
VET Unit off campus
The VCAL Co-ordinator must be consulted
and evidence of the SBAT must be provided
if this option is chosen
Page 71
Vocational
Education and
Training
(VET)
and
School
Based
Apprenticeship
AND
TRAINEESHIP
(SBAt)
Page 72 “I am like a little
pencil in God’s hand.
He does the writing. The
pencil has nothing to do
with it.”
Mother Teresa
Trinity College Colac
Vocational Education and Training (VET)
Who can enrol in a VET course?
Students in Years 10, 11 or 12 can access
VET courses.
What is a VET course?
VET courses are applied learning
courses. They are competency based
and nationally accredited. Most courses
run over two years. VET courses have
many features as they give students the
opportunity to:
• Gain credit towards either the VCE
or VCAL;
• Achieve a nationally accredited
certificate;
• Achieve a Statement of
Attainment indicating all units of
competence achieved;
• Achieve a contribution toward
their ATAR score.
Where can I undertake a VET course?
Trinity College, in partnership with
Registered Training Organisations,
offers VET Courses which are available
on or off-campus, depending on the
course. Some of the areas available
include:
• Agriculture
• Automotive
• Building and Construction
• Hairdressing
• Hospitality
• Interactive Digital Media
• Sport and Recreation
Further information regarding VET
courses
by
Registered
Training
Organisations will be available during
Term 3.
When are VET Courses Held?
Apart from the three VET Certificates
studied at Trinity College as part of the
regular school timetable, all other VET
courses currently operate on a Wednesday.
Students enrolled in these courses need
to sign out of the College to attend their
VET Course which may be offered in
Colac or Geelong. It is expected that this
arrangement will continue in 2017.
VET Certificates Offered at Trinity College
As part of the school’s daily timetable, the
following three VET Courses are offered in
2017:
• VET Agriculture (Certificate II)
• VET Interactive Digital Media
(Certificate III)
• VET Sport and Recreation (Certificate
III)
More details regarding these courses are in
this book under the section entitled ‘VCE
and VET Subjects’ which begins on Page 39.
VET Hospitality (Certificate II) is offered as
a course to be studied in the Trade Training
What do VET Courses cost?
Centre (Pound Road Campus). Further
Final costs for the 2017 VET courses details regarding this course are on the
cannot be established until late August. following page.
This is because actual costs charged by
the Registered Training Organisations
(RTOs) have not yet been determined.
In addition, subsidies received from the
Catholic Education Commission of Victoria
(CECV) to offset the cost of VET Courses
have not yet been received. Transport costs
for VET subjects outside of Colac are also
to be determined. This may be at parents’
expense. Once details have been finalised,
information will be distributed.
How do I enrol in a VET course?
Please arrange an appointment with the
VET Coordinator to discuss VET options.
School Based Apprenticeships and Traineeships
School Based Apprenticeships and
Traineeships (SBATs) are relatively new
but are quickly gaining popularity.
SBAT scheme may also give students a
contribution to their ATAR score. This is
dependent on the trade or qualification.
Students must be fifteen years of age to
take part in the programme. Registering
as a school based apprentice or trainee
gives students the opportunity to gain a
nationally accredited certificate, whilst
also completing their other studies. The
The benefits of the programme are that
students gain practical experience in the
workforce. SBATs are registered with
the appropriate boards and are paid
an hourly rate for work and training.
For some students, it is the pathway to
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
a full-time apprenticeship or job. This
programme can offer students variety in
their studies and students can also gain
competence in work-related skills. This
can enhance job prospects and enable
students to network within the local
workforce.
Further information about SBATs are
available from the Careers Officer.
Page 73
VET Hospitality Certificate II
VCE VET Hospitality is a program drawn
from a national training package and
offers portable qualifications which are
recognised throughout Australia. These
qualifications provide students with the
knowledge and skills to prepare them
for a diverse range of occupations in the
hospitality industry, including commercial
cookery, catering and food and beverage
service.
range of commercial cookery skills which
can be transferred across all aspects
of life, as well as acquiring workplace
ready subjects including using hygienic
practices for food safety and working
effectively with others. Most importantly,
the skills the students learn form the
foundation for securing part-time work
as well as establishing a long-term career
in hospitality and catering operations.
The Hospitality units, presented at an
impressive commercial grade trade
training centre, have seen students
learn a range of cookery and catering
operation skills which provide a practical
pathway to work within various catering
settings such as hospitals and aged care
facilities, sporting and entertainment
venues, hotel banqueting departments,
cafes and bistros.
Qualifications
The industry-experienced trainer uses a
workplace training approach, enabling
students to benefit from learning a
Please Note: In 2017, at the Trade Training
Centre, Pound Road Campus, either
SIT20312 Certificate II in Hospitality
Page 74 Students will be enrolled in SIT31013
Certificate III in Catering Operations,
which incorporates
•
SIT20213 Certificate II in Hospitality
•
SIT20312 Certificate II in Kitchen
Operations
•
SIT30713 Certificate III in Hospitality
or SIT20312 Certificate II in Kitchen
Operations, will be offered.
If there is sufficient interest for this
subject to run, it will operate at the same
time as other external VET courses: on a
Wednesday afternoon and evening and
not as part of the regular Trinity College
daily timetable.
Scored Assessments
Students wishing to receive a study score
for VCE VET Hospitality must undertake
Scored Assessment. This consists of
three coursework tasks, worth 66% of
the overall study score and an end of
year examination with 34% of the overall
study score.
Scored assessment is based on the Units
3 & 4 sequences in Hospitality or Kitchen
Operations streams that comprise VCE
VET Hospitality.
Trinity College Colac
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Years 7 to 10
Selecting Units For Study
When students, in consultation with
parents and teachers, undertake the
selection process, the following reasons
should be primary in a student’s
considerations:
• to
satisfy
the
minimum
requirements in a particular
learning area;
• to extend the student's interest in
a particular learning area/subject
area;
• to follow a designated pathway
leading to further studies or
employment prospects;
• to reinforce concepts learned in
earlier units;
• to provide further development of
a particular ability;
Trinity College does not guarantee that all
units offered will run in a particular year or
semester. The viability of any unit or class
is dependent on the number of students
selecting that unit.
How can teachers assist in my subject
selections?
The teachers of Trinity College are fully
aware of the ways in which they can best
help the students who seek advice on
units to be studied. Their advice will be
based on the following criteria:
• the teacher's knowledge of the
student's ability in the given
learning area;
• the knowledge and skills that
will be achieved by successfully
completing the particular unit;
• the information obtained from
teachers of the student's previous
units in that learning area;
• the interest shown by the student
in a particular subject area and a
desire to further develop already
acquired skills;
• consultation with the Careers
Officer;
• consultation with the profile of
the student as given by previous
studies, both with respect to
completing prerequisites and to
the performance results obtained
in previous units in that learning
area or subject area.
What do I need to know if choosing a
VCE or VET subject?
A student may undertake a maximum
of one VCE or VET study in Year 10,
provided the student has demonstrated
exceptional ability in the relevant
learning area and has demonstrated a
maturity in all other aspects of studies
appropriate with the expectations of a
senior student. This study will take up
two subject selections on their Subject
Selection form. The VCE/VET units
studied will count toward the completion
of the quota of compulsory units set for
the appropriate learning area.
Some learning areas have recommendations of prerequisite units that
should be successfully completed before
undertaking a VCE/VET unit. Students are
advised to consider the pathway for each
learning area into VCE/VET studies before
finalising their selection of units.
What if I’m new to Trinity College?
Exemption from and/or accreditation for
specific units will be granted to students
transferring from other schools to Trinity
College, providing that confirmation of
satisfactory completion of similar work is
evident.
What if I’m unsure about my choices
after my selection forms have been
submitted?
Students seeking to discuss possible unit
changes prior to the commencement
of the new calendar year, must have a
meeting with the Timetabler.
Once classes have commenced for the
year, any alteration to semester units,
can only occur on successful application
of the “Request for Change of Subject
Unit” form which is available from the
Year Level Coordinator. This application
must be fully completed and submitted
to the Timetabler before the request will
be processed.
Is there any variation in the rules
regarding compulsory units?
Variation to the rules regarding the
number of compulsory units is possible
but only after application and discussion.
Such variation allows Trinity College to
adapt courses for students with special
academic needs.
Is other assistance or support
available?
The provision of support for students
with individual needs will continue to
be an important part of the College’s
provision for its students.
In the Learning Enrichment Area, assistance is provided in a variety of ways,
by giving individual support or through
interactive small group work. Students
may work on modified programmes and
receive added support in the classroom.
Trinity College - We Make a Difference
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 75
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
VCE STUDENTS
Information for VCE students and What must I include in my VCE For studies with large enrolments (1,000
or more):
programme?
their parents:
The Victorian Certificate of Education
(VCE) is the certificate that the majority of
students in Victoria receive on satisfactory
completion of their secondary education.
The VCE provides diverse pathways to
further study or training at university or
TAFE and to employment.
Vital information for parents and students
can be obtained from the Victorian
Curriculum and Assessment Authority
(VCAA). Please refer to the website listed
below for further details on VCE study
designs and resources, VCE publications,
general advice and policy, VCE
examinations and assessment as well as
university recognition of VCE. Publications
referred to in the answers below can be
located on the VCAA website: www.vcaa.
vic.edu.au/vce/index.html
What do I have to do to be awarded
the VCE?
Refer to the ‘How do I graduate with the
VCE?’ section within the ‘Where to Now?
Guide' for details, located on the website.
How is the ATAR calculated? How are
subjects scaled?
The Australian Tertiary Admission Rank
(ATAR) is calculated by the Victorian
Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) from
your study scores.
For more information on the ATAR, see the
'ABC of Scaling - Scaling and the ATAR: A
Simplified Explanation' published by VTAC
under their website's Publication and
Statistics section.
For more information on the following,
please visit the VTAC website: • ATAR
• Scaling (including the current
Scaling Report)
• Primary four
• Increments
• Special Entry Access Schemes
(SEAS) (including Year 12 Special
Consideration)
• Aggregate scores
• Tertiary offers (including change
of preferences)
• University places
The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment
Authority (VCAA) is not responsible for
any of the above.
Page 76 To earn your VCE, you must satisfactorily
complete at least 16 units.
1. Regardless of how many units you do
altogether, you must satisfactorily
complete: At least three units from
the English group listed below:
o Foundation English Units 1 and 2
o English Units 1 to 4
o English as an Additional
Language (EAL) Units 3 and 4
o English Language Units 1 to 4
o Literature Units 1 to 4
At least one of these units must be
at Unit 3 or 4 level. However, VTAC
advises that for the calculation of the
ATAR, students must satisfactorily
complete both Unit 3 and Unit 4 of an
English sequence.
2. Three additional sequences of Unit
3 and 4 studies in addition to the
sequence chosen from the English
group. These sequences can be
from VCE studies and/or VCE VET
programmes.
If you intend to apply for tertiary
entrance at the end of your VCE, you
need to be aware that the Victorian
Tertiary Admissions Centre has additional
requirements for the calculation of the
ATAR.
How many subjects do I have to
study each year?
The VCAA does not prescribe a minimum
number of subjects/units that students
have to study each year. You can take as
long as you need to complete the VCE.
What are the attendance requirements for the VCE?
All VCE units require 50 hours of class
time. You need to attend sufficient class
time to complete work.
What is a study score?
A study score shows how well you have
performed in a study at Unit 3 and 4
level, compared to everybody else in
Victoria who took that study. Study
scores calculated by the VCAA will be
used by the Victorian Tertiary Admissions
Centre (VTAC) to calculate the ATAR.
The maximum study score is 50. Each
year, and for every study, the mean study
score is set at 30. A score of between 23
and 37 shows that you are in the middle
range of students; a score of more than
38 indicates that you are in the top 15%.
•
•
•
•
•
•
2% of students will get a score
on or above 45
9% on or above 40
26% on or above 35
53% on or above 30
78% on or above 25
93% on or above 20.
How can I earn a study score?
At Unit 3 and 4 level, there are three
Graded Assessments for each study,
consisting of School-assessed Coursework
(SACs), School-assessed Tasks (SATs) and
examinations.
VCE VET subjects that have scored
assessment
have
two
Graded
Assessments.
The Graded Assessments are different
for each study and contribute towards
the study score in different ways. If
you complete at least two Graded
Assessments and have satisfactorily
completed both Unit 3 and 4, you will be
awarded a study score.
How is the study score calculated?
To calculate the study score, the VCAA
combines the standardised scores for each
of your Graded Assessments. Each graded
assessment in a study contributes a specific
percentage, or weighting, to the final study
score.
Once the scores have been standardised,
weighted and totalled your total score
is compared with the scores of all other
students in that study and then converted
to a score out of 50.
How does the GAT affect my VCE
results?
The General Achievement Test (GAT) is
an important part of the VCE assessment
procedures.
Although GAT results do not count directly
towards a student’s VCE results, they play
an important role in checking that school
assessments and examinations have
been accurately assessed.
If a student applies for a Derived
Examination Score, the GAT is used in
determining this derived score. Therefore
students should attempt to score as high
as possible on all parts of the GAT.
Achievement on the GAT is a good
predictor of achievement on other
assessments. If students have done well
on the GAT, their achievements are likely
to be high in their school assessments
and examinations.
Trinity College Colac
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
VCAL STUDENTS
Information for VCAL students and
their parents:
Vital information for parents and students
can be obtained from the Victorian
Curriculum and Assessment Authority
(VCAA). Please refer to the website listed
below for further details on VCAL: www.
vcaa.vic.edu.au/vcal/index.html
Why would I choose to do VCAL
instead of the VCE?
The VCE is a good option for students who
would like to go on to further education
at university. However, you might feel
that this is not the right option for you.
Just like the VCE, the VCAL is an accredited
senior secondary school qualification
undertaken in Years 11 and 12. The VCAL
is based on hands-on learning, also known
as applied learning. If you choose to do
the VCAL instead of the VCE, you will gain
practical experience and employability
skills, as well as the skills you will need to
go onto further training in the workplace
or at a TAFE.
When and where can I do VCAL?
You can begin your VCAL programme
in Years 11 or 12 of secondary school.
The VCAL is also available at most
TAFE institutes and a number of Adult
Community Education (ACE) centres.
What are the VCAL levels?
The VCAL has two levels - Intermediate
and Senior. You would complete your
VCAL at the level that matches your
needs and abilities.
VCAL Certificate for either Intermediate
or Senior level, depending on the VCAL
level you chose to complete. You will also
get a Statement of Results, listing all VCE
(if VCE units were successfully completed
as part of your VCAL course) and VCAL
units, and a Statement of Attainment for
VET or Further Education courses. These
will list all units and modules you have
successfully completed as part of your
VCAL programme.
I have already started a VET
certificate. Will this count towards
my VCAL?
Yes. You should speak with your teacher
or Careers Officer to work out how much
of your prior study counts towards your
VCAL and to plan the remainder of your
VCAL learning programme.
Can I work part-time and/or continue
an apprenticeship while enrolled in
VCAL?
You can gain recognition and credit for
part-time work while enrolled in the
VCAL. This work can include:
• part-time apprenticeship or traineeship.
• work placements.
• Students are not permitted to
undertake their personal paid parttime work during their school day.
How is VCAL assessed?
You must successfully achieve each
learning outcome in each unit or module
of your VCAL programme. VCE, other
VET and accredited courses/certificates
are assessed in accordance with existing
requirements. Your teacher will explain
the requirements to meet the learning
outcomes for VCAL units.
Final grades are assessed as:
S = Satisfactory, or
N = Not yet completed.
Do I need to sit for the General
Achievement Test (GAT)?
The GAT is a test of knowledge and
skills in writing, mathematics, science
and technology, humanities and social
sciences and the arts. It is undertaken by
all students doing one or more VCE Unit 3
and 4 sequences. Students doing a scored
VCE VET Unit 3–4 sequence will also be
required to sit the GAT. Students whose
only enrolment consists of VCAL units
are not required to sit the GAT. However,
students can choose to sit the GAT if it is
appropriate to their pathway into further
education, training or employment.
Can I swap to VCE if I change my
mind?
You should discuss this with the VCAL
Coordinator if you wish to pursue this
option.
Are there any entry requirements?
There are no entry requirements. You
begin the VCAL at a level suitable to your
learning needs. Your teacher or Careers
Officer will be able to help you decide
which level is suitable for you.
How long would VCAL take me to
complete?
Regardless of the VCAL level you
choose, your learning programme would
normally take one year to complete.
What do you get after successfully
completing VCAL?
If you successfully complete your
learning programme, you will receive a
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Page 77
GLOSSARY AND ACRONYMS
ACARA: Australian Curriculum Assessment & Reporting
Authority.
Accreditation period: The period during which a course or
certificate is accredited.
Assessment task: A task set by the teacher to assess
students’ achievements of unit outcomes for School-assessed
Coursework (see also Outcomes).
General Achievement Test (GAT): A test of knowledge
and skills in writing, mathematics, science and technology,
humanities and social sciences and the arts. All students
enrolled in VCE Unit 3 and 4 sequence must sit the GAT. It is
used by the VCAA to check that schools are marking Schoolassessed Tasks to the same standard, as part of the statistical
moderation of School-assessed Coursework and as a quality
assurance check on the VCAA’s marking of examinations and
School-assessed Tasks.
Attendance: Apart from satisfying various subject outcomes
to gain ‘S’ (satisfactory), students are also required to
attend 100% of class time per subject. All absences must be
satisfactorily explained or the student could risk an ‘N’ (not
satisfactory) for that unit.
Graded Assessment: All VCE studies have three Graded
Assessments for each Unit 3 and 4 sequence, except for scored
VCE VET programmes, which have two. Each study includes at
least one examination, most have School-assessed Coursework,
and some have School-assessed Tasks.
Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF): The national
framework for all qualifications in post-compulsory education
and training.
Grading: Students are graded ‘S’ or ‘N’ for satisfactory
completion of set VCE/VCAL tasks and ‘Performance graded’
for SATs and SACs.
Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF): The nationally
agreed set of regulatory arrangements that ensure high
quality vocational education and training services in Australia.
Horizontal Timetable: The traditional way of organising the
delivery of a curriculum based on year levels.
Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR): The overall
ranking on a scale of zero to 99.95 that a student receives,
based on his/her study scores. The ATAR is calculated by VTAC
and used by universities and TAFE institutes to select students
for courses.
Authentication: The process of ensuring that the work
submitted by students for assessment is their own.
Credential: The certificate that the student is awarded on
successful completion of all course requirements by the VRQA.
Credit (VCAL): In the VCAL, students are awarded one credit
for completion of accredited curriculum in accordance with
the course requirements for VCAL.
Internally assessed: School based assessment - School
Assessed Tasks (SATs) and/or School Assessed Coursework
(SAC).
Languages ‒ Formerly known as Languages Other Than
English (LOTE).
Learning Areas: Formerly known as Domains, these are
discipline-based content areas as outlined in the Victorian
Curriculum F-10.
Learning Programme (VCAL): Curriculum selected for delivery
by the VCAL provider to meet each student’s interest and
abilities and to meet minimum VCAL course requirements.
Criteria: The specific guidelines/descriptions for assessment
tasks within all units of study.
Local Learning and Employment Networks (LLENs): Networks
established across Victoria to support young people’s
connections with local education and training organisations,
employers and community groups.
Derived Examination Score (DES): Provision available
for students who have missed an examination or whose
examination performance has been impaired due to illness or
other extenuating personal circumstances.
Outcomes: What a student must know and be able to do in
order to satisfactorily complete a unit as specified in the VCE
study design or VCAL unit.
Distant Education: A print based, audio and visual learning
materials distance education programme.
Enhancement Studies: A standard first year university subject
as part of a Year 12 VCE programme.
Enrichment: The opportunity to extend and challenge
students with advanced units of work.
Examinations: External assessments set and marked
by the VCAA. All VCE Units 3 and 4 studies have at least
one examination. Most written examinations are held in
October and November. Performance examinations and oral
components of Languages examinations are held in October.
Extension studies: First-year university studies recognised by
the VCAA for contribution to the ATAR for students who are
academically very able.
Page 78 Pathway: A suggested partial package of combinations of
Study Units, optional additional studies and/or methods of
study, as a guide for the development of a programme or
course of study to suite the student’s needs.
Pre-requisites: VCE studies listed by TAFE and university
institutions which students must have attempted all or some
of within their VCE programme in order to qualify for entry
into particular courses.
Programme: A selection of Study Units to enable a student to
complete their VCE.
Results: The recorded outcomes of a student’s progress for
each unit of study. The recorded outcome for the completion
of the student’s VCE.
Satisfactory Completion (VCAL): The school or other
Trinity College Colac
GLOSSARY AND ACRONYMS
VCAL provider decision that a student has demonstrated
achievement of the outcomes for a VCAL unit. Students
receive an S for the satisfactory completion of a unit. If they
do not satisfactorily complete a unit, they receive an N for
not yet complete. Students qualify for the VCAL when they
achieve sufficient credits to satisfy the course requirements
set out in Section 15.
Strand: The VCAL contains four curriculum strands; literacy
and numeracy skills, industry specific skills, work related skills
and personal development skills.
Student Number: The unique number assigned to each
student enrolled in VCE, VCE VET and VCAL.
Studies: The subjects available in the VCE.
Satisfactory completion (VCE): The school or other
VCE provider decision that a student has demonstrated
achievement of the outcomes for a unit. Students receive
an S for the satisfactory completion of a unit. If they do not
satisfactorily complete a unit, they receive an N for it. Students
qualify for the VCE when they satisfy units which meet the
programme requirements set out in Section 5.
Study Design: Each study has specific details (objectives,
areas of work, outcomes and assessment tasks) contained
in a booklet called the ‘Study Design’. Each school develops
courses and appropriate assessment tasks using these ‘Study
Designs’ to determine the exact nature of the work to be done
to fulfil the purposes of the outcomes.
School-assessed Coursework (SAC): A school-based
assessment that is reported as a grade for either a VCE Unit
3 and 4 sequence or Unit 3 and Unit 4 individually. Schoolassessed Coursework consists of a set of assessment tasks that
assess students’ achievement of VCE Units 3 and 4 outcomes.
Study Score: A score from zero to 50 which shows how
a student performed in a VCE study, relative to all other
Victorian students enrolled in that same study in a result year.
It is based on the student’s results in school assessments and
examinations.
School-assessed Task (SAT): A school-based assessment for
a VCE Unit 3 and 4 sequence set by the VCAA and assessed
by teachers in accordance with published criteria. Schools’
assessments of tasks are subject to review by a panel
appointed by the VCAA.
Study Score (Relative Position): The Study Score (relative
position) is a measure of a student’s performance in that
study. It is reported on a 50 point scale.
School Based Apprenticeship or Traineeship (SBAT): Is
an apprenticeship or traineeship undertaken by a student
enrolled in a senior secondary program (VCE or VCAL), with at
least one day per week timetabled to be spent on the job or
in training during the normal school week.
Semester: The equivalent to a half school year. Most
units are completed in one semester. References to VCE
semesters equate Semesters 1 & 2 units within a VCE study
to approximate the Year 11 level of difficulty. Semesters 3
& 4 Units within a VCE study equate to the Year 12 level of
difficulty.
Senior Secondary Qualification: The VCE and the VCAL are
senior secondary qualifications that are designed to be
completed in Years 11 and 12.
Sequence of units: Units 3 and 4 are sequential units - no Unit
4 study can be undertaken without first completing Unit 3 of
the same study.
Special Needs Education: The current process of offering
assistance to a small number of students in need of additional
academic assistance.
Special Provision: Arrangements that are made to allow
students who are experiencing significant hardship the
maximum opportunity to demonstrate both what they know
and what they can do.
Statistical moderation: The process used to ensure that
schools’ assessments are comparable throughout the State. It
involves adjusting each school’s School-assessed Coursework
scores for each study to match the level and spread of the
external reference scores for the students in that school
enrolled in that study.
Curriculum Handbook for 2017
Unit of competence (UoC): The specification of knowledge
and skills and the application of that knowledge and skills to
the standard of performance expected in the workplace. The
RTO assesses competence. (VCAL)
Unit Requirement: A given task that monitors the attainment
of outcomes within the Victorian Curriculum Framework.
Units (VCAL): VCAL units contain accredited learning outcomes
that enable content to be developed and/or planned at the
local level.
Units (VCE): The components of a VCE study that are a
semester in duration. There are usually four units in a VCE
study, numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4.
Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL): An
accredited senior secondary school qualification undertaken
by students in Years 10, 11 and 12 which focuses on applied
learning, to develop personal, social and employability skills
and knowledge.
Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE): An accredited senior
secondary school qualification.
Victorian Curriculum F-10: This curriculum is the common
set of knowledge and skills required by students for lifelong learning, social development and active and informed
citizenship.
Vocational Education and Training (VET): Nationally
recognised vocational certificates. These certificates may be
integrated within a VCE or VCAL programme.
VTAC: Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre acts on behalf
of universities, TAFEs and other providers facilitating and
coordinating the joint selection system. VTAC calculates and
distributes the Australian Tertiary Adminission Rank (ATAR).
Page 79
TRINITY PRAYER
Let us pray to the One God, Father, Son and Spirit
that our lives may bear witness to our faith.
Father you sent your Word to bring us truth
and your Spirit to make us holy.
Through them we come to know the mystery of your life
Help us to worship you, one God in three persons,
by proclaiming and living our faith in you.
Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.
Trinity College Colac Inc
119 Hart Street (PO Box 23)
COLAC VIC 3250
Phone 5233 9200
Page 80 Trinity College Colac
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