Getting Results Guide

Getting Results Guide
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5/20/05
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Getting Results Guide
Publication VW32-GR001B-EN-P - May 2005
Supersedes Publication VW32-GR001A-EN-P
Contacting Rockwell
Software
Technical Support Telephone—440-646-5800
Technical Support Fax—440-646-5801
Internet Support—www.software.rockwell.com or
www.support.rockwellautomation.com
Copyright Notice
© 2005 Rockwell Software Inc., a Rockwell Automation company. All rights reserved.
Printed in the United States of America.
Portions copyrighted by the Allen-Bradley Company, LLC, a Rockwell Automation Company.
This manual and any accompanying Rockwell Software products are copyrighted by Rockwell
Software Inc. Any reproduction and/or distribution without prior written consent from
Rockwell Software Inc. is strictly prohibited. Please refer to the license agreement for details.
VBA and DCOM, Copyright 1996, 1997 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Trademark Notices
Allen-Bradley, RSLinx, and ControlLogix are registered trademarks, and the Rockwell Software
logo, AdvanceDDE, ControlView, Object Smart Path, RSView32, RSView32 Resource Kit,
SLC, and SoftLogix are trademarks of Rockwell Automation Inc.
Adobe, Acrobat, Photoshop, and Reader are registered trademarks of Adobe Systems
Incorporated. AutoCAD is a registered trademark of Autodesk, Inc. CorelDRAW is a registered
trademark of Corel Corporation or Corel Corporation Limited. Crystal Reports is a registered
trademark of Crystal Decisions, Inc. or its affiliates. dBASE is a registered trademark of dBASE
Inc. Pentium is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States
and other countries. KEPServerEnterprise is a trademark of Kepware Technologies Inc.
ActiveX, Microsoft, Visual Basic, Visual FoxPro, Windows, and Windows NT are registered
trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. OPC is a
registered trademark of the OPC Foundation.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective holders and are hereby acknowledged.
Warranty
This Rockwell Software product is warranted in accord with the product license. The product’s
performance will be affected by system configuration, the application being performed, operator
control, and other related factors.
The product’s implementation may vary among users.
This manual is as up-to-date as possible at the time of printing; however, the accompanying
software may have changed since that time. Rockwell Software reserves the right to change any
information contained in this manual or the software at any time without prior notice.
The instructions in this manual do not claim to cover all the details or variations in the
equipment, procedure, or process described, nor to provide directions for meeting every possible
contingency during installation, operation, or maintenance.
Doc ID VW32-GR001B-EN-P
May 2005
Contents
Chapter 1
Installing and activating RSView32 ......................................................................... 1
About RSView32 ..................................................................................................... 1
Determining system requirements ............................................................ 1
Step 1
„
Total your points ............................................................................................ 2
Step 2
„
Determine the recommended system configuration ................................ 3
Installing RSView32 and the user’s guides ........................................ 3
Installing RSView32 on Windows XP, Windows 2000, and Windows NT ........... 4
Installing RSView32 ........................................................................................................ 4
Installation summary ....................................................................................................... 5
Activating RSView32 .......................................................................................... 5
About the Activation disk .............................................................................................. 5
Activation keys ................................................................................................................. 6
Moving activation keys back to the Activation disk................................................... 7
Activating RSView32 after installation ......................................................................... 8
Protecting your activation files ...................................................................................... 8
Reactivating a damaged key............................................................................................ 9
Activating RSView32 Works as a runtime-only system...........................................10
Troubleshooting activation ..........................................................................................10
Starting RSView32 ..............................................................................................11
Starting RSView32 manually ........................................................................................11
Starting RSView32 automatically.................................................................................11
Ensuring your system has sufficient virtual memory ................13
Uninstalling RSView32 ....................................................................................15
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i
Chapter 2
Getting started................................................................................................................................ 17
Welcome to RSView32..................................................................................... 17
RSView32 Works........................................................................................................... 17
RSView32 Runtime ....................................................................................................... 20
Quick Start steps................................................................................................. 20
Step 1
„
Create a project............................................................................................. 20
Step 2
„
Set up communications in RSView32....................................................... 20
Step 3
„
Create graphic displays, trends, and alarm summaries ........................... 21
Step 4
„
Set up tags ..................................................................................................... 21
Step 5
„
Set up logging ............................................................................................... 22
Step 6
„
Secure your system....................................................................................... 22
Step 7
„
Customize and integrate RSView32 with other applications ................ 23
Chapter 3
Creating and working with projects ...................................................................... 25
Creating a project ............................................................................................... 25
What is a project? ............................................................................................... 26
Project files ..................................................................................................................... 26
Exploring the RSView32 main window ................................................ 28
The menu bar ................................................................................................................. 28
The toolbar ..................................................................................................................... 28
The Project Manager..................................................................................................... 29
The activity bar...............................................................................................................29
The status bar .................................................................................................................29
Showing and hiding the toolbar, status bar, and activity bar .................................. 30
Working in the Project Manager ............................................................... 31
Tabs ................................................................................................................................. 32
Folders............................................................................................................................. 32
Editors ............................................................................................................................. 32
Components ................................................................................................................... 35
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Getting Results with RSView32
Hints for working in editors .........................................................................37
Using the context menus ..............................................................................................37
Using the Selection button ...........................................................................................37
Entering tag names ........................................................................................................37
Using RSView32 commands........................................................................................38
Using expressions ..........................................................................................................38
Using the Project Documentor...................................................................39
Using the Project Transport Wizard .......................................................39
Using components from ControlView projects ..............................39
Chapter 4
Setting up communications ............................................................................................. 41
Using direct driver communications .....................................................41
Windows Service Packs.................................................................................................41
Communications editors...............................................................................................42
Setting up direct driver communications ...................................................................43
Using OPC and DDE communications ...................................................43
Communications editors...............................................................................................44
Setting up communications with OPC and DDE servers.......................................44
Checking that communications are working ..................................45
If communications are not working............................................................................46
Chapter 5
Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries ................................... 47
Creating and editing graphic displays ..................................................47
Creating a new graphic display.....................................................................................48
Types of displays............................................................................................................49
Choosing a background color and display size .........................................................52
Importing a graphic .......................................................................................................53
Viewing the libraries and samples ...............................................................................54
Creating a button ...........................................................................................................55
Embedding an ActiveX object.....................................................................................57
Adding color to objects ................................................................................................59
Contents
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Arranging the objects .................................................................................................... 60
Animating objects.......................................................................................................... 61
Testing the animation.................................................................................................... 63
Setting up runtime appearance .................................................................................... 63
Creating a trend ................................................................................................... 64
Creating an alarm summary ........................................................................ 65
Filter alarms .................................................................................................................... 66
Assign colors to alarms ................................................................................................. 66
Chapter 6
Creating tags .................................................................................................................................... 67
What is a tag? ........................................................................................................ 67
Tag types ......................................................................................................................... 67
Creating tags as needed ................................................................................ 68
Creating many tags at once ........................................................................ 69
Importing tags from an Allen-Bradley PLC database ................ 70
Importing ControlLogix tags ....................................................................... 70
Using folders to organize tags ................................................................... 71
Chapter 7
Setting up logging
and security ........................................................................................................................................ 73
Logging information........................................................................................... 73
Setting up logging .......................................................................................................... 73
Viewing logged information......................................................................................... 74
Securing your system ....................................................................................... 75
Setting up project-level security................................................................................... 75
Setting up system-level security ................................................................................... 79
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Getting Results with RSView32
Chapter 8
Using the RSView32 Object Model and VBA ................................................ 81
About the RSView32 Object Model and VBA ...................................81
How RSView32 uses VBA code..................................................................................82
The VBA integrated development environment ............................83
Opening the IDE window............................................................................................83
Parts of the IDE window .............................................................................................84
Quick Start steps .................................................................................................85
Step 1
„
Create your VBA code.................................................................................85
Step 2
„
Call your VBA code from within RSView32 ...........................................85
What is a subroutine? .......................................................................................86
When to use VBA code instead of an RSView32 macro.........................................86
Running VBA code ..............................................................................................87
How RSView32 runs VBA code .................................................................................87
Viewing VBA subroutines ..............................................................................88
Opening the VBA IDE for editing ..............................................................89
The RSView32 Object Model .......................................................................89
Global object variables..................................................................................................92
Viewing the objects .......................................................................................................92
Getting Help on RSView32 objects............................................................................93
Opening Help from the Object Browser ...................................................................94
Opening Help from the Code Window .....................................................................95
Opening Help from the RSView32 Help Contents window ..................................95
Using VBA Help .....................................................................................................96
VBA documentation .....................................................................................................96
Contents
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Chapter 9
Planning a project ....................................................................................................................... 97
The planning process ....................................................................................... 97
Understanding the process .......................................................................... 97
Collecting data ...................................................................................................... 98
Designing a database ....................................................................................... 98
Collect information ....................................................................................................... 98
Organize tags..................................................................................................................98
Planning alarms .................................................................................................... 99
Planning graphic displays ............................................................................. 99
Develop a hierarchy of displays................................................................................... 99
Create a template to ensure consistency .................................................................... 99
Using trends ..........................................................................................................101
Designing a secure system ........................................................................101
Customizing the system, and integrating with other applications ............................................................................................................................102
Automating application configuration......................................................................102
Using data with other applications............................................................................102
Customizing the system..............................................................................................102
Chapter 10
Getting the information you need ........................................................................... 103
Using RSView32 Help .....................................................................................103
Viewing the Help contents.........................................................................................103
Using the index ............................................................................................................105
Finding words or topics..............................................................................................106
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Getting Results with RSView32
Using the RSView32 online user’s guides .......................................107
Viewing the guides.......................................................................................................107
Moving around in the user’s guides ..........................................................................108
Zooming in and out.....................................................................................................109
Finding information ....................................................................................................109
Printing pages ...............................................................................................................110
Using the online guide for the reader .......................................................................110
Technical support .............................................................................................111
When you call ...............................................................................................................111
Index .........................................................................................................................................................113
Contents
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vii
1
Chapter
Installing and activating
RSView32
About RSView32
RSView32™ is a Windows®-based software program for creating and running
data acquisition, monitoring, and control applications.
Designed for use in Microsoft® Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT®,
and Windows 9x environments, RSView32 contains the tools you need for
creating all aspects of a human-machine interface, including real-time animated
graphic displays, trends, and alarm summaries. RSView32 integrates easily with
Rockwell Software, Microsoft, and other third-party products to maximize the
power of ActiveX®, VBA, OLE, ODBC, OPC®, and DDE technologies.
Determining system requirements
The hardware and software you use with RSView32 depends on the demands
your project places on the system. The greater the demand, the more powerful
a system you need.
The recommendations below are based on field experience. It is possible that
your application will operate on a platform below these recommendations.
In the following tables, the demands your project places on the system are
represented by points. Total your points in step 1, and then use the table in
step 2 to determine the hardware and software you need.
n
1
Step 1
„
Total your points
For
If you are
Add points
RSView32
project
running displays, or editing your project using
RSView32 Works
2
using more than 30,000 tags
2
using more than 5,000 tags
1
changing displays, on average, more than
5 times per minute
1
using more than 200 objects in displays
2
using ActiveX controls in displays
2
monitoring more than 1,500 tags for alarms
2
monitoring more than 300 tags for alarms
1
Active Display
System, DDE,
or OPC
simultaneously
active clients
using typically more than 5 active clients
2
using at least 1 client
1
Data log or
historical
trends
logging less than 100 tags in 1 model
1
logging between 100 and 1,000 tags in 1 model
2
logging to more than 1 model
2
Event detector,
derived tags, or
real-time
trends
using any
1
VBA
using any
2
Add-ons
using any, for each one
1
Alarms
Total your points here
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Getting Results with RSView32
Step 2 „ Determine the recommended system
configuration
For this number
of points
Minimum hardware
you need
Minimum software you need
8 or more
Pentium® II 400 MHz
128 MB RAM
Windows XP Professional
or
Windows 2000 Professional
or
Windows NT Workstation 4.0
with Service Pack 4 or
Service Pack 6
6 to 7
Pentium II 300 MHz
128 MB RAM
Windows XP Professional
or
Windows 2000 Professional
or
Windows NT Workstation 4.0
with Service Pack 4 or
Service Pack 6
3 to 5
Pentium 200 MHz
64 MB RAM
Windows XP Professional
or
Windows 2000 Professional
or
Windows NT Workstation 4.0
with Service Pack 4 or
Service Pack 6
1 to 2
Pentium 100 MHz
24 MB RAM
Windows NT Workstation 4.0
with Service Pack 4 or
Service Pack 6
or
Windows 9x
Installing RSView32 and the user’s guides
The steps below explain how to install the RSView32 software and user’s
guides from a CD-ROM to your computer. If you choose not to install the user’s
guides, you can view them from the CD-ROM.
Installing and activating RSView32
n
3
Installing RSView32 on Windows XP,
Windows 2000, and Windows NT
As part of the installation process, RSView32 creates program folders and
modifies registry entries. In order to make these modifications, the currentlylogged-in user must have administrator rights on the computer on which
RSView32 is installed (for example, the Windows NT administrator account
has these rights).
Windows 9x does not require administrator rights during the installation
process.
Installing RSView32
Follow these instructions to install RSView32 on Windows XP, Windows 2000,
Windows NT, or Windows 9x.
To install RSView32
1.
Close all open Windows programs.
2.
Place the RSView32 CD-ROM in your CD-ROM drive. The CD-ROM should
start running automatically.
If the CD-ROM does not start automatically, run D:\SETUP.EXE where D is
the drive containing the CD-ROM.
3.
In the RSView32 window, click the button for the option you want to
install.
4.
Follow the on-screen instructions.
5.
During installation, you will be prompted to activate RSView32. If
activation is present from an earlier version of RSView or RSView32,
click Next.
If you removed the activation or if you are installing RSView32 for the first
time, insert the Activation disk in the diskette drive and click Activate. For
details about activation, see “Activating RSView32” on page 5.
6.
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n
When installation is complete, restart Windows. If you do not restart
Windows now, be sure to restart it before running RSView32 for the first
time.
Getting Results with RSView32
Installation summary
The default installation does the following:
„
„
„
installs RSView32 in \Program Files\Rockwell Software\RSView
adds a Rockwell Software\RSView32 folder to your list of programs. This
folder contains the shortcuts for RSView32.
installs the ODBC drivers for Watcom SQL® 4.0 in the system directory of
your operating system. Only Watcom SQL 4.0 is supported with RSView32.
Other versions may not function correctly. Check the ODBC Data Source
Administrator in the Windows Control Panel for version numbers.
Activating RSView32
Rockwell Software uses activation files to activate its Windows-based software
packages. The activation files reside on the Activation disk. During installation,
the software prompts you to insert the Activation disk and move the activation
key from the disk to the drive where you’ve installed RSView32.
About the Activation disk
RSView32 comes with an Activation disk (may also be referred to as a Master
disk) that activates the RSView32 software. Without activation, RSView32 runs
in demo mode, allowing a maximum of 35 device tags and two hours of use.
The Activation disk contains:
„
one or more activation keys
The activation key is the software that activates RSView32. Depending on
what you purchased, your Activation disk will have one or more activation
keys. For example, if your company purchased four RSView32 installations,
you require four activation keys. The keys are product-specific. For
example, RSView32 Works requires a Works activation key. Multiple copies
of the same software require activation keys with matching serial numbers.
All of the activation keys can be on the same activation disk.
„
„
a program called EVMOVE.EXE that moves activation keys to and from
computers
a program called RESET.EXE that reactivates a damaged activation key
You can move activation keys to and from the Activation disk. The programs
EVMOVE.EXE and RESET.EXE always stay on the Activation disk.
Installing and activating RSView32
n
5
Activation keys
The following table lists the activation keys for the RSView32 products.
This key
Is for this product
RSView.D100K
RSView32 Works, 100,000 tag database
RSView.D32K
RSView32 Works, 32,000 tag database
RSView.D5K
RSView32 Works, 5,000 tag database
RSView.D1500
RSView32 Works, 1,500 tag database
RSView.D300
RSView32 Works, 300 tag database
RSView.D150
RSView32 Works, 150 tag database
RSView.R100K
RSView32 Runtime, 100,000 tag database
RSView.R32K
RSView32 Runtime, 32,000 tag database
RSView.R5K
RSView32 Runtime, 5,000 tag database
RSView.R1500
RSView32 Runtime, 1,500 tag database
RSView.R300
RSView32 Runtime, 300 tag database
RSView.R150
RSView32 Runtime, 150 tag database
To view the keys on your Activation disk
1.
Insert the Activation disk into a diskette drive.
2.
In the File Manager, My Computer, or Windows Explorer, select the drive
containing the diskette.
3.
Start EVMOVE.EXE.
The EvMove Summary dialog box opens showing your activation keys.
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Getting Results with RSView32
Moving activation keys back to the Activation disk
You can move the activation key back to the Activation disk at any time. For
example, move activation back to the Activation disk:
„
„
„
to run RSView32 on a different computer
before installing or using software that could damage your activation files
(see “Protecting your activation files” on page 8 for a list of specific
operations that can damage activation)
before sending your computer to a technician
By default, when you move activation keys back to the Activation disk, the
software automatically moves all activation keys for the appropriate product.
To move activation keys back to the Activation disk
1.
Ensure RSView32 and all other Rockwell Software products are closed.
2.
Insert the Activation disk into a diskette drive.
3.
Run A:\EVMOVE.EXE where A is the diskette drive containing the
Activation disk. The EvMove Summary dialog box opens.
4.
In the From field, select the drive where RSView32 is installed. In the To
field, select the drive containing the Activation disk. Click OK.
5.
Either move activation keys for all installations or for a selected number of
installations.
„
„
6.
To move activation keys for all installations, click Move.
To change the number of activations to move to the Activation disk,
select the activation key, and then click Edit Selected. In the Move field,
type the number of activation keys to move. Click OK, and then click
Move.
To close the EvMove Summary dialog box, click OK.
Installing and activating RSView32
n
7
Activating RSView32 after installation
You might need to reactivate RSView32 after moving activation keys back to
the Activation disk or after resetting a damaged key. To reactivate RSView32,
move the activation key from the Activation disk back to the hard drive.
By default, when you move activation to a hard drive from the Activation disk,
the software moves only one “install” of an activation key for RSView32.
To move activation keys to the hard drive
1.
Ensure RSView32 and all other Rockwell Software products are closed.
2.
Insert the Activation disk into a diskette drive.
3.
Run A:\EVMOVE.EXE where A is the diskette drive containing the
Activation disk. The EvMove Summary dialog box opens.
4.
In the From field, select the drive containing the Activation disk. In the To
field, select the drive where RSView32 is installed. Click OK.
5.
Either move activation keys for all installations or for a selected number of
installations.
„
„
6.
To move activation keys for all installations, click Move.
To change the number of activations to move, select the activation key,
and then click Edit Selected. In the Move field, type the number of
activation keys to move. Click OK, and then click Move.
To close the EvMove Summary dialog box, click OK.
Protecting your activation files
Performing certain operations on your hard drive can damage activation files.
Always move activation keys from your hard drive back to the Activation disk
before doing any of the following operations. After completing the operation,
it is safe to move the activation keys back to the hard drive and reactivate
RSView32.
Move activation files back to the Activation disk before:
„
8
n
Upgrading,
installing, and uninstalling operating system software or networking system
software can damage the activation files.
Upgrading or installing your computer’s operating system.
Getting Results with RSView32
„
Compressing or uncompressing your computer’s hard drive. Compressing
the hard drive with some compression software programs can damage
activation software. In addition, uncompressing a hard drive with activation
files on the compressed drive can damage activation.
Reactivating a damaged key
If your activation key becomes damaged for any reason, contact Rockwell
Software Technical Support for a reset code—440-646-5800.
When you call
When you call, you need to be at a computer. You do not have to use the same
computer that RSView32 is installed on. However, you must have the
Activation disk with a serial number that matches the RSView32 software.
The support representative will explain how to find the product ID and system
ID from the Activation disk and then will assign a reset code for the activation
key. After obtaining a reset code from the technical support representative,
reset the key, and then reactivate RSView32.
To reactivate a key with a reset code
1.
Ensure RSView32 and all other Rockwell Software products are closed.
2.
Insert the Activation disk into a diskette drive.
3.
Run A:\RESET.EXE where A is the diskette drive containing the Activation
disk.
4.
In the Reset Code dialog box, type the reset code, and then click OK.
5.
Reactivate RSView32 following the steps in “Activating RSView32 after
installation” on page 8.
Installing and activating RSView32
n
9
Activating RSView32 Works as a runtime-only
system
You can install RSView32 Works, and then activate it as a runtime-only system.
To do this, move all Works activation keys back to the Activation disk, and
move a Runtime activation key to the hard drive.
Installing RSView32 Works on field computers is useful for updating
RSView32 projects in the field. When you need to update a project, add the
Works activation key to access all the features of the Works system. When you
finish updating the project, remove the Works activation key and reinstall the
Runtime activation key.
For a list of activation keys, see “Activation keys” on page 6.
Troubleshooting activation
If activation is not working:
„
„
„
„
10
n
Are you using the right Activation disk? Check the serial numbers on your
RSView32 software and printed on your Activation disk labels—the serial
numbers must match.
Does your computer have a virus? Boot sector viruses can damage your
Activation disk. The Rockwell Software support team recommends using a
commercial virus protection program.
Did you save other files on the Activation disk? Saving any files to the
Activation disk can damage the activation software.
Did you perform an operation on your hard drive that damaged the
activation software? See “Protecting your activation files” on page 8.
Getting Results with RSView32
Starting RSView32
You can start RSView32 manually or you can set up RSView32 to start
automatically when Windows starts.
The steps below describe how to start RSView32 on Windows 95 or later.
Starting RSView32 manually
To start RSView32 in Windows XP
„
Click the Windows Start button, select All Programs, Rockwell Software,
RSView32, and then click RSView32 Works.
To start RSView32 in Windows 2000, Windows NT, and Windows 9x
„
Click the Windows Start button, select Programs, Rockwell Software,
RSView32, and then click RSView32 Works.
Starting RSView32 automatically
To automatically start RSView32 Works each time Windows starts, include an
RSView32 Works shortcut in the Windows StartUp folder. You can also open
a project when Windows starts.
To add RSView32 to the StartUp folder in Windows XP and
Windows 2000
1.
Click the Windows Start button, select Settings, and then click “Taskbar &
Start Menu.”
2.
In the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box, click the Advanced
tab.
3.
Click Add. The Create Shortcut dialog box opens.
4.
To start RSView32 Works when Windows starts, browse to the location of
the RSV32.exe file, and then click the file name.
The path is \Program Files\Rockwell Software\RSView\RSV32.exe.
5.
To start RSView32 Works and open a project when Windows starts,
specify the path to RSView32 and to the project. For example, to specify a
project called Norm’s Bakery, type:
“C:\Program Files\Rockwell Software\RSView\RSV32.exe”
“C:\Program Files\Rockwell Software\Samples\Norm’s Bakery\Norm’s
Bakery.rsv”
Installing and activating RSView32
n
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If the path contains spaces, you must enclose it in double quotes.
6.
Click OK, and then click Next.
7.
In the Select Program Folder dialog box, select the Startup folder, and then
click Next.
8.
Specify a name for the shortcut (for example, RSView32).
9.
Click Finish, and then click OK.
For more information, see your Windows documentation.
To add RSView32 to the StartUp folder in Windows NT and
Windows 9x
1.
Click the Windows Start button, point to Settings, and then click Taskbar.
2.
In the Taskbar Properties dialog box, click the Start Menu Programs tab.
3.
Click Add. The Create Shortcut dialog box opens.
4.
In the Command Line field, do one of the following:
„
to start RSView32 Works when Windows starts, specify the path to
RSView32. If you choose the RSView32 default installation, the path is:
“C:\Program Files\Rockwell Software\RSView\RSV32.exe”
„
to start RSView32 Works and open a project when Windows starts,
specify the path to RSView32 and to the project. For a project called
Norm’s Bakery, the path is:
“C:\Program Files\Rockwell Software\RSView\RSV32.exe”
“C:\Norm’s Bakery\Norm’s Bakery.rsv”
If the path contains spaces, you must enclose it in double quotes.
5.
Click Next.
6.
In the Select Program Folder dialog box, select the StartUp folder and
specify a name for the shortcut (for example, RSView32 Works).
7.
Click Finish.
For more information, see your Windows documentation.
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Getting Results with RSView32
Ensuring your system has sufficient virtual memory
Windows uses virtual memory to extend the physical memory installed in a
computer. It does this by moving information from RAM to disk if the
information has not been used recently. When the information is required by
an application, the information is then moved back into RAM. This process of
moving information from RAM to disk is called swapping.
To guarantee that Windows will have enough virtual memory to run RSView32
and other applications, you can force Windows to reserve a specific amount of
disk space for use as virtual memory. While the amount of virtual memory
needed depends completely on your application and what other programs are
running, the following recommendations should be sufficient in most cases.
It is better to use a permanent swap file than to use a temporary swap file. With
a permanent swap file, you specify how much disk space can be used. This
avoids any disk problems that could occur if a temporary swap file becomes too
large.
By default, Windows 9x uses a temporary swap file, but you can create a
permanent swap file. By default, Windows XP, Windows 2000, and
Windows NT use a permanent swap file, but you can change the size of this
file.
To set up a permanent swap file, specify the virtual memory setting.
To specify a virtual memory setting in Windows XP and
Windows 2000
1.
On your desktop, right-click the My Computer icon, and then click
Properties.
2.
Click the Advanced tab, and then click Performance Options.
3.
Under Virtual Memory, click Change.
4.
If you have more than one hard drive, select the hard drive you want the
swap file to be located on. Preferably, this should be the hard drive with the
fastest access time.
5.
Under Paging file size for selected drive, specify 192 MB as the Initial Size
and 384 MB or more as the Maximum Size.
6.
Click Set, and then click OK.
Installing and activating RSView32
n
13
To specify a virtual memory setting in Windows NT 4.0
1.
On your desktop, right-click the My Computer icon, and then click
Properties.
2.
Click the Performance tab.
3.
Under Virtual Memory, click Change.
4.
If you have more than one hard drive, select the hard drive you want the
swap file to be located on. Preferably, this should be the hard drive with the
fastest access time.
5.
Under Paging File Size for Selected Drive, specify 150 MB as the Initial Size
and 250 MB or more as the Maximum Size.
6.
Click Set, and then click OKx
To specify a virtual memory setting in Windows 9x
1.
On your desktop, right-click the My Computer icon, and then click
Properties.
2.
Click the Performance tab.
3.
Click the Virtual Memory button. The Virtual Memory dialog box opens.
4.
Click the button marked “Let me specify my own virtual memory settings.”
5.
If you have more than one hard drive, select the hard drive you want the
swap file to be located on. Preferably, this should be the hard drive with the
fastest access time.
6.
Specify a minimum size of 150 MB and a maximum size of 250 MB or more.
To specify a fixed swap file size, make the minimum and maximum file sizes
the same.
7.
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n
Click Set, and then click OK.
Getting Results with RSView32
Uninstalling RSView32
To uninstall RSView32, use the Uninstall RSView32 program.
To uninstall RSView32
1.
Click the Windows Start button, point to Settings, and click Control Panel.
2.
Double-click Add/Remove Programs, select RSView32 7.20.00 (CPR 7),
and click Add/Remove.
3.
Follow the on-screen instructions.
4.
When the Uninstall program is complete, restart Windows.
Installing and activating RSView32
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2
Chapter
Getting started
Welcome to RSView32
RSView32™ is Windows®-based software for developing and running humanmachine interface applications.
Designed for use in Microsoft® Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT®,
and Windows 9x, RSView32 gives you all the tools you need to create and run
effective monitoring and supervisory control applications.
RSView32 Works contains both development and runtime software. Use this
software to develop and run RSView32 applications.
RSView32 Runtime contains only runtime software. Use this software to run
applications developed in RSView32 Works.
RSView32 Works
RSView32 Works contains editors for creating a complete human-machine
interface application and contains software for running the applications you
create. Use the editors to create applications that are as simple or as
sophisticated as you need. When you have finished developing your
application, switch to run mode or use RSView32 Runtime (which is included
with RSView32 Works and uses less memory), and run your application.
n
17
Use the Graphic
Display editor to
create graphical
displays of your
process.
With RSView32, you can:
„
„
„
„
„
18
n
use the RSView32 ActiveX® and OLE container capabilities to take
advantage of advanced technology. For example, embed Visual Basic® or
other ActiveX components in RSView32 graphic displays to extend the
capabilities of RSView32.
create and edit displays with tools native to the Microsoft programs you are
using now. With sophisticated object-oriented graphics and animation, plus
simple drag-and-drop and cut-and-paste techniques, application
configuration is simplified.
use the RSView32 Object Model and VBA to share data with other
Windows programs such as Microsoft Access and Microsoft SQL Server,
interoperate with other Windows programs such as Microsoft Excel, and
customize and extend RSView32 to fit your unique needs
use graphics from the RSView32 graphic libraries or import files from other
drawing packages such as CorelDRAW®, and Adobe® Photoshop®
develop your application quickly using RSView32 productivity tools such as
the Project Documentor, Project Transport Wizard, Command Wizard,
Tag Browser, and Object Smart Path™ (OSP)
Getting Results with RSView32
„
„
„
„
„
„
avoid entering information twice. Import an Allen-Bradley® PLC or SLC™
database with the PLC Database Browser. Or browse for tags in third-party
OPC® servers. To import ControlLogix® tags, use the Logix 5000 Tag
Import utility.
use the RSView32 alarm notification capability to monitor process incidents
with multiple levels of severity. Create multiple alarm summaries to provide
specific alarm data rather than viewing the alarms for the entire system.
create trends that show process variables plotted against time. Display realtime or historical data with up to 16 pens (tags) in each trend.
log data simultaneously to multiple log files or remote ODBC databases to
provide various records of production data. Bring the logged data directly
into other third-party programs such as Microsoft Excel and Crystal
Reports® without converting files.
lock users into the RSView32 application by disabling Windows keys
use the electronic signature verification and authorization feature to verify
the identity of the operator before an action can occur. This feature allows
you to meet the security standards required for regulated manufacturing
applications, for example those required for US Government 21 CFR
Part 11 compliance.
Getting started
n
19
RSView32 Runtime
RSView32 Runtime contains the software for running RSView32 applications.
RSView32 Runtime also contains a sub-set of the RSView32 Works editors, so
you can edit selected parts of a project at runtime. RSView32 Runtime is
bundled with RSView32 Works or can be purchased separately.
With RSView32 Runtime, your application uses less memory to run.
Quick Start steps
The following steps explain how to get up and running with RSView32. To
work with RSView32, you must complete steps 1 and 2 in the specified order.
The other steps can be completed in any order.
Step 1
„
Create a project
Create the project that you will run. A project is a folder on your hard disk that
contains, among other things, the RSView32 project file (*.RSV).
For details, see Chapter 3, Creating and working with projects.
Step 2
„
Set up communications in RSView32
Establish communications between RSView32 and the hardware and devices
you are using.
For communications with most Allen-Bradley devices as well as SoftLogix™
5 devices, RSView32 uses a direct driver connection. RSView32 uses the
drivers in RSLinx®.
To set up direct driver communications to devices, set up a channel and node
and, optionally, a scan class.
For communications with other local and remote devices,
RSView32 uses
OPC or DDE connections.
OPC (OLE for process control) allows RSView32 to act as a client or server,
allowing peer-to-peer communication between different RSView32 stations, as
well as other OPC servers.
RSView32 uses standard or high-speed AdvanceDDE™ (dynamic data
exchange) data formats to communicate with DDE servers and DDE clients
such as Microsoft Excel.
20
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Getting Results with RSView32
To set up OPC or DDE communications, set up an OPC or DDE node.
For details, see Chapter 4, Setting up communications.
Step 3 „ Create graphic displays, trends, and
alarm summaries
Create graphic displays that represent your process. Build your graphic displays
in a variety of ways:
„
„
„
use the RSView32 drawing tools to create graphic objects and text. You can
create simple objects such as ellipses and rectangles, or create more complex
objects such as trends and alarm summaries. You can also embed ActiveX
objects.
drag and drop ready-made objects from the RSView32 libraries into a
display
import objects or entire images that have already been created in other
drawing packages such as CorelDRAW
Create graphic displays, trends, and alarm summaries in the Graphic Display
editor.
For details, see Chapter 5, Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries.
Step 4
„
Set up tags
Create tags in any combination of ways:
„
create tags as needed using the Tag Browser
„
create a complete tag database in the Tag Database editor
„
import an existing Allen-Bradley PLC or SLC database using the PLC
Database Browser
„
import ControlLogix tags using the Logix 5000 Tag Import utility
„
browse for tags in third-party OPC servers
For details, see Chapter 6, Creating tags.
Getting started
n
21
Step 5
„
Set up logging
Set up activity, alarm, and data logging to have a permanent record of what is
happening when your system is running.
Set up activity logging in the Activity Log Setup editor. Set up alarm logging in
the Alarm Log Setup editor. Set up data logging in the Data Log Setup editor.
All logged information is stored in dBASE® IV (.DBF) format and can be
viewed with third-party software such as Microsoft Excel, Crystal Reports, and
Visual FoxPro®. For data logging, you can also use the ODBC storage format
to store data directly in an ODBC-compliant database.
For details, see Chapter 7, Setting up logging and security.
Step 6
„
Secure your system
Set up security at the:
„
so you control which users or groups of users have access to
which features.
Project level
In addition, at the project level, you can use the signature button to verify
and track actions such as tag writes and running commands. This feature,
together with other RSView32 security features, allows you to meet the
security standards required for regulated manufacturing applications, for
example those required for US Government 21 CFR Part 11 compliance.
„
System level so you lock users into your RSView32 application. For
Windows 9x, set up system-level security in the RSView32 Startup editor.
For Windows XP, Windows 2000, and Windows NT, set up system-level
security using the Win2K XP DeskLock tool or NT 4.0 DeskLock tool,
included on the RSView32 Resources CD-ROM. These tools are also
available from the Windows Start menu, on the RSView32 Tools menu.
For details, see Chapter 7, Setting up logging and security.
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Getting Results with RSView32
Step 7 „ Customize and integrate RSView32 with
other applications
Use the RSView32 Object Model with Visual Basic or Visual Basic for
Applications (VBA) to customize and extend the capabilities of RSView32, and
to integrate RSView32 with other applications. Some ways you might do this
include:
„
Networking. If your RSView32 application includes logic to switch between
redundant PLCs, you can use the RSView32 Object Model with Visual
Basic or VBA to include node information in a graphic display. This lets you
indicate the station number of the active PLC, and allows an operator to
take corrective action if a PLC goes offline.
Write a VBA program to modify alarm information,
such as thresholds and severities, each time a different product is
manufactured on a multipurpose production line.
„
Tag management.
„
User and access control.
„
„
Within a VBA program, check the security code
for an engineer or operator, and then allow the VBA program to change
alarm configurations, or display only status information, depending on the
person’s level of access.
Alarms. Write your own alarm detection algorithms using Visual Basic or
VBA, and then add alarm events to RSView32, to respond to your
algorithms for annunciation, logging, printing, and for display in alarm
summaries.
Data logging. Use the RSView32 Object Model and other object models to
collect data from multiple sources, such as expert systems, self-tuning PID
algorithms, and tags, and then view the data in trends. You can also filter
data for your own needs by reading from one data log model, and then
writing to another data log model.
Use the RSView32 Object Model with Visual Basic or
VBA to log specific operator actions for tracking and documentation
purposes. Write activity information to customized categories for sorting
and analysis.
„
Activity logging.
„
Application interfacing. Use the RSView32 Object Model to interface with
the object models of other applications. For example, you can use the
Microsoft Excel object model to create a report in a worksheet, to add
statistical formulas for analysis, and then print the report.
Getting started
n
23
3
Chapter
Creating and working
with projects
Creating a project
To begin working in RSView32™, you need to create a project (also referred to
as an application). For more information about projects, see “What is a
project?” on page 26.
New
To create a project, click the New button on the toolbar or click New on the
File menu.
The project name,
including the path,
can be up to 200
characters long.
To specify a
different name for
the subdirectory,
type it here.
After you create a new project, a Project Manager appears displaying the name
of the project.
n
25
What is a project?
A project consists of a folder on your hard disk that contains, at a minimum,
the following items:
„
project file (*.RSV)
„
tag folder
„
comprf (communications profile) folder
„
cache folder
The *.RSV file contains general project information such as a list of project
components and their directory locations and version numbers. By default, all
project components are located locally in folders under the project folder, but
they can also be located in other directories or shared with other projects
running on other computers.
Project files
The following table lists the default RSView32 folders.
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n
Folder
Contents
File extensions
project name
RSView32 project file, security
and user account files, and the
folders described below
.rsv, .sec, .act
project name\actlog
Activity log files
.dbf
project name\almlog
Alarm log files
.dbf
project name\als
Alarm summary files
.als
project name\cab
ActiveX® control setup files
.cab
project name\cache
RSView32 internal files
.ctl, .dat, .idx
project name\comprf
Internal information on
channels, nodes, and scan
classes
.csv, .ctl
Getting Results with RSView32
Folder
Contents
File extensions
project name\dlglog
Data log models
Data log files
Information for current file set
Information for historical file
sets
.mdf
.dbf
.dns
.dlg
project name\dts
Derived tag files
.dts
project name\eds
Events files
.eds
project name\gfx
Graphic display files
.gfx
project name\key
Global key files
.key
project name\mcr
Macro files
.mcr
project name\par
Parameter files
.par
project name\rcp
Recipe files
.rcp
project name\tag
Tag database files
Tag cache file
.db, .ctl, .dat
.cac
project name\tgs
Tag monitor files
.tgs
project name\vba
RSView32 VBA code files
.vba
Creating and working with projects
n
27
Exploring the RSView32 main window
Once you create a project in RSView32, you will see the RSView32 main
window.
Menu bar
Toolbar
Project
Manager
Activity bar
Status bar
The menu bar
The menu bar contains the menu items for the active window. Each editor has
its own set of menus.
The toolbar
The toolbar contains buttons for commonly used menu items so you can
quickly access the items without opening the menu. When you point to a
button on the toolbar, the button name is displayed in a tooltip.
Tooltip
28
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Getting Results with RSView32
The Project Manager
The Project Manager contains the editors for creating and editing the
components that will make up your project. For more information about the
Project Manager, see “Working in the Project Manager” on page 31.
The activity bar
The activity bar shows system activities. To log activities to the activity bar, the
Activity Bar check boxes must be selected in the Activity Log Setup editor. For
details, see Chapter 8, Configuring Activity Logging, in the online RSView32 User’s
Guide.
The status bar
The status bar provides different kinds of information depending on where the
pointer is and what RSView32 is doing. It can provide information on:
„
the active window or selected tool
For example, if you position the pointer over the Open button, the
following message appears in the status bar:
„
the location of a project component
For example, if you select a component in the Project Manager, the status
bar shows the path to the component, such as:
Creating and working with projects
n
29
Showing and hiding the toolbar, status bar, and
activity bar
You can display or hide the toolbar, status bar, and activity bar using the items
on the View menu. If there is a checkmark beside the item, the bar is visible. If
there is no checkmark, the bar is hidden.
The toolbar and status bar are
visible, but the activity bar is not.
Using the activity bar
You can detach the activity bar from the RSView32 main window and move
the bar anywhere on the screen. However, you can attach the bar only to the
bottom of the main window. To move the bar when it is not attached, grab the
title bar and drag.
To detach the activity bar, place the pointer
between the buttons, and drag the mouse.
When the bar is not attached to the window, you can resize it. To show more
messages, grab the bottom of the bar and drag to make it bigger.
To clear the most recent message in the activity bar, click Clear. To clear all the
messages in the activity bar, click Clear All.
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Getting Results with RSView32
Working in the Project Manager
Each time you create a project, a Project Manager appears showing the project
name.
Project name
Tabs
Folder
Editor
Left pane
Right pane
The Project Manager window is divided into two panes. When you first create
a project, the left pane appears with a series of folders and the right pane is
empty. As you create project components, they are displayed in the right pane.
The parts of the Project Manager are described below.
Creating and working with projects
n
31
Tabs
The Project Manager contains tabs so you can easily switch between edit and
run modes. The Edit Mode tab contains the editors for developing your
project. The Run Mode tab contains the components that you can use at
runtime. Switching between the two tabs allows you to test your project quickly
as you create it.
In run mode, you can run individual project components, or you can run the
entire project. When you are in this mode, you see what users of your project
will see. Double-click a component to run it.
For detailed information about running a project, see Chapter 18, Running your
project, in the online RSView32 User’s Guide.
Folders
The Project Manager uses folders to organize editors. To open or close a folder,
do one of the following:
„
double-click the folder
„
press Enter to either open or close the folder depending on its current state
„
select the folder, right-click to open the context menu, and then click
Expand or Collapse
Right-click to view
the context menu.
Editors
Editors are for creating or configuring project components. To open an editor,
do one of the following:
„
„
double-click the editor’s icon
select the editor’s icon, right-click to open the context menu, and then click
New or Show
Right-click to view
the context menu.
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Getting Results with RSView32
The context menu contains New if you can create a component with the editor
and contains Show if you cannot create a component with the editor.
The following table describes each editor.
Use this editor
To
Channel
Specify channels for direct driver communication with
devices. Channels must be set up before you configure
nodes for direct driver devices.
Node
Assign names and define attributes for the direct driver
devices, OPC® servers, or DDE servers that RSView32
will communicate with.
Scan Class
Set up the rate for scanning tags that communicate with
direct driver devices.
Tag Database
Create tags and set up alarms.
Tag Monitor
Display the realtime values of a tag or group of tags.
User Accounts
Assign security codes to users to limit access to a project.
Security Codes
Assign security codes to commands and macros.
Activity Log Setup
Specify the type of system activity you want to log and
where, when, and how you want it logged.
Activity Log
Viewer
View activity log files.
Startup
Specify how your project will look and what will run when
the project starts.
Command Line
Open a command line for entering RSView32 commands.
Display
Create graphic displays.
Library
Drag and drop objects from the graphic libraries into your
graphic displays.
Creating and working with projects
n
33
34
n
Use this editor
To
Parameters
Create a parameter file for use with graphic displays
containing tag placeholders, so you can use the same
graphic displays with different tags.
Recipe
Create a recipe file for use with graphic displays containing
a recipe field.
Alarm Setup
Configure where, when, and how you want alarm messages
logged.
Alarm Log Viewer
View historical alarm information.
Alarm Summary
Specify the alarm information you want displayed and
create a format for that information.
Suppressed List
Display a list of tags for which alarm notification is
suppressed.
Data Log Setup
Create data log models, specifying where, when, and how
you want selected tag values logged.
Derived Tags
Create tags whose values are derived from other tags and
functions.
Events
Create events, which are expressions that trigger
commands or macros.
Macro
Create macros to run a series of RSView32 commands.
Global Keys
Remap your keyboard to run RSView32 commands.
Visual Basic®
Editor
Create VBA code to do conditional branching, issue
RSView32 commands, or link RSView32 data to other
applications.
Getting Results with RSView32
Components
Components appear in the right pane of the Project Manager. A component is
a reference to a physical file. The component can reference a file in a folder
under the project directory, a file outside of the project directory, or a file on
another computer.
These components
were created with
the Graphic Display
editor.
Displaying components
To display components, select an editor. Any components created with the
editor appear in the right pane of the Project Manager.
Opening components
To open a component, do one of the following:
„
double-click the component
„
select the component, and then click the Edit button in the Project Manager
„
select the component, right-click to open the context menu, and then click
Edit
Right-click to view the
context menu.
Creating and working with projects
n
35
For detailed information about using the Remove, Rename, and Delete menu
items, see Chapter 1, Working with projects, in the online RSView32 User’s Guide.
Viewing component locations
Components can reference files in different locations. To view the location of
the component’s file, select the component in the Project Manager, and then
check the location displayed in the status bar.
The component Cooling Area is located at:
The component Oven Area is located at:
Using the same component in more than one project
The same files can be used in more than one project by adding components to
a project using one of two options. When you add a component in the Project
Manager using the Copy Existing Component into Project option, you are
creating a copy of the file in the project. When you add a component using the
second option, Create Shortcut to Existing Component, you are not creating a
copy of the file in the project. Instead, you are creating a path to the file’s
location outside of the project. The advantage of this method is that there is
only one copy of the file, and changes made to it are available to all projects
using the file.
To add a component, select the editor that was used to create the desired
component, right-click to display the context menu, and then click Copy
Existing Component into Project or click Create Shortcut to Existing
Component.
In the dialog box, locate the component you want to add and click Open. The
component appears in the right pane of the Project Manager. Files that are
located outside of the project have an arrow symbol on the component icon,
as shown on the previous page for the Oven Area component.
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Getting Results with RSView32
Hints for working in editors
When developing a project, you will use many different editors, but they have
many similar features and often require similar information. Knowing how to
use these features saves time.
Using the context menus
The Project Manager and the Graphic Display editor use context menus. To
open a context menu, right-click the mouse.
Using the Selection button
Selection button
The Selection button appears beside data-entry fields. You can type
information into the fields, or you can click the Selection button to open a list
containing valid entries for the field.
Entering tag names
Many editors require a tag name. Tags are stored in the tag database and their
names are then used in other parts of RSView32. You do not have to create tags
before you work in other editors.
To supply a tag name, use any of these methods
„
„
„
type the name of a tag that already exists in the tag database
click the ... (Selection) button or Tags button, whichever is available, to
open the Tag Browser where you can select, create, or edit a tag
type the name of a tag that is not yet created. When you try to save, you are
prompted to create the tag. You do not have to create the tag to use the tag
name, but be sure to create the tag later or errors will be reported at runtime.
For detailed information about tags, see Chapter 4, Creating tags, in the online
RSView32 User’s Guide.
Creating and working with projects
n
37
Using RSView32 commands
Many editors require an RSView32 command. Commands allow you to control
RSView32 at runtime. Most commands accept parameters for added precision
and control. You can also create a list of RSView32 commands in a macro and
use the macro name in places where commands are required.
Using the Command Wizard
The Command Wizard helps you select and build commands.
Click a folder to
display the
commands in a
category.
When you click a
command the
command
syntax is
displayed here.
To open the Wizard, do one of the following:
„
„
„
click the ... (Selection) button beside any action field or in the command line
double-click in an action field or, in the Macro editor, in any area of the
window
click the Commands item on the Edit menu
For detailed information about RSView32 commands, see Appendix A,
RSView32 Commands, in the online RSView32 User’s Guide, or see online help.
Using expressions
Many editors use expressions to compute values based on tags and functions.
Expressions can be complex logical expressions, or they can be tag names.
For detailed information about expressions, see Chapter 14, Creating expressions,
in the online RSView32 User’s Guide.
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Using the Project Documentor
The Project Documentor is a utility that provides you with detailed information
on RSView32 projects. This utility is a browser that allows you to view the
contents of the project’s components and the tags used in these components.
You can also print and export the information.
For more information, see the Project Documentor Help, included on the
RSView32 Resources CD-ROM, and also available from the RSView32 Tools
menu on the Windows Start menu.
Using the Project Transport Wizard
The Project Transport wizard lets you:
„
rename a project
„
copy a project
„
delete a project
„
back a project up to a .zip file
„
restore a project that has been backed up to a .zip file.
For more information, see the Transport Help, included on the RSView32
Resources CD-ROM, and also available from the RSView32 Tools menu on
the Windows Start menu.
Using components from ControlView projects
Many components, such as graphic displays or tag databases, can be imported
from a ControlView™ or ControlView Builder project into RSView32. For
more information, see the ControlView Project Import Wizard Help, included
on the RSView32 Resources CD-ROM, and also available from the RSView32
Tools menu on the Windows Start menu.
For a description of how RSView32 differs from ControlView and
ControlView Builder, see Appendix C, Differences Between RSView32 and
ControlView, in the online RSView32 User’s Guide.
Creating and working with projects
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4
Chapter
Setting up
communications
Using direct driver communications
For communications with most Allen-Bradley® devices, RSView32™ uses a
direct-driver connection. RSView32 uses the drivers in RSLinx® to
communicate with Allen-Bradley devices.
To communicate with SoftLogix™ 5 programmable controllers, you must use
an RSLinx driver.
You must use the version of RSLinx that came with your RSView32 software.
This version has been tested for compatibility with RSView32. Other versions
may not function correctly.
If you are not using Allen-Bradley devices—for example, if you are using
Siemens or Modicon devices—use OPC® or DDE communications. For
details, see “Using OPC and DDE communications” on page 43.
Windows Service Packs
If your operating system is Windows XP Professional Edition, use Service
Pack 1 or later.
If your operating system is Windows® 2000 Professional or Windows 2000
Server, use Service Pack 3 or later.
If your operating system is Windows NT®, use version 4.0 or greater. Service
Pack 4 or Service Pack 6 for Windows NT 4.0 (available from the Microsoft®
web site) must be installed as well.
n
41
Communications editors
To set up direct-driver communications, open the System folder in the Project
Manager, and use the editors shown below.
Use these editors
to set up
communications.
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Getting Results with RSView32
Setting up direct driver communications
1.
Start RSLinx and then configure and load the appropriate communications
driver.
2.
Start RSView32 and create or open a project.
3.
In the Channel editor, select a channel and assign the appropriate network
and the RSLinx driver to it.
4.
In the Node editor, create nodes for each programmable controller you
wish to communicate with. In the Data Source field, select Direct Driver.
5.
If you want to change the default rate at which nodes are scanned, edit the
scan classes in the Scan Class editor. This step is optional.
6.
In the Tag Database editor, create tags. In the Data Source Type field,
choose Device. In the Node Name field, choose one of the nodes you have
created. In the Scan Class field, choose a scan class. In the Address field,
specify the physical memory location in the programmable controller.
7.
Check that communications are working. For details, see “Checking that
communications are working” on page 45.
Using OPC and DDE communications
For communications with a wide range of local and remote devices, RSView32
uses OPC or DDE connections. OPC (OLE for process control) allows
RSView32 to act as a client or server, allowing peer-to-peer communication
between different RSView32 stations, as well as other OPC servers such as
KEPServerEnterprise™. RSView32 can browse tags in other OPC servers, and
also provides for OPC tag browsing of RSView32 tags. RSView32 supports
OPC 1.0 and OPC 2.0.
RSView32 uses standard or high-speed AdvanceDDE™ (dynamic data
exchange) data formats to communicate with DDE servers and DDE clients
such as Microsoft Excel.
If you are not using Allen-Bradley devices—for example, if you are using
Siemens or Modicon devices—you can use OPC or DDE to communicate
with the devices.
Setting up communications
n
43
Communications editors
To set up OPC or DDE communications, open the System folder in the
Project Manager, and use the editors shown below.
Use these editors
to set up
communications.
Setting up communications with OPC and DDE
servers
44
n
1.
Start the OPC or DDE server.
2.
Start RSView32 and create or open a project.
3.
In the Node editor, create nodes for each OPC or DDE server and/or
topic you wish to communicate with. In the node’s Data Source field,
select OPC Server or DDE Server, according to which type you are using.
4.
In the Tag Database editor, create tags. In the Data Source Type field,
choose Device. In the Node Name field, choose the OPC or DDE nodes
that you have created. In the Address field, specify the name of the tag in
the OPC server, or specify the DDE item.
5.
Check that communications are working. For details, see “Checking that
communications are working” next.
Getting Results with RSView32
Checking that communications are working
The simplest way to check if communications are working is to use the tag
monitor. The tag monitor shows tag values and states. If you have not created
a tag, use the Tag Browser in the tag monitor to create the tag.
When
communications
are working, the
Value column
contains a value
and the State
column says Valid.
Follow the steps below to check communications for direct driver, OPC, and
DDE devices.
To check communications for an existing tag
1.
In the RSView32 Project Manager, open the System folder, double-click
Command Line, and then enter ComStatusOn to start logging
communication errors.
2.
In the RSView32 Project Manager, open the System folder, and then open
the Tag Monitor.
3.
In the Tag Name column, type the name of a tag that you have created, and
then press Enter.
If communications are working, a value will appear in the Value column and
Valid will appear in the State column. If communications are not working,
an error will appear in the State column, and an error message will appear
in the activity bar.
Setting up communications
n
45
To check communications for a new tag
1.
In the RSView32 Project Manager, open the System folder, and then open
the Tag Monitor.
2.
On the View menu, click Form.
3.
Click the ... (Selection) button beside the Tag Name field to open the Tag
Browser, and then click New Tag.
4.
Type a tag name, and then choose a tag type. Under Data Source Type,
click Device. For Node Name, click the ... (Selection) button to display a
list of the nodes you’ve created, and then select a node. In the Address
field, type a programmable controller address for direct-driver
communications, the name of a tag in the OPC server, or a DDE item.
Click OK.
5.
The newly created tag is selected in the Tag Browser. Click OK.
If communications are working, a value will appear in the Value column and
Valid will appear in the State column.
If communications are not working
„
Check that the communication driver is properly configured.
To verify that the device you are trying to communicate with has been
detected, in RSLinx use RSWho.
If the device appears in RSWho but a tag value is not displayed in
RSView32, close your project, close RSView32, and then close RSLinx.
Restart RSView32, reopen the project, and then open the tag monitor again.
(RSLinx starts automatically when you restart RSView32.)
„
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n
For details about the type of communication errors you are experiencing,
type ComStatusOn at the command line, then view the activity log in the
Activity Log Viewer. To log communication errors, the Communications
category must be selected in the Activity Log Setup editor. For details, see
Chapter 8, Configuring activity logging, in the online RSView32 User’s Guide.
Getting Results with RSView32
5
Chapter
Creating displays, trends,
and alarm summaries
Creating and editing graphic displays
You can create any number of graphic displays as part of an RSView32™
project. A graphic display represents the operator’s view of plant activity. It can
show system or process data and provide operators with a way to write values
to an external device such as a programmable controller or server.
A graphic display is made up of graphic objects. To add objects to a display,
you can:
„
create objects using the editor’s drawing tools
„
drag and drop objects from another display or a graphic library
„
copy and paste objects from another Windows® application
„
import objects or entire displays created in other drawing packages such as
CorelDRAW®, and Photoshop®
n
47
„
embed ActiveX® and OLE objects.
Trend display
Buttons for opening other displays
Some objects have animation attached to them so they change appearance to
reflect changes in plant activity. To attach animation, you must specify one or
more tags that will control the object’s appearance and specify how the
appearance will change as the tag’s values change
Creating a new graphic display
To create a new graphic display, double-click the Graphic Display editor icon
in the Project Manager.
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Getting Results with RSView32
When the editor opens, you are presented with a new, blank display ready for
you to begin work. The editor is your drawing space in which you can create
any type of display you like.
Move these
toolbars
anywhere you
want. To see
more toolbars,
use the View
menu.
Drawing area.
To see what
actions you can
perform, rightclick to open the
context menu.
When you test run a graphic display, the activity bar provides runtime information. To hide the
activity bar, click the Project Manager, open the View menu, and then click Activity Bar.
Saving and naming the graphic display
To save the graphic display, click the Save button. In the Save As dialog box,
type a name for the display. The name can be up to 200 characters long
(including the path) and can include spaces.
Types of displays
You can create any type of display in the Graphic Display editor. For example,
you can create a full-screen display that serves as a main menu for all the other
displays, or you can create a small display that pops up when required. What
makes displays appear different to users is the display’s type, size, and behavior.
Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries
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49
The type of display you choose determines how the display interacts with other
displays on the screen:
„
„
„
is the default display type. Use this option if you want the graphic
display to replace other open graphic displays when it opens. RSView32 will
close any graphic display that the newly opened display overlaps. This way
you don’t need to issue separate commands to close the other displays.
Replace
On Top is used to keep the graphic display on top at all times. It will remain
on top even if another display has focus. However, if more than one graphic
display of the On Top type is open at once, the display that has focus, or
had the most recent focus, appears on top.
Overlay is used if the graphic display doesn’t need to replace others or
appear on top. The display will layer with other displays, overlapping some
and being overlapped by others as the focus changes between multiple
displays. Overlay displays always appear behind On Top displays, and are
replaced by Replace displays. Use Overlay with care, because keeping
multiple displays open can affect system performance.
You specify the display type in the Display Settings dialog box in the Graphic
Display editor. Choose Display Settings on the context menu (shown on
page 49) to open the dialog box.
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Getting Results with RSView32
Opening and closing displays
RSView32 uses commands to open and close displays. To open a display, use
the Display <file> command. To close a display, you can use the Replace
display type (so that opening a new display causes other open displays to close),
or use the Abort <file> command to explicitly close a display.
Clicking the Breads
button opens the
Bread - Main Menu
display and closes
the Norm’s Bakery Main Menu display.
In the above example, the display type for the Bread - Main Menu display is
Replace, so that the Norm’s Bakery - Main Menu display closes automatically
(is replaced) when the Bread - Main Menu display opens. The following
command has been assigned to the Breads button:
Display Bread - Main Menu
When a user clicks the Breads button, the Bread - Main Menu display opens
and the Norm’s Bakery - Main Menu display closes.
If the Bread - Main Menu display uses the Overlay or On Top display type, and
you want the Norm’s Bakery - Main Menu display to close when the user opens
the Bread - Main Menu display, assign two commands to the Breads button:
Abort Norm’s Bakery - Main Menu
Display Bread - Main Menu
Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries
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51
Choosing a background color and display size
You can change a display’s background color and size any time during the
drawing process. You can also set your own defaults so the Graphic Display
editor opens just the way you want. Setting a default is one way to give your
graphic displays a consistent look and feel.
Specify the background color and display size in the Display Settings dialog
box. Right-click an empty area of the display and then click Display Settings on
the context menu.
You’ll probably
want to specify Size
to Main Window at
Runtime for most
displays.
Specify the
background color.
To make your
choices the default
for all new displays,
click Set as Default.
Choosing a display size
For most displays, use the Size to Main Window at Runtime option. Any
display that uses this option is automatically scaled to occupy all of the
RSView32 main window. You only need to specify the window size for smaller
displays, such as pop-up or tiled displays.
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Importing a graphic
You might like to include graphics you’ve already created in other applications.
RSView32 imports many different graphic file types, including .BMP, .WMF,
.DXF, and .JPG, so you can import images such as logos, photographs, or
drawings of a machine or process.
You can import .DXF files generated by AutoCAD® version 12 or earlier
directly. You must export .DXF files generated by AutoCAD version 13 or later
to .WMF format and then import the .WMF files into RSView32.
To import a file, click the File menu and then click Open. Select the type of file
to import in the Files of type field, locate the file you want to import, and then
click Open.
The Norm’s Bakery
logo was imported
into the graphic
display.
Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries
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53
Viewing the libraries and samples
Before you start drawing objects, look at the graphic libraries and samples
included with RSView32. The libraries and samples contain hundreds of
objects that you can drag and drop into your display, saving you drawing time.
Some of the objects might not be exactly what you need, but you can change
them in any way you want—resize them, reshape them, change their color, and
so on.
To see a list of the libraries, click the Library icon in the left pane of the Project
Manager. The library components are listed in the right pane of the Project
Manager.
Instead of drawing a slider, drag and drop it from the Sliders library.
Many library objects already have animation configured for them. When you
drag and drop an object into a display, all animation attached to the object is
retained. You can use the animation as is, but you will usually want to change
the tag name associated with the animation. To change the tag name, use tag
substitution.
Using tag substitution
With tag substitution, you can replace some or all of the tag, expression, or
command references in a graphic display. Select an object or group of objects,
right-click to open the context menu, and then click Tag Substitution.
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Creating a button
Button tool
Use the Button tool to create, label, and specify an action for a button. You can
create four different styles of button, and can attach any RSView32 command
to the button to create the button’s action.
The button’s appearance is up to you. The fonts, colors, and fill styles available
for other graphic objects are also available for button objects. You can also
import a graphic image for the button so you can label the button with a symbol
or picture.
To create buttons that are the same size, create one button, and then duplicate
it. To edit the duplicated button, double-click it to open the Button
Configuration dialog box.
The grid is helpful
when drawing
objects. To use the
grid, right-click an
empty area of the
display, and then
click Grid Settings.
Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries
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55
Adding an action to the button
Users expect buttons to perform actions, and the most common button actions
are opening and closing displays.
To specify an action for a button, double-click it. In the Button Configuration
dialog box, click the Action tab and then specify a command. For a complete
list of RSView32 commands and their actions, use the Command Wizard, or
see the online help.
In the example below, a display called Bread - Main Menu has been created and
is used with the Display command. At runtime, when a user clicks the Breads
button, the Bread - Main Menu display opens.
Click this button to
open the Command
Wizard and create a
command.
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Embedding an ActiveX object
ActiveX objects are supplied independently of RSView32 through products
such as Microsoft® Visual Basic® (version 4.0 or later). When an ActiveX object
is embedded in a display, RSView32 can use the object’s features by linking the
object’s properties to RSView32 tags and by linking the object’s events and
methods to RSView32 commands.
The Baking display requires a gauge for monitoring oven temperature. Instead
of drawing the gauge, the designer uses the Rockwell Software gauge object and
attaches an RSView32 tag to the gauge’s Value property. At runtime, the
gauge’s needle changes position to reflect the tag’s value.
ActiveX tool
To embed an ActiveX object, use the ActiveX tool. Drag the mouse to draw a
box about the size you want for the object and release the mouse. In the Insert
an ActiveX Control dialog box, double-click an ActiveX object. To link the
object to an RSView32 tag, use the ActiveX Property Panel dialog box. Select
the object, right-click to open the context menu, point to ActiveX, and then
click Property Panel.
Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries
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57
Select the property you want to link to a tag, and then type, or browse for the RSView32 tag name.
You can view an object’s properties, methods, and events in two ways:
„
„
to view the object’s properties, select the object, and then click ActiveX
Property Panel on the View menu
to view the properties, methods, and events through RSView32, select the
object, right-click to display the context menu, point to Animation, point to
ActiveX Control, and then click Properties, Events, or Methods
If you frequently use ActiveX objects in your displays you might want to add
the icons for the objects you use to the ActiveX Toolbox. For more
information, see Chapter 11, Creating graphic displays, in the online RSView32
User’s Guide.
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Adding color to objects
You can change the color of objects before or after you draw them. Objects
can have two colors—line color and fill color. Line color applies to the outline
of an object, and to text. Fill color applies to the inside of an object.
To show the color palettes, click them on the View menu. Like toolbars, the
color palettes can be placed anywhere on the screen and can be attached to any
edge of the window. To apply color to an object, select the object and then click
a new color on the appropriate color palette.
When you select an object, the object’s fill color is selected
in the Fill Color palette.
Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries
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Arranging the objects
Once you’ve created two or more objects, you can arrange them. You can align
them, space them, and group them. To select multiple objects, click one object
and Ctrl-click other objects. You can also select multiple objects by holding the
mouse down and dragging. As you drag, a selection box appears around the
objects; release the mouse when the box includes all the objects you want.
To show the Alignment
toolbar, click Alignment
Toolbar on the View menu.
Aligning objects
Objects are aligned based on their relative positions. In the example above,
clicking Align Top aligns the top of the Reports button to the top of the Breads
button. Clicking Align Bottom aligns the bottom of the Breads button to the
bottom of the Reports button.
Spacing objects
Spacing objects ensures there is an equal amount of space between each object.
Objects are spaced based on the distance between the outside edges of the two
outer-most objects. Use the buttons on the toolbar to space objects vertically
and horizontally.
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Grouping objects
Grouping objects makes individual objects into a single object. Once objects
are grouped, you can still work with the individual objects using group editing.
Click to select
the group.
Double-click to
edit the group.
Click an object to
select and edit it.
Animating objects
Most graphic objects can have animation attached to them. Groups of objects
can also have animation. You can attach as many types of animation as you like.
For example, apply both width and height animation to an object so it looks
like it is moving out of or into the display as it grows and shrinks.
Using Object Smart Path
Attaching animation to objects is easy with Object Smart Path™ (OSP). With
OSP, you define an object’s range of motion by dragging the object—there’s
no pixel counting involved.
Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries
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OSP works through the Animation dialog box. The Animation dialog box can
stay open all the time, so you can move between it and the graphic display. To
open the Animation dialog box, select an object, right-click to display the
context menu, click Animation, and then click a type of animation.
The slider is shown
in its At Minimum
position.
Whenever the tag
associated with the
slider is at its
minimum, the
slider is in this
position.
To set up the object’s start position, place the object where you want it to start,
and then click At Minimum in the Animation dialog box. To set up the object’s
end position, drag the object to where you want it to end, and then click At
Maximum in the Animation dialog box.
Copying and pasting animation
You can copy the animation from one object and paste it on another object. If
the object has more than one type of animation, all animation is copied and
pasted. To copy animation, select the object with the desired animation, rightclick to open the context menu, and click Copy Animation. To paste animation,
select the object you want to paste animation to, right-click to open the context
menu, and then click Paste Animation.
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Testing the animation
Test Mode
Normal Mode
To test the animation in a display, use test mode. In test mode, RSView32
collects data from the data source and animates your display. However, test
mode does not change the size or position of your display. When you’re
finished testing, return to normal mode to continue editing. To switch between
normal and test mode, click the buttons on the toolbar or click the options on
the View menu.
Setting up runtime appearance
You can specify how each graphic display will appear at runtime. You can
specify the display type, window style, and window size and position. The
window style includes whether the window will have a title bar and, if so, what
the title bar will say and what buttons it will include.
If you don’t
include a title bar,
you cannot have
items such as the
Minimize button
that are part of the
title bar.
Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries
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Creating a trend
A trend is a visual representation of realtime or historical tag values, which
provides operators with a way to track plant activity as it is happening.
With RSView32 trends, you can:
„
plot data for up to sixteen tags in each trend object
„
plot constant values as well as tag values
„
use shading to emphasize when a tag crosses a reference value
„
use realtime data from tags or use historical data from log files
„
use data from a local or remote computer
The numbers
along this axis
represent the
minimum and
maximum
values for the
tag selected in
the legend.
Each line, or
pen, represents
a tag value.
Each pen’s tag
name appears
in the legend.
The sliders and buttons around the trend are graphic objects created separately from the
trend but are important because they control the trend at runtime. You can find these
objects in the Trends library.
You can drag and drop a trend from a graphic library into your display, or you
can create a trend with the Trend drawing tool.
To use a trend from the graphic libraries, click the Library icon in the left pane
of the Project Manager, and then double-click Trends in the right pane of the
Project Manager. Select all or part of the trend and drag and drop it into your
display. Use tag substitution to update the tags associated with the trend. For
details, see “Using tag substitution” on page 54.
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Trend tool
To create a trend, click the Trend tool. Drag the mouse to draw a box about
the size you want for the trend and then release the mouse. In the Trend dialog
box, set up the trend.
For detailed information about trends, see Chapter 13, Configuring trends, in the
online RSView32 User’s Guide.
Creating an alarm summary
An alarm summary displays the alarm information recorded in the computer’s
memory. The summary is completely configurable, so you can determine what
and how alarm information is displayed.
Although you can
add many
headings, too
much information
can be
overwhelming.
The button bar can contain a variety of buttons and can be placed on any edge of the alarm summary.
The summary can list up to 1,000 alarm entries. As new alarms occur, they
appear at the top of the list. When the summary becomes full, one alarm is
removed from the bottom of the list for each new alarm that appears at the top.
Alarms are also removed when they are out-of-alarm and acknowledged.
Creating displays, trends, and alarm summaries
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Filter alarms
To limit the information included in an alarm summary, filter out the
information you don’t want. You can filter information by tag name, tag type,
alarm severity, and alarm state.
Assign colors to alarms
You can configure alarm incidents to be a different color. For example, you
might configure alarms of low severity as blue, medium severity as yellow, and
high severity as red. When the alarm is displayed, the operator can tell an
alarm’s severity at a glance. You can also configure different blink styles for
different alarm severities, as well as for Out of Alarm and Fault State messages.
You can drag and drop an alarm summary from a graphic library into your
display or you can create an alarm summary with the Alarm Summary tool.
To use an alarm summary from the graphic libraries, click the Library icon in
the left pane of the Project Manager. The libraries are listed in the right pane of
the Project Manager. Double-click the Alarm Information library to open it.
Select the alarm summary and drag and drop it into your display.
Alarm
Summary tool
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n
To create an alarm summary, click the Alarm Summary tool. Drag the mouse
to draw a box the size you want for the alarm summary and then release the
mouse. You will be presented with a blank alarm summary. To add headings,
click the Insert menu. To add buttons, click Buttons on the Format menu.
Getting Results with RSView32
6
Chapter
Creating tags
What is a tag?
A tag is a logical name for a variable in a device or in local memory (RAM). Tags
that receive their data from an external source such as a programmable
controller or server are referred to as device tags. Tags that receive their data
internally from RSView32™ are referred to as memory tags.
Tags are stored in the tag database and their names are then used in other parts
of RSView32. You can create tags in a combination of ways. You can:
„
create tags as needed
„
create many tags at once
„
import tags from an Allen-Bradley® PLC database or from ControlLogix®
„
create tags using the RSView32 Object Model and Visual Basic® or Visual
Basic for Applications. For more information about using the RSView32
Object Model, see Chapter 8, Using the RSView32 Object Model and VBA.
Also see Help.
RSView32 provides for OPC® 2.0 browsing of RSView32 tags.
Tag types
RSView32 uses the following tag types:
„
Analog tags
store a range of values.
„
Digital tags
store 0 or 1.
„
String tags store ASCII strings, a series of characters, or whole words. The
maximum string length is 255 characters.
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67
„
System tags store information generated while the system is running,
including alarm information and the system time and date. RSView32
creates system tags when a project is created and stores the tags in the
system folder in the tag database. You cannot edit or write to system tags,
but you can use them anywhere you would use any other tag.
Creating tags as needed
You can create tags as you need them while working in other editors. To create
a tag, do one of the following:
„
„
in any field requiring a tag or an expression, type a tag name. If the tag
doesn’t exist in the tag database, you will be prompted to create the tag
when you try to save. You can use the tag name without creating the tag, but
be sure to create the tag later or errors will occur at runtime.
click the Tags or ... (Selection) button, whichever is available, to open the
Tag Browser. Use the Tag Browser to select, create, and edit tags.
Click this button to open the
Tag Browser.
Organize tags
into folders. For details, see
“Using folders to organize
tags” on page 71.
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Creating many tags at once
To create many tags at once, use the Tag Database editor. You can organize
tags into groups using folders. Using folders speeds up database creation
because you can duplicate a folder and its tags in a single operation. For
example, if you have several similar machines that require the same tags, you
can create a folder called Machine1 and define its tags. To create the tags for
Machine2, duplicate the folder and change the node name or address of each
tag in the new folder.
Organize tags into folders. For details, see “Using folders to organize tags” on page 71.
You can also import tags created in other applications. To import tags, use the
Database Import and Export Wizard. The Database Import and Export
Wizard is available from the RSView32 Tools menu (on the Start menu, select
Programs, Rockwell Software, RSView32 Tools, Database Import and Export
Wizard).
For more information about using the wizard, see Database Import and Export
Help.
Creating tags
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69
Importing tags from an Allen-Bradley PLC database
Button in Tag
Database editor
Button in Tag
Browser
You can selectively import tags from an Allen-Bradley PLC database into the
RSView32 tag database. Tags imported in this way are copied into the
database—they are not shared with the source database. This means changes
to tags in RSView32 do not affect the database from which they’ve been
imported and vice-versa.
To open the PLC Database Browser, click the Other DB button in the Tag
Browser, or click the DB Browser button on the toolbar in the Tag Database
editor.
To locate your
database, click
Browse.
Filter and
search for the
tags you want to
import.
To specify or
create a folder
for the tags,
type the folder
name here.
Importing ControlLogix tags
To import ControlLogix tags, use the Logix 5000 Tag Import utility. The Logix
5000 Tag Import utility is located on the RSView32 Tools menu (on the Start
menu, select Programs, Rockwell Software, RSView32 Tools, Logix 5000 Tag
Import).
For information about using the utility, see the Logix 5000 Tag Import Help.
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Using folders to organize tags
To organize tags, create a folder and include tags that are related to one another.
To separate the folder name from the rest of the tag name, use a backlash (\).
For example, tags in the folder called Breads would start with Breads\. For
greater organization, you can nest folders; for example, Breads\Baking\Oven.
For more information about organizing your tag database, see “Designing a
database” on page 98.
Creating tags
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7
Chapter
Setting up logging
and security
Logging information
You can log:
„
Activities. The activity log records information about various types of
system activity, including command or macro usage, tag writes, system
messages and errors, and communication errors. If you use the electronic
signature button, the activity log records the name and comment of the
operator who initiates the button’s action, and, if required, the name and
comment of the supervisor who authorizes the action.
To set up activity logging, use the Activity Log Setup editor. To set up the
electronic signature button, use the Graphic Display editor.
„
„
Alarms. The alarm log records alarm incidents, including when a tag goes
into alarm, when a tag goes out of alarm, and when an alarm is
acknowledged. The name of the user who acknowledged the alarm is also
logged. To set up alarm logging, use the Alarm Log Setup editor.
The data log records specific tag values, or data, under
certain conditions. These conditions are defined by a data log model. To set
up data logging, use the Data Log Setup editor.
Data (tag values).
Setting up logging
Activity logging, alarm logging, and data logging use similar editors to set up
logging. For each type of logging, specify where to store log files, when to
create and delete log files, and what particular information to log. The
illustration below shows the Data Log Setup editor.
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73
Set up general
aspects of the model.
Specify where to log
the data to.
With data logging, you
also specify which
storage format you
want—narrow dBASE
IV, wide dBASE IV, or
ODBC. This is not an
option with the other
types of logging.
Specify when to
create and delete log
data.
Specify when to log
tag values.
Specify which tags
to log.
For each type of logging, you can create up to 26 log files per day. As files are
created, they are automatically named based on the date the file was created and
the type of data it contains. For data logging only, if you choose to use long file
names you can create up to 9,999 log files per day.
Viewing logged information
There are several ways to view logged information:
„
„
„
Activities. View activity information in the Activity Bar and the Activity
Log Viewer.
Alarms. View alarm information in the Alarm Log Viewer and in alarm
summaries.
View tag data in realtime and historical trends. Realtime
trends show data as it is being collected. Historical trends show data from a
log file or ODBC database.
Data (tag values).
All logged information is stored in dBASE® IV (.DBF) format, which can easily
be displayed or analyzed in third-party software such as Microsoft® Excel,
Crystal Reports®, and Visual FoxPro® without file conversions or importing
and exporting.
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For data log only, you also have the option of storing data using the ODBC
storage format, and viewing the data in an ODBC-compliant relational
database application.
For activity and alarm logging, you have the option of exporting data to an
ODBC-compliant database, and viewing the data in an ODBC-compliant
relational database application.
Securing your system
You can set up security at the project level and the system level.
controls which users or groups of users have access to
certain features in your project. For example, you might not want all users to
be able to change tag values, so you would restrict access to tags. You can also
restrict access to graphic displays and RSView32 commands.
Project-level security
You can also use the signature button to verify and track actions such as tag
writes and running commands. This feature, together with other RSView32™
security features, allows you to meet the security standards required for
regulated manufacturing applications, for example those required for US
Government 21 CFR Part 11 compliance.
System-level security
locks users into your RSView32 project so they cannot
exit to Windows .
®
Setting up project-level security
Setting up security codes and user accounts
The first step in setting up security is assigning security codes. You can limit
access to any RSView32 command, graphic display, or tag by assigning a
security code to it. There are 17 codes—an asterisk (*) and the letters A through
P. The asterisk allows unlimited access, and the letters limit access.
Assign security codes in the following places:
Assign a security code to
In the
An RSView32 command
Security Codes editor
A graphic display
Display Settings dialog box in the
Graphic Display editor
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Assign a security code to
In the
A tag
Tag Database editor
Once you have assigned the security codes, you can then assign the codes to
users or groups of users. In this way, you can limit users’ ability to run
commands, open displays, and write to tags. Use the User Accounts editor to
assign security codes to users.
When adding users to RSView32, you can enter user names and passwords in
the User Accounts editor, or, if you are using Windows XP, Windows 2000, or
Windows NT®, you can use the Windows user list instead of creating a custom
list in RSView32. No matter which method you use, you still have to assign
security access to the individual users.
Security is active whenever a project is loaded. If no user is logged into the
project, the default user (from the User Accounts editor) is active.
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Assign security codes to commands . . .
. . . and then assign codes to users.
In the above example, the Default user has access only to security code “A”.
That way, when no user is logged in, there is no access to any part of the project
other than the Login and Logout commands. The manager has access to all
security codes, so is able to access all parts of the project. The operators have
access only to security codes “A” and “C”.
Setting up logging and security
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Setting up electronic signature buttons
In addition to limiting access on a tag-by-tag or command-by-command basis,
you can use the electronic signature button to keep track of who initiates
actions such as tag writes and running commands. You can also require that the
action is approved by a pre-authorized verifier before the action is initiated.
When the operator clicks this
button, the RSView Electronic
Signature dialog box opens,
and the user must be
authenticated before the new
tag value is downloaded to the
programmable controller.
You can use the electronic signature button to secure these operations:
„
setting a tag value
„
issuing an RSView32 command
Add the electronic signature button to your graphic displays in the Graphic
Display editor.
At runtime, the operator must enter a name, password, and comment before
the action assigned to the button is initiated. Optionally, you can also require
that a supervisor approve the action by entering a name, password, and
comment. The names and comments are recorded in the activity log, allowing
you to keep a permanent record of who initiated the actions and why.
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Setting up system-level security
System-level security locks users into your RSView32 project so they can’t exit
to the Windows operating system or switch to other Windows programs. To
set up system-level security, set up your displays as described below and use the
additional security appropriate for your operating system.
Setting up displays
No matter which operating system you’re using, you can help prevent users
from going outside of the RSView32 project by setting up your displays as
follows:
„
„
do not include title bars or minimize and maximize buttons on graphic
displays by clearing the appropriate check boxes in the Display Settings
dialog box in the Graphic Display editor
ensure RSView32 occupies the entire screen by maximizing RSView32 and
removing the Windows taskbar.
To maximize RSView32, place a shortcut to RSView32 in the Windows
startup folder, and set the shortcut’s run setting to Maximized. For details
about creating shortcuts, see your Windows documentation.
To remove the taskbar in Windows XP and Windows 2000, clear the
Always on top check box and select the Auto hide check box in the Taskbar
Properties dialog box.
To remove the taskbar in Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 9x,
clear
the Always on top check box and select the Auto hide check box in the
Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box.
Setting up logging and security
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Disabling Windows shortcut keys
To disable the shortcut keys, use the Startup editor.
Check all these
boxes to disable
access to the
Project Manager
and to disable the
Windows shortcut
keys.
You cannot disable
Ctrl-Alt-Del or
Alt-Tab for
Windows XP,
Windows 2000, or
Windows NT from
here. Use the
DeskLock tool.
Replacing the desktop in Windows XP, Windows 2000, and
Windows NT
The Win2K XP DeskLock tool or NT 4.0 DeskLock tool is included on the
RSView32 Resources CD, and on the RSView32 Tools menu (on the Start
menu, select Programs, Rockwell Software, RSView32 Tools, and then the tool
for your operating system).
This tool can have far-reaching effects on your operating system. The
DeskLock tool replaces the standard Windows XP, Windows 2000, and
Windows NT logon and desktop with a customized desktop. The desktop is
intended to prevent operators from having access to operating system
functions such as restarting Windows or shutting down tasks.
Before using the DeskLock tool, read the DeskLock Help file completely.
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8
Chapter
Using the RSView32
Object Model and VBA
About the RSView32 Object Model and VBA
The RSView32™ Object Model and Microsoft® Visual Basic® for Applications
(VBA) provide a complete development environment for customizing and
extending the capabilities of RSView32.
For example, use the RSView32 Object Model and VBA to:
„
„
„
create code (VBA subroutines) that does conditional branching
tie RSView32 data to other third-party applications such as Microsoft
Access or Microsoft SQL Server
control RSView32 from within a VBA subroutine by issuing RSView32
commands
To customize and extend the capabilities of RSView32, use the:
VBA integrated development environment. The Microsoft Visual Basic for
Applications integrated development environment (IDE). Use the IDE to
create, run, and debug VBA subroutines, and then call these subroutines from
within RSView32.
A group of objects that represent features of
RSView32. By creating VBA code that interacts with the RSView32 objects,
you can manipulate RSView32 and automate processes.
RSView32 Object Model.
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How RSView32 uses VBA code
RSView32 uses the term “code” to refer to a VBA subroutine. You can run
VBA code from anywhere you can run an RSView32 command. For example,
in the RSView32 Events editor, create an event to run VBA code when an
alarm occurs, or in the RSView32 Graphic Display editor, create a button that
runs VBA code when the button is selected.
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The VBA integrated development environment
RSView32 includes Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications. Use the VBA
integrated development environment (IDE) to create, test, and debug VBA
subroutines, and then run these subroutines from within RSView32.
This chapter provides a brief description of the IDE but does not include
detailed information about VBA—it is assumed that you are familiar with the
VBA environment and programming language. This chapter highlights aspects
of VBA that are unique to RSView32 and describes how to use VBA from
within RSView32. For information about how to access VBA information, see
“Using VBA Help” on page 96.
Opening the IDE window
To open the VBA IDE:
1.
In the RSView32 Project Manager, open the Logic and Control folder.
2.
Open the VBA IDE by doing one of the following:
„
double-click Visual Basic Editor
„
right-click Visual Basic Editor, and then click Show
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Parts of the IDE window
The illustration below shows the main parts of the IDE window. Each part is
then described in more detail.
Project Explorer
Window
Properties
Window
Subroutine or
Code Window
Project Explorer Window
When you start the Visual Basic Editor for the first time, it creates a VBA
project with the same name as the RSView32 project. This project contains an
RSView32 Objects folder, which contains an object called ThisProject, that
represents all the subroutines written for this VBA project. The object can
contain any number of subroutines, and these subroutines are visible from
within the RSView32 Command Wizard.
You can create additional VBA objects and user forms, but these are not
directly accessible from within RSView32. To use the subroutines in these
objects and to use the user forms, you must call them from subroutines that
exist in the VBA project object, ThisProject.
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Properties Window
This window lists the property settings for the user forms and the objects on
those forms. You cannot call forms directly from RSView32. To use a form,
call the form from a subroutine in the VBA project object, ThisProject.
Subroutine or Code Window
This window is where you write and edit your VBA subroutines. When you are
creating VBA code that you want to call from within RSView32, be sure the
project in the VBA code window is ThisProject. The title bar of the code
window displays the path and name of the project that is open.
Quick Start steps
There are only two main steps to using the RSView32 Object Model and VBA.
These are:
Step 1
„
Create your VBA code
Using the Visual Basic programming language, create subroutines in the code
window for ThisProject. Create subroutines that work with the RSView32
objects.
For details, see VBA Help. For information about accessing Help for VBA, see
“Using VBA Help” on page 96.
Step 2
„
Call your VBA code from within RSView32
In RSView32, call the subroutines in ThisProject to trigger actions in response
to events. To call a subroutine, issue the RSView32 VbaExec <subroutine name>
command from a macro, an Action field, or a command line.
For details, see “Running VBA code” on page 87.
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What is a subroutine?
A subroutine is RSView32’s term for a Visual Basic subroutine. When you start
the Visual Basic Editor, an object called ThisProject is created in the Project
Explorer Window. This object can contain any number of subroutines and
these subroutines can be called directly from RSView32. The subroutines you
create can use other VBA subroutines, functions, user forms, classes, and
modules.
When to use VBA code instead of an RSView32
macro
With an RSView32 macro, you can create a list of RSView32 commands that
will run in response to an action. VBA code allows you to do much more. For
example, with VBA code you can:
„
„
„
„
create conditional logic
perform operations other than executing commands, such as adding tags to
the RSView32 database
reference third-party object models such as the Microsoft Access database
model
use VBA user forms that contain native VB and ActiveX® controls
A macro, however, is still useful. When all you need is to issue a series of
RSView32 commands, a macro is the most efficient way to do this.
For VBA code examples, see Help for the Object Browser. For information
about accessing Help for the Object Browser, see “Opening Help from the
Object Browser” on page 94.
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Running VBA code
To run VBA code, issue the VBAExec <subroutine name> command. Use this
command in any of the following places:
„
in a field that requires you to enter an action. For example, use the
VBAExec command in the Action field of the button object so when a user
selects the button, VBA code runs.
„
in a macro
„
in a command line
The syntax for the command is:
VBAExec <subroutine name> [parameter 1], [parameter 2]
where
subroutine name—is the name of any subroutine in the ThisProject object. The
subroutine name is not case sensitive.
parameter—is any parameter that a particular subroutine requires. Separate
parameters with commas. The parameter can be of any data type, except
Object.
VBA code can also be triggered by an event from an Activity, Tag, or Tags
object.
How RSView32 runs VBA code
VBA subroutines run on a first-in, first-out basis. Each subroutine runs to
completion before the next subroutine is started. For that reason, do not create
subroutines that wait for user input before proceeding because if a user does
not respond, all processing of subroutines stops. For example, if you create a
dialog box that requires user input and no one responds to that dialog box, all
processing of subroutines stops until the user input is received (although
RSView32 continues to run normally).
If the subroutine you are running contains events, they continue to be fired,
even after the subroutine has run. To stop events from firing, you must set the
value of the event variable to Nothing before exiting the subroutine. See Help
for an example. To locate the Help topic, on the Contents tab of the RSView32
Help dialog box, double-click RSView32 Object Model, double-click
Examples, and then double-click Tag Events.
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Viewing VBA subroutines
VBA subroutines you create are listed in the RSView32 Command Wizard.
This list of subroutines is not visible anywhere else in RSView32.
To view the list of subroutines:
1.
Open the Command Wizard by doing any one of the following:
„
„
„
double-click in an Action field or, in the Macro editor, double-click
anywhere in the editor
click the … button beside an Action field or any field requiring an
RSView32 command
click Commands on the Edit menu in the Command Line, Security
Codes editor, Events editor, and Macro editor
2.
In the Command Wizard, click Logic and Control, click Visual Basic
Editor, click Runtime, and then click VbaExec.
3.
In the Command Wizard window, click Next. This will take you to Step 2
of the Wizard where you’ll be able to see the list of subroutines in the
Subroutine list.
Scroll through
this list to see the
subroutines in
the project.
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Opening the VBA IDE for editing
You can open the VBA IDE for editing by issuing the VbaEdit [subroutine name]
command. Like the VBAExec command, you can enter this command in any
Action field, in a macro, and in a command line.
The syntax for the command is:
VbaEdit [subroutine name]
where subroutine name is the name of any VBA subroutine in the project. If you
do not specify a subroutine name, the VBA IDE opens at the first subroutine.
If you specify a subroutine name, the VBA IDE opens with the cursor at the
specified Sub statement. The subroutine name is not case sensitive.
You can also open the VBA IDE by double-clicking Visual Basic Editor in the
Logic and Control folder.
The RSView32 Object Model
The RSView32 Object Model contains OLE automation objects that represent
RSView32 features. Using these objects, you can interact with an RSView32
project by running one of the subroutines you have created.
The RSView32 Object Model contains the following objects:
Activity.
This object represents the RSView32 Activity Log. Use this object to
log activities to the RSView32 activity log file and, if RSView32 is set up to do
so, to the activity bar or printer.
AnalogTagAlarmCfg.
Use this object to read and write an analog tag’s alarm
configuration information.
AlarmThreshold. This object represents one of the eight alarm thresholds for
an analog tag. Use this object to read and write an analog tag’s alarm threshold
configuration information.
AlarmThresholds.
This object represents all of the available alarm thresholds
for an analog tag. Use this object to read and write an analog tag’s alarm
threshold configuration information.
Application.
This object represents the RSView32 application. Use this object
to get information about the RSView32 application.
Channel.
This object represents an RSView32 channel. Use this object to read
and write a channel's configuration information.
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Channels.
This object represents all of the available channels. Use this object
to get a Channel object.
Command.
This object represents the RSView32 command server. Use this
object to issue an RSView32 command.
DataLog. This object represents the RSView32 data log system. Use this object
to access the RSView32 data log system.
DataLogModel. This object represents a data log model in your project. Use this
object to add records, access files for the data log model, read records, and write
to records.
DataLogModelCfg.
Use this object to configure a data log model in your
project.
DataLogModels.
This object represents all of the data log models in your
project. Use this object to add a new model, copy an existing model, get a
model, and remove a model.
DataLogNarrowRecord. This object represents one record of a narrow-format
data log model. Use this object to manage the tag information (value, status,
and name) for the record and to share data with a DataLogWideRecord object.
DataLogNarrowRecords. This object represents all of the
DataLogNarrowRecord objects in a data log model. Use this object to get a
DataLogNarrowRecord object.
DataLogTagValue.
This object represents the Tag Name, Value and Status
information for a data log tag or record. A wide format database record
(DataLogWideRecord) has a collection of DataLogTagValue objects for each
record. The narrow format database record (DataLogNarrowRecord) has only
one DataLogTagValue object for each record.
DataLogTagValues. This object represents all of the DataLogTagValue objects
in a wide data log record. Use this object to maintain a collection of data log
value objects (column pairs of value/status for a given tag) in a wide format
database record.
DataLogWideRecord.
This object represents one record of a wide-format data
log model. Use this object to manage the tag information (value, status, and
name) for the record.
DataLogWideRecords. This object represents all of the DataLogWideRecord
objects in your model. Use this object to get a DataLogWideRecord object.
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DigitalTagAlarmCfg. Use this object to read and write a digital tag’s alarm
configuration information.
Folder. This object represents a folder in the RSView32 tag database. Use this
object to navigate to other folders or tags in the tag database.
Folders. This object represents all of the folders contained in a folder. Use this
object to navigate to other folders. You can create and delete folders using this
collection.
Node. This object represents an RSView32 node. Use this object to read and
write a node’s configuration information.
Nodes. This object represents all of the configured nodes. Use this object to get
a Node object. You can create and delete nodes using this collection.
ODBCAdministrator. Use this object to list the available ODBC data sources,
and to create and validate tables within an existing data source.
Project.
Use this object to retrieve information about the currently-loaded
RSView32 project and to access other RSView32 objects.
Security. Use this object to retrieve security information about the current
user, or to change the current user (that is, to log the current user out, and to
log another user in).
Tag. This object represents an RSView32 tag. Use this object to read and write
a tag’s value, and read and write tag configuration information.
TagDb.
This object represents the RSView32 tag database. Use this object to
create and delete RSView32 tags; to create, delete, and duplicate folders, and to
get or query for Tag objects.
Tags. This object represents a group of tags. Use this object to work with tags
as a collection.
For detailed information about the properties, methods, and events of these
objects, see Help for the Object Browser. For information about accessing
Help for the Object Browser, see “Opening Help from the Object Browser”
on page 94.
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Global object variables
A global object variable is a predefined object that is available, for convenience,
to all subroutines. RSView32 creates these objects when it creates a VBA
project. Use these objects as you would any other RSView32 object.
The following global object variables are available:
„
gActivity
„
gChannels
„
gCommand
„
gDataLog
„
gNodes
„
gODBCAdministrator
„
gProject
„
gSecurity
„
gTagDb
Viewing the objects
Use the Object Browser to view the RSView32 objects in the VBA IDE.
To open the Object Browser, do one of the following:
„
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n
right-click anywhere in the Code window, and then click Object Browser on
the popup menu
„
on the View menu, click Object Browser
„
press F2
Getting Results with RSView32
Select RSView32
to display only
RSView32 objects.
Select globals to
view all RSView32
constants.
Select any object
to view its
properties,
methods, and
events.
To view the global object variables, select RSView32 in the first list.
Getting Help on RSView32 objects
RSView32 contains Help for every RSView32 object, including a detailed
description of the object’s properties, methods, and events. To open Help,
select an item in the Object Browser, and then press F1or the ? key on the
keyboard.
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Opening Help from the Object Browser
To open Help from the Object Browser:
1.
Open the Object Browser.
2.
In the list at the top of the window, select RSView32.
3.
Under Classes or Members, highlight an item and then press F1 or the ?
key on the keyboard.
To view the contents for the entire Help file for the RSView32 Object Model:
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n
1.
Follow the steps above to open a Help topic.
2.
In the Help window, click Help Topics.
Getting Results with RSView32
Opening Help from the Code Window
To open Help from the Code Window, in a line of code, highlight an RSView32
object name or highlight an RSView32 object’s property or method, and then
press F1.
Opening Help from the RSView32 Help Contents
window
To open VBA Code Help from RSView32 Help:
1.
On the RSView32 menu bar, click Help, and then click Contents.
2.
In the Contents window, double-click VBA Code for an overview, or
double-click RSView32 Object Model for details about the objects.
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Using VBA Help
VBA comes with its own Help. To access this Help, do any one of the
following:
„
click Help on the toolbar, and then click a menu item
„
in any area of the IDE, press F1
VBA documentation
If you’re new to Visual Basic, you might want to look at the following Microsoft
publications:
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„
Visual Basic Getting Started
„
Visual Basic Programmers Guide
Getting Results with RSView32
9
Chapter
Planning a project
The planning process
A well-designed project requires planning. To help you plan, this chapter
provides guidelines for:
„
understanding the process you’re automating
„
collecting data
„
designing a database
„
designing graphic displays
„
using trends
„
designing a secure system
Understanding the process
Gather information from a variety of sources so you have a complete and
detailed understanding of the process you’re automating.
Specifically, you should:
„
„
„
„
„
talk to operators and other experts who are going to use the system. Find
out what information they need to optimize plant operations.
talk to management and MIS (Management Information Systems) staff to
find out what information they need to support planning decisions
break up each section of the process into its constituent parts
determine what type of communications you’ll be using—direct driver,
OPC®, or DDE communications
determine which process variables need to be accessed and identify their
locations in the programmable controllers
n
97
Collecting data
When planning data collection, design your system so only essential data is
collected. Limiting data collection is important because collection activities
require substantial processing power and generate a lot of traffic on the
communication channel or network.
Keep data collection requirements in mind when designing the layout of the
programmable controller data tables and the tag database. Ideally, tag addresses
should reference contiguous blocks of programmable controller data tables to
reduce highway traffic and optimize system response.
Designing a database
Take the time to plan your tag database. A good design helps reduce the time
required for maintenance and can improve programmable controller-toRSView32 response time.
Collect information
Before you begin creating the database, collect the following information:
„
„
„
flowcharts of your processes (or process and instrument diagrams)
list of programmable controller data table or register addresses your project
will be accessing
alarm requirements (for more detail, see “Planning alarms” below)
Organize tags
Before creating tags:
„
„
develop naming conventions for tags, choosing names that are familiar and
logical to everyone. This makes troubleshooting easier.
group related tags
Group tags in the way that makes most sense for your application. For
example, group all similar devices or group related areas of the plant floor.
When creating tags, place related tags into folders. For greater organization,
nest folders.
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Planning alarms
Before configuring alarms, plan:
„
what conditions will trigger alarms
„
how operators will be notified of those alarms
„
what information you want alarm messages to contain
„
what actions will occur in response to those alarms
„
which alarms will require additional actions that you can supply using a
macro
Planning graphic displays
When planning displays, determine the best way for users to navigate through
your displays and develop a template to establish a common look and feel for
your displays.
Develop a hierarchy of displays
A hierarchy is a series of graphic displays that provide progressively more detail
as users move through them. A hierarchy should meet the needs of the various
users, including managers, supervisors, and operators.
Well-organized graphic displays present information clearly and consistently
and guide users through the system. Before designing individual graphic
displays, plan an overall display hierarchy and plan how users will navigate
through the hierarchy.
Create a template to ensure consistency
It is possible to keep a consistent appearance among all the displays in a project
by presenting the same pieces of information in the same place on each display.
To ensure uniformity, develop a display with common elements that acts as a
template. Each time you develop a new display, start with a copy of the
template.
Planning a project
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For example, the template could contain:
„
company logo
„
title
„
date and time
„
navigational buttons
When designing displays, practicing good visual design principles helps users
and increases their efficiency. Aim for these important design principles:
Consistency
„
Be consistent with your use of symbols and color.
„
Be consistent with button labels and button placement.
When you design several displays, place the same kinds of buttons in the
same positions. For example, if you have a Start button in a certain position
in one display, don’t put a Stop button in the same position in the next
display.
Clarity
„
„
„
„
Use symbols that are easily recognizable. For example, use the conventional
ISA symbols for tanks and valves.
Don’t overload the screen with information.
Use standard, clear terminology, and avoid abbreviations or acronyms that
the user might not understand.
Use colors with recognizable meanings. For example, in North America the
colors red and green often mean stop and start. Keep color meanings
consistent by assigning red only to Stop buttons, and green only to Start
buttons.
Some people are color blind to red and green so don’t rely on color alone
to establish meaning.
„
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Use high contrast color combinations, such as yellow on blue.
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Usability
„
„
If you’re designing for a touch screen, don’t place important buttons where
they’ll be blocked by a pop-up window. The user can’t press a covered
button. Also, ensure the button is large enough for users to touch easily.
Ensure there is always a clear way to move between displays.
Using trends
When planning trends, consider how they will be used. For example, will the
trend be used to:
„
analyze process trends
„
monitor production efficiency
„
archive process variables to ensure compliance with government
regulations
Based on such considerations, you can determine:
„
which tags need to be plotted on the same trend
„
which tags need to be logged by using a historical trend
Designing a secure system
When deciding on your security requirements, consider whether to:
„
restrict access to every project component to prevent accidental changes or
is limited access enough
„
restrict access to certain plant areas
„
have everyone log on
„
design your system to meet the security standards required for US
Government 21 CFR Part 11 compliance
Based on these considerations, you can set up security for individual users or
groups of users. For example, you might want to set up groups of users, such
as a manager group and a worker group.
Planning a project
n
101
Customizing the system, and integrating with other
applications
Automating application configuration
When planning your application, determine which routine maintenance
activities you could automate using the RSView32 Object Model with Visual
Basic® or Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). For example, you might want
to have RSView32 generate tags automatically, allowing you to add similar
product lines to your plant quickly and easily.
Using data with other applications
If you regularly require RSView32 data for use in programs such as Microsoft®
Excel, or PowerPoint, consider using VBA to extract the data from RSView32
automatically.
Customizing the system
Adding alarm events
You can write your own alarm detection algorithms using PLC logic, Visual
Basic or VBA, and you can then create events in RSView32 to respond to the
algorithms.
Validating operator input
To validate operator input, use the RSView32 Object Model with Visual Basic
or VBA. In Visual Basic or VBA, create your own pop-up dialog boxes for data
entry. Use Visual Basic or VBA logic to validate the operator’s input, for
example to ensure that the value an operator enters for a tag falls within 10%
of the value of another tag.
Another option is to use the electronic signature button, which allows you to
specify a range of values for operator input. You can also set up the button so
that the operator’s data must be approved by a supervisor before the button’s
action is initiated. You can use the button to initiate tag writes and to run
commands.
Designing intuitive graphic displays
Use the RSView32 Object Model to populate VBA form objects with data, for
use in graphic displays. For example, use list boxes or combo boxes in graphic
displays to allow operators to select options such as recipe items.
102
n
Getting Results with RSView32
10 Getting the information
Chapter
you need
Using RSView32 Help
RSView32 Help provides step-by-step procedures and reference information
for working with all the features in RSView32. To open Help while RSView32
is running:
„
click the Help button on any window
„
on the RSView32 menu bar, click Help, and then click Contents
„
press the F1 key
Viewing the Help contents
For an overview of RSView32 Help, click the Contents tab.
n
103
To see the topics in
a book, double-click
the book.
To go to a topic,
double-click the
topic.
104
n
Getting Results with RSView32
Using the index
The Help index is similar to an index in a book, listing keywords for topics in
Help. To see the index, click the Index tab.
As you type a
word here, index
entries are listed
below.
To go to a topic,
double-click it
here.
Getting the information you need
n
105
Finding words or topics
To search the entire text of the Help, click the Find tab. The first time you use
Find, the Find Setup Wizard opens. Follow the instructions in the Wizard to
build a list of terms. Building the list might take a few moments, but the next
time you use Find, the list of terms will already exist.
To change
search options,
click the Options
button.
Scroll through
the list to find the
term you’re
looking for.
When you find
the term, doubleclick it to go to
that topic.
To get Help on using the Find tab, right-click a field, and then click What’s
This?
106
n
Getting Results with RSView32
Using the RSView32 online user’s guides
The complete RSView32 User’s Guide, RSView32 Runtime User’s Guide, and
RSView32 Getting Results manuals are included on the RSView32 CD-ROM with
the Adobe® Acrobat® Reader® software for viewing the guides. The RSView32
User’s Guide and RSView32 Runtime User’s Guide provide more detail about the
topics presented in this Getting Results manual. You can print all or part of the
guides, and you can copy text and graphics from the guides and paste them into
other documents.
Viewing the guides
If you installed the user’s guides when you installed RSView32™, you can access
them by clicking Help, Online Books, and then by clicking either Getting
Results, or Users Guide.
If you are using RSView32 Runtime, the Online Books menu will show
Runtime Users Guide instead of Users Guide.
To view the
RSView32 online
books, click one of
these items.
If you installed the user’s guides when you installed RSView32, you will also
have an icon for them in the Rockwell Software group.
To view the
RSView32 user’s
guides, click this
item.
If you did not install the guides, you can view them from the CD-ROM.
Getting the information you need
n
107
To view the user’s guides from the CD-ROM
1.
Insert the RSView32 CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive. The CD-ROM
should start running automatically.
If the CD-ROM does not start automatically, run D:\SETUP.EXE where D is
the drive containing the CD-ROM.
2.
In the RSView32 window, click the View the RSView32 User’s Guides
button.
Moving around in the user’s guides
Use any of the following methods to move through the user’s guides:
„
„
„
„
108
n
click a chapter bookmark on the left side of the window
click a button on the toolbar. Each button has a tooltip that tells you the
action the button will perform
click the button at the bottom of the window and, when the Go To dialog
box opens, specify the page you’d like to go to
click the scroll bar button on the right side of the window. When you click
the button, the page number appears
Getting Results with RSView32
Zooming in and out
Use any of the following methods to zoom in and out of pages:
„
„
„
click the Zoom tool on the toolbar to change the pointer to the Zoom
pointer. To zoom in on a particular paragraph or graphic, click the Zoom
pointer anywhere on the page.
click a button on the toolbar. Each button has a tooltip that tells you the
action the button will perform.
click the button on the bottom of the window and then specify a zoom ratio
Finding information
You can search the user’s guide for a particular word or phrase.
To find a word or phrase
1.
Find tool
2.
Do one of the following:
„
on the toolbar, click the Find tool
„
on the Tools menu, click Find
In the Find dialog box, type the word or phrase you want, and then click
Find.
The word or phrase is highlighted in the text. To find another instance of
the word or phrase, click Find Again on the Tools menu.
Getting the information you need
n
109
Printing pages
You can print selected text, single pages, or an entire guide.
To print selected text
1.
On the File menu, click Print Setup, then select and set up the printer you
will use.
2.
Do one of the following:
„
Text selection
tool
„
on the toolbar, click the text selection tool, and then select the text you
want to copy
on the Tools menu, click Select Text, and then select the text you want
to copy
3.
On the File menu, click Print.
4.
In the Print dialog box, ensure the correct printer is selected, click
Selection, and then click OK.
To print one or more pages
1.
On the File menu, click Print Setup to select and set up the printer you will
use.
2.
On the File menu, click Print.
3.
In the Print dialog box, ensure the correct printer is selected, click Current
Page or specify Start and End pages, and then click OK.
Using the online guide for the reader
For more information about the Adobe Acrobat Reader, see the Adobe
Acrobat online guide. To open the online guide while Adobe Acrobat Reader
is running, click Help on the menu bar and then click Reader Online Guide.
110
n
Getting Results with RSView32
Technical support
If you have a question about RSView32, please consult this guide, the
RSView32 Help, or the RSView32 online user’s guides. Or, click Help,
Rockwell Software on the Web, and then click the name of the web page you
want to view. To use Rockwell Software on the Web, you must have a web
browser installed on your computer and a current internet connection.
If you can’t find the answers, contact Rockwell Software Technical Support:
Telephone
440-646-5800
Fax
440-646-5801
Internet support
www.software.rockwell.com
or
www.support.rockwellautomation.com
Support staff are available Monday through Friday from 8 A . M . to 5 P . M .
eastern time, except during holidays.
When you call
When you call, be at a computer and prepared to give the following
information:
„
the product serial number
You can find this number on the Activation disk label. You can also find
this number online. On the RSView32 menu, click Help, and then click
About RSView32.
„
the product version number
You can find this number online. On the RSView32 menu, click Help, and
then click About RSView32.
„
the type of hardware you are using
„
the exact wording of any messages that appeared on your screen
„
„
a description of what happened and what you were doing when the problem
occurred
a description of how you tried to solve the problem
You may also be required to provide information about the RSView32 add-ons
and updates that are installed on your computer.
Getting the information you need
n
111
To view the list of installed add-ons and updates
112
n
1.
With the Project Manager window active, click Help, About RSView32.
2.
Click Add-ons to view the list of installed add-ons. Click Updates to view
the list of installed updates.
Getting Results with RSView32
Index
Symbols
format „ 53
.D B F storage format
.D X F format „ 53
.J P G format „ 53
.R S V file „ 26
.W M F format „ 53
.BMP
„
74
Numerics
21 CFR Part 11 compliance
setting up security for „ 75, 78
A
Abort command „ 51
Activating RSView32 „ 5
after installation „ 8
as runtime-only system „ 10
moving activation keys „ 7
reactivating damaged key „ 9
troubleshooting „ 10
with reset code „ 9
Activation disk
activation keys „ 6
moving activation keys „ 7
protecting files „ 8
ActiveX objects „ 57
ActiveX Toolbox „ 58
Activity bar „ 29, 74
clearing messages on „ 30
hiding „ 30
moving „ 30
resizing „ 30
showing „ 30
Activity Log Setup editor „ 46, 73
Activity Log Viewer „ 46, 74
Adobe Acrobat Reader „ 107
AdvanceDDE „ 43
Alarm Log Setup editor „ 73
Alarm Log Viewer „ 74
Alarm summaries, creating „ 65
Alarms, planning „ 99
Animation
attaching to objects „ 61
copying and pasting „ 62
testing „ 63
B
Buttons
creating „ 55
creating actions for
duplicating „ 55
„
56
C
Code window
getting help „ 95
Color
background of displays „ 52
fill „ 59
items in alarm summary „ 65
line „ 59
Command Wizard „ 38
Commands
Abort „ 51
Display „ 51
in buttons „ 56
in editors „ 38
in macros „ 38
securing „ 75
n
113
Communications
checking „ 45
DDE „ 43
direct-driver „ 41, 43
errors „ 46
OPC „ 43
RSLinx „ 41, 43, 46
troubleshooting „ 46
Components
adding „ 36
displaying „ 35
opening „ 35
using in more than one project
viewing location of „ 36
Context menu „ 32, 37
Control. See Animation
ControlLogix tags, importing „ 70
ControlView „ 39
Expressions
File names
for project files „ 26
length of project name „ 25
long, for data logging „ 74
references to „ 36
G
„
36
Data collection, planning „ 98
Data Log Setup editor „ 73
Database Import and Export Wizard „ 69
DDE
server „ 44
supported formats „ 43
Display command „ 51
Display Settings dialog box „ 49, 52, 63
Documentation
VBA „ 96
E
Edit mode „ 32
Editing VBA code
opening the VBA IDE „ 89
Editors
hints for working in „ 37
list of „ 32
Electronic signatures „ 75, 78
Events
using „ 87
114
n
„
38
F
D
EVMOVE.EXE
„
5, 8
Getting Results with RSView32
Global object variables „ 92
Graphic displays
adding objects to „ 47
animating „ 47
background color of „ 52
closing „ 51
creating „ 49
Display Settings dialog box „ 49, 52, 63
ensuring consistency among „ 99
including a title bar in „ 63
opening „ 51
planning „ 99
runtime settings for „ 63
saving „ 49
securing „ 75
Size to Main Window at Runtime
option „ 52, 79
sizing „ 52
specifying a default „ 52
testing „ 63
types of „ 49
Graphic images, importing „ 53
Graphic libraries „ 54
alarm summaries „ 65
trends „ 64
H
Help
Online Help
Code Window „ 95
Object Browser „ 94
technical support „ 111
using VBA online Help „ 96
See also
I
IDE
„
83
opening the VBA IDE for editing „ 89
using „ 83
Importing graphic images „ 53
Installing online user’s guides „ 3
Installing RSView32 „ 3
administrator rights „ 4
installation summary „ 5
uninstalling „ 15
Integrated Development Environment. See IDE
Internet support „ 111
K
KEPServerEnterprise
„
43
L
Logging
activities „ 73
alarms „ 73
data (tag values) „ 73
viewing logged information „ 74
Logix 5000 Tag Import utility „ 70
Long file names, for data logging „ 74
M
Macros
using VBA code instead of „ 86
Macros, creating „ 38
Memory
adjusting virtual memory „ 13
Modicon devices „ 43
N
Node editor „ 43, 44
NT 4.0 DeskLock tool
„
80
O
Object Browser „ 92
getting help „ 94
Object Model, RSView32
Object Smart Path „ 61
Object variables. See Global object variables
Objects
ActiveX „ 57
alarm summaries „ 65
aligning „ 60
animating „ 61
applying color to „ 59
arranging „ 60
buttons „ 55
grouping „ 60
importing „ 53
spacing „ 60
substituting tags in „ 54
testing animation of „ 63
trends „ 64
viewing „ 92
ODBC storage format „ 74
Online books „ 107
Online Help
contents „ 103
finding words in „ 106
for Adobe Acrobat „ 110
index „ 105
opening „ 103
Online Help. See Help
Online user’s guides
Adobe Acrobat Reader „ 107
finding information in „ 109
help for „ 110
installing „ 3
moving around in „ 108
printing selections or pages from „ 110
viewing „ 3, 107
viewing from the C D - R O M „ 108
OPC
communications „ 43
server „ 44
P
PLC database, importing
„
„
70
89
Index
n
115
Project
.R S V file „ 26
adding components to „ 36
creating „ 25
file extensions „ 26
folders in „ 26
location of components „ 26
planning „ 97
Project Documentor tool „ 39
Project Manager „ 25, 29, 31
displaying components in „ 35
edit mode „ 32
editors „ 32
folders „ 32
run mode „ 32
Project name
length of „ 25
Project Transport Wizard „ 39
R
RESET.EXE
„
5, 9
Rockwell Software on the Web „ 111
RSLinx „ 41, 43, 46
RSView32 „ 1
activating „ 5
activating as runtime-only system „ 10
exploring „ 28
installing „ 3
starting „ 11
system requirements „ 1
uninstalling „ 15
Works software „ 17
RSView32 commands. See Commands
RSView32 Database Import and Export
Wizard „ 69
RSView32 Object Model
about „ 89
objects „ 89
116
n
Getting Results with RSView32
RSView32 Tools
ControlView Project Import Wizard
Database Import and Export Wizard
Logix 5000 Tag Import utility „ 70
NT 4.0 DeskLock tool „ 80
Project Documentor „ 39
Project Transport Wizard „ 39
Win2K XP DeskLock tool „ 80
RSView32 VBA code
quick start „ 85
RSWho „ 46
Run mode „ 32
Running VBA code
from within RSView32 „ 87
„
„
39
69
S
Scan Class editor „ 43
Security
electronic signatures „ 75, 78
planning „ 101
project-level „ 75
assigning codes to users „ 76
securing commands
„
75
securing graphic displays
„
75
75
75, 79
securing tags
„
system-level „
disabling Windows shortcut keys
setting up displays
„
„
79
79
using the Win2K XP DeskLock tool and
NT 4.0 DeskLock tool „ 80
Security Codes editor „ 76
Selection button „ 37
Siemens devices „ 43
Signature button „ 75, 78
SLC database, importing „ 70
SoftLogix 5 „ 41
Status bar „ 29
hiding „ 30
showing „ 30
T
Tag Browser „ 45, 68
Tag Database editor „ 43, 44, 69
Tag monitor „ 45
Tag substitution „ 54
Tags
analog „ 67
creating as needed „ 68
creating many at once „ 69
designing the database „ 98
device „ 67
digital „ 67
folders „ 69
importing „ 69, 70
memory „ 67
naming „ 37, 98
organizing „ 71, 98
securing „ 75
string „ 67
system „ 67
using in an expression „ 38
Technical support „ 111
resetting damaged activation „ 9
Title bar in graphic displays „ 63
Toolbar „ 28
hiding „ 30
showing „ 30
Trends
creating „ 64
planning „ 101
viewing logged data in „ 74
U
Uninstalling RSView32 „ 15
US Government 21 CFR Part 11 compliance
setting up security for „ 75, 78
User Accounts editor „ 76
User’s guides. See Online user’s guides
Using the Integrated Development Environment
„
83
Using VBA code
„
82
V
VBA code
defined „ 82, 86
quick start „ 85
running from within RSView32 „ 87
using instead of macros „ 86
VBA documentation „ 96
VBA IDE
opening for editing „ 89
VBA Integrated Development Environment. See
VBA IDE
Viewing objects „ 92
Virtual memory
setting in Windows 2000 and Windows XP „
13
setting in Windows 95 „ 14
setting in Windows NT „ 14
W
Win2K XP DeskLock tool „ 80
Windows keys, disabling „ 79
Windows user list „ 76
World Wide Web „ 111
Index
n
117
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