caution - ACT/Apricot
SYSTEM PRODUCT GUIDE
VS660
apricot
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Mini-Tower System
Product Guide
Copyright © Apricot Computers Limited 1995
Portions Copyright  1994, Intel Corporation.
Information contained in this document is subject to change without notice and does
not represent a commitment on the part of Apricot Computers Limited. Any software
described in this manual is furnished under a license agreement. The software may
be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of this agreement. It is against
the law to copy any disk supplied for any other purpose than the purchaser’s personal
use.
All rights reserved; no use or disclosure without written consent.
Printed in the United Kingdom
Radio Frequency Interference Testing
(USA) This equipment has been tested for radio frequency emissions and has been
certified to the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC
Rules. For more information about compliance with FCC regulations about RFI, see
Chapter 7 in this manual.
(Europe) This equipment complies with the relevant clauses of following European
directives: 89/336/EEC and 73/23/EEC, and is able to bear the CE mark.
Safety
This equipment meets or exceeds requirements for safety in the US (UL 1950),
Canada (CSA 950), Europe (EN 60950) and international (IEC 950).
OverDrive and Pentium are registered trademarks and Intel486, Intel487, Intel386,
Intel387, and i486 are trademarks of Intel Corporation.
†
ii
Third-party brands and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Contents
1
Product Description
Feature Summary ...................................................................................1-2
Central Processing Unit (CPU) .............................................................1-3
System Memory ......................................................................................1-3
Cache Memory ........................................................................................1-3
Enhanced PCI/IDE Peripheral Interface .............................................1-4
System I/O ..............................................................................................1-4
System BIOS ............................................................................................1-5
BIOS Upgrades ................................................................................1-5
Plug and Play ..........................................................................................1-5
Expansion Slots .......................................................................................1-6
Power Management ...............................................................................1-6
Integrated 16-bit Audio .........................................................................1-6
Video Graphics Subsystem....................................................................1-7
Power Supply..........................................................................................1-7
System Security.......................................................................................1-7
Battery ......................................................................................................1-8
Speaker.....................................................................................................1-8
2
Installing Your System
Selecting a Site.........................................................................................2-2
Checking the Input Voltage Setting .....................................................2-3
Checking the Power Cord .....................................................................2-4
Connecting Devices When Configuring the System ..........................2-4
Before Installing Optional Items...........................................................2-4
System Front Panel Controls and Indicators ......................................2-5
Back Panel Connectors and Features ...................................................2-6
Turning on the System at First Start-up...............................................2-7
Resetting the System ..............................................................................2-9
Using Keyboard Shortcuts.....................................................................2-9
Setting Fast and Slow CPU Modes..............................................2-10
Setting Up Add-in Boards and Drives...............................................2-10
System Product Guide
iii
3
Using the Setup Program
Make a Record of the Setup Configuration......................................... 3-1
Overview of the Setup Menu Screens.................................................. 3-2
Overview of the Setup Keys.................................................................. 3-3
Main BIOS Setup Screen ........................................................................ 3-4
System Date...................................................................................... 3-4
System Time..................................................................................... 3-4
Floppy Options ................................................................................ 3-4
Primary IDE Master ........................................................................ 3-4
Primary IDE Slave ........................................................................... 3-4
Secondary IDE Master .................................................................... 3-4
Secondary IDE Slave ....................................................................... 3-4
Language .......................................................................................... 3-4
Boot Options .................................................................................... 3-5
Video Mode...................................................................................... 3-5
Mouse................................................................................................ 3-5
Base Memory ................................................................................... 3-5
Extended Memory........................................................................... 3-5
Floppy Options Subscreen .................................................................... 3-6
Floppy A: .......................................................................................... 3-6
Floppy B:........................................................................................... 3-6
Floppy A: Type ................................................................................ 3-6
Floppy B: Type................................................................................. 3-6
IDE Configuration Subscreen ............................................................... 3-7
IDE Device Configuration .............................................................. 3-7
Number of Cylinders ...................................................................... 3-7
Number of Heads ............................................................................ 3-7
Number of Sectors........................................................................... 3-7
Maximum Capacity......................................................................... 3-7
IDE Translation Mode .................................................................... 3-8
Multiple Sector Setting ................................................................... 3-8
Fast Programmed I/O Modes........................................................ 3-8
Boot Options Subscreen......................................................................... 3-9
First Boot Device.............................................................................. 3-9
Second Boot Device......................................................................... 3-9
Third Boot Device............................................................................ 3-9
Fourth Boot Device.......................................................................... 3-9
System Cache ................................................................................... 3-9
Boot Speed...................................................................................... 3-10
Num Lock....................................................................................... 3-10
Setup Prompt ................................................................................. 3-10
Typematic Rate Programming..................................................... 3-10
iv
Contents
Typematic Rate Delay ...................................................................3-10
Typematic Rate ..............................................................................3-10
Advanced Screen ..................................................................................3-11
Processor Type...............................................................................3-11
Processor Speed .............................................................................3-11
Cache Size.......................................................................................3-11
Peripheral Configuration..............................................................3-11
Advanced Chipset Configuration ...............................................3-11
Power Management Configuration.............................................3-11
Plug and Play Configuration .......................................................3-11
Peripheral Configuration Subscreen ..................................................3-12
Configuration Mode......................................................................3-12
PCI IDE Interface...........................................................................3-12
Floppy Interface.............................................................................3-12
Serial Port 1 Address.....................................................................3-12
Serial Port 2 Address.....................................................................3-13
Serial Port 2 IR Mode ....................................................................3-13
Parallel Port Address ....................................................................3-13
Parallel Port Mode.........................................................................3-13
Advanced Chipset Configuration Subscreen.................................... 3-14
Base Memory Size .........................................................................3-14
ISA LFB Size ...................................................................................3-14
ISA LFB Base Address ..................................................................3-14
Video Palette Snoop ...................................................................... 3-14
Latency Timer (PCI Clocks) ......................................................... 3-14
PCI Burst.........................................................................................3-14
Bank O SIMM Detected ................................................................ 3-15
Bank 1 SIMM Detected ................................................................. 3-15
Power Management Configuration Subscreen ................................. 3-16
Advanced Power Management ...................................................3-16
IDE Drive Power Down................................................................3-16
VESA Video Power Down............................................................3-16
Inactivity Timer .............................................................................3-16
Hot Key...........................................................................................3-16
Plug and Play Configuration Subscreen............................................3-17
Configuration Mode......................................................................3-17
Boot with PnP OS ..........................................................................3-17
ISA Shared Memory Size..............................................................3-17
ISA Shared Memory Base Address .............................................3-17
IRQ 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12..............................................................3-18
Security Screen ......................................................................................3-19
Administrative and User Access Modes ....................................3-19
System Product Guide
v
Security Screen Options....................................................................... 3-20
User Password is ........................................................................... 3-20
Administrative Password is......................................................... 3-20
Set User Password......................................................................... 3-20
Set Administrative Password ...................................................... 3-20
Unattended Start ........................................................................... 3-20
Security Hot Key (CTRL-ALT-) ................................................... 3-20
Exit Screen ............................................................................................. 3-21
Exit Saving Changes...................................................................... 3-21
Exit Discarding Changes .............................................................. 3-21
Load Setup Defaults...................................................................... 3-21
Discard Changes............................................................................ 3-21
4
Taking Your System Apart
Before You Begin .................................................................................... 4-1
Removing the Side cover ....................................................................... 4-3
Installing the Side cover ........................................................................ 4-5
Removing the Bezel................................................................................ 4-5
Installing the Bezel ................................................................................. 4-6
Add-in Board Considerations............................................................... 4-7
Removing Expansion Slot Covers ........................................................ 4-9
Removing Breakout Slot Covers.................................................... 4-9
Removing Standard Slot Covers ................................................. 4-10
Installing an Expansion Slot Cover .................................................... 4-11
Installing an Add-in Board.................................................................. 4-11
Removing an Add-in Board ................................................................ 4-12
Removing the 3.5-inch Drive Carrier ................................................. 4-13
Installing the 3.5-inch Drive Carrier .................................................. 4-14
Removing the Floppy Disk Drive....................................................... 4-14
Installing a Floppy Disk Drive............................................................ 4-15
Installing a Drive in the 3.5-inch Drive Carrier ................................ 4-16
Removing a Drive from the 3.5-inch Drive Carrier.......................... 4-17
Installing a 5.25-inch Device ............................................................... 4-18
Removing a 5.25-inch Device.............................................................. 4-22
Removing the System Board ............................................................... 4-22
Installing the System Board ......................................................... 4-23
5
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
Before You Begin .................................................................................... 5-1
System Board Components ................................................................... 5-3
vi
Contents
Jumper Block Overview.........................................................................5-4
How to Disable Access to the Setup Program .............................5-7
How to Clear CMOS RAM.............................................................5-7
How to Clear the Password ...........................................................5-7
How to Set the ISA Bus Clock Speed Jumper ..............................5-8

Installing an OverDrive Processor.....................................................5-9
Clearance Requirements .................................................................5-9
Installing the Upgrade .................................................................. 5-10
Installing Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs) ....................... 5-13
Removing SIMMs .................................................................................5-16
Installing Video DRAM ....................................................................... 5-17
Replacing the Battery ........................................................................... 5-19
6
Solving Problems
Resetting the System ..............................................................................6-1
Troubleshooting Procedure...................................................................6-2
Problems at Initial System Start-up......................................................6-4
Problems After the System Has Been Running Correctly .................6-5
Problems Running New Application Software ..................................6-6
Problems Operating Add-in Boards ....................................................6-7
Problems and Suggestions.....................................................................6-8
Error and Information Messages ........................................................6-11
Beep Codes ............................................................................................6-11
Error and Information Messages ........................................................6-12
PCI Configuration Status and Error Messages ................................. 6-15
7
Technical Reference
Safety Compliance..................................................................................7-1
Dimensions..............................................................................................7-1
System Environment ..............................................................................7-1
Power Supply Specifications.................................................................7-2
AC Input ...........................................................................................7-2
Power Supply Output .....................................................................7-2
Board Connectors ...................................................................................7-3
Primary Power Connector..............................................................7-3
Diskette Drive Connector ...............................................................7-4
IDE Connectors................................................................................7-5
Hard Drive LED Connector ...........................................................7-6
Remote On/Off................................................................................7-7
Reset Connector ...............................................................................7-8
System Product Guide
vii
Sleep/Resume Connector............................................................... 7-9
Infra-red Connector....................................................................... 7-10
Speaker Connector ........................................................................ 7-11
Wave Table Connector.................................................................. 7-12
CD-ROM Audio Interface Connector ......................................... 7-12
Voice Modem Audio Interface .................................................... 7-12
VGA Connector ............................................................................. 7-13
VESA Feature Connector.............................................................. 7-14
ISA Connectors .............................................................................. 7-15
PCI Connectors .............................................................................. 7-18
System I/O Addresses.................................................................. 7-20
Memory Map ................................................................................. 7-22
Board Interrupts ............................................................................ 7-23
DMA................................................................................................ 7-24
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) .............................................. 7-25
Electromagnetic Compatibility Notice (USA) ........................... 7-25
Electromagnetic Compatibility Notices (International) ........... 7-26
A
BIOS Update
BIOS Update...........................................................................................A-1
Using the Upgrade Utility.............................................................A-1
B
Installing Software Drivers
Installing Plug and Play Software ........................................................B-1
Installing Power Management Software .............................................B-2
Turning the System Off with APM Installed ......................................B-2
Using the Suspend/Resume Feature ...................................................B-3
C
Optional Integrated Audio System
Audio System Features ......................................................................... C-1
System Board Audio Connectors ........................................................ C-2
CD-ROM-to-Audio Interface Connector ..................................... C-2
Voice Modem Audio Interface Connector .................................. C-2
Audio Software...................................................................................... C-2
Windows Software ......................................................................... C-2
Audio Input.............................................................................. C-2
Audio Mixer............................................................................. C-3
Audio Transport...................................................................... C-3
DOS Software.................................................................................. C-3
CS32HMX.EXE ........................................................................ C-3
viii
Contents
CS32MIX.EXE: ......................................................................... C-3
CS4232C.EXE ........................................................................... C-3
CSACGUCD.EXE .................................................................... C-3
CS32DIAG.EXE........................................................................ C-3
CS32INTR.EXE ........................................................................ C-3
Basic Audio System Controls............................................................... C-4
How to Play a MIDI File................................................................ C-4
How to Play a WAV File ............................................................... C-4
How to Control the Volume.......................................................... C-4
How to Mix Sounds ....................................................................... C-4
D
Optional Graphics Controller
Installing Video Drivers........................................................................D-1
Using the Galileo Control Panel ..........................................................D-2
Resolution........................................................................................D-3
Color Depth.....................................................................................D-3
Refresh Rate.....................................................................................D-3
Switches ...........................................................................................D-3
Small/Large Fonts Enabled Switch ......................................D-3
Polygon and Ellipse Support Switches.................................D-3
About ...............................................................................................D-3
Available Resolutions ...........................................................................D-4
System Product Guide
ix
Tables
5-1.
5-2.
5-3.
5-4.
5-5.
D-1.
System Board Jumper Block Settings ................................................... 5-5
ISA Bus Clock Speeds ............................................................................ 5-8
Clearances for OverDrive Processor Upgrades.................................. 5-9
Required SIMM Speeds ....................................................................... 5-13
Memory Options................................................................................... 5-14
Supported Resolutions..........................................................................D-4
Figures
2-1.
2-2.
2-3.
4-1.
4-2.
4-3.
4-4.
4-5.
4-6.
4-7.
4-8.
4-9.
4-10.
4-11.
4-12.
4-13.
5-1.
5-2.
5-3.
5-4.
5-5.
5-6.
5-7.
D-1.
Check the Input Voltage Setting........................................................... 2-3
Mini-Tower Front Panel Controls and Indicators .............................. 2-5
Mini-Tower Back Panel Connectors and Features ............................. 2-6
Removing the Side cover....................................................................... 4-4
Removing the Bezel................................................................................ 4-6
System Slot Numbering Convention ................................................... 4-7
Removing a Breakout Expansion Slot Cover ...................................... 4-9
Removing an Expansion Slot Cover................................................... 4-10
Installing an Add-in Board.................................................................. 4-12
Removing the 3.5-inch Drive Carrier ................................................. 4-13
Removing the Floppy Disk Drive....................................................... 4-15
Installing an Internal Drive ................................................................. 4-17
Removing EMI Shields and Filler Panels .......................................... 4-19
Installing the Snap-In Slide Rails........................................................ 4-20
Installing a 5.25-inch Device ............................................................... 4-21
Removing the System Board ............................................................... 4-23
System Board Components ................................................................... 5-3
System Board Jumper Blocks ................................................................ 5-6
Removing the CPU Clamp .................................................................. 5-11
Installing a Microprocessor Upgrade ................................................ 5-12
Installing SIMMs .................................................................................. 5-15
Installing Video DRAM on the System Board .................................. 5-18
Replacing the Battery ........................................................................... 5-20
Galileo Graphics Control Panel ...........................................................D-2
■ ■ ■
x
Contents
Product Description
1
This manual describes the Mini-Tower system. This system is based on the
Intel Pentium microprocessor. This chapter describes the principal features
of the system.
After unpacking the system, make sure the following items are present and
in good condition:
•
System unit
•
Keyboard
•
Mouse
•
Power cord
If any item is damaged or missing, contact your system supplier. Save all
boxes and packing material to repack the system in the future.
System Product Guide
1-1
Feature Summary
1-2
•
Intel Pentium microprocessor
•
Support for up to 128 MB of DRAM installed in single in-line memory
modules (SIMMs) (8 MB already installed)
•
†
Onboard Crystal audio system (optional)
•
Onboard S3† Trio64V+† Graphics controller
•
82439 PCI chip set
•
One 1.44 MB, 3.5-inch high-density diskette drive
•
Optional CD-ROM drive
•
Windows† 95-compatible Plug and Play capability
•
Support for Advanced Power Management (APM)
•
200 watt power supply switchable between 115 and 230 V ac
•
Three dedicated PCI slots
•
Two dedicated ISA slots
•
One combination slot for one PCI or ISA board
•
AMIBIOS in a flash memory device; supports system setup and PCI
auto-configuration
•
Two PCI/IDE peripheral connectors on the system board
•
Two RS-232C-compatible 9-pin serial connectors
•
One multimode, 25-pin Centronics -compatible parallel port
•
PS/2†-style keyboard and mouse connectors
•
Speaker on the system board
•
Backup battery for the CMOS RAM and real-time clock
•
Optional processor cache SIMM
†
Product Description
Central Processing Unit (CPU)
The system is designed to operate with the Intel Pentium microprocessor.
The Pentium processor, in addition to its expanded data and addressing
capabilities, includes the following features:
•
Ready for next generation OverDrive processor
•
Backward compatibility with Intel microprocessor architecture
•
Onchip numeric coprocessor (compatible with the Intel486 DX
processor and compliant with ANSI/IEEE standard 754-1985)
•
Onchip 16 KB cache (8 KB for data, 8 KB for code)
•
Burst-mode bus cycles
Chapter 5 tells how to upgrade the CPU.
System Memory
The system supports base (conventional) and extended memory. Operating
systems such as MS-DOS†, OS/2†, UNIX†, and all application programs use
base memory. For better performance, Windows 95, OS/2 and UNIX as well
as many MS-DOS applications use extended memory. For the system
memory map, see Chapter 7.
The system supports up to 128 MB of DRAM. DRAM is implemented
through four 72-pin single in-line memory modules (SIMMs). Chapter 5 tells
how to install memory modules.
Cache Memory
The Pentium microprocessor includes 16 KB of cache on the chip. The core
chip set includes a cache controller that supports secondary write-back cache
memory. The system can support 256 KB of secondary cache memory.
System Product Guide
1-3
Enhanced PCI/IDE Peripheral Interface
The system provides two high speed, 32-bit PCI/IDE interfaces. Each
PCI/IDE interface supports:
•
Up to two IDE hard drives on the PCI bus
•
PIO Mode 3 and 4 and AT API devices
•
In conjunction with the system BIOS provides an option that supports
logical block addressing (LBA) of hard drives larger than 528 MB
If you are using third-party controllers or non-IDE hard disk drives, the
system Setup program provides options that allow you to manually
configure the controller functions.
System I/O
A single onboard I/O controller integrates the functions for the serial ports,
parallel port, and diskette drive. This component provides
•
1-4
Multimode bi-directional parallel port
−
Standard mode: Centronics-compatible operation
−
Support for Enhanced Parallel Port
−
High-speed mode: support for Enhanced Capabilities Port
•
Two RS-232C-compatible 9-pin serial ports.
•
Industry standard diskette drive controller
•
Real-time clock for the system
•
Keyboard and mouse controller
Product Description
System BIOS
The system BIOS, from American Megatrends Incorporated (AMI), provides
ISA and PCI compatibility. The BIOS is contained in a flash memory device
on the system board. The BIOS provides the power-on self test (POST), the
system Setup program, and a PCI and IDE auto-configuration utility.
The system BIOS is always shadowed. Shadowing allows any BIOS routines
to be executed from fast 32-bit onboard DRAM instead of from the slower
8-bit flash device.
BIOS Upgrades
Because the BIOS is stored in a flash memory device, you can easily upgrade
the BIOS without having to disassemble the system. The flash upgrade
process can be done by running a utility from a diskette or hard disk, or over
a network.
The DOS-based upgrade utility (Flash Memory Update Program, FMUP) has
three main options:
•
Update the flash BIOS from a file on disk.
•
Copy the current BIOS code from the flash device to a disk file to
provide a backup if the upgrade cannot be finished.
•
Compare the flash BIOS to a disk file to verify that the versions are the
same and make sure that the system has the correct BIOS version.
Appendix A tells how to run the BIOS upgrade utility. For information
about the latest BIOS update, contact your service representative.
Plug and Play
Your system is fully Plug and Play compatible. Plug and Play makes it
easier to add components to your system. This feature provides these
important benefits:
•
PCI cards and Plug and Play ISA cards are configured automatically
•
IDE hard disks and main memory are configured automatically
•
Windows 95 Plug and Play ready
System Product Guide
1-5
Expansion Slots
The system has two dedicated 16-bit ISA/AT-compatible, three dedicated
PCI-compatible expansion slots, and one combination slot that can be used
by either a PCI or an ISA board. See Chapter 4 for more information about
expansion slots and installing add-in boards.
Power Management
Your system supports the Intel/Microsoft Advanced Power Management
(APM) specification. Advanced Power Management consists of one or more
layers of software that support power management in computer with power
manageable hardware. Power Management works with APM-capable
operating systems to reduce power consumption in your system. IDE hard
drives and monitor/graphics card combinations that support the VESA
DPMS standards can be put to sleep along with the processor after a userdefined period of inactivity. The system Setup program provides options for
defining a time and a hotkey to enable the power saving mode.
Integrated 16-bit Audio
There is an optional integrated audio solution from Crystal that provides
built in support for the following standards:
•
Sound Blaster† Pro
•
Multimedia PC Level 2
•
MPU-401
The system includes software for getting the most out of your audio system.
Appendix C tells more about the audio system and software.
1-6
Product Description
Video Graphics Subsystem
The graphics subsystem features the S3 Trio64V+ integrated PCI graphics
controller. The Trio64V+ controller is a high performance graphics engine
that provides the following features:
•
Standard 1 MB of graphics memory, expandable to 2 MB
•
Multiple screen resolutions/color densities available
•
Support for 8-bit bi-directional VESA advanced feature connector
•
Support for VESA Display Power Management Signaling (DPMS)
monitor power savings modes
•
Support for VESA Display Data Channel (DDC2B) that permits transfer
of monitor identification and resolution support data for ease of use
A VESA-compliant 8514/A feature connector is provided on the system
board in addition to a standard 15-pin analog VGA connector on the back
panel. The VESA pass-through connector is useful when an auxiliary video
subsystem is installed in one of the expansion slots such as an 8514/A
compatible video card or DVI board.
Appendix D tells more about the Trio64V+ graphics controller.
Power Supply
The system has a 200 watt power supply to provide power for onboard
resources, add-in boards, and drives. A switch on the system back panel sets
the power supply to operate at either
•
115 V ac (in the range of 90-135 V ac; 4 A)
•
230 V ac (in the range of 180-265 V ac; 2 A)
For power supply output ratings, see Chapter 7.
System Security
System security is provided by password options enabled through the Setup
program (see Chapter 3).
System Product Guide
1-7
Battery
A battery on the system board provides power backup for the real-time clock
and CMOS RAM. Chapter 5 provides information about replacing the
battery.
You can set the time for the clock and the CMOS values by using the system
BIOS Setup program, described in Chapter 3.
Speaker
A speaker is mounted on the system board. The speaker provides audible
error code information (beep codes) during the power-on self test (POST) if
the system cannot use the video interface. See Chapter 6 for beep code
information.
■ ■ ■
1-8
Product Description
Installing Your System
2
This chapter explains how to set up your system, including
•
Selecting a site
•
Checking the input voltage setting and power cord
•
Location of front and back panel connectors and controls
•
Turning on the system at first start-up
•
Turning the system off
•
Resetting the system
•
Using keyboard shortcuts
•
Setting up drives
System Product Guide
2-1
Selecting a Site
The system is designed to operate in a typical commercial environment.
Choose a site that is:
•
Located near a grounded, three-pronged power outlet. For the United
States and Canada, this means a NEMA 5-15R outlet for 115 V ac or a
NEMA 6-15R outlet for 230 V ac. For other regions, this means a
grounded, three-pronged power outlet approved by the electrical code
of the region.
•
Clean and dust-free.
•
Well ventilated and away from sources of heat including direct sunlight.
•
Away from sources of vibration or physical shock.
•
Isolated from strong electromagnetic fields produced by electrical
devices (such as air conditioners, large fans, large electric motors, radio
and TV transmitters, and high-frequency security devices).
✏
2-2
Note
In geographic regions that are susceptible to electrical
storms, we highly recommend you plug your system into a
surge suppressor.
Installing Your System
Checking the Input Voltage Setting
A 200 watt power supply is integrated into the system to provide power for
onboard resources, add-in boards, and drives. A switch on the system back
panel (Figure 2-1) can be used to set the power supply to operate at:
•
115 V ac (in the range of 100 - 120 V ac), or
•
230 V ac (in the range of 220 - 240 V ac)
To verify that your system has the correct setting for your environment,
check the input power selection switch. The voltage visible on the switch is
the voltage the system is set to operate at. For power supply output ratings,
see Chapter 7.
230
115
OM04060
Figure 2-1. Check the Input Voltage Setting
System Product Guide
2-3
Checking the Power Cord
! WARNING
▲
Do not attempt to modify or use the supplied AC power
cord if it is not the exact type required.
In some cases, the power cord supplied with this system may not be
compatible with the AC wall outlet in your region. If this is true, you must
obtain a suitable power cord that meets the following criteria:
•
The cord must be rated for use with the available AC voltage, with a
current rating that is at least 125% of the current rating of the product.
•
The AC plug must be terminated in a grounding-type male plug
designed for use in your region. The plug ends must be labeled or
marked to indicate that they have been certified by an agency acceptable
in your region.
•
The connector at the product end must be an IEC 320, sheet C13, female
connector (or the equivalent EN 60 320 connector).
•
The cord must be less than 14.8 feet (4.5 meters) long and be created with
<HAR> (harmonized) or VDE certified cordage.
Connecting Devices When Configuring the System
To configure the system, you must add a monitor, a graphics controller, and
a keyboard to the system. If the system normally operates without a monitor
or keyboard (for example, as a network server), you may remove these
devices after configuring the system.
Before Installing Optional Items
Before installing other items, such as drives, add-in boards, software, and a
mouse, connect a keyboard and a monitor, and let the power-on self test
(POST) run. Then, add your drives, boards, system board components, and
software. Be sure to follow the warnings and cautions in Chapter 4.
•
If you need to run Setup, refer to Chapter 3.
•
Chapter 4 tells how to remove and replace system components.
•
Chapter 5 tells how to install and configure system board components.
If the POST is not successful, see "Turning on the System at First Startup" in
this chapter and "Problems at Initial System Start-up" in Chapter 6.
2-4
Installing Your System
System Front Panel Controls and Indicators
C
A
D
B
E
F
OM04059
Figure 2-2. Mini-Tower Front Panel Controls and Indicators
A. Diskette eject button. Press to eject a diskette from the drive.
B. Diskette drive light. Turns on when the system reads or writes data to a
diskette.
C. Bay for 5.25-inch devices, shown with three plastic filler panels in place.
D. Power control button. Press to turn on the system.
E. Power on/off light. Turns on when the system power is on; blinks when
in power saving/sleep mode.
F. Hard disk light. Turns on when the system reads or writes data to an
IDE hard disk.
System Product Guide
2-5
Back Panel Connectors and Features
A
B
C
K
L
D
E
M
F
G
I
H
N
O
P
J
OM04058
Figure 2-3. Mini-Tower Back Panel Connectors and Features
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
K.
L.
M.
N.
O.
P.
2-6
Input voltage select switch
9-pin serial port connector COM1
9-pin serial port connector COM2
PS/2-style mouse/keyboard connector
PS/2-style mouse/keyboard connector
Video graphics connector
Line-out/speaker jack (may not be fitted)
Line-in jack (may not be fitted)
Microphone jack (may not be fitted)
Add-in board expansion slots
Socket for AC power input
Power supply fan
Parallel port connector
Knock outs for additional I/O ports
MIDI and dual game port connector (may not be fitted)
Padlock slot (padlock not included)
Installing Your System
Turning on the System at First Start-up
To power up the system for the first time, follow these steps:
1.
All system components such as a video monitor and keyboard should be
connected before turning on the system. All connections should be
made while the system is off.
2.
Connect the female end of the AC power cord into the AC power input
socket at the rear of the system, and plug the male end of the power cord
into a grounded electrical outlet.
3.
Turn on power to the monitor.
4.
Press the power button at the front of the system (the green power LED
on the front panel will go on). The system will power up and
immediately begin the power-on self test (POST).
When you boot the system, the POST checks the settings stored in CMOS
RAM against the actual hardware configuration. During the memory test,
the POST displays the amount of memory that it has tested. The POST takes
approximately 15 seconds to complete. If you want to go into the Setup
program, press the <F1> key after the POST starts the memory test, but
before the system boots up (see Setup, Chapter 3). Your next step after
booting depends on what POST finds. See the following possibilities:
System Product Guide
2-7
What happens
What to do
If the settings in CMOS RAM match the hardware
configuration, and if the POST does not find any
errors, the power-on testing continues.
No action needed.
If the POST finds a fatal error (an error that prevents
the system from continuing the boot process), it
generates a series of beeps. A specific number of
beeps indicates a certain error message.
Record the number of beeps. See
Chapter 7 for a description of the
system beep codes and
troubleshooting procedures.
If the POST finds a non-fatal error (an error that
doesn't stop the boot process from continuing), the
system displays a message in the following format:
Locate the error message in
Chapter 7, and take action as
indicated under the explanation for
the error message. If needed, run
the Setup program.
Error message line 1
Error message line 2
Press <F1> for Setup,
<Esc> to Boot
If you need to reconfigure the system setup, start
the Setup program.
If you need to begin again, reboot the system.
2-8
Press <F1> after the POST starts
the memory test, but before the
system boots up. You have about
five seconds to press <F1> to enter
Setup before the boot process
continues.
Press <Ctrl + Alt + Del>.
Installing Your System
Resetting the System
To reset the system, press the key sequence:
<Ctrl + Alt + Del>
You can also reset the system by shutting system power off and then
powering back up. To do this:
1.
Press the front panel power control button.
2.
Wait at least 20 seconds.
3.
Press the power button. The system will power up and immediately
begin the power-on self test (POST).
Resetting the system will:
•
Clear the system memory
•
Restart the power-on self test (POST)
•
Reinitialize all peripherals
•
Load the operating system
Using Keyboard Shortcuts
The keyboard controller supports using shortcuts to reset the system (soft
boot) and toggle between fast (turbo) and slow CPU speed.
Normally the CPU runs in fast (turbo) mode at its full rated speed. Some
application software requires running the system in slow mode. Changing
to fast mode by using shortcuts may not be supported by some systems or by
some applications, in which case you can specify fast or slow mode by using
the Setup program. For instance the set slow or fast mode keyboard shortcut
will not work if the CPU is being operated in protected mode. (When you
operate Windows in enhanced mode, the CPU is operating in protected
mode.)
The numbers and symbols in the following tables refer to the keys on the
numeric keypad.
System Product Guide
2-9
Setting Fast and Slow CPU Modes
To do the following
Press at the same time
Set slow (deturbo) mode: (You’ll hear a lowtone beep.)
<Ctrl + Alt + ->
Set fast (turbo) mode: System runs at the full
rated speed of the CPU. (You’ll hear a hightone beep.)
<Ctrl + Alt + +>
Setting Up Add-in Boards and Drives
Chapter 4 explains how to physically install add-in boards and drives. The
system is fully Plug and Play compatible. With Plug and Play capability, the
system automatically configures IDE hard disk drives, diskette drives, PCI
cards, and Plug and Play ISA add-in boards.
■ ■ ■
2-10
Installing Your System
Using the Setup Program
3
This chapter tells how to use the Setup program that is built into the system
BIOS. The Setup program makes it possible to change and store system
configuration information such as the types of peripherals that are installed,
the boot-up sequence for the system, and enabling or disabling the power
management support. The Setup information is stored in CMOS random
access memory (RAM) and is backed up by a battery when power to the
system is off.
If the system does not operate as described here, see the chapter titled
“Solving Problems” for problem descriptions and error messages.
If you want to go into the Setup program, press the <F1> key after the POST
starts the memory test, but before the system boots up. You have about five
seconds to press <F1> to enter Setup before the boot process continues.
Make a Record of the Setup Configuration
To make sure you have a reference to the Setup values for your system, we
recommend you write down the current settings and keep this record up-todate.
System Product Guide
3-1
Overview of the Setup Menu Screens
The Setup program initially displays the Main menu screen. In each screen
there are options for modifying the system configuration. Select a menu
screen by pressing the left <←> or right <→> arrow keys. Use the up <↑> or
down <↓> arrow keys to select items in a screen. Use the <Enter> key to
select an item for modification. For certain items, pressing <Enter> will
bring up a subscreen. After you have selected an item, use the arrow keys to
modify the setting.
Setup Menu Screen
Description
Main
For setting up and modifying some of the basic
options of a PC, such as time, date, diskette drives,
hard drives.
Advanced
For modifying the more advanced features of a PC,
such as peripheral configuration and advanced
chipset configuration.
Security
For specifying passwords that can be used to limit
access to the system.
Exit
For saving or discarding changes.
Setup Subscreen
Description
Floppy Options
For configuring your diskette drives.
IDE Configuration
For configuring your hard drives.
Boot Options
For modifying options that affect the system boot
up, such as the boot sequence.
Peripheral Configuration
For modifying options that affect the serial ports, the
parallel port, and the disk drive interfaces.
Advanced Chipset Configuration
For modifying options that affect memory and
system busses.
Power Management Configuration
For accessing and modifying Advanced Power
Management (APM) options.
Plug and Play Configuration
For modifying options that affect the system’s Plug
and Play capabilities.
3-2
Using the Setup Program
Overview of the Setup Keys
The following keys have special functions in the BIOS Setup program.
Setup Key
Description
<F1>
Pressing the <F1> key brings up a help screen for the current
item.
<Esc>
Pressing the <Esc> key takes you back to the previous screen.
Pressing <Esc> in the Main, Advanced, Security, or Exit screen
allows you to Exit Discarding Changes (see later in this chapter).
<Enter>
Pressing the <Enter> key selects the current item or option.
<↑>
Pressing the up arrow <↑> key changes the selection to the
previous item or option.
<↓>
Pressing the down arrow <↓> key changes the selection to the
next item or option.
<←> <→>
Pressing the left <←> or right arrow <→> keys in the Main,
Advanced, Security, or Exit menu screens changes the menu
screen. Pressing either key in a subscreen does nothing.
<F5>
Pressing the <F5> key allows you to Load Setup Defaults (see
later in this chapter).
<F6>
Pressing the <F6> key allows you to Discard Changes (see later
in this chapter).
<F10>
Pressing the <F10> key allows you to Exit Saving Changes (see
later in this chapter).
System Product Guide
3-3
Main BIOS Setup Screen
This section describes the Setup options found on the main menu screen. If
you select certain options from the main screen (e.g., Boot Options), the
Setup program switches to a subscreen for the selected option.
System Date
Specifies the current date. Select the month from a pop-up menu.
System Time
Specifies the current time.
Floppy Options
When selected, this pops up the Floppy Options menu.
Primary IDE Master
Reports if a IDE device is connected to the system. When selected, this
brings up the IDE Configuration subscreen.
Primary IDE Slave
Reports if a IDE device is connected to the system. When selected, this
brings up the IDE Configuration subscreen.
Secondary IDE Master
Reports if a IDE device is connected to the system. When selected, this
brings up the IDE Configuration subscreen.
Secondary IDE Slave
Reports if a IDE device is connected to the system. When selected, this
brings up the IDE Configuration subscreen.
Language
Specifies the language of the text strings used in the Setup program and the
BIOS. The options are any installed languages.
3-4
Using the Setup Program
Boot Options
When selected, this brings up the Boot Options subscreen.
Video Mode
Reports the video mode. There are no options.
Mouse
Reports if a mouse is installed or not. There are no options.
Base Memory
Reports the amount of base memory. There are no options.
Extended Memory
Reports the amount of extended memory. There are no options.
System Product Guide
3-5
Floppy Options Subscreen
Floppy A:
Reports if a diskette drive is connected to the system. There are no options.
Floppy B:
Reports if a second diskette drive is connected to the system. There are no
options.
Floppy A: Type
Specifies the physical size and capacity of the diskette drive. The options are
Disabled, 360 KB, 5.25-inch; 1.2 MB, 5.25-inch; 720 KB, 3.5-inch; 1.44/1.25
MB, 3.5-inch; 2.88 MB, 3.5-inch. The default is 1.44/1.25 MB, 3.5-inch.
Floppy B: Type
Specifies the physical size and capacity of the diskette drive. The options are
Disabled, 360 KB, 5.25-inch; 1.2 MB, 5.25-inch; 720 KB, 3.5-inch; 1.44/1.25
MB, 3.5-inch; 2.88 MB, 3.5-inch. The default is Disabled.
3-6
Using the Setup Program
IDE Configuration Subscreen
IDE Device Configuration
Used to manually configure the device or have the system auto configure it.
The options are Auto Configured, User Definable, and Disabled. The default
is Auto Configured. If you select User Definable then the Number of
Cylinders, Number of Heads, and Number of Sectors items can be modified.
Number of Cylinders
If IDE Device Configuration is set to User Definable, you must type the
correct number of cylinders for your hard disk. If IDE Device Configuration
is set to Auto Configured, this reports the number of cylinders for your hard
disk and cannot be modified.
Number of Heads
If IDE Device Configuration is set to User Definable, you must type the
correct number of heads for your hard disk. If IDE Device Configuration is
set to Auto Configured, this reports the number of heads for your hard disk
and cannot be modified.
Number of Sectors
If IDE Device Configuration is set to User Definable, you must type the
correct number of sectors for your hard disk. If IDE Device Configuration is
set to Auto Configured, this reports the number of sectors for your hard disk
and cannot be modified.
Maximum Capacity
Reports the maximum capacity of your hard disk. It is calculated from the
number of cylinders, heads, and sectors. There are no options here.
System Product Guide
3-7
IDE Translation Mode
Specifies the IDE translation mode. The options are Standard CHS (standard
cylinder head sector — less than 1024 cylinders), Logical Block, Extended
CHS (extended cylinder head sector — greater than 1024 cylinders), and
Auto Detected (BIOS detects IDE drive support for LBA). The default is
Auto Detected.
! CAUTION
▲
Do not change this from the option selected when the hard
drive was formatted. Changing the option can result in
corrupted data.
Multiple Sector Setting
Sets the number of sectors transferred by an IDE drive per interrupt
generated. The options are Disabled, 4 Sectors/Block, 8 Sectors/Block, or
Auto Detected. The default is Auto Detected. Check the specifications for
your hard disk drive to determine which setting provides optimum
performance for your drive.
Fast Programmed I/O Modes
Sets how fast transfers on the IDE interface occur. The options are Disabled
or Auto Detected. The default is Auto Detected. If set to Disabled, transfers
occur at a less than optimized speed. If set to Auto Detected, transfers occur
at the drive’s maximum speed.
3-8
Using the Setup Program
Boot Options Subscreen
This section describes the options available on the Boot Options subscreen.
First Boot Device
Sets which drive the system checks first to find an operating system to boot
from. The following options are available:
Floppy
The system checks the Floppy drive first.
Hard Disk
The system checks the Hard Disk first.
CD ROM
The system checks the CD ROM first.
Network
The system checks the Network first.
Disabled
For First Boot Device, the default is Floppy. If the system is unable to boot
from the selected boot device, the system will check the device selected for
Second Boot Device.
Second Boot Device
The options are Floppy, Hard Disk, CD ROM, Network, and Disabled.
Default is Hard Disk. If the system is unable to boot from the selected boot
device, the system will check the device selected for Third Boot Device.
Third Boot Device
The options are Floppy, Hard Disk, CD ROM, Network, and Disabled. The
default is disabled. If the system is unable to boot from the selected boot
device, the system will check the device selected for Fourth Boot Device.
Fourth Boot Device
The options are Floppy, Hard Disk, CD ROM, Network, and Disabled. The
default is Disabled.
System Cache
Enables or disables both the primary and the secondary cache memory. The
options are Enabled or Disabled. The default is Enabled.
System Product Guide
3-9
Boot Speed
Sets the system’s boot speed. The options are Deturbo and Turbo. The
default is Turbo. If Turbo is selected, boot-up occurs at full speed. If
Deturbo is selected, the board operates at a slower speed.
Num Lock
Sets the beginning state of the Num Lock feature on your keyboard. The
options are On and Off. The default is Off.
Setup Prompt
Turns on (or off) the “Press <F1> Key if you want to run Setup” prompt
during the power-up sequence. The options are Enabled and Disabled. The
default is Enabled.
✏
Note
This option has no effect on your ability to access the Setup
program. It only toggles the prompt.
Typematic Rate Programming
Sets the typematic rates. The options are Default and Override. The default
is Default. Choosing Override enables Typematic Rate Delay and Typematic
Rate.
Typematic Rate Delay
Sets how long it takes for the key-repeat function to start when you hold
down a key on the keyboard. The options are 250, 500, 750, and 1000
millisecond delays. The default is 250. If Typematic Rate Programming is
set to Default, this option will not be visible.
Typematic Rate
Sets the speed at which characters repeat when you hold down a key on the
keyboard. The higher the number, the faster the characters repeat. The
options are 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 24, and 30 characters per second. The default
is 6. If Typematic Rate Programming is set to Default, this option will not be
visible.
3-10
Using the Setup Program
Advanced Screen
This section describes the Setup options found on the Advanced menu
screen. If you select certain options from the Advanced screen (e.g.,
Peripheral Configuration), the Setup program switches to a subscreen for the
selected option. Subscreens are described in the sections following the
description of the Advanced screen options.
Processor Type
Reports the CPU type. There are no options.
Processor Speed
Reports the CPU clock speed. There are no options.
Cache Size
Reports the size of the secondary cache. There are no options. If your
system contains no L2 cache, this item will not appear.
Peripheral Configuration
When selected, this brings up the Peripheral Configuration subscreen.
Advanced Chipset Configuration
When selected, this brings up the Advanced Chipset Configuration
subscreen.
Power Management Configuration
When selected and enabled, this brings up the Advanced Power
Management subscreen.
Plug and Play Configuration
When selected, this brings up the Plug and Play Configuration subscreen.
System Product Guide
3-11
Peripheral Configuration Subscreen
This section describes the screens for the peripheral configuration subscreen.
Configuration Mode
Enables you to choose between setting the peripheral configuration yourself,
or having the system do it. The options are Auto and Manual. The default is
Auto.
When Auto is selected, the system peripherals are automatically configured
during power up. The options below for PCI IDE Interface, Floppy Interface,
Serial Port 1 and Serial Port 2 Addresses, Serial Port 2 IR Mode, and the
Parallel Port Address cannot be modified. The settings displayed for those
options reflect the current state of the hardware.
PCI IDE Interface
Enables or disables the PCI IDE hard disk interface. The options are Enabled
and Disabled. The default is Enabled. (If Configuration Mode is set to Auto,
this option cannot be modified.)
Floppy Interface
Enables or disables the diskette drive interface. The options are Enabled and
Disabled. The default is Enabled. (If Configuration Mode is set to Auto, this
option cannot be modified.)
Serial Port 1 Address
Selects the address of the serial port. The options are Disabled; COM1, 3F8h,
IRQ4; COM2, 2F8h, IRQ3; COM3, 3E8h, IRQ4; and COM4, 2E8h, IRQ3. If the
Configuration Mode is set to Auto, the Setup program assigns the first free
COM port (normally COM1, 3F8h) as the serial port 1 address, regardless of
what is selected under the Serial Port 1 Address option. (If Configuration
Mode is set to Auto, this option cannot be modified.)
3-12
Using the Setup Program
Serial Port 2 Address
Selects the address of the serial port. The options are Disabled; COM1, 3F8h,
IRQ4; COM2, 2F8h, IRQ3; COM3, 3E8h, IRQ4; and COM4, 2E8h, IRQ3. If the
Configuration Mode is set to Auto, the Setup program assigns the first free
COM port (normally COM2, 2F8h) as the serial port 2 address, regardless of
what is selected under the Serial Port 2 Address option. (If Configuration
Mode is set to Auto, this option cannot be modified.)
✏
Note
If either serial port address is set, the address it is set to will
not appear in the options dialog box of the other serial port.
If an ATI mach32† or an ATI mach64† video controller is
active, the COM4, 2E8h, IRQ3 address will not appear in the
options dialog box of either serial port.
Serial Port 2 IR Mode
Makes Serial Port 2 available to infrared applications. The options are
Enabled and Disabled. The default is Disabled. (If Configuration Mode is
set to Auto, this option cannot be modified.)
Parallel Port Address
Selects the address and IRQ of the parallel port. The options are Disabled;
LPT3, 3BCh, IRQ7; LPT1, 378h, IRQ7; LPT2, 278h, IRQ7; LPT3, 3BCh, IRQ5
LPT1, 378h, IRQ5; and LPT2, 278h, IRQ5. If the Configuration Mode is set to
Auto, the setup program assigns LPT1, 378h, IRQ7 as the parallel port
address, regardless of what is selected under the Parallel Port Address
option. (If Configuration Mode is set to Auto, this option cannot be
modified.)
Parallel Port Mode
Selects the mode for the parallel port. The options are Compatible, Bidirectional, ECP, and EPP. The default is Compatible. Compatible means
the parallel port operates in AT-compatible mode. Bi-directional means the
parallel port operates in bi-directional PS/2-compatible mode. EPP and ECP
mean the parallel port operates high-speed, bi-directionally. This option is
not affected by the Configuration Mode field above.
System Product Guide
3-13
Advanced Chipset Configuration Subscreen
This section describes the options available on the Advanced Chipset
Configuration Subscreen.
Base Memory Size
Sets the size of the base memory. The options are 512 KB and 640 KB. The
default is 640 KB.
ISA LFB Size
Sets the size of the linear frame buffer. The options are Disabled and 1 MB.
The default is Disabled. If this is set to 1 MB, then the ISA LFB Base Address
field will appear.
ISA LFB Base Address
Reports the base address of the LFB. There are no options. This field will
not appear if the ISA LFB Size is set to Disabled.
Video Palette Snoop
Controls the ability of a primary PCI graphics controller to share a common
palette with an ISA add-in video card. The options are Enabled and
Disabled. The default is Disabled.
Latency Timer (PCI Clocks)
Sets the length of time an agent on the PCI bus can hold the bus when
another agent has requested the bus. Valid numbers are between 0 and 256.
The default is 66.
PCI Burst
Enables or disables bursting on the PCI bus. When disabled, forces normal
PCI cycles. When enabled, allows PCI cycles to burst. Must be disabled
with some graphics cards that don’t support burst cycles. If the display
appears to be corrupted, disable this field.
3-14
Using the Setup Program
Bank O SIMM Detected
Reports the type of memory found in the bank 0 SIMM slots. There are no
options.
Bank 1 SIMM Detected
Reports the type of memory found in the bank 1 SIMM slots. There are no
options.
System Product Guide
3-15
Power Management Configuration Subscreen
This section describes the options available on the Power Management
Subscreen.
Advanced Power Management
Enables or disables the Advanced Power Management (APM) support in
your system’s BIOS. The options are Enabled and Disabled. The default is
Enabled. Power Management will only work with APM-capable operating
systems to manage power consumption in your system. If Advanced Power
Management is set to Disabled, none of the fields in the Advanced Power
Management subscreen will be visible.
IDE Drive Power Down
Sets any IDE drives to spin down when the system goes into power managed
mode. The options are Enabled and Disabled. The default is Enabled.
VESA Video Power Down
Sets the command issued to your graphics controller when the system goes
into power managed mode. The command options are Disabled, Standby,
Suspend, and Sleep. The default is Sleep.
Inactivity Timer
Sets how long the system must be inactive before it enters power managed
mode. Enter the number of minutes. The range is 0 to 255 minutes. The
default is 10 minutes.
Hot Key
Sets the hot key that, when pressed while holding down the <Ctrl> and
<Alt> keys, causes the system to enter power managed mode. All alphabetic
keys are valid.
3-16
Using the Setup Program
Plug and Play Configuration Subscreen
This section describes the options found on the Plug and Play configuration
subscreen.
Configuration Mode
Sets how the BIOS gets information about ISA cards that do not have Plug
and Play capabilities. The options are Use Setup Utility and Use ICU (ISA
Configuration Utility). The default is Use Setup Utility.
If Use ICU is selected, the BIOS will depend on run-time software to ensure
that there are no conflicts between ISA boards with Plug and Play
capabilities and those without. Choosing Use ICU enables Boot with PnP OS
and disables all other options.
Boot with PnP OS
Enables the PC to boot with an operating system capable of managing Plug
and Play add-in cards. The options are None, Other, and Windows 95. The
default is Windows 95. If Configuration Mode (above) is set to Use Setup
Utility, this option will not be visible.
ISA Shared Memory Size
Enables you to “unshadow” a block of the upper memory area. The options
are Disabled, 16 KB, 32 KB, 48 KB, 64 KB, 80 KB, and 96 KB. The default is
Disabled. If this is set to Disabled, the ISA Shared Memory Base Address
(described below) will not be visible.
Shadowing is a technique that copies a block of memory from an add-in
card’s ROM to the same address in system memory. This provides faster
access and achieves higher performance. By default, all upper memory is
shadowed.
ISA Shared Memory Base Address
Sets the base address for the ISA Shared Memory. The options are C8000h,
CC000h, D0000h, D4000h, D8000h, and DC000h. The default is C8000h. This
setting could affect the ISA Shared Memory Size item. The value entered in
the ISA Shared Memory Size item cannot extend to the E0000h address. For
example, if a size of 64K was selected, options D4000h, D8000h, and DC000h
will not be available.
System Product Guide
3-17
IRQ 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12
Sets the status of the IRQ. The options are Available and Used By ISA Card.
The default is Available. The PCI auto-configuration code looks here to see
if these interrupts are available for use by a PCI add-in board. If an interrupt
is available, the PCI auto-configuration code can assign the interrupt to be
used by the system. If your system contains an ISA agent that uses one of
these interrupts, select Used By ISA Card for that interrupt.
3-18
Using the Setup Program
Security Screen
This section describes the two access modes that can be set using the options
found on the Security screen, and then describes the Security screen options
themselves.
Administrative and User Access Modes
The options on the Security screen menu make it possible to restrict access to
the Setup program by enabling you to set passwords for two different access
modes: Administrative mode and User mode.
In general, Administrative mode has full access to the Setup options,
whereas User mode has restricted access to the options. Thus, by setting
separate Administrative and User passwords, a system administrator can
limit who can change critical Setup values. The actual limitations depend on
whether either the Administrative or User passwords or both are set. (See
the table below for a description of how the passwords actually work
together.)
To limit access to who can boot the system, set the User password. This is
the password that the system asks for before booting. If only the
Administrative password is set, the system boots up without asking for a
password. If both passwords are set, you can enter either password to boot
the system.
The following table shows the effects of setting the Administrative and User
passwords. (The table is for reference only, and is not shown on the Security
screen.) In the table, the statement “Can change a limited number of
options” means you can change the system date and time, the power
management hot key, the User password, the security hot key, and
unattended start.
Administrative and User Password Functions
Password Set
Administrative mode
can . . .
User mode can . . .
Password Required
During Boot Process
Neither
Can change all options*
Can change all options*
None
Administrative only
Can change all options
Can change a limited
number of options
None
User only
N/A
Can change all options
User
Both
Can change all options
Can change a limited
number of options
Administrative or User
* If no password is set, any user can change all Setup options.
System Product Guide
3-19
Security Screen Options
User Password is
Reports if there is a User password set. There are no options.
Administrative Password is
Reports if there is an Administrative password set. There are no options.
Set User Password
Sets the User password. The password can be up to seven alphanumeric
characters.
Set Administrative Password
Sets the Administrative password. The password can be up to seven
alphanumeric characters.
Unattended Start
Controls when the security password is requested. The options are Enabled
and Disabled. The default is Disabled. The User password must be enabled
before you can enable this option. If Enabled is selected, the system boots,
but the keyboard will be locked until the User password is entered.
Security Hot Key (CTRL-ALT-)
Sets a hot key that, when pressed, locks the keyboard until the User
password is entered. The Keyboard LED’s flash to indicate that the
keyboard is locked. When you enter the User password, you do not have to
press the <Enter> key.
3-20
Using the Setup Program
Exit Screen
This section describes the different ways to exit and save or not save changes
made in the Setup program.
Exit Saving Changes
Saves the changes to CMOS RAM and exits the Setup program. You can also
press the <F10> key anywhere in the Setup program to do this.
Exit Discarding Changes
Exits the Setup program without saving any changes. This means that any
changes made while in the Setup program are discarded and NOT SAVED.
Pressing the <Esc> key in any of the four main screens will do this.
Load Setup Defaults
Resets all of the setup options to their defaults. You can also press the <F5>
key anywhere in the Setup program to do this.
This selection loads the default Setup values from the ROM table.
Discard Changes
Discards any changes you made during the current Setup session without
exiting the program. You can also press the <F6> key anywhere in the Setup
program to do this.
This selection loads the CMOS RAM values that were present when the
system was turned on.
■ ■ ■
System Product Guide
3-21
Taking Your System Apart
4
This chapter tells how to take apart and reassemble the major parts of the
system. Chapter 5 describes how to remove and install system board
components.
Before You Begin
•
Be sure to do each procedure in the correct order.
•
The procedures (and warnings) for removing and reinstalling the side
covers are assumed to precede all other procedures described in this
chapter.
•
Set up an equipment log to record the system model and serial numbers,
all installed options, and other information about the system. If you
need this information, it will be easier to consult the log than to open up
and examine the system.
•
You will need a Phillips screwdriver (#2 bit). We recommend that you
use an antistatic wrist strap and a conductive foam pad when working
on the system.
! WARNINGS
▲
The procedures in this chapter assume familiarity with the
general terminology associated with personal computers
and with the safety practices and regulatory compliance
required for using and modifying electronic equipment.
The power supply in this system contains no userserviceable parts. To avoid personal injury or damage to
your equipment, refer repair or replacement of the power
supply to qualified personnel only. All other areas and
components of this system are considered user-accessible.
System Product Guide
4-1
Disconnect the system from its power source and from any
telecommunications links, networks or modems before
doing any of the procedures described in this chapter.
Failure to disconnect power, telecommunications links,
networks or internal modems before you open the system
or do any procedures can result in personal injury or
equipment damage.
Do not operate the system with the cover removed.
Always replace the cover before turning on the system.
! CAUTIONS
▲
▲
The total power draw on the system must not exceed the
specifications for the power supply. See Chapter 7 for the
power supply specifications.
Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage disk drives, add-in
boards, and other components. Conduct the procedures
described in this chapter only at an ESD workstation. If
such a station is not available, you can provide some ESD
protection by wearing an antistatic wrist strap and attaching
it to a metal part of the system chassis.
Add-in boards can be extremely sensitive to ESD and always
require careful handling. After removing the board from its
protective wrapper or from the system, place the board flat
on a grounded, static-free surface, component-side up. Use
a conductive foam pad if available, but not the board
wrapper. Do not slide the board over any surface.
4-2
Taking Your System Apart
Removing the Side cover
! CAUTION
▲
▲
For proper cooling and airflow, do not operate the system
with the cover removed. Always replace the cover before
turning on the system.
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Turn the system power off with the power enable switch at the rear
panel and unplug the AC power cord from the back of the chassis.
3.
Put identification tags on all cables attached to the system.
4.
Disconnect the cables from the system.
5.
If you installed a padlock on the back of the system, unlock the padlock
and remove it (Figure 4-1, A).
6.
The side cover is on the left side of the system (as viewed from the front).
The cover is secured with two screws at the rear of the system. Remove
the screws (Figure 4-1, B).
7.
Pull the cover so it slides backwards. Make sure that cover clears the
padlock slot.
8.
Pull the bottom of the cover out (like it was hinged at the top) until the
bottom metal tabs clear their slots.
9.
Slide the cover up until it comes free of the chassis.
System Product Guide
4-3
B
A
A
OM04061
Figure 4-1. Removing the Side cover
4-4
Taking Your System Apart
Installing the Side cover
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Check that you have not left any tools or loose parts inside the system.
Check that everything is properly installed and tightened.
3.
Insert the metal tabs on the top of the side cover into their slots on the
chassis.
4.
Insert the metal tabs on the bottom of the side cover into their slots on
the chassis.
5.
Slide the cover forward as far as it will go.
6.
Replace and tighten the screws securing the side cover to the chassis.
7.
For security, you may want to install a padlock on the system to prevent
unauthorized removal of the cover from the chassis.
8.
Reconnect all cables to the system.
Removing the Bezel
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Remove the side cover.
3.
Remove the screw securing the bezel to the chassis (Figure 4-2, A).
4.
Squeeze the two tabs so they clear their slots (Figure 4-2, B).
5.
Pull the left side of the bezel out (like it was hinged on the right side)
until the retaining screw tab, and the power button clear the chassis
(Figure 4-2, C).
6.
Slide the bezel to the right until it comes free (Figure 4-2, D).
System Product Guide
4-5
D
A
B
C
OM04062
Figure 4-2. Removing the Bezel
Installing the Bezel
4-6
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Insert the metal tabs on the right side into their slots.
3.
Squeeze the bezel and the chassis together along the left side so the tabs
snap into their slots.
4.
Replace and tighten the bezel retaining screw.
5.
Replace the side cover.
Taking Your System Apart
Add-in Board Considerations
The next few procedures tell how to remove and install slot covers and addin boards. As an aid to installing boards in your system, this section
describes the arrangement and numbering conventions for the slot
connectors on the system board.
ISA-compatible add-in boards can be installed in any of the system board
ISA slots. PCI-compatible add-in boards can be installed in any of the PCI
slots.
! CAUTIONS
▲
Do not overload the system board by installing add-in
boards that draw excessive current. The system is designed
to provide 2 A (average) of +5 V power for each board in the
system. The total +5 V current draw in a fully-loaded
system (all add-in board slots filled) must not exceed 14 A.
Add-in boards can be extremely sensitive to ESD and always
require careful handling. Hold the board by the edges only;
do not touch the electronic components or gold connectors.
After removing a board from its protective wrapper or from
the system, place it flat on a grounded, static-free surface,
component-side up. Do not slide the board over any
surface.
System Product Guide
4-7
6
5
4
3
2
1
OM04216
Figure 4-3. System Slot Numbering Convention
Figure 4-3 shows the numbering convention for the connectors on the system
board and for the slot openings on the back panel. The numbers are for
reference only and are not actually printed on the system board or the back
panel. Notice that slot opening 3 in the back panel can hold either a PCI or
an ISA board (but not both at the same time).
4-8
Taking Your System Apart
Removing Expansion Slot Covers
There are two kinds of slot covers, breakout slot covers and standard slot
covers. The procedure covers both kinds.
Removing Breakout Slot Covers
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
! CAUTIONS
▲
▲
Be careful to not damage components on the system board
or add-in boards when doing this procedure. You may need
to remove add-in boards that are next to the slot cover you
want to remove.
2.
Insert a #2 bit Phillips screwdriver into the top of the slot cover. Move
the screwdriver and slot cover toward the inside of the chassis until the
slot cover breaks away from the chassis (Figure 4-4). Lift the slot cover
up and out.
O M 04 335
Figure 4-4. Removing a Breakout Expansion Slot Cover
System Product Guide
4-9
Removing Standard Slot Covers
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
! CAUTION
▲
Be careful to not damage components on the system board
or add-in boards when doing this procedure. You may need
to remove add-in boards that are next to the slot cover you
want to remove.
2.
Remove the expansion slot screw from the top of the slot cover (Figure 45). Lift the cover up and out. Save the slot cover in case you remove the
board later.
OM04178
Figure 4-5. Removing an Expansion Slot Cover
4-10
Taking Your System Apart
Installing an Expansion Slot Cover
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Using one of the original slot covers, insert the cover into the slot at the
base of the chassis and secure it with a screw.
✏
Note
If you no longer have the original slot cover, use a standard
metal slot cover. The bottom end of the cover fits inside the
chassis, flush with the chassis wall, and the top end secures
to the board guide with a screw.
Installing an Add-in Board
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Remove the expansion slot cover from the slot you plan to use. Save the
cover and screw to reinstall if you decide not to install a board in that
slot.
3.
Remove the board from its wrapper and place it on a grounded, staticfree surface.
4.
Set any board jumpers or switches according to the manufacturer’s
instructions.
5.
Hold the board by its top edge or upper corners and firmly press the
board into the connector on the system board (Figure 4-6).
6.
Align the rounded notch in the retaining bracket with the threaded hole
in the expansion slot frame (Figure 4-6). The retaining bracket fits into
the space that was occupied by the expansion slot cover.
7.
Insert a screw, but push the notch against the screw before tightening.
Otherwise the bracket may interfere with the bracket of an adjacent slot
cover or with another add-in board.
8.
Connect cables (if any are needed) to the installed board.
System Product Guide
4-11
OM04179
Figure 4-6. Installing an Add-in Board
Removing an Add-in Board
✏
4-12
Note
Expansion slot covers must be installed on all vacant slots to
maintain the electromagnetic emissions characteristics of the
system and to ensure proper cooling of the system
components.
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Disconnect any cables attached to the add-in board you are removing.
3.
Remove the screw that holds the board retaining bracket to the chassis.
4.
Hold the board at each end, and carefully rock it back and forth until the
edge connectors pull free. Make sure that you do not scrape the board
against other components.
Taking Your System Apart
5.
Store the board in an antistatic wrapper.
6.
If you disconnected cables from the board and you are not reinstalling
this board or one like it, remove the cables from the system.
7.
Install an expansion slot cover over the vacant slot.
Removing the 3.5-inch Drive Carrier
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Disconnect the power cable and the ribbon data cable from any drives in
the carrier.
3.
Remove the two screws that secure the carrier to the 5.25-inch drive bay
(Figure 4-7, A and B).
4.
Slide the carrier back until the tabs hit their stops (Figure 4-7).
5.
Pull the carrier away from the 5.25-inch drive bay and remove it from
the chassis.
A
A
B
OM04079
Figure 4-7. Removing the 3.5-inch Drive Carrier
System Product Guide
4-13
Installing the 3.5-inch Drive Carrier
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Insert the tabs on carrier into their slots on the bottom and side of the
5.25-inch drive bay.
3.
Slide the carrier forward until the screw hole in the front drive bay and
the hole in the carrier line up.
4.
Insert the two screws that secure the carrier to the front drive bay into
their holes and tighten them. (If you removed the front bezel, replace it
before tightening the screw.)
5.
If there is a drive in the carrier, attach the power cable and the ribbon
data cable to the drive.
Removing the Floppy Disk Drive
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Remove the 3.5-inch drive carrier from the system.
3.
Remove the four screws holding the drive to the drive carrier
(Figure 4-8, B).
4.
Slide the drive out of the drive carrier.
5.
If you do not plan to replace the drive you just removed, and there are
no other diskette drives on the same data cable, disconnect the cable
from the system board.
6.
Replace the carrier in the system.
! CAUTION
▲
If you are not reinstalling a 3.5-inch diskette drive, cover the
empty bay with a filler panel and a shield to maintain the
electromagnetic-interference characteristics of the system
and to ensure proper cooling inside.
4-14
Taking Your System Apart
C
A
B
OM04081
Figure 4-8. Removing the Floppy Disk Drive
Installing a Floppy Disk Drive
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Remove the 3.5-inch drive carrier from the system.
3.
Remove the floppy disk drive from its protective wrapper and place it
on an antistatic surface.
4.
Set any drive jumpers or switches according to the manufacturer’s
instructions.
5.
Slide the floppy drive into the 3.5-inch drive carrier. Line the holes on
the carrier up with the screw holes on the drive.
6.
Insert and tighten four screws of the appropriate size and length (not
supplied).
7.
Install the 3.5-inch drive carrier.
8.
Attach the power cable and the data cable to the drive.
System Product Guide
4-15
Installing a Drive in the 3.5-inch Drive Carrier
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Remove the 3.5-inch drive carrier.
3.
Remove the drive from its protective wrapper and place it on an
antistatic surface.
4.
Set any jumpers, switches, or terminating resistors according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
5.
Slide the drive into the carrier until the screw holes line up.
6.
Secure the drive to the carrier with four screws (Figure 4-9, C) of the
appropriate size and length (not supplied).
7.
Connect a power connector from the power supply to the drive. If the
drive is an IDE drive, connect the data cable between the drive and one
of the PCI/IDE connectors on the system board. If the drive is a nonIDE type, refer to the drive manufacturer’s instructions for connecting a
data cable and interface board and for configuring the drive.
✏
8.
4-16
Note
The system board provides two PCI/IDE headers for
connecting IDE hard drives. You can connect up to two IDE
drives (on the supplied cable) to each PCI/IDE header. If
one PCI/IDE header already has two drives connected to it,
you can connect additional IDE drives to the second
PCI/IDE header.
Replace the 3.5-inch drive carrier.
Taking Your System Apart
A
B
C
OM04078
Figure 4-9. Installing an Internal Drive
Removing a Drive from the 3.5-inch Drive Carrier
1.
Observe the precautions in "Before You Begin."
2.
Disconnect the data cables and power cables from any drives in the rear
drive carrier.
3.
Remove the 3.5-inch drive carrier from the system.
4.
Remove the four screws that attach the drive to the carrier.
5.
Remove the drive from the carrier and place it on an antistatic surface.
6.
Replace the 3.5-inch drive carrier.
System Product Guide
4-17
Installing a 5.25-inch Device
! CAUTIONS
▲
▲
If you are installing a device that should not be accessible
from the front, do not remove the EMI shield and filler
panel.
When removing a plastic filler panel, be careful not to break
the panel or its tabs. Save all EMI shields and filler panels
for reuse if necessary.
4-18
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Remove one of the EMI shields from the chassis (Figure 4-10, A). Save
the shield in case you need to it them later.
3.
If the device will be accessible from the front, remove the screws
securing the filler panel to the bezel (Figure 4-10, B). Remove the filler
panel. Save the filler panel and screw in case you need to replace them
later.
4.
Remove the device from its protective wrapper and place it on an
antistatic surface. Record the model and serial number in the equipment
log.
Taking Your System Apart
A
B
OM04066
Figure 4-10. Removing EMI Shields and Filler Panels
5.
Set any device jumpers or switches according to the manufacturer’s
instructions.
6.
Use two screws (not supplied) plus the EMC caps to attach a plastic,
snap-in slide rail to each side of the device (Figure 4-11, A, B, C).
System Product Guide
4-19
A
B
OM04408
Figure 4-11. Installing the Snap-In Slide Rails
4-20
7.
Position the drive so that the plastic slide rails on each side of the device
engage the front peripheral bay guide rails.
8.
Push the drive into the bay until the slide rails lock in place.
9.
Connect power and data cables to the device.
Taking Your System Apart
OM04080
Figure 4-12. Installing a 5.25-inch Device
10. If the device won’t be accessible from the front, replace the EMI shield.
11. Replace the bezel.
System Product Guide
4-21
Removing a 5.25-inch Device
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Disconnect the power and data cables attached to the device.
3.
While squeezing the protruding plastic snap-in rails attached to the
device towards each other (Figure 4-12), carefully slide the device out of
the bay.
4.
Replace the EMI shield and secure it to the chassis with a screw.
5.
Replace the filler panel and secure it to the bezel with two screws.
Removing the System Board
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Disconnect all internal cables connected to any add-in boards installed in
the expansion slots.
3.
Remove all add-in boards.
4.
Disconnect all internal cables connected to the system board.
5.
Remove the nine retaining screws and set them aside (Figure 4-13).
6.
Carefully pop the board off of the snap-in standoff located near the card
retaining bracket (be careful not to flex the board) and lift the board out
of the chassis (Figure 4-13).
! CAUTION
▲
Be careful not to scrape any board components. Do not flex
the board. Place the board on a grounded, static-free surface
or in an antistatic protective wrapper.
4-22
Taking Your System Apart
A
OM04065
Figure 4-13. Removing the System Board
Installing the System Board
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Position the system board over the threaded standoffs inside the chassis
and press it onto the snap-in standoff (Figure 4-13).
3.
Secure the board to the chassis with nine screws.
4.
Connect all internal cables to the system board.
5.
Install any add-in boards.
6.
Connect all internal cables that go to the add-in boards installed in the
expansion slots.
■ ■ ■
System Product Guide
4-23
Installing and Configuring
System Board Options
5
This chapter describes the following:
•
The system board layout
•
The system board configuration jumpers
•
Installing an OverDrive processor upgrade
•
Installing single in-line memory modules (SIMMs)
•
Installing video DRAM (for systems with the optional video subsystem)
•
Replacing the battery
Before You Begin
•
Be sure to do each procedure in the correct order.
•
The procedures (and warnings) for removing and reinstalling the system
cover are assumed to precede all other procedures described in this
chapter. Chapter 4 tells how to remove the system cover.
•
Set up an equipment log to record the system model and serial numbers,
all installed options, and other information about the system. If you
need this information, it will be easier to consult the log than to open up
and examine the system.
•
You will need a flat blade screwdriver, and a jumper removal tool. We
recommend that you use an antistatic wrist strap and a conductive foam
pad when working on the system.
System Product Guide
5-1
! WARNINGS
▲
The procedures in this chapter assume familiarity with the general
terminology associated with personal computers and with the
safety practices and regulatory compliance required for using and
modifying electronic equipment.
The power supply in this system contains no user-serviceable
parts. To avoid personal injury or damage to your equipment,
refer repair or replacement of the power supply to qualified
personnel only. All other areas and components of this system are
considered user-accessible.
Disconnect the system from its power source and from any
telecommunications links, networks or modems before doing any
of the procedures described in this chapter. Failure to disconnect
power, telecommunications links, networks or internal modems
before you open the system or do any procedures can result in
personal injury or equipment damage.
Do not operate the system with the cover removed. Always
replace the cover before turning on the system.
! CAUTIONS
▲
▲
The total power draw on the system must not exceed the
specifications for the power supply. See Chapter 7 for the power
supply specifications.
Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage disk drives, add-in boards,
and other components. Follow the procedures described in this
chapter only at an ESD workstation. If such a station is not
available, you can provide some ESD protection by wearing an
antistatic wrist strap and attaching it to a metal part of the system
chassis.
Add-in boards can be extremely sensitive to ESD and always require
careful handling. After removing the board from its protective
wrapper or from the system, place the board flat on a grounded,
static-free surface, component-side up. Use a conductive foam pad if
available, but not the board wrapper. Do not slide the board over
any surface.
5-2
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
System Board Components
A
B
X
C
D
W
V
U
E
F
G
H
T
S
R
Q
P
I
J
O
N
K
M
L
OM04214
Figure 5-1. System Board Components
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
Pentium microprocessor
Primary power connector
SIMM sockets
IDE connectors
On board speaker
Floppy drive connector
Front Panel connectors
†
VESA feature connector
Optional S3 Trio64V+ graphics
controller
J. Video memory sockets
K. Fan connector
L. Battery
M. ISA add-in board connectors
System Product Guide
N. Optional Yamaha† OPL3
synthesizer
O. Optional Crystal Audio device
P. PCI add-in board connectors
Q. Voice modem audio interface
R. Wave table connector
S. CD-ROM audio connector
T. Audio/MIDI/Game Port
connectors (may not be fitted)
U. Fan connector
V. VGA†/Parallel port connectors
W. PS/2 Mouse/Keyboard
connectors
X. COM1/COM2 connectors
5-3
Jumper Block Overview
The system board in your computer contains six jumper blocks with
moveable jumpers. The jumpers make it possible to change certain aspects
of the system configuration. For instance, you can prevent access to the
system Setup program by moving one of the jumpers. If you forget your
system password, you can clear the password by moving one of the jumpers.
The system has been properly configured at the factory. Normally, the only
time you will ever change the jumper is if you want to:
•
Disable or enable access to the Setup program
•
Reset the CMOS RAM settings to the default values
•
Clear the system password
•
Change the ISA bus speed
•
Recover from a corrupted BIOS during a BIOS upgrade
Table 5-1 describes the function of the jumper blocks. Figure 5-2 shows the
location of the jumper blocks on the system board. Descriptions of how to
change the jumpers follow Figure 5-2.
! CAUTIONS
▲
If you change a jumper, you will need to remove the system cover
and possibly add-in boards or other system components. Be sure to
follow the precautions and procedures provided in Chapter 4 when
you remove the cover or other system parts.
Do not squeeze the pliers or other tool you use to remove a jumper,
or you may bend or break the pins.
✏
5-4
Notes
A jumper is a small plastic-encased conductor that slips over jumper
pins. To change a jumper setting, use a pair of fine needle-nosed
pliers to remove the jumper from its current location and slide it
onto the new pins to obtain the desired setting.
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
Table 5-1. System Board Jumper Block Settings
Jumper in
Figure 5-2
Function
Pins Jumpered
Jumpers
J2G1,
J10C2
Reserved
CAUTION: These jumpers were set by the
factory for your system; do not change
these jumpers from the factory setting.
J10C3
Reset CMOS settings to default
CMOS RAM values
2-3 = Normal mode (Default)
1-2 = Reset CMOS settings
J10C3
Clear password
5-6 = Normal mode (Default);
4-5 = Clear password
J10C4
ISA bus clock speed:
sets the ISA bus to a slower or
faster setting.
2-3 = 8.33 MHz (50 MHz CPU bus)
7.5 MHz (60 MHz CPU bus)
8.25 MHz (66 MHz CPU bus)
(Default)
1-2 = 8.33 MHz (50 MHz CPU bus)
10 MHz (60 MHz CPU bus)
11 MHz (66 MHz CPU bus)
J10C4
Enables/disables access to
Setup Program
5-6 = Setup program can be
accessed (Default)
4-5 = Setup program access
disabled
J10K1
2-3= VR mode (3.3 V - 3.465 V) (Default)
CPU Voltage Regulator: some
upgrade processors may require 1-2= VRE mode (3.465 V - 3.63 V)
changing from the default VR
Caution: This jumper should only be
setting to the VRE setting.
changed to the VRE setting if
documentation that came with your
upgrade CPU indicates that the required
voltage must be between 3.465 V and
3.63 V
System Product Guide
5-5
3
J10K1
1
6
3
4
1
6
3
4
1
6
3
4
1
6
3
4
1
J10C4
J2G1
J10C3
J10C2
3
1 2
OM04227
Figure 5-2. System Board Jumper Blocks (see Table 5-1)
5-6
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
How to Disable Access to the Setup Program
1.
Turn off power and remove the system cover.
2.
Move the jumper on J10C4 from pins 5-6 to pins 4-5.
3.
Replace the system cover and turn power back on.
4.
To enable access to the setup program, move the jumper on J10C4 from
pins 4-5 to pins 5-6.
How to Clear CMOS RAM
This procedure should be done after the system BIOS is updated.
1.
Turn off power and remove the system cover.
2.
Move the jumper on J10C5 from pins 2-3 to pins 1-2.
3.
Turn on power and allow the system to boot.
4.
Turn off power.
5.
Move the jumper on J10C4 from pins 1-2 back to pins 2-3 to restore
normal operation.
6.
Replace the system cover and turn power back on.
How to Clear the Password
This procedure should only be done if the user password has been forgotten.
1.
Turn off power and remove the system cover.
2.
Move the jumper on J10C3 from pins 5-6 to pins 4-5.
3.
Turn on power and allow the system to boot.
4.
Turn off power.
5.
Move the jumper on J10C3 from pins 5-6 back to pins 4-5 to restore
normal operation.
6.
Replace the system cover and turn the power back on.
System Product Guide
5-7
How to Set the ISA Bus Clock Speed Jumper
Depending on the speed of the CPU in your system, the default setting for the
ISA bus clock jumper ranges from 7.5 MHz to 8.33 MHz. You may be able to
improve the performance of some ISA add-in boards by speeding up the ISA
bus clock speed. However, keep in mind that some ISA add-in boards may
have problems operating above the ISA bus clock standard of 8 MHz. If you
change the jumper on J10C4 to pins 1-2 and experience operating problems
with ISA boards, you may want to move the jumper back to the slower
position. Table 5-2 below shows how the two settings for jumper J10C4
affect the ISA bus clock speed for different CPUs.
Table 5-2. ISA Bus Clock Speeds
ISA Bus Clock Speed
Jumper J10C4 pins 2-3
CPU Bus Speed (default setting)
Jumper J10C4 pins 1-2
50 MHz
8.33 MHz
8.33 MHz
60 MHz
7.5 MHz
10 MHz
66 MHz
8.25 MHz
11 MHz
To change the ISA bus clock speed:
5-8
1.
Turn off power and remove the system cover.
2.
Move the jumper on J10C4 to the desired position.
3.
Replace the system cover and turn power back on.
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
Installing an OverDrive Processor
This section tells how to install an OverDrive processor upgrade in your
system. Be sure to read the “Clearance Requirements” section below before
installing a processor upgrade in your system.
! CAUTION
▲
You do not need to change any jumpers to install an
OverDrive processor upgrade.
Clearance Requirements
The OverDrive processor comes with a heat sink mounted on top. To
maintain proper airflow once the upgrade is installed in the system, the
processor and heat sink require certain clearances. Table 5-3 shows the
required clearances.
Table 5-3. Clearances for OverDrive Processor Upgrades
Location
Minimum Clearance
Clearance above the top of the OverDrive
processor’s heat sink
0.4 inches
Clearance on at least 3 of the 4 sides of the
upgrade processor
0.2 inches
System Product Guide
5-9
Installing the Upgrade
To install the upgrade, do the following:
1.
2.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.” We recommend you
take the following steps to reduce the risk of electronic discharge
damage to the processor and system board components:
•
Touch the metal chassis before touching the processor or system
board. Keep part of your body in contact with the metal chassis to
dissipate the static charge while handling the processor.
•
Avoid moving around needlessly.
Turn off all peripheral devices connected to the system, and turn off the
system.
! WARNING
▲
The microprocessor and heat sink may be hot if the system
has been running. To avoid the possibility of a burn, if
the system has been running let the processor and heat
sink cool for 10 minutes before going on with this
procedure.
3.
Remove any add-in boards that block access to the socket.
4.
Figure 5-1 shows the location of the processor socket. You must first
remove the clamp over the heat sink and CPU. Insert a small flat-bladed
screwdriver into the slot on the end of the clamp. Release the clamp by
pushing outward on the blade of the screwdriver as shown in Figure 5-3.
As you move the clamp away from the socket, ease the clamp up and
away from the processor and heat sink. When you remove the clamp,
the heat sink will slide off the CPU.
! CAUTION
▲
When you remove the CPU clamp, avoid scraping the clamp
against any system board components.
5-10
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
OM03834
Figure 5-3. Removing the CPU Clamp
System Product Guide
5-11
5.
Push the lever on the processor socket down and out until it pulls up
freely. Lift the lever until it stands straight up (Figure 5-4). Remove the
processor from the socket. Do not touch or bend the pins.
6.
Place the old processor in a piece of conductive foam and store it in an
antistatic package. Save the processor clamp and heat sink.
7.
Remove the upgrade processor from its antistatic package; do not touch
or bend the pins.
8.
Center the processor over the socket. Take care to align the beveled edge
of the processor (Pin 1) as shown in Figure 5-4, A.
9.
With the processor in place, lower it gently, being careful not to bend the
pins. Push the lever on the socket forward until it snaps into place
(Figure 5-4).
A
A
OM04466
Figure 5-4. Installing a Microprocessor Upgrade
10. Replace any add-in boards that were removed.
11. If for any reason you need to reinstall the original processor, do steps 1
through 10 above. Remember to reinstall the original CPU clamp.
5-12
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
Installing Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs)
The system board contains four 72-pin, tin lead SIMM sockets. The sockets
are defined as Bank 0 and Bank 1. Two SIMM sockets make up one SIMM
bank. The types of SIMMs that can be installed in the system are as follows:
4 MB, 8 MB, 16 MB, and 32 MB. The computer can support up to 128 MB of
DRAM.
When you install SIMMs, you must completely fill at least one bank. The
computer automatically detects the installed memory, so it doesn’t matter
which bank is used, as long as both sockets in the bank are filled. You can
mix SIMM sizes and types between banks, but not within a bank. For
example, you should not install a 4 MB SIMM in one socket of Bank 0 and
install an 8 MB SIMM in the second socket of the same bank. Likewise, you
should not mix EDO and Fast Page Mode (FPM) SIMMs in the same bank.
You can, however, install 4 MB SIMMs in Bank 0 and 8 MB SIMMs in Bank 1.
You can also install EDO SIMMs in one bank and FPM SIMMs in the second
bank. When adding SIMMs, use only tin lead, 72-pin, EDO or FPM DRAM.
Table 5-4 shows which speed DRAMs should be used with which CPU.
Faster devices can be used but will not improve system performance.
Table 5-4. Required SIMM Speeds
CPU Bus
Speed
Use EDO DRAM of at
Least This Speed
Use Fast Page Mode DRAM
of at Least This Speed
50 MHz
70 ns
70 ns
60 MHz
70 ns
70 ns
66 MHz
60 ns
70 ns
By using various combinations of SIMMs, you can configure the system
memory from 8 MB to 128 MB. Table 5-5 shows the possible combinations of
SIMM types and the resulting amount of system memory. Remember that
each SIMM bank contains two SIMM sockets. Therefore, the amount of
memory in one bank includes the memory installed in both sockets in that
bank.
System Product Guide
5-13
Table 5-5. Memory Options
5-14
For a Total
System
Memory
Of…
…
Install a 72-pin SIMM of the
following size in each socket in
SIMM Bank 0
(Sockets J7K3 + J7K2)
Install a 72-pin SIMM of the
following size in each socket in
SIMM Bank 1
(Sockets J7k1 + J6K1)
8 MB
4 MB (8 MB total in Bank 0)
Empty
16 MB
4 MB (8 MB total in Bank 0)
4 MB (8 MB total in Bank 1)
16 MB
8 MB (16 MB total in Bank 0)
Empty
24 MB
8 MB (16 MB total in Bank 0)
4 MB (8 MB total in Bank 1)
32 MB
8 MB (16 MB total in Bank 0)
8 MB (16 MB total in Bank 1)
32 MB
16 MB (32 MB total in Bank 0)
Empty
40 MB
16 MB (32 MB total in Bank 0)
4 MB (8 MB total in Bank 1)
48 MB
16 MB (32 MB total in Bank 0)
8 MB (16 MB total in Bank 1)
64 MB
16 MB (32 MB total in Bank 0)
16 MB (32 MB total in Bank 1)
64 MB
32 MB (64 MB total in Bank 0)
Empty
72 MB
32 MB (64 MB total in Bank 0)
4 MB (8 MB total in Bank 1)
80 MB
32 MB (64 MB total in Bank 0)
8 MB (16 MB total in Bank 1)
96 MB
32 MB (64 MB total in Bank 0)
16 MB (32 MB total in Bank 1)
128 MB
32 MB (64 MB total in Bank 0)
32 MB (64 MB total in Bank 1)
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
To install SIMMs, do the following procedure:
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Turn off all peripheral devices connected to the system.
3.
Turn off the system.
4.
Remove any full-length add-in boards or other components as needed to
gain access to the sockets (see Chapter for assembly procedures and
precautions).
5.
Holding the SIMM only by the edges, remove it from its antistatic
package. A SIMM has a small notch in the middle of the bottom edge
that mates with a raised bump in the SIMM socket. There is also a notch
at one side of the module.
6.
Firmly insert the bottom edge of the SIMM into the socket (Figure 5-5).
Press evenly against the module’s upper corners to rotate it to a vertical
position secured by the retaining clips of the connector. When properly
installed, the SIMM is oriented at a 90° angle relative to the system
board. If the SIMM does not install correctly, gently spread the retaining
clips just enough so that you can pull away the top edge of the SIMM
and try again.
7.
Reinstall and reconnect any parts you removed or disconnected to gain
access to the SIMM sockets.
OM04409
Figure 5-5. Installing SIMMs
System Product Guide
5-15
Removing SIMMs
To remove a SIMM, do the following:
5-16
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Turn off all peripheral devices connected to the system.
3.
Turn off the system.
4.
Remove any full-length add-in boards or other components as needed to
gain access to the sockets.
5.
Gently spread the retaining clips just enough so you can rotate the top
edge of the SIMM downward to an angle of about 45°.
6.
Holding the SIMM only by the edges, lift it away from the socket, and
store it in an antistatic package.
7.
Reinstall and reconnect any parts you removed or disconnected to gain
access to the SIMM sockets.
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
Installing Video DRAM
! WARNINGS
▲
Take care to correctly install the video DRAM chips. If installed
incorrectly, video DRAMs can overheat, resulting in damage to the
chips and possibly the system board.
If you think the video DRAMs might have been installed
incorrectly, shut down system power and allow a cooling period
before checking the chips for correct installation.
The optional video graphics controller comes with 1 MB of video DRAM
installed on the system board. You can also install an additional 1 MB of
video DRAM. The additional memory plugs into the empty sockets shown
in Figure 5-6. Each socket holds a 256 KB x 16, 60 ns (or faster), SOJ DRAM
component. Both sockets must be empty or both must be populated. You do
not have to set any system jumpers if you install the additional video
memory.
Contact your service representative for a recommendation on specific part
numbers for installing the additional video DRAM.
Before you can install or remove video DRAM, you must remove the system
cover and any add-in boards that are blocking access to the video memory
sockets. After you are finished, replace any system parts you removed.
Refer to Chapter 4, "Taking Apart Your System," for the procedures to
remove and replace the system cover and add-in boards.
1.
Remove one of the DRAMs from its antistatic package, being careful not
to touch the pins on the device.
2.
Position the DRAM so its orientation mark (either a notch or a small dot
on the top of the short side) aligns with the end of socket that has a notch
(Figure 5-6). Align the pins on the DRAM with the socket.
3.
Press the DRAM into the socket.
4.
Repeat steps 1 through 3 to install the remaining DRAM in the
remaining empty video DRAM socket.
System Product Guide
5-17
B
C
A
OM04215
Figure 5-6. Installing Video DRAM on the System Board
5-18
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
Replacing the Battery
A lithium battery on the system board provides power to the real-time clock
and CMOS RAM when the system is powered down. The battery has an
estimated life expectancy of three years. When the battery starts to weaken,
it looses voltage; when the voltage drops below a certain level, the system
setting stored in CMOS RAM (for example, the date and time) may be
wrong. If the battery fails, you will need to replace it with an equivalent
battery. Figure 5-1 shows the location of the battery.
As long as local ordinance permits, you may dispose of individual batteries
as normal trash. Do not expose batteries to excessive heat or fire. Keep all
batteries away from children.
! CAUTION
▲
Danger of explosion if the battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace
only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the
equipment manufacturer. Discard used batteries according to
manufacturer’s instructions.
! ATTENTION
▲
Il y a danger d’explosion s’li y a remplacement incorrect de la
batterie. Remplacer uniquement avec une batterie du méme type ou
d’un type recommandé par le constructeur. Mettre au rébut les
batteries usagées conformément aux instructions du fabricant.
! ADVARSEL!
▲
▲
Lithiumbatteri - Eksplosionsfare ved fejlagtig håndtering.
Udskiftning må kun ske med batteri af samme fabrikat og type.
Levér det brugte batteri tilbage til leverandøren.
! ADVARSEL
▲
Lithiumbatteri - Eksplosjonsfare. Ved utskifting benyttes kun batteri
som anbefalt av apparatfabrikanten. Brukt batteri returneres
apparatleverandøren.
System Product Guide
5-19
! VARNING
▲
Explosionsfara vid felaktigt batteribyte. Använd samma batterityp
eller en ekvivalent typ som rekommenderas av apparattillverkaren.
Kassera använt batteri enligt fabrikantens instruktion.
! VAROITUS
▲
Paristo voi räjähtää, jos se on virheellisesti asennettu. Vaihda paristo
ainoastaan laitevalmistajan suosittelemaan tyyppiin. Hävitä käjtetty
paristo valmistajan ohjeiden mukaisesti.
To replace the battery, do the following:
1.
Observe the precautions in “Before You Begin.”
2.
Turn off all peripheral devices connected to the system.
3.
Turn off the system.
4.
Remove any components that are blocking access to the battery.
5.
Figure 5-1 shows the battery location. Gently pry the battery free from
its socket, taking care to note the "+" and "-" orientation of the battery
(Figure 5-7).
6.
Install the new battery in the socket.
7.
Replace any system parts that were previously removed.
8.
Run Setup to reset the date and time.
OM03774
Figure 5-7. Replacing the Battery
■ ■ ■
5-20
Installing and Configuring System Board Options
Solving Problems
6
The first part of this chapter helps you identify and solve problems that
might occur when the system is in use. The second part lists error code
messages that might display.
Resetting the System
There are two ways to reset the system:
•
Press <Ctrl + Alt + Del>
•
Cycle the system power. To do this:
1.
Press in and release the front panel power control button.
2.
Wait at least 20 seconds.
3.
Press in and release the front panel power control button. The
system will power up and immediately begin the power-on self test
(POST).
Resetting the system will:
•
Clear the system memory
•
Restart the power-on self test (POST)
•
Reinitialize all peripherals
•
Load the operating system
System Product Guide
6-1
Troubleshooting Procedure
This section provides a step-by-step troubleshooting procedure to identify a
problem and locate its source.
! CAUTION
▲
Turn off the system and any peripheral devices before you
disconnect peripheral cables from the system. Otherwise,
you can permanently damage the system or the peripheral
devices.
6-2
1.
Turn off the system and any peripheral devices. Disconnect all external
peripherals from the system, except for the keyboard and the video
display.
2.
Make sure the system is plugged into a properly grounded power outlet.
3.
Make sure your keyboard and video display are correctly connected to
the system. Turn on the video display, and turn up its brightness and
contrast controls to at least two-thirds of the maximum (refer to the
documentation supplied with the video display).
4.
If the operating system normally loads from the hard disk drive, make
sure there is no diskette in the diskette drive. If the operating system
normally loads from a diskette, insert the operating system diskette into
the drive.
5.
Turn on the system. If the power indicator does not light, but the system
seems to be operating normally, the indicator is probably defective.
Solving Problems
6.
Monitor the power-on self test (POST) execution. Each time you turn on
the system, the POST checks the system board, memory, keyboard, and
certain peripheral devices.
✏
Note
During the memory test, the POST displays the amount of
memory it has tested. Depending on the amount of memory
installed, the POST can take up to 60 seconds to complete. If
you do not want to wait for the memory test to complete,
you can terminate the test after it starts by pressing the
<Esc>.
Check the following during the POST:
a.
If the POST does not detect any errors, the system beeps once and
boots up.
b. Errors that do not prevent the boot process (non-fatal errors) display
a message that looks similar to the following:
Error Message Line 1
Error Message Line 2
Press <F1> for Setup,
<Esc> to Boot
You can note the error and press <Esc> to resume the boot-up
process, or <F1> to enter Setup.
c.
7.
Errors that prevent the boot process from continuing (fatal errors),
are communicated by a series of audible beeps. If this type of error
occurs, refer to the error codes and messages listed at the end of this
chapter.
Confirm that the operating system has loaded.
System Product Guide
6-3
Problems at Initial System Start-up
Problems that occur at initial start-up are usually caused by incorrect
installation or configuration. Hardware failure is a less frequent cause.
___ Are all cables correctly connected and secured?
___ Are the configuration settings correct in Setup? See Chapter 3.
___ Are all drivers properly installed?
___ Are jumpers on the system board correct if changed from the default
settings? See Chapter 5 for defaults.
___ Are all jumper and switch settings on add-in boards and peripheral
devices set correctly? For the valid settings, see the documentation
shipped with these devices. Ensure that there are no conflicts, for
example, two add-in boards sharing the same interrupt.
___ Is the power supply set to the proper input voltage? See Chapter 2.
___ Are add-in boards and disk drives installed correctly?
See Chapter 4.
___ Is there a keyboard attached?
___ Is a bootable diskette installed in drive A?
___ If the system has a hard disk, is it properly formatted or defined?
___ Are all SIMMs installed correctly? Try reseating the SIMMs. See
Chapter 5.
___ Is the operating system properly loaded? See the operating system
documentation.
6-4
Solving Problems
Problems After the System Has Been Running
Correctly
After the system hardware and software have been running correctly,
problems often indicate equipment failure. Go through the checklist below
to see if the situation is one that may be easily corrected.
If the problem recurs after you have checked and corrected all of these items,
refer to the troubleshooting procedures (see "Troubleshooting Procedure" in
this chapter).
___ If you are running the software from a diskette, try using a new copy.
___ If you are running the software from a hard disk, try running it from a
diskette. If the software runs correctly, there may be a problem with the
copy on the hard disk. Reinstall the software on the hard disk and try
again. Make sure all the necessary files are installed.
___ Try clearing CMOS RAM (Chapter 5) and running Setup (Chapter 3).
___ If the problems are intermittent, there may be a loose cable, dirt in the
keyboard (if keyboard input is incorrect), a marginal power supply, or
other random component failures.
___ A transient voltage spike, power outage, or brownout may have
occurred. Symptoms of voltage spikes include a flickering video
display, unexpected system reboots, and the system not responding to
user commands. Reload the software and try again.
___ Voltage spikes can occasionally cause the heads of the disk drive to
contact the disk. This can corrupt or destroy data files. If you are
experiencing voltage spikes on the power line, install a surge suppresser
between the power outlet and the system power cord.
___ Try reseating the SIMMs.
System Product Guide
6-5
Problems Running New Application Software
Problems that occur when you run new application software are usually
related to the software. Faulty equipment is much less likely, especially if
other software runs correctly. Go through the checklist below to see if the
situation is one that may be easily corrected. If the problem persists after
you have checked and corrected all of these items, contact the software
vendor's customer service representative.
___ Does the system meet the minimum hardware requirements for the
software? Refer to the software documentation.
___ Is the software an authorized copy? Unauthorized copies often do not
work. Obtain an authorized copy of the software.
___ If you are running the software from a diskette, is it a good copy?
___ If you are running the software from a hard disk, is the software
correctly installed? Were all necessary procedures followed and files
installed?
___ Are the correct device drivers installed?
___ Are the correct video drivers installed?
___ Is the software correctly configured for the system?
___ Are you using the software correctly?
6-6
Solving Problems
Problems Operating Add-in Boards
Problems related to add-in boards are usually related to improper board
installation or interrupt and address conflicts. Go through the checklist
below to see if you can correct the problem. If the problem persists after you
have checked and corrected all of these items, contact the board vendor's
customer service representative.
___ Did you install the add-in board according to the manufacturer’s
instructions? Check the documentation that came with the board.
___ Are all cables installed properly?
The following items are suggestions for troubleshooting problems related to
ISA legacy (non-Plug and Play) add-in boards.
___ If the ISA legacy board uses an interrupt, run Setup and set the interrupt
that is being used by the ISA board to Used by ISA Card.
___ If the ISA legacy board uses memory space between 80000H - 9FFFFH,
run Setup and set conventional memory to 512 K.
___ If the ISA legacy board uses shared memory between C8000H - DFFFH,
run Setup and enable shared memory for the appropriate memory space.
System Product Guide
6-7
Problems and Suggestions
Contact your service representative if the suggested actions don't solve the
problem.
What happens
What to do
Application software
problems
Make sure all cables are installed correctly.
Verify that the system board jumpers are set properly.
Verify that your system hardware configuration is set correctly. In
Setup, check the values against the system settings you recorded
previously. If an error is evident (wrong type of drive specified, for
example), make the change in Setup and reboot the system.
Record your change.
Make sure the software is properly configured for the system.
Refer to the software documentation for information.
Try a different copy of the software to see if the problem is with the
copy you are using.
Try running the software in a different speed mode. See "Using
Keyboard Shortcuts" in Chapter 2.
If other software runs correctly on the system, contact the vendor
of the software that fails.
If you check all of the above with no success, try clearing CMOS
RAM (Chapter 5) and reconfiguring the system. Make sure you
have your list of system settings available to re-enter, because
clearing CMOS RAM sets the options to their default values.
Characters on-screen are
distorted or incorrect
Make sure the brightness and contrast controls are properly
adjusted.
Make sure the video signal cable and power cables are properly
installed.
Make sure your monitor is compatible with the video mode you
have selected.
6-8
Solving Problems
What happens
What to do
Characters do not appear
on screen
Make sure the video display is plugged in and turned on.
Check that the brightness and contrast controls are properly
adjusted.
Check that the video signal cable is properly installed.
Make sure a video board is installed, enabled, and jumpered
correctly.
Reboot the system.
CMOS RAM settings are
wrong
If system settings stored in CMOS RAM change for no apparent
reason (for example, the time of day develops an error), the
backup battery may no longer have enough power to maintain the
settings. Replace the battery (Chapter 5).
Diskette drive light does
not go on when drive is in
use or is tested by POST
Make sure the power and signal cables for the drive are properly
installed.
Hard drive light does not
go on when drive is in use
or is tested by POST
Make sure the power and signal cables for the drive are properly
installed.
Check that the drive is properly configured and enabled in Setup.
Make sure the front panel connector is securely attached to the
system board headers.
Check that the drive is properly configured and enabled in Setup.
Check the drive manufacturer's manual for proper configuration for
remote hard disk drive activity.
Power-on light does not go
on
If the system is operating normally, check the connector between
the system board and the front panel. If OK, the light may be
defective.
Prompt doesn't appear
after system boots
See "Problems at Initial System Start-up".
System Product Guide
6-9
What happens
What to do
Setup, can't enter
If you can't enter Setup to make changes, check the jumper that
disables entry into Setup (Chapter 5). If the jumper is set to allow
entry into Setup, you might need to clear CMOS RAM to the
default values (Chapter 5) and reconfigure the system in Setup
(Chapter 3).
System halts before
completing POST
This indicates a fatal system error that requires immediate service
attention. Note the screen display and write down any beep code
emitted. Provide this information to your service representative.
6-10
Solving Problems
Error and Information Messages
The rest of this chapter describes beep codes, and error messages that you
might see or hear when you start up the system:
✏
Note
In all cases, if the problem persists, call your service
representative.
Beep Codes
Beeps
Error Message
Description
1
Refresh Failure
The memory refresh circuitry on the
baseboard is faulty.
2
NA
Will not occur.
3
Base 64 KB Memory Failure
Memory failure in the first 64 KB.
4
Timer Not Operational
Memory failure in the first 64 KB of memory,
or Timer 1 on the baseboard is not
functioning.
5
Processor Error
The CPU on the baseboard generated an
error.
6
8042 - Gate A20 Failure
The keyboard controller may be bad. The
BIOS cannot switch to protected mode.
7
Processor Exception Interrupt
Error
The CPU generated an exception interrupt.
8
Display Memory Read/Write
Error
The system video adapter is either missing
or its memory is faulty. This is not a fatal
error.
9
ROM Checksum Error
The ROM checksum value does not match
the value encoded in the BIOS.
10
CMOS Shutdown Register
Read/Write Error
The shutdown register for CMOS RAM
failed.
11
Cache Error / External Cache
Bad
The external cache is faulty.
System Product Guide
6-11
Error and Information Messages
Error Message
Explanation
8042 Gate - A20 Error
Gate A20 on the keyboard cont4oller (8042) is
not working. Replace the 8042.
Address Line Short!
Error in the address decoding circuitry on the
baseboard.
Cache Memory Failure, Do Not Enable
Cache!
Cache memory is defective.
CH-2 Timer Error
Most AT systems include two timers. There is
an error in timer 2.
CMOS Battery State Low
CMOS RAM is powered by a battery. The
battery power is low. Replace the battery.
CMOS Checksum Failure
After CMOS RAM values are saved, a
checksum value is generated for error
checking. The previous value is different from
the current value. Run Setup.
CMOS System Options Not Set
The values stored in CMOS RAM are either
corrupt or nonexistent. Run Setup.
CMOS Display Type Mismatch
The video type in CMOS RAM does not match
the type detected by the BIOS. Run Setup.
CMOS Memory Size Mismatch
The amount of memory on the baseboard is
different than the amount in CMOS RAM. Run
Setup.
CMOS Time and Date Not Set
Run Setup to set the date and time in CMOS
RAM.
Diskette Boot Failure
The boot disk in floppy drive A: is corrupt. It
cannot be used to boot the system. Use
another boot disk and follow the screen
instructions.
DMA Error
Error in the DMA Controller.
DMA #1 Error
Error in the first DAM channel.
DMA #2 Error
Error in the second DMA channel.
6-12
Solving Problems
Error Message
Explanation
FDD Controller Failure
The BIOS cannot communicate with the floppy
disk drive controller. Check all appropriate
connections after the system is powered down.
HDD Controller Failure
The BIOS cannot communicate with the hard
disk drive controller. Check all appropriate
connections after the system is powered down.
INTR #1 Error
Interrupt channel 1 failed POST.
INTR #2 Error
Interrupt channel 2 failed POST.
Invalid Boot Diskette
The BIOS can read the disk in floppy drive A:,
but cannot boot the system. Use another boot
disk.
Keyboard is Locked ...Please Unlock It
The keyboard lock on the system is engaged.
The system must be unlocked to continue.
Keyboard Error
There is timing problem with the keyboard. Set
the Keyboard option in CMOS setup to Not
Installed to skip the keyboard POST routines.
KB/Interface Error
There is an error in the keyboard controller.
System Product Guide
6-13
Error Message
Explanation
Off Board Parity Error
Parity error in memory installed in an expansion
slot. The format is:
OFF BOARD PARITY ERROR ADDR (HEX) =
(XXXX)
XXXX is the hex address where the error
occurred.
Parity Error ????
6-14
Parity error in system memory at an unknown
address.
Solving Problems
PCI Configuration Status and Error Messages
The following PCI messages are displayed as a group with bus, device and
function information.
Message
Explanation
Floppy Disk Controller Resource Conflict
The floppy disk controller has requested a
resource that is already in use.
NVRAM Checksum Error, NVRAM Cleared
The ESCD data was reinitialized because of
an NVRAM checksum error. Try rerunning the
ICU.
NVRAM Cleared By Jumper
The “Clear CMOS” jumper has been moved to
the ON position and CMOS RAM has been
cleared.
NVRAM Data Invalid, NVRAM Cleared
Invalid entry in the ESCD.
Parallel Port Resource Conflict
The parallel port has requested a resource that
is already in use.
PCI Error Log is Full
This message is displayed when more than 15
PCI conflict errors are detected. No additional
PCI errors can be logged.
PCI I/O Port Conflict
Two devices requested the same resource,
resulting in a conflict.
PCI IRQ Conflict
Two devices requested the same resource,
resulting in a conflict.
PCI Memory Conflict
Two devices requested the same resource,
resulting in a conflict.
Primary Boot Device Not Found
The designated primary boot device (hard disk
drive, diskette drive, or CD-ROM drive) could
not be found.
System Product Guide
6-15
Message
Explanation
Primary IDE Controller Resource Conflict
The primary IDE controller has requested a
resource that is already in use.
Primary Input Device Not Found
The designated primary input device
(keyboard, mouse, or other, if input is
redirected) could not be found.
Secondary IDE Controller Resource Conflict The secondary IDE controller has requested a
resource that is already in use.
Serial Port 1 Resource Conflict
Serial port 1 has requested a resource that is
already in use.
Serial Port 2 Resource Conflict
Serial port 1 has requested a resource that is
already in use.
Static Device Resource Conflict
A non Plug and Play ISA card has requested a
resource that is already in use.
System Board Device Resource Conflict
A non Plug and Play ISA card has requested a
resource that is already in use.
■ ■ ■
6-16
Solving Problems
Technical Reference
7
Safety Compliance
This equipment meets or exceeds requirements for safety in the US
(UL 1950), Canada (CSA 950), Europe (EN60950) and international IEC 950).
Dimensions
Width
21 cm (8.3 inches)
Depth
46.67 cm (18.375 inches)
Height (with feet installed)
39 cm (15.5 inches)
Weight (without peripherals)
9.7 kg (21.4 pounds)
System Environment
Parameter
Specification
Operating temperature
10 to 35° C (50 to 95° F)
Non-operating temperature
–40 to 70° C (–40 to 158° F)
Operating humidity (no hard disk drive)
80% RH @ 33°C
Non-operating humidity
92% RH @ 33°C
System Product Guide
7-1
Power Supply Specifications
The following sections provide the specifications for the system’s 200 watt
power supply.
! WARNINGS
▲
To avoid damage to the system board or power supply, do not
exceed a total of 200 watts power draw.
Do not overload the system board by installing add-in boards that
draw excessive current. The system is designed to provide 2 A of +
5 V current for each board in the system. The total + 5 V current
draw in a fully-loaded system (all add-in board slots filled) must
not exceed 14 A.
✏
Note
In geographic regions that are susceptible to electrical
storms, we highly recommend you plug your system into a
surge suppressor.
AC Input
Input frequency is 50/60 Hz.
Voltage
Current
115 V (90 - 135 V)
4A
230 V (180 - 265 V)
2A
Power Supply Output
7-2
DC Voltage
Current
(Maximum Continuous)
+5 V
22.0 A
-5 V
0.5 A
+12 V
6.0 A
-12 V
0.8 A
Technical Reference
Board Connectors
This section provides the pinouts for the system board connectors.
Chapter 5 shows the location of the connectors (Figure 5-1).
Primary Power Connector
Pin
Signal Name
1
3.3 V
2
3.3 V
3
GND
4
+5 V
5
GND
6
+5 V
7
GND
8
PWRGD
9
+5 V SB
10
+12 V
11
3.3 V
12
-12 V
13
GND
14
PS-
15
GND
16
GND
17
GND
18
-5 V
19
+5 V
20
+5 V
System Product Guide
7-3
Diskette Drive Connector
J9G1
34
33
2
5
1
OM04225
7-4
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
1
Ground
2
DENSEL
3
Ground
4
Reserved
5
Key
6
FDEDIN
7
Ground
8
Index-
9
Ground
10
Motor Enable A-
11
Ground
12
Drive Select B-
13
Ground
14
Drive Select A-
15
Ground
16
Motor Enable B-
17
MSEN1
18
DIR-
19
Ground
20
STEP-
21
Ground
22
Write Data-
23
Ground
24
Write Gate-
25
Ground
26
Track 00-
27
MSEN0
28
Write Protect-
29
Ground
30
Read Data-
31
Ground
32
Side 1 Select-
33
Ground
34
Diskette Change -
Technical Reference
IDE Connectors
The system provides two PCI/IDE peripheral connectors.
40
J8H1
J8H2
39
2
1
OM04226
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
1
Reset IDE
2
Ground
3
Host Data 7
4
Host Data 8
5
Host Data 6
6
Host Data 9
7
Host Data 5
8
Host Data 10
9
Host Data 4
10
Host Data 11
11
Host Data 3
12
Host Data 12
13
Host Data 2
14
Host Data 13
15
Host Data 1
16
Host Data 14
17
Host Data 0
18
Host Data 15
19
Ground
20
Key
21
DDRQ0 (DDRQ1)
22
Ground
23
I/O Write-
24
Ground
25
I/O Read-
26
Ground
27
IOCHRDY
28
Vcc pull-up
29
DDACK0
30
Ground
31
IRQ14 (IRQ15)
32
Reserved
33
Addr 1
34
Reserved
35
Addr 0
36
Addr 2
37
Chip Select 1P (1S)-
38
Chip Select 3P (3S)-
39
Activity-
40
Ground
System Product Guide
7-5
Hard Drive LED Connector
1
3
6
8
10
12
HD LED
15
17
19
21
23
26
OM04221
7-6
Pin
Signal Name
12
+5 V
13
Key
14
HD ACTIVE
15
+5 V
Technical Reference
Remote On/Off
1
PWR ON
3
6
8
10
12
15
17
19
21
23
26
OM04218
System Product Guide
Pin
Signal Name
1
Power on
2
Power return
7-7
Reset Connector
1
3
6
8
10
12
15
17
19
21
RESET
23
26
OM04223
7-8
Pin
Signal Name
21
Ground
22
RESET
Technical Reference
Sleep/Resume Connector
1
3
SLEEP
6
8
10
12
15
17
19
21
23
26
OM04219
System Product Guide
Pin
Signal Name
3
Comatose
4
+5 V
7-9
Infra-red Connector
1
3
6
8
INFRARED
10
12
15
17
19
21
23
26
OM04220
7-10
Pin
Signal Name
6
+5 V
7
Key
8
IR_RX
9
Ground
10
IR_TX
Technical Reference
Speaker Connector
1
3
6
8
10
12
15
17
19
21
23
SPEAKER
26
OM04224
System Product Guide
Pin
Signal Name
23
+5 V
24
Key
25
SPKR_DAT
connect
26
SPKR_DAT
7-11
Wave Table Connector
Pin
Signal
1
Wave Right
2
Ground
3
Wave Left
4
Ground
5
Key
6
Ground
7
MIDI_Write
8
Ground
CD-ROM Audio Interface Connector
Pin
Signal
1
Ground
2
CD-Left
3
Ground
4
CD-Right
Voice Modem Audio Interface
7-12
Pin
Signal Name
1
Mic In
2
Ground
3
Mono Out
4
Ground
Technical Reference
VGA Connector
Pin
Signal
1
Ground
2
Ground
3
Blue
4
Green
5
Red
6
Ground
7
No connect (reserved)
8
Ground
9
Ground
10
Ground
11
DDCCLK (DDC Clock)
12
VSYNC (Vertical Sync)
13
HSYNC (Horizontal Sync)
14
DDCDAT (DDC Data)
15
No connect (reserved)
System Product Guide
7-13
VESA Feature Connector
7-14
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
1
Ground
2
Data 0
3
Ground
4
Data 1
5
Ground
6
Data 2
7
Data enable
8
Data 3
9
Sync enable
10
Data 4
11
PCLK enable
12
Data 5
13
Vcc
14
Data 6
15
Ground
16
Data 7
17
Ground
18
PCLK
19
Ground
20
BLANK
21
Ground
22
HSYNC
23
Vcc
24
VSYNC
25
Ground
26
N/C
27
key
28
key
29
IICCLK
30
Ground
31
IICDAT
32
N/C
33
EN1
34
EN2
Technical Reference
ISA Connectors
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
B1
GND
A1
IOCHK-
B2
RSTDRV
A2
SD7
B3
Vcc
A3
SD6
B4
IRQ9
A4
SD5
B5
-5 V
A5
SD4
B6
DRQ2
A6
SD3
B7
-12 V
A7
SD2
B8
0WS-
A8
SD1
B9
+12 V
A9
SD0
B10
GND
A10
IOCHRDY
B11
SMEMW-
A11
AEN
B12
SMEMR-
A12
SA19
B13
IOW-
A13
SA18
B14
IOR-
A14
SA17
B15
DACK3-
A15
SA16
B16
DRQ3
A16
SA15
B17
DACK1-
A17
SA14
B18
DRQ1
A18
SA13
B19
REFRESH-
A19
SA12
Continued
System Product Guide
7-15
ISA Connectors
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
B20
SYSCLK
A20
SA11
B21
IRQ7
A21
SA10
B22
IRQ6
A22
SA9
B23
IRQ5
A23
SA8
B24
IRQ4
A24
SA7
B25
IRQ3
A25
SA6
B26
DACK2-
A26
SA5
B27
TC
A27
SA4
B28
BALE
A28
SA3
B29
Vcc
A29
SA2
B30
OSC
A30
SA1
B31
GND
A31
SA0
KEY
KEY
D1
MEMCS16-
C1
SBHE-
D2
IOCS16-
C2
LA23
D3
IRQ10
C3
LA22
D4
IRQ11
C4
LA21
D5
IRQ12
C5
LA20
D6
IRQ15
C6
LA19
D7
IRQ14
C7
LA18
D8
DACK0-
C8
LA17
Continued
7-16
Technical Reference
ISA Connectors
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
D9
DRQ0
C9
MEMR-
D10
DACK5-
C10
MEMW-
D11
DRQ5
C11
SD8
D12
DACK6-
C12
SD9
D13
DRQ6
C13
SD10
D14
DACK7-
C14
SD11
D15
DRQ7
C15
SD12
D16
Vcc
C16
SD13
D17
Master-
C17
SD14
D18
GND
C18
SD15
System Product Guide
7-17
PCI Connectors
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
A1
GND
B1
-12 V
A32
AD16
B32
AD17
A2
+12 V
B2
No Connect
A33
3.3 V
B33
CBE2-
A3
No Connect
B3
GND
A34
FRAME-
B34
GND
A4
No Connect
B4
No Connect
A35
GND
B35
IRDY-
A5
Vcc
B5
Vcc
A36
TRDY-
B36
3.3 V
A6
PCIINT3-
B6
Vcc
A37
GND
B37
DEVSEL-
A7
PCIINT1-
B7
PCIINT2-
A38
STOP-
B38
GND
A8
Vcc
B8
PCIINT4-
A39
3.3 V
B39
PLOCK-
A9
Reserved
B9
No Connect
A40
SDONE
B40
PERR-
A10
Vcc
B10
Reserved
A41
SBO-
B41
3.3 V
A11
Reserved
B11
No Connect
A42
GND
B42
SERR-
A12
GND
B12
GND
A43
PAR
B43
3.3 V
A13
GND
B13
GND
A44
AD15
B44
CBE1-
A14
Reserved
B14
Reserved
A45
3.3 V
B45
AD14
A15
SPCIRST-
B15
GND
A46
AD13
B46
GND
A16
Vcc
B16
PCLKE
A47
AD11
B47
AD12
A17
AGNT-
B17
GND
A48
GND
B48
AD10
A18
GND
B18
REQA-
A49
AD9
B49
GND
A19
Reserved
B19
Vcc
A50
KEY
B50
KEY
A20
AD30
B20
AD31
A51
KEY
B51
KEY
A21
3.3 V
B21
AD29
A52
CBEO-
B52
AD8
Continued
7-18
Technical Reference
PCI Connectors
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
Pin
Signal Name
A22
AD28
B22
GND
A53
3.3 V
B53
AD7
A23
AD26
B23
AD27
A54
AD6
B54
3.3 V
A24
GND
B24
AD25
A55
AD4
B55
AD5
A25
AD24
B25
3.3 V
A56
GND
B56
AD3
A26
AD22 (IDSEL) B26
CBE3-
A57
AD2
B57
GND
A27
3.3 V
B27
AD23
A58
AD0
B58
AD1
A28
AD22
B28
GND
A59
Vcc
B59
Vcc
A29
AD20
B29
AD21
A60
SREQ64-
B60
SACK64-
A30
GND
B30
AD19
A61
Vcc
B61
Vcc
A31
AD18
B31
3.3 V
A62
Vcc
B62
Vcc
System Product Guide
7-19
System I/O Addresses
Address Range
(Hexadecimal)
Size
(Decimal)
Description
0000 - 000F
16 bytes
PIIX - DMA 1
0020 - 0021
2 bytes
PIIX - Interrupt Controller 1
002E-002F
2 Bytes
Ultra I/O configuration registers
0040 - 0043
4 bytes
PIIX - Timer 1
0048 - 004B
4 bytes
PIIX - Timer 2
0060
1 byte
Keyboard Controller Data Byte
0061
1 byte
PIIX - NMI, speaker control
0064
1 byte
Keyboard Controller, CMD/STAT Byte
0070, bit 7
1 bit
PIIX - Enable NMI
0070, bits 6:0
7 bits
PIIX - Real Time Clock, Address
0071
1 byte
PIIX - Real Time Clock, Data
0078
1 byte
Reserved - Brd. Config.
0079
1 byte
Reserved - Brd. Config.
0080 - 008F
16 bytes
PIIX - DMA Page Register
00A0 - 00A1
2 bytes
PIIX - Interrupt Controller 2
00C0 - 00DE
31 bytes
PIIX - DMA 2
00F0
1 byte
Reset Numeric Error
0170 - 0177
8 bytes
Secondary IDE Channel
01F0 - 01F7
8 bytes
Primary IDE Channel
0278 - 027B
4 bytes
Parallel Port 2
02F8 - 02FF
8 bytes
On-Board Serial Port 2
0376
1 byte
Sec IDE Chan Cmd Port
Continued
7-20
Technical Reference
System I/O Addresses
Address Range
(Hexadecimal)
Size
(Decimal)
Description
0377
1 byte
Sec IDE Chan Stat Port
0378 - 037F
8 bytes
Parallel port 1
03BC - 03BF
4 bytes
Parallel Port x
03E8 - 03EF
8 bytes
Serial Port 3
03F0 - 03F5
6 bytes
Floppy Channel 1
03F6
1 byte
Pri IDE Chan Cmnd Port
03F7 (Write)
1 byte
Floppy Chan 1 Cmd
03F7, bit 7
1 bit
Floppy Disk Chg Chan 1
03F7, bits 6:0
7 bits
Pri IDE Chan Status Port
03F8 - 03FF
8 bytes
On-Board Serial Port 1
LPT + 400h
8 bytes
ECP port, LPT + 400h
04D0-04D1
2 bytes
Edge/Level INTR Control Reg
0CF8-0CFA*
4 bytes
PCI Config Address Reg
0CFB
1 byte
Turbo & Reset control Reg
0CFC-0CFF*
4 bytes
PCI Config Data Reg
FF00-FF07
8 bytes
IDE Bus Master Reg
* Only accessible by DWORD accesses.
System Product Guide
7-21
Memory Map
Address Range
(Decimal)
Address Range
(Hexadecimal)
Size
Description
1024K-131072K
100000-8000000
127M
Extended Memory
960K-1023K
F0000-FFFFF
64K
AMI System BIOS
952K-959K
EE000-EFFFF
8K
Main BIOS
948K-951K
ED000-EDFFF
4K
ESCD (Plug and Play
configuration area)
944-947K
EC000-ECFFF
4K
OEM LOGO (available as
UMB)
896K-943K
E0000-EBFFF
47K
BIOS RESERVED (Currently
available as UMB)
800-895K
C8000-DFFFF
96K
Available HI DOS memory
(open to ISA and PCI bus)
640K-799K
A0000-C7FFF
160K
Available HI DOS Memory
(normally reserved for) video)
639K
9FC00-9FFFF
1K
Extended BIOS Data
(moveable by QEMM,
386MAX)
512K-638K
80000-9FBFF
127K
Extended conventional
0K-511K
00000-7FFFF
512K
Conventional
7-22
Technical Reference
Board Interrupts
Interrupt
Request
System Resource
NMI
I/O Channel Check
0
Reserved, Interval Timer
1
Reserved, Keyboard buffer full
2
Reserved, Cascade interrupt from slave PIC
3
Serial Port 2
4
Serial Port 1
5
User available
6
Floppy
7
Parallel Port 1
8
Real Time Clock
9
User available
10
User available
11
User available
12
On-board Mouse Port (Avail if no PS/2 mouse)
13
Reserved, Math coprocessor
14
Primary IDE
15
Secondary IDE if present, else User available
System Product Guide
7-23
DMA
DMA
Channel
Data Width
0
8- or 16-bits
Open
1
8- or 16-bits
Open
2
8- or 16-bits
Floppy
3
8- or 16-bits
Parallel Port (for ECP/EPP Config.)
4
7-24
System Resource
Reserved - Cascade channel
5
16-bits
Open
6
16-bits
Open
7
16-bits
Open
Technical Reference
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)
Electromagnetic Compatibility Notice (USA)
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a
Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate
radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to
radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the
equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
•
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
•
Increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver.
•
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to
which the receiver is connected.
•
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Any changes or modifications not expressly approved by the grantee of this
device could void the user's authority to operate the equipment. The
customer is responsible for ensuring compliance of the modified product.
Only peripherals (computer input/output devices, terminals, printers, etc.)
that comply with FCC class B limits may be attached to this computer
product. Operation with noncompliant peripherals is likely to result in
interference to radio and TV reception.
All cables used to connect to peripherals must be shielded and grounded.
Operation with cables, connected to peripherals, that are not shielded and
grounded may result in interference to radio and TV reception.
✏
Note
If a Class A device is installed within this system, then the system is
to be considered a Class A system. In this configuration, operation
of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference.
System Product Guide
7-25
Electromagnetic Compatibility Notices (International)
(English translation of the notice above)
This equipment is in the Class 2 category (information equipment to be used
in a residential area or an area adjacent thereto) and conforms to the
standards set by the Voluntary Control Council For Interference by Data
Processing Equipment and Electronic Office Machines aimed at preventing
radio interference in such residential area.
When used near a radio or TV receiver, it may become the cause of radio
interference.
Read the instructions for correct handling.
------------The system was tested and found to be compliant with CISPR 22/85 Class B,
and VCCI Class II regulations.
Declaration of the Manufacturer or Importer
This system is in compliance with EU directive 89/336/EEC, using the EMC
standards EN55022 and EN50082-1.
■ ■ ■
7-26
Technical Reference
BIOS Update
A
BIOS Update
The system BIOS resides on a flash component. You can upgrade a flash
BIOS through software, without taking the system apart or replacing the
flash component. This appendix tells how to upgrade your system BIOS
from a diskette. Your service representative can provide you with the latest
BIOS upgrade for your system.
Using the Upgrade Utility
1.
Write down the Setup selections currently set on your system
(Chapter 3 tells about the Setup program).
2.
Insert the upgrade diskette in your system's diskette drive.
3.
Reboot the system.
4.
When the flash upgrade menu appears, choose "Update Flash Memory
Area from a file."
5.
When the menu asks you to enter a path/filename, use the arrow keys to
select the .bio file, and press <Enter>.
6.
The utility asks for a confirmation that you want to load the new flash
into memory. Select "Continue with Programming."
7.
After the upgrade completes, remove the upgrade disk.
8.
Reboot the system and start the Setup program. Press <F5> to reset the
BIOS defaults. Then, use the copy of the Setup selections you made at
the beginning of this procedure to set the options.
■ ■ ■
System Product Guide
A-1
Installing Software Drivers
B
This appendix tells you how to install:
•
Power management software
•
Plug and Play software
Each of these are contained on a separate diskette. Each diskette contains a
SETUP.EXE program that installs the software or drivers. The files on the
diskettes are compressed to conserve space. The files can not be copied
directly to the hard disk; you must use the Setup Program located on each
installation diskette.
Certain models are not supplied with this software.
Installing Plug and Play Software
The Plug and Play software must be installed from Windows.
1.
Close any open applications so that only Windows is running.
2.
Insert the Plug and Play diskette into the diskette drive.
3.
From the Program Manager File menu, select Run.
4.
In the Command Line dialog box, type A:\SETUP and press <Enter>.
5.
Follow the instructions in the Setup utility.
Refer to the README.TXT file on the diskette for more information about
the Plug and Play software.
System Product Guide
B-1
Installing Power Management Software
The APM software must be installed from Windows.
1.
Close any open applications so that only Windows is running.
2.
Insert the APM Software diskette into the diskette drive.
3.
From the Program Manager File menu, select Run.
4.
In the Command Line dialog box, type A:\SETUP and press <Enter>.
5.
Follow the instructions in the Setup utility.
Refer to the README.TXT file on the power management diskette for
information about the APM software.
Turning the System Off with APM Installed
There are three ways to power off the system.
In hardware:
•
Press the power button.
In software:
B-2
•
In Windows 3.1 or 3.11, click the PowerMan icon and select the
PowerDown option.
•
In Windows 95, clicking on the Shutdown button in the Start menu turns
the system off after a dialog box appears.
Installing Software Drivers
Using the Suspend/Resume Feature
The system supports a suspended mode of operation. Suspending the
system reduces energy consumption in accordance with the EPA Energy Star
specification. This feature also allows the system to resume, that is, return to
an active state.
To suspend system operation, do one of the following:
•
Press a user-defined keyboard hot-key sequence (the Hot Key option in
the Power Management Configuration Subscreen, described in
Chapter 3).
•
Wait until the Inactivity Timer automatically switches the system into
suspended mode (the Inactivity Timer option in the Power Management
Configuration Subscreen, described in Chapter 3).
To resume system operation, do one of the following:
•
Press any key on the keyboard.
•
Move or click the mouse (configurable via the PowerMan application).
■ ■ ■
System Product Guide
B-3
Optional Integrated
Audio System
C
Your system may contain an on-board 16-bit audio component from Crystal
Semiconductor Corporation. The software that came with the system
includes several audio applications for DOS and Windows 3.x. This
appendix describes:
•
Features of the audio system
•
Audio connectors on the system back panel
•
Audio software
•
How to use the basic audio controls
✏
Note
For Windows 95, you do not need to install audio software
drivers. This appendix is applicable only to DOS and
Windows 3.x.
Audio System Features
The audio system provides the following features:
•
Support for four major sound standards: Sound Blaster Pro 2.0,
Windows Sound System, Ad Lib, and MPU-401
•
16-bit and 8-bit stereo digital sound recording and playback
•
Sampling rates selectable from 4 kHz to 44 kHz
•
Stereo analog/digital mixer
•
Selectable input source with individual mute and volume control
•
Mixing of all input sources with individual volume control
•
Yamaha OPL3 stereo FM music synthesizer that produces 20
independent stereo voices
•
MIDI interface
•
Full duplex interface
System Product Guide
C-1
System Board Audio Connectors
There is one audio-related connector on the system board: the CD-ROM-toaudio interface connector. The connector is briefly described below (see
Figure 5-1 for the location of the system board connectors).
CD-ROM-to-Audio Interface Connector
If you install a CD-ROM drive in the system, this 4-pin connector makes it
possible to connect the audio from a CD-ROM drive to the audio system
mixer. This connector is compatible with the CD-ROM-to-audio cable
supplied with most CD-ROM drives.
Voice Modem Audio Interface Connector
This four pin connector is for mixing the speaker output from a voice
assisted telephony modem into the MIC IN audio stream into the audio
system and redirecting the MONO OUT audio stream into the telephony
modem. This connector allows the telephony modem to be properly
configured for use without requiring cables to be installed into the external
audio jacks. The connector is compatible with the typical cable that is
supplied with CD-ROM readers for interfacing to audio add-in cards.
Audio Software
The system includes Windows and MS-DOS software for getting the most
out of your audio system. This section describes the Windows and MS-DOS
applications that come with your audio software.
✏
Note
For Windows 95, you do not need to install audio software
drivers.
Windows Software
The Crystal group contains three Windows software applications: Audio
Input, Audio Mixer, and Audio Transport.
Audio Input
This is a control panel that allows you to modify the input gain settings for
the on-board audio.
C-2
Integrated Audio System
Audio Mixer
This is a control panel that allows you to modify the mixer attenuation
settings for the on-board audio.
Audio Transport
This is an application that allows you to record input from multiple audio
devices, play back recorded sounds, and use Windows object linking and
embedding (OLE) to embed audio files in Windows applications.
DOS Software
The audio software includes one TSR (terminate-and-stay-resident) program
and five applications. The TSR and application executable files are described
below.
CS32HMX.EXE
This is a memory-resident utility that allows you to control the volume with
hot-keys.
CS32MIX.EXE:
This command line utility allows you to control the sound mixer.
CS4232C.EXE
This utility lets you choose between running a DOS application in either the
on-board audio’s Sound Blaster or Windows Sound System mode.
CSACGUCD.EXE
This is an audio CD player application.
CS32DIAG.EXE
This is the diagnostics application.
CS32INTR.EXE
This is a launching utility for the CS32MIX.EXE, CSACGUCD.EXE, and
CS32DIAG.EXE.
System Product Guide
C-3
Basic Audio System Controls
How to Play a MIDI File
The easiest way to play a MIDI file is to use the Media Player application in
the Windows Accessories program group.
To play a MIDI file, do the following:
1.
Start the Media Player in the Windows Accessories group.
2.
From the Media Player File menu, open the MIDI file you want to play.
3.
Click on the Play button.
How to Play a WAV File
The easiest way to play a WAV file is to use the Sound Recorder application
in the Windows Accessories program group.
To play a sound, do the following:
1.
Start the Sound Recorder in the Windows Accessories program group.
2.
From the Sound Recorder File menu, open the WAV file you want to
play.
3.
Click on the Play button.
How to Control the Volume
Use the mixer utility software to adjust the volume. The mixer is located in
the Crystal program group.
How to Mix Sounds
Use the mixer utility software to mix sounds. The mixer is located in the
Crystal program group.
■ ■ ■
C-4
Integrated Audio System
Optional Graphics Controller
D
The onboard S3 Trio64V+ integrated PCI graphics controller is an optional
system component. The S3 controller provides the following features:
•
Standard 1 MB of graphics memory, expandable to 2 MB
•
Multiple screen resolutions/color densities available
•
Support for 8-bit bi-directional VESA advanced feature connector
•
Support for VESA Display Power Management Signaling (DPMS)
monitor power savings modes
•
Support for VESA Display Data Channel (DDC2B) that permits transfer
of monitor identification and resolution support data for ease of use
✏
Note
For Windows 95, you do not need to install software drivers.
This chapter is applicable only to DOS and Windows 3.x.
Installing Video Drivers
The video drivers for Windows 3.x must be installed from Windows.
1.
Close any open applications so that only the Program Manager is
running.
2.
Insert the video drivers diskette into the diskette drive.
3.
Select Run from the Program Manager File menu.
4.
Type a:\setup in the Command Line field and click the OK button.
5.
Follow the instructions in the Setup utility.
Refer to the README.TXT file on the diskette for more information about
the video drivers.
System Product Guide
D-1
Using the Galileo Control Panel
You can make certain changes to your graphics system configuration by
using the Galileo control panel. To access the control panel:
1.
Start Windows.
2.
In the Main program group, open the Control Panel icon.
3.
Open the panel called Galileo to view the graphics system control panel
(Figure D-1).
GALILEO
Resolution
Color Depth
Refresh Rate
Switches
640 x 480
800 x 600
1024 x 768
1152 x 864
1280 x 1024
1600 x 1200
About
Current Configuration
Driver Resolution
640 X 480
Driver Color Depth
256 Colors
Driver Refresh Rate
72 Hz
Driver Font Size
Small Font
OK
Cancel
OM03809
Figure D-1. Galileo Graphics Control Panel
The Galileo control panel provides five buttons that you can select to either
make changes to the graphics configuration or get information about the
graphics system. When you click on any of the buttons, a menu or
information screen appears.
D-2
Graphics Controller
Resolution
The Resolution menu allows you to select a graphics resolution that the
system will use while running Windows. Any resolution that is not
available to your system appears in faint gray and cannot be selected.
Color Depth
The Color Depth menu makes it possible to choose the number of colors that
will be available to your system while running Windows. Any color depth
that is not available to your system will appear in faint gray and cannot be
selected.
Refresh Rate
The Refresh Rate menu allows you to select the monitor refresh rate used by
the graphics system. In general, the higher the refresh rate, the better your
display quality will appear. However, depending on what resolution you've
selected (see Resolution above), some refresh rates may not be available.
Any refresh rate that is not available will appear in faint gray and cannot be
selected.
Switches
The Switches menu allows you to select certain support modes to enhance
graphics appearance and operation.
Small/Large Fonts Enabled Switch
Under certain resolutions, this switch allows you to change the fonts used by
Windows.
Polygon and Ellipse Support Switches
These switches are for environments where CAD or illustrator's workstation
applications are being used. If your system will be used as a drafting or
illustrator's workstation, these switches should be turned on.
About
When you click on the About button, an information screen appears that
describes the specific S3 Trio graphics controller in your system. The
information screen also lists the current graphics configuration selected for
your system.
System Product Guide
D-3
Available Resolutions
The graphics controller in your system supports the resolutions and refresh
rates shown in Table D-1. Keep in mind that many monitors do not support
all of the resolutions and refresh rates. It is possible to set a graphics mode
that your monitor does not support. Therefore, before setting or changing
the mode for your monitor, read the documentation that came with your
monitor to see which resolutions and refresh rates are supported. Also note
that some resolutions require 2 MB of video DRAM.
Table D-1. Supported Resolutions
Pixel
Resolution
Number of
Colors
640x480
16
60
1 MB
640x480
256
60, 72, 75, 85
1 MB
640x480
65536
60, 72, 75
1 MB
640x480
16.7 million
60, 72, 75
2 MB
800x600
256
56, 60, 72, 75, 85
1 MB
800x600
65536
60, 72, 75
1 MB
800x600
16.7 million
60, 72, 75
2 MB
1024x768
256
43(I), 60, 70, 75, 85
1 MB
1024x768
65536
43(I), 60, 70, 75
2 MB
1280x1024
16
45(I), 60, 72, 75
1 MB
1280x1024
256
45(I), 60, 72, 75
2 MB
Refresh Rate (Hz)
Memory
Required
(I) = interlaced
■ ■ ■
D-4
Graphics Controller
APRICOT COMPUTERS LIMITED
3500 PARKSIDE
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BIRMINGHAM B37 7YS
UNITED KINGDOM
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
APRICOT COMPUTERS LIMITED
TRAVELLERS LANE
HATFIELD
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UNITED KINGDOM
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GOTHAER STRASSE 8
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40835 RATINGEN
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