SHS Course Guide - Springfield School District

SHS Course Guide - Springfield School District
pringfield
igh
chool
2016-2017
Academic Programming and
Scheduling Guide
0
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
The resource has been developed to provide students and parents/guardians with
valuable information and tools to assist in the planning of their SHS academic career.
Students and parents/guardians can access this document on the SHS Web Page under the 2015-2016 Scheduling Tab
Table of Contents
Academic Planning, Programming and Scheduling................................. 1
Course Selection Guidelines ................................................................... 1
Considerations for the Course Request Process ..................................... 2
Acceleration and Course Exemption ....................................................... 3
Guidelines for Changing Scheduled Courses........................................... 3
Promotion Requirements ....................................................................... 4
Repeating Courses and Summer School ................................................. 4
Weighted Courses ................................................................................... 4
Grading Scales and GPA .......................................................................... 5
Class Rank ............................................................................................... 5
National Honors Society ......................................................................... 5
Options for Academically Talented / Gifted Students ............................ 6
NCAA Eligibility Requirements ................................................................ 7
Graduation Requirements ...................................................................... 8
Earned Credit Requirements for Graduation .......................................... 8
Grade Level Core/Elective Course Offerings ........................................ 9-12
Department Course Descriptions
Art ............................................................................................................. 50
Administrative Technologies .................................................................... 40
Communications & Video Production ...................................................... 48
Family and Consumer Sciences ................................................................ 43
Health and Physical Education ................................................................. 56
Industrial Technology ............................................................................... 45
Language Arts ........................................................................................... 13
Mathematics ............................................................................................ 31
Music ........................................................................................................ 54
Science...................................................................................................... 25
Social Studies ............................................................................................ 19
World Languages ...................................................................................... 37
College Credit Opportunities .................................................................... 57

Dual and Concurrent Enrollment Courses
Career and Technical Education ............................................................... 64
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Academic Planning, Programming and Scheduling
Springfield High School is committed to preparing graduates for life after high school – “Commencement is the beginning . . .” Many
of our graduates further their education by pursuing a post-secondary education at two and four year colleges and universities.
Others enter military service, trade or technical schools or the work force, maybe even with certifications they have received from
DCTS programs. Recognizing that the majority of our graduates will seek further education and/or training of some kind, we
recommend that students develop their High School Plan around a sequence of courses that will maximize the potential to pursue
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rigorous and challenging post-secondary education opportunities. This plan can begin in 9 or 10 grade with specialized classes but
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most students focus in on a career path in 11 grade.
Course Selection Guidelines
The course selection process is extremely important and plays a vital role in preparing students for their post-secondary endeavors.
Course selection involves careful thought and planning and this process is a collaborative effort between counselors, teachers,
students and parents. Parent conferences are also very helpful and welcomed by counselors. Call 610-938-6130, 7:30 a.m. – 3:00
p.m. for appointments during the school year or by email. The High School Guidance Counselors are:
Colleen Grucella – Class of 2017
Kelly Pedrotty – Class of 2018
Jamie Weaver – Cl ass of 2019
Elizabeth Reilly – Class of 2020
Kendra Campbell – College & Career Counselor
Springfield High School takes pride in a wide variety of academic and special area offerings. Students can pursue college preparatory
along with highly rigorous honors and advanced placement courses in addition to exploring and experiencing many courses in the
arts and technology application areas. Students are encouraged to take full advantage of these options. Throughout the course
selection and scheduling process, please carefully read the course descriptions and expectations associated with each course.
Working with your counselor, make sure the courses you select are in line with your academic plan. Choosing the right courses is
one of the most significant tasks a student completes each year. Courses should be selected with these questions in mind:






Will this course allow me to meet graduation requirements?
Will this course help me to meet college entrance requirements?
Will this course help me develop a skill to become employable after high school?
Will this course introduce me to a new subject or experience?
Is this course appropriate for my ability? Will it be a challenge?
Do I have the prerequisite for this course?
Note: Requirements for graduation are on pages 9. Students must be sure they have all required courses each
year. Every effort will be made to schedule all students with seven (7) credits comprised of scheduled courses,
school service opportunities, internship/externship opportunities or independent studies. Senior students have
additional scheduling opportunities.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Considerations when completing the course request process:
Preparing Course Requests

A “Credit Tracker Form” will be distributed to students and is also available on the SHS web page under the Scheduling
tab. Use HAC Transcript feature to view completed course and courses you are currently enrolled in this school year.

A Grade Level “Course Selection Sheet” will also be distributed to students and is also available at the SHS web page
under the Scheduling tab. These forms need to be completed with a high degree of accuracy because they will be used
to enter course requests into the scheduling program. Students will be instructed on how to complete this process at
our grade level scheduling meetings.
Course Sequencing

Course sequencing must be adhered to when planning your program of study.
 Planning charts are presented at the beginning of each core content area in this guide
 It is important to review prerequisite course before requesting a course.
Prerequisites

Prerequisites for courses should be carefully considered and adhered to when planning a program of study. Questions
regarding appropriate placement related to prerequisites and qualifications should be directed to the student’s current
teacher in that area or guidance counselor.
 Most courses in the Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide (APSG) have percentage based prerequisites and some require teacher recommendation. Please keep in mind that these percentages are the
initial screener in determining if a student has demonstrated the academic rigor to be successful in these more
rigorous courses.
 Where appropriate, performance requirements above and beyond College Preparatory courses are identified.
Please consider these requirements when making your requests.
 Before students complete the course selection process, teachers will make recommendations based on
demonstrated academic ability and performance.
 In some instances, a student does not meet the course pre-requisites, or display the recommended standards
of academic performance, and as such is not recommended by a teacher. If a student still desires to take the
course under these circumstances, the student and parent must complete a Course Recommendation Waiver
Form available through guidance.
Course Offering Requirements


Course may not be offered during the school year if an insufficient (fewer than 15) number of students request the
course or if an insufficient number of students (fewer than 15) are able to be scheduled into the course.
Students selecting rigorous academic course work, including Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors courses, must be aware
of the commitment that the administration and Board of School Directors make to staff AP and Honors courses. Students
are expected to honor their commitment to take these challenging courses. Please make sure that you are fully committed
to these challenges because the withdrawing from an Honors or AP level course can have a significant impact on the college
application and college acceptance process. Teachers will make recommendations for Honors and AP courses based on
student ability and performance. Counselors will guide you through the selection and commitment process so that you are
confident in your decision to pursue these courses.
Note: AP course offerings in particular may be eliminated if not requested by a sufficient
number of students. Additionally, when scheduling is completed, an AP course can be
removed from the schedule if an insufficient number of students are enrolled in the course.
The Master Schedule

Students are given opportunities to choose from a wide variety of courses beyond the required courses listed in this
guide. Every effort is made to fulfill these requests; however, it is difficult to provide every course that every individual
student requests. The development of a master schedule takes into consideration many factors when determining
which courses can be offered. Staffing, the number of students requesting a particular course, unique combinations of
course requests, and school resources are among many factors that influence the course offerings courses in a given
year. HS administration and guidance will work diligently and methodically to provide a rich and varied academic
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
experience, but there may be some instances where, for scheduling purposes, the administration and guidance staff
may need to enroll students in courses they did not request. If this occurs, every effort will be made to place the
student in a similar course at a similar level. That is why it is important for students to list an adequate number of
electives and alternatives to insure they are scheduled into courses aligned with their academic goals and interests.
Acceleration and Course Exemption
Periodically students wish to accelerate through a course sequence to advance to the next level for a variety of reasons. The
guidelines for these opportunities are as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
A request to exempt a course by exam is to be initiated by parent and student, in writing, to the principal;
the letter must clearly state reason for the exemption request. Exemption by exam must be requested
prior to the start of the course. Permission to exempt a course by exam is granted at the principal's
discretion.
Any costs are to be funded by the student and/or parents, which may include the costs of assembling
materials, and administering and scoring the exams.
The student must take the district mid-term and final examinations for the course and achieve a score of
85% or better. These examinations need to be taken and evaluated at least 2 weeks before the start of
the course.
No grade will be assigned or included in the GPA.
No credit will be awarded for the course.
If the criteria in Step 3 are met, the course will be listed on the transcript as “Course by Exemption” and
will be awarded a passing mark of “P”.
The scheduling of the mid-year and final examinations dates and administration/scoring will be arranged
by the building principal or his/her designee.
Guidelines for Changing Scheduled Courses
Student schedules will be reviewed and revised by counselors and students. Schedules will be available to students before the start
of the 2015-2016 SY. These changes should be completed before the end of the school year or during the summer. Students
requiring or requesting a schedule change must do so by accessing the On-Line Course Change Request form at
https://apps.ssdcougars.org/public.php?app=courseSelection. This form will be the primary means by which counselors will
review and make schedule changes. If you cannot access this form, contact the Guidance Office at 610-938-6130. Parents/guardians
and students should know that counselors may not check or reply to emails and phone messages during summer break. However,
they do monitor the change request entries frequently and will reply and make changes before the start of the school year. With
that in mind, students and parents are required to enter all course request changes on-line. This system has proven to be very
efficient and effective. It is not necessary or recommended that an email and/or phone message are left in addition to the on-line
request. This creates redundant work for the counselors and may slow the process of making changes which impacts all students.
Initial Drop/Add Period
Students recommended for and meeting the prerequisite academic standards to be enrolled in Advanced Placement courses must
notify their counselor before August 1 if they no longer wish to remain in the AP course. Students enrolled in AP courses after this
date will be maintained on the AP class list and must complete the course.
Students enrolled in courses other than AP must submit a request to the counselor by August 19, 2016 to be removed from a course
without penalty. If a student wishes to drop a course after the start of the school year, the drop/add procedure below will be
followed.
Procedures for Dropping/Adding Courses – After Initial Drop/Add Period
nd
Periodically students request to drop a course after the initial add/drop period in the beginning of the school year or 2 semester.
When these situations arise, the following steps must be taken prior to an administrator’s consideration of a course change:

The student and parent must submit the request in writing and clearly state the reason and/or rationale. This request must
be submitted to the teacher and the counselor.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide


Once the teacher and counselor have received and reviewed the request, the following will occur:
▫ The counselor will issue the student and the parent the Course Drop Procedure Form to insure they are aware of
the request to drop the class unless the request was initiated by the parent
▫ The counselor will arrange a meeting with the student and the teacher to review the request and determine if the
student is:
 Attending regularly and actively engaging in classwork
 Completing in-class work and HW assignments
 Maintaining an organized notebook and planner
 Exhibiting good study habits
▫ The teacher, counselor and student will develop a plan of action that must include at least a minimum of 5
documented before/after school sessions with the teacher or tutor over a 3 week period
▫ The teacher must contact the parent to discuss the situation
 The parent will be asked to share information about home study habits and efforts that will be made at
home to address the issue
 Teacher will share efforts that have been made in the classroom with regards to instruction & assessment
strategies, and interventions (Use SHS Student Feedback Checklist)
If all of these steps have been followed, the student is still not making adequate academic progress, and the drop request is
still being proposed, then a meeting with the counselor and administrator must be arranged to review the situation. Once
all information is reviewed, the counselor and administrator will arrange a meeting with the student, parent and teacher to
present their recommendation. If the decision is made to drop the course, a withdrawal code “WF” will appear on the
students transcripts based on the final recommendation.
*** Note: Additional measures will be taken for seniors and will include contacting a potential
college or one for which acceptance has been granted.
Promotion Requirements
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To be promoted to the 11 grade, students must have earned a minimum of 11 credits by the end of the 10th grade. Six (6) of these
credits must be in the core academic areas of LA, SS, Math and Science. Students who do not meet the promotion requirement will
remain with their guidance counselor and advisory and will be designated as a sophomore.
Repeating Courses and Summer School
If a student fails a core course, they have the option to repeat the course(s) the following school year or attend Summer School.
Counselors will assess these situations and make a recommendation that is in the student’s best interest academically. Repeating
courses can be beneficial, especially with courses that build on prior knowledge. Sometimes scheduling constraints are such that
repeating a course creates difficulty in scheduling. In these cases the student is encouraged to attend Summer School. Please
contact the Guidance Office for specifics regarding qualifications for summer school, grading procedures, available courses, dates,
and tuition.
Failing any course may impede or jeopardize a student graduating within four (4) years. Students and parents/guardians are strongly
encouraged to make necessary and appropriate arrangements in the event of a course failure.
Weighted Courses
A student can be enrolled in College Preparatory, Honors or Advanced Placement courses. Due to the higher academic rigor of
Honors and AP courses, a heavier weight is assigned to these courses when calculating a student’s GPA. College Prep courses carry a
weight of 1.00, Honors a weight of 1.125 and AP a weight of 1.25.
Students enrolled in an AP course must sit for the AP Exam to receive AP weight (1.25) at the conclusion of the course. If a student
does not sit for the AP Exam, the student will be awarded Honors weight (1.125) at the conclusion of the course and must take the
final examination in that course.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
GPA Calculation
All MP and Final grades will be recorded and reported as a numerical value. Students can use the following method to calculate GPA:

Determine Total Quality Points - sum of all points for each course attempted as determined by the following formula:
Quality Points per Course = % Grade earned in course x Credit x Weighted Value
Overall GPA = Total Quality Points / Credits Attempted
Class Rank
Class rank is calculated at the end of the school year and is based on the overall weighted GPA. Student MP Report Cards include
class rank but this is an un-weighted calculation and is not a true indication of the student’s class rank.
National Honor Society
Requirements for consideration for elections in the NHS include:
 Junior or Senior
 95.0000 weighted Cumulative GPA or higher the summer before Junior or Senior Year
 Enrolled in 3 or more Honors/AP courses during the school year in which application is made (invitations are mailed in
August and applications are submitted in September)
More details will be shared in the invitation/application materials.
Delaware County Technical Schools Programs
A complete list of the courses offered by Delaware County Technical Schools is provided beginning on page 62. The Delaware
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County Technical Schools program is offered to 11 and 12 grade students at the Intermediate Unit Vocational Technical Schools.
The training at the schools is extensive and demanding and provides a graduate with an excellent background for technical careers.
The Technical Schools Program is offered as a half-day AM or PM program and the school district provides transportation to and
from the Technical School. To enroll, students should meet with their guidance counselor to complete the Technical Schools
application. Students and their parents are encouraged to visit the Delaware County Technical Schools. Call for an appointment:
Folcroft (610) 583-7620 or Aston (610) 459-3050.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Options for Academically Talented / Gifted Students
HONORS & ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES - Springfield High School offers intensive studies that require extensive independent
preparation and a strong commitment to meeting high demands for critical, creative, and analytical work.
Language Arts:
Mathematics:
Science:
Social Studies:
World
Language:
Advanced
Placement
Courses:
Honors Language Arts courses are offered at all grade levels to students interested in developing skills
necessary to prepare for Advanced Placement (AP) English Language and Composition and/or AP
English Literature and Composition.
The accelerated student enrolls sequentially in the Honors Mathematics program which provides the
necessary foundation to prepare students for enrollment in our Advanced Placement Statistics and
Calculus courses.
Students interested in pursuing an intensive science program requiring extensive independent
learning and preparations are encouraged to participate in the Science Academy. Students enter in to
an accelerated science program that culminates with the completion of multiple AP level courses.
Honors Social Studies courses are offered at all grade levels to students interested in developing skills
necessary to prepare for AP American History, AP European History, AP American Government and/or
AP Psychology.
Students with the appropriate level of exposure to a foreign language at the middle school level will
be allowed to enroll in upper level language courses at the high school level and accelerate their
progression through our course offerings.
Springfield High School offers a wide variety of AP classes across various departments.
These are rigorous, first-year college level courses whose descriptions and examinations are prepared
and approved by the College Board. Through completion of the courses and the Advanced Placement
Examinations offered in May, students have the opportunity to earn college credits or advanced
standing in a college curriculum.
Enrollment in an Advanced Placement course requires evidence of superior skills in reading
comprehension, writing, listening, logic, and problem solving. Evidence of academic success, teacher
recommendations, and in some cases preliminary assignments is required for placement in these
courses. The pacing and workload in Advanced Placement courses requires a high level of
commitment from students
AP Potential
College Board data indicates that hundreds of thousands of high school students have the potential to succeed in Advanced
Placement courses but never take AP courses.
AP Potential is a free web-based tool used by schools to help identify students with the potential to achieve success in AP. Research
indicates that PSAT scores predict performance on specific AP exams more accurately than more traditional methods.
There are many benefits to taking Advanced Placement courses while in high school. Students who take AP courses, regardless of
exam score, are more likely to be successful their first year of college than students who have never taken an AP course. In addition,
students who earn a 3 or higher on their AP exams are more likely to achieve success in college and graduate with a college degree.
Advanced Placement courses give high school students a college course experience while they are still in high school and offer the
rigor that is desired by colleges in the college admissions process. There is also the benefit of potentially earning college credit at a
fraction of the cost of taking a college course in college.
Because we believe in the many benefits of the Advanced Placement program, students identified through their PSAT scores to be
likely to achieve success in one or more Advanced Placement Programs will receive a letter from the College Board indicating this.
PSAT scores are only one indicator of success. Not receiving an AP Potential letter from the College Board does not mean a student
will not be successful. We encourage all students to challenge themselves and take courses that will enrich their learning experience.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)
Divisions I & II Initial Eligibility Requirements
DIVISION I
DIVISION II
16 Core Courses:
16 Core Courses
4 years of English.
3 years of English
3 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher).
2 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)
2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab)
2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab)
1 year of additional English, mathematics or
natural/physical science.
3 years of additional English, mathematics or
natural/physical science
2 years of social science.
2 years of social science.
4 years of additional courses (from any area above,
foreign language or comparative
religion/philosophy).
4 years of additional courses (from any area above,
foreign language or comparative
religion/philosophy).
* Beginning August 1, 2018 NCAA Division II will require students to earn a minimum 2.2 GPA in core courses and earn an SAT
combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core course GPA on the Division II competition sliding scale.
For NCAA eligibility purposes, only NCAA designated “core courses” are used in the calculation of the NCAA GPA. This is an NCAA
policy and is not related to Springfield High School Grading Policy. Be sure to look at your high school’s list of NCAA-approved core
courses at www.eligibilitycenter.org to make certain that you know which of your courses will be counted toward your NCAA GPA.
Division I and Division II GPA and SAT/ACT test score requirements are based on a sliding scale determined by the NCAA and can be
found at www.eligibilitycenter.org.
Please refer to www.eligibilitycenter.org for complete and updated information.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Graduation Requirements
In order to graduate and earn a diploma from Springfield HS, all must meet the following requirements:
1.
Successfully complete and earn credit for courses as detailed in the table below.
2.
Demonstrate proficiency on Keystone Examinations in the areas of Algebra I, Biology and English Literature.
These exams will be administered near the end of the completion of the course.
i. Students that do not demonstrate proficiency on the Algebra I, Biology, and English Literature Exams will
be required to complete a project-based assessment for each subject area for which they do not
demonstrate proficiency.
ii. Students will be scheduled for this course(s), and the course(s) will take the place of elective courses in
the student’s schedule
Graduation Credit Requirements by Grade Level
Department
Language Arts
Social Studies
Science (Biology and Chemistry required, Physics preferred)
Math (including geometry)
World Language
HE/PE (minimum of 0.5 each year of enrollment)
Finance (640, 958A, 963, 964, 981)
Core Requirements
12
11
10
9
4
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
2
2
0.5
2
2
0.5
2
2
0.5
2
2
0.5
17.5
17.5
17.5
17.5
8.5
7.5
3
3
3.5
3.5
Elective Credits
No more than 3.5 elective credits in any one department can be
applied towards fulfilling the Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
requirement. Once the 8.5 credits are earned, students may then
attempt additional credits in any area.
Primary Academy/Pathway
Miscellaneous Courses or Secondary Academy/Pathway
(TO MEET MINIMUM GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS)
Minimum Graduation Credits Required
26
25
24
24
Miscellaneous Courses or Secondary Academy/Pathway
(ABOVE MINIMUM GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS)
4
4
4
4
Possible Earned Credits
30
29
28
28
Elective Credit Departments
Language Arts
Social Studies
Science
Mathematics
World Language
Art
Administrative Technology
Family and Consumer Science
Industrial Technologies
Music
Communications/Video Production
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DCTS – Delaware County Technical
Schools
DCCC – Delaware County
Community College
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
9th Grade
Core and Elective Class Offerings
Language Arts:
Computer Applications & Business Education:
Core Requirements
110 Honors LA I
111 CP LA I
630 Introduction to Web Design
642 Desktop Publishing
646 Photoshop I
904A
Computer Applications
Elective Courses
126 Creative Writing
840 Introduction to Acting
Social Studies:
Communications & Video Production:
Core Requirements
220 Honors US History I
221 CP US History I
770 Television Production: Multi-Camera Production
839 Public Speaking
840 Intro to Acting
Elective Courses
254 Civil and Criminal Law
257 From Gutenberg to Google
Science:
Industrial Technology:
Core Requirements
310 Fundamentals of Science
311 CP Biology
701A
Industrial Materials I
710 Architectural Design I
715 Engineering: Structural Design
731A
Graphic Arts & Design I
734 New Course: Digital Painting and Illustration
Elective Courses
372 Planet Earth
Mathematics:
Art:
801
803
805
809
811
813
815
817
819
824
826
827
Core Requirements
411 Algebra I
430 H Algebra II
431 CP Algebra II
World Languages:
Core Requirements
501 French I
521 Spanish I
522 Spanish II
531 German I
Studio Art
Drawing & Design
Painting & Drawing
Printmaking
Functional Ceramics
Sculptural Ceramics
Tile Making
Primitive Ceramics
Sculpture
Special Effects Photography
Portrait Photography
Digital Photography
Music:
Family and Consumer Science:
601
602
620
641
845
855
857
859
861
870
Fundamentals of Foods and Nutrition
Focus on Foods and Nutrition
Child Development
Core Communications and Future Planning Skills
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Music, Interactive Media and Your World
Symphonic Band/Marching Band - performance
Orchestra - performance
9th & 10th Grade Senior Choir - performance
Springfield Singers - performance
Introduction to Composing with Computers
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
10th Grade
Core and Elective Class Offerings
Language Arts:
Social Studies:
Science:
Core Requirements
121 CP LA II
120 Honors LA II
Core Requirements
241 CP US Civics and Government
240 H US Civics and Government
245 AP United States Government and Politics
265 AP Human Geography
Core Requirements
321 CP Chemistry
320 H Chemistry
Elective Courses
253 Contemporary Issues
254 Civil and Criminal Law
255 Psychology
257 From Gutenberg to Google
World Languages:
361
365
Elective Courses
126 Creative Writing
150 Journalism
151 Literature and Film
Mathematics:
Core Requirements
431 CP Algebra II
430 H Algebra II
421 CP Geometry
420 H Geometry
441 CP Pre-Calculus
440 H Pre-Calculus
Elective Courses
373A
374
379
Planet Earth
Comparative Anatomy and
Physiology
Meteorology
Astronomy
Forensic Science
Core Requirements
501 French I
502 French II
531 German I
532 German II
521 Spanish I
523 Spanish III
522 Spanish II
561 Latin I
Computer Applications & Business Education:
Family and Consumer Science:
Industrial Technology:
630 Introduction to Web Design
631 Web Design II
642 Desktop Publishing
646 Photoshop I
647 Photoshop II
904A Computer Applications
945 Introduction to Programming
951 Emerging Technologies/Tech Support
955A Introduction to Business
956 Marketing
958A Money Management
963 Accounting I
601
602
603
605
611
620
621
701A Industrial Materials I
702 Industrial Materials II
710 Architectural Design I
715 Engineering: Structural Design
716 Fabrication Technology:
Robotics
731A Graphic Arts & Design I
732 Graphic Arts & Design II
734 Digital Painting and Illustration
Communications & Video Production:
770 Television Production: Multi-Camera
Production
771 Television Production: Film-Style
Production
773 Broadcast Journalism
839 Public Speaking
840 Introduction to Acting
842 Advanced Acting
850 Principles of Leadership
Fundamentals of Foods and Nutrition
Focus on Foods and Nutrition
Advanced Food Preparation
The Science of Food
Interior Design and Housing
Child Development
Child Development II: Preschool
Art:
801
803
805
807
809
811
813
815
817
819
824
826
827
Studio Art
Drawing & Design
Painting & Drawing
Honors Art
Printmaking
Functional Ceramics
Sculptural Ceramics
Tile Making
Primitive Ceramics
Sculpture
Special Effects Photography
Portrait Photography
Digital Photography
10
Music
845 Music, Interactive Media & Your
World
846 Music Production I
855 Symphonic Band
857 Orchestra
853 Symphony Orchestra/Band
860 Concert Choir
861 Springfield Singers
880 AP Music Theory
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
11th Grade ----- Core and Elective Class Offerings
Language Arts:
Social Studies:
Science:
Core Requirements
131 CP LA III
130 Honors LA III
139 AP Language and Composition
Core Requirements
223 CP US History II
222 Honors US History II
225 AP United States History
Core Requirements
321 CP Chemistry
331 CP Physics
330 H Physics 355 AP Physics 1
Elective Courses
127 Writing Fiction
128 Advanced Writing Fiction
150 Journalism
151 Literature and Film
160 Journalism II
Elective Courses
252 African American Experience
253 Contemporary Issues
254 Civil and Criminal Law
255 Psychology
256 AP Psychology
257 From Gutenberg to Google
258 Know Your Rights
265 AP Human Geography
Mathematics:
World Languages:
Elective Courses
325 General Organic and Biochemistry
350 AP Biology
351 AP Chemistry
356 AP Physics 2
361 Planet Earth
362 AP Environmental Science
365 Comparative Anatomy & Physiology
366 Human Anatomy & Physiology
373A
Meteorology
374 Astronomy
379 Forensic Science
Music
Core Requirements
421 CP Geometry
420 H Geometry
459 CP Pre-Calculus
458 H Pre-Calculus
442 H Discrete Mathematics
460 AP Calculus AB
461 AP Calculus BC
Core Requirements
501 French I
502 French II
503 French III
531 German I
533 German III
532 German II
521 Spanish I
523 Spanish III
522 Spanish II
525 H Spanish IV
845 Music, Interactive Media & Your
World (formerly Am Mus Scene)
846 Music Production I
855 Symphonic Band
857 Orchestra
853 Symphony Orchestra/Band
860 Concert Choir
861 Springfield Singers
880 AP Music Theory
Elective Courses
445 Probability and Statistics
450 AP Statistics
Computer Applications & Business Education
630 Introduction to Web Design (Beginning
Web Design)
631 Web Design 2 (Advanced Web Design)
642 Desktop Publishing
646 Photoshop I
647 Photoshop II
904A Computer Applications
945 Introduction to Programming
946 Mobile App Development
951 Emerging Technologies/Tech Support
955A Introduction to Business
956 Marketing
958A
Money Management
963 Accounting I
964 Accounting II
965 Business II
980 AP Computer Science
981 AP Microeconomics
Communications & Video Production
770
771
773
774
775
839
840
842
850
Television Production: Multi-Camera
Television Production: Film-Style
Broadcast Journalism
Advanced Video Production
Documentary Video Production
Public Speaking
Introduction to Acting
Advanced Acting
Principles of Leadership
Family and Consumer Science
601
602
603
605
611
620
621
640
Fundamentals of Foods and Nutrition
Focus on Foods and Nutrition
Advanced Food Preparation
The Science of Food
Interior Design and Housing
Child Development
Child Development II: Preschool
Real World: Managing Relationships &
Money
Art
Studio Art
Drawing & Design
Painting & Drawing
Honors Art – TEACHER REC
Printmaking
Functional Ceramics
Sculptural Ceramics
Tile Making
Primitive Ceramics
Sculpture
Special Effects Photography (formerly
Multi Design Photo)
826 Portrait Photography (formerly Creative
Portraiture)
827 Digital Photography
827 Digital Photography
828 AP Studio Art: 3D Design – TEACHER REC
829 AP Studio Art : 2D Design – TEACHER REC
829H
Honors Photography
801
803
805
807
809
811
813
815
817
819
824
11
Industrial Technology
701A
Industrial Materials I
702 Industrial Materials II
703 Industrial Materials III
710 Architectural Design I
715 Engineering: Structural Design
716 Fabrication Technology: Robotics
731A
Graphic Arts & Design I
732 Graphic Arts & Design II
733 Graphic Arts & Design III
734 Digital Painting and Illustration
Health and Physical Education
036 HE/PE
041 Advanced HE/PE
Vocational/Technical Offerings
Delaware County Technical School
See details in Programming Guide
Pages 62-70
Delaware County Community College
See details in Programming Guide
Pages 62-70
College Credit Offerings
Dual Enrollment Courses
Concurrent Enrollment Courses
See details in Programming Guide
Pages 62-70
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
12th Grade ----- Core and Elective Class Offerings
Language Arts
Core Requirements:
140 Honors LA IV
141 CP LA IV
149 AP English Literature and Composition
Elective Courses:
127
128
151
160
Writing Fiction
Advanced Writing Fiction
Literature and Film
Journalism II (Teacher Recommendation)
Social Studies
Elective Courses:
Elective Courses:
235
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
265
325 General Organic and Biochemistry
330 H Physics or 355 AP Physic I
331 CP Physics
350 AP Biology
351 AP Chemistry
356 AP Physics 2
352 AP Physics C: Mechanics
361 Planet Earth
362 AP Environmental Science
365 Comparative Anatomy & Physiology
366 Human Anatomy & Physiology
373A
Meteorology
374 Astronomy
379 Forensic Science
Music
AP European History
African American Experience
Contemporary Issues
Civil and Criminal Law
Psychology
AP Psychology
From Gutenberg to Google
Know Your Rights: The Bill of Rights & You
Economics Alive
Comparative Cultures and Religions
International Relations
AP Human Geography
Mathematics:
4th Credit Options:
439
442
445
446
458
459
460
461
450
Algebra III/Trigonometry
Honors Discrete Mathematics
Probability and Statistics
Mathematics for Business and Finance
H Pre-Calculus
CP Pre-Calculus
AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC
AP Statistics
World Languages:
Core Requirements and Elective Options:
501, 502, 503 French I, II OR III
531, 532, 533
Communications & Video Production
770 Television Production: Multi-Camera
Production
771 Television Production: Film-Style
Production
773 Broadcast Journalism
774 Advanced Video Production
775 Documentary Video Production
839 Public Speaking
840 Introduction to Acting
842 Advanced Acting
850 Principles of Leadership
German I, II OR III
521, 522, 523 Spanish I, II OR III
525 H Spanish IV
526 AP Spanish V
845 Music, Interactive Media & Your
World (formerly Am Mus Scene)
846 Music Production I
855 Symphonic Band
857 Orchestra
853 Symphony Orchestra/Band
860 Concert Choir
861 Springfield Singers
880 AP Music Theory
561 Latin I
Computer Applications & Business Education
630 Introduction to Web Design (Beginning
Web Design)
631 Web Design 2 (Advanced Web Design)
642 Desktop Publishing
646 Photoshop I
647 Photoshop II
658 Digital Portfolio
904A
Computer Applications
945 Introduction to Programming
946 Mobile App Development
951 Emerging Technologies/Tech Support
955A Introduction to Business (Business
Principles)
956 Marketing
958A
Money Management
963 Accounting I
964 Accounting II
965 Business II
980 AP Computer Science
981 AP Microeconomics
Science
Family and Consumer Science
601
602
603
605
611
620
621
622
640
Fundamentals of Foods and Nutrition
Focus on Foods and Nutrition
Advanced Food Preparation
The Science of Food
Interior Design and Housing
Child Development
Child Development II: Preschool
Child Development III – TEACHER REC
Real World: Managing Relationships &
Money
Industrial Technology
701A
Industrial Materials I
702 Industrial Materials II
703 Industrial Materials III
710 Architectural Design I
715 Engineering: Structural Design
716 Fabrication Technology: Robotics
731A
Graphic Arts & Design I
732 Graphic Arts & Design II
733 Graphic Arts & Design III
734 Digital Painting and Illustration
Art
Health and Physical Education
801 Studio Art
803 Drawing & Design
805 Painting & Drawing
807 Honors Art
809 Printmaking
811 Functional Ceramics
813 Sculptural Ceramics
815 Tile Making
817 Primitive Ceramics
819 Sculpture
824 Special Effects Photography
826 Portrait Photography
827 Digital Photography
828 AP Studio Art: 3D Design – TEACHER REC
829 AP Studio Art : 2D Design – TEACHER REC
829H Honors Photography – TEACHER REC
036 HE/PE
041 Advanced HE/PE
Vocational/Technical Offerings
Delaware County Technical School
See details in Programming Guide
Pages 62-70
Delaware County Community College
See details in Programming Guide
Pages 62-70
College Credit Offerings
Dual or Open Enrollment Courses
Concurrent Enrollment Courses
See details in Programming Guide
Pages 62-70
12
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Language Arts
Accelerated Program
The Language Arts program at Springfield High School integrates all the language arts skills– reading, writing, speaking,
listening, thinking, and researching – into the curriculum and helps students apply these skills to meaningful tasks. Our
program goal is to have students achieve high academic standards goals in the language arts: reading independently,
reading critically, analyzing and responding to literature, writing in various forms for a variety of audiences, producing
compositions of high quality, speaking proficiently, and using research skills. Students at all grade levels will be expected
to know and meet district and state standards in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Technology is infused into each
course in a deliberate and meaningful fashion.
This program is ideal for students applying to colleges designated as competitive and most competitive.
Students selecting the most rigorous courses typically select college majors and careers which are
communications-based (for example, Arts and Sciences, Pre-Law, Political Science, etc.).
Grade 9
Language Arts (I) H
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Language Arts (II) H
AP Language &
Composition
or
H Language Arts (III)
AP Literature &
Composition
or
H Language Arts (IV)
This program is ideal for students for the majority of college and career bound students. Students selecting
these courses will be well prepared for a wide variety of college majors and career choices, both
communications and technology-based.
Standard Program
Grade 9
CP Language Arts (I)
Grade 10
Grade 11
H Language Arts (II)
or
CP Language Arts (II)
H Language Arts (III)
or
CP Language Arts (III)
13
Grade 12
H Language Arts (IV)
or
CP Language Arts (IV)
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
110 H Language Arts (I): Foundations of Literature /Honors
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Language Arts Credit
Grade: 9
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 84% or higher in 8 grade language arts plus or
Grade of 94% or higher in 8 grade language arts
th
th
In Language Arts (I) Honors, students will be introduced to and study various genres of fiction and non-fiction, and they will learn the
necessary skills specific to each type of reading. To enhance their understanding and appreciation of the literature, students will
discover the relationship between the works and their respective time periods and cultures. Texts include, but are not limited to:
The Odyssey, Romeo and Juliet, Lord of the Flies, “A Modest Proposal,” Romantic poetry, Things Fall Apart, and All Quiet on the
Western Front. In conjunction with and in addition to the reading, students will employ the writing process and write extensively in
various modes, ranging from formal literary analysis to persuasion and poetic response. Reading and writing skills will be assessed
daily for development with a goal of demonstration of mastery. Grammar and vocabulary development via the Sadlier Vocabulary
Workshop program (Level E) are also stressed.
In Honors level classes, students must be self-motivated, possess strong writing skills, and be able to work through challenging texts
independently. They will be required to read and write more extensively and in more depth, and they can expect a greater demand
for homework responsibilities.
Language Arts (I) Honors requires the following additions to/variations from the College Preparatory level:




A summer reading assignment for a required text.
Homer’s The Odyssey (in lieu of Greek myths).
Two to three additional texts, including a Shakespearean comedy.
Two to three additional writing pieces or projects.
111 CP Language Arts (I): Survey of Literature /College Preparatory
1.0 credit
Language Arts Credit
Grade: 9
In Language Arts (I) College Preparatory, students will be introduced to and study various genres of fiction and non-fiction, and they
will learn the necessary skills specific to each type of reading. To enhance their understanding and appreciation of the literature,
students will discover the relationship between the works and their respective time periods and cultures Texts include Ancient Greek
myths, Romeo and Juliet, Lord of the Flies, satire, Romantic poetry, and A Raisin the Sun. In conjunction with and in addition to the
reading, students will employ the writing process and write extensively in various modes, ranging from formal literary analysis to
persuasion and poetic response. Reading and writing skills will be assessed daily for development with a goal of demonstration of
mastery. Grammar and vocabulary development via the Sadlier Vocabulary Workshop program (Level D) are also stressed.
120 H Language Arts (II): The American Experience /Honors
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Language Arts Credit
Grade: 10
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 84% or higher in 110 or
Grade of 94% or higher in 111
Language Arts (II) Honors will examine how American writers have represented and interpreted the American experience through
their works. The course intends to provide students with an exposure to the social, economic and cultural events that have shaped
and defined our values and our goals as a nation. The development of the course may be thematic or chronological. Students in the
Honors level classes will read from American writers including Arthur Miller, John Steinbeck, and Harper Lee. In addition to the
study of literature, students will have opportunities to employ the writing process in a variety of writing modes. Grammar, usage,
mechanics, and vocabulary via the Sadlier Vocabulary Workshop program (Level F) will be studied and developed. This course will
place an emphasis in preparing students for taking the Keystone Literature Exam. Assessment methods vary and include oral,
written, multi-media and group presentations.
In Honors level classes, students will be required to read and write more extensively and in more depth and can expect a greater
demand for homework responsibilities and independent preparation.
Language Arts (II) Honors requires more of the following than in the College Preparatory level:

Analytical writing,
14
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide



Reading,
Independent work
Homework
121 CP Language Arts (II): The American Experience /College Preparatory
1.0 credit
Language Arts Credit
Grade: 10
Language Arts (II) College Preparatory will examine how American writers have represented and interpreted the American
experience through their works. The course intends to provide students with an exposure to the social, economic and cultural
events that have shaped and defined our values and our goals as a nation. The development of the course may be thematic or
chronological. Students in Academic level classes will read from American writers including Arthur Miller, Mitch Albom, John
Steinbeck, and Harper Lee. In addition to the study of literature, students will have the opportunity to employ the writing process in
a variety of writing modes. This course will place a heavy emphasis in preparing students for taking the Keystone Literature Exam.
Grammar, usage, mechanics, and vocabulary development via the Sadlier Vocabulary Workshop (Level E) will be
studied. Assessment methods vary and include oral, written, multi-media and group presentations.
130 H Language Arts (III): Global Perspectives /Honors
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Language Arts Credit
Grade: 11
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 84% or higher in 120 or
Grade of 94% or higher in 121
Language Arts (III) Honors builds upon the 10th grade literature experience. This course moves students from an American outlook
on the 20th century to a global perspective. Through this global exposure to modern world literature, students explore the human
condition in light of the cultural implications found in novels, short stories, poetry, plays, and memoirs from throughout the world,
including the Middle East, Asia, Africa and Latin America. In addition to the study of literature, this course focuses on college
preparation, including an emphasis on the development of college level writing and literary analysis, MLA format, vocabulary
development via the Sadlier Vocabulary Workshop program (Level G), and independent reading and writing. Assessment methods
vary and include written, multi-media and group presentations.
In Honors level classes, students will be required to read and write more extensively and in more depth and can expect a greater
demand for homework responsibilities and independent preparation.
Language Arts (III) Honors requires more of the following than in the College Preparatory level:




Two summer reading books and assessments
Extensive fiction and non-fiction reading
Emphasis on college level writing, developing mature and sophisticated writing style
More homework responsibilities
131 CP Language Arts (III): Global Perspectives /College Preparatory
1.0 credit
Language Arts Credit
Grade: 11
Language Arts (III) College Preparatory builds upon the 10th grade literature experience. This course moves students from an
American outlook on the 20th century to a global perspective. Through this global exposure to modern world literature, students
explore the human condition in light of the cultural implications found in novels, short stories, poetry, plays, and memoirs from
throughout the world, including the Middle East, Asia, Africa and Latin America. In addition to the study of literature, students will
employ the writing process in a variety of modes, including narrative, informational, and persuasive. Grammar, usage, mechanics,
and vocabulary development via the Sadlier Vocabulary Workshop program (Level F) will be stressed. Assessment methods vary and
include oral, written, multi-media and group presentations.
15
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
139 Advanced Placement English Language and Composition
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Language Arts Credit
Grade: 11
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 90% or higher in 120 or
Grade of 94% or higher in 121
The AP English Language and Composition course is designed to help students become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of
rhetorical contexts and to become skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should
make students aware of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic
conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. To this end, grammar instruction is a strong
component of the course. Students will have opportunities to write about a variety of subjects and to demonstrate an awareness of
audience and purpose. The overarching objective is to enable students to write effectively and confidently across the curriculum and
in their professional and personal lives. Another purpose of the AP English Language and Composition course is to enable students
to read complex texts from many disciplines and historical periods with understanding and to write prose of sufficient richness and
complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers. To reflect the increasing importance of graphics and visual images in
texts published in print and electronic media, students are asked to analyze how such images both relate to written texts and serve
as alternative forms of texts themselves. Vocabulary development will be addressed via the Sadlier Vocabulary Workshop program
(Level G). Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the AP grade weight.
140 H Language Arts (IV): Epics, Classics & Contemporaries /Honors
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Language Arts Credit
Grade: 12
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 84% or higher in 130 or
Grade of 94% or higher in 131
In Language Arts (IV) Honors, students will develop an understanding and appreciation of major works of classical and modern
literature. Works may include Oedipus Rex, Antigone, A Doll’s House, Macbeth and/or Hamlet. The course will weave in a variety of
supplementary texts that enhance student comprehension of core texts. The course will center on various types of writing including
argument, analysis, and evaluation. The students will engage in the writing process through critical analysis of the text, drafting an
argument, and working through the revision process. Other areas of study include literary criticism, vocabulary acquisition via the
Sadlier Vocabulary Workshop program (Level H), mechanical expression, and literary analysis.
In Honors level classes, students will be required to read and write more extensively and in more depth and can expect a greater
demand for homework responsibilities and independent preparation.
Language Arts (IV) Honors requires more of the following than in the College Preparatory level:




One summer reading book and two assessments
Extensive fiction and non-fiction reading
Emphasis on college level writing, developing mature and sophisticated writing style
More homework responsibilities
141 CP Language Arts (IV): Epics, Classics & Contemporaries /College Preparatory
1.0 credit
Language Arts Credit
Grade: 12
In Language Arts (IV) College Preparatory, students will develop an understanding and appreciation of major works of classical and
modern literature. Works may include Oedipus Rex, Antigone, A Doll’s House, Macbeth and/or Hamlet. The course will weave in a
variety of supplementary texts that enhance student comprehension of core texts. The course will center on various types of writing
including argument, analysis, and evaluation. The students will engage in the writing process through critical analysis of the text,
drafting an argument, and working through the revision process. Other areas of study include vocabulary acquisition via the Sadlier
Vocabulary Workshop program (Level G), mechanical expression, and literary analysis.
16
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
149 Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Language Arts Credit
Grade: 12
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 85% or higher in 139 or
Grade of 90% or higher in 130 or
Grade of 97% or higher in 131
The purpose of this course is to give qualified students the opportunity to read, write, think, and speak about challenging works of
literature in a seminar setting. The overall reading goal is to provide for the experience, interpretation, and evaluation of literature
through extensive writing and discussion. We will supplement our core readings with independent readings and supplementary
texts. As we read, we will look to identify common themes among the novels, plays, poems, stories, articles, and essays. Our reading
and writing will be supported by work from the Sadlier Vocabulary Workshop program (Level H). The way we make learning real and
lasting is through finding connections between the different texts we immerse ourselves in during class. We will not study texts in
isolation; rather, we will put them in conversation with one another and use them as lenses for critically viewing each text. We will
learn to use literary criticism to create meaning with texts. We will learn to apply Theory of Mind to challenging texts, grapple with
issues of authorial choice as a threshold concept, and practice a variety of writing approaches from analytical to argumentative. The
way we use the texts of this course will help to prepare students for the AP Literature and Composition exam in May and a college
level English course. This course follows the AP curriculum. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the
AP grade weight.
In this AP course, students will be required to read and write more extensively and in more depth and can expect a greater demand
for homework responsibilities and independent preparation.
AP Literature and Composition requires more of the following than in the Language Arts (IV) Honors level:







Three summer reading books and four assessments
Extensive fiction and non-fiction reading navigated using note-taking strategies
Emphasis on university-level writing that recognizes writing as a process; developing a mature and sophisticated
writing style
Expectation of interdisciplinary learning experiences (challenging course work) to draw upon in seminar setting
More homework responsibilities
Love of reading and writing
Willingness to speak and contribute during seminar setting
Language Arts Electives
*126 Creative Writing
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9/10
HAC access
In this course, students will explore the art of storytelling. The emphasis will be on creating short fiction and learning the techniques
of short story writing. Students will participate in frequent short writing exercises in an attempt to learn about plot structure,
conflict creation, dialogue, character development, and voice. Completion of written stories, novels, and writing contests will be
required, as well as at least one submission by each student to the Literary Magazine. Computers will be used extensively, both for
word processing and Internet exploration. Students who complete this course are not eligible to take 127 Writing Fiction.
*127 Writing Fiction
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11/12
HAC access
In this course, students will explore the art of storytelling. The emphasis will be on creating short fiction and learning the techniques
of short story writing. Students will participate in frequent short writing exercises in an attempt to learn about plot structure,
conflict creation, dialogue, character development, and voice. Completion of written stories, novels, and writing contests will be
required, as well as at least one submission by each student to the Literary Magazine. Computers will be used extensively, both for
word processing and Internet exploration. Students are not eligible to take this course if they have already taken 126 Creative
Writing.
17
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
*128 Advanced Writing Fiction
0.5 Credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
HAC Access
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 94% or higher in 127
For Advanced Writing Fiction, students will be expected to have the fundamentals of writing at their disposal. This environment will
dive deeper into the elements of writing, emulating a college level writing environment. Students will be expected to work
independently on writing projects, submit work for contests and publication, share their writing in a writing circle environment and
produce a finished product, whether it be a novel, short story collection or poetry collection. Students will also be expected to
complete an author study project and be able to identify elements in the works of a published author to implement into their own
writing.
*150 Journalism/Newspaper Production
1.0 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11
HAC access
Grade 12 students expressing an interest must have teacher recommendation from prior year’s LA teacher.
This course will focus on all aspects of newspaper production. The class will study the specific steps of newspaper publication
beginning with the generation of ideas for timely articles through the revision and publishing process. The students will study the
ethics of student journalism, the interview process, feature and editorial writing, photography, editing, and layout. All students will
have the opportunity and responsibility to develop articles and ideas for current issues of the SPRI HIAN. All writers for the SPRI
HIAN, or those interested in becoming writers, should consider taking this course. Students electing Journalism/Newspaper
Production will be responsible for the production of the school newspaper, THE SPRI HIAN. Technology will be used in the layout
and production of the newspaper (digital cameras, desktop publishing, etc.)
160 Journalism/Newspaper Production II
1.0 Credit
Teacher recommendation only.
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
*151 Literature and Film
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
HAC Access
In teaching both literary and filmmaking techniques, this course will use a variety of carefully chosen films as a medium for
understanding the relationship between film and literature. Students will study the language of film and will focus on artistic
techniques, such as the use of lighting, camera angles, music and sound, and editing, in order to better evaluate a film’s
success. Students will submit film reviews based on some of the techniques and devices studied and interpreted. All Language Arts
academic standards will be met in this course with a heavy emphasis on persuasive writing.
18
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Social Studies
Standard Program
Accelerated Program
The Social Studies program at Springfield High School is designed to allow the student the option of becoming involved in
specific aspects of the social sciences that parallel his/her specific interest. The program is designed to consider the
development of the intellectual capabilities of each student which will in turn lead the student to become a more
rational thinking being. Coupled with this is an emphasis on the application of the many higher order thinking processes
including the various skills connected with decision making, problem solving, critical and creative thinking. The students
will have the necessary knowledge, intellectual and social awareness, and communicative skills to function and develop
st
in the 21 century.
This program is ideal for students applying to competitive colleges, especially if the student is planning to
major in business management, economics, psychology, law and other social science disciplines.
Grade 9
U.S. History (I)/ H
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
AP United States
Government and Politics
AP United States History
Electives:
or
or
AP European History
AP Psychology
H United States Civics and
Government
H United States History II
This program is ideal for the majority of college and career bound students. Students selecting these courses
will be well prepared for a wide variety of college majors and career choices.
Grade 9
Grade 10
Grade 11
U. S. History(I) /H
or
U.S. History (I)/CP
H United States Civics and
Government
or
CP United States Civics
and Government
H Unites States History (II)
or
CP United States History (II)
19
Grade 12
Electives:
AP European History
AP Psychology
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
220 H United States History I: 1750 – 1877/ Honors
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Social Studies
Grade: 9
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 94% or higher in Grade 8 Social Studies
This course surveys American History from pre-Revolution to the end of the 19 Century, highlighting some of the important political
and cultural contributions by Pennsylvanians along the way. Important events, themes, and people are studied with an emphasis on
their relationship to one another and their meaning to the present. The course examines the beneficiaries of the American
Experience as well as those who were left out. It traces the extraordinary social, technological, economic and foreign policy
transformations that have made us what we are as a people. Students are challenged to analyze events while using primary and
secondary sources that sometimes lead to various interpretations of the evidence. Above all, students are required to think about
the meaning of this nation’s history in their lives. Reading, writing, discussing, and role-playing are the essential strategies used in
this course. The Internet also plays a vital role in accessing primary sources and varied interpretations. Students will be challenged
to develop and hone skills specific to: researching, questioning, public speaking, cooperative learning, listening and analysis.
th
Within the Honors classes students will be expected to challenge themselves to think deeply about the connections between the
historical texts they encounter and current events that are unfolding within the United States today. Students will also be expected
to take engage in various independent and collaborative research and writing initiatives.
221 CP United States History I: 1750 – 1877/ College Preparatory
1.0 Credit
Social Studies
Grade: 9
This course surveys American History from pre-Revolution to the end of the 19 Century, highlighting some of the important political
and cultural contributions by Pennsylvanians along the way. Important events, themes, and people are studied with an emphasis on
their relationship to one another and their meaning to the present. The course examines the beneficiaries of the American
Experience as well as those who were left out. It traces the extraordinary social, technological, economic and foreign policy
transformations that have made us what we are as people. Students are challenged to analyze events while using primary and
secondary sources that sometimes lead to various interpretations of the evidence. Above all, students are required to think about
the meaning of this nation’s history in their lives. Reading, writing, discussing, and role-playing are the essential strategies used in
this course. The Internet also plays a vital role in accessing primary sources and varied interpretations. Students will be challenged
to develop and hone skills specific to: researching, questioning, public speaking, cooperative learning, listening and analysis.
th
240 H United States Civics and Government/ Honors – Grade 10
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Social Studies
Grade: 10
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 84% or higher in Grade 9 United States History (I) Honors or
Grade of 94% or higher in Grade 9 United States History (I) CP
United States Civics and Government is designed to assist students in developing an understanding of the American political system
and an appreciation for the important role that citizens play in our democratic republic. Units of study include the purpose and
function of government, historical foundations and significant documents of American government, general processes of
government, the interpretation and application of law, and the role of individual citizens and that of groups and organizations in our
political system. Students will also compare and contrast the role of the federal government with that of the state of Pennsylvania.
Internet research is used for simulations and problem solving projects as well as to provide a consistent awareness of current events
in Washington and Harrisburg.
Within the Honors classes students will be expected to challenge themselves to think deeply about the connections between the
historical texts they encounter and current events that are unfolding within the United States today. Students will also be expected
to take engage in various independent and collaborative research and writing initiatives.
20
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
241 CP United States Civics and Government/ College Preparatory
1.0 Credit
Social Studies
Grade: 10
United States Civics and Government is designed to assist students in developing an understanding of the American political system
and an appreciation for the important role that citizens play in our democratic republic. Units of study include the purpose and
function of government and the historical foundations and significant documents of American government, the general processes of
government, the interpretation and application of law, and the role of individual citizens and that of groups and organizations in our
political system. Students will also compare and contrast the role of the federal government with that of the state of Pennsylvania.
Internet research is used for simulations and problem solving projects as well as to provide a consistent awareness of current events
in Washington and Harrisburg.
245 Advanced Placement United States Government & Politics
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Social Studies
Grade: 10
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 90% or higher in Grade 9 Honors United States History (1)
Grade of 94% or higher in Grade 9 CP United States History (I)
The Advanced Placement American Government and Politics course is an intensive program of instruction and personal study
focusing on the national level of government and politics. Students will critically examine five common areas and subjects normally
covered in an introductory college political science course: the Constitution; underpinnings of Government, political parties and
interest groups; institutions and policy processes of the national government; civil rights and civil liberties. The course uses web
resources extensively in addition to textbook and primary source materials. Students with consistently high grades in social studies
and teacher recommendations will be considered for the course. This course follows the AP curriculum. Students must take the
Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the AP grade weight.
222 H United States History II: 1877 – Present /Honors
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Social Studies
Grade: 11
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 84% or higher in Grade 10 Honors United States Civics & Government
Grade of 94% or higher in Grade 10 CP United States
Civics & Government with teacher recommendation.
This course surveys American History from Industrialism to the present, highlighting some of the important political and cultural
contributions by Pennsylvanians along the way. Important events, themes, and people are studied with an emphasis on their
relationship to one another and their meaning to the present. The course examines the beneficiaries of the American Experience as
well as those who were left out. It traces the extraordinary social, technological, economic and foreign policy transformations that
have made us what we are as people. Students are challenged to analyze events while using primary and secondary sources that
sometimes lead to various interpretations of the evidence. Above all, students are required to think about the meaning of this
nation’s history in their lives. Reading, writing, discussing, and role-playing are the essential strategies used in this course. The
Internet also plays a vital role in accessing primary sources and varied interpretations. A semester long research project will
culminate with a formal research thesis paper.
The Honors course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the
problems and materials in United States history. Students should learn to assess historical materials – their relevance to a given
interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance, and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical
scholarship. A semester long research project will culminate with a formal 6-8 page research thesis paper.
223 CP United States History II: 1877 – Present /College Prep
1.0 Credit
Social Studies
Grade: 11
This course surveys American History from Industrialism to the present, highlighting some of the important political and cultural
contributions by Pennsylvanians along the way. Important events, themes, and people are studied with an emphasis on their
relationship to one another and their meaning to the present. The course examines the beneficiaries of the American Experience as
well as those who were left out. It traces the extraordinary social, technological, economic and foreign policy transformations that
have made us what we are as people. Students are challenged to analyze events while using primary and secondary sources that
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sometimes lead to various interpretations of the evidence. Above all, students are required to think about the meaning of this
nation’s history in their lives. Reading, writing, discussing, and role-playing are the essential strategies used in this course. The
Internet also plays a vital role in accessing primary sources and varied interpretations. A semester long research project will
culminate with a formal research thesis paper.
225 Advanced Placement United States History
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Social Studies
Grade: 11
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 90% or higher in Grade 10 Honors United States Civics & Government
Grade of 94% or higher in 10 grade CP United States Civics and Government
th
The Advanced Placement program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual
knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history from early settlement to the present.
This course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those
made by full-year introductory college courses. Student should learn to assess historical materials – their relevance to a given
interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance, and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical
scholarship. The Internet also plays a vital role in accessing primary sources and varied interpretations for research projects. This
course follows the AP curriculum. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the AP grade weight.
Social Studies Electives
*235 Advanced Placement European History
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Social Studies
Grade: 12
HAC Access
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 90% or higher in Grade 11HonorsUnited States Government and
Politics, AP Government, or AP U.S. History
Grade of 94% or higher in Grade 11 CP United States Government and Politics
This course is designed as a college level course and students are expected to take the AP test in May. The scope of the course is
from the Renaissance to present day and utilizes a college level text plus a variety of primary sources. Students will be expected to
complete several research projects plus participate in historic simulations and class discussions. Analysis of material to determine
patterns in history is a necessity in the course, as, is understanding how to write a complete persuasive historic essay. Students must
become comfortable in using the internet for research and contacting other AP sites. This course follows the AP curriculum. Students
must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the AP grade weight.
*252 The African American Experience
0.5 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
HAC access
This 0.5 credit elective course will examine issues, topics, and themes that are central to the African American experience. The
course will depict the African background of the African American and the integral role they have played in the exploration and
development of the United States. The following topics will be addressed: African American history from the African background and
the slave trade to the present; U.S. slave communities; resistance and rebellion; abolitionism; the era of accommodation; and the
origins and successes of 20th century protest and contemporary issues in the African American community.
*253 Contemporary Issues in United States Government
0.5 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grade: 10, 11, 12
HAC access
This course will deal with real world current issues that society is struggling to resolve. It will cut across many academic disciplines,
and consider current and important problems we face today. Students will be graded on their conversations and debates involving
politics, free speech, gender, race, crime, terrorism, privacy, etc. In addition, students will select other issues when they create
multi-media presentations for their major project. Students will practice problem solving through research, deliberation and choice
making.
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*254 Civil and Criminal Law
0.5 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grade: 9,10,11,12
HAC access
The Civil and Criminal Law course offers the student an exciting hands-on experience in practical law using the Street Law Text and
other Street Law materials. The major emphasis will be on practical application through student simulations, mock trials, moot court
hearings and presentations. Students will be using the Internet to research past cases, precedents, and legal updates.
*255 Psychology
0.5 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades:10,11,12
HAC access
The primary goal of this semester course is to expose students to some of the major topics and themes of the field of psychology.
The course covers the history of psychology and four major perspectives of psychology; biological, behavioral, psychodynamic, and
humanistic, as well as a study of the brain, social psychology and abnormal psychology. Students will gain insight into research in
psychology by designing, conducting, and presenting experimental research. As a result of their experience in the course, students
will gain a better understanding of the dynamics behind human behavior; their own and others.
*256 Advanced Placement Psychology
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Grade of 90 % or higher in honors level social studies courses
Grade of 84% or higher in AP level social studies courses
HAC access
This is a rigorous college level course. By design, the course is patterned after a typical undergraduate introductory psychology
course. A college-level text is used in the course. The course covers 14 designated topics: 1) History and Approaches; 2) Research
Methods; 3) Biological Bases of Behavior; 4) Sensation and Perception; 5) States of Consciousness; 6) Learning; 7) Cognition; 8)
Motivation and Emotion; 9) Developmental Psychology; 10) Personality; 11) Testing and Individual Differences; 12) Abnormal
Psychology; 13) Treatment of Psychological Disorders; 14) Social Psychology. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in
order to earn the AP grade weight.
*257 From Gutenberg to Google: The Role of Technology in Society
0.5 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
HAC access
Students in this course will examine the role that technology has played in influencing history and culture. Students will analyze the
development of technologies in a historical context while reflecting on the role that various technologies currently play in the 21st
century world. Specific attention will be given to the economic and social impact of specific technology usage and emerging
technology trends. Participation will be a key component of the course and students entering this course should be prepared
actively collaborate and to engage in active discussion of assignments.
*258 Know Your Rights: The Bill of Rights and You
0.5 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
HAC access
Anyone who has ever watched a cop drama knows that criminal suspects have certain rights, including the right to remain silent and
the right to an attorney. People speak their minds freely on television and on the internet knowing that they have a right to free
speech. These rights, and many more, are guaranteed and protected under the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights. In
this course, we will explore these rights in real life cases and analyze the Supreme Court’s role as protector and defender of the
Constitution. Activities will include debates and simulations, as well as participation in an intensive moot Supreme Court hearing.
*259 Economics Alive: The Power to Choose
0.5 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
HAC access
Econ Alive! The Power to Choose demystifies economics for students. A concise, standards-based text and multiple intelligence
activities help students grasp complex concepts in terms of understandable real-world situations. Students in this course will analyze
news headlines to determine how events will cause demand or supply curves to shift, becomes members of the Federal Reserve and
analyze economic data to set monetary policy, form businesses, create business plans, and compete for investor funding. Students
will also become investors in a real-time stock market simulation.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
*260 Comparative Cultures and Religions
0.5 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
HAC access
Students examine the cultural beliefs, practices, and religions of the peoples of Asia, Africa, and The Middle East with an emphasis
on understanding and appreciating the diversity of our social world. Students will learn the cultural “Do’s and Don’ts” so necessary
to conducting business in our increasingly interconnected world. We will also examine current areas of conflict through a cultural
lens and work toward to developing a plan to foster a greater level of peace and tolerance in this troubled world.
265 AP Human Geography
1.0 Credit
Social Studies
Grades: 11, 12
HAC Access
The AP Human Geography course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human
understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine
human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers
use in their research and application.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Science
The Science program at Springfield High School is designed to allow the student the option of becoming involved in specific
aspects of the Sciences that parallel her/his specific interest. From Biology to Advanced Placement (AP) Environmental Science,
the Science curriculum is flexible enough to account for individual needs. The program is designed to consider the development
of the intellectual capabilities of each student which will in turn, lead the student to become an articulate and rational thinker.
Coupled with this, is an emphasis on the application of higher order thinking processes including the skills connected with
decision making, problem solving, and critical and creative thinking. The students will gain the necessary knowledge, intellectual
st
and social awareness, and communicative skills to function and succeed in the 21 century.
305
H Biology/Honors
1.0 Credit
Prerequisites:
Science Credit
Grade: 9
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 96% or higher in 8th grade science
Grade of 96% or higher in Algebra I
Advanced on the PSSA science exam
Honors Biology is a rigorous and challenging course designed to explore the characteristics of the life. Course content includes the
scientific method (summer work required), characteristics of living things, cell structure, function and transport, cellular
reproduction, biochemistry, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, genetics, DNA, ecology and evolution. Students will be introduced
to some of the techniques, equipment, and information used by biologists. In addition to in class lecture and lab activities,
independent supplemental reading and enrichment activities will be assigned and completed outside of the classroom. Students will
sit for their Keystone Biology Exam during this course.
311 Biology /College Prep
1.0 Credit
Science Credit
Grade: 9
Biology is a lab course designed to explore the characteristics of the life. Course content includes the scientific method,
characteristics of living things, cell structure and function, cellular reproduction, biochemistry, photosynthesis, cellular respiration,
genetics, DNA, and evolution. Students will be introduced to some of the techniques, equipment, and information used by
biologists. Students will be doing many labs and activities to reinforce the concepts and develop their technical writing skills. Current
biological issues will also be explored. The majority of 9 grade students will enroll in this course. Students will sit for their Keystone
Biology Exam during this course.
th
320 H Chemistry /Honors
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Science Credit
Grade: 10
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 87% or higher in Algebra I
Grade of 94% or higher in CP Biology
Grade of 84% to 93% in CP Biology requires a teacher recommendation
This course is recommended for exceptional math and science students as evidenced by the prerequisites above. The major areas of
study are atomic structure and mole concept, chemical bonding, kinetic molecular theory, solutions, chemical reactions, reaction
rates, acid/base chemistry, and oxidation/reduction chemistry. Students will develop skills in making observations, analyzing data,
drawing conclusions, and problem solving. Honors Chemistry students can expect:






Additional assigned problems
More in-depth treatment of concepts and problems
More in-depth analysis of experimental techniques and results
More frequent use of higher order thinking processes
More challenging evaluations/assessments
Opportunity for independent research through optional projects
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
321 CP Chemistry /College Prep
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Science Credit
Successful completion of CP Biology (311)
Grades: 10, 11
Chemistry is a laboratory course which emphasizes five major areas of study: atomic structure and mole concept, chemical bonding
and chemical formulas, principles of chemical reactions, kinetic molecular theory, solutions and acid/base chemistry. Students will
develop skills in making observations, analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and problem solving. The course involves use of
calculators, simulations on the computer, and using the computer to produce lab reports. This course is recommended for collegebound students.
330 H Physics /Honors
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Science Credit
Grades: 11, 12
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Science
Grade of 94% or higher in 320 or 321 (H or CP Chemistry)
Grade of 84%-93% in 320 or 321 requires teacher recommendation
Math
Grade of 94% or higher in 430 or 431 (H or CP Algebra II)
Grade of 84%-93% in in 430 or 431 requires teacher recommendation
This course focuses on understanding the basics laws of mechanics: motion, forces, momentum, energy, torque, rotation, and
electricity. Skills of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry will be integrated freely and extensively in the course, both in the
formulation of physical laws and in the solutions of problems. Students are expected to manipulate algebraic expressions involving
multiple variables and should have an understanding of basic trigonometric functions. The student will be required to conduct
experiments and compile data into lab reports. In addition, students in the honors physics course will be expected to:



Compile 12-15 formal lab reports throughout the course,
Conduct independent and group research, and
Write a research paper on important physics concepts.
This course is intended for college-bound students who have a career interest in the sciences, math, or engineering.
331 CP Physics /College Prep
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Science Credit
Grades: 11, 12
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Science
Successful completion of 320 or 321 (H or CP Chemistry)
Math
Successful completion of 430 or 431 (H or CP Algebra II)
This course will focus on the laws of mechanics, including motion, forces, momentum, energy, torque, rotation and electricity.
Students taking the course will improve their problem-solving skills and learn to compile laboratory data into a lab report.
Throughout the course, students will use lab equipment and computer-interface software to collect data and will be required to
report their findings through formal lab reports. Students are expected to use mathematics to quantitatively discuss the concepts of
physics, as well as be able to solve problems. This course is intended for college-bound students who are not necessarily interested
in math, the sciences, or engineering as possible careers
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Advanced Placement Science Classes
*350 Advanced Placement Biology
1.5 Credits
Prerequisite:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 11, 12
HAC Access
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 87% or higher in 305/306 (H Academy Biology/Chemistry) and 320
Grade of 94% or higher in 311 or 321 (CP Biology/Chemistry)
Grade of 84% to 93% in 311 or 321 requires teacher recommendations
This course is designed to be the equivalent of a first year college course in Biology, and has been developed according to the new
guidelines of the College Board. In-depth topics of study include molecular genetics and evolution, cell structure and energy
transformation, population ecology, plants, and animals. The required lab component of the course includes investigations and
technologies in areas such as recombinant DNA technology, aquatic productivity, botany and biochemistry, and comparative
vertebrate dissections, will help students improve written and oral communication skills. This course follows the AP curriculum.
Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the AP GPA weight.
*351 Advanced Placement Chemistry
1.5 Credits
Prerequisite:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
HAC Access
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Science
Grade of 94% or higher in 311, 320 or 321 (Biology, H or CP Chemistry)
Grade of 84 to 93% in 311, 321, or 320 requires teacher recommendations
Math
Grade of 70% or higher in 430 or 431 (H or CP Algebra II) – strongly recommended
This course is designed to be the equivalent of a first year college course. In AP Chemistry students will master fundamental
principles of chemistry and develop competence in problem solving. The areas of study include a highly rigorous treatment of the
structure of matter, the status of matter, chemical reactions, and descriptive chemistry. There is also a strong laboratory component
for the course. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the AP grade weight.
355 Advanced Placement Physics 1
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Science
Grade of 94% or higher in 320 or 321 (H or CP Chemistry)
Grade of 84%-93% in 320/321 requires teacher recommendation
Math
Grade of 94% or higher in 430 or 431 (H or CP Algebra II)
Grade of 84%-93% in in 430 or 431 requires teacher recommendation
Students who have already completed Honors Physics 330 are not eligible for 354. This course is intended for college-bound
students who have a career interest in the sciences, math, or engineering. No prior physics education is required; however this is a
rigorous AP course for students who intend to pursue further honors and AP science electives. This course focuses on
understanding the basics laws of mechanics and electricity: motion, forces, momentum, energy, torque, rotation. Skills of algebra,
geometry, and trigonometry will be integrated freely and extensively in the course, both in the formulation of physical laws and in
the solutions of problems. Students are expected to manipulate algebraic expressions involving multiple variables and should have
an understanding of basic trigonometric functions. The student will be required to conduct experiments and compile data into lab
reports
This course follows the AP curriculum and will prepare students for the AP Physics 1 exam. Students must take the Advanced
Placement Exam in order to earn the AP GPA weight.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
*356 Advanced Placement Physics 2
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 11, 12
HAC Access
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as
follows:
Science
Grade of 94% or higher in 330 or 354
Grade of 84-93% in 330 or 354 with teacher recommendation
Math
Grade of 84% or higher in 442 and/or 443
Recommend completion of 442
Recommend completion of or concurrent enrollment of 443
This is an AP physics course serving as an algebra-based survey of classical mechanics, electricity & magnetism, thermodynamics,
fluids, waves, optics, & nuclear physics. Skills of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry will be integrated freely and extensively in the
course, both in the formulation of physical laws and in the solutions of problems. Students are expected to manipulate algebraic
expressions involving multiple variables and should have an understanding of basic trigonometric functions. The student will be
required to conduct experiments and compile data into lab reports. This course follows the AP curriculum and will prepare students
for the AP Physics 2 exam. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the AP GPA weight.
*352 Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanics
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 11, 12
HAC Access
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 94% or higher in 330
Grade of 84%-93% in 330 or 331 w/ teacher recommendation
Grade of 84% or higher in 355; 84% or lower requires teacher recommendation
Concurrently taking or successful completion of 460 or 461 (AP Calc AB or BC)
An advanced mechanics course offered to students who already completed a semester of physics (honors preferred). Taking AP
Calculus concurrently, or in the past is also recommended. The course will take a calculus-based approach to exploring the topics
covered in introductory physics including: kinematics, dynamics, work & energy, momentum, rotation, gravitation, and oscillations.
Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the AP GPA weight.
*362 Advanced Placement Environmental Science
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 11, 12
HAC Access
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 94% or higher in 305, 311, 320 or 321
Grade of 84-93% in 305, 306, 311, 320 or 321 requires teacher recommendation
This course will provide scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationship of the
natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems, to evaluate risks associated with these problems and to examine
alternative solutions. This class includes a strong lab component. Topics include energy flow, the biosphere, the human population,
renewable and nonrenewable resources, environmental quality, and global change. This course follows the AP curriculum. Students
must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the AP GPA weight.
Science Electives
*325 General Organic & Biochemistry
0.5 Credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 11, 12
HAC Access
Successful completion of Biology (305 or 311) and Chemistry (310, 320 or 321)
General Organic & Biochemistry (GOB) is a laboratory course designed to introduce the basics of organic chemistry and then cover
key concepts from biology from a chemistry standpoint. The basic concepts of organic chemistry including nomenclature and
structural aspects of the major functional groups and their reactions will be covered first. The second half of the course will cover
biomolecules, a chemical perspective of the cell and key biochemical reactions. While there may be some overlap, students having
taken AP Biology or AP Chemistry will still find new material in this course. This course is recommended for students planning on
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
health-related careers (nursing, dental hygienist, physical therapy) that may require a biochemistry course or college-bound
students who are anticipating taking organic chemistry or biochemistry.
*361 Planet Earth
0.5 Credit
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 9,10,11,12
HAC Access
Planet Earth is an introductory course designed to cover the following topics about our planet: the atmosphere, the oceans, its
ecosystems, human population dynamics, its agriculture, water resources, biodiversity decline, energy challenges, atmospheric
pollution, and climate change. This course along with biology and chemistry will prepare the student for AP Environmental Science
in grades 11 or 12.
*365 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy & Physiology
0.5 Credit
Course Fee:
Prerequisites:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
HAC Access
$35
Successful completion of Biology
This course provides an introductory study of vertebrate organisms with a mandatory dissection lab component. This course is
designed to introduce students to modern classification systems as well as to terminology of anatomy and physiology. The content
will offer a survey of the major vertebrate classes with an emphasis on evolutionary adaptations of each group. Cooperative lab
dissection work and small projects are a required component of this course.
366
Human Anatomy and Physiology
0.5 Credit
Prerequisites:
Science Elective Credit
Grades: 11, 12
Grade of 74% or higher in 305/306, 311 320, 321
HAC Access
This course is a study of both human anatomy and physiology with an integral laboratory component. This course is designed to
prepare students who are considering entering the medical, nursing, or allied health fields and as such is of a rigorous content level.
The course will offer a survey of important anatomical terms as well as an overview of the body’s major organ systems. Students will
have the opportunity to gain insight into various career options and the studies required for them.
*373A Meteorology
1.0 Credit
Prerequisites:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
HAC Access
A strong algebra background is necessary. A strong chemistry background if preferred.
This course is a study of the earth’s atmosphere and weather-related phenomena. Major principles of meteorology will be
addressed by long-term study of real time data sources from the Internet. The students will study the structure of the atmosphere,
basic meteorological principles, weather maps and severe weather systems. This is a highly challenging, science course on par with
introductory Meteorology courses taught at the college level. The curriculum presupposes students have an understanding of the
gas laws, fundamental physics principles and excellent math skills.
*374 Astronomy
0.5 Credit
Prerequisites:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
HAC Access
A strong algebra background is necessary; a strong chemistry background is preferred.
This course is a rigorous introduction to the field of astronomy designed to provide an overview of astronomy, including basic
physical concepts involving planets, stars, galaxies, and cosmological distances. The course is designed to emphasize conceptual
understanding and an appreciation for the discovery process. Besides classroom work, students will complete an observational
component as well as a research paper.
Topics may include, but are not limited to: astronomical techniques of measurement and calculations, the visible sky, constellations,
the sun, the planets & their moons, cosmological models, Kepler and Newton’s laws of motion, the electromagnetic spectrum,
properties of stars, stellar distances, and stellar evolution.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
*379 Forensic Science
0.5 Credit
Prerequisites:
Humanities and Elective Credit
Grade of 80% or higher in 305 or 311
Grades: 10, 11, 12
HAC Access
This course will cover updated techniques, practices and procedures used in forensic science. Students will participate in forensic
analysis and the proper procedures for collection and preservation of evidence at crime scenes. Students will investigate new
technologies used by forensic scientists. Discussions of probabilities role in interpreting the significance of scientifically evaluated
evidence will be incorporated in this course. Students will study actual cases to see the role of forensic science in criminal
investigations.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Mathematics
The Springfield High School Mathematics department offers programs that will provide students with mathematics
courses appropriate to their future goals. From Algebra I to Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus, the mathematics
curriculum has offerings to meet each student’s specific needs. All courses are designed to prepare students to use
mathematics effectively in today’s world. The critical skills of problem-solving, logical reasoning and decision-making are
incorporated and developed in all courses. Recognizing the importance of technology in today’s world, the department
emphasizes the use of technology in all courses in order to enable students to develop superior skills in this area. A
Texas Instrument TI 84 or TI 84+ graphing calculator is a necessity for Algebra II courses and above. Students should
consult the academic planning and programming guide for proper course sequence and prerequisites.
411 CP Algebra I /College Preparatory
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics Credit
Successful completion of Math at ETR
Students not completing Math at ETR to a satisfactory level may be required
to take a math support class in conjunction with Algebra II.
The goal of this course is to develop algebraic skills and concepts and to enhance problem solving ability that every student needs to
succeed in college, technical school, or the working world. A secure foundation in basic mathematical skills, fractions, and decimals is
essential for success. Topics covered in this course include: number theory, polynomial expressions and equations, products and
factors of polynomials, coordinate graphing, graphing linear equations, determining and analyzing the slope of lines, probability, and
radical and rational expressions. Algebra skills and concepts needed to solve equations, inequalities and systems of equations will
be developed. Algebraic problem solving techniques will be employed to solve relevant applications. Graphing calculator technology
will be introduced. All topics in this course will prepare students for successful completion of the Algebra I Keystone exam. A TI
Graphing Calculator is recommended.
430 H Algebra II /Honors
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics Credit
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Students coming from ETR: 84% in Geometry or 94% in Algebra I
Students at SHS: 94% or higher in Algebra I
This course is recommended for those exceptional mathematics students who have successfully completed Algebra I with
distinction. Students will experience a challenging investigation of many topics including transformations of functions, modeling
with linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions, solving linear and non-linear systems, operations with
polynomial functions, exploring radical functions, working with sequences and series, and investigating probability including
permutations and combinations. The Honors course will also include study of trigonometric ratios and functions. Graphing calculator
technology will accompany students throughout the course. Graphing calculator technology is a course requirement. Refer to the
course syllabus for recommended brands/models. Topics will be covered in more depth than in the CP level course, 431.
431 CP Algebra II /College Preparatory
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics Credit
Successful completion of High School level Algebra I
Students not completing Algebra I to a satisfactory level may be required
to take a math support class in conjunction with Algebra II.
Algebra II is a demanding course designed to challenge the student through a more thorough investigation of many
topics, including transformations of functions, modeling with linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic
functions, solving linear and non-linear systems, operations with polynomial functions, exploring radical functions,
working with sequences and series, and investigating probability including permutations and combinations. Graphing
calculator technology will accompany students throughout the course. Graphing calculator technology is a course
requirement.
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420 H Geometry/Honors
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics credit
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 94% or higher in 431 or a grade of 84% or higher in 430
This course is recommended for those students who have completed Honors Algebra II or who have completed Algebra II in high
school and are looking for a rigorous course. Students are expected to have a solid understanding of mathematical processes. This
course will help students develop the foundations of deductive reasoning which will enable them to draw upon their ability to
reason in a logical framework to construct proofs. Through the use of applications and investigations, students will learn the
properties of polygons, circles, perpendicular and parallel lines, along with perimeters, areas, and volumes, as well as
transformations, congruence, and similarity. The use of transformations will be critical to the understanding of these concepts. Due
to the nature of this course, in-depth discussion and extension of certain topics and additional projects and/or assignments will be
evident throughout the course. Projects involving:
 Convex and non-convex figures
 Abstract applications of reflections, regular polygons, reflection/rotation symmetry
 Substantially more involved proofs
 Indirect proofs, indirect reasoning
 Introduction of the calculus concept of limit as related to area
 Abstract computation of formulas involving solids
 Derivation of certain formulas
421 CP Geometry/ College Preparatory
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics credit
Successful completion of 430 or 431
This course is recommended for those students who have completed Algebra II. Students are expected to have a solid
understanding of mathematical processes. This course will help students develop the foundations of deductive
reasoning which will enable them to draw upon their ability to reason in a logical framework to construct proofs.
Through the use of applications and investigations, students will learn the properties of polygons, circles, perpendicular
and parallel lines, along with perimeters, areas, and volumes, as well as transformations, congruence, and similarity. The
use of transformations will be critical to the understanding of these concepts.
439 Algebra III/ Trigonometry
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics credit
Grade 12
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Successful completion of 430 or 431
Successful completion of 420 or 421
This course is recommended for the college preparatory senior who may need reinforcement of Geometry and Algebra II eligible
content. Students will have technological experiences with statistical displays of data, linear and quadratic models. Other topics
include: transformations of parent functions, trigonometric ratios and laws.
442
H Discrete Mathematics /Honors
1.0 Credit
Mathematics Credit
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and completion of Pre-Calculus or Honors Pre-Calculus.
This course is recommended for those students who have completed Pre-Calc or Honors Pre-Calc and need additional experience
before taking calculus at SHS or Post-Secondary. In this course students will continue their daily experience with graphing calculator
technology. Topics to be covered will include: double angle formulas, α + β formulas, trigonometric identities, polar coordinates,
complex numbers in trigonometric form, introduction to mathematical logic and reasoning, analyzing functions, solving advanced
algebraic equations and inequalities, applications of algebraic functions, mathematical induction and its application to factoring
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inequalities, transformations of ellipses and hyperbolas, additional proofs of trigonometric identities, and if time allows, derivatives
will be introduced.
Due to the honors level, in-depth discussion and extension of certain topics will be evident throughout the course.
458 H Pre-Calculus/ Honors
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics Credit
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 84% or higher in Honors Algebra II
Grade of 94% or higher in CP Algebra II
This course is recommended for those exceptional mathematics students who have completed Honors Algebra II and Honors
Geometry. In this course students will have daily experience with graphing calculator technology in the investigation of such topics
as functions and models, trigonometric functions and their inverses, trigonometric identities, explicit and recursive formulas of
sequences, Pascal’s Triangle and the Binomial Theorem, ellipses and hyperbolas, and the logic of solving inequalities.
Due to the nature of this Honors course, in-depth discussions, proofs, and extension of certain topics and additional projects and/or
assignments will be evident throughout the course. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to take AP
Calculus.
459 CP Pre-Calculus/College Prep
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics Credit
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 74% or higher in CP Algebra II
This course is recommended for those math students who have completed CP Algebra II and CP Geometry. In this course students
will have daily experience with graphing calculator technology in the investigation of such topics as functions and models,
trigonometric functions and their inverses, trigonometric identities, explicit and recursive formulas for sequences, Pascal’s Triangle
and the Binomial Theorem, and the logic of solving inequalities.
460 Advanced Placement Calculus AB
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics Credit
Grades: 11, 12
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 84% or higher in 442 of 458
A
Concentrated review of
trigonometry and limits.
B
C
Calculus 101
This rigorous advanced placement course follows the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Curriculum Framework.
Big Idea 1
Enduring understanding
Limits
The concept of a limit can be used to understand the behavior of functions.
Big Idea 2
Enduring understanding
Derivatives
The derivative of a function is defined as the limit of a difference quotient and can be
determined using a variety of strategies.
A function’s derivative, which itself is a function, can be used to understand the
behavior of the function.
The derivative has multiple interpretations and applications including those that
involve instantaneous rates of change.
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The Mean Value Theorem connects the behavior of a differentiable function over an
interval to the behavior of the derivative of that function at a particular point on the
interval.
Big Idea 3
Enduring understanding
Anti-differentiation is the inverse process of differentiation.
The definite integral of a function over an interval is the limit of a Riemann sum over
that interval and can be calculated using a variety of strategies.
Integrals and the The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, which has two distinct formulations,
Fundamental
connects differentiation and integration.
Theorem of
The definite integral of a function over an interval is a mathematical tool with many
Calculus
interpretations and applications involving accumulation.
Anti-differentiation is an underlying concept involved in solving separable differential
equations. Solving separable differential involves determining a function or relation
given its rate of change.
Students must take the AP Exam in order to earn the AP grade weight. Students engaged in the college admission
process should understand that prospective colleges want to see high school students enrolled in AP mathematics
courses as evidence that the student is taking a challenging, rigorous course load.
461 Advanced Placement Calculus BC
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics Credit
Grades: 11, 12
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 94% or higher in 442 or 458
A
B
Calculus 101
C
Calculus 201
This rigorous advanced placement course follows the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Curriculum Framework.
Big Idea 1
Enduring understanding
Limits
The concept of a limit can be used to understand the behavior of functions.
Big Idea 2
Enduring understanding
Derivatives
The derivative of a function is defined as the limit of a difference quotient and can be
determined using a variety of strategies.
A function’s derivative, which itself is a function, can be used to understand the
behavior of the function.
The derivative has multiple interpretations and applications including those that
involve instantaneous rates of change.
The Mean Value Theorem connects the behavior of a differentiable function over an
interval to the behavior of the derivative of that function at a particular point on the
interval.
Big Idea 3
Enduring understanding
Integrals and the Anti-differentiation is the inverse process of differentiation.
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Fundamental
Theorem of
Calculus
The definite integral of a function over an interval is the limit of a Riemann sum over
that interval and can be calculated using a variety of strategies.
The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, which has two distinct formulations,
connects differentiation and integration.
The definite integral of a function over an interval is a mathematical tool with many
interpretations and applications involving accumulation.
Anti-differentiation is an underlying concept involved in solving separable differential
equations. Solving separable differential involves determining a function or relation
given its rate of change.
Big Idea 4
Enduring understanding
The sum of an infinite number of real numbers may converge.
Series
A function can be represented by an associated power series over the interval of
convergence for the power series.
Students must take the AP Exam in order to earn the AP grade weight. Students engaged in the college admission
process should understand that prospective colleges want to see high school students enrolled in AP mathematics
courses as evidence that the student is taking a challenging, rigorous course load.
Mathematics Electives
*445 Probability and Statistics/College Prep
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics Credit
Grades: 11, 12
HAC Access
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 84% or higher in 431 and/or 459
Grade of 70% or higher in 430, 442, and/or 458
This course is designed to meet the mathematical and research needs of students who plan to enter such fields as economics,
business, education, psychology, sociology, biology and medicine, as well as science and mathematics. This course is considered
excellent preparation for usual college courses offered in these fields. This course requires a good deal of independent work outside
of the classroom. The topics covered in the course include measurement scales and sample design, measures of center and
dispersion, probability, estimation of confidence intervals, normal and binomial distributions, sampling distributions, hypothesis
testing, linear regression, and chi-square tests of independence and goodness of fit.
*446 Mathematics for Business and Finance
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics Credit
Grades: 11, 12
Successful completion of H/CP Algebra II
HAC Access
Topics will include: Managing Money (Gross and net income), Investments (simple interest, compound interest, annuities),
Purchases (sales tax, unit price, sale price), Loans (single payment, installment, APR) Mortgages (loans, total interest and cost,
closing costs, real estate taxes and insurance), Insurance (homeowners, health, life), Investments (CDs, stocks, dividends, bonds,
mutual funds, retirement). Students, particularly in the vo-tech fields, need concrete financial skills and knowledge. None of our
current mathematics courses address these topics. This course would be ideal for seniors as an alternative to Pre-Calculus or
Algebra III/Trig.
*450 Advanced Placement Statistics
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Mathematics Credit
Grades: 11, 12
HAC Access
Teacher recommendation along with recommended standards of academic performance as follows:
Grade of 84% or higher in 420/430, 421/431, 458/459
This is a rigorous, time-consuming, advanced placement course, which introduces the major concepts and tools for collecting,
analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The topics for AP Statistics are divided into four major themes: exploratory analysis,
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. This course follows the AP curriculum. Students must take the Advanced
Placement Exam in order to earn the AP grade weight. Students engaged in the college admission process should understand that
prospective colleges want to see high school students enrolled in AP mathematics courses as evidence that the student is taking a
challenging, rigorous course load.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
World Language
The need for all learners to become competent in their ability to communicate with people of other countries is increasingly apparent due to
instantaneous worldwide communication networks and an economy that is globally interconnected. Proficiency in languages other than one’s
own is a definite asset to the workplace, and for personal enrichment, especially when traveling. The World Language Department offers
courses in French, Spanish, and German. Students may elect to take Spanish through the Advanced Placement level; German is offered through
level 4 and French is offered through level three. With each additional year of study, students improve their linguistic fluency and grammatical
accuracy, and continue to gain insight into the culture and literature of the language they are studying. Because learning a language involves
continually building upon previous knowledge, the World Language faculty strongly recommends that students earn a minimum grade of 70% in
a prerequisite course in order to progress to the next level.
501 French I /College Prep
1.0 Credit
World Language
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
The purpose of this course is to introduce and develop the skills necessary to listen, speak, read, and write French at an elementary
level, with the emphasis on developing conversational skills. Students will learn vocabulary and basic structures, which will become
the means to understand and be understood in the language. Students will gain knowledge of and sensitivity towards the culture
and customs of the French-speaking world. A video series, audio recordings, and on-line resources are integral parts of the course.
502 French II /College Prep
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
World Language
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Successful completion of 501
In this course students will continue to develop their basic listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills. There will be an emphasis
on developing students’ understanding and appreciation of French-speaking cultures, and on developing their conversational
skills. A video series, audio recordings, and on-line resources are integral parts of the course.
503 French III
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
World Language
Grades: 11, 12
Successful completion of 502
This course will continue to strengthen the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing at an intermediate level. Cultural
readings, situational vocabulary, and more advanced structures will be the primary focus of the course. Much of the learning and
practice of this material will be done in co-operative groups, through small group discussion, presentations, and compositions. A
variety of teaching techniques and materials will be used, including a video series, and audio recordings.
521 Spanish I /College Prep
1.0 Credit
World Language
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
The purpose of this course is to begin to develop fundamental speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills.
Students will gain a knowledge of and sensitivity towards the culture of the Spanish-speaking peoples of the world. Activities in this
course will help the student master basic vocabulary, use questions and answers, develop listening comprehension skills, read
elementary selections, and study the customs of Spanish-speaking countries. Audio selections, videos, and on-line resources will aid
in furthering competency. Spanish I is intended for students who have never taken Spanish or for those who have had a minimal
exposure. Students successfully completing the ETR Spanish I program should enroll in Spanish II.
522 Spanish II /College Prep
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
World Language
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Successful completion of 521
This course is intended for students who have successfully completed Spanish I. In order to continue the development of basic
speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, students will learn to use the vocabulary appropriate to their level in meaningful
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
spoken and written sentences and brief conversations. Through the reading of a short novel and cultural readings from the textbook,
discussions, and projects, students will be better able to understand some of the cultural aspects of the various Spanish-speaking
peoples. On-line resources, videos, and an audio program are integral parts of this course.
523 Spanish III /College Prep
1.0 Credit
World Language
Grades: 10, 11,12
Prerequisite:
Successful completion of 522
The purpose of this course is to enable Spanish students to increase proficiency in conversation and writing. A continued
development of fundamental vocabulary, listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills will be stressed. Students will read
short stories and cultural selections in Spanish. Special projects will be assigned to promote speaking and writing proficiency. Online resources and an audio program are integral parts of the course.
524 Conversational Spanish
0.5 Credit
Prerequisite:
World Language
Completion of 523. Grade of 80% or better is recommended
Grades: 11, 12
Students may enter Conversation following Spanish III. Students will speak based on a text, movies, and a short novel. Students
participate in role play, dramas and skits. Students should be prepared to work closely with others and to participate in
presentations. Conversation is a good way to increase fluency and keep in touch with Spanish for college courses or everyday use.
525 H Spanish IV /Honors
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
World Language
Completion of 523 and a grade of 84% or better are recommended
Grades: 11, 12
In this course students will work on continuing to develop advanced listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills, with an emphasis
on both oral and written communication skills. Gaining fluency in the language through the use of cultural readings, situational
vocabulary, and more advanced structures will continue to be the primary focus of the course. Students will create multi-media
projects and write extensively. A variety of teaching techniques and materials will be used, on-line resources, audio recordings, and
video resources will aid in furthering competency in listening comprehension, speaking and cultural awareness.
526 Advanced Placement Spanish Language
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
World Language
Grades: 11, 12
Grade of 84% or higher in 525
The Advanced Placement Spanish course is an intensive course of instruction that follows the AP Spanish Language curriculum and
continues to develop all four communication skills. Through the use of vocabulary enrichment, varied reading materials, and
discussion on a variety of topics, students will be able to communicate more effectively in written and spoken Spanish. Audio and
video tapes, as well as on-line resources will aid in furthering competency in listening comprehension, speaking, and cultural
awareness. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to earn the AP grade weight.
531 German I /College Prep
1.0 Credit
World Language
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Students will develop basic communicative proficiency through a variety of oral and written activities: stories, dialogues, teacherstudent interaction, small group activities, readings, songs and games, as well as through use of a strongly integrated audio, video
and software program. Students will be introduced to the customs and culture of the German speaking people, learning about a
typical student’s family and school life, sports and other past-time activities, shopping, and eating out.
532 German II /College Prep
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
World Language
Successful completion of 531
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Students will continue to develop their communicative proficiency through storytelling, role-playing, readings, and interacting with
the teacher and their classmates, as well as through use of a strongly integrated audio, video, and software program. Grammar and
vocabulary will be expanded as students cover topics such as giving directions, shopping for gifts, talking about past vacations, and
food and physical activities as they relate to health. Students will exchange letters with e-pals in German speaking countries in order
to more personally expand their understanding of the culture. Student Travel Abroad Opportunity to Germany. There is travel
available to Germany. Teacher in the department will have the pertinent information about the program.
533 German III/College Prep
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
World Language
Grades: 11, 12
Successful completion of 532
It is strongly recommended that German II was completed with a minimum grade of 84% to be successful in this
course.
Students will continue to develop their communicative proficiency through storytelling, role-playing, and interacting with the
teacher and their classmates, as well as through use of a strongly integrated audio, video, and software program. Particular
emphasis will be placed on practicing real-life situations one might encounter on a trip to a German speaking nation. Students will
read traditional folk and fairy tales, as well as more contemporary stories. An additional video series will help students hone their
listening and speaking skills, and gain an ever-growing awareness of the culture and customs of the people. Student Travel Abroad
Opportunity to Germany. There is travel available to Germany. Teacher in the department will have the pertinent information about
the program.
561
1.0 Credit
Latin I
World Language
Grades: 09, 10, 11, 12
This course is intended to introduce the students to the structure and syntax of the Latin language, and to examine the parallels
between Latin and English syntax, structure, and vocabulary. This course will enable students to translate and compose introductory
Latin. Students will be guided through the reading of elementary passages, as well as in the preparation of projects. Latin is the
foundational language of the sciences, medicine and law; students pursuing these fields after high school should consider Latin a
prerequisite. This course will also benefit students taking the SAT and ACT.
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Administrative Technologies
The Administrative Technologies Department at Springfield High School is designed to provide students the option of becoming
involved in specific aspects of the business and technology world that parallels their personal and career interests. Students have
the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in business and to function more efficiently in the
technologically driven 21st Century. The program develops lifelong learning skills that foster flexible career paths and confidence
in adapting to a workplace that demands constant retooling.
630 Introduction to Web Design
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
This course assumes no previous experience in web design. Students learn to identify the components and characteristics of high
quality sites and how to create them. The class covers file structure and organization, basic graphic editing as well as color and
design strategies. We also explore some creative and fun features including Flash animation, sound and interaction. The class
culminates with the creation of an all-inclusive web site displaying all their work in this class.
631 Web Design II
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Successful completion of 630
Web Design 2 takes students to the next level in web design. Students have the opportunity to explore their different areas of
interest and develop skills in those areas. While the first few classes are review and refresher exercises, we then move onto lessons
on problem solving, team building and design. Later lessons are specific to the group's interests. Some topics you might want to
explore include: editing HTML5 code, Dreamweaver, CSS, Flash websites, Flash animation, Flash Games and debugging JavaScripts.
642 Desktop Publishing
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
This course will provide hands-on experience in publication and communication: Students learn to make professional looking
documents such as brochures, stationery, business cards, flyers, programs, newsletters, children stories, etc. using Microsoft
Publisher. Each student will develop a portfolio of work to document creativity as text and graphics are brought together to create
effective design. Principles of layout and design, graphic design techniques, and publishing terminology are stressed. Opportunities
for creativity, problem solving and decision making are provided in a fun and relaxed classroom environment where students know
what they have to do, when it is due and are given the time to do their best work.
646 Photoshop I
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop. Students will explore the questions that
face today’s Photoshop artist and provide some educated answers through the use of Adobe Photoshop’s digital tools and features.
Students will learn basic graphic design principles while creating, editing, and manipulating images. Students will use basic and
advanced editing tools of Photoshop to create logos, movie posters, magazine covers, and digital collages.
647 Photoshop II
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 645
This course merges and expands on prior knowledge and skills learned in Photoshop I. The course requires students to research and
analyze all components of the design process and sets the stage for independent design projects. This course teaches students more
advanced digital techniques using Photoshop CS5 including but not limited to: image manipulation through masking and layers,
multiple selection methods, saving and exporting, scanning, retouching, pen tool, and cutting edge techniques used in industry
today.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
904A Computer Applications
0.5 credit
Human, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9,10,11,12
‘Computer Applications’ is designed to develop microcomputer skills with a primary emphasis on the Microsoft Office application
suite with the extension to collaborative, cloud computing resources. Software programs include word processing, database
development, spreadsheets, and presentation creation. This course is an introductory, software application class that is selfdirected. Resources allow students the opportunity to complete at a basic, intermediate or advanced level and include study
materials for Microsoft Office Certification. Google Apps for education will be incorporated into the course. The introduction will
include the suite of tools including Docs, Sheets, Slides and Sites. The emphasis of this introduction will focus on the collaborative
advantages of these using the tools in group projects and ubiquitous Internet-based editing.
945 Introduction to Programming
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
This course allows students to explore the field of computer programming. Students learn basic programming functions as their
develop problem solving strategies and critical thinking skills. Students will create design, write, and develop console and Graphical
User Interface (GUI) applications. Topics focus on the object-oriented paradigm, control and decision structures, loops, parameters,
modular programming, the software development process, documentation, debugging, validation and testing.
946 There’s An App for That: Mobile App Development
0.5 credit
Human, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11,12
‘There’s An App for That’ is a course where creativity, problem solving, and technology skills converge to design mobile apps for
smart phones. Areas of interdisciplinary study will include computer programming, database management, web design, video
production, marketing, and graphics (Adobe Photoshop & Illustrator). Course emphasis is placed on collaborative team work
throughout the process of idea generation, design document creation, prototyping, technical development, and testing of mobile
applications. The capstone of the course is focused on research and development of a mobile application that has the potential to
make the SHS experience better for students, parents, or staff. (* It is suggested that students have an android device for this
course, but emulators are available)
951 Emerging Technologies/Tech Support
0.5 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Teacher Recommendation
Grades: 10, 11, 12
This class is for those individuals who have a serious interest in computers and technology and are considering a career in IT. This
class will focus on troubleshooting hardware/software issues throughout the building while working in conjunction with the High
School and District Tech Departments. When students are not troubleshooting or assisting others in the building, they will work
independently in a structured environment to develop digital literacy skills by learning about the latest topics in technology.
955A Introduction to Business
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grade: 10, 11, 12
This course introduces students to the world of business: how they are planned, organized, created, and make or lose money in our
economic system. Students learn about the different fields of study within business and the career opportunities that exist in each
field. In addition to the textbook, students discuss real business issues and current events directly related to business the economy
and consumers.
965 Business II
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grade: 10, 11, 12
This course continues our exploration of business; different fields of study within business and careers possible for young people
with an understanding of business. In addition to the textbook, students discuss real business issues and current events directly
related to business the economy and consumers. To add a little more fun to the class, students buy and sell stocks in the online
Simulated Stock Market game where the winners walk away with small prizes and big bragging rights.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
956 Marketing
1.0 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
This course presents marketing as a set of skills and knowledge combined with economics, finance, and career planning to create
strategic plans. Students learn the foundations and functions needed to successfully market goods, services, and ideas to consumers.
Professional development, customer service, and technology are presented as keys to students' success. While students study
business, economics, selling, human relations, communications, distribution, promotion, product planning, and pricing, they also see
marketing as a career choice. Marketing is recommended for students considering a university major in Business Administration,
Marketing and Communications.
958A Money Management
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
In this course, students will discover how career choices affect future income. They will learn how taxes and wages can affect their
lives. The students will build a resume in order to properly market themselves. They will explore the banking and credit system,
including checking accounts and maintaining proper financial records. The students will understand how to properly manage their
money by creating buying plans, setting limits and maintain a personal budget. The students will understand the costs, pitfalls and
benefits of credit. Upon completion of this course the students will be able to use the tools necessary to live a financially
responsible life. This course fulfills the Personal Finance & Money Management credit requirement.
963 Accounting I
1.0 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Students will learn to maintain financial records using basic accounting procedures. Included is instruction in the full accounting
cycle of a sole proprietorship, as well as a corporation, with the significance of accounting on management decisions. Students will
explore accounting as a career and adapt accounting procedures to personal finances. Accounting is recommended for those who
are considering a university major in business or accounting.
This course fulfills the Personal Finance & Money Management credit requirement.
964 Accounting II
1.0 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Successful completion of 963
This course offers proficiency in basic and complex accounting procedures for corporations. Principles of a merchandising business
and corporation structures will be approached realistically. This course is designed for students who hope to own a business or
follow a career in accounting.
Advanced Placement Courses
980 Advanced Placement Computer Science (A)
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Successful completion of 945 and either has completed or be currently enrolled in Algebra II
This advanced placement course is offered to those students with excellent problem solving ability and a keen interest in computer
science as a career. The focus of this course is to provide students with a conceptual background in computer science. The major
emphasis is on programming methodology, algorithm design, and object oriented programming in the Java language. This course
prepares a student for advanced placement in a college computer science program by means of the Advanced Placement Exam. All
students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the College Board’s Advanced Placement Exam.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
981 Advanced Placement Microeconomics
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Completed or currently enrolled in Algebra II
This is a college level course that introduces students to the concept that economic questions exist because of scarcity, wants
exceed the resources available to satisfy them, choices must be made and cost–benefit analysis can be used to understand and
explore the smaller segments of the economy such as consumers and producers and how they interact in output markets and
resource markets, and of course the impact of government policies on these economic units. This course follows approved AP
curriculum. Students must take and pass the AP exam to be eligible to receive college credit.
000 AP Computer Science Principles Arriving 2017-2018
1 credit
Human, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9,10,11,12
AP Computer Science Principles is a new AP course offered by College Board which introduces students to the foundational concepts
of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. With a unique focus on
creative problem solving and real-world applications, AP Computer Science Principles prepares students for college and career. This
course exposes students to a broad range of technology concepts with the goal of creating leaders in computer science fields. Big
ideas include creativity, abstraction, data and information, algorithms, programming, the Internet, and global impact.
000 AP Macroeconomics
1 credit
Arriving 2017-2018
Human, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11,12
The purpose of the AP course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that
apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level
determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization
policies, economic growth, and international economics
Family and Consumer Sciences
601 Fundamentals of Foods and Nutrition
0.5 credit
Lab Fee: $25
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
This course introduces students to the art and science of cooking. Students will learn how to prepare foods focusing on the areas of
dairy, vegetable, meats and grains as well as foods from many different cultures. Students will also be participating in the original
recipe competition at Celebration of the Arts. The final exam will help focus on how current food choices will affect their health
today as well as in the future. Students have the opportunity to explore careers in the foods and nutrition industry.
602 Focus on Foods and Nutrition
0.5 credit
Lab Fee: $25
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
In this course, students use up-to-date technologies such as the food processor, microwave and convection oven to prepare both
familiar and new dishes. Culinary principles will be applied to foods including eggs, chicken and Fruit. Students will prepare
traditional and interesting foods such as chicken parmesan, Hungarian goulash and baked Alaska. Using sophisticated diet analysis
software, students will evaluate numerous foods as well as their overall nutritional health. Students have the opportunity to explore
careers in the foods and nutrition industry.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
603 Advanced Food Preparation
1.0 credit
Lab Fee: $45
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Successful completion of 601 or 602
Advanced Food Preparation is for any student who wants to learn the tricks involved in making even a simple meal look exciting and
complicated. This course includes the study of advanced cooking techniques used in the preparation of such foods as soups, sauces,
gingerbread houses and much more. Home cooking projects utilize complex diet analysis software to aid in meal planning. Regional
cuisines including French, Italian, Chinese, and American will be examined in detail. Test your skills by designing and creating a piece
of edible art for the cake decorating competition at Celebration of the Arts.
605A The Science of Food through the Lifespan
.5 credit
Lab Fee: $35
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Successful completion of 601 or 602
Travel your life span on culinary terms. How should you eat to maintain a healthy body? What foods should be consumed or
avoided during pregnancy? What foods help an infant thrive? How do you feed yourself well when you are on very tight
budget? How do nutritional needs change as we age? Learn the answers to these questions as well as many others such as the
science behind candy making and how our environment affects our food needs and choices.
611 Interior Design and Housing
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
In this course students will study the elements of interior design and learn how to use them in various living environments. Students
will design floor plans and analyze room usage and traffic patterns in order to determine the best ways to utilize the space and
furnishings. Color schemes as well as furniture styles, selection and placement will be examined by both personal experimentation
and computer. Major projects include a personal home improvement project and a dream room design and presentation board.
620 Child Development
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
This course deals with the development of a child and the issues s/he may face as they grow up. The influence of the family and the
impact of the way basic needs are met early in life are examined. Students will study and practice practical ways to communicate
with both children & adults. Differences between boys and girls will be observed and analyzed as well as each facet of how a child
developments. Special relevant issues such as labor and childbirth, the importance of play and the building of good self-esteem will
be discussed. This is a valuable course for those interested in career areas such as early childhood/elementary or secondary
education, day care supervision, special ed, social work, child psychology, pediatric medicine and parenting.
621 Child Development II: Preschool
1.0 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Strongly recommended to take Child Development as a prerequisite to CD II
This course allows students to study the development of children in a more up close and personal way by working with real children,
ages 3-4 years old, in a preschool setting. Students will have the opportunity to gain skills writing lesson plans, teaching lessons, and
supervising activities in Rainbow Junction, our in-house preschool program, all while learning to work with a team of fellow
classmates. Students will discover how to motivate, discipline, and supervise children while learning how to plan age-appropriate
lessons and activities. This course provides a more practical, in-depth hands-on experience for students who are interested in
working with children in any capacity.
622 Child Development III: Advanced
.5 OR 1.0 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Prerequisite:
Successful completion of 621, teacher approval and you must be willing to walk or provide
your own transportation every day, rain or shine, to the Springfield Literacy Center or other
assigned elementary school campus.
This course offers the opportunity to work at one of the district's elementary schools under the supervision of the Child
Development Instructor. Students will teach lessons, create visual displays, work with children in small groups, and generally assist
the cooperating teacher during the period they are in the elementary school classroom. This course provides an excellent
opportunity for valuable, hands-on classroom experience all while exploring a variety of aspects of teaching. Students will report to
their assigned school each day as well as complete various practical assignments for the Child Development Instructor. Students
must be self-motivated and able to work well independently.
640 Real World: Managing Relationships and Money
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
This course fulfills the Personal Finance and Money Management requirement.
Life on your own will be the focus of this course. Managing your own checkbook,establishing good credit, determining costs for
major life events (wedding, buying a house, having a baby) will all be examined as well as learning to handle paying monthly bills
while balancing personal and family life. The psychology of relationships and higher level communication skills are the focus while
integrating all parts of financial matters during the life cycle. Practical, hands-on methods are applied for successful learning.
Research strategies are developed and curriculum directed projects are worked on in cooperative groups.
641 Core Communication and Future Planning Skills
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grade: 9
This course is strongly recommended for all freshmen. The design of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of
communication and the psychology of relationships. The emphasis is on verbal and nonverbal communication and relationship
intelligence. Several practical exercises in public speaking will provide the students with oratorical experience needed in postsecondary education and the world of work. The essential elements of this course revolve around The 7 Habits of Highly Effective
Teens. The students will investigate a career path, write a resume, practice interviewing techniques, and learn fundamental
relationship skills to better communicate with family, teachers, peers, bosses, and coworkers. These components are designed to
meet the individual needs of all students as they pursue their high school education
Industrial Technology
701A Industrial Materials I
1 Semester - .5 credit
Lab Fee:
$35
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9,10,11,12
The Industrial Materials program is described as “Creativity through Problem Solving.” Students have every opportunity to design
and create amazing pieces of decorative and functional art from beautiful woods. Students will develop an appreciation for fine
quality and attention to detail through their creations. Industrial Materials I is just the first of four levels that students can
experience in the program – many families have a house full of beautiful furniture built entirely by hand from these courses. Take
this first-level course to gain the expertise and hopefully have your creations published nationally as many students have already
achieved. Design examples include detailed jewelry boxes, clocks, small pieces of furniture, or anything that your mind can create!
Even if you have absolutely no experience, you should expect success and be prepared to take home pieces you will be extremely
proud to display. Evaluation is based on safe lab procedures and work habits. Emphasis is placed on meeting individual needs,
working safely, and preparing for “Celebration of the Arts” to showcase student work. Please view over 100 student creations at
www.ssdcougars.org/webpage/gtrout and be amazed!
702 Industrial Materials II
Full year - 1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Successful completion of 701
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
In Industrial Materials II students will refine their problem-solving and creative skills practiced in Industrial Materials I and work on
advanced techniques such as creating intricate moldings, carvings, or any design their minds can create as part of their artistic
masterpiece. Students have virtually no limitations in their designs and have the opportunity to receive advanced instruction
through open lab work sessions after school and in the evenings. Our students have designed nearly every piece of furniture
imaginable over the past 28 years and have been featured in 33 national and international publications, as well as displayed at the
Philadelphia Furniture Show. Projects include complete bedroom and dining room sets, pool tables, sideboards, armoires, pianos,
harpsichords, Victorian desks, and even a Model –T truck. Course activities will require students to design and create a major piece
of furniture…or more! Evaluation is based on lab procedures, safe work habits, and preparation for the “Celebration of the Arts” to
showcase student work to the public. Please view over 100 student creations at www.ssdcougars.org/webpages/gtrout and be
amazed! These advanced students are responsible for their chosen materials.
703
Industrial Materials III
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Successful completion of 702 and teacher approval
Two years of Industrial Materials II, Independent Studies are available and encouraged for those students who truly wish to make
the most incredible artistic creations possible! View www.ssdcougars.org/webpages/gtrout highly motivated students may exceed
1.0 credits per year if their schedule permits. These advanced students are responsible for their chosen materials.
710 Architectural Design I
1.0 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
This very popular course has been designed to meet student’s desires to learn more about architectural design and engineering
concepts. Emphasis will be placed on floor plan configurations, traffic flow patterns, adding twenty first century amenities, interior
design, elevation drawings, understanding typical wall elevations/exploded views, landscape design and the use of a 3D virtual
reality software. Model Building will bring the theory to reality as students will build their “Dream House” from balsa wood in ¼ inch
scale. Creativity, accuracy of plans to models and craftsmanship exhibited in building the model will be measured for final grade.
Technical sketches will provide students with rendering skills (to shade their elevations) and be required in the areas of pencil, ink
and colored prisma-color. Models and Technical Sketches will be put on display and judged at the annual Celebration of the Arts.
715 Engineering: Structural Design
0.5 Credit
Lab Fee:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
$35
This course offers students opportunities to explore pre-engineering and design concepts. Instruction will feature elements of the
STEM curriculum (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math ). A fully functional lab with computers, engineering conceptual
modules and industry leading equipment will assist students in grasping content and assembling prototypes. The project based
curriculum emphasizes creativity in design, materials and construction techniques used today and in the future. Areas of study will
include: architectural design and layout, structural engineering, manufacturing/building techniques and green energy alternatives.
Solid Works and Google Sketch-Up software will enhance design creativity in a supportive learning environment. The course has
been developed to provide twenty-first century technology, combined with a team approach to create solutions generated by design
challenges. Design briefs are used to describe the real life situation to provide an authentic learning experience. Students interested
in exploring engineering as a career and learning while having fun should strongly consider this course!
716 Fabrication Technology: Robotics
0.5 Credit
Lab Fee:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
$35
Have you ever wanted to build a Robot or UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle)? Use a Laser Engraver to etch images onto products?
Program a CNC Mill to fabricate distinct parts? . . . . Then our new Fabrication Technology course is for YOU!
This course offers students opportunities to explore pre-engineering concepts in robotics, design and fabrication. Instruction will
feature elements of STEM curricula (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math). A fully functional lab with computers, engineering
conceptual modules and industry leading equipment will assist students in grasping the content. Projects will include fabrication and
programming of a robot, and designing and manufacturing using a CNC/Laser. Course emphasis will be placed on a hands-on
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
curriculum that features creativity in design, and materials and fabrication techniques used today and in the future. Areas of study
will include: CNC G-Code programming, robotics engineering, laser technology and manufacturing and assembly techniques related
to core design prototypes. Solid Works and Google Sketch-Up software will enhance design creativity in a tech driven learning
environment. This course has been developed to provide twenty-first century technology, combined with a team approach to create
solutions generated by design challenges. Design briefs are used to describe real life situations to provide an authentic learning
experience. Students interested in understanding how products are fabricated should join us in exploring engineering in an entirely
new way.
731A Graphic Arts & Design I
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
SHS Graphic Design I is a semester long class that gives students the opportunity to learn and apply design principles and industry
standards of graphic arts and design. Using art, color, design, layout and typography, the SHS Graphic Design I students will be able
to create professional looking illustrations and designs. They will choose, alter, and manipulate art both mechanically and digitally
to produce various visual images and forms. Students will learn how to use Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, as well as traditional
design tools and techniques.
This is a project based course that teaches the necessary skills though hands-on application. Students will demonstrate the skills
learned through a variety of challenging design projects. Projects include: Cover design- magazine cover (Semester 1) or cover
design for the Springfield Press St. Patrick’s Day edition (Semester 2). Holiday Greeting Card design, Company Branding project
including logo design, and business cards. Final project: Inspirational Typography poster. Students will use acquired typography
and design skills to create a wide format poster with an inspirational message for incoming freshmen to SHS. There is no limit to
creativity. A good imagination, combined with acquired technical skills over the course of the semester, will provide for a great
learning experience that can be transferred to other areas of academic, as well as occupational life.
732 Graphic Arts & Design II
1.0 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 731
Grades: 10, 11, 12
This is a yearlong, project-based course that develops career and communication skills in print production and graphic design, using
Adobe tools and various output media.
These key skills are developed in a spiral-each project adds more challenging skills to foundation proficiencies. Students experience
subject areas and skills across careers in graphic design, photography, print and layout design, and production.
Course Content:
▫ Understanding the fundamentals of design
▫ Applying the Design Problem Solving Process
▫ Advanced understanding of the Adobe tools and where best to apply them. (Adobe Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop, and
Bridge)
▫ Peer editing and evaluation in a collaborative environment
▫ Technical image manipulation and print publishing skills
▫ Digital and hand illustration, and coloring/shading
▫ Communication and collaboration with peers and team members, using project plans or specifications
▫ Technical graphic and print-production skills such as creating vector-based graphics and filters. Scanning and digital touch
up, understanding resolution and image size for different outputs.
▫ Design solutions, including multi-page and double-page layouts
▫ Possible Projects:
▫ Brochure/Newsletter
InDesign/Photoshop
▫ Digital Ap Design
Illustrator
▫ Prisma-Color Design Project
Illustrator and Prisma Pencils
▫ Branding (Multiple projects)
Illustrator/InDesign
▫ Packaging Design
Illustrator
▫ Info-graphic Poster
Illustrator
733 Graphic Arts & Design III – Advanced Print and Digital Media
1.0 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
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Grades: 11, 12
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 732 and teacher recommendation
This is a yearlong, project-based course that develops career aptitude for graphic design through application. Graphic Arts and
Design III students will provide the SHS District and community a service in print production and graphic design based on district and
community requests/needs.
▫ SHS School District print production using graphic design tools
▫ Individual Digital Portfolio creation using Adobe tools
Through district and community projects, Independent Study students will experience real world challenges in graphic design and
print production.
734 New Course: Digital Painting and Illustration
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Digital Painting and Illustration is a semester long course that focuses on digital computer painting and illustration techniques.
Students will learn to use the tools and techniques of digital painting using Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and a Wacom tablet to
produce digital art. Students will also learn basic drawing skills, the traditional drawing concepts of basic composition and design,
the use of shadows and highlights to create the illusion of volume, and how to use atmospheric and linear perspective to create the
illusion of space.
Students will explore how these skills can be used with applications to the fields of game design and animation, such as animation
backgrounds, textures for 3D animation, concept art, and illustration.
Communications & Video Production
770
Television Production: Multi-Camera Production
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
This course focuses on multi-camera video productions. Students learn the basics of scriptwriting, directing, audio, lighting, camera
operation, and graphics for video. These skills are incorporated into the production of a series of video projects that include
instructional videos, public service announcements, and dramatic scenes. Students will learn how to use the equipment in the
studio setting, and then over the course of the semester, will also learn how to transport and set up the equipment on
location. Students who have taken this class will have the opportunity to participate in the recording and broadcast of special
televised events such as COTA and the Dance Marathon.
771
Television Production: Film-Style Production
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Much of today's video production equipment is portable; therefore, many productions are shot on location. The course teaches
students to create videos that are shot on location and edited in the studio. Emphasis is placed on the writing of treatments, scripts,
and storyboards, single camera shooting, and non-linear editing techniques. Students will work in small teams and produce a series
of videos including (but not limited to) a stop-motion animation, a Public Service Announcement, a music video, and a short
film. Students who have taken this class will have the opportunity to participate in the recording and broadcast of special televised
events such as COTA and the Dance Marathon.
773
Broadcast Journalism
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Successful completion of 770 or 771
Grades: 11, 12
In Broadcast Journalism, students will be taught the skills of story selection, news writing and delivery, along with basic and
advanced TV Production skills. The class will produce weekly announcements for the high school delivered via the web. In addition,
students will produce a series of news reports on various subjects that will be shown in the high school, and on SETv. Students in
this class will be assigned a specific job or leadership role based on their abilities and experience, and will treat their time in the class
like a work day in a television news studio. Students who have taken this class will have the opportunity to participate in the
recording and broadcast of special televised events such as COTA and the Dance Marathon.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
774
Advanced Video Production
0.5 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Successful completion of 770 & 771
Grades: 11, 12
Advanced Video Production provides the opportunity for students who have succeeded in the other video production classes to
further develop their skills. This course is intended for students who have completed both Multi-Camera Video Production (770) and
Film-Style Video Production (771). Students in this class will work individually and in small groups producing content for The Growl,
our weekly video announcement program, as well as content for SETv, the district cable channel. Work in this class may also include
special projects at the request of the staff and administration of SHS. In addition to the video equipment and editing software used
in previous classes, students in this class will also learn basic special effects through Adobe AfterEffects. This class requires a strong
work ethic and a high standard for quality since all work completed for this class is intended for broadcast inside and outside of the
school building.
776 Documentary Video Production
0.5 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Successful completion of 771
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Documentary Video Production is an advanced-level video production course that allows students to work individually on three
documentary videos of increasing length. The choice of subject matter is completely the prerogative of the student. Students will
work through the entire process of developing an idea, doing research, collecting interviews, storyboarding, writing, shooting, and
editing. All completed videos will be considered for broadcast on SETv, and may be entered into contests, when available. This is a
perfect class for a creative, tech-savvy student who wants the opportunity to work individually, and produce projects that could be
used as a portfolio piece or demo reel in the future.
*839
0.5 credit
Public Speaking
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
HAC Access
Students will become comfortable in speaking before an audience in formal and informal situations. Students in this course will
participate in a variety of speaking situations including informative, persuasive, and narrative. They will evaluate speeches, express
individual opinions, and work on speech projects with peers. The instructor and the class will evaluate the performance of speaking
exercises based on specific oral presentation skills instructed in class. Students will also learn the language of communication and
the importance of both verbal and nonverbal communication when communicating with an audience. Students will realize the value
and skill of integrating technology to enhance presentations.
*840
Introduction to Acting
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
HAC Access
Students will develop self-confidence in this course, both as performers and as individuals. They will receive a general orientation to
the Stanislavski "Method" of acting. Course activities include extensive work in improvisation, characterization, stage movement,
monologues, and scene work. Class and teacher viewing of performances and class participation are included in the evaluation of
students.
*842
0.5 credit
Prerequisite:
Advanced Acting
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Successful completion of Introduction to Acting
Grades: 10,11,12
HAC Access
Delving further into the acting skills and techniques introduced in "Introduction to Acting", students will explore and perform
contrasting monologues from published plays, as well as one scene in a safe and supportive atmosphere. Understanding the
dramatic text, communicating with a fellow actor, and discovering personal connections to a character and scene are just some of
the benefits of this class. Public performance will again be stressed with students performing scenes and plays on stage at
Celebration of the Arts.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
*850 Principles of Leadership
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10,11,12
HAC Access
Prerequisite:
Students taking this course should be part of a leadership structure for a sports team, club, or other organization.
Students may be required to submit a leadership profile for review.
This course will engage students in determining their own strengths and weaknesses as leaders. It will enable students to overcome
leadership obstacles so that their student-run activities or sports teams can be efficient, organized, and exciting. Students will
explore 17 leadership characteristics by examining both current and historical leaders and role models and then utilize these
characteristics in classroom leadership activities. The reading and analysis of current leadership models, publications, and other
literature will allow the students to apply the concepts to their developing leadership style. Guest speakers will make presentations
to the class.
Art
801 Studio Art
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Studio Art provides the opportunity for beginning art students as well as more advanced students to experiment with concepts,
methods, and materials in the following areas: design, drawing, print-making, painting and 3-D design. By studying the contributions
of artists past and present and participating in studio work and critiques, students will gain a more critical appreciation of the value
of art. Students will use the Internet as a research tool for art historical information. Students will be required to enter at least one
piece of their artwork in the Celebration of the Arts exhibit. Students are required to supply an artist’s sketchbook.
803 Drawing and Design
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
This course will allow students to study fine art and commercial art in depth and develop a strong portfolio. Students will explore
career opportunities in art and discuss art careers with an art school representative. Students will focus on observational drawing
skills, principles of design, and color theory. Students will regularly engage in self, peer, and group critiques. Students will use the
Internet as a research tool for art historical information as well as becoming familiar with contemporary artists. Students will be
required to enter at least one piece of their artwork in the Celebration of the Arts exhibit. Students are required to supply an artist’s
sketchbook.
805 Painting and Drawing
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Students in this course will develop drawing techniques in pencil, charcoal, pastel, and pen and ink as they are used in fine and
commercial art. Course activities will include participation in self, peer, and group critiques; exploration of career opportunities in
art; familiarization with significant periods in art history; exhibition of work in local, regional and national competitions; and the
opportunity to draw life and imagination. Students will develop painting techniques as they are used in fine and commercial art.
Media used in class may include tempera, acrylic, and watercolor. Students will use the Internet as a research tool for art historical
information. Students will be required to enter their work in the Celebration of the Arts exhibit. Students are required to supply an
artist’s sketchbook.
807 Honors Art
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Successful completion of two of the following courses: 801, 803, or 805
Students going onto Advanced Placement Art will use this class to begin developing the breadth sections of their Advanced
Placement Portfolio. This course will provide a variety of experiences in the formal, technical, and expressive means available to an
artist. Students will explore career opportunities in art, discuss art careers with an art school representative, refine their observation
skills, research art historical information on the Internet, and become familiar with contemporary artists. Students will hang an
exhibit of their work at the Celebration of the Arts. All Honors Art students will be required to have a large sketchbook and also a
small sketchbook used for the purpose of outside independent required projects. This course is designed for the serious art student
contemplating art school.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
809 Printmaking
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
This course will expand artistic expression, technical skills, and knowledge of the use and meaning of the print. Lessons include but
are not limited to: mono-print, collograph, relief, intaglio, and silkscreen processes. Students will make historical, cultural and crosscurricular connections. Art work will build on previous experiences in art and knowledge of the Elements of Art and the Principles of
Design. Students will use the Internet to research a variety of contemporary and historical prints and the artists who created them.
Students will try experimental and collaborative activities; participate in critiques; and exhibit their work in the Celebration of the
Arts.
811 Functional Ceramics
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Lab Fee: $18
Ever look around your home and notice all the functional objects made of clay? Plates, cups, mugs, pitchers, platters, vases, salt and
pepper shakers, bowls… Ever wish you could learn to make pottery on the potter’s wheel? Here’s your chance to create some
amazingly beautiful and functional pottery for your own use. Is it easy? Not always. Will you get dirty? Yes. Will it be worth all the
effort and the dirt? Absolutely! You’ll have the opportunity to experiment with a wide variety of concepts, methods and
techniques. While learning about cultural artistic heritage and participating in studio work and critiques, you’ll create original
designs for your own functional pottery. Using handbuilding techniques and the potter’s wheel, you’ll bring your designs to life.
Digital portfolios are used to document your progress, processes and problem-solving strategies. All students are required to enter
at least one piece in the Celebration of the Arts exhibit. **There is an $18 lab fee for this course.
813 Sculptural Ceramics
0.5 credit
Lab Fee: $18
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
At the core of this course are the basic questions of any artist: How does your sculpture reflect who you are, what you think and
what you feel? As a sculptor, how do I communicate meaning? You will have the unique opportunity to explore the world of
sculptural ceramics – by studying contemporary ceramic sculptors such as Victor Spinski, Beth Cavener Stichter, John Brickels and
Adrian Arleo. This project-based course links studio work and critiques to artistic/cultural heritage. Students will focus on meaning
and symbolism in art as it relates to their artwork and to the artwork of professional artists; continually asking themselves how their
in-class learning connects with their lives and to the larger world of art. The Internet is used as a research tool. Using a digital
portfolio, students will document their progress and problem-solving strategies. Students are required to enter at least one piece in
the Celebration of the Arts exhibit. **There is an $18 lab fee for this course.
815 Tile Making: Impression and Expression
0.5 credit
Lab Fee:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
$18
A unique combination of drawing and ceramics, the tile artwork at Celebration of the Arts never fails to delight and inspire the
viewers. Students learn several techniques for creating tiles, including stamping, mold making, picture mosaics and traditional
mosaics. All the phases of tile making, including creating an original design, working with clay, glazing, gluing and grouting, will be
experienced firsthand. This exciting course focuses on personal expression as it is linked to artistic and cultural heritage – specifically
Pennsylvania tile artists - and on participation in studio work and critiques. . The Internet is used as a research tool. Using a digital
portfolio, students will document their progress and problem-solving strategies. Students are required to enter at least one piece in
the Celebration of the Arts exhibit. **There is an $18 lab fee for this course.
817 Primitive Ceramics: Earth, Air, Fire and Water
0.5 credit
Lab Fee: $18
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
We go seriously old school in Primitive Ceramics. By experimenting with primitive techniques including: creating your own clay
bodies (meaning we will walk to the creek and dig up and process our own clay), burnishing, smoke-firing, traditional and horsehair
raku, and alternative finishes (we often use fire as a tool in this course). The results are often unpredictable and always
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beautiful. Focusing on independent research and design; students study several early civilizations and their hand-constructed
pottery-making/sculpture techniques. The Internet is used as a research tool. Using a digital portfolio, students will document their
progress and problem-solving strategies. Students are required to enter at least one piece in the Celebration of the Arts exhibit.
**There is an $18 lab fee for this course.
819 Sculpture
0.5 credit
Lab Fee: $18
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
How often in your lifetime are you going to get the opportunity to carve stone?! Here’s your chance to take on an unusual
challenge. This rigorous and exciting course provides the opportunity for students to explore the fine art of sculpture. Areas of study
include sculptural aesthetics, history, criticism and production. Students will explore major principles, concepts, techniques,
materials, and tools of the sculptor. While the main project in this course is a stone carving using alabaster or soapstone, we also use
a variety of other materials such as plaster, Pariscraft, found objects, clay, paper and wood on smaller projects. In this project-based
course, students do independent online research and create original designs for their sculptures. Using a digital portfolio, students
will document their progress and problem-solving strategies. Students are required to enter at least one piece in the Celebration of
the Arts exhibit. **There is an $18 lab fee for this course.
824 Special Effects Photography
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Special Effects Photography allows students to successful expand their technical knowledge of photographic techniques by
experimenting with effects photography. Examples of assignments are light drawing, Bokeh, compositing, double exposure, tilt shift,
grunge, HDR, and many other lens effects. With the help of high end photographic equipment and editing suites such as Adobe
Photoshop and lightroom students will push their imagination to create unique imagery. During the creative process students will
need to solve challenging creative problems unlike any other course offered at SHS. The course is constructed to make even the
amateur photographer successful. Students may borrow a digital camera from the photography department, but having a camera of
their own would be extremely beneficial. Please visit the SHS photography website at www.shsphotography.shutterfly.com for
information and examples of projects. Like all special area courses, student work will be proudly displayed in Celebration of the Arts
near the end of the 2nd semester. There is a $25 lab fee for this course and a mandatory online waiver form that must be completed
to borrow equipment.
826 Portrait Photography
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Portrait Photography’s focus is the creative process of depicting people from strangers to friends and family. Students will explore
portraiture utilizing many photographic techniques and projects such as self-portraiture, faceless portrait, indoor and outdoor
portraiture, pet/ animal photography, multiple subject portraiture, and sports photography. Along with class assignments students
will photograph their environment and learn about photographic journalism. They will have the option to submit their work for
publication in various school and community outlets such as the Spri-Hian, Yearbook, the district website, and others. Students will
learn and utilize the most basic concepts of a DSLR camera as well as their phones to produce creative and journalistic work. With
the help of high end photographic equipment and editing suites such as Adobe Photoshop and lightroom students will push their
imagination to the limits and learn in a 21st century environment. Students may borrow a digital camera from the photography
department, but having a camera of their own would be beneficial. Like all special area courses, student work will be proudly
displayed in Celebration of the Arts near the end of the 2nd semester. There is a $25 lab fee for this course and a mandatory online
waiver form that must be completed to borrow equipment.
827 Digital Photography
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Digital Photography is a course dedicated to the ever changing technological advances in the world of photography and design.
Students will have the opportunity to learn the benefits of digital imagery, how to operate Canon DLSR cameras, various lenses,
tripods, and other photographic equipment. They will also learn the role of digital photography in the world through "visual literacy"
and become acquainted with the world’s leading photograph editing software Adobe Lightroom to enhance their photographs for
print and web based interfaces. Students will complete various assignments such as panoramic, macro, still life, lowlight,
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
architectural, and minor effects photography. To complete the assignments students will have the opportunity to sign-out school
provided equipment with parental permission. Students may borrow a digital camera from the photography department, but having
a camera of their own would be beneficial. Like all special area courses, student work will be proudly displayed in Celebration of the
Arts near the end of the 2nd semester. There is a $25 lab fee for this course and a mandatory online waiver form that must be
completed to borrow equipment.
829H Honors Photography
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Successful completion of the following courses (824, 826, and 827)
This course is for the highly motivated photographer who wants to perform at a college level while still in high school. The honors
photography course is the perfect stepping stone to AP Photography and will be used as a benchmark entering the AP course (829).
This will require independent work, goal setting, planning skills, and ongoing communication with the teacher. The 15 images
created will be a combination of teacher assigned and student driven projects. Students will strengthen many photographic skills,
including comprehensive technical knowledge of their camera, professional use of software and printing output options, as well as
brainstorming critical creative problems. This course provides the experience of taking the Advancement placement course with a
more controlled workload designed deliberately to prepare students for the AP experience. Writing skills and the ability to improve
upon them are a must for the student to succeed in this independent atmosphere. Continued use of the photography journal is
expected and encouraged. Please visit the SHS photography website at www.shsphotography.shutterfly.com for information and
examples of projects. There is a lab fee for this course that will be calculated after enrollment is complete, as well as a mandatory
online waiver form that must be completed to use and borrow equipment.
Advance Placement Courses
828 Advanced Placement Studio: Art 3-D
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Successful completion of the following courses (811, 813, 815, 817, and/or 819
Teacher Recommendation Only
Lab Fee:
$18
The Advanced Placement 3-D course focuses on individual exploration and study using a broad interpretation of sculptural issues. A
variety of approaches to representation, abstraction, and expression may be part of the student’s portfolio. These may include
traditional sculpture, architectural models, apparel, ceramics, three-dimensional fiber arts or metal work. Students develop a body
of 3-D artwork which will be submitted in digital slide form to the College Board for evaluation and potential college credit.
Portfolios are made up of three sections: Quality (10 slides) • Concentration (12 slides) • Breadth (16 slides). Each student is
required to create an artist’s statement for the AP portfolio. Students must submit and complete an AP portfolio in order to receive
AP grade weight. **There is an $18 lab fee for this course.
829 Advanced Placement 2D Design Portfolio: Photography & Design
1.0 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the following courses (824, 826, and 827)
Teacher Recommendation Only
This course is for the highly motivated design student who wants to perform at a college level while still in high school. This will
require independent work, goal setting, planning skills, and ongoing communication with the teacher. The 29 images created will fill
the required “Quality,” “Concentration.” and “Breadth” sections of the College Board Advanced Placement 2D Design Portfolio.
Students will strengthen their photographic skills, including comprehensive technical knowledge of their camera, professional use of
software such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Lightroom, In-Design, and other web based applications to explore printing output
options, as well as solving creative problems. Much of the thematic design of their self-driven assignments will be based on their
proposed “Visual Idea”. The course culminates in May with the submission of a portfolio to the Ap college board, as well as
presentation of the student’s portfolio on a visual installation called a “Wall” at Celebration of the Arts.
Writing skills and the ability to improve upon them are a must for the student to succeed in this independent atmosphere. There is a
$150 lab fee for this course, an $85 dollar Advance Placement testing fee, and a mandatory online waiver form that must be
completed to borrow equipment. This course is taught completely with digital technologies. This course provides the opportunity
for students to earn honors weight by fulfilling additional requirements outside of the school day. See director for more information.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
831 Advanced Placement Studio Art: Drawing
1.0 credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Successful completion of the following courses (801, 803, 805, and 807)
Teacher Recommendation Only
This course enables highly motivated students to perform at the college level while still in high school. Students will focus on
developing a sense of excellence in art and an in-depth commitment to a particular artistic theme. These works will represent the
required Quality and Concentration sections in their Advanced Placement Portfolio. Students will strengthen their drawing skills
through intense study of the human figure, geometric compositions, and landscape. Various media will be explored in black and
white, and color. Projects will range from photo-realism to imagination compositions. Students will use the Internet as a research
tool. It is expected that all course participants will take and submit an AP portfolio in May and exhibit their work in Celebration of
the Arts. Students are expected to supply an artist’s sketchbook
Music
845 Music, Interactive Media & Your World (formerly American Music Scene)
0.5 credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
This course explores the development and patterns of popular music in the worlds that we live in and “play” in: Film, Television,
Animation, Video Game, Smart-phone, Tablet, Commercial, Advertising, and Studio Music. Students will study historical creative
processes and recordings of how music has evolved to its current state; integrating their skills to become informed consumers and
creators!
846 Music Production I
0.5 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 09, 10, 11, 12
Open to all students, Grades 9 through 12. No prior music experience required besides a devoted interest in music and the music industry OR
Sound Engineering OR Communications.
All-Inclusive Music Studio, Industry, Technology, & Composition Course. Learn about Production processes - composing, recording,
editing, mixing, mastering, and tools available to you. Functional Piano and Guitar Skills will be introduced. The physical and
compositional aspects of music, sound, recording and production techniques are explored and demonstrated. Production and PostProduction techniques are explored, with special emphasis on Music Editing, Composition, and Sound Design. Studio Lab
Assignments reinforce topics covered. Summative assessments include individual projects such as live recording, mixing and
mastering of Music Department events at Springfield High School (i.e. Winter and Spring Concerts and any events requested by
Springfield High School that our students can offer their services for) and collaborative Compositional Projects. Internships in the
Music Industry and Music Studios are explored. Springfield Record Label will be an integral, technological part of the Springfield
High School Music Department; extending curriculum to compliment interdepartmental Television, Film, Animation and
Multimedia Curriculum.
855
Symphonic Band
1.0 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Pre-requisites: Participation in the middle-school band program, previous instrumental music experience, or audition with the Band
Director.
Additional Information: This course provides the opportunity for students to earn Honors Weight by fulfilling additional requirements
outside of the school day. See Band Director for more information.
Symphonic Band is a performance, academic, and co-curricular ensemble open to students in Woodwind, Brass, and Percussion
students in Grades 9 through 12. Students study and rehearse Band and Wind Ensemble literature of various styles and difficulty in
this class. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals of musicianship. Students refine performance technique and ensemble playing.
Performances, concerts, and rehearsals outside of the school day are required. Students are encouraged to study privately on their
individual instruments. As a co-curricular class, students enrolled in Symphony Orchestra/Band are expected to participate in
Marching Band; the performance ensemble who participates in Parades and events for our Springfield and Morton communities.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Exemptions from specific marching band performances, rehearsals, or events during the fall may be considered at the discretion of
the Band Director. Please see springfieldcougarsmusic.org for the two kinds of Marching Band tracks we offer at Springfield High
School; “Parade Band” and full-time “Marching Band”.
857 Orchestra
1.0 Credit
Humanities or Music Credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Orchestra is an ensemble of performers who play stringed instruments. String players are eligible for inclusion by participation in the
middle school program or by audition with the instructor. Standard orchestra literature and lighter selections are rehearsed and
performed to gain an understanding of various periods and styles of music. Required concerts and performances are presented in
the evenings throughout the school year. There is a uniform cleaning fee.
This course provides the opportunity for students to earn honors weight by fulfilling additional requirements outside of the school
day. See director for more information.
853
Symphony Orchestra/ Band
1.0 Credit
Pre-requisites:
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Audition or Approval by the Director.
Grades: 11, 12
Additional Information: This course provides the opportunity for students to earn Honors Weight by fulfilling additional requirements
outside of the school day. See Band Director for more information.
Symphony Orchestra/Band is a performance, academic, and co-curricular ensemble open to auditioned Woodwind, Brass, and
Percussion students in Grades 10 through 12 who have completed 1 year of Symphonic Band. Students study and rehearse both
Band and Orchestra literature of various styles and difficulty in this class. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals of musicianship.
Students refine performance technique and ensemble playing. Performances, concerts, and rehearsals outside of the school day are
required. Students are encouraged to study privately on their individual instruments. As a co-curricular class, students enrolled in
Symphony Orchestra/Band are expected to participate in Marching Band; the performance ensemble who participates in Parades
and events for our Springfield and Morton communities. Exemptions from specific marching band performances, rehearsals, or
events during the fall may be considered at the discretion of the Band Director. Please see springfieldcougarsmusic.org for the two
kinds of Marching Band tracks we offer at Springfield High School; “Parade Band” and full-time “Marching Band”.
860 Concert Choir
1.0 Credit
Humanities or Music Credit
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Every student will be given the opportunity, encouragement, and assistance to develop the fundamental skills essential in achieving
a high standard of vocal performance, good tone quality, accurate intonation, correct breathing, clear diction, and an awareness and
sensitivity for artistic interpretation. Required concerts and performances are the Winter Concert, Spring Concert, and Graduation.
In addition to regular class time, every student will be required to attend evening rehearsals prior to each concert as listed on the
yearly Choral Department Calendar and in the Choral Department Handbook. There is a nominal uniform cleaning fee. This course
provides the opportunity for students to earn honors weight by fulfilling additional requirements outside of the school day. See
Director for more information.
861 Springfield Singers
1.0 Credit
Prerequisite:
Humanities or Music Credit
Audition
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
The Springfield Singers is a select group whose membership is by audition only. The fundamental skills essential in achieving a high
standard of vocal performance will be stressed. Emphasis will be on ear training, sight singing and application of basic music theory.
A higher level of difficulty of choral literature will be learned. Springfield Singers are also members of the Springfield Blue and Gold
Concert Choirs. Required concerts and performances are listed on the yearly Choral Department Calendar and in the Choral
Department Handbook (including: Winter Concert, Spring Concert, Jazz Concert, Graduation). In addition to regular class time, every
student will be required to attend evening rehearsals prior to each concert. There is a nominal uniform cleaning fee. This course
provides the opportunity for students to earn honors weight by fulfilling additional requirements outside of the school day. See
Director for more information.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
880 AP Music Theory
1.0 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 9-12
The ultimate goal of an AP Music Theory course is to develop a student's ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic
materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. The achievement of these goals may best be approached by
initially addressing fundamental aural, analytical, and compositional skills using both listening and written exercises. Building on this
foundation, the course should progress to include more creative tasks, such as the harmonization of a melody by selecting
appropriate chords, composing a musical bass line to provide two-voice counterpoint, or the realization of figured-bass notation.
Health and Physical Education
035 09 and 10 Health/Physical Education
036 11 and 12 Health/Physical Education
0.5 credit
th
th
th
th
Health/Physical Education Credit
Health and Physical Education is a 4 year requirement. The P.E. component is intended to improve the individual’s level of physical
fitness, increase enjoyment of physical activity, and encourage more extensive strategies in a variety of sports. Students will develop
skills in lifetime, team, and cooperative sports which may include tennis, golf, weight training, volleyball, badminton, pickleball,
physical conditioning, table tennis, ultimate games, handball, indoor soccer, base games, speedball, and floor hockey. All students
are required to wear a regulation gym uniform, sneakers, and socks. To receive full credit, students must be prepared with a gym
uniform, attend class regularly, and participate in class activities. The Health component is designed to help students make healthy
choices throughout their lifetime. Age appropriate topics related to phases of human development will be covered concerning
social, emotional and physical well-being of the individual.
041 Health/Physical Education: Advanced
0.5 credit
Health/Physical Education Credit
Grades: 11, 12
Students will participate in a co-ed, intensified Physical Education experience. Points of emphasis will be placed on tournaments,
rules and strategies, officiating and participating in unique physical education opportunities. Field trips and guest speakers may be
part of this course along with activities that cannot be offered in the regular Physical Education classes. Students take this class in
lieu of the regular Health and Physical Education class.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Dual and Concurrent Enrollment Courses
College Credit for High School Students
Springfield High School has partnered with Delaware County Community College to provide students in grades 11 and 12
the opportunity to earn college credit while still in high school through two methods – Concurrent Enrollment and Dual
Enrollment. Concurrent Enrollment courses are offered on the High School campus during the school day and are taught
by high school teachers who have been certified by DCCC to teach the courses. Dual Enrollment courses are offered and
taken on DCCC’s campus. The positioning of these courses in the school day can present challenges. Every effort will be
made to accommodate the time of these classes while still providing students with a full and robust schedule at SHS. We
hope that you will consider some of these courses while planning your academic programming. Additionally, some of the
DCCC courses are part of a Vocational Certification Program very similar to programs offered at Delaware County
Technical Schools. These DCCC programs, listed below, are two year programs where students take courses at SHS for
part of the school day and attend classes at DCCC for part of the day.
Note:
Unless otherwise stated, all Dual and Concurrent Enrollment require the student to sit for DCCC Accuplacer
assessment. Required scores may vary per course. See the DCCC counselor for more details.
Dual Enrollment Courses
Dual Enrollment (“DE”) provides students with an opportunity to enrich their education with courses at Delaware
County Community College that complement the classes already offered at Springfield. Please note that these DE
courses cannot replace courses that are graduation requirements, and students cannot take a course that is already
offered at Springfield HS for credit at the high school.
After they complete high school, students can transfer these credits directly to Delaware County Community College, or
may transfer them to a four-year college or university. Students will work with their counselor and the Dual Enrollment
Assistant Director to choose courses that will transfer to the four year school of their choice.
Students must apply to the program and placement test with the College in order to take Dual Enrollment courses.
Please use Course Code DE 100 when completing your course requests to indicate that you are interested and your
counselor will follow up with you to help select, apply for and schedule your dual enrollment course.
Tuition and deadlines are as follows:
Standard Rate
Dual Enrollment Rate
Savings
$330 per course
$120 per course
$210 per course
Application Deadlines
Fall Semester – August 1
Spring Semester – December 1
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Summer 1 – May 1
Summer 2 – June 1
2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Popular DE courses at Springfield HS:
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


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
Intro to Sociology
Microeconomics
Medical Terminology
Construction First Aid & Safety
Engineering Topics Seminar
Introduction to Teaching
The Delaware County Community College course catalog can be accessed by clicking here.
Sample DE courses that align with Springfield’s emerging academy model:
*Please note that course offerings may be subject to enrollment trends and professor eligibility. The following list is
merely an example, not a guarantee of course offerings.
Engineering , Mathematics, Science, and Technology
BIO 115: Field Ecology
Field Ecology is designed primarily for majors in biology, natural science, and related fields, yet is open to students of all
majors. This course introduces students to the general principles of field ecology pertaining to terrestrial, aquatic, and
marine habitats. Emphasis will be placed upon regional conservation issues, biodiversity concepts, plant and animal
interactions and adaptations, effects of human disturbance on native flora and fauna, and field research techniques.
Students are expected to develop and apply skills in field research and utilizing the scientific method.
DPR 234: Introduction to Computer Game Programming
This course teaches students the concepts of programming using the C++ language and DirectX. This course will
introduce students to C++ Object oriented Programming, as well as, DirectX and its components. Students will create 2D
and 3D objects, program animation sequences, add sound effects to games, create a virtual game world and program a
full-featured role-playing game.
TCC 112: CADD Graphics
This course provides students with the concepts and skills necessary to form the basis of object visualization and
documentation inherent to the creation and conveying of technical designs and drawings. Appropriate drafting concepts
and skills are developed through use of both free-hand sketching and computer-assisted drafting. Instruction in the use
of CADD systems is integrated with graphic theory throughout the course. The course covers theoretical and applied
drafting concepts appropriate for conveying graphical representation of objects and designs in a variety of technical
environments including manufacturing and construction, as well as architectural, mechanical and civil engineering
design.
TDD 216: Three-Dimensional CADD
This course provides instruction in advanced computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) techniques in addition to
creation of three-dimensional drawings. Students progress from two-dimensional projection to wireframe, surface
modeling, solids modeling and rendering techniques. Emphasis will be placed on maximizing a personal computer-based
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
CADD system to develop a series of increasingly difficult drafting assignments and ending with a presentation quality
final project and portfolio of completed drawings.
AHM 233 Medical Terminology
This course is designed to introduce the skills and knowledge needed to develop an understanding of the language of
medicine. The mechanism of building a medical vocabulary, utilizing roots, prefixes, suffixes, and the combining forms,
and the pronunciation are emphasized. A workbook/text, audiotapes, and computer software are used to give the
student hands-on experience in the use of the language of medicine. *This course is required for the EMT certificate
Business
BUS 215: Human Resource Management
This course presents an in-depth study of the principles of human resource management. The course presents both the
theoretical and practical aspects of the broad human resource functions which managers must understand in order to
develop an effective and productive workforce. Computer simulations and exercises are used to introduce students to
the practical aspects of human resource management.
BUS 105: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
This class is an introduction entrepreneurial class for students interested in starting their own business. The ultimate
goal of the class is to improve management, leadership, accounting and overall business skills and knowledge base for
our entrepreneur students.
HRM 100: Introduction to Hospitality
This course introduces students to the vast lodging and food service industry. The origins and history of the modern
American hotel/motel business and the enormous growth of the food industries are presented in the context of global
tourism. Supervisory duties including organizational theory, resource management of the prime cost associated with
these businesses, and asset control processes are introduced. Career opportunities are examined as an essential part of
the course.
PLG 100 Introduction to Paralegal
This course focuses on four specific areas of the paralegal profession: (1) the role of the paralegal in the legal profession,
(2) the legal and ethical rules that determine unauthorized practice, (3) an understanding of the judicial system at the
federal, state and local level, and (4) the various areas of law-civil and criminal with emphasis on the legal terminology
associated with each area. *Prepares students to enter into the paralegal AAS degree program
Arts
HUM 100: Introduction to Visual Arts
This course is designed to introduce students, through a broad overview, to the nature of art, the people who make art,
the various forms art takes and to the importance of art in our everyday lives. Students consider the role of the artist in
society and how that role changes historically. Issues such as aesthetics, creativity and perception, and what it means to
be a visually literate patron of the arts will be explored. A thorough introduction to the visual elements and principles of
design will help students to form some guidelines for analysis and criticism in such areas as drawing, painting,
photography, film, video, sculpture, architecture, crafts, environmental design, theater, dance and music.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Humanities
HUM 141: Film Language
This course is intended to engage students in analysis of the film medium, to help them relate the art of film to their
lives and their language and to stimulate their appreciation of the visible world. The course includes a brief survey of
film history, a study of the subject matter and bias of the documentary film and visible forms of poetry in the art film.
HUM 180: Aspiration and Dissonance--A Global Interdisciplinary Study of History, Literature and Religion
This course considers the persistent separation between humanity’s greatest ideals (defined as our “aspirations”) and
the reality of history (defined as “dissonance”) through selected historical, literary, and mystical works from all over the
world. This inter-disciplinary, co-taught course is designed to make the student think about the purpose and value of
these aspirations, the skepticism that results from their enduring failure, and the changes that a global education may
bring to this situation.
HUM 205: Latin American Studies
This course provides an overview of the Latino-American cultural heritage. Based on elements from anthropology,
culture (both folk and popular), film, folklore, language and linguistics, theater and drama, and literature, the course
examines various cultural traditions within Latino-American society
Liberal Arts
ARB 101 Elementary Arabic I
This course introduces students to Arabic alphabets, articulation of sounds, basic grammar, reading and writing.
Vocabulary words for cultural and social settings are introduced. Listening and speaking are emphasized in class and
laboratory settings.
CHI 101: Elementary Chinese
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Chinese Language by focusing on the development of functional
competence in the four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), as well as Chinese cultural knowledge. Students
completing this course will master Chinese pronunciation system (Hanyu Pinyin), basic Chinese Characters writing skill,
basic Chinese grammar. The emphasis is placed on actual verbal communication.
HIS 251: History of Modern China
This course is an introductory study of the history of China from the seventeenth century to the present. Specifically, the
course seeks to analyze how China has been able to build a dynamic and growing civilization amidst rebellion, reform,
and revolution. Political, economic, and social issues will be discussed to gain a greater understanding and appreciation
of Chinese civilization. Three major themes in the course will deal with imperialism, nationalism, and modernization. An
effort will be made to understand the political, economic, and social “self-strengthening” experiments in China within a
global perspective. The final portion of the course will examine contemporary Chinese society.
MAT 120: Modern College Mathematics
This course is designed to give students in the non-science fields an appreciation of and experience in using the
concepts, logical reasoning and problem-solving techniques involved in various fields of mathematics. It fulfills the
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
mathematics elective for liberal arts, administration of justice, early childhood education, fire-science technology and
general education majors at the College.
RUS 101: Elementary Russian
This course introduces students to the Russian language by focusing on the development of functional competence in
the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), as well as the expansion of cultural knowledge. Students
completing this course will learn about the basic structure of Russian grammar and writing as well as become familiar
with elementary conversational skills.
SOC 110: Introduction to Sociology
The factors that determine social organization, behavior and change are considered in relation to the individual
student’s own life. Study is concentrated on social intervention, culture, social class, demography, collective behavior,
institutions and socialization
SOC 240: Human Geography
This class will look at how places and regions are interconnected, how they are unique, and how people, ideas, and
things moving from one locale to another can change a place or region. After taking this class, students will view their
surroundings in new ways by asking questions like: Why are peoples, cultures, and places what they are? Why are they
where they are? How can geography help me understand today’s changing world?
Concurrent Enrollment Courses
As stated above, concurrent enrollment courses are Delaware County Community College courses that will be taught by
Springfield High School teachers at the HS during the school day. Upon successful completion of the course, students will
be awarded credit by SHS and DCCC, i.e. students will earn college credit while taking courses at SHS.
** These courses will be weighted as College Prep course weight. However, students will be awarded Honors Weight
upon completion of a Capstone Project unique to each course.
SHS Course # (Select CE100 if interested and notify counselor of specific course)
DCCC Course # ART 100
PENDING FINAL APPROVAL
Art and Child Development/CP
(Honors Weight awarded with successful completion of Capstone Project)
1.0 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
This course examines artistic development and expression in childhood. Emphasis will be on actual artistic production,
the visual language of art including the principles of design and color and on issues of aesthetics and response strategies
in relation to art criticism and art history. The cognitive developmental stages of artistic growth in childhood and
psychomotor skills will serve as a foundation in preparation for curriculum planning.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
SHS Course # (Select CE100 if interested and notify counselor of specific course)
DCCC Course #
POL 200
World Affairs/CP
(Honors Weight awarded with successful completion of Capstone Project)
1.0 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
This course deals with the theory and practice of international relations. Upon successful completion of the course,
students should be able to analyze the role of power in international politics. Students will identify the major constraints
a national state must deal with in the formulation and implementation of foreign policy, as well as assess the impact of
the United Nations on the relations between national states in the contemporary world. Finally, students will plan
developmentally and culturally appropriate strategies to address individual differences among political adversaries.
SHS Course # (Select CE100 if interested and notify counselor of specific course)
DCCC Course #
INT 100
Student Success/CP
(Honors Weight awarded with successful completion of Capstone Project)
1.0 Credit
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
Student Success provides an opportunity for students to learn and adopt methods to promote their success in
college. The course assists students in establishing educational objectives and increases success in achieving them.
Included are the skills, behaviors and attitudes associated with success.
SHS Course # (Select CE100 if interested and notify counselor of specific course)
DCCC Course #
BIO 102
Humans and the Environment/CP
1.0 Credit
(Honors Weight awarded with successful completion of Capstone Project)
Humanities, Technologies, & Arts
Grades: 11, 12
This course provides an introduction to the study of the design of the natural world and interactions between humans
and their environment. It includes an investigation of the impact of human activities on biodiversity, natural resources,
availability of energy, and contamination of the environment. The scientific, economic, and social issues that contribute
to environmental problems are also examined. Sustainability principles, policies, and programs are explored on the local,
national and global level. This course is designed for non-science majors.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Additional opportunities through Delaware County Community College:
SWO 101: Introduction to Social Work and Human Services
This is a one semester introduction to human services and the major policies and practices that are used to understand
human strengths and challenges. The course explores the skills, values and knowledge based needed to effectively work
as a culturally competent, human service professional in a multidisciplinary setting.
Skilled Trades:
TCS 141 Construction First Aid/Safety
Emergency first-aid and accident-prevention instruction for construction employees and managers. OSHA requirements
are stressed in this course. Administrative aspects of recordkeeping requirements, rights and responsibilities, standards,
safety program development and implementation are covered. Safety training includes identification and elimination of
accident and health hazards, inspection techniques and administration of first-aid and CPR. *Required for most
associate’s degrees and certificates in the skilled trades (construction, plumbing, electrical, etc)
WLD 100 Introduction to Welding
Classroom instruction includes the proper selection of A.C and D.C. power sources and their applications. Oxy-fuel
welding and cutting equipment and safety procedures are covered. Also discussed is proper set-up, use of GMAW and
GTAW power sources and how to correctly set up and use them. All requirements and safety procedures are covered.
WLD 101 Introduction to Oxy-Fuel Welding and Cutting
Course emphasis is on fuel gases, welding, and cutting equipment.
Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
• List the major advantages and disadvantages of different fuel gases.
• Maintain an oxy-fuel welding set.
• Demonstrate lighting, adjusting, and extinguishing an oxy-fuel flare.
• Use an oxy-fuel cutting torch.
Emergency & Protective Services
EMER 105: Incident Management
This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the Incident Command-Unified Command Structure.
Additionally, a look at incident management from various perspectives such as local fire departments, industrial settings,
the Oklahoma City bombing, and others will be discussed. The student will work in an interactive program to prepare for
future roles and responsibilities as those charged with a management role in incident command, control or mitigation.
Moreover, the student will learn from the experiences of others, sharpening their understanding skills relative to the
dimensions of emergency incident management.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
EMS 100: Emergency Medical Technician
This intensive program is designed to instruct the pre-hospital care provider in the skills necessary to reduce mortality
and morbidity from accident and illness. Topics covered include patient assessment, cardiopulmonary resuscitation,
mechanical aids to ventilation, trauma management, head, neck and spinal injuries, fractures, medical and
environmental emergencies, crisis intervention and vehicle rescue. *When paired with AHM 233, this results in an EMT
certificate from the College.
FST 100: Introduction to Fire Protection
A course in the history and development of fire protection. Topics covered are the role of the fire service in the
development of civilization; personnel in fire protection; general introduction to fire hazards; and a discussion of the
problems and possible solutions for current and future fire protection.
Delaware County Technical High School
Course List
960AH
Health Occupations
960AT
Automotive Technology
960BT
Building Trades
960 CFSMA
Composite Fabrication
And Sheet Metal
Assembly
960CM
Cosmetology
960CA
Culinary Arts and
Hospitality
This course includes anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, nutrition,
medical procedures, emergency and clinical care, and health care issues. Clinical
education is an integral part of the program.
DCTS has the distinction of being among a small number of schools and colleges to
be selected to participate in the AYES program, a partnership with General
Motors, Daimler Chrysler, BMW, Honda, Hyundai, Subaru, Toyota, Mitsubishi
Motors, Nissan, Volkswagen, Audi and Mercedes Benz corporations. This program
gives DCTS students a competitive edge by allowing them to work directly on new
cars with technicians experienced in the field and at dealerships.
Practical experience and classroom training prepares students enrolled in the
Building Trades program to find employment in the construction field or enter a
post-secondary institution. Students are taught carpentry, masonry, plumbing,
roofing, drywall application, painting and framing/finishing.
Description to come.
The Cosmetology Program is a three-year standards-based education program.
The 1250 hours required for this course are earned when a score of 80% or above
is achieved for each individual unit, which includes both theoretical and hands-on
training. Students learn haircutting, coloring, manicuring, facials, hairstyling, and
shampoo techniques and treatments.
Culinary Arts and Hospitality prepares students for success in our nation's number
one employer, the food service and hospitality industry. Students are taught food
preparation, dining service, inventory control, safety, sanitation and management
skills. Our students also learn food nutrition, healthy cooking, equipment
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
960CN
Computer Network and
Digital Forensics
960CP
Carpentry
960CR
Collision Repair
960
Dental Technology
960EC
Early Childhood
Education
identification, use of hand tools and culinary vocabulary. We are the only high
school Culinary Arts program in this part of Pennsylvania to be certified by the
American Culinary Federation.
This course is designed to provide a broad background in the nature of electricity,
the operation and application of electric circuits, and the physics of electric
current flow.
The Carpentry program prepares students for employment in residential home
remodeling and light commercial construction industries. The curriculum covers
the use of hand and power tools, blueprint reading, estimating and scheduling of
construction operations. Students are introduced to concrete form building,
placing, reinforcing and finishing.
DCTS's Collision Repair Technology course is based on an occupational analysis of
the auto body field and reflects the job requirements of ICAR (Inter-Industry
Conference on Auto Collision Repair) and the Automotive Collision Technology
standards. Using state-of-the-art equipment, students are taught MIG
welding/cutting, metal repair, corrosion protection, masking, refinishing,
undercoating, unibody inspection and detailing.
Description to come.
The Early Childhood Education (ECE) program prepares students to work with
young children in a variety of settings that require an understanding of how
children grow, learn and develop. The curriculum is aligned with the National Child
Care Association's core of 15 "Professional Abilities."
Delaware County Technical High School
Course List
The Emergency and Protective Services (EPS) program offers a comprehensive
public safety education to students interested in pursuing a career or volunteering
in the emergency medical, law enforcement, fire, security, industrial safety or
emergency management services.
This course prepares students to apply the technical knowledge and skills
necessary to install, repair and maintain commercial, industrial and residential
heating, air conditioning and refrigeration systems. The course is taught in
compliance with the standards established by the National Association for Testing
Excellence (NATE) and the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA).
Interactive Multimedia is a computer graphics program that introduces students
to technology-based desktop publishing, multimedia design and production skills.
Students learn the concepts of color and design and their use in computer-based
graphic design. They also learn animation, sound, video and graphics editing in the
multimedia class
The Industrial and Residential Electricity program introduces students to the basis
concepts of residential and commercial wiring. Students install circuits, switches,
conductors, circuit breakers and other electrical devices. Skills are taught in
compliance with the National Electrical Code (NEC) industry standards.
960EP
Emergency and
Protective Services
960HV
Heating and Air
Conditioning
960IM
Interactive Multimedia
and Design
960IR
Electrical Construction
Technology
960LS
Environmental
Landscape and
Equipment Operations
As a member of the Landscape & Greenhouse Operations class, students learn the
principles and skills that lead to successful careers in the fields of landscape
design/maintenance, nursery and greenhouse production/operations, and floral
arts.
960MH
Logistic and Inventory
Materials and Inventory Control introduces students to the distribution service
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
Management
960SM
966
industry. The course curriculum prepares students to work in distribution centers,
warehouses, and supply rooms.
Sports Medicine
Delaware County Technical High School is offering a NEW PROGRAM for high
school students interested in pursuing careers in Sports Medicine, Athletic
Training, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Exercise Physiology, Fitness
Training, and Nutrition. The salary range for these careers range from $27,000$205,000 depending on the level of post-secondary education and career choice.
The new DCTS program will be called “Exercise Therapy & Sports Science” and will
be begin Sept, 2016. Students who complete this DCTS program could potentially
earn certifications in the following areas: Personal Training, First Aide, CPR, and
AED. The projected job growth for occupations related to this program is up to
33% higher than the average growth rate for all careers! We anticipate this
program filling quickly so see your counselor asap to apply and reserve your seat
in the program!
This course is a perfect match for the student interested in the healthcare field,
and would like to learn more about available options. In this program the hospital
becomes the classroom. Crozer Keystone Health Systems will offer a clinical
rotation through different departments. Students will work alongside medical
professionals to learn the importance of communication with patients. Classroom
instruction will be given on the study of body systems, anatomy, infection control,
and process of illnesses and injury. Medical terminology and core patient care
skills such as taking vital signs, assisting with activities of daily living, and sterile
techniques will be taught. This course carries an honors weighted grade.
Honors Medical
Technology
Delaware County Community College
Technology Programs
961AT
961ET
Automotive Technology
Electro-Mechanical
Technology
The Early College Automotive program is designed to allow interested students to
earn a certificate in Automotive Technology upon graduation from high school.
Students who choose to continue in the program will earn the Associate in Applied
Science in the Skilled Trades with one additional year of full time study. Please see
the attached flier for more information about the course sequence for the
Automotive Technology program. Students who earn the certificate in Automotive
can access an entry level position in automotive maintenance and repair. Students
who earn the associate’s degree can access higher level management jobs or a
career as a mechanic with brands such as BMW, Lexus, and/or Mercedes-Benz.
The Early College Electromechanical program is designed to allow interested
students to earn a certificate in Electromechanical Technology upon graduation
from high school. Students who choose to continue in the program will earn the
Associate in Applied Science with one additional year of full time study. Please see
the attached flier for more information about careers in the Electro-Mechanical
field.
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2016-2017 Academic Programming and Scheduling Guide
EQUAL RIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES POLICY
With the aim of assuring equal rights and opportunities within our school community, and to comply with the federal laws (including
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
and OCR Guidelines IV-0, State laws and State Department of Education regulations concerning same) the Springfield School District
declares itself to be an equal rights and opportunities employer. As such, it does not discriminate against individuals or groups
because of race, color, national origin, religion, age, sex, marital status, or non-relevant handicaps. Springfield School District’s
commitment to non-discrimination extends to students, employees and the community
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