SAMPLE UNIT
NEW
Challenges
IT
3
Patricia Mugglestone
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Con en s
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Teacher’s Handbook
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Introduction
x
SA
Students’ Book contents pages
ii
Student A/B activities
89
Questionnaire scores and answers
90
Time Out magazine
91
Time Out answer key
98
Word Bank
99
Teacher’s notes
4
Student’s Book audioscript
105
Workbook key
109
Workbook audioscript
114
= Students’ Book material
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Introduc ion to New Challenges
About the Students’ Book
The course has eight main modules and a Get Ready revision module at the start to get students to use language from
New Challenges 1 and 2. At the end of the book there is a magazine section related to the units with fun activities like
puzzles, games and reading for pleasure. Each module starts with a Get Ready page which introduces the module topic.
There are then three main lessons. In odd-numbered modules, there are Across Culture lessons and in even-numbered
modules, there are Your Challenge and Understanding Grammar spots. Each module finishes with a Language Check and
a Study Corner with learner development activities to help students become better learners.
New features in Students’ Book 3
Speak Out
These sections give students the chance to express their personal views about topics and ideas presented in the units.
For example, in Module 1 students are asked to give their opinions about their own school environment (page 9,
Exercise 6), about an alternative type of school described in the Unit (page 10, Exercise 3) and about their school rules
(page 13, Exercise 12).
Word Bank
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Other features in Students’ Book 3
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N
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The Word Bank (pages 106–111) provides a module-by-module study and reference resource for students to use during
lessons and for revision purposes. It lists and expands vocabulary from the Module under headings such as Multi-part
Verbs, Collocations, Prepositions, Compounds and Word Building as well as grouping vocabulary in word families, e.g.
Cooking (Module 3).
Vocabulary is presented with definitions and example sentences using the words or phrases in context, e.g. take part in
something do an activity with other people: I take part in the school sports day every year. (Module 1)
During lessons, students are referred to the Word Bank to develop their word building skills (e.g. Module 1, Unit 2,
Exercises 8, 9 and 10, page 13); to expand word families (e.g. Module 3, Across Cultures, Exercise 8, page 37) and to
check their answers to an exercise (e.g. Module 3, Unit 8, Exercise 9, page 33).
Helps
Everyday Listening
M
PL
These sections offer advice that students then put into practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking activities.
The Help sections cover reading skills such as scanning for information (Module 1, page 13), writing skills such as getting
ideas for emails, letters and postcards (Module 2, page 26), listening skills such as listening for specific information
(Module 4, page 45) and speaking skills such as preparation for roleplays (Module 3, page 35).
Text Builder
SA
These sections give students the opportunity to listen to English in everyday situations, such as interviews for holiday
jobs (Module 2, Unit 6, page 25), phone calls (Module 4, Unit 12, page 45) and announcements (Module 1, Unit 3, page
15). The exercises train students to listen as we do in real life, for example for specific facts and key information.
These sections occur in Your Challenge (Modules 2, 4, 6 and 8). They build on the sentence level skills that students
practised in the Sentence Builders in New Challenges 1 and 2. Text Builders focus on important features of whole
‘texts’, such as paragraph topics (Module 2, page 26), reference words (Module 4, page 46) and linkers (Module 8, page
86).
Fact or Fiction?
The Fact or Fiction? texts provide short real-life contexts related to the module topic. Students decide whether they
think the information is true or false. Sometimes students can use their general knowledge (e.g. page 23, the first
woman to win a Nobel Prize). Sometimes students have to guess (e.g. page 43, the percentage of American parents who
say they have the same values as their children and vice versa). Encourage students to discuss and give reasons for their
guesses.
The Time Out magazine
ii
At the back of the Students’ Book there is the Time Out section, a set of ‘fun’ activities and puzzles in a magazine
format. There are twenty-four activities in the magazine, one for each of the twenty-four core units in the Students’
Book. Students can do the activities working individually, in pairs or in small groups.
The magazine activities are designed to be used when there is time after students have completed a related activity in
the Unit, at the end of a Unit or at home. The magazine recycles language and topics of the Units in new contexts and
authentic, motivating activities such as puzzles (e.g. Activity 4, page 94), quizzes (e.g. Activity 7, page 95) and stories
(Activities 16–18, pages 100–101).
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Introduc ion to New Challenges
How to use this Handbook
This Handbook contains reduced pages from the Students’ Book, together with teaching suggestions, background
information on the content of the Unit, pronunciation guidance for difficult names and places, audioscripts, answers to
exercises and ideas for extra activities; it also includes the answers for the Workbook.
The Handbook will help you plan your lessons and is handy for use during lessons.
Module objectives
The module objectives are listed at the top of the first page of each Module in the Students’ Book.
When starting a Module, read through the objectives with the students and check that they understand any new
vocabulary, e.g. ‘announcements’ in Module 1, ‘abilities’ in Module 2. If appropriate, ask students to discuss any of
the activities they have done, using their own language or English, e.g. ‘writing emails’ (Module 2). Encourage students
to say what they remember about any of the grammar points they have studied in the past, e.g. Present Simple and
Present Continuous (Module 1).
At the end of a Module, ask students to read the objectives again. Help students assess how well they have achieved the
objectives and to say which objectives they found easy or more difficult to achieve.
Background information
IT
Background Information provides facts and information about aspects of the social and cultural content of the Units. It
is intended primarily for the teacher but is helpful when students ask about events, people and places mentioned in a
Unit, e.g. Eton and Roedean (Module 1, Unit 2, page 12).
Ways of checking answers
PL
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Students can work in pairs or small groups.
Try to vary how you check students’ answers to exercises:
• If spelling is important, ask students to spell the words for you to write on the board or invite students to come to
the board and write the answers on the board.
• Alternatively, ask students to read aloud the answers. If necessary, correct any serious pronunciation problems.
• At times you may prefer to write the answers on the board yourself for students to check their own answers.
• Students self-check the answers to some exercises, such as pair activities (e.g. page 83, Exercise 11) and quizzes (e.g.
page 37, Exercise 10) by referring to the answers given in the book and to the Language Check by listening to the CD.
Extra activities
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M
Use the short Extra activities if there is time in the lesson. These activities develop from the content of the Students’
Book and are intended to give a change of focus and help student motivation and concentration.
Extra activities include:
• activities developing from a reading text, e.g. Module 2, Unit 4, after Exercise 4, page 20
• activities developing from a listening text, e.g. Module 2, Unit 6, after Everyday Listening, Exercise 2, page 25
• activities practising a language point from the lesson, e.g. Module 2, Unit 5, after Exercise 5, page 22
Digital components
New Challenges offers teachers digital material to support learning in a variety of different ways.
• New Challenges ActiveTeach: an interactive version of the Students’ Book suitable for using with any IWB or simply
with a computer and projector. Using the touch-sensitive screen of the interactive whiteboard, you can easily
integrate audio, video and interactive activities into your lessons to motivate your whole class. Includes games,
all the audio for the Students’ Book and Workbook, the New Challenges DVD, the Word Bank and more teacher’s
resources – in short, all the New Challenges resources at the click of a button!
• New Challenges Teacher’s Resources MultiROM: includes Teacher Development Workshops, photocopiable resources,
a DVD and DVD worksheets. It also contains print ready tests and easily customisable tests with answer keys.
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Challenge
Challenge In The Classroom
The characters in the story provide positive role models
for teenage students because they are doing something
worthwhile and overcoming personal and group problems
to achieve their goals. The story provides a springboard
for education in citizenship: making students aware
of their rights and responsibilities; helping others and
working for the community; being a good citizen.
The Students’ Book
Organisation
New Challenges has a topic-based approach. It enables
students to learn about the world through English and to
learn the language at the same time.
IT
The course is divided into eight main modules plus a Get
Ready module. The Get Ready module gets students to use
language from New Challenges 1 and 2, familiarises them
with the course and develops their awareness as learners.
The themes in the main modules:
N
1 are related to students’ own world (e.g. schools,
health, the generation gap, music, films)
U
2 are cross-curricular (e.g. famous women in history, the
history of medicine, musical instruments, literature,
inventions, prehistory)
3 develop citizenship education (e.g. learning about
people around the world, rights and responsibilities of
teenagers)
E
We first thought of the title of this book after speaking to
the inspired (and inspiring) head teacher of a secondary
school in a working class district outside Warsaw. He
was talking to us about all the problems his school
faced and, despite them, the many achievements of his
students inside and outside the classroom. They took
part in science olympiads, sporting events, choirs, youth
orchestras, theatre groups, chess competitions and many
other activities. This demonstrated the kind of enthusiasm
and challenge we wanted to inspire in our own material.
Our definition of a ‘challenge’ is a task that, while not
easy to accomplish, is worthwhile and rewarding.
A challenge requires patience, hard work and the ability
to overcome problems. Many challenges also involve
working with other people as a team to achieve goals that
would be impossible to reach as an individual.
For many years, in both society and education, there
has been a tendency to focus on activities that give
instant reward and success. However, more and more
young people are taking part in challenging activities
like popular marathons, expeditions, extreme sports and
voluntary work. Even in the unlikely world of computer
gaming, game designers have found that the most
popular games are those that are the most difficult, hence
the expression ‘hard fun’. The conclusion must be that a
challenge is often fun because it is not easy; people enjoy
being stretched and challenged.
4 are about other cultures around the world (e.g.
schools, food, nomads, music)
M
PL
Within the English language classroom there is one
obvious challenge: learning a foreign language in a few
hours a week within a school context. The challenge is
there for students (and teachers) whether we like it or not.
It may sometimes look insurmountable but it is not if we
break it down into a series of smaller tasks or ‘challenges’.
SA
In New Challenges, each module contains a series of
grammar and skills activities and builds towards final
speaking, writing and listening tasks in which students can
use the language they have learnt. Because these tasks
are achievable, they build students’ confidence as well as
laying the foundations for communicative competence.
In parallel, there are learner development activities, such
as self-checks at the end of each module that encourage
students to be aware of how well they are progressing
towards the greater challenge of learning English.
The theme of ‘challenge’ is also present in such topics
in New Challenges 3 as the achievements of talented
women in history, dealing with teenage problems and the
harshness of a nomadic lifestyle. In addition, the story
focuses on how a group of teenage characters, at both a
group and personal level, take part in challenges. In New
Challenges 3, the characters are at a school of performing
arts: they have to do auditions, perform a piece of music
and a song, make a film and give a presentation.
In New Challenges 3, the eight main modules are
organised like this:
1 a Get Ready page introduces students to the topic
2 the first lesson presents grammar through reading texts
and gives plenty of practice
3 the second lesson develops reading, presents
vocabulary and practises speaking
4 the third lesson develops the story and has a major
focus on speaking and listening
5 odd-numbered modules have Across Cultures lessons
with reading, speaking and a project
6 even-numbered modules have Your Challenge spots
with writing tasks and Understanding Grammar spots
7 at the end of every module there is a language check
and learner development spot
At the end of the book there is Time Out, a magazine
section related to the lessons with fun activities like
puzzles, games and reading for pleasure. Students can do
the activities if they finish early in class or at home. There
is also a Word Bank organised by lexical features (Multipart Verbs, Word Families, Compounds etc.). Students can
use this section to do activities in the coursebook and as a
reference to revise and increase their own vocabulary.
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Approach
Grammar
• Key Expressions are related to key functional areas from
B.1.1 and some of those from B.1.2 in the Common
European Framework (e.g. expressing belief, opinion,
agreement and disagreement politely).
• There are other useful phrases in the story dialogues.
These are focused on in the Workbook.
In New Challenges 3, grammar is the first lesson in each
module.
• Grammar is presented in context. Students read a variety
of texts and then focus on the structures.
• First there is a focus on form. Then students work out,
in a guided way, how to use the new structure.
• Practice moves from easier, more guided exercises on
form to freer speaking and writing tasks.
• The final activity (Your Turn) gives students an
opportunity to use the grammar to talk about their own
lives.
• There are four Understanding Grammar sections that
focus on problematic areas such as question tags.
• In the Study Corner, students test their knowledge and
are guided to remedial exercises.
• The main pronunciation spot is in the Everyday Listening
section. Pronunciation focuses on difficult sounds for
students (e.g. /t/, /d/, /θ/ and /ð/).
• Listen closely, also in the Everyday Listening section, looks
at supra-segmental pronunciation work. One of the
biggest problems students have with listening to natural
English speech is actually hearing words and expressions,
as many words just seem to disappear. Listen closely
tasks at this level focus on stress in common phrases,
contractions, unstressed function words (e.g. a/are/of/
have) and word boundaries.
Sentence Builders
Skills
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U
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• In New Challenges 3, skills activities are guided,
structured and, wherever possible, integrated with
other skills.
• There are speaking activities in every lesson and
tasks always use language that has been presented to
students (vocabulary, grammar and Key Expressions).
Students are given time to think about their ideas and
prepare for speaking as well as time to report back to
the class.
• There are at least three reading texts per module.
Text types include: magazine articles/letters; letters,
emails and notes; extracts from non-fiction; interviews;
questionnaires; travel brochures; stories; and
biographies. There is also extra reading in the Time Out
magazine.
• There are three listening tasks in every module. First
there is a gist listening in the Get Ready section. In
the story unit, students read and listen to dialogues
which help them see the relation between spoken
language and its written form. The Everyday Listening
has both extensive and intensive tasks. Listen closely
and Pronunciation tasks develop learners’ ability to
distinguish sounds, words and expressions.
• There is writing in every module. In odd-numbered
modules, there are projects which students can either
do in pairs or on their own. Projects give students
a chance to write about their own world and to be
creative. There are clear models and stages. In evennumbered modules, Your Challenge spots focus on
more interactive writing: an email; short notes; a film
review; a biography. Students are given clear models
and the writing tasks are carefully staged. Text Builders
focus on the structure of the target text and on linking
words and expressions.
M
PL
E
• Sentence structure has often been neglected in ELT
even though most language groups have quite different
syntax from that in English (e.g. verb position in Slav
languages; adjective position in Latin languages). L1
interference causes mistakes of word order and these
are usually more serious than other mistakes because
they affect understanding.
• Sentence Builders focus on sentence structure which is
often related to the main grammar (e.g. while and when
related to past tenses).
• Target patterns appear in texts, are explicitly focused on
in Sentence Builders and are then practised in guided
exercises. Sentence Builders can be used as a pattern
bank to help students when revising.
Pronunciation
Lexis
SA
• Key Word boxes in New Challenges 3 cover lexical
areas such as schools, abilities, health, food, places,
transport, jobs, films, personality, feelings, music and
science. Key Words help students to understand both
reading and listening texts and give them essential
vocabulary for writing and speaking tasks.
• Word Builders focus on key lexical features and help
build up students’ capacity to organise and learn English
vocabulary. Lexical features include multi-part verbs
(e.g. take up an activity), the delexicalised verbs make
and do (e.g. make your bed), dependent prepositions
(e.g. study for), verbs with prepositions (e.g. live in),
word families (e.g. boil/fry/grill), confusing words
(e.g. actually and now) and compound nouns and
adjectives (e.g. campsite and well-known). These spots
also focus on wordbuilding (e.g. adjective suffixes, noun
suffixes, adjectival prefixes).
• The Word Bank provides a reference for all of the
lexical features in New Challenges 3 and also contains
the lexical features that students looked at in the
previous two levels of New Challenges.
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Culture
There is cultural input throughout the book.
•
The story also provides cultural insights into the lives of
the four characters who are at the school of performing
arts in Norwich and visit different places in Norfolk.
•
The Across Cultures sections deal with different cultures.
Learners write projects about their own culture using the
language of the reading texts.
•
With each of the three main units, there is a
corresponding spot in the Time Out magazine. This
means that, when students finish early or have time to
spare, they can do a game, puzzle or quiz in the Time
Out section.
•
In the Study Corner, students test what they have learnt
in the Language Check and then listen and check their
answers. In the Feedback section, they can find out what
areas they need to study more and are referred to the
Workbook for further practice.
•
Finally, the Study Help systematically develops study
skills. In New Challenges 3, there are spots about:
similar words; storing words/expressions; memorising
vocabulary; explaining words; self-assessment.
Learner Development
•
One of the greatest challenges for students is to become
better learners and to learn to study English on their
own. Several features encourage learner independence
in New Challenges 3.
•
On the Get Ready page, the objectives box clearly shows
students what they are going to learn in the module.
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Module 5
a
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•
Talk about travel and make suggestions.
Read about safaris and nomads.
Listen to travel plans.
Write a description of a tour round your country.
U
Learn more about the Present Perfect.
d
b
c
E
these pages
introduce the
module topic
PL
activities develop
gist listening skills
On he Move
Get Ready
1
Key Words:
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3.2
2
3
SA
lexical areas
related to the
module topic
are presented
Look at the Key Words. Add five more types of
transport.
these activities
introduce the
unit topic
13
1
Look at the Key Words and decide which
people have to travel a lot.
Key Words:
Farmers don’t have to travel a lot. They work on
their land.
Look at the photos of Clara Saruhashi. What
does she do?
Reading
3.5
3
4
4
5
6
Read the text. Check your guesses from
Exercise 2.
Read the text again. Are the sentences true (T),
false (F) or is there no information (NI)?
Clara Saruhashi travels a lot.
She enjoys her job.
She became interested in travelling
at university.
Most of her work is in a TV studio.
Her husband always travels with her.
Camping in the Amazon jungle was a
good experience.
A01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_PRE.indd 6
and
and
and
speaking
activities relate
the topic to the
students’ own
lives
5
Speak Out Do you agree with these
statements? Say why or why not. Tell the class.
• People in my town drive too fast.
• Young people on motorbikes are dangerous.
• Extreme sports fans are crazy!
49
10
Grammar: Present Perfect
5
Complete the sentences from the text with the
verbs in the Present Perfect.
grammar is
presented
through guided
discovery
Have you been to China yet?
She is a well-known
TV presenter.
B
A
B
6
7
➔
She knows a lot
about Antarctica.
➔
Do we know when exactly the past events in
Exercise 5 happened?
1
2
3
4
I had a final question. ‘Have you ever been
in danger?’ Clara laughed and said, ‘There
was a giant spider in my tent in the Amazon
jungle – it wasn’t dangerous but I was very
frightened. I’ve never liked spiders!’
do a Hungarian language course ✓
get a new laptop ✓
read some guidebooks ✓
camp make
swim visit
Game Cover the list in Exercise 11. Ask and
answer about the travel writer’s plans.
Has he applied for a new passport yet? Yes, he has.
Has he booked a hotel in Budapest yet? No, he hasn’t.
Your Turn
Use the correct verbs in the box in the Present
Perfect to make affirmative and negative
sentences about Clara Saruhashi’s career.
present
ride
She has made a lot of TV programmes.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
grammar practice
moves from
controlled to freer
exercises
check ticket prices 7
12
a) questions
b) affirmative sentences
c) negative sentences with not
d) negative sentences without not
Read the travel writer’s plans for his next trip.
Make sentences with already and yet.
apply for a new passport ✓
book a hotel in Budapest 7
buy camera memory cards 7
Match the words (1–4) with the types of
sentences (a–d). One of the words goes with
two types.
already
yet
ever
never
Yes, I’ve been there three times. (already / ever)
Have you seen a wild panda? (ever / already)
No, I’ve seen a wild panda. (never / ever).
And I haven’t seen one in a zoo. (never / yet).
He’s already applied for a new passport.
He hasn’t booked a hotel in Budapest yet.
Have you ever been in danger?
I have never wanted a safe job in an office.
She has already been to six continents.
I haven’t been to Antarctica yet.
Has she been to Peru yet?
Practice
9
11
Read the sentences. Translate the words in
bold into your language.
1–b
Clara has already been to six continents but
there is one place she hasn’t visited. ‘I haven’t
been to Antarctica yet but I really want to
go. I’ve read lots of books about the area and
I think it will be a fantastic experience. The
problem is, I hate being cold!’
Have you been to China? (never / yet)
Present consequence
more
She
than a hundred
programmes.
lots
I
of books about
the area.
8
My next question: ‘When did you become
interested in travelling?’ Her answer, ‘I
have never wanted a safe job in an office.
When I was a little girl, I wanted to be a
flight attendant or a tour guide. I studied
languages at university so I could travel.
I’m very lucky: I go to amazing places, meet
fascinating people – and I get paid for it!’
A
Read the interview with a travel writer. Choose
the correct words to complete the sentences
and put them in the correct places.
Past event
1
2
3
4
5
When I interviewed her, I asked, ‘What
have you done in the last six months?’
She answered, ‘I’ve done some really
interesting things: I have walked on
the Great Wall of China, I’ve climbed
Machu Picchu in Peru and I’ve swum
with dolphins. I love being close to
animals so it was a fantastic experience!’
50
and
and
Which types of transport do you use?
Which do you use every day?
Which would you like to try?
Which would you never use?
H
vi
4
5
Listen to four people. Who:
had an accident?
takes part in competitions?
shares their interest with their
boyfriend/girlfriend?
does their hobby at weekends?
started it two years ago?
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions.
ave you ever canoed along the
Amazon River? Or travelled
across the Sahara desert on a
camel? I haven’t! But Clara Saruhashi,
a TV presenter, has done both – and
a lot more! Clara’s job with UTravel
TV takes her all over the world and
she has made more than a hundred
programmes.
reading texts
present new
grammar in
context
4
1
2
3
Grammar
1
2
3
2
Which types of transport do we use for fun?
TV Traveller
Warm-up
3.4
1
2
3
4
3.3
these boxes show
teachers and
students the
objectives of
each module
a lot of TV programmes (✓)
sharks (7)
French, Spanish and Italian (✓)
in the Amazon jungle (✓)
an elephant (7)
programmes about cooking (7)
the South Pole (7)
study
13
Pair work. Ask and answer questions.
Student A, page 89
Student B, page 90
14
Speak Out Tell the class two things
about your partner.
Marta has been abroad. She has never travelled
by ship.
15
Use the cues below and already, yet and never
to make sentences about what you have and
haven’t done in your life. Add your own ideas.
• try bungee jumping • swim in the sea
• take part in a sports competition • go abroad
• climb the highest mountain in my country
• go on holidays on my own • learn to drive
• finish school
I’ve already been abroad three times.
I haven’t finished school yet.
TIME OUT!
Page 98, Exercise 13
51
lessons end with
personalisation
activities
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14 On Safari
a variety of tasks
systematically
develop reading
skills
Warm-up
• I love / like / can’t stand …
• … is good fun / great / cool / horrible /
boring / relaxing.
I love travelling. Travelling is good fun!
1
2
OKAVANGO
DELTA
3.7
2
Work in pairs. Student A reads text (1).
Student B reads text (2). Write notes
about these topics:
• place • number of days • animals
• transport to the place • transport on
the safari • accommodation • price
• dates
3
Work in pairs. Ask and answer
questions about the safaris. Use
these question words.
• Where • How long • What • How
• How much • When
Where is your safari? What animals can
you see?
4
1
2
3
Total Safari offers this trip for
adventurous backpackers.
4
C
KAMPALA
CHIMP AND GORILLA
SAFARI, UGANDA
A
Lake
Victoria
I
Okavango
Delta
Maun
BOTSWANA
Work in pairs. Answer the questions.
Price: £1215
Email: [email protected]
6
Look at the Word Builder. Copy and
complete it with compound words in
blue from the texts. Are they nouns (n)
or adjectives (adj.)?
Word Builder
52
Look at the photo. Have
you ever been boating or
canoeing? Where?
Reading and Listening
3.8
2
Read and listen to the
dialogue. Answer the
questions.
Which of the characters:
1 have an argument?
2 nearly loses his jacket?
3 suggests getting in the water?
4 suggests calling somebody?
5 gets the jacket?
a) sunbathe
b) walk along the beach
c) swim in the sea on your own
3 How would you like to travel
round Europe?
a) with your family
b) on a school trip
c) backpacking with a friend
Dates: 12th February, 18th June
20 Price: £3100
Email: [email protected]
Complete the compound words.
www.mydailyblog.org
My Daily Blog
4 Which of these places would you
prefer to spend the night in?
7
Word Quiz Find compound words in the word chains.
1
2
3
4
nightlifestyle
snowmobilephonebookshelf
weekdayschoolholidayresort
skateboardingschoollunchtimetabletenniscourt
a) a luxury hotel
b) a youth hostel
c) a tent
5 Which of these things would you
like to do?
a) go sightseeing in a big city
b) try paragliding
c) go to a summer adventure
camp
Word Bank, pages 107–108
8
Look at the Sentence Builder. In which sentence is
watching the subject and in which is it the object of
the sentence?
Fact or Fiction?
There are only 660 mountain
gorillas in the world.
Sentence Builder
Answer on page 92.
TIME OUT!
3
Matt
Gwen
O sole mio, la la la laaa …
Matt, sit down. Don’t be so silly. You’re going to sink
the boat!
Oh, don’t be so scared, Gwen. Don’t you like my singing?
No, I don’t. I’m sick of you being stupid all the time!
Come on you two. Just stop arguing.
Whoa! I nearly fell in!
Serves you right!
Watch out, Matt. Your jacket’s in the water!
Oh, no! It’s got my wallet and passport in it! It’s all your
fault, Gwen.
Gwen My fault?
Jasmin Look, just calm down, you two. What about using your oar,
Sam? Get it before it sinks!
Sam
I’m trying. But I can’t get it.
Gwen Why don’t you get in the water, Matt? It was your fault.
Matt
No way!
Jasmin We could call the boat centre.
Matt
Yeah, shall we do that?
Sam
No, it’s okay. Hold me, Jas, so I don’t fall in.
Jasmin Right.
Sam
Got it! Here it is! And your wallet and passport are fine.
You’re lucky, Matt.
Matt
Thanks, Sam. Sorry about that, everyone.
Gwen Oh, all right. Come on, let’s get back.
Matt
Gwen
Sam
Matt
Gwen
Sam
Matt
Look at the Key Expressions.
Key Expressions:
4
3.9
1
3.10
2
Work in pairs. Use the Key Expressions and
make suggestions for the situations.
A
B
Let’s have a surprise party for him.
No, why don’t we all go go-karting?
1
It’s your friend’s birthday on Saturday and
you’re discussing what to do for him.
You are with your friend. You can hear shouts
of ‘Help’ from next door.
It’s late and you’ve both missed the last bus
home.
2
3
6
Listen again. Complete the travel
information.
Times:
,
17.15, 18.40
return
Price: 4£
Work in pairs. Imagine you are lost in a forest.
Use the ideas below, make suggestions and
decide what to do.
Bus:
Times: 12.00 and
5
Price: 6£
Compare your suggestions with another pair
of students.
dying. Humans travel to a distant planet called
Pandora to find a valuable material which will
save Earth. There they meet the Na’vi, blueskinned, athletic aliens who haven’t destroyed
their planet. The humans make an avatar – half
human, half Na’vi – to get information about
Pandora. The character Jake Scully is chosen for
this job. However, he falls in love with an alien,
Neytiri, and decides to join the Na’vi.
Pronunciation Listen to the sound of the
letter ‘g’ in these words. Repeat the words.
1 /ɡ/ group
2 /dz/ generation
3 /ŋ/ everything
Look at the words below. How do you say
them? Put them in the correct group, 1, 2
or 3.
age allergy angry annoying argue
digital energetic forget game
graffiti gymnastics living room logical
organised original ring shopping
teenager washing-up
3.12
5
Listen and check your answers. Repeat the
words.
2
A01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_PRE.indd 7
2
3 Although this film is 163 minutes long, it never
gets boring because the special effects are
extraordinary. It’s one of the most expensive films
ever made and the use of CGI plus 3D is brilliant.
However, the characters aren’t always convincing
and some of the script is unnatural as well. Also,
I found the environmental message annoying.
4 I don’t usually enjoy films like Star Wars and
The Matrix but I really enjoyed Avatar. It’s worth
seeing it for the special effects. Don’t miss it!
3
1
Read the review of Avatar. Is it generally
positive or negative?
•
•
3
•
Read the text again and underline the verbs in the
Past Simple and the Present Perfect.
Look at the verbs you underlined in Exercise 1.
Match the tenses (1–2) with the uses and timelines
(a–b).
Present Perfect
2
Past Simple
a) we know exactly when the event happened and we
don’t want to link it with the present
now
b) the event happened in the period of time before now
and has influence on the present situation
Look at the linking words in blue in the text.
Which do we use for:
• addition? • contrast? • examples?
basic information: title, date, kind of film,
director, stars
background to the story: where? / when? /
what happens?
opinions: acting / story / special effects and
photography, music
recommendations: it’s (not) worth seeing,
I (don’t) recommend it
2
3
4
4
Read the sentences and translate the verbs in bold
into your language. Is the translation the same or
different?
1
2
She has appeared in over 100 films.
In 1976, she appeared in Taxi Driver.
5
Match the sentences (1–2) with the people (a–b).
1
2
1
2
6
STEP
4
1
Write notes about the film.
Use your notes to write the review. Write
four short paragraphs.
STEP
Match the paragraphs (1–4) with the topics
(a–d).
Write a review of a film you have seen recently.
•
Text Builder
a) recommendations c) opinions
b) background to the story d) basic information
66
5
deals with sounds
and word stress –
in other modules,
Listen closely
looks at features
of natural speech
these sections
present and
practise grammar
which can often
be difficult for
students
Read the text about Jodie Foster and look at the
photos. Have you seen the films? What did you think
of them?
Jodie Foster, an American actress and film director, was
born in 1962. She has appeared in over 100 films. She
started her film career as a child. In 1976, she appeared
in Taxi Driver with Robert De Niro and was nominated
for an Oscar. In 1985, she graduated from Yale University
with a degree in literature. So far, she has won two Oscars
for Best Actress. She won her first Oscar in 1988 and her
second in 1991 for The Silence of the Lambs. Recently, she
has directed and produced a number of films, too.
Check spelling, vocabulary and grammar.
STEP
the final writing
task is the
students’ own
challenge
Look at the photo. Have you seen the film?
What did you think of it?
55
BIODATA
STEP
1
Page 99, Exercise 15
Unders anding Grammar: Present Perfect and Past Simple
now
Writing: Film review
return
3
4
SA
this section looks
at text structure,
linking and
punctuation
extensive listening
is developed
through a variety
of tasks
return
3
TIME OUT!
Film Review
2 Avatar takes place in 2154 when the world is
and
Train:
3.11
1
Cameron, is a special-effects-packed sciencefiction film. The stars are Sam Worthington, Zoe
Saldana and Sigourney Weaver.
functional
language is
focused on and
practised
Listen to the conversation in the travel
agent’s. How do the couple decide to
travel? How long is their journey going
to be?
Times: 1
19.40
Price: 2£
Why don’t we make a fire to keep warm?
No, it’s raining. Everything is wet. Shall we …?
A
B
these boxes focus
on key features of
sentence structure
Plane:
• it’s cold • it’s starting to rain • it’s getting dark
• you are hungry • you have a mobile phone
• there is a river • you have a tent
• you have matches • you have a compass
M
PL
5
Your Challenge
1 Avatar (2009), directed by Titanic director James
53
Everyday Listening
54
in evennumbered
modules there are
Your Challenge
and Understanding
Grammar spots
Page 98, Exercise 14
Skills
Speaking
The next weekend, the group rent a boat on the Norfolk Broads,
an area of lakes and rivers near Norwich.
E
dialogues and
photos develop
the story
a) only go on the slow rides
b) go on rides but avoid the most
scary ones
c) go on everything!
2 What do you do when you go to
the beach?
U
1
1 When you go to an amusement
park, what do you do?
All accommodation is in luxury hotels, lodges or
campsites. Food is included. Transport by airconditioned 4x4 vehicles.
Dates: 16th April, 5th May.
tasks include
discussion,
quizzes,
questionnaires
and information
gap activities
enturous Are You?
Fly from London to Kampala.
Track chimpanzees in Kibale National Park.
Trekking to find gorillas in Bwindi National
Park. Watching them is an incredible
experience!
10 Days 10–12: Go to a well-known chimp sanctuary on
Lake Victoria. Forty-six chimps from zoos
and circuses live here. Remember, they’re
not wild so they love playing!
Day in Kampala. Five-star hotel. Do some
Day 13:
sightseeing and relaxing.
15
Return flight to London.
Day 14:
Days 2–5:
Days 6–9:
15 The Boa Trip
Warm-up
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the
questions. Check your scores on page 91.
How Adv
5 Day 1:
Last summer, me and my friends got student rail
tickets and travelled round Europe. We went
1 sight
in big cities. We stayed in
2 camp
or youth hostels – they were not
and were full of other
exactly 3 luxury
4 back
with all their 5 camping
.
The rooms weren’t 6 air, so sometimes
it wasn’t very comfortable. We made a lot of new
friends as most of the foreign students were
7 English.
backpacker (n)
nature lover (n)
hard-working (adj.)
Speaking
10
Do you like watching chimps and gorillas on
TV? Come and see them in the wild!
1 Uganda’s national parks are in spectacular
rainforests with an incredible variety of wildlife
including TEN species of primates. The stars of the
show are, of course, the rare mountain gorillas.
1 The Okavango river doesn’t go into the
sea but flows into the Kalahari desert
and forms an area of lakes and small
islands. This is a nature lover’s paradise with elephants,
hippos, lions,
5 cheetahs and leopards, 450 species of birds and 1000 plant
species.
Day 1:
Fly from London to Maun via Johannesburg.
Day 2:
Fly to our campsite in the delta. Put up your tent
under a palm tree and relax.*
Days 3–9: Go out with your English-speaking guide
in his
10
mokoro (wooden canoe). At night, you camp on
the islands. Your hard-working guide takes you
bird watching and on walks to see wild animals.
Day 10:
Back to Maun. Return flight to London.
* You can bring camping equipment or rent it from
us. There are
15 hot showers, a restaurant and a shop at the campsite.
Which safari would you like to go on?
What animals would you like to see?
What other places would you like to
go to?
What would you like to see and do
there?
5
UGANDA
,
BOTSWANA
Reading
travelling camping cycling
swimming playing football
studying English dancing
going to school getting up early
doing my homework
IT
Look at the Key Words. Which five
animals are not from Africa? What
other African animals can you add to
the list?
Key Words:
3.6
these spots focus
on lexical features
Write two sentences about each activity
in the box. Use these words:
N
1
AF
R
these lexical
quiz activities
test students on
the same lexical
feature as the
Word Builder but
using vocabulary
they have seen
before. Students
are referred to
the Word Bank to
help them and
to check their
answers
Skills
9
Work in groups. Read each other’s reviews.
Do you agree with them?
4
I don’t agree with Anna’s review. I thought the film
was brilliant.
5
1
2
3
He’s got two Oscars.
He got two Oscars.
She’s become famous.
She became famous.
a) a dead actor
b) a living actor
a) a new star
b) an old star
Put the verbs in brackets in the Present Perfect or
Past Simple.
Hollywood
(produce) many superstars.
(you, watch) the Oscar awards ceremony
on TV last night?
Tom Cruise
(receive) three Oscar
nominations but he
(not win) an Oscar.
Leonardo DiCaprio
(act) in over twenty
films.
Alfred Hitchcock
(not like) dark-haired
actresses.
7
Read the dialogue. What tense is used
to start the conversation? What tense is
used to ask about details?
Tom
Mike
Tom
Mike
Tom
Mike
8
Have you seen any good films lately?
Yes, I have. I watched Jaws last night.
Where did you watch it?
At home. My dad’s got it on DVD.
Did you like it?
Yes. It’s old and the special effects are
a bit funny but I was scared anyway.
Work in pairs. Use the cues to talk
about your experiences.
A
B
A
B
Have you been to the United States?
Yes, I have.
Did you go to Hollywood?
No, I didn’t.
1
be to the United States / go to
Hollywood
talk to an actor / who
act in a play / what role
write a film review / what film
see a Star Wars film / like the special
effects
watch a horror film / be scared
2
3
4
5
6
67
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10/10/2011 10:28
Introduc ion to New Challenges
Across Cultures 3
in odd-numbered
modules, there
are Across Cultures
lessons
a
Warm-up
3.13
1
2
1
2
3
4
5
8
b
Listen to three pieces of music. Match
them with the photos (a–c).
1
3
Nomads travel for fun.
Nomads often live in places with
extreme climates.
The Sami are from Siberia.
The Bedouin live in Arabia and
North Africa.
The Moken live on the coasts of
Thailand and Burma (Myanmar).
9
c
1
Sami
3
Read the texts again. Which nomads:
1
2
3
4
5
6
welcome strangers?
travel in the summer?
are good at finding water?
live on land for only part of the year?
use modern technology?
don’t look after animals?
What do the blue words in the text refer to?
1
2
3
4
some (line 2)
others (line 3)
some (line 9)
they (line 10)
1 some – nomads
6
Moken
5
6
7
8
them (line 11)
some (line 20)
it (line 31)
they (line 33)
Look at the Word Builder. The words in bold
are often confusing. What are they in your
language?
Word Builder
Nomads
1
5
The Sami live in northern Scandinavia. Most
of them now have ‘normal’ jobs in towns and
cities but some carry on their traditional way of
life. In early summer, they go on a long journey
north with their reindeers. The Sami take them
far into the Arctic Circle to find grass and plants
to eat. When autumn begins, they take the
reindeers south again. Nowadays, the Sami use
snowmobiles and mobile phones when they are
looking after their animals. However, they still
wear their colourful costumes and sing their
traditional songs.
The word ‘Bedouin’ means ‘desert inhabitant’. Many Bedouins
live in towns in Arabia and North Africa but some still
make trips into the desert to get food for their camels. The
camels, or ‘ships of the desert’, carry everything and provide
food (milk and meat) and shelter (wool for tents). Bedouin
hospitality is famous: they give strangers food and water.
Bedouins know many tricks to find water. For example, when
they see insects or birds, they know water is usually near.
20
7
10
15
1
The Moken are often called ‘sea gypsies’. Some follow their
traditional lifestyle in the coastal areas of Thailand and
Myanmar. During the rainy season, when the sea is rough,
they live in huts on the beach but for the rest of the year they 30
live on their boats. They catch seafood and sell it in fishing
villages. Moken children learn to swim before they can walk.
They can see underwater twice as clearly as the rest of us and
can stay underwater twice as long! The Moken people know
the sea very well – before the tsunami in 2005, they left the sea 35
and looked for high ground.
2
3
4
5
6
3
4
5
Choose interesting places. Write notes about
the places to visit and things to do.
Use your notes to write a description of the
tour.
Copy a map and draw the route on it.
Find pictures to add to your description.
Make a wall poster with your description,
maps and pictures, like the one below.
Choose the correct word.
Are you from England? No, I’m from Scotland,
actually / nowadays.
Traffic pollution wasn’t a problem a hundred
years ago but it is actually / nowadays.
The train journey / trip took four hours.
My dad went on a business journey / trip to
London.
She’s carrying / wearing a lovely dress.
The camels carry / wear huge baskets.
Inverness
N
Aberdeen
D
Glasgow
Day 3: Visit the beautiful
university city of St Andrews,
the home of golf. St Andrews
has got a good beach but the water is freezing!
St. Andrews
EDINBURGH
Day 4: Travel north to Inverness to see the
monster in Loch Ness. Then …
57
there are four
projects in the
book which give
students the
chance to work
together and
be creative
N
IT
56
2
Days 1 and 2: Arrive in
Edinburgh. There are many
things to see, like Edinburgh
Castle and Holyrood Palace.
Visit the National Gallery to
see some great paintings or
go shopping for souvenirs on
the Royal Mile.
25
Sea Gypsies
1
LA
OT
The Reindeer People
Desert Survivors
Touring your country
SC
For nomads, being on the move is part of
everyday life. Some move to look for food for
their animals or themselves, others travel to
buy and sell things. Actually, there are not many
nomads left in the world nowadays but some
nomadic people still survive.
texts look at
cultures around
the world
5
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions.
Have you ever moved house? How old were
you? How did you feel?
Would you like to move to another place?
Where would you like to live?
Would you like to live like a nomad? Why/Why
not?
2
3
Read the text about nomads. Check
your guesses from Exercise 2.
4
the Word Builder
focuses on a
relevant lexical
feature
Word Bank, page 107
Speaking
Bedouin
Reading
3.14
Word Quiz Complete the sentences with the
words in brackets.
They wanted to
a bank and
a million pounds. (steal/rob)
I
a lot of money but I still try to
the lottery. (earn/win)
this cup to the kitchen, please. And
can you
me a biscuit? (bring/take)
2
Look at the photos. Do you think the
sentences about nomads are true (T)
or false (F)?
S udy Corner 5
Language Check
4
1
16
What are the types of transport?
1
2
you
the teacher
your homework yet? (give)
England 17
the World Cup once.
They 18
it in London in 1966. (win)
I 19
in Paris last year on holiday.
20
I
there twice. (be)
3
5
2
A
B
A
5
Complete the gaps with one word.
Have you 21
been to Italy?
Yes, but I’ve 22
visited Rome.
Has your sister finished her maths homework
23
?
Yes, she’s 24
done it but she
hasn’t finished her science 25
.
E
4
Put the verbs in brackets in the Past Simple or
Present Perfect.
U
self-test exercises
check students’
vocabulary,
grammar and
functional
language
Complete the gaps with the names of jobs.
B
A
grows food or looks after animals.
A
takes photos.
A
catches criminals or directs traffic.
A
usually does paperwork and
answers the phone in an office.
10 A
talks to the camera and gives
information.
6
Complete the gaps with one word.
A
B
A
26
3
B
Grammar
Complete the compound words in the
sentences.
11 Rare mountain gorillas live in the rain
in Uganda.
12 Australia and New Zealand are Englishcountries.
13 My dad’s hobby is bird
.
14 We stayed in a fivehotel.
15 There are fifteen national
in Britain.
Vocabulary
/ 15
/ 10
It’s Amber’s birthday tomorrow.
we get her a present?
Good idea! What 27
getting her
a CD?
No, she downloads all her music. We
28
get her a T-shirt.
Okay. 29
go to Shirtz Shop.
30
don’t we look in the market
first? It’s cheaper.
Yeah, that’s a great idea.
PL
6
7
8
9
A
B
A
Key Expressions
/5
S udy Help: Explaining words
When you don’t know a word, try to describe it.
We stayed in a sort of hotel for young people.
(youth hostel)
It’s a kind of black and white bear and it lives
in China. (panda)
• Look at the table below. Check where you
•
M
Feedback
• Listen and check your answers to the
Language Check. Write down your scores.
made mistakes.
SA
students listen
and check their
answers before
doing extra
revision
3.15
58
Wrong answers:
Look again at:
Numbers 1–5
Get Ready – Key Words
Numbers 6–10
Unit 13 – Key Words
Numbers 11–15
Unit 14 – Word Builder
Numbers 16–25
Unit 13 – Grammar
Numbers 26–30
Unit 15 – Key Expressions
• Now do the exercises in Language Check 5
of the Workbook.
What are these words?
It’s a kind of small boat for one or
two people.
He/She is a sort of waiter/waitress.
He/She brings the food on aeroplanes.
3 It’s a kind of car. It’s good for safaris.
1
2
•
A
B
A
Work in pairs. Each choose three words
from this module. Describe them to your
partner using sort of or kind of. Your
partner guesses the word.
It’s a sort of expensive hotel.
A five-star hotel?
Yes!
learner
development
activities help
students become
better learners
The Workbook
The Workbook gives further practice of the language
introduced in the Students’ Book. Each unit directly reflects
the content of the corresponding unit of the Students’ Book.
Groups of Key Words and lexical features from Word Builders
are recycled and practised on the Get Ready page and in
the Skills unit. Grammar structures and uses are practised
in the Grammar unit and exercises are graded according
to difficulty with a one-, two- and three-star system. There
is also a handy Grammar Reference section at the back of
the book. Reading and writing skills are practised in the
Skills unit, which also includes a focus on punctuation. The
Language Check in each module acts as a follow-up to the
Language Quiz in the Study Corner of the Students’ Book.
Alternate modules of the Workbook finish with a Reading
Corner, which can be used as a ‘reading for pleasure’ activity
or to give further reading comprehension practice. There
are extra listening activities on every Get Ready page and in
the Skills unit. The recordings are on the New Challenges 3
Workbook audio CD.
viii
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Introduc ion to New Challenges
Council Of Europe
New Challenges 3 covers most of the descriptors of the
Common European Framework at B.1.1 level (low threshold)
except those related to work and other adult contexts, and
some of those at B.1.2 level (high threshold).
Spoken Production B.1.1
Can give a straightforward presentation on a familiar
topic. (Module 7)
Can relate the plot of a book or film and describe
his/her reactions. (Module 6)
Can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions,
plans and actions. (Module 6)
Can work out how to communicate the main point(s)
he/she wants to get across, exploiting any resources
available and limiting the message to what he/she
can recall or finds the means to express. (Module 3)
Writing B.1.1
Can write accounts of experiences, describing feelings
and reactions in a simple connected text. (Module 2)
Can write personal letters and notes asking for or
conveying simple information of immediate relevance,
getting across the point he/she feels to be important.
(Modules 2, 4 and 8)
Can write notes conveying simple information of
immediate relevance to friends, service people, teachers
and others. (Modules 4 and 8)
Can write very brief reports to a standard
conventionalised format, which pass on routine factual
information. (Module 3)
Can write personal letters describing experiences, feelings
and events in some detail. (Module 2)
Listening B.1.1
U
Reading B.1.1
Can understand the description of events, feelings and
wishes in personal letters. (Module 2)
Can find and understand relevant information in letters
and brochures. (Modules 1, 2 and 5)
Can recognise significant points in a straightforward
magazine article on familiar subjects. (Modules 1, 3, 5,
7 and 8)
SA
M
PL
E
Can express and respond to feelings such as surprise,
happiness, sadness, interest and indifference. (Module 4)
Can take part in discussions on familiar subjects.
(Module 2)
Can deal with transactions while travelling. (Module 5)
Can express belief, opinion, agreement and disagreement
politely. (Module 2)
Can make his/her opinions and reactions understood as
regards to possible solutions of the question of what to
do next. (Module 6)
Can find out and pass on straightforward factual
information. (Module 5)
Can ask for and follow detailed information. (Module 5)
N
Can convey meaning by qualifying a word meaning
something similar. (Module 5)
Can define the features of something concrete for
which he/she can’t remember the word. (Module 5)
Spoken Interaction B.1.1
Can extrapolate meaning of occasional unknown words
from context and deduce sentence meaning provided the
topic discussed is familiar. (Modules 4 and 5)
Can understand the main points of radio news bulletins
and simpler recorded material about familiar subjects
delivered relatively slowly and clearly. (Module 8)
IT
Spoken Production B.1.2
Spoken Interaction B.1.2
Can express thoughts on abstract, cultural topics such as
films, books and music. (Modules 6 and 7)
Can summarise and give his/her opinion about a book.
(Module 6)
Can provide concrete information required in an
interview/consultation (e.g. doctor: symptoms). (Module 3)
ix
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Module 1
Ge Ready
Talk about your school, likes and dislikes.
Background
Read about schools around the world.
This spread introduces the
characters and the setting of
the story. In the photos we
can see the characters in their
home environments. All of
them are artistic in different
ways and interested in
developing their talent at the
school.
The Petergate School of
Performing Arts in Norwich is
not real but is based on many
similar schools in Britain and
the United States.
Norwich is a medium-sized
city in East Anglia.
More information about
both important music and
performing arts schools and
the city of Norwich is available
on the Internet.
Listen to school announcements.
Write about your ideal school.
Learn more about the Present Simple and
Present Continuous.
Jasmin
IT
Get Ready
1.6
1
Listen to the people in the photos. Make notes
about:
U
N
Extra
• where they are from • what they like
• what they are good at • what they want to be
1.7
2
Listen again and complete the sentences with
Matt, Jasmin, Sam or Gwen.
Sam
Gwen
Jasmin
Matt
Jasmin
Sam
goes to a big school.
goes to a small private school.
has a good dance teacher.
has acting classes at school.
has dance classes after school.
and Gwen play the piano.
PL
E
1
2
3
4
5
6
3
Key Words:
M
1.8
Look at the Key Words. What facilities has your
school got? Has it got any others?
SA
Read through the module
objectives with the class. Check
that students understand
any new words and phrases,
e.g. ‘school announcements’.
Encourage them to say which
of the activities they think they
will find easier or more difficult.
At the end of the module, help
students to assess how well they
have achieved the objectives.
Follow this procedure in each
module.
Schools
Matt
8
1.6
4
Read the advert. Which things would you
like to do?
I’d like to do drama and I’d like to make a film.
Exercise 1
Answers
Audioscript ➞ page 105
Matt: from New York; likes acting
and music; good at playing the guitar;
wants to be an actor.
Jasmin: from Manchester; likes
dancing and music; good at playing
the saxophone; wants to be a dancer.
Sam: from London; likes music; good
at singing; wants to be a pop star.
Gwen: from Cardiff; likes films; good
at taking photos; wants to be a film
director.
• Ask students to look at the photos
and guess what the people like
doing and what they want to
be. Play the recording, twice if
necessary. Students write notes.
• Tell students not to worry if they
can’t hear all the information as
there is a lot to listen for.
8
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Exercise 5
• Give students time to
think of their answers and
reasons before they work
in pairs. Help with any new
vocabulary students need.
Extra
Ask students to say which day
of the week they don’t like
and which place in the school
they don’t like and to give their
reasons.
Exercise 6
Gwen
IT
Sam
5
Summer courses
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions
and give reasons for your answers.
PETERGATE SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS
1
Would you like to be a professional
musician, singer, dancer or actor?
With us, you CAN do it!
My favourite subject is chemistry because I’ve got a
great teacher.
3-wEEk RESIdENTIAL COuRSE IN NORwICH
3
4
U
N
What is your favourite subject at school?
2
(185 kilometres from London).
What is your favourite activity in your
English class?
What is your favourite day of the week?
What is your favourite place in the school?
E
6
• Music: classes for piano, guitar, violin,
flute, saxophone
• Singing • Dance • Drama
• Performances: Students perform a
piece of music and a song. Groups
produce a short film or play.
• Excellent facilities: theatre, dance
studio, recording studio
• Read through the questions
with the class and elicit two
or three suggestions.
• In turn, students tell the
class their opinions. They
can see which ideas are
most popular.
Speak Out Tell the class your opinions.
1
PL
What extra facilities would you like to have at
your school?
I’d like to have a skatepark near the science
laboratories.
2
SA
M
• Accommodation: shared rooms
• Full board (breakfast, lunch and dinner)
• Large gardens • Tennis court
• Gymnasium • Outdoor swimming pool
What extra classes would you like to have?
Dates: courses begin 15th July and 15th August
1.7
Exercise 2
• Give students time to read through
the sentences and see if they can
remember who does what.
• Play the recording for students to
complete the sentences.
Answers ➞ student page
Extra
Divide the class into four groups. Ask
each group to listen carefully to one of
the speakers and make a note of extra
information about the person. The
groups then tell the class their extra
information.
1.8
TIM E OUT!
Page 00, Exercise 0
9
Exercise 3
• Play the recording for the students
to listen and repeat the Key Words.
Check word stress and students’
understanding.
Extra
Give students one minute to read
through the lesson. Students
then close their books.
Write four or five phrases on the
board, omitting the vowels, e.g.
1 R_S_D_NT__L
C__RS_
2 _XC_LL_NT
F_C_L_T__S
3 F_LL B__RD
4 D_NC_ ST_D__
5 SC__NC_
L_B_R_T_RY
Students work in pairs,
completing the phrases with
vowels.
Check answers by asking
individuals to complete the
words on the board.
Answers:
1 residential course
2 excellent facilities
3 full board
4 dance studio
5 science laboratory
Exercise 4
• Read through the advert with the
class. Explain or encourage students
to guess the meaning of any new
words.
• Students work in groups or as a
whole class, saying what they would
like to do.
9
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Home Schooling
1
This Uni
Warm-up
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 6, 7, 8 and 9)
More time: do the Extra
activity
1
Look at the web page and the
photos. How is home schooling
different from your school day?
Background
Exercise 1
in Britain
• Check that students
understand any new words
in the text about home
schooling in Britain, e.g.
‘match’, ‘abilities’ and
‘learning styles’.
• Students suggest how home
schooling differs from their
school day.
Who can do it? Any parent can decide to teach their
children at home. You don’t have to be a teacher.
Why do it? You can match the day to your children’s interests,
abilities and learning styles. Children learn at their own speed
with people they know and love.
Reading and Listening
2
Read and listen to the interview. Check
your answers from Exercise 1.
John I’m John Watts, a reporter for the
Daily News. I’m visiting Sally Atkins
and her two children. Ned is fifteen,
Leah is ten and they learn at home
with their mum. Sally, can you tell
me about home schooling?
Sally Yes, I can. Today is a typical day.
Leah is in the garden. She’s drawing
plants and writing about them. She
loves the natural world. Every Friday
she goes to a nature club with other
kids. They learn about animals and
the environment.
John Who decides what she does?
Sally Here she is – why don’t you ask her?
John Hi, Leah. Who decides what you do
every day?
Leah I do. I talk to Mum about the things
that I’m interested in and she helps
me. It’s great! I don’t have formal
lessons so I’m never bored. Today
I’m making a poster about plants
for my nature club.
John That sounds interesting. What about
you, Ned?
It’s different for me now because I’m studying for
three exams: maths, English and science. I chose
the subjects and Mum’s helping me to study and
revise. Today I’m doing some practice exams. Twice
a week, I study physics with another home-school
kid, Isabelle. Her dad’s a scientist and he’s teaching
us about energy and force at the moment.
John So you have got some friends.
Ned Of course! I meet them in the park every day to
play football.
U
N
E
PL
10
Reading and Listening
1.9
Exercise 2
• Play the recording for students to
read and listen and check their ideas.
Leah decides what she does every day.
She doesn’t have formal lessons. She’s
never bored.
Ned chose the subjects he’s studying
for. He studies with another homeschool student and her father.
Exercise 3
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 10
Ned
IT
1.9
Example answers
10
What is it? Home schooling is when parents teach their
children. In Britain, about 50, 000 students learn at home.
M
Warm-up
Home
Schooling
SA
The concept of home schooling
is completely alien in many
countries and you may like to
share student reactions to the
idea in class. As the text states,
only a relatively small number
of children are educated
at home in Britain but the
number is growing.
The law on home schooling
in the UK is very flexible and,
as the text states, it is not
necessary for either parent to
be a qualified teacher. The only
condition is that children must
receive a full-time education
appropriate to their age. Local
authorities may at times check
informally that a child being
educated at home is indeed
receiving tuition and may take
action if they believe that
parents are not complying with
the law.
More detailed information
about home schooling in
the UK is available on the
Internet by searching for ‘home
schooling’ at:
www.direct.gov.uk
• Students discuss the questions in
small groups of three or four.
• The discussion can then be opened
up as a class discussion.
3
Speak Out Do you think home schooling is a
good idea? Would you like to study at home with your
parents? Why/Why not? Tell the class.
Grammar: Present Simple and Present
Continuous
4
Read the sentences (1–4) and match them with the
names of the tenses: Present Simple and Present
Continuous.
a) Present Simple
1 They learn at home.
2 She loves the natural world.
b) Present Continuous
3 She’s drawing plants.
4 I’m studying for three exams.
Grammar: Present Simple
and Present Continuous
Exercise 4
Answers ➞ student page
Exercise 5
• Read aloud the uses (a–d) and check
students’ understanding.
• After checking their answers,
students find more examples in the
text for each use.
Answers ➞ student page
05/10/2011 11:50
Grammar
5
R
Find the sentences (1–4) from Exercise 4 in the
text. Match them with the uses (a–d) below.
Find more examples in the text for each use.
We use the Present Simple to talk about:
2
a) a present state or feeling,
1
b) an activity we do regularly.
I
R
We use the Present Continuous to talk about:
c) an activity happening right now at the
3
time of speaking,
d) an activity happening for some time
around the time of speaking but not
4
necessarily now.
I
R
9
Practice
6
No, I don’t. I work with the best person for
that subject. For example, Mum 7
(teach) me French, art and geography. Dad’s a
scientist so I 8
(do) things like biology
with him. At the moment, my older sister
9
(study) for a physics exam, so Dad
10
(help) her and a friend, Ned.
Do you get good grades?
I 11
(not know)! I never 12
(take) tests or exams.
How do you know if you are learning?
I 13
(not worry) about that.
Extra
Write on the board:
1 Tell me about a typical day
for you.
2 Do you get good grades?
3 How do you know if you are
learning?
Students work in small groups,
asking and answering the
questions. Tell them to give as
much information as they can
in their answers. Open up a
class discussion about the last
question.
Use the notes below to make sentences about
Ned and Ruby. Use the Present Simple and
Present Continuous.
Match the people (1–6) with the sentences (a–f).
1–b
1
2
3
4
8
I
R
I
R
I
Complete the sentences with the verbs in
brackets in the Present Simple or the Present
Continuous.
Ned is doing a practice exam today. He learns at home.
Laura is a good student. She likes (like)
school a lot.
Jill wants to travel across Siberia next year so
she ’s learning (learn) Russian.
Chris is very fit. He swims (swim) a lot and
goes (go) jogging every day.
I’m on a diet. I ’m not eating (not eat) sweets
this month.
Complete the interview with Ruby with the
correct form of the verbs in brackets.
Tell me about a typical day for you.
Every day is different. I 1don’t start (not start)
at a regular time. At the moment, I 2
(learn) about the stars, so I 3
(do) a
lot of things at night!
4
your parents
(study) the
stars with you?
My dad is but Mum isn’t. She 5
(hate)
being outside in the cold for hours.
6
you always
(study) with
your dad?
Answers
IT
7
• Students do the exercise
orally or as a written
exercise.
Ruby: look at the
sky this week, make
notes today, not go
to traditional school,
not often work on a
laptop, play tennis every
weekend, study French
with her mum
Your Turn
10
U
N
6
Ned: do a practice
exam today, learn at
home, never wear a
school uniform, not
do a past exam paper
on the Internet, play
football every day, study
for three exams at the
moment
Work in pairs. Describe your school. Use the
ideas below and the time expressions in the
box. Add your own ideas.
• get grades • play sport/music • have lessons
• have tests • train for a match • go on trips
• work with other students • watch films
• put on a play
We have lessons every day but we don’t have tests
very often. This week our class team is training for
a basketball match.
11
Practice
Answers
3d)
4c)
Page 93, Exercise 1
Exercise 8
Exercise 6
2a)
Read your descriptions to the class. Which is
the most interesting?
TIM E OUT!
5f)
6e)
Exercise 7
• Check answers by asking individuals
to read aloud the sentences.
Answers ➞ student page
• Advise students to read through
the interview quickly for general
understanding before they start
completing it.
• Check answers by asking pairs
of students to read aloud the
questions and answers in the
dialogue.
Answers
2 ’m learning 3 ’m doing 4 Are
(your parents) studying 5 hates
6 Do (you always) study 7 teaches
8 do 9 is studying 10 is helping
11 don’t know 12 take 13 don’t
worry
Ned is doing a practice exam
today. He learns at home. He
never wears a school uniform.
He isn’t doing a past exam
paper on the Internet. He
plays football every day. He
is studying for three exams at
the moment.
Ruby is looking at the sky
this week. She’s making notes
today. She doesn’t go to a
traditional school. She doesn’t
often work on a laptop. She
plays tennis every weekend.
She studies French with her
mum.
every day sometimes never often
at the moment always this week/month
E
4
5
Exercise 9
PL
3
a) I’m not eating
chocolate.
b) I don’t eat
chocolate.
c) I only read
magazines.
d) I’m only reading
magazines.
e) I study every day.
f) I’m studying every
day.
M
2
a person allergic
to chocolate
a person on a
slimming diet
a history teacher
on holiday
a teenage girl
a student before an
exam
a hard-working
student
SA
1
Your Turn
11
Exercise 10
• Read the example sentences
with the class. Remind
students of the position of
time expressions (e.g. often,
at the moment) in sentences.
• Check students’ writing and
point out any language
errors for the pairs to correct
before they read their
description in Exercise 11.
Exercise 11
• Students read their
descriptions and discuss as
a class.
TI M E OUT!
Page 93,
Exercise 1
Photocopiable activity 1,
Teacher’s Resources MultiROM
11
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 11
05/10/2011 11:50
Boarding Schools
2
This Uni
Warm-up
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 7, 9 and 10)
More time: do the activity in
the Time Out section
1
Read the text about two British boarding
schools, Roedean and Eton. Are there boarding
schools in your country? Would you like to go
to one? Why/Why not?
Background
Eton and Roedean are two of
the most prestigious schools
in the UK. Some schools in the
UK still have ‘house’ systems as
mentioned in the text, though
these are less common in
schools today.
1.10
2
Read the text about UWC and match the titles
(a–e) with the paragraphs (1–5).
a) fees
b) free-time
activities
c) houses
d) general
information
e) the first
school
RoEDEAn
Eton CollEgE
Opened 1885 in Brighton, near the sea.
400 girls aged eleven to eighteen
(about fifteen per cent are day girls).
Three houses. Girls share rooms in
groups. Fees: approx. £24,000 per year.
Opened in 1440 in Windsor, near London. About
1300 boys aged thirteen to eighteen. Twenty-five
houses. No dormitories; pupils have their own
study-bedrooms. Fees: approx. £26,000 per year.
UWC
Warm-up
1 UWC is a movement consisting of thirteen schools and colleges
and over 120 national committees, which can be found in
five continents. German educationalist, Kurt Hahn, had the
idea for the international colleges during the 1950s’ Cold
War. He believed that young people from all over the world,
learning and living together, could help to build international
understanding and world peace.
2 On 19th September 1962, the first school, UWC Atlantic
College, was opened in Wales. UWC Atlantic College is
a mixed boarding school and has 350 students aged from
sixteen to nineteen years old. It is more diverse than most
schools: the students come from as many as eighty different
countries. Life at UWC Atlantic College is not as formal as at
some boarding schools. Students don’t wear a uniform and there
are no compulsory sports or competitions between the houses.
3 In addition to academic work, UWC students take part in
community service. Every student must take up a voluntary
activity for two afternoons or evenings a week. UWC Atlantic
College students can choose from a wide range of activities and
services. For example, they can help with sea and beach rescue;
work on the college farm where they learn to grow food and
take care of the environment or organise activities for disabled
children.
4 At UWC Atlantic College, the students live in seven houses.
Each house has beds for about forty-eight students and,
usually, four students from different countries share a room.
Houseparents live with the students and take care of them. The
rooms are quite simple and the students share bathrooms. Each
student house has a living room with a small kitchen and study
rooms. Breakfast, lunch and dinner take place in a beautiful
twelfth-century dining room.
Exercise 1
PL
E
U
N
IT
• Give students time to read
about Eton /ˈiːtәn/ and
Roedean /ˈrәʊdiːn/. Check
that they understand the
vocabulary, e.g. (school)
houses. Students may like to
convert the fees from British
pounds into their own
currency.
• Students say if they would
like to go to a boarding
school and give their
reasons.
Exercise 2
5 Anyone can apply to a UWC school or college. There are no
SA
• Ask students to talk about
the people and the places in
the photos.
• Read through the titles (a–e)
with the class.
• Students read the text,
matching the titles with
the paragraphs. Tell
students to read for general
understanding. Explain that
they will study the text in
detail in Exercises 3–5.
M
Reading
1.10
Reading
Answers
1d) 2e) 3b) 4c) 5a)
Exercise 3
• Read aloud the advice
and check that students
understand the meaning of
scanning. Encourage them to
do this when they read texts
in their L1.
12
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 12
12
restrictions on nationality, religion or politics. The fees are
about £23,500 a year but the school chooses students for
their ability to learn, not their ability to pay. The organisation
helps students if they need money.
Exercise 4
• Students work individually, scanning
the texts and completing the table.
• Write the headings of the table on
the board. Check answers by asking
students to complete the table on
the board.
Answers
Atlantic College
Location
Wales
Year opened
1962
mixed boarding
school
16–19
350 students
7
Type of school
Age of students
Number of students
Number of houses
Eton
Windsor, near
London
1440
boys boarding
school
13–18
1300 students
25
Roedean
Brighton
1885
girls boarding
school
11–18
400 students
3
05/10/2011 11:50
Skills
3
7
Look at the Reading Help.
Reading Help: Scanning for information
Compare your school with Atlantic College,
Eton and Roedean. Use the Sentence Builder
and these words to write sentences.
Read the text quickly to get the general idea.
Read the questions to see what type of information
you need (e.g. names, dates, times).
•
My school has got more students than Atlantic College.
Find the paragraph with the information and read
it carefully.
8
Copy the table. Scan the texts from Exercises
1 and 2 and complete the table.
Atlantic
College
Eton
Location
1440
9
mixed
boarding
school
1
10
6
All the UWC are international.
The first UWC was in Germany.
Atlantic College students must play sports.
All students at UWCs study in English.
The students at Atlantic College eat all their
meals in their houses.
Most students at a UWC are from rich
families.
Look at the Sentence Builder. Find two more
examples in the text.
Sentence Builder
1
2
3
4
5
Why don’t you start to learn Italian?
Please look after the baby.
She always does something in the school play.
Can you feed my cat when I’m away, please?
I’d like to start judo next term.
Answers ➞ student page
Verb Quiz Find these get expressions in the
Word Bank. You’ve got two minutes!
To enter a bus. get on
You do this every morning. get up
To enter a car. get into
To meet people. get together
To be friendly with someone. get on with
Word Bank, page 106
Speaking
11
Exercise 10
Speaking
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions.
SA
Fact or Fiction?
Fact or Fiction?
‘Public schools’ in Britain are, in
fact, expensive private schools
Answer on page 92.
TIM E OUT!
Page 93, Exercise 2
13
Exercise 5
Exercise 7
• Students do the exercise
individually.
• If students disagree about any of
the answers, ask them to read aloud
the section of the text that supports
their answer.
Exercise 6
• Read through the instructions and
list of words with the class. Elicit
two or three example sentences.
• Students write six to eight
sentences, comparing their school
with Atlantic College, Eton and
Roedean. Tell students to use each
pattern in the Sentence Builder
in at least one sentence. Check
students’ sentences.
• Read the sentences with the
students.
Exercise 8
Answers ➞ student page
Answers
The students come from as many as
eighty different countries.
Life at UWC Atlantic College is not as
formal as at some boarding schools.
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 13
• After students have worked
in pairs, open up a class
discussion about some of
the questions.
• Give students time to think
of what school rules are
unfair.
• Then, each student tells
the class to see how much
general agreement there is.
Speak Out What rules at your school
do you think are unfair? Tell the class.
M
12
Exercise 11
Exercise 12
Which do you think is better:
1 day or boarding schools?
2 boys, girls or mixed schools?
3 school uniform or own clothes?
4 final exams or project work?
PL
Read the text in Exercise 2 again. Are the
sentences true (T), false (F) or is there no
information (NI)?
NI
The exams are in the gym.
IT
Number of
houses
6
Rewrite the sentences using verbs from the
Word Builder.
U
N
Number of
students
T
F
F
NI
F
2 Why don’t you take up
learning Italian?
3 Please take care of
the baby.
4 She always takes part in
the school play.
5 Can you take care of my cat
while I’m away, please?
6 I’d like to take up judo
next term.
The exams take place in the gym.
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
Answers
Word Builder
Roedean
Age of
students
5
Look at the Word Builder. Find the verbs in red
in the text and read the sentences.
Brighton
Year
opened
Type of
school
• Check answers by asking
individuals to read aloud
the sentences.
E
4
Exercise 9
• activities • big • classes • expensive
• famous • international • old • students
•
•
• Students find and read aloud the
sentences in the text which contain
the verbs. Check that students
understand the meaning of the
verbs.
• After checking the answer,
ask students if this
information surprises them.
What different types of
school do they have in their
country?
TI M E OUT!
Page 93,
Exercise 2
13
05/10/2011 11:50
Arriving
3
This Uni
Warm-up
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 3 and 4)
More time: do the Extra
activities
1
Look at the photo. What can you remember
about the students?
Reading and Listening
1.11
Background
2
• Gwen • Jasmin • Matt • Sam • Mr Bywater
• Mr Grant • Benson • Mrs Tyler-Smith
The four characters arrive
at the Petergate School of
Performing Arts in Norwich.
We see the owner of the
school (Mrs Tyler-Smith) and
two teachers (Mr Grant and Mr
Bywater).
The four students arrive at Petergate School.
Doug Right, here we are. This is the school.
Jasmin It looks great, Mr Grant.
Doug Call me Doug.
Jasmin Right … er, Doug.
Doug That’s Mr Bywater over there, one of the
music teachers. And that’s Mrs Tyler-Smith
with her cat, Benson. She’s the owner.
Come and meet her.
Mrs T-S Hello! Did you have a good trip?
Jasmin Yes, thanks.
Mrs T-S Are you Gwen?
Jasmin No, I’m Jasmin. This is Gwen.
Gwen Pleased to meet you.
Mrs T-S So, you’re an actress, Janet.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
U
N
IT
• Encourage students to say as
much as they can remember
about each of the students.
• Students describe the
appearance of the three
adults in the picture. Check
that students remember the
word beard.
E
Reading and
Listening
Exercise 2
• Play the recording twice for
students to listen, read and
complete the task.
• Students do the exercise,
working individually.
Mrs Tyler-Smith
Sam
M
Exercise 3
Gwen
Benson
Matt
SA
Answers ➞ student page
Mr Bywater
Mr Grant
PL
1.11
Jasmin Jasmin. Well, I prefer dancing to acting.
I really love dancing.
Mrs T-S Oh. And you, Helen, sorry, Gwen. You’d
like to be a singer. Is that right?
Gwen Well, I’d rather be a film director. That’s
my ambition and I like taking photos.
Mrs T-S Really? Well, come in!
Sam
Hey, it’s a big place!
Matt
I can’t stand old houses. I’m allergic to
dust.
Sam
Allergic to dust?
Matt
Yeah, and cats. I hate going near them.
And I don’t like dogs much either.
Sam
Don’t you like any animals?
Matt
I don’t mind goldfish. They’re okay.
Sam
Well, there’s a cat over there. Look.
Matt
Oh no! And who’s that strange guy with
the beard?
Sam
I think he’s one of the teachers.
Matt
Really? He looks scary.
Sam
Come on. Let’s go in.
Read and listen to the dialogue. Find the
people (and the animal) in the photo.
Jasmin
14
Answers ➞ student page
Extra
Ask students if they (or any
of their friends or family) are
allergic to anything. If so, what
problems do they have?
Speaking
Exercise 4
• Advise students to read through
the sentences before they start
completing them.
• Check answers by asking individuals
to read aloud the sentences. Check
that students understand that the ’d
in You’d and I’d in sentences 3 and
4 stands for would.
Exercise 5
• Ask three students to read out
the example dialogue. Elicit two
or three more sentences from
the class, using some of the Key
Expressions.
• Students work in groups of three to
five, discussing what they like and
dislike about school.
Answers ➞ student page
Extra
14
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 14
Put students into groups of six to act out
the dialogue.
05/10/2011 11:50
Skills
3
Read the dialogue again. Are the sentences
true (T) or false (F)?
T
F
T
F
1
2
3
4
Doug is friendly to Jasmin.
Mrs Tyler-Smith has a good memory.
Matt doesn’t like the place.
Matt is allergic to goldfish.
Work in pairs. Say true sentences about the
ideas below. Use I like or I’d like.
Everyday Listening
I’d like to have acting classes at school.
• have acting classes • meet Keira Knightley
• eat Turkish food • speak English
• go snowboarding • play the guitar
• visit the UK
Speaking
4
8
9
Complete the Key Expressions from the
dialogue with the words in the box.
A
hate like (x2) love mind
much prefer rather stand
B
Key Expressions:
1.12
Audioscript ➞ page 105
• Give students time to read
through the information
before you play the
recording.
• Play the recording, twice
if necessary, for students
to listen and complete the
information.
Work in pairs. Arrange things to do this
weekend, e.g. go to the cinema, rent a DVD,
go shopping. Use I prefer and I’d rather.
What would you like to do on Friday night?
Would you like to go out or watch TV at home?
I’d rather go out because I prefer going to the
cinema to watching TV.
prefer
mind
5
Everyday Listening
1.12
Meals
Work in groups. What do people like and
dislike about school?
Breakfast from 1 7.30 to 2 8.30
Lunch at 3 1 o’clock
Dinner at 4 7 o’clock
After-lunch concerts at 1.45 on
5 Wednesdays and 6 Fridays
U
N
Rehearsal rooms 7 10 o’clock
Theatre/dance studio/gym 8 9 o’clock
Swimming pool/tennis court 9 9 o’clock
Speak Out Tell the class about your
10 o’clock , please!
E
NO NOISE after 10
Look at the Sentence Builder. Which sentences
are about:
a) general likes/dislikes?
b) something you want to do now or in the
future?
Excursions:
<realia 1.4>
th
London 11 17
July
Great Yarmouth (the coast) 12
1.13
2
July
Listen closely Listen to the extracts
from Exercise 1. Which of these words
can you hear in the sentences: are or a?
M
Sentence Builder
24 th
SA
1.14
3
Page 93, Exercise 3
Exercise 8
• After each group has reported
back to the class, students can see
if there is any general agreement
about what they all like or dislike.
• If you noticed any problems in the
use of the Key Expressions or verb
forms in Exercises 5 and 6, go over
these with the class.
• Remind students to say true
sentences.
• Read the sentences with the
students. Remind students of
sentences 3 and 4 in Exercise 4.
1 a 2 are 3 a 4 are
5 a 6 are
15
1.14
Exercise 6
Exercise 7
Answers
Listen to more extracts. Which of these
words can you hear: of or have?
TIM E OUT!
Exercise 2
Audioscript ➞ page 105
• Write on the board:
1 They are students at a
boarding school.
2 We have got a pair of
scissors.
• Draw students’ attention to
the words are and a in the
first sentence and have and
of in the second sentence.
Ask several students to read
aloud the sentences.
• Play the recording, pausing
it appropriately for students
to listen and note if they
hear are or a.
• After checking answers, ask
students to listen again and
say the complete sentences.
Closing times of facilities:
PL
7
group.
1.13
0.0
SuMMER COuRSES
Do you like doing sport at school?
I can’t stand sport, I prefer dancing.
I don’t mind PE classes and I like swimming.
6
Answers ➞ student page
Listen to Mrs Tyler-Smith and complete
the information about summer courses
at Petergate.
PETERGATE
much
• sport • rooms (e.g. the library) • classes
• school lunches • after-school clubs
• school trips • exams • school parties/dances
A
B
C
1
IT
love
like
rather
like
stand
hate
Exercise 1
Exercise 9
• Ask two students to read aloud the
example dialogue. Elicit suggestions
for continuing and finishing the
dialogue from the class.
• Students work in pairs, taking turns
to start the dialogue.
• Some of the pairs can say one of
their dialogues for the class to hear.
Exercise 3
• Follow the same procedure
as in Exercise 2.
Audioscript ➞ page 105
Answers
1 have 2 of
4 have 5 of
TI M E OUT!
3 have
6 of
Page 93,
Exercise 3
Photocopiable activity 2,
Teacher’s Resources MultiROM
Answers
a) I like watching/I prefer watching
b) I’d like to watch/I’d rather watch
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 15
15
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Across Cultures 1
Across Cul ures 1
Background
Depending on your students’
educational background, they
may find the information in
the text more or less surprising.
Many countries have state
education systems which
are offered to all students,
although private education
in various shapes and
forms is also very common.
Examination systems vary
substantially from country to
country and students may be
relatively unfamiliar with the
concept of public exams.
After Exercise 5 you might like
to try to answer any questions
which the students wrote
in the Warm-up and which
remain unanswered by the
main text.
Warm-up
Reading
1
2
IT
education-info.com
U
N
Our family is moving from the United States to London. Keira, (thirteen)
and Oliver (fifteen) are worrying about going to school in the UK. (The
only one they know about is Hogwarts in the Harry Potter films!)
Can anyone answer our questions?
1 Are schools free in the UK?
2 Are the school subjects the same as in the United States?
3 What’s a typical day like?
4 At what age do students start/leave school?
5 Do kids wear a uniform?
6 Do schools have entrance exams?
Thanks for your help!
2b) 3e) 4c) 5d) 6d)
State education is free so the schools
pay for teachers, books, exam fees
and any special equipment for
science, etc. We (parents) pay for
school uniforms and things like rulers,
calculators. Also, schools charge for
extras like school trips. About ninety
per cent of British students go to a
state school.
M
SA
Answers
Here, students start primary school when
they are five and move to secondary school
when they are eleven. At sixteen, students take
public exams called General Certificate of
Secondary Education. After GCSEs, students
can leave school, do a course to prepare for a
job or study for A level (Advanced Level) exams
(these are necessary for university entrance).
d
E
PL
a
• Remind students of the
advice about scanning a text
for information (page 13).
• Students work individually,
scanning the replies (a–e)
and matching them with the
questions (1–6).
c
Moving Mom
Reading
Exercise 3
Read the text about schools in the UK. Match
the questions (1–6) with the correct replies
(a–e). Two questions are answered in the same
reply.
www.education-info.com/forum
• Students work individually,
writing their questions
before comparing their
ideas.
• Elicit some example
questions from the class.
• Students read the questions
(1–6) at the beginning of the
text.
• See if there are any
questions which no one in
the class thought of.
3
Read the questions (1–6) at the beginning of
the text. Are they the same as your questions?
1–a
Exercise 1
Exercise 2
1.15
Is there a lot of homework?
Warm-up
1.15
Imagine you are moving to a school in another
country. What do you want to know? Write two
questions. Then compare your questions with
a partner.
16
b
I go to a comprehensive
school and I study:
English, maths , science,
technology, history ,
geography, foreign languages,
music, art, sport and
citizenship. My school also
has after-school clubs for
swimming and drama.
Jayathome
[email protected]
e
Retiredheadteacher
Most schools are comprehensive so they
don’t have an entrance exam. Secondary
schools usually have a uniform. Some
schools have simple uniforms with, for
example, a shirt, sweatshirt and a dark
skirt or trousers. Other schools have more
formal uniforms with jackets and ties.
Dave75
My school day is 8.40 to 4 o’clock,
Monday to Friday. We start with registration.
Then we move about the school for
different lessons. We have short breaks
between lessons and a longer break at
lunchtime. Some people eat in the school
canteen but I take a packed lunch.
glittergirl
Exercise 4
Exercise 5
• When checking students’ answers,
ask them to correct the false
sentences or explain why they are
false.
• Students work in pairs, reading
their questions again and trying to
answer them.
• Each pair says their two questions
and answers them if possible.
Answers ➞ student page
1 F – Text a) says state education is
free and that about ninety per cent
of British students go to a state
school.
5 F – Text c) says students take GCSEs
at 16 and that after that they can
leave school.
6 F – Text d) says secondary schools
usually have a uniform.
Extra
Open up a class discussion about
students’ reactions to different aspects of
the text, e.g. uniforms, types of school,
the ages for starting and leaving school,
public exams.
16
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 16
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1
F
2
NI
3
4
T
T
5
6
F
F
7
T
1
10
A
B
A
Game Work in pairs. How much can you
remember about British schools? Test your
partner. Student A uses the text to ask
questions. Students B closes the book and
answers.
Who pays for the students’ books?
Their parents.
No. The school pays for their books.
Exercise 10
Find compound nouns in the text with these
meanings.
Your ideal school
1
state school
a secondary school with no entrance exam
special clothes students must wear at school
the place where students can eat lunch
an exam that is the same everywhere
the money you pay to take an exam
an exam you take to get into a school
7
2
Look at the Word Builder. How do you say the
phrases in your language?
1
2
3
3
4
Write your description in three
paragraphs.
My ideal school is near the sea. It’s a day school
for boys and girls. There isn’t a uniform and
there aren’t any rules. The school has got a
music studio, an Olympic-size swimming pool
and a computer for every student.
4
Work in groups. Read each other’s
descriptions. Say what you like or dislike
about your partners’ ideal schools.
SA
5
One person writes about GCSEs and A levels.
Which
do students take in your
country?
How do you
a test? Do you plan your
revision carefully or do it the night before?
Do you eat in your
? Why/Why not?
Does your school
extras like guitar
lessons?
Who
your school equipment like
pens, pencils, etc?
general description (location, type of
school, uniform, rules, facilities)
a typical school day (classes, lunch,
breaks)
after school (clubs, activities, trips,
homework)
PL
2
3
Complete the questions with words and
phrases from Exercises 6 and 7.
Plan your description. Make notes on
these points:
M
1
Think about these things:
• location • day school or boarding school
• school trips • boys, girls or mixed school
• number of students in a class • facilities
• uniform or no uniform • school rules
• after-school clubs
Word Builder
8
• Work through the first two
questions and elicit possible
answers from the class.
• Students work in pairs,
taking turns to ask and
answer the questions.
• Some of the students can
say their questions and
answers for the class to
hear.
Check if your questions in Exercise 1 are
answered in the text.
a school the government pays for
2
3
4
5
6
7
Exercise 9
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions
from Exercise 8.
17
Exercise 6
Exercise 7
• Students work individually or in
pairs, finding the words in the text.
• Check answers by asking individuals
to read aloud the sentences
containing the words.
• Ask students to find and read aloud
the sentences in the text containing
the Word Builder expressions.
• Students discuss whether in their
language they also use prepositions
after these verbs.
Answers
2 comprehensive school 3 school
uniform 4 school canteen
5 public exam 6 exam fee
7 entrance exam
Extra
Give students time to read through the
text again. Explain or encourage students
to guess the meaning of any other new
words.
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 17
• Give students time to read
the text again. Tell them to
try and remember as much
as possible.
• Students work in pairs,
testing each other on the
text. Suggest that each
student asks three or four
questions, then they change
roles. If you have a mixedability class, you may wish
to have weaker students
work in groups of three
or four and allow them
to cooperate in answering
questions.
IT
6
9
U
N
5
Most British parents pay for their
children’s education.
British students have to clean their
classrooms.
There are after-school activities.
Nobody can leave school before they
are sixteen.
Everybody takes A level exams.
A lot of secondary schools don’t have
a uniform.
Normally there aren’t any lessons at
the weekend.
Speaking
Speaking
Read the text again. Are the sentences true (T),
false (F) or is there no information (NI)?
E
4
Exercise 8
• Make sure students understand that
they should use words and phrases
from both Exercises 6 and 7 to
complete the questions.
• Read through the stages of
the project so that students
understand what to do.
• In Stage 1, encourage
students to exchange ideas
as a whole class so that all
the students have plenty of
ideas to choose from.
• Students make notes for
their three paragraphs. Help
with vocabulary if necessary.
• Ask one of the students to
read aloud the example first
paragraph. As students are
writing their paragraphs,
monitor and point out any
language errors for them to
correct.
• Students work in groups of
three or four, reading and
commenting on each other’s
ideal school.
Answers
1 public exams 2 study for 3 school
canteen 4 charge for 5 pays for
17
05/10/2011 11:50
S udy Corner 1
Language Check
Language Check
Exercises 1–4
1
1
Answers ➞ student page
Feedback
• Students listen to the
recording to check their
answers. Check spelling
where necessary by asking
individuals to write the
answers on the board.
• After checking answers to
Exercise 3, students work in
pairs, reading the dialogue
aloud. Correct any serious
pronunciation errors.
• Students look at the table
to see which sections in the
Students’ Book they need to
look at again.
• Give students time in
class or at home to do
Language Check 1 of the
Workbook.
Complete the words in the sentences.
2
3
4
We have our chemistry lessons in a
la b o r a t o r y.
Our school has got three tennis c o u r t s .
There is a football p i t c h .
I get books from the school l i b r a r y .
2
Complete the verbs in the sentences.
4
A
B
A
B
Hi, Alan. What 11 are you doing you (do) here?
Shh, Fred, don’t speak so loudly.
I 12 ’m revising (revise) for my exams. I often
13 come
(come) to the library. I sometimes
14
use (use) the computers here.
I 15 use
(use) my dad’s computer at home
when my sister isn’t on it!
Where is she? I want to talk to her.
She 16 is/’s playing (play) hockey. They
17 are/’re having (have) a school competition
this week. They always 18 have (have) it at
this time.
Oh yes, I forgot about that. Anyway, why are
you here? You hate studying.
E
Feedback
• Listen and check your answers to the
Language Check. Write down your scores.
PL
• Look at the table. Check where you made
mistakes.
Wrong answers: Look again at:
Get Ready – Key Words
Numbers 5–10
Unit 2 – Word Builder
M
Numbers 1–4
Numbers 11–20 Unit 1 – Grammar
SA
Numbers 21–30 Unit 3 – Key Expressions
18
/ 10
S udy Help: Using your coursebook
Put the verbs in brackets in the Present Simple
or the Present Continuous.
your coursebook
1.16
Communication
Find these things in New Challenges 3. Which
are the most useful for you?
• Key Words • Key Expressions • Word Builder
• Word Bank • Reading/Listening Help
• Sentence Builder • Language Check
• Time Out Magazine
•
Match the problems (1–10) with the
solutions (a–j).
IT
A
B
A
/ 10
Vocabulary
3
Would you 21 love / like to 22 go / going to the
school dance this weekend?
Thanks, but I’d 23 rather / prefer go to the
cinema. I love 24 go / going out with my friends
but I prefer 25 watch / watching films to
26 dance / dancing. I 27 can’t / don’t stand
28 be / being in noisy places.
I 29 don’t / can’t mind that – I love
30 to go / going to clubs and discos!
B
up photography.
I want to take
When I’m ill, my mum takes care of me.
up karate or judo.
I’d like to take
When my neighbour is away, I take care
of his dog.
9 He’d like to take part in the concert.
10 The school dance takes place in the gym.
/ 10
Choose the correct word.
A
5
6
7
8
Study Help: Using
• The exercises in this section
give students an opportunity
to become familiar with
the different components
and exercise types in New
Challenges 3.
• Read through the list of
headings with the class.
Give students time to work
individually or in pairs,
looking through the first
module again and finding
examples of each heading.
Remind students that the
Time Out Magazine and
Word Bank are at the end of
the book.
Grammar
1–b
I want to …
U
N
1.16
I 19 am/’m looking for (look for) information
for the quiz. They 20 ask (ask) a lot of
geography questions and there’s a good atlas
here.
A
• Now do the exercises in Language Check 1
of the Workbook.
• Students need to refer to their
Workbook as well as the Students’
Book for the next exercise. Read
through the problems (1–10) and
the solutions (a–j) with the class.
• Elicit the solutions to the first
two or three problems from the
students.
• Students work individually,
completing the exercise. They can
compare answers in pairs or groups
of three before checking answers as
a class.
• After checking answers, students
1
2
3
4
find out what’s in a module
find some tips for reading and listening d)
do some extra reading a)
find answers to word quizzes (e.g. verb
quiz) h)
5 revise vocabulary f)
6 revise a grammar area e)
7 do extra grammar practice c)
8 find useful expressions for speaking j)
9 do a revision test g)
10 find some tips for studying i)
Look at ...
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)
i)
j)
stories in Time Out Magazine
the top of the Get Ready page
the Workbook Grammar Reference
Reading and Listening Help boxes
the Workbook or CD-ROM
the Word Bank
the Language Check
Key Word boxes, Word Builder and the
Word Bank
the Study Help boxes
Key Expressions boxes
discuss which of these problems
and solutions they think are most
important for them at this stage in
their learning.
Answers ➞ student page
Module 1 test,
Teacher’s Resources MultiROM
18
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Introduc ion to New Challenges
About the Students’ Book
The course has eight main modules and a Get Ready revision module at the start to get students to use language from
New Challenges 1 and 2. At the end of the book there is a magazine section related to the units with fun activities like
puzzles, games and reading for pleasure. Each module starts with a Get Ready page which introduces the module topic.
There are then three main lessons. In odd-numbered modules, there are Across Culture lessons and in even-numbered
modules, there are Your Challenge and Understanding Grammar spots. Each module finishes with a Language Check and
a Study Corner with learner development activities to help students become better learners.
New features in Students’ Book 3
Speak Out
These sections give students the chance to express their personal views about topics and ideas presented in the units.
For example, in Module 1 students are asked to give their opinions about their own school environment (page 9,
Exercise 6), about an alternative type of school described in the Unit (page 10, Exercise 3) and about their school rules
(page 13, Exercise 12).
Word Bank
E
Other features in Students’ Book 3
U
N
IT
The Word Bank (pages 106–111) provides a module-by-module study and reference resource for students to use during
lessons and for revision purposes. It lists and expands vocabulary from the Module under headings such as Multi-part
Verbs, Collocations, Prepositions, Compounds and Word Building as well as grouping vocabulary in word families, e.g.
Cooking (Module 3).
Vocabulary is presented with definitions and example sentences using the words or phrases in context, e.g. take part in
something do an activity with other people: I take part in the school sports day every year. (Module 1)
During lessons, students are referred to the Word Bank to develop their word building skills (e.g. Module 1, Unit 2,
Exercises 8, 9 and 10, page 13); to expand word families (e.g. Module 3, Across Cultures, Exercise 8, page 37) and to
check their answers to an exercise (e.g. Module 3, Unit 8, Exercise 9, page 33).
Helps
Everyday Listening
M
PL
These sections offer advice that students then put into practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking activities.
The Help sections cover reading skills such as scanning for information (Module 1, page 13), writing skills such as getting
ideas for emails, letters and postcards (Module 2, page 26), listening skills such as listening for specific information
(Module 4, page 45) and speaking skills such as preparation for roleplays (Module 3, page 35).
Text Builder
SA
These sections give students the opportunity to listen to English in everyday situations, such as interviews for holiday
jobs (Module 2, Unit 6, page 25), phone calls (Module 4, Unit 12, page 45) and announcements (Module 1, Unit 3, page
15). The exercises train students to listen as we do in real life, for example for specific facts and key information.
These sections occur in Your Challenge (Modules 2, 4, 6 and 8). They build on the sentence level skills that students
practised in the Sentence Builders in New Challenges 1 and 2. Text Builders focus on important features of whole
‘texts’, such as paragraph topics (Module 2, page 26), reference words (Module 4, page 46) and linkers (Module 8, page
86).
Fact or Fiction?
The Fact or Fiction? texts provide short real-life contexts related to the module topic. Students decide whether they
think the information is true or false. Sometimes students can use their general knowledge (e.g. page 23, the first
woman to win a Nobel Prize). Sometimes students have to guess (e.g. page 43, the percentage of American parents who
say they have the same values as their children and vice versa). Encourage students to discuss and give reasons for their
guesses.
The Time Out magazine
ii
At the back of the Students’ Book there is the Time Out section, a set of ‘fun’ activities and puzzles in a magazine
format. There are twenty-four activities in the magazine, one for each of the twenty-four core units in the Students’
Book. Students can do the activities working individually, in pairs or in small groups.
The magazine activities are designed to be used when there is time after students have completed a related activity in
the Unit, at the end of a Unit or at home. The magazine recycles language and topics of the Units in new contexts and
authentic, motivating activities such as puzzles (e.g. Activity 4, page 94), quizzes (e.g. Activity 7, page 95) and stories
(Activities 16–18, pages 100–101).
A01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_PRE.indd 2
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Introduc ion to New Challenges
How to use this Handbook
This Handbook contains reduced pages from the Students’ Book, together with teaching suggestions, background
information on the content of the Unit, pronunciation guidance for difficult names and places, audioscripts, answers to
exercises and ideas for extra activities; it also includes the answers for the Workbook.
The Handbook will help you plan your lessons and is handy for use during lessons.
Module objectives
The module objectives are listed at the top of the first page of each Module in the Students’ Book.
When starting a Module, read through the objectives with the students and check that they understand any new
vocabulary, e.g. ‘announcements’ in Module 1, ‘abilities’ in Module 2. If appropriate, ask students to discuss any of
the activities they have done, using their own language or English, e.g. ‘writing emails’ (Module 2). Encourage students
to say what they remember about any of the grammar points they have studied in the past, e.g. Present Simple and
Present Continuous (Module 1).
At the end of a Module, ask students to read the objectives again. Help students assess how well they have achieved the
objectives and to say which objectives they found easy or more difficult to achieve.
Background information
IT
Background Information provides facts and information about aspects of the social and cultural content of the Units. It
is intended primarily for the teacher but is helpful when students ask about events, people and places mentioned in a
Unit, e.g. Eton and Roedean (Module 1, Unit 2, page 12).
Ways of checking answers
Extra activities
M
PL
E
U
N
Students can work in pairs or small groups.
Try to vary how you check students’ answers to exercises:
• If spelling is important, ask students to spell the words for you to write on the board or invite students to come to
the board and write the answers on the board.
• Alternatively, ask students to read aloud the answers. If necessary, correct any serious pronunciation problems.
• At times you may prefer to write the answers on the board yourself for students to check their own answers.
• Students self-check the answers to some exercises, such as pair activities (e.g. page 83, Exercise 11) and quizzes (e.g.
page 37, Exercise 10) by referring to the answers given in the book and to the Language Check by listening to the CD.
SA
Use the short Extra activities if there is time in the lesson. These activities develop from the content of the Students’
Book and are intended to give a change of focus and help student motivation and concentration.
Extra activities include:
• activities developing from a reading text, e.g. Module 2, Unit 4, after Exercise 4, page 20
• activities developing from a listening text, e.g. Module 2, Unit 6, after Everyday Listening, Exercise 2, page 25
• activities practising a language point from the lesson, e.g. Module 2, Unit 5, after Exercise 5, page 22
Digital components
New Challenges offers teachers digital material to support learning in a variety of different ways.
• New Challenges ActiveTeach: an interactive version of the Students’ Book suitable for using with any IWB or simply
with a computer and projector. Using the touch-sensitive screen of the interactive whiteboard, you can easily
integrate audio, video and interactive activities into your lessons to motivate your whole class. Includes games,
all the audio for the Students’ Book and Workbook, the New Challenges DVD, the Word Bank and more teacher’s
resources – in short, all the New Challenges resources at the click of a button!
• New Challenges Teacher’s Resources MultiROM: includes Teacher Development Workshops, photocopiable resources,
a DVD and DVD worksheets. It also contains print ready tests and easily customisable tests with answer keys.
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Challenge
Challenge In The Classroom
The characters in the story provide positive role models
for teenage students because they are doing something
worthwhile and overcoming personal and group problems
to achieve their goals. The story provides a springboard
for education in citizenship: making students aware
of their rights and responsibilities; helping others and
working for the community; being a good citizen.
The Students’ Book
Organisation
New Challenges has a topic-based approach. It enables
students to learn about the world through English and to
learn the language at the same time.
IT
The course is divided into eight main modules plus a Get
Ready module. The Get Ready module gets students to use
language from New Challenges 1 and 2, familiarises them
with the course and develops their awareness as learners.
The themes in the main modules:
N
1 are related to students’ own world (e.g. schools,
health, the generation gap, music, films)
U
2 are cross-curricular (e.g. famous women in history, the
history of medicine, musical instruments, literature,
inventions, prehistory)
3 develop citizenship education (e.g. learning about
people around the world, rights and responsibilities of
teenagers)
E
We first thought of the title of this book after speaking to
the inspired (and inspiring) head teacher of a secondary
school in a working class district outside Warsaw. He
was talking to us about all the problems his school
faced and, despite them, the many achievements of his
students inside and outside the classroom. They took
part in science olympiads, sporting events, choirs, youth
orchestras, theatre groups, chess competitions and many
other activities. This demonstrated the kind of enthusiasm
and challenge we wanted to inspire in our own material.
Our definition of a ‘challenge’ is a task that, while not
easy to accomplish, is worthwhile and rewarding.
A challenge requires patience, hard work and the ability
to overcome problems. Many challenges also involve
working with other people as a team to achieve goals that
would be impossible to reach as an individual.
For many years, in both society and education, there
has been a tendency to focus on activities that give
instant reward and success. However, more and more
young people are taking part in challenging activities
like popular marathons, expeditions, extreme sports and
voluntary work. Even in the unlikely world of computer
gaming, game designers have found that the most
popular games are those that are the most difficult, hence
the expression ‘hard fun’. The conclusion must be that a
challenge is often fun because it is not easy; people enjoy
being stretched and challenged.
4 are about other cultures around the world (e.g.
schools, food, nomads, music)
M
PL
Within the English language classroom there is one
obvious challenge: learning a foreign language in a few
hours a week within a school context. The challenge is
there for students (and teachers) whether we like it or not.
It may sometimes look insurmountable but it is not if we
break it down into a series of smaller tasks or ‘challenges’.
SA
In New Challenges, each module contains a series of
grammar and skills activities and builds towards final
speaking, writing and listening tasks in which students can
use the language they have learnt. Because these tasks
are achievable,, they build students’ confidence as well as
laying the foundations for communicative competence.
In parallel, there are learner development activities, such
as self-checks at the end of each module that encourage
students to be aware of how well they are progressing
towards the greater challenge of learning English.
The theme of ‘challenge’ is also present in such topics
in New Challenges 3 as the achievements of talented
women in history, dealing with teenage problems and the
harshness of a nomadic lifestyle. In addition, the story
focuses on how a group of teenage characters, at both a
group and personal level, take part in challenges. In New
Challenges 3, the characters are at a school of performing
arts: they have to do auditions, perform a piece of music
and a song, make a film and give a presentation.
In New Challenges 3, the eight main modules are
organised like this:
1 a Get Ready page introduces students to the topic
2 the first lesson presents grammar through reading texts
and gives plenty of practice
3 the second lesson develops reading, presents
vocabulary and practises speaking
4 the third lesson develops the story and has a major
focus on speaking and listening
5 odd-numbered modules have Across Cultures lessons
with reading, speaking and a project
6 even-numbered modules have Your Challenge spots
with writing tasks and Understanding Grammar spots
7 at the end of every module there is a language check
and learner development spot
At the end of the book there is Time Out, a magazine
section related to the lessons with fun activities like
puzzles, games and reading for pleasure. Students can do
the activities if they finish early in class or at home. There
is also a Word Bank organised by lexical features (Multipart Verbs, Word Families, Compounds etc.). Students can
use this section to do activities in the coursebook and as a
reference to revise and increase their own vocabulary.
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Approach
Grammar
• Key Expressions are related to key functional areas from
B.1.1 and some of those from B.1.2 in the Common
European Framework (e.g. expressing belief, opinion,
agreement and disagreement politely).
• There are other useful phrases in the story dialogues.
These are focused on in the Workbook.
In New Challenges 3, grammar is the first lesson in each
module.
• Grammar is presented in context. Students read a variety
of texts and then focus on the structures.
• First there is a focus on form. Then students work out,
in a guided way, how to use the new structure.
• Practice moves from easier, more guided exercises on
form to freer speaking and writing tasks.
• The final activity (Your Turn) gives students an
opportunity to use the grammar to talk about their own
lives.
• There are four Understanding Grammar sections that
focus on problematic areas such as question tags.
• In the Study Corner, students test their knowledge and
are guided to remedial exercises.
• The main pronunciation spot is in the Everyday Listening
section. Pronunciation focuses on difficult sounds for
students (e.g. /t/, /d/, /θ/ and /ð/).
• Listen closely, also in the Everyday Listening section, looks
at supra-segmental pronunciation work. One of the
biggest problems students have with listening to natural
English speech is actually hearing words and expressions,
as many words just seem to disappear. Listen closely
tasks at this level focus on stress in common phrases,
contractions, unstressed function words (e.g. a/are/of/
have)) and word boundaries.
Sentence Builders
Skills
IT
U
N
• In New Challenges 3, skills activities are guided,
structured and, wherever possible, integrated with
other skills.
• There are speaking activities in every lesson and
tasks always use language that has been presented to
students (vocabulary, grammar and Key Expressions).
Students are given time to think about their ideas and
prepare for speaking as well as time to report back to
the class.
• There are at least three reading texts per module.
Text types include: magazine articles/letters; letters,
emails and notes; extracts from non-fiction; interviews;
questionnaires; travel brochures; stories; and
biographies. There is also extra reading in the Time Out
magazine.
• There are three listening tasks in every module. First
there is a gist listening in the Get Ready section. In
the story unit, students read and listen to dialogues
which help them see the relation between spoken
language and its written form. The Everyday Listening
has both extensive and intensive tasks. Listen closely
and Pronunciation tasks develop learners’ ability to
distinguish sounds, words and expressions.
• There is writing in every module. In odd-numbered
modules, there are projects which students can either
do in pairs or on their own. Projects give students
a chance to write about their own world and to be
creative. There are clear models and stages. In evennumbered modules, Your Challenge spots focus on
more interactive writing: an email; short notes; a film
review; a biography. Students are given clear models
and the writing tasks are carefully staged. Text Builders
focus on the structure of the target text and on linking
words and expressions.
M
PL
E
• Sentence structure has often been neglected in ELT
even though most language groups have quite different
syntax from that in English (e.g. verb position in Slav
languages; adjective position in Latin languages). L1
interference causes mistakes of word order and these
are usually more serious than other mistakes because
they affect understanding.
• Sentence Builders focus on sentence structure which is
often related to the main grammar (e.g. while and when
related to past tenses).
• Target patterns appear in texts, are explicitly focused on
in Sentence Builders and are then practised in guided
exercises. Sentence Builders can be used as a pattern
bank to help students when revising.
Pronunciation
Lexis
SA
• Key Word boxes in New Challenges 3 cover lexical
areas such as schools, abilities, health, food, places,
transport, jobs, films, personality, feelings, music and
science. Key Words help students to understand both
reading and listening texts and give them essential
vocabulary for writing and speaking tasks.
• Word Builders focus on key lexical features and help
build up students’ capacity to organise and learn English
vocabulary. Lexical features include multi-part verbs
(e.g. take up an activity), the delexicalised verbs make
and do (e.g. make your bed), dependent prepositions
(e.g. study for), verbs with prepositions (e.g. live in),
word families (e.g. boil/fry/grill), confusing words
(e.g. actually and now) and compound nouns and
adjectives (e.g. campsite and well-known). These spots
also focus on wordbuilding (e.g. adjective suffixes, noun
suffixes, adjectival prefixes).
• The Word Bank provides a reference for all of the
lexical features in New Challenges 3 and also contains
the lexical features that students looked at in the
previous two levels of New Challenges.
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Culture
There is cultural input throughout the book.
•
The story also provides cultural insights into the lives of
the four characters who are at the school of performing
arts in Norwich and visit different places in Norfolk.
•
The Across Cultures sections deal with different cultures.
Learners write projects about their own culture using the
language of the reading texts.
•
With each of the three main units, there is a
corresponding spot in the Time Out magazine. This
means that, when students finish early or have time to
spare, they can do a game, puzzle or quiz in the Time
Out section.
•
In the Study Corner, students test what they have learnt
in the Language Check and then listen and check their
answers. In the Feedback section, they can find out what
areas they need to study more and are referred to the
Workbook for further practice.
•
Finally, the Study Help systematically develops study
skills. In New Challenges 3, there are spots about:
similar words; storing words/expressions; memorising
vocabulary; explaining words; self-assessment.
Learner Development
•
One of the greatest challenges for students is to become
better learners and to learn to study English on their
own. Several features encourage learner independence
in New Challenges 3.
•
On the Get Ready page, the objectives box clearly shows
students what they are going to learn in the module.
N
Module 5
a
IT
•
Talk about travel and make suggestions.
Read about safaris and nomads.
Listen to travel plans.
Write a description of a tour round your country.
U
Learn more about the Present Perfect.
d
b
activities develop
gist listening skills
M
PL
Get Ready
1
he Move
Look at the Key Words. Add five more types of
transport.
3.2
3.3
4
1
2
3
4
5
Listen to four people. Who:
and
and
had an accident?
takes part in competitions?
shares their interest with their
boyfriend/girlfriend?
does their hobby at weekends?
started it two years ago?
and
and
and
speaking
activities relate
the topic to the
students’ own
lives
5
2
3
SA
lexical areas
related to the
module topic
are presented
c
E
these pages
introduce the
module topic
these activities
introduce the
unit topic
13
1
Look at the Key Words and decide which
people have to travel a lot.
Key Words:
Farmers don’t have to travel a lot. They work on
their land.
Look at the photos of Clara Saruhashi. What
does she do?
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions.
Which types of transport do you use?
Which do you use every day?
Which would you like to try?
Which would you never use?
Reading
3.5
3
4
4
5
6
Read the text. Check your guesses from
Exercise 2.
Read the text again. Are the sentences true (T),
false (F) or is there no information (NI)?
Clara Saruhashi travels a lot.
She enjoys her job.
She became interested in travelling
at university.
Most of her work is in a TV studio.
Her husband always travels with her.
Camping in the Amazon jungle was a
good experience.
H
vi
A01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_PRE.indd 6
10
Grammar: Present Perfect
5
Complete the sentences from the text with the
verbs in the Present Perfect.
grammar is
presented
through guided
discovery
Have you been to China yet?
She is a well-known
TV presenter.
B
A
B
6
7
1
2
3
4
➔
She knows a lot
about Antarctica.
➔
Do we know when exactly the past events in
Exercise 5 happened?
9
I had a final question. ‘Have you ever been
in danger?’ Clara laughed and said, ‘There
was a giant spider in my tent in the Amazon
jungle – it wasn’t dangerous but I was very
frightened. I’ve never liked spiders!’
do a Hungarian language course ✓
get a new laptop ✓
read some guidebooks ✓
Game Cover the list in Exercise 11. Ask and
answer about the travel writer’s plans.
Has he applied for a new passport yet? Yes, he has.
Has he booked a hotel in Budapest yet? No, he hasn’t.
Your Turn
Use the correct verbs in the box in the Present
Perfect to make affirmative and negative
sentences about Clara Saruhashi’s career.
camp make
swim visit
grammar practice
moves from
controlled to freer
exercises
check ticket prices 7
12
a) questions
b) affirmative sentences
c) negative sentences with not
d) negative sentences without not
Read the travel writer’s plans for his next trip.
Make sentences with already and yet.
apply for a new passport ✓
book a hotel in Budapest 7
buy camera memory cards 7
Match the words (1–4) with the types of
sentences (a–d). One of the words goes with
two types.
already
yet
ever
never
Yes, I’ve been there three times. (already / ever)
Have you seen a wild panda? (ever / already)
No, I’ve seen a wild panda. (never / ever).
And I haven’t seen one in a zoo. (never / yet).
He’s already applied for a new passport.
He hasn’t booked a hotel in Budapest yet.
Have you ever been in danger?
I have never wanted a safe job in an office.
She has already been to six continents.
I haven’t been to Antarctica yet.
Has she been to Peru yet?
present
ride
She has made a lot of TV programmes.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
11
Read the sentences. Translate the words in
bold into your language.
Practice
Clara has already been to six continents but
there is one place she hasn’t visited. ‘I haven’t
been to Antarctica yet but I really want to
go. I’ve read lots of books about the area and
I think it will be a fantastic experience. The
problem is, I hate being cold!’
Have you been to China? (never / yet)
Present consequence
more
She
than a hundred
programmes.
lots
I
of books about
the area.
1–b
My next question: ‘When did you become
interested in travelling?’ Her answer, ‘I
have never wanted a safe job in an office.
When I was a little girl, I wanted to be a
flight attendant or a tour guide. I studied
languages at university so I could travel.
I’m very lucky: I go to amazing places, meet
fascinating people – and I get paid for it!’
A
Read the interview with a travel writer. Choose
the correct words to complete the sentences
and put them in the correct places.
Past event
8
When I interviewed her, I asked, ‘What
have you done in the last six months?’
She answered, ‘I’ve done some really
interesting things: I have walked on
the Great Wall of China, I’ve climbed
Machu Picchu in Peru and I’ve swum
with dolphins. I love being close to
animals so it was a fantastic experience!’
50
49
1
2
3
4
5
ave you ever canoed along the
Amazon River? Or travelled
across the Sahara desert on a
camel? I haven’t! But Clara Saruhashi,
a TV presenter, has done both – and
a lot more! Clara’s job with UTravel
TV takes her all over the world and
she has made more than a hundred
programmes.
reading texts
present new
grammar in
context
Speak Out Do you agree with these
statements? Say why or why not. Tell the class.
• People in my town drive too fast.
• Young people on motorbikes are dangerous.
• Extreme sports fans are crazy!
Grammar
1
2
3
2
Which types of transport do we use for fun?
TV Traveller
Warm-up
3.4
1
2
3
4
these boxes show
teachers and
students the
objectives of
each module
a lot of TV programmes (✓)
sharks (7)
French, Spanish and Italian (✓)
in the Amazon jungle (✓)
an elephant (7)
programmes about cooking (7)
the South Pole (7)
study
13
Pair work. Ask and answer questions.
Student A, page 89
Student B, page 90
14
Speak Out Tell the class two things
about your partner.
Marta has been abroad. She has never travelled
by ship.
15
Use the cues below and already, yet and never
to make sentences about what you have and
haven’t done in your life. Add your own ideas.
• try bungee jumping • swim in the sea
• take part in a sports competition • go abroad
• climb the highest mountain in my country
• go on holidays on my own • learn to drive
• finish school
I’ve already been abroad three times.
I haven’t finished school yet.
TIME OUT!
Page 98, Exercise 13
51
lessons end with
personalisation
activities
10/10/2011 10:27
14 On Safari
a variety of tasks
systematically
develop reading
skills
Warm-up
• I love / like / can’t stand …
• … is good fun / great / cool / horrible /
boring / relaxing.
I love travelling. Travelling is good fun!
1
2
OKAVANGO
DELTA
3.7
2
Work in pairs. Student A reads text (1).
Student B reads text (2). Write notes
about these topics:
• place • number of days • animals
• transport to the place • transport on
the safari • accommodation • price
• dates
3
Work in pairs. Ask and answer
questions about the safaris. Use
these question words.
• Where • How long • What • How
• How much • When
Where is your safari? What animals can
you see?
4
1
2
3
Total Safari offers this trip for
adventurous backpackers.
4
C
KAMPALA
CHIMP AND GORILLA
SAFARI, UGANDA
A
Lake
Victoria
I
Okavango
Delta
Maun
BOTSWANA
Work in pairs. Answer the questions.
Price: £1215
Email: [email protected]
6
Look at the Word Builder. Copy and
complete it with compound words in
blue from the texts. Are they nouns (n)
or adjectives (adj.)?
Word Builder
52
Look at the photo. Have
you ever been boating or
canoeing? Where?
Reading and Listening
3.8
2
Read and listen to the
dialogue. Answer the
questions.
Which of the characters:
1 have an argument?
2 nearly loses his jacket?
3 suggests getting in the water?
4 suggests calling somebody?
5 gets the jacket?
a) sunbathe
b) walk along the beach
c) swim in the sea on your own
3 How would you like to travel
round Europe?
a) with your family
b) on a school trip
c) backpacking with a friend
Dates: 12th February, 18th June
20 Price: £3100
Email: [email protected]
Complete the compound words.
www.mydailyblog.org
My Daily Blog
4 Which of these places would you
prefer to spend the night in?
7
Word Quiz Find compound words in the word chains.
1
2
3
4
nightlifestyle
snowmobilephonebookshelf
weekdayschoolholidayresort
skateboardingschoollunchtimetabletenniscourt
a) a luxury hotel
b) a youth hostel
c) a tent
5 Which of these things would you
like to do?
a) go sightseeing in a big city
b) try paragliding
c) go to a summer adventure
camp
Word Bank, pages 107–108
8
Look at the Sentence Builder. In which sentence is
watching the subject and in which is it the object of
the sentence?
Fact or Fiction?
There are only 660 mountain
gorillas in the world.
Sentence Builder
Answer on page 92.
TIME OUT!
3
Matt
Gwen
O sole mio, la la la laaa …
Matt, sit down. Don’t be so silly. You’re going to sink
the boat!
Oh, don’t be so scared, Gwen. Don’t you like my singing?
No, I don’t. I’m sick of you being stupid all the time!
Come on you two. Just stop arguing.
Whoa! I nearly fell in!
Serves you right!
Watch out, Matt. Your jacket’s in the water!
Oh, no! It’s got my wallet and passport in it! It’s all your
fault, Gwen.
Gwen My fault?
Jasmin Look, just calm down, you two. What about using your oar,
Sam? Get it before it sinks!
Sam
I’m trying. But I can’t get it.
Gwen Why don’t you get in the water, Matt? It was your fault.
Matt
No way!
Jasmin We could call the boat centre.
Matt
Yeah, shall we do that?
No, it’s okay. Hold me, Jas, so I don’t fall in.
Sam
Jasmin Right.
Got it! Here it is! And your wallet and passport are fine.
Sam
You’re lucky, Matt.
Thanks, Sam. Sorry about that, everyone.
Matt
Gwen Oh, all right. Come on, let’s get back.
Matt
Gwen
Sam
Matt
Gwen
Sam
Matt
4
Look at the Key Expressions.
3.9
1
3.10
2
Work in pairs. Use the Key Expressions and
make suggestions for the situations.
A
B
Let’s have a surprise party for him.
No, why don’t we all go go-karting?
1
It’s your friend’s birthday on Saturday and
you’re discussing what to do for him.
You are with your friend. You can hear shouts
of ‘Help’ from next door.
It’s late and you’ve both missed the last bus
home.
2
3
Listen again. Complete the travel
information.
Times:
,
17.15, 18.40
return
Price: 4£
Work in pairs. Imagine you are lost in a forest.
Use the ideas below, make suggestions and
decide what to do.
Bus:
Times: 12.00 and
5
Price: 6£
Compare your suggestions with another pair
of students.
this section looks
at text structure,
linking and
punctuation
dying. Humans travel to a distant planet called
Pandora to find a valuable material which will
save Earth. There they meet the Na’vi, blueskinned, athletic aliens who haven’t destroyed
their planet. The humans make an avatar – half
human, half Na’vi – to get information about
Pandora. The character Jake Scully is chosen for
this job. However, he falls in love with an alien,
Neytiri, and decides to join the Na’vi.
Pronunciation Listen to the sound of the
letter ‘g’ in these words. Repeat the words.
1 /ɡ/ group
2 /dz/ generation
3 /ŋ/ everything
4
Look at the words below. How do you say
them? Put them in the correct group, 1, 2
or 3.
age allergy angry annoying argue
digital energetic forget game
graffiti gymnastics living room logical
organised original ring shopping
teenager washing-up
3.12
5
Listen and check your answers. Repeat the
words.
2
A01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_PRE.indd 7
2
3 Although this film is 163 minutes long, it never
gets boring because the special effects are
extraordinary. It’s one of the most expensive films
ever made and the use of CGI plus 3D is brilliant.
However, the characters aren’t always convincing
and some of the script is unnatural as well. Also,
I found the environmental message annoying.
4 I don’t usually enjoy films like Star Wars and
The Matrix but I really enjoyed Avatar. It’s worth
seeing it for the special effects. Don’t miss it!
3
1
Read the review of Avatar. Is it generally
positive or negative?
•
•
3
•
Read the text again and underline the verbs in the
Past Simple and the Present Perfect.
Look at the verbs you underlined in Exercise 1.
Match the tenses (1–2) with the uses and timelines
(a–b).
Present Perfect
2
Past Simple
a) we know exactly when the event happened and we
don’t want to link it with the present
now
b) the event happened in the period of time before now
and has influence on the present situation
Look at the linking words in blue in the text.
Which do we use for:
• addition? • contrast? • examples?
basic information: title, date, kind of film,
director, stars
background to the story: where? / when? /
what happens?
opinions: acting / story / special effects and
photography, music
recommendations: it’s (not) worth seeing,
I (don’t) recommend it
2
3
4
4
Read the sentences and translate the verbs in bold
into your language. Is the translation the same or
different?
1
2
She has appeared in over 100 films.
In 1976, she appeared in Taxi Driver.
5
Match the sentences (1–2) with the people (a–b).
1
2
1
2
6
STEP
4
1
Write notes about the film.
Use your notes to write the review. Write
four short paragraphs.
STEP
Match the paragraphs (1–4) with the topics
(a–d).
Write a review of a film you have seen recently.
•
Text Builder
a) recommendations c) opinions
b) background to the story d) basic information
66
5
deals with sounds
and word stress –
in other modules,
Listen closely
looks at features
of natural speech
these sections
present and
practise grammar
which can often
be difficult for
students
Read the text about Jodie Foster and look at the
photos. Have you seen the films? What did you think
of them?
Jodie Foster, an American actress and film director, was
born in 1962. She has appeared in over 100 films. She
started her film career as a child. In 1976, she appeared
in Taxi Driver with Robert De Niro and was nominated
for an Oscar. In 1985, she graduated from Yale University
with a degree in literature. So far, she has won two Oscars
for Best Actress. She won her first Oscar in 1988 and her
second in 1991 for The Silence of the Lambs. Recently, she
has directed and produced a number of films, too.
Check spelling, vocabulary and grammar.
STEP
the final writing
task is the
students’ own
challenge
Look at the photo. Have you seen the film?
What did you think of it?
55
BIODATA
STEP
1
Page 99, Exercise 15
Unders anding Grammar: Present Perfect and Past Simple
now
Writing: Film review
return
3
TIME OUT!
Film Review
2 Avatar takes place in 2154 when the world is
extensive listening
is developed
through a variety
of tasks
return
3
3.11
1
Cameron, is a special-effects-packed sciencefiction film. The stars are Sam Worthington, Zoe
Saldana and Sigourney Weaver.
and
Train:
Why don’t we make a fire to keep warm?
No, it’s raining. Everything is wet. Shall we …?
6
functional
language is
focused on and
practised
Listen to the conversation in the travel
agent’s. How do the couple decide to
travel? How long is their journey going
to be?
Times: 1
19.40
Price: 2£
• it’s cold • it’s starting to rain • it’s getting dark
• you are hungry • you have a mobile phone
• there is a river • you have a tent
• you have matches • you have a compass
A
B
these boxes focus
on key features of
sentence structure
Plane:
SA
M
PL
5
Your Challenge
1 Avatar (2009), directed by Titanic director James
53
Everyday Listening
54
in evennumbered
modules there are
Your Challenge
and Understanding
Grammar spots
Page 98, Exercise 14
Skills
Speaking
The next weekend, the group rent a boat on the Norfolk Broads,
an area of lakes and rivers near Norwich.
E
dialogues and
photos develop
the story
a) only go on the slow rides
b) go on rides but avoid the most
scary ones
c) go on everything!
2 What do you do when you go to
the beach?
U
1
1 When you go to an amusement
park, what do you do?
All accommodation is in luxury hotels, lodges or
campsites. Food is included. Transport by airconditioned 4x4 vehicles.
Dates: 16th April, 5th May.
tasks include
discussion,
quizzes,
questionnaires
and information
gap activities
enturous Are You?
Fly from London to Kampala.
Track chimpanzees in Kibale National Park.
Trekking to find gorillas in Bwindi National
Park. Watching them is an incredible
experience!
10 Days 10–12: Go to a well-known chimp sanctuary on
Lake Victoria. Forty-six chimps from zoos
and circuses live here. Remember, they’re
not wild so they love playing!
Day in Kampala. Five-star hotel. Do some
Day 13:
sightseeing and relaxing.
15
Return flight to London.
Day 14:
Days 2–5:
Days 6–9:
15 The Boa Trip
Warm-up
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the
questions. Check your scores on page 91.
How Adv
5 Day 1:
Last summer, me and my friends got student rail
tickets and travelled round Europe. We went
1 sight
in big cities. We stayed in
2 camp
or youth hostels – they were not
and were full of other
exactly 3 luxury
4 back
with all their 5 camping
.
The rooms weren’t 6 air, so sometimes
it wasn’t very comfortable. We made a lot of new
friends as most of the foreign students were
7 English.
backpacker (n)
nature lover (n)
hard-working (adj.)
Speaking
10
Do you like watching chimps and gorillas on
TV? Come and see them in the wild!
1 Uganda’s national parks are in spectacular
rainforests with an incredible variety of wildlife
including TEN species of primates. The stars of the
show are, of course, the rare mountain gorillas.
1 The Okavango river doesn’t go into the
sea but flows into the Kalahari desert
and forms an area of lakes and small
islands. This is a nature lover’s paradise with elephants,
hippos, lions,
5 cheetahs and leopards, 450 species of birds and 1000 plant
species.
Day 1:
Fly from London to Maun via Johannesburg.
Day 2:
Fly to our campsite in the delta. Put up your tent
under a palm tree and relax.*
Days 3–9: Go out with your English-speaking guide
in his
10
mokoro (wooden canoe). At night, you camp on
the islands. Your hard-working guide takes you
bird watching and on walks to see wild animals.
Day 10:
Back to Maun. Return flight to London.
* You can bring camping equipment or rent it from
us. There are
15 hot showers, a restaurant and a shop at the campsite.
Which safari would you like to go on?
What animals would you like to see?
What other places would you like to
go to?
What would you like to see and do
there?
5
UGANDA
,
BOTSWANA
Reading
travelling camping cycling
swimming playing football
studying English dancing
going to school getting up early
doing my homework
IT
Look at the Key Words. Which five
animals are not from Africa? What
other African animals can you add to
the list?
Key Words:
3.6
these spots focus
on lexical features
Write two sentences about each activity
in the box. Use these words:
N
1
AF
R
these lexical
quiz activities
test students on
the same lexical
feature as the
Word Builder but
using vocabulary
they have seen
before. Students
are referred to
the Word Bank to
help them and
to check their
answers
Skills
9
Work in groups. Read each other’s reviews.
Do you agree with them?
4
I don’t agree with Anna’s review. I thought the film
was brilliant.
5
1
2
3
He’s got two Oscars.
He got two Oscars.
She’s become famous.
She became famous.
a) a dead actor
b) a living actor
a) a new star
b) an old star
Put the verbs in brackets in the Present Perfect or
Past Simple.
Hollywood
(produce) many superstars.
(you, watch) the Oscar awards ceremony
on TV last night?
Tom Cruise
(receive) three Oscar
nominations but he
(not win) an Oscar.
Leonardo DiCaprio
(act) in over twenty
films.
Alfred Hitchcock
(not like) dark-haired
actresses.
7
Read the dialogue. What tense is used
to start the conversation? What tense is
used to ask about details?
Tom
Mike
Tom
Mike
Tom
Mike
8
Have you seen any good films lately?
Yes, I have. I watched Jaws last night.
Where did you watch it?
At home. My dad’s got it on DVD.
Did you like it?
Yes. It’s old and the special effects are
a bit funny but I was scared anyway.
Work in pairs. Use the cues to talk
about your experiences.
A
B
A
B
Have you been to the United States?
Yes, I have.
Did you go to Hollywood?
No, I didn’t.
1
be to the United States / go to
Hollywood
talk to an actor / who
act in a play / what role
write a film review / what film
see a Star Wars film / like the special
effects
watch a horror film / be scared
2
3
4
5
6
67
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Introduc ion to New Challenges
Across Cultures 3
in odd-numbered
modules, there
are Across Cultures
lessons
a
Warm-up
3.13
1
2
1
2
3
4
5
8
b
Listen to three pieces of music. Match
them with the photos (a–c).
1
3
Nomads travel for fun.
Nomads often live in places with
extreme climates.
The Sami are from Siberia.
The Bedouin live in Arabia and
North Africa.
The Moken live on the coasts of
Thailand and Burma (Myanmar).
9
c
1
Sami
3
Read the texts again. Which nomads:
1
2
3
4
5
6
welcome strangers?
travel in the summer?
are good at finding water?
live on land for only part of the year?
use modern technology?
don’t look after animals?
What do the blue words in the text refer to?
1
2
3
4
some (line 2)
others (line 3)
some (line 9)
they (line 10)
1 some – nomads
6
Moken
5
6
7
8
them (line 11)
some (line 20)
it (line 31)
they (line 33)
Look at the Word Builder. The words in bold
are often confusing. What are they in your
language?
Word Builder
Nomads
1
5
The Sami live in northern Scandinavia. Most
of them now have ‘normal’ jobs in towns and
cities but some carry on their traditional way of
life. In early summer, they go on a long journey
north with their reindeers. The Sami take them
far into the Arctic Circle to find grass and plants
to eat. When autumn begins, they take the
reindeers south again. Nowadays, the Sami use
snowmobiles and mobile phones when they are
looking after their animals. However, they still
wear their colourful costumes and sing their
traditional songs.
The word ‘Bedouin’ means ‘desert inhabitant’. Many Bedouins
live in towns in Arabia and North Africa but some still
make trips into the desert to get food for their camels. The
camels, or ‘ships of the desert’, carry everything and provide
food (milk and meat) and shelter (wool for tents). Bedouin
hospitality is famous: they give strangers food and water.
Bedouins know many tricks to find water. For example, when
they see insects or birds, they know water is usually near.
20
7
10
15
1
The Moken are often called ‘sea gypsies’. Some follow their
traditional lifestyle in the coastal areas of Thailand and
Myanmar. During the rainy season, when the sea is rough,
they live in huts on the beach but for the rest of the year they 30
live on their boats. They catch seafood and sell it in fishing
villages. Moken children learn to swim before they can walk.
They can see underwater twice as clearly as the rest of us and
can stay underwater twice as long! The Moken people know
the sea very well – before the tsunami in 2005, they left the sea 35
and looked for high ground.
2
3
4
5
6
3
4
5
Choose interesting places. Write notes about
the places to visit and things to do.
Use your notes to write a description of the
tour.
Copy a map and draw the route on it.
Find pictures to add to your description.
Make a wall poster with your description,
maps and pictures, like the one below.
Choose the correct word.
Are you from England? No, I’m from Scotland,
actually / nowadays.
Traffic pollution wasn’t a problem a hundred
years ago but it is actually / nowadays.
The train journey / trip took four hours.
My dad went on a business journey / trip to
London.
She’s carrying / wearing a lovely dress.
The camels carry / wear huge baskets.
Inverness
N
Aberdeen
D
Glasgow
Day 3: Visit the beautiful
university city of St Andrews,
the home of golf. St Andrews
has got a good beach but the water is freezing!
St. Andrews
EDINBURGH
Day 4: Travel north to Inverness to see the
monster in Loch Ness. Then …
57
there are four
projects in the
book which give
students the
chance to work
together and
be creative
N
IT
56
2
Days 1 and 2: Arrive in
Edinburgh. There are many
things to see, like Edinburgh
Castle and Holyrood Palace.
Visit the National Gallery to
see some great paintings or
go shopping for souvenirs on
the Royal Mile.
25
Sea Gypsies
1
LA
OT
The Reindeer People
Desert Survivors
Touring your country
SC
For nomads, being on the move is part of
everyday life. Some move to look for food for
their animals or themselves, others travel to
buy and sell things. Actually, there are not many
nomads left in the world nowadays but some
nomadic people still survive.
texts look at
cultures around
the world
5
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions.
Have you ever moved house? How old were
you? How did you feel?
Would you like to move to another place?
Where would you like to live?
Would you like to live like a nomad? Why/Why
not?
2
3
Read the text about nomads. Check
your guesses from Exercise 2.
4
the Word Builder
focuses on a
relevant lexical
feature
Word Bank, page 107
Speaking
Bedouin
Reading
3.14
Word Quiz Complete the sentences with the
words in brackets.
They wanted to
a bank and
a million pounds. (steal/rob)
I
a lot of money but I still try to
the lottery. (earn/win)
this cup to the kitchen, please. And
can you
me a biscuit? (bring/take)
2
Look at the photos. Do you think the
sentences about nomads are true (T)
or false (F)?
S udy Corner 5
Language Check
4
1
16
What are the types of transport?
1
2
you
the teacher
your homework yet? (give)
England 17
the World Cup once.
They 18
it in London in 1966. (win)
I 19
in Paris last year on holiday.
20
I
there twice. (be)
3
5
2
A
B
A
5
Complete the gaps with one word.
Have you 21
been to Italy?
Yes, but I’ve 22
visited Rome.
Has your sister finished her maths homework
23
?
Yes, she’s 24
done it but she
hasn’t finished her science 25
.
E
4
Put the verbs in brackets in the Past Simple or
Present Perfect.
U
self-test exercises
check students’
vocabulary,
grammar and
functional
language
Complete the gaps with the names of jobs.
B
A
grows food or looks after animals.
A
takes photos.
A
catches criminals or directs traffic.
A
usually does paperwork and
answers the phone in an office.
10 A
talks to the camera and gives
information.
6
Complete the gaps with one word.
A
B
A
26
3
B
Grammar
Complete the compound words in the
sentences.
11 Rare mountain gorillas live in the rain
in Uganda.
12 Australia and New Zealand are Englishcountries.
13 My dad’s hobby is bird
.
14 We stayed in a fivehotel.
15 There are fifteen national
in Britain.
Vocabulary
/ 15
/ 10
It’s Amber’s birthday tomorrow.
we get her a present?
Good idea! What 27
getting her
a CD?
No, she downloads all her music. We
28
get her a T-shirt.
Okay. 29
go to Shirtz Shop.
30
don’t we look in the market
first? It’s cheaper.
Yeah, that’s a great idea.
M
PL
6
7
8
9
A
B
A
Key Expressions
/5
S udy Help: Explaining words
When you don’t know a word, try to describe it.
Feedback
• Listen and check your answers to the
We stayed in a sort of hotel for young people.
(youth hostel)
It’s a kind of black and white bear and it lives
in China. (panda)
• Look at the table below. Check where you
•
Language Check. Write down your scores.
made mistakes.
SA
students listen
and check their
answers before
doing extra
revision
3.15
58
Wrong answers:
Look again at:
Numbers 1–5
Get Ready – Key Words
Numbers 6–10
Unit 13 – Key Words
Numbers 11–15
Unit 14 – Word Builder
Numbers 16–25
Unit 13 – Grammar
Numbers 26–30
Unit 15 – Key Expressions
• Now do the exercises in Language Check 5
of the Workbook.
What are these words?
It’s a kind of small boat for one or
two people.
He/She is a sort of waiter/waitress.
He/She brings the food on aeroplanes.
3 It’s a kind of car. It’s good for safaris.
1
2
•
A
B
A
Work in pairs. Each choose three words
from this module. Describe them to your
partner using sort of or kind of. Your
partner guesses the word.
It’s a sort of expensive hotel.
A five-star hotel?
Yes!
learner
development
activities help
students become
better learners
The Workbook
The Workbook gives further practice of the language
introduced in the Students’ Book. Each unit directly reflects
the content of the corresponding unit of the Students’ Book.
Groups of Key Words and lexical features from Word Builders
are recycled and practised on the Get Ready page and in
the Skills unit. Grammar structures and uses are practised
in the Grammar unit and exercises are graded according
to difficulty with a one-, two- and three-star system. There
is also a handy Grammar Reference section at the back of
the book. Reading and writing skills are practised in the
Skills unit, which also includes a focus on punctuation. The
Language Check in each module acts as a follow-up to the
Language Quiz in the Study Corner of the Students’ Book.
Alternate modules of the Workbook finish with a Reading
Corner, which can be used as a ‘reading for pleasure’ activity
or to give further reading comprehension practice. There
are extra listening activities on every Get Ready page and in
the Skills unit. The recordings are on the New Challenges 3
Workbook audio CD.
viii
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Introduc ion to New Challenges
Council Of Europe
New Challenges 3 covers most of the descriptors of the
Common European Framework at B.1.1 level (low threshold)
except those related to work and other adult contexts, and
some of those at B.1.2 level (high threshold).
Spoken Production B.1.1
Can give a straightforward presentation on a familiar
topic. (Module 7)
Can relate the plot of a book or film and describe
his/her reactions. (Module 6)
Can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions,
plans and actions. (Module 6)
Can work out how to communicate the main point(s)
he/she wants to get across, exploiting any resources
available and limiting the message to what he/she
can recall or finds the means to express. (Module 3)
Writing B.1.1
Can write accounts of experiences, describing feelings
and reactions in a simple connected text. (Module 2)
Can write personal letters and notes asking for or
conveying simple information of immediate relevance,
getting across the point he/she feels to be important.
(Modules 2, 4 and 8)
Can write notes conveying simple information of
immediate relevance to friends, service people, teachers
and others. (Modules 4 and 8)
Can write very brief reports to a standard
conventionalised format, which pass on routine factual
information. (Module 3)
Can write personal letters describing experiences, feelings
and events in some detail. (Module 2)
Listening B.1.1
U
Reading B.1.1
Can understand the description of events, feelings and
wishes in personal letters. (Module 2)
Can find and understand relevant information in letters
and brochures. (Modules 1, 2 and 5)
Can recognise significant points in a straightforward
magazine article on familiar subjects. (Modules 1, 3, 5,
7 and 8)
SA
M
PL
E
Can express and respond to feelings such as surprise,
happiness, sadness, interest and indifference. (Module 4)
Can take part in discussions on familiar subjects.
(Module 2)
Can deal with transactions while travelling. (Module 5)
Can express belief, opinion, agreement and disagreement
politely. (Module 2)
Can make his/her opinions and reactions understood as
regards to possible solutions of the question of what to
do next. (Module 6)
Can find out and pass on straightforward factual
information. (Module 5)
Can ask for and follow detailed information. (Module 5)
N
Can convey meaning by qualifying a word meaning
something similar. (Module 5)
Can define the features of something concrete for
which he/she can’t remember the word. (Module 5)
Spoken Interaction B.1.1
Can extrapolate meaning of occasional unknown words
from context and deduce sentence meaning provided the
topic discussed is familiar. (Modules 4 and 5)
Can understand the main points of radio news bulletins
and simpler recorded material about familiar subjects
delivered relatively slowly and clearly. (Module 8)
IT
Spoken Production B.1.2
Spoken Interaction B.1.2
Can express thoughts on abstract, cultural topics such as
films, books and music. (Modules 6 and 7)
Can summarise and give his/her opinion about a book.
(Module 6)
Can provide concrete information required in an
interview/consultation (e.g. doctor: symptoms). (Module 3)
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Module 1
Ge Ready
Talk about your school, likes and dislikes.
Background
Read about schools around the world.
This spread introduces the
characters and the setting of
the story. In the photos we
can see the characters in their
home environments. All of
them are artistic in different
ways and interested in
developing their talent at the
school.
The Petergate School of
Performing Arts in Norwich is
not real but is based on many
similar schools in Britain and
the United States.
Norwich is a medium-sized
city in East Anglia.
More information about
both important music and
performing arts schools and
the city of Norwich is available
on the Internet.
Listen to school announcements.
Write about your ideal school.
Learn more about the Present Simple and
Present Continuous.
Jasmin
Get Ready
Extra
1.6
1
Listen to the people in the photos. Make notes
about:
2
Sam
Gwen
Jasmin
Matt
Jasmin
Sam
goes to a big school.
goes to a small private school.
has a good dance teacher.
has acting classes at school.
has dance classes after school.
and Gwen play the piano.
PL
1
2
3
4
5
6
Listen again and complete the sentences with
Matt, Jasmin, Sam or Gwen
Gwen..
E
1.7
U
• where they are from • what they like
• what they are good at • what they want to be
3
Look at the Key Words. What facilities has your
school got? Has it got any others?
M
1.8
SA
Read through the module
objectives with the class. Check
that students understand
any new words and phrases,
e.g. ‘school announcements’.
Encourage them to say which
of the activities they think they
will find easier or more difficult.
At the end of the module, help
students to assess how well they
have achieved the objectives.
Follow this procedure in each
module.
N
IT
Matt
8
1.6
4
Read the advert. Which things would you
like to do?
I’d like to do drama and I’d like to make a film.
Exercise 1
Answers
Audioscript ➞ page 105
Matt: from New York; likes acting
and music; good at playing the guitar;
wants to be an actor.
Jasmin: from Manchester; likes
dancing and music; good at playing
the saxophone; wants to be a dancer.
Sam: from London; likes music; good
at singing; wants to be a pop star.
Gwen: from Cardiff; likes films; good
at taking photos; wants to be a film
director.
• Ask students to look at the photos
and guess what the people like
doing and what they want to
be. Play the recording, twice if
necessary. Students write notes.
• Tell students not to worry if they
can’t hear all the information as
there is a lot to listen for.
8
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Exercise 5
• Give students time to
think of their answers and
reasons before they work
in pairs. Help with any new
vocabulary students need.
Extra
Ask students to say which day
of the week they don’t like
and which place in the school
they don’t like and to give their
reasons.
Exercise 6
Gwen
N
IT
Sam
5
Summer courses
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions
and give reasons for your answers.
PETERGATE SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS
1
Would you like to be a professional
musician, singer, dancer or actor?
With us, you CAN do it!
My favourite subject is chemistry because I’ve got a
great teacher.
3-WEEK RESIDENTIAL COURSE IN NORWICH
3
4
What is your favourite subject at school?
2
Extra
What is your favourite activity in your
English class?
What is your favourite day of the week?
What is your favourite place in the school?
U
(185 kilometres from London).
E
6
• Music: classes for piano, guitar, violin,
flute, saxophone
• Singing • Dance • Drama
• Performances: Students perform a
piece of music and a song. Groups
produce a short film or play.
• Excellent facilities: theatre, dance
studio, recording studio
• Read through the questions
with the class and elicit two
or three suggestions.
• In turn, students tell the
class their opinions. They
can see which ideas are
most popular.
Speak Out Tell the class your opinions.
1
PL
What extra facilities would you like to have at
your school?
I’d like to have a skatepark near the science
laboratories.
2
SA
M
• Accommodation: shared rooms
• Full board (breakfast, lunch and dinner)
• Large gardens • Tennis court
• Gymnasium • Outdoor swimming pool
What extra classes would you like to have?
Dates: courses begin 15th July and 15th August
1.7
Exercise 2
• Give students time to read through
the sentences and see if they can
remember who does what.
• Play the recording for students to
complete the sentences.
Answers ➞ student page
Extra
Divide the class into four groups. Ask
each group to listen carefully to one of
the speakers and make a note of extra
information about the person. The
groups then tell the class their extra
information.
1.8
TIM E OUT!
Page 00, Exercise 0
9
Exercise 3
• Play the recording for the students
to listen and repeat the Key Words.
Check word stress and students’
understanding.
Give students one minute to read
through the lesson. Students
then close their books.
Write four or five phrases on the
board, omitting the vowels, e.g.
1 R_S_D_NT__L
C__RS_
2 _XC_LL_NT
F_C_L_T__S
3 F_LL B__RD
4 D_NC_ ST_D__
5 SC__NC_
L_B_R_T_RY
Students work in pairs,
completing the phrases with
vowels.
Check answers by asking
individuals to complete the
words on the board.
Answers:
1 residential course
2 excellent facilities
3 full board
4 dance studio
5 science laboratory
Exercise 4
• Read through the advert with the
class. Explain or encourage students
to guess the meaning of any new
words.
• Students work in groups or as a
whole class, saying what they would
like to do.
9
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Home Schooling
1
This Uni
Warm-up
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 6, 7, 8 and 9)
More time: do the Extra
activity
1
Look at the web page and the
photos. How is home schooling
different from your school day?
Background
Exercise 1
in Britain
• Check that students
understand any new words
in the text about home
schooling in Britain, e.g.
‘match’, ‘abilities’ and
‘learning styles’.
• Students suggest how home
schooling differs from their
school day.
Why do it? You can match the day to your children’s interests,
abilities and learning styles. Children learn at their own speed
with people they know and love.
Reading and Listening
2
Read and listen to the interview. Check
your answers from Exercise 1.
John I’m John Watts, a reporter for the
Daily News. I’m visiting Sally Atkins
and her two children. Ned is fifteen,
Leah is ten and they learn at home
with their mum. Sally, can you tell
me about home schooling?
Sally Yes, I can. Today is a typical day.
Leah is in the garden. She’s drawing
plants and writing about them. She
loves the natural world. Every Friday
she goes to a nature club with other
kids. They learn about animals and
the environment.
John Who decides what she does?
Sally Here she is – why don’t you ask her?
John Hi, Leah. Who decides what you do
every day?
Leah I do. I talk to Mum about the things
that I’m interested in and she helps
me. It’s great! I don’t have formal
lessons so I’m never bored. Today
I’m making a poster about plants
for my nature club.
John That sounds interesting. What about
you, Ned?
U
E
PL
10
Reading and Listening
1.9
Exercise 2
• Play the recording for students to
read and listen and check their ideas.
Leah decides what she does every day.
She doesn’t have formal lessons. She’s
never bored.
Ned chose the subjects he’s studying
for. He studies with another homeschool student and her father.
Exercise 3
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 10
Ned
It’s different for me now because I’m studying for
three exams: maths, English and science. I chose
the subjects and Mum’s helping me to study and
revise. Today I’m doing some practice exams. Twice
a week, I study physics with another home-school
kid, Isabelle. Her dad’s a scientist and he’s teaching
us about energy and force at the moment.
John So you have got some friends.
Ned Of course! I meet them in the park every day to
play football.
N
IT
1.9
Example answers
10
What is it? Home schooling is when parents teach their
children. In Britain, about 50, 000 students learn at home.
Who can do it? Any parent can decide to teach their
children at home. You don’t have to be a teacher.
M
Warm-up
Home
Schooling
SA
The concept of home schooling
is completely alien in many
countries and you may like to
share student reactions to the
idea in class. As the text states,
only a relatively small number
of children are educated
at home in Britain but the
number is growing.
The law on home schooling
in the UK is very flexible and,
as the text states, it is not
necessary for either parent to
be a qualified teacher. The only
condition is that children must
receive a full-time education
appropriate to their age. Local
authorities may at times check
informally that a child being
educated at home is indeed
receiving tuition and may take
action if they believe that
parents are not complying with
the law.
More detailed information
about home schooling in
the UK is available on the
Internet by searching for ‘home
schooling’ at:
www.direct.gov.uk
• Students discuss the questions in
small groups of three or four.
• The discussion can then be opened
up as a class discussion.
3
Speak Out Do you think home schooling is a
good idea? Would you like to study at home with your
parents? Why/Why not? Tell the class.
Grammar: Present Simple and Present
Continuous
4
Read the sentences (1–4) and match them with the
names of the tenses: Present Simple and Present
Continuous.
a) Present Simple
1 They learn at home.
2 She loves the natural world.
b) Present Continuous
3 She’s drawing plants.
4 I’m studying for three exams.
Grammar: Present Simple
and Present Continuous
Exercise 4
Answers ➞ student page
Exercise 5
• Read aloud the uses (a–d) and check
students’ understanding.
• After checking their answers,
students find more examples in the
text for each use.
Answers ➞ student page
05/10/2011 11:50
Grammar
5
R
Find the sentences (1–4) from Exercise 4 in the
text. Match them with the uses (a–d) below.
Find more examples in the text for each use.
We use the Present Simple to talk about:
2
a) a present state or feeling,
1
b) an activity we do regularly.
I
R
We use the Present Continuous to talk about:
c) an activity happening right now at the
3
time of speaking,
d) an activity happening for some time
around the time of speaking but not
4
necessarily now.
I
R
9
Practice
6
No, I don’t. I work with the best person for
that subject. For example, Mum 7
(teach) me French, art and geography. Dad’s a
scientist so I 8
(do) things like biology
with him. At the moment, my older sister
9
(study) for a physics exam, so Dad
10
(help) her and a friend, Ned.
Do you get good grades?
I 11
(not know)! I never 12
(take) tests or exams.
How do you know if you are learning?
I 13
(not worry) about that.
Extra
Write on the board:
1 Tell me about a typical day
for you.
2 Do you get good grades?
3 How do you know if you are
learning?
Students work in small groups,
asking and answering the
questions. Tell them to give as
much information as they can
in their answers. Open up a
class discussion about the last
question.
Use the notes below to make sentences about
Ned and Ruby. Use the Present Simple and
Present Continuous.
Match the people (1–6) with the sentences (a–f).
1–b
1
2
3
4
8
I
R
I
R
I
Complete the sentences with the verbs in
brackets in the Present Simple or the Present
Continuous.
Tell me about a typical day for you.
Every day is different. I 1don’t start (not start)
at a regular time. At the moment, I 2
(learn) about the stars, so I 3
(do) a
lot of things at night!
4
your parents
(study) the
stars with you?
My dad is but Mum isn’t. She 5
(hate)
being outside in the cold for hours.
6
you always
(study) with
your dad?
Ned is doing a practice exam
today. He learns at home. He
never wears a school uniform.
He isn’t doing a past exam
paper on the Internet. He
plays football every day. He
is studying for three exams at
the moment.
Ned is doing a practice exam today. He learns at home.
Laura is a good student. She likes (like)
school a lot.
Jill wants to travel across Siberia next year so
she ’s learning (learn) Russian.
Chris is very fit. He swims (swim) a lot and
goes (go) jogging every day.
I’m on a diet. I ’m not eating (not eat) sweets
this month.
Complete the interview with Ruby with the
correct form of the verbs in brackets.
Answers
N
IT
7
• Students do the exercise
orally or as a written
exercise.
Ruby: look at the
sky this week, make
notes today, not go
to traditional school,
not often work on a
laptop, play tennis every
weekend, study French
with her mum
Your Turn
10
U
6
Ned: do a practice
exam today, learn at
home, never wear a
school uniform, not
do a past exam paper
on the Internet, play
football every day, study
for three exams at the
moment
Work in pairs. Describe your school. Use the
ideas below and the time expressions in the
box. Add your own ideas.
Ruby is looking at the sky
this week. She’s making notes
today. She doesn’t go to a
traditional school. She doesn’t
often work on a laptop. She
plays tennis every weekend.
She studies French with her
mum.
every day sometimes never often
at the moment always this week/month
E
4
5
Exercise 9
• get grades • play sport/music • have lessons
• have tests • train for a match • go on trips
• work with other students • watch films
• put on a play
PL
3
a) I’m not eating
chocolate.
b) I don’t eat
chocolate.
c) I only read
magazines.
d) I’m only reading
magazines.
e) I study every day.
f) I’m studying every
day.
We have lessons every day but we don’t have tests
very often. This week our class team is training for
a basketball match.
M
2
a person allergic
to chocolate
a person on a
slimming diet
a history teacher
on holiday
a teenage girl
a student before an
exam
a hard-working
student
11
SA
1
Practice
Answers
3d)
4c)
TIM E OUT!
Page 93, Exercise 1
Exercise 8
Exercise 6
2a)
Read your descriptions to the class. Which is
the most interesting?
5f)
6e)
Exercise 7
• Check answers by asking individuals
to read aloud the sentences.
Answers ➞ student page
• Advise students to read through
the interview quickly for general
understanding before they start
completing it.
• Check answers by asking pairs
of students to read aloud the
questions and answers in the
dialogue.
Answers
2 ’m learning 3 ’m doing 4 Are
(your parents) studying 5 hates
6 Do (you always) study 7 teaches
8 do 9 is studying 10 is helping
11 don’t know 12 take 13 don’t
worry
Your Turn
11
Exercise 10
• Read the example sentences
with the class. Remind
students of the position of
time expressions (e.g. often,
at the moment) in sentences.
• Check students’ writing and
point out any language
errors for the pairs to correct
before they read their
description in Exercise 11.
Exercise 11
• Students read their
descriptions and discuss as
a class.
TI M E OUT!
Page 93,
Exercise 1
Photocopiable activity 1,
Teacher’s Resources MultiROM
11
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 11
05/10/2011 11:50
Boarding Schools
2
This Uni
Warm-up
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 7, 9 and 10)
More time: do the activity in
the Time Out section
1
Read the text about two British boarding
schools, Roedean and Eton. Are there boarding
schools in your country? Would you like to go
to one? Why/Why not?
Background
Eton and Roedean are two of
the most prestigious schools
in the UK. Some schools in the
UK still have ‘house’ systems as
mentioned in the text, though
these are less common in
schools today.
1.10
2
Read the text about UWC and match the titles
(a–e) with the paragraphs (1–5).
a) fees
b) free-time
activities
c) houses
d) general
information
e) the first
school
ROEDEAN
ETON COLLEGE
Opened 1885 in Brighton, near the sea.
400 girls aged eleven to eighteen
(about fifteen per cent are day girls).
Three houses. Girls share rooms in
groups. Fees: approx. £24,000 per year.
Opened in 1440 in Windsor, near London. About
1300 boys aged thirteen to eighteen. Twenty-five
houses. No dormitories; pupils have their own
study-bedrooms. Fees: approx. £26,000 per year.
UWC
Warm-up
1 UWC is a movement consisting of thirteen schools and colleges
and over 120 national committees, which can be found in
five continents. German educationalist, Kurt Hahn, had the
idea for the international colleges during the 1950s’ Cold
War. He believed that young people from all over the world,
learning and living together, could help to build international
understanding and world peace.
2 On 19th September 1962, the first school, UWC Atlantic
College, was opened in Wales. UWC Atlantic College is
a mixed boarding school and has 350 students aged from
sixteen to nineteen years old. It is more diverse than most
schools: the students come from as many as eighty different
countries. Life at UWC Atlantic College is not as formal as at
some boarding schools. Students don’t wear a uniform and there
are no compulsory sports or competitions between the houses.
3 In addition to academic work, UWC students take part in
community service. Every student must take up a voluntary
activity for two afternoons or evenings a week. UWC Atlantic
College students can choose from a wide range of activities and
services. For example, they can help with sea and beach rescue;
work on the college farm where they learn to grow food and
take care of the environment or organise activities for disabled
children.
4 At UWC Atlantic College, the students live in seven houses.
Each house has beds for about forty-eight students and,
usually, four students from different countries share a room.
Houseparents live with the students and take care of them. The
rooms are quite simple and the students share bathrooms. Each
student house has a living room with a small kitchen and study
rooms. Breakfast, lunch and dinner take place in a beautiful
twelfth-century dining room.
Exercise 1
PL
E
U
N
IT
• Give students time to read
about Eton /ˈiːtәn/ and
Roedean /ˈrәʊdiːn/. Check
that they understand the
vocabulary, e.g. (school)
houses. Students may like to
convert the fees from British
pounds into their own
currency.
• Students say if they would
like to go to a boarding
school and give their
reasons.
Exercise 2
5 Anyone can apply to a UWC school or college. There are no
SA
• Ask students to talk about
the people and the places in
the photos.
• Read through the titles (a–e)
with the class.
• Students read the text,
matching the titles with
the paragraphs. Tell
students to read for general
understanding. Explain that
they will study the text in
detail in Exercises 3–5.
M
Reading
1.10
Reading
Answers
1d) 2e) 3b) 4c) 5a)
Exercise 3
• Read aloud the advice
and check that students
understand the meaning of
scanning. Encourage them to
do this when they read texts
in their L1.
12
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 12
12
restrictions on nationality, religion or politics. The fees are
about £23,500 a year but the school chooses students for
their ability to learn, not their ability to pay. The organisation
helps students if they need money.
Exercise 4
• Students work individually, scanning
the texts and completing the table.
• Write the headings of the table on
the board. Check answers by asking
students to complete the table on
the board.
Answers
Atlantic College
Location
Wales
Year opened
1962
mixed boarding
school
16–19
350 students
7
Type of school
Age of students
Number of students
Number of houses
Eton
Windsor, near
London
1440
boys boarding
school
13–18
1300 students
25
Roedean
Brighton
1885
girls boarding
school
11–18
400 students
3
05/10/2011 11:50
Skills
3
7
Look at the Reading Help.
Reading Help: Scanning for information
Compare your school with Atlantic College,
Eton and Roedean. Use the Sentence Builder
and these words to write sentences.
Read the text quickly to get the general idea.
Read the questions to see what type of information
you need (e.g. names, dates, times).
•
My school has got more students than Atlantic College.
Find the paragraph with the information and read
it carefully.
8
Copy the table. Scan the texts from Exercises
1 and 2 and complete the table.
Atlantic
College
Eton
Location
1440
9
mixed
boarding
school
1
10
6
All the UWC are international.
The first UWC was in Germany.
Atlantic College students must play sports.
All students at UWCs study in English.
The students at Atlantic College eat all their
meals in their houses.
Most students at a UWC are from rich
families.
Look at the Sentence Builder. Find two more
examples in the text.
Sentence Builder
1
2
3
4
5
Why don’t you start to learn Italian?
Please look after the baby.
She always does something in the school play.
Can you feed my cat when I’m away, please?
I’d like to start judo next term.
Answers ➞ student page
Verb Quiz Find these get expressions in the
Word Bank. You’ve got two minutes!
To enter a bus. get on
You do this every morning. get up
To enter a car. get into
To meet people. get together
To be friendly with someone. get on with
Word Bank, page 106
Speaking
11
Exercise 10
Speaking
Speaking
Exercise 11
• After students have worked
in pairs, open up a class
discussion about some of
the questions.
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions.
Exercise 12
Which do you think is better:
1 day or boarding schools?
2 boys, girls or mixed schools?
3 school uniform or own clothes?
4 final exams or project work?
• Give students time to think
of what school rules are
unfair.
• Then, each student tells
the class to see how much
general agreement there is.
PL
Read the text in Exercise 2 again. Are the
sentences true (T), false (F) or is there no
information (NI)?
NI
The exams are in the gym.
N
IT
Number of
houses
6
Rewrite the sentences using verbs from the
Word Builder.
U
Number of
students
T
F
F
NI
F
2 Why don’t you take up
learning Italian?
3 Please take care of
the baby.
4 She always takes part in
the school play.
5 Can you take care of my cat
while I’m away, please?
6 I’d like to take up judo
next term.
The exams take place in the gym.
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
Answers
Word Builder
Roedean
Age of
students
5
Look at the Word Builder. Find the verbs in red
in the text and read the sentences.
Brighton
Year
opened
Type of
school
• Check answers by asking
individuals to read aloud
the sentences.
E
4
Exercise 9
• activities • big • classes • expensive
• famous • international • old • students
•
•
Speak Out What rules at your school
do you think are unfair? Tell the class.
SA
M
12
Fact or Fiction?
Fact or Fiction?
‘Public schools’ in Britain are, in
fact, expensive private schools
Answer on page 92.
TIM E OUT!
Page 93, Exercise 2
13
Exercise 5
Exercise 7
• Students do the exercise
individually.
• If students disagree about any of
the answers, ask them to read aloud
the section of the text that supports
their answer.
Exercise 6
• Read through the instructions and
list of words with the class. Elicit
two or three example sentences.
• Students write six to eight
sentences, comparing their school
with Atlantic College, Eton and
Roedean. Tell students to use each
pattern in the Sentence Builder
in at least one sentence. Check
students’ sentences.
• Read the sentences with the
students.
Exercise 8
Answers ➞ student page
Answers
The students come from as many as
eighty different countries.
Life at UWC Atlantic College is not as
formal as at some boarding schools.
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 13
• Students find and read aloud the
sentences in the text which contain
the verbs. Check that students
understand the meaning of the
verbs.
• After checking the answer,
ask students if this
information surprises them.
What different types of
school do they have in their
country?
TI M E OUT!
Page 93,
Exercise 2
13
05/10/2011 11:50
Arriving
3
This Uni
Warm-up
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 3 and 4)
More time: do the Extra
activities
1
Look at the photo. What can you remember
about the students?
Reading and Listening
1.11
Background
2
• Gwen • Jasmin • Matt • Sam • Mr Bywater
• Mr Grant • Benson • Mrs Tyler-Smith
The four characters arrive
at the Petergate School of
Performing Arts in Norwich.
We see the owner of the
school (Mrs Tyler-Smith) and
two teachers (Mr Grant and Mr
Bywater).
The four students arrive at Petergate School.
Doug Right, here we are. This is the school.
Jasmin It looks great, Mr Grant.
Doug Call me Doug.
Jasmin Right … er, Doug.
Doug That’s Mr Bywater over there, one of the
music teachers. And that’s Mrs Tyler-Smith
with her cat, Benson. She’s the owner.
Come and meet her.
Mrs T-S Hello! Did you have a good trip?
Jasmin Yes, thanks.
Mrs T-S Are you Gwen?
Jasmin No, I’m Jasmin. This is Gwen.
Gwen Pleased to meet you.
Mrs T-S So, you’re an actress, Janet.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
U
N
IT
• Encourage students to say as
much as they can remember
about each of the students.
• Students describe the
appearance of the three
adults in the picture. Check
that students remember the
word beard.
E
Reading and
Listening
Exercise 2
• Play the recording twice for
students to listen, read and
complete the task.
• Students do the exercise,
working individually.
Mrs Tyler-Smith
Sam
M
Exercise 3
Gwen
Benson
Matt
SA
Answers ➞ student page
Mr Bywater
Mr Grant
PL
1.11
Jasmin Jasmin. Well, I prefer dancing to acting.
I really love dancing.
Mrs T-S Oh. And you, Helen, sorry, Gwen. You’d
like to be a singer. Is that right?
Gwen Well, I’d rather be a film director. That’s
my ambition and I like taking photos.
Mrs T-S Really? Well, come in!
Sam
Hey, it’s a big place!
Matt
I can’t stand old houses. I’m allergic to
dust.
Sam
Allergic to dust?
Matt
Yeah, and cats. I hate going near them.
And I don’t like dogs much either.
Sam
Don’t you like any animals?
Matt
I don’t mind goldfish. They’re okay.
Sam
Well, there’s a cat over there. Look.
Matt
Oh no! And who’s that strange guy with
the beard?
Sam
I think he’s one of the teachers.
Matt
Really? He looks scary.
Sam
Come on. Let’s go in.
Read and listen to the dialogue. Find the
people (and the animal) in the photo.
Jasmin
14
Answers ➞ student page
Extra
Ask students if they (or any
of their friends or family) are
allergic to anything. If so, what
problems do they have?
Speaking
Exercise 4
• Advise students to read through
the sentences before they start
completing them.
• Check answers by asking individuals
to read aloud the sentences. Check
that students understand that the ’d
in You’d and I’d in sentences 3 and
4 stands for would.
Exercise 5
• Ask three students to read out
the example dialogue. Elicit two
or three more sentences from
the class, using some of the Key
Expressions.
• Students work in groups of three to
five, discussing what they like and
dislike about school.
Answers ➞ student page
Extra
14
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 14
Put students into groups of six to act out
the dialogue.
05/10/2011 11:50
Skills
3
Read the dialogue again. Are the sentences
true (T) or false (F)?
T
F
T
F
1
2
3
4
Doug is friendly to Jasmin.
Mrs Tyler-Smith has a good memory.
Matt doesn’t like the place.
Matt is allergic to goldfish.
Work in pairs. Say true sentences about the
ideas below. Use I like or I’d like.
Everyday Listening
I’d like to have acting classes at school.
• have acting classes • meet Keira Knightley
• eat Turkish food • speak English
• go snowboarding • play the guitar
• visit the UK
Speaking
4
8
9
Complete the Key Expressions from the
dialogue with the words in the box.
A
hate like (x2) love mind
much prefer rather stand
B
Key Expressions:
1.12
Audioscript ➞ page 105
• Give students time to read
through the information
before you play the
recording.
• Play the recording, twice
if necessary, for students
to listen and complete the
information.
Work in pairs. Arrange things to do this
weekend, e.g. go to the cinema, rent a DVD,
go shopping. Use I prefer and I’d rather.
What would you like to do on Friday night?
Would you like to go out or watch TV at home?
I’d rather go out because I prefer going to the
cinema to watching TV.
prefer
mind
5
Everyday Listening
1.12
Meals
Work in groups. What do people like and
dislike about school?
U
Closing times of facilities:
Rehearsal rooms 7 10 o’clock
Theatre/dance studio/gym 8 9 o’clock
Swimming pool/tennis court 9 9 o’clock
Speak Out Tell the class about your
10 o’clock , please!
E
NO NOISE after 10
Look at the Sentence Builder. Which sentences
are about:
a) general likes/dislikes?
b) something you want to do now or in the
future?
<realia 1.4>
Excursions:
th
London 11 17
July
Great Yarmouth (the coast) 12
1.13
2
24 th
July
Listen closely Listen to the extracts
from Exercise 1. Which of these words
can you hear in the sentences: are or a?
M
Sentence Builder
SA
1.14
3
Page 93, Exercise 3
Exercise 8
• After each group has reported
back to the class, students can see
if there is any general agreement
about what they all like or dislike.
• If you noticed any problems in the
use of the Key Expressions or verb
forms in Exercises 5 and 6, go over
these with the class.
• Remind students to say true
sentences.
• Read the sentences with the
students. Remind students of
sentences 3 and 4 in Exercise 4.
1 a 2 are 3 a 4 are
5 a 6 are
15
1.14
Exercise 6
Exercise 7
Answers
Listen to more extracts. Which of these
words can you hear: of or have?
TIM E OUT!
Exercise 2
Audioscript ➞ page 105
• Write on the board:
1 They are students at a
boarding school.
2 We have got a pair of
scissors.
• Draw students’ attention to
the words are and a in the
first sentence and have and
of in the second sentence.
Ask several students to read
aloud the sentences.
• Play the recording, pausing
it appropriately for students
to listen and note if they
hear are or a.
• After checking answers, ask
students to listen again and
say the complete sentences.
Breakfast from 1 7.30 to 2 8.30
Lunch at 3 1 o’clock
Dinner at 4 7 o’clock
After-lunch concerts at 1.45 on
5 Wednesdays and 6 Fridays
PL
7
group.
1.13
0.0
SUMMER COURSES
Do you like doing sport at school?
I can’t stand sport, I prefer dancing.
I don’t mind PE classes and I like swimming.
6
Answers ➞ student page
Listen to Mrs Tyler-Smith and complete
the information about summer courses
at Petergate.
PETERGATE
much
• sport • rooms (e.g. the library) • classes
• school lunches • after-school clubs
• school trips • exams • school parties/dances
A
B
C
1
N
IT
love
like
rather
like
stand
hate
Exercise 1
Exercise 9
• Ask two students to read aloud the
example dialogue. Elicit suggestions
for continuing and finishing the
dialogue from the class.
• Students work in pairs, taking turns
to start the dialogue.
• Some of the pairs can say one of
their dialogues for the class to hear.
Exercise 3
• Follow the same procedure
as in Exercise 2.
Audioscript ➞ page 105
Answers
1 have 2 of
4 have 5 of
TI M E OUT!
3 have
6 of
Page 93,
Exercise 3
Photocopiable activity 2,
Teacher’s Resources MultiROM
Answers
a) I like watching/I prefer watching
b) I’d like to watch/I’d rather watch
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Across Cultures 1
Across Cul ures 1
Background
Depending on your students’
educational background, they
may find the information in
the text more or less surprising.
Many countries have state
education systems which
are offered to all students,
although private education
in various shapes and
forms is also very common.
Examination systems vary
substantially from country to
country and students may be
relatively unfamiliar with the
concept of public exams.
After Exercise 5 you might like
to try to answer any questions
which the students wrote
in the Warm-up and which
remain unanswered by the
main text.
Warm-up
Reading
1
2
N
IT
education-info.com
.com
Our family is moving from the United States to London. Keira, (thirteen)
and Oliver (fifteen) are worrying about going to school in the UK. (The
only one they know about is Hogwarts in the Harry Potter films!)
Can anyone answer our questions?
1 Are schools free in the UK?
2 Are the school subjects the same as in the United States?
3 What’s a typical day like?
4 At what age do students start/leave school?
5 Do kids wear a uniform?
6 Do schools have entrance exams?
Thanks for your help!
2b) 3e) 4c) 5d) 6d)
U
State education is free so the schools
pay for teachers, books, exam fees
and any special equipment for
science, etc. We (parents) pay for
school uniforms and things like rulers,
calculators. Also, schools charge for
extras like school trips. About ninety
per cent of British students go to a
state school.
M
SA
Answers
Here, students start primary school when
they are five and move to secondary school
when they are eleven. At sixteen, students take
public exams called General Certificate of
Secondary Education. After GCSEs, students
can leave school, do a course to prepare for a
job or study for A level (Advanced Level) exams
(these are necessary for university entrance).
d
E
PL
a
• Remind students of the
advice about scanning a text
for information (page 13).
• Students work individually,
scanning the replies (a–e)
and matching them with the
questions (1–6).
c
Moving Mom
Reading
Exercise 3
Read the text about schools in the UK. Match
the questions (1–6) with the correct replies
(a–e). Two questions are answered in the same
reply.
www.education-info.com/forum
• Students work individually,
writing their questions
before comparing their
ideas.
• Elicit some example
questions from the class.
• Students read the questions
(1–6) at the beginning of the
text.
• See if there are any
questions which no one in
the class thought of.
3
Read the questions (1–6) at the beginning of
the text. Are they the same as your questions?
1–a
Exercise 1
Exercise 2
1.15
Is there a lot of homework?
Warm-up
1.15
Imagine you are moving to a school in another
country. What do you want to know? Write two
questions. Then compare your questions with
a partner.
16
b
I go to a comprehensive
school and I study:
English, maths , science,
technology, history ,
geography, foreign languages,
music, art, sport and
citizenship. My school also
has after-school clubs for
swimming and drama.
Jayathome
[email protected]
e
Retiredheadteacher
Most schools are comprehensive so they
don’t have an entrance exam. Secondary
schools usually have a uniform. Some
schools have simple uniforms with, for
example, a shirt, sweatshirt and a dark
skirt or trousers. Other schools have more
formal uniforms with jackets and ties.
Dave75
My school day is 8.40 to 4 o’clock,
Monday to Friday. We start with registration.
Then we move about the school for
different lessons. We have short breaks
between lessons and a longer break at
lunchtime. Some people eat in the school
canteen but I take a packed lunch.
glittergirl
Exercise 4
Exercise 5
• When checking students’ answers,
ask them to correct the false
sentences or explain why they are
false.
• Students work in pairs, reading
their questions again and trying to
answer them.
• Each pair says their two questions
and answers them if possible.
Answers ➞ student page
1 F – Text a) says state education is
free and that about ninety per cent
of British students go to a state
school.
5 F – Text c) says students take GCSEs
at 16 and that after that they can
leave school.
6 F – Text d) says secondary schools
usually have a uniform.
Extra
Open up a class discussion about
students’ reactions to different aspects of
the text, e.g. uniforms, types of school,
the ages for starting and leaving school,
public exams.
16
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1
F
2
NI
3
4
T
T
5
6
F
F
7
T
1
10
A
B
A
Game Work in pairs. How much can you
remember about British schools? Test your
partner. Student A uses the text to ask
questions. Students B closes the book and
answers.
Who pays for the students’ books?
Their parents.
No. The school pays for their books.
Exercise 10
Find compound nouns in the text with these
meanings.
1
a secondary school with no entrance exam
special clothes students must wear at school
the place where students can eat lunch
an exam that is the same everywhere
the money you pay to take an exam
an exam you take to get into a school
2
Look at the Word Builder. How do you say the
phrases in your language?
1
2
3
3
4
Write your description in three
paragraphs.
My ideal school is near the sea. It’s a day school
for boys and girls. There isn’t a uniform and
there aren’t any rules. The school has got a
music studio, an Olympic-size swimming pool
and a computer for every student.
4
Work in groups. Read each other’s
descriptions. Say what you like or dislike
about your partners’ ideal schools.
SA
5
One person writes about GCSEs and A levels.
Which
do students take in your
country?
How do you
a test? Do you plan your
revision carefully or do it the night before?
Do you eat in your
? Why/Why not?
Does your school
extras like guitar
lessons?
Who
your school equipment like
pens, pencils, etc?
general description (location, type of
school, uniform, rules, facilities)
a typical school day (classes, lunch,
breaks)
after school (clubs, activities, trips,
homework)
PL
2
3
Complete the questions with words and
phrases from Exercises 6 and 7.
Plan your description. Make notes on
these points:
M
1
Think about these things:
• location • day school or boarding school
• school trips • boys, girls or mixed school
• number of students in a class • facilities
• uniform or no uniform • school rules
• after-school clubs
Word Builder
8
• Give students time to read
the text again. Tell them to
try and remember as much
as possible.
• Students work in pairs,
testing each other on the
text. Suggest that each
student asks three or four
questions, then they change
roles. If you have a mixedability class, you may wish
to have weaker students
work in groups of three
or four and allow them
to cooperate in answering
questions.
Your ideal school
state school
7
• Work through the first two
questions and elicit possible
answers from the class.
• Students work in pairs,
taking turns to ask and
answer the questions.
• Some of the students can
say their questions and
answers for the class to
hear.
Check if your questions in Exercise 1 are
answered in the text.
a school the government pays for
2
3
4
5
6
7
Exercise 9
Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions
from Exercise 8.
N
IT
6
9
U
5
Most British parents pay for their
children’s education.
British students have to clean their
classrooms.
There are after-school activities.
Nobody can leave school before they
are sixteen.
Everybody takes A level exams.
A lot of secondary schools don’t have
a uniform.
Normally there aren’t any lessons at
the weekend.
Speaking
Speaking
Read the text again. Are the sentences true (T),
false (F) or is there no information (NI)?
E
4
17
Exercise 6
Exercise 7
• Students work individually or in
pairs, finding the words in the text.
• Check answers by asking individuals
to read aloud the sentences
containing the words.
• Ask students to find and read aloud
the sentences in the text containing
the Word Builder expressions.
• Students discuss whether in their
language they also use prepositions
after these verbs.
Answers
2 comprehensive school 3 school
uniform 4 school canteen
5 public exam 6 exam fee
7 entrance exam
Extra
Give students time to read through the
text again. Explain or encourage students
to guess the meaning of any other new
words.
M01_CHAL_TRB_03GLB_8484_M01.indd 17
Exercise 8
• Make sure students understand that
they should use words and phrases
from both Exercises 6 and 7 to
complete the questions.
• Read through the stages of
the project so that students
understand what to do.
• In Stage 1, encourage
students to exchange ideas
as a whole class so that all
the students have plenty of
ideas to choose from.
• Students make notes for
their three paragraphs. Help
with vocabulary if necessary.
• Ask one of the students to
read aloud the example first
paragraph. As students are
writing their paragraphs,
monitor and point out any
language errors for them to
correct.
• Students work in groups of
three or four, reading and
commenting on each other’s
ideal school.
Answers
1 public exams 2 study for 3 school
canteen 4 charge for 5 pays for
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S udy Corner 1
Language Check
Language Check
Exercises 1–4
1
1
Answers ➞ student page
Feedback
• Students listen to the
recording to check their
answers. Check spelling
where necessary by asking
individuals to write the
answers on the board.
• After checking answers to
Exercise 3, students work in
pairs, reading the dialogue
aloud. Correct any serious
pronunciation errors.
• Students look at the table
to see which sections in the
Students’ Book they need to
look at again.
• Give students time in
class or at home to do
Language Check 1 of the
Workbook.
Complete the words in the sentences.
2
3
4
We have our chemistry lessons in a
la b o r a t o r y.
Our school has got three tennis c o u r t s .
There is a football p i t c h .
I get books from the school l i b r a r y .
2
Complete the verbs in the sentences.
3
A
B
A
B
A
B
Feedback
• Listen and check your answers to the
Language Check. Write down your scores.
PL
• Look at the table. Check where you made
mistakes.
Wrong answers: Look again at:
Get Ready – Key Words
Numbers 5–10
Unit 2 – Word Builder
M
Numbers 1–4
Numbers 11–20 Unit 1 – Grammar
SA
Numbers 21–30 Unit 3 – Key Expressions
18
Would you 21 love / like to 22 go / going to the
school dance this weekend?
Thanks, but I’d 23 rather / prefer go to the
cinema. I love 24 go / going out with my friends
but I prefer 25 watch / watching films to
26 dance / dancing. I 27 can’t / don’t stand
28 be / being in noisy places.
I 29 don’t / can’t mind that – I love
30 to go / going to clubs and discos!
Communication
Hi, Alan. What 11 are you doing you (do) here?
Shh, Fred, don’t speak so loudly.
I 12 ’m revising (revise) for my exams. I often
13 come
(come) to the library. I sometimes
14
use (use) the computers here.
I 15 use
(use) my dad’s computer at home
when my sister isn’t on it!
Where is she? I want to talk to her.
She 16 is/’s playing (play) hockey. They
17 are/’re having (have) a school competition
this week. They always 18 have (have) it at
this time.
Oh yes, I forgot about that. Anyway, why are
you here? You hate studying.
E
1.16
Choose the correct word.
A
A
Put the verbs in brackets in the Present Simple
or the Present Continuous.
your coursebook
• The exercises in this section
give students an opportunity
to become familiar with
the different components
and exercise types in New
Challenges 3.
• Read through the list of
headings with the class.
Give students time to work
individually or in pairs,
looking through the first
module again and finding
examples of each heading.
Remind students that the
Time Out Magazine and
Word Bank are at the end of
the book.
/ 10
/ 10
/ 10
U
Study Help: Using
4
B
up photography.
I want to take
When I’m ill, my mum takes care of me.
up karate or judo.
I’d like to take
When my neighbour is away, I take care
of his dog.
9 He’d like to take part in the concert.
10 The school dance takes place in the gym.
5
6
7
8
Vocabulary
Grammar
S udy Help: Using your coursebook
Find these things in New Challenges 3. Which
are the most useful for you?
• Key Words • Key Expressions • Word Builder
• Word Bank • Reading/Listening Help
• Sentence Builder • Language Check
• Time Out Magazine
•
Match the problems (1–10) with the
solutions (a–j).
N
IT
1.16
I 19 am/’m looking for (look for) information
for the quiz. They 20 ask (ask) a lot of
geography questions and there’s a good atlas
here.
A
• Now do the exercises in Language Check 1
of the Workbook.
• Students need to refer to their
Workbook as well as the Students’
Book for the next exercise. Read
through the problems (1–10) and
the solutions (a–j) with the class.
• Elicit the solutions to the first
two or three problems from the
students.
• Students work individually,
completing the exercise. They can
compare answers in pairs or groups
of three before checking answers as
a class.
• After checking answers, students
1–b
I want to …
1
2
3
4
find out what’s in a module
find some tips for reading and listening d)
do some extra reading a)
find answers to word quizzes (e.g. verb
quiz) h)
5 revise vocabulary f)
6 revise a grammar area e)
7 do extra grammar practice c)
8 find useful expressions for speaking j)
9 do a revision test g)
10 find some tips for studying i)
Look at ...
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)
i)
j)
stories in Time Out Magazine
the top of the Get Ready page
the Workbook Grammar Reference
Reading and Listening Help boxes
the Workbook or CD-ROM
the Word Bank
the Language Check
Key Word boxes, Word Builder and the
Word Bank
the Study Help boxes
Key Expressions boxes
discuss which of these problems
and solutions they think are most
important for them at this stage in
their learning.
Answers ➞ student page
Module 1 test,
Teacher’s Resources MultiROM
18
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